<%BANNER%>






The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! DOWNLOADS
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03813
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 09-29-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03813

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By Tim Croft Star News Editor There was division in the room and division on the po dium. But after a debate that lasted nearly an hour last week, Port St. Joe commis sioners voted 3-2 to approve an ordinance that would ex tend the hours for alcohol sales in the city to conform with hours in unincorporat ed areas of the county. The ordinance allows those with a license to sell alcohol in the city to do so until 2 a.m. ET each night, as opposed to the previous mid night ET deadline. Those hours are exactly the same as in the county. Commissioners Bo Pat terson, Lorinda Gingell and Bill Kennedy voted in favor of the ordinance; Mayor Mel Magidson and Commission er Rex Buzzett dissented. Buzzett voted against the ordinance even being read a second time for adoption. Buzzett said that after con sidering previous stands against any event in the city lasting beyond midnight, he had a change of heart on ex tending sales hours. This is about these peo ple running their businesses the same hours as every body else does, Patterson said. If you dont, you are discriminatory to them. Gingell expressed a simi lar attitude, saying that all the businesses in the city wanted was a level playing eld from a business per spective, adding the two ex tra hours was appropriate. Several owners of estab lishments that sell alcohol in the city had come to the commission requesting the extension of hours as a way to keep customers in the city and avoid potentially devas tating accidents on the roads as patrons moved from the city to an establishment out side the city for the addition al two hours. Their argument was made on two levels. The ex tra two hours would provide badly needed revenue and city tax collections during difcult economic times; and by extending hours there would be less trafc on U.S. 98 between the city and, for example, Lookout Lounge on the county line once mid night passed. More than 200 patrons of the St. Joe Bar signed a peti tion requesting the change. I dont see the big deal here, said Connie Butler of the St. Joe Bar. We are not saying we are necessarily PSJ commissioners extend alcohol sale hours Thursday, SEPTEMBER 29 2011 SUNSET OVER INDIAN PASS By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer The executive director of the Gulf County Tour ist Development Council contracted an event plan ner without approval from the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners and without legally putting this work out for bid. Amber Davis was hired in mid-August after she approached the TDC and offered to assist with new events. With all the TDC func tions with BP funds, she was able to help with the projects, said TDC execu tive director Tim Kerigan. This is a temporary-type position. The TDC board rst dis cussed hiring Davis at its July 13 meeting. Kerigan told the board about his encounter with Davis and agreed he and assistant di rector Kellee Novak could use help with upcoming events. A motion was made by board member Jay Rish to let the TDC nd help for events on a contract and as needed type basis, accord ing to meeting minutes ob tained at the Clerk of Courts ofce. The motion was sec onded by Warren Yeager. The TDC board began discussing Daviss pay at the next meeting Aug. 2. Kerigan asked the board whether it was considering pay per hour or per event. He said he had heard from a few board members that they had a different expec tation. Board member Steve Newman said during the meeting he went back to pri or months minutes and un derstood it should be a pay as you go directed part-time assisted position. Alyson Gerlach coun tered by stating the position sounded contractual and asked if the TDC should put it out for bid. Kerigan then said if the position is as needed, then its not con tractual. Rish noted that no one recommended Davis to the TDC, but rather Davis approached them. After Kerigan and TDC assistant director Kellee Novak spoke in favor of hir ing Davis, the board made a motion last month to try Davis out and if its not working, its not working. The board then toyed with a wage for Davis. Ker igan said he just wanted to be clear if we are talking about $12 an hour or $25 an hour. Rish said the board needed to outline what our needs are and look at that appropriately across the board. Fifty dollars (an hour) isnt the right number but neither is $12. TDC meeting minutes showed no further discus sion about Davis during the Aug. 9 and Sept. 6 meet ings. Meeting minutes do not show that the TDC board ever voted in favor of hir ing Davis or approved any contracts with Davis or her company. Davis and Kerigan signed three separate mem orandums of understanding (MOUs), outlining Daviss professional services on Aug. 19. Each MOU contracted Daviss company, State craft, to develop, enhance and/or provide assistance with events under the di rection and approval of the TDC to be held no later than April 30, 2012. The rst MOU prom ises Davis a professional service fee of $7,000, to be paid in two installments for late summer and early fall events. Davis received the rst $3,500 installment on Sept. 9 in a check from the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. The check also covered $6,541 in expenses for the TDCs golden scallop trea sure hunt. The second MOU con tracts Davis and Statecraft for new winter events at $8,300 to be paid in three installments and the third MOU contracts $9,000 to be paid in four installments for new spring events. In total, the MOUs on le contract Davis for $24,300 worth of event planning with the TDC between late August 2011 and April 2012. City Attorney Jeremy Novak said, under a coun ty policy adopted in 2005 regarding hired services, county agencies must col lect at least three verbal bids for services ranging TDC hiring raises questions By Tim Croft Star News Editor For the proposed Northwest Florida Re newable Energy Center (NWFREC), next Tuesday represents a milestone. Port St. Joe city com missioners will consider a development order for the project, which would provide a local green light to the project that has been percolating for nearly two years. Due to the expected turnout for the discus sion of the project, which has stirred controversy among many residents, the meeting, a regularlyscheduled bi-monthly meeting of the commis sion, has been moved to the Centennial Building. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. ET. The citys Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) unani mously approved the draft development or der late last month. Now the full commission will weigh in. Earlier this summer, the project received the final air emissions permit from the Florida Depart ment of Environmental Protection, the final state permit required for the project, which was also issued a stormwater management permit from the DEP. The $225 million NWFREC, which is pro posed to burn woody bio mass in the form of forest residue left after logging operations, is estimated to generate 180-200 jobs during the 18-month con struction timeline with 85-100 permanent jobs generated at the plant and through the fuel pro duction pipeline. Local elected and eco nomic development of ficials have championed the project, with some of ficials traveling to South Carolina where a much smaller version of a simi lar plant provides power on campus. The project is seen as a potential stepping stone toward creating a green technology center in the county, a concept sup ported by Floridas Great Northwest, a regional economic development organization. Rentech, the Califor nia-based company de veloping the project, esti mates the plant will come online sometime in 2013. However, financing remains a question mark for the project. Originally seeking a federal loan guarantee, Rentech was notified this summer by the U.S. Department of Energy that the project would not be considered at that time because of a lack of funding. PSJ commissioners to take up energy center development See ALCOHOL A2 See ENERGY A3 See TDC A2BAY DAY, B1YEAR 73, N UMBER 50 Opinion .......................................A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ...................A5 Outdoors .....................................A6 Sports ...........................................A7-A8 School News ................................B3 Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B4 Classieds ....................................B6-B7

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 from $5,000 to $10,000, and must legally advertise for services or positions paying more than $10,000. The TDC is paying Davis in separate install ments, each under the $5,000 mark. There are only two ex ceptions to the rule that come from sole services, such as hiring a particu lar band for a concert, and emergency services. If its something many people can do, there needs to be a bid, Novak said. Youre not a sole source provider of that service. Kerigan said the TDC never put out a bid for the service because its not a position; its a contract for hire. It was more because of everything she had al ready done for the com munity, Kerigan said of his decision to hire Davis. The board asked for help, and she came to us. Kerigan said Davis is not an employee of the TDC or Gulf County. I understand some peoples concerns with her personal afliations with others, Kerigan said. In a small community its very likely that people will have these types of afliations. I dont want any troubles with it, but Im also sensi tive to anyones concerns or questions. Everything were doing is highly scru tinizedthrough BP, the governors ofce. Its not anything were doing to upset anyone. The TDC did not submit a Request for Proposal to the board of county com missioners to hire Davis. Novak said any county agency spending taxpayer dollars must get the ap proval from the county commission to do so. The TDC does not have the authority to bind the countys contracts without the commission ers approval, Novak said. Those ve guys are the ones that have to vote on these things. If its some thing that obligates the county to a certain amount of money, it has to go through the commission. Novak said there have been misunderstandings among agencies where they think getting the boards approval means getting the approval of the agencys own board. There is only one board, and its the board of county commissioners, Novak said. The execu tive director doesnt make these decisions, the com mission makes these deci sions. Kerigan said he enlist ed Novaks help in making sure things are done ac cording to county code. My recommendation (to Kerigan) was to put a list together of potential expenditures for the pub lic and the commission to review, Novak said. Get this stuff before the com mission. All your stuff. Novak said he will begin sitting in on TDC meetings to educate the board and make sure everything is done according to county policy. Novak said the TDC board does not have the au thority to throw around Gulf County dollars without the commissions approval. He also said the TDC cannot be signing contracts without the boards approval. The TDC would like to thank all of those that helped make the PoJo Live Music Fest such a success. We could not have done this without all of your help and efforts. Commissioner Bill Williams Commissioner Warren Yeagar Rick Ott From the Heart Recording Studio Kerigan Marketing Ramseys Printing Coast 2 Coast Printing and Promotions Panache Tent & Events Gulf County Sheriffs Department Raymond Hart Gulf County Maintenance Bobby Pickels Progress Energy Janis Tankersley New South Outdoors Jodi Perez Amber Davis Mize Plumbing Andrew Rowell GAC Pour Services LLC Dixon & Sons Taxi Service Lewis Bear Company Darla Lyle & Carla Hand Gulf County Clerks Ofce Johanna White Vision Bank Money Tree Sgt. Chris Buchanan Toye Roberts Carpet Country Florida Eco Services Kim McFarland & Joni White St. Joseph Bay Humane Society PSJ Student Government Young Explorers Band of Gold Steve Newman Alyson Gerlach Chris Petrie Jack Kerigan John & Carlene Parker Elaine Lerch Joel Reed Lindsay Thomas Christa Mathews Joe Robinson Crystal Follin Provisions Steamers Hotdogs Snow King Boon Docks Mango Marleys Downtowners Regans Oyster Bar Paul Gants Barbeque Prickly Pears 850-819-4492 429 S Tyndall Parkway, Suite M Marsha Mongoven, Licensed Esthetician Variety of facials, chemical peels, and waxing Visit www.forskinsakellc.com for complete menu MICRODERM WITH YOUR FIRST FACIAL F or S kin S ake, LLC F REE Now Open! ALCOHOL from page A1 TDC from page A1 going to be open until 2 a.m. each night. We want the option, if we have the business, to stay open the two extra hours. Al Smith of Rays said, All were asking for is the same right as in the county. Every bit of revenue we can get, we need. We pay the same taxes as everybody else. Those arguments, however, were not persuasive to those who spoke in opposition to the ordi nance, which several characterized as a gateway to the arrival of clubs and other larger drinking establish ments in order to take advantage of the longer operating hours. If you do this, you fundamen tally change Port St. Joe, said resi dent Marcus Sturdivant, who said commissioners were listening too much to President Barack Obama, who Sturdivant contended was try ing to fundamentally change the country. Several opponents noted that the ordinance seemed a continua tion of the relaxation of rules per taining to alcohol sales, a move that began several years ago with the approval of Sunday sales by the commission. Gary White, speaking, he said, not as a minister but a citizen, sug gested that there were not droves of people driving from the city to establishments in unincorporated areas at midnight, rendering the safety issue somewhat of a red her ring. He also suggested that any addi tional revenue, as it is tax revenue for the city, would be pennies and that only two or three businesses in town even operate until midnight. Im not speaking about this from a religious point of view, or from the moral perspective, but about the logic, White said. Mid night is an adequate time. Local businessman Ted Lovelace spoke about the dangers of alcohol and said the new extend ed hours would open the city up to become a pleasure palace and nightspot. Where are we going to go with this, Lovelace said. Lovelace also said, and was echoed later by Sturdivant, that voters would likely not forget who supported the ordinance and who did not. This will be your decision, he said. It will be on your plate. Magidson took umbrage with such a statement. I have never voted for or against an issue because I think it will cost me an election, Magidson said. I have never voted one way or another because I thought it would cost me one vote. Kennedy ended the discussion by noting, as he had in prior meet ings, that he had no problem with the extended hours and wished that the passion shown during the debate on the alcohol sales was focused on things far more impor tant than two hours. RECYCLING In an effort to make recycling easier for residents, the containers previously sited at the city trans fer station on Industrial Road had been moved to the STAC House on Eighth Street, allowing round the clock access. The city is also offering a pickup price for businesses that produce a lot of cardboard: $40 a month for pickup once a week and $80 a month for pickup twice a week. The recycling program has re ally gone well and has been a good thing for the city, said city man ager Charlie Weston. If we get enough interest we can get more containers in the city.G ULF PINES Resident Christine McElroy lauded commissioners for choos ing not to purchase the deed to Gulf Pines Hospital through a bank ruptcy proceeding and encouraged commissioners to carefully con sider any future consideration of buying the land at auction. McElroy said the citys top pri ority should be providing a water distribution system that produces clear, drinkable for all and until that time the city should be careful about expending funds on a proj ect that given current estimates on cost would be a money-loser for the city.

PAGE 3

Local The Star| A3 Thursday, September 29, 2011 ATTENTION FORD F-250 POWER STROKE DIESEL ENGINE IF YOU OWN OR LEASE A FORD SUPER DUTY TRUCK OR AN EXCURSION VEHICLE FOR MODEL YEARS 2003 2007 EQUIPPED WITH FORDS 6.0L DIESEL ENGINE, COMMONLY KNOWN AS FORDS POWER STROKE DIESEL ENGINE, YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL RIGHTS IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS YOUR POSSIBLE CLAIM FOR DAMAGES, CALL: Lovelace Law Firm, P.A. 12870 US Hwy 98 West Suite 200 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Telephone: 850-837-6020 Toll free: 1-888-837-2281 Fax: 1-850-837-4093 dml@lovelacelaw.com www.lovelacelaw.com 24-EMERGENCY SERVICE FOR OUR CURRENT CLIENTS! Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility 300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM Drs. Hours By Appt. D ISCOUNT T HURSDAYS Spays / Neuters 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients ENERGY from page A1 Rentech has been ex ploring its options in the private and public mar kets, said a company spokeswoman, but noth ing has been finalized. Meanwhile, the company has entered into contracts for the engineering and equipment procurement for the construction phase of the project. The 55 megawatt plant will use 900 dry tons of forest residue per day, according to company of ficials. Despite seeking to add fast-growing grasses to a level of 50 percent of the fuel source within three years, the company has no plans to use such grasses, officials said, though permit language would allow them as a fuel source. Land permitted on the north end of the county for growing operations has been abandoned and the grow operations eradi cated. While opponents la bel the plant, the first commercial-size applica tion for the companys SilvaGas process, an in cinerator in disguise, the company argues that emissions will not be no ticeable, that the process is not burning, but heat ing large amounts of sand, with water added during the process to produce steam to turn a generator to produce electricity. Nearly all the electric ity from the plant will be purchased by Progress Energy under an agree ment signed more than two years ago. The plant, company officials noted, met all re quirements of the DEP, which are the same as the U.S. Environmental Pro tection Agency. But opponents are evi dent, as signs around the city proclaim Biomass? No. The primary argument is that the plant was per mitted by the DEP as a mi nor source of air pollution and therefore was held to less stringent standards than appropriate. As this is the first com mercial scale use of the SilvaGas process, oppo nents label the plant an experiment. Further, opponents ar gue that there is no safe threshold established by the medical community for particulate emissions, so-called nano particu lates, which the plant will emit. In essence, oppo nents argue, the medical science has yet to catch the technology. A list of medical asso ciations has raised ques tions about biomass in general. State associa tions have expressed con cerns about the Port St. Joe project among several others around the state, including one in Gaines ville. The air emissions per mit for the Port St. Joe project was twice chal lenged: the first sent the company then developing the project back to the drawing board after pull ing the application; the second ended when the challenge was dropped this summer. As for the potential jobs to be created by the proj ect, opponents state those benefits are outweighed by the risks. A development order would clear the way for Rentech to begin con struction on the old Mate rials Transfer Industries site, a former coal-trans fer station that is a brown field.

PAGE 4

Opinion A4 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 Mama lives in a retirement community in Alabama and I visit her as much as I can. The other residents are a lot of fun to watch and listen to. They all have stories to tell and they want to tell them. In my opinion, their stories are a lot better than books or television. This particular visit was on the last day of National Assisted Living Week. It was a Friday, and they were having a luau with pia coladas. Im not a big fan of coconut, but I tried them and they were good. We were sitting out back in a large gazebo type structure sipping our pia coladas, talking and having a good time. Out of the approximately twenty residents there, only three were men. Being a math guy interested in statistics, I know that women tend to outlive men by about ve years. Sitting under the gazebo with these folks, it was kind of obvious. The three fellows sat together side by side. They were all around 90 yearsold, give or take a couple of years. Their names were John Frank, Buck and Ray. I was in the south, they were from the south, and they had appropriate southern names. With these three wise men, I realized that I was in the presence of greatness. Yes, these fellows had seen almost one hundred years each, and they were slowing down a lot, but they were genuine American Heroes. Of the three men, Buck was the only one I had met before. Previously, Buck hadnt been in a talkative mood. On this day, Buck was in a very talkative mood. First, I talked with John Frank. Mama had introduced me to John Frank earlier in the day. His wife lives in the same facility as my Mama, and John Frank lives across the street in a facility that is able to provide more care. When I talked to John Frank, I was actually talking to his wife. It was one of the sweetest experiences you could imagine. He was tired and often said to his wife, I dont remember, you tell them. She would proudly answer the questions and smile. John Frank smiled as she told his stories. It was incredible to see the love in both of their faces. John Frank was an Air Force man in World War II who ew 65 bombing missions. The thought of that alone blew me away. His wife told of missions to Sardinia and Africa (I assume Tunisia) in the ght against the Axis Forces (the Nazis). His wife was quick to say that he only dropped bombs in 64 of those 65 missions (he served as an escort in one). Im sure that she had heard the story many times; it was as though she had to get it right. They didnt want to take credit for the one with no bombs. It was an incredible feat, even if he didnt get to drop bombs on that one mission. According to John Franks wife, it was at a time when our country didnt have enough men for the planes. She noted that initially, yers were limited to 25 combat ights, and then the limit was extended to 50 and extended again to 65. After 65 missions, John Frank came home. I was sitting with this hero, listening to his wife and I was watching him smile. I was honored and was pretty sure that the smile was out of love for his wife and probably had nothing to do with his combat missions. After talking to John Frank, I talked to Ray. He was a new resident and was still getting used to the surroundings of the retirement community. Ray didnt say much, he didnt have to. Ray was with the 11th Airborne Division, also known as The Angels, during WW II and the Korean War. Ray seemed to think this information was all I needed to know. It was. Then, there was Buck Buck was a Navy Seal, before they were actually called Navy Seals. He was an excellent swimmer growing up, the best he knew of. Buck, at 92 yearsold, still makes this claim multiple times a day. No one disputes him; he goes on to say he swam nekkid in Wehadkee Creek, Ala., and that there werent bathing suits back then. He laughs when he says it. Buck has been written about in Hero Books, and folks know that his stories are true. The ladies sit around like school girls saying Buck, tell him about the swimming pool, or Buck, tell him about Mrs. Roosevelt, or Buck, tell him about getting baptized. At 92, Buck still gets a little excited as he tells his stories and laughs. There is a rumor that Buck was Over the past year there has been much debate centered around providing a level playing eld, a foundation for competition that is equal for all. From extending alcohol sales for Port St. Joe establishments or creating a new state high school athletic classication for small rural schools, leveling the eld has become clich. But as reported this week by reporter Valerie Garman not all playing elds, for example the one the Gulf Tourist Development Council, or at least its executive director, is playing on, are level, as evidenced by the recent hiring of Amber Davis and her company for contract work. The TDC, though several board members said they had no knowledge of the hiring, contracted with Davis and her company to provide professional services for TDC events through April 2012. The contracts, or memorandums of understanding, for a total of nearly $25,000, however, were written in increments that by all appearances seem designed to circumvent county bidding rules that mandate anything over $10,000 be put out for bid. The rst payment to Davis totaled $3,500 for her professional services and another $6,000-plus for supplies and marketing for the golden scallop promotion. No single MOU reaches the threshold of $10,000. Leave aside for this discussion the fact that Davis is linked socially with County Commissioner Bill Williams. As one TDC board member suggested the entire episode not only stinks it is rancid on its face. First, there would be a question of just how much the TDC requires in assistance to market any event. This is an organization ush with cash from a BP settlement to seven Florida counties to enhance tourism. This is an ofce operated by an executive director, Tim Kerigan, whose taxpayer-paid salary of over $50,000 is pretty well above average for this county. And when it comes to marketing events, until the contracts with Davis were signed in early August, all marketing for PoJo had come from Kerigan Marketing under a county contract it secured last year. Why the need for additional professional services? The Chamber of Commerce had a model for bringing in extra help for events they were called volunteers. They were plentiful and free. And, in the case of the golden scallop promotion, this is an event that only took shape the past month how much marketing extended beyond the borders of Gulf County? Why doesnt this promotion begin in June with the start of scallop season and serve as a season-long event? How is this event in need of an additional $3,000 professional services contract? The event, as offered late in the season, seems a way to toss BP money around with no apparent purpose beyond steering business in a desired direction. Further, the TDC board had issues over the hire. Meeting minutes reect that some board members had heartburn concerning whether the MOUs with Davis were a contract in search of a Request for Proposals. There is a measuring stick for such a situation. If you have to ask, chances are that an RFP is not only needed, but should be required, for nothing other than adhering to transparent governance procedures. TDC meeting minutes also reect that after a general discussion about going out for bid, a discussion about how much to pay Davis she requested $50 an hour there was silence on the subject for two subsequent meetings, a span during which Davis entered into the series of MOUs with Tim Kerigan. The TDC board does not appear to have taken an ofcial vote on the nal MOUs. Consider the contrasting views of this scenario. When contacted about the arrangement with Davis, Tim Kerigan pronounced it not a big deal, that the TDC had needed help with events, had been approached by Davis and put Davis under contract. However, county attorney Jeremy Novak expressed concern about bidding requirements, stating only the Board of County Commissioners had the power to approve contracts over $10,000 and that Kerigan could not unilaterally act where commissioners had the nal say. Novak took the position a step beyond, saying he would be attending TDC meetings to ensure compliance with county rules and urged Kerigan to put everything he is doing as TDC executive director in the sunshine, in the eyes of the public and commissioners. But this sort of action has too often been part of the countys DNA and that the BOCC chairman who, as a TDC board member, seconded a motion to hire some event help with no parameters set was remotely in support of this contractual hocuspocus speaks volumes. At its most fundamental, local government is in place to ensure fairness for all, that those who might not be part of the morning coffee klatch, the post-commission card games or a member of the proper church congregation, gets a fair shake. And there is no more appropriate place than in bidding for county business. If taxpayers cant rely on a level eld from an entity that spends public funds, the adage that holds that who you know is more important than what you know prevails. There is every potential that Davis offers an appropriate service to the TDC. There is also every possibility that in a county where unemployment remains stuck in double gures, there are others with equal or better skill sets who would nd $25,000 a lifeline in tough times. But until entities funded by public dollars act with probity and fairness in spending the funds they are entrusted with instead of providing the perception that the inside track to the pie belongs only to insiders, government has unked the trust test. And with trust gone any credibility that the playing eld is level is out the window. Its as plain as black and white Keyboard KLATTERINGS The 3 wise men A level playing eld TIM CROFT Star news editor The Western Channel is currently airing an old Kirk Douglas movie, Lonely Are the Brave. Kirk hadnt given his trusty horse, Whiskey, his rst pat before I was transported to 1962. That was the summer the picture was released and when David Paschall talked me into going down to the Park Theatre with him to see it. I wasnt too interested, now if David had been a good looking girl it might have been different. Ye gads! The thing was in black and white! This was 1962 for goodness sakes; we had Cinemascope and Technicolor! And it was set in modern times! There was no posse rushing to the rescue, no dusty cattle drives and no wagon train attacks. This movie wasnt going to have a sinister saloon owner vying treacherously to steal the old mans ranch. All we were going to get was an hour and a half of looking at the dent in Kirks chin. I had paid a whole quarter to see a modern day western lmed without the benet of color! Hollywood had tricked me again! The management had my money, David seemed perfectly content and I certainly didnt have any place else to be. I settled in and quickly went to pondering on exactly how Kirk shaved around that hole. He played a character named Jack Burns. Ole Jack didnt cotton much too modern times. The movie might have been set in 1962 but the character sure wasnt! Too many laws, too much bureaucracy, the world seemingly abounded in red tape and personal governmental agendas. Jack longed for a simpler time. An era less constraining. I had trouble in school spotting the symbolism Miss Polly was always pointing out in those poems by Keats and Shelly, but I understood immediately Jacks penchant for cutting any fence he came across. He didnt carry an I.D. He had no social security card, no drivers license, no Diners card. He pointed out emphatically that he needed no identication papers, he KNEW who he was! Course, this didnt sit well with the local powers that be after the ght with the one armed man. And let me say quickly, there wasnt anything wrong with Jacks sense of justice. He put one arm behind his back so the ght would be even-up. The overbearing police playing the authoritarian role couldnt understand Jacks individualistic penchant. He aint like us. They pushed and shoved him a mite. I reckon that was so we could get the overlord, underdog picture xed in our minds. But a barroom brawl wasnt that big of a deal in a small western town in 1962, they decided to let Jack go. He hit a deputy right square on the jaw. Jack had to walk his own line, make his own statement. And he wanted to be put in jail so he could break his good friend out. Apparently hed ridden a long way and cut a lot of fences to do just that! But the friend only had a short time left and was through bucking the system. Jack sat in the jail cell and shook his head. He couldnt understand. He explained about the fences and the no trespassing, no hunting, no hiking, keep-out, restricted, closed area signs. Jack felt constrained. Either we will live free and open or we will live caged and subservient. His world was as black and white as the movie. You can imagine how long a man like Jack stayed cooped up. He pulled a le from his boot, sawed through a couple of bars and made his escape to the freedom he so desperately desired. The freedom he so thoughtfully understood. The freedom he would relinquish to no man or authority. He saddled Whiskey, who he knew, unlike his friend, would not let him down and cut a trail for old Mexico. His crimes so far (they didnt know to charge him with fence cutting) added up to a ght in a bar and hitting a policeman. For this the long arm of government called out every available agency to hunt him down. They sent jeeps, walkie talkies, helicopters, the highway patrol, deputies of every persuasion, bounty hunters, meddlesome reporters and the kitchen sink after him. Even the most non symbolist among us couldnt help but notethat was a lot of show, a lot of re power and a sinful amount of tax money to nd one, at best, quasi lawbreaker who simply wanted to be left alone. Think of the poor that could have been fed; the jobless that might have been helped; the real criminals that could have been apprehended; or, at the very least, they might have bought a prosthesis for the one armed guy. The rest of the picture zoned in on Jack and Whiskeys race for Mexico. Jack naturally had to shoot the helicopter down. He took the obligatory bullet in the leg, depended on his horse and never doubted for one second his right to seek his own manifest destiny. He doesnt make it, of course. He gets run over by a semi-truck loaded with toilets. You talk about symbolism! This wasnt Its a Wonderful Life. I saw an interview with Kirk Douglas years later where he said this was his favorite of all his movies. It was for me, too. I hear that a re-make of this movie is in the works. Theyre looking for a cocoa colored horse and an actor with a dimple in his chin. They are going to bring it up to date by not changing it at all! Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See CRANKS A5

PAGE 5

9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 U p c o m i n g OPEN AT 11AM E T 7 DAYS A W EE K WWW.L OO K O UTL O U N G E .C O M E v e n t s ! WE D NE SDAY, FRIDAY & S ATURDAY 9 P M E T K ARA O K E & D A N CI N G I N TH E C R O WS N E ST T HURSDAY, FRIDAY & S ATURDAY 9 P M E T R A N DY S TARK ON TH E P OOP DE CK W ITH A RT LON G ON S AX S ATURDAYS S U N DAY 7 P M E T O PEN M IC HO ST E D BY B ARRY HEN S ON B RI N G YO UR IN STRUM EN T A N D SON GS T U E SDAY & WE D NE SDAY L ADI E S NIGHT 5 P M T IL C L O SI N G dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! M OSES J. M EDI N A 850.527.0441 MMEDI N A @ CRESTE N TER P RISES COM REMODELI NG SER V ICES L ICE N SE #R G 0058632 Come Stick Your Nose In My Business You wont be disappointed!! Whether youre looking for a little extra money or a full time career. Youre looking for SCENTSY! Scentsy is safer than traditional candles! Using a beautiful ceramic warmer, a low wattage light bulb and over 80 wonderful scents, you can transform your house into a fabulous smelling home! My team is growing rapidly but we still have plenty of room for more enthusiastic people. Ty Robinson 850.229.2679 www.tyrobinson.scentsy.us Become an Independent Scentsy Consultant Today! Check out my website or give me a call! Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S Letters A5 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 a ladies man in his younger days. He still is. On this particular day, Buck wouldnt be outdone. He was born to compete and he still does. We were sitting around drinking our pia coladas, when Buck got started talking. He said, Im 92 years-old, I bet Im the oldest man out here. There were four men outside drinking pia coladas; John Frank, Ray, Buck and me. I knew he had me beat, Ray had already admitted to being 90 and John Frank just smiled. Buck was not sure if he got his point across, so he continued to say it. I was born in 1919, Im 92 years-old and I bet Im the oldest man out here. Honestly, I loved it every time he said it. Every time he said it, I agreed with him. However, after 7 or 8 times, Ray nally decided to say something to Buck. Ray, who was wearing a VFW hat slightly covering his eyes, turned to Buck and asked, Why dont you get a sign and wear it around your neck? I have changed this a little because I think Ray might have put it in 11th Airborne lingo. Im still trying to gure out why they called them The Angels. One thing is for sure, I wasnt going to ask Ray that question on this day. However, I knew I was in the presence of three wise men, three American heroes and three fellows who still have a lot to offer. BN Heard writes about what cranks his tractor at www.CranksMyTractor. com. His column is carried in newspapers and magazines across the southeastern United States. CRANKS from page A4 At the end of August, a large, disgusting algae outbreak slimed Old Tampa Bay. Two months earlier, an algae outbreak in the Caloosahatchee River near Fort Myers turned the river bright green, smelled like raw sewage, and made thousands of sh go belly up. Water with algae outbreaks like this is so toxic that health authorities say you shouldnt touch it, much less drink it or swim in it. It can give you rashes, respiratory problems, and even kill you. U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Oklahoma, found that out the hard way. He swam in the same type of toxic algae outbreak in Grand Lake, Oklahoma, in June and said he became deathly sick that night with an upper respiratory illness. There is no question, Ihhofe told the Tulsa World, that his illness came from the toxic algae in the lake. Oklahoma health ofcials had warned people not to touch the water, swim in the popular lake, or eat sh from it. Like Floridas outbreaks, the one in Grand Lake was fueled by the socalled nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus, which come from inadequately treated sewage, fertilizer, and manure. After years of seeing nauseating algae outbreaks on popular Florida tourist beaches like Sanibel Island and at shing meccas like the St. Johns River, we citizens nally got the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to start setting limits on the sewage, fertilizer and manure pollution thats threatening our drinking water and our health. This type of pollution is preventable. We can combat it at its source by upgrading old sewer plants, using modern manure management on agricultural operations and being smarter about applying fertilizer. Cleaning up our waters is a good thing, but you wouldnt know it by reading the distortions and inated cost estimates that highly paid polluter-lobbyists are peddling to scare people. They will spend whatever it takes to make sure they can keep using our public waters as their private sewers. The truth is that meeting Floridas new limits for these contaminants is likely to cost a few dollars extra per person per month phased in over many years. In Chesapeake Bay, for example, advanced wastewater treatment cut pollution at a cost of only $2.50 per household per month. Not a bad price for clean water. The Florida DEP is in the process of setting new statewide standards for phosphorus and nitrogen pollution. Unfortunately, the rules that state regulators have proposed so far are inadequate to protect public health and clean up the waters. It is critical that the states polluters, now emboldened by the current anything-goes mentality in Tallahassee, dont end up writing the DEPs waterpollution rules. It is critical that our state regulators protect the public, not the polluters. Tourism, shing, and boating are our economic lifeblood in Florida. When visitors come here and see dead sh and No Swimming signs, they wont come back, and that affects our state budget and our jobs. David Guest is an attorney in the Tallahassee ofce of Earthjustice, a public-interest law rm. Dont let polluters write clean-water rules DA VID GUEST Guest Column Dear Editor: This letter is in response to front page article in The Star, by news reporter Valerie Garman, in reference to a workshop meeting by the Mexico Beach City Council voting on a tentative millage rate. First of all, that was a workshop that was open to discuss the tentative rate from the council, property owners and citizens of Mexico Beach. The millage rate was not set as a nal vote by the council as this was only a workshop. There were several mistakes in the article. First of all the article stated that the city purchased the historic Parker House, to be converted into the Mexico Beach City Hall, for a higher price than was offered at a public auction of the property. This is totally false. The city purchased the property for less than what was offered at the auction. Cathey Parker Hobbs and her siblings decided not to accept the offer from the auction. It was not her decision alone to reject the offer. This accusation was made by a disgruntled property owner. Your reporter did not question the city council, mayor or city manager to verify this accusation. The Parker Family also donated additional land adjoining the property to the city after reaching the agreement for the city to purchase the property. It is true that the mayor and Hobbs are cousins, but the mayor abstained from voting on the purchase of the Historic Parker House. I for one am proud that the city was able to purchase the property to preserve and honor the Parker Family. For those who do not know, the Parker Family founded and developed Mexico Beach. On the accusations that materials to reconstruct the Parker House would likely be purchased at the local Ace Hardware Store (owned by the Cathey Family), I see nothing wrong here if the materials are put out for bids, and the local Ace Hardware comes in at the lowest bid. Only makes sense to go with the lowest bidder. The awarding of the reconstruction contract: Mayor Cathey did not vote on this at all. The decision was made by the city council without the mayor voting. Last, the city has insurance to cover the cost to make the needed repairs to the Parker House and the insurance company will be making the payment to the Contractor of Choice. The article also implied that total (complete) construction was needed. In truth only the destroyed areas will be torn down and the rest repaired. This was not reported in the article. My family and I love living in Mexico Beach and have for the past 17 and a half years. We visited here for many, many years before buying property and moving here. For those who dont love it, the door is always open for them to move away. Victor Webb Mexico Beach Dont love Mexico Beach? Door is open According to Gail Cunningham, spokesperson for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, we live in a credit-dominated society. Without a checking or savings account, she says, its difcult to cash payroll, Social Security and unemployment checks; you need a credit or debit card to shop online, book a ight or rent a car; and you may be forced to carry large amounts of cash to pay bills. Acommon money management tool for people in this situation is prepaid cards. These cards look and work much like regular debit cards except that instead of funding them through a checking or savings account, you load money on the card by cash, check, funds transfer or direct deposit. Common prepaid card features include: You dont need a bank account or solid credit rating to obtain one. They start out with a zero balance until you add money. Purchases or ATM withdrawals will diminish the cards balance until it reaches zero and you discard it or you reload the card. Spending is limited to the amount loaded on the card, so you cant buy more than you have. Cards can offer Zero Liability protection if you promptly report loss, theft or fraudulent charges. Most allow ATM cash withdrawals and online or phone purchases. Theyre safer to carry than large amounts of cash. Common types of prepaid cards include: Reloadable cards to which more money can later be added. Gift cards used until their balance is depleted; theyre not reloadable. Teen cards where parents can reload the cards and monitor purchases online or by phone (allowing teens a chance to manage spending and budgeting in a controlled environment). Travel cards a safe alternative to cash and travelers checks. Payroll cards wages are loaded into the cards account for immediate access (similar to checking account direct deposit). Government agencyprovided cards benets such as Social Security and unemployment are loaded into your card account. Healthcare cards allow point-of-service access to funds in your Flexible Spending Account or Health Savings Account to pay for qualied medical expenses. Prepaid cards may come with fees and restrictions, so its important to read the cards terms and conditions carefully and to shop around for the best deals. Good comparison sites include www. bankrate.com and www. creditcards.com. The 411 on prepaid cards JASON ALDERMAN

PAGE 6

E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@bellsouth.net Not long ago, kayaks were the province of the Inu it peoples beyond the Arctic Circle plus a few whackedout whitewater enthusiasts with more nerve than sense. But what a difference a few years can make. Today, paddle-powered boats are by far the fastest growing seg ment of an otherwise stag nant boating market, both because of the environmentrst attitude of millions of young people and because they are simply very useful, cost-efcient little boats. These paddle-powered cockleshells offer swift, si lent access to water so shal low that powerboats cant even think of invading it. For the nature photographer and wildlife watcher, theres no watercraft that can com pare; shore birds, marine mammals and sh simply ignore a yak as if its a log oating past. For shing in shallow bay areas like those that abound throughout the Panhandle, there also are big benets. Kayaks put the angler so low to the water that the sh cant see him or her, and the approach is dead silent. They cruise over water only inches deep, across mud bot toms too soft to wade, and they theyre light enough to launch anywhere, including off a seawall in the middle of town if thats where the sh happen to be. Intrepid an glers even take them off the beach and head out to sea to do battle with king mackerel and tarpon. Plus, when the day ends, you can store your boat standing on end on the porch of your walk-up apartment. And theres no environmental footprint paddle power is simple, clean muscle-power. Kayaks are light enough for one angler, man or woman, to hoist to a rack on the top of a car or slide into the bed of a pickup, SUV or station wagon. Theyre typi cally 10 to 14 feet long, and weights for kayaks rigged for shing are usually less than 60 pounds. Theyre available in siton-top versions as well as the more traditional models where the legs go under a bow deck. Many anglers like the sit-on-top models be cause theyre easier to get in and out of; a typical day in kayak country includes a good bit of wade-shing as well as shing from the boat, so the ease of entry can be important. Most kayak makers des ignate various models for various duties; those who intend to use their boats for shing probably will want a recreational or general use version, said Ian Joyce, spokesman for Wilderness Systems Kayaks, one of the leading shing kayaks. These are wider and more stable than some of the sport models, Joyce said. The trade-off is that the wider the beam, the harder the kayak is to paddle, and the slower it goes for a giv en amount of effort. Wider kayaks also are somewhat heavier, though not enough so that this should become a factor in getting the boats in and out of the water in most areas. Most anglers set their kayaks up with back rests to ease the pressure on the spine over long hours in the boat. They also are likely to add small anchors, sometimes on a roller that allows dropping it without moving from the seat in the kayak; paddle keepers that prevent the double-ended paddle from drifting away should it fall overboard; slipin tackle boxes that t pre molded slots in the deck; ice chests; and of course water proof bags for anything that doesnt like saltwater, includ ing electronic car keys, cell phones and wallets one of the facts of life in kayaking is that nearly everything gets wet. And, of course, you need rod holders. Most opt for at least two, allowing them a quick choice of lures for varying depths. By law and by common sense, it also is wise to carry and wear a personal ota tion device any time you are in a kayak. Sooner or later, you probably will turn the boat over. Often, in the backcountry, the remedy is simply to stand up. But in deeper water, the boat might quickly drift away, and a life preserver can make all the difference. Many opt for the belt-pack or suspender-type inatable, which offers more freedom of movement for paddling and casting than the vest type. Many resorts through out the Panhandle now of fer kayaks for rent, giving a great opportunity to try be fore you buy. And most boat dealers now have at least a few yaks somewhere in their inventory. Expect to spend about $800 minimum for a kayak equipped to sh, about $2,000 for a fully equipped rig. If you just want a sport-yak to play with, some are available for as little as $450. Ocean, Ho bie, Old Town, Wilderness Systems, Nu-Canoe and others offer a wide variety of models suitable for Pan handle yakking. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters LIMITED QUANTITIES A VAI L A BL E QUEST HEAT B OW B Y G5 $499.99 FRANK SARGEANT | Special to the Star Kayaks rigged for fishing usually have rod holders, padded seats with backrests, and dry storage boxes for gear. Paddlepower comes from the double-ended kayak paddle, though some anglers add electric motors for easier operation against wind and tide. Kayaks nd new home on the ats Page 6 Thursday, September 29, 2011 Some anglers go the extra mile with their kayaks by carrying them to remote fishing areas in their center-console bayboats. Both kayaks and powerboats have their place in the all-around Panhandle anglers arsenal. Find More News Online Freshwater Grouper shing is red hot now since the re-opener of gag grouper. Most sh are being caught in the 60to 150-foot range and there are good reports from the MBARA sites out of Mexico Beach are producing sh. Inshore Offshore Trout and redsh have made their way into the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Most anglers are using grubs and jigs here, but live bait will certainly nd sh as well. Some ounder are caught here are large in size. Lakes and streams are very productive freshwater shing right now in our area. Fall feeding patterns are starting to emerge, and shing will continue to improve. Lake Wimico is a hot spot for all that swims. SP ONS ORED B Y

PAGE 7

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com A Section (850) 227-7100 No Rainchecks Limited Quantities While Supplies Last halfhitch.com Ameristep Dog House Blind Ideal for rearm & bow hunting & a great hide for photographers. 814 / 10412 Save $65 $49 Reg $114 1657 Mens Hunting Boot Waterproof Mossy Oak Break-Up Fabric, 7" Dark Brown Oil Leather Uninsulated $29 Reg $59 Save $30 IKam Xtreme Video Eyewear Audio/video recording glasses. 8 GB of memory; 4 GB built in. 50002 $79 Reg $119 Save $40 Bushnell Trail Sentry 5MP Trail Camera Weatherproof & rugged, fast trigger speed, high resolution full color images. 119205C $39 Special Buy 22174-06041 30qt. Propane Turkey Fryer 15 black solid steel stand & 30qt. tall aluminum pot, CSA 39 *Model may vary approved hose & regulator. Reg $59 Save $20 Reg $139 Big Dog Two Man Ladder Tree Stand Large 40 x 12-3/4 foot & seat platform. Padded seat cushion & ip-up shooting rail. Certied to all TMA standards. 2 fall arrest systems included. $99 BDL-451 Save $40 Moultrie Pro Hunter Game Feeder $79 Reg $139 Save $60 MFH-PHB30B Mossy Oak Break Up Innity Gear BreakUp Innity truly oers hunters another dimension in camo. 19 & UP 1/3 OFF 0021 0007 0020 Sale Ends 10/31/2011 Programmable Digital Timer. 30Gal. 200 lb. capacity. Page 7 Thursday, September 29, 2011 By Tim Croft Star News Editor From any perspective, it was a less than auspices in troduction to a new district and classication. Port St. Joe opened up its District 4-1A schedule at Blountstown last Friday night and several big sec ond-quarter plays proved the Tiger Sharks undoing as they fell 34-8 to the Ti gers. We had some moments but we gave up some big plays and we kind of let down after that, guys just kind of gave up, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. Blountstown quarter back Hunter Jordan ran for 73 yards and two touch downs, and passed for 97 yards and two scores as the Tigers shed its unof cial title as the best winless team in North Florida for a new moniker: undefeated in District 4-1A. Give them credit, Barth said. They made some big plays. They did what they had to do. We didnt. The Tigers (1-3, 1-0 dis trict) scored three touch downs during a 9-minute span in the second quarter Friday on their way to the win over Port St. Joe (1-2, 0-1). Jordan put Blountstown in the lead with 4:45 to go in the rst quarter on a 25yard run. Port St. Joe scored less than 4 minutes later on a safety, with Daniel May getting a tackle in the end zone, making it 7-2 at the end of the rst quarter. We gave up a big play right after that, a long pass, sort of a Hail Mary that their guy caught and ran it down to set up a touchdown, Barth said. We never quite made it back after that. It just got out of hand and we never got back in it. The Tiger Sharks were playing without start ing quarterback Trevor Lang, who has been nurs ing a bad shoulder for two weeks. Lang quit the team on Monday. Rumello Zaccarro start ed in Langs place and hit 3 of 4 passes for 67 yards and a touchdown. I thought Rumello played really well and I thought we ran well at times, Barth said, noting the Tiger Sharks nished with 105 rushing yards. We are not even close to the end of the season. We have to stay positive in prac tice, work through some of things we didnt do right with the guys and keep working hard and staying focused and positive. The Tiger Sharks would not score another point fol lowing Mays safety until the score was 34-2 midway through the fourth quarter. Jordan made it 14-2 after the long pass with 8:44 left in the second quarter on a 2-yard run. Seven minutes later, Javakiel Brigham scored on an 8-yard run to give Blountstown a 21-2 lead. The Tigers increased the lead to 28-2 with 19 seconds left in the second quarter, 1 minutes after Brighams score. Blount stown capitalized on a turn over with a 10-yard scoring pass from Jordan to Antho ny Jones. We would slant inside and they would run out side, Barth said. Wed try to contain on the outside and they ran inside. We didnt tackle. We just did not have focus. Jordan tossed another touchdown pass midway through the third quarter this one a 30-yard con nection to Roosevelt Mar tin. Port St. Joe scored on a 30-yard pass with 6:20 re maining in the game from Zaccarro to Corey North. Jordan led Blountstown in both rushing and pass ing. He carried the ball eight times, and completed all three passes he threw, two for touchdowns. Marquel Thomas was the teams second-leading rusher with 62 yards on four carries. Ryan Haphcox had one catch for 57 yards. Walt Bowers led Port St. Joe rushers with 51 yards on 10 carries. Zaccarro completed 3 of 4 pass at tempts for 67 yards and one touchdown. There is still a long way to go, Barth said. A playoff spot is still there. We have to work through our mis takes and stay positive. Port St. Joe is at Holmes County at 8 p.m. ET on Fri day. Star Staff Report Gene Rafeld League football got off to a great start last Saturday when teams from Franklin Coun ty and Wewahitchka joined the Port St. Joe teams for the annual Jamboree at Shark Stadium. Under clear blue skies a record crowd saw football the way it should be played, by youngsters giving all for the love of the game. The format for the Jam boree had Port St. Joes three teams playing two quarters each against both Franklin County and Wewa. The 11 and 12 year old Buccaneers played Frank lin rst and got things off to a great start with 24 to 0 win. Jasmine Thomas scored three touchdowns, one a 20-yard run and another on a touchdown pass from quarterback Bryce Regis ter. Thomas also scored on an interception return. The next two quarters were a matchup between Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe. Both defenses played outstanding ball and the lone score came on a Port St. Joe fumble that was returned by Wewahitchka for a touchdown and a 6-0 scoring advantage for the 16 minutes. After the break, the de fending Big Bend Champi on Jaguars, ages 9-10, took the eld to start their quest for a three peat. It was to tal domination against both Franklin and Wewahitchka with the Jags winning both games by 24-0 scores. With the rst string offense play ing, PSJ went up by six when Kendre Gant ran up the middle, lost his balance, recovered and went 50-plus yards for a touchdown. On the next possession, Cam eron Harmon took a pitch from quarterback Josh Butts and went 65 yards for a touchdown. That was the last series of the day for the starting backeld as the second string replaced them. The scoring in the Franklin County game was completed when Roman Harrison smashed up the middle, shook off tacklers and scored from 25 yards. Against Wewa, the second string offense was in for the entire game. Tailback Gregory Julius reached the end zone twice and Harri son once. The stingy Jaguar de fense, carrying a motto of zero did not give up a rst down. The line was in the opposing backelds all day. Neither Wewahitchka nor Franklin could handle Har rison who made tackle after tackle from his nose guard position. Defensive end Jar rett Browning and tackle/ middle linebacker D.J. Da vis had strong games. The linebackers were attacking and making tackles at the line of scrimmage. The nal series of the day featured the 7 and 8 year old Dolphins. They are great fun to watch and put on a real show for their fans. In the rst game against Franklin County, tailback Brenon Foxworth had two long runs for touchdowns to give Port St. Joe a 12-0 win. Against Wewahitchka another Fox worth run, this one right up the middle, resulted in the only score of the ball game and a 6-0 Port St. Joe vic tory despite the standout rushing of Wewahitchkas tailback Harley Redd. Tiger Sharks fall to Blountstown in district opener Gene Rafeld Football starts season at Shark Stadium P hotos by TIM CROF T | The Star A Franklin County defender pulls Wewahitchkas Harley Redd down from behind after a long gain. Kendre Gant gets into open space on route to a touchdown for the Jaguars.

PAGE 8

A8 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 1930 W. hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Downtown Highland view TUESDAY FRIDAY 9-6 SATURDAY 9-2 10% OFF EVERYTHING IN STOCK Golfers Specials FOR THE MONTH OF O CTOBER at Saint Joseph Bay Golf Club H ere are four new specials for the month of O ctober you will not want to miss out on at the local SJ B G C located at 700 C ountry C lub R d. (off of C -30A): 1. A foursome can play all day for $100.00 and get a free hot dog at the turn (limited for foursomes only). 2. A new membership for ages 35 and under is only $100.00 initiation fee and $60.00 per month 3. Former members can play 18 holes with cart for only $25.00 any day of the week 4. All members will receive 20% off on all foods and drinks. All specials are subject to 7% FST. In addition SJBGC has two exciting golf tournaments coming up on Oct 9th and Nov 19th and are open to any golfer. C all the golf shop at 227-1751 for details. Visit our web site stjoebaygolf.com LGA Autumn Action SCR A MB L E GO L F TOURN A MEN T SHO TG UN S TA R T 1:00 P.M. E ST S T JO S EPH BA Y GO L F CL UB SUND A Y O C T OBER 9, 2011 Its a Family Affair! By Tim Croft Star News Editor Condence is building around the Wewahitchka High School campus. With a second-straight strong performance on of fense and evident improve ment on defense the Gators (2-2) jumped to a big early lead at Cottondale last Fri day before coming away with a 52-30 victory. That represented the second win in Coach Den nis Kizziahs goal for the season. With the Gators three toughest opponents behind them, Wewahitchka is in perfect position to win its next three games to host Sneads on Oct. 21 with a playoff spot on the line. We are on track, Kiz ziah said. We need to get three more wins and we are there. The kids have bought into it. They are working hard, as always they are giving 100 percent. When you do that good things are bound to happen. Good things happened early and often during the rst half against Cottondale (0-4). The Gators scored ve touchdowns en route to a 3614 lead at intermission that all but sealed the outcome. We scored pretty much at will, Kizziah said. The offensive line seems to be coming up and off the line better and holding their blocks. And our running backs are doing a great job. Senior running back Theryl Brown again led the way with 259 yards and ve touchdowns on just 17 rush es. For the season Brown is averaging more than 10 yards a carry, having rushed for 836 yards on 80 carries. He has two games over 200 yards rushing. Brown received plenty of help. Quarterback Justin Flowers had 108 yards rush ing and three touchdowns as the Gators threw just four times, completing one for 22 yards to Chris Myrick. Fullback Jaylen Addison had 72 yards on just eight carries and Randy Roth, who is seeing more and more time in the backeld, had nearly 40 yards on just ve touches. The Gators ended the night with more than 450 yards of total offense. We are getting a bit bet ter every week, Kizziah said. We are working on the little things, keeping hold of the ball, holding blocks, maintaining gaps on de fense. The kids are buying into that and they are prac ticing every day with more condence. It is very good to see. They understand if they just work hard, good things will happen and they are seeing it now. The defense also showed vast improvement, Kizziah said, holding Cot tondale largely in check un til the game was well out of reach. The Hornets scored a late touchdown well after the game was decided to make the nal score closer than the play on the eld. Defensively, we got more kids around the ball, Kizziah said. We have been working on swarm ing to the ball and I think we did that better (against Cottondale). We still have to improve our tackling, but we are getting better. Jarvis Shereld led the defense with a pair of inter ceptions. Wewahitchka is back home on Friday, hosting Franklin County with an 8 p.m. ET kickoff. TIM CROF T | The Star Theryl Brown had his second 200-yard rushing day, scored ve touchdowns and led Wewahitchka to its second-straight victory. Gators rush past Cottondale 52-30 Star Staff Report After completing a four-match tournament on Saturday, Sept. 17, the Lady Tiger Sharks rested on Sunday and then began a back-to-back-to-back week. They began the week at Wewahitchka where the junior varsity team logged its rst victory of the sea son. Haley Wood and Shan non Pridgeon had four and three kills, respectively. The high servers for their match were Nicole Win dolf with ve aces and Alexis Brinkmeier with seven. The JV won the match 3-2. The varsity de feated the Lady Gators in three straight sets. Katie Lacour had 17 assists and six service aces. Autumn Haynes had six kills and Katie Gardner had three blocks. Tuesday evening the Lady Tiger Sharks trav eled to Blountstown for a district match with the Lady Tigers. Although the Lady Tiger Sharks did not win the match, they made a great showing. After losing the rst two sets by scores of 14-25 and 1925 they won the third and fourth sets 25-22 and 25-23. This set up a nal set to 15 which Port St Joe could not quite pull off. The nal score was 13-15. Ka tie Lacour had 27 assists, three service aces and six kills. Katie Gardner had two aces and eight kills while Oneika Lockley had 40 digs. The third match for the week came at home Wednesday evening in a varsity only match against East Gadsden. East Gads den was no match for the power plays of Port St Joe that night. The Lady Ti ger Sharks won in three straight sets by scores of 25-13, 25-11, and 25-13. The leaders for the evening were Katie Lacour with 13 assists and four aces, Katie Gardner with seven aces and eight kills, Au tumn Haynes with seven aces and three kills. This week the ladies were at Rutherford on Monday evening and then at home for district play against Franklin County on Tuesday and Liberty County at home tonight. Please come out and sup port the team. They play hard and would love the fan support. Speaking of sup port, dont forget to help us out and support the SideOut foundation for breast cancer awareness and re search. Your can donate to us or visit our fundraising page at www.side-out.org/ application/ous/fundrais ing_page/7004 all dona tions are tax deductible. Sports Port St Joe Volleyball has a busy week

PAGE 9

COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, September 29, 2011 By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer St. Joseph Bay is a gem. The bay provides a place to kayak, sh, scallop, wade, dive, swim, explore, watch the sun set, skip rocks, col lect seashells and simply treasure. This weekend, residents and visitors alike can give something back to the bay. Bask in the natural splen dor of the State Buffer Pre serve while supporting a group whose goal is to pro tect and preserve the bay and its delicate ecosystems. The Friends of St. Joseph Bays biannual Bay Day cel ebration fundraiser will be held Saturday, Oct. 1, at the Preserves Center at 3915 State Road 30-A in Port St. Joe. Its been very success ful because the central focus is to draw attention to the buffer preserve and the aquatic preserve, said Jean Huffman, a member of the friends group who has helped organize the event. These places are really valuable. Its great outreach for our friends group. The event will feature live music, rafes, exhibits throughout the day, and the popular shrimp boil lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET. Lunch includes a low-country boil of local shrimp, kielbasa sausage, corn and potatoes, and is served with coleslaw, garlic bread and tea for a $10 dona tion. The shrimp boil, thats the big draw, Huffman said. In some past years, weve run out early. But weve learned our lesson so we should have plenty. Huffman said it still never hurts to get there early. Its lots of fun, Huffman said of the event. You can sit out here on the deck and enjoy the beautiful bay with your plate and enjoy the peo ple and live music. Tours will be offered throughout the day, guided by experts in the eld. Field trips will include bird walks along the Deal Tract on St. Joseph Penin sula, tram tours through the buffer preserve, explore the shore bay walks at Eagle Harbor and the Deal Tract, boat tours of the bay, and an astronomy walk and talk that evening, which will examine planet spacing and constellations in the night sky. The boat tours are cosponsored by Seahorse Wa ter Safaris, Premier Sport shing Adventures and the Port St. Joe Marina. Tours will be led by Captain Trey Landry and David Mussel white. Huffman will be leading the Backwoods and Wild owers tram tours through the buffer preserve. She said last springs prescribed burns in the area have given way to a new growth of ow ers in the preserve. When you burn in the spring, in the fall the ow ers come out and theyre really beautiful, Huffman said. This is the time when the owers are really bloom ing. Some tours require sign ing up in advance, and those interested should call the preserve or visit www.stjo sephbaypreserves.org for more information. Tours and activities are free, but the friends group will be collecting donations throughout the day. The donations will help the friends group fund a va riety of projects to benet the aquatic preserve and buffer preserve. In the past, money raised at Bay Day has helped fund habitat res toration, hydrological resto ration, education programs, research support, trail build ing, signs, kiosks and opera tion at the buffer preserve. Huffman said the com munity needs to come out and enjoy their public land at the preserve. Its lesser known than the state park, but its a re ally phenomenal place, Huffman said. We live in a place with some of the most beautiful natural areas any where. The Friends of St. Joseph Bay holds a Bay Day fund raiser in February and Octo ber each year. Huffman said although the February event is usu ally busier because of the snowbirds, the October event gives the group an op portunity to reach out to the locals. Were really happy to have local people come out, Huffman said. Too many people in town dont even know what the buffer preserve is. We encourage people to come and see what were all about. Enjoy the day, support the bay at Bay Day By Mark Knapke Park Manager (850) 227-1327 The weather is starting to change, the deer are stir ring and visitation is starting to slow a bit. Scallop season ends Sept. 25. As scallop season ends, the shing will improve. The water temper ature has started to cool and good catches of trout and redsh are being reported. Staff recently spotted three deer run through the parking area at Eagle Har bor. The male deer will not be so friendly with each other once moods begin to change and breeding sea son approaches. There are a couple of fawns that have also been seen just past the ranger station as you enter the park. I wish I could share a photo of them maybe next time. This is also the time of year when the fall owers come into bloom and the migration of birds and but teries are noticed. A photo of a zebra swallow tail but tery at the park is included for your enjoyment. This is a great time to vis it St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. Come visit and enjoy the beach, wade or snorkel the clear emerald waters of the gulf or bay, launch your boat, wet a line, hike one of the trails or stay the night in the campground or a cabin. We plan to continue to submit regular updates about St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, and we hope you enjoy them. We look forward to your visit and appreciate your support of the park. For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastateparks.org. Fall approaches at St. Joseph Peninsula Star Staff Report Twelve Gulf County delegates attended the the Republican presiden cy caucus and straw poll held in Orlando over the weekend. The countys delegation was more than a number of counties with much larger populations, said delegate Jim McK night. Herman Cain was the surprise winner of the straw poll for president, and Adam Hasner was the winner of the straw poll for U.S. Senate. Pictured, from left to right, are Debbie Van Zant, Mary Baird, Tracy Melvin, Mary Virginia De Pue, Johanna White, Sheri Dodsworth, Loretta Cos tin, Leonard Costin, Tom Semmes, Debbie Ashbrook and Jim McKnight. Thom Baird is not pictured. County delegates attend state caucus STAR FILE PHOTO S Attendees of Februarys Bay Day examine area wildlife on a walking tour. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Its an eccentric space. There are Congo drums, hang ing surfboards, pieces of driftwood and rafa, buoys, paintings, an air plane propeller, weather vein, a mo torcycle, ceramics in every stage of construction, wagon wheels, ribbons hanging from the ceiling, painted tiles, a silhouette rooster, aprons and countless tools. Color bursts from the acrylic beach scenes, glazed ceramics and quirky dcor. Formerly used as a warehouse, the building at 214 Williams Ave. is now a space to create. Tuesday night at 5:30, Leslie Wentzell is buried somewhere in the back amidst the knickknacks. Jack Johnson is playing on the stereo, sending a relaxing lull of acoustics echoing towards the high ceilings and back down to the clay-stained worktables. Wentzell uses the huge space as part studio, part storage, and part tool shop, where her husband, Dave, dabbles in woodworking. She loves having his tools around, because when it comes to art, you never know what you might need to create the perfect effect. Dave is constantly rearranging the vignettes, the scenes set up on the ledge of the upstairs loft, mov ing things around, adding this and that. You are guaranteed to see something new whenever you visit the studio. It keeps things interest ing. It gets the creative juices ow ing. In her own work, Wentzell is inspired by natures forms: sea shells, grasses, driftwood; which reects through the props and pieces strewn about the studio. She is impressed by their quiet beauty. In her sculptures, gnarled branches and twisting vines take a feminine form, joining the ele ments of nature and humanity. Wentzell and her husband moved to Port St. Joe from Wiscon sin in 2006, and made a reality her dream to open an art studio. My direction still isnt 100 per cent in my mind, said Wentzell, who opened the studio doors to the public in October 2010, and dubbed it The Artery. I feel like Im al ways running to catch up. She is running to catch up with her ideas and visions for the future of The Artery, which she indicated have been in constant inux since her dream of an art studio materi alized. She plans on adding jewelrymaking classes and collage class es to the schedule soon and more classes geared towards kids. She just bought a glass kiln and wants to experiment with glass fusing, she wants to have open houses and studio sales, she wants classes geared towards tourists, and the ideas keep owing. For now, she offers classes in clay and acrylics and open studio time for those hoping to continue using their new skills. I started offering these classes and (the students have) this new skill, but where are they going to use it? Wentzell said. Are they supposed to just wait another month for a class? Thus, open studio was born. I thought if a few people came, great, she said. And if it bombed, Im not out anything. To her surprise, the classes were very well received. I felt like there was a need for this here. Its a place to work where you can feel comfortable, she said. Its a place where you can be messy. You dont have to worry about ruining your rug at home. Wentzell was an instructor for the grant-funded Gulf Alliance for Local Arts (GALA) 2011 Summer Arts Program, during which she provided her studio space for the A low country boil features local shrimp, corn, kielbasa sausage and potatoes is served during the Friends of St. Joseph Bays biannual Bay Day celebration at the State Buffer Preserve in February. A space to CREATE PHOTO S BY VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Leslie Wentzell demonstrates a molding technique Sept. 14 during an introduction to clay class. Wentzell opened her studio, The Artery, to the public last October, and the response has exceeded her expectations. See CREATE B8 Class veteran Holly Atkins shares the progress of her sh platter with another studio patron. Atkins has been attending open studio hours and art classes since the Artery opened last October. Studio owner Leslie Wentzell guides Alison Bowling through the beginning stages of her coil project.

PAGE 10

B2 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society DIXIETHEA T RE.COM 850.653.3200 Presents PEARLS for the KING! OY S T ERS & E L V IS A T TH E D I X IE 8 P M FRI D AY & SA T UR D AY SE PT EMBER 30 & O C T OBER 1 Y Another year has passed, how time has own; We cant believe how much youve grown! Skylar Clayton turned 7 on Sept. 22. She celebrated her birthday with a Peace Out water party. Skylar is the daughter of Jamie and Mary Clayton; granddaughter of Keith and Debbie Ford, and Sam, Sr. and Jeannette Amerson; greatgranddaughter of the late Pat Norris and Barbara G.G. Lawder; and niece of Jeremy Owens and Sam Amerson, Jr. Malaki Jhikovy Dawson turned 5 on Sept. 22. Malakis Mommy and family would like to wish him a very Happy 5th Birthday with lots of love. Michael Edward Gainey and Kimberly Sue Buskens were married on Saturday, September 17, 2011 on their farm in Rock Bluff. Kathy Brown performed the double-ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Fred and Marylee Buskens of Overstreet. The groom is the son of Clyde Edward Gainey, the late Geraldine Gainey, and step-son of Linda Gainey, all of Bristol. Immediately following the ceremony, an old fashion Country reception was held there at the barn, followed by a barn dance later that evening. The music was provided by Darrell Parker of Port St. Joe. Please join Durens Piggly Wiggly as we congratulate Darius Chambers as our September Associate of the Month.SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Star Staff Report South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department has honored its pledge of sponsorship of one of the emer gency rooms at the new Sacred Heart Hospital in Port St Joe out of the sales of their Smokin Hot Fire ghters calendar. Jan Sapte, Chairman of the Ladies Auxiliary and project manager of the calendar, and Preston Russ, President of South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Depart ment Inc., presented the nal check to Dr. Henry Rob erts, Foundation President, and Kathy Chastain, Inter im CNO, at the hospital on Thursday, Sept. 22.All Request Oldies but Goodies The Gulf County Senior Citizens and Community Center, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, would like to invite you to join them on Tuesday, Oct. 4, from 10 a.m. to noon ET to enjoy the Oldies but Goodies Show by Deejay Steve McIntire. He will be playing all types of music by request from the 50s, 60s and 70s. The event is free and open to the public. Please call Debbie at 229-8466 for details. Skylar Clayton is 7 Piggly Wiggly Employee of the Month Malaki Jhikovy Dawson turns 5 Gainey, Buskens are wed Society BRIEFS South Gulf County VFD honors pledge Society News

PAGE 11

The Star| B3 Thursday, September 29, 2011 PY 5984 Psychological Counseling & Evaluations Accepting New Patients At The Cornerstone 1103 Fortune Avenue Panama City, FL 32401 850.628.0094 Miriam S. (Mimi) Bozarth, PH. D. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER THIS PROJEC T RECEIVED FINANCIAL ASSIS T ANCE FROM VISI T FLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.com P AR T IAL FUNDING FOR T HIS EVEN T PROVIDED BY T HE GULF COUN T Y T OURISM DEVELOPMEN T C OUNCIL BARLOWS Well Drilling Pump Repair & Water Services Well Drilling & Pump Repair Deep or Shallow Wells Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties 850-639-9355 or 850-814-7454 LI C EN S E D & I N S U R E D School News Special to The Star Faith Christian School is proud to present the newest member of the staff, Mrs. Carly Pickels. Mrs. Pickels is a graduate of Georgia State University with a degree in journalism and is teaching middle school language arts. Mrs. Pickels has an enthusiasm for reading and writing, and she hopes to instill that passion in her students. She believes reading can open any door imaginable and that a sound foundation in grammar can help students excel in areas such as communication and business. By Carissa Morrison and Melik Bailey General information For all of the latest and up-to-date information, please visit Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High Schools website regularly. The address is http://psjhs-gcs-.schoolloop. com/. The Calendar of Events, Shark Bites (weekly schedule) and important news are on the main page. Then you can check out Home of the Tiger Sharks from the Our School menu. On this page, you will nd links to the monthly breakfast and lunch menus as well as the Pinnacle Grade Viewer and other important documents. You can also keep up to date with all of the other sports, clubs and organizations happenings by selecting from the menu. Happy surng, and Go Tiger Sharks! Senior trip down payment must be turned in to Mrs. Alcorn by Sept. 30 if you are going. Cost is $60. You must pay to reserve a spot. Clubs SWAT Club: The following students were elected for Jr./Sr. High School SWAT Club: President: Jakari Sims Vice president: Marquez Cutler Secretary 1: Tacara Shackelford Secretary 2: Khaliyah Johnson Treasurer: Tyson Davis Media relations: Marques Cutler Math Club: Math Club will nalize all donations for care packages for soldiers on Oct. 6. Please be sure to send donations to Mrs. Ethridge before Oct. 6. If you need ideas for donations, please see Mrs. Ethridge. Sports Go SHARKS! There will be a home volleyball game against Liberty County today, Sept. 29. Junior varsity will play at 6 p.m. ET and varsity at 7 p.m. The junior varsity football game against Florida High has been changed to an away game in Franklin County at 7 p.m. ET today, Sept. 29. The varsity football game in Holmes County will be at 8 p.m. ET Sept. 30. The junior varsity cross country meet in Bay County will be at 9 a.m. ET Oct. 1. There will be a volleyball game in Blountstown on Oct. 4, with junior varsity at 6 p.m. and varsity at 7 p.m. A junior varsity cross country meet will be at 3 p.m. Oct. 5 in Blountstown. The rst ever youth cheerleading camp put on by the varsity cheerleaders was very successful and will hopefully become a tradition. Any girl who did not receive a shirt on the day of the camp should stop by the Jr./Sr. High School ofce, as those shirts are now in. We look forward to the half-time performance on Nov. 4, given by our youth camp participants. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Lane Harris is a polite, bespectacled 11-year-old, with dreams of one day becoming an astronaut and maybe an Eagle Scout. He is also a hero. Sept. 15 started as a normal afternoon for Lane, a sixth-grade student at Port St. Joe Elementary. He met his friend Alec, and the two boys went swimming in a nearby pool. What started out as innocent fun quickly turned to emergency as the boys disrupted a swarm of angry bees while getting out of the pool. Alec, who is severely allergic to bees, was stung four times. Thankfully I had a phone on me, said Lane, who quickly called 911 and Alecs mother. I held his head back, like this, and called the paramedics, Lane said as he demonstrated how to open up the airway using his own head. I was just thinking, Dont panic. This is one of your best friends, Lane said. I would hate to go to his funeral. Alecs mother arrived with his EpiPen and immediately administered the shot. Alecs mother, who is also highly allergic to bees, was stung in the arm and eyelid and needed some of the medicine herself. Alec was stung again after the shot was administered, but the EpiPen had run out, and Alec went into anaphylactic shock with severe respiratory complications. Lane stayed calm and maintained an airway for Alec for 20 minutes until the paramedics arrived. I was scared, Lane said of those long 20 minutes. But in Boy Scouts they teach us to panic afterwards, not during. Lane said he probably wouldnt have known what to do if it wasnt for the Boy Scouts, which he has been involved in for almost a year. They teach us a lot about survival and safety, Lane said. Scoutmaster Dave Oliphant said Boy Scouts are taught to remain calm during emergencies and get the job done. The scouts are also taught basic rst aid like how to stop bleeding, how to splint and how to open up the airway like Lane did. If you lose your cool, youre not helping anybody, Oliphant said. (First aid is) a skill they have to learn, and its a skill when theyre older, they have to pass on to the younger scouts. Oliphant plans on nominating Lane for a national award through the Boy Scouts of America. They have to make sure the scout did something to warrant the award. Hopefully he will be recognized, Oliphant said. I think Lane is a hero. At the scouts meeting on Monday, all the guys were patting him on the back. Lanes mother, Marion Harris, said she was in awe of her sons calmness and quick thinking during the accident. I know adults who would have panicked right there, she said. Just the fact that he knew to tilt the childs head back to open up the airways, Boy Scouts has done wonders for him this year. Harris said her son called after the paramedics arrived and nally broke down. He just lost it, she said of her son, who said he was incredibly sad and scared after the incident. Harris said Alecs mother has offered Lane money, but he denies it every time. He didnt do it for that, Harris said. Hes just glad to still have his friend here. Hes been extremely humble through this whole thing. When asked how it feels when he is regarded as a hero, Lane replied, It feels kind of good, but kind of weird. (Alec is) always thanking me, and I dont want him to. Every time Alec thanks Lane, he reminds his friend that his mom doesnt want to lose him, and neither do his friends and family. Thats why I did it, Lane said. He doesnt owe me anything. The Lions Tale The Lions TALE CARLY PICKELS DAZZLING DOLPHINS Pre-kindergarten: Riyleh Parker Kindergarten: Ardarien Shackleford 1st grade: Gabriella Price 2nd grade: Elliana Burkett 3rd grade: Will McCall 4th grade: Lane Herring 5th grade: Dianara Angel 6th grade: Alvin Dempsey Bus Riders of the Week: Riley Byrd, Kylie Lumley, Bailey Hurst, Trinten Lee and Landon Lee. Scout prepared when it counts V ALERIE G AR M A N | The Star Lane Harris, a sixth-grade student at Port St. Joe Elementary, stayed calm and cleared his friend Alecs airway as he struggled to breathe after being stung multiple times by bees.

PAGE 12

Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) FAITH Thursday, September 29, 2011 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Revival at Victory Temple First Born Revival, revival, revival. There will be a revival at Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church in Port St. Joe Sept. 28-30 at 7:30 p.m. ET nightly. Elder Charles Gathers will be bringing the word of God. We invite each and every one of you to come out and be blessed by the word of God. Once again, Victory Temple invites you to attend this Holy Ghost Revival. Faith BRIEFS Written by LaDonna Pelt OUR MOM Last night I thought of you. Yes, mama I did. The thought of you put a smile on my face. It sure enough did. Days turn into months, months turn into years. Though your precious memory still lingers here. Last might we thought of you, knowing all is good. There is no more sorrow, no more tears. We are stepping out of the shadows to live up to our years. Today we thought of you, as we left you a yellow rose. You will not be forgotten. Though we have to go, well see you someday. But until then, only God knows. From your daughters. We love you and miss you, Brenda, Tabitha and LaDonna Mr. James Dumas passed away Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011 at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe Nurs ing Home. Funeral services were held Wednes day, Sept. 28 at New Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church located at 146 Avenue C in Port St. Joe, at 11 a.m. ET. Rev. Sandra HooperClark, Pastor, ofciated at the services. James Dumas Obituary Special to The Star For the past ve years, the congregation of First United Methodist, of Port St. Joe, has developed a relationship with the village of Sumbe in Cameroon. This has been a wonderful journey together. First Church has been able to help the village by supporting their local pastor and his family in Sumbe. When the church realized that the village was without a single health care person in the village, they were also able to support a fulltime nurse and clinic. They were also able to help provide fresh water by helping the community dig a well. These are all things that are readily available to us that we take for granted. On Monday, Rev. Nkemba Ndjungu and his wife, Mbwizu, paid a visit to First United Methodist Church to say thank you for all of their support. Members of the church were able to spend the day with the Mission Superintendant a listen to the struggles and triumphs of doing ministry in Cameroon. Rev. Ndjungu shared with the group that the average life-span in Cameroon is only forty to 45 years. This continues to be a concern for the nation of Africa as well as those who support their mission. Lets all remember to keep the people of Cameroon, and especially the village of Sumbe, in our prayers.S PECIAL T O THE ST A R Rev. Nkemba Ndjungu and his wife Mbwizu. Visit from Cameroon Thank you to the community and Sacred Heart Hospital I would like to thank all of the churches and people that prayed for and visited my wife, Rita, during her stay in Sacred Heart Hospital in Port St. Joe, for all the tremendous and delicious food that was brought to our home, and for the owers and cards and many acts of kindness. I would like to thank the staff at Sacred Heart Hospital for the professional care they gave my wife, and not only my wife but the concern they had for my whole family. From the people in the cafeteria to the nurses, technicians, clergy and doctors, they were constantly checking on us to keep us supplied in snacks and drinks, and to encourage and reassure us as the days went by. Its hospitals like this that make your stay (even though the end results were not what I wanted) a more pleasant one. Its easy to just say thank you and let it go at that, but these employees at Sacred Heart went beyond the call of duty to put you at ease. Words cannot express how well we were treated. I can certainly say that I was proud to be in a hospital like Sacred Heart in Port St. Joe. Thank you for everything and God Bless, Red Todd and Family Thinking of OTHERS Card of thanks At the age of 49, Paula went to be with the Lord peacefully Sept. 17, 2011 surrounded by her family and many friends in Fort Walton Beach Medical Center. She was a former employee of Batson-Cook, Inc. and Family Dollar Store of Port St. Joe and transferred to the Fort Walton Beach store to be closer to her family and those sweet grandchildren that were her heart. This is a special thank you to all of you in Howard Creek and Port St. Joe. We can not express enough what all you people have done for this family. The prayers, the trips to Fort Walton Beach, the owers, the love has meant so much to us and Rev. Henry Hester, no words can say to you what we feel for you. May God send a special blessing your way. Thank you again, William Lawson, husband, and Helen and Charles Muncher, mother and father-inlaw. Paula P Dearwent Lawson family A memory close to the heart They say memories are golden, well maybe that is true. I never wanted you. A million times I cried, if love alone could have saved you, you never would have died. In life I loved you dearly, in death I love you still. In my heart you hold a place, no one else could ll. If tears could build a stairway, and heartache make a lane, Id walk the path to heaven and bring you back again. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same, but as God calls us one by one the chain will link again. Happy Birthday Baby girl! Momma, Daddy and everyone loves and misses you dearly!Trinity Faith Haddock Sept. 28, 2010

PAGE 13

Local The Star| B5 Thursday, September 29, 2011 Vegetable gardening involves a lot of decision making. An important decision you have to make for each crop you grow in your garden is whether to start from seed or from transplants. In this article I will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of planting seed directly in the garden. This information was provided by Extension Vegetable Crop Specialist Dr. Steve Olson of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The biggest advantage in starting directly from seed is that you have a wider selection of crop varieties to choose from. Your garden center might have several varieties of seed for a given crop but only one or two varieties in transplants. Also, some crops just dont transplant very well. As I said in previous articles you are better off starting from seed with beans, corn, cucumber, turnips and similar crops. On the other hand, some crops transplant quite well. They include things like broccoli, collards, lettuce and tomatoes. If transplants are available for these crops theyre probably a better bet than starting from seed, unless youre planning quite a large garden. It is true that just about all vegetables can be grown from seed. The most common exceptions are sweet potatoes, strawberries and Irish potatoes. For specic recommendations on the crops you want to grow, consult your local Cooperative Extension Ofce and acquire a copy of the Vegetable Garden Guide, Circular #104. If you decide to start from seed remember to get the best quality seed you can nd. The quality of the seed you plant might mean the difference between success and failure in your garden, so buy good seed from a reliable dealer. For a few crops you can save seed from your own garden, but for many other its impractical. Considering the fact that most seed is relatively inexpensive, youre probably better off buying the seed you need if its available. Its also important to buy tested varieties. IFAS Scientists test most crop varieties and recommend only those which do well in Florida conditions. Youll have the best chance for success in your garden if you plant crops varieties with some resistance to common Florida pests. Of course, you can plant anything you like. But many Florida vegetable gardeners cheat themselves out of gardening success by continuing to plant inferior varieties without even testing the varieties recommended for our state. There is one note of caution to keep in mind when handling seeds, most of the seeds youll nd at our garden center have been treated with chemicals to reduce injury and decay caused by insects and diseases. You can usually tell when seeds have been treated theyre coated with brightly colored dye. Its a good idea to use treated seeds, in fact, you should try not to use anything else. But the chemicals on the seeds are poisonous so they should be handled with care. These seeds shouldnt be eaten by people or animals under any circumstances and they should always be kept out of the reach of children. Finally, follow the planting recommendation on the seed packet. If you plant too deep then your plants might not be able to reach the soil surface. If you plant too shallow, the seed might be washed away with the rst rain. For more information on starting the fall vegetable garden from seed, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit our website: http:// gulf.ifas.u.edu Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! S IN CE 2002, D OING B U SIN E SS IN T H IS CO MMU NIT Y LAWN CARE, TREE & PA L M TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVA L DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVA L or whatever your yard needs are CALL J O E @ 850-670-5478 E -MA I L @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com COMBS CONSTRU C TION I N C CGC 1507649 *ADDITIONS T ERMITE R EP A IR *WINDO W R EPL A CEMENT (850) 229.8385 OR (850) 227-8156 glencombspsj@gmail.com v 3026382 ATTENTION DARVON/DARVOCET/ PROPOXYPHENE IF YOU HAVE USED DARVON/DARVOCET PAIN MEDICATION, YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL RIGHTS. THIS IS NOT A CLAIM AGAINST YOUR DOCTOR. THIS IS A CLAIM AGAINST THE MANUFACTURER OF THIS DRUG. IF YOU HAVE USED THIS DRUG, AND WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS YOUR POSSIBLE CLAIM, CALL: Lovelace Law Firm, P.A. 12870 US Hwy 98 West Suite 200 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Telephone: 850-837-6020 Toll free: 1-888-837-2281 Fax: 1-850-837-4093 dml@lovelacelaw.com www.lovelacelaw.com 1202066 FREE ESTIMATES 1-850-626-9242 1-800-69-SHRED Security-cleared personnel Fort Walton Beachs leading mobile destruction company Weekly, monthly, or annual service Locally owned & operated FranklinCounty FutureNow 2011 We want to share some fantastic news with you about a very important and meaningful youth outreach program that came to Franklin County on Wednesday September 28th called FranklinCounty FutureNow. There are not many opportunities to connect with EVERY TEENAGER IN OUR COMMUNITY at one event. FutureNow was a wake up call to our teens with a message. A clear vision for your life will inspire you to keep from destructive decisions, and help you reach for your dreams and goals! On Wednesday Night, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes along with your local churches and FutureNow shared with our youth an eternally important message wrapped in an unforgettable presentation. All students and their families, along with the entire community were invited to a high energy worship celebration event at no cost, simply provided as a service to the community. The FutureNow daytime assembly was made possible through the generous support of our Sponsors. Sincerely, Your FutureNow Team Everyone in Franklin County can be involved in some way in making this FutureNow event a continuing success through the follow-up teams, donations and planning for 2012. We feel very strongly that our community and the lives of the students will be changed for the better, forever. Together we can work to make a lasting impact in the lives of our local teens, meeting this goal is well within our reach! In these dicult times, there is no investment that could be more important than the hearts, minds and souls of our young people. Our broader goal has been to partner with FutureNow in this 2011 event to develop the format to have our own annual event each fall here in Franklin County. We are still accepting donations toward our youth. We thank you for joining us in this great cause, because our future is being made NOW! Please send any donations to: FranklinCounty FutureNow P.O. Box 476, Apalachicola Fl, 32329. If you have questions, comments or input please contact one of our FutureNow Team Leaders. Starting the fall vegetable garden from seed Find More News ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director

PAGE 14

B6| The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 35671S AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT (amended to correct legal description) Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BECKY NORRIS, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on October 13, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, at the front of the courthouse steps of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: Parcel A: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 89 degrees 15 minutes 46 seconds East along the Northern boundary line of said Section 20, a distance of 1318.67 feet; thence run South 00 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southwesterly right-of-way boundary of County Road C-30-E; thence run North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 101.36 feet to a re-rod for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 112.53 feet; thence run South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West 401.45 feet to the approximate mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run along said approximate mean high water line as follows: South 26 degrees 27 minutes 50 seconds East 53.45 feet; thence South 36 degrees 57 minutes 55 seconds East 63.24 feet; thence leaving said approximate mean high water line run North 57 degrees 06 minutes 34 seconds East 371.76 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to a 15.00 foot access easement over and across a portion of the Easterly part thereof. Less and except: Commencing at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 15 minutes 46 seconds East along the North line of Section 20, a distance of 1318.87 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West a distance of 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southerly margin of County Road 30E; thence North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E a distance of 101.36 feet to the Point of Beginning of the lands herein described; thence continue North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E a distance of 56.23 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West a distance of 246.22 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West a dis35605S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. VICTOR T. MIMS, MELISSA D. MIMS A/K/A MELISSA MIMS A/K/A MELISSA D. GABLE A/K/A MELISSA DIANNE MIMS, EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY -INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. CASE NO. 11-101-CA NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure dated September 7, 2011, in Case No. 11-101-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and VICTOR T. MIMS, MELISSA D. MIMS A/K/A MELISSA MIMS A/K/A MELISSA D. GABLE A/K/A MELISSA DIANNE MIMS, EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY -INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE and STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on October 13, 2011, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, and run East 30 feet to the East right of way line of North Murphy Road (30 foot right of way); thence run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West along said East right of way line for 555 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West along said East right of way line for 105 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line, run South 89 degrees 45 minutes 32 seconds East for 420 feet; thence run North 00 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East for 210 feet to the South right of way line of Rammacher Road (30 foot right of way); thence run North 89 degrees 45 minutes 32 seconds West along said South right of way line for 210 feet; thence leaving said South right of way line, run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West for 105 feet; thence North 89 degrees 45 minutes 32 seconds West for 210 feet to the Point of Beginning, lying and being in the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq, Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth & Bowden P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32308 September 29, October 6, 2011 35628S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF GEORGE R. ORLANDO, Deceased. File No. 11-62PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of GEORGE R. ORLANDO, deceased, whose date of death was May 28, 2011; File Number 11-62PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: September 29, 2011. Joseph R. Orlando Personal Representative 4621 Park Street Panama City, FL 32404 BARRON, REDDING, HUGHES, FITE, SANBORN, KIEHN, LEEBRICK & DICKEY, P.A. Brian D. Leebrick Fla. Bar #172634 P. O. Box 2467 Panama City, Florida 32402 (850) 785-7454 ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE September 29, October 6, 2011 35592S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, formerly known as COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. FREDERICK S. WHITE, SR., a married man, Defendant. Case No.: 11-83 CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13th, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-83 CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendant, FREDERICK S. WHITE, SR., I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 11:00 o’clock a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 13th day of October, 2011, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Exhibit A Parcel 1: Commence at the Northeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 0119’18” West along the East boundary line of said Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West for 50.01 feet, thence North 8957’57” East along the South right of way of Johnson Lane for 934.79 feet for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning, continue North 8957’57” East along the South right of way line of Johnson Lane for 121.26 feet; thence North 0116’11” East 50.00 feet to the North boundary line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36; thence North 8957’57” East along said North boundary line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36 for 263.34 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36; thence South 0116’11” West along the East boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for 510.98 feet; thence South 8956’19” West 385.03 feet; thence North 0119’18” East for 461.17 feet to the Point of Beginning. and Parcel 2: Commence at an iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence go South 0000’00” East along the West line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 511.63 feet for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning go North 8836’57” East for a distance of 1319.83 feet to a point on the East line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence go South 0002’54” East along the East line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 808.41 feet to the Southeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence go South 8837’23” West along the South line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 659.45 feet; thence go North 0122’37” West for a distance of 25.00 feet; thence go South 8952’12” West along the Northerly right of way line of Albany Thomas Road for a distance of 660.28 feet to a point on the West line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence go North 0000’00” West for a distance of 768.88 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT: Beginning at a Inch diameter iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 8837’23” West along the South boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 659.45 feet to a found inch diameter iron rod and cap stamped L.S. 4111; thence departing the South boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter go North 0122’37” West for a distance of 25.00 feet to a found inch diameter iron rod and cap stamped L.S. 4111; thence go North 0002’54” West for a distance of 304.99 feet to a set inch diameter iron rod and cap stamped L.S. 4111; thence go North 8837’23” East for a distance of 660.04 feet to a set inch diameter iron rod and cap stamped L.S. 4111 on the East boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence go South 0002’54” East along the East boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 330.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. and Parcel 3A portion of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36; thence along the West line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter South 0000’00” East 511.63 feet; thence North 8836’57” East 320.20 feet; thence South 0114’41” East 99.97 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 8924’57” East 208.33 feet; thence South 0035’59” East 207.43 feet; thence South 8845’19” West 205.89 feet; thence North 0114’41” West 214.06 feet to the Point of Beginning. and Parcel 4: Commence at a rod and cap being used as marking the Southeast Comer of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North 0057’59” East 161.65 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 6536’13” West 171.97 feet to a rod and cap lying on the Easterly right of way of State Road Number 71, said point lying in a curve to the left having a radius of 11034.28 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve and said right of way for 194.30 feet, thru a central angle of 0100’32”, chord of said arc being North 2904’35” West 194.30 feet to a rod and cap for the Point of Beginning; thence from said Point of Beginning continue along said curve and said right of way for 169.40 feet, thru a central angle of 0052’47”, chord of said are being North 3001’15” West 169.39 feet; thence leaving said right of way run North 8819’51” East 334.38 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 0020’54” East 149.12 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 8819’51” West 250.50 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Lot 15, Duck Pond Village Subdivision, as recorded in the plat thereof in the public records of Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 6 Page 66. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 14th day of September, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk September 29, October 6, 2011 35440S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. EDDIE JULIUS, JR. and DIANNA JULIUS, Defendants. CASE NO. 2011-07-CA NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 18, 2011 and entered in Civil Case No. 11-07-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and EDDIE JULIUS, JR. and DIANA JULIUS are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 13th day of October, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lot 10, Block 1020, Unit No. 3, Millview Addition to the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 53, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 22nd day of August, 2011. REBECCA NORRIS CIRCUIT COURT CLERK By: BA Baxter DEPUTY CLERK September 22, 29, 2011 35556S IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GARY S. SETTLE and BARBARA LENSING CUNNINGHAM, Defendants. CASE NO. 11-44 CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-44 CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the defendants, GARY S. SETTLE and BARBARA LENSING CUNNINGHAM, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 13th day of October, 2011, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Parcel 1: Begin at a re-rod (marked #6475) marking the Southwest corner of Lot 16, Block “A” of Peninsula Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 11 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, said point also lying on the Easterly right-of-way boundary of Shoreline Drive; from said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 18 degrees 43 minutes 17 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary a distance of 118.96 feet to a re-rod (marked #4432), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 90 degrees 46 degrees [sic minutes] 49 minutes [sic seconds] East 131.39 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 18 degrees 43 minutes 46 seconds West 118.93 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 89 degrees 46 minutes 06 seconds West 131.38 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; containing 0.34 acres, more or less; AND Parcel 2: AN UNDIVIDED ONE-HALF INTEREST IN Lot 20, Block A, Cape Breezes Subdivision as recorded in the Plat Book 3, page 23, of the public records of Gulf County, Florida; AND Parcel 3: A portion of Section 15, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a concrete monument marking the intersection of the county line common to Gulf and Franklin Counties with the Southerly right of way line of County Road No. 30 (66 feet wide), thence Westerly along said right of way line as follows: along the arc of a curve concave Northerly, said curve having a radius of 2990.87 feet through a central angle of 11 degrees 28 minutes 55 seconds for 599.37 feet, said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and a distance of South 83 degrees 29 minutes 42.5 seconds West, 598.36 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 89 degrees 14 minutes 10 seconds West 88.82 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave Southerly, said curve having a central angle of 12 degrees 04 minutes 56 seconds and a radius of 1801.50 feet; thence westerly along the arc of said curve for 379.89 feet; said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of South 83 degrees 11 minutes 42 seconds West, 379.19 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 77 degrees 09 minutes 14 seconds West, 1516.03 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave Northerly, said curve having a central angle of 02 degrees 11 minutes 43 seconds and a radius of 20,858.59 feet; thence Westerly along the arc of a curve for 799.19 feet, said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of South 78 degrees 15 minutes 05.5 seconds West 799.14 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 79 degrees 20 minutes 57 seconds West for 224.19 feet to an iron rod for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue South 79 degrees 20 minutes 57 seconds West for 77.99 feet to an iron rod marking the point of curvature of a curve Northerly, said curve having a central angle of 0 degrees 01 minutes 43 seconds and a radius of 10,710.42 feet; thence Westerly along the arc of said curve for 5.35 feet, said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of South 79 degrees 21 minutes 22 seconds West for 5.35 feet; thence leaving said right of way line of County Road No. 30, South 10 degrees 39 minutes 03 seconds East for 344.72 feet, more or less, to the edge of an open marsh; thence meandering Easterly along and with the edge of said open marsh the following three courses and distances; thence South 51 degrees 14 minutes 50 seconds East, 30.23 feet, more or less; thence South 86 degrees 02 minutes 59 seconds East, 46.89 feet, more or less; thence North 84 degrees 53 minutes 11 seconds East, 18.35 feet, more or less, to a point of a line that bears South 10 degrees 39 minutes 03 seconds East from the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 10 degrees 39 minutes 03 seconds West for 381.29 feet, more or less, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 14th day of September, 2011. HON. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT Gulf County, Florida By: Shonna Young Gay Clerk/Deputy Clerk September 22, 29, 2011 35489S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY L. O’ROURKE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NANCY L. O’ROURKE; MORRIS A. LINKINS, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MORRIS A. LINKINS, JR.; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s). CASE NO. 23-2011-CA-000266 NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MORRIS A. LINKINS, JR.; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); Whose residence are/is unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff’s attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: Lot 3, Block E, PENINSULA ESTATES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 11, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. If you fail to file your answer or written defenses in the above proceeding, on plaintiff’s attorney, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. DATED at GULF County this 7th day of September, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@judl4.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 22, 29, 2011 35665 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. RIZZO, GARY A., et. al., Defendants. CASE No. 23-2009-CA-000509 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2009-CA000509 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, RIZZO, GARY A., et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of on the 13th day of October, 2011, the following described property: LOT 26, WATER’S EDGE SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 212 WATERS EDGE DRIVE, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 To be published on September 29, 2011 and October 6, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of Iis pendens must file a claim within 30 days after the sale. DATED this 16th day of September, 2011. REBECCA L (BECKY) NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, SUITE 700 100 WEST CYPRESS CREEK ROAD, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 September 29, October 6, 2011 Registered Home Daycare Has opening for children over 12 months of age. Full time $100. weekly. Call 850-340-0994 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains!

PAGE 15

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 29, 2011 The Star | B7 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd Floor; 3 Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16' inside clearance; Dual 12' roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing availableHwy 98 Retail / Of ce Vacant LotsTwo lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30' x 80' each; $69,900 per lot SOLD tLots nHwy98;30 UNDER CONTRACT f ce /re tai l SOLD FL a ran ce; Du al 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldn’t you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. COOK/ GOLF SHOP ASSISTANT ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB700 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD227-1757ASK FOR LAURIE Turn to classified ’ s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you Beacon Hill 2 br, 1 ba, carport, $600 mo. + dep. Pelican Walk Real Estate (850) 647-2473 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $650 month + deposit 850-229-6403 Would like toSwap my home in a N. Georgia Mountain City, for a home in this area. No money owed, Call 478-252-4636 For Sale or Rent2 br, 1 ba, CH&A, Call 850-227-1804 RV Lots at Kristiana RV Park at Beacon Hill 2 blocks from the Gulf, $250 month, W/S included. Call John 850-647-5000/340-0675 Wewa, RV’s for rent Weekly or monthly. Includes W/S/E. Call 850-639-5721 Golfer executive 3 br, 2.5 ba, PVT beach, $350K. Pelican Walk Real Estate (850) 647-2473 Price ReducedFSBO : 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 3 Bedrooms 1 Bath Corner lot home Hunter Ave. Wewa $650/Mos., No Pets Central H&A, W/D Clean, updated Fenced back yard 850-832-4090 Text FL79244 to 56654 1, 2, & 3 bedroom long term rentals available in Mexico Beach. Please call 850-348-0262 Text FL75507 to 56654 PSJ 3 br, 3 ba, 1 b Living Room, Dining Room, Office, Kitchen w/ 2 porches, home association and lawn care, no pets, $1100 mo. (850) 227-1212 95% Success Chance. No Direct Sales. Test This Easy Home Business. $69.95 Risk-Free, Limited-Time Offer. 1-888-835-6822; 1-800-447-0503 2 storage spaces available, 32’x34’ on America Street (West End), John (850) 340-0675 Full Service Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL79133 to 56654 2 br apartments for Rent near Hwy 71 & Wewahitchka. Apply at Fisher Building Supply at 848 Hwy 22 or Call 639-5102 for more info Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. PSJ 915 16th Street, Saturday Oct 1st, 8am-12pm;Moving SaleAbsolutely no early sales. Cash only! No checks please.Metal scaffolding for building, 2 fridges, 2 freezers, dining set and snack bar stools, 2 king sized bedroom sets, 2 Lazy Boy couches, large coffee table, big screen TV, and other TVs, 2 entertainment center, patio furniture, 4 swings, treadmill, ellipticle, diving suit and gear, new Cabella Pit, christmas stuff, toys, clothes, we have everything!!!! Text FL78808 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESHiring part-time inspectors to inspect properties after they are cleaned. Weekend work required. Apply in person weekdays between 9am-5pm at 125 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairCleanerCheerful, detailed person for various household duties. Indian Pass area. 4 hours daily. Excellent references required. (850) 227-7234 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Cage Bird MenagerieParakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Apalachicola 80 Waddell Rd, 3+ miles from Red Light on 12th Street, look for signs, Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-?; household items, clothes (from infants to plus sizes), shoes, some furniture, appliances, TVs, exercise equipment, some tools and fishing tackle, and much more. Bay Harbour, 426 Ling Street, Highland View, October 1, 8:a.m. until. Entertainment, Storage center, clothes, games, china, lots of misc. items tance of 104.92 feet, more or less, to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeast along the waters of the Gulf of Mexico to a point which is South 57 degrees 06 minutes 34 seconds West of the Point of Beginning; thence North 57 degrees 06 minutes 34 seconds East a distance of 63.0 feet, more or less, to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue North 57 degrees 06 minutes 34 seconds East a distance of 246.35 feet to the Point of Beginning. Parcel B: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 89 degrees 15 minutes 46 seconds East along the Northern boundary line of said Section 20, a distance of 1318.67 feet; thence run South 00 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southwesterly right-of-way boundary of County Road C-30-E; thence run North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 213.89 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 113.83 feet; thence run South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West 429.16 feet to the approximate mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run along said approximate mean high water line as follows: South 36 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds East 50.84 feet; thence South 26 degrees 27 minutes 50 seconds East 59.63 feet; thence leaving said approximate mean high water line run North 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds East 401.45 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to an access easement over and across the Easterly 15.00 feet thereof. Less and Except: Commencing at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 15 minutes 46 seconds East along the North line of Section 20, a distance of 1318.57 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West a distance of 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southerly margin of County Road 30E; thence North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E a distance of 270.77 feet to the Point of Beginning of the lands herein described; thence continue North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E a distance of 56.95 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West a distance of 280.00 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West a distance of 69.1 feet, more or less, to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeast along the waters of the Gulf of Mexico to a point which is South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West from the Point of Beginning; thence North 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds East a distance of 95.6 feet, more or less, to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue North 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds East a distance of 263.67 feet to the Point of Beginning. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment in Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. CAPE SAN BLAS JV, LLC; ROBERT E. MCGILL, III; A. BOWEN BALLARD; SHANE CANNON, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2011 CA 000202 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the undersigned not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 19th day of September, 2011. BECKY NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk MEGAN F FRY, ESQ. Florida Bar No. 0058608 Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry, Bond & Stackhouse Suite 800, 125 West Romana Street P. O. Box 13010 Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 Tel: (850) 434-9200 Fax: (850) 432-7340 Attorney for Plaintiff September 29, October 6, 2011 35637S PUBLIC NOTICE Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency is seeking licensed contractors to bid on the construction of a fence along the 98 corridor between Second and Third Avenues. Complete bid packages are available on request from Gail Alsobrook, Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency, 150 Captain Fred’s Place, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Bids must be received by 4 pm on Tuesday, October 13, 2011. Phone: 850-229-6899. September 29, 2011 35689S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that a foreclosure and subsequent auction will be held on personal properties to secure unpaid debts. This sale will cover rental units 2A08, 3A04 at The Space Place, 625 15th St. Mexico Beach, FL 32456. These items will include furniture, TV’s, clothing, dishes, books, and miscellaneous items. This sale will take place on October 15, 2011. All sales are final, paid in cash, and must be removed from the property at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation upon settlement between management and debtor. September 29, October 6, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $119,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 Beachside FOR RENT ST. JOE BEACH 113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98 2 bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98 2 bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach WINDMARK BEACH 212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #4 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #6 2 bd/2ba Fully Furnished MEXICO BEACH Villas of Mexico Beach, 3706 Hwy 98 New Condos, Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 3bd/3ba Furnished Unit 302 2bd/2ba Unfurnished INDIAN PASS 8822 – CR 30A 3 bd/2ba Unfurnished (Right down from Raw Bar ) Pictures available on MLS #243890CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision 101 Two Palms Drive 4 bd Unfurnished Two Palm Subdivision 3 bd/3 ba Furnished and covered pool (small pet allowed with pet deposit) PORT ST. JOE 1206 Palm Blvd 1.5 bd/1ba Partially Furnished Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Dr. Unit 15 2 bd/2ba Furnished 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are j ust starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects.

PAGE 16

Local B8 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 world of clay and world of colors classes that were offered to local kids free of charge. It was a lot of fun here this summer, said Wentzell, who hosted the classes ve days a week. It gave the kids exposure to art, and it gave us exposure to the community. Wentzell said people are hungry for classes like these for their kids. She has also been trying to harness the seasonality of Port St. Joe, and plans to offer more classes catered to area tourists next sum mer with projects that can be completed in one class, focusing on beach-type themes. What I havent been doing, I dont have a sales space, a gallery space, Wentzell said. But she hopes to have an open house in early Decem ber to display her own work and the work of her students. She has been encouraging her students to think about selling their work. And maybe the open house will escalate into a quarterly studio sale, she said. Wentzell holds an intro duction to open studio class on the second Wednesday of every month. On Sept. 14, four students showed up for the class, two brand new faces, Anna Richison and Marlon Newbon, and two others Wentzell has worked with before, Alison Bowling and Marci Watson. The students mixed in with about seven other open studio regulars, who popped in throughout the night and went straight to work on their projects. (Open studio) is com pletely drop-in, Wentzell said. And you only pay for the amount of time youre here. The Artery offers open studio every Monday and Wednesday from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ET, Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET, and most Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET. The cost for open studio time is $5 per hour, or patrons can purchase a 10hour card for $40. Students must purchase their own clay from the stu dio, but all glazes, tools and kiln rings are included. Reservations can be made by calling or dropping by the studio, or at the No Name Caf on Reid Avenue. First-time student Richi son was the rst to arrive for the introduction class. She heard about the class from a friend and went to the No Name Caf for more infor mation. After seeing some work an employee had done at The Artery, Richison was convinced the class was something she should try. She said she had no clay experience and that gave me more incentive, Richison said. I couldnt believe they were rst time pieces, the nish was so unique. Youre kind of a lost soul when you rst start. In her intro class, Wen tzell provides specic in struction and guidance for rst-time clay workers so they have the necessary tools to create successful projects in open studio. If someone off the street came in and I just gave them some clay, they prob ably wouldnt be success ful, Wentzell said. Theres denitely more one-on-one attention the rst night, es pecially for the novice. When the rest of the intro students arrived, Wentzell ushered the group over to a corner of the studio lled with nished ceramics piec es and began explaining the different types of structural clay projects, using exam ples from the shelves. She holds up a textured yellow plate with a green inset as an example of a slab project, a totem pole demonstrates a coil technique, and a gesture towards a shelf of pinch pots provides students with a va riety of ideas. She leaves it up to the students to decide what kind of project they want to tackle rst. Watson is drawn to a sh platter made with a mold, Richison decides to make a plate and is inspired by a rich blue glaze, Newbon de cides to make a champion ship cup, and Bowling de cides to work with coils. After doling out hunks of clay to each student, Went zell goes over methods for keeping the clay moist, how to score and slip and assists everyone with the rst leg of their projects. As the night goes on, Wentzell buzzes around the studio offering advice and assistance: You just have to do what the clay likes to do; Theres no such thing as a mistake; Youre the boss of the clay; Any sug gestions I make aesthetical ly you may disregard, this is YOUR project. Richison makes a joke about the movie Ghost when Wentzell suggests that, while the studio has many tools available, some people prefer to work with their hands. Thats where Patrick Swayze comes in, Richison said. Three veteran studio art ists sit at another table glaz ing their pieces. They care fully pick from Wentzells collection of glazes, all tested and red on small tiles, with names like stormy blue, pea cock, old brick, jade pebble and Sahara sand. Trina Siprell started com ing to open studio in Janu ary and nds a therapeutic escape in her time spent at The Artery. Her breakthrough mo ment came when she learned to squish clay. I have learned if I dont like (my piece), I can just squish it up and start fresh, said Siprell, as she glazed her terra-cotta bowl. That was my breakthrough momentlearning to start over. Siprell and her friend Holly Atkins, who has at tended classes since The Ar tery opened a year ago, also spends the class helping the new students and offering suggestions. We really help each other out with ideas, Atkins said. We have a lot of fun. The atmosphere among the artists is supportive and encouraging. They have inside jokes. They laugh about a yellow ceramic face they call Robin Williams. Siprell has a moment and questions whether or not she is brave enough to add a daring glaze. Elaine Lerch, a long-time friend of Wentzell, works on a sign for outside what she calls her Glass Shack, where she keeps a collection of mosaics. Shes a very talented lady, Lerch said of Wentzell. Shes been able to do what no one else has been able to do get me comfortable and ease my nerves. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West Pass TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 227-7847 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Sep 29 88 68 30 % Fri, Sep 30 87 62 0 % Sat, Oct 1 82 59 0 % Sun, Oct 2 79 61 0 % Mon, Oct 3 80 65 0 % Tues, Oct 4 82 67 0 % Wed, Oct 5 83 66 0 % 9/29 Thu 07:47AM 0.2 L 11:12PM 2.0 H 9/30 Fri 09:15AM 0.1 L 10/1 Sat 12:05AM 2.1 H 10:53AM 0.1 L 10/2 Sun 01:07AM 2.2 H 12:27PM 0.1 L 10/3 Mon 02:15AM 2.1 H 01:44PM 0.1 L 10/4 Tue 03:28AM 2.0 H 02:41PM 0.1 L 10/5 Wed 04:43AM 1.9 H 03:20PM 0.3 L 9/29 Thu 04:12AM 1.7 H 11:37AM 0.1 L 06:36PM 1.6 H 11:26PM 1.3 L 9/30 Fri 04:40AM 1.7 H 12:30PM 0.1 L 07:45PM 1.5 H 11:53PM 1.4 L 10/1 Sat 05:14AM 1.7 H 01:30PM 0.1 L 09:03PM 1.4 H 10/2 Sun 12:22AM 1.5 L 05:55AM 1.7 H 02:41PM 0.2 L 10:35PM 1.3 H 10/3 Mon 01:00AM 1.4 L 06:45AM 1.7 H 04:01PM 0.3 L 10/4 Tue 12:05AM 1.3 H 02:22AM 1.4 L 07:49AM 1.6 H 05:19PM 0.4 L 10/5 Wed 12:54AM 1.3 H 04:30AM 1.4 L 09:17AM 1.5 H 06:25PM 0.4 L CREATE from page B1 VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Trina Siprell (left) helps intro student Marlon Newbon with his rst clay project as Wentzell stands by, poised to offer advice if needed.



PAGE 1

50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By Tim CroftStar News Editor There was division in the room and division on the podium. But after a debate that lasted nearly an hour last week, Port St. Joe commissioners voted 3-2 to approve an ordinance that would extend the hours for alcohol sales in the city to conform with hours in unincorporated areas of the county. The ordinance allows those with a license to sell alcohol in the city to do so until 2 a.m. ET each night, as opposed to the previous midnight ET deadline. Those hours are exactly the same as in the county. Commissioners Bo Patterson, Lorinda Gingell and Bill Kennedy voted in favor of the ordinance; Mayor Mel Magidson and Commissioner Rex Buzzett dissented. Buzzett voted against the ordinance even being read a second time for adoption. Buzzett said that after considering previous stands against any event in the city lasting beyond midnight, he had a change of heart on extending sales hours. This is about these people running their businesses the same hours as everybody else does, Patterson said. If you dont, you are discriminatory to them. Gingell expressed a similar attitude, saying that all the businesses in the city wanted was a level playing eld from a business perspective, adding the two extra hours was appropriate. Several owners of establishments that sell alcohol in the city had come to the commission requesting the extension of hours as a way to keep customers in the city and avoid potentially devastating accidents on the roads as patrons moved from the city to an establishment outside the city for the additional two hours. Their argument was made on two levels. The extra two hours would provide badly needed revenue and city tax collections during difcult economic times; and by extending hours there would be less trafc on U.S. 98 between the city and, for example, Lookout Lounge on the county line once midnight passed. More than 200 patrons of the St. Joe Bar signed a petition requesting the change. I dont see the big deal here, said Connie Butler of the St. Joe Bar. We are not saying we are necessarily PSJ commissioners extend alcohol sale hoursThursday, SEPTEMBER 29 2011 SUNSET OVER INDIAN PASSBy Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer The executive director of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council contracted an event planner without approval from the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners and without legally putting this work out for bid. Amber Davis was hired in mid-August after she approached the TDC and offered to assist with new events. With all the TDC functions with BP funds, she was able to help with the projects, said TDC executive director Tim Kerigan. This is a temporary-type position. The TDC board rst discussed hiring Davis at its July 13 meeting. Kerigan told the board about his encounter with Davis and agreed he and assistant director Kellee Novak could use help with upcoming events. A motion was made by board member Jay Rish to let the TDC nd help for events on a contract and as needed type basis, according to meeting minutes obtained at the Clerk of Courts ofce. The motion was seconded by Warren Yeager. The TDC board began discussing Daviss pay at the next meeting Aug. 2. Kerigan asked the board whether it was considering pay per hour or per event. He said he had heard from a few board members that they had a different expectation. Board member Steve Newman said during the meeting he went back to prior months minutes and understood it should be a pay as you go directed part-time assisted position. Alyson Gerlach countered by stating the position sounded contractual and asked if the TDC should put it out for bid. Kerigan then said if the position is as needed, then its not contractual. Rish noted that no one recommended Davis to the TDC, but rather Davis approached them. After Kerigan and TDC assistant director Kellee Novak spoke in favor of hiring Davis, the board made a motion last month to try Davis out and if its not working, its not working. The board then toyed with a wage for Davis. Kerigan said he just wanted to be clear if we are talking about $12 an hour or $25 an hour. Rish said the board needed to outline what our needs are and look at that appropriately across the board. Fifty dollars (an hour) isnt the right number but neither is $12. TDC meeting minutes showed no further discussion about Davis during the Aug. 9 and Sept. 6 meetings. Meeting minutes do not show that the TDC board ever voted in favor of hiring Davis or approved any contracts with Davis or her company. Davis and Kerigan signed three separate memorandums of understanding (MOUs), outlining Daviss professional services on Aug. 19. Each MOU contracted Daviss company, Statecraft, to develop, enhance and/or provide assistance with events under the direction and approval of the TDC to be held no later than April 30, 2012. The rst MOU promises Davis a professional service fee of $7,000, to be paid in two installments for late summer and early fall events. Davis received the rst $3,500 installment on Sept. 9 in a check from the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. The check also covered $6,541 in expenses for the TDCs golden scallop treasure hunt. The second MOU contracts Davis and Statecraft for new winter events at $8,300 to be paid in three installments and the third MOU contracts $9,000 to be paid in four installments for new spring events. In total, the MOUs on le contract Davis for $24,300 worth of event planning with the TDC between late August 2011 and April 2012. City Attorney Jeremy Novak said, under a county policy adopted in 2005 regarding hired services, county agencies must collect at least three verbal bids for services ranging TDC hiring raises questionsBy Tim CroftStar News Editor For the proposed Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center (NWFREC), next Tuesday represents a milestone. Port St. Joe city commissioners will consider a development order for the project, which would provide a local green light to the project that has been percolating for nearly two years. Due to the expected turnout for the discussion of the project, which has stirred controversy among many residents, the meeting, a regularlyscheduled bi-monthly meeting of the commission, has been moved to the Centennial Building. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. ET. The citys Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) unanimously approved the draft development order late last month. Now the full commission will weigh in. Earlier this summer, the project received the final air emissions permit from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the final state permit required for the project, which was also issued a stormwater management permit from the DEP. The $225 million NWFREC, which is proposed to burn woody biomass in the form of forest residue left after logging operations, is estimated to generate 180-200 jobs during the 18-month construction timeline with 85-100 permanent jobs generated at the plant and through the fuel production pipeline. Local elected and economic development officials have championed the project, with some officials traveling to South Carolina where a much smaller version of a similar plant provides power on campus. The project is seen as a potential stepping stone toward creating a green technology center in the county, a concept supported by Floridas Great Northwest, a regional economic development organization. Rentech, the California-based company developing the project, estimates the plant will come online sometime in 2013. However, financing remains a question mark for the project. Originally seeking a federal loan guarantee, Rentech was notified this summer by the U.S. Department of Energy that the project would not be considered at that time because of a lack of funding.PSJ commissioners to take up energy center development See ALCOHOL A2 See ENERGY A3 See TDCTDC A2BBAY DDAY, BB1YEARYEAR 73, N N UMBER 50Opinion. .......................................AA4-AA5Letters to the Editor. ...................AA5Outdoors. .....................................AA6 Sports...........................................AA7-AA8School News. ................................BB3Faith. .............................................BB4 Obituaries. ....................................BB4Classieds. ....................................BB6-BB7

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 from $5,000 to $10,000, and must legally advertise for services or positions paying more than $10,000. The TDC is paying Davis in separate installments, each under the $5,000 mark. There are only two exceptions to the rule that come from sole services, such as hiring a particular band for a concert, and emergency services. If its something many people can do, there needs to be a bid, Novak said. Youre not a sole source provider of that service. Kerigan said the TDC never put out a bid for the service because its not a position; its a contract for hire. It was more because of everything she had already done for the community, Kerigan said of his decision to hire Davis. The board asked for help, and she came to us. Kerigan said Davis is not an employee of the TDC or Gulf County. I understand some peoples concerns with her personal afliations with others, Kerigan said. In a small community its very likely that people will have these types of afliations. I dont want any troubles with it, but Im also sensitive to anyones concerns or questions. Everything were doing is highly scrutinizedthrough BP, the governors ofce. Its not anything were doing to upset anyone. The TDC did not submit a Request for Proposal to the board of county commissioners to hire Davis. Novak said any county agency spending taxpayer dollars must get the approval from the county commission to do so. The TDC does not have the authority to bind the countys contracts without the commissioners approval, Novak said. Those ve guys are the ones that have to vote on these things. If its something that obligates the county to a certain amount of money, it has to go through the commission. Novak said there have been misunderstandings among agencies where they think getting the boards approval means getting the approval of the agencys own board. There is only one board, and its the board of county commissioners, Novak said. The executive director doesnt make these decisions, the commission makes these decisions. Kerigan said he enlisted Novaks help in making sure things are done according to county code. My recommendation (to Kerigan) was to put a list together of potential expenditures for the public and the commission to review, Novak said. Get this stuff before the commission. All your stuff. Novak said he will begin sitting in on TDC meetings to educate the board and make sure everything is done according to county policy. Novak said the TDC board does not have the authority to throw around Gulf County dollars without the commissions approval. He also said the TDC cannot be signing contracts without the boards approval. The TDC would like to thank all of those that helped make the PoJo Live Music Fest such a success. We could not have done this without all of your help and efforts.Commissioner Bill Williams Commissioner Warren Yeagar Rick Ott From the Heart Recording Studio Kerigan Marketing Ramseys Printing Coast 2 Coast Printing and Promotions Panache Tent & Events Gulf County Sheriffs Department Raymond Hart Gulf County Maintenance Bobby Pickels Progress Energy Janis Tankersley New South Outdoors Jodi Perez Amber Davis Mize Plumbing Andrew Rowell GAC Pour Services LLC Dixon & Sons Taxi Service Lewis Bear Company Darla Lyle & Carla Hand Gulf County Clerks Ofce Johanna White Vision Bank Money Tree Sgt. Chris Buchanan Toye Roberts Carpet Country Florida Eco Services Kim McFarland & Joni White St. Joseph Bay Humane Society PSJ Student Government Young Explorers Band of Gold Steve Newman Alyson Gerlach Chris Petrie Jack Kerigan John & Carlene Parker Elaine Lerch Joel Reed Lindsay Thomas Christa Mathews Joe Robinson Crystal Follin Provisions Steamers Hotdogs Snow King Boon Docks Mango Marleys Downtowners Regans Oyster Bar Paul Gants Barbeque Prickly Pears 850-819-4492 429 S Tyndall Parkway, Suite MMarsha Mongoven, Licensed EstheticianVariety of facials, chemical peels, and waxingVisit www.forskinsakellc.com for complete menuMICRODERM WITH YOUR FIRST FACIAL F or S kin S ake, LLC FREE! Now Open! ALCOHOL from page A1 TDCC from page A1going to be open until 2 a.m. each night. We want the option, if we have the business, to stay open the two extra hours. Al Smith of Rays said, All were asking for is the same right as in the county. Every bit of revenue we can get, we need. We pay the same taxes as everybody else. Those arguments, however, were not persuasive to those who spoke in opposition to the ordinance, which several characterized as a gateway to the arrival of clubs and other larger drinking establishments in order to take advantage of the longer operating hours. If you do this, you fundamentally change Port St. Joe, said resident Marcus Sturdivant, who said commissioners were listening too much to President Barack Obama, who Sturdivant contended was trying to fundamentally change the country. Several opponents noted that the ordinance seemed a continuation of the relaxation of rules pertaining to alcohol sales, a move that began several years ago with the approval of Sunday sales by the commission. Gary White, speaking, he said, not as a minister but a citizen, suggested that there were not droves of people driving from the city to establishments in unincorporated areas at midnight, rendering the safety issue somewhat of a red herring. He also suggested that any additional revenue, as it is tax revenue for the city, would be pennies and that only two or three businesses in town even operate until midnight. Im not speaking about this from a religious point of view, or from the moral perspective, but about the logic, White said. Midnight is an adequate time. Local businessman Ted Lovelace spoke about the dangers of alcohol and said the new extended hours would open the city up to become a pleasure palace and nightspot. Where are we going to go with this, Lovelace said. Lovelace also said, and was echoed later by Sturdivant, that voters would likely not forget who supported the ordinance and who did not. This will be your decision, he said. It will be on your plate. Magidson took umbrage with such a statement. I have never voted for or against an issue because I think it will cost me an election, Magidson said. I have never voted one way or another because I thought it would cost me one vote. Kennedy ended the discussion by noting, as he had in prior meetings, that he had no problem with the extended hours and wished that the passion shown during the debate on the alcohol sales was focused on things far more important than two hours.RECYCLINGIn an effort to make recycling easier for residents, the containers previously sited at the city transfer station on Industrial Road had been moved to the STAC House on Eighth Street, allowing round the clock access. The city is also offering a pickup price for businesses that produce a lot of cardboard: $40 a month for pickup once a week and $80 a month for pickup twice a week. The recycling program has really gone well and has been a good thing for the city, said city manager Charlie Weston. If we get enough interest we can get more containers in the city.GG ULF PINESResident Christine McElroy lauded commissioners for choosing not to purchase the deed to Gulf Pines Hospital through a bankruptcy proceeding and encouraged commissioners to carefully consider any future consideration of buying the land at auction. McElroy said the citys top priority should be providing a water distribution system that produces clear, drinkable for all and until that time the city should be careful about expending funds on a project that given current estimates on cost would be a money-loser for the city.

PAGE 3

LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, September 29, 2011 ATTENTION FORD F-250 POWER STROKE DIESEL ENGINE IF YOU OWN OR LEASE A FORD SUPER DUTY TRUCK OR AN EXCURSION VEHICLE FOR MODEL YEARS 2003 2007 EQUIPPED WITH FORDS 6.0L DIESEL ENGINE, COMMONLY KNOWN AS FORDS POWER STROKE DIESEL ENGINE, YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL RIGHTS IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS YOUR POSSIBLE CLAIM FOR DAMAGES, CALL: Lovelace Law Firm, P.A. 12870 US Hwy 98 West Suite 200 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Telephone: 850-837-6020 Toll free: 1-888-837-2281 Fax: 1-850-837-4093 dml@lovelacelaw.com www.lovelacelaw.com 24-EMERGENCY SERVICE FOR OUR CURRENT CLIENTS! Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM Drs. Hours By Appt. DISCOUNT THURSDAYS Spays / Neuters 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients ENERGY from page A1Rentech has been exploring its options in the private and public markets, said a company spokeswoman, but nothing has been finalized. Meanwhile, the company has entered into contracts for the engineering and equipment procurement for the construction phase of the project. The 55 megawatt plant will use 900 dry tons of forest residue per day, according to company officials. Despite seeking to add fast-growing grasses to a level of 50 percent of the fuel source within three years, the company has no plans to use such grasses, officials said, though permit language would allow them as a fuel source. Land permitted on the north end of the county for growing operations has been abandoned and the grow operations eradicated. While opponents label the plant, the first commercial-size application for the companys SilvaGas process, an incinerator in disguise, the company argues that emissions will not be noticeable, that the process is not burning, but heating large amounts of sand, with water added during the process to produce steam to turn a generator to produce electricity. Nearly all the electricity from the plant will be purchased by Progress Energy under an agreement signed more than two years ago. The plant, company officials noted, met all requirements of the DEP, which are the same as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. But opponents are evident, as signs around the city proclaim Biomass? No. The primary argument is that the plant was permitted by the DEP as a minor source of air pollution and therefore was held to less stringent standards than appropriate. As this is the first commercial scale use of the SilvaGas process, opponents label the plant an experiment. Further, opponents argue that there is no safe threshold established by the medical community for particulate emissions, so-called nano particulates, which the plant will emit. In essence, opponents argue, the medical science has yet to catch the technology. A list of medical associations has raised questions about biomass in general. State associations have expressed concerns about the Port St. Joe project among several others around the state, including one in Gainesville. The air emissions permit for the Port St. Joe project was twice challenged: the first sent the company then developing the project back to the drawing board after pulling the application; the second ended when the challenge was dropped this summer. As for the potential jobs to be created by the project, opponents state those benefits are outweighed by the risks. A development order would clear the way for Rentech to begin construction on the old Materials Transfer Industries site, a former coal-transfer station that is a brownfield.

PAGE 4

OpinionA4 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011Mama lives in a retirement community in Alabama and I visit her as much as I can. The other residents are a lot of fun to watch and listen to. They all have stories to tell and they want to tell them. In my opinion, their stories are a lot better than books or television. This particular visit was on the last day of National Assisted Living Week. It was a Friday, and they were having a luau with pia coladas. Im not a big fan of coconut, but I tried them and they were good. We were sitting out back in a large gazebo type structure sipping our pia coladas, talking and having a good time. Out of the approximately twenty residents there, only three were men. Being a math guy interested in statistics, I know that women tend to outlive men by about ve years. Sitting under the gazebo with these folks, it was kind of obvious. The three fellows sat together side by side. They were all around 90 yearsold, give or take a couple of years. Their names were John Frank, Buck and Ray. I was in the south, they were from the south, and they had appropriate southern names. With these three wise men, I realized that I was in the presence of greatness. Yes, these fellows had seen almost one hundred years each, and they were slowing down a lot, but they were genuine American Heroes. Of the three men, Buck was the only one I had met before. Previously, Buck hadnt been in a talkative mood. On this day, Buck was in a very talkative mood. First, I talked with John Frank. Mama had introduced me to John Frank earlier in the day. His wife lives in the same facility as my Mama, and John Frank lives across the street in a facility that is able to provide more care. When I talked to John Frank, I was actually talking to his wife. It was one of the sweetest experiences you could imagine. He was tired and often said to his wife, I dont remember, you tell them. She would proudly answer the questions and smile. John Frank smiled as she told his stories. It was incredible to see the love in both of their faces. John Frank was an Air Force man in World War II who ew 65 bombing missions. The thought of that alone blew me away. His wife told of missions to Sardinia and Africa (I assume Tunisia) in the ght against the Axis Forces (the Nazis). His wife was quick to say that he only dropped bombs in 64 of those 65 missions (he served as an escort in one). Im sure that she had heard the story many times; it was as though she had to get it right. They didnt want to take credit for the one with no bombs. It was an incredible feat, even if he didnt get to drop bombs on that one mission. According to John Franks wife, it was at a time when our country didnt have enough men for the planes. She noted that initially, yers were limited to 25 combat ights, and then the limit was extended to 50 and extended again to 65. After 65 missions, John Frank came home. I was sitting with this hero, listening to his wife and I was watching him smile. I was honored and was pretty sure that the smile was out of love for his wife and probably had nothing to do with his combat missions. After talking to John Frank, I talked to Ray. He was a new resident and was still getting used to the surroundings of the retirement community. Ray didnt say much, he didnt have to. Ray was with the 11th Airborne Division, also known as The Angels, during WW II and the Korean War. Ray seemed to think this information was all I needed to know. It was. Then, there was Buck Buck was a Navy Seal, before they were actually called Navy Seals. He was an excellent swimmer growing up, the best he knew of. Buck, at 92 yearsold, still makes this claim multiple times a day. No one disputes him; he goes on to say he swam nekkid in Wehadkee Creek, Ala., and that there werent bathing suits back then. He laughs when he says it. Buck has been written about in Hero Books, and folks know that his stories are true. The ladies sit around like school girls saying Buck, tell him about the swimming pool, or Buck, tell him about Mrs. Roosevelt, or Buck, tell him about getting baptized. At 92, Buck still gets a little excited as he tells his stories and laughs. There is a rumor that Buck was Over the past year there has been much debate centered around providing a level playing eld, a foundation for competition that is equal for all. From extending alcohol sales for Port St. Joe establishments or creating a new state high school athletic classication for small rural schools, leveling the eld has become clich. But as reported this week by reporter Valerie Garman not all playing elds, for example the one the Gulf Tourist Development Council, or at least its executive director, is playing on, are level, as evidenced by the recent hiring of Amber Davis and her company for contract work. The TDC, though several board members said they had no knowledge of the hiring, contracted with Davis and her company to provide professional services for TDC events through April 2012. The contracts, or memorandums of understanding, for a total of nearly $25,000, however, were written in increments that by all appearances seem designed to circumvent county bidding rules that mandate anything over $10,000 be put out for bid. The rst payment to Davis totaled $3,500 for her professional services and another $6,000-plus for supplies and marketing for the golden scallop promotion. No single MOU reaches the threshold of $10,000. Leave aside for this discussion the fact that Davis is linked socially with County Commissioner Bill Williams. As one TDC board member suggested the entire episode not only stinks it is rancid on its face. First, there would be a question of just how much the TDC requires in assistance to market any event. This is an organization ush with cash from a BP settlement to seven Florida counties to enhance tourism. This is an ofce operated by an executive director, Tim Kerigan, whose taxpayer-paid salary of over $50,000 is pretty well above average for this county. And when it comes to marketing events, until the contracts with Davis were signed in early August, all marketing for PoJo had come from Kerigan Marketing under a county contract it secured last year. Why the need for additional professional services? The Chamber of Commerce had a model for bringing in extra help for events they were called volunteers. They were plentiful and free. And, in the case of the golden scallop promotion, this is an event that only took shape the past month how much marketing extended beyond the borders of Gulf County? Why doesnt this promotion begin in June with the start of scallop season and serve as a season-long event? How is this event in need of an additional $3,000 professional services contract? The event, as offered late in the season, seems a way to toss BP money around with no apparent purpose beyond steering business in a desired direction. Further, the TDC board had issues over the hire. Meeting minutes reect that some board members had heartburn concerning whether the MOUs with Davis were a contract in search of a Request for Proposals. There is a measuring stick for such a situation. If you have to ask, chances are that an RFP is not only needed, but should be required, for nothing other than adhering to transparent governance procedures. TDC meeting minutes also reect that after a general discussion about going out for bid, a discussion about how much to pay Davis she requested $50 an hour there was silence on the subject for two subsequent meetings, a span during which Davis entered into the series of MOUs with Tim Kerigan. The TDC board does not appear to have taken an ofcial vote on the nal MOUs. Consider the contrasting views of this scenario. When contacted about the arrangement with Davis, Tim Kerigan pronounced it not a big deal, that the TDC had needed help with events, had been approached by Davis and put Davis under contract. However, county attorney Jeremy Novak expressed concern about bidding requirements, stating only the Board of County Commissioners had the power to approve contracts over $10,000 and that Kerigan could not unilaterally act where commissioners had the nal say. Novak took the position a step beyond, saying he would be attending TDC meetings to ensure compliance with county rules and urged Kerigan to put everything he is doing as TDC executive director in the sunshine, in the eyes of the public and commissioners. But this sort of action has too often been part of the countys DNA and that the BOCC chairman who, as a TDC board member, seconded a motion to hire some event help with no parameters set was remotely in support of this contractual hocuspocus speaks volumes. At its most fundamental, local government is in place to ensure fairness for all, that those who might not be part of the morning coffee klatch, the post-commission card games or a member of the proper church congregation, gets a fair shake. And there is no more appropriate place than in bidding for county business. If taxpayers cant rely on a level eld from an entity that spends public funds, the adage that holds that who you know is more important than what you know prevails. There is every potential that Davis offers an appropriate service to the TDC. There is also every possibility that in a county where unemployment remains stuck in double gures, there are others with equal or better skill sets who would nd $25,000 a lifeline in tough times. But until entities funded by public dollars act with probity and fairness in spending the funds they are entrusted with instead of providing the perception that the inside track to the pie belongs only to insiders, government has unked the trust test. And with trust gone any credibility that the playing eld is level is out the window.Its as plain as black and white Keyboard KLATTERINGSThe 3 wise menA level playing eld TiIM CrROFtTStar news editor The Western Channel is currently airing an old Kirk Douglas movie, Lonely Are the Brave. Kirk hadnt given his trusty horse, Whiskey, his rst pat before I was transported to 1962. That was the summer the picture was released and when David Paschall talked me into going down to the Park Theatre with him to see it. I wasnt too interested, now if David had been a good looking girl it might have been different. Ye gads! The thing was in black and white! This was 1962 for goodness sakes; we had Cinemascope and Technicolor! And it was set in modern times! There was no posse rushing to the rescue, no dusty cattle drives and no wagon train attacks. This movie wasnt going to have a sinister saloon owner vying treacherously to steal the old mans ranch. All we were going to get was an hour and a half of looking at the dent in Kirks chin. I had paid a whole quarter to see a modern day western lmed without the benet of color! Hollywood had tricked me again! The management had my money, David seemed perfectly content and I certainly didnt have any place else to be. I settled in and quickly went to pondering on exactly how Kirk shaved around that hole. He played a character named Jack Burns. Ole Jack didnt cotton much too modern times. The movie might have been set in 1962 but the character sure wasnt! Too many laws, too much bureaucracy, the world seemingly abounded in red tape and personal governmental agendas. Jack longed for a simpler time. An era less constraining. I had trouble in school spotting the symbolism Miss Polly was always pointing out in those poems by Keats and Shelly, but I understood immediately Jacks penchant for cutting any fence he came across. He didnt carry an I.D. He had no social security card, no drivers license, no Diners card. He pointed out emphatically that he needed no identication papers, he KNEW who he was! Course, this didnt sit well with the local powers that be after the ght with the one armed man. And let me say quickly, there wasnt anything wrong with Jacks sense of justice. He put one arm behind his back so the ght would be even-up. The overbearing police playing the authoritarian role couldnt understand Jacks individualistic penchant. He aint like us. They pushed and shoved him a mite. I reckon that was so we could get the overlord, underdog picture xed in our minds. But a barroom brawl wasnt that big of a deal in a small western town in 1962, they decided to let Jack go. He hit a deputy right square on the jaw. Jack had to walk his own line, make his own statement. And he wanted to be put in jail so he could break his good friend out. Apparently hed ridden a long way and cut a lot of fences to do just that! But the friend only had a short time left and was through bucking the system. Jack sat in the jail cell and shook his head. He couldnt understand. He explained about the fences and the no trespassing, no hunting, no hiking, keep-out, restricted, closed area signs. Jack felt constrained. Either we will live free and open or we will live caged and subservient. His world was as black and white as the movie. You can imagine how long a man like Jack stayed cooped up. He pulled a le from his boot, sawed through a couple of bars and made his escape to the freedom he so desperately desired. The freedom he so thoughtfully understood. The freedom he would relinquish to no man or authority. He saddled Whiskey, who he knew, unlike his friend, would not let him down and cut a trail for old Mexico. His crimes so far (they didnt know to charge him with fence cutting) added up to a ght in a bar and hitting a policeman. For this the long arm of government called out every available agency to hunt him down. They sent jeeps, walkie talkies, helicopters, the highway patrol, deputies of every persuasion, bounty hunters, meddlesome reporters and the kitchen sink after him. Even the most non symbolist among us couldnt help but notethat was a lot of show, a lot of re power and a sinful amount of tax money to nd one, at best, quasi lawbreaker who simply wanted to be left alone. Think of the poor that could have been fed; the jobless that might have been helped; the real criminals that could have been apprehended; or, at the very least, they might have bought a prosthesis for the one armed guy. The rest of the picture zoned in on Jack and Whiskeys race for Mexico. Jack naturally had to shoot the helicopter down. He took the obligatory bullet in the leg, depended on his horse and never doubted for one second his right to seek his own manifest destiny. He doesnt make it, of course. He gets run over by a semi-truck loaded with toilets. You talk about symbolism! This wasnt Its a Wonderful Life. I saw an interview with Kirk Douglas years later where he said this was his favorite of all his movies. It was for me, too. I hear that a re-make of this movie is in the works. Theyre looking for a cocoa colored horse and an actor with a dimple in his chin. They are going to bring it up to date by not changing it at all! Respectfully, Kes HUnkerNKER DOWnNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CranksRANKS MY tra TRACtTOrRBN Heard See Cranks RANKS A5

PAGE 5

9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971 UpcomingOPEN AT 11AM ET 7 DAYS A WEEKWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM Events!!WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PM ETKARAOKE & DANCING IN THECROWS NESTTHURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PM ETRANDY STARK ON THE POOPDECK WITHARTLONG ONSAXSATURDAYSSUNDAY 7 PM ETOPENMICHOSTED BY BARRYHENSONBRINGYOURINSTRUMENT ANDSONGSTUESDAY & WEDNESDAYLADIES NIGHT 5 PMTILCLOSING dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! MOSES J. MEDINA 850.527.0441MMEDINA@CRESTENTERPRISES.COM REMODELING SERVICES LICENSE#RG0058632 Come Stick Your Nose In My BusinessYou wont be disappointed!!Whether youre looking for a little extra money or a full time career. Youre looking for SCENTSY!Scentsy is safer than traditional candles!Using a beautiful ceramic warmer, a low wattage light bulb and over 80 wonderful scents, you can transform your house into a fabulous smelling home!My team is growing rapidly but we still have plenty of room for more enthusiastic people.Ty Robinson850.229.2679 www.tyrobinson.scentsy.us Become an Independent Scentsy Consultant Today!Check out my website or give me a call! Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S LettersA5 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011a ladies man in his younger days. He still is. On this particular day, Buck wouldnt be outdone. He was born to compete and he still does. We were sitting around drinking our pia coladas, when Buck got started talking. He said, Im 92 years-old, I bet Im the oldest man out here. There were four men outside drinking pia coladas; John Frank, Ray, Buck and me. I knew he had me beat, Ray had already admitted to being 90 and John Frank just smiled. Buck was not sure if he got his point across, so he continued to say it. I was born in 1919, Im 92 years-old and I bet Im the oldest man out here. Honestly, I loved it every time he said it. Every time he said it, I agreed with him. However, after 7 or 8 times, Ray nally decided to say something to Buck. Ray, who was wearing a VFW hat slightly covering his eyes, turned to Buck and asked, Why dont you get a sign and wear it around your neck? I have changed this a little because I think Ray might have put it in 11th Airborne lingo. Im still trying to gure out why they called them The Angels. One thing is for sure, I wasnt going to ask Ray that question on this day. However, I knew I was in the presence of three wise men, three American heroes and three fellows who still have a lot to offer. BN Heard writes about what cranks his tractor at www.CranksMyTractor. com. His column is carried in newspapers and magazines across the southeastern United States. CRANKS from page AA4At the end of August, a large, disgusting algae outbreak slimed Old Tampa Bay. Two months earlier, an algae outbreak in the Caloosahatchee River near Fort Myers turned the river bright green, smelled like raw sewage, and made thousands of sh go belly up. Water with algae outbreaks like this is so toxic that health authorities say you shouldnt touch it, much less drink it or swim in it. It can give you rashes, respiratory problems, and even kill you. U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Oklahoma, found that out the hard way. He swam in the same type of toxic algae outbreak in Grand Lake, Oklahoma, in June and said he became deathly sick that night with an upper respiratory illness. There is no question, Ihhofe told the Tulsa World, that his illness came from the toxic algae in the lake. Oklahoma health ofcials had warned people not to touch the water, swim in the popular lake, or eat sh from it. Like Floridas outbreaks, the one in Grand Lake was fueled by the socalled nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus, which come from inadequately treated sewage, fertilizer, and manure. After years of seeing nauseating algae outbreaks on popular Florida tourist beaches like Sanibel Island and at shing meccas like the St. Johns River, we citizens nally got the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to start setting limits on the sewage, fertilizer and manure pollution thats threatening our drinking water and our health. This type of pollution is preventable. We can combat it at its source by upgrading old sewer plants, using modern manure management on agricultural operations and being smarter about applying fertilizer. Cleaning up our waters is a good thing, but you wouldnt know it by reading the distortions and inated cost estimates that highly paid polluter-lobbyists are peddling to scare people. They will spend whatever it takes to make sure they can keep using our public waters as their private sewers. The truth is that meeting Floridas new limits for these contaminants is likely to cost a few dollars extra per person per month phased in over many years. In Chesapeake Bay, for example, advanced wastewater treatment cut pollution at a cost of only $2.50 per household per month. Not a bad price for clean water. The Florida DEP is in the process of setting new statewide standards for phosphorus and nitrogen pollution. Unfortunately, the rules that state regulators have proposed so far are inadequate to protect public health and clean up the waters. It is critical that the states polluters, now emboldened by the current anything-goes mentality in Tallahassee, dont end up writing the DEPs waterpollution rules. It is critical that our state regulators protect the public, not the polluters. Tourism, shing, and boating are our economic lifeblood in Florida. When visitors come here and see dead sh and No Swimming signs, they wont come back, and that affects our state budget and our jobs. David Guest is an attorney in the Tallahassee ofce of Earthjustice, a public-interest law rm. Dont let polluters write clean-water rules DaA VidID GUestESTGuest Column Dear Editor: This letter is in response to front page article in The Star, by news reporter Valerie Garman, in reference to a workshop meeting by the Mexico Beach City Council voting on a tentative millage rate. First of all, that was a workshop that was open to discuss the tentative rate from the council, property owners and citizens of Mexico Beach. The millage rate was not set as a nal vote by the council as this was only a workshop. There were several mistakes in the article. First of all the article stated that the city purchased the historic Parker House, to be converted into the Mexico Beach City Hall, for a higher price than was offered at a public auction of the property. This is totally false. The city purchased the property for less than what was offered at the auction. Cathey Parker Hobbs and her siblings decided not to accept the offer from the auction. It was not her decision alone to reject the offer. This accusation was made by a disgruntled property owner. Your reporter did not question the city council, mayor or city manager to verify this accusation. The Parker Family also donated additional land adjoining the property to the city after reaching the agreement for the city to purchase the property. It is true that the mayor and Hobbs are cousins, but the mayor abstained from voting on the purchase of the Historic Parker House. I for one am proud that the city was able to purchase the property to preserve and honor the Parker Family. For those who do not know, the Parker Family founded and developed Mexico Beach. On the accusations that materials to reconstruct the Parker House would likely be purchased at the local Ace Hardware Store (owned by the Cathey Family), I see nothing wrong here if the materials are put out for bids, and the local Ace Hardware comes in at the lowest bid. Only makes sense to go with the lowest bidder. The awarding of the reconstruction contract: Mayor Cathey did not vote on this at all. The decision was made by the city council without the mayor voting. Last, the city has insurance to cover the cost to make the needed repairs to the Parker House and the insurance company will be making the payment to the Contractor of Choice. The article also implied that total (complete) construction was needed. In truth only the destroyed areas will be torn down and the rest repaired. This was not reported in the article. My family and I love living in Mexico Beach and have for the past 17 and a half years. We visited here for many, many years before buying property and moving here. For those who dont love it, the door is always open for them to move away.Victor WebbMexico BeachDont love Mexico Beach? Door is openAccording to Gail Cunningham, spokesperson for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, we live in a credit-dominated society. Without a checking or savings account, she says, its difcult to cash payroll, Social Security and unemployment checks; you need a credit or debit card to shop online, book a ight or rent a car; and you may be forced to carry large amounts of cash to pay bills. Acommon money management tool for people in this situation is prepaid cards. These cards look and work much like regular debit cards except that instead of funding them through a checking or savings account, you load money on the card by cash, check, funds transfer or direct deposit. Common prepaid card features include: You dont need a bank account or solid credit rating to obtain one. They start out with a zero balance until you add money. Purchases or ATM withdrawals will diminish the cards balance until it reaches zero and you discard it or you reload the card. Spending is limited to the amount loaded on the card, so you cant buy more than you have. Cards can offer Zero Liability protection if you promptly report loss, theft or fraudulent charges. Most allow ATM cash withdrawals and online or phone purchases. Theyre safer to carry than large amounts of cash. Common types of prepaid cards include: Reloadable cards to which more money can later be added. Gift cards used until their balance is depleted; theyre not reloadable. Teen cards where parents can reload the cards and monitor purchases online or by phone (allowing teens a chance to manage spending and budgeting in a controlled environment). Travel cards a safe alternative to cash and travelers checks. Payroll cards wages are loaded into the cards account for immediate access (similar to checking account direct deposit). Government agencyprovided cards benets such as Social Security and unemployment are loaded into your card account. Healthcare cards allow point-of-service access to funds in your Flexible Spending Account or Health Savings Account to pay for qualied medical expenses. Prepaid cards may come with fees and restrictions, so its important to read the cards terms and conditions carefully and to shop around for the best deals. Good comparison sites include www. bankrate.com and www. creditcards.com. The 411 on prepaid cards JasoASON Alder LDERMaAN

PAGE 6

E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTDoo OO RS www.starfl.comSection A By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@bellsouth.net Not long ago, kayaks were the province of the Inu it peoples beyond the Arctic Circle plus a few whackedout whitewater enthusiasts with more nerve than sense. But what a difference a few years can make. Today, paddle-powered boats are by far the fastest growing seg ment of an otherwise stag nant boating market, both because of the environmentrst attitude of millions of young people and because they are simply very useful, cost-efcient little boats. These paddle-powered cockleshells offer swift, si lent access to water so shal low that powerboats cant even think of invading it. For the nature photographer and wildlife watcher, theres no watercraft that can com pare; shore birds, marine mammals and sh simply ignore a yak as if its a log oating past. For shing in shallow bay areas like those that abound throughout the Panhandle, there also are big benets. Kayaks put the angler so low to the water that the sh cant see him or her, and the approach is dead silent. They cruise over water only inches deep, across mud bot toms too soft to wade, and they theyre light enough to launch anywhere, including off a seawall in the middle of town if thats where the sh happen to be. Intrepid an glers even take them off the beach and head out to sea to do battle with king mackerel and tarpon. Plus, when the day ends, you can store your boat standing on end on the porch of your walk-up apartment. And theres no environmental footprint paddle power is simple, clean muscle-power. Kayaks are light enough for one angler, man or woman, to hoist to a rack on the top of a car or slide into the bed of a pickup, SUV or station wagon. Theyre typi cally 10 to 14 feet long, and weights for kayaks rigged for shing are usually less than 60 pounds. Theyre available in siton-top versions as well as the more traditional models where the legs go under a bow deck. Many anglers like the sit-on-top models be cause theyre easier to get in and out of; a typical day in kayak country includes a good bit of wade-shing as well as shing from the boat, so the ease of entry can be important. Most kayak makers des ignate various models for various duties; those who intend to use their boats for shing probably will want a recreational or general use version, said Ian Joyce, spokesman for Wilderness Systems Kayaks, one of the leading shing kayaks. These are wider and more stable than some of the sport models, Joyce said. The trade-off is that the wider the beam, the harder the kayak is to paddle, and the slower it goes for a giv en amount of effort. Wider kayaks also are somewhat heavier, though not enough so that this should become a factor in getting the boats in and out of the water in most areas. Most anglers set their kayaks up with back rests to ease the pressure on the spine over long hours in the boat. They also are likely to add small anchors, sometimes on a roller that allows dropping it without moving from the seat in the kayak; paddle keepers that prevent the double-ended paddle from drifting away should it fall overboard; slipin tackle boxes that t pre molded slots in the deck; ice chests; and of course water proof bags for anything that doesnt like saltwater, includ ing electronic car keys, cell phones and wallets one of the facts of life in kayaking is that nearly everything gets wet. And, of course, you need rod holders. Most opt for at least two, allowing them a quick choice of lures for varying depths. By law and by common sense, it also is wise to carry and wear a personal ota tion device any time you are in a kayak. Sooner or later, you probably will turn the boat over. Often, in the backcountry, the remedy is simply to stand up. But in deeper water, the boat might quickly drift away, and a life preserver can make all the difference. Many opt for the belt-pack or suspender-type inatable, which offers more freedom of movement for paddling and casting than the vest type. Many resorts throughout the Panhandle now of fer kayaks for rent, giving a great opportunity to try be fore you buy. And most boat dealers now have at least a few yaks somewhere in their inventory. Expect to spend about $800 minimum for a kayak equipped to sh, about $2,000 for a fully equipped rig. If you just want a sport-yak to play with, some are available for as little as $450. Ocean, Ho bie, Old Town, Wilderness Systems, Nu-Canoe and others offer a wide variety of models suitable for Pan handle yakking. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting HeadquartersLIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLEQUEST HEAT BOWBY G5$499.99 FRANK SARGEANT | Special to the StarKayaks rigged for fishing usually have rod holders, padded seats with backrests, and dry storage boxes for gear. Paddlepower comes from the double-ended kayak paddle, though some anglers add electric motors for easier operation against wind and tide. Kayaks nd new home on the atsPage 6 Thursday, September 29, 2011 Some anglers go the extra mile with their kayaks by carrying them to remote fishing areas in their center-console bayboats. Both kayaks and powerboats have their place in the all-around Panhandle anglers arsenal. Find More News Online Freshwater Grouper shing is red hot now since the re-opener of gag grouper. Most sh are being caught in the 60to 150-foot range and there are good reports from the MBARA sites out of Mexico Beach are producing sh. Inshore Offshore Trout and redsh have made their way into the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Most anglers are using grubs and jigs here, but live bait will certainly nd sh as well. Some ounder are caught here are large in size. Lakes and streams are very productive freshwater shing right now in our area. Fall feeding patterns are starting to emerge, and shing will continue to improve. Lake Wimico is a hot spot for all that swims. SpP ONsS OrRED bB Y

PAGE 7

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTs S www.starfl.com ASection (850) 227-7100 No Rainchecks Limited Quantities While Supplies Last halfhitch.comAmeristep Dog House Blind Ideal for rearm & bow hunting & a great hide for photographers.814 / 10412 Save $65$49 Reg $114 1657Mens Hunting BootWaterproof Mossy Oak Break-Up Fabric, 7" Dark Brown Oil Leather Uninsulated $29 Reg $59 Save $30IKam Xtreme Video EyewearAudio/video recording glasses. 8 GB of memory; 4 GB built in.50002 $79 Reg $119 Save $40Bushnell Trail Sentry 5MP Trail CameraWeatherproof & rugged, fast trigger speed, high resolution full color images.119205C $39 Special Buy22174-06041 30qt. Propane Turkey Fryer15 black solid steel stand & 30qt. tall aluminum pot, CSA 39 *Model may varyapproved hose & regulator. Reg $59 Save $20 Reg $139Big Dog Two Man Ladder Tree StandLarge 40 x 12-3/4 foot & seat platform. Padded seat cushion & ip-up shooting rail. Certied to all TMA standards. 2 fall arrest systems included.$99 BDL-451 Save $40 Moultrie Pro Hunter Game Feeder$79 Reg $139 Save $60 MFH-PHB30B Mossy Oak Break Up Innity GearBreakUp Innity truly oers hunters another dimension in camo. 19 & UP 1/3 OFF0021 0007 0020Sale Ends 10/31/2011Programmable Digital Timer. 30Gal. 200 lb. capacity. Page 7 Thursday, September 29, 2011By Tim CroftStar News Editor From any perspective, it was a less than auspices in troduction to a new district and classication. Port St. Joe opened up its District 4-1A schedule at Blountstown last Friday night and several big second-quarter plays proved the Tiger Sharks undoing as they fell 34-8 to the Ti gers. We had some moments but we gave up some big plays and we kind of let down after that, guys just kind of gave up, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. Blountstown quarter back Hunter Jordan ran for 73 yards and two touch downs, and passed for 97 yards and two scores as the Tigers shed its unof cial title as the best winless team in North Florida for a new moniker: undefeated in District 4-1A. Give them credit, Barth said. They made some big plays. They did what they had to do. We didnt. The Tigers (1-3, 1-0 dis trict) scored three touch downs during a 9-minute span in the second quarter Friday on their way to the win over Port St. Joe (1-2, 0-1). Jordan put Blountstown in the lead with 4:45 to go in the rst quarter on a 25yard run. Port St. Joe scored less than 4 minutes later on a safety, with Daniel May getting a tackle in the end zone, making it 7-2 at the end of the rst quarter. We gave up a big play right after that, a long pass, sort of a Hail Mary that their guy caught and ran it down to set up a touchdown, Barth said. We never quite made it back after that. It just got out of hand and we never got back in it. The Tiger Sharks were playing without starting quarterback Trevor Lang, who has been nursing a bad shoulder for two weeks. Lang quit the team on Monday. Rumello Zaccarro started in Langs place and hit 3 of 4 passes for 67 yards and a touchdown. I thought Rumello played really well and I thought we ran well at times, Barth said, noting the Tiger Sharks nished with 105 rushing yards. We are not even close to the end of the season. We have to stay positive in practice, work through some of things we didnt do right with the guys and keep working hard and staying focused and positive. The Tiger Sharks would not score another point fol lowing Mays safety until the score was 34-2 midway through the fourth quarter. Jordan made it 14-2 after the long pass with 8:44 left in the second quarter on a 2-yard run. Seven minutes later, Javakiel Brigham scored on an 8-yard run to give Blountstown a 21-2 lead. The Tigers increased the lead to 28-2 with 19 seconds left in the second quarter, 1 minutes after Brighams score. Blountstown capitalized on a turn over with a 10-yard scoring pass from Jordan to Antho ny Jones. We would slant inside and they would run out side, Barth said. Wed try to contain on the outside and they ran inside. We didnt tackle. We just did not have focus. Jordan tossed another touchdown pass midway through the third quarter this one a 30-yard con nection to Roosevelt Mar tin. Port St. Joe scored on a 30-yard pass with 6:20 remaining in the game from Zaccarro to Corey North. Jordan led Blountstown in both rushing and pass ing. He carried the ball eight times, and completed all three passes he threw, two for touchdowns. Marquel Thomas was the teams second-leading rusher with 62 yards on four carries. Ryan Haphcox had one catch for 57 yards. Walt Bowers led Port St. Joe rushers with 51 yards on 10 carries. Zaccarro completed 3 of 4 pass attempts for 67 yards and one touchdown. There is still a long way to go, Barth said. A playoff spot is still there. We have to work through our mis takes and stay positive. Port St. Joe is at Holmes County at 8 p.m. ET on Fri day.Star Staff ReportGene Rafeld League football got off to a great start last Saturday when teams from Franklin Coun ty and Wewahitchka joined the Port St. Joe teams for the annual Jamboree at Shark Stadium. Under clear blue skies a record crowd saw football the way it should be played, by youngsters giving all for the love of the game. The format for the Jam boree had Port St. Joes three teams playing two quarters each against both Franklin County and Wewa. The 11 and 12 year old Buccaneers played Frank lin rst and got things off to a great start with 24 to 0 win. Jasmine Thomas scored three touchdowns, one a 20-yard run and another on a touchdown pass from quarterback Bryce Regis ter. Thomas also scored on an interception return. The next two quarters were a matchup between Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe. Both defenses played outstanding ball and the lone score came on a Port St. Joe fumble that was returned by Wewahitchka for a touchdown and a 6-0 scoring advantage for the 16 minutes. After the break, the de fending Big Bend Champi on Jaguars, ages 9-10, took the eld to start their quest for a three peat. It was to tal domination against both Franklin and Wewahitchka with the Jags winning both games by 24-0 scores. With the rst string offense play ing, PSJ went up by six when Kendre Gant ran up the middle, lost his balance, recovered and went 50-plus yards for a touchdown. On the next possession, Cam eron Harmon took a pitch from quarterback Josh Butts and went 65 yards for a touchdown. That was the last series of the day for the starting backeld as the second string replaced them. The scoring in the Franklin County game was completed when Roman Harrison smashed up the middle, shook off tacklers and scored from 25 yards. Against Wewa, the second string offense was in for the entire game. Tailback Gregory Julius reached the end zone twice and Harri son once. The stingy Jaguar de fense, carrying a motto of zero did not give up a rst down. The line was in the opposing backelds all day. Neither Wewahitchka nor Franklin could handle Har rison who made tackle after tackle from his nose guard position. Defensive end Jar rett Browning and tackle/ middle linebacker D.J. Da vis had strong games. The linebackers were attacking and making tackles at the line of scrimmage. The nal series of the day featured the 7 and 8 year old Dolphins. They are great fun to watch and put on a real show for their fans. In the rst game against Franklin County, tailback Brenon Foxworth had two long runs for touchdowns to give Port St. Joe a 12-0 win. Against Wewahitchka another Fox worth run, this one right up the middle, resulted in the only score of the ball game and a 6-0 Port St. Joe vic tory despite the standout rushing of Wewahitchkas tailback Harley Redd.Tiger Sharks fall to Blountstown in district openerGene Rafeld Football starts season at Shark Stadium P hotos by TIM CROFt T | The StarA Franklin County defender pulls Wewahitchkas Harley Redd down from behind after a long gain. Kendre Gant gets into open space on route to a touchdown for the Jaguars.

PAGE 8

A8 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 1930 W. hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456Downtown Highland viewTUESDAY FRIDAY 9-6 SATURDAY 9-2 10% OFFEVERYTHING IN STOCK Golfers Specials FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER at Saint Joseph Bay Golf ClubHere are four new specials for the month of October you will not want to miss out on at the local SJBGC located at 700 Country Club Rd. (off of C-30A):1. A foursome can play all day for $100.00 and get a free hot dog at the turn (limited for foursomes only). 2. A new membership for ages 35 and under is only $100.00 initiation fee and $60.00 per month 3. Former members can play 18 holes with cart for only $25.00 any day of the week 4. All members will receive 20% off on all foods and drinks. All specials are subject to 7% FST. In addition SJBGC has two exciting golf tournaments coming up on Oct 9th and Nov 19th and are open to any golfer. Call the golf shop at 227-1751 for details.Visit our web site stjoebaygolf.com LGA Autumn Action SCRAMBLE GOLF TOURNAMENT SHOTGUN START 1:00 P.M. EST ST. JOSEPHBAY GOLFCLUB SUNDAY OCTOBER 9, 2011 Its a Family Affair! By Tim Croft Star News Editor Condence is building around the Wewahitchka High School campus. With a second-straight strong performance on of fense and evident improve ment on defense the Gators (2-2) jumped to a big early lead at Cottondale last Fri day before coming away with a 52-30 victory. That represented the second win in Coach Den nis Kizziahs goal for the season. With the Gators three toughest opponents behind them, Wewahitchka is in perfect position to win its next three games to host Sneads on Oct. 21 with a playoff spot on the line. We are on track, Kiz ziah said. We need to get three more wins and we are there. The kids have bought into it. They are working hard, as always they are giving 100 percent. When you do that good things are bound to happen. Good things happened early and often during the rst half against Cottondale (0-4). The Gators scored ve touchdowns en route to a 3614 lead at intermission that all but sealed the outcome. We scored pretty much at will, Kizziah said. The offensive line seems to be coming up and off the line better and holding their blocks. And our running backs are doing a great job. Senior running back Theryl Brown again led the way with 259 yards and ve touchdowns on just 17 rush es. For the season Brown is averaging more than 10 yards a carry, having rushed for 836 yards on 80 carries. He has two games over 200 yards rushing. Brown received plenty of help. Quarterback Justin Flowers had 108 yards rush ing and three touchdowns as the Gators threw just four times, completing one for 22 yards to Chris Myrick. Fullback Jaylen Addison had 72 yards on just eight carries and Randy Roth, who is seeing more and more time in the backeld, had nearly 40 yards on just ve touches. The Gators ended the night with more than 450 yards of total offense. We are getting a bit bet ter every week, Kizziah said. We are working on the little things, keeping hold of the ball, holding blocks, maintaining gaps on de fense. The kids are buying into that and they are prac ticing every day with more condence. It is very good to see. They understand if they just work hard, good things will happen and they are seeing it now. The defense also showed vast improvement, Kizziah said, holding Cottondale largely in check un til the game was well out of reach. The Hornets scored a late touchdown well after the game was decided to make the nal score closer than the play on the eld. Defensively, we got more kids around the ball, Kizziah said. We have been working on swarm ing to the ball and I think we did that better (against Cottondale). We still have to improve our tackling, but we are getting better. Jarvis Shereld led the defense with a pair of inter ceptions. Wewahitchka is back home on Friday, hosting Franklin County with an 8 p.m. ET kickoff. TIM CROFt T | The StarTheryl Brown had his second 200-yard rushing day, scored ve touchdowns and led Wewahitchka to its second-straight victory.Gators rush past Cottondale 52-30Star Staff ReportAfter completing a four-match tournament on Saturday, Sept. 17, the Lady Tiger Sharks rested on Sunday and then began a back-to-back-to-back week. They began the week at Wewahitchka where the junior varsity team logged its rst victory of the sea son. Haley Wood and Shannon Pridgeon had four and three kills, respectively. The high servers for their match were Nicole Win dolf with ve aces and Alexis Brinkmeier with seven. The JV won the match 3-2. The varsity de feated the Lady Gators in three straight sets. Katie Lacour had 17 assists and six service aces. Autumn Haynes had six kills and Katie Gardner had three blocks. Tuesday evening the Lady Tiger Sharks trav eled to Blountstown for a district match with the Lady Tigers. Although the Lady Tiger Sharks did not win the match, they made a great showing. After losing the rst two sets by scores of 14-25 and 1925 they won the third and fourth sets 25-22 and 25-23. This set up a nal set to 15 which Port St Joe could not quite pull off. The nal score was 13-15. Ka tie Lacour had 27 assists, three service aces and six kills. Katie Gardner had two aces and eight kills while Oneika Lockley had 40 digs. The third match for the week came at home Wednesday evening in a varsity only match against East Gadsden. East Gads den was no match for the power plays of Port St Joe that night. The Lady Tiger Sharks won in three straight sets by scores of 25-13, 25-11, and 25-13. The leaders for the evening were Katie Lacour with 13 assists and four aces, Katie Gardner with seven aces and eight kills, Au tumn Haynes with seven aces and three kills. This week the ladies were at Rutherford on Monday evening and then at home for district play against Franklin County on Tuesday and Liberty County at home tonight. Please come out and sup port the team. They play hard and would love the fan support. Speaking of sup port, dont forget to help us out and support the SideOut foundation for breast cancer awareness and re search. Your can donate to us or visit our fundraising page at www.side-out.org/ application/ous/fundraising_page/7004 all dona tions are tax deductible. SportsPort St Joe Volleyball has a busy week

PAGE 9

COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Thursday, September 29, 2011By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer St. Joseph Bay is a gem. The bay provides a place to kayak, sh, scallop, wade, dive, swim, explore, watch the sun set, skip rocks, collect seashells and simply treasure. This weekend, residents and visitors alike can give something back to the bay. Bask in the natural splendor of the State Buffer Preserve while supporting a group whose goal is to protect and preserve the bay and its delicate ecosystems. The Friends of St. Joseph Bays biannual Bay Day celebration fundraiser will be held Saturday, Oct. 1, at the Preserves Center at 3915 State Road 30-A in Port St. Joe. Its been very successful because the central focus is to draw attention to the buffer preserve and the aquatic preserve, said Jean Huffman, a member of the friends group who has helped organize the event. These places are really valuable. Its great outreach for our friends group. The event will feature live music, rafes, exhibits throughout the day, and the popular shrimp boil lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET. Lunch includes a low-country boil of local shrimp, kielbasa sausage, corn and potatoes, and is served with coleslaw, garlic bread and tea for a $10 donation. The shrimp boil, thats the big draw, Huffman said. In some past years, weve run out early. But weve learned our lesson so we should have plenty. Huffman said it still never hurts to get there early. Its lots of fun, Huffman said of the event. You can sit out here on the deck and enjoy the beautiful bay with your plate and enjoy the people and live music. Tours will be offered throughout the day, guided by experts in the eld. Field trips will include bird walks along the Deal Tract on St. Joseph Peninsula, tram tours through the buffer preserve, explore the shore bay walks at Eagle Harbor and the Deal Tract, boat tours of the bay, and an astronomy walk and talk that evening, which will examine planet spacing and constellations in the night sky. The boat tours are cosponsored by Seahorse Water Safaris, Premier Sportshing Adventures and the Port St. Joe Marina. Tours will be led by Captain Trey Landry and David Musselwhite. Huffman will be leading the Backwoods and Wildowers tram tours through the buffer preserve. She said last springs prescribed burns in the area have given way to a new growth of owers in the preserve. When you burn in the spring, in the fall the owers come out and theyre really beautiful, Huffman said. This is the time when the owers are really blooming. Some tours require signing up in advance, and those interested should call the preserve or visit www.stjosephbaypreserves.org for more information. Tours and activities are free, but the friends group will be collecting donations throughout the day. The donations will help the friends group fund a variety of projects to benet the aquatic preserve and buffer preserve. In the past, money raised at Bay Day has helped fund habitat restoration, hydrological restoration, education programs, research support, trail building, signs, kiosks and operation at the buffer preserve. Huffman said the community needs to come out and enjoy their public land at the preserve. Its lesser known than the state park, but its a really phenomenal place, Huffman said. We live in a place with some of the most beautiful natural areas anywhere. The Friends of St. Joseph Bay holds a Bay Day fundraiser in February and October each year. Huffman said although the February event is usually busier because of the snowbirds, the October event gives the group an opportunity to reach out to the locals. Were really happy to have local people come out, Huffman said. Too many people in town dont even know what the buffer preserve is. We encourage people to come and see what were all about.Enjoy the day, support the bay at Bay DayBy Mark KnapkePark Manager (850) 227-1327 The weather is starting to change, the deer are stirring and visitation is starting to slow a bit. Scallop season ends Sept. 25. As scallop season ends, the shing will improve. The water temperature has started to cool and good catches of trout and redsh are being reported. Staff recently spotted three deer run through the parking area at Eagle Harbor. The male deer will not be so friendly with each other once moods begin to change and breeding season approaches. There are a couple of fawns that have also been seen just past the ranger station as you enter the park. I wish I could share a photo of them maybe next time. This is also the time of year when the fall owers come into bloom and the migration of birds and butteries are noticed. A photo of a zebra swallow tail buttery at the park is included for your enjoyment. This is a great time to visit St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. Come visit and enjoy the beach, wade or snorkel the clear emerald waters of the gulf or bay, launch your boat, wet a line, hike one of the trails or stay the night in the campground or a cabin. We plan to continue to submit regular updates about St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, and we hope you enjoy them. We look forward to your visit and appreciate your support of the park. For information about Florida State Parks, visit www.oridastateparks.org.Fall approaches at St. Joseph PeninsulaStar Staff ReportTwelve Gulf County delegates attended the the Republican presidency caucus and straw poll held in Orlando over the weekend. The countys delegation was more than a number of counties with much larger populations, said delegate Jim McKnight. Herman Cain was the surprise winner of the straw poll for president, and Adam Hasner was the winner of the straw poll for U.S. Senate. Pictured, from left to right, are Debbie Van Zant, Mary Baird, Tracy Melvin, Mary Virginia De Pue, Johanna White, Sheri Dodsworth, Loretta Costin, Leonard Costin, Tom Semmes, Debbie Ashbrook and Jim McKnight. Thom Baird is not pictured.County delegates attend state caucus STAR FILE PHOTOs SAttendees of Februarys Bay Day examine area wildlife on a walking tour. By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Its an eccentric space. There are Congo drums, hanging surfboards, pieces of driftwood and rafa, buoys, paintings, an airplane propeller, weather vein, a motorcycle, ceramics in every stage of construction, wagon wheels, ribbons hanging from the ceiling, painted tiles, a silhouette rooster, aprons and countless tools. Color bursts from the acrylic beach scenes, glazed ceramics and quirky dcor. Formerly used as a warehouse, the building at 214 Williams Ave. is now a space to create. Tuesday night at 5:30, Leslie Wentzell is buried somewhere in the back amidst the knickknacks. Jack Johnson is playing on the stereo, sending a relaxing lull of acoustics echoing towards the high ceilings and back down to the clay-stained worktables. Wentzell uses the huge space as part studio, part storage, and part tool shop, where her husband, Dave, dabbles in woodworking. She loves having his tools around, because when it comes to art, you never know what you might need to create the perfect effect. Dave is constantly rearranging the vignettes, the scenes set up on the ledge of the upstairs loft, moving things around, adding this and that. You are guaranteed to see something new whenever you visit the studio. It keeps things interesting. It gets the creative juices owing. In her own work, Wentzell is inspired by natures forms: seashells, grasses, driftwood; which reects through the props and pieces strewn about the studio. She is impressed by their quiet beauty. In her sculptures, gnarled branches and twisting vines take a feminine form, joining the elements of nature and humanity. Wentzell and her husband moved to Port St. Joe from Wisconsin in 2006, and made a reality her dream to open an art studio. My direction still isnt 100 percent in my mind, said Wentzell, who opened the studio doors to the public in October 2010, and dubbed it The Artery. I feel like Im always running to catch up. She is running to catch up with her ideas and visions for the future of The Artery, which she indicated have been in constant inux since her dream of an art studio materialized. She plans on adding jewelrymaking classes and collage classes to the schedule soon and more classes geared towards kids. She just bought a glass kiln and wants to experiment with glass fusing, she wants to have open houses and studio sales, she wants classes geared towards tourists, and the ideas keep owing. For now, she offers classes in clay and acrylics and open studio time for those hoping to continue using their new skills. I started offering these classes and (the students have) this new skill, but where are they going to use it? Wentzell said. Are they supposed to just wait another month for a class? Thus, open studio was born. I thought if a few people came, great, she said. And if it bombed, Im not out anything. To her surprise, the classes were very well received. I felt like there was a need for this here. Its a place to work where you can feel comfortable, she said. Its a place where you can be messy. You dont have to worry about ruining your rug at home. Wentzell was an instructor for the grant-funded Gulf Alliance for Local Arts (GALA) 2011 Summer Arts Program, during which she provided her studio space for the A low country boil features local shrimp, corn, kielbasa sausage and potatoes is served during the Friends of St. Joseph Bays biannual Bay Day celebration at the State Buffer Preserve in February. A space toCREATE PHOTOs S BY VALERIE GARMAN | The StarLeslie Wentzell demonstrates a molding technique Sept. 14 during an introduction to clay class. Wentzell opened her studio, The Artery, to the public last October, and the response has exceeded her expectations. See CREATE B8Class veteran Holly Atkins shares the progress of her sh platter with another studio patron. Atkins has been attending open studio hours and art classes since the Artery opened last October. Studio owner Leslie Wentzell guides Alison Bowling through the beginning stages of her coil project.

PAGE 10

B2 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society DIXIETHEATRE.COM 850.653.3200 Presents PEARLSfor the KING! OYSTERS & ELVISAT THE DIXIE8 PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 30 & OCTOBER 1 Y Another year has passed, how time has own; We cant believe how much youve grown! Skylar Clayton turned 7 on Sept. 22. She celebrated her birthday with a Peace Out water party. Skylar is the daughter of Jamie and Mary Clayton; granddaughter of Keith and Debbie Ford, and Sam, Sr. and Jeannette Amerson; greatgranddaughter of the late Pat Norris and Barbara G.G. Lawder; and niece of Jeremy Owens and Sam Amerson, Jr. Malaki Jhikovy Dawson turned 5 on Sept. 22. Malakis Mommy and family would like to wish him a very Happy 5th Birthday with lots of love. Michael Edward Gainey and Kimberly Sue Buskens were married on Saturday, September 17, 2011 on their farm in Rock Bluff. Kathy Brown performed the double-ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Fred and Marylee Buskens of Overstreet. The groom is the son of Clyde Edward Gainey, the late Geraldine Gainey, and step-son of Linda Gainey, all of Bristol. Immediately following the ceremony, an old fashion Country reception was held there at the barn, followed by a barn dance later that evening. The music was provided by Darrell Parker of Port St. Joe.Please join Durens Piggly Wiggly as we congratulate Darius Chambers as our September Associate of the Month.SPECIAL TO TT HE STARStar Staff ReportSouth Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department has honored its pledge of sponsorship of one of the emergency rooms at the new Sacred Heart Hospital in Port St Joe out of the sales of their Smokin Hot Fireghters calendar. Jan Sapte, Chairman of the Ladies Auxiliary and project manager of the calendar, and Preston Russ, President of South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department Inc., presented the nal check to Dr. Henry Roberts, Foundation President, and Kathy Chastain, Interim CNO, at the hospital on Thursday, Sept. 22.AAll RRequest OOldies but GoodiesThe Gulf County Senior Citizens and Community Center, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, would like to invite you to join them on Tuesday, Oct. 4, from 10 a.m. to noon ET to enjoy the Oldies but Goodies Show by Deejay Steve McIntire. He will be playing all types of music by request from the 50s, 60s and 70s. The event is free and open to the public. Please call Debbie at 229-8466 for details. Skylar Clayton is 7Piggly Wiggly Employee of the MonthMalaki Jhikovy Dawson turns 5Gainey, Buskens are wed Society BRIEFsSSouth Gulf County VFD honors pledge Society News

PAGE 11

The Star| B3Thursday, September 29, 2011 PY 5984 Psychological Counseling & Evaluations Accepting New Patients At The Cornerstone 1103 Fortune Avenue Panama City, FL 32401 850.628.0094 Miriam S. (Mimi) Bozarth, PH. D. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER THIS PROJECT RECEIVED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM VISITFLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.comPARTIAL FUNDING FOR THIS EVENT PROVIDED BY THE GULF COUNTY TOURISM DEVELOPMENTCOUNCIL BARLOWSWell Drilling Pump Repair & Water ServicesWell Drilling & Pump Repair Deep or Shallow WellsServing Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties 850-639-9355 or 850-814-7454 LICENSED &INSURED School NewsSpecial to The StarFaith Christian School is proud to present the newest member of the staff, Mrs. Carly Pickels. Mrs. Pickels is a graduate of Georgia State University with a degree in journalism and is teaching middle school language arts. Mrs. Pickels has an enthusiasm for reading and writing, and she hopes to instill that passion in her students. She believes reading can open any door imaginable and that a sound foundation in grammar can help students excel in areas such as communication and business.By Carissa Morrison and Melik BaileyGeneral informationFor all of the latest and up-to-date information, please visit Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High Schools website regularly.  The address is http://psjhs-gcs-.schoolloop. com/.  The Calendar of Events, Shark Bites (weekly schedule) and important news are on the main page.  Then you can check out Home of the Tiger Sharks from the Our School menu.  On this page, you will nd links to the monthly breakfast and lunch menus as well as the Pinnacle Grade Viewer and other important documents.  You can also keep up to date with all of the other sports, clubs and organizations happenings by selecting from the menu.  Happy surng, and Go Tiger Sharks! Senior trip down payment must be turned in to Mrs. Alcorn by Sept. 30 if you are going. Cost is $60. You must pay to reserve a spot.Clubs SWAT Club: The following students were elected for Jr./Sr. High School SWAT Club: President:  Jakari Sims Vice president:  Marquez Cutler Secretary 1:  Tacara Shackelford     Secretary 2: Khaliyah Johnson Treasurer:  Tyson Davis Media relations:  Marques Cutler Math Club: Math Club will nalize all donations for care packages for soldiers on Oct. 6. Please be sure to send donations to Mrs. Ethridge before Oct. 6.  If you need ideas for donations, please see Mrs. Ethridge.Sports Go SHARKS! There will be a home volleyball game against Liberty County today, Sept. 29. Junior varsity will play at 6 p.m. ET and varsity at 7 p.m. The junior varsity football game against Florida High has been changed to an away game in Franklin County at 7 p.m. ET today, Sept. 29. The varsity football game in Holmes County will be at 8 p.m. ET Sept. 30. The junior varsity cross country meet in Bay County will be at 9 a.m. ET Oct. 1. There will be a volleyball game in Blountstown on Oct. 4, with junior varsity at 6 p.m. and varsity at 7 p.m. A junior varsity cross country meet will be at 3 p.m. Oct. 5 in Blountstown. The rst ever youth cheerleading camp put on by the varsity cheerleaders was very successful and will hopefully become a tradition.  Any girl who did not receive a shirt on the day of the camp should stop by the Jr./Sr. High School ofce, as those shirts are now in.  We look forward to the half-time performance on Nov. 4, given by our youth camp participants.By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Lane Harris is a polite, bespectacled 11-year-old, with dreams of one day becoming an astronaut and maybe an Eagle Scout. He is also a hero. Sept. 15 started as a normal afternoon for Lane, a sixth-grade student at Port St. Joe Elementary. He met his friend Alec, and the two boys went swimming in a nearby pool. What started out as innocent fun quickly turned to emergency as the boys disrupted a swarm of angry bees while getting out of the pool. Alec, who is severely allergic to bees, was stung four times. Thankfully I had a phone on me, said Lane, who quickly called 911 and Alecs mother. I held his head back, like this, and called the paramedics, Lane said as he demonstrated how to open up the airway using his own head. I was just thinking, Dont panic. This is one of your best friends, Lane said. I would hate to go to his funeral. Alecs mother arrived with his EpiPen and immediately administered the shot. Alecs mother, who is also highly allergic to bees, was stung in the arm and eyelid and needed some of the medicine herself. Alec was stung again after the shot was administered, but the EpiPen had run out, and Alec went into anaphylactic shock with severe respiratory complications. Lane stayed calm and maintained an airway for Alec for 20 minutes until the paramedics arrived. I was scared, Lane said of those long 20 minutes. But in Boy Scouts they teach us to panic afterwards, not during. Lane said he probably wouldnt have known what to do if it wasnt for the Boy Scouts, which he has been involved in for almost a year. They teach us a lot about survival and safety, Lane said. Scoutmaster Dave Oliphant said Boy Scouts are taught to remain calm during emergencies and get the job done. The scouts are also taught basic rst aid like how to stop bleeding, how to splint and how to open up the airway like Lane did. If you lose your cool, youre not helping anybody, Oliphant said. (First aid is) a skill they have to learn, and its a skill when theyre older, they have to pass on to the younger scouts. Oliphant plans on nominating Lane for a national award through the Boy Scouts of America. They have to make sure the scout did something to warrant the award. Hopefully he will be recognized, Oliphant said. I think Lane is a hero. At the scouts meeting on Monday, all the guys were patting him on the back. Lanes mother, Marion Harris, said she was in awe of her sons calmness and quick thinking during the accident. I know adults who would have panicked right there, she said. Just the fact that he knew to tilt the childs head back to open up the airways, Boy Scouts has done wonders for him this year. Harris said her son called after the paramedics arrived and nally broke down. He just lost it, she said of her son, who said he was incredibly sad and scared after the incident. Harris said Alecs mother has offered Lane money, but he denies it every time. He didnt do it for that, Harris said. Hes just glad to still have his friend here. Hes been extremely humble through this whole thing. When asked how it feels when he is regarded as a hero, Lane replied, It feels kind of good, but kind of weird. (Alec is) always thanking me, and I dont want him to. Every time Alec thanks Lane, he reminds his friend that his mom doesnt want to lose him, and neither do his friends and family. Thats why I did it, Lane said. He doesnt owe me anything. The Lions Tale The Lions TALECARLY PICKELS DaAZZliLINgG dDOlphiLPHINsS Pre-kindergarten: Riyleh Parker Kindergarten: Ardarien Shackleford 1st grade: Gabriella Price 2nd grade: Elliana Burkett 3rd grade: Will McCall 4th grade: Lane Herring 5th grade: Dianara Angel 6th grade: Alvin Dempsey Bus Riders of the Week: Riley Byrd, Kylie Lumley, Bailey Hurst, Trinten Lee and Landon Lee.Scout prepared when it counts Valerie ALERIE Gar AR Ma A N | The StarLane Harris, a sixth-grade student at Port St. Joe Elementary, stayed calm and cleared his friend Alecs airway as he struggled to breathe after being stung multiple times by bees.

PAGE 12

Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) FAITHThursday, September 29, 2011 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Revival at Victory Temple First BornRevival, revival, revival. There will be a revival at Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church in Port St. Joe Sept. 28-30 at 7:30 p.m. ET nightly. Elder Charles Gathers will be bringing the word of God. We invite each and every one of you to come out and be blessed by the word of God. Once again, Victory Temple invites you to attend this Holy Ghost Revival. Faith brBRIEfFS Written by LaDonna Pelt OUR MOMLast night I thought of you. Yes, mama I did. The thought of you put a smile on my face. It sure enough did. Days turn into months, months turn into years. Though your precious memory still lingers here. Last might we thought of you, knowing all is good. There is no more sorrow, no more tears. We are stepping out of the shadows to live up to our years. Today we thought of you, as we left you a yellow rose. You will not be forgotten. Though we have to go, well see you someday. But until then, only God knows. From your daughters. We love you and miss you, Brenda, Tabitha and LaDonna Mr. James Dumas passed away Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011 at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe Nursing Home. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Sept. 28 at New Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church located at 146 Avenue C in Port St. Joe, at 11 a.m. ET. Rev. Sandra HooperClark, Pastor, ofciated at the services. James Dumas Obituary Special to The StarFor the past ve years, the congregation of First United Methodist, of Port St. Joe, has developed a relationship with the village of Sumbe in Cameroon. This has been a wonderful journey together. First Church has been able to help the village by supporting their local pastor and his family in Sumbe. When the church realized that the village was without a single health care person in the village, they were also able to support a fulltime nurse and clinic. They were also able to help provide fresh water by helping the community dig a well. These are all things that are readily available to us that we take for granted. On Monday, Rev. Nkemba Ndjungu and his wife, Mbwizu, paid a visit to First United Methodist Church to say thank you for all of their support. Members of the church were able to spend the day with the Mission Superintendant a listen to the struggles and triumphs of doing ministry in Cameroon. Rev. Ndjungu shared with the group that the average life-span in Cameroon is only forty to 45 years. This continues to be a concern for the nation of Africa as well as those who support their mission. Lets all remember to keep the people of Cameroon, and especially the village of Sumbe, in our prayers.SS PECIAL tT O THE StST Ar RRev. Nkemba Ndjungu and his wife Mbwizu.Visit from Cameroon Thank you to the community and S Sacred H Heart HHospitalI would like to thank all of the churches and people that prayed for and visited my wife, Rita, during her stay in Sacred Heart Hospital in Port St. Joe, for all the tremendous and delicious food that was brought to our home, and for the owers and cards and many acts of kindness. I would like to thank the staff at Sacred Heart Hospital for the professional care they gave my wife, and not only my wife but the concern they had for my whole family. From the people in the cafeteria to the nurses, technicians, clergy and doctors, they were constantly checking on us to keep us supplied in snacks and drinks, and to encourage and reassure us as the days went by. Its hospitals like this that make your stay (even though the end results were not what I wanted) a more pleasant one. Its easy to just say thank you and let it go at that, but these employees at Sacred Heart went beyond the call of duty to put you at ease. Words cannot express how well we were treated. I can certainly say that I was proud to be in a hospital like Sacred Heart in Port St. Joe. Thank you for everything and God Bless, Red Todd and Family Thinking of OtTHErRS Card of thanksAt the age of 49, Paula went to be with the Lord peacefully Sept. 17, 2011 surrounded by her family and many friends in Fort Walton Beach Medical Center. She was a former employee of Batson-Cook, Inc. and Family Dollar Store of Port St. Joe and transferred to the Fort Walton Beach store to be closer to her family and those sweet grandchildren that were her heart. This is a special thank you to all of you in Howard Creek and Port St. Joe. We can not express enough what all you people have done for this family. The prayers, the trips to Fort Walton Beach, the owers, the love has meant so much to us and Rev. Henry Hester, no words can say to you what we feel for you. May God send a special blessing your way. Thank you again, William Lawson, husband, and Helen and Charles Muncher, mother and father-inlaw. PPaula PP Dearwent LLawson familyA memory close to the heart They say memories are golden, well maybe that is true. I never wanted you. A million times I cried, if love alone could have saved you, you never would have died. In life I loved you dearly, in death I love you still. In my heart you hold a place, no one else could ll. If tears could build a stairway, and heartache make a lane, Id walk the path to heaven and bring you back again. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same, but as God calls us one by one the chain will link again. Happy Birthday Baby girl! Momma, Daddy and everyone loves and misses you dearly!Trinity Faith HHaddockSept. 28, 2010

PAGE 13

LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, September 29, 2011Vegetable gardening involves a lot of decision making. An important decision you have to make for each crop you grow in your garden is whether to start from seed or from transplants. In this article I will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of planting seed directly in the garden. This information was provided by Extension Vegetable Crop Specialist Dr. Steve Olson of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The biggest advantage in starting directly from seed is that you have a wider selection of crop varieties to choose from. Your garden center might have several varieties of seed for a given crop but only one or two varieties in transplants. Also, some crops just dont transplant very well. As I said in previous articles you are better off starting from seed with beans, corn, cucumber, turnips and similar crops. On the other hand, some crops transplant quite well. They include things like broccoli, collards, lettuce and tomatoes. If transplants are available for these crops theyre probably a better bet than starting from seed, unless youre planning quite a large garden. It is true that just about all vegetables can be grown from seed. The most common exceptions are sweet potatoes, strawberries and Irish potatoes. For specic recommendations on the crops you want to grow, consult your local Cooperative Extension Ofce and acquire a copy of the Vegetable Garden Guide, Circular #104. If you decide to start from seed remember to get the best quality seed you can nd. The quality of the seed you plant might mean the difference between success and failure in your garden, so buy good seed from a reliable dealer. For a few crops you can save seed from your own garden, but for many other its impractical. Considering the fact that most seed is relatively inexpensive, youre probably better off buying the seed you need if its available. Its also important to buy tested varieties. IFAS Scientists test most crop varieties and recommend only those which do well in Florida conditions. Youll have the best chance for success in your garden if you plant crops varieties with some resistance to common Florida pests. Of course, you can plant anything you like. But many Florida vegetable gardeners cheat themselves out of gardening success by continuing to plant inferior varieties without even testing the varieties recommended for our state. There is one note of caution to keep in mind when handling seeds, most of the seeds youll nd at our garden center have been treated with chemicals to reduce injury and decay caused by insects and diseases. You can usually tell when seeds have been treated theyre coated with brightly colored dye. Its a good idea to use treated seeds, in fact, you should try not to use anything else. But the chemicals on the seeds are poisonous so they should be handled with care. These seeds shouldnt be eaten by people or animals under any circumstances and they should always be kept out of the reach of children. Finally, follow the planting recommendation on the seed packet. If you plant too deep then your plants might not be able to reach the soil surface. If you plant too shallow, the seed might be washed away with the rst rain. For more information on starting the fall vegetable garden from seed, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit our website: http:// gulf.ifas.u.edu Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn CareRobert PelcMowing Service227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE & PALM TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com COMBS CONSTRUCTIONINC.CGC 1507649*ADDITIONS *TERMITEREPAIR *WINDOWREPLACEMENT (850) 229.8385 OR (850) 227-8156 glencombspsj@gmail.com v 3026382 ATTENTIONDARVON/DARVOCET/ PROPOXYPHENEIF YOU HAVE USED DARVON/DARVOCET PAIN MEDICATION, YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL RIGHTS. THIS IS NOT A CLAIM AGAINST YOUR DOCTOR. THIS IS A CLAIM AGAINST THE MANUFACTURER OF THIS DRUG. IF YOU HAVE USED THIS DRUG, AND WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS YOUR POSSIBLE CLAIM, CALL: Lovelace Law Firm, P.A. 12870 US Hwy 98 West Suite 200 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Telephone: 850-837-6020 Toll free: 1-888-837-2281 Fax: 1-850-837-4093 dml@lovelacelaw.com www.lovelacelaw.com 1202066 FREE ESTIMATES1-850-626-9242 1-800-69-SHRED Security-cleared personnel Fort Walton Beachs leading mobile destruction company Weekly, monthly, or annual service Locally owned & operated FranklinCounty FutureNow 2011We want to share some fantastic news with you about a very important and meaningful youth outreach program that came to Franklin County on Wednesday September 28th called FranklinCounty FutureNow. There are not many opportunities to connect with EVERY TEENAGER IN OUR COMMUNITY at one event. FutureNow was a wake up call to our teens with a message. A clear vision for your life will inspire you to keep from destructive decisions, and help you reach for your dreams and goals! On Wednesday Night, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes along with your local churches and FutureNow shared with our youth an eternally important message wrapped in an unforgettable presentation. All students and their families, along with the entire community were invited to a high energy worship celebration event at no cost, simply provided as a service to the community. The FutureNow daytime assembly was made possible through the generous support of our Sponsors. Sincerely, Your FutureNow TeamEveryone in Franklin County can be involved in some way in making this FutureNow event a continuing success through the follow-up teams, donations and planning for 2012. We feel very strongly that our community and the lives of the students will be changed for the better, forever. Together we can work to make a lasting impact in the lives of our local teens, meeting this goal is well within our reach! In these dicult times, there is no investment that could be more important than the hearts, minds and souls of our young people. Our broader goal has been to partner with FutureNow in this 2011 event to develop the format to have our own annual event each fall here in Franklin County. We are still accepting donations toward our youth. We thank you for joining us in this great cause, because our future is being made NOW!Please send any donations to: FranklinCounty FutureNow P.O. Box 476, Apalachicola Fl, 32329. If you have questions, comments or input please contact one of our FutureNow Team Leaders. Starting the fall vegetable garden from seed Find More News ROY LEE CArR TErR County extension director

PAGE 14

B6| The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 35671S AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT (amended to correct legal description) Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BECKY NORRIS, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on October 13, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, at the front of the courthouse steps of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: Parcel A: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 89 degrees 15 minutes 46 seconds East along the Northern boundary line of said Section 20, a distance of 1318.67 feet; thence run South 00 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southwesterly right-of-way boundary of County Road C-30-E; thence run North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 101.36 feet to a re-rod for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 112.53 feet; thence run South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West 401.45 feet to the approximate mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run along said approximate mean high water line as follows: South 26 degrees 27 minutes 50 seconds East 53.45 feet; thence South 36 degrees 57 minutes 55 seconds East 63.24 feet; thence leaving said approximate mean high water line run North 57 degrees 06 minutes 34 seconds East 371.76 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to a 15.00 foot access easement over and across a portion of the Easterly part thereof. Less and except: Commencing at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 15 minutes 46 seconds East along the North line of Section 20, a distance of 1318.87 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West a distance of 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southerly margin of County Road 30E; thence North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E a distance of 101.36 feet to the Point of Beginning of the lands herein described; thence continue North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E a distance of 56.23 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West a distance of 246.22 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West a dis35605S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. VICTOR T. MIMS, MELISSA D. MIMS A/K/A MELISSA MIMS A/K/A MELISSA D. GABLE A/K/A MELISSA DIANNE MIMS, EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY -INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. CASE NO. 11-101-CA NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure dated September 7, 2011, in Case No. 11-101-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and VICTOR T. MIMS, MELISSA D. MIMS A/K/A MELISSA MIMS A/K/A MELISSA D. GABLE A/K/A MELISSA DIANNE MIMS, EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY -INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE and STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on October 13, 2011, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, and run East 30 feet to the East right of way line of North Murphy Road (30 foot right of way); thence run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West along said East right of way line for 555 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West along said East right of way line for 105 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line, run South 89 degrees 45 minutes 32 seconds East for 420 feet; thence run North 00 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East for 210 feet to the South right of way line of Rammacher Road (30 foot right of way); thence run North 89 degrees 45 minutes 32 seconds West along said South right of way line for 210 feet; thence leaving said South right of way line, run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West for 105 feet; thence North 89 degrees 45 minutes 32 seconds West for 210 feet to the Point of Beginning, lying and being in the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq, Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth & Bowden P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32308 September 29, October 6, 2011 35628S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF GEORGE R. ORLANDO, Deceased. File No. 11-62PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of GEORGE R. ORLANDO, deceased, whose date of death was May 28, 2011; File Number 11-62PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: September 29, 2011. Joseph R. Orlando Personal Representative 4621 Park Street Panama City, FL 32404 BARRON, REDDING, HUGHES, FITE, SANBORN, KIEHN, LEEBRICK & DICKEY, P.A. Brian D. Leebrick Fla. Bar #172634 P. O. Box 2467 Panama City, Florida 32402 (850) 785-7454 ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE September 29, October 6, 2011 35592S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, formerly known as COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. FREDERICK S. WHITE, SR., a married man, Defendant. Case No.: 11-83 CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13th, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-83 CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendant, FREDERICK S. WHITE, SR., I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 11:00 oclock a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 13th day of October, 2011, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Exhibit A Parcel 1: Commence at the Northeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 01 West along the East boundary line of said Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West for 50.01 feet, thence North 89 East along the South right of way of Johnson Lane for 934.79 feet for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning, continue North 89 East along the South right of way line of Johnson Lane for 121.26 feet; thence North 01 East 50.00 feet to the North boundary line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36; thence North 89 East along said North boundary line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36 for 263.34 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36; thence South 01 West along the East boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for 510.98 feet; thence South 89 West 385.03 feet; thence North 01 East for 461.17 feet to the Point of Beginning. and Parcel 2: Commence at an iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence go South 00 East along the West line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 511.63 feet for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning go North 88 East for a distance of 1319.83 feet to a point on the East line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence go South 00 East along the East line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 808.41 feet to the Southeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence go South 88 West along the South line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 659.45 feet; thence go North 01 West for a distance of 25.00 feet; thence go South 89 West along the Northerly right of way line of Albany Thomas Road for a distance of 660.28 feet to a point on the West line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence go North 00 West for a distance of 768.88 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT: Beginning at a Inch diameter iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 88 West along the South boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 659.45 feet to a found inch diameter iron rod and cap stamped L.S. 4111; thence departing the South boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter go North 01 West for a distance of 25.00 feet to a found inch diameter iron rod and cap stamped L.S. 4111; thence go North 00 West for a distance of 304.99 feet to a set inch diameter iron rod and cap stamped L.S. 4111; thence go North 88 East for a distance of 660.04 feet to a set inch diameter iron rod and cap stamped L.S. 4111 on the East boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence go South 00 East along the East boundary line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 330.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. and Parcel 3A portion of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36; thence along the West line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter South 00 East 511.63 feet; thence North 88 East 320.20 feet; thence South 01 East 99.97 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 89 East 208.33 feet; thence South 00 East 207.43 feet; thence South 88 West 205.89 feet; thence North 01 West 214.06 feet to the Point of Beginning. and Parcel 4: Commence at a rod and cap being used as marking the Southeast Comer of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North 00 East 161.65 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 65 West 171.97 feet to a rod and cap lying on the Easterly right of way of State Road Number 71, said point lying in a curve to the left having a radius of 11034.28 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve and said right of way for 194.30 feet, thru a central angle of 01, chord of said arc being North 29 West 194.30 feet to a rod and cap for the Point of Beginning; thence from said Point of Beginning continue along said curve and said right of way for 169.40 feet, thru a central angle of 00, chord of said are being North 30 West 169.39 feet; thence leaving said right of way run North 88 East 334.38 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 00 East 149.12 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 88 West 250.50 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Lot 15, Duck Pond Village Subdivision, as recorded in the plat thereof in the public records of Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 6 Page 66. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 14th day of September, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk September 29, October 6, 2011 35440S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. EDDIE JULIUS, JR. and DIANNA JULIUS, Defendants. CASE NO. 2011-07-CA NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 18, 2011 and entered in Civil Case No. 11-07-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and EDDIE JULIUS, JR. and DIANA JULIUS are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 13th day of October, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lot 10, Block 1020, Unit No. 3, Millview Addition to the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 53, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 22nd day of August, 2011. REBECCA NORRIS CIRCUIT COURT CLERK By: BA Baxter DEPUTY CLERK September 22, 29, 2011 35556S IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GARY S. SETTLE and BARBARA LENSING CUNNINGHAM, Defendants. CASE NO. 11-44 CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 13, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-44 CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the defendants, GARY S. SETTLE and BARBARA LENSING CUNNINGHAM, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 13th day of October, 2011, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Parcel 1: Begin at a re-rod (marked #6475) marking the Southwest corner of Lot 16, Block A of Peninsula Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 11 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, said point also lying on the Easterly right-of-way boundary of Shoreline Drive; from said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 18 degrees 43 minutes 17 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary a distance of 118.96 feet to a re-rod (marked #4432), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 90 degrees 46 degrees [sic minutes] 49 minutes [sic seconds] East 131.39 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 18 degrees 43 minutes 46 seconds West 118.93 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 89 degrees 46 minutes 06 seconds West 131.38 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; containing 0.34 acres, more or less; AND Parcel 2: AN UNDIVIDED ONE-HALF INTEREST IN Lot 20, Block A, Cape Breezes Subdivision as recorded in the Plat Book 3, page 23, of the public records of Gulf County, Florida; AND Parcel 3: A portion of Section 15, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a concrete monument marking the intersection of the county line common to Gulf and Franklin Counties with the Southerly right of way line of County Road No. 30 (66 feet wide), thence Westerly along said right of way line as follows: along the arc of a curve concave Northerly, said curve having a radius of 2990.87 feet through a central angle of 11 degrees 28 minutes 55 seconds for 599.37 feet, said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and a distance of South 83 degrees 29 minutes 42.5 seconds West, 598.36 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 89 degrees 14 minutes 10 seconds West 88.82 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave Southerly, said curve having a central angle of 12 degrees 04 minutes 56 seconds and a radius of 1801.50 feet; thence westerly along the arc of said curve for 379.89 feet; said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of South 83 degrees 11 minutes 42 seconds West, 379.19 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 77 degrees 09 minutes 14 seconds West, 1516.03 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave Northerly, said curve having a central angle of 02 degrees 11 minutes 43 seconds and a radius of 20,858.59 feet; thence Westerly along the arc of a curve for 799.19 feet, said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of South 78 degrees 15 minutes 05.5 seconds West 799.14 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 79 degrees 20 minutes 57 seconds West for 224.19 feet to an iron rod for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue South 79 degrees 20 minutes 57 seconds West for 77.99 feet to an iron rod marking the point of curvature of a curve Northerly, said curve having a central angle of 0 degrees 01 minutes 43 seconds and a radius of 10,710.42 feet; thence Westerly along the arc of said curve for 5.35 feet, said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of South 79 degrees 21 minutes 22 seconds West for 5.35 feet; thence leaving said right of way line of County Road No. 30, South 10 degrees 39 minutes 03 seconds East for 344.72 feet, more or less, to the edge of an open marsh; thence meandering Easterly along and with the edge of said open marsh the following three courses and distances; thence South 51 degrees 14 minutes 50 seconds East, 30.23 feet, more or less; thence South 86 degrees 02 minutes 59 seconds East, 46.89 feet, more or less; thence North 84 degrees 53 minutes 11 seconds East, 18.35 feet, more or less, to a point of a line that bears South 10 degrees 39 minutes 03 seconds East from the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 10 degrees 39 minutes 03 seconds West for 381.29 feet, more or less, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 14th day of September, 2011. HON. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT Gulf County, Florida By: Shonna Young Gay Clerk/Deputy Clerk September 22, 29, 2011 35489S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY L. OROURKE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NANCY L. OROURKE; MORRIS A. LINKINS, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MORRIS A. LINKINS, JR.; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s). CASE NO. 23-2011-CA-000266 NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MORRIS A. LINKINS, JR.; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); Whose residence are/is unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: Lot 3, Block E, PENINSULA ESTATES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 11, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. If you fail to file your answer or written defenses in the above proceeding, on plaintiffs attorney, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. DATED at GULF County this 7th day of September, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@judl4.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 22, 29, 2011 35665 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. RIZZO, GARY A., et. al., Defendants. CASE No. 23-2009-CA-000509 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2009-CA000509 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, RIZZO, GARY A., et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of on the 13th day of October, 2011, the following described property: LOT 26, WATERS EDGE SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 212 WATERS EDGE DRIVE, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 To be published on September 29, 2011 and October 6, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of Iis pendens must file a claim within 30 days after the sale. DATED this 16th day of September, 2011. REBECCA L (BECKY) NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, SUITE 700 100 WEST CYPRESS CREEK ROAD, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 September 29, October 6, 2011 Registered Home Daycare Has opening for children over 12 months of age. Full time $100. weekly. Call 850-340-0994 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains!

PAGE 15

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 29, 2011 The Star | B7 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space202 Marina Drive Centennial Bank Bldg 2nd Floor; 3 Spaces Avail; +/-491-5,000sf; $12 psf mod gross 308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16 inside clearance; Dual 12 roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $395,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing availableHwy 98 Retail / Of ce Vacant LotsTwo lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30 x 80 each; $69,900 per lot SOLD tLots nHwy98;30 UNDER CONTRACT f ce /re tai l SOLD FL a ran ce; Du al 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. COOK/ GOLF SHOP ASSISTANT ST. JOSEPH BA Y GOLF CLUB700 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD227-1757ASK FOR LAURIE Turn to classified s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you Beacon Hill 2 br, 1 ba, carport, $600 mo. + dep. Pelican Walk Real Estate (850) 647-2473 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $650 month + deposit 850-229-6403 Would like toSwap my home in a N. Georgia Mountain City, for a home in this area. No money owed, Call 478-252-4636 For Sale or Rent2 br, 1 ba, CH&A, Call 850-227-1804 RV Lots at Kristiana RV Park at Beacon Hill 2 blocks from the Gulf, $250 month, W/S included. Call John 850-647-5000/340-0675 Wewa, RVs for rent Weekly or monthly. Includes W/S/E. Call 850-639-5721 Golfer executive 3 br, 2.5 ba, PVT beach, $350K. Pelican Walk Real Estate (850) 647-2473 Price ReducedFSBO: 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 3 Bedrooms 1 Bath Corner lot home Hunter Ave. Wewa $650/Mos., No Pets Central H&A, W/D Clean, updated Fenced back yard 850-832-4090 Text FL79244 to 56654 1, 2, & 3 bedroom long term rentals available in Mexico Beach. Please call 850-348-0262 Text FL75507 to 56654 PSJ 3 br, 3 ba, 1 b Living Room, Dining Room, Office, Kitchen w/ 2 porches, home association and lawn care, no pets, $1100 mo. (850) 227-1212 95% Success Chance. No Direct Sales. Test This Easy Home Business. $69.95 Risk-Free, Limited-Time Offer. 1-888-835-6822; 1-800-447-0503 2 storage spaces available, 32x34 on America Street (West End), John (850) 340-0675 Full Service, Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL79133 to 56654 2 br apartments for Rent near Hwy 71 & Wewahitchka. Apply at Fisher Building Supply at 848 Hwy 22 or Call 639-5102 for more info Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. PSJ 915 16th Street, Saturday Oct 1st, 8am-12pm;Moving SaleAbsolutely no early sales. Cash only! No checks please.Metal scaffolding for building, 2 fridges, 2 freezers, dining set and snack bar stools, 2 king sized bedroom sets, 2 Lazy Boy couches, large coffee table, big screen TV, and other TVs, 2 entertainment center, patio furniture, 4 swings, treadmill, ellipticle, diving suit and gear, new Cabella Pit, christmas stuff, toys, clothes, we have everything!!!! Text FL78808 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESHiring part-time inspectors to inspect properties after they are cleaned. Weekend work required. Apply in person weekdays between 9am-5pm at 125 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairCleanerCheerful, detailed person for various household duties. Indian Pass area. 4 hours daily. Excellent references required. (850) 227-7234 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Cage Bird MenagerieParakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Apalachicola 80 Waddell Rd, 3+ miles from Red Light on 12th Street, look for signs, Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-?; household items, clothes (from infants to plus sizes), shoes, some furniture, appliances, TVs, exercise equipment, some tools and fishing tackle, and much more. Bay Harbour, 426 Ling Street, Highland View, October 1, 8:a.m. until. Entertainment, Storage center, clothes, games, china, lots of misc. items tance of 104.92 feet, more or less, to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeast along the waters of the Gulf of Mexico to a point which is South 57 degrees 06 minutes 34 seconds West of the Point of Beginning; thence North 57 degrees 06 minutes 34 seconds East a distance of 63.0 feet, more or less, to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue North 57 degrees 06 minutes 34 seconds East a distance of 246.35 feet to the Point of Beginning. Parcel B: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 89 degrees 15 minutes 46 seconds East along the Northern boundary line of said Section 20, a distance of 1318.67 feet; thence run South 00 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southwesterly right-of-way boundary of County Road C-30-E; thence run North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 213.89 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 113.83 feet; thence run South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West 429.16 feet to the approximate mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run along said approximate mean high water line as follows: South 36 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds East 50.84 feet; thence South 26 degrees 27 minutes 50 seconds East 59.63 feet; thence leaving said approximate mean high water line run North 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds East 401.45 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to an access easement over and across the Easterly 15.00 feet thereof. Less and Except: Commencing at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 15 minutes 46 seconds East along the North line of Section 20, a distance of 1318.57 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West a distance of 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southerly margin of County Road 30E; thence North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E a distance of 270.77 feet to the Point of Beginning of the lands herein described; thence continue North 16 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds West along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E a distance of 56.95 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West a distance of 280.00 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West a distance of 69.1 feet, more or less, to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeast along the waters of the Gulf of Mexico to a point which is South 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds West from the Point of Beginning; thence North 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds East a distance of 95.6 feet, more or less, to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue North 58 degrees 15 minutes 29 seconds East a distance of 263.67 feet to the Point of Beginning. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment in Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. CAPE SAN BLAS JV, LLC; ROBERT E. MCGILL, III; A. BOWEN BALLARD; SHANE CANNON, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2011 CA 000202 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the undersigned not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 19th day of September, 2011. BECKY NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk MEGAN F FRY, ESQ. Florida Bar No. 0058608 Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry, Bond & Stackhouse Suite 800, 125 West Romana Street P. O. Box 13010 Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 Tel: (850) 434-9200 Fax: (850) 432-7340 Attorney for Plaintiff September 29, October 6, 2011 35637S PUBLIC NOTICE Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency is seeking licensed contractors to bid on the construction of a fence along the 98 corridor between Second and Third Avenues. Complete bid packages are available on request from Gail Alsobrook, Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency, 150 Captain Freds Place, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Bids must be received by 4 pm on Tuesday, October 13, 2011. Phone: 850-229-6899. September 29, 2011 35689S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that a foreclosure and subsequent auction will be held on personal properties to secure unpaid debts. This sale will cover rental units 2A08, 3A04 at The Space Place, 625 15th St. Mexico Beach, FL 32456. These items will include furniture, TVs, clothing, dishes, books, and miscellaneous items. This sale will take place on October 15, 2011. All sales are final, paid in cash, and must be removed from the property at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation upon settlement between management and debtor. September 29, October 6, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. MLS# 243988 100 Plantation Drive, Carrabelle, FL $534,600 Bank Owned 243816 17 Little Rive Circle, Wewahitchka, FL $9,900 Lot 243812 2500 HWY 71 North, Wewahitchka, FL $59,900 Lot 244924 2 HWY 381, Wewahitchka, FL $89,900 Acreage 244322 101 Lower Landing Dr., Wewahitchka, FL $109,900 Riverfront 243496 148 Squirrel Ave., Wewahitchka, FL $119,900 Home 240660 249 Bonita St,, Port St. Joe, FL $34,000 Lot 243493 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr., Port St Joe, FL $44,500 Lot 242660 1209 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL $175,000 Home 241998 357 HWY 98, Port St. Joe, FL $295,000 Commercial 243184 2850 Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 243095 415 Monument Ave., Port St Joe, FL $299,900 Commercial 244920 22 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $ 39,900 Deeded Beach Access 244919 18 Cape San Blas Rd., Cape San Blas, FL $ 59,900 Deeded Beach Access 244921 10 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $59,900 Deeded Beach Access 241222 8 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $112,900 Bay Front 242510 3 Cape San Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $136,900 Bay Front 243939 102 Seascape Dr., Cape San Blas, FL $225,000 Under Contract 244556 112 Rosemary Court, Cape San Blas, FL $449,000 Jubilation Subdivision 241453 106 Sand Dollar Way, Cape San Blas, FL $779,900 Gulf Front 239971 7750 Cape Sane Blas Rd, Cape San Blas, FL $1,199,000 Gulf Front 242710 210 Sting Ray Lane, Port St. Joe, FL $23,900 Lot 244659 400 Gulf Aire Drive, Port St. Joe, FL $119,900 Under Contract 108831 512 Long St., Mexico Beach, FL $189,000 ICW Front 244604 118 41st St., Mexico Beach, FL $239,900 BeachsideFOR RENTST. JOE BEACH 113 Gulf Terrace 3bd/2ba Highland Subdivision St. Joe Beach 311 Bonnet Street 2bd/2ba No pets Coronado # 3 7314 W. Hwy 98 2 bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach Coronado #4 7318 W. Hwy 98 2 bd/2ba Furnished St. Joe Beach WINDMARK BEACH 212 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #4 2bd/2ba Fully Furnished 210 Watermark Way (old Hwy 98) Townhouse Unit #6 2 bd/2ba Fully Furnished MEXICO BEACH Villas of Mexico Beach, 3706 Hwy 98 New Condos, Furnished, Gulf Access, on Canal Unit 301 3bd/3ba Furnished Unit 302 2bd/2ba Unfurnished INDIAN PASS 8822 CR 30A 3 bd/2ba Unfurnished (Right down from Raw Bar ) Pictures available on MLS #243890CAPE SAN BLAS/INDIAN PASSJubilation Subdivision 101 Two Palms Drive 4 bd Unfurnished Two Palm Subdivision 3 bd/3 ba Furnished and covered pool (small pet allowed with pet deposit) PORT ST. JOE 1206 Palm Blvd 1.5 bd/1ba Partially Furnished Eagle Landing Ponderosa Pines Dr. Unit 15 2 bd/2ba Furnished 101 S 33RD ST. MEXICO BEACH 850-648-5683 800-260-1137 WWW.FLORIDAGULFCOAST.COM252 MARINA DRIVE PORT ST. JOE 850-227-9600 800-451-2349www. oridagulfcoast.com FORRENT FOR SALE Classifiedcan!If youre ready to move up or are j ust starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. Weve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if youre planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the markets best prospects.

PAGE 16

LocalB8 | The Star Thursday, September 29, 2011world of clay and world of colors classes that were offered to local kids free of charge. It was a lot of fun here this summer, said Wentzell, who hosted the classes ve days a week. It gave the kids exposure to art, and it gave us exposure to the community. Wentzell said people are hungry for classes like these for their kids. She has also been trying to harness the seasonality of Port St. Joe, and plans to offer more classes catered to area tourists next summer with projects that can be completed in one class, focusing on beach-type themes. What I havent been doing, I dont have a sales space, a gallery space, Wentzell said. But she hopes to have an open house in early December to display her own work and the work of her students. She has been encouraging her students to think about selling their work. And maybe the open house will escalate into a quarterly studio sale, she said. Wentzell holds an introduction to open studio class on the second Wednesday of every month. On Sept. 14, four students showed up for the class, two brand new faces, Anna Richison and Marlon Newbon, and two others Wentzell has worked with before, Alison Bowling and Marci Watson. The students mixed in with about seven other open studio regulars, who popped in throughout the night and went straight to work on their projects. (Open studio) is completely drop-in, Wentzell said. And you only pay for the amount of time youre here. The Artery offers open studio every Monday and Wednesday from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ET, Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET, and most Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET. The cost for open studio time is $5 per hour, or patrons can purchase a 10hour card for $40. Students must purchase their own clay from the studio, but all glazes, tools and kiln rings are included. Reservations can be made by calling or dropping by the studio, or at the No Name Caf on Reid Avenue. First-time student Richison was the rst to arrive for the introduction class. She heard about the class from a friend and went to the No Name Caf for more information. After seeing some work an employee had done at The Artery, Richison was convinced the class was something she should try. She said she had no clay experience and that gave me more incentive, Richison said. I couldnt believe they were rst time pieces, the nish was so unique. Youre kind of a lost soul when you rst start. In her intro class, Wentzell provides specic instruction and guidance for rst-time clay workers so they have the necessary tools to create successful projects in open studio. If someone off the street came in and I just gave them some clay, they probably wouldnt be successful, Wentzell said. Theres denitely more one-on-one attention the rst night, especially for the novice. When the rest of the intro students arrived, Wentzell ushered the group over to a corner of the studio lled with nished ceramics pieces and began explaining the different types of structural clay projects, using examples from the shelves. She holds up a textured yellow plate with a green inset as an example of a slab project, a totem pole demonstrates a coil technique, and a gesture towards a shelf of pinch pots provides students with a variety of ideas. She leaves it up to the students to decide what kind of project they want to tackle rst. Watson is drawn to a sh platter made with a mold, Richison decides to make a plate and is inspired by a rich blue glaze, Newbon decides to make a championship cup, and Bowling decides to work with coils. After doling out hunks of clay to each student, Wentzell goes over methods for keeping the clay moist, how to score and slip and assists everyone with the rst leg of their projects. As the night goes on, Wentzell buzzes around the studio offering advice and assistance: You just have to do what the clay likes to do; Theres no such thing as a mistake; Youre the boss of the clay; Any suggestions I make aesthetically you may disregard, this is YOUR project. Richison makes a joke about the movie Ghost when Wentzell suggests that, while the studio has many tools available, some people prefer to work with their hands. Thats where Patrick Swayze comes in, Richison said. Three veteran studio artists sit at another table glazing their pieces. They carefully pick from Wentzells collection of glazes, all tested and red on small tiles, with names like stormy blue, peacock, old brick, jade pebble and Sahara sand. Trina Siprell started coming to open studio in January and nds a therapeutic escape in her time spent at The Artery. Her breakthrough moment came when she learned to squish clay. I have learned if I dont like (my piece), I can just squish it up and start fresh, said Siprell, as she glazed her terra-cotta bowl. That was my breakthrough momentlearning to start over. Siprell and her friend Holly Atkins, who has attended classes since The Artery opened a year ago, also spends the class helping the new students and offering suggestions. We really help each other out with ideas, Atkins said. We have a lot of fun. The atmosphere among the artists is supportive and encouraging. They have inside jokes. They laugh about a yellow ceramic face they call Robin Williams. Siprell has a moment and questions whether or not she is brave enough to add a daring glaze. Elaine Lerch, a long-time friend of Wentzell, works on a sign for outside what she calls her Glass Shack, where she keeps a collection of mosaics. Shes a very talented lady, Lerch said of Wentzell. Shes been able to do what no one else has been able to do get me comfortable and ease my nerves. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an imWEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West PassTIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Sep 2988 6830% Fri, Sep 3087 62 0% Sat, Oct 182 59 0% Sun, Oct 279 61 0% Mon, Oct 380 65 0% Tues, Oct 482 67 0% Wed, Oct 583 66 0%9/29Thu07:47AM 0.2 L11:12PM 2.0H 9/30Fri09:15AM 0.1 L 10/1Sat12:05AM 2.1 H 10:53AM 0.1L 10/2Sun01:07AM 2.2 H 12:27PM 0.1L 10/3Mon02:15AM 2.1 H 01:44PM 0.1L 10/4Tue03:28AM 2.0 H 02:41PM 0.1L 10/5Wed 04:43AM 1.9 H 03:20PM 0.3L 9/29Thu04:12AM 1.7 H 11:37AM 0.1L 06:36PM 1.6 H 11:26PM 1.3L 9/30Fri 04:40AM 1.7 H 12:30PM 0.1L 07:45PM 1.5 H 11:53PM 1.4L 10/1Sat 05:14AM 1.7 H 01:30PM 0.1L 09:03PM 1.4 H 10/2Sun 12:22AM 1.5 L 05:55AM 1.7H 02:41PM 0.2 L 10:35PM 1.3H 10/3Mon 01:00AM 1.4 L 06:45AM 1.7H 04:01PM 0.3 L 10/4Tue 12:05AM 1.3 H 02:22AM 1.4L 07:49AM 1.6 H 05:19PM 0.4L 10/5Wed 12:54AM 1.3 H 04:30AM 1.4L 09:17AM 1.5 H 06:25PM 0.4L CREATE from page B1 VALERIE GARMAN | The StarTrina Siprell (left) helps intro student Marlon Newbon with his rst clay project as Wentzell stands by, poised to offer advice if needed.