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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03812
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 09-15-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03812

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By Tim Croft Star News Editor Ray Dickens, former mayor of Wewahitchka, passed away last week after a long courageous ve-year battle with cancer. He was 76. Dickens was known for his love of Wewahitchka, his passion for sports, music and the most vulnerable in his community, particularly seniors. Ray supported the peo ple of Wewahitchka, said Wewahitchka city manager Don Minchew of his longtime friend and colleague. No one born and raised in a town could love their town more than Ray Dickens. He fed ball teams out of his own pocket. Those Senior Citizen sh fries, any mon ey needed came out of his pocket. And he didnt want a thing in return. That was just who he is. Dickens, with his health declining, decided earlier this summer he would not seek re-election due to his declining health. He had served as Mayor of Wewahitchka for more than two decades. Ive worked under a lot of mayors and I never have worked for one who loved his town more than Ray Dickens, said Minchew. Maybe as much, but not more. He had the people at heart; that is the bottom line. In an open letter to the citizens of Wewahitchka, Dickens discussed the medical issues that forced him to retire from public life, though he had been a staunch advocate for a local candidate to become county health director earlier this year, looking tall and dis tinguished, as always, and advocating for local prefer ence with a strong voice. In his letter to residents, Dickens thanked the people of Wewahitchka for allow ing him to serve in ofce for more than two decades Dickens was city com missioner and mayor from 1982 until 1985, moved to Mississippi for work and returned to elected ofce as mayor in 1993. I would like to thank the citizens of Wewahitchka for allowing me to serve as City Commissioner then as your Mayor. I have felt blessed with so many friendships, Dickens wrote. It has been a great pleasure to serve the great citizens of Wewa hitchka in this ofcial ca pacity for so many years. I have had many great experiences because of the good people of Wewa. I have seen a lot of changes in the City during my tenure, but the people of Wewahitchka By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer In an extensive meet ing Sept. 7 that bounced back and forth from spe cial meeting to agenda workshop, the Mexico Beach City Council slashed a new police cruiser from their pro posed budget and se lected a design team for the reconstruction of the historic Parker House in Mexico Beach. The council voted 4-0 (Mayor Al Cathey was not present) to hire Cathey Construction and Devel opment over Southern Cat Construction after representatives from both companies addressed the council. The city received sev en inquiries about the Parker House job, but only Cathey Construction and Southern Cat submit ted presentations to the council. All but one wing of the 2,600 square-foot Parker House, considered the den area, was destroyed in a July fire. The city purchased the Parker House the clos ing occurred in the week prior to the fire with plans to convert it into a new city hall building. Council members were quizzed last week by resi dent Mary Jo Walsh con cerning a potential con flict involving the award ing of the contract. Walsh noted the city paid a higher price than the Parker House brought at auction several years ago after the auction was gaveled the final auc tion price was rejected by owner Cathy Parker Hobbs and Walsh also noted that the mayor and Hobbs were cousins. She further noted that the mayor was vice-presi dent and co-founder of Cathey Construction and Development and that the construction business was likely to purchase supplies and equipment needed for the Parker House rehab work from Catheys Ace Hardware in Mexico Beach, owned by the mayor. Council members, however, put all that aside in awarding the contract The fire damage is ex tensive enough that the project is not considered a restoration, but rather a complete construction job. Brian Cathey, presi dent of Cathey Construc tion, presented a slide show to the council high lighting the companys previous historic renova tion projects and fire res toration projects. Cathey offered a pro posed two months for de sign and an additional six to seven month for con struction on the project. Cathey cited heavy smoke damage through out the house, and in cluded photos of the soot ing lines in the master bedroom, which was least affected by the fire, in his presentation. A representative from Southern Cat Construc tion also appeared before the council, noting the companys history of fire reconstruction jobs. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001 Marty Jarosz picked some gs from his backyard to share with his coworkers, and they were delicious. It was a beautiful morn ing. The United Nations had designated Sept. 11 as International Day of Peace, and it was as if the UN had a direct link to Gods ear, Jarosz said. He still doesnt under stand how a day so sublime could give way to such hor ric circumstances. In his classroom on the rst oor of Curtis High School in Staten Is land, Jarosz ipped on the television when word got around about a nearby plane crash. As a trained pilot him self, Jarosz thought the pilot might have suffered a heart attack and lost control. Airplanes just dont y into buildings, he said. When the second plane hit, the entire school shook. It sounded like a train was running down the hallway right outside of my room, Jarosz said. At that moment, we knew this was no accident. An announcement came over the intercom; the school needed to be locked down. This was not a drill. Jarosz went outside to lock the school gates and saw plumes of dark smoke rising over the skyline. There was a horren dous noise, and both tow ers disappeared behind a blanket of smoke. When the smoke cleared, tower two was gone, Jarosz said. He took pictures. He By Tim Croft Star News Editor New location, more stage, more acts, this weekends sec ond annual PoJo Live Music Fest offers for something for all ages at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. The event is sponsored by the Gulf County Tourist De velopment Council using BP funds distributed to TDCs in seven Florida counties to assist in bringing back the tour ists after last years oil spill. And applying lessons learned from last summers series of concerts under the PoJo Live banner, TDC said execu tive director Tim Kerigan made some signicant changes for this years event. First, the event is one weekend. Music will serenade the masses from 4-10 p.m. ET on Friday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. ET on Saturday. Kerigan had long sought a way to use Veterans Memo rial Park, said Kellee Novak of the TDC, and the PoJo event offered the perfect t. We saw some things we wanted to change from last year, Novak said, noting that one stage and the limitations on parking and band set-up at George Core Park had the TDC looking for other venues. We just could not accom modate it at George Core Park. This year there will be two stages, there is plenty of parking and most of all it is overlooking the beach and that is part of the point, promoting the beach. Tim thought it See P o J o A3 See DICKENS A3 See MILLAGE A2 See 9/11 A8Y EA R 73, N UMBE R 48 Thursday, SEPTEMBE R 15 2011 Mexico Beach Cleanup, B1 Jump into PoJo this weekend PoJo Live Music Fest set for Veterans Memorial Park S PECIAL TO THE STA R The Sheepdogs, who won an online contest and appeared on the August cover of Rolling Stone magazine, will perform during the PoJo Live Music Fest. Mexico Beach council approves tentative millage REMEMBERING 9/11 VALE R IE G A R MAN | The Star Members of the NJROTC at Port St. Joe High School present the colors to begin the Patriots Day ceremony held in the gymnasium Sept. 8. Do you remember? By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Spencer Milton opened with a prayer. The children, who ran about frantically just moments earlier, quietly bowed their heads, tiny American ags in hand. Milton prayed for the families who lost loved ones in the smoke and ames of tragedy that rose over the New York City sky line on Sept. 11, 2001. He prayed for those families who for ten years have had one less place to set at the dinner table. The Woodmen of the World held an In Honor and Remem brance and ag pre sentation ceremony Sunday at the Taunton Childrens Home in Wewahitchka, hon oring the heroes and victims of Sept. 11, and presenting the childrens home with an American ag and commemorative plaque. Founded on pater nalism and patriotism, Woodmen of the World is a nationwide fra ternal benet society that has been promot ing pride in the United States through its Pa triotic Program since 1947. The Woodmens remembrance cer emonies took place across the country Sunday. The organiza tion has presented more than two mil lion American ags to churches, schools and non-prot orga nizations across the country, and now has added the Taunton Childrens Home the list. Through its Pa triotic Program, the See MILTON A8 Longtime Wewahitchka Mayor Ray Dickens dies Opinion .......................................A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ...................A5 Outdoors .....................................A6 Sports ...........................................A7 School News ................................B3 Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B8 Classieds ....................................B6-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 By Tim Croft Star News Editor A couple of clicks of the computer mouse can open up the world around any property owner, resident or visitor in Gulf County. That is the aim of an ongoing effort by the Gulf County Geographic Infor mation Systems ofce and director Scott Warner. Over the past year or more, Warner has assem bled a multi-layered web site accessible through the county portal that offers a window to a host of infor mation pertinent to a par cel, a street, a point on the map, all with a little inter net navigation. Want to know what building permits might be needed for a property? Need to know the nearest intersection to a particular parcel? Interested in know ing whether your business falls within an Enterprise Zone, making it eligible to a host of economic incen tives? All that information and so much more are avail able at your ngertips. It really has a lot of in formation, said resident Rich Brenner during a re cent county commission meeting. It really is a very informative, helpful site. The idea, Warner said, is hardly a new one. Its an idea that has oated around for several years, Warner said. It al lows the public to see Gulf County and if they wish, make their own maps. Ive seen Bay County doing it, other counties do ing it and I went to some conferences and saw these sites and thought we need to have this. Its not hard and pretty straightforward and there is a help menu. The GIS interactive system is broken into ma jor themes, Warner said: Emergency Management, GIS, Building and Plan ning, Enterprise Zones, Tourist Development Council information, Board of County Commission ers and critical habitats among the most trafcked areas of the site. The starting off point is to log onto the countys site at www.gulfcounty.gov and look to the upper right for the updated GIS interactive mapping site. A simple click of that link will bring you to a virtual encyclopedia of all things Gulf County. From re zones to ood zones to re tax districts to voting precincts to areas considered environmen tally sensitive due to the presence of threatened or endangered species such as sea turtles, plovers (a species of bird) and the St. Andrews beach mouse. All building information is there, about permits, the Coastal Construction Con trol Line, about (Coastal Barrier Resource Act) areas, elevations, War ner said. You can use an elevation tool that is down to six inches in accuracy to look at houses and struc tures. GIS, it is an informa tion system. Its taking all that information and put ting it in one system. As Warner discovers a new tool to add a new layer to his mapping, he adds that layer. He is constantly scouting other governmen tal and non-governmental websites for any tidbits of information that would make the Gulf County in teractive map better. Im not sure how many layers there are, Warner said. There is so much information. A user can go in and quickly get all this information. This is just a series of layers that show you all this data. Of course, for entities such as Emergency Medi cal Services and Emergen cy Management, a critical tool is the 9-1-1 mapping layer within the system, providing pinpoint direc tions of any location in Gulf County. I have never purchased anything for the system, Warner said. The only costs are for building the 91-1 date base. I coordinate with the Department of Emergency Management and we come together and on a statewide basis share data. The 9-1-1 system, the backbone is on GIS so the dispatcher has all this in formation about location if for instance the person on the other end of the line is unable to speak. The system is pretty amazing. The thing I like is you have the ability to se lect the data you want and export it out in Excel for mat and you can play with that and create the report or maps you want. An individual can plug in a parcel number or ad dress and be linked to the Property Appraisers site to learn about the sales history of that particular piece of land. Such search es can be performed by ad dress, area, parcel owner or parcel number. The individual can then add on any property tax information from another layer in the GIS interac tive site to understand the nancial obligations asso ciated with that property. A user can also look at the maps, save the URL to that web address and e-mail the map to them. For example, if they have a favorite shing hole that is sweet angling, go to the GIS site, locate the loca tion on a map and send it to your home computer for good future shing. Visitors can also go on the site and using the street elevation maps get a look at the motel, hotel or vacation rental property they are considering for a trip to the beach. It will even tell you what your voting precinct is and what district you are in just by typing in an ad dress, Warner said. There is also detailed information from FEMA concerning ood zones and information about the countys land use regula tions. In short, just about any thing to know about Gulf County, or at least that which has been quantied, Warner has provided the layer of information to the GIS system. It really is a terric tool, Brenner said. GULF COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY MONTHLY MEETING Capital City Bank September 19, 2011 7:00 PM ET The Gulf County Republican Party will be wrapping up the details for the trip to Orlando on September 22nd-24th, for the Gulf County Delegates who will be participating in the Presidency 5 Straw Poll. All interested Republicans are invited. Come and See our Furnishings & Interior Decorations for your Home! Where are you? County GIS can assist MILLAGE from page A1 IMAGES COURTESY OF SCOTT WARNER W ITH G ULF COUNTY GIS An example of a printout for an Address Report showing thumbnail of site picture. A screenshot example of a navigational chart map. The representative also said the company has the advantage of an in-house certified insurance ad juster to aid in the project. Southern Cat proposed roughly the same time frame for construction. Nearly three hours af ter the presentations were made, the council voted 40 in favor of hiring Cathey Construction. The tentative 4.73 mill age rate was lowered slightly during the meet ing to 4.64 as the council removed a $30,000 police cruiser from the general fund budget after hearing protests from the public in attendance at the meet ing, many of whom ques tioned the need for spe cific items, particularly the cruiser, in the general fund budget.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, September 15, 2011 have stayed true friends to me. Dickens was not only a xture as mayor, he was a constant and steadying pres ence in the city, a tall upright gure at high school football, baseball, basketball and soft ball games, giving candy out to kids at Halloween and al ways a presence at the citys annual Christmas parade. He was often found in the morning talking with friends over coffee at the Express Lane. Each Halloween, he made a point of giving out candy to the children, with kudos for every costume. He was a part of every Christ mas parade and any event from a benet for an ill citi zen to celebrating the state titles won by the Wewahitch ka girls softball team that served as a celebration of the community he loved, those who knew him said. After purchasing the an nex building from the county the facility was the countys former Road Department building the city named the annex in honor of Dickens. It was an honor that moved him deeply, a surprise recognition he did not seek but thoroughly enjoyed. Minchew said at the time that because the mayor was having health problems, city ofcials and residents wanted do something in his honor. More than 200 people lled the new city building for what was a surprise dedi cation. He loves people. His heart is there, said Minchew. So we just wanted to let him know that we love him. Those ongoing health is sues led to Dickens decision that it was time to step away from public ofce. Through life we have to make many decisions for unforeseen circumstances, we cannot do what we need to do, Dickens letter con tinued. I have felt blessed serving this community for more than 20 years. Thank you again for all your love and support. Minchew said Dickens loved where he lived and en joyed its people, just not the spotlight. Dickens was born in Sumrall, Mississippi. He graduated from Sum rall High in 1955 and was offered a basketball schol arship to Pearl River Com munity College which he declined to enter the U.S. Army. He moved to Wewahitch ka in 1968, met and married Sue Gaskin and put down roots. He was a personable man, those who knew him said, with a penchant for nding the right touch in any circumstance. Dickens was far more than a mayor to his constituents, several said he was rst and fore most a friend. He never took his duties lightly, whether handing out candy to the children or co ordinating the sh fry for the Senior Citizens. He always rose to every occasion and opportunity to serve and come alongside the citizens of Wewahitchka, Minchew and others stated. Star Staff Report Last week the Wewa hitchka City Commission moved one familiar face into a new seat and brought aboard a new commission er. Councilman Philip Gas kin was sworn as the citys new mayor by city attorney Russ Scholz. Gaskin was the lone candidate who quali ed for the race for mayor, succeeding Ray Dickens who declined another run due to health reasons. Dickens, who served more than two decades as Wewahitchkas mayor, passed away last week. Gaskin, who has been the Ward I councilman for more than a decade, will serve a four-year term. In addition to Gaskins ascension to mayor, Jimbo Nunery was a unanimous selection of the Commis sion to succeed Gaskin in the Ward I seat. Due to the circumstances of the elec tion, the Commission was charged under city charter with the selection for the Ward I seat. Nunery was sworn in for a new four-year term by Gaskin. Wewahitchka swears in new mayor, councilman P o J o from page A1 DICKENS from page A1 was the perfect spot. You will have a great vista of the beautiful beach. We think it will be a great event. The two days will be packed with music, from local favorites such as the Bo Spring Band and Buddy Hamm to Saturday head liner ALO. Other acts include The Sheepdogs, who won an on line contest and appeared on the August cover of Roll ing Stone magazine as a top unsigned band, as well as Mishka and the Honey Is land Swamp Band. Novak noted that it will be a musical lineup that provides a wide variety of sounds, from rock to blues to Cajun. It will be an eclectic group of musicians, Novak said. There is a little bit of everything. The cool thing is we will have two stages so there will be constant music throughout the two days. With two stages, the set from one act can be broken down while another sets up on the main stage against a backdrop of music from the second stage. The double stage set-up also allows for more acts, providing exposure during the festival for a number of local acts. Free shuttles will carry tourists and locals alike from several locations to Veterans Memorial Park, so leave the car behind, Novak urged. There will be three shuttles on Friday and ve on Saturday running con tinuous routes that will in clude stops at Salinas Park, Simmons Bayou, the Gulf/ Franklin Center, Shark Sta dium and WindMark Beach. Promotion of all things Gulf County will extend to food and beverage vendors. There will be adult bever ages provided by local bars, including the Thirsty Goat and Boon Docks, and food will come from several Gulf County restaurants. It is just another great reason to promote the great restaurants in Gulf County, Novak said. The musical acts also provide promotion. With lo cal, regional and national fan bases, the musicians will be followed on Twitter and Facebook as they travel to and experience Gulf County and its beaches and vistas. A lot of them talk about coming here and for some of them this is going to serve as a kind of vaca tion, they will be staying here and enjoying the sh ing and beach and good food, Novak noted. We are bringing in musicians that will advertise the area as much as we do. For more information on this years music festi val visit PoJoLive.com or call 229-7800. We dont think the county or TDC has ever done something like this before, Novak said. This will be a great music event. Philip Gaskin swears in Jimbo Nunery. LEFT: Russ Scholz swears in Gaskin.

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Opinion A4 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 I enjoy walking around stores when Im not in a hurry. Im drawn to products on the ends of aisles and those tucked away on the bottom shelf. If I see something Im unfamiliar with, I will stand and read the product manufacturers claims of greatness. On this particular day, I was in the health and beauty section studying a bar of soap. Soap bars are fun to study (it is for me). I know it is clich, but smelling of soap is good clean fun. A blue and orange box caught my eye because it claimed I could Shower, shampoo and shave with it. The very idea of this was appealing to me. After smelling the soap, I was sold. The soap smelled good and it looked good. It was an orangey color with little specks in it. The box noted the soap had shea, mango and avocado butters. Again, that just sounded like it would feel good on my skin. After looking over my shoulder a couple of times to make sure no one was watching me sniff the miracle soap, I picked up a box and headed for the check out. I needed to get home and try it right then. I got the only bar that was left on the shelf, it wasnt in an ideal location. It was in the evening and I really didnt need to shower, shampoo or shave, but I had to try all three. I did. I was a new man. I smelled so good I couldnt take it. The next morning, I showered again (and shampooed and shaved). It was like the fountain of youth. I felt better, I smelled great. After I got to work, two or three people told me how good I looked and smelled. I said to myself, I know and I now know the secret. When I got home, I took another shower and felt even better. I looked in the mirror a lot and was coming to the conclusion that I looked younger. It had to be the soap. Needing to know if I could buy this soap in bulk, I sat down at the computer and searched the company that made the soap, Shea Moisture. My rst approach was to look for images and see if anyone else was getting younger or taking two or three showers a day. Well, what I found surprised me. All of the images were of beautiful African American women with perfect and glowing skin. They all looked happy and clean and radiant, but they were all African American women. I was using products developed for beautiful black women. I did not care; I had found a miracle soap that must be making me look happy and glowing like all of the pictures I had seen. This was my secret and I kept it to myself. Having only one bar, I had to go back and see if the store had restocked. What would happen to me if they stopped carrying this miracle soap? I was scared. Relieved, I found that the store had a couple more bars of the soap on the shelf. I picked them both up and found that Shea Moisture made other soaps (for beautiful Black women and me). I saw this pretty green bar of soap made by the company and picked it up to read the label. It had frankincense and myrrh in it and you know what I was thinking. I couldnt help thinking about the three wise men and Jesus and I had to have it. This soap claims to have antiaging properties, promote mental strength and is all organic. It was for me! I needed to try it, so I went straight to the check out where this cute African American girl was waiting. As she picked up the green bar of soap to scan, she said, Oooh, I use this soap. I said, I know. She looked at me kind of funny, and then I explained to her that I was hooked on products marketed to pretty black women. She laughed and said, If it works for you I interrupted and said, Oh does it ever work! She said, Thats all that matters. We discussed the benets of shea butter for a while (By this time I knew the whole shea butter story of where in Africa it came from and how it was harvested). I went home and took a shower with the new green soap t for a king. It was incredible. Frankincense, myrrh and me. I felt young and royal. Another week passed, and one day I forgot to hide my soap in the bathroom. I had been hiding it under the sink. If my family found out my secret; they might try to steal my soap. One year and three weeks ago county voters, or at least those in the districts of the two-longest serving county commissioners, brought about a new era at the ballot box. In removing Billy Traylor and Nathan Peters Jr. and replacing them with Ward McDaniel and Tan Smiley, respectively, voters seem to seek a new tone, more responsiveness and a new era of accountability to those tasked to serve their interests. With an experienced hand moving into the chairmans seat to set board priorities for action, there was a sense that a corner had been turned toward, as one letter writer characterized it, a new era of sunshine. One year later, taking into account that changes on the podium did not occur until several months after the primary election, that new era sounds and acts with an uneasily eerie resemblance to its predecessor. Economic development For the fourth time since 2000 the Board of County Commissioners put a torch to the Economic Development Council for a new model, stepping back to a consolidated Chamber/EDC model one which the county moved away from in the late 1990s to provide an exclusive platform for economic development efforts. In taking the action to effectively decimate the existing EDC, again, barely three years into a pledgedupon ve-year plan, commissioners asserted they were looking for more efcient expenditure of dollars and cohesiveness in economic development initiatives. The result has been, essentially, a lost year, with the cost to taxpayers in the near-term all but identical. Long term? Who can say what sitting on the sidelines for a year will cost. The chamber jumped aboard with a reorganizational plan and launched a nationwide search, with the aid of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, for a new executive director. That director will not take over until the end of this month and, with the Chamber workforce largely shed during the process, will start over with a blank slate, making it a safe bet that tangible results wont come soon. Meanwhile the Chamber is requesting BOCC funding for next year roughly equal to Chamber/EDC funding in each of the previous two years, providing scant cost savings to taxpayers. In essence, commissioners put economic development on hold for 2011, during already difcult economic times, save a $200,000 loan to the Port of Port St. Joe, which remains undeveloped despite years of visioning and grant investment; and championing a renewable energy plant in limbo due over nancing. RV regulation Commissioners spent the better part of three months debating an ordinance to regulate the use of recreational vehicles in the county, reaching the point of drafting and advertising a lengthy ordinance. But when poised to adopt the ordinance, two commissioners expressed fatigue with the exercise, were joined by a third and like that the entire process underwritten by taxpayers was relegated to the dust bin. That such an ordinance was needed seemed evident to many, particularly those living in coastal areas. Even commissioners acknowledged action was needed for the protection of all. But commissioners failed to move away from a one-size ts all concept toward an ordinance to appropriately address RV use in various areas of the county coastal, north end, western boundaries undermining the entire effort, leaving residents bewildered and frustrated. John Ford/Employee Health Insurance The summer months were marked by acrimony and employee unrest regarding rst health insurance and secondly the termination of EMT John Ford. Those two debates whether to uphold the termination of Ford and how to address employee distress about health insurance options consumed hours of meeting time and revealed deep divisions among commissioners. The takeaway from the discussion over the termination was that the EMS department is sharply divided north and south; that commissioners, reecting their divisions, have helped spread that chasm by failing to address operational issues lingering for years; and that Ford was largely caught in the switches of that divide due to Monday morning quarterbacking of a judgment call. Add in the health insurance debate and the evidence was clear that commissioners had failed their workforce and constituents in two critical areas providing a vision and earning employee buy-in for that vision; and putting policies and procedures, and consequences, in place that were clear and consistently adhered to. Countywide voting The change in the board makeup to start the year produced the elusive 3-2 vote for moving ahead on countywide voting, a voter mandate percolating for seven years, only to see commissioners fail to even kick the can down the road. Oh, commissioners said theyd move ahead, but faced with a price tag higher than anticipated higher due to delaying tactics and obstinacy among commissioners over the years commissioners have all but left the issue on the table for another year and board. Rather than, say, bank money for a future legal ght, commissioners showed theyd rather spend frivolously on, for example, a park not even within the purview of the county. Again, county voters are faced with a voting bloc of commissioners from Districts 1, 2 and 4 with no apparent desire to to move away from a governance model of district wants trumping county needs, no matter the cost to all taxpayers. Shortly after he took ofce, Smiley said commissioners should be judged individually, not by the district seat they occupy, but by their actions in doing the peoples business. By that measuring stick, or most any other, the past year has demonstrated the old adage the more things change the more they stay the same. Aunt Maudes churn paddle is still useful Keyboard KLATTERINGS Confessions of a sweetsmelling white man A year in review TIM CROFT Star news editor Several of my friends have asked me if I was going to tear down the old buildings in the back now that I am putting in a new garage. I might have to back up here a little to fully explain. The garage is in keeping with my year long quest for the Husband of the Year award. As you might remember, I purchased the Western Channel for Cathys Christmas present. For our anniversary this summer, I took her to the banks of the Little Bighorn River in Montana, the site of Custers famous last stand. I gured these two sacrices by themselves were enough to get JD Power and Associates to recognize me ofcially as Husband of the Year. I threw the Oreck XL vacuum cleaner in on her birthday, just for insurance. I was practicing my acceptance speech in front of some co-workers when one of them fell over in shock and disbelief. She allowed, in no uncertain terms, that I must be out of my ever-loving mind! Apparently, unbeknownst to me, there are scores of men vying to out-do me in the relationship business. I immediately started on a garage so Cathy wouldnt have to unload the groceries in the rain. This was no time to wiggle-waggle. I had to come up with a coup de grace! This new, two car edice with some nice trimmings, built especially for my wife, would surely put me over the top. I dug out a space and went to pouring concrete! Now, back to the question at hand; am I going to tear down the two 50-yearold, dilapidated buildings out by the back fence? Listen, Im from Tennessee. Aint nobody from the volunteer state going to take down a perfectly good building, ever. For any reason! First of all, you cant have too much storage space. If someone shows up with 57 bushels of corn, weve got to have room. You might need to lay out some tomatoes for ripening. I dont have quite enough space to hang tobacco, but Ive got a great bench for a reloading machine. Youve got to have an extra halter or two in case your neighbors horse wanders over. If your in-laws come for the weekend and decide to stay a few extra days you can suddenly remember youve got to nd Aunt Maudes churn paddle you stored in the back shed. If you play it just right, it can take two or three days to sift through every thing in that old building. And when your grand-niece marries the son of the foreman of the Southern Star Lumber Company, you just might need that tool shed to roll down to the next holler so they can set up house keeping. Where would we cook the chittlins? Most housewives banned them from the kitchen after the Second World War. What if we needed an emergency board to lay across the porch steps? The back wall of the furtherest building is an easy target. You can nail it back on come spring when you x the steps proper. You need a place to run to if the back yard pickin and singin gets interrupted by a sudden shower. The last thing on earth that can happen is to get that Gibson Hummingbird or your Martin D-45 wet! Ive seen moonshine kept in innocent looking kerosene drums. Ive listened to the biggest whoppers ever told sitting astride an old saw horse in a back shed. Leon would hide out behind the saddles when it was time to hoe cotton. We used a sidewall to keep score of the horse shoe throwing. And you need a safety valve in case Mama deems no more tobacco spitting contests in the living room. Shoot, we used to prop the really old cribs up with cross ties to keep them from tilting over! It hasnt ever crossed my mind for one second to tear down either of those outstanding buildings! What would Cathy do with her Christmas ornaments? Ive got a giant inatable reindeer across my table saw even as we speak. Boxes of different colored Christmas lights cover a fair sized work bench. A black stove-top hat that belongs to Frosty hangs beside my Golden Flo co-op cap. Candles and Yuletide motifs adorn the back wall. My tool belt is a holder for a corn cop pipe and an eggnog recipe. Folks, if I tear that shed down, we can forget about Christmas at our house! And Im not even going to get into the clay ower pots. I dont have any idea how many sizes those things come in but weve got six of each! We haveem stacked to the ceiling in one room. Several are cracked. Some have wild creatures growing out of them. All have holes in the bottom. And I dont think any of them have been touched by a human hand in 15 years. But boys, weve gotem in case we decide to spruce up the area around the garage! As you can see, this new building doesnt warrant or equate to two old sheds being torn down. I reckon Ill limp along with all three. I am hoping Cathy decides to put her Christmas ornaments and clay pots in the garage like God intended. Boy howdy, I could get my saw and workbench back! And win Husband of the Year award at the same time. Its a trifecta! Course, I havent won the award yet. At least, JD hasnt called. But I gure Im a shoe in. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See CONFESSIONS A5

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My son found it. I was doomed. Now my son had gured out my shea-butterbeautiful-black-ladies-soap secret. Hes 13; he already takes two showers a day. My soap would disappear. I needed more. To my surprise, the store had restocked and had a big supply (probably because I was buying it all). This time, I got the African Black Soap bar that helps acne and troubled skin. I dont have acne, but I had to have it. In the next few days, I confessed my addiction to a close friend at work who happens to be an African American woman (who uses shea butter soap). She was rolling in the oor and waving her hands. She likes to laugh at me anyway, so it was OK that I was entertaining her. She said, You have to tell this story. We discussed the proper uses of terms because I didnt want to offend anyone. She simply said black women understand. I said, I know one thing, African American women understand what kind of soap to use. She couldnt stop laughing. Ive given this a lot of thought; Joe Namath did pantyhose commercials, so maybe I could do commercials for this soap company. I called them. They were very nice and again got a good laugh out of the confessions of a sweet smelling white man. Im still waiting on the spokesperson offer. Im BN Heard and Im proud to say that I smell and feel great because I use a soap marketed to beautiful black women. You can nd Cranks My Tractor stories on Amazon for the Kindle and at www. CranksMyTractor.com. WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West Pass TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 227-7847 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Sep 15 89 69 10 % Fri, Sep 16 87 69 20 % Sat, Sep 17 85 67 10 % Sun, Sep 18 84 67 0 % Mon, Sep 19 84 68 0 % Tues, Sep 20 84 69 10 % Wed, Sep 21 85 70 0 % 9/15 Thu 08:06AM 0.6 L 11:53PM 1.7 H 9/16 Fri 09:13AM 0.6 L 9/17 Sat 12:27AM 1.8 H 10:39AM 0.4 L 9/18 Sun 01:13AM 1.8 H 12:18PM 0.4 L 9/19 Mon 02:10AM 1.9 H 01:38PM 0.3 L 9/20 Tue 03:14AM 1.9 H 02:36PM 0.2 L 9/21 Wed 04:23AM 2.0 H 03:21PM 0.1 L 9/15 Thu 04:48AM 1.6 H 11:59AM 0.5 L 06:38PM 1.4 H 11:35PM 1.1 L 9/16 Fri 05:11AM 1.7 H 12:32PM 0.4 L 07:32PM 1.4 H 11:58PM 1.2 L 9/17 Sat 05:39AM 1.7 H 01:12PM 0.4 L 08:35PM 1.3 H 9/18 Sun 12:26AM 1.3 L 06:12AM 1.7 H 02:04PM 0.4 L 09:54PM 1.3 H 9/19 Mon 01:02AM 1.4 L 06:52AM 1.7 H 03:18PM 0.4 L 11:30PM 1.3 H 9/20 Tue 01:52AM 1.4 L 07:42AM 1.6 H 04:47PM 0.4 L 9/21 Wed 12:55AM 1.3 H 03:36AM 1.4 L 08:49AM 1.6 H 06:03PM 0.4 L dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S Letters A5 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 CONFESSIONS from page A4 An opportunity to say thanks Dear Editor: At 8:46 a.m. on Sunday 9/11, the South Gulf County Fire Department held a memorial service in remembrance, not only of the firemen who perished in the fall of the two towers, but for all who died on that day. It was a simple, solemn ceremony which we found very moving. The event was held at Salinas Park across from the fire station. Almost the entire fleet of fire department vehicles were proudly displayed in the parking lot there. As long-time residents of the cape, we were reminded of how much this wonderful service has grown and improved. Under excellent leadership and with dedicated volunteers, the number, caliber and variety of equipment has shown vast improvement. We have gained a second fire station to protect the northern part of the peninsula, where we live, in case the road washes out. A ladder truck makes it possible to reach upper stories of buildings. Defibrillators have been stationed along the cape and firemen have been trained to use them. Grants have been written; personnel have been trained, and there is cooperation with the state park. We in the community should be so very grateful and proud. So let us take this opportunity to say, Thank you. Pat and Fred Harris Port St. Joe Community blessed with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Dear Editor: This is to all the citizens of Gulf County. I was recently hospitalized for nearly four weeks at the new Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf here in Port St. Joe due to a fall during which I struck my head. The reason I am writing this letter is to let the people of Gulf and Franklin counties know how blessed we are to have such a fine health facility in our community. From the moment I entered the door of the new hospital until the day I left I never saw a frown on any of the workers faces. All were wearing smiles and I really know it made my stay in the hospital so much better. Everyone I came in contact with was so nice to me and helpful from the doctors (Dr. Oksanen), nurses, therapist, dieticians, janitors, volunteers and clerical personnel, they were so great. I really mean it when I say it is the best hospital I have ever been in (and Ive been some from Japan, Hawaii, California, Alabama and Florida). I have never been treated as good as I was at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. I want to say a very well done to all connected with the hospital, from the board of directors to the hardest job workers in the organization and I just hope and pray that as it grows larger, it will not lose the caring and friendliness it has shown me. I am sure it will grow with the attitude it has at the present). People lets let the staff know how much they are appreciated as we use it. It is easy to say thank you for a swell job well done. Its a blessing to have such a wonderful health facility. Wallace Tillery Port St. Joe Concerns about the new energy center Dear Editor: I have just finished reading the article in the Sept. 1 issue of The Star about the (Planning and Development Review Board) approval of the renewable energy center here. If what Mrs. Jane Adkins says is true, and she is brave enough to express herself based on experience, then Port St. Joe is in real trouble. At the present time we have water which is not pure, so when we get not pure air, there is only one solution. Have a company which manufactures gas masks start a business here. As the saying goes, Time and tide waits for no man and when there is money flowing it makes the tide of socalled prosperity move fast. Let us hope the experts in the field of environmental safety know what they are doing when they allow this new company to come here. Marjorie Parker Port St. Joe By Jason Alderman You can scarcely turn on the TV without seeing ads for reverse mortgages. Theyre touted as a great tool for cash-strapped seniors to tap their home equity to pay off bills while remaining in their homes with no monthly mortgage payments. Although that may be true for some people, these complicated and costly loans arent right for everyone, so it pays to do your homework. Heres a primer on reverse mortgages and precautions you need to take: Reverse mortgages let homeowners age 62 or older borrow against their home equity without having to make monthly payments (as with refinance loans). The loan neednt be repaid until you move out permanently, sell the property or die. In addition, seniors wishing to downsize or relocate may make a large down payment on a new home and then use a reverse mortgage to finance the rest. The vast majority of these mortgages are made through the Federal Housing Administrations Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) program. Common features include: All parties on the loan must be at least age 62. The home (current or future) must be your principal residence. You must own the home outright or be able to pay it off with proceeds from the loan. The allowable loan amount is based on your homes appraised value, your age, interest rate and type (fixed or variable), mortgage insurance and applicable fees. Generally, the older you are and the more valuable your home, the greater the available loan. The repayment amount never exceeds the homes final sale value, so you (or your heirs) are never liable for more than you originally borrowed. You can take the money as a lump sum, a line of credit, fixed monthly payments or any combination. Reverse mortgages can be very expensive. Lenders may charge a loan origination fee of up to $6,000. In addition, you must pay upfront and then ongoing mortgage insurance premiums (MIPs). HECM Standard loans have an upfront MIP of 2 percent of the homes value. HECM Saver loans have a far lower 0.01 percent upfront MIP (although the allowable loan amount may be up to 18 percent less). Both versions also charge an additional 1.25 percent MIP of the outstanding balance annually, as well as a loan origination fee of up to $6,000 and various other charges. A few other potential downsides with reverse mortgages: You are responsible for homeowners fees, property taxes, insurance and repairs for the life of the loan. If you dont pay them, you risk cancellation or foreclosure. They arent costeffective if you plan to move in a few years. Some couples put only the older spouse on the loan in order to secure a higher balance, but this can backfire: If that person dies first, the survivor could be bound to pay off the loan a real problem if the homes value is underwater. The longer you carry a reverse mortgage, the more your home equity and thus, your estate will decrease. Because reverse mortgages are so complicated, potential borrowers are required to consult a Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)approved counselor before being allowed to apply. Before you even get to that stage, do your research. Helpful sites include those sponsored by the HUD (www.hud. gov) and AARP (www. aarp.org). Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. Reverse mortgages arent for everyone JASON ALDERMAN LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A Corner of Marina Drive Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters By Stan Kirkland Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission For years sheries biologists in several states watched the eastward expansion of athead catsh popula tions from their native waters of the Midwest. Now that the species has found its way to most of the rivers of the Florida panhandle, they are here at a price. Thats the view of Dan Dobbins, a sheries biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission (FWC). Dobbins retires at the end of the month but hes spent much of his 35year career studying the effects of atheads on native sh species in the Ochlockonee River and other rivers west to the Alabama line. The rst thing you have to under stand about atheads is the fact they are an opportunistic predator. They become predatory at a very small size and they eat whats easy to get, whats available, he said. They eat whatever occupies the same niche or place they occupy. Dobbins said several native spe cies are heavily impacted by at heads, including bullheads, which comprises several species of small catsh, white catsh and redbreast sunsh, commonly called river bream by anglers. Although atheads will certainly eat channel catsh, which are highly prized as a food sh, he said channel catsh numbers dont seem to be im pacted as much as the other species. From 2002 to 2005 Dobbins said freshwater sheries staff tried to re duce the number of atheads in a 7 -mile section of the Yellow River be low Interstate 10 using electroshock ing boats. We went multiple times a year and removed every athead we saw. We did well the rst couple of years, re moving 20-30 sh, but then it jumped to 240 sh, he said. We realized that we couldnt keep up. Reproduction outside the area we worked was such that there was a constant supply of sh. Similarly on the Choctawhatchee River, Dobbins said staff has done baseline sampling work over the years looking at what species are present and their abundance. He said in 2002 they found only a few atheads in the upper river near the Alabama line, which were collect ed and removed. By 2004 they were picking up at heads all the way down to Highway 20. In their most recent surveys com pleted this year, he said bullheads and white catsh have virtually disap peared from the upper river while the athead population has exploded. Flatheads are now the predomi nant catsh species in the river, he said. Like them or not, Dobbins said at heads are here to stay. He said several civic organizations in towns along the Apalachicola River now hold annual athead catsh tour naments. The tournaments draw anglers and their money from north Florida, south Alabama and Georgia mostly. While native catsh are typically caught on earthworms or stink baits, thats not the case with atheads. Serious athead anglers use stout tackle and small bluegills or shellcrack er for bait and they sh the deeper holes after sundown. As a non-native sh, Dobbins said the standing advice for anglers is to keep any atheads they catch and never move or release any unwanted sh. FWC Fisheries biologist Andy Strickland shocked this athead in the Apalachicola River. Flatheads taking over The rst thing you have to understand about atheads is the fact they are an opportunistic predator. They become predatory at a very small size and they eat whats easy to get, whats available. They eat whatever occupies the same niche or place they occupy. Dan Dobbins FWC biologist Carrabelles Candi Boone encountered this bear on US 98, just west of the Hog Wild Bar-B-Q, at 1593 Highway 98, on Monday morning, Sept. 5. Evidently, the bear was enjoying Labor Day, sitting in the middle of the road, but reluctantly moved away when Boone drove up. I took some photos, and then apparently he had enough of us, and started coming towards our car, and giving us some bear lip, said Boone. Suddenly shing has improved from one side of the county to the other. In Walton County, many redsh are being caught in Hogtown Bayou. If you have never been to Hogtown it is and old cracker settlement just north of Santa Rosa just west of U.S. 331 north. When you approach the bayou and before you cross the bridge you will turn left and there is a boat ramp. Also situated there is a pretty park with tables to picnic and bathroom facilities. Usually the bayou is full of menhaden but lately a guide I know said that white shrimp are mixed in with them. He said nd the white shrimp and you will nd the speckled trout and redsh. He said to watch for the birds diving and this time of the year they might be after shrimp. A sherman in the pass reportedly caught more than 30 ounder last week before the weather became rough. According to my calendar, September is a little early for ounder to be heading to the Gulf; October usually is the month to look for these sh. I was talking with guide Capt. Greg Burnet on the guide boat Osprey and he said a couple of his clients had a ball catching skipjacks in the Gulf before the storm two weeks ago. Most of the time shermen will turn up their noses at skipjacks. Capt. Greg said as they were returning from a redsh trip, he saw what he thought were bonito striking on the surface. He told one of his clients to pitch a topwater lure to the frenzy, and before he could get a turn on the reel his line was peeling off at a furious rate. Not knowing what this sherman had on his line, he told the other client to do the same with another rod also equipped with a topwater lure. This immediately drew another strike and another line-burning run. Neither sh jumped, they just see-sawed back and forth until Capt. Greg saw the rst sh hooked and he could not believe his eyes. When they got both sh in the boat they weighed in two skipjacks at 9 and 10 pounds, respectively. Could you imagine catching these sh on a y rod? Hooked on Outdoors SCOTT LINDSEY Outdoor Writer CA N D I B OONE | Special to The Times Freshwater This weekend will be the re-opener of Gag grouper. This shery has had little or no pressure this year since it was closed from June 1 until now. Live pinsh and nger mullet are plentiful in the bay, so getting bait shouldnt be hard. Inshore Offshore Scallop season is still going strong, and now with the Golden Scallop Hunt(visitgulf.com), more locals can get in on the action. Big scallops are in 3 to 5 feet of water just behind Blacks Island. Limits can be had very quickly now if you can nd the honey holes. With rising water on the rivers, cat shing is red hot. Bush hooks are producing nice catches of channel cat from the Dead Lakes to Howard Creek. Bream are everywhere in the creeks and in the big river. Top water popping bugs are bait of choice for hungry sunsh. SPONS ORED B Y Thursday, September 15, 2011 Page 6 GRIN AND BEAR IT

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com A Section By Tim Croft Star News Editor Mark the host Tiger Shark offense absent from Friday nights visit by Boz eman. The Tiger Sharks man aged just 125 total offen sive yards, roughly onequarter the output of last weeks season-opening win and the Bucks (1-1) spent much of the second half in Port St. Joe territo ry to score two late touch downs and carve out a 21-0 win. After having two play ers rush for over 100 yards and ve run for at least 40 yards last week, Port St. Joe was paced by the 37 yards from freshman Jar kiece Davis and rushed 38 times for just 117 yards. The stout defense of Bozeman never allowed Port St. Joe (1-1) closer than the Buck 29. I was worried about their size, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. They controlled both sides of the line of scrimmage. They made the plays when they had to and we didnt. We have to learn from our mis takes and grow. But as I told the team we have a lot of season left to play. We have the next week off and we have a chance to regroup and get ready for a very good Blountstown team in a dis trict game. Neither team could mount much of an attack over the opening 24 min utes as they combined for a mere 172 yards and threats were few. Port St. Joe pushed across mideld on each of its rst two possessions, but had only Daniel Mays this close miss wide left on a 47-yard eld goal to show for it. Bozeman did not earn a rst down until early in the second quarter, that series ending when Jordan Burns fumbled the snap on a punt attempt which again put Port St. Joe on the Buck side of the eld. But the game turned af ter Port St. Joe went back wards, due to an unsports manlike conduct penalty and Chandler Burkett par tially blocked Mays punt near mideld to give Boze man the ball at its 31. The Bucks needed just ve plays to score on a drive, preserved when running back Daniel Tay lor turned a fumble in the backeld into a 10-yard gain to the Port St. Joe 44. On the next play, Boze man quarterback Jacob Martinez (a game-high 96 rushing yards and two touchdowns) went option right, cut against the grain and slipped three tackles en route to a touchdown for a 7-0 Bozeman lead at 2:21 before intermission after Burns extra point kick. Bozeman put the game away in the second half while taking all but four of its offensive snaps on the Port St. Joe side of the eld. The key was a fourthand-11 at the Port St. Joe 28 after Bozeman had pinned St. Joe on downs and forced a short punt by May. Martinez lined up to take a short snap, hesi tated for a moment to al low the Tiger Shark front to charge in and dashed through a gaping hole in the middle to score with 4:34 remaining in the third period. Burns made it 14-0. Near the midpoint of the nal period Port St. Joe stopped Bozeman on downs at the Tiger Shark 5 when Natrone Lee and LeGrand McLemore com bined on a halt Joey Bran nen (56 rushing yards), but Rumello Zaccarro could not handle a pitch the Tiger Sharks had ve fum bles, losing three three plays later and Bozeman recovered at the St. Joe 7. Two plays later Isaiah Robbins (59 yards on just ve carries) barreled over from the 2 and Burns add ed the nal point at 3:44 to end all hope for Port St. Joe. I am very happy about our defense, especially against a team like Port St. Joe, said Bozeman coach Loren Tillman. You look at that scoreboard and see all those titles and that can be intimidating. To come in here and shut them out is impressive. On offense, I thought the offensive line played much better than last week. Last week we failed to do some small things that were the difference against West Gadsden. This week we played well enough all around to win. By Tim Croft Star News Editor Three minutes. Those proved decisive for Wewahitchka (0-2) last Friday as the Gators fell behind 22-0 in the opening three minutes and twice fought back to close within 10 points before the visiting Yellow Jackets of Vernon and a ground game that con sumed 428 yards proved too much. The Yellow Jackets (1-1) nished up 51-26. After the rst three or four minutes we got a little better, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah. Sometimes we play really well on defense. But we are still having problems tack ling in space. Every time the other team gets the ball, they can go all the way. We have to correct that. The Gators, welcoming back starting quarterback Justin Flowers, who suf fered a hairline fracture of the arm in a Kickoff Classic, racked up some offensive numbers of their own. Theryl Brown rushed for 158 yards and two touch downs, including a 55-yard scoring scamper, and Flow ers was 10 for 23 for 134 yards as Wewahitchka had over 300 yards of total of fense. From the early de cit, spurred by touchdown runs of 30 and 40 yards by Vernons Giovonni Bell, the Gators battled back to pull within 28-18 by intermission. Vernons offense consisted of a 300-pound fullback bat tering the inside while Bell and others did damage on the outside. As they did against Port St. Joe in Week One, the Ga tors asserted themselves in the fourth quarter, pulling to 36-26 before Vernon put the game away. We came back in the second half, Kizziah said. We had some stops. We threw the ball well. But we had some penalties and dropped some balls (six dropped passes) and they just ran past us. The rst three teams weve played (Kickoff Clas sic against Blountstown, Port St. Joe and Vernon) are the best three teams on our schedule. We could win the next ve and be in a posi tion for a playoff spot when we play Sneads (Oct. 21 at home). Well nd out what kind of team we are this weekend if we go to (Quincy) Munroe and take care of business. The Gators play at Mun roe at 7:30 p.m. ET. Stats Over the rst two games, Wewahitchka is being led of fensively by Brown, who has rushed for 421 yards and six touchdowns on 46 carries. Jayln Addison has rushed for 167 yards, Flowers 31 yards and Corey Walding 61 yards. Brown also has thrown for 30 yards and has three receptions for 42 yards. Ad dison has three catches for 41 yards and Chris Myrick leads the team with four catches for 50 yards. Walding is the teams top tackler with 24 total tackles. Brandon Price has 17 total tackles and Taylor Husband 16. Christian Turner has 11 tackles and has caused a fumble; Austin Guffey 10 tackles, a caused fumble, a recovered fumble and an interception and Quentin Carter has nine tackles and caused one fumble. Ben Hayward also has nine tack les and has recovered a fumble. Special to The Star The Lady Tiger Sharks of Port St Joe logged a solid victory in their home opener on Sept. 6. They defeated the visiting Lady Rams of Ruth erford in three straight sets by scores of 25-20, 26-24 and 25-13. Port St Joe was able to put together a solid team ef fort for the victory. The Lady Tiger Sharks have seven se niors on the team and that experience was evident dur ing the match. Katie Lacour was strong with her serving and sets, Katie Gardner is stepping up as a strong of fensive hitter and Oneika Lockley is beginning to show solid defensive skills. The ladies were off the rest of the week to prac tice before beginning their district play this past Tues day at West Gadsden High School and tonight at Liberty County High School. Next week will be a very busy week for the team. The Lady Tiger Sharks play at Wewahitchka on Monday, at Blountstown on Tuesday and at home on Wednesday against East Gadsden. The Wednesday match against East Gadsden will be a varsity-only match at 6 p.m. ET in The Dome. Port St. Joe will also be play ing in a tournament this weekend at Mosley High School where the rst match will be against Wal ton at 10 a.m. ET followed by a match against Arnold at 11 a.m. The rest of the tournament will be deter mined by pool play. See you Wednesday at 6 p.m. ET and dont forget to help the effort to support breast cancer awareness and research by support ing Dig Pink an event sponsored by the Side-Out Foundation, which will be held Thursday, Oct. 20 in a match against Wewahi tchka. Page 7 Thursday, September 15, 2011 Gators fall to visiting Vernon 51-26 The Bozeman defense, here hemming in Port St. Joe quarterback Trevor Lang, allowed just 125 total offensive yards, less than 40 in the second half, as the Bucks shut out Port St. Joe. Bozeman blanks Port St. Joe 21-0 LADY GATORS FALL IN THREE AT FRANKLIN COUNTY D AVID A D L ER S TEIN | Florida Freedom The Wewahitchka High volleyball team traveled to Franklin County last week and lost the match in three hard-fought games. The Lady Gators will host Port St. Joe at 5 p.m. CT on Monday. Wewahitchka travels to Graceville on Tuesday, hosts Bethlehem at 5 p.m. CT on Thursday and Tallahassee John Paul at 3 p.m. CT on Friday. The Lady Gators (1-6 overall, 1-4 in district play) are led by Jessica Smith, who has 37 points, 48 assists and 18 kills for the season. Katie Parker has 29 points, 39 assists and 20 kills. Donia Lanier has 36 points and 12 kills while Danielle Harris has added 35 points and 17 kills. T IM CROFT | The Star Port St. Joe running back Natrone Lee looks for space against Bozeman on Friday night. Lady Tiger Sharks beat Rutherford at home

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 Woodmen members also distribute American Patri ots Handbooks to schools, libraries and newly natural ized citizens, and give out American History Awards to students who excel in the subject. Lance Mayers, area manager for the Woodmen of the World, said the orga nization is the second larg est purchaser of American ags in the country, behind only the federal govern ment. Before the ag was raised, local Woodmen Lodge representative Grant Peel asked the ceremonys attendees to honor the ser vice men and women who risked their lives to save others on Sept. 11 and con tinue to put themselves at risk everyday. They all deserve our thanks and gratitude, Peel said. We dedicate the ag to all the American heroes and victims. Peel quoted Abraham Lincoln, Any nation that does not honor its heroes will not long endure. Peel then asked the audience, Do you remember? Mayers remembers where he was when Presi dent Kennedy was assas sinated, when the Space Shuttle Challenger explod ed shortly after launch and as the events of Sept. 11 un folded. There are events in your life that you always remem ber, Mayers said. Lets never forget that day. Mayers quoted statistics of the lives lost in the trag edy, including one statistic that resonates directly with the Woodmen of the World foundation: 75 percent of Sept. 11 victims were young fathers. The ag was raised by Adam Murphy, a correction al ofcer who raised ags at school events when he was in high school, and Albert Signor, Sr., a war veteran and member of VFW Post 8285. Signor saluted in respect as Murphy raised the colors to full mast and led specta tors in the Pledge of Alle giance, followed by a mo ment of silence. After the singing of the National An them, Murphy lowered the ag to half staff to honor the fallen victims of Sept. 11. David Taunton, who heads the childrens home, thanked the Woodmen for presenting them with a ag and honored them the orga nization for its dedication to volunteerism and patrio tism. I remember seeing those ofcers and remen running into those build ings, Taunton said. Thats the kind of bravery were celebrating today, and thats the kind of bravery our country will always be known for. Taunton also shared his memory of Sept. 11, when one of his children bolted frantically through the door and beckoned him to turn on the television. Moments later, a wild squirrel climbed through an open window and up the boys britches leg and into his hat. I still dont know what the connection is, Taunton said. still has them, but he doesnt look at them very often. Most of the Curtis High stu dents were picked up by noon. We found out later that two of our students had lost parents in the attack, Jarosz said. Meanwhile, students from a nearby economics and nance high school were evacuated to the Curtis High School building. The entire city was on lockdown, and the phone lines were discon nected. We couldnt reach any par ents, so we became their parents, Jarosz said. There was a quiet carnival atmosphere in the school that day. For 18 hours, the parents knew nothing of their childrens well-be ing. When the phone lines were functioning again, Jarosz ushered ve students at a time into the ofce to call their parents. One ninth-grader immediately began crying when she nally reached her mother. Jarosz recalls the mother say ing, This was truly a phone call from heaven. Jarosz attended seven funerals that fall for friends, service men and women, killed in the attacks. He wears the name of a close friend on his sleeve to remember him by. They died because the only wrong decision they made that day was to go to work, Jarosz said. Jarosz, a retired Navy Lt. Commander who now heads the NJROTC Program at Port St. Joe High School, shared his gripping experience at a Patriots Day cer emony held Sept. 8 in the gymna sium at PSJHS. As a kid, Jarosz always wished he could be on his favorite televi sion show You Were There, a program that interviewed those who were present during histori cal events. You better watch out what you wish for, it just might come true, he said. He never thought he would be a witness to the worst terrorist attack in the history of the United States, with a front row ticket to watch his nation bleed. Students and faculty members were forced to remember where they were on the day that changed the face of the country forever. Principal Jeremy Knapp was teaching his rst block English class when a teacher across the hall told him to turn on his televi sion. We were all trying to gure out how a plane just hit a building, Knapp said as he addressed the assembly of students. It changed my life, it changed your lives; it changed the world. PSJHS student Daniel Neal also shared his own story. He was only a child when it hap pened, a second-grader, unable to grasp the severity of the situation. All I remember from that day was (my teacher) Ms. Nelson look ing frantically at the T.V., holding back tears, her hands folded as if in prayer, Neal said. We were chil dren; too young to understand. Nelson turned off the television and continued to teach, he said. In a time of great peril, (Ms. Nelson) maintained her compo sure for the sake of the children, Neal said. She explained things in a way we could grasp. He asked his peers to recog nize the many teachers, Nelson and Jarosz included, who helped protect and comfort the children of the United States as the tragic events unfolded. He was met with a standing applause from the stu dent body. Also recognized at the assembly was U.S. Marine Corporal Chris topher Schell, a 2009 graduate of PSJHS, who returned from a tour in Afghanistan only three weeks prior. Schell was accompanied by his wife and mother. Students watched a patriotic slideshow, accompanied by Alan Jacksons song Where Were You When the World Stopped Turn ing. Their young faces reected im ages of billowing smoke plumes escaping the twin towers, of re ghters walking streets of rubble and ash, American Flags being hoisted at ground zero, and a plea from the projector to Never For get 9.11.2001. A detailed timeline of events was read, a play by play sequence from the time each of the four planes took off, until they met their fate. Students observed a moment of silence for the 3,052 lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001. To close the assembly, Mary Lou Cumbie sang America the Beauti ful, and God Bless America, and the students rose in respect with out being asked. Though they were mere children at the time of the at tacks, each student harbors his or her own vivid memory of the day that changed their home forever. Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! M OSES J. M EDI N A 850.527.0441 MMEDI N A @ CRESTE N TER P RISES COM REMODELI NG SER V ICES L ICE N SE #R G 0058632 BARLOWS Well Drilling Pump Repair & Water Services Well Drilling & Pump Repair Deep or Shallow Wells Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties 850-639-9355 or 850-814-7454 LI C EN S E D & I N S U R E D 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 U p c o m i n g OPEN AT 11AM E T 7 DAYS A W EE K WWW.L OO K O UTL O U N G E .C O M E v e n t s ! 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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, September 15, 2011 Diving for gold on the shell By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Forget Wonka bars and golden tickets. Port St. Joe is on the hunt for golden scallops. The waters of St. Joseph Bay will glitter until the end of scallop season, with 100 prizewinning golden scallops sprinkled underwater among the sand and sea creatures. Each golden scallop represents a chance at winning a $20,000 grand prize. The Gulf County Tourism Development Council is hosting its rst St. Joseph Bay Treasure Hunt in an effort to encourage residents and visitors to take advantage of this years extended scallop season. Participants can jet back to the 17th century, when pirates sailed the waters in search of buried treasure. Simply disregard the speedboat and GPS system. The treasure hunt began Sept. 11 and will continue through Sept. 24. The last day of scallop season is Sept. 25. The spray-painted scallop shells were dropped in the bay on Sunday and are waiting to be unearthed. (The TDC) is putting on the event with BP funding in an effort to attract tourists to Gulf County, said Amber Davis, who has been working with the TDC to organize the treasure hunt. Scallop season has never been extended before, and we want to let people know that it does go on until the end of September. Davis said the TDC used real scallop shells for the hunt, and each scallop has been painted gold and encrypted to prevent forgery. Anyone who nds a golden scallop must attend one of the two treasure ceremonies, which will be held Sept. 17 and 24 at 5 p.m. ET at the City Commons Gazebo in Port St. Joe on the corner of State Road 71 and Reid Avenue. Golden scallops must be presented by 5:15 p.m. ET to qualify for the $20,000 prize. Each scallop presented will be redeemed for a ticket and entered in a drawing. The holder of the rst ticket drawn will pick out one of the 100 prize envelopes only one of which represents the grand prize. If the grand prize is not selected, that person will be the rst to pick from the second prize board, containing prizes up to $500. The second prize board will be loaded with prize baskets and gift certicates from local businesses. Everybody that nds a gold scallop will win something, Davis said. We have a whole array of different prizes and plenty of stuff for the kids, too. Davis said there is a possibility the bays currents and tides could hide the golden scallops forever. We have a plan to retrieve any that arent found, Davis said. But we hope theyre all found. We really want all of them to be found. A map is provided on the TDCs website that outlines scalloping areas in the bay where the golden scallops will most likely be hiding. There will also be a picture posted of the golden scallops so hunters know what they are looking for. Treasure hunters must register at www.visitgulf.com under the Events and Festivals tab. There is no registration deadline. We want to get everybody out on the water here one last time and get them scalloping, Davis said. We want to encourage everyone to visit Gulf County and have a good time. A SCHOOL OF DISTINCTION By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Students and teachers across the country might soon look to Port St. Joe Elementary School as a model for success. The elementary school was honored last week as a College for Every Student (CFES) School of Distinction in a banner presentation by CFES President Rick Dalton. We are so proud of Port St. Joe Elementary, Dalton said. Its a national model whats happening here. Founded in 1991, CFES is a national nonprot organization focusing on fueling the desire to attend college among underserved youths and helping them pave the pathway there. Schools of Distinction are recognized for going the distance and ensuring every student is intensely part of the program. This year, 21 schools across the country were honored for their dedication to CFES. We get to travel around to schools and colleges and share whats going on in our best schools, Dalton said during his visit to PSJE. Dalton shared his itinerary for the coming weeks, during which he will be visiting schools in New York City as well as schools in the Adirondack Mountains. Well be talking about you, Dalton said to the three sixthgraders invited to meet with him. Youre a part of great things. Sixth-grader Kanon Martin shared with Dalton a school project he participated in where students grew vegetables and sold them at the local farmers market to raise money for a scholarship fund. Dalton said these might be things students in Hawaii will be doing in the future after the success of the PSJE program is shared in schools across the country. Elementary school CFES scholars also collected coins for college for the Gulf County Scholarship Program as a part of early college awareness and participated in a variety of activities focusing on goal setting, character building, leadership and mentoring. The CFES scholars at PSJE were required to visit at least one college campus and complete a research project on one college. Sixthand ninthgrade scholars also completed a college application. Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka have been a part of CFES almost since the beginning, Dalton said. Its a recognition of their success in implementing the program throughout the entire school. Dalton said most of the 150 participating schools select about 100 students to join the CFES program, while PSJE has shown the dedication to involve every student enrolled. Dalton said the program is aimed at creating a college culture in the U.S. and adhering to President Barack Obamas American Graduation Initiative, an effort to strengthen community colleges across the country and better prepare graduates for the new jobs of the 21st century. Every student needs to have the opportunity to go to college, Dalton said. He hopes to see the U.S. return to the position it once held as the country with the highest rate of college graduates in the world. Dalton said 96 percent of high school seniors participating in the CFES scholar program have gone to college. To see this at Port St. Joe Elementary, its inspirational, Dalton said. People are really paying attention to the wonderful strides Gulf County is making. Gulf County Schools Superintendent Jim Norton said the countys involvement with CFES ensures that every hardworking student in the county can afford to go to college. CFES, its a program that we get to be truly a model system, said Norton, who also attended the banner ceremony. We want to give every student college opportunity, whether they can afford it or not. It says an awful lot, Norton said of the honor. This is something my staff and administration is going to support at the highest level. For more information on College for Every Student, visit www.collegefes.org. Annual beach cleanup to be held in Mexico Beach Star Staff Report The annual Mexico Beach Cleanup will be held this Saturday beginning at 8:30 a.m. CT. Volunteers should meet at Sunset Park, next to the El Governor Motel at U.S. Highway 98 and 19th Street. The cleanup will continue until 10:30 a.m. CT. Cleanup supplies, water and snacks will be provided. The Mexico Beach Cleanup is a joint partnership between The Ocean Conservancy and the Mexico Beach Civic Association. The cleanup is part of the 26th annual International Coastal Cleanup, as this year marks over a quartercentury of dedicated volunteerism. Hundreds of thousands of volunteers around the world continue the tradition each year, spending a few hours removing trash from their local beach or waterway and keeping track of everything they nd on standardized data cards. The Ocean Conservancy uses this data to create the worlds only state-bystate, country-by-country index of what is trashing our ocean, lakes and rivers, which has helped to identify the sources and solutions to marine debris over the past 25 years. In 2010, more than 615,000 volunteers removed more than 8 million pounds of debris in 114 countries. The International Coastal Cleanup is a great opportunity for our community to get together and do something positive and needed for our stretch of beautiful coastline and at the same time be part of a worldwide cleanup effort helping to stop pollution of our oceans, said Jane Mathis, ICC coordinator for Mexico Beach. In 2010, Florida had 25,290 volunteers (second in the U.S.), who collected almost 350,000 pounds of trash from over 1,100 miles of shorelines and underwater areas. About 30 volunteers in Mexico Beach collected over 540 pounds of trash from our three miles of beach and dunes, Mathis said. Ocean Conservancy President and CEO Vikki Spruill said, Over the last quarter-century, the International Coastal Cleanup has grown from a single cleanup on a Texas beach to a worldwide movement to end the threat of trash in our ocean, our life support system. Over the past 25 years of Ocean Conservancys International Coastal Cleanup, more than 8.5 million volunteers have removed 145 million pounds of trash from the shores of lakes, streams, rivers and the ocean on just one day each year, Spruill continued. They have recorded every item found including 53 million cigarette butts, 14 million food wrappers and containers, 13 million caps and lids. The list goes on and on giving us a clear picture of the manufactured items impacting the health of humans, wildlife and economies. The hard work of volunteers culminates in the only global snapshot of the problem of marine debris every year, generated by Ocean Conservancy to enlist lawmakers, corporations, communities and individuals in solving this serious pollution problem, Spruill continued. But, she added, the challenge remains: The threat that marine debris poses to the health of our ocean continues to grow, and each of us as individuals has a role to play in turning the tide. Trash does not fall from the sky; it falls from human hands and those hands have the power to stop it. Whether we live near a coast or hundreds of miles inland, we are all connected to the ocean and share a responsibility for its care. Visit www.ocean conservancy.org/cleanup for more information and the 2011 report. For more information on the cleanup, call Jane Mathis at 850-648-5900. S PECI A L TO T HE S T A R This map of St. Josephs Bay shows the prime hunting area for the 100 golden scallops that are an entry to a prize giveaway worth $20,000. V A LERIE G A RM A N | The Star Port St. Joe Elementary sixth-graders Mya Schram, Kanon Martin and Ethan Lafountaine hold the School of Distinction banner presented to PSJE for its dedication to the College for Every Student program. COURTESY OF J A NE MA THIS Volunteers work to pick up trash along the shorelines of Mexico Beach. PSJES earns national award from CFES

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B2 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Y Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER 24-EMERGENCY SERVICE FOR OUR CURRENT CLIENTS! Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility 300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM Afternoon Appointments Available Drs. Hours By Appt. 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients Rylan turns 5 Happy 5th Birthday Rylan!!! We LOVE you so very much!!!! Shylah Marlo Thomas is born Amanda and Marlo Thomas would like to announce the birth of their third daughter, Shylah Marlo Thomas. She was born Aug. 27, 2011. You cant judge fertilizers by appearance. Fortunately, state law requires each fertilizer label to include specic content facts. Fertilizers are manufactured from a wide variety of materials to supply required plant nutrients. Once these materials are mixed, it becomes difcult to distinguish the materials present. In the past, a few unscrupulous manufacturers have taken advantage of this to increase their prot. To protect consumers and legitimate manufacturers from such practices, the Florida legislature enacted the rst fertilizer law in 1889 and has amended it many times since enactment. My information was provided by Extension soils specialist Dr. J.B. Sartain, of the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). To obtain the proper types of fertilizers for various applications, you must understand the label. At the top, youll nd the identication of the manufacturer or distributor. This doesnt tell how well the fertilizer will help your lawn, ornamentals or vegetables. Next, if the term organic is used, there will be a statement identifying the type of material, as well as how much is natural and how much is synthetic. This is an important indication of how the fertilizer will react in your soil. For example, natural organic nitrogen is released slowly. So a fertilizer containing a high percentage of this material would be good for lawns, mainly helping them stay green, without causing spurts of extra fast growth. The key information is found in the guaranteed analysis section of the label. A series of numbers, such as 8-8-8, 10-10-10 or 13-13-13, tell you how much, or the primary plant nutrients the fertilizer contains. That is, the number showing the guaranteed amount of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. For example, a fertilizer labeled 8-8-8 contains 8 percent nitrogen, 8 percent phosphorous and 8 percent potassium. Thus, a 100pound bag of this analysis contains 24 pounds of plant food. The other 76 pound is accounted for by conditioners and llers, required for even spreading. These might include some incidental trace elements. If the fertilizer contains signicant amount of secondary plant foods, such as calcium, magnesium, copper and others, they will be listed near the bottom of the tag. The most difcult part of the label to understand is the information listed right after the total nitrogen gure, in the guaranteed analysis section. In addition to the total amount, the label gives percentages of each of several types of nitrogen in the mix. This tells you a lot about how the fertilizer works. Youll see the terms nitrate nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, water soluble organic nitrogen, urea nitrogen and water-soluble organic nitrogen, urea nitrogen and water-insoluble nitrogen. Plants use nitrate, watersoluble organic and urea nitrogen fairly quickly. They might work well in a vegetable garden. But, they wont last very long, because theyre rapidly leached out of the soil by rain and irrigation water. On the other hand, ammoniacal and waterinsoluble nitrogen will last longer in sandy Florida soils. Following the basic analysis is a statement of the maximum amount of chlorine the fertilizer contains. Excess chlorine might be injurious to certain plants, both vegetable and ornamental species. But, small amounts can be benecial under some conditions. Unfortunately, I cant fully explain everything this complicated in one short article. But, I hope Ive claried a few of the basic points. To obtain the proper fertilizer for your specic vegetable and ornamental gardening needs, you must understand the information on fertilizer labels. When in doubt, we suggest check with your favorite Garden Center or contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit http://gulf.ifas.u.edu. Star Staff Report Doris Johnson, a longtime resident of Port St. Joe and former resident of Apalachicola, has been approved for a liver-kidney transplant at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. A genetic disease has attacked her liver and kidneys, causing them to fail. After undergoing two weeks of comprehensive testing at the Mayo Clinic, she has been informed she is a candidate for a transplant when the organs become available. An account has been set up at Superior Bank in Port St. Joe to help Johnson offset some of the costs of the housing, post-transplant drugs and other necessities. If you would like to contribute, please call Carol at Superior Bank and ask for the Doris Johnson Medical Fund. There will be several fundraisers given in the next few months, and your participation would be greatly appreciated. The many phone calls, prayers and contributions are just some of the ways her spirit has been lifted. Society Births and BIRTHDAYS The Florida fertilizer label ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Account set up for Doris Johnson JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT TRAINING SESSION SPECIAL T O THE S T A R Junior Achievement of Northwest Florida recently conducted a training session in Port St. Joe. The training was Sept. 1 and was hosted by Centennial Bank. The training was held to train new volunteers for the seven additional classes that are being provided Gulf County because of a $2,500 grant received from the Port St. Joe Building Capacity Fund for the 2011-2012 school year. Pictured from left are Mark Friedman, Heather Bryant, Karen Fontaine, Vikki Anderson, Maegon Conners, Kim Knight, Cathy Cox, Farica Gant, David Butler and Bill Mahan.

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The Star| B3 Thursday, September 15, 2011 More than 140 Gulf County youth got to experience unforgettable fun through the Port St. Joe Summer Youth Leadership Program! Not only was the program filled with fun activities and games, but it also promoted learning, healthy choices and positive social behaviors. 142 Children Registered 20 Young Adults Obtained Work Experience and Earned a Microsoft Certification 4,824 Nutritious Meals Served Christian Community Development Fund, Washington Improvement Group Community Action Committee, City of Port St. Joe, Gulf County Board of County Commissioners, Dupont Capacity Building Fund, Four H Extension Office, Gulf Coast State College, Gulf District Schools, Port St. Joe Elementary School, Minnie Likely, and the Auburn Youth. By Will Ramsey and Sergio Clemmons Special to The Star General information Progress reports will be given to students today. Sports group pictures (football, cheerleaders, volleyball, band) will be taken today. Deadline to register for ACT at Port St. Joe in October is Sept. 16 College day is from 9 a.m. to noon ET Sept. 16. All students in grades 9-12 have an opportunity to visit with numerous colleges, military recruiters and local businesses regarding future plans. Underclassmen and senior retake pictures will be Sept. 19. On Sept. 21, there will be a SWAT meeting in the student activity room. On Sept. 22, seniors will order graduation invitations from 8 a.m. to noon ET. Sports JV/Varsity volleyball at Liberty County High at 6 and 7 p.m. today. Go Sharks! Volleyball tournament at Mosley Sept. 17; Go Sharks! Cross country at Tallahassee Lincoln 10:30 a.m. ET Sept. 17; Go Sharks! JV/Varsity volleyball at Wewahitchka at 6 and 7 p.m. ET Sept. 19; Go Sharks! Cross Country at Graceville at 4 p.m. Sept. 20; Go Sharks! JV/ Varsity volleyball at Blountstown High 6 and 7 p.m. Sept. 20; Go Sharks! JV/Varsity volleyball vs. E Gadsden High at 6 and 7 p.m. ET Sept. 21; Go Sharks! JV football at Wewahitchka at 7 p.m. Sept. 22; Go Sharks! Varsity football at Blountstown at 8 p.m. ET Sept. 23; Go Sharks! Other news Marine science classes are studying data, satellite images and forecast advisories as they plot the track of Hurricane Katia in the Atlantic Ocean. Star Staff Report You are never too old to learn. No tests, no grades, no stress just fun. Registration is now open for Education Encore classes at the Gulf/Franklin campus, Room A 101. Education Encore provides noncredit enrichment classes for active adults on a variety of topics including computers, exercise, art, drawing, photography, religion, writing, Spanish, home repair, story crafting, history and more. The goal of Education Encore is to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom. If you have been to college, this is an opportunity to relive the college experience. If you have not attended college, this is an opportunity to live the college experience. Just as exercising the body keeps one physically t, exercising the mind keeps one mentally t. Classes will be held on six consecutive Wednesdays from Sept. 21 through Oct. 26. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which includes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, please visit www.gulfcoast. edu/EducationEncore, or for more information, call 872-3823 or email Jim Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. Dont miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest. Star Staff Report A corrections class is scheduled for Oct. 3 at the Gulf Coast State College, Gulf/Franklin campus in Port St. Joe. According to sources within the Department of Corrections, only applicants who have completed the class and passed the state board exam are being considered for employment as correctional ofcers. But the institutions in our area are beginning to hire ofcers following a lengthy hiring freeze and are running out of qualied applicants. The previous class was canceled because of a lack of enrollment, but we are continuing our efforts to encourage those citizens who wish to pursue a career with good benets to contact us. For more information, please call 227-9670, ext. 5507 or 5511 for more details. DAZZLING DOLPHINS SPECIAL T O T HE STAR The Dazzling Dolphins for Sept. 15 are pre-kindergarten, Leland Whitlock; kindergarten, Isaiah Mims; 1st, Skylar Clayton; 2nd, Ricky Forbes-Rosado; 3rd, Bailey Hurst; 4th, Brittany Hanson; 5th, Aaron Godwin; 6th, Gracie Cryderman. Bus Riders of the week are Chris Anderson, Kylie Ingalls, Breana Wable, Tyler Harwood, Hannah Lee, Raylyn Hardy and Krista Taylor. SPECIAL T O T HE STAR Dazzling Dolphins for Sept. 8 are pre-kindergarten, Boston McGhee; kindergarten, Ella Dimitrijevich; 1st, Maelynn Butler; 2nd, Synia Dawson; 3rd, Sarah Fidler; 4th, Shayleigh Jackson; 5th, Jasmine Thomas; and 6th, Ashton Childress. Bus Riders of the Week are JaMarrien Becton, Ricky Forbes, Brian Darnall, Shawna Flowers, Izzy Thomas, Brittany Hanson, Angela Batts and Andrew Sheppard. Corrections class scheduled Education Encore registration open School News The Lions Tale Special to The Star The fourth-grade reading class has started a Reading Buddies program for the K5 students. Once a week, the fourth-graders select a story, share it their reading buddies and write about their experience in their journals. Our reading buddy program seeks to foster a love of reading by allowing older students to mentor and inspire young readers. The rst stories have emphasized the K5 phonics lessons, and future stories will continue to focus on phonics as well as comprehension. The program has been so well received that other preschool buddies soon will be added to the program.

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler First Presbyterian Church 508 Sixteenth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 850-227-1756 Rev. Ruth Hemple Worship Service 10:00 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Rev. Drucilla Tyler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Wewahitchka Church of God located at 119 Bay Ave in Wewahitchka. Will be giving away FREE food assistance on September 25th. If you are in need of groceries PLEASE call 639.2221 in advance to register. Service times are Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. FAITH Thursday, September 15, 2011 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Will it make a difference? When you stand before God, in judgment, will it make any difference whether you miss heaven by a mile, like the atheists and the agnostics, and the cultists, or whether you miss heaven by an inch, like those who attend church every time the door is open, and yet never become part of the Kingdom of God becoming a child of God, born of God and born again? Jesus said, Not everyone who says to Me, Lord, Lord, shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. Many will say to Me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name? And then I will declare to them, I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness! Matthew 7:21-23 Christians do confess Jesus as Savior and Jesus as Lord of their lives, and might still miss heaven by an inch, because those are not the things which make a person a Christian. Real Christians will be baptized in water, by immersion, if possible, but that is not what makes a person a real Christian. Real Christians believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, but that is not what makes a person a real Christian. A person becomes a real Christian, when he, or she, is born of God. If you are a believer, it is because God granted you to become a believer and to become His adopted child. If you study John 1:11-13 and John 3:3-7, all of the verses, not just the ones you hear in church, youll see what I mean. If you are a real Christian, it means that you have been changed. The Apostle Paul wrote in 2nd Corinthians 5:17, Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new. Some translations say, new creature. He also wrote in Galatians 6:15, For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision, nor uncircumcision, avails anything, but a new creation. Some make it sound like becoming a Christian is all up to you. Its not! If something that you could do could make you a Christian, Jesus wouldnt have had to die that horrible death on the cross. Can you make yourself a new creation? Of course you cant. I hear that there are a few who are saying that I am making the churches in this area look bad. The only ones that might look bad are those whose leaders are taking verses out of context and making a religion out of them. Who benets when people walk out of church thinking that the can live any way they want and still go to heaven? Questions or comments are invited. Send to us at one of the addresses below: Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible, every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh. Check us out this Sunday! For the spring and summer seasons, our services begin, with a time of greeting and fellowship, at 9:45 a.m. CT on Sunday. Our worship begins at 10 a.m. For those interested, we have midweek ministry, helping people on an individual basis. Inquire for more information. Come early on Sunday morning so that you can meet us informally, and join in the praise and worship music led by TJ. On Sunday morning we worship at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st Street. The Civic Center is located behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker Realty, just off U.S. Highway 98, in the western end of Mexico Beach. Look for the white building with the dark green roof. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337 Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook: Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com The Christian CONSCIENCE Special to The Star St. Josephs Catholic Church has made a cookbook featuring delicious recipes from members of St. Josephs as well as their mission church, St. Lawrences Catholic Church, in Wewahitchka. The cookbook has many wonderful recipes from a very diverse culture of people as well as the history of St. Josephs Catholic Church. The history ranges from how the church began in Port St. Joe and the many priests that have served, as well as the history of the stained glass windows in the church. Also included are the Churchs Feast and Liturgical days that are followed by the Catholic Church. These cookbooks will make an excellent birthday, Christmas or any special occasion gift. As holidays approach us, St. Joseph is running a special on the cookbooks, one cookbook is $15 or two for $25. There is also a limited edition Tempting Recipes CD for $10. The CD will contain St. Josephs Tempting Recipes and 10 other cookbooks. Proceeds from the sale of the cookbooks will go to the Family Life Ministry at St. Josephs. If you are interested in purchasing cookbooks, please call Charmaine Earley at 227-5343, Trish Warriner at Tapper & Company, 227-1111 or Barb Van Treese at 227-9837. Cookbooks and CDs are also available at No Came Caf, Books & More, Persnickety, Port Inn, Mainstay Suites, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulfs gift shop and the Port St. Joe Marina. Purchases may also be made on Mondays or Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. EST at the parish ofce on 20th Street. St. Josephs Catholic Church cookbook sale Annual Womens Day Annual Womens Day will be celebrated at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church on the 3rd Sunday, Sept. 18. The day will begin at 10 a.m. ET with Church School followed by a special 11 a.m. morning worship service with Evangelist Barbara Bell of Panama City as the guest speaker. A special invitation by the Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church membership is extended to everyone to come and be a part of this great day of blessings from God. The church is located in Port St. Joe on Avenue D. Revival at Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church bells are ringing. Revival, revival, revival, featuring Elder O.H. Walker of Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville, who will be bringing the word of God to Gods people. Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will host a revival Sept. 21-23, with services at 7:30 p.m. ET each night. There will be prayer meetings at 7 p.m. ET Sept. 19-20. Zion Fair invites everyone to come and be blessed. City Wide Mission Fruit Harvest The City Wide Missionary Society of Port St. Joe will sponsor its Annual Fruit Harvest Worship Services on Thursday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. ET at the Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church located at 315 Martin Luther King Blvd. Foreign Mission service will be the highlight of this years program and will feature Mr. Marty Rileys recent mission trip to Brazil. Marty, a member of First Baptist Church located here in Port St. Joe, will share his experiences in the mission eld through pictorial presentations and personal observations. This program is opened to everyone to attend and support the work of the City Wide Missionary Society. An offering will be taken.New Horizon AA The New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 850-639-3600. Faith BRIEFS

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, September 15, 2011 Star Staff Report The challenges of health care delivery in rural America are several and familiar: poor infrastruc ture, insufcient supply of skilled doctors, and dis persed poor populations, all of which make afford able care hard to achieve. Cindy Drapal, chief nursing ofcer of George E. Weems Memorial Hospital, says technology is the key to bridging this gap. In December 2010, Chuck Edwards, chief tech nology ofcer of Bluemanta Technology Group in Port St. Joe, began working to secure a grant and imple ment a connected health strategy for the hospital. In May 2011, the telemedi cine program took ight with the installation of the hospitals rst mobile tele medicine unit. The unit al lows Weems clinicians and patients to communicate with urban resources via the Internet. We have made it a pri ority to explore innovative yet practical connected health solutions to im prove health care delivery. It was very exciting to see telemedicine become a re ality at Weems, Edwards said. The telemedicine unit includes an Ergotron mo bile cart with onboard bat teries, and audio visual equipment from Cisco Systems Inc. The unit also features onboard local and remote diagnostics capa bilities. The video otoscope, which uses the latest rod lens technology to provide crisp, clear images of the tympanic membrane and auditory ear canal, allows clinicians to record live video or capture still imag es and review them in real time with patients and oth er clinicians. A Bluetoothenabled electronic stetho scope connects wirelessly to heart and lung sound visualization software. Telemedicine has played a key role on several occa sions since it was installed, with the most recent appli cation involving the treat ment of a trauma patient. Weems hospital personnel were able to connect to outof-area surgical specialists to review the patients inju ries in real time. In recent years, the nancial obstacles for tele medicine have crumbled, making it more cost-effec tive for rural health care providers to adopt the tech nology. Medicare and Medic aid reimburse doctors the same basic rate for in-per son patient care as a video conference with a remote patient. Private insurance companies are also pay ing for many telemedicine services. Payers are real izing that connected health technologies, such as tele medicine, make efcient use of dwindling resources to reduce health care costs and deliver quality patient care, Drapal said. For more information or to see a demonstration of the telemedicine capabili ties at Weems, call Cindy Drapal at 850-653-8853. Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 C A LL T ODAY! GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! S IN CE 2002, D OING B U SIN E SS IN T H IS CO MMU NIT Y LAWN CARE, TREE & PA L M TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVA L DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVA L or whatever your yard needs are CALL J O E @ 850-670-5478 E -MA I L @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Aaron Farnsley, AIF CFP MBA Farnsley & Johnston 505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3336 aaron.farnsley@farnsley.com Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im Telemedicine at Weems Hospital DAR invites community to celebrate Constitution Week Star Staff Report The local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is cel ebrating Constitution Week Sept. 17-23 and urges ev erybody to read the Consti tution to understand what the document really says. Constitution Week is a weeklong commemoration of Americas most impor tant document and is one of the countrys least-known ofcial observances. The Constitution stands as a testament to the tenacity of Americans throughout history to maintain their liberties and freedom and to insure those inalienable rights to every American, according to a DAR news release. While few have claimed that the U.S. Constitution is perfect, it has proved to be the best political document and form of government ever devised. The Constitution guar anteed its citizens the freedom to make their own decisions and encouraged their willingness to work hard and make sacrices, knowing they would keep the rewards of their labor and ingenuity, knowing they were creating better lives for themselves and posterity, according to a DAR release. Under the Constitution, this nation has enjoyed un paralleled growth, prosper ity and power and has been an inuence for good in the world. Americans need to know what the Constitution says. It is impossible to protect it without knowing what is in it, and it cant protect Americans unless they pro tect the Constitution. Among those celebrat ing Constitution Week will be So Ana Schweers. She is the daughter of Gretchen and Michael Schweers, granddaughter of Midge Stevens and Wayne Ste vens and Liz Schweers, great-granddaughter of Joe Stevens and William H. Howell Jr. and greatgreat-grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Howell Sr., who were early pioneers of Port St. Joe. So is the sixth gen eration in her family to be eligible to be a member of the DAR. Her mother, Gretchen Schweers, is an outstanding junior member of the local DAR chapter. Fly your ag Sept. 17-23. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Chuck Edwards of Bluemanta, and Cindy Drapal, chief nursing ofcer at Weems Memorial Hospital in Franklin County. P HOTO S S PECIAL TO T HE STAR ABOVE: So Schweers and her mother, Gretchen Schweers, will be celebrating Constitution Week Sept. 17-23. RIGHT: Lyd Stokoe, left, and Virginia Harrison, right, of the local chapter of the DAR, join Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson with a proclamation commemorating Constitution Week.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 15, 2011 The Star | B6 JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3758) is accepting applications for the following position:LABORATORY & ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALISTPlease submit an application and cover letter along with ve references to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn. Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, Fl. 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The Position will be open until lled. Salaries will be DOQ. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldn’t you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. 35379S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 10-479CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GARY L. SMITH, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY L. SMITH, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against any Defendants, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject property, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, I will sell at public auction to the highest bidder in cash in at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on September 22, 2011, that certain real property situated in the County of Gulf, State of Florida, more particularly described as follows: The North 1/2 of Lot 29, SAN BLAS ESTATES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 20, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West; thence N 0004’21” East along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West for 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot wide right of way of State Road No. 30-E; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line as follows: S 2325’11” East for 1642.44 feet to a point of curve; thence along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 11426.79 feet and a central angle of 0208’33” for 427.29 feet; thence S 2533’44” East for 1711.69 feet to a point of curve; thence along the arc of a curve to the right which has a radius of 11415.15 feet and a central angle of 0518’49” for 1058.64 feet; thence S 2014’55” East for 6496.59 feet to the point of beginning; thence continue S 2014’55” East along said right of way line for 49.98 feet; thence leaving said right of way line S 6945’05” West for 630.70 feet, more or less, to the water’s edge of the Gulf of Mexico, thence Northwesterly along said water’s edge for 50 feet, more or less, to a point which bears S 6945’05” West from the point of beginning; thence N 6945’05” East for 635.7 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. If you are a person with a disability who needs special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, you should, within two (2) working days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation, at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Phone (850) 718-0026. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call (800) 955-8771. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Dated August 26, 2011 By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept 8, 15, 2011 35362S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 352 Application No. 2011-20 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01901-175R Description of Property: Lot 15, Sawmill Estates Unit 1, according to the Official map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 1, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Taunton Development, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 12th day of October, 2011. Dated this 6th day of September, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Sept 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 35381S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-1-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, 502 Earth City Expressway, Suite 307 Earth City, MO 63045, Plaintiff, vs. CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN, and GULF COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Gulf, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: SEE EXHIBIT “A” TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999 HOMES OF MERIT, 28x48, M 763 MOBILE HOME; SERIAL NUMBER DCA M763-D1444A and DCA M763-D1444B. Schedule A A lot or parcel of land lying and being on the Northerly side of Creekview Drive in the Northeast Quarter of Section 10, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point of intersection of the Northerly right of way boundary line of Creekview Drive and the East boundary line of Section 10, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence go N6033’18”W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 318.28 feet; thence go N2950’24”W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 315.24 feet; thence go N3914’51”W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for distance of 240.54 feet for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue N3914’51”W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 88.62 feet, thence departing said Northerly right of way boundary line, go N4038’43”E, for a distance of 453.38 feet to the centerline of Stone Mill Creek; thence along the centerline of Stone Mill Creek the following courses and distances, N7608’59”E, 20.10 feet; S5854’11”E, 35.66 feet; S2021156”W, 9.66 feet; S0258’24”E, 39.75 feet; thence S0308’17”E, 31.03 feet; thence departing said centerline of Stone Mill Creek go S4213’09”W, for a distance of 431.13 feet to the Point of Beginning. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the origninal with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 28th day of April, 2011. CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Timothy D. Padgett, Esq. Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 422-2520 phone (850) 422-2567 fax Sept 15, 22, 2011 35399S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY MAUREEN M. MITCHELL Plaintiff STEPHEN NORRIS and MELISSA MITCHELL and UNKNOWN TENANTS and GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Defendant(s). Case No. 11-90CA NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MELISSA MITCHELL 2321 Hwy 71. Wewahitchka, Fl. 32465 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property: Begin at the SW corner of SE 1/3 of SW 1/4 of Section 36, T4S, R10W, and run North 586 feet; thence run East 797 feet, more or less to SR No. 71 for the POB to the NE corner fo John Bailey Lot; thence run Northerly along the West side of said Road No. 71 for 102 feet; thence run West for 210 feet; thence run Southerly paralleling Road NO. 71 for 104 feet to John Bailey Line; thence run East for 210 feet to the POB. Containing 1/2 acre, more or less, and lying and being in Gulf County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to CHARLES A. COSTIN, Attorney for the Plaintiff whose address is P.O. Box 98, Port St. Joe, Florida on or before October 6th, 2011, a date which is within Thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice in The Star and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before and service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) disabled person who, because their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA coordinator at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or telephone voice (850) 229-6113 not later than five (5) business prior to such proceeding. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 2nd day of September, 2011. BECKY L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk September 15, 22, 2011 35408S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JESSE WARD KENERLY File Number 11-48PR Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of JESSE WARD KENERLY, deceased, whose date of death was July 10, 2008 and whose social security number is XXX-XX-XXXX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is September 15, 2011. Personal Representative: Lynne Kenerly 235 Glencourtney Dr. Sandy Springs, GA 30328 Scott Kenerly 225 Cherry Mountain St. Ellenboro, NC 28040-6804 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin Florida Bar No. 699070 Post Office Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Telephone: (850) 227-1159 September 15, 22, 2011 35418S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER USE PERMIT Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application(s) for water use permit(s) has (have) been received by the Northwest Florida Water Management District: Application number I07232 filed 08/30/2011 St. Joe Timberland Company, 133 South WaterSound Parkway, WaterSound, FL 32413 Requesting a maximum withdrawal of 19,474,577 gallons per day from the Brothers River and the Apalachicola River for Water Based Recreation use by an existing facility. General withdrawal location(s) in Gulf County: T06S, R08W, Sec. 7; T6S, R8W, Sec. 7D Interested persons may object to or comment upon the applications or submit a written request for a copy of the staff report(s) containing proposed agency action regarding the application(s) by writing to the Division of Resource Regulation of the Northwest Florida Water Management District, attention Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Havana, Florida 32333-9700, but such comments or requests must be received by 5 o’clock p.m. on September 29, 2011. No further public notice will be provided regarding this (these) application(s). Publication of this notice constitutes constructive notice of this permit application to all substantially affected persons. A copy of the staff report(s) must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings and any public hearing date. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an administrative hearing regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request according to the provisions of 28-106.201, Florida Administrative Code. Notices of Proposed Agency Action will be mailed only to persons who have filed such requests. September 15, 2011 35473S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at a Special Meeting on the 27th day of September, 2011, at 5:01 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE NO. 470 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA LEVYING THE AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE RATE FOR MUNICIPAL PURPOSES ON ALL TAXABLE PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2011 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2012, STATING THE PERCENTAGE BY WHICH THE MILLAGE LEVIED IS (11.70)% LESS THAN THE ROLLED-BACK RATE; AND, PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any 35449S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage Unit #L-8, Melissa Myers and #92, Tyson O’Bryane will be opened for sale on September 29, 2011 at 8:30 am. September 15, 22, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 15, 2011 The Star | B7 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 401 Reid Avenue +/5,400sf: Move in ready; Inquire for terms 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16' inside clearance; Dual 12' roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $515,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 407 Reid Ave +/4,988 sf : 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $399,000 317 Monument Ave +/4,431 sf : Hwy 98 frontage w/ On-site parking; $499,000 401 Reid Avenue+/5,400 sf : Retail space; $225,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for terms260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing availableHwy 98 Retail / Of ce Vacant LotsTwo lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30' x 80' each; $69,900 per lot SO LD t Lots nHwy98;30 UNDER CONTRACT Avenue fce/retail UNDER CONTRACT 16' inside clearance; Dual 12' roll-up doo ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. L et a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. September 15, 2011 35475S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA ORDINANCE NO. 2011-1054L AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED ON THE CITY’S ADOPTED EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT, AND UPDATED DATA AND ANALYSIS, WHICH INCLUDE AMENDMENTS TO THE TEXT OF THE FUTURE LAND USE; TRAFFIC CIRCULATION; HOUSING; INFRASTRUCTURE; CONSERVATION; RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE; INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION; PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES; AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENTS OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, TO REVISE AND UPDATE THE EXISTING GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND POLICIES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE MANDATES SET FORTH IN CHAPTER 163, FLORIDA STATUTES; AUTHORIZING TRANSMITTAL OF THESE AMENDMENTS TO THE APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS, AND OTHER APPLICABLE AGENCIES FOR REVIEW AND COMMENT AS REQUIRED BY FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVIDING FOR A REPEALER PROVISION, A SAVINGS CLAUSE, A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE, AND CODIFICATION; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, the State Legislature passed the Local Government Comprehensive Planning and Land Development Regulation Act requiring all local governments to prepare a Comprehensive Plan; and, WHEREAS, the City of Wewahitchka Comprehensive Plan was adopted pursuant to Ordinance No. 6-12-90, as amended; and WHEREAS, the City of Wewahitchka Evaluation and Appraisal Report was adopted pursuant to Resolution No. 2010-1077R, on August 23, 2010; and WHEREAS, the City has received and reviewed the proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan, and said proposed amendments being reviewed by the Planning Commission (Local Planning Agency) at a duly advertised hearing on April 21, 2011, which determined such amendments to be consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and appropriate to the future land uses within the City; and WHEREAS, City Commission has agreed with the recommendations of the Local Planning Agency that the proposed amendments comply with the requirements of Chapter 163, Florida Statutes, Part II, and that the proposed amendments are consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and appropriate to the future land uses within the City; and WHEREAS, City Commission held a duly advertised public hearing for the transmittal of the proposed amendments to the Department of Community Affairs on April 28, 2011; and WHEREAS, the City has received and responded to the Florida Department of Community Affairs’ Objections, Recommendations and Comments Report (ORC); and WHEREAS, after notice of public hearing being duly published, City Commission on September 26, 2011, approved on Second Reading the proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendments provided as Attachment A. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA: SECTION 1. The foregoing ‘WHEREAS” clauses are hereby ratified and confirmed as being true and correct and are hereby made a specific part of this Ordinance upon adoption hereof. SECTION 2. The City of Wewahitchka hereby adopts the EAR-based Comprehensive Plan Amendments to its current Comprehensive Plan as amended, which amendments consist of the pages which are identified as Attachment A (Comprehensive Plan Goals, Objectives and Policies) and which are incorporated into the current Comprehensive Plan. The City of Wewahitchka does adopt the Supporting Documents (Data and Analysis) separately and apart from the Comprehensive Plan Amendments. A copy of the Comprehensive Plan, as amended, and the required Supporting Documentation, is on file at City Hall in Wewahitchka, Florida. SECTION 3. The City Manager shall transmit the adopted amendments to the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, Florida Department of Community Affairs and other applicable agencies in accordance with State statutes governing the review of Comprehensive Plan amendments. SECTION 4. Projects securing preliminary Planning Commission approval prior to April 21, 2011 shall be vested with respect to the applicability of these provisions. SECTION 5. It is the intention of the City Commission that each provision hereof be considered severable, and that the invalidity of any provision of this Ordinance shall not affect the validity of any other portion of this Ordinance, the Wewahitchka Comprehensive Plan, or the Wewahitchka Land Development Regulations. SECTION 6. All rights, actions, proceedings and Contracts of the City, including the City Commission, the City Manager, or any of its departments, boards or officers undertaken pursuant to the existing code provisions, shall be enforced, continued, or completed, in all respects, as though begun or executed hereunder. SECTION 7. All ordinance or parts of ordinances that are inconsistent or in conflict with the provisions of this Ordinance are repealed. SECTION 8. If any section, part of session, paragraph, clause, phrase or word of this Ordinance is declared invalid, the remaining provisions of this Ordinance shall not be affected. SECTION 9. It is the intention of the City Commission that the provisions of this Ordinance shall become and be made a part of the City of Wewahitchka Comprehensive Plan, as amended, which provisions may be renumbered or relettered and that the word ordinance be changed to “element”, “section”, or other appropriate word to accomplish such intention. SECTION 10. The effective date of this plan amendment shall be the date a final order is issued by the Florida Department of Community Affairs finding the amendment to be in compliance in accordance with Chapter 163.3184, FS, as amended; or the date a final order is issued by the Administration Council finding the amendment to be in compliance in accordance with Chapter 163.3184, FS, as amended, and further that the Florida Department of Community Affairs notice of intent to find a plan amendment in compliance shall be deemed to be a final order if no timely petition challenging the amendment is filed. PASSED AND ADOPTED THIS DAY OF A.D. 2011. APPROVED: Honorable Phillip Gaskin, Mayor ATTEST: Connie Parrish, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM AND LEGAL SUFFICIENCY: S. Russell Scholz, City Attorney September 15, 2011 35474S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at a Special Meeting on the 27th day of September, 2011, at 5:01 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 471 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ADOPTING THE TENTATIVE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011/2012 AS THE FINAL BUDGET OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011 AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. September 15, 2011 35476S PUBLIC NOTICE THE CODE ENFORCEMENT SPECIAL MASTER FOR THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE WILL HOLD CODE ENFORCEMENT HEARINGS: WHEN: Tuesday September 20, 2011 TIME: 6:00 P.M. WHERE: Port St. Joe Fire Station SUBJECT: Code Enforcement Violations at the following locations: 1303 McClelland Ave. Owner Marie Naegele All persons are invited to attend these meetings. Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Special Master with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Code Enforcement Special Master of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceedings should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, Telephone No. 850/229-8261. THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE Jim Anderson City Clerk September 15, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Wewahitchka AuctionThe Specialists of the South Presents a Fabulous Live & Internet AuctionSeptember 24, 2011, 9 AM CST Start, Preview/ Register at 8. Lake Alice Park Amphitheatre, Across the Street 149 Hwy 71 North, Wewa. Preview, Register & Bid Online www.specialists ofthesouth.com. Dick Adams, Auctioneer: AU3226, AB2366. As Is, Where Is, All Sales Final. Buyer’s Premium. Dealer’s Must Present 2011 Tax Certificate. St. Joe 2007 Long Ave Sept 17th, 8:am-12:pmMulti Family Garage / Moving Sale2 couches, table and chairs, bed, chest, toys, girls clothing, sizes 3 to 5 and 10. Lots of misc. Items ST. Joe 674 Jones Homestead Rd. Fri & Sat 8:am-?Yard SaleLots of items! Bldg Const/TradesMarine WorkWelder Needed. Work at Port St Joe. $15-33/hr. Call (800) 211-4441 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Movie Extras to stand in background for major film. Earn up to $300 per day. Experience not required. 877-824-6274 Full Service Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL76714 to 56654 2 br apartments for Rent near Hwy 71 & Wewahitchka. Apply at Fisher Building Supply at 848 Hwy 22 or Call 639-5102 for more info Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small Apt for rent at Bryan’t landing on river w/s/e incl. $400 mo. 2 br 2 ba, house at Bryan’t landing on river w/s/e incl $700 pet negotiable. 850-899-0162 1, 2, & 3 bedroom long term rentals available in Mexico Beach. Please call 850-348-0262 Text FL75507 to 56654 3 br home with 150 ft boat dock, deep water, year round, Call (850) 348-7774 Bayview Home @ Indian Pass. 4 br, 3 ba, 2 acres, large storage and Boat shed. $1200 mo + $1200 dep. $200 pet fee. In the St. Joe school district. Call 850-229-1065 or 850-227-5025 Would like toSwap my home in a N. Georgia Mountain City, for a home in this area. No money owed, Call 478-252-4636 RV Lots at Kristiana RV Park at Beacon Hill 2 blocks from the Gulf, $250 month, W/S included. Call John 850-647-5000/340-0675 Wewa, RV’s for rent Weekly or monthly. Includes W/S/E. Also Call 850-639-5721 3 br, 2 ba home priced to sell. 85K negotiable. within 1 mi of 3 schools Central heat & air. 2105 long Avenue, PSJ. Call 850-697-2768 for appt. Buyer to pay closing costs! Text FL75911 to 56654 138’ x 315’ acre for sale 553 Ridge Rd. in Franklin County. 5 blocks from Bay, 5 miles from St. George Island. $35,000 firm. Call (850)566-7878 Price ReducedFSBO : 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane

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B8 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, September 19 2011 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, September 27, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application by Emile & Gail Iverstine for Parcel ID # 06269-135R Located in Section 19, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroachment into side and road setback for ECL affected lot. 2. Open Discussion 3. Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312. 2011-68 PUBLIC NOTICE C IT Y O F P O R T S T J OE The City Commission will hold a Special Meeting on Thursday September 15, 2011 at 5:01 P.M. EST. at City Hall, 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd. Topics: 1. Ordinance 470, 2011/2012 Ad Valorem Property Tax Millage R ate Public Hearing and 1st Reading 2. Ordinance 471, 2011 Budget Public Hearing and 1st Reading 3. Gulf Pines Hospital Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. PUBLIC NOTICE City of Port St. Joe The City Commission will hold public hearings on the following topics at its September 20, 2011 Regular Meeting at 6:00 P.M. EST. and its Regular Meeting to be held on October 18, 2011 at 6:00 P.M. EST. Topics: Ordinance 472, Water Utility Rates Ordinance 473, Sewer Utility Rates Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any deci sion made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verba tim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. Tommy Stephen Anderson Tommy Stephen Anderson was born on June 15, 1947, in Port St. Joe, Florida. He went home to be with his Heavenly Father on September 9, 2011. He was a lifelong resident of Gulf County. Tommy was preceded in death by his parents, Jesse and Susan Patricia Anderson of Port St. Joe, Florida; a brother, Harold Gene Anderson of Sunny Hills, Florida; and a sister, Judith Lynn Bond of Port St Joe, Florida. He is survived by his son, Timothy (LeAnna) Anderson; step-grandson, John-Paul Helms, all of Port St. Joe, Florida; a sister, Gail (James) Rider of Cumming, Georgia; several nieces and nephews; and numerous close friends. Tommy will truly be missed. In Tommys 64 years, he lived his life to the fullest. Some of his many talents and hobbies included working with wood and on cars, shing, hunting, cooking, and spending time with friends and family. He loved helping people and was always going out of his way for anyone in need. Tommy was laid to rest on Monday, September 12, 2011, at Holly Hill Cemetery following a service at Oak Grove Church. The service was ofciated by close friend and pastor, David Fernandez. Special thanks go out to all of the staff at The Bridge at Bay St. Joe Nursing Home. Everyone went above and beyond to meet any need Tommy or his family had, both physical and spiritual. The family would like to thank everyone for their thoughts, prayers, food, and all other kindnesses. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Ray Dickens Ray Dickens of Wewahitchka, Florida, passed away at home on Friday, September 9, 2011, with his loving companion of fortyone years by his side, Sue Dickens. He courageously battled cancer for the past 5 years. He was born October 9, 1934, in Sumrall, Mississippi, to Jack & Burnice (Barnett) Dickens. He graduated from Sumrall High School in 1955 and was offered a basketball scholarship to Pearl River Community College in Poplarville, Mississippi, which he declined to proudly enlist in the United States Army. During his six years in the Army, he traveled to Tipa, China, where he worked in the receiving and transmitter station and repaired radio antennas. He also played on the Army football team, where he played against players such as Rosey Grier. He returned to Sumrall to work with his older brother, Charles Dickens, for Hercules, Inc. in Louisiana and Alabama. He later moved to DeFuniak Springs, Florida, and started Dickens Land Clearing. He moved to Wewahitchka in 1968, where he fell in love with the area and the people. He decided to stay and call Wewahitchka home. It was here he met and married Sue Gaskin. He was an active member of Dalkeith Baptist Church in Wewahitchka, where he led and directed music for many years. Music was an inuential part of his life. He spent many hours enjoying playing his guitar and singing. For the past twentytwo years, he has proudly served as Mayor of Wewahitchka, for the citizens whom he greatly loved and called friends. This was a task he never took lightly, from handing out candy to the children, attending the many sporting events, and coordinating the sh fry for the Senior Citizens. He always rose to every occasion and opportunity to serve and come alongside the citizens of Wewahitchka. The dedication of the Wewahitchka City Annex in 2010 was a great honor for him. In return, the citizens of Wewahitchka have poured out their love and support upon Ray and Sue during his illness. He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack and Burnice Dickens, and his nephew, Craig Lott, all of Sumrall; and Charley and Rosselle Gaskin, and Charles Arthur Gaskin, all of Wewahitchka. Survivors include his wife, Sue Dickens of Wewahitchka; a brother, Charles Dickens of Gulfport, Mississippi, and his wife, Amanda of Blountstown, Florida; a son, Bobby Dickens and wife, Cindy of Freeport, Florida; two daughters, Becky Minardo of Mobile, Alabama, and Tracy Nowe of Houston, Texas; two stepdaughters, Sherry Hall and husband, Steve of Niceville, Florida, and Suzanne Aull of Wewahitchka; two granddaughters; three grandsons; ve stepgranddaughters; one great-granddaughter; three nieces; and one nephew. Funeral services were held 3 p.m. CT Sunday, September 11, at the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church in Wewahitchka with Reverend Joey Smith and Reverend John Clenney ofciating. The family received friends 5-8 p.m. CT Saturday, September 10, also at the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church. Pallbearers were Phillip Gaskin, Gage Gaskin, Harold Lester, Lee Mims, Chipper Wade, and nephew, Leslie Dickens. Honorary pallbearers were the Wewahitchka City Council Members, the City of Wewahitchka Workers, and the Adult Sunday School class of Dalkeith Baptist Church. Services were under the direction of Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown. Phone 674-5449. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com. Everett Skull Owens, Jr. Everett Skull Owens, Jr., 78, of Port St. Joe, passed away at home peacefully while surrounded by his loving family on Friday, Aug. 26, 2011. He was born Sept. 5, 1932, in Samson, Ala., to the late Everett Owens Sr. and Hettie M. Weeks in Geneva County. Everett was the youngest of four brothers and four sisters. He was a graduate of Ponce de Leon High School in 1951, and also served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1955. He then moved to Port St. Joe, where he married Mildred Slaughter and raised his family. Everett worked at the Port St. Joe paper mill for more than 40 years. He also became active in local politics, serving as Gulf County Commissioner for District Four from 1974 to 1978 and again from 1982 to 1986. Skull was a member of the Port St. Joe Masonic Lodge No. 111, serving for more than 50 years, and was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe. His greatest joy was spending time with his friends and family, coaching little league, hunting and shing. He was known for his quick wit and will be remembered for being a devoted husband, father, grandfather, greatgrandfather and treasured friend. He will be deeply missed by those lives he has touched. Survivors include his wife, Mildred, of 56 years; two sons, Steven Owens and wife, Judy, of Port St. Joe, and John Owens and wife, Catherine, of Orlando, Fla.; ve grandchildren, Stephanie Davis and husband, Allen, of Port St. Joe, Mitchell Owens of Fort Walton, Fla., Sydney Owens of Port St. Joe, and Michael and Olivia Owens, both of Orlando, Fla.; and two great-grandchildren, Charles Allen Davis Jr. and Ava Marie Davis, both of Port St. Joe. Funeral services for Mr. Owens were held at the First Baptist Church in Port St. Joe, with Brother Howard Browning ofciating. Interment was held at Pleasant Ridge Cemetery in Westville, Fla., on August 29, 2011. In lieu of owers, contributions can be made to Emerald Coast Hospice or to the building fund at First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe. Kenneth Lee Search Kenneth Lee Search of Beacon Hill in Gulf County went to be with the Lord on July 18, 2011. He is survived by his son, Theodore Search, and Theodores mother, Carol Roudebush. Mr. Search was born December 17, 1945, in Lima, Illinois. He graduated from Pekin High School, then got his undergraduate degree at the University of Illinois. He went on to get a Masters degree in English at Vanderbilt University. Later, he received another Masters degree in Clinical Social Work at the University of Illinois in 1978. Ken worked for Counseling and Family Services in Peoria, Illinois, from 1978 to 2007. He served as a substance abuse counselor for the Alabama State government from 2007-09, then in the same eld for the Florida government in Wewahitchka from 2009-10. A memorial service for Ken Search was held on Thursday, August 11, 2011, at Mexico Beach First United Methodist Church, led by Pastor Jerry Arhelger and Pastor Ted Spencer, formerly of Wewahitchka United Methodist Church, where Ken had been a member before he moved to Beacon Hill. Ken will be greatly missed by his family members and friends. Nina Viola Thompson Nina Viola Thompson, 92, of Wewahitchka, passed away Wednesday, September 7, 2011, at a local hospital. Mrs. Thompson was born November 26, 1918, in Island Falls, Maine. She was raised in Santa Rosa and moved to Apalachicola to work on a shrimp boat with her late husband, Fred Thompson, in 1946. Mrs. Thompson also shucked oysters at several of the oyster houses in the area. She attended Honeyville United Methodist Church. Mrs. Thompson is survived by children, George E. Thompson and wife, Joyce, Doris Johnson, Fred A. Thompson (deceased), and Harold W. Thompson and wife, Jean; 18 grandchildren; 28 greatgrandchildren; nine greatgreat-grandchildren; a sister, Patricia Hayes; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. CT on Friday, September 9, 2011, at Honeyville United Methodist Church with Rev. Brian Turner ofciating. Interment followed in Buckhorn Cemetery. The family received friends at the church from 1-2 p.m. Southerland Family Funeral Home was entrusted with the arrangements. RA Y DICKENS EVERETT SKULL OWENS, JR. Local Obituaries



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By Tim CroftStar News Editor Ray Dickens, former mayor of Wewahitchka, passed away last week after a long courageous ve-year battle with cancer. He was 76. Dickens was known for his love of Wewahitchka, his passion for sports, music and the most vulnerable in his community, particularly seniors. Ray supported the people of Wewahitchka, said Wewahitchka city manager Don Minchew of his longtime friend and colleague. No one born and raised in a town could love their town more than Ray Dickens. He fed ball teams out of his own pocket. Those Senior Citizen sh fries, any money needed came out of his pocket. And he didnt want a thing in return. That was just who he is. Dickens, with his health declining, decided earlier this summer he would not seek re-election due to his declining health. He had served as Mayor of Wewahitchka for more than two decades. Ive worked under a lot of mayors and I never have worked for one who loved his town more than Ray Dickens, said Minchew. Maybe as much, but not more. He had the people at heart; that is the bottom line. In an open letter to the citizens of Wewahitchka, Dickens discussed the medical issues that forced him to retire from public life, though he had been a staunch advocate for a local candidate to become county health director earlier this year, looking tall and distinguished, as always, and advocating for local preference with a strong voice. In his letter to residents, Dickens thanked the people of Wewahitchka for allowing him to serve in ofce for more than two decades Dickens was city commissioner and mayor from 1982 until 1985, moved to Mississippi for work and returned to elected ofce as mayor in 1993. I would like to thank the citizens of Wewahitchka for allowing me to serve as City Commissioner then as your Mayor. I have felt blessed with so many friendships, Dickens wrote. It has been a great pleasure to serve the great citizens of Wewahitchka in this ofcial capacity for so many years. I have had many great experiences because of the good people of Wewa. I have seen a lot of changes in the City during my tenure, but the people of Wewahitchka By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer In an extensive meeting Sept. 7 that bounced back and forth from special meeting to agenda workshop, the Mexico Beach City Council slashed a new police cruiser from their proposed budget and selected a design team for the reconstruction of the historic Parker House in Mexico Beach. The council voted 4-0 (Mayor Al Cathey was not present) to hire Cathey Construction and Development over Southern Cat Construction after representatives from both companies addressed the council. The city received seven inquiries about the Parker House job, but only Cathey Construction and Southern Cat submitted presentations to the council. All but one wing of the 2,600 square-foot Parker House, considered the den area, was destroyed in a July fire. The city purchased the Parker House the closing occurred in the week prior to the fire with plans to convert it into a new city hall building. Council members were quizzed last week by resident Mary Jo Walsh concerning a potential conflict involving the awarding of the contract. Walsh noted the city paid a higher price than the Parker House brought at auction several years ago after the auction was gaveled the final auction price was rejected by owner Cathy Parker Hobbs and Walsh also noted that the mayor and Hobbs were cousins. She further noted that the mayor was vice-president and co-founder of Cathey Construction and Development and that the construction business was likely to purchase supplies and equipment needed for the Parker House rehab work from Catheys Ace Hardware in Mexico Beach, owned by the mayor. Council members, however, put all that aside in awarding the contract The fire damage is extensive enough that the project is not considered a restoration, but rather a complete construction job. Brian Cathey, president of Cathey Construction, presented a slideshow to the council highlighting the companys previous historic renovation projects and fire restoration projects. Cathey offered a proposed two months for design and an additional six to seven month for construction on the project. Cathey cited heavy smoke damage throughout the house, and included photos of the sooting lines in the master bedroom, which was least affected by the fire, in his presentation. A representative from Southern Cat Construction also appeared before the council, noting the companys history of fire reconstruction jobs. By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001 Marty Jarosz picked some gs from his backyard to share with his coworkers, and they were delicious. It was a beautiful morning. The United Nations had designated Sept. 11 as International Day of Peace, and it was as if the UN had a direct link to Gods ear, Jarosz said. He still doesnt understand how a day so sublime could give way to such horric circumstances. In his classroom on the rst oor of Curtis High School in Staten Island, Jarosz ipped on the television when word got around about a nearby plane crash. As a trained pilot himself, Jarosz thought the pilot might have suffered a heart attack and lost control. Airplanes just dont y into buildings, he said. When the second plane hit, the entire school shook. It sounded like a train was running down the hallway right outside of my room, Jarosz said. At that moment, we knew this was no accident. An announcement came over the intercom; the school needed to be locked down. This was not a drill. Jarosz went outside to lock the school gates and saw plumes of dark smoke rising over the skyline. There was a horrendous noise, and both towers disappeared behind a blanket of smoke. When the smoke cleared, tower two was gone, Jarosz said. He took pictures. He By Tim CroftStar News Editor New location, more stage, more acts, this weekends second annual PoJo Live Music Fest offers for something for all ages at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. The event is sponsored by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council using BP funds distributed to TDCs in seven Florida counties to assist in bringing back the tourists after last years oil spill. And applying lessons learned from last summers series of concerts under the PoJo Live banner, TDC said executive director Tim Kerigan made some signicant changes for this years event. First, the event is one weekend. Music will serenade the masses from 4-10 p.m. ET on Friday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. ET on Saturday. Kerigan had long sought a way to use Veterans Memorial Park, said Kellee Novak of the TDC, and the PoJo event offered the perfect t. We saw some things we wanted to change from last year, Novak said, noting that one stage and the limitations on parking and band set-up at George Core Park had the TDC looking for other venues. We just could not accommodate it at George Core Park. This year there will be two stages, there is plenty of parking and most of all it is overlooking the beach and that is part of the point, promoting the beach. Tim thought it See PoJo A3 See DICKENS A3 See MILLAGE A2 See 9/11 A8YEA EA R 73, N N UMBEr R 48 Thursday, SEPTEMBEr R 15 2011 MMexico BBeach CCleanup, BB1Jump into PoJo this weekendPoJo Live Music Fest set for Veterans Memorial Park SS PECIAL TO THE STAr RThe Sheepdogs, who won an online contest and appeared on the August cover of Rolling Stone magazine, will perform during the PoJo Live Music Fest. Mexico Beach council approves tentative millage REMEMBERING 9/11VALEr R IE GG Ar R MAN | The StarMembers of the NJROTC at Port St. Joe High School present the colors to begin the Patriots Day ceremony held in the gymnasium Sept. 8. Do you remember?By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Spencer Milton opened with a prayer. The children, who ran about frantically just moments earlier, quietly bowed their heads, tiny American ags in hand. Milton prayed for the families who lost loved ones in the smoke and ames of tragedy that rose over the New York City skyline on Sept. 11, 2001. He prayed for those families who for ten years have had one less place to set at the dinner table. The Woodmen of the World held an In Honor and Remembrance and ag presentation ceremony Sunday at the Taunton Childrens Home in Wewahitchka, honoring the heroes and victims of Sept. 11, and presenting the childrens home with an American ag and commemorative plaque. Founded on paternalism and patriotism, Woodmen of the World is a nationwide fraternal benet society that has been promoting pride in the United States through its Patriotic Program since 1947. The Woodmens remembrance ceremonies took place across the country Sunday. The organization has presented more than two million American ags to churches, schools and non-prot organizations across the country, and now has added the Taunton Childrens Home the list. Through its Patriotic Program, the See MILTON A8 Longtime Wewahitchka Mayor Ray Dickens diesOpinion. .......................................AA4-AA5Letters to the Editor. ...................AA5Outdoors. .....................................AA6 Sports...........................................AA7School News. ................................BB3Faith. .............................................BB4 Obituaries. ....................................BB8Classieds. ....................................BB6-BB8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 By Tim CroftStar News Editor A couple of clicks of the computer mouse can open up the world around any property owner, resident or visitor in Gulf County. That is the aim of an ongoing effort by the Gulf County Geographic Information Systems ofce and director Scott Warner. Over the past year or more, Warner has assembled a multi-layered website accessible through the county portal that offers a window to a host of information pertinent to a parcel, a street, a point on the map, all with a little internet navigation. Want to know what building permits might be needed for a property? Need to know the nearest intersection to a particular parcel? Interested in knowing whether your business falls within an Enterprise Zone, making it eligible to a host of economic incentives? All that information and so much more are available at your ngertips. It really has a lot of information, said resident Rich Brenner during a recent county commission meeting. It really is a very informative, helpful site. The idea, Warner said, is hardly a new one. Its an idea that has oated around for several years, Warner said. It allows the public to see Gulf County and if they wish, make their own maps. Ive seen Bay County doing it, other counties doing it and I went to some conferences and saw these sites and thought we need to have this. Its not hard and pretty straightforward and there is a help menu. The GIS interactive system is broken into major themes, Warner said: Emergency Management, GIS, Building and Planning, Enterprise Zones, Tourist Development Council information, Board of County Commissioners and critical habitats among the most trafcked areas of the site. The starting off point is to log onto the countys site at www.gulfcounty.gov and look to the upper right for the updated GIS interactive mapping site. A simple click of that link will bring you to a virtual encyclopedia of all things Gulf County. From re zones to ood zones to re tax districts to voting precincts to areas considered environmentally sensitive due to the presence of threatened or endangered species such as sea turtles, plovers (a species of bird) and the St. Andrews beach mouse. All building information is there, about permits, the Coastal Construction Control Line, about (Coastal Barrier Resource Act) areas, elevations, Warner said. You can use an elevation tool that is down to six inches in accuracy to look at houses and structures. GIS, it is an information system. Its taking all that information and putting it in one system. As Warner discovers a new tool to add a new layer to his mapping, he adds that layer. He is constantly scouting other governmental and non-governmental websites for any tidbits of information that would make the Gulf County interactive map better. Im not sure how many layers there are, Warner said. There is so much information. A user can go in and quickly get all this information. This is just a series of layers that show you all this data. Of course, for entities such as Emergency Medical Services and Emergency Management, a critical tool is the 9-1-1 mapping layer within the system, providing pinpoint directions of any location in Gulf County. I have never purchased anything for the system, Warner said. The only costs are for building the 91-1 date base. I coordinate with the Department of Emergency Management and we come together and on a statewide basis share data. The 9-1-1 system, the backbone is on GIS so the dispatcher has all this information about location if for instance the person on the other end of the line is unable to speak. The system is pretty amazing. The thing I like is you have the ability to select the data you want and export it out in Excel format and you can play with that and create the report or maps you want. An individual can plug in a parcel number or address and be linked to the Property Appraisers site to learn about the sales history of that particular piece of land. Such searches can be performed by address, area, parcel owner or parcel number. The individual can then add on any property tax information from another layer in the GIS interactive site to understand the nancial obligations associated with that property. A user can also look at the maps, save the URL to that web address and e-mail the map to them. For example, if they have a favorite shing hole that is sweet angling, go to the GIS site, locate the location on a map and send it to your home computer for good future shing. Visitors can also go on the site and using the street elevation maps get a look at the motel, hotel or vacation rental property they are considering for a trip to the beach. It will even tell you what your voting precinct is and what district you are in just by typing in an address, Warner said. There is also detailed information from FEMA concerning ood zones and information about the countys land use regulations. In short, just about anything to know about Gulf County, or at least that which has been quantied, Warner has provided the layer of information to the GIS system. It really is a terric tool, Brenner said. GULF COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY MONTHLY MEETINGCapital City Bank September 19, 2011 7:00 PM ETThe Gulf County Republican Party will be wrapping up the details for the trip to Orlando on September 22nd-24th, for the Gulf County Delegates who will be participating in the Presidency 5 Straw Poll. All interested Republicans are invited. Come and See our Furnishings & Interior Decorations for your Home! Where are you? County GIS can assist MILLAGE from page A1 IMAGES COURTESY OF ScSCOTT WARNER wW ITH GG ULF COUNTY GISGISAn example of a printout for an Address Report showing thumbnail of site picture. A screenshot example of a navigational chart map.The representative also said the company has the advantage of an in-house certified insurance adjuster to aid in the project. Southern Cat proposed roughly the same time frame for construction. Nearly three hours after the presentations were made, the council voted 40 in favor of hiring Cathey Construction. The tentative 4.73 millage rate was lowered slightly during the meeting to 4.64 as the council removed a $30,000 police cruiser from the general fund budget after hearing protests from the public in attendance at the meeting, many of whom questioned the need for specific items, particularly the cruiser, in the general fund budget.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, September 15, 2011 have stayed true friends to me. Dickens was not only a xture as mayor, he was a constant and steadying presence in the city, a tall upright gure at high school football, baseball, basketball and softball games, giving candy out to kids at Halloween and always a presence at the citys annual Christmas parade. He was often found in the morning talking with friends over coffee at the Express Lane. Each Halloween, he made a point of giving out candy to the children, with kudos for every costume. He was a part of every Christmas parade and any event from a benet for an ill citizen to celebrating the state titles won by the Wewahitchka girls softball team that served as a celebration of the community he loved, those who knew him said. After purchasing the annex building from the county the facility was the countys former Road Department building the city named the annex in honor of Dickens. It was an honor that moved him deeply, a surprise recognition he did not seek but thoroughly enjoyed. Minchew said at the time that because the mayor was having health problems, city ofcials and residents wanted do something in his honor. More than 200 people lled the new city building for what was a surprise dedication. He loves people. His heart is there, said Minchew. So we just wanted to let him know that we love him. Those ongoing health issues led to Dickens decision that it was time to step away from public ofce. Through life we have to make many decisions for unforeseen circumstances, we cannot do what we need to do, Dickens letter continued. I have felt blessed serving this community for more than 20 years. Thank you again for all your love and support. Minchew said Dickens loved where he lived and enjoyed its people, just not the spotlight. Dickens was born in Sumrall, Mississippi. He graduated from Sumrall High in 1955 and was offered a basketball scholarship to Pearl River Community College which he declined to enter the U.S. Army. He moved to Wewahitchka in 1968, met and married Sue Gaskin and put down roots. He was a personable man, those who knew him said, with a penchant for nding the right touch in any circumstance. Dickens was far more than a mayor to his constituents, several said he was rst and foremost a friend. He never took his duties lightly, whether handing out candy to the children or coordinating the sh fry for the Senior Citizens. He always rose to every occasion and opportunity to serve and come alongside the citizens of Wewahitchka, Minchew and others stated. Star Staff ReportLast week the Wewahitchka City Commission moved one familiar face into a new seat and brought aboard a new commissioner. Councilman Philip Gaskin was sworn as the citys new mayor by city attorney Russ Scholz. Gaskin was the lone candidate who qualied for the race for mayor, succeeding Ray Dickens who declined another run due to health reasons. Dickens, who served more than two decades as Wewahitchkas mayor, passed away last week. Gaskin, who has been the Ward I councilman for more than a decade, will serve a four-year term. In addition to Gaskins ascension to mayor, Jimbo Nunery was a unanimous selection of the Commission to succeed Gaskin in the Ward I seat. Due to the circumstances of the election, the Commission was charged under city charter with the selection for the Ward I seat. Nunery was sworn in for a new four-year term by Gaskin.Wewahitchka swears in new mayor, councilman PoJo from page A1 DICKENS from page A1was the perfect spot. You will have a great vista of the beautiful beach. We think it will be a great event. The two days will be packed with music, from local favorites such as the Bo Spring Band and Buddy Hamm to Saturday headliner ALO. Other acts include The Sheepdogs, who won an online contest and appeared on the August cover of Rolling Stone magazine as a top unsigned band, as well as Mishka and the Honey Island Swamp Band. Novak noted that it will be a musical lineup that provides a wide variety of sounds, from rock to blues to Cajun. It will be an eclectic group of musicians, Novak said. There is a little bit of everything. The cool thing is we will have two stages so there will be constant music throughout the two days. With two stages, the set from one act can be broken down while another sets up on the main stage against a backdrop of music from the second stage. The double stage set-up also allows for more acts, providing exposure during the festival for a number of local acts. Free shuttles will carry tourists and locals alike from several locations to Veterans Memorial Park, so leave the car behind, Novak urged. There will be three shuttles on Friday and ve on Saturday running continuous routes that will include stops at Salinas Park, Simmons Bayou, the Gulf/ Franklin Center, Shark Stadium and WindMark Beach. Promotion of all things Gulf County will extend to food and beverage vendors. There will be adult beverages provided by local bars, including the Thirsty Goat and Boon Docks, and food will come from several Gulf County restaurants. It is just another great reason to promote the great restaurants in Gulf County, Novak said. The musical acts also provide promotion. With local, regional and national fan bases, the musicians will be followed on Twitter and Facebook as they travel to and experience Gulf County and its beaches and vistas. A lot of them talk about coming here and for some of them this is going to serve as a kind of vacation, they will be staying here and enjoying the shing and beach and good food, Novak noted. We are bringing in musicians that will advertise the area as much as we do. For more information on this years music festival visit PoJoLive.com or call 229-7800. We dont think the county or TDC has ever done something like this before, Novak said. This will be a great music event.Philip Gaskin swears in Jimbo Nunery. LEFT: Russ Scholz swears in Gaskin.

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OpinionA4 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011I enjoy walking around stores when Im not in a hurry. Im drawn to products on the ends of aisles and those tucked away on the bottom shelf. If I see something Im unfamiliar with, I will stand and read the product manufacturers claims of greatness. On this particular day, I was in the health and beauty section studying a bar of soap. Soap bars are fun to study (it is for me). I know it is clich, but smelling of soap is good clean fun. A blue and orange box caught my eye because it claimed I could Shower, shampoo and shave with it. The very idea of this was appealing to me. After smelling the soap, I was sold. The soap smelled good and it looked good. It was an orangey color with little specks in it. The box noted the soap had shea, mango and avocado butters. Again, that just sounded like it would feel good on my skin. After looking over my shoulder a couple of times to make sure no one was watching me sniff the miracle soap, I picked up a box and headed for the check out. I needed to get home and try it right then. I got the only bar that was left on the shelf, it wasnt in an ideal location. It was in the evening and I really didnt need to shower, shampoo or shave, but I had to try all three. I did. I was a new man. I smelled so good I couldnt take it. The next morning, I showered again (and shampooed and shaved). It was like the fountain of youth. I felt better, I smelled great. After I got to work, two or three people told me how good I looked and smelled. I said to myself, I know and I now know the secret. When I got home, I took another shower and felt even better. I looked in the mirror a lot and was coming to the conclusion that I looked younger. It had to be the soap. Needing to know if I could buy this soap in bulk, I sat down at the computer and searched the company that made the soap, Shea Moisture. My rst approach was to look for images and see if anyone else was getting younger or taking two or three showers a day. Well, what I found surprised me. All of the images were of beautiful African American women with perfect and glowing skin. They all looked happy and clean and radiant, but they were all African American women. I was using products developed for beautiful black women. I did not care; I had found a miracle soap that must be making me look happy and glowing like all of the pictures I had seen. This was my secret and I kept it to myself. Having only one bar, I had to go back and see if the store had restocked. What would happen to me if they stopped carrying this miracle soap? I was scared. Relieved, I found that the store had a couple more bars of the soap on the shelf. I picked them both up and found that Shea Moisture made other soaps (for beautiful Black women and me). I saw this pretty green bar of soap made by the company and picked it up to read the label. It had frankincense and myrrh in it and you know what I was thinking. I couldnt help thinking about the three wise men and Jesus and I had to have it. This soap claims to have antiaging properties, promote mental strength and is all organic. It was for me! I needed to try it, so I went straight to the check out where this cute African American girl was waiting. As she picked up the green bar of soap to scan, she said, Oooh, I use this soap. I said, I know. She looked at me kind of funny, and then I explained to her that I was hooked on products marketed to pretty black women. She laughed and said, If it works for you I interrupted and said, Oh does it ever work! She said, Thats all that matters. We discussed the benets of shea butter for a while (By this time I knew the whole shea butter story of where in Africa it came from and how it was harvested). I went home and took a shower with the new green soap t for a king. It was incredible. Frankincense, myrrh and me. I felt young and royal. Another week passed, and one day I forgot to hide my soap in the bathroom. I had been hiding it under the sink. If my family found out my secret; they might try to steal my soap. One year and three weeks ago county voters, or at least those in the districts of the two-longest serving county commissioners, brought about a new era at the ballot box. In removing Billy Traylor and Nathan Peters Jr. and replacing them with Ward McDaniel and Tan Smiley, respectively, voters seem to seek a new tone, more responsiveness and a new era of accountability to those tasked to serve their interests. With an experienced hand moving into the chairmans seat to set board priorities for action, there was a sense that a corner had been turned toward, as one letter writer characterized it, a new era of sunshine. One year later, taking into account that changes on the podium did not occur until several months after the primary election, that new era sounds and acts with an uneasily eerie resemblance to its predecessor.Economic developmentFor the fourth time since 2000 the Board of County Commissioners put a torch to the Economic Development Council for a new model, stepping back to a consolidated Chamber/EDC model one which the county moved away from in the late 1990s to provide an exclusive platform for economic development efforts. In taking the action to effectively decimate the existing EDC, again, barely three years into a pledgedupon ve-year plan, commissioners asserted they were looking for more efcient expenditure of dollars and cohesiveness in economic development initiatives. The result has been, essentially, a lost year, with the cost to taxpayers in the near-term all but identical. Long term? Who can say what sitting on the sidelines for a year will cost. The chamber jumped aboard with a reorganizational plan and launched a nationwide search, with the aid of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, for a new executive director. That director will not take over until the end of this month and, with the Chamber workforce largely shed during the process, will start over with a blank slate, making it a safe bet that tangible results wont come soon. Meanwhile the Chamber is requesting BOCC funding for next year roughly equal to Chamber/EDC funding in each of the previous two years, providing scant cost savings to taxpayers. In essence, commissioners put economic development on hold for 2011, during already difcult economic times, save a $200,000 loan to the Port of Port St. Joe, which remains undeveloped despite years of visioning and grant investment; and championing a renewable energy plant in limbo due over nancing.RV regulationCommissioners spent the better part of three months debating an ordinance to regulate the use of recreational vehicles in the county, reaching the point of drafting and advertising a lengthy ordinance. But when poised to adopt the ordinance, two commissioners expressed fatigue with the exercise, were joined by a third and like that the entire process underwritten by taxpayers was relegated to the dust bin. That such an ordinance was needed seemed evident to many, particularly those living in coastal areas. Even commissioners acknowledged action was needed for the protection of all. But commissioners failed to move away from a one-size ts all concept toward an ordinance to appropriately address RV use in various areas of the county coastal, north end, western boundaries undermining the entire effort, leaving residents bewildered and frustrated.John Ford/Employee Health InsuranceThe summer months were marked by acrimony and employee unrest regarding rst health insurance and secondly the termination of EMT John Ford. Those two debates whether to uphold the termination of Ford and how to address employee distress about health insurance options consumed hours of meeting time and revealed deep divisions among commissioners. The takeaway from the discussion over the termination was that the EMS department is sharply divided north and south; that commissioners, reecting their divisions, have helped spread that chasm by failing to address operational issues lingering for years; and that Ford was largely caught in the switches of that divide due to Monday morning quarterbacking of a judgment call. Add in the health insurance debate and the evidence was clear that commissioners had failed their workforce and constituents in two critical areas providing a vision and earning employee buy-in for that vision; and putting policies and procedures, and consequences, in place that were clear and consistently adhered to.Countywide votingThe change in the board makeup to start the year produced the elusive 3-2 vote for moving ahead on countywide voting, a voter mandate percolating for seven years, only to see commissioners fail to even kick the can down the road. Oh, commissioners said theyd move ahead, but faced with a price tag higher than anticipated higher due to delaying tactics and obstinacy among commissioners over the years commissioners have all but left the issue on the table for another year and board. Rather than, say, bank money for a future legal ght, commissioners showed theyd rather spend frivolously on, for example, a park not even within the purview of the county. Again, county voters are faced with a voting bloc of commissioners from Districts 1, 2 and 4 with no apparent desire to to move away from a governance model of district wants trumping county needs, no matter the cost to all taxpayers. Shortly after he took ofce, Smiley said commissioners should be judged individually, not by the district seat they occupy, but by their actions in doing the peoples business. By that measuring stick, or most any other, the past year has demonstrated the old adage the more things change the more they stay the same.Aunt Maudes churn paddle is still useful Keyboard KLATTERINGSConfessions of a sweetsmelling white manA year in review TiIM crCROftFTStar news editor Several of my friends have asked me if I was going to tear down the old buildings in the back now that I am putting in a new garage. I might have to back up here a little to fully explain. The garage is in keeping with my year long quest for the Husband of the Year award. As you might remember, I purchased the Western Channel for Cathys Christmas present. For our anniversary this summer, I took her to the banks of the Little Bighorn River in Montana, the site of Custers famous last stand. I gured these two sacrices by themselves were enough to get JD Power and Associates to recognize me ofcially as Husband of the Year. I threw the Oreck XL vacuum cleaner in on her birthday, just for insurance. I was practicing my acceptance speech in front of some co-workers when one of them fell over in shock and disbelief. She allowed, in no uncertain terms, that I must be out of my ever-loving mind! Apparently, unbeknownst to me, there are scores of men vying to out-do me in the relationship business. I immediately started on a garage so Cathy wouldnt have to unload the groceries in the rain. This was no time to wiggle-waggle. I had to come up with a coup de grace! This new, two car edice with some nice trimmings, built especially for my wife, would surely put me over the top. I dug out a space and went to pouring concrete! Now, back to the question at hand; am I going to tear down the two 50-yearold, dilapidated buildings out by the back fence? Listen, Im from Tennessee. Aint nobody from the volunteer state going to take down a perfectly good building, ever. For any reason! First of all, you cant have too much storage space. If someone shows up with 57 bushels of corn, weve got to have room. You might need to lay out some tomatoes for ripening. I dont have quite enough space to hang tobacco, but Ive got a great bench for a reloading machine. Youve got to have an extra halter or two in case your neighbors horse wanders over. If your in-laws come for the weekend and decide to stay a few extra days you can suddenly remember youve got to nd Aunt Maudes churn paddle you stored in the back shed. If you play it just right, it can take two or three days to sift through every thing in that old building. And when your grand-niece marries the son of the foreman of the Southern Star Lumber Company, you just might need that tool shed to roll down to the next holler so they can set up house keeping. Where would we cook the chittlins? Most housewives banned them from the kitchen after the Second World War. What if we needed an emergency board to lay across the porch steps? The back wall of the furtherest building is an easy target. You can nail it back on come spring when you x the steps proper. You need a place to run to if the back yard pickin and singin gets interrupted by a sudden shower. The last thing on earth that can happen is to get that Gibson Hummingbird or your Martin D-45 wet! Ive seen moonshine kept in innocent looking kerosene drums. Ive listened to the biggest whoppers ever told sitting astride an old saw horse in a back shed. Leon would hide out behind the saddles when it was time to hoe cotton. We used a sidewall to keep score of the horse shoe throwing. And you need a safety valve in case Mama deems no more tobacco spitting contests in the living room. Shoot, we used to prop the really old cribs up with cross ties to keep them from tilting over! It hasnt ever crossed my mind for one second to tear down either of those outstanding buildings! What would Cathy do with her Christmas ornaments? Ive got a giant inatable reindeer across my table saw even as we speak. Boxes of different colored Christmas lights cover a fair sized work bench. A black stove-top hat that belongs to Frosty hangs beside my Golden Flo co-op cap. Candles and Yuletide motifs adorn the back wall. My tool belt is a holder for a corn cop pipe and an eggnog recipe. Folks, if I tear that shed down, we can forget about Christmas at our house! And Im not even going to get into the clay ower pots. I dont have any idea how many sizes those things come in but weve got six of each! We haveem stacked to the ceiling in one room. Several are cracked. Some have wild creatures growing out of them. All have holes in the bottom. And I dont think any of them have been touched by a human hand in 15 years. But boys, weve gotem in case we decide to spruce up the area around the garage! As you can see, this new building doesnt warrant or equate to two old sheds being torn down. I reckon Ill limp along with all three. I am hoping Cathy decides to put her Christmas ornaments and clay pots in the garage like God intended. Boy howdy, I could get my saw and workbench back! And win Husband of the Year award at the same time. Its a trifecta! Course, I havent won the award yet. At least, JD hasnt called. But I gure Im a shoe in. Respectfully, Kes HUnkerNKER DOWnNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 cranksCRANKS MY tract TRACTOrRBN HeardSee cC OnfessiNFESSIOnsNS A5

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My son found it. I was doomed. Now my son had gured out my shea-butterbeautiful-black-ladies-soap secret. Hes 13; he already takes two showers a day. My soap would disappear. I needed more. To my surprise, the store had restocked and had a big supply (probably because I was buying it all). This time, I got the African Black Soap bar that helps acne and troubled skin. I dont have acne, but I had to have it. In the next few days, I confessed my addiction to a close friend at work who happens to be an African American woman (who uses shea butter soap). She was rolling in the oor and waving her hands. She likes to laugh at me anyway, so it was OK that I was entertaining her. She said, You have to tell this story. We discussed the proper uses of terms because I didnt want to offend anyone. She simply said black women understand. I said, I know one thing, African American women understand what kind of soap to use. She couldnt stop laughing. Ive given this a lot of thought; Joe Namath did pantyhose commercials, so maybe I could do commercials for this soap company. I called them. They were very nice and again got a good laugh out of the confessions of a sweet smelling white man. Im still waiting on the spokesperson offer. Im BN Heard and Im proud to say that I smell and feel great because I use a soap marketed to beautiful black women. You can nd Cranks My Tractor stories on Amazon for the Kindle and at www. CranksMyTractor.com. WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West PassTIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Sep 1589 6910% Fri, Sep 1687 6920% Sat, Sep 1785 6710% Sun, Sep 1884 67 0% Mon, Sep 1984 68 0% Tues, Sep 2084 6910% Wed, Sep 2185 70 0%9/15Thu08:06AM 0.6 L11:53PM 1.7H 9/16Fri09:13AM 0.6 L 9/17Sat12:27AM 1.8 H10:39AM 0.4 L 9/18Sun01:13AM 1.8 H12:18PM 0.4 L 9/19Mon02:10AM 1.9 H01:38PM 0.3 L 9/20Tue03:14AM 1.9 H02:36PM 0.2 L 9/21Wed 04:23AM 2.0 H 03:21PM 0.1 L 9/15Thu04:48AM 1.6 H 11:59AM 0.5L 06:38PM 1.4 H 11:35PM 1.1L 9/16Fri 05:11AM 1.7 H 12:32PM 0.4L 07:32PM 1.4 H 11:58PM 1.2L 9/17Sat 05:39AM 1.7 H 01:12PM 0.4L 08:35PM 1.3 H 9/18Sun 12:26AM 1.3 L 06:12AM 1.7H 02:04PM 0.4 L 09:54PM 1.3H 9/19Mon 01:02AM 1.4 L 06:52AM 1.7H 03:18PM 0.4 L 11:30PM 1.3H 9/20Tue 01:52AM 1.4 L 07:42AM 1.6H 04:47PM 0.4 L 9/21Wed 12:55AM 1.3 H 03:36AM 1.4L 08:49AM 1.6 H 06:03PM 0.4L dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S LettersA5 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 CONFESSIONS from page AA4 An opportunity to say thanksDear Editor: At 8:46 a.m. on Sunday 9/11, the South Gulf County Fire Department held a memorial service in remembrance, not only of the firemen who perished in the fall of the two towers, but for all who died on that day. It was a simple, solemn ceremony which we found very moving. The event was held at Salinas Park across from the fire station. Almost the entire fleet of fire department vehicles were proudly displayed in the parking lot there. As long-time residents of the cape, we were reminded of how much this wonderful service has grown and improved. Under excellent leadership and with dedicated volunteers, the number, caliber and variety of equipment has shown vast improvement. We have gained a second fire station to protect the northern part of the peninsula, where we live, in case the road washes out. A ladder truck makes it possible to reach upper stories of buildings. Defibrillators have been stationed along the cape and firemen have been trained to use them. Grants have been written; personnel have been trained, and there is cooperation with the state park. We in the community should be so very grateful and proud. So let us take this opportunity to say, Thank you.Pat and Fred HarrisPort St. JoeCommunity blessed with Sacred Heart Hospital on the GulfDear Editor: This is to all the citizens of Gulf County. I was recently hospitalized for nearly four weeks at the new Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf here in Port St. Joe due to a fall during which I struck my head. The reason I am writing this letter is to let the people of Gulf and Franklin counties know how blessed we are to have such a fine health facility in our community. From the moment I entered the door of the new hospital until the day I left I never saw a frown on any of the workers faces. All were wearing smiles and I really know it made my stay in the hospital so much better. Everyone I came in contact with was so nice to me and helpful from the doctors (Dr. Oksanen), nurses, therapist, dieticians, janitors, volunteers and clerical personnel, they were so great. I really mean it when I say it is the best hospital I have ever been in (and Ive been some from Japan, Hawaii, California, Alabama and Florida). I have never been treated as good as I was at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. I want to say a very well done to all connected with the hospital, from the board of directors to the hardest job workers in the organization and I just hope and pray that as it grows larger, it will not lose the caring and friendliness it has shown me. I am sure it will grow with the attitude it has at the present). People lets let the staff know how much they are appreciated as we use it. It is easy to say thank you for a swell job well done. Its a blessing to have such a wonderful health facility.Wallace Tillery Port St. JoeConcerns about the new energy centerDear Editor: I have just finished reading the article in the Sept. 1 issue of The Star about the (Planning and Development Review Board) approval of the renewable energy center here. If what Mrs. Jane Adkins says is true, and she is brave enough to express herself based on experience, then Port St. Joe is in real trouble. At the present time we have water which is not pure, so when we get not pure air, there is only one solution. Have a company which manufactures gas masks start a business here. As the saying goes, Time and tide waits for no man and when there is money flowing it makes the tide of socalled prosperity move fast. Let us hope the experts in the field of environmental safety know what they are doing when they allow this new company to come here.Marjorie ParkerPort St. JoeBy Jason AldermanYou can scarcely turn on the TV without seeing ads for reverse mortgages. Theyre touted as a great tool for cash-strapped seniors to tap their home equity to pay off bills while remaining in their homes with no monthly mortgage payments. Although that may be true for some people, these complicated and costly loans arent right for everyone, so it pays to do your homework. Heres a primer on reverse mortgages and precautions you need to take: Reverse mortgages let homeowners age 62 or older borrow against their home equity without having to make monthly payments (as with refinance loans). The loan neednt be repaid until you move out permanently, sell the property or die. In addition, seniors wishing to downsize or relocate may make a large down payment on a new home and then use a reverse mortgage to finance the rest. The vast majority of these mortgages are made through the Federal Housing Administrations Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) program. Common features include: All parties on the loan must be at least age 62. The home (current or future) must be your principal residence. You must own the home outright or be able to pay it off with proceeds from the loan. The allowable loan amount is based on your homes appraised value, your age, interest rate and type (fixed or variable), mortgage insurance and applicable fees. Generally, the older you are and the more valuable your home, the greater the available loan. The repayment amount never exceeds the homes final sale value, so you (or your heirs) are never liable for more than you originally borrowed. You can take the money as a lump sum, a line of credit, fixed monthly payments or any combination. Reverse mortgages can be very expensive. Lenders may charge a loan origination fee of up to $6,000. In addition, you must pay upfront and then ongoing mortgage insurance premiums (MIPs). HECM Standard loans have an upfront MIP of 2 percent of the homes value. HECM Saver loans have a far lower 0.01 percent upfront MIP (although the allowable loan amount may be up to 18 percent less). Both versions also charge an additional 1.25 percent MIP of the outstanding balance annually, as well as a loan origination fee of up to $6,000 and various other charges. A few other potential downsides with reverse mortgages: You are responsible for homeowners fees, property taxes, insurance and repairs for the life of the loan. If you dont pay them, you risk cancellation or foreclosure. They arent costeffective if you plan to move in a few years. Some couples put only the older spouse on the loan in order to secure a higher balance, but this can backfire: If that person dies first, the survivor could be bound to pay off the loan a real problem if the homes value is underwater. The longer you carry a reverse mortgage, the more your home equity and thus, your estate will decrease. Because reverse mortgages are so complicated, potential borrowers are required to consult a Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)approved counselor before being allowed to apply. Before you even get to that stage, do your research. Helpful sites include those sponsored by the HUD (www.hud. gov) and AARP (www. aarp.org). Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. Reverse mortgages arent for everyone JasoASON AlderLDERMaAN LettersETTERS toTO theTHE editorEDITOR

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com OUTDoo OO RSwww.starfl.comSection A Corner of Marina Drive Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters By Stan Kirkland Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission For years sheries biologists in several states watched the eastward expansion of athead catsh populations from their native waters of the Midwest. Now that the species has found its way to most of the rivers of the Florida panhandle, they are here at a price. Thats the view of Dan Dobbins, a sheries biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Dobbins retires at the end of the month but hes spent much of his 35year career studying the effects of atheads on native sh species in the Ochlockonee River and other rivers west to the Alabama line. The rst thing you have to understand about atheads is the fact they are an opportunistic predator. They become predatory at a very small size and they eat whats easy to get, whats available, he said. They eat whatever occupies the same niche or place they occupy. Dobbins said several native species are heavily impacted by atheads, including bullheads, which comprises several species of small catsh, white catsh and redbreast sunsh, commonly called river bream by anglers. Although atheads will certainly eat channel catsh, which are highly prized as a food sh, he said channel catsh numbers dont seem to be impacted as much as the other species. From 2002 to 2005 Dobbins said freshwater sheries staff tried to reduce the number of atheads in a 7 -mile section of the Yellow River below Interstate 10 using electroshocking boats. We went multiple times a year and removed every athead we saw. We did well the rst couple of years, removing 20-30 sh, but then it jumped to 240 sh, he said. We realized that we couldnt keep up. Reproduction outside the area we worked was such that there was a constant supply of sh. Similarly on the Choctawhatchee River, Dobbins said staff has done baseline sampling work over the years looking at what species are present and their abundance. He said in 2002 they found only a few atheads in the upper river near the Alabama line, which were collected and removed. By 2004 they were picking up atheads all the way down to Highway 20. In their most recent surveys completed this year, he said bullheads and white catsh have virtually disappeared from the upper river while the athead population has exploded. Flatheads are now the predominant catsh species in the river, he said. Like them or not, Dobbins said atheads are here to stay. He said several civic organizations in towns along the Apalachicola River now hold annual athead catsh tournaments. The tournaments draw anglers and their money from north Florida, south Alabama and Georgia mostly. While native catsh are typically caught on earthworms or stink baits, thats not the case with atheads. Serious athead anglers use stout tackle and small bluegills or shellcracker for bait and they sh the deeper holes after sundown. As a non-native sh, Dobbins said the standing advice for anglers is to keep any atheads they catch and never move or release any unwanted sh. FWCFisheries biologist Andy Strickland shocked this athead in the Apalachicola River.Flatheads taking overThe rst thing you have to understand about atheads is the fact they are an opportunistic predator. They become predatory at a very small size and they eat whats easy to get, whats available. They eat whatever occupies the same niche or place they occupy. Dan Dobbins FWC biologistCarrabelles Candi Boone encountered this bear on US 98, just west of the Hog Wild Bar-B-Q, at 1593 Highway 98, on Monday morning, Sept. 5. Evidently, the bear was enjoying Labor Day, sitting in the middle of the road, but reluctantly moved away when Boone drove up. I took some photos, and then apparently he had enough of us, and started coming towards our car, and giving us some bear lip, said Boone.Suddenly shing has improved from one side of the county to the other. In Walton County, many redsh are being caught in Hogtown Bayou. If you have never been to Hogtown it is and old cracker settlement just north of Santa Rosa just west of U.S. 331 north. When you approach the bayou and before you cross the bridge you will turn left and there is a boat ramp. Also situated there is a pretty park with tables to picnic and bathroom facilities. Usually the bayou is full of menhaden but lately a guide I know said that white shrimp are mixed in with them. He said nd the white shrimp and you will nd the speckled trout and redsh. He said to watch for the birds diving and this time of the year they might be after shrimp. A sherman in the pass reportedly caught more than 30 ounder last week before the weather became rough. According to my calendar, September is a little early for ounder to be heading to the Gulf; October usually is the month to look for these sh. I was talking with guide Capt. Greg Burnet on the guide boat Osprey and he said a couple of his clients had a ball catching skipjacks in the Gulf before the storm two weeks ago. Most of the time shermen will turn up their noses at skipjacks. Capt. Greg said as they were returning from a redsh trip, he saw what he thought were bonito striking on the surface. He told one of his clients to pitch a topwater lure to the frenzy, and before he could get a turn on the reel his line was peeling off at a furious rate. Not knowing what this sherman had on his line, he told the other client to do the same with another rod also equipped with a topwater lure. This immediately drew another strike and another line-burning run. Neither sh jumped, they just see-sawed back and forth until Capt. Greg saw the rst sh hooked and he could not believe his eyes. When they got both sh in the boat they weighed in two skipjacks at 9 and 10 pounds, respectively. Could you imagine catching these sh on a y rod?Hooked on Outdoors ScCOTT LINdsDSEYOutdoor Writer CAN N DI I BOONE OONE | Special to The Times FreshwaterThis weekend will be the re-opener of Gag grouper. This shery has had little or no pressure this year since it was closed from June 1 until now. Live pinsh and nger mullet are plentiful in the bay, so getting bait shouldnt be hard. Inshore OffshoreScallop season is still going strong, and now with the Golden Scallop Hunt(visitgulf.com), more locals can get in on the action. Big scallops are in 3 to 5 feet of water just behind Blacks Island. Limits can be had very quickly now if you can nd the honey holes. With rising water on the rivers, cat shing is red hot. Bush hooks are producing nice catches of channel cat from the Dead Lakes to Howard Creek. Bream are everywhere in the creeks and in the big river. Top water popping bugs are bait of choice for hungry sunsh. SPONsS OREdD bB Y Thursday, September 15, 2011 Page 6 GRIN aANdD BEaAR IT

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTs S www.starfl.com ASectionBy Tim CroftStar News Editor Mark the host Tiger Shark offense absent from Friday nights visit by Boz eman. The Tiger Sharks man aged just 125 total offen sive yards, roughly onequarter the output of last weeks season-opening win and the Bucks (1-1) spent much of the second half in Port St. Joe territo ry to score two late touch downs and carve out a 21-0 win. After having two play ers rush for over 100 yards and ve run for at least 40 yards last week, Port St. Joe was paced by the 37 yards from freshman Jar kiece Davis and rushed 38 times for just 117 yards. The stout defense of Bozeman never allowed Port St. Joe (1-1) closer than the Buck 29. I was worried about their size, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. They controlled both sides of the line of scrimmage. They made the plays when they had to and we didnt. We have to learn from our mis takes and grow. But as I told the team we have a lot of season left to play. We have the next week off and we have a chance to regroup and get ready for a very good Blountstown team in a dis trict game. Neither team could mount much of an attack over the opening 24 min utes as they combined for a mere 172 yards and threats were few. Port St. Joe pushed across mideld on each of its rst two possessions, but had only Daniel Mays this close miss wide left on a 47-yard eld goal to show for it. Bozeman did not earn a rst down until early in the second quarter, that series ending when Jordan Burns fumbled the snap on a punt attempt which again put Port St. Joe on the Buck side of the eld. But the game turned af ter Port St. Joe went back wards, due to an unsports manlike conduct penalty and Chandler Burkett par tially blocked Mays punt near mideld to give Boze man the ball at its 31. The Bucks needed just ve plays to score on a drive, preserved when running back Daniel Tay lor turned a fumble in the backeld into a 10-yard gain to the Port St. Joe 44. On the next play, Boze man quarterback Jacob Martinez (a game-high 96 rushing yards and two touchdowns) went option right, cut against the grain and slipped three tackles en route to a touchdown for a 7-0 Bozeman lead at 2:21 before intermission after Burns extra point kick. Bozeman put the game away in the second half while taking all but four of its offensive snaps on the Port St. Joe side of the eld. The key was a fourthand-11 at the Port St. Joe 28 after Bozeman had pinned St. Joe on downs and forced a short punt by May. Martinez lined up to take a short snap, hesi tated for a moment to al low the Tiger Shark front to charge in and dashed through a gaping hole in the middle to score with 4:34 remaining in the third period. Burns made it 14-0. Near the midpoint of the nal period Port St. Joe stopped Bozeman on downs at the Tiger Shark 5 when Natrone Lee and LeGrand McLemore com bined on a halt Joey Bran nen (56 rushing yards), but Rumello Zaccarro could not handle a pitch the Tiger Sharks had ve fum bles, losing three three plays later and Bozeman recovered at the St. Joe 7. Two plays later Isaiah Robbins (59 yards on just ve carries) barreled over from the 2 and Burns add ed the nal point at 3:44 to end all hope for Port St. Joe. I am very happy about our defense, especially against a team like Port St. Joe, said Bozeman coach Loren Tillman. You look at that scoreboard and see all those titles and that can be intimidating. To come in here and shut them out is impressive. On offense, I thought the offensive line played much better than last week. Last week we failed to do some small things that were the difference against West Gadsden. This week we played well enough all around to win. By Tim Croft Star News Editor Three minutes. Those proved decisive for Wewahitchka (0-2) last Friday as the Gators fell behind 22-0 in the opening three minutes and twice fought back to close within 10 points before the visiting Yellow Jackets of Vernon and a ground game that con sumed 428 yards proved too much. The Yellow Jackets (1-1) nished up 51-26. After the rst three or four minutes we got a little better, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah. Sometimes we play really well on defense. But we are still having problems tack ling in space. Every time the other team gets the ball, they can go all the way. We have to correct that. The Gators, welcoming back starting quarterback Justin Flowers, who suf fered a hairline fracture of the arm in a Kickoff Classic, racked up some offensive numbers of their own. Theryl Brown rushed for 158 yards and two touch downs, including a 55-yard scoring scamper, and Flow ers was 10 for 23 for 134 yards as Wewahitchka had over 300 yards of total of fense. From the early de cit, spurred by touchdown runs of 30 and 40 yards by Vernons Giovonni Bell, the Gators battled back to pull within 28-18 by intermission. Vernons offense consisted of a 300-pound fullback bat tering the inside while Bell and others did damage on the outside. As they did against Port St. Joe in Week One, the Ga tors asserted themselves in the fourth quarter, pulling to 36-26 before Vernon put the game away. We came back in the second half, Kizziah said. We had some stops. We threw the ball well. But we had some penalties and dropped some balls (six dropped passes) and they just ran past us. The rst three teams weve played (Kickoff Clas sic against Blountstown, Port St. Joe and Vernon) are the best three teams on our schedule. We could win the next ve and be in a posi tion for a playoff spot when we play Sneads (Oct. 21 at home). Well nd out what kind of team we are this weekend if we go to (Quincy) Munroe and take care of business. The Gators play at Mun roe at 7:30 p.m. ET.StatsOver the rst two games, Wewahitchka is being led of fensively by Brown, who has rushed for 421 yards and six touchdowns on 46 carries. Jayln Addison has rushed for 167 yards, Flowers 31 yards and Corey Walding 61 yards. Brown also has thrown for 30 yards and has three receptions for 42 yards. Ad dison has three catches for 41 yards and Chris Myrick leads the team with four catches for 50 yards. Walding is the teams top tackler with 24 total tackles. Brandon Price has 17 total tackles and Taylor Husband 16. Christian Turner has 11 tackles and has caused a fumble; Austin Guffey 10 tackles, a caused fumble, a recovered fumble and an interception and Quentin Carter has nine tackles and caused one fumble. Ben Hayward also has nine tack les and has recovered a fumble. Special to The StarThe Lady Tiger Sharks of Port St Joe logged a solid victory in their home opener on Sept. 6. They defeated the visiting Lady Rams of Ruth erford in three straight sets by scores of 25-20, 26-24 and 25-13. Port St Joe was able to put together a solid team ef fort for the victory. The Lady Tiger Sharks have seven se niors on the team and that experience was evident dur ing the match. Katie Lacour was strong with her serving and sets, Katie Gardner is stepping up as a strong of fensive hitter and Oneika Lockley is beginning to show solid defensive skills. The ladies were off the rest of the week to prac tice before beginning their district play this past Tues day at West Gadsden High School and tonight at Liberty County High School. Next week will be a very busy week for the team. The Lady Tiger Sharks play at Wewahitchka on Monday, at Blountstown on Tuesday and at home on Wednesday against East Gadsden. The Wednesday match against East Gadsden will be a varsity-only match at 6 p.m. ET in The Dome. Port St. Joe will also be play ing in a tournament this weekend at Mosley High School where the rst match will be against Wal ton at 10 a.m. ET followed by a match against Arnold at 11 a.m. The rest of the tournament will be deter mined by pool play. See you Wednesday at 6 p.m. ET and dont forget to help the effort to support breast cancer awareness and research by supporting Dig Pink an event sponsored by the Side-Out Foundation, which will be held Thursday, Oct. 20 in a match against Wewahi tchka.Page 7 Thursday, September 15, 2011Gators fall to visiting Vernon 51-26The Bozeman defense, here hemming in Port St. Joe quarterback Trevor Lang, allowed just 125 total offensive yards, less than 40 in the second half, as the Bucks shut out Port St. Joe.Bozeman blanks Port St. Joe 21-0 LADY GATORsS FAllLL IN THREE AT FFRANKlLIN COUNTY DD AVID AA Dl L ERs S TEIN | Florida FreedomThe Wewahitchka High volleyball team traveled to Franklin County last week and lost the match in three hard-fought games. The Lady Gators will host Port St. Joe at 5 p.m. CT on Monday. Wewahitchka travels to Graceville on Tuesday, hosts Bethlehem at 5 p.m. CT on Thursday and Tallahassee John Paul at 3 p.m. CT on Friday. The Lady Gators (1-6 overall, 1-4 in district play) are led by Jessica Smith, who has 37 points, 48 assists and 18 kills for the season. Katie Parker has 29 points, 39 assists and 20 kills. Donia Lanier has 36 points and 12 kills while Danielle Harris has added 35 points and 17 kills. TT IM CROFT | The StarPort St. Joe running back Natrone Lee looks for space against Bozeman on Friday night. Lady Tiger Sharks beat Rutherford at home

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011Woodmen members also distribute American Patriots Handbooks to schools, libraries and newly naturalized citizens, and give out American History Awards to students who excel in the subject. Lance Mayers, area manager for the Woodmen of the World, said the organization is the second largest purchaser of American ags in the country, behind only the federal government. Before the ag was raised, local Woodmen Lodge representative Grant Peel asked the ceremonys attendees to honor the service men and women who risked their lives to save others on Sept. 11 and continue to put themselves at risk everyday. They all deserve our thanks and gratitude, Peel said. We dedicate the ag to all the American heroes and victims. Peel quoted Abraham Lincoln, Any nation that does not honor its heroes will not long endure. Peel then asked the audience, Do you remember? Mayers remembers where he was when President Kennedy was assassinated, when the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded shortly after launch and as the events of Sept. 11 unfolded. There are events in your life that you always remember, Mayers said. Lets never forget that day. Mayers quoted statistics of the lives lost in the tragedy, including one statistic that resonates directly with the Woodmen of the World foundation: 75 percent of Sept. 11 victims were young fathers. The ag was raised by Adam Murphy, a correctional ofcer who raised ags at school events when he was in high school, and Albert Signor, Sr., a war veteran and member of VFW Post 8285. Signor saluted in respect as Murphy raised the colors to full mast and led spectators in the Pledge of Allegiance, followed by a moment of silence. After the singing of the National Anthem, Murphy lowered the ag to half staff to honor the fallen victims of Sept. 11. David Taunton, who heads the childrens home, thanked the Woodmen for presenting them with a ag and honored them the organization for its dedication to volunteerism and patriotism. I remember seeing those ofcers and remen running into those buildings, Taunton said. Thats the kind of bravery were celebrating today, and thats the kind of bravery our country will always be known for. Taunton also shared his memory of Sept. 11, when one of his children bolted frantically through the door and beckoned him to turn on the television. Moments later, a wild squirrel climbed through an open window and up the boys britches leg and into his hat. I still dont know what the connection is, Taunton said. still has them, but he doesnt look at them very often. Most of the Curtis High students were picked up by noon. We found out later that two of our students had lost parents in the attack, Jarosz said. Meanwhile, students from a nearby economics and nance high school were evacuated to the Curtis High School building. The entire city was on lockdown, and the phone lines were disconnected. We couldnt reach any parents, so we became their parents, Jarosz said. There was a quiet carnival atmosphere in the school that day. For 18 hours, the parents knew nothing of their childrens well-being. When the phone lines were functioning again, Jarosz ushered ve students at a time into the ofce to call their parents. One ninth-grader immediately began crying when she nally reached her mother. Jarosz recalls the mother saying, This was truly a phone call from heaven. Jarosz attended seven funerals that fall for friends, service men and women, killed in the attacks. He wears the name of a close friend on his sleeve to remember him by. They died because the only wrong decision they made that day was to go to work, Jarosz said. Jarosz, a retired Navy Lt. Commander who now heads the NJROTC Program at Port St. Joe High School, shared his gripping experience at a Patriots Day ceremony held Sept. 8 in the gymnasium at PSJHS. As a kid, Jarosz always wished he could be on his favorite television show You Were There, a program that interviewed those who were present during historical events. You better watch out what you wish for, it just might come true, he said. He never thought he would be a witness to the worst terrorist attack in the history of the United States, with a front row ticket to watch his nation bleed. Students and faculty members were forced to remember where they were on the day that changed the face of the country forever. Principal Jeremy Knapp was teaching his rst block English class when a teacher across the hall told him to turn on his television. We were all trying to gure out how a plane just hit a building, Knapp said as he addressed the assembly of students. It changed my life, it changed your lives; it changed the world. PSJHS student Daniel Neal also shared his own story. He was only a child when it happened, a second-grader, unable to grasp the severity of the situation. All I remember from that day was (my teacher) Ms. Nelson looking frantically at the T.V., holding back tears, her hands folded as if in prayer, Neal said. We were children; too young to understand. Nelson turned off the television and continued to teach, he said. In a time of great peril, (Ms. Nelson) maintained her composure for the sake of the children, Neal said. She explained things in a way we could grasp. He asked his peers to recognize the many teachers, Nelson and Jarosz included, who helped protect and comfort the children of the United States as the tragic events unfolded. He was met with a standing applause from the student body. Also recognized at the assembly was U.S. Marine Corporal Christopher Schell, a 2009 graduate of PSJHS, who returned from a tour in Afghanistan only three weeks prior. Schell was accompanied by his wife and mother. Students watched a patriotic slideshow, accompanied by Alan Jacksons song Where Were You When the World Stopped Turning. Their young faces reected images of billowing smoke plumes escaping the twin towers, of reghters walking streets of rubble and ash, American Flags being hoisted at ground zero, and a plea from the projector to Never Forget 9.11.2001. A detailed timeline of events was read, a play by play sequence from the time each of the four planes took off, until they met their fate. Students observed a moment of silence for the 3,052 lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001. To close the assembly, Mary Lou Cumbie sang America the Beautiful, and God Bless America, and the students rose in respect without being asked. Though they were mere children at the time of the attacks, each student harbors his or her own vivid memory of the day that changed their home forever. Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! MOSES J. MEDINA 850.527.0441MMEDINA@CRESTENTERPRISES.COM REMODELING SERVICES LICENSE#RG0058632 BARLOWSWell Drilling Pump Repair & Water ServicesWell Drilling & Pump Repair Deep or Shallow WellsServing Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties 850-639-9355 or 850-814-7454 LICENSED &INSURED 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971 UpcomingOPEN AT 11AM ET 7 DAYS A WEEKWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM Events!! WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PM ETKARAOKE & DANCING IN THECROWS NESTTHURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PM ETRANDY STARK ON THE POOPDECKSUNDAY 7 PM ETOPENMIKEHOSTED BY BARRYHENSONBRINGYOURINSTRUMENT ANDSONGSTUESDAY & WEDNESDAYLADIES NIGHT 5 PMTILCLOSING Haughty HeronNow Accepting New Members WINE TASTINGS EDUCATION MEMBERDISCOUNTS MEMBER PARTIES The Please call for details (850) 381-0700117SailorsCove, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-3463 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PIERCING, FEATHERS, FASHION EXTENSIONS & UP DOS. BRING A FRIEND & MENTIONTHIS AD & RECEIVE 10% OFF A SERVICE.NoAppointmentNecessary Walk-ins Welcome WALTER SMITH announces at MILTON from page A1 9/11 from page A1

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Thursday, September 15, 2011Diving for gold on the shellBy Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Forget Wonka bars and golden tickets. Port St. Joe is on the hunt for golden scallops. The waters of St. Joseph Bay will glitter until the end of scallop season, with 100 prizewinning golden scallops sprinkled underwater among the sand and sea creatures. Each golden scallop represents a chance at winning a $20,000 grand prize. The Gulf County Tourism Development Council is hosting its rst St. Joseph Bay Treasure Hunt in an effort to encourage residents and visitors to take advantage of this years extended scallop season. Participants can jet back to the 17th century, when pirates sailed the waters in search of buried treasure. Simply disregard the speedboat and GPS system. The treasure hunt began Sept. 11 and will continue through Sept. 24. The last day of scallop season is Sept. 25. The spray-painted scallop shells were dropped in the bay on Sunday and are waiting to be unearthed. (The TDC) is putting on the event with BP funding in an effort to attract tourists to Gulf County, said Amber Davis, who has been working with the TDC to organize the treasure hunt. Scallop season has never been extended before, and we want to let people know that it does go on until the end of September. Davis said the TDC used real scallop shells for the hunt, and each scallop has been painted gold and encrypted to prevent forgery. Anyone who nds a golden scallop must attend one of the two treasure ceremonies, which will be held Sept. 17 and 24 at 5 p.m. ET at the City Commons Gazebo in Port St. Joe on the corner of State Road 71 and Reid Avenue. Golden scallops must be presented by 5:15 p.m. ET to qualify for the $20,000 prize. Each scallop presented will be redeemed for a ticket and entered in a drawing. The holder of the rst ticket drawn will pick out one of the 100 prize envelopes only one of which represents the grand prize. If the grand prize is not selected, that person will be the rst to pick from the second prize board, containing prizes up to $500. The second prize board will be loaded with prize baskets and gift certicates from local businesses. Everybody that nds a gold scallop will win something, Davis said. We have a whole array of different prizes and plenty of stuff for the kids, too. Davis said there is a possibility the bays currents and tides could hide the golden scallops forever. We have a plan to retrieve any that arent found, Davis said. But we hope theyre all found. We really want all of them to be found. A map is provided on the TDCs website that outlines scalloping areas in the bay where the golden scallops will most likely be hiding. There will also be a picture posted of the golden scallops so hunters know what they are looking for. Treasure hunters must register at www.visitgulf.com under the Events and Festivals tab. There is no registration deadline. We want to get everybody out on the water here one last time and get them scalloping, Davis said. We want to encourage everyone to visit Gulf County and have a good time. A SCHOOL OF DISTINCTIONBy Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer Students and teachers across the country might soon look to Port St. Joe Elementary School as a model for success. The elementary school was honored last week as a College for Every Student (CFES) School of Distinction in a banner presentation by CFES President Rick Dalton. We are so proud of Port St. Joe Elementary, Dalton said. Its a national model whats happening here. Founded in 1991, CFES is a national nonprot organization focusing on fueling the desire to attend college among underserved youths and helping them pave the pathway there. Schools of Distinction are recognized for going the distance and ensuring every student is intensely part of the program. This year, 21 schools across the country were honored for their dedication to CFES. We get to travel around to schools and colleges and share whats going on in our best schools, Dalton said during his visit to PSJE. Dalton shared his itinerary for the coming weeks, during which he will be visiting schools in New York City as well as schools in the Adirondack Mountains. Well be talking about you, Dalton said to the three sixthgraders invited to meet with him. Youre a part of great things. Sixth-grader Kanon Martin shared with Dalton a school project he participated in where students grew vegetables and sold them at the local farmers market to raise money for a scholarship fund. Dalton said these might be things students in Hawaii will be doing in the future after the success of the PSJE program is shared in schools across the country. Elementary school CFES scholars also collected coins for college for the Gulf County Scholarship Program as a part of early college awareness and participated in a variety of activities focusing on goal setting, character building, leadership and mentoring. The CFES scholars at PSJE were required to visit at least one college campus and complete a research project on one college. Sixthand ninthgrade scholars also completed a college application. Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka have been a part of CFES almost since the beginning, Dalton said. Its a recognition of their success in implementing the program throughout the entire school. Dalton said most of the 150 participating schools select about 100 students to join the CFES program, while PSJE has shown the dedication to involve every student enrolled. Dalton said the program is aimed at creating a college culture in the U.S. and adhering to President Barack Obamas American Graduation Initiative, an effort to strengthen community colleges across the country and better prepare graduates for the new jobs of the 21st century. Every student needs to have the opportunity to go to college, Dalton said. He hopes to see the U.S. return to the position it once held as the country with the highest rate of college graduates in the world. Dalton said 96 percent of high school seniors participating in the CFES scholar program have gone to college. To see this at Port St. Joe Elementary, its inspirational, Dalton said. People are really paying attention to the wonderful strides Gulf County is making. Gulf County Schools Superintendent Jim Norton said the countys involvement with CFES ensures that every hardworking student in the county can afford to go to college. CFES, its a program that we get to be truly a model system, said Norton, who also attended the banner ceremony. We want to give every student college opportunity, whether they can afford it or not. It says an awful lot, Norton said of the honor. This is something my staff and administration is going to support at the highest level. For more information on College for Every Student, visit www.collegefes.org.Annual beach cleanup to be held in Mexico BeachStar Staff ReportThe annual Mexico Beach Cleanup will be held this Saturday beginning at 8:30 a.m. CT. Volunteers should meet at Sunset Park, next to the El Governor Motel at U.S. Highway 98 and 19th Street. The cleanup will continue until 10:30 a.m. CT. Cleanup supplies, water and snacks will be provided. The Mexico Beach Cleanup is a joint partnership between The Ocean Conservancy and the Mexico Beach Civic Association. The cleanup is part of the 26th annual International Coastal Cleanup, as this year marks over a quartercentury of dedicated volunteerism. Hundreds of thousands of volunteers around the world continue the tradition each year, spending a few hours removing trash from their local beach or waterway and keeping track of everything they nd on standardized data cards. The Ocean Conservancy uses this data to create the worlds only state-bystate, country-by-country index of what is trashing our ocean, lakes and rivers, which has helped to identify the sources and solutions to marine debris over the past 25 years. In 2010, more than 615,000 volunteers removed more than 8 million pounds of debris in 114 countries. The International Coastal Cleanup is a great opportunity for our community to get together and do something positive and needed for our stretch of beautiful coastline and at the same time be part of a worldwide cleanup effort helping to stop pollution of our oceans, said Jane Mathis, ICC coordinator for Mexico Beach. In 2010, Florida had 25,290 volunteers (second in the U.S.), who collected almost 350,000 pounds of trash from over 1,100 miles of shorelines and underwater areas. About 30 volunteers in Mexico Beach collected over 540 pounds of trash from our three miles of beach and dunes, Mathis said. Ocean Conservancy President and CEO Vikki Spruill said, Over the last quarter-century, the International Coastal Cleanup has grown from a single cleanup on a Texas beach to a worldwide movement to end the threat of trash in our ocean, our life support system. Over the past 25 years of Ocean Conservancys International Coastal Cleanup, more than 8.5 million volunteers have removed 145 million pounds of trash from the shores of lakes, streams, rivers and the ocean on just one day each year, Spruill continued. They have recorded every item found including 53 million cigarette butts, 14 million food wrappers and containers, 13 million caps and lids. The list goes on and on giving us a clear picture of the manufactured items impacting the health of humans, wildlife and economies. The hard work of volunteers culminates in the only global snapshot of the problem of marine debris every year, generated by Ocean Conservancy to enlist lawmakers, corporations, communities and individuals in solving this serious pollution problem, Spruill continued. But, she added, the challenge remains: The threat that marine debris poses to the health of our ocean continues to grow, and each of us as individuals has a role to play in turning the tide. Trash does not fall from the sky; it falls from human hands and those hands have the power to stop it. Whether we live near a coast or hundreds of miles inland, we are all connected to the ocean and share a responsibility for its care. Visit www.ocean conservancy.org/cleanup for more information and the 2011 report. For more information on the cleanup, call Jane Mathis at 850-648-5900. SS PECIa A L TO TT HE SS Ta A RThis map of St. Josephs Bay shows the prime hunting area for the 100 golden scallops that are an entry to a prize giveaway worth $20,000. Va A LERIE Ga A RMa A N | The StarPort St. Joe Elementary sixth-graders Mya Schram, Kanon Martin and Ethan Lafountaine hold the School of Distinction banner presented to PSJE for its dedication to the College for Every Student program. COURTESY OF Ja A NE MaMA THISVolunteers work to pick up trash along the shorelines of Mexico Beach. PSJES earns national award from CFES

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B2 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Y Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER 24-EMERGENCY SERVICE FOR OUR CURRENT CLIENTS! Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PMAfternoon Appointments AvailableDrs. Hours By Appt. 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients Rylan turns 5 Happy 5th Birthday Rylan!!! We LOVE you so very much!!!!Shylah Marlo Thomas is bornAmanda and Marlo Thomas would like to announce the birth of their third daughter, Shylah Marlo Thomas. She was born Aug. 27, 2011. You cant judge fertilizers by appearance. Fortunately, state law requires each fertilizer label to include specic content facts. Fertilizers are manufactured from a wide variety of materials to supply required plant nutrients. Once these materials are mixed, it becomes difcult to distinguish the materials present. In the past, a few unscrupulous manufacturers have taken advantage of this to increase their prot. To protect consumers and legitimate manufacturers from such practices, the Florida legislature enacted the rst fertilizer law in 1889 and has amended it many times since enactment. My information was provided by Extension soils specialist Dr. J.B. Sartain, of the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). To obtain the proper types of fertilizers for various applications, you must understand the label. At the top, youll nd the identication of the manufacturer or distributor. This doesnt tell how well the fertilizer will help your lawn, ornamentals or vegetables. Next, if the term organic is used, there will be a statement identifying the type of material, as well as how much is natural and how much is synthetic. This is an important indication of how the fertilizer will react in your soil. For example, natural organic nitrogen is released slowly. So a fertilizer containing a high percentage of this material would be good for lawns, mainly helping them stay green, without causing spurts of extra fast growth. The key information is found in the guaranteed analysis section of the label. A series of numbers, such as 8-8-8, 10-10-10 or 13-13-13, tell you how much, or the primary plant nutrients the fertilizer contains. That is, the number showing the guaranteed amount of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. For example, a fertilizer labeled 8-8-8 contains 8 percent nitrogen, 8 percent phosphorous and 8 percent potassium. Thus, a 100pound bag of this analysis contains 24 pounds of plant food. The other 76 pound is accounted for by conditioners and llers, required for even spreading. These might include some incidental trace elements. If the fertilizer contains signicant amount of secondary plant foods, such as calcium, magnesium, copper and others, they will be listed near the bottom of the tag. The most difcult part of the label to understand is the information listed right after the total nitrogen gure, in the guaranteed analysis section. In addition to the total amount, the label gives percentages of each of several types of nitrogen in the mix. This tells you a lot about how the fertilizer works. Youll see the terms nitrate nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, water soluble organic nitrogen, urea nitrogen and water-soluble organic nitrogen, urea nitrogen and water-insoluble nitrogen. Plants use nitrate, watersoluble organic and urea nitrogen fairly quickly. They might work well in a vegetable garden. But, they wont last very long, because theyre rapidly leached out of the soil by rain and irrigation water. On the other hand, ammoniacal and waterinsoluble nitrogen will last longer in sandy Florida soils. Following the basic analysis is a statement of the maximum amount of chlorine the fertilizer contains. Excess chlorine might be injurious to certain plants, both vegetable and ornamental species. But, small amounts can be benecial under some conditions. Unfortunately, I cant fully explain everything this complicated in one short article. But, I hope Ive claried a few of the basic points. To obtain the proper fertilizer for your specic vegetable and ornamental gardening needs, you must understand the information on fertilizer labels. When in doubt, we suggest check with your favorite Garden Center or contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit http://gulf.ifas.u.edu.Star Staff ReportDoris Johnson, a longtime resident of Port St. Joe and former resident of Apalachicola, has been approved for a liver-kidney transplant at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. A genetic disease has attacked her liver and kidneys, causing them to fail. After undergoing two weeks of comprehensive testing at the Mayo Clinic, she has been informed she is a candidate for a transplant when the organs become available. An account has been set up at Superior Bank in Port St. Joe to help Johnson offset some of the costs of the housing, post-transplant drugs and other necessities. If you would like to contribute, please call Carol at Superior Bank and ask for the Doris Johnson Medical Fund. There will be several fundraisers given in the next few months, and your participation would be greatly appreciated. The many phone calls, prayers and contributions are just some of the ways her spirit has been lifted. Society Births and BIrtRTHDAYsS The Florida fertilizer label ROY LEE CArtRTErR County extension director Account set up for Doris Johnson JUNIOrR ACHIEVEmMENtT trTRAINING sSEssSSION SPECIAL tT O THE St T Ar R Junior Achievement of Northwest Florida recently conducted a training session in Port St. Joe. The training was Sept. 1 and was hosted by Centennial Bank. The training was held to train new volunteers for the seven additional classes that are being provided Gulf County because of a $2,500 grant received from the Port St. Joe Building Capacity Fund for the 2011-2012 school year. Pictured from left are Mark Friedman, Heather Bryant, Karen Fontaine, Vikki Anderson, Maegon Conners, Kim Knight, Cathy Cox, Farica Gant, David Butler and Bill Mahan.

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The Star| B3Thursday, September 15, 2011 More than 140 Gulf County youth got to experience unforgettable fun through the Port St. Joe Summer Youth Leadership Program! Not only was the program filled with fun activities and games, but it also promoted learning, healthy choices and positive social behaviors. 142 Children Registered 20 Young Adults Obtained Work Experience and Earned a Microsoft Certification 4,824 Nutritious Meals Served Christian Community Development Fund, Washington Improvement Group Community Action Committee, City of Port St. Joe, Gulf County Board of County Commissioners, Dupont Capacity Building Fund, Four H Extension Office, Gulf Coast State College, Gulf District Schools, Port St. Joe Elementary School, Minnie Likely, and the Auburn Youth. By Will Ramsey and Sergio ClemmonsSpecial to The StarGeneral information Progress reports will be given to students today. Sports group pictures (football, cheerleaders, volleyball, band) will be taken today. Deadline to register for ACT at Port St. Joe in October is Sept. 16 College day is from 9 a.m. to noon ET Sept. 16.  All students in grades 9-12 have an opportunity to visit with numerous colleges, military recruiters and local businesses regarding future plans. Underclassmen and senior retake pictures will be Sept. 19. On Sept. 21, there will be a SWAT meeting in the student activity room. On Sept. 22, seniors will order graduation invitations from 8 a.m. to noon ET.Sports JV/Varsity volleyball at Liberty County High at 6 and 7 p.m. today.  Go Sharks! Volleyball tournament at Mosley Sept. 17;  Go Sharks! Cross country at Tallahassee Lincoln 10:30 a.m. ET Sept. 17; Go Sharks! JV/Varsity volleyball at Wewahitchka at 6 and 7 p.m. ET Sept. 19; Go Sharks! Cross Country at Graceville at 4 p.m. Sept. 20; Go Sharks! JV/ Varsity volleyball at Blountstown High 6 and 7 p.m. Sept. 20; Go Sharks! JV/Varsity volleyball vs. E Gadsden High at 6 and 7 p.m. ET Sept. 21; Go Sharks! JV football at Wewahitchka at 7 p.m. Sept. 22; Go Sharks! Varsity football at Blountstown at 8 p.m. ET Sept. 23; Go Sharks!Other newsMarine science classes are studying data, satellite images and forecast advisories as they plot the track of Hurricane Katia in the Atlantic Ocean.Star Staff ReportYou are never too old to learn. No tests, no grades, no stress just fun. Registration is now open for Education Encore classes at the Gulf/Franklin campus, Room A 101. Education Encore provides noncredit enrichment classes for active adults on a variety of topics including computers, exercise, art, drawing, photography, religion, writing, Spanish, home repair, story crafting, history and more. The goal of Education Encore is to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom. If you have been to college, this is an opportunity to relive the college experience. If you have not attended college, this is an opportunity to live the college experience. Just as exercising the body keeps one physically t, exercising the mind keeps one mentally t. Classes will be held on six consecutive Wednesdays from Sept. 21 through Oct. 26. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which includes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, please visit www.gulfcoast. edu/EducationEncore, or for more information, call 872-3823 or email Jim Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. Dont miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest. Star Staff ReportA corrections class is scheduled for Oct. 3 at the Gulf Coast State College, Gulf/Franklin campus in Port St. Joe.  According to sources within the Department of Corrections, only applicants who have completed the class and passed the state board exam are being considered for employment as correctional ofcers.  But the institutions in our area are beginning to hire ofcers following a lengthy hiring freeze and are running out of qualied applicants.  The previous class was canceled because of a lack of enrollment, but we are continuing our efforts to encourage those citizens who wish to pursue a career with good benets to contact us.  For more information, please call 227-9670, ext. 5507 or 5511 for more details. DAZZLINgG DoOLPHINsS SPECIAL To O TT HE STAR The Dazzling Dolphins for Sept. 15 are pre-kindergarten, Leland Whitlock; kindergarten, Isaiah Mims; 1st, Skylar Clayton; 2nd, Ricky Forbes-Rosado; 3rd, Bailey Hurst; 4th, Brittany Hanson; 5th, Aaron Godwin; 6th, Gracie Cryderman. Bus Riders of the week are Chris Anderson, Kylie Ingalls, Breana Wable, Tyler Harwood, Hannah Lee, Raylyn Hardy and Krista Taylor. SPECIAL To O TT HE STAR Dazzling Dolphins for Sept. 8 are pre-kindergarten, Boston McGhee; kindergarten, Ella Dimitrijevich; 1st, Maelynn Butler; 2nd, Synia Dawson; 3rd, Sarah Fidler; 4th, Shayleigh Jackson; 5th, Jasmine Thomas; and 6th, Ashton Childress. Bus Riders of the Week are JaMarrien Becton, Ricky Forbes, Brian Darnall, Shawna Flowers, Izzy Thomas, Brittany Hanson, Angela Batts and Andrew Sheppard. Corrections class scheduled Education Encore registration open School News The Lions TaleSpecial to The Star The fourth-grade reading class  has started a Reading Buddies program for the K5 students.  Once a week, the fourth-graders select a story, share it  their reading buddies and  write  about their experience in their journals.  Our reading buddy program seeks to foster a love of reading by allowing older students to mentor and inspire young readers. The rst stories have  emphasized the K5 phonics lessons, and future stories will continue to focus on phonics  as well as  comprehension.  The program has been so well received that other preschool buddies soon will be added to the program.

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler First Presbyterian Church508 Sixteenth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456850-227-1756Rev. Ruth Hemple Worship Service 10:00 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Rev. Drucilla Tyler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Wewahitchka Church of Godlocated at 119 Bay Ave in Wewahitchka. Will be giving away FREE food assistance on September 25th. If you are in need of groceries PLEASE call 639.2221 in advance to register. Service times are Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. FAITHThursday, September 15, 2011 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Will it make a difference?When you stand before God, in judgment, will it make any difference whether you miss heaven by a mile, like the atheists and the agnostics, and the cultists, or whether you miss heaven by an inch, like those who attend church every time the door is open, and yet never become part of the Kingdom of God becoming a child of God, born of God and born again? Jesus said, Not everyone who says to Me, Lord, Lord, shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. Many will say to Me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name? And then I will declare to them, I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness! Matthew 7:21-23 Christians do confess Jesus as Savior and Jesus as Lord of their lives, and might still miss heaven by an inch, because those are not the things which make a person a Christian. Real Christians will be baptized in water, by immersion, if possible, but that is not what makes a person a real Christian. Real Christians believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, but that is not what makes a person a real Christian. A person becomes a real Christian, when he, or she, is born of God. If you are a believer, it is because God granted you to become a believer and to become His adopted child. If you study John 1:11-13 and John 3:3-7, all of the verses, not just the ones you hear in church, youll see what I mean. If you are a real Christian, it means that you have been changed. The Apostle Paul wrote in 2nd Corinthians 5:17, Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new. Some translations say, new creature. He also wrote in Galatians 6:15, For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision, nor uncircumcision, avails anything, but a new creation. Some make it sound like becoming a Christian is all up to you. Its not! If something that you could do could make you a Christian, Jesus wouldnt have had to die that horrible death on the cross. Can you make yourself a new creation? Of course you cant. I hear that there are a few who are saying that I am making the churches in this area look bad. The only ones that might look bad are those whose leaders are taking verses out of context and making a religion out of them. Who benets when people walk out of church thinking that the can live any way they want and still go to heaven? Questions or comments are invited. Send to us at one of the addresses below: Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible, every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh. Check us out this Sunday! For the spring and summer seasons, our services begin, with a time of greeting and fellowship, at 9:45 a.m. CT on Sunday. Our worship begins at 10 a.m. For those interested, we have midweek ministry, helping people on an individual basis. Inquire for more information. Come early on Sunday morning so that you can meet us informally, and join in the praise and worship music led by TJ. On Sunday morning we worship at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st Street. The Civic Center is located behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker Realty, just off U.S. Highway 98, in the western end of Mexico Beach. Look for the white building with the dark green roof. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337 Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook: Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com The Christian CONScCIENcCESpecial to The StarSt. Josephs Catholic Church has made a cookbook featuring delicious recipes from members of St. Josephs as well as their mission church, St. Lawrences Catholic Church, in Wewahitchka. The cookbook has many wonderful recipes from a very diverse culture of people as well as the history of St. Josephs Catholic Church. The history ranges from how the church began in Port St. Joe and the many priests that have served, as well as the history of the stained glass windows in the church. Also included are the Churchs Feast and Liturgical days that are followed by the Catholic Church. These cookbooks will make an excellent birthday, Christmas or any special occasion gift. As holidays approach us, St. Joseph is running a special on the cookbooks, one cookbook is $15 or two for $25. There is also a limited edition Tempting Recipes CD for $10. The CD will contain St. Josephs Tempting Recipes and 10 other cookbooks. Proceeds from the sale of the cookbooks will go to the Family Life Ministry at St. Josephs. If you are interested in purchasing cookbooks, please call Charmaine Earley at 227-5343, Trish Warriner at Tapper & Company, 227-1111 or Barb Van Treese at 227-9837. Cookbooks and CDs are also available at No Came Caf, Books & More, Persnickety, Port Inn, Mainstay Suites, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulfs gift shop and the Port St. Joe Marina. Purchases may also be made on Mondays or Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. EST at the parish ofce on 20th Street.St. Josephs Catholic Church cookbook saleAnnual Womens DayAnnual Womens Day will be celebrated at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church on the 3rd Sunday, Sept. 18. The day will begin at 10 a.m. ET with Church School followed by a special 11 a.m. morning worship service with Evangelist Barbara Bell of Panama City as the guest speaker. A special invitation by the Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church membership is extended to everyone to come and be a part of this great day of blessings from God. The church is located in Port St. Joe on Avenue D.Revival at Zion Fair Missionary BaptistChurch bells are ringing. Revival, revival, revival, featuring Elder O.H. Walker of Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville, who will be bringing the word of God to Gods people. Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will host a revival Sept. 21-23, with services at 7:30 p.m. ET each night. There will be prayer meetings at 7 p.m. ET Sept. 19-20. Zion Fair invites everyone to come and be blessed. City Wide Mission Fruit HarvestThe City Wide Missionary Society of Port St. Joe will sponsor its Annual Fruit Harvest Worship Services on Thursday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. ET at the Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church located at 315 Martin Luther King Blvd. Foreign Mission service will be the highlight of this years program and will feature Mr. Marty Rileys recent mission trip to Brazil. Marty, a member of First Baptist Church located here in Port St. Joe, will share his experiences in the mission eld through pictorial presentations and personal observations. This program is opened to everyone to attend and support the work of the City Wide Missionary Society. An offering will be taken.NNew Horizon AAThe New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 850-639-3600. Faith brBRIEfFS

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, September 15, 2011Star Staff ReportThe challenges of health care delivery in rural America are several and familiar: poor infrastructure, insufcient supply of skilled doctors, and dis persed poor populations, all of which make affordable care hard to achieve. Cindy Drapal, chief nursing ofcer of George E. Weems Memorial Hospital, says technology is the key to bridging this gap. In December 2010, Chuck Edwards, chief tech nology ofcer of Bluemanta Technology Group in Port St. Joe, began working to secure a grant and imple ment a connected health strategy for the hospital. In May 2011, the telemedi cine program took ight with the installation of the hospitals rst mobile tele medicine unit. The unit allows Weems clinicians and patients to communicate with urban resources via the Internet. We have made it a priority to explore innovative yet practical connected health solutions to im prove health care delivery. It was very exciting to see telemedicine become a re ality at Weems, Edwards said. The telemedicine unit includes an Ergotron mo bile cart with onboard bat teries, and audio visual equipment from Cisco Systems Inc. The unit also features onboard local and remote diagnostics capabilities. The video otoscope, which uses the latest rod lens technology to provide crisp, clear images of the tympanic membrane and auditory ear canal, allows clinicians to record live video or capture still imag es and review them in real time with patients and other clinicians. A Bluetoothenabled electronic stetho scope connects wirelessly to heart and lung sound visualization software. Telemedicine has played a key role on several occa sions since it was installed, with the most recent appli cation involving the treat ment of a trauma patient. Weems hospital personnel were able to connect to outof-area surgical specialists to review the patients inju ries in real time. In recent years, the nancial obstacles for tele medicine have crumbled, making it more cost-effec tive for rural health care providers to adopt the tech nology. Medicare and Medicaid reimburse doctors the same basic rate for in-per son patient care as a video conference with a remote patient. Private insurance companies are also pay ing for many telemedicine services. Payers are realizing that connected health technologies, such as tele medicine, make efcient use of dwindling resources to reduce health care costs and deliver quality patient care, Drapal said. For more information or to see a demonstration of the telemedicine capabili ties at Weems, call Cindy Drapal at 850-653-8853. Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847CALLTODAY! GET YOUR AD IN227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn CareRobert PelcMowing Service227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE & PALM TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Aaron Farnsley, AIF, CFP, MBA Farnsley & Johnston 505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3336 aaron.farnsley@farnsley.com Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an imTelemedicine at Weems Hospital DAR invites community to celebrate Constitution WeekStar Staff ReportThe local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is celebrating Constitution Week Sept. 17-23 and urges ev erybody to read the Consti tution to understand what the document really says. Constitution Week is a weeklong commemoration of Americas most impor tant document and is one of the countrys least-known ofcial observances. The Constitution stands as a testament to the tenacity of Americans throughout history to maintain their liberties and freedom and to insure those inalienable rights to every American, according to a DAR news release. While few have claimed that the U.S. Constitution is perfect, it has proved to be the best political document and form of government ever devised. The Constitution guar anteed its citizens the freedom to make their own decisions and encouraged their willingness to work hard and make sacrices, knowing they would keep the rewards of their labor and ingenuity, knowing they were creating better lives for themselves and posterity, according to a DAR release. Under the Constitution, this nation has enjoyed unparalleled growth, prosper ity and power and has been an inuence for good in the world. Americans need to know what the Constitution says. It is impossible to protect it without knowing what is in it, and it cant protect Americans unless they pro tect the Constitution. Among those celebrating Constitution Week will be So Ana Schweers. She is the daughter of Gretchen and Michael Schweers, granddaughter of Midge Stevens and Wayne Stevens and Liz Schweers, great-granddaughter of Joe Stevens and William H. Howell Jr. and greatgreat-grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Howell Sr., who were early pioneers of Port St. Joe. So is the sixth gen eration in her family to be eligible to be a member of the DAR. Her mother, Gretchen Schweers, is an outstanding junior member of the local DAR chapter. Fly your ag Sept. 17-23. SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Chuck Edwards of Bluemanta, and Cindy Drapal, chief nursing ofcer at Weems Memorial Hospital in Franklin County. PP HOTOs S sS PECIAL TO TT HE STAR AABOVE: So Schweers and her mother, Gretchen Schweers, will be celebrating Constitution Week Sept. 17-23. RRIGHT: Lyd Stokoe, left, and Virginia Harrison, right, of the local chapter of the DAR, join Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson with a proclamation commemorating Constitution Week.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 15, 2011 The Star | B6 JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3758) is accepting applications for the following position:LABORATORY & ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALISTPlease submit an application and cover letter along with ve references to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn. Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, Fl. 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The Position will be open until lled. Salaries will be DOQ. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. 35379S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 10-479CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GARY L. SMITH, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY L. SMITH, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against any Defendants, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject property, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, I will sell at public auction to the highest bidder in cash in at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on September 22, 2011, that certain real property situated in the County of Gulf, State of Florida, more particularly described as follows: The North 1/2 of Lot 29, SAN BLAS ESTATES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 20, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West; thence N 00 East along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West for 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot wide right of way of State Road No. 30-E; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line as follows: S 23 East for 1642.44 feet to a point of curve; thence along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 11426.79 feet and a central angle of 02 for 427.29 feet; thence S 25 East for 1711.69 feet to a point of curve; thence along the arc of a curve to the right which has a radius of 11415.15 feet and a central angle of 05 for 1058.64 feet; thence S 20 East for 6496.59 feet to the point of beginning; thence continue S 20 East along said right of way line for 49.98 feet; thence leaving said right of way line S 69 West for 630.70 feet, more or less, to the waters edge of the Gulf of Mexico, thence Northwesterly along said waters edge for 50 feet, more or less, to a point which bears S 69 West from the point of beginning; thence N 69 East for 635.7 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. If you are a person with a disability who needs special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, you should, within two (2) working days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation, at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Phone (850) 718-0026. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call (800) 955-8771. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Dated August 26, 2011 By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept 8, 15, 2011 35362S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 352 Application No. 2011-20 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01901-175R Description of Property: Lot 15, Sawmill Estates Unit 1, according to the Official map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 1, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Taunton Development, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 12th day of October, 2011. Dated this 6th day of September, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Sept 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 35381S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-1-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, 502 Earth City Expressway, Suite 307 Earth City, MO 63045, Plaintiff, vs. CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN, and GULF COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARNELIA DIANE GORTMAN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Gulf, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: SEE EXHIBIT A TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999 HOMES OF MERIT, 28x48, M 763 MOBILE HOME; SERIAL NUMBER DCA M763-D1444A and DCA M763-D1444B. Schedule A A lot or parcel of land lying and being on the Northerly side of Creekview Drive in the Northeast Quarter of Section 10, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point of intersection of the Northerly right of way boundary line of Creekview Drive and the East boundary line of Section 10, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence go N60W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 318.28 feet; thence go N29W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 315.24 feet; thence go N39W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for distance of 240.54 feet for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue N39W, along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 88.62 feet, thence departing said Northerly right of way boundary line, go N40E, for a distance of 453.38 feet to the centerline of Stone Mill Creek; thence along the centerline of Stone Mill Creek the following courses and distances, N76E, 20.10 feet; S58E, 35.66 feet; S20W, 9.66 feet; S02E, 39.75 feet; thence S03E, 31.03 feet; thence departing said centerline of Stone Mill Creek go S42W, for a distance of 431.13 feet to the Point of Beginning. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the origninal with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 28th day of April, 2011. CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Timothy D. Padgett, Esq. Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 422-2520 phone (850) 422-2567 fax Sept 15, 22, 2011 35399S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY MAUREEN M. MITCHELL Plaintiff STEPHEN NORRIS and MELISSA MITCHELL and UNKNOWN TENANTS and GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Defendant(s). Case No. 11-90CA NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MELISSA MITCHELL 2321 Hwy 71. Wewahitchka, Fl. 32465 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property: Begin at the SW corner of SE 1/3 of SW 1/4 of Section 36, T4S, R10W, and run North 586 feet; thence run East 797 feet, more or less to SR No. 71 for the POB to the NE corner fo John Bailey Lot; thence run Northerly along the West side of said Road No. 71 for 102 feet; thence run West for 210 feet; thence run Southerly paralleling Road NO. 71 for 104 feet to John Bailey Line; thence run East for 210 feet to the POB. Containing 1/2 acre, more or less, and lying and being in Gulf County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to CHARLES A. COSTIN, Attorney for the Plaintiff whose address is P.O. Box 98, Port St. Joe, Florida on or before October 6th, 2011, a date which is within Thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice in The Star and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before and service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) disabled person who, because their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA coordinator at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or telephone voice (850) 229-6113 not later than five (5) business prior to such proceeding. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 2nd day of September, 2011. BECKY L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk September 15, 22, 2011 35408S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF JESSE WARD KENERLY File Number 11-48PR Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of JESSE WARD KENERLY, deceased, whose date of death was July 10, 2008 and whose social security number is XXX-XX-XXXX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is September 15, 2011. Personal Representative: Lynne Kenerly 235 Glencourtney Dr. Sandy Springs, GA 30328 Scott Kenerly 225 Cherry Mountain St. Ellenboro, NC 28040-6804 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin Florida Bar No. 699070 Post Office Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Telephone: (850) 227-1159 September 15, 22, 2011 35418S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER USE PERMIT Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application(s) for water use permit(s) has (have) been received by the Northwest Florida Water Management District: Application number I07232 filed 08/30/2011 St. Joe Timberland Company, 133 South WaterSound Parkway, WaterSound, FL 32413 Requesting a maximum withdrawal of 19,474,577 gallons per day from the Brothers River and the Apalachicola River for Water Based Recreation use by an existing facility. General withdrawal location(s) in Gulf County: T06S, R08W, Sec. 7; T6S, R8W, Sec. 7D Interested persons may object to or comment upon the applications or submit a written request for a copy of the staff report(s) containing proposed agency action regarding the application(s) by writing to the Division of Resource Regulation of the Northwest Florida Water Management District, attention Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Havana, Florida 32333-9700, but such comments or requests must be received by 5 oclock p.m. on September 29, 2011. No further public notice will be provided regarding this (these) application(s). Publication of this notice constitutes constructive notice of this permit application to all substantially affected persons. A copy of the staff report(s) must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings and any public hearing date. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an administrative hearing regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request according to the provisions of 28-106.201, Florida Administrative Code. Notices of Proposed Agency Action will be mailed only to persons who have filed such requests. September 15, 2011 35473S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at a Special Meeting on the 27th day of September, 2011, at 5:01 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE NO. 470 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA LEVYING THE AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE RATE FOR MUNICIPAL PURPOSES ON ALL TAXABLE PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2011 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2012, STATING THE PERCENTAGE BY WHICH THE MILLAGE LEVIED IS (11.70)% LESS THAN THE ROLLED-BACK RATE; AND, PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any 35449S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage Unit #L-8, Melissa Myers and #92, Tyson OBryane will be opened for sale on September 29, 2011 at 8:30 am. September 15, 22, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 15, 2011 The Star | B7 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 401 Reid Avenue +/5,400sf: Move in ready; Inquire for terms 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16 inside clearance; Dual 12 roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $515,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 407 Reid Ave +/4,988 sf : 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $399,000 317 Monument Ave +/4,431 sf : Hwy 98 frontage w/ On-site parking; $499,000 401 Reid Avenue+/5,400 sf : Retail space; $225,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for terms260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing availableHwy 98 Retail / Of ce Vacant LotsTwo lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30 x 80 each; $69,900 per lot SO LD t Lots nHwy98;30 UNDER CONTRACT Avenue fce/retail UNDER CONTRACT 16 inside clearance; Dual 12 roll-up doo ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. September 15, 2011 35475S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA ORDINANCE NO. 2011-1054L AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED ON THE CITYS ADOPTED EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT, AND UPDATED DATA AND ANALYSIS, WHICH INCLUDE AMENDMENTS TO THE TEXT OF THE FUTURE LAND USE; TRAFFIC CIRCULATION; HOUSING; INFRASTRUCTURE; CONSERVATION; RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE; INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION; PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES; AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENTS OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, TO REVISE AND UPDATE THE EXISTING GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND POLICIES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE MANDATES SET FORTH IN CHAPTER 163, FLORIDA STATUTES; AUTHORIZING TRANSMITTAL OF THESE AMENDMENTS TO THE APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS, AND OTHER APPLICABLE AGENCIES FOR REVIEW AND COMMENT AS REQUIRED BY FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVIDING FOR A REPEALER PROVISION, A SAVINGS CLAUSE, A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE, AND CODIFICATION; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, the State Legislature passed the Local Government Comprehensive Planning and Land Development Regulation Act requiring all local governments to prepare a Comprehensive Plan; and, WHEREAS, the City of Wewahitchka Comprehensive Plan was adopted pursuant to Ordinance No. 6-12-90, as amended; and WHEREAS, the City of Wewahitchka Evaluation and Appraisal Report was adopted pursuant to Resolution No. 2010-1077R, on August 23, 2010; and WHEREAS, the City has received and reviewed the proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan, and said proposed amendments being reviewed by the Planning Commission (Local Planning Agency) at a duly advertised hearing on April 21, 2011, which determined such amendments to be consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and appropriate to the future land uses within the City; and WHEREAS, City Commission has agreed with the recommendations of the Local Planning Agency that the proposed amendments comply with the requirements of Chapter 163, Florida Statutes, Part II, and that the proposed amendments are consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and appropriate to the future land uses within the City; and WHEREAS, City Commission held a duly advertised public hearing for the transmittal of the proposed amendments to the Department of Community Affairs on April 28, 2011; and WHEREAS, the City has received and responded to the Florida Department of Community Affairs Objections, Recommendations and Comments Report (ORC); and WHEREAS, after notice of public hearing being duly published, City Commission on September 26, 2011, approved on Second Reading the proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendments provided as Attachment A. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA: SECTION 1. The foregoing WHEREAS clauses are hereby ratified and confirmed as being true and correct and are hereby made a specific part of this Ordinance upon adoption hereof. SECTION 2. The City of Wewahitchka hereby adopts the EAR-based Comprehensive Plan Amendments to its current Comprehensive Plan as amended, which amendments consist of the pages which are identified as Attachment A (Comprehensive Plan Goals, Objectives and Policies) and which are incorporated into the current Comprehensive Plan. The City of Wewahitchka does adopt the Supporting Documents (Data and Analysis) separately and apart from the Comprehensive Plan Amendments. A copy of the Comprehensive Plan, as amended, and the required Supporting Documentation, is on file at City Hall in Wewahitchka, Florida. SECTION 3. The City Manager shall transmit the adopted amendments to the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, Florida Department of Community Affairs and other applicable agencies in accordance with State statutes governing the review of Comprehensive Plan amendments. SECTION 4. Projects securing preliminary Planning Commission approval prior to April 21, 2011 shall be vested with respect to the applicability of these provisions. SECTION 5. It is the intention of the City Commission that each provision hereof be considered severable, and that the invalidity of any provision of this Ordinance shall not affect the validity of any other portion of this Ordinance, the Wewahitchka Comprehensive Plan, or the Wewahitchka Land Development Regulations. SECTION 6. All rights, actions, proceedings and Contracts of the City, including the City Commission, the City Manager, or any of its departments, boards or officers undertaken pursuant to the existing code provisions, shall be enforced, continued, or completed, in all respects, as though begun or executed hereunder. SECTION 7. All ordinance or parts of ordinances that are inconsistent or in conflict with the provisions of this Ordinance are repealed. SECTION 8. If any section, part of session, paragraph, clause, phrase or word of this Ordinance is declared invalid, the remaining provisions of this Ordinance shall not be affected. SECTION 9. It is the intention of the City Commission that the provisions of this Ordinance shall become and be made a part of the City of Wewahitchka Comprehensive Plan, as amended, which provisions may be renumbered or relettered and that the word ordinance be changed to element, section, or other appropriate word to accomplish such intention. SECTION 10. The effective date of this plan amendment shall be the date a final order is issued by the Florida Department of Community Affairs finding the amendment to be in compliance in accordance with Chapter 163.3184, FS, as amended; or the date a final order is issued by the Administration Council finding the amendment to be in compliance in accordance with Chapter 163.3184, FS, as amended, and further that the Florida Department of Community Affairs notice of intent to find a plan amendment in compliance shall be deemed to be a final order if no timely petition challenging the amendment is filed. PASSED AND ADOPTED THIS DAY OF A.D. 2011. APPROVED: Honorable Phillip Gaskin, Mayor ATTEST: Connie Parrish, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM AND LEGAL SUFFICIENCY: S. Russell Scholz, City Attorney September 15, 2011 35474S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at a Special Meeting on the 27th day of September, 2011, at 5:01 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 471 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ADOPTING THE TENTATIVE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011/2012 AS THE FINAL BUDGET OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011 AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. September 15, 2011 35476S PUBLIC NOTICE THE CODE ENFORCEMENT SPECIAL MASTER FOR THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE WILL HOLD CODE ENFORCEMENT HEARINGS: WHEN: Tuesday September 20, 2011 TIME: 6:00 P.M. WHERE: Port St. Joe Fire Station SUBJECT: Code Enforcement Violations at the following locations: 1303 McClelland Ave. Owner Marie Naegele All persons are invited to attend these meetings. Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Special Master with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Code Enforcement Special Master of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceedings should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, Telephone No. 850/229-8261. THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE Jim Anderson City Clerk September 15, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Wewahitchka AuctionThe Specialists of the South Presents a Fabulous Live & Internet AuctionSeptember 24, 2011, 9 AM CST Start, Preview/ Register at 8. Lake Alice Park Amphitheatre, Across the Street 149 Hwy 71 North, Wewa. Preview, Register & Bid Online www.specialists ofthesouth.com. Dick Adams, Auctioneer: AU3226, AB2366. As Is, Where Is, All Sales Final. Buyers Premium. Dealers Must Present 2011 Tax Certificate. St. Joe 2007 Long Ave Sept 17th, 8:am-12:pmMulti Family Garage / Moving Sale2 couches, table and chairs, bed, chest, toys, girls clothing, sizes 3 to 5 and 10. Lots of misc. Items ST. Joe 674 Jones Homestead Rd. Fri & Sat 8:am-?Yard SaleLots of items! Bldg Const/TradesMarine WorkWelder Needed. Work at Port St Joe. $15-33/hr. Call (800) 211-4441 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Movie Extras to stand in background for major film. Earn up to $300 per day. Experience not required. 877-824-6274 Full Service, Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL76714 to 56654 2 br apartments for Rent near Hwy 71 & Wewahitchka. Apply at Fisher Building Supply at 848 Hwy 22 or Call 639-5102 for more info Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Small Apt. for rent at Bryant landing on river w/s/e incl. $400 mo. 2 br 2 ba, house at Bryant landing on river w/s/e incl $700 pet negotiable. 850-899-0162 1, 2, & 3 bedroom long term rentals available in Mexico Beach. Please call 850-348-0262 Text FL75507 to 56654 3 br home with 150 ft boat dock, deep water, year round, Call (850) 348-7774 Bayview Home @ Indian Pass. 4 br, 3 ba, 2 acres, large storage and Boat shed. $1200 mo + $1200 dep. $200 pet fee. In the St. Joe school district. Call 850-229-1065 or 850-227-5025 Would like toSwap my home in a N. Georgia Mountain City, for a home in this area. No money owed, Call 478-252-4636 RV Lots at Kristiana RV Park at Beacon Hill 2 blocks from the Gulf, $250 month, W/S included. Call John 850-647-5000/340-0675 Wewa, RVs for rent Weekly or monthly. Includes W/S/E. Also Call 850-639-5721 3 br, 2 ba home priced to sell. 85K negotiable. within 1 mi of 3 schools Central heat & air. 2105 long Avenue, PSJ. Call 850-697-2768 for appt. Buyer to pay closing costs! Text FL75911 to 56654 138 x 315 acre for sale 553 Ridge Rd. in Franklin County. 5 blocks from Bay, 5 miles from St. George Island. $35,000 firm. Call (850)566-7878 Price ReducedFSBO: 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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B8 | The Star Thursday, September 15, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, September 19 2011 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, September 27, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1.Variance Application by Emile & Gail Iverstine for Parcel ID # 06269-135R Located in Section 19, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroachment into side and road setback for ECL affected lot. 2.Open Discussion 3.Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312. 2011-68 PUBLIC NOTICE CITYOF PORT ST. JOEThe City Commission will hold a Special Meeting on Thursday September 15, 2011 at 5:01 P.M. EST. at City Hall, 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd. Topics: 1. Ordinance 470, 2011/2012 Ad Valorem Property Tax Millage Rate Public Hearing and 1st Reading 2. Ordinance 471, 2011 Budget Public Hearing and 1st Reading 3. Gulf Pines Hospital Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. PUBLIC NOTICECity of Port St. JoeThe City Commission will hold public hearings on the following topics at its September 20, 2011 Regular Meeting at 6:00 P.M. EST. and its Regular Meeting to be held on October 18, 2011 at 6:00 P.M. EST. Topics: Ordinance 472, Water Utility Rates Ordinance 473, Sewer Utility Rates Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. Tommy Stephen AndersonTommy Stephen Anderson was born on June 15, 1947, in Port St. Joe, Florida. He went home to be with his Heavenly Father on September 9, 2011. He was a lifelong resident of Gulf County. Tommy was preceded in death by his parents, Jesse and Susan Patricia Anderson of Port St. Joe, Florida; a brother, Harold Gene Anderson of Sunny Hills, Florida; and a sister, Judith Lynn Bond of Port St Joe, Florida. He is survived by his son, Timothy (LeAnna) Anderson; step-grandson, John-Paul Helms, all of Port St. Joe, Florida; a sister, Gail (James) Rider of Cumming, Georgia; several nieces and nephews; and numerous close friends. Tommy will truly be missed. In Tommys 64 years, he lived his life to the fullest. Some of his many talents and hobbies included working with wood and on cars, shing, hunting, cooking, and spending time with friends and family. He loved helping people and was always going out of his way for anyone in need. Tommy was laid to rest on Monday, September 12, 2011, at Holly Hill Cemetery following a service at Oak Grove Church. The service was ofciated by close friend and pastor, David Fernandez. Special thanks go out to all of the staff at The Bridge at Bay St. Joe Nursing Home. Everyone went above and beyond to meet any need Tommy or his family had, both physical and spiritual. The family would like to thank everyone for their thoughts, prayers, food, and all other kindnesses. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Ray DickensRay Dickens of Wewahitchka, Florida, passed away at home on Friday, September 9, 2011, with his loving companion of fortyone years by his side, Sue Dickens. He courageously battled cancer for the past 5 years. He was born October 9, 1934, in Sumrall, Mississippi, to Jack & Burnice (Barnett) Dickens. He graduated from Sumrall High School in 1955 and was offered a basketball scholarship to Pearl River Community College in Poplarville, Mississippi, which he declined to proudly enlist in the United States Army. During his six years in the Army, he traveled to Tipa, China, where he worked in the receiving and transmitter station and repaired radio antennas. He also played on the Army football team, where he played against players such as Rosey Grier. He returned to Sumrall to work with his older brother, Charles Dickens, for Hercules, Inc. in Louisiana and Alabama. He later moved to DeFuniak Springs, Florida, and started Dickens Land Clearing. He moved to Wewahitchka in 1968, where he fell in love with the area and the people. He decided to stay and call Wewahitchka home. It was here he met and married Sue Gaskin. He was an active member of Dalkeith Baptist Church in Wewahitchka, where he led and directed music for many years. Music was an inuential part of his life. He spent many hours enjoying playing his guitar and singing. For the past twentytwo years, he has proudly served as Mayor of Wewahitchka, for the citizens whom he greatly loved and called friends. This was a task he never took lightly, from handing out candy to the children, attending the many sporting events, and coordinating the sh fry for the Senior Citizens. He always rose to every occasion and opportunity to serve and come alongside the citizens of Wewahitchka. The dedication of the Wewahitchka City Annex in 2010 was a great honor for him. In return, the citizens of Wewahitchka have poured out their love and support upon Ray and Sue during his illness. He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack and Burnice Dickens, and his nephew, Craig Lott, all of Sumrall; and Charley and Rosselle Gaskin, and Charles Arthur Gaskin, all of Wewahitchka. Survivors include his wife, Sue Dickens of Wewahitchka; a brother, Charles Dickens of Gulfport, Mississippi, and his wife, Amanda of Blountstown, Florida; a son, Bobby Dickens and wife, Cindy of Freeport, Florida; two daughters, Becky Minardo of Mobile, Alabama, and Tracy Nowe of Houston, Texas; two stepdaughters, Sherry Hall and husband, Steve of Niceville, Florida, and Suzanne Aull of Wewahitchka; two granddaughters; three grandsons; ve stepgranddaughters; one great-granddaughter; three nieces; and one nephew. Funeral services were held 3 p.m. CT Sunday, September 11, at the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church in Wewahitchka with Reverend Joey Smith and Reverend John Clenney ofciating. The family received friends 5-8 p.m. CT Saturday, September 10, also at the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church. Pallbearers were Phillip Gaskin, Gage Gaskin, Harold Lester, Lee Mims, Chipper Wade, and nephew, Leslie Dickens. Honorary pallbearers were the Wewahitchka City Council Members, the City of Wewahitchka Workers, and the Adult Sunday School class of Dalkeith Baptist Church. Services were under the direction of Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown. Phone 674-5449. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.Everett Skull Owens, Jr.Everett Skull Owens, Jr., 78, of Port St. Joe, passed away at home peacefully while surrounded by his loving family on Friday, Aug. 26, 2011. He was born Sept. 5, 1932, in Samson, Ala., to the late Everett Owens Sr. and Hettie M. Weeks in Geneva County. Everett was the youngest of four brothers and four sisters. He was a graduate of Ponce de Leon High School in 1951, and also served in the U.S. Army from 1953 to 1955. He then moved to Port St. Joe, where he married Mildred Slaughter and raised his family. Everett worked at the Port St. Joe paper mill for more than 40 years. He also became active in local politics, serving as Gulf County Commissioner for District Four from 1974 to 1978 and again from 1982 to 1986. Skull was a member of the Port St. Joe Masonic Lodge No. 111, serving for more than 50 years, and was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe. His greatest joy was spending time with his friends and family, coaching little league, hunting and shing. He was known for his quick wit and will be remembered for being a devoted husband, father, grandfather, greatgrandfather and treasured friend. He will be deeply missed by those lives he has touched. Survivors include his wife, Mildred, of 56 years; two sons, Steven Owens and wife, Judy, of Port St. Joe, and John Owens and wife, Catherine, of Orlando, Fla.; ve grandchildren, Stephanie Davis and husband, Allen, of Port St. Joe, Mitchell Owens of Fort Walton, Fla., Sydney Owens of Port St. Joe, and Michael and Olivia Owens, both of Orlando, Fla.; and two great-grandchildren, Charles Allen Davis Jr. and Ava Marie Davis, both of Port St. Joe. Funeral services for Mr. Owens were held at the First Baptist Church in Port St. Joe, with Brother Howard Browning ofciating. Interment was held at Pleasant Ridge Cemetery in Westville, Fla., on August 29, 2011. In lieu of owers, contributions can be made to Emerald Coast Hospice or to the building fund at First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe.Kenneth Lee SearchKenneth Lee Search of Beacon Hill in Gulf County went to be with the Lord on July 18, 2011. He is survived by his son, Theodore Search, and Theodores mother, Carol Roudebush. Mr. Search was born December 17, 1945, in Lima, Illinois. He graduated from Pekin High School, then got his undergraduate degree at the University of Illinois. He went on to get a Masters degree in English at Vanderbilt University. Later, he received another Masters degree in Clinical Social Work at the University of Illinois in 1978. Ken worked for Counseling and Family Services in Peoria, Illinois, from 1978 to 2007. He served as a substance abuse counselor for the Alabama State government from 2007-09, then in the same eld for the Florida government in Wewahitchka from 2009-10. A memorial service for Ken Search was held on Thursday, August 11, 2011, at Mexico Beach First United Methodist Church, led by Pastor Jerry Arhelger and Pastor Ted Spencer, formerly of Wewahitchka United Methodist Church, where Ken had been a member before he moved to Beacon Hill. Ken will be greatly missed by his family members and friends.Nina Viola ThompsonNina Viola Thompson, 92, of Wewahitchka, passed away Wednesday, September 7, 2011, at a local hospital. Mrs. Thompson was born November 26, 1918, in Island Falls, Maine. She was raised in Santa Rosa and moved to Apalachicola to work on a shrimp boat with her late husband, Fred Thompson, in 1946. Mrs. Thompson also shucked oysters at several of the oyster houses in the area. She attended Honeyville United Methodist Church. Mrs. Thompson is survived by children, George E. Thompson and wife, Joyce, Doris Johnson, Fred A. Thompson (deceased), and Harold W. Thompson and wife, Jean; 18 grandchildren; 28 greatgrandchildren; nine greatgreat-grandchildren; a sister, Patricia Hayes; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. CT on Friday, September 9, 2011, at Honeyville United Methodist Church with Rev. Brian Turner ofciating. Interment followed in Buckhorn Cemetery. The family received friends at the church from 1-2 p.m. Southerland Family Funeral Home was entrusted with the arrangements. RaA Y DICkensKENS EverettVERETT SkKUllLL OWensENS, JrR. Local Obituaries


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