<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03836
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 04-05-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03836

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com A controlled burn quickly spiraled out of control last week in Gulf County. Brian Goddin, wild re mitigation specialist for the Florida Forest Service, said the res rate of growth this early in the year could be an indicator for a violent year of res in 2012. Reported at 1:37 p.m. on Monday, March 26, the re had grown from an estimated 75 acres at 2:50 p.m. ET to more than 300 acres in only 15 minutes. By 3:35 p.m. it had reached 450 acres in size. By Monday evening, GPS mapping determined that the re had grown to more than 700 acres. We do think that this year could be potentially a pretty intense one (for wild res), Goddin said. Its only March and we had a re blow up to 700 acres. This could be a red ag for things to come. The re erupted from a controlled burn on private land in what Goddin attributes to a sudden atmospheric change, which caused the re to jump the lines or spark over the mapped control boundary. Unfortunately thats the case, Goddin said. It doesnt happen very oftenbut it was a result of an estate controlled burn, which is normally a great thing. Embers, or rebrands, can be carried by the wind up to a half mile or a mile in poor conditions. The Florida Forest Service is still investigating the speci c Thursday, APRIL 5 2012 By TIM CROFT 227-72827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Time for the next step. That was the message from St. Joe Company vice president Jorge Gonzalez last week to Port of Port St. Joe Port Authority members as the partners attempt to build upon momentum from a Memorandum of Understanding to collaborate on port development. That MOU, Gonzalez said, always was intended as a template, a platform, for more formal agreements on how to develop the port of Port St. Joe. An important aspect of that partnership took shape last week as the Port Authority formally adopted a resolution expanding the master port planning footprint to include St. Joe property in particular the old paper mill site and Jetty Park, owned by the City of Port St. Joe. The Port St. Joe City Commission is expected to take up the resolution for adoption at its next regularly scheduled meeting. The next step, Gonzalez suggested, would be to formally etch the collaboration with the Port Authority through an agreement on business development at the port. The MOU (language) always contemplated going into additional agreements, Gonzalez said. One of those involves a Capital City Bank loan to the Port Authority of more than $4 million. Gonzalez said company of cials still were working on options for addressing the loan while the port is developing and anticipated providing those options at the next Port Authority meeting on April 12. Those options largely rest YEAR 74, NUMBER 25 Amid nancial distress, Port Authority prepares next step with St. Joe Port plans will be expanded FFS of cial: Wild re could be red ag for things to come See WILDFIRE A9 See PORT A6 Special to The Star I am 32 years old and have been married to my wife Jacqueline for six years. We have two children, Colt age three, and Cooper who is one. Jacqueline is a Kindergarten teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary, where Colt also attends pre-K. My family has been a part of Gulf County for many years. My parents are Pat and Lewana Patterson who are graduates of Wewahitchka High School and currently live in Wewahitchka. My mother has been a teacher at Port St. Joe High School for the past 38 years. My grandparents are Fletcher and Jo Patterson, Patterson announces bid for county judge Special to The Star Gulf County Commissioner Warren Yeager would like to take this opportunity to announce he is seeking re-election to the of ce of Gulf County Commissioner District 5. Warren is married to Jacque (Ard) Yeager and they have two children, daughter Kelli Combs (Robert) and son Ryan Yeager (Brigette) and they also have four grandsons. Yeager began public service in Gulf County more than 30 years ago when he served as president Yeager seeks re-election for District 5 BOCC See PATTERSON A12 See YEAGER A12 quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 74, NUMBER 25 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A10 Sports ........................................... A11 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B5 Classi eds .................................... B6-B8 JARROD PATTERSON WARREN YEAGER TAR TAR By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners and representatives from the various contractors involved with the construction of the citys $21 million surface water plant convened at the plant for a workshop on Tuesday. The workshop included a walk-through of the plant, which has been online less than three years and has experienced what could be labeled growing pains. Though answers on some issues remain elusive and are being investigated, the goal of assessing the issues and creating an action list took a step in a forward direction, said Philip Jones of Preble Rish Engineers, the citys engineers of record. We just need to get everybody in this room and hash it out and come up with solutions, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson said at the conclusion of the walk-through. We dont need to be throwing rocks at each other. The people are looking to us, not just commissioners, to solve these problems. If we can solve them, we can have good water and a good plant, and that is the goal. The walk-through centered on issues raised by commissioners during two workshops on the plant and discussion during one regular meeting. And though some issues painting peeling on the oors, a This graphic shows the location of last weeks wild re in Gulf County. The re was the result of a controlled burn on private land that sparked over the mapped control boundary. SPECIAL TO THE STAR PLANT TREATMENT CITY, ENGINEERS IN SEARCH OF ANSWERS AT WATER PLANT TIM CROFT | The Star Bob Lyles of the water treatment plant staff notes the work staff has undertaken to try to patch a leak in the concrete wall in a ltration membrane tank, believed the de ciency most in need of addressing. Below, engineers from Siemens, CDM and Preble Rish examine pumps and ttings in the Clean In Place room. See PLANT A8

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach (850) 648-8207 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11AM-CLOSE 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT 8 PM BAND THE ALL YOU C A N E AT BRE A KF A S T SAT URD A Y & S UND A Y 8:00 A .M. THE ALL YOU C A N E AT BRE A KF A KF A KF S T SAT URD A Y & A Y & A S UND A Y 8:00 A Y 8:00 A A .M. Tiki BA R H appy H our on F ri, S at & S un from 4 to 7 with L ive E ntertainment by Brady D J & K araoke Wednesday thru S unday! K-9 team getting a scent of the place By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Hank, Maggie, Daisy and Bam were getting a feel for Port St. Joe on Monday. Schedules permitting, they will be back twice a month. The K-9 team from Gulf Correctional Institution was in Port St. Joe this week to begin a ramped up scheduling of urban training in the county as the unit hones the skills of its dogs. Were trying to make more of a presence in Port St. Joe, said Sgt. Kevin Romer of the K-9 team. We want the dogs to be fully familiar with the county and the communities where they will be utilized. We want to let the people see us, let the residents see us and let the bad guys see us, also. Maybe that will a make them think twice. The GCI unit is, by reputation, one of the best scent-tracking teams in the region. The unit is called out for countless missing-persons calls across an eight-county area, Romer said, and also chase the bad guys when called upon. They are supplemented across Northwest Florida by well-trained K-9 units in Gulf, Liberty and Washington counties, to name a few, Romer said. The work in Port St. Joe, Wewahitchka and Sand Hills gets the dogs accustomed to people, houses and roads. We have some of the best tracking teams in the country right here in this area, Romer said. The GCI team is comprised of bloodhounds, or rather 90 percent bloodhound with some coonhound in the mix to provide stamina and drive in the hot Florida weather, Romer said. Being part coonhound helps with the heat and drive and doesnt take away from the ability to track, Romer said. Bloodhounds track by scent, or the molecules of the human essence. Those molecules can remain on most surfaces not concrete or asphalt up to six hours. The dogs also can track by following what Romer called ground disturbances. For instance, the dog might pick up a scent but maybe as the scent crosses a concrete pathway the dog might lose it. But by snif ng for molecules that indicate a footstep or other disturbance of the soil in the ground around that concrete, the dog also tracks its prey. The training is fairly straightforward. Romer and another member of his team, Of cer Clyde Melvin, walk a stretch of ground they found several suitable areas with suf cient room on Monday and maybe hide behind a tree or in some bushes. After a period of time, the dogs will be set loose to track the scent. Romer ran a trail for Melvin to run two dogs; Melvin returned the favor on the other two dogs. The dogs range from youngsters to veterans. Hank is 3 years old and an established tracker of local renown. Hes got it, Romer said. I would consider him our best dog. Daisy, 7, is Hanks mother and also an established tracker, though her son is better, Romer said. Maggie is 8 months old, and Bam is a year and two months. Both still are learning the ropes, Romer said. (Scent-tracking) is probably the most labor intensive training with dogs, Romer said. You are not going to know if you have a good scent-tracking dog for two years. Bloodhounds are more interested in what you can do for them, not what they can do for you. So you can have one that is a good tracker for the rst year and then just stops. You just have to keep working them and hope you have a good one in two years. Romer noted those dogs that do not pass muster are adopted and placed in good homes. Romer said most training is done with other teams but what is important in their home county is to ensure the dogs are familiar to the lay of the land and its people thus, the training in Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe. Romer and his team will be out in Port St. Joe training their dogs on two Mondays each month. Hank, Maggie, Daisy and Bam will have a good smell of the place in the event of any problems. At left, the K-9 team from Gulf Correctional Institution poses with the scent-tracking dogs. Below, Sgt. Kevin Romer, left, and Of cer Clyde Melvin pose with Hank, considered the best scenttracking dog in the Gulf Correctional Institutions K-9 unit. TIM CROFT | The Star SPECIAL TO THE STAR

PAGE 3

Local The Star| A3 Thursday, April 5, 2012 to Port St. Joe Marina 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Fl 32456 850-227-9393 To Fill Your Easter Baskets Receive a PRIZE EGG with purchase ($10.00 minimum) Friday, April 6th thru Sunday, April 8th 25 % OFF EVERYTHING must have coupon for discount *except previously marked clearance items Documenting the space race By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA The space race captured the attention of a generation, and Sal Salerno was no exception. For years, Salerno eagerly gobbled up newspaper and magazine reports on every detail of the contest between the United States and the Soviets to put a man into orbit, then a man on the moon. What separates Salerno from the rest of his generation is what he did with those periodicals; he preserved them carefully and stored them, some for almost 50 years. I just felt that what we were doing was exciting, you know. It was an exciting thing that we were doing in that time period, Salerno said. Youve got to be a nut job with it; that was what I was. I was a fanatic. In 2010, Salerno decided it was time to get rid of the some 1,000 pieces he had collected over the years. He started shopping around the collection, but the offers he was getting seemed low to him. A collector in California offered Salerno $200 for the whole collection; Salerno used to get $5 for each copy of an autographed New York Daily News from 1965. You can always get more if you nd the right people, Salerno said. That was NASA. Last year, Salerno approached the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, and they were interested. Salerno got the collection to Orlando, and he threw out a number he thought was reasonable: $30,000. According to Salerno, the space center people said they were interested, but after a couple months they still had not committed to buying his collection. To spur their decision, Salerno decided if they were not interested in buying the collection, he would come get it. He asked for some barrels to be placed in front of the building when he arrived. He threatened to burn the collection right there in the parking lot. Kennedy Space Center of cials were interested, but $30,000 seemed steep. After some negotiating, Salerno agreed to take $20,000 for the collection the Kennedy people later would call Salernos masterpiece, on the condition his name would be on the exhibit. And he wanted free admission to the Kennedy Space Center for himself. And his family. For life. Deal. His collection is not on display, and it could be several years before it is. I just hope I live long enough to see it with my grandchildren, the 75-yearold Salerno said. The self-professed fanatic remains fascinated by space. His atheist friend Louie tells Salerno he will not believe in God until the heavens part and he can see him for himself. But Salerno, a Catholic, sees God and the evidence of creation in space. How else to explain life on Earth? There are other suns, other planets, but ours supports life, because everything is just in perfect order, Salerno said. ANDREW P. JOHNSON | Florida Freedom Newspapers Sal Salerno sits with copies of newspapers he saved over the years about the space race. Salerno sold the bulk of his collection to the Kennedy Space Center last year to become a collection called The Salerno Collection. Wewa man sells collection to Kennedy Space Center I just felt that what we were doing was exciting, you know. It was an exciting thing that we were doing in that time period. Youve got to be a nut job with it; that was what I was. I was a fanatic. Sal Salerno, space race collector

PAGE 4

Thursday, April 5, 2012 Opinion A4 | The Star The other day I found a site on the internet that had old newspapers archived that you could search. I grew up in a newspaper in Alabama, so I thought Id check and see if they had old issues of The Anniston Star, in Anniston, Ala. They did. I was excited and wanted to see what I could nd. This place would just let you type in a name or anything and it would search the newspaper or newspapers you selected. Doing what most folks would, I put my own name in the search box and clicked on the Search button. I shouldnt have done that. What did I nd? Well, you would probably say that I was just 9 years old, it couldnt be that bad. It was. It was a picture of a baseball team. The Internet site had full versions of old newspapers. Holding the magnifying glass over the picture, I was right there in the middle of the baseball team, my hands interlocked, tilting my head a little to the right and gritting my teeth. It wasnt a smile, it was a grimace. It was a grimace that can still be seen on my face 40 years later. I had found the answer to the question that I am always asked, Why do you have that look on your face? That 1972 season ended so poorly. With a record of 19 wins and 2 losses and the league championship, how can I say that the season ended poorly? It was my last at bat of the season, the game was well in hand and the championship was ours. I was in a great groove, after a long season, I was hitting everything that was thrown to me. This was typical for my little league baseball career. I never seemed to start doing well until the season was almost over. On this day, this last day of the season, I had already hit one ball over the right elders head. I knew, I just knew, that I could get the rst home run of my career on my last at bat of the season. The eld we played on was not perfect, but it was a good eld. There was a hill in right eld that gradually went up to the outeld fence. It gave the eld character. The dugouts were just benches outside the fence, but they were still dugouts. The eld had no gates to get in, just an opening on the right eld side. Dogs could have wandered in and out, but never did. So, why the lifelong grimace? The rst pitch was a ball, so was the second. On the third pitch, I hit a long foul ball that veered outside the eld to the right. The fourth pitch was a ball, but I wasnt about to take a base on balls in my last at bat. I hit another foul ball on the fth pitch. Now, with a full count, I had a perfect situation for my rst home run. No, the game wasnt on the line; we were ahead by a whole bunch. We were so far ahead that this would denitely be my last at bat. I remember the ball coming off of the bat, it felt so good. It was a shot down the right eld line. I remember watching it. I remember saying to myself, Its not going to get out, but perhaps I can get a triple out of it. I was 9 years old. It was my last at bat of the 1972 season. It was a fair ball. Did I say it was a fair ball? It was a fair ball. It had triple written all over it. Before the ball had a chance to fall (and probably roll to the right eld fence), this fellow that was waiting to play the next game decided to run onto the eld. This fellow did not play for the team we were playing against. He played for a team waiting to play. He ran onto the eld through the opening in the fence into fair territory and caught the ball my ball the ball I hit. It was my last at bat of the season. The umpire called me out. He called me out. Out? I pitched a t. I was nine, the umpire was probably 16, but that still didnt excuse his ignorance. You would think that your coach would raise a ruckus, but I guess since the championship was already decided and the game was so lopsided, he didnt see the point. It was my last at bat. Its been 40 years. I still remember their names (the umpire and the kid who ran on the eld and caught my ball). The grimace on my face will stay. It was my last at bat! Ive coached youth baseball for 30 years and never seen such a bad call. Ill never forget it. It was my last at bat! You can nd more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. Last week during a Port Authority board meeting, the question was posed as to what a port would be without a face. The discussion centered on the continued job status of long-time port director Tommy Pitts. Pitts, due to a lack of resources at the Port Authority, was on full pay through the end of the month and then will work for $1 per month and no benets he can not pay for himself on a monthto-month basis as he looks for work. After 10 years, Pitts was effectively tossed to the sidelines. The one man that actually looked out at the landscape at the port planning area from the start and had a vision of an operational port relegated the bench. Right or wrong, maybe Pitts was not the man to be the marketing guru for the port, maybe there were perceived weakness in a mild demeanor save when it came to the port and an unwillingness to play politics. But whether he was the right man for the job or not moving forward, he deserved better than Hey, great job the past 10 years, good luck on future endeavors. If nothing else the institutional knowledge inside the mans head should have been enough for the Port Authority to uncover every rock and explore every option as at least two board members continued last week to keep the one man who has walked and talked the port for more than a decade. Unfortunately, that is the case with the business of creating jobs in this county, which has been set back months if not years by actions of those with sway the past two years. Consider the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce. Under the guise of more efciency and reducing costs the Board of County Commissioners mandated a consolidation of the Economic Development Council and the Chamber of Commerce. In that process, the Chamber adopted a model to move forward and cleaned house, including discarding an executive director, Sandra Chan, who had served in that capacity for more than a decade. Again, there may have been questions about whether Chan was the right person to lead the Chamber moving forward under its new mandate. That is fair. But, whether a proper t to lead the Chamber or not, Chan had devoted sufcient time and energy to the community and the small businesses over more than a decade to deserve more than a give us your keys and dont let the door hit you on the way out. And by tossing aside any institutional knowledge at the Chamber, including it would turn out the basics such as passwords for computers, the Chamber restarted with a new director who has been on the job barely six months and started behind the eight ball at that, literally from scratch. The Chamber, according to comments from its board president last week, is now ramping up an economic development committee more than a year after a functioning EDC was dissolved. That EDC had an executive director who had actually cultivated leads Preble Rish Engineers is enjoying one of those openings right now with an ofce in Haiti and brought in business strategies to the equation. But, alas, he did not live here, a prerequisite that seems immaterial given the treatment of Pitts and Chan who are long-time residents, and so he was asked to leave less than three years into a ve-year plan. A plan the county commissioners pledged to see through. And the demolition of the EDC was the fourth such demolition by county commissioners inside of 12 years. Now there is the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, which is without its interim executive director, who was told last week her work with the county had been completed barely a month after it started. With the application window for the next director still open as of last Friday, as county administrator Don Butler told Star Staff Writer Valerie Garman, the TDC is again without an executive director and operating with a point person for events, based on advertising and marketing efforts, who is an independent contractor and the girlfriend of the chairman of the BOCC. So, a broader question from the one asked at the Port Authority meeting last week would be what is the face those in sway are trying to project for Gulf County? To what end all this maneuvering including the termination of former TDC executive director Tim Kerigan for, essentially, failing to alter the environment which he inherited? And where is the accountability from commissioners? Remember, the TDC audit did include a damning section about expenditures rife with conicts, but that section was surrounded by four pages of deciencies that fall directly into the laps of the BOCC. They are the ones who must set policy and procedure and ensure that county agencies adhere. They are the ones who must set an agenda that is for the long-term interest of the entire county, providing in turn a face of stable, efcient and publicinterest service. Instead what residents see is a board pretending to act as one but whose actions are revealed when the county administrator talks during a budget meeting of having ve boss men with varying views on issues. What century, let alone decade, is the county operating in? There is a line in a song out now that asks a pointed question: Does the country take care of its own? Wed submit that the community stewardship of those with sway over decisions in this county is measured by their respective denition of their own. So many treasures gone with the wind Keyboard KLATTERINGS Bad calls BOCC must gaze into the mirror TIM CROFT Star news editor Ive been watching American Pickers on the History Channel. It makes me so mad! They gave a guy in Wisconsin $300 for a faded, rusted up Sinclair Gasoline sign. I almost fainted. Then Frank bundled a 1951 Chevrolet hood ornament with a plastic Alka-Seltzer boy and shook hands on an $80 deal. I could have been a millionaire! These guys go all over the country buying up old lanterns, butter churns, railroad crossing signs, handcuffs, pin ball machines and anything else that strikes their fancy, they think they can turn for a prot or that might help their TV ratings. It doesnt seem to matter if the object actually functions like it was intended. A little rust to them seems to add character. I will admit, they dont mind getting their hands dirty. And they somehow manage to nd some of the ah, some of uh, some real interesting characters along the way. Theyve got this big panel truck and they pull up in front of sheds, barns, 100-year-old hardware stores and any place else thats got antiques, junk, faded stuff or pieces of this and that sticking out the windows. Listen, Mike and Frank get excited over a tossed aside, used up, empty-for-years Clabber Girl Baking Powder can. Ive seenem high-ve over a kitchen safe that didnt have the ower sifter, one door was missing and the pull out porcelain tray was cracked in a dozen places. They once plopped down $450 for a petried dinosaur bone. And you ought to see them when they run across a dilapidated 1936 Indian motorcycle! They will haggle a little bit. Or ip a coin. Mike once arm wrestled an interesting character over the nal value. And they dont buy everything they see. But mostly, if they want it, they manage to work it out. One of their favorite lines is, Ive got to have this piece! And they seem to know a little bit about everything theyre looking at. They can talk bicycles from the late 40s, brass doorknobs from the turn of the century, Martin Guitars out of Nazareth, Penn., tintype photography, dog sleds, horse collars, petal cars and World War II vintage Japanese swords. They dont call themselves Antique Archeology for nothing! It just makes me sick every time American Pickers comes on. Why, Aunt Beatrice and Uncle Womack had enough old stuff in their house to make us all millionaires! There were two or three kerosene lanterns on every mantel. Neither one of Aunt Beas kitchen safes had broken porcelain. Her old Singer sewing machine with the foot treadle was an antique the rst time I ever saw it. She was still using her churn. And those tall milk cans that Mike and Frank think so highly of today were sitting in every corner of her house! She tried to give me her coffee grinder one time but, silly me, thought it much easier to just buy a can of Folgers. If I could have gotten the property rights to Granddaddys tool shed, I could own an NFL franchise. You never saw the likes of rasps, drawing knives, hand bits, cross cut saws, harnesses, wood chisels, powder horns, nail kegs, wooden barrels, single and doubletree plows, an old Sulky, a drink Royal Crown Cola thermometer with absolutely no rust, several spittoons, a nonfunctioning Cushman Eagle motor scooter and an 8-by-10 glossy photo of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Mike and Frank would have been in hog heaven. When Tommie Hill changed his service station from Texaco to DX Boron they stacked them old signs out back. Mr. Tommie tried to give them away to any and everybody for the whole 2 years I worked down there. I could have had them just for the effort of toting them out to the house. I was guring more on the weight of those giant double sided Texaco emblems than I was the cash that awaited the owner. Nobody realized we were looking at hundreds of dollars weeds grew up between those things. Last time I stopped by to see Mr. Tommie and introduce my rst wife to him, he was still trying to get me to haul them signs off. If Id only known Mike and Frank back then! I cant remember what David and I did with those little petal cars we once raced through the house. Same for all those army men. And Lord, the baseball cards we went through. We had toy metal trucks by the dozen. Our Lionel Train stretched the whole length of the dining room. Whod athought someone would show up one day offering a premium for a used up Squirt soft drink bottle. Ruth Ann Wiley ended up with my pink and black Elvis hat. And Mom gave our Roy Rogers gun and holster sets to a young neighbor when we went off to college. Im telling you, with any type of foresight, we all could have been rich! I cant believe we carried out with the trash empty Calumet Indian Head cans, out-dated Life magazines, Lash LaRue whips and that old Maytag wringer washer after they nally strung electricity out to the house. We used those wooden Coca-Cola crates as rewood. It was like tossing money down the drain! American Pickers are especially big on old Western Flyer bicycles. David Mark and I both sported one in the mid 50s. Man, those things had real chrome, headlights, leather seats, a mega horn and white side wall tires. We were pretty special cruising downtown on those things. I cant for the life of me remember what happened to them you dont suppose Dave is holding out on me? Ive got to tune in next week to make sure Mike and Frank arent out in his back yard, haggling over my old bike. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard

PAGE 5

Dear Editor: On March 9, the 2012 legislative session concluded. Unfortunately, no legislation passed addressing the protection against arbitrary evictions for residents living in assisted living facilities (ALFs). The need for legislation is apparent the Governors Assisted Living Facility Workgroup recommended enacting eviction protections for residents of ALFs, and several legislators proposed bills that included additional protections for ALF residents from arbitrary evictions. However, lack of protections for ALF residents remains a reality. Why are additional laws necessary? Florida law currently allows an ALF administrator to relocate or terminate a resident from an ALF for almost any reason, as long as the administrator provides the resident with 45 days notice and documents the reason. Florida ALF residents, numbering almost 80,000 cannot challenge their eviction in court even though they rent a unit just like an apartment dweller. Although many residents have advanced care needs, similar to residents of nursing homes, they lack a process for an appeal of an involuntary discharge. This leaves Floridas elders vulnerable to threats of retaliation. Because ALF residents do not have basic due process protections from being asked to leave their homes, administrators may decide to relocate a resident for making what may be legitimate complaints to state agencies involving things like poor care or lack of food. For example, a resident was recently evicted after ling a complaint with the Ombudsman Program. What was the administrators reason for evicting the resident? The resident was not happy here. Incidents like these serve as an example to other residents that if they complain, they could be evicted too. The Ombudsman Program investigated 75 inappropriate ALF eviction complaints and 72 fear of retaliation complaints during 2010-11. An even greater number of arbitrary discharges may have occurred but were not reported to the Ombudsman Program. When a resident is relocated from an ALF, the facility is not obligated to report its action to any governmental entity, no matter the circumstances or the frailty of the resident. How can ALF residents be protected? We need to pass legislation providing basic due process to ALF residents, including the ability to challenge a proposed relocation in a neutral forum and the requirement that a 45-days written notice be handed to the resident, and documented as being given. Establish standards for the appropriate relocation of residents, such as changes in medical condition, failure to pay, and behavioral changes necessitating a different setting. Require the ALF to notify the Ombudsman Program of any notice issued and permit a representative of the local ombudsman council to meet with the resident and work with the administrator to resolve the issue, if possible and appropriate. These recommendations will protect ALF residents from inappropriate evictions, allowing residents to seek redress of any concerns about their care and quality of life without fear of retaliation. If you would like to work with us to better the lives of all long-term care facility residents, please contact 1-888-8310404 or visit ombudsman. my orida.com to nd out how you can volunteer. If you do not have the time to commit to the program, urge your legislators to support positive changes for ALF residents, including protection from arbitrary evictions. Sincerely, Jim Crochet State Ombudsman, Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program (850) 414-2327 www.ombudsman.my orida.com Helping Clients Keep More Of What They Earn All Tax Services Financial Statements Outsourced Accounting QuickBooks IRS Problem Resolution Payroll Set-Up Business Formation Management Consulting Business Plans Retirement Planning 202 Marina Drive, Suite 303 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-1040 PH (850) 229-1050 FX keith@keithjonescpa.com www.keithjonescpa.com MEMBER: AMERIC A N A ND FLORID A INSTITUTES OF C PAS Thursday, April 5, 2012 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS Letters A5 | The Star If youre among the millions of Americans expecting an income tax refund this year, youve probably already led your 2011 return and are eagerly awaiting the money. But if you havent already mentally spent your refund on a guilty pleasure, here are several great ways to better put that money to work for you: Pay down debt. Bee ng up credit card and loan payments can signi cantly lower your long-term interest payments. Suppose you currently pay $120 a month toward a $3,000 credit card balance at 18 percent interest. At that pace itll take 32 months and $788 in interest to pay off, assuming no new purchases. By doubling your payment to $240 youll shave off 18 months and $441 in interest. Start an emergency fund. To protect your family against the impact of a layoff or other unexpected nancial crisis, set aside enough cash to cover six to nine months of living expenses. Seed the account with part of your refund and then set up automatic deductions from accounts. Boost retirement savings. Beef up your 2012 IRA or 401(k) contribution, especially if your employer offers matching contributions; a 50 percent match corresponds to a 50 percent guaranteed rate of return something you wont likely nd in any investment. Spend now to save later. Reap long-term savings on things youll eventually pay for anyway: Replace older appliances with energyef cient models that will pay for themselves through lower utility bills. For example, replacing a 1980s refrigerator with an Energy Star model will save over $100 a year. The Energy Star website (www.energystar.gov) can help you nd Energy Star products and estimate savings. Switching from traditional light bulbs to energy-ef cient alternatives like CFLs and LEDs, while initially more expensive, can save about $6 per bulb in annual energy costs. Just make sure they are Energy Starquali ed models, which exceed minimum standards. Schedule routine car maintenance. According to AAA, simply changing your cars air lter once a year can save over $270, while replacing older spark plugs can save $540 in wasted fuel. Ask whether your utility offers free or subsidized home energy audits. An audit will reveal which investments such as increasing home insulation and replacing drafty windows and doors will lower both winter and summer energy bills. Finance education. Strengthen your career prospects and earnings potential by adding new skills through college courses or vocational training. Ask if your employer will help pay for job-related education. You can also set money aside for your childrens or grandchildrens education by contributing to a 529 Quali ed State Tuition Plan or Coverdell Education Savings Account. Bonus: Your contributions will grow tax-free until withdrawn. Prepay bills. If you expect major expenses later this year (e.g., insurance premiums, orthodontia, college tuition), start setting money aside now so you wont rack up interest charges later. Also, paying slightly more each month toward your mortgage principal can save thousands in interest over the life of the loan. And nally, if you regularly receive large tax refunds, youre probably having too much tax withheld from your paycheck youre essentially giving the government an interestfree loan. Ask your employer for a new W-4 form and recalculate your withholding allowance. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 23, go to www. practicalmoneyskills. com/summit2012. Put your tax refund to work JASON ALDERMAN When Steve Southerland ran for Congress in 2010 his constant battle cry was that the federal government had grown too large and that taxpayers were being asked to fund too many Big Government federal programs. In his rst year and a half in of ce, little has changed in his rhetoric. He has voted to cut drastically, and in some cases end, federal programs promoting job growth and those that maintain services and safety nets for the poor, the elderly and in rm. So why has Mr. Southerland chosen this time to introduce legislation that will subsidize, through taxpayer bailouts, poor development decisions in coastal Gulf County by a small group of wealthy homeowners and developers? Those of us who live in this region know Cape San Blas and Indian Pass Peninsula are highly vulnerable to storm surge. It is the classic barrier island susceptible to wind and wave action that moves the shoreline and remakes the map with every major storm that passes. Yet Mr. Southerland and his wealthy developer friends are convinced that you and I should be willing to pick up the tab when the next beach re-nourishment project is needed. He and his buddies would like Big Government (read your tax dollars) to be used to re-nourish their beaches and make their homes and condos available for federal ood insurance. In 2009 the Federal Emergency Management Administration determined that such re-nourishment and availability of federal ood insurance was not appropriate because it would expose taxpayers to hundreds of millions of dollars in ongoing costs, subsidize and provide incentives for high-risk shoreline development, and undermine the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA). Florida is already far too reliant on state subsidized insurance to cover our coastal property exposure. The state backed Citizens Insurance and Hurricane Catastrophe Fund are dangerously over-exposed and reliant on bonding should a major storm hit anywhere in Florida. Mr. Southerlands legislation (H.R. 4150) offers the same sort of subsidy at the federal level. He says as much himself when quoted by the selfserving trade publication Dredging Today.Com: Ive worked closely with Gulf County of cials to ensure that coastal communities have access to the resources they need to rebuild local beaches in the event of a hurricane or other natural disaster, Southerland said. Despite its designation as a higher risk ood zone, Gulf County is prohibited from receiving federal ood insurance under current law. This inequity in the law forces Gulf County homeowners to purchase private sector insurance at a much higher rate, if they are able to obtain coverage at all. Our common sense legislation will remedy this situation by making Gulf County residents eligible for federal ood insurance, and FEMA reimbursement for road construction, dredging and beach nourishment. Lets break this statement down into its very expensive elements for all taxpayers. When Mr. Southerland says access to the resources they need to rebuild local beaches, the translation is we want you, the taxpayer, to pick up the tab for re-nourishing Cape San Blas and Indian Pass Peninsula. When he says its designation as a higher risk ood zone, prohibited from receiving federal ood insurance under current law, Mr. Southerland is acknowledging the very purpose for CBRA to discourage development of low lying coastal zones so that they can remain natural and serve the valuable purpose of storm protection and wildlife habitat. When lamenting the fact that some Gulf County homeowners have to purchase private sector insurance at a much higher rate, if they are able to obtain coverage at all, he is suggesting that private insurance markets (those that most of us rely on for our own insurance) just wont provide low cost insurance to people who insist on building in places they should not be building! As an advocate for land conservation and rational building codes, I believe CBRA works exactly as it was intended to work by applying market forces (i.e. prohibitively expensive insurance and denial of publicly backed ood insurance) in helping control bad development. I am willing as well to give private property rights advocates leeway with respect to their personal choices as to where they build. However, when we the taxpayers, have to pay for these decisions I have to say an emphatic NO! If you chose to build on shifting sands, dont shift the risk to the public! By removing these two units in Gulf County from CBRA that is exactly what Mr. Southerland would have. The end result is to encourage developers and homeowners to continued their bad decision-making and offer them a free ride at the taxpayers expense. I would suggest that Mr. Southerland rethink his bailout proposal for the lucky few who can afford to live on this beautiful stretch of Gulf County beaches. Asking the taxpayers to pick up the tab for their bad development choices just does not match his rhetoric as a small government, lower taxes politician. Jay Liles is a policy consultant to the Florida Wildlife Federation and a candidate for Congress in the 2nd Congressional District. Southerland talk does not match actions Protection for assisted living residents needed JAY LILES

PAGE 6

Local A6 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 on the value of the Port of Port St. Joes assets, especially land holdings, but the company is awaiting an appraisal of those assets before crafting options for the partners. I had hoped to be there by now, but we need to move forward anyway, move forward on additional agreements, Gonzalez said. We strongly feel to get real traction we need to be aggressive (with business development). We need to be proactive and aggressive. Gonzalez said though the Port Authority has dealt with passive leads that come to the Chamber of Commerce or Port Authority of ces, what St. Joe proposes is to analyze potential companies in the market, what those companies need and the port could offer and try to aggressively match the two. The goal would be to pursue companies based on leads generated by market analysis and marketing. There is a lot of time and energy goes into that, and we are prepared to do that, Gonzalez said, adding the company brings a sales, marketing and nancial analysis tool set to the table. This is all about framing the market ideals, and it needs to be a coordinated effort. I think our focus right now is on business development. The question the Port Authority board members wrestled with much of the rest of last weeks meeting was exactly how that would be coordinated and by whom. Citing a lack of funding, the board members unanimously, though with trepidation from some members, moved to furlough Port of Port St. Joe executive director Tommy Pitts effective at the end of April. Pitts said he was not surprised given the Port Authoritys bleak nancial picture and noted that maybe the dynamics on the board had changed and a new executive director was what was desired. He said there had been no funding for the kind of marketing Gonzalez referenced, and it has only been recently that we have had something to market, referring to the MOU with the St. Joe Co. It has been a long, drawn-out incremental process, but we have just gotten to the point of having something to market, Pitts said. I would like to stay engaged in some way. I think we are very close on one project and we get calls on a frequent basis. The board agreed to keep Pitts on at $1 per month on a month-to-month basis in part to allow him to qualify for his insurance, which Pitts will pay for and move the Port Authority of ce and phone under the umbrella of the consolidated Chamber of Commerce/Economic Development Council. The Port Authority had been leasing a building on U.S. 98, but could no longer afford to make monthly payments the landlord gave them the past three months free. He put 10 years of his heart into the port, said Port Authority member Leonard Costin. I thank him for his service. I hope we can get him back at some point, but I am not sure that will happen. Despite the bleak nancial picture, some board members wondered how exactly they would operate without the one man in the community Pitts who knew the most about the port, was an engineer, had secured millions in grant funds, had a seat on the Florida Ports Council and has passionately advocated for the port for more than a decade. Port attorney Tom Gibson said his concern was what a major investor would think when inquiring about the Port of Port St. Joe if there was no director. Somebody has to be in charge of the port, said board member Eugene Rafeld. I agree that nothing is going to happen overnight. My concern is how to run a business and pursue federal grants without a port director. You still need to have a face to the port. My concern is can you run a port without a face or a board. Costin emphasized that the Port Authority board would now have to serve as the face of the port and Gonzalez noted that until concentrated interest in the port materialized, the need for technical expertise on the ground was minimized. Board member Patrick Jones noted that there are day-to-day operational aspects of the port and that he did not believe the Port Authority could afford a gap at this time in meeting those needs and services. Someone needs to handle this but who is going to handle this, Jones said, acknowledging that nances were limiting options. Think of all the things we (the board) dont know about ports. Who is going to answer those questions? Jones also noted that in the halls of government from which millions in grants have owed to the port for infrastructure development, the absence of a port director could have an impact on whether future grant funds come to the Port of Port St. Joe. Jones oated the idea of using the Arizona Chemical plant property, now in port hands unencumbered, could be used for collateral to generate operating income to bridge the cashow shortfall. The idea was never speci cally addressed. And when asked whether St. Joe could provide a man on the ground, Gonzalez said the company had no interest in becoming a Port Authority or taking over in any manner. We have resources to build the business development arm, Gonzalez said. We want to give it a shot for three years and build that business development arm. The goal, he added, to bring customers as soon as possible and provide a robust long-term revenue stream for the port. Were not saying anything about needing the director or not, but at this point I dont think anything will happen at the port without business development, Gonzalez said. The disconnect, Gonzalez and Jones noted at different points of the meeting, was that Port of Port St. Joe is unique among Floridas 14 deepwater ports in that it has a Port Authority and Port Director, but no operating port. The hope is to have a draft agreement for moving ahead by the April 12 meeting, Gonzalez said. Weems Hospital would like to recognize and celebrate their Doctors on staff. NATIO N AL their Doctors on staff. Weems Hospital would like to recognize and celebrate FRIDAY, MARCH 30 TH 2012 Shezad Sanaullah, MD Patrick Conrad, MD Eugene Charbonneau, DO Stephen Miniat, MD Tamara Marsh, DPM Helen Nitsios, MD James Stockwell, MD Paul D. Hart, MD Garrett H. Chumney, MD Nathanael Hawkins, MD F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD Weems Medical Center East 110 NE 5 TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 850-697-2345 F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 TH TH TH TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Memorial Hospital 135 AV EN U E G, AP ALACH I C O LA FL 850-653-8853 An Easter Service Like No Other! Why just listen to the Easter story, when you can experience it? Youre invited to attend The Thorn Easter Experience at Highland View Assembly of God This unique service features: Easter is the greatest love story ever told, and this year it comes to life with The Thorn Easter Experience. Dont Miss It! N O T I C E O F G E N E R A L E L E C T I O N I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that a GENERAL ELECTION will be held in GULF County, State of Florida, on the SIXTH day of NOVEMBER, 2012, A.D., to ll or retain the following ofces: President and Vice-President United States Senator Representative in Congress State Attorney: Judicial Circuit 14 Public Defender: Judicial Circuit 14 State Senator State Representative Supreme Court: Retention of Three Justices First District Court of Appeal: Retention of Four Judges Circuit Judge, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit: Groups 3, 6 and 11 Clerk of the Circuit Court Sheriff Property Appraiser Tax Collector Superintendent of Schools Supervisor of Elections County Court Judge: Group 1 School Board: Districts 3 and 4 County Commissioner: Districts 1, 3 and 5 Harbor Master for the Port of Port Saint Joe Tupelo Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 PORT from page A1

PAGE 7

Local The Star| A7 Thursday, April 5, 2012 Communities in Florida are becoming concerned about the tobacco industrys practice of targeting adolescents and young adults through product development, packaging, pricing, advertising, and promotional activities. The Gulf County SWAT youth in the picture, who are also members of the Gulf County Tobacco Free and Substance Abuse Response Guide (SARG) Partnership, recognize that retailers who sell tobacco products play a vital role in protecting youth from becoming the next generation of Americans to die prematurely from tobacco-related disease. We would like to thank RICHS IGA in Wewahitchka for being the FIRST store in Gulf County that sells tobacco products to pledge to be a vital community partner. On March 28th, 3 SWAT youth met with Wewahitchka IGA representative, Ms. Heather Dyas who signed the agreement. As shown in the picture, they have by agreed to display tobacco cessation penny trays at their tobacco outlet. The trays display The Florida Quitline number, a valuable free resource to help people quit tobacco. The toll-free Florida Quitline at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW (1-877-822-6669) will connect you to a train addiction and create a personalized quit plan. Youll receive proactive coaching sessions, self-help materials, and quit aids like nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) (available while supplies last). For additional information, please contact Sarah Hinds at the Gulf County Health Department. 850-227-1276, ext 205. Left to Right: Lana Harrison (SWAT Advisor), Trent McGill, Shelby Wood, Heather Dyas (IGA Rep.), and Trey McGill. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 4-30-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Special to The Star On March 14, Tallahassee Community College hosted the annual Womens History Month ceremony with this years theme of Womens Education Womens Empowerment. Dr. Patricia K. Hardman was recognized as one of the honorees for her contribution to the eld of dyslexia. Dr. Jeanne OKon, chair of the committee, said, I would like for people who attend the WHM ceremony to take away the understanding that women are signi cant, contributing members of our society and that they always have been. I would like for them to realize that women, like our honorees, make huge contributions on a daily basis and still dont get the same recognition, status and pay as do men. And our ceremony is all about embracing these ten community women honorees to let them know how much we admire and appreciate them! Patricia K. Hardman, PhD, never dreamed when she received her Math degree from the University of South Carolina that she would become involved in the eld of dyslexia. In fact, she had never heard of it until her aunt called her in 1971 and said that her cousin had been identi ed as being dyslexic. Find out what that means and what we need to do about it, was the family directive. Not only did she nd out how to help her cousin, but this opened an entire new vocation and eld of study for her. She was mentored by Dr. Charles Shedd, an early researcher in the area of dyslexia. She developed Saturday schools in Charleston and Tallahassee and then opened full time schools for children with dyslexia and ADHD in Charleston, Orlando, Macon, Albany and Tallahassee. Hardman has developed an entire curriculum (reading, math, grammar and study skills) designed to teach the students these ways to learn. Dyslexic learners learn differently; therefore teachers have to change the way they teach to match the neurological difference and way these individuals learn, she said. Since 1975, Woodland Hall Academy in Tallahassee has been changing the lives of children and adults with Dyslexia and ADHD. Hardman views herself as a catalyst for change. Not only in the area of education has she changed the way teachers view and approach students with dyslexia, but she has helped to change laws in Florida affecting thousands of individuals. Working with Representative Betty Easley in 1985, legislation was crafted and passed that allows students who have dyscalculia (disability in math) to substitute other courses in college for the math requirement allowing them to obtain a college degree in their chosen (non-math) eld. In the mid 90s she worked with Senator Steve Wise to broaden the accommodations available on the FCAT. Hardman helped Senate President John McKay craft the McKay Scholarship Program and served on the Senate Task Force, at the appointment of Governor Bush, to guide the program through the early years. The McKay Scholarship Program is the rst and largest state scholarship program for students with disabilities in the country; allowing over 22,000 children with disabilities access to both public and private programs that t their needs. Hardman has received the Distinguished Service Award from The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools for her contribution to this program. Hardman shows no signs of slowing down even though she has moved to Port St. Joe for semi-retirement. She does play four or ve games of golf every week but also continues to advocated for disability issues; is a partner in a residential construction company; is the president of the Coastal Community Association of South Gulf County; and continues as the CFO of Dyslexia Research Institute. One last fact, in her journey, Hardman, also discovered she is dyslexic with ADHD. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Dr. Jeanne OKan, Chair of Womens History Month, Dr. Karinda Barrett, TCC Instructor and Dr. Patricia K. Hardman, CEO of Dyslexia Research Institute. Hardman recognized for work with dyslexia

PAGE 8

Local A8 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 patched seam on a chlorine treatment tank and rust in a clari er were deemed maintenance-related or of lesser priority, solutions to other de ciencies remain. For example, a series of failures ve in all with pumps that bring fresh canal water into the plant for treatment as well as problems with ttings on outside pumps handling caustic acid and pumps handling various chemicals in what is known as the Clean in Place (CIP) room. Weve identi ed some things that are maintenance-related and some that are construction-related that we are working with (construction contractor Marshall Brothers Industrial) on, and we appreciate their willingness to work with us on those, Jones said. But there are other things that we are still investigating. We are committed to working at it and bringing resolution to the problems. Of particular concern is a leak in a concrete membrane tank wall that is seen as an immediate priority for redress. We are concerned about the membrane tank, Jones said, the leaking from a seam in the tank evident. Its probably the most important item to address in the immediate future. There was some discussion about whether the membrane tanks should have been lined or not to prevent any leaking, and the timeline that occurred for notifying Marshall Brothers of the leak when it rst appeared shortly after the plant began operation. But Matt Marshall of Marshall Brothers said the leak would be xed, and whether the tanks were lined or not was somewhat beside the point given the nature and extent of the leaking. Marshall said the leak would be xed by his company at no cost to the city. We are going to stand behind our work, Marshall said. The repair began Tuesday. Also of interest were leaking pumps handling caustic chemicals and a look at the pumps and systems used in the CIP room. From the time the plant opened, weve had problems with these caustic pumps, plant supervisor Larry McClamma said of the outside caustic chemical pumps that showed signs of continuous leakage. On one pump system within the CIP room, staff had replaced a pump leaking from its ttings with another pump that has eliminated the problem, said Bob Lyles of the citys plant staff. A representative with Siemens said a similar plant had been built just before the Port St. Joe plant in Dauphin, Ala., and staff there could serve as a sounding board for issues they have encountered with essentially the same technology. During the walk-through, groups with the contractors CDM, which designed the plant, Siemens, which designed the ltration system equipment and Marshall Brothers conferred on various issues, and took copious notes and photos. At least all the players are here sticking their head into this, said Commissioner Rex Buzzett. As long as they come up with solutions, they can talk among themselves all day. The investigation into nding answers, as the mayor encouraged and Jones committed to, will continue. 8197710 Uncompromised Commitment to Compliance On-Time, Ef cient and Discreet Reliable, Professional Service Customized Cost Effective Solutions Proven Track Record TM 1-850-309-1996 shredit.com COST CUTTERS LAWN SERVICE Affordably Addressing All Your Lawn Care Needs Licensed & Insured Serving from Mexico Beach to the Cape. Full Service Lawn Care Starting at $29 CA LL : Art Sigman 850.628.0694 or Ken Daves: 850.899.0468 asigman@mchsi.com Gun Show April 14th & 15th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2075355 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 o r 2 Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 P ACKAGE ST O RE & LO UNGE GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR F AVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRIT S WWW.L OO K O UTL O UNGE.C O M L A D IE S N IGHT E VERY T UE SD AY AN D W E D NE SD AY 5-10 ET K ARA O KE & DJ IN THE (N O NS M O KING) C R O W S N E S T E VERY W E D NE SD AY, FRI D AY & SATUR D AY WITH N ATALIE AN D N O W O N T HUR SD AY S WITH DEBRA H APPY HO UR MO N D AY FRI D AY 5-7 ET COME E NJOY SUN S ET S ON THE POO P DE C K L IVE M U S IC N O W START S AT 7 PM ET WITH R AN D Y STARK O N FRI D AY JO INE D BY A RT LO NG O N SAX O N SATUR D AY PLANT from page A1 TIM CROFT | The Star Caustic chemical pumps housed outside the water treatment plant show clear signs of leakage. The walk-through began at the series of raw water pumps. The city has had to replace ve pump motors in the past year at a cost of nearly $2,000 per motor.

PAGE 9

Local The Star| A9 Thursday, April 5, 2012 Cape Palms Park, Cape San Blas 6081 Cape San Blas Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Saturday, April 7th 7:30 am Onsite Registration; 8 am Race Begins Cost: Adults: $20; 15 and Under $15 Get your hop on and join us at The Cape for the 5K Rabbit Run/ Walk. The event will begin and end at Cape Palms Park and follow Loggerhead Run, the bike/walking trail that runs the len gth of beautiful Cape San Blas and St. Joseph Peninsula. First 50 runners to register receive a complimentary race day t-shirt. For more information call the Gulf County TDC at 850.229.7800 All times are Eastern. Presented by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council Salt Air Market The Port St. Joe Salt Air Farmers Market brings fresh seasonal produce from local small farmers and much more to Floridas Forgotten Coast. Throughout the growing season, regionally grown vegetables and fruit, locally harvested Gulf seafood, carefully crafted artisan goods, and educational opportunities highlight the markets. Located in downtown Port St. Joe, in the City Commons Park, the SaltAir Farmers Market serves as a community gathering place and cultural center where attendees can enjoy arts, workshops, live music, and exhibitions while shopping the market and Reid Avenues retail district. There is no better place to be on a Saturday Morning. JSL Easter Egg Hunt Saturday April 7th 10:00 a.m. EDT Photos with the Easter Bunny Arts and Crafts Children ages 10 and under Admission is Free More information? lindsayelizsher@gmail.com Port St. Joes Downtown Merchants Committee of the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce invites you to celebrate First Fridays on the rst Friday of each month. Festivities begin at 5 p.m. Explore historic downtown Port St. Joes one-of-a-kind boutiques, shops, cafes, restaurants, galleries, spas, salons. night spots and more! Attendees can expect great sales, food and entertainment. Look for seasonal sales from retailers along with dinner specials, drink specials and live entertainment from restaurants and bars. TGIF! SHOP / 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM DINE / 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM UNWIND / All Night Long! Friday Night: Billy Dean, 19 South, and Randall Big Daddy Webster. Saturday: Buddy Hamm 117 Sailors Cove, Port St. Joe, FL (850) 229.3463 On Over to Gulf County Easter Weekend www.visitgulf.com This Event Funded In Part By The Gulf County Tourism Development Council Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGH T S PECIALS 6:00 8:30 HOURS : 236 R eid A ve (850) 229.7121 GULF SH RIMP, S CALLOPS, C RAB C LAWS & F IS H POPCOR N B UR G ERS: WI TH FF Above orders served with: FF B AKED P O T A T O, S ALAD A N D B READ ** AWARD WI NN I NG DESSER T S ** start of the re but has con rmed it was a result of a controlled burn on private land in Gulf County. This particular re spotted across the dirt line of where it was supposed to be, Goddin said. Many times when its a weather shift, you cant predict it because it happens so quickly. Goddin said wind and low humidity are two weather conditions most likely to enhance a wild re. Humidity doesnt necessarily mean hot, said Goddin, who noted low humidity, when the air is really dry, tends to fuel vegetation and cause re to burn more violently. Goddin said while some parts of the country may experience a speci c re season, Florida is susceptible to wild res at any point in the year. In Gulf County, theres yearround re activity, Goddin said. Fuels in Florida can burn at just about any time of the year. Florida vegetation can burn in the spring, summer, fall or winter. Fire is a natural part of our Florida ecosystems, and its not a matter of if we are going to have wild res, but when and at what intensity, Goddin said. Goddin said every homeowner outside of a burn ban area does have the right to burn debris, but there are guidelines to follow to ensure safe burns are conducted. Burns must be conducted at least 25 feet away from the property owners home, 50 feet from any paved or public roads and 150 feet from any other occupied buildings. Goddin encourages people to never leave a re unattended, keep a water supply handy and to not burn on windy days when res can easily jump. Fire when it gets away from you, it can get out of control very quickly, Goddin said. If the re does get into the woods, Goddin said dont hesitatecall 911 immediately. Just be careful, thats the main thing, Goddin said. Just be smart. Goddin also suggested ways for area residents to protect their homes in the event of a wild re. The Florida Forest Service suggests homeowners reduce the risk of their home burning through the protection of the two most vulnerable parts of the home: the roof and the area immediately surrounding the structure. Research indicates that home ignitions usually occur over relatively short distancestens of yards, not hundreds of feet, from re brands landing on or around the structure or ames from slow-moving, low-intensity surface res contacting ammable portions of the structure. According to the FFS, homeowners can reduce this risk by keeping debris off roofs and out of gutters and through careful landscaping around the home, particularly in the immediate 30 feet of land surrounding the structure. Careful landscaping should eliminate any ammable vegetation in contact with the structure, thin out trees and shrubs, prune tree limbs to a height of 6 to 10 feet, replace ammable landscape material with higher water content material, replace ammable mulch with rock or gravel, and eliminate ladder fuels near the structure that might carry a re to the roof. Goddin said homeowners if remember to be clean, lean and green (cleanno accumulations of dead vegetation; leansmall amounts of ammable vegetation; greenplants are healthy and green with a well irrigated lawn) the chances of home ignition will be drastically reduced. WILDFIRE from page A1

PAGE 10

E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters SHIMAN O TREVALA JIGGING RO D S S T AR T ING A T $ 119.99 Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 10 Freshwater Inshore/Offshore We are getting back into the hot weather this week on the Forgotten Coast. Offshore water temperaturesare on the rise and will reach 80 degrees soon. Cobia are starting to show up in our area this week, and a 53# sh was caught close to shore on Monday. Spanish mackerel are everywhere near the beaches and on the Mexico Beach Pier. Trolling spoons and mackerel trees will nd sh fast, but you may need to add a weight to get down to the sh. Grouper are back on the menu this week, but make sure that you understand the new grouper regulations on the FWC website before you head out. Bass shing is still hot this week as many anglers are reporting good catches in Lake Wimico. Worms and crank baits have produced the most sh, but a few guys are still shiner shing. Depot creek has been quiet lately, but with the good rain we had last week, the cat sh bite should improve this week. SPONSORED BY By Joseph Mitchell, Park Service Specialist St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, (850) 227-1327 Special to The Star The coastal park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has provided a peaceful and beautiful setting for recreational activities for many years. But few realize how the park has changed since its formation 5,000 years ago. Two barrier islands, one from Eagle Harbor to the north and one south from Eagle Harbor to Richardson Hammock, were joined at Eagle Harbor approximately 1,000 years ago. This large barrier island was later joined to the mainland some 600 years ago forming Cape San Blas and St. Joseph Spit. The area is constantly being changed by the sediment transforming processes of erosion and sediment deposition. Much of the eroded material is transported northward and is redeposited at the northern tip of the Spit. A well developed primary dune system extends to nearly the tip of St. Josephs peninsula. This dune ridge has been diminished by several hurricanes: most noticeably by Hurricane Eloise in 1975, Hurricane Elaina in 1985, Hurricane Opal in 1995 and Hurricane Dennis in 2004. During these storms, the dunes were breached in several places by tidal surges, which allowed water, seaweed and debris into the Park. While breaches to the dunes are common during severe storm events, erosion and lesser storm damage can be minimized by vegetation. Dunes can become stabilized when plants such as sea oats, railroad vines, dune panic grass and beach grass anchor and grow in the poor nutrient sands. Plants can trap and hold sand carried by wind and wave actions. Areas that are stable for hundreds of years can support other plants, such as yaupon, scrub oaks, bay trees and saw palmettos. Beach ridges are present in parts of the interior of the peninsula behind the primary dunes. This row of ridges is called the secondary dune ridge. The secondary dune ridge can support plant communities different from the primary dunes, such as Rosemary, beach mint, chapmen and laurel oaks, saw palmetto and woody vines. Finally, toward the interior of the peninsula are the ancient dunes. These are the original dunes from 3,000 to 1,000 years ago and are the most stable of the dune system that makes up St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. Within the ancient dunes, pine trees, sable palmettos, holly and yaupons grow unencumbered by the winds and gulf surf. Between these dune ridges are swells and depressions that can hold water. Cattails, rushes and lilies are and can often be seen in these low lying areas. The eastern side of the peninsula, along St. Joe Bay, is bordered with a thin band of coastal salt marsh vegetation, beyond which extends a shallow underwater grass at up to one half mile wide. At the edges of the grass at the waters depth increases to 18 feet or more. The edge of the grass at is the actual shoreward edge of the sand body on which the original barrier islands were formed. The barrier dune systems play an important part in protecting the shore line of Port St Joe. Without the peninsula halting storm surges and waves from Hurricanes, the shoreline of Port St Joe would be much different. For information about Florida State Parks, visit www. oridastateparks.org. Until Next time, From the Rangers at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park Star Staff Report This sick turtle was rescued at Indian Pass during the St. Vincent Island Open House last Friday by the refuge Manager Shelly Stiaes and the Supporters of St. Vincent Volunteers. David Moody of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was instrumental in getting the turtle to shore. Also, two very new residents of Port St. Joe, who came out for the Open House, Don Stoneburger and Kathy Strnad, volunteered to not take the barge to the island when they heard a volunteer was needed to transport the sick turtle to Panama City Beach. The two drove the sick turtle to Gulf World for rehabilitation. Special to The Star The possibilities for taking advantage of the upcoming license-free shing day, Saturday April 7, in Florida are almost endless. Thats because people of all ages can cast their lines into 3 million acres of lakes, ponds and reservoirs and 12,000 miles of shable rivers, streams and canals. The hardest part might be picking your destination. These abundant resources, coupled with responsible freshwater sh management, are why Florida is known as the Fishing Capital of the World. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) scheduled the rst of four license-free recreational shing days on this holiday weekend so more people will have the chance to get out and try their luck. Plus, this weekend coincides with a productive freshwater shing period, when the weather is usually pleasant. Many of Floridas recreational sport shes, such as black bass, bluegill and redear sun sh, move into the shallows to spawn during spring, making them more available for anglers to catch. Besides enjoying the fun of reeling in a sh, people nd that recreational shing is a good motivator to enjoy the great outdoors. In fact, shing is a prime reason lots of folks get outside in the rst place. Fishing is a low-cost, wholesome form of entertainment, which is why the FWC offers four days when a recreational shing license is not needed. The FWC also made June 2 and Sept. 1 license-free saltwater shing days and set June 9 as the second license-free freshwater shing day. These days coincide with a holiday weekend, National Fishing and Boating Week or open-harvest seasons for popular bay scallops, lobster and king mackerel. All other bag limit, season and size restrictions apply on these dates for recreational, not commercial, shing. To make your shing day successful, check out My FWC.com/Fishing for freshwater shing tips, locations and rules. So escape the hustle and bustle Saturday by telling everyone youve gone shing. But dont forget to take your kids and spouse and friends to share the fun. Special to The Star With nesting season under way for shorebirds like the snowy plover, black skimmer and American oystercatcher, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) asks beachgoers to take care not to disturb their nests. Wellinformed, courteous beachgoers can provide needed relief to these stressed species. The snowy plover, for example, nests along Gulf Coast beaches through August, and its population has shrunk to as few as 200 pairs in this state. Increased human activity and development on coastal barrier island beaches are among the key reasons that snowy plovers and other beachnesting species are listed as threatened or endangered. Shorebird nesting continues through August. By recognizing the warning signs that you have entered an area of beach where shorebird nesting is taking place, you can save chicks and eggs from a needless death, said Nancy Douglass, who works on shorebird conservation at the FWC. If you notice birds suddenly stand up, become agitated or y about at your approach, you are likely entering a nesting site. Above the high-tide mark, snowy plovers and other species, such as Wilsons plovers and least terns, lay well-camou aged eggs in shallow depressions on the sand. This behavior makes the eggs nearly invisible to predators. Unfortunately, the camou age effect also makes these eggs nearly invisible to the untrained human eye. Further complicating the issue of shorebird conservation: Any disturbance by people, pets or vehicles can cause shorebirds to temporarily or permanently abandon their nests, resulting in the death of young chicks or the destruction of the eggs by predators. Once shorebird parents are frightened from the nest, exposed chicks or eggs can succumb to the heat of the Florida summer sun in as little as ve minutes, and predation by gulls and crows increases signi cantly when parents are forced to leave, even for a few moments. Here are some simple things you can do to help nesting shorebirds: Keep your distance. If birds become agitated or leave their nests, you are too close! A general rule is to stay at least 300 feet from a nest. *Respect posted areas. Some shorebird nesting areas are posted with symbolic fencing, which consists of signs on posts connected by twine marked with agging tape. Avoid marked nesting areas and cross only at designated pathways. These posted beach areas may shift during the nesting season, depending on where the birds have chosen to lay eggs at any given time. *Never intentionally force birds to y. When birds are chased or disturbed, they use energy they need for nesting and migration. *Keep pets away from nesting areas. Even wellbehaved pets can be perceived as a threat. If you take pets to the beach, keep them leashed and away from nesting areas. *Keep the beach clean and do not feed wildlife. Food scraps attract predators such as raccoons, gulls and crows to our beaches. Litter can entangle birds, sea turtles and other wildlife. Spread the word. If you see people disturbing nesting birds, gently let them know how their actions may hurt the birds survival. If they continue to disturb nesting birds, please report their activities to the FWCs Wildlife Alert hotline at 888404-FWCC (3922), #FWC or *FWC on your cell phone or by texting Tip@MyFWC. com. Because many Florida shorebirds are listed as threatened or endangered, it is a violation of state and federal laws to harass or take any endangered or threatened birds, their eggs or young. To learn more, download the Share the Beach with Beach-Nesting Birds brochure from the Living with Wildlife area at MyFWC.com/Wildlife. Or check out the Florida Shorebird Alliance at www. shorebirdalliance.org. Birds nesting on Florida shores requires beachgoers to be aware Turtle rescued during St. Vincent Open House St. Joseph Peninsula State Parks Dunes SPECIAL TO THE STAR Erosion along the beaches at the north end of the park. Special to The Star At the River Delta Bass Club of Apalachicolas Feb. 2012 tournament, held Feb. 25 in White City, Lloyd Alford, top, nished in rst place with 13.37 pounds. Mike Pridgen, bottom, nished in second with 13.19 pounds. Finishing third with 11.85 pounds was Gerald Dykes. Dewitt Galloway nished fourth with 10.79 pounds. Fifth place went to Greg Dykes with 10.36 pounds, followed by sixth place, Brandon King 9.49 pounds; seventh place James Newsome, 9.20 pounds; eighth place Paul Newsome 8.80 pounds; ninth place Alvin Martina 8.43 pounds; 10th place Pap Duncan 5.42 pounds; 11th place Sherman Alford 4.99 pounds; and 12th place Mark Yowell, with 3.00 pounds. The club is supported by Apalachicola Ace Hardware and Fishermans Choice Bait and Tackle of Eastpoint, For info about River Delta Bass Club, call Pridgen at 653-5563. LICENSE-FREE FISHING SATURDAY ALFORD WINS BASS TOURNEY LLOYD ALFORD MIKE PRIDGEN COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI

PAGE 11

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com A Section WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 29 Th 1034am 1.0 727pm 1.2 244am 0.0 201pm 1.1 30 Fr 1147am 1.0 828pm 1.2 358am 0.1 327pm 1.1 31 Sa 1245pm 1.0 947pm 1.1 516am 0.1 513pm 1.0 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, Apr 5 82 64 0 % Fri, Apr 6 81 65 0 % Sat, Apr 7 75 54 0 % Sun, Apr 8 75 55 0 % Mon, Apr 9 75 55 0 % T ues, Apr 10 75 55 0 % Wed, Apr 11 75 55 0 % Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 11 Star Staff Report In a season of ups and downs, there have been more ups than downs for the Wewahitchka High School baseball team. On March 19, the Gators downed Franklin County 8-4. Austin Chumney started and pitched four innings, allowing three runs on two hits and striking out three. Rashard Ranie was 1 for 3 with two runs and three runs batted in and Hunter McDaniel was 1 for 3 with a run and three RBIs. The Gators downed Altha 5-4 on March 23, the margin saved by a diving catch in center by Justin Flowers and a sliding catch by McDaniel in the out eld for the nal two outs of the game. Heath Bailey started and went the distance, allowing four runs on four hits and fanning eight. Flowers went 2 for 4 with a pair of doubles and scored a run and Jay Shiver was 2 for 3 with a runscored and an RBI. The Gators played two on March 27, losing 7-5 to Aucilla Christian and beating Vernon 9-5. Against Aucilla, Austin Guffey started and went six innings on the mound, allowing eight hits and four earned runs. Cole Harper was 2 for 5 with two doubles, scored twice and drove in one. Chris Myrick earned the win on the mound against Vernon, tossing seven innings and scattering seven hits while striking out two and walking one. Flowers was 4 for 4 with a double, three RBIs and a run-scored, Ranie was 2 for 3 with two RBIs and McDaniel had a pair of hits, drove in one and scored twice. Last Friday, the Gators fell to Sneads 14-4 with McDaniel driving in two runs on one hit. The Gators were edged by Tallahasse John Paul II 5-4 on Monday. Walding went 3 for 3 with a double, drove in one run and scored another for Wewahitchka. The Gators were at Graceville on Tuesday. Star Staff Report Four consecutive losses in the past week have dropped the Wewahitchka High School softball team to 8-10 overall as the season nears its close. On March 26, the Lady Gators fell 9-5 to Sneads. Ashleigh Price pitched 4 1/3 innings, walking ve and striking out three while taking the loss. Jessica Smith pitched the nal 2 2/3 innings, walking two. Tara Walding was 3 for 4 with a double and Jaden Rouse was 2 for 4 with a double for Wewahitchka. The following night the Lady Gators dropped a runrule game to Arnold 12-2. Price pitched all ve innings, striking out ve and walking one. Cheyenne Luckie, Alyssa Bass and Caitlin Burch were each 1 for 2 at the plate, Burch driving in a run. Smith was 1 for 3 with an RBI. Two nights later, the Lady Gators fell 14-2 to county foe Port St. Joe. Price went ve innings on the mound, walking none and striking out none. Smith and Tori Lanter each went 2 for 3 and Luckie was 1 for 2. This past Monday, the Lady Gators dropped a 4-2 decision to Franklin County. Price pitched three innings allowing all four Seahawk runs and Smith pitched the nal three innings. Ireland Hamm had a hit, Rouse was 2 for 3 and Bass was 1 for 1 for Wewahitchka. The Lady Gators were at West Gadsden on Wednesday, host Ponce de Leon tonight and host East Gadsden on April 12. Senior night tonight at 7 p.m. at Lady Shark Field Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe High School softball team hosted the Bozeman Bucs last Tuesday night, pounding Bozeman for a ve-inning run-rule victory. MaKayla Ramsey started and pitched all ve innings for the Lady Sharks (now 15-5 overall), allowing no runs and striking out four and scattering ve hits to earn her 10th win of the season. Leading hitters for the Port St. Joe were Katie Lacour with two hits; Shannon Pridgeon with a double and single and Haley Wood, Katie Gardner, Brittany King, and Miranda Gref each had one hit. Hitting has come around, said Port St. Joe coach Jim Belin. The defense is very solid again, turning a double play. We are playing really well right now! On Thursday the Lady Sharks traveled to county rival Wewahitchka and won 14-2, again on a run-rule after ve innings. Ramsey went the ve innings on the mound, facing 22 batters and allowing six hits, two earned runs and striking out six and walking no one. Leading the Port St. Joe attack were Lacour and Gardner, who each went 4 for 4. Gardners hits included her third home run of the season and she drove in seven runs. Pridgeon had two hits, including a double, with Wood, Gref, Christian Laine, and Kesley Miles each adding two hits. The next night, the Lady Sharks hosted Franklin County and won 11-0, again in ve innings. Ramsey was the winning pitcher, facing 18 batters and giving up two hits, walking none, while striking out one. Lacour was 3 for 3 for Port St. Joe and Pridgeon had two hits including a double. Laine also had a pair of hits, including a double and Gardner hit her fourth home run. This past Monday, Port St. Joe hosted Marianna and won 10-1, avenging a defeat from earlier in the season. Ramsey recorded her 100th strikeout of the year, pitching seven innings and allowing three hits and one earned run while striking out six and walking ve. Lacour was 5 for 5, Pridgeon 4 for 4 and Gardner had two hits. Special to The Star A semi-professional football team is now being started in Franklin County. Organizer Nate Tatum is seeking coaches and players, age 18 and older, to take part in the team. Tatum plans to use the team name Sharks, reminiscent of the former Apalachicola High School teams, and the team colors of blue and gold. He is seeking an af liation with the Florida Football Alliance at www.ffafootball. org. Tatum hopes to form a team in Apalachicola made up of players from anywhere between Panama City and Tallahassee. All are welcome. As importantly, he needs the help of coaches, both a head coach and offensive and defensive coordinators. For more information, call 899-0800 or Silverfox1029@yahoo.com Special to The Star Port St Joe High School has showcases with dozens and dozens of trophies and plaques but this summer it will house a special Football Memorabilia case. The Port St. Joe Football related memorabilia case will be displayed in the soon to be newly refurbished football locker room. At present time we have a couple of jerseys and lettermans jackets from both state championship teams. The actual football from the 1971 State game will be on display as well as one of the helmets. We are still needing items and need the help of the community and football players. The items on loan to the school will have a brass name plate to recognize the individuals who have donated them. The memorabilia case will be the focal point of the new locker room and a constant reminder of the rich heritage of champions at Port St. Joe High School. If you have any items please contact Traci Gaddis at 227-6770 (cell) or 648-5474 wk) or ggaddis@ gtcom.net. Star Staff Report Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School will conduct cheerleading tryouts in the school gymnasium April 30 through May 4. Each athlete must have a current health physical, parental consent and a signed copy of the cheerleading policies and procedures. You must have all three forms completed in order to start practice. Without these documents you will not be able to tryout. To be eligible for tryouts you must have a 2.0 GPA or better and no Level 2 offense referral. Tryout practice will begin at 3 p.m. ET each day and will continue until 4:30 p.m. Any questions contact Lindsay Williams at 229-6251 or lwilliams@gulf.k12. .us. Wewahitchka Gators continue mixed season Star Staff Report During a rough week on the diamond, the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks were one-hit twice and lost a wild 10-9 game to Franklin County. The Tiger Sharks were one-hit by Bozeman 9-1 on Tuesday and managed just one hit against Florida High on Saturday. In between, Port St. Joe traveled to Franklin County and managed just ve hits and made ve key errors, according to Coach T.C. Brewer, while losing 10-9. The Tiger Sharks hosted Liberty County on Tuesday, are at Blountstown on Friday and celebrate Senior Night at 7 p.m. ET next Tuesday with a game against Liberty County. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | Florida Freedom The Port St. Joe baseball team fell 10-9 at Franklin County last week. Tiger Sharks drop three in a row Lady Gators fall under .500 Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High cheerleading tryouts PSJHS football title memorabilia sought SPECIAL TO THE STAR Seniors Katie Gardner, left, and Katie Lacour, right, will be honored during Senior Night at 7 p.m. ET tonight. Lady Sharks now 15-5 SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL TEAM IN THE WORKS

PAGE 12

Local A12 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 and coach in the Port St. Joe Dixie Youth organization. That service continued when he was elected as Gulf County Commissioner in 1992 and served on the Board until 2000. In 2001, then Gov. Jeb Bush appointed Yeager to the Port St. Joe Port Authority and he served in that capacity until 2008 when he was again elected as Gulf County Commissioner District 5. It has been a privilege to serve the citizens of Gulf County and with the continued support of the public I would be honored to continue my record of public service. I am humbled and I appreciate the opportunities the people of Gulf County have given me to serve them. I am proud of the accomplishments we have achieved together and I will work hard to continue those successes. One of my goals when I was elected in 2008 was to reduce the property tax burden on our citizens and I am proud that in the last three years we have achieved a near 35 percent reduction. Some of the accomplishments we have achieved together are: Cape San Blas bike path improvements and extensions, sidewalk repair in Oak Grove, a new re station on Cape San Blas, Salinas Park Bayside development, Indian Pass boat ramp repairs with a new restroom facility, Odena Landing construction, Stump Hole armoring, widening areas of County Road 30 and others. These projects have happened because of the help of many and the leadership role I have taken to accomplish things that are important to our citizens. As the incoming chair of the Small County Coalition and the leadership role I have with the Florida Association of Counties, I have been able to develop relationships with state and federal agencies that have allowed us to nd funding for projects we otherwise might not be able to complete. We also work with our state and federal elected of cials on legislation that is important to Gulf County. We worked with Rep. Jimmy Patronis to pass the only local bill ever to pass for Gulf County that helped protect private property owners from negative impacts of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection moving the Coastal Construction line on Cape San Blas. We are working with Congressman Steve Southerland on legislation to correct an error by U.S. Fish and Wildlife when they erroneously placed the Cape and Indian Pass in a Coastal Barrier Resource Act designation. This bill has now been led and if passed could be the most important federal legislation ever for Gulf County. While these and other projects have been signi cant, one of the most important and the one I am most proud, is the collaboration and cooperation of so many that worked together to bring Eastern Shipbuilding to our community with up to 200 jobs in the near future. All parties, Gulf County, the City of Port St. Joe, Port St. Joe Port Authority and the Chamber/EDC, working together is a model for future partnerships in bringing diversi cation to Gulf Countys job market. It is a model that I was proud to be part of designing and these partners now meet once a month, working together for the betterment of Gulf County. Another milestone is the Memorandum of Understanding agreement between the Port St. Joe Port Authority and the St. Joe Company outlining a partnership going forward, putting the past behind and working together to develop port operations on properties owned by both entities. Working together we have a bright future here in Gulf County and I am excited for our residents and thank you for the support you have given to me during my tenure and I look forward to our continued efforts to make our County a better place. YEAGER from page A1 Over 35 Years Experience. 208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe 850.229.1111 www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist New Sorrelli Arriving Daily! Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist COMMER C IAL R ESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY ASSO C I A TION M GR. SPRING P ROMOTION N EW CU S TOMER S 1/2 O FF 2 MONTH S GULF COUNTY AND M EXI C O BEA C H (850) 247.8956 www.coastalpoolandspa.com 2012 Election Notice Notice is hereby given that the City of Port St. Joes Primary Election will be held Tuesday, May 8, 2012, in the Fire Station. Polls open at 7:00 A.M., ET, and close 7:00 P.M., ET. Registration books are now open at the oce of Linda Grin, Gulf County Supervisor of Elections, and will remain open thru Monday April 9, 2012, at 5:00 P.M., ET. Candidate qualifying begins Wednesday, March 21, 2012, at 12:00 Noon and ends on Wednesday, March 28, 2012, at Noon. e following oces will be up for election: Commissioner Group III and Commissioner Group IV. Beginning April 28, 2012 May 5, 2012, (includes Saturdays of April 28th and May 5th) Early Voting will be held at the Supervisor of Elections oce located at 401 Long Avenue from 9:00 A.M., ET to 5:00 P.M., ET. No Sunday voting on April 29, 2012. Also, Absentee Ballots may be requested now but will be mailed after received from printer. e City of Port St. Joe who were both longtime educators in Wewahitchka and still reside there, and Lamar, who also lives in Wewahitchka, and the late Ada Davis. I attended Port St. Joe Elementary School and graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 1998 as valedictorian. After graduation I received a baseball scholarship to attend the University of West Florida in Pensacola, where I graduated in 2002 with a Bachelors degree in Psychology. I attended Barry University School of Law where I received my Law degree in 2005. After law school I began working for the State Attorneys Of ce for the 14th Judicial Circuit in the Port St. Joe of ce. I was admitted to the Florida Bar in 2006 and was sworn in as an Assistant State Attorney. I worked in that capacity until January 2009, when I accepted a position with the State Attorneys Of ce for the 2nd Judicial Circuit in Apalachicola where I am currently employed. During my time with the State Attorneys Of ce I have had the opportunity to represent the State of Florida in thousands of cases including felonies, misdemeanors and juveniles. I have tried numerous cases, both jury trials and trials before a judge alone. I have come to learn that the cases I handle are not just a set of facts and pieces of evidence, but are each a unique set of circumstances that greatly impact the lives of the people involved. I have a great deal of experience working with people who are dealing with some of the most dif cult times of their lives, both victims and their families, as well as those accused of crimes and their families. After law school, I chose to come home to Gulf County because I wanted to give something back to the community that gave me so much growing up. Countless citizens, not only took an interest in my life and where I was going and how I was doing, they actively participated in it and gave of themselves to help me. I want to be your County Judge because I believe that I am the right person at the right time to serve the people of Gulf County in that capacity. I believe that it is time for new leaders to step forward in Gulf County and be servants of the people. If elected Judge I promise to be open, accessible, and accountable to the people. I promise to uphold the law and treat every litigant with the dignity and respect that they deserve. I have the strength, courage, and integrity to the right thing, even when it may not be the popular thing. Most of all, I promise to treat every person equally and be a Judge for all of Gulf County. PATTERSON from page A1

PAGE 13

COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, April 5, 2012 Star Staff Report Spring is in the air along the Forgotten Coast. The Salt Air Farmers Market begins its fourth year this Saturday, April 7, providing Port St. Joe and surrounding areas fresh produce, home-baked breads, jams, fresh seafood, our local Tupelo Honey and a variety of knickknacks from local artists and craftsmen. Supported by the Small Farms Program at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, and headed by Dr. Jennifer Taylor, the Salt Air Farmers Market is a true grassroots, community effort. As a result of Taylors guidance, the Salt Air Market draws both local and regional farmers. The Salt Air farmers from North Florida and South Georgia bring in seasonal fruits and vegetables. Longtime member, Dorothy and Willard Barnhart of Barnhart Farms, were recently named the 2011 Jefferson County Outstanding Farm Family of the Year. The Barnhart family owns about 162 acres in various parts of Jefferson County and harvests about 50 chemical free acres at a time. Planting from seeds, the family rotates crops according to need. Some of the crops that the Barnharts raise include: broccoli, collard greens, turnips, tomatoes, carrots, zucchini, squash, various peppers, spinach, Red Russian kale and two types of okra. B&H Farms of Pelham grows organic tomatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, peppers, squash, greens, lettuce and herbs. B&H also offers home-baked pies and quiche. At the market, our own Indian Pass Nursery specializes in native and hard-tond heirloom tomatoes. The Salt Air Farmers Market offers a venue for local artists to show off handcrafted soaps, unique tie dye garments, hand painted glassware, jewelry, shell art and more. Fresh coffee is donated by No Name Caf Books and More and is sold along with Lorindas delicious homemade breads jams and chow-chow. As a result of the market, City Commons Park downtown Port St. Joe where the market is held, was redesigned and upgraded through city and county funding, community effort, grants and the team at our local Redevelopment Agency. It is now a beautiful and welcoming park, complete with a monument to the paper mill workers of Port St. Joe. The Salt Air Famers Market has built a pavilion that has become the focal point of City Commons Park. To encourage community involvement, the market offers free tables at every market for the use of local non-pro t organizations; PTAs, Softball Teams, Churches, Scouts, etc. are invited to join us at each market. This year the Salt Air Farmers Market has partnered with From the Heart of Sopchoppy recording studio will be offering live entertainment by Mimi Hearn at the opening market on April 7. Some portions of the market will be lmed for an episode of From the Heart Music Hour to be broadcast on WFSU at a later date. The Salt Air Farmers Market is held on the rst and third Saturday of every month April though November at the corner of Reid Avenue and State Highway 71 in Port St. Joe from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. You can also visit the web site at www. saltairmarket.com or follow the Salt Air Farmers Market on Facebook. Salt Air Farmers Market returns Saturday Star Staff Report The Junior Service League of Port St. Joe will hold its annual Easter Egg Hunt beginning at 10 a.m. ET Saturday at the Eighth Street Park in Port St. Joe. In addition to the funlled hunt, children will meet and have a photo opportunity with the Easter Bunny, as well as enjoying making crafts. All kids ages 10 and under are welcome to attend the event; admission is free. And for the adults, dont forget to bring the cameras! The Junior Service League is an organization of resident women whose goal is to bene t Gulf County children. The Easter Egg Hunt is just one of many programs the League sponsors throughout the year. Every contribution to the Junior Service League is used to promote the welfare and bene t of children with needs in our community. For more information about the Easter Egg Hunt, please contact Lindsay Fisher at 706654-6313 or lindsayeliz sher@ gmail.com or The Junior Service League, P.O. Box 114, Port St. Joe, FL 32457, jslpsj@gmail.com. JSL Easter egg hunt Saturday By BEVERLY MOUNT-DOUDS Special to The Star Editors note: This is the second of a series of articles about some of the historical gures that made Gulf County. This story starts with a letter from Georges son, Ned Patton. Ned was in his 90s when he wrote me and told me this story, and these were his words: Bear Hunting in Port St. Joe By Ned A. Patton This story needs an introduction to be believable. My father was George A. Patton Jr. and he was a bear hunter by choice. At age 73 (in 1945), my father related several of his many, many hunting stories to a Mr. Jacobs, a writer for The Florida Sportsman. Mr. Jacobs article was published a short time later, and a copy of that issue has survived in our family records. In the article, there are several of my dads favorite stories. One story includes a lost timber wolf, another story is about a big bob cat; both happen to have occurred on the San Blas Peninsula. In writing the article, Mr. Jacob refers to yet another bear story which started on that same peninsula. He says he hopes to write that story another time. Dad died about three years later. The story apparently was never written. As I happen to participate in that hunt, Im going to try and tell this bear story. I must have been 13 or 14 years old at the time. We were living on a small farm near Port St. Joe, actually on the site of the old City of St. Joseph (now Oak Grove, formerly know as Patton Place.) From time to time, farmers, dairymen or bee keepers would have a bear attack their livestock and make off with a pig or calf. Needless to say, this was a serious lost for the owner. The likelihood of a repeat visit was high. That was the basis for a message from a pig farmer begging for help. Early next morning, my dad loaded the dogs and me in our pick-up truck and headed for Cape San Blas. Two hunting friends and an extra horse had left earlier on horseback to meet us at the site. It was a hot day in June probably about 1925. The bear had a 24 hour headstart and we had no idea where he had gone after stealing the pig. That was for the dogs to nd out. After scouting around for a bit, the dogs and horsemen soon found the bear heading for the San Blas Peninsula. The narrow sliver of land extends about 15 miles and forms St. Joseph Bay. There are no roads, little vegetation and hot! The chase to catch up with the bear consumed most of the day. The dogs were getting very tired and my dad concluded we must halt at Eagle Pass and plan to come back the next day. With one hunter prepared to spend the night, he would build several small res with driftwood to keep the bear from escaping the trap we had him in. The rest GEORGE A. PATTON: A TRUE FLORIDA SPORTSMAN PART II Florida Pioneers: a tribute to the many families of Gulf County is free. And for the adults, dont forget to bring the cameras! The Junior Service League organization of resident women whose goal is to bene t Gulf County children. Easter Hunt is just one of many programs the League sponsors to downtown Port St. Joe Friday Cruise in By TIM CROFT 227-72827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Port St. Joe Downtown Merchants Committee has a suggestion for this Friday evening: Cruise into downtown and check out the cars. From 5-8 p.m. ET this Friday the rst Friday of the month, establishing a summer-long cruising strip the Merchants Committee will host a car show. The lineup will take place on Second Street between U.S. 98 and Reid Avenue, with the hope that interest from the public and the passion of gear heads will force the expansion of the show further into downtown. It is to draw people to downtown and hopefully to the stores and restaurants in the downtown area, said Dana Boyer, chairperson for the rst Cruise in to Port St. Joe. And you meet such a variety of people from all walks of life at one of these car shows. (Husband) George and I did a lot of research. We went to a lot of shows and that was the most interesting and fun thing to me; the diversity and passion (car owners) have for their cars. The show will attract everything from muscle cars to antiques, along with what Jim Muldoon of Mexico Beach called joke cars, such as his vintage, incredibly well-kept 1988 Yugo, widely considered by car enthusiasts to have been the Edsel on steroids of its day a bomb. PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOHN PARKER See PIONEERS B5 See CRUISE IN B5

PAGE 14

B2 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 As the spring growing season begins, its important to get a watering program established for your lawn grass. As we all know, water is essential for an attractive, healthy lawn. During the time of year when Florida doesnt receive much rainfall, its necessary to supplement the water requirement of your lawn grass with an effective watering program. Florida usually gets a lot of rainfall each year, so it might not seem a lack of water could become a serious problem for your lawn grass. But remember Florida soils are quite sandy, for the most part, do not hold water very long. Also, during the very hot days of summer, water quickly is lost from the soil. So, to keep your grass lush and green, you need to have some kind of watering program for your lawn. Basically, the watering program contains three factors: Determining when to water, the amount of water to apply and the method of applying water; well consider each of these in some detail. There are several ways you can tell when your lawn needs water. If you notice spots in the lawn which rst look bluish-grass in color, and then, turn brown, water is needed. Another way to tell if the lawn needs water is to see if footprints remain, in the grass for a long time after the lawn has been walked on. A wellwatered lawn can withstand a normal amount of traf c without leaving prints in the grass. Still another way is to take a soil sample from the root zone of the grass. If it feels dry and crumbly, water is needed. Certain cultural practices tend to go along with a need for water. High temperatures and strong winds will cause plants to lose water faster than they can absorb it. When your lawn shows signs of needing water, water it immediately. A delay might cause permanent damage to your lawn. How much water to apply depends on how much water is already present in the soil, and on the soils ability to hold water. You want to wet the entire root zone, but not saturate the soil. A general rule for watering you lawn is to apply from one-half to one inch of water which means about 300 to 600 gallons of water for a thousand square feet of grass. During the winter, you can water about once per week. In the summer, however, the lawn might need water as often as three times a week. Keep in mind this is a general rule. All soils are different, so you might have to adjust these amounts of water for your particular lawn. To correctly apply water, avoid extremes. Light, frequent waterings are inef cient and produce shallow root systems. Too much water, however, also is harmful to the grass because it keeps the root zone constantly saturated. Roots need air as well as water to function properly. Too much water decreases their growth. Never allow the water to run at a faster rate than it can be absorbed by the soil. The excess only will run off and be wasted. The time to water also is important. If possible, try to water your lawn early in the morning. Avoid night watering since this might encourage lawn diseases. Only water during the hottest part of the day when it is necessary to cool the lawn to prevent heat damage. For more information on watering your lawn, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 2292909 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas.u .edu. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Service is what we sell. Check our prices before you buy! www.lightingbylavonne.com Check our prices before you buy! Service is what we sell. 50% 75% OFF! Lighting & Ceiling F ans 3631 Hwy 231, Panama City F L 850-769-1232 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Society SPECIAL TO THE STAR Linda Fisher of Sanford, Mich., is the winner of a raf e for a two-night, three-day stay in the renovated Keepers Cottage at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse during the Florida Lighthouse Challenge April 2122.The drawing was held last Friday as Meloney Douds, left, and tour guide Frank Perry did the honors of drawing the winning ticket at the Lighthouse Gift Shop. The Lighthouse Lady, Beverly Mount-Douds, thanks everyone who donated and said to Linda Fisher, Congratulations, and see you on April 20 for check in. Mr. and Mrs. John Howard Lovett, of Panama City, announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter Valerie Frances to Douglas Blair Sale, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Julien Sale of Panama City. The bride-elect is the paternal granddaughter of Mrs. Joel Byron Lovett, of Port St. Joe, and the late Mr. Joel Byron Lovett. She is the maternal granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Dykes Webb, of Chipley. Her anc is the paternal grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davis Sale, of Panama City and the maternal grandson of Mrs. James Fuller Holly, of Orlando, and the late Dr. James Fuller Holly. Ms. Lovett is a graduate of Chipley High School and the University of Florida. She is employed by the Bay County Board of County Commissioners as the public information of cer. Her anc is a graduate of Rutherford High School and of Washington and Lee University. He is employed by Landrum Professional as a business development manager. A May wedding is planned. There will be a bene t yard sale Saturday morning, in front of Bluewater Realty in the Port City Shopping Center in Port St. Joe. All donations are appreciated. Please come out to show your support. All proceeds will bene t the family of Lisa Turman. Donations may also be made to a Benevolent Account No.1968696 in Tyndall Federal Credit Union in Port St. Joe. ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Know the best ways to water your lawn Valerie Lovett, Douglas Sale engaged SPECIAL TO THE STAR Bene t yard sale Saturday MICHIGAN RESIDENT WINS LIGHTHOUSE RAFFLE Special to The Star American Legion Post 116 of Port St. Joe will hold a bene t sh fry from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. EDT ( or until all the sh is gone) tomorrow, Good Friday. This event will take place at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. Along with sh locally caught, cleaned and fried by our members, there will be baked beans, coleslaw and hush puppies. Soft drinks and water will be available. A $6 donation will be used by the Legion to support various community projects. Tickets can be purchased in advanced or at the park the day of the event. For more information, call 227-3776. Legion Post 116 will also have a representative there with information regarding joining our Post. Interested veterans can also go to www.legion.org. American Legion bene t sh fry, membership drive

PAGE 15

The Star| B3 Thursday, April 5, 2012 Everyone is invited to our Call: 229-LIFE (5433) for more info Easter Service Easter Service APR IL 8, 10:30 AM in the PSJ Elementary School Auditorium Special music featuring: Lisa Keels, Ralph Barwick & Austin Clayton KID S : Church in the Gym, special visit from Mr. Hare and ... Egg hunt after the service! He died for all. so all are welcome! School News By Chad Quinn General Information Prom is scheduled for Saturday, April 21. The prom theme this year is Viva Las Vegas. The prom will begin at 8 p.m., the Senior Walk will be at 11:30 p.m., and the prom will be over at midnight. This year, several parents are hosting an After the Prom party, which will take place in the Centennial Building immediately following the dance. Coach Gannon is selling last years white game jersey for $40; white-and-purple game jerseys from 2010-2011 for $20; and white (No Pain No Gain) T-shirts for $10. See Mrs. Taylor in the school of ce to purchase one of these. Lady Tiger Shark Volleyball Camp The Port St Joe High School Lady Tiger Sharks will host a volleyball camp for younger girls. The camp is designed to allow players to learn the fundamentals of bump passing, overhead passing, and serving. Campers will learn from the Port St. Joe High School coaching staff and players how playing and competing the right way is always fun. The camp is designed for girls going into the fourth grade through eighth grade in the fall of 2012. The camp will be held at the PSJ High School gymnasium. We will have stations for the young players to rotate through and nish the day on Friday with an afternoon tournament. We will provide snacks and drinks on Monday through Thursday plus on Friday we will have a pizza lunch. After lunch on Friday, we will play as many games as we can before 3 p.m. ET. What to bring: Your own kneepads. Water, snacks, volleyballs, etc. will be provided When: MondayThursday, June 4-7, 9 a.m. until noon ET. Friday, June 8, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET Fee: $35 Deadline for Registration: May 15 Please register early so we can order T-shirts for the girls. Registration forms are available in the high school front of ce or online at http://psjhs-gcs.schoolloop.com/ and check the news section of the main page. For more information, contact Coach Taylor at 229-8251 or by e-mail at wtaylor@ gulf.k12. .us (email is the best way to contact me). Congratulations to the following cadets who earned recognition for their outstanding work in the Community from the Tupelo Lodge No. 289 Free and Accepted Masons of Florida at the lodges Salute to America Dinner on March 26: C/ LeAnna Collins, C/ Javarri Beachum, C/ Ryan Baker, C/ Tyler McGuf n. April 9: Holiday School Closed All Day April 10: FCAT Reading Retakes at 8 a.m. April 11: FCAT Reading Retakes at noon. April 12: FCAT Math retakes at 8 a.m. Clubs April 5: 11:50 a.m., Junior Executive Board Meeting April 10: 10:45 a.m., SWAT meeting Jr. High; 11:50 a.m., National Honor Society April 11: 2 p.m., SGA Elections7th period April 12: 11:50 a.m. Junior Executive Board Meeting Sports Spring football begins May 1. You must have a physical before this date and check in with Coach Gannon to get all equipment. You must have a parent consent form signed. April 5: 6 p.m., Softball at home vs. Larue County, Ky., (varsity only) Time TBA April 6: 7 p.m., baseball, varsity only at Blountstown April 10: 7 p.m. softball at Rutherford (varsity only) April 10: 7 p.m. baseball (varsity only) at home vs. Liberty County Special to The Star Wewahitchka Elementary School Media Specialist Kim Ludlam hosted a Family Night at the Book Fair on Thursday, March 29. We were happy to welcome childrens book author Ronda Friend for a full day of activities with our students and a special presentation for parents that evening. Many parents, grandparents, staff and students enjoyed the night of fun lled reading and wonderful snacks provided by the Wewahitchka Womans Club. Pre-Kindergarten: Kate Fidler (not pictured); Kindergarten: Landon Lee; First grade: Prince Jones; Second grade: Amari Nickson; Third grade:Clay Fox; Fourth grade: Sara Whit eld; Fifth grade: Cole Haddock (not pictured); and Sixth grade: Lauren Hall. Bus Riders of the Week: Pete Bernal, Alyson Sheppard and Layny Longley. Star Staff Report There will be a Digital Photo Presentation course offered from 9-11 a.m. EDT on four consecutive Wednesdays, April 11, April 18, April 25 and May 2 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College. The fee for the course is $45.Register at the Gulf/ Franklin campus in Port St. Joe prior to the rst class, April 11. Students will experience the bene ts of using digital photos along with the computer in order to share moments in color and with text. This course will teach how to use Microsoft PowerPoint and bring your photography and photo editing to life. Present memories with captions and bullet-point text to enhance your photography experience. You will be able to create slideshows and digital scrapbook. Team taught, by two of your favorite Education Encore instructors, Lana Scroggins with her enthusiastic expertise in computers and gadgets and Sue Bull, experienced in photography and photo editing, at Gulf Coast State College. Come learn how to create, edit and share your digital photo slideshows in the world of computing. For more information contact susanbull@ bellsouth.net, lws@ mindspring.com, jbarr@ gulfcoast.edu or call Jim Barr at 873-3513. Digital photo course at Gulf, Franklin FAMILY NIGHT AT WES BOOK FAIR DAZZLING DOLPHINS

PAGE 16

FAITH Page B4 www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) First Baptist Church of Mexico Beach 823 N. 15th St. Good Friday Service April 6th at 12 noon, at 6pm the movie Passion of the Christ Sunday Sonrise Service on the beach April 8th at 6am, at the Sea St ramp off of higway 98 in Mexico Beach (bring blanket and lawn chair) Serving free breakfast after Sonrise Service. More Info Contact Pastor Eddie @ 850-340-0921 COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 SAVE THE DATE SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 2012 HOWARD CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH COVERED DISH & GOSPEL SING WITH NAOMI & THE SEGOS Howard Creek Baptist Church A Place of Grace Sunday School ........................... 9:45 am (EST) Sunday Morning Worship ........ 11:00 am (EST) Wednesday Evening Worship .... 6:00 pm (EST) April 5th Maundy Thurs. 7 p.m. Communion Service April 6th Good Friday, 7 p.m. Tenebrae Service April 8th, Easter Sunday, 8 a.m. Sunset Park 9:30 A M BR EA K FAST ON E ASTE R SUND A Y 11 a.m. Communion Service 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL (850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Thursday, April 5, 2012 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. Special to The Star There will be an Easter Sunrise Service at 7:30 a.m. ET at Frank Pate Park on April 8. This is an ecumenical service sponsored by the Port St. Joe Ministerial Association. The sermon this year will be given by Vicki Summers of Highland View Church of God. Passion Week at Victory Temple Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church Seasoned Women Department will be hosting Passion Week at 7:30 p.m. ET nightly April 2-6. Speakers are as follows: Monday, Pastor W. Williams from Body of Christ Jesus Church; Tuesday, Pastor J. Jenkins, Jr. from New Life Christian Center; Wednesday, Pastor C. Gathers from Victory Temple; Thursday, Pastor A. Rutherford from Family Life Church; and Friday, Pastor Clark from New Bethel AME Church. Everyone is cordially invited to attend the service. Its not about use, but its about Jesus. Come and be blessed. Lifetree Caf open in Mexico Beach Lifetree Caf is now open in Mexico Beach across from the El Governor Motel. Simply put, Lifetree Caf is a conversation caf a place and time for people to gather weekly to experience stories and talk about thought-provoking topics relating to life and faith. The conversation group meets every Monday at 7 p.m. CT. Lifetree Caf is also open every Saturday morning for free coffee and relaxing conversation. Everyone is welcome. Lifetree Caf is organized in conjunction with Living Water Church at the Beach. Starting in April, Living Water Church at the Beach will have service every Sunday at 8 a.m. CT on the beach at Sunset Park in Mexico Beach. For more information visit livingwateratthebeach.com/ or contact Pastor Ted Richter at 890-1424. Dont just celebrate Easter, experience it! Easter: Its the greatest story ever told, and this year at Highland View Assembly of God it comes to life with the Thorn Easter Experience! Experience an Easter service like no other featuring realistic videos of the Easter story, live dramas and beautiful and inspiring music. Join us at 10:30 a.m. ET on Easter Sunday, April 8. Your family will enjoy a friendly, relaxed atmosphere, free refreshments and an Easter Egg hunt for the kids. For more information, call 2297161 and find us on Facebook! St. Johns collecting items for needy St. Johns Episcopal Church in Wewahitchka is collecting gently used clothing, household items, furniture, working appliances, etc. These donations will be stored at the church for needy families and for the semi-annual church yard sales with proceeds going to charity. Drop off is at 233 E. Osceola Ave. Call Martha at 639-5924. Leave items on porch if no one is home. A free program of World War II songs will be held Sunday, April 22 at 7 p.m. ET in the Fellowship Hall of the First United Methodist Church at 1001 Constitution Drive in Port St. Joe. The public is invited to attend. Trudy Strand, director of the choral group, said that the evening is designed to be a fun fest and renew memories of WWII-era songs for those who identify with and/or appreciate them. The audience is invited to sing and dance along if desired. The program will be presented by members and friends of the church choir. Light refreshments will be served as part of the approximately one-hour program. The choral group will also perform the program, on another date, for the residents of The Bridge in Port St. Joe. If Jesus is your savior, lets Honor him today. Our mission as a Christian is to show the lost the way. His mission on earth was to die for us all. Lately He has sent a message or two, but not all are getting His call. Since His is our mission too, we need to step up the pace. Lets tell more people about Jesus and His amazing grace. The way to heaven begins at the front of the cross. Only the blood of Jesus could ever pay the cost. Accept His grace today and heaven will be swell. If you keep turning down His grace, prepare yourself for hell. Billy Johnson Faith BRIEFS WWII Songfest set for April 22 Easter sunrise service A Christians mission

PAGE 17

Local The Star| B5 Thursday, April 5, 2012 Lisa was born Oct. 3, 1960, in Collins, Miss., to the late D.M. and Lora Robertson and passed away Sunday, March 25, 2012, at Bay Medical in Panama City following a short illness. She lived in Port St. Joe, Fla., for six years with her husband, James, and their daughters, Lora and Amber. She was employed at Durens Piggly Wiggly from 2008 until her disability. Lisas perfect day consisted of spending the day walking on the beach with her family and two dogs. In addition to her immediate family, Lisa is survived by two sisters, Claudia Doggett from Eastabuchie, Miss., and Charlotte Rogers from Decatur, Texas; two brothers, Tom and Mark Robertson, from Seminary, Miss.; and numerous other family members and friends. She was loved and well respected by all who had the pleasure of knowing her and will be greatly missed. A memorial service was on St. Joe Beach on Saturday, March 31 at 7-7:30 p.m. EDT. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to The American Cancer Society in her name or to a Benevolent Account No. 1968696 in Tyndall Federal Credit Union. Lisa Robertson Williams Turman John Jack Russell Schweizer, 80, of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed away at 11 a.m. Tuesday, March 27, 2012, at Blanchard Valley Hospital, Findlay. Mr. Schweizer was born in St. Paul, Minn., on July 17, 1931, to the late Myron and Louise Schweizer. He is survived by his spouse, Peggy, whom he married Oct. 16, 1954. Also surviving are his children, Stephanie Brokamp of Findlay, Ohio, and David Schweizer of Tampa, Fla.; grandchildren Nicholas (Molly) Coale of Upper Arlington, Ohio; Lucas Coale, and Mitchell Coale; Katie (Tom) Martin of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Steve (Erika and Evan) Brokamp of Findlay; greatgranddaughter Alexandria Coale (Nick & Molly) of Upper Arlington, Ohio; surviving siblings are brother, Al Schweizer (Kris) of St. Paul, Minn. and sister, Mary Lou Miner (Jim) of Northeld, Minn. John also has two surviving sisters-inlaw, Julie Schweizer and Joanne Schweizer. He is also survived by numerous nieces and nephews. John proudly served in the United States Air Force as a pilot from 1951-1971. He received numerous awards and decorations, including multiple Air Medals with oak leaf clusters and two Distinguished Flying Crosses with Oak Leaf Clusters. Upon his retirement from the Air Force, he had a successful career in the telecommunications industry, retiring in 1991 as President of American Paging, Inc. John also served as an international consultant in the industry until 1999. A memorial service was held at St. Michaels Catholic Church, 750 Bright Road, in Findlay, Ohio, on Friday, March 30, along with a Military Honors ceremony. The Schweizer family wishes to acknowledge and thank the doctors and nurses who cared for John at Blanchard Valley Hospital. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations to the Wounded Warrior Project c/o Southwest Caging, 5342 N.W. 25th St., Topeka, KS 66616 or woundedwarriorproject. org. Online condolences to the family may be made via www.kirkpatrickbehnke. com. John Schweizer JOHN SCHWEIZER When Christ shall come with shout of acclamation And take me homewhat joy shall ll my heart! Then I shall bow in humble adoration And there proclaim, my God, How Great Thou Art! Mother Ruth Skanes Lowery was born to Elder Shephard and Laura Skanes July 9, 1929, in Birmingham, Ala. She was the fourth of 13 children. Mother Lowery confessed Christ at an early age and was a member of Smitheld Church of God In Christ in Birmingham under the leadership of Elder Shephard Skanes. She was educated in the Birmingham Public Schools. She relocated to Port St. Joe, Fla., and married her beloved husband of 37 years, Bradley Thomas Lowery Sr. She retired from Bay St. Joseph Rehabilitation Center after 10 years of service. Mother Lowery was a good and faithful member and servant of the Port St. Joe Church of God In Christ under the leadership of Elder O. T. Stallworth and presently, Superintendent David Woods Jr. Waiting for her at the portals of Heaven are her husband, Bradley T. Lowery Sr.; three of her dear children, Michael Lowery, Linda Gail Myers and Bradley T. Lowery Jr.; and parents, Elder Shephard and Laura Skanes. Mother Ruth Skanes Lowery leaves precious memories with her loving family; devoted daughters, Carolyn Horne (Clarence) of Titusville, Fla., Gwendolyn Lowery of Port St. Joe, Sandra Bryant (Robert) and Elaine Lowery of Orlando; also cherishing her memories are a godson, Henry Hogue of Port St. Joe; a sister, Betty Hudson of San Diego, Calif.; a brother, William Ralph Skanes (Josie) of Birmingham, Ala.; 25 grandchildren, a host of great-grandchildren, a very special nephew/son, Pastor Robert Lowery Jr.; and many more relatives and friends, especially lifelong friends, Mother Annie Stallworth and Mother Rita Stephens. Return unto thy rest, O my soul; for the Lord hath dealt bountifully with thee (Psalm 116:7). All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Ruth Lowery Pearl Foster, 72, of Wewahitchka, passed away Thursday, March 29, 2012, at the home of her youngest daughter in Niceville, Fla.a. She was born July 25, 1939, to Cecil and Sallie Glass in Wewahitchka, Fla.a, where she lived all of her life. Pearl was preceded in death by her husband, Charles E. Charlie Foster; parents, Cecil and Sallie Glass; sisters Sallie Mae Werden and Ina Culpan; brothers, Preacher Glass, Kenneth Glass, Junior Glass and Johnny Glass. She is survived by her ve children, Shelia Scott (husband Charles) of Panama City, Fla., Mike Chumney (wife Linda Jo) of Wewahitchka, Fla., Cecil Chumney of Panama City, Fla., Tina Chumney of Wewahitchka, Fla., and Rhonda Faulk (husband Greg) of Niceville, Fla.; two stepdaughters, Donna Roberts (husband David) of Wewahitchka, Fla. and Rannie Tucker (husband Dannie) of Amelia Island, Fla.; three sisters, Louise Keith, Kathryn Oliver and Betty Ruth Williams all of Wewahitchka, Fla.; two brothers, Joe Glass (wife Marlece) of Colorado Springs, Colo., and James Glass (wife Doris) of Blountstown, Fla.; 14 grandchildren, Melissa Dickens, Kayla Bailey (husband Chad), Shanell Chumney, Cameron Jones, Shannon Jones, Faith Jones, Austin Chumney, Sean Roberts and Chad Roberts, all of Wewahitchka, Fla., and Donald Dickens and Maleah Scott of Panama City, Fla., Kavan Faulk and Joey Faulk of Niceville, Fla., and Sherry Pippin of Georgia; two greatgrandchildren, Ashlyn Ake and Cole Bailey, both of Wewahitchka, Fla. Funeral services were held Saturday, March 31, at First Pentecostal Church of Wewahitchka at 10 a.m. Burial followed in Roberts Cemetery. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home Wewahitchka Branch Chapel. Pearl Foster Obituaries of us loaded up and headed home for the night. After a nights rest, we were up early the next morning to return to the San Blas Peninsula and catch our trapped bear. Suddenly, the phone rang and someone informed us a bear had just been seen to swimming ashore in downtown Port St. Joe. That is an eight mile swim for a tired bear, but he did it. Thus began a bear hunt in the city of Port St. Joe. The bears trip to the nearby swamp behind the city was well observed, and we soon had the dogs on his fresh trail. Within a short time, about half the people in the town had joined the hunt. There were two roads which crosses the swamp area. The bear and the dogs were between the two crossings. The spectators collected at these roads to get a good look at the bear when he tired to escape. Some were intent on shooting the bear. There were all kinds of weapons in evidence and there was concern that someone other than the bear might get hurt. However, the bear was too smart to leave the heavy cover of the swamp. He, with the dogs in hot pursuit, circled back and forth between the road crossings for an hour or two. Nobody got a glimpse of the bear. But it was exciting to see the bushes shaking and know the bear was that close. Finally, the bear gave up the chase and climbed a tree to escape the dogs. My Dad soon joined the dogs and used his trusty 30-30 rie to end his crime career. There were plenty of volunteers to get the bear out of the swamp and put it on display at the downtown drug store (Smiths Drug Store). Everybody had a close up look and many had their picture taken standing next to him. The dogs and us bear hunters were very glad it was over. None of us have forgotten, and still sort of admire, the bear that swam the Bay. Next week, in my last story of the Pattons Ill tell you all about Mrs. Edna Patton, who contributed her energies and talents in the garden club and the beautication of our fair city. Muldoon was among the local acionados who provided fuel for the concept from the Merchants Committee and Boyer. Boyer noted that there are many passionate car lovers in the area and rather than take their precious machines over to Panama City or some other destination for the nearest car show, a short trip to Port St. Joe to share the passion was sufficient. There is a fraternal feel when the gear heads come to town. To come over this way is neat, Muldoon said, Boyer adding that local drivers were all eager to help and chip in. The aim for downtown merchants is a chance to draw those who might not have visited downtown recently, but also to raise awareness of the offerings in downtown. Just listening to these guys, I never met a guy who didnt love cars, said Darren McDaniels of Steamers and the Downtown Merchants Committee. Its a great draw. Whether you are talking about a 16-year-old or an 85year-old, there is that commonality. Folks that dont normally come to downtown will come for something like this. As if speaking about stray cats, Bob Faliski, a glint in his eyes, said his eet of nearly a dozen automobiles have, just kind of followed me home, they just turned up. Raised on a farm, Faliski had to learn to handle machinery and drive at an early age, or else hear about it, in strong terms, from his father. He and his wife, Jean, have been collecting throughout their long marriage and Bob inched when asked about giving up any of his strays that followed him home. The Faliskis cars range from a 1929 Ford Model A to a 1955 Chevy to the last model year for the Buick Riviera, 1999, a model which had just 2,000 roll off the assembly line. I still work on em, but as you get older its gets tougher to get down there under them, Faliski said. (Collecting cars) is a part of history for one thing. Its like collecting stamps only with cars its more money and more work. Faliski also bemoaned the modern cars, which, for him, literally pale in comparison to the cars of the 1950s and s. Those were happy cars, Faliski said. Those were bright and they were happy. Today it is as if the car makers have a monopoly on all the gray paint in the world. Cars are so drab now. Muldoon said he got the car bug as a teenage and it has never left him. Though he has winnowed a once larger collection to three, including the white clean-as-a-whistle Yugo, he remains bitten. Theyre nice to play with, fun to have, Muldoon said. And they are good garage furniture. CRUISE IN from page B1 PIONEERS from page B1 COU RT E S Y O F F L O R IDA S T A T E AR CHIVE S George Patton at left during a shing trip.

PAGE 18

Local B6 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 B6 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 86709S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Gulf Group Properties, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 1400 Application No. 2012 -03 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 06274-275R Description of Property:Lot 86679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2010-CA-000180 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ARMANDO PENTON A/K/A ARMANDO V. PENTON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ARMANDO PENTON A/K/A ARMANDO V. PENTON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 20, 2012 and Final Judgment dated June 21, 2011, entered in Civil Case No.: 23-2010-CA-000180, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is Plaintiff, and ARMANDO PENTON A/K/A ARMANDO V. PENTON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ARMANDO PENTON A/K/A ARMANDO V. PENTON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendants. REBECCA L. NORRIS, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., E.T., held at the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL. 32426 on the 19th day of April, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, LAGOON VISTA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE(S) 5, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 21, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 (954) 354-3544 (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Email: ADAReyuest@judl4.flcourts.or g, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days: if you are hearing or voice impaired call 711. March 29, April 5, 2012 86655S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1112-13 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: (A) Sale of three (3) 2007 Mack Dump Trucks Model CTP713B (B) Sale of one (1) 1991 Caterpillar Bulldozer Model D4HLGP Proposals must be turned in to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Thursday, April 5, 2012. Interested parties should contact Public Works Director Bobby Knee for additional information at (850) 227-1401. Equipment may be viewed by appointment only Monday-Thursday 7:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m., E.T. by calling (850) 227-1401. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME OR YOUR NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Bids will be opened at the above location on Monday, April 9, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Attest: BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS /s/Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ William C. Williams, III, Chairman March 29, April 5, 2012 86257S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 959 Application No. 2012 -04 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 R.E. No. 03801-053R Description of Property:A parcel of land lying and being in Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCING at the Southeast Corner of Lot 5, Block B Integras Rehabilitation Phase II, a Subdivision, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida (Point also being on the North Right of Way Line of Kaelyn Lane, as recorded in Official Records Book 287, Page 918, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida) and run thence North 89 Degrees 48 Minutes 25 Seconds East, along said North Right of Way Line, for a distance of 324.53 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 11 Minutes 35 Seconds West, along the West Right of Way Line of said Kaelyn Lane, for a distance of 85.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence leaving said West Right of Way Line, run South 89 Degrees 48 Minutes 25 Seconds West, for a distance of 237.00 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds West, for a distance of 156.89 feet; thence North 18 Degrees 11 Minutes 20 Seconds East, for a distance of 28.00 feet; thence North 09 Degrees 13 Minutes 48 Seconds East, for a distance of 58.42 feet; thence North 70 Degrees 25 Minutes 07 Seconds East, for a distance of 42.04 feet; thence North 23 Degrees 02 Minutes 43 Seconds East, for a distance of 42.69 feet; thence North 76 Degrees 09 Minutes 48 Seconds East, for a distance of 53.61 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 22 Minutes 04 Seconds East, for a distance of 58.06 feet; thence North 87 Degrees 36 Minutes 25 Seconds East, for a distance of 47.42 feet; thence South 65 Degrees 00 Minutes 23 Seconds East, for a distance of 33.09 feet; thence South 00 Degrees 11 Minutes 35 Seconds East, for a distance of 43.26 feet to a point on the aforesaid Right of Way Line of Kaelyn Lane; point being on a non tangent curve, concave to the East, thence Southerly along said Right of Way Line and Curve, with a radius of 50.00 feet, through a central angle of 168 Degrees 27 Minutes 47 Seconds, for an arc distance of 147.01 feet (Chord of said Arc being South 05 Degrees 34 Minutes 32 Seconds West, 99.49 feet); thence South 00 Degrees 11 Minutes 35 Seconds East, along the West Right of Way Line of said Kaelyn Lane, for a distance of 192.32 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 1.569 acres, more or less. (LEGAL DESCRIPTION AS RECORDED IN O. R. BOOK 516, PAGE 957, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA). Name in which assessed: Integras Therapy & Wellness Ctrs, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 25th day ofApril, 2012. Dated this 20th day of March, 2012 REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk March 22, 29, April, 5, 12, 2012 86707 PUBLIC NOTICE Gulf County BOCC/ Tourist Development Council Request for Proposals/ RFP # 1112-14 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners/ Tourist Development Council will receive proposals from any qualified person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: TV PRODUCTION Gulf County BOCC/ Tourism Development Council is accepting proposals to produce a new TV ad campaign to consist of 1) brand and 1) donut TV spot to promote the area on networks including, but not limited to: Panama City, FL, Tallahassee, FL, Nashville, TN, and Atlanta, GA. Gulf County TDC is looking for regional firms which could assist in the creative concept, script development, filming, editing and final production of 1) Brand Spot and 1) Donut Spot, both :30 seconds in length. Please place YOUR COMPANY NAME, SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER on the outside of your envelope, and provide three copies of your proposal. Bids must be submitted to, and specifications may be obtained from, the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 by 4:30 p.m., E.T. on Friday, April 13, 2012. Bids will be opened at this same location on Monday, April 16, 2012, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Specifications may also be viewed at www. gulfcounty-fl.gov. Any questions concerning this RFP must be submitted in writing no later than 11:00 am EST, on April 9, 2012 and should be directed to Kellee Novak, Assistant Director at kellee@ visitgulf.com and a copy of your correspondence to ksummers@gulfclerk. com. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ William C. Williams, III, Chairman Attest: /s/Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk April 5, 2012 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical Business Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centuraonline.com These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Trades & Services 227-7847 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction bobgilbert54@gmail.com Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 NO JOB TOO BIG PLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 joes_lawn@yahoo.com JOES LAWN CARE J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-9663 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction

PAGE 19

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, April 5, 2012 The Star | B7 See emeraldcoastjobs.com to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldn’t you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com and nd a job that makes everybody happy. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 86777S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Port St. Joe: 132 Bridgeport Ln.(Across from courthouse) Sat April 7th 8am to noonHuge 3 Family Yard Sale!You name it, it’s here!! Sweatmore Strawberry RanchOPEN MAR 22nd 8AM Weather Permitting Mon-Sat 8am-7pm Sunday 8am-5pm 850-722-4819 86769S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jerry M. Pybus Family Trust, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 244 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-05 R.E. No. 01517-033R Description of Property: COMMENCE at a St. Joe Paper Company Concrete Monument marking the Northeast Corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence North 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds West along the North boundary line of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of said Section 3, 1149.76 feet to a found 1/2” diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 6596 on the Westerly right of way boundary line of North Dianna Street (a County maintained road having a 60 foot wide right of way); thence departing the North boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter, South 03 Degrees 11 Minutes 12 Seconds West along the Westerly right of way boundary line of North Dianna Street, 204.49 feet to a found 1/2” diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 0732; thence departing said Westerly right of way boundary line, North 85 Degrees 29 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 116.74 feet to a set 1/2” diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 7556 for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 85 Degrees 29 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 180.00 feet to a found 1/2” diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 0732; thence North 04 Degrees 12 Minutes 12 Seconds East, 115.00 feet to a set 1/2” diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 7556; thence South 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds East, 180.37 feet to a set 1/2” diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 7556; thence South 04 Degrees 12 Minutes 12 Seconds West 124.61 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE 20 FOOT WIDE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER, UPON AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE at a St. Joe Paper Company Concrete Monument marking the Northeast Comer of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds West along the North boundary line of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of said Section 3,1149.76 feet to a found 1/2” diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 6596 on the Westerly right of way boundary line of North Dianna Street (a County maintained road having a 60 foot wide right of way); thence departing the North boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter, South 03 Degrees 11 Minutes 12 Seconds West along the Westerly right of way boundary line of North Dianna Street, 68.83 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South 03 Degrees 11 Minutes 12 Seconds West along said Westerly right of way boundary line, 20.02 feet; thence departing said Westerly right of way boundary line, North 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds West, 114.93 feet; thence North 04 Degrees 12 Minutes 12 Seconds East 20.04 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds East, 114.58 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: Vicki Carol Beatty All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 9th day of May, 2012. Dated this 3rd day of April, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 86767S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jerry M. Pybus Family Trust, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 580 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-07 R.E. No. 03083-400R Description of Property: Lot 40, Palm Breeze Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Charlotte M. (Rouse) Seabrooks All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 9th day of May, 2012. Dated this 3rd day of April, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 86765S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jerry M. Pybus Family Trust, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 510 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-06 R.E. No. 02684-038R Description of Property: Lot H, Sunnywood Estates Unit 2, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 17, of the Official Records of Gulf County, Florida, on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court. (SAID LOT AS SHOWN NOT INCLUDED IN PLAT). Name in which assessed: Mary Ann Jamerson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 9th day of May, 2012. Dated this 3rd day of April, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 15, in Block C, according to the Plat of Treasure Bay, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 32, in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Charles Sam Jones III and Kelly McCoy Jones All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk March 29, April 5, 12, 19, 2012 Wewahitchka, FL #00 Frank Sexton #48 Jason Lowery #96 Molly Griffen will be open for sale on April 16, 2012 at 8:30 A.M. if payments are not brought up to date. April 5, 12, 2012

PAGE 20

B8| The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373 Retail / Of ce Space143 Acklins Island Drive-Cape San Blas+/1000sf; $10 psf mod gross; high visibility on Cape San Blas Road ; available May 1st212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 219 Reid Avenue Of ce/Retail; +/-5400 sf; subdividable $7 psf mod gross (former Goodwill) 235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail;+/-800sf-1800;$14psfmod gross 407 Reid Avenue +/-905sf; move in ready; $14psf mod-grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 separate storage units availableFor Sale223 Monument Avenue Four city lots fronting Hwy 98; $375,000 407 Reid Avenue+/4988 sf: 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $349,500401 Reid Avenue+/5400 sf: Retail space; $165,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for termsLoggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details Marina Cove Lots 12, 13, & 14; $375,000 PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; $399,000 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVESThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Available Positions: Territory Sales Representative Digital Sales RepresentativeRequired Skills  Highly motivated and results driven  Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker  Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others  Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook)  Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions  Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment  Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment  Effective time management and organization skills  Excellent verbal and written communication skills  Keen attention to detail  The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience. SALES/RETENTION CLERK We are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: The News HeraldCareers 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS3 BR 2BA, UNFURNISHED HOUSE Beautiful Bay View .........................................$800 2 BR MOBILE HOME UNFURNISHED Country, Private ..............................................$600 1 BR FURNISHED CONDO Nice, Includes Utilities.....................................$910 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum ..........................$105 Plus Daily 3 BR 1 BA, FURNISHED HOUSE Monthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$850 1 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Inc Water .......................$475 2 BR 1BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ............................................................$450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAY BED Furnished, Lanark, Inc Utilities ......................$650 OFFICE SPACE Hwy 98 Frontage, Carrabelle .....$550 Plus Utilities Classifiedcan!If you re ready to move up or are j ust starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town And if you re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market s best prospects. M U L T I U N I T MULTI UNIT B U I L D I N G BUILDING Fully Occupied 5400 total sq ft Downtown Reid Ave$249,900 C a l l : Call: 8 5 0 5 2 7 2 5 6 0 850.527.2560 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 ApalachicolaSouth Side. Historic House, totally renovated, bay breezes. Approx. 2800sf. $395,000 (850) 653-5853 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot -large yard. W/D incl $650/mo + dep. 301-265-5368 White City Clean 3/2 House!2 Blk from boat ramp, quiet, long term, $650 + Dep, Call 850-270-8757.Text FL03874 to 56564 Port St. Joe -Small Furnished 1br 1ba travel trailer on private lot, 2 blocks from the beach. $100/week or $350/mo. Includes utils. Small pet okay. Call 941-720-4941 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Choice Commercial Space coming available on Reid Ave. Corner of 3rd, adjacent to Mulberry Square. Currently successful pet store. Call Patrick 850-527-6090 or Randy 251-978-2538 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Ice Machine, Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 North Florida Child Development, Inc.is seekingTeachers/Substitutes for our 0-5 year old classrooms at our Gulf County Centers Prefer a minimum of a CDA (FCCPC) Pickup Applications at the Center Or send resumes to smcgill@ oridachildren.orgDFWP/M-F/7-5/EOESouth Gulf County 153 Red sh Street Port St. Joe, FL Terri Bird, Center Manager (850) 229-6415 North Gulf County 131 West River Road Wewahitchka, FL Jana Miller, Center Manager (850) 639-6520 Install/Maint/RepairMediacomCommunicationsThe 8th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach Fl for ENTRY LEVEL Installer No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid driver’s license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, please visit our website at http://careers.mediacomcc.co m refer to job 5757. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Logistics/TransportNow HiringCaptains and MatesRetail help needed. Commission based, flexible schedule, part time. Shipwright Wood Boat builder with experience. Call (850) 274-1321 or send email augusta.west@ammfl.org. Web ID#: 34201917 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Dietary Aide EMT Med Tech Lab Tech RN Applications are available at:www weemsmemorial.com &may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34203836 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech – FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Administrative/ClericalReceptionistNeeded for busy office. Must have experience with Microsoft office. Send resume to: resume9481@yahoo.com DFW & EEO Install/Maint/RepairMediacomhas the following opening:Field AuditorCovers Tyndall AFB, Port St. Joe, Carabelle & Apalachicola FL. Inspects and audits all outside cable connections in assigned areas. Investigate leads involving illegal activities related to cable service. Base pay plus commissions. Must have a valid drivers license with a satisfactory driving record. Mediacom offers competitive pay and benefits including Medical/ Dental/Vision/401K. For immediate consideration please visit our online career center to apply at http://careers. mediacomcc.com and select job 5738. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer MFDV Food Svs/Hospitality The Port Inn & Mainstay Suites are now accepting applicationsPT Desk Service Agent FT Room Attendant PT Breakfast AttendantWeekends and holidays are required. Dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below: Make beds, make friends, make money! Inquire about benefits package. EOE, DFWP The Port Inn 501 Monument Ave, PSJ 32456 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting Applications *Full-time reservationist w/great benefits. *Part-time seasonal housecleaning inspectors. Both positions require weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 T urn to classified s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020



PAGE 1

50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com A controlled burn quickly spiraled out of control last week in Gulf County. Brian Goddin, wild re mitigation specialist for the Florida Forest Service, said the res rate of growth this early in the year could be an indicator for a violent year of res in 2012. Reported at 1:37 p.m. on Monday, March 26, the re had grown from an estimated 75 acres at 2:50 p.m. ET to more than 300 acres in only 15 minutes. By 3:35 p.m. it had reached 450 acres in size. By Monday evening, GPS mapping determined that the re had grown to more than 700 acres. We do think that this year could be potentially a pretty intense one (for wild res), Goddin said. Its only March and we had a re blow up to 700 acres. This could be a red ag for things to come. The re erupted from a controlled burn on private land in what Goddin attributes to a sudden atmospheric change, which caused the re to jump the lines or spark over the mapped control boundary. Unfortunately thats the case, Goddin said. It doesnt happen very oftenbut it was a result of an estate controlled burn, which is normally a great thing. Embers, or rebrands, can be carried by the wind up to a half mile or a mile in poor conditions. The Florida Forest Service is still investigating the speci c Thursday, APRIL 5 2012 By TIM CROFT227-72827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Time for the next step. That was the message from St. Joe Company vice president Jorge Gonzalez last week to Port of Port St. Joe Port Authority members as the partners attempt to build upon momentum from a Memorandum of Understanding to collaborate on port development. That MOU, Gonzalez said, always was intended as a template, a platform, for more formal agreements on how to develop the port of Port St. Joe. An important aspect of that partnership took shape last week as the Port Authority formally adopted a resolution expanding the master port planning footprint to include St. Joe property in particular the old paper mill site and Jetty Park, owned by the City of Port St. Joe. The Port St. Joe City Commission is expected to take up the resolution for adoption at its next regularly scheduled meeting. The next step, Gonzalez suggested, would be to formally etch the collaboration with the Port Authority through an agreement on business development at the port. The MOU (language) always contemplated going into additional agreements, Gonzalez said. One of those involves a Capital City Bank loan to the Port Authority of more than $4 million. Gonzalez said company of cials still were working on options for addressing the loan while the port is developing and anticipated providing those options at the next Port Authority meeting on April 12. Those options largely rest YEAR 74, NUMBER 25Amid nancial distress, Port Authority prepares next step with St. JoePort plans will be expandedFFS of cial: Wild re could be red ag for things to come See WILDFIRE A9 See PORT A6Special to The StarI am 32 years old and have been married to my wife Jacqueline for six years. We have two children, Colt age three, and Cooper who is one. Jacqueline is a Kindergarten teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary, where Colt also attends pre-K. My family has been a part of Gulf County for many years. My parents are Pat and Lewana Patterson who are graduates of Wewahitchka High School and currently live in Wewahitchka. My mother has been a teacher at Port St. Joe High School for the past 38 years. My grandparents are Fletcher and Jo Patterson, Patterson announces bid for county judge Special to The StarGulf County Commissioner Warren Yeager would like to take this opportunity to announce he is seeking re-election to the of ce of Gulf County Commissioner District 5. Warren is married to Jacque (Ard) Yeager and they have two children, daughter Kelli Combs (Robert) and son Ryan Yeager (Brigette) and they also have four grandsons. Yeager began public service in Gulf County more than 30 years ago when he served as president Yeager seeks re-election for District 5 BOCC See PATTERSON A12 See YEAGER A12 quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 74, NUMBER 25 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion .......................................A4-A5Letters to the Editor ...................A5Outdoors .....................................A10 Sports...........................................A11School News ................................B3Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B5Classi eds ....................................B6-B8 JARROD PATTERSON WARREN YEAGER TAR TAR By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners and representatives from the various contractors involved with the construction of the citys $21 million surface water plant convened at the plant for a workshop on Tuesday. The workshop included a walk-through of the plant, which has been online less than three years and has experienced what could be labeled growing pains. Though answers on some issues remain elusive and are being investigated, the goal of assessing the issues and creating an action list took a step in a forward direction, said Philip Jones of Preble Rish Engineers, the citys engineers of record. We just need to get everybody in this room and hash it out and come up with solutions, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson said at the conclusion of the walk-through. We dont need to be throwing rocks at each other. The people are looking to us, not just commissioners, to solve these problems. If we can solve them, we can have good water and a good plant, and that is the goal. The walk-through centered on issues raised by commissioners during two workshops on the plant and discussion during one regular meeting. And though some issues painting peeling on the oors, a This graphic shows the location of last weeks wild re in Gulf County. The re was the result of a controlled burn on private land that sparked over the mapped control boundary.SPECIAL TO THE STAR PLANT TREATMENT CITY, ENGINEERS IN SEARCH OF ANSWERS AT WATER PLANTTIM CROFT | The StarBob Lyles of the water treatment plant staff notes the work staff has undertaken to try to patch a leak in the concrete wall in a ltration membrane tank, believed the de ciency most in need of addressing. Below, engineers from Siemens, CDM and Preble Rish examine pumps and ttings in the Clean In Place room.See PLANT A8

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach (850) 648-8207OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11AM-CLOSE 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT 8 PM BAND THE ALL YOU CAN EAT BREAKFASTSATURDAY & SUNDAY 8:00 A.M. THE ALL YOU C A N E AT BRE A KF A KF A KF S T SAT URD A Y & A Y & A S UND A Y 8:00 A Y 8:00 A A .M. Tiki BAR HappyHour on Fri,Sat & Sun from 4 to 7 with LiveEntertainment by Brady DJ & Karaoke Wednesday thru Sunday! K-9 team getting a scent of the placeBy TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Hank, Maggie, Daisy and Bam were getting a feel for Port St. Joe on Monday. Schedules permitting, they will be back twice a month. The K-9 team from Gulf Correctional Institution was in Port St. Joe this week to begin a ramped up scheduling of urban training in the county as the unit hones the skills of its dogs. Were trying to make more of a presence in Port St. Joe, said Sgt. Kevin Romer of the K-9 team. We want the dogs to be fully familiar with the county and the communities where they will be utilized. We want to let the people see us, let the residents see us and let the bad guys see us, also. Maybe that will a make them think twice. The GCI unit is, by reputation, one of the best scent-tracking teams in the region. The unit is called out for countless missing-persons calls across an eight-county area, Romer said, and also chase the bad guys when called upon. They are supplemented across Northwest Florida by well-trained K-9 units in Gulf, Liberty and Washington counties, to name a few, Romer said. The work in Port St. Joe, Wewahitchka and Sand Hills gets the dogs accustomed to people, houses and roads. We have some of the best tracking teams in the country right here in this area, Romer said. The GCI team is comprised of bloodhounds, or rather 90 percent bloodhound with some coonhound in the mix to provide stamina and drive in the hot Florida weather, Romer said. Being part coonhound helps with the heat and drive and doesnt take away from the ability to track, Romer said. Bloodhounds track by scent, or the molecules of the human essence. Those molecules can remain on most surfaces not concrete or asphalt up to six hours. The dogs also can track by following what Romer called ground disturbances. For instance, the dog might pick up a scent but maybe as the scent crosses a concrete pathway the dog might lose it. But by snif ng for molecules that indicate a footstep or other disturbance of the soil in the ground around that concrete, the dog also tracks its prey. The training is fairly straightforward. Romer and another member of his team, Of cer Clyde Melvin, walk a stretch of ground they found several suitable areas with suf cient room on Monday and maybe hide behind a tree or in some bushes. After a period of time, the dogs will be set loose to track the scent. Romer ran a trail for Melvin to run two dogs; Melvin returned the favor on the other two dogs. The dogs range from youngsters to veterans. Hank is 3 years old and an established tracker of local renown. Hes got it, Romer said. I would consider him our best dog. Daisy, 7, is Hanks mother and also an established tracker, though her son is better, Romer said. Maggie is 8 months old, and Bam is a year and two months. Both still are learning the ropes, Romer said. (Scent-tracking) is probably the most labor intensive training with dogs, Romer said. You are not going to know if you have a good scent-tracking dog for two years. Bloodhounds are more interested in what you can do for them, not what they can do for you. So you can have one that is a good tracker for the rst year and then just stops. You just have to keep working them and hope you have a good one in two years. Romer noted those dogs that do not pass muster are adopted and placed in good homes. Romer said most training is done with other teams but what is important in their home county is to ensure the dogs are familiar to the lay of the land and its people thus, the training in Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe. Romer and his team will be out in Port St. Joe training their dogs on two Mondays each month. Hank, Maggie, Daisy and Bam will have a good smell of the place in the event of any problems. At left, the K-9 team from Gulf Correctional Institution poses with the scent-tracking dogs. Below, Sgt. Kevin Romer, left, and Of cer Clyde Melvin pose with Hank, considered the best scenttracking dog in the Gulf Correctional Institutions K-9 unit. TIM CROFT | The Star SPECIAL TO THE STAR

PAGE 3

LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, April 5, 2012 to Port St. Joe Marina 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Fl 32456850-227-9393 To Fill Your Easter BasketsReceive a PRIZE EGG with purchase ($10.00 minimum)Friday, April 6th thru Sunday, April 8th 25 % OFF EVERYTHINGmust have coupon for discount *except previously marked clearance items Documenting the space raceBy CHRIS OLWELL747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA The space race captured the attention of a generation, and Sal Salerno was no exception. For years, Salerno eagerly gobbled up newspaper and magazine reports on every detail of the contest between the United States and the Soviets to put a man into orbit, then a man on the moon. What separates Salerno from the rest of his generation is what he did with those periodicals; he preserved them carefully and stored them, some for almost 50 years. I just felt that what we were doing was exciting, you know. It was an exciting thing that we were doing in that time period, Salerno said. Youve got to be a nut job with it; that was what I was. I was a fanatic. In 2010, Salerno decided it was time to get rid of the some 1,000 pieces he had collected over the years. He started shopping around the collection, but the offers he was getting seemed low to him. A collector in California offered Salerno $200 for the whole collection; Salerno used to get $5 for each copy of an autographed New York Daily News from 1965. You can always get more if you nd the right people, Salerno said. That was NASA. Last year, Salerno approached the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, and they were interested. Salerno got the collection to Orlando, and he threw out a number he thought was reasonable: $30,000. According to Salerno, the space center people said they were interested, but after a couple months they still had not committed to buying his collection. To spur their decision, Salerno decided if they were not interested in buying the collection, he would come get it. He asked for some barrels to be placed in front of the building when he arrived. He threatened to burn the collection right there in the parking lot. Kennedy Space Center of cials were interested, but $30,000 seemed steep. After some negotiating, Salerno agreed to take $20,000 for the collection the Kennedy people later would call Salernos masterpiece, on the condition his name would be on the exhibit. And he wanted free admission to the Kennedy Space Center for himself. And his family. For life. Deal. His collection is not on display, and it could be several years before it is. I just hope I live long enough to see it with my grandchildren, the 75-yearold Salerno said. The self-professed fanatic remains fascinated by space. His atheist friend Louie tells Salerno he will not believe in God until the heavens part and he can see him for himself. But Salerno, a Catholic, sees God and the evidence of creation in space. How else to explain life on Earth? There are other suns, other planets, but ours supports life, because everything is just in perfect order, Salerno said. ANDREW P. JOHNSON | Florida Freedom NewspapersSal Salerno sits with copies of newspapers he saved over the years about the space race. Salerno sold the bulk of his collection to the Kennedy Space Center last year to become a collection called The Salerno Collection. Wewa man sells collection to Kennedy Space CenterI just felt that what we were doing was exciting, you know. It was an exciting thing that we were doing in that time period. Youve got to be a nut job with it; that was what I was. I was a fanatic.Sal Salerno, space race collector

PAGE 4

Thursday, April 5, 2012 OpinionA4 | The StarThe other day I found a site on the internet that had old newspapers archived that you could search. I grew up in a newspaper in Alabama, so I thought Id check and see if they had old issues of The Anniston Star, in Anniston, Ala. They did. I was excited and wanted to see what I could nd. This place would just let you type in a name or anything and it would search the newspaper or newspapers you selected. Doing what most folks would, I put my own name in the search box and clicked on the Search button. I shouldnt have done that. What did I nd? Well, you would probably say that I was just 9 years old, it couldnt be that bad. It was. It was a picture of a baseball team. The Internet site had full versions of old newspapers. Holding the magnifying glass over the picture, I was right there in the middle of the baseball team, my hands interlocked, tilting my head a little to the right and gritting my teeth. It wasnt a smile, it was a grimace. It was a grimace that can still be seen on my face 40 years later. I had found the answer to the question that I am always asked, Why do you have that look on your face? That 1972 season ended so poorly. With a record of 19 wins and 2 losses and the league championship, how can I say that the season ended poorly? It was my last at bat of the season, the game was well in hand and the championship was ours. I was in a great groove, after a long season, I was hitting everything that was thrown to me. This was typical for my little league baseball career. I never seemed to start doing well until the season was almost over. On this day, this last day of the season, I had already hit one ball over the right elders head. I knew, I just knew, that I could get the rst home run of my career on my last at bat of the season. The eld we played on was not perfect, but it was a good eld. There was a hill in right eld that gradually went up to the outeld fence. It gave the eld character. The dugouts were just benches outside the fence, but they were still dugouts. The eld had no gates to get in, just an opening on the right eld side. Dogs could have wandered in and out, but never did. So, why the lifelong grimace? The rst pitch was a ball, so was the second. On the third pitch, I hit a long foul ball that veered outside the eld to the right. The fourth pitch was a ball, but I wasnt about to take a base on balls in my last at bat. I hit another foul ball on the fth pitch. Now, with a full count, I had a perfect situation for my rst home run. No, the game wasnt on the line; we were ahead by a whole bunch. We were so far ahead that this would denitely be my last at bat. I remember the ball coming off of the bat, it felt so good. It was a shot down the right eld line. I remember watching it. I remember saying to myself, Its not going to get out, but perhaps I can get a triple out of it. I was 9 years old. It was my last at bat of the 1972 season. It was a fair ball. Did I say it was a fair ball? It was a fair ball. It had triple written all over it. Before the ball had a chance to fall (and probably roll to the right eld fence), this fellow that was waiting to play the next game decided to run onto the eld. This fellow did not play for the team we were playing against. He played for a team waiting to play. He ran onto the eld through the opening in the fence into fair territory and caught the ball my ball the ball I hit. It was my last at bat of the season. The umpire called me out. He called me out. Out? I pitched a t. I was nine, the umpire was probably 16, but that still didnt excuse his ignorance. You would think that your coach would raise a ruckus, but I guess since the championship was already decided and the game was so lopsided, he didnt see the point. It was my last at bat. Its been 40 years. I still remember their names (the umpire and the kid who ran on the eld and caught my ball). The grimace on my face will stay. It was my last at bat! Ive coached youth baseball for 30 years and never seen such a bad call. Ill never forget it. It was my last at bat! You can nd more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. Last week during a Port Authority board meeting, the question was posed as to what a port would be without a face. The discussion centered on the continued job status of long-time port director Tommy Pitts. Pitts, due to a lack of resources at the Port Authority, was on full pay through the end of the month and then will work for $1 per month and no benets he can not pay for himself on a monthto-month basis as he looks for work. After 10 years, Pitts was effectively tossed to the sidelines. The one man that actually looked out at the landscape at the port planning area from the start and had a vision of an operational port relegated the bench. Right or wrong, maybe Pitts was not the man to be the marketing guru for the port, maybe there were perceived weakness in a mild demeanor save when it came to the port and an unwillingness to play politics. But whether he was the right man for the job or not moving forward, he deserved better than Hey, great job the past 10 years, good luck on future endeavors. If nothing else the institutional knowledge inside the mans head should have been enough for the Port Authority to uncover every rock and explore every option as at least two board members continued last week to keep the one man who has walked and talked the port for more than a decade. Unfortunately, that is the case with the business of creating jobs in this county, which has been set back months if not years by actions of those with sway the past two years. Consider the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce. Under the guise of more efciency and reducing costs the Board of County Commissioners mandated a consolidation of the Economic Development Council and the Chamber of Commerce. In that process, the Chamber adopted a model to move forward and cleaned house, including discarding an executive director, Sandra Chan, who had served in that capacity for more than a decade. Again, there may have been questions about whether Chan was the right person to lead the Chamber moving forward under its new mandate. That is fair. But, whether a proper t to lead the Chamber or not, Chan had devoted sufcient time and energy to the community and the small businesses over more than a decade to deserve more than a give us your keys and dont let the door hit you on the way out. And by tossing aside any institutional knowledge at the Chamber, including it would turn out the basics such as passwords for computers, the Chamber restarted with a new director who has been on the job barely six months and started behind the eight ball at that, literally from scratch. The Chamber, according to comments from its board president last week, is now ramping up an economic development committee more than a year after a functioning EDC was dissolved. That EDC had an executive director who had actually cultivated leads Preble Rish Engineers is enjoying one of those openings right now with an ofce in Haiti and brought in business strategies to the equation. But, alas, he did not live here, a prerequisite that seems immaterial given the treatment of Pitts and Chan who are long-time residents, and so he was asked to leave less than three years into a ve-year plan. A plan the county commissioners pledged to see through. And the demolition of the EDC was the fourth such demolition by county commissioners inside of 12 years. Now there is the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, which is without its interim executive director, who was told last week her work with the county had been completed barely a month after it started. With the application window for the next director still open as of last Friday, as county administrator Don Butler told Star Staff Writer Valerie Garman, the TDC is again without an executive director and operating with a point person for events, based on advertising and marketing efforts, who is an independent contractor and the girlfriend of the chairman of the BOCC. So, a broader question from the one asked at the Port Authority meeting last week would be what is the face those in sway are trying to project for Gulf County? To what end all this maneuvering including the termination of former TDC executive director Tim Kerigan for, essentially, failing to alter the environment which he inherited? And where is the accountability from commissioners? Remember, the TDC audit did include a damning section about expenditures rife with conicts, but that section was surrounded by four pages of deciencies that fall directly into the laps of the BOCC. They are the ones who must set policy and procedure and ensure that county agencies adhere. They are the ones who must set an agenda that is for the long-term interest of the entire county, providing in turn a face of stable, efcient and publicinterest service. Instead what residents see is a board pretending to act as one but whose actions are revealed when the county administrator talks during a budget meeting of having ve boss men with varying views on issues. What century, let alone decade, is the county operating in? There is a line in a song out now that asks a pointed question: Does the country take care of its own? Wed submit that the community stewardship of those with sway over decisions in this county is measured by their respective denition of their own.So many treasures gone with the wind Keyboard KLATTERINGSBad callsBOCC must gaze into the mirror TiIM CrROFtTStar news editor Ive been watching American Pickers on the History Channel. It makes me so mad! They gave a guy in Wisconsin $300 for a faded, rusted up Sinclair Gasoline sign. I almost fainted. Then Frank bundled a 1951 Chevrolet hood ornament with a plastic Alka-Seltzer boy and shook hands on an $80 deal. I could have been a millionaire! These guys go all over the country buying up old lanterns, butter churns, railroad crossing signs, handcuffs, pin ball machines and anything else that strikes their fancy, they think they can turn for a prot or that might help their TV ratings. It doesnt seem to matter if the object actually functions like it was intended. A little rust to them seems to add character. I will admit, they dont mind getting their hands dirty. And they somehow manage to nd some of the ah, some of uh, some real interesting characters along the way. Theyve got this big panel truck and they pull up in front of sheds, barns, 100-year-old hardware stores and any place else thats got antiques, junk, faded stuff or pieces of this and that sticking out the windows. Listen, Mike and Frank get excited over a tossed aside, used up, empty-for-years Clabber Girl Baking Powder can. Ive seenem high-ve over a kitchen safe that didnt have the ower sifter, one door was missing and the pull out porcelain tray was cracked in a dozen places. They once plopped down $450 for a petried dinosaur bone. And you ought to see them when they run across a dilapidated 1936 Indian motorcycle! They will haggle a little bit. Or ip a coin. Mike once arm wrestled an interesting character over the nal value. And they dont buy everything they see. But mostly, if they want it, they manage to work it out. One of their favorite lines is, Ive got to have this piece! And they seem to know a little bit about everything theyre looking at. They can talk bicycles from the late 40s, brass doorknobs from the turn of the century, Martin Guitars out of Nazareth, Penn., tintype photography, dog sleds, horse collars, petal cars and World War II vintage Japanese swords. They dont call themselves Antique Archeology for nothing! It just makes me sick every time American Pickers comes on. Why, Aunt Beatrice and Uncle Womack had enough old stuff in their house to make us all millionaires! There were two or three kerosene lanterns on every mantel. Neither one of Aunt Beas kitchen safes had broken porcelain. Her old Singer sewing machine with the foot treadle was an antique the rst time I ever saw it. She was still using her churn. And those tall milk cans that Mike and Frank think so highly of today were sitting in every corner of her house! She tried to give me her coffee grinder one time but, silly me, thought it much easier to just buy a can of Folgers. If I could have gotten the property rights to Granddaddys tool shed, I could own an NFL franchise. You never saw the likes of rasps, drawing knives, hand bits, cross cut saws, harnesses, wood chisels, powder horns, nail kegs, wooden barrels, single and doubletree plows, an old Sulky, a drink Royal Crown Cola thermometer with absolutely no rust, several spittoons, a nonfunctioning Cushman Eagle motor scooter and an 8-by-10 glossy photo of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Mike and Frank would have been in hog heaven. When Tommie Hill changed his service station from Texaco to DX Boron they stacked them old signs out back. Mr. Tommie tried to give them away to any and everybody for the whole 2 years I worked down there. I could have had them just for the effort of toting them out to the house. I was guring more on the weight of those giant double sided Texaco emblems than I was the cash that awaited the owner. Nobody realized we were looking at hundreds of dollars weeds grew up between those things. Last time I stopped by to see Mr. Tommie and introduce my rst wife to him, he was still trying to get me to haul them signs off. If Id only known Mike and Frank back then! I cant remember what David and I did with those little petal cars we once raced through the house. Same for all those army men. And Lord, the baseball cards we went through. We had toy metal trucks by the dozen. Our Lionel Train stretched the whole length of the dining room. Whod athought someone would show up one day offering a premium for a used up Squirt soft drink bottle. Ruth Ann Wiley ended up with my pink and black Elvis hat. And Mom gave our Roy Rogers gun and holster sets to a young neighbor when we went off to college. Im telling you, with any type of foresight, we all could have been rich! I cant believe we carried out with the trash empty Calumet Indian Head cans, out-dated Life magazines, Lash LaRue whips and that old Maytag wringer washer after they nally strung electricity out to the house. We used those wooden Coca-Cola crates as rewood. It was like tossing money down the drain! American Pickers are especially big on old Western Flyer bicycles. David Mark and I both sported one in the mid 50s. Man, those things had real chrome, headlights, leather seats, a mega horn and white side wall tires. We were pretty special cruising downtown on those things. I cant for the life of me remember what happened to them you dont suppose Dave is holding out on me? Ive got to tune in next week to make sure Mike and Frank arent out in his back yard, haggling over my old bike. Respectfully, Kes HUnkerNKER DOWnNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CranksRANKS MY tra TRACtTOrRBN Heard

PAGE 5

Dear Editor: On March 9, the 2012 legislative session concluded. Unfortunately, no legislation passed addressing the protection against arbitrary evictions for residents living in assisted living facilities (ALFs). The need for legislation is apparent the Governors Assisted Living Facility Workgroup recommended enacting eviction protections for residents of ALFs, and several legislators proposed bills that included additional protections for ALF residents from arbitrary evictions. However, lack of protections for ALF residents remains a reality. Why are additional laws necessary? Florida law currently allows an ALF administrator to relocate or terminate a resident from an ALF for almost any reason, as long as the administrator provides the resident with 45 days notice and documents the reason. Florida ALF residents, numbering almost 80,000 cannot challenge their eviction in court even though they rent a unit just like an apartment dweller. Although many residents have advanced care needs, similar to residents of nursing homes, they lack a process for an appeal of an involuntary discharge. This leaves Floridas elders vulnerable to threats of retaliation. Because ALF residents do not have basic due process protections from being asked to leave their homes, administrators may decide to relocate a resident for making what may be legitimate complaints to state agencies involving things like poor care or lack of food. For example, a resident was recently evicted after ling a complaint with the Ombudsman Program. What was the administrators reason for evicting the resident? The resident was not happy here. Incidents like these serve as an example to other residents that if they complain, they could be evicted too. The Ombudsman Program investigated 75 inappropriate ALF eviction complaints and 72 fear of retaliation complaints during 2010-11. An even greater number of arbitrary discharges may have occurred but were not reported to the Ombudsman Program. When a resident is relocated from an ALF, the facility is not obligated to report its action to any governmental entity, no matter the circumstances or the frailty of the resident. How can ALF residents be protected? We need to pass legislation providing basic due process to ALF residents, including the ability to challenge a proposed relocation in a neutral forum and the requirement that a 45-days written notice be handed to the resident, and documented as being given. Establish standards for the appropriate relocation of residents, such as changes in medical condition, failure to pay, and behavioral changes necessitating a different setting. Require the ALF to notify the Ombudsman Program of any notice issued and permit a representative of the local ombudsman council to meet with the resident and work with the administrator to resolve the issue, if possible and appropriate. These recommendations will protect ALF residents from inappropriate evictions, allowing residents to seek redress of any concerns about their care and quality of life without fear of retaliation. If you would like to work with us to better the lives of all long-term care facility residents, please contact 1-888-8310404 or visit ombudsman. my orida.com to nd out how you can volunteer. If you do not have the time to commit to the program, urge your legislators to support positive changes for ALF residents, including protection from arbitrary evictions. Sincerely,Jim Crochet State Ombudsman, Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program (850) 414-2327 www.ombudsman.my orida.com Helping Clients Keep More Of What They Earn All Tax Services Financial Statements Outsourced Accounting QuickBooks IRS Problem Resolution Payroll Set-Up Business Formation Management Consulting Business Plans Retirement Planning202 Marina Drive, Suite 303 Port St. Joe, FL 32456(850) 229-1040 PH(850) 229-1050 FXkeith@keithjonescpa.com www.keithjonescpa.comMEMBER: AMERICAN AND FLORIDA INSTITUTES OF CPAS Thursday, April 5, 2012 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LettersA5 | The StarIf youre among the millions of Americans expecting an income tax refund this year, youve probably already led your 2011 return and are eagerly awaiting the money. But if you havent already mentally spent your refund on a guilty pleasure, here are several great ways to better put that money to work for you: Pay down debt. Bee ng up credit card and loan payments can signi cantly lower your long-term interest payments. Suppose you currently pay $120 a month toward a $3,000 credit card balance at 18 percent interest. At that pace itll take 32 months and $788 in interest to pay off, assuming no new purchases. By doubling your payment to $240 youll shave off 18 months and $441 in interest. Start an emergency fund. To protect your family against the impact of a layoff or other unexpected nancial crisis, set aside enough cash to cover six to nine months of living expenses. Seed the account with part of your refund and then set up automatic deductions from accounts. Boost retirement savings. Beef up your 2012 IRA or 401(k) contribution, especially if your employer offers matching contributions; a 50 percent match corresponds to a 50 percent guaranteed rate of return something you wont likely nd in any investment. Spend now to save later. Reap long-term savings on things youll eventually pay for anyway: Replace older appliances with energyef cient models that will pay for themselves through lower utility bills. For example, replacing a 1980s refrigerator with an Energy Star model will save over $100 a year. The Energy Star website (www.energystar.gov) can help you nd Energy Star products and estimate savings. Switching from traditional light bulbs to energy-ef cient alternatives like CFLs and LEDs, while initially more expensive, can save about $6 per bulb in annual energy costs. Just make sure they are Energy Starquali ed models, which exceed minimum standards. Schedule routine car maintenance. According to AAA, simply changing your cars air lter once a year can save over $270, while replacing older spark plugs can save $540 in wasted fuel. Ask whether your utility offers free or subsidized home energy audits. An audit will reveal which investments such as increasing home insulation and replacing drafty windows and doors will lower both winter and summer energy bills. Finance education. Strengthen your career prospects and earnings potential by adding new skills through college courses or vocational training. Ask if your employer will help pay for job-related education. You can also set money aside for your childrens or grandchildrens education by contributing to a 529 Quali ed State Tuition Plan or Coverdell Education Savings Account. Bonus: Your contributions will grow tax-free until withdrawn. Prepay bills. If you expect major expenses later this year (e.g., insurance premiums, orthodontia, college tuition), start setting money aside now so you wont rack up interest charges later. Also, paying slightly more each month toward your mortgage principal can save thousands in interest over the life of the loan. And nally, if you regularly receive large tax refunds, youre probably having too much tax withheld from your paycheck youre essentially giving the government an interestfree loan. Ask your employer for a new W-4 form and recalculate your withholding allowance. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 23, go to www. practicalmoneyskills. com/summit2012.Put your tax refund to work JASON ALDERMAN When Steve Southerland ran for Congress in 2010 his constant battle cry was that the federal government had grown too large and that taxpayers were being asked to fund too many Big Government federal programs. In his rst year and a half in of ce, little has changed in his rhetoric. He has voted to cut drastically, and in some cases end, federal programs promoting job growth and those that maintain services and safety nets for the poor, the elderly and in rm. So why has Mr. Southerland chosen this time to introduce legislation that will subsidize, through taxpayer bailouts, poor development decisions in coastal Gulf County by a small group of wealthy homeowners and developers? Those of us who live in this region know Cape San Blas and Indian Pass Peninsula are highly vulnerable to storm surge. It is the classic barrier island susceptible to wind and wave action that moves the shoreline and remakes the map with every major storm that passes. Yet Mr. Southerland and his wealthy developer friends are convinced that you and I should be willing to pick up the tab when the next beach re-nourishment project is needed. He and his buddies would like Big Government (read your tax dollars) to be used to re-nourish their beaches and make their homes and condos available for federal ood insurance. In 2009 the Federal Emergency Management Administration determined that such re-nourishment and availability of federal ood insurance was not appropriate because it would expose taxpayers to hundreds of millions of dollars in ongoing costs, subsidize and provide incentives for high-risk shoreline development, and undermine the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA). Florida is already far too reliant on state subsidized insurance to cover our coastal property exposure. The state backed Citizens Insurance and Hurricane Catastrophe Fund are dangerously over-exposed and reliant on bonding should a major storm hit anywhere in Florida. Mr. Southerlands legislation (H.R. 4150) offers the same sort of subsidy at the federal level. He says as much himself when quoted by the selfserving trade publication Dredging Today.Com: Ive worked closely with Gulf County of cials to ensure that coastal communities have access to the resources they need to rebuild local beaches in the event of a hurricane or other natural disaster, Southerland said. Despite its designation as a higher risk ood zone, Gulf County is prohibited from receiving federal ood insurance under current law. This inequity in the law forces Gulf County homeowners to purchase private sector insurance at a much higher rate, if they are able to obtain coverage at all. Our common sense legislation will remedy this situation by making Gulf County residents eligible for federal ood insurance, and FEMA reimbursement for road construction, dredging and beach nourishment. Lets break this statement down into its very expensive elements for all taxpayers. When Mr. Southerland says access to the resources they need to rebuild local beaches, the translation is we want you, the taxpayer, to pick up the tab for re-nourishing Cape San Blas and Indian Pass Peninsula. When he says its designation as a higher risk ood zone, prohibited from receiving federal ood insurance under current law, Mr. Southerland is acknowledging the very purpose for CBRA to discourage development of low lying coastal zones so that they can remain natural and serve the valuable purpose of storm protection and wildlife habitat. When lamenting the fact that some Gulf County homeowners have to purchase private sector insurance at a much higher rate, if they are able to obtain coverage at all, he is suggesting that private insurance markets (those that most of us rely on for our own insurance) just wont provide low cost insurance to people who insist on building in places they should not be building! As an advocate for land conservation and rational building codes, I believe CBRA works exactly as it was intended to work by applying market forces (i.e. prohibitively expensive insurance and denial of publicly backed ood insurance) in helping control bad development. I am willing as well to give private property rights advocates leeway with respect to their personal choices as to where they build. However, when we the taxpayers, have to pay for these decisions I have to say an emphatic NO! If you chose to build on shifting sands, dont shift the risk to the public! By removing these two units in Gulf County from CBRA that is exactly what Mr. Southerland would have. The end result is to encourage developers and homeowners to continued their bad decision-making and offer them a free ride at the taxpayers expense. I would suggest that Mr. Southerland rethink his bailout proposal for the lucky few who can afford to live on this beautiful stretch of Gulf County beaches. Asking the taxpayers to pick up the tab for their bad development choices just does not match his rhetoric as a small government, lower taxes politician. Jay Liles is a policy consultant to the Florida Wildlife Federation and a candidate for Congress in the 2nd Congressional District. Southerland talk does not match actionsProtection for assisted living residents needed JAY LILES

PAGE 6

LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012on the value of the Port of Port St. Joes assets, especially land holdings, but the company is awaiting an appraisal of those assets before crafting options for the partners. I had hoped to be there by now, but we need to move forward anyway, move forward on additional agreements, Gonzalez said. We strongly feel to get real traction we need to be aggressive (with business development). We need to be proactive and aggressive. Gonzalez said though the Port Authority has dealt with passive leads that come to the Chamber of Commerce or Port Authority of ces, what St. Joe proposes is to analyze potential companies in the market, what those companies need and the port could offer and try to aggressively match the two. The goal would be to pursue companies based on leads generated by market analysis and marketing. There is a lot of time and energy goes into that, and we are prepared to do that, Gonzalez said, adding the company brings a sales, marketing and nancial analysis tool set to the table. This is all about framing the market ideals, and it needs to be a coordinated effort. I think our focus right now is on business development. The question the Port Authority board members wrestled with much of the rest of last weeks meeting was exactly how that would be coordinated and by whom. Citing a lack of funding, the board members unanimously, though with trepidation from some members, moved to furlough Port of Port St. Joe executive director Tommy Pitts effective at the end of April. Pitts said he was not surprised given the Port Authoritys bleak nancial picture and noted that maybe the dynamics on the board had changed and a new executive director was what was desired. He said there had been no funding for the kind of marketing Gonzalez referenced, and it has only been recently that we have had something to market, referring to the MOU with the St. Joe Co. It has been a long, drawn-out incremental process, but we have just gotten to the point of having something to market, Pitts said. I would like to stay engaged in some way. I think we are very close on one project and we get calls on a frequent basis. The board agreed to keep Pitts on at $1 per month on a month-to-month basis in part to allow him to qualify for his insurance, which Pitts will pay for and move the Port Authority of ce and phone under the umbrella of the consolidated Chamber of Commerce/Economic Development Council. The Port Authority had been leasing a building on U.S. 98, but could no longer afford to make monthly payments the landlord gave them the past three months free. He put 10 years of his heart into the port, said Port Authority member Leonard Costin. I thank him for his service. I hope we can get him back at some point, but I am not sure that will happen. Despite the bleak nancial picture, some board members wondered how exactly they would operate without the one man in the community Pitts who knew the most about the port, was an engineer, had secured millions in grant funds, had a seat on the Florida Ports Council and has passionately advocated for the port for more than a decade. Port attorney Tom Gibson said his concern was what a major investor would think when inquiring about the Port of Port St. Joe if there was no director. Somebody has to be in charge of the port, said board member Eugene Rafeld. I agree that nothing is going to happen overnight. My concern is how to run a business and pursue federal grants without a port director. You still need to have a face to the port. My concern is can you run a port without a face or a board. Costin emphasized that the Port Authority board would now have to serve as the face of the port and Gonzalez noted that until concentrated interest in the port materialized, the need for technical expertise on the ground was minimized. Board member Patrick Jones noted that there are day-to-day operational aspects of the port and that he did not believe the Port Authority could afford a gap at this time in meeting those needs and services. Someone needs to handle this but who is going to handle this, Jones said, acknowledging that nances were limiting options. Think of all the things we (the board) dont know about ports. Who is going to answer those questions? Jones also noted that in the halls of government from which millions in grants have owed to the port for infrastructure development, the absence of a port director could have an impact on whether future grant funds come to the Port of Port St. Joe. Jones oated the idea of using the Arizona Chemical plant property, now in port hands unencumbered, could be used for collateral to generate operating income to bridge the cashow shortfall. The idea was never speci cally addressed. And when asked whether St. Joe could provide a man on the ground, Gonzalez said the company had no interest in becoming a Port Authority or taking over in any manner. We have resources to build the business development arm, Gonzalez said. We want to give it a shot for three years and build that business development arm. The goal, he added, to bring customers as soon as possible and provide a robust long-term revenue stream for the port. Were not saying anything about needing the director or not, but at this point I dont think anything will happen at the port without business development, Gonzalez said. The disconnect, Gonzalez and Jones noted at different points of the meeting, was that Port of Port St. Joe is unique among Floridas 14 deepwater ports in that it has a Port Authority and Port Director, but no operating port. The hope is to have a draft agreement for moving ahead by the April 12 meeting, Gonzalez said. Weems Hospital would like to recognize and celebrate their Doctors on staff.NATIONAL their Doctors on staff. Weems Hospital would like to recognize and celebrate FRIDAY, MARCH 30TH, 2012 Shezad Sanaullah, MD Patrick Conrad, MD Eugene Charbonneau, DO Stephen Miniat, MD Tamara Marsh, DPM Helen Nitsios, MD James Stockwell, MD Paul D. Hart, MD Garrett H. Chumney, MD Nathanael Hawkins, MD F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD Weems Medical Center East 110 NE 5 TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 850-697-2345 F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 TH TH TH TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Memorial Hospital 135 AVENUE G, APALACHICOLA, FL 850-653-8853 An Easter Service Like No Other!Why just listen to the Easter story, when you can experience it? Youre invited to attendThe Thorn Easter Experience at Highland View Assembly of GodThis unique service features: Easter is the greatest love story ever told, and this year it comes to life with The Thorn Easter Experience. Dont Miss It! N O T I C E O F G E N E R A L E L E C T I O NI, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that a GENERAL ELECTION will be held in GULF County, State of Florida, on the SIXTH day of NOVEMBER, 2012, A.D., to ll or retain the following ofces: President and Vice-President United States Senator Representative in Congress State Attorney: Judicial Circuit 14 Public Defender: Judicial Circuit 14 State Senator State Representative Supreme Court: Retention of Three Justices First District Court of Appeal: Retention of Four Judges Circuit Judge, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit: Groups 3, 6 and 11 Clerk of the Circuit Court Sheriff Property Appraiser Tax Collector Superintendent of Schools Supervisor of Elections County Court Judge: Group 1 School Board: Districts 3 and 4 County Commissioner: Districts 1, 3 and 5 Harbor Master for the Port of Port Saint Joe Tupelo Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 PORT from page A1

PAGE 7

LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, April 5, 2012 Communities in Florida are becoming concerned about the tobacco industrys practice of targeting adolescents and young adults through product development, packaging, pricing, advertising, and promotional activities. The Gulf County SWAT youth in the picture, who are also members of the Gulf County Tobacco Free and Substance Abuse Response Guide (SARG) Partnership, recognize that retailers who sell tobacco products play a vital role in protecting youth from becoming the next generation of Americans to die prematurely from tobacco-related disease. We would like to thank RICHS IGA in Wewahitchka for being the FIRST store in Gulf County that sells tobacco products to pledge to be a vital community partner. On March 28th, 3 SWAT youth met with Wewahitchka IGA representative, Ms. Heather Dyas who signed the agreement. As shown in the picture, they have by agreed to display tobacco cessation penny trays at their tobacco outlet. The trays display The Florida Quitline number, a valuable free resource to help people quit tobacco. The toll-free Florida Quitline at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW (1-877-822-6669) will connect you to a train addiction and create a personalized quit plan. Youll receive proactive coaching sessions, self-help materials, and quit aids like nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) (available while supplies last). For additional information, please contact Sarah Hinds at the Gulf County Health Department. 850-227-1276, ext 205.Left to Right: Lana Harrison (SWAT Advisor), Trent McGill, Shelby Wood, Heather Dyas (IGA Rep.), and Trey McGill. Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 4-30-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Special to The StarOn March 14, Tallahassee Community College hosted the annual Womens History Month ceremony with this years theme of Womens Education Womens Empowerment. Dr. Patricia K. Hardman was recognized as one of the honorees for her contribution to the eld of dyslexia. Dr. Jeanne OKon, chair of the committee, said, I would like for people who attend the WHM ceremony to take away the understanding that women are signi cant, contributing members of our society and that they always have been. I would like for them to realize that women, like our honorees, make huge contributions on a daily basis and still dont get the same recognition, status and pay as do men. And our ceremony is all about embracing these ten community women honorees to let them know how much we admire and appreciate them! Patricia K. Hardman, PhD, never dreamed when she received her Math degree from the University of South Carolina that she would become involved in the eld of dyslexia. In fact, she had never heard of it until her aunt called her in 1971 and said that her cousin had been identi ed as being dyslexic. Find out what that means and what we need to do about it, was the family directive. Not only did she nd out how to help her cousin, but this opened an entire new vocation and eld of study for her. She was mentored by Dr. Charles Shedd, an early researcher in the area of dyslexia. She developed Saturday schools in Charleston and Tallahassee and then opened full time schools for children with dyslexia and ADHD in Charleston, Orlando, Macon, Albany and Tallahassee. Hardman has developed an entire curriculum (reading, math, grammar and study skills) designed to teach the students these ways to learn. Dyslexic learners learn differently; therefore teachers have to change the way they teach to match the neurological difference and way these individuals learn, she said. Since 1975, Woodland Hall Academy in Tallahassee has been changing the lives of children and adults with Dyslexia and ADHD. Hardman views herself as a catalyst for change. Not only in the area of education has she changed the way teachers view and approach students with dyslexia, but she has helped to change laws in Florida affecting thousands of individuals. Working with Representative Betty Easley in 1985, legislation was crafted and passed that allows students who have dyscalculia (disability in math) to substitute other courses in college for the math requirement allowing them to obtain a college degree in their chosen (non-math) eld. In the mid 90s she worked with Senator Steve Wise to broaden the accommodations available on the FCAT. Hardman helped Senate President John McKay craft the McKay Scholarship Program and served on the Senate Task Force, at the appointment of Governor Bush, to guide the program through the early years. The McKay Scholarship Program is the rst and largest state scholarship program for students with disabilities in the country; allowing over 22,000 children with disabilities access to both public and private programs that t their needs. Hardman has received the Distinguished Service Award from The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools for her contribution to this program. Hardman shows no signs of slowing down even though she has moved to Port St. Joe for semi-retirement. She does play four or ve games of golf every week but also continues to advocated for disability issues; is a partner in a residential construction company; is the president of the Coastal Community Association of South Gulf County; and continues as the CFO of Dyslexia Research Institute. One last fact, in her journey, Hardman, also discovered she is dyslexic with ADHD. SPECIAL TO THE STARDr. Jeanne OKan, Chair of Womens History Month, Dr. Karinda Barrett, TCC Instructor and Dr. Patricia K. Hardman, CEO of Dyslexia Research Institute.Hardman recognized for work with dyslexia

PAGE 8

LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 patched seam on a chlorine treatment tank and rust in a clari er were deemed maintenance-related or of lesser priority, solutions to other de ciencies remain. For example, a series of failures ve in all with pumps that bring fresh canal water into the plant for treatment as well as problems with ttings on outside pumps handling caustic acid and pumps handling various chemicals in what is known as the Clean in Place (CIP) room. Weve identi ed some things that are maintenance-related and some that are construction-related that we are working with (construction contractor Marshall Brothers Industrial) on, and we appreciate their willingness to work with us on those, Jones said. But there are other things that we are still investigating. We are committed to working at it and bringing resolution to the problems. Of particular concern is a leak in a concrete membrane tank wall that is seen as an immediate priority for redress. We are concerned about the membrane tank, Jones said, the leaking from a seam in the tank evident. Its probably the most important item to address in the immediate future. There was some discussion about whether the membrane tanks should have been lined or not to prevent any leaking, and the timeline that occurred for notifying Marshall Brothers of the leak when it rst appeared shortly after the plant began operation. But Matt Marshall of Marshall Brothers said the leak would be xed, and whether the tanks were lined or not was somewhat beside the point given the nature and extent of the leaking. Marshall said the leak would be xed by his company at no cost to the city. We are going to stand behind our work, Marshall said. The repair began Tuesday. Also of interest were leaking pumps handling caustic chemicals and a look at the pumps and systems used in the CIP room. From the time the plant opened, weve had problems with these caustic pumps, plant supervisor Larry McClamma said of the outside caustic chemical pumps that showed signs of continuous leakage. On one pump system within the CIP room, staff had replaced a pump leaking from its ttings with another pump that has eliminated the problem, said Bob Lyles of the citys plant staff. A representative with Siemens said a similar plant had been built just before the Port St. Joe plant in Dauphin, Ala., and staff there could serve as a sounding board for issues they have encountered with essentially the same technology. During the walk-through, groups with the contractors CDM, which designed the plant, Siemens, which designed the ltration system equipment and Marshall Brothers conferred on various issues, and took copious notes and photos. At least all the players are here sticking their head into this, said Commissioner Rex Buzzett. As long as they come up with solutions, they can talk among themselves all day. The investigation into nding answers, as the mayor encouraged and Jones committed to, will continue. 8197710 Uncompromised Commitment to Compliance On-Time, Ef cient and Discreet Reliable, Professional Service Customized Cost Effective Solutions Proven Track Record TM1-850-309-1996 shredit.com COST CUTTERS LAWN SERVICE Affordably Addressing All Your Lawn Care Needs Licensed & InsuredServing from Mexico Beach to the Cape. Full Service Lawn Care Starting at $29CALL: Art Sigman 850.628.0694 or Ken Daves: 850.899.0468 asigman@mchsi.com Gun ShowApril14th & 15th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2075355Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 o r 2 Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 PACKAGE STORE & LOUNGEGREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITSWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM LADIESNIGHT EVERYTUESDAY ANDWEDNESDAY 5-10ETKARAOKE & DJ IN THE (NON-SMOKING)CROWSNESTEVERYWEDNESDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY WITH NATALIE AND NOWONTHURSDAYS WITH DEBRAHAPPY HOUR MONDAY FRIDAY 5-7 ETCOMEENJOY SUNSETS ON THE POOP DECKLIVEMUSICNOW STARTS AT 7 PM ET WITHRANDY STARK ON FRIDAY JOINED BY ARTLONGON SAX ON SATURDAY PLANT from page A1 TIM CROFT | The StarCaustic chemical pumps housed outside the water treatment plant show clear signs of leakage. The walk-through began at the series of raw water pumps. The city has had to replace ve pump motors in the past year at a cost of nearly $2,000 per motor.

PAGE 9

LocalThe Star| A9Thursday, April 5, 2012 Cape Palms Park, Cape San Blas6081 Cape San Blas Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456Saturday, April 7th 7:30 am Onsite Registration; 8 am Race Begins Cost: Adults: $20; 15 and Under $15Get your hop on and join us at The Cape for the 5K Rabbit Run/ Walk. The event will begin and end at Cape Palms Park and follow Loggerhead Run, the bike/walking trail that runs the length of beautiful Cape San Blas and St. Joseph Peninsula. First 50 runners to register receive a complimentary race day t-shirt. For more information call the Gulf County TDC at 850.229.7800All times are Eastern. Presented by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council Salt Air MarketThe Port St. Joe Salt Air Farmers Market brings fresh seasonal produce from local small farmers and much more to Floridas Forgotten Coast. Throughout the growing season, regionally grown vegetables and fruit, locally harvested Gulf seafood, carefully crafted artisan goods, and educational opportunities highlight the markets. Located in downtown Port St. Joe, in the City Commons Park, the SaltAir Farmers Market serves as a community gathering place and cultural center where attendees can enjoy arts, workshops, live music, and exhibitions while shopping the market and Reid Avenues retail district. There is no better place to be on a Saturday Morning. JSL Easter Egg HuntSaturday April 7th 10:00 a.m. EDT Photos with the Easter Bunny Arts and Crafts Children ages 10 and under Admission is Free More information?lindsayelizsher@gmail.com Port St. Joes Downtown Merchants Committee of the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce invites you to celebrate First Fridays on the rst Friday of each month. Festivities begin at 5 p.m. Explore historic downtown Port St. Joes one-of-a-kind boutiques, shops, cafes, restaurants, galleries, spas, salons. night spots and more! Attendees can expect great sales, food and entertainment. Look for seasonal sales from retailers along with dinner specials, drink specials and live entertainment from restaurants and bars. TGIF!SHOP / 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM DINE / 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM UNWIND / All Night Long! Friday Night: Billy Dean, 19 South, and Randall Big Daddy Webster. Saturday: Buddy Hamm 117 Sailors Cove, Port St. Joe, FL (850) 229.3463 On Over to Gulf County Easter Weekend www.visitgulf.com This Event Funded In Part By The Gulf County Tourism Development Council Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGHTSPECIALS 6:00 8:30HOURS: 236ReidAve (850) 229.7121GULFSHRIMP, SCALLOPS, CRABCLAWS & FISHPOPCORN BURGERS:WITHFF Above orders served with:FF,BAKEDPOTATO, SALAD ANDBREAD **AWARDWINNINGDESSERTS** start of the re but has con rmed it was a result of a controlled burn on private land in Gulf County. This particular re spotted across the dirt line of where it was supposed to be, Goddin said. Many times when its a weather shift, you cant predict it because it happens so quickly. Goddin said wind and low humidity are two weather conditions most likely to enhance a wild re. Humidity doesnt necessarily mean hot, said Goddin, who noted low humidity, when the air is really dry, tends to fuel vegetation and cause re to burn more violently. Goddin said while some parts of the country may experience a speci c re season, Florida is susceptible to wild res at any point in the year. In Gulf County, theres yearround re activity, Goddin said. Fuels in Florida can burn at just about any time of the year. Florida vegetation can burn in the spring, summer, fall or winter. Fire is a natural part of our Florida ecosystems, and its not a matter of if we are going to have wild res, but when and at what intensity, Goddin said. Goddin said every homeowner outside of a burn ban area does have the right to burn debris, but there are guidelines to follow to ensure safe burns are conducted. Burns must be conducted at least 25 feet away from the property owners home, 50 feet from any paved or public roads and 150 feet from any other occupied buildings. Goddin encourages people to never leave a re unattended, keep a water supply handy and to not burn on windy days when res can easily jump. Fire when it gets away from you, it can get out of control very quickly, Goddin said. If the re does get into the woods, Goddin said dont hesitatecall 911 immediately. Just be careful, thats the main thing, Goddin said. Just be smart. Goddin also suggested ways for area residents to protect their homes in the event of a wild re. The Florida Forest Service suggests homeowners reduce the risk of their home burning through the protection of the two most vulnerable parts of the home: the roof and the area immediately surrounding the structure. Research indicates that home ignitions usually occur over relatively short distancestens of yards, not hundreds of feet, from re brands landing on or around the structure or ames from slow-moving, low-intensity surface res contacting ammable portions of the structure. According to the FFS, homeowners can reduce this risk by keeping debris off roofs and out of gutters and through careful landscaping around the home, particularly in the immediate 30 feet of land surrounding the structure. Careful landscaping should eliminate any ammable vegetation in contact with the structure, thin out trees and shrubs, prune tree limbs to a height of 6 to 10 feet, replace ammable landscape material with higher water content material, replace ammable mulch with rock or gravel, and eliminate ladder fuels near the structure that might carry a re to the roof. Goddin said homeowners if remember to be clean, lean and green (cleanno accumulations of dead vegetation; leansmall amounts of ammable vegetation; greenplants are healthy and green with a well irrigated lawn) the chances of home ignition will be drastically reduced. WILDFIRE from page A1

PAGE 10

E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters SHIMANO TREVALA JIGGINGRODS STARTING AT$119.99 Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 10 Freshwater Inshore/OffshoreWe are getting back into the hot weather this week on the Forgotten Coast. Offshore water temperaturesare on the rise and will reach 80 degrees soon. Cobia are starting to show up in our area this week, and a 53# sh was caught close to shore on Monday. Spanish mackerel are everywhere near the beaches and on the Mexico Beach Pier. Trolling spoons and mackerel trees will nd sh fast, but you may need to add a weight to get down to the sh. Grouper are back on the menu this week, but make sure that you understand the new grouper regulations on the FWC website before you head out. Bass shing is still hot this week as many anglers are reporting good catches in Lake Wimico. Worms and crank baits have produced the most sh, but a few guys are still shiner shing. Depot creek has been quiet lately, but with the good rain we had last week, the cat sh bite should improve this week. SPONSORED BY By Joseph Mitchell, Park Service SpecialistSt. Joseph Peninsula State Park, (850) 227-1327 Special to The Star The coastal park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has provided a peaceful and beautiful setting for recreational activities for many years. But few realize how the park has changed since its formation 5,000 years ago. Two barrier islands, one from Eagle Harbor to the north and one south from Eagle Harbor to Richardson Hammock, were joined at Eagle Harbor approximately 1,000 years ago. This large barrier island was later joined to the mainland some 600 years ago forming Cape San Blas and St. Joseph Spit. The area is constantly being changed by the sediment transforming processes of erosion and sediment deposition. Much of the eroded material is transported northward and is redeposited at the northern tip of the Spit. A well developed primary dune system extends to nearly the tip of St. Josephs peninsula. This dune ridge has been diminished by several hurricanes: most noticeably by Hurricane Eloise in 1975, Hurricane Elaina in 1985, Hurricane Opal in 1995 and Hurricane Dennis in 2004. During these storms, the dunes were breached in several places by tidal surges, which allowed water, seaweed and debris into the Park. While breaches to the dunes are common during severe storm events, erosion and lesser storm damage can be minimized by vegetation. Dunes can become stabilized when plants such as sea oats, railroad vines, dune panic grass and beach grass anchor and grow in the poor nutrient sands. Plants can trap and hold sand carried by wind and wave actions. Areas that are stable for hundreds of years can support other plants, such as yaupon, scrub oaks, bay trees and saw palmettos. Beach ridges are present in parts of the interior of the peninsula behind the primary dunes. This row of ridges is called the secondary dune ridge. The secondary dune ridge can support plant communities different from the primary dunes, such as Rosemary, beach mint, chapmen and laurel oaks, saw palmetto and woody vines. Finally, toward the interior of the peninsula are the ancient dunes. These are the original dunes from 3,000 to 1,000 years ago and are the most stable of the dune system that makes up St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. Within the ancient dunes, pine trees, sable palmettos, holly and yaupons grow unencumbered by the winds and gulf surf. Between these dune ridges are swells and depressions that can hold water. Cattails, rushes and lilies are and can often be seen in these low lying areas. The eastern side of the peninsula, along St. Joe Bay, is bordered with a thin band of coastal salt marsh vegetation, beyond which extends a shallow underwater grass at up to one half mile wide. At the edges of the grass at the waters depth increases to 18 feet or more. The edge of the grass at is the actual shoreward edge of the sand body on which the original barrier islands were formed. The barrier dune systems play an important part in protecting the shore line of Port St Joe. Without the peninsula halting storm surges and waves from Hurricanes, the shoreline of Port St Joe would be much different. For information about Florida State Parks, visit www. oridastateparks.org. Until Next time, From the Rangers at St. Joseph Peninsula State ParkStar Staff ReportThis sick turtle was rescued at Indian Pass during the St. Vincent Island Open House last Friday by the refuge Manager Shelly Stiaes and the Supporters of St. Vincent Volunteers. David Moody of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was instrumental in getting the turtle to shore. Also, two very new residents of Port St. Joe, who came out for the Open House, Don Stoneburger and Kathy Strnad, volunteered to not take the barge to the island when they heard a volunteer was needed to transport the sick turtle to Panama City Beach. The two drove the sick turtle to Gulf World for rehabilitation.Special to The StarThe possibilities for taking advantage of the upcoming license-free shing day, Saturday April 7, in Florida are almost endless. Thats because people of all ages can cast their lines into 3 million acres of lakes, ponds and reservoirs and 12,000 miles of shable rivers, streams and canals. The hardest part might be picking your destination. These abundant resources, coupled with responsible freshwater sh management, are why Florida is known as the Fishing Capital of the World. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) scheduled the rst of four license-free recreational shing days on this holiday weekend so more people will have the chance to get out and try their luck. Plus, this weekend coincides with a productive freshwater shing period, when the weather is usually pleasant. Many of Floridas recreational sport shes, such as black bass, bluegill and redear sun sh, move into the shallows to spawn during spring, making them more available for anglers to catch. Besides enjoying the fun of reeling in a sh, people nd that recreational shing is a good motivator to enjoy the great outdoors. In fact, shing is a prime reason lots of folks get outside in the rst place. Fishing is a low-cost, wholesome form of entertainment, which is why the FWC offers four days when a recreational shing license is not needed. The FWC also made June 2 and Sept. 1 license-free saltwater shing days and set June 9 as the second license-free freshwater shing day. These days coincide with a holiday weekend, National Fishing and Boating Week or open-harvest seasons for popular bay scallops, lobster and king mackerel. All other bag limit, season and size restrictions apply on these dates for recreational, not commercial, shing. To make your shing day successful, check out My FWC.com/Fishing for freshwater shing tips, locations and rules. So escape the hustle and bustle Saturday by telling everyone youve gone shing. But dont forget to take your kids and spouse and friends to share the fun.Special to The StarWith nesting season under way for shorebirds like the snowy plover, black skimmer and American oystercatcher, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) asks beachgoers to take care not to disturb their nests. Wellinformed, courteous beachgoers can provide needed relief to these stressed species. The snowy plover, for example, nests along Gulf Coast beaches through August, and its population has shrunk to as few as 200 pairs in this state. Increased human activity and development on coastal barrier island beaches are among the key reasons that snowy plovers and other beachnesting species are listed as threatened or endangered. Shorebird nesting continues through August. By recognizing the warning signs that you have entered an area of beach where shorebird nesting is taking place, you can save chicks and eggs from a needless death, said Nancy Douglass, who works on shorebird conservation at the FWC. If you notice birds suddenly stand up, become agitated or y about at your approach, you are likely entering a nesting site. Above the high-tide mark, snowy plovers and other species, such as Wilsons plovers and least terns, lay well-camou aged eggs in shallow depressions on the sand. This behavior makes the eggs nearly invisible to predators. Unfortunately, the camou age effect also makes these eggs nearly invisible to the untrained human eye. Further complicating the issue of shorebird conservation: Any disturbance by people, pets or vehicles can cause shorebirds to temporarily or permanently abandon their nests, resulting in the death of young chicks or the destruction of the eggs by predators. Once shorebird parents are frightened from the nest, exposed chicks or eggs can succumb to the heat of the Florida summer sun in as little as ve minutes, and predation by gulls and crows increases signi cantly when parents are forced to leave, even for a few moments. Here are some simple things you can do to help nesting shorebirds: Keep your distance. If birds become agitated or leave their nests, you are too close! A general rule is to stay at least 300 feet from a nest. *Respect posted areas. Some shorebird nesting areas are posted with symbolic fencing, which consists of signs on posts connected by twine marked with agging tape. Avoid marked nesting areas and cross only at designated pathways. These posted beach areas may shift during the nesting season, depending on where the birds have chosen to lay eggs at any given time. *Never intentionally force birds to y. When birds are chased or disturbed, they use energy they need for nesting and migration. *Keep pets away from nesting areas. Even wellbehaved pets can be perceived as a threat. If you take pets to the beach, keep them leashed and away from nesting areas. *Keep the beach clean and do not feed wildlife. Food scraps attract predators such as raccoons, gulls and crows to our beaches. Litter can entangle birds, sea turtles and other wildlife. Spread the word. If you see people disturbing nesting birds, gently let them know how their actions may hurt the birds survival. If they continue to disturb nesting birds, please report their activities to the FWCs Wildlife Alert hotline at 888404-FWCC (3922), #FWC or *FWC on your cell phone or by texting Tip@MyFWC. com. Because many Florida shorebirds are listed as threatened or endangered, it is a violation of state and federal laws to harass or take any endangered or threatened birds, their eggs or young. To learn more, download the Share the Beach with Beach-Nesting Birds brochure from the Living with Wildlife area at MyFWC.com/Wildlife. Or check out the Florida Shorebird Alliance at www. shorebirdalliance.org. Birds nesting on Florida shores requires beachgoers to be awareTurtle rescued during St. Vincent Open HouseSt. Joseph Peninsula State Parks Dunes SPECIAL TO THE STARErosion along the beaches at the north end of the park.Special to The StarAt the River Delta Bass Club of Apalachicolas Feb. 2012 tournament, held Feb. 25 in White City, Lloyd Alford, top, nished in rst place with 13.37 pounds. Mike Pridgen, bottom, nished in second with 13.19 pounds. Finishing third with 11.85 pounds was Gerald Dykes. Dewitt Galloway nished fourth with 10.79 pounds. Fifth place went to Greg Dykes with 10.36 pounds, followed by sixth place, Brandon King 9.49 pounds; seventh place James Newsome, 9.20 pounds; eighth place Paul Newsome 8.80 pounds; ninth place Alvin Martina 8.43 pounds; 10th place Pap Duncan 5.42 pounds; 11th place Sherman Alford 4.99 pounds; and 12th place Mark Yowell, with 3.00 pounds. The club is supported by Apalachicola Ace Hardware and Fishermans Choice Bait and Tackle of Eastpoint, For info about River Delta Bass Club, call Pridgen at 653-5563. LICENSE-FREE FISHING SATURDAY ALFORD WINS BASS TOURNEYLLOYD ALFORD MIKE PRIDGEN COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI

PAGE 11

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com ASection WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847 29 Th 1034am 1.0 727pm 1.2 244am 0.0 201pm 1.1 30 Fr 1147am 1.0 828pm 1.2 358am 0.1 327pm 1.1 31 Sa 1245pm 1.0 947pm 1.1 516am 0.1 513pm 1.0 Date HighLow%Precip Thu, Apr 582 64 0% Fri, Apr 681 65 0% Sat, Apr 775 54 0% Sun, Apr 875 55 0% Mon, Apr 975 55 0% Tues, Apr 1075 55 0% Wed, Apr 1175 55 0% Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 11Star Staff ReportIn a season of ups and downs, there have been more ups than downs for the Wewahitchka High School baseball team. On March 19, the Gators downed Franklin County 8-4. Austin Chumney started and pitched four innings, allowing three runs on two hits and striking out three. Rashard Ranie was 1 for 3 with two runs and three runs batted in and Hunter McDaniel was 1 for 3 with a run and three RBIs. The Gators downed Altha 5-4 on March 23, the margin saved by a diving catch in center by Justin Flowers and a sliding catch by McDaniel in the out eld for the nal two outs of the game. Heath Bailey started and went the distance, allowing four runs on four hits and fanning eight. Flowers went 2 for 4 with a pair of doubles and scored a run and Jay Shiver was 2 for 3 with a runscored and an RBI. The Gators played two on March 27, losing 7-5 to Aucilla Christian and beating Vernon 9-5. Against Aucilla, Austin Guffey started and went six innings on the mound, allowing eight hits and four earned runs. Cole Harper was 2 for 5 with two doubles, scored twice and drove in one. Chris Myrick earned the win on the mound against Vernon, tossing seven innings and scattering seven hits while striking out two and walking one. Flowers was 4 for 4 with a double, three RBIs and a run-scored, Ranie was 2 for 3 with two RBIs and McDaniel had a pair of hits, drove in one and scored twice. Last Friday, the Gators fell to Sneads 14-4 with McDaniel driving in two runs on one hit. The Gators were edged by Tallahasse John Paul II 5-4 on Monday. Walding went 3 for 3 with a double, drove in one run and scored another for Wewahitchka. The Gators were at Graceville on Tuesday.Star Staff ReportFour consecutive losses in the past week have dropped the Wewahitchka High School softball team to 8-10 overall as the season nears its close. On March 26, the Lady Gators fell 9-5 to Sneads. Ashleigh Price pitched 4 1/3 innings, walking ve and striking out three while taking the loss. Jessica Smith pitched the nal 2 2/3 innings, walking two. Tara Walding was 3 for 4 with a double and Jaden Rouse was 2 for 4 with a double for Wewahitchka. The following night the Lady Gators dropped a runrule game to Arnold 12-2. Price pitched all ve innings, striking out ve and walking one. Cheyenne Luckie, Alyssa Bass and Caitlin Burch were each 1 for 2 at the plate, Burch driving in a run. Smith was 1 for 3 with an RBI. Two nights later, the Lady Gators fell 14-2 to county foe Port St. Joe. Price went ve innings on the mound, walking none and striking out none. Smith and Tori Lanter each went 2 for 3 and Luckie was 1 for 2. This past Monday, the Lady Gators dropped a 4-2 decision to Franklin County. Price pitched three innings allowing all four Seahawk runs and Smith pitched the nal three innings. Ireland Hamm had a hit, Rouse was 2 for 3 and Bass was 1 for 1 for Wewahitchka. The Lady Gators were at West Gadsden on Wednesday, host Ponce de Leon tonight and host East Gadsden on April 12.Senior night tonight at 7 p.m. at Lady Shark FieldStar Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe High School softball team hosted the Bozeman Bucs last Tuesday night, pounding Bozeman for a ve-inning run-rule victory. MaKayla Ramsey started and pitched all ve innings for the Lady Sharks (now 15-5 overall), allowing no runs and striking out four and scattering ve hits to earn her 10th win of the season. Leading hitters for the Port St. Joe were Katie Lacour with two hits; Shannon Pridgeon with a double and single and Haley Wood, Katie Gardner, Brittany King, and Miranda Gref each had one hit. Hitting has come around, said Port St. Joe coach Jim Belin. The defense is very solid again, turning a double play. We are playing really well right now! On Thursday the Lady Sharks traveled to county rival Wewahitchka and won 14-2, again on a run-rule after ve innings. Ramsey went the ve innings on the mound, facing 22 batters and allowing six hits, two earned runs and striking out six and walking no one. Leading the Port St. Joe attack were Lacour and Gardner, who each went 4 for 4. Gardners hits included her third home run of the season and she drove in seven runs. Pridgeon had two hits, including a double, with Wood, Gref, Christian Laine, and Kesley Miles each adding two hits. The next night, the Lady Sharks hosted Franklin County and won 11-0, again in ve innings. Ramsey was the winning pitcher, facing 18 batters and giving up two hits, walking none, while striking out one. Lacour was 3 for 3 for Port St. Joe and Pridgeon had two hits including a double. Laine also had a pair of hits, including a double and Gardner hit her fourth home run. This past Monday, Port St. Joe hosted Marianna and won 10-1, avenging a defeat from earlier in the season. Ramsey recorded her 100th strikeout of the year, pitching seven innings and allowing three hits and one earned run while striking out six and walking ve. Lacour was 5 for 5, Pridgeon 4 for 4 and Gardner had two hits.Special to The StarA semi-professional football team is now being started in Franklin County. Organizer Nate Tatum is seeking coaches and players, age 18 and older, to take part in the team. Tatum plans to use the team name Sharks, reminiscent of the former Apalachicola High School teams, and the team colors of blue and gold. He is seeking an af liation with the Florida Football Alliance at www.ffafootball. org. Tatum hopes to form a team in Apalachicola made up of players from anywhere between Panama City and Tallahassee. All are welcome. As importantly, he needs the help of coaches, both a head coach and offensive and defensive coordinators. For more information, call 899-0800 or Silverfox1029@yahoo.comSpecial to The StarPort St Joe High School has showcases with dozens and dozens of trophies and plaques but this summer it will house a special Football Memorabilia case. The Port St. Joe Football related memorabilia case will be displayed in the soon to be newly refurbished football locker room. At present time we have a couple of jerseys and lettermans jackets from both state championship teams. The actual football from the 1971 State game will be on display as well as one of the helmets. We are still needing items and need the help of the community and football players. The items on loan to the school will have a brass name plate to recognize the individuals who have donated them. The memorabilia case will be the focal point of the new locker room and a constant reminder of the rich heritage of champions at Port St. Joe High School. If you have any items please contact Traci Gaddis at 227-6770 (cell) or 648-5474 wk) or ggaddis@ gtcom.net.Star Staff ReportPort St. Joe Junior/Senior High School will conduct cheerleading tryouts in the school gymnasium April 30 through May 4. Each athlete must have a current health physical, parental consent and a signed copy of the cheerleading policies and procedures. You must have all three forms completed in order to start practice. Without these documents you will not be able to tryout. To be eligible for tryouts you must have a 2.0 GPA or better and no Level 2 offense referral. Tryout practice will begin at 3 p.m. ET each day and will continue until 4:30 p.m. Any questions contact Lindsay Williams at 229-6251 or lwilliams@gulf.k12. .us.Wewahitchka Gators continue mixed seasonStar Staff ReportDuring a rough week on the diamond, the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks were one-hit twice and lost a wild 10-9 game to Franklin County. The Tiger Sharks were one-hit by Bozeman 9-1 on Tuesday and managed just one hit against Florida High on Saturday. In between, Port St. Joe traveled to Franklin County and managed just ve hits and made ve key errors, according to Coach T.C. Brewer, while losing 10-9. The Tiger Sharks hosted Liberty County on Tuesday, are at Blountstown on Friday and celebrate Senior Night at 7 p.m. ET next Tuesday with a game against Liberty County.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | Florida FreedomThe Port St. Joe baseball team fell 10-9 at Franklin County last week. Tiger Sharks drop three in a row Lady Gators fall under .500 Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High cheerleading tryouts PSJHS football title memorabilia sought SPECIAL TO THE STARSeniors Katie Gardner, left, and Katie Lacour, right, will be honored during Senior Night at 7 p.m. ET tonight.Lady Sharks now 15-5 SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL TEAM IN THE WORKS

PAGE 12

LocalA12 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012and coach in the Port St. Joe Dixie Youth organization. That service continued when he was elected as Gulf County Commissioner in 1992 and served on the Board until 2000. In 2001, then Gov. Jeb Bush appointed Yeager to the Port St. Joe Port Authority and he served in that capacity until 2008 when he was again elected as Gulf County Commissioner District 5. It has been a privilege to serve the citizens of Gulf County and with the continued support of the public I would be honored to continue my record of public service. I am humbled and I appreciate the opportunities the people of Gulf County have given me to serve them. I am proud of the accomplishments we have achieved together and I will work hard to continue those successes. One of my goals when I was elected in 2008 was to reduce the property tax burden on our citizens and I am proud that in the last three years we have achieved a near 35 percent reduction. Some of the accomplishments we have achieved together are: Cape San Blas bike path improvements and extensions, sidewalk repair in Oak Grove, a new re station on Cape San Blas, Salinas Park Bayside development, Indian Pass boat ramp repairs with a new restroom facility, Odena Landing construction, Stump Hole armoring, widening areas of County Road 30 and others. These projects have happened because of the help of many and the leadership role I have taken to accomplish things that are important to our citizens. As the incoming chair of the Small County Coalition and the leadership role I have with the Florida Association of Counties, I have been able to develop relationships with state and federal agencies that have allowed us to nd funding for projects we otherwise might not be able to complete. We also work with our state and federal elected of cials on legislation that is important to Gulf County. We worked with Rep. Jimmy Patronis to pass the only local bill ever to pass for Gulf County that helped protect private property owners from negative impacts of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection moving the Coastal Construction line on Cape San Blas. We are working with Congressman Steve Southerland on legislation to correct an error by U.S. Fish and Wildlife when they erroneously placed the Cape and Indian Pass in a Coastal Barrier Resource Act designation. This bill has now been led and if passed could be the most important federal legislation ever for Gulf County. While these and other projects have been signi cant, one of the most important and the one I am most proud, is the collaboration and cooperation of so many that worked together to bring Eastern Shipbuilding to our community with up to 200 jobs in the near future. All parties, Gulf County, the City of Port St. Joe, Port St. Joe Port Authority and the Chamber/EDC, working together is a model for future partnerships in bringing diversi cation to Gulf Countys job market. It is a model that I was proud to be part of designing and these partners now meet once a month, working together for the betterment of Gulf County. Another milestone is the Memorandum of Understanding agreement between the Port St. Joe Port Authority and the St. Joe Company outlining a partnership going forward, putting the past behind and working together to develop port operations on properties owned by both entities. Working together we have a bright future here in Gulf County and I am excited for our residents and thank you for the support you have given to me during my tenure and I look forward to our continued efforts to make our County a better place. YEAGER from page A1 Over 35 Years Experience.208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe850.229.1111www.BaysideFloristPSJ.comYour Full Service Wedding and Event Florist New Sorrelli Arriving Daily! Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONMGR. SPRINGPROMOTION NEW CUSTOMERS 1/2OFF 2 MONTHSGULF COUNTY AND MEXICO BEACH (850) 247.8956www.coastalpoolandspa.com 2012 Election NoticeNotice is hereby given that the City of Port St. Joes Primary Election will be held Tuesday, May 8, 2012, in the Fire Station. Polls open at 7:00 A.M., ET, and close 7:00 P.M., ET. Registration books are now open at the oce of Linda Grin, Gulf County Supervisor of Elections, and will remain open thru Monday April 9, 2012, at 5:00 P.M., ET. Candidate qualifying begins Wednesday, March 21, 2012, at 12:00 Noon and ends on Wednesday, March 28, 2012, at Noon. e following oces will be up for election: Commissioner Group III and Commissioner Group IV. Beginning April 28, 2012 May 5, 2012, (includes Saturdays of April 28th and May 5th) Early Voting will be held at the Supervisor of Elections oce located at 401 Long Avenue from 9:00 A.M., ET to 5:00 P.M., ET. No Sunday voting on April 29, 2012. Also, Absentee Ballots may be requested now but will be mailed after received from printer. e City of Port St. Joe who were both longtime educators in Wewahitchka and still reside there, and Lamar, who also lives in Wewahitchka, and the late Ada Davis. I attended Port St. Joe Elementary School and graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 1998 as valedictorian. After graduation I received a baseball scholarship to attend the University of West Florida in Pensacola, where I graduated in 2002 with a Bachelors degree in Psychology. I attended Barry University School of Law where I received my Law degree in 2005. After law school I began working for the State Attorneys Of ce for the 14th Judicial Circuit in the Port St. Joe of ce. I was admitted to the Florida Bar in 2006 and was sworn in as an Assistant State Attorney. I worked in that capacity until January 2009, when I accepted a position with the State Attorneys Of ce for the 2nd Judicial Circuit in Apalachicola where I am currently employed. During my time with the State Attorneys Of ce I have had the opportunity to represent the State of Florida in thousands of cases including felonies, misdemeanors and juveniles. I have tried numerous cases, both jury trials and trials before a judge alone. I have come to learn that the cases I handle are not just a set of facts and pieces of evidence, but are each a unique set of circumstances that greatly impact the lives of the people involved. I have a great deal of experience working with people who are dealing with some of the most dif cult times of their lives, both victims and their families, as well as those accused of crimes and their families. After law school, I chose to come home to Gulf County because I wanted to give something back to the community that gave me so much growing up. Countless citizens, not only took an interest in my life and where I was going and how I was doing, they actively participated in it and gave of themselves to help me. I want to be your County Judge because I believe that I am the right person at the right time to serve the people of Gulf County in that capacity. I believe that it is time for new leaders to step forward in Gulf County and be servants of the people. If elected Judge I promise to be open, accessible, and accountable to the people. I promise to uphold the law and treat every litigant with the dignity and respect that they deserve. I have the strength, courage, and integrity to the right thing, even when it may not be the popular thing. Most of all, I promise to treat every person equally and be a Judge for all of Gulf County. PATTERSON from page A1

PAGE 13

COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Thursday, April 5, 2012Star Staff Report Spring is in the air along the Forgotten Coast. The Salt Air Farmers Market begins its fourth year this Saturday, April 7, providing Port St. Joe and surrounding areas fresh produce, home-baked breads, jams, fresh seafood, our local Tupelo Honey and a variety of knickknacks from local artists and craftsmen. Supported by the Small Farms Program at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, and headed by Dr. Jennifer Taylor, the Salt Air Farmers Market is a true grassroots, community effort. As a result of Taylors guidance, the Salt Air Market draws both local and regional farmers. The Salt Air farmers from North Florida and South Georgia bring in seasonal fruits and vegetables. Longtime member, Dorothy and Willard Barnhart of Barnhart Farms, were recently named the 2011 Jefferson County Outstanding Farm Family of the Year. The Barnhart family owns about 162 acres in various parts of Jefferson County and harvests about 50 chemical free acres at a time. Planting from seeds, the family rotates crops according to need. Some of the crops that the Barnharts raise include: broccoli, collard greens, turnips, tomatoes, carrots, zucchini, squash, various peppers, spinach, Red Russian kale and two types of okra. B&H Farms of Pelham grows organic tomatoes, eggplant, cucumbers, peppers, squash, greens, lettuce and herbs. B&H also offers home-baked pies and quiche. At the market, our own Indian Pass Nursery specializes in native and hard-tond heirloom tomatoes. The Salt Air Farmers Market offers a venue for local artists to show off handcrafted soaps, unique tie dye garments, hand painted glassware, jewelry, shell art and more. Fresh coffee is donated by No Name Caf Books and More and is sold along with Lorindas delicious homemade breads jams and chow-chow. As a result of the market, City Commons Park downtown Port St. Joe where the market is held, was redesigned and upgraded through city and county funding, community effort, grants and the team at our local Redevelopment Agency. It is now a beautiful and welcoming park, complete with a monument to the paper mill workers of Port St. Joe. The Salt Air Famers Market has built a pavilion that has become the focal point of City Commons Park. To encourage community involvement, the market offers free tables at every market for the use of local non-pro t organizations; PTAs, Softball Teams, Churches, Scouts, etc. are invited to join us at each market. This year the Salt Air Farmers Market has partnered with From the Heart of Sopchoppy recording studio will be offering live entertainment by Mimi Hearn at the opening market on April 7. Some portions of the market will be lmed for an episode of From the Heart Music Hour to be broadcast on WFSU at a later date. The Salt Air Farmers Market is held on the rst and third Saturday of every month April though November at the corner of Reid Avenue and State Highway 71 in Port St. Joe from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. You can also visit the web site at www. saltairmarket.com or follow the Salt Air Farmers Market on Facebook.Salt Air Farmers Market returns Saturday Star Staff ReportThe Junior Service League of Port St. Joe will hold its annual Easter Egg Hunt beginning at 10 a.m. ET Saturday at the Eighth Street Park in Port St. Joe. In addition to the funlled hunt, children will meet and have a photo opportunity with the Easter Bunny, as well as enjoying making crafts. All kids ages 10 and under are welcome to attend the event; admission is free. And for the adults, dont forget to bring the cameras! The Junior Service League is an organization of resident women whose goal is to bene t Gulf County children. The Easter Egg Hunt is just one of many programs the League sponsors throughout the year. Every contribution to the Junior Service League is used to promote the welfare and bene t of children with needs in our community. For more information about the Easter Egg Hunt, please contact Lindsay Fisher at 706654-6313 or lindsayeliz sher@ gmail.com or The Junior Service League, P.O. Box 114, Port St. Joe, FL 32457, jslpsj@gmail.com.JSL Easter egg hunt SaturdayBy BEVERLY MOUNT-DOUDSSpecial to The Star Editors note: This is the second of a series of articles about some of the historical gures that made Gulf County. This story starts with a letter from Georges son, Ned Patton. Ned was in his 90s when he wrote me and told me this story, and these were his words:Bear Hunting in Port St. JoeBy Ned A. PattonThis story needs an introduction to be believable. My father was George A. Patton Jr. and he was a bear hunter by choice. At age 73 (in 1945), my father related several of his many, many hunting stories to a Mr. Jacobs, a writer for The Florida Sportsman. Mr. Jacobs article was published a short time later, and a copy of that issue has survived in our family records. In the article, there are several of my dads favorite stories. One story includes a lost timber wolf, another story is about a big bob cat; both happen to have occurred on the San Blas Peninsula. In writing the article, Mr. Jacob refers to yet another bear story which started on that same peninsula. He says he hopes to write that story another time. Dad died about three years later. The story apparently was never written. As I happen to participate in that hunt, Im going to try and tell this bear story. I must have been 13 or 14 years old at the time. We were living on a small farm near Port St. Joe, actually on the site of the old City of St. Joseph (now Oak Grove, formerly know as Patton Place.) From time to time, farmers, dairymen or bee keepers would have a bear attack their livestock and make off with a pig or calf. Needless to say, this was a serious lost for the owner. The likelihood of a repeat visit was high. That was the basis for a message from a pig farmer begging for help. Early next morning, my dad loaded the dogs and me in our pick-up truck and headed for Cape San Blas. Two hunting friends and an extra horse had left earlier on horseback to meet us at the site. It was a hot day in June probably about 1925. The bear had a 24 hour headstart and we had no idea where he had gone after stealing the pig. That was for the dogs to nd out. After scouting around for a bit, the dogs and horsemen soon found the bear heading for the San Blas Peninsula. The narrow sliver of land extends about 15 miles and forms St. Joseph Bay. There are no roads, little vegetation and hot! The chase to catch up with the bear consumed most of the day. The dogs were getting very tired and my dad concluded we must halt at Eagle Pass and plan to come back the next day. With one hunter prepared to spend the night, he would build several small res with driftwood to keep the bear from escaping the trap we had him in. The rest GEORGE A. PATTON: A TRUE FLORIDA SPORTSMAN PART IIFlorida Pioneers: a tribute to the many families of Gulf County is free. And for the adults, dont forget to bring the cameras! The Junior Service League organization of resident women whose goal is to bene t Gulf County children. Easter Hunt is just one of many programs the League sponsors to downtown Port St. Joe Friday Cruise in By TIM CROFT227-72827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Port St. Joe Downtown Merchants Committee has a suggestion for this Friday evening: Cruise into downtown and check out the cars. From 5-8 p.m. ET this Friday the rst Friday of the month, establishing a summer-long cruising strip the Merchants Committee will host a car show. The lineup will take place on Second Street between U.S. 98 and Reid Avenue, with the hope that interest from the public and the passion of gear heads will force the expansion of the show further into downtown. It is to draw people to downtown and hopefully to the stores and restaurants in the downtown area, said Dana Boyer, chairperson for the rst Cruise in to Port St. Joe. And you meet such a variety of people from all walks of life at one of these car shows. (Husband) George and I did a lot of research. We went to a lot of shows and that was the most interesting and fun thing to me; the diversity and passion (car owners) have for their cars. The show will attract everything from muscle cars to antiques, along with what Jim Muldoon of Mexico Beach called joke cars, such as his vintage, incredibly well-kept 1988 Yugo, widely considered by car enthusiasts to have been the Edsel on steroids of its day a bomb. PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOHN PARKERSee PIONEERS B5 See CRUISE IN B5

PAGE 14

B2 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012As the spring growing season begins, its important to get a watering program established for your lawn grass. As we all know, water is essential for an attractive, healthy lawn. During the time of year when Florida doesnt receive much rainfall, its necessary to supplement the water requirement of your lawn grass with an effective watering program. Florida usually gets a lot of rainfall each year, so it might not seem a lack of water could become a serious problem for your lawn grass. But remember Florida soils are quite sandy, for the most part, do not hold water very long. Also, during the very hot days of summer, water quickly is lost from the soil. So, to keep your grass lush and green, you need to have some kind of watering program for your lawn. Basically, the watering program contains three factors: Determining when to water, the amount of water to apply and the method of applying water; well consider each of these in some detail. There are several ways you can tell when your lawn needs water. If you notice spots in the lawn which rst look bluish-grass in color, and then, turn brown, water is needed. Another way to tell if the lawn needs water is to see if footprints remain, in the grass for a long time after the lawn has been walked on. A wellwatered lawn can withstand a normal amount of traf c without leaving prints in the grass. Still another way is to take a soil sample from the root zone of the grass. If it feels dry and crumbly, water is needed. Certain cultural practices tend to go along with a need for water. High temperatures and strong winds will cause plants to lose water faster than they can absorb it. When your lawn shows signs of needing water, water it immediately. A delay might cause permanent damage to your lawn. How much water to apply depends on how much water is already present in the soil, and on the soils ability to hold water. You want to wet the entire root zone, but not saturate the soil. A general rule for watering you lawn is to apply from one-half to one inch of water which means about 300 to 600 gallons of water for a thousand square feet of grass. During the winter, you can water about once per week. In the summer, however, the lawn might need water as often as three times a week. Keep in mind this is a general rule. All soils are different, so you might have to adjust these amounts of water for your particular lawn. To correctly apply water, avoid extremes. Light, frequent waterings are inef cient and produce shallow root systems. Too much water, however, also is harmful to the grass because it keeps the root zone constantly saturated. Roots need air as well as water to function properly. Too much water decreases their growth. Never allow the water to run at a faster rate than it can be absorbed by the soil. The excess only will run off and be wasted. The time to water also is important. If possible, try to water your lawn early in the morning. Avoid night watering since this might encourage lawn diseases. Only water during the hottest part of the day when it is necessary to cool the lawn to prevent heat damage. For more information on watering your lawn, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 2292909 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas.u .edu. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER Service is what we sell. Check our prices before you buy!www.lightingbylavonne.com Check our prices before you buy! Service is what we sell. 50% 75% OFF!Lighting & Ceiling Fans 3631 Hwy 231, Panama City FL 850-769-1232 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Society SPECIAL TO THE STARLinda Fisher of Sanford, Mich., is the winner of a raf e for a two-night, three-day stay in the renovated Keepers Cottage at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse during the Florida Lighthouse Challenge April 2122.The drawing was held last Friday as Meloney Douds, left, and tour guide Frank Perry did the honors of drawing the winning ticket at the Lighthouse Gift Shop. The Lighthouse Lady, Beverly Mount-Douds, thanks everyone who donated and said to Linda Fisher, Congratulations, and see you on April 20 for check in. Mr. and Mrs. John Howard Lovett, of Panama City, announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter Valerie Frances to Douglas Blair Sale, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Julien Sale of Panama City. The bride-elect is the paternal granddaughter of Mrs. Joel Byron Lovett, of Port St. Joe, and the late Mr. Joel Byron Lovett. She is the maternal granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Dykes Webb, of Chipley. Her anc is the paternal grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davis Sale, of Panama City and the maternal grandson of Mrs. James Fuller Holly, of Orlando, and the late Dr. James Fuller Holly. Ms. Lovett is a graduate of Chipley High School and the University of Florida. She is employed by the Bay County Board of County Commissioners as the public information of cer. Her anc is a graduate of Rutherford High School and of Washington and Lee University. He is employed by Landrum Professional as a business development manager. A May wedding is planned. There will be a bene t yard sale Saturday morning, in front of Bluewater Realty in the Port City Shopping Center in Port St. Joe. All donations are appreciated. Please come out to show your support. All proceeds will bene t the family of Lisa Turman. Donations may also be made to a Benevolent Account No.1968696 in Tyndall Federal Credit Union in Port St. Joe. ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension directorKnow the best ways to water your lawnValerie Lovett, Douglas Sale engagedSPECIAL TO THE STAR Bene t yard sale Saturday MICHIGAN RESIDENT WINS LIGHTHOUSE RAFFLESpecial to The StarAmerican Legion Post 116 of Port St. Joe will hold a bene t sh fry from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. EDT ( or until all the sh is gone) tomorrow, Good Friday. This event will take place at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. Along with sh locally caught, cleaned and fried by our members, there will be baked beans, coleslaw and hush puppies. Soft drinks and water will be available. A $6 donation will be used by the Legion to support various community projects. Tickets can be purchased in advanced or at the park the day of the event. For more information, call 227-3776. Legion Post 116 will also have a representative there with information regarding joining our Post. Interested veterans can also go to www.legion.org. American Legion bene t sh fry, membership drive

PAGE 15

The Star| B3Thursday, April 5, 2012 Everyone is invited to our Call: 229-LIFE (5433) for more info Easter Service Easter Service APRIL 8, 10:30 AMin the PSJ Elementary School Auditorium Special music featuring: Lisa Keels, Ralph Barwick & Austin Clayton KIDS: Church in the Gym, special visit from Mr. Hare and ... Egg hunt after the service!He died for all. so all are welcome! School NewsBy Chad QuinnGeneral InformationProm is scheduled for Saturday, April 21. The prom theme this year is Viva Las Vegas. The prom will begin at 8 p.m., the Senior Walk will be at 11:30 p.m., and the prom will be over at midnight. This year, several parents are hosting an After the Prom party, which will take place in the Centennial Building immediately following the dance. Coach Gannon is selling last years white game jersey for $40; white-and-purple game jerseys from 2010-2011 for $20; and white (No Pain No Gain) T-shirts for $10. See Mrs. Taylor in the school of ce to purchase one of these. Lady Tiger Shark Volleyball Camp The Port St Joe High School Lady Tiger Sharks will host a volleyball camp for younger girls. The camp is designed to allow players to learn the fundamentals of bump passing, overhead passing, and serving. Campers will learn from the Port St. Joe High School coaching staff and players how playing and competing the right way is always fun. The camp is designed for girls going into the fourth grade through eighth grade in the fall of 2012. The camp will be held at the PSJ High School gymnasium. We will have stations for the young players to rotate through and nish the day on Friday with an afternoon tournament. We will provide snacks and drinks on Monday through Thursday plus on Friday we will have a pizza lunch. After lunch on Friday, we will play as many games as we can before 3 p.m. ET. What to bring: Your own kneepads. Water, snacks, volleyballs, etc. will be provided When: MondayThursday, June 4-7, 9 a.m. until noon ET. Friday, June 8, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET Fee: $35 Deadline for Registration: May 15 Please register early so we can order T-shirts for the girls. Registration forms are available in the high school front of ce or online at http://psjhs-gcs.schoolloop.com/ and check the news section of the main page. For more information, contact Coach Taylor at 229-8251 or by e-mail at wtaylor@ gulf.k12. .us (email is the best way to contact me). Congratulations to the following cadets who earned recognition for their outstanding work in the Community from the Tupelo Lodge No. 289 Free and Accepted Masons of Florida at the lodges Salute to America Dinner on March 26: C/ LeAnna Collins, C/ Javarri Beachum, C/ Ryan Baker, C/ Tyler McGuf n. April 9: Holiday School Closed All Day April 10: FCAT Reading Retakes at 8 a.m. April 11: FCAT Reading Retakes at noon. April 12: FCAT Math retakes at 8 a.m.Clubs April 5: 11:50 a.m., Junior Executive Board Meeting April 10: 10:45 a.m., SWAT meeting Jr. High; 11:50 a.m., National Honor Society April 11: 2 p.m., SGA Elections7th period April 12: 11:50 a.m. Junior Executive Board MeetingSportsSpring football begins May 1. You must have a physical before this date and check in with Coach Gannon to get all equipment. You must have a parent consent form signed. April 5: 6 p.m., Softball at home vs. Larue County, Ky., (varsity only) Time TBA April 6: 7 p.m., baseball, varsity only at Blountstown April 10: 7 p.m. softball at Rutherford (varsity only) April 10: 7 p.m. baseball (varsity only) at home vs. Liberty County Special to The StarWewahitchka Elementary School Media Specialist Kim Ludlam hosted a Family Night at the Book Fair on Thursday, March 29. We were happy to welcome childrens book author Ronda Friend for a full day of activities with our students and a special presentation for parents that evening. Many parents, grandparents, staff and students enjoyed the night of fun lled reading and wonderful snacks provided by the Wewahitchka Womans Club. Pre-Kindergarten: Kate Fidler (not pictured); Kindergarten: Landon Lee; First grade: Prince Jones; Second grade: Amari Nickson; Third grade:Clay Fox; Fourth grade: Sara Whit eld; Fifth grade: Cole Haddock (not pictured); and Sixth grade: Lauren Hall. Bus Riders of the Week: Pete Bernal, Alyson Sheppard and Layny Longley.Star Staff ReportThere will be a Digital Photo Presentation course offered from 9-11 a.m. EDT on four consecutive Wednesdays, April 11, April 18, April 25 and May 2 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College. The fee for the course is $45.Register at the Gulf/ Franklin campus in Port St. Joe prior to the rst class, April 11. Students will experience the bene ts of using digital photos along with the computer in order to share moments in color and with text. This course will teach how to use Microsoft PowerPoint and bring your photography and photo editing to life. Present memories with captions and bullet-point text to enhance your photography experience. You will be able to create slideshows and digital scrapbook. Team taught, by two of your favorite Education Encore instructors, Lana Scroggins with her enthusiastic expertise in computers and gadgets and Sue Bull, experienced in photography and photo editing, at Gulf Coast State College. Come learn how to create, edit and share your digital photo slideshows in the world of computing. For more information contact susanbull@ bellsouth.net, lws@ mindspring.com, jbarr@ gulfcoast.edu or call Jim Barr at 873-3513.Digital photo course at Gulf, Franklin FAMILY NIGHT AT WES BOOK FAIR DAZZLING DOLPHINS

PAGE 16

FAITHPage B4 www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) First Baptist Church of Mexico Beach 823 N. 15th St. Good Friday ServiceApril 6th at 12 noon, at 6pm the movie Passion of the ChristSundaySonrise Service on the beach April 8th at 6am, at the Sea St ramp off of higway 98 in Mexico Beach(bring blanket and lawn chair) Serving free breakfast after Sonrise Service. More Info Contact Pastor Eddie @ 850-340-0921 COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 SAVE THE DATE SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 2012 HOWARD CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH COVERED DISH & GOSPEL SING WITH NAOMI & THE SEGOS Howard Creek Baptist ChurchA Place of Grace Sunday School...........................9:45 am (EST) Sunday Morning Worship........11:00 am (EST) Wednesday Evening Worship....6:00 pm (EST) April 5th Maundy Thurs. 7 p.m. Communion Service April 6th Good Friday, 7 p.m. Tenebrae Service April 8th, Easter Sunday, 8 a.m. Sunset Park 9:30A.M. BREAKFAST ON EASTER SUNDAY 11 a.m. Communion Service 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL (850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Thursday, April 5, 2012This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week.Special to The StarThere will be an Easter Sunrise Service at 7:30 a.m. ET at Frank Pate Park on April 8. This is an ecumenical service sponsored by the Port St. Joe Ministerial Association. The sermon this year will be given by Vicki Summers of Highland View Church of God. Passion Week at Victory TempleVictory Temple First Born Holiness Church Seasoned Women Department will be hosting Passion Week at 7:30 p.m. ET nightly April 2-6. Speakers are as follows: Monday, Pastor W. Williams from Body of Christ Jesus Church; Tuesday, Pastor J. Jenkins, Jr. from New Life Christian Center; Wednesday, Pastor C. Gathers from Victory Temple; Thursday, Pastor A. Rutherford from Family Life Church; and Friday, Pastor Clark from New Bethel AME Church. Everyone is cordially invited to attend the service. Its not about use, but its about Jesus. Come and be blessed.Lifetree Caf open in Mexico BeachLifetree Caf is now open in Mexico Beach across from the El Governor Motel. Simply put, Lifetree Caf is a conversation caf a place and time for people to gather weekly to experience stories and talk about thought-provoking topics relating to life and faith. The conversation group meets every Monday at 7 p.m. CT. Lifetree Caf is also open every Saturday morning for free coffee and relaxing conversation. Everyone is welcome. Lifetree Caf is organized in conjunction with Living Water Church at the Beach. Starting in April, Living Water Church at the Beach will have service every Sunday at 8 a.m. CT on the beach at Sunset Park in Mexico Beach. For more information visit livingwateratthebeach.com/ or contact Pastor Ted Richter at 890-1424. Dont just celebrate Easter, experience it!Easter: Its the greatest story ever told, and this year at Highland View Assembly of God it comes to life with the Thorn Easter Experience! Experience an Easter service like no other featuring realistic videos of the Easter story, live dramas and beautiful and inspiring music. Join us at 10:30 a.m. ET on Easter Sunday, April 8. Your family will enjoy a friendly, relaxed atmosphere, free refreshments and an Easter Egg hunt for the kids. For more information, call 2297161 and find us on Facebook! St. Johns collecting items for needySt. Johns Episcopal Church in Wewahitchka is collecting gently used clothing, household items, furniture, working appliances, etc. These donations will be stored at the church for needy families and for the semi-annual church yard sales with proceeds going to charity. Drop off is at 233 E. Osceola Ave. Call Martha at 639-5924. Leave items on porch if no one is home. A free program of World War II songs will be held Sunday, April 22 at 7 p.m. ET in the Fellowship Hall of the First United Methodist Church at 1001 Constitution Drive in Port St. Joe. The public is invited to attend. Trudy Strand, director of the choral group, said that the evening is designed to be a fun fest and renew memories of WWII-era songs for those who identify with and/or appreciate them. The audience is invited to sing and dance along if desired. The program will be presented by members and friends of the church choir. Light refreshments will be served as part of the approximately one-hour program. The choral group will also perform the program, on another date, for the residents of The Bridge in Port St. Joe. If Jesus is your savior, lets Honor him today. Our mission as a Christian is to show the lost the way. His mission on earth was to die for us all. Lately He has sent a message or two, but not all are getting His call. Since His is our mission too, we need to step up the pace. Lets tell more people about Jesus and His amazing grace. The way to heaven begins at the front of the cross. Only the blood of Jesus could ever pay the cost. Accept His grace today and heaven will be swell. If you keep turning down His grace, prepare yourself for hell. Billy Johnson Faith BRIEFSWWII Songfest set for April 22Easter sunrise serviceA Christians mission

PAGE 17

LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, April 5, 2012 Lisa was born Oct. 3, 1960, in Collins, Miss., to the late D.M. and Lora Robertson and passed away Sunday, March 25, 2012, at Bay Medical in Panama City following a short illness. She lived in Port St. Joe, Fla., for six years with her husband, James, and their daughters, Lora and Amber. She was employed at Durens Piggly Wiggly from 2008 until her disability. Lisas perfect day consisted of spending the day walking on the beach with her family and two dogs. In addition to her immediate family, Lisa is survived by two sisters, Claudia Doggett from Eastabuchie, Miss., and Charlotte Rogers from Decatur, Texas; two brothers, Tom and Mark Robertson, from Seminary, Miss.; and numerous other family members and friends. She was loved and well respected by all who had the pleasure of knowing her and will be greatly missed. A memorial service was on St. Joe Beach on Saturday, March 31 at 7-7:30 p.m. EDT. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to The American Cancer Society in her name or to a Benevolent Account No. 1968696 in Tyndall Federal Credit Union.Lisa Robertson Williams TurmanJohn Jack Russell Schweizer, 80, of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed away at 11 a.m. Tuesday, March 27, 2012, at Blanchard Valley Hospital, Findlay. Mr. Schweizer was born in St. Paul, Minn., on July 17, 1931, to the late Myron and Louise Schweizer. He is survived by his spouse, Peggy, whom he married Oct. 16, 1954. Also surviving are his children, Stephanie Brokamp of Findlay, Ohio, and David Schweizer of Tampa, Fla.; grandchildren Nicholas (Molly) Coale of Upper Arlington, Ohio; Lucas Coale, and Mitchell Coale; Katie (Tom) Martin of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Steve (Erika and Evan) Brokamp of Findlay; greatgranddaughter Alexandria Coale (Nick & Molly) of Upper Arlington, Ohio; surviving siblings are brother, Al Schweizer (Kris) of St. Paul, Minn. and sister, Mary Lou Miner (Jim) of Northeld, Minn. John also has two surviving sisters-inlaw, Julie Schweizer and Joanne Schweizer. He is also survived by numerous nieces and nephews. John proudly served in the United States Air Force as a pilot from 1951-1971. He received numerous awards and decorations, including multiple Air Medals with oak leaf clusters and two Distinguished Flying Crosses with Oak Leaf Clusters. Upon his retirement from the Air Force, he had a successful career in the telecommunications industry, retiring in 1991 as President of American Paging, Inc. John also served as an international consultant in the industry until 1999. A memorial service was held at St. Michaels Catholic Church, 750 Bright Road, in Findlay, Ohio, on Friday, March 30, along with a Military Honors ceremony. The Schweizer family wishes to acknowledge and thank the doctors and nurses who cared for John at Blanchard Valley Hospital. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations to the Wounded Warrior Project c/o Southwest Caging, 5342 N.W. 25th St., Topeka, KS 66616 or woundedwarriorproject. org. Online condolences to the family may be made via www.kirkpatrickbehnke. com.John Schweizer JOHN SCHwWEIZErRWhen Christ shall come with shout of acclamation And take me homewhat joy shall ll my heart! Then I shall bow in humble adoration And there proclaim, my God, How Great Thou Art! Mother Ruth Skanes Lowery was born to Elder Shephard and Laura Skanes July 9, 1929, in Birmingham, Ala. She was the fourth of 13 children. Mother Lowery confessed Christ at an early age and was a member of Smitheld Church of God In Christ in Birmingham under the leadership of Elder Shephard Skanes. She was educated in the Birmingham Public Schools. She relocated to Port St. Joe, Fla., and married her beloved husband of 37 years, Bradley Thomas Lowery Sr. She retired from Bay St. Joseph Rehabilitation Center after 10 years of service. Mother Lowery was a good and faithful member and servant of the Port St. Joe Church of God In Christ under the leadership of Elder O. T. Stallworth and presently, Superintendent David Woods Jr. Waiting for her at the portals of Heaven are her husband, Bradley T. Lowery Sr.; three of her dear children, Michael Lowery, Linda Gail Myers and Bradley T. Lowery Jr.; and parents, Elder Shephard and Laura Skanes. Mother Ruth Skanes Lowery leaves precious memories with her loving family; devoted daughters, Carolyn Horne (Clarence) of Titusville, Fla., Gwendolyn Lowery of Port St. Joe, Sandra Bryant (Robert) and Elaine Lowery of Orlando; also cherishing her memories are a godson, Henry Hogue of Port St. Joe; a sister, Betty Hudson of San Diego, Calif.; a brother, William Ralph Skanes (Josie) of Birmingham, Ala.; 25 grandchildren, a host of great-grandchildren, a very special nephew/son, Pastor Robert Lowery Jr.; and many more relatives and friends, especially lifelong friends, Mother Annie Stallworth and Mother Rita Stephens. Return unto thy rest, O my soul; for the Lord hath dealt bountifully with thee (Psalm 116:7). All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Ruth LoweryPearl Foster, 72, of Wewahitchka, passed away Thursday, March 29, 2012, at the home of her youngest daughter in Niceville, Fla.a. She was born July 25, 1939, to Cecil and Sallie Glass in Wewahitchka, Fla.a, where she lived all of her life. Pearl was preceded in death by her husband, Charles E. Charlie Foster; parents, Cecil and Sallie Glass; sisters Sallie Mae Werden and Ina Culpan; brothers, Preacher Glass, Kenneth Glass, Junior Glass and Johnny Glass. She is survived by her ve children, Shelia Scott (husband Charles) of Panama City, Fla., Mike Chumney (wife Linda Jo) of Wewahitchka, Fla., Cecil Chumney of Panama City, Fla., Tina Chumney of Wewahitchka, Fla., and Rhonda Faulk (husband Greg) of Niceville, Fla.; two stepdaughters, Donna Roberts (husband David) of Wewahitchka, Fla. and Rannie Tucker (husband Dannie) of Amelia Island, Fla.; three sisters, Louise Keith, Kathryn Oliver and Betty Ruth Williams all of Wewahitchka, Fla.; two brothers, Joe Glass (wife Marlece) of Colorado Springs, Colo., and James Glass (wife Doris) of Blountstown, Fla.; 14 grandchildren, Melissa Dickens, Kayla Bailey (husband Chad), Shanell Chumney, Cameron Jones, Shannon Jones, Faith Jones, Austin Chumney, Sean Roberts and Chad Roberts, all of Wewahitchka, Fla., and Donald Dickens and Maleah Scott of Panama City, Fla., Kavan Faulk and Joey Faulk of Niceville, Fla., and Sherry Pippin of Georgia; two greatgrandchildren, Ashlyn Ake and Cole Bailey, both of Wewahitchka, Fla. Funeral services were held Saturday, March 31, at First Pentecostal Church of Wewahitchka at 10 a.m. Burial followed in Roberts Cemetery. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home Wewahitchka Branch Chapel.Pearl Foster Obituariesof us loaded up and headed home for the night. After a nights rest, we were up early the next morning to return to the San Blas Peninsula and catch our trapped bear. Suddenly, the phone rang and someone informed us a bear had just been seen to swimming ashore in downtown Port St. Joe. That is an eight mile swim for a tired bear, but he did it. Thus began a bear hunt in the city of Port St. Joe. The bears trip to the nearby swamp behind the city was well observed, and we soon had the dogs on his fresh trail. Within a short time, about half the people in the town had joined the hunt. There were two roads which crosses the swamp area. The bear and the dogs were between the two crossings. The spectators collected at these roads to get a good look at the bear when he tired to escape. Some were intent on shooting the bear. There were all kinds of weapons in evidence and there was concern that someone other than the bear might get hurt. However, the bear was too smart to leave the heavy cover of the swamp. He, with the dogs in hot pursuit, circled back and forth between the road crossings for an hour or two. Nobody got a glimpse of the bear. But it was exciting to see the bushes shaking and know the bear was that close. Finally, the bear gave up the chase and climbed a tree to escape the dogs. My Dad soon joined the dogs and used his trusty 30-30 rie to end his crime career. There were plenty of volunteers to get the bear out of the swamp and put it on display at the downtown drug store (Smiths Drug Store). Everybody had a close up look and many had their picture taken standing next to him. The dogs and us bear hunters were very glad it was over. None of us have forgotten, and still sort of admire, the bear that swam the Bay. Next week, in my last story of the Pattons Ill tell you all about Mrs. Edna Patton, who contributed her energies and talents in the garden club and the beautication of our fair city. Muldoon was among the local acionados who provided fuel for the concept from the Merchants Committee and Boyer. Boyer noted that there are many passionate car lovers in the area and rather than take their precious machines over to Panama City or some other destination for the nearest car show, a short trip to Port St. Joe to share the passion was sufficient. There is a fraternal feel when the gear heads come to town. To come over this way is neat, Muldoon said, Boyer adding that local drivers were all eager to help and chip in. The aim for downtown merchants is a chance to draw those who might not have visited downtown recently, but also to raise awareness of the offerings in downtown. Just listening to these guys, I never met a guy who didnt love cars, said Darren McDaniels of Steamers and the Downtown Merchants Committee. Its a great draw. Whether you are talking about a 16-year-old or an 85year-old, there is that commonality. Folks that dont normally come to downtown will come for something like this. As if speaking about stray cats, Bob Faliski, a glint in his eyes, said his eet of nearly a dozen automobiles have, just kind of followed me home, they just turned up. Raised on a farm, Faliski had to learn to handle machinery and drive at an early age, or else hear about it, in strong terms, from his father. He and his wife, Jean, have been collecting throughout their long marriage and Bob inched when asked about giving up any of his strays that followed him home. The Faliskis cars range from a 1929 Ford Model A to a 1955 Chevy to the last model year for the Buick Riviera, 1999, a model which had just 2,000 roll off the assembly line. I still work on em, but as you get older its gets tougher to get down there under them, Faliski said. (Collecting cars) is a part of history for one thing. Its like collecting stamps only with cars its more money and more work. Faliski also bemoaned the modern cars, which, for him, literally pale in comparison to the cars of the 1950s and s. Those were happy cars, Faliski said. Those were bright and they were happy. Today it is as if the car makers have a monopoly on all the gray paint in the world. Cars are so drab now. Muldoon said he got the car bug as a teenage and it has never left him. Though he has winnowed a once larger collection to three, including the white clean-as-a-whistle Yugo, he remains bitten. Theyre nice to play with, fun to have, Muldoon said. And they are good garage furniture. CRUISE IN from page B1 PIONEERS from page B1 CCOUrt RT Es S Y Of F Fl L Or R IDA St T At T E ArAR CHIVEs SGeorge Patton at left during a shing trip.

PAGE 18

LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 B6| The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 86709S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Gulf Group Properties, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 1400 Application No. 2012 -03 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 06274-275R Description of Property:Lot 86679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2010-CA-000180 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ARMANDO PENTON A/K/A ARMANDO V. PENTON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ARMANDO PENTON A/K/A ARMANDO V. PENTON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL O THER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 20, 2012 and Final Judgment dated June 21, 2011, entered in Civil Case No.: 23-2010-CA-000180, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is Plaintiff, and ARMANDO PENTON A/K/A ARMANDO V. PENTON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ARMANDO PENTON A/K/A ARMANDO V. PENTON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendants. REBECCA L. NORRIS, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., E.T., held at the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL. 32426 on the 19th day of April, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, LAGOON VISTA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE(S) 5, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 21, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 (954) 354-3544 (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Email: ADAReyuest@judl4.flcourts.or g, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days: if you are hearing or voice impaired call 711. March 29, April 5, 2012 86655S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1112-13 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: (A) Sale of three (3) 2007 Mack Dump Trucks Model CTP713B (B) Sale of one (1) 1991 Caterpillar Bulldozer Model D4HLGP Proposals must be turned in to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Thursday, April 5, 2012. Interested parties should contact Public Works Director Bobby Knee for additional information at (850) 227-1401. Equipment may be viewed by appointment only Monday-Thursday 7:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m., E.T. by calling (850) 227-1401. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME OR YOUR NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Bids will be opened at the above location on Monday, April 9, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Attest: BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS /s/Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ William C. Williams, III, Chairman March 29, April 5, 2012 86257S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 959 Application No. 2012 -04 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 R.E. No. 03801-053R Description of Property:A parcel of land lying and being in Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCING at the Southeast Corner of Lot 5, Block B Integras Rehabilitation Phase II, a Subdivision, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida (Point also being on the North Right of Way Line of Kaelyn Lane, as recorded in Official Records Book 287, Page 918, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida) and run thence North 89 Degrees 48 Minutes 25 Seconds East, along said North Right of Way Line, for a distance of 324.53 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 11 Minutes 35 Seconds West, along the West Right of Way Line of said Kaelyn Lane, for a distance of 85.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence leaving said West Right of Way Line, run South 89 Degrees 48 Minutes 25 Seconds West, for a distance of 237.00 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds West, for a distance of 156.89 feet; thence North 18 Degrees 11 Minutes 20 Seconds East, for a distance of 28.00 feet; thence North 09 Degrees 13 Minutes 48 Seconds East, for a distance of 58.42 feet; thence North 70 Degrees 25 Minutes 07 Seconds East, for a distance of 42.04 feet; thence North 23 Degrees 02 Minutes 43 Seconds East, for a distance of 42.69 feet; thence North 76 Degrees 09 Minutes 48 Seconds East, for a distance of 53.61 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 22 Minutes 04 Seconds East, for a distance of 58.06 feet; thence North 87 Degrees 36 Minutes 25 Seconds East, for a distance of 47.42 feet; thence South 65 Degrees 00 Minutes 23 Seconds East, for a distance of 33.09 feet; thence South 00 Degrees 11 Minutes 35 Seconds East, for a distance of 43.26 feet to a point on the aforesaid Right of Way Line of Kaelyn Lane; point being on a non tangent curve, concave to the East, thence Southerly along said Right of Way Line and Curve, with a radius of 50.00 feet, through a central angle of 168 Degrees 27 Minutes 47 Seconds, for an arc distance of 147.01 feet (Chord of said Arc being South 05 Degrees 34 Minutes 32 Seconds West, 99.49 feet); thence South 00 Degrees 11 Minutes 35 Seconds East, along the West Right of Way Line of said Kaelyn Lane, for a distance of 192.32 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 1.569 acres, more or less. (LEGAL DESCRIPTION AS RECORDED IN O. R. BOOK 516, PAGE 957, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA). Name in which assessed: Integras Therapy & Wellness Ctrs, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 25th day ofApril, 2012. Dated this 20th day of March, 2012 REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk March 22, 29, April, 5, 12, 2012 86707 PUBLIC NOTICE Gulf County BOCC/ Tourist Development Council Request for Proposals/ RFP # 1112-14 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners/ Tourist Development Council will receive proposals from any qualified person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: TV PRODUCTION Gulf County BOCC/ Tourism Development Council is accepting proposals to produce a new TV ad campaign to consist of 1) brand and 1) donut TV spot to promote the area on networks including, but not limited to: Panama City, FL, Tallahassee, FL, Nashville, TN, and Atlanta, GA. Gulf County TDC is looking for regional firms which could assist in the creative concept, script development, filming, editing and final production of 1) Brand Spot and 1) Donut Spot, both :30 seconds in length. Please place YOUR COMPANY NAME, SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER on the outside of your envelope, and provide three copies of your proposal. Bids must be submitted to, and specifications may be obtained from, the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 by 4:30 p.m., E.T. on Friday, April 13, 2012. Bids will be opened at this same location on Monday, April 16, 2012, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Specifications may also be viewed at www. gulfcounty-fl.gov. Any questions concerning this RFP must be submitted in writing no later than 11:00 am EST, on April 9, 2012 and should be directed to Kellee Novak, Assistant Director at kellee@ visitgulf.com and a copy of your correspondence t o ksummers@gulfclerk. com. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ William C. Williams, III, Chairman Attest: /s/Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk April 5, 2012 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical Business Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. C all 866-467-0054 www.Centuraonline.com These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Trades & Services 227-7847 GET YOUR AD INCALL TODAY! GET YOUR AD IN227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction bobgilbert54@gmail.com Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn CareRobert PelcMowing Service227-5374 NO JOB TOO BIGPLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478joes_lawn@yahoo.comJOES LAWN CARE J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-966315 Years of Service!Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction

PAGE 19

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, April 5, 2012 The Star | B7 See emeraldcoastjobs.com to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com and nd a job that makes everybody happy. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 86777S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Port St. Joe: 132 Bridgeport Ln.(Across from courthouse) Sat April 7th 8am to noonHuge 3 Family Yard Sale!You name it, its here!! Sweatmore Strawberry RanchOPEN MAR 22nd 8AM Weather Permitting Mon-Sat 8am-7pm Sunday 8am-5pm 850-722-4819 86769S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jerry M. Pybus Family Trust, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 244 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-05 R.E. No. 01517-033R Description of Property: COMMENCE at a St. Joe Paper Company Concrete Monument marking the Northeast Corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence North 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds West along the North boundary line of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of said Section 3, 1149.76 feet to a found 1/2 diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 6596 on the Westerly right of way boundary line of North Dianna Street (a County maintained road having a 60 foot wide right of way); thence departing the North boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter, South 03 Degrees 11 Minutes 12 Seconds West along the Westerly right of way boundary line of North Dianna Street, 204.49 feet to a found 1/2 diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 0732; thence departing said Westerly right of way boundary line, North 85 Degrees 29 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 116.74 feet to a set 1/2 diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 7556 for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 85 Degrees 29 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 180.00 feet to a found 1/2 diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 0732; thence North 04 Degrees 12 Minutes 12 Seconds East, 115.00 feet to a set 1/2 diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 7556; thence South 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds East, 180.37 feet to a set 1/2 diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 7556; thence South 04 Degrees 12 Minutes 12 Seconds West 124.61 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE 20 FOOT WIDE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER, UPON AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE at a St. Joe Paper Company Concrete Monument marking the Northeast Comer of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds West along the North boundary line of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of said Section 3,1149.76 feet to a found 1/2 diameter iron rod and cap, stamped L.B. 6596 on the Westerly right of way boundary line of North Dianna Street (a County maintained road having a 60 foot wide right of way); thence departing the North boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter, South 03 Degrees 11 Minutes 12 Seconds West along the Westerly right of way boundary line of North Dianna Street, 68.83 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South 03 Degrees 11 Minutes 12 Seconds West along said Westerly right of way boundary line, 20.02 feet; thence departing said Westerly right of way boundary line, North 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds West, 114.93 feet; thence North 04 Degrees 12 Minutes 12 Seconds East 20.04 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 29 Minutes 37 Seconds East, 114.58 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: Vicki Carol Beatty All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 9th day of May, 2012. Dated this 3rd day of April, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 86767S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jerry M. Pybus Family Trust, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 580 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-07 R.E. No. 03083-400R Description of Property: Lot 40, Palm Breeze Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Charlotte M. (Rouse) Seabrooks All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 9th day of May, 2012. Dated this 3rd day of April, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 86765S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jerry M. Pybus Family Trust, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said Tax Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 510 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 Application No: 2012-06 R.E. No. 02684-038R Description of Property: Lot H, Sunnywood Estates Unit 2, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 17, of the Official Records of Gulf County, Florida, on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court. (SAID LOT AS SHOWN NOT INCLUDED IN PLAT). Name in which assessed: Mary Ann Jamerson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 9th day of May, 2012. Dated this 3rd day of April, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 15, in Block C, according to the Plat of Treasure Bay, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 32, in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Charles Sam Jones III and Kelly McCoy Jones All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of May, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk March 29, April 5, 12, 19, 2012 Wewahitchka, FL #00 Frank Sexton #48 Jason Lowery #96 Molly Griffen will be open for sale on April 16, 2012 at 8:30 A.M. if payments are not brought up to date. April 5, 12, 2012

PAGE 20

B8| The Star Thursday, April 5, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373 Retail / Of ce Space143 Acklins Island Drive-Cape San Blas+/1000sf; $10 psf mod gross; high visibility on Cape San Blas Road ; available May 1st212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 219 Reid Avenue Of ce/Retail; +/-5400 sf; subdividable $7 psf mod gross (former Goodwill) 235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail;+/-800sf-1800;$14psfmod gross 407 Reid Avenue +/-905sf; move in ready; $14psf mod-grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 separate storage units availableFor Sale223 Monument Avenue Four city lots fronting Hwy 98; $375,000 407 Reid Avenue+/4988 sf: 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $349,500401 Reid Avenue+/5400 sf: Retail space; $165,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for termsLoggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details Marina Cove Lots 12, 13, & 14; $375,000 PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; $399,000 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVESThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Available Positions: Territory Sales Representative Digital Sales RepresentativeRequired Skills Highly motivated and results driven Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment Effective time management and organization skills Excellent verbal and written communication skills Keen attention to detail The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience.SALES/RETENTION CLERK We are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts.Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: The News HeraldCareers 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS3 BR 2BA, UNFURNISHED HOUSE Beautiful Bay View .........................................$800 2 BR MOBILE HOME UNFURNISHED Country, Private ..............................................$600 1 BR FURNISHED CONDO Nice, Includes Utilities.....................................$910 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum ..........................$105 Plus Daily 3 BR 1 BA, FURNISHED HOUSE Monthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$850 1 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Inc Water .......................$475 2 BR 1BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ............................................................$450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAY BED Furnished, Lanark, Inc Utilities ......................$650 OFFICE SPACE Hwy 98 Frontage, Carrabelle .....$550 Plus Utilities Classifiedcan!If you re ready to move up or are j ust starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market s best prospects. MULTI UNIT MULTI UNIT BUILDING BUILDINGFully Occupied 5400 total sq ft Downtown Reid Ave$249,900 Call: Call: 850.527.2560 850.527.2560 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 ApalachicolaSouth Side. Historic House, totally renovated, bay breezes. Approx. 2800sf. $395,000 (850) 653-5853 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot -large yard. W/D incl $650/mo + dep. 301-265-5368 White City Clean 3/2 House!2 Blk from boat ramp, quiet, long term, $650 + Dep, Call 850-270-8757.Text FL03874 to 56564 Port St. Joe -Small Furnished 1br 1ba travel trailer on private lot, 2 blocks from the beach. $100/week or $350/mo. Includes utils. Small pet okay. Call 941-720-4941 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Choice Commercial Space coming available on Reid Ave. Corner of 3rd, adjacent to Mulberry Square. Currently successful pet store. Call Patrick 850-527-6090 or Randy 251-978-2538 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Ice Machine, Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 North Florida Child Development, Inc.is seekingTeachers/Substitutes for our 0-5 year old classrooms at our Gulf County Centers Prefer a minimum of a CDA (FCCPC) Pickup Applications at the Center Or send resumes to smcgill@ oridachildren.orgDFWP/M-F/7-5/EOESouth Gulf County 153 Red sh Street Port St. Joe, FL Terri Bird, Center Manager (850) 229-6415 North Gulf County 131 West River Road Wewahitchka, FL Jana Miller, Center Manager (850) 639-6520 Install/Maint/RepairMediacomCommunicationsThe 8th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach Fl for ENTRY LEVEL Installer No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid drivers license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, please visit our website at http://careers.mediacomcc.co m refer to job 5757. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Logistics/TransportNow HiringCaptains and MatesRetail help needed. Commission based, flexible schedule, part time. Shipwright Wood Boat builder with experience. Call (850) 274-1321 or send email augusta.west@ammfl.org. Web ID#: 34201917 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Dietary Aide EMT Med Tech Lab Tech RN Applications are available at:www weemsmemorial.com &may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34203836 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Administrative/ClericalReceptionistNeeded for busy office. Must have experience with Microsoft office. Send resume to: resume9481@yahoo.com DFW & EEO Install/Maint/RepairMediacomhas the following opening:Field AuditorCovers Tyndall AFB, Port St. Joe, Carabelle & Apalachicola FL. Inspects and audits all outside cable connections in assigned areas. Investigate leads involving illegal activities related to cable service. Base pay plus commissions. Must have a valid drivers license with a satisfactory driving record. Mediacom offers competitive pay and benefits including Medical/ Dental/Vision/401K. For immediate consideration please visit our online career center to apply at http://careers. mediacomcc.com and select job 5738. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer MFDV Food Svs/Hospitality The Port Inn & Mainstay Suites are now accepting applicationsPT Desk Service Agent FT Room Attendant PT Breakfast AttendantWeekends and holidays are required. Dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below: Make beds, make friends, make money! Inquire about benefits package. EOE, DFWP The Port Inn 501 Monument Ave, PSJ 32456 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting Applications *Full-time reservationist w/great benefits. *Part-time seasonal housecleaning inspectors. Both positions require weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 T urn to classified s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020