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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03815
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 10-13-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03815

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 73, NUMB ER 52 Thursday, OCT O B ER 13 2011 By Tim Croft Star News Editor The Port of Port St. Joe is showing up on the sonar of folks in high places in town this week to assess the potential of Floridas last undeveloped deepwa ter port. Ananth Prasad, Secre tary of the Florida Depart ment of Transportation, and members of the Gulf County legislative delega tion were in town Wednes day on a fact-nding mis sion about the port. Also scheduled to at tend were Rep. Marti Coley (R-Marianna), Rep. Jimmy Patronis (R-Panama City Beach) schedule per mitting state Sen. Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee), a representative from the staff of Congressman Steve Southerland (R-Panama City) as well as FDOT and county ofcials. This on top of a recent meeting in Panama City between port ofcials and Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Flori da) that port ofcials said was very constructive, the senator expressed his sup port for port development. I think the meeting, particularly with Repre sentative Coley coming, is a signal that people inland recognize the impact the port could have for the re gion, said Port Authority executive director Tommy Pitts. To us, it is very ex citing that there is that kind of interest. Pitts said interest ex tends to the Governors Mansion. During an inter view at the annual Lincoln Day dinner earlier this year, Gov. Rick Scott voiced sup port for development of the port and the importance of meeting the needs in devel oping each of Floridas 14 deepwater ports. The state is very sup portive, Pitts said. The governor is very aware of our activities. Among those activities is a more proactive part nership with the St. Joe Company in developing the old mill site, as well as the parcel north of the mill site that St. Joe previously leased to the Port Author ity. The shakeup in leader ship and strategy changes at St. Joe has led to what Port Authority board chair woman Johanna White called a joint effort for job creation through the port. The Apalachee Regional Planning Council has long Signicant week for Port of Port St. Joe State and economic development ofcials visit to assess needs Art & Wine B1 By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Gulf Countys numbers are creeping up and up. According to data from the U.S. Cen sus Bureau, Gulf Countys population percent increase is higher than the states, along with the poverty rate. Gulf Countys population increased 19 percent between 2000 and 2010, slightly higher than Floridas state population growth of 17.6 percent, and double U.S. population percent increase gure of 9.7 percent. With a total growth of 2,531 residents, the county population is growing faster than it did between 1990 and 2000. The percent increase in population from 1990 to 2000 was 15.9 percent. If the trend continues, Gulf County could see an increase of more than 3,000 residents in the next 10 years, bringing the population to almost 19,000. Florida is the fourth most populated state in the nation, behind California, Texas and New York, and is projected to move into the number three spot ahead of New York by 2015 based on growth trends. Census gures also reveal that Gulf County also has a disproportionate male population, with 60 percent male and 40 percent female. Census data conrms Gulf County has felt the wrath of the recession, with increasing poverty levels and a decreas ing median household income. The median household income of Gulf County has dropped from $38,160 in 2007 to $35,656 in 2010, and ranks below that of the state ($44,755) and the nation as a whole ($50,046). The county poverty level is also high er than the state and national levels, with 23 percent of the population living below the poverty line, up from 16.7 per cent in 2007. Statewide, 15 percent of the By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer The Gulf County Tourism Development Council Board reviewed a series of pend ing special events contracts with Amber Daviss compa ny, Statecraft, at its monthly meeting Oct. 6. What began as three memorandums of under standing, contracting Davis for $24,300 of event planning to be paid in nine install ments between September 2011 and April 2012, is now being re-examined by the TDC Board as individual event planning contracts upon suggestion by County Attorney Jeremy Novak. TDC Executive Director Tim Kerigan entered into the MOUs with Davis in midAugust after she approached the TDC and offered to as sist with event planning. The initial MOUs, under county policy, would have required the TDC to collect bids for the position. Kerigan signed the set of contracts without any vote from the TDC board. Kerigan said he failed initially in the contracting process. He said either the contracts needed to be com bined and the position put out for bid, or they should be broken down into indi vidual event consultation contracts, which is the route the TDC will take. County Attorney Jeremy Novak reminded the board that any time the TDC wants to spend more than $5,000 the request must go before the Board of County Com missioners for approval. Novak presented an 18item list of past event expen ditures, all of which exceed ed county policy guidelines, during the meeting. The list included such TDC-sponsored events as the Scallop and Music Fest, First Fridays, Saltwater Slam and the Pojo Live Mu sic Festival. Kerigan presented sev en event proposals for the boards approval, all of which were pitched by Davis, and each with its own consulting fee under $5,000. What you have in front of you are individual expenses that you have the ability to approve, said Novak, who noted the original MOUs Kerigan entered exceeded that expense allotment. Novak said the TDC does not need to collect bids for individual events with in dividual contractors under $5,000. The proposed events in cluded a tagged trout and redsh tournament, a run at Cape San Blas, a series of snowbird social society events, a sandcastle build ing contest, worship on the water events, a New Years event, and a St. Patricks Day cooking contest. We can accept them, deny them, or accept some thing similar, Kerigan said. Board member Jason Bogan said the redsh tour nament was one of the 26 ideas he submitted to the board six months ago. Board member Mel By Tim Croft Star News Editor For many, the Port Theatre is a 73-year-old diamond in rough shape. A private/public partnership is dedicating itself to applying some polish to the historic theater in or der to turn it into the Port Theatre Art and Culture Center. This is a legendary community asset that will benet all residents of Gulf County and the community, said Gail Alsobrook, executive di rector of the Port St. Joe Redevel opment Agency, one of the partners in the effort to revitalize the theater. It can be a hub for art and cultural events. A steering committee, comprised of local business owners as well as representatives from local arts organizations, has been exploring the revitalization of the theater for some two years. From those explorations has emerged a board of directors for the Port Theatre Art and Culture Cen ter (PTACC) and the drafting of Ar ticles of Incorporation. The group will seek to become a 501 (c) 3 non-prot by the end of the year. This is an exploratory effort to identify everything we need to reach our goal, Alsobrook said. The peo ple on the board have the expertise and the skills to get us there. The effort is distinctively collab orative in nature. The Forgotten Coast Cultural Co alition has pledged start-up funds in support of an art and culture center in Gulf County. The group envisions such a center as headquarters for its annual Great Plein Air Paint Out, among other events. The PSJRA has pledged support as the theater is in its redevelop ment area and is seen a major com ponent for revitalization of down town. The revitalization of the theater could be an economic engine for the 2000-2010: how Gulf County has changed TDC takes another look at contracts See NEEDS A2 See CHANGED A2 See TDC A2 See THEA TRE A3 From Roy Rogers in the 1940s to the Harvey Arnold Band in 1980, the Port Theatres stage played host to a variety of live acts over the decades. Several old projectors still remain inside the entryway of the theater. Below Left: Old lm reels and some of the original wall paneling remain on the walls of the old theater. Below Center: The projection room, construction to be reproof, remains largely intact. Below Right: The acoustics for the three-story auditorium section of the theatre, seen here looking from the projection room to the stage beyond, are considered excellent. GROUP SEEKS TO REVITALIZE PORT THEATRE P hotos by T IM CRO FT | The Star This is a legendary community asset that will benet all residents of Gulf County and the community. Gail Alsobrook executive director of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency Opinion ....................................... A4 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A6 Sports ........................................... A7-A8 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4-B5 Obituaries .................................... B4 Classieds .................................... B6-B7

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 850-819-4492 429 S Tyndall Parkway, Suite M Marsha Mongoven, Licensed Esthetician Variety of facials, chemical peels, and waxing Visit www.forskinsakellc.com for complete menu MICRODERM WITH YOUR FIRST FACIAL F or S kin S ake, LLC F REE ADMISSION: A C A N GOOD FOR N EEDY FA MILIES Calling All Beginner Artists! Painting Classes specially designed for new painters using the tried and true technique of One Stroke Painting. Classes are $35.00, 3 hours, and include all materials; as well as a starter set of brushes to keep. Glynis Holcombe OSCI (One Stroke Certied Instructor) www.pieceocape.com 850-229-1185 NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Roman Nation, MD Family Medicine Physician Acute and Chronic Care Diabetes High Blood Pressure High Cholesterol Nutrition/Weight Loss Depression/Anxiety Insomnia/ADHD Asthma/COPD 850-481-1101 221 East 23rd Street (across from Lowes) Medicare/Medicaid and most insurances accepted! NEEDS from page A1 voiced the sentiment that port development in Port St. Joe was a huge step in unlocking the economic potential of the county and region. Things have changed phenomenally, Pitts said. (St. Joes) strategy has changed and as a result we are working towards the same goals of jobs and creating economic activity. We have always known we needed to attract private funds. We see a private/ public partnership as the best opportunity for port development. Now we see St. Joe as an ally in port de velopment. (The Ports coastal parcel) and mill site are actively being considered and marketed for port and marine activity (by St. Joe). That opens the prospect for port activity itself. Pitts added that the barge bulkhead, and access road, along the Intracoast al Canal offers options for new customers, as does the access to rail that the port gained by the purchase of the old Arizona Chemical property earlier this year. With potential develop ment of the former mill site and the ports so-called Parcel A, or coastal par cel, the ports capabilities grow. Having properties that are developed has attract ed the attention of custom ers, Pitts said. (Prasad) will learn about the attri butes we do have here. We have so much going for us here. That includes close prox imity to a federal shipping channel, over 100 acres of land in port hands, an ad jacent wastewater plant, a signicant source of fresh water in the Gulf County Canal, access to rail and two natural gas pipelines from the purchase of the Arizona Chemical prop erty. Pitts also cited develop ments at the state and fed eral level which will aid the case for port development. That includes the gover nors focus on job creation, his emphasis on ports as engines for that creation and his push to reduce the regulatory burden on busi nesses. Further, with the expansion of the Panama Canal completed in two years, and Florida ports positioned to reap benets from the trade that expan sion will bring, the Port of Port St. Joe is in position to grow and develop. We have seen changes in the past year or two that make us more optimistic on deepwater expansion, Pitts said. With the Panama Ca nal expansion there are a lot of changing dynamics in shipping and looking for new opportunities. What state studies have found is that the impact of ports on Floridas economy has been greatly underesti mated. Part of this weeks meet ings was to show key elected and appointed ofcials what a port advisory commit tee has helped identify as hurdles to development, in cluding identifying funding needs. The advisory committee has crafted a strategic plan and nancing plan to meet those hurdles. Those plans were to be discussed this week. Its exciting for us to have them all come here, Pitts said. White said it was a key step in the creation of badly needed jobs. With all those people coming they are acknowl edging the regional impact of the port, White said. We need the jobs and we need the jobs now. People are hurting real bad. CHANGED from page A1 population lives below the poverty line, with a simi lar nationwide rate of 15.3 percent of the U.S. popula tion living below the pov erty line. Gulf County is also less educated than the national and state populations. Countywide, 75.5 per cent of persons age 25 and up are high school gradu ates, and 13.4 percent hold a bachelors degree or higher. Statewide, 84.9 percent are high school graduates, and 25.6 percent have a bachelors degree or high er. Nationally, 85.6 percent of persons 25 and older have a high school diploma, and 28.2 hold a bachelors degree or higher. Educational attain ment is slightly up in Gulf County from the numbers collected during the 2000 Census, which cited 72.6 percent of persons age 25 and up as having a high school diploma, and only 10.1 percent of the popula tion with a bachelors de gree or higher. The number of hous ing units in Gulf County increased by 1,523 from 2000 to 2010, with a higher vacancy rate among units and higher percentage of renters documented in 2010. Of the 9,110 total hous ing units documented by the Census Bureau in 2010, 58.6 percent were occupied and 41.4 percent vacant. Of the occupied houses, 74.8 percent were owner occu pied and 25.2 percent were renter occupied. The 2000 Census docu mented 7,587 total housing units, 65 percent of which were occupied and 35 per cent vacant. Of those oc cupied, 81 percent of units were owner occupied, and 19 percent renter occu pied. Of those 2010 vacancies, 19.3 percent were for rent, 6.6 percent for sale, and 61.5 percent were units for seasonal or recreational use. Of the 2000 vacancies, 20.9 percent were for rent, 5.4 percent for sale, and 47.9 percent were for sea sonal or recreational use. TDC from page A1 Magidson voted no on each event and Bogan abstained for personal reasons. Im voting no on every one of them for a reason, Magidson said. I think were heading down a very slippery slope here folks, and you all know what Im talking about. Magidson said it ap pears to the public that the TDC is trying to skirt bid ding requirements. We have gone to one source, or one source has come to us, and weve just rolled over and said okay, said Magidson, who noted that the TDC board never voted on last months golden scallop treasure hunt event. The board approved two of the proposed events, denied one and motioned to table the remaining four, leaving them open for further discussion at future meet ings. Board member War ren Yeager said the board members needed to take the personalities out of their decisions. Im concerned that its personalities, Yeager said. Lets take the per sonalities out of it. Lets look at it honestly and openly. Magidson said person alities were not the issue. Were spending other peoples money and we better spend it right, Magidson said. This body has operated under the radar for far too long.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, October 13, 2011 General Law Practice: Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Probate, Wills, Trusts and Estates, Business and Corporations, Family Law, Military Law and Elder Law Issues WE W ILL ASSIST YOU, YOUR BUSINESS AND YOUR FAMILY W ITH SPEED, E FFICIENCY AND ECONOMY. ALISA W. JAMES, P.A., Col USAF Reserves JAG Attorney and Counsellor at Law 109 Harrison Avenue Panama City, FL 850-215-0095 awjameslaw@knology.net alisawjamespa.com E state P lanning, W ills and T rusts M ilitary D ivorce and M odications THEA TRE from page A1 downtown area, Alsobrook said. The rst board meeting for the PTACC was held last week and the vision for the theater emerged: One that will honor the legacy of the theater; a multiuse facility to serve the com munity in a number of ways and will appeal to all age groups; a cultural hub for the community; programming to unite families; a tourist attraction; a showcase for local talent; and a place for inspiration and fun. We want it to be a userfriendly center, Alsobrook said. We see it being used for live theater, movies, dance classes and recitals, the Childrens Theater, for town hall meetings. This could be a showcase for downtown. The Port Theatre opened in June 1938 and many folks still recall seeing mov ies such as Lassie Come Home and The Greatest Show on Earth as well as live acts such as Roy Rog ers grace the stage of the theater. The theater closed in 1967 and fell into general disrepair, battered twice by hurricanes, during the ensu ing years. Paula and Wade Clark purchased the theater in the 1990s, but sold it several years ago and the building remains closed and unat tended. In June 2003, the theater, after considerable effort by the Clarks, was placed on the National Register of His toric Places. Despite years of neglect, a letter from the Florida De partment of State included the following passage: To qualify for listing in the National Register, a property must not only be shown to have a docu mented area of historic signicance, it must also retain physical integrity. The theatre, although sub jected to damage from two hurricanes, has retained its historic character. The entry, lobby, auditorium, reconstructed balcony, pro jection room, managers apartment and circulation patterns characteristic of a public theatre remains intact. The U.S. Department of Interior noted, The Art Deco Style treatment of the faade is largely intact and still maintains a distinct and signicant presence on the main commercial thor oughfare of Port St. Joe. Further, the Department of Interior letter notes that acoustics within the threestory auditorium space is exceptional. The PTACC board members met last week with Harry Arnold, the cur rent owner of the theater to begin the exploration of the nancial commitment needed to begin the revital ization of the theater. The town needs it, I think itd be the biggest draw on Reid Avenue, Ar nold said of a revitalized Port Theatre.

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Opinion A4 | The Star USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Visit to Elvis home not tax-deductable By most any measure, last weeks public hearing on the development order for the Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center was an exercise in what democracy should be. Even if the vote did not go the way opponents desired, that does not undermine the lessons the public hearing could offer other governing bodies in the county. As was said late in the meeting, no doubt some would go away unhappy, some happy, but all who wished had been heard. More than two dozen people signed up to speak before Port St. Joe city commissioners and were given their time, none of them hearing a buzzer at three, ve or seven minutes to alert them they had gone overtime, none of them shut off from making their points. The lone request from Mayor Mel Magidson was to try to be brief and non-redundant and while many speakers could not adhere to either request, all were allowed their full say. That the hearing, held solely to consider this development order, was held in the Centennial Building to accommodate the crowd and lasted almost four hours is also testament to government providing a forum for citizen input. Advanced citizenship, though, depends on informed citizens and on several points reasoned debate was drowned. The contention that somehow this project sneaked up on citizens is a non-starter. This project has been around since 2009. The county, city and Florida Department of Environmental Protection held two public workshops in 2009 the DEP participating specically due to the controversy a similar project attracted in Tallahassee. There were two town hall-style meetings held by opponents this year. Reporting on this project has been extensive for two years, whether one, as one audience member said, takes this newspaper or not. This was no stealth initiative, but one of the most signicant stories, on many levels, in Gulf County the past two years. Secondly, there were statements made that were ill-informed or disingenuous. A Tallahassee resident stated the project was up for a federal loan guarantee. That is wrong. Months ago the U.S. Department of Energy put a term sheet for a federal loan guarantee on hold due to lack of funds. The countrys economic environment has only worsened. By all accounts, there is no loan guarantee. The company is lining up private nancing. Important to remember: this was one of the most forcefully stated arguments from opponents of this project in the town hall meetings this year. But even with federal money no longer in the equation, the argument lives on. More disingenuous was the statement by the same Tallahassee resident that a challenge to the air emissions permit was led and simply not heard, contrary to Florida law. The challenge was in fact withdrawn by those who led it and was done so the week before a hearing was set for Port St. Joe, the precise sort of hearing on the merits of the projects permitting that many opponents now seek from the city and county. Such a hearing was scheduled before an administrative judge. Folks wanting to point ngers about the alleged lack of a public forum to consider the technical merits of this project can point at this withdrawal of the challenge by opponents. And for the contention that opponents had insufcient preparation time for any challenge hearing, the attorney spearheading the case has been working against the project for two years 30 days was insufcient to mount a hearing on the merits of the opposition. Finally, Commissioner Bo Patterson was insensitive in trying to identify Port St. Joe natives in attendance and how long they had lived here, but the larger point was on target. The crowd that came out last week was roughly 200, with a number of those in favor of the project. To argue that opponents were in the majority at last weeks hearing and therefore should sway commissioners votes is a stretch. Maybe opponents were a majority of those attending the meeting, but given the crowds size and divided viewpoints it seems hard to create a mandate out of the meeting, as was asserted last week. It is these highly-disputable statements, without supporting facts, that undermine the reasoned arguments of residents such as Trish Petrie and Jon Hooper, who have followed this project for two years while voicing concerns, poring over permit materials and asking pointed and appropriate questions. In the end, city commissioners had little choice. As County Commissioner Bill Williams told one opponent months ago, what was being asked of local ofcials was to overrule the decisions of those state and federal agencies charged with making those decisions. And, in large measure, many antiproject arguments voiced last week were with those agencies another reason the withdrawal of the challenge was in the long run a disservice to those who feel a full public vetting of the project has not been made. But the bottom line is that this project jumped through all the hurdles and was deemed worthy of moving ahead. Certainly, as it moves forward elected ofcials and residents must maintain vigilance about pledges by the project developer regarding safeguarding the environment and pledges that the community has a new economic development partner instead of a future white elephant that soils a postcard paradise. Time will tell. But the advanced citizenship de mocracy is designed to make one work on display last week provides a dose of hope. People take classes to learn to stay on topic. Speakers go around the country teaching people and selling books about the art of keeping the audiences attention. The experts emphasize when and where the key points should be made when speaking. You have heard their lines. Tell them what you are going to tell them, tell them, and then tell them again. They preach ltering and eliminating the uff. What if I like the uff? What if I like listening to someone talk about nothing in particular? What if I dont consider it rambling? What if I hear something different? Babies are a wonderful example of conversations about nothing. They ooh and ah and gurgle when they are babies. As they get a little older, they start stringing together more words that are just babbling. Parents love to hear it, I know I did. My children would talk and talk and I would simply respond. Often I would say I feel the same way or You have to be kidding me or my favorite, I love you too. It was music to my ears. As they got older, I could understand what they were saying as they were playing with dolls in the dollhouse or action gures or just looking at themselves in the mirror. They would let their dolls or little men talk to each other and it allowed them to escape into a makebelieve world. Being able to listen from around a corner or from behind a door, I was able to escape with them. What they were saying was just rambling, but it was sweet rambling. As teenagers, my children still ramble about school, music, boys, girls and things that wouldnt mean much to most people. As their Daddy, it means a lot to me. Sometimes, my mind will stray and I would try to tell myself that its music that wont always be in my house. Adults ramble, sometimes to the point of making you think they have regressed to toddler status again. If you were to hear me talking to my dogs, you would probably think this of me. Sometimes it is just pure gibberish, but my dogs seem to like it. They love me. There is a fellow in my ofce that will come in and start talking about one subject and cover ten more subjects in ve minutes. He is an expert rambler. It doesnt bother me, I like it. It is his version of poetry. He can go from rockets to pinewood derby cars to rock music to geology in the blink of an eye. To my ears, it is sweet rambling because he is my friend. Conversations with him can also be very entertaining. Does he go off on tangents? Does he go on and on? Is he longwinded? Yes, yes and yes. I like it. In talking to my 90-year-old friend Phyllis, she says people accuse her of rambling. Phyllis says that some of her relatives dont want to hear from her because of this reason. Friends (and hopefully relatives) shouldnt hear rambling. They should hear poetry or music or simply I care enough to listen. When I talk to my Mama on the phone, she will get started on a story and it will get longer and longer. She gets excited and tells me who I can tell and who I cant. Sometimes it takes her breath away. I love it. I absolutely love it. To hear the excitement in her voice and how it goes up and down with the story is soothing to me. Is it rambling? Yes, sweet rambling that I want to hear. Listening to rambling takes us places, lets us pretend, allows us to escape and lets us love and show we care. It is entertaining. Folks will sit in front of a television for hours watching shows that are pure rambling. These same folks will complain about having to listen to their parents, grandparents or friends ramble for ve or ten minutes. I dont understand. Then there are these folks that call you on the phone rambling about TIM CROFT Star news editor Advanced citizenship When are you going to stop writing those articles? I paused before answering and glanced discreetly toward the questioners face. I couldnt tell if it was an innocent query or a sublime message screaming for me to get off the stage. Maybe this person had found me out. They realized this whole journalistic facade is a masquerade. Or perhaps its another one of those syntaxrich analysts who perused my little blurbs searching for double negatives and dangling participles. Ive never actually thought of my stories as writing. I just kind of think of something that happened and I retell it out loud. I have learned to jot the yarn down as I go cause the newspaper business doesnt lend itself too well with verbal thoughts. If you read something that I said that comes out in print and makes absolutely no sense, rest assured that it was a great premise that simply got lost in the translation. My wife retired. It was a pretty weak answer but I still wasnt sure if the question was friendly or if I was under re, and someone has got to earn a living for us. That was about as directly indirect as I could be. And I was only half-kidding. Cathy gured shed been in the bread winning business long enough. She bailed. I gured we didnt owe anyone an explanation over inner-house policy. And Cathys retiring is not open for debate. Shucks, I debated it for the whole year she was thinking about it to no avail! As a matter of fact, she retired over my vigorous protest. Grandchildren time was more important to her than money! She didnt hear me when I pointed out how much more we could do for the kids if she kept working. She didnt hear me when I pointed out that it might interrupt the lives of sons and daughter-in-laws if she moved in with the grandkids. She didnt hear me when I pointed out that school teachers had spring break, fall break, Christmas and all summer to visit grandchildren. When you get right down to it, I might have come out better if I had just had her hearing tested Our bank account naturally took a hit. But, guys, that aint the half of it! These grandkids had the audacity to be born way up in Georgia and the far reaches of North Tennessee. Thats a lot of gas money! And she naturally has to take them out to eat, which means a lot of ravioli money out of my pocket! And the zoo is just across town. And Cars 2 is in every theater. And we have to have a Johnny Appleseed outt. And Disney has a cruise now just for the Mickey Mouse Club watchers. And Halloween costumes have to be ordered. We didnt spend that kind of money when Cathy was sequestered in a classroom teaching math and history. She brought money home instead of taking it out! The gross national product of Toccoa, Georgia and Franklin, Tennessee, doubles every time Cathy visits! We get brochures and coupon offers in the mail from both cities. Chucky Cheese has a room reserved for her. She has piled up more mileage lately than the Antique Road Show. Shes on a rst-name basis with service station attendants in four states. AAA recently inducted her into their national car and driver Hall of Fame. I think the new freedom is affecting her brain. She just ew to Memphis to see our niece play soccer. Listen, we dont even have a grandchild in that splendid city on the bluff! This retirement gig is denitely taking on some wings! Ive got credit card charges from Graceland, Rendezvous Ribs, the Wolfchase Galleria, Beale Street tours and Sun Records gift shop. Im paying for sight seeing Im not seeing, tours Im not on and meals Im not eating. Shes springing for shrimp cocktails and steak tartar for the whole group while Im existing on cheese and crackers, peanut butter sandwiches, diet Cokes and dirt cake. She left knowing Im no Rachel Ray in the kitchen. I pointed that out rather vociferously but she didnt hear me again. This retirement thing may be great..if you are the retiree. Its not so hot if you are the one left treading water. Im trying to do the right thing here. Ive been to the convenience stores to see if they could use an exmath whiz as a lotto clerk. Maybe Cathy could turn her vast babysitting skills into some grocery money. She can do yard work. any kind of job will keep her off the road. So far the plan to put her back to work is not panning out. The more she hangs around the grandkids, the more she wants to hang around the grandkids! This thing about not going to work is growing on her. Her easy chair has become pretty easy to nd! I was going to discuss it with her this morning but Avery burpedCathy was ten miles north of Atlanta before I could get down to that part where I thought she was gone too much! The bottom line is Ive got to keep writing. And please keep buying these newspapers. Buy some extras and pass them out to your friends! Ill try to return the favor by dangling fewer participles. Ill do you some great human interest stories. Ill pen an expose or two. Ill write about your ditsy aunt. Ill nish that story where Leon rode the big horse into the prom. Thank you for your continuing support. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Thursday, October 13, 2011 Keyboard KLATTERINGS See RAMBLING A5 Sweet rambling

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S Letters A5 | The Star dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs you needing a vacation home or new mattress or credit card. These people are absolutely NOT sweet ramblers. They, like some politicians, get paid to ramble. A lot of what they say is certied gibberish (you may call it something else). Give me babies babbling, little girls playing pretend with dollhouses, teenagers talking about prom dresses, people at the ofce talking about recipes, Phyllis talking about TV evangelists and Mama talking about growing up. Give them to me every day. I want to hear them. I need to hear them. If you are my friend, never apologize for rambling. I want to know about your owers, your sister, your Aunt Gladys, your secret brownie recipe, your favorite song and what it means to you and what brand of tea you use. I really do, Im not nosey. I just like to hear it. Ill make the time for sweet rambling. Its what makes you you, and you are what makes me me. You can nd more stories by BN Heard at www.CranksMyTractor. Myths vs. Facts Dear Editor: When someone signs a petition they should do so because of facts, not emotional arguments. There has been a campaign to sign a petition against the Biomass Plant being built in Port St Joe. Anyone has a right to their opinion and to sign any petition they choose, but lets separate the facts from the emotional arguments about the Biomass Plant that our city commissioners have now wisely issued the Development Order needed for Rentech to proceed. 1. Myth: Tourists wont come with a biomass plant in PSJ. Fact: Most visitors wont even know it is here. A similar biomass plant is on the University of South Carolina campus and the football fans and students dont stay away. You dont even know it is there. There is no noise or smell that would give it away. The paper mill and garbage burning plant in Panama City have not destroyed their tourism, growth or property values there and they have odors that this plant will NOT have. 2. Myth: Taxpayer dollars will be used to build the plant. Fact: Rentech will have private investors to build the plant. Rentech has announced it is not seeking federal tax dollars to develop this project. There are some federal, state and local tax incentives that Rentech may make use of, but these incentives are available to any renewable project and any project built here. 3. Myth: There will be two smoke stacks billowing smoke in downtown Port St. Joe. Fact: There will be six stacks, NO SMOKE, and the site is almost two miles back from U.S. Highway 98, located in the industrial park. 3. Myth: The stacks could impede Tyndall jets and create problems. Fact: In the Development Order Application the federal law citing shows the project is not in conict with FAA and/or military regulations. Have any of you seen a jet from Tyndall ying at 100 feet above St. Joe? 5. Myth: The plant will deplete the fresh water from the canal. Fact: Arizona Chemical and Premier Chemical used 1,750,000 gallons of water a day. The Biomass Plant uses a little over half of that. While these other industrial plants were operating in Port St. Joe, the city had no supply problems. 6. Myth: The emissions are going to kill us and the bay. Fact: There has been extensive air modeling showing that the emissions will not add in any signicant way to the existing air emissions found in the area in order to obtain the Air Permit from DEP. The emissions will exceed all required Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS) required by federal regulations. Fact: The building of the $200,000,000 plant will create approximately 200 jobs in Gulf County. Operating the plant will involve approximately 25 direct jobs and 75 indirect jobs for Gulf County with an annual payroll of approximately $2,000,000. Fact: Rentech has met or exceeded every federal or state requirement and has been permitted by EPA and DEP, no easy task, requiring an expenditure of $10,000,000 on its part to get to this stage. The City Commission did the right thing by issuing the Development Order to allow them to begin building. Fact: Gulf County is a depressed county and losing ground. Without industry that is clean and green, it cannot exist without imposing higher taxes on the land owners. Our County did well when St. Joe Paper Company and Arizona Chemical were here. Workers were employed; children were educated and went to college. Now, there are no jobs, no industry, and eco-tourism, while we all support it, by itself cannot provide enough income to allow the citizens of Gulf County to live the American Dream. Fact: Gulf County needs the Biomass Plant here and needs other industries that are compatible with our pristine and rural environment. Without industry we will fall back into the dead zone like Gulf County found itself in after the hurricane and fever in the 1800s. Port St Joe began as a robust community, being the site of the rst signing of the Constitution. Then it became a sleepy shing village, at best, until St. Joe Paper Company chose to be here. Rentech could be the St Joe of the 21st Century for Gulf County. We need to be rst again. Thanks to the City Commission for their unanimous vote to allow them to start building. Patricia K. Hardman, PhD Port St. Joe Rentech biomass incinerator Dear Editor: I was one of the citizens who spoke out in opposition to the Rentech Biomass Incinerator at the recent City Commissioners Meeting. I expressed my concern about the proceedings at the Planning & Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting, which was held on Aug. 30. It became very obvious that the decision to accept or deny the Technical Advisory Committees recommendation had been made even before the meeting was held. The findings sheet had already been typed up and included a statement that the PDRBs recommendation to approve the Development Order be presented to the city commissioners. Opposition affidavits, petitions for public meetings, letters and exhibits from an environmental lawyer had been either sent to the PDRB or presented at the meeting. Yes, there was time allocated for input from the public. Yes, several people made comments raising questions or speaking out in opposition. The PDRB members neither asked questions nor made comments. They did not even consider the topics brought up by the citizens. The words mockery and travesty come to mind when describing the proceedings at this meeting. Why bother having time allocated for public input if the PDRB will not even address the citizens comments? Is this democracy at work? I addressed this situation when I spoke at the City Commissioner meeting on Oct. 4. I stated that my fervent hope was that this type of behavior would not be repeated a second time. At the Oct. 4 meeting, more than 24 people spoke regarding the biomass incinerator. The vast majority of these folks spoke in opposition to the approval of the Rentech Development Order. The Commissioners heard the comments, made a few replies, and then voted unanimously to accept the PDRBs recommendation that they approve Rentechs Development Order. Does the phrase rubber stamp come to mind? Landy Luther Port St. Joe To Gulf County citizens Dear Editor: Mayor Mel, I saw and heard your statements on public television Channels 7 and 13 in Panama City and I quote you, This biomass plant will produce 200 local jobs during its construction and approximately 25-40 full-time jobs, again local, during operation of the plant. Okay. I will go on record as asking you to produce the names of the local construction companies and of the local labor crews. I bet that like the last two big jobs in Port St. Joe, CVS Drugs and the new Dollar Stores, they will come from out of county and even out of state. Voters, take a look for yourselves at the tags on the contractors work trucks. By the way, if you have no federal funds for this project, how will we pay for this plant? More taxes? Bet me that not one 100-foot tall smokestacks will turn away tourists and new buyers to this area. Gulf County will be the loser in the near future. Bay waters along the so-called city drinking water ditch water gets more dirty or unfit. Bay fishing, swimming and scallops will be again a thing of the past, just as it was during the days of the old mill and of the chemical plant. Clean air, take a deep breath now, enjoy and remember how it was. Health issues will increase I promise. Wind or solar power would have been a much better choice. Clean air no pollution. John Parker Highland View LETTERS TO THE EDITOR RAMBLING from page A4 Myth: There will be two smoke stacks billowing smoke in downtown Port St. Joe. Fact: There will be six stacks, NO SMOKE, and the site is almost two miles back from U.S. Highway 98, located in the industrial park. Patricia K. Hardman, PhD Port St. Joe PY 5984 Psychological Counseling & Evaluations Accepting New Patients At The Cornerstone 1103 Fortune Avenue Panama City, FL 32401 850.628.0094 Miriam S. (Mimi) Bozarth, PH. D. BARLOWS Well Drilling Pump Repair & Water Services Well Drilling & Pump Repair Deep or Shallow Wells Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties 850-639-9355 or 850-814-7454 LI C EN S E D & I N S U R E D Yes, there was time allocated for input from the public. Yes, several people made comments raising questions or speaking out in opposition. The PDRB members neither asked questions nor made comments. They did not even consider the topics brought up by the citizens. Landy Luther Port St. Joe Thursday, October 13, 2011

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters M O ULTRIE I NFRARED TRIAL CA M ERA R EG $119.99 SALE PRICE $89.99 Page 6 Thursday, October 13, 2011 Freshwater Offshore shing is a hit or miss this month so far. Strong winds and high seas are keeping even the larger for hire boats at dock. Gag grouper are still in the 100-150 feet range out of Mexico Beach, holding over wrecks and offshore ledges. Red grouper are still being caught in Apalachicola and south of Cape San Blas. Inshore Offshore With high winds and scattered rain over the last few days, most anglers were left at home or at the docks. Good schools of mullet are every where in the bay and in Indian pass right now and a good cast net is a must. Nice reports of good sized red sh and trout have been the norm lately caught on live shrimp and live Lys. All eyes this week will be on the upcoming bass tournament this weekend at White City. This is the second year that the Gulf County Sheriff Department is hosting the event with a top prize of $10,000. All proceeds go to the G.C.S.O Explorer Post and other Gulf County youth programs. SPONSORED B Y Special to The Star The Florida sea turtle nesting season has come to an end, and there is good news for two of Floridas federally endangered sea turtle species. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission (FWC) and its partners document ed a record high annual nest count for green turtles in Florida. Leatherback tur tles also had a high number of nests, with the count fall ing just shy of the previous high mark in 2009. Loggerheads, the spe cies that nests most com monly in Florida, did not have an increase in num bers this year. The nest count for this federally threatened sea turtle was close to average for the previous ve years. Howev er, since 1998, the trend in the number of loggerhead nests is a general decline. Were pleased with the green turtle and leath erback nesting totals in 2011, said Dr. Blair With erington, an FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute scientist. Nesting by both species has been rising dramatically and can be at tributed at least in part to major conservation efforts over the past few decades. However, our loggerhead nesting totals have declined or are at best stable, which suggests that this species has a different, and per haps more difcult, set of conservation challenges. Nest counts are per formed each year through Floridas Index Nesting Beach Survey, which was created to measure season al sea turtle nesting, and to allow for accurate compari sons of beaches and years. The standardized index counts take place on 255 miles of selected beaches along both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. In one of the largest wildlife counts in the na tion, hundreds of FWC partners diligently survey Floridas nesting beaches throughout the sea turtle nesting season. We are grateful for the large number of partners and volunteers that make this survey possible, With erington said. Without them, we couldnt collect nesting data on such a large scale. The FWCs role in co ordinating Floridas sea turtle nest counts is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wild life Service and sales of the states sea turtle license plate. For more informa tion about sea turtle nest counts, visit www.MyFWC. com/Research, click on Wildlife, then click on Nesting under the Sea Turtle heading. Sick or injured sea turtles can be reported by contacting the FWC Wild life Alert Hotline at 888-404FWCC (3922). Star Staff Report With $25,000 in prize money and a rst-place catch of $10,000, the sec ond annual Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Bass Tour nament is primed to kickoff Oct. 15-16. The tournament is spon sored by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. The tournament will begin and end at the White City Landing. All proceeds from the tournament benet vari ous community outreach programs by the sheriffs ofce, including Christmas for Kids, the Halloween Haunted House and oth ers. Visit for www.gcso tournament.com for more details and to download a rules and regulation form. Special to The Star Get your claw-crackers ready because Floridas recreational and com mercial stone crab claw harvest seasons open Sat urday, Oct. 15. Stone crab claws must be at least 2 inches in length to be harvested le gally, but claws may not be taken from egg-bear ing female stone crabs. Recreational harvesters are allowed to use up to ve stone crab traps, and there is a daily bag limit of one gallon of claws per person or two gallons per vessel, whichever is less. Recreational and com mercial traps may be bait ed and placed in the water beginning Oct. 5, but none may be pulled until Oct. 15. The season lasts until May 16, 2012. Though stone crab har vest rules will remain the same, the FWC voted in June to extend state man agement regulations for stone crabs into federal waters. This came after the Gulf of Mexico Fish ery Management Council voted to repeal the Fish ery Management Plan for stone crabs in federal wa ters and allow the FWC to manage them in all waters surrounding Florida. This change goes into effect Oct. 24. For more information on harvesting stone crabs for fun, as well as commer cial stone crab regulations and licensing information, go to MyFWC.com/Rules and click on Fishing Saltwater. Visit the Fresh from Florida website at www. FL-seafood.com for ideas on how to turn your stone crab catch into a feast the family will love. A banner year for two turtle species found locally BLAIR WITHERINGTON | FWC A leatherback sea turtle hatchling emerges from a nest in St. Lucie County. Sheriffs Ofce bass tournament Stone crab season to openPHOTO COURTESY OF THE F W C Stone crab claw harvest season opens Oct. 15 for both recreational and commercial harvesters. Claws must be at least 2 inches in length to be harvested legally. Special to The Star As fall settles into the Big Bend, the Florida black bear begins foraging for winter. Its a perfect time to celebrate the states largest land mammal. Come out for the third an nual Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival, an event dedi cated to helping people un derstand and live in harmony with the Florida black bear. The family-oriented festi val is Saturday, Oct. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sands Park in Carrabelle. The fes tival is free and a great way for families to spend the day together doing something fun and educational. The small, Gulf-side com munity of Carrabelle sits in the heart of Apalachicola Na tional Forest, one of Floridas biggest undeveloped habitats for black bears. Our goal is for festivalgoers to learn everything they always wanted to know about the Florida black bear and more, said David Telesco, bear management program coordinator for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Helping people un derstand bear behavior is one of the primary goals for the festival. If people who live in bear country understand what makes bears tick, they will know what they can do to discourage bears from hang ing around in their neighbor hoods. Telesco will offer informa tive presentations about black bears and their biology. Betsy Knight will tell interesting stories about wildlife rehabili tation, and Laurie McDonald of Defenders of Wildlife will share tips on how to coexist with black bears. Other activities at the fes tival include exciting tours into a bear habitat with Adam Warwick, an FWC biologist who gained instant fame by rescuing a black bear from drowning in the bay off Alliga tor Point. Join us in the sto rytelling tent, where you can sit on hay bales and enjoy sto ries from local authors or lis ten to great music by locally renowned southern rock and blues band King Cotton and folk musician Dale Crider. Bring your kids to the Come Be a Bear activ ity, and watch them trans form into a black bear and learn about the life of a bear through the seasons. The festival is presented by the FWC, Defenders of Wildlife, U.S. Forest Service, Florida Forest Service, city of Carrabelle and the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. For more information about the third annual For gotten Coast Black Bear Fes tival visit www.mycarrabelle. com or call the festival coor dinator, Allen Loyd, at 727823-3888. Family fun at Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival set for Oct. 15F W C P HOTO | Special to The Star Events like the Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival help Floridians of all ages learn more about the states largest land mammal. Black Bear, Black Bear FWC extending state regulations into federal waters

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com A Section Special to The Star Wow! What a golf tour nament. Gale force winds and rain were in the fore cast but we had a beautiful day to play. We had players from Ohio, Tallahassee, Tennessee, Franklin, Bay and Gulf counties. Some were scared off by the fore cast, but the eld thorough ly enjoyed themselves. The Ladies Golf Associ ation of St. Joseph Bay Golf Club held their sixth annual Autumn Action Golf Tour nament to benet two local charities High School High Tech of Gulf County, which serves high function ing youth with disabilities to give them experience in vocational opportuni ties and summer intern ships for work experience, and Gulf County Domestic Violence Task Force, which has a goal to end domes tic violence in Gulf County through education of our youth and emergency nancial support for victims. Winners, we had plenty. The Teen Team winners were Witt Shoaf, Sammy Bucceri and Carl Sheline. They were sponsored by Drs. Anne Brown and Fred Thomason. In the adult category the rst-place winners were Buddy Ren fro, Kenny Woods, Wayne Parrish,and Guerry Magid son from St. Joseph Bay Golf Club, winning $500. Second-place winners were Eric Schoelles, Damon Mc Nair, Penelope Evenoff and Phil Dodson from the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club, winning $350. Third-place winners were Debbie Ash brook, Andrew Rowell, Rob Stegemeyer and Herman Bell, split between St. Jo seph Bay Golf Club and Tyndall winning $250 which they donated back to the Gulf County Domestic Vio lence Task Force. Fourthplace winners were Jake Jacobs, Denise Allen, Cleo Hobbs and Geri McCarthy, split between St. Joe and Tyndall, winning $100. Other awards that were given were Closest to the Hole, No. 4 Marvin Shimfes sel, No. 7 Dr. Anne Brown, No.12 Debbie Ashbrook, and No. 15 Jeremy Heynes. Closest to the Line Wom en, Denise Allen and Men, Wayne Parrish, Teens, Sammay Bucceri. More than $3,000 in door prizes donated by many generous local merchants were given out as well. The Spit the Pot was won by Richard Radford of Eastpoint with a pot of $603. His comment was, I have never won anything in my life. He made the same comment when he won a door prize. He had a very good day and enjoyed the golf round as well. The major sponsors of the event were Rentech, GAC Contractors Inc., Gulf 2 Bay Development & Construction, Penelopes Pet Stop, Progress En ergy, Coastal Community Association of South Gulf County, Mainstay Suites, Port Inn, Thirsty Goat, Duren Piggly Wiggly, Fair point Communications, The Shrimp Company, Pre ble-Rish, Forgotten Coast Realty, David Lister, DDS and El Governor Motel. There were 38 Hole Spon sors by local businesses. We would also like to thank Marie Stephens, our pho tographer. The Gulf County Tourist Development Coun cil partially underwrote the event. Bill Cramer Chevrolet sponsored the hole in one prizes with a new Chevro let being the major prize. Unfortunately, no one made the hole in one. Through these sponsors help, more than $10,000 was raised to benet two local nonprot charities. High School High Tech of Gulf County and Gulf County Domestic Violence Task Force will be able to serve their folks because of the businesses, golfers and a tremendously caring com munity. Our deepest ap preciation goes out to all the volunteers, golfers, businesses and individuals that made this tournament such a success. (850) 227-7100 No Rainchecks Limited Quantities While Supplies Last halfhitch.com Ameristep Dog House Blind Ideal for rearm & bow hunting & a great hide for photographers. 814 / 10412 Save $65 $49 Reg $114 1657 Mens Hunting Boot Waterproof Mossy Oak Break-Up Fabric, 7" Dark Brown Oil Leather Uninsulated $29 Reg $59 Save $30 IKam Xtreme Video Eyewear Audio/video recording glasses. 8 GB of memory; 4 GB built in. 50002 $79 Reg $119 Save $40 Bushnell Trail Sentry 5MP Trail Camera Weatherproof & rugged, fast trigger speed, high resolution full color images. 119205C $39 Special Buy 22174-06041 30qt. Propane Turkey Fryer 15 black solid steel stand & 30qt. tall aluminum pot, CSA 39 *Model may vary approved hose & regulator. Reg $59 Save $20 Reg $139 Big Dog Two Man Ladder Tree Stand Large 40 x 12-3/4 foot & seat platform. Padded seat cushion & ip-up shooting rail. Certied to all TMA standards. 2 fall arrest systems included. $99 BDL-451 Save $40 Moultrie Pro Hunter Game Feeder $79 Reg $139 Save $60 MFH-PHB30B Mossy Oak Break Up Innity Gear BreakUp Innity truly oers hunters another dimension in camo. 19 & UP 1/3 OFF 0021 0007 0020 Sale Ends 10/31/2011 Programmable Digital Timer. 30Gal. 200 lb. capacity. Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 7 By Tim Croft Star News Editor PORT ST. JOE Too many and too much of the host Tiger Sharks spelled de feat for Franklin County last Friday night at Shark Field. Port St. Joe had seven players combine to rush for 349 yards and ve different players score touchdowns as the Tiger Sharks domi nated from the opening whistle of a 38-6 victory. In snapping a threegame losing streak, Port St. Joe (2-3, 1-1 in District 4-1A) also kept its playoff hopes alive while render ing the mathematics a daunting equation for the Seahawks (2-4, 0-2). Weve been there the last three weeks, weve just been sluggish and weve been playing some pretty good football teams, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. This was a big game for us. We came out very focused. We knew we needed to set the tone early. That the Tiger Sharks most certainly did. Port St. Joes control of the rst half was utterly total. The Tiger Sharks had 39 offensive plays for 271 yards while holding the Seahawks to 11 offensive plays and 48 total yards. Port St. Joe scored on its rst ve possessions, eat ing up the clock with just one drive fewer than eight plays. The Tiger Sharks also beneted from superb eld possession, starting only one march as deep as their own 20 and need ing just two plays and an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty to score on that possession. Meanwhile, the Se ahawks had just two rst downs in the rst 24 min utes, fumbled twice to set up Port St. Joe touchdowns and failed to generate any momentum. Ouch, said Franklin County coach Josh Wright after a second consecutive trip into Gulf County the Seahawks were at Wewa hitchka last week ended in a loss. From the get-go, they had us pegged. They did their homework. On de fense, we would go inside and they would go outside. Wed go outside, theyd go inside. We just didnt do the job. They did. Port St. Joe took the opening kickoff and marched methodically to the Franklin County 14 before stalling and settling for a Daniel May 31yard eld goal. The Tiger Sharks would not be denied the end zone again in the half. Port St. Joe stopped Franklin County on downs and took over at its 20 fol lowing a Seahawk punt. Quarterback Trevor Lang back in the lineup after losing three weeks to a shoulder injury sprinted for 26 yards and another 15 yards was tacked on after a horse collar tackle. Natrone Lee (a gamehigh 133 yards on 11 car ries) burst over the right side of the line on a coun ter play from the Seahawk 40 one play later for the touchdown and May made it 10-0. Franklin Countys Dwayne Griggs fumbled on the rst play of the next drive, the Tiger Sharks re covering at the Seahawk 47. Eight plays later fresh man Travarous Riley went 9 yards for Port St. Joe and it was 17-0 after Mays ex tra point kick. After holding Franklin County three-and-out on its next possession, Port St. Joe got the ball back at its 43 following a punt and 10 plays later it was Walt Bow ers from the 6 for a touch down, the extra point kick blocked. May turned that set back around on the ensu ing kickoff when he drilled his kick into the leg of a Se ahawk and Chase Nichols pounced on the loose ball to give Port St. Joe posses sion at the Franklin 43. Eight plays later it was freshman Jarkeice Davis (99 rushing yards) catching a 7-yard pass from Lang for the touchdown. Mays extra point made it 30-0 at intermission. Leonard Green caught a 6-yard pass from Zachary Armistead to get Franklin County on the board on the opening drive of the second half, but the extra point kick failed and that was the Seahawk highlight for the night. Corey North rushed in from the 7 in the nal four minutes, Lang hitting Lee for two points to complete the scoring. Tiger Sharks dominate Franklin County 38-6 First place winners with the representatives of the two charities, from left, Debbie Ashbrook, Kenny Wood, Guerry Magidson, Wayne Rish, Buddy Renfro and Pat Hardman. LGA tournament raises money for two local charities

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A8 | The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 October 18 th 9:00 am 3 pm Buy Rite Port St Joe 302 Cecil Costin Blvd Port St Joe, Fl 32456 Ph:(850) 227-7099 Call us today for details 1. Who needs a u vaccine? a) You b) You c) You d) All of the above Even healthy people can get the u, and it can be serious. Everyone 6 months or older should get a u vaccine. This means you. This season, protect yourself and those around you by getting a u vaccine. THE FLU ENDS WITH U Toll included. Taxes, surcharges and fees, such as E911 and gross receipts charges, vary by market & could add between 6% & 39% to your bill; 83 Administrative/line/mo. is not tax, is not pro-rated & is subject to change. IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Subject to Month to Month Customer Agreement and Calling Plan, 45/min after allowance. Customers eligible for Link Up assistance will receive a 50% discount on the Activation Fee, and Verizon Wireless will waive the remainder of the Activation Fee. Limited-time offer. Offer not available in all areas. Restrictions may apply. Network details at verizonwireless.com. 2011 Verizon Wireless Q4NAL FEDERAL LIFELINE NOTICE Verizon Wireless customers may be eligible to receive reduced-rate telecommunications service under the Federal Lifeline and Link Up programs. Qualifying customers will save at least $8.25 per month. Service activation fees may also be waived if you qualify for Link Up assistance. Additional discounts are available for eligible residents of Tribal lands. You may be eligible for Lifeline and Link Up assistance if you currently participate in a qualifying public assistance program or otherwise satisfy the federal income requirements. These requirements vary by state. To receive further information about the Lifeline and Link Up program, call Verizon Wireless at 800-924-0585 or go to verizonwireless.com/lifeline. Verizon Wireless only offers Lifeline/Link Up assistance in areas where the company has been designated as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier. By Tim Croft Star News Editor With the season draw ing to a close and district playoffs set for Oct. 2527, Port St. Joe extended its District 4-1A winning ways with a pair of key wins. Last Tuesday, the Lady Tiger Sharks (107 overall, 4-3 in district play) hosted Blount stown, which had beaten Port St. Joe in five sets at Blountstown earlier in the season. This time, playing in front of a home crowd, the Lady Tiger Sharks prevailed in five close sets. With distractions of Homecoming week, the ladies really had to work hard for this win, said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor of the match, which ended with scores of 27-25, 20-25, 25-23, 1725 and 15-12. Leading the team with kills were Nicole Spilde and Autumn Haynes with nine apiece. Katie Lacour had 25 assists, and Oneika Lockley had 29 digs and 27 service receptions. That final set was an all-around team victory, Taylor said. Two nights later, the Lady Tiger Sharks hosted West Gadsden and won the match in straight sets, 25-16, 25-20 and 25-13. Lacour and Haley Wood each had four ser vice aces. Katie Gardner, Raney Besore, Spilde and Ni cole Endres each had six kills, Lacour had 29 as sists and Jaclyn Kerigan had 13 error-free service receptions. On Monday, the Lady Tiger Sharks were at Tallahassee Rickards where they came away with another straightsets win. The game scores were 25-14, 25-15, and 25-5. Gardner had five aces with six points off serves, Lockley had six aces and nine points from serves, Haynes added eight aces and nine points off serves and Lacour had five aces and eight points off serves. The Lady Tiger Sharks traveled to Franklin County on Tuesday for their final district match of the season. The team plays host to East Gadsden at 7 p.m. ET tonight. Next week, the fi nal two regular season matches will be at home. Start times for both matches will be 6 p.m. for junior varsity and varsity will follow at ap proximately 7 p.m. Wednesday night will bring Bay High to Port St Joe and Thursday night is our final regular sea son match, against We wahitchka. This will be Senior Night as well as the annu al Dig Pink charity event for breast cancer aware ness and research. Come out support the Lady Tiger Sharks. Give em a reason to roll out both sets of bleachers and rock The Dome. By Tim Croft Star News Editor GRACEVILLE Wewahi tchka is getting pretty comfortable on the edge. For the second time in three games, the Gators (4-2 overall, 2-1 in District 2-1A) overcame a huge second-half deficit to pull out their fourth-straight win 47-46. The Gators were down 46-19 in the third period before mounting their comeback which culmi nated with Theryl Brown catching the game-win ning pass from 24 yards out with 2:36 remaining. The Gators dominated the final period, allowing Graceville zero offensive yards while scoring nearly at will. They could do noth ing and we played on their side of the field the entire fourth quarter, said We wahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah. Wewahitchka scored the final 29 points three weeks ago to beat Frank lin County, but topped that comeback against a dis trict foe as the Gators con tinued their trek from an 0-2 start to a matchup next Friday against Sneads that will have significant playoff implications. We are exactly where we want to be, pointing to ward Sneads next week, Kizziah said. You are liv ing right and doing what you are supposed to do when you win games like this. Thats all we can fig ure. The Gator comeback was fueled by a change of offensive strategy. With Graceville largely bottling up the rushing of Brown and quarterback Justin Flowers, Kizziah decided to spread the field and throw. We made them make adjustments they could not make, Kizziah said. Flowers finished 14 of 21 passing for 267 yards and five touchdowns. He was throwing the heck out of the ball, Kiz ziah said. Brown had six catches for 139 yards and three touchdowns, adding two 2-point conversions. Ben Hayward had five recep tions for 103 yards and two touchdowns. Jayln Addison added two rushing touchdowns for Wewahitchka. They did a good job stopping the run and Ther yl got a little banged up, Kizziah said. But they were concentrating so much on stopping Brown and Flowers that left a little room for Jayln. The game swung criti cally in the final six min utes. Graceville faced fourth-and-17 at its 40 when the Tigers faked a punt and were stopped cold by Wewahitchka. The Gators drove down the field to the 24 and faced a fourth-and-17. Kiz ziah said the only pass he had not called to that point was for Brown to run a corner route. Despite being tripleteamed, the senior stand out made the grab of a ball Flowers threw perfectly, Kizziah said. Its a win, and well take it, Kizziah said. It doesnt matter how it hap pened. We just go about it a different way, I guess. The Gators (4-2, 2-1) then stopped the Tigers at the 30-yard line to pre serve the District 2-4A win. The Gators play at John Paul II in Tallahassee on Friday. Gators win fourth straight in shootout Lady Tiger Sharks heading to playoffs on a roll Sports

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, October 13, 2011 B Page 1 Section By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer With a seven category art display and an array of ne white, red and blended wines, there will be something to tickle everyones taste buds at the 13th Annual Mexico Beach Art and Wine Festival. Enjoy art, music, wine and a beautiful beach background at the event from 2-8 p.m. CT Oct. 15 at the Driftwood Inn in Mexico Beach. The event will also feature plenty of food, live and silent auctions, and live musical entertainment. The festival is sponsored by the Special Events for Mexico Beach Committee and raises money for the Best Blast on the Beach Fourth of July Fireworks display. The entry fee is $5 and children under 12 are free. There will be something for everyones taste palate, said Kimberly Shoaf, director of the Mexico Beach Community Development Council. There will be beer and wine and a good time. The Drew Tillman Band out of Tallahassee will be performing, beginning at 3 p.m. CT on the beach outside of the Driftwood Inn. Tillman is a nationally recognized singer and songwriter, popular among the Tallahassee music scene. According to Tillmans website, the heart of his music is rooted in the blues and fueled by the drive of American rock and roll. He has an energetic playing style, unique vocals and a strong desire to please his audience. (Tillman) has played for us before at the Mexico Beach Music in the Park events, Shoaf said. Theres going to be plenty of dancing on the beach because the band will be playing out there. The art show will begin at 2 p.m. CT and will feature art from a variety of mediums. Categories include oil and acrylic, watercolor and pastels, sculpture and pottery, stained glass and jewelry, wood carving and furniture, photography and digital art. Shoaf said the event usually brings in artists from all over. Entries will be judged and prizes will be given to the artists who excel in each category. Awards include $200 for best in show, and $100 for rst place in each category. Grand prize winners and second place winners will also receive gift baskets from local businesses. Awards will be announced at 6 p.m. CT. The live auction will begin after the announcement of the winners and will feature work from the artists who participated in the show. Shoaf said the committee also brought back a silent auction for this year, which will feature artwork and donated gift baskets from local businesses. Its a great event thats held right on the beach, Shoaf said. You get to peruse various forms of art while enjoying ne wines. Its just an overall good time. Shoaf said planning the event each year takes a lot of organization, teamwork and volunteer efforts. We have a great committee that wants this event to succeed, Shoaf said. They go above and beyond to make sure its successful. A glass of wine with a taste of art By Mark Knapke Park Manager St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, 227-1327 St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has a healthy population of whitetail deer. There is an estimated number of about 50 deer that reside within the state park. The doe, or female deer, hang out in small groups year round along with fawn and young deer up to a year old. Bucks, male deer, hang out together in bachelor herds separated from the doe most of the year, except during mating season which occurs fall through winter. The bucks develop antlers during the summer. The antlers are covered in velvet like tissue as they grow and harden. In the fall, the buck rub the velvet off of their antlers and later make circular scraps on the ground where they will deposit their scent to establish a territory. During the mating season, buck battle to defend their territory and mating privileges. Mating typically occurs beginning late fall into early spring. Gestation is about six months. Fawns are typically born from spring into early summer. If you visit St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, you are likely to see deer along the park drive. Several fawn have been hanging out with their mothers just past the ranger station. The fawn are so cute with their spotted coats. Please observe the speed limit in the park and do not feed the wildlife. Other wildlife that can be viewed in the park include a number of migratory song birds, shore birds, wading birds, squirrels, raccoons, bobcat, otter, fox and opossum, as well as many other critters. We hope you come to visit St. Joseph Peninsula State Park soon and enjoy the wildlife! Until next time, From the Rangers at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastateparks.org. Whitetail deer at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park This weekend is the third annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival Below is a schedule of performances throughout the weekend: (All times Eastern unless otherwise noted) Friday, Oct 14 Provisions 6 p.m. Sherrie Austin and Will Rambeaux The Thirsty Goat 6:30 p.m. Walt Aldridge, Steve Leslie, Kevin Denney, Abigail Rose 8:30 p.m. Sherrie Austin, Will Rambeaux, Jillia Jackson, Haden Carpenter 10:30 p.m. Chas Sandford, Marty Dodson, Todd Taylor, Susan Ruth Mango Marleys (Mexico Beach, Central Time) 7 p.m. Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte 9 p.m. Wil Nance, Bruce Wallace, Bud Lee, Tim Buppert St. Joe Bar 10 p.m.Jam SessionHaden Carpenter, Jillia Jackson and Friends Saturday, Oct 15 Dockside Cafe 2 p.m. Songwriters Workshop moderated by Steve Leslie, Will Rambeaux and others Haughty Heron 7 p.m. Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte 9 p.m. Wil Nance, Bruce Wallace, Bud Lee, Tim Buppert Toucans (Mexico Beach, Central Time) 6 p.m. Walt Aldridge, Steve Leslie, Kevin Denney, Abigail Rose 8 p.m. Sherrie Austin, Will Rambeaux, Jillia Jackson, Haden Carpenter 10 p.m. Chas Sandford, Marty Dodson, Todd Taylor, Susan Ruth Sunday, Oct 16 Indian Pass Raw Bar 2 p.m. Walt Aldridge, Steve Leslie, Kevin Denney, Abigail Rose 4 p.m. Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte, Sherrie Austin 6 p.m. Wil Nance, Bruce Wallace, Bud Lee, Tim Buppert 8 p.m. Chas Sandford, Marty Dodson, Todd Taylor, Susan RuthFILE PH O T O Returning artist Chas Sanford plays to a packed house at the Indian Pass Raw Bar during last years festival.ON THE BLAST BAY SCHEDULEFILE PH O T O Patrons check out locally-crafted woodworking while enjoy a taste of the grape at last years Art and Wine Festival. Star Staff Report Area bikers can cruise for a cause Saturday, Oct. 22 at the Fourth Annu al Ride for Peace Poker Run spon sored by the Gulf County Domestic Violence Task Force. The run takes bikers on a coastal tour, starting at Honeyville Park in Wewahitchka and stopping at vari ous parks and restaurants along sce nic U.S. Highway 98, including Frank Pate Park, Toucans and The Runway Restaurant and Oyster Bar. Its a chance for people to get out and ride their bikes for good, said Pam Martin, who works for the Salva tion Armys Domestic Violence Task Force. Its a beautiful trip through Mexico Beach and St. Joe Beach. Sign in is at 10 a.m. CT at Hon eyville Park and last bike out is at 11 a.m. CT. The run will bring bikers back to Honeyville Park by 3 p.m. CT, in time for a free live concert during which local Wewahitchka musician Jerry Arhelger, who has recorded and written songs in Nashville, will be performing. There will also be door prizes, a 50/50 drawing and a bake sale at the event. Martin said the she encourages even those not planning on partici pating in the poker run to attend the concert. She also said you dont have to ride a motorcycle to participate in the poker run. The event costs $20 per driver, $10 for passengers and $5 for each addi tional hand. All proceeds will benefit victims and children of domestic violence. Its really a lot of fun, Martin said. Its going to be a great day, and its for a good cause. For more information call 850-2292901. Ride for Peace next weekend

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society 24-EMERGENCY SERVICE FOR OUR CURRENT CLIENTS! Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility 300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM Drs. Hours By Appt. D ISCOUNT T HURSDAYS Spays / Neuters 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients 300 Long Ave, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850)229-6009 Website: agapevet.com I RESCUED A HUMAN TODAY Her eyes met mine as I walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to have her. She wagged her tail, not too exuberantly, so I wouldnt be afraid. As I looked at her in the kennel she blocked my view from a little accident she had in the back of her cage. She didnt want me to know that she hadnt been walked today. Sometimes the shelter keepers get too busy and she didnt want me to think poorly of them. So many more are out there who havent walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one. On Friday, October 14th, 2011 (and every 2nd Friday of each month) we will feature Dogs for Dogs. Come by the Port St. Joe Marina around lunchtime (11:00 a.m. ~ 2:00 p.m.) and enjoy a hot dog or chili dog (max 2) lunch, (chips, and soda) included for a $5.00 cash donation. All donations will be given to St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. This event is open to the public, so please help us spread the word. Dogs for Dogs October 14, 2011 At Port St. Joe Marina 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Fl 32456 850-227-9393 Society By Roy Lee Carter County Extension Director Mulching is one of the best things we can do for landscape plants. Most of us use mulch simply because it makes our plants look better. But, improving the landscapes appearance is only one of the many benets of mulching. Its hard to decide which of the benets of mulching landscape ornamentals is most important. My information on this topic was provided by Extension Urban Horticulture Specialist Dr. Robert J. Black of the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. First, mulching makes it harder for weeds to grow in shrubbery and ower beds. Also, a mulch acts as an insulating blanket over plant roots, keeping them cool in hot weather and warm in winter. Another advantage is that mulch slows evaporation and helps conserve moisture in the soil. Also, it reduces the crusting that can occur when the soil surface dries out. This is important because it allows water from rain or irrigation to soak into the soil rather than run off and cause erosion. As organic mulches decompose, they work down into the soil. This improves soil texture and may even increase soil fertility. Seriously speaking, mulching just makes the landscape look better. Two types of mulching materials are used in Florida organic mulches and inert mulches. Organic mulches include compost, bark, leaves, grass clippings, straw, wood chips, sawdust and similar materials. Inert mulches are things like gravel, pebbles and polyethylene plastic lm. Applying organic mulch is a simple matter. Just spread a 2 to 4 inch thick layer of the selected material around the base of the newly planted landscape ornamentals. Then, add more mulch as needed during the year. Never allow the mulch to pile up around the trunks or lower branches of your plants. Spring is usually the best time to add mulch to established plants. If youre mulching with straw, wood chips or sawdust, its a good idea to apply some high nitrogen fertilizer at the same time. One or two cups of such fertilizer per bushel of mulch should help avoid deciency problems. If youre using plastic mulching (the polyethylene lm), you need to add fertilizer rst. Apply about two pounds of a recommended garden fertilizer for every 100 square feet. Broadcast it over the area and work it down about 2 or 3 inches into the soil. This may not seem like much fertilizer, but plastic mulch reduces the amount that leaches out of the root zone of your plants. You can apply less fertilizer to begin with. Thats one reason why IFAS scientists recommended plastic mulch for commercial ornamental and vegetable crop production in Florida. To summarize, mulching can be one of your most valuable gardening practices. Mulch helps control weeds and conserves soil moisture. It also moderates soil temperatures, improves texture and can increase fertility. Finally, mulch adds to the beauty of your landscape for a relatively low cost. Youll get good results by using a variety of organic and inert mulching materials. For more information on mulching ornamentals, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas.u.edu. Star Staff Report Have you or your loved one been diagnosed with diabetes? Jenny Stuckey, registered nurse and certied diabetes educator for Sacred Heart Hospital, will host a diabetes selfmanagement class on Tuesday, Oct. 18 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT in the conference room at the Gulf County Health Department in Wewahitchka. The self-management class is open to adults with diabetes who are looking for ways to manage their disease. The class will cover topics on exercise, medication and nutrition for patients to reduce the symptoms of diabetes. Pre-registration is required and a physician referral is needed to attend the class. The $10 fee will include lunch for the day. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert starches, sugar and other food into the energy you need for daily life. Unfortunately, the exact cause of diabetes is not known, but major risk factors include family history, obesity and lack of exercise. For more information or to join the class, please call Nell Tortoriello at 229-5601. For more information about Sacred Heart, please visit www. sacredheartonthegulf. org. To learn more about the Gulf County Health Department visit their website, www.gulfchd. com. Star Staff Report The Gulf County Se nior Citizens Association, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, presents their annual Health Fair on Friday Oct. 21 from 9:30 a.m. un til 1 p.m. ET. There will be numer ous vendors from area health agencies that will be providing free health screenings including vi sion and stroke screen ings, blood pressure checks, hearing screen ings and much more. The Gulf County Health Department will also be on hand to admin ister u shots. Please call the health department at 227-1276 for more in formation about the u shots. The event is free and open to the public. All ages are invited to attend. DJ Steve McIntire from That Oldies Place will be providing music, and door prizes will be rafed throughout the day. For more information about the health fair, call Deb bie at the Gulf County Senior Citizens Center at 229-8466. Star Staff Report The Gulf County Health Department and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will be pro viding u shot clinics throughout the month of October. The dates, sites and times are: Oct. 15 from 9 a.m. until noon CT on the Gulf County Health De partment, 807 W. State 22 in Wewahitchka; Oct. 21 from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET at the Gulf County Senior Citi zens Center, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe; Oct. 29 from 9 a.m. to noon ET at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, 3801 E. U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. Please note, u Shots are $20. Please bring your identication card. Star Staff Report When it comes to Medicare coverage and choices, how do you decide? Mainstay Financial Group will present a free seminar to help you learn more on Thursday, Oct. 13 at 10 a.m. ET at the Gulf Coast State College Gulf Franklin Center in Port St. Joe. Join this seminar to learn the difference between Original Medicare, Supplements, Medicare Advantage Health Plans and Drug Coverage. This seminar is part of the monthly series of free education programs sponsored by the Sacred Heart Senior Spirit, a free program for persons 55 and older. Benets include free screenings, seminars, special in-patient benets such as free guest meal tickets and a monthly calendar of events detailing all Senior Spirit events and containing health and event information. For more information or to register for this free seminar, please call 229-5627 or visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.org. Happy 50th wedding anniversary Charles and Bonnie Stephens. With much love and admiration, Your family Mulching ornamentals ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director Sacred Heart to host diabetes class Anniversary Senior seminar on Medicare coverage 2011 Public Health Fair Flu shot clinics

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The Star| B3 Thursday, October 13, 2011 Homecoming Court for 2011 was: (Top left ) Top to bottom: Katie Lacour, Megan Walker, Lacey Strickland, Kristina Furstenberg, Emerald Muniz, 6th grade attendant Kate McLemore. (Top right ) Top to bottom: Raqueatha Bailey, Marsi Garrell, Natalie Wood, Katie Gardner, Erin White, and Kaley Wilder. Right Emerald Muniz (middle) and escorted by her brother Forest Halualani (on left), was crowned Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High Homecoming Queen for 2011 by last years queen Catherine Cordova during halftime of last Fridays game against Franklin County. THIS PROJEC T RECEIVED FINANCIAL ASSIS T ANCE FROM VISI T FLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.com P AR T IAL FUNDING FOR T HIS EVEN T PROVIDED BY T HE GULF COUN T Y T OURISM DEVELOPMEN T C OUNCIL Now Open! Come Stick Your Nose In My Business You wont be disappointed!! Whether youre looking for a little extra money or a full time career. Youre looking for SCENTSY! Scentsy is safer than traditional candles! Using a beautiful ceramic warmer, a low wattage light bulb and over 80 wonderful scents, you can transform your house into a fabulous smelling home! My team is growing rapidly but we still have plenty of room for more enthusiastic people. Ty Robinson 850.229.2679 www.tyrobinson.scentsy.us Become an Independent Scentsy Consultant Today! Check out my website or give me a call! 1202066 FREE ESTIMATES 1-850-626-9242 1-800-69-SHRED Security-cleared personnel Fort Walton Beachs leading mobile destruction company Weekly, monthly, or annual service Locally owned & operated School News By Heather Brant and Claudia Gref General Information Oct. 13 FCAT Math retakes Oct. 14 End of rst nine weeks Oct. 17-18 Fall Break Sports Oct. 13 Volleyball at East Gadsden, JV at 6 p.m. and varsity at 7 p.m. ET. Oct. 14 Football at Rocky Bayou at 8 p.m. ET. Oct. 15 Cross Country at Mosley at 9 a.m. ET. The Varsity Cheerleaders placed 2nd in their very rst district competition on Saturday, Oct. 1 at Bozeman. Congratulations! NJROTC News The Cadet Corps of the Port St. Joe NJROTC consists of 55 dedicated and motivated cadets. The company has been extremely busy. Along with providing Color Guard and ag raising support at our home football games, the company has been extremely active throughout the community. Cadets did journeymans work at the Paws in the Park 5K Run and Fund Raising Event, provided community support for the Scallop Festival 5K Run and provided Color Guard Support for the Panama City Navy League Luncheon. Events scheduled for October include the Homecoming Festivities on Oct. 7, providing Color Guard Support for the Delta Raider Company at the Clifford Sims Veterans Home on Oct.9, and support for the Gulf County Sheriffs Fishing Tournament on Oct. 15. The Cadet Drill Team will start their fall practices in preparation for their rst Drill Competition on Dec. 10 at Boca Raton High School. GO TIGER SHARK COMPANY! Star Staff Report Port St. Joe Elementary School will hold its annual Fall Carnival from 4-6 p.m. ET on Friday, Oct. 21 on the eld behind the Centennial Building. There will be a Cake Walk, Bounces, Pie in the Face, Face Paint, Soda Ring Toss, Duck Shoot and much more. Special to The Star Did you know that Julius Cesar, a Roman Emperor, was stabbed to death by his senators so they could regain control of the Roman Empire? It is interesting to note that Caesars closest friend, Antony, and his adopted son, Octavian, shared power of the Empire after Caesars demise. Once in power, Antony fell in love with Cleopatra and began to give parts of the Roman territory to her. Of course this angered many Romans so in 31 B.C. (before the birth of Christ), Octavian and Antony fought a bloody battle off the coast of Greece in which Antonys eet surrendered. Antony abandoned his eet and he and Cleopatra escaped to Egypt where they committed suicide. Octavian conquered Egypt and returned to Rome as the undisputed ruler of this dominant empire. Octavian had many titles, but the Bible calls him Caesar Augustus. This should sound familiar, as this was the Roman Emperor that instituted the census that forced Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem. History draws a line at this time because the birth of Christ begins Anno Domini (A.D.), meaning in the year of our Lord. Rome ruled the world at the time of Christ but by A.D. 500, the Empire had vanished. After the birth of Christ, many other Roman emperors ruled the vast empire. Domitian who ruled from A.D. 81 to 96, demanded to be worshipped as a god. Constantine, who began his reign in 324, claimed to have seen a cross in the sky with the words Conquer by this written on it. He is remembered as the rst Christian emperor of the Roman Empire, and after many years of the persecution of Christians, he began to persecute in the name of Christianity. History, from a Christian perspective, is an important part of academics as well as an important part of life. George Orwell stated, Whoever controls the past controls the future. Whoever controls the present controls the past. However, all of this seems dry to the average student when they are bombarded with a plethora of dates and places. On the other hand, a study of events and the people involved can be fascinating as drama unfolds story after story. There is intrigue, murder, blackmail, romance, bravery and inspiration in the stories passed down through the centuries. They entertain us, teach us and give us courage to stand for our convictions. We cannot afford to be ignorant of those things that are past, but we must learn from past mistakes and triumphs to be blessed with a better tomorrow. PreK Whitney Butler, K Fisher VanDertulip, 1st Trinten Lee, 2nd Ava Ryan, 3rd Zion Padilla, 4th Rainey Nobles, 5th Isabella Johnston and 6th Cheyenne Nelson. Bus riders of the week : Lealand Whitlock, Austin OBryan, Sarah Metcalf, Emily Whiteld, Brianna Biagini, Kaylee Jones and Albert Scheffer. The Lions Tale DAZZLING DOLPHINS Annual Fall Carnival

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Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 FAITH Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Obituaries Apalachicola native James Vincent DeCosmo died Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011, in Tallahassee following an extended illness. He was 86. DeCosmo was the only son of the late James Vincent DeCosmo, Sr. (1898-1956) and Katherine Emanuel (DeCosmo) (1900-1987) of Apalachicola. His siblings were the late Clara DeCosmo (Herndon) and the late Katherine DeCosmo (Lovett) of St. Petersburg, Florida. The DeCosmos grew up on 53 10th Street and enjoyed the beach at Indian Pass whenever they could. DeCosmos grandparents were Frank Vincent DeCosmo (who came to Apalachicola from Italy) and Mary Silva Randolph Buzzett (DeCosmo), who came from New Orleans along with her mother, Anna Silva. When she reached Apalachicola, Anna Silva married a Buzzett rst, and after his death married Antoine Messina. DeCosmo (Coz to all his friends) distinguished himself as an avid outdoorsman and a talented athlete, playing both basketball and football at Chapman High School. In 1943 he was drafted into military service and eventually served two years as a private rst-class in the Army Air Corps as a navigator. On the Philippine island of Leyte, he and all his crew members survived the crash of their aircraft behind enemy lines and walked to safety. After service, DeCosmo used the G.I. Bill to pursue a college degree. In 1946, he enrolled at the newly formed Tallahassee Branch of the University of Florida (TBUF), the transitional institution between the Florida State College for Women and Florida State University, created by the Florida Leg islature in 1947. He became a member of TBUFs only football team. After obtaining a Masters degree in physi cal education at FSU, DeCosmo was hired by the department in which he was enrolled. He served 28 years, teaching all aspects of physical education and serving for many years as the assistant director of the universitys famed Flying High Circus. DeCosmo cre ated and coached a team of ying trapeze artists that was known as The Flying DeCosmos. After retiring in 1975, De Cosmo became a stand-out golfer in his age group, reg ularly posting scores that matched his age through 2005 at his favorite course, Hilaman Park, in Tallahas see. The club eventually created an annual tourna ment in his honor, naming it The Coz. DeCosmo was married to Lucy (Kelley) DeCosmo, originally of Perry, Fla., for 60 years until her death in 2009. He is survived by four children, Janet DeCosmo, Linda DeCosmo, Patricia (DeCosmo) Wesolowski, all of Tallahassee, and James M. DeCosmo, of Austin, Texas; along with 14 grand children and six greatgrandchildren. Funeral details are not yet complete, but will be posted at 850-656-9467 as soon as possible. In lieu of owers, friends are encouraged to send donations to the American Heart Association. James Vincent DeCosmo JAMES D e COSMO Special to The Star On Sunday, Oct. 23, at both morning Worship Services, Dr. John Ed Mathison will be at First United Methodist Church to preach. John Ed was the pastor at Frazer Memorial United Methodist Church for over 30 years. Under his leadership the church grew from about 300 members to over 9,000. Dr. Mathison retired two years ago this past June but he hasnt slowed down at all. As a matter of fact, he has picked up the pace. John Ed is traveling all over the world sharing Gods love and the gift of his experience and wisdom. We are very fortunate to have John Ed with us. John Ed is the son of Si Mathison who was the pastor of First United Methodist Church in Panama City for a number of years. Everyone is invited to come and worship with John Ed at our casual service, Worship On the Water at 9 a.m. ET, or our traditional service at 11 a.m. ET in the Sanctuary. Its not every day that we have someone with John Eds leadership and achievement with us. Mathison to speak in Port St. Joe Oct. 23 1924-2011 Alva Franklin Kemp, 86, of Wewahitchka Fla., passed away on Sunday Oct. 9, 2011. He was born at Wetap po Creek in Wewahitchka, Fla., and has lived in We wahitchka for 86 years. Mr. Kemp retired as a heavy equipment op erator with Gulf County Road Department after 36 years of services. He was also employed by Gulf County Senior Citizens for 19 years and served in the U.S. Navy in 1946. He enjoyed sh ing and going to church where he played his gui tar for many years. He was predeceased by his Parents Joshua and Mary Kemp; and two grandsons, Tracy Wade Kemp and David Kemp. Survivors include his wife, Roxie Kemp and his six children: Franklin (Debbie) Kemp of Kinard, Diane (Earl) Bright of Altha, Houston (Pat) Kemp of Wetappo Creek, Minnie Carolyn Kemp of Wewahitchka, Patty Pippin of Dalkieth, Reba Whitehurst of Wewahi tchka; 17 grandchildren and 27 great-grandchil dren; a very special nephew, Travis Prescott, and his daughter, Andrea Prescott. Pallbearers will be Alvas grandsons and great grandsons. Honor ary pallbearers will be all present and former em ployees of the Gulf Coun ty Road Department of Wewahitchka Florida. There was a viewing from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesday Oct. 11, at the Glad Tid ings Assembly of God Church. The funeral was on Oct. 12, also at the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church at 2 p.m. CT with Rev. Joey Smith, Rev. Robert G. Miller and Dallas Presley ofciat ing. Interment followed at Kemp Cemetery State 22. Funeral Services will be handled by Comforter Funeral Home in Port St. Joe.Alva Franklin Kemp David Elijah Gardner, Jr. passed from this life on Oct. 4, 2011 in Gainesville, Fla., surrounded by his family in love. He touched the lives of so many people with his love, laughter and zeal for life. He had a contagious personality that left a trail of friends in his path. We will greatly miss him, but we will always rejoice that God had allowed him to be a gift to us. The late David E. Gard ner, Jr. was born on Feb. 3, 1942, in Pensacola, Fla., to the late Mr. David and Ethel Gardner, Sr. He worked for the Alachua County School System and Shands Hospi tal for many years before retiring to a life of leisure. He leaves to cherish him in memory: a sister Mrs. Thelma Lewis; two broth ers, Mr. Tommy Gardner and Mr. Steve Gardner; his children, David Gardner, III, LaLitha Gardner (Harry Johnson), Leroy Gardner, Dana Gardner, Reginald Clark, Brianni Gardner, Eugenia Rashell Parham, and Lynetta Gardner; a host of nieces, nephews, grandchildren and loving friends throughout Panama City, Miami, Port St. Joe and Gainesville, Fla. The funeral service was held at 11 a.m. EDT on Monday, Oct. 10, at the Zion Fair Baptist Church with interment in Forest Hill Cemetery.All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.David Elijah Gardner Jr. Dennis Chris McKnight of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed away Sunday, Oct. 9, 2011 in Wewahitchka, Fla., at the age of 57. He was born Aug. 26, 1954 in Panama City, Florida to the late George Thomas and Iris (Percival) McKnight. He was a long time resident of Gulf and Bay County and was a millwright. He was survived by his brother, Scotty McKnight of Candler, Fla.; his sister, Elaine Rafeld of Callaway, Florida; sisterin-law, Linda McKnight; nephew, Rusty McKnight and great-nephew, Chase McK night. A memorial service will be held 10 a.m. CT, Saturday, Oct. 15 in the Chapel at Ad ams Funeral Home in Blountstown. Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Phone 674-5449. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com.Dennis Chris McKnight First United Methodist hosts guest preacher

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PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, October 17, 2011 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application by Keith Vargo for Parcel ID # 6269-013R Located in Section 18 Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroach 10 into the 20 road setback for Sugarloaf Lane. 2. Development Application by Cinnamon Hill, LLC and Others For the undeveloped area around Star Fish and Tulip Avenues between Triton and Nutmeg Streets in Beacon HillLocated in Sections 30, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida develop and ll Tulip and Star Fish road right-of-ways. 3. Open Discussion 4. Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312. 2011-74 Keith Vargo Cinnamon Hill Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance COMBS CONSTRU C TION I N C CGC 1507649 *ADDITIONS T ERMITE R EP A IR *WINDO W R EPL A CEMENT (850) 229.8385 OR (850) 227-8156 glencombspsj@gmail.com v JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! S IN CE 2002, D OING B U SIN E SS IN T H IS CO MMU NIT Y LAWN CARE, TREE & PA L M TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVA L DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVA L or whatever your yard needs are CALL J O E 850-670-5478 O R 850-370-6911 E -MA I L @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! M OSES J. M EDI N A 850.527.0441 MMEDI N A @ CRESTE N TER P RISES COM REMODELI NG SER V ICES L ICE N SE #R G 0058632 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 OPEN AT 11AM E T 7 DAYS A W EE K WWW.L OO K O UTL O U N G E .C O M F O R O NE NIGHT ON LY FRIDAY, N O V E MB E R 4TH 8 P M T O 12 MID N IGHT E T BO BBY KENNE DY & M ICH E LL E M ILLIGAN WE D NE SDAY, FRIDAY & S ATURDAY 9 P M E T K ARA O K E & D A N CI N G I N TH E C R O WS N E ST T HURSDAY, FRIDAY & S ATURDAY 9 P M E T R A N DY S TARK ON TH E P OOP DE CK W ITH A RT LON G ON S AX S ATURDAYS T U E SDAY & WE D NE SDAY L ADI E S NIGHT 5 P M T IL C L O SI N G H ALL O W EEN PARTY & CO STUM E CON T E ST S ATURDAY, OCT O B E R 28TH Faith The Star| B5 Thursday, October 13, 2011 Benet program at New Life Divine people of God will be sponsoring a benet program for our brother in Christ Theodore Taylor art 6:30 p.m. ET on Saturday, Oct. 15 at New Life Church in Port St. Joe. Annual Womens Day at New Bethel New Bethel Baptist Church of Port St. Joe will celebrate its annual Womens Day at 11:30 a.m. ET on Sunday, Oct. 16. The speaker will be Evangelist Alma Pugh of Apalachicola and the colors are white, silver, black, green and pink. Everyone is invited out to lift up the name of the Lord. Pastor Cyril Mills. Annual Convocation at New Covenant The New Covenant Missionary World Outreach Center, located at 252 Avenue E in Port St. Joe, will host its annual convocation beginning Monday, Oct. 17 through Thursday, Oct. 20. Nightly meetings will be held at 7 p.m. ET on those dates. This years theme is Living under an Open Heaven. Everyone is welcome. For more information contact Debbie at 850-866-5205 New Horizon AA The New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 850639-3600. Faith BRIEFS Star Staff Report The St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club of Port St. Joe will be hosting its annual Spaghetti dinner on Saturday evening, Oct. 15 from 5-7 p.m. ET at the Church Hall on the corner of Monument and 20th Street in Port St. Joe. This is not your ordinary spaghetti dinner made by a bunch of guys getting together to cook in the kitchen. The spaghetti dinner will be prepared by renowned Chef Ian Williams from Verandas Bistro in Apalachicola. Chef Ian is serving up a spaghetti dinner with Bolognese sauce, garlic bread, salad, dessert and a soft drink. A donation bar will also be available. The cost is only $8 per ticket for adults; $4 for children under the age of 12 and take out is available. Tickets are available from Dan Van Treese 2279837 or any Mens Club Member. Tickets are also available at the No Name Caf, 306 Reid Ave in Port St. Joe, 229-9277. For more information on this event or any other St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club activities, please contact Bill Reid via cell phone at 850-227-8232 or via email at Bill@HospitalityLinens. net. Spaghetti dinner Saturday at St. Josephs Catholic Church

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COOK/ GOLF SHOP ASSISTANT ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB700 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD227-1757ASK FOR LAURIE See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldn’t you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centura.us.com Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 35921S NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County School Board proposes to amend and adopt policies, as provided for in the Administrative Procedures Act, for the purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change. •2.28 Schedule for Legal Advertisements 3.18 School Calendar 3.22 Opening and Closing of Schools 3.48 Service Animals 3.701 Visitor Identification Measure 4.71 Participation of Home Education and Private School Students in Extracurricular Activities 5.18 Children of Military Families 5.341 Use of Time Out, Seclusion and Physical Restraint for Students with Disabilities 6.10 Employment of Personnel 6.18 Contracts: Instructional and Administrative Personnel 6.37 Suspension and Dismissal (Option 2) 66.40 Assessment of Employees 6.91 Salary Schedules 7.10 School Budget System 7.20 Accounting and Control Procedures 7.33 Petty Cash Funds 7.65 Antifraud 7.70 Purchasing and Bidding 8.61 Telecommunications Plan, FIRN2 and Internet Use (Option 2) Ecnomic Impact: These proposals may result in direct costs associated with implementation. IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT: Time: 10:00 AM EDT Date: November 8, 2011 Place: Gulf County School Board Room 150 Middle School Road Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The entire text of the proposed rules can be inspected during regular office hours at the Gulf County School Board Office, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL. Special Legal authority under which the adoption is authorized and the law being implemented and interpreted is made specific. The addition and changes are proposed by Duane McFarland, Director for Business Services and approved for consideration by Jim Norton, Superintendent. Amendments: See above. October 13, 2011 35725S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board is accepting bids for lockers at Wewahitchka Elementary School. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road or faxed by calling 850-229-8369. Bids will be accepted starting October 6, 2011 and ending October 20, 2011 at 12:00 p.m. E.S.T. October 6, 13, 2011 35865S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, VS. CARLA S. PATTERSON, MICHAEL E. HARTLEY “JB”, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, and THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY, Defendants. CASE NO. 11-217CA NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CARLA S. PATTERSON and MICHAEL E. HARTLEY “JB” YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose on the following described property in Gulf County, Florida: Lots 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 & 13, Block “M”, Howard Creek Properties, an unrecorded subdivision of a portion of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West and a portion of Section 6, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Southeast quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 8938’25” East along the South line of said Southeast quarter of Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 2515’19” West for 564.79 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northerly along said curve having a radius of 2234.30 feet for an are distance of 197.22 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 2743’03” West for 197.16 feet; thence North 3018’46” West for 212.40 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue North 3018’46” West for 170.75 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northerly along said curve having a radius of 884.64 feet for an arc distance of 325.88 feet, the chord arc bearing North 4051’58” West for 324.04 feet; thence North 5125’10” West for 401.28 feet; thence South 3834’50” West for 218.00 feet; thence South 5125’10” East for 401.28 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 666.64 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an are distance of 245.58 feet, the chord of said arc bearing South 4051’58’ East for 244.19 feet; thence South 3018’46” East for 170.75 feet; thence North 5941’14” East for 218.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. has been filed against you, and GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA and THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Michael J. Henry, Plaintiffs Attorney, whose address is 221 McKenzie Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401 on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs’ attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED this 24th day of August, 2011. Clerk Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: Tina Money Deputy Clerk October 13, 20, 2011 35719S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, VS. JAMES BAILEY IV and MYSTIC PALMS SUBDIVISION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendant. CASE NO: 11-124-CA CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 21, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on October 20, 2011, the following described property: Lot 9, Mystic Palms, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 8, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Dated: September 23, 2011. Gulf County Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 2011 35672S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2010-CA-000226 Division: HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2007-1 Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY D. EVANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIMOTHY D. EVANS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated June 27, 2011, entered in Civil Case No.: 23-2010CA-000226, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2007-1 is Plaintiff, and TIMOTHY D. EVANS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIMOTHY D. EVANS, are Defendants. Rebecca L Norris, Clerk the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. ET, at the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on the 20th day of October, 2011 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 6: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF TREASURE BAY SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 32, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE GO S. 89’18’39” E. ALONG AN EASTERLY EXTENSION OF THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TREASURE BAY SUBDIVISION FOR A DISTANCE OF 68.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY R/W LINE OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30 (HAVING A 66 FOOT WIDE R/W); THENCE GO N.15’24’53” E. ALONG SAID R/W LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 155.78 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE N. 15’24’53” E. ALONG SAID R/W LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 103.40 FEET; THENCE GO S. 15’24’39” W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 103.40 FEET; THENCE GO N. 89’18’39” W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 217.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL BEING LOCATED IN SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 6, TREASURE BAY UNRECORDED. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 23, 2011. Rebecca L Norris Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 (954) 354-3544 Fax: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Telephone 850-718-0026 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. Oct 6, 13, 2011 35761S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA OPTIMUMBANK Plaintiff, and OB REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS 1570, LLC Intervenor-Plaintiff, vs. TODD OLIVE; SHELIA MEAD aka SHEILA MEAD; ESTATE OF FRED E. MEAD, deceased; STANLEY M. KATZ; and GULF PINES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION OF GULF COUNTY, INC. Defendants. Case No.: 10-0418-CA NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated, September 27, 2011, entered in this cause, will sell at 11:00 a.m. EST in the lobby at the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 on the 27th day of October, 2011, the following described parcel of real property, to-wit: Lot 23, Block A, Gulf Pines Subdivision, according to the Official Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 25, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS OF THE DATE OF THE SALE. In accordance with F.S. 45.031(3). the successful high bidder, if other than the Plaintiff, shall post with the Clerk a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the final bid or $1,000.00, whichever is less. The balance shall be paid to the Clerk within twenty-four hours of the sale, otherwise the Clerk shall re-advertise the sale and pay all costs of the sale from the deposit. Any remaining funds shall be applied toward the judgment. THIS NOTICE dated this 28th day of September, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of Court, By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 2011 35641S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: Estate of KENNETH LEE SEARCH, Deceased. FILE NO. 11-68 PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of KENNETH LEE SEARCH, deceased, whose date of death was JULY 18, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 6, 2011. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Theodore A. Search 3248 Creekside Drive Apt #741 Evansville, IN 47715 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Daniel Harmon III Florida Bar No.: 0544078 23 E 8th Street Panama City, Fl 32401 (850) 215-2443 October 6, 13, 2011 B6| The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 13, 2011 The Star | B7 MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $119,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 Beachside FOR RENT ST. JOE BEACH 113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98 2 bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98 2 bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach WINDMARK BEACH 212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #4 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #6 2 bd/2ba Fully Furnished MEXICO BEACH Villas of Mexico Beach, 3706 Hwy 98 New Condos, Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 3bd/3ba Furnished Unit 302 2bd/2ba Unfurnished INDIAN PASS 8822 – CR 30A 3 bd/2ba Unfurnished (Right down from Raw Bar ) Pictures available on MLS #243890CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision 101 Two Palms Drive 4 bd Unfurnished Two Palm Subdivision 3 bd/3 ba Furnished and covered pool (small pet allowed with pet deposit) PORT ST. JOE 1206 Palm Blvd 1.5 bd/1ba Partially Furnished Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Dr. Unit 15 2 bd/2ba Furnished 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOME Country Living Eastpoint Area ......................$800 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$650 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE ............$500 DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY PIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ..........................$700 WKLY PLUS 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd Floor; 3 Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16' inside clearance; Dual 12' roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available131 E. Gulf Beach DrSt. George Island, +/3,950sf of ce/retail; $285,00071 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms ue SO LD Eas po int F L nside clea ran ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. L et a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Buy it Classified. Make your move to the medium that ’ s your number one source of information about homes for sale For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Gulfaire executive 3 br, 2.5 ba, PVT beach, $350K. Pelican Walk Real Estate (850) 647-2473 Price ReducedFSBO : 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 Bayview Home @ Indian Pass. 4 br, 3 ba, 2 acres, large storage and Boat shed. $1200 mo + $1200 dep. $200 pet fee. In the St. Joe school district. Call 850-229-1065 or 850-227-5025 Beacon Hill 2 br, 1 ba, carport, $600 mo. + dep. Pelican Walk Real Estate (850) 647-2473 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $650 month + deposit 850-229-6403 For Sale or Rent2 br, 1 ba, CH&A, Call 850-227-1804 RV Lots at Kristiana RV Park at Beacon Hill 2 blocks from the Gulf, $250 month, W/S included. Call John 850-647-5000/340-0675 2 storage spaces available, 32’x34’ on America Street (West End), John (850) 340-0675 Full Service Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL80999 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Food Svs/HospitalityVacation Rental Operations ManagerHiring Full time position. Requirements: strong project management, communication, and computer skills. Rental property management experience desired. Sunset Reflections Vacation Rentals (850) 227-5432 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Easy $1,500 WeeklyMailing Postcards from Home. Law Firm needs help NOW! NO experience necessary! Supplies Provided. FEE Genuine Opportunity! FREE info! 1-800-765-4007 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Oct 22 & 23rd 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Administrative/ClericalAdministrative Asst/ BookkeeperKerigan Marketing Associates, Port St. Joe. Most duties via computer w/ Quickbooks bookkeeping, MS Word & Excel. Positive attitude, speed, professionalism & willingness to resolve conflict under pressure are important traits. Apply via email only by sending resume to info@ kerigan.com, by Oct 20. Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Registered Dietician RN Lab Technician EMT Clerical Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 34173429 Camera bag (Tamrac) lost near Stump Hole Beach. Lots of sentimental value. Call (850) 830-1796 or 836-4488 Howard Creek, 130 Magnolia Ave Friday 14th, 8:am-?Large Estate SaleTwo sheds full, 1997 Lance Camper slide in with AC, lots of clothes 1 xl and mens 2 xl Mexico Beach 20th Street, Saturday 9:00 a.m.-? CST;Antique Bottle Yard SaleBottles from 1690-1900, nautical items and art work. St. Joe Beach “Seashore Sub” 8005 Alabama Ave, Sat Oct 15th, 7:30-12:00Large Family Garage SaleBoy’s baby clothes size 0-2, baby items toddler, men & women clothing, household items, toys TV’s electroinc and much more. Priced to sell. Text FL80860 to 56654 Opening Soon Upscale Consignment ShoppeRent a space now at a discounted rate in Downtown PSJ. Call before it’s too late!! (850) 229-6165 35893S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of BAYOU BISTRO, located at 912 16th Street, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456, intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port Saint Joe, Florida, this 16th day of August, 2011 Elner Amison October 13, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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Local B8 | The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer In a measure of heath factors throughout the state, Gulf County falls among the higher risk counties. In Floridas 67 counties, Gulf County ranks 40th on the list, which measures residents health behaviors based on personal choices and environment. The lower ranking counties represent those with the highest health risks. We know we have some really poor risk factors that set us up for unhealthy be haviors, said Marsha Play er Lindeman, administrator of the Gulf County Health Department. These are diseases that are directly re lated to the lifestyle choices we make. The health factors list examines four areas: health behaviors such as tobacco use, diet and exercise, alco hol use and high risk sexual behavior, access and quality of care, social and economic factors such as education, employment and income, and physical environment. In Lindemans rst year as administrator, she has been given a tool that will help prioritize the services the department provides. Every three years, the health department com pletes a community needs assessment that provides an outline of the countys health prole. Lindeman said she is lucky to have started her job in the same year the assess ment is done. The statistics give her the instruments to better address the health needs of the community in partnership with other lo cal health care providers, schools, government, busi nesses and civic organiza tions. In weeks past, Lindeman has presented the statistics to the Port St. Joe City Com mission and the Gulf County Board of County Commis sioners, and plans on ex tending the education much further. What you nd in these assessments are lots of op portunities to make changes in the community that will positively impact the health of the people, Lindeman said. She said Gulf Countys low ranking on the health factors list was one of the most surprising statistics in the assessment and is a direct link to the countys chronic disease statistics, nearly all of which fall higher than the state percentage. This is a community that has a problem with obe sity, diabetes, heart disease, Lindeman said. All of these diseases can be prevented. She said the citys effort in constructing new biking and walking paths, providing residents with a new place to exercise, is a step in the right direction in addressing the obesity problem. You cant change it all, Lindeman said. You cant change that in a year. Instead, Lindeman said the health department, in partnership with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, will introduce programs fo cusing on chronic disease management, helping peo ple manage, improve and control their diseases. We need to introduce accessible ways to learn how to eat better and learn how to get more activity in our lives, Lindeman said. Were looking at programs to where we bring in pa tients with diabetes and teach them how to choose better foods and how to cook better foods. The new statistics pro vide new guidelines for the community for health edu cation and promotion. We have to do both. We have to prevent and we have to help people get the best quality of life with a chronic disease, Lindeman said. Lindeman was also shocked by statistics includ ed in the assessment from a 2010 survey done by the Florida Department of Chil dren and Families measur ing youth substance abuse across the state. The survey is administered every two years to a statewide sample of middleand high-school students. According to survey data, Gulf County ranked higher than the state aver age across the board for alcohol use, binge drink ing, cigarette use and use of marijuana and hashish. The county also nearly dou bled the statewide percent age for reported cocaine or crack cocaine use, use of prescription amphetamines and use of club drugs. (For full survey results visit www. dcf.state..us) Lindeman said the sta tistics provide an oppor tunity for all of the stake holders in the community to really look at these prob lems and begin addressing them. The community needs assessment also showed an increasing poverty rate in Gulf County, with 17.5 percent of the population living at or below the pover ty level, and 27.6 percent of the population considered low income. About 50 percent of our patients (at the health de partment) are at or below poverty level, Lindeman said. Certainly our popula tion (of patients) is poorer than the case load of a pri vate practice physician. Lindeman recently con ducted a workshop with community leaders to ex amine how to improve the countys health prole. Lindeman said the workshop was interesting because the group deemed Gulf Countys small size as one of its greatest strengths, but also one of its greatest weaknesses. Although the county has the capacity to eas ily band together, it is also challenged with limited re sources. They were all very en thusiastic that this commu nity does have the capac ity to change, Lindeman said. They felt like even with fewer resources and fewer people we still can be strong. The community stake holders also brainstormed health goals for the com munity. In the next two years well work those goals, and then after three years well circle around and do this again, Lindeman said. I hope we can see the trends improve. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West Pass TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 227-7847 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Oct 13 83 61 20 % Fri, Oct 14 82 57 0 % Sat, Oct 15 80 59 0 % Sun, Oct 16 80 61 0 % Mon, Oct 17 81 66 0 % Tues, Oct 18 81 61 10 % Wed, Oct 19 76 54 0 % 10/13 Thu 07:19AM 0.3 L 10:30PM 1.9 H 10/14 Fri 08:12AM 0.3 L 11:05PM 1.9 H 10/15 Sat 09:18AM 0.2 L 11:47PM 2.0 H 10/16 Sun 10:35AM 0.2 L 10/17 Mon 12:35AM 2.0 H 11:46AM 0.1 L 10/18 Tue 01:26AM 2.0 H 12:42PM 0.1 L 10/19 Wed 02:21AM 1.9 H 01:26PM 0.1 L 10/13 Thu 03:27AM 1.6 H 11:09AM 0.2 L 06:09PM 1.4 H 10:42PM 1.3 L 10/14 Fri 03:50AM 1.6 H 11:38AM 0.2 L 06:54PM 1.4 H 11:06PM 1.3 L 10/15 Sat 04:18AM 1.7 H 12:08PM 0.2 L 07:43PM 1.4 H 11:36PM 1.4 L 10/16 Sun 04:51AM 1.7 H 12:45PM 0.2 L 08:37PM 1.3 H 10/17 Mon 12:13AM 1.4 L 05:30AM 1.6 H 01:31PM 0.2 L 09:39PM 1.3 H 10/18 Tue 01:02AM 1.4 L 06:15AM 1.6 H 02:32PM 0.3 L 10:42PM 1.3 H 10/19 Wed 02:16AM 1.4 L 07:12AM 1.5 H 03:44PM 0.3 L 11:36PM 1.3 H Health assessment highlights challenges



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 73, NUMBer ER 52 Thursday, OCTo O Ber ER 13 2011 By Tim CroftStar News Editor The Port of Port St. Joe is showing up on the sonar of folks in high places in town this week to assess the potential of Floridas last undeveloped deepwater port. Ananth Prasad, Secre tary of the Florida Depart ment of Transportation, and members of the Gulf County legislative delegation were in town Wednes day on a fact-nding mis sion about the port. Also scheduled to attend were Rep. Marti Coley (R-Marianna), Rep. Jimmy Patronis (R-Panama City Beach) schedule per mitting state Sen. Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee), a representative from the staff of Congressman Steve Southerland (R-Panama City) as well as FDOT and county ofcials. This on top of a recent meeting in Panama City between port ofcials and Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Flori da) that port ofcials said was very constructive, the senator expressed his support for port development. I think the meeting, particularly with Representative Coley coming, is a signal that people inland recognize the impact the port could have for the re gion, said Port Authority executive director Tommy Pitts. To us, it is very ex citing that there is that kind of interest. Pitts said interest ex tends to the Governors Mansion. During an inter view at the annual Lincoln Day dinner earlier this year, Gov. Rick Scott voiced sup port for development of the port and the importance of meeting the needs in devel oping each of Floridas 14 deepwater ports. The state is very sup portive, Pitts said. The governor is very aware of our activities. Among those activities is a more proactive part nership with the St. Joe Company in developing the old mill site, as well as the parcel north of the mill site that St. Joe previously leased to the Port Author ity. The shakeup in leader ship and strategy changes at St. Joe has led to what Port Authority board chair woman Johanna White called a joint effort for job creation through the port. The Apalachee Regional Planning Council has long Signicant week for Port of Port St. JoeState and economic development ofcials visit to assess needs Art & Wine B1By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Gulf Countys numbers are creeping up and up. According to data from the U.S. Cen sus Bureau, Gulf Countys population percent increase is higher than the states, along with the poverty rate. Gulf Countys population increased 19 percent between 2000 and 2010, slightly higher than Floridas state population growth of 17.6 percent, and double U.S. population percent increase gure of 9.7 percent. With a total growth of 2,531 residents, the county population is growing faster than it did between 1990 and 2000. The percent increase in population from 1990 to 2000 was 15.9 percent. If the trend continues, Gulf County could see an increase of more than 3,000 residents in the next 10 years, bringing the population to almost 19,000. Florida is the fourth most populated state in the nation, behind California, Texas and New York, and is projected to move into the number three spot ahead of New York by 2015 based on growth trends. Census gures also reveal that Gulf County also has a disproportionate male population, with 60 percent male and 40 percent female. Census data conrms Gulf County has felt the wrath of the recession, with increasing poverty levels and a decreas ing median household income. The median household income of Gulf County has dropped from $38,160 in 2007 to $35,656 in 2010, and ranks below that of the state ($44,755) and the nation as a whole ($50,046). The county poverty level is also high er than the state and national levels, with 23 percent of the population living below the poverty line, up from 16.7 per cent in 2007. Statewide, 15 percent of the By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer The Gulf County Tourism Development Council Board reviewed a series of pend ing special events contracts with Amber Daviss compa ny, Statecraft, at its monthly meeting Oct. 6. What began as three memorandums of under standing, contracting Davis for $24,300 of event planning to be paid in nine install ments between September 2011 and April 2012, is now being re-examined by the TDC Board as individual event planning contracts upon suggestion by County Attorney Jeremy Novak. TDC Executive Director Tim Kerigan entered into the MOUs with Davis in midAugust after she approached the TDC and offered to as sist with event planning. The initial MOUs, under county policy, would have required the TDC to collect bids for the position. Kerigan signed the set of contracts without any vote from the TDC board. Kerigan said he failed initially in the contracting process. He said either the contracts needed to be com bined and the position put out for bid, or they should be broken down into indi vidual event consultation contracts, which is the route the TDC will take. County Attorney Jeremy Novak reminded the board that any time the TDC wants to spend more than $5,000 the request must go before the Board of County Com missioners for approval. Novak presented an 18item list of past event expen ditures, all of which exceed ed county policy guidelines, during the meeting. The list included such TDC-sponsored events as the Scallop and Music Fest, First Fridays, Saltwater Slam and the Pojo Live Mu sic Festival. Kerigan presented sev en event proposals for the boards approval, all of which were pitched by Davis, and each with its own consulting fee under $5,000. What you have in front of you are individual expenses that you have the ability to approve, said Novak, who noted the original MOUs Kerigan entered exceeded that expense allotment. Novak said the TDC does not need to collect bids for individual events with in dividual contractors under $5,000. The proposed events in cluded a tagged trout and redsh tournament, a run at Cape San Blas, a series of snowbird social society events, a sandcastle build ing contest, worship on the water events, a New Years event, and a St. Patricks Day cooking contest. We can accept them, deny them, or accept some thing similar, Kerigan said. Board member Jason Bogan said the redsh tour nament was one of the 26 ideas he submitted to the board six months ago. Board member Mel By Tim CroftStar News Editor For many, the Port Theatre is a 73-year-old diamond in rough shape. A private/public partnership is dedicating itself to applying some polish to the historic theater in or der to turn it into the Port Theatre Art and Culture Center. This is a legendary community asset that will benet all residents of Gulf County and the community, said Gail Alsobrook, executive di rector of the Port St. Joe Redevel opment Agency, one of the partners in the effort to revitalize the theater. It can be a hub for art and cultural events. A steering committee, comprised of local business owners as well as representatives from local arts organizations, has been exploring the revitalization of the theater for some two years. From those explorations has emerged a board of directors for the Port Theatre Art and Culture Cen ter (PTACC) and the drafting of Ar ticles of Incorporation. The group will seek to become a 501 (c) 3 non-prot by the end of the year. This is an exploratory effort to identify everything we need to reach our goal, Alsobrook said. The peo ple on the board have the expertise and the skills to get us there. The effort is distinctively collab orative in nature. The Forgotten Coast Cultural Co alition has pledged start-up funds in support of an art and culture center in Gulf County. The group envisions such a center as headquarters for its annual Great Plein Air Paint Out, among other events. The PSJRA has pledged support as the theater is in its redevelop ment area and is seen a major com ponent for revitalization of down town. The revitalization of the theater could be an economic engine for the 2000-2010: how Gulf County has changedTDC takes another look at contracts See neeNEEDS A2 See CCHanANGeED A2 See TDCTDC A2 See TTHeaEA TreRE A3 From Roy Rogers in the 1940s to the Harvey Arnold Band in 1980, the Port Theatres stage played host to a variety of live acts over the decades. Several old projectors still remain inside the entryway of the theater. Below Left: Old lm reels and some of the original wall paneling remain on the walls of the old theater. Below Center: The projection room, construction to be reproof, remains largely intact. Below Right: The acoustics for the three-story auditorium section of the theatre, seen here looking from the projection room to the stage beyond, are considered excellent. GROUP SEEKS TO REVITALIZE PPORT TTHEATRE P hotos by TT IM CroCRO FT | The StarThis is a legendary community asset that will benet all residents of Gulf County and the community. GGail Alsobrook executive director of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment AgencyOpinion . ....................................... A4Letters to the Editor . ................... A5Outdoors . ..................................... A6 Sports ...........................................A7-A8School News . ................................ BB3 Faith . ............................................. BB4-BB5 Obituaries . .................................... BB4 Classieds . .................................... BB6-BB7

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 850-819-4492 429 S Tyndall Parkway, Suite MMarsha Mongoven, Licensed EstheticianVariety of facials, chemical peels, and waxingVisit www.forskinsakellc.com for complete menuMICRODERM WITH YOUR FIRST FACIAL F or S kin S ake, LLC FREE! ADMISSION: A CAN GOOD FOR NEEDY FAMILIES Calling All Beginner Artists!Painting Classes specially designed for new painters using the tried and true technique of One Stroke Painting. Classes are $35.00, 3 hours, and include all materials; as well as a starter set of brushes to keep.Glynis Holcombe OSCI(One Stroke Certied Instructor)www.pieceocape.com 850-229-1185 NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! Roman Nation, MD Family Medicine PhysicianAcute and Chronic Care Diabetes High Blood Pressure High Cholesterol Nutrition/Weight Loss Depression/Anxiety Insomnia/ADHD Asthma/COPD850-481-1101 221 East 23rd Street (across from Lowes) Medicare/Medicaid and most insurances accepted! NEEDS from page A1voiced the sentiment that port development in Port St. Joe was a huge step in unlocking the economic potential of the county and region. Things have changed phenomenally, Pitts said. (St. Joes) strategy has changed and as a result we are working towards the same goals of jobs and creating economic activity. We have always known we needed to attract private funds. We see a private/ public partnership as the best opportunity for port development. Now we see St. Joe as an ally in port de velopment. (The Ports coastal parcel) and mill site are actively being considered and marketed for port and marine activity (by St. Joe). That opens the prospect for port activity itself. Pitts added that the barge bulkhead, and access road, along the Intracoastal Canal offers options for new customers, as does the access to rail that the port gained by the purchase of the old Arizona Chemical property earlier this year. With potential development of the former mill site and the ports so-called Parcel A, or coastal par cel, the ports capabilities grow. Having properties that are developed has attract ed the attention of custom ers, Pitts said. (Prasad) will learn about the attributes we do have here. We have so much going for us here. That includes close proximity to a federal shipping channel, over 100 acres of land in port hands, an ad jacent wastewater plant, a signicant source of fresh water in the Gulf County Canal, access to rail and two natural gas pipelines from the purchase of the Arizona Chemical property. Pitts also cited develop ments at the state and fed eral level which will aid the case for port development. That includes the gover nors focus on job creation, his emphasis on ports as engines for that creation and his push to reduce the regulatory burden on busi nesses. Further, with the expansion of the Panama Canal completed in two years, and Florida ports positioned to reap benets from the trade that expan sion will bring, the Port of Port St. Joe is in position to grow and develop. We have seen changes in the past year or two that make us more optimistic on deepwater expansion, Pitts said. With the Panama Ca nal expansion there are a lot of changing dynamics in shipping and looking for new opportunities. What state studies have found is that the impact of ports on Floridas economy has been greatly underesti mated. Part of this weeks meet ings was to show key elected and appointed ofcials what a port advisory commit tee has helped identify as hurdles to development, in cluding identifying funding needs. The advisory committee has crafted a strategic plan and nancing plan to meet those hurdles. Those plans were to be discussed this week. Its exciting for us to have them all come here, Pitts said. White said it was a key step in the creation of badly needed jobs. With all those people coming they are acknowl edging the regional impact of the port, White said. We need the jobs and we need the jobs now. People are hurting real bad. CHAnNGED from page A1population lives below the poverty line, with a similar nationwide rate of 15.3 percent of the U.S. popula tion living below the pov erty line. Gulf County is also less educated than the national and state populations. Countywide, 75.5 per cent of persons age 25 and up are high school gradu ates, and 13.4 percent hold a bachelors degree or higher. Statewide, 84.9 percent are high school graduates, and 25.6 percent have a bachelors degree or high er. Nationally, 85.6 percent of persons 25 and older have a high school diploma, and 28.2 hold a bachelors degree or higher. Educational attain ment is slightly up in Gulf County from the numbers collected during the 2000 Census, which cited 72.6 percent of persons age 25 and up as having a high school diploma, and only 10.1 percent of the popula tion with a bachelors de gree or higher. The number of hous ing units in Gulf County increased by 1,523 from 2000 to 2010, with a higher vacancy rate among units and higher percentage of renters documented in 2010. Of the 9,110 total hous ing units documented by the Census Bureau in 2010, 58.6 percent were occupied and 41.4 percent vacant. Of the occupied houses, 74.8 percent were owner occu pied and 25.2 percent were renter occupied. The 2000 Census docu mented 7,587 total housing units, 65 percent of which were occupied and 35 per cent vacant. Of those oc cupied, 81 percent of units were owner occupied, and 19 percent renter occu pied. Of those 2010 vacancies, 19.3 percent were for rent, 6.6 percent for sale, and 61.5 percent were units for seasonal or recreational use. Of the 2000 vacancies, 20.9 percent were for rent, 5.4 percent for sale, and 47.9 percent were for sea sonal or recreational use. TDcC from page A1Magidson voted no on each event and Bogan abstained for personal reasons. Im voting no on every one of them for a reason, Magidson said. I think were heading down a very slippery slope here folks, and you all know what Im talking about. Magidson said it ap pears to the public that the TDC is trying to skirt bid ding requirements. We have gone to one source, or one source has come to us, and weve just rolled over and said okay, said Magidson, who noted that the TDC board never voted on last months golden scallop treasure hunt event. The board approved two of the proposed events, denied one and motioned to table the remaining four, leaving them open for further discussion at future meetings. Board member War ren Yeager said the board members needed to take the personalities out of their decisions. Im concerned that its personalities, Yeager said. Lets take the per sonalities out of it. Lets look at it honestly and openly. Magidson said personalities were not the issue. Were spending other peoples money and we better spend it right, Magidson said. This body has operated under the radar for far too long.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, October 13, 2011 General Law Practice: Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Probate, Wills, Trusts and Estates, Business and Corporations, Family Law, Military Law and Elder Law IssuesWEWILL ASSIST YOU, YOUR BUSINESS AND YOUR FAMILY WITH SPEED, EFFICIENCY AND ECONOMY. ALISA W. JAMES, P.A., Col USAF Reserves JAGAttorney and Counsellor at Law109 Harrison AvenuePanama City, FL 850-215-0095 awjameslaw@knology.net alisawjamespa.com E state P lanning, W ills and T rusts M ilitary D ivorce and M odications THEAt TRE from page A1downtown area, Alsobrook said. The rst board meeting for the PTACC was held last week and the vision for the theater emerged: One that will honor the legacy of the theater; a multiuse facility to serve the com munity in a number of ways and will appeal to all age groups; a cultural hub for the community; programming to unite families; a tourist attraction; a showcase for local talent; and a place for inspiration and fun. We want it to be a userfriendly center, Alsobrook said. We see it being used for live theater, movies, dance classes and recitals, the Childrens Theater, for town hall meetings. This could be a showcase for downtown. The Port Theatre opened in June 1938 and many folks still recall seeing mov ies such as Lassie Come Home and The Greatest Show on Earth as well as live acts such as Roy Rog ers grace the stage of the theater. The theater closed in 1967 and fell into general disrepair, battered twice by hurricanes, during the ensu ing years. Paula and Wade Clark purchased the theater in the 1990s, but sold it several years ago and the building remains closed and unat tended. In June 2003, the theater, after considerable effort by the Clarks, was placed on the National Register of His toric Places. Despite years of neglect, a letter from the Florida De partment of State included the following passage: To qualify for listing in the National Register, a property must not only be shown to have a documented area of historic signicance, it must also retain physical integrity. The theatre, although sub jected to damage from two hurricanes, has retained its historic character. The entry, lobby, auditorium, reconstructed balcony, pro jection room, managers apartment and circulation patterns characteristic of a public theatre remains intact. The U.S. Department of Interior noted, The Art Deco Style treatment of the faade is largely intact and still maintains a distinct and signicant presence on the main commercial thor oughfare of Port St. Joe. Further, the Department of Interior letter notes that acoustics within the threestory auditorium space is exceptional. The PTACC board members met last week with Harry Arnold, the cur rent owner of the theater to begin the exploration of the nancial commitment needed to begin the revitalization of the theater. The town needs it, I think itd be the biggest draw on Reid Avenue, Ar nold said of a revitalized Port Theatre.

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OpinionA4 | The Star USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Visit to Elvis home not tax-deductableBy most any measure, last weeks public hearing on the development order for the Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center was an exercise in what democracy should be. Even if the vote did not go the way opponents desired, that does not undermine the lessons the public hearing could offer other governing bodies in the county. As was said late in the meeting, no doubt some would go away unhappy, some happy, but all who wished had been heard. More than two dozen people signed up to speak before Port St. Joe city commissioners and were given their time, none of them hearing a buzzer at three, ve or seven minutes to alert them they had gone overtime, none of them shut off from making their points. The lone request from Mayor Mel Magidson was to try to be brief and non-redundant and while many speakers could not adhere to either request, all were allowed their full say. That the hearing, held solely to consider this development order, was held in the Centennial Building to accommodate the crowd and lasted almost four hours is also testament to government providing a forum for citizen input. Advanced citizenship, though, depends on informed citizens and on several points reasoned debate was drowned. The contention that somehow this project sneaked up on citizens is a non-starter. This project has been around since 2009. The county, city and Florida Department of Environmental Protection held two public workshops in 2009 the DEP participating specically due to the controversy a similar project attracted in Tallahassee. There were two town hall-style meetings held by opponents this year. Reporting on this project has been extensive for two years, whether one, as one audience member said, takes this newspaper or not. This was no stealth initiative, but one of the most signicant stories, on many levels, in Gulf County the past two years. Secondly, there were statements made that were ill-informed or disingenuous. A Tallahassee resident stated the project was up for a federal loan guarantee. That is wrong. Months ago the U.S. Department of Energy put a term sheet for a federal loan guarantee on hold due to lack of funds. The countrys economic environment has only worsened. By all accounts, there is no loan guarantee. The company is lining up private nancing. Important to remember: this was one of the most forcefully stated arguments from opponents of this project in the town hall meetings this year. But even with federal money no longer in the equation, the argument lives on. More disingenuous was the statement by the same Tallahassee resident that a challenge to the air emissions permit was led and simply not heard, contrary to Florida law. The challenge was in fact withdrawn by those who led it and was done so the week before a hearing was set for Port St. Joe, the precise sort of hearing on the merits of the projects permitting that many opponents now seek from the city and county. Such a hearing was scheduled before an administrative judge. Folks wanting to point ngers about the alleged lack of a public forum to consider the technical merits of this project can point at this withdrawal of the challenge by opponents. And for the contention that opponents had insufcient preparation time for any challenge hearing, the attorney spearheading the case has been working against the project for two years 30 days was insufcient to mount a hearing on the merits of the opposition. Finally, Commissioner Bo Patterson was insensitive in trying to identify Port St. Joe natives in attendance and how long they had lived here, but the larger point was on target. The crowd that came out last week was roughly 200, with a number of those in favor of the project. To argue that opponents were in the majority at last weeks hearing and therefore should sway commissioners votes is a stretch. Maybe opponents were a majority of those attending the meeting, but given the crowds size and divided viewpoints it seems hard to create a mandate out of the meeting, as was asserted last week. It is these highly-disputable statements, without supporting facts, that undermine the reasoned arguments of residents such as Trish Petrie and Jon Hooper, who have followed this project for two years while voicing concerns, poring over permit materials and asking pointed and appropriate questions. In the end, city commissioners had little choice. As County Commissioner Bill Williams told one opponent months ago, what was being asked of local ofcials was to overrule the decisions of those state and federal agencies charged with making those decisions. And, in large measure, many antiproject arguments voiced last week were with those agencies another reason the withdrawal of the challenge was in the long run a disservice to those who feel a full public vetting of the project has not been made. But the bottom line is that this project jumped through all the hurdles and was deemed worthy of moving ahead. Certainly, as it moves forward elected ofcials and residents must maintain vigilance about pledges by the project developer regarding safeguarding the environment and pledges that the community has a new economic development partner instead of a future white elephant that soils a postcard paradise. Time will tell. But the advanced citizenship de mocracy is designed to make one work on display last week provides a dose of hope. People take classes to learn to stay on topic. Speakers go around the country teaching people and selling books about the art of keeping the audiences attention. The experts emphasize when and where the key points should be made when speaking. You have heard their lines. Tell them what you are going to tell them, tell them, and then tell them again. They preach ltering and eliminating the uff. What if I like the uff? What if I like listening to someone talk about nothing in particular? What if I dont consider it rambling? What if I hear something different? Babies are a wonderful example of conversations about nothing. They ooh and ah and gurgle when they are babies. As they get a little older, they start stringing together more words that are just babbling. Parents love to hear it, I know I did. My children would talk and talk and I would simply respond. Often I would say I feel the same way or You have to be kidding me or my favorite, I love you too. It was music to my ears. As they got older, I could understand what they were saying as they were playing with dolls in the dollhouse or action gures or just looking at themselves in the mirror. They would let their dolls or little men talk to each other and it allowed them to escape into a makebelieve world. Being able to listen from around a corner or from behind a door, I was able to escape with them. What they were saying was just rambling, but it was sweet rambling. As teenagers, my children still ramble about school, music, boys, girls and things that wouldnt mean much to most people. As their Daddy, it means a lot to me. Sometimes, my mind will stray and I would try to tell myself that its music that wont always be in my house. Adults ramble, sometimes to the point of making you think they have regressed to toddler status again. If you were to hear me talking to my dogs, you would probably think this of me. Sometimes it is just pure gibberish, but my dogs seem to like it. They love me. There is a fellow in my ofce that will come in and start talking about one subject and cover ten more subjects in ve minutes. He is an expert rambler. It doesnt bother me, I like it. It is his version of poetry. He can go from rockets to pinewood derby cars to rock music to geology in the blink of an eye. To my ears, it is sweet rambling because he is my friend. Conversations with him can also be very entertaining. Does he go off on tangents? Does he go on and on? Is he longwinded? Yes, yes and yes. I like it. In talking to my 90-year-old friend Phyllis, she says people accuse her of rambling. Phyllis says that some of her relatives dont want to hear from her because of this reason. Friends (and hopefully relatives) shouldnt hear rambling. They should hear poetry or music or simply I care enough to listen. When I talk to my Mama on the phone, she will get started on a story and it will get longer and longer. She gets excited and tells me who I can tell and who I cant. Sometimes it takes her breath away. I love it. I absolutely love it. To hear the excitement in her voice and how it goes up and down with the story is soothing to me. Is it rambling? Yes, sweet rambling that I want to hear. Listening to rambling takes us places, lets us pretend, allows us to escape and lets us love and show we care. It is entertaining. Folks will sit in front of a television for hours watching shows that are pure rambling. These same folks will complain about having to listen to their parents, grandparents or friends ramble for ve or ten minutes. I dont understand. Then there are these folks that call you on the phone rambling about TIM CROFtT Star news editorAdvanced citizenshipWhen are you going to stop writing those articles? I paused before answering and glanced discreetly toward the questioners face. I couldnt tell if it was an innocent query or a sublime message screaming for me to get off the stage. Maybe this person had found me out. They realized this whole journalistic facade is a masquerade. Or perhaps its another one of those syntaxrich analysts who perused my little blurbs searching for double negatives and dangling participles. Ive never actually thought of my stories as writing. I just kind of think of something that happened and I retell it out loud. I have learned to jot the yarn down as I go cause the newspaper business doesnt lend itself too well with verbal thoughts. If you read something that I said that comes out in print and makes absolutely no sense, rest assured that it was a great premise that simply got lost in the translation. My wife retired. It was a pretty weak answer but I still wasnt sure if the question was friendly or if I was under re, and someone has got to earn a living for us. That was about as directly indirect as I could be. And I was only half-kidding. Cathy gured shed been in the bread winning business long enough. She bailed. I gured we didnt owe anyone an explanation over inner-house policy. And Cathys retiring is not open for debate. Shucks, I debated it for the whole year she was thinking about it to no avail! As a matter of fact, she retired over my vigorous protest. Grandchildren time was more important to her than money! She didnt hear me when I pointed out how much more we could do for the kids if she kept working. She didnt hear me when I pointed out that it might interrupt the lives of sons and daughter-in-laws if she moved in with the grandkids. She didnt hear me when I pointed out that school teachers had spring break, fall break, Christmas and all summer to visit grandchildren. When you get right down to it, I might have come out better if I had just had her hearing tested Our bank account naturally took a hit. But, guys, that aint the half of it! These grandkids had the audacity to be born way up in Georgia and the far reaches of North Tennessee. Thats a lot of gas money! And she naturally has to take them out to eat, which means a lot of ravioli money out of my pocket! And the zoo is just across town. And Cars 2 is in every theater. And we have to have a Johnny Appleseed outt. And Disney has a cruise now just for the Mickey Mouse Club watchers. And Halloween costumes have to be ordered. We didnt spend that kind of money when Cathy was sequestered in a classroom teaching math and history. She brought money home instead of taking it out! The gross national product of Toccoa, Georgia and Franklin, Tennessee, doubles every time Cathy visits! We get brochures and coupon offers in the mail from both cities. Chucky Cheese has a room reserved for her. She has piled up more mileage lately than the Antique Road Show. Shes on a rst-name basis with service station attendants in four states. AAA recently inducted her into their national car and driver Hall of Fame. I think the new freedom is affecting her brain. She just ew to Memphis to see our niece play soccer. Listen, we dont even have a grandchild in that splendid city on the bluff! This retirement gig is denitely taking on some wings! Ive got credit card charges from Graceland, Rendezvous Ribs, the Wolfchase Galleria, Beale Street tours and Sun Records gift shop. Im paying for sight seeing Im not seeing, tours Im not on and meals Im not eating. Shes springing for shrimp cocktails and steak tartar for the whole group while Im existing on cheese and crackers, peanut butter sandwiches, diet Cokes and dirt cake. She left knowing Im no Rachel Ray in the kitchen. I pointed that out rather vociferously but she didnt hear me again. This retirement thing may be great..if you are the retiree. Its not so hot if you are the one left treading water. Im trying to do the right thing here. Ive been to the convenience stores to see if they could use an exmath whiz as a lotto clerk. Maybe Cathy could turn her vast babysitting skills into some grocery money. She can do yard work. any kind of job will keep her off the road. So far the plan to put her back to work is not panning out. The more she hangs around the grandkids, the more she wants to hang around the grandkids! This thing about not going to work is growing on her. Her easy chair has become pretty easy to nd! I was going to discuss it with her this morning but Avery burpedCathy was ten miles north of Atlanta before I could get down to that part where I thought she was gone too much! The bottom line is Ive got to keep writing. And please keep buying these newspapers. Buy some extras and pass them out to your friends! Ill try to return the favor by dangling fewer participles. Ill do you some great human interest stories. Ill pen an expose or two. Ill write about your ditsy aunt. Ill nish that story where Leon rode the big horse into the prom. Thank you for your continuing support. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert cCRaANKS MY tTRactACTOR BN HeardThursday, October 13, 2011 Keyboard KKLATTERINERINGSS See RaAMBLING A5 Sweet rambling

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S LettersA5 | The Star dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs you needing a vacation home or new mattress or credit card. These people are absolutely NOT sweet ramblers. They, like some politicians, get paid to ramble. A lot of what they say is certied gibberish (you may call it something else). Give me babies babbling, little girls playing pretend with dollhouses, teenagers talking about prom dresses, people at the ofce talking about recipes, Phyllis talking about TV evangelists and Mama talking about growing up. Give them to me every day. I want to hear them. I need to hear them. If you are my friend, never apologize for rambling. I want to know about your owers, your sister, your Aunt Gladys, your secret brownie recipe, your favorite song and what it means to you and what brand of tea you use. I really do, Im not nosey. I just like to hear it. Ill make the time for sweet rambling. Its what makes you you, and you are what makes me me. You can nd more stories by BN Heard at www.CranksMyTractor.Myths vs. FactsDear Editor: When someone signs a petition they should do so because of facts, not emotional arguments. There has been a campaign to sign a petition against the Biomass Plant being built in Port St Joe. Anyone has a right to their opinion and to sign any petition they choose, but lets separate the facts from the emotional arguments about the Biomass Plant that our city commissioners have now wisely issued the Development Order needed for Rentech to proceed. 1. Myth: Tourists wont come with a biomass plant in PSJ. Fact: Most visitors wont even know it is here. A similar biomass plant is on the University of South Carolina campus and the football fans and students dont stay away. You dont even know it is there. There is no noise or smell that would give it away. The paper mill and garbage burning plant in Panama City have not destroyed their tourism, growth or property values there and they have odors that this plant will NOT have. 2. Myth: Taxpayer dollars will be used to build the plant. Fact: Rentech will have private investors to build the plant. Rentech has announced it is not seeking federal tax dollars to develop this project. There are some federal, state and local tax incentives that Rentech may make use of, but these incentives are available to any renewable project and any project built here. 3. Myth: There will be two smoke stacks billowing smoke in downtown Port St. Joe. Fact: There will be six stacks, NO SMOKE, and the site is almost two miles back from U.S. Highway 98, located in the industrial park. 3. Myth: The stacks could impede Tyndall jets and create problems. Fact: In the Development Order Application the federal law citing shows the project is not in conict with FAA and/or military regulations. Have any of you seen a jet from Tyndall ying at 100 feet above St. Joe? 5. Myth: The plant will deplete the fresh water from the canal. Fact: Arizona Chemical and Premier Chemical used 1,750,000 gallons of water a day. The Biomass Plant uses a little over half of that. While these other industrial plants were operating in Port St. Joe, the city had no supply problems. 6. Myth: The emissions are going to kill us and the bay. Fact: There has been extensive air modeling showing that the emissions will not add in any signicant way to the existing air emissions found in the area in order to obtain the Air Permit from DEP. The emissions will exceed all required Ambient Air Quality Standards (AAQS) required by federal regulations. Fact: The building of the $200,000,000 plant will create approximately 200 jobs in Gulf County. Operating the plant will involve approximately 25 direct jobs and 75 indirect jobs for Gulf County with an annual payroll of approximately $2,000,000. Fact: Rentech has met or exceeded every federal or state requirement and has been permitted by EPA and DEP, no easy task, requiring an expenditure of $10,000,000 on its part to get to this stage. The City Commission did the right thing by issuing the Development Order to allow them to begin building. Fact: Gulf County is a depressed county and losing ground. Without industry that is clean and green, it cannot exist without imposing higher taxes on the land owners. Our County did well when St. Joe Paper Company and Arizona Chemical were here. Workers were employed; children were educated and went to college. Now, there are no jobs, no industry, and eco-tourism, while we all support it, by itself cannot provide enough income to allow the citizens of Gulf County to live the American Dream. Fact: Gulf County needs the Biomass Plant here and needs other industries that are compatible with our pristine and rural environment. Without industry we will fall back into the dead zone like Gulf County found itself in after the hurricane and fever in the 1800s. Port St Joe began as a robust community, being the site of the rst signing of the Constitution. Then it became a sleepy shing village, at best, until St. Joe Paper Company chose to be here. Rentech could be the St Joe of the 21st Century for Gulf County. We need to be rst again. Thanks to the City Commission for their unanimous vote to allow them to start building.Patricia K. Hardman, PhDPort St. JoeRentech biomass incineratorDear Editor: I was one of the citizens who spoke out in opposition to the Rentech Biomass Incinerator at the recent City Commissioners Meeting. I expressed my concern about the proceedings at the Planning & Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting, which was held on Aug. 30. It became very obvious that the decision to accept or deny the Technical Advisory Committees recommendation had been made even before the meeting was held. The findings sheet had already been typed up and included a statement that the PDRBs recommendation to approve the Development Order be presented to the city commissioners. Opposition affidavits, petitions for public meetings, letters and exhibits from an environmental lawyer had been either sent to the PDRB or presented at the meeting. Yes, there was time allocated for input from the public. Yes, several people made comments raising questions or speaking out in opposition. The PDRB members neither asked questions nor made comments. They did not even consider the topics brought up by the citizens. The words mockery and travesty come to mind when describing the proceedings at this meeting. Why bother having time allocated for public input if the PDRB will not even address the citizens comments? Is this democracy at work? I addressed this situation when I spoke at the City Commissioner meeting on Oct. 4. I stated that my fervent hope was that this type of behavior would not be repeated a second time. At the Oct. 4 meeting, more than 24 people spoke regarding the biomass incinerator. The vast majority of these folks spoke in opposition to the approval of the Rentech Development Order. The Commissioners heard the comments, made a few replies, and then voted unanimously to accept the PDRBs recommendation that they approve Rentechs Development Order. Does the phrase rubber stamp come to mind? Landy LutherPort St. JoeTo Gulf County citizensDear Editor: Mayor Mel, I saw and heard your statements on public television Channels 7 and 13 in Panama City and I quote you, This biomass plant will produce 200 local jobs during its construction and approximately 25-40 full-time jobs, again local, during operation of the plant. Okay. I will go on record as asking you to produce the names of the local construction companies and of the local labor crews. I bet that like the last two big jobs in Port St. Joe, CVS Drugs and the new Dollar Stores, they will come from out of county and even out of state. Voters, take a look for yourselves at the tags on the contractors work trucks. By the way, if you have no federal funds for this project, how will we pay for this plant? More taxes? Bet me that not one 100-foot tall smokestacks will turn away tourists and new buyers to this area. Gulf County will be the loser in the near future. Bay waters along the so-called city drinking water ditch water gets more dirty or unfit. Bay fishing, swimming and scallops will be again a thing of the past, just as it was during the days of the old mill and of the chemical plant. Clean air, take a deep breath now, enjoy and remember how it was. Health issues will increase I promise. Wind or solar power would have been a much better choice. Clean air no pollution.John ParkerHighland View LettersETTERS toTO theTHE EditorDITOR RAMBLING from page AA4 Myth: There will be two smoke stacks billowing smoke in downtown Port St. Joe. Fact: There will be six stacks, NO SMOKE, and the site is almost two miles back from U.S. Highway 98, located in the industrial park. Patricia K. Hardman, PhD PPort St. Joe PY 5984 Psychological Counseling & Evaluations Accepting New Patients At The Cornerstone 1103 Fortune Avenue Panama City, FL 32401 850.628.0094 Miriam S. (Mimi) Bozarth, PH. D. BARLOWSWell Drilling Pump Repair & Water ServicesWell Drilling & Pump Repair Deep or Shallow WellsServing Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties 850-639-9355 or 850-814-7454 LICENSED &INSURED Yes, there was time allocated for input from the public. Yes, several people made comments raising questions or speaking out in opposition. The PDRB members neither asked questions nor made comments. They did not even consider the topics brought up by the citizens.Landy Luther PPort St. Joe Thursday, October 13, 2011

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com OUTDoo OO RSwww.starfl.comSection A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters MOULTRIE INFRARED TRIAL CAMERAREG $119.99 SALE PRICE $89.99 Page 6 Thursday, October 13, 2011 FreshwaterOffshore shing is a hit or miss this month so far. Strong winds and high seas are keeping even the larger for hire boats at dock. Gag grouper are still in the 100-150 feet range out of Mexico Beach, holding over wrecks and offshore ledges. Red grouper are still being caught in Apalachicola and south of Cape San Blas.Inshore OffshoreWith high winds and scattered rain over the last few days, most anglers were left at home or at the docks. Good schools of mullet are everywhere in the bay and in Indian pass right now and a good cast net is a must. Nice reports of good sized red sh and trout have been the norm lately caught on live shrimp and live Lys. All eyes this week will be on the upcoming bass tournament this weekend at White City. This is the second year that the Gulf County Sheriff Department is hosting the event with a top prize of $10,000. All proceeds go to the G.C.S.O Explorer Post and other Gulf County youth programs. SponsoredPONSORED bB Y Special to The StarThe Florida sea turtle nesting season has come to an end, and there is good news for two of Floridas federally endangered sea turtle species. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and its partners documented a record high annual nest count for green turtles in Florida. Leatherback turtles also had a high number of nests, with the count falling just shy of the previous high mark in 2009. Loggerheads, the species that nests most commonly in Florida, did not have an increase in numbers this year. The nest count for this federally threatened sea turtle was close to average for the previous ve years. However, since 1998, the trend in the number of loggerhead nests is a general decline. Were pleased with the green turtle and leatherback nesting totals in 2011, said Dr. Blair Witherington, an FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute scientist. Nesting by both species has been rising dramatically and can be attributed at least in part to major conservation efforts over the past few decades. However, our loggerhead nesting totals have declined or are at best stable, which suggests that this species has a different, and perhaps more difcult, set of conservation challenges. Nest counts are performed each year through Floridas Index Nesting Beach Survey, which was created to measure seasonal sea turtle nesting, and to allow for accurate comparisons of beaches and years. The standardized index counts take place on 255 miles of selected beaches along both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. In one of the largest wildlife counts in the nation, hundreds of FWC partners diligently survey Floridas nesting beaches throughout the sea turtle nesting season. We are grateful for the large number of partners and volunteers that make this survey possible, Witherington said. Without them, we couldnt collect nesting data on such a large scale. The FWCs role in coordinating Floridas sea turtle nest counts is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and sales of the states sea turtle license plate. For more information about sea turtle nest counts, visit www.MyFWC. com/Research, click on Wildlife, then click on Nesting under the Sea Turtle heading. Sick or injured sea turtles can be reported by contacting the FWC Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404FWCC (3922).Star Staff ReportWith $25,000 in prize money and a rst-place catch of $10,000, the second annual Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Bass Tournament is primed to kickoff Oct. 15-16. The tournament is sponsored by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. The tournament will begin and end at the White City Landing. All proceeds from the tournament benet various community outreach programs by the sheriffs ofce, including Christmas for Kids, the Halloween Haunted House and others. Visit for www.gcsotournament.com for more details and to download a rules and regulation form.Special to The StarGet your claw-crackers ready because Floridas recreational and commercial stone crab claw harvest seasons open Saturday, Oct. 15. Stone crab claws must be at least 2 inches in length to be harvested legally, but claws may not be taken from egg-bearing female stone crabs. Recreational harvesters are allowed to use up to ve stone crab traps, and there is a daily bag limit of one gallon of claws per person or two gallons per vessel, whichever is less. Recreational and commercial traps may be baited and placed in the water beginning Oct. 5, but none may be pulled until Oct. 15. The season lasts until May 16, 2012. Though stone crab harvest rules will remain the same, the FWC voted in June to extend state management regulations for stone crabs into federal waters. This came after the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council voted to repeal the Fishery Management Plan for stone crabs in federal waters and allow the FWC to manage them in all waters surrounding Florida. This change goes into effect Oct. 24. For more information on harvesting stone crabs for fun, as well as commercial stone crab regulations and licensing information, go to MyFWC.com/Rules and click on Fishing Saltwater. Visit the Fresh from Florida website at www. FL-seafood.com for ideas on how to turn your stone crab catch into a feast the family will love. A banner year for two turtle species found locallyBLAIR WITHERINGTON | FWCA leatherback sea turtle hatchling emerges from a nest in St. Lucie County.Sheriffs Ofce bass tournamentStone crab season to openPHOTO COURTESY OF THE FF WC CStone crab claw harvest season opens Oct. 15 for both recreational and commercial harvesters. Claws must be at least 2 inches in length to be harvested legally. Special to The StarAs fall settles into the Big Bend, the Florida black bear begins foraging for winter. Its a perfect time to celebrate the states largest land mammal. Come out for the third annual Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival, an event dedicated to helping people understand and live in harmony with the Florida black bear. The family-oriented festival is Saturday, Oct. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sands Park in Carrabelle. The festival is free and a great way for families to spend the day together doing something fun and educational. The small, Gulf-side community of Carrabelle sits in the heart of Apalachicola National Forest, one of Floridas biggest undeveloped habitats for black bears. Our goal is for festivalgoers to learn everything they always wanted to know about the Florida black bear and more, said David Telesco, bear management program coordinator for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Helping people understand bear behavior is one of the primary goals for the festival. If people who live in bear country understand what makes bears tick, they will know what they can do to discourage bears from hanging around in their neighborhoods. Telesco will offer informative presentations about black bears and their biology. Betsy Knight will tell interesting stories about wildlife rehabilitation, and Laurie McDonald of Defenders of Wildlife will share tips on how to coexist with black bears. Other activities at the festival include exciting tours into a bear habitat with Adam Warwick, an FWC biologist who gained instant fame by rescuing a black bear from drowning in the bay off Alligator Point. Join us in the storytelling tent, where you can sit on hay bales and enjoy stories from local authors or listen to great music by locally renowned southern rock and blues band King Cotton and folk musician Dale Crider. Bring your kids to the Come Be a Bear activity, and watch them transform into a black bear and learn about the life of a bear through the seasons. The festival is presented by the FWC, Defenders of Wildlife, U.S. Forest Service, Florida Forest Service, city of Carrabelle and the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. For more information about the third annual Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival visit www.mycarrabelle. com or call the festival coordinator, Allen Loyd, at 727823-3888. Family fun at Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival set for Oct. 15FF WC C pP HOTO | Special to The StarEvents like the Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival help Floridians of all ages learn more about the states largest land mammal.Black Bear, Black BearFWC extending state regulations into federal waters

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTs S www.starfl.com ASectionSpecial to The StarWow! What a golf tournament. Gale force winds and rain were in the forecast but we had a beautiful day to play. We had players from Ohio, Tallahassee, Tennessee, Franklin, Bay and Gulf counties. Some were scared off by the forecast, but the eld thoroughly enjoyed themselves. The Ladies Golf Association of St. Joseph Bay Golf Club held their sixth annual Autumn Action Golf Tournament to benet two local charities High School High Tech of Gulf County, which serves high functioning youth with disabilities to give them experience in vocational opportunities and summer internships for work experience, and Gulf County Domestic Violence Task Force, which has a goal to end domestic violence in Gulf County through education of our youth and emergency nancial support for victims. Winners, we had plenty. The Teen Team winners were Witt Shoaf, Sammy Bucceri and Carl Sheline. They were sponsored by Drs. Anne Brown and Fred Thomason. In the adult category the rst-place winners were Buddy Renfro, Kenny Woods, Wayne Parrish,and Guerry Magidson from St. Joseph Bay Golf Club, winning $500. Second-place winners were Eric Schoelles, Damon McNair, Penelope Evenoff and Phil Dodson from the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club, winning $350. Third-place winners were Debbie Ashbrook, Andrew Rowell, Rob Stegemeyer and Herman Bell, split between St. Joseph Bay Golf Club and Tyndall winning $250 which they donated back to the Gulf County Domestic Violence Task Force. Fourthplace winners were Jake Jacobs, Denise Allen, Cleo Hobbs and Geri McCarthy, split between St. Joe and Tyndall, winning $100. Other awards that were given were Closest to the Hole, No. 4 Marvin Shimfessel, No. 7 Dr. Anne Brown, No.12 Debbie Ashbrook, and No. 15 Jeremy Heynes. Closest to the Line Women, Denise Allen and Men, Wayne Parrish, Teens, Sammay Bucceri. More than $3,000 in door prizes donated by many generous local merchants were given out as well. The Spit the Pot was won by Richard Radford of Eastpoint with a pot of $603. His comment was, I have never won anything in my life. He made the same comment when he won a door prize. He had a very good day and enjoyed the golf round as well. The major sponsors of the event were Rentech, GAC Contractors Inc., Gulf 2 Bay Development & Construction, Penelopes Pet Stop, Progress Energy, Coastal Community Association of South Gulf County, Mainstay Suites, Port Inn, Thirsty Goat, Duren Piggly Wiggly, Fairpoint Communications, The Shrimp Company, Preble-Rish, Forgotten Coast Realty, David Lister, DDS and El Governor Motel. There were 38 Hole Sponsors by local businesses. We would also like to thank Marie Stephens, our photographer. The Gulf County Tourist Development Council partially underwrote the event. Bill Cramer Chevrolet sponsored the hole in one prizes with a new Chevrolet being the major prize. Unfortunately, no one made the hole in one. Through these sponsors help, more than $10,000 was raised to benet two local nonprot charities. High School High Tech of Gulf County and Gulf County Domestic Violence Task Force will be able to serve their folks because of the businesses, golfers and a tremendously caring community. Our deepest appreciation goes out to all the volunteers, golfers, businesses and individuals that made this tournament such a success. (850) 227-7100 No Rainchecks Limited Quantities While Supplies Last halfhitch.comAmeristep Dog House Blind Ideal for rearm & bow hunting & a great hide for photographers.814 / 10412 Save $65$49 Reg $114 1657Mens Hunting BootWaterproof Mossy Oak Break-Up Fabric, 7" Dark Brown Oil Leather Uninsulated $29 Reg $59 Save $30IKam Xtreme Video EyewearAudio/video recording glasses. 8 GB of memory; 4 GB built in.50002 $79 Reg $119 Save $40Bushnell Trail Sentry 5MP Trail CameraWeatherproof & rugged, fast trigger speed, high resolution full color images.119205C $39 Special Buy22174-06041 30qt. Propane Turkey Fryer15 black solid steel stand & 30qt. tall aluminum pot, CSA 39 *Model may varyapproved hose & regulator. Reg $59 Save $20 Reg $139Big Dog Two Man Ladder Tree StandLarge 40 x 12-3/4 foot & seat platform. Padded seat cushion & ip-up shooting rail. Certied to all TMA standards. 2 fall arrest systems included.$99 BDL-451 Save $40 Moultrie Pro Hunter Game Feeder$79 Reg $139 Save $60 MFH-PHB30B Mossy Oak Break Up Innity GearBreakUp Innity truly oers hunters another dimension in camo. 19 & UP 1/3 OFF0021 0007 0020Sale Ends 10/31/2011Programmable Digital Timer. 30Gal. 200 lb. capacity. Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 7By Tim Croft Star News Editor PORT ST. JOE Too many and too much of the host Tiger Sharks spelled defeat for Franklin County last Friday night at Shark Field. Port St. Joe had seven players combine to rush for 349 yards and ve different players score touchdowns as the Tiger Sharks dominated from the opening whistle of a 38-6 victory. In snapping a threegame losing streak, Port St. Joe (2-3, 1-1 in District 4-1A) also kept its playoff hopes alive while rendering the mathematics a daunting equation for the Seahawks (2-4, 0-2). Weve been there the last three weeks, weve just been sluggish and weve been playing some pretty good football teams, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. This was a big game for us. We came out very focused. We knew we needed to set the tone early. That the Tiger Sharks most certainly did. Port St. Joes control of the rst half was utterly total. The Tiger Sharks had 39 offensive plays for 271 yards while holding the Seahawks to 11 offensive plays and 48 total yards. Port St. Joe scored on its rst ve possessions, eating up the clock with just one drive fewer than eight plays. The Tiger Sharks also beneted from superb eld possession, starting only one march as deep as their own 20 and needing just two plays and an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty to score on that possession. Meanwhile, the Seahawks had just two rst downs in the rst 24 minutes, fumbled twice to set up Port St. Joe touchdowns and failed to generate any momentum. Ouch, said Franklin County coach Josh Wright after a second consecutive trip into Gulf County the Seahawks were at Wewahitchka last week ended in a loss. From the get-go, they had us pegged. They did their homework. On defense, we would go inside and they would go outside. Wed go outside, theyd go inside. We just didnt do the job. They did. Port St. Joe took the opening kickoff and marched methodically to the Franklin County 14 before stalling and settling for a Daniel May 31yard eld goal. The Tiger Sharks would not be denied the end zone again in the half. Port St. Joe stopped Franklin County on downs and took over at its 20 following a Seahawk punt. Quarterback Trevor Lang back in the lineup after losing three weeks to a shoulder injury sprinted for 26 yards and another 15 yards was tacked on after a horse collar tackle. Natrone Lee (a gamehigh 133 yards on 11 carries) burst over the right side of the line on a counter play from the Seahawk 40 one play later for the touchdown and May made it 10-0. Franklin Countys Dwayne Griggs fumbled on the rst play of the next drive, the Tiger Sharks recovering at the Seahawk 47. Eight plays later freshman Travarous Riley went 9 yards for Port St. Joe and it was 17-0 after Mays extra point kick. After holding Franklin County three-and-out on its next possession, Port St. Joe got the ball back at its 43 following a punt and 10 plays later it was Walt Bowers from the 6 for a touchdown, the extra point kick blocked. May turned that setback around on the ensuing kickoff when he drilled his kick into the leg of a Seahawk and Chase Nichols pounced on the loose ball to give Port St. Joe possession at the Franklin 43. Eight plays later it was freshman Jarkeice Davis (99 rushing yards) catching a 7-yard pass from Lang for the touchdown. Mays extra point made it 30-0 at intermission. Leonard Green caught a 6-yard pass from Zachary Armistead to get Franklin County on the board on the opening drive of the second half, but the extra point kick failed and that was the Seahawk highlight for the night. Corey North rushed in from the 7 in the nal four minutes, Lang hitting Lee for two points to complete the scoring. Tiger Sharks dominate Franklin County 38-6First place winners with the representatives of the two charities, from left, Debbie Ashbrook, Kenny Wood, Guerry Magidson, Wayne Rish, Buddy Renfro and Pat Hardman. LGA tournament raises money for two local charities

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A8 | The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 October 18th 9:00 am 3 pmBuy Rite Port St Joe302 Cecil Costin Blvd Port St Joe, Fl 32456 Ph:(850) 227-7099Call us today for details 1. Who needs a u vaccine? a) You b) You c) You d) All of the aboveEven healthy people can get the u, and it can be serious. Everyone 6 months or older should get a u vaccine.This means you.This season, protect yourself and those around you by getting a u vaccine.THE FLU ENDS WITH U Toll included. Taxes, surcharges and fees, such as E911 and gross receipts charges, vary by market & could add between 6% & 39% to your bill; 83 Administrative/line/mo. is not tax, is not pro-rated & is subject to change. IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Subject to Month to Month Customer Agreement and Calling Plan, 45/min after allowance. Customers eligible for Link Up assistance will receive a 50% discount on the Activation Fee, and Verizon Wireless will waive the remainder of the Activation Fee. Limited-time offer. Offer not available in all areas. Restrictions may apply. Network details at verizonwireless.com. 2011 Verizon Wireless Q4NALFEDERAL LIFELINE NOTICE Verizon Wireless customers may be eligible to receive reduced-rate telecommunications service under the Federal Lifeline and Link Up programs. Qualifying customers will save at least $8.25 per month. Service activation fees may also be waived if you qualify for Link Up assistance. Additional discounts are available for eligible residents of Tribal lands. You may be eligible for Lifeline and Link Up assistance if you currently participate in a qualifying public assistance program or otherwise satisfy the federal income requirements. These requirements vary by state. To receive further information about the Lifeline and Link Up program, call Verizon Wireless at 800-924-0585 or go to verizonwireless.com/lifeline. Verizon Wireless only offers Lifeline/Link Up assistance in areas where the company has been designated as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier. By Tim CroftStar News Editor With the season drawing to a close and district playoffs set for Oct. 2527, Port St. Joe extended its District 4-1A winning ways with a pair of key wins. Last Tuesday, the Lady Tiger Sharks (107 overall, 4-3 in district play) hosted Blountstown, which had beaten Port St. Joe in five sets at Blountstown earlier in the season. This time, playing in front of a home crowd, the Lady Tiger Sharks prevailed in five close sets. With distractions of Homecoming week, the ladies really had to work hard for this win, said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor of the match, which ended with scores of 27-25, 20-25, 25-23, 1725 and 15-12. Leading the team with kills were Nicole Spilde and Autumn Haynes with nine apiece. Katie Lacour had 25 assists, and Oneika Lockley had 29 digs and 27 service receptions. That final set was an all-around team victory, Taylor said. Two nights later, the Lady Tiger Sharks hosted West Gadsden and won the match in straight sets, 25-16, 25-20 and 25-13. Lacour and Haley Wood each had four service aces. Katie Gardner, Raney Besore, Spilde and Nicole Endres each had six kills, Lacour had 29 assists and Jaclyn Kerigan had 13 error-free service receptions. On Monday, the Lady Tiger Sharks were at Tallahassee Rickards where they came away with another straightsets win. The game scores were 25-14, 25-15, and 25-5. Gardner had five aces with six points off serves, Lockley had six aces and nine points from serves, Haynes added eight aces and nine points off serves and Lacour had five aces and eight points off serves. The Lady Tiger Sharks traveled to Franklin County on Tuesday for their final district match of the season. The team plays host to East Gadsden at 7 p.m. ET tonight. Next week, the final two regular season matches will be at home. Start times for both matches will be 6 p.m. for junior varsity and varsity will follow at approximately 7 p.m. Wednesday night will bring Bay High to Port St Joe and Thursday night is our final regular season match, against Wewahitchka. This will be Senior Night as well as the annual Dig Pink charity event for breast cancer awareness and research. Come out support the Lady Tiger Sharks. Give em a reason to roll out both sets of bleachers and rock The Dome.By Tim CroftStar News Editor GRACEVILLE Wewahitchka is getting pretty comfortable on the edge. For the second time in three games, the Gators (4-2 overall, 2-1 in District 2-1A) overcame a huge second-half deficit to pull out their fourth-straight win 47-46. The Gators were down 46-19 in the third period before mounting their comeback which culminated with Theryl Brown catching the game-winning pass from 24 yards out with 2:36 remaining. The Gators dominated the final period, allowing Graceville zero offensive yards while scoring nearly at will. They could do nothing and we played on their side of the field the entire fourth quarter, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah. Wewahitchka scored the final 29 points three weeks ago to beat Franklin County, but topped that comeback against a district foe as the Gators continued their trek from an 0-2 start to a matchup next Friday against Sneads that will have significant playoff implications. We are exactly where we want to be, pointing toward Sneads next week, Kizziah said. You are living right and doing what you are supposed to do when you win games like this. Thats all we can figure. The Gator comeback was fueled by a change of offensive strategy. With Graceville largely bottling up the rushing of Brown and quarterback Justin Flowers, Kizziah decided to spread the field and throw. We made them make adjustments they could not make, Kizziah said. Flowers finished 14 of 21 passing for 267 yards and five touchdowns. He was throwing the heck out of the ball, Kizziah said. Brown had six catches for 139 yards and three touchdowns, adding two 2-point conversions. Ben Hayward had five receptions for 103 yards and two touchdowns. Jayln Addison added two rushing touchdowns for Wewahitchka. They did a good job stopping the run and Theryl got a little banged up, Kizziah said. But they were concentrating so much on stopping Brown and Flowers that left a little room for Jayln. The game swung critically in the final six minutes. Graceville faced fourth-and-17 at its 40 when the Tigers faked a punt and were stopped cold by Wewahitchka. The Gators drove down the field to the 24 and faced a fourth-and-17. Kizziah said the only pass he had not called to that point was for Brown to run a corner route. Despite being tripleteamed, the senior standout made the grab of a ball Flowers threw perfectly, Kizziah said. Its a win, and well take it, Kizziah said. It doesnt matter how it happened. We just go about it a different way, I guess. The Gators (4-2, 2-1) then stopped the Tigers at the 30-yard line to preserve the District 2-4A win. The Gators play at John Paul II in Tallahassee on Friday.Gators win fourth straight in shootoutLady Tiger Sharks heading to playoffs on a roll Sports

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, October 13, 2011 BPage 1SectionBy Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer With a seven category art display and an array of ne white, red and blended wines, there will be something to tickle everyones taste buds at the 13th Annual Mexico Beach Art and Wine Festival. Enjoy art, music, wine and a beautiful beach background at the event from 2-8 p.m. CT Oct. 15 at the Driftwood Inn in Mexico Beach. The event will also feature plenty of food, live and silent auctions, and live musical entertainment. The festival is sponsored by the Special Events for Mexico Beach Committee and raises money for the Best Blast on the Beach Fourth of July Fireworks display. The entry fee is $5 and children under 12 are free. There will be something for everyones taste palate, said Kimberly Shoaf, director of the Mexico Beach Community Development Council. There will be beer and wine and a good time. The Drew Tillman Band out of Tallahassee will be performing, beginning at 3 p.m. CT on the beach outside of the Driftwood Inn. Tillman is a nationally recognized singer and songwriter, popular among the Tallahassee music scene. According to Tillmans website, the heart of his music is rooted in the blues and fueled by the drive of American rock and roll. He has an energetic playing style, unique vocals and a strong desire to please his audience. (Tillman) has played for us before at the Mexico Beach Music in the Park events, Shoaf said. Theres going to be plenty of dancing on the beach because the band will be playing out there. The art show will begin at 2 p.m. CT and will feature art from a variety of mediums. Categories include oil and acrylic, watercolor and pastels, sculpture and pottery, stained glass and jewelry, wood carving and furniture, photography and digital art. Shoaf said the event usually brings in artists from all over. Entries will be judged and prizes will be given to the artists who excel in each category. Awards include $200 for best in show, and $100 for rst place in each category. Grand prize winners and second place winners will also receive gift baskets from local businesses. Awards will be announced at 6 p.m. CT. The live auction will begin after the announcement of the winners and will feature work from the artists who participated in the show. Shoaf said the committee also brought back a silent auction for this year, which will feature artwork and donated gift baskets from local businesses. Its a great event thats held right on the beach, Shoaf said. You get to peruse various forms of art while enjoying ne wines. Its just an overall good time. Shoaf said planning the event each year takes a lot of organization, teamwork and volunteer efforts. We have a great committee that wants this event to succeed, Shoaf said. They go above and beyond to make sure its successful. A glass of wine with a taste of art By Mark KnapkePark Manager St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, 227-1327 St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has a healthy population of whitetail deer. There is an estimated number of about 50 deer that reside within the state park. The doe, or female deer, hang out in small groups year round along with fawn and young deer up to a year old. Bucks, male deer, hang out together in bachelor herds separated from the doe most of the year, except during mating season which occurs fall through winter. The bucks develop antlers during the summer. The antlers are covered in velvet like tissue as they grow and harden. In the fall, the buck rub the velvet off of their antlers and later make circular scraps on the ground where they will deposit their scent to establish a territory. During the mating season, buck battle to defend their territory and mating privileges. Mating typically occurs beginning late fall into early spring. Gestation is about six months. Fawns are typically born from spring into early summer. If you visit St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, you are likely to see deer along the park drive. Several fawn have been hanging out with their mothers just past the ranger station. The fawn are so cute with their spotted coats. Please observe the speed limit in the park and do not feed the wildlife. Other wildlife that can be viewed in the park include a number of migratory song birds, shore birds, wading birds, squirrels, raccoons, bobcat, otter, fox and opossum, as well as many other critters. We hope you come to visit St. Joseph Peninsula State Park soon and enjoy the wildlife! Until next time, From the Rangers at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastateparks.org.Whitetail deer at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park This weekend is the third annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival Below is a schedule of performances throughout the weekend: (All times Eastern unless otherwise noted) Friday, Oct 14Provisions 6 p.m. Sherrie Austin and Will Rambeaux The Thirsty Goat 6:30 p.m. Walt Aldridge, Steve Leslie, Kevin Denney, Abigail Rose 8:30 p.m. Sherrie Austin, Will Rambeaux, Jillia Jackson, Haden Carpenter 10:30 p.m. Chas Sandford, Marty Dodson, Todd Taylor, Susan Ruth Mango Marleys (Mexico Beach, Central Time) 7 p.m. Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte 9 p.m. Wil Nance, Bruce Wallace, Bud Lee, Tim Buppert St. Joe Bar 10 p.m.Jam SessionHaden Carpenter, Jillia Jackson and FriendsSaturday, Oct 15Dockside Cafe 2 p.m. Songwriters Workshop moderated by Steve Leslie, Will Rambeaux and others Haughty Heron 7 p.m. Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte 9 p.m. Wil Nance, Bruce Wallace, Bud Lee, Tim Buppert Toucans (Mexico Beach, Central Time) 6 p.m. Walt Aldridge, Steve Leslie, Kevin Denney, Abigail Rose 8 p.m. Sherrie Austin, Will Rambeaux, Jillia Jackson, Haden Carpenter 10 p.m. Chas Sandford, Marty Dodson, Todd Taylor, Susan RuthSunday, Oct 16Indian Pass Raw Bar 2 p.m. Walt Aldridge, Steve Leslie, Kevin Denney, Abigail Rose 4 p.m. Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte, Sherrie Austin 6 p.m. Wil Nance, Bruce Wallace, Bud Lee, Tim Buppert 8 p.m. Chas Sandford, Marty Dodson, Todd Taylor, Susan RuthFILE PHo O To OReturning artist Chas Sanford plays to a packed house at the Indian Pass Raw Bar during last years festival.oON THE BLAsST BAYsSCHEDULEFILE PHo O To OPatrons check out locally-crafted woodworking while enjoy a taste of the grape at last years Art and Wine Festival. Star Staff Report Area bikers can cruise for a cause Saturday, Oct. 22 at the Fourth Annual Ride for Peace Poker Run sponsored by the Gulf County Domestic Violence Task Force. The run takes bikers on a coastal tour, starting at Honeyville Park in Wewahitchka and stopping at various parks and restaurants along scenic U.S. Highway 98, including Frank Pate Park, Toucans and The Runway Restaurant and Oyster Bar. Its a chance for people to get out and ride their bikes for good, said Pam Martin, who works for the Salvation Armys Domestic Violence Task Force. Its a beautiful trip through Mexico Beach and St. Joe Beach. Sign in is at 10 a.m. CT at Honeyville Park and last bike out is at 11 a.m. CT. The run will bring bikers back to Honeyville Park by 3 p.m. CT, in time for a free live concert during which local Wewahitchka musician Jerry Arhelger, who has recorded and written songs in Nashville, will be performing. There will also be door prizes, a 50/50 drawing and a bake sale at the event. Martin said the she encourages even those not planning on participating in the poker run to attend the concert. She also said you dont have to ride a motorcycle to participate in the poker run. The event costs $20 per driver, $10 for passengers and $5 for each additional hand. All proceeds will benefit victims and children of domestic violence. Its really a lot of fun, Martin said. Its going to be a great day, and its for a good cause. For more information call 850-2292901.Ride for Peace next weekend

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society 24-EMERGENCY SERVICE FOR OUR CURRENT CLIENTS! Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM Drs. Hours By Appt. DISCOUNT THURSDAYS Spays / Neuters 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients 300 Long Ave, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850)229-6009 Website: agapevet.com I RESCUED A HUMAN TODAYHer eyes met mine as I walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to have her. She wagged her tail, not too exuberantly, so I wouldnt be afraid. As I looked at her in the kennel she blocked my view from a little accident she had in the back of her cage. She didnt want me to know that she hadnt been walked today. Sometimes the shelter keepers get too busy and she didnt want me to think poorly of them. So many more are out there who havent walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one. On Friday, October 14th, 2011 (and every 2nd Friday of each month) we will feature Dogs for Dogs. Come by the Port St. Joe Marina around lunchtime (11:00 a.m. ~ 2:00 p.m.) and enjoy a hot dog or chili dog (max 2) lunch, (chips, and soda) included for a $5.00 cash donation. All donations will be given to St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. This event is open to the public, so please help us spread the word.Dogs for DogsOctober 14, 2011At Port St. Joe Marina340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Fl 32456 850-227-9393 Society By Roy Lee CarterCounty Extension Director Mulching is one of the best things we can do for landscape plants. Most of us use mulch simply because it makes our plants look better. But, improving the landscapes appearance is only one of the many benets of mulching. Its hard to decide which of the benets of mulching landscape ornamentals is most important. My information on this topic was provided by Extension Urban Horticulture Specialist Dr. Robert J. Black of the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. First, mulching makes it harder for weeds to grow in shrubbery and ower beds. Also, a mulch acts as an insulating blanket over plant roots, keeping them cool in hot weather and warm in winter. Another advantage is that mulch slows evaporation and helps conserve moisture in the soil. Also, it reduces the crusting that can occur when the soil surface dries out. This is important because it allows water from rain or irrigation to soak into the soil rather than run off and cause erosion. As organic mulches decompose, they work down into the soil. This improves soil texture and may even increase soil fertility. Seriously speaking, mulching just makes the landscape look better. Two types of mulching materials are used in Florida organic mulches and inert mulches. Organic mulches include compost, bark, leaves, grass clippings, straw, wood chips, sawdust and similar materials. Inert mulches are things like gravel, pebbles and polyethylene plastic lm. Applying organic mulch is a simple matter. Just spread a 2 to 4 inch thick layer of the selected material around the base of the newly planted landscape ornamentals. Then, add more mulch as needed during the year. Never allow the mulch to pile up around the trunks or lower branches of your plants. Spring is usually the best time to add mulch to established plants. If youre mulching with straw, wood chips or sawdust, its a good idea to apply some high nitrogen fertilizer at the same time. One or two cups of such fertilizer per bushel of mulch should help avoid deciency problems. If youre using plastic mulching (the polyethylene lm), you need to add fertilizer rst. Apply about two pounds of a recommended garden fertilizer for every 100 square feet. Broadcast it over the area and work it down about 2 or 3 inches into the soil. This may not seem like much fertilizer, but plastic mulch reduces the amount that leaches out of the root zone of your plants. You can apply less fertilizer to begin with. Thats one reason why IFAS scientists recommended plastic mulch for commercial ornamental and vegetable crop production in Florida. To summarize, mulching can be one of your most valuable gardening practices. Mulch helps control weeds and conserves soil moisture. It also moderates soil temperatures, improves texture and can increase fertility. Finally, mulch adds to the beauty of your landscape for a relatively low cost. Youll get good results by using a variety of organic and inert mulching materials. For more information on mulching ornamentals, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas.u.edu.Star Staff ReportHave you or your loved one been diagnosed with diabetes? Jenny Stuckey, registered nurse and certied diabetes educator for Sacred Heart Hospital, will host a diabetes selfmanagement class on Tuesday, Oct. 18 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT in the conference room at the Gulf County Health Department in W ewahitchka.  The self-management class is open to adults with diabetes who are looking for ways to manage their disease. The class will cover topics on exercise, medication and nutrition for patients to reduce the symptoms of diabetes. Pre-registration is required and a physician referral is needed to attend the class. The $10 fee will include lunch for the day. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert starches, sugar and other food into the energy you need for daily life. Unfortunately, the exact cause of diabetes is not known, but major risk factors include family history, obesity and lack of exercise. For more information or to join the class, please call Nell Tortoriello at 229-5601. For more information about Sacred Heart, please visit www. sacredheartonthegulf. org. To learn more about the Gulf County Health Department visit their website, www.gulfchd. com.Star Staff ReportThe Gulf County Senior Citizens Association, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, presents their annual Health Fair on Friday Oct. 21 from 9:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET. There will be numerous vendors from area health agencies that will be providing free health screenings including vision and stroke screenings, blood pressure checks, hearing screenings and much more. The Gulf County Health Department will also be on hand to administer u shots. Please call the health department at 227-1276 for more information about the u shots. The event is free and open to the public. All ages are invited to attend. DJ Steve McIntire from That Oldies Place will be providing music, and door prizes will be rafed throughout the day. For more information about the health fair, call Debbie at the Gulf County Senior Citizens Center at 229-8466. Star Staff ReportThe Gulf County Health Department and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will be providing u shot clinics throughout the month of October. The dates, sites and times are: Oct. 15 from 9 a.m. until noon CT on the Gulf County Health Department, 807 W. State 22 in Wewahitchka; Oct. 21 from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET at the Gulf County Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe; Oct. 29 from 9 a.m. to noon ET at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, 3801 E. U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. Please note, u Shots are $20. Please bring your identication card.Star Staff ReportWhen it comes to Medicare coverage and choices, how do you decide? Mainstay Financial Group will present a free seminar to help you learn more on Thursday, Oct. 13 at 10 a.m. ET at the Gulf Coast State College Gulf Franklin Center in Port St. Joe. Join this seminar to learn the difference between Original Medicare, Supplements, Medicare Advantage Health Plans and Drug Coverage. This seminar is part of the monthly series of free education programs sponsored by the Sacred Heart Senior Spirit, a free program for persons 55 and older. Benets include free screenings, seminars, special in-patient benets such as free guest meal tickets and a monthly calendar of events detailing all Senior Spirit events and containing health and event information. For more information or to register for this free seminar, please call 229-5627 or visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.org. Happy 50th wedding anniversary Charles and Bonnie Stephens.With much love and admiration, Your familyMulching ornamentals ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension directorSacred Heart to host diabetes class Anniversary Senior seminar on Medicare coverage2011 Public Health Fair Flu shot clinics

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The Star| B3Thursday, October 13, 2011 Homecoming Court for 2011 was: (Top left) Top to bottom: Katie Lacour, Megan Walker, Lacey Strickland, Kristina Furstenberg, Emerald Muniz, 6th grade attendant Kate McLemore.(Top right) Top to bottom: Raqueatha Bailey, Marsi Garrell, Natalie Wood, Katie Gardner, Erin White, and Kaley Wilder. Right, Emerald Muniz (middle) and escorted by her brother Forest Halualani (on left), was crowned Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High Homecoming Queen for 2011 by last years queen Catherine Cordova during halftime of last Fridays game against Franklin County. THIS PROJECT RECEIVED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM VISITFLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.comPARTIAL FUNDING FOR THIS EVENT PROVIDED BY THE GULF COUNTY TOURISM DEVELOPMENTCOUNCIL Now Open! Come Stick Your Nose In My BusinessYou wont be disappointed!!Whether youre looking for a little extra money or a full time career. Youre looking for SCENTSY!Scentsy is safer than traditional candles!Using a beautiful ceramic warmer, a low wattage light bulb and over 80 wonderful scents, you can transform your house into a fabulous smelling home!My team is growing rapidly but we still have plenty of room for more enthusiastic people.Ty Robinson850.229.2679 www.tyrobinson.scentsy.us Become an Independent Scentsy Consultant Today!Check out my website or give me a call! 1202066 FREE ESTIMATES1-850-626-9242 1-800-69-SHRED Security-cleared personnel Fort Walton Beachs leading mobile destruction company Weekly, monthly, or annual service Locally owned & operated School NewsBy Heather Brant and Claudia GrefGeneral InformationOct. 13 FCAT Math retakes Oct. 14 End of rst nine weeks Oct. 17-18 Fall Break Sports Oct. 13 Volleyball at East Gadsden, JV at 6 p.m. and varsity at 7 p.m. ET. Oct. 14 Football at Rocky Bayou at 8 p.m. ET. Oct. 15 Cross Country at Mosley at 9 a.m. ET. The Varsity Cheerleaders placed 2nd in their very rst district competition on Saturday, Oct. 1 at Bozeman. Congratulations!NJROTC NewsThe Cadet Corps of the Port St. Joe NJROTC consists of 55 dedicated and motivated cadets. The company has been extremely busy. Along with providing Color Guard and ag raising support at our home football games, the company has been extremely active throughout the community. Cadets did journeymans work at the Paws in the Park 5K Run and Fund Raising Event, provided community support for the Scallop Festival 5K Run and provided Color Guard Support for the Panama City Navy League Luncheon. Events scheduled for October include the Homecoming Festivities on Oct. 7, providing Color Guard Support for the Delta Raider Company at the Clifford Sims Veterans Home on Oct.9, and support for the Gulf County Sheriffs Fishing Tournament on Oct. 15. The Cadet Drill Team will start their fall practices in preparation for their rst Drill Competition on Dec. 10 at Boca Raton High School. GO TIGER SHARK COMPANY!Star Staff ReportPort St. Joe Elementary School will hold its annual Fall Carnival from 4-6 p.m. ET on Friday, Oct. 21 on the eld behind the Centennial Building. There will be a Cake Walk, Bounces, Pie in the Face, Face Paint, Soda Ring Toss, Duck Shoot and much more.Special to The StarDid you know that Julius Cesar, a Roman Emperor, was stabbed to death by his senators so they could regain control of the Roman Empire? It is interesting to note that Caesars closest friend, Antony, and his adopted son, Octavian, shared power of the Empire after Caesars demise. Once in power, Antony fell in love with Cleopatra and began to give parts of the Roman territory to her. Of course this angered many Romans so in 31 B.C. (before the birth of Christ), Octavian and Antony fought a bloody battle off the coast of Greece in which Antonys eet surrendered. Antony abandoned his eet and he and Cleopatra escaped to Egypt where they committed suicide. Octavian conquered Egypt and returned to Rome as the undisputed ruler of this dominant empire. Octavian had many titles, but the Bible calls him Caesar Augustus. This should sound familiar, as this was the Roman Emperor that instituted the census that forced Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem. History draws a line at this time because the birth of Christ begins Anno Domini (A.D.), meaning in the year of our Lord. Rome ruled the world at the time of Christ but by A.D. 500, the Empire had vanished. After the birth of Christ, many other Roman emperors ruled the vast empire. Domitian who ruled from A.D. 81 to 96, demanded to be worshipped as a god. Constantine, who began his reign in 324, claimed to have seen a cross in the sky with the words Conquer by this written on it. He is remembered as the rst Christian emperor of the Roman Empire, and after many years of the persecution of Christians, he began to persecute in the name of Christianity. History, from a Christian perspective, is an important part of academics as well as an important part of life. George Orwell stated, Whoever controls the past controls the future. Whoever controls the present controls the past. However, all of this seems dry to the average student when they are bombarded with a plethora of dates and places. On the other hand, a study of events and the people involved can be fascinating as drama unfolds story after story. There is intrigue, murder, blackmail, romance, bravery and inspiration in the stories passed down through the centuries. They entertain us, teach us and give us courage to stand for our convictions. We cannot afford to be ignorant of those things that are past, but we must learn from past mistakes and triumphs to be blessed with a better tomorrow. PreK Whitney Butler, K Fisher VanDertulip, 1st Trinten Lee, 2nd Ava Ryan, 3rd Zion Padilla, 4th Rainey Nobles, 5th Isabella Johnston and 6th Cheyenne Nelson. Bus riders of the week: Lealand Whitlock, Austin OBryan, Sarah Metcalf, Emily Whiteld, Brianna Biagini, Kaylee Jones and Albert Scheffer. The Lions Tale DAZZLingING DoDOLpPHinINSAnnual Fall Carnival

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Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 FAITHThursday, October 13, 2011 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com ObituariesApalachicola native James Vincent DeCosmo died Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011, in Tallahassee following an extended illness. He was 86. DeCosmo was the only son of the late James Vincent DeCosmo, Sr. (1898-1956) and Katherine Emanuel (DeCosmo) (1900-1987) of Apalachicola. His siblings were the late Clara DeCosmo (Herndon) and the late Katherine DeCosmo (Lovett) of St. Petersburg, Florida. The DeCosmos grew up on 53 10th Street and enjoyed the beach at Indian Pass whenever they could. DeCosmos grandparents were Frank Vincent DeCosmo (who came to Apalachicola from Italy) and Mary Silva Randolph Buzzett (DeCosmo), who came from New Orleans along with her mother, Anna Silva. When she reached Apalachicola, Anna Silva married a Buzzett rst, and after his death married Antoine Messina. DeCosmo (Coz to all his friends) distinguished himself as an avid outdoorsman and a talented athlete, playing both basketball and football at Chapman High School. In 1943 he was drafted into military service and eventually served two years as a private rst-class in the Army Air Corps as a navigator. On the Philippine island of Leyte, he and all his crew members survived the crash of their aircraft behind enemy lines and walked to safety. After service, DeCosmo used the G.I. Bill to pursue a college degree. In 1946, he enrolled at the newly formed Tallahassee Branch of the University of Florida (TBUF), the transitional institution between the Florida State College for Women and Florida State University, created by the Florida Legislature in 1947. He became a member of TBUFs only football team. After obtaining a Masters degree in physical education at FSU, DeCosmo was hired by the department in which he was enrolled. He served 28 years, teaching all aspects of physical education and serving for many years as the assistant director of the universitys famed Flying High Circus. DeCosmo created and coached a team of ying trapeze artists that was known as The Flying DeCosmos. After retiring in 1975, DeCosmo became a stand-out golfer in his age group, regularly posting scores that matched his age through 2005 at his favorite course, Hilaman Park, in Tallahassee. The club eventually created an annual tournament in his honor, naming it The Coz. DeCosmo was married to Lucy (Kelley) DeCosmo, originally of Perry, Fla., for 60 years until her death in 2009. He is survived by four children, Janet DeCosmo, Linda DeCosmo, Patricia (DeCosmo) Wesolowski, all of Tallahassee, and James M. DeCosmo, of Austin, Texas; along with 14 grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Funeral details are not yet complete, but will be posted at 850-656-9467 as soon as possible. In lieu of owers, friends are encouraged to send donations to the American Heart Association.James Vincent DeCosmo JAMES DeCOSMOSpecial to The StarOn Sunday, Oct. 23, at both morning Worship Services, Dr. John Ed Mathison will be at First United Methodist Church to preach. John Ed was the pastor at Frazer Memorial United Methodist Church for over 30 years. Under his leadership the church grew from about 300 members to over 9,000. Dr. Mathison retired two years ago this past June but he hasnt slowed down at all. As a matter of fact, he has picked up the pace. John Ed is traveling all over the world sharing Gods love and the gift of his experience and wisdom. We are very fortunate to have John Ed with us. John Ed is the son of Si Mathison who was the pastor of First United Methodist Church in Panama City for a number of years. Everyone is invited to come and worship with John Ed at our casual service, Worship On the Water at 9 a.m. ET, or our traditional service at 11 a.m. ET in the Sanctuary. Its not every day that we have someone with John Eds leadership and achievement with us.Mathison to speak in Port St. Joe Oct. 231924-2011Alva Franklin Kemp, 86, of Wewahitchka Fla., passed away on Sunday Oct. 9, 2011. He was born at Wetappo Creek in Wewahitchka, Fla., and has lived in Wewahitchka for 86 years. Mr. Kemp retired as a heavy equipment operator with Gulf County Road Department after 36 years of services. He was also employed by Gulf County Senior Citizens for 19 years and served in the U.S. Navy in 1946. He enjoyed shing and going to church where he played his guitar for many years. He was predeceased by his Parents Joshua and Mary Kemp; and two grandsons, Tracy Wade Kemp and David Kemp. Survivors include his wife, Roxie Kemp and his six children: Franklin (Debbie) Kemp of Kinard, Diane (Earl) Bright of Altha, Houston (Pat) Kemp of Wetappo Creek, Minnie Carolyn Kemp of Wewahitchka, Patty Pippin of Dalkieth, Reba Whitehurst of Wewahitchka; 17 grandchildren and 27 great-grandchildren; a very special nephew, Travis Prescott, and his daughter, Andrea Prescott. Pallbearers will be Alvas grandsons and great grandsons. Honorary pallbearers will be all present and former employees of the Gulf County Road Department of Wewahitchka Florida. There was a viewing from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesday Oct. 11, at the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church. The funeral was on Oct. 12, also at the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church at 2 p.m. CT with Rev. Joey Smith, Rev. Robert G. Miller and Dallas Presley ofciating. Interment followed at Kemp Cemetery State 22. Funeral Services will be handled by Comforter Funeral Home in Port St. Joe.AAlva Franklin KempDavid Elijah Gardner, Jr. passed from this life on Oct. 4, 2011 in Gainesville, Fla., surrounded by his family in love. He touched the lives of so many people with his love, laughter and zeal for life. He had a contagious personality that left a trail of friends in his path. We will greatly miss him, but we will always rejoice that God had allowed him to be a gift to us. The late David E. Gardner, Jr. was born on Feb. 3, 1942, in Pensacola, Fla., to the late Mr. David and Ethel Gardner, Sr. He worked for the Alachua County School System and Shands Hospital for many years before retiring to a life of leisure. He leaves to cherish him in memory: a sister Mrs. Thelma Lewis; two brothers, Mr. Tommy Gardner and Mr. Steve Gardner; his children, David Gardner, III, LaLitha Gardner (Harry Johnson), Leroy Gardner, Dana Gardner, Reginald Clark, Brianni Gardner, Eugenia Rashell Parham, and Lynetta Gardner; a host of nieces, nephews, grandchildren and loving friends throughout Panama City, Miami, Port St. Joe and Gainesville, Fla. The funeral service was held at 11 a.m. EDT on Monday, Oct. 10, at the Zion Fair Baptist Church with interment in Forest Hill Cemetery.All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.David EElijah Gardner Jr.Dennis Chris McKnight of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed away Sunday, Oct. 9, 2011 in Wewahitchka, Fla., at the age of 57. He was born Aug. 26, 1954 in Panama City, Florida to the late George Thomas and Iris (Percival) McKnight. He was a long time resident of Gulf and Bay County and was a millwright. He was survived by his brother, Scotty McKnight of Candler, Fla.; his sister, Elaine Rafeld of Callaway, Florida; sisterin-law, Linda McKnight; nephew, Rusty McKnight and great-nephew, Chase McKnight. A memorial service will be held 10 a.m. CT, Saturday, Oct. 15 in the Chapel at Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown. Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Phone 674-5449. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com.Dennis Chris MMcKnight First United Methodist hosts guest preacher

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PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, October 17, 2011 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application by Keith Vargo for Parcel ID # 6269-013R Located in Section 18 Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroach 10 into the 20 road setback for Sugarloaf Lane. 2. Development Application by Cinnamon Hill, LLC and Others For the undeveloped area around Star Fish and Tulip Avenues between Triton and Nutmeg Streets in Beacon HillLocated in Sections 30, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida develop and ll Tulip and Star Fish road right-of-ways. 3. Open Discussion 4. Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312.2011-74 Keith Vargo Cinnamon Hill Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn CareRobert PelcMowing Service227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance COMBS CONSTRUCTIONINC.CGC 1507649*ADDITIONS *TERMITEREPAIR *WINDOWREPLACEMENT (850) 229.8385 OR (850) 227-8156 glencombspsj@gmail.com v JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE & PALM TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE 850-670-5478 OR 850-370-6911 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! MOSES J. MEDINA 850.527.0441MMEDINA@CRESTENTERPRISES.COM REMODELING SERVICES LICENSE#RG0058632 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971OPEN AT 11AM ET 7 DAYS A WEEKWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COMFOR ONE NIGHT ONLYFRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4TH 8 PM TO 12 MIDNIGHT ET BOBBY KENNEDY & MICHELLEMILLIGANWEDNESDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PM ETKARAOKE & DANCING IN THECROWS NESTTHURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PM ETRANDY STARK ON THE POOPDECK WITHARTLONGONSAXSATURDAYSTUESDAY & WEDNESDAYLADIES NIGHT 5 PMTILCLOSING HALLOWEEN PARTY & COSTUMECONTEST SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28TH FaithThe Star| B5Thursday, October 13, 2011Benet program at New LifeDivine people of God will be sponsoring a benet program for our brother in Christ Theodore Taylor art 6:30 p.m. ET on Saturday, Oct. 15 at New Life Church in Port St. Joe.Annual Womens Day at New BethelNew Bethel Baptist Church of Port St. Joe will celebrate its annual Womens Day at 11:30 a.m. ET on Sunday, Oct. 16. The speaker will be Evangelist Alma Pugh of Apalachicola and the colors are white, silver, black, green and pink. Everyone is invited out to lift up the name of the Lord. Pastor Cyril Mills.Annual Convocation at New CovenantThe New Covenant Missionary World Outreach Center, located at 252 Avenue E in Port St. Joe, will host its annual convocation beginning Monday, Oct. 17 through Thursday, Oct. 20. Nightly meetings will be held at 7 p.m. ET on those dates. This years theme is Living under an Open Heaven. Everyone is welcome. For more information contact Debbie at 850-866-5205 New Horizon AAThe New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 850639-3600. Faith bBRIEFSStar Staff ReportThe St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club of Port St. Joe will be hosting its annual Spaghetti dinner on Saturday evening, Oct. 15 from 5-7 p.m. ET at the Church Hall on the corner of Monument and 20th Street in Port St. Joe. This is not your ordinary spaghetti dinner made by a bunch of guys getting together to cook in the kitchen. The spaghetti dinner will be prepared by renowned Chef Ian Williams from Verandas Bistro in Apalachicola. Chef Ian is serving up a spaghetti dinner with Bolognese sauce, garlic bread, salad, dessert and a soft drink. A donation bar will also be available. The cost is only $8 per ticket for adults; $4 for children under the age of 12 and take out is available. Tickets are available from Dan Van Treese 2279837 or any Mens Club Member. Tickets are also available at the No Name Caf, 306 Reid Ave in Port St. Joe, 229-9277. For more information on this event or any other St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club activities, please contact Bill Reid via cell phone at 850-227-8232 or via email at Bill@HospitalityLinens. net.Spaghetti dinner Saturday at St. Josephs Catholic Church

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COOK/ GOLF SHOP ASSISTANT ST. JOSEPH BA Y GOLF CLUB700 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD227-1757ASK FOR LAURIE See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centura.us.com Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 35921S NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County School Board proposes to amend and adopt policies, as provided for in the Administrative Procedures Act, for the purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change. .28 Schedule for Legal Advertisements 3.18 School Calendar 3.22 Opening and Closing of Schools 3.48 Service Animals 3.701 Visitor Identification Measure 4.71 Participation of Home Education and Private School Students in Extracurricular Activities 5.18 Children of Military Families 5.341 Use of Time Out, Seclusion and Physical Restraint for Students with Disabilities 6.10 Employment of Personnel 6.18 Contracts: Instructional and Administrative Personnel 6.37 Suspension and Dismissal (Option 2) 66.40 Assessment of Employees 6.91 Salary Schedules 7.10 School Budget System 7.20 Accounting and Control Procedures 7.33 Petty Cash Funds 7.65 Antifraud 7.70 Purchasing and Bidding 8.61 Telecommunications Plan, FIRN2 and Internet Use (Option 2) Ecnomic Impact: These proposals may result in direct costs associated with implementation. IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT: Time: 10:00 AM EDT Date: November 8, 2011 Place: Gulf County School Board Room 150 Middle School Road Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The entire text of the proposed rules can be inspected during regular office hours at the Gulf County School Board Office, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL. Special Legal authority under which the adoption is authorized and the law being implemented and interpreted is made specific. The addition and changes are proposed by Duane McFarland, Director for Business Services and approved for consideration by Jim Norton, Superintendent. Amendments: See above. October 13, 2011 35725S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board is accepting bids for lockers at Wewahitchka Elementary School. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road or faxed by calling 850-229-8369. Bids will be accepted starting October 6, 2011 and ending October 20, 2011 at 12:00 p.m. E.S.T. October 6, 13, 2011 35865S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, VS. CARLA S. PATTERSON, MICHAEL E. HARTLEY JB, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, and THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY, Defendants. CASE NO. 11-217CA NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CARLA S. PATTERSON and MICHAEL E. HARTLEY JB YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose on the following described property in Gulf County, Florida: Lots 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 & 13, Block M, Howard Creek Properties, an unrecorded subdivision of a portion of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West and a portion of Section 6, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Southeast quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 East along the South line of said Southeast quarter of Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 West for 564.79 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northerly along said curve having a radius of 2234.30 feet for an are distance of 197.22 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 27 West for 197.16 feet; thence North 30 West for 212.40 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue North 30 West for 170.75 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northerly along said curve having a radius of 884.64 feet for an arc distance of 325.88 feet, the chord arc bearing North 40 West for 324.04 feet; thence North 51 West for 401.28 feet; thence South 38 West for 218.00 feet; thence South 51 East for 401.28 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 666.64 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an are distance of 245.58 feet, the chord of said arc bearing South 40 East for 244.19 feet; thence South 30 East for 170.75 feet; thence North 59 East for 218.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. has been filed against you, and GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA and THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Michael J. Henry, Plaintiffs Attorney, whose address is 221 McKenzie Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401 on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED this 24th day of August, 2011. Clerk Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: Tina Money Deputy Clerk October 13, 20, 2011 35719S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, VS. JAMES BAILEY IV and MYSTIC PALMS SUBDIVISION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendant. CASE NO: 11-124-CA CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 21, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on October 20, 2011, the following described property: Lot 9, Mystic Palms, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 8, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Dated: September 23, 2011. Gulf County Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 2011 35672S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2010-CA-000226 Division: HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2007-1 Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY D. EVANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIMOTHY D. EVANS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated June 27, 2011, entered in Civil Case No.: 23-2010CA-000226, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2007-1 is Plaintiff, and TIMOTHY D. EVANS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIMOTHY D. EVANS, are Defendants. Rebecca L Norris, Clerk the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. ET, at the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on the 20th day of October, 2011 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 6: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF TREASURE BAY SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 32, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE GO S. 89 E. ALONG AN EASTERLY EXTENSION OF THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TREASURE BAY SUBDIVISION FOR A DISTANCE OF 68.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY R/W LINE OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30 (HAVING A 66 FOOT WIDE R/W); THENCE GO N.15 E. ALONG SAID R/W LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 155.78 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE N. 15 E. ALONG SAID R/W LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 103.40 FEET; THENCE GO S. 15 W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 103.40 FEET; THENCE GO N. 89 W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 217.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL BEING LOCATED IN SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 6, TREASURE BAY UNRECORDED. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 23, 2011. Rebecca L Norris Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 (954) 354-3544 Fax: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Telephone 850-718-0026 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. Oct 6, 13, 2011 35761S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA OPTIMUMBANK Plaintiff, and OB REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS 1570, LLC Intervenor-Plaintiff, vs. TODD OLIVE; SHELIA MEAD aka SHEILA MEAD; ESTATE OF FRED E. MEAD, deceased; STANLEY M. KATZ; and GULF PINES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION OF GULF COUNTY, INC. Defendants. Case No.: 10-0418-CA NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated, September 27, 2011, entered in this cause, will sell at 11:00 a.m. EST in the lobby at the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 on the 27th day of October, 2011, the following described parcel of real property, to-wit: Lot 23, Block A, Gulf Pines Subdivision, according to the Official Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 25, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS OF THE DATE OF THE SALE. In accordance with F.S. 45.031(3). the successful high bidder, if other than the Plaintiff, shall post with the Clerk a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the final bid or $1,000.00, whichever is less. The balance shall be paid to the Clerk within twenty-four hours of the sale, otherwise the Clerk shall re-advertise the sale and pay all costs of the sale from the deposit. Any remaining funds shall be applied toward the judgment. THIS NOTICE dated this 28th day of September, 2011. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of Court, By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 2011 35641S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: Estate of KENNETH LEE SEARCH, Deceased. FILE NO. 11-68 PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of KENNETH LEE SEARCH, deceased, whose date of death was JULY 18, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 6, 2011. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Theodore A. Search 3248 Creekside Drive Apt #741 Evansville, IN 47715 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Daniel Harmon III Florida Bar No.: 0544078 23 E 8th Street Panama City, Fl 32401 (850) 215-2443 October 6, 13, 2011 B6| The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 13, 2011 The Star | B7 MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $119,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 BeachsideFOR RENTST. JOE BEACH 113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98 2 bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98 2 bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach WINDMARK BEACH 212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #4 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #6 2 bd/2ba Fully Furnished MEXICO BEACH Villas of Mexico Beach, 3706 Hwy 98 New Condos, Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 3bd/3ba Furnished Unit 302 2bd/2ba Unfurnished INDIAN PASS 8822 CR 30A 3 bd/2ba Unfurnished (Right down from Raw Bar ) Pictures available on MLS #243890CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision 101 Two Palms Drive 4 bd Unfurnished Two Palm Subdivision 3 bd/3 ba Furnished and covered pool (small pet allowed with pet deposit) PORT ST. JOE 1206 Palm Blvd 1.5 bd/1ba Partially Furnished Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Dr. Unit 15 2 bd/2ba Furnished 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOME Country Living Eastpoint Area ......................$800 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$650 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE ............$500 DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY PIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ..........................$700 WKLY PLUS 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd Floor; 3 Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16 inside clearance; Dual 12 roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $285,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing available131 E. Gulf Beach DrSt. George Island, +/3,950sf of ce/retail; $285,00071 Market Street Multi tenant historic bldg downtown Apalachicola; +/7,252; Inquire for terms ue SO LD Eas po int F L nside clea ran ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Gulfaire executive 3 br, 2.5 ba, PVT beach, $350K. Pelican Walk Real Estate (850) 647-2473 Price ReducedFSBO: 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 Bayview Home @ Indian Pass. 4 br, 3 ba, 2 acres, large storage and Boat shed. $1200 mo + $1200 dep. $200 pet fee. In the St. Joe school district. Call 850-229-1065 or 850-227-5025 Beacon Hill 2 br, 1 ba, carport, $600 mo. + dep. Pelican Walk Real Estate (850) 647-2473 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $650 month + deposit 850-229-6403 For Sale or Rent2 br, 1 ba, CH&A, Call 850-227-1804 RV Lots at Kristiana RV Park at Beacon Hill 2 blocks from the Gulf, $250 month, W/S included. Call John 850-647-5000/340-0675 2 storage spaces available, 32x34 on America Street (West End), John (850) 340-0675 Full Service, Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL80999 to 56654 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Food Svs/HospitalityVacation Rental Operations ManagerHiring Full time position. Requirements: strong project management, communication, and computer skills. Rental property management experience desired. Sunset Reflections Vacation Rentals (850) 227-5432 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Easy $1,500 WeeklyMailing Postcards from Home. Law Firm needs help NOW! NO experience necessary! Supplies Provided. FEE Genuine Opportunity! FREE info! 1-800-765-4007 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Oct 22 & 23rd 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Administrative/ClericalAdministrative Asst/ BookkeeperKerigan Marketing Associates, Port St. Joe. Most duties via computer w/ Quickbooks bookkeeping, MS Word & Excel. Positive attitude, speed, professionalism & willingness to resolve conflict under pressure are important traits. Apply via email only by sending resume to info@ kerigan.com, by Oct 20. Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Registered Dietician RN Lab Technician EMT Clerical Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 34173429 Camera bag (Tamrac) lost near Stump Hole Beach. Lots of sentimental value. Call (850) 830-1796 or 836-4488 Howard Creek, 130 Magnolia Ave Friday 14th, 8:am-?Large Estate SaleTwo sheds full, 1997 Lance Camper slide in with AC, lots of clothes 1 xl and mens 2 xl Mexico Beach 20th Street, Saturday 9:00 a.m.-? CST;Antique Bottle Yard SaleBottles from 1690-1900, nautical items and art work. St. Joe Beach, Seashore Sub 8005 Alabama Ave, Sat Oct 15th, 7:30-12:00Large Family Garage SaleBoys baby clothes size 0-2, baby items toddler, men & women clothing, household items, toys TVs electroinc and much more. Priced to sell. Text FL80860 to 56654 Opening Soon Upscale Consignment ShoppeRent a space now at a discounted rate in Downtown PSJ. Call before its too late!! (850) 229-6165 35893S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of BAYOU BISTRO, located at 912 16th Street, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port Saint Joe, Florida 32456, intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port Saint Joe, Florida, this 16th day of August, 2011 Elner Amison October 13, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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LocalB8 | The Star Thursday, October 13, 2011By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer In a measure of heath factors throughout the state, Gulf County falls among the higher risk counties. In Floridas 67 counties, Gulf County ranks 40th on the list, which measures residents health behaviors based on personal choices and environment. The lower ranking counties represent those with the highest health risks. We know we have some really poor risk factors that set us up for unhealthy behaviors, said Marsha Player Lindeman, administrator of the Gulf County Health Department. These are diseases that are directly related to the lifestyle choices we make. The health factors list examines four areas: health behaviors such as tobacco use, diet and exercise, alcohol use and high risk sexual behavior, access and quality of care, social and economic factors such as education, employment and income, and physical environment. In Lindemans rst year as administrator, she has been given a tool that will help prioritize the services the department provides. Every three years, the health department completes a community needs assessment that provides an outline of the countys health prole. Lindeman said she is lucky to have started her job in the same year the assessment is done. The statistics give her the instruments to better address the health needs of the community in partnership with other local health care providers, schools, government, businesses and civic organizations. In weeks past, Lindeman has presented the statistics to the Port St. Joe City Commission and the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners, and plans on extending the education much further. What you nd in these assessments are lots of opportunities to make changes in the community that will positively impact the health of the people, Lindeman said. She said Gulf Countys low ranking on the health factors list was one of the most surprising statistics in the assessment and is a direct link to the countys chronic disease statistics, nearly all of which fall higher than the state percentage. This is a community that has a problem with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, Lindeman said. All of these diseases can be prevented. She said the citys effort in constructing new biking and walking paths, providing residents with a new place to exercise, is a step in the right direction in addressing the obesity problem. You cant change it all, Lindeman said. You cant change that in a year. Instead, Lindeman said the health department, in partnership with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, will introduce programs focusing on chronic disease management, helping people manage, improve and control their diseases. We need to introduce accessible ways to learn how to eat better and learn how to get more activity in our lives, Lindeman said. Were looking at programs to where we bring in patients with diabetes and teach them how to choose better foods and how to cook better foods. The new statistics provide new guidelines for the community for health education and promotion. We have to do both. We have to prevent and we have to help people get the best quality of life with a chronic disease, Lindeman said. Lindeman was also shocked by statistics included in the assessment from a 2010 survey done by the Florida Department of Children and Families measuring youth substance abuse across the state. The survey is administered every two years to a statewide sample of middleand high-school students. According to survey data, Gulf County ranked higher than the state average across the board for alcohol use, binge drinking, cigarette use and use of marijuana and hashish. The county also nearly doubled the statewide percentage for reported cocaine or crack cocaine use, use of prescription amphetamines and use of club drugs. (For full survey results visit www. dcf.state..us) Lindeman said the statistics provide an opportunity for all of the stakeholders in the community to really look at these problems and begin addressing them. The community needs assessment also showed an increasing poverty rate in Gulf County, with 17.5 percent of the population living at or below the poverty level, and 27.6 percent of the population considered low income. About 50 percent of our patients (at the health department) are at or below poverty level, Lindeman said. Certainly our population (of patients) is poorer than the case load of a private practice physician. Lindeman recently conducted a workshop with community leaders to examine how to improve the countys health prole. Lindeman said the workshop was interesting because the group deemed Gulf Countys small size as one of its greatest strengths, but also one of its greatest weaknesses. Although the county has the capacity to easily band together, it is also challenged with limited resources. They were all very enthusiastic that this community does have the capacity to change, Lindeman said. They felt like even with fewer resources and fewer people we still can be strong. The community stakeholders also brainstormed health goals for the community. In the next two years well work those goals, and then after three years well circle around and do this again, Lindeman said. I hope we can see the trends improve. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an imWEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West PassTIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Oct 1383 6120% Fri, Oct 1482 57 0% Sat, Oct 1580 59 0% Sun, Oct 1680 61 0% Mon, Oct 1781 66 0% Tues, Oct 1881 6110% Wed, Oct 1976 54 0%10/13Thu07:19AM 0.3 L10:30PM 1.9H 10/14Fri08:12AM 0.3 L11:05PM 1.9H 10/15Sat09:18AM 0.2 L11:47PM 2.0H 10/16Sun10:35AM 0.2 L 10/17Mon12:35AM 2.0 H11:46AM 0.1 L 10/18Tue01:26AM 2.0 H12:42PM 0.1 L 10/19Wed 02:21AM 1.9 H01:26PM 0.1 L 10/13Thu03:27AM 1.6 H11:09AM 0.2L 06:09PM 1.4 H10:42PM 1.3L 10/14Fri 03:50AM 1.6 H11:38AM 0.2L 06:54PM 1.4 H11:06PM 1.3L 10/15Sat 04:18AM 1.7 H12:08PM 0.2L 07:43PM 1.4 H11:36PM 1.4L 10/16Sun 04:51AM 1.7 H12:45PM 0.2L 08:37PM 1.3 H 10/17Mon 12:13AM 1.4 L05:30AM 1.6H 01:31PM 0.2 L09:39PM 1.3H 10/18Tue 01:02AM 1.4 L06:15AM 1.6H 02:32PM 0.3 L10:42PM 1.3H 10/19Wed 02:16AM 1.4 L07:12AM 1.5H 03:44PM 0.3 L11:36PM 1.3H Health assessment highlights challenges