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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03842
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 05-24-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03842

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR A rousing send off Thursday, MAY 24 2012 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Memories will be soldered into the hard-wiring of young brains this weekend as 134 high school seniors will enter the next passage in life. Seniors will walk the stage to receive their diplomas at both ends of the county over the next three days. Graduation ceremonies for Port St. Joe High School begin at 7 p.m. ET tonight at the R. Marion Craig Coliseum. At 6 p.m. CT on Saturday, the seniors at Wewahitchka High School will walk the stage to receive their sheepskins and turn the tassels on their mortarboards. The Class of 2012 (photos of the seniors begin on Page A8 of this newspaper): Port St. Joe High honors (3.85 GPA or higher) Karah Sherrie Bradley, Cameron Joseph Butts, William Connor Clark, Ian Christopher Frost, Kristina Lynn Furstenberg, Michelle Amber Hiscock, Rachel Lynne Jones, Avery James Little, Daniel McChristian May, Klenton LeGrand McLemore, Jenny Elizabeth Miles and Emerald Victoria Moana Muniz. Honors (3.5 to 3.849 GPA) Patricia Gale Davidson, Lisa Marie Davis, Nicolas James Dickinson, Katherine Leigh Lacour, Sarah Elizabeth Pippin, Sylvia Marie Sheline, Lacey Brooke Strickland, Alexandria Kayla Thomas, Erin Suzanne White and Kaley Danielle Wilder. Graduates Brittany Renee Anthony, Steven Michael Arthur, RaQueatha Latifah Bailey, Ryan DeLane Baker, Raney Suzanne Besore, Walter Fletcher Bowers, Elizabeth Louise Branch, Rhea Camille Brookins, Andrew Beau Burke, Blake Edward Buskens, LeAnna Marie Collins, Airren Shanise Daniels, Ashton Marie Davis, Dylan Corbett Dunaway, Austin Ryan Farmer, Bryce Jamir Frazier, Katie Alexis Gardner, Marsi Patricia Garrell; Victoria Lynn Hallman, Autumn Rose Haynes, Matthew Austin Howze, Phillip Michael Chance Hubbard, Jesse Lee Hyman, Jeffrey Eugene Jackson, Paul Brantley Jacobs, Joseph James Julian, Andrew Michael Kemp, Caleb Lee Kesterson, Alexander Lugene King, Trevor Jarrell Lang, Oneika Cherelle Lockley, Montana Ray Lyle, Samuel Miles McGee, Autumn SanLea Merriel, Daniel Ryan Neal, Sadik Latinan Padilla; William Joseph Rish, III, Ashley Jakia Robinson, Graduation weekend 134 will receive high school diplomas See GRADUATION A2 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Lewanna Patterson strolled down the hallway to the Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High gym while talking with science teacher Scott Lamberson. It was the nal day of school for seniors and Patterson and Lamberson were joining the celebration. As she walked the hallway, Pattersons expression changed. While listening to Lamberson, she had suddenly noticed the scattered cameras at the end of the hallway that were pointed at her. On the far wall of the gym, across the railing of the second level was a huge sign emblazoned, Congratulations Mrs. Patterson. Patterson hesitated before taking another step. Her mouth formed the words, Oh my gosh but the sounds were not forthcoming. And at the end of the walkway, Patterson tried to soak in EUBANKS RETIRES FROM WES Special to The Star After 21 years of dedicated service, Michael Eubanks is retiring from his position as Wewahitchka Elementary School Physical Education Aide. Mr. Michael, as he is affectionately known by students and faculty alike, began working at WES in 1991. Since then, Mr. Michael has worked with hundreds of children as they came through the PE department. When a child wanted to stop running before he reached the nish line it was Mr. Michaels cheers of encouragement that kept him going. When a little one scraped a knee or fell from the monkey bars it was Mr. Michaels quietly spoken words of comfort that dried the tears. But Mr. Michaels in uence reached much farther than that. He frequently visited classrooms (Mr. Browns was always a favorite) to encourage children to make the most of their educational opportunities and to make wise decisions in their personal lives. The epitome of a gentleman and a role model, Mr. Michael is looked up to by many children. May 16 was proclaimed Mr. Michael Day in honor of this extraordinary man. Knowing that he is an avid Florida Gator fan, the students and faculty showered him with A rousing send off Special to The Star Dan Christie has announced his intent to seek the position of Gulf County Property Appraiser. Christie brings 31 years of experience as the Chief Deputy for the Gulf County Property Appraisers office, where he has reported directly to outgoing appraiser Kesley Colbert since 1985. Christie commented, I have gained extensive working knowledge of the duties and the processes of property appraising, tax roll preparation, deed posting, title searching, field working, ownership mapping, and public relations that will assure a smooth transition and continued successes that Kesley Colbert instituted during his tenure. In working for Colbert for the past 28 years I have learned from the best ... patience, character and integrity. I will continue to work hard to lead a team that delivers a fair level of assessment for all the property owners of Gulf County. Christie earned the designation of Certified Florida Evaluator, through the International Association of Appraising Officers and has he extended his training with courses in Land Appraisal, Commercial Appraisal, Digital Mapping and Geographical Information Special to The Star Wyvonne Grif n Pickett, a Gulf County native, announced this week her candidacy for the of ce of Gulf County Supervisor of Elections. Time ies by so fast, it seems like just yesterday I was a candidate for Clerk of Court, Pickett said. Twenty years later, Im back, wanting the opportunity to work, again, for the people of Gulf County as their Supervisor of Elections. I havent been gone from here, just working privately in the real estate, construction, restoration and property management business. These professionals have allowed me the opportunity to live here in Gulf County. I was born and raised in Oak Grove, and moved into St. Joe during my school years. Then to Simmons Bayou, Cape San Blas, moved to Beacon Hill, out to Wetappo, then up North of Wewahitchka and presently back to St. Joe Beach. Its been a whirlwind but it has allowed me the opportunity to know so many good people by making new friends and neighbors. I loved living in all of these places because they all were my county home. Pickett graduated with honors from Port St. Joe High School in 1972 and obtained a business degree from Gulf Coast Community College. She has maintained a real estate brokers By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Port St. Joe commissioners deadlocked on a motion to reward an information technology contract to a new consultant, TJs Networking Group out of Panama City, despite a recommendation from City Manager Jim Anderson. The choice to hire TJs Networking Group would come with a choice not to renew the citys previous IT contract with local provider Bluemanta, which expired May 18. Anderson said the city could no longer contract with Bluemanta because the company no longer has access to the county networks after its contract with the county was terminated last August. Access is needed because the Port St. Joe Police Department frequently shares information with the Gulf County Sheriffs Department. Bluemanta is not allowed to access the police departments computers because they share information with the sheriff, Anderson said, adding that Bluemanta no longer has access to sheriff department computers since their county contract is no longer valid. Commissioners Lorinda Gingell, Bo Patterson and Bill Kennedy all voted DAN CHRISTIE WYVONNE PICKETT CHRISTIE ANNOUNCES FOR PROPERTY APPRAISER PICKETT ANNOUNCES FOR SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS Lewanna Patterson retires from Port St. Joe High School EUBANKS RETIRES FROM WES See EUBANKS A2 See RETIRES A2 See CHRISTIE A3 See PICKETT A3 Commissioners deadlock on IT contract See CONTRACT A2 .......................................................................................................................... PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The Star Patterson was greeted by a standing ovation and a gym full of current and former students expressing their love for Mrs. Patterson. MICHAEL EUBANKS Lewanna Patterson takes in the scene at the R. Marion Craig Coliseum last week as students, faculty and alumni celebrated her retirement. Behind her, right, is husband Pat. YEAR 74, NUMBER 32 Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A6 Sports ........................................... A7 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B4 Classi eds .................................... B7-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Wednesday, May 30, 2012 Arrival of 20 Wounded Warrior Heroes and their Guest plus 4 returning Warriors as Volunteers Private Welcome Dinner at Windmark for Warriors & their Guest. Honor Motorcade Parade for Our Community to Welcome Warriors 5:30PM EDT Motorcade Departs Windmark to Centenial Bldg, (see map for route) cheer & welcome our Warrior Hero Guests. Thursday, May 31, 2012 6:00 PM EDT HONOR BANQUET at Centennial Bldg with Brigadier General Bill Wolf for Warriors, Partner Sponsors & Special Guests Friday, June 1, 2012 7:00AM EDT Departure from PSJ Marina of Boats for Warrior Offshore Shootout Fishing Tournament WE WELCOME ALL CITIZENS PLEASE JOIN US FRI. MORNING AT 7:00 am, COME TO MARINA AND WAVE FLAGS AT JETTY PARK AS WARRIORS & BOATS LEAVE!!! Noon -1:30PM EDT Return and Weigh In of Fish for Warriors Fish will be cleaned by Volunteers from VFW Saturday, June 2, 2012 8:00AM EDT Farewell Breakfast especially prepared for Warriors & Guest by VFW Post 10069 and American Legion 116 along with the VFW Post 10069 Ladies Auxiliary GOLD PARTNER Anonymous Contributor Bluewater Outriggers Dockside Cafe Durens Piggly Wiggly John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 SILV ER PARTNER Bill Cramer Chevrolet Cadillac Buick GMC Boon Docks Restaurant City of Mexico Beach City of Port St. Joe Coast2Coast Printing Military Order of the Purple Heart, Chapter #794, PC, FL No Worries Vacation Rentals Panache Tents & Events Quilts of Valor Semper Fi Sisters Tapper & Company VFW Post 10069 Ladies Auxiliary Walter Green Swimwear & Accessories SILV ER L E V E L BO AT P ARTNER S Blake Anderson Brad Benners CMSgt Bob Cox, ret & CMSgt. Carol Cox, ret Danny Tankersly Dewey Blaylock Don Spillers Earl Stuckey Frank Romiti Guy Williams Jacob Tankersly Jim Lewis Lee Duren & Brent Romiti Matt Terry Nate Odum Randy Hudson Ryan Kelley Steve Newman & Zach Childs Steve Petty Tom Perry Zach Ferrell & Chris Hatcher B R O N Z E PARTNER Bridge at Bay St. Joe Capital City Bank Catherine VanBuskirk Centennial Bank Charles Costin, Atty. Debbie Hooper, Photography Farnsley & Johnston Wealth Manange ment Consultants, LLC Greg Abrams Seafood Harolds Auto Parts, Wewahitchka LT.COL. & Mrs. Jim Poe, ret Mexico Beach CDC Mr. Jay Rish Mr. & Mrs. Jim Caughey Mr. & Mrs. Stuart Shoaf Port St. Joe Marina Sandys Stitches Scallop Cove St. Joe Ace Hardware St. Joe Shrimp Sunset Coastal Grill Willis V. Rowan American Legion Post 116 S P EC I A L CO NTR IB UT O R Barbara Radcliff Blackwell Insurance Boyd & Paula Picket Boyer Signs Captain Trey Landry Catheys Ace Hardware Costin Insurance John C. Gainous Post 10069 VFW Mens Auxiliary Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Tabatt Roberson & Associates Waterfront Auto Sales FR I EN DS OF THE EV ENT Alines Beauty Salon Bayside Lumber Cadence Bank Cathey Construction Eds Red First United Methodist Church-PSJ Frank May Gulf County Beaches Fire Dept. Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Gulf County EMS Gulf County Sheriffs Dept. Gulf Foods Joe Mamas Wood Fired Pizza Merritt Construction No Name Cafe Port St. Joe Board of City Commis sioners Port St. Joe Fire Dept. Port St. Joe Police Dept. Preble-Rish St. Joe Rent All St. Joesph Historical Society Inc Wewahitchka Board of City Commissioners. Wewahitchka Womens Club The Veterans Task Force of NW Florida All Motorcycle Rider Organizations PARTNER SPONSOR LIST Thank you to the many patriotic citizens who are volunteering to make this community event possible as we Honor American Heroes. OR To purchase a graduation greeting ad: Call Joel Reed at 370.6090 jreed@star.com or Kari Fortune at 227.7847 kfortune@star.com Your 2012 Senior GRADUATION from page A1 Raymond Christopher Robles, Bethany Catherine Rutherford, Nichole Lillian Spilde, Jamie Revells Squire, Samantha Jade Taylor, Megan Lyndsea Walker, Montez Rashun Walker, Arion Caleb Ward, Cole Andrus Warren, Stephen George Whiten, Michaela Suzanne Wiegand, Lora Olivia Williams and Natalie Lauren Ward. Wewahitchka High honors (3.85 GPA or higher) Oliver Bryce Gerber, Lyndsey Taylor Ramsey, Megan Marie Setterich, Donia Marie Lanier, Anna Kaitlyn Gaskin, Cory Ethan Walding, Kristopher Kane Cox, Katelyn Drew Roberts, Heath Evan Bailey and Irjaria Lynn Pippin, Honor (3.5 to 3.849 GPA) Taylor Jay Husband, Nicholas Gauge Combs, Jeremy Dean Morrill and Justin Bradly Flowers. Graduates Beau Hunter Boggess, Theryl Rishaun Brown, Michael Austin Bryan, Michael Conrad Bryan, Jr., Quentin Schulyler Oats Carter, Austin Michael Chumney, Casey Blake Dauphin, Daniel Earl Ray Fisher, Taylor Brianne Flowers, Raven Cheyenne Forehand, Courtney Diane Goins, Deanna Nicole Gortt; Travis Edward Grifn, James Austin Guffey, Shelby Jeanne Hardin, Hailey Nicole Harris, Daniella Nicole Harris, Ciara Terrell Kordelius Jackson, Katie Lynn Jones, Sarah Cheyenne Luckie, Benjamin Hunter McDaniel, Travis Ryan McGill, Trent Avery McGill, Trey Daniel McGill, Bridgette Colena Myers, Christopher Gregory Myrick, Amber Nicole Norris, LaDonna Ann Faye Pelt; Sebastian Tyler Quentin, Shoshonie Lynn Rhames, David Allen Rice, Jr., Randal James Roth, David Shavez Russ, Jillian Shea Russell, Chelsea Renee Sandifer, Mack Daniel Sandlin, Tyler Anthony Sarmiento, Johnathan Alexander Shellnut, James Dillan Strickland, Joseph Mathew Tanner, Anthony Johnathan Tillery, Megan Marie Udell, James Dylan Ward, Richard Michael Ward and Tyler Rish Whitten. EUBANKS from page A1 pennants, mugs, caps and more that bore the UF logo. Despite the fact that Mr. Michael received only a token honorarium for his services, he was highly dependable, coming in each morning to assist with playground duty. Like the proverbial postman, neither rain, nor sleet, nor Floridas sweltering sun kept him from his post. Michael Eubanks was a reliable, loyal xture at WES whose absence will be felt for years to come. Mr. Michael is looking forward to retirement and spending time with his family. The faculty, staff and student body of WES would like to wish Mr. Michael all the best and give him a heartfelt thank you for all he has done for our school and our children. RETIRES from page A1 the scene. The gym was full, not only with students from the high school, but with former students and colleagues, on their feet, cheering, shouting and applauding Patterson. You are all in big trouble, all those of you who knew about this, Patterson would say later, tongue rmly in cheek. The celebration had been one of the best-kept secrets in Gulf County, at least from Patterson. All the planning had been done on Facebook because Patterson does not have a Facebook page or by word of mouth and secrecy was paramount. If she nds out about it, she probably wont show up for school. Shell call in sick, husband Pat Patterson said. Before the celebration, Pattersons son Jarred wondered if former student Calvin Pryor, one of dozens of former pupils who paid the visit to celebrate Pattersons retirement, was needed to ensure his mom made the event. Patterson was honored for her 38 years at Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School, an English and Spanish teacher whose ability to touch her students was on full display last week in the R. Marion Craig Coliseum. Patterson, not coincidentally, is also the only teacher to be selected as Gulf County Teacher of the Year three times. Shes a great teacher, said Duane McFarland, former principal at PSJHS and now with the district of ce. She is a great leader. Thirty-eight years of passion for education is hard to nd. Added current PSJHS principal Jeremy Knapp, It is my hope I can affect as many children as she did. But as several speakers noted, Patterson is more than a teacher and always was. Martha Sanborn, a veteran of 35 years at PJSHS, called her a true friend and teacher. Ann Comforter noted that her children still know Patterson as Aunt Lewanna. A true friend is someone who has your back, who is on your side, Sanborn said. You cant trade that and Lewanna is a true friend. She has been my mainstay. We both love our God. We both love our family. And we both love Port St. Joe High School. Beyond a slide show, a gift and some owers, Patterson also received a place of permanence at Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School. The A pod and language arts department at the school were dedicated in Pattersons honor, complete with a plaque and cheers. This place is my heart, Patterson said. CONTRACT from page A1 against going with a new rm. Kennedy said he voted against the motion due to lack of information and also said he didnt want to take any business away from a local provider. A termination letter to County Administrator Don Butler from Bluemanta owner Chuck Edwards cited overwork and a volatility of the political environment as the reason for Bluemantas ended relationship with the county. Although our agreements over the last two years have stipulated one Bluemanta technician be assigned to Gulf County, Bluemanta has dedicated two and for many months three technicians to address the growing support needs, speci cally of the BOCC of ces, and without additional compensation, Edwards wrote. The everincreasing demand on our staff combined with the overwhelming volatility of the political climate, has put an overwhelming strain on our company, and does not permit us to continue the relationship. The city will be left with no IT consultant until a decision is reached. Lighthouse facilities Commissioners continued their discussion on the potential relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse to city property at last Tuesdays meeting. Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson reported that the city received one proposal of $213,000 to move three buildings including the lighthouse, keepers quarters and gift shop. He also reported that Eglin AFB has continued to be on board for the project. The sentiment is theyve just got to gure out how to turn it over to us, Magidson said. So far the roads have been pretty smooth and were kind of on the same page. Magidson said he met at George Core Park with an engineer who specializes in historical restoration projects Magidson said the engineer will bring the project to the Florida Historic Trust for Preservation. Were still looking at quite a large number in moving fees and relocation, Magidson said. This is going to be fairly expensive but we wont worry about that. Were going to nd the money to get it done. Magidson said moving the lighthouse to city property would also incur additional costs from Progress Energy. Everybody wants to do it, its just paying for it, he said. July 4 Fireworks Anderson brought a proposal before the commissioners about helping to fund a July 4 reworks show for the area. He said it has been discussed that the city, county and Gulf County Tourism Development Council partner to provide a show by each chipping in $5,000. Last year, reworks were paid for in full by the TDC. Anderson said the money would need to come from contingency funds because the city does not have the money in the budget. He said they are also very short on the time needed to put out a bid. Times are tough, said Commissioner Bo Patterson. Theres a lot of need around the city. Commissioner Rex Buzzett agreed with Patterson. He said the city has already reduced funding for organizations like the Friends of the Library and Gulf County Association for Retarded Citizens. He suggested the city put pressure on the TDC to take care of the reworks. The commissioners asked if they could potentially loan the TDC the $5,000 and be reimbursed. Unfortunately for the TDC, theyre kind of in a state of ux right now, Magidson said. All I can do is ask.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, May 24, 2012 Paid Political Advertisment Paid for by: Citizens Improving Gulf County CHRISTIE from page A1 PICKETT from page A1 license for the last 30 years. She worked under Gulf County Sheriff Raymond Lawrence as a civil clerk and was later employed with the County Courthouse under the direction of Judge David L. Taunton for more than 12 years. She resigned her position as Judicial Assistant to run for Clerk of Court, began working in real estate and has been ever since. Wyvonne and her husband owned and operated Cape San Blas Vacation Rentals and Cape San Blas Cleaning Service. I was part of the growth and development of this unique area, she said. Our business was the first, and at that time, the only business to provide a host of services to the Cape. This required the accountability of millions of dollars that were placed in my trust, requiring separate accounting for each customer. I was the banker on most days and the garbage collector on others. Pickett later became the owner/manager of Scallop Cove BP. Upon leaving those businesses due to family health, she became involved in real estate investing and construction and has been involved for the last 10 years. I am ready to get back to working with the people of Gulf County, Pickett said. I know I can make an impact on our present economical conditions. I want to see the office of the Supervisor of Elections become more than a place to vote and register. There are times when the general public needs someone on their payroll from whom they can receive assistance. This could be that place. I know what hard work is and what devotion means. I know how to serve the public. Our voting rights, the security of the voters, and voting records are a great responsibility. The integrity of this office will be maintained to the highest degree of competency, as it has under Mrs. Griffins direction. I will provide you with the most efficient, service-oriented office in the Panhandle by using our tax dollars wisely. I have the leadership, skills and experience, and the financial background to maintain and serve the citizens of Gulf County. Wyvonne is the daughter of Buford and Ruth Grif n, mother of John J. Hattaway (J.J.), wife to Britt Pickett, sister to Juanise Grif n, stepmother of Boyd, Paula, Ronald and Leisa Picket, and step grandmother of Kimberly Shoaf, Grayson, Kyle, Christian, Dell, Kerigan, Katie Pickett and Jeremy and Emily Baxley, most all of which live here in Gulf County. Wyvonne attends the same church where she was raised, the Oak Grove Community Church. May God direct our lives to helping those in our community and our nation, she said. Wyvonne welcomes anyone to contact her with questions or concerns. She can be reached by phone at 647-2564 or by email at electwyvonne@hotmail. com. By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, led visiting Florida Sen. Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee) through what she dubbed the heart of the community last Wednesday morning. This gym is the heart of the community, Bodine said as she led Montford on a tour of the WIG Center and new community resource center in North Port St. Joe. We dont have a movie theater, we dont have a mall, but we have a gym. Bodine discussed with Montford a series of programs the workforce board leads designed to reach out to disadvantaged children in the community, including a summer camp program that hosted more than 150 children last year. Montford, a longtime Florida educator, spent the morning speaking with Bodine, Workforce Board Chairman Gary Ross and a host of others involved in the WIGs many programs about how government regulations and funding shifts have presented challenges for the resource center. Many of the problems presented stem from the Regional Workforce Boards Accountability Act, a multifaceted bill in the Florida Senate addressing regional workforce boards training, account expenditures and performance reports among other things. One big issue, Bodine said, is the mandate on how the board is to handle 50 percent of expenditures for individual training accounts. While the 50 percent may cover books and tuition, it does not cover extra expenses like certain vaccinations, uniforms or exams. Another important aspect of the training programs that may be threatened are the individual case managers assigned to each student that help to ease any back-to-school anxieties and guide students through the process. (The students) need somebody to encourage themthese case managers really hold their hands, Bodine said. When we go to the other side of that 50 percent we wont be able to pay these case managers and thats bad news, Ross said. They didnt think these things through. Montford expressed that in the large state like Florida, a one-sizets all approach does not cater to what each unique community needs. Theres a difference between Miami and Gulf County and thats a good thing, Montford said. Thats why were here. If its not working, we need to back up. Montford commended the workforce board and other groups present at the WIG center like the Christian Community Development Fund for banding together to provide a variety of resources for the community. It sounds like you do a good job in this community in pulling everyone together, Montford said. Montford asked the group if they have sensed a change in the attitude in the students who participate in the different programs at the center. A lot of these kids, they dont have hope, he said. County Commissioner Tan Smiley agreed with Montford that when the economy took a downturn, it diminished a vision for many young adults who could have obtained good jobs at the local phone company, paper mill or railroad. When all those jobs went away, the vision got smaller, said Smiley, who sees nothing but optimism in the WIG Centers direction for the North Port St. Joe Community. He said the presence of Bodine and the workforce board, and on-site mentors like Assane Beye are a blessing for the community. I can see great things just looking at it, Smiley said. I can see it. State Senator Montford tours WIG Center VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Sen. Bill Montford talks with Kim Bodine, the executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board and Workforce Board Chairman Gary Ross about upcoming summer programs at the Washington Improvement Group Center during a visit May 16. Services. He has shared the responsibility for preparing 31 consecutive years of tax rolls for approval of the Florida Department of Revenue without a single defect letter. Dan is an active member of Long Avenue Baptist Church, teaches a College and Career Sunday school class and sings in the choir. He has been a volunteer at the Gulf Forestry Camp, Gulf County Jail, and Franklin Work Camp over the past 22 years. He currently leads a Bible Study at Bay City Work Camp in Franklin County each Tuesday evening. Dan is an avid sherman, photographer and enjoys the great outdoors. And Dan is most proud of his beautiful daughter Alicia Marie Christie (Batista), a 2000 graduate of Port St. Joe High School and University of West Florida graduate, who currently teaches 5th grade in Raleigh, N.C. Serving in this of ce for the past 31 years I have had the privilege of meeting and helping the people of Gulf County, said Christie. I humbly ask for your support and vote to continue to serve you as Gulf County Property Appraiser. To share your concerns I invite you to call me at 227-1681, email me at dangulf99@hotmail.com, or learn more at www.votedanchristie. com.

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Thursday, May 24, 2012 Opinion A4 | The Star This was the rst Mothers Day I have spent without being able to talk to my Mama. As many of you know, it is difcult. Thats not a true statement; it is very close to unbearable. As I lay in the bed last night, tears ran down both sides of my cheeks and into my ears. Mama always understood when I cried. Mothers are just that way. When there seemed to be no hope and nothing else to do but cry, Mama had an answer. All of her problems, pains and sorrows were not secondary they were non-existent when you needed her. It could be something little or something enormous, but the world stopped and Mama had an answer. To my baby brother, she would say Buckle down Winsocki, Buckle down, from the song in the 1943 lm Best Foot Forward. The song goes on to note, If you ght youll chuckle at defeat. If you ght your luckll not retreat. She always had an answer. It might have been an I understand, or a hug. However, it was often a straightforward answer and a solution. Over the past few months since Mama has been gone, the one thing that I keep nding myself saying is, Mama was smart. She had the answer before I asked the question. She knew what I was thinking. I would like to think most mothers have that quality. I sincerely hope yours does or did. Mama loved to read my stories. She was my Mama. A teacher for more than 40 years, she overlooked the grammatical errors and gured out what I was saying. Mama always broke the code. Mama knew what I was trying to say. She understood there was a rst level, a second level and a Mama level. Sometimes she would say, You better watch what youre writing. To that, I would respond, Mama, no one would get that but you. She would laugh. I loved to hear my Mama laugh. She knew I was right. She had different special relationships with each of her three sons. She did it in a way that wove us together, rather than make us jealous. This is something that only a mother can do. I would like to think that only my mother could do it, but I know there are countless others who are doing the same thing. Mama read me, she knew, she never once asked me, What are you trying to say? She knew. Recently, I met a Jewish Frog. Mama would have appreciated meeting this frog. It was the Saturday before Mothers Day and we were practicing baseball. It was a spectacular day to be outside. The boys were practicing, the parents were talking and the little brother was wandering around. It was our second basemans little brother. He is a cute little fellow that is always into something. He comes on and off the eld as he wishes, sometimes shagging balls, sometimes just to get into mischief. The boys on the eld dont give it a second thought, he is the teams little brother. About halfway through practice, the little boy found a frog, either on the eld or in the woods nearby. He had to go player to player showing them his frog. He also found an empty water bottle that he used to make a portable terrarium. He put some grass and a stick in the bottle. During a break in the practice, I asked the little boy if I could see his frog. He nodded and took his frog out of the bottle. As I took pictures, I talked to the little fellow about his frog. Whats the frogs name? Jadon, the little boy replied. Where does a little boy get a name like that for a frog? I just gured he had a friend with the same name, or maybe there was a cartoon or television character with the name. During Jadons photo shoot, I noticed how very careful the little boy was when handling the frog. It was obvious that this was not his rst frog capture. He never gave me a reason for his new frogs name, so I decided to do a little research when I got home. This will be a weekend of barbecues, family and good times. For some it will mean an extra day in bed, at the beach, in front of the television. According to forecasters, the weather outside will be delightful, with a small chance of rain and plenty o sunshine. The beaches are inviting, the water intoxicating, with plenty to keep everybody busy. Amid the hustle and bustle is time to pause to remember, to consider the price that was paid and continues to be paid for those bounty of choices. From Lexington and Concord to Anbar Province, from the Chosin Reservoir to the Ardennes Forest, from Hamburger Hill to Hu Province, the price in American blood and lives is what affords us the ability to enjoy a holiday because it has surely been no holiday for the men and women of uniform. Who have answered a call that some cant imagine answering, who have suffered injuries many of us could not possibly comprehend, who have sacriced beyond the pale, beyond what many of us could fathom. We read, watch and hear their stories of battles in foreign lands, but we dont, we cant, fully appreciate the experience, the mind-set, the motivation required to defend your country, to sacrice all for your fellow American, fellow man. As was noted in last weeks story about wounded warriors, you cant know until you have walked in their boots. Many of us in this community will welcome a reminder of that cost, during the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend, during the rst weekend of June. We will see the price paid by men and women, and will have a chance to offer a bit of thanks, a small gesture, a welcome to our piece of paradise, understanding that it will never be enough, that the bill will never be fully paid. These men and women have fought and been seriously hurt while many of their comrades have died to provide the backbone to basic rights we enjoy, rights that seem under attack, the right to free speech, freedom to worship where we choose, a free press. Memorial Days meaning was driven home to me since I came to Port St. Joe, one of the rst stories I wrote for The Star, about the death of Christopher Blaschum, a Lieutenant Commander and Navy pilot who died while on training exercises in the Mediterranean. He was a graduate of Port St. Joe High School who was known for his infectious laugh, out-sized personality and among the rst of what has become the thousands of those who died in the wars that followed 9/11. His funeral was in large part a celebration of his life and mourning of his passing, but also a heart-rending testament to the sacrices of the soldier. Once the uniform is donned, soldier cuts to the front of the line from adjectives such as son, father, husband, wife, sister, brother and mother. The uniform wipes it all away. The following Motivational Analysis was written by Lt. Colonel Richard T. Tallman and is contained within the le of Clifford S. Sims Congressional Medal of Honor le. Sims was awarded the Medal of Honor after throwing himself on a grenade to save his men in a far-off province in Vietnam. He is the only man from Gulf County so awarded and if it does not capture what we should remember this weekend it is hard to know what would. Staff Sergeant Sims was not a man to act rashly; he made decisions with the rm belief that he was right, and he made them without counting the cost to himself. He was intensely loyal to his men, and never put his own interests above theirs. Just ve days before he died he was assigned the task of securing an LZ during heavy ghting. He assured that his men were properly positioned and behind suitable cover. And he made certain that the wounded were expeditiously evacuated. Yet he never considered cover for himself during a full six hour period during which he was under a harassing sniper re. His devotion was to his duty and to his men. And so I believe, as he never acted otherwise that I was aware of, did he consider the safety of his men on 21 February, fully aware of the sacrice he was making, yet more poignantly concerned for the fate of his men were he to choose any other course. In simple fact, Staff Sergeant Sims knowingly and willingly laid down his life so that his comrades might live. Even having read that passage dozens of times, having read the testimony that was submitted recommending Sims this man who rose from an impoverished, segregated life to marry, have a child and go off to war and not return due to his sense of honor and duty for the Medal of Honor, trying to understand his sacrice under re still clutches the throat. And particularly in this day and age when too much of what we read, hear and experience derives from the impacts of men and women, at home and throughout the country, who carry with them a false sense of entitlement, that life owes them, that their community owes them. Sims life and his sense of patriotism and courage shames them all and is a lesson all youngsters should be taught and understand, as some will walk the stage for graduation this weekend. And this Memorial Day we pledge to have a ne time, spend the extra hour in bed if able, go to the beach, have a meal out, but do so remembering that for more than 200 years and still counting men and women have paid a price for this holiday in blood. That such men and women have existed through the years is sufcient to remember; that they continue to walk among us is reason for celebratory awe. Skip beat to his own drum Keyboard KLATTERINGS Mama and the Jewish Frog Remember the why TIM CROFT Star news editor Have you pursued something so hard that you werent quite so sure what to do with it when it nally confronted you? You channeled so much energy and thought into the end result that maybe you lost sight of the objective. Or perhaps, the goal presented more challenges than you ever suspected. And the rewards, in the end, werent all they were cracked up to be. It brings to mind General Custer chasing so ardently after those Indiansuntil he caught them. You cant imagine how we looked forward to high school graduation! Wed been stuck in our little hometown forever! Oh, man, wed read about New York, Hollywood and Route 66 that could take you clean across the nation. But that was pipe dream stuff to us. In the here and now Miss Polly was force feeding Macbeth, of all things, into our little minds. Double, double, toil and trouble was the only part that I could relate to. And we didnt give a ying hoot if that Birnam wood ever got to Dunsinane! The tedium of everyday can dilute the joy of living if you are not careful. Of course, we didnt understand this in elementary school. And graduating from anything never crossed our minds. Shucks, we were just getting started. Our entire lives consisted of spelling bees, reading classes and multiplication tables. If we were arranged alphabetically Pam Collins would be in the desk behind me. She could talk a blue streak. About anything! Anne Alexander, Billy Thompson and Diana Morris were going to make the best grades. Bobby Brewer and Ricky Hale never won the spelling contest, but you ought to have seen the things they could make out of the clay on Miss Carolyns back table. We didnt look too much forwards or backwards. We didnt philosophize, criticize or judge. Mostly we were in the survival mode. And we understood with the intuitiveness of a Rhodes Scholar that what happened to Suzie Cozart or Phil Cook could surely happen to us! We certainly didnt think bonding or lifelong friendships; we just had a mutual interest in each others back. If Joe Galloway made Miss Belle mad, we all likely would suffer. By junior high we were spreading our wings. guratively, if not literally. It dawned on us that Skip Trevathan didnt think just like Betsy Dinwiddie, or like any of the rest of us for that matter. Buddy Wiggleton was funnier than Kenny Butler. Don Melton could throw a baseball harder than Alice Reynolds, but he wasnt as pretty. We ALL had something to offer! We didnt understand all the pieces. And we surely werent ready for that why me and why in this little town just yet. But we were growing in spite of ourselves. We also realized a great big world existed past Gleason and Huntingdon. We just didnt know how to get there. There had to be more to life than a classroom, a dairy bar and a fairly average town square. We felt trapped. When Millicent Blackburn got back from her stay in Memphis I stood over on her grandmothers front porch and quizzed her for hours. I dont think it ever crossed my mind one time that there were fellow ninth graders from the eastern most tip of South Carolina to the far side of Astoria, Oregon, asking the exact same questions. You are really not alone..even when you think you are. But try telling that to the painfully shy, pimple faced teenager trying so hard to ask Charlotte Melton to the Friday night dance. Somewhere in there between the logarithms and conjugating all those verbs we began to see graduation as our ticket out. It would make sense of all these endless classes, ball games, after school activities, parent-teacher conferences and Macbeth. We would have arrived! Look out world! We might even nally make it to Memphis. We gathered up at that back booth out at Franks Dairy Bar and shared our hearts about the future. College was high on the list for many of us. For others, it was the military. Still others had already lined up jobs. I was amazed to nd how truly interested I was in what Terry Harrison chosen path was. It suddenly really mattered what Fran Smartt was going to do with the rest of her life. Ditto for Beverly Sparks and Larry Ridinger. The closer we got to commencement day the less we talked about who Ruth Ann Wiley was dating and the more we talked about the new direction life was taking each of us. There was an excitement in our voices. Finally! Graduation seemed the perfect ending for your school career. They handed you a diploma and you were ready for the world. What could be easier than that! Pam Garrett was straightening my tie and brushing my tassel out of the way when I started to seriously ponder on this graduation thing. Bobby Brewer came by and slapped me on the arm. Id rather make clay airplanes with him..than think about the next fty years without him! Pam Collins could talk a blue streak, but it was our blue streak! Who could ever replace the laughter Buddy Wiggleton had wrought in all our lives? I didnt need to see Memphis, Millicent had already lled me in. Somehow graduation didnt make as much sense as you had always believed when you got right in the middle of it. I had been looking forwardbut the journey to get here hadnt been half as bad as Id been making it out to be. John Ingram gave one last tug to his cap, Heber, you ready? Only a lifelong friend would call me by my rst name. And no, when it got right down to it, I wasnt ready. Life is not about the next town, the next challenge, the next cant miss opportunity. It is about the people on both sides holding you up along the way. And boy howdy, Ive had some good ones. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See BN HEARD A5

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FREE DIABETES EDUCATION CLASSES TO BE HELD EACH WEEK BEGINNING WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2012 TWO LOCATIONS, TWO TIMES! C LASSES TAU G HT B Y ER ICA C ESKA R E G ISTERE D DIETICIAN EVE RY ONE WELCOME! EVERYONE WELCOME! 10:00 AM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH ST CARRABELLE 697-2345 5:00 PM WEEMS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 135 AVENUE G APALACHICOLA 653-8853 X101 Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 5-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Sowell Tractor Co., Inc. 2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.com We Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. SOUTH GULF COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT World Famous ANNUAL MEMORIAL WEEKEND BUTT ROAST 2012 Dont forget to order your butt in good time this year. We will not be selling tickets this year, but butts can be ordered in advance on line at our website www.sgcre.com A full roasted butt will cost $30 but we will also be selling sandwiches, chips and a soda for $6 and a Family-To-Go box with 1lb meat, coleslaw, 4 buns, 4 sodas and barbecue sauce for $20. We will be selling from lunchtime Thursday 24th May to after lunch on Saturday 26th May 2012. Come and join us we look forward to seeing you. All proceeds from the sale will go to our 501(c)(3) corporation to further the activities of our re department. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE (800-435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. Letters The Star| A5 Thursday, May 24, 2012 By Jason Alderman Now that tax day has passed, chances are youre either waiting patiently for your 2011 tax refund, its already been spent or you just wrote the U.S. Treasury a check. Its difcult to calculate exactly how much youll owe in taxes unless your income and family situation are identical from year to year. But going more than a few hundred dollars above or below your nal tax bill is not a good idea. A big refund means youve been giving the government an interestfree loan. Underpaying means you may have to pay costly penalties and interest on the amount. Your goal should be to receive little or no tax refund. Better to use that money throughout the year to pay down credit card balances or other debt, build savings, beef up your retirement plan contributions or invest. Unless youre self-employed, retired or had unexpected sources of income, the driving factor for how much tax you owe or have refunded is probably your W-4 form. Thats one of the many forms you lled out your rst day on the job. IRS Form W-4 determines how much federal income tax is withheld from your paychecks. The more allowances you claim on the W-4, the less income tax is withheld each pay period. When you le your yearly tax return, the government basically settles accounts with you. If they took out too much during the year, you get a refund; not enough and you pay additional taxes. Its a good idea to review your W-4 each year in case your nancial or family situation has changed. For example, if you or your spouse: Experience a signicant increase or decrease in income. Add a second job, start or stop working (including retirement). Have a child (including adoptions). Reduce or increase how many dependents youre claiming. Get married or divorced. Buy or sell a house. File for bankruptcy. Increase or decrease income adjustments for IRA/401(k) deductions, student loan interest payments or alimony. Signicantly change your itemized deductions or tax credits. If you have a sizeable change in taxable income not subject to withholding, you may want to either increase the amount withheld from your paychecks or make quarterly estimated tax payments. Otherwise, the IRS may charge you an underpayment penalty come next April. Estimated tax rules are fairly complicated, so refer to IRS Publication 505. Ask your HR department for a new W-4, or download the IRS version that lets you enter your information electronically and print out a copy (search www.irs.gov.) The form contains worksheets for calculating personal withholding allowances and estimating income adjustments if you plan to itemize deductions. Generally, youll claim one allowance for yourself and one for each of your dependents. However, you can adjust the number to avoid having too much or too little tax withheld from your pay. If you need additional help, see IRS Publication 919, use the IRSs Withholding Calculator or use the calculator found in most tax preparation software packages. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. The path of democracy Editors note: The following was submitted by Tom Parker of St. Joe Beach. In 1787, Alexander Tyler, a Scottish history professor at the University of Edinburgh, noticed a continuing pattern in the advance and decline of the worlds democracies. After Tylers words, Parker ponders a simple question. On this holiday that honors those who fought for our democracy, it seemed a timely passage. A democracy will continue to exist up until the time that voters discover they can vote themselves generous gifts from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always vote for the candidates who promise the most benets from the public treasury, with the result that every democracy will nally collapse due to loose scal policy, which is always followed by a dictatorship. The average age of the worlds greatest civilizations from the beginning of history, has been about 200 years. During those 200 years, those nations always progressed through the following sequence: 1. From bondage to spiritual faith; 2. From spiritual faith to great courage; 3. From courage to liberty; 4. From liberty to abundance; 5. From abundance to complacency; 6. From complacency to apathy; 7. From apathy to dependence; 8. From dependence back to bondage. So where are we, citizens of the United States, in the historically proven Life Cycles of Nations? I found that Jadon comes from the Hebrew origin. How did the little boy know the frog was Jewish? I dont know. Little boys know things like this I suppose. I found various meanings for the name, but the predominant ones were, God has heard, Thankful and He will judge. Some pretty heavy meanings for such a little frog (and boy). In researching Jewish frogs, I found a wonderful story told by a Southern Rabbi (in the state of Georgia). The Rabbi tells of a fellow who was trying to get rid of a frog on his dining room table during the Frog Plague in Egypt. This fellow got really tired, annoyed and frustrated with the frogs ribbits. The frog was persistent. The croaking was never ending. The Egyptian fellow started hitting the frog. The more he hit the frog, more frogs would appear. It kept on and on. The Rabbi compared the croaking frog to children, noting they (the children) want our attention, our love and they want answers to their questions. If the children dont get what they want, they just go on and on asking for it over and over again. This begging/croaking from children requires parents to respond correctly and calmly. The Rabbi notes that parents should remain in control and give the same sweet response that is rm and consistent. In other words, dont whack the frog it will get worse. He ends the story noting, Our children are blessings, not a plague. The more we remember that, the better well respond to them! Not being Jewish, I didnt know what the Rabbis salutation, Good Shabbos meant. I found that the term simply meant Good Sabbath. Jewish folks consider from Friday sundown to Saturday sundown, the Sabbath. Jadon, the frog, was found on a Saturday afternoon. Perhaps little boys know more than we think they do. I know mothers do. Find more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. BN HEARD from page A4 SHOULD YOU ADJUST YOUR TAX WITHHOLDING? THE PATH OF DEMOCRACY

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters MAY FEATURED FISH: This months grand prize: Calcutta prize pack includes, gear bag, T-shirt, a pair of sunglasses, decals, visor and drink coozie $129.99 value Wright Mcgill Blair Wiggins S-curve rod with a Sabalos SAB 30 reel combo, $100.00 gift card for online shopping at Bluewater Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 6 Special to The Star Because Memorial Day weekend, which kicks off summer activi ties, is right around the corner, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva tion Commission (FWC) reminds all boaters in Florida to rededicate themselves to boating safely. Florida is a great place to enjoy boating year-round, said Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. That weekend marks the unof ficial beginning of sum mer and means even more people will be out on the water. National Safe Boating Week (May 19-25) also presents an opportunity to empha size the importance of remaining safe while boating. Memorial Day week end is May 26-28. The safe-boating ef fort is timely, as 10 peo ple have already lost their lives this year due to boating accidents. We want to reach out to as many boaters as we can to help them under stand that most boating accidents are prevent able, Brown said. FWC officers are committed to keeping people as safe as possible, but we need your help. The FWC reminds boaters to enjoy their time on the water by re membering a few safety precautions, such as re maining alert while op erating a boat, wearing a life jacket at all times and designating a sober boat operator. According to the FWC, inattentiveness of the op erator often contributes to boating accidents, and statistics show that more than 64 percent of the 66 boating-related deaths confirmed last year were attributed to drowning. The wide variety of comfortable, affordable and stylish life jackets on the market today of fers all boaters the pro tection they need. Boating smart and safely could result in fewer injuries and deaths each year, Brown said. More information can be found by visiting My FWC.com/Boating. Special to The Star In Florida, shing is an important part of our life style as well as the econo my. However, this enjoyable activity sometimes can lead to problems for birds and other wildlife, such as sea turtles and manatees. According to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission biologists, monolament shing line and shing hooks that are improperly handled or dis carded can entangle these animals, leading to injury and even death. The brown pelican is one species that is espe cially impacted by monol ament line. These birds fre quently spend time looking for an easy meal at piers and other shing hotspots. They are often hooked ac cidently as they try to grab bait off an anglers line. Discarded monolament line can wind up hang ing from trees, piers and other structures, and can ensnare these birds. Once entangled, pelicans can have a difcult time ying and feeding. We often nd peli cans that died as a result of monolament line en tanglements hanging from trees and other vegeta tion, said FWC regional biologist Ricardo Zam brano. These birds of ten suffer for days before succumbing to injury or starvation. Here are some simple things you can do to help protect brown pelicans and other wildlife: Properly dispose of monolament line. If you have unwanted line, store it safely and securely until it can be placed in a recy cling bin. Dont leave shing line unattended, as pelicans may be tempted to steal your bait. Avoid casting near trees, utility lines and oth er areas where your line may get caught. Check your tackle fre quently for frayed line that may easily break. Do not feed pelicans or other wildlife, since it encourages them to ap proach fishing boats, piers and anglers. If available, use fish-scrap reposito ries. If they are not avail able, discard your fish scraps in a garbage can or at home. If you do accidentally hook a pelican, you should avoid cutting the line. Gen tly remove the hook if you feel confident you can do so without causing harm to yourself or the bird. If you cannot safely remove the hook and line from the pelican, contact a local wildlife rehabilitator. For a list of wildlife rehabilita tors in your area, contact any of the FWCs five re gional offices or consult wildliferehabinfo.org/. For more information on the statewide Monofil ament Recovery & Recy cling Program, visit mrrp. myfwc.com. By JESSICA BASHAM Special to The Star Green anoles, a type of American lizard, are often called American chame leons because they can change color, but they are not chameleons at all. These anoles are the only native lizard in the southeastern United States that changes color, but it is only from bright green to brown or gray. Usually their change in color is due to stress but also to temperature and mating. Males extend a bright pink dewlap (a piece of skin that unfolds from its throat) when looking for a mate or when warning other males to back off. Their head-bobs are like pushups and show the female and other males that they are strong. Mating season starts in the beginning of April and continues throughout the summer months. In South Florida, the mating season is a little longer. If you see a green anole bobbing up and down and showing his dewlap, look around; there may be a female nearby. A female lays one or some times two eggs every two weeks, usually in dirt or de bris at the base of a plant. The green anole is the only native anole in the Southeast and is found from North Carolina west to Texas and throughout Florida. True chameleons, how ever, live in Africa, Mada gascar, Portugal, Spain and parts of Asia. At least two species have been introduced into Florida. They can change to every color of the rainbow be cause of mood, tempera ture, habitat, stress, anger and defense. They often blend easily into their sur roundings by changing color. Chameleons hold on to branches with their feet and coiled tails. Their long, curled tongues shoot out like arrows to catch prey. Anoles are small, long and slender. Like the cha meleon, they have the abil ity to cling to objects but only because of a sticky pad on the underside of their toes. Their tails are not coiled but long and thin and can break easily. This is so they can escape pred ators. When caught by the tail, the lizard squirms un til its tail breaks and it can escape to freedom. The confused predator is left with only the tail and won dering where its lunch has gone. Lizard tails will grow back a little. In southwestern Flor ida, the dewlap may be gray, white or light green. These populations are a different subspecies or race of green anole. Watching green anoles is easy. Around homes, they hang from walls, scurry across sidewalks and driveways and climb shrubs, branches and trees. A little anole visits me daily. He perches on a railing outside my office window and bobs his head up and down, showing off his bright pink dewlap. Anoles generally have a territory, so chances are youll see one in the same place, day after day. The one I see is missing his tail. Another anole in Florida that is not na tive is the brown anole from Cuba. Many times they are confused with the native green anole when the green anole has turned brown. But brown anoles have obvious pat terns on their backs and sides. Green anoles typi cally have no pattern, al though a female may have a slightly wavy whitish stripe down her back. For more information, you can visit animaldiver sity.ummz.umich.edu/site/ accounts/information/Ano lis_carolinensis.html. Special to The Star A new draft of the veyear update to the Gopher Tortoise Management Plan for the state is available for review. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is asking for public input. The threatened gopher tortoise is classied as a keystone species, because its extensive burrows offer shelter to more than 350 other species such as the federally threatened east ern indigo snake. Gopher tortoises were identied more than 235 years ago by naturalist William Bartram as he explored Florida. Gopher tortoise bur rows average 6.5 feet deep and 15 feet long, provide a home for hundreds of other species and offer great amenities: constant temperature, refuge from res and bad weather, and protection from preda tors, said Deborah Burr, the FWCs gopher tortoise plan coordinator. When gopher tortoises decline, so do the occupants of their burrows, such as in digo snakes, gopher frogs and burrowing owls. The revised draft Go pher Tortoise Manage ment Plan for the rst time addresses the total picture of the tortoise and its ten ants, Burr said. The draft plan and link to comment on the plan are available at MyFWC.com/ GopherTortoise. Public comment will be accepted on the draft plan through June 25. More than 100 in dividuals and stakeholders already have made sug gestions on improving the original 2007 plan, through written input and a public meeting. The draft revisions to the Gopher Tortoise Man agement Plan are sched uled to go before the FWCs Commissioners at their Sept. 5-6 meeting. The objectives of the draft plan are: Minimize loss of go pher tortoises by ensuring humane, responsible relo cation from lands slated for development; Increase and improve species habitat; Enhance and restore populations where the spe cies no longer occurs or has been severely depleted; Maintain its function as a keystone species by also conserving commen sal species. Floridas rst Gopher Tortoise Management Plan was approved by the FWC in 2007 and was scheduled to be updated ve years later. Under the original plan, Florida has made progress in slowing the decline of go pher tortoises by providing options to move tortoises off lands slated for devel opment as well as oppor tunities for homeowners and landowners interested in conserving tortoises on their property. Since 2007, the plan has restored and managed an annual average of 36,000 acres of gopher tortoise habitat, expanded pro tected tortoise habitat by more than 6,500 acres, and humanely relocated than 4,000 gopher tortoises from development sites to public and private properties that afford the species longterm conservation. Stakeholders in the Go pher Tortoise Technical As sistance Group were instru mental in the development and implementation of the Gopher Tortoise Manage ment Plan and continue to provide input during the plans revision process. As sistance group represen tatives come from a wide range of interests: indus try, conservation, land de velopment, state and local government, universities and research, commercial services, private landown ers, large federal and state land managers, animal advocacy and the general public. In Florida, it is illegal to harm gopher tortoises or their burrows. Gopher Tortoise Management Plan draft updated The green anole is no chameleon Monolament shing line perilous for pelicans FWC reminds boaters to boat smart, safely Offshore species are returning to the Forgotten Coast in great numbers this month. Spanish Mackerel and king sh are thick in the near shore number in Mexico Beach. Try the buoy line out of Mexico Beach rst trolling dusters with cigar minnows for both the Kings and Spanish. Plenty of chicken or peanut dolphin are showing up close to shore as well this month. Lighter spinning or casting gear with a silver spoon or Got-Cha plugs will keep the school around your boat if you keep one hooked. Only a few weeks left until red snapper season opens, so gear up! Inshore Offshore As May is at its midway mark, shing in St. Joe Bay is still red hot. Good conditions for inshore shing have produced great catches of trout, ounder, and red sh this past week. Most anglers are using live shrimp and bull minnows, but Gulp 3 shrimp in a New penny or Sugar spice glow is the hot bait now. Use a popping cork for the ats and grubs for the deeper holes around the bay. SPONSORED BY

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com A Section By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com PORT ST. JOE The Tiger Sharks proved an inhospitable host as spring football practice game to a close last Thursday night. Eleven Port St. Joe running backs rushed for more than 420 yards and the Tiger Sharks blanked both Franklin County and Wewahitchka over 24 minutes of play to come away with a clean sweep during a threeteam jamboree. The Tiger Sharks pummeled Franklin County 27-0 over two quarters and dominated a battered Gator team 19-0. Wewahitchka beat Franklin County 24-7 in the opening half. I was pleased with the effort, said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon. We have good depth at running back, but we are young on the offensive line and we cant afford any injuries. But I thought we played well tonight. Wewahitchka 24, Franklin County 6 The Seahawks took the opening possession there were no kickoffs or punts during the jamboree and marched 70 yards in 12 plays to a touchdown. Most of the damage, all on the ground, came from quarterback Dwayne Griggs and running back Skyler Hutchinson. Hutchinson scored from the 1-yard line for the touchdown and Dan Careno added the extra point kick. From there it was the Jayln Addison show. Addison rushed eight times for 136 yards in the 24 minutes against the Seahawks he finished the night with 162 rushing yards and scored on runs of 29, six and 58 yards. On the Gators first possession they marched 70 yards in five plays, the big play a pass into the left flat by Rashard Ranie that Jarvest Sherfield made a nice one-handed grab of and turned into a 29-yard gain. Addison scored two players later from 29 yards and Ranie ran for the twopoint conversion. Franklin County responded by driving to the Wewahitchka 1-yard line but on a third-and-goal, a handoff was fumbled and the Gators recovered. Six plays and 98 yards later including a gorgeous deep rainbow for 76 yards from Ranie to Sherfield and Addison scored from the 3. James Harris ran for the two-point conversion. Griggs was intercepted at the Gator 46 while the Seahawks were marching again they finished with more total yards than Wewahitchka but their final four possessions ended fumble, interception, fumble, fumble and Addison sprinted 58 yards for a touchdown on the next play. Ranie scored on the two-point conversion to complete the scoring. Port St. Joe 27, Franklin County 0 Using remnants of the Fling-T favored by former Coach John Palmer, an offense that uses motion and misdirection to create space for running plays, the Tiger Sharks dominated the two quarters against Franklin County. A fumbled Port St. Joe handoff on the first series against the Seahawks was followed by domination as the Tiger Sharks rushed for 258 yards with 11 different backs, including three seventh-graders, getting touches. Franklin County fumbled the ball right back after that initial series and Jarkeice Davis (the nights leading rusher with 179 yards) sprinted 80 yards around left end for a touchdown. After stopping the Seahawks on downs Port St. Joe needed just four plays to cover 54 yards, Natrone Lee catching a 24-yard touchdown pass at the right ag from quarterback Ramello Zaccarro. The Tiger Sharks converted another Franklin County fumble one of six turnovers for the Seahawks into a 10-yard touchdown run by Lee, who nished with 101 rushing yards. The Seahawks fumbled on the ensuing play and three plays later Dusty Richter carried from 11 yards out for the touchdown, Justin Hites extra point Hites was three of four on extra point kicks providing the nal scoring for the two quarters. Port St. Joe 19, Wewahitchka 0 The nal two quarters were between county rivals Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka and after losing four starters in the opening half against Franklin County the Gators were playing with one hand behind their back. Port St. Joe stopped Wewahitchka on downs to open the rst quarter and marched 62 yards on nine plays on the following drive. Rumella Zaccarro dove over from the 1-yard line for the score. The Gators marched to the Port St. Joe 45 on the next drive but was forced to punt the ball ending up at the Tiger Shark 15.\ A Davis sweep for 27 yards and a 15-yard penalty on a late hit put Port St. Joe in Wewahitchka territory and the Tiger Sharks scored ve plays later on another 1-yard dive by Zaccarro. Hites missed on the opening extra point and the Tiger Sharks went for two on Zaccarros second scored but the pass failed. The teams exchanged turnovers before Wewahitchka fumbled the ball away at the Tiger Shark 48. Davis dashed 32 yards, Lee 21 and Joe Love nished the drive with a 8yard touchdown up the middle of the defense. Hites hit the extra point kick to complete the scoring. I didnt like that, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah of the nal two quarters. We lost four kids in that rst half and we just cant afford that. When we were fresh and the other team was fresh, we played well. After the rst possession, I thought our defense really cracked down. Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 7 Star Staff Report Katie Lacour, Port St. Joe High Schools all-time leader in hits and stolen bases signed a letter of intent to attend Southeastern Louisiana later this year on a softball scholarship. Lacour, one of just two seniors on the Port St. Joe team and a four-year starter signed last week to play for the Lions. Southeastern Louisiana University is a NCAA Division 1 school in Hammond and plays in the Southland Conference. This past season, Lacour batted a teambest .550 while helping the Lady Sharks reach the state Class 1A nal four. Star Staff Report All-Pro Soccer, will be holding two Summer Soccer Camps in the area, on Monday-Friday. June 1115. The rst will be sponsored by the Gulf County Soccer Boosters and be held at the Port St Joe Soccer Complex from 9-11:30 a.m. (ET) on those dates. On those same dates, the Callaway Arsenal Soccer Club will be hosting the camp from 4-6:30 p.m. (CT) at the Callaway Sports Complex. Both camps will be supervised by former professional player and coach, Gary Hindley. Coach Hindley, a ve-time Coach of the Years selectee, is currently both the boys and girls coach at Port St Joe High School. At both camps, there will be individual instruction for both eld players and goalkeepers, from ages 717. Spaces will be limited. For questions or to obtain a registration form, contact Coach Hindley at 276-6353 or gjhallpro@ aol.com. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Womens Softball League will begin play on Tuesday, June 5. For details call 340-1389 or visit facebook.com/PSJWomensSoftball. Port St. Joe dominates jamboree Star Staff Report During the month of June, the St. Josephs Bay Golf and Country Club is pleased to offer free golf lessons to local boys and girls ages 8-16. Highly skilled instructors will introduce students to all aspects of the game including such basics as grip, stance, posture and swing. Other topics will deal with the correct full swing, short game, trouble shots, chipping and putting. The junior golf clinic will be held every Friday in June from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET beginning June 1. All equipment and practice balls will be provided free of charge and special tee times and prices are available for parent/student matches. Limited space is available, so please register early. For more information call 227-1751, visit our web site at www.stjoebaygolf.com or email info@stjoebaygolf. com. Port St. Joe womens softball league starting soon PSJHSs Lacour signs with Southeastern Louisiana I was pleased with the effort. We have good depth at running back, but we are young on the offensive line and we cant afford any injuries. But I thought we played well tonight. Chuck Gannon Port St. Joe Coach Free golf lessons for students this June SUMMER SOCCER CAMPS Star Staff Report Wewahitchka track standout Donia Lanier has signed a cross country scholarship with Chipola College. Pictured from left, are: (seated) Donia Lanier, (back) Mary Holley, Wewahitchka High School girls cross country coach; Jay Bidwell, Wewahitchka High head coach for track and cross country; Donias mother Tammy Lanier; and Chipola cross country coach Rance Massengill. Lanier was track and cross country captain this year at WHS and voted the schools most valuable runner. Wewahitchkas cross country team nished second in the district. Lanier also placed rst in the 300 meter hurdles and was on relay teams which won rst place in the 4 x 800 and 4 x 100 at the district meet and placed in the Region 1-1A meet, the former team earning a spot in the state Class 1A meet. WHSs Lanier signs with Chipola

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Heath Bailey Beau Boggess Theryl Brown Austin Bryan Quentin Carter Austin Chumney C ONGRATULATIONS W E W AHIT C HKA H IGH S C HOOL C LASS OF 2012 Gauge Combs Kristopher Cox Casey Dauphin Daniel Fisher Justin Flowers Taylor Flowers Raven Forehand Kaitlyn Gaskin Bryce Gerber Courtney Goins Deanna Gortt Austin Guffey Taylor Husband Ciara Jackson Katie Jones Donia Lanier Cheyenne Luckie Hunter McDaniel Travis McGill Trent McGill Trey McGill Jeremy Morrill Bridgette Myers Chris Myrick Amber Norris Ladonna Pelt Jaria Pippin Sebastian Quentin Lyndsey Ramsey Shoshonie Rhames David Rice Jr. Katelyn Roberts Randy Roth David Russ Jill Russell Chelsea Sandifer Mack Sandlin Tyler Sarmiento Mathew Tanner Megan Udell Cory Walding Tyler Whitten Richie Ward ALMA MATER Oh, Wewahitchka High School were loyal to you, to our school and our friends were faithful and true. You stand by the highway, a beacon of light, a symbol there to knowledge, to the truth and the right. You stand for the highest, you stand for the right. Were true to your colors of red and of white. And whereere we wander from these halls so dear, the clear call of our high school we will always hear. Megan Setterich Johnathan Shellnut JD Strickland Dylan Ward Daniel Withers

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Local The Star| A9 Thursday, May 24, 2012 C ONGRATULATIONS P ORT S T J OE H IG H S CH OOL C LASS OF 2012 Brittany Anthony Raqueatha Bailey Ryan Baker Raney Besore Karah Bradley Rhea Brookins Andrew Burke Christopher Bush Blake Buskens Cameron Butts Connor Clark LeAnna Collins Patricia Davidson Ashton Davis Paul Jacobs Rachel Jones Joseph Julian Andrew Kemp Caleb Kesterson Alex King Katherine Lacour Autumn Merriel Jenny Miles Emerald Muniz Daniel Neal Sadik Padilla William Rish Ashley Robinson Raymond Robles Bethany Rutherford Sylvia Sheline Nichole Splide Jamie Squire Lacey Stickland Samantha Taylor Alexandria Thomas Megan Walker Montez Walker Arion Ward Cole Warren Erin White Stephen Whiten Michaela Wiegand Kaley Wilder Lora Williams Natalie Wood Lisa Davis Nicholas Dickinson Dylan Dunaway Bryce Frazier Ian Frost Kristina Furstenburg Katie Gardner Marsi Garrell Allyson Harvey Autumn Haynes Michelle Hiscock Matthew Howze Phillip Hubbard Jesse Hyman Trevor Lang Avery Little Oneika Lockley Montana Lyle Daniel May Samuel McGee Klenton McLemore GO SHARKS!!!

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Ryan Baker LeAnna Collins Lisa Davis Bethany Rutherford Durens Piggly Wiggly 125 W Hwy 98, Port St. Joe (850) 229.8398 www.DURENSPIGGLYWIGGLY.com Congratulations on Your Graduation From Gook Luck In Your Future 515 Cecil G Costins Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL (850) 227-6195 Congratulations to All Our Local Graduates! st. joe rent-all & st. joe n u rs e r y & supply 706 First Street, Port St. Joe 850.227.2112 850.227.7449 A World Of Well Wishes, Grads! Congratulations & Good Luck In The Future! From Best Wishes from 302 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd Port St. Joe, FL (850) 227.7099 Best Wishes from 218 Hwy 98 Wewahitchka, FL (850) 639.2252 The time has arrived to send you on your way, the days of youth culminating with that walk across the stage to grab that sheepskin and toss the mortar into the air. This is one of those milestones on which the foundation of life is constructed and each and every graduate of Gulf County Schools all 150 or so deserves kudos for reaching this point, prepared to make that walk into adulthood. This newspaper has for years celebrated those who achieve honors and high honors designation, but this year we decided to take that celebration, that pride in what our public schools produce, to another level. Hence, this tab, aimed to be a keepsake, a remembrance of roots and a time in life which is like no other, when the possibilities are limitless, the potential enormous and the world in all its in nite options begins to expand before those who will grace stages in Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka. Commencement speeches were never a forte, heaven knows public speaking is not a skill with which we are blessed, but we will take a moment to pass on some lessons learned from the years beyond high school. Lesson No. 1 STOKE THE FIRE IN YOUR GUT. Whatever path you choose as you leave high school, make sure it ends in a place where you love, where your passion eclipses considerations about paychecks and status or power. Like so many youth of my generation, I chose an opposite path. Although I had grown up around a dining room table in which the issues of the day were parsed and discussed by a mother who was a schoolteacher and a father who was a newspaperman, even though I loved to write and delve into the events of the day, I chose the ladder. This was the corporate ladder with a series of hotels, working my way up toward heftier paychecks and more responsibility and power. More and more, however, my coworkers and bosses noticed that my written reports were detailed, thorough and written was some degree of air. I didnt quite understand it, until I had a chance to jump off the carousel for awhile, but I was headed back to where I belonged, what I loved, what I learned from my father engaged journalism. We arent in this business to become wealthy or sock away dough for a house in the Caribbean we are in this business because we believe in what we do, love what we do, have a re for what we do. In a commencement address, Thomas Friedman, winner of three Pulitzer Prizes for his reporting, summed it up pretty well. Ill let him take it from here Let me close with a toned down version of a poem that was written by the slam poet Taylor Mali. It is called: What Teachers Make. It contains some wisdom that I think belongs in every graduation speech. It goes like this: The dinner guests were sitting around the table discussing life. One man, a CEO, decided to explain the problem with education. He argued this way. Whats a kid going to learn from someone who decided his best option in life was to become a teacher? You know, its true what they say about teachers: Those who can do, do; those who cant do, teach. To corroborate his statement he said to another guest, Hey, Susan, youre a teacher. Be honest, what do you make? Susan, who had a reputation for honesty and frankness, replied, You want to know what I make? I make kids work harder than they ever thought they could and I can make kids sit through 40 minutes of study hall in absolute silence. I can make a C-plus feel like the Congressional Medal of Honor and an A feel like a slap in the face if the student didnt do his or her very best. Susan continued, I can make parents tremble when I call home or feel almost like they won the lottery when I tell them how well their child is progressing. Gaining speed, she went on: You want to know what I make? I make kids wonder, I make them question, I make them criticize, I make them apologize and mean it, I make them write and I make them read, read, read. I make them show all their work in math and hide it all on their nal drafts in English. Susan then stopped and cleared her throat. I make them understand that if you have the brains, then follow your heart. And if someone ever tries to judge you by what you make in money, you pay them no attention. Susan then paused. You want to know what I make? she said. I make a difference. What about you? Lesson No. 2 TREAT THE FOLKS WHO CROSS YOUR PATH IN LIFE AS EQUALS. This is echoed in the story above and words which scrolling across my computer screen at home when it is at rest, a statement from Bruce Springsteen, whose compassion for his fellow man, his empathy to those from all walks of life, permeates his songs. It is a thought which reverberates through the Golden Rule and which life teaches is a simple reality. In the end, nobody wins unless everybody wins. Unless you are willing to wait, extend a hand to pull along those who have fallen behind, humanity, we, are losers. Regardless of whether your GPA was a 4.0 or a 2.0, that sheepskin you will soon hold represents a ticket stamped relatively equally to push you onto the tracks toward the rest of your life. You have come from different backgrounds and stations in life, had varying advantages and disadvantages, but youve all arrived at the same place with pretty much equal opportunity. As much as your life will be about investing in you and your potential, though, it should also be about investing in your community, the landscape before you. Rising water oats all a bit higher. Lesson No. 3 NOTHING IN THIS LIFE FROM THIS POINT FORWARD WILL COME EASY. I borrow heavily from the late Dr. David Langston on this one because time and again he managed to succinctly explain and expound on his passion instilling a work ethic in young people. Hard work, dedication, continuing on in the face of sometimes paralyzing obstacles, internal as well as external, are the rungs on which a life accomplished is reached. No matter how far beyond you may have started, no matter how much of a head start others gained, hard work, passion and a willingness to put shoulder to grindstone day after day can be the great equalizer. Lesson No. 4 MAKE THIS JUST THE STARTING LINE FOR YOUR LEARNING CURVE. AND LEARN HOW TO LEARN. One of the great joys of being in the newspaper business, being a reporter, is, as Friedman has noted, that ability to gain a Masters degree every day of the week. There is always something, a project, an initiative, a person making a difference in the community in which we live, some story out there, through which we expand our knowledge and sate our curiosity. We in the newspaper business are constantly expanding our knowledge of the world in which we live, the good and the bad, and in turn enhancing our ability to make a difference. The old adage that knowledge is power is a truism in journalism each and every day. Seek out the experts, the best teachers regardless of subject. Strive to challenge yourself. Your brain has millions of little gray cells ensure that when your hair turns gray you are still lling those cells up. Lesson No. 5 LISTEN. Continuing your education, understanding and supporting your community, helping those who fall behind, they involve the ability to listen. My father taught me one lesson through osmosis or genetics or whatever, a good reporter isnt the one spouting on television or engaging in those talking head marathons which too often passes for journalism and news these days. The good reporter is the one you dont notice, who spends time as the y on the wall and only buzzes into the conversation with questions to gain clearer understanding. The listener, not the talker that is the one to respect, in journalism and the broader world. Lesson No. 6 DONT FALL TOO MADLY IN LOVE WITH TECHNOLOGY. The gadgets of this ever-changing world are a wonder to behold and the tasks they accomplish are stunning to those of who can still remember black and white television or the days when radio ruled the communications world. But it is important to remember that each of those gadgets should be labeled Judgment Not Included. My rst cellphone was one required of my job. It is on only during work hours and I alert callers to leave messages only if they must. I sometimes miss the Remington typewriter or the pen and paper on which I rst began to write. Unfailingly I nd that I learn more and come away more satis ed from a one-on-one interview, listening to a forum of concerned citizens or simple workplace interaction than I ever can from the Internet or a Blackberry or an iPod. As gadgets chip away at our human interaction, we stray further from a community and closer to the apocalyptic vision found in the Terminator movies. And, nally: Lesson No. 7 This lesson arrived centuries ago at the tip of Mark Twains pen. It seems the most apt sendoff graduates could be given. Always work like you dont need the money. Always fall in love like youve never been hurt. Always dance like nobody is watching. And always always live like its heaven on earth. Congratulations and go on and make your own good luck. TIM CROFT Star news editor A letter from the editor to the Class of 2012

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, May 24, 2012 Local girl donates hair to honor memory of great-grandmother By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star.com Three generations of women gathered at a quaint salon off a dirt road in Overstreet last Wednesday to honor the memory of their beloved mother, granny and great-granny. Seven-year-old Skylar Clayton sat quietly in the stylists chair, her long, dirty blonde hair looped in a ponytail at her back. Just one moment and a few scissor snips later, she held that same 11-inch ponytail in her hands. When asked why she was getting her hair cut so short, Skylar refused to answer because she didnt want to make her nana cry. Finally, she mustered, Its for my GG. Although she tried to hold back her tears, Skylars Port St. Joe residents answered call to service during WWII By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star.com With its annual golf tournament right around the corner, the 23 mem bers of the Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club are gearing up for a full season of ser vice projects to benet the community. The Dr. Bob King Me morial Golf Tournament is scheduled for June 2 at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. The money raised through the tournament will help fund Kiwanis Club service projects throughout the year. Majority of what we do, we try to do locally, said Kiwanis Club President Barbara Radcliff. We like to see our money working in Gulf County. Through last years major fundraisers, the golf tournament, a sh fry and a pancake breakfast, the Kiwanis Club raised more than $8,600 to put back into the community. Our focus for the most part, is children, Radcliff said. Theyre certainly our future, and theres just great need here in Gulf County. The kids are being affected in more ways than the average person thinks about. The Port St. Joe Chap ter of the Kiwanis Club has been in service for 71 years and funds projects like the Port St. Joe Elemen tary Accelerated Reader program, local Girl Scout troops, The Gulf Coast State College School of Cu linary Arts, Friends of the Library and the Growing Minds Center. They also donated Christmas bas kets to the needy during holiday times. The club also funds scholarships for local students. They provided $25,000 in funding for Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf and just cut the second of ve $1,000 checks for the new North Florida Child Development Center in Port St. Joe. For as small a club as we are, that was a big deal, Radcliff said of the donation to Sacred Heart. The club also holds a contingency fund for emer gency situations. During a budget crisis at Port St. Joe Elemen tary last year, the Kiwanis Club used money from the funds to help buy needed school supplies. Kiwanis member Kathy Balentines favorite proj ect is putting together Christmas baskets for needy families. Last year, a mother and her young son came by Balentines ofce to pick up the fami lys Christmas basket. The young son was looking in it and was just so happy about the things that were inside, Balen tine said. I remember him saying Oh we can make a cake! when he saw a box of cake mix. Balentine said some of the basket deliveries even stemmed into other indi viduals in the club chip ping in to help purchase presents for the children in the needy families. First Fridays to feature Drew Smith Star Staff Report The First Fridays Music Series 2012, sponsored by the Gulf Alliance for Local Arts, will continue its eighth season at 6 p.m. ET this Friday at the Port Inn and Thirsty Goat. The Port Inn and Thirsty Goat are located on U.S. Highway 98 in historic Port St. Joe, directly across from St. Joseph Bay. This Friday features Nashville Heads to South in the form of Drew Smith. Born and raised in southernmiddle Tennessee next to the Alabama Line, the halfway point between Music Row and Muscle Shoals, Smith is the son of a preacher, raised on THE TRUTH, Steve Earle, Foster & Lloyd, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Tom Petty, Van Morrison, John Prine, the Eagles and everything between the Stones and Jones. After touring coast to coast for nearly two years, Smith is currently in his rst major publishing contract in Nashville, where he continues to write, perform and reside. He is recording his rst major project with producer Billy Joe Walker, Jr. The fun gets started from 6-7 p.m. ET with social hour, which will feature a performance by the Port St. Joe High School Odyssey of the Mind team along with good company, refreshments, cheese and stuff. Drew Smith begins performing at 7 p.m. ET and the music will continue until 11 p.m. ET. Kiwanis Club gears up for golf fundraiser Its for my GG VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Seven-year old Skylar Clayton donated 11 inches of dirty blonde hair to Locks of Love in honor of her great-grandmother, who died two years ago from brain cancer. At right is Skylars new haircut. Stylist Rose Buskens of Hair DeSigns by Rose, below, cut Skylars long ponytail. PLANE SPOTTING Star Staff Report Editors note: This story ran in this newspaper several years ago. We run it again this week in observance of Memorial Day and to honor all those who answered when the country called. In the absence of civil defense organizations, food rationing and a military draft, civilians often feel disconnected from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, soldiers ght our nations conicts, and the rest of us go about our business. But it was not always so. During World War II, civilians were required to make numerous sacrices for the war effort. Food and gasoline rationing compelled men and women to plant gardens and ride bicycles. Housewives entered the workforce because of the shortage of male labor, and necessity forced all to forgo their usual comforts. Though most sacrices were required by government mandate, some were made out of a personal sense of duty. Men and women volunteered their time and talents to create surgical dressings for troops overseas, patrolled local beaches and scanned the skies for enemy aircraft. In Port St. Joe, a community rallied to build an Air Warning Service observation tower, staffed by a core group of dedicated volunteers for whom service was second nature. A lofty retreat The entire Port St. Joe community leant a hand in the construction of the observation tower. Business owners and residents made donations ranging from 50 cents to $3, and the St. Joe Lumber and Export Company contributed all the lumber. Not towering in the traditional sense residents say it measured only 24-30 feet tall the observation tower stood in a grassy lot between Third and Fourth streets, about midway between Williams and Reid avenues. Rows of zigzagging stairs led to the top of the tower, which featured an enclosed room with a at roof and a wrap-around observation deck. The room was sparsely decorated, with a heavy canvas oor covering, a See LOCKS B6 F ILE PHOTOS Silhouettes of the various German airplane used in World War II. This handy pack of cards helped plane spotters stateside. At top, aircraft spotting cards, such as this deck featuring German aircraft, made amateur plane spotters out of ordinary citizens during World War II. See PLANE SPOTTING B5 See KIW ANIS B6

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OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society MILEY Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Society B2 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Star Staff Report The Port Saint Joe Garden Club is pleased to announce the ower show Garden Melodies will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET on Saturday, June 9. It is a small standard show registered with the National Federation of Garden Clubs and will include both design and horticultural entries. Besides the ower show, a plant sale will be held on the grounds. The garden center, a historic building of Port St Joe, is located at 216 Eighth Street. Star Staff Report A birthday card shower is planned for Ron Isbell, former general manager of The Star. Isbell is currently recovering from renal cell cancer surgery that has left him with a spinal cord injury and paralysis. He will celebrate his 63rd birthday on May 31. Cards can be sent to P.O. Box 1552, Kings Mountain, NC 28086. If you would like to email him instead, you can send birthday wishes to isbell.wendy@gmail.com. By Johanna White This past week, Sharon Gaskin, CEO of NWF Child Development, made a presentation to update us on the past years activities. Construction is under way for the new facility, but was halted several weeks ago due to a slow revenue stream from funding agencies. However, that problem has been corrected and construction has started again. The opening has been delayed from August until the December break. Sharon has been busy forging new agreements with Gulf Coast State Colleges Franklin Center to use space for their nursing program and possibly a new program for Early Childhood Development. She also has a state of the art kitchen and is talking about starting a culinary program. The street has been named Field of Dreams, which is very appropriate since the project was a dream of Sharons for the past several years. A check for $1,000 was given as part of our five-year $5,000 commitment. The annual Dr. Robert E. King Kiwanis Club Golf Tournament is Saturday, June 2, with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. ET. The entry fee is $60 per player, which includes a round of golf, a chance to win cash prizes, door prizes and a barbecue lunch. This event is a great way to support our local community. The Kiwanis Club would like to invite our local businesses to participate by being a Hole Sponsor ($75) or a Patron ($175). Hole Sponsor advertisement on a Tee Box and a Patron, advertisement on the putting green and one players entry fee, respectively. This event is the largest fundraiser that the Kiwanis Club does each year. We rely on our community support to be able to fund the many projects that we assist. We truly appreciate all of you who have supported this tournament in the past. Our hopes are that you will support us again this year. And for those who will consider becoming a hole sponsor or patron, your support is greatly appreciated too. For information regarding the Kiwanis club tournament, call Johanna White at 227-8752. The Kiwanis motto is Serving the children of the world. Special to The Star In observance of Memorial day, the sanitation services schedule for Mexico Beach will be: Monday, May 28: Holiday, no pick up Tuesday, May 29: 15th Street to Canal Parkway Wednesday, May 30: 14th Street to Highway 386 Thursday, May 31: Regular garbage pick up Friday, June 1: Regular garbage pick up Star Staff Report Young readers will explore the night this summer as the Gulf County Public Library presents Dream Big, Read! during the 2012 Summer Reading Program. Children entering grades K4 thru fth will enjoy programs on stargazing and moon lore, dreams and wishes, space exploration and nocturnal animals. There are certain to be some surprise visitors as well. Each child is invited to participate in the Summer Reading Challenge while families may join the Read-to Me portion of the program. Space for Dream Big, Read! is limited, so register now. Programs begin at 1 p.m. ET on Tuesday, June 5. For more information, visit or call the library at 229-8879. Programs are free of charge and open to children of all abilities. Generous support for the Summer Reading Program is provided by the Friends of the Gulf County Public Library. Wewahitchka Public Library summer reading Dream Big, Read is the theme for this summers reading program at the Wewahitchka Public Library. The program will be held each Wednesday during through July 25 beginning at 3 p.m. CT. The program is for children kindergarten through fth grade. There will be reading, singing, crafts and special guests. The program is free. For more information contact 872-7510. Special to The Star The members of the Port St Joe Rotary are busy nalizing the details for their drawing to raise money for Rotary Internationals End Polio Now campaign. Polio eradication has been Rotarys top priority for more than two decades. The International Humanitarian Service Organization is a spearheading partner in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, along with the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and UNICEF. Rotary Club members worldwide have contributed more than $1 billion and countless volunteer hours to the polio eradication effort. The Port St Joe Rotary Club is hoping to raise $2,000 to go toward their contribution to this worldwide effort. Beginning June 1, club members will be selling $2 tickets for chances to win many incredible prizes. The drawing will be held during the Scallop Festival on August 3. Chances may be purchased from any Rotary Club member or at No Name Cafe, Sunset Coastal Grill and Gulf Coast Hatteras. The PSJ Rotary Club meets at noon on Thursday at Sunset Coastal Grill. If you are interested in more information regarding service projects or membership, please contact Patti Blaylock at 227-7900 or Father Tommy Dwyer at 227-1845. Special to The Star Gulf County Senior Citizens will be selling spaghetti plates on Friday, June 1, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. ET at the Senior Center located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe. The plates will cost $7.50 and will include spaghetti with meat sauce, breadsticks, salad and dessert. You may eat at the center or carry out. All proceeds will go to providing services to the elderly in Gulf County. Tickets are available at the Senior Citizens Center or from any employee or board member. Call 229-8466 for more information. Remember, donations are very necessary and greatly appreciated. Library launches summer reading program for kids Rotary looks to raise funds to help in ght against polio Special to The Star New Kiwanis facility restarts construction Garden Club announces Garden Melodies show Mexico Beach holiday sanitation schedule Birthday card shower planned for former Star general manager Senior Citizens selling spaghetti plates Special to The Star School is almost out, so its time to start planning for fun and educational summer camps. Gulf Coast State College is offering three different Kids College Summer Camps for children. All Around Campus is a middle school camp designed to familiarize students with campus life while getting a hands-on sampling of a variety of subjects including but not limited to health sciences, physical sciences, arts, sports, communications and social sciences. Around the World camp is for both elementary and middle school age children. This camp allows children to learn and encounter different countries and cultures from around the world. They will get a chance to experience the people, arts, food, languages and more. Shining Stars camp is perfect for elementary and middle school age children who love the stage. This camp will teach all aspects of musical theater including scene work, stage movement, improvisation skills, pantomime, monologue and both singing and speaking development. The elementary camps will be June 18-22 and July 23-27. The middle school camps will be July 9-13. Camp hours are Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon. For more information and to register, visit www.gulfcoast.edu/ kidscollege or call Kelli at 850-7691551 extension 6108. Gulf Coast to host Kids College summer camps KIDS COLLEGE DATES Elementary camps June 18-22 and July 23-27 Middle school camps July 9-12

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THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGH T S PECIALS 6:00 8:30 HOURS : 236 R eid A ve (850) 229.7121 CAROLYNS FAMOUS S EA F OOD PLATTER: $14.95 8 OZ R IB EYE S P E CI AL OR S H R I M P S P E CI AL WI T H 2 S I DES : $11.95 Orders served with: C H EESE GRITS, FF, BAKED POTATO, S ALAD AND BREAD ** A W ARD W INNIN G DESSERTS ** School News The Star| B3 Thursday, May 24, 2012 Pre-kindergarten, James Foxworth; kindergarten, MaKenna Kurnitsky; rst grade, AJ Davis; second grade, Sean McGarry; third grade, Kamari Clayton (not pictured); fourth grade, Hannah Smith; fth grade, Eva Varnes; and sixth grade, Braden Baumgardner. Bus rider of the week: Taylor Todd. Special to The Star Special to The Star Congratulations to eighth-grade graduate Kylie Skoda and graduate Tiffany Burch of Faith Christian School. Burch has been a student of FCS since K3. After graduating from FCS middle school, Burch completed high school through Faith Christian Schools umbrella program. Burch graduates as an honor student. To learn more about Faith Christians preschool, elementary and middle school campus classes or the high school umbrella program, call the school of ce at 229-6707 or visit at www. faithchristianpsj.net. Special to The Star Cadet Javarri Beachum is going to Annapolis. The Port St Joe Junior/Senior High School junior has been selected to attend the prestigious U.S. Naval Academy Summer Seminar from June 2-7. This seminar is a fast-paced, six-day experience for high achievers who have completed their junior year in high school. Summer Seminar teaches you about life at the Naval Academy, where academics, athletics, and professional training play equally important roles in developing our nations leaders and may just lead to an appointment to USNA with the Class of 2017. Thousands of quali ed applicants are screened each year with only 2,250 offers being made to quali ed rising seniors. Selection criteria include superior high school performance, strong PSAT, SAT, or ACT results, demonstrated achievement in athletics and extracurricular activities, demonstrated leadership ability, physically t and in good health with normal vision and a positive attitude, self-disciplined and of good moral character. Cadet Beachum is already in a select group of students that possess the Right Stuff for acceptance at our nations premier Maritime College. During the six-day session, candidates will become a part of the Academy. They will live in Bancroft Hall (the dormitory in which all Academy midshipmen live), eat in the dining hall, participate in academic and leadership workshops and experience a variety of other activities on the campus. They will have an opportunity to see rst-hand what the Academy has to offer through its exceptional academic, athletic, extracurricular activities and leadership training programs. Community support for Cadet Beachums dream was quick in coming. Port St Joes Willis V. Rowan American Legion Post 116 Commander Doug Calendine says the Post would be honored to provide a scholarship to Cadet Beachum to pursue his dream of an appointment to the Naval Academy. The tuition to attend a session is $350, which pays for room and board, as well as a variety of materials. The Legions recent Fish Fry raised $500 in support of the Port St Joe NJROTC Program, and these funds may well make this young mans dream of becoming a Naval Aviator a reality. Special to The Star ST. PETERSBURG The Progress Energy Foundation will invest $500,000 this year to fund energy education classroom projects as and workforce development at high school career academies in Florida. The funds will support public-education foundations, science centers and career academies. Every dollar we contribute to education is an investment in the future of our state, said Vincent Dolan, president and CEO of Progress Energy Florida. We are proud to support programs that engage and excite students about energy, alternative energy and energy ef ciency. Our support of career academies will pay huge dividends when the students who bene t from these programs join the workforce and become active participants in our communities. During the past 10 years, the Progress Energy Foundation has invested $17 million to assist education initiatives in Florida. Progress Energy Foundation grants will support these Florida programs: K-12 schools: The Progress Energy Foundation provided funding to 18 education foundations throughout its service territory to support math and science education programs with an emphasis on those that include energy efciency, renewable energy and environmental education. Education foundations from Alachua, Citrus, Gulf, Franklin, Hernando, Highlands, Lake, Levy, Madison, Marion, Orange, Osceola, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Seminole, Sumter and Volusia counties received funding. Career Academies: Funding will support workforce development through investments in career academies, which offer high school students the opportunity to receive training in a speci c career area such as engineering or environmental science. Grants were awarded to Junior Achievement of West Central Florida and the Career Technical Foundation to support programs for high school students in Pinellas and Pasco counties. Science Centers: The grant to the Orlando Science Center (OSC) will allow 2,500 fourth-grade students to visit the centers Science Park and use its alternative energy video game component, the Hydrogen X-Change exhibit, which was developed with a previous Progress Energy Foundation grant. The game promotes the understanding of alternative energy sources such as solar, nuclear, wind and biomass. The Science Center of Pinellas County received a grant to continue offering weather and energy-related programming and curriculum to Pinellas County schoolchildren. Through the grant, more than 3,500 children will learn about energy generation, energy ef ciency and alternative energy at the centers speciallydesigned energy room. Education is one part of the companys overall investment in nonpro t partners in Florida, North Carolina and South Carolina. Since 2001, Progress Energy has contributed more than $17 million to public education. This year, the company will invest nearly $1.2 million in K-12 education throughout Florida and the Carolinas. Our company has a proud history of supporting education in the communities where our customers and employees live and work, Dolan said. We recognize that a strong education system helps to improve the quality of life in local communities. In addition to education grants, the company funds grants which focus on the environment and economic development. The Progress Energy Foundation is funded each year by the companys board of directors from shareholder funds. Progress Energy Florida, a subsidiary of Progress Energy, provides electricity and related services to more than 1.6 million customers in Florida. The company is headquartered in St. Petersburg and serves a territory of more than 20,000 square miles. Progress Energy Florida is pursuing a balanced approach to meeting the future energy needs of the region. That balance includes increased energy-efciency programs, investments in renewable energy technologies and a state-of-the-art electricity system. For more information about Progress Energy, visit http://www.progress-energy. com/. Left: Back row, from left: LeeAnn Bernal, sixth grade; Brett Miller, fth grade; Janiah Keith, third grade. Front row, Ashley Thompson, kindergarten; Sarah Bailey, second grade; Katie Jones, rst grade; Hope Thompson, kindergarten. Right: Aleah Wooten, fourth grade. Special to The Star Progress Energy contributes $500,000 to education Local cadet selected for Naval Academy summer seminar JAVARRI BEACHUM KYLIE SKODA TIFFANY BURCH Faith Christian School congratulates graduates DAZZLING DOLPHINS WES STUDENTS OF THE WEEK

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A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 Church & Bake Sale 111 N. 22nd St. Mexico Beach Saturday, May 26th at 7:00 am Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SUNDAY : WOR S HIP AT SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM 11 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BI B LE CLA SS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE T IME 9 11 AM M ONDAY : L IFE T REE CAF 7 PM W EDNE S DAY : MEN S B I B LE S TUDY 8 AM & WOMEN S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL (850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. Thursday, May 24, 2012 Lonnie Moses Family We would like to take the time to send out a heartfelt thank you to the community for the compassion and generosity shown to us during our time of loss. The phone calls, food and owers were truly touching. We are certain that somehow someone has slipped through our less than perfect record keeping, but please know that each of gesture of love did not go unnoticed. We would like to thank Pastor Ray Creamer and the Highland Park Community Church for a beautiful viewing and service that Lonnie would have been proud of. To Rocky Comforter, thank you for the special attention that you have always given to our family. May God bless and keep each of you. In Loving Memory of Ernie J. Woodrow 12/5/59-5/29/09 Remember Me You still live on in the hearts and minds of the loving family and friends you left behind. Mom, dad and sisters and Maddie Annual Youth Day at Philadelphia Primitive On Sunday, the youth department of Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will observe annual Youth Day beginning with its church school at 10 a.m. ET followed with a special worship service at 11 a.m. All children and youth are encouraged to attend and participate. The church is at 259 Avenue D, Port St. Joe. St. Johns collecting items for needy St. Johns Episcopal Church in Wewahitchka is collecting gently used clothing, household items, furniture, working appliances, etc. These donations will be stored at the church for needy families and for the semi-annual church yard sales with proceeds going to charity. Drop off is at 233 E. Osceola Ave. Call Martha at 639-5924. Leave items on porch if no one is home. Thursday, May 24, 2012 FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Shirley Ann Brogdon, 65, of Highland View, passed away Tuesday, May 15, 2012, in Panama City, Fla. She was a lifelong resident of Gulf County and had worked for Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing home. Baptist by faith, she was a wonderful mother, granny, great-granny and sister. She was dedicated to her family. Shirley was kind to everyone and was always there to talk to. She is survived by her children, Billy Reynolds and Melinda, Loretta Bowers and Walt, Karen Chancey, and Duke Vann; her grandchildren, Shawn and Brandi, Jerry Lee and Jenny, Randi, Charles and Rebekah, Cassidy and Debo, Tristan, and Hallie; her great-grandchildren, Tiyah, Kayla, Casen, Brooklyn, and Isla; her mother, Cora Ayers; her sisters, Ella Parson, and Bonnie Keigans; and her brother, John Ayers. Funeral services were Saturday, May 19, 2012, at 4 p.m. EDT at Beach Baptist Chapel with the Rev. David Nichols of ciating. Interment followed in Holly Hilly Cemetery. All services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Shirley Ann Brogdon Sister Lillian Green was born on Dec 31, 1926, to the late Joseph and Meeley Bradley in Andalusia, Ala. On Thursday, May 3, 2012, in the early morning, she departed this earthly life. Sister Green received her educational from Dunbar High School in Apalachicola. During later years, she completed the requirements and received a certi cate in Home Health Care. Sister Green joined Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Apalachicola in 1948. She served as a member of the Mount Zion Usher Board and worked diligently on the beauti cation club committee. Prior to her illness, Sister Green was a very active member of Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church. She served under many pastors. She was preceded in death by her rst husband, Joe Walker, and later William Bill Green of Apalachicola. Her employment included a supervisory position at Sea Sweet Seafood Company in Apalachicola, from 1970-1987. After the seafood business closed, she was a successful home health care provider. She enjoyed shing, gardening and traveling with her family. She participated in a variety of community activities and promoted voter registration in Franklin County. She leaves to cherish her love and memories a loving and devoted son, Willie Joe Walker (Patricia), of Apalachicola; a special daughter, Savannah Tyler, of Carrabelle; eight grandchildren, Terrence Walker, of Apalachicola, Sheldon Walker, of Apalachicola, Damon Walker, of Apalachicola, Antonio Sanders (Lavonya), of Panama City, Yvonne Mitchell (Jessie) of Hinesville, Ga., Joann Walker, of Starke, and Latrenda Walker of Oceanside, Calif.; Sabrina Hamilton (the late George), of Panama City, and Raine Addison, of St. Petersburg; 25 great-grandchildren; nieces and many friends. Lillian Green LILLIAN GREEN Obituaries IN MEMORY ERNIE J. WOODROW CARD OF THANKS Faith BRIEFS Be repentant Have you ever felt that your prayers didnt get past the ceiling? Did you wonder why you got such a feeling? Could it be something you did, or maybe, something you didnt do? It could be one or more things that make you feel youre not getting through. Have you read the word lately? He might have a job for you. Of course if youre a Christian its a must to witness, are you doing this too? Do you have a loose tongue and run people down? Ill be it you do, you always wear a frown. I could keep writing till my pencil is spent, But maybe you get my point, that its time to repent. When you ask forgiveness and truly repent, Your prayers will be answered and your time well spent. Billy Johnson

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, May 24, 2012 table and chairs furnished by the Chavers-Fowhand Furniture Company and a telephone provided by the St. Joseph Telephone and Telegraph Company. To entice volunteers to the tower, The Star editor W.S. Bill Smith, who doubled as the towers chief observer, touted its excellent view and cool comfort. A cool sea breeze constantly wafts through the windows and even in the middle of the day when we were all sweltering recently from the excessive heat, it was cool in the observation tower, Smith wrote July 17, 1942. Nearby Reid Avenue was booming in 1942. Residents could catch the latest movie at the Port Theatre, grab a drink at one of the avenues ve bars or have a cherry Coke at one of three drugstores. Smith cited the towers excellent view of affairs transpiring on the main thoroughfares of the city as one of its chief selling points. In print, Smith might have complained that he had the job of chief observer dumped into his lap, but he was ideally suited to lead the observation towers volunteers. A World War I veteran whod lost a leg in battle, Smith used The Star as a platform from which to expound the merits of patriotism and self-sacrice. In The Stars April 17, 1942 edition, Smith stressed the vital importance of civilian defense. If you are not willing to make a personal sacrice, there will be no defense, and the matter of spotting planes is one of the most vital of all the civilian defense activities, he wrote. When we think of the boys in uniform, who ask nothing and accept 24hour duty if necessary, we shouldnt consider it a sacrice to serve two or four hours a week here at home. He asked for women and men outside the draft age limits to sign on for two-hour shifts on a 24hour, seven-day-a-week schedule. Volunteers needed only to have normal sight and hearing and the ability to learn a few simple rules. Homemaker, plane spotter Elizabeth Fensom was a 26-year-old homemaker with a young baby when she volunteered for the 4-6 p.m. Monday afternoon shift at the tower. Her reasoning was simple: I suppose I couldnt do much, but I guessed I could do that, recalled Fensom. Fensom had moved to Port St. Joe in 1940, settling into the only home available at the time. She was sailing with friends off of the peninsula when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, catapulting the U.S. into war. The words Pearl Harbor meant nothing to Fensom at the time, but the war would soon hit close to home. Her brother, Capt. James Ball, fought in the Infantry during World War II, and her husband, Paul, narrowly avoided service. I was glad my husband didnt have to go. He wouldve been in the rst lot that was drafted, but we had a baby, so he was not called right away, Fensom recalled. As 1942 dawned, the threat of another attack on U.S. soil was foremost in the nations consciousness. Even in a sleepy town like Port St. Joe, residents mentally prepared for the worst. Im not a fearful person. I dont get afraid very much, but Im sure thats why we were spotting the planes, so we wouldnt be attacked again. Im sure we thought that was a possibility, Fensom said. A few pieces of paper posted on the towers wall gave spotters the basics on how to identify planes and report sightings to a U.S. Army central call center. Fensom did not recall receiving any ofcial training from the Gulf County Defense Council or any other agency. Fortunately, during her time in the tower, Fensom never spotted any aircraft, enemy or otherwise. I never saw a plane. I never saw anything to report, and I dont know if anybody did, she said. We were bored as the devil Wherever Billy Howell went, Tom Parker was sure to follow. The lifelong friends did everything together worked the projectors at the Port Theatre, served Coca-Cola at LeHardys drugstore and scanned the skies for airplanes from their perch in the observation tower. Parker, nicknamed Dooder by sister Geraldine, who couldnt pronounce the word Junior, and Howell, nicknamed Slick for hair that lay as at as a wet cat, were 14 years old when they rst climbed the towers winding stairs. Howell signed on for the 2-4 a.m. Friday night shift, and Parker for the 4-6 a.m. shift, but they generally kept one another company. Both had been active Boy Scouts and possessed a sense of civic duty beyond their years. When people asked us to do something, we were always glad to do it, remembered Parker. The boys typically carried snacks into the tower and kept their eyes peeled for aircraft. We were anxious to see a plane. We shouldnt have been, really, but we were anxious to see something that was noteworthy to report, remembered Parker. The life of a plane spotter proved not as exciting as the thrillseeking lads had hoped. During their time in the tower, they called in only a few planes. Parker even suspected that Tyndall Air Force Base had own the planes overhead just to see if he and Howell were on the ball. Both boys knew they were needed in the tower in the off chance that something terrible might happen. They also knew they could nd a better way to pass the time. We were bored as the devil, remembered Howell. The towers telephone provided the lone source of amusement for the restless duo. In the early years of the war, Port St. Joe had only about 20 telephones. Those who enjoyed the luxury of having a telephone often shared lines with other families. Because his father was a railroad engineer, Howell had a telephone in his home, but Parkers family did not get one until 1947. The boys made prank calls from the tower phone to amuse themselves, but always kept the conversation clean. We use to call up and say, Is this Dr. Carvers on Reid Avenue? and theyd say, Yes, and wed say, Well move it over cause somebody wants to get by, remembered Parker. Dr. Carver nally recognized the pranksters and offered some exasperated advice: Why dont you boys go home and go to bed? No one to blame Smith continued to promote the tower in The Star through the end of 1942, and set a personal example of service by maintaining a regular WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, May 24 87 69 0 % Fri, May 25 87 72 10 % Sat, May 26 86 73 0 % Sun, May 27 85 73 0 % Mon, May 28 85 73 20 % T ues, May 29 85 73 0 % Wed, May 30 86 73 0 % A & A HomeCare, Inc. would like to welcome home David Buck Fernandez. He is returning back home to Gulf County and will be resuming care of Gulf County residents as a part time PTA under Kay Geoghagan, Physical Therapist. A & A HomeCare, Inc. is pleased to be able to offer his services. A&A HOMEC A RE INC Gulf C ountys Local Home Health Agency B C BS of Florida PP O Provider (850) 639-3333 or (850) 227-3331 www.aahomecareinc.com License # HHA299991819 Love, Grandma & Granddaddy K a r a h B r a d l e y Pd.Pol.Adv. TM 1-850-309-1996 shredit.com PLANE SPOTTING from page B1 FILE PHOTOS Above is a British deck of aircraft spotting cards. At left, silhouettes of Japanese aircraft from World War II are featured in this deck of cards used by civilian plane spotters. See PLANE SPOTTING B6 Is it asking too much of those who remain behind to give 120 minutes of their time each week, out of a total of 10,080 minutes to a job that is recognized as one of the most important that civilians can do? George L. Snowden, district civil director of the Aircraft Warning Service Im not a fearful person. I dont get afraid very much, but Im sure thats why we were spotting the planes, so we wouldnt be attacked again. Im sure we thought that was a possibility. Elizabeth Fensom, Port St. Joe plane spotter We were anxious to see a plane. We shouldnt have been, really, but we were anxious to see something that was noteworthy to report. Tom Dooder Parker, Port St. Joe plane spotter

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Trades & Services 227-7847 GET YOUR AD IN Services C A LL T ODAY! GET YOUR AD IN CALL TODAY! 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction JOES LAWN CARE FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE AND TREE TRI MM ING WITH RE M OVAL OF ALL DEBRIS AND JUNK NEW CUSTOMERS 10% DIS C OUNT FROM YOUR PREVIOUS LAWN C ARE PROVIDER W ITH STAT E M EN T OF TH E COST FIRST C UT FREE W ITH V E RBAL COMMITM EN T TO AT L E AST 12 MO N THS OF S E RVIC E P LEASE C ALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite 850-229-9663 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 P ACKAGE ST O RE & LO UNGE GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR F AVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRIT S WWW.L OO K O UTL O UNGE.C O M U PC O MING E VENT S M EM O RIAL DAY W EEKEN D KARAO K E/DJ IN THE CROWS N EST W E D NES D AY THRU S UN D AY 9PM ET LIVE MUSI C ON THE POO P DE CK BO BB Y KENNE D Y & MI C HE LL E MI LL IGAN FIR S T SUN D AY, JUNE 3R D POT L U CK LIVE MUSI C 6 PM WITH SP E C IA L G UESTS CHAR L IE & DANA H UNT B L A CK dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp grandmother, Jeannette Amerson, had to dab her eyelids as two years of emotions from the sudden loss of her mother streamed out. Skylars great grandmother, or her GG, passed away two years ago from brain cancer. Ever since losing her great-grandmother, Barbara Lawder, Skylar has been growing her hair in hopes of donating it to Locks of Love in her honor. And last Wednesday, that day nally came. Locks of Love is a non-prot organization that provides hairpieces to nancially disadvantaged children in the U.S. suffering from long-term medical hair loss. Skylar, a rst grader at Port St. Joe Elementary, asked her mother to make sure her hair goes to a child struggling with cancer. My granny wasnt sick for very long, but Skylar was by her side the entire time, said Skylars mother, Mary Clayton. Sometimes she would spend the night in the hospital with her, so shes been waiting to do this for a long time. It makes you realize we take things for granted, Radcliff said. That turkey, ham, cake that you have on holidays, it makes you realize that not everyone sits down to that. Radcliff said giving is simply part of a Ki wanis Club members DNA. But its something they are unable to do without the communitys support through fundraisers. Radcliffe wanted to remind the community that teams and sponsors still are needed for the June 2 golf tournament. The tournament will begin at 9 a.m. and end with an early after noon lunch and awards ceremony. There will be cash prizes handed out to the tournament winters and many other giveaways and rafes throughout the day. Anyone interested in being a player or spon sor can call 229-6327. LOCKS from page B1 KIWANIS from page B1 shift at the tower. By November, he became frustrated by his volunteers unwillingness to do the same. On Nov. 6, 1942, Smith attempted to entice volunteers back to their evening and early morning appointments by announcing the addition in the tower of an oil heater, provided by the St. Joe Paper Company. By May 14, 1943, however, Smith traded the gentle coaxing for coarser language. In an editorial entitled Enthusiasm Waning, Smith blasted residents for failing to fulll their civic duty by manning the tower. A German U-boat had sunk the British tanker, Empire Mica, a year earlier off Cape San Blas, and Coast Guardsmen patrolled area beaches on horseback. But only Smith and a faithful few observers reported for duty in the tower. Imagining an attack on the gasoline terminal and paper mill, which he deemed a fair possibility, Smith countered the inevitable accusation that he had not done his duty as chief observer with his harshest words yet. ...let em fry in their own lazy fat when an incendiary bomb comes plummeting through the roof of their home some night, he wrote. Two months later, following a report that the U.S. might be subjected to aerial bombing by the Axis powers, Smith reminded residents that theyd have only themselves to blame should such a tragedy occur. If raiding enemy airplanes sneak through Port St. Joe, dont blame it on your chief observer, wrote Smith. ... Hes been hoping that an enemy plane MIGHT come over here and drop a bomb or two so that people would get back on their watches. When his articles failed to restore volunteers to their posts, Smith tried a different strategy. On Oct. 30, 1942, he printed a letter written by George L. Snowden, district civil director of the Aircraft Warning Service, in which he hoped to arouse the people of Port St. Joe from their complacency and false sense of security. Snowden noted that from the period of Aug. 9 to Oct. 11, 1942, the tower was vacant for 66 hours each week. Responding to volunteers claims of boredom, Snowden asked residents to put duty before custom. Speaking of the sacrices made by the men in uniform, Snowden posed a question worth pondering. Is it asking too much of those who remain behind to give 120 minutes of their time each week, out of a total of 10,080 minutes to a job that is recognized as one of the most important that civilians can do? Howell and Parker shared Smiths disappointment over tower truancy. I think that was a common occurrence, said Parker. They didnt have the sense of responsibility they shouldve had. Though Fensom didnt recall there being a problem with tower volunteers, she shuddered to think that she might not have fullled her obligations. I hope I wasnt one of the ones who didnt do my shift, she said. On his and Parkers record of service, Howell was more denitive: We were there, he said. Demolition Howell and Parker entered the Coast Guard and Navy, respectively, just as the war was winding down. Neither was home to see the observation tower demolished for salvage lumber in October 1945. Howell had not even thought of the tower for many years, though he could produce a sketch on command. During their time in the service, Howell and Parker received advanced instruction in plane spotting. That was one of the rst things they taught you, to be a lookout, said Howell, who was stationed at a Coast Guard air station in Miami. Parker recalled guard duty on a ships deck and the nicknames assigned to Japanese aircraft, female names like Betty and Donna. Both Howell and Parker returned to Port St. Joe after the war and have remained close friends, still calling one another by their nicknames, Slick and Dooder. During World War II, Port St. Joe did not experience the type of aerial bombing so vividly imagined by Smith. The city commemorated the May 8 and Aug. 15, 1945, victories in Europe and Japan by blowing the re siren and offering prayers in local churches. Fensom rejoiced to learn that her brother, whose bravery in combat earned him the Silver Star, soon would be coming home. I was thrilled to death because my brother was still alive, she recalled. By the end of the war, Fensom had two children. She returned to her duties as a homemaker, leaving her days as a plane spotter behind. From her home in Beacon Hill, Fensom said her services would not be useful, should the nation again call on plane spotters to scan the local skies. I wouldnt know one plane from another, she said. PLANE SPOTTING from page B5

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 24, 2012 The Star | B7 87475 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 08-00015-CA EMIGRANT MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., a Foreign profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JEAN THOMPSON, et al., Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered May 2, 2012 and entered in Case No. 08-00015-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Emigrant Mortgage Company is Plaintiff, and Jean Thompson, Unknown Spouse of Jean Thompson, John Doe and Jane Doe are Defendants, The Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Gulf County Courthouse, Front Lobby at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 on this 7th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 18, Block 1022, MILLVIEW ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT THREE, according to the map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 53, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Property Address: 104 Apollo Street, Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456-1410. DATED this 10th day of May, 2012. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Courts Gulf County By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Steven M. Davis FL Bar No. 894249 121 Alhambra Plaza 10th Floor Coral Gables, FL 33134 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (305) 262-4433 Fax (305) 442-2232 May 24, 31, 2012 87240 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Transportation Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or faxed by calling 850-227-1204. Items up for bid. Gas/Diesel/Oil, Bid#13-002 Tires/Tubes, Bid #13-003 Seat Covers, Bid#13-005 May 17, 24, 2012 87469 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO.: 12-24-PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of CHARLES A. GASKIN, SR., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of CHARLES A. GASKIN, SR., deceased, File Number 12-24-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and that personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 24, 2012 CHARLES A. GASKIN, JR. P.O. Box 862 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Personal Representative Estate of Charles A. Gaskin, Sr. Attorney for Personal Representative: THOMAS S. GIBSON FL Bar No. 0350583 RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 206 E. 4th Street P.O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850-229-8211 May 24, 31, 2012 87477 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 12-26-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF CASON J. CALLAWAY, JR. Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of CASON J. CALLAWAY, JR., deceased, whose date of death was March 20, 2011 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 24, 2012. Personal Representatives: Phebe C. Robertson 2126 Piedmont Lake Rd. Pine Mountain, GA 31822 Kenneth H. Callaway 3505 GA Hwy 116 Hamilton, GA 31811 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850)-227-1159 May 24, 31, 2012 87203S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors, LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 434 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-15 R.E. No. 02543-000R Lots 1 and 2, of Block 3, of Pine Ridge Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida, as per plat or map on record in the County Court House, Gulf County, Port St. Joe, Florida. Name in which assessed: Johnny Lee Jackson & Margaret V. Jackson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 6th day of June, 2012. Dated this 1st day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 87201S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors, LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1239 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-14 R.E. No. 05775-000R Lot 13 and 15, of Block 1005, of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Official map thereof on file in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Clifford Jones All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 6th day of June, 2012. Dated this 1st day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 87282S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 23-2009-CA-000529 BANK OF AMERICA, NA, Plaintiff, vs. BEATA G. WOLF; SEA HAVEN PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; PETER THOMAS WOLF A/K/A PETER T. WOLF; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 7th day of May, 2012, and entered in Case No. 23-2009-CA-000529, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, NA is the Plaintiff and BEATA G. WOLF, SEA HAVEN PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; PETER THOMAS WOLF A/K/A PETER T. WOLF and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM on the 7th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 29 SEA HAVEN SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 10th day of May, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk of The Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: LAW OFFICES OF MARSHALL C. WATSON, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 May 17, 24, 2012 87230S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for an Exchange Server, Domain Controller Server, and Migration project at the district office located at 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL. For complete details go to www.gulf.k12.fl.us and click “Exchange Server” located under “Request for Bid” on our Home Page. Bids will be accepted starting May 8th, 2012 and ending May 29th, 2012. May 17, 24, 2012 87288S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 23-2012-CA000054 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS1, Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE E. BLEVINS, JR., ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WAYNE E. BLEVINS, JR. LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 587 PLANTATION DRIVE PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT 1, BLOCK “G”, CAPE PLANTATION PHASE II, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION FOR 1476.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE ST. JOSEPH BAY COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE; THENCE ALONG SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 18 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 240.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 955.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 4 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 522.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 265.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 336.71 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 36.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 137.63 FEET; THENCE, LEAVING SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY, SOUTH 66 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 75.55 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE EASTERLY SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 350.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 26 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR 163.18 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 6 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 18.E SECONDS WEST 161.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 6 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 7.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 728.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 7 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 18 SECONDS FOR 91.34 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 3 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 91.28 FEET; THENCE, LEAVING SAID CURVE ON A NON-RADIAL LINE, NORTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 193.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 1, BLOCK “G” IS SUBJECT TO COVENANTS AND RESTRICTIONS AS CONTAINED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107, PAGES 1058-1072 AND AS AMENDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 125, PAGES 737-739 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND A PORTION OF LOT 2, BLOCK “G”, CAPE PLANTATION PHASE II, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A SAINT JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION FOR 1476.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE ST. JOSEPH BAY COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE; THENCE ALONG SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 18 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 240.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 955.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 4 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 522.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 265.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 285.71 FEET TO AN IRON ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 51.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE LEAVING SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY SOUTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ON A NON-RADIAL LINE FOR. 193.33 FEET TO AN IRON ROD ON A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 728.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR 26.17 FEET; SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 1 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST, 26.17 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF COMPOUND CURVE WITH A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SAID CURVE HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 42 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 18 SECONDS AND THE RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE FOR 18.59 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 23 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, 18.16 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST, 15.13 FEET TO AN IRONROD; THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 218.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO: COVENANTS AND RESTRICTIONS AS CONTAINED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107 AT PAGES 1058-1072 AND AS AMENDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 125, AT PAGES 737-739, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. MINERAL RIGHTS RESERVED BY PREVIOUS GRANTORS. THIS PROPERTY IS INTENDED TO BE INCLUDED IN AN BECOME PART OF LOT 1, BLOCK “G”, CAPE PLANTATION SUBDIVISION. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 587 Plantation Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on Pendergast & Morgan, P.A., the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 6675 Corporate Parkway, Suite 301, Jacksonville, FL 32216, within thirty (30) days of the first publication. Please file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Port St. Joe, Florida, on the 8th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk, Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this hearing should contact ADA Coordinator not later than one (1) day prior to the proceeding at Amber Baggett. For the hearing and voice impaired 850-482-9844. Attorney for Plaintiff: Jean C. Zabin Florida Bar # 418439 Pendergast & Morgan, P.A., 6675 Corporate Parkway, Ste 301, Jacksonville, FL 32216 Telphone: 678-534-3844 May 24, 31, 2012 87311S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors, LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 138 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-17 R.E. No. 00741-093R Description of Property: FARM #22 (5 acres, more or less) of Gulf County Farms, Inc., Properties, an unrecorded subdivision of that portion of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of State Road No. 71, more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the intersection of the North line of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, and the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said State Road having a right of way of 66 feet; thence South 18 Degrees 16 Minutes 20 Seconds East along said right of way line for 3902.75 feet; thence South 71 Degrees 43 Minutes 40 Seconds West for 726.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Thence South 18 Degrees 16 Minutes 20 Seconds East for 300.00 feet; thence South 71 Degrees 43 Minutes 40 Seconds West for 726.00 feet; thence North 18 Degrees 16 Minutes 20 Seconds West for 300.00 feet; thence North 71 Degrees 43 Minutes 40 Seconds East for 726.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: Eli Ross & Leslie Ross All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of June, 2012. Dated this 8th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012 87313S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors, LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 155 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-16 R.E. No. 00941-001R Description of Property: Begin at the Northwest Comer of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, and nun South for 330 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run South 165 feet, thence turn left and run East to the West Line of State Road 381, approximately 888.11 feet, thence run Northwesterly along West side of SR 381, for 152.75 feet to the South Line of Jimmie Lee Rogers Land, thence turn left and run West to POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being In Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida. ALSO: Begin at the Northwest Corner of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, and run South for 495 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run South 165 feet, thence run due East 963.29 feet to the West Right of Way line of State Road No. 381, thence run Northwesterly 181.25 feet along the West side of said State Road; thence run due West 888.11 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being in Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: W. O. Bryant & Ruth M. Bryant All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of June, 2012. Dated this 8th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012 87437S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Investments 2234, LLC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 491 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2008 Application No: 2012-19 87433S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Investments 2234, LLC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 728 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2008 Application No: 2012-18 R.E. No. 03806-009R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the NW Comer of U. S. Govemment Lot 5, Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 11 West; thence South along the West line of said Govemment Lot 5, for 980.9 feet to the Southerly R/W line of U. S. Highway 98; thence South 40 Degrees and 46 Minutes East along said R/W line for 1233.36 feet; thence North 49 Degrees and 14 Minutes East for 100 feet to the Northerly R/W line of U. S. Highway 98; thence North 40 Degrees and 46 Minutes West along said R/W line for 425 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue North 40 Degrees and 46 Minutes West along said R/W line for 75 feet; thence North 49 Degrees and 14 Minutes East for 200.72 feet to the South line of U. S. Govemment Lot 5, thence North 89 Degrees and 55 Minutes East along said South line for 64.97 feet; thence South 40 Degrees and 46 Minutes East for 32.64 feet; thence South 49 Degrees and 14 Minutes West for 250 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: William C. Williams III, H. Steven Miller, Chauncey Beiser All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 20th day of June, 2012. Dated this 15th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 17, 24, 31 June 7, 2012

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B8| The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373 Retail / Of ce Space143 Acklins Island Drive-Cape San Blas+/1000sf; $10 psf mod gross; high visibility on Cape San Blas Road ; available May 1st212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-4915,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 219 Reid Avenue Of ce/Retail;+/-5400 sf; sub dividable $7 psf mod gross (former Goodwill) 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail;+/-800sf-1800;$14psfmod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98+/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 separate storage units availableFor Sale217 W. River Road-Wewahitchka+/-9,000sf; retail building; next to Rich's IGA; +/-1 acre; on-site; avail for lease; inquire for terms223 Monument Avenue Four city lots fronting Hwy 98; $375,000 Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina DriveCorner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for detailsMarina Cove Lots 12, 13, & 14; $375,000 PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; $399,000 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS3 BR 2BA DOUBLEWIDE UNFURNISHED Large Yard, In Country ....................................$700 2 BR MOBILE HOME UNFURNISHED Country, Private ..............................................$550 1 BR FURNISHED CONDO Nice, Includes Utilities.....................................$910 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum ..........................$105 Plus Daily 1 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Inc Water .......................$475 2 BR 1BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ...............................................$375 & $450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAY BED Furnished, Lanark, Inc Utilities ......................$650 2BR 1BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 1BR REMODELED HOUSE Carrabelle .......................................................$450 OFFICE SPACE Hwy 98 Frontage, Carrabelle .....$400 Plus Utilities Mexico BeachLight & airy 2bd/ 2.5ba furn/unfurn Town Home Beachside, Tyndall side of town. Central air, W/D. Fans throughout. Reserved prkg.; Avail 06/01! $950/mo + $800 dep. Call Brenda 850-227-5380 or Gilbert 201-895-4255Text FL10388 to 56654 1bed cozy cottage A vailable June 1 in Port St. Joe. $450/mo + utilities. No smoking /pets 850-229-1215 East Point Carrabelle 900 Square ft designer 1bedroom, open plan, Jacuzzi, washer & dryer, satellite, secluded, 1/2 mile from beach .$230 bi-weekly or $460 per month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL07685 to 56654 White City Clean 3br 2ba House!2 Blk from boat ramp, quiet, long term, $625 + Dep, 270-8757/906-0095Text FL10316 to 56564 Trailer lots & Camper lots available for rent, Beacon Hill, For info Call (850) 348-7774 WeWa 3br/2ba central heat & air $525/mo + dep 639-5721; RV great for 1 to 2 people $115 a week + dep incl. W/S/E 639-5721. 2br/1ba $425/mo + $425 sec dep. 639-5721 For Sale or Trade $230,000 Lake Front home Toledo Bend Reservoir, Hamphill, Texas 3br, 2ba, 1 acre, boathouse, dock, pavilion, Call 409-579-1107 Dodge Extended Cab 1998 4-wheel drive, 150,000 miles. $1,850 OBO. 850-227-5771. Text FL10534 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in Port St. Joe area.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34208971 Text FL08971 to 56654 Nursing Faculty, Gulf Franklin CampusTo teach didactics, laboratories and clinicals for the Practical Nursing program at the Port St. Joe campus. Design and implement the curriculum plan to meet requirements for the program and the Certi ed Nursing Assistant program. This includes assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation of courses, program objectives and NLNAC requirements. Requires: MSN with a minimum two (2) years of general medical surgical nursing experience + a current FL RN license. Salary based on degree and experience. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 6/1/12.Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. Application (must be completed) & additional info:www.gulfcoast.edu/hr GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O cer 850.872.3866 Out of State Ad FARM WORKERS AND CROP LABORERS Colchester, Vermont Area 10 temporary positions at S. Mazza Farmstand & Greenhouses, Inc. / S. Mazza Farm Inc. Workers needed to do eld work, hand weeding, hoeing, planting etc. for diversi ed crops. Will also harvest crops. To start approx. 06/04/12 to 11/10/12. A great deal of heavy lifting, standing, bending and kneeling for long periods of time. Wage is $ 10.56 per hr. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of contract period. Tools are provided without cost. Housing provided at no cost to workers who reside outside of the normal commuting distance. Transportation cost reimbursed after 15 days or 50% of contract period, whichever comes rst. Contact The Nearest Department of Labor Of ce for application and referral. Job order number: 116431. HELP WANTEDPort St. Joe Location TWO POSITIONSSales / O ce Warehouse / Delivery C L E A N E R S CLEANERS N E E D E D NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 D r i Dri B r i t e Brite CARPET TECH NEEDED CALL: James at 850.229.9663 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical Business Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centuraonline.com AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech – FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 HealthcareNHC HOMECARE PORT ST. JOERN Part-time / PRN, Field & QA Position Available. Requires: License in the state of FL, w/ one year professional nursing exp. Home care or acute care exp pref but not required. Benefit options & competitive pay. Fax resume to Holly at 229-2725 or call 229-8238 for info... Web ID#: 34208989 Text FL08989 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairPT Lawn Service HelpWith own truck and valid DL. Call Danny (352) 497-6933 Web ID#: 34209350 Medical/HealthCNA/HHABrightStar Care of Bay County (HHA 299993930) is seeking CNA/HHAs to provide loving, compassionate care to our clients in Gulf and Franklin County. Must have min of 1 yr of experience in providing Personal Care,meet all of the statutory requirements for being a home health worker, have reliable transport/safe driving record. If you love people and are servant-minded, please apply at www.brightstarcare.com/caree r-center or call (850) 238-3271 Web ID#: 34210595 Text FL10595 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Creative/DesignBlacksmith or Metal FabricatorTo Co-op on art projects. (850) 639-5721 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting Applications *Full-time reservationist w/ great benefits. *Part-time maintenance office clerk. Both positions require weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairNow HiringThe City of Mexico Beach is currently accepting applications for ONE part time position in the Sanitation Department. The position’s primary responsibility is working as a “slinger” on the back of the sanitation vehicle; this position requires a valid driver’s license. The part time driver position has the potential to turn into a full time position in the future. The successful applicant will be required to work in inclement weather and applicants should expect a strenuous work environment; as part of the hiring process, the applicant will be required to pass background and drug tests prior to hire. Applications will be accepted at Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL 32456. Applications will stop being accepted on May 31, 2012 at 4:00 p.m. For more information please call 850-648-5700. The City of Mexico Beach is a Drug-Free work place and is an EEOC provider. Web ID#: 34210232 Text FL10232 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook NeededThe Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 R.E. No. 03186-065R Description of Property: PARCEL “B” SCROGGS -MINOR REPLAT -2005 BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE at the Northwest Comer of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Seconds West 1923.07 feet to a point tying on the Southerly right of way of County Road Number 30, said point lying in a curve concave to the North with a radius of 2346.20; thence Northeasterly slag said curve and sold right of way for 329.02 feet, thru a central angle of 08 Degrees 02 Minutes 06 Seconds, chord of said arc being North 74 Degrees 20 Minutes 50 Seconds East 328.75 feet; thence leaving said right of way run South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Seconds West 392.39 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of Canoe Lane; thence run along said right of way South 82 Degrees 39 Minutes 37 Seconds East 394.62 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving sold right of way run South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 107.41 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING, run East 61.01 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 228.21 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 Degrees 58 Minutes 35 Seconds East 14.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 186.60 feet to a point lying on the approximate mean high waterline of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run along said right of way South 85 Degrees 17 Minutes 29 Seconds West 75.27 feet; thence leaving sold right of way run North 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds East 421.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 0.65 acre, more or less. SUBJECT TO a 10 foot wide access and utility easement being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Seconds West 1923.07 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of County Road Number 30, sold point lying in a curve concave to the North with a radius of 2346.20; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 329.02 feet, thru a central angle of 08 Degrees 02 Minutes 06 Seconds, chord of said arc being North 74 Degrees 20 Minutes 50 Seconds East 328.75 feet; thence leaving said right of way run South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Second West 392.39 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of Canoe Lane; thence run along said right of way South 82 Degrees 39 Minutes 37 Seconds East 394.62 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right of way run South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 107.41 feet; thence East 10.00 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds East 106.12 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of Canoe Lane; thence run along said right of way North 82 Degrees 39 Minutes 37 Seconds West 10.08 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO a 5 foot wide pedestrian access easement being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Seconds West 1923.07 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of County Road Number 30, said point lying in a curve concave to the North with a radius of 2346.20; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 329.02 feet, thru a central angle of 08 Degrees 02 Minutes 06 Seconds, chord of said arc being North 74 Degrees 20 Minutes 50 Seconds East 328.75 feet; thence continue along said right of way South 82 Degrees 39 Minutes 37 Seconds West 75.56 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run, South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds East 325.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 186.60 feet to a point lying on the approximate mean high waterline of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run along said waterline South 85 Degrees 17 Minutes 29 Seconds West 5.02 feet; thence leaving said waterline run North 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds East 187.02 feet: thence South 89 Degrees 58 Minutes 35 Seconds East 5.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING Name in which assessed: Gregory J. Scroggs & Jackie P. Scroggs All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 20th day of June, 2012. Dated this 15th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 17, 24, 31 June 7, 2012 87495S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF MEXICO BEACH SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE IV NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The City of Mexico Beach will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing the: CITY OF MEXICO BEACH -SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE III Plans and specifications can be obtained at the City of Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, Florida 32410. Bids will be received until 2:00 p.m. Central Time, Friday, June 15th at City of Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, Florida 32410 and will be opened and read publicly immediately thereafter. All Bids shall be submitted in an envelope clearly marked “Sealed Bid -Sidewalk Project Phase IV”. The City of Mexico Beach reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The City also reserves the right to reject contractors who in the City’s opinion are not qualified to perform the work based on the questionnaire submitted. All Bids shall be firm for a period of 90 days after opening. This includes material prices. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Point of Contact will be Chris Hubbard, City Administrator, at 850. 648.5700 or by email at c.hubbard@mexicobeachgov.com. All bidders shall comply with all applicable state and local laws concerning licensing, registration, and regulations of contractors doing business in Florida. The City shall award the contract to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder; provided however, the City reserves the right to award the contract to a bidder who is not the lowest responsive and responsible bidder if the city determines in its reasonable discretion that another bid offers the city a better value based upon the reliability, quality of service, or product of such other bidder. May 24, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. BUYER BEWARE If you are looking to buy St. Joe Property (Breakfast Point, Rivercamps, Windmark, Rivertown Watersound West Beach, Watersound North) take notice. St. Joe is systematically removing or reducing amenities at residential developments. Amenities currently at the development have been reduced significantly while HOA dues have increased. Adopt: Adoring Family, Veterinarian Doctor, LOVE awaits baby. Susan *800552-0045* FLBar42311 Expenses Paid* Mexico Beach, 212 CR 386, 1 block off 98, Friday-Monday 8:00 a.m. CST-?;Biggest EverStore shelving and jewelry display case, everything from A to Z. Port St. Joe, St. Joseph Catholic Church on 20th St. Sat 5/26, 8am-2pmYard & Bake SaleEverything from furniture to playthings to clothing to yard & kitchen items. Text FL10234 to 56654 For SalePicnic Tables-Ready Made or Made to order. $85 each. Will deliver. Call 850-648-8132 Wurlitzer Spinet 1950’s Piano in good condition $250 Call 648-5691 or 340-0801 Spot Advertising works!



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR A rousing send offThursday, MAY 24 2012 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Memories will be soldered into the hard-wiring of young brains this weekend as 134 high school seniors will enter the next passage in life. Seniors will walk the stage to receive their diplomas at both ends of the county over the next three days. Graduation ceremonies for Port St. Joe High School begin at 7 p.m. ET tonight at the R. Marion Craig Coliseum. At 6 p.m. CT on Saturday, the seniors at Wewahitchka High School will walk the stage to receive their sheepskins and turn the tassels on their mortarboards. The Class of 2012 (photos of the seniors begin on Page A8 of this newspaper):Port St. JoeHigh honors (3.85 GPA or higher) Karah Sherrie Bradley, Cameron Joseph Butts, William Connor Clark, Ian Christopher Frost, Kristina Lynn Furstenberg, Michelle Amber Hiscock, Rachel Lynne Jones, Avery James Little, Daniel McChristian May, Klenton LeGrand McLemore, Jenny Elizabeth Miles and Emerald Victoria Moana Muniz. Honors (3.5 to 3.849 GPA) Patricia Gale Davidson, Lisa Marie Davis, Nicolas James Dickinson, Katherine Leigh Lacour, Sarah Elizabeth Pippin, Sylvia Marie Sheline, Lacey Brooke Strickland, Alexandria Kayla Thomas, Erin Suzanne White and Kaley Danielle Wilder. Graduates Brittany Renee Anthony, Steven Michael Arthur, RaQueatha Latifah Bailey, Ryan DeLane Baker, Raney Suzanne Besore, Walter Fletcher Bowers, Elizabeth Louise Branch, Rhea Camille Brookins, Andrew Beau Burke, Blake Edward Buskens, LeAnna Marie Collins, Airren Shanise Daniels, Ashton Marie Davis, Dylan Corbett Dunaway, Austin Ryan Farmer, Bryce Jamir Frazier, Katie Alexis Gardner, Marsi Patricia Garrell; Victoria Lynn Hallman, Autumn Rose Haynes, Matthew Austin Howze, Phillip Michael Chance Hubbard, Jesse Lee Hyman, Jeffrey Eugene Jackson, Paul Brantley Jacobs, Joseph James Julian, Andrew Michael Kemp, Caleb Lee Kesterson, Alexander Lugene King, Trevor Jarrell Lang, Oneika Cherelle Lockley, Montana Ray Lyle, Samuel Miles McGee, Autumn SanLea Merriel, Daniel Ryan Neal, Sadik Latinan Padilla; William Joseph Rish, III, Ashley Jakia Robinson, Graduation weekend134 will receive high school diplomasSee GRADUATION A2By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Lewanna Patterson strolled down the hallway to the Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High gym while talking with science teacher Scott Lamberson. It was the nal day of school for seniors and Patterson and Lamberson were joining the celebration. As she walked the hallway, Pattersons expression changed. While listening to Lamberson, she had suddenly noticed the scattered cameras at the end of the hallway that were pointed at her. On the far wall of the gym, across the railing of the second level was a huge sign emblazoned, Congratulations Mrs. Patterson. Patterson hesitated before taking another step. Her mouth formed the words, Oh my gosh but the sounds were not forthcoming. And at the end of the walkway, Patterson tried to soak in EUBANKS RETIRES FROM WESSpecial to The StarAfter 21 years of dedicated service, Michael Eubanks is retiring from his position as Wewahitchka Elementary School Physical Education Aide. Mr. Michael, as he is affectionately known by students and faculty alike, began working at WES in 1991. Since then, Mr. Michael has worked with hundreds of children as they came through the PE department. When a child wanted to stop running before he reached the nish line it was Mr. Michaels cheers of encouragement that kept him going. When a little one scraped a knee or fell from the monkey bars it was Mr. Michaels quietly spoken words of comfort that dried the tears. But Mr. Michaels in uence reached much farther than that. He frequently visited classrooms (Mr. Browns was always a favorite) to encourage children to make the most of their educational opportunities and to make wise decisions in their personal lives. The epitome of a gentleman and a role model, Mr. Michael is looked up to by many children. May 16 was proclaimed Mr. Michael Day in honor of this extraordinary man. Knowing that he is an avid Florida Gator fan, the students and faculty showered him with A rousing send offSpecial to The Star Dan Christie has announced his intent to seek the position of Gulf County Property Appraiser. Christie brings 31 years of experience as the Chief Deputy for the Gulf County Property Appraisers office, where he has reported directly to outgoing appraiser Kesley Colbert since 1985. Christie commented, I have gained extensive working knowledge of the duties and the processes of property appraising, tax roll preparation, deed posting, title searching, field working, ownership mapping, and public relations that will assure a smooth transition and continued successes that Kesley Colbert instituted during his tenure. In working for Colbert for the past 28 years I have learned from the best ... patience, character and integrity. I will continue to work hard to lead a team that delivers a fair level of assessment for all the property owners of Gulf County. Christie earned the designation of Certified Florida Evaluator, through the International Association of Appraising Officers and has he extended his training with courses in Land Appraisal, Commercial Appraisal, Digital Mapping and Geographical Information Special to The StarWyvonne Grif n Pickett, a Gulf County native, announced this week her candidacy for the of ce of Gulf County Supervisor of Elections. Time ies by so fast, it seems like just yesterday I was a candidate for Clerk of Court, Pickett said. Twenty years later, Im back, wanting the opportunity to work, again, for the people of Gulf County as their Supervisor of Elections. I havent been gone from here, just working privately in the real estate, construction, restoration and property management business. These professionals have allowed me the opportunity to live here in Gulf County. I was born and raised in Oak Grove, and moved into St. Joe during my school years. Then to Simmons Bayou, Cape San Blas, moved to Beacon Hill, out to Wetappo, then up North of Wewahitchka and presently back to St. Joe Beach. Its been a whirlwind but it has allowed me the opportunity to know so many good people by making new friends and neighbors. I loved living in all of these places because they all were my county home. Pickett graduated with honors from Port St. Joe High School in 1972 and obtained a business degree from Gulf Coast Community College. She has maintained a real estate brokers By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Port St. Joe commissioners deadlocked on a motion to reward an information technology contract to a new consultant, TJs Networking Group out of Panama City, despite a recommendation from City Manager Jim Anderson. The choice to hire TJs Networking Group would come with a choice not to renew the citys previous IT contract with local provider Bluemanta, which expired May 18. Anderson said the city could no longer contract with Bluemanta because the company no longer has access to the county networks after its contract with the county was terminated last August. Access is needed because the Port St. Joe Police Department frequently shares information with the Gulf County Sheriffs Department. Bluemanta is not allowed to access the police departments computers because they share information with the sheriff, Anderson said, adding that Bluemanta no longer has access to sheriff department computers since their county contract is no longer valid. Commissioners Lorinda Gingell, Bo Patterson and Bill Kennedy all voted DAN CHRISTIE WYVONNE PICKETT CHRISTIE ANNOUNCES FOR PROPERTY APPRAISER PICKETT ANNOUNCES FOR SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONSLewanna Patterson retires from Port St. Joe High School EUBANKS RETIRES FROM WES See EUBANKS A2 See RETIRES A2 See CHRISTIE A3 See PICKETT A3 Commissioners deadlock on IT contractSee CONTRACT A2.......................................................................................................................... PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The StarPatterson was greeted by a standing ovation and a gym full of current and former students expressing their love for Mrs. Patterson. MICHAEL EUBANKS Lewanna Patterson takes in the scene at the R. Marion Craig Coliseum last week as students, faculty and alumni celebrated her retirement. Behind her, right, is husband Pat. YEAR 74, NUMBER 32Opinion .......................................A4-A5Letters to the Editor ...................A5Outdoors .....................................A6 Sports...........................................A7School News ................................B3Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B4Classi eds ....................................B7-B8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Wednesday, May 30, 2012Arrival of 20 Wounded Warrior Heroes and their Guest plus 4 returning Warriors as Volunteers Private Welcome Dinner at Windmark for Warriors & their Guest.Honor Motorcade Parade for Our Community to Welcome Warriors5:30PM EDT Motorcade Departs Windmark to Centenial Bldg, (see map for route) cheer & welcome our Warrior Hero Guests. Thursday, May 31, 20126:00 PM EDT HONOR BANQUET at Centennial Bldg with Brigadier General Bill Wolf for Warriors, Partner Sponsors & Special GuestsFriday, June 1, 20127:00AM EDT Departure from PSJ Marina of Boats for Warrior Offshore Shootout Fishing Tournament WE WELCOME ALL CITIZENS PLEASE JOIN US FRI. MORNING AT 7:00 am, COME TO MARINA AND WAVE FLAGS AT JETTY PARK AS WARRIORS & BOATS LEAVE!!!Noon -1:30PM EDT Return and Weigh In of Fish for Warriors Fish will be cleaned by Volunteers from VFW Saturday, June 2, 20128:00AM EDT Farewell Breakfast especially prepared for Warriors & Guest by VFW Post 10069 and American Legion 116 along with the VFW Post 10069 Ladies Auxiliary GOLD PARTNER Anonymous Contributor Bluewater Outriggers Dockside Cafe Durens Piggly Wiggly John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 SILVER PARTNER Bill Cramer Chevrolet Cadillac Buick GMC Boon Docks Restaurant City of Mexico Beach City of Port St. Joe Coast2Coast Printing Military Order of the Purple Heart, Chapter #794, PC, FL No Worries Vacation Rentals Panache Tents & Events Quilts of Valor Semper Fi Sisters Tapper & Company VFW Post 10069 Ladies Auxiliary Walter Green Swimwear & Accessories SILVER LEVEL BOAT PARTNERS Blake Anderson Brad Benners CMSgt Bob Cox, ret & CMSgt. Carol Cox, ret Danny Tankersly Dewey Blaylock Don Spillers Earl Stuckey Frank Romiti Guy Williams Jacob Tankersly Jim Lewis Lee Duren & Brent Romiti Matt Terry Nate Odum Randy Hudson Ryan Kelley Steve Newman & Zach Childs Steve Petty Tom Perry Zach Ferrell & Chris Hatcher BRONZE PARTNER Bridge at Bay St. Joe Capital City Bank Catherine VanBuskirk Centennial Bank Charles Costin, Atty. Debbie Hooper, Photography Farnsley & Johnston Wealth Manangement Consultants, LLC Greg Abrams Seafood Harolds Auto Parts, Wewahitchka LT.COL. & Mrs. Jim Poe, ret Mexico Beach CDC Mr. Jay Rish Mr. & Mrs. Jim Caughey Mr. & Mrs. Stuart Shoaf Port St. Joe Marina Sandys Stitches Scallop Cove St. Joe Ace Hardware St. Joe Shrimp Sunset Coastal Grill Willis V. Rowan American Legion Post 116 SPECIALCONTRIBUTOR Barbara Radcliff Blackwell Insurance Boyd & Paula Picket Boyer Signs Captain Trey Landry Catheys Ace Hardware Costin Insurance John C. Gainous Post 10069 VFW Mens Auxiliary Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Tabatt Roberson & Associates Waterfront Auto Sales FRIENDSOF THE EVENT Alines Beauty Salon Bayside Lumber Cadence Bank Cathey Construction Eds Red First United Methodist Church-PSJ Frank May Gulf County Beaches Fire Dept. Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Gulf County EMS Gulf County Sheriffs Dept. Gulf Foods Joe Mamas Wood Fired Pizza Merritt Construction No Name Cafe Port St. Joe Board of City Commissioners Port St. Joe Fire Dept. Port St. Joe Police Dept. Preble-Rish St. Joe Rent All St. Joesph Historical Society Inc Wewahitchka Board of City Commissioners. Wewahitchka Womens Club The Veterans Task Force of NW Florida All Motorcycle Rider Organizations PARTNER SPONSOR LISTThank you to the many patriotic citizens who are volunteering to make this community event possible as we Honor American Heroes. OR To purchase a graduation greeting ad: Call Joel Reed at 370.6090 jreed@star.com or Kari Fortune at 227.7847 kfortune@star.com Your 2012 Senior GRADUATION from page A1Raymond Christopher Robles, Bethany Catherine Rutherford, Nichole Lillian Spilde, Jamie Revells Squire, Samantha Jade Taylor, Megan Lyndsea Walker, Montez Rashun Walker, Arion Caleb Ward, Cole Andrus Warren, Stephen George Whiten, Michaela Suzanne Wiegand, Lora Olivia Williams and Natalie Lauren Ward.Wewahitchka High honors (3.85 GPA or higher) Oliver Bryce Gerber, Lyndsey Taylor Ramsey, Megan Marie Setterich, Donia Marie Lanier, Anna Kaitlyn Gaskin, Cory Ethan Walding, Kristopher Kane Cox, Katelyn Drew Roberts, Heath Evan Bailey and Irjaria Lynn Pippin, Honor (3.5 to 3.849 GPA) Taylor Jay Husband, Nicholas Gauge Combs, Jeremy Dean Morrill and Justin Bradly Flowers. Graduates Beau Hunter Boggess, Theryl Rishaun Brown, Michael Austin Bryan, Michael Conrad Bryan, Jr., Quentin Schulyler Oats Carter, Austin Michael Chumney, Casey Blake Dauphin, Daniel Earl Ray Fisher, Taylor Brianne Flowers, Raven Cheyenne Forehand, Courtney Diane Goins, Deanna Nicole Gortt; Travis Edward Grifn, James Austin Guffey, Shelby Jeanne Hardin, Hailey Nicole Harris, Daniella Nicole Harris, Ciara Terrell Kordelius Jackson, Katie Lynn Jones, Sarah Cheyenne Luckie, Benjamin Hunter McDaniel, Travis Ryan McGill, Trent Avery McGill, Trey Daniel McGill, Bridgette Colena Myers, Christopher Gregory Myrick, Amber Nicole Norris, LaDonna Ann Faye Pelt; Sebastian Tyler Quentin, Shoshonie Lynn Rhames, David Allen Rice, Jr., Randal James Roth, David Shavez Russ, Jillian Shea Russell, Chelsea Renee Sandifer, Mack Daniel Sandlin, Tyler Anthony Sarmiento, Johnathan Alexander Shellnut, James Dillan Strickland, Joseph Mathew Tanner, Anthony Johnathan Tillery, Megan Marie Udell, James Dylan Ward, Richard Michael Ward and Tyler Rish Whitten. EUBANKS from page A1pennants, mugs, caps and more that bore the UF logo. Despite the fact that Mr. Michael received only a token honorarium for his services, he was highly dependable, coming in each morning to assist with playground duty. Like the proverbial postman, neither rain, nor sleet, nor Floridas sweltering sun kept him from his post. Michael Eubanks was a reliable, loyal xture at WES whose absence will be felt for years to come. Mr. Michael is looking forward to retirement and spending time with his family. The faculty, staff and student body of WES would like to wish Mr. Michael all the best and give him a heartfelt thank you for all he has done for our school and our children. RETIRES from page A1the scene. The gym was full, not only with students from the high school, but with former students and colleagues, on their feet, cheering, shouting and applauding Patterson. You are all in big trouble, all those of you who knew about this, Patterson would say later, tongue rmly in cheek. The celebration had been one of the best-kept secrets in Gulf County, at least from Patterson. All the planning had been done on Facebook because Patterson does not have a Facebook page or by word of mouth and secrecy was paramount. If she nds out about it, she probably wont show up for school. Shell call in sick, husband Pat Patterson said. Before the celebration, Pattersons son Jarred wondered if former student Calvin Pryor, one of dozens of former pupils who paid the visit to celebrate Pattersons retirement, was needed to ensure his mom made the event. Patterson was honored for her 38 years at Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School, an English and Spanish teacher whose ability to touch her students was on full display last week in the R. Marion Craig Coliseum. Patterson, not coincidentally, is also the only teacher to be selected as Gulf County Teacher of the Year three times. Shes a great teacher, said Duane McFarland, former principal at PSJHS and now with the district of ce. She is a great leader. Thirty-eight years of passion for education is hard to nd. Added current PSJHS principal Jeremy Knapp, It is my hope I can affect as many children as she did. But as several speakers noted, Patterson is more than a teacher and always was. Martha Sanborn, a veteran of 35 years at PJSHS, called her a true friend and teacher. Ann Comforter noted that her children still know Patterson as Aunt Lewanna. A true friend is someone who has your back, who is on your side, Sanborn said. You cant trade that and Lewanna is a true friend. She has been my mainstay. We both love our God. We both love our family. And we both love Port St. Joe High School. Beyond a slide show, a gift and some owers, Patterson also received a place of permanence at Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School. The A pod and language arts department at the school were dedicated in Pattersons honor, complete with a plaque and cheers. This place is my heart, Patterson said. CONTRACT from page A1against going with a new rm. Kennedy said he voted against the motion due to lack of information and also said he didnt want to take any business away from a local provider. A termination letter to County Administrator Don Butler from Bluemanta owner Chuck Edwards cited overwork and a volatility of the political environment as the reason for Bluemantas ended relationship with the county. Although our agreements over the last two years have stipulated one Bluemanta technician be assigned to Gulf County, Bluemanta has dedicated two and for many months three technicians to address the growing support needs, speci cally of the BOCC of ces, and without additional compensation, Edwards wrote. The everincreasing demand on our staff combined with the overwhelming volatility of the political climate, has put an overwhelming strain on our company, and does not permit us to continue the relationship. The city will be left with no IT consultant until a decision is reached. Lighthouse facilities Commissioners continued their discussion on the potential relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse to city property at last Tuesdays meeting. Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson reported that the city received one proposal of $213,000 to move three buildings including the lighthouse, keepers quarters and gift shop. He also reported that Eglin AFB has continued to be on board for the project. The sentiment is theyve just got to gure out how to turn it over to us, Magidson said. So far the roads have been pretty smooth and were kind of on the same page. Magidson said he met at George Core Park with an engineer who specializes in historical restoration projects Magidson said the engineer will bring the project to the Florida Historic Trust for Preservation. Were still looking at quite a large number in moving fees and relocation, Magidson said. This is going to be fairly expensive but we wont worry about that. Were going to nd the money to get it done. Magidson said moving the lighthouse to city property would also incur additional costs from Progress Energy. Everybody wants to do it, its just paying for it, he said. July 4 Fireworks Anderson brought a proposal before the commissioners about helping to fund a July 4 reworks show for the area. He said it has been discussed that the city, county and Gulf County Tourism Development Council partner to provide a show by each chipping in $5,000. Last year, reworks were paid for in full by the TDC. Anderson said the money would need to come from contingency funds because the city does not have the money in the budget. He said they are also very short on the time needed to put out a bid. Times are tough, said Commissioner Bo Patterson. Theres a lot of need around the city. Commissioner Rex Buzzett agreed with Patterson. He said the city has already reduced funding for organizations like the Friends of the Library and Gulf County Association for Retarded Citizens. He suggested the city put pressure on the TDC to take care of the reworks. The commissioners asked if they could potentially loan the TDC the $5,000 and be reimbursed. Unfortunately for the TDC, theyre kind of in a state of ux right now, Magidson said. All I can do is ask.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, May 24, 2012 Paid Political Advertisment Paid for by: Citizens Improving Gulf County CHRISTIE from page A1 PICKETT from page A1license for the last 30 years. She worked under Gulf County Sheriff Raymond Lawrence as a civil clerk and was later employed with the County Courthouse under the direction of Judge David L. Taunton for more than 12 years. She resigned her position as Judicial Assistant to run for Clerk of Court, began working in real estate and has been ever since. Wyvonne and her husband owned and operated Cape San Blas Vacation Rentals and Cape San Blas Cleaning Service. I was part of the growth and development of this unique area, she said. Our business was the first, and at that time, the only business to provide a host of services to the Cape. This required the accountability of millions of dollars that were placed in my trust, requiring separate accounting for each customer. I was the banker on most days and the garbage collector on others. Pickett later became the owner/manager of Scallop Cove BP. Upon leaving those businesses due to family health, she became involved in real estate investing and construction and has been involved for the last 10 years. I am ready to get back to working with the people of Gulf County, Pickett said. I know I can make an impact on our present economical conditions. I want to see the office of the Supervisor of Elections become more than a place to vote and register. There are times when the general public needs someone on their payroll from whom they can receive assistance. This could be that place. I know what hard work is and what devotion means. I know how to serve the public. Our voting rights, the security of the voters, and voting records are a great responsibility. The integrity of this office will be maintained to the highest degree of competency, as it has under Mrs. Griffins direction. I will provide you with the most efficient, service-oriented office in the Panhandle by using our tax dollars wisely. I have the leadership, skills and experience, and the financial background to maintain and serve the citizens of Gulf County. Wyvonne is the daughter of Buford and Ruth Grif n, mother of John J. Hattaway (J.J.), wife to Britt Pickett, sister to Juanise Grif n, stepmother of Boyd, Paula, Ronald and Leisa Picket, and step grandmother of Kimberly Shoaf, Grayson, Kyle, Christian, Dell, Kerigan, Katie Pickett and Jeremy and Emily Baxley, most all of which live here in Gulf County. Wyvonne attends the same church where she was raised, the Oak Grove Community Church. May God direct our lives to helping those in our community and our nation, she said. Wyvonne welcomes anyone to contact her with questions or concerns. She can be reached by phone at 647-2564 or by email at electwyvonne@hotmail. com. By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, led visiting Florida Sen. Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee) through what she dubbed the heart of the community last Wednesday morning. This gym is the heart of the community, Bodine said as she led Montford on a tour of the WIG Center and new community resource center in North Port St. Joe. We dont have a movie theater, we dont have a mall, but we have a gym. Bodine discussed with Montford a series of programs the workforce board leads designed to reach out to disadvantaged children in the community, including a summer camp program that hosted more than 150 children last year. Montford, a longtime Florida educator, spent the morning speaking with Bodine, Workforce Board Chairman Gary Ross and a host of others involved in the WIGs many programs about how government regulations and funding shifts have presented challenges for the resource center. Many of the problems presented stem from the Regional Workforce Boards Accountability Act, a multifaceted bill in the Florida Senate addressing regional workforce boards training, account expenditures and performance reports among other things. One big issue, Bodine said, is the mandate on how the board is to handle 50 percent of expenditures for individual training accounts. While the 50 percent may cover books and tuition, it does not cover extra expenses like certain vaccinations, uniforms or exams. Another important aspect of the training programs that may be threatened are the individual case managers assigned to each student that help to ease any back-to-school anxieties and guide students through the process. (The students) need somebody to encourage themthese case managers really hold their hands, Bodine said. When we go to the other side of that 50 percent we wont be able to pay these case managers and thats bad news, Ross said. They didnt think these things through. Montford expressed that in the large state like Florida, a one-sizets all approach does not cater to what each unique community needs. Theres a difference between Miami and Gulf County and thats a good thing, Montford said. Thats why were here. If its not working, we need to back up. Montford commended the workforce board and other groups present at the WIG center like the Christian Community Development Fund for banding together to provide a variety of resources for the community. It sounds like you do a good job in this community in pulling everyone together, Montford said. Montford asked the group if they have sensed a change in the attitude in the students who participate in the different programs at the center. A lot of these kids, they dont have hope, he said. County Commissioner Tan Smiley agreed with Montford that when the economy took a downturn, it diminished a vision for many young adults who could have obtained good jobs at the local phone company, paper mill or railroad. When all those jobs went away, the vision got smaller, said Smiley, who sees nothing but optimism in the WIG Centers direction for the North Port St. Joe Community. He said the presence of Bodine and the workforce board, and on-site mentors like Assane Beye are a blessing for the community. I can see great things just looking at it, Smiley said. I can see it. State Senator Montford tours WIG Center VALERIE GARMAN | The StarSen. Bill Montford talks with Kim Bodine, the executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board and Workforce Board Chairman Gary Ross about upcoming summer programs at the Washington Improvement Group Center during a visit May 16.Services. He has shared the responsibility for preparing 31 consecutive years of tax rolls for approval of the Florida Department of Revenue without a single defect letter. Dan is an active member of Long Avenue Baptist Church, teaches a College and Career Sunday school class and sings in the choir. He has been a volunteer at the Gulf Forestry Camp, Gulf County Jail, and Franklin Work Camp over the past 22 years. He currently leads a Bible Study at Bay City Work Camp in Franklin County each Tuesday evening. Dan is an avid sherman, photographer and enjoys the great outdoors. And Dan is most proud of his beautiful daughter Alicia Marie Christie (Batista), a 2000 graduate of Port St. Joe High School and University of West Florida graduate, who currently teaches 5th grade in Raleigh, N.C. Serving in this of ce for the past 31 years I have had the privilege of meeting and helping the people of Gulf County, said Christie. I humbly ask for your support and vote to continue to serve you as Gulf County Property Appraiser. To share your concerns I invite you to call me at 227-1681, email me at dangulf99@hotmail.com, or learn more at www.votedanchristie. com.

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Thursday, May 24, 2012 OpinionA4 | The StarThis was the rst Mothers Day I have spent without being able to talk to my Mama. As many of you know, it is difcult. Thats not a true statement; it is very close to unbearable. As I lay in the bed last night, tears ran down both sides of my cheeks and into my ears. Mama always understood when I cried. Mothers are just that way. When there seemed to be no hope and nothing else to do but cry, Mama had an answer. All of her problems, pains and sorrows were not secondary they were non-existent when you needed her. It could be something little or something enormous, but the world stopped and Mama had an answer. To my baby brother, she would say Buckle down Winsocki, Buckle down, from the song in the 1943 lm Best Foot Forward. The song goes on to note, If you ght youll chuckle at defeat. If you ght your luckll not retreat. She always had an answer. It might have been an I understand, or a hug. However, it was often a straightforward answer and a solution. Over the past few months since Mama has been gone, the one thing that I keep nding myself saying is, Mama was smart. She had the answer before I asked the question. She knew what I was thinking. I would like to think most mothers have that quality. I sincerely hope yours does or did. Mama loved to read my stories. She was my Mama. A teacher for more than 40 years, she overlooked the grammatical errors and gured out what I was saying. Mama always broke the code. Mama knew what I was trying to say. She understood there was a rst level, a second level and a Mama level. Sometimes she would say, You better watch what youre writing. To that, I would respond, Mama, no one would get that but you. She would laugh. I loved to hear my Mama laugh. She knew I was right. She had different special relationships with each of her three sons. She did it in a way that wove us together, rather than make us jealous. This is something that only a mother can do. I would like to think that only my mother could do it, but I know there are countless others who are doing the same thing. Mama read me, she knew, she never once asked me, What are you trying to say? She knew. Recently, I met a Jewish Frog. Mama would have appreciated meeting this frog. It was the Saturday before Mothers Day and we were practicing baseball. It was a spectacular day to be outside. The boys were practicing, the parents were talking and the little brother was wandering around. It was our second basemans little brother. He is a cute little fellow that is always into something. He comes on and off the eld as he wishes, sometimes shagging balls, sometimes just to get into mischief. The boys on the eld dont give it a second thought, he is the teams little brother. About halfway through practice, the little boy found a frog, either on the eld or in the woods nearby. He had to go player to player showing them his frog. He also found an empty water bottle that he used to make a portable terrarium. He put some grass and a stick in the bottle. During a break in the practice, I asked the little boy if I could see his frog. He nodded and took his frog out of the bottle. As I took pictures, I talked to the little fellow about his frog. Whats the frogs name? Jadon, the little boy replied. Where does a little boy get a name like that for a frog? I just gured he had a friend with the same name, or maybe there was a cartoon or television character with the name. During Jadons photo shoot, I noticed how very careful the little boy was when handling the frog. It was obvious that this was not his rst frog capture. He never gave me a reason for his new frogs name, so I decided to do a little research when I got home. This will be a weekend of barbecues, family and good times. For some it will mean an extra day in bed, at the beach, in front of the television. According to forecasters, the weather outside will be delightful, with a small chance of rain and plenty o sunshine. The beaches are inviting, the water intoxicating, with plenty to keep everybody busy. Amid the hustle and bustle is time to pause to remember, to consider the price that was paid and continues to be paid for those bounty of choices. From Lexington and Concord to Anbar Province, from the Chosin Reservoir to the Ardennes Forest, from Hamburger Hill to Hu Province, the price in American blood and lives is what affords us the ability to enjoy a holiday because it has surely been no holiday for the men and women of uniform. Who have answered a call that some cant imagine answering, who have suffered injuries many of us could not possibly comprehend, who have sacriced beyond the pale, beyond what many of us could fathom. We read, watch and hear their stories of battles in foreign lands, but we dont, we cant, fully appreciate the experience, the mind-set, the motivation required to defend your country, to sacrice all for your fellow American, fellow man. As was noted in last weeks story about wounded warriors, you cant know until you have walked in their boots. Many of us in this community will welcome a reminder of that cost, during the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend, during the rst weekend of June. We will see the price paid by men and women, and will have a chance to offer a bit of thanks, a small gesture, a welcome to our piece of paradise, understanding that it will never be enough, that the bill will never be fully paid. These men and women have fought and been seriously hurt while many of their comrades have died to provide the backbone to basic rights we enjoy, rights that seem under attack, the right to free speech, freedom to worship where we choose, a free press. Memorial Days meaning was driven home to me since I came to Port St. Joe, one of the rst stories I wrote for The Star, about the death of Christopher Blaschum, a Lieutenant Commander and Navy pilot who died while on training exercises in the Mediterranean. He was a graduate of Port St. Joe High School who was known for his infectious laugh, out-sized personality and among the rst of what has become the thousands of those who died in the wars that followed 9/11. His funeral was in large part a celebration of his life and mourning of his passing, but also a heart-rending testament to the sacrices of the soldier. Once the uniform is donned, soldier cuts to the front of the line from adjectives such as son, father, husband, wife, sister, brother and mother. The uniform wipes it all away. The following Motivational Analysis was written by Lt. Colonel Richard T. Tallman and is contained within the le of Clifford S. Sims Congressional Medal of Honor le. Sims was awarded the Medal of Honor after throwing himself on a grenade to save his men in a far-off province in Vietnam. He is the only man from Gulf County so awarded and if it does not capture what we should remember this weekend it is hard to know what would. Staff Sergeant Sims was not a man to act rashly; he made decisions with the rm belief that he was right, and he made them without counting the cost to himself. He was intensely loyal to his men, and never put his own interests above theirs. Just ve days before he died he was assigned the task of securing an LZ during heavy ghting. He assured that his men were properly positioned and behind suitable cover. And he made certain that the wounded were expeditiously evacuated. Yet he never considered cover for himself during a full six hour period during which he was under a harassing sniper re. His devotion was to his duty and to his men. And so I believe, as he never acted otherwise that I was aware of, did he consider the safety of his men on 21 February, fully aware of the sacrice he was making, yet more poignantly concerned for the fate of his men were he to choose any other course. In simple fact, Staff Sergeant Sims knowingly and willingly laid down his life so that his comrades might live. Even having read that passage dozens of times, having read the testimony that was submitted recommending Sims this man who rose from an impoverished, segregated life to marry, have a child and go off to war and not return due to his sense of honor and duty for the Medal of Honor, trying to understand his sacrice under re still clutches the throat. And particularly in this day and age when too much of what we read, hear and experience derives from the impacts of men and women, at home and throughout the country, who carry with them a false sense of entitlement, that life owes them, that their community owes them. Sims life and his sense of patriotism and courage shames them all and is a lesson all youngsters should be taught and understand, as some will walk the stage for graduation this weekend. And this Memorial Day we pledge to have a ne time, spend the extra hour in bed if able, go to the beach, have a meal out, but do so remembering that for more than 200 years and still counting men and women have paid a price for this holiday in blood. That such men and women have existed through the years is sufcient to remember; that they continue to walk among us is reason for celebratory awe.Skip beat to his own drum Keyboard KLATTERINGSMama and the Jewish FrogRemember the why TiIM CrROFtT Star news editor Have you pursued something so hard that you werent quite so sure what to do with it when it nally confronted you? You channeled so much energy and thought into the end result that maybe you lost sight of the objective. Or perhaps, the goal presented more challenges than you ever suspected. And the rewards, in the end, werent all they were cracked up to be. It brings to mind General Custer chasing so ardently after those Indiansuntil he caught them. You cant imagine how we looked forward to high school graduation! Wed been stuck in our little hometown forever! Oh, man, wed read about New York, Hollywood and Route 66 that could take you clean across the nation. But that was pipe dream stuff to us. In the here and now Miss Polly was force feeding Macbeth, of all things, into our little minds. Double, double, toil and trouble was the only part that I could relate to. And we didnt give a ying hoot if that Birnam wood ever got to Dunsinane! The tedium of everyday can dilute the joy of living if you are not careful. Of course, we didnt understand this in elementary school. And graduating from anything never crossed our minds. Shucks, we were just getting started. Our entire lives consisted of spelling bees, reading classes and multiplication tables. If we were arranged alphabetically Pam Collins would be in the desk behind me. She could talk a blue streak. About anything! Anne Alexander, Billy Thompson and Diana Morris were going to make the best grades. Bobby Brewer and Ricky Hale never won the spelling contest, but you ought to have seen the things they could make out of the clay on Miss Carolyns back table. We didnt look too much forwards or backwards. We didnt philosophize, criticize or judge. Mostly we were in the survival mode. And we understood with the intuitiveness of a Rhodes Scholar that what happened to Suzie Cozart or Phil Cook could surely happen to us! We certainly didnt think bonding or lifelong friendships; we just had a mutual interest in each others back. If Joe Galloway made Miss Belle mad, we all likely would suffer. By junior high we were spreading our wings. guratively, if not literally. It dawned on us that Skip Trevathan didnt think just like Betsy Dinwiddie, or like any of the rest of us for that matter. Buddy Wiggleton was funnier than Kenny Butler. Don Melton could throw a baseball harder than Alice Reynolds, but he wasnt as pretty. We ALL had something to offer! We didnt understand all the pieces. And we surely werent ready for that why me and why in this little town just yet. But we were growing in spite of ourselves. We also realized a great big world existed past Gleason and Huntingdon. We just didnt know how to get there. There had to be more to life than a classroom, a dairy bar and a fairly average town square. We felt trapped. When Millicent Blackburn got back from her stay in Memphis I stood over on her grandmothers front porch and quizzed her for hours. I dont think it ever crossed my mind one time that there were fellow ninth graders from the eastern most tip of South Carolina to the far side of Astoria, Oregon, asking the exact same questions. You are really not alone..even when you think you are. But try telling that to the painfully shy, pimple faced teenager trying so hard to ask Charlotte Melton to the Friday night dance. Somewhere in there between the logarithms and conjugating all those verbs we began to see graduation as our ticket out. It would make sense of all these endless classes, ball games, after school activities, parent-teacher conferences and Macbeth. We would have arrived! Look out world! We might even nally make it to Memphis. We gathered up at that back booth out at Franks Dairy Bar and shared our hearts about the future. College was high on the list for many of us. For others, it was the military. Still others had already lined up jobs. I was amazed to nd how truly interested I was in what Terry Harrison chosen path was. It suddenly really mattered what Fran Smartt was going to do with the rest of her life. Ditto for Beverly Sparks and Larry Ridinger. The closer we got to commencement day the less we talked about who Ruth Ann Wiley was dating and the more we talked about the new direction life was taking each of us. There was an excitement in our voices. Finally! Graduation seemed the perfect ending for your school career. They handed you a diploma and you were ready for the world. What could be easier than that! Pam Garrett was straightening my tie and brushing my tassel out of the way when I started to seriously ponder on this graduation thing. Bobby Brewer came by and slapped me on the arm. Id rather make clay airplanes with him..than think about the next fty years without him! Pam Collins could talk a blue streak, but it was our blue streak! Who could ever replace the laughter Buddy Wiggleton had wrought in all our lives? I didnt need to see Memphis, Millicent had already lled me in. Somehow graduation didnt make as much sense as you had always believed when you got right in the middle of it. I had been looking forwardbut the journey to get here hadnt been half as bad as Id been making it out to be. John Ingram gave one last tug to his cap, Heber, you ready? Only a lifelong friend would call me by my rst name. And no, when it got right down to it, I wasnt ready. Life is not about the next town, the next challenge, the next cant miss opportunity. It is about the people on both sides holding you up along the way. And boy howdy, Ive had some good ones. Respectfully, Kes HUnkerNKER DOWnN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CranksRANKS MY traTRACtTOrR BN Heard See BN HearEARD A5

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Coupon Expires: 5-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Sowell Tractor Co., Inc.2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.comWe Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. SOUTH GULF COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENTWorld FamousANNUAL MEMORIAL WEEKEND BUTT ROAST 2012Dont forget to order your butt in good time this year.We will not be selling tickets this year, but butts can be ordered in advance on line at our website www.sgcre.com A full roasted butt will cost $30 but we will also be selling sandwiches, chips and a soda for $6 and a Family-To-Go box with 1lb meat, coleslaw, 4 buns, 4 sodas and barbecue sauce for $20.We will be selling from lunchtime Thursday 24th May to after lunch on Saturday 26th May 2012. Come and join us we look forward to seeing you.All proceeds from the sale will go to our 501(c)(3) corporation to further the activities of our re department. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE (800-435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. LettersThe Star| A5Thursday, May 24, 2012By Jason AldermanNow that tax day has passed, chances are youre either waiting patiently for your 2011 tax refund, its already been spent or you just wrote the U.S. Treasury a check. Its difcult to calculate exactly how much youll owe in taxes unless your income and family situation are identical from year to year. But going more than a few hundred dollars above or below your nal tax bill is not a good idea. A big refund means youve been giving the government an interestfree loan. Underpaying means you may have to pay costly penalties and interest on the amount. Your goal should be to receive little or no tax refund. Better to use that money throughout the year to pay down credit card balances or other debt, build savings, beef up your retirement plan contributions or invest. Unless youre self-employed, retired or had unexpected sources of income, the driving factor for how much tax you owe or have refunded is probably your W-4 form. Thats one of the many forms you lled out your rst day on the job. IRS Form W-4 determines how much federal income tax is withheld from your paychecks. The more allowances you claim on the W-4, the less income tax is withheld each pay period. When you le your yearly tax return, the government basically settles accounts with you. If they took out too much during the year, you get a refund; not enough and you pay additional taxes. Its a good idea to review your W-4 each year in case your nancial or family situation has changed. For example, if you or your spouse: Experience a signicant increase or decrease in income. Add a second job, start or stop working (including retirement). Have a child (including adoptions). Reduce or increase how many dependents youre claiming. Get married or divorced. Buy or sell a house. File for bankruptcy. Increase or decrease income adjustments for IRA/401(k) deductions, student loan interest payments or alimony. Signicantly change your itemized deductions or tax credits. If you have a sizeable change in taxable income not subject to withholding, you may want to either increase the amount withheld from your paychecks or make quarterly estimated tax payments. Otherwise, the IRS may charge you an underpayment penalty come next April. Estimated tax rules are fairly complicated, so refer to IRS Publication 505. Ask your HR department for a new W-4, or download the IRS version that lets you enter your information electronically and print out a copy (search www.irs.gov.) The form contains worksheets for calculating personal withholding allowances and estimating income adjustments if you plan to itemize deductions. Generally, youll claim one allowance for yourself and one for each of your dependents. However, you can adjust the number to avoid having too much or too little tax withheld from your pay. If you need additional help, see IRS Publication 919, use the IRSs Withholding Calculator or use the calculator found in most tax preparation software packages. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. The path of democracy Editors note: The following was submitted by Tom Parker of St. Joe Beach. In 1787, Alexander Tyler, a Scottish history professor at the University of Edinburgh, noticed a continuing pattern in the advance and decline of the worlds democracies. After Tylers words, Parker ponders a simple question. On this holiday that honors those who fought for our democracy, it seemed a timely passage. A democracy will continue to exist up until the time that voters discover they can vote themselves generous gifts from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always vote for the candidates who promise the most benets from the public treasury, with the result that every democracy will nally collapse due to loose scal policy, which is always followed by a dictatorship. The average age of the worlds greatest civilizations from the beginning of history, has been about 200 years. During those 200 years, those nations always progressed through the following sequence: 1. From bondage to spiritual faith; 2. From spiritual faith to great courage; 3. From courage to liberty; 4. From liberty to abundance; 5. From abundance to complacency; 6. From complacency to apathy; 7. From apathy to dependence; 8. From dependence back to bondage. So where are we, citizens of the United States, in the historically proven Life Cycles of Nations? I found that Jadon comes from the Hebrew origin. How did the little boy know the frog was Jewish? I dont know. Little boys know things like this I suppose. I found various meanings for the name, but the predominant ones were, God has heard, Thankful and He will judge. Some pretty heavy meanings for such a little frog (and boy). In researching Jewish frogs, I found a wonderful story told by a Southern Rabbi (in the state of Georgia). The Rabbi tells of a fellow who was trying to get rid of a frog on his dining room table during the Frog Plague in Egypt. This fellow got really tired, annoyed and frustrated with the frogs ribbits. The frog was persistent. The croaking was never ending. The Egyptian fellow started hitting the frog. The more he hit the frog, more frogs would appear. It kept on and on. The Rabbi compared the croaking frog to children, noting they (the children) want our attention, our love and they want answers to their questions. If the children dont get what they want, they just go on and on asking for it over and over again. This begging/croaking from children requires parents to respond correctly and calmly. The Rabbi notes that parents should remain in control and give the same sweet response that is rm and consistent. In other words, dont whack the frog it will get worse. He ends the story noting, Our children are blessings, not a plague. The more we remember that, the better well respond to them! Not being Jewish, I didnt know what the Rabbis salutation, Good Shabbos meant. I found that the term simply meant Good Sabbath. Jewish folks consider from Friday sundown to Saturday sundown, the Sabbath. Jadon, the frog, was found on a Saturday afternoon. Perhaps little boys know more than we think they do. I know mothers do. Find more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. BN HEARD from page A4 SHOULD YOU ADJUsST YOUR TAX WITHHOLDING? TTHE PATH OF DEMOCRACY

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTDoo OO RS www.starfl.comSection A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting HeadquartersMAY FEATURED FISH: This months grand prize: Calcutta prize pack includes, gear bag, T-shirt, a pair of sunglasses, decals, visor and drink coozie $129.99 value Wright Mcgill Blair Wiggins S-curve rod with a Sabalos SAB 30 reel combo, $100.00 gift card for online shopping at Bluewater Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 6Special to The StarBecause Memorial Day weekend, which kicks off summer activi ties, is right around the corner, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva tion Commission (FWC) reminds all boaters in Florida to rededicate themselves to boating safely. Florida is a great place to enjoy boating year-round, said Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. That weekend marks the unof ficial beginning of sum mer and means even more people will be out on the water. National Safe Boating Week (May 19-25) also presents an opportunity to empha size the importance of remaining safe while boating. Memorial Day week end is May 26-28. The safe-boating ef fort is timely, as 10 peo ple have already lost their lives this year due to boating accidents. We want to reach out to as many boaters as we can to help them under stand that most boating accidents are prevent able, Brown said. FWC officers are committed to keeping people as safe as possible, but we need your help. The FWC reminds boaters to enjoy their time on the water by re membering a few safety precautions, such as re maining alert while op erating a boat, wearing a life jacket at all times and designating a sober boat operator. According to the FWC, inattentiveness of the op erator often contributes to boating accidents, and statistics show that more than 64 percent of the 66 boating-related deaths confirmed last year were attributed to drowning. The wide variety of comfortable, affordable and stylish life jackets on the market today offers all boaters the pro tection they need. Boating smart and safely could result in fewer injuries and deaths each year, Brown said. More information can be found by visiting My FWC.com/Boating.Special to The StarIn Florida, shing is an important part of our life style as well as the econo my. However, this enjoyable activity sometimes can lead to problems for birds and other wildlife, such as sea turtles and manatees. According to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission biologists, monolament shing line and shing hooks that are improperly handled or dis carded can entangle these animals, leading to injury and even death. The brown pelican is one species that is espe cially impacted by monol ament line. These birds fre quently spend time looking for an easy meal at piers and other shing hotspots. They are often hooked ac cidently as they try to grab bait off an anglers line. Discarded monolament line can wind up hang ing from trees, piers and other structures, and can ensnare these birds. Once entangled, pelicans can have a difcult time ying and feeding. We often nd peli cans that died as a result of monolament line en tanglements hanging from trees and other vegeta tion, said FWC regional biologist Ricardo Zam brano. These birds of ten suffer for days before succumbing to injury or starvation. Here are some simple things you can do to help protect brown pelicans and other wildlife: Properly dispose of monolament line. If you have unwanted line, store it safely and securely until it can be placed in a recy cling bin. Dont leave shing line unattended, as pelicans may be tempted to steal your bait. Avoid casting near trees, utility lines and oth er areas where your line may get caught. Check your tackle fre quently for frayed line that may easily break. Do not feed pelicans or other wildlife, since it encourages them to ap proach fishing boats, piers and anglers. If available, use fish-scrap reposito ries. If they are not avail able, discard your fish scraps in a garbage can or at home. If you do accidentally hook a pelican, you should avoid cutting the line. Gen tly remove the hook if you feel confident you can do so without causing harm to yourself or the bird. If you cannot safely remove the hook and line from the pelican, contact a local wildlife rehabilitator. For a list of wildlife rehabilita tors in your area, contact any of the FWCs five re gional offices or consult wildliferehabinfo.org/. For more information on the statewide Monofil ament Recovery & Recy cling Program, visit mrrp. myfwc.com. By JEssSSICA BAsSHAM Special to The Star Green anoles, a type of American lizard, are often called American chameleons because they can change color, but they are not chameleons at all. These anoles are the only native lizard in the southeastern United States that changes color, but it is only from bright green to brown or gray. Usually their change in color is due to stress but also to temperature and mating. Males extend a bright pink dewlap (a piece of skin that unfolds from its throat) when looking for a mate or when warning other males to back off. Their head-bobs are like pushups and show the female and other males that they are strong. Mating season starts in the beginning of April and continues throughout the summer months. In South Florida, the mating season is a little longer. If you see a green anole bobbing up and down and showing his dewlap, look around; there may be a female nearby. A female lays one or some times two eggs every two weeks, usually in dirt or de bris at the base of a plant. The green anole is the only native anole in the Southeast and is found from North Carolina west to Texas and throughout Florida. True chameleons, how ever, live in Africa, Mada gascar, Portugal, Spain and parts of Asia. At least two species have been introduced into Florida. They can change to every color of the rainbow be cause of mood, tempera ture, habitat, stress, anger and defense. They often blend easily into their sur roundings by changing color. Chameleons hold on to branches with their feet and coiled tails. Their long, curled tongues shoot out like arrows to catch prey. Anoles are small, long and slender. Like the cha meleon, they have the abil ity to cling to objects but only because of a sticky pad on the underside of their toes. Their tails are not coiled but long and thin and can break easily. This is so they can escape pred ators. When caught by the tail, the lizard squirms un til its tail breaks and it can escape to freedom. The confused predator is left with only the tail and won dering where its lunch has gone. Lizard tails will grow back a little. In southwestern Flor ida, the dewlap may be gray, white or light green. These populations are a different subspecies or race of green anole. Watching green anoles is easy. Around homes, they hang from walls, scurry across sidewalks and driveways and climb shrubs, branches and trees. A little anole visits me daily. He perches on a railing outside my office window and bobs his head up and down, showing off his bright pink dewlap. Anoles generally have a territory, so chances are youll see one in the same place, day after day. The one I see is missing his tail. Another anole in Florida that is not na tive is the brown anole from Cuba. Many times they are confused with the native green anole when the green anole has turned brown. But brown anoles have obvious pat terns on their backs and sides. Green anoles typi cally have no pattern, al though a female may have a slightly wavy whitish stripe down her back. For more information, you can visit animaldiver sity.ummz.umich.edu/site/ accounts/information/Ano lis_carolinensis.html.Special to The StarA new draft of the veyear update to the Gopher Tortoise Management Plan for the state is available for review. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is asking for public input. The threatened gopher tortoise is classied as a keystone species, because its extensive burrows offer shelter to more than 350 other species such as the federally threatened east ern indigo snake. Gopher tortoises were identied more than 235 years ago by naturalist William Bartram as he explored Florida. Gopher tortoise bur rows average 6.5 feet deep and 15 feet long, provide a home for hundreds of other species and offer great amenities: constant temperature, refuge from res and bad weather, and protection from predators, said Deborah Burr, the FWCs gopher tortoise plan coordinator. When gopher tortoises decline, so do the occupants of their burrows, such as indigo snakes, gopher frogs and burrowing owls. The revised draft Go pher Tortoise Management Plan for the rst time addresses the total picture of the tortoise and its ten ants, Burr said. The draft plan and link to comment on the plan are available at MyFWC.com/ GopherTortoise. Public comment will be accepted on the draft plan through June 25. More than 100 in dividuals and stakeholders already have made sug gestions on improving the original 2007 plan, through written input and a public meeting. The draft revisions to the Gopher Tortoise Man agement Plan are sched uled to go before the FWCs Commissioners at their Sept. 5-6 meeting. The objectives of the draft plan are: Minimize loss of go pher tortoises by ensuring humane, responsible relo cation from lands slated for development; Increase and improve species habitat; Enhance and restore populations where the species no longer occurs or has been severely depleted; Maintain its function as a keystone species by also conserving commensal species. Floridas rst Gopher Tortoise Management Plan was approved by the FWC in 2007 and was scheduled to be updated ve years later. Under the original plan, Florida has made progress in slowing the decline of go pher tortoises by providing options to move tortoises off lands slated for development as well as oppor tunities for homeowners and landowners interested in conserving tortoises on their property. Since 2007, the plan has restored and managed an annual average of 36,000 acres of gopher tortoise habitat, expanded pro tected tortoise habitat by more than 6,500 acres, and humanely relocated than 4,000 gopher tortoises from development sites to public and private properties that afford the species longterm conservation. Stakeholders in the Go pher Tortoise Technical As sistance Group were instru mental in the development and implementation of the Gopher Tortoise Management Plan and continue to provide input during the plans revision process. As sistance group representatives come from a wide range of interests: industry, conservation, land development, state and local government, universities and research, commercial services, private landowners, large federal and state land managers, animal advocacy and the general public. In Florida, it is illegal to harm gopher tortoises or their burrows. Gopher Tortoise M Management Plan draft updated The green anole is no chameleon MMonolament shing line perilous for pelicans FWC reminds boaters to boat smart, safely Offshore species are returning to the Forgotten Coast in great numbers this month. Spanish Mackerel and king sh are thick in the near shore number in Mexico Beach. Try the buoy line out of Mexico Beach rst trolling dusters with cigar minnows for both the Kings and Spanish. Plenty of chicken or peanut dolphin are showing up close to shore as well this month. Lighter spinning or casting gear with a silver spoon or Got-Cha plugs will keep the school around your boat if you keep one hooked. Only a few weeks left until red snapper season opens, so gear up! Inshore OffshoreAs May is at its midway mark, shing in St. Joe Bay is still red hot. Good conditions for inshore shing have produced great catches of trout, ounder, and red sh this past week. Most anglers are using live shrimp and bull minnows, but Gulp 3 shrimp in a New penny or Sugar spice glow is the hot bait now. Use a popping cork for the ats and grubs for the deeper holes around the bay. SPoONsoSORED BY

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com ASectionBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com PORT ST. JOE The Tiger Sharks proved an inhospitable host as spring football practice game to a close last Thursday night. Eleven Port St. Joe running backs rushed for more than 420 yards and the Tiger Sharks blanked both Franklin County and Wewahitchka over 24 minutes of play to come away with a clean sweep during a threeteam jamboree. The Tiger Sharks pummeled Franklin County 27-0 over two quarters and dominated a battered Gator team 19-0. Wewahitchka beat Franklin County 24-7 in the opening half. I was pleased with the effort, said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon. We have good depth at running back, but we are young on the offensive line and we cant afford any injuries. But I thought we played well tonight.Wewahitchka 24, Franklin County 6The Seahawks took the opening possession there were no kickoffs or punts during the jamboree and marched 70 yards in 12 plays to a touchdown. Most of the damage, all on the ground, came from quarterback Dwayne Griggs and running back Skyler Hutchinson. Hutchinson scored from the 1-yard line for the touchdown and Dan Careno added the extra point kick. From there it was the Jayln Addison show. Addison rushed eight times for 136 yards in the 24 minutes against the Seahawks he finished the night with 162 rushing yards and scored on runs of 29, six and 58 yards. On the Gators first possession they marched 70 yards in five plays, the big play a pass into the left flat by Rashard Ranie that Jarvest Sherfield made a nice one-handed grab of and turned into a 29-yard gain. Addison scored two players later from 29 yards and Ranie ran for the twopoint conversion. Franklin County responded by driving to the Wewahitchka 1-yard line but on a third-and-goal, a handoff was fumbled and the Gators recovered. Six plays and 98 yards later including a gorgeous deep rainbow for 76 yards from Ranie to Sherfield and Addison scored from the 3. James Harris ran for the two-point conversion. Griggs was intercepted at the Gator 46 while the Seahawks were marching again they finished with more total yards than Wewahitchka but their final four possessions ended fumble, interception, fumble, fumble and Addison sprinted 58 yards for a touchdown on the next play. Ranie scored on the two-point conversion to complete the scoring.Port St. Joe 27, Franklin County 0Using remnants of the Fling-T favored by former Coach John Palmer, an offense that uses motion and misdirection to create space for running plays, the Tiger Sharks dominated the two quarters against Franklin County. A fumbled Port St. Joe handoff on the first series against the Seahawks was followed by domination as the Tiger Sharks rushed for 258 yards with 11 different backs, including three seventh-graders, getting touches. Franklin County fumbled the ball right back after that initial series and Jarkeice Davis (the nights leading rusher with 179 yards) sprinted 80 yards around left end for a touchdown. After stopping the Seahawks on downs Port St. Joe needed just four plays to cover 54 yards, Natrone Lee catching a 24-yard touchdown pass at the right ag from quarterback Ramello Zaccarro. The Tiger Sharks converted another Franklin County fumble one of six turnovers for the Seahawks into a 10-yard touchdown run by Lee, who nished with 101 rushing yards. The Seahawks fumbled on the ensuing play and three plays later Dusty Richter carried from 11 yards out for the touchdown, Justin Hites extra point Hites was three of four on extra point kicks providing the nal scoring for the two quarters.Port St. Joe 19, Wewahitchka 0The nal two quarters were between county rivals Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka and after losing four starters in the opening half against Franklin County the Gators were playing with one hand behind their back. Port St. Joe stopped Wewahitchka on downs to open the rst quarter and marched 62 yards on nine plays on the following drive. Rumella Zaccarro dove over from the 1-yard line for the score. The Gators marched to the Port St. Joe 45 on the next drive but was forced to punt the ball ending up at the Tiger Shark 15.\ A Davis sweep for 27 yards and a 15-yard penalty on a late hit put Port St. Joe in Wewahitchka territory and the Tiger Sharks scored ve plays later on another 1-yard dive by Zaccarro. Hites missed on the opening extra point and the Tiger Sharks went for two on Zaccarros second scored but the pass failed. The teams exchanged turnovers before Wewahitchka fumbled the ball away at the Tiger Shark 48. Davis dashed 32 yards, Lee 21 and Joe Love nished the drive with a 8yard touchdown up the middle of the defense. Hites hit the extra point kick to complete the scoring. I didnt like that, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah of the nal two quarters. We lost four kids in that rst half and we just cant afford that. When we were fresh and the other team was fresh, we played well. After the rst possession, I thought our defense really cracked down. Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 7Star Staff ReportKatie Lacour, Port St. Joe High Schools all-time leader in hits and stolen bases signed a letter of intent to attend Southeastern Louisiana later this year on a softball scholarship. Lacour, one of just two seniors on the Port St. Joe team and a four-year starter signed last week to play for the Lions. Southeastern Louisiana University is a NCAA Division 1 school in Hammond and plays in the Southland Conference. This past season, Lacour batted a teambest .550 while helping the Lady Sharks reach the state Class 1A nal four.Star Staff ReportAll-Pro Soccer, will be holding two Summer Soccer Camps in the area, on Monday-Friday. June 1115. The rst will be sponsored by the Gulf County Soccer Boosters and be held at the Port St Joe Soccer Complex from 9-11:30 a.m. (ET) on those dates. On those same dates, the Callaway Arsenal Soccer Club will be hosting the camp from 4-6:30 p.m. (CT) at the Callaway Sports Complex. Both camps will be supervised by former professional player and coach, Gary Hindley. Coach Hindley, a ve-time Coach of the Years selectee, is currently both the boys and girls coach at Port St Joe High School. At both camps, there will be individual instruction for both eld players and goalkeepers, from ages 717. Spaces will be limited. For questions or to obtain a registration form, contact Coach Hindley at 276-6353 or gjhallpro@ aol.com.Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Womens Softball League will begin play on Tuesday, June 5. For details call 340-1389 or visit facebook.com/PSJWomensSoftball.Port St. Joe dominates jamboree Star Staff Report During the month of June, the St. Josephs Bay Golf and Country Club is pleased to offer free golf lessons to local boys and girls ages 8-16. Highly skilled instructors will introduce students to all aspects of the game including such basics as grip, stance, posture and swing. Other topics will deal with the correct full swing, short game, trouble shots, chipping and putting. The junior golf clinic will be held every Friday in June from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET beginning June 1. All equipment and practice balls will be provided free of charge and special tee times and prices are available for parent/student matches. Limited space is available, so please register early. For more information call 227-1751, visit our web site at www.stjoebaygolf.com or email info@stjoebaygolf. com. Port St. Joe womens softball league starting soonPSJHSs Lacour signs with Southeastern LouisianaI was pleased with the effort. We have good depth at running back, but we are young on the offensive line and we cant afford any injuries. But I thought we played well tonight.Chuck Gannon Port St. Joe CoachFree golf lessons for students this June SUMMER SOCCER CAMPS Star Staff ReportWewahitchka track standout Donia Lanier has signed a cross country scholarship with Chipola College. Pictured from left, are: (seated) Donia Lanier, (back) Mary Holley, Wewahitchka High School girls cross country coach; Jay Bidwell, Wewahitchka High head coach for track and cross country; Donias mother Tammy Lanier; and Chipola cross country coach Rance Massengill. Lanier was track and cross country captain this year at WHS and voted the schools most valuable runner. Wewahitchkas cross country team nished second in the district. Lanier also placed rst in the 300 meter hurdles and was on relay teams which won rst place in the 4 x 800 and 4 x 100 at the district meet and placed in the Region 1-1A meet, the former team earning a spot in the state Class 1A meet.WHSs Lanier signs with Chipola

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Heath Bailey Beau Boggess Theryl Brown Austin Bryan Quentin Carter Austin Chumney CONGRATULATIONS WEWAHITCHKAHIGHSCHOOL CLASSOF 2012 Gauge Combs Kristopher Cox Casey Dauphin Daniel Fisher Justin Flowers Taylor Flowers Raven Forehand Kaitlyn Gaskin Bryce Gerber Courtney Goins Deanna Gortt Austin Guffey Taylor Husband Ciara Jackson Katie Jones Donia Lanier Cheyenne Luckie Hunter McDaniel Travis McGill Trent McGill Trey McGill Jeremy Morrill Bridgette Myers Chris Myrick Amber Norris Ladonna Pelt Jaria Pippin Sebastian Quentin Lyndsey Ramsey Shoshonie Rhames David Rice Jr. Katelyn Roberts Randy Roth David Russ Jill Russell Chelsea Sandifer Mack Sandlin Tyler Sarmiento Mathew Tanner Megan Udell Cory Walding Tyler Whitten Richie WardALMA MATEROh, Wewahitchka High School were loyal to you, to our school and our friends were faithful and true. You stand by the highway, a beacon of light, a symbol there to knowledge, to the truth and the right. You stand for the highest, you stand for the right. Were true to your colors of red and of white. And whereere we wander from these halls so dear, the clear call of our high school we will always hear. Megan Setterich Johnathan Shellnut JD Strickland Dylan Ward Daniel Withers

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LocalThe Star| A9Thursday, May 24, 2012 CONGRATULATIONS PORTST. JOE HIGHSCHOOL CLASSOF 2012 Brittany Anthony Raqueatha Bailey Ryan Baker Raney Besore Karah Bradley Rhea Brookins Andrew Burke Christopher Bush Blake Buskens Cameron Butts Connor Clark LeAnna Collins Patricia Davidson Ashton Davis Paul Jacobs Rachel Jones Joseph Julian Andrew Kemp Caleb Kesterson Alex King Katherine Lacour Autumn Merriel Jenny Miles Emerald Muniz Daniel Neal Sadik Padilla William Rish Ashley Robinson Raymond Robles Bethany Rutherford Sylvia Sheline Nichole Splide Jamie Squire Lacey Stickland Samantha Taylor Alexandria Thomas Megan Walker Montez Walker Arion Ward Cole Warren Erin White Stephen Whiten Michaela Wiegand Kaley Wilder Lora Williams Natalie Wood Lisa Davis Nicholas Dickinson Dylan Dunaway Bryce Frazier Ian Frost Kristina Furstenburg Katie Gardner Marsi Garrell Allyson Harvey Autumn Haynes Michelle Hiscock Matthew Howze Phillip Hubbard Jesse Hyman Trevor Lang Avery Little Oneika Lockley Montana Lyle Daniel May Samuel McGee Klenton McLemoreGO SHARKS!!!

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LocalA10 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Ryan Baker LeAnna Collins Lisa Davis Bethany RutherfordDurens Piggly Wiggly125 W Hwy 98, Port St. Joe (850) 229.8398 www.DURENSPIGGLYWIGGLY.com Congratulations on Your Graduation FromGook Luck In Your Future 515 Cecil G Costins Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL (850) 227-6195 Congratulations to All Our Local Graduates! st. joe rent-all & st. joe nursery & supply706 First Street, Port St. Joe 850.227.2112 850.227.7449A World Of Well Wishes, Grads!Congratulations & Good Luck In The Future!From Best Wishes from302 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd Port St. Joe, FL(850) 227.7099 Best Wishes from218 Hwy 98 Wewahitchka, FL(850) 639.2252 The time has arrived to send you on your way, the days of youth culminating with that walk across the stage to grab that sheepskin and toss the mortar into the air. This is one of those milestones on which the foundation of life is constructed and each and every graduate of Gulf County Schools all 150 or so deserves kudos for reaching this point, prepared to make that walk into adulthood. This newspaper has for years celebrated those who achieve honors and high honors designation, but this year we decided to take that celebration, that pride in what our public schools produce, to another level. Hence, this tab, aimed to be a keepsake, a remembrance of roots and a time in life which is like no other, when the possibilities are limitless, the potential enormous and the world in all its in nite options begins to expand before those who will grace stages in Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka. Commencement speeches were never a forte, heaven knows public speaking is not a skill with which we are blessed, but we will take a moment to pass on some lessons learned from the years beyond high school.Lesson No. 1STOKE THE FIRE IN YOUR GUT.Whatever path you choose as you leave high school, make sure it ends in a place where you love, where your passion eclipses considerations about paychecks and status or power. Like so many youth of my generation, I chose an opposite path. Although I had grown up around a dining room table in which the issues of the day were parsed and discussed by a mother who was a schoolteacher and a father who was a newspaperman, even though I loved to write and delve into the events of the day, I chose the ladder. This was the corporate ladder with a series of hotels, working my way up toward heftier paychecks and more responsibility and power. More and more, however, my coworkers and bosses noticed that my written reports were detailed, thorough and written was some degree of air. I didnt quite understand it, until I had a chance to jump off the carousel for awhile, but I was headed back to where I belonged, what I loved, what I learned from my father engaged journalism. We arent in this business to become wealthy or sock away dough for a house in the Caribbean we are in this business because we believe in what we do, love what we do, have a re for what we do. In a commencement address, Thomas Friedman, winner of three Pulitzer Prizes for his reporting, summed it up pretty well. Ill let him take it from here Let me close with a toned down version of a poem that was written by the slam poet Taylor Mali. It is called: What Teachers Make. It contains some wisdom that I think belongs in every graduation speech. It goes like this: The dinner guests were sitting around the table discussing life. One man, a CEO, decided to explain the problem with education. He argued this way. Whats a kid going to learn from someone who decided his best option in life was to become a teacher? You know, its true what they say about teachers: Those who can do, do; those who cant do, teach. To corroborate his statement he said to another guest, Hey, Susan, youre a teacher. Be honest, what do you make? Susan, who had a reputation for honesty and frankness, replied, You want to know what I make? I make kids work harder than they ever thought they could and I can make kids sit through 40 minutes of study hall in absolute silence. I can make a C-plus feel like the Congressional Medal of Honor and an A feel like a slap in the face if the student didnt do his or her very best. Susan continued, I can make parents tremble when I call home or feel almost like they won the lottery when I tell them how well their child is progressing. Gaining speed, she went on: You want to know what I make? I make kids wonder, I make them question, I make them criticize, I make them apologize and mean it, I make them write and I make them read, read, read. I make them show all their work in math and hide it all on their nal drafts in English. Susan then stopped and cleared her throat. I make them understand that if you have the brains, then follow your heart. And if someone ever tries to judge you by what you make in money, you pay them no attention. Susan then paused. You want to know what I make? she said. I make a difference. What about you?Lesson No. 2 TREAT THE FOLKS WHO CROSS YOUR PATH IN LIFE AS EQUALS.This is echoed in the story above and words which scrolling across my computer screen at home when it is at rest, a statement from Bruce Springsteen, whose compassion for his fellow man, his empathy to those from all walks of life, permeates his songs. It is a thought which reverberates through the Golden Rule and which life teaches is a simple reality. In the end, nobody wins unless everybody wins. Unless you are willing to wait, extend a hand to pull along those who have fallen behind, humanity, we, are losers. Regardless of whether your GPA was a 4.0 or a 2.0, that sheepskin you will soon hold represents a ticket stamped relatively equally to push you onto the tracks toward the rest of your life. You have come from different backgrounds and stations in life, had varying advantages and disadvantages, but youve all arrived at the same place with pretty much equal opportunity. As much as your life will be about investing in you and your potential, though, it should also be about investing in your community, the landscape before you. Rising water oats all a bit higher.Lesson No. 3 NOTHING IN THIS LIFE FROM THIS POINT FORWARD WILL COME EASY.I borrow heavily from the late Dr. David Langston on this one because time and again he managed to succinctly explain and expound on his passion instilling a work ethic in young people. Hard work, dedication, continuing on in the face of sometimes paralyzing obstacles, internal as well as external, are the rungs on which a life accomplished is reached. No matter how far beyond you may have started, no matter how much of a head start others gained, hard work, passion and a willingness to put shoulder to grindstone day after day can be the great equalizer.Lesson No. 4 MAKE THIS JUST THE STARTING LINE FOR YOUR LEARNING CURVE. AND LEARN HOW TO LEARN.One of the great joys of being in the newspaper business, being a reporter, is, as Friedman has noted, that ability to gain a Masters degree every day of the week. There is always something, a project, an initiative, a person making a difference in the community in which we live, some story out there, through which we expand our knowledge and sate our curiosity. We in the newspaper business are constantly expanding our knowledge of the world in which we live, the good and the bad, and in turn enhancing our ability to make a difference. The old adage that knowledge is power is a truism in journalism each and every day. Seek out the experts, the best teachers regardless of subject. Strive to challenge yourself. Your brain has millions of little gray cells ensure that when your hair turns gray you are still lling those cells up.Lesson No. 5 LISTEN.Continuing your education, understanding and supporting your community, helping those who fall behind, they involve the ability to listen. My father taught me one lesson through osmosis or genetics or whatever, a good reporter isnt the one spouting on television or engaging in those talking head marathons which too often passes for journalism and news these days. The good reporter is the one you dont notice, who spends time as the y on the wall and only buzzes into the conversation with questions to gain clearer understanding. The listener, not the talker that is the one to respect, in journalism and the broader world.Lesson No. 6 DONT FALL TOO MADLY IN LOVE WITH TECHNOLOGY.The gadgets of this ever-changing world are a wonder to behold and the tasks they accomplish are stunning to those of who can still remember black and white television or the days when radio ruled the communications world. But it is important to remember that each of those gadgets should be labeled Judgment Not Included. My rst cellphone was one required of my job. It is on only during work hours and I alert callers to leave messages only if they must. I sometimes miss the Remington typewriter or the pen and paper on which I rst began to write. Unfailingly I nd that I learn more and come away more satis ed from a one-on-one interview, listening to a forum of concerned citizens or simple workplace interaction than I ever can from the Internet or a Blackberry or an iPod. As gadgets chip away at our human interaction, we stray further from a community and closer to the apocalyptic vision found in the Terminator movies. And, nally:Lesson No. 7This lesson arrived centuries ago at the tip of Mark Twains pen. It seems the most apt sendoff graduates could be given. Always work like you dont need the money. Always fall in love like youve never been hurt. Always dance like nobody is watching. And always always live like its heaven on earth. Congratulations and go on and make your own good luck. TIM CROFTStar news editorA letter from the editor to the Class of 2012

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionThursday, May 24, 2012Local girl donates hair to honor memory of great-grandmotherBy VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star.com Three generations of women gathered at a quaint salon off a dirt road in Overstreet last Wednesday to honor the memory of their beloved mother, granny and great-granny. Seven-year-old Skylar Clayton sat quietly in the stylists chair, her long, dirty blonde hair looped in a ponytail at her back. Just one moment and a few scissor snips later, she held that same 11-inch ponytail in her hands. When asked why she was getting her hair cut so short, Skylar refused to answer because she didnt want to make her nana cry. Finally, she mustered, Its for my GG. Although she tried to hold back her tears, Skylars Port St. Joe residents answered call to service during WWIIBy VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star.com With its annual golf tournament right around the corner, the 23 members of the Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club are gearing up for a full season of ser vice projects to benet the community. The Dr. Bob King Me morial Golf Tournament is scheduled for June 2 at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. The money raised through the tournament will help fund Kiwanis Club service projects throughout the year. Majority of what we do, we try to do locally, said Kiwanis Club President Barbara Radcliff. We like to see our money working in Gulf County. Through last years major fundraisers, the golf tournament, a sh fry and a pancake breakfast, the Kiwanis Club raised more than $8,600 to put back into the community. Our focus for the most part, is children, Radcliff said. Theyre certainly our future, and theres just great need here in Gulf County. The kids are being affected in more ways than the average person thinks about. The Port St. Joe Chap ter of the Kiwanis Club has been in service for 71 years and funds projects like the Port St. Joe Elemen tary Accelerated Reader program, local Girl Scout troops, The Gulf Coast State College School of Cu linary Arts, Friends of the Library and the Growing Minds Center. They also donated Christmas baskets to the needy during holiday times. The club also funds scholarships for local students. They provided $25,000 in funding for Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf and just cut the second of ve $1,000 checks for the new North Florida Child Development Center in Port St. Joe. For as small a club as we are, that was a big deal, Radcliff said of the donation to Sacred Heart. The club also holds a contingency fund for emer gency situations. During a budget crisis at Port St. Joe Elemen tary last year, the Kiwanis Club used money from the funds to help buy needed school supplies. Kiwanis member Kathy Balentines favorite project is putting together Christmas baskets for needy families. Last year, a mother and her young son came by Balentines ofce to pick up the fami lys Christmas basket. The young son was looking in it and was just so happy about the things that were inside, Balen tine said. I remember him saying Oh we can make a cake! when he saw a box of cake mix. Balentine said some of the basket deliveries even stemmed into other individuals in the club chip ping in to help purchase presents for the children in the needy families. First Fridays to feature Drew SmithStar Staff ReportThe First Fridays Music Series 2012, sponsored by the Gulf Alliance for Local Arts, will continue its eighth season at 6 p.m. ET this Friday at the Port Inn and Thirsty Goat. The Port Inn and Thirsty Goat are located on U.S. Highway 98 in historic Port St. Joe, directly across from St. Joseph Bay. This Friday features Nashville Heads to South in the form of Drew Smith. Born and raised in southernmiddle Tennessee next to the Alabama Line, the halfway point between Music Row and Muscle Shoals, Smith is the son of a preacher, raised on THE TRUTH, Steve Earle, Foster & Lloyd, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Tom Petty, Van Morrison, John Prine, the Eagles and everything between the Stones and Jones. After touring coast to coast for nearly two years, Smith is currently in his rst major publishing contract in Nashville, where he continues to write, perform and reside. He is recording his rst major project with producer Billy Joe Walker, Jr. The fun gets started from 6-7 p.m. ET with social hour, which will feature a performance by the Port St. Joe High School Odyssey of the Mind team along with good company, refreshments, cheese and stuff. Drew Smith begins performing at 7 p.m. ET and the music will continue until 11 p.m. ET. Kiwanis Club gears up for golf fundraiserIts for my GGVALERIE GARMAN | The StarSeven-year old Skylar Clayton donated 11 inches of dirty blonde hair to Locks of Love in honor of her great-grandmother, who died two years ago from brain cancer. At right is Skylars new haircut. Stylist Rose Buskens of Hair DeSigns by Rose, below, cut Skylars long ponytail. PLANE SPOTTINGStar Staff ReportEditors note: This story ran in this newspaper several years ago. We run it again this week in observance of Memorial Day and to honor all those who answered when the country called. In the absence of civil defense organizations, food rationing and a military draft, civilians often feel disconnected from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, soldiers ght our nations conicts, and the rest of us go about our business. But it was not always so. During World War II, civilians were required to make numerous sacrices for the war effort. Food and gasoline rationing compelled men and women to plant gardens and ride bicycles. Housewives entered the workforce because of the shortage of male labor, and necessity forced all to forgo their usual comforts. Though most sacrices were required by government mandate, some were made out of a personal sense of duty. Men and women volunteered their time and talents to create surgical dressings for troops overseas, patrolled local beaches and scanned the skies for enemy aircraft. In Port St. Joe, a community rallied to build an Air Warning Service observation tower, staffed by a core group of dedicated volunteers for whom service was second nature. AA lofty retreat The entire Port St. Joe community leant a hand in the construction of the observation tower. Business owners and residents made donations ranging from 50 cents to $3, and the St. Joe Lumber and Export Company contributed all the lumber. Not towering in the traditional sense residents say it measured only 24-30 feet tall the observation tower stood in a grassy lot between Third and Fourth streets, about midway between Williams and Reid avenues. Rows of zigzagging stairs led to the top of the tower, which featured an enclosed room with a at roof and a wrap-around observation deck. The room was sparsely decorated, with a heavy canvas oor covering, a See LLOCKS B6 FILE ILE PHOTOS Silhouettes of the various German airplane used in World War II. This handy pack of cards helped plane spotters stateside. At top, aircraft spotting cards, such as this deck featuring German aircraft, made amateur plane spotters out of ordinary citizens during World War II.See PLANELANE SPOTTINING B5 See KIIWANI ANIS B6

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OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society MILEY Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information SocietyB2 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012Star Staff ReportThe Port Saint Joe Garden Club is pleased to announce the ower show Garden Melodies will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET on Saturday, June 9. It is a small standard show registered with the National Federation of Garden Clubs and will include both design and horticultural entries. Besides the ower show, a plant sale will be held on the grounds. The garden center, a historic building of Port St Joe, is located at 216 Eighth Street.Star Staff ReportA birthday card shower is planned for Ron Isbell, former general manager of The Star. Isbell is currently recovering from renal cell cancer surgery that has left him with a spinal cord injury and paralysis. He will celebrate his 63rd birthday on May 31. Cards can be sent to P.O. Box 1552, Kings Mountain, NC 28086. If you would like to email him instead, you can send birthday wishes to isbell.wendy@gmail.com.By Johanna WhiteThis past week, Sharon Gaskin, CEO of NWF Child Development, made a presentation to update us on the past years activities. Construction is under way for the new facility, but was halted several weeks ago due to a slow revenue stream from funding agencies. However, that problem has been corrected and construction has started again. The opening has been delayed from August until the December break. Sharon has been busy forging new agreements with Gulf Coast State Colleges Franklin Center to use space for their nursing program and possibly a new program for Early Childhood Development. She also has a state of the art kitchen and is talking about starting a culinary program. The street has been named Field of Dreams, which is very appropriate since the project was a dream of Sharons for the past several years. A check for $1,000 was given as part of our five-year $5,000 commitment. The annual Dr. Robert E. King Kiwanis Club Golf Tournament is Saturday, June 2, with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. ET. The entry fee is $60 per player, which includes a round of golf, a chance to win cash prizes, door prizes and a barbecue lunch. This event is a great way to support our local community. The Kiwanis Club would like to invite our local businesses to participate by being a Hole Sponsor ($75) or a Patron ($175). Hole Sponsor advertisement on a Tee Box and a Patron, advertisement on the putting green and one players entry fee, respectively. This event is the largest fundraiser that the Kiwanis Club does each year. We rely on our community support to be able to fund the many projects that we assist. We truly appreciate all of you who have supported this tournament in the past. Our hopes are that you will support us again this year. And for those who will consider becoming a hole sponsor or patron, your support is greatly appreciated too. For information regarding the Kiwanis club tournament, call Johanna White at 227-8752. The Kiwanis motto is Serving the children of the world.Special to The StarIn observance of Memorial day, the sanitation services schedule for Mexico Beach will be: Monday, May 28: Holiday, no pick up Tuesday, May 29: 15th Street to Canal Parkway Wednesday, May 30: 14th Street to Highway 386 Thursday, May 31: Regular garbage pick up Friday, June 1: Regular garbage pick upStar Staff ReportYoung readers will explore the night this summer as the Gulf County Public Library presents Dream Big, Read! during the 2012 Summer Reading Program. Children entering grades K4 thru fth will enjoy programs on stargazing and moon lore, dreams and wishes, space exploration and nocturnal animals. There are certain to be some surprise visitors as well. Each child is invited to participate in the Summer Reading Challenge while families may join the Read-to Me portion of the program. Space for Dream Big, Read! is limited, so register now. Programs begin at 1 p.m. ET on Tuesday, June 5. For more information, visit or call the library at 229-8879. Programs are free of charge and open to children of all abilities. Generous support for the Summer Reading Program is provided by the Friends of the Gulf County Public Library.Wewahitchka Public Library summer reading Dream Big, Read is the theme for this summers reading program at the Wewahitchka Public Library. The program will be held each Wednesday during through July 25 beginning at 3 p.m. CT. The program is for children kindergarten through fth grade. There will be reading, singing, crafts and special guests. The program is free. For more information contact 872-7510.Special to The StarThe members of the Port St Joe Rotary are busy nalizing the details for their drawing to raise money for Rotary Internationals End Polio Now campaign. Polio eradication has been Rotarys top priority for more than two decades. The International Humanitarian Service Organization is a spearheading partner in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, along with the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and UNICEF. Rotary Club members worldwide have contributed more than $1 billion and countless volunteer hours to the polio eradication effort. The Port St Joe Rotary Club is hoping to raise $2,000 to go toward their contribution to this worldwide effort. Beginning June 1, club members will be selling $2 tickets for chances to win many incredible prizes. The drawing will be held during the Scallop Festival on August 3. Chances may be purchased from any Rotary Club member or at No Name Cafe, Sunset Coastal Grill and Gulf Coast Hatteras. The PSJ Rotary Club meets at noon on Thursday at Sunset Coastal Grill. If you are interested in more information regarding service projects or membership, please contact Patti Blaylock at 227-7900 or Father Tommy Dwyer at 227-1845. Special to The StarGulf County Senior Citizens will be selling spaghetti plates on Friday, June 1, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. ET at the Senior Center located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe. The plates will cost $7.50 and will include spaghetti with meat sauce, breadsticks, salad and dessert. You may eat at the center or carry out. All proceeds will go to providing services to the elderly in Gulf County. Tickets are available at the Senior Citizens Center or from any employee or board member. Call 229-8466 for more information. Remember, donations are very necessary and greatly appreciated. Library launches summer reading program for kids Rotary looks to raise funds to help in ght against polioSpecial to The StarNew Kiwanis facility restarts construction Garden Club announces Garden Melodies show Mexico Beach holiday sanitation scheduleBirthday card shower planned for former Star general manager Senior Citizens selling spaghetti plates Special to The StarSchool is almost out, so its time to start planning for fun and educational summer camps. Gulf Coast State College is offering three different Kids College Summer Camps for children. All Around Campus is a middle school camp designed to familiarize students with campus life while getting a hands-on sampling of a variety of subjects including but not limited to health sciences, physical sciences, arts, sports, communications and social sciences. Around the World camp is for both elementary and middle school age children. This camp allows children to learn and encounter different countries and cultures from around the world. They will get a chance to experience the people, arts, food, languages and more. Shining Stars camp is perfect for elementary and middle school age children who love the stage. This camp will teach all aspects of musical theater including scene work, stage movement, improvisation skills, pantomime, monologue and both singing and speaking development. The elementary camps will be June 18-22 and July 23-27. The middle school camps will be July 9-13. Camp hours are Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon. For more information and to register, visit www.gulfcoast.edu/ kidscollege or call Kelli at 850-7691551 extension 6108.Gulf Coast to host Kids College summer campsKIDS COLLEGE DATESElementary camps June 18-22 and July 23-27 Middle school camps July 9-12

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THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGHTSPECIALS 6:00 8:30HOURS: 236ReidAve (850) 229.7121CAROLYNS FAMOUS SEAFOOD PLATTER: $14.95 8 OZ RIBEYESPECIALOR SHRIMPSPECIAL WITH 2 SIDES: $11.95Orders served with:CHEESE GRITS, FF, BAKED POTATO, SALAD AND BREAD **AWARD WINNINGDESSERTS** School NewsThe Star| B3Thursday, May 24, 2012 Pre-kindergarten, James Foxworth; kindergarten, MaKenna Kurnitsky; rst grade, AJ Davis; second grade, Sean McGarry; third grade, Kamari Clayton (not pictured); fourth grade, Hannah Smith; fth grade, Eva Varnes; and sixth grade, Braden Baumgardner. Bus rider of the week: Taylor Todd. Special to The StarSpecial to The StarCongratulations to eighth-grade graduate Kylie Skoda and graduate Tiffany Burch of Faith Christian School. Burch has been a student of FCS since K3. After graduating from FCS middle school, Burch completed high school through Faith Christian Schools umbrella program. Burch graduates as an honor student. To learn more about Faith Christians preschool, elementary and middle school campus classes or the high school umbrella program, call the school of ce at 229-6707 or visit at www. faithchristianpsj.net.Special to The StarCadet Javarri Beachum is going to Annapolis. The Port St Joe Junior/Senior High School junior has been selected to attend the prestigious U.S. Naval Academy Summer Seminar from June 2-7. This seminar is a fast-paced, six-day experience for high achievers who have completed their junior year in high school. Summer Seminar teaches you about life at the Naval Academy, where academics, athletics, and professional training play equally important roles in developing our nations leaders and may just lead to an appointment to USNA with the Class of 2017. Thousands of quali ed applicants are screened each year with only 2,250 offers being made to quali ed rising seniors. Selection criteria include superior high school performance, strong PSAT, SAT, or ACT results, demonstrated achievement in athletics and extracurricular activities, demonstrated leadership ability, physically t and in good health with normal vision and a positive attitude, self-disciplined and of good moral character. Cadet Beachum is already in a select group of students that possess the Right Stuff for acceptance at our nations premier Maritime College. During the six-day session, candidates will become a part of the Academy. They will live in Bancroft Hall (the dormitory in which all Academy midshipmen live), eat in the dining hall, participate in academic and leadership workshops and experience a variety of other activities on the campus. They will have an opportunity to see rst-hand what the Academy has to offer through its exceptional academic, athletic, extracurricular activities and leadership training programs. Community support for Cadet Beachums dream was quick in coming. Port St Joes Willis V. Rowan American Legion Post 116 Commander Doug Calendine says the Post would be honored to provide a scholarship to Cadet Beachum to pursue his dream of an appointment to the Naval Academy. The tuition to attend a session is $350, which pays for room and board, as well as a variety of materials. The Legions recent Fish Fry raised $500 in support of the Port St Joe NJROTC Program, and these funds may well make this young mans dream of becoming a Naval Aviator a reality. Special to The StarST. PETERSBURG The Progress Energy Foundation will invest $500,000 this year to fund energy education classroom projects as and workforce development at high school career academies in Florida. The funds will support public-education foundations, science centers and career academies. Every dollar we contribute to education is an investment in the future of our state, said Vincent Dolan, president and CEO of Progress Energy Florida. We are proud to support programs that engage and excite students about energy, alternative energy and energy ef ciency. Our support of career academies will pay huge dividends when the students who bene t from these programs join the workforce and become active participants in our communities. During the past 10 years, the Progress Energy Foundation has invested $17 million to assist education initiatives in Florida. Progress Energy Foundation grants will support these Florida programs: K-12 schools: The Progress Energy Foundation provided funding to 18 education foundations throughout its service territory to support math and science education programs with an emphasis on those that include energy efciency, renewable energy and environmental education. Education foundations from Alachua, Citrus, Gulf, Franklin, Hernando, Highlands, Lake, Levy, Madison, Marion, Orange, Osceola, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Seminole, Sumter and Volusia counties received funding. Career Academies: Funding will support workforce development through investments in career academies, which offer high school students the opportunity to receive training in a speci c career area such as engineering or environmental science. Grants were awarded to Junior Achievement of West Central Florida and the Career Technical Foundation to support programs for high school students in Pinellas and Pasco counties. Science Centers: The grant to the Orlando Science Center (OSC) will allow 2,500 fourth-grade students to visit the centers Science Park and use its alternative energy video game component, the Hydrogen X-Change exhibit, which was developed with a previous Progress Energy Foundation grant. The game promotes the understanding of alternative energy sources such as solar, nuclear, wind and biomass. The Science Center of Pinellas County received a grant to continue offering weather and energy-related programming and curriculum to Pinellas County schoolchildren. Through the grant, more than 3,500 children will learn about energy generation, energy ef ciency and alternative energy at the centers speciallydesigned energy room. Education is one part of the companys overall investment in nonpro t partners in Florida, North Carolina and South Carolina. Since 2001, Progress Energy has contributed more than $17 million to public education. This year, the company will invest nearly $1.2 million in K-12 education throughout Florida and the Carolinas. Our company has a proud history of supporting education in the communities where our customers and employees live and work, Dolan said. We recognize that a strong education system helps to improve the quality of life in local communities. In addition to education grants, the company funds grants which focus on the environment and economic development. The Progress Energy Foundation is funded each year by the companys board of directors from shareholder funds. Progress Energy Florida, a subsidiary of Progress Energy, provides electricity and related services to more than 1.6 million customers in Florida. The company is headquartered in St. Petersburg and serves a territory of more than 20,000 square miles. Progress Energy Florida is pursuing a balanced approach to meeting the future energy needs of the region. That balance includes increased energy-efciency programs, investments in renewable energy technologies and a state-of-the-art electricity system. For more information about Progress Energy, visit http://www.progress-energy. com/.Left: Back row, from left: LeeAnn Bernal, sixth grade; Brett Miller, fth grade; Janiah Keith, third grade. Front row, Ashley Thompson, kindergarten; Sarah Bailey, second grade; Katie Jones, rst grade; Hope Thompson, kindergarten. Right: Aleah Wooten, fourth grade.Special to The StarProgress Energy contributes $500,000 to education Local cadet selected for Naval Academy summer seminarJAVARRI BEACHUM KYLIE SKODA TIFFANY BURCHFaith Christian School congratulates graduates DAZZLING DOLPHINS WES STUDENTS OF THE WEEK

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A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 Church & Bake Sale 111 N. 22nd St. Mexico BeachSaturday, May 26th at 7:00 am Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SUNDAY : WORSHIP AT SUNSETPARK 8 AM 11 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BIBLE CLASS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE TIME 9 11 AM MONDAY : LIFETREE CAF 7 PM WEDNESDAY: MENS BIBLE STUDY 8 AM & WOMENS BIBLE STUDY 5 PM1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL(850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. Thursday, May 24, 2012Lonnie Moses Family We would like to take the time to send out a heartfelt thank you to the community for the compassion and generosity shown to us during our time of loss. The phone calls, food and owers were truly touching. We are certain that somehow someone has slipped through our less than perfect record keeping, but please know that each of gesture of love did not go unnoticed. We would like to thank Pastor Ray Creamer and the Highland Park Community Church for a beautiful viewing and service that Lonnie would have been proud of. To Rocky Comforter, thank you for the special attention that you have always given to our family. May God bless and keep each of you. In Loving Memory of Ernie J. Woodrow 12/5/59-5/29/09 Remember Me You still live on in the hearts and minds of the loving family and friends you left behind. Mom, dad and sisters and MaddieAnnual Youth Day at Philadelphia PrimitiveOn Sunday, the youth department of Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will observe annual Youth Day beginning with its church school at 10 a.m. ET followed with a special worship service at 11 a.m. All children and youth are encouraged to attend and participate. The church is at 259 Avenue D, Port St. Joe.St. Johns collecting items for needySt. Johns Episcopal Church in Wewahitchka is collecting gently used clothing, household items, furniture, working appliances, etc. These donations will be stored at the church for needy families and for the semi-annual church yard sales with proceeds going to charity. Drop off is at 233 E. Osceola Ave. Call Martha at 639-5924. Leave items on porch if no one is home. Thursday, May 24, 2012 FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.comShirley Ann Brogdon, 65, of Highland View, passed away Tuesday, May 15, 2012, in Panama City, Fla. She was a lifelong resident of Gulf County and had worked for Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing home. Baptist by faith, she was a wonderful mother, granny, great-granny and sister. She was dedicated to her family. Shirley was kind to everyone and was always there to talk to. She is survived by her children, Billy Reynolds and Melinda, Loretta Bowers and Walt, Karen Chancey, and Duke Vann; her grandchildren, Shawn and Brandi, Jerry Lee and Jenny, Randi, Charles and Rebekah, Cassidy and Debo, Tristan, and Hallie; her great-grandchildren, Tiyah, Kayla, Casen, Brooklyn, and Isla; her mother, Cora Ayers; her sisters, Ella Parson, and Bonnie Keigans; and her brother, John Ayers. Funeral services were Saturday, May 19, 2012, at 4 p.m. EDT at Beach Baptist Chapel with the Rev. David Nichols of ciating. Interment followed in Holly Hilly Cemetery. All services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home.Shirley Ann BrogdonSister Lillian Green was born on Dec 31, 1926, to the late Joseph and Meeley Bradley in Andalusia, Ala. On Thursday, May 3, 2012, in the early morning, she departed this earthly life. Sister Green received her educational from Dunbar High School in Apalachicola. During later years, she completed the requirements and received a certi cate in Home Health Care. Sister Green joined Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church in Apalachicola in 1948. She served as a member of the Mount Zion Usher Board and worked diligently on the beauti cation club committee. Prior to her illness, Sister Green was a very active member of Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church. She served under many pastors. She was preceded in death by her rst husband, Joe Walker, and later William Bill Green of Apalachicola. Her employment included a supervisory position at Sea Sweet Seafood Company in Apalachicola, from 1970-1987. After the seafood business closed, she was a successful home health care provider. She enjoyed shing, gardening and traveling with her family. She participated in a variety of community activities and promoted voter registration in Franklin County. She leaves to cherish her love and memories a loving and devoted son, Willie Joe Walker (Patricia), of Apalachicola; a special daughter, Savannah Tyler, of Carrabelle; eight grandchildren, Terrence Walker, of Apalachicola, Sheldon Walker, of Apalachicola, Damon Walker, of Apalachicola, Antonio Sanders (Lavonya), of Panama City, Yvonne Mitchell (Jessie) of Hinesville, Ga., Joann Walker, of Starke, and Latrenda Walker of Oceanside, Calif.; Sabrina Hamilton (the late George), of Panama City, and Raine Addison, of St. Petersburg; 25 great-grandchildren; nieces and many friends.Lillian Green LILLIAN GREEN Obituaries IN MEMORY ERNIE J. WOODROW CARD OF THANKS Faith BRIEFS Be repentantHave you ever felt that your prayers didnt get past the ceiling? Did you wonder why you got such a feeling? Could it be something you did, or maybe, something you didnt do? It could be one or more things that make you feel youre not getting through. Have you read the word lately? He might have a job for you. Of course if youre a Christian its a must to witness, are you doing this too? Do you have a loose tongue and run people down? Ill be it you do, you always wear a frown. I could keep writing till my pencil is spent, But maybe you get my point, that its time to repent. When you ask forgiveness and truly repent, Your prayers will be answered and your time well spent. Billy Johnson

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, May 24, 2012table and chairs furnished by the Chavers-Fowhand Furniture Company and a telephone provided by the St. Joseph Telephone and Telegraph Company. To entice volunteers to the tower, The Star editor W.S. Bill Smith, who doubled as the towers chief observer, touted its excellent view and cool comfort. A cool sea breeze constantly wafts through the windows and even in the middle of the day when we were all sweltering recently from the excessive heat, it was cool in the observation tower, Smith wrote July 17, 1942. Nearby Reid Avenue was booming in 1942. Residents could catch the latest movie at the Port Theatre, grab a drink at one of the avenues ve bars or have a cherry Coke at one of three drugstores. Smith cited the towers excellent view of affairs transpiring on the main thoroughfares of the city as one of its chief selling points. In print, Smith might have complained that he had the job of chief observer dumped into his lap, but he was ideally suited to lead the observation towers volunteers. A World War I veteran whod lost a leg in battle, Smith used The Star as a platform from which to expound the merits of patriotism and self-sacrice. In The Stars April 17, 1942 edition, Smith stressed the vital importance of civilian defense. If you are not willing to make a personal sacrice, there will be no defense, and the matter of spotting planes is one of the most vital of all the civilian defense activities, he wrote. When we think of the boys in uniform, who ask nothing and accept 24hour duty if necessary, we shouldnt consider it a sacrice to serve two or four hours a week here at home. He asked for women and men outside the draft age limits to sign on for two-hour shifts on a 24hour, seven-day-a-week schedule. Volunteers needed only to have normal sight and hearing and the ability to learn a few simple rules.Homemaker, plane spotterElizabeth Fensom was a 26-year-old homemaker with a young baby when she volunteered for the 4-6 p.m. Monday afternoon shift at the tower. Her reasoning was simple: I suppose I couldnt do much, but I guessed I could do that, recalled Fensom. Fensom had moved to Port St. Joe in 1940, settling into the only home available at the time. She was sailing with friends off of the peninsula when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, catapulting the U.S. into war. The words Pearl Harbor meant nothing to Fensom at the time, but the war would soon hit close to home. Her brother, Capt. James Ball, fought in the Infantry during World War II, and her husband, Paul, narrowly avoided service. I was glad my husband didnt have to go. He wouldve been in the rst lot that was drafted, but we had a baby, so he was not called right away, Fensom recalled. As 1942 dawned, the threat of another attack on U.S. soil was foremost in the nations consciousness. Even in a sleepy town like Port St. Joe, residents mentally prepared for the worst. Im not a fearful person. I dont get afraid very much, but Im sure thats why we were spotting the planes, so we wouldnt be attacked again. Im sure we thought that was a possibility, Fensom said. A few pieces of paper posted on the towers wall gave spotters the basics on how to identify planes and report sightings to a U.S. Army central call center. Fensom did not recall receiving any ofcial training from the Gulf County Defense Council or any other agency. Fortunately, during her time in the tower, Fensom never spotted any aircraft, enemy or otherwise. I never saw a plane. I never saw anything to report, and I dont know if anybody did, she said.We were bored as the devilWherever Billy Howell went, Tom Parker was sure to follow. The lifelong friends did everything together worked the projectors at the Port Theatre, served Coca-Cola at LeHardys drugstore and scanned the skies for airplanes from their perch in the observation tower. Parker, nicknamed Dooder by sister Geraldine, who couldnt pronounce the word Junior, and Howell, nicknamed Slick for hair that lay as at as a wet cat, were 14 years old when they rst climbed the towers winding stairs. Howell signed on for the 2-4 a.m. Friday night shift, and Parker for the 4-6 a.m. shift, but they generally kept one another company. Both had been active Boy Scouts and possessed a sense of civic duty beyond their years. When people asked us to do something, we were always glad to do it, remembered Parker. The boys typically carried snacks into the tower and kept their eyes peeled for aircraft. We were anxious to see a plane. We shouldnt have been, really, but we were anxious to see something that was noteworthy to report, remembered Parker. The life of a plane spotter proved not as exciting as the thrillseeking lads had hoped. During their time in the tower, they called in only a few planes. Parker even suspected that Tyndall Air Force Base had own the planes overhead just to see if he and Howell were on the ball. Both boys knew they were needed in the tower in the off chance that something terrible might happen. They also knew they could nd a better way to pass the time. We were bored as the devil, remembered Howell. The towers telephone provided the lone source of amusement for the restless duo. In the early years of the war, Port St. Joe had only about 20 telephones. Those who enjoyed the luxury of having a telephone often shared lines with other families. Because his father was a railroad engineer, Howell had a telephone in his home, but Parkers family did not get one until 1947. The boys made prank calls from the tower phone to amuse themselves, but always kept the conversation clean. We use to call up and say, Is this Dr. Carvers on Reid Avenue? and theyd say, Yes, and wed say, Well move it over cause somebody wants to get by, remembered Parker. Dr. Carver nally recognized the pranksters and offered some exasperated advice: Why dont you boys go home and go to bed?No one to blameSmith continued to promote the tower in The Star through the end of 1942, and set a personal example of service by maintaining a regular WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu, May 2487 69 0% Fri, May 2587 7210% Sat, May 2686 73 0% Sun, May 2785 73 0% Mon, May 2885 7320% Tues, May 2985 73 0% Wed, May 3086 73 0% A & A HomeCare, Inc. would like to welcome home David Buck Fernandez. He is returning back home to Gulf County and will be resuming care of Gulf County residents as a part time PTA under Kay Geoghagan, Physical Therapist. A & A HomeCare, Inc. is pleased to be able to offer his services. A&AHOMECAREINC. GulfCountys Local Home Health Agency BCBS of Florida PPO Provider (850) 639-3333 or (850) 227-3331 www.aahomecareinc.com License # HHA299991819 Love, Grandma & Granddaddy KarahBradley Pd.Pol.Adv. TM1-850-309-1996 shredit.com PLANE SPOTTING from page B1 FILE PHOTOSAbove is a British deck of aircraft spotting cards. At left, silhouettes of Japanese aircraft from World War II are featured in this deck of cards used by civilian plane spotters.See PLANE SPOTTING B6Is it asking too much of those who remain behind to give 120 minutes of their time each week, out of a total of 10,080 minutes to a job that is recognized as one of the most important that civilians can do?George L. Snowden, district civil director of the Aircraft Warning ServiceIm not a fearful person. I dont get afraid very much, but Im sure thats why we were spotting the planes, so we wouldnt be attacked again. Im sure we thought that was a possibility.Elizabeth Fensom, Port St. Joe plane spotterWe were anxious to see a plane. We shouldnt have been, really, but we were anxious to see something that was noteworthy to report.Tom Dooder Parker, Port St. Joe plane spotter

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 Trades & Services 227-7847 GET YOUR AD INServicesCALL TODAY! GET YOUR AD INCALL TODAY! 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction JOES LAWN CARE FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE AND TREE TRIMMING WITH REMOVAL OF ALL DEBRIS AND JUNKNEW CUSTOMERS 10% DISCOUNTFROM YOUR PREVIOUS LAWN CARE PROVIDER WITH STATEMENT OF THE COST FIRST CUT FREEWITH VERBAL COMMITMENT TO AT LEAST 12 MONTHS OF SERVICE.PLEASECALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite 850-229-966315 Years of Service!Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THEMEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 PACKAGE STORE & LOUNGEGREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITSWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM UPCOMINGEVENTS MEMORIAL DAY WEEKENDKARAOKE/DJ IN THE CROWS NEST WEDNESDAY THRU SUNDAY 9PM ETLIVE MUSIC ON THE POOP DECKBOBBY KENNEDY & MICHELLE MILLIGAN FIRST SUNDAY, JUNE 3RD POTLUCK LIVE MUSIC 6 PM WITH SPECIALGUESTS CHARLIE & DANA HUNT BLACK dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp grandmother, Jeannette Amerson, had to dab her eyelids as two years of emotions from the sudden loss of her mother streamed out. Skylars great grandmother, or her GG, passed away two years ago from brain cancer. Ever since losing her great-grandmother, Barbara Lawder, Skylar has been growing her hair in hopes of donating it to Locks of Love in her honor. And last Wednesday, that day nally came. Locks of Love is a non-prot organization that provides hairpieces to nancially disadvantaged children in the U.S. suffering from long-term medical hair loss. Skylar, a rst grader at Port St. Joe Elementary, asked her mother to make sure her hair goes to a child struggling with cancer. My granny wasnt sick for very long, but Skylar was by her side the entire time, said Skylars mother, Mary Clayton. Sometimes she would spend the night in the hospital with her, so shes been waiting to do this for a long time. It makes you realize we take things for granted, Radcliff said. That turkey, ham, cake that you have on holidays, it makes you realize that not everyone sits down to that. Radcliff said giving is simply part of a Ki wanis Club members DNA. But its something they are unable to do without the communitys support through fundraisers. Radcliffe wanted to remind the community that teams and sponsors still are needed for the June 2 golf tournament. The tournament will begin at 9 a.m. and end with an early after noon lunch and awards ceremony. There will be cash prizes handed out to the tournament winters and many other giveaways and rafes throughout the day. Anyone interested in being a player or spon sor can call 229-6327. LOCKS from page B1 KIWANIS from page B1 shift at the tower. By November, he became frustrated by his volunteers unwillingness to do the same. On Nov. 6, 1942, Smith attempted to entice volunteers back to their evening and early morning appointments by announcing the addition in the tower of an oil heater, provided by the St. Joe Paper Company. By May 14, 1943, however, Smith traded the gentle coaxing for coarser language. In an editorial entitled Enthusiasm Waning, Smith blasted residents for failing to fulll their civic duty by manning the tower. A German U-boat had sunk the British tanker, Empire Mica, a year earlier off Cape San Blas, and Coast Guardsmen patrolled area beaches on horseback. But only Smith and a faithful few observers reported for duty in the tower. Imagining an attack on the gasoline terminal and paper mill, which he deemed a fair possibility, Smith countered the inevitable accusation that he had not done his duty as chief observer with his harshest words yet. ...let em fry in their own lazy fat when an incendiary bomb comes plummeting through the roof of their home some night, he wrote. Two months later, following a report that the U.S. might be subjected to aerial bombing by the Axis powers, Smith reminded residents that theyd have only themselves to blame should such a tragedy occur. If raiding enemy airplanes sneak through Port St. Joe, dont blame it on your chief observer, wrote Smith. ... Hes been hoping that an enemy plane MIGHT come over here and drop a bomb or two so that people would get back on their watches. When his articles failed to restore volunteers to their posts, Smith tried a different strategy. On Oct. 30, 1942, he printed a letter written by George L. Snowden, district civil director of the Aircraft Warning Service, in which he hoped to arouse the people of Port St. Joe from their complacency and false sense of security. Snowden noted that from the period of Aug. 9 to Oct. 11, 1942, the tower was vacant for 66 hours each week. Responding to volunteers claims of boredom, Snowden asked residents to put duty before custom. Speaking of the sacrices made by the men in uniform, Snowden posed a question worth pondering. Is it asking too much of those who remain behind to give 120 minutes of their time each week, out of a total of 10,080 minutes to a job that is recognized as one of the most important that civilians can do? Howell and Parker shared Smiths disappointment over tower truancy. I think that was a common occurrence, said Parker. They didnt have the sense of responsibility they shouldve had. Though Fensom didnt recall there being a problem with tower volunteers, she shuddered to think that she might not have fullled her obligations. I hope I wasnt one of the ones who didnt do my shift, she said. On his and Parkers record of service, Howell was more denitive: We were there, he said.DemolitionHowell and Parker entered the Coast Guard and Navy, respectively, just as the war was winding down. Neither was home to see the observation tower demolished for salvage lumber in October 1945. Howell had not even thought of the tower for many years, though he could produce a sketch on command. During their time in the service, Howell and Parker received advanced instruction in plane spotting. That was one of the rst things they taught you, to be a lookout, said Howell, who was stationed at a Coast Guard air station in Miami. Parker recalled guard duty on a ships deck and the nicknames assigned to Japanese aircraft, female names like Betty and Donna. Both Howell and Parker returned to Port St. Joe after the war and have remained close friends, still calling one another by their nicknames, Slick and Dooder. During World War II, Port St. Joe did not experience the type of aerial bombing so vividly imagined by Smith. The city commemorated the May 8 and Aug. 15, 1945, victories in Europe and Japan by blowing the re siren and offering prayers in local churches. Fensom rejoiced to learn that her brother, whose bravery in combat earned him the Silver Star, soon would be coming home. I was thrilled to death because my brother was still alive, she recalled. By the end of the war, Fensom had two children. She returned to her duties as a homemaker, leaving her days as a plane spotter behind. From her home in Beacon Hill, Fensom said her services would not be useful, should the nation again call on plane spotters to scan the local skies. I wouldnt know one plane from another, she said. PLANE SPOTTING from page B5

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 24, 2012 The Star | B7 87475 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 08-00015-CA EMIGRANT MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., a Foreign profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JEAN THOMPSON, et al., Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered May 2, 2012 and entered in Case No. 08-00015-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Emigrant Mortgage Company is Plaintiff, and Jean Thompson, Unknown Spouse of Jean Thompson, John Doe and Jane Doe are Defendants, The Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Gulf County Courthouse, Front Lobby at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 on this 7th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 18, Block 1022, MILLVIEW ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT THREE, according to the map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 53, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Property Address: 104 Apollo Street, Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456-1410. DATED this 10th day of May, 2012. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Courts Gulf County By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Steven M. Davis FL Bar No. 894249 121 Alhambra Plaza 10th Floor Coral Gables, FL 33134 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (305) 262-4433 Fax (305) 442-2232 May 24, 31, 2012 87240 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Transportation Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or faxed by calling 850-227-1204. Items up for bid. Gas/Diesel/Oil, Bid#13-002 Tires/Tubes, Bid #13-003 Seat Covers, Bid#13-005 May 17, 24, 2012 87469 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO.: 12-24-PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of CHARLES A. GASKIN, SR., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of CHARLES A. GASKIN, SR., deceased, File Number 12-24-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and that personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 24, 2012 CHARLES A. GASKIN, JR. P.O. Box 862 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Personal Representative Estate of Charles A. Gaskin, Sr. Attorney for Personal Representative: THOMAS S. GIBSON FL Bar No. 0350583 RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 206 E. 4th Street P.O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850-229-8211 May 24, 31, 2012 87477 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 12-26-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF CASON J. CALLAWAY, JR. Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of CASON J. CALLAWAY, JR., deceased, whose date of death was March 20, 2011 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 24, 2012. Personal Representatives: Phebe C. Robertson 2126 Piedmont Lake Rd. Pine Mountain, GA 31822 Kenneth H. Callaway 3505 GA Hwy 116 Hamilton, GA 31811 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850)-227-1159 May 24, 31, 2012 87203S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors, LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 434 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-15 R.E. No. 02543-000R Lots 1 and 2, of Block 3, of Pine Ridge Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida, as per plat or map on record in the County Court House, Gulf County, Port St. Joe, Florida. Name in which assessed: Johnny Lee Jackson & Margaret V. Jackson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 6th day of June, 2012. Dated this 1st day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 87201S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors, LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1239 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-14 R.E. No. 05775-000R Lot 13 and 15, of Block 1005, of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Official map thereof on file in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Clifford Jones All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 6th day of June, 2012. Dated this 1st day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 87282S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 23-2009-CA-000529 BANK OF AMERICA, NA, Plaintiff, vs. BEATA G. WOLF; SEA HAVEN PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; PETER THOMAS WOLF A/K/A PETER T. WOLF; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 7th day of May, 2012, and entered in Case No. 23-2009-CA-000529, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, NA is the Plaintiff and BEATA G. WOLF, SEA HAVEN PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; PETER THOMAS WOLF A/K/A PETER T. WOLF and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM on the 7th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 29 SEA HAVEN SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 10th day of May, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk of The Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: LAW OFFICES OF MARSHALL C. WATSON, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 May 17, 24, 2012 87230S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for an Exchange Server, Domain Controller Server, and Migration project at the district office located at 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL. For complete details go to www.gulf.k12.fl.us and click Exchange Server located under Request for Bid on our Home Page. Bids will be accepted starting May 8th, 2012 and ending May 29th, 2012. May 17, 24, 2012 87288S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 23-2012-CA000054 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS1, Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE E. BLEVINS, JR., ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WAYNE E. BLEVINS, JR. LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 587 PLANTATION DRIVE PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT 1, BLOCK G, CAPE PLANTATION PHASE II, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION FOR 1476.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE ST. JOSEPH BAY COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE; THENCE ALONG SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 18 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 240.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 955.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 4 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 522.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 265.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 336.71 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 36.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 137.63 FEET; THENCE, LEAVING SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY, SOUTH 66 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 75.55 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE EASTERLY SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 350.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 26 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR 163.18 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 6 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 18.E SECONDS WEST 161.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 6 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 7.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 728.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 7 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 18 SECONDS FOR 91.34 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 3 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 91.28 FEET; THENCE, LEAVING SAID CURVE ON A NON-RADIAL LINE, NORTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 193.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 1, BLOCK G IS SUBJECT TO COVENANTS AND RESTRICTIONS AS CONTAINED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107, PAGES 1058-1072 AND AS AMENDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 125, PAGES 737-739 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND A PORTION OF LOT 2, BLOCK G, CAPE PLANTATION PHASE II, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A SAINT JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION FOR 1476.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE ST. JOSEPH BAY COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE; THENCE ALONG SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 18 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 240.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 955.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 4 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 522.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 265.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 285.71 FEET TO AN IRON ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 51.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE LEAVING SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY SOUTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ON A NON-RADIAL LINE FOR. 193.33 FEET TO AN IRON ROD ON A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 728.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR 26.17 FEET; SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 1 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST, 26.17 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF COMPOUND CURVE WITH A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SAID CURVE HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 42 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 18 SECONDS AND THE RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE FOR 18.59 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 23 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, 18.16 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST, 15.13 FEET TO AN IRONROD; THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 218.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO: COVENANTS AND RESTRICTIONS AS CONTAINED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107 AT PAGES 1058-1072 AND AS AMENDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 125, AT PAGES 737-739, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. MINERAL RIGHTS RESERVED BY PREVIOUS GRANTORS. THIS PROPERTY IS INTENDED TO BE INCLUDED IN AN BECOME PART OF LOT 1, BLOCK G, CAPE PLANTATION SUBDIVISION. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 587 Plantation Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on Pendergast & Morgan, P.A., the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6675 Corporate Parkway, Suite 301, Jacksonville, FL 32216, within thirty (30) days of the first publication. Please file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at Port St. Joe, Florida, on the 8th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk, Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this hearing should contact ADA Coordinator not later than one (1) day prior to the proceeding at Amber Baggett. For the hearing and voice impaired 850-482-9844. Attorney for Plaintiff: Jean C. Zabin Florida Bar # 418439 Pendergast & Morgan, P.A., 6675 Corporate Parkway, Ste 301, Jacksonville, FL 32216 Telphone: 678-534-3844 May 24, 31, 2012 87311S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors, LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 138 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-17 R.E. No. 00741-093R Description of Property: FARM #22 (5 acres, more or less) of Gulf County Farms, Inc., Properties, an unrecorded subdivision of that portion of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of State Road No. 71, more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the intersection of the North line of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, and the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said State Road having a right of way of 66 feet; thence South 18 Degrees 16 Minutes 20 Seconds East along said right of way line for 3902.75 feet; thence South 71 Degrees 43 Minutes 40 Seconds West for 726.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Thence South 18 Degrees 16 Minutes 20 Seconds East for 300.00 feet; thence South 71 Degrees 43 Minutes 40 Seconds West for 726.00 feet; thence North 18 Degrees 16 Minutes 20 Seconds West for 300.00 feet; thence North 71 Degrees 43 Minutes 40 Seconds East for 726.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: Eli Ross & Leslie Ross All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of June, 2012. Dated this 8th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012 87313S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Visionary Distributors, LC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 155 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-16 R.E. No. 00941-001R Description of Property: Begin at the Northwest Comer of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, and nun South for 330 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run South 165 feet, thence turn left and run East to the West Line of State Road 381, approximately 888.11 feet, thence run Northwesterly along West side of SR 381, for 152.75 feet to the South Line of Jimmie Lee Rogers Land, thence turn left and run West to POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being In Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida. ALSO: Begin at the Northwest Corner of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, and run South for 495 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run South 165 feet, thence run due East 963.29 feet to the West Right of Way line of State Road No. 381, thence run Northwesterly 181.25 feet along the West side of said State Road; thence run due West 888.11 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being in Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: W. O. Bryant & Ruth M. Bryant All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of June, 2012. Dated this 8th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012 87437S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Investments 2234, LLC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 491 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2008 Application No: 2012-19 87433S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Investments 2234, LLC, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 728 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2008 Application No: 2012-18 R.E. No. 03806-009R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the NW Comer of U. S. Govemment Lot 5, Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 11 West; thence South along the West line of said Govemment Lot 5, for 980.9 feet to the Southerly R/W line of U. S. Highway 98; thence South 40 Degrees and 46 Minutes East along said R/W line for 1233.36 feet; thence North 49 Degrees and 14 Minutes East for 100 feet to the Northerly R/W line of U. S. Highway 98; thence North 40 Degrees and 46 Minutes West along said R/W line for 425 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue North 40 Degrees and 46 Minutes West along said R/W line for 75 feet; thence North 49 Degrees and 14 Minutes East for 200.72 feet to the South line of U. S. Govemment Lot 5, thence North 89 Degrees and 55 Minutes East along said South line for 64.97 feet; thence South 40 Degrees and 46 Minutes East for 32.64 feet; thence South 49 Degrees and 14 Minutes West for 250 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: William C. Williams III, H. Steven Miller, Chauncey Beiser All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 20th day of June, 2012. Dated this 15th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 17, 24, 31 June 7, 2012

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B8| The Star Thursday, May 24, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373 Retail / Of ce Space143 Acklins Island Drive-Cape San Blas+/1000sf; $10 psf mod gross; high visibility on Cape San Blas Road ; available May 1st212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-4915,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 219 Reid Avenue Of ce/Retail;+/-5400 sf; sub dividable $7 psf mod gross (former Goodwill) 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail;+/-800sf-1800;$14psfmod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98+/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 separate storage units availableFor Sale217 W. River Road-Wewahitchka+/-9,000sf; retail building; next to Richs IGA; +/-1 acre; on-site; avail for lease; inquire for terms223 Monument Avenue Four city lots fronting Hwy 98; $375,000 Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina DriveCorner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for detailsMarina Cove Lots 12, 13, & 14; $375,000 PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; $399,000 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS3 BR 2BA DOUBLEWIDE UNFURNISHED Large Yard, In Country ....................................$700 2 BR MOBILE HOME UNFURNISHED Country, Private ..............................................$550 1 BR FURNISHED CONDO Nice, Includes Utilities.....................................$910 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum ..........................$105 Plus Daily 1 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Inc Water .......................$475 2 BR 1BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ...............................................$375 & $450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAY BED Furnished, Lanark, Inc Utilities ......................$650 2BR 1BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 1BR REMODELED HOUSE Carrabelle .......................................................$450 OFFICE SPACE Hwy 98 Frontage, Carrabelle .....$400 Plus Utilities Mexico BeachLight & airy 2bd/ 2.5ba furn/unfurn Town Home Beachside, Tyndall side of town. Central air, W/D. Fans throughout. Reserved prkg.; Avail 06/01! $950/mo + $800 dep. Call Brenda 850-227-5380 or Gilbert 201-895-4255Text FL10388 to 56654 1bed cozy cottage A vailable June 1 in Port St. Joe. $450/mo + utilities. No smoking /pets 850-229-1215 East Point Carrabelle 900 Square ft designer 1bedroom, open plan, Jacuzzi, washer & dryer, satellite, secluded, 1/2 mile from beach .$230 bi-weekly or $460 per month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL07685 to 56654 White City Clean 3br 2ba House!2 Blk from boat ramp, quiet, long term, $625 + Dep, 270-8757/906-0095Text FL10316 to 56564 Trailer lots & Camper lots available for rent, Beacon Hill, For info Call (850) 348-7774 WeWa 3br/2ba central heat & air $525/mo + dep 639-5721; RV great for 1 to 2 people $115 a week + dep incl. W/S/E 639-5721. 2br/1ba $425/mo + $425 sec dep. 639-5721 For Sale or Trade $230,000 Lake Front home Toledo Bend Reservoir, Hamphill, Texas 3br, 2ba, 1 acre, boathouse, dock, pavilion, Call 409-579-1107 Dodge Extended Cab 1998 4-wheel drive, 150,000 miles. $1,850 OBO. 850-227-5771. Text FL10534 to 56654 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in Port St. Joe area.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34208971 Text FL08971 to 56654 Nursing Faculty, Gulf Franklin CampusTo teach didactics, laboratories and clinicals for the Practical Nursing program at the Port St. Joe campus. Design and implement the curriculum plan to meet requirements for the program and the Certi ed Nursing Assistant program. This includes assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation of courses, program objectives and NLNAC requirements. Requires: MSN with a minimum two (2) years of general medical surgical nursing experience + a current FL RN license. Salary based on degree and experience. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 6/1/12.Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. Application (must be completed) & additional info:www.gulfcoast.edu/hr GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O cer 850.872.3866 Out of State Ad FARM WORKERS AND CROP LABORERS Colchester, Vermont Area 10 temporary positions at S. Mazza Farmstand & Greenhouses, Inc. / S. Mazza Farm Inc. Workers needed to do eld work, hand weeding, hoeing, planting etc. for diversi ed crops. Will also harvest crops. To start approx. 06/04/12 to 11/10/12. A great deal of heavy lifting, standing, bending and kneeling for long periods of time. Wage is $ 10.56 per hr. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of contract period. Tools are provided without cost. Housing provided at no cost to workers who reside outside of the normal commuting distance. Transportation cost reimbursed after 15 days or 50% of contract period, whichever comes rst. Contact The Nearest Department of Labor Of ce for application and referral. Job order number: 116431. HELP WANTEDPort St. Joe Location TWO POSITIONSSales / O ce Warehouse / Delivery CLEANERS CLEANERS NEEDED NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 Dri Dri Brite BriteCARPET TECH NEEDEDCALL: James at 850.229.9663 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical Business Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centuraonline.com AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 HealthcareNHC HOMECARE PORT ST. JOERN Part-time / PRN, Field & QA Position Available. Requires: License in the state of FL, w/ one year professional nursing exp. Home care or acute care exp pref but not required. Benefit options & competitive pay. Fax resume to Holly at 229-2725 or call 229-8238 for info... Web ID#: 34208989 Text FL08989 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairPT Lawn Service HelpWith own truck and valid DL. Call Danny (352) 497-6933 Web ID#: 34209350 Medical/HealthCNA/HHABrightStar Care of Bay County (HHA 299993930) is seeking CNA/HHAs to provide loving, compassionate care to our clients in Gulf and Franklin County. Must have min of 1 yr of experience in providing Personal Care,meet all of the statutory requirements for being a home health worker, have reliable transport/safe driving record. If you love people and are servant-minded, please apply at www.brightstarcare.com/caree r-center or call (850) 238-3271 Web ID#: 34210595 Text FL10595 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Creative/DesignBlacksmith or Metal FabricatorTo Co-op on art projects. (850) 639-5721 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting Applications *Full-time reservationist w/ great benefits. *Part-time maintenance office clerk. Both positions require weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairNow HiringThe City of Mexico Beach is currently accepting applications for ONE part time position in the Sanitation Department. The positions primary responsibility is working as a slinger on the back of the sanitation vehicle; this position requires a valid drivers license. The part time driver position has the potential to turn into a full time position in the future. The successful applicant will be required to work in inclement weather and applicants should expect a strenuous work environment; as part of the hiring process, the applicant will be required to pass background and drug tests prior to hire. Applications will be accepted at Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL 32456. Applications will stop being accepted on May 31, 2012 at 4:00 p.m. For more information please call 850-648-5700. The City of Mexico Beach is a Drug-Free work place and is an EEOC provider. Web ID#: 34210232 Text FL10232 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook NeededThe Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 R.E. No. 03186-065R Description of Property: PARCEL B SCROGGS -MINOR REPLAT -2005 BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE at the Northwest Comer of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Seconds West 1923.07 feet to a point tying on the Southerly right of way of County Road Number 30, said point lying in a curve concave to the North with a radius of 2346.20; thence Northeasterly slag said curve and sold right of way for 329.02 feet, thru a central angle of 08 Degrees 02 Minutes 06 Seconds, chord of said arc being North 74 Degrees 20 Minutes 50 Seconds East 328.75 feet; thence leaving said right of way run South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Seconds West 392.39 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of Canoe Lane; thence run along said right of way South 82 Degrees 39 Minutes 37 Seconds East 394.62 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving sold right of way run South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 107.41 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING, run East 61.01 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 228.21 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 Degrees 58 Minutes 35 Seconds East 14.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 186.60 feet to a point lying on the approximate mean high waterline of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run along said right of way South 85 Degrees 17 Minutes 29 Seconds West 75.27 feet; thence leaving sold right of way run North 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds East 421.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 0.65 acre, more or less. SUBJECT TO a 10 foot wide access and utility easement being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Seconds West 1923.07 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of County Road Number 30, sold point lying in a curve concave to the North with a radius of 2346.20; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 329.02 feet, thru a central angle of 08 Degrees 02 Minutes 06 Seconds, chord of said arc being North 74 Degrees 20 Minutes 50 Seconds East 328.75 feet; thence leaving said right of way run South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Second West 392.39 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of Canoe Lane; thence run along said right of way South 82 Degrees 39 Minutes 37 Seconds East 394.62 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right of way run South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 107.41 feet; thence East 10.00 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds East 106.12 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of Canoe Lane; thence run along said right of way North 82 Degrees 39 Minutes 37 Seconds West 10.08 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO a 5 foot wide pedestrian access easement being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 00 Degrees 20 Minutes 46 Seconds West 1923.07 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way of County Road Number 30, said point lying in a curve concave to the North with a radius of 2346.20; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 329.02 feet, thru a central angle of 08 Degrees 02 Minutes 06 Seconds, chord of said arc being North 74 Degrees 20 Minutes 50 Seconds East 328.75 feet; thence continue along said right of way South 82 Degrees 39 Minutes 37 Seconds West 75.56 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run, South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds East 325.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds West 186.60 feet to a point lying on the approximate mean high waterline of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run along said waterline South 85 Degrees 17 Minutes 29 Seconds West 5.02 feet; thence leaving said waterline run North 00 Degrees 01 Minute 25 Seconds East 187.02 feet: thence South 89 Degrees 58 Minutes 35 Seconds East 5.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING Name in which assessed: Gregory J. Scroggs & Jackie P. Scroggs All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 20th day of June, 2012. Dated this 15th day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 17, 24, 31 June 7, 2012 87495S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF MEXICO BEACH SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE IV NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The City of Mexico Beach will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing the: CITY OF MEXICO BEACH -SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE III Plans and specifications can be obtained at the City of Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, Florida 32410. Bids will be received until 2:00 p.m. Central Time, Friday, June 15th at City of Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, Florida 32410 and will be opened and read publicly immediately thereafter. All Bids shall be submitted in an envelope clearly marked Sealed Bid -Sidewalk Project Phase IV. The City of Mexico Beach reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The City also reserves the right to reject contractors who in the Citys opinion are not qualified to perform the work based on the questionnaire submitted. All Bids shall be firm for a period of 90 days after opening. This includes material prices. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Point of Contact will be Chris Hubbard, City Administrator, at 850. 648.5700 or by email at c.hubbard@mexicobeachgov.com. All bidders shall comply with all applicable state and local laws concerning licensing, registration, and regulations of contractors doing business in Florida. The City shall award the contract to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder; provided however, the City reserves the right to award the contract to a bidder who is not the lowest responsive and responsible bidder if the city determines in its reasonable discretion that another bid offers the city a better value based upon the reliability, quality of service, or product of such other bidder. May 24, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. BUYER BEWARE If you are looking to buy St. Joe Property (Breakfast Point, Rivercamps, Windmark, Rivertown Watersound West Beach, Watersound North) take notice. St. Joe is systematically removing or reducing amenities at residential developments. Amenities currently at the development have been reduced significantly while HOA dues have increased. Adopt: Adoring Family, Veterinarian Doctor, LOVE awaits baby. Susan *800552-0045*FLBar42311 Expenses Paid* Mexico Beach, 212 CR 386, 1 block off 98, Friday-Monday 8:00 a.m. CST-?;Biggest EverStore shelving and jewelry display case, everything from A to Z. Port St. Joe, St. Joseph Catholic Church on 20th St. Sat 5/26, 8am-2pmYard & Bake SaleEverything from furniture to playthings to clothing to yard & kitchen items. Text FL10234 to 56654 For SalePicnic Tables-Ready Made or Made to order. $85 each. Will deliver. Call 850-648-8132 Wurlitzer Spinet 1950s Piano in good condition $250 Call 648-5691 or 340-0801 Spot Advertising works!