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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03828
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 01-12-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03828

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer It takes more than the teachers to make sure the school day runs smoothly, and Gulf Countys four school-related employ ees of the year prove it. In the elemen tary schools, one chosen employ ee is dedicated Thursday, JANUARY 12 2012 Y E AR 74, N UMB E R 13 By Tim Croft Star News Editor The As keep coming for Gulf District Schools. The Florida Department of Education released high school grades for the 201011 school year last week and for the fth-straight year Gulf District Schools can lay claim to an A. Port St. Joe High School earned an A from the state under the school grading formula while Wewahitchka High School grabbed a B as the district will once again lay claim to schools graded A or B. I just appreciate the time and effort the staff put in to make the school a qual ity school, said Duane Mc Farland, Port St. Joe High School principal for three years before moving to the district ofce for the cur rent school year. Its been a pleasure working with such quality people and what they have done to move the school for ward. And I am sure it will continue under the current principal Jeremy Knapp. Added to elementary and middle school grades released last spring, the districts six schools all earned an A or B. All three schools in Port St. Joe were A schools; all schools in Wewahitchka were high B schools. In addition to the A dis trict, given a clean recentlycompleted audit, the district is likely to be recognized as one of fewer than a dozen districts statewide desig nated high-performing. A high-performing dis trict provides a few perks, such as exibility with the school calendar and the freedom to use the districts own template as opposed to the state template for school improvement plans. This will be the fthstraight year the district has been recognized as high-performing. We are very proud of our teachers, students and administrators, said Sara Joe Wooten, the districts assistant superintendent of instruction. You have to Schools again sport A grades See GRADES A7 By Tim Croft Star News Editor Two suspects are in custody in association with an attempted bank robbery in Mexico Beach and two other crimes in Florida and Alabama. Investigators with the Mexico Beach Department of Public Safety and the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce last Friday arrested Samuel Paul Wadsworth and Rachel Wingate of Panama City Beach, charging the pair with attempted robbery of the Centennial Bank in Mexico Beach on Jan. 3. Wadsworth, 39, and Wingate, 45, were arrested when investigators located the pair at their residence. Wad sworth is alleged to have entered the banks and store; Wingate is alleged to be the driver of the getaway car. The pair pleaded not guilty Monday in connection to the Mexico Beach attempted robbery. Wadsworth is being held at the Bay County Jail on $17,000 bond and Wingate is being held on $10,000 bond. Wadsworth was identied through a tip: he had re cently paid of several debts and was seen with large amounts of cash, raising suspicion, according to the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce. During a subsequent interview, evidence was pre sented that led to the arrest of the pair, according to J.T. Hallman with the Police Division of the Mexico Beach Department of Public Safety. The arrests cleared two other crimes, Hallman said; a bank robbery on Jan. 4 in Defuniak Springs and the attempted robbery of a food store in Dothan, AL on Dec. 30, 2011. Charges from those two incidents are pending. Wadsworth and Wingate acknowledged involvement in the crimes, according to Hallman. The BCSO investigation revealed Wadsworth is a con victed sex offender from Alabama and he was arrested for failure to register as a sex offender in Bay County. Wingate was charged by Mexico Beach authorities as principal to armed robbery. On Jan. 3 a white male entered the Centennial Bank located at 101 15th Street in Mexico Beach. He produced a note instructing the teller a robbery was taking place and that he wanted the money, though he produced no weapon. After the teller alerted a manager to call police, the male left the bank. He was later indentied as the same male who had robbed at least one bank in Defuniak Arrests made in MB attempted bank robbery By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Theres no need to leave your house, no need to nd your checkbook, no need to waste a stamp and no need to rush to City Hall before 5 p.m. You can pay your bill at 2 a.m. on a Wednesday, or at noon on a Sunday. Pay your bill in your pajamas, while watching T.V., or at work. Pay it the day its due at 4:59 p.m. and stealthily squeak by the $10 late fee. Paying your water bill has never been easier with the City of Port St. Joes new online bill pay system, a service provided at no cost to the customer. What we really want people to do, is to have the ability to pay their bills in the convenience of their homes, 24 hours a day, said City Manager Charlie Weston said. I think its a no-brainer; total conve nience, zero cost. Through the online bill pay service, residents can also track their water us age by comparing previ ous bills. (Residents) can go back and see what their consumption is and maybe set goals to get their usage down, Weston said. It helps us at the city to bet ter utilize our resources. Payments can be made online with Visa, Master Card or Discover credit cards. Today, everybody is wired into something, Weston said. This will get rid of the snail mail; bypass all that and get it from your ofce to ours. So far, only 105 people have signed up for online bill pay. My goal is to get 1,500 people using this thing, Weston said. Theres no reason that half our cus tomers shouldnt be on this thing. And for those who may be skeptical about entering their personal information online, Weston assures the citys online bill pay is as secure as any traditional payment method. We went to great lengths to make sure this is a secure site, Weston said. Were very con scious of that and were very condent that its a secure site. Robin Combs, the citys Let your ngers do the paying Top of the class District schools honor teachers of the year By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer They are the teachers who make learning fun. They are the teachers who celebrate Pi Day on March 14, who go above and beyond to reach a strug gling student, who wont stop until they nd the right book for a student to enjoy. In their classrooms, they utilize new technologies like SMART Boards, and express concern for their students beyond the sub jects they teach. They strive to make sure every student feels special and that every student has a chance to be successful. Later this month, after careful observation from a school employee from outside Gulf County, one teacher will be chosen to represent the district in the Florida Teacher of the Year awards pro gram. Nomi nated by their peers, these four teachers are, in the words of the districts Assistant Superintendent for Business Services Duane McFarland, Born to teach. These are the Teachers of the Year from each dis trict school in no particular order: Port St. Joe Elementa ryKrissy Gentry (Fourth Grade) One could argue Krissy Gentrys knack for teaching is in her blood. Growing up, Gentry al ways knew she would be a teacher like her mother, a woman who dedicated her life to educating the disad vantaged. Gentrys mother, a teach er for 35 years who special ized in ESE and adult edu cation, taught a 101-year old woman from rural Jackson County to write her name for the rst time. Gentry and her sister, now also a teacher, called the woman Aunt Sue. Schools honor non-instructional employees See TEACHERS A6 See PAYING A7 COURT E SY ME XICO BE ACH DE PARTM E NT OF P UBLIC S AF E TY A surveillance photo of the suspect in the attempted robbery of the Centennial Bank in Mexico Beach. See ARRESTS A7 See HONOR A10 DAWGS in Prison ........................B1 Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A8 Sports ........................................... A9 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B4 Classieds .................................... B6-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Star Staff Report The Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association (MBARA) can now add two more reefs to its roster. One reef memorializes a mans life and love of shing, and another shares a residents appreciation for the paradise on earth he nds in Mexico Beach. The MBARA recently established a new memorial reef in memory of the late Pat Mulligan and a named reef in honor of Tennessee Chuck McKibbon in the Gulf of Mexico. Bob Cox, President of the MBARA, said the owners of the Mexico Beach Marina commissioned the memorial reef in honor of Bill Mulligans father, Pat Mulligan as a tribute to his avid enjoyment of shing. Cox said the owners of the Mexico Beach Marina are thankful for the members of the MBARA and all the work they do to increase marine life in the local area. A second reef was named after Tennessee Chuck McKibbon. Ron Childs, MBARA Director of Education, said McKibbon commissioned the reef to share his love for shing and enjoyment of everyday life. He retired from the Tennessee Department of Conservation in 1999 and moved to Mexico Beach. McKibbon considers Mexico Beach paradise on Earth. The MBARA expresses its sincere appreciation to the Mexico Beach Marina and for their support of its articial program over the years. The contributions are a huge part of the MBARAs success in building articial reefs and rebuilding our sheries in the Gulf of Mexico. Since its incorporation in 1997, the MBARA has set a milestone of establishing 1000 patch reefs, or small articial reef habitats in the waters off Mexico Beach. For more information on these memorial reefs and the memorial reef program, please visit MBARAs website at www. mbara.org. The Lake House Restaurant 18831 SR 20 W. Blountstown, FL 32424 (850) 674-5253 Lunch served Tuesday-Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CST) Dinner served Friday and Saturday 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (CST) Sunday Brunch from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (CST) We cook Cuban delicacies, Southern favorites and Seafood. This week get 40% off all Christmas items in our gift shop. Bring this ad with you and get 10% off your meal. Check out our website: Check out our Superbowl and Valentines Day events information on our website. Thursday, January 12, 2012 SETTING IT STRAIGHT Due to a production error, stories in last weeks paper provided contradictory information regarding lawsuits led against the city of Port St. Joe regarding the development order issued for the proposed and now abandoned Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center. The lawsuits contend the development order was issued contrary to the provisions of the county and city comprehensive plans and the citys land development regulations. The Star regrets any confusion. New memorial and named reefs in the Gul f PHOTO S BY B OB AND CAROL COXT op photo, A barge deploys articial reefs in the Gulf of Mexico. Bottom photos, The Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association recently deployed two new reefs off Mexico Beach.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, January 12, 2012 By Chris Segal Florida Freedom Newspapers Last week, state of cials launched a tri-coun ty initiative aimed at pre venting domestic violence and protecting children by partnering domestic violence advocates with social workers. The details of the Northwest Florida Re gional Domestic Violence and Child Welfare Initia tive were discussed dur ing the Community Day held at the Wyndham Bay Point Resort. The event included remarks from Attorney General Pam Bondi, Department of Children and Families Secretary David Wilkins and Tiffany Carr, presi dent of the Florida Coali tion Against Domestic Violence. The new effort will seek local solutions to keep chil dren in their homes with a protective parent rather than using a one-size-tsall approach of having a child being placed in the foster care system. This is a communitybased initiative, Carr said of why the pilot program was launched in North west Florida. There are [people committed] to stopping domestic vio lence and child abuse in Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties. The program will cost about $4 million and the funding will come from the attorney generals of ce. Domestic violence in the home accounts for 30 percent of the casel oad for the department, Wilkins said. The initiative also will allow for some cuts at the Department of Children and Families (DCF) while putting more services in the community. The thought is it ultimately is cheaper for the taxpayer to keep children with their nonviolent parent than to have them put into the foster care system. Studies have shown when there is domestic violence in the home, chil dren often are abused as well. What tends to hap pen is that the victim gets punished, too, Wilkins said of children being put in foster care when one parent displays domestic violence. This initiative will get the treatment to the community and help the victims. The way the initiative will work is by placing do mestic violence advocates as liaisons between the court system, State At torneys ofce, Big Bend Community Based Care, law enforcement agencies and the Northwest Region of DCF. The professional advo cates will help inform all the departments and or ganizations to ensure the offending parent is held accountable for domestic violence and protect the victims of the violence and the children in the home. Maintaining per manency and a safe envi ronment in a childs own home decreases their risk of mental health issues, homelessness and drug or alcohol dependency as an adult, Bondi said. We think this will have a tremendous impact. Hopefully with community support, many of these children will be able to stay in their homes and the perpetrators of domes tic violence will be locked up, she said. Carr explained the ini tiative was built off a simi lar program created using federal stimulus money. During a test of the pro gram, DCF reduced the number of children being removed from the nonof fending parent by 900 chil dren in an eight-month period, according to Carr. The purpose of Thurs days community day was to gather ofcials from lo cal agencies, state organi zations, law enforcement, superintendents and elected ofcials from Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties to outline the initiative. The next level was to have a coordinated com munity response and to have the silos removed, Carr said. It has to be the entire community. We need to ensure victims and families are safe. If the pilot program is successful, the initia tive could be expanded throughout the state. By Tom McLaughlin Florida Freedom Newspapers Saving Eglin Air Force Bases valuable Research Development Testing and Evaluation wing will be priority one for Floridas new Defense Support Task Force. The task force met for the rst time Monday in Tallahassee and decided it needed to move quickly to ensure the Air Force Mate riel Command didnt take action on May 1 to move Eglins 46th Test Wings RDT&E component out of Florida. If we are going to do something, we have to do it now, said Okaloosa Coun ty resident David Goetsch, who was named Monday to chair the 12-member task force when Gov. Rick Scott isnt available to do so. The Air Force is mov ing forward with plans to implement a consolidation of its Materiel Command. It has until Oct. 1 to do so, but leaders have decided to target May 1 as the day to have the consolidation completed. Task force member and state Rep. Matt Gaetz, RFort Walton Beach, com pared the latest moves of a military trying to cut ex penses to a BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure) process without public in put. The issue we are in es sence going through is a BRAC process without the benet of BRAC itself, he said. Present plans call for the consolidation to put the 46th Test Wing under the command of a two-star general at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Edwards command ers have tried for years to nagle the RTD&E com ponent, which attracts highly educated aerospace experts to the community, away from Eglin. Goetsch and other eco nomic experts see a per fect storm of opportunity now for Edwards to suc ceed in snatching the test wing. The threat to Eglin was considered grave enough late last year that U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson introduced leg islation intended to force Air Force leaders to con duct a study and report to Congress on what its con solidation would accom plish. Task force members six of whom hail from Northwest Florida are soliciting the clout of fellow member Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll in their effort to see that the study is done be fore any consolidation oc curs, Goetsch said. Carroll, who rose to the rank of lieutenant com mander in the U.S. Navy, is well informed and has con nections, Goetsch said. The plan is for her to work with Okaloosa County experts, Air Force leaders, U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller and Nelson to make sure the consolidation goes as Nel sons amendment dictated it should, he said. The task force will hold a special meeting in two weeks to discuss the pos sibility of appointing a con sultant to assist Carroll, Goetsch said. Were going to deter mine in two weeks if the lieutenant governor needs somebody providing her with information day by day, hour by hour, he said. Task Force seeks to minimize defense cuts in Panhandle Florida pushes new domestic violence initiative We think this will have a tremendous impact. Hopefully with community support, many of these children will be able to stay in their homes and the perpetrators of domestic violence will be locked up. Tiffany Carr President of the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Floridas new Defense Support Task Force wants to prevent shift of Eglins RDT&E wing to California

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Opinion A4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINGS USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Now people, Im telling this story with my hand up. I could hardly believe it myself. Cathy and I stopped at a Cracker Barrel on the way back from one of the grandkids rst dental checkup. I had just nished ordering the chicken and dumplings, fried okra and turnip greens and was scanning the place as Cathy gleefully pointed out one more time the X-rays clearly depicting the straightness of our little darlings front teeth. Im hearing her, but mostly Im hoping no neighboring table can put together that we drove right at ve hundred miles one way to attend a tooth review! Didnt you like Dr. Winton? He could tell how smart Hannah was by the way she sat right up Cathy! I near bout jumped out of my skin, Theyve got a picture of my great Uncle Harvey and Aunt May White up on the wall yonder! I slid out of my seat and maneuvered around two tables and by a four-star waitress to get a better look. I apologized to the couple from Eau Claire, Michigan, as I leaned across their meatloaf dinners to make sure. Son of a gun! There was no mistaking Uncle Harvey. Now, he died in 1954 or And I was fairly small but you couldnt forget that horseshoe-shaped cut on his chin nor that big scar over his right eye. The sprawling beard could not hide the clear outline of the cut under his lip. And that long, deep gash over his eye looked like someone stuck a knife in it and took two steps to the left. I sat down with the Michigan folks and went to lling them in about my great uncle. He was almost with Teddy Roosevelt at San Juan Hill. Whenever he used to tell the story, you could still feel the disappointment in his voice at being a day late. He had such great stories about his army days and his early life in Lawrence County. He walked with a slight limp, but when we queried him about it hoping for a good war tale, he dismissed it as old age. Mom said he got kicked on the chin by a mule when he and Aunt May rst set up house keeping. Aunt May White was actually Grannys aunt. Im not sure how kin she was to us but this was back in the day when everyone was either an uncle, aunt or cousin. Aunt May died before I was old enough to remember her, but Id seen lots of pictures. I pointed out the sharp nose and the dark, Cherokee eyes to Cathy, the waitress and the Eau Claire group. The cut over Harveys eye was a whole nuther story. Ive heard several versions. None of them bear real well on the familys rich history. I dont believe the jealouslover account. One look at Aunt May White would make the wanderingest of husbands hang close to the cabin. The drunken brawl melee was more likely the case. Granddaddy gured Harvey picked up the souvenir in a much ballyhooed 10-round bout with Jeff Kiefer, a noted light heavyweight boxer from Paducah. Uncle Harvey never mentioned the scar in my presence. What are my relatives doing hanging on a wall in Cracker Barrel? Ive seen other old couples on the wall. I thought they were made up! You know, thrown in amongst the horse collars, Calumet Baking Soda signs and the antique coffee making machine for the down home effect. It never dawned on me these folks are real until right now! When those Cracker Barrel folks invite you in like family, they aint kidding! I bet Harvey and Aunt May might have cracked a smile if they had known the picture was being preserved for posterity. She might have even let her hair down. And a wee smile and a wink could have made the meat loaf and cream corn sparkle. Course, none of those old pictures have people smiling in them. I dont know if it was bad dental work, constipation or the style in 1914. They didnt come across as mean mind you. They just looked serious as all get out! Picture day might have coincided with a bad hog market. Me and the Eau Claire folks got to wondering if this was the only store exhibiting Uncle Harvey and Aunt May. Who in the family gave permission? You reckon they have copied this thing and are displaying it from Florida to Montana? There are copyright laws! And dont you need a writ of habeas corpus or something? You just cant hang Uncle Harvey up without due process. I gured, at the very least, Cracker Barrel owed us a free meal. The Michigan wife and I stood in front of the picture while her husband took our picture. I detailed again the bar room brawl to some late comers. And it took a while to explain that unclecousin kinfolk thing to the bus load of basketball players from Mt. Juliet. I signed a few autographs. And I tried to get Uncle Harvey in the throngs of the San Juan Hill battle but honesty, and history, compelled me to stick to the facts. We were making our way out of the dining hall when I spied the ancient 12 gauge over the giant replace. Wait a minute! Uncle Harvey had an old shotgun! I got up on the hearth for a better look. It was a Remington Model 82 with those now famous rabbit ear hammers. Id know this gun anywhere! It even had the broken trigger guard. I was trying to turn it over to see the HHW initials on the stock when the Michigan couple came running back in with their camera. I got to looking around for his Spanish War uniform and that mule. Respectfully, Kes Thursday, January 12, 2012 Next week as the nation pauses to celebrate the life of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., it is worth consid ering the ideals that lay well beyond the man who led a movement toward equal rights for all races. King was much more than a civil rights activist, much more than a nonparalleled speech maker. He was a man, awed as he may have been, as we all are, who reached far beyond the narrow ness of civil rights to consider the human condition. And during the times we face now, with economic uncertainty and great disparity, with far too many living in desperate need, his words of 1958 re main achingly relevant. Following are portions of an essay titled The Dimensions of a Complete Life. It is one essay in the book The Measure of a Man and provides in sight into the philosophical founda tion of Kings work. They are words I refer to often, words of faith in a power beyond hu man understanding, humanity with out conditions, and a belief in self that speaks volumes. King wrote, Many, many cen turies ago, out on a lonely, obscure island called Patmos, a man by the name of John caught a vision of the new Jerusalem descending out of heaven from God. One of the great est glories of this new city of God that John saw was its completeness. It was not partial and one-sided, but it was complete in all three of its di mensions. And so, in describing the city in the twenty-rst chapter of the book of Revelation, John says this: The length and the breadth and the height of it are equal. Now John is saying something quite signicant here What John is really saying is this: that life as it should be and life at its best is the life that is complete on all sides. There are three dimensions of any complete life to which we can t ly give the words of this text: length, breadth and height. The length of life as we shall think of it here is not its duration or its longevity, but it is the push of a life forward to achieve its personal ends and ambitions. It is the inward concern for ones own welfare. The breadth of life is the out ward concern for the welfare of oth ers. The height of life is the upward reach for God. These are the three dimensions of life, and without the three being correlated, working harmoniously together, life is incomplete Now let us notice rst the length of life Some years ago a learned rabbi wrote a book entitled Peace of Mind He has a chapter in the book entitled Love Thyself Properly. In this chapter he says in substance that it is impossible to love other selves adequately unless you love your own self properly So every individual has a responsibility to be concerned about himself enough to discover what he is made for. After he discovers his calling, he should set out to do it with all the strength and power of his being No matter how small one thinks his lifes work is in terms of the norms of the world and the so-called big jobs, he must realize that it has cosmic signicance if he is serving humanity and doing the will of God. To carry this to one extreme, if it falls your lot to be a street-sweeper, sweep streets as Raphael painted pictures, as Michelangelo carved marble, as Beethoven composed music, as Shakespeare wrote poetry In the words of Douglas Mallock: If you cant be a highway, just be a trail; If you cant be the sun, be a star; For it isnt the size that you win or you fail Be the best of whatever you are. But dont stop here; it is danger ous to stop here The breadth of life is that dimen sion of life in which we are concerned about others. An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow connes of his individual istic concerns to broader concerns of all humanity. As long as there is poverty in the world I can never be rich, even if I have a billion dollars. As long as diseases are rampant and millions of people in this world cannot expect to live more than twenty-eight or thirty years, I can never be totally healthy even if I just got a good checkup at the Mayo Clinic. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be No individual or na tion can stand out boasting of being independent. We are interdependent When we discover this, we master the second dimension of life. Some people never get beyond the rst two dimensions of life. They master the rst two. They develop their inner powers; they love human ity, but they stop right there They seek to live life without a sky. But if we are to live the complete life we must reach up and discover God. H.G. Wells was right: The man who is not religious begins at no where and ends at nothing. In a real sense everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see. Plato was right: The visible is a shadow cast by the invisible. Love yourself, if that means ra tional, healthy and moral self-inter est. You are commanded to do that. That is the length of life. Love your neighbor as you love yourself. You are commanded to do that. That is the breadth of life. But never forget that there is a rst and even greater commandment, Love the Lord thy God with all thy heart and all thy soul and all thy mind. This is the height of life. And when you do this you live the complete life. My son was on a cleaning spree. He wasnt sick or anything, he was just anxiously cleaning his room out and getting rid of things he had outgrown or broken. He did keep the Wife Ball World Series trophy with nothing but the baseball players legs from the knees down adorning the top. The trophy means a lot to him. He had this bright idea that he needed a sofa or a futon in his bedroom. I didnt think about it too much until he asked me if I was using the mini refrigerator I had brought home from work a few months earlier. I suppose he was making his own version of a 14 year-old man cave. I didnt let him have the refrigerator. In going through all of the boxes my son was throwing away, I kept nding these little packets of silica gel. You know what Im talking about. They put them in vitamins and electronics and other things to keep the moisture down. On the little package, it is always notes, Silica Gel, Throw Away, Do Not Eat, Desiccant. I suppose I should be happy that my son did not eat the little bags of silica gel. My oldest daughter decided to eat the Tylenol once; she was about a year old. At the time, she was an only child and if you have ever had to give a child ipecac, its not a fun experience. It makes them throw up projectile style. (They say dont give your children that anymore.) The silica gel packages had my interest. I had seen these little packages in various forms over the years in medicine and cardboard boxes and always wondered what would happen if you did eat them. No, I didnt eat them. I looked up the term, desiccant. I should have known what it means, but I didnt. A desiccant induces or sustains a state of dryness in its local vicinity in a moderately sealed container. It is what you might call a dryer outer. Why cant I eat it? Well, the truth is, I can eat it. I shouldnt want to, it would be nasty and I would want to spit it out. However, I dont think it would kill me. Wouldnt it dry me out? Or cause me to dissolve like putting salt on a snail or slug? This called for a little research. I am a researcher, so I did a little research to nd out if the silica gel packets would make me dissolve or something. The rst thing I found out was that silica gel can adsorb (not absorb, theres a difference) approximately 40 percent of its weight in moisture. This sounded like it could dry me up or make me disappear or shrivel up like a slug covered in salt. Being a math guy, I did the math to gure out how many packets of silica gel I would need to disappear. I weigh about 180 pounds and they say your body is approximately 70 percent water. That means I have 126 pounds of water in me. Im not sure what the remaining 54 pounds would look like, once the water part of me dries up. The salt covered slug does still come to mind. If silica gel adsorbs 40 percent of its weight, I would need 10 pounds of silica gel to get rid of 4 pounds of water. According to my calculations, I would need to eat 315 pounds of silica gel to completely lose my water weight. Further research revealed that each silica gel package weighs about one tenth of an ounce. Needing 315 pounds worth means I would need to eat 50,400 little packets of silica gel. That would be just too dog gone much work opening up 50,400 of those little packages. However, I do now understand why they tell you, Throw away, do not eat. Its just not worth the effort. In a few years, someone will come on in an infomercial late at night with a new improved weight loss program to help you lose your water weight. They will be selling you silica gel in big dry dog food size bags guaranteeing you will lose your water weight. Dont buy it. Dont eat the stuff either. In the middle of all the drying out, it will make you really really sick to your stomach. No, I didnt try it. And I didnt research if the water would still be in the silica gel that would still be in me. I decided to try out my sons futon. Maybe that mini fridge isnt such a bad idea. Read more stories online at www. CranksMyTractor.com CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Eating Silica Gel TIM CROFT Star news editor HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert You ARE family at Cracker Barrel A lesson in Life

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S Letters A5 | The Star Thursday, January 12, 2012 We are all blessed by our sophisticated health care systems. We now enjoy new medical breakthroughs for complicated and serious conditions. Over against this good news are the facts the systems will be chronically over budget for the foreseeable future. Added to that is the even bigger challenge the needs are outstripping our growing capacities. There is no end in sight for this bind since we all want the latest from medical research and the highly trained specialists. There is an even greater challenge on the horizon. It is called wellness. Sadly, medical successes dont lead to family wellness. A cure just returns us to our previous state of wellness or unwellness. Medical treatments do not produce wellness. However, wellness is on the happy side of things. It often prevents illness. In other cases it eases treatment and recovery. So, why is there not more wellness? There are several reasons why wellness is in the shadow of big medicine. First, medicine has all the money locked up in the hands of specialists and their equipment. The health care budget for community family-based health care services is hardly visible. Second, wellness is beyond the reach of the systems because the personnel are schooled in illness. The big third is that wellness is the exclusive work of the family. The health care establishment doesnt recognize this central fact. It even gets in the way of increased family responsibility for their own wellness and illness. Wellness is in a different world from illness. It comes from within families. It is a positive lifestyle. It focuses on building family strengths. The professions have yet to learn how to help families with their wellness. Of all the professions, public health nursing comes closest. Family wellness calls families for seriously altered lifestyles. Strangely, our debt crisis will help us change from debt styles to saving; from problem focus to wellness. Families need to get solidly into wellness practices. To do this, they need new kinds of professional supports. They also need funding for research to examine family wellness. Authored by Robert C. Shaw, B.A.Sc. B.D. M.S. W. President of the Markham Institute for Human Services Please see: www. themarkhaminstitute.org Contact Robert at: rcecshaw@aol.com By John Dunn Special to The Star Consumer condence among Floridians rose three points to 69 in December, reecting a cautious optimism in the economy, according to a recent University of Florida survey. Though the latest gure is only one point below the level set in December 2010, it also marks the highest rank in the past nine months. The index used by UF researchers in the survey is benchmarked to 1966, which means a value of 100 represents the same level of condence for that year. The lowest index possible is a 2; the highest is 150. Consumer condence in December shot up in four of the ve indexes used by survey takers, and declined in only one. The index that reveals whether Floridians think their personal nances have improved from a year ago rose one point to 53. Another showed that their overall expectations in the soundness of the U.S. economy jumped six points to 59. Condence in the economys performance over the next ve years also rose this time three points to 71. Finally, the overall perception of survey takers that the present is a good time to buy big ticket items, such as washing machines and laptops went up sharply by seven points to 85. The only index to show dropping condence was an expectation of a drop in personal nances a year from now, declining two points to 78. Taken as a whole, the UF survey reects a changing mood that matches growing condence across the nation, said Chris McCarty, director of UFs Survey Research Center in the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. In addition, he added, there are factors in the Florida economy that were interpreted as positive by both younger and older respondents. Men were more positive than women by a margin of 71 points to 67. Floridians are most likely optimistic about continued improvement in the employment situation, McCarty said. The decline in unemployment in November was 0.4 percent to 10 percent. The drop marked the rst time in many months that economic sectors other than tourism led the way in employment increases. McCarty noted employers in trade, transportation and utilities employed 34,800 more workers from October to November. However, he cautioned that many of these new jobs were in retail trade and might only reect holiday seasonal hiring, which could disappear in early 2012. McCarty also cited several other reasons for the change in mood. Retailers are offering big seasonal discounts to shoppers and mortgage interest rates are low. Housing prices might have bottomed out for a while, he said, hovering about around $130,100 for a single-family home. Gas prices are down, too. A gallon cost about 15 cents less than it did in November, though prices are expected to rise in 2012. Stock prices were unsteady but did not sink in the wake of bad economic news coming from Europe, as some economists expected. Media reports about the U.S. Congress wrangling over debt and spending issues also didnt sour consumer condence. Contrary to our prediction, the impasse of the Super Commission regarding decit reductions came and went with very little concern from consumers, McCarty said. Overall, the mood for December modestly is upbeat. But McCarty cautioned that Floridians might nd it hard to remain optimistic in the coming year, if Congress carries through with $1.2 trillion in mandatory spending cuts required by the debt ceiling deal in 2011. The UF survey was conducted between Dec. 11 and Dec. 22 and reects the responses of 411 individuals statewide. The University of Florida is one of the nations largest public universities. Through its research and other activities, UF contributes more than $8.76 billion a year to Floridas economy and has a total employment impact of more than 100,000 jobs statewide. John Dunn is a writer for the University of Floridas news bureau. He can be reached at dunnj@ embarqmail.com. A big thank you Dear Editor: I would like to give a big thank you to all of the staff and volunteers at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. I was in the swing bed program to receive rehabilitation for 20 days. All those that participated in my care gave me the utmost attention. I felt like I was their only client. I would like to give a special thank you to Dr. Oksanen, who went above and beyond what was required of him. To the staff of nurses and techs, to the physical and occupational professionals who gave me the tools to return home, a big thank you. As a community, we are very blessed to have such a ne facility to meet our needs. It was such a feeling of relief to have rehab so close to home which did not require travel to Panama City for my family. Robert W. Baker Mexico Beach By many measures, womens lives have changed substantially in recent decades. However, according to a comprehensive government report called Women in America, while certain social and economic situations for women have improved, when it comes to personal nances, many women still face challenging hurdles. Key report ndings include: Women live longer than men but are much more likely to experience critical health problems that hamper their ability to work and to pass up needed care because of cost. Although the earnings gap between women and men continues to narrow, its still signicant: Among full-time workers, womens weekly earnings as a percentage of mens have increased from 62 percent in 1979 to 80 percent in 2009. More women than men now graduate high school and college, but far fewer earn degrees in engineering, computer sciences and other higherpaying elds. Women increasingly marry later, have fewer children or remain childless, yet still are more likely to live in poverty, particularly singlemother families. Women are less likely than men to work outside the home (61 percent vs. 75 percent in 2009) and are much more likely to work part-time and to take time off to raise children or care for aging relatives. In a nutshell: Women generally earn less and live longer than men, so at retirement they often have less in savings, receive smaller retirement and Social Security benets and must spread out their money longer. Clearly, women need to take charge of their nancial wellbeing. Here are a few places to start: Develop a budget to track income and expenses. Either download a budget spreadsheet template or investigate software packages and online account management services like Quicken. com, Mint.com, Yodlee. com and Mvlopes.com Plan for retirement. Time is your biggest ally when it comes to retirement savings, so get cracking. Start estimating your retirement needs: Social Securitys Retirement Estimator (www.ssa.gov/estimator), which automatically enters your earnings information from its records to estimate your projected Social Security benets under different scenarios, such as age at retirement, future earnings projections, etc. Check whether your 401(k) plan administrators website has a calculator to estimate how much you will accumulate under various contribution and investment scenarios. If not, try the retirement calculators at Bankrate. com and AARP to determine your current nancial status and what youll need to save to meet your retirement needs. Do your research. Many helpful personal nancial education and management tools are available online, including: The National Foundation of Credit Counselings MyMoneyCheckUp program offers a step-bystep assessment of your overall nancial health and behavior in four personal nance areas: budgeting and credit management, saving and investing, planning for retirement and managing home equity (www.mymoneycheckup. org). Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney JASON ALDERMAN Florida consumer condence jumps LETTER TO THE EDITOR Everything on Sale End of Business March 31, 2012 Needles & Thread, Inc. Call (850) 227-5528 1400 Monument Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Fabrics Patterns Short Bolt Backing Thread Yardage Batting Women must save for the future The great illness vs. wellness imbalance

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Local A6 | The Star She proved youre never too old to learn, said Gentry, who has been teaching for 23 years. I feel like I do follow in my moth ers footsteps. I love these kids and I want to do what I can to make them feel suc cessful. The best part about teaching, Gentry said, is when a concept nally clicks for a student. I can remember show ing the students how to break down words and then sound out the long words, Gentry said. And they said, Mrs. Gentry, I didnt know I could read these big words! Gentry said she feels drawn to her disadvantaged students in particular be cause they have the hardest lives. I have a yearning for those students who need a little bit extra, Gentry said. I want to make my students feel successful. Wewahitchka Elemen taryJennifer Guffey (First Grade) In Jennifer Guffeys rstgrade class, everyone has a spot. Guffeys polka dot classroom theme helps her communicate to her stu dents that everyone is spe cial in his or her own way. Each student has their own colorful polka dot hang ing on Guffeys classroom door. It shows them that ev erybody has things theyre good at, Guffey said. You have to kind of reiterate that to them. Were a family in here. Guffey said her favorite thing about her job is the rst-grade students, an age group she adores. Its the students for sure and their eagerness to learn, Guffey said. Its a very rewarding job. You get to see them learn to read and teach them to have a love for reading. In her ninth year teach ing at WES, Guffey utilizes tools like her SMART Board to form words and a spell ing game called Sparkle to make reading fun for her students. Theres a lot of develop ment during the year, she said. You get to see that growth throughout the year. Theyre like little sponges. Port St. Joe High SchoolDenise Ethridge, (Math 11th and 12th) In only her second year teaching, Denise Ethridge is already breaking records. Last March, in honor of International Pi Day, Eth ridge organized an activity that her students remember as the most fun school day ever. Throughout the day, math students across the school constructed a pi chain, with each colored link represent ing a digit of pi. By the end of the day, the chain represented 12,000 dig its, tripling her initial 4,000digit goal. The chain also beat the standing record of 10,000 digits and was so long it stretched across the bas ketball court 27 times. Ethridge originally start ed her career as a banker, but is glad she made the ca reer switch. Oh my gosh I should have done this 100 years ago! she said. Ethridge is a teacher who uses technology in the class room every day. She admits she wouldnt know how to teach with out her SMART Board, a new classroom technology that integrates a computer into a dry erase board. The SMART Board also hooks up to a class set of graph ing calculators and allows students to digitally turn in calculator work. Ethridge also uses a lot of hands-on learning tech niques, especially in her AP statistics class, where they often use candy to formulate models. Ethridge said her favor ite part about teaching is her students. I care more for (my stu dents) far beyond math, Ethridge said. I want to know whats going on in their lives and see if I can help. Wewahitchka High SchoolJudy Eppinette (Reading 9th-12th) Judy Eppinettes goal is to nd the perfect book for every student, followed by another and another. She knows that to be come a good reader, a stu dent must rst nd a love for it. The most rewarding (part of teaching) is seeing students enjoy reading, Eppinette said. To take someone who is having a very hard time and to nd the right book for them and for them to say hey, is there anything else like this? Eppinette teaches inten sive reading at WHS, a class designed for students who have struggled to pass the reading portion of the FCAT, a requirement for high school graduation. It means their future, Eppinette said of the impor tance of passing the FCAT. This is one of the require ments of graduation. Its critical for whether they get a diploma or not. Eppinettes main focus in her classroom is to get her students to read indepen dently. We have a girl right now that was basically a nonreader, Eppinette said. Now shes reading all the time. She is pulling herself out of the pit she was in and progressing. The shelves in Ep pinettes classroom are stocked with books, and she believes there is a book for every student. Some of them may not have passed the FCAT, but they can, Eppinette said. The other reading teach ers and I have the same fo cus to get the kids reading as much as we can. Eppinette has been teach ing for 25 years. This year is only her third at WHS. Its an honor of course; especially when youve joined a new faculty, she said of her Teacher of the Year award. It was unex pected. We have so many people that work so hard in this school. 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 P ACKAGE ST O RE & LO UNGE GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR F AVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRIT S WWW.L OO K O UTL O UNGE.C O M FRI D AY & SATUR D AY R AN D Y STARK L IVE K ARA O KE & DJ WITH N ATALIE L A D IE S N IGHT T UE SD AY & W E D NE SD AY 5 C L OS ING H APPY HO UR MO N D AY FRI D AY 5 7 Apalachicola dental practice offers Six Month Smile Braces Adults and older teenagers looking to straighten their teeth can now get the smile they have always wanted, in just six months, through a cosmetic braces system available at the ofces of James A. Padgett, DDS in Apalachicola, FL. Dr. James Padgett is one of the areas rst dental practices to offer the Six Month Smiles System, designed specically for adults and teenagers who have crooked, crowded, or spaced teeth, without major bite issues. The technique offers tremendous advantages over traditional metal braces. Unlike the traditional braces people often wear for two or four years, this procedure straightens teeth in an average of just six months and uses low forces to gently move teeth comfortably. The Six Month Smile System utilizes specialized clear brackets and tooth colored wires, making them virtually invisible. The procedure requires fewer dental visits and is typically less expensive than traditional braces. In addition, the Six Month Smiles System can result in healthier gums, since straight teeth are easier to clean than crooked teeth. Please call the ofce for a complimentary free consult at (850)653-9653. Dr Ivers and Staff wishes you a HAPPY NEW YEAR May 2012 bring you and your loved ones... A year of Health & Wisdom... A year of Peace & Prosperity... And also a year of Love & Laughter. We look forward to seeing you in 2012. 9 am 6 pm Wed & Sat 9 am 2 pm VINCENT IV ER S M.D. www.iversmd.com ALL MAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED Thursday, January 12, 2012 TEACHERS from page A1 P hotos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Port St. Joe Elementary Teacher of the Year Krissy Gentry holds a tribute to Aunt Sue, a woman her mother taught to write her name at age 101. Wewahitchka Elementary Teacher of the Year Jennifer Guffey in her rst grade classroom where everybody has a spot. Port St. Joe High School Teacher of the Year Denise Etheridge organized a pi chain activity for International Pi Day last March, where the paper chain links each represent a digit of pi. The chain grew to more than 12,000 links and stretched across the basketball court 27 times. Wewahitchka High School Teacher of the Year Judy Eppinette strives to instill a love for reading in her students.

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Local The Star| A7 accounts specialist, has spearheaded the develop ment of the online bill pay system. Combs said they have taken every step to make sure the site is se cure. Combs said the city has its own secure server to process the payments through a third party ven dor. Anybody who is con cerned about security, wed be glad to talk to them, Combs said. Weston and Combs both hope to see a spike in the use of the online bill pay system, something that could lead the city to an optional paperless billing system in the future. In addition to offering online bill pay, the citys new Web site is designed so residents and visitors can nd answers with a click of the mouse. Im thrilled with the new Web site, Weston said. Were really focused on getting it out there and keeping it current. The site hosts photo al bums of community events, introductions to city staff, and a list of all of the citys ordinances. Weston said visitors will soon be able to search the code database to quickly locate the related ordinance. It kind of walks you through what city govern ment is, said Weston, who pointed out the sites dif ferent department pages. Weve got great employ ees who are dedicated. These people are the faces of the city. The site also provides links to other area organi zations like the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Gulf County Tourism De velopment Council, Port of Port St. Joe Port Authority and the Port St. Joe Rede velopment Agency. We need to speak from one voice, Weston said. A few areas of the site are still under mainte nance, including the code enforcement page, which Weston said will soon help educate area residents and visitors on the citys build ing codes without requiring a trip to city hall. When somebody has an issue, they can go to the code enforcement (page), see who the point of contact is and see what the process is, Weston said. The parks and recre ation page is also under development, but will soon feature information and maps of area parks, includ ing the Port City Trail sys tem, and will also feature announcements for local youth sports clubs. My vision, several years from now, is for the city to have a great parks and recreation depart ment, Weston said. We have great facilities. Springs. In the latter robbery, the man, who said he had a weapon though he did not display one, left with an undisclosed amount of cash. Surveillance camera footage from the incidents showed what police be lieved to be the same sus pect, according to Mexico Beach Police Chief Brad Hall. Law enforcement of cers from several agen cies met last Thursday to coordinate the investiga tion, which involved the Mexico Beach, DeFuniak Springs and Dothan po lice departments and the Walton County Sheriffs Ofce, as well as BCSO. On Friday authorities issued an alert asking for the publics help in locat ing the suspects. The two were arrested later that day. DO YOUR FEET HURT? Why Suffer with heel pain, ingrown toenails, burning feet, diabetic foot conditions, corns, bunions, callouses? Whatever the problem, the sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better youre going to feel. Dr. Burton S. Schuler Podiatrist Foot Specialist 763-3333 So Why Wait? Make your appointment. Call today! We accept Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS and other major Insurances Dr. Burton S. Schuler Learn more about Dr. Schuler at footcareforyou.com 27 years in practice of Podiatric Medicine, Pain Management & Foot Surgery in Panama City 37 years in treating diabetes Strickly in-ofce treatment Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp GRADES from page A1 Thursday, January 12, 2012 give the community and parents plenty of credit also. They really push chil dren to excel. We have great school leadership. Our teachers work hard and are commit ted to student achievement. Our students work hard and take advantage of the opportunities the district offers. There is a sense of pride here. Both county high schools technically earned sufcient points to earn A grades last year, but were dropped a letter grade due to lack of sufcient prog ress among students in the lowest quartile, particularly in reading. However, this year, Port St. Joe High School had at least 50 percent of those students 58 percent compared to 33 percent last year make adequate yearly progress, resulting in no drop in grade, while Wewahitchka High School earned enough points for a high B. Wooten said the change in the grading formula for high schools two years ago provided a better snapshot for student achievement in high school and also trained a spotlight on the districts efforts to expand options for high school students. The formula change made scores on the Florida Comprehensive Assess ment Test only taken by high school freshmen and sophomores count for just 50 percent of the scor ing formula. The other 50 percent is based on graduation rates the district topped the state dropout rates the district was among the lowest in the state and participation and success in dual enrollment college level course and Indus try Certication courses such as carpentry, welding and business. With the changing of the formula they got more realistic, Wooten said. It really takes into account what those kids are doing beyond FCAT. More than 140 college level courses were taken by district high school students during the rst semester of this year. The number increases by the semester. The number of courses the kids are taking and passing with a C or bet ter, which they must do to count, Wooten said. All of those kids are taking col lege courses and passing. They are better prepared for college. And for those students for whom college may not serve as the best option, the district offers clear al ternatives. You have to drill down on student assessment and nd out what is going on with each student, Wooten said. The district applied grant money to provide English and reading teach ers an extra hour each week last school year to as sess student success and progress. That grant mon ey is providing two hours of additional analysis of student progress. The perks from recogni tion as a high-performing district have also assisted, Wooten said. The ability to start the school year a bit earlier than other districts is fa vorable for dual enroll ment because it allows the district to put its semes ter schedule with the rst semester ending by Christmas in synch with Gulf Coast State College. The school improve ment template the district uses is also more userfriendly and easy to navi gate for teachers, admin istrators and parents than the states template, which districts not recognized as high-performing must use. HOW TO PAY YOUR BILL ONLINE Step onevisit www.cityofportstjoe.com Step twoOn the homepage, click pay your bill online and click it again on the next page Step threeEnter your account number and customer ID, which can be found on your water bill. (Select remember my search criteria to save this information in your browser) Step fourClick manage bills for the address you wish to make a payment on Step veSelect your outstanding bill to make a payment, or click show past bills to view bill history ARRESTS from page A1 PAYING from page A1 COURTESY MEXI CO B EA CH DEPART M ENT OF P UBLI C S AFETY Surveillance image from a bank robbery in Defuniak Springs.

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A Your Hunting Headquarters Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) WWW.BWOHUNT.COM T H A N K Y OU F O R A G R E A T 2011, WE AR E L OO KI NG F O R W ARD TO A NOTHE R G R E A T Y E AR. Thursday, January 12, 2012 Page 8 By Joseph T. Collins Since my rst visit to St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge in 1998, I have been smitten. To me, a man born in northern climes with an obsessive interest in am phibians, reptiles, turtles and crocodilians, St. Vin cent Refuge on the Florida panhandles Gulf Coast is a fantasy fullled. It is a place for my kind of wildlife to live in its natural environment, largely undisturbed. For 14 of the past 15 years, I have visited the barrier island refuge to conduct herpetofaunal sur veys under the auspices of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. My colleagues including my wife, photog rapher Suzanne L. Col linsand I have amassed data on the diversity, dis tribution, abundance and microhabitat preferences of amphibians, reptiles, turtles and crocodilians on St. Vincent Refuge, which is accessible only by boat. We have found that most snake species are active in winter, despite cool tem peratures. We have deter mined that pygmy rattle snakes are so pervasive that we must watch our step for fear of crushing them. Our main objective, though, has been to de termine if the endangered eastern indigo snake is present. The species had never been recorded on the island refuge, but the service released a large number of them there in the 1980s as part of a patri ation effort. Since 1998, we havent found any of them, and, as long as a decade ago, we reported that the patriation had failed. But we remain ever vigilant for eastern indigos, in case we were wrong. My most memorable moment at St. Vincent Ref uge occurred in January 2002, when I was searching for eastern diamondback rattlesnakes. The eastern diamondback, a denizen of deep palmetto thickets and gopher tortoise burrows, is the refuges largest snake. It can grow up to eight feet long and weigh up to 10 pounds. Yet, it is extremely difcult to detect unless it rattles, something it does only when you are much too close to it. On that warm January day, I spied a large, hollow log. Guessing it might con tain a diamondback (or a cottonmouth), I crouched down and quietly ap proached it. I looked in, us ing the sunlight off a small mirror. Nobody was home. I stood up. Behind me, not more than three feet away, a ve-foot eastern dia mondback began to rattle. Apparently, my low-level approach had not alarmed it, but, when I stood up, it became agitated, appar ently thinking I looked like something out of Jurassic Park. I bagged the snake and took it back to the boat ramp at Indian Pass, where I was scheduled to give a presentation to two dozen wildlife enthusiasts. With the visitors seated on benches on an open trailer hooked up to a truck ready for a tour of the refuge, I explained the importance of herpeto fauna to the island. When I took out a beautiful scarlet snake that my colleagues and I had found earlier, the visitors were awed by its orange-black-and-cream colors and pattern. After they got back onto the trailer, I emptied the eastern diamondback rattlesnake out of the bag and let it stretch out on the ground. First, there was silence. Then, the snake rattled. This brought a sharp intake of breath from many visitors. Soon, most were excitedly taking pho tographs, albeit from the elevated safety of the trail er. Afterward, the tour guide who showed them the island told me it was his fastest tour everbecause nobody got off the trailer. Our work on the island has convinced my colleagues and me that St. Vincent Ref uge is one of the most valu able jewels in the National Wildlife Refuge System. It provides the kind of isola tion that ensures the longterm well-being of its ora and fauna. And that isolation permits the kind of longterm biological research so sorely needed to provide current information for use in wildlife management pro grams across the southeast ern United States. Joseph T. Collins is direc tor of the Center for North American Herpetology. He, with Suzanne L. Collins and Travis W. Taggart, is co-au thor of A Pocket Guide to Snakes of St. Vincent Na tional Wildlife RefugeFlor ida, published in 2011 by Mennonite Press. St. Vincent Refuge: A Herpetologists Paradise Zack McFarland, 10, of St. Joe Beach, got this nice 7-point with his trusty .243 rie while hunting with his Dad, Tim, on New Years Day 2012 at around 5:30 p.m. EST in Calhoun County. This makes the second year in a row Zack has harvested a big shooter buck with only one shot. By Mark Knapke Park ManagerSt. Joseph Peninsula State Park 227-1327 The Department of En vironmental Protections St. Joseph Peninsula State Park conducts ecosystem restoration projects at the park to re-establish and perpetuate Floridas native ecosystems. One of the land manage ment tools we use is pre scribed re. Typically, we use prescribed re to con trol invasive exotic vegeta tion from gaining a foothold and to promote the growth of planted and native Flori da vegetation. Many of our native plants and animals have adapted to wildland res. These species will not only survive such res but will ourish afterwards. Prescribed Fires Reduce the potential for damaging wildres. Improve the quality of habitats for wildlife. Control the presence of harmful non-native plant species. Recycle nutrients. There is an extensive amount of planning that goes into conducting a pre scribed re. During this process we analyze the prevailing weather condi tions, season and drought conditions to achieve our management goals while providing the utmost safety to the resources, local com munity and our personnel. We work closely with the Florida Forest Service, the local re department and other agencies and have established burn zones and re breaks. We typically burn two or three zones an nually and prescribed res are typically accomplished during winter months. During a prescribed re you should expect to See and smell smoke. See some open ame and smoldering material. Notice some falling ash. For more information about prescribed re, and its applications in Florida, visit: www.dep.state..us/ parks/bncr/landmanage ment.htm, reinorida.ifas. u.edu or www.-dof.com/ wildre/rx_index.html. Until next time, best wishes from the Park Rang ers at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastateparks.org. Prescribed re Star Staff Report In their December newsletter, the Support ers of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge posted a schedule for events for the rst half of 2012. The Supporters conduct wagon tours of St. Vincent Island October through May. The tours are open wagon and last approxi mately four hours. The rst tour for 2012 has been scheduled for Wednesday, Jan 11. There is a per person charge of $10 paid to the private company that op erates the shuttle from In dian Pass to St. Vincent To reserve a spot go to www.stvincentfriends. com/. For more information call the refuge ofce at 653-8808. The Supporters annual membership meeting has been scheduled for Feb. 26 at 1 p.m. ET. There will be a short business meeting, an opportunity for mem bership renewal or new membership application processing, a special guest speaker and a free lunch. The event is open to the public and will be held at the St Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve, 3915 County Road 30A in Gulf County. This years St. Vin cent Island open house is scheduled for March 30. More details will be re leased down the road but, typically, there are a wide variety of events for partic ipants both young and old including exhibits, hikes, nature trails, music, his torical narratives, photo opportunities, art exhibits and lunch for the rst 100 visitors. If you have not attended a St. Vincent Island open house in the past, make it a point to mark your cal endar for this fun-lled event. The stated goal of the Supporters is to support environmental activities that include education, recreation and increased understanding of the his tory and natural environ ment of the St. Vincent Na tional Wildlife Refuge. Upcoming Supporters of St. Vincent events SUZANNE L. CO LL IN S | Center for North American Herpetology The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest snake found on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. STRAIGHT SHOOTING support environmental activities that include education, recreation and increased understanding of the history and natural environment of the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. The stated goal of the Supporters of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge Pier/Surf Bottom shing is still good for catches of triggersh, mingo, white snapper, black snapper, grouper and amberjack. Live bait shed over a wreck works well for amberjack. Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Speckled trout are biting good around the grass ats in 5to 7feet of water. Live shrimp, nger mullet or pinsh work well for bait as well as a jig and grub. Redsh are also on the grass ats and will hit the same bait as the trout. Under overcast skies, with an east wind, the water is clean with 1-to 2-foot waves at the Okaloosa Island Pier. In the last couple of days, anglers have been catching bonito, pompano and redsh. Other sh showing up are sheepshead, bluesh and ounder. SPONSORED BY

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com A Section Thursday, January 12, 2012 Page 9 By Tim Croft Star News Editor An unbeaten season came to an abrupt halt last week, but by weeks end the Port St. Joe High School boys soccer team was back in the win column. District 1-1A rival Frank lin County halted the Tiger Sharks unbeaten streak at 11 games last Thursday with a 1-0 victory in Eastpoint, even though Port St. Joe doubled the Seahawks shots at 8-4. The lone goal of the game came on a long-range blast that eluded rst-year goal keeper Walt Bowers, who made three saves on four Franklin County shots. With three starters missing we struggled to pos sess the ball at mideld and coordinate any offensive cre ativity or combination play, said Port St. Joe coach Gary Hindley. The loss dropped the Ti ger Sharks to 10-1-1 overall and 3-1-1 in district play. The Port St. Joe boys re sponded to their rst loss of the season by traveling to Freeport and putting on a scoring clinic in a 9-2 victory, a team-best offensive output for the season. It was the nal district match of the regular season with the district tournament coming next week, and it improved the Tiger Sharks score to 11-1-1 and 4-1-1. Senior midelder Daniel May and freshman forward Marcel Duarte each had a hat trick, scoring three goals apiece. May has now scored 11 goals this season, Duartes 12 leads the team. Also scoring for the Ti ger Sharks were LaGrand McLemore, Cole Cryder man and Javarri Beachum. Duarte, McLemore, Cry derman and Drew Lacour each had two assists; Daniel Jones and Dell Pickett one assist apiece. Port St. Joe outshot Freeport 30-5. Bowers started in goal and saw 60 minutes of ac tion, giving up one goal and making three saves, earn ing the win to improve to 81 for the season with a .587 goals against average. The Tiger Sharks played at Baker on Monday and hosted Springeld Ruther ford on Tuesday. The boys play at Mari anna tonight and travel to North Bay Haven Academy for the nal regular season game on Saturday. Lady Tiger Sharks The Port St. Joe girls won one and tied the other last week to improve to 7-31 overall and nish 3-2-1 in district play. The girls drew with Franklin County 2-2 last Thursday. Senior captain Rachel Jones converted a penalty kick in the 15th minute to score her ninth goal of the year and Chris tian Laine scored in the 49th minute as Port St. Joe bolted to a 2-0 lead. Lexie McGhee assisted on Laines goal. Franklin County scored twice in the nal 30 min utes to knot the game at the nal whistle. Each team recorded 11 shots, with Port St. Joe keeper Shannon Pridgeon making ve saves. As with the boys, the Lady Tiger Sharks re sponded with a road win on Saturday, recording their fourth shutout of the sea son with a 4-0 win over Wal ton County. McGhee, a sophomore forward, scored her fth goal of the season and Laine added her fourth. Jones tallied her teamleading 10th of the year and junior captain Jaclyn Ker igan added her second. All goals were unassisted. Pridgeon, a freshman, recorded her second shut out, needing to make just two saves. The girls travel to Mari anna tonight. Port St. Joe will face Freeport at North Bay Haven on Saturday. The Lady Tiger Sharks are seeded second in the District 1-1A tournament, which begins next Tuesday at Franklin County. The Lady Tiger Sharks face the third-seeded Lady Seahawks at 7 p.m. ET. The winner of that game will be guaranteed a play off spot and will face topseeded Rocky Bayou in the championship game at 7 p.m. ET on Jan. 20. Tiger Sharks suffer rst loss, bounce right back By Tim Croft Star News Editor The Port St. Joe High School boys basketball pro gram will honor the coach that started the legacy of state titles that has dened the program. Former Coach Bill Dick son, who was inducted into the schools Athletic Hall of Fame during the 2011 foot ball season, will be honored during a special ceremony prior to Saturdays home game against district and inter-county rival Franklin County. A hospitality room will open at 6 p.m. ET for all those who would like to meet and greet with Dickson and the on-court ceremony will be held following the Lady Tiger Sharks game, be tween 7-7:15 p.m. ET. Dickson, who lives in Mis sissippi, was unable to at tend the ceremonies during the football season. He will be on hand Saturday night. It will be a nice night, said Port St. Joe coach Der ek Kurnitsky. He is very de serving of going into the Hall of Fame and we are happy we get to honor him in per son. Dickson was a standout as a youngster playing for Wewahitchka High School. He later played at Troy (AL) State, where he set the school scoring record, which still stands. After early coaching stops following college, Dick son returned to Gulf County to coach at Port St. Joe High School. He coached the Tiger Sharks from 1966-74, win ning region and state titles in 1969 and 1972. Those are the rst of the eight state titles the Port St. Joe boys have won, not to mention another seven trips as far as the state Final Four. Dicksons 1972 team was noteworthy for nishing with a losing regular-season record only to beat Havana Northside for the state title. Northside had beaten Port St. Joe twice during the reg ular season and again in the district title game. Dickson was named state Coach of the Year in 1969 and 1972 and was named National Coach of the Year in 1971-72. Former players under Dickson and the general public are urged to come out and honor Dickson on Satur day night. Tiger Sharks drop two close games The prior week was one of frustration for the young Tiger Sharks as they lost a game they led at home to Mosley and fell on the road to a West Gadsden team in what could be characterized as something of a moral vic tory. On Jan. 3, the Tiger Sharks (5-9 overall, 3-2 in District 4-1A) hosted Mos ley and carved out a lead through three quarters. Leading 51-44 heading into the nal period, though, the Tiger Sharks faltered, committing key turnovers and missing shots to pave the way for a 24-13 advan tage of the Dolphins in the fourth-quarter and a 68-64 Port St. Joe loss. It was the same as with Cottondale the week be fore, Kurnisky said. We are up and we just could not close the deal. We need to learn to slow down and win games. We need to learn how to close games. We work on it a lot in practice, but that is much different than in games. We just need to think and ex ecute what we want to do. Slowing down is a key this year for a young team starting just one senior, who is joined in the starting lineup by an eighth-grader, a freshman, a sophomore and a junior. We are playing a lot bet ter, Kurnitsky said. The record does not reect it, but our defense is starting to get there and we are gaining condence. The Tiger Sharks had balanced scoring against Mosley, with ve players in double gures. Natrone Lee and Ramel lo Zaccarro led the way with 15 points apiece. Jarkiece Davis and Alex King chipped in 12 points each and Chad Quinn scored 10. Last Friday, the Tiger Sharks traveled to West Gadsden, which had an av erage margin of victory of nearly 40 points against Dis trict 4-1A foes. Port St. Joe adopted a slow-down offense from the outset and kept the game close before the Panthers pulled out a 54-38 win. It was 26-19 at the half and in the third quarter we got to within four, Kurnitsky said. We were right there at the end. We played really well, but (West Gadsden) was too much and we had a run in the third quarter where we made a few turn overs and didnt take care of the ball. King led the way with 17 points for the Tiger Sharks. Lee added nine points, Quinn four, Zaccarro three, Davis and Jamie Gordon two each and Arion Ward scored one point. I really believe this team is going to win some games, Kurnitsky said. I can see it. They are playing with more condence and they havent hung their heads. This has been an interesting and fun year. This is a good group that is only going to get bet ter. The Tiger Sharks trav eled to South Walton on Tuesday and play at Blount stown on Friday in this week of district contests. The Franklin County game will tip at 7:30 p.m. ET on Satur day at The Dome. Star Staff Report The Wewahitchka High School wrestling program had two grapplers place in the top four, including the tournaments most valuable wres tler, during last weekends Andrews Institute Wrestling Invitational. The tournament was held at Gulf Breeze High School. Gator senior Beau Boggess was the champion at 106 pounds, nish ing 3-0 and being voted the tourna ments Most Valuable Wrestler by the other coaches in attendance, said Wewahitchka coach Tracy Mal colm. Boggess wasted little time in the rst two rounds, recording pins in 50 and 53 seconds, respectively. In the championship match, Bog gess earned a technical fall when he carved out an 18-3 lead in the second period. In addition to Boggess, junior Josh Epps took fourth place at 126 pounds. The week started out on an up note for Boggess, who was named the Scholar Athlete of the Week by WMBB Channel 13 out of Panama City. Bog gess appeared on television during Channel 13s Sunday broadcast. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Dixie Youth Baseball League will be holding its annual elec tion of ofcers on Thursday, Jan. 12, at 6 p.m. ET. The meeting will take place at the STAC house located on 8th Street. Anyone interest ed in holding a position as an ofcer within the league is invited to attend. Also, for the rst time in many years, we will be offering a Dixie Boys league for play ers age 13 and 14. And for parents who may be purchasing new bats for the upcoming season please be aware of new performance require ments in the AA and AAA leagues. This information can be found on the Dixie Youth Baseball website. Star Staff Report High school and junior high coaches in all sports, we need your help. In our mind every child participating in scholastic sports in our county de serves some recognition, if only for the sacrice and dis cipline required to compete. But there are a lot of teams, a lot of games and we are, alas, a small staff. Coaches and athletic directors are urged to con tact The Star will all the scores and results from your teams games. The deadline for all information is 8 a.m. ET on Tuesday. Please call 227-7827 or email to tcroft@ star.com, providing scores, individual totals and any thing remarkable and which stands out from the days or weeks competition. Photos are always wel come and can be sent via email as an attached jpeg le. We can not make these sports pages what they can be without your help. Coaches and athletic directors, parents and ath letes, principals and School Board, Superintendent Jim Norton, these are your pag es. Please help us ll them. Tiger Sharks to honor former Coach Dickson on Saturday Wewahitchka wrestlers compete at Gulf Breeze COUR T E S Y OF CAR L A MAY Marcel Duarte (No. 20) had three goals to help spark the Tiger Shark win at Freeport. Christian Laine, who had one goal, sprints through the Walton County defense with Kathleen Rish on the wing. Call to coaches urgent assistance URGENT : Call to coaches DIXIE YOUTH BASEBALL ELECTION

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Local A10 | The Star to coaching a handicapped student one-on-one and treating him as if he were her own, while another pro vides an extra set of eyes and hands in a classroom of busy Pre-K students. On the high school level, the guidance secretary at Port St. Joe High School continues to go above and beyond her secretarial du ties, as she said, When something comes at you, you just do it. And at Wewahitchka High School, the lunch room manager provides quality and variety in the lunchroom while creating a welcoming environment for the students. As WHS Prin cipal Debbie Baxley said, A child cant learn if theyre hungry. After observation from a school employee from out side Gulf County, one of the four school nominees will be chosen to represent the dis trict in the Florida School Related Employee of the Year awards program. PSJE School-related employeeMary King (Paraprofessional) She started out helping special needs teenagers at Gulf ARC, and now she works as a one-on-one aid for a special needs student at Port St. Joe Elementary. Ms. Mary is a xture in Sonya Hills rst grade class at PSJE. Mary King works as a one-on-one aid for a student in Hills class with cerebral palsy. In her second year working with the student, Hill said King treats him as one of her own. I worked at Gulf ARC for 15 years, King said. Ive always worked with special needs kids. King is a one-on-one support system and helps the student with different mobility therapies and the everyday challenges he faces. I just have always liked to work with special needs kids, King said when asked what the best part of her job is. Theres no one thing that sticks out. WES School-related employeeDiane Clark (Pre-K paraprofessional) Diane Clark said any day they glue and glitter in PreK is a good day. Clark thrives in the PreK class at Wewahitchka El ementary, where she said hugs and excitement are classroom staples and ev eryday is fun. To see the world through a 4 or 5-year-olds eyes, its just amazing, Clark said. I love my job. Clark said the most rewarding part is seeing something click for a child, whether its through pat terns, counting or rhyming words. Clark has worked as a paraprofessional for Gulf District Schools for 14 years and she has seen Pre-K become serious business. Before they start kin dergarten, the state really wants them to be ready to learn, Clark said. We do what kindergarten used to be. Kindergarten has changed so much that PreK has become serious busi ness. Were actually begin ning reading in Pre-K. At the end of the year, were beginning to read just a little bit. Clark attended Wewahi tchka Elementary herself as a child, and believes the classroom she teaches in was actually her own rstgrade classroom. This is where I started and this is where I hope to nish up, Clark said. PSJHS School-related employeeWanda Nixon (Guidance secretary) Wanda Nixon wants to give every student the op portunity to succeed, no matter where they come from. Nixon spent 17 years at Port St. Joe Middle School prior to returning to the high school where she worked years earlier. In her rst year back at PSJHS, Nixon is already right at home. I missed working with the seniors because theyre so excited about graduat ing and starting college, Nixon said. I love to see the kid who works so hard, who came from nothing, and theyre reaching for the stars and they get it. Her favorite part of the job is helping the seniors nd success. Its an honor and a shock, Nixon said of the award. Just to be nominat ed, it warmed my heart. Nixon spends the day assisting the PSJHS guid ance counselor with sched ule changes, making sure the seniors are on track and a host of other things. When something comes at you, you just do it, Nixon said. I try to make her job as easy as possible. Nixon said she truly en joys getting up and going to work everyday. Its challenging, but I like a good challenge, Nixon said. You never know whats going to come through that door. WHS School-related employeeBecky Hamm (Lunchroom manager) A child cant learn on an empty stomach. Wewahitchka High Schools lunchroom man ager Becky Hamm takes pride in providing nutri tious brain fuel for the stu dents. If a child is hungry I dont think they can learn, said Baxley. This is the only real good meal some of them get in a day. Baxley said Hamm has made a very special effort in providing students and teachers with good quality food in a friendly and car ing atmosphere. Hamm has also estab lished the rst breakfast program at WHS. She takes pride in her food and wants quality and variety, Baxley said. After a stint as the We wahitchka Elementary lunch manager, Hamm is back at home at WHS where she worked years earlier. She makes all the chil dren feel welcomed and loved, Baxley said. Im honored to have her here. 8238 HONOR from page A1 Thursday, January 12, 2012 P hotos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Port St. Joe Elementary School-related employee of the year Mary King is a paraprofessional who works one-on-one with a special needs student. Left: Wewahitchka Elementary Schoolrelated employee of the year Diane King works as a paraprofessional in a Pre-K classroom. Port St. Joe Highs School-related employee of the year Wanda Nixon works as the schools guidance secretary.

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, January 12, 2012 Star Staff Report Ghostly forms, loud voices, a playful kitten, ying objects, phan tom lights and mysterious cries. All are part of lighthouse life at stations across Florida. Whether haunted or not, this is for one lucky individual to nd out and win a unique rst: a weekend stay at the newly-restored Keepers Cottage at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The annual Florida Panhan dle Lighthouse Challenge will be April 21-22, offering tourists and lo cals the opportunity to climb all ve lighthouses along Floridas North ern Gulf Coast: the Pensacola, Cape San Blas, Cape St. George, Crooked River and St. Marks lighthouses. All will be open during those two days for climbers and visitors. During the weekend of the Chal lenge one lucky couple will have the opportunity to be the rst to spend the night in the Head Keep ers House at Cape San Blas Light house. Tickets are available for the rafe to win two nights and three days in the Keepers Cottage next door to the Gift Shop. This room has one double-size bed. No children please. Tickets are available in the Lighthouse Gift Shop for $10, and the drawing will be April 1. Contact Beverly Douds at 850-229-1151 or email her at csb lighthouselady2008@gmail.com. You also can nd her or CSB Light house on Facebook. Church honors MLK Jr.s birthday Star Staff Report The annual community Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Observance Pro gram will be at 5 p.m. ET Sunday at Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church in Port St. Joe. On Monday, honoring the national holi day, scheduled activities consist of arts and crafts, a spelling contest, a youth talent show and other educational entertainment focusing on the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The activities are planned to begin after the Neighbor hood Clean-Project, from noon to 5 p.m. ET at the Washington Recreation Center. For information, call Maxine Gant at 229-6624. Friends of Preserves seeks new members Star Staff Report Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves members and guests are invited to attend the Annual General Membership Meeting Saturday, Jan. 14 beginning at 11 a.m. ET at the Preserves Center. The agenda for this meeting will include a presentation by the new Preserve Man ager, a recap of 2011 accomplishments, a treasurers report, nomination and elec tion of the 2012 Board of Directors and other general business. Matt Greene, the Buffer Preserves new Manager, will present a Photo Journey of Northwest Floridas Flora and Fauna that emphasizes the regions rich botanical and wildlife diversity. Greene will highlight the importance of prescribed re in the long leaf pine ecosystem and discuss the once dominant turpentine industry of Florida. We encourage members to bring one or two guests who may be interested in be coming a Friend of the Preserves. Every one can enjoy assorted chili recipes includ ing vegetarian chili after the meeting. A $5 donation is requested from non-members. For information, call the Preserves Center at 850-229-1787. Chili potluck After the brief meeting, please join us for a potluck chili luncheon, prepared by your fellow Friends members and free to all attendees. There will be several chili recipes including vegetarian that range from mild to hot. You do not need to bring any food unless you wish to share some of your favorite xings to go along with the chili. Be pre pared to have a good time and meet fellow Friends. Board election One of the most important items on the General Membership Meeting agenda is the presentation of the nominating committees slate of candidates for the 2012 Board of Directors of the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves and a vote by all attending cur rent members for the new years Board posi tions. Currently serving on the Board: Charla Boggs, president, John Oliver, past presi dent, Nick Baldwin, Bill Boothe, Marcia Boothe, Sandra Chan and John Ehrman. The proposed slate of candidates for election to the Board: Nick Baldwin, Char la Boggs, Bill Boothe, Marcia Boothe, Gene Cox and John Ehrman. One lucky couple can win the opportunity to spend the weekend of the Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge at the Cape San Blas Keepers Cottage. Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge dates setCOURTESY OF BEVERLY DOU D S PRISON PETS DAWGS in Prison program offers second chances By Tim Croft Star News Editor Eleven more dogs saved. One more state added to the growing list of adopter home states. The DAWGS in Prison program continues to grow by leashes and hounds. As the program, a partnership between the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society and the Gulf Forestry Camp, neared its third anniversary last week, Graduation Class No. 17 brought to 179 the number of shelter dogs saved from an almost certainly grim fate. The program, which aims to train dogs to be sociable and adoptable while providing life skills to inmates, also added Louisiana to the list of states those dogs have found new homes, spanning from New England to the Midwest to the Deep South. DAWGS is an acronym for Developing Adoptable Dogs With Good Sociability. Ninety-nine percent of those dogs are in loving homes right now, and the other 1 percent is waiting to be placed in the right home, said Sandi Christy, co-coordinator for the DAWGS in Prison program for the Humane Society. Here we believe in second chances for the inmates and the dogs. We are seeing successes. One of the larger successes literally is Dylan, a 77-pound mass of regal serenity. A Rhodesian Ridgeback, a dog bred centuries ago to ght lions in Africa, Dylan went home to the Cajun state as Mike and Here we believe in second chances for the inmates and the dogs. We are seeing successes. Sandi Christy co-coordinator the DAWGS in Prison program for the Humane Society Photos by T IM CROFT | The Star The bond forged over eight weeks between dog and inmate and dog and dog is evident every graduation day. Last week was the 17th graduation for the DAWGS in Prison program. At top, Dylan, a 77-pounder, has a habit of crossing left foreleg over right, as if, inmate Gary Ford said, Hes ruling the roost. Below, the DAWGS program is about providing a new life for both inmates and dogs here Gary Ford, caretaker of Dylan, a majestic Rhodesian Ridgeback. See DAWGS B5

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B2 | The Star OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society 3520 EAST 15th Street PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 (TEL) 850-763-4104 www.BrightPediatrics.com DR. SAMEH ELAMIR PEDIATRICS & ADOLESCENTS Same day appointment available Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER THUR S DAY & FRIDAY NIGH T SPE C IAL S 6:00 8:30 HOURS : 236 R eid A ve (850) 229.7121 S CALLOPS, C RABS, SH RIMP & FIS H B URGERS: W I TH FF CH ICKEN FINGERS: W I TH FF S H RIMP SPECIAL : FF COLESLA W, OR Above orders served with: FF, B AKED P O T A T O, S ALAD AND B READ 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Let Me Help You Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Thursday, January 12, 2012 Society Star Staff Report Erin White is the Distinguished Young Woman of Gulf County. She was selected to represent the Gulf County area at the Gulf County program on Oct. 15, 2011. She will participate in the Distinguished Young Women of Florida state program on Jan. 21 in Winter Garden. Showtime is 7 p.m. ET at the Garden Theatre. The young woman selected during the state program will travel to Mobile, Ala., to participate in the Distinguished Young Women of America national nals where White will have an opportunity to win the title of Distinguished Young Woman of America 2012, a share of $125,000 in cash scholarships, and college scholarships to more than 200 colleges and universities across the nation. Erin is the daughter of Gary and Suzanne White and is a senior at Port St. Joe High School. She is senior class president, a member of the National Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta and math club. Erin loves to dance and has taken dance for over 15 years at Pam Nobles Dance Studio. For Erins talent, she will perform a tap dance routine to Sing Sing Sing. Erin also works part time at Goodwill and Seahorse Water Safaris. Erin plans to attend Florida State University and major in Marine Biology. Erin would love to hear from her friends and family next week. Cards can be mailed to Erin White c/o Patty Billsborough at 12836 Jacob Grace Court, Windermere, FL 34786. Flowers can be sent by contacting Bayside Florist and Gifts on Reid Ave at 229-1111. Erin will not have access to her phone, email or Facebook for the entire week. Distinguished Young Women of Florida is an ofcial preliminary of Distinguished Young Women of America (DistinguishedYW), the oldest and largest scholarship program for high school senior females of its type. Since 1958, this program (formerly Americas Junior Miss) has awarded more than $92 million in cash scholarships and provided thousands of young women with collegegranted scholarships to colleges and universities across the nation. Each year, Distinguished Young Women across the nation makes available more than $52 million in scholarship opportunities to high school senior women. In addition to providing scholarships, Distinguished young woman challenges each participant to share its national outreach program, Be Your Best Self (BYBS), with young people across the nation. Through BYBS, participants encourage self-esteem and excellence in all young people through the programs ve principles: Be healthy, Be Involved, Be Studious, Be Ambitious, and Be Responsible. Star Staff Report On Dec. 14 the Ladies Auxiliary of the John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 donated many lap robes to The Bridge nursing home in Port St. Joe. The robes were made by Grace McPherson, who went to be with the Lord last year and by Ginny Seefeldt. The lap robes were handed out to the patients at their annual Christmas Party. Shown in the photo holding some of the lap robes are Auxiliary Members Ginny Seefeldt, Marvine Blanton, Deaon Titus, Margaret Barker, and in the front Nancy Caledine and activities chairman at The Bridge Terri Nelson. Star Staff Report The Central Panhandle Chapter of the American Red Cross is seeking volunteers for its Gulf County Disaster Action Teams (DAT). Disaster Action Team members are the rst responders of the Red Cross disaster program. DAT members are on 24-hour call for a week at a time to respond to local house res or other incidents that may require emergency Red Cross services. DAT members are required to be available to respond to emergencies at any time day or night during their rotational period. DAT team members are responsible for the proper documentation (paperwork) needed to provide nancial assistance to those in need. DAT teams are a vital and integral part of practically all Red Cross response operations. If you are interested in providing this vital service in Gulf County please call Sharon Wagner at 7636587 or email Wager at swagner@redcrosspc.org. Applications may also be picked up at Port St. Joe City Hall. Star Staff Report The Bridge at Bay St. Joe will be celebrating the lifetime achievements and noteworthy community contributions of Erma Louise Parker, Frank MacAllister and Carol Jean Burrows, at an induction ceremony to honor the hometown heroes at 6 p.m. ET on Thursday, Jan. 26. The residents and staff member will be honored as hometown heroes and as Whos Who of the facility. Along with family and friends of the honored recipients, we would like to extend an invitation to community residents to join in the celebration and recognition of our special residents achievements, said Administrator Ron Reid. The Bridge at Bay St Joe is proud to honor those residents who have lived through the most challenging times in history, and also helped build and shape their communities. To register to attend the event or for more information contact The Bridge at Bay St Joe at 229-8244. PHP free tax return preparation Star Staff Report Volunteers with People Helping People of Gulf County will offer free tax return preparation from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays starting Jan. 17 and ending April 15. People Helping People, a non-prot organization, is located at 2010 Parker Ave. in Highland View. For more information call 229-5262. Amateur Radio Society to offer license exams The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will be providing license exams on Saturday, Feb. 11 at the EOC Building in Port St. Joe, located behind the Gulf County Courthouse, at 10 a.m. ET. Those interested in getting a ham license or upgrading a present license should contact C.H. Tillis at 648-8251 for details and registration. Ham it up. Get your license and get on the air. Meeting Notice: American Legion Post 116 There will be a regular general meeting of American Legion Post 116 on Saturday, Jan. 28 at 3 p.m. ET. The meeting will be held at Emerson Cooling & Heating HQ located at 109 Trade Circle West in Port St. Joe. Food and refreshments will be served after the meeting. All members are encouraged to attend. Eligibility for membership and benets can be found on the American Legion Website at www.legion.org. We invite all eligible veterans to join our organization. Please contact Commander Douglas Calendine at 227-3776 for more information. Society BRIEFS RED CROSS SEEKING VOLUNTEERS Bridge residents and staff to be honored for lifetime achievements VFW 10069 auxiliary donates lap robes ERIN WHITE PSJHSs Erin White to compete in Distinguished Young Women of Florida

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The Star| B3 Over 35 Years Experience. 208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe 850.229.1111 www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Billy CarrOwner, David Goodson Manager Designers Peggy Joe Stripling, Ann Guey & Alison Buckner Thursday, January 12, 2012 School and Local News By Tim Croft Star News Editor No tests, no grades, no stress, just fun. That is the mantra for Education Encore at Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/ Franklin Center. Registration for this years Education Encore, which provides non-credit enrichment classes for adults on a variety of topics, will be held beginning at 1 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Jan. 18 in Room A101 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus.. Education Encore strives to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom in which adults can explore new ideas. The Continuing Education Department at Gulf Coast State College sponsors the Education Encore program because the schools commitment to quality learning experiences for all citizens regardless of age, said Jim Barr, GCSC coordinator of Community Education Programs. All courses are conducted in a relaxed and supportive atmosphere by incredible instructors. Barr said participants in Education Encore range from 20 to 75. One man in his 40s decided to enroll because of the programs motto No tests, no grades, no stress, just fun and as a result of his experiences in the program was motivated to become a full-time academic student, Barr added. Instructors include local author Michael Lister, television weather personality Judy Dickey and local artist Jennifer Bonaventura, among others. Barr noted that just as exercising the body maintains physical tness, one goal of Education Encore is to maintain the tness of the mind. For participants who have never attended college, the program gives them an opportunity to live the college experience, Barr said. Participants who have attended college have an opportunity to re-live their college experience. You are never too old to learn. Education Encore offers courses on a wide range of subjects, including computers, exercise, art, drawing, photography, religion, writing, Spanish, story crafting, history and weather. Classes meet six consecutive Wednesdays beginning Jan. 25 and ending Feb. 29. There will be three periods from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; 9:45-10:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. to noon. All times EST. The fee is $66 for the six-week program the fee is the same whether taking one, two or three classes. This is a great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest, Barr said. To browse the selection of classes offered please visit the website at www.gulfcoast.edu/ EducationEncore. For more information call 8723823 or transmit an email to Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast. edu. Special to The Star The second semester calendar for Faith Christian School: January 9 Monday Students return to school 10 Tuesday Report Cards go home 16 Monday MLK Day (no school) February 13 Monday Progress Reports go home 20 Monday Presidents Day (no school) March 2 Friday Learning Fair (early dismissal for grades 4 8) 9 Friday Field Day 12-16 M F Spring Break (no school) 23 Friday Spaghetti Dinner & Auction (early dismissal for all grades) 26 Monday Report Cards go home April 6 Friday Good Friday (early dismissal for all grades) no ext. day 9 Monday Easter Holiday (no school) 16-20 M-F Achievement Testing 23 Monday Progress Reports go home May 2-6 Mon.-Fri. Teacher Appreciation Week 3 Thursday National Day of Prayer 17 Thursday Last day of school for K3 K5; no extended. day 18 Friday K5 Graduation / Preschool program at 6:30 p.m. 25 Friday Last Day for grades 1 8 Elementary program at 9 a.m. Senior/ Eighth Grade graduation and awards program at 6:30 p.m. Star Staff Report Port St. Joe High School alum Brianna Sigman was named to the Presidents Honor Roll for the fall semester at the University of North Florida. Sigman earned the award by achieving a 4.0 GPA during the Fall 2011 semester. Star Staff Report A new Correctional Basic Standards Class is scheduled to begin Jan. 25 at the Gulf Coast State College, Gulf/Franklin Campus located in Port St. Joe, Florida. This course is required for all who wish to become correctional ofcers in the state of Florida. Recent changes have been made to the FDLE curriculum and the course is now a month shorter than the previous requirement. This means students can complete the required training more quickly, at a signicant reduction in costs. Anyone interested should please call 2279670 extension 5507 or 5511. Star Staff Report Join Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf for a number of new events or activities for a healthy New Year and support your New Years resolutions. Jan. 12: Diabetes Education Class Jenny Stuckey, registered nurse and certied diabetes educator, will host a diabetes self-management class from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. EDT in the conference room at the hospital. The self-management class is open to adults with diabetes who are looking for ways to manage their disease. Pre-registration is required and a physician referral is needed to attend the class. The $10 fee will include lunch for the day. Jan. 12: Quit Smoking Now (Six week on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m.) Attend the free weekly class/support group, Quite Smoking Now. The curriculum was developed by ex-smokers for those who want to become exsmokers themselves. Free nicotine replacement therapy available for class participants. To register, call 1-87-Quit-Now-6 (1-877-8486696). Program provided by Florida AHEC. Jan. 19: New Volunteer Orientation at 10 a.m. Would you like to become a volunteer for Sacred Heart Hospital? At the core of the Scared Hearts long and proud tradition of caring for the sick, the poor, the aged and the vulnerable, stands a group of volunteers whose willing hearts and helping hands have served generations of families during their time of need. Jan. 19: Yoga (Six week on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. and 6:45 p.m.) Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf is sponsoring free community yoga classes Jan 19-Feb 23. Classes will include a chair class at 5:30 and a traditional mat class at 6:45. Jan. 28: Free Skin Screenings Gulf Coast Dermatology will provide free skin screenings as part of their annual celebration of service. For more information, contact Gulf Coast Dermatology at 2333376. Jan. 31: Fall Prevention at Home at 1 p.m. Join the Senior Spirit program for a free program on avoiding falls for you and your love ones. The presentation will be provided by the Sacred Heart Hospital Physical Therapy team. For more information on these classes, please contact Paulina Pendarvis at 229-5603. For more information about Sacred Heart, please visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.org Star Staff Report Lack of Transportation is one of the biggest challenges for thousands of local cancer patients. Many need daily or weekly treatments and they dont have a car or are too ill to drive. The American Cancer Societys Road to Recovery program provides volunteer drivers to transport cancer patients to and from these life-saving cancer treatments. Volunteer drivers donate their time and the use of their personal vehicles. The American Cancer Society has a vast volunteer network in which individuals can make a difference in the ght against cancer. One way to make a critical difference is by becoming a volunteer driver for the Road to Recovery program. Volunteer driving requires only a safe driving record, free time, a serviceable vehicle, and the desire to help. If you or anyone you know is interested in becoming a Road to Recovery volunteer driver please contact: Kim Kurnitsky, Relay For Life Event Chair, 227-4093 or your local American Cancer Society Community representative, Stephanie Bird, 785-9205, ext. 3509. You can also join us at our Relay For Life of Gulf County team meetings to get more information on our programs and services, volunteer opportunities, Relay For Life, or get any questions you have answered. Meetings are held at 6 p.m. EST at Capital City Bank. Upcoming meeting dates, Thursday, Jan. 12 and Thursday, Feb. 9. Education Encore gears up at Gulf/Franklin Center The Lions TALE The Lions Tale Correctional Basic Standards class Sigman earns Presidents Honor Roll ACSs Road to Recovery seeks volunteers Start the New Year with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf

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FAITH Page B4 www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Thursday, January 12, 2012 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. Mr. Drinker Listen, Mr. Drinker, let me tell you how you are, You struggle through the work days till its time to hit the bar. Youll drink a few and talk a lot till you get to feeling good Then youll take a bath and hit the road without eating as you should. Youll try to nd the action where somethings going on, And if you nd a party youll hang around till dawn. The next day youll be sorry and say it wont happen tonight, But a little after dark will nd you just about half tight. Some drink because of troubles, others because theyre sad, But any way you look at it a drinking problem is bad. Mr. Drinker says he can quit if he really wanted to, Just ask him who hes trying to fool, himself, or me and you? There is only one that can take away your drink and make you glad. And if you dont accept Him, Mr. Drinker, youve been had. Billy Johnson Barbara Ann Picard, 63 of Mexico Beach, Florida, passed away Thurs day, January 5, 2012 in Panama City. She was born in Spring eld, Massachu setts, but resided in Westeld the larger portion of her life. Survivors in clude her husband, Gary Schloerb of Mexico Beach, Florida; one daughter, Jen nifer Kenny (Douglas) of West Springeld, Mass; one son, Brian Forgette (Jen nifer) of Agawam, Mass; one step son, Jared Schloerb of Orlando, Florida and one sister, Carol Dow of Mexico Beach, Florida. She is also survived by six grandchil dren and numerous nieces, nephews and great nieces and nephews. Services were held at First United Methodist Church of Mexico Beach on Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 11 a.m. with Pastor Jerry Arhelger ofciating. Memorialization was by cremation. In lieu of ow ers, those wishing to may make a donation in memory of Barbara Picard to the Polycystic Kidney Disease Research and Education Foundation at www.pdk cure.org. Words of condolence may be expressed at www. heritagefhllc.com Heritage Funeral Home 247 N. Tyndall Parkway Panama City, FL 32404 (850) 785-1316 Barbara Ann Picard BARBARA ANN PICARD 1948-2012 The local congregation of Jehovahs Witnesses would like to invite the public to attend a Special Assembly Day on Jan. 14 at the Marina Civic Center in Panama City. The theme of the assembly is, Let Your Will Take Place, based on Matthew 6:10. The exciting theme for the program is appropriate due to the fact we were created because of Jehovahs will. Thus, it would be impossible to fulfill the purpose of our existence without learning and doing the will of God. This is not as easy as it may seem because we have to fight an inward tendency to sin. Without Gods help we would risk being caught alive by the devil, for the will of that one. (2 Timothy 2:26). This assembly will help us learn and work in harmony with Gods will. The answer to the following questions will be addressed: What is as important as hearing Gods Word? How can we go on perceiving what Gods will is for us? How can we find a rich and satisfying life? Also, for the young ones: What do you need to prove to Jehovah? What reward comes from doing Gods will now? Why is it urgent that we build up and encourage others? All are invited to attend and pay attention to this encouraging program. The program starts at 9:40 a.m. CT. No admission fee or collections will be taken. Fish Stories at First United Methodist of PSJ We have all grown up hearing (and probably telling) Fish Stories. After all, living in Port St. Joe, we all have more opportunities to sh that most people. Beginning Jan. 8, Rev. Mac Fulcher will begin a ve-week series called Fish Stories. We will begin the series by looking at shing in Deep Water. Our scripture will be Luke 5:1-11. So, if you would like to learn more about shing, come this Sunday to our Contemporary Service at 9 a.m. ET in the Fellowship Hall, or our Traditional Service at 11 a.m. in the Sanctuary. For more information, please call the church ofce at 227-1724. Victory Temple Seasoned Women 13th Anniversary Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church Seasoned Women Department will be observing its 13th anniversary on Jan. 20-22. Friday night services will begin at 7 p.m. ET; Saturday morning service begins at 10 a.m.; and Saturday night service is at 7 p.m. The anniversary will climax on Sunday with a service beginning at 11:30 a.m. The speakers will be announced at a later date. Pastor Gathers and the Victory Temple Church family would like to extend an invitation to one and all. Come and be blessed. Obituary Faith BRIEFS Jehovahs Witnesses special assembly Share your memories Let the community know about loved ones that have passed away. Obituaries are free and allow families and friends to remember and share. Submit obituaries by 8 a.m. ET Tuesdays to tcroft@star. com to leave a tribute to a loved one.

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Public Notice The rst Public Hearing will be held Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST and the second Public Hearing for adoption will be held January 24, 2012. The public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: AN ORDINANCE PER THE REQUIREMENTS OF FLORIDA STATUE 163.3177(3)(b) TO YEARLY REVIEW AND UPDATE THE GULF COUNTY FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SCHEDULE; ADOPTING BY REFERENCE THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 2011/2012 WORK PLAN; INCORPORATING BY REFERENCE THE UPDATED CONCURRENCY TRACKING DATA; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ORDINANCE IN CONFLICT THEREWITH, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on this matter. The ordinance and contents are on le with the Clerk of Court and at the Planning Department, Room 312 in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL. Ad #2011-88 PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, January 16 2012 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, January 24, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application by Michael Weitman for Parcel ID # 006268-119R Located in Section 18, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroach into a 25 setback by 5. 2. Variance Application Baileys Crab House & Seafood Market for Parcel 03946000R Located in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroach into the roadside setback by 8 and rear setback by 12 for business improvements. 3. Public and Open Discussion 4. Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312. Ad #2011-89 WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, Jan 12 72 36 10 % Fri, Jan 13 53 35 10 % Sat, Jan 14 56 40 10 % Sun, Jan 15 61 40 0 % Mon, Jan 16 61 50 0 % T ues, Jan 17 68 50 10 % Wed, Jan 18 67 44 60 % Thursday, January 12, 2012 If you received a potted poinset tia for Christmas, your enjoyment of this attractive plant neednt end with the holidays. So dont throw it away. With a little extra care, and a bit of luck, a gift poinsettias life can be extended for many seasons to come. All too often, we give up on potted poinsettias, once they have lost their colorful bracts. Fortunately, it is rel atively easy to save poinset tias from one Christmas to the next, by planting them in your home landscape. Before discussing outdoor planting, lets briey review the proper care of poinset tias while theyre still in your home. My information was provided by retired Ex tension horticulturist Dr. Robert Black of the Univer sity of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Poinsettias are espe cially sensitive to extremes of heat and cold, as well as sudden temperature changes. So keep your pot ted plant away from hot air vents, cold windows, and doorways, where tempera ture uctuates rapidly. Also avoid overwatering. A thor ough soaking about once a week should be sufcient. Keep your poinsettia in a brightly lighted area, but never in direct sun. Once your gift poinsettia starts to fade after the holi day, you can prepare it for transplanting. Since we live in the colder northern area of our state, youll have to hold your plant in a pro tected area until the danger of frost has past. During this period, the poinsettia should be allowed to dry and become dormant. Wa ter it only occasionally, just enough to keep it from dry ing out. When you are ready to plant your poinsettia out side, you should carefully consider its placement rel ative to the amount of light it will receive in the area where you want to set it. Poinsettias are short day plants. This means they will set buds in the fall only if the daily period of light they receive is relatively short. If you plant your poinsettia where it is exposed to extra illumina tion from porch, window, or street lights, it might nev er bloom. In late winter or early spring, after blooming is over and the danger of frost is past, poinsettias should be pruned back to within 12 to 18 inches off the ground. If they have been frozen, you might have to cut even lower, to get to live wood. To insure compact, showy plants at owering time, poinsettias should be pruned several times during the growing season. Each time new growth reaches a length of 12 inches, it should be cut or pinched back, leaving four leaves on each shoot. This operation should be con tinued until about Sept. 10, but no later. Because poin settias begin to set buds as days become shorter, prun ing after Sept. 10 might re duce ower production. Poinsettias will grow in a wide range of soils, sand, muck, marl, and clay. But, they do need fertilizer. Ap ply a complete, balanced analysis mix, such as a 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 three times a year, when growth starts in the spring, again in June, and nally in the late fall, after the bracts have set. This last application pro motes large bracts with showy color. Apply oneand-a-half pound of 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 per 100 square feet each time you fertilizer. If you wait until the dan ger of frost has past, trans plant your poinsettia to a landscape location protect ed from articial light, wa ter and fertilize it properly, and prune regularly until early fall, it should reward you the another beautiful burst of color next Christ mas. For more information on poinsettias contact your lo cal County Extension Ofce at 229-2909 or 639-3200 or visit www.gulf.ifas.u.edu. Lisa Russell made the seven-hour drive from north of New Orleans to adopt. I would have never found this without the Internet, Lisa Russell said. There are no programs like this anywhere between (Louisiana and Port St. Joe). I found a dog in the last class but when I called he had already been adopted. We checked out this class and found Dylan. We are going to keep the name. They trained him with that name and I like that name. The Russells have long had big dogs, having lost two elderly German Shepherds to old age in recent months. The couple has about 50-60 acres, Mike said, on which a dog can have, pardon the pun, a eld day. When I was growing up in Louisiana, we had some Ridgebacks, Mike said. They are fearless dogs, and they are very loyal dogs. They are hard-headed as they can be, but thats not going to be the case with one that is trained. They give them two months of training here. You cant put a dog into two months of training, itd break the bank. This is a wonderful program. Gary Ford has worked the past eight weeks as the caretaker for Dylan, a dog Judy Miick, co-coordinator of the DAWGS program for the Humane Society called a gentle giant. The thing about this dog is every other dog in this class wants to play with him, Ford said. Hes a great dog. His new owners will love him. Inmates use teamwork to train and care for the dogs. Team leaders are the most experienced in the program and essentially supervise all training during each class rotation. Some inmates are trainers, assigned to a dog one-on-one, while others are handlers, basically the rst assistant to the trainer. Caretakers are those who ensure that the dogs have 24/7 care, grooming, feeding and generally caring for the dog. The inmates some 300 have gone through the program since its inception must apply and are interviewed and screened for the ability to focus on the task and meet the responsibilities of the program. This program has made all the difference for me, Ford said. Time goes so fast. You have a purpose. I have dogs and love dogs. These past few months have just own by like this he said while snapping his ngers. Days like today are sad because you are seeing him (the dog) get out, but you are excited because a new dog is coming right in behind him. A number of inmates have graduated, of sorts, from the DAWGS in Prison to leave the Forestry Camp to productive jobs, in many cases working with animals, on the outside. Probably there is no greater success for the program than a man they called Popeye Lyons. Lyons had spent more than two decades, off and on, in jail before he found the DAWGS program, or it found him, depending on point of view. I woke up in my rst year in the DAWGS program, Lyons wrote in a letter to Christy. Lyons detailed that he had to change his attitude and outlook and shed, in a way, his skin. Everything changed in my life to be able to care for one of Gods precious creatures. They have to learn patience and how to work with all kinds of people, Christy said. This program is about training and education for dogs and inmates. We are trying to provide a permanent loving home for the dogs and skills for the inmates. As well as linking adopters to just the right dog. My mom was looking for a dog, said Alex Hartseld of Port St. Joe. Shes a little older and doesnt get around as well and we were looking for a smaller dog. We found this one a sprightly hound mix online. Were excited to get him. This is perfect for her. When you think you can get a trained dog that saves a lot of money. Local The Star| B5 TIM CROF T | The Star Angel came to the Humane Society an abandoned animal with a serious case of mange, malnutrition and an eye problem requiring surgery. Today she is healthy and heading to a new home in Panama City. DAWGS from page B1 Transplanting poinsettias ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director

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Local B6 | The Star Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 CALL TOD A Y! Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction Wood Works (In shed behind store 2284 Hwy 98 W.) WOOD WORKSMALL PROJECT S FURNITURE R E P AIR O DD J OB S M IKE (850) 348.9509 OR HAROLD (850) 227.6975 Dri Brite 850-229-9663 Free Estimates! 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction Professional Crasman HENRY HESTER CRAFTSMAN 850-227-5799 HesterHomes@fairpoint.net www.myprofessionalcrasman.com Licensed General Contractor RG291103544 24 Years Experience bobgilbert54@gmail.com Thursday, January 12, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, January 12, 2012 The Star | B6 76115S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No.: 2011-CA-000394 Division#: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft and Theresa Faye Croft a/k/a Theresa F. Croft a/k/a Teresa Croft, Husband and Wife; Unknown Tenants in Possession #l, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grant76109S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2009-CA-000438 Division: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH BURKHART and CARL BURKHART, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH BURKHART; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARL BURKHART, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on December 16, 2011, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 188 WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 188 NEEDLE GRASS WAY, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse on January 26, 2012 at 11:00am E.T. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of December, 2011. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 76079S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.; 23-2009-CA-000588 RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WARD, DANIEL ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2009-CA000588 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, WARD, DANIEL, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of, on the 2nd day of February, 2012, the following described property: LOT 21 OF SUNSET VILLAGE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 19, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 7th day of December, 2011 REBECCA L (BECKY) NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, SUITE 700 100 WEST CYPRESS CREEK ROAD, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision fo certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at PO Box 826, Marianna, FL 32448, 850718-0026, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Jan 12, 18, 2012 76065S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 11-197CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. CARLA S. PATTERSON, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 20, 2011 and entered in Civil Case No. 11-197CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and CARLA S. PATTERSON is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 26th day of January, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: EXHIBIT A Description: Lots 1 thru 5 and Tract A, Block M, Howard Creek Properties, unrecorded subdivision of a portion of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, and a portion of Section 6, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida. Thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East along the South line of said Southeast Quarter of Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 232.89 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 331.90 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 197.22 feet; said arc having a chord of 197.16 feet bearing North 27 degrees 47 minutes 03 seconds West; thence North 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds West for 224.90 feet; thence South 59 degrees 41 minutes 14 seconds West for 218.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds East for 224.90 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 2016.30 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 177.98 feet, said arc having a chord of 177.92 feet bearing South 27 degrees 47 minutes 03 seconds East; thence South 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds East for 227.39 feet; thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East for 241.76 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT Lot 3, Block M Description: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East along the South line of said Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 564.79 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 105.13 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 26 degrees 36 minutes 12 seconds West for 105.12 feet, to the Point of Beginning. Thence South 62 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West for 218.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2016.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 83.1 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 29 degrees 07 minutes 56 seconds West for 83.10 feet; thence North 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds West for 12.40 feet; thence North 59 degrees 41 minutes 14 seconds East for 218.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds East for 12.40 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 92.09 feet, the chord of said arc bearing South 29 degrees 07 minutes 56 seconds East for 92.09 feet to the Point of Beginning. DATED this 21st day of December, 2011 REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 6125S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000260 RBC BANK (USA) F/K/A RBC CENTURA BANK Plaintiff, vs. OUELLETTE, ROBERT, ET AL Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ROBERT DONALD OUELLETTE, JR. AKA ROBERT D. QUELLETTE, JR., 1101 CONSTITUTION DRIVE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 ROBERT DONALD OUELLETTE, JR. AKA ROBERT D. OUELLETTE, JR., 519 MAINE AVE., PANAMA CITY, FL 32401 AMY CREWS OUELLETTE, 1101 CONSTITUTION DRIVE, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 AMY CREWS OUELLETTE, 519 MAINE AVE., PANAMA CITY, FL 32401 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gulf County, Florida: LOT EIGHT (8) BLOCK 97 OF UNIT NO. 4, ST. JOESEPHS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 40 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and the file original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or on or before January 23, 2012; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the in the Complaint. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 15th day of December, 2011. REBECCA L. (BECKY) NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at PO BOX 826, MARIANNA, FL 32448, 850-718-0026. If hearing or voice impaired contact (TDD) (800) 955-8771 via Florida Relay System. Jan 5, 12, 2012 76047 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 11 CA 000251CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TROY LEWIS FAIRCHILD COLLEEN WINONIA FAIRCHILD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, et al Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 20, 2011, and entererd in 11 CA 000251CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, is the Plaintiff and TROY LEWIS FAIRCHILD; COLLEEN WINONA FAIRCHILD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant (s). Rebecca Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 ET on January 26, 2012, following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, so wit: LOTS 2 AND 3, BLOCK 10, LESS THE SOUTH 25 FEET OF LOT 3, BLOCK 10 CORRECTIVE PLAT OF TWIN LAKES, ACCORDING TOTHE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of December, 2011. Rebecca L Norris Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402; Phone: 850747-5327; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771; Email: ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org Jan 5, 12, 2012

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 12, 2012 The Star | B7 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 76235S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEEN JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 11-92PR IN RE: ESTATE OF SUSAN ELIZABETH ANDERSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Susan Elizabeth Anderson, deceased, whose date of death was November 26, 2011, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 1598, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims 76207S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.10-037PR IN RE: ESTATE OF BESSIE BEATRICE REVELL Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of BESSIE BEATRICE REVELL, deceased, File Number is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three (3) months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 12, 2012. Personal Representatives: Joyce E. Sweazy 658 Madison St. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representatives: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850)-227-1159 January 12, 19, 2012 76141S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 11-79PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES HOWARD WARD, SR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of James Howard Ward, Sr., deceased, whose date of death was September 11, 2011, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 3427, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 12, 2012. Personal Representative: Daniel L. Ward 406 Catalpa St. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson Jr. Attorney for Daniel L. Ward FL Bar No: 261629 528 6th St. P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227 7800 Fax: (850) 227 7878 Jan 12, 19, 2012 76127S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1112-05 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: PIPE AS INDICATED ON SPECIFICATION SHEETS Please place YOUR COMPANY NAME, SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER on the outside of your envelope, and provide three copies of your proposal. Bids must be submitted to and specifications may be obtained from the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 by 4:30 p.m., E.T. on Friday, January 27, 2012. Bids will be opened at this same location on Monday, January 30, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Any questions concerning this bid should be directed to Don Butler, Gulf County Administrator at (850) 229-6106 or (850) 227-8971. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA /s/ Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 ees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGSPROPERTY TO: Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft, WHOSE RESIDENCE IS: 1403 Dewitt Street, Panama City, FL 32401 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT 9, BLOCK “I”, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17’24”E. ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE, RUN S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. ALONG THE SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 58’26”W. FOR 141.42 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N. 62 DEGREES 20’46’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 85 DEGREES 19’08’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 200.35 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 439.00 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID CORN GRIFFIN STREET; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59’26”E. ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A NONTANGENT CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 17 DEGREES 21’10”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 82 DEGREES 46’56”E. FOR 53.40 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 53.61 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 403.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 1.94 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND BEING SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING 60 FOOT PRIVATE ROAD, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26’W. ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 652.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 499.32 FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N.00 DEGREES 00’34’W, 60.00 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY, NORTHERLY, AND WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 497.94 FEET; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 456.59 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 25.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 75 DEGREES 40’09”E. 99.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 101.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 144.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 92 DEGREES 07’41 “, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 30’55”E. 341.34 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 381.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE, THENCE N. 00 DEGREES 00’34”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 59’26”E. 56.57 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17’24”E. ALONG SAID EAST LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 59’26”W. 141.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 157.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 00’34”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 12.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 93 DEGREES 00’26”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 57’18”W. 256.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 287.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 84 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 90.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 75 DEGREES 40’09”W. 59.61 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 56 DEGREES 19’45”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 432.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 367.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 81 DEGREES 11’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 08 DEGREES 34’29”W. 477.23 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 519.54 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 81 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 244.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 334.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 61 DEGREES 18’02”E. 228.98 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 233.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 41 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 146.20 FEET, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 65 DEGREES 38’59”E. 120.56 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.26 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 155.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42’03”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 45 DEGREES 38’58”E. 217.35 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 240.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 18.56 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S. 90 DEGREES 00’00”W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 17.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 95.46 FEET; A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42’04”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 45 DEGREES 38’58”W. 133.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 147.78 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 206.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 48 DEGREES 41’59”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 65 DEGREES 38’59”W. 170.03 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 175.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 41 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 274.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 40’40”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 61 DEGREES 18’02”W. 187.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 191.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 81 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 175.00 FEET; THENCE N. 42 DEGREES 54’14”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 38.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 210.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49’51 “, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 25 DEGREES 59’18”E. 122.20 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N.09 DEGREES 04’22”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 78.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 487.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 55’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N.06 DEGREES 20’44”W. 185.24 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 186.37 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S.90 DEGREES 00’00”W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 63.28 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 18’47”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 07 DEGREES 45’39”E. 178.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CUR’JE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 158.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE S.09 DEGREES 04’22”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 76.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49’52”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 25 DEGREES 59’18”W. 87.29 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 88.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 42 DEGREES 54’14’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 111.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 85 DEGREES 44’46”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 06 DEGREES 46’55”E., 561.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 639.03 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 120.10 FEET; THENCE S.57 DEGREES 15’51 “W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 272.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DE-SAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 286 DEGREES 15’35”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 32 DEGREES 44’09”E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.81 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC; THENCE N. 57 DEGREES 15’51 “E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 298.97 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 153.33 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 496.00 FEET; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 454.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50’38”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 00 DEGREES 00’34’E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 452.89 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02”W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. more commonly known as 131 Corn Griffin Street, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30) days after tiie first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th day of December, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS Circuirt and County Courts By: Tina Money Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 PsychicReadingsby Miss Ann Bay County’s #1 Psychic Call today for a better tomorrow... 850-215-9966 Advice on Love, Business & Marriage Palm Readings $10. 3707 West 23rd St. D. Stephens Concrete Services,LLCQuality, Affordable Concrete Work and Small Tractor Work 38 Yrs. Experience, Licensed, Insured Residential & Commercial Office: 850-674-5887 Home: 850-674-5026 Cell: (850) 643-1723 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

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B8| The Star Thursday, January 12, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 Beachside FOR RENT MEXICO BEACHVillas of Mexico Beach 3706 Hwy 98, New Condos Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 – Furnished 3bd/3ba 604 Fortner Avenue – Duplex Furnished 2bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIALST. JOE BEACH113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 – 7314 W. Hwy 98, St. Joe Beach Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL Coronado #4 – 7318 W. Hwy 98, St. Joe Beach Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIALWINDMARK BEACH212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse-Unit #4 Fully Furnished 2bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse-Unit #6 Fully Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL Carr’s Bungalow#2 155 Beach Street 1bd/1ba Carr’s Bungalow #3 159 Beach Street 1bd/1ba 3bd/2baCAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision Unfurnished 4bd PORT ST. JOE1903 Juniper Avenue Unfurnished 3bd/2ba 1206 Palm Blvd Partially Furnished 1.5 bd Eagle Landing – Ponderosa Pines – Jones Homestead Partially Furnished 2bd/2ba 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALSDOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEMonthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$8501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$4252 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark ............................................................$4501 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBEDFurnished, Lanark ..........................................$450 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-4915,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 230 Reid Avenue +/756 sf; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale407 Reid Avenue+/4988 sf: 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $349,500401 Reid Avenue+/5400 sf: Retail space; $165,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for termsLoggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; inquire for terms; $399,000 71 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms SO LD wntownApalac LEASED mo mod gross UNDER CONTRACT as, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on sit e-p a 000 SO LD building in Ma ailforlease;In Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster or call 850-747-5019 HELP WANTEDPRIME RESTAURANT INC. Kitchen Manager or Asst. Kitchen Manager with Culinary experience. Send Resume to: 1302 Hwy 98 #3G Mexico Beach, FL 32456 1 br, 1 ba cabin on Chipola River in Scottsferry, Florida. Exterior constructed with bat and board cypress, two porches and metal roof. Interior ceilings and walls tongue and groove juniper, floor ceramic tiles. Cabin sits on a 1/2 acre with an 8’x10’ pump house, 12’x20’ screened in cook shed and 12’x18’ covered boat slip. Concrete boat ramp also on property, $115,000 call 850-674-5026 Wewahitchka -156 Patrick St. 2br 2ba Single Family, Fixerupper. Owner Financing or Cash Discount. $500 Down $369/mo. Call 803-978-1540 or 803-403-9555 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. ‘97 Buell S3 Thunderbolt Motorcycle, Harley Davidson Motor, runs great and garage kept, 17,000 miles. $3,500!! Call 850-271-5761 and leave a message. House Wanted in Port St JoeMinimal Needs At least 1 br, 1 bath. (not an efficiency) w/ internet. A quiet and secure location. Garage a plus! Writer and mature seminary graduate who is needing a place to finish editing books. 850-502-1803 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $700 month + deposit 301-265-5368 FOR RENT: 3 br, 2 ba 14 x 70 Mobile Home. C/H/A, no pets $450 month + $400 dd 850-229-6495 Wewa, 2 bed, 1 bath in small park. $400 a mo. + $400 security dep. Small RV For Rent good for one person. $110 a week. Includes water, sewer & electric. Call: 850-639-5721 Mexico Beach Light & airy 2bd/2.5ba furnishd TH. Beachside, Tyndall side of town. Central air, W/D. Fans throughout. Reserved prkg. Avail Feb 1. $950/mo + $800 dep. Call Brenda 850-227-5380 Text FL92300 to 56654 HOME FOR RENT AT WILLIS LANDINGA Nature Lovers Paradise!! Quality Custom home 9ft Ceiling’s, Hardwood floor’s, tile, kitchen bar.Located next to Willis Landing Boat ramp on the Brothers River. Located 10 miles south of Wewahitchka and only 18 miles north of beautiful Mexico Beach and only 32 miles from Panama City. The Apalachicola River is only a 15 minute boat ride.1,600 SF 3 Bed/2 Bath $800/month. Call 850-689-8881or e-mail monique@crestviewsite.c om Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Creative ServicesGraphic DesignerFor comm. print/sign bus. Job duties incl designing print, signage & marketing items, manage digital output for pre press & prod. Cust. serv. skills req. Mac OS X Adobe Creative Suite, QuarkXPress skills req. Full benefits pkg. send resume to ramseysprinting@fairpoint.net Web ID#: 34190356 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 GeneralInfant/ Toddler CaregiversNeeded to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP Web ID#: 34193004 PSJ690 Madison Sat. Jan 14th 8am-1pmYard SaleFurniture, clothes and dishes Brunswick billiards regulation size table. One inch marble slate, leather pockets with solid oak ball and claw legs. All accessories included $3000 Call 850-674-5026 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 76173S PUBLIC NOTICE Request for Qualifications The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is seeking qualifications from independent Certified Public Accountants to provide audit services in accordance with Government Auditing Standards for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2012, with options to renew. Interested parties should request an RFQ package via email to dbentley@gcwb.org. Responses are due by 4:00 pm CST, February 15, 2012. January 12, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 12, 2012. Personal Representative: John D. Bullington 1217 Colonial Ave. Alexandria, VA 22314 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson Jr. Attorney for John D. Bullington FL Bar No: 261629 528 6th St. P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227 7800 Fax: (850) 227 7878 January 12, 19, 2012 76181S LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF LOGIC AND ACCURACY TEST PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY ELECTION JANUARY 19, 2012 GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA The Logic and Accuracy test for the M100 Tabulation System and the Ivotronic Touch Screen System to be used for the January 31, 2012 Presidential Preference Primary Election will be held at the Gulf County Supervisor of Elections Office, 401 Long Ave, Port St Joe on January 19, 2012 -9:00 AM EST. This test is open to the public. Linda Griffin Supervisor of Elections Gulf County, Florida January 12, 2012 76259S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-415 DR In Re the Marriage of: RONALD JAY LUCHT Petitioner/Husband, and LESLIE JEAN LUCHT, Respondent/Wife. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: LESLIE JEAN LUCHT Whose last known address is: 410 Seventh Street Mexico Beach, Florida 32456 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clinton T. McCahill, attorney for the Petitioner, whose address is 305 6’h Street, Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456 on or before February 12, 2012 and file the original with the clerk of this court at or before service on the Petitioner’s attorney or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. The Petitioner will be seeking to be awarded the following personal property in this Dissolution of Marriage action: 2011 GMC Pickup, 2008 Harley Davidson Motorcycle, 1993 Prolinc Boat and a Golf Cart. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedures, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanction, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Lynn M. Barnes Deputy Clerk January 12, 15, 26 February 2, 2012 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. L et a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more Nothing works harder than the Classifieds



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer It takes more than the teachers to make sure the school day runs smoothly, and Gulf Countys four school-related employ ees of the year prove it. In the elemen tary schools, one chosen employ ee is dedicated Thursday, JANUARY 12 2012 YY EAR AR 74, N N UMBe E R 13 By Tim Croft Star News Editor The As keep coming for Gulf District Schools. The Florida Department of Education released high school grades for the 201011 school year last week and for the fth-straight year Gulf District Schools can lay claim to an A. Port St. Joe High School earned an A from the state under the school grading formula while Wewahitchka High School grabbed a B as the district will once again lay claim to schools graded A or B. I just appreciate the time and effort the staff put in to make the school a qual ity school, said Duane Mc Farland, Port St. Joe High School principal for three years before moving to the district ofce for the cur rent school year. Its been a pleasure working with such quality people and what they have done to move the school for ward. And I am sure it will continue under the current principal Jeremy Knapp. Added to elementary and middle school grades released last spring, the districts six schools all earned an A or B. All three schools in Port St. Joe were A schools; all schools in Wewahitchka were high B schools. In addition to the A dis trict, given a clean recentlycompleted audit, the district is likely to be recognized as one of fewer than a dozen districts statewide desig nated high-performing. A high-performing dis trict provides a few perks, such as exibility with the school calendar and the freedom to use the districts own template as opposed to the state template for school improvement plans. This will be the fthstraight year the district has been recognized as high-performing. We are very proud of our teachers, students and administrators, said Sara Joe Wooten, the districts assistant superintendent of instruction. You have to Schools again sport A gradesSee GRADeES A7By Tim CroftStar News Editor Two suspects are in custody in association with an attempted bank robbery in Mexico Beach and two other crimes in Florida and Alabama. Investigators with the Mexico Beach Department of Public Safety and the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce last Friday arrested Samuel Paul Wadsworth and Rachel Wingate of Panama City Beach, charging the pair with attempted robbery of the Centennial Bank in Mexico Beach on Jan. 3. Wadsworth, 39, and Wingate, 45, were arrested when investigators located the pair at their residence. Wad sworth is alleged to have entered the banks and store; Wingate is alleged to be the driver of the getaway car. The pair pleaded not guilty Monday in connection to the Mexico Beach attempted robbery. Wadsworth is being held at the Bay County Jail on $17,000 bond and Wingate is being held on $10,000 bond. Wadsworth was identied through a tip: he had re cently paid of several debts and was seen with large amounts of cash, raising suspicion, according to the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce. During a subsequent interview, evidence was pre sented that led to the arrest of the pair, according to J.T. Hallman with the Police Division of the Mexico Beach Department of Public Safety. The arrests cleared two other crimes, Hallman said; a bank robbery on Jan. 4 in Defuniak Springs and the attempted robbery of a food store in Dothan, AL on Dec. 30, 2011. Charges from those two incidents are pending. Wadsworth and Wingate acknowledged involvement in the crimes, according to Hallman. The BCSO investigation revealed Wadsworth is a convicted sex offender from Alabama and he was arrested for failure to register as a sex offender in Bay County. Wingate was charged by Mexico Beach authorities as principal to armed robbery. On Jan. 3 a white male entered the Centennial Bank located at 101 15th Street in Mexico Beach. He produced a note instructing the teller a robbery was taking place and that he wanted the money, though he produced no weapon. After the teller alerted a manager to call police, the male left the bank. He was later indentied as the same male who had robbed at least one bank in Defuniak Arrests made in MB attempted bank robberyBy Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Theres no need to leave your house, no need to nd your checkbook, no need to waste a stamp and no need to rush to City Hall before 5 p.m. You can pay your bill at 2 a.m. on a Wednesday, or at noon on a Sunday. Pay your bill in your pajamas, while watching T.V., or at work. Pay it the day its due at 4:59 p.m. and stealthily squeak by the $10 late fee. Paying your water bill has never been easier with the City of Port St. Joes new online bill pay system, a service provided at no cost to the customer. What we really want people to do, is to have the ability to pay their bills in the convenience of their homes, 24 hours a day, said City Manager Charlie Weston said. I think its a no-brainer; total convenience, zero cost. Through the online bill pay service, residents can also track their water us age by comparing previ ous bills. (Residents) can go back and see what their consumption is and maybe set goals to get their usage down, Weston said. It helps us at the city to bet ter utilize our resources. Payments can be made online with Visa, Master Card or Discover credit cards. Today, everybody is wired into something, Weston said. This will get rid of the snail mail; bypass all that and get it from your ofce to ours. So far, only 105 people have signed up for online bill pay. My goal is to get 1,500 people using this thing, Weston said. Theres no reason that half our customers shouldnt be on this thing. And for those who may be skeptical about entering their personal information online, Weston assures the citys online bill pay is as secure as any traditional payment method. We went to great lengths to make sure this is a secure site, Weston said. Were very con scious of that and were very condent that its a secure site. Robin Combs, the citys Let your ngers do the payingTop of the classDistrict schools honor teachers of the yearBy Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer They are the teachers who make learning fun. They are the teachers who celebrate Pi Day on March 14, who go above and beyond to reach a strug gling student, who wont stop until they nd the right book for a student to enjoy. In their classrooms, they utilize new technologies like SMART Boards, and express concern for their students beyond the sub jects they teach. They strive to make sure every student feels special and that every student has a chance to be successful. Later this month, after careful observation from a school employee from outside Gulf County, one teacher will be chosen to represent the district in the Florida Teacher of the Year awards pro gram. Nomi nated by their peers, these four teachers are, in the words of the districts Assistant Superintendent for Business Services Duane McFarland, Born to teach. These are the Teachers of the Year from each dis trict school in no particular order: Port St. Joe Elementa ryKrissy Gentry (Fourth Grade) One could argue Krissy Gentrys knack for teaching is in her blood. Growing up, Gentry al ways knew she would be a teacher like her mother, a woman who dedicated her life to educating the disad vantaged. Gentrys mother, a teach er for 35 years who special ized in ESE and adult edu cation, taught a 101-year old woman from rural Jackson County to write her name for the rst time. Gentry and her sister, now also a teacher, called the woman Aunt Sue.Schools honor non-instructional employees See TeEACHeERS aA6 See PAYINgG A7 CCOURTe E SY MeME XICO BeBE ACH DeDE PARTMe E NT OF PP UBLIC SS AFe E TY A surveillance photo of the suspect in the attempted robbery of the Centennial Bank in Mexico Beach.See AARReESTS A7 See HONOR A10 DAWGS in Prison ........................B1Opinion . ....................................... AA4-AA5 Letters to the Editor . ................... AA5 Outdoors . ..................................... AA8 Sports ........................................... AA9 School News . ................................ BB3 Faith . ............................................. BB4 Obituaries . .................................... BB4 Classieds . .................................... BB6-BB8

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LocalA2 | The StarStar Staff ReportThe Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association (MBARA) can now add two more reefs to its roster. One reef memorializes a mans life and love of shing, and another shares a residents appreciation for the paradise on earth he nds in Mexico Beach. The MBARA recently established a new memorial reef in memory of the late Pat Mulligan and a named reef in honor of Tennessee Chuck McKibbon in the Gulf of Mexico. Bob Cox, President of the MBARA, said the owners of the Mexico Beach Marina commissioned the memorial reef in honor of Bill Mulligans father, Pat Mulligan as a tribute to his avid enjoyment of shing. Cox said the owners of the Mexico Beach Marina are thankful for the members of the MBARA and all the work they do to increase marine life in the local area. A second reef was named after Tennessee Chuck McKibbon. Ron Childs, MBARA Director of Education, said McKibbon commissioned the reef to share his love for shing and enjoyment of everyday life. He retired from the Tennessee Department of Conservation in 1999 and moved to Mexico Beach. McKibbon considers Mexico Beach paradise on Earth. The MBARA expresses its sincere appreciation to the Mexico Beach Marina and for their support of its articial program over the years. The contributions are a huge part of the MBARAs success in building articial reefs and rebuilding our sheries in the Gulf of Mexico. Since its incorporation in 1997, the MBARA has set a milestone of establishing 1000 patch reefs, or small articial reef habitats in the waters off Mexico Beach. For more information on these memorial reefs and the memorial reef program, please visit MBARAs website at www. mbara.org. The Lake House Restaurant18831 SR 20 W. Blountstown, FL 32424 (850) 674-5253Lunch served Tuesday-Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CST) Dinner served Friday and Saturday 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (CST)Sunday Brunch from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (CST)We cook Cuban delicacies, Southern favorites and Seafood. This week get 40% off all Christmas items in our gift shop.Bring this ad with you and get 10% off your meal.Check out our website:Check out our Superbowl and Valentines Day events information on our website. Thursday, January 12, 2012 SETTING IT sSTRAIGHTDue to a production error, stories in last weeks paper provided contradictory information regarding lawsuits led against the city of Port St. Joe regarding the development order issued for the proposed and now abandoned Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center. The lawsuits contend the development order was issued contrary to the provisions of the county and city comprehensive plans and the citys land development regulations. The Star regrets any confusion. New memorial and named reefs in the Gul f PHOTOs S BY BB OB AND CAROL COXTT op photo, A barge deploys articial reefs in the Gulf of Mexico. B B ottom photos, The Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association recently deployed two new reefs off Mexico Beach.

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LocalThe Star| A3 Thursday, January 12, 2012By Chris SegalFlorida Freedom Newspapers Last week, state ofcials launched a tri-county initiative aimed at preventing domestic violence and protecting children by partnering domestic violence advocates with social workers. The details of the Northwest Florida Regional Domestic Violence and Child Welfare Initiative were discussed during the Community Day held at the Wyndham Bay Point Resort. The event included remarks from Attorney General Pam Bondi, Department of Children and Families Secretary David Wilkins and Tiffany Carr, president of the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The new effort will seek local solutions to keep children in their homes with a protective parent rather than using a one-size-tsall approach of having a child being placed in the foster care system. This is a communitybased initiative, Carr said of why the pilot program was launched in Northwest Florida. There are [people committed] to stopping domestic violence and child abuse in Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties. The program will cost about $4 million and the funding will come from the attorney generals ofce. Domestic violence in the home accounts for 30 percent of the caseload for the department, Wilkins said. The initiative also will allow for some cuts at the Department of Children and Families (DCF) while putting more services in the community. The thought is it ultimately is cheaper for the taxpayer to keep children with their nonviolent parent than to have them put into the foster care system. Studies have shown when there is domestic violence in the home, children often are abused as well. What tends to happen is that the victim gets punished, too, Wilkins said of children being put in foster care when one parent displays domestic violence. This initiative will get the treatment to the community and help the victims. The way the initiative will work is by placing domestic violence advocates as liaisons between the court system, State Attorneys ofce, Big Bend Community Based Care, law enforcement agencies and the Northwest Region of DCF. The professional advocates will help inform all the departments and organizations to ensure the offending parent is held accountable for domestic violence and protect the victims of the violence and the children in the home. Maintaining permanency and a safe environment in a childs own home decreases their risk of mental health issues, homelessness and drug or alcohol dependency as an adult, Bondi said. We think this will have a tremendous impact. Hopefully with community support, many of these children will be able to stay in their homes and the perpetrators of domestic violence will be locked u p, she said.  Carr explained the initiative was built off a similar program created using federal stimulus money. During a test of the program, DCF reduced the number of children being removed from the nonoffending parent by 900 children in an eight-month period, according to Carr. The purpose of Thursdays community day was to gather ofcials from local agencies, state organizations, law enforcement, superintendents and elected ofcials from Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties to outline the initiative. The next level was to have a coordinated community response and to have the silos removed, Carr said. It has to be the entire community. We need to ensure victims and families are safe. If the pilot program is successful, the initiative could be expanded throughout the state.By Tom McLaughlinFlorida Freedom Newspapers Saving Eglin Air Force Bases valuable Research Development Testing and Evaluation wing will be priority one for Floridas new Defense Support Task Force. The task force met for the rst time Monday in Tallahassee and decided it needed to move quickly to ensure the Air Force Materiel Command didnt take action on May 1 to move Eglins 46th Test Wings RDT&E component out of Florida. If we are going to do something, we have to do it now, said Okaloosa County resident David Goetsch, who was named Monday to chair the 12-member task force when Gov. Rick Scott isnt available to do so. The Air Force is moving forward with plans to implement a consolidation of its Materiel Command. It has until Oct. 1 to do so, but leaders have decided to target May 1 as the day to have the consolidation completed. Task force member and state Rep. Matt Gaetz, RFort Walton Beach, compared the latest moves of a military trying to cut expenses to a BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure) process without public input. The issue we are in essence going through is a BRAC process without the benet of BRAC itself, he said. Present plans call for the consolidation to put the 46th Test Wing under the command of a two-star general at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Edwards commanders have tried for years to nagle the RTD&E component, which attracts highly educated aerospace experts to the community, away from Eglin. Goetsch and other economic experts see a perfect storm of opportunity now for Edwards to succeed in snatching the test wing. The threat to Eglin was considered grave enough late last year that U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson introduced legislation intended to force Air Force leaders to conduct a study and report to Congress on what its consolidation would accomplish. Task force members six of whom hail from Northwest Florida are soliciting the clout of fellow member Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll in their effort to see that the study is done before any consolidation occurs, Goetsch said. Carroll, who rose to the rank of lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy, is well informed and has connections, Goetsch said. The plan is for her to work with Okaloosa County experts, Air Force leaders, U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller and Nelson to make sure the consolidation goes as Nelsons amendment dictated it should, he said. The task force will hold a special meeting in two weeks to discuss the possibility of appointing a consultant to assist Carroll, Goetsch said. Were going to determine in two weeks if the lieutenant governor needs somebody providing her with information day by day, hour by hour, he said.Task Force seeks to minimize defense cuts in PanhandleFlorida pushes new domestic violence initiative We think this will have a tremendous impact. Hopefully with community support, many of these children will be able to stay in their homes and the perpetrators of domestic violence will be locked up.Tiffany Carr President of the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence. Floridas new Defense Support Task Force wants to prevent shift of Eglins RDT&E wing to California

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OpinionA4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINGS USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Now people, Im telling this story with my hand up. I could hardly believe it myself. Cathy and I stopped at a Cracker Barrel on the way back from one of the grandkids rst dental checkup. I had just nished ordering the chicken and dumplings, fried okra and turnip greens and was scanning the place as Cathy gleefully pointed out one more time the X-rays clearly depicting the straightness of our little darlings front teeth. Im hearing her, but mostly Im hoping no neighboring table can put together that we drove right at ve hundred miles one way to attend a tooth review! Didnt you like Dr. Winton? He could tell how smart Hannah was by the way she sat right up Cathy! I near bout jumped out of my skin, Theyve got a picture of my great Uncle Harvey and Aunt May White up on the wall yonder! I slid out of my seat and maneuvered around two tables and by a four-star waitress to get a better look. I apologized to the couple from Eau Claire, Michigan, as I leaned across their meatloaf dinners to make sure. Son of a gun! There was no mistaking Uncle Harvey. Now, he died in 1954 or And I was fairly small but you couldnt forget that horseshoe-shaped cut on his chin nor that big scar over his right eye. The sprawling beard could not hide the clear outline of the cut under his lip. And that long, deep gash over his eye looked like someone stuck a knife in it and took two steps to the left. I sat down with the Michigan folks and went to lling them in about my great uncle. He was almost with Teddy Roosevelt at San Juan Hill. Whenever he used to tell the story, you could still feel the disappointment in his voice at being a day late. He had such great stories about his army days and his early life in Lawrence County. He walked with a slight limp, but when we queried him about it hoping for a good war tale, he dismissed it as old age. Mom said he got kicked on the chin by a mule when he and Aunt May rst set up house keeping. Aunt May White was actually Grannys aunt. Im not sure how kin she was to us but this was back in the day when everyone was either an uncle, aunt or cousin. Aunt May died before I was old enough to remember her, but Id seen lots of pictures. I pointed out the sharp nose and the dark, Cherokee eyes to Cathy, the waitress and the Eau Claire group. The cut over Harveys eye was a whole nuther story. Ive heard several versions. None of them bear real well on the familys rich history. I dont believe the jealouslover account. One look at Aunt May White would make the wanderingest of husbands hang close to the cabin. The drunken brawl melee was more likely the case. Granddaddy gured Harvey picked up the souvenir in a much ballyhooed 10-round bout with Jeff Kiefer, a noted light heavyweight boxer from Paducah. Uncle Harvey never mentioned the scar in my presence. What are my relatives doing hanging on a wall in Cracker Barrel? Ive seen other old couples on the wall. I thought they were made up! You know, thrown in amongst the horse collars, Calumet Baking Soda signs and the antique coffee making machine for the down home effect. It never dawned on me these folks are real until right now! When those Cracker Barrel folks invite you in like family, they aint kidding! I bet Harvey and Aunt May might have cracked a smile if they had known the picture was being preserved for posterity. She might have even let her hair down. And a wee smile and a wink could have made the meat loaf and cream corn sparkle. Course, none of those old pictures have people smiling in them. I dont know if it was bad dental work, constipation or the style in 1914. They didnt come across as mean mind you. They just looked serious as all get out! Picture day might have coincided with a bad hog market. Me and the Eau Claire folks got to wondering if this was the only store exhibiting Uncle Harvey and Aunt May. Who in the family gave permission? You reckon they have copied this thing and are displaying it from Florida to Montana? There are copyright laws! And dont you need a writ of habeas corpus or something? You just cant hang Uncle Harvey up without due process. I gured, at the very least, Cracker Barrel owed us a free meal. The Michigan wife and I stood in front of the picture while her husband took our picture. I detailed again the bar room brawl to some late comers. And it took a while to explain that unclecousin kinfolk thing to the bus load of basketball players from Mt. Juliet. I signed a few autographs. And I tried to get Uncle Harvey in the throngs of the San Juan Hill battle but honesty, and history, compelled me to stick to the facts. We were making our way out of the dining hall when I spied the ancient 12 gauge over the giant replace. Wait a minute! Uncle Harvey had an old shotgun! I got up on the hearth for a better look. It was a Remington Model 82 with those now famous rabbit ear hammers. Id know this gun anywhere! It even had the broken trigger guard. I was trying to turn it over to see the HHW initials on the stock when the Michigan couple came running back in with their camera. I got to looking around for his Spanish War uniform and that mule. Respectfully, KesThursday, January 12, 2012Next week as the nation pauses to celebrate the life of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., it is worth consid ering the ideals that lay well beyond the man who led a movement toward equal rights for all races. King was much more than a civil rights activist, much more than a nonparalleled speech maker. He was a man, awed as he may have been, as we all are, who reached far beyond the narrow ness of civil rights to consider the human condition. And during the times we face now, with economic uncertainty and great disparity, with far too many living in desperate need, his words of 1958 re main achingly relevant. Following are portions of an essay titled The Dimensions of a Complete Life. It is one essay in the book The Measure of a Man and provides in sight into the philosophical founda tion of Kings work. They are words I refer to often, words of faith in a power beyond hu man understanding, humanity with out conditions, and a belief in self that speaks volumes. King wrote, Many, many cen turies ago, out on a lonely, obscure island called Patmos, a man by the name of John caught a vision of the new Jerusalem descending out of heaven from God. One of the great est glories of this new city of God that John saw was its completeness. It was not partial and one-sided, but it was complete in all three of its di mensions. And so, in describing the city in the twenty-rst chapter of the book of Revelation, John says this: The length and the breadth and the height of it are equal. Now John is saying something quite signicant here What John is really saying is this: that life as it should be and life at its best is the life that is complete on all sides. There are three dimensions of any complete life to which we can t ly give the words of this text: length, breadth and height. The length of life as we shall think of it here is not its duration or its longevity, but it is the push of a life forward to achieve its personal ends and ambitions. It is the inward concern for ones own welfare. The breadth of life is the out ward concern for the welfare of oth ers. The height of life is the upward reach for God. These are the three dimensions of life, and without the three being correlated, working harmoniously together, life is incomplete Now let us notice rst the length of life Some years ago a learned rabbi wrote a book entitled Peace of Mind He has a chapter in the book entitled Love Thyself Properly. In this chapter he says in substance that it is impossible to love other selves adequately unless you love your own self properly So every individual has a responsibility to be concerned about himself enough to discover what he is made for. After he discovers his calling, he should set out to do it with all the strength and power of his being No matter how small one thinks his lifes work is in terms of the norms of the world and the so-called big jobs, he must realize that it has cosmic signicance if he is serving humanity and doing the will of God. To carry this to one extreme, if it falls your lot to be a street-sweeper, sweep streets as Raphael painted pictures, as Michelangelo carved marble, as Beethoven composed music, as Shakespeare wrote poetry In the words of Douglas Mallock: If you cant be a highway, just be a trail; If you cant be the sun, be a star; For it isnt the size that you win or you fail Be the best of whatever you are. But dont stop here; it is danger ous to stop here The breadth of life is that dimension of life in which we are concerned about others. An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow connes of his individualistic concerns to broader concerns of all humanity. As long as there is poverty in the world I can never be rich, even if I have a billion dollars. As long as diseases are rampant and millions of people in this world cannot expect to live more than twenty-eight or thirty years, I can never be totally healthy even if I just got a good checkup at the Mayo Clinic. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be No individual or na tion can stand out boasting of being independent. We are interdependent When we discover this, we master the second dimension of life. Some people never get beyond the rst two dimensions of life. They master the rst two. They develop their inner powers; they love human ity, but they stop right there They seek to live life without a sky. But if we are to live the complete life we must reach up and discover God. H.G. Wells was right: The man who is not religious begins at no where and ends at nothing. In a real sense everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see. Plato was right: The visible is a shadow cast by the invisible. Love yourself, if that means rational, healthy and moral self-inter est. You are commanded to do that. That is the length of life. Love your neighbor as you love yourself. You are commanded to do that. That is the breadth of life. But never forget that there is a rst and even greater commandment, Love the Lord thy God with all thy heart and all thy soul and all thy mind. This is the height of life. And when you do this you live the complete life. My son was on a cleaning spree. He wasnt sick or anything, he was just anxiously cleaning his room out and getting rid of things he had outgrown or broken. He did keep the Wife Ball World Series trophy with nothing but the baseball players legs from the knees down adorning the top. The trophy means a lot to him. He had this bright idea that he needed a sofa or a futon in his bedroom. I didnt think about it too much until he asked me if I was using the mini refrigerator I had brought home from work a few months earlier. I suppose he was making his own version of a 14 year-old man cave. I didnt let him have the refrigerator. In going through all of the boxes my son was throwing away, I kept nding these little packets of silica gel. You know what Im talking about. They put them in vitamins and electronics and other things to keep the moisture down. On the little package, it is always notes, Silica Gel, Throw Away, Do Not Eat, Desiccant. I suppose I should be happy that my son did not eat the little bags of silica gel. My oldest daughter decided to eat the Tylenol once; she was about a year old. At the time, she was an only child and if you have ever had to give a child ipecac, its not a fun experience. It makes them throw up projectile style. (They say dont give your children that anymore.) The silica gel packages had my interest. I had seen these little packages in various forms over the years in medicine and cardboard boxes and always wondered what would happen if you did eat them. No, I didnt eat them. I looked up the term, desiccant. I should have known what it means, but I didnt. A desiccant induces or sustains a state of dryness in its local vicinity in a moderately sealed container. It is what you might call a dryer outer. Why cant I eat it? Well, the truth is, I can eat it. I shouldnt want to, it would be nasty and I would want to spit it out. However, I dont think it would kill me. Wouldnt it dry me out? Or cause me to dissolve like putting salt on a snail or slug? This called for a little research. I am a researcher, so I did a little research to nd out if the silica gel packets would make me dissolve or something. The rst thing I found out was that silica gel can adsorb (not absorb, theres a difference) approximately 40 percent of its weight in moisture. This sounded like it could dry me up or make me disappear or shrivel up like a slug covered in salt. Being a math guy, I did the math to gure out how many packets of silica gel I would need to disappear. I weigh about 180 pounds and they say your body is approximately 70 percent water. That means I have 126 pounds of water in me. Im not sure what the remaining 54 pounds would look like, once the water part of me dries up. The salt covered slug does still come to mind. If silica gel adsorbs 40 percent of its weight, I would need 10 pounds of silica gel to get rid of 4 pounds of water. According to my calculations, I would need to eat 315 pounds of silica gel to completely lose my water weight. Further research revealed that each silica gel package weighs about one tenth of an ounce. Needing 315 pounds worth means I would need to eat 50,400 little packets of silica gel. That would be just too dog gone much work opening up 50,400 of those little packages. However, I do now understand why they tell you, Throw away, do not eat. Its just not worth the effort. In a few years, someone will come on in an infomercial late at night with a new improved weight loss program to help you lose your water weight. They will be selling you silica gel in big dry dog food size bags guaranteeing you will lose your water weight. Dont buy it. Dont eat the stuff either. In the middle of all the drying out, it will make you really really sick to your stomach. No, I didnt try it. And I didnt research if the water would still be in the silica gel that would still be in me. I decided to try out my sons futon. Maybe that mini fridge isnt such a bad idea. Read more stories online at www. CranksMyTractor.com CranksRANKS MY traTRACtTOrR BN HeardEating Silica Gel TiIM CrROFtT Star news editor HUnkerNKER DOWnN Kesley ColbertYou ARE family at Cracker Barrel A lesson in Life

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S LettersA5 | The Star Thursday, January 12, 2012We are all blessed by our sophisticated health care systems. We now enjoy new medical breakthroughs for complicated and serious conditions. Over against this good news are the facts the systems will be chronically over budget for the foreseeable future. Added to that is the even bigger challenge the needs are outstripping our growing capacities. There is no end in sight for this bind since we all want the latest from medical research and the highly trained specialists. There is an even greater challenge on the horizon. It is called wellness. Sadly, medical successes dont lead to family wellness. A cure just returns us to our previous state of wellness or unwellness. Medical treatments do not produce wellness. However, wellness is on the happy side of things. It often prevents illness. In other cases it eases treatment and recovery. So, why is there not more wellness? There are several reasons why wellness is in the shadow of big medicine. First, medicine has all the money locked up in the hands of specialists and their equipment. The health care budget for community family-based health care services is hardly visible. Second, wellness is beyond the reach of the systems because the personnel are schooled in illness. The big third is that wellness is the exclusive work of the family. The health care establishment doesnt recognize this central fact. It even gets in the way of increased family responsibility for their own wellness and illness. Wellness is in a different world from illness. It comes from within families. It is a positive lifestyle. It focuses on building family strengths. The professions have yet to learn how to help families with their wellness. Of all the professions, public health nursing comes closest. Family wellness calls families for seriously altered lifestyles. Strangely, our debt crisis will help us change from debt styles to saving; from problem focus to wellness. Families need to get solidly into wellness practices. To do this, they need new kinds of professional supports. They also need funding for research to examine family wellness. Authored by Robert C. Shaw, B.A.Sc. B.D. M.S. W. President of the Markham Institute for Human Services Please see: www. themarkhaminstitute.org Contact Robert at: rcecshaw@aol.comBy John DunnSpecial to The Star Consumer condence among Floridians rose three points to 69 in December, reecting a cautious optimism in the economy, according to a recent University of Florida survey. Though the latest gure is only one point below the level set in December 2010, it also marks the highest rank in the past nine months. The index used by UF researchers in the survey is benchmarked to 1966, which means a value of 100 represents the same level of condence for that year. The lowest index possible is a 2; the highest is 150. Consumer condence in December shot up in four of the ve indexes used by survey takers, and declined in only one. The index that reveals whether Floridians think their personal nances have improved from a year ago rose one point to 53. Another showed that their overall expectations in the soundness of the U.S. economy jumped six points to 59. Condence in the economys performance over the next ve years also rose this time three points to 71. Finally, the overall perception of survey takers that the present is a good time to buy big ticket items, such as washing machines and laptops went up sharply by seven points to 85. The only index to show dropping condence was an expectation of a drop in personal nances a year from now, declining two points to 78. Taken as a whole, the UF survey reects a changing mood that matches growing condence across the nation, said Chris McCarty, director of UFs Survey Research Center in the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. In addition, he added, there are factors in the Florida economy that were interpreted as positive by both younger and older respondents. Men were more positive than women by a margin of 71 points to 67.  Floridians are most likely optimistic about continued improvement in the employment situation, McCarty said. The decline in unemployment in November was 0.4 percent to 10 percent. The drop marked the rst time in many months that economic sectors other than tourism led the way in employment increases. McCarty noted employers in trade, transportation and utilities employed 34,800 more workers from October to November. However, he cautioned that many of these new jobs were in retail trade and might only reect holiday seasonal hiring, which could disappear in early 2012. McCarty also cited several other reasons for the change in mood. Retailers are offering big seasonal discounts to shoppers and mortgage interest rates are low. Housing prices might have bottomed out for a while, he said, hovering about around $130,100 for a single-family home. Gas prices are down, too. A gallon cost about 15 cents less than it did in November, though prices are expected to rise in 2012.  S tock prices were unsteady but did not sink in the wake of bad economic news coming from Europe, as some economists expected. Media reports about the U.S. Congress wrangling over debt and spending issues also didnt sour consumer condence. Contrary to our prediction, the impasse of the Super Commission regarding decit reductions came and went with very little concern from consumers, McCarty said. Overall, the mood for December modestly is upbeat. But McCarty cautioned that Floridians might nd it hard to remain optimistic in the coming year, if Congress carries through with $1.2 trillion in mandatory spending cuts required by the debt ceiling deal in 2011. The UF survey was conducted between Dec. 11 and Dec. 22 and reects the responses of 411 individuals statewide. The University of Florida is one of the nations largest public universities. Through its research and other activities, UF contributes more than $8.76 billion a year to Floridas economy and has a total employment impact of more than 100,000 jobs statewide. John Dunn is a writer for the University of Floridas news bureau. He can be reached at dunnj@ embarqmail.com.A big thank youDear Editor: I would like to give a big thank you to all of the staff and volunteers at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. I was in the swing bed program to receive rehabilitation for 20 days. All those that participated in my care gave me the utmost attention. I felt like I was their only client. I would like to give a special thank you to Dr. Oksanen, who went above and beyond what was required of him. To the staff of nurses and techs, to the physical and occupational professionals who gave me the tools to return home, a big thank you. As a community, we are very blessed to have such a ne facility to meet our needs. It was such a feeling of relief to have rehab so close to home which did not require travel to Panama City for my family. Robert W. Baker Mexico Beach By many measures, womens lives have changed substantially in recent decades. However, according to a comprehensive government report called Women in America, while certain social and economic situations for women have improved, when it comes to personal nances, many women still face challenging hurdles. Key report ndings include: Women live longer than men but are much more likely to experience critical health problems that hamper their ability to work and to pass up needed care because of cost. Although the earnings gap between women and men continues to narrow, its still signicant: Among full-time workers, womens weekly earnings as a percentage of mens have increased from 62 percent in 1979 to 80 percent in 2009. More women than men now graduate high school and college, but far fewer earn degrees in engineering, computer sciences and other higherpaying elds. Women increasingly marry later, have fewer children or remain childless, yet still are more likely to live in poverty, particularly singlemother families. Women are less likely than men to work outside the home (61 percent vs. 75 percent in 2009) and are much more likely to work part-time and to take time off to raise children or care for aging relatives. In a nutshell: Women generally earn less and live longer than men, so at retirement they often have less in savings, receive smaller retirement and Social Security benets and must spread out their money longer. Clearly, women need to take charge of their nancial wellbeing. Here are a few places to start: Develop a budget to track income and expenses. Either download a budget spreadsheet template or investigate software packages and online account management services like Quicken. com, Mint.com, Yodlee. com and Mvlopes.com Plan for retirement. Time is your biggest ally when it comes to retirement savings, so get cracking. Start estimating your retirement needs: Social Securitys Retirement Estimator (www.ssa.gov/estimator), which automatically enters your earnings information from its records to estimate your projected Social Security benets under different scenarios, such as age at retirement, future earnings projections, etc. Check whether your 401(k) plan administrators website has a calculator to estimate how much you will accumulate under various contribution and investment scenarios. If not, try the retirement calculators at Bankrate. com and AARP to determine your current nancial status and what youll need to save to meet your retirement needs. Do your research. Many helpful personal nancial education and management tools are available online, including: The National Foundation of Credit Counselings MyMoneyCheckUp program offers a step-bystep assessment of your overall nancial health and behavior in four personal nance areas: budgeting and credit management, saving and investing, planning for retirement and managing home equity (www.mymoneycheckup. org). Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney JasoASON Alder LDERMaANFlorida consumer condence jumps LetterETTER toTO theTHE EditorDITOR Everything on SaleEnd of Business March 31, 2012Needles & Thread, Inc.Call (850) 227-55281400 Monument Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Fabrics Patterns Short Bolt Backing Thread Yardage Batting Women must save for the future The great illness vs. wellness imbalance

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LocalA6 | The Star She proved youre never too old to learn, said Gentry, who has been teaching for 23 years. I feel like I do follow in my moth ers footsteps. I love these kids and I want to do what I can to make them feel suc cessful. The best part about teaching, Gentry said, is when a concept nally clicks for a student. I can remember show ing the students how to break down words and then sound out the long words, Gentry said. And they said, Mrs. Gentry, I didnt know I could read these big words! Gentry said she feels drawn to her disadvantaged students in particular be cause they have the hardest lives. I have a yearning for those students who need a little bit extra, Gentry said. I want to make my students feel successful. Wewahitchka Elemen taryJennifer Guffey (First Grade) In Jennifer Guffeys rstgrade class, everyone has a spot. Guffeys polka dot classroom theme helps her communicate to her stu dents that everyone is spe cial in his or her own way. Each student has their own colorful polka dot hang ing on Guffeys classroom door. It shows them that ev erybody has things theyre good at, Guffey said. You have to kind of reiterate that to them. Were a family in here. Guffey said her favorite thing about her job is the rst-grade students, an age group she adores. Its the students for sure and their eagerness to learn, Guffey said. Its a very rewarding job. You get to see them learn to read and teach them to have a love for reading. In her ninth year teach ing at WES, Guffey utilizes tools like her SMART Board to form words and a spell ing game called Sparkle to make reading fun for her students. Theres a lot of develop ment during the year, she said. You get to see that growth throughout the year. Theyre like little sponges. Port St. Joe High SchoolDenise Ethridge, (Math 11th and 12th) In only her second year teaching, Denise Ethridge is already breaking records. Last March, in honor of International Pi Day, Eth ridge organized an activity that her students remember as the most fun school day ever. Throughout the day, math students across the school constructed a pi chain, with each colored link represent ing a digit of pi. By the end of the day, the chain represented 12,000 dig its, tripling her initial 4,000digit goal. The chain also beat the standing record of 10,000 digits and was so long it stretched across the bas ketball court 27 times. Ethridge originally start ed her career as a banker, but is glad she made the ca reer switch. Oh my gosh I should have done this 100 years ago! she said. Ethridge is a teacher who uses technology in the class room every day. She admits she wouldnt know how to teach with out her SMART Board, a new classroom technology that integrates a computer into a dry erase board. The SMART Board also hooks up to a class set of graph ing calculators and allows students to digitally turn in calculator work. Ethridge also uses a lot of hands-on learning tech niques, especially in her AP statistics class, where they often use candy to formulate models. Ethridge said her favor ite part about teaching is her students. I care more for (my stu dents) far beyond math, Ethridge said. I want to know whats going on in their lives and see if I can help. Wewahitchka High SchoolJudy Eppinette (Reading 9th-12th) Judy Eppinettes goal is to nd the perfect book for every student, followed by another and another. She knows that to be come a good reader, a stu dent must rst nd a love for it. The most rewarding (part of teaching) is seeing students enjoy reading, Eppinette said. To take someone who is having a very hard time and to nd the right book for them and for them to say hey, is there anything else like this? Eppinette teaches inten sive reading at WHS, a class designed for students who have struggled to pass the reading portion of the FCAT, a requirement for high school graduation. It means their future, Eppinette said of the impor tance of passing the FCAT. This is one of the require ments of graduation. Its critical for whether they get a diploma or not. Eppinettes main focus in her classroom is to get her students to read indepen dently. We have a girl right now that was basically a nonreader, Eppinette said. Now shes reading all the time. She is pulling herself out of the pit she was in and progressing. The shelves in Ep pinettes classroom are stocked with books, and she believes there is a book for every student. Some of them may not have passed the FCAT, but they can, Eppinette said. The other reading teach ers and I have the same fo cus to get the kids reading as much as we can. Eppinette has been teach ing for 25 years. This year is only her third at WHS. Its an honor of course; especially when youve joined a new faculty, she said of her Teacher of the Year award. It was unex pected. We have so many people that work so hard in this school. 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 PACKAGE STORE & LOUNGEGREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITSWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM FRIDAY & SATURDAY RANDY STARK LIVE KARAOKE & DJ WITHNATALIE LADIESNIGHT TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 5 CLOSING HAPPY HOUR MONDAY FRIDAY 5 7 Apalachicola dental practice offers Six Month Smile BracesAdults and older teenagers looking to straighten their teeth can now get the smile they have always wanted, in just six months, through a cosmetic braces system available at the ofces of James A. Padgett, DDS in Apalachicola, FL. Dr. James Padgett is one of the areas rst dental practices to offer the Six Month Smiles System, designed specically for adults and teenagers who have crooked, crowded, or spaced teeth, without major bite issues. The technique offers tremendous advantages over traditional metal braces. Unlike the traditional braces people often wear for two or four years, this procedure straightens teeth in an average of just six months and uses low forces to gently move teeth comfortably. The Six Month Smile System utilizes specialized clear brackets and tooth colored wires, making them virtually invisible. The procedure requires fewer dental visits and is typically less expensive than traditional braces. In addition, the Six Month Smiles System can result in healthier gums, since straight teeth are easier to clean than crooked teeth. Please call the ofce for a complimentary free consult at (850)653-9653. Dr Ivers and Staff wishes you a HAPPY NEW YEAR May 2012 bring you and your loved ones... A year of Health & Wisdom... A year of Peace & Prosperity... And also a year of Love & Laughter. We look forward to seeing you in 2012. 9 am 6 pm Wed & Sat 9 am 2 pmVINCENTIVERS, M.D. www.iversmd.comALLMAJORINSURANCEACCEPTED Thursday, January 12, 2012 TEACHERS from page A1 P hotos by VALERIE GARMAN | The StarPort St. Joe Elementary Teacher of the Year Krissy Gentry holds a tribute to Aunt Sue, a woman her mother taught to write her name at age 101. Wewahitchka Elementary Teacher of the Year Jennifer Guffey in her rst grade classroom where everybody has a spot. Port St. Joe High School Teacher of the Year Denise Etheridge organized a pi chain activity for International Pi Day last March, where the paper chain links each represent a digit of pi. The chain grew to more than 12,000 links and stretched across the basketball court 27 times. Wewahitchka High School Teacher of the Year Judy Eppinette strives to instill a love for reading in her students.

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LocalThe Star| A7 accounts specialist, has spearheaded the develop ment of the online bill pay system. Combs said they have taken every step to make sure the site is se cure. Combs said the city has its own secure server to process the payments through a third party ven dor. Anybody who is concerned about security, wed be glad to talk to them, Combs said. Weston and Combs both hope to see a spike in the use of the online bill pay system, something that could lead the city to an optional paperless billing system in the future. In addition to offering online bill pay, the citys new Web site is designed so residents and visitors can nd answers with a click of the mouse. Im thrilled with the new Web site, Weston said. Were really focused on getting it out there and keeping it current. The site hosts photo al bums of community events, introductions to city staff, and a list of all of the citys ordinances. Weston said visitors will soon be able to search the code database to quickly locate the related ordinance. It kind of walks you through what city govern ment is, said Weston, who pointed out the sites dif ferent department pages. Weve got great employ ees who are dedicated. These people are the faces of the city. The site also provides links to other area organi zations like the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Gulf County Tourism De velopment Council, Port of Port St. Joe Port Authority and the Port St. Joe Rede velopment Agency. We need to speak from one voice, Weston said. A few areas of the site are still under mainte nance, including the code enforcement page, which Weston said will soon help educate area residents and visitors on the citys build ing codes without requiring a trip to city hall. When somebody has an issue, they can go to the code enforcement (page), see who the point of contact is and see what the process is, Weston said. The parks and recre ation page is also under development, but will soon feature information and maps of area parks, includ ing the Port City Trail sys tem, and will also feature announcements for local youth sports clubs. My vision, several years from now, is for the city to have a great parks and recreation department, Weston said. We have great facilities. Springs. In the latter robbery, the man, who said he had a weapon though he did not display one, left with an undisclosed amount of cash. Surveillance camera footage from the incidents showed what police believed to be the same sus pect, according to Mexico Beach Police Chief Brad Hall. Law enforcement of cers from several agen cies met last Thursday to coordinate the investiga tion, which involved the Mexico Beach, DeFuniak Springs and Dothan po lice departments and the Walton County Sheriffs Ofce, as well as BCSO. On Friday authorities issued an alert asking for the publics help in locat ing the suspects. The two were arrested later that day. DO YOUR FEET HURT? Why Suffer with heel pain, ingrown toenails, burning feet, diabetic foot conditions, corns, bunions, callouses? Whatever the problem, the sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better youre going to feel. Dr. Burton S. Schuler Podiatrist Foot Specialist 763-3333 So Why Wait?Make your appointment. Call today!We accept Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS andother major InsurancesDr. Burton S. SchulerLearn more about Dr. Schuler at footcareforyou.com 27 years in practice of Podiatric Medicine, Pain Management & Foot Surgery in Panama City 37 years in treating diabetes Strickly in-ofce treatment Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp GRADES from page A1Thursday, January 12, 2012give the community and parents plenty of credit also. They really push chil dren to excel. We have great school leadership. Our teachers work hard and are commit ted to student achievement. Our students work hard and take advantage of the opportunities the district offers. There is a sense of pride here. Both county high schools technically earned sufcient points to earn A grades last year, but were dropped a letter grade due to lack of sufcient prog ress among students in the lowest quartile, particularly in reading. However, this year, Port St. Joe High School had at least 50 percent of those students 58 percent compared to 33 percent last year make adequate yearly progress, resulting in no drop in grade, while Wewahitchka High School earned enough points for a high B. Wooten said the change in the grading formula for high schools two years ago provided a better snapshot for student achievement in high school and also trained a spotlight on the districts efforts to expand options for high school students. The formula change made scores on the Florida Comprehensive Assess ment Test only taken by high school freshmen and sophomores count for just 50 percent of the scor ing formula. The other 50 percent is based on graduation rates the district topped the state dropout rates the district was among the lowest in the state and participation and success in dual enrollment college level course and Indus try Certication courses such as carpentry, welding and business. With the changing of the formula they got more realistic, Wooten said. It really takes into account what those kids are doing beyond FCAT. More than 140 college level courses were taken by district high school students during the rst semester of this year. The number increases by the semester. The number of courses the kids are taking and passing with a C or bet ter, which they must do to count, Wooten said. All of those kids are taking col lege courses and passing. They are better prepared for college. And for those students for whom college may not serve as the best option, the district offers clear al ternatives. You have to drill down on student assessment and nd out what is going on with each student, Wooten said. The district applied grant money to provide English and reading teach ers an extra hour each week last school year to as sess student success and progress. That grant mon ey is providing two hours of additional analysis of student progress. The perks from recognition as a high-performing district have also assisted, Wooten said. The ability to start the school year a bit earlier than other districts is favorable for dual enroll ment because it allows the district to put its semes ter schedule with the rst semester ending by Christmas in synch with Gulf Coast State College. The school improvement template the district uses is also more userfriendly and easy to navi gate for teachers, admin istrators and parents than the states template, which districts not recognized as high-performing must use. HOW TO PAY YOUR BILL ONLINEStep onevisit www.cityofportstjoe.com Step twoOn the homepage, click pay your bill online and click it again on the next page Step threeEnter your account number and customer ID, which can be found on your water bill. (Select remember my search criteria to save this information in your browser) Step fourClick manage bills for the address you wish to make a payment on Step veSelect your outstanding bill to make a payment, or click show past bills to view bill history AARRESTS from page A1 PAYINgG from page A1 COURTESY MEXIc CO BB EAch CH DEPARTm M ENT OF PP UBLIc C SS AFETY Surveillance image from a bank robbery in Defuniak Springs.

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTDoo OO RS www.starfl.comSection A Your Hunting Headquarters Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)WWW.BWOHUNT.COM THANK YOUFOR A GREAT 2011, WE ARE LOOKING FORWARDTO ANOTHER GREAT YEAR. Thursday, January 12, 2012 Page 8By Joseph T. CollinsSince my rst visit to St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge in 1998, I have been smitten. To me, a man born in northern climes with an obsessive interest in am phibians, reptiles, turtles and crocodilians, St. Vin cent Refuge on the Florida panhandles Gulf Coast is a fantasy fullled. It is a place for my kind of wildlife to live in its natural environment, largely undisturbed. For 14 of the past 15 years, I have visited the barrier island refuge to conduct herpetofaunal sur veys under the auspices of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. My colleagues including my wife, photog rapher Suzanne L. Col linsand I have amassed data on the diversity, dis tribution, abundance and microhabitat preferences of amphibians, reptiles, turtles and crocodilians on St. Vincent Refuge, which is accessible only by boat. We have found that most snake species are active in winter, despite cool tem peratures. We have deter mined that pygmy rattle snakes are so pervasive that we must watch our step for fear of crushing them. Our main objective, though, has been to determine if the endangered eastern indigo snake is present. The species had never been recorded on the island refuge, but the service released a large number of them there in the 1980s as part of a patri ation effort. Since 1998, we havent found any of them, and, as long as a decade ago, we reported that the patriation had failed. But we remain ever vigilant for eastern indigos, in case we were wrong. My most memorable moment at St. Vincent Ref uge occurred in January 2002, when I was searching for eastern diamondback rattlesnakes. The eastern diamondback, a denizen of deep palmetto thickets and gopher tortoise burrows, is the refuges largest snake. It can grow up to eight feet long and weigh up to 10 pounds. Yet, it is extremely difcult to detect unless it rattles, something it does only when you are much too close to it. On that warm January day, I spied a large, hollow log. Guessing it might con tain a diamondback (or a cottonmouth), I crouched down and quietly ap proached it. I looked in, us ing the sunlight off a small mirror. Nobody was home. I stood up. Behind me, not more than three feet away, a ve-foot eastern dia mondback began to rattle. Apparently, my low-level approach had not alarmed it, but, when I stood up, it became agitated, appar ently thinking I looked like something out of Jurassic Park. I bagged the snake and took it back to the boat ramp at Indian Pass, where I was scheduled to give a presentation to two dozen wildlife enthusiasts. With the visitors seated on benches on an open trailer hooked up to a truck ready for a tour of the refuge, I explained the importance of herpeto fauna to the island. When I took out a beautiful scarlet snake that my colleagues and I had found earlier, the visitors were awed by its orange-black-and-cream colors and pattern. After they got back onto the trailer, I emptied the eastern diamondback rattlesnake out of the bag and let it stretch out on the ground. First, there was silence. Then, the snake rattled. This brought a sharp intake of breath from many visitors. Soon, most were excitedly taking pho tographs, albeit from the elevated safety of the trail er. Afterward, the tour guide who showed them the island told me it was his fastest tour everbecause nobody got off the trailer. Our work on the island has convinced my colleagues and me that St. Vincent Ref uge is one of the most valu able jewels in the National Wildlife Refuge System. It provides the kind of isola tion that ensures the longterm well-being of its ora and fauna. And that isolation permits the kind of longterm biological research so sorely needed to provide current information for use in wildlife management pro grams across the southeast ern United States. Joseph T. Collins is direc tor of the Center for North American Herpetology. He, with Suzanne L. Collins and Travis W. Taggart, is co-au thor of A Pocket Guide to Snakes of St. Vincent Na tional Wildlife RefugeFlor ida, published in 2011 by Mennonite Press. St. Vincent Refuge: A Herpetologists ParadiseZack McFarland, 10, of St. Joe Beach, got this nice 7-point with his trusty .243 rie while hunting with his Dad, Tim, on New Years Day 2012 at around 5:30 p.m. EST in Calhoun County. This makes the second year in a row Zack has harvested a big shooter buck with only one shot.By Mark KnapkePark ManagerSt. Joseph Peninsula State Park 227-1327 The Department of Environmental Protections St. Joseph Peninsula State Park conducts ecosystem restoration projects at the park to re-establish and perpetuate Floridas native ecosystems. One of the land manage ment tools we use is pre scribed re. Typically, we use prescribed re to con trol invasive exotic vegeta tion from gaining a foothold and to promote the growth of planted and native Flori da vegetation. Many of our native plants and animals have adapted to wildland res. These species will not only survive such res but will ourish afterwards. Prescribed Fires Reduce the potential for damaging wildres. Improve the quality of habitats for wildlife. Control the presence of harmful non-native plant species. Recycle nutrients. There is an extensive amount of planning that goes into conducting a pre scribed re. During this process we analyze the prevailing weather condi tions, season and drought conditions to achieve our management goals while providing the utmost safety to the resources, local community and our personnel. We work closely with the Florida Forest Service, the local re department and other agencies and have established burn zones and re breaks. We typically burn two or three zones an nually and prescribed res are typically accomplished during winter months. During a prescribed re you should expect to See and smell smoke. See some open ame and smoldering material. Notice some falling ash. For more information about prescribed re, and its applications in Florida, visit: www.dep.state..us/ parks/bncr/landmanagement.htm, reinorida.ifas. u.edu or www.-dof.com/ wildre/rx_index.html. Until next time, best wishes from the Park Rang ers at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastateparks.org.Prescribed reStar Staff ReportIn their December newsletter, the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge posted a schedule for events for the rst half of 2012. The Supporters conduct wagon tours of St. Vincent Island October through May. The tours are open wagon and last approxi mately four hours. The rst tour for 2012 has been scheduled for Wednesday, Jan 11. There is a per person charge of $10 paid to the private company that op erates the shuttle from Indian Pass to St. Vincent To reserve a spot go to www.stvincentfriends. com/. For more information call the refuge ofce at 653-8808. The Supporters annual membership meeting has been scheduled for Feb. 26 at 1 p.m. ET. There will be a short business meeting, an opportunity for mem bership renewal or new membership application processing, a special guest speaker and a free lunch. The event is open to the public and will be held at the St Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve, 3915 County Road 30A in Gulf County. This years St. Vin cent Island open house is scheduled for March 30. More details will be released down the road but, typically, there are a wide variety of events for partic ipants both young and old including exhibits, hikes, nature trails, music, his torical narratives, photo opportunities, art exhibits and lunch for the rst 100 visitors. If you have not attended a St. Vincent Island open house in the past, make it a point to mark your cal endar for this fun-lled event. The stated goal of the Supporters is to support environmental activities that include education, recreation and increased understanding of the his tory and natural environ ment of the St. Vincent Na tional Wildlife Refuge.Upcoming Supporters of St. Vincent events SUZANNE L. COll LL INs S | Center for North American HerpetologyThe eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest snake found on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. STRAIGHT sSHOOTING support environmental activities that include education, recreation and increased understanding of the history and natural environment of the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. TThe stated goal of the Supporters of St. Vincent NNational Wildlife RRefuge Pier/SurfBottom shing is still good for catches of triggersh, mingo, white snapper, black snapper, grouper and amberjack. Live bait shed over a wreck works well for amberjack. Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomSpeckled trout are biting good around the grass ats in 5to 7feet of water. Live shrimp, nger mullet or pinsh work well for bait as well as a jig and grub. Redsh are also on the grass ats and will hit the same bait as the trout. Under overcast skies, with an east wind, the water is clean with 1-to 2-foot waves at the Okaloosa Island Pier. In the last couple of days, anglers have been catching bonito, pompano and redsh. Other sh showing up are sheepshead, bluesh and ounder. SpoPONsorSORED bBY

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTs S www.starfl.com ASectionThursday, January 12, 2012 Page 9By Tim CroftStar News Editor An unbeaten season came to an abrupt halt last week, but by weeks end the Port St. Joe High School boys soccer team was back in the win column. District 1-1A rival Franklin County halted the Tiger Sharks unbeaten streak at 11 games last Thursday with a 1-0 victory in Eastpoint, even though Port St. Joe doubled the Seahawks shots at 8-4. The lone goal of the game came on a long-range blast that eluded rst-year goalkeeper Walt Bowers, who made three saves on four Franklin County shots. With three starters missing we struggled to possess the ball at mideld and coordinate any offensive creativity or combination play, said Port St. Joe coach Gary Hindley. The loss dropped the Tiger Sharks to 10-1-1 overall and 3-1-1 in district play. The Port St. Joe boys responded to their rst loss of the season by traveling to Freeport and putting on a scoring clinic in a 9-2 victory, a team-best offensive output for the season. It was the nal district match of the regular season with the district tournament coming next week, and it improved the Tiger Sharks score to 11-1-1 and 4-1-1. Senior midelder Daniel May and freshman forward Marcel Duarte each had a hat trick, scoring three goals apiece. May has now scored 11 goals this season, Duartes 12 leads the team. Also scoring for the Tiger Sharks were LaGrand McLemore, Cole Cryderman and Javarri Beachum. Duarte, McLemore, Cryderman and Drew Lacour each had two assists; Daniel Jones and Dell Pickett one assist apiece. Port St. Joe outshot Freeport 30-5. Bowers started in goal and saw 60 minutes of action, giving up one goal and making three saves, earning the win to improve to 81 for the season with a .587 goals against average. The Tiger Sharks played at Baker on Monday and hosted Springeld Rutherford on Tuesday. The boys play at Marianna tonight and travel to North Bay Haven Academy for the nal regular season game on Saturday.Lady Tiger SharksThe Port St. Joe girls won one and tied the other last week to improve to 7-31 overall and nish 3-2-1 in district play. The girls drew with Franklin County 2-2 last Thursday. Senior captain Rachel Jones converted a penalty kick in the 15th minute to score her ninth goal of the year and Christian Laine scored in the 49th minute as Port St. Joe bolted to a 2-0 lead. Lexie McGhee assisted on Laines goal. Franklin County scored twice in the nal 30 minutes to knot the game at the nal whistle. Each team recorded 11 shots, with Port St. Joe keeper Shannon Pridgeon making ve saves. As with the boys, the Lady Tiger Sharks responded with a road win on Saturday, recording their fourth shutout of the season with a 4-0 win over Walton County. McGhee, a sophomore forward, scored her fth goal of the season and Laine added her fourth. Jones tallied her teamleading 10th of the year and junior captain Jaclyn Kerigan added her second. All goals were unassisted. Pridgeon, a freshman, recorded her second shutout, needing to make just two saves. The girls travel to Marianna tonight. Port St. Joe will face Freeport at North Bay Haven on Saturday. The Lady Tiger Sharks are seeded second in the District 1-1A tournament, which begins next Tuesday at Franklin County. The Lady Tiger Sharks face the third-seeded Lady Seahawks at 7 p.m. ET. The winner of that game will be guaranteed a playoff spot and will face topseeded Rocky Bayou in the championship game at 7 p.m. ET on Jan. 20.Tiger Sharks suffer rst loss, bounce right backBy Tim CroftStar News Editor The Port St. Joe High School boys basketball program will honor the coach that started the legacy of state titles that has dened the program. Former Coach Bill Dickson, who was inducted into the schools Athletic Hall of Fame during the 2011 football season, will be honored during a special ceremony prior to Saturdays home game against district and inter-county rival Franklin County. A hospitality room will open at 6 p.m. ET for all those who would like to meet and greet with Dickson and the on-court ceremony will be held following the Lady Tiger Sharks game, between 7-7:15 p.m. ET. Dickson, who lives in Mississippi, was unable to attend the ceremonies during the football season. He will be on hand Saturday night. It will be a nice night, said Port St. Joe coach Derek Kurnitsky. He is very deserving of going into the Hall of Fame and we are happy we get to honor him in person. Dickson was a standout as a youngster playing for Wewahitchka High School. He later played at Troy (AL) State, where he set the school scoring record, which still stands. After early coaching stops following college, Dickson returned to Gulf County to coach at Port St. Joe High School. He coached the Tiger Sharks from 1966-74, winning region and state titles in 1969 and 1972. Those are the rst of the eight state titles the Port St. Joe boys have won, not to mention another seven trips as far as the state Final Four. Dicksons 1972 team was noteworthy for nishing with a losing regular-season record only to beat Havana Northside for the state title. Northside had beaten Port St. Joe twice during the regular season and again in the district title game. Dickson was named state Coach of the Year in 1969 and 1972 and was named National Coach of the Year in 1971-72. Former players under Dickson and the general public are urged to come out and honor Dickson on Saturday night.Tiger Sharks drop two close gamesThe prior week was one of frustration for the young Tiger Sharks as they lost a game they led at home to Mosley and fell on the road to a West Gadsden team in what could be characterized as something of a moral victory. On Jan. 3, the Tiger Sharks (5-9 overall, 3-2 in District 4-1A) hosted Mosley and carved out a lead through three quarters. Leading 51-44 heading into the nal period, though, the Tiger Sharks faltered, committing key turnovers and missing shots to pave the way for a 24-13 advantage of the Dolphins in the fourth-quarter and a 68-64 Port St. Joe loss. It was the same as with Cottondale the week before, Kurnisky said. We are up and we just could not close the deal. We need to learn to slow down and win games. We need to learn how to close games. We work on it a lot in practice, but that is much different than in games. We just need to think and execute what we want to do. Slowing down is a key this year for a young team starting just one senior, who is joined in the starting lineup by an eighth-grader, a freshman, a sophomore and a junior. We are playing a lot better, Kurnitsky said. The record does not reect it, but our defense is starting to get there and we are gaining condence. The Tiger Sharks had balanced scoring against Mosley, with ve players in double gures. Natrone Lee and Ramello Zaccarro led the way with 15 points apiece. Jarkiece Davis and Alex King chipped in 12 points each and Chad Quinn scored 10. Last Friday, the Tiger Sharks traveled to West Gadsden, which had an average margin of victory of nearly 40 points against District 4-1A foes. Port St. Joe adopted a slow-down offense from the outset and kept the game close before the Panthers pulled out a 54-38 win. It was 26-19 at the half and in the third quarter we got to within four, Kurnitsky said. We were right there at the end. We played really well, but (West Gadsden) was too much and we had a run in the third quarter where we made a few turnovers and didnt take care of the ball. King led the way with 17 points for the Tiger Sharks. Lee added nine points, Quinn four, Zaccarro three, Davis and Jamie Gordon two each and Arion Ward scored one point. I really believe this team is going to win some games, Kurnitsky said. I can see it. They are playing with more condence and they havent hung their heads. This has been an interesting and fun year. This is a good group that is only going to get better. The Tiger Sharks traveled to South Walton on Tuesday and play at Blountstown on Friday in this week of district contests. The Franklin County game will tip at 7:30 p.m. ET on Saturday at The Dome. Star Staff ReportThe Wewahitchka High School wrestling program had two grapplers place in the top four, including the tournaments most valuable wrestler, during last weekends Andrews Institute Wrestling Invitational. The tournament was held at Gulf Breeze High School. Gator senior Beau Boggess was the champion at 106 pounds, nishing 3-0 and being voted the tournaments Most Valuable Wrestler by the other coaches in attendance, said Wewahitchka coach Tracy Malcolm. Boggess wasted little time in the rst two rounds, recording pins in 50 and 53 seconds, respectively. In the championship match, Boggess earned a technical fall when he carved out an 18-3 lead in the second period. In addition to Boggess, junior Josh Epps took fourth place at 126 pounds. The week started out on an up note for Boggess, who was named the Scholar Athlete of the Week by WMBB Channel 13 out of Panama City. Boggess appeared on television during Channel 13s Sunday broadcast.Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Dixie Youth Baseball League will be holding its annual election of ofcers on Thursday, Jan. 12, at 6 p.m. ET. The meeting will take place at the STAC house located on 8th Street. Anyone interested in holding a position as an ofcer within the league is invited to attend. Also, for the rst time in many years, we will be offering a Dixie Boys league for players age 13 and 14. And for parents who may be purchasing new bats for the upcoming season please be aware of new performance requirements in the AA and AAA leagues. This information can be found on the Dixie Youth Baseball website.Star Staff ReportHigh school and junior high coaches in all sports, we need your help. In our mind every child participating in scholastic sports in our county deserves some recognition, if only for the sacrice and discipline required to compete. But there are a lot of teams, a lot of games and we are, alas, a small staff. Coaches and athletic directors are urged to contact The Star will all the scores and results from your teams games. The deadline for all information is 8 a.m. ET on Tuesday. Please call 227-7827 or email to tcroft@ star.com, providing scores, individual totals and anything remarkable and which stands out from the days or weeks competition. Photos are always welcome and can be sent via email as an attached jpeg le. We can not make these sports pages what they can be without your help. Coaches and athletic directors, parents and athletes, principals and School Board, Superintendent Jim Norton, these are your pages. Please help us ll them.Tiger Sharks to honor former Coach Dickson on SaturdayWewahitchka wrestlers compete at Gulf Breeze COURt T Es S Y OF CARl L A MAYMarcel Duarte (No. 20) had three goals to help spark the Tiger Shark win at Freeport. Christian Laine, who had one goal, sprints through the Walton County defense with Kathleen Rish on the wing. Call to coaches urgent assistance UURGENtT : Call to coaches DIXIE YOUtTH BAsSEBAllLL ElLEctCTION

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LocalA10 | The Starto coaching a handicapped student one-on-one and treating him as if he were her own, while another pro vides an extra set of eyes and hands in a classroom of busy Pre-K students. On the high school level, the guidance secretary at Port St. Joe High School continues to go above and beyond her secretarial du ties, as she said, When something comes at you, you just do it. And at Wewahitchka High School, the lunch room manager provides quality and variety in the lunchroom while creating a welcoming environment for the students. As WHS Prin cipal Debbie Baxley said, A child cant learn if theyre hungry. After observation from a school employee from out side Gulf County, one of the four school nominees will be chosen to represent the dis trict in the Florida School Related Employee of the Year awards program. PSJE School-related employeeMary King (Paraprofessional) She started out helping special needs teenagers at Gulf ARC, and now she works as a one-on-one aid for a special needs student at Port St. Joe Elementary. Ms. Mary is a xture in Sonya Hills rst grade class at PSJE. Mary King works as a one-on-one aid for a student in Hills class with cerebral palsy. In her second year working with the student, Hill said King treats him as one of her own. I worked at Gulf ARC for 15 years, King said. Ive always worked with special needs kids. King is a one-on-one support system and helps the student with different mobility therapies and the everyday challenges he faces. I just have always liked to work with special needs kids, King said when asked what the best part of her job is. Theres no one thing that sticks out. WES School-related employeeDiane Clark (Pre-K paraprofessional) Diane Clark said any day they glue and glitter in PreK is a good day. Clark thrives in the PreK class at Wewahitchka El ementary, where she said hugs and excitement are classroom staples and ev eryday is fun. To see the world through a 4 or 5-year-olds eyes, its just amazing, Clark said. I love my job. Clark said the most rewarding part is seeing something click for a child, whether its through patterns, counting or rhyming words. Clark has worked as a paraprofessional for Gulf District Schools for 14 years and she has seen Pre-K become serious business. Before they start kindergarten, the state really wants them to be ready to learn, Clark said. We do what kindergarten used to be. Kindergarten has changed so much that PreK has become serious busi ness. Were actually begin ning reading in Pre-K. At the end of the year, were beginning to read just a little bit. Clark attended Wewahitchka Elementary herself as a child, and believes the classroom she teaches in was actually her own rstgrade classroom. This is where I started and this is where I hope to nish up, Clark said. PSJHS School-related employeeWanda Nixon (Guidance secretary) Wanda Nixon wants to give every student the opportunity to succeed, no matter where they come from. Nixon spent 17 years at Port St. Joe Middle School prior to returning to the high school where she worked years earlier. In her rst year back at PSJHS, Nixon is already right at home. I missed working with the seniors because theyre so excited about graduat ing and starting college, Nixon said. I love to see the kid who works so hard, who came from nothing, and theyre reaching for the stars and they get it. Her favorite part of the job is helping the seniors nd success. Its an honor and a shock, Nixon said of the award. Just to be nominated, it warmed my heart. Nixon spends the day assisting the PSJHS guidance counselor with sched ule changes, making sure the seniors are on track and a host of other things. When something comes at you, you just do it, Nixon said. I try to make her job as easy as possible. Nixon said she truly en joys getting up and going to work everyday. Its challenging, but I like a good challenge, Nixon said. You never know whats going to come through that door. WHS School-related employeeBecky Hamm (Lunchroom manager) A child cant learn on an empty stomach. Wewahitchka High Schools lunchroom man ager Becky Hamm takes pride in providing nutri tious brain fuel for the stu dents. If a child is hungry I dont think they can learn, said Baxley. This is the only real good meal some of them get in a day. Baxley said Hamm has made a very special effort in providing students and teachers with good quality food in a friendly and car ing atmosphere. Hamm has also established the rst breakfast program at WHS. She takes pride in her food and wants quality and variety, Baxley said. After a stint as the We wahitchka Elementary lunch manager, Hamm is back at home at WHS where she worked years earlier. She makes all the children feel welcomed and loved, Baxley said. Im honored to have her here. 8238 HONOR from page A1Thursday, January 12, 2012 P hotos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Port St. Joe Elementary School-related employee of the year Mary King is a paraprofessional who works one-on-one with a special needs student. LLeft: Wewahitchka Elementary Schoolrelated employee of the year Diane King works as a paraprofessional in a Pre-K classroom. Port St. Joe Highs School-related employee of the year Wanda Nixon works as the schools guidance secretary.

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Thursday, January 12, 2012Star Staff ReportGhostly forms, loud voices, a playful kitten, ying objects, phantom lights and mysterious cries. All are part of lighthouse life at stations across Florida. Whether haunted or not, this is for one lucky individual to nd out and win a unique rst: a weekend stay at the newly-restored Keepers Cottage at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The annual Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge will be April 21-22, offering tourists and locals the opportunity to climb all ve lighthouses along Floridas Northern Gulf Coast: the Pensacola, Cape San Blas, Cape St. George, Crooked River and St. Marks lighthouses. All will be open during those two days for climbers and visitors. During the weekend of the Challenge one lucky couple will have the opportunity to be the rst to spend the night in the Head Keepers House at Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Tickets are available for the rafe to win two nights and three days in the Keepers Cottage next door to the Gift Shop. This room has one double-size bed. No children please. Tickets are available in the Lighthouse Gift Shop for $10, and the drawing will be April 1. Contact Beverly Douds at 850-229-1151 or email her at csblighthouselady2008@gmail.com. You also can nd her or CSB Lighthouse on Facebook.Church honors MLK Jr.s birthdayStar Staff ReportThe annual community Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Observance Program will be at 5 p.m. ET Sunday at Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church in Port St. Joe. On Monday, honoring the national holiday, scheduled activities consist of arts and crafts, a spelling contest, a youth talent show and other educational entertainment focusing on the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The activities are planned to begin after the Neighborhood Clean-Project, from noon to 5 p.m. ET at the Washington Recreation Center. For information, call Maxine Gant at 229-6624.Friends of Preserves seeks new membersStar Staff ReportFriends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves members and guests are invited to attend the Annual General Membership Meeting Saturday, Jan. 14 beginning at 11 a.m. ET at the Preserves Center. The agenda for this meeting will include a presentation by the new Preserve Manager, a recap of 2011 accomplishments, a treasurers report, nomination and election of the 2012 Board of Directors and other general business. Matt Greene, the Buffer Preserves new Manager, will present a Photo Journey of Northwest Floridas Flora and Fauna that emphasizes the regions rich botanical and wildlife diversity. Greene will highlight the importance of prescribed re in the longleaf pine ecosystem and discuss the once dominant turpentine industry of Florida. We encourage members to bring one or two guests who may be interested in becoming a Friend of the Preserves. Everyone can enjoy assorted chili recipes including vegetarian chili after the meeting. A $5 donation is requested from non-members. For information, call the Preserves Center at 850-229-1787. Chili potluckAfter the brief meeting, please join us for a potluck chili luncheon, prepared by your fellow Friends members and free to all attendees. There will be several chili recipes including vegetarian that range from mild to hot. You do not need to bring any food unless you wish to share some of your favorite xings to go along with the chili. Be prepared to have a good time and meet fellow Friends.Board electionOne of the most important items on the General Membership Meeting agenda is the presentation of the nominating committees slate of candidates for the 2012 Board of Directors of the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves and a vote by all attending current members for the new years Board positions. Currently serving on the Board: Charla Boggs, president, John Oliver, past president, Nick Baldwin, Bill Boothe, Marcia Boothe, Sandra Chan and John Ehrman. The proposed slate of candidates for election to the Board: Nick Baldwin, Charla Boggs, Bill Boothe, Marcia Boothe, Gene Cox and John Ehrman. One lucky couple can win the opportunity to spend the weekend of the Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge at the Cape San Blas Keepers Cottage.Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge dates setCOURTESY OF BEVERLY DOUd D S PRISON pPETS DAWGS in Prison program offers second chancesBy Tim CroftStar News Editor Eleven more dogs saved. One more state added to the growing list of adopter home states. The DAWGS in Prison program continues to grow by leashes and hounds. As the program, a partnership between the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society and the Gulf Forestry Camp, neared its third anniversary last week, Graduation Class No. 17 brought to 179 the number of shelter dogs saved from an almost certainly grim fate. The program, which aims to train dogs to be sociable and adoptable while providing life skills to inmates, also added Louisiana to the list of states those dogs have found new homes, spanning from New England to the Midwest to the Deep South. DAWGS is an acronym for Developing Adoptable Dogs With Good Sociability. Ninety-nine percent of those dogs are in loving homes right now, and the other 1 percent is waiting to be placed in the right home, said Sandi Christy, co-coordinator for the DAWGS in Prison program for the Humane Society. Here we believe in second chances for the inmates and the dogs. We are seeing successes. One of the larger successes literally is Dylan, a 77-pound mass of regal serenity. A Rhodesian Ridgeback, a dog bred centuries ago to ght lions in Africa, Dylan went home to the Cajun state as Mike and Here we believe in second chances for the inmates and the dogs. We are seeing successes. SSandi Christy co-coordinator the DAWGS in Prison program for the Humane Society Photos by TT IM CROFT | The StarThe bond forged over eight weeks between dog and inmate and dog and dog is evident every graduation day. Last week was the 17th graduation for the DAWGS in Prison program. At top, Dylan, a 77-pounder, has a habit of crossing left foreleg over right, as if, inmate Gary Ford said, Hes ruling the roost. Below, the DAWGS program is about providing a new life for both inmates and dogs here Gary Ford, caretaker of Dylan, a majestic Rhodesian Ridgeback.See DAWGSS B5

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B2 | The Star OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society 3520 EAST 15th Street PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 (TEL) 850-763-4104 www.BrightPediatrics.com DR. SAMEH ELAMIRPEDIATRICS & ADOLESCENTSSame day appointment available Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGHT SPECIALS 6:00 8:30HOURS: 236ReidAve (850) 229.7121 SCALLOPS, CRABS, SHRIMP & FISH BURGERS: WITHFF CHICKEN FINGERS: WITHFF SHRIMPSPECIAL:FF,COLESLAW, OR Above orders served with:FF, BAKEDPOTATO, SALAD AND BREAD 850-769-6139236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL Stan TrappeATTORNEY AT LAWLet Me Help YouAdmitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Thursday, January 12, 2012 SocietyStar Staff ReportErin White is the Distinguished Young Woman of Gulf County. She was selected to represent the Gulf County area at the Gulf County program on Oct. 15, 2011. She will participate in the Distinguished Young Women of Florida state program on Jan. 21 in Winter Garden. Showtime is 7 p.m. ET at the Garden Theatre. The young woman selected during the state program will travel to Mobile, Ala., to participate in the Distinguished Young Women of America national nals where White will have an opportunity to win the title of Distinguished Young Woman of America 2012, a share of $125,000 in cash scholarships, and college scholarships to more than 200 colleges and universities across the nation. Erin is the daughter of Gary and Suzanne White and is a senior at Port St. Joe High School. She is senior class president, a member of the National Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta and math club. Erin loves to dance and has taken dance for over 15 years at Pam Nobles Dance Studio. For Erins talent, she will perform a tap dance routine to Sing Sing Sing. Erin also works part time at Goodwill and Seahorse Water Safaris. Erin plans to attend Florida State University and major in Marine Biology. Erin would love to hear from her friends and family next week. Cards can be mailed to Erin White c/o Patty Billsborough at 12836 Jacob Grace Court, Windermere, FL 34786. Flowers can be sent by contacting Bayside Florist and Gifts on Reid Ave at 229-1111. Erin will not have access to her phone, email or Facebook for the entire week. Distinguished Young Women of Florida is an ofcial preliminary of Distinguished Young Women of America (DistinguishedYW), the oldest and largest scholarship program for high school senior females of its type. Since 1958, this program (formerly Americas Junior Miss) has awarded more than $92 million in cash scholarships and provided thousands of young women with collegegranted scholarships to colleges and universities across the nation. Each year, Distinguished Young Women across the nation makes available more than $52 million in scholarship opportunities to high school senior women. In addition to providing scholarships, Distinguished young woman challenges each participant to share its national outreach program, Be Your Best Self (BYBS), with young people across the nation. Through BYBS, participants encourage self-esteem and excellence in all young people through the programs ve principles: Be healthy, Be Involved, Be Studious, Be Ambitious, and Be Responsible.Star Staff ReportOn Dec. 14 the Ladies Auxiliary of the John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 donated many lap robes to The Bridge nursing home in Port St. Joe. The robes were made by Grace McPherson, who went to be with the Lord last year and by Ginny Seefeldt. The lap robes were handed out to the patients at their annual Christmas Party. Shown in the photo holding some of the lap robes are Auxiliary Members Ginny Seefeldt, Marvine Blanton, Deaon Titus, Margaret Barker, and in the front Nancy Caledine and activities chairman at The Bridge Terri Nelson.Star Staff ReportThe Central Panhandle Chapter of the American Red Cross is seeking volunteers for its Gulf County Disaster Action Teams (DAT). Disaster Action Team members are the rst responders of the Red Cross disaster program. DAT members are on 24-hour call for a week at a time to respond to local house res or other incidents that may require emergency Red Cross services. DAT members are required to be available to respond to emergencies at any time day or night during their rotational period. DAT team members are responsible for the proper documentation (paperwork) needed to provide nancial assistance to those in need. DAT teams are a vital and integral part of practically all Red Cross response operations. If you are interested in providing this vital service in Gulf County please call Sharon Wagner at 7636587 or email Wager at swagner@redcrosspc.org. Applications may also be picked up at Port St. Joe City Hall.Star Staff ReportThe Bridge at Bay St. Joe will be celebrating the lifetime achievements and noteworthy community contributions of Erma Louise Parker, Frank MacAllister and Carol Jean Burrows, at an induction ceremony to honor the hometown heroes at 6 p.m. ET on Thursday, Jan. 26. The residents and staff member will be honored as hometown heroes and as Whos Who of the facility. Along with family and friends of the honored recipients, we would like to extend an invitation to community residents to join in the celebration and recognition of our special residents achievements, said Administrator Ron Reid. The Bridge at Bay St Joe is proud to honor those residents who have lived through the most challenging times in history, and also helped build and shape their communities. To register to attend the event or for more information contact The Bridge at Bay St Joe at 229-8244.PHP free tax return preparationStar Staff ReportVolunteers with People Helping People of Gulf County will offer free tax return preparation from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays starting Jan. 17 and ending April 15. People Helping People, a non-prot organization, is located at 2010 Parker Ave. in Highland View. For more information call 229-5262.Amateur Radio Society to offer license examsThe Gulf Amateur Radio Society will be providing license exams on Saturday, Feb. 11 at the EOC Building in Port St. Joe, located behind the Gulf County Courthouse, at 10 a.m. ET. Those interested in getting a ham license or upgrading a present license should contact C.H. Tillis at 648-8251 for details and registration. Ham it up. Get your license and get on the air.Meeting Notice: American Legion Post 116 There will be a regular general meeting of American Legion Post 116 on Saturday, Jan. 28 at 3 p.m. ET. The meeting will be held at Emerson Cooling & Heating HQ located at 109 Trade Circle West in Port St. Joe. Food and refreshments will be served after the meeting. All members are encouraged to attend. Eligibility for membership and benets can be found on the American Legion Website at www.legion.org. We invite all eligible veterans to join our organization. Please contact Commander Douglas Calendine at 227-3776 for more information. Society BrRIEFsS RED CrROssSS sSEEKInNG VOlLUnNTEErsRS Bridge residents and staff to be honored for lifetime achievements VFW 10069 auxiliary donates lap robes ErERInN WhHITEPSJHSs Erin White to compete in Distinguished Young Women of Florida

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The Star| B3 Over 35 Years Experience.208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe850.229.1111www.BaysideFloristPSJ.comYour Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Billy CarrOwner, David Goodson Manager Designers Peggy Joe Stripling, Ann Guey & Alison Buckner Thursday, January 12, 2012 School and Local NewsBy Tim CroftStar News Editor No tests, no grades, no stress, just fun. That is the mantra for Education Encore at Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/ Franklin Center. Registration for this years Education Encore, which provides non-credit enrichment classes for adults on a variety of topics, will be held beginning at 1 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Jan. 18 in Room A101 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus.. Education Encore strives to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom in which adults can explore new ideas. The Continuing Education Department at Gulf Coast State College sponsors the Education Encore program because the schools commitment to quality learning experiences for all citizens regardless of age, said Jim Barr, GCSC coordinator of Community Education Programs. All courses are conducted in a relaxed and supportive atmosphere by incredible instructors. Barr said participants in Education Encore range from 20 to 75. One man in his 40s decided to enroll because of the programs motto No tests, no grades, no stress, just fun and as a result of his experiences in the program was motivated to become a full-time academic student, Barr added. Instructors include local author Michael Lister, television weather personality Judy Dickey and local artist Jennifer Bonaventura, among others. Barr noted that just as exercising the body maintains physical tness, one goal of Education Encore is to maintain the tness of the mind. For participants who have never attended college, the program gives them an opportunity to live the college experience, Barr said. Participants who have attended college have an opportunity to re-live their college experience. You are never too old to learn. Education Encore offers courses on a wide range of subjects, including computers, exercise, art, drawing, photography, religion, writing, Spanish, story crafting, history and weather. Classes meet six consecutive Wednesdays beginning Jan. 25 and ending Feb. 29. There will be three periods from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; 9:45-10:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. to noon. All times EST. The fee is $66 for the six-week program the fee is the same whether taking one, two or three classes. This is a great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest, Barr said. To browse the selection of classes offered please visit the website at www.gulfcoast.edu/ EducationEncore. For more information call 8723823 or transmit an email to Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast. edu.Special to The StarThe second semester calendar for Faith Christian School:January 9 Monday Students return to school 10 Tuesday Report Cards go home 16 Monday MLK Day (no school) February 13 Monday Progress Reports go home 20 Monday Presidents Day (no school) March 2 Friday Learning Fair (early dismissal for grades 4 8) 9 Friday Field Day 12-16 M F Spring Break (no school) 23 Friday Spaghetti Dinner & Auction (early dismissal for all grades) 26 Monday Report Cards go home April 6 Friday Good Friday (early dismissal for all grades) no ext. day 9 Monday Easter Holiday (no school) 16-20 M-F Achievement Testing 23 Monday Progress Reports go home May 2-6 Mon.-Fri. Teacher Appreciation Week 3 Thursday National Day of Prayer 17 Thursday Last day of school for K3 K5; no extended. day 18 Friday K5 Graduation / Preschool program at 6:30 p.m. 25 Friday Last Day for grades 1 8 Elementary program at 9 a.m. Senior/ Eighth Grade graduation and awards program at 6:30 p.m. Star Staff ReportPort St. Joe High School alum Brianna Sigman was named to the Presidents Honor Roll for the fall semester at the University of North Florida. Sigman earned the award by achieving a 4.0 GPA during the Fall 2011 semester.Star Staff ReportA new Correctional Basic Standards Class is scheduled to begin Jan. 25 at the Gulf Coast State College, Gulf/Franklin Campus located in Port St. Joe, Florida. This course is required for all who wish to become correctional ofcers in the state of Florida. Recent changes have been made to the FDLE curriculum and the course is now a month shorter than the previous requirement. This means students can complete the required training more quickly, at a signicant reduction in costs. Anyone interested should please call 2279670 extension 5507 or 5511.Star Staff ReportJoin Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf for a number of new events or activities for a healthy New Year and support your New Years resolutions. Jan. 12: Diabetes Education Class Jenny Stuckey, registered nurse and certied diabetes educator, will host a diabetes self-management class from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. EDT in the conference room at the hospital. The self-management class is open to adults with diabetes who are looking for ways to manage their disease. Pre-registration is required and a physician referral is needed to attend the class. The $10 fee will include lunch for the day. Jan. 12: Quit Smoking Now (Six week on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m.) Attend the free weekly class/support group, Quite Smoking Now. The curriculum was developed by ex-smokers for those who want to become exsmokers themselves. Free nicotine replacement therapy available for class participants. To register, call 1-87-Quit-Now-6 (1-877-8486696). Program provided by Florida AHEC. Jan. 19: New Volunteer Orientation at 10 a.m. Would you like to become a volunteer for Sacred Heart Hospital? At the core of the Scared Hearts long and proud tradition of caring for the sick, the poor, the aged and the vulnerable, stands a group of volunteers whose willing hearts and helping hands have served generations of families during their time of need. Jan. 19: Yoga (Six week on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. and 6:45 p.m.) Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf is sponsoring free community yoga classes Jan 19-Feb 23. Classes will include a chair class at 5:30 and a traditional mat class at 6:45. Jan. 28: Free Skin Screenings Gulf Coast Dermatology will provide free skin screenings as part of their annual celebration of service. For more information, contact Gulf Coast Dermatology at 2333376. Jan. 31: Fall Prevention at Home at 1 p.m. Join the Senior Spirit program for a free program on avoiding falls for you and your love ones. The presentation will be provided by the Sacred Heart Hospital Physical Therapy team. For more information on these classes, please contact Paulina Pendarvis at 229-5603. For more information about Sacred Heart, please visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.orgStar Staff ReportLack of Transportation is one of the biggest challenges for thousands of local cancer patients. Many need daily or weekly treatments and they dont have a car or are too ill to drive. The American Cancer Societys Road to Recovery program provides volunteer drivers to transport cancer patients to and from these life-saving cancer treatments. Volunteer drivers donate their time and the use of their personal vehicles. The American Cancer Society has a vast volunteer network in which individuals can make a difference in the ght against cancer. One way to make a critical difference is by becoming a volunteer driver for the Road to Recovery program. Volunteer driving requires only a safe driving record, free time, a serviceable vehicle, and the desire to help. If you or anyone you know is interested in becoming a Road to Recovery volunteer driver please contact: Kim Kurnitsky, Relay For Life Event Chair, 227-4093 or your local American Cancer Society Community representative, Stephanie Bird, 785-9205, ext. 3509. You can also join us at our Relay For Life of Gulf County team meetings to get more information on our programs and services, volunteer opportunities, Relay For Life, or get any questions you have answered. Meetings are held at 6 p.m. EST at Capital City Bank. Upcoming meeting dates, Thursday, Jan. 12 and Thursday, Feb. 9.Education Encore gears up at Gulf/Franklin Center The Lions TALE The Lions TaleCorrectional Basic Standards classSigman earns Presidents Honor RollACSs Road to Recovery seeks volunteersStart the New Year with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf

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FAITHPage B4 www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Thursday, January 12, 2012This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week.Mr. DrinkerListen, Mr. Drinker, let me tell you how you are, You struggle through the work days till its time to hit the bar. Youll drink a few and talk a lot till you get to feeling good Then youll take a bath and hit the road without eating as you should. Youll try to nd the action where somethings going on, And if you nd a party youll hang around till dawn. The next day youll be sorry and say it wont happen tonight, But a little after dark will nd you just about half tight. Some drink because of troubles, others because theyre sad, But any way you look at it a drinking problem is bad. Mr. Drinker says he can quit if he really wanted to, Just ask him who hes trying to fool, himself, or me and you? There is only one that can take away your drink and make you glad. And if you dont accept Him, Mr. Drinker, youve been had. Billy JohnsonBarbara Ann Picard, 63 of Mexico Beach, Florida, passed away Thursday, January 5, 2012 in Panama City. She was born in Springeld, Massachusetts, but resided in Westeld the larger portion of her life. Survivors include her husband, Gary Schloerb of Mexico Beach, Florida; one daughter, Jennifer Kenny (Douglas) of West Springeld, Mass; one son, Brian Forgette (Jennifer) of Agawam, Mass; one step son, Jared Schloerb of Orlando, Florida and one sister, Carol Dow of Mexico Beach, Florida. She is also survived by six grandchildren and numerous nieces, nephews and great nieces and nephews. Services were held at First United Methodist Church of Mexico Beach on Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 11 a.m. with Pastor Jerry Arhelger ofciating. Memorialization was by cremation. In lieu of owers, those wishing to may make a donation in memory of Barbara Picard to the Polycystic Kidney Disease Research and Education Foundation at www.pdkcure.org. Words of condolence may be expressed at www. heritagefhllc.com Heritage Funeral Home 247 N. Tyndall Parkway Panama City, FL 32404 (850) 785-1316Barbara Ann Picard BaARbaBARaA ANN PICaARdD1948-2012 The local congregation of Jehovahs Witnesses would like to invite the public to attend a Special Assembly Day on Jan. 14 at the Marina Civic Center in Panama City. The theme of the assembly is, Let Your Will Take Place, based on Matthew 6:10. The exciting theme for the program is appropriate due to the fact we were created because of Jehovahs will. Thus, it would be impossible to fulfill the purpose of our existence without learning and doing the will of God. This is not as easy as it may seem because we have to fight an inward tendency to sin. Without Gods help we would risk being caught alive by the devil, for the will of that one. (2 Timothy 2:26). This assembly will help us learn and work in harmony with Gods will. The answer to the following questions will be addressed: What is as important as hearing Gods Word? How can we go on perceiving what Gods will is for us? How can we find a rich and satisfying life? Also, for the young ones: What do you need to prove to Jehovah? What reward comes from doing Gods will now? Why is it urgent that we build up and encourage others? All are invited to attend and pay attention to this encouraging program. The program starts at 9:40 a.m. CT. No admission fee or collections will be taken.Fish Stories at First United Methodist of PSJWe have all grown up hearing (and probably telling) Fish Stories. After all, living in Port St. Joe, we all have more opportunities to sh that most people. Beginning Jan. 8, Rev. Mac Fulcher will begin a ve-week series called Fish Stories. We will begin the series by looking at shing in Deep Water. Our scripture will be Luke 5:1-11. So, if you would like to learn more about shing, come this Sunday to our Contemporary Service at 9 a.m. ET in the Fellowship Hall, or our Traditional Service at 11 a.m. in the Sanctuary. For more information, please call the church ofce at 227-1724.Victory Temple Seasoned Women 13th AnniversaryVictory Temple First Born Holiness Church Seasoned Women Department will be observing its 13th anniversary on Jan. 20-22. Friday night services will begin at 7 p.m. ET; Saturday morning service begins at 10 a.m.; and Saturday night service is at 7 p.m. The anniversary will climax on Sunday with a service beginning at 11:30 a.m. The speakers will be announced at a later date. Pastor Gathers and the Victory Temple Church family would like to extend an invitation to one and all. Come and be blessed. Obituary Faith bBRIEfsFSJehovahs Witnesses special assembly Share your memoriesLet the community know about loved ones that have passed away. Obituaries are free and allow families and friends to remember and share. Submit obituaries by 8 a.m. ET Tuesdays to tcroft@star. com to leave a tribute to a loved one.

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Public NoticeThe rst Public Hearing will be held Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST and the second Public Hearing for adoption will be held January 24, 2012. The public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following:AN ORDINANCE PER THE REQUIREMENTS OF FLORIDA STATUE 163.3177(3)(b) TO YEARLY REVIEW AND UPDATE THE GULF COUNTY FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SCHEDULE; ADOPTING BY REFERENCE THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 2011/2012 WORK PLAN; INCORPORATING BY REFERENCE THE UPDATED CONCURRENCY TRACKING DATA; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ORDINANCE IN CONFLICT THEREWITH, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on this matter. The ordinance and contents are on le with the Clerk of Court and at the Planning Department, Room 312 in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL.Ad #2011-88 PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, January 16 2012 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, January 24, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application by Michael Weitman for Parcel ID # 006268-119R Located in Section 18, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroach into a 25 setback by 5. 2. Variance Application Baileys Crab House & Seafood Market for Parcel 03946000R Located in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroach into the roadside setback by 8 and rear setback by 12 for business improvements. 3. Public and Open Discussion 4. Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312.Ad #2011-89 WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847Date HighLow%Precip Thu, Jan 1272 3610% Fri, Jan 1353 3510% Sat, Jan 1456 4010% Sun, Jan 1561 40 0% Mon, Jan 1661 50 0% Tues, Jan 1768 5010% Wed, Jan 1867 4460% Thursday, January 12, 2012If you received a potted poinsettia for Christmas, your enjoyment of this attractive plant neednt end with the holidays. So dont throw it away. With a little extra care, and a bit of luck, a gift poinsettias life can be extended for many seasons to come. All too often, we give up on potted poinsettias, once they have lost their colorful bracts. Fortunately, it is relatively easy to save poinsettias from one Christmas to the next, by planting them in your home landscape. Before discussing outdoor planting, lets briey review the proper care of poinsettias while theyre still in your home. My information was provided by retired Extension horticulturist Dr. Robert Black of the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural S ciences. Poinsettias are especially sensitive to extremes of heat and cold, as well as sudden temperature changes. So keep your potted plant away from hot air vents, cold windows, and doorways, where temperature uctuates rapidly. Also avoid overwatering. A thorough soaking about once a week should be sufcient. Keep your poinsettia in a brightly lighted area, but never in direct sun. Once your gift poinsettia starts to fade after the holiday, you can prepare it for transplanting. Since we live in the colder northern area of our state, youll have to hold your plant in a protected area until the danger of frost has past. During this period, the poinsettia should be allowed to dry and become dormant. Water it only occasionally, just enough to keep it from drying out. When you are ready to plant your poinsettia outside, you should carefully consider its placement relative to the amount of light it will receive in the area where you want to set it. Poinsettias are short day plants. This means they will set buds in the fall only if the daily period of light they receive is relatively short. If you plant your poinsettia where it is exposed to extra illumination from porch, window, or street lights, it might never bloom. In late winter or early spring, after blooming is over and the danger of frost is past, poinsettias should be pruned back to within 12 to 18 inches off the ground. If they have been frozen, you might have to cut even lower, to get to live wood. To insure compact, showy plants at owering time, poinsettias should be pruned several times during the growing season. Each time new growth reaches a length of 12 inches, it should be cut or pinched back, leaving four leaves on each shoot. This operation should be continued until about Sept. 10, but no later. Because poinsettias begin to set buds as days become shorter, pruning after Sept. 10 might reduce ower production. Poinsettias will grow in a wide range of soils, sand, muck, marl, and clay. But, they do need fertilizer. Apply a complete, balanced analysis mix, such as a 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 three times a year, when growth starts in the spring, again in June, and nally in the late fall, after the bracts have set. This last application promotes large bracts with showy color. Apply oneand-a-half pound of 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 per 100 square feet each time you fertilizer. If you wait until the danger of frost has past, transplant your poinsettia to a landscape location protected from articial light, water and fertilize it properly, and prune regularly until early fall, it should reward you the another beautiful burst of color next Christmas. For more information on poinsettias contact your local County Extension Ofce at 229-2909 or 639-3200 or visit www.gulf.ifas.u.edu. Lisa Russell made the seven-hour drive from north of New Orleans to adopt. I would have never found this without the Internet, Lisa Russell said. There are no programs like this anywhere between (Louisiana and Port St. Joe). I found a dog in the last class but when I called he had already been adopted. We checked out this class and found Dylan. We are going to keep the name. They trained him with that name and I like that name. The Russells have long had big dogs, having lost two elderly German Shepherds to old age in recent months. The couple has about 50-60 acres, Mike said, on which a dog can have, pardon the pun, a eld day. When I was growing up in Louisiana, we had some Ridgebacks, Mike said. They are fearless dogs, and they are very loyal dogs. They are hard-headed as they can be, but thats not going to be the case with one that is trained. They give them two months of training here. You cant put a dog into two months of training, itd break the bank. This is a wonderful program. Gary Ford has worked the past eight weeks as the caretaker for Dylan, a dog Judy Miick, co-coordinator of the DAWGS program for the Humane Society called a gentle giant. The thing about this dog is every other dog in this class wants to play with him, Ford said. Hes a great dog. His new owners will love him. Inmates use teamwork to train and care for the dogs. Team leaders are the most experienced in the program and essentially supervise all training during each class rotation. Some inmates are trainers, assigned to a dog one-on-one, while others are handlers, basically the rst assistant to the trainer. Caretakers are those who ensure that the dogs have 24/7 care, grooming, feeding and generally caring for the dog. The inmates some 300 have gone through the program since its inception must apply and are interviewed and screened for the ability to focus on the task and meet the responsibilities of the program. This program has made all the difference for me, Ford said. Time goes so fast. You have a purpose. I have dogs and love dogs. These past few months have just own by like this he said while snapping his ngers. Days like today are sad because you are seeing him (the dog) get out, but you are excited because a new dog is coming right in behind him. A number of inmates have graduated, of sorts, from the DAWGS in Prison to leave the Forestry Camp to productive jobs, in many cases working with animals, on the outside. Probably there is no greater success for the program than a man they called Popeye Lyons. Lyons had spent more than two decades, off and on, in jail before he found the DAWGS program, or it found him, depending on point of view. I woke up in my rst year in the DAWGS program, Lyons wrote in a letter to Christy. Lyons detailed that he had to change his attitude and outlook and shed, in a way, his skin. Everything changed in my life to be able to care for one of Gods precious creatures. They have to learn patience and how to work with all kinds of people, Christy said. This program is about training and education for dogs and inmates. We are trying to provide a permanent loving home for the dogs and skills for the inmates. As well as linking adopters to just the right dog. My mom was looking for a dog, said Alex Hartseld of Port St. Joe. Shes a little older and doesnt get around as well and we were looking for a smaller dog. We found this one a sprightly hound mix online. Were excited to get him. This is perfect for her. When you think you can get a trained dog that saves a lot of money. LocalThe Star| B5 TIM CROFt T | The StarAngel came to the Humane Society an abandoned animal with a serious case of mange, malnutrition and an eye problem requiring surgery. Today she is healthy and heading to a new home in Panama City. DAWGS from page B1 Transplanting poinsettias RROY LEE c CARt TERCounty extension director

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LocalB6 | The Star Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847CALL TODAY! Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn CareRobert PelcMowing Service227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction Wood Works(In shed behind store 2284 Hwy 98 W.) WOOD WORKSMALL PROJECTSFURNITURE REPAIRODD JOBS MIKE (850) 348.9509 OR HAROLD (850) 227.6975 Dri Brite 850-229-9663Free Estimates! 15 Years of Service!Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction Professional Crasman HENRY HESTER CRAFTSMAN 850-227-5799 HesterHomes@fairpoint.net www.myprofessionalcrasman.com Licensed General Contractor RG291103544 24 Years Experience bobgilbert54@gmail.com Thursday, January 12, 2012 CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 12, 2012 The Star | B6 76115S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No.: 2011-CA-000394 Division#: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft and Theresa Faye Croft a/k/a Theresa F. Croft a/k/a Teresa Croft, Husband and Wife; Unknown Tenants in Possession #l, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grant76109S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2009-CA-000438 Division: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH BURKHART and CARL BURKHART, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH BURKHART; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARL BURKHART, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on December 16, 2011, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 188 WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 188 NEEDLE GRASS WAY, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse on January 26, 2012 at 11:00am E.T. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of December, 2011. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 76079S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.; 23-2009-CA-000588 RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WARD, DANIEL ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2009-CA000588 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, WARD, DANIEL, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of, on the 2nd day of February, 2012, the following described property: LOT 21 OF SUNSET VILLAGE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 19, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 7th day of December, 2011 REBECCA L (BECKY) NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, SUITE 700 100 WEST CYPRESS CREEK ROAD, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision fo certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at PO Box 826, Marianna, FL 32448, 850718-0026, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Jan 12, 18, 2012 76065S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 11-197CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. CARLA S. PATTERSON, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 20, 2011 and entered in Civil Case No. 11-197CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and CARLA S. PATTERSON is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 26th day of January, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: EXHIBIT A Description: Lots 1 thru 5 and Tract A, Block M, Howard Creek Properties, unrecorded subdivision of a portion of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, and a portion of Section 6, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida. Thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East along the South line of said Southeast Quarter of Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 232.89 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 331.90 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 197.22 feet; said arc having a chord of 197.16 feet bearing North 27 degrees 47 minutes 03 seconds West; thence North 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds West for 224.90 feet; thence South 59 degrees 41 minutes 14 seconds West for 218.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds East for 224.90 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 2016.30 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 177.98 feet, said arc having a chord of 177.92 feet bearing South 27 degrees 47 minutes 03 seconds East; thence South 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds East for 227.39 feet; thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East for 241.76 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT Lot 3, Block M Description: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East along the South line of said Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 564.79 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 105.13 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 26 degrees 36 minutes 12 seconds West for 105.12 feet, to the Point of Beginning. Thence South 62 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West for 218.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2016.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 83.1 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 29 degrees 07 minutes 56 seconds West for 83.10 feet; thence North 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds West for 12.40 feet; thence North 59 degrees 41 minutes 14 seconds East for 218.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds East for 12.40 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 92.09 feet, the chord of said arc bearing South 29 degrees 07 minutes 56 seconds East for 92.09 feet to the Point of Beginning. DATED this 21st day of December, 2011 REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 6125S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000260 RBC BANK (USA) F/K/A RBC CENTURA BANK Plaintiff, vs. OUELLETTE, ROBERT, ET AL Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ROBERT DONALD OUELLETTE, JR. AKA ROBERT D. QUELLETTE, JR., 1101 CONSTITUTION DRIVE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 ROBERT DONALD OUELLETTE, JR. AKA ROBERT D. OUELLETTE, JR., 519 MAINE AVE., PANAMA CITY, FL 32401 AMY CREWS OUELLETTE, 1101 CONSTITUTION DRIVE, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 AMY CREWS OUELLETTE, 519 MAINE AVE., PANAMA CITY, FL 32401 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gulf County, Florida: LOT EIGHT (8) BLOCK 97 OF UNIT NO. 4, ST. JOESEPHS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 40 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and the file original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or on or before January 23, 2012; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the in the Complaint. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 15th day of December, 2011. REBECCA L. (BECKY) NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at PO BOX 826, MARIANNA, FL 32448, 850-718-0026. If hearing or voice impaired contact (TDD) (800) 955-8771 via Florida Relay System. Jan 5, 12, 2012 76047 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 11 CA 000251CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TROY L EWIS FAIRCHILD COLLEEN WINONIA FAIRCHILD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, et al Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 20, 2011, and entererd in 11 CA 000251CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, is the Plaintiff and TROY LEWIS FAIRCHILD; COLLEEN WINONA FAIRCHILD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant (s). Rebecca Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 ET on January 26, 2012, following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, so wit: LOTS 2 AND 3, BLOCK 10, LESS THE SOUTH 25 FEET OF LOT 3, BLOCK 10 CORRECTIVE PLAT OF TWIN LAKES, ACCORDING TOTHE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of December, 2011. Rebecca L Norris Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402; Phone: 850747-5327; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771; Email: ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org Jan 5, 12, 2012

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 12, 2012 The Star | B7 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 76235S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEEN JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 11-92PR IN RE: ESTATE OF SUSAN ELIZABETH ANDERSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Susan Elizabeth Anderson, deceased, whose date of death was November 26, 2011, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 1598, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims 76207S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.10-037PR IN RE: ESTATE OF BESSIE BEATRICE REVELL Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of BESSIE BEATRICE REVELL, deceased, File Number is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three (3) months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 12, 2012. Personal Representatives: Joyce E. Sweazy 658 Madison St. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representatives: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850)-227-1159 January 12, 19, 2012 76141S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 11-79PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES HOWARD WARD, SR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of James Howard Ward, Sr., deceased, whose date of death was September 11, 2011, and the last four digits of whose social security number are 3427, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 12, 2012. Personal Representative: Daniel L. Ward 406 Catalpa St. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson Jr. Attorney for Daniel L. Ward FL Bar No: 261629 528 6th St. P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227 7800 Fax: (850) 227 7878 Jan 12, 19, 2012 76127S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1112-05 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: PIPE AS INDICATED ON SPECIFICATION SHEETS Please place YOUR COMPANY NAME, SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER on the outside of your envelope, and provide three copies of your proposal. Bids must be submitted to and specifications may be obtained from the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 by 4:30 p.m., E.T. on Friday, January 27, 2012. Bids will be opened at this same location on Monday, January 30, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Any questions concerning this bid should be directed to Don Butler, Gulf County Administrator at (850) 229-6106 or (850) 227-8971. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA /s/ Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 ees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGSPROPERTY TO: Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft, WHOSE RESIDENCE IS: 1403 Dewitt Street, Panama City, FL 32401 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT 9, BLOCK I, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17E. ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE, RUN S. 89 DEGREES 59W. ALONG THE SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 58W. FOR 141.42 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N. 62 DEGREES 20W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 85 DEGREES 19W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 200.35 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 439.00 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID CORN GRIFFIN STREET; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59E. ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A NONTANGENT CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 17 DEGREES 21, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 82 DEGREES 46E. FOR 53.40 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 53.61 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N. 01 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 403.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 1.94 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND BEING SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING 60 FOOT PRIVATE ROAD, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59W. ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 652.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 499.32 FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N.00 DEGREES 00W, 60.00 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY, NORTHERLY, AND WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 497.94 FEET; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 456.59 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 25.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 75 DEGREES 40E. 99.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 101.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 144.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 92 DEGREES 07 , AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 30E. 341.34 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 381.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE, THENCE N. 00 DEGREES 00W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 59E. 56.57 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17E. ALONG SAID EAST LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 59W. 141.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 157.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 00E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 12.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 93 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 57W. 256.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 287.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 84 DEGREES 59W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 90.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 75 DEGREES 40W. 59.61 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 56 DEGREES 19W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 432.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 367.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 81 DEGREES 11, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 08 DEGREES 34W. 477.23 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 519.54 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 81 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 244.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 334.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 61 DEGREES 18E. 228.98 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 233.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 41 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 146.20 FEET, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 65 DEGREES 38E. 120.56 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.26 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 155.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 45 DEGREES 38E. 217.35 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 240.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 18.56 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S. 90 DEGREES 00W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 17.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 95.46 FEET; A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 45 DEGREES 38W. 133.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 147.78 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 206.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 48 DEGREES 41, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 65 DEGREES 38W. 170.03 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 175.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 41 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 274.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 40, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 61 DEGREES 18W. 187.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 191.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 81 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 175.00 FEET; THENCE N. 42 DEGREES 54E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 38.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 210.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49 , AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 25 DEGREES 59E. 122.20 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N.09 DEGREES 04E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 78.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 487.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 55, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N.06 DEGREES 20W. 185.24 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 186.37 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S.90 DEGREES 00W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 63.28 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 18, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 07 DEGREES 45E. 178.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURJE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 158.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE S.09 DEGREES 04W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 76.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 25 DEGREES 59W. 87.29 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 88.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 42 DEGREES 54W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 111.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 85 DEGREES 44, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 06 DEGREES 46E., 561.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 639.03 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.56 DEGREES 19E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 120.10 FEET; THENCE S.57 DEGREES 15 W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 272.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DE-SAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 286 DEGREES 15, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 32 DEGREES 44E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.81 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC; THENCE N. 57 DEGREES 15 E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 298.97 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 153.33 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 496.00 FEET; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 454.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 00 DEGREES 00E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 452.89 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. more commonly known as 131 Corn Griffin Street, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30) days after tiie first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th day of December, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS Circuirt and County Courts By: Tina Money Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 PsychicReadingsby Miss Ann Bay Countys #1 Psychic Call today for a better tomorrow... 850-215-9966 Advice on Love, Business & Marriage Palm Readings $10. 3707 West 23rd St. D. Stephens Concrete Services,LLCQuality, Affordable Concrete Work and Small Tractor Work 38 Yrs. Experience, Licensed, Insured Residential & Commercial Office: 850-674-5887 Home: 850-674-5026 Cell: (850) 643-1723 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

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B8| The Star Thursday, January 12, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 BeachsideFOR RENTMEXICO BEACHVillas of Mexico Beach 3706 Hwy 98, New Condos Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 Furnished 3bd/3ba 604 Fortner Avenue Duplex Furnished 2bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIALST. JOE BEACH113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98, St. Joe Beach Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98, St. Joe Beach Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIALWINDMARK BEACH212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse-Unit #4 Fully Furnished 2bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse-Unit #6 Fully Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL Carrs Bungalow#2 155 Beach Street 1bd/1ba Carrs Bungalow #3 159 Beach Street 1bd/1ba 3bd/2baCAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision Unfurnished 4bd PORT ST. JOE1903 Juniper Avenue Unfurnished 3bd/2ba 1206 Palm Blvd Partially Furnished 1.5 bd Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Jones Homestead Partially Furnished 2bd/2ba101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALSDOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEMonthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$8501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$4252 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark ............................................................$4501 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBEDFurnished, Lanark ..........................................$450 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-4915,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 230 Reid Avenue +/756 sf; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale407 Reid Avenue+/4988 sf: 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $349,500401 Reid Avenue+/5400 sf: Retail space; $165,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for termsLoggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; inquire for terms; $399,000 71 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms SO LD wntownApalac LEASED mo mod gross UNDER CONTRACT as, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on sit e-p a 000 SO LD building in Ma ailforlease;In Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster or call 850-747-5019 HELP WANTEDPRIME RESTAURANT INC.Kitchen Manager or Asst. Kitchen Manager with Culinary experience. Send Resume to: 1302 Hwy 98 #3G Mexico Beach, FL 32456 1 br, 1 ba cabin on Chipola River in Scottsferry, Florida. Exterior constructed with bat and board cypress, two porches and metal roof. Interior ceilings and walls tongue and groove juniper, floor ceramic tiles. Cabin sits on a 1/2 acre with an 8x10 pump house, 12x20 screened in cook shed and 12x18 covered boat slip. Concrete boat ramp also on property, $115,000 call 850-674-5026 Wewahitchka-156 Patrick St. 2br 2ba Single Family, Fixerupper. Owner Financing or Cash Discount. $500 Down $369/mo. Call 803-978-1540 or 803-403-9555 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Buell S3 Thunderbolt Motorcycle, Harley Davidson Motor, runs great and garage kept, 17,000 miles. $3,500!! Call 850-271-5761 and leave a message. House Wanted in Port St JoeMinimal Needs At least 1 br, 1 bath. (not an efficiency) w/ internet. A quiet and secure location. Garage a plus! Writer and mature seminary graduate who is needing a place to finish editing books. 850-502-1803 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $700 month + deposit 301-265-5368 FOR RENT: 3 br, 2 ba, 14 x 70 Mobile Home. C/H/A, no pets $450 month + $400 dd 850-229-6495 Wewa, 2 bed, 1 bath in small park. $400 a mo. + $400 security dep. Small RV For Rent good for one person. $110 a week. Includes water, sewer & electric. Call: 850-639-5721 Mexico Beach Light & airy 2bd/2.5ba furnishd TH. Beachside, Tyndall side of town. Central air, W/D. Fans throughout. Reserved prkg. Avail Feb 1. $950/mo + $800 dep. Call Brenda 850-227-5380 Text FL92300 to 56654 HOME FOR RENT AT WILLIS LANDINGA Nature Lovers Paradise!! Quality Custom home 9ft Ceilings, Hardwood floors, tile, kitchen bar.Located next to Willis Landing Boat ramp on the Brothers River. Located 10 miles south of Wewahitchka and only 18 miles north of beautiful Mexico Beach and only 32 miles from Panama City. The Apalachicola River is only a 15 minute boat ride.1,600 SF 3 Bed/2 Bath $800/month. Call 850-689-8881or e-mail monique@crestviewsite.c om Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Creative ServicesGraphic DesignerFor comm. print/sign bus. Job duties incl designing print, signage & marketing items, manage digital output for pre press & prod. Cust. serv. skills req. Mac OS X Adobe Creative Suite, QuarkXPress skills req. Full benefits pkg. send resume to ramseysprinting@fairpoint.net Web ID#: 34190356 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 GeneralInfant/ Toddler CaregiversNeeded to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP Web ID#: 34193004 PSJ690 Madison Sat. Jan 14th 8am-1pmYard SaleFurniture, clothes and dishes Brunswick billiards regulation size table. One inch marble slate, leather pockets with solid oak ball and claw legs. All accessories included $3000 Call 850-674-5026 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 76173S PUBLIC NOTICE Request for Qualifications The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is seeking qualifications from independent Certified Public Accountants to provide audit services in accordance with Government Auditing Standards for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2012, with options to renew. Interested parties should request an RFQ package via email to dbentley@gcwb.org. Responses are due by 4:00 pm CST, February 15, 2012. January 12, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 12, 2012. Personal Representative: John D. Bullington 1217 Colonial Ave. Alexandria, VA 22314 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson Jr. Attorney for John D. Bullington FL Bar No: 261629 528 6th St. P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227 7800 Fax: (850) 227 7878 January 12, 19, 2012 76181S LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF LOGIC AND ACCURACY TEST PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY ELECTION JANUARY 19, 2012 GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA The Logic and Accuracy test for the M100 Tabulation System and the Ivotronic Touch Screen System to be used for the January 31, 2012 Presidential Preference Primary Election will be held at the Gulf County Supervisor of Elections Office, 401 Long Ave, Port St Joe on January 19, 2012 -9:00 AM EST. This test is open to the public. Linda Griffin Supervisor of Elections Gulf County, Florida January 12, 2012 76259S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-415 DR In Re the Marriage of: RONALD JAY LUCHT Petitioner/Husband, and LESLIE JEAN LUCHT, Respondent/Wife. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: LESLIE JEAN LUCHT Whose last known address is: 410 Seventh Street Mexico Beach, Florida 32456 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clinton T. McCahill, attorney for the Petitioner, whose address is 305 6h Street, Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456 on or before February 12, 2012 and file the original with the clerk of this court at or before service on the Petitioners attorney or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. The Petitioner will be seeking to be awarded the following personal property in this Dissolution of Marriage action: 2011 GMC Pickup, 2008 Harley Davidson Motorcycle, 1993 Prolinc Boat and a Golf Cart. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedures, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanction, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Lynn M. Barnes Deputy Clerk January 12, 15, 26 February 2, 2012 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds!