<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03824
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 12-15-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03824

Full Text















YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937


Thursday, DECEMBER 15,2011 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com 50(





District tops FL in high school grad rate


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Gulf County Schools are
No. 1.
For the second consecu-
tive school year, Gulf Coun-
ty produced the top high
school graduation rate in
the state with 95.8 percent
of students entering high


school five years ago earn-
ing a diploma.
As comparison to neigh-
boring counties, Calhoun
County was at 90.2 percent,
Franklin at 72.5 percent and
Bay County at 81.5 percent.
The county's graduation
rate has steadily increased
each year since 2006-07,
when it was 85.1 percent.


The district topped the
state last year at more than
95 percent and finished
among the top three of all
districts in each of the past
three years.
The most recent num-
bers are for the 2009-10
school year.
"We've been in the top
three districts the last three


years, and I really think it
is a combination of things,"
said Sara Joe Wooten, as-
sistant superintendent for
instruction.
Teachers, Wooten said,
really care in this small
district of just less than
2,000 students, motivating
students and stressing the
importance in today's hy-


per-connected world of a
high school diploma.
"There is much credit to
the parents who get their
kids here and are involved,"
Wooten said. "They are en-
couraging and supporting
their children."
Guidance counselors
work well with teachers to
identify the "right shoe that


fits" each student, Wooten
continued.
"I also think we have
a variety of programs for
students," Wooten said.
"We've got so many pro-
grams in place for kids. We
have such a range of oppor-
tunities."

See GRADUATION A7


Protecting turtles


W HAT M e i-ern,: I.:::., dic-,ss .,.:::.lunr-ler
response needs and to sign up any.:::.r'e
who would like to assist.
WHEN Dec. 15 at 6 p.m. ET
WHERE St. Joseph Bay State Buffier
Preserve Center, 3915 State Road 3-:-A
Port St. Joe


B:iy iri January
24' I 1


Meeting tonight as researchers, volunteers prepare for winter stun events


By Valerie Garman
Star Staff Writer
A cold bay is no place for a sea
turtle.
Local turtle patrollers learned
that the hard way in January
2010, as hundreds of immobile
sea turtles washed to shore
around St. Joseph Bay during
a week of consistently frigid
temperatures.
This year, the group is
preparing for the worst, working
to make sure no turtle is stranded
in the bay this winter.
The Port St. Joe Turtle Patrol
in partnership with the University
of Florida Marine Turtle
Research Group is preparing for
cold-stun turtle events, and is in
need of volunteers.
Because sea turtles are
cold-blooded reptiles, they


rely on surrounding water
temperatures to regulate
their body temperatures. As
temperatures in shallow St.
Joseph Bay continue to drop,
juvenile sea turtles may become
"cold stunned."
Unable to withstand such
cold conditions, they become
immobile and can be found
floating in the water or washed
up on bay shorelines.
Brial Stephens, the lead
research biologist with the
University of Florida Marine
Turtle Research Group said the
turtles tend to stun when the
temperature stays in the mid to
lower 40s or below consistently
for a few days.
"St. Joseph Bay is generally
really shallow," Stephens said.
"When it starts to get really cold
outside, the shallow water gets


cold really quickly."
"They start to shut their
bodies down a little bit. The wind
then blows them to inshore
areas, where we typically
retrieve them."
"We're really considered
first responders in St. Joseph
Bay," said Jessica McKenzie,
volunteer coordinator for the
local turtle patrol. "It's a big
operation. There's a lot of
distance we have to cover, so
we're usually out there from
sun-up to sun-down."
Volunteers are needed this


winter for many
different tasks
Turtle

See TURTLES
A9 A


/-Ss


N


(
" "


A host of volunteers assisted in rescur-..:l
turtles during a cold-stun event last
year. Organizers are hoping to solicit
the community's help this year as winter
temperatures begin to arrive.


Mexico Beach supports police department


By Chris Olwell
Florida Freedom Newspapers
MEXICO BEACH A man
who showed up Tuesday
to address the City Coun-
cil gave the police chief a
chance to demonstrate
his usefulness to a city
government that consid-
ered eliminating its police
department when he es-
corted the speaker from


the building at the request
of the mayor.
As expected, the City
Council decided to keep
the police department in-
stead of contracting with
the Bay County Sheriff
's Office during its first
discussion on the mat-
ter Tuesday; city officials
have said the option was
considered for budgetary
reasons. That didn't stop


people from showing up
and giving the council an
earful.
In September, Bay
County Sheriff Frank McK-
eithen gave the council a
rough estimate of what it
would cost for his office to
take over law enforcement
in the town about the
same as it costs now. His
office also did an evalua-
tion of the department's


performance that outlined
deficiencies in several ar-
eas.
Mayor Al Cathey and
other council members
said the evaluation raised
concerns about the police.
But among the citizens
who showed up and ad-
dressed the council there
was overwhelming sup-
port for keeping the de-
partment and a general


sense that the process
might have lacked trans-
parency.
"I think most of you
sitting here, including
myself if I weren't the
mayor, wouldn't know
about some of the issues
I'm talking about...and
I'm not here to air dirty
laundry. I'm simply

See MBPD A7


Wewa


welcomes


St. Nick this


weekend

By Valerie Garman
Star StaffWriter
Santa Claus is coming
to Wewahitchka.
The annual
Wewahitchka Christmas
Parade will be held this
Saturday, Dec. 17, at 5 p.m.
CT at the corner of East
River Road and State 71.
Parade participants will
line up at Emerald Coast
Credit Union and head
north on State 71.
The parade, organized
by the city of Wewahitchka,
will feature decorated
cars, antique cars, horses,
police cruisers, fire trucks
and much more, said City
Clerk Connie Parrish.
Parrish said often
the most popular parade
participants for the
children are the decorated
Shriner go karts and mini
cars that perform tricks on
the street, weaving in and
out along the parade route.
"They entertain the
kids really good," Parrish
said. "And of course, Santa
Claus will be at the end on
the fire truck."
Parrish said the parade
has a lot of participation
this year, and is expected
to last at least 30 to 45
minutes.
Patrons can just
park anywhere and
everywhere, she said,
although most park in
the IGA parking lot.
Following the
Wewahitchka
Christmas Parade,
North Florida Child
Development Inc. will
raffle off two handcrafted
children's playhouses, one
tor a boy and one for a girl.
The raffle will take place
at Lake Alice Park, but
winners do not need to be
present to claim the prize.
The playhouses were
built by hand by inmates
at the Gulf Correctional
Institution, which partners
each year with NFCD in
its annual Bikes for Boys
and Girls of Gulf County
Campaign.
All proceeds from
the raffle will benefit the
Bikes for Boys and Girls
program, which provides
tricycles and bicycles
for needy children of
Gulf County in time for
Christmas.

See PARADE A6


FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS INTERACTIVE
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE


Subscribe to The Star
800-345-8688
For your hometown paper
delivered to your home!


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Opinion ..................................... A4-A5 School News.............................. B3
Letters to the Editor ................. A5 Faith........................................... B4
Outdoors ................................... A 10 Obituaries.................................. B4
Sports...................................... Al 1-12 Classifieds.................................. B7-B8


Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET
Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET
Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278
Classified deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020


NE *I






A2 I The Star


Local


Thursday, December 15, 2011


Main, David Barnhart and a helper drove from Jefferson County to help Hi.lci-r-id V,
till her garden. Inset, Barnhart works in Palmer's garden on a recent weeke-nd


By Valerie Gorman
Star Staff Writer


He sets up his stand at
City Commons Park every
other Saturday between
April and November like
clockwork.
He lays out his bounty
of fresh fruits and
vegetables, all grown
pesticide-free, and waits
for his regular customers,
many of whom won't


buy their produce from
anybody but him.
David Barnhart and
his father have been
traveling from their home
in Jefferson County to
Port St. Joe for the Salt Air
Farmers' Market since it
began, and although the
market has closed for the
season, with the help of
local hotel owner David
Warriner, Barnhart and his
father will continue selling


produce in Port St. Joe
through the winter.
Warriner has offered
Barnhart a space in front
of the old bank building
next to the Port Inn on the
corner of Sixth Street and
U.S. 98, so he can continue
setting up his stand every
other weekend in Port St.
Joe.
Barnhart will be at that
location this Saturday
selling produce from 9 a.m.


until noon ET.
"The fact that we don't
have a farmers' market
here (in the winter) doesn't
mean that his stuff stops
growing," Warriner said.
"We're trying to find him
a place that's a little more
visible in the off-season."
Warriner said he is
also in the process of
revamping the old gas
station parking lot, next to
the former Dollar General


FRIDAY DECEMBER 16T 8:00PM

Live Music with Buddy Hamm

Finger Foods & Drink Specials All Night

SATURDAY DECEMBER 17TH 8:00PM

Drink Specials Free Wings & $1 Drafts


117 Sailors Cove Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-3463


on U.S. 98 between Second
and Third Street, which
could also offer a potential
location for Barnhart's
produce stand.
Barnhart is just happy
he and his father can
continue coming to Port St.
Joe on the first and third
Saturday of every month.
"I just want to come
over and bring my
produce," Barnhart
said. "The people here
are just so great and so
welcoming."
Barnhart's father,
Willard, has been fighting
cancer, and traveling to
different markets around
the state helps him regain
lost energy, Barnhart said.
"This has been a real
good market and my father
loves it," Barnhart said.
"This really energizes him;
he loves it over here."
An entomologist by
trade, Barnhart uses his
knowledge of insects to
grow produce without
using any chemicals or
pesticides.
For fertilizer, he uses a
fish emulsion, a nitrogen-
rich substance made by
decaying fish in the sun.
Barnhart said the
pilgrims and Native
Americans used a similar
process to grow crops for
the first Thanksgiving
almost 400 years ago.
Barnhart describes it as
a natural Miracle Grow.
The emulsion has
helped Barnhart's winter
crop pop up plenty of
fresh produce, including
broccoli, cauliflower,
mustard greens, carrots,
rutabagas, radishes,
spinach, arugula, kale,
tangerines and much
more.


Barnhart likes to
specialize in growing the
unfamiliar and exotic. At
any point in the season
you might come across
red okra, garnet mustard,
curry leaf mustard,
pineapple, kiwis and a
variety of melons. He also
has avocado trees that
tower above his 6-foot-
something frame.
The Barnhart family
owns a combined 160 acres
of farmland in Jefferson
County, and harvests
about 50 acres at a time of
whatever is in season.
The Barnharts were
also named the 2011
Jefferson County Farm
Family of the Year by the
Jefferson County Farm
Bureau in September, for
their exemplification of
rural values.
In September, Barnhart
came down with a helper
and brought plants
and seeds for Jeanette
Palmer's garden, located
on the corner of Dolphin
Street and Porpoise
Avenue in Highland View.
Since then, the crops
have filled in, with cabbage,
broccoli and collard greens
sprouting from the earth.
Barnhart returned last
weekend to help Palmer till
and weed her garden.
Palmer, an advocate for
local, fresh produce, hopes
the crops from her garden
can help Gulf County
People Helping People,
also located in Highland
View, by providing fresh
produce for the food
pantry.
"What goes around
comes around," Palmer
said. "I just want everyone
to have access to local,
fresh produce."


NE *I




Thursday, December 15, 2011


Local


DUREN'S PIGGLY WIGGLY IS OPEN FROM 6AM TO 10PM DAILY
ON CHRISTMAS DAY WE WILL BE OPEN FROM 7AM TO 2PM
LET THE "PIG" PREPARE YOUR HOLIDAY MEAL. WHETHER IT IS
DINNER FOR TWO, ORA BANQUET FOR TWO HUNDRED, WE CAN
COOK TO SUIT YOUR NEEDS.


MEAT DEPARTMENT
BUTT PORTION HAMS SHANK PORTION
$1.49/LB M $1.29/LB


FRESH HENS ................................................... 990/LB
BONELESS FRYER BREAST ...............................$1 .89/LB
BONELESS PORK LOIN (WHOLE ONLY)......... $1.79/LB


GROCERY
PW SUGAR 4LB $1.99
(LIMIT 1 WITH $25 OR MORE FOOD ORDER)


STANDING RIBEYE ROAST .............................. $5.99/LB
40/50CT FRESH SHRIMP.................................. $5.99/LB
STEAMED FREE!!


KRAFT MAYO 300Z
$2.49


27-300Z FOLGERS COFFEE............................$7.99 PREMIUM SALTINES 1LB BOX .......... ..............$1.75
DUNCAN HINES CAKE MIX ......... ................880 BOX ENRICHED WHITE LILY FLOUR 5LB ..................$2.00
PRODUCE
FRUIT BASKETS MADE ESPECIALLY TO FIT YOUR
SPECIAL OCCASION $14.95 $19.95
SWEET POTATOES CELERY 390 (STALK) BANANAS
I1 D/00& R 3LB/99O


JLU/ 77 "1r 8LB FL GRAPEFRUIT ...................................... $3.49
8LB FL ORANGES ..................... .....,,,........... $3.49
8LB RED DELICIOUS APPLES ..........................$3.49/LB
DELI
BOARS HEAD MEAT AND CHEESE TRAYS
FRUIT AND VEGETABLES TRAYS MR
HAMS AND TURKEYS
"BAKED AND PREPARED FOR YOUR HOLIDAY MEAL"
PARTY TRAYS
FINGERS SANDWICHES
DRUMMETTES
TRADITIONAL SIDE DISHES
DESSERTS
DELI WILL BE SERVING TRADITIONAL
CHRISTMAS DINNER ON CHRISTMAS DAY
FROM 10AM 1PM


H SMI I *I : I v ''




( SEI OROFNDFURONETAIC
[e~l I 'A4![ l,1 Z] [:,l,.!L Jl .[.f1l


WWW.DURENSPIGGLYWIGGLY.COM


C


(


OR FIND US ON FACEBOOK
DUREN'S PIGGLY WIGGLY

(if (E


NE *I


SPECIAL APPEARANCE BY
R. PIG AT THE DUREN'S PIGGLY
WIGGLY CHRISTMAS FEST!


tc


NOW ACCEPTINGORDERS FOR CHISTMAS DINNE


The Star A3


I-


p q


vO FZ ""


J


OM





ON


LI











A4 I The Star Oinion


Thursday, December 15, 2011


Dancing in




the car


It was close to 40
degrees on this last day
of November. Life was
catching up with me and
I was tired before the day
had even started.
Backing out of the
driveway, I turned
on the music in my
car and decided I
would not let this
day get the best
of me. It was my
birthday! CRAN
Motown, here I TRA
come. TBA
As the O'Jays B
started belting
out "Love Train," my body
was moving faster than my
car going down the street
leaving my house. The only
thing better than singing
in the shower, is dancing in
the car.
Leaving my
neighborhood, the car was
literally bouncing from my
movements inside. I was
just warming up.
My commute is about
30 minutes on a normal
morning down Interstate
64 on the Virginia
Peninsula. Everyone in
my car decided we would
dance all the way to work. I
was alone.
The antics of a
borderline middle-aged
nut embarrass spouses,
children and friends.
However, on this morning,
there was no one to
embarrass but myself and I
was in the car.
Heated seats are nice.
My vehicle has about
180,000 miles on it, but the
heated seats work just
fine. The heated seats are
also good for dancing in
the car. My backside was
sliding from left to right as I
merged onto the interstate;
it was time for some real
car dancing.
Safely controlling the
vehicle with my left hand, I
continued to slide from left
to right in the seat and do
a lasso move with my right
hand. Think cowboy about
to rope a calf.
I had caught a nice open
stretch on the interstate,
with the exception of a
white Mercedes that was
right behind me. In my rear
view mirror, I could tell the
driver was a female.
The lady in the
Mercedes pulled over into
the left lane and seemed to
want to pass. When she got
up beside me, she settled
in for the show. I danced
harder. I went from a right
handed lasso to a left
handed lasso and although
she couldn't see it, I was
getting in some nice hip
and pelvic moves.


i





C
H


THE STAR
USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: 1-800-345-8688


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Star
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone 850-227-1278


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months
Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.

TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


I looked over at her with
a happy smile that had a
touch of stupid in it. She
just looked back, with an
expression of concern. It
was unfulfilling to
me; I wanted her
to be entertained. I
could tell she was
an older woman,
but that was no
excuse.
A group of cars
KS MY were approaching
T from behind the
eTR free side by side
ard show I was putting
on for this woman.
The lady in the white
Mercedes slowed and got
back in behind me.
Cars were now passing
on my left. My seat was hot
and I was on a roll. I kept
playing the O'Jays' "Love
Train" over and over again.
I pretended Don Cornelius,
the host of "Soul Train"
(think 1970's) was saying,
"It's time for the Soul Train
line."
The Soul Train line was
when the dancers made
two lines and took turns
doing their best moves
between the lines.
My shoulder-shrugging
move was hitting close
to perfect and my head
bobbing chicken move was
dead on.
A school bus full of
children came by and
waved and laughed. They
were followed by two young
girls who proceeded to
dance with me from their
car. They got a special butt-
bump with the inside-of-
the-car-door move for their
enthusiasm.
The lady in the white
Mercedes came back up
on my left, again just to
watch. I was touching my
chin on the steering wheel
and then the back of my
head on the headrest to the
rhythm of the music. Again,
I looked over at her. The
lady still had no smile, but
more of an "Oh My" look on
her face.
Her lack of enjoyment
was disappointing to me.
She then eased
back in behind me for a
backstage view and to let
a refrigerated truck pass
on the left. As the truck
passed, I had started
throwing in some Kung
Ri dance moves while
continuing to try to throw
my shoulders out of whack.
The fellow on the
passenger of the truck side
laughed and pushed the
palms of his hands in the
air telling me to "pump
it up." I did I finally
switched from the O'Jays
to the Jackson 5. They were


Keyboard KLATTERINGS




intentions and perceptions


The decision by Port St.
Joe commissioners last
week not to stand in the way
of the creation of the Gulf
Coast Hope Center was
soundly based.
The application for a
business license to operate
the center
from an
office on the
property
of 5 Star
Paint and
Collision
was cut and
dried.
TIM CROFT The
Star news editor folks behind
the Gulf
Coast Hope
Center had jumped through
all the requisite hoops.
The office was moved
from the downtown
business district.
The folks behind the
effort had, as was stated
last week, done everything
asked by city officials.
There was no foundation
for commissioners to deny,
or in any way impede,
awarding the license.
And Rev Billy Fox of
the Panama City Rescue
Mission had every right
to wonder why the Hope
Center was being "singled
out" as it were, and asked
commissioners to put aside
many of their perceptions
in their consideration of the
facility.
Meanwhile, Mayor
Mel Magidson said he
believed he understood
the intentions of the folks
behind the center and saw
no reason to interfere.
All of which sounds fine
on its face, but intentions
bleeding into perceptions is
what the opposition to the
center is about, believing
that space does not exist is
like believing in the Tooth
Fairy.
Good intentions are


behind the Panama City
Rescue Mission; real-
life, heart-melting good
intentions.
That does not change the
perception that the mission
also is a magnet for those
who have no interest in
taking an extended hand up,
or using the Rescue Mission
as anything but a haven for
mischief.
A drive along the section
of Highway 98 in front of the
Rescue Mission is an eye-
opener.
Good intentions are what
led some local individuals
to envision the founding
of an outreach center and
to invite Fox and officials
from the Rescue Mission
to provide some insight on
challenges.
The perception of many
of those same original local
organizers, however, is that
the idea was subsumed by
a broader vision etched by
Fox, et al.
Good intentions
may have fueled the
establishment of an office
in the downtown business
district, but the perception
that the office had little
business smack in the
middle of the city's retail
center hardly seemed to
register on the folks in
charge of the Hope Center.
There is disconnect
borne of intentions and fed
by perceptions.
The intention provided
is to offer an outreach office
for the homeless of Gulf
County, even though there
seems no documented
homeless population in Gulf
County.
Folks in need are already
being placed with the
nearest services, according
to local law enforcement
officials, who direct their
ranks to put the down-on-
their-luck on the path to
services when the need


arises, quantified as several
times a year, once every
couple of months or so.
Those services are, in
general, found in Panama
City, not Port St. Joe or Gulf
County.
So if those in need, those
without a roof over their
heads and a warm meal
to sit down to, are already
being put in touch with
the Panama City Rescue
Mission, Hope Center
organizers leave open the
perception there is more
to this outreach office than
meets the eye.
Also left open to
question, and therefore
another dose of perception
about this outreach office,
is where those in need of
services will be coming
from if there is not a
documented homeless
population in Gulf County to
warrant an outreach office.
Does the office, as
many perceive, become a
magnet for a problem that
Gulf County, given its size
and level of resources, is
certainly ill-equipped to be
attracting the homeless
from elsewhere?
Furthermore, while
the stated intent is not to
provide food or shelter
at the Hope Center,
there is nothing in the
business license process
- other than a stating of
intent at last week's City
Commission meeting to
prohibit or constrain such
operations in the future.
The perception that
opponents of the Rescue
Mission are somehow
taking a hard-hearted
approach is belied by the
community in which that
opposition arises.
This is a community, like
so many small communities
around the country, that
takes great pride in taking
care of its own, embodied


in organizations such as
the Christian Community
Development Fund or
the dozens who gather
each Thanksgiving and
Christmas to provide warm
meals to hundreds who
might otherwise do without.
That community is
symbolized in the Bikes for
Boys and Girls Christmas
campaign, the Sheriff's
Office Christmas for Kids
and Families program, the
Kiwanis Club and Lions
Club Christmas outreach
programs.
That is a mere
sampling.
And the perception
those opponents of the Gulf
Coast Hope Center are
most troubled by is that of
the Panama City Rescue
Mission as a magnet
for all forms of mischief
and crime of which the
community wants no part.
The name on the
business license for the
Gulf Coast Hope Center is
the Panama City Rescue
Mission.
So it is incumbent
on Fox and city officials
to delineate between
intentions and perceptions.
Fox, local businessman
Matt Scoggins and
organizers of the Gulf
Coast Hope Center
must demonstrate their
intentions of providing
outreach services, and
nothing more, to those in
need who are directed to
the office.
That is a worthy effort.
But those organizers
must join and work with
city officials to vigilantly
ensure the Gulf Coast
Hope Center does not
become a Panama City
Rescue Mission satellite
that reinforces ugly
perceptions regarding the
ills such a facility can bring
upon the community.


How about a Memphis barber?


Back in the 1920s,
Will Rogers said, "I don't
make jokes. I just watch
the Congress and report
the facts." And then he
explained himself
by declaring,
"There's no trick to
being a humorist
when you have the
whole government
working for you."
And on presidential
races he threw in, HUI
"Politics has gotten DC
so expensive that it Kese
takes lots of money
to even get beat
with."
Now folks, if I could
write like that I wouldn't be
buried down here on the
bottom of page 4!
I watched two minutes
of a presidential debate the
other night and wondered
what 'ole Will would have
had to say about the finger
pointing, bemoaning,
name calling and general
confusion sifting through
the "selection process." He
might have scratched his
head and innocently-like
remarked, "It sorta looked
like one of those much-
ballyhooed survival shows
on steroids."
Finding the right person
to run our great nation
can't be this hard. We've got
well over 300 million people
in the United States. All
you've got to do to qualify to
run is be 35 years old and
a naturalized citizen. That
will take in a whole heap of
bodies!
Maybe we ain't (Will
said during the heights of
the Great Depression, "Lot
of people who don't say
ain't, ain't eating!") looking
in the right place. We're
trying to select a candidate
from those suit-wearing


N
Y


professional politicians
who, come election year,
jump up on talk shows
and newsreels like leaping
frogs. They spring from
the woodwork
"automatic"
S experts on health
care, economic
rectification,
foreign policy
and fundraising.
The emphasis,
KER naturally, seems
S to always be on
WN the fund raising
Colbert
aspects of the job.
How about we
elect a truck driver! You
ponder deep on that. You
can't tell me that a guy
running an 18- wheeler
from Banger, Maine, to
Astoria, Oregon, on a
regular basis wouldn't have
a clue about what's really
going on in America. Why,
the foreman at the loading
dock in South Banger
would fill him in on every
bad bill passed in the New
England area in the last 50
years, whether he wanted
to hear it or not! This gear
jammer would get a weekly
dose of down-to-earth, solid
advice from Dixie Faye,
the late night waitress at
the Conoco Truck Stop
just west of Springfield,
Ill. You talk about being on
the ground floor with mid-
America!
He'd share Dixie's
insight the next night at the
super Shell Center outside
of Denver over coffee and
a country fried chicken
steak with fellow drivers
from Houma, La., Great
Falls, Mont., and Escalon,
Calif. The Escalon driver,
quite naturally, would take
over the conversation with
his concerns for the San
Joaquin River ecological


system.
We need to elect
someone who has actually
had a real job for goodness
sakes! Health insurance to
a truck driver with a wife
and three children is not
some kind of political hot
potato. He's 17 years into a
30- year mortgage. He's not
pointing fingers at Fannie
Mae, nor has he "colluded"
with Bank of America or
sat on any high falluten
lending institutions' Board
of Trustees. He's the guy
paying for everything!
How about the
housewife in New Jersey?
You pick anyone of them
and you might find a
qualified presidential
candidate driving a
minivan. She's got a son to
deliver to soccer practice.
One daughter has a dance
recital rehearsal and
the youngest has a cross
country meet way over
in Piscataway. She's the
vice president of the PTA.
She's an active member
of the Red Cross. She
does charity work for
"Meals on Wheels." She
teaches a Sunday School
class, checks on her aging
mother-in-law daily and has
supper almost on the table
when her husband returns
from his job in the city. She
is the queen of diplomacy
and multitasking. Her
coolness under fire is
legendary. And her laugh
is infectious, her tears
are real and her roots run
deep.
This lady doesn't have
to look into a camera and
"declare" her love for
children or the need for
more school funding. She
won't have to "promote"
her stand on the homeless
or "explain" her position on


God, country or family. She
hasn't been talking about
what "this nation needs,"
she's too busy doing it!
We're looking at the glue
that has held America
together for two centuries.
The plain truth is, just like
the truck driver, she is too
important and needed right
where she is to run for
president.
We could elect one of
them good 'ole boys from
South Georgia; maybe
an alligator hunter from
down near the Okefenokee
Swamp. You chase
alligators for a living you
wouldn't have any problems
with a hostile Congress.
You wouldn't be intimidated
by threats and innuendoes
coming out of Pakistan and
Iran either. John Wayne's
birthday would become a
national holiday. And think
of the quotes he could
give CNN. "That senator
from Indiana that said he
didn't like gator tail ain't
nothing but a moccasin
snake."
How about the quiet
Iowa farmer? He has
invested his life in hogs
and corn fields. He's the
most honest guy in the
world. His word is his bond.
He wouldn't say so, and
he'd plumb blush if you
mentioned it, but he wrote
the book on truth, justice
and the American way.
Let's quit admiring him,
and start electing him!
Will Rogers also said,
"What the country needs
is dirtier fingernails and
cleaner minds." Now, he
might have been talking
about more than politics
there.

Respectfully,
Kes


NE ~*I


See CRANKS A5










A5 I The Star Letters


Thursday, December 15, 2011


Don't let hazards


ruin your holidays


The holiday season,
with excited children,
rushing parents, holiday
decorations and holiday
parties, can unfortunately
create potential for
accidental poisonings.
The staff of the Florida/
USVI Poison Information
Center in Jacksonville
would like to remind
everyone of the potential
poisoning hazards that
could threaten your holiday
cheer.
Holiday decorations at
this time of year often find
their way into a young child
or pet's mouth. Likewise,
alcoholic beverages left
unattended at family
parties have been known
to change holiday cheer
into a significant cause for
concern. The Poison Center
can be reached at (800)
222-1222, 24 hours a day,
to immediately help with
any of these concerns or
to answer questions about
these holiday hazards.
The following tips can
help you to ensure a safer
holiday season. Don't
forget to remind your
sleepover holiday guests to
keep their medications up,
out of reach and out of sight
of young children!
Do not thaw food
at room temperature;
this allows for bacterial
growth. Thaw frozen
food unwrapped in the
refrigerator.
Wash work areas,
utensils and hands after
contact with uncooked
meat.
Cook food carefully as
to prevent salmonella.
Salmonella is a common
and widespread cause
of food poisoning and is
typically found in raw
meats, poultry, eggs, milk,
fish and their byproducts.
Salmonella can only be
destroyed by cooking food
thoroughly to temperatures
above 140 degrees.
Though they're not
fatal poisons, poinsettias,
if consumed, can cause
some stomach pain and


even vomiting. Keep small
children and pets away
from poinsettias to keep the
plant pretty and the kids
and pets comfortable.
Antique ornaments
might have hidden
hazards. Be aware that
some older ornaments
may be decorated with
harmful lead paints or
contain poisonous liquids.
Bubble lights may contain
methylene chloride which
is toxic if the liquid is
swallowed.
The use of artificial
snow can cause respiratory
problems if not used in a
well-ventilated area.
Angel hair, made of spun
glass, is irritating to the
eyes and skin. Be mindful
of icicles or tinsel; both can
be a choking hazard if put in
the mouth.
Lamp oils can be toxic if
contents are swallowed and
coughed or vomited into the
lungs.
Artificial tree scents
often contain alcohol and
other irritants and can be
dangerous if swallowed or
sprayed into the eyes. Tree
preservatives should also
be kept away from children
and pets.
Many small decorations,
toy parts and batteries can
block a child's airway if
swallowed. If the decoration
or toy fits into the inside
of an empty toilet paper
roll, it might be too small
for very young children to
handle. Button batteries
are particularly dangerous
if swallowed and require
immediate medical
attention.
The Poison Help line
is available 24 hours a
day at (800) 222-1222 for
information or advice on
holiday poisoning hazards
or if you are experiencing
a poisoning emergency.
Program the number
into your phone for quick
access or download the free
iPhone App at www.aapcc.
org. When the problem is
poison, the answer is poison
control.


How to undo a Roth IRA conversion


We've all suffered buyer's
remorse say you buy something
you really can't afford or the item's
sudden drop in value make it seem,
in retrospect, a poor investment.
That's what has happened to some
people who've taken advantage of
IRS rules that allow
them to convert
a regular IRA or
401(k) into a Roth
IRA, only to later
discover it might not
have been the right
strategy.
JASON However, in this
ALDERMAN particular situation,
the IRS graciously
allows for a do-over, called a Roth
IRA "re-characterization." Read on
to learn how re-characterizations
work and whether you might be a
good candidate.
First, a brief primer on IRAs:
With regular IRAs, one contributes
pre-tax dollars, which lowers your
current taxable income so you pay
less tax now. Your account grows,
tax-free, until you withdraw the
money at retirement, when you pay
income tax on withdrawals at your
tax rate at the time. By contrast,
with Roth IRAs, you're taxed on your


contributions during the current
year, but all withdrawals, including
investment earnings, are tax-free at
retirement.
The cardinal rule of Roth IRA
conversions is to make sure you
have money outside your IRA to pay
the tax bill borrowing from your
IRA will not only lessen the amount
of money available to grow tax-free,
but you'll also be subject to a 10
percent early withdrawal penalty if
you're under age 59 12.
So what about that buyer's
remorse? There are several
reasons someone might want to re-
characterize their converted Roth
IRA:
You decide you can't afford
to pay the additional taxes owed
after all perhaps you become
unemployed for a few months or
other pressing expenses arise.
Adding income from the
conversion puts you into a higher
marginal tax bracket or subjects you
to the alternative minimum tax.
The value of your converted
Roth IRA has dropped significantly,
so in effect you're paying taxes on
phantom money.
There are a few rules to
keep in mind if you decide to re-


characterize:
You have until Oct. 15 of the
year following the conversion to
re-characterize, provided you've
filed your tax return or filed for an
extension on time.
You can re-characterize all or
part of the converted amount.
The amount you re-
characterize will be adjusted for any
gains or losses while it was invested
in the Roth IRA.
To initiate a re-characterization,
contact the financial institution that
has your Roth IRA for instructions.
*You'll need to file an amended
tax return (IRS Form 1040X) along
with IRS Form 8606.
You can later reconvert the re-
characterized IRA back to a Roth,
but you must wait until 30 days after
the re-characterization or one year
after the initial conversion.
Clearly, these are complicated
transactions, so it's probably a good
idea to work with a tax professional
or financial planner to guide you
through the process.

Jason Alderman directs Visa's
financial education programs. To
Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter:
www.twittercom/PracticalMoney


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


After-school program a boost
Dear Editor:
I would like to take the time
to thank the after-school tutoring
program at Port St. Joe Elementary
School. My son, Terry Whitlock, is
7 years old and is in the first grade.
School has always been a struggle for
him. I had him enrolled in a school
in Apalachicola for kindergarten. It
was not long before we had started
seeing behaviors from him. I would
get notes from the teacher to help
him with his letters and sounds
but trying to sit down and study
with Terry always ended up a
nightmare. He would voice on a
regular basis that he hated school.
He was held back and had to repeat
kindergarten. The second year was
worse than the first. He would cry
in the mornings and beg to stay
home. We would actually have to
physically pick him up and put him
in the car. After school would be
just as difficult. He would cry and
refuse to let me help him study. He
would tell me he was stupid because
he couldn't read like the other kids
and the other kids made fun of him.


When we moved to Port St. Joe,
the school talked to me about how
behind he was and suggested the
tutoring program. I prayed so hard
and hoped that this would help. It
was no time before I had my happy
carefree child back. I could not
believe he was actually retaining
information and retaining more than
I had hoped for. Terry has gone from
refusing to read to reading to me
every night. Most children ask for
toys and candy when they are in the
store with their parents. Terry will
ask for a new book. His Christmas
list is even full of requests on what
kinds of books he would like to read.
Now school is a fun adventure. He
wakes up before my alarm clock in
the mornings and waits by the door
calling for me to hurry so he can
get to school early. When I pick him
up from tutoring in the evenings,
before I can even ask how his day
was, he bursts out, "Guess what I
learned today?" Followed by an hour
of proud happy chattering about
anything and everything they had
done that day.
The teachers in the tutoring
program are always so helpful.


I speak with them daily on his
progress and they are always
willing to give me tips and advice
on what else we can be doing at
home. They are always available
to listen to my concerns and help
me watch for any weak areas so
we can go ahead and address them
before he gets behind again. Their
patience and caring demeanor has
well surpassed my expectations.
I do not know where Terry and I
would be or what we would do if not
for the tutoring program. Within
less than one school year, I have
gone from worrying about my child
being a high school dropout to
believing I will actually see my child
graduate. Words can not express
the happiness and gratitude I have
for that. This program is truly
irreplaceable.
To everyone who makes the
tutoring program possible, thank
you from the bottom of my heart.
Words are not enough to express my
gratitude.
Danielle Parrish and
Terry Lee Whitlock
Port St. Joe


CRANKS from page A4


singing "I Want You Back"
I picked up a dry-
erase marker that was in
the passenger seat and
started singing into it while
continuing to dance. It is
difficult to do a complete
spin while driving. However,
I did get in more than few
big head bobs (minus the
afro) to the rhythm of the
beat.
As I was snapping my
fingers on my left hand and
driving/holding the dry-
erase marker microphone
with my right hand, my
older admirer pulled up
again on my left side. I
tipped my hat and gave her
the "I-did-the-best-I- could"
look because I was about
to exit.
To my surprise, she
again pulled in behind and


took the same exit. There
are only a few stop lights
between the interstate
and the research center
where I work. At each light,
I looked in the rearview
mirror and the lady in the
white Mercedes was still
there.
At the last stop light,
I was singing/screaming
with the Jackson 5, "All I
want, All I need..." into the
black dry- erase marker.
My right ring finger and
pinky stuck straight out
as I held my pretend
microphone high in the air.
Passing through the
security gate, the lady was
still behind me. Not only did
she take in my 30-minute
show, but she worked
at the same place I did.
Thousands of folks pass


SHAREYOUROPIN IONS

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: 850-227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form
of letters to the editor or a guest column are
solicited and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial
page should be a forum where differing ideas
and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.


through this gate a day, so I
still wasn't worried.
I flipped on my blinker
to turn right into the
parking lot of my building.
Looking in the rear view
mirror, I swallowed my
tongue my onlooker who
I couldn't seem to please,
was turning in right behind
me. She parked two spaces
over in the parking lot.
When I got out of my car, it


was still shaking.
She got out of her car
and looked at me.
I wanted to scream like
Russell Crowe in his role
as Maximus, in the movie
"Gladiator." In the movie,
there is a scene where
Maximus dispatches of a
fellow gladiator in the ring,
hurls his sword into the
crowd and yells, "Are you
not entertained? Are you


not entertained? Is this not
why you are here?"
I simply turned around
backwards toward the
entrance to the building
and did the best Michael
Jackson moonwalk a
middle-aged white man in
Converse Chuck Taylor All-
Star low top tennis shoes
could do on asphalt.
She never said a word.
When I got inside, I asked


a co-worker if he knew
the older lady who drove
the white Mercedes. He
said, "Yes, she brings a
lawn chair in the summer
and sits outside and reads
documents."
I asked him, "Is she a bit
odd?"

Read more stories
online at www.
CranksMyTractorcom.


tRob Garver, MD

NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER
Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe

Qualifications: -

Board Certified in Pulmonary Disease,
and Critical Care Medicine
Castle Connolly Best Doctor List 2005-2011

Expertise in:

Shortness of breath Asthma/COPD
Coughs Lung Cancer
Wheezing Abnormal X-rays


Now Accepting o

Appointments


Call Toll Free
888-681-5864


For more info
www.seclung.com


NE ~*I


I can help you get the coverage you need.
People who switched to Allstate saved money and got more
,:'-,Ii:.:ni,,. Which means they're better prepared for the
mayhem that can happen everywhere. So don't wait! Call me
today.


Cindy S Traylor
(850) 639 5077
Gaskin-Graddy Insurance Agency, Inc.
156 2ND ST/POB 157
WEWAHITCHKA


Allstate.
You're in good hands,


Coverage and savings based on policy features selected and are subject to terms,
conditions and availability. Allstate Fire And Casualty Insurance Company: Northbrook,
IL. 2, i ) All'.ill r Ilijialii:e onLij piil '






A6 I The Star Local Thursday, December 1 5, 2011


GCEC holds toy drive


Special to The Star
Gulf Coast Electric
Cooperative recently
presented toys donated
by its employees to the
Children's Home Society.
The toys donated by
GCEC will be distributed
to underprivileged
children in Bay, Calhoun,
Gulf, Holmes, Jackson and
Washington counties.
"We are happy to be
able to donate to this very
worthy cause," said Gulf
Coast Electric Manager
of Marketing and Member
Services Kristin Evans.
"These toys will provide
Christmas presents to
children who might not
have otherwise received
any."
Established in
1902, Children's Home
Society of Florida is
one of Florida's oldest
private not-for-profit
organizations providing
services to children and
families.
CHS delivers a
unique spectrum of
social services designed
to protect children at
risk of abuse, neglect
or abandonment; to
strengthen and stabilize
families; to help young


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative Manager of
Marketing and Member Services Kristin Evans
(center) presents toys donated by GCEC employees


to Andrea Ziglar (left) and
Children's Home Society.
people break the cycle of
abuse and neglect; and to
find safe, loving homes for
children. Every year, CHS
helps to improve the lives
of about 100,000 children
and family members.
Nationally accredited
since 1982 by the Council
on Accreditation, CHS is
headquartered in Winter
Park, Fla. Its 14 divisions
blanket the state, with
nearly 2,000 dedicated,
trained staff members
delivering child-focused,
family-centered care.
Gulf Coast Electric


Kelly Honea (right) of the

Cooperative is part of
the Touchstone Energy
national alliance of local,
consumer-owned electric
cooperatives providing
high standards of service
to customers large and
small. Approximately
70 employees serve
more than 20,000 meters
and 2,500 miles of line
in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,
Jackson, Walton and
Washington counties
and in the municipalities
of Wewahitchka, Ebro,
Lynn Haven, White City,
Fountain and Southport.


4* @



0 *



* *
* *
0 *

( *
















* *

* 0
o A,




* S'
* 0



0 1







0 0



J., .1
D@ O0G3 Realty


PARADE from page A1


These life-sized playhouses, built by inmates at Gulf
Correctional Institution, will be raffled off after the
Wewahitchka Christmas Parade Saturday as part
of North Florida Child Development's Bikes for Boys
and Girls fundraiser.


"It's been a
struggle this year,"
said Sharon Gaskin,
CEO of NFCD. "The
tickets are five for $20,
but this year people
are really hanging on
to that $20."
Despite lower ticket
sales, NFCD will give
away about 100 bikes
this year, Gaskin said.
The bicycles will
also be distributed at
Lake Alice Park after
the parade Saturday.
Tickets may still
be purchased in Port
St. Joe at the South
Gulf Early Child
Development Center
(call Terri Bird at
832-8275), the North
Gulf Center (call Jana
Miller at 832-8539),
and at the central
office located in the
old courthouse in
Wewahitchka.
Tickets will also
be available the
day of the parade.
Representatives
from NFCD will be
selling tickets outside
of Vision Bank on
Saturday.
All are invited
to come and enjoy
the holiday spirit in
Wewahitchka this
weekend.


rg to


We will be gellng HolidayI


lft^^iQ^^^3^M~I3^^^5I^^

GteetinTg ajEinjffg cti
Fo oei nformation leae otat








THE STAR


-J


1


'i' 1" i

BY v I t-


NE *I


STAR


A6 I The Star


Local


Thursday, December 15, 2011






Thursday, December 15, 2011


MBPD from paqe Al


saying that it is my
firm belief that the
police department,
they are not immune
to being a part of this
community because
of their empowered
rights and what they
do," Cathey said.
"With that said, I
strongly support the
police department."
A woman who said
her name was Kath-
erine Anderson told
the mayor she didn't
understand his state-
ments and asked him
to clarify his meaning.
Cathey responded,
"No, ma'am."
Another speaker,
Lisa Logan, drew
several "amens"
from members of the


crowd when she said
the BCSO evaluation
was biased. The may-
or was shouted down
when he tried to cut
her off.
Hall escorted the
last speaker out of
the building after
he got into an argu-
ment with Cathey,
although what they
were arguing about
is unclear.
When Hall re-
turned to his seat, he
thanked the people
for supporting him
and his department.
"We'll look at it, and
we'll improve from
this point forward,"
Hall said.
"We're already do-
ing that."


Local


The Starl A7


GRADUATION from page Al


Particularly for those
students who do not find
the traditional seven-pe-
riod day, five-day week
the ideal environment,
Wooten said.
The district, she
noted, does a good job
of transitioning many
of those students to the
adult school, where stu-
dents can work and learn
around other responsi-
bilities and still emerge
with a high school diplo-
ma.
"We have a really good
graduation rate from the
adult school, and they
are not getting an adult
school diploma they
are getting a high school
diploma," Wooten said.
For those students
who seek a challenge


- who might easily be
bored by the core cur-
riculum the district
also offers a host of dual
enrollment opportuni-
ties to allow high school
students to earn college
credits from the high
school campus.
As technology infra-
structure has allowed,
the district has expanded
dual enrollment oppor-
tunities and student par-
ticipation has increased
accordingly.
The district has more
than 100 students in-
volved in dual enrollment
in some form.
"These students can
do so much with dual en-
rollment," Wooten said,
noting that one Wewahi-
tchka High School stu-


dent is currently on track
to graduate in the spring
with his high school di-
ploma and an associate's
degree from Gulf Coast
State College.
"Students who pursue
the more strenuous route
- they are challenged,"
Wooten said. "There is
every opportunity in the
world."
The success in gradu-
ating students is another
success story for a dis-
trict that has been an
honor roll district four
years running, is filled
with "A" and "B" schools,
based on the state's
school grading formula,
and also topped the state
last year in graduating
African-American stu-
dents.


There are actually two
measurements for gradu-
ation rate one used by
the Florida Department
of Education, the other
the National Governor's
Association.
Under the latter, Gulf
County had a 95.7 grad-
uation rate, Calhoun
County 88.8 percent, Bay
80.4 percent and Franklin
68.1 percent.
"This accomplish-
ment doesn't occur with-
out our educators provid-
ing our students with the
curriculum, motivation
and understanding of
the importance of a high
school diploma," said Su-
perintendent of Schools
Jim Norton. "Kudos to
both (junior/senior high)
schools."


NE *I


Brought to you by.......



THE PINK PONY and THE WIZARD of OZ



Perception is Reality...... see future ads









7



4


2
-1










Address 609 Allen Ave., rescue Mission Panama City

Age 36 Race W Sex M Date 9/14/2011

Offense narcotic equip-possess manufacture deliver, drugs-produce produce methamphetamine, violation
of probation-poss c/s witd x3

Agency PCPD


http://baymugshots.com/category/agency/panama-city-police-department/





A8 I The Star


Local


Thursday, December 15, 2011


Holiday DONATIONS


LIONS CLUB DONATES TOYS


VALERIE GARMAN I The Star
The Port St. Joe Lions Club, with help from the staff of Sunset Coastal Grill
and donations from the public, collected a bounty of toys to donate to People
Helping People of Gulf County this holiday season. The toys will help needy
children in Gulf County have a wonderful Christmas. Pictured from left are Patti
Blaylock, owner of Sunset Coastal Grill, Bobby Pickels and Ray Thompson,
Lions Club members, Henry Hogue of People Helping People, Erika White,
executive director of People Helping People, and volunteer Jerry Stokoe.

VFW DONATES TO PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
The VFW Post 10069 Women's Auxiliary in Port St. Joe collected and donated
toys to Gulf County People Helping People for needy children in the area this
holiday season. Pictured from left are Nancy Calendine, Jerry Stokoe and
Carolyn Groleau.


PROGRESS DONATES TO PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE


VALERIE GARMAN I The Star
Bobby Pickels (right) presents a donation check from Progress Energy to Erika
White, executive director of Gulf County People Helping People. Pickels said
he hopes the money will help White stock the food pantry at People Helping
People to help families in need.


CHURCH DONATES GIFTS TO LOCAL NURSING HOME


Jfc ,- ... 'r'


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Santa's helpers from St. Peters Anglican Church deliver Christmas Presents to
the Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing home. From left are Tony Maige, Father Lou
Little and Fead Etheridge.


Advertise

your

New Year's Party


Contact


or


4 ]E


:ITHE STAR


AOLN
~ /a~e~1o4(&~6 #


L ~ -

I * I. *l


50% Off
Fitz & Floyd

Old World
Christmas Ornaments

M. Bagnell Christmas


Billy Carr- Owner
David Goodson Manager
Welcome Back Peggy Joe Stripling & Anm ( ,i Ili' i
Full Service Local Florist with over 35 Years Experience.
208 Reid Avenue Downtown Port St. Joe 850.229.1111
www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com
-~*


CONCEALED WEAPONS COURSE
Hosted by: Gulf County Republican Party

Gulf County Republican Party will hold a formal gun use class on January 14,
2012, in Port St. Joe. This class is the first step in obtaining a gun permit/concealed
weapon license in the State of Florida. This is the fourth time this class has been
offered by the Gulf County Republican Party and the cost has been discounted to
$75.00 per person.
The class consists of gun safety, review of Florida statutes pertaining to concealed
weapons, and familiarization with the weapon while shooting at the firing range.
After completing the classroom instruction and the range qualification, packets
will be provided that contain all forms and instructions to apply for the Concealed
Weapon or Firearm License.
For those who would like to attend the concealed weapons/gun permit class, please
contact Tom Semmes for an application. His contact info is TSemmes@netscape.
com or 850-639-5345. The last day to sign up for the class is January 10, 2012.








l polud Il mInousclllli. IIhe
11th Annual

Shoe Drive

Help those in need!
It's lime to go Ihlouglh our closets
for those unwanted pairs of shoes, in
reasonable condition. You can bring
the shoes to Coastal Foot and Ankle
Clinic located at 221 HWY 98. Donations
will go to Franklin's Promise and will be
distributed at The community service
center (old Apalachicola high school)
at 192 14th street in Apalachicola.
Distribution will be December 6th
and 20th from 9:00am to 12:00pm.
You can call 653-FEET (3338) for more information.


ic
""
s" w


IV







Thursday, December 1 5, 2011 The Stan AQ


Local


bottled water, laundry
detergent and plastic tubs
for turtle transport.
McKenzie said tonight's
meeting is designed to
provide an opportunity for
the community to learn
more about the turtles in
the area and more about


cold-stun events.
"We're just hoping to
get enough volunteers to
search and retrieve turtles
as effectively as possible,"
McKenzie said. "The more
people we have, the more
turtles we can help. Every
little bit helps."


AIWE L A ALMANA I


Turtles were warmed on the deck of the St. Joseph
State Buffer Preserve Center last year while awaiting
transport to Gulf World.


TURTLES from page Al


Patrol needs volunteers
to monitor water
temperatures, scout for
cold-stunned turtles in the
morning by walking along
the shoreline, focusing on
the southern section of the
bay, and search for and
retrieve turtles by going
out in boats and kayaks
and pulling them out of the
water.
The group will set up
designated drop-off points
for cold-stunned turtles
and from there they will
transport the turtles to
Gulf World in Panama City
Beach for rehabilitation,
McKenzie said.
"As a community, it's
neat that people can
get out there in the field
and help the turtles,"
McKenzie said.
Stephens said to look
for the top of the turtle's
shell peeking out of the
water when out in the bay.
If the weather has been
consistently cold, chances
are the floating turtle is
cold-stunned and needs to
be pulled out of the frigid
bay.
Cold-stunned turtles
are generally found along


the shallow parts of the
bay, but sometimes the
turtles bury themselves to
protect their bodies from
the cold, Stephens said.
"The main thing is to
just try to slowly warm
them up," said Stephens,
who has worked with
cold-stunned turtles in
Port St. Joe for the past
two winters, both of which
she said have been pretty
severe.
In January 2010,
Stephens said they pulled
about 1,700 cold-stunned
turtles out of the bay.
"That massive event -
we would have been much
better off if we would have
had what (McKenzie) has
organized," Stephens said.
"It was just mass chaos.
Nobody expected that
many turtles to strand.
They just can't handle it."
One saving grace was
a large contingent of local
tourists, boat captains and
residents who responded
as word spread of the
cold-stun event. More
than 1,100 turtles survived
after being transported to
Gulf World in Panama City
Beach.


e-y irAt<


_j

e -

Cold-stunned green sea turtles await transport in
January 2010.


Stephens said it is
important to save as many
turtles as possible because
they are endangered.
The endangered green
sea turtle is the area's
most abundant species,
and other species seen in
the area include Kemp's
Ridley turtles, a critically
endangered species.
Stephens said they
also find the occasional
loggerhead in the bay.
Stephens said the
turtles probably stay in
the cold bay during the
winter because there is an
abundant food source.
"It's as if they say, let
me weigh my benefits,"
Stephens said. "There's
a lot of seagrass here.
The main reason they're
staying here is because
there's such a great food
source."


In addition to organizing
volunteer efforts, the
turtle patrol group is also
seeking donations to help
with their cold-stun events
this winter.
The group is seeking
"Towels for Turtles" to
provide warmth for sea
turtles retrieved during
cold stun events. If you
have towels or blankets
that you would like to
donate, there will be drop-
off bins located at the Fish
Inn at 3841 Cape San Blas
Road in Port St. Joe, and
the Cape Tradin' Post on
the St. Joseph Peninsula.
"The towels are a real
important thing because
it seems like we're always
short on them," Stephens
said.
The group is also asking
for donations of hand
sanitizer, paper towels,


Date
Thu, Dec 15
Fri, Dec 16
Sat, Dec 17
Sun, Dec 18
Mon, Dec 19
Tues, Dec 20
Wed, Dec 21


High
730
720
730
670
700
750
670


Low
550
550
470
520
530
510
450


% Precip
10 %
0%
10 %
0%
20 %
30 %
20 %


TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:


Bald Point


HIGH
Minus 9:16


LOW
Minus 0:03


St.Joseph Bay
12/15 Thu 09:34AM -0.3 L
12/16 Fri 12:06AM 1.0 H 09:39AM -0.1 L
12/17 Sat 12:21AM 0.7 H 09:16AM 0.1 L
05:45PM 0.7 H
12/18 Sun 07:23AM 0.2 L 05:06PM 0.9 H
12/19 Mon 02:08AM -0.1 L 05:12PM 1.1 H
12/20 Tue 02:57AM -0.4 L 05:42PM 1.4 H
12/21 Wed 03:54AM-0.7 L 06:26PM 1.6 H

Apalachicola Bay, West Pass


12/15 Thu 12:05AM
12:31PM
12/16 Fri 01:10AM
01:08PM
12/17 Sat 02:26AM
01:47PM
12/18 Sun 03:48AM
02:29PM
12/19 Mon 05:05AM
03:17PM
12/20 Tue 06:13AM
04:19PM
12/21 Wed 07:13AM
05:39PM


05:01AM
07:44PM
06:07AM
08:09PM
07:30AM
08:36PM
09:18AM
09:06PM
11:35AM
09:39PM
02:00PM
10:17PM
03:28PM
11:02PM


E O 0po o th -EE L ALMANAC
pIfamTOay! 227-7847]

ib-w^y'T


, 1. 850-653-7633 ,


www.A1OualityDocks.com r Laity Jocos Li 2104


SDonat your



imsen l i a ag.


Large selection of
adult, teen & kids books.
(New Releases)


Special order books and have
within 2-3 days!


Games and puzzles for all ages.


Now carrying Latte Vino.


Pass Christian Soaps & Lotions
(as featured on Good Morning America)


Gift certificates also available
for classes in jewelry, knitting,
art and clay.


Custom gift basket


Check out our
$5, $10 and $20
gift selections.


Art & Craft kits and su
for all ages.


Awesome coffee -
whole beans or group


Place orders early for c
cakes, Bead Lady jewelry
Unique Dragonfly tie


Save Gas, Shop Local

New items arriving daily!


s.








pplies e





nd. *


ustom
y, and o
dye.


NE ~*I


Thursday, December 15, 2011


The Star A9


~










E-mail outdoors
news to tcroft@
starfl.com


OUTDOORS


A
Section


Thursday, December 15, 2011 w w w.starfl. com Page 10


at.


-"A

MEME SMITH I Special to Florida Freedom
From left are Alex Smith, his brother Campbell and dad Joe Smith with Alex's first deer.




Its never too early to




teach hunting safety


By Stan Kirkland
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
Joe Smith and his wife, MeMe,
live in Pensacola and own and
operate two pediatric outpatient
therapy clinics in the Florida
Panhandle. Joe grew up in Bay
County, following in the footsteps
of his dad on hunting and fishing
trips.
He's now teaching his own
young sons about the outdoors,
including hunting and being safe.
Alex is 11 and the oldest. Joe
recently took him on a dove hunt
in north Escambia County, where
he bagged his first dove. While
visiting family in Bay County over
Thanksgiving holidays, Alex sat
in a deer blind next to his dad and
downed his first deer a four-
point buck.
Joe said the whole family was
along, and it was an experience
they will always remember. The
meat has already been processed
and will be used by family.


Even though Alex and his
younger brother Campbell, who is
7, are too young to take a hunter
safety course, Joe talks to his
sons about deer and other wildlife
and the need to practice safety.
"They've carried BB guns
and we let them shoot at targets,
but we've always talked about
keeping the guns pointed in a safe
direction, and to treat each gun
like it's loaded," Smith said. "And,
we wear our hunter orange."
"No question but eventually
both boys will take the hunter
safety course."
Shortly after their birth Joe
said his parents, who still live
in Panama City, purchased
both boys a lifetime Florida
Sportsman's License. When the
boys come of age, they'll never
have to purchase a hunting or
fishing license in Florida.
Under Florida law, any person
born on or after July 1, 1975,
must complete a hunter safety
course before purchasing a
hunting license. Licenses are


required beginning at age 16.
Children under age 16 may hunt
with a parent or adult supervisor
and are not required to take the
hunter safety course.
The National Shooting Sports
Foundation (NSSF) recently
released data that shows hunting
is one of the safest recreational
pursuits. The survey looked at
injury rates for hunters and 28
other recreational activities.
Topping the list for safe
activities was overnight camping,
then billiards, followed by
hunting.
Joe Smith realizes the value
of hunter safety in the classroom,
but he's giving his kids an
invaluable head start. Without
knowing it, he's one of the
reasons hunting ranks high as a
safe activity.
Information about the
hunter safety course offered by
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
is available at MyFWC.com/
huntersafety.


The Journey of 1,000

miles begins with one 'flap


By Jessy Kinnett, Park Ranger
(850)227-1327
St. Joseph Peninsula State Park,
If you could fly south
for the winter, what
destination would you
choose? Just ask any
Monarch butterfly and
they will tell you that
Mexico is nice this time
of year. Perhaps one
Monarch in particular may
make that very journey
to Mexico. She might
drive south to lay the eggs
that will hatch and make
the same journey back
to Florida next summer.
Either way she didn't go
unnoticed during her stay
at St. Joseph Peninsula
State Park. Her name is
PBR 339.
On Nov. 14, Eddie
and Lorraine Williford
discovered PBR 339 on a
hike from the campground.
The photos they took
captured the tag located
on her right wing as
well as her namesake.
It is unknown at this
time where PBR 339
received her accessory
but the information will be
processed. It can be noted
that the PBR 339 tag was
issued in the Eastpoint,
Florida region.
Tagging Monarchs
occurs each year from
Canada to Mexico to
Florida. These tags help
track migration routes,
survival rates and the
influences of weather on
the insects. Monarchs
thrive on milkweed, which


is common throughout the
entire North American
Continent. Monarchs
however, cannot survive
harsh cold winters and
must travel to warmer
latitudes to reproduce.
No one Monarch can
take the complete trip to
Mexico and back again
but they will reproduce
the offspring that can. It
is estimated that every
third to fourth generation
will make the migration,
but how is still being
researched. It is estimated
that they inherit the flight
patterns and utilize the
earth's magnetic fields to
navigate and travel to their
locations. The massive
migration only occurs east
of the Rocky Mountains.
The western population
winters on the warm
coastal and southern parts
of California.
If you wish to take
part in the tagging or
recovery process, you can
visit www.monarchwatch.
com to view more than
15,000 listed tags and their
locations. You can also
purchase the kits used to
tag your own butterflies.
The massive migration
peaks are during mid to
late October and early
November for St. Joseph
Peninsula State Park.
For information about
Florida State Parks, visit
www.floridastateparks.org.
Until Next time,
From the ranger at St.
Joseph Peninsula State
Park


RIVER DELTA BASSMASTERS TAKE CROWN


The River Delta Bassmasters, a
local fishing club comprised of
members from Apalachicola and
Port St. Joe, on Oct. 29 won the
2011 Panhandle Tournaments
of Champions, fishing the
Apalachicola River System out of
White City Marina. The top eight
fishermen representing nine bass
clubs 72 competitors competed
for team and individual honors.


Consolidated Bassmasters was the
host team for this year's tourney.
The twp top fishermen in the
tournament, Greg Dykes, with
15.25 pounds, and his father,
Gerald Dykes, with 14.75 pounds,
won first and second place
respectively. The eight members
of the winning team caught and
weighed a total of 70.67 pounds to
win the team competition.


The winning team, shown above,
from left, are Pap Duncan, Greg
Dykes, Mike Pridgen, Gerald Dykes,
Dewitt Galloway, Scooter Braswell,
Lloyd Alford and James Newsome.
The fishing club holds monthly
tournaments every third Saturday
out of Abercrombie Landing outside
Apalachicola. Any fisherman
interested in joining the club can
contact any member about joining.


ILUE ATERy-


FSH REPORTSPONSORED BY

LU EWAT ER

SUOUTRIGGERSI -

Freshwater

Fishing is improving now that the weather has settled down. Most
catches are of bream and crappie, with a few cats mixed in as well.
Lots of hand painted bream and shellcraker are coming to the dock
at Howard Creek landing. Bass and sheepshead are still
biting in good numbers as well.


Inshore

St. Joe bay is hit or miss for trout and red fish this week. Some
reports from the Eagle Harbor area on slot size reds were
coming in, but most have moved on by now. Most action is in
the I.C.W. canal. Larger trout are in the deeper parts and at
the "T", but most are around the 15-18" mark. A good color
choice now is sugar and spice in GULP 3" shrimp.


li'.S 6'1
F q'4 I


I


Pri
Lj '". rfflaw ,
*'rv~lTT14 TTW~v~l1^14w^ll~t44r~ ":(


[vNO UNTIL 3 R--







SPORT ST.JOE WEWAH TCHKA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, December 15, 2011 w w w.starfl. com Page 11





Port St. Joe High School soccer



Boys remain undefeated; girls lose first in district play


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Port St. Joe High School
has seen quite enough of
Rocky Bayou on the pitch,
thank you very much.
The Niceville-area school
ended the Lady Tiger
Sharks' district winning
streak and pushed the
Port St. Joe boys out of the
winning column though
not the unbeaten column
- during last week's soccer
action.
The Port St. Joe teams
will be in action tonight
against visiting district
opponent Franklin County
at Sam Cox Field. The girls,
now 3-3-0 overall and 1-1-0
in District 1-1A, will play
at 6 p.m. ET and the Tiger
Sharks (7-0-1, 2-0-1) will take
the field at 8 p.m.
The Lady Tiger Sharks
host Rutherford at 6 p.m.
ET on Friday and the boys
host district foe Freeport at
8 p.m. ET.
On Dec. 6, Port St. Joe
visited Rocky Bayou with
the girls coming away on
the short end of a 5-1 score
and the Tiger Sharks and
Rocky Bayou ending their
game in a 1-1 tie.
"The girls played
uninspired in the first
half and gave up five
unanswered goals," said
Port St. Joe coach Gary
Hindley, who noted the Lady
Tiger Sharks had allowed
but two goals all season.
"The team looked confused
and lacked energy."
The lone goal for Port
St. Joe came in the second
half courtesy of the foot of
eighth-grader Kathleen
Rish on an assist from
Christian Laine. But the
Port St. Joe girls were
outshot 10-5, with freshman
keeper Shannon Pridgeon,
who took over from Laine
after 20 minutes as Laine,
making five saves, moved to
forward.


Daniel May scored
the lone Port St. Joe goal
for the boys in the later
contest, the first game
of the season the Tiger
Sharks did not win.
May's fifth goal on a free
kick in the 18th minute was
answered by Rocky Bayou
with a 40-yard blast shortly
after halftime.
Port St. Joe outshot
Rocky Bayou 12-8, with
goalkeeper Javarri
Beachum making four
saves.
Rocky Bayou's turn to
travel was last Saturday
as the schools matched up
again at Sam Cox Field.
The girls were shutout
3-0 while the Tiger Sharks
won 2-0.
"The girls stepped up
their effort (from earlier in
the week), but still came up
short," said Hindley.
Rocky Bayou outshot
the Lady Tiger Sharks 10-4,
with Pridgeon making three
saves and allowing three
goals in 60 minutes and
Laine pitching a shutout,
making two saves, during
the first 20 minutes before
moving to forward.
Walt Bowers was in net
and provided the shutout for
the Tiger Sharks, making
goals by May and Morgan
Kennington stand up.
The Tiger Sharks
outshot Rocky Bayou 12-5
and Bowers made three
saves.
May's goal was on a
penalty kick early in the
game, his second game-
winner of the season, and
Kennington's, the first for
the sophomore, came in the
25th minute.
North Bay Haven
Between contests with
Rocky Bayou, the Tiger
Sharks traveled to Bay
County and shut out North
Bay Haven Academy 5-0.
Hindley noted he was
able to provide extensive


i


-.-


PHOTOS COURTESY OF CARLA MAY
Port St. Joe's Rachel Jones moves through the center of the Rocky Bayou defense during a 3-0 loss last
Saturday.


minutes to all 15 players
who made the trip to play
what the coach called "a
young" North Bay Haven
team.
Freshman Marcel
Duarte, the team's leading
scorer with nine goals,
had a pair in the first
half- in the seventh and
14th minutes and Drew
Lacour, scoring his fourth
goal of the year, made it 3-0
in the 25th minute.
Lacour assisted on
Duarte's second goal the
first was unassisted and
Witt Shoaf and Blaine
Bush registered assists on
Lacour's goal.
Beachum scored twice
unassisted, in the 34th and
55th minute, to finish the
scoring.
Port St. Joe outshot
North Bay Haven 18-5
margin and Bowers had
two saves in 60 minutes
of action, while seventh-
grader Joseph Kerigan saw
20 minutes of duty and had
three saves.


Witt Shoaf gains control as Cole Cryderman closes as the Port St. Joe boys
remained unbeaten last Saturday with a 2-0 win over Rocky Bayou.


Tiger Sharks lose to Wewa, fall below .500


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Port St. Joe High School
boys' basketball Coach
Derek Kurnitsky knew his
young team might take
some lumps early.
After the past week, one
should consider the Tiger
Sharks a bit bruised.
The Tiger Sharks (2-
3 overall, 1-0 in District
4-1A) started last week
strong but finished with a
tight loss last Saturday at
county rival Wewahitchka,
the first time the Gators
had beaten the Tiger
Sharks since the 1980's,
or at least as long as any
coaches at Port St. Joe


High could remember.
"I think it was back
when Jim Belin was
coaching" in the 1980's,
Kurnitsky said. "It's been
so long we're not sure.
"It was a tit-for-tat
game in the second half.
We played hard and we
lose, what can you do?
Give them credit. They
made more plays than we
did and they deserved to
win."
Raheem Wright, the
junior double-double
machine for the Gators,
had 18 points and Theryl
Brown had 17 to lead
Wewahitchka to the 64-59
victory.
Natrone Lee led Port


St. Joe with 18 points.
Alex King and Chad Quinn
added 13 apiece. Arion
Ward chipped in with eight
points, Ramello Zaccarro
five and Jamie Gorden,
and eighth-grader, two.
"We were up seven
points late in the first half
and it was back and forth
the whole second half,"
Kurnitsky said. "At the end
they had the last lead. We
have to figure out how to
score more points."
The week started well
for the Tiger Sharks on
Dec. 6 as they beat visiting
Blountstown 59-53 in a
district tilt.
The score, Kurnitsky
said, was not fully


indicative of the talent
difference, but the Tiger
Sharks found ways to hurt
themselves, the coach said.
"We missed a bunch of
free throws," Kurnitsky
said. "We missed open
shots. We did not execute
well on offense.
"We are about where
I thought we'd be at this
point with such a young
team. We are just young and
inexperienced. We play hard
every night, you can't ask
for more effort. We need to
correct our mistakes and I
think they are correctable
mistakes."
King led all scorers
against Blountstown with
23 points and Lee was also


in double figures with 18
points. Zaccarro and Ward
scored six points apiece,
Quinn had four points and
Caleb Odom two.
Two nights later, the
Tiger Sharks were back
in "The Dome" against
visiting South Walton,
which broke open a tight
game in the second
quarter and pulled away at
the end for a 57-46 win.
"We had big foul
trouble," Kurnitsky said.
"We were playing with
junior varsity team for a
while we had so many fouls
and guys on the bench. But
it was a two-point game
with a minute left and they
pulled away with foul shots


and they hit a (3-pointer)
at the buzzer."
King had 16 to lead
Port St. Joe and Lee was
also in double figures with
10 points. Quinn finished
with nine points, Ward six,
Marcel Johnson three and
Gordon two.
"We are not going to
win many games scoring
46 points," Kurnitsky said.
"We have to work hard
and focus on scoring more
points."
Port St. Joe visited
Bozeman on Tuesday and
will play at the Tallahassee
Maclay Classic on Friday
and Saturday, opening up
play on Friday against
Seminole (Ga.) County.


Jingle Bell Tournament raises money, toys for People Helping People


Star Staff Report

The 2nd Annual Jingle
Bell Golf Tournament at
St Joseph's Bay Golf Club
turned out to be a day
of fun and surprises for
all the golfers. Nice cash
prizes were paid out for
the top four places.
First place was taken
by Ethel Bardsley of
Eastpoint, second place
was won by Andrew Rowell
of Mexico Beach, third
place went to Penelope
Evanoff of Eastpoint and
fourth place was won by
Ken Mawrey of Port St Joe.
The game was
individual play with
handicap.


There were plenty of
prizes for the other players
as well.
Kenny Wood won
closest to the line that ran
down the left side of the
fairway near the rough.
Pat Hardman won closest
to Santa's Hat between the
waters on No. 11, closest
to the pin on the par 3 No.
12 and closest to the Jingle
Bells by the water on No.
8.
Mauren Alldis was
closest to Santa's Hat
by the water on No. 5
but managed to stay
out. Trudy Strand found
Santa's Hat in the Sand
Trap on No. 1. Andy
Durance got closest to the


line running down by the
sand trap-but avoided
the trap on No. 14. Debbie
Ashbrook managed to
play next to Santa's Hat
in the Sand Trap on No.
7. Andrew Rowell was
closest to the pin on
the par 3 No. 7. Damon
McNair was closest to the
pin on the par 3 No. 4. Phil
Dodson managed to end
up on the "hump" in the
rough near the 18th green,
barely missing the green.
All winners took home
Santa stockings filled with
old fashion goodies like
apples, candy canes, old
golf balls, coosies, and gift
certificates.
The golfers all brought


toys to be given to People
Helping People for the
children in Gulf County
and quite a variety of toys
made it under the tree. The
proceeds from the Jingle
Bell Tournament will also
be given to People Helping
People to be used to help
the less fortunate Gulf
County residents over the
holidays with food and toys.
To say the tournament
was a huge success would
be an understatement. The
tournament was partially
funded through a grant
from the Gulf County
Tourist Development
Council and sponsored by
The St Joseph Bay Golf
Club.


Patricia Hardman played Santa calling out the
winners. Damon McNair and Andrew Rowell go
after their winning Santa Stockings.


NE *I






A12 I The Star


Snorts


Thursday, December 15, 2011


Port St. Joe Karate School wins big at National Karate Tournament


Special to The Star
Students from the
Karate School in Port St.
Joe had a great showing
at the U.S. Tang Soo
Do National Karate
Tournament held recently
in West Virginia.
Thirteen competitors
traveled the 1,500
miles round-trip to the
tournament, and many got
to see snow for the first
time.
Ralph Barwick, the
senior instructor and
owner of The Karate
School said every student
who participated in the
tournament received either
first, second or third place
honors.
The competitors came
home with a total of 12 gold
medals, 11 silver, and 13
bronze.


A statement was made
from a third degree black
belt from the national office.
He said, "Port St. Joe came
to win."
Winners in their
divisions include: Ralph
Barwick- silver in
traditional forms and
bronze in sparring; Travis
Gould (assistant instructor)
- silver in sparring, silver
in traditional forms and
bronze in breaking; Mary
Barwick (black belt) gold
in traditional forms, gold
in sparring and bronze in
breaking; Henry Balogh-
gold in traditional forms,
gold in weapons forms,
bronze in sparring and
bronze in breaking; Joseph
Kerigan- gold in sparring
and gold in breaking; Emma
Doran- gold in sparring,
silver in breaking and
bronze in traditional forms;


Haley Anderson- silver
in sparring and silver in
breaking (Haley competed
against boys a couple of
ranks higher than her
because she had no girls
in her division); James
Smith- bronze in sparring
and bronze in breaking;
Gionvanni Wells- gold in
breaking, gold in traditional
forms and silver in sparring;
Michael Sherrill- gold
in sparring and silver in
traditional forms; Justin
Barrios- gold in traditional
forms, silver in sparring and
silver in breaking; Colton
Jones- gold in weapons
forms, silver in traditional
forms and bronze in
breaking; Richard Burkett-
bronze in traditional forms
and bronze in breaking;
Madison Burkett- bronze
in traditional forms and
bronze in sparring.


Students from The Karate School in Port St. Joe won 36 medals at the U.S. Tang
Soo Do National Karate Tournament.


Christmas break soccer camp Cheerleaders thank sponsors


Star Staff Report


All pro soccer will be
hosting two separate area
soccer camps, over the
Christmas holiday break.
A morning camp,
sponsored by the Gulf
County Soccer Boosters
Association, will be held
from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
ETon T\W\TH, Dec 27-29
at the Port St. Joe
High School soccer
complex. Separate


instruction will be
available for both field
players and goalkeepers.
Ages are from 5-17 for
field and 12-17 for keepers.
Former professional
player and coach and
present coach of Port St
Joe High School girls' and
boys' teams, Gary Hindley,
is the lead instructor.
Noted goalkeeper coach
Don Maples will be in
charge of goalkeeper
instruction.


The second camp,
sponsored by the U14-B
Callaway Arsenal team,
will be held those same
dates, but from 3-5:30
p.m. (CT), at the Callaway
Sports Complex. Both
Hindley and Maples will
be there also to instruct.
Additional information
or to register for either
camp, you can reach
Hindley at 276-6353 or
email at gjhallpro@aol.
com.


Star Staff Report

The varsity
cheerleaders at Port St.
Joe High School would
like to thank the following
sponsors for their support
as the team undertakes
regional and state
competition in the next


two weeks.
G3 Realty, CRI Carr
Riggs & Ingram, Ace
Hardware Port St Joe,
The Thackers, Indian
Pass Marine Services,
Piggly Wiggly Port
St Joe, Piggly Wiggly
- Apalachicola, Costin
Insurance Agency,


Emerald Dance Academy,
Hannon Insurance,
Wood's Fisheries,
Raffield's Fisheries, The
ERrstenburgs, Ramsey's
Printing, Scallop Cove,
Boar's Head Restaurant,
The Newmans, 5 Star
Paint & Collision Center
and JKA Homes.


CALL TO COACHES, URGENT ASSISTANCE REQUESTED


Star Staff Report
High school and junior
high coaches in all sports,
we need your help.
In our mind every child
participating in scholastic
sports in our county
deserves some recognition,
if only for the sacrifice
and discipline required to
compete.
But there are a lot of
teams, a lot of games and


we are, alas, a small staff.
Coaches and athletic
directors are urged to
contact The Star will all the
scores and results from
your team's games. The
deadline for all information
is 8 a.m. ET on Tuesday.
Please call 227-7827 or
email to tcroft@starfl.com,
providing scores, individual
totals and anything
remarkable and which
stands out from the day's


or week's competition.
Photos are always
welcome and can be sent
via email as an attached
jpeg file.
We can not make these
sports pages what they
can be without your help.
Coaches and athletic
directors, parents and
athletes, principals and
School Board, these are
your pages. Please help us
fill them.


Vision
Bank


TWO BANKS
COMING TOGETHER TO BETTER

SERVE THE PANHANDLE

AND SOUTH ALABAMA.

Vision Bank has entered into an agreement to join
forces with one of the nation's strongest and most
respected banks, Centennial Bank. Right after the first
of the year, we'll be changing our name to reflect the
Centennial identity.


Already at home in the Panhandle, Centennial
has been a part of Florida since 1994.
In fact, Centennial has almost 50
locations across the state from
the Panhandle to the Keys.
Centennial lives its
philosophy of "Banking
that comes to you." So
you'll get to know
bankers who come
out from behind their


"Like" I

the Port St Joe Star on

[THE SfAR Facebook and follow us on
Twitter @ PSJ_Star for daily

local news updates & photos!



















Tampns soied ini adshungon ourt ofJulyFLA


*


MY100BANK.COM I AHomeBancSharesCompany Nasdaq:HOMB) MC F


NE *I


desks to be where
you are. It's our
commitment to
our neighbors
which remains at
the heart of who
we are.
If you have any
questions about
the changeover, please
give us a call at 1-866-334-2200.
We think you'll find the same
friendly, community-focused
service you've always loved just
more of it, in more places than ever.


.4;
ag












COMMUNITY


B
Section


Thursday, December 15, 2011 w w w. starfl com Page 1



Hunter looks back on his 'Year of the Pig'


Author to sign

books about his

hunt for wild pigs

By Valerie Garman
Star Staff Writer
In 2007, Mark Hainds set a goal
to kill a pig in 10 different states.
So he did ... and then he wrote
a book about it.
"This is the nonfiction account
of that year, which also happened
to be the Chinese calendar year
of the pig," Hainds said about
his book, aptly titled "Year of the
Pig."


His journey is recollected in 23
chapters, each named after the
type of vegetation he hunted in.
One chapter titled "Bahia
Grass" chronicles an unfortunate
situation during a pig hunt in Ala-
bama.
Hainds writes, "My flashlight
was growing dim. I turned around
just as the batteries died com-
pletely. As I sat, contemplating
my sorry situation, the first drops
of rain started falling from the ap-
proaching storm front. Scratched
from head to toe, buried in a yau-
pon thicket, covered with blood,
sitting in the dark in a cold rain
with a fever, a bad cough, and a
two-hundred-pound hog carcass,
the revelation hit me: 'Maybe this


is why more people go golfing
than pig hunting.'"
Hainds will be signing cop-
ies of his book "Year of the Pig"
in Port St. Joe on Saturday, Dec.
17, at the No Name Caf6 on Reid
Avenue from 10 a.m. to noon ET.
He will also be at the Downtown
Bookstore in Apalachicola from
1-3 p.m.
Five chapters of "Year of the
Pig" are set in Florida, more than
any other state. Hainds trekked
through Slash Pine, Saw Palmet-


to, Laurel Oak, Hollies and Dog
Fennel in search of his prize: a
wild pig.
"In Florida especially, you're
surrounded by (wild pigs) basi-
cally," Hainds said. "They're all
over the place."
The national pig hunt brings
Hainds as far as Hawaii.
He used a wide range of weap-
ons including a black-powder
rifle, bow and arrow, knife and
See PIG B5


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Author Mark Hainds will be signing copies of his book "Year
of the Pig" at No Name Cafe on Reid Avenue in Port St. Joe
Saturday morning.


From left are a field of vibrant wildflowers, a
St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF BILL AND MARCIA BOOTHE I NatureinFocus.com
toad, up close and a great egret in its natural habitat. Below is a panorama of the


through


the lens


By Valerie Garman
Star Staff Writer
Bill Boothe specializes in the little
things.
He captures the vibrant colors of native
Florida wildflower petals, the delicately
patterned wings of a butterfly and the
foreign beauty of insects up-close.
Boothe has shared his love of nature
photography by entering photo contests
across the Panhandle, and now he is asking
other nature enthusiasts to do the same.
The Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves


is sponsoring its first annual Nature Photo
Contest and is already accepting entries.
"A lot of people have great images,
but they're apprehensive about showing
their work," said Boothe, a member of the
friends group.
He said the contest is a great way for
photographers to get their names out there
and put their work on display for the first
time. Boothe encourages photographers
to not be shy about sharing their work
because contest entries could potentially
lead to magazine publication down the
road.


The contest spans five categories:
Landscapes, Animal Kingdom, Floral
Kingdom, Up-close and personal (macro
photography) and At the Buffer Preserve.
"We're looking for anything that has to
do with nature," Boothe said.
The photographs will be on display
at the Apalachicola Center for History,
Culture and Art at 86 Water St. from Jan.
14-18, with an opening reception on Jan.
14, and at Preserves Center in Port St. Joe,
from Feb. 4 -11.
See NATURE B5


St. Joe Co.,


98 Real


Estate partner


at WindMark

By Valerie Garman
Star Staff Writer
With a local real estate group
managing the WindMark Beach
development, residents can now
seek on-site help and look for-
ward to more activity throughout
the community, said Zach Far-
rell, a realtor with 98 Real Estate
Group.
The St. Joe Company an-
nounced in September that 98
Real Estate Group would be pro-
viding real estate services for its
WindMark Beach community.
The St. Joe Company sought
a local real estate company in
order to be more engaged in the
area, something the WaterSound-
based land development compa-
ny was unable to accomplish.
"Basically the St. Joe Com-
pany is looking to have a more
locally-owned and operated firm
to manage the property," Farrell
said. "They wanted a localized
real estate firm to handle that
area."
Farrell said 98 Real Estate's
relationships with other local re-
altors, understanding of the envi-
ronment and involvement in the
community have benefited the
WindMark Beach property.
"It won't impact (property
owners) at all," Farrell said. "If
anything, it will help because
we're on site now."
With an on-site office at the
WindMark Beach community, the
98 Real Estate Group is respon-
sible for the management and
rentals of 19 luxury condo units
and one showcase house, known
as the "Southern Accent House."
"Basically we will maintain

See WINDMARK B5


All I want for Christmas is a 2-wheeler


Knights of Pythias

donate bikes to

needy kids

By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The Knights of Pythias are salvaging
Christmas for some three dozen children
this year.
The Raymond A. Driesbach, Sr. Lodge
No. 77, based out of Port St. Joe, completed
its annual of collection of used and timeworn
bikes that will be repaired and donated to
needy children this Christmas season, pro-
viding wheels for tikes in want of them.
A group of lodge members, led by Chan-
cellor Commander Clarence Monette, com-
pleted their annual campaign on Monday


~E~ lcI


TIM CROFT | The Star
From left, Clarence Monette, Clifford
Jones, Horace Barr, Bonnie Bell
and David Lewis, load up used and
dilapidated bicycles for the trip to
Salvage Santa in Panama City. Some
of the bikes will come back to needy
children in Gulf County.
when they transported more than 35 bicy-
cles to Salvage Santa in Panama City.
Mike Jones, aka Salvage Santa, will tear


down the bikes and provide new tires, tubes,
pedals, handle grips and clean up the bikes
in time for them to roll under the trees of
children in Bay, Gulf and surrounding coun-
ties.
Jones also ensures all the mechanics of
each bike are working properly and are safe
for riding. Jones identifies needy children
through schools and a host of civic and char-
itable organizations.
The bike collection and restoration proj-
ect is an annual part of the Port St. Joe
lodge's annual program.
The Knights also will take on an educa-
tion, inspection, repair and safety compo-
nent to the lodge's outreach next year.
Four times a year, each quarter on the
calendar, lodge members will hold weekend
workshops for boys and girls ages six to 12.
The workshops will provide education
on the rules of the road for bicyclers, how
to share the road with motorized vehicles;
parts of a bicycle, how to fit your helmet and
avoid crashes.


"Bike riding is fun, but accidents hap-
pen," Monette said. "Through the work-
shops, we hope to reduce death and injuries
to bikers through a comprehensive program
of education and bike safety training."
Every year, some 300,000 youngsters end
up in a hospital emergency room because of
an injury while riding a bicycle, and at least
10,000 of those suffer injuries are sufficient
to require hospitalization.
Children, as well as adults, also can die
from head injuries suffered while riding a
bike, Monette said.
The Knights of Pythias is one of the old-
est fraternal organizations in North Ameri-
ca, founded in 1864, and is dedicated to uni-
versal peace and goodwill and the practice
of Friendship, Charity and Benevolence. At
its peak, the Knights of Pythias had more
than 1,100 lodges spread across the nation
with well over 47,000 members.
For more information about the Knights
of Pythias, go to info@knightsofpythiasfl.
com.


NE *I


YEAR
OF THE

pI- -,


MARK J HANDS


r







B2 I The Star Thursday, December 1 5, 2011 Socidy


Happy BIRTHDAY



















Happy Birthday Debbie!
Debbie Saunders of Tallahassee will
celebrate her birthday on Dec. 14. She will be
61-years-old finally old enough to buy alcohol!
She is the widow of the late Dr. Edward T.
Saunders of Carrabelle and mother of Dana
Burkett and Terry Saunders of Tallahassee.
She is also the proud grandmother of Samantha
Burkett. We love you Mama, more than you will
ever know! We pray you have many, many more
birthdays to come-you deserve them.
Love,
Dana, Terry and Samantha



CHRISTMAS BAZAAR AT

ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB


Star Staff Report


The Jingle Bell Golf
Tournament and the 2nd
Annual Christmas Bazaar
were held Dec. 9-10 at the
St. Joseph Bay Golf Club.
The quality of the vendors'
hand-made products
and works of art were
outstanding. Shoppers
from the area and outside
the area alike came to do
some Christmas shopping
and were not disappointed.
Attendees also enjoyed
donuts, muffins, and free
hot apple cider, prepared
and provided by the Golf
Club.
The goal of the events
was to raise needed funds
for Gulf County children
in need, through the
People Helping People
organization. Vendors, the
St. Joseph Bay Ladies Golf
Association, participating
golfers, and the public
all donated new toys for
the kids. Vendors' table


fees, cash donated in
Christmas stockings, part
of the golf fees, the sale of
mulliganss," and some of
the winner's prize money
will all go to PHP to make
a much brighter Christmas
for the recipients. This
year's event yielded 2.5
times the amount that was
collected last year.
Volunteers included
Barb Van Treese
(Chairperson of the
Bazaar), Pat Hardman and
Ethel Bardsley (Co-Chairs
for the Golf Tournament),
Kristy Van Treese, Trudy
Strand, Maureen Alldis,
Dan Van Treese, Jane
Morrissey, Randy June,
Mary Kelly, Laurie June,
and the St. Joseph Bay Golf
Club staff.
The events were
supported by the
Gulf County Tourist
Development Council and
Penelope's Pet Stop of
Eastpoint. (Golf tournament
results on Page All).


PET OFTHE

P E WEEK
St. Joseph Bay Humane Society

Y o HELP CHIP!!
You know that wise tale...
cats have 9 lives? Well sadly,
this is not the case for me!
I only have one ...and it's
almost up!!! Chip has been
fully vetted by a generous
sponsor, which means
his adoption fee will be
discounted to an approved
r adopter!!! Heisaterrificadult
male cat. Despite his size he
is a big cuddle cat. Chip loves to be held and rubbed on the belly.
He is fantastic with other cats, dogs, and adores his humans!! What
else could you ask for?? Chip deserves a loving forever home to call
his own. PLEASE HELP CHIP BEFORE HIS TIME IS UP!!! If you are
unable to adopt at this time, please consider fostering. Fostering not
only saves this pets life, but also opens a space for one more!

We want to wish you a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year
from all us Doggies and Kitties here at S.J.B.H.S!
PLEASE HELP US! If you are not able to adopt a pet then please
help us save a life by sponsoring one today just Contact Melody at
227-1103 or Shelter Mom Melissa at 625-5676 for more information
on how to help! You may also find more information about our
other dogs and cats we have here on our website at www.
SJBHumaneSociety.org. Our hours for the shelter are Tuesday-
Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Also Faith's Thrift Hut is in great need
of donations also and all the proceeds go directly to support the
animals in our care! Faiths Thrift Hut Has Expanded! We now have
more furniture & appliances. Plus lots of other great thrift store
treasures. The hours for the store are Thursday-Saturday from 10
am-3 pm. Volunteers are always welcome at both our store and our
shelter! Our store and shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port
St. Joe! Hope to see you all there soon!


Engagement



















---





Jasmine Ward, Michael Moss engaged

The Ward and Moss families are pleased to
announce the upcoming marriage of Michael
Moss, son of Annette and Charlie Moss of
Glenville, N.C., to Jasmine Ward, daughter of
Deborah Ward of Apalachicola and the late
James Ward, Sr. of Wewahitchka. The ceremony
will be carried out by Brother Joey Smith and
held at Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church in
Wewahitchka at 5 p.m. CT on Jan. 14, 2012.









Personal & Business
Bankruptcy

Over 30 Years Legal Experience
Office located at: 19 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL

850-670-3030
ir. .e a debt relief agency
can help people file
h.I .kruptcy relief under the
i 1,. Bankruptcy Code."
c- hiring of a lawyer is
.. .iinportant decision that
S.. ,ld not be based solely
S i. advertisements. Before
S ,. ,, decide, ask us to send
, I ee written information
i.i....I our qualifications and
experience."


Engagement


























Kimberly Thomas, Brian Wagner engaged

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Thomas of Port St. Joe and
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Wagner of Roanoke, Virginia
are pleased to announce the engagement and
forthcoming marriage of their children, Kimberly
Diane Thomas and Brian Lee Wagner. Kimberly
is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Miller of Tallahassee, Florida and the
late Mr. and Mrs. A.W Thomas of Port St. Joe,
Florida.
Brian is the father of three beautiful girls,
Chloe, Rachel, and Abigail and grandson of Ms.
Arleta Schrieber and the late Mr. Raymond
Schrieber of Tonawanda, New York and the late
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wagner of North Tonawanda,
New York.
Kimberly is a 1993 graduate of Port St. Joe
High School and 1998 Graduate of University of
Florida where she received a Bachelor of Science
degree in Physical Therapy. She is currently
employed as a physical therapist at Sacred
Heart Rehabilitation. Brian is a 1990 graduate
of Friendly High School in Fort Washington,
Maryland and a graduate of Excelsior College
where he received a Bachelor of Science degree.
He is an F-22 Avionics/Weapons Equipment
Specialist with Air Force Engineering and
Technichal Services at Tyndall Air Force Base.
Their wedding will be on Dec. 17 at 4 p.m. ET
at First United Methodist Church in Port St. Joe.
Family and friends are invited to attend.


Salvation Army seeks
volunteers
The Salvation Army
is currently looking for
volunteers to ring the bell
at the Piggly Wiggly this
holiday season. Volunteers
are asked to work one-hour
shifts. If you are interested,
please call 596-9552 for more
information.
Community Volunteers
needed to prepare
holiday meals
Volunteers are needed
to ensure nobody in Gulf
County goes hungry this
holiday season.
Volunteers will meet
at the Oak Grove Church
on Dec. 23 at 1 p.m. ET
to prepare hundreds of
delicious holiday turkey and
ham dinners for those in
need. The dinners will be
delivered on the morning
of Christmas Eve. We invite
families and individuals to
come join us as we prepare
these wonderful dinners
which will be served all over
Gulf County and Mexico
Beach.


MB SANITATION SCHEDULE

To all Mexico Beach sanitation customers
Star Staff Report
The City of Mexico Beach will observe the following
schedule for sanitation services during the month of De-
cember:
Week of Dec. 19-23:
Monday- Regular garbage pick up
Tuesday-Regular garbage pick up
Wednesday- 15th Street to Canal Parkway
Thursday- 15th Street to U.S. Highway 386
Friday- Holiday-No garbage pick up

Week of Dec. 26-30:
Monday-Holiday-No garbage pick up
Tuesday-15th Street to Canal Parkway
Wednesday- 15th Street to U.S. Highway 386
Thursday- Regular garbage pick up
Friday-Regular garbage pick up


BOOK SIGNING FRIDAY


Special to The Star

Local author Virginia
Bathurst Beck will host
a book signing of her
collection of columns, "Life
Begins at Eighty" at the
Gulf County Library Friday,
Dec. 16 from 10 a.m. until
noon ET
Life Begins at Eighty
is a collection of Beck's
columns about her life,
from Depression days to
the present. Beck loves to
write and has written all
her life, including skits for
PTA and for her Tops clubs,
letters to the editor, and
political letters to get things
done or undone. She has
written poetry just for her
amusement or the pure joy
and laughter of her friends.
She wrote rap before it
became popular!
She wrote her first
column when she was 80
for The Star in Port St. Joe.
Soon, she was writing for
the Pilot Tribune in her
old hometown of Blair,
Nebraska and Zapata,
Texas where they had
formerly wintered. Her
writing life had begun.
She covers topics in her
columns from growing up
during the Depression,
when milk was given


LIFE BEGINS
AT
EIGHTY
A Life of Love, Music and Laughter


Beck's collection of
columns, Life Begins at
Eighty.
away free and lamb chops
were five cents per pound,
to walking three miles
to school through snow
and wind. She recalls
the animals in her life,
dogs, cats and horses
that she loved, as well as
the importance of family
connections and memories.
The columns in "Life
Begins at Eighty" provide a
vivid, humorous picture of
one woman's fascinating life
and times.
Beck invites the
community to "come one,
come all" to her book
signing this Friday.


"The Magic of Cape San Bias
and the Surrounding Area" c ,i i, ,
Books available at:
No Name Bookstore,
Bluewater Outriggers,
Area Bookstores,
Cape San Bias Lighthouse Gilt Shojp l If
**Available Online* *





KEITH L. JONES, CPA
AUDIT, ACCOUNTING, TAX & CONSULTING SERVICES



America Counts on CPAs
202 Marina Drive, Suite 303 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-1040 PH. 850-229-1050Fx
keith@keithjonescpa.com www.keithjonescpa.com
MEMBER: AMERICAN AND FLORIDA INSTITUTES OF CPA'S


NE *I


Society BRIEFS


On Friday, Dec. 23, 15-
20 volunteers are needed
at Oak Grove Church, 613
Madison Ave. in Port St.
Joe, from 1-4 p.m. ET On
Dec. 24,85-plus volunteers
are needed to help on the
serving line and with meal
deliveries from 6 a.m. until
noon ET
There will be plenty
of work for any volunteer
interested in helping with
food preparation, serving,
assembling, packing or
delivering. For more
information on how to get
involved, please contact
Jerry Stokoe at 381-6122.

Volunteer tax
assistance
People Helping People,
through the IRS Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance
program, will offer free
tax preparation to low- to
moderate-income in Gulf
County from Jan. 17 to
April 15. We are currently
seeking volunteers to
become IRS certified tax
preparers. Please give us
a call at 229-5262 for more
information.


B2 I The Star


Society


Thursday, December 15, 2011


vi |l r l i o B lt h u I B (






Thursday, December 15, 2011


School News


The Star I B3


W M 1111111
PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Gov. Rick Scott appointed James McKnight of Wewahitchka to the Gulf Coast
State College Board of Trustees.


Scott appoints three to Gulf Coast

State College Board of Trustees


Star Staff Report

On Dec. 8, Governor
Rick Scott announced
the appointments of
Leah O. Dunn, James W
McKnight and Ralph C.
Roberson to the District
Board of Trustees at Gulf
Coast State College.
Dunn, 56, of Panama
City, has been the chief
executive officer of Gulf
Resources L.L.C. since
2008, Cobroc Med L.L.C.
since 2005 and Dunn
Properties L.L.C. since
2001. She has also been
the chief financial officer
of DSI L.L.C. since 2003.
Dunn has served as
board chair and advisory
chair of the Science
and Discovery Center
of Northwest Florida
and has been a member
of the Florida Medical
Association Alliance
and the Bay Education
Foundation. Dunn
received a bachelor's
degree from the
University of Oklahoma.
She succeeds Charles
Isler for a term ending
May 31, 2015.
McKnight, 59, of
Wewahitchka, has been
the chief operating officer
of North Florida Child
Development, Inc. since
2010. Previously, he
was an administrator at
Crenshaw Community
Hospital from 2005 to 2008
and chief executive officer
at Doctors' Memorial
Hospital from 1999 to
2004. McKnight has been
a member of the Gulf
County Planning and

Leah 0.
Dunn
was also
appointed
to the GCSC
board,
pending
Florida
Senate
confirmation.


Scott appointed Ralph Roberson of Port St. Joe
term ending May 31, 2014.


Development Review
Board since 2010 and
was a member of the
Kiwanis Club of Luverne,
Alabama, from 2005
to 2008. He received
an associate degree
from Hillsborough
Community College,
a bachelor's degree
from the University of
South Florida and a
master's degree from the
University of St. Francis.
He succeeds Linda Wood
for a term ending May 31,
2015.
Roberson, 59, of Port
St. Joe, is a certified
public accountant and
has been the owner of
Roberson and Associates
PA. since 1997. From
1993 to 2001, he served
on the board of trustees
of Gulf Coast Community
College. Roberson


for a


has been a member of
the Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce
since 1987, the Gulf
County Chamber of
Commerce since 1986
and the Florida Institute
of CPAs since 1979. From
1985 to 2006, he was a
member of the Rotary Club
of Port St. Joe where he
served as president and
director, and he is also a
past member of the Florida
Association of Community
Colleges. He received an
associate degree from
Tallahassee Community
College and bachelor's
degree from the University
of West Florida. He
succeeds James Norton for
a term beginning Dec. 8,
and ending May 31, 2014.
The appointments are
subject to confirmation by
the Florida Senate.


I DAZZLING DOLPHINS


Pre-Kindergarten-Mason Reed
Kindergarten-Mary Margaret Farrell
2nd Grade-Laynye Longley
3rd Grade-Bobby Gay
4th Grade-Madison Jasinski


5th Grade-Tyler Cornwell
6th Grade-Claudia Alcorn
Bus riders of the week-Jennifer Larson, Ca-
leb Kyle, Brianna Wable, River Rollins and
Romey Andrews


The Lion's TALE


Special to The Star
Faith Christian School
extends a warm invitation
to you and your family
to attend our Chrismon
Ceremony presented by the
students, faculty, and staff.
This ceremony points
the way to Jesus' Birth with
a series of special Chrismon
ornaments made by the
students of FCS.
The service is at 9 a.m.
ET on Friday, Dec. 16.
Brunch will follow


HFaith
ChristiiilSchuol


SAR









By Samantha Ford
General Information
Congratulations to Mary Bouington, Kenya Caywood, Austin Clayton, Dixie
Oliphant, Bryanna Stuart and Michaela Wiegand on earning their Microsoft of-
fice Word 2007 certification. This certification requires advanced study of Mi-
crosoft Word as well as successfully completing an online Microsoft practical
exam.
Dec. 15 Motivation speaker assembly at 2:15 p.m.;
Dec. 16 NHS and Bridges Christmas Party during B lunch and 5th period;
Dec. 19-21 Final Exams;
Dec. 21 End of second nine weeks;
Dec. 21 half day, no lunch.
Sports
Dec. 15 Girls and boys soccer vs. Franklin City at 6/8 p.m. ET;
Dec. 16 Boys basketball Hoops Classic at Maclay, TBA;
Girls' basketball vs. West Gadsden at 5:30 p.m. ET;
Girls' soccer vs. Rutherford at 6 p.m. ET;
Boys' soccer vs. Freeport at 8 p.m. ET;
Dec. 17 Boys basketball Hoops Classic at Maclay, TBA;
Cheerleaders Regional competition in Jacksonville -Good luck;
Dec. 19 Boys' basketball Hoops Classic at Maclay, TBA
Girls' soccer at Freeport, 5 p.m. ET;
Dec. 20 Boys' soccer vs. N. Bay Haven at 6 p.m. ET;
Dec. 22 JV/Varsity basketball vs. Liberty County at 6/7:30 p.m. ET;
Girls' and boys' soccer at Baker at 6/8 p.m. ET.
Go Sharks!
Merry Christmas from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School


Farnsley & Johnston


Wealth Management Consultants, LLC

I Sets l's Apart.....

* Experience Generating Retirement Income
* Client's Interests Always Coine First
* Fee-Based Investment Alanagemt it
* Estate Planning and Trust Manage e Services
* Consuiltaire Approach to Ilorking h Ter

6 vww.Fa slev.com


Office Locations:
Atlant Ia. GA Port St. jIe. FL
- ,, ,. J .,J 11 11h.u .l, T I .j I . P. I. ,, I-. i I'.P isi f i t .. l ,, i j i ld .r 1i' . ...l l., ., llr,,u
jlI.1 l Ih. i,.h t.,, ... ht IH j .,..., 11 ,.,., ,,1b ur. I I L P s .' .I.. d [n, e l \.2.,


What


850-227-333


SMART LENSESm
Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances



------------- d a


Todd Robinson, M.D. Darren Payne, M.D.
Board Certified Eye Physician Board Certified Sye Physician
and Cataract Surgeon and Cataract Surgeon

FOR NEW PATIENTS WE
59 AND OLDER NEW PATIENTS,
I This certificate is good for a complete I
SMedical Eye Exam with CALL TODAY
STodd Robinson, M.D. FOR YOUR
Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. 1 PRIORITY
The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for I Lee Mul i,, M.D APPOINTMENT'
Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases. Board Certified Eye Physician, M
Board Certified Eye Physician
FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: and Cataract Surgeon
850-763-6666
850-763-66661600 Jenks Ave. Panama City, FL
ELIGIBILITY U S Citizens hving In the Florida Panhandle, I (8 0) c o o-"-' . 1 --*ou,
59 years and older not present under our c(850) 763-6666 1-800-227-5704
I- CouponExpre- 231-11 CODE: PJOO www.mulliseye.com
NO HIDDEN CHARGES It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed
by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for he free,
discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment


--------------


I,,













FAITH


This business invites COMFORTER
you to visit the church FUNERAL HOME
S 10 P. "Rocky" Comforter
of your choice this L.F.D.
week. (850) 227-1818


Thursday, December 15, 2011 w w w.starf 1.com Page B4


Obituaries


Jesse Franklin Turner Jr.


Emma Lou (Anderson) Rish


Willie Merle Estridge


Jesse Franklin Turner,
Jr., 87, of Port St. Joe
passed away Sunday, Dec.
11, 2011.
Mr. Turner was born
Nov. 19, 1924, to the late
Jesse and Jettie Turner
in Mason Hall, Tenn. He
married the love of his life,
Peggy Luckett, in 1948 and
moved to Coloma, Mich.
He worked and retired
from Auto Specialists
Manufacturing. He was a
member of the United Auto
Worker's Union, and a 32
degree mason. He moved
to Port St. Joe in 1979.
He is preceded in death
by his parents; a brother,
James Ralph Turner;
a grandson, Jonathon
Thumm; and son-in-law,
Claude "Randy" Weston.
He is survived by
his wife, Peggy Turner;
daughters, Karla Weston


and Debbie (John)
Thumm; grandchildren,
Robert (Ann Marie)
Weston, Randall Weston,
Mark Weston, Ryan (Julie)
Thornburg, Alicia (Steve)
Matincheck, Melissa
(Kevin) Clements; a
sister, Janelle (Bennett)
Lewis; and 11 great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
held 3 p.m. ET Thursday,
Dec. 15, at the Church of
Christ in Port St. Joe, Fla.
The family will receive
friends from 2-3 p.m. ET on
Thursday at the church.
Condolences may be
submitted or viewed at
www.southerlandfamily.
com.

Southerland Family Funeral Home
507 Tenth St.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


Card of THANKS

We would like to take the time to send out a
heartfelt thank you for the compassion and generosity
shown to us during our time of loss. The phone calls,
food and flowers were truly touching. We would also
like to send a special thank-you to The Bridge at
St. Joseph nursing home for all the love, care and
attention shown to our mother in her final days.
Also to Mr. Rocky Comforter, as always thank you
for the guidance and attention to our family. Brother
Ray Creamer and members of the Highland Park
Community Church, thank you for everything. May
God bless and keep each of you.

The family of Martha Moses

First Baptist Church
I 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
SJeff Pinder Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
i Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students
New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church


Sunday
Sunday School............. 9:00 am
Worship Service............ 10:30 am
Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm
www.fbcpsj.org


Wednesday
Wednesday Nght Supper.............. 5:00- 6:15 pm
Children's Choir........................... 5:45 6:10 pm
Nursery................................. 6:00- 7:30 pm
AWANA's................................. 6:15 7:30 pm
Surrender Student Ministry........... 6:15 7:30 pm
The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 -7:30 pm
Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........6:30 -7:30 pm
Prayer Meetin ............................ 6:30 7:30 pm
"Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm
(Rehearsal in Sanduary)


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe


Sunday:
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m. ET
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. ET
Traditional Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET
Wednesday:
Youth: 5:30p.m. ET
KChoir: 7:00 p.m. ET


850) 227-1724
Rev. Mac Fulcher
Pastor
Ann Comforter Jeremy Dixon
Music Director Youth Minister
Deborah Loyless
Director of Children Ministries


Emma Lou (Anderson)
Rish passed away on
Wednesday night Dec. 8
at 11:11 p.m. after being
loaded into an ambulance
at Panama City Nursing
Center.
She is survived by her
son James E. Rish; her
grandson Nathan Rish
ofWewahitchka; and her
granddaughter, Colleen
Rish of Panama City. She
was a native of Charleston,
W Va. She was born there
on May 3,1925. Her parents
were H. E. Anderson and
Hazel Star Anderson;
both were one-half Native
American. The family was of
the Methodist persuasion.
They lived on Capital Hill
which overlooked the city
and the state capital. Her
dad had been a surveyor
and later a Constable and
Jailer for the city. Her
mother was a housewife.
After high school, Emma
Lou worked for the Civil
Service/Army Signal Corps
during WW II, when she
met a soldier in Miami
stationed at the nearby
Army Air Corps base
whose home of record was
Wewahitchka.
James E Rish and she
married in the Presbyterian
church there and in time
moved to Wewa.
He had three sisters


After a beautiful
life, Ronald Keiser Sr.
continues his journey
with our Lord and
Savior Jesus Christ. His
memory will be cherished
by his beloved wife,
Etta Keiser, two sons


and she had three brothers.
All of her West Virginia
nieces and nephews loved
her, not only because she
was their only aunt on
dad's side. It was because
she was "neat" and every
Christmas sent them lots
of toys plus the best honey
on the planet. She worked
at the Wewahitchka State
Bank for a time, sold Tupelo
honey, and enjoyed art work.
Her pastimes were taking
care of her hardworking
husband, son and various
cattle dogs. Plus, throwing
the beer bottles of a certain
beekeeping litterbug
neighbor back into his yard.
Services were held at the
First Presbyterian Church
in Wewahitchka on Monday,
Dec. 12 on Main Street
Wewahitchka.
The visitation was at
1 p.m. and the service was
at 2 p.m. CST The burial
was at the family plot at
Jehu Cemetery north of
town. Thank you all for your
prayers. I remember as a 5-
year-old asking my mother
several times "Where is it
that I am from?" And she
would say: We-wa-hit-ch-ka.
J.E. Rish.
All services are under
the direction of the
Comforter Eineral Home,
Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.


Ron, Jr. and Paul; six
grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service
was held at his home
in St. Joe Beach on
Saturday, Dec. 9, 2011
beginning at 5 p.m. ET.


Willie Merle Estridge of
Tallahassee, Fla., passed
away Monday, Dec. 5,
2011 in Tallahassee at the
age of 66. She was born
April 17, 1945 to the late
George W and Willie Lee
(Kemp) Estridge. She
was a retired computer
operator supervisor for
30 years for the Florida
Department of Agriculture.
She was a 1963 graduate of
Wewahitchka High School.
She is survived by
her son, Dallas Lynn
Jones and his wife,
Cyndi, of Altha, Fla.;
daughter, Brigitte Renee
Jones of Tallahassee;
grandchildren, Priscilla
Hunt, Morgan Jones,


Dallas Lynn Jones III, and
Madison Jones; a brother,
Charles A. Estridge of
Columbus, Ohio.
Eineral services were
10:30 a.m. CT, Thursday,
Dec. 8, 2011 in the
Chapel of Adams Funeral
Home with Reverend
Charles Pettis officiating.
Interment followed
in Kemp Cemetery in
Wewahitchka, Fla. The
family received friends
9-10:30 a.m. CT, Thursday,
Dec. 8 at the funeral home.
Adams Funeral Home in
Blountstown is in charge
of the arrangements.
Phone 674-5449. Online
condolences may be made
at www.adamsfh.com.


William Hampton Linton


William Hampton
Linton passed away
peacefully on Dec. 7,
2011 surrounded by
family and friends.
He was born on
Sept. 3,1941 and
resided in Wewahi-
tchka, Fla. He was V
preceded in death
by his wife, Jernyl
Linton "Jerri" and his par-
ents William H. and Onita
Linton.
He is survived by his
brother Terry Linton and
wife Jordan; his children,
Steve Linton and wife,
Sharon, Tony Linton and
wife, Kathy, Mike Linton
and wife, Flora, Sherry
McCormack and husband,
Jimmy, Michael Harper
and wife, Sally, Lisa Tin-
del and husband Todd;
his grandchildren, Jenna
Anthony, Zachery, Rhett,
Christina, and Stephanie
Linton, Colin McCormack,


I
NII
.IrN


Whitney and Wes
Tindell.
He was a re-
tired CPA and
spent many years
in the Clearwater,
FL area. He loved
spending time with
LLIAM family and friends,
ITON and will be deeply
missed. A special
thanks to Ms. Cora for see-
ing him through his tough-
est times.
He lay in state at the
First United Methodist
Church in Wewahitchka
from 6-7 p.m. CST last Fri-
day, and for an hour prior to
the service on Saturday.
The funeral service was
held at 10 a.m. CST Satur-
day with interment to follow
in the family plot in Buck-
horn Cemetery.
All services are under
the direction of the Com-
forter Funeral Home, Wewa-
hitchka Branch Chapel.


Faith BRIEFS


United Methodist of
Port St. Joe
First United Methodist
Church of Port St. Joe
will be hosting a live
Nativity Scene on the
Monument Avenue side
of the church on Friday,
Dec. 16, Saturday, Dec.
17 and Sunday the 18th
from 6-7 p.m. ET. The Live
Nativity will be complete
with live animals and the
characters of Christmas.
During the Live Nativity
on Sunday, there will be


singing of Christmas
Carols, hot chocolate and
cookies. Please join us
any, or all, of the three
nights as we celebrate the
birth of Jesus. For more
information please call the
church office at 227-1724.


Revival services will
be held at 7 p.m. ET each
night, Dec. 15-17.
The Officers and
members of Zion Fair are
inviting everyone to come
out and be blessed.


Live Nativity at
Christmas revival at First "Community
Zion Fair Christmas Trilogy"
A Christmas Revival at FUMC of Mexico


will be held at Zion Fair
Missionary Baptist
Church in Port St. Joe with
Evangelist Erika Brown.


Beach
First United Methodist
Church of Mexico Beach


presents "Community
Christmas Trilogy: Three
Nights of Christmas
Celebration" this weekend.
At 6:30 p.m. CT on Friday,
Dec. 16, the church will host
"Ein, Fellowship, Food,
Karaoke Music & Santa";
at 5 p.m. CT on Saturday,
Dec. 17, the church will host
a "Live Nativity with Live
Animals & Choir" with food
and fellowship immediately
following and on Sunday,
Dec. 18 at 6:30 p.m. CT
Neysa Semmler & Alex will
be in concert.


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
figlllanb view aptiet CQlurtI
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.
Pastor Josh Fidler Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.




St. Peter's Church, ACC
(Traditional Services 1928 BCP)
Morning Prayer & Holy Communion
Sunday...............10:00 A.M.
Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M.
4th Thursday of Every Month
The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest
The Rev Lou Little, Deacon
Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center,
120 Library Drive
"An Unchanging Faith InA( A World"



Th i United AMetho did
ffiu" 4 f lm itc Jeac&
111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Servikes:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beaoh United Methodistl church
NIISERY PnR IDED
Rev. Jerry Arhelger,Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


"Our Church can be your home"

first Church of the Nazarene
2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, florida 32456
(850) 229-9596

Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness.
Psalm 29:2


Sunday School............................10 a.m .
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


> Faith Bible Church
www.faithbiblepsi.net
80120' Street, Port St. Joe, FI. (850) 229-6707
9:45 AM .................................................... ................................. Sunday School
10:30 AM ............................................................................. Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 AM ................................................................................................ W orship
6:00 PM ........................................ ...... ............................ .. W orship

Home of Faith Christian School
www.faithchristianpsj.iiet


TO KNOW CHRISTAND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN
Come worship with us!
Rector Father Tommy Dwyer
ST. JAMES'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45


NE *I


Ronald Keiser, Sr.


A Spirit Filled


S *Fami y Life Outreach Oriented
Word of Faith Churcd

Church
Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford
Welcome you to worship with us: HOME OF THE
Sunday 10:30am POWERHOUSE
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm YOUTH MINISTRIES
Wednesday 7pm
www.familylifechurch.net
S323 Reid Ave-~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL~ 850-229-5433


Nursery provided for all services



SOUTHERLAND FAMILY


FUNERAL HOME


507 10th Street Port St. Joe


(850) 229-8111


www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org


(8


h


r






Thursday, December 15, 2011


Local


The Star I B5


PIG from page B1
high-powered rifle, and various pests.
tracking and hunting methods "And they're just not cute and
to stalk swine through foreign cuddly like a deer," Hainds said.
vegetation like cypress swamps, "It's something that's kind of
saw palmetto and Hawaii's wili- stirring the interest of land man-
wili forests. agers, environmentalists and
Hainds said wild pigs have die-hard pig hunters," Hainds
wreaked havoc on ecosystems said of the book, published in
across the country. His dislike September by the University
for wild pigs began with his af- of Alabama Press. "It's gaining
finity for pine tree restoration. momentum.
"I've been teaching people "With so many books being
for 20 years on how to restore published every year, it's kind of
the longleaf ecosystem," said hard to rise above the fray. But
Hainds, a research associate my book is unlike any other book
with Auburn University and published this year. It's truly
research coordinator for the unique."
Longleaf Alliance located at the If nothing else, Hainds can
Solon Dixon Forestry Center in rest easy knowing that the pig
Andalusia, Ala. populations of Florida, Loui- A
Wild pigs come in and root siana, Alabama, Texas, Cali- .
up the pine trees, carry diseas- fornia, Arkansas, Tennessee,
es and can basically take spe- Hawaii, Oklahoma and Georgia
cies right out of the ecosystem, have been slightly decreased af-
Hainds said. ter his 2007 swine-slaughtering
Feral hogs are considered soir6e.
SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Hainds stands at a campsite during
one of his many pig hunts across the country.


NATURE from page B1
Contest winners will be announced at the
winter Bay Day event at the Preserves Center
Feb. 4. Prizes and ribbons will be awarded.
"I think it will bring out the nature
photographers in the area and in the region,"
Boothe said. "There are a lot of great
photographers out there."
Boothe, who lives in Bristol, said he also
hopes the contest will also help bring tourism
to the area.
Boothe said when looking for inspiration,
the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve Center is
a great place to start.
S "It really opens up people's eyes," Boothe
said. "They don't realize what a little gem
i they have there in Port St. Joe at the Buffer
Preserve."
Boothe said the contest invites
photographers from all over to enter, but asks
that the photos be taken in the Panhandle,
from the Suwannee River west.
Boothe and the friends group hope to make
the nature photo contest an annual event.
"There's definitely a need for it in the area,
I think," Boothe said. "We've talked to quite a
few people who are interested."
The entry deadline for the contest is Jan. 6.
Entry fees are $10 per photo for friends group
members, and $20 per photo or $50 for three
photos for other entrants, with all proceeds
benefitting the Friends of St. Joseph Bay
Preserves.
For more information or to download an
entry form, visit www.stjosephbaypreserves.
org/photo-contest.


Courtesy of BILL AND MARCIA BOOTHE I NatureinFocus.com
A drumhead, a native Florida wildflower, up
close.


WINDMARK from poae B1


(the properties) if anything happens,"
Farrell said. "It's a higher-end unit,
so we want to keep it at that higher
end."
Farrell said 98 Real Estate Group
does a lot of group bookings this
time of the season for various con-
ferences and retreats.
"People don't realize it, but we
are busy out here," said Farrell, who


said he was surprised by the amount
of units that are rented at the prop-
erty
Farrell said the 98 Real Estate
Group seeks to further revive the
area with more community events
at the town center area in WindMark
Beach.
They are also looking into more
offseason events to help bring more


Locally o\ c ned and opelatedl to meet all
\ OLr i I1insrI ance needs

a diviion of 4 INSUANC

850.670.1200
43 ISLAND DRIVE EASTPOINT, FLORIDA
dbuitlerC('coastalcoverage.coni


traffic to the area.
Farrell said when the WindMark
Beach area was newly-developed
it was the site of many community
events.
"As the market declined, they
kind of pulled out of doing events be-
cause of financial reasons," Farrell
said. "We look forward to getting the
community back out here."


Or teMEN
ive the ift of Regional Literature from

Forgotten Coast Used and
Out of Print Books

Featuring authors and topics from
Old and New Florida and the South
Gift-Quality Used, New, 1st Editions
Signed Copies
Publisher, 2011 Edition,
Alexander Key's Island Light
available in hardcover and paperback
http: www.forgottencoastbooks.com






A -: l .


DISCOUNT PACKAGE
aI|I ,,f.. P.


CAmte s Patg
THURSDAY DEC 15TH @ 7PM
LOTS OF FUN, FOOD AND PRIZES


NEW YEAR'S EVE
THE BEST ENTERTAINMENT WITH
BOBBY KENNEDY AND
MICHELLE MILLIGAN
IN THE CROW'S NEST
DJ/KARAOKE
DOWNSTAIRS







PUBLIC NOTICE


A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and
Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on
Monday, December 19,2011 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and
at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC)
meeting on Tuesday, January 10, 2012 at 6:00 p.m.
EST. Both public hearings will be held in the
BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore
Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will
be to discuss and act on the following:


1. Variance Application by Ned Harman for
Parcel ID # 06314-075R Located in Section 23
Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County,
Florida Replace an existing 4' dune walkover
with a 6' dune walkover for handicap accessibility.
2. Public and Open Discussion
3. Staff


The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on
these matters. Information prior to the meeting can
be viewed at the Planning and Building Department
at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312.

Ned Harman


NE*I


WERE
HAVING AN


AUGI1TN
Saturday, Dec. 17th 2011

10:00 AM Central Time
Preview Starts at 9:00AM Central


Gaddis and Associates

1107 Nth 15th Street
Mexico Beach, Fl. 32410
Business Lic. #AB 3111
Auctioneer Lic. # AU 4288
www.auctionzip.com ID# 28587
House hold items, antiques, tools,
collectables and much more.
We are accepting consignments
For info call Garry @ 850 227 8280

We will be at Mexico Beach
Ofl5th Street Follow theSigns


Ad #2011-87






B6 | The Star


Local


Thursday, December 15, 2011


Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative employees celebrate service anniversaries


Special to The Star
Several GCEC
employees and trustees
were recently recognized
for celebrating service
anniversaries. The
13 Board members
and employees have a
combined total of 167
years of service to the
Cooperative.


Justin Barnes and
Gary Cox received one-
year service pins; Pam
Burns, Shannon Hill, Lorie
Jackson-Lewis, Teressa
Jones, and Nathan Riley
received five-year service
pins; Gary Whitfield
received a 10-year service
pin; Debbie Bush received
a 15-year service pin;
Donna Brock and Charles


Nunery received 25-year
service pins; Eudon Baxley
received a 30-year service
pin; and Sid Dykes received
a 35-year service pin.
Gulf Coast Electric
Cooperative is part of
the Touchstone Energy
national alliance of local,
consumer-owned electric
cooperatives providing
high standards of service


to customers large and
small. Approximately
70 employees serve
more than 20,000 meters
and 2,500 miles of line
in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,
Jackson, Walton and
Washington counties
and in the municipalities
of Wewahitchka, Ebro,
Lynn Haven, White City,
Fountain and Southport.


THIS HOLIDAY

GIVE SOMETHING


DEPENDABLE


BG 55
MS 170 CHAIN SAW HAND
Bar lengths may vary by region.
Designed for occasional wood-cutting Proven h
tasks around the home
Includes many of the excellent design
features of our professional models
Anti-vibration system for comfortable operation "


FS 45 T

GET GEARED UP Easy-to-
with protective apparel and accessories, for home


Are you ready for a -STIHL ?


HELD BLOWER

andheld blower at an affordable price


TRIMMER

use, well-balanced trimmer
*owner use


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Several GCEC employees and trustees were recently
recognized for celebrating service anniversaries.
Pictured, from left, are: Sid Dykes, Gary Cox,
Donna Brock, Charles Nunery, Shannon Hill, Teressa
Jones, Lorie Jackson-Lewis, Debbie Bush and Justin
Barnes. Not pictured are: Eudon Baxley, Pam
Burns, Nathan Riley and Gary Whitfield.


We wish you all a safe, happy and
healthy Holiday Season and look
Forward to seeing you in the New Year!



VINCENT IVERS, M.D. Mon Tue Thurs Fri
301 Twentieth Street 9 am 6 pm
Port St. Joe, FL 32456 W
850-227-7070 Wed & Sat
850-227-7070w9 am 2 pm
www.iversmd.com ,.ALL MAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED


850-229-9663
Steam Cleaning & Remediation
24 Hour Water Extraction
IICRC Certified Technicians
Mold Remediation, Tile & Grout Cleaning,
Air Duct Cleaning, Carpet & Upholstery
Licensed & Insured



S-


Robert Pelc
Mowing Service
Yard Cleanup
Affordable Lawn Care

227-5374


COMBS CONSTRUCTION INC.
CGC 1507649


GET


I
D IN
TRADESll&
9




SERVICE



CAL L


Extreme Clean
PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.
Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning
Serving the entire Gulf Coast area
Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning
RVs Cars Trucks Vans
24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction
SXtrenme Cleane
SROPFSSIONr FLOOR (CA INC
229-1324 *Servingthe entire Gulf Coast area-
...... CeramicTile and Grout Cleaning
RY'sRVs-Cars-Trucks -Vans
24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction


NE ~*I


oo\otonis & so
.. Michael & Anthony *1 e
w A,0 State Certified Electrician ESI2000204 -
& Finish Carpentry RG006883
850-229-6751 850-227-5666
*gI^JJI^I~lmdI~3.I~u~aU.J


I


ST JOE ENTAL 706 1ST STRET, POR ST JO
( 8 5 0 2 2 7 1 1 2 8 5 0 ) 2 7 -7 4 9


ALL MAJOR~ INSURANCE ACCEPTED L







Thursday, December 15, 2011


CLASSIFIED


The Star I B7


COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA


YOUR FLORIDA FREEDOM CLASSIFIED CONNECTION


WE'RE AVAILABLE 24 7



for all of your buying and selling needs.





8504474020 e 8O !^4m68o istu nieateeadosmaktlc^


1100 Legal Advertising
1110- Classified Notices
1120- Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 Carpools &
Rideshare
1130 Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150- Personals
1160- Lost
1170- Found


36935
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-29-CP

IN RE: ESTATE OF
GRADY O'BRIAN
Deceased.

NOTICE
TO CREDITORS


The administration of
the estate of GRADY
O'BRIAN, deceased,
whose date of death
was February 3, 2011,
is pending in the Circuit
Court for GULF County,
Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of
which is 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456. The
names and addresses
of the personal repre-
sentative and the per-
sonal representative's
attorney are set forth
below.

All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of
the decedent and other
persons having claims
or demands against
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publi-
cation of this notice is
December 15,2011.

Personal
Representative:
Bobbie Jean Griffith
6206 Boatrace Road
Panama City, FL 32404


1100
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SHER L/ALLAN, ESQ.
FL Bar No. 0847951
731 Oak Avenue
Panama City, FL 32401
(850) 914-2220
Dec 15, 22, 2011



36162S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE 14TH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.:
23-2011-CA-000315-
CAXXXX

REGIONS BANK, an Al-
abama banking corp.,
successor by merger to
AMSOUTH BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

LEONARD MARNELL, a
married man, UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
LEONARD MARNELL,
WINDMARK BEACH
COMMUNITY ASSOCI-
ATION, INC., a Florida
Corporation, not for
profit, UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS, UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1,
and UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF PUBLICA-
TION NOTICE OF AC-
TION CONSTRUCTIVE
SERVICE-PROPERTY

TO: Defendant(s) UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
LEONARD MARNELL,
present address un-
known, present ad-
dress unknown, whose
last known address is
1639 North Eagle
Ridge Path, Hernando,
FL 34442 and all par-
ties having or claiming
to have my right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action has been
filed to foreclose a
mortgage on the de-
scribed real property
located in Gulf County,
Florida:

Lot 40, Windmark
Beach, according to
the map or plat thereof
as recorded in Plat
Book 4, Page(s) 1-5,
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida.

and that you are re-
quired to serve a copy
of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on
Caridad M. Garrido,
Esq., attorney for
LEONARD MARNELL,
whose address is 2800
Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Suite 190 Coral
Gables, FL 33134 on or
before December 27th,
2011, and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of
this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered
against you for the re-
lief demanded in the
Complaint.

Witness my hand and
the seal of this Court
on the 15th day of No-
vember, 2011.


1100

Rebecca Norris,
CLERK OF COURT

By: BA Baxter
As Deputy Clerk

Attorney for Plaintiff:
Caridad M. Garrido,
Esq.,
FL Bar No: 814733
Peter A. Hernandez,
Esq.
FL Bar No. 64309
2800 Ponce de Leon
Blvd., Suite 190
Coral Gables, FL 33134
Tel: 305-447-0019
Email: Cary@
garridorundquist.com
Peter@garridorund
quist.com
Dec 8, 15, 2011



30230S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE
FOURTEEN JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 11-119-CA

CENTENNIAL BANK
an Arkansas banking
corporation, successor
in interest to Bayside
Savings Bank,
Plaintiff,

vs.

SYBIL DUNCAN,
Defendant.

CLERK'S NOTICE
OF SALE UNDER FS.
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that,
in accordance with the
Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure
dated November 30,
2011, in the above-
styled cause, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Front lobby of the Gulf
County Courthouse,
1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Blvd., Port St..Joe,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
(Eastern Standard
Time) on January 12,
2012 the following de-
scribed property:

Lot 2, Unit IVA:
A tract of land located
in Fractional Section
14, Township 9 South,
Range 11 West, Gulf
County, Florida, and
being more particularly
described as follows:
Commencing at the
point of intersection of
the North line of Treas-
ure Bay Unit 1, as per
plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 3, Page 32,
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida, with
the Westerly right of
way line of County
Road No. 30; thence
North 15'27'30" East
along said Westerly
right of way line
1826.04 feet for the
Point of Beginning;
thence North 89'16'30"
West, 254.25 feet;
thence North 15'27'30"
East, 103.40 feet;
thence South 89'16130"
East, 254.25 feet to a
point on the Westerly
right of way line of said
County Road No. 30;
thence South 15'27'30"
West along said West-
erly right of way line
103.40 feet to the Point
of Beginning.

Dated: December 7,
2011.

Rebecca Norris
Gulf County Clerk of
Court

By: BA Baxter
Deputy Clerk
Dec 15, 22, 2011


S 1100
36108S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
BAY COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
CASE NO.: 11-239-CA
CIVIL DIVISION

CENTENNIAL BANK,
as successor in interest
to BAYSIDE SAVINGS
BANK
Plaintiff,

vs.

RICHARD W. KRAUSE
and PATRICIA B.
FRANZEN, husband
and wife,
Defendants

NOTCE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS GIVEN that
pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated November
14, 2011, in the above-
styled cause, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash in the
Lobby of the Clerk's Of-
fice, of the Gulf County
Courthouse in Port St.
Joe, Florida, on De-
cember 29, 2011 at
11:00 a.m. ET, the fol-
lowing described prop-
erty:

EXHIBIT "A'

Lot 28, Block 41, City
of Port St. Joe, Florida,
according to the plat
thereof, recorded inPlat
Book 1, Pages 18 & 17,
of the Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida.

(Parcel Identification
Number: 04951-OOOR).

Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owners) as of the date
of the Lis Pendens,
must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

DATED ON November
16,2011.

Becky Norris
Clerk of Court

By: BA Baxter
As Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY
FOR PLAINTIFF
Mary Ellen Davis,
Esquire
17 High Drive, Suite C
PO. Box 1720
Crawfordville, FL 32326
(850) 926-6003
Dec8, 15,2011



36186S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR THE
FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY
STATE OF FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 11-65-CA

BANKEAST,
Plaintiff,

vs.

CHARLES B. HICKS;
DENNIS J. WEAVER
and JANA R. WEAVER,
SEACLIFFS BEACH
HOMES ASSOCIA-
TION, INC., a Florida
not-for-profit corpora-
tion, UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1, UNKNOWN
TENANT #2, UN-
KNOWN TENANT #3,
and UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #4, the names be-
ing fictitious to account
for parties who may be
in possession,
Defendants.

CLERK'S
NOTICE OF SALE


1100
PURSUANT TO F.S.
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that,
in accordance with the
Partial Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure
dated November 29,
2011, in Case No.:
11-65-CA of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit in and
for Gulf County, Flor-
ida, in the above-
styled cause, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Gulf County Court-
house in Port St. Joe,
Florida at 11:00 a.m.
EST on January 5,
2012, the following
described property:

Parcel 1:
Seacliffs Beach
Homes, Unit C-14:
Commence at the
Northwest corner of
Government Lot 4,
Section 36, Township 8
South, Range 12 West,
Gulf County, Florida;
thence along the East
line of Government Lot
2 of said Section 36,
North 00 degrees 14
minutes 43 seconds
East, 2138.58 feet;
thence North 89 de-
grees 45 minutes 17
seconds West, 475
feet; thence continue
North 89 degrees 45
minutes 17 seconds
West, 678.83 feet;
thence South 00 de-
grees 20 minutes 50
seconds East, 71.15
feet to the Point of Be-
ginning; thence con-
tinue South 00 degrees
20 minutes 50 seconds
East, 56.67 feet; thence
South 88 degrees 34
minutes 57 minutes
West, 37.51 feet;
thence North 00 de-
grees 14 minutes 43
seconds West, 57.83
feet; thence South 89
degrees 45 minutes 17
seconds East, 36.91
feet to the Point of Be-
ginning

Parcel 2:
Seacliffs Beach
Homes, Unit G-38:
Commence at the
Northwest corner of
Government Lot 4,
Section 36, Township 8
South, Range 12 West,
Gulf County, Florida;
thence along the East
line of Government Lot
2 of said Section 36,
North 00 degrees 14
minutes 43 seconds
East, 1848.21 feet;
thence North 89 de-
grees 31 minutes 49
seconds West, 632.32
feet to a point on the
are of a nontangent
curve concave to the
Northwest; thence
Northerly along the are
of said curve, having a
radius of 106.00 feet, a
central angle of
2351'40", for an arc
length of 44.14 feet,
(chord to said curve
bears South 11 de-
grees 13 minutes 41
seconds West, 43.83
feet); thence North 00
degrees 42 minutes 09
seconds West, 102.06
feet to the Point of Be-
ginning; thence North
89 degrees 59 minutes
06 seconds West,
68.77 feet; thence
North 00 degrees 22
minutes 53 seconds
West, 19.73 feet;
thence South 89 de-
grees 31 minutes 49
seconds East, 68.67
feet; thence South 00
degrees 42 minutes 09
seconds East, 19.19
feet to the Point of Be-
ginning. Said lands ly-
ing in Section 36,
Township 8 South,
Range 12 West, Gulf
County, Florida.


I 1100
DATED: November 29,
2011.

BECKY NORRIS
Clerk of the Circuit
Court

By: T Knox
Dec 8, 15, 2011


36206S
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the City
Commission of the City
of Port St. Joe, Florida,
at its meeting on the
3rd day of January,
2012, at 6:00 PM.,
EST, in the regular
Commission meeting
room at the Municipal
Building, Port St. Joe,
Florida, will have the
2nd reading and con-
sider for final adoption
an Ordinance with the
following title:

AN ORDINANCE OF
THE CITY OF PORT
ST JOE, FLORIDA
AMENDING THE LAND
DEVELOPMENT REG-
ULATIONS; ESTAB-
LISHING MEMBER-
SHIP FOR THE PLANN-
ING AND DEVELOP-
MENT REVIEW
BOARD; PROVIDING
FOR REPEAL OF ALL
ORDINANCES OR
PARTS OF ORDI-
NANCES IN CONFLICT
HEREWITH; PROVID-
ING FOR SEVERA-
BILITY AND PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFEC-
TIVE DATE.

Copies of the Ordi-
nance are available for
public inspection at
City of Port St. Joe City
Hall, located at 305
Cecil G. Costin Sr.,
Blvd., Port St. Joe,
Florida.

Interested persons may
attend and be heard at
the public hearing or
provide comments in
writing to the City Com-
missioners, City of Port
St. Joe City Hall, 305
Cecil G. Costin, Sr.,
Blvd., Port St. Joe,
Florida. Transactions of
the public hearing will
not be recorded. Per-
sons wishing to appeal
any decision made dur-
ing the hearing will
need a record of the
proceeding and should
ensure a verbatim rec-
ord is made, including
the testimony on which
the appeal is based.
Any person who wishes
to attend and requires
assistance may call the
City Clerk's Office at
(850) 229-8261, Est.
114.

CITY COMMISSION OF
THE CITY OF PORT
ST JOE, FLORIDA

BY S/MEL
MAGIDSON, JR.
Mayor-Commissioner

Attest: S/James A.
Anderson
City Clerk-Auditor
Dec 15,2011


36218S
CITY OF PORT ST.
JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE
REQUEST FOR BIDS

Sealed bids for City of
Port St. Joe MSA M7
SCBAS will be received
at City Hall, 305 Cecil
G. Costin Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456 up until 4:00 PM
EST, January 12, 2012.
Bids will be publicly
opened and acknowl-
edged, January 12 at
4:01 PM EST, at the
City of Port St. Joe City


I 1100
Hall.

Bids shall be submitted
in a sealed envelope,
plainly marked with
bidder's name, ad-
dress, date and time of
opening, and bid num-
ber for "City of Port St.
Joe MSA M7 SCBA'.

DESCRIPTION OF
WORK: Work consists
of delivery of six com-
plete units of a MSA M7
SCBA, with 2216 psi
Aluminum Cylinder and
six spare 2216 psi
Aluminum Cylinders to
1002 10th Street, Port
St Joe, FL 32456. The
following is a break-
down of the bid specifi-
cations for the equip-
ment.

1. Six Fire Hawk MSA
M7 SCBA with 2216 psi
Aluminum Cylinders
Item #
BM7LD11COC12AAA

2. Six Spare 2216 psi
Aluminum Cylinders
ltem#809872

BID NO: 2011-11

Copies of the Bid Pack-
age and detailed prod-
uct description are
available at City Hall,
305 Cecil G. Costin Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, and may
be examined at this ad-
dress or obtained free
of charge.

The City of Port St. Joe
reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and
all Statements of Bids
in whole or in part, to
waive informalities in
the process, to obtain
new Statements of
Bids, or to postpone
the opening pursuant
to the City's purchasing
policies. Each State-
ment of Bid shall be
valid to the City of Port
St. Joe for a period of
sixty (30) days after the
opening.

The City of Port St. Joe
is an Equal Opportunity
Employer

This notice dated De-
cember 12,2011
Submitted by James
Anderson, City Clerk
Dec 15, 2011

36807S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLOR-
IDA
CASE NO.: 11-19 PR

IN RE: The Estate of
WILLIAM CHESTER
HOLMAN, SR.
Deceased.

NOTICE
TO CREDITORS

the administration of
the estate of WILLIAM
CHESTER HOLMAN,
SR., deceased, File
Number 11-19 PR, is
pending in the Circuit
Court for the Four-
teenth Judicial Circuit,
in and for Gulf County,
Florida, the address of
which is 1000 Cecil
Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port
Saint Joe, Florida
32456. The name and
address of the personal
represen- tative and the
personal representa-
tives' attorney are set
forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:

All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or


1100
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is served within
three months after the
date of the first publica-
tion of this notice must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of
the decedent and per-
sons having claims or
demands against the
estate of the decedent
must file claims with
this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NO-
TICE. ALL CLAIMS AN
DEMANDS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

The date of first publi-
cation of this Notice is
December 15, 2011.

Dated this 2nd day of
December, 2011.

Petitioner/ Personal
Representative:
Carolyn Chapman
Holman
451 Bonita Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456

Attorney
for the Petitioner
Personal
Representative:
Clinton T McCahill
FL Bar No. 0073482
305 Sixth Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 229-9040
Fax: (850) 229-9049
Dec 15, 22, 2011



1110
Incorrect
Insertion
Policy

For Classified
In-column Ad-
vertisers

All ads placed by
phone are read back
to the advertiser to
insure correctness.
The newspaper will
assume correctness
at the time of the
read-back procedure
unless otherwise in-
formed.


Please 2 yourad.

Advertisers are re-
quested to check the
advertisement on the
first insertion for cor-
rectness. Errors
should be reported
immediately.

Your Florida Free-
dom newspaper will
not be responsible
for more than one in-
correct insertion, nor
will it be liable for
any error in adver-
tisements to a
greater extent than
the cost of the space
occupied by the er-
ror.

Any copy change,
during an ordered
schedule constitutes
a new ad and new
charges.

We do not
guarantee position
of ANY ad under
any classification.


S 1110

Publisher's
Notice


"SCAM"

To avoid possible
scams, it is recom-
mended that con-
sumers should verify
caller information
when receiving calls
regarding credit card
payments. Consum-
ers should also con-
tact the local com-
pany themselves in-
stead of giving this
information to indi-
viduals who are
contacting them di-
rectly.




1120

PROFESSIONAL PHO-
TOS of you and your
family for the holidays.
No shooting or travel
fees for shoots con-
ducted on St. George
Island. No obligation to
purchase prints or dig-
ital files. Email
wakarusa@mac.com
or call Larry at
785-633-1887 for more
information. See sam-
ples of our work at
www.KsHeritage.Zenfolio.c
om


2100 Pets
2110 Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120 Pet Supplies
2130 Farm Animals/
Supplies
2140 Pets/Livestock
Wanted
2150 Pet Memorials



2100




Extra Mile
Pet Sitting
Home visits/overnight
in the comfort of your
pets home. Gulf & Bay
County Diana 227-5770
Dan 227-8225
extramilepetsitting.com


I g
3100 Antiques
3110 -Appliances
3120-Arts & Crafts
3130 -Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160 Business
Equipment
3170 Collectibles
3180 -Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood
3210- Free Pass it On
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment
3300 Miscellaneous
3310 Musical Instruments
3320 Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)
+1







B8 I The Star


CLASSIFIED


Thursday, December 15, 2011


7100- Homes
7105 Open House
7110- Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 Walerfront
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-ol-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare


PSJ 1101 Constitution
Drive, Sat. Dec 17th
7:30 am to 2:00 pm
Multi-Family
Sale
Ladies, Mens, Girls and
Baby clothes, toys,
household items, lathe
bandsaw, planer/jointer
No early birds!!
Text FL90129 to 56654






PSJ 208 Gautier Me-
morial Lane, Sat. Dec
17th 7am-11am
GARAGE SALE
Brand name women
clothing and shoes,
baby girl items, acces-
sories, home and
kitchen items and misc.
Text FL90110 to 56654


Sat Dec 16-17 8:am-?
Yard Sale
Lots of items!


DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
NEEDED
I Buy sealed, unexpired
Boxes (850)710-0189



DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
NEEDED
I Buy sealed, unexpired
Boxes (850)710-0189


Idren is a must. I
Excellent benefits Classified can!
package! Apply at:
Early Education and If you're ready to move up or HOME FOR
I Care, Inc. RL A.ETTEIORR RENT AT
162AvenueE I are just starting out Classified A
Apalachcola, FL .. can help you open the door WILLIS
32320 F--ILANDING
IEOEM/F/V/DDFWP Ito home ownership. We've A N
I We-ld 34190182 6110 A Nature Lovers Para-
Web-id34190182 got properties at every price, disell Quality Custom
Text FL90182 to 56654 Publisher's withlocations all over town! home 9ft Ceiling's,
Notice Hardwood floor's, tile,
tice And if you're planning to sell, kitchen bar.Located
All real estate advertis- Classified can introduce you next to Willis Landing
ing in this newspaper is to the market's best Boat ramp on the
-- subject to the bFairs Brothers River. Located
Medical/HealthHousing Act which prospects. 10 miles south of
MedcalHemakes it illegal to ad- Wewahitchka and only
vertise any preference, 18 miles north of beau-
COMMUNITY limitation or discrmina- tiful Mexico Beach and
HEALTH NURSING tlon based on race, only 32 miles from Pan-
DIRECTOR color, religion, sex, ama City. The Apalach
handicap, familial status 6100 6100 ama City. The Apalach
The Gulf County Health or national origin, or an Icola River is only a 15
Department has one intention, to make any minute boat ride.1,600
opening for a full-time such preference, limita- l SF 3 Bed/2 Bath
Community Health tion or discrimination" $800/month. Call
Nursing Director. An- Familial status includes W ec C re st 850-689-8881 or e-mail
nual Salary Range children under the age monique@crestviewsite.c
$44,649. $88,499.; of 18 living with parents 5| t alte. om
or legal custodians,
B.S. degree in nursing pregnant women and 108 S. E. AVE. A
required & Masters pre- people securing cus- CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322
ferred with 1-3 years tody of children under
Public Health Nursing 18. 850-697-9604 850-323-0444
experience required. www.seacrestre.com
Fingerprinting & Emer This newspaper will not w w.firstfitness.com/carrabelle
agency Duties Required; knowingly accept any.first ess.com/carrabelle 6140
Benefits Assigned. advertising for real es PROPERTY MANAGEMENTAND RENTALS
Cltate which is in violation
Closing Date: Decem- of the law. Our readers RENTALS PSJ, 3 br 1 ba all
ber 16, 2011. Refer to are hereby informedRENTALSJ 3br1 ba a
Requisition Number that all dwellings adver- brick 404 Battles
64086423. For more ttsed in this newspaper 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE.....$500 Street, corner lot large
information, contact are available on a equal INCLUDES WATER, CARRABELLE yard, $650 month +
Lesia Hathaway at opportunity basis. To deposit 301-265-5368
850-227-1276, ext. 149. complain of dscrimina- 2 BR 1 BA TRAILER ..................................$450
EO/AAtADAEmployer. tion call HUD toll-free at
Eo/AADA Epltons 1-800-669-9777. The REMODELED, UNFURNISHED
Electronic Applications toll-free number for the
Only Apply at: hearing impaired is DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP
Deolefrstmvflrida.Com for 1-800-927-9275.
a s s s t a n c e 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY
87 P2 ple First at- PIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL 1
Web-ld 34190221 3 Night Minimum ....................$105 PLUS DALY
Text FL90221 to 56654 m 3 N 05 PLUS DAILY Rent to Own!
2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT 2105 Long Ave PSJ. 3


Now Hiring! I e 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO
Are You Making Less _______In Port __tJoe
Than $40,000 Per Year? Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY
Covenant Transport 229-6200 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT
Needs Driver Trainees
Now! No experience re- 8147400 Pet Friendly...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES llf|
quired. 8 7 __
*Immediate Job Place-
ment Assistance
*OTR, Regional, & Lo- 2 br, 1 ba
cal Jobs $400 month + $400
CALL NOW FOR MORE idep. Hiland View. Call
INFORMATION 850-227-4051
1-866-280-5309
Need a
helping hand?
Advertise in MINI-STORAGE AND OFFICE COMPLEX
Climate Controlled Units Lease Warehouse Space
the Help Lease Office Space Watercraft and RV Storage ewa, p2 bed 1 batha n
small park. $400 a mo.
Wanted *Now Available* 10 x 30 Storage Units +$400 security dep.
Small RV For Rent
Section in the 850 -229 -80 1 4 good for oneperson.
Classifieds! www.AMERICAMINISTORAGEANDOFFICE.com* $e11 a week. IncludeS
water, sewer& electric.
Call: 850-639-5721


40 4100 4100 41000 164
61-0 L


7100



Your land or
family land is
all you need
to buy
a new home.
Call
850-682-3344


6100 6100


7150
Price Reduced
FSBO: 5.5 acres White
City, Fl. Nice property,
minutes to Intercoastal
Water Way. Convenient
to beaches, reasonable
offers considered, call
904-626-1482

These tiny ads
sell, hire, rent
and inform for
thousands of
families each
week. Let a little
Classified ad do a
big job for you.
Emerald Coast
Marketplace
747-5020




6100


6SeflSe


TO HER STUDENTS, SHE'S THEIR MATH TEACHER.


| 4100 |

Food Svs/Hospitality
The Port Inn is now ac-
cepting applications for
a full time.
Breakfast
Attendant
The shift is from 6:00
am 2:00 pm. Days off
are negotiable. Candi-
dates must be able to
work weekend and hol-
idays. If you have an
eye for detail & a pas-
sion for service, we
want you! Please apply
in the person at the ad-
dress below. Make
omelettes, Make waf-
fles, Make money. In-
quire about benefits
package. EOE. DFW
Port Inn 501 Monument
ave. Port Saint Joe
Florida. 32456


THE ,TAR


in


inc--o er
,IlonstfY


Find the right person for your job today
at emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster
or call 850-747-5019


APALACHICO ~ E
& C./-PPELLO .IES


Call Our New Numbers Now!


Call:
Toll Free:
Fax:
Email:
Email:


850-747-5020
800-345-8688
850-747-5044
thestar@pcnh.com
thetimes@pcnh.com


'43988
'43816
243812
244924
'44322
'43496
'40660
'43493
'42660
'41998
243184
243095
'44920
'44919
'44921
'41222
'42510
'43939
'44556
'41453
239971
'42710
'44659
108831
'44604


100 Plantation Drive,(arrabelle, FL
17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL
2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitlhka, FL
2 HWY 381, Wewahithka, FL
101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL
148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahit(hka, FL
249 Bonita St., Port St. Joe, FL
480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St loe, FL
1209 Monument Ave., Port St. loe, FL
357 HWY 98, Port St. loe, FL
2850 Hwy 98, Port St. loe, FL
415 Monument Ave., Port St loe, FL
22 (ape San Bias Rd, (ape San Bias, FL
18 (ape San Bias Rd., (ape San Bias, FL
10 (ape San Bias Rd, (ape San Bias, FL
8 (ape San Bias Rd,(ape San BlasFL
3 (ape San Bias Rd,(ape San Bias,FL
102 Seascape Dr., (ape San Bias, FL
112 Rosemary (ourt, (ape San Bias, FL
106 Sand Dollar Way, (ape San Bias, FL
7750 (ape Sane Bias Rd, (ape San Bias, FL
210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe,FL
400 Gull Aire Drive, Port St. loe, FL
512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL
118 41st St.,Mexico Beach, FL


IMEXICO BEACH
Villas of Mexico Beach
3706 Hwy 98, New Condos
Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal
Unit 301 Furnished
West End Harbor- Unit 4-104
Fully Furnished
604 Fortner Avenue Duplex
Furnished
ST. JOE BEACH
113 Gulf Terrace
311 Bonnet Street
Coronado # 3 7314W.Hwy 98, St.Joe Beach
Furnished
Coronado #4 7318W.Hwy98, St.Joe Beach
Furnished
WINDMARK BEACH
212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse-Unit #4
Fully Furnished
210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse-Unit #6
Fully Furnished
Carr's Bungalow#2
155 Beach Street
Carr's Bungalow #3
159 Beach Street
INDIAN PASS
8822 CR 30A Right down from Raw Bar
Unfurnished
CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASS
Jubilation Subdivision
Unfurnished
101 Two Palms Drive -Two Palm Subdivision
Furnished and covered pool
PORT ST. JOE
1903 Juniper Avenue
Unfurnished
1206 Palm Blvd
Partially Furnished
Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines -Jones Homestead
Partially Furnished
I 1:1


S534,600
59.900
S59.900
S89.900
S109,900
589.900
S34,000
544,500
5175,000
5295,000
5299.900
5299.900
S 39,900
5 59.900
559.900
5112,900
5136,900
5225,000
5449,000
5779,900
51,199,000
523,900
5119,900
5189,000
$239,900


3bd/3ba
lbd/2ba
2bd/2ba
3bd/2ba
2bd/2ba
2 bd/2ba
2 bd/2ba

2bd/2ba
2 bd/2ba
lbd/lba
lbd/lba

3bd/2ba

4bd
3bd/3ba


Bank Owned
Lot
Lot
Acreage
River Iront
Home
Lot
Lot
Home
commerciall
commerciall
commerciall
Deeded Beach Access
Deeded Beach Access
Deeded Beach Access
Bay Front
Bay Front
Under contractt
jubilation Subdivision
GullFront
GullFront
Lot
Under contractt
KW Front
Beachside


SNOW BIRD SPECIAL
Highland Subdivision St.Joe Beach
No pets
SNOW BIRD SPECIAL
SNOW BIRD SPECIAL

SNOW BIRD SPECIAL
SNOW BIRD SPECIAL




Pictures available on MLS #243890




Small pet allowed with pet deposit


3bd/2ba
1.5 bd
2bd/2ba
r.G LC AI CO


Port St. Joe Commercial

For Lease

Retail / Office Space

202 Marina Drive
Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd & 3rd Floor Spaces Avail; +/-491-
5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross
316& 318 ReidAvenue
Office /Retail; +/- 1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf
308 ReidAvenuen uA SE
Suite A +/- 11 O b ,t mo mod gross
101 ReidAvenue
Seven office suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM
103 Reid Avenue
Great office/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross
230 ReidAvenue
+/- 756 sf; $10 psf mod gross

Warehouse / Flex Space

110 Trade Circle West
+/- 2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading;
inquire for terms
2790 Hwy 98
+/- 5,640 sf : Office / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also
available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 separate storage units
available
For Sale

Loggerhead Restaurant
Cape San Bias, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer
asking $350,000. Short Sale
60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL
+/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled office & retail show space;
located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000
516 1st Street
+/-11,400 sf office/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high
clearance entryways; $395,000
320 Marina Drive
Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call
for details
260 Marina Drive
+/- 3,200 sf : Multi tenant bdi fi i l construction
w/ ample parlU UPWd yrtor/ ,' irTor dfaits; $285,000
PSJ Commerce Park
+/- 6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner financing available
235 W Gulf Beach Drive
Office/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also
avail for lease; inquire for terms; $399,000
71 Market Street
Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/- 7,252; Inquire for
terms



Marketed Exclusively by:

850-229-6373 NORTH FLORIDA
LAND CAPITAL


HELP IS ONLY A

PHONE CALL

I Pl o AWAY


To Place Your Classified ad


EONRCOS


6140 |


6140 o | 6140


.. .. . i


] I ;1EN


I-1I II-- I--- -- I- i I- II- I
I-I
I
"- ''.' II"1- ' '1"-
''- '1 I:'-' '-' '- II -'

1.- -I-I-I -II - - I II- - II