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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03827
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 01-05-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03827

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, JANUARY 5 2012 By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer There are a host of species in the Gulf of Mexico that have yet to be discovered and observed. Were in an area that you dont have to travel to the other side of the world to nd something youve never seen before, said Carol Cox, a volunteer for the Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association (MBARA). The main thing is that weve got a lot of unusual species here and theres probably a lot out there that still needs to be discovered. Cox, an avid diver and underwater photographer, learned rst-hand you never know what youre going to nd at the bottom of the ocean while conducting a research dive for the MBARA on the Progress Energy Reef off Mexico Beach. Cox noticed she had photographed something unusual after examining underwater photos from the dive. The oddball creature in the photo was actually a rare species of shrimp that Cox documented in its natural environment for the rst time. Just about every dive we do, we log in the marine life we observe and the condition of the reef, said Cox, who volunteers for the MBARA and frequently tracks the conditions of reefs off Mexico Beach. The rst photo I took of one of these (shrimp), I didnt know I photographed it. I thought I was photographing a seashell. She knew it was something she had never seen before, so Cox sent her photos in for a second opinion. But when her second opinion didnt know what it was either, they called in the big guns. Enter Mary Wicksten, a biology professor from Texas A&M University specializing in invertebrate studies. Wicksten was so intrigued by the discovery she made the trip to Mexico Beach in October 2010 to observe the rarely observed shrimp species for herself. They contacted me and I said Wowee gee-wiz! and got in touch with Carol, Wicksten said. The rst discoveries (of these By Tim Croft Star News Editor Linda Grif n was rst elected Gulf County Supervisor of Elections in 2000, the year of the protracted recount between presidential candidates Al Gore and George W. Bush. Grif n will head toward retirement with another signi cant election cycle in 2012, with another presidential election and of ces from municipal to county to state to U.S. Senate up for grabs. In with a bang and out with a bang, Grif n chuckled this week as she talked about her decision to retire and not seek reelection after four terms and 16 years in of ce. This is my last year. Life is too short. The older I get the less things matter. Life is about more than having things. I always said I wanted to retire at 65 or 66. I will be 67 when I retire. Grif n has presided over county elections during a period of much churning in the election process. Oversight has increased, machinery has changed, time-tables, precincts and districts have been altered. The landscape in 2012 barely resembles that of 2000. Gone are the chalkboards at the county courthouse, replaced by computers and print outs and modems. There have been so many changes since I was elected, Grif n said. The election world has been turned upside down. We have been gearing up for (this year). This will be a busy year. What a year to go out on. The year starts at the end of this month with the Republican Presidential Primary. The primary will be held Jan. 31 and all registered Republican voters in the county will vote on Primary Day at their designated precinct. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET. Early voting begins Jan. 21 and runs through Jan. 28. By Tim Croft Star News Editor For a project that appears all but dead, the Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center continues to garner plenty of attention. The nal few weeks of 2011 offered a urry of activity as the developer of the proposed woody biomass energy plant in Port St. Joe issued its rst public comments on the project it abandoned during the fourth quarter and several lawsuits were led challenging the state and local permitting of the project. During a meeting on Nov. 29, a consultant for Rentech Inc., the West Coast-based renewable energy company developing the NWFREC noti ed Port St. Joe city of cials the company was pulling out of the project because of the inability to secure nancing for the $200 million construction phase. A press release announcing Rentechs intentions was to be released the following day, city ofcials were told, but for several weeks no of cial word came from Rentech, leaving opponents and proponents of the project guessing. However, a press release issued just prior to Christmas, detailing Rentechs activities for the fourth quarter of 2011, spells out the thinking behind the companys decision to pull stakes from Port St. Joe. The Companys energy strategy includes reduced spending on project development and (research and development) , the release said in part. Rentech does not intend on its own to fund development activities but may coinvest alongside partners. For example, Rentech may seek to invest in projects that would combine Rentechs biomass gasi cation technologies with thirdparty technology for the production of renewable fuels or power The Rentech investment in such an instance would be to fund the commercial deployment of a gasi er the Port St. Joe project was set to be Rentechs rst commercial application of its biomass gasi cation process which would require $30-$40 million in investment by the company contingent on a complete nancing package for such a project, the release stated. Rentech project development should not exceed a few million dollars per year and the number of projects will be limited, the release stated. The company also would no longer be involved with projects that relied on U.S. Grif n gears for nal election cycle this year Abandoned biomass project challenged See LAWSUIT A6 See ELECTION A2 Divers capture the of the gulf mysteries PHOTOS BY CAROL COX Top, Texas A&M Biologist Mary Wicksten made the trip to Mexico Beach to observe the rare species of shrimp. Here, Wicksten observes a saw blade shrimp. Left, Coxs research and documentation on these arrow shrimp were also featured in a scienti c journal article. See SHRIMP A10 YEAR 74, NUMBER 12 Commissioners urged to be proactive on rescue mission By Tim Croft Star News Editor Port St. Joe city commissioners were pressed Tuesday night on what they envisioned for the future of the Panama City Rescue Mission satellite of ce. Commissioners were strongly urged by a resident to be proactive in nipping potential negative impacts on the community. Port St. Joe resident Christine McElroy addressed commissioners during their regular bimonthly meeting. And, she said, she would be back again and again until she believed commissioners had taken steps to provide comfort to the community concerning the rescue mission. Last month, commissioners approved a business license for the satellite of ce at 5 Star Collision in North Port St. Joe. The property for the of ce, which rescue mission of cials said is solely for referrals, is zoned commercial. Mayor Mel Magidson reiterated on Tuesday the commission had little choice in the decision. There had been an application for a business license submitted, and all processes were followed. We had no right to deny it, Magidson said. McElroy referred to media reports of the past year concerning issues with the rescue mission in Panama City. She noted the number of people served by the mission is a fraction of the people who idle around the mission in downtown Panama City. McElroy also held up a study on the homeless population in Florida and noted there is no documented problem in Gulf County. McElroy posed a series of questions to each commissioner Commissioner Bill Kennedy was not present because of illness concerning the rescue mission. In particular, McElroy asked if commissioners would approve a dormitorystyle rescue mission facility in Port St. Joe and whether they were willing to pass ordinances to prevent growth from the satellite of ce. She expressed a concern, stated by several residents over the previous months, for the city not to become the magnet the Panama City Rescue Mission has been for homeless people, vagrants and criminals from other areas. I am asking you to be proactive, McElroy said. I think that is what the citizens of Port St. Joe deserve. If we have zero (homeless) it shouldnt be a problem to pass an ordinance to prevent the import of people (who could create mischief and crime in the city). Commissioners Rex Buzzett, Lorinda Gingell and Bo Patterson all said they would not be in favor of a dormitory-style facility a position in keeping with their previously stated concerns and views of the satellite of ce, which commissioners want as a referral of ce only. Magidson declined to be part of what he called McElroys inquisition. He said the commission properly acted in issuing the business license, was aware of concerns, which commissioners share in part, and would be vigilant in ensuring safety. I think you are making assumptions, Magidson said, adding McElroy stated the absence of a homeless problem as fact but was assuming the presence of the satellite of ce would bring problems to the city. McElroy pressed her point, saying she had been told that rescue mission ofcials wanted to create dormitory-style facility in Port St. Joe. This is the place they want to come, she said. Commissioners unanimously agreed that they would consider any reasonable ordinance put in front of them to ensure compliance with their wishes on See MISSION A10 Nobles Dance Studio B1 Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A8 Sports ........................................... A9 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B4 Classi eds .................................... B6-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, January 5, 2012 Weems Medical Center East provides primary care services, urgent care services and rotating specialty care services. The rst lecture will be on January 6, 2012 at 5:30pm. David Dixon, DO of North Fl Womens Care will be discussing Abnormal Menstrual Bleeding: A Review of the Causes and a Discussion of New Minimally Invasive Therapies Join us for a series of physician lectures to be held at our Weems Medical Center East in Carrabelle. Ofce hours are 8a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Call 850-697-2345 for an appointment today! Walk-ins are welcome. Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. 50% Off Fitz & Floyd Old World Christmas Ornaments M. Bagnell Christmas Full Service Local Florist with over 35 Years Experience. Billy CarrOwner David Goodson Manager Welcome Back Peggy Joe Stripling & Ann Guffey Christmas Ornaments M. Bagnell Christmas Christmas Ornaments M. Bagnell Christmas Great Gifts Tyler Candles Wilton Armetale On Jan. 21-22, early voting will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET at the Supervisor of Elections Of ce on Long Avenue in Port St. Joe and from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. CT at the Charles Whitehead Public Library in Wewahitchka. On Jan. 23-27, early voting will continue from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET at Grif ns ofce in Port St. Joe and from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT at the Charles Whitehead Public Library in Wewahitchka. During the nal day of early voting, Jan. 28, the hours will be 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET at Grif ns of ce and 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. CT at the public library in Wewahitchka. Whether voting in the primary or not, Grif n and assistant supervisor of election John Hanlon recommended voters ensure their registration information is correct as the year unfolds. Voters should make sure all their voter registration information is correct, Grif n said. Especially their address, where they live, they need to make sure we have the correct information. The city of Port St. Joe will have two seats up for grabs in the spring those of Commissioners Rex Buzzett and Lorinda Gingell and the city of Wewahitchka also will have two seats in play, those held by Commissioners Ralph Fisher and Jimmy Nunery. The terms of county commissioners, the seats of Carmen McLemore, Warren Yeager and Bill Williams expire this year, with Yeager already indicating he will not seek re-election. In addition, all constitutional of cers Property Appraiser, Tax Collector, Supervisor of Elections, Sheriff, Superintendent of Schools and Clerk of Circuit Court must stand for election ,and the School Board seats of Danny Little and Linda Wood also will be in play. County Judge Tim McFarland must also stand for reelection. Beyond that, voters will elect a president and vice president this year, weigh in on Bill Nelsons U.S. Senate seat and that of Congressman Steve Southerland and decide on the future placeholder for Florida House. This is going to be a very busy election cycle for us, Hanlon said. ELECTION from page A1 Bridal products and services. Valuable information on planning your big day plus more! The Wedding Planner will be inserted in the News Herald, The St Joe Star & Apalachicola Times. Additional copies will be made available at this years Bridal Expo to be held at Edgewater Beach Resort. 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Star Staff Report The Gulf County Legislative Delegation will be holding a public hearing in Port St. Joe on Thursday, Jan. 5, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. ET. The hearing will be held in the Board of County Commissioners meeting room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building adjacent to the County Courthouse. All residents and elected of cials are invited to attend. This hearing will allow the citizens the opportunity to meet their legislators, discuss concerns, ask questions and offer comments for the 2012 Legislative Session. Star Staff Report Gulf County Emergency Management in coordination with Be Ready Alliance Coordinating for Emergencies (BRACE) announced this week the kickoff of the 2012 Community Partner Initiative. Meetings beginning Jan. 10 in Gulf and Bay counties will kickoff the North Florida campaign. Additional meetings will be held in Okaloosa and Walton counties on Jan. 26 and in Franklin County on Feb. 7. The Gulf County meeting will be held at 3 p.m. ET on Tuesday, Jan. 10 at the Gulf County Emergency Operations Center located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. in Port St. Joe. The meeting is free and open to the public and local organizations and businesses are encouraged to attend. The goal of this unique partnership is to enhance disaster readiness and response capabilities of community, faith-based organizations and businesses throughout Gulf County, said Marshall Nelson, director of the countys Emergency Management Department. We are urging all local groups to sign up for this excellent opportunity today. During 2012 the Community Partner Initiative will be working together with county emergency management departments and numerous agencies and organizations to strengthen relationships and disaster preparedness, response and recovery capabilities in the Florida counties of Gulf, Bay, Franklin, Okaloosa and Walton For important meeting registration information and schedules please go to the Community Partner Initiative website at www. drc-group.com/project/cpi. html. BRACE prepares the community for disasters County delegation to hold hearing

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, January 5, 2012 http://baymugshots.com/category/agency/panama-city-police-department / Paid for by: Concerned Citizen of Port St. Joe. Address 609 Allen Ave., Rescue mission Panama City Age 19 Race W Sex M Date 11/30/2010 Offense simple asslt intent threat to do violence, fraud-imperson false id given to leo Agency PCPD Address 609 Allen Ave., Rescue Mission Panama City Age 35 Race W Sex M Date 7/6/2011 Offense failure to appear-violation of probation-child abuse, child support Agency Address 609 Allen Ave., Rescue Mission Panama City Age 64 Race W Sex M Date 9/15/2011 Offense fraud utter false bank bill note check draft Agency BCSO Address 609 Allen Ave., Panama City Age 33 Race W Sex M Date 7/18/2011 Offense possession of narcotics equipment, display of cancelled or revoked drivers license, nonmoving violation attach registration license plate not as, drugs-produce produce methamphetamine, narcotic equip-possess manufacture deliver, possession of more than 14 grams of meth Agency PCPD Address 609 Allen Ave., transient Panama City Age 46 Race W Sex M Date 11/9/2010 Offense drugs-possess wit sell etc other schedule iii or iv, opium or deriv-sell schedule iii, evidence-destroying tamper with or fabricate physical, resisting an without violence Agency PCPD Address 609 Allen Ave., Panama City Age 45 Race W Sex M Date 7/11/2011 Offense sex offender violation fail to register as required Agency PCPD Address 609 Allen Ave., rescue Mission Panama City Age 37 Race W Sex M Date 12/4/2010 Offense fugitive from justice: escape Agency Address 609 Allen Ave., Panama City Age 57 Race W Sex M Date 12/6/2010 Offense mo: open alcoholic beverage, mo: aggressive solicitation Agency PCPD Address 609 Allen Ave., Panama City Age 36 Race W Sex M Date 9/20/2010 Offense battery Agency PCPD Address 609 Allen Ave., Panama City Age 37 Race W Sex M Date 12/4/2010 Offense trespassing fail to leave property upon order by owner Agency BCSO

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Thursday, January 5, 2012 Opinion A4 | The Star Folks at the ofce tend to take their vacation time around the holidays. Its actually a good time to get a lot of work done if you are running behind. My next door ofce neighbor Duane and I were enjoying lunch in his ofce. Weve been friends and worked together for more than twenty years. Duane was having a salad with balsamic vinaigrette dressing and a handful of walnuts. He had been watching the movie Forks Over Knives multiple times over the last week or so. The movie has a cult following of sorts and makes the claim that possibly all degenerative diseases can be controlled or reversed by not eating animal-based and processed foods. Hell get over it. I was eating kind of healthy too, with my left hand anyway. In my left hand, I had a bag of Roman Meal Sungrain Whole Wheat bread with 24 grams of whole grains per serving. Its a good source of ber. The bread bag had a picture of a Roman soldier on it. I like it; I used to eat it with my Papa (Grandfather) when we would go on our adventures. As I ate my Roman Soldier bread a slice at a time, I was using my right hand to jab a black plastic fork into a can of Armour Barbecue Flavored Vienna Sausages. Armour Barbecue Flavored Vienna Sausages have a thick, rich barbecue sauce that is seasoned to perfection and bursting with avor! Thats what it says on the can. The instructions on the can also note that you should refrigerate after opening. Who opens a can of Vienna sausages and doesnt eat them all? If you put them in the refrigerator, that stuff that they are in would get all thick and you would have Vienna sausage aspic. As I alternated bread and barbecue Vienna sausage bites, we were talking about how it was the perfect holiday meal. We got off on Christmas meals and parties and what we remembered about growing up. It was a good conversation. Both of our fathers enjoyed cooking breakfast and felt it necessary to cook every piece of meat and every egg when preparing breakfast for the family. We discussed fried bologna in the morning and how that it was only proper to have the thick slices. Duane grew up in the Lincoln Park area of Detroit, one of six brothers. His dad was in the auto industry and apparently was a great fellow. I never met Duanes dad before he passed away; after hearing about him through the years, I really would have liked to meet him. Then our conversation moved on to parties and such. Duane shook his head in disgust and said that his mother and her sisters would have a Limburger cheese party once a month to get together and talk about things (and maybe drink a beer). It sounded like his mothers Limburger cheese parties were similar to present day book clubs, bunko and sewing groups. In other words, they were an excuse to get together and talk and in some cases pop a cork. I understand this. Duane told me that he would come home from school, open the front door and say something similar to Oh my goodness, they are doing it again. He didnt use those exact words. I love cheese, but Ive only smelled Limburger once. I understood what he was saying. The parties took place in the family dining room and Duane said the best he could do was throw his books in the front door and run back outside. His brothers did the same the thing. He even noted that on warm days when the door was open, the smell of the Limburger squeezed through the screen door and could be smelled as he was walking home from school. Duane noted, I didnt even go home for dinner on the days she had those cheese parties. We covered our faces and snuck in after dark. A mother with six boys deserved to breathe every once in a while, I think I get it. Maybe breathe is not the best choice of words. The Limburger cheese parties were exactly like the book clubs, bunko and sewing groups. Stinky cheese versus stinky boys, I guess she decided that once a month she would cut the cheese and take a break. Read more stories online at www. CranksMyTractor.com. As international trends go, 2011 was the year ordinary people stood up and were counted, seeking real sway over the governance of their lives. From the Arab Spring to the Occupy Wall Street movement, events of the past year were hued in the color of the less fortunate, the dispossessed, hoping and acting to bring balance to the scales between governed and government, between the haves and havenots. While certainly not of equal value or importance, 2012 should inspire a renewed commitment by the county powers that be the Board of County Commissioners to bring more fairness and representation to the ordinary county voter. Commissioners should proceed full speed ahead on county-wide voting. The county does not possess a representative form of government. When each voter has just a 20 percent say on the makeup of the board that guides their government, the BOCC, representative government can be counted absent. When a county commissioner must answer to just 20 percent of the voting populace, must gain a majority of the vote from a population fragment of a mere 3,000 while the county population bulges over 15,000, that is not representative government. When representation from county government is derived in stark contrast to the rest of the governmental structure all voters in both cities have a say in every commission seat; each voter in the county votes for constitutional ofcers full representative government remains elusive. This is a fractured system that breeds competing agendas and missions, one that has led to questionable spending decisions and a sort of gridlock that seems to have permeated the BOCC this past year. No better example was provided than a proposed RV ordinance. Over several months commissioners held public workshops and meetings as they inched toward the drafting of an ordinance to restrict the use and deployment of RVs in the county. Commissioners took a county-wide approach but from a single-member posture. While trying to craft an ordinance that was, effectively, a one-size ts all, commissioners ignored the reality that this is not a homogenous county. Commissioners on the south end, particularly the two representing much of the south end tourist corridor, were listening to their constituents while trying to get a handle on a plethora of RVs popping up in St. Joe Beach, Beacon Hill, St. Joseph Peninsula and Indian Pass. As was stated by one of those commissioners repeatedly, there was a need to provide some protection in tourist areas of the county regarding how RVs were set up, what areas would be open to RVs long-term and how RVs were used. That stance and goal, though, was not a t for much of the rest of the county, particularly inland areas where RVs, motor homes, mobile homes, whatever the label, are a part of living in Gulf County and pretty much always have been. Therefore the two commissioners on the countys north end were hearing from their constituents that, hey, this RV ordinance seems an overstep by government. And instead of seeking an ordinance that would address all concerns, all areas of the county, commissioners were undermined by their competing agendas and the feedback from constituents that fed those agendas. So it was no surprise that in the end, commissioners, with north end commissioners leading the charge, pulled the plug on the ordinance. After months of meetings and drafting the ordinance, all at taxpayer expense, commissioners ended up passing on nothing but frustration. From this corner, Commissioner Tan Smiley was correct when he took ofce last year and insisted that commissioners be judged by their actions, not the number of their district or who held the seat before. Commissioner Ward McDaniel is not Billy Traylor, the man he replaced. Smiley is not Nathan Peters Jr., the man he replaced when voters thought they were bringing political change in 2010. But the system Traylor and Peters helped perpetuate for over two decades in ofce a fact made clear when an attorney researched the viability of a legal ght for countywide voting; noting the delays on the issue by prior commissions remains in 2012. The faces, ideas and perspectives might have changed, but voters are still not fully represented with each voter allowed to vote on every BOCC seat on the commission. While a court ght would be dicey, the attorney said, it was not one to set aside. The key issue was voting trends in 2008. They changed dramatically between 2004 when voters once again overwhelmingly supported county-wide representation and 2008, as commissioners dithered. The coming year offers an opportunity to change those dynamics. Voting trends in 2012, as well as the end of redistricting, could alter the dynamics, the price tag, the potential for a winnable challenge, the odds of opposition to that challenge, But no matter how it lines up the rst domino that must fall is the BOCC putting the county in position for change, for returning full power to the voters of the county. The price tag of a court ght can be handled if done judiciously, budgeting funds just as rainy day and contingency funds are created. Commissioners could have taken taxpayer dollars expended last year on an RV ordinance that went nowhere, a EMS ring reversed after a series of public meetings and a dustup over health insurance and TDC spending both of which should have been addressed years ago and provided a tidy nest egg to get court action moving. Commissioners, though, whiffed on the chance to move ahead, as they have each year since 2004. But if events of 2011 proved anything, the clock is ticking for those who would choose to restrict the power of the ordinary citizen and voter. Whole town in on my resolution Keyboard KLATTERINGS Cutting the cheese Putting the power in peoples hands TIM CROFT Star news editor No New Years predictions and/or resolutions from me. Wasnt it Gutenberg, or maybe Gareld, who said, Things at rest tend to stay at rest and things in motion tend to stay in motion? The translation is, people are going to keep on doing what theyve been doing in spite of good intentions, well thought out plans or late December promises made out of desperation, hope or exaggerated beliefs in ones own abilities. Ive tried the dieting resolution. I couldnt pass on the coconut cream pie. I tried the kinder to your neighbors promise. My good neighbors already overlook my many shortcomings. They even kid me about them over the fence. Ive made the get in shape pledge. I dont look good in shorts and that computer enhanced, muscled up guy on the video kept shouting at me! One year, I resoluted to do the vacuuming, dish washing and dusting on a shared basis. Unfortunately, that was the exact January my tennis elbow reared its ugly head. New Years Resolutions are good ideas that most often dont pan out. Maybe we aim too high. It would be like Olive Oil determining she wanted to become the fat lady for a circus; or Pavarotti deciding to become a country singer; or Stevie Wonder trying out for the Green Bay Packers. My 1963 promise to myself was to get a date with Mary Hadley Hayden. I shared my inner most thoughts over some eggnog with Ricky Gene Stafford. My stars and garters, are you completely nuts! Rick, I thought, was a little too quick to sum up the situation. Besides, who died and left him in charge of resolutions! Mary Hadley was the prettiest girl in school. Exactly my point was the way Ricky Gene put it. There had to be a way! I sought out the advice of my older, and much wiser, brother. Leon stared off into space for what seemed like forever before turning back to me. How much money do you have? Its going to take something like the bribe of the century to pull this off! I approached Pam Collins, who was Mary Hadleys good friend, and I think, rst cousin. Pam looked me right in the eye and swallowed hard. Dang! I knew she wasnt going to be much help even before she started laughing. 1963 wasnt going too well for me and we werent even through the rst week! LaRenda Bradeld put her hand on my shoulder in the parking lot our rst day back at school, Kes, good luck with Mary Hadley. Now how did she nd out? I just had this thought a couple of days ago Im going to kill Pam Collins the rst time she shows her face! Buddy Wiggleton caught up with me going into English, Hey, this is going to be better than the time we let the bull loose at the church picnic. I have heard, Yogi leaned over while Miss Clark was digging out Great Expectations, that the prettier they are, the worse they kiss. He said it like this whole thing was a scientic experimentation. Mr. Warren, the school superintendant, ran into me in the gym, I think you might have misunderstood my aim high speech at the beginning of the semester. Daddy strolled down to the barn where I was nishing up with the milking. Son, dating can be a difcult challenge. You might want to start out with some of the girls out this way before you tackle Hubert Haydens daughter. The small town curse had gotten me again! And I was thinking Im through with the News Years hex game forever when I ran slap into Mary Hadley in the lunch line on Thursday. My neck turned six shades of red! I prayed the oor would open up and swallow me. My knees buckled. I went to wishing I had that Frankie Avalon curl or Fabian smile. And I was trying like the dickens to say hello in my most grown-up, manly voice. But there wasnt nothing coming out! Mary Hadley smiled and moved on down the line. Drats! Wed never heard of the Carpe Diem philosophy in 1963. And that suave and debonair stuff only worked in Brylcreem commercials and Cary Grant movies. Mom ironed my best shirt and kept it ready just in case. Mr. John Motheral, who ran the drugstore downtown, was kind enough to tell me the Coke oat was on him if Mary Hadley and I per chance came in together. Frank out at Franks Dairy Bar said basically the same thing. Tommie Hill at the DX Station offered a tank of gas if and when the occasion took place. I was thinking why not take out a billboard for goodness sakes! Or put it on the marquee at the Park Theatre! And oh, by the way, Mr. Clericuzio, who ran the Theatre, had one of the double seats reserved for us because stranger things have happened. Never, in the entire history of New Years resolutions, had a plan gone so awry! So, you can make all the pledges and declarations you want to. I hope and pray they all work out for you. Just please understand why Im kinda doing it one day at a time. And that is not to say that I havent done my share of long-range thinking. I daydreamed about playing shortstop for the St. Louis Cardinals, but I never got so far as to make that a prediction or a resolution. Ive often wondered what it would be like to be rich and famous. But that has never been an overriding consideration. Ive entertained on several occasions running the Boston marathon, but reality always overtakes me before I get too deep into training. I reckon I did hear some of Mr. Warrens speech. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard

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Dr Ivers and Staff wishes you a HAPPY NEW YEAR May 2012 bring you and your loved ones... A year of Health & Wisdom... A year of Peace & Prosperity... And also a year of Love & Laughter. We look forward to seeing you in 2012. 9 am 6 pm Wed & Sat 9 am 2 pm VINCENT IV ER S M.D. www.iversmd.com ALL MAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED Thursday, January 5, 2012 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS Letters A5 | The Star Toy BB gun considered a weapon? Dear Editor: On April 18, 2010, while living in another part of the county, I was arrested for exhibiting a rearm, which is a rst-degree misdemeanor. But according to the legal de nition, which I got from the Florida Senate website, my toy gun didnt qualify as a rearm, which would make sense considering it was a toy BB gun. The neighbor who called the authorities was good friends with another neighbor who had, at that time, charges pending through the State Attorneys of ce. The neighbor said I had a magnum revolver and she was afraid for her life. However, my toy BB gun is clear plastic and does not look like a magnum. When I saw the judge on April 19 at the jail he was about to give me a bond until I told him it was a toy BB gun. The judge said in front of 10 different people that he didnt think I could be charged with what I was charged with. Then he stopped talking and looked up the law but did not nish either way. Then he said he would release me with the condition that I would not have anything in my hands that would be considered a weapon. Then I asked him what I can do about not being able to walk outside my home without being afraid. He told me considering I was seeing the State Attorney on Dec. 20 to make the State Attorney aware of what happened over the weekend. So I did as I was told and the State Attorney became upset. He then read me the same de nition of a rearm that I got from the Florida Senate website. Then he read the de nition for a weapon and said that my toy BB gun was a weapon. After my conversation with the State Attorney, he changed my charge to improper exhibition of a dangerous weapon. So I looked up the law on the internet. As I stated before, what I found was this law gives many examples of weapons, but it did show a toy BB gun as an example of a weapon but it did say etc. This is how I believe they were able to get the law to t this case instead of the case tting the law. Through additional research, I found that the evidence log for my BB gun indicates that the of cer who took it into custody believed it a toy gun. Further, the manufacturer of my BB gun clearly provides labeling indicating the gun is a toy. According to the legal department at Walmart Corp., which sold the BB gun, the toy is sold as a sporting goods item with an age level appropriateness label. Now let me tell you the reason for me having a toy BB gun in my hand in the rst place. You see my moms life and my life have been threatened several times. So when my mom said she was going to the store and was late coming back I got afraid for her life. So I grabbed the only thing I could think of that might help her and that was my toy BB gun. You are asking how would a toy BB gun help, right? Well, I was hoping it would help buy me enough time to help my mom out of whatever anybody was doing to her. Now that you have read what happened to me please keep in my mind if it could be done to me, it could be done to anyone. So please let me ask you one thing: Is this justice or something you or the community should be concerned about? I think so. If you agree let the community know what you think. George M. Strobele St. Joe Beach LETTER TO THE EDITOR By Capt Bob Zales We are individuals, businesses and associations that represent the true fishermen (commercial, recreational and recreational charter) from the five Gulf of Mexico States of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. Collectively, we represent many thousands of fishermen and we are unanimous in our opposition to further funding of any new Catch Share programs in the Gulf of Mexico. The commercial fishing associations and seafood dealers listed here market 80 percent of the reef fish harvested in the Gulf. We are united in our request that new Catch Share Programs in the Gulf of Mexico be put on hold and that no further funding for new Catch Share programs be provided by Congress and/or NOAA/NMFS until a complete analysis of the effects of the current programs is completed. Before we do more damage to the coastal communities of the Gulf we want to know what impacts Catch Share programs are having on Gulf of Mexico jobs, recreational charter boats, commercial fishing vessels, recreational anglers, seafood houses, industry infrastructure, and small industryrelated support businesses. In Florida alone, recreational and commercial fishing accounted for $15.3 billion in sales for 2008. In addition to the negative social and economic impacts on our coastal communities, the amount of discards and discard mortality created by these programs needs careful consideration. A comprehensive study of the social, scientific, and economic impacts of Catch Share programs is the prudent way to address this issue rather than a headlong rush to implement more of these programs to benefit a small class of fishermen. You have heard from the Environmental Defense Fund, their K Street lawyers, and the few so called commercial fishing associations (paid for by EDF), that the Gulf should be exempted from any legislation that restricts funding for new Catch Share programs. EDF and their pseudo-associations represent fewer than 10% of the fishermen and an even smaller percentage of commercial seafood dealers from the Gulf. These people do not speak for the multitude of fishermen in the Gulf of Mexico. Catch Share programs provide no benefit for the resource they serve only to make millionaires of a few and sharecroppers of the many, while reducing overall jobs, harming families, and negatively impacting coastal communities. Until and unless Catch Share programs can be proven to provide benefits to the resource, to the majority of fishermen, to create jobs, and to enhance communities, they should be placed on hold with no new funding from Congress. This position has not changed for the over 3,000 fishermen from across the country who traveled to Washington, DC for the United We Fish rally held on Feb. 24, 2010. This was the largest gathering of commercial, recreational charter, and recreational fishermen ever assembled for one United event. We encourage you to support zero funding for new Catch Share programs in the Gulf of Mexico in FY2012. For more information and to be added to a list of supporters contact Bob Zales, II bobzales@att.net 850-814-8001 or Bob Spaeth rspaeth8@aol.com 727-643-9558. Stop funding new catch share programs in Gulf of Mexico By Jason Alderman College costs are out of control. Total outstanding student loans hover around $1 trillion, second only to home mortgages. Student loan repayment takes a hefty toll on starting salaries even during good economic times. But with so many recent graduates unable to nd a decent job or any job repayment can be a nightmare. You cant walk away from student loan debt. Its practically impossible to get it discharged through bankruptcy and theres no statute of limitations on how long lenders can pursue you through collections. Indeed, the government can withhold tax refunds and garnish wages inde nitely. The Obama administration recently accelerated improvements to a readily available, yet underused, student loan repayment plan called Income-Based Repayment (IBR) that had been slated to begin in 2014. IBR is available for many federally guaranteed student loans and can be particularly bene cial for low-income families, the unemployed and people with lowerpaying, public service jobs in education, government or non-pro t organizations. Under IBR, monthly payments are capped at an affordable level relative to your adjusted gross income, family size and state of residence. For example, if you earn less than 150 percent of the governments poverty level for your family size, you would pay zero. You still owe the money, but are not required to begin making payments until your income increases. As your income increases, so will your monthly payment but up to no more than 15 percent of income that exceeds that same 150 percent of poverty level. In addition, the government will forgive debt still owed after 25 years of consistent repayment. And those with qualifying public service jobs must only repay for 10 years before the balance is discharged. Under the recent IBR enhancements, for students who took out their rst loan during or after 2008 and open at least one additional loan during or after 2012, the cap will drop from 15 to 10 percent and the forgiveness period drop to 20 years. Those with older loans can still bene t from the original IBR terms. Other IBR features include: All Stafford, PLUS and Consolidation Loans made under either the Direct Loan program or the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) program qualify for IBR, except loans in default, Parent PLUS Loans or Consolidation Loans containing Parent PLUS Loans. You must submit updated income documentation each year. If your income rises, so will your payment amount, although never above what youd otherwise pay under a standard 10-year repayment schedule. Because IBR will likely extend the term of your loan, youll probably accrue more interest than under a standard 10-year payoff. Private student loans dont qualify for IBR. Borrowers with two different types of federal loans at least one each issued under the Direct Loan and FFEL programs may consolidate their loans under a new Special Direct Consolidations Loans program between Jan. 1, 2012, and June 30, 2012. This will lower FFEL loan rates by 0.25 percent, plus an additional 0.25 percent discount if you sign up for automatic payments. Visit www.studentaid.ed.gov/ specialconsolidation for details. If you expect your nancial hardship to be temporary, other loan repayment options, including economic hardship deferment, forbearance and extended repayment, may be better options. For details, visit the Federal Student Aid site, www.studentaid. ed.gov and search Postponing Repayment. Other good resources include www. naid.org and the Project on Student Debt (www. projectonstudentdebt.org). Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/PracticalMoney. Easing student loan repayments JASON ALDERMAN You cant walk away from student loan debt. Its practically impossible to get it discharged through bankruptcy and theres no statute of limitations on how long lenders can pursue you through collections. Indeed, the government can withhold tax refunds and garnish wages inde nitely.

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, January 5, 2012 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Help Restore the Gulf Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Draft Phase I Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment PUBLIC MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT The Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Trustees want to hear from you! A draft plan of proposed early restoration projects is available for public review and comment. The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Draft Phase I Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment injured marshes, coastal dune and nearshore habitats, oysters, and human uses (on water recreation). The trustees will conduct two public meetings in Florida where you can learn more about the draft restoration plan and comment on it. FLORIDA PUBLIC MEETINGS Jan. 11, 2012 6:00 7:00 PM Open House Emerald Coast Convention Center 7:00 9:00 PM Meeting 1250 Miracle Strip Pkwy SE, Fort Walton Beach, FL 32548 Jan. 12, 2012 6:00 7:00 PM Open House Univ. of W. FL Conference Center 7:00 9:00 PM Meeting 11000 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514 To learn more about Early Restoration, review and comment on the draft plan, visit phone, please contact, Kristin Lock, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, 850.245.2112, or Nanciann Regalado, Dept. of the Interior, 678.296.6805. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Department of Energy funding. When it acquired the Port St. Joe project in April 2011, Rentech announced it was in discussions on a term sheet for a federal loan guarantee. Later in the year, it was announced the loan guarantee was on hold because of a lack of government funding. The Company stopped development of large scale projects that required larger development spending by Rentech in order to meet deadlines for government funding, last months release stated. For example, in the fourth quarter of scal year 2011, Rentech abandoned its large-scale projects that relied on DOE funding and took losses of more than $58 million based on prior investment in those projects. Among the three projects abandoned was the NWFREC, the release detailed. While the company may no longer rely on DOE nancing for commercial projects, the release stated the company would pursue other grants and forms of support as well as partnerships. As Rentech was sounding retreat on its Port St. Joe project, a series of lawsuits were led challenging the permitting of the NWFREC. On Dec. 19, six Port St. Joe residents led a pair of lawsuits in Circuit Court seeking to rescind the city of Port St. Joes development order for the project. The development order was issued Nov. 17 and the suits challenge the local permitting of the plant on the grounds that of cials claimed the biomass plant quiet and clean based on erroneous information provided by a contingent of local elected of cials and business leaders regarding a visit to a much smaller plant at the University of South Carolina. While local of cials claimed the plant was not noisy, smelly or an eyesore on the USC campus, The State newspaper published a series of articles in 2009 concerning chronic problems at the plant. Although there have been some reports that Rentech is cancelling the project for lack of funding, the citys development order and the states air and water permits remain in effect. Rentech is still searching for funding, and it can transfer the development approval to another company, said Landy Luther, one of the plaintiffs in the development order appeal. The city development order is in effect for 18 months; state water management and air emissions permits are good for ve years. In its nal meeting of 2011, Port St. Joe city commissioners took no action on the lawsuits as the city had yet to be served with any paperwork. Further, three other Port St. Joe residents led a complaint with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, asserting that the state committed a civil rights violation by issuing an air emissions permit for the biomass plant in close proximity to a predominantly African-American neighborhood. The plant, if built, would have been within 1-2 miles of North Port St. Joe. A letter to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection during the permitting process last year threatened such a lawsuit. LAWSUIT from page A1 WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, Jan 5 68 46 10 % Fri, Jan 6 68 54 10 % Sat, Jan 7 70 55 30 % Sun, Jan 8 71 50 30 % Mon, Jan 9 67 45 10 % T ues, Jan 10 62 47 10 % Wed, Jan 11 69 46 20 % THUR S DAY & FRIDAY NIGH T SPE C IAL S 6:00 8:30 HOURS : 236 R eid A ve (850) 229.7121 BURGERS: WITH FF C HIC KEN FI NGERS: WITH FF S H R IMP S P E CIAL: FF C O L ES LAW, OR Above orders served with: FF B A KED PO TAT O, SALA D A ND BRE A D SPECIAL TO THE STAR An artists rendering of the Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center, a project that has been abandoned because of a lack of funding.

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, January 5, 2012 Joe Manning Al McCambry Glen and Katrina McDonald McNeil Carroll Engineering, Inc. Bob and Bernice McSpadden Tom and Margaret Neubauer Mike and Jenny Nichols Jimmy and Katie Patronis John and Gail Robbins Ken and Ann Shaw St. Joe Community Foundation Floyd and Gloria Skinner David Southall Jerry and Mary Sowell Bill and Rebecca Spann Regions Bank Wayne and Luelle Stubbs Summit Bank Joe and Ann Tannehill Tyndall Federal Credit Union Vision Bank Gary and Cumi Walsingham Elizabeth J. Walters, Esq. Keith and Josey Wilt Ed and June Wright THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PANAMA CITY Karen Hanes Endowed Scholarship The following friends and associates of Karen Hanes are pleased to have participated in the initial establishment of the Karen Hanes Endowed Scholarship in recognition of her outstanding contributions to our community. This scholarship will help to ensure deserving students have the assistance needed to reach their dream of achieving a college degree at FSU Panama City. Rush Akin, M.D. Anonymous Friends Applied Research Associates, Inc. Bense Family Foundation Brian and Marie Baumgardner Nicole Barefield Tony and Joyce Bennett Bill and Jennifer Cappleman The Clemons Company Bill and Carolyn Cramer Dr. Hulon and Dinah Crayton Larry and Nancy Dantzler Ray Dubuque (with AT&T Corporate Match) Neal and Leah Dunn Tim and Karen Farrell Weldon Feightner Freedom Communications Joey and Michelle Ginn Jorge and Pamela Gonzalez Frank and Chris Hall Ralph and Janice Hanks HealthSouth Emerald Coast Rehabilitation Hospital Dave and Jennie Lambert If you would like to join these friends and associates in recognizing Karen, please contact Mary Beth Lovingood, Director of Development, FSU Panama City at 850-770-2108 or mblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@bellsouth.net For a lot of smart Panhandle hunters, the deer season doesnt even start until the New Years hangover is just an unpleasant memory. Thats because Panhandle deer behave a lot more like Alabama whitetails than those in the rest of Florida. The rut, or mating season, doesnt get started until the first strong moon phase in January, and typically runs until near the end of February. For those who seek big bucks, its the only time of year worth being in the woods; the odds of seeing a trophy-quality deer increase dramatically as hormones drive the dominant males to stay on the move almost around the clock. Radiotracking studies have repeatedly shown that adult bucks become almost entirely nocturnal during hunting season except when the rut gets rolling. Then, they get stupid and may go roaming at high noon. Where to nd rutting bucks Dominant bucks stake out a home territory during the rut, marking the terrain with scrapes in the dirt and antler tickling stations overhead. These locations let does in estrus know that theyre around, and also warn other bucks to stay clear. The dominant bucks make a circuit of their scrapes several times daily during the peak of the rut. Scrapes can be anywhere, but frequently they are on an edge where agricultural fields meet hardwood forests, along little-traveled jeep trails through hardwoods, along creek edges, and, of course, on heavily used deer trails. In well-populated woods, there might be dozens of these scrapes, and the key to successful hunting is to sit over one that is live or in use. You can tell from the fresh scrapes, foot prints and urine in the dirt, plus newly broken twigs overhead, when you find a hot scrape. Its not uncommon for a buck to bed close enough to his scrape line that he can hear any sounds that come from the area, so getting in and getting set in silence can be critical. If you carry in a portable stand and make a lot of racket going up a tree, you might well be alerting the buck that youre there. A better plan is to set up a ladder stand in advance, walk in silently before first light, get up the tree as quietly as possible, and settle down to wait him out. Stand placement Whitetails have an amazing sense of smell, so placing the stand downwind from the area in which you expect the deer to appear is very important. In settled weather, the breeze most often comes from the west. After a front, it usually starts from the northwest, moves around to the north, then northeast. Sometimes a front coming in off the gulf will bring south winds keep an eye on the weather and position your stand accordingly. Its also wise to put it well away from any scrape or trail, but with a clear shooting lane to the likely travel path. Sit tight While the vast majority of deer hunters limit their time in the woods from just before dawn until about 10 a.m. and then again from 3 p.m. until dark, for those who truly want a trophy, an allday sit is a much better plan. Particularly in the rut, bucks might walk at any time of day. Theres also the mandrive phenomenon; when other hunters start climbing down and walking out, they frequently start deer moving, and the hunter who stays put gets a shot. Take a comfortable butt-pad, plenty of food and water, and plan to make a day of it; your odds of success will go up dramatically. Rattling and grunting Bucks sometimes make a lot of noise when fighting or tending does, but unless youre in an area where the deer are thick and other hunters are rare, its usually best to keep your silence. Rattling with real or artificial horns to imitate the sound of bucks fighting can work incredibly well in some areas like the big, deer-rich ranches of South Texas, but used on public lands in North Florida, all it usually does is scare deer into the next county. That said, a grunt tube can sometimes help if used judiciously. A soft baah will usually stop a crossing buck in his tracks, and that might be just what you need to center the crosshairs, so keep one hanging around your neck. Knight & Hale and many other call companies make good ones. Full moon hunting There seems to be something about the full moon that causes rutting deer to go crazy, so the ideal scenario is a cold front that arrives a day or two in advance of the full moon, blows in a bunch of icy air, then passes leaving the skies brittle but clear, the wind calm. On these frosty mornings, its common to see bucks running everywhere in what appeared to be totally empty woods a few days earlier. There are full moons on Jan. 9 and Feb. 7. Deer ries There continues to be a bit of foolishness floating around some hunt camps about brush guns, rifles that shoot well through brush and thus are good choices in heavy cover the 30-30 is the legendary brush gun. But most modern whitetail experts point out that, in the first place, no responsible hunter is going to shoot at a deer that they cant clearly see, and that if theres a lot of brush between rifle and target, the shot ought not to be taken. Secondly, the 30-30 is not much of a deer rifle compared to others, coming up short both in energy and accuracy compared to many other rifles including the venerable .308, the 30-06, .280 and lots more. The object in deer hunting is to shoot like a sniper, one shot, one kill, and that requires patience, a clear target, and a rifle that will shoot exactly where you want it to at ranges out to 300 yards. It also requires practice. A study done by an ammo company a few years back indicated that most hunters dont go through a box of 20 cartridges in three years. Thats not nearly enough shooting to be consistently accurate. Enough practice to first, get the scope sighted dead on 2 inches high at 100 yards is the standard for most hunters and secondly to learn exactly when the gun is going to go off as you increase trigger pressure is critical. (Also, theres no reason to choose a gun that kills at both ends for whitetails; a .300 Win Mag will surely do the job, but it has such a wicked recoil that most hunters cant shoot it without flinching and all the inaccuracies that go with.) Warm wisdom Dressing to stand a long day in a cold woods is key to hunting success if the cold fronts roll through on schedule. The key to keeping warm, expert woodsmen agree, is to dress in layers that will allow you to regulate your temperature as conditions change. A layer of absorbent polypropylene underclothing and socks next to the skin will help wick sweat and prevent that damp, clammy feeling that results from a long walk to the stand. Long johns of this material, including a longsleeved undershirt, will let moisture escape. Poly socks are easy on the feet, too theyre worn as an undersock, topped by a wool sock just bulky enough to make a comfortable fit in the hunting boot. Insulated boots with a close fit on the heel and arch but plenty of space around the toes make for easy walking but allow good circulation when you sit for long hours in a tree stand. Boots that are too tight guarantee cold feet. When its really cold, a pair of bibbed wool pants is a great defense against the chill, and for sitting still for many hours in sub-freezing temperatures, you might want to top off with a down parka. (Yes, this is sort of Florida, but not really, not when a northern wind comes blowing down out of Canada those 20-degree mornings are cold whether you sit in a stand in Bay County or 500 miles further north.) Good rain gear from GoreTex or other breathable material also has to go in the pack; often a light rain causes deer to move really well, but you wont see them if you have to head for the truck because youre wet. Buy the rain gear plenty big enough to go over top of the heaviest coats and pants youll be wearing again, stuff thats too tight will make you cold. Dont forget insulated Gore-Tex gloves, again, a bit oversized. Hunting safely The biggest danger to hunters is not from their rifles but from their tree-stands. Falling out of the stand causes dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries nationwide every year. The Tree Stand Manufacturers Association offers the following cautions for hunting safely from an elevated stand: Never climb while carrying weapons or gear; draw them up with a rope after youre securely seated in the stand. Let other hunters know where you are, and take along a cellphone or two-way radio so you can contact them. Never use a stand that has worn, missing or loose parts. Always wear a full harness. Keep the tether as short as possible and clear of neck and shoulders. If you feel yourself becoming drowsy or sick, get out of the tree; many falls occur as a result of falling asleep or from sudden illness. Practice using the harness, including suspending yourself by the tether before you go hunting. Always have a helper standing by for practice runs. If you ever fall, first contact a hunting partner and let them know you are attempting selfrecovery. Ask them to keep tabs on you with return calls every five minutes. If you cant recover and are hung suspended by the tether, call for help. Keep your legs moving to pump blood out of them; otherwise, blood pooling in the legs could cause you to pass out. Manufacturers say the safest recovery via a harness is to climb back into the stand. Only as a last resort should you cut the tether or release the harness buckles. For lots more on treestand safety, visit the Tree Stand Manufacturers Association website, www.tmastands.com. North Florida seasons The modern gun season continues through Feb. 19 in Zone D, the western panhandle. And the latest deer season in the state, the Zone D muzzle-loader/archery/ crossbow extension, is Feb. 20-26. Only antlered deer may be taken in the late seasons. The daily limit is two bucks, the possession limit four. Your Hunting Headquarters REG $179.99 SALE $139.99 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) WWW.BWOHUNT.COM S EVE R AL I N STOC K A N D TH E R E A R E G O I N G FAST. ANOTH E R SH IP M E NT O F 2011 S H I M A NO C UR AD OS E 5 S A N D E 7 S A R E HERE! Thursday, January 5, 2012 Freshwater Inshore The trout bite was fantastic last week and into the weekend. This week will prove a bit more challenging with the sudden temperature drops. Most action will still be in the deeper holes in the canal or Apalachicola River creeks. Last week the trout were biting on Sugar and Spice glow 3 Gulp, electric chicken, and silver glitter D.O.A. shrimp. The Depot Creek is producing good numbers of crappie right now. With the cold snap this week, this shery will only get better. Most are using live crappie shinners, but small grubs and jig heads will nd sh faster. Channel cat are still being report here as well. The bass bite is quiet in the rivers, but some sheepshead are showing up at the docks in Howard Creek. SPONSORED BY Page 8 From now through late February is prime time for Panhandle hunters Saving the best for last SUMMIT TR EE STA NDS | Special to Star Elevated tree stands give hunters a good view of the woods and also put them out of the line of scent and sight of whitetails below.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com A Section Thursday, January 5, 2012 Page 9 By Tim Croft Star News Editor Port St. Joe soccer is hitting its stride as the season begins the closing stretch. With the boys and girls both in action tonight, each is on a winning streak. The Lady Tiger Sharks have responded to a threegame losing streak last month by producing three consecutive wins in the nal week before Christmas break to improve to 6-3-0 overall. They are 3-2-0 in District 1-1A. The Tiger Sharks, meanwhile, continue their undefeated season, moving to 10-0-1 as a stocking stuffer for the holiday. Port St. Joe is 4-0-1 in district play. Both teams were to have played at Baker on the Thursday prior to the break but those games were postponed due to eld conditions and will be made up next week. On the Tuesday prior to the break, each team secured a home win. The Lady Tiger Sharks defeated Rutherford 5-3 at Sam Cox Field. Port St. Joe was led by senior co-captain Rachel Jones, who recorded two goals (numbers seven and eight on the season) and added an assist. Sophomore Allie Strippling scored her fth goal of the season and also assisted on a goal and midelder Bryanna Stuart scored her rst goal of the year and also had an assist. Freshman Haley Wood had a goal and Mary Branch an assist for the Lady Tiger Sharks. Sophomore keeper Christian Laine had ve saves on 10 Lady Ram shots to improve to 4-1-0. The Tiger Sharks routed North Bay Haven Academy 5-1. Five different players scored goals for Port St. Joe: LaGrand McLemore scored his third of the year, Javarri Beachum his seventh, Daniel May his ninth, Drew Lacour his fth and Cole Cryderman his fth. LaCour had two assists and McLemore and Witt Shoaf each had an assist for the Tiger Sharks. Senior Walt Bowers was in goal for 70 minutes, facing 14 Bay Haven shots and had four saves to earn the win, improving to 8-0-0 on the season. Both teams travel to Franklin County for district matches tonight. The teams will be at Freeport (boys) and Walton County (girls) on Saturday and face Baker in the makeups for games lost before break on Monday. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Dixie Youth Baseball League will be holding its annual election of officers on Thursday, Jan. 12, at 6 p.m. ET. The meeting will take place at the STAC house on 8th Street. Anyone interested in holding a position as an officer within the league is invited to attend. Also, for the first time in many years, we will be offering a Dixie Boys league for players age 13 and 14. And for parents who might be purchasing new bats for the upcoming season, please be aware of new performance requirements in the AA and AAA leagues. This information can be found on the Dixie Youth Baseball website. Star Staff Report High school and junior high coaches in all sports, we need your help. In our minds, every child participating in scholastic sports in our county deserves some recognition, if only for the sacri ce and discipline required to compete. But there are a lot of teams, a lot of games and we are, alas, a small staff. Coaches and athletic directors are urged to contact The Star will all the scores and results from your teams games. The deadline for all information is 8 a.m. ET on Tuesday. Please call 2277827 or email to tcroft@ star .com, providing scores, individual totals and anything remarkable and which stands out from the days or weeks competition. Photos are always welcome and can be sent via email as an attached jpeg le. We can not make these sports pages what they can be without your help. Coaches and athletic directors, parents and athletes, principals and School Board, Superintendent Jim Norton, these are your pages. Please help us ll them. PRYOR STANDS OUT IN BOWL GAME SPECIAL TO THE STAR Port St. Joe High School alum Calvin Pryor (No. 25) had a standout game on Dec. 27 during the University of Louisvilles Belk Bowl loss to North Carolina State. Pryor, starting at free safety, had three solo tackles and one assist. He also ranged far to his left in the second quarter to snag an interception on a deep pass attempt down the sideline by the Wolfpack. The Cardinals converted the turnover into three points. For the season, Pryor, a true freshman who played in all 13 games, starting the nal six, was sixth on the team in tackles with 43 31 solo and 12 assisted tackles. Pryor had one sack and three tackles for loss. He intercepted two passes, broke up ve more, forced two fumbles and recovered two. PSJ soccer teams enter 2012 on a roll By Tim Croft Star News Editor Twelve games into the basketball season, the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks are moving up the learning curve. A team that sports just three seniors, one of those a rst-year transfer, to go with a roster dotted by sophomores, freshmen and even an eighth-grade starter, has experienced its share of lumps during a 5-7 start. But Coach Derek Kurnitsky, who has had to alter his coaching focus and teams playing style, said he sees the progress. The record is not where we want to be, but I see the light at the end of the tunnel, Kurnitsky said. Were getting there. We are just a young team and we are experiencing some growing pains. We are not going to win every one. I think weve improved. I see the kids are improving. Those kids would comprise a mighty ne junior varsity team. The Tiger Shark starting ve includes freshman Jarkeice Davis, eighth-grader Chad Quinn and sophomores Natrone Lee and Rammello Zaccarro. Only wing Alex King, a senior, has considerable playing time on the hardwood. King averages a teamhigh 17 points while Lee, who scored four or fewer points in the rst three games, has come on to average 12 points a game. The Tiger Sharks also are not deep, with a bench manned by sophomores Caleb Odom and Jamie Gordon and seniors Arion Ward, the sixth man, and Nick Dickinson. The latter two join King as the only seniors, Dickinson a transfer from Michigan. After stumbling from the gate, Port St. Joe won three of four after taking two of three during a holiday classic in Tallahassee, before being blown out at Spring eld Rutherford and splitting road games against Liberty County (53-35) and Cottondale (47-46) last week. The Liberty County win moved the Tiger Sharks to 2-2 in District 4-1A. I am not into moral victories, but Cottondale is 11-2, just beat Holmes County and we were playing at their place, which is never easy, even when Ive taken loaded teams up there, Kurnitsky said. We were up 13 points at halftime, up by seven at the beginning of the fourth quarter, and until the nal minutes it might have been the best game weve put together. Our kids played well, but we had some mistakes at the end. The nal score was also indicative of a new style of play for the typically uptempo Tiger Sharks. Port St. Joe, usually playing the entire oor, pressing and running, has found success this year in the half-court, holding the ball when needed and employing set plays and a slower tempo to maximize skill sets. The Tiger Sharks have yet to score more than 64 points in any games this season. I know how we are going to have to play down the stretch and we are not a high-scoring team, Kurnitsky said. You have to adapt your coaching to the talent you have. You have to adjust. We are just not capable of being a highscoring team. We arent the deepest team, either. We have to be patient, cut down on turnovers and hold the ball and run our sets. This is who we are. If we are going to be a good team at the end this is what we have to be. The kids understand that this is just what it is. They have really bought into it. Kurnitsky, also, has had to buy into a new roster and tactical changes in coaching and teaching his charges. Ive learned to have way more patience, Kurnitsky said. Ive done more teaching this year than in the past ve years combined. And Ive enjoyed it. It is a lot of fun watching the players learn and grow. Kurnitsky said he has seen things click for his young charges as the season has unfolded and the team gains more experience and understands how to play together in preparation for the cauldron of the stretch run, district and region playoffs. We want to get hot late, Kurnitsky said. The last couple of weeks I want to be on a roll. And I see that happening. Port St. Joe hosted Lynn Haven Mosley on Tuesday and travels to West Gadsden on Friday and South Walton next Tuesday. Young Tiger Sharks seek second-half growth Dixie Youth Baseball elects of cers Coaches: We need your help CARLA MAY | Special to the Star Top, Cole Cryderman scored his fth goal of the season in a 5-1 win over North Bay Haven. Right, Drew Lacour (in white, left) scored a goal and had two assists against North Bay Haven.

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, January 5, 2012 A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. The Constitution of the United States, Amendment 2. Currently, 575 of your fellow Gulf County residents have exercised their constitutional 2nd Amendment right by obtaining their Concealed Weapon License. We invite you to join us and qualify for your Florida Concealed Weapon or Firearm License by attending the formal class held by the Republican Party of Gulf County on Saturday, January 14, 2012. The class is the rst step in obtaining your license in the State of Florida. The cost of the class is $75.00. Please contact Tom Semmes at 850-639-5345 for additional information. Reminder The Florida Republican Presidential Preference Primary is January 31, 2012. If you wish to inuence our Nations selection to correct the current administrations failures and put us back on the path to prosperity remember to VOTE! Also, please join your fellow Gulf County Republicans at our next meeting on Monday, January 16th at 7:00 p.m. EST upstairs at the Capital City Bank building in Port St. Joe. See you there! Tom Semmes State Committeeman Membership Communication Committee Joanna Bryan, Chairman JOANNA812000@yahoo.com Watch for our new website coming soon at www.gulfgop.com Its a great day to be a Republican! shrimp) were from troll nets and sh stomachs. Until now, nobody had actually seen this thing alive. Commonly known as sea whip shrimp, the species seeks a habitat in a type of reef known as a gorgonian, or sea whip. Although the species is very hard to find, Cox managed to locate two of the shrimp for Wicksten to observe during her trip to Mexico Beach. They really dont know much about these shrimp, Cox said. You just never know what may be a key species out there. Wicksten said Coxs documentation of the species will aid in a big project underway to document different species in the Gulf of Mexico and will also be added to a national list of marine species. Coxs observations also led to a scientific journal article co-authored with Wicksten that documents the different invertebrates associated with sea whips in the Gulf of Mexico, including the sea whip shrimp and another species known as arrow shrimp. The online article, titled Invertebrates associated with gorgonians in the northern Gulf of Mexico, primarily used data Cox and her husband, Bob Cox, collected while doing research dives for the MBARA. The MBARA is a nonpro t organization that has deployed more than 150 arti cial reefs in the Gulf of Mexico since 1997. The organization focuses on the conservation and environmental improvement of our natural and arti cial marine reef systems, while also conducting and promoting scienti c research and educational outreach. Cox said the more research that is done for the MBARA, the more points they receive for the grants they apply for, especially those from the state of Florida. And more points equal more money to build arti cial reefs and more reefs means more marine life habitats in the Gulf. Wicksten was very impressed with the arti cial reef system produced by the MBARA off Mexico Beach. The arti cial reefs were designed to attract sh, but they also introduce hard surfaces, Wicksten said. You get all of these oddball shrimp and things on these reefs. Cox and Wicksten both agreed this area of the Gulf is incredibly understudied. Theres a fair amount of marine life in the Gulf that lives fairly close to shore, but you cant see them because of visibility, said Wicksten, also an enthusiastic diver. There are a lot of small and inconspicuous marine creatures out there. You dont have to be a PhD biologist to nd animals that are unusual or worthy of a scienti c paper; you just have to look carefully. SHRIMP from page A1 Photos BY CAROL COX Cox captured the rst photo of this shrimp species, commonly known as the sea whip shrimp, alive in its natural environment, which led to a scienti c journal article chronicling her research. the satellite of ce. I dont think any of us want a problem from there, Patterson said. McElroy noted to Magidson that three commissioners, a majority, said they would not support a dormitory-style facility, meaning an ordinance should not be an issue. Gingell said city attorney Tom Gibson was looking at other communities around Florida to examine how they addressed potential problems with a homeless shelter or rescue mission. Its not up to me, Magidson said. Whatever any commissioner wants to do and they get three votes, that is up to them. We have a lot of bigger sh to fry to deal with a problem that isnt there. City manager search The deadline for applications for the city manager position City Manager Charlie Weston announced late last year he would retire when his contract expires this month passed on Dec. 31 and Weston said 41 applications were received. We have a lot of qualied people in that bunch, Weston said. He said he will meet with Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, to establish a process for screening and culling the applications and would provide a timeline for hiring once that process is set. Weston indicated that if asked he would extend his employment as requested to ensure a smooth transition. Energy plant lawsuit Commissioners deferred any decision on an answer to a lawsuit led by Gulf Citizens for Clean Renewable Energy until further consultation with Gibson. (See related story on A1). The city was served papers on the lawsuit on Dec. 21 and has 20 days, or until Jan. 10, to formally respond. Magidson indicated Gibson has been trying to reach the plaintiffs South Florida attorney to explore settlement options. The underlying contention of the lawsuit is that the city did not adhere to the tenets of its comprehensive plan in issuing a development permit for the proposed Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center. The lawsuit was led two weeks after the city was noti ed by the NWFREC developer that it was pulling out of the project, con rmed late last month in the developers press release on its fourth quarter activities. The lawsuit seeks to rescind the development order, with the city on the hook for the plaintiffs attorney fees. MISSION from page A1 SPECIAL TO THE STAR Tom Conley from the Florida League of Cities presents Mayor Mel Magidson Jr. with a check for more than $38,000, representing a return on property insurance premiums. SPECIAL BONUS

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, January 5, 2012 By David Adlerstein Florida Freedom Newspapers Whenever a featured player in a performance goes down, a stand-in is called for because, as they say in show biz, the show must go on. This past month, when a situation similar to this happened, dancers at Pam Nobles Studios had a rare opportunity to learn from a gifted artist, a veterans pro fessional dancer who has hoofed it with the greats. Longtime dance instruc tor Pam Nobles, who has taught hundreds of young dancers over the last 30 years in both Franklin and Gulf counties, had to un dergo neck surgery last year, and was out of action for a couple months. On Nov. 29, surgeons performed an anterior cervical fusion, grafting bone from her hip and af xing a titanium plate with two screws to stabilize the affected vertebrae. The problem of bone spurs and stenosis was solved, but it meant six weeks of inac tion for the popular dance teacher. So Nobles called upon her good friend, Scott Ben son, a professional dancer and choreographer for the past three decades, to offer instruction to her students, both the children and young adults as well as the older Hot Flashes dance troupe. The result was inspiring, and at times electric, as Benson gave the budding performers a glimpse of the insights and expertise from a professional career. Theres talent every where, these kids have talent, he said over a preChristmas lunch along the Apalachicola waterfront. They just dont know they have talent. Originally from Laguna Nobles dancers study with modern professional By Lois Swoboda Florida Freedom Newspapers This December, 103 hunters got to enjoy the St. Vincent Island experience and six of them bagged a sambar. Anyone lucky enough to have visited St. Vincent Is land knows that it is 12,500 acres of undeveloped paradise where wildlife abounds. Birds and reptiles of many kinds share the for est and dunes with whitetailed deer, bob cats, pos sums, raccoons and other native mammals. There are also more exotic residents on the is land. St. Vincent is famously home to a population of red wolves, since it is one of the nurseries where young sters of the highly endan gered species are reared before being released in their native range. Sadly, there are feral hogs, which are a constant threat to the natural bal ance of the island ecosys tem. Last but not least, there are 70 to 100 sambar deer. Sambar deer, a type of elk, are native to Southeast Asia. A former owner of the island introduced them to St. Vincent in 1908, along with other exotic animals as hunting stock. The other exotics are gone now, but the sambars share the island with native white-tailed deer without conict, because the sam bars feed on aquatic weeds and prefer the marshes. The whitetails keep to the dryer upland areas. Public hunting of whitetailed deer, sambar deer, feral hogs, and raccoons is permitted on 11,400 acres of St. Vincent Island. The refuge opened to sambar hunting during the 1987-88 hunting season. There are three hunts on St. Vincent each year per year but only the quota hunt in December allows a hunter to legally harvest sambar. Each year there is a lottery for the 200 coveted permits that allow the bearer to camp on the is land during the hunt and bag a sambar. Often, more than 1,000 applications for the hunt are received. During the quota hunt, sportsmen can take one sambar and unlimited hogs and raccoons. Both hogs and rac coons prey on the eggs of Fall and winter hunts on St. Vincent Island See HUNTS B3 DAVID ADLER ST EI N | Florida Freedom Port St. Joe High School junior Erin White rehearses with Scott Benson, left. See NOBLES B5 Bringing in 2012 with a bang The Port St. Joe sky sparkled Saturday night as patrons gathered along St. Joseph Bay to blast into the New Year with a reworks show. The Port St. Joe reworks display was part of the Celebrate Safe, Celebrate Twice event sponsored by the Gulf County Tourism De velopment Council and the Mexico Beach Community Redevelopment Council. The event aimed to ensure patrons enjoyed a safe drive into 2012 by provid ing a free shuttle service to different hot spots in Port St. Joe and across the central time zone border to Mexico Beach.

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OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society 3520 EAST 15th Street PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 (TEL) 850-763-4104 www.BrightPediatrics.com DR. SAMEH ELAMIR PEDIATRICS & ADOLESCENTS Same day appointment available dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN DAILY AT 11 P ACKAGE ST O RE & LO UNGE GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR F AVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRIT S WWW.L OO K O UTL O UNGE.C O M FRI D AY & SATUR D AY R AN D Y STARK L IVE K ARA O KE & DJ WITH N ATALIE L A D IE S N IGHT T UE SD AY & W E D NE SD AY 5 C L OS ING H APPY HO UR MO N D AY FRI D AY 5 7 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Let Me Help You Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Society B2 | The Star Thursday, January 5, 2012 M.A.D. BAKE SALE BENEFITS ANMIAL SHELTER Special to The Star I would like to extend a gracious thanks to all of the volunteers who helped make this holiday season special for the many needy families across Gulf County. I know the wonderful Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners would not have been possible without Gods blessings, all of the volunteers and sponsors, the Oak Grove Church, Pastor James Wiley and Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie Gainey, who both went beyond the call of duty, whatever the need. They ordered the food and supplies, directed, arranged and efciently assembled hundreds of meals. Thanks to Tim and Crystal DuPuy for their sharing and consideration for others. They gathered coats and jackets and Christmas toys for needy children and helped several people along the way. They also cooked turkeys and donated their time helping people in the community. A very special thank you to George and Hilda Duren, owners of the Piggly Wiggly, and their great staff who assisted us every time we called, no matter what. They cooked the dressing, baked cakes, revised delivery schedules, and helped us so very much. Thanks Mr. Duren for all youve done to help us with this dinner. Thanks to Sacred Heart on the Gulfs Dietary department. They were all deeply involved with the turkey preparation for the Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. Their help was greatly appreciated by everyone involved. We would like to thank Patti Blaylock and the staff at the Sunset Coastal Grill for cooking 15 turkeys in all, collecting toys, and arranging for the different visitors to help by donating Christmas toys for the community. Charles Givens, owner of the Corner Grocery Store, helped the kids referred to as the G.A.N.G. (Getting to A New Generation) by teaching them the importance of helping people in need. They delivered over 200 plates of food throughout their community. Thanks to Barbara Radcliff for making up the thank-you yers, and for Ramseys Printing & Supply for printing and cutting them. Eddie operated the computer that showed all of the volunteers what a wonderful gathering was held during Thanksgiving Day. He also played background music that helped set the theme. Special thanks to Sherrie Bowen, who coordinated the sweet potato preparation, and Sandie Kennedy for coordinating the green bean preparation. Plenty of help was needed for this massive undertaking. Thank you all for making the volunteer program a success! Anyone interested in volunteering for this worthwhile program can call 850-381-6122 for more information. Jerry Stokoe Special thanks to all holiday volunteers Star Staff Report Come to the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement this Saturday for a Pancake benet to raise funds for the Club House porch. The breakfast will be from 6-9 a.m. CT. A special breakfast will be served in the Club House which consists of all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausage, and choice of coffee, milk, or juice. The cost is $5 for adults, $3 for children ages 6-12 and the breakfast is free to children age 5 and under. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is a living museum documenting rural life in Northwest Florida since the early 1800s. It is located in Sam Atkins Park, about one mile west of the intersection of State 71 and State 20. Follow State 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park. Turn north at Lindys Fried Chicken onto Silas Green Street (between 18th and 20th Streets) and follow the signs. For more information, contact the Settlement at 850-674-2777 For further directions and information on the historic buildings at the Settlement, go to www. ppmuseum.org. Panhandle Pioneer Settlement serves up pancakesS PECI A L TO T HE S T A R Lauren Davis, Callie Capps and Rebecca Kerigan are M.A.D. (Making A Difference). The girls held a bake sale and raised $150, which they took directly to the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. Whats next, girls? Society BRIEFS Writing group meeting The PRIZEWRITERS writing group will hold its next meeting at the Gulf County Public Library at 2 p.m. ET on Tuesday, Jan. 17. All those interested in writing a book, compiling family memoirs, etc. are welcome to attend. The meetings are free. This group believes that writers should be with writers in order to encourage each other to complete their work. For more information, contact Marjorie Parker at 2296023.Amateur R adio S ociety to offer license exams The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will be providing license exams on Saturday, Feb. 11 at the EOC Building in Port St. Joe, located behind the Gulf County Courthouse, at 10 a.m. ET. Those interested in getting a ham license or upgrading a present license should contact C.H. Tillis at 850-6488251 for details and registration. Ham it up. Get your license and get on the air! Quit smoking now Star Staff Report If you are ready to quit smoking now, a free weekly class/support group will begin at 5:30 p.m. ET Thursday, Jan. 12, at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Quit Smoking Now is a curriculum developed by ex-smokers for those who want to become exsmokers. Free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is available to all class participants. Register at 1-87-QUITNOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) or contact Brigitta Nuccio at 850-482-6500 or email her at bnuccio@bigbendahec. org. The class is sponsored by the Florida AHEC Network and the Florida Department of Health.

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Local The Star| B3 Thursday, January 5, 2012 Gulf County Health Department Special to The Star Jan. 8-14 is Folic Acid Awareness Week, but folic acid should be a part of a healthy lifestyle every day of the week. You can start the New Year off right by taking a multivitamin with 400 mcg of the B-vitamin folic acid every day. Your body uses folic acid every day to stay healthy. What is folic acid and why do you need it? Think you are getting all of the vitamins you need from your diet alone? Think again. Most people do not know that it is hard to get certain vitamins from food alone. Many believe they do not need to take multivitamins be cause they eat healthy foods. Multivitamins help ll in those nutrition gaps in the diet, especially when it comes to getting enough folic acid. Folic acid is the syn thetic form of the natu rally occurring folate in foods. Folate is found in foods such as leafy green vegetables, beans, liver and some fruit. The syn thetic version, folic acid, is found in multivitamins and fortied foods like breakfast cereal, pasta and bread. Folic acid is easier for your body to ab sorb than folate, plus 50 to 90 percent of food folate is destroyed in cooking. In 1998, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration started fortifying grain and cereal products with folic acid in order to re duce neural tube defects (NTDs). While this was a great step in the ght to prevent birth defects, it is not enough to protect all women and their po tential children. Folic acid is an es sential B-vitamin; there fore, everyone needs it in order to stay in good health. Folic acid helps build DNA and your body uses it for cell growth and re production, fundamental building block process ing and genetic material production. Folic acid is water soluble, therefore it passes through your body very quickly. Tak ing folic acid every day ensures that you always have it in your system when your body needs it. For women in their childbearing years, it is particularly important to consume 400 mcg of fo lic acid daily. It has been shown to reduce the risk of NTDs in developing ba bies by up to 70 percent. Since 50 percent of preg nancies are unplanned, its important to take folic acid every day, even if youre not planning to get preg nant. The most common NTDs are spina bida and anencephaly. Who needs folic acid? We all do. Everyone needs folic acid every day. Taking folic acid ev ery day, before pregnancy begins, is an important way to reduce neural tube defects (NTDs). These birth defects occur in the rst weeks of fetal devel opment, often before a woman even knows she is pregnant. Some women may be at higher risk. Not only do Latinas have higher rates of NTD-affected pregnan cies, but they also have the lowest awareness/ knowledge about folic acid than women of other race/ ethnic groups. In addition, Latinas have a lower con sumption of folic acid than non-Hispanic women. Get Involved in Folic Acid Awareness Week The Gulf County Health Department works to edu cate consumers and health care providers about the benets and uses of folic acid. It is recommended to take a multivitamin with 400 mcg of folic acid, eat ing fortied foods, along with a healthy diet. For more information about the Gulf County Health Department or folic acid visit one of our clinics at 2475 Garrison Avenue in Port St. Joe or 807 State 22 in Wewahitchka or call our Healthy Start Education Team at 227.1276 ext. 106. Remember to make folic acid part of a healthy life style in 2012. HUNTS from page B1 the endangered sea turtles that are also annual visi tors to the island. During the quota hunt only primitive weapons like muzzle-loaders and bows may be used. Crossbows are not permitted on the island. In 2011, participants took home six sambar deer and six feral hogs. Non-quota hunts are held on the island in Janu ary and November. The November hunt is for archers only. The Janu ary hunt is open to primi tive weapons. During these hunts, sportsmen can bag a whitetailed deer, and unlimited raccoons and hogs. From Nov. 17-19, 63 hunters visited the island and bagged 11 white-tailed deer and ve feral hogs. The 2012 primitive weapons non-quota hunt is scheduled for Jan. 19-21. Hunters are responsible for providing their own transportation to and from the island. To learn more about hunting on St. Vincent Is land, visit www.fws.gov/ saintvincent/hunt-sh.html or call or visit the refuge ofce and visitor center in the Harbor Master Build ing at 479 Market Street, Apalachicola. The Center is open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The refuge telephone number is 653-8808. Sea turtles on St. Vincent in 2011 After a tempestuous season with some unusual twists in 2010, the sea turtles on St. Vincent Island had a fairly good year in 2011 According to the Support ers of St. Vincent, in 2010, 44 turtle nests were found on the island refuge. All of them were from loggerhead turtles. Of those, 19 were moved to Kennedy Space Center to protect them from the BP oil spill. Nearly 1350 of the eggs left on the island hatched and almost all of the hatch lings made it to the Gulf of Mexico. In 2011 the count of hatchlings on the island was up by over 1,000 with 2,375 young turtles emerg ing from 46 nests. Seven nests were inun dated or washed away. National Folic Acid Awareness Week is Jan. 8-14 COURTE S Y OF DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY. COM An aerial view of St. Vincent Island.

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) (850) 827-2887 Howard Creek Baptist Church A Place of Grace 9:45 am (EST) 11:00 am (EST) Thursday, January 5, 2012 Thursday, January 5, 2012 FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com You Have a Choice Why cant people put their faith in God and live for Him each day? How much better life would be if we only lived His way. Its not a matter of who has their way, because God will have the nal say. Why cant we just learn to obey, listen to what He has to say? A good example is to look back and seek. What did you do for God last week? He supplies our needs every day. If you dont put Him rst, will it stay that way? Daily living for Jesus will lead to an abundant life. Living daily in sin will bring you judgment and strife. Its very simple, but you have to choose, abundant life with Jesus, or with Satan and lose. Billy Johnson Thomas Clay Doss, 49, of Wewahitchka, Fla., passed away, Dec. 24, 2011, in a local hospital. He was born May 3, 1962. He had worked as a supervisor in oil elds in Louisiana. He was preceded in death by his father, Reverend Thomas Pleasant Doss, Jr. He is survived by his wife, Vickie Doss, of Wewahitchka, Fla; mother, Betty Doss, of Panama City, Fla; sister, Diane McCormick of Panama City; brother, Thomas Calvin Doss and wife, Pam, of Alaska; nieces and nephews, Stacy McCormick, Amanda McCormick, both of Panama City, Lauryn Doss of Panama City, Jana Doss of Alaska and Christopher Doss of Panama City; great-nieces and nephews, Blake, Cole, Hunter, Wyatt and Aurora. He is also survived by the Drenkhahn family and the West family of Stoughton, Wis. Funeral services were held Thursday, Dec. 29, at 1 p.m., in the Wilson Funeral Home Chapel with Pastor John Kramer of ciating. Interment followed in Evergreen Memorial Gardens. The family received friends at the funeral home on Thursday prior to the service. Wilson Funeral Home, 214 Airport Road, Panama City, FL 32405, 850-7855272. Thomas Clay Doss Mr. Osvaldo Isa Badillo Alayo, 29, of Wewahitchka, Fla., passed away Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2011 at his home. Osvaldo was born on Dec. 12, 1982 in Havana, Cuba, and had lived in Wewahitchka for the past seven years after living in Mobile, Ala. He was a welder for Eastern Marine in Panama City and attended the New Harvest Assembly of God Church in Wewahitchka. Survivors include his wife, Jaquelyn (Faircloth) Badillo, of Wewahitchka; mother, Zunilda Alayo Perdomo, of West Palm Beach, Fla.; father, Osvaldo Eliseo Badillo Diaz, of Mobile, Ala.; two sons, Juleon Badillo of Wewahitchka, and Jose Alvaro Sanchez, of Havana, Cuba; one daughter, Jalyan Rose Badillo, of Wewahitchka; step-daughter, Jala Moulds, of Wewahitchka; and maternal grandfather, Ramon Alayo Zapata, of West Palm Beach, Fla. Funeral services were Thursday, Dec. 29 at the New Harvest Assembly of God Church in Wewahitchka with Reverend Eddie Causey of ciating. Internment followed the ceremony at Buckhorn Cemetery in Wewahitchka. The family received friends before the service. All arrangements were under the direction of Marlon Peavy at the Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown, Fla. Osvaldo Isa Badillo Alayo Obituaries Guardian Angel Once I walked upon this earth in my life I had no clue. I had no knowledge of God or his Word and what Satan had planned to do. I walked and lived unknowing and Satan with me had his way. For this very reason I struggled I found misery every day. No matter how hard Id try Id fail again and again. Until one day so frustrated I thought my life I had to end. I sat with my head dropped in my hands thinking how Id leave this world. My eyes were closed, my heart was broke but in my head there was this girl. Then I heard this sound, looked up real fast and beheld a beautiful face. Her hair was long, she seemed to glow white and a aw there was no trace. She spoke to me in a heavenly voice and said Its you I came to see. This misery youve faced and this thing youve planned doesnt have to be. She went on to tell me about my life and how it was full of sin. Then she told me about salvation through Christ that I needed only to invite him in. So on that day I gave my life to Gods only begotten Son. And on that day Satan lost his power to keep me on the run. Since, Ive searched to thank that girl for all she had done for me. I never saw her again but know now deep in my heart an angel she had to be. Mark Cumbie Faith BRIEFS Fish Stories at First United Methodist of PSJ We have all grown up hearing (and probably telling) Fish Stories. After all, living in Port St. Joe, we all have more opportunities to sh that most people. Beginning Jan. 8, Rev. Mac Fulcher will begin a ve-week series called Fish Stories. We will begin the series by looking at shing in Deep Water. Our scripture will be Luke 5:1-11. So, if you would like to learn more about shing, come this Sunday our Contemporary Service at 9 a.m. ET in the Fellowship Hall, or our Traditional Service at 11 a.m. in the Sanctuary. For more information, please call the church of ce at 2271724. Revival at New Bethel Baptist New Bethel Baptist Church of Port St. Joe and Pastor Cyril Mills will be hosting Revival services at 7 p.m. ET nightly Jan. 5-7. The speaker will be Evangelist Jennifer Bailey. Everyone is invited to come out and support the woman of God and lift up the name of the Lord. Share your memories Let the community know about loved ones that have passed away. Obituaries are free and allow families and friends to remember and share. Submit obituaries by 8 a.m. ET Tuesdays to tcroft@star com to leave a tribute to a loved one.

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, January 5, 2012 Trades & Services Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction Dri Brite 850-229-9663 Free Estimates! 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction Wood Works (In shed behind store 2284 Hwy 98 W.) WOOD WORKSMALL PROJECT S FURNITURE R E P AIR O DD J OB S M IKE (850) 348.9509 OR HAROLD (850) 227.6975 GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 Public Notice The rst Public Hearing will be held Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST and the second Public Hearing for adoption will be held January 24, 2012. The public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: AN ORDINANCE PER THE REQUIREMENTS OF FLORIDA STATUE 163.3177(3)(b) TO YEARLY REVIEW AND UPDATE THE GULF COUNTY FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SCHEDULE; ADOPTING BY REFERENCE THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 2011/2012 WORK PLAN; INCORPORATING BY REFERENCE THE UPDATED CONCURRENCY TRACKING DATA; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ORDINANCE IN CONFLICT THEREWITH, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on this matter. The ordinance and contents are on le with the Clerk of Court and at the Planning Department, Room 312 in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL. Ad #2011-88 PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, January 16 2012 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, January 24, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application by Michael Weitman for Parcel ID # 006268-119R Located in Section 18, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroach into a 25 setback by 5. 2. Variance Application Baileys Crab House & Seafood Market for Parcel 03946000R Located in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroach into the roadside setback by 8 and rear setback by 12 for business improvements. 3. Public and Open Discussion 4. Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312. Ad #2011-89 NOBLES from page B1 Beach, California and now living in the Panhandle, Benson knew he had talent as a world-class water polo player, playing center-for ward in the s on teams that faced such top-notch foreign competition as for eign competitors in the Pan American Games. The son of a California beach power lifter, Benson was a jock in his youth, earning a water polo scholarship to UCLA. Im still a rubber band, he said. It gave me exibil ity. But instead of an ath letic career, the 5 160pound, 29-inch waisted Benson opted instead to pursue classical ballet at U.S. International Univer sity in San Diego, a school afliated with the San Di ego Ballet. There he studied under Sir John Hart, former ar tistic director for the Royal Ballet, his wife Lady Ann Hart, and Erling Sunde before graduating in 1981 with a bachelor of ne arts with minor in music. As a ballet dancer, he played for four seasons with the San Diego Opera, in such clas sical ballets as Carmen and Don Quixote but it was not his passion in life. I played the wolf once but it wasnt me, he said. Funky, jazzy stage work was more his style, and as Bernardo in West Side Story and with parts in such musicals as Grease, Chorus Line and Cats he was nding his style. He picked up some other nice work if you can get it, appearing in South Ameri can television commercials or bad television shows out of Tijuana, appearing as a federale with a machine gun. Ultimately, though, it was in the realm of modern dance, and its growing im portance as a showcase for other commercial and re cording work, that Benson found his niche. He became a member of the rst group of dancers to do trade shows, now a sta ple in the industry, when he performed with a group for Puma sportswear, dancing to the music of Eye of the Tiger. Set up a small stage in venues both in America and Europe, Benson and company combined prod uct giveaways with an ath letic spectacle, part of an effort to blend dance with contemporary recreation and lifestyle promotion. As a dancer he promot ed everything from Hurley skateboards and snow boards, to Ski Doo snow mobiles to Miller Beer, ap pearing in a television com mercial as a deliveryman dancing on bottle caps to the jingle Hit Your Spot. Its just another job, said the soft-spoken Ben son, who even with knee surgery two years ago, is still only about 190 pounds, with a 32-inch waist. He stays t by doing mountain biking and cross training, and honing his prowess as a single handicap golfer at St. James Golf Resort in Carrabelle. Perhaps the most ex citing aspect of Bensons dance career has been a chance to be a part of the music video craze that be gan with the advent of MTV. He has appeared in perfor mances by superstars who have included Rick Astley, George Michael, Reba Mc Intyre, Stevie Nicks and Paula Abdul among a host of others. Including Michael Jack son, as Benson appeared with both The King of Pop and sister Latoya in their Moonwalker work, with Smooth Criminals, shot on a soundstage in Los An geles. Just to watch Michael worked, they made it pos sible to do what we did, he said. He has rubbed elbows and tripped the light with such world class choreog raphers as Danny Hoctor and Betty Byrd, the famed American dance team, met Henny Youngman and Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse and done television work with Tommy Walsh. As long as youre doing what you love, he said. I was given a gift. Benson has known No bles for about 25 years, rst crossing paths at a 1986 dance convention in Orlan do when Benson was part of Dance Caravan, a sixweek summer tour, mostly of big cities, to teach the latest dance moves, styles, and cutting edge work to aspiring dancers. Sometimes Nobles would take as many as two dozen dancers to the event, where they had a chance to learn from the best and re turn back home to perfect what they had learned. You get all your train ing in studios, thats where your best training comes from, Benson said. You learn what you need to do to go to auditions Bensons dance instruc tion expertise has taken him throughout the coun try, from Phoenix to New Orleans, to convey hip-hop tricks and techniques, and lyrical dance combina tions. This January, Nobles will be back working at her studio and her danc ers brush with a top-notch professional a thing of the past. Until he graces the lo cal studios with his graceful moves and teaching tips. P hotos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | Florida Freedom Pam Nobles Studios Hot Flashes, including Gulf County Supervisor of Elections Linda Grifn, center, left, a stand in a tableau during a Scott Benson class. Scott Benson does a ying leap during a class at Pam Nobles Studios.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 5, 2012 The Star | B6 36879S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-431-CA DIVISION: 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, etc., Plaintiff, vs. JERMAINE ROBINSON, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Jermaine Robinson Last Known Address 1842 Stonemill Creek Wewahitchka, FL 32454 Ursula Robinson Last Known Address 1842 Stonemill Creek Wewahitchka, FL 32454 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclosure a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: Exhit “A” COMMENCE AT A 4” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (AS MONUMENTED) FOR A DISTANCE OF 225,60 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD (HAVING A 60 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 211.56 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B, NO. 6596 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EASY ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 105.78 FEET TO A 1/2-DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L. B. NO 6596, THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 481.29 FEET TO A 1(2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.S, NO. 6596, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 411.0 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND TOP OF BANK OF STONE MILL CREEK; THEN TURN RIGHT AND MEANDER UPSTREAM ALONG THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND TOP OF BANK FOR 208 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE DEPARTING THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND THE TOP OF BANK, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 326.5 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B, 6596; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 431.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with 2006 Nobility, Kingswood, 66x28 manufactured home, Serial No: N8-12961AB, located on the property. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Lance Paul Cohen, the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Cohen & Thurston, P.A. 1723 Blanding Boulevard, Suite 102, Jacksonvilee, Florida 32210, within thirty (30) days from the first date of publication of this notice, on or before January 9, 2012, and filed the original with the Clerk of the Court either before service on the Plaintiff’s attorney’s or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on the 29th day of November, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: Tanya Knox Dec 29, 2011 Jan 5, 2012 36288 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-CA-000230 FIRST TENNESSEE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. VIENTO BEACH, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company, STEVEN BRADLEY, JON LAPLANTE, and BRAD ZEITLIN, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered on December 6, 2011, in that certain cause pending in the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein FIRST TENNESSEE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff, and VIENTO BEACH, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company, STEVEN BRADLEY, JON LAPLANTE, and BRAD ZEITLIN, are Defendants, in Civil Action Cause No. 2011-CA-000230, I, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the aforesaid Court, will at 11:00 a.m. (EST), on January 12, 2012, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash at the Courthouse Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes, the following described real and personal property, situate and being in Gulf County, Florida to-wit: REAL PROPERTY DESCRIPTION (collectively referred to in Exhibit 6 as the “Land”): EXHIBIT “1” LEGAL DESCRIPTION A portion of Government Lot 2 of Section 27, Township 7 South, Range 11 West; Gulf County, Florida, Being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the 6 inch triangular concrete monument marking the point of intesection of the Southwesterly right of way line of State Road 30 (U.S. Highway 98) with the West line of said Government Lot 2; thence along the Southwesterly right of way line of said State Road 30 S4659’33”E, 622.44 feet to the iron rod marking the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right of way line, S4619’17”E, 621.66 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said right of way line, S4323’47”W, 182.84 feet to an iron rod; thence N6536’09”W, 184.77 feet to an iron rod; thence N4639’36”W, 150.06 feet to an iron rod; thence N4311’46”E, 42.89 feet to an iron rod; thence N4634’48”W, 149.98 feet to an iron rod; thence S4330’09”W, 10.00 feet to an iron rod; thence N4640’42”W, 149.91 feet to an iron rod; thence N4414’39”E, 213.47 feet to the Point of Beginning EXHIBIT “2” LEGAL DESCRIPTION PARCEL A: Commence at the Northwest corner of Original Government Lot 2, Section 27, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South along the West line of said Original Government Lot 2, a distance of 170.28 feet to the Southwesterly right-ofway boundary of U. S. Highway No. 98, thence run South 46 degrees 47 minutes 20 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 32.50 feet to a concrete monument for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning thence run South 00 degrees 49 minutes 18 seconds West 1078.04 feet to a rod and cap, thence run South 89 degrees 10 minutes 03 seconds East 150.01 feet to a rod and cap, thence run South 00 degrees 50 minutes 44 seconds West 193.48 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of Butler Bay Road, thence run along said right-of-way boundary as follows: South 87 degrees 53 minutes 27 seconds East 192.16 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 3307.00 feet thru a central angle of 03 degrees 45 minutes 47 seconds for an arc distance of 217.19 feet, the chord of said arc being North 87 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds East 217.15 feet, thence North 82 degrees 19 minutes 33 seconds East 332.21 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 1020.00 feet thru a central angle of 06 degrees 18 minutes 49 seconds for an arc distance of 112.40 feet, the chord of said arc being North 86 degrees 41 minutes 05 seconds East 112.34 feet, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 25 degrees 57 minutes 22 seconds East 202.88 feet to a rod and cap on the Southwesterly right-ofway boundary of U. S. Highway No. 98, thence run North 46 degrees 01 minutes 15 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 245.62 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 44 degrees 03 minutes 59 seconds West 182.90 feet to a rod and cap, thence run North 64 degrees 56 minutes 55 seconds West 184.74 feet to a rod and cap, thence run North 43 degrees 35 minutes 15 seconds East 43.19 feet, thence run North 46 degrees 01 minutes 19 seconds West 299.81 feet to a rod and cap, thence run South.44 degrees 10 minutes 01 seconds West 9.98 feet to a rod. and cap, thence run North 45 degrees 59 minutes 38 seconds West 450.90 feet to a rod and cap, thence run North 43 degrees 58 minutes 02 seconds East 77.59 feet to a rod and cap, thence run North 45 degrees 41 minutes 44 seconds West 60.24 feet to a rod and cap, thence run North 45 degrees 00 minutes 45 seconds East 12.08 feet to a rod and cap, thence run North 45 degrees 57 minutes 11 seconds West 112.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 00 degrees 44 minutes 56 seconds East 164.79 feet to a concrete monument on the Southwesterly right-of -way boundary of said U. S. Highway No. 98, thence run North 43 degrees 07 minutes 43 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 34.46 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 12.50 acres, more or less. AND ALSO: PARCEL B: Commence at the Northwest corner of Original Government Lot 2, Section 27, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South along the West line of said Original Government Lot 2, a distance of 170.28 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of U. S. Highway No. 98, thence run South 46 degrees 47 minutes 20 seconds East along said rightof-way boundary 32.50 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 49 minutes 18 seconds West 1078.04 feet to a rod and cap, thence run South 89 degrees 10 minutes 03 seconds East 150.01 feet to a rod and cap, thence run South 00 degrees 50 minutes 44 seconds West 259.48 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Butler Bay Road for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run along said right-of-way boundary as follows: South 87 degrees 53 minutes 27 seconds East 193.08 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 3373.00 feet thru a central angle of 03 degrees 49 minutes 20 seconds for an arc distance of 225.01 feet, the chord of said arc being North 87 degrees 24 minutes 58 seconds East: 224.97 feet, thence North 82 degrees 19 minutes 33 seconds East 334.05 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 954.00 feet thru a central angle of 26 degrees 05 minutes 55 seconds for an arc distance of 434.55 feet, the chord of said arc being South 83 degrees 22 minutes 55 seconds East 430.81 feet to a rod and cap, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 44 minutes 36 seconds West 337.92, feet to the approximate mean high waterline of St. Joseph Bay, thence run along said approximate mean high waterline as follows: North 63 degrees 40 minutes 02 seconds West 272.75 feet, thence North 67 degrees 15 minutes 51 seconds West 182.34 feet, thence North 72 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds West 188.39 feet, thence North 69 degrees 10 minutes 56 seconds West 33.72 feet, thence North 60 degrees 00 minutes 08 seconds West 28.34 feet, thence North 40 degrees 55 minutes 41 seconds West 30.46 feet, thence North 29 degrees 15 minutes 17 seconds West 38.17 feet, thence North 50 degrees 06 minutes 03 seconds West 28.67 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said Butler Bay Road, thence leaving said approximate mean high waterline run South 82 degrees 19 minutes 33 seconds West, along said right-of-way boundary 42.08 feet to the approximate mean high waterline of said St. Joseph Bay, thence run along said approximate mean high waterline as follows: South 27 degrees 17 minutes 38 seconds West 17.03 feet, thence South 66 degrees 21 minutes 16 seconds West 27.92 feet,thence South 87 degrees 23 minutes 16 seconds West 51.95 feet, thence North 88 degrees 18 minutes 10 seconds West 41.43 feet, thence South 79 degrees 59 minutes 47 seconds West 54.04 feet, thence South 75 degrees 08 minutes 56 seconds West 49.87 feet, thence North 88 degrees 31 minutes 58 seconds West 148.08 feet, thence South 86 degrees 13 minutes 04 seconds West 45.81 feet, thence leaving said approximate mean high waterline run North 00 degrees 50 minutes 44 seconds East 46.35 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 3.81 acres, more or less. EXHIBIT “3” LEGAL DESCRIPTION Commence on the West line of Lot Two (2), Section 27, T7S, R11W, where the West line enters into St. Joseph’s Bay; being the Southwest corner of said Lot, thence run North parallel with said West line 270 feet; thence run East with right angle to said West line 150 feet; thence run South 270 feet, more or less, to St. Joseph’s Bay, thence run Westerly along-St. Joseph’s Bay 150 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. Subject to mineral rights heretofore conveyed. EXHIBIT “4” LEGAL DESCRIPTION Beginning at a point South 05 degrees 25 minutes East 102.458 feet from the Northwest corner of Government Lot 4, Section 27, Township 7, Range 11, South and West, intersecting a point 121.833 feet Southwest of a triangular concrete monument, a permanent reference mark of St. Joe Paper Company. The point of beginning is also the point of intersection of the South right of way line of US Highway 98, 60 feet South of the center line of said highway, and the North right of way line of Old US Highway 98, 33 feet from the center line of said Old Highway. Thence North 46 degrees 50 minutes West following the South right of way line of US Highway 98 a distance of 365.083 feet to the center line of a concrete culvert under the Highway. Thence South 25 degrees 04 minutes West 220.250 feet to a stake on the North right of way line of Old US Highway 98; thence in an Easterly direction following the curved right of way line on North side of Old US Highway 98 to the point of beginning. EXHIBIT “5” LEGAL DESCRIPTION All of Las Palmas Subdivision according to the Plat thereof recorded in the public records of Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 4, Page 16. EXHIBIT “6” PERSONAL PROPERTY DESCRIPTION l .All of the buildings and improvements located on the Land and all right, title and interest of VIENTO BEACH, LLC (“Borrower”) in and to any utility lines and/or improvements located on the Land or in which Borrower has any interest in connection with the Land, and all right, title and interest of the Borrower in and to the streets and roads abutting the Land to the center lines thereof, and strips and gores within or adjoining the Land, the air space and rights to use said air space above the Land, all rights of ingress and egress by motor vehicles to parking facilities on or within the Land, all easements now or hereafter affecting, or inuring to the benefit of the owner of the Land, including, without limitation, the Borrower’s rights under any easement and related agreements and royalties and all rights appertaining to the use and enjoyment of the Land, including, without limitation, alley, vault, drainage, mineral, water, oil and gas rights, together with any and all other rights, privileges and interests appurtenant thereto (collectively, the “Premises”). 2. All fixtures and articles of personal property and all appurtenances and additions thereto and substitutions or replacements thereof, owned by the Borrower and attached to, contained in, or used in connection with the Premises (thought not attached thereto) or placed on any part thereof (collectively, the “Equipment”), (exclusive of any articles of personal property owned by any tenants occupying the Premises) including, but not limited to, all screens, awnings, shades, blinds, curtains, draperies, carpets, rugs, furniture and furnishings, heating, electrical, mechanical, lighting, plumbing, ventilating, air conditioning, refrigerating, incinerating and elevator equipment and systems, stoves, ranges, vacuum cleaning systems, call systems, sprinkler systems and other fire prevention and extinguishing apparatus and materials, motors, machinery, pipes, appliances, equipment, fittings and fixtures, and the trade name, goodwill and books and records relating to the business operated on the Premises. 3. All of Borrower’s “equipment” and “general intangibles” (as quoted terms are deemed in the Uniform Commercial Code of the State of Florida) located at the Premises, together with the benefits of all deposits and payments made thereon by Borrower. 4. All leases, letting, rental agreements, use agreements, occupancy agreements and licenses, if any, of the Premises or any portion thereof (collectively, the “Leases”) and all right, title and interest of the Borrower thereunder, including, without limitation, the rights of the Borrower, as lessor, in respect of cash, promissory notes and securities deposited thereunder and the right to receive and collect the rents, issues and profits thereof and any other sums payable thereunder (the “Rents”). 5. All unearned premiums, accrued, accruing or to accrue under insurance policies obtained, or caused to be obtained, by the Borrower and the Borrowers’ interest in and to all proceeds of the conversion, voluntary or involuntary, of the Land and/or personal property described herein (the “Property”) or any part thereof into cash or liquidated claims, including, without limitation, proceeds of casualty insurance, title insurance or any other insurance maintained on the Premises and the Equipment or any part of either thereof, and all awards and/or other compensation (collectively “Awards”) made to the owners of the Premises and the Equipment or any part of either thereof by any governmental or other lawful authorities for the taking by eminent domain, condemnation or otherwise, of all or any part the Property or any easement or other right therein, including Awards for any change of grade of streets. 6. All extensions, improvements, betterments, substitutes and replacements of, and all additions and appurtenances to, the Premises and the Equipment, acquired by or released to the Borrower or constructed, assembled or placed on the Premises, and all conversions of the security constituted thereby, immediately upon such acquisition, release, construction, assembling, placement or conversion, as the case may be. Said sale will be made pursuant to and in order to satisfy the terms of said Final Judgment of Foreclosure. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 6th day of December, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of the Court By /s/ B.A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiff: Joseph E. Foster, Esq. FL Bar No.: 282091 AKERMAN SENTERFITT Post Office Box 231 420 South Orange Ave. Suite 1200 Orlando, FL 32802-0231 (407) 423-4000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dec 29, 2011 Jan 5, 2012

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 5, 2012 The Star | B7 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 76115S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No.: 2011-CA-000394 Division#: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft and Theresa Faye Croft a/k/a Theresa F. Croft a/k/a Teresa Croft, Husband and Wife; Unknown Tenants in Possession #l, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGSPROPERTY TO: Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft, WHOSE RESIDENCE IS: 1403 Dewitt Street, Panama City, FL 32401 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT 9, BLOCK “I”, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17’24”E. ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE, RUN S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. ALONG THE SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 58’26”W. FOR 141.42 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N. 62 DEGREES 20’46’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 85 DEGREES 19’08’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 200.35 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 439.00 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID CORN GRIFFIN STREET; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59’26”E. ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A NONTANGENT CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 17 DEGREES 21’10”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 82 DEGREES 46’56”E. FOR 53.40 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 53.61 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 403.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 1.94 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND BEING SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING 60 FOOT PRIVATE ROAD, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26’W. ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 652.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 499.32 FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N.00 DEGREES 00’34’W, 60.00 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY, NORTHERLY, AND WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 497.94 FEET; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 456.59 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 25.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 75 DEGREES 40’09”E. 99.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 101.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 144.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 92 DEGREES 07’41 “, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 30’55”E. 341.34 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 381.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE, THENCE N. 00 DEGREES 00’34”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 59’26”E. 56.57 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17’24”E. ALONG SAID EAST LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 59’26”W. 141.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 157.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 00’34”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 12.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 93 DEGREES 00’26”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 57’18”W. 256.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 287.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 84 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 90.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 75 DEGREES 40’09”W. 59.61 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 56 DEGREES 19’45”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 432.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 367.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 81 DEGREES 11’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 08 DEGREES 34’29”W. 477.23 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 519.54 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 81 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 244.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 334.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 61 DEGREES 18’02”E. 228.98 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 233.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 41 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 146.20 FEET, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 65 DEGREES 38’59”E. 120.56 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.26 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 155.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42’03”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 45 DEGREES 38’58”E. 217.35 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 240.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 18.56 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S. 90 DEGREES 00’00”W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 17.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 95.46 FEET; A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42’04”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 45 DEGREES 38’58”W. 133.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 147.78 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 206.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 48 DEGREES 41’59”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 65 DEGREES 38’59”W. 170.03 FEET; THENCE SOUTH76109S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2009-CA-000438 Division: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH BURKHART and CARL BURKHART, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH BURKHART; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARL BURKHART, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on December 16, 2011, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 188 WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 188 NEEDLE GRASS WAY, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse on January 26, 2012 at 11:00am E.T. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of December, 2011. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 6125S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000260 RBC BANK (USA) F/K/A RBC CENTURA BANK Plaintiff, vs. OUELLETTE, ROBERT, ET AL Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ROBERT DONALD OUELLETTE, JR. AKA ROBERT D. QUELLETTE, JR., 1101 CONSTITUTION DRIVE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 ROBERT DONALD OUELLETTE, JR. AKA ROBERT D. OUELLETTE, JR., 519 MAINE AVE., PANAMA CITY, FL 32401 AMY CREWS OUELLETTE, 1101 CONSTITUTION DRIVE, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 AMY CREWS OUELLETTE, 519 MAINE AVE., PANAMA CITY, FL 32401 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gulf County, Florida: LOT EIGHT (8) BLOCK 97 OF UNIT NO. 4, ST. JOESEPH’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 40 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and the file original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or on or before January 23, 2012; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the in the Complaint. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 15th day of December, 2011. REBECCA L. (BECKY) NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at PO BOX 826, MARIANNA, FL 32448, 850-718-0026. If hearing or voice impaired contact (TDD) (800) 955-8771 via Florida Relay System. Jan 5, 12, 2012 76065S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 11-197CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. CARLA S. PATTERSON, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 20, 2011 and entered in Civil Case No. 11-197CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and CARLA S. PATTERSON is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 26th day of January, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: EXHIBIT “A” Description: Lots 1 thru 5 and Tract A, Block M, Howard Creek Properties, unrecorded subdivision of a portion of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, and a portion of Section 6, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida. Thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East along the South line of said Southeast Quarter of Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 232.89 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 331.90 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 197.22 feet; said arc having a chord of 197.16 feet bearing North 27 degrees 47 minutes 03 seconds West; thence North 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds West for 224.90 feet; thence South 59 degrees 41 minutes 14 seconds West for 218.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds East for 224.90 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 2016.30 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 177.98 feet, said arc having a chord of 177.92 feet bearing South 27 degrees 47 minutes 03 seconds East; thence South 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds East for 227.39 feet; thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East for 241.76 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT Lot 3, Block M Description: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East along the South line of said Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 564.79 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 105.13 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 26 degrees 36 minutes 12 seconds West for 105.12 feet, to the Point of Beginning. Thence South 62 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West for 218.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2016.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 83.1 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 29 degrees 07 minutes 56 seconds West for 83.10 feet; thence North 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds West for 12.40 feet; thence North 59 degrees 41 minutes 14 seconds East for 218.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds East for 12.40 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 92.09 feet, the chord of said arc bearing South 29 degrees 07 minutes 56 seconds East for 92.09 feet to the Point of Beginning. DATED this 21st day of December, 2011 REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 76047 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.’ 11 CA 000251CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TROY LEWIS FAIRCHILD COLLEEN WINONIA FAIRCHILD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, et al Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 20, 2011, and entererd in 11 CA 000251CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, is the Plaintiff and TROY LEWIS FAIRCHILD; COLLEEN WINONA FAIRCHILD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant (s). Rebecca Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 ET on January 26, 2012, following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, so wit: LOTS 2 AND 3, BLOCK 10, LESS THE SOUTH 25 FEET OF LOT 3, BLOCK 10 CORRECTIVE PLAT OF TWIN LAKES, ACCORDING TOTHE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of December, 2011. Rebecca L Norris Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402; Phone: 850747-5327; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771; Email: ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org Jan 5, 12, 2012 D. Stephens Concrete Services,LLCQuality, Affordable Concrete Work and Small Tractor Work 38 Yrs. Experience, Licensed, Insured Residential & Commercial Office: 850-674-5887 Home: 850-674-5026 Cell: (850) 643-1723 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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B8| The Star Thursday, January 5, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space212 Hwy 98-Town Centre Building1st, 2nd, 3rd oor suites avail; +/-1700-2250sf; $6.75-$8.75psf mod gross202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-4915,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 230 Reid Avenue +/756 sf; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale407 Reid Avenue+/4988 sf: 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $349,500401 Reid Avenue+/5400 sf: Retail space; $165,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for termsLoggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; inquire for terms; $399,000 71 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms SO LD wntownApalac LEASED mo mod gross SO LD building in Ma ailforlease;In 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 Beachside FOR RENT MEXICO BEACHVillas of Mexico Beach 3706 Hwy 98, New Condos Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 – Furnished 3bd/3ba West End Harbor – Unit 4-104 Fully Furnished 1bd/2ba 604 Fortner Avenue – Duplex Furnished 2bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIALST. JOE BEACH113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 – 7314 W. Hwy 98, St. Joe Beach Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL Coronado #4 – 7318 W. Hwy 98, St. Joe Beach Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIALWINDMARK BEACH212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse-Unit #4 Fully Furnished 2bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse-Unit #6 Fully Furnished 2 bd/2ba SNOW BIRD SPECIAL Carr’s Bungalow#2 155 Beach Street 1bd/1ba Carr’s Bungalow #3 159 Beach Street 1bd/1baINDIAN PASS8822 – CR 30A – Right down from Raw Bar Pictures available on MLS #243890 Unfurnished 3bd/2baCAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision Unfurnished 4bd 101 Two Palms Drive – Two Palm Subdivision Furnished and covered pool 3bd/3ba Small pet allowed with pet depositPORT ST. JOE1903 Juniper Avenue Unfurnished 3bd/2ba 1206 Palm Blvd Partially Furnished 1.5 bd Eagle Landing – Ponderosa Pines – Jones Homestead Partially Furnished 2bd/2ba 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 HELP WANTEDPRIME RESTAURANT INC. Kitchen Manager or Asst. Kitchen Manager with Culinary experience. Send Resume to: 1302 Hwy 98 #3G Mexico Beach, FL 32456 1 br, 1 ba cabin on Chipola River in Scottsferry, Florida. Exterior constructed with bat and board cypress, two porches and metal roof. Interior ceilings and walls tongue and groove juniper, floor ceramic tiles. Cabin sits on a 1/2 acre with an 8’x10’ pump house, 12’x20’ screened in cook shed and 12’x18’ covered boat slip. Concrete boat ramp also on property, $115,000 call 850-674-5026 Wewahitchka -156 Patrick St. 2br 2ba Single Family, Fixerupper. Owner Financing or Cash Discount. $500 Down $369/mo. Call 803-978-1540 or 803-403-9555 House Wanted in Port St JoeMinimal Needs At least 1 br, 1 bath. (not an efficiency) w/ internet. A quiet and secure location. Garage a plus! Writer and mature seminary graduate who is needing a place to finish editing books. 850-502-1803 PSJ -3br 2.5ba, central Heat and Air, non Smoking, Downtown. $800/mo + $500 dep. Call 850-227-2077 HOME FOR RENT AT WILLIS LANDINGA Nature Lovers Paradise!! Quality Custom home 9ft Ceiling’s, Hardwood floor’s, tile, kitchen bar.Located next to Willis Landing Boat ramp on the Brothers River. Located 10 miles south of Wewahitchka and only 18 miles north of beautiful Mexico Beach and only 32 miles from Panama City. The Apalachicola River is only a 15 minute boat ride.1,600 SF 3 Bed/2 Bath $800/month. Call 850-689-8881or e-mail monique@crestviewsite.c om Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Creative ServicesGraphic DesignerFor comm. print/sign bus. Job duties incl designing print, signage & marketing items, manage digital output for pre press & prod. Cust. serv. skills req. Mac OS X Adobe Creative Suite, QuarkXPress skills req. Full benefits pkg. send resume to ramseysprinting@fairpoint.net Web ID#: 34190356 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Brunswick billiards regulation size table. One inch marble slate, leather pockets with solid oak ball and claw legs. All accessories included $3000 Call 850-674-5026 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 175.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 41 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 274.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 40’40”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 61 DEGREES 18’02”W. 187.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 191.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 81 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 175.00 FEET; THENCE N. 42 DEGREES 54’14”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 38.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 210.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49’51 “, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 25 DEGREES 59’18”E. 122.20 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N.09 DEGREES 04’22”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 78.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 487.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 55’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N.06 DEGREES 20’44”W. 185.24 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 186.37 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S.90 DEGREES 00’00”W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 63.28 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 18’47”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 07 DEGREES 45’39”E. 178.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CUR’JE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 158.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE S.09 DEGREES 04’22”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 76.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49’52”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 25 DEGREES 59’18”W. 87.29 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 88.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 42 DEGREES 54’14’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 111.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 85 DEGREES 44’46”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 06 DEGREES 46’55”E., 561.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 639.03 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S.56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 120.10 FEET; THENCE S.57 DEGREES 15’51 “W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 272.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DE-SAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 286 DEGREES 15’35”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 32 DEGREES 44’09”E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.81 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC; THENCE N. 57 DEGREES 15’51 “E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 298.97 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 153.33 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 496.00 FEET; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 454.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50’38”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 00 DEGREES 00’34’E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 452.89 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02”W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. more commonly known as 131 Corn Griffin Street, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30) days after tiie first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th day of December, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS Circuirt and County Courts By: Tina Money Deputy Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 76127S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1112-05 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: PIPE AS INDICATED ON SPECIFICATION SHEETS Please place YOUR COMPANY NAME, SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER on the outside of your envelope, and provide three copies of your proposal. Bids must be submitted to and specifications may be obtained from the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 by 4:30 p.m., E.T. on Friday, January 27, 2012. Bids will be opened at this same location on Monday, January 30, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Any questions concerning this bid should be directed to Don Butler, Gulf County Administrator at (850) 229-6106 or (850) 227-8971. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA /s/ Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Jan 5, 12, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more Nothing works harder than the Classifieds Classifiedcan!If you re ready to move up or are j ust starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town And if you re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market s best prospects.