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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03822
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 12-01-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03822

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! TABLE OF CONTENTS Thursday, DECEMBER 1, 2011 Y E A R 74, NUMBER 7 Opinion ....................................... A4 Outdoors ..................................... A6 Sports ........................................... A7 Society .........................................B2School News ................................B3 Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B4 Classieds ....................................B7-B8 Real Estate ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 By Tim CroftStar News Editor Those bones are old. Bones and artifacts found Nov. 13 along the waterline at Lake Wimico have been identied as coming from a documented archaeological site. The site, known as GC55, meaning the 55th such found in Gulf County, has been researched be fore, but its origins remain something of a mystery. The medical examiner from the 14th Judicial Cir cuit and Gulf County Sher iff Joe Nugent ruled that the site was not a crime scene once the bones and artifacts were dated. The medical examiner and sheriff pretty much closed the book on that one, said Dave Dickel with the Florida Bureau of Ar chaeological Research. Much of the material found likely dates to the midto late-1800s, Dickel said. It is pretty inconceiv able that these are less than 75 years old, Dickel said, noting the accepted benchmark for the age at which bones turn from po tential crime scene items to forensic nds. We are pretty positive they are from late or mid-19th cen tury. Researchers from the Bureau of Archaeological Research toured the site on Nov. 17. Found near the site was a geologic marker, likely placed there in 1988 when the site was researched by Dr. Nancy White from the University of Florida, who has done extensive archae ological work in the area for years. Dickel said White had been unable to determine the ethnicity of the bones found, and Dickel said there was little evidence the buri al ground found was Native American in origin. There was nothing de nitive found that this was (a Native American) burial ground, Dickel said. At this point we are working with the assumption we dont think these are (Na tive American). Having teeth would help, given differences in diet and chewing, but none were found. Some cranial bones found might help identify the origin of the remains found by a family on a weekend camping trip several weekends ago. The problem, Dickel Star Staff Report The Christmas season swings into full action this weekend, with a host of events from Port St. Joe to Mexico Beach. The festivities continue over the next few weekends. Here is a sampling of what is in store for a bit of holiday cheer. Port St. Joe Christmas on the Coast The Gulf County Chamber of Commerce invites you to bring the entire family downtown Saturday, Dec. 3 for a day full of holiday fun. The day begins with the Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast at Peppers on Reid Avenue from 7-10 a.m. ET. Tickets are $5. From 9 a.m. until 5 p.m., there will be a special holiday farmers market at City Commons Park. The downtown merchants will have their doors open all day for your chance to shop, dine and unwind. The tree lighting ceremony will take place at 6:30 p.m. at City Commons Park, followed by a lighted Christmas parade at 6:45 p.m. Afterwards, Santa will be available for photos, and prizes will be awarded for parade oats. For parade entry information, contact the chamber at 227-1223. By Tim CroftStar News Editor There is something special about the Pridgeon-Rish Sunday school class at First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe. Long led by the late Billy Joe Rish, who waged a courageous battle against cancer before passing away several years ago, the Sunday school class has served as the Petri dish for the churchs annual Relay for Life fundraisers. One year it was elephant poop that could be dropped off at a neighbor or friends yard for a contribution. Another year, it was a face-off of college mascot colors to raise dollars for cancer research and awareness. A lot of things that happen come out of that (Sunday school) class, said Beth Bauer, one of the mischief-makers at First United Methodist. We have a lot of fun with it. We dont like to brag, but we have been the top moneyearner each of the past three years. The class is at it again. Should a shopper or diner happened past Josephs Cottage on Reid Avenue or the Sunset Coastal Grill on U.S. Highway 98 over the weekend they may have gazed upon a life-sized visage of Santa Claus. Made out of wood, with eyes made of porcelain drawer pulls with peace By Tim CroftStar News Editor One school project un der budget could benet two other public schools. Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton pro posed to the Gulf County School Board last week that board members con sider moving state brickand-mortar dollars saved from a roong project at Wewahitchka Elementary School to projects at two other schools. At issue is roughly $900,000 in state Public Ed ucation Capital Outlay, or PECO funds. Those funds are earmarked by the Flor ida Department of Educa tion and state lawmakers for school capital improve ments. Dollars, some $1.5 mil lion, were earmarked by the state for completing the Wewahitchka Elemen tary School project, but that roong job came in under budget by nearly $1 million. After three years, any unexpended PECO funds must be returned to the state, but Norton said he and nancial ofcer Sissy Worley had received per mission from the FDOE and state auditor general to shift the remaining funds to improve the facilities at two Port St. Joe schools. See SCHOOLS A3Norton proposes fund shift Bones, artifacts found at Lake Wimico from distant pastS P ECI A L TO T HE ST A R One of three femur bones found in Lake Wimico on Sunday, an indication the remains of at least two people were found. See BONES A5Where in the world is Santa? FUMC Relay for Life fundraiser among several on display Saturday This life-size wooden Santa is part of the newest fundraiser for the Relay for Life team from First United Methodist Church. T IM C ROFT | The Star See SANT A A5 Developer pulls out of energy center project, A2 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR See CHRISTMAS A5 This 2010 parade oat paid homage to the events name, Christmas on the Coast. Tis the Season 2011 holiday events sure to bring cheer to participants ST A R F ILE PHOTO S Santa Claus makes his debut at the 2010 Port St. Joe Christmas Parade.

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, December 1, 2011 the Port St Joe Star on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @ PSJ_Star for daily local news updates & photos! Like By Tim Croft Star News Editor Citing an inability to se cure nancing, Rentech, Inc., the developer of the Northwest Florida Renew able Energy Center, has pulled out of the project. Rentech had hoped to secure a federal loan guarantee from the U.S. Department of Energy, but this summer the DOE put the term sheet for the loan guarantee on hold due to the number of projects in the pipeline and available funding. Since then, Rentech, a Colorado-based renew able energy publicly-trad ed company, had sought nancing in the private sector, but the current eco nomic environment proved one too many hurdles for the project, a 55 megawatt energy plant to be built in Port St. Joe. The plant, as proposed, would produce steam to drive generators to pro duce electricity, the fuel source woody biomass, or forest residue. Progress Energy had an agreement in place to purchase elec tricity from the plant. According to numbers provided by Rentech, the project would have pro duced up to 200 construc tion jobs during the 18month build-out and 30-35 permanent jobs at the plant. Another 75-100 jobs would be created in the fuel chain. They are pulling out of the project because of nancing, said Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson. Magidson added that once the loan guarantee fell through, nancing was going to be a tough slog in the current economic envi ronment, though Rentech ofcials remained hopeful. It is not a surprise that the company was unable to nd nancing, Magidson said. We are disappointed and hope it is revived. It is a blow, but not the end of the world. We will continue to work with the (Gulf County Economic Development Council) and the county to bring jobs to Gulf County. Magidson said Rentech ofcials hoped to revive the project in the future should the economic outlook brighten. The next presi dential election could bring changes, Magidson added. He added that Rentech will continue to explore the possibility of bringing in a partner or a buyer for the project. If things change they will revive the project, Magidson said. This weeks decision was the latest twist in a long, tortured path for the renewable energy plant. The project was rst brought to the county in 2009 and a series of public workshops, with the Flor ida Department of Envi ronmental Protection and city and county ofcials sponsoring, were held, in cluding a demonstration project from the University of Auburn. An initial application for a DEP air emissions permit was pulled that year to re ne the process that would be used in the plant and permitting went forward again earlier this year. That permit was chal lenged, but the parties chal lenging the permit with drew their protest just as an administrative hearing was to be held in Port St. Joe. After the air permit was issued by the DEP, the city took up a development or der for the project, which was approved during a con tentious and lengthy special meeting on Oct. 4. Protests against the project continued from a citizens group alleging the plant would not provide clean energy. However, local elected and economic development ofcials championed the project and at one point it was seen as a magnet for other renewable energy research and production companies to relocate to the area. Developer pulls out of energy center

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THE ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB & THE CAMP GORDON WWII MUSEUM WISHES TO THANK OUR WONDERFUL SPONSORS OF OUR RECENT SILENT AUCTION AND GOLF TOURNAMENT JOHN C. GAINOUS VFW POST 10069 AMERICAN LEGION POST 116 AMERICAN LEGION SAUL-BRIDGES POST 13 TALLAHASSEE DALYS WATER SPORTS CAMP GORDON JOHNSTON ASSOCIATION PORT ST. JOE MARINA THE PORT INN GULF TO BAY CONST. MATHEWS LAW FIRM HANNON INS. AGCY. M C DANIEL CONSULTING WATERFRONT AUTO SALES TONY MINICHIELLO BILL MORRISSEY CAPITAL CITY BANK OLIVIER MONOD (ST GEORGE INN) SJBGC DEBBIE HOOPER (JOE BAY AERIALS) KENNY WOOD SUNSET COASTAL GRILL LINDA MINICHIELLO CULBRETH FINANCIAL GROUP HAWAILAN MOON DANCE CO. TOUCANS RESTAURANT & GIFTS MARK MINICHIELLO APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE HOG WILD BBQ HOMETOWN BP & GRILL CITY OF CARRABELLE BOW WOW BEACH SHOP COLLINS VACATION RENTALS KERIGAN MARKETING ASSOCIATES BOYER SIGNS ONE MORE SHOT, A.K.A. GEORGE & CLETUS HAPPY OURS BAY CITY LODGE & RESTAURANT STEAMERS HOT DOGS BARB & DAN VAN TREESE DICK DAVIS LAURIE JUNE DAVID & TRUDY STRAND D UREN S P IGGLY W IGGLY BLUEWATER OUTRIGGERS NO NAME CAF CENTENNIAL BANK G ULF C OAST R EAL E STATE G ROUP T HE P ORT F INE W INE & S PIRITS 2KL P HOTOGRAPHY AND THE GULF COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL AND, A BIG TH A NK YOU TO: M IKE A LLDIS L AURIE J UNE B ARB V AN T REESE M ARY K ELLY B ILL M ORRISSEY L INDA M INICHIELLO K RISTY R AFFIELD K EN T UCKER B ILL S NYDER D AVE C ASH J ACK K ERIGAN F ATHER P HIL F ORTIN THE PSJHS NROTC, L T C OMMANDER M ARTIN J AROS Z, M AJOR L T C OL (R ET .) D AVID B UTLER G ENERAL J IM S IMMONS AND THE ENTIRE S T J OSEPH B AY G OLF C LUB S TAFF Christmas Bazaar Golf Tournament Entry Fee $300 1st Place, $200 2nd Place, $100 3rd Place, $50 4th Place Great Cash Prizes & Numerous Door Prizes! Members: $45, or $30 plus a toy Non-Members: $55, or $40 plus a toy Registration and any questions by calling the Pro Shop at 850-227-1751, visit the club in person or online at www.stjosephbaygolf.com Do your Christmas shopping while supporting local artists with handmade gifts including: Friday, Dec 9, 8am 6pm & Saturday, Dec 10, 9am 4pm Saturday, Dec 10, 12pm Shotgun Start (Individual Handicap Play) Jewelry | Specialty Breads | Decorations Original Art | Hand-stitched items Jams | Jellies | Pottery December 9 & 10, 2011 2nd Annual Supporting Gulf County Christmas for Kids and People Helping People St. Joseph Bay Golf Club MEXICO BEACH KRINGLEMART Saturday, December 3rd 10:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. (CST) Mexico Beach Welcome Center 102 Canal Parkway, Mexico Beach Vendors will showcase unique gift items including local art, handcrafted jewelry, pottery and much more. This event is free to the public. Santa will be arriving at 1:00 p.m. to visit with the children For More Information Call (850) 648-8196 or visit our website at www.mexico-beach.com Sponsored by Special Events for Mexico Beach, Inc. Proceeds to benet the July 4th reworks fund. Local Thursday, December 1, 2011 The Star| A3 Norton proposed spend ing roughly $500,000 to re furbish the cafeteria and kitchen at Port St. Joe El ementary School. In addi tion, he proposed spending $300,000-$400,000 to replace lockers at Port St. Joe Ju nior/Senior High School as well as maintain the exterior condition of The Dome. The lockers at the high school are just deplorable, Norton said. They have been there since the school was built. At the elementary school we will increase the footprint and reduce the noise from the cafeteria and refurbish the kitchen. These are two projects in dire need of being done. Both projects are in the districts ve-year plan, and Norton noted that improve ments to the elementary school cafeteria and kitch en had not been funded by the half-cent sales tax ap proved by voters more than a decade ago for improve ments at the school. I think these will be two successful projects and this is at no cost to our local taxpayers, Norton said, adding that no ad valorem dollars would be used, only state PECO dollars already in the districts bank ac count. We are excited we could shift the dollars around, said Worley. (The state) deemed (these projects) were truly a need here. The board did not take formal action on the pro posal last week, but sched uled a workshop prior to its Dec. 6 meeting to discuss the logistics and plans. Norton emphasized that the district must begin mov ing ahead on the projects, pending board approval. The contracts for ar chitecture and design to construction must be ad vertised and awarded and the aim is to have work ers ready to move ahead the day school lets out for the 2011-12 school year in June. We need to be ready to go, Norton said. Reorganization The board undertook its annual reorganization of board ofcers during last weeks meeting. Billy Quinn, Jr. moved into the chairmans posi tion, based on seniority, with Linda Wood ascending to vice chair. Board mem ber John Wright had served the past year as chairman, with Quinn vice chair. TIM C R OF T | The Star Incoming board chair Billy Quinn Jr., left, and Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton, right, present outgoing chairman John Wright with a plaque in recognition of his past year of service as chairman of the Gulf County School Board. SCHOOLS from page A1

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Opinion A4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINGS USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Thursday, December 1, 2011 Recently, I spent over 24 hours driving during a threeor four-day period. It really isnt so bad if you are not in a hurry. Driving allows you time to think, dream and play with the radio. Please note that I only play with the radio when it is safe to do so. Long road trips require stops at state visitor information centers, truck stops and other points of interest. Again, the key is not to be in a hurry. When I stop at gas stations and truck stops, I like to check out the candy counters. My Grandmama had a candy store and just looking at the candy reminds me of her. I enjoy it. As you drive along, you get hankerings. On this particular trip, I got a hankering for Mallo Cups and Goo Goo Clusters. They bring back good memories and anytime you can bring something good back, you should (kind of like Cokes in glass bottles). After nding a truck stop with both Mallo Cups and Goo Goo Clusters, I drove on down the interstate feeling good about my success. After an hour, the Mallo Cups were calling my name. I had gotten a long four pack of the Mallo Cups and as I drove, I eased open one of the ends. Sinking my teeth in, I remembered why I liked Mallo Cups as a boy. It didnt have anything to do with the whipped marshmallow center surrounded by a delicious combination of milk chocolate and coconut. As a matter of fact, I dont even like coconut. I bought Mallo Cups because they had cardboard coins inserted into the package. The coins ranged in value from a penny to fty cents. The goal was to save up to 500 cents/ points and you could send them in for free candy. Keeping in mind that I didnt like coconut so much, I thought about why I actually did that for the next hour. I guess it was for the sense of accomplishment, a goal that a little boy could obtain as opposed to growing up to be a professional baseball player or rocket scientist or something. Over the years, Ive actually acquired a taste for them. Maybe its the memory Ive acquired a taste for, I really dont know. For the record, I only remember one package of free candy that came to our house in Alabama from the Boyer Candy Company in Altoona, Pennsylvania. It was in the summer, the reward ended up being packages of melted whipped marshmallows, delicious milk chocolate and coconut. My brother put them in the freezer and they ended up being frozen Mallo Cup sticks that you had to pick the wax paper cups out of. Continuing to drive, I looked for the cardboard coins in my four pack of Mallo Cups, they werent there. To my disappointment, the four packs do not contain the cardboard coins. The taste of coconut bothered me more. The Goo Goo Cluster was still sitting there in the passenger seat; I decided to let it stay in its package. It wont melt for a few months. I think I buy them just because they remind me of Nashville, Tenn., a place that I enjoy visiting. Supposedly, the Goo Goo Cluster was the rst ever combination candy bar. In 1912, the Standard Candy Company in Nashville poured out a melted blob of caramel, marshmallow, peanuts and chocolate and let it get hard and put a wrapper on it. The Goo Goo Cluster doesnt have coconut in it, but it does have caramel in it. I dont care so much for caramel either. The thought of Minnie Pearl and Roy Acuff at the Grand Ole Opry kind of mask the taste. On my cars radio, a classic country station was playing Roy Acuffs Wabash Cannonball. It was appropriate. I was in Tennessee and I was singing along with Roy, who passed away in 1992. Driving and thinking, I asked myself, Why do I eat things that I dont care for so much? Are the memories really that good? Yes, they are. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. On Dec. 13 the Mexico Beach City Council is scheduled to take up a possible switch to the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce for law enforcement services. Moving away from the citys police force has been an exploration, a fact-nding as it was labeled by city manager Chris Hubbard, to determine the viability of such a move. According to Hubbard, as reported by Star Staff Writer Valerie Garman in a recent story, the research was undertaken to determine if costs could be reduced by the change in law enforcement. This is a laudable goal. In an era of shrinking public and private sector budgets, any taxing authority not seeking ways to save taxpayer dollars is falling down on the job. But the intent would seem more laudable if the effort had taken place during the spring and summer months, as a run up to crafting the budget for the scal year that began with the rst of October. Instead, according to Hubbard, the city, in particular Mayor Al Cathey, approached Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen sometime in late summer for an audit of the city police department and presentation of what McKeithens ofce would offer as an alternative. The presentation from McKeithen arrived during an October workshop, hardly the kind of timeframe that would realize any savings for 2011-12. And McKeithens presentation, Hubbard indicated, highlighted no real savings for the city. Hubbard said a move to the Sheriffs Ofce for law enforcement would cost about as much, if not more, than the city currently spends on its police department. However, Hubbard added that the sheriffs ofce would bring more resources to the task, such as crime scene investigators, detectives and the like. That is indeed true, but it would be true regardless. Mexico Beach is hardly a hot bed of crime. We are not talking the murder capital of Florida. We arent even talking the petit theft capital of Florida. But should the horric happen, as it has infrequently, and Mexico Beach has a murder or armed robbery or other serious criminal act, the sheriffs ofce would certainly provide all the resources the city requested. Those crime scene investigators and detectives they would be at the citys disposal to investigate a serious offense, likely taking the lead. At its core, this contention is a red herring. When the two primary arguments offered by city ofcials for a switch have been knocked away, the foundation for such a proposal rapidly topples. Consider the logistics: Mexico Beach is separated from the rest of Bay County by Tyndall Air Force Base, which has its own law enforcement presence. The distance from Mexico Beach to the DuPont Bridge, roughly where one leaves Tyndall and enters the city of Parker, is more than 15 miles. Depending on trafc on twolane U.S. Highway 98, that is a 15-20 minute drive time just to reach the scene of any crime in Mexico Beach, and this scenario depends on a responding deputy just happening to be in Parker near the bridge at the time. And what if a drone crashes on the Tyndall base? What happens during the several instances each year, for a myriad of reasons, that the stretch of U.S. 98 along Tyndall is closed for base operations? Sure, there is hope that a Gulf-toBay Highway will one day provide a sort of Back Beach Road around U.S. 98 between Gulf County and U.S. 231, but that day is well into the future. In the meantime, the city of Mexico Beach would be protected the central mission of law enforcement by a force signicantly distant in proximity. In that light, it makes far more sense to approach the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce, save issues of jurisdiction crossing county lines. Consider also re and EMS: Mexico Beach is one of fewer-than10 municipalities in the state which have a public safety department encompassing the re department and EMS as well as law enforcement. All three operate under the same chief. Will Chief Brad Hall stick around after one-third, or more, is slashed from his salary ? If not, what does the city do about leadership for re and EMS? City ofcials have been quick to state there will be no impact to re and emergency medical protection, but that is a hollow statement given the makeup of the Department of Public Safety. There is also a human element to the issue. The city would be choosing to put a half-dozen or so folks out of work with any switch. Further, the police department was established by city charter; the Public Safety Department by ordinance. Can the council unilaterally alter the charter without citizen input? For that is the overriding issue here, the willingness of city ofcials to shut the public out of the discussion. One of the fundamentals of government is protecting and serving its citizens, but the city council has thus far been allergic to public discussion on this topic. McKeithens presentation at a workshop was just that a presentation with no input from the public. The public was denied the opportunity to fully explore the issue at last months regular meeting because the item wasnt listed on the agenda. But the folks with the biggest stake in this discussion are residents. It is their protection and their safety at play here. Those residents deserve more of a say than theyve had thus far in a matter as consequential as public safety. I missed Mom and Dad this Thanksgiving. Dad has been gone for years now; Mom just a couple. And please understand, it wasnt a lonely Thanksgiving! My sons were there. My grandchildren were there. Cathys immediate, fairly close, not-so-close and a few we-didntknow-at-all family members showed up. In droves! I thought Gil Favor and Rowdy Yates were pushing a trail herd through by the time we sat down to eat. You can turn aside for a moment, even in a crowd. Dad liked to eat. Oh, he wouldnt make a fuss or let on. He wasnt going to make the rounds hugging, shaking hands or entertaining. But he enjoyed the family. He enjoyed the meal. He enjoyed the fellowship. He would never say so, but I think he was giving thanks more than any of us ever realized. He sure understood the season. Mom would be everywhere. Shed wipe her hands on that apron a thousand times in between peeping in the oven and checking the three pots she had going on the top of the stove. Shed be seeing to everyone. Did they want some tea while they waited? Were Leons girls alright upstairs by themselves? Do we want to try to eat before the ballgame? Do we have enough seats? Someone is going to have to eat in the kitchen. She would be the last to sit down. She would be the last to serve her plate. She made sure the cranberry sauce was close to her middle son. Her head would lift slightly as someone took a rst bite of potato salad, searching for the approval smile. Her eyes darted from plate to plate; she wanted to be ready if someone needed a rell. I look back now and wonder if Mom wasnt so busy maybe she missed a little of the thanksgiving. I put that thought aside quickly. Mom was having a blast. She was in her element. The giving was her way of showing thanks! I never imagined life without either of them. They came from such humble beginnings. Dad grew up across Shannon Creek on a hillside farm. Mom lived on the other side of the little Mt. Zion School, just up the road off of Sugar Creek. Ive never heard the full story of how they met down where the creeks forked. I know Dad took to rabbit hunting up close to the Kennedy farm. They married in December of 1934. I dont know much about the proposal, wedding day or their early years. Life, as they lived it, wasnt about them. It was about us. And it was about family. They each had six brothers and sisters that reached adulthood. Believe me, Mom and Dad knew something about large Thanksgiving gettogethers! Mom was fourteen when they married. I have rolled that over time and time again in my mind. I know it was a different era. In so many ways, a completely different world..but still, fourteen! Daddy dropped out of school after the third grade. His father needed him on the farm more than they did down at the little one-room school at Mt. Zion. A child bride and an elementary school drop-out. What would you gure the odds of them making it? I wondered about how they spent their rst Thanksgiving as husband and wife. I wondered if they pondered on the future. Did they go to the movies? When did they start planning on Leon, me and David? I should have asked more questions when I had the chance. I should have paid more attention to the little glances and the unspoken moments between them. I never, ever heard either of them bemoan the hardships of farm living in the heights of the Great Depression. I never heard either of them complain about their lot in life, a break that might not have gone their way or how they came to be at the end of Stonewall Street with three fairly demanding children. They didnt belittle anyone or waste time on that lifeis-unfair speech. What I did hear from them was laughter, encouragement and a kind word just when the world was sticking a foot on my neck. Oh yeah, you let me step over one of their clearly-dened lines of decency and good decorum and they would whip my little backside quicker than you could say Father OLeary is not a Baptist! They could take that child rearing theme to extremes sometimes! They wanted to know how things were going at school. They asked questions about what we were learning. They made sure our friends stopped by for a sandwich or a bite of chocolate pie. It seemed innocent and polite enough, but I look back now and realize it also gave them insight into who we were hanging around with. Theyd follow you out the back door and embarrass the dickens out of you by yelling Be careful as you were getting in the car with Ricky Gene or Ann Carol. They didnt just raise us; they were involved in every blooming detail of our lives! They led by word, action and example. And let me tell you, they could do some almighty pushing if the situation demanded it. They invested everything they had in us. Ill be reaping the dividends until the day I die. I looked across the table at my two sons. How proud Mom and Dad would have been of them. I soaked in the noise from ve bouncing grandchildren. I hate they didnt get to share a banana sandwich with my Father. These precious young souls never saw Mom at her best. But I know without a doubt the legacy of my parents, the faithful precepts of my upbringing, the care and love of family courses deep in their veins. Not bad for a child bride and a third grade drop-out! Thankfully, Kes Mallo Cups and Goo Goo Clusters CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard TIM CROFT Star news editor Removing public from public safety HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Heres some Thanksgiving leftovers

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Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S For the Holidays... Give the Gift of Regional Literature from Forgotten Coast Used and Out of Print Books Featuring authors and topics from Old and New Florida and the South Gift-Quality Used, New, 1st Editions Signed Copies Publisher, 2011 Edition, Alexander Keys Island Light available in hardcover and paperback http://www.forgottencoastbooks.com Local Thursday, December 1, 2011 The Star| A5 SP E C I A L TO T HE S T A R Also found was this coin from L.W Lyons Clothing and Furnishing Goods store in New Orleans. The store closed in 1960. BONES from page A1 said, is the condition of the site. Given wave action, from tides, boats on the water, natural wave action of the water depending on weather conditions, the site is considered a de ated site. In other words, water action through the years has caused erosion to an extent that the layers put down by people of differ ent eras were now on one level, with little to demar cate decades or centu ries. For example, in ad dition to a coin that likely dates to the 1860s a commemorative coin from a New Orleans business has an address from which the company moved in 1868 there was also found a tennis shoe. A geologic marker near the site was 14 inches above the surface of the ground. When those are laid down they are ush with the ground, Dickel said. The site not only con tains items dated to the 1800s, but Dickel said it was conceivable a full dig of the site could reveal items thousands of years old. All this stuff is there on the same level, Dickel said. It is all there on one level, plus there are these scattered bones. It might be a historic cemetery out there. Historic for what peo ple? If Native American, Dickel said, the bureau would work with the ap propriate tribe authorities on proper disposition. If a historic AfricanAmerican site, Dickel said, the bureau would again contact appropriate authorities. In general, he added, if African-Ameri can, the bones and arti facts would be returned to the site a site, Dickel noted, which is illegal un der state law to tamper with. The ultimate answer will come from a universi ty researcher and expert on such nds, Dickel said, and should be known in about a month or so. Dickel said while not entirely common, it was not unusual to nd such historic cemeteries in such remote areas. Ru ral areas, such as North Florida, are dotted with historic archaeological sites such the one found at Lake Wimico. Since the site had al ready been documented, there was no excavation conducted two weeks ago. More skeletal remains and artifacts were recov ered. The investigation is pending nal determina tion of the archaeologists ndings, Nugent said. signs for eyeballs, this Santa is available to the highest bidder and in need of a good home. Susan Julian from our class was able to get this Santa donated from a friend in Georgia, Bauer said. Santa came home with Susan. We all saw it and immediately started brainstorming. The brainstorm was to drop Santa in front of various businesses and restaurants in town. In turn, he would become a silent auction subject. A sign on the front of the jolly old guy says, If you think Im so nice, my backsides the price. There is a sheet for bidders to write down their bid amounts and to track how their bid is holding up. The sign continues, After touring around town, you wont let me down, because nothing will do but to come home with you. The starting bid is $35 and the minimum bid is $5 and bids have begun adding up on Santas backside after tours of Josephs Cottage, Sunset Coastal Grill and No Name Caf. Santa will make stops throughout town. He is going to different retail establishments and restaurants, Bauer said. We dont want to leave anybody out. Any business or restaurant who would like Santa to pay a visit is asked to contact Bauer at 227-9041 or 340-0779. He is going to have an engagement calendar, Bauer said with a chuckle. Bidders can also stop by and check out Santas backside to know where the bidding is headed. The auction will end at 12:30 p.m. ET on Sunday, Dec. 18, when a winner will be announced at the church. Updates on Santas whereabouts may be found on the Facebook page for the Port St. Joe Star. The Methodist Church has a second fundraiser to benet Relay for Life. Each member of the congregation is asked to bring in a Christmas ornament that is especially intriguing or attractive to be hung on the huge tree inside the church fellowship hall. The church will conduct a silent auction on each ornament, the proceeds going to Relay. You can take your ornament home with you but you have to make sure you are the high bidder, Bauer said. The person who offers the ornament that brings the highest bid will be treated to the Rev. Mac Fulchers famous Grits-aYa-Ya. First United Methodist is only one of the Relay for Life teams that will be on hand this Saturday for the special Christmas SaltAir Farmers Market at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. The public is urged to come out and see rsthand the ingenious ways teams are raising money: The El Governor Team Gov Bugs are holding a rafe for a four-night stay at the El Governor Motel in Mexico Beach. Tickets are $5 each or six for $20.00. The Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Team (Meredith Ward, 227-4885) rafes for a thirty-one bag; $3 each or two for $5. The WASWA Team (Kim Kurnitsky, 227-4093) Choose Hope Ornaments, $10 each. Fairpoint Communications Team (Donna White, 229-7251) rafes for Festival of Wreaths, $1 each. Port St. Joe High School Team Pretty in Pink (Kaley Wilder, 2299291 or 340.0985) selling feet for a cure, $1 each. SANTA from page A1Fair P oint Festival of Wreaths Rafe The employees at FairPoint Communications in Port St. Joe have created wreaths for a cause this holiday season. They will rafe the beautifully decorated wreaths, which are currently on display in their business ofce in Port St. Joe, on Dec. 3 at the Christmas on the Coast event in downtown Port St. Joe. The wreaths will be on display at the City Commons gazebo, and the drawing will take place before the Christmas parade. Tickets are $1 a piece or $5 for six. All proceeds will benet local charities and nonprot organizations. Mexico Beach Holiday Kringlemart On Saturday, Dec. 3, the Mexico Beach Special Events Committee will host a Holiday Kringlemart outside of the Mexico Beach Welcome Center, 102 Canal Parkway, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. CT. The market will feature a variety of unique gift items in a showcase from local vendors. There will be something for everyone on your list! Items will include unique and local handcrafted jewelry, art, pottery, clothing, house wares as well as homemade baked goods and specialty foods. This event is free and open to the public. Mexico Beach tree lighting Sunset Park in Mexico Beach is being transformed into a Florida beach Christmas. The Special Events for Mexico Beach, The Mexico Beach Community Development Council, along with the City of Mexico Beach invites the public to attend the annual Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony held at Sunset Park (next to El Governor Motel) on Sunday, Dec. 4. The event kicks off at 5:30 p.m. CT with a Christmas story reading from author Marcia Harden. The lighting ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. CT and will feature music, homemade desserts and hot chocolate. Following the lighting ceremony, a special holiday golf cart parade will begin, followed by a visit from Santa. If you are interested in decorating your golf cart and riding in the parade, please contact Traci Gaddis at 648-5474. The Mexico Beach Department of Public Safety will also be collecting donations of new, unwrapped toys to deliver to families in need. Please join us as we bring the warmth and spirit of the holidays to the beach. For any questions about the events please contact the Mexico Beach Welcome Center at 6488196. C hristmas bazaar and golf tournament The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club will hold its second annual Christmas Bazaar and Jingle Bell Golf Tournament Dec. 9-10, supporting Gulf County Christmas for Kids and People Helping People. The club is open to the public and the golf tournament will be a fourplayer, best-ball format, with a 12 p.m. ET shotgun start on Saturday, Dec. 10. The Christmas Bazaar will ll the holiday-decorated clubhouse with local artists and craftsmen selling handmade gifts including jewelry, jams and jellies, hand-stitched items, pottery, decorations, stained glass, original art, specialty breads and fresh foods. The Christmas Bazaar will be open Friday, Dec. 9, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET and Saturday, Dec. 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information visit www.stjoebaygolf.com or call 850-227-1751. Wewa P arade The City of Wewahitchka invites you to attend its annual Christmas Parade on Saturday, Dec. 17 at 5 p.m. CT at the corner of State 71 and East River Road in Wewahitchka. For more information about the parade please contact Connie at the City of Wewahitchka at 850-6392605. CHRISTMAS from page A1

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Thursday, December 1, 2011 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters GARMIN ETREX VEN T URE HAND HELD GPS GREAT FOR THE WOODS OR THE WATER R E G $169.99 N OW $109.99 By Lois Swoboda Florida Freedom Newspapers The Franklin County Tourist Development Council is sponsoring a contest to promote geocaching to attract tourists to the area. Geocaching, which combines the terms geographical and cache, is an outdoor adventure that sends seekers on a treasure hunt for containers of trinkets and prizes. Participants use a Global Positioning System receiver (GPSr) to hide and seek containers called geocaches. A typical cache is a waterproof container containing a logbook. According to Groundspeak, the organizer of the game, (www. geocaching.com), there are nearly 200 geocache sites in our forests and towns and dotting the coast between Alligator Point and the western edge of Franklin County. Around the world, there are more than 1.2 million geocaches registered with Groundspeak, including ve in Antarctica and two on Easter Island. The contest launched on Halloween. Heres how it works: Hidden somewhere in Franklin County is a puzzle cache (GC369DD) containing 100 coupons, each good for a Salty geocoin. The oyster-shaped coins were minted especially for the Franklin County contest. Geocoins are collected by geocachers and retail for anywhere from $10 to $40, with some rare coins selling for signicantly more. The coins are awarded to winners at local visitor centers. Contestants must nd geographical coordinates hidden in the lids of geocaches in the county to locate the nal container. As of Nov. 21, the puzzle had been solved by 15 searchers, and all but one has collected his or her coin. First to solve the puzzle was Sheila Walaszek of Orlando, who was staying on St. George Island when she learned of the contest in an article in Forgotten Coastline magazine. Walaszek said she was thrilled to be rst to solve the puzzle. It was the rst time Ive ever really won anything, she said. Walaszek said she visits the area annually to bicycle, rollerblade and spend time on the beach with her dog Daisy. When I come here I always plan on caching, she said. You see so many things you wouldnt otherwise see. The idea is to lure visitors to the area for the rst time. So far it seems to be working. A couple who drove to the county to attempt the challenge wrote, Completed this today after our visit to Tallahassee. We had no idea that there was this big festival going on. We wrote one of the numbers down wrong, which led us on a wild goose chase for the nal. No regrets. We got out of the truck and a mother bear and her two cubs went running across the street in front of us. As we were driving away, we spotted a gray fox. Rechecked our numbers and made the nd. This is a good way to introduce people to the area. We didnt have any plans to visit otherwise, and really like the area. Thanks for the fun, wrote the couple. The contest will continue until April or until all of the coins have been claimed. geocaching craze Franklin County embraces In the Salty Geocoin Challenge, 100 geocoins like this one are redeemable to adventurous visitors who can locate the geocaches throughout Franklin County. Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Sheila Walaszek, right, accepts the rst prize awarded in the Salty Geocoin Challenge from Cindy Steiger at the Apalachicola Visitor Center. This is a good way to introduce people to the area. We didnt have any plans to visit otherwise, and really like the area. Thanks for the fun. Salty Geocoin Challenge participants By Jessy Kinnett Park Ranger St. Joseph Peninsula State Park 227-1327 Florida waters have cooled down but shing is still as hot as it was in August. Fishing on the gulf surf line and wading into St Joseph Bay during cooler weather yields some very common (and tasty) species. Red Drum and Southern Kingsh take center stage for most diehard snowbirds and locals. Red Drum, Channel Bass, Red Fish, or simply Reds, are all aliases for this feisty sh. Known for their signature black dot near the tail, they are a blast to catch and abundant in the bay during cooler months. Spawning occurs during cooler months bringing more reds in the bay as well as the abundance of mollusks, crustaceans and small fry sh. Mostly bottom feeders, allow your bait to rest on the bay bottom or within a couple of feet from it to snag one of these strong ghters. Menhaden are a favorite amongst adult red, but synthetics work well also. Southern Kingsh, Gulf Kingsh, Sand Mullet, Sandcroakers and whiting are all aliases for the gulf coasts best pansh. Slight differences between the species all amount to nothing when they are side by side. Mostly distinguishable by slight variations in colors or subtle markings, these sh school in large groups and patrol close to the gulf shoreline hunting sand eas and small shellsh. Utilize small hooks and cut bait on high-low bottom rigs and wait for the schools to arrive. Cut shrimp and synthetics work very well for these misidentied jewels of the coast. Get out to St. Joseph Peninsula State park access to the gulf, access to the bay and a perfect way to spend the cooler weather! Until Next time, The Rangers at St. S P E CIAL T O THE ST A R James Gavin, 14, bagged this Thanksgiving buck on a St. Joe hunting lease using a 7 mm-08 youth rie he received on his birthday. He took the deer from a double lean-up stand he was sharing with his granddad, Dan. James lives with his grandparents Dan and Marsha Henry on Cape San Blas. He hunts and shes with his grandfather as long as he keeps his grades up. A THANKSGIVING BUCK By Lois Swoboda Florida Freedom Newspapers If you notice some unusual spi der eggs on your porch or under a shelf, watch out. They might be the eggs of a brown widow spider, which have been abundant in the county this year. These interesting egg cases are round with tiny protruding spikes reminiscent of the head of a medi eval mace. Everyone is familiar with black widow spiders, whose bite can sometimes be fatal, but Florida is home to three other widow spiders, the southern widow spider, red wid ow spider and brown widow spider. Although the venom of these spiders is not as toxic as the black widow, they are very painful and can cause serious injury if not treated. If you have a brown widow spi der infestation, you will probably notice the eggs before you see the spider. Brown widows are reclusive and hide in cracks and dark corners. Some typical sites include inside old tires, empty containers such as buck ets and nursery pots, mailboxes, en tryway corners, under eaves, stacked equipment, cluttered storage closets and garages, behind hurricane shut ters, undercarriages of motor homes, and screened porches. Beware of brown widows 1 Fish, 2 sh, red sh, kingshS P E CIAL T O T HE ST A R A redsh. Page 6 Freshwater Last week the whiting bite started back up on St. Joe Beach and under the George Tapper bridge. Some pompano were caught as well, but not in good numbers. Larger red sh are in the surf and will eat just about anything now. Inshore Offshore Most of the trout are still small in St. Joe Bay; however, the bite should get better with the cold weather this week. The I.C.W. Canal will soon be come the hot spot in town as inshore species continue to migrate for the winter. Red sh are still being caught just about everywhere in our waters. Larger sh are holding on inshore wrecks and close to the beaches. The Fishermans Landing reports great catches of shellcracker still with some channel cat in the mix this past weekend. Sheephead are still being caught in the river and into the Brothers. Good news is that the cold snap has triggered the crappie bite, and great reports this week of full coolers coming in at Howard Creek. SPONS ORED B Y Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com A Section Thursday, December 1, 2011 Page 7 Star Staff Report Since 2003 the Gene Rafeld Football League has played its games in the Big Bend League against Franklin County, Wewahitchka, Blountstown, Liberty County, Sneads and Chattahoochee. League rules called for each town to eld three teams, the 7-8 year old Teeny Mites, 9-10 year old Tiny Mites and 11-12 year old Pee Wees. In recent years some of the towns have had difculty in getting enough players to ll out the rosters at every level. This year Sneads and Liberty County were unable to eld a Pee Wee team. As a result the other Pee Wee teams in the League had only four scheduled games. To solve this problem the League decided to go to only two teams in each town. They will be 7-, 8and 9-year-old Tiny Mites called the Jaguars and 10-, 11and 12-year-old Pee Wees, called the Buccaneers, in Port St. Joe. The change should result in every town being able to eld the requisite number of teams so that everyone will have a full schedule. In some towns, Port St. Joe included, some teams are expected to have large rosters making it difcult for all players to get enough playing time. To give everyone plenty of time on the eld and to ensure that each child gets the game experience he needs to develop, we will play a 5th quarter that will not count in league standings. This 5th quarter will be used exclusively for the younger and non-starter players on the team. Before the 2012 season starts League ofcials will meet again to work out any problems that may come up as a result of these changes. Changes coming to Gene Rafeld Football Star Staff Report The Gene Rafeld Foot ball League will hold its Awards Celebration at 6 p.m. ET tonight, Dec. 1, at the cafeteria at Port St. Joe High School. Tiger Shark Coach Vern Bath will be the guest speaker. This year all three Port St. Joe teams accom plished something never done before. The Dolphins, Jaguars and Buccaneers went through the season undefeated and won their Super Bowl Championship games. The players will be honored with trophies, championship T-shirts, and the appreciation for a job well done. Players, their families, friends and fans are all in vited to share in this event. Gene Rafeld Football schedules awards celebration Star Staff Report The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club hosted a fundrais ing Silent Auction and golf tournament on Nov. 18-19 to benet the Camp Gor don Johnston Museum. The museum, located in Carrabelle, is dedicated to preserving and protect ing the heritage of the sol diers of World War II, espe cially those who trained at Camp Gordon Johnston. The camp opened in 1942 to prepare amphibious soldiers and their support groups. A quarter of a mil lion men were trained at CGJ before it closed in April 1946. Fridays entertainment was provided by One More Shot, A.K.A. George & Cletus. The auction raised over $2,500 for the museum, a not-for-prot corporation. The golf tournament on Saturday raised an ad ditional $6,700. The tour nament on Saturday was preceded by an Honoring Americas Veterans cer emony. Three WWII veterans were special guests: Jim Sealey, Fred Fitzgerald, and David Butler. Dan Van Treese, club president, and Tony Minichiello, market ing director for the muse um, were co-emcees. The invocation was delivered by Farther Phil Fortin and the Port St. Joe High School NROTC presented the col ors while Lt. Commander Martin Jarosz sand the National Anthem.Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Jim Simmons was the principal speaker. The team of David War riner, Dave Warriner, Gary Settle and Tommy Lake came in rst place; Dan Anderson, Carol Anderson, Chip Crow and Deborah Crow nished second,; and Eric Scholles, Damon Mc Nair, Penelope Evanoff and Phil Dodson nished third. Longest Drive and Clos est to the Hole awards went to Marvin Shimfessel, Mike Alldis, Gary Settle, and Nick Nicolas. Star Staff Report The Lady Tiger Sharks, playing against two larger classication schools, split a pair of road games prior to the Thanksgiving break. Port St. Joe (1-1 for the season) beat Springeld Rutherford 50-37 on Nov. 15 before losing two days later 60-41 at Lynn Haven Mosley. The Lady Tiger Sharks transformed a 13-7 de cit into a 26-19 halftime lead with a 19-point sec ond quarter, led by Katie Lacour, who scored eight of her game-high 21 points in the period. The Lady Rams shaved the lead by one in the third quarter but Port St. Joe pulled away in the nal eight minutes. Maya Robbins added 10 points for Port St. Joe, with Lyssa Parker chipping in with nine, MeMe Alex ander with six and Ashley Robinson and Nicole Spilde scoring two points apiece. Against Mosley, the Lady Tiger Sharks were down early and trailed 2816 at halftime. Port St. Joe chipped away at the lead in the third quarter before a 22-point outburst in the nal quarter sealed the Lady Dolphin win. Lacour led Port St. Joe with 12 points, Parker added 10 and Robbins nine. Alex ander and Autumn Haynes each scored four points and Robinson added two. Port St. Joe traveled to Sneads on Tuesday and plays at Wewahitchka at 1 p.m. ET today. The Lady Tiger Sharks rst home game is 6:30 p.m. ET on Fri day. By Tim Croft Star News Editor Youth will be served, and doing much of the serving, this basketball season for the Port St. Joe boys. The Tiger Sharks must replace four starters, and the vast majority of the scoring, this season and will do with a team that features just three seniors, one a transfer from Michigan, and two eighthgraders. The season starts for the young Tiger Sharks this Thursday when they travel to Lynn Haven Mosley. Port St. Joe will be at Bay High on Saturday. We are anxious to get the season started, said Port St. Joe coach Derek Kurnitsky. We are very young. We have some very talented players, but we are very young. We just need to start playing some people. The returning seniors are Alex King and Arion Ward. King started much of last season while Ward came off the bench. The other senior is Nick Dickenson who transferred from Michigan. Ramello Zaccarro and Natrone Lee, both juniors, return, moving from reserve roles to starting, and they are joined by Caleb Odom and Jak Riley, both freshmen. The varsity squad is rounded out by eighthgraders Chad Quinn and Marcel Johnson. We are going to have to rely on our familiar (modus operandi), speed and quickness, Kurnitsky said. The key will be adjusting to the speed of the varsity game. There is a difference between junior varsity or middle school and high school varsity. It is something you can not practice, and you can not simulate. Once the young kids catch up with the speed of the game, theyll be ne. We may take some lumps early, but we have talent and well get there. Reserved seating is available for the varsity team. One season ticket good for reserved seating for all home games costs $60 and you can purchase two for $100. The varsitys rst home game is Tuesday against Blountstown. Game action starts at 6 p.m. ET. This weekend will offer a junior high tournament. The Port St. Joe Centennial Bank Classic will start at 10 a.m. ET at Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School with Port St. Joe (currently 4-1) playing Wewahitchka. Games will continue all day. The schedule has Wewahitchka against Wakulla at 11 a.m.; Port St. Joe (B) plays Wakulla (B) at noon; the Port St. Joe girls play the Wakulla girls at 1 p.m.; Port St. Joe (A) plays Wakulla (A) at 2 p.m.; Wakulla versus Quincy Shanks at 3 p.m.; and Port St. Joe (A) against Shanks (A) at 4 p.m. It is not a tournament, but a classic, Kurnitsky said. Everybody gets two games. Admission for the day is $5 per person. Tourney, auction raises more than $9,000 Port St. Joe girls split rst 2 games Season starts for young Tiger Sharks PHOTOS SP ECIAL TO T HE S TAR A special tribute to veterans preceded the start of the golf tournament, which raised more than $6,700 for the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. The winning team was David Warriner, Dave Warriner, Tommy Lake and Gary Settle.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, December 1, 2011

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Photos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Left Harley, a student at The Growing Minds Center, works on identifying photos of everyday tasks with his instructor. Above Seven-year-old Sam works one-on-one with his instructor. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer At 10:30 a.m. on day one of the reno vation, all of the carpet had already been torn up. They work like Tasmanian Devils, said Ofcer Jesse Burkett, as he assisted a group of volunteers from the Covenant House in Kinard with the rst step in a renovation project to spruce up the Mexi co Beach Police Department on Nov. 22. The renovation process will be com pletely volunteer-driven, and is aimed at updating the department building and creating a better work environment. Burkett and other members of the de partment have volunteered their time, along with a handful of volunteers from the Covenant House, eliminating the need to delve into city resources to fund the renovation. This is probably one of the great est things we could ask for, said Mexico Beach Police Chief Brad Hall. These young men came down and volunteered their time, and they did it with no hesita tion. The Covenant House is a halfway house ministry aimed at helping people turn their lives around by stressing the importance of work ethic and personal re sponsibility. I am very grateful to the Covenant House and what theyve done, Hall said. It allows us to continue our everyday jobs while they update our building. Im grate ful theyre here; I cant say that enough. Hall said the remodeling has come at a good time because it will go hand-in-hand with other departmental changes he is looking to make. Hall said the department has goals to become more community-oriented and more involved with the citizens of Mexico Beach, and to update and upgrade its poli cies. He said as time passes, things simply need to be updated, both structurally and departmentally. Over time, things have to be done, we have to rebuild, Hall said. Law enforcement is always a changing prac tice. The department recently purchased database software that will allow it to eventually go paperless and rid the building of bulky le cabinets. It will also allow the department to move towards state accreditation. The renovation will also allow more privacy for interviews, and better over all organization. Hall said the departmental updates will help the ofcers more efciently ac complish their ultimate goal; to provide protection to the community. Hopefully we will get this remodel done within the next couple of weeks, Hall said. But the departmental chang es are going to take some time. Thursday, December 1, 2011 Star Staff Report Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf has opened a new Womens Health Center in the hospitals Medical Ofce Building that will provide mammography services as well as bone density testing and ultrasound testing. The fa cility began providing select ser vices Nov. 7. The Womens Center is a joint effort between the Gulf County Health Department and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. While located at the Sacred Heart Hos pital campus, the state-of-the-art Selenia Digital Mammography device was purchased jointly with a grant secured by Health Department. The new equipment allows for improved image qual ity, digital archiving, and most importantly to many women, less breast compression. The new equipment is digi tal with higher quality images to increase accuracy of diagnosis, which is the greatest advantage, said Temple Parton, mam mography technologist with the hospital. The facility also features DEXA bone density testing to de tect osteoporosis and ultrasound imaging. Advanced technology now provides radiologists at Sa cred Heart Hospital in Pensacola to have instant access to mam mography images taken in Port St. Joe, allowing the radiologists to provide their expert consulta tion to Gulf County residents. Meanwhile, a nurse navigator at the new Womens Center pro vides any required examination and patient education. The nurse SHH opens new Womens Center Renovating the police station at a bargain price Star Staff Report Gulf Correctional Institutes Warden Charles Halley and North Florida Child Development, Inc.s Chief Executive Ofcer, Sharon Gaskin, are pleased to announce a fundraiser for the 2011 Bikes for the Boys and Girls in Gulf County program. NFCD purchased the lumber for two playhouses that were constructed by inmate labor at GCI. This year, there will be a chance to win a playhouse for one lucky child. The drawing will be held Dec. 17 after the evening Christmas Parade sponsored by the City of Wewahitchka. The funds raised through ticket sales for the rafe will pay to purchase tricycles and bikes for needy children of Gulf County. Tickets may be purchased in Port St. Joe at the South Gulf Early Child Development Center (call Terri Bird at 832-8275), the North Gulf Center (call Jana Miller at 832-8539), and at the Central Ofce located in the old courthouse in Wewahitchka. For additional information, or if any organization would like to participate, contact Sebrina McGill at (850) 639-5080, ext. 10 or email smcgill@oridachildren. org. Give a child wheels, receive a chance to win a childs playhouse VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Volunteers from the Covenant House in Kinard strip the oors at the Mexico Beach Police Department. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Sam loves animals and letter patterns. The seven-year-old taught himself to read and likes to spell out phrases like Feature Presentation and Merry Christmas on the oor with letter magnets. Trey can make just about anything out of Play Dough. Christian is an artist, and consistently produces amazing drawings. Harvey likes to talk about weird food combinations like hot sauce and ice cream and zucchini milkshakes. He especially loves Bernie Botts every avor jelly beans, a candy featured in the Harry Potter book series, with avors like earwax and frog legs. Christine Hermsdorfer knows the idiosyncrasies of each of her nine fulltime students. She knows their likes and dislikes, what they excel in, and pays particular attention to the challenges her students face. Hermsdorfer operates The Growing Minds Center, a nonprot school catered to children affected by autism and developmental or behavioral challenges. And while each of her students shows special gifts of their own, each faces difculties with communication and social interaction. Some people think (autism is) more Growing Minds Center takes on new students, new challenges We denitely want to get bigger. We want people to know that were here. Christine Hermsdorfer Growing Minds owner A place to grow See CENTER B5 See GROW B5

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B2 | The Star Thursday, December 1, 2011 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Society Special to The Star Recently the GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club, Inc.,(GFWC WWC) partnered with employees from Gulf Correctional Institute (CI) in collecting coats, blankets, shoes, T-shirts and hats for students at Port St. Joe Elementary School, and Port St. Joe North Florida Head Start. Pictured above are DeEtta Smallwood, counselor, Port St. Joe Elementary; Carolyn Watson, Dianne Semmes and Pat Stripling, GFWC WWC; Doug Sloan, assistant warden, Gulf CI; Patty Fisher, GFWC WWC; Bonita Smith, classication ofcer, Gulf CI; and Laura Baxley, GFWC WWC. This project was a concerted effort between GFWC WWC, Gulf CI, Port St. Joe Elementary and North Florida Head Start. Coats are needed for children aged six-months through the 6th grade and if you would like to donate to this project, please call Dianne Semmes at 6395345/227-6425. Pick up is available. We would like to thank those who donated items for this project, and to let you know they were very much appreciated. Special to The Star Butch Arendt of the John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 is shown receiving a plaque from Rodney Herring on behalf of the American Legion Legacy Run, an effort to raise scholarship funds for the surviving children of those killed in action in the War Against Terrorism since Sept. 11, 2001. The Gainous Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars has been a Sponsor of the Legacy Run for the past three years. Star Staff Report The 14th annual Community Thanksgiving dinner was a tremendous success. The 75 volunteers worked so harmoniously together. People came from all over the United States, as far as Michigan and Wisconsin, to be part of the wonderful Thanksgiving program. The volunteers were led by Jimmy and Bunnie Gainey, assisted by Doug and Namcy Calindine, Julia and James McQuaig, Larry Chism, Barry Bledsoe, Jerry and Lyd Stokoe and Ann Ballard. These wonderful people started the day at 5:30 a.m. and other volunteers arrived to help where ever they could. The following volunteers arrived with smiles and with happiness to be there. The majority of the people said this was the most fullling and heart-warming thing they had done to help people during the holidays. Linda Litttleton, Skippy Pittman, Lynn Dweyer, Mary Jo Walsh, Diana Parrish, Mary Virginia DePue, Perry Weinberg, Jan Ord, Phillip Robinson, Ty Robinson, Erica Bruckner, Melinda Reynolds, Susan Ashworth, Nicholas Ashworth, Charles Stephens, Tommy Johnson, Robin Vathis, Catherine Minger, Sherry Wood, Mary Wood, Kate Wood, Christie Todd, Caelie, Charley Black, Cheryl Vacco, Nick Vacco, Eric Asher, Sharon Asher, Ruth Sauls, Tommy Sauls, Bonnie Wilson, Barb Yard, Craig Yard, Bill Sanders Shirley Sanders, Kaycee Krum, Deanne Williams, Beverly Brown, Patti Slater, Megan Hubbard, Ben Welch, Barbara Bledsoe, Sharon Suber, Mary Kelly, Ron Kelly, Marjorie Parker, Will, Mariann, Aidan and Emma Brown, Joel Rogers, Zee and Melissa, Fred Meschino, Melody Meschino, Bob Sutton, Rob Greenland, Suzanne Doran, Emma Doran, Tristan Doran, Bill Soles, Rich Brenner, Liz Brenner, Willie Ramsey, Charlie Givens Charles Beechum, Tim DePuy, Crystal DePuy, Billy Dixson, Tyson Davis, Joe Foxworth, Kancus Marchum, Daiquan Teller and Joel Rogers. A special thanks to the men that cleaned, wiped down tables, cleared trash, vacuumed and mopped the oors, they were: Rich Brenner, Willie Ramsey, Bill Soles, Larry Chism and Barry Bledsoe, Also, a special thanks to the sponsors: Durens Piggly Wiggly and staff; Oakgrove Assembly of God Church and staff/volunteers, Mr. and Mrs. Rich Brenner, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Moon, Hannon Insurance Agency, First Baptist Church and members, St. Josephs Catholic Church and members, St. Josephs Catholic Church congregation and Mens Group, First United Methodist and members, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, Fairpoint Communications and staff, VFW Post 100069, Ramseys Printing and Ofce Supply, Billy Dixson and Sons Taxi Service, Sunset Coastal Grille, U.S. Highway 71 Bob Suttons Flea Market, Corner Grocery Store and Howard Creek Grocery Store and Jamie Mayhann. All request Oldies but Goodies Gulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, invites the public to join them from 10 a.m. until noon ET on Tuesday, Dec. 6 to enjoy the Oldies but Goodies Show by deejay Steve McIntire. He will be playing all types of music by request from the 1950s, s and s. Donations are appreciated. For more information, call Debbie at 229-8466. Salvation Army seeks volunteers The Salvation Army is currently looking for volunteers to ring the bell at the Piggly Wiggly this holiday season. Volunteers are asked to work one-hour shifts. If you are interested, please call 596-9552 for more information. Gulf County Democratic Party meeting The Gulf County Democratic Party will meet at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, Dec. 1 at the Port St. Joe Fire Station Building. All members are encouraged to attend and participate. Mr. Frank Day will be our guest speaker. Day is the Chairperson for the Walton County Democratic Party, and serves as the Regional Director for Small Counties Democratic Coalition. Volunteer tax assistance People Helping People, through the IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, will offer free tax preparation to lowto moderate-income in Gulf County from Jan. 17 to April 15. To become an IRS certied tax preparer please join us on Tuesday, Dec. 6 and Dec. 13 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET at 2010 Parker Ave. in Highland View. For more information, give us a call at 229-5262. Society BRIEFS Special to The Star The 4th annual SaltAir Farmers Market is accepting applications from local artisans to participate in Port St. Joes Christmas Market on Saturday, Dec. 3. This special market is an allday event, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and features handcrafted jewelry, art, and locallygrown produce. Join us at City Commons Square and celebrate the holiday spirit with your friends and neighbors while showing off your arts and crafts. Please note: only handcrafted goods are accepted. The cost for a 10x10 space is just $10. For more information or to request an application, please contact John Parker at info@ saltairmarket.com or call 404-906-2637. Information is also available at the No Name Caf Books and More at 306 Reid Ave in downtown Port St. Joe. COA TS FOR KIDS Legacy Run honors VFW Post Volunteers prepare, pack and deliver 600 Thanksgiving dinners Special to The Star The Mexico Beach Welcome Center is arranging for winter visitors the opportunity to win some extra cash not once, but twice, in Biloxi, MS. Snowbirds will be ocking to the casinos to win big and enjoy the scenery. Travelers will be transported on charter busses for an overnight trip in January and in February. The rst casino trip departs Jan.17 and returns the next day. The second casino trip departs Feb. 21-22. Each trip package includes transportation, playing voucher pass, buffet vouchers, room and entertainment. Rates for each casino trip are $99 for double occupancy and $139 for single occupancy. You can go in January or February, or do both! These trips are open to anyone, whether they be a part time Floridian or live here year round, we want you to join us on one or both of these wonderful excursions. There will be exciting games on the bus, wonderful friendships made, casino tips swapped and tons of fun. The busses will depart from the El Governor at 5:30 a.m. CST and the rst stop will be at the Boomtown Casino where there will be a 6 hour playtime period. After that, its off to the Isle of Capri Casino where well stop for the night. The next morning will start off with a trip to the Imperial Palace casino where there will be four hours of playing time and then its time to head home. We hope this trip will be a great getaway and enjoyable for all. If anyone has any questions or would like more information, please contact the Mexico Beach Welcome center by calling 648-8196 or visit our website at www.mexicobeach.com. Artisans invited to participate in annual Christmas SaltAir Farmers Market Mexico Beach trips to Biloxi for winter visitors

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The Star| B3 Thursday, December 1, 2011 Annual Holiday Open House Friday, December 2, 2011 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. *Refreshments *Door Prizes 315 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850-229-6600 Alines Merle Norman Studio School News By Hannah Young and Kyli Wockenfuss General Information The music/drama department is having a busy week. Selected guitar students will be performing Christmas music at noon on Thursday and Friday, Dec. 1-2 in the caf eteria at Sacred Heart Hospital. The Musical theatre stu dents will be presenting two plays, The Gift of the Magi and Christmas in WhoVille on Monday night, Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. ET. Admission is free! Florida Theatre Studio will be conducting a writing workshop on Dec. 5-6 for selected Jr./Sr. high students. Senior Trip payment is due by the end of November. There is no Senior Trip payment for the month of Decem ber, so please use this as a catch-up month if you are be hind with any payments. ACT testing at Port St. Joe, 8 a.m. ET. Sports The competition cheer squad went to a competition in Pensacola, Florida on Saturday, November 19th where they won 1st place in Time Our Dance and Cheer and 2nd place in ght song. Dec. 1 Girls Basketball at Wewahitchka, 1 p.m. ET; boys and girls soccer versus Baker at 6 p.m./8 p.m.; boys basketball at Mosley, 8 p.m. ET. Dec. 2 Girls basketball versus Bay High, 5 p.m.; JV/Varsity boys basketball versus Bay High 6 p.m./7:30 p.m. Dec. 3 Christmas Classic Cheer Competition at Graceville; girls basketball at East Gadsden, 4 p.m.; boys basketball at Wewahitchka, 6 p.m./7:30 p.m. ET; girls and boys soccer versus Rocky Bayou, 10 a.m./noon. Special to The Star Kids College is not just a summer camp anymore! The Continuing Education Department at Gulf Coast State College has added fun new courses just for kids. Musical Theatre is an after school workshop where students will delve into the art of dancing, singing and acting. During this ten week workshop, students will learn proper vocal and acting techniques and prepare for a grand nale showcase performance at Gulf Coast State College. A few of the course highlights include focusing on improvisation, pantomime, monologue, scene work, stage movement, singing and speaking voice development. Plus, students will gain important tips on auditioning techniques to prepare them for future plays and musicals. Classes start in September, meet once a week for one hour and are limited to 16 students. Halloween Horror Treats is a delicious new class where kids take sweet revenge on all the ghosts and goblins that can make Halloween so horrifying. Students will learn how to create edible eyes, monster toes, sweet skulls and more! This nobake cooking class is open to students between 6 and 11 years old, who want to have some Halloween fun and make yummy treats. Class is limited to 20 students. For more information or to register, visit www. gulfcoast.edu/kidscollege or contact the Continuing Education Department at 872.3823 or email continuinged@gulfcoast. edu. Special to The Star The Florida High School/High Tech students at Port St. Joe High School engaged with professionals and businesses in the community at an informative job fair Nov. 18, learning about job and occupational opportunities. Twenty-one students participated with questions and answers about different professions and what is required for each. Cathy Cox, director of the Dyslexia Research Institute High School High Tech Program, organized the Job Fair. Participating businesses were Tina Richter, Phlebotomy Tech, Sacred Heart Hospital; Kimberly Thomas, Physical Therapist, Sacred Heart Hospital; Ron Baumgartner, Computer Consultant; Matt Hortman, Wildlife Biologist with Florida Fish & Wildlife; Sandy Buccieri, Masseuse with Donamelia Day Spa; April Hicks, Cosmetologist with Donamelia Day Spa; Crystal Lewis, nail tech with Donamelia Day Spa; and Susan Machemer, Fairpoint Communications. Each professional gave the students a tremendous amount of information about the various career opportunities in their elds. Students also discussed opportunities for summer internships with these businesses. Florida High School/High Tech offers paid summer internship positions to students who participate in the program. Students have been placed in numerous businesses in Port St. Joe and have received mentoring and job skills training over the past four summers. One of the awards that can be earned by the High School/High Tech students during the year is a laptop computer. Points are given for participation in the meetings, involvement in the golf tournament that raises the funds to pay the summer internships, community service hours which are accumulated over the school year. In the past it has taken the students until February to accumulate enough points but because of his extensive community service and involvement in the High School/High Tech Program, Carl Sheline was awarded the rst of the laptops this school year. Congratulations on a job well done to Carl. For more information about the High School/ High Tech Program and how students can become involved to participate in career shadowing or having a paid internship student in your business, please contact Patricia Hardman, 527-2347. Florida High School/High Tech is partially funded by The Able Trust and Vocational Rehabilitation. Special to The Star Port St. Joe Elementary Schools After-School program participated in a service-learning project called Pennies For Patients. This is a nationally-known organization that promotes awareness for leukemia. Leukemia is a childhood illness that attacks kids and sometimes adults. Our school collected over $1,000 in pennies and we want to celebrate that effort. We also would like to thank our teachers, staff, students, parents, Mrs. Regina Grantland and Centennial Bank for collecting and counting all the donations. It is no small effort to collect just pennies for a fundraiser. We truly will make a muchneeded contribution to the Leukemia Foundation where every penny counts. Thanks everyone for your hard work! Special to The Star The annual Thanksgiving presentation was performed by the kindergarten, rst, second, third and fourth grades on Wednesday, Nov. 23 at Faith Christian School. Parents and students enjoyed the play called The First Thanksgiving. The Pilgrims were played by Farren Newman, Catherine Bouington, Shelby Causey, Magnolia Sarmiento, Jacob Davis, Emma Grace Burke, Kristen Bouington, Mary Kate Wood and Jade Cothran. The Indians were played by Carter Costin, Alex Taylor, Donovan Cumbie, Mazie Hodges, Maelee Lewis, Miracle Smiley and Riley McGufn. The Lions TALE The Lions Tale High School/High Tech students learn about job opportunities PENNIES FOR P A TIENTS Kids College expands

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FAITH Page B4 www.starfl.com This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 (850) 827-2887 Howard Creek Baptist Church A Place of Grace 9:45 am (EST) 11:00 am (EST) Jerry Arhelger, www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 Thursday, December 1, 2011 Blind following the blind Isnt it time to abandon blind religion, based on what you heard? Give that old heart of stone to Jesus, and accept the new heart, that He wants to give you. Ask Him to make you into what He wants you to be. Youd be surprised at the number of regular churchgoers, who refuse to do this. They insist that they are saved because of something they did in a church years ago and think its okay to continue in sin. They quote the Apostle Paul in 1st Corinthians 6:12 and 1st Corinthians 10:23, All things are lawful for me They forget that Paul had given his heart of stone to Jesus, the same thing, which we ask people to do. Paul frequently warned his readers, about continuing in sin. Paul had accepted the New Covenant, and taught it, in his letter to the Hebrews, and in his other letters. You also need to accept the New Covenant. We are told about the New Covenant in Jeremiah 31:31-34, Jeremiah 32:38-40, Ezekiel 11:18-20, Ezekiel 18:30-32, and Ezekiel 36:24-27. It is also found in Hebrews 8:6-13, John 1:11-13, and in John 3:3-7. In Mark 14:24, Jesus is quoted as saying, This is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many. Yes, there is a lot of garbage on the internet. Theres also a lot of garbage in print, which you are subjected to every time you go through grocery store check out lines. Theres garbage on cable TV. Theres garbage on the radio. You cant escape it, unless you hide under a rock, and never come out. What those that slam the internet dont tell you is that there is a powerful search engine on the internet, where you can search up to 30 different English Bibles, and about 70 more in other languages, including New Testament Greek. You dont have to remain in ignorance, and remain a slave to the people you listen to in every church meeting. You dont have to allow these Bible teachers to hold you in bondage to his/her teaching. You can go down to the library and search out the internet site, Bible Gateway. Its at www.biblegateway.com. In seconds, or at the most a few minutes you can nd the truth on any Bible topic. I dont ask anyone to believe me. Believe what is recorded in all the good Bibles, like the New King James Version and the King James Version. If you care about living the life on earth that God wants you to live or about where you will spend eternity, isnt it worth a few hours of research at the library, or maybe a few hours of research at home? Dont let another day go by without spending time with God in prayer asking Him to make you into what He wants you to be. Questions or comments are invited. Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh. Check us out this Sunday. On Sunday morning we worship, at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st St. The Civic Center is located behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker Realty just off U.S. Highway 98 in the western end of Mexico Beach. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337 Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook, look for Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com The Christian CONSCIENCE Zederick (Zed) Midgelow Storey, a longtime airframe mechanic and jack-of-alltrades, nally achieved his dream of ying high. On Oct. 23, 2011, he soared peacefully into the afterlife following a yearlong battle with cancer. Born Oct. 21, 1934 in Perdue, Saskatchewan, to Albert and Lucy Hodgson Storey, Zed entered the Canadian Armed Forces at age 21, where he served with honor and was recognized for countless achievements during the next 26 years. He was a resident of Port St. Joe since 1987, working as a handy man in the local area. Zed was an active member of the Port St. Joe Gun, Rie and Pistol Club. Zed was preceded in death by his parents; brother, Douglas Storey; and son, Gary Storey. He is survived in by his son, Steven Storey of Vancouver, Canada; brother, Joshua Storey (Vera); sister, Evelyn Storey Spence; nieces, Beverly Blackwell (Thomas); Peggy Watts (Wayne); and Sherry Wilkinson (Dave); nephews: Ab Storey (Shelley); Leslie Spence (Janine); Barry Spence (Linda); Patrick Storey; Mike Storey (Suzette); and grandchildren, Jessica and Cassidy. His legacy and loving memories live on in the United States through surviving family members Dorothy Lewis; Diane Lewis Greenwood (Jerry); David Lewis (Laurie); Michael Lewis (Maria); Jacqueline Lewis Ferguson (Scott); Timothy Lewis; and including beloved grandchildren: Bryan, Kristy, Amy, Jeromey, Amber, Zac, Michael John, Joshua, Sarah, and Connor. A memorial gathering celebrating Zeds life will be Saturday, Dec. 3 at 1 p.m. ET at the Hall of St Josephs Catholic Church 2001 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, Fla. The family expresses grateful appreciation to Dr. Thomas Johnson, Dr. Lowery and the entire staff of Sacred Heart Medical Oncology Group, who treated Zed with loving kindness. In lieu of owers, the family would be honored by donations in Zeds memory to Sacred Heart Foundation of the Emerald Coast, shf-emeraldcoast@ shhpens.org; or to Edge Elementarys Relay for Life Team 300 Highway 85 North Niceville, FL 32578 (Attn. Michelle McKain). Please make Relay for Life checks payable to The American Cancer Society. Zederick (Zed) Midgelow Storey ZEDERICK STOREY George Austin Alexander, 73, passed away on Thursday morning, Nov. 10, 2011, at Bay Medical Center. He is survived by his spouse of 14 years, Rosmarie, and his stepson. He enjoyed living on the Forgotten Coast, where he met his wife vacationing at the Cape. George left this world peacefully and will be sorely missed. George A. Alexander GEORGE A. ALEXANDER Raymon Wilson Britt Willis (Webster, N.C.) died unexpectedly on Nov. 24, 2011 while visiting family in Port St. Joe, Fla. Ray, as she was known by family and friends, was born in Barrien County, Ky., to Raymond Porter Britt and Etta Smith Britt on Feb. 7, 1919. After graduation from Glasgow High School, Ray entered Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Ala. where she graduated in 1940. While teaching school in Greenwood, Fla, she met Robert Allen Willis and they were married in Glasgow in June 1941. While Robert Allen was serving as a U.S. Army ofcer during WWII, Ray lived in Spartanburg (S.C.), Columbus (Ga.), and Camp Blanding (FL). After WWII, they returned to Greenwood, Fla., where together they built a seed company into a cattle ranch that by 1975 became the largest and oldest registered aberdeen-angus herd in Florida. Following retirement, they enjoyed motor home travel throughout the United States and Canada. After moving to Webster they enjoyed the mountain environment, history, and the people of western North Carolina. Ray was an avid reader and member of the Sylva United Methodist Church, D.A.R. and bridge clubs. She especially enjoyed the weekly games of bridge with her close friends. She is survived by her son, Robert A. Willis (Charlotte), Port St. Joe, Fla.; daughter, Anne Willis Hudson (Russell), Taylors, S.C.; four grandchildren, ve greatgrandchildren, and her special poodle, Bo. Funeral services were at 10 a.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 28, in the Melton Funeral Home Chapel with burial to follow in Sylvas Fairview Cemetery. The family has requested that, in lieu of owers, donations be made to a favorite charity. Local services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Raymon Wilson Britt Willis Obituaries SHARE GODS RETIREMENT PLAN Are you praying for the lost? Does it bother you at all? Do you have family that isnt ready for Jesus to make His nal call? Are you doing your part? You pass lost folks every day. Do you tell them about Jesus, or help them out some other way? Your life should tell the story if Jesus lives within. Less sin will be apparent when youve been born again. If by chance youre not able, just give for those who can. There are missionaries who gladly share salvations plan. Many of these lost their life by sharing with the lost. God has blessed us so very much, that we too should share at any cost. Billy Johnson

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, December 1, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf County Board of County Commis sioners will hold a public hearing to consider adoption of an Ordinance with the following title: AN ORDINANCE OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; IMPOSING A MANDATO RY SURCHARGE OF THIRTY DOLLARS ($30) ON EACH NON-CRIMINAL OR CRIMINAL TRAFFIC VIOLATION; PROVIDING FOR THE USE OF SAID SURCHARGE; PROVIDING AUTHORITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL AND SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE The public hearing will be held during the Gulf County Board of County Com All interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Or Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and that for such purpose he/she may need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings made and which would include any evidence BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: WARREN YEAGER, CHAIRMAN REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS BID #1112-03 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive proposals from any MISDEMEANOR PROBATION SERVICES BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Empty Hopes. Empty Hearts. Empty Stockings. Thousands of families & individuals in our area are at-risk of going to bed hungry and empty-handed on Christmas. WAN T T O MAK E A DIFF E R E N CE ? M ail in the Empty Stocking F und envelope inserted in todays paper to the Salvation A rmy or The N ews Herald with your contribution! The Empty Stocking F und provides food and toy baskets to thousands of families in Bay, Gulf, F ranklin, Holmes, and Washington counties. T YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS THE T IMES & C arrabelle A palachicola THE S TAR YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR navigator is someone to answer questions, review the risk factors for breast cancer and offer guidance. Mammography im aging of the breast has proven to be the most effective way to detect breast cancer early. The American Cancer Society recommends annual mammograms for women over the age of 40. To schedule your screening, contact our centralized schedul ing department at 2295802. About Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Sacred Heart Hospi tal on the Gulf opened in 2010 to serve resi dents of Gulf, Franklin and Bay counties. The 25-bed facility in Port St. Joe features 24-hour emergency services, inpatient services, sur gical services, a full complement of diag nostic and laboratory services, and a helipad to be used by Sacred Hearts regional air ambulance service to provide rapid transport for trauma or critically ill patients. The hospital is oper ated by Sacred Heart Health System based in Pensacola and a part of Ascension Health, the nations largest system of Catholic, not-for-prof it healthcare facilities. For more information about Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, visit online at www. sacredheartonthegulf. org, nd us on Face book or call (850) 2295600. About the Gulf County Health Department The Gulf County Health Department, in cooperation with its coapplicant, Saint Joseph Care of Florida, Inc, a Florida not-for-prot corporation, operates a federally qualied health center in Gulf County that provides primary care, dental care, pediatric care, ob stetrics and gynecologi cal care, and orthopedic care for patients in and around the Gulf County area. The partnership be tween Gulf CHD and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf strives to in sure there are no gaps in care and services for this community. CENTER from page B1 like mental retardation, but their IQs are very high, Hermsdorfer said. Their communication issues get in the way of showing what they know. Theyre all different, but the main issue is communications and social interactions. While there is no cure for autism, therapy can reduce the symptoms. Hermsdorfer founded The Growing Minds Center in 2008 alongside a group of parents with autistic children living in Port St. Joe. The school focuses on meeting students needs through Applied Behavior Analysis, the most widely-used treatment for autism. The center began as an afterschool program with ve students, operating out of a room at Long Avenue Baptist Church, and has since transformed into a full-day, year-round school program with its own building off Industrial Road. There are currently nine full-time students, and three students in the afterschool program, which takes place twice a week. The new building has eight rooms and 2,200 square feet, providing plenty of room for growth, and with an estimated one out of every 110 children affected by autism, the need for the center is also growing. We denitely want to get bigger, Hermsdorfer said. We want people to know that were here. Hermsdorfer recently applied for a grant to help fund a website and brochures for the school in order to lay out the options parents have for tuition aid for autistic students. As a certied private school, the center accepts state-funded McKay Scholarships for parents hoping to offset costs. However, no matter how much the school grows, Hermsdorfer plans on maintaining the 2-to-1 teacher-student ratio it operates on. Whenever we get two more kids, we hire somebody else, Hermsdorfer said. Well never get rich, but thats what it takes. Among their nine full-time students, Hermsdorfer employs one teacher, two tutors, a behavioral analyst and a graduate student. Each student is evaluated upon enrollment and assigned a specic learning plan, catered to their specic needs, so that any behaviors the student might have can be addressed. Hermsdorfer said behaviors often stem from not knowing the right means to get attention, resulting in yelling, noncompliance and inappropriate behavior. Once the student improves their communication skills, these behaviors often subside. Hermsdorfer keeps a le for each student, with meticulous data logged for each task they have mastered, struggled with or needed a prompt to achieve. If the learning plan doesnt show progress, it is changed. At The Growing Minds Center, the school day functions much differently than a public school environment. Students receive specialized one-on-one attention, rotating in 30minute blocks to different therapies, activities and lessons throughout the day. On a particular recent morning, Heaven and Christian are in the middle of a math lesson. Heaven plays with a panorama with toy horses as a reward. In another room, Sam works one-on-one with an instructor, focusing on his language skills. There are plastic letters scattered on the oor. Another student watches a life-skills video, and in the same room, two others don headphones as they complete typing programs. The center focuses on more visual and handson learning. Lessons often involve identifying pictures, completing math problems with tangible objects and conducting applied problem solving. They need things broken out into small pieces, Hermsdorfer said. It takes a lot of patience. You have to be willing to reinforce every little thing. The key to teaching children with autism, Hermsdorfer said, is plenty of patience and exibility. The instructors focus on using reinforcements in their teaching by giving students plenty of praise or by catering to their specic likes, (Harveys reinforcement is talking about weird food; for Sam, its animal drawings.) Students also participate in life-skills classes, which help them learn basic social skills like using a public restroom, identifying survival signs (like EXIT signs) and ordering lunch at a restaurant. The group recently took a eld trip to Hungry Howies, where the students learned how to order food at the counter, when to give the cashier the money and how to respond to any questions the cashier asked. The next eld trip will be either to the recycling center or the grocery store, Hermsdorfer said. Hermsdorfer hopes to be able to partner with local businesses in the future to provide job coaches for her older students interested in entering the workforce. With an estimated 200,000 autistic teens set to reach adulthood in the United States within the next ve years, Hermsdorfer said her ultimate goal for students is to have jobs and function in mainstream society. She said autism awareness in Gulf County has skyrocketed in the last three years alone. When Hermsdorfer moved to the area 13 years ago, little was known about the disorder. But since then, the spectrum has broadened and more and more children are being diagnosed at an early age. Most children are diagnosed around age 2, but Hermsdorfer has seen children diagnosed as young as 18 months. Overall, she said, the mission of the Growing Minds Center is to give autistic children the potential to thrive. The parents are really happy and theyre big supporters of what were doing, Hermsdorfer said. Wed just like to be able to help as many kids as we can. GROW from page B1

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, December 1, 2011 By Roy Lee Carter County Extension Director Shrubs are very popular landscape plants in Florida, and its easy to see why. They require little maintenance, once theyre established, and usually have few disease problems. Occasionally, though, a fungus disease will attack shrubbery and when this happens, its important to know how to treat the diseased plants. This information was provided by retired extension plant pathologist Dr. Tom Kucharek of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. There are two types of shrub diseases: the soil-borne and the foliar. In this article, we will focus on the soil-borne diseases of ornamental shrubbery. If you choose healthy, vigorous plants to start with, disease problems will be greatly reduced. You might pay more for these plants, but the cheaper varieties, with little or no resistance to diseases, will usually end up costing you more in the long run. But what do you do if you buy a nice, healthy shrub, give it plenty of water and care, and a fungus disease problem still develops. Your rst step will be to identify the type of disease as either a soil-borne group, such as root rot and lower stem rots. The most common soil-borne disease on Florida shrubs is the mushroom root rot. You can identify this disease by scraping away some of the outer bark at the base of the main stem. If you nd a white fungus mat right under the bark, the shrub has mushroom root rot. As the disease spreads through the roots and lower stems, the plant will become less vigorous and branch die-back will occur. The plant may live for many years with this disease or it may die within a year or two. While you cant control the disease, youll improve the plants appearance by pruning out the dying branches. If you nd that you are making frequent cutting on the shrub, it may have to be removed. Before you plant another woody shrub in the same location, you should fumigate that soil with a good fungicide. If the diseased shrub was part of a hedge row, however, you should not use the fungicide because it will kill the roots of adjacent plants. Just let the remaining plants ll the empty space. You might want to consider turf or annual plants in place of the shrub, since they arent affected by mushroom root rot as the source of the problem, contact your local County Extension Ofce about sending a sample to IFAS Plant Pathologist Laboratory in Quincy or Gainesville. To review, remember that you will have fewer problems if you start your landscape with healthy vigorous plants. If you do see fungus disease symptoms, try to identify the problem as soil-borne or foliar. You really cant control a soil-borne disease short of removing the plant and fumigating the soil, but you can keep the plant as healthy as possible by cutting out the affected branches. For more information, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 6393200, 229-2909 or visit their website at http://gulf.ifas. u.edu. Trades & Services A Dust Bunny just isnt Funny! Efcient & Detailed Cleaning EVERYTIME!! Residential, Rentals & Ofces F OR ALL Y O U R C L E A NING NEEDS C O NT A CT: Gabrielle Piergiovanni @ (850) 227-7541 or (850) 227-6671 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 RODNEY HALL ROOFING Lic.#CCC1326056 When Experience Counts FOR LEA F AND STRAW REMOVAL F ROM ROO F OR GUTTERS. CALL ( O fce) 850.229.6859 (Cell) 850.527.0533 rodneyhallroonginc@yahoo.com 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction CALL BEN (850) 258-6903 Call Anytime! 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C A LL WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West Pass TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 227-7847 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Dec 1 64 39 0 % Fri, Dec 2 69 49 0 % Sat, Dec 3 70 55 0 % Sun, Dec 4 73 56 10 % Mon, Dec 5 74 53 10 % Tues, Dec 6 63 37 30 % Wed, Dec 7 61 45 0 % 12/1 Thu 12:24AM 1.2 H 10:30AM 0.1 L 11:09PM 0.9 H 12/2 Fri 09:58AM 0.2 L 07:09PM 0.9 H 12/3 Sat 08:33AM 0.3 L 06:13PM 1.0 H 12/4 Sun 03:45AM 0.2 L 06:00PM 1.1 H 12/5 Mon 03:38AM 0.0 L 06:09PM 1.3 H 12/6 Tue 04:02AM -0.2 L 06:30PM 1.4 H 12/7 Wed 04:37AM -0.3 L 07:01PM 1.6 H 12/1 Thu 01:42AM 0.8 L 06:28AM 1.0 H 02:10PM 0.2 L 08:52PM 1.0 H 12/2 Fri 03:04AM 0.7 L 07:53AM 0.9 H 02:52PM 0.4 L 09:19PM 1.1 H 12/3 Sat 04:22AM 0.5 L 09:41AM 0.8 H 03:35PM 0.6 L 09:46PM 1.1 H 12/4 Sun 05:28AM 0.2 L 11:50AM 0.8 H 04:23PM 0.7 L 10:13PM 1.2 H 12/5 Mon 06:24AM 0.0 L 01:39PM 0.9 H 05:16PM 0.9 L 10:43PM 1.2 H 12/6 Tue 07:13AM -0.2 L 02:52PM 1.0 H 06:11PM 1.0 L 11:14PM 1.2 H 12/7 Wed 07:57AM -0.3 L 03:42PM 1.0 H 07:03PM 1.1 L 11:48PM 1.3 H 9941546 FREE ESTIMATES 1-850-626-9242 1-800-69-SHRED Security-cleared personnel Fort Walton Beachs leading mobile destruction company Weekly, monthly, or annual service Locally owned & operated Robert C. 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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, December 1, 2011 The Star | B7 36699S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JANE VAN HEIDEN Deceased. File No. 2011-80-PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JANE VAN HEIDEN, deceased, Case Number 2011-80-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Rm 148, Port St. Joe FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against 36679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION BANK OF AMERICA N.A., Plaintiff, vs. STEVE HOUSEHOLDER, et al, Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 09000515CA DIVISION: NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 31, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09000515CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA N. A. is the Plaintiff and STEVE HOUSEHOLDER; TINA HOUSEHOLDER; WETAPPO PRESERVE OWNER’S ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM ET, on the 15th day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 181 WETAPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 181 WIDE WATER CIRCLE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 14, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Gulf County Courthouse #850-229-6113 (TDD) Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10109690 December 1, 8, 2011 36677S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, VS. DAYLE FLINT, et al, Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 23-2010-CA-000486 DIVISION: NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 31, 2011 and entered in Case No. 23-2010-CA000486 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and DAYLE FLINT; TENANT # 1 N/K/A MELISSA HAUN, and TENANT #2 N/K/A TRAVIS WRIGHT are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 15th day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3 OF WOODMERE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 59, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 910 AVENUE A, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 14, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Gulf County Courthouse #850-229-6113 (TDD) Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10080535 December 1, 8, 2011 36671S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1112-02 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Sale of House -To Be Relocated 6909 Highway 71, White City Proposals must be turned in to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, December 16, 2011. The website www.gulfcounty-fl.gov also will have specifications. Interested parties should contact Michael Hammond for additional information at (850) 227-1124. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Bids will be opened at the above location on Monday, December 19, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Attest: Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Chairman December 1, 8, 2011 36122S VARIANCE NOTICE The City of Port St. Joe Planning and Development Review Board will hold a Meeting to discuss a Request for a Variance on December 20,2011, 4:00 EST, at the 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St Joe, Fl for Duren Family Limited Partnership located at 125 W. Hwy 98, Parcel #04596-050R. The reason for the request is Per Section 6.62 is requiring a Variance of Section 6.2.4 of the Sign Ordinance. The proposed plans can be reviewed at the Building Department located at 1002 10th St. and can be reached for questions at (850) 229-1093. All persons are invited to attend this meeting. Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Planning and Development Review Board with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Planning and Review Board of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing special accommodations to participate in these proceedings should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, (850)229-8261 Dec 1, 2011 36649S NOTICE OF DETERMINATION OF QUALIFICATION FOR EXEMPTION In the Matter of an Application for a Determination of Qualification for an Exemption by: Name: Jeffery & Candice Anderson File No. 0306311001EE Address: c/o Garlick Environmental Associates, Inc. Post Office Box 385 Apalachicola, FL 32329 County: Gulf County The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice that it has determined an exempt dock in St Joseph Bay, Class III, 119 Watermark way, Port St Joe, Fl 32456, in Section 16, Township 7 North, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, qualifies for an exemption. Based on the information sent to us, we have determined that this project is exempt from our Environmental Resource Permit requirements under: Section 373.406(6) of the Florida Statutes and Rule 62-346 of the Florida Administrative Code. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., before the deadline for filing a petition. On the filing of a timely and sufficient petition, this action will not be final and effective until further order of the Department. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that the Department’s final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Pursuant to Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C., a petition for an administrative hearing must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action, including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the specific rules or statutes; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. The petition must be filed (received by the Clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Also, a copy of the petition shall be mailed to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. In accordance with Rule 62-110.106(3), F.A.C., petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 21 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), F.S. must be filed within 21 days of publication of the notice or within 21days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 21 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The failure to file a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person’s right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. Under Rule 62-110.106(4), F.A.C., a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline for filing a petition for an administrative hearing. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. Mediation is not available in this proceeding. The application is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Marjory Stoneman Douglas Building, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3000. December 1, 2011 36625S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA VISION BANK, Plaintiff, vs. STANLEY B. ROBERSON, Defendant. CASE NO.: 11-228 CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2011, entered in Case No. 11-228 CA in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein VISION BANK is Plaintiff, and STANLEY B. ROBERSON is Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on December 15, 2011, the following described Property situated in Gulf County, Florida, legally described as: LOT 8, BLOCK A OF TREASURE SHORES SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on November 14, 2011. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at Telephone 850/229-6112. Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 24, December 1, 2011 36046S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232008CA000231CA XXXX EMC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. WALTER JOSEPH LEVICK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WALTER JOSEPH LEVICK, IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, GULF AIRE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s). RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEIN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13, 2011 and an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 8, 2011. entered in Civil Case No.: 232008CA 000231CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein EMC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, and WALTER JOSEPH LEVICK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WALTER JOSEPH LEVICK, IF ANY, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; GULF AIRE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the Front Lobby of the Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 at 11:00 AM ET on the 26th day of January, 2012 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE POINT OF INTERSECTION ON THE NORTHEASTERN RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98 (S.R. #30) AND SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, AS SAME IS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF PORT ST. JOE BEACH, UNIT TWO, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 6 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 52’ 49” WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNARY LINE OF SECTION 32 FOR 22.105 FEET; THENCE NORTH 39 DEGREES 51’ 00” WEST ALONG SAID NORTHEASTERN R/W LINE 486.37 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 09’ 00” WEST FOR 66 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY R/W LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98; THENCE NORTH 39 DEGREES 51’ WEST ALONG SAID R/W LINE 318.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID R/W LINE 18 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 09 WEST 27.71 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A COMMON WALL; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID COMMON WALL 36 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BEARING 167.20 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE WATERS EDGE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS EDGE 18 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A POINT SOUTH 50 DEGREES 09’ WEST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 50 DEGREES 09’ EAST 167.20 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A COMMON WALL; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID COMMON WALL 36 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BEARING 27.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on November 9, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire Popkin & Rosaler, P. A. 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard Suite 400 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 (954) 360-9030 Fax: (954) 420-5187 December 1, 8, 2011 Earn College Degree Online *Medical Business, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. 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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! TABLE OF CONTENTS Thursday, DECEMBER 1, 2011 YE E AR R 74, NUMBER 7Opinion .......................................A4Outdoors .....................................A6 Sports...........................................A7Society .........................................BB2School News ................................BB3Faith .............................................BB4 Obituaries ....................................BB4Classieds ....................................BB7-BB8 Real Estate ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 C lassied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020By Tim CroftStar News Editor Those bones are old. Bones and artifacts found Nov. 13 along the waterline at Lake Wimico have been identied as coming from a documented archaeological site. The site, known as GC55, meaning the 55th such found in Gulf County, has been researched before, but its origins remain something of a mystery. The medical examiner from the 14th Judicial Circuit and Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent ruled that the site was not a crime scene once the bones and artifacts were dated. The medical examiner and sheriff pretty much closed the book on that one, said Dave Dickel with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research. Much of the material found likely dates to the midto late-1800s, Dickel said. It is pretty inconceivable that these are less than 75 years old, Dickel said, noting the accepted benchmark for the age at which bones turn from potential crime scene items to forensic nds. We are pretty positive they are from late or mid-19th century. Researchers from the Bureau of Archaeological Research toured the site on Nov. 17. Found near the site was a geologic marker, likely placed there in 1988 when the site was researched by Dr. Nancy White from the University of Florida, who has done extensive archaeological work in the area for years. Dickel said White had been unable to determine the ethnicity of the bones found, and Dickel said there was little evidence the burial ground found was Native American in origin. There was nothing denitive found that this was (a Native American) burial ground, Dickel said. At this point we are working with the assumption we dont think these are (Native American). Having teeth would help, given differences in diet and chewing, but none were found. Some cranial bones found might help identify the origin of the remains found by a family on a weekend camping trip several weekends ago. The problem, Dickel Star Staff ReportThe Christmas season swings into full action this weekend, with a host of events from Port St. Joe to Mexico Beach. The festivities continue over the next few weekends. Here is a sampling of what is in store for a bit of holiday cheer.Port St. Joe C C hristmas on the CCoastThe Gulf County Chamber of Commerce invites you to bring the entire family downtown Saturday, Dec. 3 for a day full of holiday fun. The day begins with the Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast at Peppers on Reid Avenue from 7-10 a.m. ET. Tickets are $5. From 9 a.m. until 5 p.m., there will be a special holiday farmers market at City Commons Park. The downtown merchants will have their doors open all day for your chance to shop, dine and unwind. The tree lighting ceremony will take place at 6:30 p.m. at City Commons Park, followed by a lighted Christmas parade at 6:45 p.m. Afterwards, Santa will be available for photos, and prizes will be awarded for parade oats. For parade entry information, contact the chamber at 227-1223. By Tim CroftStar News Editor There is something special about the Pridgeon-Rish Sunday school class at First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe. Long led by the late Billy Joe Rish, who waged a courageous battle against cancer before passing away several years ago, the Sunday school class has served as the Petri dish for the churchs annual Relay for Life fundraisers. One year it was elephant poop that could be dropped off at a neighbor or friends yard for a contribution. Another year, it was a face-off of college mascot colors to raise dollars for cancer research and awareness. A lot of things that happen come out of that (Sunday school) class, said Beth Bauer, one of the mischief-makers at First United Methodist. We have a lot of fun with it. We dont like to brag, but we have been the top moneyearner each of the past three years. The class is at it again. Should a shopper or diner happened past Josephs Cottage on Reid Avenue or the Sunset Coastal Grill on U.S. Highway 98 over the weekend they may have gazed upon a life-sized visage of Santa Claus. Made out of wood, with eyes made of porcelain drawer pulls with peace By Tim CroftStar News Editor One school project under budget could benet two other public schools. Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton proposed to the Gulf County School Board last week that board members consider moving state brickand-mortar dollars saved from a roong project at Wewahitchka Elementary School to projects at two other schools. At issue is roughly $900,000 in state Public Education Capital Outlay, or PECO funds. Those funds are earmarked by the Florida Department of Education and state lawmakers for school capital improvements. Dollars, some $1.5 million, were earmarked by the state for completing the Wewahitchka Elementary School project, but that roong job came in under budget by nearly $1 million. After three years, any unexpended PECO funds must be returned to the state, but Norton said he and nancial ofcer Sissy Worley had received permission from the FDOE and state auditor general to shift the remaining funds to improve the facilities at two Port St. Joe schools.See sS CHOOLsS A3Norton proposes fund shift Bones, artifacts found at Lake Wimico from distant pastSp P ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A ROne of three femur bones found in Lake Wimico on Sunday, an indication the remains of at least two people were found.See BOn NEsS A5Where in the world is Santa?FUMC Relay for Life fundraiser among several on display SaturdayThis life-size wooden Santa is part of the newest fundraiser for the Relay for Life team from First United Methodist Church. TT IM CC ROFT | The Star See sanSAN Ta A A5Developer pulls out of energy center project, A2 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR See CHRIs STMasAS A5This 2010 parade oat paid homage to the events name, Christmas on the Coast. Tis the Season2011 holiday events sure to bring cheer to participants STa A R FF ILE PHOTOs SSanta Claus makes his debut at the 2010 Port St. Joe Christmas Parade.

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, December 1, 2011 the Port St Joe Star on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @ PSJ_Star for daily local news updates & photos!Like By Tim Croft Star News Editor Citing an inability to se cure nancing, Rentech, Inc., the developer of the Northwest Florida Renew able Energy Center, has pulled out of the project. Rentech had hoped to secure a federal loan guarantee from the U.S. Department of Energy, but this summer the DOE put the term sheet for the loan guarantee on hold due to the number of projects in the pipeline and available funding. Since then, Rentech, a Colorado-based renewable energy publicly-traded company, had sought nancing in the private sector, but the current eco nomic environment proved one too many hurdles for the project, a 55 megawatt energy plant to be built in Port St. Joe. The plant, as proposed, would produce steam to drive generators to pro duce electricity, the fuel source woody biomass, or forest residue. Progress Energy had an agreement in place to purchase elec tricity from the plant. According to numbers provided by Rentech, the project would have pro duced up to 200 construc tion jobs during the 18month build-out and 30-35 permanent jobs at the plant. Another 75-100 jobs would be created in the fuel chain. They are pulling out of the project because of nancing, said Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson. Magidson added that once the loan guarantee fell through, nancing was going to be a tough slog in the current economic envi ronment, though Rentech ofcials remained hopeful. It is not a surprise that the company was unable to nd nancing, Magidson said. We are disappointed and hope it is revived. It is a blow, but not the end of the world. We will continue to work with the (Gulf County Economic Development Council) and the county to bring jobs to Gulf County. Magidson said Rentech ofcials hoped to revive the project in the future should the economic outlook brighten. The next presidential election could bring changes, Magidson added. He added that Rentech will continue to explore the possibility of bringing in a partner or a buyer for the project. If things change they will revive the project, Magidson said. This weeks decision was the latest twist in a long, tortured path for the renewable energy plant. The project was rst brought to the county in 2009 and a series of public workshops, with the Flor ida Department of Envi ronmental Protection and city and county ofcials sponsoring, were held, in cluding a demonstration project from the University of Auburn. An initial application for a DEP air emissions permit was pulled that year to re ne the process that would be used in the plant and permitting went forward again earlier this year. That permit was chal lenged, but the parties chal lenging the permit with drew their protest just as an administrative hearing was to be held in Port St. Joe. After the air permit was issued by the DEP, the city took up a development or der for the project, which was approved during a con tentious and lengthy special meeting on Oct. 4. Protests against the project continued from a citizens group alleging the plant would not provide clean energy. However, local elected and economic development ofcials championed the project and at one point it was seen as a magnet for other renewable energy research and production companies to relocate to the area. Developer pulls out of energy center

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THE ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB & THE CAMP GORDON WWII MUSEUM WISHES TO THANK OUR WONDERFUL SPONSORS OF OUR RECENT SILENT AUCTION AND GOLF TOURNAMENT JOHN C. GAINOUS VFW POST 10069 AMERICAN LEGION POST 116 AMERICAN LEGION SAUL-BRIDGES POST 13 TALLAHASSEE DALYS WATER SPORTS CAMP GORDON JOHNSTON ASSOCIATION PORT ST. JOE MARINA THE PORT INN GULF TO BAY CONST. MATHEWS LAW FIRM HANNON INS. AGCY. MCDANIEL CONSULTING WATERFRONT AUTO SALES TONY MINICHIELLO BILL MORRISSEY CAPITAL CITY BANK OLIVIER MONOD (ST GEORGE INN) SJBGC DEBBIE HOOPER (JOE BAY AERIALS) KENNY WOOD SUNSET COASTAL GRILL LINDA MINICHIELLO CULBRETH FINANCIAL GROUP HAWAILAN MOON DANCE CO. TOUCANS RESTAURANT & GIFTS MARK MINICHIELLO APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE HOG WILD BBQ HOMETOWN BP & GRILL CITY OF CARRABELLE BOW WOW BEACH SHOP COLLINS VACATION RENTALS KERIGAN MARKETING ASSOCIATES BOYER SIGNS ONE MORE SHOT, A.K.A. GEORGE & CLETUS HAPPY OURS BAY CITY LODGE & RESTAURANT STEAMERS HOT DOGS BARB & DAN VAN TREESE DICK DAVIS LAURIE JUNE DAVID & TRUDY STRAND DURENS PIGGLY WIGGLY BLUEWATER OUTRIGGERS NO NAME CAF CENTENNIAL BANK GULF COAST REAL ESTATE GROUP THE PORT FINE WINE & SPIRITS 2KL PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE GULF COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL AND,A BIG THANK YOU TO:MIKE ALLDIS, LAURIE JUNE, BARB VAN TREESE, MARY KELLY, BILL MORRISSEY, LINDA MINICHIELLO, KRISTY RAFFIELD, KEN TUCKER, BILL SNYDER, DAVE CASH, JACK KERIGAN, FATHER PHIL FORTIN, THE PSJHS NROTC, LT. COMMANDER MARTIN JAROSZ, MAJOR LT. COL (RET.) DAVID BUTLER, GENERAL JIM SIMMONS, ANDTHEENTIRE ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB STAFF Christmas Bazaar Golf Tournament Entry Fee $300 1st Place, $200 2nd Place, $100 3rd Place, $50 4th Place Great Cash Prizes & Numerous Door Prizes!Members: $45, or $30 plus a toy Non-Members: $55, or $40 plus a toy Registration and any questions by calling the Pro Shop at 850-227-1751, visit the club in person or online at www.stjosephbaygolf.com Do your Christmas shopping while supporting local artists with handmade gifts including: Friday, Dec 9, 8am 6pm & Saturday, Dec 10, 9am 4pm Saturday, Dec 10, 12pm Shotgun Start (Individual Handicap Play) Jewelry | Specialty Breads | Decorations Original Art | Hand-stitched items Jams | Jellies | PotteryDecember 9 & 10, 20112nd AnnualSupporting Gulf County Christmas for Kids andPeople Helping PeopleSt. Joseph Bay Golf Club MEXICO BEACHKRINGLEMARTSaturday, December 3rd 10:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. (CST)Mexico Beach Welcome Center102 Canal Parkway, Mexico Beach Vendors will showcase unique gift items including local art, handcrafted jewelry, pottery and much more. This event is free to the public. Santa will be arriving at 1:00 p.m. to visit with the childrenFor More Information Call (850) 648-8196 or visit our website at www.mexico-beach.comSponsored by Special Events for Mexico Beach, Inc. Proceeds to benet the July 4th reworks fund. LocalThursday, December 1, 2011 The Star| A3Norton proposed spending roughly $500,000 to refurbish the cafeteria and kitchen at Port St. Joe Elementary School. In addition, he proposed spending $300,000-$400,000 to replace lockers at Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School as well as maintain the exterior condition of The Dome. The lockers at the high school are just deplorable, Norton said. They have been there since the school was built. At the elementary school we will increase the footprint and reduce the noise from the cafeteria and refurbish the kitchen. These are two projects in dire need of being done. Both projects are in the districts ve-year plan, and Norton noted that improvements to the elementary school cafeteria and kitchen had not been funded by the half-cent sales tax approved by voters more than a decade ago for improvements at the school. I think these will be two successful projects and this is at no cost to our local taxpayers, Norton said, adding that no ad valorem dollars would be used, only state PECO dollars already in the districts bank account. We are excited we could shift the dollars around, said Worley. (The state) deemed (these projects) were truly a need here. The board did not take formal action on the proposal last week, but scheduled a workshop prior to its Dec. 6 meeting to discuss the logistics and plans. Norton emphasized that the district must begin moving ahead on the projects, pending board approval. The contracts for architecture and design to construction must be advertised and awarded and the aim is to have workers ready to move ahead the day school lets out for the 2011-12 school year in June. We need to be ready to go, Norton said.ReorganizationThe board undertook its annual reorganization of board ofcers during last weeks meeting. Billy Quinn, Jr. moved into the chairmans position, based on seniority, with Linda Wood ascending to vice chair. Board member John Wright had served the past year as chairman, with Quinn vice chair. TIM Cr R OFt T | The StarIncoming board chair Billy Quinn Jr., left, and Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton, right, present outgoing chairman John Wright with a plaque in recognition of his past year of service as chairman of the Gulf County School Board. SCHOOLS from page A1

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OpinionA4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINGS USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Thursday, December 1, 2011Recently, I spent over 24 hours driving during a threeor four-day period. It really isnt so bad if you are not in a hurry. Driving allows you time to think, dream and play with the radio. Please note that I only play with the radio when it is safe to do so. Long road trips require stops at state visitor information centers, truck stops and other points of interest. Again, the key is not to be in a hurry. When I stop at gas stations and truck stops, I like to check out the candy counters. My Grandmama had a candy store and just looking at the candy reminds me of her. I enjoy it. As you drive along, you get hankerings. On this particular trip, I got a hankering for Mallo Cups and Goo Goo Clusters. They bring back good memories and anytime you can bring something good back, you should (kind of like Cokes in glass bottles). After nding a truck stop with both Mallo Cups and Goo Goo Clusters, I drove on down the interstate feeling good about my success. After an hour, the Mallo Cups were calling my name. I had gotten a long four pack of the Mallo Cups and as I drove, I eased open one of the ends. Sinking my teeth in, I remembered why I liked Mallo Cups as a boy. It didnt have anything to do with the whipped marshmallow center surrounded by a delicious combination of milk chocolate and coconut. As a matter of fact, I dont even like coconut. I bought Mallo Cups because they had cardboard coins inserted into the package. The coins ranged in value from a penny to fty cents. The goal was to save up to 500 cents/ points and you could send them in for free candy. Keeping in mind that I didnt like coconut so much, I thought about why I actually did that for the next hour. I guess it was for the sense of accomplishment, a goal that a little boy could obtain as opposed to growing up to be a professional baseball player or rocket scientist or something. Over the years, Ive actually acquired a taste for them. Maybe its the memory Ive acquired a taste for, I really dont know. For the record, I only remember one package of free candy that came to our house in Alabama from the Boyer Candy Company in Altoona, Pennsylvania. It was in the summer, the reward ended up being packages of melted whipped marshmallows, delicious milk chocolate and coconut. My brother put them in the freezer and they ended up being frozen Mallo Cup sticks that you had to pick the wax paper cups out of. Continuing to drive, I looked for the cardboard coins in my four pack of Mallo Cups, they werent there. To my disappointment, the four packs do not contain the cardboard coins. The taste of coconut bothered me more. The Goo Goo Cluster was still sitting there in the passenger seat; I decided to let it stay in its package. It wont melt for a few months. I think I buy them just because they remind me of Nashville, Tenn., a place that I enjoy visiting. Supposedly, the Goo Goo Cluster was the rst ever combination candy bar. In 1912, the Standard Candy Company in Nashville poured out a melted blob of caramel, marshmallow, peanuts and chocolate and let it get hard and put a wrapper on it. The Goo Goo Cluster doesnt have coconut in it, but it does have caramel in it. I dont care so much for caramel either. The thought of Minnie Pearl and Roy Acuff at the Grand Ole Opry kind of mask the taste. On my cars radio, a classic country station was playing Roy Acuffs Wabash Cannonball. It was appropriate. I was in Tennessee and I was singing along with Roy, who passed away in 1992. Driving and thinking, I asked myself, Why do I eat things that I dont care for so much? Are the memories really that good? Yes, they are. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. On Dec. 13 the Mexico Beach City Council is scheduled to take up a possible switch to the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce for law enforcement services. Moving away from the citys police force has been an exploration, a fact-nding as it was labeled by city manager Chris Hubbard, to determine the viability of such a move. According to Hubbard, as reported by Star Staff Writer Valerie Garman in a recent story, the research was undertaken to determine if costs could be reduced by the change in law enforcement. This is a laudable goal. In an era of shrinking public and private sector budgets, any taxing authority not seeking ways to save taxpayer dollars is falling down on the job. But the intent would seem more laudable if the effort had taken place during the spring and summer months, as a run up to crafting the budget for the scal year that began with the rst of October. Instead, according to Hubbard, the city, in particular Mayor Al Cathey, approached Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen sometime in late summer for an audit of the city police department and presentation of what McKeithens ofce would offer as an alternative. The presentation from McKeithen arrived during an October workshop, hardly the kind of timeframe that would realize any savings for 2011-12. And McKeithens presentation, Hubbard indicated, highlighted no real savings for the city. Hubbard said a move to the Sheriffs Ofce for law enforcement would cost about as much, if not more, than the city currently spends on its police department. However, Hubbard added that the sheriffs ofce would bring more resources to the task, such as crime scene investigators, detectives and the like. That is indeed true, but it would be true regardless. Mexico Beach is hardly a hot bed of crime. We are not talking the murder capital of Florida. We arent even talking the petit theft capital of Florida. But should the horric happen, as it has infrequently, and Mexico Beach has a murder or armed robbery or other serious criminal act, the sheriffs ofce would certainly provide all the resources the city requested. Those crime scene investigators and detectives they would be at the citys disposal to investigate a serious offense, likely taking the lead. At its core, this contention is a red herring. When the two primary arguments offered by city ofcials for a switch have been knocked away, the foundation for such a proposal rapidly topples. Consider the logistics: Mexico Beach is separated from the rest of Bay County by Tyndall Air Force Base, which has its own law enforcement presence. The distance from Mexico Beach to the DuPont Bridge, roughly where one leaves Tyndall and enters the city of Parker, is more than 15 miles. Depending on trafc on twolane U.S. Highway 98, that is a 15-20 minute drive time just to reach the scene of any crime in Mexico Beach, and this scenario depends on a responding deputy just happening to be in Parker near the bridge at the time. And what if a drone crashes on the Tyndall base? What happens during the several instances each year, for a myriad of reasons, that the stretch of U.S. 98 along Tyndall is closed for base operations? Sure, there is hope that a Gulf-toBay Highway will one day provide a sort of Back Beach Road around U.S. 98 between Gulf County and U.S. 231, but that day is well into the future. In the meantime, the city of Mexico Beach would be protected the central mission of law enforcement by a force signicantly distant in proximity. In that light, it makes far more sense to approach the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce, save issues of jurisdiction crossing county lines. Consider also re and EMS: Mexico Beach is one of fewer-than10 municipalities in the state which have a public safety department encompassing the re department and EMS as well as law enforcement. All three operate under the same chief. Will Chief Brad Hall stick around after one-third, or more, is slashed from his salary ? If not, what does the city do about leadership for re and EMS? City ofcials have been quick to state there will be no impact to re and emergency medical protection, but that is a hollow statement given the makeup of the Department of Public Safety. There is also a human element to the issue. The city would be choosing to put a half-dozen or so folks out of work with any switch. Further, the police department was established by city charter; the Public Safety Department by ordinance. Can the council unilaterally alter the charter without citizen input? For that is the overriding issue here, the willingness of city ofcials to shut the public out of the discussion. One of the fundamentals of government is protecting and serving its citizens, but the city council has thus far been allergic to public discussion on this topic. McKeithens presentation a t a workshop was just that a presentation with no input from the public. The public was denied the opportunity to fully explore the issue at last months regular meeting because the item wasnt listed on the agenda. But the folks with the biggest stake in this discussion are residents. It is their protection and their safety at play here. Those residents deserve more of a say than theyve had thus far in a matter as consequential as public safety. I missed Mom and Dad this Thanksgiving. Dad has been gone for years now; Mom just a couple. And please understand, it wasnt a lonely Thanksgiving! My sons were there. My grandchildren were there. Cathys immediate, fairly close, not-so-close and a few we-didntknow-at-all family members showed up. In droves! I thought Gil Favor and Rowdy Yates were pushing a trail herd through by the time we sat down to eat. You can turn aside for a moment, even in a crowd. Dad liked to eat. Oh, he wouldnt make a fuss or let on. He wasnt going to make the rounds hugging, shaking hands or entertaining. But he enjoyed the family. He enjoyed the meal. He enjoyed the fellowship. He would never say so, but I think he was giving thanks more than any of us ever realized. He sure understood the season. Mom would be everywhere. Shed wipe her hands on that apron a thousand times in between peeping in the oven and checking the three pots she had going on the top of the stove. Shed be seeing to everyone. Did they want some tea while they waited? Were Leons girls alright upstairs by themselves? Do we want to try to eat before the ballgame? Do we have enough seats? Someone is going to have to eat in the kitchen. She would be the last to sit down. She would be the last to serve her plate. She made sure the cranberry sauce was close to her middle son. Her head would lift slightly as someone took a rst bite of potato salad, searching for the approval smile. Her eyes darted from plate to plate; she wanted to be ready if someone needed a rell. I look back now and wonder if Mom wasnt so busy maybe she missed a little of the thanksgiving. I put that thought aside quickly. Mom was having a blast. She was in her element. The giving was her way of showing thanks! I never imagined life without either of them. They came from such humble beginnings. Dad grew up across Shannon Creek on a hillside farm. Mom lived on the other side of the little Mt. Zion School, just up the road off of Sugar Creek. Ive never heard the full story of how they met down where the creeks forked. I know Dad took to rabbit hunting up close to the Kennedy farm. They married in December of 1934. I dont know much about the proposal, wedding day or their early years. Life, as they lived it, wasnt about them. It was about us. And it was about family. They each had six brothers and sisters that reached adulthood. Believe me, Mom and Dad knew something about large Thanksgiving gettogethers! Mom was fourteen when they married. I have rolled that over time and time again in my mind. I know it was a different era. In so many ways, a completely different world..but still, fourteen! Daddy dropped out of school after the third grade. His father needed him on the farm more than they did down at the little one-room school at Mt. Zion. A child bride and an elementary school drop-out. What would you gure the odds of them making it? I wondered about how they spent their rst Thanksgiving as husband and wife. I wondered if they pondered on the future. Did they go to the movies? When did they start planning on Leon, me and David? I should have asked more questions when I had the chance. I should have paid more attention to the little glances and the unspoken moments between them. I never, ever heard either of them bemoan the hardships of farm living in the heights of the Great Depression. I never heard either of them complain about their lot in life, a break that might not have gone their way or how they came to be at the end of Stonewall Street with three fairly demanding children. They didnt belittle anyone or waste time on that lifeis-unfair speech. What I did hear from them was laughter, encouragement and a kind word just when the world was sticking a foot on my neck. Oh yeah, you let me step over one of their clearly-dened lines of decency and good decorum and they would whip my little backside quicker than you could say Father OLeary is not a Baptist! They could take that child rearing theme to extremes sometimes! They wanted to know how things were going at school. They asked questions about what we were learning. They made sure our friends stopped by for a sandwich or a bite of chocolate pie. It seemed innocent and polite enough, but I look back now and realize it also gave them insight into who we were hanging around with. Theyd follow you out the back door and embarrass the dickens out of you by yelling Be careful as you were getting in the car with Ricky Gene or Ann Carol. They didnt just raise us; they were involved in every blooming detail of our lives! They led by word, action and example. And let me tell you, they could do some almighty pushing if the situation demanded it. They invested everything they had in us. Ill be reaping the dividends until the day I die. I looked across the table at my two sons. How proud Mom and Dad would have been of them. I soaked in the noise from ve bouncing grandchildren. I hate they didnt get to share a banana sandwich with my Father. These precious young souls never saw Mom at her best. But I know without a doubt the legacy of my parents, the faithful precepts of my upbringing, the care and love of family courses deep in their veins. Not bad for a child bride and a third grade d rop-out! Thankfully, KesMallo Cups and Goo Goo Clusters CranksRANKS MY tra TRACtTOrRBN Heard TiIM CrROFtTStar news editorRemoving public from public safety HUnkerNKER DOWnNKesley ColbertHeres some Thanksgiving leftovers

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A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S For the Holidays... Give the Gift of Regional Literature fromForgotten Coast Used and Out of Print BooksFeaturing authors and topics from Old and New Florida and the SouthGift-Quality Used, New, 1st Editions Signed Copies Publisher, 2011 Edition, Alexander Keys Island Light available in hardcover and paperbackhttp://www.forgottencoastbooks.com LocalThursday, December 1, 2011 The Star| A5 SPe E Ci I Al L toTO The HE St T Ar RAlso found was this coin from L.W Lyons Clothing and Furnishing Goods store in New Orleans. The store closed in 1960. BONES from page AA1said, is the condition of the site. Given wave action, from tides, boats on the water, natural wave action of the water depending on weather conditions, the site is considered a deated site. In other words, water action through the years has caused erosion to an extent that the layers put down by people of different eras were now on one level, with little to demarcate decades or centuries. For example, in addition to a coin that likely dates to the 1860s a commemorative coin from a New Orleans business has an address from which the company moved in 1868 there was also found a tennis shoe. A geologic marker near the site was 14 inches above the surface of the ground. When those are laid down they are ush with the ground, Dickel said. The site not only contains items dated to the 1800s, but Dickel said it was conceivable a full dig of the site could reveal items thousands of years old. All this stuff is there on the same level, Dickel said. It is all there on one level, plus there are these scattered bones. It might be a historic cemetery out there. Historic for what people? If Native American, Dickel said, the bureau would work with the appropriate tribe authorities on proper disposition. If a historic AfricanAmerican site, Dickel said, the bureau would again contact appropriate authorities. In general, he added, if African-American, the bones and artifacts would be returned to the site a site, Dickel noted, which is illegal under state law to tamper with. The ultimate answer will come from a university researcher and expert on such nds, Dickel said, and should be known in about a month or so. Dickel said while not entirely common, it was not unusual to nd such historic cemeteries in such remote areas. Rural areas, such as North Florida, are dotted with historic archaeological sites such the one found at Lake Wimico. Since the site had already been documented, there was no excavation conducted two weeks ago. More skeletal remains and artifacts were recovered. The investigation is pending nal determination of the archaeologists ndings, Nugent said. signs for eyeballs, this Santa is available to the highest bidder and in need of a good home. Susan Julian from our class was able to get this Santa donated from a friend in Georgia, Bauer said. Santa came home with Susan. We all saw it and immediately started brainstorming. The brainstorm was to drop Santa in front of various businesses and restaurants in town. In turn, he would become a silent auction subject. A sign on the front of the jolly old guy says, If you think Im so nice, my backsides the price. There is a sheet for bidders to write down their bid amounts and to track how their bid is holding up. The sign continues, After touring around town, you wont let me down, because nothing will do but to come home with you. The starting bid is $35 and the minimum bid is $5 and bids have begun adding up on Santas backside after tours of Josephs Cottage, Sunset Coastal Grill and No Name Caf. Santa will make stops throughout town. He is going to different retail establishments and restaurants, Bauer said. We dont want to leave anybody out. Any business or restaurant who would like Santa to pay a visit is asked to contact Bauer at 227-9041 or 340-0779. He is going to have an engagement calendar, Bauer said with a chuckle. Bidders can also stop by and check out Santas backside to know where the bidding is headed. The auction will end at 12:30 p.m. ET on Sunday, Dec. 18, when a winner will be announced at the church. Updates on Santas whereabouts may be found on the Facebook page for the Port St. Joe Star. The Methodist Church has a second fundraiser to benet Relay for Life. Each member of the congregation is asked to bring in a Christmas ornament that is especially intriguing or attractive to be hung on the huge tree inside the church fellowship hall. The church will conduct a silent auction on each ornament, the proceeds going to Relay. You can take your ornament home with you but you have to make sure you are the high bidder, Bauer said. The person who offers the ornament that brings the highest bid will be treated to the Rev. Mac Fulchers famous Grits-aYa-Ya. First United Methodist is only one of the Relay for Life teams that will be on hand this Saturday for the special Christmas SaltAir Farmers Market at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. The public is urged to come out and see rsthand the ingenious ways teams are raising money: T he El Governor Team Gov Bugs are holding a rafe for a four-night stay at the El Governor Motel in Mexico Beach. Tickets are $5 each or six for $20.00. T he Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Team (Meredith Ward, 227-4885) rafes for a thirty-one bag; $3 each or two for $5. T he WASWA Team (Kim Kurnitsky, 227-4093) Choose Hope Ornaments, $10 each. F airpoint Communications Team (Donna White, 229-7251) rafes for Festival of Wreaths, $1 each. P ort St. Joe High School Team Pretty in Pink (Kaley Wilder, 2299291 or 340.0985) selling feet for a cure, $1 each. SANTA from page AA1FairP P oint Festival of Wreaths RafeThe employees at FairPoint Communications in Port St. Joe have created wreaths for a cause this holiday season. They will rafe the beautifully decorated wreaths, which are currently on display in their business ofce in Port St. Joe, on Dec. 3 at the Christmas on the Coast event in downtown Port St. Joe. The wreaths will be on display at the City Commons gazebo, and the drawing will take place before the Christmas parade. Tickets are $1 a piece or $5 for six. All proceeds will benet local charities and nonprot organizations.Mexico Beach Holiday KringlemartOn Saturday, Dec. 3, the Mexico Beach Special Events Committee will host a Holiday Kringlemart outside of the Mexico Beach Welcome Center, 102 Canal Parkway, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. CT. The market will feature a variety of unique gift items in a showcase from local vendors. There will be something for everyone on your list! Items will include unique and local handcrafted jewelry, art, pottery, clothing, house wares as well as homemade baked goods and specialty foods. This event is free and open to the public. Mexico Beach tree lightingSunset Park in Mexico Beach is being transformed into a Florida beach Christmas. The Special Events for Mexico Beach, The Mexico Beach Community Development Council, along with the City of Mexico Beach invites the public to attend the annual Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony held at Sunset Park (next to El Governor Motel) on Sunday, Dec. 4. The event kicks off at 5:30 p.m. CT with a Christmas story reading from author Marcia Harden. The lighting ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. CT and will feature music, homemade desserts and hot chocolate. Following the lighting ceremony, a special holiday golf cart parade will begin, followed by a visit from Santa. If you are interested in decorating your golf cart and riding in the parade, please contact Traci Gaddis at 648-5474. The Mexico Beach Department of Public Safety will also be collecting donations of new, unwrapped toys to deliver to families in need. Please join us as we bring the warmth and spirit of the holidays to the beach. For any questions about the events please contact the Mexico Beach Welcome Center at 6488196. CC hristmas bazaar and golf tournament The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club will hold its second annual Christmas Bazaar and Jingle Bell Golf Tournament Dec. 9-10, supporting Gulf County Christmas for Kids and People Helping People. The club is open to the public and the golf tournament will be a fourplayer, best-ball format, with a 12 p.m. ET shotgun start on Saturday, Dec. 10. The Christmas Bazaar will ll the holiday-decorated clubhouse with local artists and craftsmen selling handmade gifts including jewelry, jams and jellies, hand-stitched items, pottery, decorations, stained glass, original art, specialty breads and fresh foods. The Christmas Bazaar will be open Friday, Dec. 9, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET and Saturday, Dec. 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information visit www.stjoebaygolf.com or call 850-227-1751. Wewa P P aradeThe City of Wewahitchka invites you to attend its annual Christmas Parade on Saturday, Dec. 17 at 5 p.m. CT at the corner of State 71 and East River Road in Wewahitchka. For more information about the parade please contact Connie at the City of Wewahitchka at 850-6392605. CHRISTMAS from page AA1

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Thursday, December 1, 2011 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters GARMIN ETREX VENTURE HAND HELD GPSGREAT FOR THE WOODS OR THE WATER REG $169.99 NOW $109.99 By Lois SwobodaFlorida Freedom Newspapers The Franklin County Tourist Development Council is sponsoring a contest to promote geocaching to attract tourists to the area. Geocaching, which combines the terms geographical and cache, is an outdoor adventure that sends seekers on a treasure hunt for containers of trinkets and prizes. Participants use a Global Positioning System receiver (GPSr) to hide and seek containers called geocaches. A typical cache is a waterproof container containing a logbook. According to Groundspeak, the organizer of the game, (www. geocaching.com), there are nearly 200 geocache sites in our forests and towns and dotting the coast between Alligator Point and the western edge of Franklin County. Around the world, there are more than 1.2 million geocaches registered with Groundspeak, including ve in Antarctica and two on Easter Island. The contest launched on Halloween. Heres how it works: Hidden somewhere in Franklin County is a puzzle cache (GC369DD) containing 100 coupons, each good for a Salty geocoin. The oyster-shaped coins were minted especially for the Franklin County contest. Geocoins are collected by geocachers and retail for anywhere from $10 to $40, with some rare coins selling for signicantly more. The coins are awarded to winners at local visitor centers. Contestants must nd geographical coordinates hidden in the lids of geocaches in the county to locate the nal container. As of Nov. 21, the puzzle had been solved by 15 searchers, and all but one has collected his or her coin. First to solve the puzzle was Sheila Walaszek of Orlando, who was staying on St. George Island when she learned of the contest in an article in Forgotten Coastline magazine. Walaszek said she was thrilled to be rst to solve the puzzle. It was the rst time Ive ever really won anything, she said. Walaszek said she visits the area annually to bicycle, rollerblade and spend time on the beach with her dog Daisy. When I come here I always plan on caching, she said. You see so many things you wouldnt otherwise see. The idea is to lure visitors to the area for the rst time. So far it seems to be working. A couple who drove to the county to attempt the challenge wrote, Completed this today after our visit to Tallahassee. We had no idea that there was this big festival going on. We wrote one of the numbers down wrong, which led us on a wild goose chase for the nal. No regrets. We got out of the truck and a mother bear and her two cubs went running across the street in front of us. As we were driving away, we spotted a gray fox. Rechecked our numbers and made the nd. This is a good way to introduce people to the area. We didnt have any plans to visit otherwise, and really like the area. Thanks for the fun, wrote the couple. The contest will continue until April or until all of the coins have been claimed. geocaching craze Franklin County embraces In the Salty Geocoin Challenge, 100 geocoins like this one are redeemable to adventurous visitors who can locate the geocaches throughout Franklin County.Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesSheila Walaszek, right, accepts the rst prize awarded in the Salty Geocoin Challenge from Cindy Steiger at the Apalachicola Visitor Center. This is a good way to introduce people to the area. We didnt have any plans to visit otherwise, and really like the area. Thanks for the fun.Salty Geocoin Challenge participantsBy Jessy KinnettPark Ranger St. Joseph Peninsula State Park 227-1327 Florida waters have cooled down but shing is still as hot as it was in August. Fishing on the gulf surf line and wading into St Joseph Bay during cooler weather yields some very common (and tasty) species. Red Drum and Southern Kingsh take center stage for most diehard snowbirds and locals. Red Drum, Channel Bass, Red Fish, or simply Reds, are all aliases for this feisty sh. Known for their signature black dot near the tail, they are a blast to catch and abundant in the bay during cooler months. Spawning occurs during cooler months bringing more reds in the bay as well as the abundance of mollusks, crustaceans and small fry sh. Mostly bottom feeders, allow your bait to rest on the bay bottom or within a couple of feet from it to snag one of these strong ghters. Menhaden are a favorite amongst adult red, but synthetics work well also. Southern Kingsh, Gulf Kingsh, Sand Mullet, Sandcroakers and whiting are all aliases for the gulf coasts best pansh. Slight differences between the species all amount to nothing when they are side by side. Mostly distinguishable by slight variations in colors or subtle markings, these sh school in large groups and patrol close to the gulf shoreline hunting sand eas and small shellsh. Utilize small hooks and cut bait on high-low bottom rigs and wait for the schools to arrive. Cut shrimp and synthetics work very well for these misidentied jewels of the coast. Get out to St. Joseph Peninsula State park access to the gulf, access to the bay and a perfect way to spend the cooler weather! Until Next time, The Rangers at St. Sp P Ecial CIAL To O THE STa A RJames Gavin, 14, bagged this Thanksgiving buck on a St. Joe hunting lease using a 7 mm-08 youth rie he received on his bir thday.  He took the deer from a double lean-up stand he was sharing with his granddad, Dan. James lives with his grandparents Dan and Marsha Henr y on Cape San Blas.  He hunts and shes with his grandfather as long as he keeps his grades up.  A THaANKsgiSGIViINgG BUcCKBy Lois SwobodaFlorida Freedom Newspapers If you notice some unusual spider eggs on your porch or under a shelf, watch out. They might be the eggs of a brown widow spider, which have been abundant in the county this year. These interesting egg cases are round with tiny protruding spikes reminiscent of the head of a medieval mace. Everyone is familiar with black widow spiders, whose bite can sometimes be fatal, but Florida is home to three other widow spiders, the southern widow spider, red widow spider and brown widow spider. Although the venom of these spiders is not as toxic as the black widow, they are very painful and can cause serious injury if not treated. If you have a brown widow spider infestation, you will probably notice the eggs before you see the spider. Brown widows are reclusive and hide in cracks and dark corners. Some typical sites include inside old tires, empty containers such as buckets and nursery pots, mailboxes, entryway corners, under eaves, stacked equipment, cluttered storage closets and garages, behind hurricane shutters, undercarriages of motor homes, and screened porches.Beware of brown widows 1 Fish, 2 sh, red sh, kingshSp P Ecial CIAL To O TT HE STa A RA redsh.Page 6 FreshwaterLast week the whiting bite started back up on St. Joe Beach and under the George Tapper bridge. Some pompano were caught as well, but not in good numbers. Larger red sh are in the surf and will eat just about anything now. Inshore OffshoreMost of the trout are still small in St. Joe Bay; however, the bite should get better with the cold weather this week. The I.C.W. Canal will soon become the hot spot in town as inshore species continue to migrate for the winter. Red sh are still being caught just about everywhere in our waters. Larger sh are holding on inshore wrecks and close to the beaches. The Fishermans Landing reports great catches of shellcracker still with some channel cat in the mix this past weekend. Sheephead are still being caught in the river and into the Brothers. Good news is that the cold snap has triggered the crappie bite, and great reports this week of full coolers coming in at Howard Creek. SPONsS OrRED bB Y Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com OUTDoo OO RSwww.starfl.comSection A

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTs S www.starfl.com ASectionThursday, December 1, 2011 Page 7 Star Staff ReportSince 2003 the Gene Rafeld Football League has played its games in the Big Bend League against Franklin County, Wewahitchka, Blountstown, Liberty County, Sneads and Chattahoochee. League rules called for each town to eld three teams, the 7-8 year old Teeny Mites, 9-10 year old Tiny Mites and 11-12 year old Pee Wees. In recent years some of the towns have had difculty in getting enough players to ll out the rosters at every level. This year Sneads and Liberty County were unable to eld a Pee Wee team. As a result the other Pee Wee teams in the League had only four scheduled games. To solve this problem the League decided to go to only two teams in each town. They will be 7-, 8and 9-year-old Tiny Mites called the Jaguars and 10-, 11and 12-year-old Pee Wees, called the Buccaneers, in Port St. Joe. The change should result in every town being able to eld the requisite number of teams so that everyone will have a full schedule. In some towns, Port St. Joe included, some teams are expected to have large rosters making it difcult for all players to get enough playing time. To give everyone plenty of time on the eld and to ensure that each child gets the game experience he needs to develop, we will play a 5th quarter that will not count in league standings. This 5th quarter will be used exclusively for the younger and non-starter players on the team. Before the 2012 season starts League ofcials will meet again to work out any problems that may come up as a result of these changes. Changes coming to Gene Rafeld FootballStar Staff ReportThe Gene Rafeld Foot ball League will hold its Awards Celebration at 6 p.m. ET tonight, Dec. 1, at the cafeteria at Port St. Joe High School. Tiger Shark Coach Vern Bath will be the guest speaker. This year all three Port St. Joe teams accom plished something never done before. The Dolphins, Jaguars and Buccaneers went through the season undefeated and won their Super Bowl Championship games. The players will be honored with trophies, championship T-shirts, and the appreciation for a job well done. Players, their families, friends and fans are all in vited to share in this event.Gene Rafeld Football schedules awards celebration Star Staff ReportThe St. Joseph Bay Golf Club hosted a fundrais ing Silent Auction and golf tournament on Nov. 18-19 to benet the Camp Gor don Johnston Museum. The museum, located in Carrabelle, is dedicated to preserving and protect ing the heritage of the sol diers of World War II, espe cially those who trained at Camp Gordon Johnston. The camp opened in 1942 to prepare amphibious soldiers and their support groups. A quarter of a million men were trained at CGJ before it closed in April 1946. Fridays entertainment was provided by One More Shot, A.K.A. George & Cletus. The auction raised over $2,500 for the museum, a not-for-prot corporation. The golf tournament on Saturday raised an ad ditional $6,700. The tour nament on Saturday was preceded by an Honoring Americas Veterans cer emony. Three WWII veterans were special guests: Jim Sealey, Fred Fitzgerald, and David Butler. Dan Van Treese, club president, and Tony Minichiello, marketing director for the muse um, were co-emcees. The invocation was delivered by Farther Phil Fortin and the Port St. Joe High School NROTC presented the col ors while Lt. Commander Martin Jarosz sand the National Anthem.Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Jim Simmons was the principal speaker. The team of David War riner, Dave Warriner, Gary Settle and Tommy Lake came in rst place; Dan Anderson, Carol Anderson, Chip Crow and Deborah Crow nished second,; and Eric Scholles, Damon Mc Nair, Penelope Evanoff and Phil Dodson nished third. Longest Drive and Clos est to the Hole awards went to Marvin Shimfessel, Mike Alldis, Gary Settle, and Nick Nicolas.Star Staff ReportThe Lady Tiger Sharks, playing against two larger classication schools, split a pair of road games prior to the Thanksgiving break. Port St. Joe (1-1 for the season) beat Springeld Rutherford 50-37 on Nov. 15 before losing two days later 60-41 at Lynn Haven Mosley. The Lady Tiger Sharks transformed a 13-7 decit into a 26-19 halftime lead with a 19-point second quarter, led by Katie Lacour, who scored eight of her game-high 21 points in the period. The Lady Rams shaved the lead by one in the third quarter but Port St. Joe pulled away in the nal eight minutes. Maya Robbins added 10 points for Port St. Joe, with Lyssa Parker chipping in with nine, MeMe Alex ander with six and Ashley Robinson and Nicole Spilde scoring two points apiece. Against Mosley, the Lady Tiger Sharks were down early and trailed 2816 at halftime. Port St. Joe chipped away at the lead in the third quarter before a 22-point outburst in the nal quarter sealed the Lady Dolphin win. Lacour led Port St. Joe with 12 points, Parker added 10 and Robbins nine. Alex ander and Autumn Haynes each scored four points and Robinson added two. Port St. Joe traveled to Sneads on Tuesday and plays at Wewahitchka at 1 p.m. ET today. The Lady Tiger Sharks rst home game is 6:30 p.m. ET on Fri day.By Tim CroftStar News Editor Youth will be served, and doing much of the serving, this basketball season for the Port St. Joe boys. The Tiger Sharks must replace four starters, and the vast majority of the scoring, this season and will do with a team that features just three seniors, one a transfer from Michigan, and two eighthgraders. The season starts for the young Tiger Sharks this Thursday when they travel to Lynn Haven Mosley. Port St. Joe will be at Bay High on Saturday. We are anxious to get the season started, said Port St. Joe coach Derek Kurnitsky. We are very young. We have some very talented players, but we are very young. We just need to start playing some people. The returning seniors are Alex King and Arion Ward. King started much of last season while Ward came off the bench. The other senior is Nick Dickenson who transferred from Michigan. Ramello Zaccarro and Natrone Lee, both juniors, return, moving from reserve roles to starting, and they are joined by Caleb Odom and Jak Riley, both freshmen. The varsity squad is rounded out by eighthgraders Chad Quinn and Marcel Johnson. We are going to have to rely on our familiar (modus operandi), speed and quickness, Kurnitsky said. The key will be adjusting to the speed of the varsity game. There is a difference between junior varsity or middle school and high school varsity. It is something you can not practice, and you can not simulate. Once the young kids catch up with the speed of the game, theyll be ne. We may take some lumps early, but we have talent and well get there. Reserved seating is available for the varsity team. One season ticket good for reserved seating for all home games costs $60 and you can purchase two for $100. The varsitys rst home game is Tuesday against Blountstown. Game action starts at 6 p.m. ET. This weekend will offer a junior high tournament. The Port St. Joe Centennial Bank Classic will start at 10 a.m. ET at Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High School with Port St. Joe (currently 4-1) playing Wewahitchka. Games will continue all day. The schedule has Wewahitchka against Wakulla at 11 a.m.; Port St. Joe (B) plays Wakulla (B) at noon; the Port St. Joe girls play the Wakulla girls at 1 p.m.; Port St. Joe (A) plays Wakulla (A) at 2 p.m.; Wakulla versus Quincy Shanks at 3 p.m.; and Port St. Joe (A) against Shanks (A) at 4 p.m. It is not a tournament, but a classic, Kurnitsky said. Everybody gets two games. Admission for the day is $5 per person. Tourney, auction raises more than $9,000Port St. Joe girls split rst 2 games Season starts for young Tiger Sharks PHOTOS SpSP ECIAL TO TT HE SS TAR A special tribute to veterans preceded the start of the golf tournament, which raised more than $6,700 for the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. The winning team was David Warriner, Dave Warriner, Tommy Lake and Gary Settle.

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, December 1, 2011

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionPhotos by VALERIE GARMAN | The StarLeft, Harley, a student at The Growing Minds Center, works on identifying photos of everyday tasks with his instructor. Above, Seven-year-old Sam works one-on-one with his instructor. By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer At 10:30 a.m. on day one of the renovation, all of the carpet had already been torn up. They work like Tasmanian Devils, said Ofcer Jesse Burkett, as he assisted a group of volunteers from the Covenant House in Kinard with the rst step in a renovation project to spruce up the Mexico Beach Police Department on Nov. 22. The renovation process will be completely volunteer-driven, and is aimed at updating the department building and creating a better work environment. Burkett and other members of the department have volunteered their time, along with a handful of volunteers from the Covenant House, eliminating the need to delve into city resources to fund the renovation. This is probably one of the greatest things we could ask for, said Mexico Beach Police Chief Brad Hall. These young men came down and volunteered their time, and they did it with no hesitation. The Covenant House is a halfway house ministry aimed at helping people turn their lives around by stressing the importance of work ethic and personal responsibility. I am very grateful to the Covenant House and what theyve done, Hall said. It allows us to continue our everyday jobs while they update our building. Im grateful theyre here; I cant say that enough. Hall said the remodeling has come at a good time because it will go hand-in-hand with other departmental changes he is looking to make. Hall said the department has goals to become more community-oriented and more involved with the citizens of Mexico Beach, and to update and upgrade its policies. He said as time passes, things simply need to be updated, both structurally and departmentally. Over time, things have to be done, we have to rebuild, Hall said. Law enforcement is always a changing practice. The department recently purchased database software that will allow it to eventually go paperless and rid the building of bulky le cabinets. It will also allow the department to move towards state accreditation. The renovation will also allow more privacy for interviews, and better overall organization. Hall said the departmental updates will help the ofcers more efciently accomplish their ultimate goal; to provide protection to the community. Hopefully we will get this remodel done within the next couple of weeks, Hall said. But the departmental changes are going to take some time. Thursday, December 1, 2011 Star Staff ReportSacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf has opened a new Womens Health Center in the hospitals Medical Ofce Building that will provide mammography services as well as bone density testing and ultrasound testing. The facility began providing select services Nov. 7. The Womens Center is a joint effort between the Gulf County Health Department and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. While located at the Sacred Heart Hospital campus, the state-of-the-art Selenia Digital Mammography device was purchased jointly with a grant secured by Health Department. The new equipment allows for improved image quality, digital archiving, and most importantly to many women, less breast compression. The new equipment is digital with higher quality images to increase accuracy of diagnosis, which is the greatest advantage, s aid Temple Parton, mam mography technologist with the hospital. The facility also features DEXA bone density testing to detect osteoporosis and ultrasound imaging. Advanced technology now provides radiologists at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola to have instant access to mammography images taken in Port St. Joe, allowing the radiologists to provide their expert consultation to Gulf County residents. Meanwhile, a nurse navigator at the new Womens Center provides any required examination and patient education. The nurse SHH opens new Womens CenterRenovating the police station at a bargain priceStar Staff ReportGulf Correctional Institutes Warden Charles Halley and North Florida Child Development, Inc.s Chief Executive Ofcer, Sharon Gaskin, are pleased to announce a fundraiser for the 2011 Bikes for the Boys and Girls in Gulf County program. NFCD purchased the lumber for two playhouses that were constructed by inmate labor at GCI. This year, there will be a chance to win a playhouse for one lucky child. The drawing will be held Dec. 17 after the evening Christmas Parade sponsored by the City of Wewahitchka. The funds raised through ticket sales for the rafe will pay to purchase tricycles and bikes for needy children of Gulf County. Tickets may be purchased in Port St. Joe at the South Gulf Early Child Development Center (call Terri Bird at 832-8275), the North Gulf Center (call Jana Miller at 832-8539), and at the Central Ofce located in the old courthouse in Wewahitchka. For additional information, or if any organization would like to participate, contact Sebrina McGill at (850) 639-5080, ext. 10 or email smcgill@oridachildren. org. Give a child wheels, receive a chance to win a childs playhouse VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Volunteers from the Covenant House in Kinard strip the oors at the Mexico Beach Police Department.By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Sam loves animals and letter patterns. The seven-year-old taught himself to read and likes to spell out phrases like Feature Presentation and Merry Christmas on the oor with letter magnets. Trey can make just about anything out of Play Dough. Christian is an artist, and consistently produces amazing drawings. Harvey likes to talk about weird food combinations like hot sauce and ice cream and zucchini milkshakes. He especially loves Bernie Botts every avor jelly beans, a candy featured in the Harry Potter book series, with avors like earwax and frog legs. Christine Hermsdorfer knows the idiosyncrasies of each of her nine fulltime students. She knows their likes and dislikes, what they excel in, and pays particular attention to the challenges her students face. Hermsdorfer operates The Growing Minds Center, a nonprot school catered to children affected by autism and developmental or behavioral challenges. And while each of her students shows special gifts of their own, each faces difculties with communication and social interaction. Some people think (autism is) more Growing Minds Center takes on new students, new challengesWe denitely want to get bigger. We want people to know that were here.Christine Hermsdorfer Growing Minds owner A place to grow See cC ENTER B5 See gG ROW B5

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B2 | The Star Thursday, December 1, 2011 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society SocietySpecial to The StarRecently the GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club, Inc.,(GFWC WWC) partnered with employees from Gulf Correctional Institute (CI) in collecting coats, blankets, shoes, T-shirts and hats for students at Port St. Joe Elementary School, and Port St. Joe North Florida Head Start. Pictured above are DeEtta Smallwood, counselor, Port St. Joe Elementary; Carolyn Watson, Dianne Semmes and Pat Stripling, GFWC WWC; Doug Sloan, assistant warden, Gulf CI; Patty Fisher, GFWC WWC; Bonita Smith, classication ofcer, Gulf CI; and Laura Baxley, GFWC WWC. This project was a concerted effort between GFWC WWC, Gulf CI, Port St. Joe Elementary and North Florida Head Start. Coats are needed for children aged six-months through the 6th grade and if you would like to donate to this project, please call Dianne Semmes at 6395345/227-6425. Pick up is available. We would like to thank those who donated items for this project, and to let you know they were very much appreciated.Special to The StarButch Arendt of the John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 is shown receiving a plaque from Rodney Herring on behalf of the American Legion Legacy Run, an effort to raise scholarship funds for the surviving children of those killed in action in the War Against Terrorism since Sept. 11, 2001. The Gainous Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars has been a Sponsor of the Legacy Run for the past three years.Star Staff ReportThe 14th annual Community Thanksgiving dinner was a tremendous success. The 75 volunteers worked so harmoniously together. People came from all over the United States, as far as Michigan and Wisconsin, to be part of the wonderful Thanksgiving program. The volunteers were led by Jimmy and Bunnie Gainey, assisted by Doug and Namcy Calindine, Julia and James McQuaig, Larry Chism, Barry Bledsoe, Jerry and Lyd Stokoe and Ann Ballard. These wonderful people started the day at 5:30 a.m. and other volunteers arrived to help where ever they could. The following volunteers arrived with smiles and with happiness to be there. The majority of the people said this was the most fullling and heart-warming thing they had done to help people during the holidays. Linda Litttleton, Skippy Pittman, Lynn Dweyer, Mary Jo Walsh, Diana Parrish, Mary Virginia DePue, Perry Weinberg, Jan Ord, Phillip Robinson, Ty Robinson, Erica Bruckner, Melinda Reynolds, Susan Ashworth, Nicholas Ashworth, Charles Stephens, Tommy Johnson, Robin Vathis, Catherine Minger, Sherry Wood, Mary Wood, Kate Wood, Christie Todd, Caelie, Charley Black, Cheryl Vacco, Nick Vacco, Eric Asher, Sharon Asher, Ruth Sauls, Tommy Sauls, Bonnie Wilson, Barb Yard, Craig Yard, Bill Sanders Shirley Sanders, Kaycee Krum, Deanne Williams, Beverly Brown, Patti Slater, Megan Hubbard, Ben Welch, Barbara Bledsoe, Sharon Suber, Mary Kelly, Ron Kelly, Marjorie Parker, Will, Mariann, Aidan and Emma Brown, Joel Rogers, Zee and Melissa, Fred Meschino, Melody Meschino, Bob Sutton, Rob Greenland, Suzanne Doran, Emma Doran, Tristan Doran, Bill Soles, Rich Brenner, Liz Brenner, Willie Ramsey, Charlie Givens Charles Beechum, Tim DePuy, Crystal DePuy, Billy Dixson, Tyson Davis, Joe Foxworth, Kancus Marchum, Daiquan Teller and Joel Rogers. A special thanks to the men that cleaned, wiped down tables, cleared trash, vacuumed and mopped the oors, they were: Rich Brenner, Willie Ramsey, Bill Soles, Larry Chism and Barry Bledsoe, Also, a special thanks to the sponsors: Durens Piggly Wiggly and staff; Oakgrove Assembly of God Church and staff/volunteers, Mr. and Mrs. Rich Brenner, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Moon, Hannon Insurance Agency, First Baptist Church and members, St. Josephs Catholic Church and members, St. Josephs Catholic Church congregation and Mens Group, First United Methodist and members, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, Fairpoint Communications and staff, VFW Post 100069, Ramseys Printing and Ofce Supply, Billy Dixson and Sons Taxi Service, Sunset Coastal Grille, U.S. Highway 71 Bob Suttons Flea Market, Corner Grocery Store and Howard Creek Grocery Store and Jamie Mayhann. All request Oldies but GoodiesGulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, invites the public to join them from 10 a.m. until noon ET on Tuesday, Dec. 6 to enjoy the Oldies but Goodies Show by deejay Steve McIntire. He will be playing all types of music by request from the 1950s, s and s. Donations are appreciated. For more information, call Debbie at 229-8466.Salvation Army seeks volunteersThe Salvation Army is currently looking for volunteers to ring the bell at the Piggly Wiggly this holiday season. Volunteers are asked to work one-hour shifts. If you are interested, please call 596-9552 for more information.Gulf County Democratic Party meetingThe Gulf County Democratic Party will meet at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, Dec. 1 at the Port St. Joe Fire Station Building. All members are encouraged to attend and participate. Mr. Frank Day will be our guest speaker. Day is the Chairperson for the Walton County Democratic Party, and serves as the Regional Director for Small Counties Democratic Coalition. Volunteer tax assistancePeople Helping People, through the IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, will offer free tax preparation to lowto moderate-income in Gulf County from Jan. 17 to April 15. To become an IRS certied tax preparer please join us on Tuesday, Dec. 6 and Dec. 13 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET at 2010 Parker Ave. in Highland View. For more information, give us a call at 229-5262. Society BRIEFsSSpecial to The StarThe 4th annual SaltAir Farmers Market is accepting applications from local artisans to participate in Port St. Joes Christmas Market on Saturday, Dec. 3. This special market is an allday event, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and features handcrafted jewelry, art, and locallygrown produce. Join us at City Commons Square and celebrate the holiday spirit with your friends and neighbors while showing off your arts and crafts. Please note: only handcrafted goods are accepted. The cost for a 10x10 space is just $10. For more information or to request an application, please contact John Parker at info@ saltairmarket.com or call 404-906-2637. Information is also available at the No Name Caf Books and More at 306 Reid Ave in downtown Port St. Joe. CoaOA TsS FoOR KIdsDSLegacy Run honors VFW PostVolunteers prepare, pack and deliver 600 Thanksgiving dinnersSpecial to The StarThe Mexico Beach Welcome Center is arranging for winter visitors the opportunity to win some extra cash not once, but twice, in Biloxi, MS. Snowbirds will be ocking to the casinos to win big and enjoy the scenery. Travelers will be transported on charter busses for an overnight trip in January and in February. The rst casino trip departs Jan.17 and returns the next day. The second casino trip departs Feb. 21-22. Each trip package includes transportation, playing voucher pass, buffet vouchers, room and entertainment. Rates for each casino trip are $99 for double occupancy and $139 for single occupancy. You can go in January or February, or do both! These trips are open to anyone, whether they be a part time Floridian or live here year round, we want you to join us on one or both of these wonderful excursions. There will be exciting games on the bus, wonderful friendships made, casino tips swapped and tons of fun. The busses will depart from the El Governor at 5:30 a.m. CST and the rst stop will be at the Boomtown Casino where there will be a 6 hour playtime period. After that, its off to the Isle of Capri Casino where well stop for the night. The next morning will start off with a trip to the Imperial Palace casino where there will be four hours of playing time and then its time to head home. We hope this trip will be a great getaway and enjoyable for all. If anyone has any questions or would like more information, please contact the Mexico Beach Welcome center by calling 648-8196 or visit our website at www.mexicobeach.com. Artisans invited to participate in annual Christmas SaltAir Farmers MarketMexico Beach trips to Biloxi for winter visitors

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The Star| B3Thursday, December 1, 2011 Annual Holiday Open HouseFriday, December 2, 2011 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. *Refreshments *Door Prizes315 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850-229-6600 Alines Merle Norman Studio School NewsBy Hannah Young and Kyli WockenfussGeneral Information The music/drama department is having a busy week. Selected guitar students will be performing Christmas music at noon on Thursday and Friday, Dec. 1-2 in the cafeteria at Sacred Heart Hospital. The Musical theatre students will be presenting two plays, The Gift of the Magi and Christmas in WhoVille on Monday night, Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. ET. Admission is free! Florida Theatre Studio will be conducting a writing workshop on Dec. 5-6 for selected Jr./Sr. high students. Senior Trip payment is due by the end of November. There is no Senior Trip payment for the month of December, so please use this as a catch-up month if you are behind with any payments. ACT testing at Port St. Joe, 8 a.m. ET.SportsThe competition cheer squad went to a competition in Pensacola, Florida on Saturday, November 19th where they won 1st place in Time Our Dance and Cheer and 2nd place in ght song. Dec. 1 Girls Basketball at Wewahitchka, 1 p.m. ET; boys and girls soccer versus Baker at 6 p.m./8 p.m.; boys basketball at Mosley, 8 p.m. ET. Dec. 2 Girls basketball versus Bay High, 5 p.m.; JV/Varsity boys basketball versus Bay High 6 p.m./7:30 p.m. Dec. 3 Christmas Classic Cheer Competition at Graceville; girls basketball at East Gadsden, 4 p.m.; boys basketball at Wewahitchka, 6 p.m./7:30 p.m. ET; girls and boys soccer versus Rocky Bayou, 10 a.m./noon.Special to The StarKids College is not just a summer camp anymore! The Continuing Education Department at Gulf Coast State College has added fun new courses just for kids. Musical Theatre is an after school workshop where students will delve into the art of dancing, singing and acting. During this ten week workshop, students will learn proper vocal and acting techniques and prepare for a grand nale showcase performance at Gulf Coast State College. A few of the course highlights include focusing on improvisation, pantomime, monologue, scene work, stage movement, singing and speaking voice development. Plus, students will gain important tips on auditioning techniques to prepare them for future plays and musicals. Classes start in September, meet once a week for one hour and are limited to 16 students. Halloween Horror Treats is a delicious new class where kids take sweet revenge on all the ghosts and goblins that can make Halloween so horrifying. Students will learn how to create edible eyes, monster toes, sweet skulls and more! This nobake cooking class is open to students between 6 and 11 years old, who want to have some Halloween fun and make yummy treats. Class is limited to 20 students. For more information or to register, visit www. gulfcoast.edu/kidscollege or contact the Continuing Education Department at 872.3823 or email continuinged@gulfcoast. edu.Special to The StarThe Florida High School/High Tech students at Port St. Joe High School engaged with professionals and businesses in the community at an informative job fair Nov. 18, learning about job and occupational opportunities. Twenty-one students participated with questions and answers about different professions and what is required for each. Cathy Cox, director of the Dyslexia Research Institute High School High Tech Program, organized the Job Fair. Participating businesses were Tina Richter, Phlebotomy Tech, Sacred Heart Hospital; Kimberly Thomas, Physical Therapist, Sacred Heart Hospital; Ron Baumgartner, Computer Consultant; Matt Hortman, Wildlife Biologist with Florida Fish & Wildlife; Sandy Buccieri, Masseuse with Donamelia Day Spa; April Hicks, Cosmetologist with Donamelia Day Spa; Crystal Lewis, nail tech with Donamelia Day Spa; and Susan Machemer, Fairpoint Communications. Each professional gave the students a tremendous amount of information about the various career opportunities in their elds. Students also discussed opportunities for summer internships with these businesses. Florida High School/High Tech offers paid summer internship positions to students who participate in the program. Students have been placed in numerous businesses in Port St. Joe and have received mentoring and job skills training over the past four summers. One of the awards that can be earned by the High School/High Tech students during the year is a laptop computer. Points are given for participation in the meetings, involvement in the golf tournament that raises the funds to pay the summer internships, community service hours which are accumulated over the school year. In the past it has taken the students until February to accumulate enough points but because of his extensive community service and involvement in the High School/High Tech Program, Carl Sheline was awarded the rst of the laptops this school year. Congratulations on a job well done to Carl. For more information about the High School/ High Tech Program and how students can become involved to participate in career shadowing or having a paid internship student in your business, please contact Patricia Hardman, 527-2347. Florida High School/High Tech is partially funded by The Able Trust and Vocational Rehabilitation.Special to The StarPort St. Joe Elementary Schools After-School program participated in a service-learning project called Pennies For Patients. This is a nationally-known organization that promotes awareness for leukemia. Leukemia is a childhood illness that attacks kids and sometimes adults. Our school collected over $1,000 in pennies and we want to celebrate that effort. We also would like to thank our teachers, staff, students, parents, Mrs. Regina Grantland and Centennial Bank for collecting and counting all the donations. It is no small effort to collect just pennies for a fundraiser. We truly will make a muchneeded contribution to the Leukemia Foundation where every penny counts. Thanks everyone for your hard work! Special to The StarThe annual Thanksgiving presentation was performed by the kindergarten, rst, second, third and fourth grades on Wednesday, Nov. 23 at Faith Christian School. Parents and students enjoyed the play called The First Thanksgiving. The Pilgrims were played by Farren Newman, Catherine Bouington, Shelby Causey, Magnolia Sarmiento, Jacob Davis, Emma Grace Burke, Kristen Bouington, Mary Kate Wood and Jade Cothran. The Indians were played by Carter Costin, Alex Taylor, Donovan Cumbie, Mazie Hodges, Maelee Lewis, Miracle Smiley and Riley McGufn. The Lions TALE The Lions Tale High School/High Tech students learn about job opportunities PENNiIEsS FOR pP Ati TIENtsTSKids College expands

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FAITHPage B4 www.starfl.comThis business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 (850) 827-2887 Howard Creek Baptist ChurchA Place of Grace 9:45 am (EST) 11:00 am (EST) Jerry Arhelger, www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 Thursday, December 1, 2011 Blind following the blindIsnt it time to abandon blind religion, based on what you heard? Give that old heart of stone to Jesus, and accept the new heart, that He wants to give you. Ask Him to make you into what He wants you to be. Youd be surprised at the number of regular churchgoers, who refuse to do this. They insist that they are saved because of something they did in a church years ago and think its okay to continue in sin. They quote the Apostle Paul in 1st Corinthians 6:12 and 1st Corinthians 10:23, All things are lawful for me They forget that Paul had given his heart of stone to Jesus, the same thing, which we ask people to do. Paul frequently warned his readers, about continuing in sin. Paul had accepted the New Covenant, and taught it, in his letter to the Hebrews, and in his other letters. You also need to accept the New Covenant. We are told about the New Covenant in Jeremiah 31:31-34, Jeremiah 32:38-40, Ezekiel 11:18-20, Ezekiel 18:30-32, and Ezekiel 36:24-27. It is also found in Hebrews 8:6-13, John 1:11-13, and in John 3:3-7. In Mark 14:24, Jesus is quoted as saying, This is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many. Yes, there is a lot of garbage on the internet. Theres also a lot of garbage in print, which you are subjected to every time you go through grocery store check out lines. Theres garbage on cable TV. Theres garbage on the radio. You cant escape it, unless you hide under a rock, and never come out. What those that slam the internet dont tell you is that there is a powerful search engine on the internet, where you can search up to 30 different English Bibles, and about 70 more in other languages, including New Testament Greek. You dont have to remain in ignorance, and remain a slave to the people you listen to in every church meeting. You dont have to allow these Bible teachers to hold you in bondage to his/her teaching. You can go down to the library and search out the internet site, Bible Gateway. Its at www.biblegateway.com. In seconds, or at the most a few minutes you can nd the truth on any Bible topic. I dont ask anyone to believe me. Believe what is recorded in all the good Bibles, like the New King James Version and the King James Version. If you care about living the life on earth that God wants you to live or about where you will spend eternity, isnt it worth a few hours of research at the library, or maybe a few hours of research at home? Dont let another day go by without spending time with God in prayer asking Him to make you into what He wants you to be. Questions or comments are invited. Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh. Check us out this Sunday. On Sunday morning we worship, at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st St. The Civic Center is located behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker Realty just off U.S. Highway 98 in the western end of Mexico Beach. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337 Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook, look for Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com The Christian CONSCIENCEZederick (Zed) Midgelow Storey, a longtime airframe mechanic and jack-of-alltrades, nally achieved his dream of ying high. On Oct. 23, 2011, he soared peacefully into the afterlife following a yearlong battle with cancer. Born Oct. 21, 1934 in Perdue, Saskatchewan, to Albert and Lucy Hodgson Storey, Zed entered the Canadian Armed Forces at age 21, where he served with honor and was recognized for countless achievements during the next 26 years. He was a resident of Port St. Joe since 1987, working as a handy man in the local area. Zed was an active member of the Port St. Joe Gun, Rie and Pistol Club. Zed was preceded in death by his parents; brother, Douglas Storey; and son, Gary Storey. He is survived in by his son, Steven Storey of Vancouver, Canada; brother, Joshua Storey (Vera); sister, Evelyn Storey Spence; nieces, Beverly Blackwell (Thomas); Peggy Watts (Wayne); and Sherry Wilkinson (Dave); nephews: Ab Storey (Shelley); Leslie Spence (Janine); Barry Spence (Linda); Patrick Storey; Mike Storey (Suzette); and grandchildren, Jessica and Cassidy. His legacy and loving memories live on in the United States through surviving family members Dorothy Lewis; Diane Lewis Greenwood (Jerry); David Lewis (Laurie); Michael Lewis (Maria); Jacqueline Lewis Ferguson (Scott); Timothy Lewis; and including beloved grandchildren: Bryan, Kristy, Amy, Jeromey, Amber, Zac, Michael John, Joshua, Sarah, and Connor. A memorial gathering celebrating Zeds life will be Saturday, Dec. 3 at 1 p.m. ET at the Hall of St Josephs Catholic Church 2001 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, Fla. The family expresses grateful appreciation to Dr. Thomas Johnson, Dr. Lowery and the entire staff of Sacred Heart Medical Oncology Group, who treated Zed with loving kindness. In lieu of owers, the family would be honored by donations in Zeds memory to Sacred Heart Foundation of the Emerald Coast, shf-emeraldcoast@ shhpens.org; or to Edge Elementarys Relay for Life Team 300 Highway 85 North Niceville, FL 32578 (Attn. Michelle McKain). Please make Relay for Life checks payable to The American Cancer Society. Zederick (Zed) Midgelow SStorey ZEDERICK SSTOREY George Austin Alexander, 73, passed away on Thursday morning, Nov. 10, 2011, at Bay Medical Center. He is survived by his spouse of 14 years, Rosmarie, and his stepson. He enjoyed living on the Forgotten Coast, where he met his wife vacationing at the Cape. George left this world peacefully and will be sorely missed.George A. Alexander GEORgGE A. ALEXaANDER Raymon Wilson Britt Willis (Webster, N.C.) died unexpectedly on Nov. 24, 2011 while visiting family in Port St. Joe, Fla. Ray, as she was known by family and friends, was born in Barrien County, Ky., to Raymond Porter Britt and Etta Smith Britt on Feb. 7, 1919. After graduation from Glasgow High School, Ray entered Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Ala. where she graduated in 1940. While teaching school in Greenwood, Fla, she met Robert Allen Willis and they were married in Glasgow in June 1941. While Robert Allen was serving as a U.S. Army ofcer during WWII, Ray lived in Spartanburg (S.C.), Columbus (Ga.), and Camp Blanding (FL). After WWII, they returned to Greenwood, Fla., where together they built a seed company into a cattle ranch that by 1975 became the largest and oldest registered aberdeen-angus herd in Florida. Following retirement, they enjoyed motor home travel throughout the United States and Canada. After moving to Webster they enjoyed the mountain environment, history, and the people of western North Carolina. Ray was an avid reader and member of the Sylva United Methodist Church, D.A.R. and bridge clubs. She especially enjoyed the weekly games of bridge with her close friends. She is survived by her son, Robert A. Willis (Charlotte), Port St. Joe, Fla.; daughter, Anne Willis Hudson (Russell), Taylors, S.C.; four grandchildren, ve greatgrandchildren, and her special poodle, Bo. Funeral services were at 10 a.m. ET, Monday, Nov. 28, in the Melton Funeral Home Chapel with burial to follow in Sylvas Fairview Cemetery. The family has requested that, in lieu of owers, donations be made to a favorite charity. Local services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. RRaymon Wilson Britt Willis Obituaries SSHaARE GODS RETIREmMENT PLaAN Are you praying for the lost? Does it bother you at all? Do you have family that isnt ready for Jesus to make His nal call? Are you doing your part? You pass lost folks every day. Do you tell them about Jesus, or help them out some other way? Your life should tell the story if Jesus lives within. Less sin will be apparent when youve been born again. If by chance youre not able, just give for those who can. There are missionaries who gladly share salvations plan. Many of these lost their life by sharing with the lost. God has blessed us so very much, that we too should share at any cost. Billy Johnson

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, December 1, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adoption of an Ordinance with the following title: AN ORDINANCE OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; IMPOSING A MANDATORY SURCHARGE OF THIRTY DOLLARS ($30) ON EACH NON-CRIMINAL OR CRIMINAL TRAFFIC VIOLATION; PROVIDING FOR THE USE OF SAID SURCHARGE; PROVIDING AUTHORITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL AND SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE The public hearing will be held during the Gulf County Board of County ComAll interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed OrCommission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and that for such purpose he/she may need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings made and which would include any evidence BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: WARREN YEAGER, CHAIRMAN REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS BID #1112-03The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive proposals from any MISDEMEANOR PROBATION SERVICES BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Empty Hopes. Empty Hearts. Empty Stockings.Thousands of families & individuals in our area are at-risk of going to bed hungry and empty-handed on Christmas.WANTTO MAKE A DIFFERENCE?Mail in the Empty Stocking Fund envelope inserted in todays paper to the Salvation Army or The News Herald with your contribution!The Empty Stocking Fund provides food and toy baskets to thousands of families in Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Holmes, and Washington counties. T YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS THE T IMES&CarrabelleApalachicola THESTAR YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR navigator is someone to answer questions, review the risk factors for breast cancer and offer guidance. Mammography imaging of the breast has proven to be the most effective way to detect breast cancer early. The American Cancer Society recommends annual mammograms for women over the age of 40. To schedule your screening, contact our centralized scheduling department at 2295802. About Sacred Heart Hospital on the GulfSacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf opened in 2010 to serve residents of Gulf, Franklin and Bay counties. The 25-bed facility in Port St. Joe features 24-hour emergency services, inpatient services, surgical services, a full complement of diagnostic and laboratory services, and a helipad to be used by Sacred Hearts regional air ambulance service to provide rapid transport for trauma or critically ill patients. The hospital is operated by Sacred Heart Health System based in Pensacola and a part of Ascension Health, the nations largest system of Catholic, not-for-profit healthcare facilities. For more information about Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, visit online at www. sacredheartonthegulf. org, nd us on Facebook or call (850) 2295600. About the Gulf County Health DepartmentThe Gulf County Health Department, in cooperation with its coapplicant, Saint Joseph Care of Florida, Inc, a Florida not-for-prot corporation, operates a federally qualied health center in Gulf County that provides primary care, dental care, pediatric care, obstetrics and gynecological care, and orthopedic care for patients in and around the Gulf County area. The partnership between Gulf CHD and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf strives to insure there are no gaps in care and services for this community. CENTER from page B1like mental retardation, but their IQs are very high, Hermsdorfer said. Their communication issues get in the way of showing what they know. Theyre all different, but the main issue is communications and social interactions. While there is no cure for autism, therapy can reduce the symptoms. Hermsdorfer founded The Growing Minds Center in 2008 alongside a group of parents with autistic children living in Port St. Joe. The school focuses on meeting students needs through Applied Behavior Analysis, the most widely-used treatment for autism. The center began as an afterschool program with ve students, operating out of a room at Long Avenue Baptist Church, and has since transformed into a full-day, year-round school program with its own building off Industrial Road. There are currently nine full-time students, and three students in the afterschool program, which takes place twice a week. The new building has eight rooms and 2,200 square feet, providing plenty of room for growth, and with an estimated one out of every 110 children affected by autism, the need for the center is also growing. We denitely want to get bigger, Hermsdorfer said. We want people to know that were here. Hermsdorfer recently applied for a grant to help fund a website and brochures for the school in order to lay out the options parents have for tuition aid for autistic students. As a certied private school, the center accepts state-funded McKay Scholarships for parents hoping to offset costs. However, no matter how much the school grows, Hermsdorfer plans on maintaining the 2-to-1 teacher-student ratio it operates on. Whenever we get two more kids, we hire somebody else, Hermsdorfer said. Well never get rich, but thats what it takes. Among their nine full-time students, Hermsdorfer employs one teacher, two tutors, a behavioral analyst and a graduate student. Each student is evaluated upon enrollment and assigned a specic learning plan, catered to their specic needs, so that any behaviors the student might have can be addressed. Hermsdorfer said behaviors often stem from not knowing the right means to get attention, resulting in yelling, noncompliance and inappropriate behavior. Once the student improves their communication skills, these behaviors often subside. Hermsdorfer keeps a le for each student, with meticulous data logged for each task they have mastered, struggled with or needed a prompt to achieve. If the learning plan doesnt show progress, it is changed. At The Growing Minds Center, the school day functions much differently than a public school environment. Students receive specialized one-on-one attention, rotating in 30minute blocks to different therapies, activities and lessons throughout the day. On a particular recent morning, Heaven and Christian are in the middle of a math lesson. Heaven plays with a panorama with toy horses as a reward. In another room, Sam works one-on-one with an instructor, focusing on his language skills. There are plastic letters scattered on the oor. Another student watches a life-skills video, and in the same room, two others don headphones as they complete typing programs. The center focuses on more visual and handson learning. Lessons often involve identifying pictures, completing math problems with tangible objects and conducting applied problem solving. They need things broken out into small pieces, Hermsdorfer said. It takes a lot of patience. You have to be willing to reinforce every little thing. The key to teaching children with autism, Hermsdorfer said, is plenty of patience and exibility. The instructors focus on using reinforcements in their teaching by giving students plenty of praise or by catering to their specic likes, (Harveys reinforcement is talking about weird food; for Sam, its animal drawings.) Students also participate in life-skills classes, which help them learn basic social skills like using a public restroom, identifying survival signs (like EXIT signs) and ordering lunch at a restaurant. The group recently took a eld trip to Hungry Howies, where the students learned how to order food at the counter, when to give the cashier the money and how to respond to any questions the cashier asked. The next eld trip will be either to the recycling center or the grocery store, Hermsdorfer said. Hermsdorfer hopes to be able to partner with local businesses in the future to provide job coaches for her older students interested in entering the workforce. With an estimated 200,000 autistic teens set to reach adulthood in the United States within the next ve years, Hermsdorfer said her ultimate goal for students is to have jobs and function in mainstream society. She said autism awareness in Gulf County has skyrocketed in the last three years alone. When Hermsdorfer moved to the area 13 years ago, little was known about the disorder. But since then, the spectrum has broadened and more and more children are being diagnosed at an early age. Most children are diagnosed around age 2, but Hermsdorfer has seen children diagnosed as young as 18 months. Overall, she said, the mission of the Growing Minds Center is to give autistic children the potential to thrive. The parents are really happy and theyre big supporters of what were doing, Hermsdorfer said. Wed just like to be able to help as many kids as we can. GROW from page B1

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, December 1, 2011By Roy Lee CarterCounty Extension Director Shrubs are very popular landscape plants in Florida, and its easy to see why. They require little maintenance, once theyre established, and usually have few disease problems. Occasionally, though, a fungus disease will attack shrubbery and when this happens, its important to know how to treat the diseased plants. This information was provided by retired extension plant pathologist Dr. Tom Kucharek of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. There are two types of shrub diseases: the soil-borne and the foliar. In this article, we will focus on the soil-borne diseases of ornamental shrubbery. If you choose healthy, vigorous plants to start with, disease problems will be greatly reduced. You might pay more for these plants, but the cheaper varieties, with little or no resistance to diseases, will usually end up costing you more in the long run. But what do you do if you buy a nice, healthy shrub, give it plenty of water and care, and a fungus disease problem still develops. Your rst step will be to identify the type of disease as either a soil-borne group, such as root rot and lower stem rots. The most common soil-borne disease on Florida shrubs is the mushroom root rot. You can identify this disease by scraping away some of the outer bark at the base of the main stem. If you nd a white fungus mat right under the bark, the shrub has mushroom root rot. As the disease spreads through the roots and lower stems, the plant will become less vigorous and branch die-back will occur. The plant may live for many years with this disease or it may die within a year or two. While you cant control the disease, youll improve the plants appearance by pruning out the dying branches. If you nd that you are making frequent cutting on the shrub, it may have to be removed. Before you plant another woody shrub in the same location, you should fumigate that soil with a good fungicide. If the diseased shrub was part of a hedge row, however, you should not use the fungicide because it will kill the roots of adjacent plants. Just let the remaining plants ll the empty space. You might want to consider turf or annual plants in place of the shrub, since they arent affected by mushroom root rot as the source of the problem, contact your local County Extension Ofce about sending a sample to IFAS Plant Pathologist Laboratory in Quincy or Gainesville. To review, remember that you will have fewer problems if you start your landscape with healthy vigorous plants. If you do see fungus disease symptoms, try to identify the problem as soil-borne or foliar. You really cant control a soil-borne disease short of removing the plant and fumigating the soil, but you can keep the plant as healthy as possible by cutting out the affected branches. 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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, December 1, 2011 The Star | B7 36699S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JANE VAN HEIDEN Deceased. File No. 2011-80-PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JANE VAN HEIDEN, deceased, Case Number 2011-80-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Rm 148, Port St. Joe FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against 36679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION BANK OF AMERICA N.A., Plaintiff, vs. STEVE HOUSEHOLDER, et al, Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 09000515CA DIVISION: NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 31, 2011 and entered in Case No. 09000515CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA N. A. is the Plaintiff and STEVE HOUSEHOLDER; TINA HOUSEHOLDER; WETAPPO PRESERVE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM ET, on the 15th day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 181 WETAPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 181 WIDE WATER CIRCLE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 14, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Gulf County Courthouse #850-229-6113 (TDD) Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10109690 December 1, 8, 2011 36677S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, VS. DAYLE FLINT, et al, Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 23-2010-CA-000486 DIVISION: NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 31, 2011 and entered in Case No. 23-2010-CA000486 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and DAYLE FLINT; TENANT # 1 N/K/A MELISSA HAUN, and TENANT #2 N/K/A TRAVIS WRIGHT are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 15th day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3 OF WOODMERE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 59, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 910 AVENUE A, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 14, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Gulf County Courthouse #850-229-6113 (TDD) Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10080535 December 1, 8, 2011 36671S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1112-02 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Sale of House -To Be Relocated 6909 Highway 71, White City Proposals must be turned in to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, December 16, 2011. The website www.gulfcounty-fl.gov also will have specifications. Interested parties should contact Michael Hammond for additional information at (850) 227-1124. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Bids will be opened at the above location on Monday, December 19, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Attest: Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Chairman December 1, 8, 2011 36122S VARIANCE NOTICE The City of Port St. Joe Planning and Development Review Board will hold a Meeting to discuss a Request for a Variance on December 20,2011, 4:00 EST, at the 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St Joe, Fl for Duren Family Limited Partnership located at 125 W. Hwy 98, Parcel #04596-050R. The reason for the request is Per Section 6.62 is requiring a Variance of Section 6.2.4 of the Sign Ordinance. The proposed plans can be reviewed at the Building Department located at 1002 10th St. and can be reached for questions at (850) 229-1093. All persons are invited to attend this meeting. Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Planning and Development Review Board with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Planning and Review Board of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing special accommodations to participate in these proceedings should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, (850)229-8261 Dec 1, 2011 36649S NOTICE OF DETERMINATION OF QUALIFICATION FOR EXEMPTION In the Matter of an Application for a Determination of Qualification for an Exemption by: Name: Jeffery & Candice Anderson File No. 0306311001EE Address: c/o Garlick Environmental Associates, Inc. Post Office Box 385 Apalachicola, FL 32329 County: Gulf County The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice that it has determined an exempt dock in St Joseph Bay, Class III, 119 Watermark way, Port St Joe, Fl 32456, in Section 16, Township 7 North, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, qualifies for an exemption. Based on the information sent to us, we have determined that this project is exempt from our Environmental Resource Permit requirements under: Section 373.406(6) of the Florida Statutes and Rule 62-346 of the Florida Administrative Code. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., before the deadline for filing a petition. On the filing of a timely and sufficient petition, this action will not be final and effective until further order of the Department. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that the Departments final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Pursuant to Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C., a petition for an administrative hearing must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action, including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the specific rules or statutes; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. The petition must be filed (received by the Clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Also, a copy of the petition shall be mailed to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. In accordance with Rule 62-110.106(3), F.A.C., petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 21 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), F.S. must be filed within 21 days of publication of the notice or within 21days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 21 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The failure to file a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that persons right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. Under Rule 62-110.106(4), F.A.C., a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline for filing a petition for an administrative hearing. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. Mediation is not available in this proceeding. The application is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Marjory Stoneman Douglas Building, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3000. December 1, 2011 36625S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA VISION BANK, Plaintiff, vs. STANLEY B. ROBERSON, Defendant. CASE NO.: 11-228 CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2011, entered in Case No. 11-228 CA in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein VISION BANK is Plaintiff, and STANLEY B. ROBERSON is Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on December 15, 2011, the following described Property situated in Gulf County, Florida, legally described as: LOT 8, BLOCK A OF TREASURE SHORES SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on November 14, 2011. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at Telephone 850/229-6112. Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 24, December 1, 2011 36046S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232008CA000231CA XXXX EMC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. WALTER JOSEPH LEVICK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WALTER JOSEPH LEVICK, IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, GULF AIRE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s). RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEIN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13, 2011 and an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 8, 2011. entered in Civil Case No.: 232008CA 000231CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein EMC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, and WALTER JOSEPH LEVICK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WALTER JOSEPH LEVICK, IF ANY, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; GULF AIRE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the Front Lobby of the Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 at 11:00 AM ET on the 26th day of January, 2012 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE POINT OF INTERSECTION ON THE NORTHEASTERN RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98 (S.R. #30) AND SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, AS SAME IS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF PORT ST. JOE BEACH, UNIT TWO, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 6 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 52 49 WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNARY LINE OF SECTION 32 FOR 22.105 FEET; THENCE NORTH 39 DEGREES 51 00 WEST ALONG SAID NORTHEASTERN R/W LINE 486.37 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 09 00 WEST FOR 66 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY R/W LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98; THENCE NORTH 39 DEGREES 51 WEST ALONG SAID R/W LINE 318.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID R/W LINE 18 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 09 WEST 27.71 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A COMMON WALL; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID COMMON WALL 36 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BEARING 167.20 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE WATERS EDGE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS EDGE 18 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A POINT SOUTH 50 DEGREES 09 WEST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 50 DEGREES 09 EAST 167.20 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A COMMON WALL; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID COMMON WALL 36 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BEARING 27.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on November 9, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire Popkin & Rosaler, P. A. 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard Suite 400 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 (954) 360-9030 Fax: (954) 420-5187 December 1, 8, 2011 Earn College Degree Online *Medical Business, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. 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