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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03818
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 11-03-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03818

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, NOVEMBER 3 2011 Y E A R 74, N UMBER 3 By Tim Croft Star News Editor There was, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson noted, symmetry to the somewhat winding nature of David B. Langston Drive. After all, Magidson added, nothing Dr. David Langston, star basketball player, educator, creator of a foundation to pro vide opportunities for children of all colors and backgrounds, for whom he spent his life advocat ing for, accomplished was done in a straight line. Langston, who passed away more than two years ago while returning from a junior college basketball tournament, was re membered and memorialized last Wednesday with the ofcial dedication of David B. Langston Drive. One part of him would be proud, but he wouldnt want all the attention, said Langstons son Eric. He made some mis takes in his life, and he felt if he would get the kids young enough he could teach them to avoid Daylight saving time ends Sunday Star Staff Report North Florida Child Development will hold its groundbreaking event for the New Early Child Development and Family Resource Center at 176 Field of Dreams in Port St. Joe, located across from the Gulf Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College on High way 98. The groundbreaking ceremony will be Mon day, Nov. 7 at 2 p.m. ET. U.S. Representative Steve Southerland will be the guest speaker at the event. A reception will follow at Sacred Heart Hospital in the cafeteria. The facility will add space and services from the current Highland View facility and will also inject additional jobs and payroll into the commu nity. NFCD to break ground on new center David B. Langston Drive dedicated By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer With an additional $1.1 million from British Petro leum to juice up its annual $600,000 budget, the Gulf County Tourism Develop ment Council has gone on a spending spree this year, without acquiring any ap proval from the Board of County Commissioners on its lengthy list of expendi tures, county commission ers said during two recent public meetings. Because the TDC oper ates as a county depart ment, county policy re quires approval from the commission for any expen diture of $5,000 or more. Policy also requires county agencies to collect verbal bids for services ranging from $5,000 to $10,000 and to legally advertise ser vices with a price tag of $10,000 or more. While the TDC budget nearly tripled this year, the TDC and BOCC have until recently disregarded these policies, allowing TDC executive director Tim Kerigan to call all the shots in spending the councils nearly $2 million budget, commissioners noted. We went from having a roughly $250,000 mar keting and events budget to having four times that much, Kerigan said. Its Commissioners question TDC spending See TDC A6 By Tim Croft Star News Editor Maybe it took a bit, years in fact, but the Gulf County Courthouse has less of an open-door feel. And that is a good thing, court administrators, depu ties and judges say. The Gulf County Court house completed an up grade of security last week, going live last Wednesday with a new full body scan ner and monitor bank at the front entrance. In addition, the back entrance off the courtyard between the sheriffs of ce and jail is now closed to the public. The only access is using an employee card on a swipe station at each door. The back entrance also has a camera wired to the monitor bank at the front entrance to allow the dep uty on duty to observe the comings and goings at the back entrance. Courthouse security gets boost See COURTHOUSE A3 The family of the late Dr. David Langston gather around the road sign that will mark the roadway named in his honor, one that links a community long divided by railroad tracks. Photos by T IM C ROFT | The Star Langstons sister, Linda Tschudi, and son, Eric, make remarks during the ceremony. When his turn came, Eric battled his emotions to get his prepared remarks out. Children were Langstons calling, providing opportunities to further their education and transform them into economic contributors to their community. The late Dr. David Langston Remembering a passionate advocate for children From left, 14th Judicial Court administrator Jan Shadburn, County Judge Tim McClellan, Circuit Court Judge Shonna Young Gay, Robyn Gable, assistant court administrator, Sheriff Joe Nugent and County Commission chair Warren Yeager. See LANGSTON A3 Opinion ..................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................. A5 Outdoors ................................... A8 Sports ......................................... A9-A10 School News ..............................B3 Faith ...........................................B4 Obituaries ..................................B4 Classieds ..................................B7-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 Venus: Provisions The Thirsty Goat Mango Marleys (Mexico Beach) St Joe Bar Songwriters Workshop (Dockside Cafe) Toucans (Mexico Beach) Haughty Heron Indian Pass Raw Bar Sponsors: Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Tapper & Company Management, Inc & Fair Communications Construction, Inc Gulf Coast Vacation Rentals Miller Jack Daniels Monumental County TDC Medical Durens Floridaze Coffee at Joe Company and Jamie Megan Jeff Aaron Partial funding for this event provided by the Gulf County Tourism Development Council This project received nancial assistance from VISIT FLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.com For the third year in a row, we were able to increase our number of writers, number of guests in attendance, and our number of venues. This could not have been done without the incredible community support that we continue to receive. Thank you to all of our generous sponsors and friends! By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer School nursing is more than just ice packs and Band-Aids. With an increase in complex medical condi tions in children across the country, school nurses are becoming more of an as set as school funding goes down. Whats happened is weve gotten better and better at helping children with prenatal births, said Martha Bergren, direc tor of research for the Na tional Association of School Nurses. But now more children are having more health problems when they become school-aged. Suc cess in one sphere has led to more challenges in the educational sphere. Although the need of ten goes unrecognized, the Gulf County School District has made it a priority to continue to provide stu dents with a strong school health program in partner ship with the Gulf County Health Department. We have one of the richest and most effective school health programs in the state, said Marsha Lindeman, administrator of the Gulf County Health Department. Its almost unheard of to have (these services). With a registered nurse and three health aids in Port St. Joe schools and a registered nurse and two health aids in Wewahitchka schools, Gulf County is an anomaly among Florida counties. Florida has one of the highest student-to-school nurse ratios in the coun try, ranking 48th out of 51 nationwide, with 2,537 stu dents per school nurse, ac cording to the National As sociation of School Nurses. Gulf County, however, had roughly 1,900 students enrolled for the 2010-2011 school year, and two regis tered nurses present, mak ing the student-to-school nurse ratio 950 to one. Twenty-ve percent of all schools dont have a nurse at all, Bergren said. And 14 percent of those schools dont even have an unlicensed stand-in. Bergren said when it comes time for schools to cut budgets, the health sec tor is often the rst to go. With major cutbacks in education funding across the state, Lindeman admit ted she was worried the school board would slash funding for nursing pro grams in county schools when it adopted its 20112012 budget. They took some pretty steep cuts, but they never once considered a cut to the money they give to the Gulf County Health Department, Lindeman said. They never once cut a penny from the school health budget. Bergren said when a school has a full-time reg istered nurse, kids are 57 percent less likely to be sent home in the middle of the day. People think of school nursing as just ice packs and Band-Aids, said Gulf County School Health Co ordinator Amy Driggers. It is that, but its so much more. When Driggers worked as the Port St. Joe School nurse eight years ago, she never anticipated the job would one day involve helping diabetic students meticulously count carbo hydrates to control blood sugar, or the number of students carrying inhalers and EpiPens would esca late. The trend is national, with newly diagnosed cases of diabetes almost doubling in the last 10 years, the prevalence of food allergies among children up 18 per cent from 1997 to 2007, and asthma rates continuing to grow, with one out of every 10 school-aged children di agnosed with asthma. Driggers said this time of year is absolutely chaotic in the school health sector, as she and her staff meticu lously draw out individual health plans for kids with specic health issues and organize screenings and immunizations. Every student who has been diagnosed with a seri ous health issue has an in dividual care plan laid out by a doctor, so the nurses know how to best help each child on a day-to-day basis and in case of an emer gency. With seven students in the Port St. Joe schools with Type One diabetes, the health care staff also trains teachers and faculty to respond to the highs and lows the disease causes. Were training the teachers and faculty so the parents can go to work in peace, Driggers said. Lori LaCivita, the reg istered school nurse for Port St. Joe schools, said it is common to see health problems in children that were once thought to only effect adults like high blood pressure and Type Two dia betes. Body mass index screening results from a 2010 school health service summary for Gulf County by the Florida Department of Health revealed that 16.5 percent of the rst, third and sixth graders screened were overweight and 22.41 percent were obese. We have such a rise in childhood obesity that youre going to see these things, LaCivita said. LaCivita said diabe tes used to be categorized into juvenile onset (type one) and adult onset (type two), but as childhood obe sity rates continue to rise the lines are becoming blurred. The new trend in man aging diabetes is counting carbohydrates, a micro managed meal plan that helps manage blood glu cose levels. LaCivita helps a handful of students with carbohydrate counting on a daily basis. LaCivita also spends a lot of time with the stu dent and his or her par ents to better understand the childs specic health needs. The number one thing is to make sure theyre safe at school, LaCivita said. Every student is differ ent, but its all based on a formula with their specic need in mind. The school health staff spends time bouncing back and forth between schools, Driggers between Wewahi tchka and Port St. Joe, and LaCivita between Port St. Joe Elementary and Ju nior-Senior High. LaCivita said she cant imagine not having a regis tered nurse on staff. With no nurse, schools may rely on the principal, secretary or teacher to address students health needs. You cant expect the teachers to address the medical needs on top of everything else, LaCivita said. Our teachers are overwhelmed enough just trying to teach them. Responsibilities expand for school nurses Photos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star (Pictured clockwise from left) Lori LaCivita, RN for the Port St. Joe Schools, Amy Driggers, Gulf County School Health Coordinator, and Wendy Baker, one of three health aids at the Port St. Joe Schools.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, November 3, 2011 117 Hwy 98, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653.8825 218 Hwy 71, Wewahitchka, FL (850) 639.2252 302 Cecil G Costin Sr Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL (850) 227.7099 Full body scanner, X-ray machines and monitors are among the upgrades to security that went live in the Gulf County Courthouse last week. This brings us up to all the other courthouses our size in the state, said County Judge Tim McFarland. I went over to Franklin County recently and their courthouse was ahead of ours, and I thought we need to change that. The county and its courthouse made national news 25 years ago, when a hus band distraught over divorce proceed ings entered the court hearing armed with a gun and shot and killed the judge, an attorney and a witness. Clyde Melvin, the shooter, died in prison two years ago. Circuit court and county judges have frequently written letters or appeared before the Board of County Commission ers, seeking improvements in security at the courthouse. The issues were on display last week when Circuit Court Judge Shonna Young Gay sentenced the robbers from the De cember 2010 armed robbery of Vision Bank. Following sentencing, several family members and friends charged through the swinging gates separating spectators from court ofcers and a host of friends and family members of several of the convicted robbers lingered around the courthouse, expressing their outrage. The security improvements are the result of a partnership. The 14th Circuit State Courts Pro gram provided $25,000 upfront for the monitors, cameras and X-ray scanning equipment. County commissioners and McFarlands ofce chipped in support and some dollars for additional equip ment, such as metal detectors, and Sher iff Joe Nugent provided the full-body scanner. It was a group effort all the way around, McFarland said. Chief Judge Hentz McClellan and the 14th Circuit State Court System graciously assisted in funding these security upgrades, and these measures could not have been re alized without the full support of Sheriff Nugent and the Gulf County Commis sioners. The citizens of Gulf County will be the beneciaries of this remarkable group effort for years to come. The high-tech measures, McFarland noted, bolster a well-trained and knowl edgeable security detail provided by Nu gent. These (improvements) will make somebody who might be considering doing something crazy to think twice about, Nugent said. COURTHOUSE from page A1 some of those mistakes and team them to be a suc cess, as a person, economi cally, in the community. In a sense, the dedica tion was a symbolic re membrance. It was a remembrance of a man who, with a cell phone constantly at his ear and a deep gravelly voice that easily announced his presence, made a mark on a community of consider able distinction. Losing his parents early in life, he and his brother, Norris, whose untimely death at an early age would compel David to name his youth foundation in his brothers honor, Langston, with the help of several mentors, rose to unimag ined heights for an African American in Gulf County in the 1960s and 70s. Langston, enshrined in the Port St. Joe High School Athletic Hall of Fame, was arguably the nest basketball player in county scholastic history, taking the Tiger Sharks to a state title before a dis tinguished college career at Drake University and a brief professional career in the now-defunct American Basketball Association. He was a Sunkist High School All-American as a senior in high school and named all-Missouri Valley Conference while at Drake. But the tools, the dis cipline and work ethic he learned along the way drove him to earn a bachelors de gree at Drake, a masters at Indiana State and a Doc torate of Education from LaSalle University. He placed a lot of emphasis on education, Magidson said. He took that emphasis for his edu cation and transformed it to educating children. I think it is tting that this road has some curves. David never took a straight line to get what he wanted accomplished. He would return to his roots in Port St. Joe to cre ate the Norris D. Langston Youth Scholarship Founda tion, which would ultimate ly reach into seven coun ties with after-school pro grams, tutoring, mentoring and motivational speakers. He was for the com munity, for all races, said Langstons sister, Linda Tschudi. He was about ed ucating the children. That is why I have the privilege of educating (children at Port St. Joe Elementary School, primarily students with special needs). And he cajoled and lob bied local and state lead ers to fund his passion. Two former state educa tion commissioners spoke at the foundations an nual banquet, as did Allen Bense, then the speaker of the Florida House. He could, as friend Eu gene Rafeld once noted, get more done with a car and a cellphone than just about anybody. The dedication, though, was something else. Advo cated by former city com missioner John Reeves, the roadway represents a badly needed link and era sure of the railroad tracks that once divided a com munity, black and white. The road links Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard on the north end of town, a primarily minority area, with Williams Avenue on the south end, in the main shopping and business dis trict of Port St. Joe. It is a symbol, Reeves stated frequently over the years, of what Langston was about Langston did not care about skin tone or household income; it was all about hard work and keeping on the straight and narrow and reaching for the American dream Langston rmly believed still existed for all willing to put in the effort. He worked hard for the youth white, black, green, purple, polka dotted, it didnt matter, Eric Langs ton said. He wanted to ed ucate them and (empower) them economically. And, lastly, the road was the result of a community partnership. GAC Contractors do nated construction of the road and Preble Rish Engi neers owner Ralph Rish was a long-time friend and supporter of the Langston Foundation donated the engineering. County Commissioner Warren Yeager and former County Commissioner Na than Peters Jr. provided district road bond funds to the project and the St. Joe Company donated the land. Fairpoint Communications was willing to move several underground lines to make the road possible. This is a special day for the city, Magidson said. This shows what people coming together with their minds in the right place can get done. Tschudi attempted to sum up what she thought her brother would see in last weeks dedication. He would be proud of all his accomplishments, but he wouldnt want the pat on the back, she said with a rueful smile. Charles Beachum was among the 75 or so at tendees. Beachum said he knew Langston since he was this high, pointing to a spot below his knees. He remembered the David Langston of the ath letic elds and how those lessons translated into Langstons life. I can still hear him say ing, Winners never quit and quitters never win and he took that to his grave, Beachum said. I believe in a spirit world. Davids spirit was here today. LANGSTON from page A1

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Opinion A4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINGS USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 What is it? What is it that makes us think we are better (or smaller) than we are? I guess thats easy. It is vanity or needing a warm fuzzy as I like to call it. Is it bad? Not necessarily, unless it really messes things up for other people. I did not know about this thing called vanity sizing. Im a man, how am supposed to know about such things? Recently, I had a good friend explain it to me. It basically comes down to the fact that clothing people are changing what things are (sizes) to make folks feel better about themselves. With womens clothing, it seems that over the years the sizes have gotten smaller or larger or messed up (a lot). If you were a size 6 in 1960, you were able to wear a size 4 in 1970. That same size 6 in 1960 would be size 00 today. I think the closer to zero you are in womens clothing, the smaller you are supposed to be. I dont know. I just know that this seems to be kind of confusing and a little vane. This vanity sizing in womens clothing does explain a couple of things that have always puzzled me. One being the reason it takes women so long to shop for clothes and the other being the reason they have to try on everything in the store. They really have no idea what size they are on any given day. How could they? This Vanity Fantasy has spilled over into everything else we do. Just think about it, the folks at the bank want you to buy more house than you can afford. The folks at the car lot will let you take an extra year or two to pay for that fancy vehicle (that you deserve). Do you have children or have you ever been to school? This vanity fantasy takes place in the schools every day. What used to be a C+ or a Bis now an A. Why? Its simple more As mean happier parents and less controversy for everyone. Get your warm fuzzies right here! Ive taught college math courses for over 15 years, students are quick to ask for extra credit and tell me that Im ruining their perfect GPA. Im equally quick in telling them that I dont believe in extra credit and also that perfect GPAs dont mean much either. What about grade point averages? Students are graduating high school with GPAs of 4.9 and 5.0 on a 4.0 scale. Hmmm, does that mean they are better than the best? I understand that they take advanced classes and they have to do something about taking those into consideration, it just seems all out of whack to me. I think its ok to keep score I think we need to lose more, to fail more and to make more Cs. If you dont, you live life in this vanity fantasy and you dont really appreciate the good stuff (which really has nothing to do with any of this). After researching this vanity sizing more, I found out that clothing designers do this with mens clothes as well. I found a cheat sheet of sorts that explained what a pair a pants with a 36-inch waistline actually is. With one brand, it actually is 37 inches. The rest went way on up, with one well-known brands 36-inch pants actually accommodating a fellow with a 41 -inch waist. Do you think he feels better? Probably. Do you think he weighs less? No. Im sure there are vanity scales to handle that situation. If they want to help me out with this vanity sizing, I might have a suggestion or two. I dont have any trouble with the waist business. I know I have a 35-inch waist a real one. Im good with it. However, I also know I have a 29-inch inseam. Do you know how embarrassing it is to be a hair under 6 feet tall and have a 29-inch inseam? People stand around the store looking at the sizes and ask questions like Who has a 29-inch inseam? They hold a pair of 34 x 29 inch pants up and say things like This guy must look funny, or You have to be kidding me. I have a Fred Flintstone body, Im used to it. Envy me when it comes clearance time, the 29-inch inseam pants are always still there The clothing industry doesnt need to change the inseam sizes to make me feel better about myself. However, some little stickers to go over the sizes on the back of my jeans might be nice though. I could change the 29 to a 34. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard County commissioners are correct in trying to bring accountability to the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. The TDC is a special taxing unit established in Florida law and commissioners, along with their constituents, have every right to expect full transparency from the agency and its board. Where, however, have the commissioners been? Listening between the lines, there is plenty to shock about with what is going on with a county agency suddenly ush with more than $1 million in BP money and spending as if having won the Lotto. As reported by Star Staff Writer Valerie Garman on the front page of this newspaper, the TDC is simply acting as business as usual, though feeling strong with green-hued steroids with dead Presidents on them. County attorney Jeremy Novak probably summed it up best when he told commissioners at one point during a recent meeting that the TDC has had little structure in the past. That explains a lot. For instance, an executive director who enters into contracts worth hundreds of thousands of dollars without the approval of anyone else not his own board or the Board of County Commissioners. As another, a county agency operating under a marketing agreement that exists in theory only a company was issued a letter of award on its bid but never signed a formal contract with the county, without a plausible explanation provided. But there is just a whiff of hyperbole and hypocrisy in this sudden attention to the TDC that is alarming for county taxpayers. Be clear, the money at issue here is largely money paid by British Petroleum as a portion of nes to the impacted Florida counties to bring back tourists. That, in truth, is part of the problem, a rush of cash that overwhelms proper policy requirements and logic. That would seem the case with an event such as the PoJo Live Music Festival. Paying more than $30,000 to a headliner few had heard of. Spending tens of thousands of dollars, much of it spent out of the county, on perks for the bands. Blowing a budget without any way to quantify that blowing the budget would provide the requisite bang. That is a pretty fair interpretation of an event that allegedly fell under the category of being high impact but lacked much bump for local lodging establishments, which lacking attendance gures for the free festival is the lone way to assess impact. Even the TDC executive director acknowledged being a tad overwhelmed by his embarrassment of riches and how the money has been spent at a time of great economic hardship in the county also turned out to be an embarrassment. But in typical years, the TDC operates under a budget in the high six gures, the expenditure of those dollars the Board of County Commissioners is charged with overseeing. So to take the executive director to task in a public meeting about an apparent lack of accountability is akin to the fox scolding the chicken for not eating enough to maintain bulk. County commissioners should be requiring that accountability from the rst dollar expended each year accountability is not something to trot out when the public winds blow from a certain direction. That commissioners see no accountability from the TDC is on them, not the executive director of the TDC. Commissioners have long talked a good game about accountability and transparency in county government and if the TDC episode is anything, it is indication work remains. Further, if the company the executive directors brother owns and operates wins an award for marketing services to the TDC, ensuring a contract has been signed is on commissioners. To bring up the issue of conict via nepotism at this point makes little sense since it was the county the Board of County Commissioners that gives nal approval to award the contract in the rst place. The entire argument is particularly disingenuous coming from the very commissioner whose close personal and professional relationship with a contracted partner of the TDC opened this current can of worms. The commission was already on notice concerning policies and procedures and the dynamics of agencies and boards that operate under the auspices of the BOCC. A county grand jury earlier this year took the TDC to task for not fully adhering to open meeting and records laws during the hiring process of the current executive director; the grand jurys admonishment compelled the county attorney to rene and reinforce county policy as it applied to the various county boards such as the TDC. And for commissioners to argue they did not know or fully grasp what was going on within the TDC is a stretch given that the BOCC chairman sits on the TDC board and the county attorneys wife works within the TDC ofce. This episode feels eerily familiar to that which recently roiled the county EMS department, without the dollars. In that case, as with the TDC, entrenched operating procedures many of which ew in the face of county policy were allowed to fester, along with a communication disconnect between department and BOCC, until accountability and transparency were eclipsed by politics and personal agendas. That is not far removed from what has happened recently with the TDC. The TDC indeed has work to do to put its house in order, as commissioners urged, but commissioners should also be looking in the mirror for the answers. If true accountability and transparency are going to exist in county government, it must start on that podium, with those ve commissioners. They must lead, not follow, be proactive, and professional, in ensuring sunshine in government not reactive, and personal, to the latest crisis. Commissioners are elected to lead, and at hand is another teachable moment about leadership. TIM CROFT Star news editor I ate breakfast last week at a local church and caught a little grief from the cooks for passing on the grits. The good pastor even questioned my country roots as I settled for the eggs and sausage. Listen, I took it all in stride. Its hard to get a free meal off of a Methodist! Me and grits go way back. Mom would add a tad extra water and force them into us via a baby bottle. Before we could walk, we learned to grind corn between two rocks. Leon would bust it up with a hammer. That little ne dust would get in your hair, your eyes, your nose, your mouthI brushed some out of my left ear last week; been stuck there for sixty years. Ive eaten grits for breakfast when there wasnt nothing else. Ive eaten grits for lunch when wed mix it with Polk salad or pork rinds. Ive eaten it for supper when wed wet our appetite on a rack of squirrel legs and then ll up on grits. Ive had it baked, seared, fried, grilled, boiled, broiled, sauted and blackened. On cold winter days Mom would treat us to hominy grits and chitlens. Ive stirred it in amongst eggs, hog brains, bacon bits, red-eye gravy and Cheerios. Ive pouredem over biscuits, sausage patties, toast, pancakes, chicken livers and mayonnaise sandwiches. Ive had grits served to me so runny they wouldnt hardly stay on the plate. Ive seenem so lumpy youd athought it was a bad batch of mashed potatoes. Ive eaten grits when they were as thick as a bowl of Quaker oats left out overnight. Ive had them things grow in my mouth to the point I near bout couldnt get enough sweet tea to wash them down. Ive had them swell up in my belly. There aint no other feeling in the world like grit stomach! And this is not a story about growing up poor. Far from it! We were the happiest people on the face of the earth. We didnt have any money. But that doesnt have anything to do with being poor. It wasnt like Leon and Daddy were eating steak and Butterngers while me and David Mark were left with the grits. We shared everything around that kitchen table. We laughed and loved, cried, fought and grew up staring at those grits. I asked Mom every day why was it always grits. She didnt lecture on being frugal; or how we needed to sell a hog or two; or how much better off we were than a couple of neighbors just down the road. She would mention those starving children in India and remind us how good grits were for us. I didnt gure the nutritional value of any foods back in those days. We didnt know polyunsaturated from amino acids. We went strictly on how it faired on your palate. But Mom, they dont taste like nothing! I could be a little persistent in my younger days. Son, lets put some more butter on yours Ive eaten grits that were swimming in margarine. Ive smothered them with pepper and salt. I tried cheese. Ive thrown in chunks of onion. Ive put ketchup on grits. Ive poured buttermilk, sorghum molasses, cane syrup and honey over them. Mom would compress them into little balls and wed eat them like hush puppies. She would slice fresh cornbread open and stuff the grits in to make a sandwich. We celebrated Davids fourth birthday with a ve-layer grit cake. In the rst grade, Miss Carolyn had us gluing those Pilgrims and turkeys onto the poster board with some kind of white sticky paste. Yogi allowed that, nally, someone had invented a practical use for grits. And I know for a fact that grit stomach worked on re ants. We got invaded one summer. They were all over the yard. Dad sprinkled a big handful of grits around every hill. The ants would eat their ll, even take some extra grits down to the queen. Dad would wait an hour or so and water down the hills real good. As soon as the ants took a drink and the water hit those grits in their bellies..it would blow them little fellers up from the inside out! If you went down to the City Caf between 4:30 and 10:00 a.m., you were going to get grits. Period! Me and David would both order a breakfast of cheeseburgers and French fries. Dixie Faye would somehow manage to get a bowl of grits in there between the pickle and the toasted bun. Mr. Jack Cantrell took it upon himself to point out as we stood up to leave, You boys didnt nish your grits. It was like it was un-American or something! I know grits are like ice cream in Georgia. And I certainly understand heritage, tradition, truth, justice and the American way! The terms nger licking and southern fried warm all of our hearts. And Im almost dead positive certain there is a statistic out there somewhere that reports that 97.3 percent of all the grits sold in the world are purchased in the South. I think that is wonderful. I never said I didnt like grits.or that I dont like them today. I just believe that God, in His innite wisdom, allotted each person a certain amount of grits to eat in his or her lifetime. I ate my appointed share before I was 10-years-old! Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Vanity fantasies A teachable moment from the TDC True Grit takes more than an eyepatch Thursday, November 3, 2011

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S A5 | The Star 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN AT 11AM E T 7 DAYS A W EE K WWW.L OO K O UTL O U N G E .C O M FRIDAY, N O V E MB E R 4TH FR O M SO UTH E R N S ATIS F ACTI ON BO BBY KENNE DY & M ICH E LL E M ILLIGA N IN TH E C R O WS N E ST DOO RS O PEN AT 7P M -EAST E R N S H O W B E GI N S AT 8P M -EAST E R N N O CO V E R, A LL S E ATI N G ON F IRST C O M E BASIS. CO MI N G If you havent already jumped on the home energy-efficiency bandwagon, the good news is that several federal energy tax credits originally slated to end in 2010 were extended through Dec. 31, 2011; but the not-so-good news is that these credits are worth significantly less and are more restrictive than before. All is not lost, however, since several additional credits (outlined below) remain in effect through 2016. Heres how the soonto-expire energy tax credits work: You may claim a credit for 10 percent of the total cost of various home energyefficiency products for your existing primary residence, including: insulation; heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems; metal and asphalt roofs; energy-efficient windows, doors and skylights; biomass stoves and non-solar water heaters. There are a few restrictions, however: The maximum combined credit is $500 (10 percent of $5,000 in total cost) for all allowable products purchased between 2006 and 2011. Thus, if youve already claimed credits over $500 in previous years when limits were higher, you cannot file. Certain items have lower allowable tax credit maximums. For example: windows are capped at $200 in total credits; furnaces and boilers $150 maximum (must have an annual fuel utilization rate of 95 or greater); central air conditioner $300 maximum; water heater $300 (within certain efficiency limits); and biomass stoves $300. You cannot claim a credit for labor costs. Energy tax credits are nonrefundable, which means you can only claim a credit to offset taxes you owe for the year. Tax credits may only be claimed once and are limited to the year in which you purchased the item. Energy tax credits will continue to be available for geothermal heat pumps, solar energy systems and wind energy systems installed at new or existing principal or second homes by Dec. 31, 2016, for 30 percent of cost, with no upper limit. In addition, a credit continues for fuel cells at 30 percent of cost up to $500 per kW of power capacity (for primary residences only). And tax credits are still available on certain fuelefficient vehicles. Visit www.fueleconomy.gov/ feg/taxcenter.shtml for details. For full details on available tax credits, visit www.energystar. gov. If youre a low-income household and cant afford to weatherproof your home, you may be eligible for the Department of Energys Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). If youre accepted, a professional weatherization crew will conduct a home energy audit where theyll analyze your utility bills, test for inltration of outside air, inspect your home and equipment for safety and determine the most cost-effective energy conservation measures for your home. Depending on what they nd, the agency will then conduct needed repairs and equipment installation, which might include: installing wall, oor and attic insulation; sealing and repairing ducts; reducing air inltration and pressure imbalances; and tuning, repairing or replacing heating and cooling systems, as needed. To learn how WAP works, visit www.eere.energy. gov/wip/wap.html. Also, you may qualify for short-term utility bill assistance through the Low-Income Energy Assistance Program (www.acf.hhs.gov/ programs/ocs/liheap). Other great ways to cut energy costs include turning your thermostat back 10 15 degrees for eight hours, while asleep or at work, using Energy Star appliances and compact uorescent lights and lowering your hot water heater temperature to 120 F or lower. Bottom line: Take advantage of nancial incentives available to make your home more energy efcient just in time for winters chill. Jason Alderman education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. Watch new crosswalks Dear Editor: The town looks great! Nice improvements. The brick crosswalks look lovely. You might want to educate your resident drivers on how to not stop in the middle of them while waiting for the light to change. It happened all three times I was walking in town. Leanne Walasek Atlanta Biomass funding Dear Editor, An Oct. 18, 2010, article in the Wall Street Journal online aired some interesting facts about Biomass plants. In 2007, a $7.7 million biomass plant was built to meet the energy needs of a medium security prison, the Northern Nevada Correctional Center. Two years later, the plant closed due to excessive costs. In Loyalton, Industry Inc. closed a 16-megawatt plant due to federal logging restrictions, to obtain wood from the surrounding forests. Please note: It was Federal logging restrictions. In Gunnison, Colo., Western State College shelved their plan to install a biomass boiler on its campus due to high costs for supply and operation. local utility, the Salt River Project, canceled a long-term power-buying contract with a 24megawatt plant after the Chapter 11. As long as the biomass industry is forced to compete with coal and natural gas, we will not grow this industry, said Bob Cleave, CEO of the Biomass Power Association, a trade group based in Portland, Maine. The article went on to state that the industrys growth is threatened by concerns that biomass power isnt as green as supporters say it is. With its hard to imagine that a private lending agency up to the plate or will the for another Solyndra? How soon will Gulf Respectfully, Tom Knoche Port St. Joe Thanks to mentors Dear Editor: Gulf County ARC Administrator Dianna Harrison along with the Port St. Joe High School Bridges Program and the Florida Agency for Persons with Disabilities would like to recognize the mentees and mentors who participated in the Florida Disability Employment Awareness Disability Mentoring Day. Juanita Jenkins, mentored by Christine Strayer of Gulf County Tax Collector Shirley Jenkins; Jeremiah Wyatt, mentored by Sandy Price of Capital City Bank; David Andrews, mentored by Johanna White of Vision Bank; Albert Scheffer, mentored by Gulf County School Superintendent Jim Norton; Kelsea Lamb, mentored by Vikki Anderson of Centennial Bank; ShaNiqua Walker, mentored by Kenneth Weimorts of Emerald Coast Credit Union; Dustin Walker, mentored by Hal Keels of Coastal Design and Landscape; Javon Jones, mentored by Rick Williams of Tallahassee Orthopedic Center; and Preston Burkett, mentored by Port St. Joe High School Coach Vern Barth. Thanks for making this years event a great success! Dianna Harrison Executive director Gulf County ARC By Robert C. Shaw, B.A.Sc. B.D. M.S.W. Cert. President, The Markham Insti tute for Human Services Why do most drivers drive safely? Because there is a law? Not likely. They do so because it is in their character. How did it get there? That is the big wellness question. Another example: I love the great songs. I do my best to play them on my piano. The richness of music is one of the vital gems in my life. How did it get in me? So, now I search for the hidden wellness treasure. My parents and grandparents showed little interest in music. No one played an instrument. Yet, as a teenager I started to teach myself to play the piano. Since then, music has been a big part of my life. Where did this come from? There was an uncle who played the piano. I would watch as he played the great old songs from sheet music. We never talked about music. My love of music was sown there. Nobody in the family thought about this vital event. It was wellness well hidden. We each can check this out. All we have to do is ask ourselves, what is really important in my life? For each one, we do a family background check. Who in my greater family has this important life feature? To whom am I indebted? When we do this, we find at least four big parts of our life with direct connection to a parent, grandparent, uncle or aunt. We have put our fingers on the key elements in our life. We have also seen how these gifts have silently, and usually unnoticed, flowed from a family member to me. I have discovered the hidden wellness treasure. This however, is not the biggest part of the story. The bigger deal is that I now know that the character of our children flows from us and our parents and older generations. This is where the mud hits the wall. We are responsible for the raising of our kids and grandkids but we havent been aware of how it happens. We have read the child-care books. Wellness doesnt come from books. It comes from family life. The real wellness is not street stuff; it is soul stuff. Are we fit for the job? So what do we do to ensure wellness for our kids and grandkids? First we take stock of the big character traits we have. Is that enough? Then, we need to check all our relatives for their wellness gems. Enter the Family Wellness Rainbow. It gives a good picture of the full scope of family wellness. That tells us how we are doing. It also tells us where we need work. As each family searches for its hidden treasures, it learns more about how the larger family really works. Using the Rainbow, the family can then get to work where there are gaps in their wellness for their children. For a view of the Family Wellness Rainbow please see: www. familycybermall.org Please see: www. themarkhaminstitute.org Reach Robert at: rcecshaw@aol.com. Family wellness our hidden treasure A Clinicians Viewpoint Energy-Efciency tax credits expire soon Letters Thursday, November 3, 2011 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR JASON ALDERMAN

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 a lot of money. Weve tried to do our best with it, and the numbers show weve done well marketing our county. County commissioner Bill Williams brought the issue to the commission ers attention at the Oct. 11 and Oct. 25 commission meetings, presenting sev eral invoices for extrane ous expenditures support ing events such as the PoJo Live Music Festival and funding NASCAR sponsor ships without the boards approval. Williams motioned for an immediate external au dit of TDC expenditures, as long as the audit costs less than $5,000, in order to track the operational and nancial sectors of the agency. Williams also recom mended Kerigan work with Dawn Moliterno, execu tive director of the Walton County TDC and chairper son of the Northwest Flor ida Tourism Council, for assistance with spending strategies for the remain der of the BP funds. We have a division of this county that has spun and continues to spin out of control, Williams said on Oct. 25. To me this is an immediate emergen cy that needs to be ad dressed. Accountability and internal control is not there. Until the audit is com plete, Williams asked Com missioner Warren Yeager, a member of the TDC board, to oversee the TDC expen ditures. This audit will help clarify some issues, Yea ger said at a special meet ing Oct. 31. Lets have this discussion at our regular board meeting next time to make sure everything is in order. At the Oct. 31 special meeting the board called for any BP-related expendi ture to go before the board for approval in the consent agenda. BP money distribution This year, BP distrib uted a total of $30 million to tourism development councils in a seven coun ty coalition in Northwest Florida that includes Gulf, Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay and Franklin, to be used solely to promote tourism to off set losses last summer after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig in the Gulf of Mexico. The agreements made with BP give area TDCs full discretion to deter mine proper use of pay ment and only requires organizations keep a rea sonably detailed record of how the payments were used and submit quarterly reports. Gulf County received $1,161,534 from BP for the tourism program in 2011, in three allocations: $387,178 on April 23, June 11 and Sept. 11. Of the money allotted, the TDC spent $639,077 as of Oct. 17, not including outstanding invoices. In Floridas Coastal Northwest Communica tion Councils executive summary of the 2011 funds, each countys allotment was broken down into a spending plan. Gulf Coun tys plan allotted $585,000 for advertising, $90,000 for public relations support and media tours, $335,000 for area event support and $150,000 for high impact events. The Gulf County TDC held one high impact event, Septembers PoJo Live Music Festival, which accounted for $174,104 in BP funds as of Oct. 17, ac cording to the 2011 invoice list. Of the money spent on the two-day festival, about $80,000 was spent on band contracts ($36,000 of that for headliners ALO), anoth er $20,000 for band accom modations and hospitality, $6,000 for the PoJo shuttle bus, about $9,000 for pro motional ads, posters and banners, $9,500 for T-shirts and koozies, and $3,079 for imprinted PoJo grocery totes. The PoJo Live Music Festival alone exceeded the proposed $150,000 bud get for high-impact events, with $174,108 of invoices from the high impact event account and more money drawn from the area event support account. Williams and Commis sioner Ward McDaniel questioned extraneous ex penditures for tent rentals and the $6,000 PoJo taxi service, an expenditure Williams described as ab surd. McDaniel asked why no bids were collected for tent rentals, and why the TDC chose to rent with an out-of-town party rental service, with so many local families struggling. Quantifying impact The only sales docu ments from the PoJo Live Music Festival cite $485 made from T-shirt sales and $7,434 from the sale of tickets, which were re quired to purchase alcohol at the event. Because the concert was free, Kerigan was un able to provide a record of the number of attendees for this high impact event, focused on attracting outof-county visitors. Bed tax collections have been consistently higher in 2011, with record numbers in July and the numbers for August almost back to where they were in 2009. The bed tax collections for September have been steadily rising since 2008. The September 2011 bed tax was $74,190, up from $49,091 in 2010 and $36,028 in 2009. Overall, the gross revenue from this scal year totaled $847,657, top ping last years $740,845 and $790,526 from the year before. Kerigan estimated roughly $1.3 million brought into Gulf County in Septem ber. September is usu ally one of our slowest months, Kerigan said. Weve had some great in creases, but at the same time we need to ne-tune our policies. During the weekend of Sept. 16 and 17 when the PoJo Festival was held in St. Joe Beach, most area hotels and motels reported average occupancy. The El Governor Motel in Mexico Beach didnt ll up that weekend, with 45 of the 125 rooms vacant. The Mainstay Suites and Port Inn reported oc cupancy levels more typi cal of July, at 90 and 95 per cent. The Gulf View Motel was full Thursday through Sunday that week, but own er Jan Smith said the mo tel usually stays full, with documented full occupan cy last year for 96 weeks straight. Owner and manager of the Dixie Bell Motel Dan McDonough reported full occupancy, but he said the 10-unit motel is usually fully booked on weekends. McDonough said events like PoJo help more than they hurt. The Driftwood Inn in Mexico Beach had all of its 20 beachside units and four houses full for the week end, but manager Shawna Wood chalked it up to nor mal trafc. In the past, youd have to book three months in advance, but this year you could still call two to three weeks ahead and get something, Wood said. This year was amazingly better (than last year), but we still werent back 100 percent. MUST GO T O MAKE ROO M FO R 2012 MODELS! MOWERS AT COST 2011 See TDC A7 TDC from page A1

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, November 3, 2011 (850) 229.6991 1930 W. hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Downtown Highland view TUESDAY FRIDAY 9-6 SATURDAY 9-2 15% OFF EVERYTHING Except consignment guns GOIN G OUT O F BU S INE SS BREAKDOWN OF BP FUNDS SPENT IN 2011 Total to Gulf County TDC in 2011$1,161,534 Total Spent as of Oct. 17$639,077.40 High Impact Events PoJo Live Music Festival $174,104.08 Hardware/Setup $39,974.57 Band Contracts $81,350 ALO $36,000 Bob Schneider $10,000 Matt Costa $8,500 The Sheepdogs $7,500 Honey Island Swamp Band $4,500 Michael Tolcher $4,500 Spiritual Rez $3,000 Thomas Wynn & The Believers $2,750 Mishka (deposit only) $2,000 Bo Spring Band $1,200 Sara Mac Band $500 The Curry Brothers $500 Buddy Hamm $250 Greg Wood $150 Band Accommodations/hospitality $20,917.82 PoJo Merchandise/Promotions $15,039.43 Personnel Services $12,679 Security $1,225 Two-day shuttle service $6,000 Event Assistance/ Bartenders $2,554 Camera crews $2,900 Alcohol $4,143.26 *PoJo cost from area event support account $4,784.27 *Money collected from T-shirt/alcohol sales $7,919 Advertising and Public Relations Support $251,989 Paid to Kerigan Marketing$224,489.42 Television $106,885.25 Print $44,200.27 Interactive $51,487.75 Outdoor $19,276.15 Public Relations Support$2,640 Paid to other marketing entities $30,140.63 Television $30,000 Print $140.63 Area Event Support $210,343.27 Top 10 account expenditures (single invoices) 1) Gulf County Sheriffs Second Annual Bass Tournament $25,000 2) Fourth of July Fireworks $25,000 3) NASCAR Sponsorship at Talladega Camping World Truck Series Race $25,000 4) Florida Scallop and Music Festival $20,000 5) Gulf County Visitor Guides $15,632 6) Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival $15,000 7) Gator Classic Catsh Tournament $15,000 8) Gulf Alliance for Local Arts First Fridays $10,800 9) Scallop Drop Treasure Hunt (not including event consultation) $6,551 10) GALA Summer Arts Program $5,000 Gaskin Park Flathead Catsh Tournament $5,000 Bluewater Outrigger Area Event Support $5,000 Salt Air Farmers Market $5,000 TDC from page A6 Questions about spending/contracts From January to Oc tober 2011 the TDC spent $210,989 from the area event support account. The highest allotments were $25,000 for the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Bass Tournament, $25,000 for the Fourth of July re works, $25,000 for a Visit gulf.com NASCAR sponsor ship at the Oct. 22 Camping World Truck Series Race at the Talladega Super Speed way (Truck No. 82 driven by Grant Ennger), $20,000 for Julys Florida Scallop and Music Festival and $15,632 to print Gulf County visitor guides. Funds from the account also helped to fund other area events and Visit Gulf County promotions. In total, $251,989 has been spent on advertising and public relations sup port, with $224,489.42 worth of invoices made out to Kerigan Marketing. Kerigan Marketing, owned by Jack Kerigan, brother of TDC executive director Tim Kerigan, has been providing marketing services for the TDC with out a contract since its pre vious contract expired in March 2010, another issue Williams presented at the BOCC meeting. The county issued an award letter to Kerigan Marketing in the spring of 2010, but no formal contract was signed. County attorney Jer emy Novak addressed the TDCs need for a formal contract with Kerigan Mar keting at the Oct. 6 TDC board meeting. The TDC had no formal structure in the past, Novak said. The county issued an award letter in the spring of 2010, and Jack (Kerigan) has been operating under that. Novak said the county needs to sign a contract with a termination date as soon as possible, and pre sented a revised version of the TDCs original contract with Kerigan Marketing for the BOCC to look over at the meeting Oct. 25. My problem with it is two-fold, said Williams, who also expressed disap proval for the conict of interest arising from Tim Kerigan contracting his brothers company as the TDCs sole marketing ser vices provider. Williams cited Florida Statute 112.3143, which lays out voting conicts for public ofcials in regards to relatives. The statute states: Relative means any father, mother, son, daughter, husband, wife, brother, sister, father-inlaw, mother-in-law, son-inlaw, or daughter-in-law. Jack Kerigan addressed the board, citing higher bed taxes in Gulf County for 2011 and growing Web site trafc for VisitGulf.com. Every media pitch we put out has a plan, Jack Kerigan said. Our team is completely transparent in everything that we do. Williams said it is im possible to be transparent without a contract. Jack Kerigan offered no explanation as to why no contract was signed after the award letter was issued. Tim Kerigan said it is unfair to compare the Gulf County TDC to the Walton County TDC because Wal ton County is a larger oper ation, receiving more than $8 million from BP in 2011 and with a much larger staff to handle the funds. Obviously there are things we need to address, Kerigan said. We certainly are doing what we can with the staff we have. Kerigan said he has not tried to do anything unethi cal, and that the TDC has held to its allocations with the BP funds, with a spend ing plan similar to Santa Rosa County. Kerigan said where the TDC has failed is by not requesting BOCC approval for expenditures totaling more than $5,000. If were looking at poli cies and procedures, we can handle that, Kerigan said. But when are we go ing to have this amount of money to spend again? Williams responded by demanding Kerigan put the house back in order. Follow statute, follow suit, do your job and were ne, Williams said.

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters AMERISTEP DOGHOUSE BLIND WAS $89.99 NOW $59.99 By Stan Kirkland Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission In less than two weeks, anyone who visits the low er Apalachicola River will swear a war has broken out. Rest assured, its no war, but the annual opening of squirrel season. Small-game season, which is the open season for gray squirrel and quail, runs from Nov. 12 to March 4 throughout the state. Hunters are allowed to kill 12 squirrels daily. The lower Apalachicola River isnt the only area where squirrel hunters will be out in numbers. In the Florida Panhandle, therell be lots of squirrel hunters hunting the hardwoods along practically every river and creek where they have access. On the Apalachicola River below Wewahitchka, most of the boat ramps will be crowded with trucks and boat trailers while their owners hunt out of their boats. Where theres pri vate property, some hunt ers use simple cabins as their base for sleeping and eating. Other hunters use tents and sleep primitive style, on the ground. One hunter who made the trip every year for al most 30 years is Tony Bigot of Fort Walton Beach. The 64-year-old hasnt hunted the past couple of years but he said it was a trip that he and eight or nine friends made together every year. It was really a ritual for us. We would go down on Friday afternoon or night (the day before the open ing), sleep in a friends cab in and then hunt Saturday morning and go back in the afternoon, he said. Bigot said they hunted near Brothers River and generally found lots of squirrels. Sometimes youd kill your bag limit in a couple hours. But usually, wed get ve or six in the morning and about that many in the afternoon. Bigot said he always prided himself on his sense of direction and being able to nd his way back to the camp, but one day ev ery oak, gum and cypress looked the same and he knew he was lost. After wandering in cir cles for several hours, he found a guy cutting rewood and paid him $5 to take him back to the boat landing. My friends were there looking for me. I took a lot of kidding, he said. Bigot said he enjoyed his annual opening-weekend trip so much that he took both his son and daughter to experience the Southern tradition. We enjoyed the hunt but all the other stuff eating camp food, sitting around a re at night and smelling like smoke, and everyone telling stories about their hunt those are things Ill always remember, he said. JOHN DRUMMON D | Special to the Star From left, Michael Dobbs, John Drummond and Mark Bateman bagged 21 gray squirrels. Squirrel season returns Nov. 12 Special to The Star As the days grow short er and the sun not quite so hot, a slower more relaxed recreational opportunity becomes favorable at the park. Long, peaceful walks on miles of unpopulated beach are a paradise to the parks November and De cember visitors. The beachcombers who travel to the Florida pan handle will notice the type of sand on the beach at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park is made from quartz and gypsum. This beau tiful, white sand washed down from the Appala chian Mountains where it was originally formed. Treasures are to be had for those who look! Some common types of shells found at the park are the ghting conch, which are numerous in the spring when they lay eggs; the lettered olive, whelks and cockles usually rest in the sand at the surf zone. The shells and seaweed are deposited along the high water mark. This is called the wrack line and is an excellent place to nd sharks teeth, shells and different kinds of oating seeds called sea beans. After weeks or months at sea, many of these drift ing seeds wash up on the beach from the Caribbean, South America and even from as far away as Africa. A beachcomber can en joy the sand, the sea and the fresh air while exer cising at the same time. So, come to the beach and treasure hunt! Until Next time, The Rangers at St. Jo seph Peninsula State Park For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastateparks. Beachcombing at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 8 Inshore Trout and redfish are everywhere in St. Joe Bay. The trout are still mostly small, but some larger fish are being caught in deeper water. Red fish are abundant in just about all waters in our area. Use live croakers or pinfish to entice the big bulls or fresh cut mullet chunks. Key spots to find big bull reds are Mexico Beach Pier, under the Tapper bridge and at the oil docks at night. Gag grouper season will come to an end and this month. This fall season has produced many good fish. Most legal fish are holding still in the 100 to 200-foot range; however, the cooler water temps will soon have grouper close to shore. Some kingfish are being caught, but it is a hit-ormiss fishery. Loads of sand trout and some sheepshead are getting hooked at the inshore towers close to the tip of the cape. SPONSORED BY SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Enjoy the sand, the sea and the fresh air at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com A Section By Jason Shoot Florida Freedom Newspapers Wewahitchkas Theryl Brown and Bozemans Ja cob Martinez staged a duel for the ages Friday night at Gator Field. It was Brown, however, who went home pleased with the end result. Brown ran for 343 yards and ve touchdowns, and his 11-yard touchdown run with a minute and a half remaining in the game lifted the host Gators to a thrilling 52-45 win in front of a raucous Homecoming crowd. He is something else, said Wewahitchka coach Denniz Kizziah. We are apparently comfortable winning this way. I guess it seems each week it gets a little more exciting and we gured out how to make it more exciting this week. Representing District 2-1A, Wewa improved to 72 overall with its seventh consecutive win. Bozeman, which resides in District 3-1A, slipped to 2-6 with its fth straight loss. The Gators needed ev ery one of Browns heroics to withstand Martinez and his Bozeman teammates. Martinez, the Bucks quar terback, nished with a whopping 528 yards of total offense, 312 on the ground and another 216 through the air. His perfectly placed 26-yard strike to Alex Hobbs in the end zone gave Bozeman a 45-44 lead with 3:21 remaining. The consequence of that play was it left Brown far too much time to put his legs to work. The Wewa tailback carried the ball ve times for 43 yards on the ensuing drive, culmi nating with his go-ahead touchdown run. Daniel Taylor returned the Gators kickoff 36 yards to the Wewa 35 with 1:16 left and put Bozeman in posi tion to tie the game or steal a victory. Brown had other intentions, though, and he stepped in front of a hur ried Martinez pass in the end zone on fourth-and-15 to seal Wewas victory. Martinez had given the Bucks a 36-33 lead with a 1-yard touchdown run with 6:46 remaining, but Wewas Jalyn Addison returned Bozemans kickoff 72 yards for a touchdown to put the Gators back in front 44-39. Perhaps the biggest difference between the two teams was that Wewa already had played sev eral games of this nature, contests that resembled tennis matches as much as football games with the way the ball moved back and forth, up and down the eld. Over its past seven games, Wewas offense has generated 345 points, while the defense has allowed 223. Over 33 years of coach ing, I have had some good teams and some bad teams, Kizziah said. Im not sure yet which one this is. I told the coaches if we could get past Bozeman, which is a pretty good team, we were pretty good. And we did that. Anyway we can get the win, well take it. The rst half was a wild shootout between the two offenses. Martinez rushed for 183 yards and three touchdowns on 10 carries through two quarters, and he also contributed with three completions to re ceiver Tommy Cook for 78 yards. Martinez ran for touch downs of 18, 83, 30 and 1 yards. He also threw a pair of touchdowns, connect ing with Cook on a 29-yard touchdown pass in the rst half. Martinez nished 8for-18 passing, and his two interceptions each were picked off by Brown. The Bucks piled up 342 yards of offense before halftime en route to a 26-24 lead through two quarters, but they werent successful slowing down Wewa, either. The Gators had 233 yards of offense, including 101 rushing yards on Browns 14 carries. Brown nished the game with scoring runs of 25, 15, 74, 94 and 11 yards. Addison, in addition to his kickoff return, also turned a short completing into a 43-yard touchdown pass in the rst half. Brown has rushed for 1,885 yards on the season. That is No. 1 in the state, regardless of classication, according to MaxPreps, and Brown has surpassed Ike Mincy as the singleseason rushing leader in Wewahitchka High School history. Taylor nished with nine carries for 70 yards, and his 12-yard touchdown run two plays into the second half gave the Bucks a 33-24 lead. Brown responded two plays later, though, tearing through Bozemans de fense for his 74-yard scor ing romp. The Gators already had clinched a postseason berth with a 3-1 runner-up nish in district play. A Sneads victory over Vernon this Friday will force a threeway tie for the district title and playoff spots. Wewahitchka is off this week before traveling to West Gadsden next Friday. We are starting to get beat up some so this off week come at a good time for us, Kizziah said. Star News Editor Tim Croft contributed to this report. Page A9 Thursday, November 3, 2011 Star Staff Report The season came to a crushing halt Tuesday night for the Port St. Joe High School volleyball team. The Lady Tiger Sharks lost a District 4-1A semi nal match against Blount stown at Liberty County High School, ending their season. Blountstown won 3-1 in sets and moves on to play Thursday evening for the district title. With six seniors, Port St Joe was upset about losing out a playoff spot, guaranteed to the winner of Tuesdays game. The Lady Tigers of Blountstown just put together a really good match, said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor. I feel for our girls, with six seniors its really difcult when your season comes abruptly to an end like this. We really thought we had a good shot in the regionals this year but Blountstown just out played us. Some statistics for the season for the seniors: Katie Gardner 56 service aces, 80 kills and 13 solo blocks; Oneika Lockley with 313 service recep tions and 273 digs; Raney Besore had 40 kills; Au tumn Haynes had 74 kills, 46 service aces and seven solo blocks; Katie Lacour had 62 service aces and 289 assists; and Nichole Spilde had 41 kills and 27 service aces. By Tim Croft Star News Editor The red zone was a blank slate for Port St. Joe Friday night. The Tiger Sharks were in West Gadsden territory ve times, twice reaching inside the 10, but could not nish the task and were shutout 21-0 in a crucial District 4-1A matchup. The arithmetic for Port St. Joe (3-5 overall, 1-2 in the district) was rendered bleak by the loss. The Tiger Sharks must beat Liberty County at home next week and hope West Gadsden (3-5, 2-1) stumbles at least once in the nal two weeks to force a three-team shootout for the districts second play off spot. We could not execute in the red zone, bottom line, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. We moved the ball at times, but we did not execute when we needed to. We have to gure some things out and regroup and be ready for a good Liberty County team. Well be ready. The Tiger Sharks of fense seemed more than ready from the outset Fri day, but the opening drive stamped the DNA for the game before it was three minutes old. Port St. Joe took the opening kickoff from its 17 and moved to the Panther 22. However, quarterback Trevor Lang threw into trafc inside the Panther 5, his pass intercepted by Caleb Cook. Cook slipped one tackle, picked up two blocks down the left side line and transformed the turnover into a 96-yard touchdown return. Isereal Grande kicked the extra point and it was 7-0 West Gadsden with 9:03 left in the opening period. That interception re ally hurt, Barth said. We were ready to snatch mo mentum, but instead of being up 7-0 we were down 7-0. Port St. Joe moved right back down the eld on the next possession to a fourth-and-one at the Panther 39. Port St. Joe faked the punt, Lang, the up man, was stopped on a rushing attempt and the Panthers took over. They moved 66 yards in 12 plays on their only sustained drive of the half to score. Quarterback An dronde Kelly connected with Marquis Brown in the right at that Dan iels turned into a 16-yard touchdown and Grandes kick made it 14-0. Port St. Joe twice more moved into a position to score. The ensuing march reached as deep as the Panther 6, but a sack and a holding penalty sent the Tiger Sharks in reverse and Daniel May was wide left on a 40-yard eld goal. The next time Port St. Joe had the ball the Tiger Sharks pushed to the West Gadsden 2 in the nal min ute before a sack, a penalty and clock management is sues snuffed the drive just prior to intermission. Port St. Joe enjoyed a 127-95 cushion in total of fensive yards yet was down by two touchdowns. That was denitely not the way we game-planned it, said West Gadsden coach Antonio Bradwell. The interception helped a lot. It is a win and gets us to the next game next week. Thats what we wanted. Well take it. The second half was a story of offense under mined by penalties the teams combined for 21 yellow ags in the game and turnovers four in the nal 24 minutes alone. The Tiger Sharks gained just 40 net yards in the half the Panthers picked up the pace in the second half and nished with 293 total yards and were in Panther territory only one more time. That excursion ended with another faked punt and another West Gadsden stop. The Panthers turned the stop into points by covering 46 yards in three plays, Dexter Alls bulling the nal 11 yards up the gut. Grandes extra point kick turned the scoreboard for the nal time. During Fridays game against Liberty County, kickoff at 7:30 p.m. ET, Port St. Joe High School will in duct eight new members to the schools Athletic Hall of Fame. The ceremo nies will take place during halftime. West Gadsden shuts out Port St. Joe Brown, Wewahitchka sprint past Bozeman Port St. Joe falls in district volleyball nals Back row, left to right: Jaclyn Kerigan, Shannon Pridgeon, Nicole Endres, Haley Wood, Brittnee Peak. Front row, left to right: Autumn Haynes, Katie Gardner, Oneika Lockley, Raney Besore, Nichole Spilde, Katie Lacour

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With the wins all three teams are guaranteed a spot in the Big Bend Super Bowl, only the second time that has happened since the GRFL was formed in 1999. With only one more regular season game to play, all three teams are undefeated. If they can get past the always-tough Blountstown on Saturday, they will have set a re markable record. For two, this years performance is a welcome change. The Dolphins were middle-ofthe-pack last year but this year they have not been scored upon while winning going 5-0. Last year the Bucca neers did not even exist. They won their rst two games in double overtime, followed up with Satur days blow-out win over Franklin County. The Jaguars, the Port St. Joe team with the best record of any Gulf County team over the past decade, just expect to win. Big Bend Champions the last two years and three of the past four. The success of the pro gram ultimately comes down to the kids. The parents have to give their support getting the play ers to practice and encour aging them to succeed. The coaches have to teach and inspire. But it is the young men that put in the work, run the wind sprints, sweat in the heat and push themselves to get better. Theyre the reason for all this success. There were enough highlights Saturday to ll the page. They include an interception returned for a touchdown by Jasmin Thomas for the Bucs rst score, a 77-yard touchdown run by the Dolphins Bren non Foxworth and Jaguar tackle Jonnolan Treglowns touchdown while playing fullback for the rst time Nothing tops what the Buccaneer team did on the last play of their game. The Seahawks have a cou rageous player with dis abilities on their team. On the last play of the game he took a handoff from the quarterback and, escorted by the Franklin County team and the Buccaneers, went 85 yards to the end zone. When he reached the end zone, there were high ves all around with as many congrats from the Bucs as from the Se ahawks. Star Staff Report St. Joseph Bay Golf Club has announced it will hold a benet golf tourna ment Saturday, Nov. 19, with proceeds supporting the Camp Gordon John ston World War II Mu seum. The club is open to the public and the tourna ment will be a four-player, scramble format, kicking off at 12:30 p.m. ET with a short ceremony to honor Americas veterans and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A meal and awards ceremony will follow. As part of a full week end event, a reception will be held at 6 p.m. ET on Fri day, Nov. 18, with hors d oeuvres, beer and wine for a $10 entry fee. A cash bar for spirits will also be avail able. A silent auction will be held with auction items including framed limited edition military art, unique military collectibles, an FSU helmet and a football signed by Bobby Bowden, an FSU basketball signed by Charlie Ward and a twonight stay at Port Inn. Cash prizes for the golf tournament will include $400 to the rst-place team, $350 for second place and $200 for third. A Hole-in-One challenge will offer a new vehicle or cash prize. The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Mu seum has been honored by Smithsonian Magazine for three-straight years and is dedicated to pre serving the memories of the amphibious soldiers who trained at the camp, which is located in Carra belle. The museum houses over 5,000 square feet of artifacts, vehicles, photos, memorabilia and memo ries of the soldiers, sailors and other military as well as civilian personnel who trained and worked at the camp during the World War II years. Hole sponsorships are available and tournament registration information can be found at www.stjo ebaygolf.com or by calling 227-1751. Special lodging packages are available starting at $69.99 per night. The event is being sup ported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council and the Franklin County Tourist Develop ment Council. Special to The Star Wewahitchka High School basketball has nalized plans for an Alum ni Basketball tournament to be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at the WHS gymna sium. In addition to team play, there will be an individual 3-point shot competition, along with a dunk compe tition, with cash prizes to the winners. Please make plans to attend what we feel will be a very enter taining day of basketball. The rst game is sched uled to begin at 10 a.m. CT on Saturday. Additional games times are 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. In addition to the Alum ni Games, the 3-point shoot-out and the dunk competition will be open to anyone interested in par ticipating in these special competitions. Please make your plans to come out, next Satur day to the WHS Gymna sium and show your sup port of WHS basketball in this special fundraising event. It should be a fun and enjoyable day. Tour nament passes will be on sale at the door for $5 for adults and $3 for students. The concession stand will also be open, so plan on coming out to eat lunch and support WHS Basket ball while you also enjoy watching some great bas ketball games. Sports PSJ Gene Rafeld teams win St. Joseph Bay Golf Club to hold tournament COURTESY OF MAL PARRISH The second Dolphin defense gang-tackles a Seahawks runner. Come Stick Your Nose In My Business You wont be disappointed!! Whether youre looking for a little extra money or a full time career. Youre looking for SCENTSY! Scentsy is safer than traditional candles! Using a beautiful ceramic warmer, a low wattage light bulb and over 80 wonderful scents, you can transform your house into a fabulous smelling home! My team is growing rapidly but we still have plenty of room for more enthusiastic people. Ty Robinson 850.229.2679 www.tyrobinson.scentsy.us Become an Independent Scentsy Consultant Today! Check out my website or give me a call! WHS basketball alumni tournament

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, November 3, 2011 Star Staff Report Hundreds of trick-or-treaters descended upon Reid Avenue on Halloween night for the Chamber of Commerces annual Ghosts on the Coast event. The night was complete with dance performances, costume contests, storytelling by Pat Nease, carnival games, hay rides and plenty of candy. The downtown merchants transformed Reid Avenue into Trickor-Treat Terrace, with spooky decorations and treats at every doorstep. The event was sponsored by the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Progress Energy and the Gulf County Tourism Development Council. Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Renee Bernal doesnt like writing, but her descriptive es say about her favorite place on last years FCAT writing exam earned her a 6, the highest score possible. Bernal wrote about the woods behind her house, a place she uses as an escape from the chaos of her overscheduled teenage life. Its quiet, Bernal said. I just like to go back there and be by myself. In addition to her 6 in writing, the soft-spoken 14-year-old also scored in the highest level on the eighth-grade reading, math and science exams, with a 5 in each subject. Bernal, a ninth-grader at We wahitchka High School, was rec ognized at the Oct. 6 school board meeting for her outstanding aca demic achievement, an accom plishment Wewahitchka High School principal Debbie Baxley believes has never been seen be fore in Gulf County. I was just astounded when I saw it, Baxley said. I mean, its quite amazing. Shes one of those children thats going to do well no matter what you do, but I have to give all the credit to (the former middle school) staff. For her stellar FCAT perfor mance, Bernal received a trophy, certicate, $100 from the school and $100 from an anonymous do nor, which she plans on spending at this weekends Florida Seafood Festival. I just do it. I just answer it and go on, Bernal said of her testing strategy, which often leaves her nished long before time is up. Shes denitely a top stu dent, said Misty Wood, Bernals geometry honors teacher at WHS. She works really hard and doesnt let anyone get the best of her. Wood said Bernals family is a big part of her life, and they pro vide the support needed for suc cess. We dont get ves in science very often its tough, said Wood, who noted that the science FCAT often holds students back from achieving the highest score in all disciplines. To get the top score in all four, its something special. Bernal has maintained a 4.0 GPA through elementary and middle school, and with a sched ule loaded with honors and ad vanced classes, she plans on con tinuing her exemplary academic career through high school. Bernal even took algebra in eighth grade through Florida Virtual School so she could stay challenged and start high school ahead of the curve in math, her favorite subject. Its just easy for me, said Bernal, who thinks she got the math gene from her father. Special to The Star That little hint of fall teasing us early each morning gives no tice that one of area sportsmens most anticipated events is soon to occur. The fth annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet will be to day, Nov. 3. Port St. Joe Lions Club members are busy working to make this years event not only bigger and better than ever, but a special moment to remember. Attendees will enjoy the his toric surroundings of the Port St. Joe Centennial Building while socializing with area sportsmen and enjoying Apalachicola oys ters, boiled shrimp and all the trimmings beginning at 5 p.m. ET. The beverage bar will also open at that time. At 6:30 p.m., the serious eat ing begins. Chef Charlie Nortons famous, no-man-left-hungry ribeye steaks will take up a good portion of the dinner plate, leav ing just enough room for the sal ad, potato and rolls. Dont forget to save room for Sisters almost equally famous banana pud ding. The real winners at this years banquet, though, will be the ben eciaries of the community ser vice projects supported by the Lions Club. More than $15,000 was raised at the 2010 banquet for community service programs in the panhandle. There have been a few chang es made to this years event. First is the location, the Cen tennial Building in Port St. Joe. Because of conicts between hunting seasons and the Nov. 3 date, the Box R Ranch was un available. The good news is the Centennial Building will remove the threat of inclement weather and provide the backdrop of the historic building, erected in rec ognition of the signing place of Floridas First Constitution. Second, live music. Not just any live music, but as long as were being somewhat nostal gic, many of us remember the band Southern Satisfaction from our high school dance era. They have not only aged well, but they are better than ever and agreed to make this years banquet even more special with a one-night reunion tour. Some of the bands past members will blend with the current group and add some spe cial music to the event. At 7:30 p.m., its time for the real excitement. More than $20,000 worth of contributions and prizes will be distributed to the guests through silent auc tions, live auctions, and rafes. A few of the items offered will include shotguns, hunting ries, pistols, rods and reels and nu merous other outdoor products. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Renee Bernal, a ninth-grader at Wewahitchka High School, was recognized at the Oct. 6 school board meeting for scoring the highest level on all of the eighth-grade FCAT tests, with 5s in reading, math and science and a 6 in writing. Wewa student aces eighth-grade FCATs 5th annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet tonightT HOMA S BAIRD | Special to The Star A highlight of every banquet is Charlie Nortons specially prepared ribeye steaks. See FCAT B5 See BANQUET B5 P HOTO S B Y VALERIE GARMA N | The Star The Mystery Inc. gang of Scooby-Doo, Daphne, Velma, Shaggy and Fred won rst place in the family division of the costume contest. All that was missing was the Mystery Machine. At right, 7-year-old Skylar Clayton won third place in her division as the Sun-Maid Raisins girl, and her 3-yearold sister Christina Clayton took rst place in the 3-6 division as a Steak and Shake hot dog vendor. GHOSTS COAST O N T H E At left, this miniature UPS man won rst place in the 0-2 age group. His little sister dressed as a package. Below, Nathaniel Ford, 3, and younger brother Chase Ford, 1, don coordinating dinosaur costumes. At right, Pat Nease tells spooky stories at the Ghoulish Gazebo. Far left hundreds of costumed kids gathered at the city commons gazebo Monday for trick-ortreating on Reid Avenue. At left the Wich family took second place in the family division dressed as a group of Darth Vaders. From left are Darth cheese grater, Mrs. Vader, Darth tater, Darth Vader and Darth waiter.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Roman Nation, MD Family Medicine Physician Acute and Chronic Care Diabetes High Blood Pressure High Cholesterol Nutrition/Weight Loss Depression/Anxiety Insomnia/ADHD Asthma/COPD 850-481-1101 221 East 23rd Street (across from Lowes) Medicare/Medicaid and most insurances accepted! Special to The Star GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club had its annual Coats for Kids drive on Oct. 14. Club members gave 70 coats, 40 blankets and a number of hats gloves and Tshirts to Wewahitchka Elementary School and North Florida Child Development. The goal is for no kid to go without a coat. Their next Coats for Kids Drive will be on Nov. 9 at Port St. Joe Elementary School. Star Staff Report Billy Quinn Jr., manager of Rish Park in Port St. Joe, was recognized by Gov. Rick Scott on Sept. 30 for his superb customer service: A letter came across my desk from a Florida citizen who had written to the Agency of Persons with Disabilities. The letter describes the superb customer service demonstrated by Billy Quinn Jr., a park manager at Rish Park located on St Joseph Peninsula. During their stay, they daily observed Mr. Quinn and his staff helping others with disabilities so they could enjoy the wonderful facility. His attention to detail plus his genuine concern for others was evident. Thanks to Billy and his staff. Keep up the great work and awesome customer service. Congratulations Billy! SPECIAL TO THE STAR Happy 2nd Birthday Alonah Shay Newby Love, Mommy, Sissy, Ammaw, Papa and Aunt Shosho Special to The Star If you would like to help make a difference in the lives of others and our community, please consider joining the GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc. This is an international club, with over 100,000 members around the world that are proud to say they are a GFWC member. There will be a membership social on Monday, Nov. 14, at 5:30 p.m. CT at Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church, 138 E. Orange Street, Wewahitchka. If you have any questions about the club or the upcoming social, you may contact one of the following members: Patty Fisher, 639-9794; Dianne Semmes, 639-5345; or Carolyn Watson, 639-3801. The members of our club look forward to receiving new members, and hope you will be one of them. Society SPECIAL TO THE STAR Left to right; Patty Fisher, Dianne Semmes, Marlyn Grawey, Carolyn Watson and Donna Roberts. Coats for kids Billy Quinn Jr. recognized by governor SPECIAL TO THE STAR Billy Quinn Jr., manager of Rish Park in Port St. Joe Wewahitchka Womans Club membership HAPPY BIRTHDAY Star Staff Report There will be a meeting Thursday, Nov. 10, at 7 p.m. ET at the Oak Grove Church, 613 Madison Street in Port St. Joe, to plan the 2011 countywide Thanksgiving dinner. The committee needs nancial support from individuals and organizations to raise funds to purchase turkeys and hams so 850 dinners can be prepared, heated and delivered to needy people in Gulf County. Anyone who would like to make a donation is asked to mail it to the following address. Please call Jerry Stokoe at 3816122 if you have any questions. Volunteers are needed to make this project a success! Mail donations to: Oak Grove Church, P.O. Box 967, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Place Donation for Thanksgiving dinner on legend. 2011 Thanksgiving dinner planning meeting The Gulf County Senior Citizens and Community Center, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, would like to invite you to join them on Tuesday, Nov. 8, from 10 a.m. until noon ET to enjoy the Oldies but Goodies Show by Deejay Steve McIntire. He will be playing all types of music by request from the 50s, 60s and 70s. This event is free and open to the public. Please call Debbie at 229-8466 for more information. All request Oldies but Goodies A sh fry benet will be held for Theodore Taylor on Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 11 a.m. ET at Frank Pate Park. The meal will include sh, potato salad, baked beans, bread, cake and tea for a $6 donation. All proceeds from the sh fry will assist Taylor with nances for a needed heart and kidney transplant. Fish Fry Benet

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The Star| B3 Thursday, November 3, 2011 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Calling All Beginner Artists! Painting Classes specially designed for new painters using the tried and true technique of One Stroke Painting. Classes are $35.00, 3 hours, and include all materials; as well as a starter set of brushes to keep. Glynis Holcombe OSCI (One Stroke Certied Instructor) www.pieceocape.com 850-229-1185 Animal Hospital 300 Long Ave, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850)229-6009 Website: agapevet.com Special to The Star A basketball could be heard bouncing in the hallway of Faith Christian School on Oct. 20. Theron Smith, a former NBA player, surprised the K-5 class with his visit. T, as he is known, showed tricks with a basketball and challenged the students to try the same. Students were also shown how to practice basketball fundamentals. Students were given an opportunity to catch the basketball thrown to them by T, and they were thrilled to have a turn. It will be a memory they shall cherish throughout their lifetime. T told them of the importance of an education, no matter what career a student may choose when he or she grows up. Ts greatest challenge to the boys and girls was to accept Jesus into their hearts and to follow His will for their lives. Mr. Smith played collegiately for Ball State University. He has played for the Memphis Grizzlies and Charlotte Bobcats. He has also played overseas in France, Italy, China and Romania. Currently he is playing in Buenos Aires. The Faith Christian School K-5 class is seen pictured with Theron Smith. Special to The Star This is the Faith Christian School honor roll for the rst quarter. All As First grade: Magnolia Sarmiento and Halee Whicker Second grade: Kristen Bouington and Shelby Causey All As and Bs First grade: Donovan Cumbie and Luke OBarr Second grade: Theron Smith Third grade: Jacob Davis and Farren Newman Fourth grade: Catherine Bouington and Jade Cothran Fifth grade: J.J. Laine Seventh grade: Elijah SarmientoPHOTOS B Y T IM CROFT | The Star The students at Port St. Joe Elementary School, concluding a week of events pertaining to drug awareness and prevention, marched adorned in plenty of red to salute Red Ribbon Week last Friday. The annual event is a school-wide challenge to students to stay away from harmful inuences such as drugs, cigarettes and alcohol. The kids hiked from the school to Buck Grifn Lake, where Mayor Mel Magidson read a proclamation declaring the week Red Ribbon Week and encouraged the students to stay away from drugs. By Rebecca Kerigan and Ashely Kennedy General information Nov. 2: NJROTC eld trip to NAS Pensacola; Nov. 4: Registration deadline for ACT at Bay on Feb. 11, 2012; Nov. 7: Gold Cards issued; Nov. 8: ASVAB testing at 8:15 a.m. in Commons Area for all juniors; School Board Meeting at PSJJSHS at10 a.m. ET; Nov. 11:Veterans Day program, 9 a.m. ET in gym. Any girls who attended the youth cheerleading camp with the varsity cheerleaders should remember to meet at halftime of the football game on Nov. 4 to perform. Only girls wearing their camp shirts will be permitted onto the eld. If you still have not picked up your shirt from camp, you may do so in the high school ofce. Athletic Hall of Fame inductions will take place before the Nov. 4 football game vs. Liberty Co.; eight new members will be inducted. Seniors who are planning to go on the senior trip need to pay their $60 payment for November by Nov. 30. If the October payment has not been paid, it is late and needs to be turned in to Ms. Alcorn as soon as possible. Sports Nov. 2: Cross country district at Wewahitchka at 11 a.m.; Nov. 4: Football vs. Liberty County at 7:30 p.m. ET; Nov. 9: Football vs. Sneads 7:30 p.m. ET; GO SHARKS! Clubs All Math Club, National Honor Society and Keyettes members who have 5th or 6th period free need to help clean out the ower beds in the front of the school. Keyettes will be having a Pizza Palooza every Wednesday at 3 p.m. in the commons area to raise money for Toys for Kids. National Junior Beta Club inductions were Thursday, Oct. 27. President Logan Haddock, Vice President Samantha Ridgley, Secretary Brooke Curcie, Treasurer Marcell Johnson and Historian Damari Cutler conducted the ceremony with a harvest theme. New members being inducted were R.J. Batts, Christina LaPlante, Chloe Burke, Hayden Lee, Mary Butts, Shaye McGufn, Lauren Davis and Tyler Monroe. SP E C I A L TO T HE S T A R From left are Maelee Lewis, Carter Costin, Alex Taylor, Miracle Smiley, Riley McGufn, John Cullen, Luke Pickels, Bryce Forston and Mazie Hodges. In the back row is Theron Smith. School News The Lions Tale FCS HONOR ROLL T challenges students Saying no to drugs DAZZLING DOLPHINSSP E C I A L TO T HE S T A R Pre-kindergarten: Andrew Sheppard. Kindergarten: Desiree Causey. 1st grade: Hannah Riley. 2nd grade: Lilly Dennison. 3rd grade: Parker Cornwell. 4th grade: Raina Whiteld. 5th grade: Katie Dykes. 6th grade: Michael Sherrill. Best in the Lunchroom: Ciara Glenn. Bus Riders of the Week: Hannah Anderson, Alex Thomason, Clinton Moore, Brandon Brant and Curtis Todd

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Dr. Tim Hines at Family Life Church Dr. Tim Hines will be ministering Nov. 6-8 at Family Life Church on Reid Avenue, downtown Port St. Joe, in what will be a pivotal meeting for this region. Tim has been bringing the Word of the Lord every year for more than 10 years to this city. The grace of God and the impartation of the anointing of Gods Spirit has consistently manifested to help those hurting in their bodies and minds, and to reignite the hearts of the believers. Tim has a Bachelors and Masters degree in Theology and has served as alumni instructor at Brother Norvel Hayes New Life Bible College. He is married to a virtuous woman and they have two beautiful children. They are based here in Florida, and are submitted to Pastor David Garcia of Brooksville Assembly of God. Tim is looking forward to what God will do in these meetings at Family Life Church. We would like to invite you to come out to Family Life Church, starting Sunday morning Nov. 6 at 10:30 a.m. ET, and Sunday through Tuesday nights at 7 p.m. ET. You will not be disappointed! Annual Harvest Day Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will be observing their annual harvest day program on Nov. 6 at 11 a.m. ET at the church located at 280 Avenue C in Port St. Joe. The speaker will be Minister Ruth Newsome of Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Panama City. All are welcome to come give thanks unto the Lord and be blessed. Revival at Port St. Joe Church of God Port St. Joe Church of God in Christ will host a community revival on Nov. 9, 10, and 11 at 7:30 p.m. ET in the church sanctuary at 163 Avenue D. The evangelist will be Supt. David Woods Jr. come and experience a powerful move of God! Be empowered to your next level in Gods Kingdom! New Horizon AA The New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 850-639-3600. Faith BRIEFS Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) (850) 827-2887 Howard Creek Baptist Church A Place of Grace 9:45 am (EST) 11:00 am (EST) Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 FAITH Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Charles Richard Dick McLaughlin, passed away at C.C. Sims State Veterans Home the evening of Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011. A Mexico Beach resident since 1994, he was born June 20, 1928, in East Liv erpool, Ohio, where his cremated ashes will be interred. Wilson Funeral Home is handling arrange ments in Panama City. Dick was a WWII Navy veteran, attended Geneva College in Beaver Falls, Pa., and was Event/Promotion Manager for Conneaut Lake Park, Pa., for 33 years. While in this locale, he did a lot of civic and volunteer work, especially for the AARP Safe Driv ing for Seniors program, teach ing 97 classes locally over a 13year span. Mr. McLaugh lin is survived by his wife of almost 63 years, Ruth Ann Stull McLaughlin, two sons, C. Andrew (spouse, Kitty) of Daleville, Va., and Glenn S. (spouse, April) McLaugh lin of Columbia, Md. He also has a grandson, Mark McLaughlin, attending VCU in Richmond, Va. In lieu of owers or other expressions of sym pathy the family suggests memorials be sent to COV ENANT HOSPICE, 107 W. 19th St., Panama City, FL, 32405 or The EMPLOYEES FUND, c/o Shanae Boston, C.C. Sims State Veterans Nursing Home, 4419 Tram Road, Springeld, FL 324042559. The family of Dick McLaughlin would like to publicly express their sin cere appreciation to all the staff members of these two organizations for the com passionate and comforting care they all gave tirelessly to ease the passing of their husband/father. Thank You. Charles Richard Dick McLaughlin CHARLES M c LAUGHLIN Daniel Earl Smith, born Oct. 6, 1953 to Edward Smitty Smith and Josephine Smith, passed away Sept.14, 2011 in Houston, Texas with his family and friends by his side. Mr. Smith is preceded in death by his father and is survived by his mother; his son Nathan of Lytle, Texas; four brothers: Steve of Newnan, Georgia, Tommy of Howard Creek, Florida, Richard of Orlando, Florida, Bryan of Panama City, Florida; and numerous nieces, nephews, friends, and extended family. Dan grew up in St. Joe Beach and attended Port St. Joe High School. He spent the last 30plus years in Houston, Tex as, where he worked as a journeyman electrician. He loved the outdoors and en joyed shing, camping and hunting with his friends. He especially enjoyed riding his beloved Harley. Dan was a kind, caring and fun-loving father, son and brother. Our world is a little darker with out him near, but heaven rejoiced over his arrival. A memorial service celebrating Dans life will be held 11:30 a.m. ET on Saturday, Nov. 5, at the New Hope Baptist Church, 5875 New Hope Church Road in Tallahassee, Fla. Dan Smith DAN SMITH Ronald H. Anstis, 95, passed away Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011, at his home in Wewahitchka, in the loving arms of his wife of 70 years, Ileane. He was born to Alice (Lea) and Henry Anstis on April 1, 1916, in Trafford, Penn. He attended schools there and in New Port Richey, Fla. He was the manager of the Gravity Fill gas station at 6th and Bal dridge in North Braddock, Penn. for 20 years and was the owner of The Outpost Bait & Tackle in New Port Richey, Fla. along with his wife, Ileane, from the 1950s through the 1970s. He retired to Yankeetown, Fla., and lived there 35 years before moving to We wahitchka in 2006. He is survived by his wife of 70 years, Ileane; his daugh ter: Joan Townsend (James); his grandson: Travis Townsend (Marcy) all of Wewahitchka; his grandson Troy Townsend (Linda) of Raleigh, N.C.; his grandson: Craig Townsend (Julie) of Jacksonville; and his great-grandchildren: Kathryn and Aubrey Anna Townsend, and Ellen and Matthew Randig. A memorial service will be held at St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church in Wewahitchka at a later date and will be announced by Heritage Funeral Home. Memorial donations may be made in memory of Ronald H. Anstis to St. Johns Church, P.O. Box 595, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 or to Emerald Coast Hospice, 2925 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Panama City, FL 32405. No owers please. Those wishing to extend a word of condolence may do so at www.heritagefhllc. com. Heritage Funeral Home, 247 N. Tyndall Park way, Panama City, FL 32404, 850-785-1316. Ronald H. Anstis RONALD H. ANSTIS Obituaries What about Grace dont you understand? Its the love of God handed down to man. Man couldnt handle or live by the Ten. This is where Jesus and Grace come in. Through the shed blood of Jesus and His loving Grace, God made a way for the human race. Have you received this Grace today? If by chance you havent, there is no other way. We who have received this grace have Gods eternal love. It will never be a never-ending experience now and also in heaven above. Billy Johnson Gods life-changing grace

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, November 3, 2011 NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the 2011 Tax Roll has been delivered by the Gulf County Property Appraiser to the Gulf County Tax Collector. The 2011 Tax Roll is open for collection beginning November 1, 2011. The Tax Collectors ofce is located in the Gulf County Courthouse Room 147, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St Joe, Florida. Ofce hours are from 9 A.M. 5 P.M. EST, Monday through Friday, except holidays. The Mailing address is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd. Room 147, Port St Joe, Florida 32456. Real and Personal Property taxes will be collected as levied by the following Taxing Authorities: Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Gulf County School Board Northwest Florida Water Management District City of Port St Joe City of Wewahitchka St. Joseph Fire Control District Tupelo Fire Control District Howard Creek Fire Control District Overstreet Fire Control District MSTU G MSTU I Discount Schedule 4% Discount if paid in November 3% Discount if paid in December 2% Discount if paid in January 1% Discount if paid in February Payable without discount in March Taxes delinquent April 1 Shirley J. Jenkins Tax Collector Gulf County, Florida (850) 229-5353 NOTICE TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD From Staff Reports Blue Cross, Ascension Sacred Heart reach agreement Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida has signed a new network agreement with Ascension Sacred Heart Health System in Escambia, Gulf and Walton counties for all health product lines of business, including for the rst time, the Medicare Advantage PPO plan. Lines of business in the agreement include BlueChoice (PPO), BlueCare (HMO), BlueOptions (NetworkBlue) and traditional indemnity plans. Also included are BlueMedicare PPO and Regional PPO for Sacred Heart Emerald Coast and On the Gulf, Blue Select for Sacred Heart Emerald Coast and On the Gulf and Medicaid for Sacred Heart System, to be completed by Dec. 31, 2011. We are truly excited to welcome the Ascension Sacred Heart Health System into the BCBSF networks, said Jane Tuten, BCBSF senior markets vice president. With this expanded agreement, our members can take advantage of Ascensions quality service and care. We are especially delighted that this agreement included Medicare Advantage PPO and allows our BlueMedicare Regional PPO members access to Ascensions services. Sacred Heart welcomes Gulf Coast Dermatology Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf welcomes Gulf Coast Dermatology to its community of health providers. Heather Preisser, certied physician assistant, began seeing patients in Gulf County on Nov. 1 at the Sacred Heart on the Gulfs Medical Ofce Building. Gulf Coast Dermatology will see patients Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulfs Medical Ofce Building is located on the hospitals campus at 3801 U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. To schedule an appointment with Gulf Coast Dermatology, call 233-3376 and specify the Sacred Heart location. School district offers computer training Special to The Star The Gulf County School District will offer computer training for the beginner to the advanced learner be ginning Nov. 7 at each high school. There will be several lev els of instruction provided at Port St. Joe High School by Wayne Taylor and at Wewa hitchka High School by Deb bie Gerber. Both of these in structors are Microsoft cer tied in Word, Power Point and Excel. Instruction for those who want to learn the basics will be geared for the beginner with no pressure to learn on a fast track. For those who have mastered basic skills and want to progress in Word, Power Point and/ or Excel, instruction will be provided. If participants want to become MOS-certi ed, instructors will provide the preparation, practice and testing. There is a charge for Microsoft Ofce Suite tests, for which the individual will be responsible. This is the rst year the Adult School Program has to charge an enrollment fee, which is $28.50 per term. Only checks made to Gulf County School Board or cash may be used for the fee. The program is open-ended, which means participants may register and enter at any time during the school year. The Port St. Joe High program will be 6-9 p.m. ET Mondays and Wednesdays in the business room by the gym door. Wewahitchka High classes will be 5-8 p.m. CT Mondays and 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at the main entrance. Times may be adjusted as need and participation dictates. Health BRIEFS Special to The Star Gulf Alliance for Local Arts is excited to offer after-school art classes for children ages 5 and up encompassing visual arts includ ing instruction in clay and paint ing with mixed media. In the fall session, the World of Clay will focus on art in nature. Instructor Leslie Wentzell teaches children to let Mother Nature be their guide and use ora and fau na to inspire artist creations. The World of Color gets inspiration from recycled and found items. Instructor Dolores Lowery teaches students to look beyond the ordinary and use found and recycled objects to add a 3-dimen sional aspect to their work using acrylic paints and mediums on canvas panels and hardboard. All classes are held at The Artery, 214 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe. Clay classes are 2:45-4:15 p.m. ET Tuesdays for children ages 5 to 8 and 4:30-6 p.m. for ages 9-plus. Painting with mixed media classes are 2:45-4:15 p.m. Thurs days for children ages 5 to 8 and 4:30-6 p.m. for ages 9-plus. Classes are $10 each. Free and reduced-cost classes are avail able for any child who qualies for free or-reduced cost lunches. Registration forms are available at www.gulfalliance.org and can be picked up and returned to Port St. Joe Elementary School or The Artery. For more information, call 5413981 or email artclasses@gulfal liance.org. You can also contact instructors Leslie Wentzell at ljwentzell@yahoo.com or Dolores Lowery at 814-2826 or seagras sart@gmail.com. The Artery offers after-school arts Its always been really easy to him, and its really easy to me. Bernal is mentored by an older National Honor Society student at the high school who will prepare her to join the or ganization next year as a sopho more. In addition to her outstand ing academics, Bernal is in volved with volleyball and soft ball at Wewahitchka High. When shes not in the classroom or on the softball eld, Bernal enjoys spending time outdoors hunting, camping, shing, four-wheeling and target shooting. She is a member of the Sin gle Action Shooting Society, an international organization de signed to preserve and promote cowboy action shooting. Bernal attends monthly SASS meetings in Wewahitchka. Its kind of like a little cow boy shootout, Bernal said. My brother and my daddy do it, and so do my uncles. Bernal is also involved with Wewahitchka Search and Res cue, an organization her mom and stepdad are both a part of. Bernal often helps with the res cues, assisting people with boat accidents, and works conces sion stands at the organizations events. Although Bernal doesnt know what career path she would like to take, she wants to attend Flor ida State University after she graduates from WHS in 2015. My older brother goes to (Florida State University), she said. Hes always been a big FSU fan. We all are. Bernal has two sisters and four brothers and spends a lot of time hanging out with her family. She said they are all proud of her academic endeavors. There will also be items avail able for women and children. This will mark the second year of the $8,000 cash drawing held during the event. The lucky winner could win up to $8,000 if his ticket is drawn last from the box, but each ticket holder will have a 1 in 25 chance of at least doubling their money. Tickets for the event are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. They can be purchased at Hannon Insurance and Ramseys Printing and Ofce Products in Port St. Joe and from any Lions Club member. Additional information or ticket purchases can be made by calling 227-1133, 227-7767 or 527-1338. FCAT from page B1 T H OM AS B A IR D | Special to The Star The Sportsmans Banquets draws hundreds every year. BANQUET from page B1

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 Special to The Star While most people in Port St. Joe know her as Dr. Pat, president of the Coastal Community Association and owner of Gulf 2 Bay Development and Construction, Dr. Patricia Hardman is also the founder and Chief Operating Ofcer of Dyslexia Research Institute which is based in Tallahassee. She has studied and worked in the eld of dyslexia, ADHD and related learning disorders since the early 1970s. On Oct. 14, The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools (The Coalition) presented her with their Distinguished Service Award for her efforts in Florida to provide options in education for children with disabilities. The award was presented at Nova Southeastern University at The Coalitions fall conference. Hardmans efforts have helped to change many of the laws in Florida relating to students with disabilities. In 1985 Hardman worked with Representative Betty Easley to develop Florida Statute 1007.265 which allows college students with disabilities to substitute courses for required courses such as math and foreign language. This has allowed thousands of students in Florida to complete their college education as opposed to having to drop out because of these courses. When the FCAT only allowed an abacus as the calculator for students with dyscalculia and visual impairments, Hardman and Senator Steve Wise brought this matter before the Senate. She helped to craft legislation that would allow appropriate accommodations on the FCAT for students with disabilities. Hardman worked with Senator John McKay on the drafting of the McKay Scholarship Program. She was appointed to the McKay Task Force when accountability measures were being discussed and created in the early years of the program. Hardman worked with Governor Bush in holding back legislation that would over-regulate the private schools accepting McKay Scholarships. The Accountability Legislation that was passed in 2006 stayed true to the goal of letting parents have choice in educating their children with disabilities, while allowing private schools the autonomy to develop their programs to t the needs of the child. Hardman worked tirelessly this year with The Coalition Board to draft language to make the McKay Scholarship accessible to students on 504 Plans. This has allowed many more children access to the McKay Scholarship. While parents may never know her name, or know what she has done for countless children throughout Florida, The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools wanted Hardman to know that they recognize her service to children with disabilities. Steve Hicks, president of The Coalition presented her with the Distinguished Service Award. The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools is a not for prot Florida organization of private schools that participate in the McKay Scholarship Program. This is the largest program in the U.S. which provides parents of children with disabilities scholarships to attend other public or private schools. PUBLIC NOTICE City of Port St. Joe The City of Port St. Joe is considering submitting a USEPA Brownelds Cleanup Grant proposal to remove asbestos containing materials from the former Gulf Pines Hospital, 102 Twentieth Street, Port St. Joe, FL. A public hearing will be held on November 15, 2011 at the City Commission Regular Meeting in the Commission Chamber of City Hall (305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd ~ Port St. Joe, FL) to discuss the grant proposal and solicit public comments on the proposal. A draft proposal with Analysis of Brownelds Cleanup Alternatives will be available for public review and comment by November 15, 2011 at the City Hall. Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold a Special Meeting on November 15, 2011, at the Holiday Inn & Suites, 2725 Graves Road, Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. The meeting will be open to the public. Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction COMBS CONSTRU C TION I N C CGC 1507649 *ADDITIONS T ERMITE R EP A IR *WINDO W R EPL A CEMENT (850) 229.8385 OR (850) 227-8156 glencombspsj@gmail.com Wood Works (In shed behind store 2284 Hwy 98 W.) PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET I RESCUED A HUMAN TODAY Her eyes met mine as I walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to have her. She wagged her tail, not too exuberantly, so I wouldnt be afraid. As I looked at her in the kennel she blocked my view from a little accident she had in the back of her cage. She didnt want me to know that she hadnt been walked today. Sometimes the shelter keepers get too busy and she didnt want me to think poorly of them. So many more are out there who havent walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one. On Friday, November 11th, 2011 (and every 2nd Friday of each month) we will feature Dogs for Dogs. Come by the Port St. Joe Marina around lunchtime (11:00 a.m. ~ 2:00 p.m.) and enjoy a hot dog or chili dog (min. 2) lunch, (chips, and soda) included for a $5.00 cash donation. All donations will be given to St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. This event is open to the public, so please help us spread the word. Dogs for Dogs November 11, 2011 At Port St. Joe Marina 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Fl 32456 850-227-9393 Dr. Pat Hardman and Steve Hicks, President of The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools. Hardman honored by Florida coalition

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 3, 2011 The Star | B7 36233S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES THOMAS McNEILL, SR. Deceased. File Number 11-13PR NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of JAMES THOMAS McNEILL, SR., deceased, whose date of death was July 4, 2010 and whose social security number is XXX-XX-XXXX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is November 3, 2011. Personal Representative: BETTY L. McNEILL 1031 Indian Pass Rd. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin Florida Bar No. 699070 Post Office Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Telephone: (850) 227-1159 November 3, 10, 2011 36103S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Wewahitchka, FL Unit #96-Lynn & Molly Griffin, Unit #87-Victor Strickland and Unit #12-Sherry Young will be sold on November 10, 2011 at 8:30 am if not paid up. October 27, November 3, 2011 36221S RE: REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FROM ACCOUNTING FIRMS To Whom It May Concern: The Port St. Joe Port Authority (Port) is currently requesting proposals from interested and qualified Certified Public Accounting firms, registered and licensed under the laws of Florida, to provide auditing services. The selected firm will be required to perform an annual audit of the Port’s financial activities in accordance with generally accepted standards, with Government Accounting Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, and with Rules of the Auditor General of the State of Florida. The selected firm will be engaged for a term of three years. The proposal is to include the fee for the first year and the services will begin with the annual audit of the prior fiscal year of October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2011. In August 2012 and August 2013, the Port and the selected firm will review the scope of services and the fee for the second and third years respectively. In addition to the fee for the first year, proposals are to include (1) statements of qualifications for the firm and its principals who will be responsible for providing the services and (2) statements of experience in providing similar accounting services to governmental entities. Proposals are to be marked with “RFP Audit Services” and received by the Port by noon, Thursday, November 10th. After that deadline Port staff will open the proposals and assemble them for consideration by the Port Commissioners at the Authority’s meeting on Wednesday, November 16th. The Port’s address is 206 Monument Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The phone number is 850-229-5240 should there be any questions. Thank you for your interest in providing auditing services to the Port St. Joe Port Authority. November 3, 10, 2011 36189S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST MARGIE O. SMITH A/K/A MARGIE ODEAN SMITH A/K/A MARGIE D. SMITH A/K/ A MARGIE SMITH, DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000307 DIVISION: NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST MARGIE O. SMITH A/K/A MARGIE ODEAN SMITH A/K/A MARGIE D. SMITH A/K/ A MARGIE SMITH, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK D OF C. F. HANLON SUBDIVISION NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in the The Star. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 19th day of October, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Gulf County Courthouse #850-229-6113 (TDD) Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11021934 November 3, 10, 2011 36205S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, DBA Coastal Community Mortgage, a Florida Banking Corporation, Plaintiff, VS. KENDALL D. CRAWLEY, and WATAPPO PRESERVE OWNER’S ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. CASE NO: 11-211-CA NOTICE OF ACTION To: KENDALL D. CRAWLEY 1541 FARRINDON CIRCLE LAKE MARY, FL 32746 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property in Gulf County, Florida: Lot 143, Wetappo according to plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 36 through 42 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., the plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on or before December 5, 2011, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on the plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on October 24, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 3, 10, 2011 36149S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION LNV CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs RIVERFRONT PROPERTIES, INC.; GARY R. RHINEHEART; HARRY A. SCHULTZ; WINDMARK INVESTMENTS, LLC; GEORGIA COMMERCE BANK; WINDMARK BEACH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. CASE NO. 2010-CA-000363CA NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in this cause on October 18, 2011, the Clerk will sell the Property situated in Gulf County, described as: Lot 27, Windmark Beach, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 1, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. (the “Property”) at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. ET, on the 17th day of November, 2011, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAT THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATE: October 18, 2011. CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ROBERT W. BOOS Florida Bar No.0558079 DEBORAH H. OLIVER Florida Bar No.0485111 STEPHANIE M. MARTIN Florida Bar No.0030585 Adams and Reese LLP 101 E. Kennedy Boulevard, Suite 4000 Tampa, Florida 33602 Telephone: (813) 402-2880 Attorneys for Plaintiff November 3, 10, 2011 36095S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDCICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: The Estate of BETTY JEAN CURLEE Deceased. CASE NO.: 11-23 PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BETTY JEAN CURLEE, deceased, File Number 11-23 PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, the address of which is 1000 Cecil Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives’ attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is October 27, 2011. Dated this the 14th day of October, 2011. Susan Curlee Wilder Petitioner/Personal Representative 217 Coronado Street Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456 Clinton T. McCahill 305 Sixth Street Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456 850-229-9040 Tel. 850-229-9049 Fax FBN: 0073482 Attorney for the Petitioner Personal Representative October 27, November 3, 2011 36065S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. THREE MEN AND AN IDEA, LLC, a Dissolved Florida Limited Liability Company, ROBERT J. JASINSKI, Individually, and KENNETH ALLEN PETERSON, JR., Individually, Defendants. CASE NO. 11-246-CA CIVIL DIVISION NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 11, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerk’s Office, of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, on November 10, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. ET the following described property: Parcel #9, Sunshine Acres (unrecorded) Commence at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run North 8924’40” East for 1726.20 feet; thence North 0131’37” West for 1798.77 feet; thence North 8924’40” East for 1997.96 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning run North 0131’37” West for 189.24 feet; thence North 8924’40” East for 220.26 feet; thence South 0131’37” East for 457.29 feet to a point on the Northerly right of way line of State Road No. 386; thence South 6013’45” West along said right of way line for 250.00 feet; thence North 0131’37” West for 389.96 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land having an area of 2.62 acres, more or less, and being subject to a 30.00 foot wide roadway easement along a portion of the Westerly boundary thereof, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence run North 8924’40” East for 1726.20 feet; thence North 0131’37” West for 1798.77 feet; thence North 8924’40” East for 1997.96 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning run North 0131’37” West for 30.01 feet; thence North 8924’40” East for 30.01 feet; thence South 0131’37” East for 419.97 feet; thence South 6013’45” West for 34.06 feet; thence North 0131’37” West for 419.97 feet to the Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON October 11, 2011. Becky Norris, Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Mary Ellen Davis, Esquire 17 High Drive, Suite C Post Office Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL 32326 (850) 926-6003 October 27, November 3, 2011 36295 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF Samuel William Berkheiser Deceased. File No. 2011-76-PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Samuel W. Berkheiser, deceased, whose date of death was January 21, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Ceceil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 3, 2011. Personal Representative: Samuel W. Berkheiser, Jr. 40 5th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Attorney for Personal Representative: Max W. McCord Florida Bar No. 28119 105 West 5th Street Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 640-1131 November 3, 10, 2011

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B8| The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $119,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 Beachside FOR RENT ST. JOE BEACH 113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98 2bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98 2bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach WINDMARK BEACH 159 Beach Street Bungalow #3 1bd/1ba Unfurnished 212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #4 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #6 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished MEXICO BEACH Villas of Mexico Beach, 3706 Hwy 98 New Condos, Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 3bd/3ba Furnished Pictures available on MLS #243890CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision 101 Two Palms Drive 4bd Unfurnished Two Palm Subdivision 3bd/3 ba Furnished and covered pool (small pet allowed with pet deposit) PORT ST. JOE Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Dr. Unit 15 2bd/2ba Furnished 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE RowellAuctions.com BALLROOM215 BankForeclosed PropertiesONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE!Alabama, Georgia, Florida & South CarolinaMany Selling Absolute! 1347 Alligator Drive Alligator Point, FL Unit C-429 of the Carrabelle Boat Club Ass.at 1570 Hwy 98 W.,Carrabelle, FL 438 Mill Road, Carrabelle, FLSelling from St. James Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Rd, Carrabelle, FLNovember 15 -:6:00 p.m.Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388 2042253 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd Floor; 3 Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale300 Long Avenue +/2,000sf Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; $399,000 131 E. Gulf Beach DrSt. George Island, +/3,950sf of ce/retail; $285,00071 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms UNDER CONTRACT ant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7 UNDER CONTRACT eue sf UNDERCONTRACT lf Beach Dr geIsland,+/-3,950sfofce/retail; LE AS ED located at the cor n g;$10psfmod gr DELUXE KING MATTRESS/BOX SPRINGS WITH WOOD HEADBOARDExcellent Condition Sleeps great all for $600.00HEALTH RIDER TREAD MILL $100.00229-8014 JOB NOTICE The City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3,758) is accepting applications for the following position:Water Plant SupervisorPlease submit an application and cover letter along with ve references to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The Position will be open until lled. Salary will be DOQ. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster or call 850-747-5019 10th AnniversaryVETERAN’S Charity Poker RunNovember 5,2011 Registration 9:00-11:00 @ Katmandu/Buoy Bar Panama City Beach For more info 850 628-6149 www.vnvusa.com Sponsored by Vietnam Vets MC Legacy Vets MC St. Joe, 3br, 1 bath, fenced backyard with 2 storage buildings, new metal roof and paint on house, near school and Lake Griffin, Call (850) 227-8295 for appt. Price ReducedFSBO : 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 Small Efficiency Apt $300 mo W/S included. Pet neg. 773 Bryants Landing Road. 850-899-0162 Bayview Home @ Indian Pass. 4 br, 3 ba, 2 acres, large storage and Boat shed. $1200 mo + $1200 dep. $200 pet fee. In the St. Joe school district. Call 850-229-1065 or 850-227-5025 PSJ -1911 Cypress Ave. 3 br, 1.5 bath in Nice neighborhood, close to schools. $675 mo, $300 dep. One year lease. Call 850-867-3368 Mexico Beach Store Front. 2500 sf on Hwy 98 with 32 car parking. 5 year lease with option to buy. 850-348-7774 Text FL83641 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Port St Joe 114 Bellamy Circle, Saturday November 5th 8:00 a.m.-?; Multi Family Sale Port St Joe, 8414 Tradewinds Dr. Gulfaire Subdivision, Saturday 8:00 a.m. CST-?Two Family SaleSomething for everyone, lots of clip on earrings. Text FL84457 to 56654 St Joe Beach 8111 Alabama Ave, Saturday 8am-2pm;Multi FamilyChristmas, clothing, jewelry, housewares, etc. Wewahitchka 182 West Ave, Burgess Creek area, Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-?; clothes, dishes, toys, scrapbooking supplies, womens shoes, mens hunting boots, christmas trees and ornaments, and lots more! Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publishers Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals whom are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Mexico Bch Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com Highland View 2132 Hayes Ave, Saturday 8:00 a.m.-?;Multi Family SaleLots of bargains, kids, clothes and furniture, electronics, and more! Text FL84390 to 56654 Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centura.us.com Partners in Grime Cleaning Services 850-630-8471. or 850-340-0492 For Homes or Condo’s free estimates by phone! D & B Home Repairs Inc.Featuring Seamless Gutters. 12 colors available. Call 850-340-0605 Spot Advertising works! Classifieds work!



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, NOVEMBER 3 2011 YE E AR R 74, N N UMBER 3 By Tim CroftStar News Editor There was, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson noted, symmetry to the somewhat winding nature of David B. Langston Drive. After all, Magidson added, nothing Dr. David Langston, star basketball player, educator, creator of a foundation to provide opportunities for children of all colors and backgrounds, for whom he spent his life advocating for, accomplished was done in a straight line. Langston, who passed away more than two years ago while returning from a junior college basketball tournament, was remembered and memorialized last Wednesday with the ofcial dedication of David B. Langston Drive. One part of him would be proud, but he wouldnt want all the attention, said Langstons son Eric. He made some mistakes in his life, and he felt if he would get the kids young enough he could teach them to avoid Daylight saving time ends Sunday Star Staff ReportNorth Florida Child Development will hold its groundbreaking event for the New Early Child Development and Family Resource Center at 176 Field of Dreams in Port St. Joe, located across from the Gulf Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College on Highway 98. The groundbreaking ceremony will be Monday, Nov. 7 at 2 p.m. ET. U.S. Representative Steve Southerland will be the guest speaker at the event. A reception will follow at Sacred Heart Hospital in the cafeteria. The facility will add space and services from the current Highland View facility and will also inject additional jobs and payroll into the community. NFCD to break ground on new centerDavid B. Langston Drive dedicatedBy Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer With an additional $1.1 million from British Petroleum to juice up its annual $600,000 budget, the Gulf County Tourism Development Council has gone on a spending spree this year, without acquiring any approval from the Board of County Commissioners on its lengthy list of expenditures, county commissioners said during two recent public meetings. Because the TDC operates as a county department, county policy requires approval from the commission for any expenditure of $5,000 or more. Policy also requires county agencies to collect verbal bids for services ranging from $5,000 to $10,000 and to legally advertise services with a price tag of $10,000 or more. While the TDC budget nearly tripled this year, the TDC and BOCC have until recently disregarded these policies, allowing TDC executive director Tim Kerigan to call all the shots in spending the councils nearly $2 million budget, commissioners noted. We went from having a roughly $250,000 marketing and events budget to having four times that much, Kerigan said. Its Commissioners question TDC spendingSee Td DC A6By Tim CroftStar News Editor Maybe it took a bit, years in fact, but the Gulf County Courthouse has less of an open-door feel. And that is a good thing, court administrators, deputies and judges say. The Gulf County Courthouse completed an upgrade of security last week, going live last Wednesday with a new full body scanner and monitor bank at the front entrance. In addition, the back entrance off the courtyard between the sheriffs ofce and jail is now closed to the public. The only access is using an employee card on a swipe station at each door. The back entrance also has a camera wired to the monitor bank at the front entrance to allow the deputy on duty to observe the comings and goings at the back entrance.Courthouse security gets boostSee COURTHOUsSE A3 The family of the late Dr. David Langston gather around the road sign that will mark the roadway named in his honor, one that links a community long divided by railroad tracks.Photos by T T IM CC ROFT | The StarLangstons sister, Linda Tschudi, and son, Eric, make remarks during the ceremony. When his turn came, Eric battled his emotions to get his prepared remarks out. Children were Langstons calling, providing opportunities to further their education and transform them into economic contributors to their community. The late Dr. David LangstonRemembering a passionate advocate forchildren From left, 14th Judicial Court administrator Jan Shadburn, County Judge Tim McClellan, Circuit Court Judge Shonna Young Gay, Robyn Gable, assistant court administrator, Sheriff Joe Nugent and County Commission chair Warren Yeager. See La ANGsSTON A3Opinion. .....................................A4-A5Letters to the Editor. .................A5Outdoors. ...................................A8Sports.........................................A9-A10School News. ..............................BB3Faith. ...........................................BB4 Obituaries. ..................................BB4Classieds. ..................................BB7-BB8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 Venus:Provisions The Thirsty Goat Mango Marleys (Mexico Beach) St Joe Bar Songwriters Workshop (Dockside Cafe) Toucans (Mexico Beach) Haughty Heron Indian Pass Raw BarSponsors: Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Tapper&Company Management, Inc & Fair Communications Construction, Inc GulfCoastVacationRentals Miller JackDaniels Monumental County TDC Medical Durens Floridaze Coffee at Joe Company and Jamie Megan Jeff Aaron Partial funding for this event provided by the Gulf County Tourism Development Council This project received nancial assistance from VISIT FLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.com For the third year in a row, we were able to increase our number of writers, number of guests in attendance, and our number of venues. This could not have been done without the incredible community support that we continue to receive.Thank you to all of our generous sponsors and friends! By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer School nursing is more than just ice packs and Band-Aids. With an increase in complex medical conditions in children across the country, school nurses are becoming more of an asset as school funding goes down. Whats happened is weve gotten better and better at helping children with prenatal births, said Martha Bergren, director of research for the National Association of School Nurses. But now more children are having more health problems when they become school-aged. Success in one sphere has led to more challenges in the educational sphere. Although the need often goes unrecognized, the Gulf County School District has made it a priority to continue to provide students with a strong school health program in partnership with the Gulf County Health Department. We have one of the richest and most effective school health programs in the state, said Marsha Lindeman, administrator of the Gulf County Health Department. Its almost unheard of to have (these services). With a registered nurse and three health aids in Port St. Joe schools and a registered nurse and two health aids in Wewahitchka schools, Gulf County is an anomaly among Florida counties. Florida has one of the highest student-to-school nurse ratios in the country, ranking 48th out of 51 nationwide, with 2,537 students per school nurse, according to the National Association of School Nurses. Gulf County, however, had roughly 1,900 students enrolled for the 2010-2011 school year, and two registered nurses present, making the student-to-school nurse ratio 950 to one. Twenty-ve percent of all schools dont have a nurse at all, Bergren said. And 14 percent of those schools dont even have an unlicensed stand-in. Bergren said when it comes time for schools to cut budgets, the health sector is often the rst to go. With major cutbacks in education funding across the state, Lindeman admitted she was worried the school board would slash funding for nursing programs in county schools when it adopted its 20112012 budget. They took some pretty steep cuts, but they never once considered a cut to the money they give to the Gulf County Health Department, Lindeman said. They never once cut a penny from the school health budget. Bergren said when a school has a full-time registered nurse, kids are 57 percent less likely to be sent home in the middle of the day. People think of school nursing as just ice packs and Band-Aids, said Gulf County School Health Coordinator Amy Driggers. It is that, but its so much more. When Driggers worked as the Port St. Joe School nurse eight years ago, she never anticipated the job would one day involve helping diabetic students meticulously count carbohydrates to control blood sugar, or the number of students carrying inhalers and EpiPens would escalate. The trend is national, with newly diagnosed cases of diabetes almost doubling in the last 10 years, the prevalence of food allergies among children up 18 percent from 1997 to 2007, and asthma rates continuing to grow, with one out of every 10 school-aged children diagnosed with asthma. Driggers said this time of year is absolutely chaotic in the school health sector, as she and her staff meticulously draw out individual health plans for kids with specic health issues and organize screenings and immunizations. Every student who has been diagnosed with a serious health issue has an individual care plan laid out by a doctor, so the nurses know how to best help each child on a day-to-day basis and in case of an emergency. With seven students in the Port St. Joe schools with Type One diabetes, the health care staff also trains teachers and faculty to respond to the highs and lows the disease causes. Were training the teachers and faculty so the parents can go to work in peace, Driggers said. Lori LaCivita, the registered school nurse for Port St. Joe schools, said it is common to see health problems in children that were once thought to only effect adults like high blood pressure and Type Two diabetes. Body mass index screening results from a 2010 school health service summary for Gulf County by the Florida Department of Health revealed that 16.5 percent of the rst, third and sixth graders screened were overweight and 22.41 percent were obese. We have such a rise in childhood obesity that youre going to see these things, LaCivita said. LaCivita said diabetes used to be categorized into juvenile onset (type one) and adult onset (type two), but as childhood obesity rates continue to rise the lines are becoming blurred. The new trend in managing diabetes is counting carbohydrates, a micromanaged meal plan that helps manage blood glucose levels. LaCivita helps a handful of students with carbohydrate counting on a daily basis. LaCivita also spends a lot of time with the student and his or her parents to better understand the childs specic health needs. The number one thing is to make sure theyre safe at school, LaCivita said. Every student is different, but its all based on a formula with their specic need in mind. The school health staff spends time bouncing back and forth between schools, Driggers between Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe, and LaCivita between Port St. Joe Elementary and Junior-Senior High. LaCivita said she cant imagine not having a registered nurse on staff. With no nurse, schools may rely on the principal, secretary or teacher to address students health needs. You cant expect the teachers to address the medical needs on top of everything else, LaCivita said. Our teachers are overwhelmed enough just trying to teach them.Responsibilities expand for school nursesPhotos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star(Pictured clockwise from left) Lori LaCivita, RN for the Port St. Joe Schools, Amy Driggers, Gulf County School Health Coordinator, and Wendy Baker, one of three health aids at the Port St. Joe Schools.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, November 3, 2011 117 Hwy 98, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653.8825 218 Hwy 71, Wewahitchka, FL (850) 639.2252 302 Cecil G Costin Sr Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL (850) 227.7099 Full body scanner, X-ray machines and monitors are among the upgrades to security that went live in the Gulf County Courthouse last week.This brings us up to all the other courthouses our size in the state, said County Judge Tim McFarland. I went over to Franklin County recently and their courthouse was ahead of ours, and I thought we need to change that. The county and its courthouse made national news 25 years ago, when a husband distraught over divorce proceedings entered the court hearing armed with a gun and shot and killed the judge, an attorney and a witness. Clyde Melvin, the shooter, died in prison two years ago. Circuit court and county judges have frequently written letters or appeared before the Board of County Commissioners, seeking improvements in security at the courthouse. The issues were on display last week when Circuit Court Judge Shonna Young Gay sentenced the robbers from the December 2010 armed robbery of Vision Bank. Following sentencing, several family members and friends charged through the swinging gates separating spectators from court ofcers and a host of friends and family members of several of the convicted robbers lingered around the courthouse, expressing their outrage. The security improvements are the result of a partnership. The 14th Circuit State Courts Program provided $25,000 upfront for the monitors, cameras and X-ray scanning equipment. County commissioners and McFarlands ofce chipped in support and some dollars for additional equipment, such as metal detectors, and Sheriff Joe Nugent provided the full-body scanner. It was a group effort all the way around, McFarland said. Chief Judge Hentz McClellan and the 14th Circuit State Court System graciously assisted in funding these security upgrades, and these measures could not have been realized without the full support of Sheriff Nugent and the Gulf County Commissioners. The citizens of Gulf County will be the beneciaries of this remarkable group effort for years to come. The high-tech measures, McFarland noted, bolster a well-trained and knowledgeable security detail provided by Nugent. These (improvements) will make somebody who might be considering doing something crazy to think twice about, Nugent said. COURTHOUSE from page A1some of those mistakes and team them to be a success, as a person, economically, in the community. In a sense, the dedication was a symbolic remembrance. It was a remembrance of a man who, with a cellphone constantly at his ear and a deep gravelly voice that easily announced his presence, made a mark on a community of considerable distinction. Losing his parents early in life, he and his brother, Norris, whose untimely death at an early age would compel David to name his youth foundation in his brothers honor, Langston, with the help of several mentors, rose to unimagined heights for an African American in Gulf County in the 1960s and 70s. Langston, enshrined in the Port St. Joe High School Athletic Hall of Fame, was arguably the nest basketball player in county scholastic history, taking the Tiger Sharks to a state title before a distinguished college career at Drake University and a brief professional career in the now-defunct American Basketball Association. He was a Sunkist High School All-American as a senior in high school and named all-Missouri Valley Conference while at Drake. But the tools, the discipline and work ethic he learned along the way drove him to earn a bachelors degree at Drake, a masters at Indiana State and a Doctorate of Education from LaSalle University. He placed a lot of emphasis on education, Magidson said. He took that emphasis for his education and transformed it to educating children. I think it is tting that this road has some curves. David never took a straight line to get what he wanted accomplished. He would return to his roots in Port St. Joe to create the Norris D. Langston Youth Scholarship Foundation, which would ultimately reach into seven counties with after-school programs, tutoring, mentoring and motivational speakers. He was for the community, for all races, said Langstons sister, Linda Tschudi. He was about educating the children. That is why I have the privilege of educating (children at Port St. Joe Elementary School, primarily students with special needs). And he cajoled and lobbied local and state leaders to fund his passion. Two former state education commissioners spoke at the foundations annual banquet, as did Allen Bense, then the speaker of the Florida House. He could, as friend Eugene Rafeld once noted, get more done with a car and a cellphone than just about anybody. The dedication, though, was something else. Advocated by former city commissioner John Reeves, the roadway represents a badly needed link and erasure of the railroad tracks that once divided a community, black and white. The road links Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard on the north end of town, a primarily minority area, with Williams Avenue on the south end, in the main shopping and business district of Port St. Joe. It is a symbol, Reeves stated frequently over the years, of what Langston was about Langston did not care about skin tone or household income; it was all about hard work and keeping on the straight and narrow and reaching for the American dream Langston rmly believed still existed for all willing to put in the effort. He worked hard for the youth white, black, green, purple, polka dotted, it didnt matter, Eric Langston said. He wanted to educate them and (empower) them economically. And, lastly, the road was the result of a community partnership. GAC Contractors donated construction of the road and Preble Rish Engineers owner Ralph Rish was a long-time friend and supporter of the Langston Foundation donated the engineering. County Commissioner Warren Yeager and former County Commissioner Nathan Peters Jr. provided district road bond funds to the project and the St. Joe Company donated the land. Fairpoint Communications was willing to move several underground lines to make the road possible. This is a special day for the city, Magidson said. This shows what people coming together with their minds in the right place can get done. Tschudi attempted to sum up what she thought her brother would see in last weeks dedication. He would be proud of all his accomplishments, but he wouldnt want the pat on the back, she said with a rueful smile. Charles Beachum was among the 75 or so attendees. Beachum said he knew Langston since he was this high, pointing to a spot below his knees. He remembered the David Langston of the athletic elds and how those lessons translated into Langstons life. I can still hear him saying, Winners never quit and quitters never win and he took that to his grave, Beachum said. I believe in a spirit world. Davids spirit was here today. LANGSTON from page A1

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OpinionA4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINGS USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 What is it? What is it that makes us think we are better (or smaller) than we are? I guess thats easy. It is vanity or needing a warm fuzzy as I like to call it. Is it bad? Not necessarily, unless it really messes things up for other people. I did not know about this thing called vanity sizing. Im a man, how am supposed to know about such things? Recently, I had a good friend explain it to me. It basically comes down to the fact that clothing people are changing what things are (sizes) to make folks feel better about themselves. With womens clothing, it seems that over the years the sizes have gotten smaller or larger or messed up (a lot). If you were a size 6 in 1960, you were able to wear a size 4 in 1970. That same size 6 in 1960 would be size 00 today. I think the closer to zero you are in womens clothing, the smaller you are supposed to be. I dont know. I just know that this seems to be kind of confusing and a little vane. This vanity sizing in womens clothing does explain a couple of things that have always puzzled me. One being the reason it takes women so long to shop for clothes and the other being the reason they have to try on everything in the store. They really have no idea what size they are on any given day. How could they? This Vanity Fantasy has spilled over into everything else we do. Just think about it, the folks at the bank want you to buy more house than you can afford. The folks at the car lot will let you take an extra year or two to pay for that fancy vehicle (that you deserve). Do you have children or have you ever been to school? This vanity fantasy takes place in the schools every day. What used to be a C+ or a Bis now an A. Why? Its simple more As mean happier parents and less controversy for everyone.Get your warm fuzzies right here! Ive taught college math courses for over 15 years, students are quick to ask for extra credit and tell me that Im ruining their perfect GPA. Im equally quick in telling them that I dont believe in extra credit and also that perfect GPAs dont mean much either. What about grade point averages? Students are graduating high school with GPAs of 4.9 and 5.0 on a 4.0 scale. Hmmm, does that mean they are better than the best? I understand that they take advanced classes and they have to do something about taking those into consideration, it just seems all out of whack to me.I think its ok to keep score I think we need to lose more, to fail more and to make more Cs. If you dont, you live life in this vanity fantasy and you dont really appreciate the good stuff (which really has nothing to do with any of this). After researching this vanity sizing more, I found out that clothing designers do this with mens clothes as well. I found a cheat sheet of sorts that explained what a pair a pants with a 36-inch waistline actually is. With one brand, it actually is 37 inches. The rest went way on up, with one well-known brands 36-inch pants actually accommodating a fellow with a 41 -inch waist. Do you think he feels better? Probably. Do you think he weighs less? No. Im sure there are vanity scales to handle that situation. If they want to help me out with this vanity sizing, I might have a suggestion or two. I dont have any trouble with the waist business. I know I have a 35-inch waist a real one. Im good with it. However, I also know I have a 29-inch inseam. Do you know how embarrassing it is to be a hair under 6 feet tall and have a 29-inch inseam? People stand around the store looking at the sizes and ask questions like Who has a 29-inch inseam? They hold a pair of 34 x 29 inch pants up and say things like This guy must look funny, or You have to be kidding me. I have a Fred Flintstone body, Im used to it.Envy me when it comes clearance time, the 29-inch inseam pants are always still there The clothing industry doesnt need to change the inseam sizes to make me feel better about myself. However, some little stickers to go over the sizes on the back of my jeans might be nice though. I could change the 29 to a 34. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CranksRANKS MY tra TRACtTOrRBN Heard County commissioners are correct in trying to bring accountability to the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. The TDC is a special taxing unit established in Florida law and commissioners, along with their constituents, have every right to expect full transparency from the agency and its board. Where, however, have the commissioners been? Listening between the lines, there is plenty to shock about with what is going on with a county agency suddenly ush with more than $1 million in BP money and spending as if having won the Lotto. As reported by Star Staff Writer Valerie Garman on the front page of this newspaper, the TDC is simply acting as business as usual, though feeling strong with green-hued steroids with dead Presidents on them. County attorney Jeremy Novak probably summed it up best when he told commissioners at one point during a recent meeting that the TDC has had little structure in the past. That explains a lot. For instance, an executive director who enters into contracts worth hundreds of thousands of dollars without the approval of anyone else not his own board or the Board of County Commissioners. As another, a county agency operating under a marketing agreement that exists in theory only a company was issued a letter of award on its bid but never signed a formal contract with the county, without a plausible explanation provided. But there is just a whiff of hyperbole and hypocrisy in this sudden attention to the TDC that is alarming for county taxpayers. Be clear, the money at issue here is largely money paid by British Petroleum as a portion of nes to the impacted Florida counties to bring back tourists. That, in truth, is part of the problem, a rush of cash that overwhelms proper policy requirements and logic. That would seem the case with an event such as the PoJo Live Music Festival. Paying more than $30,000 to a headliner few had heard of. Spending tens of thousands of dollars, much of it spent out of the county, on perks for the bands. Blowing a budget without any way to quantify that blowing the budget would provide the requisite bang. That is a pretty fair interpretation of an event that allegedly fell under the category of being high impact but lacked much bump for local lodging establishments, which lacking attendance gures for the free festival is the lone way to assess impact. Even the TDC executive director acknowledged being a tad overwhelmed by his embarrassment of riches and how the money has been spent at a time of great economic hardship in the county also turned out to be an embarrassment. But in typical years, the TDC operates under a budget in the high six gures, the expenditure of those dollars the Board of County Commissioners is charged with overseeing. So to take the executive director to task in a public meeting about an apparent lack of accountability is akin to the fox scolding the chicken for not eating enough to maintain bulk. County commissioners should be requiring that accountability from the rst dollar expended each year accountability is not something to trot out when the public winds blow from a certain direction. That commissioners see no accountability from the TDC is on them, not the executive director of the TDC. Commissioners have long talked a good game about accountability and transparency in county government and if the TDC episode is anything, it is indication work remains. Further, if the company the executive directors brother owns and operates wins an award for marketing services to the TDC, ensuring a contract has been signed is on commissioners. To bring up the issue of conict via nepotism at this point makes little sense since it was the county the Board of County Commissioners that gives nal approval to award the contract in the rst place. The entire argument is particularly disingenuous coming from the very commissioner whose close personal and professional relationship with a contracted partner of the TDC opened this current can of worms. The commission was already on notice concerning policies and procedures and the dynamics of agencies and boards that operate under the auspices of the BOCC. A county grand jury earlier this year took the TDC to task for not fully adhering to open meeting and records laws during the hiring process of the current executive director; the grand jurys admonishment compelled the county attorney to rene and reinforce county policy as it applied to the various county boards such as the TDC. And for commissioners to argue they did not know or fully grasp what was going on within the TDC is a stretch given that the BOCC chairman sits on the TDC board and the county attorneys wife works within the TDC ofce. This episode feels eerily familiar to that which recently roiled the county EMS department, without the dollars. In that case, as with the TDC, entrenched operating procedures many of which ew in the face of county policy were allowed to fester, along with a communication disconnect between department and BOCC, until accountability and transparency were eclipsed by politics and personal agendas. That is not far removed from what has happened recently with the TDC. The TDC indeed has work to do to put its house in order, as commissioners urged, but commissioners should also be looking in the mirror for the answers. If true accountability and transparency are going to exist in county government, it must start on that podium, with those ve commissioners. They must lead, not follow, be proactive, and professional, in ensuring sunshine in government not reactive, and personal, to the latest crisis. Commissioners are elected to lead, and at hand is another teachable moment about leadership. TiIM CrROFtTStar news editor I ate breakfast last week at a local church and caught a little grief from the cooks for passing on the grits. The good pastor even questioned my country roots as I settled for the eggs and sausage. Listen, I took it all in stride. Its hard to get a free meal off of a Methodist! Me and grits go way back. Mom would add a tad extra water and force them into us via a baby bottle. Before we could walk, we learned to grind corn between two rocks. Leon would bust it up with a hammer. That little ne dust would get in your hair, your eyes, your nose, your mouthI brushed some out of my left ear last week; been stuck there for sixty years. Ive eaten grits for breakfast when there wasnt nothing else. Ive eaten grits for lunch when wed mix it with Polk salad or pork rinds. Ive eaten it for supper when wed wet our appetite on a rack of squirrel legs and then ll up on grits. Ive had it baked, seared, fried, grilled, boiled, broiled, sauted and blackened. On cold winter days Mom would treat us to hominy grits and chitlens. Ive stirred it in amongst eggs, hog brains, bacon bits, red-eye gravy and Cheerios. Ive pouredem over biscuits, sausage patties, toast, pancakes, chicken livers and mayonnaise sandwiches. Ive had grits served to me so runny they wouldnt hardly stay on the plate. Ive seenem so lumpy youd athought it was a bad batch of mashed potatoes. Ive eaten grits when they were as thick as a bowl of Quaker oats left out overnight. Ive had them things grow in my mouth to the point I near bout couldnt get enough sweet tea to wash them down. Ive had them swell up in my belly. There aint no other feeling in the world like grit stomach! And this is not a story about growing up poor. Far from it! We were the happiest people on the face of the earth. We didnt have any money. But that doesnt have anything to do with being poor. It wasnt like Leon and Daddy were eating steak and Butterngers while me and David Mark were left with the grits. We shared everything around that kitchen table. We laughed and loved, cried, fought and grew up staring at those grits. I asked Mom every day why was it always grits. She didnt lecture on being frugal; or how we needed to sell a hog or two; or how much better off we were than a couple of neighbors just down the road. She would mention those starving children in India and remind us how good grits were for us. I didnt gure the nutritional value of any foods back in those days. We didnt know polyunsaturated from amino acids. We went strictly on how it faired on your palate. But Mom, they dont taste like nothing! I could be a little persistent in my younger days. Son, lets put some more butter on yours Ive eaten grits that were swimming in margarine. Ive smothered them with pepper and salt. I tried cheese. Ive thrown in chunks of onion. Ive put ketchup on grits. Ive poured buttermilk, sorghum molasses, cane syrup and honey over them. Mom would compress them into little balls and wed eat them like hush puppies. She would slice fresh cornbread open and stuff the grits in to make a sandwich. We celebrated Davids fourth birthday with a ve-layer grit cake. In the rst grade, Miss Carolyn had us gluing those Pilgrims and turkeys onto the poster board with some kind of white sticky paste. Yogi allowed that, nally, someone had invented a practical use for grits. And I know for a fact that grit stomach worked on re ants. We got invaded one summer. They were all over the yard. Dad sprinkled a big handful of grits around every hill. The ants would eat their ll, even take some extra grits down to the queen. Dad would wait an hour or so and water down the hills real good. As soon as the ants took a drink and the water hit those grits in their bellies..it would blow them little fellers up from the inside out! If you went down to the City Caf between 4:30 and 10:00 a.m., you were going to get grits. Period! Me and David would both order a breakfast of cheeseburgers and French fries. Dixie Faye would somehow manage to get a bowl of grits in there between the pickle and the toasted bun. Mr. Jack Cantrell took it upon himself to point out as we stood up to leave, You boys didnt nish your grits. It was like it was un-American or something! I know grits are like ice cream in Georgia. And I certainly understand heritage, tradition, truth, justice and the American way! The terms nger licking and southern fried warm all of our hearts. And Im almost dead positive certain there is a statistic out there somewhere that reports that 97.3 percent of all the grits sold in the world are purchased in the South. I think that is wonderful. I never said I didnt like grits.or that I dont like them today. I just believe that God, in His innite wisdom, allotted each person a certain amount of grits to eat in his or her lifetime. I ate my appointed share before I was 10-years-old! Respectfully,Kes HUnkerNKER DOWnNKesley ColbertVanity fantasiesA teachable moment from the TDCTrue Grit takes more than an eyepatch Thursday, November 3, 2011

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S A5 | The Star 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971OPEN AT 11AM ET 7 DAYS A WEEKWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COMFRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4THFROMSOUTHERN SATISFACTIONBOBBY KENNEDY & MICHELLE MILLIGAN IN THECROWS NESTDOORS OPEN AT 7PM-EASTERN SHOW BEGINS AT 8PM-EASTERN NOCOVER, ALL SEATING ONFIRST COME BASIS. COMING If you havent already jumped on the home energy-efficiency bandwagon, the good news is that several federal energy tax credits originally slated to end in 2010 were extended through Dec. 31, 2011; but the not-so-good news is that these credits are worth significantly less and are more restrictive than before. All is not lost, however, since several additional credits (outlined below) remain in effect through 2016. Heres how the soonto-expire energy tax credits work: You may claim a credit for 10 percent of the total cost of various home energyefficiency products for your existing primary residence, including: insulation; heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems; metal and asphalt roofs; energy-efficient windows, doors and skylights; biomass stoves and non-solar water heaters. There are a few restrictions, however: The maximum combined credit is $500 (10 percent of $5,000 in total cost) for all allowable products purchased between 2006 and 2011. Thus, if youve already claimed credits over $500 in previous years when limits were higher, you cannot file. Certain items have lower allowable tax credit maximums. For example: windows are capped at $200 in total credits; furnaces and boilers $150 maximum (must have an annual fuel utilization rate of 95 or greater); central air conditioner $300 maximum; water heater $300 (within certain efficiency limits); and biomass stoves $300. You cannot claim a credit for labor costs. Energy tax credits are nonrefundable, which means you can only claim a credit to offset taxes you owe for the year. Tax credits may only be claimed once and are limited to the year in which you purchased the item. Energy tax credits will continue to be available for geothermal heat pumps, solar energy systems and wind energy systems installed at new or existing principal or second homes by Dec. 31, 2016, for 30 percent of cost, with no upper limit. In addition, a credit continues for fuel cells at 30 percent of cost up to $500 per kW of power capacity (for primary residences only). And tax credits are still available on certain fuelefficient vehicles. Visit www.fueleconomy.gov/ feg/taxcenter.shtml for details. For full details on available tax credits, visit www.energystar. gov. If youre a low-income household and cant afford to weatherproof your home, you may be eligible for the Department of Energys Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). If youre accepted, a professional weatherization crew will conduct a home energy audit where theyll analyze your utility bills, test for inltration of outside air, inspect your home and equipment for safety and determine the most cost-effective energy conservation measures for your home. Depending on what they nd, the agency will then conduct needed repairs and equipment installation, which might include: installing wall, oor and attic insulation; sealing and repairing ducts; reducing air inltration and pressure imbalances; and tuning, repairing or replacing heating and cooling systems, as needed. To learn how WAP works, visit www.eere.energy. gov/wip/wap.html. Also, you may qualify for short-term utility bill assistance through the Low-Income Energy Assistance Program (www.acf.hhs.gov/ programs/ocs/liheap). Other great ways to cut energy costs include turning your thermostat back 10 15 degrees for eight hours, while asleep or at work, using Energy Star appliances and compact uorescent lights and lowering your hot water heater temperature to 120 F or lower. Bottom line: Take advantage of nancial incentives available to make your home more energy efcient just in time for winters chill. Jason Alderman education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. Watch new crosswalksDear Editor: The town looks great! Nice improvements. The brick crosswalks look lovely. You might want to educate your resident drivers on how to not stop in the middle of them while waiting for the light to change. It happened all three times I was walking in town. Leanne Walasek AtlantaBiomass fundingDear Editor, An Oct. 18, 2010,  article in the Wall Street Journal online aired some interesting facts about Biomass plants. In 2007,  a $7.7 million  biomass plant was built to meet the energy needs of a  medium security prison,  the Northern Nevada Correctional Center.   Two years later,  the plant  closed due to excessive costs. In Loyalton, Industry Inc. closed a 16-megawatt plant due to federal logging restrictions, to obtain  wood from the surrounding forests.  Please note: It was  Federal logging restrictions. In Gunnison, Colo.,  Western State College shelved their plan to install a biomass boiler on its campus due to  high costs for supply and operation. local utility, the Salt River  Project, canceled a long-term power-buying contract with a 24megawatt plant after the Chapter 11. As long as the biomass industry is forced to compete with coal and natural gas, we will not grow this industry, said  Bob Cleave, CEO  of the Biomass Power Association, a trade group based in Portland, Maine. The article went  on to state that the industrys growth is threatened by concerns that biomass power isnt as green as supporters say it is.   With its hard to imagine that a private lending agency up to the plate or will the for another Solyndra? How soon will Gulf   Respectfully, Tom Knoche Port St. JoeThanks to mentorsDear Editor: Gulf County ARC Administrator Dianna Harrison  along with the  Port St. Joe High School Bridges  Program and the Florida Agency for Persons with Disabilities would like to recognize the mentees and mentors who participated in the Florida Disability Employment Awareness Disability Mentoring Day. Juanita Jenkins, mentored by Christine Strayer of Gulf County Tax Collector Shirley Jenkins; Jeremiah Wyatt, mentored by Sandy Price of Capital City Bank; David Andrews, mentored by Johanna White of Vision Bank; Albert Scheffer, mentored by Gulf County School Superintendent  Jim Norton; Kelsea Lamb, mentored by Vikki Anderson of Centennial Bank; ShaNiqua Walker, mentored by Kenneth Weimorts of Emerald Coast Credit Union; Dustin Walker, mentored by Hal Keels of Coastal Design and Landscape; Javon Jones, mentored by Rick Williams of Tallahassee Orthopedic Center; and Preston Burkett, mentored by Port St. Joe High School Coach Vern Barth. Thanks for making this years event a great success! Dianna Harrison Executive director Gulf County ARCBy Robert C. Shaw, B.A.Sc. B.D. M.S.W. Cert.President, The Markham Insti tute for Human Services Why do most drivers drive safely? Because there is a law? Not likely. They do so because it is in their character. How did it get there? That is the big wellness question. Another example: I love the great songs. I do my best to play them on my piano. The richness of music is one of the vital gems in my life. How did it get in me? So, now I search for the hidden wellness treasure. My parents and grandparents showed little interest in music. No one played an instrument. Yet, as a teenager I started to teach myself to play the piano. Since then, music has been a big part of my life. Where did this come from? There was an uncle who played the piano. I would watch as he played the great old songs from sheet music. We never talked about music. My love of music was sown there. Nobody in the family thought about this vital event. It was wellness well hidden. We each can check this out. All we have to do is ask ourselves, what is really important in my life? For each one, we do a family background check. Who in my greater family has this important life feature? To whom am I indebted? When we do this, we find at least four big parts of our life with direct connection to a parent, grandparent, uncle or aunt. We have put our fingers on the key elements in our life. We have also seen how these gifts have silently, and usually unnoticed, flowed from a family member to me. I have discovered the hidden wellness treasure. This however, is not the biggest part of the story. The bigger deal is that I now know that the character of our children flows from us and our parents and older generations. This is where the mud hits the wall. We are responsible for the raising of our kids and grandkids but we havent been aware of how it happens. We have read the child-care books. Wellness doesnt come from books. It comes from family life. The real wellness is not street stuff; it is soul stuff. Are we fit for the job? So what do we do to ensure wellness for our kids and grandkids? First we take stock of the big character traits we have. Is that enough? Then, we need to check all our relatives for their wellness gems. Enter the Family Wellness Rainbow. It gives a good picture of the full scope of family wellness. That tells us how we are doing. It also tells us where we need work. As each family searches for its hidden treasures, it learns more about how the larger family really works. Using the Rainbow, the family can then get to work where there are gaps in their wellness for their children. For a view of the Family Wellness Rainbow please see: www. familycybermall.org Please see: www. themarkhaminstitute.org Reach Robert at: rcecshaw@aol.com.Family wellness our hidden treasureA Clinicians ViewpointEnergy-Efciency tax credits expire soon LettersThursday, November 3, 2011 LettersETTERS toTO theTHE EditorDITOR JasoASON AlderLDERMaAN

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LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 a lot of money. Weve tried to do our best with it, and the numbers show weve done well marketing our county. County commissioner Bill Williams brought the issue to the commissioners attention at the Oct. 11 and Oct. 25 commission meetings, presenting several invoices for extraneous expenditures supporting events such as the PoJo Live Music Festival and funding NASCAR sponsorships without the boards approval. Williams motioned for an immediate external audit of TDC expenditures, as long as the audit costs less than $5,000, in order to track the operational and nancial sectors of the agency. Williams also recommended Kerigan work with Dawn Moliterno, executive director of the Walton County TDC and chairperson of the Northwest Florida Tourism Council, for assistance with spending strategies for the remainder of the BP funds. We have a division of this county that has spun and continues to spin out of control, Williams said on Oct. 25. To me this is an immediate emergency that needs to be addressed. Accountability and internal control is not there. Until the audit is complete, Williams asked Commissioner Warren Yeager, a member of the TDC board, to oversee the TDC expenditures. This audit will help clarify some issues, Yeager said at a special meeting Oct. 31. Lets have this discussion at our regular board meeting next time to make sure everything is in order. At the Oct. 31 special meeting the board called for any BP-related expenditure to go before the board for approval in the consent agenda. BP money distributionThis year, BP distributed a total of $30 million to tourism development councils in a seven county coalition in Northwest Florida that includes Gulf, Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay and Franklin, to be used solely to promote tourism to offset losses last summer after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig in the Gulf of Mexico. The agreements made with BP give area TDCs full discretion to determine proper use of payment and only requires organizations keep a reasonably detailed record of how the payments were used and submit quarterly reports. Gulf County received $1,161,534 from BP for the tourism program in 2011, in three allocations: $387,178 on April 23, June 11 and Sept. 11. Of the money allotted, the TDC spent $639,077 as of Oct. 17, not including outstanding invoices. In Floridas Coastal Northwest Communication Councils executive summary of the 2011 funds, each countys allotment was broken down into a spending plan. Gulf Countys plan allotted $585,000 for advertising, $90,000 for public relations support and media tours, $335,000 for area event support and $150,000 for high impact events. The Gulf County TDC held one high impact event, Septembers PoJo Live Music Festival, which accounted for $174,104 in BP funds as of Oct. 17, according to the 2011 invoice list. Of the money spent on the two-day festival, about $80,000 was spent on band contracts ($36,000 of that for headliners ALO), another $20,000 for band accommodations and hospitality, $6,000 for the PoJo shuttle bus, about $9,000 for promotional ads, posters and banners, $9,500 for T-shirts and koozies, and $3,079 for imprinted PoJo grocery totes. The PoJo Live Music Festival alone exceeded the proposed $150,000 budget for high-impact events, with $174,108 of invoices from the high impact event account and more money drawn from the area event support account. Williams and Commissioner Ward McDaniel questioned extraneous expenditures for tent rentals and the $6,000 PoJo taxi service, an expenditure Williams described as absurd. McDaniel asked why no bids were collected for tent rentals, and why the TDC chose to rent with an out-of-town party rental service, with so many local families struggling.Quantifying impact The only sales documents from the PoJo Live Music Festival cite $485 made from T-shirt sales and $7,434 from the sale of tickets, which were required to purchase alcohol at the event. Because the concert was free, Kerigan was unable to provide a record of the number of attendees for this high impact event, focused on attracting outof-county visitors. Bed tax collections have been consistently higher in 2011, with record numbers in July and the numbers for August almost back to where they were in 2009. The bed tax collections for September have been steadily rising since 2008. The September 2011 bed tax was $74,190, up from $49,091 in 2010 and $36,028 in 2009. Overall, the gross revenue from this scal year totaled $847,657, topping last years $740,845 and $790,526 from the year before. Kerigan estimated roughly $1.3 million brought into Gulf County in September. September is usually one of our slowest months, Kerigan said. Weve had some great increases, but at the same time we need to ne-tune our policies. During the weekend of Sept. 16 and 17 when the PoJo Festival was held in St. Joe Beach, most area hotels and motels reported average occupancy. The El Governor Motel in Mexico Beach didnt ll up that weekend, with 45 of the 125 rooms vacant. The Mainstay Suites and Port Inn reported occupancy levels more typical of July, at 90 and 95 percent. The Gulf View Motel was full Thursday through Sunday that week, but owner Jan Smith said the motel usually stays full, with documented full occupancy last year for 96 weeks straight. Owner and manager of the Dixie Bell Motel Dan McDonough reported full occupancy, but he said the 10-unit motel is usually fully booked on weekends. McDonough said events like PoJo help more than they hurt. The Driftwood Inn in Mexico Beach had all of its 20 beachside units and four houses full for the weekend, but manager Shawna Wood chalked it up to normal trafc. In the past, youd have to book three months in advance, but this year you could still call two to three weeks ahead and get something, Wood said. This year was amazingly better (than last year), but we still werent back 100 percent. MUST GO TO MAKE ROOM FOR 2012 MODELS! MOWERS AT COST2011 See TDC A7 TDC from page A1

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LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, November 3, 2011 (850) 229.6991 1930 W. hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456Downtown Highland viewTUESDAY FRIDAY 9-6 SATURDAY 9-215%OFFEVERYTHINGExcept consignment guns GOING OUT OF BUSINESS BREAKDOWN OF BP FFUNDS SpSPENT IN 2011Total to Gulf County TDC in 2011$1,161,534 Total Spent as of Oct. 17$639,077.40 High Impact Events PoJo Live Music Festival $174,104.08 Hardware/Setup $39,974.57 Band Contracts $81,350 ALO $36,000 Bob Schneider $10,000 Matt Costa $8,500 The Sheepdogs $7,500 Honey Island Swamp Band $4,500 Michael Tolcher $4,500 Spiritual Rez $3,000 Thomas Wynn & The Believers $2,750 Mishka (deposit only) $2,000 Bo Spring Band $1,200 Sara Mac Band $500 The Curry Brothers $500 Buddy Hamm $250 Greg Wood $150 Band Accommodations/hospitality $20,917.82 PoJo Merchandise/Promotions $15,039.43 Personnel Services $12,679 Security $1,225 Two-day shuttle service $6,000 Event Assistance/ Bartenders $2,554 Camera crews $2,900 Alcohol $4,143.26 *PoJo cost from area event support account $4,784.27 *Money collected from T-shirt/alcohol sales $7,919 Advertising and Public Relations Support $251,989 Paid to Kerigan Marketing$224,489.42 Television $106,885.25 Print $44,200.27 Interactive $51,487.75 Outdoor $19,276.15 Public Relations Support$2,640 Paid to other marketing entities $30,140.63 Television $30,000 Print $140.63 Area Event Support $210,343.27 T op 10 account expenditures (single invoices) 1) Gulf County Sheriffs Second Annual Bass Tournament $25,000 2) Fourth of July Fireworks $25,000 3) NASCAR Sponsorship at Talladega Camping World Truck Series Race $25,000 4) Florida Scallop and Music Festival $20,000 5) Gulf County Visitor Guides $15,632 6) Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival $15,000 7) Gator Classic Catsh Tournament $15,000 8) Gulf Alliance for Local Arts First Fridays $10,800 9) Scallop Drop Treasure Hunt (not including event consultation) $6,551 10) GALA Summer Arts Program $5,000 Gaskin Park Flathead Catsh Tournament $5,000 Bluewater Outrigger Area Event Support $5,000 Salt Air Farmers Market $5,000 TDC from page A6Questions about spending/contracts From January to October 2011 the TDC spent $210,989 from the area event support account. The highest allotments were $25,000 for the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Bass Tournament, $25,000 for the Fourth of July reworks, $25,000 for a Visitgulf.com NASCAR sponsorship at the Oct. 22 Camping World Truck Series Race at the Talladega Super Speedway (Truck No. 82 driven by Grant Ennger), $20,000 for Julys Florida Scallop and Music Festival and $15,632 to print Gulf County visitor guides. Funds from the account also helped to fund other area events and Visit Gulf County promotions. In total, $251,989 has been spent on advertising and public relations support, with $224,489.42 worth of invoices made out to Kerigan Marketing. Kerigan Marketing, owned by Jack Kerigan, brother of TDC executive director Tim Kerigan, has been providing marketing services for the TDC without a contract since its previous contract expired in March 2010, another issue Williams presented at the BOCC meeting. The county issued an award letter to Kerigan Marketing in the spring of 2010, but no formal contract was signed. County attorney Jeremy Novak addressed the TDCs need for a formal contract with Kerigan Marketing at the Oct. 6 TDC board meeting. The TDC had no formal structure in the past, Novak said. The county issued an award letter in the spring of 2010, and Jack (Kerigan) has been operating under that. Novak said the county needs to sign a contract with a termination date as soon as possible, and presented a revised version of the TDCs original contract with Kerigan Marketing for the BOCC to look over at the meeting Oct. 25. My problem with it is two-fold, said Williams, who also expressed disapproval for the conict of interest arising from Tim Kerigan contracting his brothers company as the TDCs sole marketing services provider. Williams cited Florida Statute 112.3143, which lays out voting conicts for public ofcials in regards to relatives. The statute states: Relative means any father, mother, son, daughter, husband, wife, brother, sister, father-inlaw, mother-in-law, son-inlaw, or daughter-in-law. Jack Kerigan addressed the board, citing higher bed taxes in Gulf County for 2011 and growing Web site trafc for VisitGulf.com. Every media pitch we put out has a plan, Jack Kerigan said. Our team is completely transparent in everything that we do. Williams said it is impossible to be transparent without a contract. Jack Kerigan offered no explanation as to why no contract was signed after the award letter was issued. Tim Kerigan said it is unfair to compare the Gulf County TDC to the Walton County TDC because Walton County is a larger operation, receiving more than $8 million from BP in 2011 and with a much larger staff to handle the funds. Obviously there are things we need to address, Kerigan said. We certainly are doing what we can with the staff we have. Kerigan said he has not tried to do anything unethical, and that the TDC has held to its allocations with the BP funds, with a spending plan similar to Santa Rosa County. Kerigan said where the TDC has failed is by not requesting BOCC approval for expenditures totaling more than $5,000. If were looking at policies and procedures, we can handle that, Kerigan said. But when are we going to have this amount of money to spend again? Williams responded by demanding Kerigan put the house back in order. Follow statute, follow suit, do your job and were ne, Williams said.

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com OUTDoo OO RSwww.starfl.comSection A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters AMERISTEP DOGHOUSE BLINDWAS $89.99NOW $59.99 By Stan KirklandFlorida Fish and Wildlife Commission In less than two weeks, anyone who visits the lower Apalachicola River will swear a war has broken out. Rest assured, its no war, but the annual opening of squirrel season. Small-game season, which is the open season for gray squirrel and quail, runs from Nov. 12 to March 4 throughout the state. Hunters are allowed to kill 12 squirrels daily. The lower Apalachicola River isnt the only area where squirrel hunters will be out in numbers. In the Florida Panhandle, therell be lots of squirrel hunters hunting the hardwoods along practically every river and creek where they have access. On the Apalachicola River below Wewahitchka, most of the boat ramps will be crowded with trucks and boat trailers while their owners hunt out of their boats. Where theres private property, some hunters use simple cabins as their base for sleeping and eating. Other hunters use tents and sleep primitive style, on the ground. One hunter who made the trip every year for almost 30 years is Tony Bigot of Fort Walton Beach. The 64-year-old hasnt hunted the past couple of years but he said it was a trip that he and eight or nine friends made together every year. It was really a ritual for us. We would go down on Friday afternoon or night (the day before the opening), sleep in a friends cabin and then hunt Saturday morning and go back in the afternoon, he said. Bigot said they hunted near Brothers River and generally found lots of squirrels. Sometimes youd kill your bag limit in a couple hours. But usually, wed get ve or six in the morning and about that many in the afternoon. Bigot said he always prided himself on his sense of direction and being able to nd his way back to the camp, but one day every oak, gum and cypress looked the same and he knew he was lost. After wandering in circles for several hours, he found a guy cutting rewood and paid him $5 to take him back to the boat landing. My friends were there looking for me. I took a lot of kidding, he said. Bigot said he enjoyed his annual opening-weekend trip so much that he took both his son and daughter to experience the Southern tradition. We enjoyed the hunt but all the other stuff eating camp food, sitting around a re at night and smelling like smoke, and everyone telling stories about their hunt those are things Ill always remember, he said. JOHN DRUMMONd D | Special to the StarFrom left, Michael Dobbs, John Drummond and Mark Bateman bagged 21 gray squirrels. Squirrel season returns Nov. 12Special to The StarAs the days grow shorter and the sun not quite so hot, a slower more relaxed recreational opportunity becomes favorable at the park. Long, peaceful walks on miles of unpopulated beach are a paradise to the parks November and December visitors. The beachcombers who travel to the Florida panhandle will notice the type of sand on the beach at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park is made from quartz and gypsum. This beautiful, white sand washed down from the Appalachian Mountains where it was originally formed. Treasures are to be had for those who look! Some common types of shells found at the park are the ghting conch, which are numerous in the spring when they lay eggs; the lettered olive, whelks and cockles usually rest in the sand at the surf zone. The shells and seaweed are deposited along the high water mark. This is called the wrack line and is an excellent place to nd sharks teeth, shells and different kinds of oating seeds called sea beans. After weeks or months at sea, many of these drifting seeds wash up on the beach from the Caribbean, South America and even from as far away as Africa. A beachcomber can enjoy the sand, the sea and the fresh air while exercising at the same time. So, come to the beach and treasure hunt! Until Next time, The Rangers at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastateparks. Beachcombing at St. Joseph Peninsula State ParkThursday, November 3, 2011 Page 8 InshoreTrout and redfish are everywhere in St. Joe Bay. The trout are still mostly small, but some larger fish are being caught in deeper water. Red fish are abundant in just about all waters in our area. Use live croakers or pinfish to entice the big bulls or fresh cut mullet chunks. Key spots to find big bull reds are Mexico Beach Pier, under the Tapper bridge and at the oil docks at night. Gag grouper season will come to an end and this month. This fall season has produced many good fish. Most legal fish are holding still in the 100 to 200-foot range; however, the cooler water temps will soon have grouper close to shore. Some kingfish are being caught, but it is a hit-ormiss fishery. Loads of sand trout and some sheepshead are getting hooked at the inshore towers close to the tip of the cape. SPONsSORED BY SPECIAL TO TT HE STAREnjoy the sand, the sea and the fresh air at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTs S www.starfl.com ASectionBy Jason ShootFlorida Freedom Newspapers Wewahitchkas Theryl Brown and Bozemans Jacob Martinez staged a duel for the ages Friday night at Gator Field. It was Brown, however, who went home pleased with the end result. Brown ran for 343 yards and ve touchdowns, and his 11-yard touchdown run with a minute and a half remaining in the game lifted the host Gators to a thrilling 52-45 win in front of a raucous Homecoming crowd. He is something else, said Wewahitchka coach Denniz Kizziah. We are apparently comfortable winning this way. I guess it seems each week it gets a little more exciting and we gured out how to make it more exciting this week. Representing District 2-1A, Wewa improved to 72 overall with its seventh consecutive win. Bozeman, which resides in District 3-1A, slipped to 2-6 with its fth straight loss. The Gators needed every one of Browns heroics to withstand Martinez and his Bozeman teammates. Martinez, the Bucks quarterback, nished with a whopping 528 yards of total offense, 312 on the ground and another 216 through the air. His perfectly placed 26-yard strike to Alex Hobbs in the end zone gave Bozeman a 45-44 lead with 3:21 remaining. The consequence of that play was it left Brown far too much time to put his legs to work. The Wewa tailback carried the ball ve times for 43 yards on the ensuing drive, culminating with his go-ahead touchdown run. Daniel Taylor returned the Gators kickoff 36 yards to the Wewa 35 with 1:16 left and put Bozeman in position to tie the game or steal a victory. Brown had other intentions, though, and he stepped in front of a hurried Martinez pass in the end zone on fourth-and-15 to seal Wewas victory. Martinez had given the Bucks a 36-33 lead with a 1-yard touchdown run with 6:46 remaining, but Wewas Jalyn Addison returned Bozemans kickoff 72 yards for a touchdown to put the Gators back in front 44-39. Perhaps the biggest difference between the two teams was that Wewa already had played several games of this nature, contests that resembled tennis matches as much as football games with the way the ball moved back and forth, up and down the eld. Over its past seven games, Wewas offense has generated 345 points, while the defense has allowed 223. Over 33 years of coaching, I have had some good teams and some bad teams, Kizziah said. Im not sure yet which one this is. I told the coaches if we could get past Bozeman, which is a pretty good team, we were pretty good. And we did that. Anyway we can get the win, well take it. The rst half was a wild shootout between the two offenses. Martinez rushed for 183 yards and three touchdowns on 10 carries through two quarters, and he also contributed with three completions to receiver Tommy Cook for 78 yards. Martinez ran for touchdowns of 18, 83, 30 and 1 yards. He also threw a pair of touchdowns, connecting with Cook on a 29-yard touchdown pass in the rst half. Martinez nished 8for-18 passing, and his two interceptions each were picked off by Brown. The Bucks piled up 342 yards of offense before halftime en route to a 26-24 lead through two quarters, but they werent successful slowing down Wewa, either. The Gators had 233 yards of offense, including 101 rushing yards on Browns 14 carries. Brown nished the game with scoring runs of 25, 15, 74, 94 and 11 yards. Addison, in addition to his kickoff return, also turned a short completing into a 43-yard touchdown pass in the rst half. Brown has rushed for 1,885 yards on the season. That is No. 1 in the state, regardless of classication, according to MaxPreps, and Brown has surpassed Ike Mincy as the singleseason rushing leader in Wewahitchka High School history. Taylor nished with nine carries for 70 yards, and his 12-yard touchdown run two plays into the second half gave the Bucks a 33-24 lead. Brown responded two plays later, though, tearing through Bozemans defense for his 74-yard scoring romp. The Gators already had clinched a postseason berth with a 3-1 runner-up nish in district play. A Sneads victory over Vernon this Friday will force a threeway tie for the district title and playoff spots. Wewahitchka is off this week before traveling to West Gadsden next Friday. We are starting to get beat up some so this off week come at a good time for us, Kizziah said. Star News Editor Tim Croft contributed to this report. Page A9 Thursday, November 3, 2011Star Staff ReportThe season came to a crushing halt Tuesday night for the Port St. Joe High School volleyball team. The Lady Tiger Sharks lost a District 4-1A seminal match against Blountstown at Liberty County High School, ending their season. Blountstown won 3-1 in sets and moves on to play Thursday evening for the district title. With six seniors, Port St Joe was upset about losing out a playoff spot, guaranteed to the winner of Tuesdays game. The Lady Tigers of Blountstown just put together a really good match, said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor. I feel for our girls, with six seniors its really difcult when your season comes abruptly to an end like this. We really thought we had a good shot in the regionals this year but Blountstown just outplayed us. Some statistics for the season for the seniors: Katie Gardner 56 service aces, 80 kills and 13 solo blocks; Oneika Lockley with 313 service receptions and 273 digs; Raney Besore had 40 kills; Autumn Haynes had 74 kills, 46 service aces and seven solo blocks; Katie Lacour had 62 service aces and 289 assists; and Nichole Spilde had 41 kills and 27 service aces.By Tim CroftStar News Editor The red zone was a blank slate for Port St. Joe Friday night. The Tiger Sharks were in West Gadsden territory ve times, twice reaching inside the 10, but could not nish the task and were shutout 21-0 in a crucial District 4-1A matchup. The arithmetic for Port St. Joe (3-5 overall, 1-2 in the district) was rendered bleak by the loss. The Tiger Sharks must beat Liberty County at home next week and hope West Gadsden (3-5, 2-1) stumbles at least once in the nal two weeks to force a three-team shootout for the districts second playoff spot. We could not execute in the red zone, bottom line, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. We moved the ball at times, but we did not execute when we needed to. We have to gure some things out and regroup and be ready for a good Liberty County team. Well be ready. The Tiger Sharks offense seemed more than ready from the outset Friday, but the opening drive stamped the DNA for the game before it was three minutes old. Port St. Joe took the opening kickoff from its 17 and moved to the Panther 22. However, quarterback Trevor Lang threw into trafc inside the Panther 5, his pass intercepted by Caleb Cook. Cook slipped one tackle, picked up two blocks down the left sideline and transformed the turnover into a 96-yard touchdown return. Isereal Grande kicked the extra point and it was 7-0 West Gadsden with 9:03 left in the opening period. That interception really hurt, Barth said. We were ready to snatch momentum, but instead of being up 7-0 we were down 7-0. Port St. Joe moved right back down the eld on the next possession to a fourth-and-one at the Panther 39. Port St. Joe faked the punt, Lang, the up man, was stopped on a rushing attempt and the Panthers took over. They moved 66 yards in 12 plays on their only sustained drive of the half to score. Quarterback Andronde Kelly connected with Marquis Brown in the right at that Daniels turned into a 16-yard touchdown and Grandes kick made it 14-0. Port St. Joe twice more moved into a position to score. The ensuing march reached as deep as the Panther 6, but a sack and a holding penalty sent the Tiger Sharks in reverse and Daniel May was wide left on a 40-yard eld goal. The next time Port St. Joe had the ball the Tiger Sharks pushed to the West Gadsden 2 in the nal minute before a sack, a penalty and clock management issues snuffed the drive just prior to intermission. Port St. Joe enjoyed a 127-95 cushion in total offensive yards yet was down by two touchdowns. That was denitely not the way we game-planned it, said West Gadsden coach Antonio Bradwell. The interception helped a lot. It is a win and gets us to the next game next week. Thats what we wanted. Well take it. The second half was a story of offense undermined by penalties the teams combined for 21 yellow ags in the game and turnovers four in the nal 24 minutes alone. The Tiger Sharks gained just 40 net yards in the half the Panthers picked up the pace in the second half and nished with 293 total yards and were in Panther territory only one more time. That excursion ended with another faked punt and another West Gadsden stop. The Panthers turned the stop into points by covering 46 yards in three plays, Dexter Alls bulling the nal 11 yards up the gut. Grandes extra point kick turned the scoreboard for the nal time. During Fridays game against Liberty County, kickoff at 7:30 p.m. ET, Port St. Joe High School will induct eight new members to the schools Athletic Hall of Fame. The ceremonies will take place during halftime. West Gadsden shuts out Port St. JoeBrown, Wewahitchka sprint past Bozeman Port St. Joe falls in district volleyball nalsBack row, left to right: Jaclyn Kerigan, Shannon Pridgeon, Nicole Endres, Haley Wood, Brittnee Peak. Front row, left to right: Autumn Haynes, Katie Gardner, Oneika Lockley, Raney Besore, Nichole Spilde, Katie Lacour

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A10 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West PassTIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Nov 377 5620% Fri, Nov 469 49 0% Sat, Nov 570 5010% Sun, Nov 671 5510% Mon, Nov 777 5810% Tues, Nov 877 5810% Wed, Nov 977 58 10%11/3Thu03:21AM 1.4 H01:31PM 0.3 L 11/4Fri04:06AM 1.1 H01:14PM 0.6 L 09:39PM 1.1 H 11/5Sat03:52AM 0.8 L06:57AM 0.9 H 12:17PM 0.8 L08:36PM 1.2 H 11/6Sun03:28AM 0.6 L 07:18PM 1.3 H 11/7Mon04:00AM 0.3 L07:21PM 1.6 H 11/8Tue04:32AM 0.2 L 07:36PM 1.7 H 11/9Wed 05:07AM 0.0 L 07:59PM 1.8 H 11/3Thu04:31AM 1.1 L09:08AM 1.2H 05:21PM 0.5 L11:51PM 1.2 H 11/4Fri 05:53AM 0.9 L 11:01AM 1.1H 06:13PM 0.6 L 11/5Sat 12:18AM 1.2 H 06:57AM 0.6L 12:53PM 1.1 H 07:00PM 0.7 L 11/6Sun 12:41AM 1.3 H06:49AM 0.4L 01:19PM 1.1 H 06:42PM 0.9L 11/7Mon 12:03AM 1.3 H07:34AM 0.2L 02:25PM 1.2 H07:19PM 1.0L 11/8Tue 12:23AM 1.4 H 08:15AM 0.1L 03:19PM 1.2 H 07:52PM 1.1L 11/9Wed 12:44AM 1.4 H08:52AM -0.1L 04:06PM 1.3 H08:22PM 1.2L Great for Special Events, Holiday Parties or a Quick Getaway Call to Reserve Today! 1-2 People Nightly Rate1-2 Nights..............................$200 3 Nights or more.....................$175 3-5 People1-2 Nights..............................$225 3 Nights or more.....................$200 6 or More People1-2 Nights..............................$250 3 Nights or more.....................$225Party Rental Rates$150(if purchasing less than $100 from bar or package)$100(if purchasing more than $100 from bar or package)* Plus 11% sales tax/Gulf Co. bed taxAll rentals are subject to approval by management. 117 Sailors Cove, Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850)229-3463www.haughtyheron.com Apartment Rental Rates Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information experience. 6406516 FREE ESTIMATES1-850-626-9242 1-800-69-SHRED Security-cleared personnel Fort Walton Beachs leading mobile destruction company Weekly, monthly, or annual service Locally owned & operated Star Staff ReportJaguar Head Coach David Davis told his team at practice last week that they were going to Frank lin County on a business trip and the idea was to take care of business. That is exactly what all three Port St. Joe Gene Rafeld teams did. The Dolphins won 30-0, the Jaguars 40-0 and the Buccaneers 42-6. With the wins all three teams are guaranteed a spot in the Big Bend Super Bowl, only the second time that has happened since the GRFL was formed in 1999. With only one more regular season game to play, all three teams are undefeated. If they can get past the always-tough Blountstown on Saturday, they will have set a re markable record. For two, this years performance is a welcome change. The Dolphins were middle-ofthe-pack last year but this year they have not been scored upon while winning going 5-0. Last year the Buccaneers did not even exist. They won their rst two games in double overtime, followed up with Satur days blow-out win over Franklin County. The Jaguars, the Port St. Joe team with the best record of any Gulf County team over the past decade, just expect to win. Big Bend Champions the last two years and three of the past four. The success of the pro gram ultimately comes down to the kids. The parents have to give their support getting the players to practice and encour aging them to succeed. The coaches have to teach and inspire. But it is the young men that put in the work, run the wind sprints, sweat in the heat and push themselves to get better. Theyre the reason for all this success. There were enough highlights Saturday to ll the page. They include an interception returned for a touchdown by Jasmin Thomas for the Bucs rst score, a 77-yard touchdown run by the Dolphins Bren non Foxworth and Jaguar tackle Jonnolan Treglowns touchdown while playing fullback for the rst time Nothing tops what the Buccaneer team did on the last play of their game. The Seahawks have a cou rageous player with dis abilities on their team. On the last play of the game he took a handoff from the quarterback and, escorted by the Franklin County team and the Buccaneers, went 85 yards to the end zone. When he reached the end zone, there were high ves all around with as many congrats from the Bucs as from the Se ahawks. Star Staff Report St. Joseph Bay Golf Club has announced it will hold a benet golf tourna ment Saturday, Nov. 19, with proceeds supporting the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Mu seum. The club is open to the public and the tourna ment will be a four-player, scramble format, kicking off at 12:30 p.m. ET with a short ceremony to honor Americas veterans and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A meal and awards ceremony will follow. As part of a full weekend event, a reception will be held at 6 p.m. ET on Fri day, Nov. 18, with hors d oeuvres, beer and wine for a $10 entry fee. A cash bar for spirits will also be avail able. A silent auction will be held with auction items including framed limited edition military art, unique military collectibles, an FSU helmet and a football signed by Bobby Bowden, an FSU basketball signed by Charlie Ward and a twonight stay at Port Inn. Cash prizes for the golf tournament will include $400 to the rst-place team, $350 for second place and $200 for third. A Hole-in-One challenge will offer a new vehicle or cash prize. The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Mu seum has been honored by Smithsonian Magazine for three-straight years and is dedicated to pre serving the memories of the amphibious soldiers who trained at the camp, which is located in Carrabelle. The museum houses over 5,000 square feet of artifacts, vehicles, photos, memorabilia and memo ries of the soldiers, sailors and other military as well as civilian personnel who trained and worked at the camp during the World War II years. Hole sponsorships are available and tournament registration information can be found at www.stjo ebaygolf.com or by calling 227-1751. Special lodging packages are available starting at $69.99 per night. The event is being sup ported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council and the Franklin County Tourist Development Council.Special to The StarWewahitchka High School basketball has nalized plans for an Alum ni Basketball tournament to be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at the WHS gymna sium. In addition to team play, there will be an individual 3-point shot competition, along with a dunk compe tition, with cash prizes to the winners. Please make plans to attend what we feel will be a very enter taining day of basketball. The rst game is sched uled to begin at 10 a.m. CT on Saturday. Additional games times are 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. In addition to the Alum ni Games, the 3-point shoot-out and the dunk competition will be open to anyone interested in par ticipating in these special competitions. Please make your plans to come out, next Satur day to the WHS Gymna sium and show your sup port of WHS basketball in this special fundraising event. It should be a fun and enjoyable day. Tour nament passes will be on sale at the door for $5 for adults and $3 for students. The concession stand will also be open, so plan on coming out to eat lunch and support WHS Basket ball while you also enjoy watching some great bas ketball games. SportsPSJ Gene Rafeld teams winSt. Joseph Bay Golf Club to hold tournament COURTESY OF MAL PARRISHThe second Dolphin defense gang-tackles a Seahawks runner. Come Stick Your Nose In My BusinessYou wont be disappointed!!Whether youre looking for a little extra money or a full time career. Youre looking for SCENTSY!Scentsy is safer than traditional candles!Using a beautiful ceramic warmer, a low wattage light bulb and over 80 wonderful scents, you can transform your house into a fabulous smelling home!My team is growing rapidly but we still have plenty of room for more enthusiastic people.Ty Robinson850.229.2679 www.tyrobinson.scentsy.us Become an Independent Scentsy Consultant Today!Check out my website or give me a call! WHS basketball alumni tournament

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Thursday, November 3, 2011Star Staff ReportHundreds of trick-or-treaters descended upon Reid Avenue on Halloween night for the Chamber of Commerces annual Ghosts on the Coast event. The night was complete with dance performances, costume contests, storytelling by Pat Nease, carnival games, hay rides and plenty of candy. The downtown merchants transformed Reid Avenue into Trickor-Treat Terrace, with spooky decorations and treats at every doorstep. The event was sponsored by the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Progress Energy and the Gulf County Tourism Development Council. Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Renee Bernal doesnt like writing, but her descriptive essay about her favorite place on last years FCAT writing exam earned her a 6, the highest score possible. Bernal wrote about the woods behind her house, a place she uses as an escape from the chaos of her overscheduled teenage life. Its quiet, Bernal said. I just like to go back there and be by myself. In addition to her 6 in writing, the soft-spoken 14-year-old also scored in the highest level on the eighth-grade reading, math and science exams, with a 5 in each subject. Bernal, a ninth-grader at Wewahitchka High School, was recognized at the Oct. 6 school board meeting for her outstanding academic achievement, an accomplishment Wewahitchka High School principal Debbie Baxley believes has never been seen before in Gulf County. I was just astounded when I saw it, Baxley said. I mean, its quite amazing. Shes one of those children thats going to do well no matter what you do, but I have to give all the credit to (the former middle school) staff. For her stellar FCAT performance, Bernal received a trophy, certicate, $100 from the school and $100 from an anonymous donor, which she plans on spending at this weekends Florida Seafood Festival. I just do it. I just answer it and go on, Bernal said of her testing strategy, which often leaves her nished long before time is up. Shes denitely a top student, said Misty Wood, Bernals geometry honors teacher at WHS. She works really hard and doesnt let anyone get the best of her. Wood said Bernals family is a big part of her life, and they provide the support needed for success. We dont get ves in science very often its tough, said Wood, who noted that the science FCAT often holds students back from achieving the highest score in all disciplines. To get the top score in all four, its something special. Bernal has maintained a 4.0 GPA through elementary and middle school, and with a schedule loaded with honors and advanced classes, she plans on continuing her exemplary academic career through high school. Bernal even took algebra in eighth grade through Florida Virtual School so she could stay challenged and start high school ahead of the curve in math, her favorite subject. Its just easy for me, said Bernal, who thinks she got the math gene from her father. Special to The StarThat little hint of fall teasing us early each morning gives notice that one of area sportsmens most anticipated events is soon to occur. The fth annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet will be today, Nov. 3. Port St. Joe Lions Club members are busy working to make this years event not only bigger and better than ever, but a special moment to remember. Attendees will enjoy the historic surroundings of the Port St. Joe Centennial Building while socializing with area sportsmen and enjoying Apalachicola oysters, boiled shrimp and all the trimmings beginning at 5 p.m. ET. The beverage bar will also open at that time. At 6:30 p.m., the serious eating begins. Chef Charlie Nortons famous, no-man-left-hungry ribeye steaks will take up a good portion of the dinner plate, leaving just enough room for the salad, potato and rolls. Dont forget to save room for Sisters almost equally famous banana pudding. The real winners at this years banquet, though, will be the beneciaries of the community service projects supported by the Lions Club. More than $15,000 was raised at the 2010 banquet for community service programs in the panhandle. There have been a few changes made to this years event. First is the location, the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Because of conicts between hunting seasons and the Nov. 3 date, the Box R Ranch was unavailable. The good news is the Centennial Building will remove the threat of inclement weather and provide the backdrop of the historic building, erected in recognition of the signing place of Floridas First Constitution. Second, live music. Not just any live music, but as long as were being somewhat nostalgic, many of us remember the band Southern Satisfaction from our high school dance era. They have not only aged well, but they are better than ever and agreed to make this years banquet even more special with a one-night reunion tour. Some of the bands past members will blend with the current group and add some special music to the event. At 7:30 p.m., its time for the real excitement. More than $20,000 worth of contributions and prizes will be distributed to the guests through silent auctions, live auctions, and rafes. A few of the items offered will include shotguns, hunting ries, pistols, rods and reels and numerous other outdoor products. SPECIAL TO THE STARRenee Bernal, a ninth-grader at Wewahitchka High School, was recognized at the Oct. 6 school board meeting for scoring the highest level on all of the eighth-grade FCAT tests, with 5s in reading, math and science and a 6 in writing. Wewa student aces eighth-grade FCATs5th annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet tonightTT HOMAs S BAIRD | Special to The StarA highlight of every banquet is Charlie Nortons specially prepared ribeye steaks.See FCAT CAT B5 See BA ANQUETET B5 PP HOTOs S bB Y VALERIE GARMAn N | The StarThe Mystery Inc. gang of Scooby-Doo, Daphne, Velma, Shaggy and Fred won rst place in the family division of the costume contest. All that was missing was the Mystery Machine. At right, 7-year-old Skylar Clayton won third place in her division as the Sun-Maid Raisins girl, and her 3-yearold sister Christina Clayton took rst place in the 3-6 division as a Steak and Shake hot dog vendor. GHOSTS COAST ONTHE At left, this miniature UPS man won rst place in the 0-2 age group. His little sister dressed as a package. Below, Nathaniel Ford, 3, and younger brother Chase Ford, 1, don coordinating dinosaur costumes. At right, Pat Nease tells spooky stories at the Ghoulish Gazebo. Far left hundreds of costumed kids gathered at the city commons gazebo Monday for trick-ortreating on Reid Avenue. At left the Wich family took second place in the family division dressed as a group of Darth Vaders. From left are Darth cheese grater, Mrs. Vader, Darth tater, Darth Vader and Darth waiter.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Roman Nation, MD Family Medicine PhysicianAcute and Chronic Care Diabetes High Blood Pressure High Cholesterol Nutrition/Weight Loss Depression/Anxiety Insomnia/ADHD Asthma/COPD850-481-1101 221 East 23rd Street (across from Lowes) Medicare/Medicaid and most insurances accepted! Special to The StarGFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club had its annual Coats for Kids d rive on Oct. 14.  Club members gave 70 coats, 40 blankets and a number of hats gloves and Tshirts to Wewahitchka Elementary School and North Florida Child Development. The goal is for no kid to go without a coat. Their next Coats for Kids Drive will be on Nov. 9 at Port St. J oe Elementary School.  Star Staff ReportBilly Quinn Jr., manager of Rish Park in Port St. Joe, was recognized by Gov. Rick Scott on Sept. 30 for his superb customer service: A letter came across my desk from a Florida citizen who had written to the Agency of Persons with Disabilities. The letter describes the superb customer service demonstrated by Billy Quinn Jr., a park manager at Rish Park located on St Joseph Peninsula. During their stay, they daily observed Mr. Quinn and his staff helping others with disabilities so they could enjoy the wonderful facility. His attention to detail plus his genuine concern for others was evident. Thanks to Billy and his staff. Keep up the great work and awesome customer service. Congratulations Billy!SPECIAL TO THE STARHappy 2nd Birthday Alonah Shay Newby Love, Mommy, Sissy, Ammaw, Papa and Aunt ShoshoSpecial to The StarIf you would like to help make a difference in the lives of others and our community, please consider joining the GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc. This is an international club, with over 100,000 members around the world that are proud to say they are a GFWC member. There will be a membership social on Monday, Nov. 14, at 5:30 p.m. CT at Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church, 138 E. Orange Street, Wewahitchka. If you have any questions about the club or the upcoming social, you may contact one of the following members: Patty Fisher, 639-9794; Dianne Semmes, 639-5345; or Carolyn Watson, 639-3801. The members of our club look forward to receiving new members, and hope you will be one of them. SocietySPECIAL TO THE STARLeft to right; Patty Fisher, Dianne Semmes, Marlyn Grawey, Carolyn Watson and Donna Roberts.Coats for kidsBilly Quinn Jr. recognized by governorSPECIAL TO THE STARBilly Quinn Jr., manager of Rish Park in Port St. JoeWewahitchka Womans Club membership HHAPPY BIIRTHDAYStar Staff ReportThere will be a meeting Thursday, Nov. 10, at 7 p.m. ET at the Oak Grove Church, 613 Madison Street in Port St. Joe, to plan the 2011 countywide Thanksgiving dinner. The committee needs nancial support from individuals and organizations to raise funds to purchase turkeys and hams so 850 dinners can be prepared, heated and delivered to needy people in Gulf County. Anyone who would like to make a donation is asked to mail it to the following address. Please call Jerry Stokoe at 3816122 if you have any questions. Volunteers are needed to make this project a success! Mail donations to: Oak Grove Church, P.O. Box 967, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Place Donation for Thanksgiving dinner on legend. 2011 Thanksgiving dinner planning meetingThe Gulf County Senior Citizens and Community Center, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, would like to invite you to join them on Tuesday, Nov. 8, from 10 a.m. until noon ET to enjoy the Oldies but Goodies Show by Deejay Steve McIntire. He will be playing all types of music by request from the 50s, 60s and 70s. This event is free and open to the public. Please call Debbie at 229-8466 for more information. All request Oldies but Goodies A sh fry benet will be held for Theodore Taylor on Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 11 a.m. ET at Frank Pate Park. The meal will include sh, potato salad, baked beans, bread, cake and tea for a $6 donation. All proceeds from the sh fry will assist Taylor with nances for a needed heart and kidney transplant. Fish Fry Benet

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The Star| B3Thursday, November 3, 2011 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER Calling All Beginner Artists!Painting Classes specially designed for new painters using the tried and true technique of One Stroke Painting. Classes are $35.00, 3 hours, and include all materials; as well as a starter set of brushes to keep.Glynis Holcombe OSCI(One Stroke Certied Instructor)www.pieceocape.com 850-229-1185 Animal Hospital 300 Long Ave, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850)229-6009 Website: agapevet.com Special to The StarA basketball could be heard bouncing in the hallway of Faith Christian School on Oct. 20. Theron Smith, a former NBA player, surprised the K-5 class with his visit. T, as he is known, showed tricks with a basketball and challenged the students to try the same. Students were also shown how to practice basketball fundamentals. Students were given an opportunity to catch the basketball thrown to them by T, and they were thrilled to have a turn. It will be a memory they shall cherish throughout their lifetime. T told them of the importance of an education, no matter what career a student may choose when he or she grows up. Ts greatest challenge to the boys and girls was to accept Jesus into their hearts and to follow His will for their lives. Mr. Smith played collegiately for Ball State University. He has played for the Memphis Grizzlies and Charlotte Bobcats. He has also played overseas in France, Italy, China and Romania. Currently he is playing in Buenos Aires. The Faith Christian School K-5 class is seen pictured with Theron Smith.Special to The StarThis is the Faith Christian School honor roll for the rst quarter.All AsFirst grade: Magnolia Sarmiento and Halee Whicker Second grade: Kristen Bouington and Shelby CauseyAll As and BsFirst grade: Donovan Cumbie and Luke OBarr Second grade: Theron Smith Third grade: Jacob Davis and Farren Newman Fourth grade: Catherine Bouington and Jade Cothran Fifth grade: J.J. Laine Seventh grade: Elijah SarmientoPHOTOS bB Y TT IM CROFT | The StarThe students at Port St. Joe Elementary School, concluding a week of events pertaining to drug awareness and prevention, marched adorned in plenty of red to salute Red Ribbon Week last Friday. The annual event is a school-wide challenge to students to stay away from harmful inuences such as drugs, cigarettes and alcohol. The kids hiked from the school to Buck Grifn Lake, where Mayor Mel Magidson read a proclamation declaring the week Red Ribbon Week and encouraged the students to stay away from drugs.By Rebecca Kerigan and Ashely KennedyGeneral informationNov. 2: NJROTC eld trip to NAS Pensacola; Nov. 4: Registration deadline for ACT at Bay on Feb. 11, 2012; Nov. 7: Gold Cards issued; Nov. 8: ASVAB testing at 8:15 a.m. in Commons Area for all juniors; School Board Meeting at PSJJSHS at10 a.m. ET; Nov. 11:Veterans Day program, 9 a.m. ET in gym. Any girls who attended the youth cheerleading camp with the varsity cheerleaders should remember to meet at halftime of the football game on Nov. 4 to perform. Only girls wearing their camp shirts will be permitted onto the eld. If you still have not picked up your shirt from camp, you may do so in the high school ofce. Athletic Hall of Fame inductions will take place before the Nov. 4 football game vs. Liberty Co.; eight new members will be inducted. Seniors who are planning to go on the senior trip need to pay their $60 payment for November by Nov. 30. If the October payment has not been paid, it is late and needs to be turned in to Ms. Alcorn as soon as possible. SSportsNov. 2: Cross country district at Wewahitchka at 11 a.m.; Nov. 4: Football vs. Liberty County at 7:30 p.m. ET; Nov. 9: Football vs. Sneads 7:30 p.m. ET; GO SHARKS!ClubsAll Math Club, National Honor Society and Keyettes members who have 5th or 6th period free need to help clean out the ower beds in the front of the school. Keyettes will be having a Pizza Palooza every Wednesday at 3 p.m. in the commons area to raise money for Toys for Kids. National Junior Beta Club inductions were Thursday, Oct. 27. President Logan Haddock, Vice President Samantha Ridgley, Secretary Brooke Curcie, Treasurer Marcell Johnson and Historian Damari Cutler conducted the ceremony with a harvest theme. New members being inducted were R.J. Batts, Christina LaPlante, Chloe Burke, Hayden Lee, Mary Butts, Shaye McGufn, Lauren Davis and Tyler Monroe. SpSP Ec C Ia A L TO TT HE SS Ta A RFrom left are Maelee Lewis, Carter Costin, Alex Taylor, Miracle Smiley, Riley McGufn, John Cullen, Luke Pickels, Bryce Forston and Mazie Hodges. In the back row is Theron Smith. School News The Lions Tale FCS HHONOR RROLLT challenges students Saying no to drugs DaAZZLINgG DOLpPHINSSpSP Ec C Ia A L TO TT HE SS Ta A RPre-kindergarten: Andrew Sheppard. Kindergarten: Desiree Causey. 1st grade: Hannah Riley. 2nd grade: Lilly Dennison. 3rd grade: Parker Cornwell. 4th grade: Raina Whiteld. 5th grade: Katie Dykes. 6th grade: Michael Sherrill. Best in the Lunchroom: Ciara Glenn. Bus Riders of the Week: Hannah Anderson, Alex Thomason, Clinton Moore, Brandon Brant and Curtis Todd

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Dr. Tim Hines at Family Life ChurchDr. Tim Hines will be ministering Nov. 6-8 at Family Life Church on Reid Avenue, downtown Port St. Joe, in what will be a pivotal meeting for this region. Tim has been bringing the Word of the Lord every year for more than 10 years to this city. The grace of God and the impartation of the anointing of Gods Spirit has consistently manifested to help those hurting in their bodies and minds, and to reignite the hearts of the believers. Tim has a Bachelors and Masters degree in Theology and has served as alumni instructor at Brother Norvel Hayes New Life Bible College. He is married to a virtuous woman and they have two beautiful children. They are based here in Florida, and are submitted to Pastor David Garcia of Brooksville Assembly of God. Tim is looking forward to what God will do in these meetings at Family Life Church. We would like to invite you to come out to Family Life Church, starting Sunday morning Nov. 6 at 10:30 a.m. ET, and Sunday through Tuesday nights at 7 p.m. ET. You will not be disappointed!Annual Harvest DayZion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will be observing their annual harvest day program on Nov. 6 at 11 a.m. ET at the church located at 280 Avenue C in Port St. Joe. The speaker will be Minister Ruth Newsome of Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Panama City. All are welcome to come give thanks unto the Lord and be blessed. Revival at Port St. Joe Church of GodPort St. Joe Church of God in Christ will host a community revival on Nov. 9, 10, and 11 at 7:30 p.m. ET in the church sanctuary at 163 Avenue D. The evangelist will be Supt. David Woods Jr. come and experience a powerful move of God! Be empowered to your next level in Gods Kingdom!New Horizon AAThe New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 850-639-3600. Faith BrRIEfsFS Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) (850) 827-2887 Howard Creek Baptist ChurchA Place of Grace 9:45 am (EST) 11:00 am (EST) Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 FAITHThursday, November 3, 2011 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.comCharles Richard Dick McLaughlin, passed away at C.C. Sims State Veterans Home the evening of Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011. A Mexico Beach resident since 1994, he was born June 20, 1928, in East Liverpool, Ohio, where his cremated ashes will be interred. Wilson Funeral Home is handling arrangements in Panama City. Dick was a WWII Navy veteran, attended Geneva College in Beaver Falls, Pa., and was Event/Promotion Manager for Conneaut Lake Park, Pa., for 33 years. While in this locale, he did a lot of civic and volunteer work, especially for the AARP Safe Driving for Seniors program, teaching 97 classes locally over a 13year span. Mr. McLaughlin is survived by his wife of almost 63 years, Ruth Ann Stull McLaughlin, two sons, C. Andrew (spouse, Kitty) of Daleville, Va., and Glenn S. (spouse, April) McLaughlin of Columbia, Md. He also has a grandson, Mark McLaughlin, attending VCU in Richmond, Va. In lieu of owers or other expressions of sympathy the family suggests memorials be sent to COVENANT HOSPICE, 107 W. 19th St., Panama City, FL, 32405 or The EMPLOYEES FUND, c/o Shanae Boston, C.C. Sims State Veterans Nursing Home, 4419 Tram Road, Springeld, FL 324042559. The family of Dick McLaughlin would like to publicly express their sincere appreciation to all the staff members of these two organizations for the compassionate and comforting care they all gave tirelessly to ease the passing of their husband/father. Thank You.Charles Richard Dick McLaughlin CharlHARLEsS McLa AUghlGHLInNDaniel Earl Smith, born Oct. 6, 1953 to Edward Smitty Smith and Josephine Smith, passed away Sept.14, 2011 in Houston, Texas with his family and friends by his side. Mr. Smith is preceded in death by his father and is survived by his mother; his son Nathan of Lytle, Texas; four brothers: Steve of Newnan, Georgia, Tommy of Howard Creek, Florida, Richard of Orlando, Florida, Bryan of Panama City, Florida; and numerous nieces, nephews, friends, and extended family. Dan grew up in St. Joe Beach and attended Port St. Joe High School. He spent the last 30plus years in Houston, Texas, where he worked as a journeyman electrician. He loved the outdoors and enjoyed shing, camping and hunting with his friends. He especially enjoyed riding his beloved Harley. Dan was a kind, caring and fun-loving father, son and brother. Our world is a little darker without him near, but heaven rejoiced over his arrival. A memorial service celebrating Dans life will be held 11:30 a.m. ET on Saturday, Nov. 5, at the New Hope Baptist Church, 5875 New Hope Church Road in Tallahassee, Fla.Dan Smith DanAN smSMIthTHRonald H. Anstis, 95, passed away Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011, at his home in Wewahitchka, in the loving arms of his wife of 70 years, Ileane. He was born to Alice (Lea) and Henry Anstis on April 1, 1916, in Trafford, Penn. He attended schools there and in New Port Richey, Fla. He was the manager of the Gravity Fill gas station at 6th and Baldridge in North Braddock, Penn. for 20 years and was the owner of The Outpost Bait & Tackle in New Port Richey, Fla. along with his wife, Ileane, from the 1950s through the 1970s. He retired to Yankeetown, Fla., and lived there 35 years before moving to Wewahitchka in 2006. He is survived by his wife of 70 years, Ileane; his daughter: Joan Townsend (James); his grandson: Travis Townsend (Marcy) all of Wewahitchka; his grandson Troy Townsend (Linda) of Raleigh, N.C.; his grandson: Craig Townsend (Julie) of Jacksonville; and his great-grandchildren: Kathryn and Aubrey Anna Townsend, and Ellen and Matthew Randig. A memorial service will be held at St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church in Wewahitchka at a later date and will be announced by Heritage Funeral Home. Memorial donations may be made in memory of Ronald H. Anstis to St. Johns Church, P.O. Box 595, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 or to Emerald Coast Hospice, 2925 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Panama City, FL 32405. No owers please. Those wishing to extend a word of condolence may do so at www.heritagefhllc. com. Heritage Funeral Home, 247 N. Tyndall Parkway, Panama City, FL 32404, 850-785-1316.Ronald H. Anstis ROnaldNALD H. AnstNSTIsS Obituaries What about Grace dont you understand? Its the love of God handed down to man. Man couldnt handle or live by the Ten. This is where Jesus and Grace come in. Through the shed blood of Jesus and His loving Grace, God made a way for the human race. Have you received this Grace today? If by chance you havent, there is no other way. We who have received this grace have Gods eternal love. It will never be a never-ending experience now and also in heaven above. Billy JohnsonGods life-changing grace

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, November 3, 2011 NOTICENotice is hereby given that the 2011 Tax Roll has been delivered by the Gulf County Property Appraiser to the Gulf County Tax Collector. The 2011 Tax Roll is open for collection beginning November 1, 2011. The Tax Collectors ofce is located in the Gulf County Courthouse Room 147, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St Joe, Florida. Ofce hours are from 9 A.M. 5 P.M. EST, Monday through Friday, except holidays. The Mailing address is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd. Room 147, Port St Joe, Florida 32456. Real and Personal Property taxes will be collected as levied by the following Taxing Authorities: Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Gulf County School Board Northwest Florida Water Management District City of Port St Joe City of Wewahitchka St. Joseph Fire Control District Tupelo Fire Control District Howard Creek Fire Control District Overstreet Fire Control District MSTU G MSTU I Discount Schedule 4% Discount if paid in November 3% Discount if paid in December 2% Discount if paid in January 1% Discount if paid in February Payable without discount in March Taxes delinquent April 1 Shirley J. Jenkins Tax Collector Gulf County, Florida (850) 229-5353 NOTICETAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD From Staff Reports Blue Cross, Ascension Sacred Heart reach agreementBlue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida has signed a new network agreement with Ascension Sacred Heart Health System in Escambia, Gulf and Walton counties for all health product lines of business, including for the rst time, the Medicare Advantage PPO plan. Lines of business in the agreement include BlueChoice (PPO), BlueCare (HMO), BlueOptions (NetworkBlue) and traditional indemnity plans. Also included are BlueMedicare PPO and Regional PPO for Sacred Heart Emerald Coast and On the Gulf, Blue Select for Sacred Heart Emerald Coast and On the Gulf and Medicaid for Sacred Heart System, to be completed by Dec. 31, 2011. We are truly excited to welcome the Ascension Sacred Heart Health System into the BCBSF networks, said Jane Tuten, BCBSF senior markets vice president. With this expanded agreement, our members can take advantage of Ascensions quality service and care. We are especially delighted that this agreement included Medicare Advantage PPO and allows our BlueMedicare Regional PPO members access to Ascensions services.Sacred Heart welcomes Gulf Coast Dermatology Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf welcomes Gulf Coast Dermatology to its community of health providers. Heather Preisser, certied physician assistant, began seeing patients in Gulf County on Nov. 1 at the Sacred Heart on the Gulfs Medical Ofce Building. Gulf Coast Dermatology will see patients Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET. Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulfs Medical Ofce Building is located on the hospitals campus at 3801 U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. To schedule an appointment with Gulf Coast Dermatology, call 233-3376 and specify the Sacred Heart location. School district offers computer trainingSpecial to The StarThe Gulf County School District will offer computer training for the beginner to the advanced learner beginning Nov. 7 at each high school. There will be several levels of instruction provided at Port St. Joe High School by Wayne Taylor and at Wewahitchka High School by Debbie Gerber. Both of these instructors are Microsoft certied in Word, Power Point and Excel. Instruction for those who want to learn the basics will be geared for the beginner with no pressure to learn on a fast track. For those who have mastered basic skills and want to progress in Word, Power Point and/ or Excel, instruction will be provided. If participants want to become MOS-certied, instructors will provide the preparation, practice and testing. There is a charge for Microsoft Ofce Suite tests, for which the individual will be responsible. This is the rst year the Adult School Program has to charge an enrollment fee, which is $28.50 per term. Only checks made to Gulf County School Board or cash may be used for the fee. The program is open-ended, which means participants may register and enter at any time during the school year. The Port St. Joe High program will be 6-9 p.m. ET Mondays and Wednesdays in the business room by the gym door. Wewahitchka High classes will be 5-8 p.m. CT Mondays and 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays at the main entrance. Times may be adjusted as need and participation dictates. Health bBRIEFsS Special to The StarGulf Alliance for Local Arts is excited to offer after-school art classes for children ages 5 and up encompassing visual arts including instruction in clay and painting with mixed media. In the fall session, the World of Clay will focus on art in nature. Instructor Leslie Wentzell teaches children to let Mother Nature be their guide and use ora and fauna to inspire artist creations. The World of Color gets inspiration from recycled and found items. Instructor Dolores Lowery teaches students to look beyond the ordinary and use found and recycled objects to add a 3-dimensional aspect to their work using acrylic paints and mediums on canvas panels and hardboard. All classes are held at The Artery, 214 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe. Clay classes are 2:45-4:15 p.m. ET Tuesdays for children ages 5 to 8 and 4:30-6 p.m. for ages 9-plus. Painting with mixed media classes are 2:45-4:15 p.m. Thursdays for children ages 5 to 8 and 4:30-6 p.m. for ages 9-plus. Classes are $10 each. Free and reduced-cost classes are available for any child who qualies for free or-reduced cost lunches. Registration forms are available at www.gulfalliance.org and can be picked up and returned to Port St. Joe Elementary School or The Artery. For more information, call 5413981 or email artclasses@gulfalliance.org. You can also contact instructors Leslie Wentzell at ljwentzell@yahoo.com or Dolores Lowery at 814-2826 or seagrassart@gmail.com. The Artery offers after-school artsIts always been really easy to him, and its really easy to me. Bernal is mentored by an older National Honor Society student at the high school who will prepare her to join the organization next year as a sophomore. In addition to her outstanding academics, Bernal is involved with volleyball and softball at Wewahitchka High. When shes not in the classroom or on the softball eld, Bernal enjoys spending time outdoors hunting, camping, shing, four-wheeling and target shooting. She is a member of the Single Action Shooting Society, an international organization designed to preserve and promote cowboy action shooting. Bernal attends monthly SASS meetings in Wewahitchka. Its kind of like a little cowboy shootout, Bernal said. My brother and my daddy do it, and so do my uncles. Bernal is also involved with Wewahitchka Search and Rescue, an organization her mom and stepdad are both a part of. Bernal often helps with the rescues, assisting people with boat accidents, and works concession stands at the organizations events. Although Bernal doesnt know what career path she would like to take, she wants to attend Florida State University after she graduates from WHS in 2015. My older brother goes to (Florida State University), she said. Hes always been a big FSU fan. We all are. Bernal has two sisters and four brothers and spends a lot of time hanging out with her family. She said they are all proud of her academic endeavors. There will also be items available for women and children. This will mark the second year of the $8,000 cash drawing held during the event. The lucky winner could win up to $8,000 if his ticket is drawn last from the box, but each ticket holder will have a 1 in 25 chance of at least doubling their money. Tickets for the event are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. They can be purchased at Hannon Insurance and Ramseys Printing and Ofce Products in Port St. Joe and from any Lions Club member. Additional information or ticket purchases can be made by calling 227-1133, 227-7767 or 527-1338. FCAT from page B1 Th H OMas AS Ba A IRd D | Special to The StarThe Sportsmans Banquets draws hundreds every year. BANQUET from page B1

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011Special to The StarWhile most people in Port St. Joe know her as Dr. Pat, president of the Coastal Community Association and owner of Gulf 2 Bay Development and Construction, Dr. Patricia Hardman is also the founder and Chief Operating Ofcer of Dyslexia Research Institute which is based in Tallahassee. She has studied and worked in the eld of dyslexia, ADHD and related learning disorders since the early 1970s. On Oct. 14, The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools (The Coalition) presented her with their Distinguished Service Award for her efforts in Florida to provide options in education for children with disabilities. The award was presented at Nova Southeastern University at The Coalitions fall conference. Hardmans efforts have helped to change many of the laws in Florida relating to students with disabilities. In 1985 Hardman worked with Representative Betty Easley to develop Florida Statute 1007.265 which allows college students with disabilities to substitute courses for required courses such as math and foreign language. This has allowed thousands of students in Florida to complete their college education as opposed to having to drop out because of these courses. When the FCAT only allowed an abacus as the calculator for students with dyscalculia and visual impairments, Hardman and Senator Steve Wise brought this matter before the Senate. She helped to craft legislation that would allow appropriate accommodations on the FCAT for students with disabilities. Hardman worked with Senator John McKay on the drafting of the McKay Scholarship Program. She was appointed to the McKay Task Force when accountability measures were being discussed and created in the early years of the program. Hardman worked with Governor Bush in holding back legislation that would over-regulate the private schools accepting McKay Scholarships. The Accountability Legislation that was passed in 2006 stayed true to the goal of letting parents have choice in educating their children with disabilities, while allowing private schools the autonomy to develop their programs to t the needs of the child. Hardman worked tirelessly this year with The Coalition Board to draft language to make the McKay Scholarship accessible to students on 504 Plans. This has allowed many more children access to the McKay Scholarship. While parents may never know her name, or know what she has done for countless children throughout Florida, The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools wanted Hardman to know that they recognize her service to children with disabilities. Steve Hicks, president of The Coalition presented her with the Distinguished Service Award. The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools is a not for prot Florida organization of private schools that participate in the McKay Scholarship Program. This is the largest program in the U.S. which provides parents of children with disabilities scholarships to attend other public or private schools. PUBLIC NOTICECity of Port St. JoeThe City of Port St. Joe is considering submitting a USEPA Brownelds Cleanup Grant proposal to remove asbestos containing materials from the former Gulf Pines Hospital, 102 Twentieth Street, Port St. Joe, FL. A public hearing will be held on November 15, 2011 at the City Commission Regular Meeting in the Commission Chamber of City Hall (305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd ~ Port St. Joe, FL) to discuss the grant proposal and solicit public comments on the proposal. A draft proposal with Analysis of Brownelds Cleanup Alternatives will be available for public review and comment by November 15, 2011 at the City Hall. Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETINGThe Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold a Special Meeting on November 15, 2011, at the Holiday Inn & Suites, 2725 Graves Road, Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. The meeting will be open to the public. Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn CareRobert PelcMowing Service227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction COMBS CONSTRUCTIONINC.CGC 1507649*ADDITIONS *TERMITEREPAIR *WINDOWREPLACEMENT (850) 229.8385 OR (850) 227-8156 glencombspsj@gmail.com Wood Works(In shed behind store 2284 Hwy 98 W.) PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET I RESCUED A HUMAN TODAYHer eyes met mine as I walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to have her. She wagged her tail, not too exuberantly, so I wouldnt be afraid. As I looked at her in the kennel she blocked my view from a little accident she had in the back of her cage. She didnt want me to know that she hadnt been walked today. Sometimes the shelter keepers get too busy and she didnt want me to think poorly of them. So many more are out there who havent walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one. On Friday, November 11th, 2011 (and every 2nd Friday of each month) we will feature Dogs for Dogs. Come by the Port St. Joe Marina around lunchtime (11:00 a.m. ~ 2:00 p.m.) and enjoy a hot dog or chili dog (min. 2) lunch, (chips, and soda) included for a $5.00 cash donation. All donations will be given to St. Joseph Bay Humane Society.This event is open to the public, so please help us spread the word. Dogs for DogsNovember 11, 2011At Port St. Joe Marina 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Fl 32456 850-227-9393 Dr. Pat Hardman and Steve Hicks, President of The Coalition of McKay Scholarship Schools.Hardman honored by Florida coalition

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 3, 2011 The Star | B7 36233S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES THOMAS McNEILL, SR. Deceased. File Number 11-13PR NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of JAMES THOMAS McNEILL, SR., deceased, whose date of death was July 4, 2010 and whose social security number is XXX-XX-XXXX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is November 3, 2011. Personal Representative: BETTY L. McNEILL 1031 Indian Pass Rd. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin Florida Bar No. 699070 Post Office Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Telephone: (850) 227-1159 November 3, 10, 2011 36103S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Wewahitchka, FL Unit #96-Lynn & Molly Griffin, Unit #87-Victor Strickland and Unit #12-Sherry Young will be sold on November 10, 2011 at 8:30 am if not paid up. October 27, November 3, 2011 36221S RE: REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FROM ACCOUNTING FIRMS To Whom It May Concern: The Port St. Joe Port Authority (Port) is currently requesting proposals from interested and qualified Certified Public Accounting firms, registered and licensed under the laws of Florida, to provide auditing services. The selected firm will be required to perform an annual audit of the Ports financial activities in accordance with generally accepted standards, with Government Accounting Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, and with Rules of the Auditor General of the State of Florida. The selected firm will be engaged for a term of three years. The proposal is to include the fee for the first year and the services will begin with the annual audit of the prior fiscal year of October 1, 2010, through September 30, 2011. In August 2012 and August 2013, the Port and the selected firm will review the scope of services and the fee for the second and third years respectively. In addition to the fee for the first year, proposals are to include (1) statements of qualifications for the firm and its principals who will be responsible for providing the services and (2) statements of experience in providing similar accounting services to governmental entities. Proposals are to be marked with RFP Audit Services and received by the Port by noon, Thursday, November 10th. After that deadline Port staff will open the proposals and assemble them for consideration by the Port Commissioners at the Authoritys meeting on Wednesday, November 16th. The Ports address is 206 Monument Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The phone number is 850-229-5240 should there be any questions. Thank you for your interest in providing auditing services to the Port St. Joe Port Authority. November 3, 10, 2011 36189S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST MARGIE O. SMITH A/K/A MARGIE ODEAN SMITH A/K/A MARGIE D. SMITH A/K/ A MARGIE SMITH, DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000307 DIVISION: NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST MARGIE O. SMITH A/K/A MARGIE ODEAN SMITH A/K/A MARGIE D. SMITH A/K/ A MARGIE SMITH, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK D OF C. F. HANLON SUBDIVISION NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in the The Star. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 19th day of October, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Gulf County Courthouse #850-229-6113 (TDD) Florida Default Law Group, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11021934 November 3, 10, 2011 36205S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, DBA Coastal Community Mortgage, a Florida Banking Corporation, Plaintiff, VS. KENDALL D. CRAWLEY, and WATAPPO PRESERVE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. CASE NO: 11-211-CA NOTICE OF ACTION To: KENDALL D. CRAWLEY 1541 FARRINDON CIRCLE LAKE MARY, FL 32746 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property in Gulf County, Florida: Lot 143, Wetappo according to plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 36 through 42 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on or before December 5, 2011, and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on October 24, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 3, 10, 2011 36149S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION LNV CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs RIVERFRONT PROPERTIES, INC.; GARY R. RHINEHEART; HARRY A. SCHULTZ; WINDMARK INVESTMENTS, LLC; GEORGIA COMMERCE BANK; WINDMARK BEACH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. CASE NO. 2010-CA-000363CA NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in this cause on October 18, 2011, the Clerk will sell the Property situated in Gulf County, described as: Lot 27, Windmark Beach, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 1, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. (the Property) at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. ET, on the 17th day of November, 2011, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAT THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATE: October 18, 2011. CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ROBERT W. BOOS Florida Bar No.0558079 DEBORAH H. OLIVER Florida Bar No.0485111 STEPHANIE M. MARTIN Florida Bar No.0030585 Adams and Reese LLP 101 E. Kennedy Boulevard, Suite 4000 Tampa, Florida 33602 Telephone: (813) 402-2880 Attorneys for Plaintiff November 3, 10, 2011 36095S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDCICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: The Estate of BETTY JEAN CURLEE Deceased. CASE NO.: 11-23 PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BETTY JEAN CURLEE, deceased, File Number 11-23 PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, the address of which is 1000 Cecil Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is October 27, 2011. Dated this the 14th day of October, 2011. Susan Curlee Wilder Petitioner/Personal Representative 217 Coronado Street Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456 Clinton T. McCahill 305 Sixth Street Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456 850-229-9040 Tel. 850-229-9049 Fax FBN: 0073482 Attorney for the Petitioner Personal Representative October 27, November 3, 2011 36065S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. THREE MEN AND AN IDEA, LLC, a Dissolved Florida Limited Liability Company, ROBERT J. JASINSKI, Individually, and KENNETH ALLEN PETERSON, JR., Individually, Defendants. CASE NO. 11-246-CA CIVIL DIVISION NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 11, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Office, of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, on November 10, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. ET the following described property: Parcel #9, Sunshine Acres (unrecorded) Commence at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run North 89 East for 1726.20 feet; thence North 01 West for 1798.77 feet; thence North 89 East for 1997.96 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning run North 01 West for 189.24 feet; thence North 89 East for 220.26 feet; thence South 01 East for 457.29 feet to a point on the Northerly right of way line of State Road No. 386; thence South 60 West along said right of way line for 250.00 feet; thence North 01 West for 389.96 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land having an area of 2.62 acres, more or less, and being subject to a 30.00 foot wide roadway easement along a portion of the Westerly boundary thereof, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence run North 89 East for 1726.20 feet; thence North 01 West for 1798.77 feet; thence North 89 East for 1997.96 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning run North 01 West for 30.01 feet; thence North 89 East for 30.01 feet; thence South 01 East for 419.97 feet; thence South 60 West for 34.06 feet; thence North 01 West for 419.97 feet to the Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON October 11, 2011. Becky Norris, Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Mary Ellen Davis, Esquire 17 High Drive, Suite C Post Office Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL 32326 (850) 926-6003 October 27, November 3, 2011 36295 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF Samuel William Berkheiser Deceased. File No. 2011-76-PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Samuel W. Berkheiser, deceased, whose date of death was January 21, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Ceceil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 3, 2011. Personal Representative: Samuel W. Berkheiser, Jr. 40 5th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Attorney for Personal Representative: Max W. McCord Florida Bar No. 28119 105 West 5th Street Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 640-1131 November 3, 10, 2011

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B8| The Star Thursday, November 3, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $119,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 BeachsideFOR RENTST. JOE BEACH 113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98 2bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98 2bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach WINDMARK BEACH 159 Beach Street Bungalow #3 1bd/1ba Unfurnished 212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #4 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #6 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished MEXICO BEACH Villas of Mexico Beach, 3706 Hwy 98 New Condos, Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 3bd/3ba Furnished Pictures available on MLS #243890CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision 101 Two Palms Drive 4bd Unfurnished Two Palm Subdivision 3bd/3 ba Furnished and covered pool (small pet allowed with pet deposit) PORT ST. JOE Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Dr. Unit 15 2bd/2ba Furnished 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE RowellAuctions.com BALLROOM215 BankForeclosed PropertiesONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE!Alabama, Georgia, Florida & South CarolinaMany Selling Absolute! 1347 Alligator Drive Alligator Point, FL Unit C-429 of the Carrabelle Boat Club Ass.at 1570 Hwy 98 W.,Carrabelle, FL 438 Mill Road, Carrabelle, FLSelling from St. James Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Rd, Carrabelle, FLNovember 15 -:6:00 p.m.Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-83882042253 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd Floor; 3 Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 318 Reid Avenue Of ce /Retail; +/1,700sf; Can be subdivided; $13.25psf 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale300 Long Avenue +/2,000sf Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available235 W. Gulf Beach Drive Of ce/Retail; +/-5,335sf multi-tenant bldg St. George Island; $399,000 131 E. Gulf Beach DrSt. George Island, +/3,950sf of ce/retail; $285,00071 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms UNDER CONTRACT ant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7 UNDER CONTRACT eue sf UNDERCONTRACT lf Beach Dr geIsland,+/-3,950sfofce/retail; LE AS ED located at the cor n g;$10psfmod gr DELUXE KING MATTRESS/BOX SPRINGS WITH WOOD HEADBOARDExcellent Condition Sleeps great all for $600.00HEALTH RIDER TREAD MILL $100.00229-8014 JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3,758) is accepting applications for the following position:Water Plant SupervisorPlease submit an application and cover letter along with ve references to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The Position will be open until lled. Salary will be DOQ. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster or call 850-747-5019 10th AnniversaryVETERANS Charity Poker RunNovember 5,2011 Registration 9:00-11:00 @ Katmandu/Buoy Bar Panama City Beach For more info 850 628-6149 www.vnvusa.com Sponsored by Vietnam Vets MC Legacy Vets MC St. Joe, 3br, 1 bath, fenced backyard with 2 storage buildings, new metal roof and paint on house, near school and Lake Griffin, Call (850) 227-8295 for appt. Price ReducedFSBO: 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 Small Efficiency Apt $300 mo W/S included. Pet neg. 773 Bryants Landing Road. 850-899-0162 Bayview Home @ Indian Pass. 4 br, 3 ba, 2 acres, large storage and Boat shed. $1200 mo + $1200 dep. $200 pet fee. In the St. Joe school district. Call 850-229-1065 or 850-227-5025 PSJ -1911 Cypress Ave. 3 br, 1.5 bath in Nice neighborhood, close to schools. $675 mo, $300 dep. One year lease. Call 850-867-3368 Mexico Beach Store Front. 2500 sf on Hwy 98 with 32 car parking. 5 year lease with option to buy. 850-348-7774 Text FL83641 to 56654 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Port St Joe 114 Bellamy Circle, Saturday November 5th 8:00 a.m.-?; Multi Family Sale Port St Joe, 8414 Tradewinds Dr. Gulfaire Subdivision, Saturday 8:00 a.m. CST-?Two Family SaleSomething for everyone, lots of clip on earrings. Text FL84457 to 56654 St Joe Beach 8111 Alabama Ave, Saturday 8am-2pm;Multi FamilyChristmas, clothing, jewelry, housewares, etc. Wewahitchka 182 West Ave, Burgess Creek area, Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-?; clothes, dishes, toys, scrapbooking supplies, womens shoes, mens hunting boots, christmas trees and ornaments, and lots more! Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals whom are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Mexico Bch Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com Highland View 2132 Hayes Ave, Saturday 8:00 a.m.-?;Multi Family SaleLots of bargains, kids, clothes and furniture, electronics, and more! Text FL84390 to 56654 Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centura.us.com Partners in Grime Cleaning Services 850-630-8471. or 850-340-0492 For Homes or Condos free estimates by phone! D & B Home Repairs Inc.Featuring Seamless Gutters. 12 colors available. Call 850-340-0605 Spot Advertising works! Classifieds work!