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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03846
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 06-21-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03846

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, JUNE 21 2012 Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A8 Sports ........................................... A9 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B4 Classi eds .................................... B7-B8 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 74, NUMBER 36 Fireworks dispute settled By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Fourth of July reworks show will go on as scheduled in Port St. Joe thanks to more than $5,000 in donations from the community. Not that it did much for simmering tensions between the Board of County Commissioners and the Port St. Joe City Commission. Dana Boyer, a member of the Port St. Joe Downtown Merchants Association who had been helping spearhead a community celebration of Independence Day, said during a special meeting Friday that after the BOCC meeting Tuesday she, and a host of members of the community, went to work. Boyer, who helped establish years ago the annual fundraising that underwrites the Mexico Beach reworks, said she took it upon herself to address statements from the BOCC that the county would move the reworks to a county park if the city did not chip in $5,000. The BOCC and Gulf County Tourist Development Council had pledged $5,000 each toward the reworks. The city, citing a tight budget and dif cult economic times, decided it could not afford to match those contributions. The BOCC voted June 12 to move the reworks if the city did not pony up the funds by Friday. Boyer took the challenge and ran. I did this on my own, Boyer said. I didnt have time to be authorized by a speci c group. I had 2 days. The result was contributions from various sectors of the community. City commissioners, County Commissioner Tan Smiley and city attorney Tom Gibson donated $100 each. Private individuals and businesses pledged anywhere from $10 to $1,000, the latter coming from Preble Rish Engineers, Boyer said. Barnes eyes post as harbor master Special to The Star Jerry Barnes has announced his intent to seek the office of Gulf County harbor master. Barnes served on the Port St. Joe City Commission for two years and the Gulf County Commission for eight years. He said he believes this experience equips him to serve the people of Gulf County as harbor master. Formerly a governorappointed position, the county harbor master is responsible for managing vessel movements, security and general oversight of the port. Barnes has been a resident of Gulf County for 57 years. He graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 1961 and was employed with Arizona Chemical for 42 years, retiring in 2005. He is the son of the late Frank and Lorell Barnes, both longtime residents of Port St. Joe. He was married to the late Elaine Wood Barnes for 46 years until her death in 2008. They have JERRY BARNES By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Dan Christies blueberry bushes are tough enough to survive hurricanes. After Hurricane Opal in 1995, Christie remembers the seven rows of berry bushes nestled behind his stilted house in Simmons Bayou swimming in 22 inches of saltwater. The water turned the plants white, and they didnt bear fruit that year, Christie said. But amazingly they survived. Every summer when the berries become ripe, Christies 1-acre backyard becomes Bayou Blueberries when he opens it to the public for blueberry picking. Port St. Joe resident Ken Kennington was spotted picking blueberries with his son, Morgan, and 10-year-old nephew, Bobby Gay, on Tuesday afternoon. Kennington said he recently went blueberry picking with his niece, who whipped up some fresh pies and cobblers with the fruit this past weekend. She baked some for Fathers Day and they turned out great, he said, as he scoured a blueberry bush for the darkest fruits. BOCC votes against cuts to library, commodities program By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Its about $200,000 down and $300,000 to go for the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. The board debated potential revenue sources and budget cuts at a June 12 workshop to cope with the 6 percent drop in property values looming for the next scal year, which will leave the county with an estimated $500,000 de cit. During their last budget workshop, the BOCC took a rm stance against raising the millage, and decided to instead explore ways to whittle down the budget and garner more revenue for the county. Commissioners voted in favor of decreasing the budget by $334,451 and moving forward with $59,250 worth of potential revenue sources. With budget increases estimated at $147,856 or more for the upcoming scal year, Commissioners still need to come up with about $300,000 in savings. County Administrator Don Butler described the above numbers as still in the rough since the county does not know at this time the amount of cash that will be carried forward and the amount of state revenue sharing, which may be down. Of the proposed cuts presented by the county budget committee, commissioners voted against cutting $50,000 from the library budget, and also against turning over the county commodities program to a non-pro t, which would garner $19,574 in savings. Commissioners voted in favor of turning over parks and recreation responsibilities to the Gulf County Tourism Development Council, which will save the county $25,000 annually. Other approved budget decreases include $50,000 from the county courthouse maintenance budget, $4,500 in funding from the Honeyville Community Center, the discontinuation of the countys Coastal Fitness Program for $3,000 in savings, $22,875 in fuel decreases, $150,000 from public works attrition losses, $22,000 in Lot split case sent back to council By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Three years and more than $60,000 in attorney fees later, a Mexico Beach lot split case is back where it started. What started as a simple lot split application submitted in 2009 has turned into a legal nightmare for the city and for property owners Joe and Mary Bush. The Bushes applied for a lot split variance in September 2009, contending they had met all requirements under the citys land use regulations when they divided their lot in 2005. Following rejection from the city planning board, the city council tabled the application for future consideration and continued to put it on the back burner for the next six months, despite the Bushes request for a public hearing. In the meantime, the council approved a new land development code on April 13, 2010, which partly addressed the subdivision of property and required stricter neighborhood consistency. One month later, the application was denied by the council. The Bushes then took legal action, bringing their case to the circuit court, appellate court, and back to the circuit court again. Most recently, a court order signed by circuit Judge James B. Fensom on June 7 nulli ed the decision made by the Mexico Beach City Council in May 2010 to deny the petitioners request for a residential lot division and subsequent Final order Denying Request for Lot Split. The order will send the request right back to the city council where it started. The case was heard in the Bay County Circuit Court after an appellate court decision in August 2011 that reversed a lower court decision in the land-use case. BOUNTIFUL BLUEBERRIES VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Bobby Gay, 10, picks a ripe one at Bayou Blueberries on Tuesday afternoon. Bayou Blueberries on CR 30-A in Port St. Joe has been in operation since the late s. See FIREWORKS A7 See BOCC A3 See BARNES A3 See LOT SPLIT A2 See BLUEBERRIES A2 Michael Lister to host book signing | B1

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The pies were so tasty, Kennington came back for more. Bayou Blueberries is in off of CR 30-A in Port St. Joe and is open for berry picking. Pickers are welcome anytime during daylight hours, and Christie said berries should be available for picking through July 4. Bayou Blueberries runs on an honor system; pickers are instructed by a laminated ier to pick as many berries as they would like, weigh their berries and drop their money, $2.50 per pound, in the adjacent box. Christie, the chief deputy at the Gulf County Property Appraisers of ce, isnt home most of the day and leaves payment discretion to the patrons of his berry patch. Thats a testimony to the general honesty of the public, Christie said. Only in Gulf County; its like Mayberry. Judging by the money in the box, Christie thinks there has been a pretty good turnout of pickers so far this season. But Christie isnt in the U-Pick berry business for the money. Its not anything to make money, he said. Its just something cool to do. In previous years, Christie donated all of the money made from the berry operation to the Christian Charity Voice of the Martyrs Christie said his blueberry plants produce fruit at different times each year, with June usually marking the peak of the season, but it isnt unusual to have early varieties and late varieties. Christie has a background in the plant nursery business and admits his blueberry patch is not pictureperfect this summer, and is open to suggestions on bird management. He said he is tried scarecrows, pie pans and every bird de ection in the book. With the help of Gulf County Extension Agent Roy Lee Carter, Christie nally came to the conclusion he just has to plant enough for the birds and the people. Hundreds of birds ock there in streams, Christie said. I tell people they y in and walk out. Local A2 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 See you at the Sunset! 602 Highway 98, Port St. Joe, FL 850.227.7900 Lunch 11am 3pm EDT, Dinner 5pm 10pm EDT Reservations Suggested 850-227-7900 Spectacular SUNSETS Blue Marlin BAR Exceptional EVENTS FRIENDS OF INVITE YOU TO A FRY WHERE: Frank Pate Park WHEN: Thursday, June 28th at 6pm Until www.ApplemanForStateAttorney.com Its time again for strong leadership Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Jim Appleman, Republican, For State Attorney 14th Judicial Circuit. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Local A2 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 The Mexico Beach City Council turned us down without us being able to present (our case) to them, Joe Bush said. We did not receive due process with the council. The appellate court reversed the case back to circuit court based on the Bushes claim of lack of due process. The case will be brought back to Mexico Beach for a quasi-judicial hearing, where council members will have the power to approve or disapprove the lot split, said Mexico Beach City Manager Chris Hubbard. The quasi-judicial hearing will be a public hearing before the Mexico Beach City Council, Hubbard said, but will run as more of a court proceeding than a regular city council meeting, set forth with more rigid requirements. Hubbard said the hearing has not been scheduled but will be advertised and open to the public. Bush said he has no intention of presenting his lot split request to the council again. Ive done my part; Ive fought this for ve years, he said. We just went through ve years of court for nothing. Were right back where we started. The taxpayers money is going down the drain again. Bush said he is not backing down, and his next step would be to talk to his attorney. Ive done everything I was supposed to do correctly, he said Its just a waste of time and a waste of money. LOT SPLIT from A1 A typo in last weeks column A Birds Eye View of St. Vincent resulted in the wrong telephone number being published for contacting the turtle adoption program. The correct phone number is 229-6735 not 229-7635. The story on candidate qualifying included the wrong date for this years General Election. It is Nov. 6, not Nov. 8. Information provided on the band playing during the community celebration of the Fourth of July was incorrect. The band is George, Cletus and Tom. The Star regrets the errors. Setting it STRAIGHT BLUEBERRIES from page A1 VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Bobby Gay, 10, shows off his bucket of fresh blueberries.

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unemployment payments and $5,476 in life manage ment payments. A $16,600 cut from the Economic Development Council fund was also ap proved, but Butler said it will require additional dis cussion because an interlo cal agreement with Port St. Joe. Other cuts that are un der review include cutting funding for Wewahitchkas T.L. James Park for a sav ings of $13,671, decreasing the number of county poll ing places to one per district and elimination of roadside debris pick-up for a savings of $50,000 annually. Commissioner Warren Yeager asked the budget committee to come back to the board with recommen dations for mandatory gar bage and roadside pick-up for county residents, with an outlay of costs for con tracting with a private-sec tor company. Calhoun County has mandatory pick-up; were behind the times on this, Yeager said. Yeager and Commis sioner Bill Williams failed on a motion to move the county to mandatory gar bage pick-up a few years back. Negotiations with waste management need to be a priority, Williams said. And it needs to be done quick. The commission ap proved $59,250 in potential revenue sources including $25,000 for an increase in building department fees, which havent been raised in more than 10 years. The county hopes to also gar ner $30,000 in payments from Bay County for runs the Gulf County Emer gency Management team makes to Mexico Beach. Commissioners also ap proved charging dry run fees for unnecessary calls to the county ambulance service, which would bring in roughly $4,250. Commissioners voted against a 5-cent local op tion gas sales tax, which could bring in $140,000 in revenue annually. Still up for review is an increase landll fees. The county currently charges $35 per ton of gar bage deposited at the land ll. The budged committee proposed doubling the fee to $70. Obviously that ($35 fee) doesnt pay for the landll, said Commissioner War ren Yeager, who asked for a review on how much sur rounding counties charge in landll fees. Yeager made a motion to increase the fee based on the average of what sur rounding counties charged and the motion passed unanimously. Local The Star| A3 Thursday, June 21, 2012 VOTE FOR Dear Voters, I am writing this letter seeking your vote and support as your Gulf County Property Appraiser. When I if this is the path I needed to take in my life for my fam ily. I reached out to friends and family as well as from my two sons to make sure I had their unwavering sup port. Based on those prayers and the overwhelming sup port I received, the decision to run for Gulf County Property Appraiser came easy, as I have always had a strong desire and willingness to serve the great people of Gulf County. and experience. My experience includes working with people as a friend, appraiser or consultant plus assis tance with real estate, property appraisal, estate issues and taxes therefore qualifying me to deal with our local property issues. By serving as Special Magistrate for several counties in the Panhandle I had the opportunity to hear the requests for fair assessments and a fair taxation system. I am requesting your support in this campaign in order to assist the people of Gulf Coun ty with any real estate issues. I will work for fairness and the promotion of conservative ideas. While living in Gulf County I have had to accept assignments outside the county to meet my obliga tions. I continue to perform appraisals in and around our county plus special assignments wher ever there is work. tor of Appraisals which required driving over four hours each day from Gulf County to Fort Walton Beach. Other employment included projects in Alabama and Texas which required driv ing over 25 hours each week so I could continue to raise my children, Trey, 16 years old and Luke, 12 years old here in Gulf County while they attended school in Wewahitchka. As stated above, I am not afraid of work or tackling issues nor afraid to stand up for what is right while be I am a Republican candidate running for property appraiser. Since I have republican opposition, only those registered as a Republican can vote for me in the primary election on August 14, 2012. In order to make it to the general election, I will need your vote, support, and hard work to make it happen. This campaign is not a campaign for Jamie Lester; it is a campaign for the people of Gulf County. This election is about representing everyone in Gulf County with creative ideas. And of commitment to achieve positive results. Once you have reviewed the credentials throughout this campaign, ask yourself: If you answer yes to all of the above then the choice is clear, Vote for Jamie Lester for Gulf County Property Appraiser. I thank you for your time and consideration. Please contact me on my cell at 850-814-8102 or call 850-639-4200 I look forward to visiting and talking with you. Sincerely, James E. Jamie Lester (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jamie Lester, Republican, for Property Appraiser st. joe rent-all 706 1ST S TREET (850) 227-2112 LATE MODELS UP GRADE BATTERIES WARRANTIES USED FINANCING AVAILABLE NEW GOLF CA RTS 4 YEAR WARRANTY 30 MILE RANGE 15MPH PO RT ST JO E STARTING AT $995.00 Pd.Pol.Ad. Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m Eugene Charbonneau, DO Susan Hardin, ARNP Dana Whaley, ARNP 110 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, Florida Local The Star| A3 Thursday, June 21, 2012 BOCC from page A1 two children: Keith and his wife, Lynn McGill Hen dricks Barnes, and Karen and her husband, Phil McCroan. They also have seven grandchildren: Blake and Brett Barnes; Justin, Jesse and Haley McCroan; Shannon Hendricks Kiser and Krystal Hendricks. Jerry is married to Deborah Brum baugh Barnes and has two stepchildren, Eric and Evan Brumbaugh. Barnes has been a member of First Baptist Church for the past 34 years, where he served as deacon for more than 20 years. He taught Sunday school, chaired the deacons and served on various committees including bud get, personnel, music search, Lords Supper and security. Barnes also has been actively involved in various community organizations. He is a volunteer at the Food Pantry and the Gulf Coast Workforce Board in partnership with the Washington Improvement Group and the Christian Community Development Fund. Barnes said he wants the people of Gulf County to know he will work hard as harbor master. He said he believes his honesty and integrity are char acteristics that will keep the job of harbor master respected. Barnes asks for your support in the upcoming election this August and invites any questions or concerns. He can be reached at 340-0510. BARNES from page A1

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Opinion A4 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 Fathers Day comes and goes; this was my twelfth without my Daddy. As strange as it sounds, I seem to get closer to him as the years go by. Maybe, its that I nd him more each day. I nd him exactly where I knew I would. I nd him in me. My Fathers Day cards were wonderful. My children are as precious to me, as I am sure yours are to you. Someday, when I have time, Im going to come up with a line of Fathers Day cards that all end with, Happy Fathers Day Daddy. Maybe, thats my way to fortune and fame. I dont want to be a father, or a dad; I want to be a Daddy. That is what my Daddy was. Whatever the situation, I still feel Daddys arm sweeping me behind him and him saying, Dont worry. We had a few tough situations, where I could have easily worried or easily been scared. However, I dont think Ill ever nd anyone who would tell you any different. If he was in front of you, they werent getting to you. Im the middle son of three boys, I saw it all. Sometimes it wasnt pretty; he did what he had to do. He knew only one way to get things to work. On the wall of my ofce, there is a letter he sent home to his mother while serving in the Navy. Her address was, Route One, Wedowee, Alabama. He was nineteen yearsold and serving on the USS the Sullivans, a Fletcher class destroyer. The Korean War was going on, but Daddy didnt say a word about it. He talked about football and his Randolph County Tigers maybe getting a shot at the County Championship. He was apologetic that he couldnt make it to the games, noting all he could do was think about them. He talked about the letters he had gotten from home and how happy they made him. However, Daddy did say that his baby sister hadnt sent anything lately and that it sure would be nice to get a few lines from her. Also, he said to tell his baby brother that he still hadnt gotten him anything for his birthday, but maybe I can before long. By his tone and his reference to other events, it was obvious that the money situation was tough back home. In one paragraph, Daddy notes to his mother, So you are still picking cotton are you, you will keep picking until your head starts giving you more trouble and you wont be able to do nothing. What else could she do? Just keep picking other peoples cotton Daddy always said, You do what you have to do. Some folks say that; some folks know what it means to have to do it. I never really knew my Daddys relationship with his father. He didnt talk much about it and Daddys father died before I ever knew him. In the letter, Daddy seemed to understand that his father was not really able to work, but was trying. I can only think that it was health related. Daddy shot straight. After explaining to his mother, it looks like we have to do something, he went on to say, what you get, you get it yourself. It was heartbreaking, reading the words of a nineteen year-old who was taking on more responsibility than he probably should have had to take on. At the same time, it makes me proud to know that Daddy was what he was, well before I was around. Young people still do it every day. They work and raise their siblings, sometimes their own children, when they are much too young to have to worry about such things. What choices do they have? They can quit, they can beg or they can keep picking cotton. Fortunately, I never have had to make such tough decisions and I never had to pick cotton. I will say that on this Fathers Day, Im proud to say that I had a Daddy who did have to make tough decisions and he did. He did it with a smile on his face and a swagger in his step that said, You cant beat me. At 19, in his letter, he told his mother not to worry, just like he told me. I didnt. He signed his name with an airplane looking, The real Rock of Gibraltar So you are still picking cotton My hometown has asked me to speak at something they call Nights on Broadway. Were not talking New York City here. McKenzie, Tennessees Broadway starts up in front of Bailey Moore Wrinkles old hardware store and runs down past where they used to hold the animals on Mule Day. It bisects the very heart of our little city. Im still pondering on the invitation. But I reckon Buddy Wiggleton and Reggie Lawrence had to work and LaRenda Bradeld must be a little under the weather. This is the same town that kicked me out in 1965. Oh, they held me in school there for twelve long arduous years before giving me the boot. They crammed that Blue Bird reading class down my throat, made me conjugate verbs against my will, forced those logarithms on me and demanded I get up close and personal with Shakespeare, Poe and Edna St. Vincent Millay. And then, just when I thought I was guring out life down at the end of North Stonewall Street, Mr. Warren stood up and told our graduating class to go forth and nd your dreams. My dreams pretty much started and ended down on Stonewall where the blacktop gave out. I learned to ride a bike so I could get to town faster. Or zip over to the baseball eld across from the pajama factory. We shot tin cans off fence posts. We chased Indians, Germans, martians and each other from one end of the big ditch to the other. Every person in town shared life with me back in those days. What a time to be young and taking it all in. I had a real girl friend. Everyone up at the Dixie Coffee Cup called me by my rst name. Mr. Kennon would give me slices of hoop cheese while Mother bought groceries. Mr. Tommie Hill paid me to pump gas into his customers cars. I thought life couldnt get much better.... The end of summer after graduation found me two hundred miles from the house, abandoned on a college campus where old professors and wideeyed freshman not only didnt know my name, they couldnt pronounce it even when I spelled it out for them. By Thanksgiving and the rst snow storm I was beyond lost and lonely. I would have quit but I thought of Miss Carolyn and Miss Barbara Clark, Coach Givens and Clella Mae Carter. Gosh, they had put so much time in me. They believed in me! I was not about to go home in the middle of the year and tell them I couldnt make it. I gritted my teeth and gured it wasnt as tough as a Coach Camp basketball practice. My goodness gracious, nothing on earth was as difcult as what he would put you through. I squared my shoulders and walked into class like I belonged there. I learned not because I suddenly had a rash of smartness. I persevered because so many people in a sleepy little village in West Tennessee had poured so much of themselves into me. Professors noted a change. The college coaches commented on my new alertness. I didnt bother with explaining that failing wasnt an option where I came from. The glitz and glamour of college life never beckoned. Mr. Ed Wiley had been quietly warning us for years in Sunday School class about just such stuff. Oh, I tried some things and marveled at some things, but listen, I never even approached the deep end, you dont have any idea how persistent Mr. Wiley was. Besides, Mr. Dwayne Melton would have ridden that big horse over if he thought I was about to mess up. There were dozens of people keeping track. You just thought you were passing through McKenzie those rst eighteen years. A lifetime of tting in with others was never a problem. Pam Collins, Bobby Brewer, Ricky Hale, Charlotte Melton, Pam Garret, John Ingram ....I could go down the whole list. Wed been working things out and getting along since Dr. Holmes birthed us all. Wed hunker down in the back of Franks Dairy Bar and talk about life, loves, adventures, the future ...all the things I have found myself in the middle of since moving away. I hope just one of them appreciates me half as much as I am thankful for each and every one of them. Gosh, the Necco Wafers we tossed at each other in the darkness of the old Park Theatre. And its a wonder someone didnt get killed sliding down that hill on Forrest Avenue. Ive seen ghts break out while choosing up side over at the pajama factory eld. We honed our social graces together. Marriage was easy for me. I grew up around Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Mitchum. What a couple. They didnt hold hands and tell me about the love they shared. It wasnt necessary, they had so much love for each other it splashed over on that middle Colbert boy. Golly, how much I learned from them. When I had sons of my own my mind dialed up immediately not only my Dad, but oh, so many fathers from my childhood days. Those memories were special, but the training and the thought processes developed in those formative years have been invaluable. I dont know what I could possibly tell a crowd of folks in McKenzie today that would be pertinent or educational about my time there. I have effectively been away now for fortyseven years. Mark me down in the has been column. But also let it be noted how fortunate I was. I came along at exactly the right moment in exactly the right place and the result was a life that shaped up and played out way better than I ever deserved. I count it a special gain that a little village took such aliken to a young wet-behind-the-ears whippersnapper like me. And Im living proof that the old maxim rings truer today than ever before: You can take the boy out of McKenzie ...but you cant take McKenzie out of the boy. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See CRANKS A5 RESTORE nes focused on oyster reef restoration Special to The Star After a comprehensive investigation into the hiring potential of 130 nationwide rms involved in the oyster reef restoration industry, the Duke University Center on Globalization, Governance & Competitiveness recently released a report, Restoring Gulf Oyster Reefs: Opportunities for Innovation, nding that oyster reef restoration projects could provide quadruple economic returns for Gulf Coast states. The study comes as Congress is in the nal stages of considering passage of the RESTORE the Gulf Coast States Act. The legislation would ensure billions of dollars in penalties for the 2010 Gulf oil disaster would be returned to the region and dedicated to gulf restoration. This legislation, along with billions of dollars from the ongoing Natural Resource Damage Assessment for the disaster, could be used to repair the damaged Gulf ecosystem and jumpstart the gulf economy. Americas oyster reefs are a hidden jewel that provide quadruple economic returns, said Shawn D. Stokes, research analyst for the center. They maximize the return on investment in coastal restoration by boosting industries vital to the U.S. economy, supporting the nations largest shing industries, stabilizing and protecting the valuable Gulf Coast and ltering water to provide clean, safe, beautiful areas for recreation and tourism industries in addition to creating jobs in a new emerging industry for oyster reef restoration. Among its key ndings, the study identied 130 rms directly (including oyster harvesting) and indirectly (such as materials and construction) involved with oyster reef industry and concluded that incorporating innovative oyster reef designs into the Gulf Coast states oil spill restoration efforts would provide new job opportunities in the Gulf and 17 other states. More than 80 percent of the identied employment locations are based in the ve Gulf states, and 68 percent of the rms qualify as small businesses by sales, according to Small Business Administration guidelines. Many of these rms are small, innovative startup companies striving to be at the forefront of the emerging oyster reef industry. Healthy oyster reefs, as nurseries for sh, are vital to the 200,000 jobs in the regions $2.4 billion shing industry. Investments in oyster reefs help small businesses like ours create jobs, build innovative products and support our local economy, said Stephen Addington, co-owner of Gulf Coast Aggregates near Carrabelle. Restoration is not only good for small businesses, it is vital for the economy here in the panhandle now and in the future. Our products can immediately be put to work in restoring the wetlands of Louisiana and in building oyster reefs that help our local economy thrive. With nal passage of the RESTORE Act and the new projects it would fund, we can create needed jobs and help ensure a healthy future for our oysters, said Stephanie Victory, president & CEO of HESCO Bastion USA. Specically, the study notes that: Increasing oyster production will generate revenue for the commercial oyster industry and create thousands of jobs in seafood processing. Oyster shuckers and seafood processors hold 30 to 50 percent of seafood industry-related jobs across the Gulf. One acre of oyster reef increases sheries catch values by $4,200 a year by providing nooks and crannies of habitat for dozens of marine resident species. Each individual oyster lters up to 1.5 gallons of water per hour, removing excess nitrogen that contributes to marine dead zones, providing a service that avoids the need for expensive wastewater treatment plants to provide the same service. Each acre of oyster reef provides $6,500 in denitrication services annually. Oyster reefs stabilize bottom sediments, reduce wave energy, prevent erosion and fortify wetlands to serve as horizontal levees that provide $23 billion worth of storm protection annually to Gulf Coast businesses and communities as well as the oil and gas pipeline infrastructure offshore, which ensures economic and energy security for the United States. The study also serves as a followup to an earlier Duke University study released in December, which determined that using Clean Water Act penalties from the 2010 oil disaster could create jobs that would benet at least 140 businesses with nearly 400 employee locations in 37 states, including more than 260 in the Gulf Coast and 60 in Florida. Two-thirds of these companies also qualify as small businesses, and all would benet from the dedication of Gulf oil spill nes to gulf restoration funding, as through the RESTORE Act. State-specic initiatives that are already under way include: In Alabama, a broad coalition of organizations has initiated the 1001000 Restore Coastal Alabama plan that sets out to build 100 linear miles of oyster reefs. In Louisiana, the Coastal Wetlands Planning Protection and Restoration Act agency is experimenting with a variety of oyster reef restoration designs as part of their regular coastal restoration demonstration projects to fortify against erosion from hurricane and storm waves. In Florida, most of the restoration projects are funded by the Department of Environmental Protection and are sub-tidal oyster cultch reefs designed to improve biodiversity, increase shery production and provide shoreline protection. In Mississippi, The Nature Conservancy recently received two grant awards to build 35 acres of new oyster reef in a large area north of the east/west CSX rail line that prohibits commercial harvest of shellsh. In Texas, the Parks and Wildlife Department has worked with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to install subtidal cultch reefs to boost marine sheries production. The study was made possible by support from the Walton Family Foundation.

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS Letters A5 | The Star Volunteering in Gulf County Dear Editor This is response to the article on volunteering that appeared in the June 14 edition of The Star. I think John and Carlene Parker symbolize what volunteering is all about in Gulf County and they have been recognized for it but not enough. They appear at every government function and attentively listen to the good, bad and different regardless of the political spins placed on them by various Commissioners. They freely give of themselves for many activities as an example to all of us and yet it seems that anyone who isnt born here is referred to as a Blow In. This is a ridiculous effort to divide the old existing families from the new arrivals who bring with them the hope and possibility to continue this wonderful way of life to a dying community. The new families do not want to destroy anything; we moved here because of the way it is and want to protect it. When my family and I moved here 11 years ago we all volunteered for anything and everything possible. We had no local favorite politicians or political positions. All we knew was that this was heaven compared to Atlanta where crime was rampart, traf c was horri c and the pace of life sped past you so fast that you did not realize 30 years had slipped away. What rst attracted us to Gulf County was the environment but we knew that beauty is only skin deep so before we decided to take the plunge, we attended the First United Methodist Church and met some of the Elders of the community. We were embraced immediately and made to feel special like you would when visiting your grandparents. We meet amazing people like Elsie Grif n, Jim Guilford and George Core who had stories to tell that were beyond amazing. I felt we found our home, the place where we wanted to nish raising our children and one day turn our toes up as others before us. Almost immediately, our children all volunteered for local projects through the Church like painting houses in need of work and my wife and I joined civic groups and organizations to contribute what we could to improve our community to help maintain the caring culture of a small town we discovered and were enjoying. So, it is the people of Gulf County that is why we stayed, why we volunteered and why we still care to this very day. If you volunteer and expect some trophy or fanfare by those you helped, then you have the wrong idea about volunteering. A volunteer is a unique person who wants to give what they can in talent, time or funds because they care and it is the right thing to do. We must all give back and the recent article in the paper about volunteering is so appropriate at this time. A long time ago, all elected of cials were considered volunteers and expected no compensation. They cared for our country in way much different than todays Career Politicians and without any hidden agendas to promote them personally. Look around you today, these people are hard to nd and on the endangered species list. This brings me to tell you that now I have con dently selected a political position which I feel strongly about, motivated only by experiences that I encountered while innocently volunteering in our community. It seems that a few like to make decisions for all to insure their personal business is protected. They thrive on control, spins and hold peoples principles hostage that work for them somewhat akin to the Paper Mill control that use to be here. It is almost as if the intimidation to everyone who had a job and was afraid to speak out oozed from the paper mill into the hands of a few local controlling (born and raised here) citizens. All one has to do is look at where Gulf County is compared to other counties: schools, population, employment, income and opportunities for our children and grandchildren. If they call us Blow Ins then they must be Blow Outs. Look, I do not care if you are a Democrat, Republican, Independent or what. Vote for who you want but do not make the mistake of re-electing any County Commissioners. The existing County Commissioners have not helped us in any way. Here is one huge obvious (among many) example; Remember the oil spill? Remember they all voted to protect us and sue BP? What happened next shows their loyalty to the people. All of a sudden, the suit was removed, Commissioners started working for BP Contractors like County Commissioner Carmen McLemore who was paid $11,400 per week (veri ed on his state nancial disclosure paperwork led with Ethics Commission). You should ask the Commissioners, Why did Franklin County receive twice as much from BP settlement than Gulf County and we were closer and sustained more damage? Do not forget what they have done to us. Disgraceful. Lets get people in control that want to do the right thing for all of us and not just for themselves. Jim Garth Port St. Joe June Grass on our beach is a problem Dear Editor: How can a small town like Mexico Beach afford to keep its beach in pristine condition, including raking the June Grass on a regular basis? Over in St. Joe Beach, the grass is everywhere. It smells, attracts biting ies, and is quite an eyesore to many. There is a tractor and sand rake sitting idle at the rehouse. With all of the money from BP handed out to promote tourism, why have our politicians neglected this situation? One of the best attractions for our area is the beach. It is time for action. Instead of buying gift cards that magically disappear, how about using resources to rake the grass? Kevin Welch, Broker-Owner Pelican Walk Real Estate, Inc. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS A5 | The Star 1229 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida Insuring Lives. Enriching Futures. Our experienced sta will help you choose a plan that suits your needs. Health Solutions for Individuals and Families Benet Plans for: Call 850-747-0288 Florida Blue is the trade name of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida depends upon the plan selected and the premium will vary with the amount Mike Nichols Your Local Agency for dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Thursday, June 21, 2012 CRANKS from page A1 Love, Albert. My godmother Phyllis called me to wish me a Happy Fathers Day and to remind me that every day was Our Fathers day. She then told me, Thank Him 7 times and do it 7 times a day. Daddy had this thing about the number 7. I told Phyllis this and asked her why she brought it up. She didnt know why, she only told me about the number 7 meaning complete. We discussed numbers in the Bible, and then talked about bedbugs and chiggers. When we were nished, she told me she loved me and I told her I loved her. You can nd more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. By JASON ALDERMAN Would you be surprised to learn that parents in many poorer countries often spend considerably more time talking with their children about money management than in wealthier countries like the United States? I was. Thats just one interesting nugget revealed at the sixth annual Financial Literacy and Education Summit recently hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and Visa Inc. Renowned U.S. and international nancial experts tackled the theme, International Solutions to Improving Financial Literacy, sharing successes and challenges faced in their own countries, as well as presenting new research that explores ways that nancial knowledge and behavior can be improved. Janet Bodner, editor of Kiplingers Personal Finance, shared ndings from the 2012 Global Financial Barometer, a new study cosponsored by Kiplingers and Visa. Some global 25,500 participants were asked about their personal nancial habits and opinions. Assessing that data, the Barometer ranked the nancial literacy levels of people in 28 countries. Among the more interesting ndings: Brazil topped the list as having the most nancially literate people, followed by Mexico, Australia, the U.S. and Canada. 68 percent of survey respondents had fewer than three months worth of emergency reserves to fund basic needs during an unexpected nancial event like job loss. 25 percent of highincome respondents had less than three months of living expenses in savings. In the U.S., for example, the average person had only 2.9 months of expenses saved. Mexico and Brazil topped the list of places that parents talk to their kids ages 5 -17 about money most often, with Mexicans talking to their kids at least 41.7 days a year and Brazilians 38.1. American families were in the middle of the pack at about 25.8 days out of the year. When asked at what age governments should require schools to teach nancial literacy, U.S. respondents ranked near the bottom at 11.9 years. By comparison, more than half of Brazilians surveyed believe such education should begin before age 9. In over half the countries, a majority believe that teens and young adults do not understand nancial basics, such as budgeting, savings, debt and spending responsibly. Bodner noted that these results add to our body of knowledge about nancial literacy. You rst have to identify what the problems are in your particular country, city or school, and then determine what is effective in handling those situations, she said. A more detailed summary of the Barometers key ndings can be found at www.practicalmoneyskills. com/barometer. William Walstad, an Economics professor at University of NebraskaLincoln, presented another interesting study which showed that people who scored poorly on a nancial literacy test but were con dent in their moneymanagement abilities exhibited similar abilities to manage credit cards as did those with stronger test skills; while those who had high test scores but lacked con dence displayed much more negative credit behavior. Walstad said these ndings suggest that building con dence has a strong role to play in nancial education. Bottom line: The panelists agreed that all of the countries represented share many of the same challenges for boosting nancial literacy including gaining wide access for programs to be tested, evaluating their results, and the fact that each has very diverse populations with different needs at different periods in their lives. To watch a free webcast of the Summit, visit www. practicalmoneyskills.com. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. Improving nancial literacy, here and abroad Fellow Gulf Countians, Currently much light is being shed on an organization called the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). This organization is nothing but a lobbyists nirvana. So what is it and who belongs to ALEC? ALEC claims to be an organization dedicated to the advancement of free market and limited government principles through a public-private partnership between state legislators and corporations. Can you detect an odor here yet? ALEC promotes conservative agendas such as hostility to collective bargaining, minority voter suppression and the weakening of environmental laws. So just who exactly runs this lobbying group? The ALEC Board of Directors consists of 26 U.S. Senators and State Representatives, 24 of whom are Republicans. The 22member Private Enterprise Board consists of some of the largest corporations in this country: Koch Companies, Johnson & Johnson, American Bail Corp., State Farm, Kraft, Reynolds American, AT&T, Exxon Mobil, Peabody Energy and the list goes on and on. You can easily guess what these corporations want of our elected of cials: undue in uence. In 2011 Florida lawmaker Rachel Burgin (R-Riverview), introduced an ALEC bill to cut corporate taxes that read whereas it is the mission of the American Legislative Exchange Council to advance . . Burgin swiftly withdrew the bill after consulting with the Board and submitted it again without the ALEC language; however, there was no doubt as to where it came from. Whats interesting is that many of the corporate in uence peddling members of ALEC are now bailing out because the kitchen is getting hot. Coca Cola, Kraft, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, McDonalds, Proctor & Gamble and, very recently, WalMart. This is just another example of both parties being unduly in uenced by big money. We have the Supreme Court to thank for that with their Citizens United (is that an oxymoron or what) decision. Local residents may not know the name of the Florida state chair of ALEC but, hold your breath, why its our own Jimmy Patronis. Respectfully, Tom Knoche Port Saint Joe LETTER TO THE EDITOR Lobbyists Nirvana

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 21, 2012 the standard for choreographed smoothness, with those of the young girls. Prancing around in shopping bags, the opening number You Better Shop Around set the stage for what was to come. Interspersed with the numbers were senior solos by Montez Walker, who earned a $200 scholarship for his newfound study with Nobles, and by Erin White, a Port St. Joe High School grad who completed 14 years of study with Nobles and received a $2,000 scholarship. June Gray, who has studied 29 years with her daughter, offered a delightful number, Totes, complete with umbrella. Linda Grif n, who has danced with Nobles for 17 years, offered a solo of her own. And of course, the older high school girls, all dressed in white, again performed Nobles signature homage to divine inspiration Amazing Grace. Professional choreographer and dancer Scott Benson delighted the audience with a whirlwind number, in which he shared the stage with White, Walker and several of the other dancers he instructed during the year at several guest appearances. One delightful moment in the afternoon show was a number Western Wear, in which guest appearances on the stage were made by Superintendent Nina Marks, County Commissioner Noah Lockley and his challenger Valentina Webb, School Board member Teresa Ann Martin, sheriffs candidate Cliff Carroll and school board candidate Pamela Shiver. Nobles also presented awards at the conclusion of the recital to Debby Ruffner for 26 years; Rita Theis for 25; Linda Maloy for 23, Bonnie Smith for 22; Grif n for 17; and Patricia Perryman for 12. Younger girls receiving awards were Holly Chambers, for 11 years; Ella Friedman for six; and Meredith Alford, Eve Bond, Emily Gay, Mackenzie King, Shaylee Martina, Gracyn Paul, Olivia Poloronis and Kylee Smith, each for three. On June 13-16, several students came away winners in the Platinum National Dance Competition at the Marina Civic Center in Panama City. The dancers were among 365 acts presented during the four-day dance marathon. Two top overall awards were earned by White and Walker with a hip-hop number choreographed and danced by the two in the Senior Duet Trio Division. The awards included Top Overall, Platinum, and they were in the top three out of 26 acts competing for grand champion in Best of the Beach. The legendary Hot Flashes dancing group won top overall in Adult Jazz Division with a number called Trouble, which also won them a Platinum award. Dancers in the group include Wanda Bar eld, Gray, Maloy, Nobles, Ruffner, Theis and White dancing for Patricia Perryman. Gray did a song and dance number to It Had to be You, winning a Platinum Award. Pam Nobles Dance Studio encourages students to enter local, district and national competitions. The studio is proud of the achievements of its students and appreciates the help of encouragement of parents and the community. Nobles has accompanied dancers all over the country, where they have won numerous awards over her 31 years of teaching dance and baton. on site for its duration. In all, 24 acres of forest belonging to The St. Joe Company burned. Davis praised the teamwork of everyone who responded to the emergency. We have had really good support from the highway patrol, local re departments, Trans eld and The St Joe Company, he said. Trans eld Services is the rm under contract to maintain state roads in the county. Davis said the Forest Service doesnt charge for accidental res like lightning strikes but does charge a suppression fee for res purposely or accidentally set by people. It adds up fast, he said, cautioning everyone to Millender, who has worked for the county for more than 10 years, rst at the land ll, was questioned about whether she had the necessary certi cations for the post. A notary public, she has completed several FEMA emergency management courses and supervisory training at Florida State University, but she is not TREEO-certi ed. It doesnt take a certi cate to run the land ll, she said, noting Johnson allowed his certi cation to lapse some time ago. Millender said she had never been given the opportunity to complete TREEO certi cation. After both interviews, County Attorney Michael Shuler said, based on the advertised requirements for the position, Millender was not quali ed to take the directors job because she lacked TREEO certi cation, did not have a class A commercial drivers license and, because she was a woman, could not supervise male inmates in Florida. Shuler called Lucy Turner, the countys consulting labor attorney, during the meeting. He said she agreed commissioners could not consider an underquali ed candidate for the position. Shuler said the county could be sued for doing so. After receiving this advice from Shuler and Turner, commissioners voted 4-1 to promote Davis to the directors position, with Commissioner Cheryl Sanders opposed. Commissioners voted to increase Davis salary from $40,800 to $45,800, with Chairman Pinki Jackel and Sanders opposed. Jackel argued that an increase to $45,000 was more appropriate, especially given improved retirement package that comes with the directors position. When asked what improvements he proposed if given the directors position, Davis said he hopes to step up the recycling program and increase attention to parks and boat ramps. He said he looks to the public for suggestions to make county services better. Davis said his biggest challenge is having the board behind me. I would like to have an open relationship with all you directors. If you feel theres something going on that you dont like, just call me. When asked what his weaknesses were, Davis said, I think Ive overcome them. Years back, Mr. Johnson told me where my weaknesses were. Commissioners will now seek an assistant director for the department. Shuler has provided commissioners with a detailed written job description. Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER MEDICARE PLANS EX CELLEN T COV ERA G E A N YO NE C AN AFFO RD TOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU Ross E. T ucker, Agent since 1981 Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter 850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005 www.tuckerlifehealth.com BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 85K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH COR LOT 12 X 53 1 B / R 8 X 24 SHED 27,500 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 $29,500 U P WILDFIRES from page A1 DAVIS from page A1 TOEING from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times From left are Jostyn Tipton, professional dancer Scott Benson and, in Shopping for Shoes, Jackie Collinsworth, Amber Henning, Erin White and Brooke Moore. be diligent when burning. Todd Schroeder, wild re mitigation specialist for the Forest Service, said this week the Lake Morality re is all wrapped up. He said he is concerned about the drought and that, in spite of last weeks rain, conditions favorable to wildre could rapidly return in windy weather. Tim Barry, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecaster in Tallahassee, said Apalachicola has received almost 9 inches of rain so far this month, more than three times the monthly average of 2.65 inches. But, he cautioned, the area is still about 3 inches below average for the year. Last year was a very dry year, and we tend to forget that, he said. Tallahassee had the second driest year on record. The drought goes back beyond Jan. 1. It would take a tropical system, or a couple, to make up for last year, and that would not be bene cial. Barry said lightning is the leading cause of wildres in Florida, second only to res ignited purposely or accidentally by human beings. At least were back on the right track, he said. Forty percent of our annual rainfall comes in June through August, and were off to a good start. Barry said there will be a better chance of widespread rainfall beginning Friday. At least were back on the right track. Forty percent of our annual rainfall comes in June through August, and were off to a good start. Tim Barry NOAA forecaster

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On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients. VINCENT IV ERS, M.D. 301 T wentieth S treet Port S t. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 www.iversmd.com S K IN C A NCER SCREENIN G While the summer is lled with family fun activities, vacations and reunions, be mindful of the dangers of the sun. Dont forget your sunscreen and skin cancer screening with Dr. Ivers. Dr. Hobson Fulmer of Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic Welcomes Our New Associate: Dr. John Duncan Along with Dr. Fulmer, Dr. Duncan will be seeing patients for small animal medicine and surgery. Please call for an appointment or come by to meet him. 850-670-8306 Clinic hours: Monday-Friday 8am 6 pm 187 Highway 98, Eastpoint Complete small animal medicine and surgery, wellness programs, laser surgery, diagnostic ultrasound, Serving Franklin and Gulf Counties for 30 years Theres a New Veterinarian in Town! 850-229-7799 for information Everyone Is Welcome to Attend AGENDA for Annual Meeting Date: June 30, 2012 Time: 9:00 AM 11:00 AM EST Place of Meeting: St. Josephs Bay Golf Club Guests Gulf County Elected TDC, Port Authority, SGCFD Candidates 11AM EST Call to Order Approval of Previous Meeting Minutes Treasurers Report Taxes & Appraisals Economic Development in Gulf Co. Port Authority Tourist Development Council Gulf County Schools Gulf County Courts County Budget Beach Restoration FEMA CBRA progress Recycling Sign Ordinance Fire Department Sheriff Nugent Report Widening of SR 30A-Dot Lighthouse Dilemma Other business Election of the 2012-2013 Board Adjournment Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 6-30-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Local The Star| A7 Thursday, June 21, 2012 We might not agree with everything, but theyve given a lot back to the community, Boyer said of Preble Rish. As of midday Friday, Boyer had collected $5,950 with more due to come in later Friday. She estimated the nal total would approach $7,000. This truly represents a broad range of the community, Boyer said. The response was great and a lot of individuals stepped up. It makes the reworks belong to the entire community. Boyer added that the input she had received during her efforts was that folks wanted to see the city contribute something. Commissioner Lorinda Gingell said the city never budgeted for the reworks because in 2011 it was determined that the TDC and Gulf County Chamber of Commerce would fund the show. However, both agencies went through sea changes in the past year new boards, new directors and she understood that some events might have been lost track of in the process. City Commissioner Bill Kennedy said that although the city was strapped, with a very tight budget, he would suggest the city contribute $500. The motion passed unanimously, but City Commissioner Rex Buzzett said his vote was for the people of Port St. Joe, not any threat from the county. Earlier in the meeting, Buzzett expressed his anger concerning comments made by county commissioners on Tuesday night when, in particular, BOCC chairman Commissioner Bill Williams questioned the leadership provided by city commissioners. Buzzett called the BOCC motion to move the reworks the most vengeful, spiteful action he had seen the BOCC take toward the city. He said the BOCC was acting like a bully and trying to intimidate the city and make commissioners look bad. They are trying to make us look like the bad guys when we are being careful with tax dollars, Buzzett said. It would look really bad if we donated $5,000 now because they tried to intimidate us. I cant say enough how upset I am with those guys. Mayor Mel Magidson, who pushed to pass Kennedys motion and adjourn the meeting because he was getting tired of trying to bite my tongue, said the city didnt have the $5,000. We just didnt feel like we could just blow up $5,000 in these times, Magidson said. And citizens in the city are also paying county taxes so they are paying for this twice. Williams, in attendance, said he disagreed with Buzzett and there was nothing vindictive in the BOCC action. Williams said the county did not have the general liability insurance needed for the show having never staged reworks and therefore was in a dif cult position. This is the best thing that could happen, Williams said of the resolution of the dispute. I commend the merchants and the individuals who donated and I think the city should contribute. Though issues remain to be resolved nalizing the location and a contractor the meeting ended with the Fourth of July reworks in Port St. Joe back in launch position. FIREWORKS from page A1

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Special to The Star Theyre rarely seen in the wild but they do exist in Florida. Theyre mink. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologists are asking for the publics help in locating these small, fast, semi-aquatic creatures. Because their size and behavior keeps them out of sight, understanding where mink are in Florida, and how many mink live in the state, is extremely challenging to biologists. If members of the public report their sightings of these elusive animals, it would be invaluable to our research, said Jesse Boulerice, FWC biologist in Lake City. The more people we have looking for mink, the more information we can gather. Fisherman, boaters and other water recreationists are asked to be particularly watchful for mink and report any sightings. These sightings will be used to identify areas where mink are more common in Florida and help biologists pinpoint locations to focus mink research. The Everglades mink is listed in Florida as a threatened species. The FWC has created an online database for anyone to report sightings of mink in Florida at https://public.myfwc.com/hsc/mink. The database link includes pictures. Mink are typically found near, in and around sources of water, although they can also be found on dry land. They have a long sleek body, thick tail, small ears and small eyes, Boulerice said. Mink are between 1 and 2.5 feet long and weigh up to 4 pounds. These animals are dark-chocolate brown to black in color and sometimes have a patch of white along the chin and throat. Mink can be confused with otters. Otters look and behave similar to mink but are much larger in size (10-30 pounds). Weasels are also similar to mink, but are smaller and have brown fur along their backs and yellow along the entire belly. Being strictly carnivorous, mink forage in and along the edges of water, eating sh, frogs, cray sh, crabs and even muskrat and other small mammals. Historically, mink were hunted and used to make mink-fur apparel. E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 8 Thursday, June 21, 2012 O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Most offshore anglers are trying to deal with the roughest seas that many anglers can remember for the month of June. We are at the half way mark with less than 20 days left in the season. Great sized snapper are in the 60-120ft range out of Mexico Beach and on the Wings out of Indian Pass. Most inshore numbers are holding few or smaller sh right now. Inshore Offshore St. Joe Bays water is clearing up this week. After the hi winds and storms from last few weeks, shing has returned to9 normal. Good trout catches are being reported at the Fire tower site and around pig Island. Some ounder have been caught under the George Tapper bridge and in the St. Joe Marina. SPONSORED BY Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Independece Day Gun Sale Starting This Weekend June 22nd through the month of July. Hundreds of guns from Top Brands. Revolvers and pistols, shotguns and ries. Prices too low to advertise! Call for a quote!! JUNE FEATURE FISH: R ED S NAPPE R Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com By Rudy Socha Special to The Star I know who screwed up your favorite shing hole and why the sh you catch may taste a little funny. Everyone has seen them, the recreational boats that have three smokers aboard going out for a day of beer and shing. Upon return, there are no empty beverage containers, cigarette butts, or single use plastic bags. They consumed the goods and disposed of the waste. Unfortunately, they disposed of it while on-site, not that littering is acceptable anywhere. Most boaters feel that the ocean is a massive body of water, and it is, but the problem is most boaters travel the same routes, hang out at the same popular shing holes, and litter the same area. This causes bottom carpeting. The food chain in any area starts with the bugs and seaweed living on the bottom. What happens is the bottom becomes covered with the cans and bottles and the exposed sea or lake oor of mud and seaweed is reduced. If you have 20 littering boats at your favorite shing hole drinking and littering two 12 packs for 100 days during the year, they would have littered 24,000 beverage containers. This means each year they carpet 28,000 square feet of the bottom terrain. Think about the cumulative 10 year affect on the bottom structure and what shing in this area would be like if that litter was not there. Aside from littering the bottom with beer and beverage bottles, cigarette butts are one of the worst items to ick overboard. Feeder and surface sh will have eaten them before the end of the day. Their digestive juices extract the chemicals from the plastic in the lter and deposit these cancer causing agents into the muscle and fat tissue of the sh you are catching and grilling up at home. The bulk of the carcinogens in every cigarette is collected in the lter. Each lter contains 69 known carcinogens. Some of these lter-trapped carcinogens never enter a smokers bloodstream, but when you start eating these cancer causing agents, they enter your system and will have an accumulated effect on you. There are several other items that inadvertently end up in the water whenever they are brought aboard a boat. The single use plastic bags containing all the items you picked up on your way to the marina always seems to catch air and set sail as soon as you use the last item in the bag. The other item that ends up in the water is Styrofoam lids from coolers. Everyone at one time or another has bought one of these cheap coolers because they needed more cooler space or forgot to bring one of the coolers from home. Here are some easy solutions for boaters to prevent your favorite shing hole from continuing to become trashed: It is important to educate other shermen and make them aware of the real impact of their actions. Their litter sinks to the bottom and is unseen and perceived as not having any effect. Take binoculars on your trip. If the sh are not biting, start watching the other boats, especially if they are catching sh and you are not. You may be able to gure out what they are doing right in addition to spotting a litterer. Spread the word. Tell everyone which boat is out in your favorite shing spot trashing the place. Fishing tournaments should do a declared beverage count when leaving the dock. Any boat returning without their empties should be disquali ed. Do not take plastic bags on board. Dump the stuff on the boat and nd a place to stash all of your goodies. Use an empty beverage container as your ashtray. It will trap and keep the butts until you reach the docks. For the Styrofoam containers, use the duct tape x. Tape a beverage or similar weight object to the top of the lid and you will not have the lid blowing off your boat allowing you to reuse the cooler. Increased regulation is not the answer. I believe education and peer pressure by shermen who care about their sport can signi cantly reduce this problem. If all of this accumulated trash stayed on top of the water in favorite shing holes instead of carpeting the bottom, this problem would have been corrected a long time ago since it would be such an eyesore to the community surrounding it. Fishermen love the environment and can appreciate shing in a pristine area lled with sh. Rudy Socha is a sherman and CEO of Wounded Nature Working Veterans. They are a 501c3 nonpro t focused on cleaning up coastal areas utilizing veterans living aboard houseboats. You can nd out more about them by visiting www.woundednature.org. Special to The Star As the weather has heated up, so too have Floridas alligator and crocodile activities, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) reminds Floridians and visitors to be cautious when having fun in and around water. Florida is home to two native crocodilians: the American alligator, which is found in all 67 counties; and the American crocodile, which may be found in coastal areas of the Keys and in southeast and southwest Florida. Both species have shared Floridas waters with people for centuries. The FWC recommends keeping pets away from the water. There are other precautionary measures people should take to reduce the chances for conicts with alligators and crocodiles, and they are available in the Living with Alligators brochure at MyFWC.com/Alligator and the Living with Crocodiles brochure at MyFWC. com/Crocodile. The FWC advises, if you have concerns with an alligator or crocodile that poses a threat to you, your pets or property, call the FWCs Nuisance Alligator Hotline at 866-FWC-GATOR (392-4286). Alligators and crocodiles are an important part of Floridas heritage and play a valuable role in the ecosystems where they live. For more information on alligators and crocodiles, visit MyFWC.com/Alligator. By JESSICA THERRIAULT Special to The Star Not everyone has a green backyard with bushes and trees. Florida is a peninsula, with the longest coastline of all states in the continental United States. Most of Floridas nearly 19 million residents live less than 60 miles from the Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico, making the beach, sand and saltwater their backyards. So lets go on a summer backyard beach safari! Begin your treasure hunt by shelling. Take a walk along the waters edge, and youll discover hundreds of varieties of shells hurled onto the beach by waves that roll or crash onto the shore. Seashells were once living organisms. The shell is the hard, protective outer part of an animal, usually a mollusk. Mollusks are animals like scallops, snails, clams and oysters. These creatures make their own shell. When the animal dies or gets eaten by another creature, the empty shell stays empty or becomes a home to other sea critters, like hermit crabs. Shelling provides hours of fun while looking for that one-of-a-kind, colorful treasure. Before you keep a shell, make sure there is nothing living in it. Otherwise, you need a special license to keep it. Another activity is digging in the sand for coquinas (pronounced KoKEE-nahs) and mole crabs. Its easy to spend hours getting lost in the color and movement of coquinas and the squirms of mole crabs. Coquinas are tiny clams that live just below the surface of the sand where the waves roll in. Tides carry and deposit them along the shoreline, where they feed on microscopic organisms in the sand. They are a dazzling sight with wonderful colors, like tiny jewels. Sometimes you dont need to dig because incoming waves will unearth them. Watch as they furiously dig, seeking cover and food as each wave rolls back out to sea. Mole crabs are small and do not look like a typical crab, nor do they look like a mole. They are fast and will bury themselves quickly in an effort to hide. To nd one, dig gently in sand near the water, just as if you are looking for coquinas. As you dig, they may bury deeper into the sand, but if you can get underneath one, then you can scoop it up. They may tickle you but dont worry. They do not bite. Be gentle, because they are soft and fragile. When you are nished observing the crab gently place it back into the soft, wet sand. Bird-watching is another fun activity. Gulls live on the beach and are known to swoop in to steal your food! Pesky as they might be, they are still fun to watch. Other birds to watch at the beach are pelicans. Pelicans glide just above the waters surface, and then SPLOOSH! They dive into the water headrst to grab a shy meal. Its also fun to look for bird tracks in the wet sand. Can you identify the tracks you nd? Do not chase the birds to make them y. Simply watch and admire their behavior. While on your safari, be sure to wear sunscreen so you can avoid sunburn, and have fun this summer! For more information, contact Jessica Therriault at Jessica.Therriault@ MyFWC.com. Photos special to The Star Top: A measurement shows that this mole crab is barely 2 centimeters long. Above: A close-up of the tiny, colorful coquina clams. Lets go on a beach safari Summer is here! Are some boaters reducing our sh stock, ruining what we catch? Report mink sightings to FWC Warm weather means active alligators, crocodiles

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com Thursday, June 21, 2012 A Page 9 Section WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, June 21 87 73 10 % Fri, June 22 87 75 10 % Sat, June 23 88 77 20 % Sun, June 24 89 77 20 % Mon, June 25 89 76 10 % T ues, June 26 87 77 30 % Wed, June 27 88 77 0 % 20 We 1029am 1.9 900pm -0.3 21 Th 1104am 1.8 925pm -0.3 22 Fr 1138am 1.7 946pm -0.2 23 Sa 1211pm 1.6 1000pm 0.0 24 Su 1244pm 1.3 1003pm 0.2 25 Mo 105pm 1.0 946pm 0.3 26 Tu 629am 1.0 838pm 0.6 27 We 552am 1.2 305pm 0.3 28 Th 558am 1.4 347pm 0.0 29 Fr 628am 1.7 442pm -0.2 30 Sa 712am 1.9 541pm -0.4 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 21 Th 707am 1.3 406pm 1.5 1115am 1.2 22 Fr 729am 1.3 454pm 1.4 1210am -0.2 1159am 1.2 23 Sa 752am 1.3 546pm 1.3 1237am -0.1 1248pm 1.1 24 Su 815am 1.3 645pm 1.2 107am 0.0 144pm 0.9 25 Mo 840am 1.3 758pm 1.0 139am 0.2 251pm 0.8 26 Tu 906am 1.4 930pm 1.0 213am 0.4 407pm 0.6 27 We 936am 1.4 1130pm 0.9 250am 0.6 526pm 0.4 28 Th 1010am 1.5 328am 0.9 640pm 0.1 29 Fr 201am 1.0 1050am 1.6 411am 1.0 745pm -0.1 30 Sa 1136am 1.6 843pm -0.3 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 1 Fr 735am 1.7 516pm -0.2 2 Sa 810am 1.9 616pm -0.4 3 Su 855am 2.0 720pm -0.6 4 Mo 946am 2.1 823pm -0.6 5 Tu 1038am 2.1 920pm -0.6 1 Fr 254am 1.0 1221pm 1.5 649am 1.1 845pm -0.2 2 Sa 416am 1.2 100pm 1.6 748am 1.2 936pm -0.4 3 Su 521am 1.3 143pm 1.6 843am 1.3 1026pm -0.5 4 Mo 613am 1.3 230pm 1.6 934am 1.4 1114pm -0.5 5 Tu 658am 1.3 320pm 1.6 1023am 1.3 July 4th Advertising Deadlines Display Advertising Schedule July 5th IssueSpace Reservation and Ad Copy Submittal Deadline June 28th, 2012 3:00pm Final Ad Approval July 2nd, 12:00pm F OURTH O F J ULY SPADEA Business Card ........................................ $30.00 2 col x 1 mod Actual Size: 3.22 x 2 1/4 Page .................................................. $225.00 3 col x 5 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 10 1/2 Page .................................................. $400.00 6 col x 5 mod Actual Size: 9.9 x 10 Full Page (back) ..................................... $750.00 6 col x 10 mod Actual Size: 9.9 x 20 P REMIUM P OSITIONS Front Page Bottom ............. $175.00 3 col x 2.5 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 5 INSIDE Page 2 ..................... $450.00 3 col x 10 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 20 Contact Joel or Kari to reserve your space today (850) 227-7847 (850) 370-6090 School hosts junior summer cheer camp Special to The Star The Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School varsity cheerleaders will be hosting a Cheer Camp for all children ages 3 through the fth grade. Registration is $35. The camp will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET July 16-18 at Oak Grove Assembly of God Church. There will be Pep Rally at 11:30 a.m. July 18 to showcase the skills learnedc. Youth will learn motion and jumps technique, two cheers, two chants, sideline dance and Xtreme routine. Snacks will be provided but each child will be responsible for a packed lunch. Registrations forms may be picked up and/or turned in to the school of ce or to any varsity cheerleader. T-shirts will be given to those registered by July 1. For any questions, email Lindsay Williams at lwilliams@gulf.K12. .us. PSJ clinches district tourney Special to The Star The Port St. Joe Ozone All-stars took the victory June 13 in the District 4 Ozone All-star Tournament. The tournament play for Port St. Joe began Friday night, June 8 against Wewahitchka, where Wewa took the game, 15-5, with three homeruns scoring 8 points to start off the game. Port St. Joe came back Sunday afternoon after rain cancelled Saturday nights play against Callaway with a win of 28-5 with Matthew Costin starting off on the mound. With Wewa overtaking Callaway on Monday, Callaway was eliminated from the tournament leaving the title between Wewa and St. Joe. Tuesday night found Elijah Hester on the mound for a six-inning battle. Wewa took the loss after Hester struck out the last batter for Wewa in the bottom of the sixth inning, closing out the game for a PSJ victory of 7-6. Travis Morrison hit Port St. Joes single homerun of the tournament during this game. The championship game was played Wednesday between St. Joe and Wewa with Blake Wood on the mound for an outstanding six innings. Port St. Joe took the championship with a victory over Wewa of 11-4. With this win, the PSJ Ozone All-stars will advance to the State Championship Tournament in Sebring, Fla., beginning July 6. Donations to help the team go to the State Tournament can be made to the Port St. Joe Ozone All-stars at Centennial Bank in Port St. Joe. Donations are greatly appreciated. SPECIAL TO THE STAR After the championship game against the Lynn Haven Rays on May 29, the Wewa Subway 14U baseball team nished their season by placing rst in the sophomore division of the Dizzy Dean County Tournament. Wewa Subways season record against Port St. Joe and other teams from Bay County was 9 and 1. Players in the front row are Kaleb Shiver, Caleb Clary, Buddy Wood, Charlie Laird, Chipper Wood and Austin Malcom. Back row includes Connor Mills, Cody Mills, Chance Harper, Chipper Gainnie, Peter Setterich, Cameron Jones and Cameron Lister, Manager Tony Muina and assistant coaches Kelan Setterich and Randy Harper. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE STAR Appearing in photo front row, from left, are Blake Wood, Cameron Harmon, Ethan LaFountaine, Bryce Johnston and Elijah Hester; second row, Matthew Costin, Kendre Gant, Brandon Brant, Trey Sanders, Travis Morrison, Gene Quinn; back row, assistant coach Charles Costin, manager Henry Hester and assistant coach Brad Johnston. Not pictured is Brooks Kennington. WEWA SUBWAY TEAM PLACES FIRST IN COUNTY TOURNAMENT

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A10 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, June 21, 2012 B Page 1 Section By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com The Panhandle is the palette Michael Lister paints with. Its everything, the Wewahitchka author said of the North Florida environment that drives his writing. Its the inspiration, and of course the area I write about. Its always in the background its the palette I paint with. Lister will be at Downtown Books in Apalachicola on Friday from 1 to 3 p.m. ET to speak about and sign copies of his new books Burnt Offerings and The Meaning of Life in Movies, and will also use the book signing as a way to give back to the environment. For every book he sells, Lister will donate $1 to the Apalachicola Riverkeepers, a nonpro t organization that strives to protect the areas natural water source. For Lister, who is on the board for the Riverkeepers, its about protecting the North Florida environment that serves as the backdrop for his novels. The environmental issues in this area are so important to me, he said. I grew up here and my family has been here for several generations. Listers latest novel Burnt Offerings is a serial killer thriller that tells the story of an exacting and methodical killer whose weapon is re, and only a wounded Florida Department of Law Enforcement agent and a retired Florida State religion professor have a chance at stopping him. Lister said reviewers have cited the book as multilayered, grisly, gripping and suspenseful, but most frequently intense. In the novel, Lister uses several points of view to tell the story, which leaves readers seeing through the eyes of the FDLE agent, the professor and the killer himself. Many, many scenes are from the killers point of view, Lister said. That way the readers get to see inside the mind of the killer. The novel is set in a ctitious version of the Apalachicola area called Bayshore near the barrier Special to The Star With a background that combines Career and Technical Education with the geography of Gulf and Franklin counties, Loretta Costin is ready to move Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/Franklin Campus to the foreground of everything residents of those two counties need in higher education. Ive seen this campus grow from the beginning. Now Im proud to be a part of it, and Im thrilled to be at home, said Costin, a Port St. Joe resident and the new director of the Gulf/Franklin Campus in Port St. Joe. Costin takes over June 25, and shes ready to expand Gulf Coast throughout the area. I want to reach out and talk with people in both counties, understand their goals and learn what else the college can do to meet their needs. Costin wants to discuss GCSCs part in the futures of every entity from the school districts to the chambers of commerce. This college provides such a great resource for this area, and theres always more we can do. Costin is focusing her efforts in three key areas, and shell be working to get more people on campus and the campus more in the minds of many demographics. I want to make sure that high school graduates know what we offer and that adults understand too, so that we can expand and meet the needs of these two groups, Costin said. Third, shes looking forward to being part of the ongoing solution for economic development and post-secondary programs at the Gulf/Franklin Campus. She knows well how to combine all the forces for success, having most recently served as Chief of Staff to the Commissioner of Education in the Florida Department of Education, where she oversaw all operational aspects of the agencys 85 employees and a budget of more than $500 million. Loretta will be a great addition to Gulf Coast State College, especially with her signi cant experience in education at the state level and her love of Gulf and Franklin counties, said GCSC President Dr. Jim Kerley. College names director Loretta Costin to take over Gulf/ Franklin Center on Monday Author Michael Lister to host book signing MICHAEL LISTER See LISTER B5 See DIRECTOR B5 VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Highland View gardener Bill Lynch holds a fresh yellow squash he picked that morning. Star Staff Report Despite the dry season, local gardener Bill Lynch is harvesting veggies by the bucketful. In late May, Lynch procured 10 buckets of yellow squash from his Highland View garden. Lynch, 85, suffered a heart attack in 1999 and is grateful for every day he can spend in his garden. You have to start all over like a little baby learn to walk and everything, Lynch said. But Im still here. The Lords been good to me. Lynch distributes the fruits and vegetables he harvests to the elderly people and close friends in his neighborhood. I just plant that stuff and raise it for my good friends, he said. Start the summer with squash by the bucketful By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Hidden in the 5,019 acres of the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve are 24 species of threatened and endangered plants, 20 known archaeological and historical sites, 18 natural ecological communities and 13 species of rare birds. The preserve provides a sanctuary for so many different species, a barrage of recreational opportunities in Gulf County and yet remains somehow hidden from public view. In a meeting held at the Buffer Preserve Center in Port St. Joe last week, a room full of state of cials, volunteers and area residents explored ways to better protect the future of those valuable 5,019 acres and raise awareness about what the preserve has to offer. The preserve was acquired for you, the citizens of Florida, said Preserve Manager Matt Green. Were here for you, the public of Florida. The meeting, organized by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, was held to present and receive input from the public on the draft management plan, which once adopted will guide the buffer preserve through its next decade of management. Green presented a list of seven goals for the preserve for the next 10 years, focused on restoring the areas natural hydrology, biodiversity and imperiled species, controlling invasive species, increasing protection of archaeological sites, expanding recreational access, and promoting coastal stewardship and scienti c research. Outreach is something I rmly believe in, said Green, who hopes to reach out to area schools and garner educational interest in the community. I want people to come to the preserve to learn how to build bird houses, to come learn about turpentine farms, to come learn to identify stars. Green said one of the main goals for the preserve in the next decade is to exHidden sanctuary Photos by BILL AND MARCIA BOOTHE | NatureinFocus.com A panorama of the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserves. St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve aims to protect nature and raise awareness See PRESERVE B5

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Society B2 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Hi, My name is Ryder and I live at the humane society with my brothers, sisters and lots of kitties and puppies. All of us love to play with the kids that come to visit and the ladies that take care of us are very sweet and we love them. But we all want a forever home to call our very own. If you can give us a safe and loving home, please contact our caretakers. We promise to love you furrever! Remember, June is Adopt a Cat Month We also need volunteers to help around the shelter. Donations of kitty litter is in great demand as well as puppy toys. Any donation no matter how small will be greatly appreciated. If you re unable to adopt at this time, perhaps you could foster or make a Donation. All pets adopted from SJBHS will be current on vaccinations and spayed/neutered. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications and pet photos are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. Our hors for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Faiths Thrift Hut is always in need of donations also, and all the proceeds go directly to support the animals in our care! The hours for the store are Thursday-Saturday from 10 am-3 pm. Volunteers are always welcome at both our store and our shelter! Our store and shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! Hope to see you all there soon! I f you are missing a pet or want to adopt a new pet, please check with your local Humane Society or Shelter. Follow us on Facebook: St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer L P ort S aint Joe area D esign professionals on premise C P rofessional I nstallation 2760 H W est P ort S aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $ 50 Off purchase of $ 750.00 or more T ile starting at C arpet starting at Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information MEDICARE PLANS EX CELLEN T COV ERA G E A N YO NE C AN AFFO RD TOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU Ross E. T ucker, Agent since 1981 Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter 850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005 www.tuckerlifehealth.com RE-ELECT LINDA WOOD SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 3 ITS ALL ABOUT THE KIDS Paid for and approved by Linda Wood, candidate for School Board District 3 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Heather L. Simmons and Nicholas A. Hall together with their families and friends are pleased to announce their engagement and forthcoming marriage. The bride-elect is a graduate of Florida State University-Panama City with a bachelors degree in civil engineering. She is the daughter of Wade and Cathy Simmons of Wewahitchka. The groom-elect is employed with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce as a K-9 deputy. He is the son of Glen and Sonjia Hall of Wewahitchka. A summer 2013 wedding date is expected. Food donations bene t seniors Star Staff Report Gulf County Senior Citizens, at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, asks for donations for low-income seniors of non-perishable foods such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for clients who love to play bingo several times a week. The group provides a hot, nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to meal sites. Anyone interested in coming in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items listed above may call Debbie at 229-8466. Sponsored ags to show area patriotism Special to The Star The GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc., in partnership with the Wewahitchka VFW Chapter 8285, invites everyone to show their patriotism by sponsoring an American ag that will be own on the light poles on State Road 71 in downtown Wewahitchka. The ags will be own for 10 days for Veterans Day. Fifty-two ags have been put in place, but about 75 have been sold. The remainder will be put up soon. The goal is to put up as many ags as possible to show patriotism and support to our military services. The group would like to thank Ralph Fisher and employees of Fishers Hardware for placing the ags. Flags can be purchased for $35, which will cover the cost of the 3by 5-foot American-made American ag, a rod and brackets to hang it, and an engraved plaque. The sponsor will have the option of either placing their name or business on the plaque or it can be in memory of a military veteran or active duty member of the Armed Forces or a loved one. Please specify this when ordering your ag. If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for this project, make your $35 check payable to GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc. Send your check to P.O. Box 94, GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc., Wewahitchka, FL 32465. For more information, call Patty Fisher at 639-9794. You may order as many ags as you like. Special to The Star Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders who live in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. The programs local councils are seeking additional volunteers to identify, investigate and resolve residents concerns. Special training and certi cation is provided. Those interested in protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents who often have no one else to advocate for them are encouraged to call toll-free 888-831-0404 or visit the programs website at http://ombudsman. my orida.com. Star Staff Report With summer here, its time to think about keeping children healthy while school is out. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board will provide free nutritionally balanced meals to children during the summer through the Summer Break Spot program. Meals will be served through Aug. 3 at the Washington Gym Complex, 414 E. Kenny St. in Port St. Joe. Lunch will be served from noon to 1 p.m. ET with a snack to follow from 2-2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed July 4-6 in observance of Independence Day). Gulf County children under the age of 18 regardless of race, color, sex, disability, age or national origin may come to eat. For more information, contact the Gulf Coast Workforce Board at 913-3285. For more information about the national Summer Food Service Program, visit www.fns.usda. gov/cnd/summer. Summer Break Spot program feeds kids for free Volunteer advocates needed to aid elders Engagement Simmons, Hall engaged

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School News The Star| B3 Thursday, June 21, 2012 (Ad#2012-55) ATTENTION RESIDENTS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Gulf County has been awarded Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding to provide Housing Re habilitation assistance for a minimum of ten (10) single-family housing units throughout the unincorporated areas (residences located outside of City Limits) of the County. Gulf County is currently accepting pre-applications from residents of the County that are interested in participating in the Countys CDBG Program. If you are interested in obtaining a pre-application, the County has made the pre-applications available at the following locations: you may request a pre-application or additional information by contacting either Towan Kopinsky at (850) 229-6106 or Jeffrey C. Winter at (904) 264-6203. Upon completion, pre-applications must be submitted to Towan Kopinsky, Grant Coordinator, at the Robert Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Room #312 or Room #301, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. ALL PRE-APPLICATIONS ARE DUE NO LATER THAN 2:00 P.M., E.T. ON JUNE 28, 2012. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer, Handicapped Accessible and Fair Housing Jurisdiction. Robert Moore Administration Building Room #312 or Room #301 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Port St. Joe Health Department 2475 Garrison Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Wewahitchka Health Department 807 West Highway 22 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Gulf County Public Library 110 Library Drive Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Charles Whitehead Public Library 314 North 2nd Street Wewahitchka, FL 32465 TM 1-850-309-1996 shredit.com 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 P ACKAGE ST O RE & LO UNGE GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR F AVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRIT S WWW.L OO K O UTL O UNGE.C O M U PC O MING E VENT S GO URMET BY THE B AY NO W SERVING SATUR D AY N IGHT S FR O M 7 PM TIL 3 AM LO CATE D IN THE LOO K O UT R EAR P ARKING LO T K ARA O KE & DJ IN THE CROWS N EST W EDNESDAY THRU S ATURDAY 9PM ET R ANDY S TARK WITH A RT LONG FRIDAY & S ATURDAY 7PM ET T HUR SD AY N IGHT SUMMER M U S IC SERIE S 7PM E ach W eek JUNE 21ST PANA M A R ED JUNE 28TH H O LL Y A DKINS & L UKE JU L Y 12TH TY L ER B USH JU L Y 5TH BRIAN BOWEN JU L Y 12TH T Y L ER BUSH JU L Y 19TH T HE CURRYS New Sorrelli Arriving Daily! Over 35 Years Experience. 208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe 850.229.1111 www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Special to The Star From: Carla May The parents of the Port St. Joe High School graduating class of 2012 held an all night, drugand alcoholfree, lock-in celebration for this years graduating seniors on May 24. After graduation, the seniors met at the PSJHS to ride a school bus over to Rock It Lanes on Panama City Beach. The seniors were treated to unlimited bowling, pool, roller skating, pizza and soft drinks. The parents added to the fun of the evening by including bowling and pool tournaments. Alex King and Katie Lacour were the winners of the Bowling Tournament, Nick Dickinson and Oneika Lockley were runners-up. Lacour and Daniel Neal were the winners of the pool tournament, and Sam Taylor and Arion Ward were the runners-up. The parents also hosted a fastest skater competition. Daniel May and Autumn Haynes were the fastest speed skaters. The seniors received door prizes throughout the evening provided by the generous donation of businesses in Port St. Joe, and Apalachicola. Each senior also received two different Port St. Joe Sharks T-shirts, a Sharks blanket and a Bible. The local area churches presented the Bibles during their morning churches services, and helped to provide the funding for the purchase of the Bibles. National statistics show that graduates are at a higher risk of accidents on graduation night than any other time in their lives. Project Graduation is an all-night, drugand alcoholfree, lock-in celebration for graduating seniors that is endorsed by Florida Law Enforcement agencies, drug and alcohol prevention programs and local community organizations. In 1985, Project Graduation began in our community as a way of not only offering an evening free of drinking and driving, but a celebration with fellow classmates under the watchful eye of proud parents. Project Graduation at Port St. Joe High School has always been successful because of the generous support of our business community. The grateful parents of this years graduating Class at Port St. Joe High School wish to thank the businesses and individuals for their generous support. Without your help, we would not have been able to provide Project Graduation. Thank You. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe High School Odyssey of the Mind Team wishes to thank the following businesses, groups, and individuals that gave donations to help send our team to World Finals Competition at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. The team finished 24th out of 55 teams at World Finals. Thanks to the following: George M. Cox, First United Methodist Church Care Closet, Leonard Costin, John C. Gainous VFW Post No. 10069, John C. Gainous VFW Post No. 10069, Ladies Auxiliary, John C. Gainous VFW Post No. 10069, Mens Auxiliary, Farnsley and Johnston Wealth Management, Frank D. May, DMD, PA, Natalie Shoaf, Integrity Therapy Services, Bradley and Joanne Buzzett, Preble Rish, Gulf Alliance for Local Arts, Bluewater/Met Group, John and Linda Wright, John Hanlon, Leslie and Andrea Heard, Ronald Shaeffer, Mrs. Toya B. Bream, Ron Lucht, Haughty Heron, Bo Spring, Port Inn/Thirsty Goat, Wood Fisheries, Lions Club of Port St. Joe and the Gulf County School Board. Thank you also to all who attended our Odyssey of the Mind fundraising events and purchased raffle tickets. We would not have been able to compete without your tremendous support. Special to The Star The 21st Century Summer Enrichment Program will put on a free production of the play The Emperors New Clothes at 10 a.m. ET June 28 in the Port St. Joe Elementary School Auditorium. The play is free and open to the public. Come out and see our students hard work. Special to The Star Correctional Officer Basic Standards Class 215 recently graduated from the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College. Each student completed 420 classroom hours of training to prepare them to become correctional officers in any state, county or private correctional facility in the State of Florida. Pictured left to right, front row: John Paul Helms, Port St. Joe; Rita Massey, Carrabelle; Nita Massey, Carrabelle; Tomilee Babb, Carrabelle; Danielle Davis, Apalachicola. Back row: Donald Swanson, instructor; C. J. Massey, Bloxham; Tristan Davis, Port St. Joe; Jackie Rowland, Apalachicola; Joyce Thomas, Apalachicola; Clarke Joyner, Corrections Coordinator. The next class is scheduled for July at the Gulf/Franklin Campus and anyone interested can call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 for more information. Port St. Joe High School Project Graduation 2012 a great success Summer Enrichment Program presents The Emperors New Clothes OM TEAM THANKS SPONSORS TO WORLD FINALS CORRECTIONAL CLASS GRADUATES FREE PRODUCTION

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FAITH Thursday, June 21, 2012 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SUNDAY : WOR S HIP AT SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM 11 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BI B LE CLA SS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE T IME 9 11 AM M ONDAY : L IFE T REE CAF 7 PM W EDNE S DAY : MEN S B I B LE S TUDY 8 AM & WOMEN S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 Mary Alice Lyons, 88, died June 15 in Panama City at Gulf Coast Medical Center. Mrs. Lyons was born in Milton, Florida to the late W.E. Hinote and Alice Pendleton Hinote. She was married to Cecil H. Lyons for 53 years before his death in 1995. Mary Alice enjoyed playing golf at the St. Joseph Bay Country Club, playing Yahtzee and dominoes with her friends and she devoted her life to her family and friends especially her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. She is also preceded in death by two brothers, Jewel and Terry Hinote; and two sisters, Selma Gandy and Naomi Griffin. Her survivors include one son, Cecil H. Lyons, Jr. and his wife Beth of Port St. Joe; two daughters, Marnie Valent and her husband Gerry of Miami and Catherine Collier and her husband Phil of Port St. Joe; grandchildren Cecil H. Lyons III, Holly Porter and her husband Ron, Michael Mock and his wife Carla, Chris Mock and his wife Joni and Shanna Watson and her husband Bryan; greatgrandchildren, Justin Lyons, Haley, Kamron and Regan Porter, Colton Johnson and Harleigh Mock, Brody and Isla Mock and Brynleigh Watson; a sister, Ruth Casey and her husband Norman; two brothers, David Hinote and Harold Hinote and wife Gail;, numerous nieces and nephews and a host of friends. Funeral services for Mrs. Lyons were at 11 a.m. ET Monday, June 18 at the First United Methodist Church in Port St. Joe with the Reverend Mac Fulcher of ciating, with internment at Holly Hill Cemetery following. Condolences can be made or viewed on our website www.southerlandfamily.com Services were arranged by Southerland Family Funeral Home, 100 E. 19th St., Panama City, FL 32405, 785-8532. Mary Alice Lyons 1932-2012 Mary Louise Law Marshall peacefully departed her family on the sunny morning of June 9, 2012. Mary Lou was born in Tarkio, Mo. on July 23, 1932 to Mabel Law as her only child. She was a fouryear National Honor Society graduate and valedictorian of her Tarkio High School class. She was accepted to and graduated from Washington University School of Nursing in St. Louis, Mo. During her career of nursing in Cape Girardeau, Mo., she met her sweetheart, Harold D. Marshall, Sr. of Morehouse, Mo. They were married June 1, 1955 at the First Baptist Church of Holly Springs, Miss. As the rst nursing home administrator and a geriatric specialist of Beaulieu Nursing Home in Newnan, Ga., she played an important role in providing quality care for the elderly and teaching geriatrics. Mary Lou served as a member of the Nursing Home Licensing Board for the State of Georgia under two governors before she retired to Port St. Joe, Fla. Mary Lou is survived by her husband of 57 years, Harold D. Marshall, Sr.; daughter, Marci Marshall Duncan of Bradenton, Fla.; daughter, Linda Marshall Estes of Okeechobee, Fla.; son, Harold D. Marshall, Jr. of Port St. Joe, Fla.; and granddaughter, Stephanie Duncan Okuley of Tampa, Fla. In lieu of owers please send private donations to the Alzheimers Association, www.alz.org. Services were arranged by Kent Forest Lawn Funeral Home, 2403 Harrison Ave., Panama City Mary Louise Law Marshall MARY LOUISE LAW MARSHALL Revival services at Philadelphia Primitive Revival Services will be at 7:30 p.m. July 9-13 at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church. The Elder Keith Cloud of Gretna will be the evangelist for the week. Pastor Jessie Hawkins and the Philadelphia Church congregation extend a cordial invitation to the Port St. Joe and other communities, to come and be blessed through the power of Gods holy word. The Church is on Avenue D in Port St. Joe. Faith BRIEFS Joshua needed Gods presence to succeed as the leader of the Jews. But then, so does every leader, while each is paying their dues. Younger ones need it more so, while trying to learn to lead. Many times they want to push, but in some cases fail to succeed. If you dont wait for the Lord to lead, youll probably spin your wheels my friend. I know because Ive seen it happen, over and over again. Dont try to get ahead of God, that will not take place. If you try, theres a pretty good chance youll fall at on your face. If you read the Word, and be obedient to God in all you do. I dont see a reason in the world that you cant be a leader too. Billy Johnson Obituaries Do you feel called to be a leader? Special to The Star Faith Christian School K4 students read! FCS students learn to read with an introduction to phonics. Developing a strong foundation with the FCS curriculum creates a bridge that helps students obtain a better understanding of written language. Phonics can help students break down words with certain sounds, and children that can sound out a word have an enormous advantage when reading. This skill branches into all academics, and gives students the tools to succeed. Every child deserves the opportunity to become a good reader. Open enrollment for new students has begun for the 20122013 school year. Class sizes are limited so early registration is recommended. Call 229-6707 or visit www. FaithChristianPSJ.net for more information. The Lions Tale SCHOOL NEWS Faith Christian School enrollment open for 2012-13 school year

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, June 21, 2012 The Star| B5 Lighthouse Utilities Company Inc. P .O. Box # 428 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0428 (850) 227-7427 2011 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report This report will be mailed to customers only upon request and is also available at 2010 County Road C-30 upon request. Were very pleased to provide you with this years Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is ground water from 2 wells that draw from the Floridan Aquifer. Our water is aerated to remove minerals and gases then chlorinated for disinfection purposes. In 2011, the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system and a search of the data sources indicated no potential sources of contamination near our wells. The assessment results are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at We are pleased to report that our drinking water meets all federal and state requirements. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact James R. Simmons @ 850-227-7427. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. Lighthouse Utilities Co., Inc. routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 201 1. Data obtained before January 1, 2011, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. follow. study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. ND means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis. This report shows our water quality results and what they mean. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. (B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. (C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. (E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agencys Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. In our continuing efforts to maintain a safe and dependable water supply, it may be necessary to make improvements in your water system. The Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Lighthouse Utilities Co., Inc. is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. We at Lighthouse Utilities Company Inc. would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to insuring the quality of your water. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel free to call any of the numbers listed. island of Pine Key, which is loosely based on St. George Island. Its pretty subtle, Lister said of the connection. It is a ctitious town, but it is based on Apalachicola. Growing up in Wewahi tchka, Lister spent many summers and weekends visiting relatives in Apala chicola and on St. George Island. Its an area he knows well, and he wanted to cap ture both the environmental and personal aspects of in Burnt Offerings. Its denitely the envi ronment, but its also the people, Lister said. I do try to capture the people of the area their jobs, their attitudes. Listers older novels also will be for sale at tomorrows signing. All of his books are available in e-book format on Amazon.com and on audio book from Audible.com. He is set to release an other novel, Split Sacrice, this Halloween. Lister said he hopes to morrows book signing will help support the effort to protect the areas natural waterways and the envi ronment he paints with his words. North Florida is what I love and North Florida is what I write about, he said. LISTER from page B1 Costins experience as Vice Chancellor for the Flor idas Division of Workforce Education involved working with business and industry to develop program standards for career and technical edu cation, adult education and registered apprenticeship programs. As Chancellor for the Division of Career and Adult Education at DOE, she was responsible for working with business and industry leaders to ensure Florida has the skilled workforce needed to grow and diversify its economy. The local economy is just one area where GCSC can make a unique contribution. Any time the Port Author ity or the economic devel opment folks are meeting with an industry or business interested in relocating, the college needs to be at the table, because whenever a company is looking at an area, they want to know if there are talented people and an educated workforce. DIRECTOR from page B1 pand recreational access to the park where appropriate. While the park already offers parking areas and biking and walking trails, Green said they hope to expand those trails in the future and also incorpo rate overnight camp sites and paddling trails in the bay. Preservation and pro tection of the land was also an important issue Green discussed, focusing on the preserves many natural aspects that are unique to the area. He said the preserve has such an abundance of rare plant species because it has remained in its natu ral state, and the historical sites are also important to protect because they pro vide valuable information on earlier cultures. Further research will be promoted in the future to aid in the preservation of the buffer preserve land. We want to promote research thats going to sustain the area, Green said. And the research we have, we need to continue to share it. Pam Phillips, a public information ofcer for the Coastal and Aquatic Man aged Areas (CAMA) said these public meetings are held so the DEP can in corporate public feedback into the draft management plan. We dont have any real hot spots, Phillips said. People just want to make sure were protecting the area. The comments have all been very positive. Phillips said promoting awareness of the area can help increase tourism, ecotourism in particular, in the area. Were related a lot to the economic drivers and the tourism industry in the area, Phillips said. We want a healthy economy and a healthy environment they go hand in hand. PRESERVE from page B1

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 Trades & Services 227-7847 GET YOUR AD IN Services C A LL T ODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite 850-229-9663 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance G ET YOUR AD IN C A LL TODAY 227-7847 Star Staff Report The Gulf County Public Transportation Department, located at the Gulf County ARC Building on Industrial Road, is now accepting new riders. Gulf County Public Transportation provides free transport for Medicaid patients in the county and those who do not otherwise have access to their own form of transportation. We transport county residents to doctors appointments, social security of ces, grocery stores when they cant get there themselves, Gulf Transportation Director Kathy Balentine said. We want to prioritize the medical trips, but were de nitely also able to provide those other trips. She said the transportation service makes a trip to Panama City at least once every day, with trips to dialysis centers in Port St. Joe and Panama City three times per week. The service is also available to make longer medical trips. The ARC has a eet of 12 vehicles, most of which are wheelchair-accessible. We want to get the word out to anybody in need, Balentine said. Right now were serving about 500 individual riders each year, but wed like to expand that if we could. The Gulf County Association of Retarded Citizens was developed in 1976 to serve the developmentally disabled adults in the community. The ARC was designated the community transportation hub in 1990. For more information, please contact the Gulf County Transportation Department at 229-6550. Those interested in becoming a new rider must rst complete an eligibility application. Medicaid patients are automatically eligible. Gulf County taking new riders Bahiagrass is a popular, lowmaintenance lawn grass that does well with limited water and fertilizer inputs. Although bahiagrass does not produce a carpet-like, dense lawn like some other warmseason lawn grasses, it does provide a good, low-maintenance lawn where slightly reduced visual quality is acceptable. Before I go any further, I need to say that if you live along the coast, youd be better off growing another kind of lawn grass. Bahiagrass is not tolerant to salt spray, so it doesnt grow well in coastal Florida. Bahiagrass needs a fairly acidic soil with a pH range of 5.5 to 6.2. If you try to grow bahiagrass in alkaline soil, the minor elements in the soil will be tied up in forms that are unavailable to the grass. If your bahiagrass isnt getting enough of the minor elements, it may turn yellow. There are three varieties of bahiagrass sold for home lawns: Argentine, common and Pensacola. Argentine is considered the best variety for lawns. Its leaves are dark green, long, narrow and closelyspaced, so it produces a very dense sod with good color. Argentine responds well to fertilization, and its the most disease resistant bahia variety. Pensacola is the second best bahiagrass for lawns. Its also a long, narrow-leafed grass. Pensacola is the grass you see most often along roadsides in Florida. Common bahia is the poorest type available. Because of its coarse texture and wide spacing, it produces thin, loose sod, so it isnt recommended for use as a lawn grass. One of the nice things about bahiagrass is that it can be planted from seed or by sod. Seed is easier and less expensive than sod, but of course, it also takes longer for your lawn to become established. The best time to seed a bahia lawn is from April to June, just before the rainy season. Planting at this time will give your bahiagrass a head start and a full seasons growth before the cold weather comes. Spring and summer are also the best time to sod your lawn. The fact that bahiagrass does grow from seed can be a disadvantage. Bahiagrass produces tall unsightly seed heads in the lawn from May through November. These seed stalks make mowing more dif cult, and to have an attractive lawn, you need to mow more often. As I said earlier, bahiagrass is the most tolerant of all the Florida lawn grasses to insects, diseases and nematodes. However, it is plagued by the mole cricket. The mole cricket is a burrowing insect that damages roots. In summary, bahiagrass is an ideal selection if you live away from the coastal area of our county. It can withstand heavy traf c and prolonged drought with damage. Bahiagrass can be grown from seed or sod and makes a dense, deep-rooted lawn grass. It also has fair shade tolerance and can withstand cold temperature. My information was provided by extension turf grass specialist Dr. Brian Unruh of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, located at the Jay REC. For more information on bahiagrass lawns, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas.u .edu. Bahiagrass an economical lawn grass ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Right now were serving about 500 individual riders each year, but wed like to expand that if we could. Kathy Balentine Gulf County transportation director

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 21, 2012 The Star | B7 D & B Home Repairs Inc.Featuring Seamless Gutters. Assorted colors also available. Call 850-340-0605 Text FL10773 to 56654 Wewahitchka Infant Care -$90 Weekly or $25 Daily. Call 850-899-0397 Spot Advertising works! BP Claims ProgramThis communication includes new information and claims procedures for individuals and businesses The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana has granted preliminary apby the terms of the settlement unless the class member timely exercises the class member’s right Access to forms All claim forms for the BP Claims Program must be submitted in one of the following ways: By mail: By email: By fax: Additional information: Online: By Phone: For any claims under OPA that are denied or that are not resolved within 90 days after the date of submission to the BP Claims Program the claimant may, provided presentment and other requirethe NPFC, US Coast Guard Stop 7100 (ca), 4200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1000, Arlington, Virginia 20598-7100 for consideration. The NPFC may be contacted at 1-800-280-7118. 87538S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 482 Application No. 2012-25 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 01888-180R Description of Property: Commence at a 4” square concrete monument marking the Southwest Corner of Oak Gardens Unit II, according to the official map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 20, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida; thence North 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 43 Seconds West along the West, boundary line of Oak Gardens Unit II, 10.00 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 48 Seconds West, along the Northerly right of way boundary line of Pridgeon Street, 114.00 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning, continue South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 48 Seconds West, 50.00 feet; thence leaving said right of way boundary line, North 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 43 Seconds West, 105.00 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 48 Seconds East, 50.00 feet; thence South 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 43 Seconds East, 105.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel having an area of 0.12 acres, more or less. Name in which assessed: Taunton Development Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday ,the 18th day of July, 2012. Dated this 12th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2012 87394S PUBLIC NOTICE On May 15, 2012, an application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, D.C., requesting its consent to the assignment of license of Station WPBH(FM), Port St. Joe, Florida (93.5 MHz), from the Aloha Station Trust, LLC to Omni Broadcasting, LLC. The sole member of the Assignor, the Aloha Station Trust, LLC, is Jeanette Tully. The officers, directors, and members owning more than a 10% interest in the Assignee, Omni Broadcasting, LLC, are Ron H. Hale, Jr., James F. Hale, and Jennifer F. Hale. A copy of the application is on file for public inspection at 1834 Lisenby Avenue, Panama City, Florida, during normal business hours. May 31, 2012 June 7, 14, 21, 2012 87540S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 349 Application No. 2012-26 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 01511-060R Description of Property: Commence at the Northeast Corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 2, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence run North 89 degrees 50 minutes 50 seconds West, along the Northerly Boundary line of said Section 2, for a distance of 492.15 feet; thence leaving said Northerly Boundary line of Section 2, run South 00 degrees 28 minutes 57 seconds West for a distance of 37.58 feet to the approximate Southerly Right-of-Way line of Kate Glass Road per County maintenance and occupation for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning, thence continue South 00 degrees 28 minutes 57 seconds West for a distance of 218.00 feet; thence run North 89 degrees 31 minutes 02 seconds West for a distance of 100.00 feet; thence run North 00 degrees 28 minutes 57 seconds East for a distance of 218.00 feet to the aforesaid approximate Southerly Right-of-Way line of Kate Glass Road per County maintenance and occupation; thence run South 89 degrees 31 minutes 02 seconds East along said approximate Southerly Right-of-Way line, for a distance of 100.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being a portion of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 2, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and having an area of 0.500 Acres, more or less. Name in which assessed: Harold C Lester & Robin L. Lester. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday ,the 18th day of July, 2012. Dated this 12th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2012 87544S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1035 Application No. 2012-28 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 03451-015R Description of Property: Lot 3, Block B of Wetappo Creek Estates, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 7, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Gary D.McPherson & Jaronia McPherson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday ,the 18th day of July, 2012. Dated this 12th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2012 87542S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1351 Application No. 2012-27 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 05444-010R Description of Property: Lot 6, Block 89, according to the Official map of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Steven P. Kerigan All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday ,the 18th day of July, 2012. Dated this 12th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2012 87711S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 319 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-21 R.E. No. 01785-010R Description of Property: COMMENCING at the NW. Corner of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence run East 402 feet to the South side of Old Panama City Wewahitchka Public Road; thence run 316.8 feet, more or less, Southeasterly along the Southern boundary line of said Public Road, for POINT OF BEGINNING, thence running due South to an Iron Pipe, which iron pipe is 135 yards South of the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence run East 85 yards, thence run South 85 yards, thence run West 85 yards, thence run North 85 yards to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 1 1/2 acres, more or fees. And being in the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. LESS AND EXCEPT: That Deeded to Odell Jones, as per Deed recorded in O. R. Book 81, Page 524, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. (Now owned by Augusta C. Russ, as per Deed recorded in O. R. Book 361, Page 256, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, Having a Parcel ID#01785-002R). PARCEL NO. II: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence run East 402 feat, to the Old Panama City Wewahitchka Public Road, thence in a Southeasterly direction along the Southerly side of said Public Road 647.4 feet. thence run South 250 feet, for a POINT OF BEGINNING, thence West 75 feet, thence South 237 1/2 feet. thence East 75 feet, thence North 237 1/2 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. All in the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West. Name in which assessed: Gwendolyn Jackson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012. Dated this 5th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Jun 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 87713S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Seybold, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certifi-cate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 290 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-22 R.E. No. 01570-100R Description of Property: A portion of Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the NW. Comer of said Section 11, thence along the North line of said Section 11, South 89 Degrees 57 Minutes 59 Seconds East for 1168.83 feet, thence South 00 Degrees 02 Minutes 01 Second West for 44.48 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence South 13 Degrees 25 Minutes 03 Seconds West for 560.00 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 34 Minutes 57 Seconds West for 560.00 feet; thence North 73 degrees 25 Minutes 03 Seconds East for 560.00 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: A non-exclusive perpetual easement on, over and across the following description: A portion of Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of said Section 11, thence along the North line of said Section 11, South 89 Degrees 57 Minutes 59 Seconds East for 1016.06 feet to a point on the Southwesterly R/W line of Stone Mill Creek Road, said point being on the arc of a non-tangent curve concave to the NE; thence Southeasterly along said Southwesterly R/W line along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 768.00 feet, a central angle of 02 Degrees 21 Minutes 18 Seconds, an arc distance of 31.57 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING (chord to said curve bears South 70 Degrees 58 Minutes 50 Seconds East for 31.57 feet) thence continue Southeasterly along said R/W line along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 768.00 feet, through a central angle of 13 Degrees 24 Minutes 43 Seconds, an arc distance of 179.77 feet (chord to said curve bears South 78 Degrees 51 Minutes 51 Seconds East for 179.36 feet), thence leaving said R/W line North 89 Degrees 37 Minutes 01 Second West for 153.17 feet; thence South 13 Degrees 25 Minutes 03 Seconds West for 481.14 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 34 Minutes 57 Seconds West for 34.64 feet, thence North 13 Degrees 25 Minutes 03 Seconds East for 491.22 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: AT & T Wireless Services of Florida, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012. Dated this 5th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Jun 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 87715S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Seybold, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certifi-cate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 25 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-23 R.E. No. 00334-048R Description of Property: The South 1/2 of Lot 5, Block 5, of Howard Creek Properties, an unrecorded Subdivision of that portion of the West 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying South of State Road No. S-387; Also described as follows: COMMENCE at the Southeast Corner of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence North 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds West along the South line of said Section 5 for 20 feet; thence North 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds East parallel with the East line of said SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 for 250 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue North 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 75 feet, thence North 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds West for 140 feet; thence South 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds West for 75 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds East for 140 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: The North 1/2 of the East 1/2 of Lot #6, Block 5, Howard Creek Properties, an unrecorded Subdivision of that portion of the West 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying South of State Road No. S-387; also described as follows: COMMENCE at the Southeast Corner of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence North 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds West along the South line of said Section 5 for 20 feet; thence North 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds East parallel with the East line of said, SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 for 175 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue North 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 75 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds West for 140 feet, thence South 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds West for 75 feet, thence South 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds East for 140 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: James E. Watford, Jr. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012. Dated this 5th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Jun 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 87795S PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES City of Port St. Joe, Florida RFP No. 2012-02 **Re-Advertisement** The City of Port St. Joe is requesting sealed bids through June 29, 2012 at 3:00 PM, ET, from qualified Information Technology Companies to conduct Computer Hardware and Software Services for all City Computer Systems as needed. The preferred Company will be knowledgeable in local and state governmental regulations, Dell Hardware, MUNIS Software, VMware Esxi 3 & 4, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Terminal Server 2008 R2, Linux Enterprises 5, Postfix & Dovecot Mail Server, Enterasys Expedition series routers, Layer 3 managed network switching, CC Proxy internet proxy and certification in CJIS Security & Awareness Testing. A Certificate of Liability Insurance of $1,000,000 for General Liability must also be included in the bid proposal. All previous bidders must re-submit a bid proposal to qualify. Statements of proposals with an original signature and 3 copies should be submitted to: City of Port St. Joe 305 Cecil Costin Sr., Blvd Port St. Joe, FL. 32456 Bids must be clearly marked “RFP #2012-02 Information Technology Services.” The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid in their judgment will be in their best interest. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. Questions regarding this solicitation may be addressed to: Charlotte Pierce, City Clerk City of Port St. Joe (850)229-8261 Ext 129 June 14, 21, 2012 87715S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Seybold, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certifi-cate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 797 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-24 R.E. No. 03391-011R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, and running South along 40 line for 120 feet; thence turn right and run West for 350 feet to County Road, thence turn left and run South for 120 feet along right of way of County Road; thence run East for 350 feet to the West line of the SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said Section, thence run North for 120 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING Name in which assessed: Valerie Dodds All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012. Dated this 5th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Jun 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 87847S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-104-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, An Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Bayside Savings Bank, Plaintiff, vs. S & M PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, MICHAEL L. BURKETT, a/k/a MICHAEL L. BURKETT JR., CHARLES A. DAVIS, a/k/a CHARLES ALLEN DAVIS, STEPHANIE M. DAVIS, a/k/a STEPHANIE MARIE DAVIS, and unknown tenants or other unknown persons in possession, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: MICHAEL L. BURKETT, JR. AND UNKNOWN TENANTS OR OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS IN POSSESSION YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property in GULF County, Florida: Commencing at the Northwest corner of Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, and run South for 320 feet to south line of County Road, thence run East for 334 feet to Point of Beginning, thence continue to run East for 236 feet, thence run South for 325 feet, thence run West 236 feet, thence run North for 325 feet to the Point of Beginning, same lying and being in Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., the plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on or before 30 days of the last date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this Court, BECKY NORRIS, Gulf County Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, either before service on the plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 8th day of June, 2012. BECKY NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk June 21, 28, 2012 87799S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2012-04 CITY OF PORT ST. JOE SEWER GRINDER PUMP STATIONS JUNE 2012 This project includes supplying grinder pumps stations for the City’s low pressure sewage system. The grinder stations will be purchased by the City for a set unit price in multiples of 5. This contract price shall be in effect for two years. Contract Documents and Specifications can be obtained at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850)229-8261 or by visiting the City’s web site at www. cityofportstjoe.com.The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Bids will be received until 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time, on July 13. 2012 at City of Port St. Joe. City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe. Florida 32456 and will be opened and read publicly Immediately thereafter. All bids shall be submitted in an envelope clearly marked “Sealed BidCity of Port St. Joe Sewer Grinder Pump Stations June 2012”. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to reject any and all bids. All bids shall be firm for a period of 60 days after opening. June 14, 21, 2012 87887S PUBLIC NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1112-22 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in purchasing the following: MINITOR V PAGERS OR EQUIVALENT Specifications may be obtained from the Clerk’s Office in the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd. Room 148 Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Interested parties should contact Brad Price for additional information at (850) 227-8353. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, June 29, 2012. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, July 2, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: WILLIAM C. WILLIAMS, III CHAIRMAN ATTEST:

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B8| The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373 Retail / Of ce Space143 Acklins Island Drive-Cape San Blas+/1000sf; $10 psf mod gross; high visibility on Cape San Blas Road ; available May 1st212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-4915,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/3,600sf; Can be subdivided; $1250 per month 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 219 Reid Avenue Of ce/Retail;+/-5400 sf; sub dividable $7 psf mod gross (former Goodwill) 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 235 W. Gulf Beach Drive St. George Island Of ce/Retail;+/-800sf-1800;$14psfmod gross 401 Cecil G Costin Of ce; +/-2,000sf-5,250sf; high level of nish; move in ready, ask rate $9.00psf-$13.00psf mod-grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98+/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 separate storage units availableFor Sale217 W. River Road Wewahitchka+/-9,000sf; retail building; next to Rich's IGA; +/-1 acre; on-site; avail for lease; inquire for terms. $500,000223 Monument Avenue Four city lots fronting Hwy 98; $375,000 Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina DriveCorner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for detailsMarina Cove Lots 12, 13, & 14; $375,000 PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive St. George Island Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; $399,000 RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark, Remodeled, Inc. Water ......................$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark ............................................................$400 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED Doublewide.....................................................$700 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, WATER VIEW HOME Unfurnished, Lawn Inc. ...................................$800 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Small Porch ....................................................$375 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, MOBILE HOME Large Yard ......................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS Outside Sales Representative An exciting opportunity now exists to join The News Herald. We are searching for enthusiastic, hard-working, and driven Outside Sales Representatives to join our team! Job Description The News Herald is looking for motivated sales professionals to establish footholds in their local markets by providing products and services to businesses. The Outside Sales Representative’s duties may include but are not limited to:  Cold call and prospect new territory opportunities.  Introduce business owners to programs via presentation, answer detailed questions and maintain that relationship. Requirements  Have strong work ethic  Experience presenting advertising materials to a variety of businesses  Cold calling experience  Reliable Transportation  Experience handling warm leads and prospecting for new leads.  Field Sales, Business to Business Sales (B2B), Inside Sales, Outside Sales, or Outbound Sales experience ( Preferred) We Offer:  Room for advancement and career opportunity  Dynamic Monthly Residual Compensation  Bonus programs  Introductory and Ongoing Training  Business Materials including phone, laptop and IPad, business cards, sales material and product knowledge information The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: Sales/Business DevInteractive Sales ManagerAre you passionate about providing the best media solutions to your customers? Florida’s Freedom Interactive Newspapers, is seeking a hands-on Interactive Sales Manager with a track record of driving revenue in multiplatform environments. You will be responsible for coaching, mentoring and developing your sales team with the goal of aggressively increasing revenue. Included within your sphere of responsibility are the following: Developing new revenue streams, setting sales goals, field coaching and managing sales performance -making this a very “hands on” leadership role. The Interactive Sales Manager will foster an attitude of exceptional customer service and provide motivation, leadership and fresh ideas to the selling process. Position Requirements: Proven sales experience in digital products Experience developing and leading a high performing sales team Vision and passion to drive growth in interactive sales Strong analytical ability to budget forecast and effectively utilize market research The successful candidate will lead cross-selling efforts in print and digital solutions and must possess a demonstrated expertise with the Internet. A college degree in advertising or marketing is preferred but not required. Sales Experience and previous media management experience is preferred. Florida Freedom offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. This role offers a chance to live and work along Florida’s Emerald Coast encompassing 24 miles of pristine white-sand beaches stretching along the Gulf of Mexico. If this sounds like the right mix of challenge and opportunity, please e-mail your resume or contact me at either of the following addresses: E-Mail: sfeith@notes.freedom.com http://www.facebook.com/#!/skfeith http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=1999909&trk =tab_pro https://twitter.com/#!/skfeith For more information about our organization please go to: freedom.com/careers Web ID#: 34211062 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK HUMAN RESOURCES: 13300 Allanton Road, Panama City, FL 32404 (850) 522-7413 € Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplacean aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS € STRUCTURAL WELDERS PIPE WELDERS € PIPEFITTERSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following positions:Utility Service Worker … Public Works DepartmentPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on June 29, 2012. The entry level salary for a Utility Service Worker will be $12.08 per hr. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position:Full time Police Of“ cerPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on June 29, 2012. The entry level salary for a Police Of“ cer will be $15.50 per hr. not including bene“ ts. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. C L E A N E R S CLEANERS N E E D E D NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 FOR SALE COMMERCIAL LOT522 3rd St, $59,000. Call (850) 227-8820 or email: gene@gm19.com. Text FL13756 to 56654 Tahoe Cascade 2004 24’ 50hp yamaha motor good condition, boat in fair condition. Comes with cover $3,800 OBO SOLD!!!!!! Text FL11522 to 56654 3 bedroom house for rent $750.; 2761 Oak Grove Ave, Port St. Joe, FL; 227-7800. FOR RENT: 2br, 2 ba 14 x 70 Mobile Home. C/H/A, no pets $550 month + $500 dd 850-229-6495 WEWAClean 3 bedroom 2 bath. Central heat and air. $525 per month plus security deposit. 850-639-5721 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Licensed Lab Tech Admin Asst. PT Registration Clerk EMT Paramedic RN LPN Applications are available at:www weemsmemorial.com &may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34213452 Medical/HealthOPS Dental AssistantThe Gulf County Health Dept, an EO/AA/VP Employer, has one opening for a full-time, OPS Dental Assistant (No Benefits Assigned). Starting Salary: $10.50 -$12.00 hourly, based on experience. Fingerprinting and Emergency Duties Required. Dental Assistant Certification or Expanded Duties Required. For more info, contact Lesia McDaniel at (850) 227-1276, ext. 149. Electronic applications only for this position; refer to Requisition Number 64923165. Closing date 07/06/12. Apply at: peoplefirst.myflorida.co m for assistance, contact: People First at 877-562-7287 Web-Id 34214105 Text FL14105 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications *Full-time front desk clerk w/great benefits. *Part-time seasonal housecleaning inspectors. Both positions require weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $25/Box! Shipping prepaid. (888) 883-8835 Port St. Joe, 506 8th St. Fri & Sat, 8-4Yard SaleBlue Willow dishes, pictures, handcarved fishing lures, ashtrays, lots more! Text 14164 to 56654 REBECCA NORRIS, CLERK June 21, 2012 87931S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEEN JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2302011 CA 00311 CA FLAGSTAR BANK FSB, Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS R. PARRISH; AMY L. PARRISH; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 12, 2012 and entered in 2302011 CA 00311 CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK FSB, is the Plaintiff and DENNIS R. PARRISH; AMY L. PARRISH; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant(s). Benny Lister as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 A.M. ET on July 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: PARCEL 1 BEGINNING AT THE SW CORNER OF THE SW OF THE NE OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST AND RUN NORTH 140 FEET IN C.W. ALDERSENS ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF WEWAHITCHKA; THENCE RUN EAST 105 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 140 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 105 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2 NORTH 11 FEET OF THE WEST 105 FEET OF THE NW OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, LESS ROAD RIGHT OF WAY. SAID LAND BEING AND LYING IN THE COUNTY OF GULF, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of June, 2012. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B.A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk June 21, 28, 2012 87911S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 12-27-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE BETTY CHISHOLM Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of MARIE BETTY CHISHOLM, deceased, whose date of death was May 2, 2012 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 21, 2012. Personal Representatives: Michael Chisholm 1106 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850)-227-1159 June 21, 28, 2012 87913S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Right Time Nutrition located at 302-A Reid Ave. in the County of GULF, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 15th day of June, 2012. CLMESSER INVESTMENTS, LLC June 21, 2012 87926S PUBLIC NOTICE The City Commission would like to announce the board will have only one meeting a month which is on the 4th Monday of every month. June 21, 2012 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Port St. Joe121 Bellamy Cir. Saturday June 23rd 7:30am -?Estate/ Garage SaleFurniture, dishes, pots/pans, lamps. Mens suite 44s, mens shirts and jackets size L, mens pants 38w-29l and other misc items Wewahitchka 215 Charles Ave, White City. June 22nd & June 23rd. 8:00 -4:00 .HUGE 4-FAMILY YARD SALEFurniture, appliances, grill, books, collectibles, new belly rings, linens, antiques dolls & more. Rain cancels. Text FL13903 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more N othing works harder than the Classifieds 747-5020



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, JUNE 21 2012Subscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion .......................................A4-A5Letters to the Editor ...................A5Outdoors .....................................A8 Sports...........................................A9School News ................................B3Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B4Classi eds ....................................B7-B8TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 74, NUMBER 36 Fireworks dispute settledBy TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Fourth of July reworks show will go on as scheduled in Port St. Joe thanks to more than $5,000 in donations from the community. Not that it did much for simmering tensions between the Board of County Commissioners and the Port St. Joe City Commission. Dana Boyer, a member of the Port St. Joe Downtown Merchants Association who had been helping spearhead a community celebration of Independence Day, said during a special meeting Friday that after the BOCC meeting Tuesday she, and a host of members of the community, went to work. Boyer, who helped establish years ago the annual fundraising that underwrites the Mexico Beach reworks, said she took it upon herself to address statements from the BOCC that the county would move the reworks to a county park if the city did not chip in $5,000. The BOCC and Gulf County Tourist Development Council had pledged $5,000 each toward the reworks. The city, citing a tight budget and dif cult economic times, decided it could not afford to match those contributions. The BOCC voted June 12 to move the reworks if the city did not pony up the funds by Friday. Boyer took the challenge and ran. I did this on my own, Boyer said. I didnt have time to be authorized by a speci c group. I had 2 days. The result was contributions from various sectors of the community. City commissioners, County Commissioner Tan Smiley and city attorney Tom Gibson donated $100 each. Private individuals and businesses pledged anywhere from $10 to $1,000, the latter coming from Preble Rish Engineers, Boyer said.Barnes eyes post as harbor masterSpecial to The StarJerry Barnes has announced his intent to seek the office of Gulf County harbor master. Barnes served on the Port St. Joe City Commission for two years and the Gulf County Commission for eight years. He said he believes this experience equips him to serve the people of Gulf County as harbor master. Formerly a governorappointed position, the county harbor master is responsible for managing vessel movements, security and general oversight of the port. Barnes has been a resident of Gulf County for 57 years. He graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 1961 and was employed with Arizona Chemical for 42 years, retiring in 2005. He is the son of the late Frank and Lorell Barnes, both longtime residents of Port St. Joe. He was married to the late Elaine Wood Barnes for 46 years until her death in 2008. They have JERRY BARNES By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Dan Christies blueberry bushes are tough enough to survive hurricanes. After Hurricane Opal in 1995, Christie remembers the seven rows of berry bushes nestled behind his stilted house in Simmons Bayou swimming in 22 inches of saltwater. The water turned the plants white, and they didnt bear fruit that year, Christie said. But amazingly they survived. Every summer when the berries become ripe, Christies 1-acre backyard becomes Bayou Blueberries when he opens it to the public for blueberry picking. Port St. Joe resident Ken Kennington was spotted picking blueberries with his son, Morgan, and 10-year-old nephew, Bobby Gay, on Tuesday afternoon. Kennington said he recently went blueberry picking with his niece, who whipped up some fresh pies and cobblers with the fruit this past weekend. She baked some for Fathers Day and they turned out great, he said, as he scoured a blueberry bush for the darkest fruits. BOCC votes against cuts to library, commodities programBy VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Its about $200,000 down and $300,000 to go for the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. The board debated potential revenue sources and budget cuts at a June 12 workshop to cope with the 6 percent drop in property values looming for the next scal year, which will leave the county with an estimated $500,000 de cit. During their last budget workshop, the BOCC took a rm stance against raising the millage, and decided to instead explore ways to whittle down the budget and garner more revenue for the county. Commissioners voted in favor of decreasing the budget by $334,451 and moving forward with $59,250 worth of potential revenue sources. With budget increases estimated at $147,856 or more for the upcoming scal year, Commissioners still need to come up with about $300,000 in savings. County Administrator Don Butler described the above numbers as still in the rough since the county does not know at this time the amount of cash that will be carried forward and the amount of state revenue sharing, which may be down. Of the proposed cuts presented by the county budget committee, commissioners voted against cutting $50,000 from the library budget, and also against turning over the county commodities program to a non-pro t, which would garner $19,574 in savings. Commissioners voted in favor of turning over parks and recreation responsibilities to the Gulf County Tourism Development Council, which will save the county $25,000 annually. Other approved budget decreases include $50,000 from the county courthouse maintenance budget, $4,500 in funding from the Honeyville Community Center, the discontinuation of the countys Coastal Fitness Program for $3,000 in savings, $22,875 in fuel decreases, $150,000 from public works attrition losses, $22,000 in Lot split case sent back to councilBy VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Three years and more than $60,000 in attorney fees later, a Mexico Beach lot split case is back where it started. What started as a simple lot split application submitted in 2009 has turned into a legal nightmare for the city and for property owners Joe and Mary Bush. The Bushes applied for a lot split variance in September 2009, contending they had met all requirements under the citys land use regulations when they divided their lot in 2005. Following rejection from the city planning board, the city council tabled the application for future consideration and continued to put it on the back burner for the next six months, despite the Bushes request for a public hearing. In the meantime, the council approved a new land development code on April 13, 2010, which partly addressed the subdivision of property and required stricter neighborhood consistency. One month later, the application was denied by the council. The Bushes then took legal action, bringing their case to the circuit court, appellate court, and back to the circuit court again. Most recently, a court order signed by circuit Judge James B. Fensom on June 7 nulli ed the decision made by the Mexico Beach City Council in May 2010 to deny the petitioners request for a residential lot division and subsequent Final order Denying Request for Lot Split. The order will send the request right back to the city council where it started. The case was heard in the Bay County Circuit Court after an appellate court decision in August 2011 that reversed a lower court decision in the land-use case. BOUNTIFUL BLUEBERRIESVALERIE GARMAN | The StarBobby Gay, 10, picks a ripe one at Bayou Blueberries on Tuesday afternoon. Bayou Blueberries on CR 30-A in Port St. Joe has been in operation since the late s.See FIREWORKS A7 See BOCC A3 See BARNES A3 See LOT SPLIT A2 See BLUEBERRIES A2Michael Lister to host book signing | B1

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The pies were so tasty, Kennington came back for more. Bayou Blueberries is in off of CR 30-A in Port St. Joe and is open for berry picking. Pickers are welcome anytime during daylight hours, and Christie said berries should be available for picking through July 4. Bayou Blueberries runs on an honor system; pickers are instructed by a laminated ier to pick as many berries as they would like, weigh their berries and drop their money, $2.50 per pound, in the adjacent box. Christie, the chief deputy at the Gulf County Property Appraisers of ce, isnt home most of the day and leaves payment discretion to the patrons of his berry patch. Thats a testimony to the general honesty of the public, Christie said. Only in Gulf County; its like Mayberry. Judging by the money in the box, Christie thinks there has been a pretty good turnout of pickers so far this season. But Christie isnt in the U-Pick berry business for the money. Its not anything to make money, he said. Its just something cool to do. In previous years, Christie donated all of the money made from the berry operation to the Christian Charity Voice of the Martyrs Christie said his blueberry plants produce fruit at different times each year, with June usually marking the peak of the season, but it isnt unusual to have early varieties and late varieties. Christie has a background in the plant nursery business and admits his blueberry patch is not pictureperfect this summer, and is open to suggestions on bird management. He said he is tried scarecrows, pie pans and every bird de ection in the book. With the help of Gulf County Extension Agent Roy Lee Carter, Christie nally came to the conclusion he just has to plant enough for the birds and the people. Hundreds of birds ock there in streams, Christie said. I tell people they y in and walk out. LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 See you at the Sunset! 602 Highway 98, Port St. Joe, FL 850.227.7900 Lunch 11am 3pm EDT, Dinner 5pm 10pm EDTReservations Suggested850-227-7900Spectacular SUNSETS Blue Marlin BAR Exceptional EVENTS FRIENDS OFINVITE YOU TO A FRY WHERE: Frank Pate Park WHEN: Thursday, June 28th at 6pm Untilwww.ApplemanForStateAttorney.comIts time again for strong leadership Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Jim Appleman, Republican, For State Attorney 14th Judicial Circuit.(Pd.Pol.Ad.) LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012The Mexico Beach City Council turned us down without us being able to present (our case) to them, Joe Bush said. We did not receive due process with the council. The appellate court reversed the case back to circuit court based on the Bushes claim of lack of due process. The case will be brought back to Mexico Beach for a quasi-judicial hearing, where council members will have the power to approve or disapprove the lot split, said Mexico Beach City Manager Chris Hubbard. The quasi-judicial hearing will be a public hearing before the Mexico Beach City Council, Hubbard said, but will run as more of a court proceeding than a regular city council meeting, set forth with more rigid requirements. Hubbard said the hearing has not been scheduled but will be advertised and open to the public. Bush said he has no intention of presenting his lot split request to the council again. Ive done my part; Ive fought this for ve years, he said. We just went through ve years of court for nothing. Were right back where we started. The taxpayers money is going down the drain again. Bush said he is not backing down, and his next step would be to talk to his attorney. Ive done everything I was supposed to do correctly, he said Its just a waste of time and a waste of money. LOT SPLIT from A1 A typo in last weeks column A Birds Eye View of St. Vincent resulted in the wrong telephone number being published for contacting the turtle adoption program. The correct phone number is 229-6735 not 229-7635. The story on candidate qualifying included the wrong date for this years General Election. It is Nov. 6, not Nov. 8. Information provided on the band playing during the community celebration of the Fourth of July was incorrect. The band is George, Cletus and Tom. The Star regrets the errors. Setting it STRAIGHT BLUEBERRIES from page A1VALERIE GARMAN | The StarBobby Gay, 10, shows off his bucket of fresh blueberries.

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unemployment payments and $5,476 in life management payments. A $16,600 cut from the Economic Development Council fund was also approved, but Butler said it will require additional discussion because an interlocal agreement with Port St. Joe. Other cuts that are under review include cutting funding for Wewahitchkas T.L. James Park for a savings of $13,671, decreasing the number of county polling places to one per district and elimination of roadside debris pick-up for a savings of $50,000 annually. Commissioner Warren Yeager asked the budget committee to come back to the board with recommendations for mandatory garbage and roadside pick-up for county residents, with an outlay of costs for contracting with a private-sector company. Calhoun County has mandatory pick-up; were behind the times on this, Yeager said. Yeager and Commissioner Bill Williams failed on a motion to move the county to mandatory garbage pick-up a few years back. Negotiations with waste management need to be a priority, Williams said. And it needs to be done quick. The commission approved $59,250 in potential revenue sources including $25,000 for an increase in building department fees, which havent been raised in more than 10 years. The county hopes to also garner $30,000 in payments from Bay County for runs the Gulf County Emergency Management team makes to Mexico Beach. Commissioners also approved charging dry run fees for unnecessary calls to the county ambulance service, which would bring in roughly $4,250. Commissioners voted against a 5-cent local option gas sales tax, which could bring in $140,000 in revenue annually. Still up for review is an increase landll fees. The county currently charges $35 per ton of garbage deposited at the landll. The budged committee proposed doubling the fee to $70. Obviously that ($35 fee) doesnt pay for the landll, said Commissioner Warren Yeager, who asked for a review on how much surrounding counties charge in landll fees. Yeager made a motion to increase the fee based on the average of what surrounding counties charged and the motion passed unanimously. LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, June 21, 2012 VOTEFOR Dear Voters, I am writing this letter seeking your vote and support as your Gulf County Property Appraiser. When I if this is the path I needed to take in my life for my family. I reached out to friends and family as well as from my two sons to make sure I had their unwavering support. Based on those prayers and the overwhelming support I received, the decision to run for Gulf County Property Appraiser came easy, as I have always had a strong desire and willingness to serve the great people of Gulf County. and experience. My experience includes working with people as a friend, appraiser or consultant plus assistance with real estate, property appraisal, estate issues and taxes therefore qualifying me to deal with ourlocal property issues. By serving as Special Magistrate for several counties in the Panhandle I had the opportunity to hear the requests for fair assessments and a fair taxation system. I am requesting your support in this campaign in order to assist the people of Gulf County with any real estate issues.I will work for fairness and the promotion of conservative ideas. While living in Gulf County I have had to accept assignments outside the county to meet my obligations. I continue to perform appraisals in and around our county plus special assignments wherever there is work. tor of Appraisals which required driving over four hours each day from Gulf County to Fort Walton Beach. Other employment included projects in Alabama and Texas which required driving over 25 hours each week so I could continue to raise my children, Trey, 16 years old and Luke, 12 years old here in Gulf County while they attended school in Wewahitchka. As stated above, I am not afraid of work or tackling issues nor afraid to stand up for what is right while beI am a Republican candidate running for property appraiser. Since I have republican opposition, only those registered as a Republican can vote for me in the primary election on August 14, 2012. In order to make it to the general election, I will need your vote, support, and hard work to make it happen. This campaign is not a campaign for Jamie Lester; it is a campaign for the people of Gulf County. This election is about representing everyone in Gulf County with creative ideas. And of commitment to achieve positive results. Once you have reviewed the credentials throughout this campaign, ask yourself: If you answer yes to all of the above then the choice is clear, Vote for Jamie Lester for Gulf County Property Appraiser. I thank you for your time and consideration. Please contact me on my cell at 850-814-8102 or call 850-639-4200, I look forward to visiting and talking with you. Sincerely, James E. Jamie Lester (Pd.Pol.Ad.)Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jamie Lester, Republican, for Property Appraiser st. joe rent-all706 1ST STREET (850) 227-2112 LATE MODELSUP GRADE BATTERIESWARRANTIESUSEDFINANCING AVAILABLE NEWGOLF CARTS4 YEAR WARRANTY 30 MILE RANGE 15MPHPORTST. JOESTARTING AT $995.00 Pd.Pol.Ad. Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Eugene Charbonneau, DO Susan Hardin, ARNP Dana Whaley, ARNP110 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, Florida LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, June 21, 2012 BOCC from page A1two children: Keith and his wife, Lynn McGill Hendricks Barnes, and Karen and her husband, Phil M cCroan. They also have seven grandchildren: Blake and Brett Barnes; Justin, Jesse and Haley McCroan; Shannon Hendricks Kiser and Krystal Hendricks. Jerry is married to Deborah Brumbaugh Barnes and has two stepchildren, Eric and Evan Brumbaugh. Barnes has been a member of First Baptist Church for the past 34 years, where he served as deacon for more than 20 years. He taught Sunday school, chaired the deacons and served on various committees including budget, personnel, music search, Lords Supper and security. Barnes also has been actively involved in various community organizations. He is a volunteer at the Food Pantry and the Gulf Coast Workforce Board in partnership with the Washington Improvement Group and the Christian Community Development Fund. Barnes said he wants the people of Gulf County to know he will work hard as harbor master. He said he believes his honesty and integrity are characteristics that will keep the job of harbor master respected. Barnes asks for your support in the upcoming election this August and invites any questions or concerns. He can be reached at 340-0510. bBARNES from page A1

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OpinionA4 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012Fathers Day comes and goes; this was my twelfth without my Daddy. As strange as it sounds, I seem to get closer to him as the years go by. Maybe, its that I nd him more each day. I nd him exactly where I knew I would. I nd him in me. My Fathers Day cards were wonderful. My children are as precious to me, as I am sure yours are to you. Someday, when I have time, Im going to come up with a line of Fathers Day cards that all end with, Happy Fathers Day Daddy. Maybe, thats my way to fortune and fame. I dont want to be a father, or a dad; I want to be a Daddy. That is what my Daddy was. Whatever the situation, I still feel Daddys arm sweeping me behind him and him saying, Dont worry. We had a few tough situations, where I could have easily worried or easily been scared. However, I dont think Ill ever nd anyone who would tell you any different. If he was in front of you, they werent getting to you. Im the middle son of three boys, I saw it all. Sometimes it wasnt pretty; he did what he had to do. He knew only one way to get things to work. On the wall of my ofce, there is a letter he sent home to his mother while serving in the Navy. Her address was, Route One, Wedowee, Alabama. He was nineteen yearsold and serving on the USS the Sullivans, a Fletcher class destroyer. The Korean War was going on, but Daddy didnt say a word about it. He talked about football and his Randolph County Tigers maybe getting a shot at the County Championship. He was apologetic that he couldnt make it to the games, noting all he could do was think about them. He talked about the letters he had gotten from home and how happy they made him. However, Daddy did say that his baby sister hadnt sent anything lately and that it sure would be nice to get a few lines from her. Also, he said to tell his baby brother that he still hadnt gotten him anything for his birthday, but maybe I can before long. By his tone and his reference to other events, it was obvious that the money situation was tough back home. In one paragraph, Daddy notes to his mother, So you are still picking cotton are you, you will keep picking until your head starts giving you more trouble and you wont be able to do nothing. What else could she do? Just keep picking other peoples cotton Daddy always said, You do what you have to do. Some folks say that; some folks know what it means to have to do it. I never really knew my Daddys relationship with his father. He didnt talk much about it and Daddys father died before I ever knew him. In the letter, Daddy seemed to understand that his father was not really able to work, but was trying. I can only think that it was health related. Daddy shot straight. After explaining to his mother, it looks like we have to do something, he went on to say, what you get, you get it yourself. It was heartbreaking, reading the words of a nineteen year-old who was taking on more responsibility than he probably should have had to take on. At the same time, it makes me proud to know that Daddy was what he was, well before I was around. Young people still do it every day. They work and raise their siblings, sometimes their own children, when they are much too young to have to worry about such things. What choices do they have? They can quit, they can beg or they can keep picking cotton. Fortunately, I never have had to make such tough decisions and I never had to pick cotton. I will say that on this Fathers Day, Im proud to say that I had a Daddy who did have to make tough decisions and he did. He did it with a smile on his face and a swagger in his step that said, You cant beat me. At 19, in his letter, he told his mother not to worry, just like he told me. I didnt. He signed his name with an airplane looking, The real Rock of GibraltarSo you are still picking cotton My hometown has asked me to speak at something they call Nights on Broadway. Were not talking New York City here. McKenzie, Tennessees Broadway starts up in front of Bailey Moore Wrinkles old hardware store and runs down past where they used to hold the animals on Mule Day. It bisects the very heart of our little city. Im still pondering on the invitation. But I reckon Buddy Wiggleton and Reggie Lawrence had to work and LaRenda Bradeld must be a little under the weather. This is the same town that kicked me out in 1965. Oh, they held me in school there for twelve long arduous years before giving me the boot. They crammed that Blue Bird reading class down my throat, made me conjugate verbs against my will, forced those logarithms on me and demanded I get up close and personal with Shakespeare, Poe and Edna St. Vincent Millay. And then, just when I thought I was guring out life down at the end of North Stonewall Street, Mr. Warren stood up and told our graduating class to go forth and nd your dreams. My dreams pretty much started and ended down on Stonewall where the blacktop gave out. I learned to ride a bike so I could get to town faster. Or zip over to the baseball eld across from the pajama factory. We shot tin cans off fence posts. We chased Indians, Germans, martians and each other from one end of the big ditch to the other. Every person in town shared life with me back in those days. What a time to be young and taking it all in. I had a real girl friend. Everyone up at the Dixie Coffee Cup called me by my rst name. Mr. Kennon would give me slices of hoop cheese while Mother bought groceries. Mr. Tommie Hill paid me to pump gas into his customers cars. I thought life couldnt get much better.... The end of summer after graduation found me two hundred miles from the house, abandoned on a college campus where old professors and wideeyed freshman not only didnt know my name, they couldnt pronounce it even when I spelled it out for them. By Thanksgiving and the rst snow storm I was beyond lost and lonely. I would have quit but I thought of Miss Carolyn and Miss Barbara Clark, Coach Givens and Clella Mae Carter. Gosh, they had put so much time in me. They believed in me! I was not about to go home in the middle of the year and tell them I couldnt make it. I gritted my teeth and gured it wasnt as tough as a Coach Camp basketball practice. My goodness gracious, nothing on earth was as difcult as what he would put you through. I squared my shoulders and walked into class like I belonged there. I learned not because I suddenly had a rash of smartness. I persevered because so many people in a sleepy little village in West Tennessee had poured so much of themselves into me. Professors noted a change. The college coaches commented on my new alertness. I didnt bother with explaining that failing wasnt an option where I came from. The glitz and glamour of college life never beckoned. Mr. Ed Wiley had been quietly warning us for years in Sunday School class about just such stuff. Oh, I tried some things and marveled at some things, but listen, I never even approached the deep end, you dont have any idea how persistent Mr. Wiley was. Besides, Mr. Dwayne Melton would have ridden that big horse over if he thought I was about to mess up. There were dozens of people keeping track. You just thought you were passing through McKenzie those rst eighteen years. A lifetime of tting in with others was never a problem. Pam Collins, Bobby Brewer, Ricky Hale, Charlotte Melton, Pam Garret, John Ingram ....I could go down the whole list. Wed been working things out and getting along since Dr. Holmes birthed us all. Wed hunker down in the back of Franks Dairy Bar and talk about life, loves, adventures, the future ...all the things I have found myself in the middle of since moving away. I hope just one of them appreciates me half as much as I am thankful for each and every one of them. Gosh, the Necco Wafers we tossed at each other in the darkness of the old Park Theatre. And its a wonder someone didnt get killed sliding down that hill on Forrest Avenue. Ive seen ghts break out while choosing up side over at the pajama factory eld. We honed our social graces together. Marriage was easy for me. I grew up around Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Mitchum. What a couple. They didnt hold hands and tell me about the love they shared. It wasnt necessary, they had so much love for each other it splashed over on that middle Colbert boy. Golly, how much I learned from them. When I had sons of my own my mind dialed up immediately not only my Dad, but oh, so many fathers from my childhood days. Those memories were special, but the training and the thought processes developed in those formative years have been invaluable. I dont know what I could possibly tell a crowd of folks in McKenzie today that would be pertinent or educational about my time there. I have effectively been away now for fortyseven years. Mark me down in the has been column. But also let it be noted how fortunate I was. I came along at exactly the right moment in exactly the right place and the result was a life that shaped up and played out way better than I ever deserved. I count it a special gain that a little village took such aliken to a young wet-behind-the-ears whippersnapper like me. And Im living proof that the old maxim rings truer today than ever before: You can take the boy out of McKenzie ...but you cant take McKenzie out of the boy. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRaANKS MY TRaACTORBN HeardSee CRa ANKS A5RESTORE nes focused on oyster reef restorationSpecial to The StarAfter a comprehensive investigation into the hiring  potential of 130 nationwide rms involved in t he oyster reef restoration  industry, the  Duke  University Center on Globalization, Governance & C ompetitiveness  recently released a report, Restoring Gulf Oyster R eefs:  Opportunities for Innovation, nding that oyster reef  restoration projects could provide  quadruple economic returns for Gulf Coast states. T he study comes  as Congress is in the nal stages of considering p assage of the  RESTORE the  Gulf Coast States Act. The legislation  would ensure billions of dollars in penalties for  the 2010  Gulf oil disaster would be returned to the region and dedicated to g ulf  restoration. This legislation, along with billions of dollars from t he ongoing  Natural Resource Damage  Assessment for the disaster, could be used to repair  the damaged Gulf ecosystem and jumpstart the gulf economy. Americas oyster  reefs are a hidden jewel that provide quadruple e conomic returns, said Shawn  D. Stokes,  research analyst for the center.  They maximize the return on investment in coastal restoration b y boosting  industries vital to the U.S. economy, supporting the n ations largest  shing  industries, stabilizing and protecting the valuable Gulf Coast and ltering  water to provide clean, safe, beautiful areas for recreation and t ourism  industries in addition to  creating jobs in a new emerging industry for oyster  reef restoration. Among its key  ndings, the study identied 130 rms directly (including oyster harvesting) a nd  indirectly (such as materials and construction) involved with oyster r eef industry  and  concluded that incorporating innovative oyster reef d esigns into the Gulf  Coast states oil spill restoration efforts would p rovide new job opportunities  in the Gulf and 17 other states.  More than 80 percent of the identied e mployment  locations are based in the ve Gulf states, and 68 p ercent of the rms  qualify as small businesses by sales, according to S mall  Business  Administration guidelines. Many of these rms are s mall, innovative startup  companies striving to be at the forefront of the emerging oyster reef i ndustry.  Healthy oyster  reefs, as nurseries for sh, are vital to the 2 00,000 jobs in the  regions $2.4 billion shing industry. Investments in oyster reefs help s mall  businesses like ours create jobs, build innovative products and s upport our  local economy, said Stephen Addington, co-owner of Gulf C oast  Aggregates near  Carrabelle. Restoration is not only good for s mall businesses, it is  vital for the economy here in the panhandle now and in the future. Our products can  immediately be put to work in restoring the w etlands of Louisiana and in  building oyster reefs that help our local economy thrive. With nal passage o f  the  RESTORE Act and the new projects it would fund, we can create n eeded jobs  and help ensure a healthy future for our oysters, said S tephanie Victory,  president & CEO of  HESCO  Bastion USA. Specically, the  study notes that: Increasing oyster production will generate revenue for t he  commercial oyster industry and create thousands of jobs in seafood p rocessing.  Oyster  shuckers and seafood  processors hold 30 to 50 percent of seafood  industry-related jobs across the Gulf. One acre of oyster reef increases sheries catch values by $ 4,200  a year  by providing  nooks and crannies of habitat for dozens of m arine resident species.  Each individual oyster lters up to 1.5 gallons of water per hour, removing excess nitrogen t hat  contributes to marine dead zones, providing a service that a voids the need  for  expensive wastewater treatment plants to p rovide the same service.  Each acre of oyster reef provides $6,500 in den itrication  services annually.  Oyster reefs stabilize bottom sediments, reduce wave e nergy,  prevent erosion and fortify wetlands to serve as horizontal l evees that provide  $23 billion worth of storm  protection annually  to Gulf Coast businesses and  communities as well as the oil and gas pipeline infrastructure offshore, w hich  ensures economic and energy security for  the United States.  The study also  serves as a followup to an  earlier  Duke University study  released in December, which  determined that using Clean Water Act penalties from the 2010 o il disaster  could  create jobs that would benet at least 140 businesses w ith nearly 400  employee locations in 37 states, including more than 260 i n the Gulf Coast and  60 in Florida. Two-thirds of these  companies also qualify as small businesses,  and all would benet from the dedication of G ulf oil spill nes to gulf  restoration funding, as through the RESTORE Act. State-specic initiatives that are a lready  under way include: In  Alabama, a broad  coalition of organizations has initiated the 1001 000 Restore Coastal Alabama  p lan that sets out to build 100 linear miles of oyster reefs. In  Louisiana, the  Coastal Wetlands Planning Protection and Restoration Act agency i s  experimenting with a variety of oyster reef restoration designs a s part of  their regular  coastal restoration demonstration projects t o fortify against  erosion from hurricane and storm waves. In  Florida, most of the  restoration projects are funded by the Department of Environmental P rotection  and are sub-tidal oyster cultch reefs designed to improve b iodiversity,  increase shery production and provide shoreline protection. In  Mississippi, The  Nature Conservancy recently received two grant awards to build 35 acres o f new  oyster reef in a large area north of the east/west CSX rail line t hat  prohibits  commercial harvest of shellsh. In  Texas, the Parks and  Wildlife Department has worked with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service t o  install subtidal cultch reefs to boost marine sheries production. The study was made possible by support from the Walton F amily  Foundation.

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LettersA5 | The StarVolunteering in Gulf CountyDear Editor This is response to the article on volunteering that appeared in the June 14 edition of The Star. I think John and Carlene Parker symbolize what volunteering is all about in Gulf County and they have been recognized for it but not enough. They appear at every government function and attentively listen to the good, bad and different regardless of the political spins placed on them by various Commissioners. They freely give of themselves for many activities as an example to all of us and yet it seems that anyone who isnt born here is referred to as a Blow In. This is a ridiculous effort to divide the old existing families from the new arrivals who bring with them the hope and possibility to continue this wonderful way of life to a dying community. The new families do not want to destroy anything; we moved here because of the way it is and want to protect it. When my family and I moved here 11 years ago we all volunteered for anything and everything possible. We had no local favorite politicians or political positions. All we knew was that this was heaven compared to Atlanta where crime was rampart, traf c was horri c and the pace of life sped past you so fast that you did not realize 30 years had slipped away. What rst attracted us to Gulf County was the environment but we knew that beauty is only skin deep so before we decided to take the plunge, we attended the First United Methodist Church and met some of the Elders of the community. We were embraced immediately and made to feel special like you would when visiting your grandparents. We meet amazing people like Elsie Grif n, Jim Guilford and George Core who had stories to tell that were beyond amazing. I felt we found our home, the place where we wanted to nish raising our children and one day turn our toes up as others before us. Almost immediately, our children all volunteered for local projects through the Church like painting houses in need of work and my wife and I joined civic groups and organizations to contribute what we could to improve our community to help maintain the caring culture of a small town we discovered and were enjoying. So, it is the people of Gulf County that is why we stayed, why we volunteered and why we still care to this very day. If you volunteer and expect some trophy or fanfare by those you helped, then you have the wrong idea about volunteering. A volunteer is a unique person who wants to give what they can in talent, time or funds because they care and it is the right thing to do. We must all give back and the recent article in the paper about volunteering is so appropriate at this time. A long time ago, all elected of cials were considered volunteers and expected no compensation. They cared for our country in way much different than todays Career Politicians and without any hidden agendas to promote them personally. Look around you today, these people are hard to nd and on the endangered species list. This brings me to tell you that now I have con dently selected a political position which I feel strongly about, motivated only by experiences that I encountered while innocently volunteering in our community. It seems that a few like to make decisions for all to insure their personal business is protected. They thrive on control, spins and hold peoples principles hostage that work for them somewhat akin to the Paper Mill control that use to be here. It is almost as if the intimidation to everyone who had a job and was afraid to speak out oozed from the paper mill into the hands of a few local controlling (born and raised here) citizens. All one has to do is look at where Gulf County is compared to other counties: schools, population, employment, income and opportunities for our children and grandchildren. If they call us Blow Ins then they must be Blow Outs. Look, I do not care if you are a Democrat, Republican, Independent or what. Vote for who you want but do not make the mistake of re-electing any County Commissioners. The existing County Commissioners have not helped us in any way. Here is one huge obvious (among many) example; Remember the oil spill? Remember they all voted to protect us and sue BP? What happened next shows their loyalty to the people. All of a sudden, the suit was removed, Commissioners started working for BP Contractors like County Commissioner Carmen McLemore who was paid $11,400 per week (veri ed on his state nancial disclosure paperwork led with Ethics Commission). You should ask the Commissioners, Why did Franklin County receive twice as much from BP settlement than Gulf County and we were closer and sustained more damage? Do not forget what they have done to us. Disgraceful. Lets get people in control that want to do the right thing for all of us and not just for themselves. Jim Garth Port St. JoeJune Grass on our beach is a problem Dear Editor: How can a small town like Mexico Beach afford to keep its beach in pristine condition, including raking the June Grass on a regular basis? Over in St. Joe Beach, the grass is everywhere. It smells, attracts biting ies, and is quite an eyesore to many. There is a tractor and sand rake sitting idle at the rehouse. With all of the money from BP handed out to promote tourism, why have our politicians neglected this situation? One of the best attractions for our area is the beach. It is time for action. Instead of buying gift cards that magically disappear, how about using resources to rake the grass? Kevin Welch, Broker-Owner Pelican Walk Real Estate, Inc. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONSA5 | The Star 1229 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FloridaInsuring Lives. Enriching Futures. Our experienced sta will help you choose a plan that suits your needs. Health Solutions for Individuals and Families Benet Plans for: Call 850-747-0288 Florida Blue is the trade name of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida depends upon the plan selected and the premium will vary with the amount Mike Nichols Your Local Agency for dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Thursday, June 21, 2012 CRANKS from page A1Love, Albert. My godmother Phyllis called me to wish me a Happy Fathers Day and to remind me that every day was Our Fathers day. She then told me, Thank Him 7 times and do it 7 times a day. Daddy had this thing about the number 7. I told Phyllis this and asked her why she brought it up. She didnt know why, she only told me about the number 7 meaning complete. We discussed numbers in the Bible, and then talked about bedbugs and chiggers. When we were nished, she told me she loved me and I told her I loved her. You can nd more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. By JASON ALDERMANWould you be surprised to learn that parents in many poorer countries often spend considerably more time talking with their children about money management than in wealthier countries like the United States? I was. Thats just one interesting nugget revealed at the sixth annual Financial Literacy and Education Summit recently hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and Visa Inc. Renowned U.S. and international nancial experts tackled the theme, International Solutions to Improving Financial Literacy, sharing successes and challenges faced in their own countries, as well as presenting new research that explores ways that nancial knowledge and behavior can be improved. Janet Bodner, editor of Kiplingers Personal Finance, shared ndings from the 2012 Global Financial Barometer, a new study cosponsored by Kiplingers and Visa. Some global 25,500 participants were asked about their personal nancial habits and opinions. Assessing that data, the Barometer ranked the nancial literacy levels of people in 28 countries. Among the more interesting ndings: Brazil topped the list as having the most nancially literate people, followed by Mexico, Australia, the U.S. and Canada. 68 percent of survey respondents had fewer than three months worth of emergency reserves to fund basic needs during an unexpected nancial event like job loss. 25 percent of highincome respondents had less than three months of living expenses in savings. In the U.S., for example, the average person had only 2.9 months of expenses saved. Mexico and Brazil topped the list of places that parents talk to their kids ages 5 -17 about money most often, with Mexicans talking to their kids at least 41.7 days a year and Brazilians 38.1. American families were in the middle of the pack at about 25.8 days out of the year. When asked at what age governments should require schools to teach nancial literacy, U.S. respondents ranked near the bottom at 11.9 years. By comparison, more than half of Brazilians surveyed believe such education should begin before age 9. In over half the countries, a majority believe that teens and young adults do not understand nancial basics, such as budgeting, savings, debt and spending responsibly. Bodner noted that these results add to our body of knowledge about nancial literacy. You rst have to identify what the problems are in your particular country, city or school, and then determine what is effective in handling those situations, she said. A more detailed summary of the Barometers key ndings can be found at www.practicalmoneyskills. com/barometer. William Walstad, an Economics professor at University of NebraskaLincoln, presented another interesting study which showed that people who scored poorly on a nancial literacy test but were con dent in their moneymanagement abilities exhibited similar abilities to manage credit cards as did those with stronger test skills; while those who had high test scores but lacked con dence displayed much more negative credit behavior. Walstad said these ndings suggest that building con dence has a strong role to play in nancial education. Bottom line: The panelists agreed that all of the countries represented share many of the same challenges for boosting nancial literacy including gaining wide access for programs to be tested, evaluating their results, and the fact that each has very diverse populations with different needs at different periods in their lives. To watch a free webcast of the Summit, visit www. practicalmoneyskills.com. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. Improving nancial literacy, here and abroadFellow Gulf Countians, Currently much light is being shed on an organization called the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). This organization is nothing but a lobbyists nirvana. So what is it and who belongs to ALEC? ALEC claims to be an organization dedicated to the advancement of free market and limited government principles through a public-private partnership between state legislators and corporations. Can you detect an odor here yet? ALEC promotes conservative agendas such as hostility to collective bargaining, minority voter suppression and the weakening of environmental laws. So just who exactly runs this lobbying group? The ALEC Board of Directors consists of 26 U.S. Senators and State Representatives, 24 of whom are Republicans. The 22member Private Enterprise Board consists of some of the largest corporations in this country: Koch Companies, Johnson & Johnson, American Bail Corp., State Farm, Kraft, Reynolds American, AT&T, Exxon Mobil, Peabody Energy and the list goes on and on. You can easily guess what these corporations want of our elected of cials: undue in uence. In 2011 Florida lawmaker Rachel Burgin (R-Riverview), introduced an ALEC bill to cut corporate taxes that read whereas it is the mission of the American Legislative Exchange Council to advance . . Burgin swiftly withdrew the bill after consulting with the Board and submitted it again without the ALEC language; however, there was no doubt as to where it came from. Whats interesting is that many of the corporate in uence peddling members of ALEC are now bailing out because the kitchen is getting hot. Coca Cola, Kraft, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, McDonalds, Proctor & Gamble and, very recently, WalMart. This is just another example of both parties being unduly in uenced by big money. We have the Supreme Court to thank for that with their Citizens United (is that an oxymoron or what) decision. Local residents may not know the name of the Florida state chair of ALEC but, hold your breath, why its our own Jimmy Patronis. Respectfully, Tom Knoche Port Saint Joe LETTER TO THE EDITOR Lobbyists Nirvana

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, June 21, 2012the standard for choreographed smoothness, with those of the young girls. Prancing around in shopping bags, the opening number You Better Shop Around set the stage for what was to come. Interspersed with the numbers were senior solos by Montez Walker, who earned a $200 scholarship for his newfound study with Nobles, and by Erin White, a Port St. Joe High School grad who completed 14 years of study with Nobles and received a $2,000 scholarship. June Gray, who has studied 29 years with her daughter, offered a delightful number, Totes, complete with umbrella. Linda Grif n, who has danced with Nobles for 17 years, offered a solo of her own. And of course, the older high school girls, all dressed in white, again performed Nobles signature homage to divine inspiration Amazing Grace. Professional choreographer and dancer Scott Benson delighted the audience with a whirlwind number, in which he shared the stage with White, Walker and several of the other dancers he instructed during the year at several guest appearances. One delightful moment in the afternoon show was a number Western Wear, in which guest appearances on the stage were made by Superintendent Nina Marks, County Commissioner Noah Lockley and his challenger Valentina Webb, School Board member Teresa Ann Martin, sheriffs candidate Cliff Carroll and school board candidate Pamela Shiver. Nobles also presented awards at the conclusion of the recital to Debby Ruffner for 26 years; Rita Theis for 25; Linda Maloy for 23, Bonnie Smith for 22; Grif n for 17; and Patricia Perryman for 12. Younger girls receiving awards were Holly Chambers, for 11 years; Ella Friedman for six; and Meredith Alford, Eve Bond, Emily Gay, Mackenzie King, Shaylee Martina, Gracyn Paul, Olivia Poloronis and Kylee Smith, each for three. On June 13-16, several students came away winners in the Platinum National Dance Competition at the Marina Civic Center in Panama City. The dancers were among 365 acts presented during the four-day dance marathon. Two top overall awards were earned by White and Walker with a hip-hop number choreographed and danced by the two in the Senior Duet Trio Division. The awards included Top Overall, Platinum, and they were in the top three out of 26 acts competing for grand champion in Best of the Beach. The legendary Hot Flashes dancing group won top overall in Adult Jazz Division with a number called Trouble, which also won them a Platinum award. Dancers in the group include Wanda Bar eld, Gray, Maloy, Nobles, Ruffner, Theis and White dancing for Patricia Perryman. Gray did a song and dance number to It Had to be You, winning a Platinum Award. Pam Nobles Dance Studio encourages students to enter local, district and national competitions. The studio is proud of the achievements of its students and appreciates the help of encouragement of parents and the community. Nobles has accompanied dancers all over the country, where they have won numerous awards over her 31 years of teaching dance and baton. on site for its duration. In all, 24 acres of forest belonging to The St. Joe Company burned. Davis praised the teamwork of everyone who responded to the emergency. We have had really good support from the highway patrol, local re departments, Trans eld and The St Joe Company, he said. Trans eld Services is the rm under contract to maintain state roads in the county. Davis said the Forest Service doesnt charge for accidental res like lightning strikes but does charge a suppression fee for res purposely or accidentally set by people. It adds up fast, he said, cautioning everyone to Millender, who has worked for the county for more than 10 years, rst at the land ll, was questioned about whether she had the necessary certi cations for the post. A notary public, she has completed several FEMA emergency management courses and supervisory training at Florida State University, but she is not TREEO-certi ed. It doesnt take a certi cate to run the land ll, she said, noting Johnson allowed his certi cation to lapse some time ago. Millender said she had never been given the opportunity to complete TREEO certi cation. After both interviews, County Attorney Michael Shuler said, based on the advertised requirements for the position, Millender was not quali ed to take the directors job because she lacked TREEO certi cation, did not have a class A commercial drivers license and, because she was a woman, could not supervise male inmates in Florida. Shuler called Lucy Turner, the countys consulting labor attorney, during the meeting. He said she agreed commissioners could not consider an underquali ed candidate for the position. Shuler said the county could be sued for doing so. After receiving this advice from Shuler and Turner, commissioners voted 4-1 to promote Davis to the directors position, with Commissioner Cheryl Sanders opposed. Commissioners voted to increase Davis salary from $40,800 to $45,800, with Chairman Pinki Jackel and Sanders opposed. Jackel argued that an increase to $45,000 was more appropriate, especially given improved retirement package that comes with the directors position. When asked what improvements he proposed if given the directors position, Davis said he hopes to step up the recycling program and increase attention to parks and boat ramps. He said he looks to the public for suggestions to make county services better. Davis said his biggest challenge is having the board behind me. I would like to have an open relationship with all you directors. If you feel theres something going on that you dont like, just call me. When asked what his weaknesses were, Davis said, I think Ive overcome them. Years back, Mr. Johnson told me where my weaknesses were. Commissioners will now seek an assistant director for the department. Shuler has provided commissioners with a detailed written job description. Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients WelcomeCall Toll Free888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER MEDICARE PLANSEXCELLENT COVERAGE ANYONE CAN AFFORDTOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAURoss E. Tucker, Agentsince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 85K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH COR. LOT 12 X 53 1 B/R 8 X 24 SHED 27,500 GULFVIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER49KMIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 $29,500 UP WILDFIRES from page A1 DAVIS from page A1 TOEING from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesFrom left are Jostyn Tipton, professional dancer Scott Benson and, in Shopping for Shoes, Jackie Collinsworth, Amber Henning, Erin White and Brooke Moore. be diligent when burning. Todd Schroeder, wild re mitigation specialist for the Forest Service, said this week the Lake Morality re is all wrapped up. He said he is concerned about the drought and that, in spite of last weeks rain, conditions favorable to wildre could rapidly return in windy weather. Tim Barry, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecaster in Tallahassee, said Apalachicola has received almost 9 inches of rain so far this month, more than three times the monthly average of 2.65 inches. But, he cautioned, the area is still about 3 inches below average for the year. Last year was a very dry year, and we tend to forget that, he said. Tallahassee had the second driest year on record. The drought goes back beyond Jan. 1. It would take a tropical system, or a couple, to make up for last year, and that would not be bene cial. Barry said lightning is the leading cause of wildres in Florida, second only to res ignited purposely or accidentally by human beings. At least were back on the right track, he said. Forty percent of our annual rainfall comes in June through August, and were off to a good start. Barry said there will be a better chance of widespread rainfall beginning Friday. At least were back on the right track. Forty percent of our annual rainfall comes in June through August, and were off to a good start.Tim Barry NOAA forecaster

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On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients.VINCENTIVERS, M.D.301TwentiethStreet Port St. Joe, FL 32456850-227-7070www.iversmd.com SKINCANCERSCREENINGWhile the summer is lled with family fun activities, vacations and reunions, be mindful of the dangers of the sun. Dont forget your sunscreen and skin cancer screening with Dr. Ivers. Dr. Hobson Fulmer of Apalachicola Bay Animal ClinicWelcomes Our New Associate: Dr. John DuncanAlong with Dr. Fulmer, Dr. Duncan will be seeing patients for small animal medicine and surgery. Please call for an appointment or come by to meet him.850-670-8306Clinic hours: Monday-Friday 8am 6 pm187 Highway 98, Eastpoint Complete small animal medicine and surgery, wellness programs, laser surgery, diagnostic ultrasound, Serving Franklin and Gulf Counties for 30 years Theres a New Veterinarian in Town! 850-229-7799 for information Everyone Is Welcome to AttendAGENDA for Annual Meeting Date: June 30, 2012 Time: 9:00 AM 11:00 AM EST Place of Meeting: St. Josephs Bay Golf ClubGuests Gulf County Elected TDC, Port Authority, SGCFD Candidates 11AM ESTCall to Order Approval of Previous Meeting Minutes Treasurers Report Taxes & Appraisals Economic Development in Gulf Co. Port Authority Tourist Development Council Gulf County Schools Gulf County Courts County Budget Beach Restoration FEMA CBRA progress Recycling Sign Ordinance Fire Department Sheriff Nugent Report Widening of SR 30A-Dot Lighthouse Dilemma Other business Election of the 2012-2013 Board Adjournment Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 6-30-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, June 21, 2012We might not agree with everything, but theyve given a lot back to the community, Boyer said of Preble Rish. As of midday Friday, Boyer had collected $5,950 with more due to come in later Friday. She estimated the nal total would approach $7,000. This truly represents a broad range of the community, Boyer said. The response was great and a lot of individuals stepped up. It makes the reworks belong to the entire community. Boyer added that the input she had received during her efforts was that folks wanted to see the city contribute something. Commissioner Lorinda Gingell said the city never budgeted for the reworks because in 2011 it was determined that the TDC and Gulf County Chamber of Commerce would fund the show. However, both agencies went through sea changes in the past year new boards, new directors and she understood that some events might have been lost track of in the process. City Commissioner Bill Kennedy said that although the city was strapped, with a very tight budget, he would suggest the city contribute $500. The motion passed unanimously, but City Commissioner Rex Buzzett said his vote was for the people of Port St. Joe, not any threat from the county. Earlier in the meeting, Buzzett expressed his anger concerning comments made by county commissioners on Tuesday night when, in particular, BOCC chairman Commissioner Bill Williams questioned the leadership provided by city commissioners. Buzzett called the BOCC motion to move the reworks the most vengeful, spiteful action he had seen the BOCC take toward the city. He said the BOCC was acting like a bully and trying to intimidate the city and make commissioners look bad. They are trying to make us look like the bad guys when we are being careful with tax dollars, Buzzett said. It would look really bad if we donated $5,000 now because they tried to intimidate us. I cant say enough how upset I am with those guys. Mayor Mel Magidson, who pushed to pass Kennedys motion and adjourn the meeting because he was getting tired of trying to bite my tongue, said the city didnt have the $5,000. We just didnt feel like we could just blow up $5,000 in these times, Magidson said. And citizens in the city are also paying county taxes so they are paying for this twice. Williams, in attendance, said he disagreed with Buzzett and there was nothing vindictive in the BOCC action. Williams said the county did not have the general liability insurance needed for the show having never staged reworks and therefore was in a dif cult position. This is the best thing that could happen, Williams said of the resolution of the dispute. I commend the merchants and the individuals who donated and I think the city should contribute. Though issues remain to be resolved nalizing the location and a contractor the meeting ended with the Fourth of July reworks in Port St. Joe back in launch position. FIREWORKS from page A1

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Special to The StarTheyre rarely seen in the wild but they do exist in Florida. Theyre mink. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologists are asking for the publics help in locating these small, fast, semi-aquatic creatures. Because their size and behavior keeps them out of sight, understanding where mink are in Florida, and how many mink live in the state, is extremely challenging to biologists. If members of the public report their sightings of these elusive animals, it would be invaluable to our research, said Jesse Boulerice, FWC biologist in Lake City. The more people we have looking for mink, the more information we can gather. Fisherman, boaters and other water recreationists are asked to be particularly watchful for mink and report any sightings. These sightings will be used to identify areas where mink are more common in Florida and help biologists pinpoint locations to focus mink research. The Everglades mink is listed in Florida as a threatened species. The FWC has created an online database for anyone to report sightings of mink in Florida at https://public.myfwc.com/hsc/mink. The database link includes pictures. Mink are typically found near, in and around sources of water, although they can also be found on dry land. They have a long sleek body, thick tail, small ears and small eyes, Boulerice said. Mink are between 1 and 2.5 feet long and weigh up to 4 pounds. These animals are dark-chocolate brown to black in color and sometimes have a patch of white along the chin and throat. Mink can be confused with otters. Otters look and behave similar to mink but are much larger in size (10-30 pounds). Weasels are also similar to mink, but are smaller and have brown fur along their backs and yellow along the entire belly. Being strictly carnivorous, mink forage in and along the edges of water, eating sh, frogs, cray sh, crabs and even muskrat and other small mammals. Historically, mink were hunted and used to make mink-fur apparel. E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 8 Thursday, June 21, 2012 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Most offshore anglers are trying to deal with the roughest seas that many anglers can remember for the month of June. We are at the half way mark with less than 20 days left in the season. Great sized snapper are in the 60-120ft range out of Mexico Beach and on the Wings out of Indian Pass. Most inshore numbers are holding few or smaller sh right now. Inshore OffshoreSt. Joe Bays water is clearing up this week. After the hi winds and storms from last few weeks, shing has returned to9 normal. Good trout catches are being reported at the Fire tower site and around pig Island. Some ounder have been caught under the George Tapper bridge and in the St. Joe Marina. SPONSORED BY Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Independece Day Gun Sale Starting This WeekendJune 22nd through the month of July. Hundreds of guns from Top Brands. Revolvers and pistols, shotguns and ries. Prices too low to advertise!Call for a quote!! JUNE FEATURE FISH: RED SNAPPERStop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.com By Rudy SochaSpecial to The Star I know who screwed up your favorite shing hole and why the sh you catch may taste a little funny. Everyone has seen them, the recreational boats that have three smokers aboard going out for a day of beer and shing. Upon return, there are no empty beverage containers, cigarette butts, or single use plastic bags. They consumed the goods and disposed of the waste. Unfortunately, they disposed of it while on-site, not that littering is acceptable anywhere. Most boaters feel that the ocean is a massive body of water, and it is, but the problem is most boaters travel the same routes, hang out at the same popular shing holes, and litter the same area. This causes bottom carpeting. The food chain in any area starts with the bugs and seaweed living on the bottom. What happens is the bottom becomes covered with the cans and bottles and the exposed sea or lake oor of mud and seaweed is reduced. If you have 20 littering boats at your favorite shing hole drinking and littering two 12 packs for 100 days during the year, they would have littered 24,000 beverage containers. This means each year they carpet 28,000 square feet of the bottom terrain. Think about the cumulative 10 year affect on the bottom structure and what shing in this area would be like if that litter was not there. Aside from littering the bottom with beer and beverage bottles, cigarette butts are one of the worst items to ick overboard. Feeder and surface sh will have eaten them before the end of the day. Their digestive juices extract the chemicals from the plastic in the lter and deposit these cancer causing agents into the muscle and fat tissue of the sh you are catching and grilling up at home. The bulk of the carcinogens in every cigarette is collected in the lter. Each lter contains 69 known carcinogens. Some of these lter-trapped carcinogens never enter a smokers bloodstream, but when you start eating these cancer causing agents, they enter your system and will have an accumulated effect on you. There are several other items that inadvertently end up in the water whenever they are brought aboard a boat. The single use plastic bags containing all the items you picked up on your way to the marina always seems to catch air and set sail as soon as you use the last item in the bag. The other item that ends up in the water is Styrofoam lids from coolers. Everyone at one time or another has bought one of these cheap coolers because they needed more cooler space or forgot to bring one of the coolers from home. Here are some easy solutions for boaters to prevent your favorite shing hole from continuing to become trashed: It is important to educate other shermen and make them aware of the real impact of their actions. Their litter sinks to the bottom and is unseen and perceived as not having any effect. Take binoculars on your trip. If the sh are not biting, start watching the other boats, especially if they are catching sh and you are not. You may be able to gure out what they are doing right in addition to spotting a litterer. Spread the word. Tell everyone which boat is out in your favorite shing spot trashing the place. Fishing tournaments should do a declared beverage count when leaving the dock. Any boat returning without their empties should be disquali ed. Do not take plastic bags on board. Dump the stuff on the boat and nd a place to stash all of your goodies. Use an empty beverage container as your ashtray. It will trap and keep the butts until you reach the docks. For the Styrofoam containers, use the duct tape x. Tape a beverage or similar weight object to the top of the lid and you will not have the lid blowing off your boat allowing you to reuse the cooler. Increased regulation is not the answer. I believe education and peer pressure by shermen who care about their sport can signi cantly reduce this problem. If all of this accumulated trash stayed on top of the water in favorite shing holes instead of carpeting the bottom, this problem would have been corrected a long time ago since it would be such an eyesore to the community surrounding it. Fishermen love the environment and can appreciate shing in a pristine area lled with sh. Rudy Socha is a sherman and CEO of Wounded Nature Working Veterans. They are a 501c3 nonpro t focused on cleaning up coastal areas utilizing veterans living aboard houseboats. You can nd out more about them by visiting www.woundednature.org.Special to The StarAs the weather has heated up, so too have Floridas alligator and crocodile activities, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) reminds Floridians and visitors to be cautious when having fun in and around water. Florida is home to two native crocodilians: the American alligator, which is found in all 67 counties; and the American crocodile, which may be found in coastal areas of the Keys and in southeast and southwest Florida. Both species have shared Floridas waters with people for centuries. The FWC recommends keeping pets away from the water. There are other precautionary measures people should take to reduce the chances for conicts with alligators and crocodiles, and they are available in the Living with Alligators brochure at MyFWC.com/Alligator and the Living with Crocodiles brochure at MyFWC. com/Crocodile. The FWC advises, if you have concerns with an alligator or crocodile that poses a threat to you, your pets or property, call the FWCs Nuisance Alligator Hotline at 866-FWC-GATOR (392-4286). Alligators and crocodiles are an important part of Floridas heritage and play a valuable role in the ecosystems where they live. For more information on alligators and crocodiles, visit MyFWC.com/Alligator.By JESSICA THERRIAULTSpecial to The Star Not everyone has a green backyard with bushes and trees. Florida is a peninsula, with the longest coastline of all states in the continental United States. Most of Floridas nearly 19 million residents live less than 60 miles from the Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico, making the beach, sand and saltwater their backyards. So lets go on a summer backyard beach safari! Begin your treasure hunt by shelling. Take a walk along the waters edge, and youll discover hundreds of varieties of shells hurled onto the beach by waves that roll or crash onto the shore. Seashells were once living organisms. The shell is the hard, protective outer part of an animal, usually a mollusk. Mollusks are animals like scallops, snails, clams and oysters. These creatures make their own shell. When the animal dies or gets eaten by another creature, the empty shell stays empty or becomes a home to other sea critters, like hermit crabs. Shelling provides hours of fun while looking for that one-of-a-kind, colorful treasure. Before you keep a shell, make sure there is nothing living in it. Otherwise, you need a special license to keep it. Another activity is digging in the sand for coquinas (pronounced KoKEE-nahs) and mole crabs. Its easy to spend hours getting lost in the color and movement of coquinas and the squirms of mole crabs. Coquinas are tiny clams that live just below the surface of the sand where the waves roll in. Tides carry and deposit them along the shoreline, where they feed on microscopic organisms in the sand. They are a dazzling sight with wonderful colors, like tiny jewels. Sometimes you dont need to dig because incoming waves will unearth them. Watch as they furiously dig, seeking cover and food as each wave rolls back out to sea. Mole crabs are small and do not look like a typical crab, nor do they look like a mole. They are fast and will bury themselves quickly in an effort to hide. To nd one, dig gently in sand near the water, just as if you are looking for coquinas. As you dig, they may bury deeper into the sand, but if you can get underneath one, then you can scoop it up. They may tickle you but dont worry. They do not bite. Be gentle, because they are soft and fragile. When you are nished observing the crab gently place it back into the soft, wet sand. Bird-watching is another fun activity. Gulls live on the beach and are known to swoop in to steal your food! Pesky as they might be, they are still fun to watch. Other birds to watch at the beach are pelicans. Pelicans glide just above the waters surface, and then SPLOOSH! They dive into the water headrst to grab a shy meal. Its also fun to look for bird tracks in the wet sand. Can you identify the tracks you nd? Do not chase the birds to make them y. Simply watch and admire their behavior. While on your safari, be sure to wear sunscreen so you can avoid sunburn, and have fun this summer! For more information, contact Jessica Therriault at Jessica.Therriault@ MyFWC.com.Photos special to The StarTop: A measurement shows that this mole crab is barely 2 centimeters long. Above: A close-up of the tiny, colorful coquina clams.Lets go on a beach safari Summer is here! Are some boaters reducing our sh stock, ruining what we catch?Report mink sightings to FWC Warm weather means active alligators, crocodiles

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.comThursday, June 21, 2012 APage 9Section WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu, June 2187 7310% Fri, June 2287 7510% Sat, June 2388 7720% Sun, June 2489 7720% Mon, June 2589 7610% Tues, June 2687 7730% Wed, June 2788 77 0% 20 We 1029am 1.9 900pm -0.3 21 Th 1104am 1.8 925pm -0.3 22 Fr 1138am 1.7 946pm -0.2 23 Sa 1211pm 1.6 1000pm 0.0 24 Su 1244pm 1.3 1003pm 0.2 25 Mo 105pm 1.0 946pm 0.3 26 Tu 629am 1.0 838pm 0.6 27 We 552am 1.2 305pm 0.3 28 Th 558am 1.4 347pm 0.0 29 Fr 628am 1.7 442pm -0.2 30 Sa 712am 1.9 541pm -0.4 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 21 Th 707am 1.3 406pm 1.5 1115am 1.2 22 Fr 729am 1.3 454pm 1.4 1210am -0.2 1159am 1.2 23 Sa 752am 1.3 546pm 1.3 1237am -0.1 1248pm 1.1 24 Su 815am 1.3 645pm 1.2 107am 0.0 144pm 0.9 25 Mo 840am 1.3 758pm 1.0 139am 0.2 251pm 0.8 26 Tu 906am 1.4 930pm 1.0 213am 0.4 407pm 0.6 27 We 936am 1.4 1130pm 0.9 250am 0.6 526pm 0.4 28 Th 1010am 1.5 328am 0.9 640pm 0.1 29 Fr 201am 1.0 1050am 1.6 411am 1.0 745pm -0.1 30 Sa 1136am 1.6 843pm -0.3 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 1 Fr 735am 1.7 516pm -0.2 2 Sa 810am 1.9 616pm -0.4 3 Su 855am 2.0 720pm -0.6 4 Mo 946am 2.1 823pm -0.6 5 Tu 1038am 2.1 920pm -0.6 1 Fr 254am 1.0 1221pm 1.5 649am 1.1 845pm -0.2 2 Sa 416am 1.2 100pm 1.6 748am 1.2 936pm -0.4 3 Su 521am 1.3 143pm 1.6 843am 1.3 1026pm -0.5 4 Mo 613am 1.3 230pm 1.6 934am 1.4 1114pm -0.5 5 Tu 658am 1.3 320pm 1.6 1023am 1.3 July 4th Advertising Deadlines Display Advertising Schedule July 5th IssueSpace Reservation and Ad Copy Submittal DeadlineJune 28th, 2012 3:00pm Final Ad Approval July 2nd, 12:00pmFOURTHOF JULY SPADEABusiness Card........................................$30.002 col x 1 mod Actual Size: 3.22 x 21/4 Page..................................................$225.003 col x 5 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 101/2 Page..................................................$400.006 col x 5 mod Actual Size: 9.9 x 10Full Page (back).....................................$750.006 col x 10 mod Actual Size: 9.9 x 20 PREMIUM POSITIONSFront Page Bottom.............$175.003 col x 2.5 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 5INSIDE Page 2.....................$450.003 col x 10 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 20Contact Joel or Kari to reserve your space today (850) 227-7847 (850) 370-6090 School hosts junior summer cheer campSpecial to The StarThe Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School varsity cheerleaders will be hosting a Cheer Camp for all children ages 3 through the fth grade. Registration is $35. The camp will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET July 16-18 at Oak Grove Assembly of God Church. There will be Pep Rally at 11:30 a.m. July 18 to showcase the skills learnedc. Youth will learn motion and jumps technique, two cheers, two chants, sideline dance and Xtreme routine. Snacks will be provided but each child will be responsible for a packed lunch. Registrations forms may be picked up and/or turned in to the school of ce or to any varsity cheerleader. T-shirts will be given to those registered by July 1. For any questions, email Lindsay Williams at lwilliams@gulf.K12. .us.PSJ clinches district tourneySpecial to The StarThe Port St. Joe Ozone All-stars took the victory June 13 in the District 4 Ozone All-star Tournament. The tournament play for Port St. Joe began Friday night, June 8 against Wewahitchka, where Wewa took the game, 15-5, with three homeruns scoring 8 points to start off the game. Port St. Joe came back Sunday afternoon after rain cancelled Saturday nights play against Callaway with a win of 28-5 with Matthew Costin starting off on the mound. With Wewa overtaking Callaway on Monday, Callaway was eliminated from the tournament leaving the title between Wewa and St. Joe. Tuesday night found Elijah Hester on the mound for a six-inning battle. Wewa took the loss after Hester struck out the last batter for Wewa in the bottom of the sixth inning, closing out the game for a PSJ victory of 7-6. Travis Morrison hit Port St. Joes single homerun of the tournament during this game. The championship game was played Wednesday between St. Joe and Wewa with Blake Wood on the mound for an outstanding six innings. Port St. Joe took the championship with a victory over Wewa of 11-4. With this win, the PSJ Ozone All-stars will advance to the State Championship Tournament in Sebring, Fla., beginning July 6. Donations to help the team go to the State Tournament can be made to the Port St. Joe Ozone All-stars at Centennial Bank in Port St. Joe. Donations are greatly appreciated.SPECIAL TO THE STARAfter the championship game against the Lynn Haven Rays on May 29, the Wewa Subway 14U baseball team nished their season by placing rst in the sophomore division of the Dizzy Dean County Tournament. Wewa Subways season record against Port St. Joe and other teams from Bay County was 9 and 1. Players in the front row are Kaleb Shiver, Caleb Clary, Buddy Wood, Charlie Laird, Chipper Wood and Austin Malcom. Back row includes Connor Mills, Cody Mills, Chance Harper, Chipper Gainnie, Peter Setterich, Cameron Jones and Cameron Lister, Manager Tony Muina and assistant coaches Kelan Setterich and Randy Harper. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE STARAppearing in photo front row, from left, are Blake Wood, Cameron Harmon, Ethan LaFountaine, Bryce Johnston and Elijah Hester; second row, Matthew Costin, Kendre Gant, Brandon Brant, Trey Sanders, Travis Morrison, Gene Quinn; back row, assistant coach Charles Costin, manager Henry Hester and assistant coach Brad Johnston. Not pictured is Brooks Kennington. WEWA SUBWAY TEAM PLACES FIRST IN COUNTY TOURNAMENT

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A10 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, June 21, 2012 BPage 1SectionBy VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com The Panhandle is the palette Michael Lister paints with. Its everything, the Wewahitchka author said of the North Florida environment that drives his writing. Its the inspiration, and of course the area I write about. Its always in the background its the palette I paint with. Lister will be at Downtown Books in Apalachicola on Friday from 1 to 3 p.m. ET to speak about and sign copies of his new books Burnt Offerings and The Meaning of Life in Movies, and will also use the book signing as a way to give back to the environment. For every book he sells, Lister will donate $1 to the Apalachicola Riverkeepers, a nonpro t organization that strives to protect the areas natural water source. For Lister, who is on the board for the Riverkeepers, its about protecting the North Florida environment that serves as the backdrop for his novels. The environmental issues in this area are so important to me, he said. I grew up here and my family has been here for several generations. Listers latest novel Burnt Offerings is a serial killer thriller that tells the story of an exacting and methodical killer whose weapon is re, and only a wounded Florida Department of Law Enforcement agent and a retired Florida State religion professor have a chance at stopping him. Lister said reviewers have cited the book as multilayered, grisly, gripping and suspenseful, but most frequently intense. In the novel, Lister uses several points of view to tell the story, which leaves readers seeing through the eyes of the FDLE agent, the professor and the killer himself. Many, many scenes are from the killers point of view, Lister said. That way the readers get to see inside the mind of the killer. The novel is set in a ctitious version of the Apalachicola area called Bayshore near the barrier Special to The StarWith a background that combines Career and Technical Education with the geography of Gulf and Franklin counties, Loretta Costin is ready to move Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/Franklin Campus to the foreground of everything residents of those two counties need in higher education. Ive seen this campus grow from the beginning. Now Im proud to be a part of it, and Im thrilled to be at home, said Costin, a Port St. Joe resident and the new director of the Gulf/Franklin Campus in Port St. Joe. Costin takes over June 25, and shes ready to expand Gulf Coast throughout the area. I want to reach out and talk with people in both counties, understand their goals and learn what else the college can do to meet their needs. Costin wants to discuss GCSCs part in the futures of every entity from the school districts to the chambers of commerce. This college provides such a great resource for this area, and theres always more we can do. Costin is focusing her efforts in three key areas, and shell be working to get more people on campus and the campus more in the minds of many demographics. I want to make sure that high school graduates know what we offer and that adults understand too, so that we can expand and meet the needs of these two groups, Costin said. Third, shes looking forward to being part of the ongoing solution for economic development and post-secondary programs at the Gulf/Franklin Campus. She knows well how to combine all the forces for success, having most recently served as Chief of Staff to the Commissioner of Education in the Florida Department of Education, where she oversaw all operational aspects of the agencys 85 employees and a budget of more than $500 million. Loretta will be a great addition to Gulf Coast State College, especially with her signi cant experience in education at the state level and her love of Gulf and Franklin counties, said GCSC President Dr. Jim Kerley. College names director Loretta Costin to take over Gulf/ Franklin Center on MondayAuthor Michael Lister to host book signing MICHAEL LISTER See LISTER B5 See DIRECTOR B5 VALERIE GARMAN | The StarHighland View gardener Bill Lynch holds a fresh yellow squash he picked that morning. Star Staff ReportDespite the dry season, local gardener Bill Lynch is harvesting veggies by the bucketful. In late May, Lynch procured 10 buckets of yellow squash from his Highland View garden. Lynch, 85, suffered a heart attack in 1999 and is grateful for every day he can spend in his garden. You have to start all over like a little baby learn to walk and everything, Lynch said. But Im still here. The Lords been good to me. Lynch distributes the fruits and vegetables he harvests to the elderly people and close friends in his neighborhood. I just plant that stuff and raise it for my good friends, he said. Start the summer with squash by the bucketful By VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Hidden in the 5,019 acres of the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve are 24 species of threatened and endangered plants, 20 known archaeological and historical sites, 18 natural ecological communities and 13 species of rare birds. The preserve provides a sanctuary for so many different species, a barrage of recreational opportunities in Gulf County and yet remains somehow hidden from public view. In a meeting held at the Buffer Preserve Center in Port St. Joe last week, a room full of state of cials, volunteers and area residents explored ways to better protect the future of those valuable 5,019 acres and raise awareness about what the preserve has to offer. The preserve was acquired for you, the citizens of Florida, said Preserve Manager Matt Green. Were here for you, the public of Florida. The meeting, organized by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, was held to present and receive input from the public on the draft management plan, which once adopted will guide the buffer preserve through its next decade of management. Green presented a list of seven goals for the preserve for the next 10 years, focused on restoring the areas natural hydrology, biodiversity and imperiled species, controlling invasive species, increasing protection of archaeological sites, expanding recreational access, and promoting coastal stewardship and scienti c research. Outreach is something I rmly believe in, said Green, who hopes to reach out to area schools and garner educational interest in the community. I want people to come to the preserve to learn how to build bird houses, to come learn about turpentine farms, to come learn to identify stars. Green said one of the main goals for the preserve in the next decade is to ex-Hidden sanctuaryPhotos by BILL AND MARCIA BOOTHE | NatureinFocus.comA panorama of the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserves. St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve aims to protect nature and raise awareness See PRESERVE B5

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SocietyB2 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyHi, My name is Ryder and I live at the humane society with my brothers, sisters and lots of kitties and puppies. All of us love to play with the kids that come to visit and the ladies that take care of us are very sweet and we love them. But we all want a forever home to call our very own. If you can give us a safe and loving home, please contact our caretakers. We promise to love you furrever! Remember, June is Adopt a Cat Month We also need volunteers to help around the shelter. Donations of kitty litter is in great demand as well as puppy toys. Any donation no matter how small will be greatly appreciated. If you re unable to adopt at this time, perhaps you could foster or make a Donation. All pets adopted from SJBHS will be current on vaccinations and spayed/neutered. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications and pet photos are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. Our hors for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Faiths Thrift Hut is always in need of donations also, and all the proceeds go directly to support the animals in our care! The hours for the store are Thursday-Saturday from 10 am-3 pm. Volunteers are always welcome at both our store and our shelter! Our store and shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! Hope to see you all there soon! If you are missing a pet or want to adopt a new pet, please check with your local Humane Society or Shelter. Follow us on Facebook: St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients WelcomeCall Toll Free888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer LPort Saint Joe area Design professionals on premise C Professional Installation2760 HWest Port Saint JoeLOCALLYOWNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $50 Offpurchase of $ 750.00 or moreTile starting at Carpet starting at Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information MEDICARE PLANSEXCELLENT COVERAGE ANYONE CAN AFFORDTOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAURoss E. Tucker, Agentsince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com RE-ELECTLINDA WOOD SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 3 ITS ALL ABOUT THE KIDSPaid for and approved by Linda Wood, candidate for School Board District 3(Pd.Pol.Ad.) Heather L. Simmons and Nicholas A. Hall together with their families and friends are pleased to announce their engagement and forthcoming marriage. The bride-elect is a graduate of Florida State University-Panama City with a bachelors degree in civil engineering. She is the daughter of Wade and Cathy Simmons of Wewahitchka. The groom-elect is employed with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce as a K-9 deputy. He is the son of Glen and Sonjia Hall of Wewahitchka. A summer 2013 wedding date is expected.Food donations bene t seniorsStar Staff ReportGulf County Senior Citizens, at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, asks for donations for low-income seniors of non-perishable foods such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for clients who love to play bingo several times a week. The group provides a hot, nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to meal sites. Anyone interested in coming in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items listed above may call Debbie at 229-8466.Sponsored ags to show area patriotismSpecial to The StarThe GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc., in partnership with the Wewahitchka VFW Chapter 8285, invites everyone to show their patriotism by sponsoring an American ag that will be own on the light poles on State Road 71 in downtown Wewahitchka. The ags will be own for 10 days for Veterans Day. Fifty-two ags have been put in place, but about 75 have been sold. The remainder will be put up soon. The goal is to put up as many ags as possible to show patriotism and support to our military services. The group would like to thank Ralph Fisher and employees of Fishers Hardware for placing the ags. Flags can be purchased for $35, which will cover the cost of the 3by 5-foot American-made American ag, a rod and brackets to hang it, and an engraved plaque. The sponsor will have the option of either placing their name or business on the plaque or it can be in memory of a military veteran or active duty member of the Armed Forces or a loved one. Please specify this when ordering your ag. If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for this project, make your $35 check payable to GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc. Send your check to P.O. Box 94, GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc., Wewahitchka, FL 32465. For more information, call Patty Fisher at 639-9794. You may order as many ags as you like.Special to The StarFloridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders who live in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. The programs local councils are seeking additional volunteers to identify, investigate and resolve residents concerns. Special training and certi cation is provided. Those interested in protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents who often have no one else to advocate for them are encouraged to call toll-free 888-831-0404 or visit the programs website at http://ombudsman. my orida.com.Star Staff ReportWith summer here, its time to think about keeping children healthy while school is out. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board will provide free nutritionally balanced meals to children during the summer through the Summer Break Spot program. Meals will be served through Aug. 3 at the Washington Gym Complex, 414 E. Kenny St. in Port St. Joe. Lunch will be served from noon to 1 p.m. ET with a snack to follow from 2-2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed July 4-6 in observance of Independence Day). Gulf County children under the age of 18 regardless of race, color, sex, disability, age or national origin may come to eat. For more information, contact the Gulf Coast Workforce Board at 913-3285. For more information about the national Summer Food Service Program, visit www.fns.usda. gov/cnd/summer. Summer Break Spot program feeds kids for free Volunteer advocates needed to aid elders EngagementSimmons, Hall engaged

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School NewsThe Star| B3Thursday, June 21, 2012 (Ad#2012-55)ATTENTION RESIDENTS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Gulf County has been awarded Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding to provide Housing Rehabilitation assistance for a minimum of ten (10) single-family housing units throughout the unincorporated areas (residences located outside of City Limits) of the County. Gulf County is currently accepting pre-applications from residents of the County that are interested in participating in the Countys CDBG Program. If you are interested in obtaining a pre-application, the County has made the pre-applications available at the following locations: you may request a pre-application or additional information by contacting either Towan Kopinsky at (850) 229-6106 or Jeffrey C. Winter at (904) 264-6203. Upon completion, pre-applications must be submitted to Towan Kopinsky, Grant Coordinator, at the Robert Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Room #312 or Room #301, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. ALL PRE-APPLICATIONS ARE DUE NO LATER THAN 2:00 P.M., E.T. ON JUNE 28, 2012. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer, Handicapped Accessible and Fair Housing Jurisdiction. Robert Moore Administration Building Room #312 or Room #301 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Port St. Joe Health Department 2475 Garrison Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Wewahitchka Health Department 807 West Highway 22 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Gulf County Public Library 110 Library Drive Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Charles Whitehead Public Library 314 North 2nd Street Wewahitchka, FL 32465 TM1-850-309-1996 shredit.com 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 PACKAGE STORE & LOUNGEGREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITSWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM UPCOMINGEVENTSGOURMET BY THE BAYNOW SERVING SATURDAY NIGHTS FROM 7PM TIL 3AMLOCATED IN THE LOOKOUTREARPARKINGLOTKARAOKE & DJ IN THE CROWS NEST WEDNESDAY THRU SATURDAY 9PM ET RANDY STARK WITH ART LONG FRIDAY & SATURDAY 7PM ETTHURSDAY NIGHT SUMMERMUSIC SERIES7PMEachWeekJUNE 21ST PANAMAREDJUNE 28TH HOLLYADKINS & LUKEJULY 12TH TYLER BUSHJULY 5TH BRIAN BOWEN JULY 12TH TYLER BUSH JULY 19TH THE CURRYS New Sorrelli Arriving Daily! Over 35 Years Experience.208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe850.229.1111www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Special to The StarFrom: Carla May The parents of the Port St. Joe High School graduating class of 2012 held an all night, drugand alcoholfree, lock-in celebration for this years graduating seniors on May 24. After graduation, the seniors met at the PSJHS to ride a school bus over to Rock It Lanes on Panama City Beach. The seniors were treated to unlimited bowling, pool, roller skating, pizza and soft drinks. The parents added to the fun of the evening by including bowling and pool tournaments. Alex King and Katie Lacour were the winners of the Bowling Tournament, Nick Dickinson and Oneika Lockley were runners-up. Lacour and Daniel Neal were the winners of the pool tournament, and Sam Taylor and Arion Ward were the runners-up. The parents also hosted a fastest skater competition. Daniel May and Autumn Haynes were the fastest speed skaters. The seniors received door prizes throughout the evening provided by the generous donation of businesses in Port St. Joe, and Apalachicola. Each senior also received two different Port St. Joe Sharks T-shirts, a Sharks blanket and a Bible. The local area churches presented the Bibles during their morning churches services, and helped to provide the funding for the purchase of the Bibles. National statistics show that graduates are at a higher risk of accidents on graduation night than any other time in their lives. Project Graduation is an all-night, drugand alcoholfree, lock-in celebration for graduating seniors that is endorsed by Florida Law Enforcement agencies, drug and alcohol prevention programs and local community organizations. In 1985, Project Graduation began in our community as a way of not only offering an evening free of drinking and driving, but a celebration with fellow classmates under the watchful eye of proud parents. Project Graduation at Port St. Joe High School has always been successful because of the generous support of our business community. The grateful parents of this years graduating Class at Port St. Joe High School wish to thank the businesses and individuals for their generous support. Without your help, we would not have been able to provide Project Graduation. Thank You.Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe High School Odyssey of the Mind Team wishes to thank the following businesses, groups, and individuals that gave donations to help send our team to World Finals Competition at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. The team finished 24th out of 55 teams at World Finals. Thanks to the following: George M. Cox, First United Methodist Church Care Closet, Leonard Costin, John C. Gainous VFW Post No. 10069, John C. Gainous VFW Post No. 10069, Ladies Auxiliary, John C. Gainous VFW Post No. 10069, Mens Auxiliary, Farnsley and Johnston Wealth Management, Frank D. May, DMD, PA, Natalie Shoaf, Integrity Therapy Services, Bradley and Joanne Buzzett, Preble Rish, Gulf Alliance for Local Arts, Bluewater/Met Group, John and Linda Wright, John Hanlon, Leslie and Andrea Heard, Ronald Shaeffer, Mrs. Toya B. Bream, Ron Lucht, Haughty Heron, Bo Spring, Port Inn/Thirsty Goat, Wood Fisheries, Lions Club of Port St. Joe and the Gulf County School Board. Thank you also to all who attended our Odyssey of the Mind fundraising events and purchased raffle tickets. We would not have been able to compete without your tremendous support.Special to The StarThe 21st Century Summer Enrichment Program will put on a free production of the play The Emperors New Clothes at 10 a.m. ET June 28 in the Port St. Joe Elementary School Auditorium. The play is free and open to the public. Come out and see our students hard work.Special to The StarCorrectional Officer Basic Standards Class 215 recently graduated from the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College. Each student completed 420 classroom hours of training to prepare them to become correctional officers in any state, county or private correctional facility in the State of Florida. Pictured left to right, front row: John Paul Helms, Port St. Joe; Rita Massey, Carrabelle; Nita Massey, Carrabelle; Tomilee Babb, Carrabelle; Danielle Davis, Apalachicola. Back row: Donald Swanson, instructor; C. J. Massey, Bloxham; Tristan Davis, Port St. Joe; Jackie Rowland, Apalachicola; Joyce Thomas, Apalachicola; Clarke Joyner, Corrections Coordinator. The next class is scheduled for July at the Gulf/Franklin Campus and anyone interested can call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 for more information.Port St. Joe High School Project Graduation 2012 a great success Summer Enrichment Program presents The Emperors New Clothes OM TEAM THANKS SPONSORS TO WORLD FINALS CORRECTIONAL CLASS GRADUATES FREE PRODUCTION

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FAITHThursday, June 21, 2012 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SUNDAY : WORSHIP AT SUNSETPARK 8 AM 11 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BIBLE CLASS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE TIME 9 11 AM MONDAY : LIFETREE CAF 7 PM WEDNESDAY: MENS BIBLE STUDY 8 AM & WOMENS BIBLE STUDY 5 PM1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 Mary Alice Lyons, 88, died June 15 in Panama City at Gulf Coast Medical Center. Mrs. Lyons was born in Milton, Florida to the late W.E. Hinote and Alice Pendleton Hinote. She was married to Cecil H. Lyons for 53 years before his death in 1995. Mary Alice enjoyed playing golf at the St. Joseph Bay Country Club, playing Yahtzee and dominoes with her friends and she devoted her life to her family and friends especially her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. She is also preceded in death by two brothers, Jewel and Terry Hinote; and two sisters, Selma Gandy and Naomi Griffin. Her survivors include one son, Cecil H. Lyons, Jr. and his wife Beth of Port St. Joe; two daughters, Marnie Valent and her husband Gerry of Miami and Catherine Collier and her husband Phil of Port St. Joe; grandchildren Cecil H. Lyons III, Holly Porter and her husband Ron, Michael Mock and his wife Carla, Chris Mock and his wife Joni and Shanna Watson and her husband Bryan; greatgrandchildren, Justin Lyons, Haley, Kamron and Regan Porter, Colton Johnson and Harleigh Mock, Brody and Isla Mock and Brynleigh Watson; a sister, Ruth Casey and her husband Norman; two brothers, David Hinote and Harold Hinote and wife Gail;, numerous nieces and nephews and a host of friends. Funeral services for Mrs. Lyons were at 11 a.m. ET Monday, June 18 at the First United Methodist Church in Port St. Joe with the Reverend Mac Fulcher of ciating, with internment at Holly Hill Cemetery following. Condolences can be made or viewed on our website www.southerlandfamily.com Services were arranged by Southerland Family Funeral Home, 100 E. 19th St., Panama City, FL 32405, 785-8532.Mary Alice Lyons 1932-2012Mary Louise Law Marshall peacefully departed her family on the sunny morning of June 9, 2012. Mary Lou was born in Tarkio, Mo. on July 23, 1932 to Mabel Law as her only child. She was a fouryear National Honor Society graduate and valedictorian of her Tarkio High School class. She was accepted to and graduated from Washington University School of Nursing in St. Louis, Mo. During her career of nursing in Cape Girardeau, Mo., she met her sweetheart, Harold D. Marshall, Sr. of Morehouse, Mo. They were married June 1, 1955 at the First Baptist Church of Holly Springs, Miss. As the rst nursing home administrator and a geriatric specialist of Beaulieu Nursing Home in Newnan, Ga., she played an important role in providing quality care for the elderly and teaching geriatrics. Mary Lou served as a member of the Nursing Home Licensing Board for the State of Georgia under two governors before she retired to Port St. Joe, Fla. Mary Lou is survived by her husband of 57 years, Harold D. Marshall, Sr.; daughter, Marci Marshall Duncan of Bradenton, Fla.; daughter, Linda Marshall Estes of Okeechobee, Fla.; son, Harold D. Marshall, Jr. of Port St. Joe, Fla.; and granddaughter, Stephanie Duncan Okuley of Tampa, Fla. In lieu of owers please send private donations to the Alzheimers Association, www.alz.org. Services were arranged by Kent Forest Lawn Funeral Home, 2403 Harrison Ave., Panama City Mary Louise Law Marshall MARY LOUISE LAW MARSHALLRevival services at Philadelphia PrimitiveRevival Services will be at 7:30 p.m. July 9-13 at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church. The Elder Keith Cloud of Gretna will be the evangelist for the week. Pastor Jessie Hawkins and the Philadelphia Church congregation extend a cordial invitation to the Port St. Joe and other communities, to come and be blessed through the power of Gods holy word. The Church is on Avenue D in Port St. Joe. Faith BRIEFSJoshua needed Gods presence to succeed as the leader of the Jews. But then, so does every leader, while each is paying their dues. Younger ones need it more so, while trying to learn to lead. Many times they want to push, but in some cases fail to succeed. If you dont wait for the Lord to lead, youll probably spin your wheels my friend. I know because Ive seen it happen, over and over again. Dont try to get ahead of God, that will not take place. If you try, theres a pretty good chance youll fall at on your face. If you read the Word, and be obedient to God in all you do. I dont see a reason in the world that you cant be a leader too. Billy Johnson ObituariesDo you feel called to be a leader? Special to The StarFaith Christian School K4 students read! FCS students learn to read with an introduction to phonics. Developing a strong foundation with the FCS curriculum creates a bridge that helps students obtain a better understanding of written language. Phonics can help students break down words with certain sounds, and children that can sound out a word have an enormous advantage when reading. This skill branches into all academics, and gives students the tools to succeed. Every child deserves the opportunity to become a good reader. Open enrollment for new students has begun for the 20122013 school year. Class sizes are limited so early registration is recommended. Call 229-6707 or visit www. FaithChristianPSJ.net for more information. The Lions Tale SCHOOL NEWSFaith Christian School enrollment open for 2012-13 school year

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, June 21, 2012 The Star| B5 Lighthouse Utilities Company Inc. P .O. Box # 428 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0428 (850) 227-7427 2011 Annual Drinking Water Quality ReportThis report will be mailed to customers only upon request and is also available at 2010 County Road C-30 upon request. Were very pleased to provide you with this years Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. Our water source is ground water from 2 wells that draw from the Floridan Aquifer. Our water is aerated to remove minerals and gases then chlorinated for disinfection purposes. In 2011, the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system and a search of the data sources indicated no potential sources of contamination near our wells. The assessment results are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at We are pleased to report that our drinking water meets all federal and state requirements. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact James R. Simmons @ 850-227-7427. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility.Lighthouse Utilities Co., Inc. routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2011. Data obtained before January 1, 2011, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. follow. study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. ND means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis. This report shows our water quality results and what they mean. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A)Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. (B)Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. (C)Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (D)Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. (E)Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agencys Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. In our continuing efforts to maintain a safe and dependable water supply, it may be necessary to make improvements in your water system. The Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Lighthouse Utilities Co., Inc. is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.We at Lighthouse Utilities Company Inc. would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to insuring the quality of your water. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel free to call any of the numbers listed. island of Pine Key, which is loosely based on St. George Island. Its pretty subtle, Lister said of the connection. It is a ctitious town, but it is based on Apalachicola. Growing up in Wewahitchka, Lister spent many summers and weekends visiting relatives in Apalachicola and on St. George Island. Its an area he knows well, and he wanted to capture both the environmental and personal aspects of in Burnt Offerings. Its denitely the environment, but its also the people, Lister said. I do try to capture the people of the area their jobs, their attitudes. Listers older novels also will be for sale at tomorrows signing. All of his books are available in e-book format on Amazon.com and on audio book from Audible.com. He is set to release another novel, Split Sacrice, this Halloween. Lister said he hopes tomorrows book signing will help support the effort to protect the areas natural waterways and the environment he paints with his words. North Florida is what I love and North Florida is what I write about, he said. LISTER from page B1Costins experience as Vice Chancellor for the Floridas Division of Workforce Education involved working with business and industry to develop program standards for career and technical education, adult education and registered apprenticeship programs. As Chancellor for the Division of Career and Adult Education at DOE, she was responsible for working with business and industry leaders to ensure Florida has the skilled workforce needed to grow and diversify its economy. The local economy is just one area where GCSC can make a unique contribution. Any time the Port Authority or the economic development folks are meeting with an industry or business interested in relocating, the college needs to be at the table, because whenever a company is looking at an area, they want to know if there are talented people and an educated workforce. DIRECTOR from page B1 pand recreational access to the park where appropriate. While the park already offers parking areas and biking and walking trails, Green said they hope to expand those trails in the future and also incorporate overnight camp sites and paddling trails in the bay. Preservation and protection of the land was also an important issue Green discussed, focusing on the preserves many natural aspects that are unique to the area. He said the preserve has such an abundance of rare plant species because it has remained in its natural state, and the historical sites are also important to protect because they provide valuable information on earlier cultures. Further research will be promoted in the future to aid in the preservation of the buffer preserve land. We want to promote research thats going to sustain the area, Green said. And the research we have, we need to continue to share it. Pam Phillips, a public information ofcer for the Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas (CAMA) said these public meetings are held so the DEP can incorporate public feedback into the draft management plan. We dont have any real hot spots, Phillips said. People just want to make sure were protecting the area. The comments have all been very positive. Phillips said promoting awareness of the area can help increase tourism, ecotourism in particular, in the area. Were related a lot to the economic drivers and the tourism industry in the area, Phillips said. We want a healthy economy and a healthy environment they go hand in hand. PRESERVE from page B1

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 Trades & Services 227-7847 GET YOUR AD INServicesCALL TODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite 850-229-966315 Years of Service!Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 Star Staff Report The Gulf County Public Transportation Department, located at the Gulf County ARC Building on Industrial Road, is now accepting new riders. Gulf County Public Transportation provides free transport for Medicaid patients in the county and those who do not otherwise have access to their own form of transportation. We transport county residents to doctors appointments, social security of ces, grocery stores when they cant get there themselves, Gulf Transportation Director Kathy Balentine said. We want to prioritize the medical trips, but were de nitely also able to provide those other trips. She said the transportation service makes a trip to Panama City at least once every day, with trips to dialysis centers in Port St. Joe and Panama City three times per week. The service is also available to make longer medical trips. The ARC has a eet of 12 vehicles, most of which are wheelchair-accessible. We want to get the word out to anybody in need, Balentine said. Right now were serving about 500 individual riders each year, but wed like to expand that if we could. The Gulf County Association of Retarded Citizens was developed in 1976 to serve the developmentally disabled adults in the community. The ARC was designated the community transportation hub in 1990. For more information, please contact the Gulf County Transportation Department at 229-6550. Those interested in becoming a new rider must rst complete an eligibility application. Medicaid patients are automatically eligible. Gulf County taking new ridersBahiagrass is a popular, lowmaintenance lawn grass that does well with limited water and fertilizer inputs. Although bahiagrass does not produce a carpet-like, dense lawn like some other warmseason lawn grasses, it does provide a good, low-maintenance lawn where slightly reduced visual quality is acceptable. Before I go any further, I need to say that if you live along the coast, youd be better off growing another kind of lawn grass. Bahiagrass is not tolerant to salt spray, so it doesnt grow well in coastal Florida. Bahiagrass needs a fairly acidic soil with a pH range of 5.5 to 6.2. If you try to grow bahiagrass in alkaline soil, the minor elements in the soil will be tied up in forms that are unavailable to the grass. If your bahiagrass isnt getting enough of the minor elements, it may turn yellow. There are three varieties of bahiagrass sold for home lawns: Argentine, common and Pensacola. Argentine is considered the best variety for lawns. Its leaves are dark green, long, narrow and closelyspaced, so it produces a very dense sod with good color. Argentine responds well to fertilization, and its the most disease resistant bahia variety. Pensacola is the second best bahiagrass for lawns. Its also a long, narrow-leafed grass. Pensacola is the grass you see most often along roadsides in Florida. Common bahia is the poorest type available. Because of its coarse texture and wide spacing, it produces thin, loose sod, so it isnt recommended for use as a lawn grass. One of the nice things about bahiagrass is that it can be planted from seed or by sod. Seed is easier and less expensive than sod, but of course, it also takes longer for your lawn to become established. The best time to seed a bahia lawn is from April to June, just before the rainy season. Planting at this time will give your bahiagrass a head start and a full seasons growth before the cold weather comes. Spring and summer are also the best time to sod your lawn. The fact that bahiagrass does grow from seed can be a disadvantage. Bahiagrass produces tall unsightly seed heads in the lawn from May through November. These seed stalks make mowing more dif cult, and to have an attractive lawn, you need to mow more often. As I said earlier, bahiagrass is the most tolerant of all the Florida lawn grasses to insects, diseases and nematodes. However, it is plagued by the mole cricket. The mole cricket is a burrowing insect that damages roots. In summary, bahiagrass is an ideal selection if you live away from the coastal area of our county. It can withstand heavy traf c and prolonged drought with damage. Bahiagrass can be grown from seed or sod and makes a dense, deep-rooted lawn grass. It also has fair shade tolerance and can withstand cold temperature. My information was provided by extension turf grass specialist Dr. Brian Unruh of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, located at the Jay REC. For more information on bahiagrass lawns, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas.u .edu.Bahiagrass an economical lawn grass ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension director Right now were serving about 500 individual riders each year, but wed like to expand that if we could.Kathy Balentine Gulf County transportation director

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 21, 2012 The Star | B7 D & B Home Repairs Inc.Featuring Seamless Gutters. Assorted colors also available. Call 850-340-0605 Text FL10773 to 56654 Wewahitchka Infant Care-$90 Weekly or $25 Daily. Call 850-899-0397 Spot Advertising works! BP Claims ProgramThis communication includes new information and claims procedures for individuals and businesses The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana has granted preliminary apby the terms of the settlement unless the class member timely exercises the class members right Access to forms All claim forms for the BP Claims Program must be submitted in one of the following ways: By mail: By email: By fax: Additional information: Online: By Phone: For any claims under OPA that are denied or that are not resolved within 90 days after the date of submission to the BP Claims Program the claimant may, provided presentment and other requirethe NPFC, US Coast Guard Stop 7100 (ca), 4200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1000, Arlington, Virginia 20598-7100 for consideration. The NPFC may be contacted at 1-800-280-7118. 87538S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 482 Application No. 2012-25 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 01888-180R Description of Property: Commence at a 4 square concrete monument marking the Southwest Corner of Oak Gardens Unit II, according to the official map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 20, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida; thence North 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 43 Seconds West along the West, boundary line of Oak Gardens Unit II, 10.00 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 48 Seconds West, along the Northerly right of way boundary line of Pridgeon Street, 114.00 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning, continue South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 48 Seconds West, 50.00 feet; thence leaving said right of way boundary line, North 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 43 Seconds West, 105.00 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 48 Seconds East, 50.00 feet; thence South 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 43 Seconds East, 105.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel having an area of 0.12 acres, more or less. Name in which assessed: Taunton Development Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday ,the 18th day of July, 2012. Dated this 12th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2012 87394S PUBLIC NOTICE On May 15, 2012, an application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, D.C., requesting its consent to the assignment of license of Station WPBH(FM), Port St. Joe, Florida (93.5 MHz), from the Aloha Station Trust, LLC to Omni Broadcasting, LLC. The sole member of the Assignor, the Aloha Station Trust, LLC, is Jeanette Tully. The officers, directors, and members owning more than a 10% interest in the Assignee, Omni Broadcasting, LLC, are Ron H. Hale, Jr., James F. Hale, and Jennifer F. Hale. A copy of the application is on file for public inspection at 1834 Lisenby Avenue, Panama City, Florida, during normal business hours. May 31, 2012 June 7, 14, 21, 2012 87540S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 349 Application No. 2012-26 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 01511-060R Description of Property: Commence at the Northeast Corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 2, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence run North 89 degrees 50 minutes 50 seconds West, along the Northerly Boundary line of said Section 2, for a distance of 492.15 feet; thence leaving said Northerly Boundary line of Section 2, run South 00 degrees 28 minutes 57 seconds West for a distance of 37.58 feet to the approximate Southerly Right-of-Way line of Kate Glass Road per County maintenance and occupation for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning, thence continue South 00 degrees 28 minutes 57 seconds West for a distance of 218.00 feet; thence run North 89 degrees 31 minutes 02 seconds West for a distance of 100.00 feet; thence run North 00 degrees 28 minutes 57 seconds East for a distance of 218.00 feet to the aforesaid approximate Southerly Right-of-Way line of Kate Glass Road per County maintenance and occupation; thence run South 89 degrees 31 minutes 02 seconds East along said approximate Southerly Right-of-Way line, for a distance of 100.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being a portion of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 2, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and having an area of 0.500 Acres, more or less. Name in which assessed: Harold C Lester & Robin L. Lester. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday ,the 18th day of July, 2012. Dated this 12th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2012 87544S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1035 Application No. 2012-28 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 03451-015R Description of Property: Lot 3, Block B of Wetappo Creek Estates, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 7, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Gary D.McPherson & Jaronia McPherson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday ,the 18th day of July, 2012. Dated this 12th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2012 87542S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1351 Application No. 2012-27 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 05444-010R Description of Property: Lot 6, Block 89, according to the Official map of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Steven P. Kerigan All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday ,the 18th day of July, 2012. Dated this 12th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2012 87711S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 319 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-21 R.E. No. 01785-010R Description of Property: COMMENCING at the NW. Corner of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence run East 402 feet to the South side of Old Panama City Wewahitchka Public Road; thence run 316.8 feet, more or less, Southeasterly along the Southern boundary line of said Public Road, for POINT OF BEGINNING, thence running due South to an Iron Pipe, which iron pipe is 135 yards South of the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence run East 85 yards, thence run South 85 yards, thence run West 85 yards, thence run North 85 yards to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 1 1/2 acres, more or fees. And being in the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. LESS AND EXCEPT: That Deeded to Odell Jones, as per Deed recorded in O. R. Book 81, Page 524, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. (Now owned by Augusta C. Russ, as per Deed recorded in O. R. Book 361, Page 256, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, Having a Parcel ID#01785-002R). PARCEL NO. II: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence run East 402 feat, to the Old Panama City Wewahitchka Public Road, thence in a Southeasterly direction along the Southerly side of said Public Road 647.4 feet. thence run South 250 feet, for a POINT OF BEGINNING, thence West 75 feet, thence South 237 1/2 feet. thence East 75 feet, thence North 237 1/2 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. All in the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West. Name in which assessed: Gwendolyn Jackson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012. Dated this 5th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Jun 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 87713S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Seybold, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certifi-cate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 290 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-22 R.E. No. 01570-100R Description of Property: A portion of Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the NW. Comer of said Section 11, thence along the North line of said Section 11, South 89 Degrees 57 Minutes 59 Seconds East for 1168.83 feet, thence South 00 Degrees 02 Minutes 01 Second West for 44.48 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence South 13 Degrees 25 Minutes 03 Seconds West for 560.00 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 34 Minutes 57 Seconds West for 560.00 feet; thence North 73 degrees 25 Minutes 03 Seconds East for 560.00 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: A non-exclusive perpetual easement on, over and across the following description: A portion of Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of said Section 11, thence along the North line of said Section 11, South 89 Degrees 57 Minutes 59 Seconds East for 1016.06 feet to a point on the Southwesterly R/W line of Stone Mill Creek Road, said point being on the arc of a non-tangent curve concave to the NE; thence Southeasterly along said Southwesterly R/W line along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 768.00 feet, a central angle of 02 Degrees 21 Minutes 18 Seconds, an arc distance of 31.57 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING (chord to said curve bears South 70 Degrees 58 Minutes 50 Seconds East for 31.57 feet) thence continue Southeasterly along said R/W line along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 768.00 feet, through a central angle of 13 Degrees 24 Minutes 43 Seconds, an arc distance of 179.77 feet (chord to said curve bears South 78 Degrees 51 Minutes 51 Seconds East for 179.36 feet), thence leaving said R/W line North 89 Degrees 37 Minutes 01 Second West for 153.17 feet; thence South 13 Degrees 25 Minutes 03 Seconds West for 481.14 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 34 Minutes 57 Seconds West for 34.64 feet, thence North 13 Degrees 25 Minutes 03 Seconds East for 491.22 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: AT & T Wireless Services of Florida, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012. Dated this 5th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Jun 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 87715S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Seybold, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certifi-cate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 25 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-23 R.E. No. 00334-048R Description of Property: The South 1/2 of Lot 5, Block 5, of Howard Creek Properties, an unrecorded Subdivision of that portion of the West 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying South of State Road No. S-387; Also described as follows: COMMENCE at the Southeast Corner of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence North 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds West along the South line of said Section 5 for 20 feet; thence North 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds East parallel with the East line of said SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 for 250 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue North 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 75 feet, thence North 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds West for 140 feet; thence South 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds West for 75 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds East for 140 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: The North 1/2 of the East 1/2 of Lot #6, Block 5, Howard Creek Properties, an unrecorded Subdivision of that portion of the West 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying South of State Road No. S-387; also described as follows: COMMENCE at the Southeast Corner of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence North 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds West along the South line of said Section 5 for 20 feet; thence North 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds East parallel with the East line of said, SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 for 175 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue North 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 75 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds West for 140 feet, thence South 0 Degrees 09 Minutes 25 Seconds West for 75 feet, thence South 89 Degrees 51 Minutes 35 Seconds East for 140 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: James E. Watford, Jr. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012. Dated this 5th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Jun 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 87795S PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES City of Port St. Joe, Florida RFP No. 2012-02 **Re-Advertisement** The City of Port St. Joe is requesting sealed bids through June 29, 2012 at 3:00 PM, ET, from qualified Information Technology Companies to conduct Computer Hardware and Software Services for all City Computer Systems as needed. The preferred Company will be knowledgeable in local and state governmental regulations, Dell Hardware, MUNIS Software, VMware Esxi 3 & 4, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Terminal Server 2008 R2, Linux Enterprises 5, Postfix & Dovecot Mail Server, Enterasys Expedition series routers, Layer 3 managed network switching, CC Proxy internet proxy and certification in CJIS Security & Awareness Testing. A Certificate of Liability Insurance of $1,000,000 for General Liability must also be included in the bid proposal. All previous bidders must re-submit a bid proposal to qualify. Statements of proposals with an original signature and 3 copies should be submitted to: City of Port St. Joe 305 Cecil Costin Sr., Blvd Port St. Joe, FL. 32456 Bids must be clearly marked RFP #2012-02 Information Technology Services. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid in their judgment will be in their best interest. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. Questions regarding this solicitation may be addressed to: Charlotte Pierce, City Clerk City of Port St. Joe (850)229-8261 Ext 129 June 14, 21, 2012 87715S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Seybold, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certifi-cate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 797 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-24 R.E. No. 03391-011R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, and running South along 40 line for 120 feet; thence turn right and run West for 350 feet to County Road, thence turn left and run South for 120 feet along right of way of County Road; thence run East for 350 feet to the West line of the SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said Section, thence run North for 120 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING Name in which assessed: Valerie Dodds All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of July, 2012. Dated this 5th day of June, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Jun 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012 87847S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-104-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, An Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Bayside Savings Bank, Plaintiff, vs. S & M PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, MICHAEL L. BURKETT, a/k/a MICHAEL L. BURKETT JR., CHARLES A. DAVIS, a/k/a CHARLES ALLEN DAVIS, STEPHANIE M. DAVIS, a/k/a STEPHANIE MARIE DAVIS, and unknown tenants or other unknown persons in possession, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: MICHAEL L. BURKETT, JR. AND UNKNOWN TENANTS OR OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS IN POSSESSION YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property in GULF County, Florida: Commencing at the Northwest corner of Southeast 1/4 of Northeast 1/4 of Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, and run South for 320 feet to south line of County Road, thence run East for 334 feet to Point of Beginning, thence continue to run East for 236 feet, thence run South for 325 feet, thence run West 236 feet, thence run North for 325 feet to the Point of Beginning, same lying and being in Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on or before 30 days of the last date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this Court, BECKY NORRIS, Gulf County Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 8th day of June, 2012. BECKY NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk June 21, 28, 2012 87799S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2012-04 CITY OF PORT ST. JOE SEWER GRINDER PUMP STATIONS JUNE 2012 This project includes supplying grinder pumps stations for the Citys low pressure sewage system. The grinder stations will be purchased by the City for a set unit price in multiples of 5. This contract price shall be in effect for two years. Contract Documents and Specifications can be obtained at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850)229-8261 or by visiting the Citys web site at www. cityofportstjoe.com.The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Bids will be received until 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time, on July 13. 2012 at City of Port St. Joe. City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe. Florida 32456 and will be opened and read publicly Immediately thereafter. All bids shall be submitted in an envelope clearly marked Sealed BidCity of Port St. Joe Sewer Grinder Pump Stations June 2012. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to reject any and all bids. All bids shall be firm for a period of 60 days after opening. June 14, 21, 2012 87887S PUBLIC NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1112-22 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in purchasing the following: MINITOR V PAGERS OR EQUIVALENT Specifications may be obtained from the Clerks Office in the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd. Room 148 Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Interested parties should contact Brad Price for additional information at (850) 227-8353. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, June 29, 2012. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, July 2, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: WILLIAM C. WILLIAMS, III CHAIRMAN ATTEST:

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B8| The Star Thursday, June 21, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373 Retail / Of ce Space143 Acklins Island Drive-Cape San Blas+/1000sf; $10 psf mod gross; high visibility on Cape San Blas Road ; available May 1st212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-4915,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/3,600sf; Can be subdivided; $1250 per month 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 219 Reid Avenue Of ce/Retail;+/-5400 sf; sub dividable $7 psf mod gross (former Goodwill) 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 235 W. Gulf Beach Drive St. George Island Of ce/Retail;+/-800sf-1800;$14psfmod gross 401 Cecil G Costin Of ce; +/-2,000sf-5,250sf; high level of nish; move in ready, ask rate $9.00psf-$13.00psf mod-grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98+/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 separate storage units availableFor Sale217 W. River Road Wewahitchka+/-9,000sf; retail building; next to Richs IGA; +/-1 acre; on-site; avail for lease; inquire for terms. $500,000223 Monument Avenue Four city lots fronting Hwy 98; $375,000 Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina DriveCorner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for detailsMarina Cove Lots 12, 13, & 14; $375,000 PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive St. George Island Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; $399,000 RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark, Remodeled, Inc. Water ......................$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark ............................................................$400 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED Doublewide.....................................................$700 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, WATER VIEW HOME Unfurnished, Lawn Inc. ...................................$800 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Small Porch ....................................................$375 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, MOBILE HOME Large Yard ......................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS Outside Sales Representative An exciting opportunity now exists to join The News Herald. We are searching for enthusiastic, hard-working, and driven Outside Sales Representatives to join our team! Job Description The News Herald is looking for motivated sales professionals to establish footholds in their local markets by providing products and services to businesses. The Outside Sales Representatives duties may include but are not limited to: Cold call and prospect new territory opportunities. Introduce business owners to programs via presentation, answer detailed questions and maintain that relationship. Requirements Have strong work ethic Experience presenting advertising materials to a variety of businesses Cold calling experience Reliable Transportation Experience handling warm leads and prospecting for new leads. Field Sales, Business to Business Sales (B2B), Inside Sales, Outside Sales, or Outbound Sales experience ( Preferred) We Offer: Room for advancement and career opportunity Dynamic Monthly Residual Compensation Bonus programs Introductory and Ongoing Training Business Materials including phone, laptop and IPad, business cards, sales material and product knowledge information The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year.Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: Sales/Business DevInteractive Sales ManagerAre you passionate about providing the best media solutions to your customers? Floridas Freedom Interactive Newspapers, is seeking a hands-on Interactive Sales Manager with a track record of driving revenue in multiplatform environments. You will be responsible for coaching, mentoring and developing your sales team with the goal of aggressively increasing revenue. Included within your sphere of responsibility are the following: Developing new revenue streams, setting sales goals, field coaching and managing sales performance -making this a very hands on leadership role. The Interactive Sales Manager will foster an attitude of exceptional customer service and provide motivation, leadership and fresh ideas to the selling process. Position Requirements: Proven sales experience in digital products Experience developing and leading a high performing sales team Vision and passion to drive growth in interactive sales Strong analytical ability to budget forecast and effectively utilize market research The successful candidate will lead cross-selling efforts in print and digital solutions and must possess a demonstrated expertise with the Internet. A college degree in advertising or marketing is preferred but not required. Sales Experience and previous media management experience is preferred. Florida Freedom offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. This role offers a chance to live and work along Floridas Emerald Coast encompassing 24 miles of pristine white-sand beaches stretching along the Gulf of Mexico. If this sounds like the right mix of challenge and opportunity, please e-mail your resume or contact me at either of the following addresses: E-Mail: sfeith@notes.freedom.com http://www.facebook.com/#!/skfeith http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=1999909&trk =tab_pro https://twitter.com/#!/skfeith For more information about our organization please go to: freedom.com/careers Web ID#: 34211062 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKHUMAN RESOURCES: 13300 Allanton Road, Panama City, FL 32404 (850) 522-7413 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplacean aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS STRUCTURAL WELDERS PIPE WELDERS PIPEFITTERSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following positions:Utility Service Worker Public Works DepartmentPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on June 29, 2012. The entry level salary for a Utility Service Worker will be $12.08 per hr. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position:Full time Police Of cerPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on June 29, 2012. The entry level salary for a Police Of cer will be $15.50 per hr. not including bene ts. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. CLEANERS CLEANERS NEEDED NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 FOR SALE COMMERCIAL LOT522 3rd St, $59,000. Call (850) 227-8820 or email: gene@gm19.com. Text FL13756 to 56654 Tahoe Cascade 2004 24 50hp yamaha motor good condition, boat in fair condition. Comes with cover $3,800 OBO SOLD!!!!!! Text FL11522 to 56654 3 bedroom house for rent $750.; 2761 Oak Grove Ave, Port St. Joe, FL; 227-7800. FOR RENT: 2br, 2 ba 14 x 70 Mobile Home. C/H/A, no pets $550 month + $500 dd 850-229-6495 WEWAClean 3 bedroom 2 bath. Central heat and air. $525 per month plus security deposit. 850-639-5721 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Licensed Lab Tech Admin Asst. PT Registration Clerk EMT Paramedic RN LPN Applications are available at:www weemsmemorial.com &may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34213452 Medical/HealthOPS Dental AssistantThe Gulf County Health Dept, an EO/AA/VP Employer, has one opening for a full-time, OPS Dental Assistant (No Benefits Assigned). Starting Salary: $10.50 -$12.00 hourly, based on experience. Fingerprinting and Emergency Duties Required. Dental Assistant Certification or Expanded Duties Required. For more info, contact Lesia McDaniel at (850) 227-1276, ext. 149. Electronic applications only for this position; refer to Requisition Number 64923165. Closing date 07/06/12. Apply at: peoplefirst.myflorida.co m for assistance, contact: People First at 877-562-7287 Web-Id 34214105 Text FL14105 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications *Full-time front desk clerk w/great benefits. *Part-time seasonal housecleaning inspectors. Both positions require weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $25/Box! Shipping prepaid. (888) 883-8835 Port St. Joe, 506 8th St. Fri & Sat, 8-4Yard SaleBlue Willow dishes, pictures, handcarved fishing lures, ashtrays, lots more! Text 14164 to 56654 REBECCA NORRIS, CLERK June 21, 2012 87931S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEEN JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2302011 CA 00311 CA FLAGSTAR BANK FSB, Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS R. PARRISH; AMY L. PARRISH; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 12, 2012 and entered in 2302011 CA 00311 CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK FSB, is the Plaintiff and DENNIS R. PARRISH; AMY L. PARRISH; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant(s). Benny Lister as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 A.M. ET on July 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: PARCEL 1 BEGINNING AT THE SW CORNER OF THE SW OF THE NE OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST AND RUN NORTH 140 FEET IN C.W. ALDERSENS ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF WEWAHITCHKA; THENCE RUN EAST 105 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 140 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 105 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2 NORTH 11 FEET OF THE WEST 105 FEET OF THE NW OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, LESS ROAD RIGHT OF WAY. SAID LAND BEING AND LYING IN THE COUNTY OF GULF, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of June, 2012. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B.A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk June 21, 28, 2012 87911S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 12-27-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE BETTY CHISHOLM Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of MARIE BETTY CHISHOLM, deceased, whose date of death was May 2, 2012 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 21, 2012. Personal Representatives: Michael Chisholm 1106 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850)-227-1159 June 21, 28, 2012 87913S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Right Time Nutrition located at 302-A Reid Ave. in the County of GULF, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 15th day of June, 2012. CLMESSER INVESTMENTS, LLC June 21, 2012 87926S PUBLIC NOTICE The City Commission would like to announce the board will have only one meeting a month which is on the 4th Monday of every month. June 21, 2012 Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Port St. Joe121 Bellamy Cir. Saturday June 23rd 7:30am -?Estate/ Garage SaleFurniture, dishes, pots/pans, lamps. Mens suite 44s, mens shirts and jackets size L, mens pants 38w-29l and other misc items Wewahitchka 215 Charles Ave, White City. June 22nd & June 23rd. 8:00 -4:00 .HUGE 4-FAMILY YARD SALEFurniture, appliances, grill, books, collectibles, new belly rings, linens, antiques dolls & more. Rain cancels. Text FL13903 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020