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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03821
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 11-24-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03821

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, NOVEMBER 24 2011 City manager Weston to retire in January By Tim Croft Star News Editor Port St. Joe city commission ers bought themselves some time without paying a dime last week. Commissioners decided last week to take title to the former Gulf Pines Hospital and land from the receiver in a federal bankruptcy case, reversing a de cision of two months ago. In effect, commissioners were buying time in order to deter mine whether the city can secure up to $90,000 in grant money from the U.S. Environmental Protec tion Agency for asbestos removal under the agencys Browneld clean-up program. The city will not know if it will receive those funds, which would cut dollars off the total cost of ac quiring and developing the Gulf Pines site, until spring. To apply for this grant, we must hold title to the property, said Mayor Mel Magidson. We do, of course, have other issues. Those would include the cost of demolition of the hospital and satisfying Internal Revenue Ser vice and county tax liens against the property. The city held a required public hearing to pursue the grant last week, and the public had until Tuesday to submit written com ments. There was no comment during the public hearing. City attorney Tom Gibson said the worst case scenario would be taking title and not being award ed the grant. At that point, the city still could walk away from the property without having ex pended a dime. However, taking title would buy the city time, Commissioner Rex Buzzett said, to pursue ad ditional grant funding, determine actual costs of demolition and, in general, have a clearer idea of what investment the city would have to make to develop the prop erty. I think there is not a lot of risk taking title, Gibson said. And we have to take title to apply for the grant. Gibson said it would be possi ble for the IRS to step in at some point to auction of the property but that the IRS still had signi cant hoops to jump through be Story and photos by Tim Croft Star News Editor The city of Port St. Joe held a soiree last Saturday for its very special guests its residents. The city held Community Apprecia tion Day on the grounds of the Centen nial Building, a morning of exercise, entertainment and games for the kids to express gratitude to residents after a very trying year. This is your community, and we want to say thanks to everybody, said city manager Charlie Weston. The day has gone real well, I think. I hope it con tinues to be an annual event. Roughly 200-250 people showed up to walk the Port City Trail there were plenty of walkers who completed all three designated loops and proudly displayed commemorative medals and hand stamps recognizing their effort and then bask in a few hours of en tertainment. There was a martial arts display from the local The Karate School and music from the Port St. Joe High Band of Gold. Booths lined the grounds extol ling the need for pet adoptions at the St. Joseph Humane Society and promot ing the various small businesses and organizations that helped sponsor the event. And to top it off, city elected ofcials and staff cooked, wrapped and distrib uted plenty of hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and drinks to the throngs who lined up. Oh, and by the by, the city also of cially dedicated the Port City Trail, more than four miles of designated hiking and bicycling trails that me ander through the city from the Port St. Joe Marina to Port St. Joe High School. When the nal phase is complete early next year, the trail will extend to the Gulf/ Franklin Center. If you havent been on that trail, you are missing something, said Mayor Mel Magidson, noting the trail was built entire ly with state grant dollars. It is a very pleasant, beautiful experience to walk the trail. Crafting for the community By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Colleen Ciochetto choked up as she approached the wreath she handmade and decorated with glittery sand dollars and an elaborate gold ribbon. For Ciochetto, the wreath represents an invaluable cause, one that is helping her 11-year-old nephew, Patrick, to overcome the obstacles of autism. On Dec. 3 her wreath will be rafed off, with the money raised benetting The Growing Minds Center, a nonprot school that provides education for Centennial Bank acquires Vision Bank locations By Randal Yakey Florida Freedom Newspapers Locally based Vision Bank will be come part of a larger banking con glomerate. Centennial Bank, a wholly owned subsidiary of Home BancShares Inc., has announced the signing of an agree ment to acquire all of the banking lo cations of Vision Bank, a subsidiary of the publicly traded Park National Cor poration. Visions main ofce is in Panama City. It has branches in Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe and St. Joe Beach. City to take title to Gulf PinesV ALERIE GARMA N | The Star This wreath, decorated by Holly Atkins, will benet People Helping People of Gulf County. T H A N K S City gives residents a little walk, a little food, much appreciation BELOW: Among the demonstrations was one from The Karate School of Port St. Joe. TOP: Want to show appreciation to kids? Pump up the jumpables. Above, by foot or by wheels, with canine or not, folks took to the Port City Trail to enjoy some outdoor recreation. City staff did the cooking and assembling of food. Y EAR 74, NUMBER 6 Opinion .....................................A4-A5 Outdoors ...................................A10 Sports .........................................A11-12 Community ...............................B1 Society .......................................B2 School News ..............................B3 Faith ...........................................B4 Classieds ..................................B7-B8 See CITY A8 See CRAFTING A9 See CENTENNIAL A8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 Invest in community, shop local this Saturday By Gail Alsobrook and Kristy Grove Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency and Gulf County Chamber of Commerce In our fast-paced, technologydriven lives, we often look back with nostalgia at bygone times and memories we hold dear. Throughout the country, people are hearkening to a time forgotten and largely lost; they yearn for authenticity a place much like Port St. Joe, whose charm captivates all who visit. Much of the authenticity and character of our city is fashioned and preserved through our smallbusiness community. Our Historic Downtown District is unique. Businesses are owned and managed by families those with passion for their work and love for their neighbors. They invest everything they have to succeed and serve their community. We regularly see three generations working together. It is so American, so small-town, so sincere, and it is what people are seeking. Charlotte Pierce, a member of the St. Joe Historical Society, said it well. More and more visitors are enjoying Historic Downtown Port St. Joe, Pierce said. Businesses have changed over the years, but the downtown has always been warm and welcoming to locals and visitors alike. There are many reasons to support local business, and while some are emotionally-based, others are simple economics: Supporting small business strengthens the community. Gulf County thrives on tourism, and the more successful our local businesses are, the more tourist dollars ow into our community. The more outside dollars, the more nancially stable we become. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, there were almost 28 million small businesses in the United States last year. Over the past two decades, they created 65 percent of the new jobs. For every $100 spent in locally-owned, independent stores, $68 returns to the community. Old Florida still is here. But it needs our patronage to continue, to attract new business, and to further strengthen our community. The windows are festive, the displays have been arranged with love, and the merchandise is poised for the holiday season. Help us celebrate our downtown on Small Business Saturday, which is Saturday. This day will give consumers an opportunity to support local businesses in Gulf County and will help boost the economy in small areas like our own. Recent studies show that dollars spent in small businesses invigorate neighborhoods just like Gulf County. Its exciting to see a movement like Small Business Saturday happening across the country. It shows that small business owners and small communities are valued, business owner Lorinda Gingell said. Small Business Saturday is getting recognition and support from major companies. For example, American Express is injecting $1 million into the economy by distributing Shop Small American Express gift cards for use at small businesses on Nov. 26 (30,000 are available through Facebook). On the Small Business Saturday page, there are many marketing tools that can be downloaded and used for the small-business owner for free. Port St. Joes Historic Downtown continues to grow and improve. In recent months a group of small business owners have formed the Downtown Merchants Committee, under the guidance of the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, to boost the awareness and revenue of all businesses in Port St. Joe through marketing campaigns and small events in the downtown area. The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency also is lending a helping hand through the ongoing facade grants program ($350,000 to date), maintaining the landscaping, and sponsoring the banner program that garnered a state-wide award for cultural enhancement. Wewahitchka is taking a step forward with the help of the local Chamber of Commerce and building a relationship of business owners by forming their own Downtown Merchant Committee. Looking forward to the future growth of our town, said Jerry Gaskin, vice president of Vision, about the committee. Gaskin has many generations of his family in Wewahitchka. Our small-business owners have always come together in the past but with the building of this new committee, it will allow new owners to see the support that they would have not only from the existing owners, but also from the Chamber of Commerce, Gaskin said. We encourage you to shop local every day and support Gulf County small businesses this Saturday. Lets be part of the movement that is raising the awareness about the important role that small businesses play. The Gulf County Chamber of Commerce and the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency wish you and yours a joyous holiday season, and we will see you downtown! Visit www. smallbusinesssaturday. com and http://facebook.com/ smallbsuinessaturday for more information on boosting your small business sales through social media on Nov. 27. To become an active member in the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Merchants Committee, call 227-1223 or visit gulfchamber. org to locate a list of the small businesses in the area. PHOTOS SP ECIAL TO T HE S TAR Shoppers stroll along Reid Avenue in Historic Downtown Port St. Joe. Below, the shops have changed, but Reid Avenue remains a hub for small businesses in Port St. Joe.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, November 24, 2011 2 nd Annual Forgotten Coast Warrior Weekend A 501-C3 Non Prot Corporation To all of our 2011 Patriotic Business and Organization Sponsors: SILVER SPONSORS Capital City Bank Centennial Bank Dockside Caf Dover Foundation EdgeWater Yamaha El Governor Motel Harts Marine & Outdoor MainStay Suites Sunset Coastal Grill BRONZE SPONSORS 98 Real Estate Group Bill Cramer Chevrolet Calcutta City of Mexico Beach Express Lane FairPoint Communications Joe Mamas Wood Fired Pizza Ladies Auxiliary VFW Post 10069 Port St. Joe Ling Ding 2011 Scallop Cove Semper Fi Sisters Sikorsky SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS FRIENDS OF THE EVENT GOLD SPONSOR Gulf County TDC PLATINUM SPONSOR BlueWater Outriggers VFW Post 10069 Port St. Joe Thank you all those who volunteered time and talent. We would like to sincerely thank all the individuals and businesses who participated in bringing this most worthwhile event to our area. Tax deductible contributions can be made to Forgotten Coast Warrior Weekend, P.O. Box 1022, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. If your business or organization donated and we failed to list your name, please contact our organization.

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Thursday, November 24, 2011 Life can be difficult, cruel and unfair. There are times when I want to talk to my Daddy, but he has been gone for more than ten years. I know what he would say; I know how he would say it. I can almost hear his voice. There are times I need to hear a Daddy voice. Today was one of those days. Who do I call? I decided to call the fellow who knew me when I was full of well, when I was full of myself. I called my high school football coach. He seemed to always know the right thing to say when the situation was difcult. It has been 30 years now since I donned the maroon for The Donoho School in Anniston, Ala. The situation was often difcult for our high school football team. I transferred to a small private school in the tenth grade from a large public high school football powerhouse. I went from a team that had no trouble dressing 80 -100 players to one that rarely could nd 20 bodies to put in a uniform. There was a reason. I wanted to play football for Coach Cliff Grubbs. My brother played for him, I wanted to play for him. The wins, the losses, they didnt matter. I appreciated the other things that Coach Grubbs had to offer. When the going got rough, he gave advice. Things like, Dont you have a chemistry test tomorrow? You dont need to be practicing football. He also taught me to throw spaghetti against the wall to see if it was done. Those were the fun things. Coach Grubbs also gave a lot of heart-toheart advice that a teenage boy needed to hear. Sometimes I didnt know what he was saying until I really thought about it. He made a difference, and he still does. I was disappointed when I rst called Coach Grubbs, who is 85 and retired to the Florida Panhandle. He didnt answer the phone, I was concerned. Knowing that he was in poor health, I thought the worst. Coach never quit on us, even when the score was a whole lot to nothing (us being the nothing). He never quit. About an hour later, my phone rang. He said, This is Clifford Grubbs, I got a call from this number. I said, Aw Coach, its me. He perked up and asked me all the normal questions you would expect him to ask. Coach asked about my job, where I was living, the children and how some of the other fellows were. We made small talk and he made a comment about how much I always livened things up. This comment was his nice way of saying that he remembered how I really was (without going into details). After the small talk, Coach Grubbs told me what I already knew. He told me about the cancer. He told me how they had cut him open and just sewed him back up. We discussed that a little and he noted that he was 85 and had lived a wonderful life. It was more than I could take, I couldnt hold it together. But Coach Grubbs just kept on talking, just like he used to when a teenage boy would sit crying in his ofce. He understood (and so did I). We nished and then he hit me with the only thing I really needed to hear. He said, I love you. I said, Coach, I love you. Later in the day, I was looking at my wall at a black and white copy of an Auburn Mississippi State game summary from 1947. I realized what the day was. It was Nov. 8, 2011. The dateline on the game summary was from Nov. 8, 1947. I found it years ago on the internet and put it on my wall. I had to call him back. I said, Coach, do you know what today is? He said, Its the 7th, no its the 8th of November. I asked him, Where were you on Nov. 8, 1947? Before he had a chance to answer, I started reading the excerpt on In some ways Thanksgiving 2011 is not much different from the Pilgrims landing on a craggy slab of Massachusetts coastline long ago. The Pilgrims of four centuries ago were facing a world they knew nothing just as the current economic environment seems a scary landscape which many of us are not wholly familiar. For the Pilgrims, most anything that could have gone wrong on their journey from religious intolerance to the New World did. It was Murphys Law applied exponentially. Beyond the miles they had been willing to foray on foot from the sea and their ship, they knew nothing of this land they had landed upon, nothing of what and who might be there. In fact, initially the thought never seemed to have crossed their minds that there would be anybody there. The ground was not suitable for crops, at least not with the rudimentary tools they carried and their lack of knowledge of the soil. The viability of what they knew to grow back home in Europe was in question. Game seemed scarce. The weather conditions atrocious, even for hardy men and women of the English and Dutch stock they were. They were literally in an unknown world. By the standards of the day, they had essentially traveled to the Moon. How that seems familiar to the environment of today, a different sort of rocky terrain. Unemployment continues to hover near 10 percent, and the unemployment rate does not even capture those who for various reasons cannot or will not seek employment in a business climate buffeted by forces that seem as with those Pilgrims beyond our control. Political ssions, religious ssions, the growing chasm between those who must worry about whether there will be food on the table that night and those who dont they all serve to divide, just as the harsh conditions at times came to divide the men and women of the Mayower. There is much to make us anxious. This will be a difcult Thanksgiving hardly a holiday for far too many. But the Pilgrims were taught a valuable lesson by the Native Americans savages as the Pilgrims initially saw them who inhabited those shores of the bay in which the Mayower ultimately anchored for safe harbor. For while these men and women werent big on modesty in their dress, and talked and behaved in ways foreign to the Pilgrims, they were also large-of-heart human beings no matter the color. What is barely understood, is explained by Nathaniel Philbrick in his book Mayower. Philbrick says while there might have been a feast of some kind on a date sometime near the end of the Pilgrims rst year in the New World, it was a product of a bond of community that had been formed. Thanksgiving, and they did not know it as that and it would not become a holiday for centuries after that 1620s sit down, was for the Pilgrims something that was played out over more than 24 hours. The previous winter, their very existence was in the balance. The Native Americans could have easily killed them, just as the weather and disease depleted their ranks. Instead, those Native Americans would teach the newcomers about the land they had they had come to, about hunting, shing and farming. They taught the Pilgrims survival. In turn, instead of choosing arrogant isolationism in their new quarters, the Pilgrims reached out to the Native Americans, establishing a bartering system, sleeping in their wigwams, choosing to learn, coming to understand these were just human beings. Only later, when territory became an issue, did tension and ultimately bloodshed come to those rst Anglo-Saxon arrivals. So today, hopefully, is a day to put aside the loose ends of life which isolate and divide us to remember the things that bring us together. The community that exists in this county emerges during the toughest of times and this year will be no different. There is North Florida Child Development and Gulf Correctional Institution providing refurbished or new bicycles for needy youngsters. There are the Kiwanis Club and Lions Club which provide precious food for those who might be without a feast on the coming day of feasts. There is the slew of volunteers who will spend their holidays providing sustenance and cheer to literally hundreds who would otherwise be without a warm meal and fellowship on a day all about warm meals and fellowship. And a Sheriffs Ofce with a mission of meeting the Christmas wishes of needy children in the county. That is just a sampling a small sampling of what a unique and special community Gulf County can be when the sledding is most difcult. The Pilgrims discovered, even in their most dire of circumstances, they were not alone. Our hope on this day is that understanding the value of that sense of community today can make a difference in all our lives. CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Remembering The matress kid TIM CROFT Star news editor Thanksgiving offers hope Im thankful for those soldiers who hung with Washington on Christmas Day, 1776. Im especially thankful for the ones who wrapped burlap bags around their feet in lieu of boots and walked the nine miles in the dead of night through a snowstorm to cross the ice cold Delaware River and surprise the Hessian troops in Trenton, New Jersey. Listen, the Continental Army, along with Americas chance of survival, was down to its last strike. That one victory by a rag-tag group of mists sparked hope in a desperate nation. We are here because they were there! And youd better believe there wasnt anything rag-tag about their hearts.or their dreams! I dont know about you, but Ive spent my Christmases opening presents, feasting on turkey and dressing and watching Its A Wonderful Life on TV. Ive never wrapped a burlap bag around a foot in my entire life. I have not braved a frozen river at night in the middle of a snow storm. And it has never crossed my mind to bust open a door and stick a bayonet in the face of a brigade of hired soldiers from Germany. Thanksgiving in this land comes in many shapes, forms and fashions. Im thankful we grew up without any money. We skipped all kinds of trouble because we couldnt afford to get into it. Now it didnt really bother us..its hard to miss what you didnt have. And our love, laughter and joy was not bought or for sale; it was real and genuine. Materialistically, we were blessed with nothing, but that is exactly what we needed at the time! No tellin how Leon, David Mark and I would have ended up if we had been tempted by all the trappings that come with the burden of where to throw your extra money. Im thankful for the guy who added the words Under God to the Pledge of Allegiance back in 1954. Of course, I didnt think so at the time. I had just spent my rst grade year learning it sans the Creator reference. And low and behold, I show up for the second grade and Miss Dorothy explained that they had added some extra words. We had to get up and recite the pledge every morning! It was going to take some doing if they kept changing the thing. None of us realized at the time how God was going to come under such attack in our nation one day. Im thankful for a tall, skinny Chicago Bear football player named J. C. Caroline. As a kid I was drawn to him because he didnt have a rst name and he played hard on every snap. When wed choose up sides for the big game out in the front yard, Leon would be Johnny Unitas. The other teams quarterback would line up as Bart Star. Jim Brown, Lance Alworth and Dick (Night Train) Lane were usually in the game. I picked J. C. every time. It didnt mater if I was on offense or defense. It didnt matter the score, the weather conditions or the game situation at any particular moment. J. C. Caroline gave me somebody to be! Im thankful I was born south of the MasonDixon Line. This is not a slam at any of our northern neighbors. Im sure they will defend their birthplace just as ardently. Im just partial to yall and aw shucks. There is something special about Memphis barbeque, Darlington racing, Alabama football, Georgia peaches (and the fruit is not bad either), Nashville music, Lewis Gizzards columns and Mayberry. I appreciate the slower pace. I like those Magnolia lined drive ways up to the big house. Im thankful we vote conservative. We proudly close our courthouses for Memorial Day and the Fourth of July. And if God hadnt intended us to hunt, He wouldnt have put so many deer in the forest. Im thankful for CocaCola. Thats my drink of choice. Bad for you, you say! You could be right. But I grew up on milk. And more milk. And then, a little more milk. I reckon I was pretty healthy in my formative years. We got a coke out at the end of Stonewall Street about once every three months. It WAS the real thing! What a special treat. I told Mom on many occasions that one day Id have money of my own and that I was going to drink a Coca-Cola every day! I fully realize that the coke taste today is not the same as those little six ounce bottles from the past. Nevertheless, I have tried to faithfully live up to the promise I made Mom those many years ago. Just a little culinary tip for you this Thanksgiving, Coca-Cola goes especially good with giblet gravy and asparagus casseroles. Im thankful Buster Brown died. At least, I dont have to put my feet into those concrete boxes he perpetrated on the youth of America for all those years. Im thankful one-a-day multiple vitamins took the place of cod liver oil. Im thankful kids today are wearing jeans with multiple rips and tears in them. It takes a little of the embarrassment out of the iron on patches I had to endure on my Tuf Nut jeans back in elementary school. Im thankful for a Sovereign Being that lets me be me. Im thankful for friends and family that overlook my shortcomings and outright idiotic things that unwittingly spring from my brain. Im thankful for older folks that have shown me the way. Im thankful for the younger generation that shares their enthusiasm with us. Im thankful for every American veteran we saluted just a couple of weeks ago. Thanksgiving, dont get me started! And if you have read down this far, Im also very thankful for you. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert More than a turkey once a year See CRANKS A5 OpinionA4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINGS USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S A5 | The Star my wall to him. With injuries still forcing men to remain on the bench, Auburns crippled team, led by sophomores Clifford Grubbs and Johnny Liptak, battled Mississippi State furiously before losing a 14-0 ball game. The Tigers, who entered the game a four touchdown underdog, played gallantly to hold the score down. Grubbs looked terric in the ground-gaining department and Liptak, who caught six passes, was the outstanding lineman on the eld. Harper Davis, States eet halfback, was the thorn in Auburns side as he reeled touchdown runs of 22 and 50 yards to give the victory to the Maroon eleven. Coach started laughing. He said, Oh, yes. He then told me the story, a story he had never told me. I had no idea. Im from Alabama, Im an Alabama fan. However, let it be known that my favorite college football player is The Mattress Kid, who played for Auburn University in the 1940s. Not Cam Newton, Bo Jackson or Pat Sullivan, but Clifford Grubbs The Mattress Kid. It was around 1940; Clifford Grubbs was 14-years-old and on his own. He had left home, we didnt discuss why. People would see him in Chewacla State Park near Auburn, Alabama toting a mattress (his home). They called him The Mattress Kid. In the summer, he would lifeguard at the state park, sleeping in the park under the stars at night. Coach Grubbs noted, There was shelter when it rained or got cold. In the summer before his senior season at Auburn High School, he was lifeguarding at the state park, living on his mattress. He was approached by the Auburn Police and folks from Auburn University. I knew I was caught and in trouble, Coach Grubbs remembered. They were going to make me leave the park. Evidently, Clifford Grubbs was one of the best high school running backs in the south, playing for Auburn High School. He had been offered scholarships by many of the prominent football powers in the south. The policemen and the school ofcials had come to get him; they wanted him to play football at Auburn (a year early). The university helped him nish out his high school credits that summer, and he entered as a 17-year-old freshman at Auburn University in 1943. I didnt ask him what happened to the mattress. Due to World War II, Auburn didnt eld a team in 1943, but they did in He stayed at Auburn for a couple of years and then joined the war effort as a paratrooper in January of 1945. Clifford Grubbs came back to play for Auburn University in 1947 and on one cold and wet Nov. 8 Saturday afternoon at historic Legion Field in Birmingham, Ala., Clifford Grubbs and the outmatched Auburn Tigers battled Mississippi State furiously. It was a rough year for Auburn football, but that thought of my coach ghting and being a four-touchdown underdog keeps me going. He caught an amoeba infection serving overseas and a bum knee slowed him down when he came back to play in 1947 but he never quit. Hes just that way. Clifford Grubbs went on to coach high school football in Florida and Alabama, making a stop for a number of years at a little school in Anniston, Ala. where he had one perfect season in 1978, a few good ones and more than a few mediocre and losing seasons. Im here to tell you that my coach is not dened by wins, trophies or having elds named after him. I remember him because he cared. Once again, after the second phone call, he told me he loved me. I cried. I cried because I had the joy of playing for one of the toughest men ever to strap on a helmet for Auburn University, who would listen, who cared, who knew how to tell when spaghetti was done and who genuinely loves me. Roll Tide and War Eagle. Now you know the story of The Mattress Kid. You can nd more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. CRANKS from page A4 Thursday, November 24, 2011 From Melanie Taylor Gulf County Extension Service During the holiday season, consumers are buying turkeys for that big family meal. Everyone wants to nd the perfect bird, but cooking it properly is even more important. These tips can help you create a safe and delicious meal. Buying & Storing Fresh and frozen birds differ in cookinf and storage time, but not in taste or quality. If you like to buy your turkey ahead of time, try a frozen bird. If you have limited storage space, you may prefer a fresh turkey. When buying a whole turkey, estimate one pound of turkey for each person. Fresh Turkey Fresh turkeys can be kept in the refrigerator for only one or two days, but after that, they must be cooked or frozen. Store a fresh turkey in a pan in the refrigerator until you are ready to cook it. (Always keep raw animal products separated from ready-to-eat food products.) Frozen Turkey Leave the turkey in the original packaging and keep it frozen until you are ready to cook it. Unless you thaw the turkey in the refrigerator, you will not be able to refreeze it once it has thawed. Frozen turkeys should be cooked within one year for best quality. Pre-Stuffed Turkeys Do not buy pre-stuffed fresh turkeys. These turkeys can contain harmful bacteria if handled improperly. If you do want your turkey to be pre-stuffed, purchase a frozen pre-stuffed turkey that is marked with USDA or State inspection seals. Do not thaw pre-stuffed frozen turkeys before cooking. Thawing In the Refrigerator The safest way to thaw a frozen turkey is in the refrigerator. Keep the turkey in its original packaging, and place a pan underneath to catch any drips. Allow for a thawing time of 24 hours for every four to ve pounds of turkey. Once the turkey has thawed, it can be kept in the refrigerator for one to two days. In the Kitchen Sink For a quicker thawing method, submerge your turkey in the kitchen sink. Put the turkey in a heavy freezer bag and close it tightly. Place it in a clean sink and ll the sink with cold water until the turkey is completely submerged. Change the water every half hour to keep it cool. The turkey should thaw for about 30 minutes per pound. You need to cook a sink-thawed turkey immediately after thawing. It cannot be refrigerated or refrozen. In the Microwave If the turkey will t, you can use a microwave for fast thawing. Check the microwave owners manual for the recommended power level and amount of time per pound. Remove all packaging and place the bird in a microwavesafe dish. Cook the turkey immediately after thawing. It is not safe to refrigerate or refreeze a microwave-thawed turkey. Preparation Prevent Cross-Contamination Carefully open any packaging covering the turkey and dispose of it right away. Wash any surfaces that the meat, juices or packaging might have touched, including refrigerator or freezer shelves. If you use the kitchen sink to thaw the turkey, be sure to drain and sanitize the sink immediately afterward. If you thaw any raw meat in the microwave, sanitize it as well. When handling fresh and frozen raw meat, wash your hands, utensils, dishes and kitchen surfaces frequently with hot, soapy water. Use separate knives and cutting boards when preparing the turkey and stufng. Early Preparation Some people prefer to cook their turkeys a day or two in advance. Once the bird has been cooked, carve it and refrigerate the meat in small, shallow containers. The wings, legs and thighs may be left whole. You can also refrigerate the juices that collect in the bottom of the pan during cooking. On the day you plan to eat the turkey, reheat the meat in an oven heated to at least 325 degrees. Cooking Stufng To save time, you can prepare the stufng ingredients in advance. Keep wet and dry ingredients separate and the wet ingredients refrigerated until just before you cook the stufng. The safest way to make stufng is to cook it separately, not inside the turkey. If you do choose to stuff the turkey, pack the stufng loosely and cook the turkey immediately afterwards. Remove the stufng from the turkey about 20 minutes after the turkey is done cooking. Frozen Turkey You can safely cook a frozen turkey without thawing it rst. A frozen bird will take longer to cook than a thawed or fresh turkey. Remove the giblets with tongs or a fork while the turkey is cooking. Remember to not thaw pre-stuffed frozen turkeys before cooking. Fresh or Thawed Turkey Be sure to remove the giblets immediately after thawing. Giblets should be cooked separately. Preheat the oven to at least 325 degrees. Place the turkey in a shallow roasting pan. The inside temperature of the turkey must reach 165 degrees in order for it to be safe to eat. You may cook the turkey to a higher temperature if desired. Use a food thermometer to check the temperature at the thickest part of the turkey breast and at the innermost part of the thigh and wing. Even if your turkey comes with a pop-up thermometer, double-check the temperature with a food thermometer. Cook an unstuffed turkey for approximately 15 minutes per pound. Allow a few extra minutes per pound for a stuffed turkey. Cooking the turkey uncovered will give it a roasted avor, but it can also dry out the meat. Put the turkey in an oven-cooking bag for more tender meat and faster cooking. Follow the manufacturers directions on the bag. Other options include pouring half a cup of water into the bottom of the pan or covering the turkey with the roasting pan lid or aluminum foil. Covering the turkey will reduce oven splatter and overbrowning. After removing the turkey from the oven, let it stand for 15 20 minutes before carving to allow the juices to settle. Leftovers Your turkey and other cooked foods will need to be eaten within two hours. After that time, leftovers should be refrigerated or thrown away. (If the temperature is over 90 degrees, food needs to be refrigerated or disposed of after one hour.) Leftover meat should be eaten within three to four days; gravy, within one to two days. You can also freeze leftovers, but make sure you eat them within six months. Turkey leftovers may be eaten cold or reheated in the oven or microwave. The oven should be heated to at least 325 degrees. Follow the owners manual instructions for reheating turkey in the microwave. For more questions on turkey or other holiday foods, contact your local Extension Ofce, visit the USDA website, or call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-674-6854. Adapted and excerpted from: Countdown to the Thanksgiving Holiday, USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (11/2010). Lets Talk Turkey, USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (1/2011). Member Board naughty nice Start With bbb.org | Start With Trust Holiday cooking: turkey food safety Opinion

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 Local The Star| A7 Thursday, November 24, 2011 Happy Thanksgiving from everyone here at Tim, Valerie, Joel, Kari & Gai l The weather has cooled, the leaves are changing... shore-ly its almost Christmas!!!! New arrivals on Coastal Decor & Maritime Antiques Expanded Jewelry Selection Layaway & Gift Certicates Available We Ship Anywhere!!! 15% Off through-out store on items $20.00 and over Friday & Saturday!!! Items marked Firm excluded! Join us for refreshments Renees homemade Italian Cookies and Hot Cocoa!!! Bay Breeze Antiques 218-220 Reid Avenue, Beautiful Downtown Port St Joe, FL 850-229-7774 Sweet Grass Dairy Cheeses Available for the Holiday s LO CAL ART www.josephscottage.com SPECIAL ORDER BOOK S AND HAVE WITHIN 2 DAY S save time and gas (as featured on Good Morning America) CLOSED WEDNESDAY N OV 23 RD AT 12PM R E-OPEN M ONDAY N OV 28 TH AT 8AM 106 Reid Ave Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850)227-9555 The Gift Shop at PORT ST. JOE MARINA is your headquarters for Christmas shopping this year! 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL. (850) 227-9393 Store Hours: Monday thru Sunday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST Black Friday Christmas Sale 25% off Entire Purchase (Excluding Clearance Rack) Register for a $100.00 Gift Certicate To Be Given Away Saturday, December 3rd Come by and check out our Gift Ideas, or you can NOW go online at www.psjmarina.com and do your Christmas Shopping. B EST PRICES IN TOWN ON C O LU MBIA S PORTSWEAR Z EPRO BE L TS -L EAT H ER COTTON BRAI D OR F IS H PRINT NO V E L T Y ITEMS JEWE L R Y, NI C KNAC K S G I F T C ERTI F ICATES AV AI L AB L E PSJM CAPS V ISORS CO FF EE C U PS COO Z IES B U RGEES CAR TAGS PSJM T S H IRTS AN D GO LF S H IRTS Persnickety has gone Gobble Gobble Crazy! Friday & Saturday after Thanksgiving Only Hours 10-6 Buy 1 get a second identical vinyl monogram FREE Adorable Monogrammed Tote Bags $10.00 All Jeans $38.00 Shiraleah Purses and Wallets 40% off Clear Glass Initial ornaments Buy 1 get 1 free Christmas napkin holders with napkin $5 00 Sweaters & Sweater Dress 40% off Game Day Clothes 50% off All Splurge Clothes 60% off Cotton Colors Happy Everything 25% off Buy 1 get 1 free initial napkins All Boots buy 1 get 1 40% off Stephen Joseph 25% off All Baby clothes 25% off All Jewelry 40% off (Excludes: Marianna, Engraved Items, Graceware) Make Your Own Sugar Scrub, Lotion, and Lip Gloss Package Gift Certicate only $15.00! F RIDAY ON LY Stripe Monogrammed Scarves Only $15.00 1 REG U LAR PRICED ITEM 40% Off (limited 1 per customer) SHACK FRIDAY SALE 5:3OAM 202 Reid Ave, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.9414 DOORS OPEN AT Dealer

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 fore an auction could take place. There is also a Tampabased company that holds a delinquent tax certicate, but for the company to ap ply for a tax deed, it would have to satisfy other debt ors with claims to the prop erty, specically the IRS and county. The company would still be left with demolishing the building and asbestos abatement. We are the only entity that really has a dog in this ght, Magidson said. City manager Charlie Weston said all indications are that the city has a good chance of securing the competitive grant funds from EPA, and Magidson said conversations with Board of County Commis sioners chairman Warren Yeager and Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton had indicated they would work with the city on owed tax es. The school district and county, Magidson said, seemed willing to wait until the sale of the land by the city to recoup the delin quent taxes. Commissioner Bo Pat terson was the lone dis senting vote. My only concern is our coming up with a loss at the end, Patterson said, acknowledging that the city was not putting out any money at this time and had time to go all-in or disown any interest in the proper ty. I promised the taxpay ers not to spend one more dime than we had to. Even with the $90,000 grant, the city is looking at a potential decit of as much as $200,000 between developing the property and what it might bring on the open market. However, the numbers could easily change by spring, when any announcement of a grant award would come, several commissioners noted. Commissioners unani mously voted to rezone the land, once title is secured, from public use to singlefamily residential in keep ing with the surrounding neighborhood. Weston announces retirement An emotional Weston, his voice halting on several occasion as he battled his emotions, read a prepared statement at the end of last weeks meeting announc ing that he would be retir ing when his contract ex pires in January 2012. He last day with the city, he said, would be Jan. 15, 2012. Weston has been with the city for four years. He said he was proud of the work performed over the four years which included straightening out the citys nancial plight, overseeing a host of large infrastruc ture projects and address ing issues of water quality but said the toll on his family has been signicant. Noting that he had ve children and eight grand children living in North Car olina, Weston said he was at a point in life where it most important to spend more time as a grandfather than a city manager. Commissioner Bill Ken nedy said the last four to ve years have been among the most active in the citys history, and Magidson said Joey Ginn, chairman of Vision Bank, said he expects Centen nial to be aggressive in the Pan handle market. Centennial is looking to grow, and they are looking for addition al acquisitions, Ginn said. He also said Park National Corporation, Visions parent company, had been looking for a buyer for Vision for some time. Park, who we merged with back in 07, over the years decid ed to concentrate on their back yard (Ohio), and they went to look for a buyer, Ginn said. According to Centennial Bank, this is a strategic expansion for Home BancShares and Centen nial Bank by acquiring 17 bank locations in the Florida Panhan dle and Baldwin County, Ala. In the Panhandle, Centennial Bank will now have eight branches in Bay County, ve in Gulf County, four in Franklin County and one each in Calhoun, Santa Rosa and Walton counties. Centennials parent company, Home BancShares Inc., is a bank holding company based in Con way, Ark. Florida State University eco nomics professor Milton Marquis said the sale follows a trend. The larger banks have been swallowing up the smaller ones for about 15 years now, Mar quis said. Most of the time it is because the smaller banks are holding too much debt. Marquis also said there have been backlashes against larger banks. Some people do get upset about their local bank going away, Marquis said. Ginn said the Centennial pur chase would increase access for customers. There will be more branches for our customers, and it will be easier for our customers to bank, Ginn said. Ginn went on to say there are no personnel changes in the works, but he would not rule out any in the future. Centennial Banks Florida Regional President Tracy M. French said Centennial would do everything it could to make the transition smooth for bank cus tomers. French said he is looking at the acquisition as an invest ment in the community. It is going to be good for all involved, French said. Centennial Bank plans to purchase only the banking loca tions, along with the majority of the performing loans and related other assets, the company re ported. All of the deposits and other related liabilities will also be as sumed by Centennial, the com pany reported. Vision will retain the remain ing performing loans, along with all nonperforming loans and other real estate owned at clos ing. Centennial said it expects to obtain performing loans of ap proximately $378.6 million and approximately $535 million of deposits. The acquisition is expected to be effective in early 2012. Finan cial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Centennial Bank now has branch ofces throughout Flor ida, from the Keys through the Panhandle and into southern Alabama. Until Centennial Bank and Vision Bank convert to a single operating system, which is an ticipated to occur in April 2012, Centennial and Vision custom ers should continue to do busi ness at their current Centennial or Vision branches. Customers of both banks, however, will be able to use Centennial and Vision ATMs free of charge in the near future, bank ofcials said. Home Bancshares Inc. claims $3.8 billion in assets. the Port St Joe Star on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @ PSJ_Star for daily local news updates & photos! Like -Flat screen T.V s -Modern, comfortable seating -Amazing photography of Port St. Joe... and much more!! 2041997 CITY from page A1 CENTENNIAL from page A1 See CITY A9

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Local The Star| A9 Thursday, November 24, 2011 A-1 Quality Docks & Boatlifts Qualied Marine Contractor, Since 1967 Why Settle For Less 850-653-7633 Environmental Permitting www.A1QualityDocks.com Docks Marinas Piers Bulkheads Boardwalks Boatslips Pile Driving Sea Walls Boat Lifts Retaining Walls Boathouses Floating Docks Larry Joe Colson Lic # 12-104 Res./Com. & Ins. children with developmental and behavioral challenges. Hes high-functioning enough to know that hes different, Ciochetto said, brushing a tear off her cheek. The center has just helped him so much. Its just so wonderful, and its such a growing need. Ciochettos wreath, along with 11 others, is hanging in the lobby at FairPoint Communications, each handcrafted to make a difference. With each wreath representing a different charity, FairPoint employees are hoping to donate $1,500 to local nonprot organizations this holiday season. The wreaths will be displayed at City Commons Park during the Christmas on the Coast celebration Dec. 3 on Reid Avenue and rafed off by the end of the night. Rafe tickets are $1 apiece or $5 for six and are available at the FairPoint Business Ofce, where the wreaths will be on display until Dec. 2. FairPoint associate Donna White said the employees did not simply draw names from a hat when deciding which charity to sponsor. Rather, each employee chose something they are passionate about. Georgia Baggett chose to sponsor Second Chance of Northwest Florida, a nonprot serving the needs of adults with traumatic brain injuries and their families, in honor of a co-worker whose daughter suffered a severe head injury. Robin Gautiers wreath will benet the Gulf County Senior Citizens Center, a place she feels really needs the extra help as the funding received from the state and federal government gets slashed more and more. Theyre constantly getting their funding cut for different things, Gautier said. Sometimes they plan eld trips and have to cancel because they dont have enough money. I just thought it would be nice for them to get a little holiday treat. Susan Machemer chose to jointsponsor the Dyslexia Research Institute and the High School High Tech program at Port St. Joe High School, organizations FairPoint is involved in through various work-study and internship programs with students from Port St. Joe High School. Her wreath, adorned with shells picked straight from St. Josephs Bay, will benet the local Gulf County students involved in these programs. Weve been very active with that group through the high school, Machemer said. We are very passionate about helping local students. This is FairPoints second year organizing the Festival of Wreaths. Last year the employees raised $924 for local nonprots, and the hope is to at least double that amount this year. We pulled this together within a week last year, and we donated more than $900 to the charities, White said. We were quite proud of ourselves for such lastminute work. It really just fell together. The Festival of Wreaths was a brainstorming effort by FairPoints Community First Team, a group that focuses on projects that help give back to the community. Wed like to grow this to be bigger and better every year, Machemer said. The Community First Team has held bake sales to benet United Way, participated in Relay for Life and Ghosts on the Coast, held various food drives and participated in school volunteer and internship programs. The Festival of Wreaths is just another way for the group to give back to nonprot organizations in the community. Other nonprots the employees chose to sponsor include United Way of Calhoun County, Advocates for Children in Panama City, the Refuge House in Perry, Gulf County Relay for Life, Gulf County People Helping People and the Franklin County Humane Society. For more information, contact Donna White at 229-7251. CITY from page A8 Weston could take pride in a job well done. At some point you will be able to look back with pride on what the city has accomplished during your time here, Magidson said. The city will immediately advertise the po sition in hopes of having a new city manager on board before Weston leaves for a seamless transition. Flushing program A complete ush of the citys water distribu tion system began Nov. 1 and has progressed through Oak Grove and Highland View, Public Works supervisor John Grantland said. The work will move to White City on Nov. 28 there will be no ushing during the Thanks giving holiday week and by the rst of year be in St. Joe Beach headed toward the city proper. There have been no surprises we didnt expect, and we are on target, Grantland said. Shortly after the rst of the year, work will begin on the rst phase of pipe replacement in the system. The rst phase will be replace ment of some eight miles of galvanized steel pipe as well as some valves to allow unidi rectional ushing of the entire system, as re quired by the state. Grant press Weston said staff is undertaking a full-court press in pursuing grant funding for a variety of initiatives. He said he had a laundry list of possible grants the city could pursue and said staff would be investigating all possibilities in preparation for application periods after the rst of the year. Buzzett specically requested staff look into any grants to improve the acoustics of the Centennial Building. The acoustics are terrible, Buzzett said. It is as close to a civic center we have. It is historical and there are a lot of events held there. Itd be a great thing for the city. Its a great building, and I think it is important for the city. CRAFTING from page A1 FairPoint Communications employees are raising money for local charities this holiday season with their second annual Festival of Wreaths. The group will rafe off a selection of handmade wreaths at the Christmas on the Coast celebration Dec. 3. VALERIE GARMAN | The Star

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters WAS $69.99 BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL $46.99 L IMITED ST O CK OPEN @ 6:00 A.M. E ASTERN TIME MO ULTRIE 6.5 HANGING GAME F EEDER W ITH DIGITAL TIMER Thursday, November 24, 2011 Muzzleloaders have seen radical change in guns By Stan Kirkland Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Just a few decades ago, a segment of the hunting population who wanted to extend their time to hunt deer purchased a muzzleloader. However, the models used in the 1970s and s are a far cry from most of the muzzleloaders sold today. Early models were generally side-hammer, percussion cap models and used either black powder or a black powder substitute as the propellant. Granted, some purists in those days still used intlock models, but intlocks were tricky to operate on good days and virtually impossible to shoot on rainy, inclement days. The side-hammer, percussion cap models were a lot simpler to re. Assuming the user rst poured powder down the barrel and then seated a lead ball or projectile (hence the name muzzleloader), the gun was almost ready to re. To make it ready for ring, the hunter had to place a small percussion cap on a metal nipple outside the barrel. If everything worked correctly, the hunter pulled the trigger, dropping the hammer on the percussion cap, which then sent sparks and re into the barrel. That caused the black powder to instantly burn and turn to gas, which sent the bullet out the barrel and toward a waiting deer. Almost all of the older muzzleloaders had iron sights and were effective up to 75 yards. In the hands of a knowledgeable and skilled muzzleloading hunter, the sidehammer muzzleloaders worked well, and many, many deer were harvested with them. However, they sometimes failed to re, for a variety of reasons, and many deer ran off to live another day. Since the 1990s, a new and different muzzleloader, referred to as an inline, has become the standard for muzzleloading hunters. Though inlines still load the same as other muzzleloaders, they are radically different. They use a modern shotshell primer thats in line with the barrel, so less can go wrong and result in a misre. Todays inlines are precision guns. and many come pretapped for scopes. These guns are effective up to 200 yards. A hunter with an inline can cover distances on a eld or a food plot that years ago would have only been possible with a centerre hunting rie. Today, Florida is divided into four zones for hunting purposes. Most of the Panhandle is in Zone D, and deer can be hunted with muzzleloaders during the designated muzzleloading, general gun and the late archery/ muzzleloading seasons. Information about Florida hunting regulations, seasons and permit costs is available at MyFWC.com, or by contacting any FWC regional ofce. Page 10 Special to The Star The Florida Wildlife Federation is proud to announce the third Kids Wildlife Habitat Contest, open to Floridas children ages 12 and under. Its easy to enter! Just tell us how your habitat provides food, water, cover and a place for creatures to raise young. Teachers, please note that schoolyard habitats are eligible. The winning habitat will be featured on our website and in our newsletter. We will award a prize of an age-suitable gardening book and a commemorative plaque to the winner. All entries must be received by March 31, 2012. There is currently great concern among health care specialists, educators, environmentalists and parents about the shrinking amount of time todays children spend playing outdoors. It is believed that this is increasing obesity, decreasing rsthand observation of basic outdoor scientic lessons and causing a sad disconnect with nature among our youngsters. Most authorities believe it is imperative to get kids away from computer games indoors and let them go outside for healthy activities. The Florida Wildlife Federation is committed to Floridas children as well as to Floridas plants and wildlife. We think there is a way to tie them together to promote health for kids and critters by encouraging youngsters to start and maintain a wildlife habitat. This is an excellent activity for children 12 and under. It gets them outdoors, keeps them active, sparks an interest in gardening, teaches them something about identifying plants and animals in the natural world and keeps them from wandering to places where they might not be safe. For all these good reasons, Florida Wildlife Federation is announcing the third Kids Wildlife Habitat Contest. Teachers, please note that schoolyard habitats are included as long as they are worked on by the children. The prize book will make an excellent addition to the school library. Though we do encourage certication by the National Wildlife Federation, it is not necessary for this contest. Just tell us how this habitat provides water, food, cover and a place to raise young. We will send an announcement of the winning kids or schools to your local newspapers (with parent permission). Go to www.fwfonline.org and look at the Habitat PowerPoint there for help and ideas. Email patricia@ fwfonline.org for more information. You can enter by sending photos and a description of your habitat. By Alex Lynch Park Ranger St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, 227-1327 Wild turkeys are occasionally seen in beautiful St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. At this time, the park does not have a resident population, but it would not be unusual to see a turkey in the park. Wild turkeys are native to North America. There are ve subspecies: Eastern, Osceola (Florida), Rio Grande, Merriams and Goulds. All ve can be found throughout the continent. The Osceola (Florida) is only found on the Florida peninsula. A wild turkeys average life span is three to four years. They average about 3 feet tall and have a wingspan of over 4 feet. An adult wild turkey can weigh between 5 and 19 pounds. Wild turkeys live in groups called ocks. Acorns are favored foods. Unlike deer, wild turkeys have a poor sense of smell and taste. They normally select acorns based on their size and shape. The turkey is one of the most famous birds in North America. In fact, Benjamin Franklin wanted to make the wild turkey, not the Bald Eagle, the national bird of the United States! The turkeys popularity comes from the American peoples love of eating the bird for special occasions like Thanksgiving and Christmas. Happy Thanksgiving from the staff at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastate parks.org. Kids wildlife habitat contest Happy Thanksgiving from the park rangers SPECIAL TO THE STAR SPECIAL TO THE STAR Shoreline shing is about to become the norm for the winter months and leading the surf shing now is big bull red sh still. Great reports from the sea wall and under the George Tapper Bridge have been coming in along with a few ounder catches around Pig Island as well. We now have bull minnows in stock, so go ounder shing after Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday! Surf The trout bite is starting to heat back up in St. Joe Bay. Live shrimp has been the go-to bait with lots of slot size sh being caught mid to late morning. Pig Island and Towns beach have produced most of the re ported catches. The Towers in St. Joe Bay are producing lots of yellow trout or sand trout now. Bass shing in the I.C.W. and in lake Wimico continue to be the hot topic in shing right now. This years freshwater shing has improved and with the hot weather on the way again this week, the bite should be steady. Large numbers of sheepshead and red sh are coming in daily from these waters as well. Freshwater Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com A Section Thursday, November 24, 2011 By Tim Croft Star News Editor Eight was enough. Port St. Joe High School in ducted eight new members into the schools Athletic Hall of Fame prior to the Tiger Sharks matchup with Liberty County on Nov. 1, honoring championship athletes and coaches as well as one of the Tiger Sharks most ardent and be loved fans. The selections were made by a committee comprised of school administrators and coaches, Hall of Fame inductees of the past and district staff, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. Prior to being ofcially hon ored on the turf of Shark Field, the eight, and their families, were wel comed with a reception. All the great stories they were telling each other, it was fun, Norton said. We may not have another chance to honor some of these people and it is important we do so. The eight new members of the Port St. Joe High School Athletic Hall of Fame: Phillip Chatham Chatham, known to team mates and friends as Phil, was a four-year letterman in football, graduating in 1951. He was AllNorthwest Florida Conference as a junior and senior and selected to play in the Florida High School Activities Association All-Star Football Game as a senior. Chatham also lettered two years in baseball and basketball and played football as a freshman at Clemson. Coach Bill Dickson Dickson was a young basket ball standout in Wewahitchka and after college returned to where he had set the scoring record, Troy State and early coaching stops, to Gulf County to coach Port St. Joe Highs basketball team. He coached the Tiger Sharks from 1966 to 1974, winning region al and state titles in 69 and 72. Those are the rst state basket ball titles won by a school that has added six more banners. The 1972 team was noteworthy as it nished the regular season with a losing record only to beat prohibitive state title favorite Ha vana Northside, a team that had beaten the Tiger Sharks twice during the season and in the dis trict championship game. Dickson was named state Coach of the Year in the statetitle-winning years and received National Coach of the Year honors in 1971 and 1972. John Lane Known as the Triple Threat, Lane was quarterback of the 1941 six-man football team that won Port St. Joe High Schools rst state title. Lane led the Tiger Sharks back from a 12-8 third-quarter decit against a much larger Dunnellon High School to a 27-12 victory, n ishing a perfect 11-0 season. One of the headlines from a newspaper was John Lane Star Staff Report Port St. Joe High Schools soccer teams have started the new season kicking. The girls won their rst game of the season against Bozeman and the boys won their opening two games against Bozeman and North Bay Haven Charter. The teams are off for the holiday and will hold Mari anna on Nov. 29, the girls playing at 6 p.m. ET at Sam Cox Field with the Tiger Sharks following at 8 p.m. Lady Tiger Sharks The Port St. Joe girls opened the season at Boz eman on Tuesday, coming away with a 3-0 victory. Rachel Jones opened the scoring at 6:30 by convert ing a penalty kick off the left post and just past the diving goalkeeper. In the second half, Alley Stripling took control of her own header among three Bozeman de fenders and scored unas sisted to make it 2-0. Jones added another penalty kick to complete the scoring. Goalkeeper Christian Laine, who earned all-dis trict honors as a freshman last season, recorded the shutout, making two saves on four Bozeman shots. Tiger Sharks Following the girls victo ry over Bozeman, the boys took the pitch and dialed in a 1-0 shutout. Javarri Beachum was the winning keeper for Port St. Joe, making two saves while Bozeman got off four shots. The lone goal came from Tiger Shark freshman Mar cel Duarte with a nice touch past the keeper in the rst half. The boys continued their winning ways last Thursday when they hosted North Bay Haven, recording a 6-0 victory over a team Coach Gary Florida Freddom Staff report BRATT Wewahitchka will have to be satised with a handful of school records and a turnaround season in 2011. The Gators, as it turned out Friday night, will not be a playoff contender in foot ball the rst year of the 1A Rural classication. District 1-1A champion Northview (8-3) ended We wahitchkas season with a decisive 67-14 victory to advance to the Region 1-1A nal next week. Freeport eliminated Vernon 32-18 on Friday and will face North view in a rematch of the District 1-1A championship game. Wewahitchka running back Theryl Brown added to his total of 2,226 yards rushing and 37 touchdowns with 124 yards rushing, 130 receiving and a touchdown, but Northview was in charge early and led 48-6 by half time. The Chiefs exerted their dominance with four rst-quarter touchdowns. TIM CROF T | The Star Theryl Brown set school records this year with more than 2,350 rushing yards and 38 touchdowns. Northview too much for Wewahitchka Port St. Joe High School inducts 8 into Athletic Hall of Fame Port St. Joe soccer teams victorious Cole Cryderman heads the ball during last weeks action against Bozeman. Martha Sanborn being inducted into the Port St. Joe Athletic Hall of Fame.TIM CROF T | The Star See INDUCTIONS A12 See FOOTBALL A12 See SOCCER A12 PHOTOS BY ANDREW WA RDLOW | Florida Freedom Newspapers The Port St. Joe boys broke from the gate as the regular season got underway with a pair of shutout wins. Page 11

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3-9 Tall Fraser Fir Christmas Trees Live Wreaths and Garlands Poinsettias Too Register to win FREE CHRISTMAS TREE, Poinsettias, Gift Certicates FRIDAY NOV 25 TH A N D SATURDAY 26 TH Extended Hours on Saturday Free Mounting with Purchase of Stand Free Baling Gifts for the Kids! Apple Cider & Hot Chocolate st. joe rent-all Panama City Bch, Destin, Navarre & Port St. Joe www.halfhitch.com (850) 227-7100 HALF HITCH THANKSGIVING Open 7AM-5PM A L L L O C A T I O N S TWO DAYS ONLY Limited Quantities! No Rainchecks! Black Friday No Law-A-Ways! Prices Good Nov 25th & 26th Only 19 4 Compare 14 Flannel Shirt Stay warm in the orginal annel shirt. 5 Compare 24 Large 3 Tray Box Multiple Compartments w/Removable Dividers Compare 39 Smiths Diamond Edge 2000 Electric Knife Sharpener 11 For All Cutlery Mechanical & Manual Sharpening #50125 Compare 119 Inflatable Life-Vest 49 U.S. Coast Guard Approved Type V Automatic/Manual Light-weight, low-prole design Adult size. #3200BLU99 Deluxe perfectflow lantern by Coleman W/Carry case, Lights easily w/matches, Unique base provides stability. 8 hours runtime #2000004176 Compare 39 Compare 89 Burly Camo Hunting Blind 39 #HB-8222 The Carnivore Easy Set-up Tough Weather Resistant 58 X 58 X 65 H 29 Waterproof Lightweight Durable. #41100 Compare 105 Mens Leather Boot by Hi-Tec by Plano #6133-06 7 Compare 14 Assorted Mens Jackets Fleece Pullover & Windbreaker Style #RM3015A/B Xterra Combo 9 Compare 19 #7040FCBO Front Drag Spinning Fishing Rod & Reel Combo 7' 2 Pc by Shakespeare Tica Spinning Reel Your Choice GAA2500/GAA3000 14 Compare 34 #GAA2500 or GA3000 Right/Left Interchangable Forged Aluminum spool Soft-touch handle knob #GM3062/RM5907 Canopy Chair 9 Compare 21 Perfect for Tailgating, Camping, Picnics, or Beach Big Dog Foxhound Ladder Tree Stand Compare 89 49 #BDL-106 Padded arm rests & ip-up shooting rail, Adjustable ladder support bar. Fall-arrest safety system included. Cajun Injector Fryers Compare 59 29 Your Choice 30Qt Fryer or 2.5Gal. Fish Fryer #387008 #2217402801 Sleeping Bag 9 Compare 39 Adult Size Keeps you cozy, warm, & comfortable #49257/15228 #WW6040XL-SNG passes his way to fame. Lane was also a baseball and basketball standout be tween1939-42, and he was named to the 1941 All-North Florida Football Team and also played three seasons of minor league baseball be fore heading to college. He was set to be drafted by the Cincinnati Reds but instead enlisted in the U.S. Army during World War II. D. L. (Buster) BoBo Owens Jr. Known as Bobo, Ow ens was a football, basket ball, baseball and track ath lete in the late 1940s. Owens was named AllNorthwest Florida Football Conference in football and basketball in 1947 to 1948. At the time, the conference spanned from Pensacola to Quincy, south to Niceville and Port St. Joe and north to Graceville. Owens set a state foot ball season scoring record in 1948, earning All-Florida honors. Owens received a scholarship to play at the University of Florida. Owens later played and starred for the base team at the Pensacola Naval Sta tion and returned to Wewa hitchka to coach the football team, where he coached for many years. Benny Roberts Beyond his legacy later in life as a grill-master, Roberts had alreday estab lished a legacy as one of the nest Tiger Sharks players and fans. He was a standout in football and basketball in 1950 and 1951 and, after the 1951 and 1952 seasons, he was named AllNorth west Conference in football and basketball. Basketball was his sport; he scored 48 points in a game, a school record that still stands and was set long before the 3-point shot. Roberts played colle giately at Georgia Military College, where he also served as band captain and drum major. While in the military Roberts army team won the post champi onship. His life after college and the military still re volved around Tiger Sharks sports. He was active in Dixie Youth baseball and helped established the girls youth softball program. The ball elds on 10th Street are named in his honor. C. W. Roberts C. W. Roberts Jr. was born in 1926, in Hosford, served in the U.S. Navy and moved to Port St. Joe in 1960. He was the project manager for the construc tion of the St. Joseph Bay Country Club and golf course, donating plenty of labor and equipment to complete the course layout. Roberts was instru mental in the construc tion of many of the Little League elds in Port St. Joe. Though not an alumnus, Roberts was a driving force in the ath letic programs and in the construction of the Port St. Joe High School foot ball stadium. The home bleachers are dedicated in his honor. Archie Lee Shackelford Better known as DShack, Shackelford was born in Port St. Joe in 1952 and was one of the standout football players in school history. Shackelford ran for 142 yards and three touch downs to lead the Tiger Sharks to the 1971 state title, completing a 13-0 sea son during which Shackel ford was the top rusher and an offensive threat. He was named rstteam all-state that year. Later, as a high school football coach, Shackelford led Kingstree High School (SC) to a runner-up nish in the state. Martha Sanborn Martha Sanborn is, as was said Friday night, the quintessential Shark fan, with her distinctive Whooooo-whoo-ooo echoing from football elds to bas ketball arenas to baseball diamonds. A top-ight teacher, she was also the cheerleader sponsor at the school. But she was more than a sponsor, as Willie Ramsey said Friday. Nearly everyone who has passed through Port St. Joe High Schools halls of glory has heard Martha Sanborns dauntless and seasoned voice resonate above the crowds that are extolling the Sharks to more lofty deeds. Brandon Sheets scored on a 35-yard run and passed 45 yards to Dalton Daniel for a score. LaMikal Kyles 46-yard run opened a 21-0 bulge with 4:06 left in the rst quarter and less than two minutes later he caught a 45-yard touchdown pass from Sheets. A 1-yard run by Roderick Woods upped the score to 350 with 11:09 remaining before halftime. The Gators tempo rarily stymied the onslaught when Ben Hayward caught a 19-yard scoring pass from quarterback Justin Flowers with 7:54 left in the second quarter. Heyward caught three passes from 35 yards. Montaio Mitchells 14yard run and Kyles 80-yard sprint, his third touchdown of the half, reinforced North views dominance before halftime. Open FRIDAY November 25 @ 4pm SATURDAY November 26 @ 12 noon Located South of Hwy 98 between Mexico Beach & Port St. Joe 850.229.6060 www.boondocksfl.com J O I N U S FO R H A N DCUT S TEAK & S CRU MP TI O U S S EA FOO D! R aw Oysters only $4.99 & $1 D raft Beer INDUCTIONS from page A11 SOCCER from page A11 FOOTBALL from page A11 JOHN LANE PHILLIP CHATHAM D. L. (BUSTER) BOBO OWENS JR. BENNY ROBERTS Hindley characterized as inexperienced. The Tiger Sharks net ted two rst half goals, one from Duarte, the other off the foot of sophomore mid elder Drew Lacour. Du arte added another goal in the second half off a penalty kick. LaGrande McLemore, Cole Cryderman and Daniel May also added second half goals. Witt Shoaf, McLemore, Beachum, and Jacob Lacour each had one assist. The shutout was shared by Beachum, who earned the win and is 2-0, and senior Walt Bowers. Combined, the two made only one save as North Bay Haven man aged just two shots all night compared to 42 from Port St. Joe. The win came at a cost as junior starting winger Justin Cothran sustained a fractured foot and will be out for much, if not all, of the season. Sports A12 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011

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www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, November 24, 2011 COMMUNITY Special to The Star Sunset Park in Mexico Beach is being transformed into a Florida Beach Christmas! The Special Events for Mexico Beach, the Mexico Beach Community Development Council, along with the City of Mexico Beach, invites the public to attend the annual Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony held at Sunset Park (next to El Governor Motel) on Sunday, Dec. 4. The evenings festivities begin with a story reading from author Marcia Harden. Harden will be reading her book Im Hungry Said the Donkey at Sunset Park at 5:30 p.m. CT. In the book, Harden writes of Gods love as she weaves a playful holiday masterpiece so that even the youngest of children can grasp the magic and majesty of the night Baby Jesus was born. A true meaning of Christmas shines through in this tender childrens story about the long, long road to Bethlehem and the hungry, hungry night in the cold and drafty stable through the eyes of the donkey. Following the story reading, the tree lighting ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. There will be music and the singing of Christmas carols to get all into the holiday spirit as well as delicious homemade desserts and hot chocolate. After the lighting of the Christmas tree, the golf cart parade will come down the street where Santa will follow behind to make his visit with all the boys and girls. We ask that those wishing to have pictures taken with Santa to please bring their cameras. The golf cart parade is gearing up once again to add special holiday air to the evenings events. With the help of some special elves in Mexico Beach, the golf carts will be adorned with Christmas lights, decorations and special touches that will excite even Scrooge. If you are interested in decorating your golf cart and riding in the parade, please contact Traci Gaddis at 648-5474. We are asking for donations of new, unwrapped toys that the Mexico Beach Department of Public Safety will deliver to families in need in our area. Please join us as we bring the warmth and spirit of the holidays to the beach. For any questions about the events, please contact the Mexico Beach Welcome Center at 6488196. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer The Reid Avenue Bunco Babes dished out sh last week for the Gulf County Library. The Bunco Babes, a group of communityminded Bunco acionados, held a sh fry to benet the library at Frank Pate Park on Nov. 17. The group raised $2,459 for the library and fed between 325 and 350 people. The Bunco Babes would like to thank all of the generous volunteers and donors that helped make the event a success. We couldnt have made that much money without everybody pitching in, said Dana Boyer, who helped organize the event for the Bunco Babes. It was truly a community event. County Commissioner Carmen McLemore supplied and prepared the fried mullet, and Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton, Port St. Joe city commissioner Bill Kennedy and Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent helped plate food. Eric Spilde from the Fish House Restaurant donated the hush puppies, and the coleslaw was donated by Patti Blaylock from Sunset Coastal Grill. Al Smith from Gracies Lounge loaned cooking supplies for the event. Half Hitch Tackle provided the tent, which was set up by Marty Jarosz and the Port St. Joe High School JROTC. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative in Wewahitchka also loaned its large fryer for the day, with help from Betty Horn and Jimbo Nunnery. This is the fourth fundraiser the Bunco Babes have put together for the library, said Bobbye Johnson, a member of the Friends of the Library group. The difference with today is they have the entire community involved. Johnson said the Bunco Babes have collectively raised more than $5,000 for the library in previous which went to purchasing books, subscriptions and CDROMs for the Gulf County Librarys Port St. Joe branch. This money is going to be used to buy books on CD, Johnson said. These ladies have worked so hard to put this together. Johnson sent off each customer by saying the library says thank you, as a steady lunch rush streamed through the line. These volunteers doing this really make a difference, Johnson said. The library is just really essential to the community. Special to The Star St. Joseph Bay Golf Club will hold its second annual Christmas Bazaar and Jingle Bell Golf Tournament Dec. 9-10, supporting Gulf County Christmas for Kids and People Helping People. The club is open to the public and the golf tournament will be individual handicap play with a 12 p.m. shotgun start on Saturday, Dec. 10. The community is encouraged to turn out and support the Christmas Bazaar, which will ll the holiday-decorated clubhouse with local artists and craftsmen selling handmade gifts, including jewelry, jams and jellies, hand-stitched items, pottery, decorations, stained glass, original art, specialty breads and fresh foods. The Christmas Bazaar will be open Friday, Dec. 9, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET and Saturday, Dec. 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Event volunteer Barb Van Treese said, Last years Christmas Bazaar was such a great success where many locals came out and were really surprised with the great values that were offered. I heard people say they were glad they came by because they found Christmas gifts that saved them a trip to Panama City. This year we just want to let more people know. The Jingle Bell Golf Tournament is being promoted as a fun event with mulligans available for $5. The format will be individual handicap play with prizes including $300 gfor rst place, $200 for second, $100 for third and $50 for fourth. The golf tournament entry fee is $45 per person for club members or $30 with a toy for donation to Gulf County Christmas for Kids. Entry is $55 for non-members, or $40 and a toy. Entry includes a meal following the tournament with a beer, wine or soft drink and a fun awards ceremony promising lots of door prizes. More information is available online at www. stjoebaygolf.com, by visiting the club in person or calling 850-227-1751. Special lodging packages are available. The event is being supported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. PSJ twins are two of a kind Christmas tree lighting ceremony Dec. 4 Christmas bazaar and golf tournament Bunco Babes dish for library with sh fry By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Growing up, the Rushing girls were known simply as the twins. A mash-up of their rst names Brennalenna was another popular identier for the inseparable duo, and when they were individually addressed, it was usually as twin one and twin two, or just twin. Today, twins Brenda Wood and Linda Wright live across the street from each other in Port St. Joe, and still delight in telling stories from their childhood, when they spent every waking moment side by side. They nish each others sentences and argue about who will tell a certain story (Let me tell it! Let me tell it!), giggling and throwing their heads back, as they recollect the days when they dressed alike, joined the same clubs, made the same grades, received the same awards and had all the same friends. Theyve been accused of cheating on their husbands, playing hooky from work and being in two places at once. Theyve had their contacts mixed up at the eye doctor, had the same teeth pulled, and had their braces for the same amount of time. They cant sit by each other at weddings, Wood said, because they get so tickled with each other. As kids, they each either wanted to be a dental hygienist or a teacher. Today, Wright, a dental hygienist, is constantly waved at in the grocery store by Woods fth-grade students, and Wood, a teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary School, is always addressed by Wrights patients. Growing up, they shared everything. Our sister even accuses us of sharing a brain, Wright said. And sometimes I swear we do. They slept in the same crib as babies and sucked each others thumbs. We still cant tell ourselves apart in pictures sometimes, said Wright as she ipped through a photo album titled A Journey of 50 Years, complete with black-andwhite photos of the girls as infants that their mother labeled with each twins name underneath, with some of the labels scratched out and rewritten. Although they are fraternal twins, their mother still had trouble telling them apart when they were younger. Wright is known in the family as the bonus, because their mother never suspected she was having twins. The twins dressed alike up until college. In their senior yearbook portraits, they don the same cateye glasses and the same short haircut. It was dumb of us to always dress alike because we would have had twice as many clothes. Wright said. We didnt realize it was weird until we left St. Joe. Wright remembers her mother buying them two winter coats and the coats hanging in their closet in plastic covers. I remember Mama saying, They wouldnt know it, but one coat is black and one is dark green, Wright said. And we wouldnt have it. The twins mother returned one of the coats and exchanged it for a matching color, knowing they wouldnt wear the coats even if they were the slightest bit different. See TWINS B6 Photos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Gulf County Sheriff Joe and Superintendent Jim Norton help plate lunch orders at the sh fry. A group prepares a pot of cheese grits at the sh fry. Photos by VALERIE | The Star Above: Twins Brenda Wood (left) and Linda Wright were inseparable growing up, and now they live across the street from each other in Port St. Joe. Left: Twins Brenda and Linda as children.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society DO YOUR FEET HURT? Why Suffer with heel pain, ingrown toenails, burning feet, diabetic foot conditions, corns, bunions, callouses? Whatever the problem, the sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better youre going to feel. Dr. Burton S. Schuler Podiatrist Foot Specialist 763-3333 So Why Wait? Make your appointment. Call today! We accept Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS and other major Insurances Dr. Burton S. Schuler Learn more about Dr. Shuler at Whyyoureallyhurt.com 25 years in practice of Podiatric Medicine, Pain Management & Foot Surgery in Panama City 36 years in treating diabetes Specialist & leading Medical Expert on Mortons Toe Society Charles E. (Ed) Doyle and his wife Edith Cornelia (Nelia) Barker Doyle, of Wewahitchka, will celebrate their 65th wedding anniversary on Nov. 22. The couple rst met many years ago, growing up on nearby farms in the rural south during the Great Depression. Nelia decided at age 13 she would one day marry Ed. Ed, who spent 1940-41 with the North Carolina National Guard joined the U.S. Navy the day after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 and served overseas during World War II. He and Nelia wed in 1946 after Ed returned to the U.S. For years, Ed worked for the U.S. Navy and was stationed all over the world. The couple settled in Wewahitchka after Eds retirement in June 1966. They have one son, four grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Nelia will be 84 years old and Ed 90 years old in January 2012. They remain active in the community with many hobbies including gardening, geology and youth outreach. Ed is a Master Gardener who has worked with county extension agent Roy Lee Carter for years. Ed and Nelia have known each other since childhood and are still in love after 65 happy years of marriage! Ed and Nelia Doyle celebrate 65 years together Happy 8th Birthday Taylor Fortune We LOVE you very much! Love, Daddy, Kari, Rylan, Bailey, Jarod & Marissa Lyndsey Marie Hill and Christopher Lee Cathey Edward and Susan Hill, former residents of Port St. Joe, are pleased to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Lyndsey Marie Hill, to Christopher Lee Cathey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Al Cathey of Mexico Beach. Lyndsey is the granddaughter of Virginia Green of St. Joe Beach and the late Paul Green and Robert Franck of Rochester, NY and Marie Hill and the late Riles Hill of Perry, FL. Lee is the grandson of Marion Cathey of Mexico Beach and the late W.O. Cathey and Marjorie Sasser of Panama City, FL and the late James F. Goff. The bride-elect is a graduate of Lee County High School in Leesburg, GA and a 2008 graduate of the University of Georgia with a BS degree in Biology. She currently teaches science at North Bay Haven School in Panama City, FL. Lee is a graduate of Port St. Joe High School in Port St. Joe, FL and attended Gulf Coast State College. He is currently a managing partner of Catheys ACE Hardware in Mexico Beach, FL. A March 3, 2012 wedding is planned at the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe. Star Staff Report Santa Claus is coming to a hospital near you. An appearance by the jolly old man himself, hopefully arriving via helicopter, will be among the highlights as the Sacred Heart on the Gulf Guild Gift Shop holds a fundraiser Dec. 1-3. The Gift Shop will offer unique gifts, inspirational treasures, holiday decorations, ornaments, nativity sets and angels during the three-day event. The gift shop will be open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET each day. The gift shop is inside Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Santa Claus is scheduled to arrive at 9 a.m. ET on Saturday. The Sacred Heart Gift Shop is a non-prot fundraising program operated by the Volunteers of the Hospital Guild. Proceeds support hospital services for the community. Special to The Star The City of Mexico Beach will observe the following schedule for Sanitation services during the Thanksgiving Holiday week: Monday 11/21/11 Regular garbage pick up Tuesday 11/22/11 Regular garbage pick up Wednesday 11/23/11 Yard Debris pick up Thursday 11/24/11 Thanksgiving HolidayNo pick up Friday 11/25/11 Thanksgiving HolidayNo pick up 2011 Countywide Thanksgiving Dinner Program-Volunteer work days/times A gathering of volunteers is needed to ensure that more than 800 Thanksgiving dinners are cooked, prepared, packaged and delivered to needy families and individuals in Gulf County. Volunteers are needed for the following dates and times: On Wednesday, Nov. 23 (Thanksgiving Eve) from 14 p.m. ET. 15 volunteers are needed at the Oak Grove Assembly of God Church at 613 Madison Ave. in Port St. Joe. On Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 24 about 80 plus volunteers are needed to help on the serving line and to help deliver meals. Volunteers will be needed from the hours of 6 a.m. until noon ET. This is a great opportunity to help needy families in Gulf County. Your help is needed to make this project a success. If you would like to be a volunteer, please call program director Jerry Stokoe at 381-6122 for more information. Donations can be mailed to Oak Grove Church, P.O. Box 967, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Place Donation for Thanksgiving dinner on legend. Christmas toys and jacket drop off locations The owners of the Pristine Pool & Supplies, Tim and Crystal DePuy have made their business available as a drop off location for the 2011 Christmas Toys program for Gulf County children. There will be a box for toys and coats and jackets available beginning Nov. 1, and also at Ramseys Printing & Supply on Reid Ave. Items may be dropped off between 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. People Helping People will also be open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. ET on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to receive food, toys, and new coats and jackets. The items collected will be distributed to needy families in Gulf County. Anyone who has any questions call program coordinator Jerry Stokoe 381-6122, or Erika White, executive director of People Helping People at 229-5262. Your help is greatly needed to help families in Gulf County. Stokoe is working with the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce to make sure no child is left out. The guidance counselors at Port St. Joe Elementary and High Schools are also working with Stokoe and the Sheriff. Please check with Stokoes booth at the Nov. 19 Community Appreciation Day at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe, and dont forget to bring a can(s) of non-perishable food to donate. There will also be a Christmas tree decorated with the names of needy children in Gulf County. Please take one to help these children have a memorable holiday. Salvation Army seeks volunteers The Salvation Army is currently looking for volunteers to ring the bell at the Piggly Wiggly this holiday season. Volunteers are asked to work one-hour shifts. If you are interested, please call 596-9552 for more information. Gulf County Democratic Party meeting The Gulf County Democratic Party will meet at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, Dec. 1 at the Port St. Joe Fire Station Building. All members are encouraged to attend and participate. Mr. Frank Day will be our guest speaker. Day is the Chairperson for the Walton County Democratic Party, and serves as the Regional Director for Small Counties Democratic Coalition. Volunteer tax assistance People Helping People, through the IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, will offer free tax preparation to lowto moderate-income in Gulf County from Jan. 17 to April 15. To become an IRS certied tax preparer please join us on Tuesday, Dec. 6 and Dec. 13 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET at 2010 Parker Ave. in Highland View. For more information give us a call at 229-5262. Society BRIEFS Engagement HAPPY BIR THDA Y SACRED HEAR T GUILD CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR MEXICO BEACH SANITATION SCHEDULE FOR THANKSGIVING WEEK

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The Star| B3 Thursday, November 24, 2011 Dont forget to make your appointment before the Holidays. Announcing: The Coin, Currency & Stamp Show Free Admission! For more information, call Doug at 850-215-8565, or Frank at 850-265-9847 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information experience. School News Pre-kindergarten: Grady Player Kindergarten: Brooke White 1st grade: Kaydan Haisten 2nd grade: Erica Ramsey 3rd grade: Allie Godwin 4th grade: Joseph Farrell 5th grade: Cameron Harmon Bus riders of the week: Sophia Wilder, Ar lena Gleichner, Jasmine Burton, Brian Dar nell, Jamarrien Becton and Chase Dykes DAZZLING DOLPHINS Special to The StarGeneral Information: Nov. 23half day, no lunch Nov. 23Jr. High will have their 23rd Annual Turkey Trot (run/walk) around 9:30 a.m. There will be a concession stand sponsored by the BETA Club; stu dents need to bring money for conces sions. Nov. 24-25Thanksgiving Holiday Boys basketball teams are selling rafe tickets to help pay for their bas ketball shoes. First place is a free week end in a house on St. Joe Beach; second place is two reserved season tickets; third place is a $25 gift certicate to the Piggly Wiggly.Sports: Nov. 28Jr. High basketball at Mari anna, 6 p.m./7 p.m. CT; Nov. 29Girls basketball at Sneads, 5:30 p.m. ET; Nov. 29 Girls and Boys soccer vs. Marianna, 6 p.m./8 p.m.; Nov. 30Varsity basketball at Cot tondale, 6 p.m./7:30 p.m. By Mrs. Crystal Causey The students of Faith Christian School honored our veterans with a special program on Veterans Day. Students from rst through third grades were at their patriotic best as they sang songs, recited a poem, and presented artwork to the veterans in attendance. Shelby Causey kicked off the festivities as she led the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance and the Star Spangled Banner. Jacob Davis then welcomed our veterans and thanked them for their seless and noble service to our country. Kristen Bouington prayed for our men and women in arms, followed by Donovan Cumbie and Magnolia Sarmiento who recited an Acrostic poem entitled Our Denition of Service. The students performed a lively arrangement of I Love America. After the introduction of the veterans given by Emma Grace Burke, Luke OBarr, and Halee Whicker, students from rst-, second-, and thirdgrades presented their Symbols of Liberty. All art was the original work of the students and the presentation included a brief history and description of their individual pieces. The children performed a moving rendition of America the Beautiful, followed by a tribute of the veterans led by Farren Newman. Theron Smith, Jr. closed with a prayer for our country. A reception followed in the dining hall of FCS for all in attendance. A special thank you to all who worked so hard to make this day special for everyone. The Lions TALE Special to The Star Wewahitchka High School has been involved in professional development training through a grant opportunity provided by Florida State Universitys Bioscopes Program. Bioscopes is a statewide partnership project dedicated to providing professional development for Floridas teachers regarding the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for science and providing in depth content knowledge enhancement during a series of summer institutes and weekly webinars. This programs main focus was a lesson study team in each participating school that was required to design, deliver and revise a high quality, grade appropriate lesson, centered on a specic NGSSS benchmark in Biology. Two high school science teachers at WHS, Kimberly McMillion and Lana Harrison, attended the Bioscopes training this past July. They were required to select other members of the faculty to be part of this cross curriculum effort in lesson study. Judy Williams technology specialist, Micah Peak media specialist and math, and Peral Hunter history and ESE were recruited by Harrison and McMillion not only for their expertise and certications, but also by their work ethics and dedication to the teaching profession. This lesson study team collaborated and worked many extra hours to ensure the success of the Bioscopes Program and student learning. Each member of the team brought multiple insights to enhance the lesson for the students and to raise the support of each team participant. PAEC representative, Pam Bondurant, who monitored the lesson study, complimented the WHS team for being thorough in planning and preparing the students, as well as positively critiquing one another. There were other guests that observed the lesson study including Principal Debbie Baxley and Superintendent Jim Norton. All participants in the program came to the consensus that this Bioscopes Lesson Study was a huge success for WHS. Special to The Star Wewahitchka High School is proud to announce its winners in the VFW sponsored Patriots Pen and Voice of Democracy contests. Conducted nationwide, these youth competitions give students an opportunity to express their views on democracy. The Voice of Democracy is the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFWs) premier scholarship program. Students compete by writing and recording a broadcast script on an annual patriotic theme. This years theme is, Is There Pride in Serving in Our Military? Winners of the Voice of Democracy contest are Chandler Vines, rst place; Danielle Ward, second; and Chelsea Cook, third. The winners of the Patriots Pen essay contest are Austin Malcolm, rst place; Carla Peavy, second; and Alexandra Paul, third. The 2011-12 theme is, Are You Proud of Your Country? Special to The Star The theme for the Fall Book Fair for Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School this year was Reading is Out of This World. A Wish List Board in the library provided students and teachers provided an opportunity to put in book titles they wish to be purchased. ATI will try to help out in purchasing some of these books that students and teachers cannot afford to buy. The following is a link to the book fair site in case parents prefer to order online bookfairs. scholastic.com/bookfairs/ cptoolkit/publish/wewa. By Shelby Wood For the rst time in 10 years, Wewahitchka High School will play host to the Three Rivers Regional Science and Engineering Fair. On Nov. 29-30, WHS students will present their science fair projects. These projects will range from biological studies to engineered inventions and can be completed individually or in teams. Open house will be held from 4-6 p.m. CT on Nov. 29 for the public to come witness the ingenuity of WHS students. On Dec. 1, winners will be announced. WHS representatives will travel to the regional competition, held this year at FSU Panama City campus during January 2012. The winners from there will continue on to the state competition in Orlando in March 2012. We wish our students luck as they delve into their scientic discoveries and explore their creative potential! PHO T OS SP ECIAL T O THE ST AR The Wewahitchka High School Voice of Democracy winners were: left to right: Chandler Vines, rst; Chelsea Cook, third; and Danielle Ward, second. VFW ESSAY CONTEST WINNERS FALL BOOK FAIR A T WHS WEWAHITCHKA HIGH BIOSCOPES LESSON STUDY The WHS VFW Patriots Pen essay winners: Left to right: Alexandra Paul, third; Austin Malcolm, rst; and Carla Peavy, second. THE SCIENCE FAIR COMES TO WHS The Lions Tale

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FAITH Page B4 www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. Thursday, November 24, 2011 Which Bible? Whenever I hear, or read, something about the Bible being without error, I usually ask, Which Bible are you talking about? There are well over 100 Bibles in existence, and at least 30 different Bibles, which are translations of ancient writings into English. I have at least 20 different English translations in my personal library, and I have researched all of them. All Bibles carry the beliefs of their translators with them. Those that come to your door, and try to convince you to take a Bible Study with them, would like you to believe that their Bible, the New World Translation, is without error. You dont have to do much independent study in this Bible to determine that it is a translation that has been inuenced heavily by their beliefs, rather than a scholarly translation of the most reliable Greek and Hebrew writings. The most popular translation of the Bible in use, in this area, is called the King James Version. It is basically a good Bible, better than most, and I use it frequently. What its advocates usually dont tell you, is that the translation was heavily inuenced by King James, himself and others who shared his beliefs. About 80 percent of the translators involved in the production of the King James Version were those who subscribed to his own beliefs. The other 20 percent, the Puritans, were virtually ignored, and were then persecuted, to the point that many ed to America. So who was King James? He was king of Scotland, known as King James VI, before he became King James I of England. Like most monarchs, as a child, he was under the teaching of private tutors. His tutors were what we today, would call extreme Calvinists, and therefore King James, himself, became an extreme Calvinist. The translators of all Bibles carry prejudices, which arise from the translators own religious beliefs. In addition to translation, an important consideration that goes into the production of Bibles is manuscript selection. Those writings that were written by Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and the Apostle Paul, for example, are no longer in existence. When someone claims, that their Bible, is a translation of the originals, they are simply not being truthful. If you have the time, and money, and are uent in Hebrew, Aramaic, and New Testament Greek, you can go to museums around the world, and read the oldest manuscripts in existence,in the original languages. Most of these date back no further than about 600 AD. There were two manuscripts that came to light in the mid1800s, that appear to date back to the 3rd century,perhaps around 390 AD. These differed substantially from the other manuscripts, and had many differences with each other. This explains the changes that appear in modern English Bibles. Of the popular English translations, only the KJV and the NKJV are based on what is called the Received Text. Questions or comments are invited. Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible, every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh.Check us out this Sunday! We worship, at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st Street. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337 Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook, look for Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com Nov. 30, 2004 was the worst day. I remember the phone ringing late at night, which everyone dreads, and my mother telling me my brother was missing. I still remember the smell in the house, what I was wearing, where I was standing, and holding my ve-month old son when I heard the news. November 30, 2004 was the day I lost my best friend, my brother, Jeffrey Frogger Holmes at the age of 29. It is now 2011. I am reminded this month that he has been gone for seven years. In the seven years he has been gone, I have met many people who called him friend. Some of them I knew and some I did not. Nonetheless, I have realized over the last seven years that Jeffrey touched so many lives. He lived life on his terms and without regret. He was also the kind of person that would give you the shirt off his back but didnt want anyone to know. To those that knew him, they knew he had a good heart. He loved his family. I can also remember his love for this great country. The year he died, he was sent overseas to Iraq. He called me the day my son was born. I remember telling him that I was sorry he had to go and to be careful. His reply Ive got to go, so Jacob has a safe world to come into. I will never forget those words. In my brothers memory, I want to live life on my own terms and with no regrets. And, without a doubt I know he is in the presence of angels and we shall meet again. To Jeffrey: I love you and miss you! Love, Sandra The Christian CONSCIENCE Let your light shine The lost need the light to shine for them, Without it, the way is dark and dim. It says in Gods Word, to let our light shine That the lost will see Jesus, and salvation nd. Many times we say we are doing our best, If God gave a grade, could you pass the test? Are we reading the Word and heeding the call? Are we witnessing for Jesus any at all? Do we let our light shine, at work and at play? Do we smile or frown as we go through the day? If you are a Christian, youre watched each day. So smile, and let your light shine, as you go on your way. Billy Johnson In the presence of angels

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, November 24, 2011 Special to The Star On Nov. 16, the Gulf Coast Workforce Board (GCWB) celebrated 15 years of pro viding workforce services to the region at its annual meeting and luncheon at FSU Panama City Campus Holley Center. At the meet ing, Executive Director Kim Bodine reviewed the local workforce system per formance over the last year which included: Assisted 526 employers recruit and hire workers Served 52,006 walk-ins at the Workforce Center Connected 5,336 indi viduals to employment Provided in demand training and/or employment services to 1,014 adults, dis located workers and youth under the Workforce Invest ment Act Helped 216 families transition from welfare to self sufciency We owe our great per formance to our hardwork ing staff, our dedicated volunteer board members and our service providers, said Kim Bodine, Executive Director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. The service providers for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board include Bay District Schools, Bay STARS; Haney Workforce Training Center; Friends of the Franklin County Library, TIGERS Program; Gulf Coast State College, Workforce Center; and Royal American Man agement. Individuals from each of the service providers along with their case manager were recognized for suc cessfully completing their workforce program includ ing Brooke McVay who com pleted the LPN program at Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/Franklin Center. The Port St. Joe Summer Youth Leadership Program was also showcased at the meet ing, noting that the program served 142 Gulf County chil dren along with 20 young adults who were all placed in internships. At the meeting the board voted on a new slate of of cers for 2011. Gary Ross from Gulf County was ap pointed to serve his second term as chairman of the board. We will focus on increas ing the publics awareness and understanding of the services available through the workforce system. Our goal is to do an even better job of bringing employers and job seekers together, said Gary Ross. Other board members elected as 2011 ofcers in clude: Vice-Chair: Tommy Ward (Bay County) Executive Committee Member: Alisa Kinsaul (Bay County) Executive Commit tee Member: Ruth Phillips (Gulf County) Executive Commit tee Member: Betty Croom (Franklin County) Executive Committee Member: Ted Mosteller (Franklin County) About the Gulf Coast Workforce Board The Gulf Coast Work force Board is a public/pri vate partnership chartered by the State of Florida to administer workforce development programs in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. Their mission is to provide leadership, over sight, guidance, and assis tance to institutions and agencies delivering training and workforce services in order to meet the economic development and employ ment needs of Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN AT 11AM E T 7 DAYS A W EE K WWW.L OO K O UTL O U N G E .C O M E v e n t s ! U p c o m i n g FRIDAY & S ATURDAY 9 P M E T K ARA O K E & D A N CI N G I N TH E C R O WS N E ST T HURSDAY, FRIDAY & S ATURDAY 9 P M E T R A N DY S TARK ON TH E P OOP DE CK T U E SDAY & WE D NE SDAY L ADI E S NIGHT 5 P M T IL C L O SI N G Christmas Party T HURSDAY DE C 15 TH dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Great for Special Events, Holiday Parties or a Quick Getaway Call to Reserve Today! 1-2 People Nightly Rate 1-2 Nights..............................$200 3 Nights or more.....................$175 3-5 People 1-2 Nights..............................$225 3 Nights or more.....................$200 6 or More People 1-2 Nights..............................$250 3 Nights or more.....................$225 Party Rental Rates $150 (if purchasing less than $100 from bar or package) $100 (if purchasing more than $100 from bar or package) Plus 11% sales tax/Gulf Co. bed tax All rentals are subject to approval by management. 117 Sailors Cove, Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850)229-3463 www.haughtyheron.com Apartment Rental Rates Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER 9941546 FREE ESTIMATES 1-850-626-9242 1-800-69-SHRED Security-cleared personnel Fort Walton Beachs leading mobile destruction company Weekly, monthly, or annual service Locally owned & operated Gulf Coast Workforce Board annual luncheon Special to The Star Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative recently pre sented a contribution to the American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society received $4,500 for Gulf Coast Electrics spon sorship of local Relay For Life events in 2012. The Cooperative contributed $1,500 each to the Relay For Life of Gulf County, the Relay For Life of Panama City and the Relay For Life of Washington County. One of the four core values of Touchstone Ener gy Cooperatives is Com mitment to Community, GCEC Manager of Mar keting and Member Ser vices Kristin Evans said. Its also one of the seven cooperative principles. As a cooperative, Gulf Coast Electric strives to uphold this value and support our local community. Gulf Coast Electric Co operative is part of the Touchstone Energy na tional alliance of local, con sumer-owned electric co operatives providing high standards of service to customers large and small. Approximately 70 employ ees serve more than 20,000 meters and 2,500 miles of line in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Wash ington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahi tchka, Ebro, Lynn Haven, White City, Fountain and Southport. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR GCEC Manager of Marketing and Member Services Kristin Evans (right) presents a check in the amount of $4,500 to Stephanie Bird of the American Cancer Society. The Cooperative will sponsor three local Relay For Life events, including the event in Gulf County, in 2012. GCEC presents contribution to American Cancer Society P HOTO S SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Brooke McVay recently completed the LPN program at the Gulf/ Franklin Center. The Gulf County contingent to last weeks annual luncheon: back row from left to right: Michael Harris, Gary Ross, Assane Beye, Barry Sellers; front row from left to right: Kim Bodine and Ruth Phillips.

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 On Christmas, the twins sorted their presents according to size and wrapping. It was inevitable they would receive the same gifts, and neither wanted to ruin the surprise. So they sorted all their presents and opened them together. One of their earliest twin memories was standing at the McDonalds in Callaway and people staring in awe at how alike they looked. Back then, twins werent as common as they are now, Wood said. Wood remembers once in rst grade when Linda came across the hall with a note for her teacher. I remember (my teacher) yelling, Didnt I tell you to stay in your seat! Wood said. In school, they were accused of cheating because they always missed all the same questions and made the same grades. Their ACT scores were exactly the same, and they graduated high school with GPAs one tenth of a point apart. In high school, they played the same leading role in Count Dracula, each twin performing one half of the play. When they went to get their restricted drivers licenses, one twin missed too many questions on the written test. The twins father told the attendant either they both pass or they both fail. They remember one of their friends saying in high school, You cant ght with one twin; youve got to ght with both of them. They both took piano lessons growing up. One twin would wait on the teachers front steps as the other had her lesson. They can still play a duet on the piano together, although they dont remember the name of it. Its March of the something, Wright said, as they both begin to hum the melody. Brenda always played the low notes, and Linda the high notes. They were never jealous of each other growing up and rarely fought or argued. They admit to arguing only about every three months. If Linda didnt get the same award as me, it was bittersweet, like this is no fun, said Wood, recalling seventh grade when she received an invitation to the junior honor society ceremony and her sister did not. Wood attended the ceremony, and remembers they called Lindas name as well. I remember going to the door and being so excited to tell her she made it too, Wood said. Around town, they are constantly mistaken for one another. People who know us, know theres two of us, and they can tell us apart, Wood said. But when it comes to acquaintances, the twins have dozens of stories about being mixed up. I can have my scrubs on and people will come up to me and ask me about school, said Wright, the dental hygienist. She remembers going into Dollar General one time and the store clerk asking as she walked in, Back already? Wright knew in an instant she had just missed running into her sister. Another time at Subway after a stressful day at work, someone asked Wright if she was Linda or Brenda. Wright mistakenly responded Brenda. The twins were separated for the rst time when Wood got married. That was the hardest thing, oh my God, said Wright, who also lived away in Birmingham for three years, and constantly waited by the phone for her sister to call. I was just tickled to death to come back home, Wright said. Soon enough, Wright started dating Woods neighbor from across the street, John Wright, and the two eventually married. They were both pregnant with their rst children at the same time. It was great to have children together, Wright said. But we were very glad they were different, one girl, one boy, because we didnt want them to be compared like we always were. When Wood found out she was pregnant with her third child, Wrights response was, God, Brenda, I cant take another pregnancy. I just felt like I was going through it with her, said Wright, who went with her sister to all of her doctors appointments all three times she was pregnant. Although they are much alike, the twins do admit to having their differences. I think we realized our differences when we got married, Wright said. We do have our differences, and we realize it more and more as we get older. Wood describes herself as much more laid back than Linda. The two hope to end up in a nursing home together someday. We never realized it before because we complemented each other, Wood said. People always ask me, Whats it like being a twin? And I ask them, Whats it like not being one? Trades & Services RODNEY HALL ROOFING lic.#ccc1326056 When Experience Counts FOR LEA F AND STRAW REMOVAL F ROM ROO F OR GUTTERS. 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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 24, 2011 The Star | B7 36643S NOTICE TO PROPOSERS Notice is hereby given that the City of Mexico Beach Florida Community Development Council (the “Council”) will accept sealed proposals until 4:00 PM (local time), on December 16, 2011, for the paving of the parking lot of the Mexico Beach Welcome Center. The project consists of removing the existing gravel parking lot, putting down a base, intermediate course, followed by a minimum of two inches of asphalt. Firms shall be limited to those certified under 489.119 F.S. as a General Contractor or, at a minimum, be FDOT certified with experience in paving, construction of roads/streets/parking lots. Copies of the specifications may be obtained from Mrs. Kimberly Shoaf, President of the Community Development Council, at 850-648-8196 during normal working hours and all interested bidders are recommended to visit the site to confirm measurements and site layout. At 4:00 PM (local time), on December 16, 2011, the proposals will be opened and read aloud. All proposals must be in sealed envelope reflecting on the outside thereof the proposer’s name and “City of Mexico Beach RFP for Paving of the Mexico Beach Welcome Center Parking Lot.” There is no obligation on the part of the Community Development Council to award the proposal to the lowest bidder, and the Council reserves the right to award the proposal to 36625S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA VISION BANK, Plaintiff, vs. STANLEY B. ROBERSON, Defendant. CASE NO.: 11-228 CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2011, entered in Case No. 11-228 CA in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein VISION BANK is Plaintiff, and STANLEY B. ROBERSON is Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on December 15, 2011, the following described Property situated in Gulf County, Florida, legally described as: LOT 8, BLOCK A OF TREASURE SHORES SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on November 14, 2011. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at Telephone 850/229-6112. Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 24, December 1, 2011 36503S IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JANET WHITAKER KING, individually, and as Personal Representative of ESTATE of ROBERT E. KING (deceased), and CUYLER KING HOBBS, Defendants. CASE NO. 11-137-CA NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CUYLER KING HOBBS, and all others having an interest in the subject property YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose mortgages on the following properties in Gulf County, Florida: Parcel I: Lot 20, Block 4, a portion of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Section 33, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the iron rod and cap numbered RLS1999 marking the Northeast corner of said Section 33; thence along the East line of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of said Section 33, S00D21’17”W, 69.84 feet to an iron rod and cap numbered RLS1999 on the South right of way line of Pleasant Rest or East Bay Road; thence along said right of way line, N88D40’33”W, 19.87 feet to an iron rod and cap numbered RLS1999; thence along a line 20 feet West of and parallel with the East line of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of said Section 33, S00D21’47”W, 1880.53 feet; thence N82D35’05”W, 533.26 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence S00D18’02”W, 153.31 feet to the cusp of a nontangent curve concave to the South; thence Westerly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 50.00 feet, a central angle of 172D52’27”, for an arc length of 150.86 feet (chord to said curve bears N86D08’11”W, 99.81 feet); thence N82D34’24”W, 50.28 feet; thence N07D26’42”E, 354.52 feet; thence S79D18’23”E, 107.17 feet; thence S00D18’02”W, 191.56 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; said lands containing 0.95 acres, more or less; Parcel II: Commence at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County Florida, and thence run North 8924’40” East for the 1726.20 feet; thence North 0131’37” West for 2254.53 feet; thence North 8924’40” East for 1750.00 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning run North 0131’37” West for 408.48 feet; thence North 8924’40” East for 250.00 feet; thence South 0131’37” East for 408.48 feet; thence South 8924’40” West for 250.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land having an area of 2.34 acres, more or less, and being subject to a 60 ft. wide roadway easement along the North boundary thereof. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Frank A. Baker, plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 4431 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida, 32446, on or before 30 days from the first date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this 8th day of November, 2011. Hon. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk November 17, 24, 2011 36461S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232011CA000374 XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MARTENA ADAMS A/K/A MARTINA ADAMS; et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARTENA ADAMS A/K/A MARTINA ADAMS and CLAUDIA GRAY Last Known Address: 137 TOREY PINE TRAIL WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 137, WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days from first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on November 2, 2011. Rebecca L Norris, Clerk As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. 1183-105097 WVA November 17, 24, 2011 36435S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, 502 Earth City Expressway, Suite 307 Earth City, MO 63045 Plaintiff, vs. CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN, and GULF COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, Defendants. CASE NO.: 2011-1-CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff’s Final Summary Judgment For Re-Establishment and Foreclosure of Note and Mortgage entered in the above-captioned action, I will Sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: A lot or parcel of land lying and being on the Northerly side of Stone Mill Creek Drive in the Northeast Quarter of Section 10, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point of intersection of the Northerly right of way boundary line of Creekview Drive and the East boundary line of Section 10, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence go N6033’18”W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 318.28 feet; thence go N2950’24”W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 315.24 feet; thence go N3914’51”W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 235.54 feet for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue N3914’51”W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 88.61 feet, thence departing said Northerly right of way boundary line, go N4038’43”E, for a distance of 453.38 feet to the centerline of Stone Mill Creek; thence along the centerline of Stone Mill Creek the following courses and distances, N7608’59”E, 20.10 feet; S1854’11”E, 33.66 feet; S2021’56”W, 9.66 feet; S0258’24”E, 39.75 feet; thence S0308’17”E, 31.03 feet; thence departing the centerline of Stone Mill Creek go S4605’50”W, for a distance of 450.40 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999 HOMES OF MERIT, 28x48, M 763 MOBILE HOME; SERIAL NUMBER DCAM763-D1444A and DCA M763-D1444B. Commonly known as: 455 E. Creekview Drive, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 1st day of December, 2011. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator’s office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 17, 24, 2011 36381S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION REGIONS BANK, an Alabama banking corp., successor by merger to AMSOUTH BANK, Plaintiff, vs. LEONARD MARNELL, a married man, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LEONARD MARNELL, WINDMARK BEACH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida Corporation, not for profit, UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, and UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000315CAXXXX NOTICE OF PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE-PROPERTY TO: Defendant(s) Leonard Marnell, present address unknown, present address unknown, whose last known address is 1639 North Eagle Ridge Path, Hernando, FL 34442 and all parties having or claiming to have my right, title or interest in the property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed to foreclose a mortgage on the described real property located in Gulf County, Florida: Lot 40, Windmark Beach, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 1-5, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Caridad M. Garrido, Esq., attorney for LEONARD MARNELL, whose address is 2800 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 190 Coral Gables, FL 33134 on or before December 10, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two weeks in the Star. Witness my hand and the seal of this Court on the 2nd day of November, 2011. CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Caridad M. Garrido, Esq., Florida Bar No: 814733 Peter A. Hernandez, Esq. Florida Bar No. 64309 2800 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 190 Coral Gables, FL 33134 Tel: 305-447-0019 Email: Cary(.garridorundquist.co m Peter(agarridorundquist.co m November 17, 24, 2011

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B8| The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 3 BR, 2 B, fenced yard, old Fl style with lots of charm in PSJ. Hdwd oors Avail. Immediately Rent $900/month Call Betty Ray Weston 227-5566 3 BR 2B on quiet dead end, lots of privacy with outside storage/workshop bldg. Ceramic oors Avail Dec. 15 Rent $750/monthCall Betty Ray Weston 227-5566 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd Floor; 3 Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale300 Long Avenue +/2,000sf Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; inquire for terms; $399,000 131 E. Gulf Beach DriveSt. George Island, +/3,950sf of ce/retail; $285,00071 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms storic bl dg downtown Apa lachicola; +/72 52 SOLD nue UNDER CONTRACT Multi tenant build ing in Marina Cove; New SO LD ach Drive land+/-395 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 Beachside FOR RENT ST. JOE BEACH 113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98 2bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98 2bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach WINDMARK BEACH 159 Beach Street Bungalow #3 1bd/1ba Unfurnished 212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #4 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #6 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished MEXICO BEACH Villas of Mexico Beach, 3706 Hwy 98 New Condos, Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 3bd/3ba Furnished Pictures available on MLS #243890CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision 101 Two Palms Drive 4bd Unfurnished Two Palm Subdivision 3bd/3 ba Furnished and covered pool (small pet allowed with pet deposit) PORT ST. JOE Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Dr. Unit 15 2bd/2ba Furnished 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 St. Joe, 3br, 1 bath, fenced backyard with 2 storage buildings, new metal roof and paint on house, near school and Lake Griffin, Call (850) 227-8295 for appt. Property for sale or lease as Office. Recently remodeled. 2 br, 1 ba, with deck in back. Zoned for both commercial and residential use. 510 6th St. Port St. Joe $800 month. 850-527-6678 Text FL85188 to 56654 Price ReducedFSBO : 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 2 Trailer lots available, Beacon Hill, 50x150, Call (850) 348-7770 for information Small Efficiency Apt $300 mo W/S included. Pet neg. 773 Bryants Landing Road. 850-899-0162 HOME FOR RENT AT WILLIS LANDINGA Nature Lovers Paradise!! Quality Custom home 9ft Ceiling’s, Hardwood floor’s, tile, kitchen bar.Located next to Willis Landing Boat ramp on the Brothers River. Located 10 miles south of Wewahitchka and only 18 miles north of beautiful Mexico Beach and only 32 miles from Panama City. The Apalachicola River is only a 15 minute boat ride.1,600 SF 3 Bed/2 Bath $800/month. Call 850-689-8881 Text FL85680 to 56654 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $650 month + deposit 301-265-5368 St. Joe 3 br, 1 ba, House on Corner lot 208 10th. $650 mo + $600 dep. 229-8801 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Mexico Beach Store Front. 2500 sf on Hwy 98 with 32 car parking. 5 year lease with option to buy. 850-348-7774 Text FL83641 to 56654 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 OtherWorship LeaderWho plays keyboard or guitar for Beach ministry in Mexico Beach. Call (850) 215-8785 Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com Coin & Stamp ShowDecember 3rd & 4th Fairgrounds PC Opens 9:am Free admission. 850-215-8565 4 10’ metal farm gates, $10 each. Call (850) 647-5179 for more information. HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications* Housekeeping Office Clerk-Full-time, requires good customer service skills & prior office experience. Team player, works well under pressure. Great benefits, weekend work required. Inspectors-Part-time, inspect properties after they are cleaned. Must be available weekends. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help and personal care for the elderly. Flexible day, evenin & weekend hours. Positions available in the Appalachicola, Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34186584 Text FL86584 to 56654 the bidder submitting a responsive proposal with a resulting negotiated agreement which is most advantageous and in the best interest of the Community Development Council and to waive any irregularity or technicality in proposals received. The Community Development Council shall be the sole judge of the proposal and the resulting negotiating agreement that is in its best interest and its decision shall be final. Any bidder failing to mark outside of the envelope, as set forth herein, may not be entitled to have their proposal considered. All proposals should be addressed as follows: Mexico Beach Community Development Center Attn: Kimberly Shoaf, President P.O. Box 13382 Mexico Beach, FL 32410 Kimberly Shoaf President November 24, 2011 36581S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of COMPLIANCE 411, located at 103 Hemmingway Circle, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 11th day of November, 2011. Whole Pie Investing LCC November 24, 2011 36645S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of SACRED HEART MEDICAL GROUP ON THE GULF, located at 55 Avenue E, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida 32320, intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Pensacola, Florida, this 18th day of November, 2011. Sacred Heart Health System, Inc. November 24, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Earn College Degree Online *Medical Business, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com D & B Home Repairs Inc.Featuring Seamless Gutters. 12 colors available. Call 850-340-0605 Care Giver now available, 12 years of experience, references available, transportation services available, ability to cook and handle light house duties. License CNA. Please call Glenda 540-521-8711 Spot Advertising works! Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, NOVEMBER 24 2011City manager Weston to retire in JanuaryBy Tim CroftStar News Editor Port St. Joe city commissioners bought themselves some time without paying a dime last week. Commissioners decided last week to take title to the former Gulf Pines Hospital and land from the receiver in a federal bankruptcy case, reversing a decision of two months ago. In effect, commissioners were buying time in order to determine whether the city can secure up to $90,000 in grant money from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for asbestos removal under the agencys Browneld clean-up program. The city will not know if it will receive those funds, which would cut dollars off the total cost of acquiring and developing the Gulf Pines site, until spring. To apply for this grant, we must hold title to the property, said Mayor Mel Magidson. We do, of course, have other issues. Those would include the cost of demolition of the hospital and satisfying Internal Revenue Service and county tax liens against the property. The city held a required public hearing to pursue the grant last week, and the public had until Tuesday to submit written comments. There was no comment during the public hearing. City attorney Tom Gibson said the worst case scenario would be taking title and not being awarded the grant. At that point, the city still could walk away from the property without having expended a dime. However, taking title would buy the city time, Commissioner Rex Buzzett said, to pursue additional grant funding, determine actual costs of demolition and, in general, have a clearer idea of what investment the city would have to make to develop the property. I think there is not a lot of risk taking title, Gibson said. And we have to take title to apply for the grant. Gibson said it would be possible for the IRS to step in at some point to auction of the property but that the IRS still had signicant hoops to jump through be-Story and photos by Tim CroftStar News Editor The city of Port St. Joe held a soiree last Saturday for its very special guests its residents. The city held Community Appreciation Day on the grounds of the Centennial Building, a morning of exercise, entertainment and games for the kids to express gratitude to residents after a very trying year. This is your community, and we want to say thanks to everybody, said city manager Charlie Weston. The day has gone real well, I think. I hope it continues to be an annual event. Roughly 200-250 people showed up to walk the Port City Trail there were plenty of walkers who completed all three designated loops and proudly displayed commemorative medals and hand stamps recognizing their effort and then bask in a few hours of entertainment. There was a martial arts display from the local The Karate School and music from the Port St. Joe High Band of Gold. Booths lined the grounds extolling the need for pet adoptions at the St. Joseph Humane Society and promoting the various small businesses and organizations that helped sponsor the event. And to top it off, city elected ofcials and staff cooked, wrapped and distributed plenty of hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and drinks to the throngs who lined up. Oh, and by the by, the city also ofcially dedicated the Port City Trail, more than four miles of designated hiking and bicycling trails that meander through the city from the Port St. Joe Marina to Port St. Joe High School. When the nal phase is complete early next year, the trail will extend to the Gulf/ Franklin Center. If you havent been on that trail, you are missing something, said Mayor Mel Magidson, noting the trail was built entirely with state grant dollars. It is a very pleasant, beautiful experience to walk the trail.Crafting for the communityBy Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Colleen Ciochetto choked up as she approached the wreath she handmade and decorated with glittery sand dollars and an elaborate gold ribbon. For Ciochetto, the wreath represents an invaluable cause, one that is helping her 11-year-old nephew, Patrick, to overcome the obstacles of autism. On Dec. 3 her wreath will be rafed off, with the money raised benetting The Growing Minds Center, a nonprot school that provides education for Centennial Bank acquires Vision Bank locationsBy Randal YakeyFlorida Freedom Newspapers Locally based Vision Bank will become part of a larger banking conglomerate. Centennial Bank, a wholly owned subsidiary of Home BancShares Inc., has announced the signing of an agreement to acquire all of the banking locations of Vision Bank, a subsidiary of the publicly traded Park National Corporation. Visions main ofce is in Panama City. It has branches in Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe and St. Joe Beach. City to take title to Gulf PinesVV ALERIE GARMAn N | The StarThis wreath, decorated by Holly Atkins, will benet People Helping People of Gulf County. T H A N K S !City gives residents a little walk, a little food, much appreciation BELOBELOW: Among the demonstrations was one from The Karate School of Port St. Joe. TO OP: Want to show appreciation to kids? Pump up the jumpables. Above, by foot or by wheels, with canine or not, folks took to the Port City Trail to enjoy some outdoor recreation. City staff did the cooking and assembling of food. YEAR EAR 74, NUMBER 6 Opinion. .....................................AA4-AA5Outdoors. ...................................AA10 Sports.........................................AA11-12Community. ...............................BB1 Society. .......................................BB2School News. ..............................BB3Faith. ...........................................BB4 Classieds. ..................................BB7-BB8See CI ITY A8 See CRA RAFTIING A9 See CE ENTEENNIALIAL A8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 Invest in community, shop local this SaturdayBy Gail Alsobrook and Kristy GrovePort St. Joe Redevelopment Agency and Gulf County Chamber of Commerce In our fast-paced, technologydriven lives, we often look back with nostalgia at bygone times and memories we hold dear. Throughout the country, people are hearkening to a time forgotten and largely lost; they yearn for authenticity a place much like Port St. Joe, whose charm captivates all who visit. Much of the authenticity and character of our city is fashioned and preserved through our smallbusiness community. Our Historic Downtown District is unique. Businesses are owned and managed by families those with passion for their work and love for their neighbors. They invest everything they have to succeed and serve their community. We regularly see three generations working together. It is so American, so small-town, so sincere, and it is what people are seeking. Charlotte Pierce, a member of the St. Joe Historical Society, said it well. More and more visitors are enjoying Historic Downtown Port St. Joe, Pierce said. Businesses have changed over the years, but the downtown has always been warm and welcoming to locals and visitors alike. There are many reasons to support local business, and while some are emotionally-based, others are simple economics: Supporting small business strengthens the community. Gulf County thrives on tourism, and the more successful our local businesses are, the more tourist dollars ow into our community. The more outside dollars, the more nancially stable we become. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, there were almost 28 million small businesses in the United States last year. Over the past two decades, they created 65 percent of the new jobs. For every $100 spent in locally-owned, independent stores, $68 returns to the community. Old Florida still is here. But it needs our patronage to continue, to attract new business, and to further strengthen our community. The windows are festive, the displays have been arranged with love, and the merchandise is poised for the holiday season. Help us celebrate our downtown on Small Business Saturday, which is Saturday. This day will give consumers an opportunity to support local businesses in Gulf County and will help boost the economy in small areas like our own. Recent studies show that dollars spent in small businesses invigorate neighborhoods just like Gulf County. Its exciting to see a movement like Small Business Saturday happening across the country. It shows t hat small business owners and small communities are valued, business owner Lorinda Gingell said. Small Business Saturday is getting recognition and support from major companies. For example, American Express is injecting $1 million into the economy by distributing Shop Small American Express gift cards for use at small businesses on Nov. 26 (30,000 are available through Facebook). On the Small Business Saturday page, there are many marketing tools that can be downloaded and used for the small-business owner for free. Port St. Joes Historic Downtown continues to grow and improve. In recent months a group of small business owners have formed the Downtown Merchants Committee, under the guidance of the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, to boost the awareness and revenue of all businesses in Port St. Joe through marketing campaigns and small events in the downtown area. The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency also is lending a helping hand through the ongoing facade grants program ($350,000 to date), maintaining the landscaping, and sponsoring the banner program that garnered a state-wide award for cultural enhancement. Wewahitchka is taking a step forward with the help of the local Chamber of Commerce and building a relationship of business owners by forming their own Downtown Merchant Committee. Looking forward to the future growth of our town, said Jerry Gaskin, vice president of Vision, about the committee. Gaskin has many generations of his family in Wewahitchka. Our small-business owners have always come together in the past but with the building of this new committee, it will allow new owners to see the support that they would have not only from the existing owners, but also from the Chamber of Commerce, Gaskin said. We encourage you to shop local every day and support Gulf County small businesses this Saturday. Lets be part of the movement that is raising the awareness about the important role that small businesses play. The Gulf County Chamber of Commerce and the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency wish you and yours a joyous holiday season, and we will see you downtown! Visit www. smallbusinesssaturday. com and http://facebook.com/ smallbsuinessaturday for more information on boosting your small business sales through social media on Nov. 27. To become an active member in the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Merchants Committee, call 227-1223 or visit gulfchamber. org to locate a list of the small businesses in the area. PHOTOS SpSP ECIAL TO TT HE SS TARShoppers stroll along Reid Avenue in Historic Downtown Port St. Joe. Below, the shops have changed, but Reid Avenue remains a hub for small businesses in Port St. Joe.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, November 24, 2011 2nd Annual Forgotten Coast Warrior WeekendA 501-C3 Non Prot CorporationTo all of our 2011 Patriotic Business and Organization Sponsors: SILVER SPONSORSCapital City Bank Centennial Bank Dockside Caf Dover Foundation EdgeWater Yamaha El Governor Motel Harts Marine & Outdoor MainStay Suites Sunset Coastal Grill BRONZE SPONSORS98 Real Estate Group Bill Cramer Chevrolet Calcutta City of Mexico Beach Express Lane FairPoint Communications Joe Mamas Wood Fired Pizza Ladies Auxiliary VFW Post 10069 Port St. Joe Ling Ding 2011 Scallop Cove Semper Fi Sisters SikorskySPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS FRIENDS OF THE EVENT GOLD SPONSORGulf County TDCPLATINUM SPONSORBlueWater Outriggers VFW Post 10069 Port St. Joe Thank you all those who volunteered time and talent.We would like to sincerely thank all the individuals and businesses who participated in bringing this most worthwhile event to our area. Tax deductible contributions can be made to Forgotten Coast Warrior Weekend, P.O. Box 1022, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. If your business or organization donated and we failed to list your name, please contact our organization.

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Thursday, November 24, 2011Life can be difficult, cruel and unfair. There are times when I want to talk to my Daddy, but he has been gone for more than ten years. I know what he would say; I know how he would say it. I can almost hear his voice. There are times I need to hear a Daddy voice. Today was one of those days. Who do I call? I decided to call the fellow who knew me when I was full of well, when I was full of myself. I called my high school football coach. He seemed to always know the right thing to say when the situation was difcult. It has been 30 years now since I donned the maroon for The Donoho School in Anniston, Ala. The situation was often difcult for our high school football team. I transferred to a small private school in the tenth grade from a large public high school football powerhouse. I went from a team that had no trouble dressing 80 -100 players to one that rarely could nd 20 bodies to put in a uniform. There was a reason. I wanted to play football for Coach Cliff Grubbs. My brother played for him, I wanted to play for him. The wins, the losses, they didnt matter. I appreciated the other things that Coach Grubbs had to offer. When the going got rough, he gave advice. Things like, Dont you have a chemistry test tomorrow? You dont need to be practicing football. He also taught me to throw spaghetti against the wall to see if it was done. Those were the fun things. Coach Grubbs also gave a lot of heart-toheart advice that a teenage boy needed to hear. Sometimes I didnt know what he was saying until I really thought about it. He made a difference, and he still does. I was disappointed when I rst called Coach Grubbs, who is 85 and retired to the Florida Panhandle. He didnt answer the phone, I was concerned. Knowing that he was in poor health, I thought the worst. Coach never quit on us, even when the score was a whole lot to nothing (us being the nothing). He never quit. About an hour later, my phone rang. He said, This is Clifford Grubbs, I got a call from this number. I said, Aw Coach, its me. He perked up and asked me all the normal questions you would expect him to ask. Coach asked about my job, where I was living, the children and how some of the other fellows were. We made small talk and he made a comment about how much I always livened things up. This comment was his nice way of saying that he remembered how I really was (without going into details). After the small talk, Coach Grubbs told me what I already knew. He told me about the cancer. He told me how they had cut him open and just sewed him back up. We discussed that a little and he noted that he was 85 and had lived a wonderful life. It was more than I could take, I couldnt hold it together. But Coach Grubbs just kept on talking, just like he used to when a teenage boy would sit crying in his ofce. He understood (and so did I). We nished and then he hit me with the only thing I really needed to hear. He said, I love you. I said, Coach, I love you. Later in the day, I was looking at my wall at a black and white copy of an Auburn Mississippi State game summary from 1947. I realized what the day was. It was Nov. 8, 2011. The dateline on the game summary w as from Nov. 8, 1947.  I found it years ago on the internet and put it on my wall. I had to call him back. I said, Coach, do you know what today is? He said, Its the 7th, no its the 8th of November. I asked him, Where were you on Nov. 8, 1947? Before he had a chance to answer, I started reading the excerpt on In some ways Thanksgiving 2011 is not much different from the Pilgrims landing on a craggy slab of Massachusetts coastline long ago. The Pilgrims of four centuries ago were facing a world they knew nothing just as the current economic environment seems a scary landscape which many of us are not wholly familiar. For the Pilgrims, most anything that could have gone wrong on their journey from religious intolerance to the New World did. It was Murphys Law applied exponentially. Beyond the miles they had been willing to foray on foot from the sea and their ship, they knew nothing of this land they had landed upon, nothing of what and who might be there. In fact, initially the thought never seemed to have crossed their minds that there would be anybody there. The ground was not suitable for crops, at least not with the rudimentary tools they carried and their lack of knowledge of the soil. The viability of what they knew to grow back home in Europe was in question. Game seemed scarce. The weather conditions atrocious, even for hardy men and women of the English and Dutch stock they were. They were literally in an unknown world. By the standards of the day, they had essentially traveled to the Moon. How that seems familiar to the environment of today, a different sort of rocky terrain. Unemployment continues to hover near 10 percent, and the unemployment rate does not even capture those who for various reasons cannot or will not seek employment in a business climate buffeted by forces that seem as with those Pilgrims beyond our control. Political ssions, religious ssions, the growing chasm between those who must worry about whether there will be food on the table that night and those who dont they all serve to divide, just as the harsh conditions at times came to divide the men and women of the Mayower. There is much to make us anxious. This will be a difcult Thanksgiving hardly a holiday for far too many. But the Pilgrims were taught a valuable lesson by the Native Americans savages as the Pilgrims initially saw them who inhabited those shores of the bay in which the Mayower ultimately anchored for safe harbor. For while these men and women werent big on modesty in their dress, and talked and behaved in ways foreign to the Pilgrims, they were also large-of-heart human beings no matter the color. What is barely understood, is explained by Nathaniel Philbrick in his book Mayower. Philbrick says while there might have been a feast of some kind on a date sometime near the end of the Pilgrims rst year in the New World, it was a product of a bond of community that had been formed. Thanksgiving, and they did not know it as that and it would not become a holiday for centuries after that 1620s sit down, was for the Pilgrims something that was played out over more than 24 hours. The previous winter, their very existence was in the balance. The Native Americans could have easily killed them, just as the weather and disease depleted their ranks. Instead, those Native Americans would teach the newcomers about the land they had they had come to, about hunting, shing and farming. They taught the Pilgrims survival. In turn, instead of choosing arrogant isolationism in their new quarters, the Pilgrims reached out to the Native Americans, establishing a bartering system, sleeping in their wigwams, choosing to learn, coming to understand these were just human beings. Only later, when territory became an issue, did tension and ultimately bloodshed come to those rst Anglo-Saxon arrivals. So today, hopefully, is a day to put aside the loose ends of life which isolate and divide us to remember the things that bring us together. The community that exists in this county emerges during the toughest of times and this year will be no different. There is North Florida Child Development and Gulf Correctional Institution providing refurbished or new bicycles for needy youngsters. There are the Kiwanis Club and Lions Club which provide precious food for those who might be without a feast on the coming day of feasts. There is the slew of volunteers who will spend their holidays providing sustenance and cheer to literally hundreds who would otherwise be without a warm meal and fellowship on a day all about warm meals and fellowship. And a Sheriffs Ofce with a mission of meeting the Christmas wishes of needy children in the county. That is just a sampling a small sampling of what a unique and special community Gulf County can be when the sledding is most difcult. The Pilgrims discovered, even in their most dire of circumstances, they were not alone. Our hope on this day is that understanding the value of that sense of community today can make a difference in all our lives. CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardRemembering The matress kid TTIM CROFTStar news editorThanksgiving offers hopeIm thankful for those soldiers who hung with Washington on Christmas Day, 1776. Im especially thankful for the ones who wrapped burlap bags around their feet in lieu of boots and walked the nine miles in the dead of night through a snowstorm to cross the ice cold Delaware River and surprise the Hessian troops in Trenton, New Jersey. Listen, the Continental Army, along with Americas chance of survival, was down to its last strike. That one victory by a rag-tag group of mists sparked hope in a desperate nation. We are here because they were there! And youd better believe there wasnt anything rag-tag about their hearts.or their dreams! I dont know about you, but Ive spent my Christmases opening presents, feasting on turkey and dressing and watching Its A Wonderful Life on TV. Ive never wrapped a burlap bag around a foot in my entire life. I have not braved a frozen river at night in the middle of a snow storm. And it has never crossed my mind to bust open a door and stick a bayonet in the face of a brigade of hired soldiers from Germany. Thanksgiving in this land comes in many shapes, forms and fashions. Im thankful we grew up without any money. We skipped all kinds of trouble because we couldnt afford to get into it. Now it didnt really bother us..its hard to miss what you didnt have. And our love, laughter and joy was not bought or for sale; it was real and genuine. Materialistically, we were blessed with nothing, but that is exactly what we needed at the time! No tellin how Leon, David Mark and I would have ended up if we had been tempted by all the trappings that come with the burden of where to throw your extra money. Im thankful for the guy who added the words Under God to the Pledge of Allegiance back in 1954. Of course, I didnt think so at the time. I had just spent my rst grade year learning it sans the Creator reference. And low and behold, I show up for the second grade and Miss Dorothy explained that they had added some extra words. We had to get up and recite the pledge every morning! It was going to take some doing if they kept changing the thing. None of us realized at the time how God was going to come under such attack in our nation one day. Im thankful for a tall, skinny Chicago Bear football player named J. C. Caroline. As a kid I was drawn to him because he didnt have a rst name and he played hard on every snap. When wed choose up sides for the big game out in the front yard, Leon would be Johnny Unitas. The other teams quarterback would line up as Bart Star. Jim Brown, Lance Alworth and Dick (Night Train) Lane were usually in the game. I picked J. C. every time. It didnt mater if I was on offense or defense. It didnt matter the score, the weather conditions or the game situation at any particular moment. J. C. Caroline gave me somebody to be! Im thankful I was born south of the MasonDixon Line. This is not a slam at any of our northern neighbors. Im sure they will defend their birthplace just as ardently. Im just partial to yall and aw shucks. There is something special about Memphis barbeque, Darlington racing, Alabama football, Georgia peaches (and the fruit is not bad either), Nashville music, Lewis Gizzards columns and Mayberry. I appreciate the slower pace. I like those Magnolia lined drive ways up to the big house. Im thankful we vote conservative. We proudly close our courthouses for Memorial Day and the Fourth of July. And if God hadnt intended us to hunt, He wouldnt have put so many deer in the forest. Im thankful for CocaCola. Thats my drink of choice. Bad for you, you say! You could be right. But I grew up on milk. And more milk. And then, a little more milk. I reckon I was pretty healthy in my formative years. We got a coke out at the end of Stonewall Street about once every three months. It WAS the real thing! What a special treat. I told Mom on many occasions that one day Id have money of my own and that I was going to drink a Coca-Cola every day! I fully realize that the coke taste today is not the same as those little six ounce bottles from the past. Nevertheless, I have tried to faithfully live up to the promise I made Mom those many years ago. Just a little culinary tip for you this Thanksgiving, Coca-Cola goes especially good with giblet gravy and asparagus casseroles. Im thankful Buster Brown died. At least, I dont have to put my feet into those concrete boxes he perpetrated on the youth of America for all those years. Im thankful one-a-day multiple vitamins took the place of cod liver oil. Im thankful kids today are wearing jeans with multiple rips and tears in them. It takes a little of the embarrassment out of the iron on patches I had to endure on my Tuf Nut jeans back in elementary school. Im thankful for a Sovereign Being that lets me be me. Im thankful for friends and family that overlook my shortcomings and outright idiotic things that unwittingly spring from my brain. Im thankful for older folks that have shown me the way. Im thankful for the younger generation that shares their enthusiasm with us. Im thankful for every American veteran we saluted just a couple of weeks ago. Thanksgiving, dont get me started! And if you have read down this far, Im also very thankful for you. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWNKesley ColbertMore than a turkey once a yearSee CC RANKS A5 OpinionAA4 | The Star Keyboard KKLATTERINATTERINGSS USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs SA5 | The Starmy wall to him. With injuries still forcing men to remain on the bench, Auburns crippled team, led by sophomores Clifford Grubbs and Johnny Liptak, battled Mississippi State furiously before losing a 14-0 ball game. The Tigers, who entered the game a four touchdown underdog, played gallantly to hold the score down. Grubbs looked terric in the ground-gaining department and Liptak, who caught six passes, was the outstanding lineman on the eld. Harper Davis, States eet halfback, was the thorn in Auburns side as he reeled touchdown runs of 22 and 50 yards to give the victory to the Maroon eleven. Coach started laughing. He said, Oh, yes. He then told me the story, a story he had never told me. I had no idea. Im from Alabama, Im an Alabama fan. However, let it be known that my favorite college football player is The Mattress Kid, who played for Auburn University in the 1940s. Not Cam Newton, Bo Jackson or Pat Sullivan, but Clifford Grubbs The Mattress Kid. It was around 1940; Clifford Grubbs was 14-years-old and on his own. He had left home, we didnt discuss why. People would see him in Chewacla State Park near Auburn, Alabama toting a mattress (his home). They called him The Mattress Kid. In the summer, he would lifeguard at the state park, sleeping in the park under the stars at night. Coach Grubbs noted, There was shelter when it rained or got cold. In the summer before his senior season at Auburn High School, he was lifeguarding at the state park, living on his mattress. He was approached by the Auburn Police and folks from Auburn University. I knew I was caught and in trouble, Coach Grubbs remembered. They were going to make me leave the park. Evidently, Clifford Grubbs was one of the best high school running backs in the south, playing for Auburn High School. He had been offered scholarships by many of the prominent football powers in the south. The policemen and the school ofcials had come to get him; they wanted him to play football at Auburn (a year early). The university helped him nish out his high school credits that summer, and he entered as a 17-year-old freshman at Auburn University in 1943. I didnt ask him what happened to the mattress. Due to World War II, Auburn didnt eld a team in 1943, but they did in He stayed at Auburn for a couple of years and then joined the war effort as a paratrooper in January of 1945. Clifford Grubbs came back to play for Auburn University in 1947 and on one cold and wet Nov. 8 Saturday afternoon at historic Legion Field in Birmingham, Ala., Clifford Grubbs and the outmatched Auburn Tigers battled Mississippi State furiously. It was a rough year for Auburn football, but that thought of my coach ghting and being a four-touchdown underdog keeps me going. He caught an amoeba infection serving overseas and a bum knee slowed him down when he came back to play in 1947 but he never quit. Hes just that way. Clifford Grubbs went on to coach high school football in Florida and Alabama, making a stop for a number of years at a little school in Anniston, Ala. where he had one perfect season in 1978, a few good ones and more than a few mediocre and losing seasons. Im here to tell you that my coach is not dened by wins, trophies or having elds named after him. I remember him because he cared. Once again, after the second phone call, he told me he loved me. I cried.  I cried because I had the joy of playing for one of the toughest men ever to strap on a helmet for Auburn University, who would listen, who cared, who knew how to tell when spaghetti was done and who genuinely loves me. Roll Tide and War Eagle. Now you know the story of The Mattress Kid. You can nd more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. CRANKS from page AA4Thursday, November 24, 2011From Melanie TaylorGulf County Extension Service During the holiday season, consumers are buying turkeys for that big family meal. Everyone wants to nd the perfect bird, but cooking it properly is even more important. These tips can help you create a safe and delicious meal.Buying & StoringFresh and frozen birds differ in cookinf and storage time, but not in taste or quality. If you like to buy your turkey ahead of time, try a frozen bird. If you have limited storage space, you may prefer a fresh turkey. When buying a whole turkey, estimate one pound of turkey for each person. Fresh Turkey Fresh turkeys can be kept in the refrigerator for only one or two days, but after that, they must be cooked or frozen. Store a fresh turkey in a pan in the refrigerator until you are ready to cook it. (Always keep raw animal products separated from ready-to-eat food products.) Frozen Turkey Leave the turkey in the original packaging and keep it frozen until you are ready to cook it. Unless you thaw the turkey in the refrigerator, you will not be able to refreeze it once it has thawed. Frozen turkeys should be cooked within one year for best quality. Pre-Stuffed Turkeys Do not buy pre-stuffed fresh turkeys. These turkeys can contain harmful bacteria if handled improperly. If you do want your turkey to be pre-stuffed, purchase a frozen pre-stuffed turkey that is marked with USDA or State inspection seals. Do not thaw pre-stuffed frozen turkeys before cooking. ThawingIn the Refrigerator The safest way to thaw a frozen turkey is in the refrigerator. Keep the turkey in its original packaging, and place a pan underneath to catch any drips. Allow for a thawing time of 24 hours for every four to ve pounds of turkey. Once the turkey has thawed, it can be kept in the refrigerator for one to two days. In the Kitchen Sink For a quicker thawing method, submerge your turkey in the kitchen sink. Put the turkey in a heavy freezer bag and close it tightly. Place it in a clean sink and ll the sink with cold water until the turkey is completely submerged. Change the water every half hour to keep it cool. The turkey should thaw for about 30 minutes per pound. You need to cook a sink-thawed turkey immediately after thawing. It cannot be refrigerated or refrozen. In the Microwave If the turkey will t, you can use a microwave for fast thawing. Check the microwave owners manual for the recommended power level and amount of time per pound. Remove all packaging and place the bird in a microwavesafe dish. Cook the turkey immediately after thawing. It is not safe to refrigerate or refreeze a microwave-thawed turkey. PreparationPrevent Cross-Contamination Carefully open any packaging covering the turkey and dispose of it right away. Wash any surfaces that the meat, juices or packaging might have touched, including refrigerator or freezer shelves. If you use the kitchen sink to thaw the turkey, be sure to drain and sanitize the sink immediately afterward. If you thaw any raw meat in the microwave, sanitize it as well. When handling fresh and frozen raw meat, wash your hands, utensils, dishes and kitchen surfaces frequently with hot, soapy water. Use separate knives and cutting boards when preparing the turkey and stufng. Early Preparation Some people prefer to cook their turkeys a day or two in advance. Once the bird has been cooked, carve it and refrigerate the meat in small, shallow containers. The wings, legs and thighs may be left whole. You can also refrigerate the juices that collect in the bottom of the pan during cooking. On the day you plan to eat the turkey, reheat the meat in an oven heated to at least 325 degrees.CookingStufng To save time, you can prepare the stufng ingredients in advance. Keep wet and dry ingredients separate and the wet ingredients refrigerated until just before you cook the stufng. The safest way to make stufng is to cook it separately, not inside the turkey. If you do choose to stuff the turkey, pack the stufng loosely and cook the turkey immediately afterwards. Remove the stufng from the turkey about 20 minutes after the turkey is done cooking. Frozen Turkey You can safely cook a frozen turkey without thawing it rst. A frozen bird will take longer to cook than a thawed or fresh turkey. Remove the giblets with tongs or a fork while the turkey is cooking. Remember to not thaw pre-stuffed frozen turkeys before cooking. Fresh or Thawed Turkey Be sure to remove the giblets immediately after thawing. Giblets should be cooked separately. Preheat the oven to at least 325 degrees. Place the turkey in a shallow roasting pan. The inside temperature of the turkey must reach 165 degrees in order for it to be safe to eat. You may cook the turkey to a higher temperature if desired. Use a food thermometer to check the temperature at the thickest part of the turkey breast and at the innermost part of the thigh and wing. Even if your turkey comes with a pop-up thermometer, double-check the temperature with a food thermometer. Cook an unstuffed turkey for approximately 15 minutes per pound. Allow a few extra minutes per pound for a stuffed turkey. Cooking the turkey uncovered will give it a roasted avor, but it can also dry out the meat. Put the turkey in an oven-cooking bag for more tender meat and faster cooking. Follow the manufacturers directions on the bag. Other options include pouring half a cup of water into the bottom of the pan or covering the turkey with the roasting pan lid or aluminum foil. Covering the turkey will reduce oven splatter and overbrowning. After removing the turkey from the oven, let it stand for 15 20 minutes before carving to allow the juices to settle. Leftovers Your turkey and other cooked foods will need to be eaten within two hours. After that time, leftovers should be refrigerated or thrown away. (If the temperature is over 90 degrees, food needs to be refrigerated or disposed of after one hour.) Leftover meat should be eaten within three to four days; gravy, within one to two days. You can also freeze leftovers, but make sure you eat them within six months. Turkey leftovers may be eaten cold or reheated in the oven or microwave. The oven should be heated to at least 325 degrees. Follow the owners manual instructions for reheating turkey in the microwave. For more questions on turkey or other holiday foods, contact your local Extension Ofce, visit the USDA website, or call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-674-6854. Adapted and excerpted from: Countdown to the Thanksgiving Holiday, USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (11/2010). Lets Talk Turkey, USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (1/2011). Member Board naughtynice Start With bbb.org | Start With Trust Holiday cooking: turkey food safety Opinion

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LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, November 24, 2011 Happy Thanksgivingfrom everyone here at Tim, Valerie, Joel, Kari & Gail The weather has cooled, the leaves are changing...shore-ly its almost Christmas!!!! New arrivals on Coastal Decor & Maritime Antiques Expanded Jewelry Selection Layaway & Gift Certicates Available We Ship Anywhere!!! 15% Off through-out store on items $20.00 and over Friday & Saturday!!!Items marked Firm excluded! Join us for refreshments Renees homemade Italian Cookies and Hot Cocoa!!!Bay Breeze Antiques 218-220 Reid Avenue, Beautiful Downtown Port St Joe, FL 850-229-7774 Sweet Grass Dairy Cheeses Available for the Holidays LOCAL ART www.josephscottage.com SPECIAL ORDER BOOKS AND HAVE WITHIN 2 DAYS! save time and gas (as featured on Good Morning America) CLOSED WEDNESDAY NOV 23RD AT 12PMRE-OPEN MONDAY NOV 28TH AT 8AM 106 Reid Ave Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850)227-9555 The Gift Shop at PORT ST. JOE MARINA is your headquarters for Christmas shopping this year! 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL. (850) 227-9393 Store Hours: Monday thru Sunday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST Black Friday Christmas Sale 25% off Entire Purchase (Excluding Clearance Rack) Register for a$100.00Gift CerticateTo Be Given Away Saturday, December 3rd Come by and check out our Gift Ideas, or you can NOW go online at www.psjmarina.com and do your Christmas Shopping. BESTPRICESINTOWNON COLUMBIA SPORTSWEARZEPROBELTS-LEATHER,COTTON BRAIDOR FISHPRINT,NOVELTY ITEMS,JEWELRY, NICK-NACKS GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE PSJMCAPS, VISORS,COFFEECUPS, COOZIES,BURGEES,CARTAGS, PSJMT-SHIRTSANDGOLFSHIRTS Persnickety has gone Gobble Gobble Crazy!Friday & Saturday after Thanksgiving OnlyHours 10-6Buy1getasecond identical vinyl monogram FREE Adorable Monogrammed Tote Bags $10.00 All Jeans $38.00 Shiraleah Purses and Wallets 40%off Clear Glass Initial ornaments Buy1get1free Christmas napkin holders with napkin $5.00 Sweaters & Sweater Dress 40%off Game Day Clothes 50%off All Splurge Clothes 60%off Cotton Colors Happy Everything 25%off Buy1get1free initial napkins All Boots buy 1 get 1 40%off Stephen Joseph 25%off All Baby clothes 25%off All Jewelry 40%off(Excludes: Marianna, Engraved Items, Graceware)Make Your Own Sugar Scrub, Lotion, and Lip Gloss Package Gift Certicate only $15.00! FRIDAY ONLY Stripe Monogrammed Scarves Only $15.00 1REGULARPRICEDITEM40% Off (limited 1 per customer) SHACK FRIDAY SALE 5:3OAM202 Reid Ave, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.9414DOORSOPEN AT Dealer

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 fore an auction could take place. There is also a Tampabased company that holds a delinquent tax certicate, but for the company to apply for a tax deed, it would have to satisfy other debtors with claims to the property, specically the IRS and county. The company would still be left with demolishing the building and asbestos abatement. We are the only entity that really has a dog in this ght, Magidson said. City manager Charlie Weston said all indications are that the city has a good chance of securing the competitive grant funds from EPA, and Magidson said conversations with Board of County Commissioners chairman Warren Yeager and Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton had indicated they would work with the city on owed taxes. The school district and county, Magidson said, seemed willing to wait until the sale of the land by the city to recoup the delinquent taxes. Commissioner Bo Patterson was the lone dissenting vote. My only concern is our coming up with a loss at the end, Patterson said, acknowledging that the city was not putting out any money at this time and had time to go all-in or disown any interest in the property. I promised the taxpayers not to spend one more dime than we had to. Even with the $90,000 grant, the city is looking at a potential decit of as much as $200,000 between developing the property and what it might bring on the open market. However, the numbers could easily change by spring, when any announcement of a grant award would come, several commissioners noted. Commissioners unanimously voted to rezone the land, once title is secured, from public use to singlefamily residential in keeping with the surrounding neighborhood.Weston announces retirementAn emotional Weston, his voice halting on several occasion as he battled his emotions, read a prepared statement at the end of last weeks meeting announcing that he would be retiring when his contract expires in January 2012. He last day with the city, he said, would be Jan. 15, 2012. Weston has been with the city for four years. He said he was proud of the work performed over the four years which included straightening out the citys nancial plight, overseeing a host of large infrastructure projects and addressing issues of water quality but said the toll on his family has been signicant. Noting that he had ve children and eight grandchildren living in North Carolina, Weston said he was at a point in life where it most important to spend more time as a grandfather than a city manager. Commissioner Bill Kennedy said the last four to ve years have been among the most active in the citys history, and Magidson said Joey Ginn, chairman of Vision Bank, said he expects Centennial to be aggressive in the Panhandle market. Centennial is looking to grow, and they are looking for additional acquisitions, Ginn said. He also said Park National Corporation, Visions parent company, had been looking for a buyer for Vision for some time. Park, who we merged with back in 07, over the years decided to concentrate on their back yard (Ohio), and they went to look for a buyer, Ginn said. According to Centennial Bank, this is a strategic expansion for Home BancShares and Centennial Bank by acquiring 17 bank locations in the Florida Panhandle and Baldwin County, Ala. In the Panhandle, Centennial Bank will now have eight branches in Bay County, ve in Gulf County, four in Franklin County and one each in Calhoun, Santa Rosa and Walton counties. Centennials parent company, Home BancShares Inc., is a bank holding company based in Conway, Ark. Florida State University economics professor Milton Marquis said the sale follows a trend. The larger banks have been swallowing up the smaller ones for about 15 years now, Marquis said. Most of the time it is because the smaller banks are holding too much debt. Marquis also said there have been backlashes against larger banks. Some people do get upset about their local bank going away, Marquis said. Ginn said the Centennial purchase would increase access for customers. There will be more branches for our customers, and it will be easier for our customers to bank, Ginn said. Ginn went on to say there are no personnel changes in the works, but he would not rule out any in the future. Centennial Banks Florida Regional President Tracy M. French said Centennial would do everything it could to make the transition smooth for bank customers. French said he is looking at the acquisition as an investment in the community. It is going to be good for all involved, French said. Centennial Bank plans to purchase only the banking locations, along with the majority of the performing loans and related other assets, the company reported. All of the deposits and other related liabilities will also be assumed by Centennial, the company reported. Vision will retain the remaining performing loans, along with all nonperforming loans and other real estate owned at closing. Centennial said it expects to obtain performing loans of approximately $378.6 million and approximately $535 million of deposits. The acquisition is expected to be effective in early 2012. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Centennial Bank now has branch ofces throughout Florida, from the Keys through the Panhandle and into southern Alabama. Until Centennial Bank and Vision Bank convert to a single operating system, which is anticipated to occur in April 2012, Centennial and Vision customers should continue to do business at their current Centennial or Vision branches. Customers of both banks, however, will be able to use Centennial and Vision ATMs free of charge in the near future, bank ofcials said. Home Bancshares Inc. claims $3.8 billion in assets. the Port St Joe Star on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @ PSJ_Star for daily local news updates & photos!Like -Flat screen T.Vs -Modern, comfortable seating -Amazing photography of Port St. Joe... and much more!! 2041997 CITY from page A1 CENTENNIAL from page A1 See CITY A9

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LocalThe Star| A9Thursday, November 24, 2011 A-1 Quality Docks & Boatlifts Qualied Marine Contractor, Since 1967 Why Settle For Less850-653-7633 Environmental Permitting www.A1QualityDocks.com Docks Marinas Piers Bulkheads Boardwalks Boatslips Pile Driving Sea Walls Boat Lifts Retaining Walls BoathousesFloating Docks Larry Joe Colson Lic # 12-104 Res./Com. & Ins. children with developmental and behavioral challenges. Hes high-functioning enough to know that hes different, Ciochetto said, brushing a tear off her cheek. The center has just helped him so much. Its just so wonderful, and its such a growing need. Ciochettos wreath, along with 11 others, is hanging in the lobby at FairPoint Communications, each handcrafted to make a difference. With each wreath representing a different charity, FairPoint employees are hoping to donate $1,500 to local nonprot organizations this holiday season. The wreaths will be displayed at City Commons Park during the Christmas on the Coast celebration Dec. 3 on Reid Avenue and rafed off by the end of the night. Rafe tickets are $1 apiece or $5 for six and are available at the FairPoint Business Ofce, where the wreaths will be on display until Dec. 2. FairPoint associate Donna White said the employees did not simply draw names from a hat when deciding which charity to sponsor. Rather, each employee chose something they are passionate about. Georgia Baggett chose to sponsor Second Chance of Northwest Florida, a nonprot serving the needs of adults with traumatic brain injuries and their families, in honor of a co-worker whose daughter suffered a severe head injury. Robin Gautiers wreath will benet the Gulf County Senior Citizens Center, a place she feels really needs the extra help as the funding received from the state and federal government gets slashed more and more. Theyre constantly getting their funding cut for different things, Gautier said. Sometimes they plan eld trips and have to cancel because they dont have enough money. I just thought it would be nice for them to get a little holiday treat. Susan Machemer chose to jointsponsor the Dyslexia Research Institute and the High School High Tech program at Port St. Joe High School, organizations FairPoint is involved in through various work-study and internship programs with students from Port St. Joe High School. Her wreath, adorned with shells picked straight from St. Josephs Bay, will benet the local Gulf County students involved in these programs. Weve been very active with that group through the high school, Machemer said. We are very passionate about helping local students. This is FairPoints second year organizing the Festival of Wreaths. Last year the employees raised $924 for local nonprots, and the hope is to at least double that amount this year. We pulled this together within a week last year, and we donated more than $900 to the charities, White said. We were quite proud of ourselves for such lastminute work. It really just fell together. The Festival of Wreaths was a brainstorming effort by FairPoints Community First Team, a group that focuses on projects that help give back to the community. Wed like to grow this to be bigger and better every year, Machemer said. The Community First Team has held bake sales to benet United Way, participated in Relay for Life and Ghosts on the Coast, held various food drives and participated in school volunteer and internship programs. The Festival of Wreaths is just another way for the group to give back to nonprot organizations in the community. Other nonprots the employees chose to sponsor include United Way of Calhoun County, Advocates for Children in Panama City, the Refuge House in Perry, Gulf County Relay for Life, Gulf County People Helping People and the Franklin County Humane Society. For more information, contact Donna White at 229-7251. CITY from page A8Weston could take pride in a job well done. At some point you will be able to look back with pride on what the city has accomplished during your time here, Magidson said. The city will immediately advertise the position in hopes of having a new city manager on board before Weston leaves for a seamless transition.Flushing programA complete ush of the citys water distribution system began Nov. 1 and has progressed through Oak Grove and Highland View, Public Works supervisor John Grantland said. The work will move to White City on Nov. 28 there will be no ushing during the Thanksgiving holiday week and by the rst of year be in St. Joe Beach headed toward the city proper. There have been no surprises we didnt expect, and we are on target, Grantland said. Shortly after the rst of the year, work will begin on the rst phase of pipe replacement in the system. The rst phase will be replacement of some eight miles of galvanized steel pipe as well as some valves to allow unidirectional ushing of the entire system, as required by the state.Grant pressWeston said staff is undertaking a full-court press in pursuing grant funding for a variety of initiatives. He said he had a laundry list of possible grants the city could pursue and said staff would be investigating all possibilities in preparation for application periods after the rst of the year. Buzzett specically requested staff look into any grants to improve the acoustics of the Centennial Building. The acoustics are terrible, Buzzett said. It is as close to a civic center we have. It is historical and there are a lot of events held there. Itd be a great thing for the city. Its a great building, and I think it is important for the city. CRAFTING from page A1 FairPoint Communications employees are raising money for local charities this holiday season with their second annual Festival of Wreaths. The group will rafe off a selection of handmade wreaths at the Christmas on the Coast celebration Dec. 3. VALERIE GARMAN | The Star

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters WAS $69.99 BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL $46.99LIMITED STOCKOPEN @ 6:00 A.M. EASTERN TIME MOULTRIE 6.5 HANGING GAMEFEEDERWITH DIGITAL TIMER Thursday, November 24, 2011 Muzzleloaders have seen radical change in gunsBy Stan KirklandFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Just a few decades ago, a segment of the hunting population who wanted to extend their time to hunt deer purchased a muzzleloader. However, the models used in the 1970s and s are a far cry from most of the muzzleloaders sold today. Early models were generally side-hammer, percussion cap models and used either black powder or a black powder substitute as the propellant. Granted, some purists in those days still used intlock models, but intlocks were tricky to operate on good days and virtually impossible to shoot on rainy, inclement days. The side-hammer, percussion cap models were a lot simpler to re. Assuming the user rst poured powder down the barrel and then seated a lead ball or projectile (hence the name muzzleloader), the gun was almost ready to re. To make it ready for ring, the hunter had to place a small percussion cap on a metal nipple outside the barrel. If everything worked correctly, the hunter pulled the trigger, dropping the hammer on the percussion cap, which then sent sparks and re into the barrel. That caused the black powder to instantly burn and turn to gas, which sent the bullet out the barrel and toward a waiting deer. Almost all of the older muzzleloaders had iron sights and were effective up to 75 yards. In the hands of a knowledgeable and skilled muzzleloading hunter, the sidehammer muzzleloaders worked well, and many, many deer were harvested with them. However, they sometimes failed to re, for a variety of reasons, and many deer ran off to live another day. Since the 1990s, a new and different muzzleloader, referred to as an inline, has become the standard for muzzleloading hunters. Though inlines still load the same as other muzzleloaders, they are radically different. They use a modern shotshell primer thats in line with the barrel, so less can go wrong and result in a misre. Todays inlines are precision guns. and many come pretapped for scopes. These guns are effective up to 200 yards. A hunter with an inline can cover distances on a eld or a food plot that years ago would have only been possible with a centerre hunting rie. Today, Florida is divided into four zones for hunting purposes. Most of the Panhandle is in Zone D, and deer can be hunted with muzzleloaders during the designated muzzleloading, general gun and the late archery/ muzzleloading seasons. Information about Florida hunting regulations, seasons and permit costs is available at MyFWC.com, or by contacting any FWC regional ofce. Page 10Special to The StarThe Florida Wildlife Federation is proud to announce the third Kids Wildlife Habitat Contest, open to Floridas children a ges 12 and under.  Its easy to enter!  Just tell us how your habitat provides food, water, cover and a place for c reatures to raise young.  Teachers, please note that schoolyard habitats are eligible. The winning habitat will be featured on our website and in our n ewsletter.  We will award a prize of an age-suitable gardening book and a commemorative plaque to t he winner.  All entries must be received by March 31, 2012. There is currently great concern among health care specialists, educators, environmentalists and parents about the shrinking amount of time todays children spend playing o utdoors.  It is believed that this is increasing obesity, decreasing rsthand observation of basic outdoor scientic lessons and causing a sad disconnect with nature a mong our youngsters.  Most authorities believe it is imperative to get kids away from computer games indoors and let them go outside for healthy a ctivities.          The Florida Wildlife Federation is committed to Floridas children as well as to Floridas plants and w ildlife.  We think there is a way to tie them together to promote health for kids and critters by encouraging youngsters to start and maintain a wildlife habitat. This is an excellent activity for children 12 and under. It gets them outdoors, keeps them active, sparks an interest in gardening, teaches them something about identifying plants and animals in the natural world and keeps them from wandering to places where they might not b e safe.  For all these good reasons, Florida Wildlife Federation is announcing the third Kids Wildlife Habitat Contest. Teachers, please note that schoolyard habitats are included as long as they are worked on b y the children.  The prize book will make an excellent addition to the school l ibrary.   Though we do encourage certication by the National Wildlife Federation, it is not necessary for this c ontest.  Just tell us how this habitat provides water, food, cover and a place to raise young. We will send an announcement of the winning kids or schools to your local newspapers (with parent permission). Go to www.fwfonline.org and look at the Habitat PowerPoint there for help and ideas. Email patricia@ fwfonline.org for more information. You can enter by sending photos and a description of your habitat. By Alex LynchPark Ranger St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, 227-1327 Wild turkeys are occasionally seen in beautiful St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. At this time, the park does not have a resident population, but it would not be unusual to see a turkey in the park. Wild turkeys are native to North America. There are ve subspecies: Eastern, Osceola (Florida), Rio Grande, Merriams and Goulds. All ve can be found throughout the continent. The Osceola (Florida) is only found on the Florida peninsula. A wild turkeys average life span is three to four years. They average about 3 feet tall and have a wingspan of over 4 feet. An adult wild turkey can weigh between 5 and 19 pounds. Wild turkeys live in groups called ocks. Acorns are favored foods. Unlike deer, wild turkeys have a poor sense of smell and taste. They normally select acorns based on their size and shape. The turkey is one of the most famous birds in North America. In fact, Benjamin Franklin wanted to make the wild turkey, not the Bald Eagle, the national bird of the United States! The turkeys popularity comes from the American peoples love of eating the bird for special occasions like Thanksgiving and Christmas. Happy Thanksgiving from the staff at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastate parks.org. Kids wildlife habitat contestHappy Thanksgiving from the park rangers SPECIAL TO THE STAR SPECIAL TO THE STAR Shoreline shing is about to become the norm for the winter months and leading the surf shing now is big bull red sh still. Great reports from the sea wall and under the George Tapper Bridge have been coming in along with a few ounder catches around Pig Island as well. We now have bull minnows in stock, so go ounder shing after Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday! SurfThe trout bite is starting to heat back up in St. Joe Bay. Live shrimp has been the go-to bait with lots of slot size sh being caught mid to late morning. Pig Island and Towns beach have produced most of the reported catches. The Towers in St. Joe Bay are producing lots of yellow trout or sand trout now. Bass shing in the I.C.W. and in lake Wimico continue to be the hot topic in shing right now. This years freshwater shing has improved and with the hot weather on the way again this week, the bite should be steady. Large numbers of sheepshead and red sh are coming in daily from these waters as well. FreshwaterEmail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com OUTDoo OO RSwww.starfl.comSection A

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTs S www.starfl.com ASection Thursday, November 24, 2011By Tim CroftStar News Editor Eight was enough. Port St. Joe High School inducted eight new members into the schools Athletic Hall of Fame prior to the Tiger Sharks matchup with Liberty County on Nov. 1, honoring championship athletes and coaches as well as one of the Tiger Sharks most ardent and beloved fans. The selections were made by a committee comprised of school administrators and coaches, Hall of Fame inductees of the past and district staff, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. Prior to being ofcially honored on the turf of Shark Field, the eight, and their families, were welcomed with a reception. All the great stories they were telling each other, it was fun, Norton said. We may not have another chance to honor some of these people and it is important we do so. The eight new members of the Port St. Joe High School Athletic Hall of Fame: Phillip Chatham Chatham, known to teammates and friends as Phil, was a four-year letterman in football, graduating in 1951. He was AllNorthwest Florida Conference as a junior and senior and selected to play in the Florida High School Activities Association All-Star Football Game as a senior. Chatham also lettered two years in baseball and basketball and played football as a freshman at Clemson. Coach Bill Dickson Dickson was a young basketball standout in Wewahitchka and after college returned to where he had set the scoring record, Troy State and early coaching stops, to Gulf County to coach Port St. Joe Highs basketball team. He coached the Tiger Sharks from 1966 to 1974, winning regional and state titles in 69 and 72. Those are the rst state basketball titles won by a school that has added six more banners. The 1972 team was noteworthy as it nished the regular season with a losing record only to beat prohibitive state title favorite Havana Northside, a team that had beaten the Tiger Sharks twice during the season and in the district championship game. Dickson was named state Coach of the Year in the statetitle-winning years and received National Coach of the Year honors in 1971 and 1972. John Lane Known as the Triple Threat, Lane was quarterback of the 1941 six-man football team that won Port St. Joe High Schools rst state title. Lane led the Tiger Sharks back from a 12-8 third-quarter decit against a much larger Dunnellon High School to a 27-12 victory, nishing a perfect 11-0 season. One of the headlines from a newspaper was John Lane Star Staff ReportPort St. Joe High Schools soccer teams have started the new season kicking. The girls won their rst game of the season against Bozeman and the boys won their opening two games against Bozeman and North Bay Haven Charter. The teams are off for the holiday and will hold Marianna on Nov. 29, the girls playing at 6 p.m. ET at Sam Cox Field with the Tiger Sharks following at 8 p.m. Lady Tiger Sharks The Port St. Joe girls opened the season at Bozeman on Tuesday, coming away with a 3-0 victory. Rachel Jones opened the scoring at 6:30 by converting a penalty kick off the left post and just past the diving goalkeeper. In the second half, Alley Stripling took control of her own header among three Bozeman defenders and scored unassisted to make it 2-0. Jones added another penalty kick to complete the scoring. Goalkeeper Christian Laine, who earned all-district honors as a freshman last season, recorded the shutout, making two saves on four Bozeman shots. Tiger Sharks Following the girls victory over Bozeman, the boys took the pitch and dialed in a 1-0 shutout. Javarri Beachum was the winning keeper for Port St. Joe, making two saves while Bozeman got off four shots. The lone goal came from Tiger Shark freshman Marcel Duarte with a nice touch past the keeper in the rst half. The boys continued their winning ways last Thursday when they hosted North Bay Haven, recording a 6-0 victory over a team Coach Gary Florida Freddom Staff report BRATT Wewahitchka will have to be satised with a handful of school records and a turnaround season in 2011. The Gators, as it turned out Friday night, will not be a playoff contender in football the rst year of the 1A Rural classication. District 1-1A champion Northview (8-3) ended Wewahitchkas season with a decisive 67-14 victory to advance to the Region 1-1A nal next week. Freeport eliminated Vernon 32-18 on Friday and will face Northview in a rematch of the District 1-1A championship game. Wewahitchka running back Theryl Brown added to his total of 2,226 yards rushing and 37 touchdowns with 124 yards rushing, 130 receiving and a touchdown, but Northview was in charge early and led 48-6 by halftime. The Chiefs exerted their dominance with four rst-quarter touchdowns. TIM CROFt T | The StarTheryl Brown set school records this year with more than 2,350 rushing yards and 38 touchdowns.Northview too much for Wewahitchka Port St. Joe High School inducts 8 into Athletic Hall of FFamePort St. Joe soccer teams victoriousCole Cryderman heads the ball during last weeks action against Bozeman. Martha Sanborn being inducted into the Port St. Joe Athletic Hall of Fame.TIM CROFt T | The Star See II NDUctCTIONsS A12 See FF OOtTBaALL A12 See SOcc CCER A12 PHOTOS BY ANDREW WaWA RDLOW | Florida Freedom NewspapersThe Port St. Joe boys broke from the gate as the regular season got underway with a pair of shutout wins.Page 11

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Fall-arrest safety system included.Cajun Injector Fryers Compare 5929Your Choice 30Qt Fryer or 2.5Gal. Fish Fryer#387008 #2217402801 Sleeping Bag9Compare 39 Adult Size Keeps you cozy, warm, & comfortable#49257/15228 #WW6040XL-SNG passes his way to fame. Lane was also a baseball and basketball standout between1939-42, and he was named to the 1941 All-North Florida Football Team and also played three seasons of minor league baseball before heading to college. He was set to be drafted by the Cincinnati Reds but instead enlisted in the U.S. Army during World War II. D. L. (Buster) BoBo Owens Jr. Known as Bobo, Owens was a football, basketball, baseball and track athlete in the late 1940s. Owens was named AllNorthwest Florida Football Conference in football and basketball in 1947 to 1948. At the time, the conference spanned from Pensacola to Quincy, south to Niceville and Port St. Joe and north to Graceville. Owens set a state football season scoring record in 1948, earning All-Florida honors. Owens received a scholarship to play at the University of Florida. Owens later played and starred for the base team at the Pensacola Naval Station and returned to Wewahitchka to coach the football team, where he coached for many years. Benny Roberts Beyond his legacy later in life as a grill-master, Roberts had alreday established a legacy as one of the nest Tiger Sharks players and fans. He was a standout in football and basketball in 1950 and 1951 and, after the 1951 and 1952 seasons, he was named AllNorthwest Conference in football and basketball. Basketball was his sport; he scored 48 points in a game, a school record that still stands and was set long before the 3-point shot. Roberts played collegiately at Georgia Military College, where he also served as band captain and drum major. While in the military Roberts army team won the post championship. His life after college and the military still revolved around Tiger Sharks sports. He was active in Dixie Youth baseball and helped established the girls youth softball program. The ball elds on 10th Street are named in his honor. C. W. Roberts C. W. Roberts Jr. was born in 1926, in Hosford, served in the U.S. Navy and moved to Port St. Joe in 1960. He was the project manager for the construction of the St. Joseph Bay Country Club and golf course, donating plenty of labor and equipment to complete the course layout. Roberts was instrumental in the construction of many of the Little L eague elds in Port  St. Joe. Though not an alumnus, Roberts was a driving force in the athletic programs and in the construction of the Port St. Joe High School football stadium. The home bleachers are dedicated in his honor. Archie Lee Shackelford Better known as DShack, Shackelford was born in Port St. Joe in 1952 and was one of the standout football players in school history. Shackelford ran for 142 yards and three touchdowns to lead the Tiger Sharks to the 1971 state title, completing a 13-0 season during which Shackelford was the top rusher and an offensive threat. He was named rstteam all-state that year. Later, as a high school football coach, Shackelford led Kingstree High School (SC) to a runner-up nish in the state. Martha Sanborn Martha Sanborn is, as was said Friday night, the quintessential Shark fan, with her distinctive Whooooo-whoo-ooo echoing from football elds to basketball arenas to baseball diamonds. A top-ight teacher, she was also the cheerleader sponsor at the school. But she was more than a sponsor, as Willie Ramsey said Friday. Nearly everyone who has passed through Port St. Joe High Schools halls of glory has heard Martha Sanborns dauntless and seasoned voice resonate above the crowds that are extolling the Sharks to more lofty deeds. Brandon Sheets scored on a 35-yard run and passed 45 yards to Dalton Daniel for a score. LaMikal Kyles 46-yard run opened a 21-0 bulge with 4:06 left in the rst quarter and less than two minutes later he caught a 45-yard touchdown pass from Sheets. A 1-yard run by Roderick Woods upped the score to 350 with 11:09 remaining before halftime. The Gators temporarily stymied the onslaught when Ben Hayward caught a 19-yard scoring pass from quarterback Justin Flowers with 7:54 left in the second q uarter. Heyward  caught three passes from 35 yards. Montaio Mitchells 14yard run and Kyles 80-yard sprint, his third touchdown of the half, reinforced Northviews dominance before halftime. Open FRIDAY November 25 @ 4pm SATURDAY November 26 @ 12 noon Located South of Hwy 98 between Mexico Beach & Port St. Joe 850.229.6060 www.boondocksfl.com JOIN USFORHANDCUTSTEAK & SCRUMPTIOUSSEAFOOD! Raw Oysters only $4.99 & $1 Draft Beer INDUCTiIOnNS from page A11 SSOCCER from page A11 FOOTBALL from page A11 JOHN LANE PHIllLLIpP CHATHAM D. L. (BUSTER) BOBO O O WENS JR. BENNY RRObBERTSHindley characterized as inexperienced. The Tiger Sharks netted two rst half goals, one from Duarte, the other off the foot of sophomore midelder Drew Lacour. Duarte added another goal in the second half off a penalty kick. LaGrande McLemore, Cole Cryderman and Daniel May also added second half goals. Witt Shoaf, McLemore, Beachum, and Jacob Lacour each had one assist. The shutout was shared by Beachum, who earned the win and is 2-0, and senior Walt Bowers. Combined, the two made only one save as North Bay Haven managed just two shots all night compared to 42 from Port St. Joe. The win came at a cost as junior starting winger Justin Cothran sustained a fractured foot and will be out for much, if not all, of the season. SportsA12 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011

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www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Thursday, November 24, 2011 COMMUNITYSpecial to The StarSunset Park in Mexico Beach is being transformed into a Florida Beach Christmas! The Special Events for Mexico Beach, the Mexico Beach Community Development Council, along with the City of Mexico Beach, invites the public to attend the annual Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony held at Sunset Park (next to El Governor Motel) on Sunday, Dec. 4. The evenings festivities begin with a story reading from author Marcia Harden. Harden will be reading her book Im Hungry Said the Donkey at Sunset Park at 5:30 p.m. CT. In the book, Harden writes of Gods love as she weaves a playful holiday masterpiece so that even the youngest of children can grasp the magic and majesty of the night Baby Jesus was born. A true meaning of Christmas shines through in this tender childrens story about the long, long road to Bethlehem and the hungry, hungry night in the cold and drafty stable through the eyes of the donkey. Following the story reading, the tree lighting ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. There will be music and the singing of Christmas carols to get all into the holiday spirit as well as delicious homemade desserts and hot chocolate. After the lighting of the Christmas tree, the golf cart parade will come down the street where Santa will follow behind to make his visit with all the boys and girls. We ask that those wishing to have pictures taken with Santa to please bring their cameras. The golf cart parade is gearing up once again to add special holiday air to the evenings events. With the help of some special elves in Mexico Beach, the golf carts will be adorned with Christmas lights, decorations and special touches that will excite even Scrooge. If you are interested in decorating your golf cart and riding in the parade, please contact Traci Gaddis at 648-5474. We are asking for donations of new, unwrapped toys that the Mexico Beach Department of Public Safety will deliver to families in need in our area. Please join us as we bring the warmth and spirit of the holidays to the beach. For any questions about the events, please contact the Mexico Beach Welcome Center at 6488196.By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer The Reid Avenue Bunco Babes dished out sh last week for the Gulf County Library. The Bunco Babes, a group of communityminded Bunco acionados, held a sh fry to benet the library at Frank Pate Park on Nov. 17. The group raised $2,459 for the library and fed between 325 and 350 people. The Bunco Babes would like to thank all of the generous volunteers and donors that helped make the event a success. We couldnt have made that much money without everybody pitching in, said Dana Boyer, who helped organize the event for the Bunco Babes. It was truly a community event. County Commissioner Carmen McLemore supplied and prepared the fried mullet, and Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton, Port St. Joe city commissioner Bill Kennedy and Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent helped plate food. Eric Spilde from the Fish House Restaurant donated the hush puppies, and the coleslaw was donated by Patti Blaylock from Sunset Coastal Grill. Al Smith from Gracies Lounge loaned cooking supplies for the event. Half Hitch Tackle provided the tent, which was set up by Marty Jarosz and the Port St. Joe High School JROTC. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative in Wewahitchka also loaned its large fryer for the day, with help from Betty Horn and Jimbo Nunnery. This is the fourth fundraiser the Bunco Babes have put together for the library, said Bobbye Johnson, a member of the Friends of the Library group. The difference with today is they have the entire community involved. Johnson said the Bunco Babes have collectively raised more than $5,000 for the library in previous which went to purchasing books, subscriptions and CDROMs for the Gulf County Librarys Port St. Joe branch. This money is going to be used to buy books on CD, Johnson said. These ladies have worked so hard to put this together. Johnson sent off each customer by saying the library says thank you, as a steady lunch rush streamed through the line. These volunteers doing this really make a difference, Johnson said. The library is just really essential to the community.Special to The StarSt. Joseph Bay Golf Club will hold its second annual Christmas Bazaar and Jingle Bell Golf Tournament Dec. 9-10, supporting Gulf County Christmas for Kids and People Helping People. The club is open to the public and the golf tournament will be individual handicap play with a 12 p.m. shotgun start on Saturday, Dec. 10. The community is encouraged to turn out and support the Christmas Bazaar, which will ll the holiday-decorated clubhouse with local artists and craftsmen selling handmade gifts, including jewelry, jams and jellies, hand-stitched items, pottery, decorations, stained glass, original art, specialty breads and fresh foods. The Christmas Bazaar will be open Friday, Dec. 9, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET and Saturday, Dec. 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Event volunteer Barb Van Treese said, Last years Christmas Bazaar was such a great success where many locals came out and were really surprised with the great values that were offered. I heard people say they were glad they came by because they found Christmas gifts that saved them a trip to Panama City. This year we just want to let more people know. The Jingle Bell Golf Tournament is being promoted as a fun event with mulligans available for $5. The format will be individual handicap play with prizes including $300 gfor rst place, $200 for second, $100 for third and $50 for fourth. The golf tournament entry fee is $45 per person for club members or $30 with a toy for donation to Gulf County Christmas for Kids. Entry is $55 for non-members, or $40 and a toy. Entry includes a meal following the tournament with a beer, wine or soft drink and a fun awards ceremony promising lots of door prizes. More information is available online at www. stjoebaygolf.com, by visiting the club in person or calling 850-227-1751. Special lodging packages are available. The event is being supported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council.PSJ twins are two of a kindChristmas tree lighting ceremony Dec. 4Christmas bazaar and golf tournamentBunco Babes dish for library with sh fry By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Growing up, the Rushing girls were known simply as the twins. A mash-up of their rst names Brennalenna was another popular identier for the inseparable duo, and when they were individually addressed, it was usually as twin one and twin two, or just twin. Today, twins Brenda Wood and Linda Wright live across the street from each other in Port St. Joe, and still delight in telling stories from their childhood, when they spent every waking moment side by side. They nish each others sentences and argue about who will tell a certain story (Let me tell it! Let me tell it!), giggling and throwing their heads back, as they recollect the days when they dressed alike, joined the same clubs, made the same grades, received the same awards and had all the same friends. Theyve been accused of cheating on their husbands, playing hooky from work and being in two places at once. Theyve had their contacts mixed up at the eye doctor, had the same teeth pulled, and had their braces for the same amount of time. They cant sit by each other at weddings, Wood said, because they get so tickled with each other. As kids, they each either wanted to be a dental hygienist or a teacher. Today, Wright, a dental hygienist, is constantly waved at in the grocery store by Woods fth-grade students, and Wood, a teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary School, is always addressed by Wrights patients. Growing up, they shared everything. Our sister even accuses us of sharing a brain, Wright said. And sometimes I swear we do. They slept in the same crib as babies and sucked each others thumbs. We still cant tell ourselves apart in pictures sometimes, said Wright as she ipped through a photo album titled A Journey of 50 Years, complete with black-andwhite photos of the girls as infants that their mother labeled with each twins name underneath, with some of the labels scratched out and rewritten. Although they are fraternal twins, their mother still had trouble telling them apart when they were younger. Wright is known in the family as the bonus, because their mother never suspected she was having twins. The twins dressed alike up until college. In their senior yearbook portraits, they don the same cateye glasses and the same short haircut. It was dumb of us to always dress alike because we would have had twice as many clothes. Wright said. We didnt realize it was weird until we left St. Joe. Wright remembers her mother buying them two winter coats and the coats hanging in their closet in plastic covers. I remember Mama saying, They wouldnt know it, but one coat is black and one is dark green, Wright said. And we wouldnt have it. The twins mother returned one of the coats and exchanged it for a matching color, knowing they wouldnt wear the coats even if they were the slightest bit different.See TWINS B6 Photos by VALERIE GARMAN | The StarGulf County Sheriff Joe and Superintendent Jim Norton help plate lunch orders at the sh fry. A group prepares a pot of cheese grits at the sh fry.Photos by VALERIE | The StarAbove: Twins Brenda Wood (left) and Linda Wright were inseparable growing up, and now they live across the street from each other in Port St. Joe. Left: Twins Brenda and Linda as children.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society DO YOUR FEET HURT? Why Suffer with heel pain, ingrown toenails, burning feet, diabetic foot conditions, corns, bunions, callouses? Whatever the problem, the sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better youre going to feel. Dr. Burton S. Schuler Podiatrist Foot Specialist 763-3333 So Why Wait?Make your appointment. Call today!We accept Medicare, Medicaid, BCBS andother major InsurancesDr. Burton S. SchulerLearn more about Dr. Shuler at Whyyoureallyhurt.com 25 years in practice of Podiatric Medicine, Pain Management & Foot Surgery in Panama City 36 years in treating diabetes Specialist & leading Medical Expert on Mortons Toe SocietyCharles E. (Ed) Doyle and his wife Edith Cornelia (Nelia) Barker Doyle, of Wewahitchka, will celebrate their 65th wedding anniversary on Nov. 22. The couple rst met many years ago, growing up on nearby farms in the rural south during the Great Depression. Nelia decided at age 13 she would one day marry Ed. Ed, who spent 1940-41 with the North Carolina National Guard joined the U.S. Navy the day after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 and served overseas during World War II. He and Nelia wed in 1946 after Ed returned to the U.S. For years, Ed worked for the U.S. Navy and was stationed all over the world. The couple settled in Wewahitchka after Eds retirement in June 1966. They have one son, four grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Nelia will be 84 years old and Ed 90 years old in January 2012. They remain active in the community with many hobbies including gardening, geology and youth outreach. Ed is a Master Gardener who has worked with county extension agent Roy Lee Carter for years. Ed and Nelia have known each other since childhood and are still in love after 65 happy years of marriage!Ed and Nelia Doyle celebrate 65 years togetherHappy 8th Birthday Taylor FortuneWe LOVE you very much! Love,Daddy, Kari, Rylan, Bailey, Jarod & MarissaLyndsey Marie Hill and Christopher Lee CatheyEdward and Susan Hill, former residents of Port St. Joe, are pleased to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Lyndsey Marie Hill, to Christopher Lee Cathey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Al Cathey of Mexico Beach. Lyndsey is the granddaughter of Virginia Green of St. Joe Beach and the late Paul Green and Robert Franck of Rochester, NY and Marie Hill and the late Riles Hill of Perry, FL. Lee is the grandson of Marion Cathey of Mexico Beach and the late W.O. Cathey and Marjorie Sasser of Panama City, FL and the late James F. Goff. The bride-elect is a graduate of Lee County High School in Leesburg, GA and a 2008 graduate of the University of Georgia with a BS degree in Biology. She currently teaches science at North Bay Haven School in Panama City, FL. Lee is a graduate of Port St. Joe High School in Port St. Joe, FL and attended Gulf Coast State College. He is currently a managing partner of Catheys ACE Hardware in Mexico Beach, FL. A March 3, 2012 wedding is planned at the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe. Star Staff ReportSanta Claus is coming to a hospital near you. An appearance by the jolly old man himself, hopefully arriving via helicopter, will be among the highlights as the Sacred Heart on the Gulf Guild Gift Shop holds a fundraiser Dec. 1-3. The Gift Shop will offer unique gifts, inspirational treasures, holiday decorations, ornaments, nativity sets and angels during the three-day event. The gift shop will be open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET each day. The gift shop is inside Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Santa Claus is scheduled to arrive at 9 a.m. ET on Saturday. The Sacred Heart Gift Shop is a non-prot fundraising program operated by the Volunteers of the Hospital Guild. Proceeds support hospital services for the community.Special to The StarThe City of Mexico Beach will observe the following schedule for Sanitation services during the Thanksgiving Holiday week: Monday 11/21/11 Regular garbage pick up Tuesday 11/22/11 Regular garbage pick up Wednesday 11/23/11 Yard Debris pick up Thursday 11/24/11 Thanksgiving HolidayNo pick up Friday 11/25/11 Thanksgiving HolidayNo pick up2011 Countywide Thanksgiving Dinner Program-Volunteer work days/timesA gathering of volunteers is needed to ensure that more than 800 Thanksgiving dinners are cooked, prepared, packaged and delivered to needy families and individuals in Gulf County. Volunteers are needed for the following dates and times: On Wednesday, Nov. 23 (Thanksgiving Eve) from 14 p.m. ET. 15 volunteers are needed at the Oak Grove Assembly of God Church at 613 Madison Ave. in Port St. Joe. On Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 24 about 80 plus volunteers are needed to help on the serving line and to help deliver meals. Volunteers will be needed from the hours of 6 a.m. until noon ET. This is a great opportunity to help needy families in Gulf County. Your help is needed to make this project a success. If you would like to be a volunteer, please call program director Jerry Stokoe at 381-6122 for more information. Donations can be mailed to Oak Grove Church, P.O. Box 967, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Place Donation for Thanksgiving dinner on legend. Christmas toys and jacket drop off locations The owners of the Pristine Pool & Supplies, Tim and Crystal DePuy have made their business available as a drop off location for the 2011 Christmas Toys program for Gulf County children. There will be a box for toys and coats and jackets available beginning Nov. 1, and also at Ramseys Printing & Supply on Reid Ave. Items may be dropped off between 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. People Helping People will also be open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. ET on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to receive food, toys, and new coats and jackets. The items collected will be distributed to needy families in Gulf County. Anyone who has any questions call program coordinator Jerry Stokoe 381-6122, or Erika White, executive director of People Helping People at 229-5262. Your help is greatly needed to help families in Gulf County. Stokoe is working with the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce to make sure no child is left out. The guidance counselors at Port St. Joe Elementary and High Schools are also working with Stokoe and the Sheriff. Please check with Stokoes booth at the Nov. 19 Community Appreciation Day at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe, and dont forget to bring a can(s) of non-perishable food to donate. There will also be a Christmas tree decorated with the names of needy children in Gulf County. Please take one to help these children have a memorable holiday. Salvation Army seeks volunteersThe Salvation Army is currently looking for volunteers to ring the bell at the Piggly Wiggly this holiday season. Volunteers are asked to work one-hour shifts. If you are interested, please call 596-9552 for more information.Gulf County Democratic Party meetingThe Gulf County Democratic Party will meet at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, Dec. 1 at the Port St. Joe Fire Station Building. All members are encouraged to attend and participate. Mr. Frank Day will be our guest speaker. Day is the Chairperson for the Walton County Democratic Party, and serves as the Regional Director for Small Counties Democratic Coalition. Volunteer tax assistancePeople Helping People, through the IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, will offer free tax preparation to lowto moderate-income in Gulf County from Jan. 17 to April 15. To become an IRS certied tax preparer please join us on Tuesday, Dec. 6 and Dec. 13 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET at 2010 Parker Ave. in Highland View. For more information give us a call at 229-5262. Society bBRIEfsFS Engagement happHAPPY BIRthda THDA Y sacSACREdD hHEaARt T gGUIldLD ch CHRIstmasSTMAS spSPEctacCTACUlaLAR MEEXIcCO bBEachACH saSANItatTATION schSCHEdDUlLE fFOR thaTHANKsgSGIvVINgG WEEK

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The Star| B3Thursday, November 24, 2011 Dont forget to make your appointment before the Holidays. Announcing:The Coin, Currency & Stamp ShowFree Admission! For more information, call Doug at 850-215-8565, or Frank at 850-265-9847 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information experience. School NewsPre-kindergarten: Grady Player Kindergarten: Brooke White 1st grade: Kaydan Haisten 2nd grade: Erica Ramsey 3rd grade: Allie Godwin 4th grade: Joseph Farrell 5th grade: Cameron Harmon Bus riders of the week: Sophia Wilder, Arlena Gleichner, Jasmine Burton, Brian Darnell, Jamarrien Becton and Chase Dykes DAZZLING DOLpPHINS Special to The StarGGeneral IInformation: Nov. 23half day, no lunch Nov. 23Jr. High will have their 23rd Annual Turkey Trot (run/walk) around 9:30 a.m. There will be a concession stand sponsored by the BETA Club; students need to bring money for concessions. Nov. 24-25Thanksgiving Holiday Boys basketball teams are selling rafe tickets to help pay for their basketball shoes. First place is a free weekend in a house on St. Joe Beach; second place is two reserved season tickets; third place is a $25 gift certicate to the Piggly Wiggly.SSports: Nov. 28Jr. High basketball at Marianna, 6 p.m./7 p.m. CT; Nov. 29Girls basketball at Sneads, 5:30 p.m. ET; Nov. 29 Girls and Boys soccer vs. Marianna, 6 p.m./8 p.m.; Nov. 30Varsity basketball at Cottondale, 6 p.m./7:30 p.m.By Mrs. Crystal CauseyThe students of Faith Christian School honored our veterans with a special program on Veterans Day. Students from rst through third grades were at their patriotic best as they sang songs, recited a poem, and presented artwork to the veterans in attendance. Shelby Causey kicked off the festivities as she led the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance and the Star Spangled Banner. Jacob Davis then welcomed our veterans and thanked them for their seless and noble service to our country. Kristen Bouington prayed for our men and women in arms, followed by Donovan Cumbie and Magnolia Sarmiento who recited an Acrostic poem entitled Our Denition of Service. The students performed a lively arrangement of I Love America. After the introduction of the veterans given by Emma Grace Burke, Luke OBarr, and Halee Whicker, students from rst-, second-, and thirdgrades presented their Symbols of Liberty. All art was the original work of the students and the presentation included a brief history and description of their individual pieces. The children performed a moving rendition of America the Beautiful, followed by a tribute of the veterans led by Farren Newman. Theron Smith, Jr. closed with a prayer for our country. A reception followed in the dining hall of FCS for all in attendance. A special thank you to all who worked so hard to make this day special for everyone. The Lions TALESpecial to The StarWewahitchka High School has been involved in professional development training through a grant opportunity provided by Florida State Universitys Bioscopes Program. Bioscopes is a statewide partnership project dedicated to providing professional development for Floridas teachers regarding the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for science and providing in depth content knowledge enhancement during a series of summer institutes and weekly webinars. This programs main focus was a lesson study team in each participating school that was required to design, deliver and revise a high quality, grade appropriate lesson, centered on a specic NGSSS benchmark in Biology. Two high school science teachers at WHS, Kimberly McMillion and Lana Harrison, attended the Bioscopes training this past July. They were required to select other members of the faculty to be part of this cross curriculum effort in lesson study. Judy Williams technology specialist, Micah Peak media specialist and math, and Peral Hunter history and ESE were recruited by Harrison and McMillion not only for their expertise and certications, but also by their work ethics and dedication to the teaching profession. This lesson study team collaborated and worked many extra hours to ensure the success of the Bioscopes Program and student learning. Each member of the team brought multiple insights to enhance the lesson for the students and to raise the support of each team participant. PAEC representative, Pam Bondurant, who monitored the lesson study, complimented the WHS team for being thorough in planning and preparing the students, as well as positively critiquing one another. There were other guests that observed the lesson study including Principal Debbie Baxley and Superintendent Jim Norton. All participants in the program came to the consensus that this Bioscopes Lesson Study was a huge success for WHS.Special to The StarWewahitchka High School is proud to announce its winners in the VFW sponsored Patriots Pen and Voice of Democracy contests. Conducted nationwide, these youth competitions give students an opportunity to express their views on democracy. The Voice of Democracy is the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFWs) premier scholarship program. Students compete by writing and recording a broadcast script on an annual patriotic theme. This years theme is, Is There Pride in Serving in Our Military? Winners of the Voice of Democracy contest are Chandler Vines, rst place; Danielle Ward, second; and Chelsea Cook, third. The winners of the Patriots Pen essay contest are Austin Malcolm, rst place; Carla Peavy, second; and Alexandra Paul, third. The 2011-12 theme is, Are You Proud of Your Country? Special to The StarThe theme for the Fall Book Fair for Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School this year was Reading is Out of This World. A Wish List Board in the library provided students and teachers provided an opportunity to put in book titles they wish to be purchased. ATI will try to help out in purchasing some of these books that students and teachers cannot afford to buy. The following is a link to the book fair site in case parents prefer to order online bookfairs. scholastic.com/bookfairs/ cptoolkit/publish/wewa.By Shelby WoodFor the rst time in 10 years, Wewahitchka High School will play host to the Three Rivers Regional Science and Engineering Fair. On Nov. 29-30, WHS students will present their science fair projects. These projects will range from biological studies to engineered inventions and can be completed individually or in teams. Open house will be held from 4-6 p.m. CT on Nov. 29 for the public to come witness the ingenuity of WHS students. On Dec. 1, winners will be announced. WHS representatives will travel to the regional competition, held this year at FSU Panama City campus during January 2012. The winners from there will continue on to the state competition in Orlando in March 2012. We wish our students luck as they delve into their scientic discoveries and explore their creative potential! PHOt T OS SpSP ECIAL tT O THE StST ARThe Wewahitchka High School Voice of Democracy winners were: left to right: Chandler Vines, rst; Chelsea Cook, third; and Danielle Ward, second. VFW ESSAY CONtTEStT WINNERS FALL bBOOkK FAIR At T WHS WWEWAHItTCHkKA HIGH bBIOSCOpPES LESSON StTUdDYThe WHS VFW Patriots Pen essay winners: Left to right: Alexandra Paul, third; Austin Malcolm, rst; and Carla Peavy, second. tTHE SCIENCE FAIR COMES tTO WHS The Lions Tale

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FAITHPage B4 www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week.Thursday, November 24, 2011Which Bible?Whenever I hear, or read, something about the Bible being without error, I usually ask, Which Bible are you talking about? There are well over 100 Bibles in existence, and at least 30 different Bibles, which are translations of ancient writings into English. I have at least 20 different English translations in my personal library, and I have researched all of them. All Bibles carry the beliefs of their translators with them. Those that come to your door, and try to convince you to take a Bible Study with them, would like you to believe that their Bible, the New World Translation, is without error. You dont have to do much independent study in this Bible to determine that it is a translation that has been inuenced heavily by their beliefs, rather than a scholarly translation of the most reliable Greek and Hebrew writings. The most popular translation of the Bible in use, in this area, is called the King James Version. It is basically a good Bible, better than most, and I use it frequently. What its advocates usually dont tell you, is that the translation was heavily inuenced by King James, himself and others who shared his beliefs. About 80 percent of the translators involved in the production of the King James Version were those who subscribed to his own beliefs. The other 20 percent, the Puritans, were virtually ignored, and were then persecuted, to the point that many ed to America. So who was King James? He was king of Scotland, known as King James VI, before he became King James I of England. Like most monarchs, as a child, he was under the teaching of private tutors. His tutors were what we today, would call extreme Calvinists, and therefore King James, himself, became an extreme Calvinist. The translators of all Bibles carry prejudices, which arise from the translators own religious beliefs. In addition to translation, an important consideration that goes into the production of Bibles is manuscript selection. Those writings that were written by Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and the Apostle Paul, for example, are no longer in existence. When someone claims, that their Bible, is a translation of the originals, they are simply not being truthful. If you have the time, and money, and are uent in Hebrew, Aramaic, and New Testament Greek, you can go to museums around the world, and read the oldest manuscripts in existence,in the original languages. Most of these date back no further than about 600 AD. There were two manuscripts that came to light in the mid1800s, that appear to date back to the 3rd century,perhaps around 390 AD. These differed substantially from the other manuscripts, and had many differences with each other. This explains the changes that appear in modern English Bibles. Of the popular English translations, only the KJV and the NKJV are based on what is called the Received Text. Questions or comments are invited. Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible, every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh.Check us out this Sunday! We worship, at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st Street. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337 Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook, look for Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com Nov. 30, 2004 was the worst day. I remember the phone ringing late at night, which everyone dreads, and my mother telling me my brother was missing. I still remember the smell in the house, what I was wearing, where I was standing, and holding my ve-month old son when I heard the news. November 30, 2004 was the day I lost my best friend, my brother, Jeffrey Frogger Holmes at the age of 29. It is now 2011. I am reminded this month that he has been gone for seven years. In the seven years he has been gone, I have met many people who called him friend. Some of them I knew and some I did not. Nonetheless, I have realized over the last seven years that Jeffrey touched so many lives. He lived life on his terms and without regret. He was also the kind of person that would give you the shirt off his back but didnt want anyone to know. To those that knew him, they knew he had a good heart. He loved his family. I can also remember his love for this great country. The year he died, he was sent overseas to Iraq. He called me the day my son was born. I remember telling him that I was sorry he had to go and to be careful. His reply Ive got to go, so Jacob has a safe world to come into. I will never forget those words. In my brothers memory, I want to live life on my own terms and with no regrets. And, without a doubt I know he is in the presence of angels and we shall meet again. To Jeffrey: I love you and miss you!Love, Sandra The Christian CONScCIENcCE Let your light shineThe lost need the light to shine for them, Without it, the way is dark and dim. It says in Gods Word, to let our light shine That the lost will see Jesus, and salvation nd. Many times we say we are doing our best, If God gave a grade, could you pass the test? Are we reading the Word and heeding the call? Are we witnessing for Jesus any at all? Do we let our light shine, at work and at play? Do we smile or frown as we go through the day? If you are a Christian, youre watched each day. So smile, and let your light shine, as you go on your way. Billy Johnson In the presence of angels

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, November 24, 2011Special to The StarOn Nov. 16, the Gulf Coast Workforce Board (GCWB) celebrated 15 years of providing workforce services to the region at its annual meeting and luncheon at FSU Panama City Campus Holley Center. At the meeting, Executive Director Kim Bodine reviewed the local workforce system performance over the last year which included: Assisted 526 employers recruit and hire workers Served 52,006 walk-ins at the Workforce Center Connected 5,336 individuals to employment Provided in demand training and/or employment services to 1,014 adults, dislocated workers and youth under the Workforce Investment Act Helped 216 families transition from welfare to self sufciency We owe our great performance to our hardworking staff, our dedicated volunteer board members and our service providers, said Kim Bodine, Executive Director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. The service providers for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board include Bay District Schools, Bay STARS; Haney Workforce Training Center; Friends of the Franklin County Library, TIGERS Program; Gulf Coast State College, Workforce Center; and Royal American Management. Individuals from each of the service providers along with their case manager were recognized for successfully completing their workforce program including Brooke McVay who completed the LPN program at Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/Franklin Center. The Port St. Joe Summer Youth Leadership Program was also showcased at the meeting, noting that the program served 142 Gulf County children along with 20 young adults who were all placed in internships. At the meeting the board voted on a new slate of ofcers for 2011. Gary Ross from Gulf County was appointed to serve his second term as chairman of the board. We will focus on increasing the publics awareness and understanding of the services available through the workforce system. Our goal is to do an even better job of bringing employers and job seekers together, said Gary Ross. Other board members elected as 2011 ofcers include: Vice-Chair: Tommy W ard (Bay County) Executive Committee Member: Alisa Kinsaul (Bay County) Executive Committee Member: Ruth Phillips (Gulf County) Executive Committee Member: Betty Croom (Franklin County) Executive Committee Member: Ted Mosteller (Franklin County) About the Gulf Coast Workforce Board The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is a public/private partnership chartered by the State of Florida to administer workforce development programs in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. Their mission is to provide leadership, oversight, guidance, and assistance to institutions and agencies delivering training and workforce services in order to meet the economic development and employment needs of Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971OPEN AT 11AM ET 7 DAYS A WEEKWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM Events!! Upcoming FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PM ETKARAOKE & DANCING IN THECROWS NESTTHURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PM ETRANDY STARK ON THE POOPDECKTUESDAY & WEDNESDAYLADIES NIGHT 5 PMTILCLOSING Christmas PartyTHURSDAY DEC 15TH dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Great for Special Events, Holiday Parties or a Quick Getaway Call to Reserve Today! 1-2 People Nightly Rate1-2 Nights..............................$200 3 Nights or more.....................$175 3-5 People1-2 Nights..............................$225 3 Nights or more.....................$200 6 or More People1-2 Nights..............................$250 3 Nights or more.....................$225Party Rental Rates$150(if purchasing less than $100 from bar or package)$100(if purchasing more than $100 from bar or package)* Plus 11% sales tax/Gulf Co. bed taxAll rentals are subject to approval by management. 117 Sailors Cove, Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850)229-3463www.haughtyheron.com Apartment Rental Rates Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER 9941546 FREE ESTIMATES1-850-626-9242 1-800-69-SHRED Security-cleared personnel Fort Walton Beachs leading mobile destruction company Weekly, monthly, or annual service Locally owned & operated Gulf Coast Workforce Board annual luncheonSpecial to The StarGulf Coast Electric Cooperative recently presented a contribution to the American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society received $4,500 for Gulf Coast Electrics sponsorship of local Relay For Life events in 2012. The Cooperative contributed $1,500 each to the Relay For Life of Gulf County, the Relay For Life of Panama City and the Relay For Life of Washington County. One of the four core values of Touchstone Energy Cooperatives is Commitment to Community, GCEC Manager of Marketing and Member Services Kristin Evans said. Its also one of the seven cooperative principles. As a cooperative, Gulf Coast Electric strives to uphold this value and support our local community. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part of the Touchstone Energy national alliance of local, consumer-owned electric cooperatives providing high standards of service to customers large and small. Approximately 70 employees serve more than 20,000 meters and 2,500 miles of line in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, Lynn Haven, White City, Fountain and Southport. SPECIAL TO TT HE STARGCEC Manager of Marketing and Member Services Kristin Evans (right) presents a check in the amount of $4,500 to Stephanie Bird of the American Cancer Society. The Cooperative will sponsor three local Relay For Life events, including the event in Gulf County, in 2012.GCEC presents contribution to American Cancer Society PP HOTOs S SPECIAL TO TT HE STARBrooke McVay recently completed the LPN program at the Gulf/ Franklin Center. The Gulf County contingent to last weeks annual luncheon: back row from left to right: Michael Harris, Gary Ross, Assane Beye, Barry Sellers; front row from left to right: Kim Bodine and Ruth Phillips.

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011On Christmas, the twins sorted their presents according to size and wrapping. It was inevitable they would receive the same gifts, and neither wanted to ruin the surprise. So they sorted all their presents and opened them together. One of their earliest twin memories was standing at the McDonalds in Callaway and people staring in awe at how alike they looked. Back then, twins werent as common as they are now, Wood said. Wood remembers once in rst grade when Linda came across the hall with a note for her teacher. I remember (my teacher) yelling, Didnt I tell you to stay in your seat! Wood said. In school, they were accused of cheating because they always missed all the same questions and made the same grades. Their ACT scores were exactly the same, and they graduated high school with GPAs one tenth of a point apart. In high school, they played the same leading role in Count Dracula, each twin performing one half of the play. When they went to get their restricted drivers licenses, one twin missed too many questions on the written test. The twins father told the attendant either they both pass or they both fail. They remember one of their friends saying in high school, You cant ght with one twin; youve got to ght with both of them. They both took piano lessons growing up. One twin would wait on the teachers front steps as the other had her lesson. They can still play a duet on the piano together, although they dont remember the name of it. Its March of the something, Wright said, as they both begin to hum the melody. Brenda always played the low notes, and Linda the high notes. They were never jealous of each other growing up and rarely fought or argued. They admit to arguing only about every three months. If Linda didnt get the same award as me, it was bittersweet, like this is no fun, said Wood, recalling seventh grade when she received an invitation to the junior honor society ceremony and her sister did not. Wood attended the ceremony, and remembers they called Lindas name as well. I remember going to the door and being so excited to tell her she made it too, Wood said. Around town, they are constantly mistaken for one another. People who know us, know theres two of us, and they can tell us apart, Wood said. But when it comes to acquaintances, the twins have dozens of stories about being mixed up. I can have my scrubs on and people will come up to me and ask me about school, said Wright, the dental hygienist. She remembers going into Dollar General one time and the store clerk asking as she walked in, Back already? Wright knew in an instant she had just missed running into her sister. Another time at Subway after a stressful day at work, someone asked Wright if she was Linda or Brenda. Wright mistakenly responded Brenda. The twins were separated for the rst time when Wood got married. That was the hardest thing, oh my God, said Wright, who also lived away in Birmingham for three years, and constantly waited by the phone for her sister to call. I was just tickled to death to come back home, Wright said. Soon enough, Wright started dating Woods neighbor from across the street, John Wright, and the two eventually married. They were both pregnant with their rst children at the same time. It was great to have children together, Wright said. But we were very glad they were different, one girl, one boy, because we didnt want them to be compared like we always were. When Wood found out she was pregnant with her third child, Wrights response was, God, Brenda, I cant take another pregnancy. I just felt like I was going through it with her, said Wright, who went with her sister to all of her doctors appointments all three times she was pregnant. Although they are much alike, the twins do admit to having their differences. I think we realized our differences when we got married, Wright said. We do have our differences, and we realize it more and more as we get older. Wood describes herself as much more laid back than Linda. The two hope to end up in a nursing home together someday. We never realized it before because we complemented each other, Wood said. People always ask me, Whats it like being a twin? And I ask them, Whats it like not being one? Trades & Services RODNEY HALL ROOFINGlic.#ccc1326056When Experience CountsFOR LEAF AND STRAW REMOVAL FROM ROOF OR GUTTERS.CALL(Ofce)850.229.6859(Cell)850.527.0533rodneyhallroonginc@yahoo.com 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction CALL BEN (850) 258-6903 CallAnytime! COMBS CONSTRUCTIONINC.CGC 1507649*ADDITIONS *TERMITEREPAIR *WINDOWREPLACEMENT (850) 229.8385 OR (850) 227-8156 glencombspsj@gmail.com Wood Works(In shed behind store 2284 Hwy 98 W.) PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn CareRobert PelcMowing Service227-5374 WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West PassTIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Nov 2472 48 0% Fri, Nov 2569 56 0% Sat, Nov 2675 5920% Sun, Nov 2770 4130% Mon, Nov 2861 45 0% Tues, Nov 2968 52 0% Wed, Nov 3070 45 10%11/24Thu05:28AM -0.6 L08:09PM 2.0 H 11/25Fri06:35AM -0.7 L09:00PM 2.0 H 11/26Sat07:43AM -0.7 L09:53PM 2.0 H 11/27Sun08:46AM -0.6 L10:43PM 1.9 H 11/28Mon09:38AM -0.6 L11:28PM 1.8 H 11/29Tue10:14AM -0.3 L 11/30Wed 12:04AM 1.4 H10:33AM -0.1 L 11/24Thu12:27AM 1.5 H08:56AM -0.5 L 04:34PM 1.2 H08:15PM 1.2L 11/25Fri 01:06AM 1.5 H09:44AM -0.6L 05:26PM 1.2 H 08:57PM 1.3L 11/26Sat 01:50AM 1.6 H10:31AM -0.5L 06:12PM 1.2 H 09:39PM 1.2L 11/27Sun 02:37AM 1.5 H11:18AM -0.5L 06:51PM 1.1 H 10:26PM 1.2L 11/28Mon 03:28AM 1.5 H12:03PM -0.4L 07:26PM 1.1 H11:20PM 1.1L 11/29Tue 04:21AM 1.4 H12:47PM -0.2L 07:57PM 1.0 H 11/30Wed 12:26AM 1.0 L05:20AM 1.2H 01:29PM 0.0 L08:25PM 1.0H 850-769-1232Mon.-Fri. 8:00am to 4:00pm50-75% Off! 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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 24, 2011 The Star | B7 36643S NOTICE TO PROPOSERS Notice is hereby given that the City of Mexico Beach Florida Community Development Council (the Council) will accept sealed proposals until 4:00 PM (local time), on December 16, 2011, for the paving of the parking lot of the Mexico Beach Welcome Center. The project consists of removing the existing gravel parking lot, putting down a base, intermediate course, followed by a minimum of two inches of asphalt. Firms shall be limited to those certified under 489.119 F.S. as a General Contractor or, at a minimum, be FDOT certified with experience in paving, construction of roads/streets/parking lots. Copies of the specifications may be obtained from Mrs. Kimberly Shoaf, President of the Community Development Council, at 850-648-8196 during normal working hours and all interested bidders are recommended to visit the site to confirm measurements and site layout. At 4:00 PM (local time), on December 16, 2011, the proposals will be opened and read aloud. All proposals must be in sealed envelope reflecting on the outside thereof the proposers name and City of Mexico Beach RFP for Paving of the Mexico Beach Welcome Center Parking Lot. There is no obligation on the part of the Community Development Council to award the proposal to the lowest bidder, and the Council reserves the right to award the proposal to 36625S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA VISION BANK, Plaintiff, vs. STANLEY B. ROBERSON, Defendant. CASE NO.: 11-228 CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 31, 2011, entered in Case No. 11-228 CA in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein VISION BANK is Plaintiff, and STANLEY B. ROBERSON is Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on December 15, 2011, the following described Property situated in Gulf County, Florida, legally described as: LOT 8, BLOCK A OF TREASURE SHORES SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on November 14, 2011. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at Telephone 850/229-6112. Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 24, December 1, 2011 36503S IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JANET WHITAKER KING, individually, and as Personal Representative of ESTATE of ROBERT E. KING (deceased), and CUYLER KING HOBBS, Defendants. CASE NO. 11-137-CA NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CUYLER KING HOBBS, and all others having an interest in the subject property YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose mortgages on the following properties in Gulf County, Florida: Parcel I: Lot 20, Block 4, a portion of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Section 33, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the iron rod and cap numbered RLS1999 marking the Northeast corner of said Section 33; thence along the East line of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of said Section 33, S00D21W, 69.84 feet to an iron rod and cap numbered RLS1999 on the South right of way line of Pleasant Rest or East Bay Road; thence along said right of way line, N88D40W, 19.87 feet to an iron rod and cap numbered RLS1999; thence along a line 20 feet West of and parallel with the East line of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of said Section 33, S00D21W, 1880.53 feet; thence N82D35W, 533.26 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence S00D18W, 153.31 feet to the cusp of a nontangent curve concave to the South; thence Westerly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 50.00 feet, a central angle of 172D52, for an arc length of 150.86 feet (chord to said curve bears N86D08W, 99.81 feet); thence N82D34W, 50.28 feet; thence N07D26E, 354.52 feet; thence S79D18E, 107.17 feet; thence S00D18W, 191.56 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; said lands containing 0.95 acres, more or less; Parcel II: Commence at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County Florida, and thence run North 89 East for the 1726.20 feet; thence North 01 West for 2254.53 feet; thence North 89 East for 1750.00 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning run North 01 West for 408.48 feet; thence North 89 East for 250.00 feet; thence South 01 East for 408.48 feet; thence South 89 West for 250.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land having an area of 2.34 acres, more or less, and being subject to a 60 ft. wide roadway easement along the North boundary thereof. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Frank A. Baker, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4431 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida, 32446, on or before 30 days from the first date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this 8th day of November, 2011. Hon. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk November 17, 24, 2011 36461S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232011CA000374 XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MARTENA ADAMS A/K/A MARTINA ADAMS; et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARTENA ADAMS A/K/A MARTINA ADAMS and CLAUDIA GRAY Last Known Address: 137 TOREY PINE TRAIL WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 137, WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days from first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on November 2, 2011. Rebecca L Norris, Clerk As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. 1183-105097 WVA November 17, 24, 2011 36435S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, 502 Earth City Expressway, Suite 307 Earth City, MO 63045 Plaintiff, vs. CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN, and GULF COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, Defendants. CASE NO.: 2011-1-CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Re-Establishment and Foreclosure of Note and Mortgage entered in the above-captioned action, I will Sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: A lot or parcel of land lying and being on the Northerly side of Stone Mill Creek Drive in the Northeast Quarter of Section 10, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point of intersection of the Northerly right of way boundary line of Creekview Drive and the East boundary line of Section 10, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence go N60W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 318.28 feet; thence go N29W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 315.24 feet; thence go N39W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 235.54 feet for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue N39W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 88.61 feet, thence departing said Northerly right of way boundary line, go N40E, for a distance of 453.38 feet to the centerline of Stone Mill Creek; thence along the centerline of Stone Mill Creek the following courses and distances, N76E, 20.10 feet; S18E, 33.66 feet; S20W, 9.66 feet; S02E, 39.75 feet; thence S03E, 31.03 feet; thence departing the centerline of Stone Mill Creek go S46W, for a distance of 450.40 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999 HOMES OF MERIT, 28x48, M 763 MOBILE HOME; SERIAL NUMBER DCAM763-D1444A and DCA M763-D1444B. Commonly known as: 455 E. Creekview Drive, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 1st day of December, 2011. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 17, 24, 2011 36381S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION REGIONS BANK, an Alabama banking corp., successor by merger to AMSOUTH BANK, Plaintiff, vs. LEONARD MARNELL, a married man, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LEONARD MARNELL, WINDMARK BEACH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida Corporation, not for profit, UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, and UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000315CAXXXX NOTICE OF PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE-PROPERTY TO: Defendant(s) Leonard Marnell, present address unknown, present address unknown, whose last known address is 1639 North Eagle Ridge Path, Hernando, FL 34442 and all parties having or claiming to have my right, title or interest in the property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed to foreclose a mortgage on the described real property located in Gulf County, Florida: Lot 40, Windmark Beach, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 1-5, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Caridad M. Garrido, Esq., attorney for LEONARD MARNELL, whose address is 2800 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 190 Coral Gables, FL 33134 on or before December 10, 2011, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two weeks in the Star. Witness my hand and the seal of this Court on the 2nd day of November, 2011. CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Caridad M. Garrido, Esq., Florida Bar No: 814733 Peter A. Hernandez, Esq. Florida Bar No. 64309 2800 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 190 Coral Gables, FL 33134 Tel: 305-447-0019 Email: Cary(.garridorundquist.co m Peter(agarridorundquist.co m November 17, 24, 2011

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B8| The Star Thursday, November 24, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 3 BR, 2 B, fenced yard, old Fl style with lots of charm in PSJ. Hdwd oors Avail. Immediately Rent $900/month Call Betty Ray Weston 227-5566 3 BR 2B on quiet dead end, lots of privacy with outside storage/workshop bldg. Ceramic oors Avail Dec. 15 Rent $750/monthCall Betty Ray Weston 227-5566 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd Floor; 3 Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 316 & 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale300 Long Avenue +/2,000sf Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; Also avail for lease; inquire for terms; $399,000 131 E. Gulf Beach DriveSt. George Island, +/3,950sf of ce/retail; $285,00071 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms storic bl dg downtown Apa lachicola; +/72 52 SOLD nue UNDER CONTRACT Multi tenant build ing in Marina Cove; New SO LD ach Drive land+/-395 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 BeachsideFOR RENTST. JOE BEACH 113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98 2bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98 2bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach WINDMARK BEACH 159 Beach Street Bungalow #3 1bd/1ba Unfurnished 212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #4 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #6 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished MEXICO BEACH Villas of Mexico Beach, 3706 Hwy 98 New Condos, Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 3bd/3ba Furnished Pictures available on MLS #243890CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision 101 Two Palms Drive 4bd Unfurnished Two Palm Subdivision 3bd/3 ba Furnished and covered pool (small pet allowed with pet deposit) PORT ST. JOE Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Dr. Unit 15 2bd/2ba Furnished 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 St. Joe, 3br, 1 bath, fenced backyard with 2 storage buildings, new metal roof and paint on house, near school and Lake Griffin, Call (850) 227-8295 for appt. Property for sale or lease as Office. Recently remodeled. 2 br, 1 ba, with deck in back. Zoned for both commercial and residential use. 510 6th St. Port St. Joe $800 month. 850-527-6678 Text FL85188 to 56654 Price ReducedFSBO: 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 2 Trailer lots available, Beacon Hill, 50x150, Call (850) 348-7770 for information Small Efficiency Apt $300 mo W/S included. Pet neg. 773 Bryants Landing Road. 850-899-0162 HOME FOR RENT AT WILLIS LANDINGA Nature Lovers Paradise!! Quality Custom home 9ft Ceilings, Hardwood floors, tile, kitchen bar.Located next to Willis Landing Boat ramp on the Brothers River. Located 10 miles south of Wewahitchka and only 18 miles north of beautiful Mexico Beach and only 32 miles from Panama City. The Apalachicola River is only a 15 minute boat ride.1,600 SF 3 Bed/2 Bath $800/month. Call 850-689-8881 Text FL85680 to 56654 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $650 month + deposit 301-265-5368 St. Joe 3 br, 1 ba, House on Corner lot 208 10th. $650 mo + $600 dep. 229-8801 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Mexico Beach Store Front. 2500 sf on Hwy 98 with 32 car parking. 5 year lease with option to buy. 850-348-7774 Text FL83641 to 56654 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 OtherWorship LeaderWho plays keyboard or guitar for Beach ministry in Mexico Beach. Call (850) 215-8785 Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com Coin & Stamp ShowDecember 3rd & 4th Fairgrounds PC Opens 9:am Free admission. 850-215-8565 4 10 metal farm gates, $10 each. Call (850) 647-5179 for more information. HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications* Housekeeping Office Clerk-Full-time, requires good customer service skills & prior office experience. Team player, works well under pressure. Great benefits, weekend work required. Inspectors-Part-time, inspect properties after they are cleaned. Must be available weekends. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help and personal care for the elderly. Flexible day, evenin & weekend hours. Positions available in the Appalachicola, Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34186584 Text FL86584 to 56654 the bidder submitting a responsive proposal with a resulting negotiated agreement which is most advantageous and in the best interest of the Community Development Council and to waive any irregularity or technicality in proposals received. The Community Development Council shall be the sole judge of the proposal and the resulting negotiating agreement that is in its best interest and its decision shall be final. Any bidder failing to mark outside of the envelope, as set forth herein, may not be entitled to have their proposal considered. All proposals should be addressed as follows: Mexico Beach Community Development Center Attn: Kimberly Shoaf, President P.O. Box 13382 Mexico Beach, FL 32410 Kimberly Shoaf President November 24, 2011 36581S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of COMPLIANCE 411, located at 103 Hemmingway Circle, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 11th day of November, 2011. Whole Pie Investing LCC November 24, 2011 36645S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of SACRED HEART MEDICAL GROUP ON THE GULF, located at 55 Avenue E, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida 32320, intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Pensacola, Florida, this 18th day of November, 2011. Sacred Heart Health System, Inc. November 24, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Earn College Degree Online *Medical Business, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com D & B Home Repairs Inc.Featuring Seamless Gutters. 12 colors available. Call 850-340-0605 Care Giver now available, 12 years of experience, references available, transportation services available, ability to cook and handle light house duties. License CNA. Please call Glenda 540-521-8711 Spot Advertising works! Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!