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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03811
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 09-08-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03811

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Thursday, SEPTEMBER 8 2011 Y E A R 73, NUMBER 47 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A6 Sports ........................................... A7 School News ................................B3 Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B4 Classieds ....................................B6-B7 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By Tim Croft Star News Editor Tuesday night was one of mixed math for the Port St. Joe City Commission. Commissioners gave nal direction to staff re garding the tentative 201112 budget, including a rec ommendation that water and sewer rates rise less than projected over the next several years. Commissioners also got a hard look at the latest g ures for acquiring the Gulf Pines Hospital property, which provided signicant pause for purchasing the property unless, as Com missioner Lorinda Gin gell said, magic occurs with the numbers by next weeks Friday deadline. The commission will hold its rst public hearing on the budget at 5:01 p.m. ET on Sept. 15 at City Hall. At the same meeting, com missioners must make a decision on taking title to the Gulf Pines property or give up a claim to the land. The proposed budget for next year includes no increase in the millage rate for the fourth consecu tive year. Since the 2008-09 scal year, the city has reduced personnel expenses by 24 percent and operating ex penses by 16 percent. Commissioners leaned toward reducing a pro posed increase in water rates to be implemented next month from 8 percent to 5 percent and on sewer from 6 percent to 4.5 per cent. The proposed increases were those called for in a rate study undertaken last year, but commissioners, taking into account ongo ing issues with water qual ity and the citys improved scal position, favored re ducing the proposed rates and maintaining 5 percent and 4.5 percent annual rate increases through 2015-16. Commissioners also approved a staff recom mendation for a 2 percent Cost of Living Allowance (COLA) salary increase for employees as well as a $750 one-time salary bump. Weve asked a lot of our employees the last three years, Mayor Mel Magidson said, adding that employees had not seen a pay increase in four years. While we have the ability, Id like to see us (provide the COLA and one-time in creases). The city is also switching from United Health Care for employee health insur ance back to Blue Cross/ Blue Shield. Deductibles are the same, but costs to the city will be slightly higher. The vast major ity of employees have their insurance fully paid by the citys $700 contribution. As for Gulf Pines, the latest gures, with county property taxes and other items needed to improve the property for develop ment, continue to move, City Attorney Tom Gibson said, in the wrong direc tion. The city is looking at a potential shortfall of roughly $130,000, at mini mum, to satisfy tax liens, demolish the building, and survey and plat the land to put it on the market, based on projections from real estate agents of what the 2.2 acres would bring at market. Commissioner Rex Buzzett said he pushed the city to gain posses sion of the property from a bankruptcy proceeding to: 1) get the hospital torn down and property on the tax rolls and 2) because 1520 neighbors of the former hospital have been looking at a derelict eyesore for more than ve years. We cant afford to do anything about it now, but I will continue to push the city (to gain possession of the property, tear down the hospital and get the prop erty on the rolls), Buzzett said. Commission addresses budget, Gulf Pines By Tim Croft Star News Editor An appellate court unanimously re versed a lower court decision and sent a Mexico Beach land-use case back to the circuit court last week. The three-judge panel from the First District Court of Appeals of Flor ida, citing substantial due process is sues, reversed a circuit court decision to dismiss action brought by Mexico Beach residents Joe and Mary Bush concerning a lot split application de nied by the city council. The case has spanned two years and cost the city at least $60,000 in at torney fees. In a seven-page opinion written by Judge J. Van Nortwick and led Aug. 31, the judges ruled that the lower court failed to address due process issues raised by the Bushes and remanded the case back to circuit court. By failing to address the due pro cess claims, the judges noted, the circuit court did not engage in the required review, mandated by case law, for cases involving what amount to quasi-judicial hearings, as with the Appeals court reverses MB land use decision By Tim Croft Star News Editor Dual enrollment numbers continue an upward arc at the county public high schools. High school students in increasing numbers are taking advantage of dual enrollment opportunities as a head start toward college degrees while working from the familiar surround ings of their home schools. So far this year, 159 students are dual-enrolled in one of three models offered by Gulf District Schools, an increase of 18 students over last year, and continuing a trend that has seen dual enrollment double in the past four years. The strides have come so far so fast that one Wewahitchka High senior, Bryce Gerber, is on track to graduate in the spring with his high school diplo ma and a two-year associate degree. With the technology available, it seemed to me we should do more for our kids with dual enrollment, said Sara Joe Wooten, district assistant Dual enrollment numbers climb By Tim Croft Star News Editor T hey are coming back and they are bringing friends. The Semper Fi Sisters will hold their third annual Beach Blast Oct. 12-16, with headquarters on Indian Pass, and for the second consecutive year the event is attracting additional military moms, grandmothers, sisters, wives, girlfriends and ancs. In addition, several of the Wounded Warriors who enjoyed a weekend of fun this spring during what has become the annual Wounded Warrior Weekend in Gulf County, will join the Semper Fis, along with the sisters with loved ones from other branches of the military deployed overseas. The Turtle Beach Inn and four to ve surrounding houses on Indian Pass will serve as base camp for the Sisters and their brood. We have more than 57 ladies from out of the county conrmed so far, said Brenda Garth, the local queen of the Semper Fi Sisters, event organizer and mother to sons and a daughter in the service. There are more new people coming for the rst time than we have ladies returning. We are taking over Indian Pass. And this year we are going to have ladies representing the Navy, the Marines, of course, the Army and the Air Force. We will have also have Gold Star moms (those who have lost sons to war) and some of the Wounded Warriors from this spring. They wanted to be a part of this. In fact, the event has grown had such a rapid rate Garth can barely wrap her head around it. Two years ago, 12 ladies, all Semper Fi Sisters with loved ones deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Marines, comprised the Beach Blast contingent. Last year the number was up to 29 women who traveled to Gulf County for a chance to leave the tension of everyday life for the family of one who is deployed behind for a weekend. This year, the number is already over 60 and growing. This is the least I can do to support the troops that are over there for us, Garth said. This is not about politics, its not about war. Its about love. Love of our country, love of our sons and daughters in harms way and love of those who answered the call before. This is a chance to bring women together for a release from the daily tensions you have when a loved one is deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan. They can come here and get support and they are not judged. The women range from Women up front Beach Blast brings Semper Fi Sisters to Gulf County P HOTOS B Y T IM CROFT | The Star In three years the Beach Blast has grown from 12 ladies to more than 60 conrmed for next months Blast. Last year, the Beach Blast brought 29 ladies from outside of Gulf County to the community. B elow A highlight of the Beach Blast is the presence of loved ones, fashioned from photos, a clothes hanger and some camouage uniforms. See WOMEN A3 See LAND USE A2 See ENROLLMENT A2 PORT ST. JOE Dine United, B1

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, September 8, 2011 Sign up now for a free account and receive a towards your deal purchase. Expires October 12, 2011 CHEESE BURGER CORNER OF 2ND AND R EID A VE. PORT ST. JOE. OP EN D AILY 118:30, SUNDAY 18 Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! M OSES J. M EDI N A 850.527.0441 MMEDI N A @ CRESTE N TER P RISES COM REMODELI NG SER V ICES L ICE N SE #R G 0058632 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. BRING A FRI E ND & M E N T ION T HIS AD & R E C E IV E 10% O FF A S E RVIC E N o A ppointment N ecessary Walk-ins Welcome Bush case against the Mex ico Beach city council on the lot split application. Among the criteria that must be considered, the judges noted, was whether procedural due process was accorded the plaintiffs. The Bushes led the lot split application in Septem ber 2009, contending that when they divided their lot into two lots in 2005 they had met all requirements under the citys land use regulations. The Bushes assertion was based on the city com prehensive plan which stated that a development shall be considered consis tent with the adopted Com prehensive Plan if the de velopment conforms to the provisions set forth in the City of Mexico Beach Land Development Code. The Planning and Zoning Board voted unanimously to deny the application fol lowing a hearing in October 2009 and the city council was to take up the applica tion in a public hearing later that month, but tabled the application for future con sideration. Over the ensuing six months the Bushes sought but were unable to obtain a hearing before the city council on their application and alleged that during this time other property owners presented and obtained ap proval and acceptance of division of parcels for sale or development, Van Nort wicks opinion details. The Bushes sought re lief in circuit court, which issued an order to the city to show cause. A nal hear ing on the application was scheduled for April 13, 2010. Again, the application was tabled to provide time for the city to retain a attorney. That attorney, David Theriaque of Theriaque & Spain of Tallahassee, has re ceived payment for services in excess of $60,000 from the city since May 2010, accord ing to an accounts payable summary from the city. As noted by the appellate court, while the Bushes ap plication was pending the city council was consider ing the adoption of new land development regula tions that in part addressed the subdivision of property and required neighbor hood consistency when lots are subdivided. The new ordinance was adopted by the council on April 13, 2010 and the fol lowing month the council unanimously denied, with out discussion, the Bushes application. In doing so, the council found that the appli cation failed to comply with the new ordinance and two policies in the Future Land Use Element of the compre hensive plan, the appellate opinion detailed. In both courts the Bush es contended that the new ly-passed ordinance cannot be applied to their applica tion and they had not been advised the city was relying on future land use policies nor given any opportunity to argue in support of their application, Van Nortwick wrote. Further, the Bushes as serted that the city manager had stated during a public meeting that the changes to the LDR would not impact their application. The Bushes sought re view from the circuit court based on due process vio lations and asserting they never received the quasijudicial hearing before the city council to which they were entitled. The circuit court found that the Bushes complaint was not timely led and while there may have been due process claims, any relief this Court could afford the (Bushes) would be of no practical purpose and would not affect the underlying va lidity of the City Councils Final Order denying the Lot Split Application. We cannot agree, Van Nortwick wrote. The appellate judges said that while consistency issues, as the city argues, must be raised, the judges noted that the Bushes have raised much more than con sistency issues. Because the Bushes assertions were beyond the scope of simple consistency, in particular issues of due process, they were entitled to review by the appellate court. The appellate judges sent the case back to the circuit court and stated if the Bushes prevail on their contentions before the cir cuit court, the nal order of the City Council would be quashed and would have no force and effect. LAND USE from page A1 superintendent for instruc tion. We are in a rural area, but why cant we? This semester, online courses are offered in Eng lish at both high schools and in digital design at Port St. Joe High. There are also two-way interactive classes in which high school students effectively sit in on classes at Gulf Coast State College through distance learning in Western civilization, al gebra and biology, the latter a new offering this year. There are also students dual-enrolled at the Gulf Coast State College campus in Panama City or the Gulf/ Franklin Center in marine biology, meteorology and government. We have saved parents over $19,000 this semester in tuition and the cost of textbooks, Wooten said. Dual enrollment saves time and money for students and parents, she added. All of these courses are offered on-site at each high school. It saves tuition, textbooks, gas, extraneous money for college there are lots of little things you dont think about when you think dual enrollment. The district has long had an articulation agreement, or dual enrollment agree ment, with Gulf Coast State College, formerly Gulf Coast Community College. Wooten said Dr. Cheryl Flax-Hyman, who serves as liaison between the college and Gulf District Schools, has been instrumental in the programs success. She works with me, and whatever we need, she makes it work for us, Woo ten said. The district has also re ceived nearly $2 million in grant dollars to enhance technology in the district both high schools, for ex ample, now have Wi-Fi ca pabilities and GCSC has also provided grant money to bolster technology for dis tance learning. The Gulf Coast Work force Board, which has a vested interest in producing a skilled workforce through the schools, has provided grant funding to broaden dual enrollment opportuni ties. Another key for the dis trict is that the two-way interactive distance cours es taught through GCSC three times a week dur ing second period, students are piped in to a classroom at the college is the pres ence of certied teachers in each subject area at the high school. Those teachers follow along with the college lesson plans and provide tutoring and additional assistance for students in the collegelevel classes. What makes our pro gram work is we put a cer tied teacher in each class room, Wooten said. These are certied teachers who can help students. Our suc cess rate in these classes is really, really high. Another key element of the program is its impact on school grades under the states grading formula. Beginning last school year, 50 percent of high school grades are based on results from the Florida Comprehensive Assess ment Test taken only by ninthand 10th-graders and 50 percent is based on participation and suc cess rates from such things as dual enrollment and ad vance placement classes. ENROLLMENT from page A1

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Recently I went to the Humane Society and adopted my 4th child Slim Pickins. I was overwhemled at how many pets there were to be adopted. Animals are being dropped off or picked up daily, either because the owners can not take care of them or they are found side the road, wondering around looking for something to eat or drink. Anyone whos ever taken in an adopted dog knows that they are the most loving, and friendly pet theyve ever had. Beginning Friday, September 9th (and every 2nd Friday of each month) we will feature Dogs for Dogs. Come by the Port St. Joe Marina around lunchtime (11:00 a.m. ~ 2:00 p.m.) and enjoy an all you can eat hot dog lunch (chips, and soda) included for a $5.00 cash donation. All donations will be given to St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. This event is open to the public, so please help us spread the word. The Gift Shop has marked down all summer clothes to the minimum cost. Be sure to stop by Friday, September 9th before or after you have your hotdog for lunch and check out our deals. Dogs for Dogs September 9, 2011 At Port St. Joe Marina 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Fl 32456 850-227-9393 F OOD, SNACKS AND DRINKS: Beef Jerky/Slim Jims Coffee (Ground or whole; instant or drip. Ground is preferred) Powder Drink Mix (Gatorade, KoolAid, Crystal Light) Sunower seeds and pumpkin seeds Tuna and chicken salad (in foil pouches, or ready-to-eat kits (no cans) Protein powder and protein bars Hot Chocolate packets, Herbal teas Hard Pretzels / Cheetos / Fritos / Chex Mix / Wheat Thins / Ritz Hard Candy (must be individually wrapped in large bags) Granola Bars / Power Bars / Cereal Bars / Cliff Bars Fig Newtons, Oreos, Nutter Butters, Cheese & Crackers Small Packs Trail Mix, Dried Fruit, Granola, Fruit Roll-Ups / Fruit By The Foot / Fruit Gummies Nuts: Peanuts, Mixed Nuts (salted preferred) Microwave food (Popcorn, Chef-BoyR-Dee, MacnCheese...) Cookies / Girl Scout Cookies (with chocolate: Oct. Feb. only!) Rice Krispie Treats (Store-bought only) Little Debbies & Hostess cake products Oatmeal Packs (Instant: just add water) Cereal (Small, individual boxes) Condiments, Spices; Sugar; Salad Dressing (no glass jars) Caffeinated gum or candy (to stay alert) CHOCOLATE PRODUCTS accepted from OCTOBER through MARCH (it will melt in high temperatures!) Hot Sauce small sizes (Eds Red or Tabasco) wrap glass bottle w/duct tape & double zip lock bag, bubble wrap ENTERTAINMENT AND SPORTS : Batteries: (AA, AAA, C & 9 Volt are the most requested) DVD Movies (new or used recent releases only, please!) Xbox Games, PSP, PS2 & PS3 Games (new or used) iTunes Gift Cards Computer Flash Drives & Thumb Drives Portable CD players Head phones / Ear Buds Electronic handheld games Pens but ONLY Stic Pens, do NOT send with clickers or movable parts) small note pads or small notebooks Stationery & Envelopes; blank cards to send home Double-sided tape, Small, Pocket Calendars Game Books: (Crossword Puzzles / Word Search Books / Math Puzzle books / MAD LIBS / Logic Problems / Sudoku) Yo-Yos, Dominoes, Playing Cards (new), Poker Chips & Mats, Dice Board games (UNO, Othello, Checkers travel size is great, too!) Frisbees / Hackey sacks Music CDs, or Sports DVD of basketball games, football or baseball games Sports, Hunting, Fishing Magazines & Books HYGIENE Baby wipes Hand sanitizer wipes (liquid tends to make mud on dirty hands) Body Wash, Liquid Soap, Facial Cleanser Shampoo /Conditioner (travel size) Hair Gel (for female troops to pull hair back) Combs / Brushes / Bobby Pins (in original packaging, please) Deodorant (travel size) Razors (disposable or Intuition or Mach 3 types) Shaving Cream in Tubes / Shaving Soap (No CANS of Shaving Cream, please!) Lip balm / Chap Stick / Carmex / Blistex Foot Powder (medicated Gold Bond is one often used) Tissues (individual packs; travel size only) Hand & Body Lotion / Moisturizer (travel size) Bug Spray / DEET / Skin-So-Soft Mouthwash (travel size) Toothpaste & Toothbrushes & Dental Floss Breath Mints / Breath Strips Lozenges / Cough Drops Loufa Sponges / Buff Puffs / Washcloths Nail les / Emery Boards / Nail Clippers Feminine Hygiene Products (Panty Liners & Tampons) Q-tips also used to clean guns! Cotton Balls Band-aids, Gauze Pads, First Aid Kits / Ace bandages, Icy Hot or Bengay cream Moleskin Shoe Insole Cushions (gel kind is best) Tylenol, Motrin, Advil or Aspirin Packets (individual unopened packages only) Eye Drops (i.e. Visine) Nasal Spray Vitamins (multi-vitamins are always needed! Original containers UNOPENED OTHER: T-SHIRTS: Cotton green & tan under shirts new (Sizes: M, L & XL) Long Sleeve T-shirts also Disposable Hand warmers and Foot warmers (in the wintertime) Laundry Detergent, Trial Paks or Individual Paks Bounce Dryer Sheets (used to put in boots, between clothes & sometimes to deter bugs) Air Fresheners (standalone-not plugin. Car types are also good) SOCKS: Black, Olive Green & White (cotton or wool) Small toys (Beanie babies) & school supplies for Iraqi & Afghan children Patriotic knick-knacks, USA ags, ags from your state, bandanas, baseball hats, football jerseys, banners to tack on their walls or tents. Black or Green duct tape, small tool kits, dust masks, carpentry tools, Fly swatters, y paper, mosquito netting, bug repellent in plastic pump bottles only (NO AEROSOL CANS, PLEASE!) Gun cleaning supplies (lube) such as Militec-1 & CLP Fleece Blankets Winter Hats in black, tan or green are always welcome!) Small survival Mirrors Some of the many items needed for shipping to troops: those with loved ones just entering or exiting basic training to those who have had loved ones deployed to war zones and wounded and killed in war. They all bring something to the table, Garth said. This allows them to remember. Its a constant remembrance, a constant journey. Its a support system. This is about the need for others to not feel alone. And to share. When I am reaching my hand up to receive guidance from a mom who has lost a son or had one wounded, Im also reaching back to help those women who have a loved one just entering basic training. One night last year, several of the women spent an evening on the roof of a house in Indian Pass, staring at the stars and kibitzing until 3 a.m. There was also the ocean boat cruise enjoyed by a number of women. And, Garth noted, there are those who just want to curl up on the beach with a good book. The event is a sponsor of the Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival which will coincide with the Beach Blast 2011. Last year, a group of the Semper Fi Sisters made an appearance at one performance wearing pink hats adorned by ashing tiaras. And, of course, there is the pirate in front of the Piggly Wiggly who has now appeared in personal photographs throughout the Semper Fi Sisters network. Before we got together some of us met at boot camp, said Paula Lowry of Riverdale, Ga., who attended the rst Beach Blast. When your son or daughter slaps you in the face with this, you feel like you are on an island with all these emotions. You have this lonely feeling. We were baptized as sisters by fear, pain and this hopeless feeling. To be able to come down and laugh, enjoy the scenery and the wonderful strangers who treated us so wonderfully, it was incredible. Pat Krawec of Taunton, Mass., noted, Our children enlisted; we were drafted. And for a brief weekend, the women can bask in the Oorah Sisterhood. We had a wonderful time, Krawec said. Your community was so warm and generous to all of us. It was incredible to see the patriotism and support for our troops in Port St. Joe. In the community as a whole down there they support the military. Id like to see that in other places, support like that. That community support is needed again this year. I need the community to donate, donate, donate, Garth said. Items are needed for the care packages assembled on the nal day of the Beach Blast last year the women sent more than 350 care packages to troops in war zones overseas and for postage to do all that shipping. Well pack as many boxes as we have items for and ship as many as we have money for, Garth said. The Post Ofce is excited and so helpful with all this. Drop off points for items are Harolds Auto Parts on State Highway 71 in Wewahitchka and The Star newspaper in Port St. Joe, in the Port Shopping Center by the Piggly Wiggly. Donations for postage or other items can also be mailed to Semper Fi Sisters, P.O. Box 1022, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Garth says those deployed overseas to submit the name, unit and address to her. WOMEN from page A1 Local The Star| A3 Thursday, September 8, 2011

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Thursday, September 8, 2011 Opinion A4 | The Star Virginia had an interesting week last week, experiencing both an earthquake and a hurricane. Both of these events scared me and when I nd humor in them, please dont think that I dont understand how deadly and devastating earthquakes and hurricanes can be. I do understand, because Ive experienced rsthand Hurricane Isabel in Williamsburg, Va., in 2003 and many deadly tornadoes in Alabama, including being less than a mile away from the 1989 tornado that killed 21 people in Huntsville. That being said, it really has been an interesting time for a fellow who does what I do for a living. An earthquake measuring 5.8 was experienced in Virginia on Aug. 23 while I was sitting in my ofce. At rst, I wasnt sure what it was. Above me, it sounded like a helicopter or something malfunctioning on the roof top. Then the chalkboards in my ofce (I have many) started to shake and my computer screens wobbled. This concerned me. It felt like a ride at an amusement park, where the oor was about to drop out from under my feet. My wind up monkey clanked his cymbals one time, it scared me, but then it was over. Outside my ofce in the hallway, everyone seemed to say at the same time, That was an earthquake. It gave us something to talk about. We had the weekend to look forward to. Hurricane Irene was headed toward us and at the time, she seemed really mad. All my friends and co-workers were getting ready. Having experienced Isabel in 2003, I was going to do my best to be prepared. It is not fun going through a real hurricane; however it can be fun preparing (if you let it be). Everyone has their hurricane preparedness list. Looking at my list, I was quite proud. I had water, food for a month, ashlights, lanterns, batteries, charged cell phones, plenty of gas, charcoal and a radio that you can crank (thanks to my Mama). I wouldnt nd propane until Saturday, but I did nd it. Hurricane Irene was scheduled to hit us on late Saturday afternoon and evening, so I was in good shape. The stores were selling out of everything you needed on Thursday, Friday and Saturday morning. The hardware store had batteries and lanterns coming in by the truckload and they were being sold as fast as they were being unloaded. The shelves at the grocery stores were empty and everyone was in a panic. On Thursday evening, I was getting my batteries and ashlights and such together. I was lining them all up on the ping pong table. I was proud of myself. My younger daughter was following me around at about midnight (school hadnt started back in Virginia) telling me that she couldnt nd the hot glue gun. Of course, I didnt use the hot glue gun last and didnt know where it was. However, it was very important to her; she was making a bulletin board birthday gift for a friend she was going to see Friday morning. She had waited until the last minute, because she had been practicing eld hockey. Having worn a skirt (in the father/daughter game) and played eld hockey, I understood. I also tend to wait until the last minute to do some things. We looked and looked for the glue gun, my daughter followed me around to make sure I was looking, but we couldnt nd it. At about 1:30 a.m. on Friday morning, I decided to go to Walmart, about 20 minutes away. My daughter needed the hot glue gun; I wanted her to have it. There was one problem; everyone was still looking for food, water, ashlights, batteries, lanterns, candles and all the things they needed to be ready for Hurricane Irene. The Semper Fi Sisters are a reminder. A reminder that 9/11 is hardly over. The Semper Fi Sisters return next month to the postcard paradise we call home to relax, gab and generally forget, at least for a few days, the heightened potential for one of the women to get that knock on the door that anyone would dread telling them a loved one is not coming home. Actually, this group has become much more than the Semper Fi Sisters. Over the past three years, their annual gathering in Gulf County, called the Beach Blast, has broadened from a dozen or so Marine moms to wives, girlfriends, sisters, aunts and grandmothers of enlisted men of all branches. The Marine moms have opened their arms just as the community opened its arms to them, welcoming those with loved ones in the Army, Air Force and Navy. But at this time when the country is reminded 24/7 on stations around the television dial that 10 years ago America suffered the worst attack on native soil in history, these moms, aunts, wives, sisters and grandmothers can relate that story far more personally than the talking heads. They will remind that 10 years after America lost nearly 4,000 lives that number has tripled in the wars that followed 9/11, leaving aside a count of the wounded and maimed. They can remind that 10 years after the country was deeply scarred at its symbolic core, downtown Manhattan, the countrys business district, and the Pentagon, the countrys defense headquarters, men and women still come home with scars borne of battle with no promise of healing in 10 years, 20 years. They are a reminder that while no one with memory of that fall day when sunshine turned to ash, dust and blood will ever forget, this circle of life and death that has been the cost of the freedoms on which this country was founded and which we enjoy today is a bill paid in blood. For many of a certain generation, all that really separates 9/11 from Pearl Harbor of seven decades ago is the technology of media. In 1941 the country could not tune in as Katie Couric, Ann Curry and Matt Lauer tried to explain to viewers what was happening as planes bombed and laid waste to the countrys largest naval installation. Pearl Harbor, in fact, was located in some exotic locale that would not become a part of a state until nearly 20 years would go by. But the iconic black and white photograph of the U.S.S. Arizona engulfed in ames and smoke as thousands were buried in a watery grave, the grainy newsreel images of that carnage is, for many of a certain generation, just as stark and real a reminder of what a dangerous world it can be in which to hold on to those freedoms. And Gulf County has lived this legacy, a legacy of which a chapter, a jarring and reality-shaking chapter indeed, is being recognized this week. As the monuments at the county courthouse and Port St. Joe city hall attest, the county has sent its young off to ght and die since wars and Gulf County were rst linked together in the 20th Century. Clifford Sims Parkway, that section of U.S. Highway 98 that threads through the Port St. Joe city limits, memorializes the actions of an African-American all but lost and forgotten in his hometown while living but revered in death for throwing his body onto a grenade to save others. On Sunday, by coincidence, Capt. Dave Maddox, who served in the Navy and the Coast Guard, patrolling local waters for a time, will turn 90 years young, one of the remaining of the Greatest Generation. A local resident served with valor and distinction at one of the most horrendous battles of the Vietnam War and two county residents were on the last helicopter out of South Vietnam when it fell after 50,000 American lives were expended in attempting to preserve it. A local high school coach and teacher, a reservist no less, is now entering at least his fourth deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan. Not that any of these folks readily speak about their experiences; for them and their families there is no need for television specials or limited edition commemorative volumes about the anniversary of that dark day 10 years ago because the swirling emotions of lives cut short in an instant, of family upheaval that will span far beyond a decade, is part of life. It is an ongoing saga. In his book Where Men Win Glory author Jon Krakauer describes the journey of Pat Tillman from millionaire NFL star to Army Ranger killed by friendly re in Afghanistan. While in the end it is a book that angers in telling how the military hid the truth of Tillmans death from his family and the country, it is also a book that exhilarates in the thoughts, as reected through his journals, that roiled Tillman in the days after 9/11 as he pondered leaving behind his glory days before fans to more glorious days for his country. He had not earned his charmed life, he wrote; he owed something. The Semper Fi Sisters will arrive next month as a reminder of how that debt is being paid, every day, by so many brave men and women whose courage only those who have experienced battle can fully appreciate. And as a reminder that the legacy of 9/11, the image of 9/11 that ought to be remembered as much this week as images of burning buildings and ash-covered streets is that of the everyday men and women in uniform who sacrice so much each and every day, and have for 10 long years. Keyboard KLATTERINGS Me, myself and Irene Remembering that horrible day TIM CROFT Star news editor Oh, say can you see Leon would whup on me on slow days. He was ve years older, much bigger and understood the family pecking (no pun intended, although come to think of it, he pecked on me some, too) order. In the fairly tranquil pace of the late 1950s we grew up thinking a little pushing and shoving was a natural way of life. He did the pushing and shoving I suffered the consequences. It was internal strife at its nest! It whiled away the hours, broke the tedium and entertained us before television reached our little neck of the woods. It was all in the family. When those guys from out on the Como Road pushed me down and was making off with my Western Flyer, Leon showed up out of nowhere. He whacked the one who had actually hit me so hard I swear his eyes went crossed and stayed that way through half of the fth grade! He extracted my bike from the tall guy by jerking both handlebars and the front fender through his rib cage. He lifted the third guy off the ground with one hand, pulled him up close and whispered, pre Clint Eastwood like, Dont ever touch him again. Them three young hooligans got the message. And so did I! Leon could push me around, that apparently was some God given commandment pertaining to rst born. Or maybe it was his constitutional right. It might have just been a Carroll County law, I dont know. He could distribute punishment, retribution and/or justice about like he saw t. BUT I was not fair game for any Tom, Dick or Harry that wanted my marbles, my hula hoop or my 1958 Mickey Mantle All Star baseball card. On September 11, 2001, some outsiders stepped into America. I dont need to remind you of the tragedy. There are reporters out there that are far more articulate than me to rekindle your spirit as it relates to that frightening event. There is no way I could put something of that catastrophic magnitude in perspective anyway. But for some reason this morning Leon and those Como outlaws keep rolling over in my mind. On the Monday before the attack on the World Trade Center, America was grumbling about gas prices, arguing over whether Joey ought to marry one of his Friends and still shaking our heads over the 2000 presidential race. That hotly contested and highly divisive campaign between Bush and Al Gore had half the country crying over the approaching global warming. The other half, naturally, was celebrating. We woke up on the 11th enthralled in our own little worlds. The universe revolved around each one of us! America went to bed that night with a whole different attitude. We were not Democrats or Republicans, Catholic or Protestant, Northerners or Southerners, rich or poor we were all in the same boat! America went to loving our neighbors, feeling each others pain and reaching out before the Red Cross sent the dun notice. People stuck American ags in their front yards voluntarily! God Bless America was sung at ball games. Folks started asking if they could help, and really meant it. We all were amazed, touched and inuenced by those reghters running INTO a burning, crumbling, falling down building, in hopes they could nd someone to help. I remember how I swelled with pride as Leon chased off those numskulls from down the road. They got what they deserved. Hooray for the good guys! You cant beat family. Those little licks he would give me forgotten, I counted them as love taps. He was my brother. I appreciated his very being! It was wonderful to be alive, an American, a child of God. Sadly, this country followed one tragedy with another one. I cant remember exactly when we started being Republicans and Democrats again. Im sure it was before the 2004 or 2008 elections. I dont see half as many ags unfurling as we did in the immediate aftermath of 9/11. The Red Cross has to beg for blood again. I can understand Pearl Harbor. We are admonished to remember it, .but theres not many folks left that actually were sitting around their radios on that fateful Sunday afternoon to hear it rst hand. Its a vibrant and commanding reminder of what can happen. But it is, after all, history now. The attack on the World Trade Center is not history! If you think that, you are living in a dream world. The threat is real and it continues. I believe Democrats have more in common with Republicans than they do with third world terrorist bent on taking over America. I think most congressmen believe that, they just dont act like it sometimes. I would love to love my neighbors without anyone having to die rst. I want to sing God Bless America when all is right. I want my grandchildrens biggest concerns to be long check out lines and who got thrown off American Idol. It borders on the ridiculous that we have to be dodging bullets before we can get together on something in this country. Of course, Im not really surprised. Leons magnanimous rescue out on the Como Road lasted until we got back in sight of the house. He pounded me a little for being so stupid to wander that far off by myself. I resented his size and bullying. I vowed Id grow up soon and get even. My short attention span had distanced his salvation of only an hour before. I hope Americas short attention span doesnt get us in the end. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See IRENE A5

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24-EMERGENCY SERVICE FOR OUR CURRENT CLIENTS! Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility 300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM Afternoon Appointments Available Drs. Hours By Appt. 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, September 19 2011 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, September 27, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application by Emile & Gail Iverstine for Parcel ID # 06269-135R Located in Section 19, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroachment into side and road setback for ECL affected lot. 2. Open Discussion 3. Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312. 2011-68 Thursday, September 8, 2011 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S Letters A5 | The Star Two in the morning at a Walmart, could be fun. As with any Walmart, an older gentleman in a blue vest welcomed me and everyone else looking for hurricane stuff into the store. He was repeating his rehearsed speech over and over again to all of the people entering the store at 2 a.m. The older blue-vested gentleman said something like, welcome to Walmart, we are out of batteries, out of ashlights, out of lanterns, there is some water over there (he pointed) etc. I caught him in between repetitions of his out of speech. A small crowd of people gathered around, probably thinking I knew where to get propane or D cell batteries. I asked the Walmart greeter, Do you have hot glue guns, and if you do, where are they? The elderly bespectacled, blue-vested, friendly gentleman paused and thought. I had caught him by surprise. The small crowd got closer to see what his response was. After a minute, he directed me to the arts and crafts area in the rear of the store. I walked slowly at rst. After realizing that the small crowd was following me, I sped up. I had them, I had my hook in them and I had them. This was fun; at least it was for me at 2 a.m. in the Walmart. Another employee took me to the aisle with the hot glue guns. At that point, the crowd was hovering around the ends of the aisles. The employee who was helping me was very nice and we discussed the hurricane and everything the store had sold out, and when they had more trucks coming in. I sure am happy you have hot glue guns, I loudly told him. We then discussed the benets of corded versus cordless hot glue guns. I chose the corded one (because it was cheaper). After slowly walking away toward the front of the store, I turned and watched the poor fellow get swamped by the crowd of folks who had been following me, undoubtedly they were asking why they needed hot glue guns, why that fellow got a corded one, and what was he doing with it, etc. My daughter nished the bulletin board birthday gift the next morning, she was happy. I had a good time at the Walmart in the wee hours of the morning. Thank you Irene. You can nd Cranks My Tractor stories on Amazon for the Kindle and at www. CranksMyTractor.com. IRENE from page A4 By Ed McAteer Contributing Writer Iran has long sought to become the undisputed leader in its region, largely through aggressive and ambitious military development. Irans weapons program is of enormous concern to the U.S. It isnt only former Soviet weapons and weapons-usable nuclear material that Iran is getting its hands onit has also actively recruited former Soviet atomic scientists. Communist China has also supplied the Iranians with nuclear technology. It is clear Iran wants its own production capability. Under the guise of creating a civilian energy program, it is pushing to bring home whole facilities like uranium-conversion facilities spending far more each year on nuclear hardware than would be required for mere domestic energy production. It now has two nuclear power plants. Iranian diplomats state that they were built only for energy. But nobody believes that, since their country is glutted with oil. Iranian state television reported on Aug. 21 that Iran is moving its centrifuges to a secret site inside a mountain near Irans Fordo plant near the city of Qom. The Fordo plant was built in secret, and its existence was only revealed to the world in September 2009. Last month, Iran also announced that it was starting to use a new centrifuge that could enrich uranium ve to six times faster than the old type. This past Sunday, the head of Irans nuclear program, Fereydon Abbasi Davani, told state television that Iran was negotiating with Russia about the construction of new nuclear plants. In recent years, the Islamic republic has announced its intentions to build research nuclear reactors and uranium enrichment facilities as well as 10 to 20 nuclear power plants to eventually produce 20,000 megawatts of electricity. Iran is still under four UN Security Council sanctions and one-sided measures imposed by the United States and the European Union over its refusal to abandon its uranium enrichment program, a process that can be used to make both nuclear fuel and the highly enriched uranium needed for a nuclear bomb. Using the Fordo plant provides greater protection for Irans uranium-purifying centrifuges against any U.S. and Israeli air strikes. This means Iran can move more quickly toward building a nuclear bomb. On the other hand, do they have one already? Notice this quote from the European newspaper over a decade ago, in a front page article titled Iran Has N-Bomb: Iran has obtained at least two nuclear warheads out of a batch ofcially listed as missing from the newly independent republic of Kazakhstan, formerly part of the Soviet Union. This article said the Russians sent a topsecret report to the CIA disclosing that several nuclear warheads vanished from a just-closed nuclear base in Kazakhstan. Two of the nuclear weapons were smuggled across the border from Kazakhstan into Iran last year and are now under the control of Reza Amrollahi, the head of the Iranian Organization for Atomic Energy. Amrollahi is also in charge of recruiting former Soviet atomic scientists have sharpened the Wests anxiety over Irans efforts to build an Islamic bomb. Iran is now working hard to become self-sufcient in its missile production. In July 2000, Iran announced a successful test of its own Shahab-3 missile, which has a range of over 800 miles. Contacts within the Iranian regime claimed that the Shahab-4, with a range of 1,300 miles, was successfully tested in the summer of 2002. This missile uses Russian technology. Robert Walpole, a National Intelligence Council ofcial, told the Senate Governmental Affairs subcommittee on proliferation that The probability that a missile with a weapon of mass destruction would be used against U.S. forces or interests [or Europes, I might add] is higher today than during most of the Cold War, and will continue to grow. In other words, in the hands of a country like Iran, this terrifying arsenal wont sit idle for long. We must awaken to the unparalleled nuclear holocaust just ahead of us. Irans history shows that they are adept at using those means at their disposal to meet their objectives. Ed McAteer is a resident of Port St. Joe. Relations in Florida since 9/11 better, but still work to be done By Dr. Donna Elam Chair, Florida Commission on Human Relations For Florida and our nation, the 10th anniversary of 9/11 serves as an appropriate time to reect on where we stand in our dealings with one another. As Chair of the Florida Commission on Human Relations, I believe we must recognize that how Americans treat each other sets the tone for how the rest of the world treats us Americans. Our country has wrestled with an internal conict since it was founded. On the one hand, we stand proudly as a nation of immigrants, a so-called melting pot that embraces people of all types and blends them into something uniquely American. On the other hand, throughout our national history we have endured staggering divisions along lines of race, ethnicity, culture, nationality and more. So how are we doing? Have the aftershocks of 9/11 brought us closer together? Or have they driven us even further apart? For the past 20 years, the Florida Attorney Generals Ofce has issued an annual report detailing hate crimes reported to the state by Florida law enforcement agencies. The most recent assessment, for 2009, shows the fewest hate crimes in the history of the report. But when we step back from that positive one-year snapshot and instead look at the bigger picture, what emerges is a pattern not of declining antagonisms but of changing targets. Not surprisingly, the period immediately following the 9/11 attacks saw a dramatic spike in hate crime incidents in Florida, particularly those based on religion or national origin. Since that terrible day 10 years ago, the percentage of reported hate crimes based on the victims religion has grown by more than one-fth and the share based on ethnicity or national origin has jumped by more than two-thirds. Over the same time period, the share of hate crimes based on a victims race or color has fallen 24 percent. Lets take time to reect on the loss of life, the families left behind and our collective responsibility for sustaining and maintaining peace in our world. Machines to enrich uranium moved to a secret site

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Freshwater Gag grouper season will reopen Sept. 16, and many anglers are eager to get back to shing. Inshore wrecks and bridge rubble sites should see good sh early on. Live bait such as small pinsh and even nger mullet will get you in the action. Inshore Offshore Scallop season continues until Sept. 27, and we still have good reports from Pig Island and in Scallop Cove. Most of the bigger shells are now in 6 to 10 feet of water, and a boat is a must. With the high surf and strong winds from the last weekend. As the storms and winds move on out of town, shing should improve over the next few days. Heavy rains mean swift water catshing. Setting bush hooks in the river for channel cats should be very productive this week. SP ONS ORED BY Corner of Marina Drive next to Piggly Wiggly Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Everything for your Outdoor Adventure 151 WEST HIG HW AY 98, P. S .J A LL S W I MW EA R UP T O 50 % OFF R EG UL A R PR I C E COME SEE US! The weekly reports from our new cement piers are as follows ... The City Pier: A few king mackerel late in the evening, Spanish mackerel and bluesh through out much of the day. There is all the live bait you could possibly use around the pier so take along a sibiki rig or a gold hook rig and a livewell. On the M.B. Miller pier: Large schools of redsh along with a few cobia. Some schools of cobia as large as 10-15 sh have been spotted, but most people shing now are tourists and they are not equipped to catch sh of this size. The June grass still is too thick to sh from the beach although more and more pompano are being seen from boats. At the jetties some divers have reported whiting as large as 3 pounds. Here again I dont know how you would ever be able to sh for them on the bottom due to the grass. In the pass in St. Andrew Bay the bull reds rule the day. Try to catch it on an outgoing tide and look for the crabs swimming on top in the oating ell grass. Most of the redsh are too big to keep, so do not stick a gaff into them to get them onboard. If they are so big they require gafng they are too big to keep. Remember they must be returned to the water unharmed if they are more than 27 inches long. Dont forget to pinch their tails when you measure them to get the legal length. It is the beginning of September, and that means the bigger king mackerel will start showing up from the far west. These smoker kings will start making their run back to the east which around here will last until the middle of November or when the water cools to the point they are uncomfortable and they leave. In St. Joe Bay the scallops are getting bigger and bigger. Since school is open you should have it to yourself until the weekend comes. Most people Ive talked to are getting the bigger ones in deep water. I feel uncomfortable in deep water catching scallops, but that is just one of the demons I wrestle with when Im around an area known to have big bull sharks. That is why I stay in knee-to waistdeep water. Go out this weekend and have a good time. Hooked on Outdoors Bradford Whited, right, was all smiles after a group harvested this 10-foot alligator during his rst hunt in Bay County. S P E C IAL TO TH E S T AR Scott Lindsey Outdoor Writer captainlindsey@knology.net Scallop season runs late this year By Frank Sargeant franksargeant@bellsouth.net For those who love to chase the tasty shellsh, it always seems to take forever for the opening of the scallop season to arrive then its over before you know it. This year, forever will last a little longer than usual. The season opened July 1 and will continue to Sept. 25, 15 days longer than in past seasons, in an effort to stimulate the economy of small coastal ports affected by last years oil spill. Open waters extend from the Pasco/ Hernando county line to the Mexico Beach Canal and so far this season the harvest has been good. Some of the largest scallops of the year will be captured in the last few weeks. The shellsh are fast-growers and those harvested in early July are signicantly smaller than those taken in September. The prime scalloping area in the Panhandle is St. Joe Bay, where clear water and lots of eel grass provide ideal habitat for the swimming shellsh. Theyre also abundant on the ats off Steinhatchee and Suwannee as well as at Homosassa and Crystal River. Scallops are an annual crop. They hatch live spawn and die in a single year, like most types of shrimp, and so the annual take by recreational divers is thought to have minimal impact. The tiny larvae develop into shellsh up to three inches across by July and August of each year and thousands of Florida families turn out to pursue these strange little animals, the only shellsh that can swim. Unlike most shellsh that afx themselves to the bottom, bay scallops can swim by clapping their shells together. Admittedly, its a slow, crazy dance, but they do manage to move from place to place and with the help of the tides can sometimes travel for miles. Bay scallops only survive where there is clear water and abundant grass. Fortunately, waters of the eastern Panhandle and Big Bend area have plenty of both, and thus plenty of scallops. The shellsh are typically found in water from 4-to-10 feet deep over turtle grass, the long-leaved greenery that sprouts abundantly from the bottom in the open areas. Because theyre lethargic swimmers, scallops are easy for a snorkeler to capture by hand and theyre a favorite target for young swimmers. Many families plan their annual summer vacation with the kids for the opening of the scallop season. Once things get rolling, nding the scallops is simply a matter of looking for the eet. Where the shellsh are abundant there will be dozens of boats drifting over them. On days when other boats are scarce, you can usually nd the shellsh by motoring slowly and looking for them on the bottom. The shells are white to gray-white and easily seen against the grass. Scalloping is a relatively safe activity, but one danger is that divers may get too far from an anchored boat and then not be able to swim back against the tide. To avoid the issue, many put divers out behind a drifting boat. The boat and the divers progress across the at at about the same rate, and one adult remains in the boat ready to pick up any divers who need a lift. The favorite scalloping ports include Steinhatchee, Crystal River, Homosassa and Bayport. Guides who specialize in scallop trips are available at all these locations, for those just getting started. A saltwater license is required to harvest scallops and the limit is two gallons whole or a half-pint, shucked, per harvester, up to 10 gallons whole and a half-gallon shucked per boat. The only part of a scallop considered edible is the adductor muscle, the white piece of esh that opens and closes the shell. Cleaning the catch is a bit of an issue. All the workings of the creature must be scooped away, leaving only the muscle, which is then severed from the shell halves with a teaspoon or an oyster knife. Some have made use of shop vacuums to clean out the entrails, which is fast, but which leaves a very smelly mess in the vacuum. Once the meat is processed, it can be used in all sorts of delicious recipes, but the best is simply to drop the bits briey into a pan of sizzling butter, scoop them out and drain. Its one of the real delicacies of the sea. For details on scalloping, visit www.myfwc. com. P HOTOS CO UR T E S Y O F TA MP A BAY WA TCH E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com Page 6 Thursday, September 8, 2011 O UTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com Thursday, September 8, 2011 A Page 7 Section NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDING THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED ON THE CITYS ADOPTED EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission, of the City of Wewahitchka will hold a public hearing to adopt Amendments to the Comprehensive Plan based on the recommendations from the Citys adopted Evaluation and Appraisal Report. These Infrastructure; Conservation; Recreation and Open Space; Intergovernmental Coordination; Capital Improvements and Public School Facilities Elements of the Comprehensive Plan. This hearing is for the following Ordinance: The City Commission public hearing will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, September 26, 2011. These hearings will be held at the City of Wewahitchka, City Hall, located at 109 South 2nd Street, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465. A copy of the proposed Amendments shall be available for inspection on weekdays between and be heard with respect to the proposed Amendments. If a person decides to appeal any decisions made by the city commission with respect to any matter considered at the hearing, that person will need a record of the proceedings, and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations for this meeting as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act should contact the City Clerk at least three business days within the incorporated areas of the City of Wewahitchka. Connie Parrish,City Clerk NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA The City of Wewahitchka has declared the following items as surplus and will accept sealed bids for the purchase of these items. Minimum bid for any vehicle is $150.00. 1. sewer plant aerators (2) 2. 1989 Chevy Van 3. 1989 Ford Pick Up 4. 1978 Ford E70 bread van 5. 1985 Dodge Pick Up 6. 1983 Ford Pick Up 7. 1984 Ford Van 8. 1978 Chevy Step Van Bids must be marked SEALED BID SURPLUS EQUIPMENT and must be received by the City Clerk prior to 12 noon (CT) Monday, September 26, 2011, at the City Annex, 318 South 7 Street, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. Items may be inspected at the City sewer plant during regular business hours Monday through Friday between 8:00 AM and 3:00 PM (CT) by appointment. Please call 850-639-2605. Bids will be opened during the regular City Commission meeting on Monday September 26, 2011, at 6:30 PM (CT). CITY CLERK CONNIE PARRISH The City of Wewahitchka is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Star Staff Report The Benders, an 8-andunder traveling baseball team recently competed in the Back to School Blow out Tournament in Do than, Ala. The team, which in cludes three players and one coach from Port St. Joe, nished the two-day tournament with a record of 5-0 and claimed the tour nament championship. The Benders opened play on Saturday with a 19-7 win over the Wiregrass Cardinals. Later on Satur day, the Benders beat the Lynn Haven Dolphins 13-5. Three wins on Sunday earned the Benders the championship. The rst was a rematch with the Wiregrass Cardinals and the Benders again outslugged the Cardinals in a 13-4 win. The next game was a rematch with Lynn Haven and again the of fense was in full swing for The Benders as they won 17-5. The Benders complete ly dominated the title game against the host Dothan Aces, winning 17-2. The Benders are com prised of kids from around the Panhandle, including Port St. Joe and Franklin County. In the photo, Clint Rest er of Franklin County is second from the left in the front row. Davis Varnes of Port St. Joe is in the second row, second from left; Gage Me dina of Port St. Joe is in the second row, sixth from left (with his mouth open); and Alex Strickland of Port St. Joe is in the second row, on the end at the right. Coach Stacy Strickland of Port St. Joe is third from the left in the third row. By Tim Croft Star News Editor For the rst eight min utes of last Fridays regu lar-season opener against county rival Port St. Joe momentum was tinted en tirely in Gator red. By the time Wewahitch ka reclaimed that edge it was too late. Senior Walt Bowers rushed for 163 yards and freshman Jarkiece Davis added 119 yards and the Tiger Sharks needed ev ery inch of their more than 450 yards of total offense to overcome a scrappy Gator team and the scintillating play of Theryl Brown for a 34-26 win. It is hard to believe you can walk away from a win feeling this bad, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. I am very frustrated. We played well in spurts but we have not gured out how to put a full game together. We just had too many mistakes. At least they are xable. Wewahitchka took con trol on the opening kickoff which Brown who rushed for 263 yards and three touchdowns on 32 carries and scored all 26 Gator points returned 85 yards for a touchdown. After Port St. Joe which had 10 penalties and ve turnovers to mitigate the Tiger Sharks offensive out put fumbled an exchange on the next series, the Ga tors recovered at their 28. Brown, subbing at quar terback for starter Justin Flowers who suffered a hairline arm fracture in last weeks Kickoff Classic at Blountstown, sprinted off left tackle for 72 yards to make the score 12-0 after Wewahitchka failed twice to convert extra-point run ning plays. But after forcing a Tiger Shark punt on the ensuing series and driving toward mideld, the Gators fum bled away the ball and mo mentum for the next two quarters. During that span Port St. Joe scored 34 consecu tive points, Davis starting things with a 31-yard sprint with three minutes left in the opening quarter and completing the outburst with a 48-yard dash around right end to make 34-12 with less than 14 seconds remaining in the third pe riod. In between, Bowers car ried for two touchdowns and Rummelo Zaccaro an other, the Tiger Sharks up 28-12 at intermission. The Tiger Sharks n ished the rst half with more than 300 yards rush ing and nished with at least 28 rushing yards from ve players. Three minutes after Davis second touchdown, however, Austin Guffey seized momentum back for Wewahitchka when he picked off a Trevor Lang pass in the at with the Ti ger Sharks knocking at the Wewahitchka 15. Guffey returned the pick to the 26 and behind Brown, who carried seven times on a nine-play drive, the Gators pushed in a touch down, with Brown running for the two points to bring the Gators within 34-20. Three plays later a fumbled exchange by the Tiger Sharks was recov ered by Wewahitchkas Ben Hayward at mideld. Brown rushed six times in the eight plays the Ga tors needed to score, but a failed extra point conver sion and subsequent onside kick sealed the win for Port St. Joe. Brown played nearly the entire game nursing an arm contusion suffered early in the second quarter. Thats what weve got to have, the kids not giving up and ghting back like that, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah. Im proud of this bunch. Theryl Brown, that is one heck-uv-a player; if we just had one or two more like him. I thought we kind of wore them out at the end. Port St. Joe hosts Boze man on Friday while Wewa hitchka hosts Vernon. TIM CROF T | The Star Walt Bowers (left) takes a pitch on a night during which he rushed for 163 yards and two touchdowns. Port St. Joe edges Wewahitchka Front Row Kneeling: Trace Mears, Clint Rester, Ryles Burch, Kellen Speights Second Row Standing: Waylon Crumpler, Davis Varnes, Trace Horne, McLane Baxter, Caden Mercer, Gage Medina, Alex Strickland Back Row: Coach Michael Baxter, Coach Adam Mercer, Coach Stacy Strickland. Not Pictured: Head Coach Emory Horne Benders traveling team wins Dothan tournament

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A8 | The Star Thursday, September 8, 2011 By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer The gulf will be packed Saturday morning with 250 sets of flailing arms and kicking legs as athletes be gin the Beach Blast Sprint Olympic Triathlon and Duathlon in the waters at St. Joe Beach across from Beacon Hill Park in Port St. Joe. Athletes will swim, bike and run their way to the finish line in a 30-mile endurance test, held biannually at Beacon Hill Park. All of them are in good shape, said race director Olga Cemore, a manager at the Panama City Health Club. There will be some first timers, but they must be training five days a week at least. Cemore expects more than 250 participants from all over the world. The full Olympic Race triathlon begins at 7 a.m. CT with a 0.7 mile swim on St. Joe Beach. Athletes will then cross Highway 98 to Beacon Hill Park and suit up for the 25 mile bike ride which will take them down Highway 98 to County 386. The race closes with a 6.2 mile run. The event provides op tions other than the full triathlon for athletes of different skill levels. The race is offered in a shorter Sprint Race ver sion where participants will swim 0.35 miles, bike 15 miles and run 3 miles, as opposed to the regu lar triathlon where par ticipants swim 0.7 miles, bike 25 miles and run 6.2 miles. A duathlon option is also offered, where partic ipants will run, bike, and run again, for those who may be uncomfortable with the swimming leg of the race. A lot of people are scared of the water, said Cemore, who also noted that the swimming portion is the hardest of the three for most athletes. Its not easy. Its much different than the pool. Cemore recommends all participants test out ocean swimming be fore entering a triathlon. Ocean currents can make the swimming more dif ficult, but mostly its the overcrowded waters that make swimming a chal lenge. You kick, you get kicked, Cemore said. You elbow people, and you get elbowed. The duathlon is also broken down into Spring Race and Olympic Race distances. Cemore said offering the duathlon helps attract more people, and also of fers another option if surf conditions are rough or dangerous. If the water is not friendly, it gives us the option to switch to the du athlon, she said. In her years as race director for the event, Ce more said she has only had to cancel the race once in 2007, when bad weather in the days before forced her into an abrupt decision to cancel. It rained like hell all day the day before and all night, Cemore said. But Saturday morning you would have never known there was a storm. Cemore hopes to never have to cancel the race again. You just never know (about the weather), she said. We did the race in the rain a few years be fore, and no one seemed to care. The race is a joint ef fort between Cemore, the Gulf County Tourist De velopment Council, the Mexico Beach Commu nity Development Council and a group of dedicated volunteers. Im in contact with the TDC, and we had to work hard on permits, Cemore said. Its gotten easier over the years. Everybody does their part and helps out. Cemore said the event would not be able to ex ist without volunteer sup port. It really doesnt mat ter if you have 100 (par ticipants) or 250, you have to have volunteers for safety. Cemore said. Those are super impor tant people. We love our volunteers. Cemore said anyone thinking of participating in a triathlon or duathlon should just try it. Youve got to train for the distance and youve got to be able to run whats required, she said. Cemore said more than 50 percent of race partici pants come back to race again. This is a good event, Cemore said. It has grown and brought people to the community. They come to the area and stay longer. PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the City Commission Regular Meeting on Tuesday October 4, 2011 at 6:00 P.M. EST. The Hearing will be held in the Centennial Building at 2201 Centennial Dr., Port St. Joe, Fl. 32456. The Public Hearing will be to discuss and act on the following: Development Order Request for 521 Premier Dr. Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center, LLC. Parcel #: 04269-002R S 25 & 36 T 7 R 11 47.501 AC M/L 4 PARCELS; 1768 FF ON US CANAL ORB 87/820 FR ST JOE LD & DEV, ALSO 150 FF ON US CANAL FR CITY IN ORB 88/550; ORB 87/1092 BEING 2.144 AC M/L FR CITY & ORB 148/434-436 FR GULF CO. FL ORB 306/151 CA FR ST JOE TIMBERLAND CO LLC ORB 306/154 FR MATERIAL TRAN SFER INC MAP 49A Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments to the Planning and Development Review Board, 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Transactions of the public hear ing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at Building Department at 1002 10th Street, Port St. Joe, Fl. 32456. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk at (850)229-8261 Ext 113. VARIANCE NOTICE The City of Port St. Joe Planning and Development Review Board will hold a Meeting to discuss a Request for a Variance on October 11,2011, 4:00 EST, at the City Fire Station 402 Williams Ave. for Lester Dale Parrott located at 509 3rd Street, Parcel #04696-000R. The reason for the request is a proposed 10x20 Carport to be built on the South-West side of the property. The proposed plans can be reviewed at the Building Department located at 1002 10th St. and can be reached for questions at (850)229-1093. All persons are invited to attend this meeting. Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Planning and Development Review Board with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Planning and Review Board of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing special accommodations to participate in these proceedings should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, (850)229-8261 WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West Pass TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 227-7847 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Sep 8 82 69 0 % Fri, Sep 9 82 69 10 % Sat, Sep 10 84 74 40 % Sun, Sep 11 84 74 40 % Mon, Sep 12 85 73 30 % Tues, Sep 13 85 74 30 % Wed, Sep 14 87 75 60 % 9/8 Thu 07:42AM 1.9 H 05:35PM 0.3 L 9/9 Fri 08:41AM 1.8 H 05:49PM 0.4 L 9/10 Sat 09:36AM 1.6 H 05:43PM 0.7 L 9/11 Sun 10:36AM 1.3 H 05:18PM 0.9 L 11:41PM 1.1 H 9/12 Mon 04:41AM 0.9 L 11:48AM 1.2 H 04:34PM 1.0 L 11:17PM 1.3 H 9/13 Tue 06:04AM 0.8 L 01:42PM 1.1 H 03:09PM 1.0 L 11:16PM 1.4 H 9/14 Wed 07:07AM 0.7 L 11:29PM 1.6 H 9/8 Thu 03:14AM 1.3 H 07:19AM 1.3 L 12:32PM 1.6 H 08:50PM 0.3 L 9/9 Fri 03:31AM 1.4 H 08:17AM 1.2 L 01:48PM 1.6 H 09:28PM 0.4 L 9/10 Sat 03:47AM 1.4 H 09:04AM 1.0 L 02:47PM 1.6 H 10:00PM 0.5 L 9/11 Sun 03:59AM 1.4 H 09:45AM 0.9 L 03:37PM 1.6 H 10:25PM 0.7 L 9/12 Mon 04:09AM 1.4 H 10:22AM 0.7 L 04:22PM 1.5 H 10:45PM 0.8 L 9/13 Tue 04:19AM 1.5 H 10:56AM 0.6 L 05:06PM 1.5 H 11:01PM 0.9 L 9/14 Wed 04:31AM 1.6 H 11:27AM 0.5 L 05:51PM 1.5 H 11:16PM 1.0 L Sports Contestants line up for the swim portion of the 2010 triathlon/duathlon. PHOTOS COURTESY OF BILL FAUTH The agony of the competition is written all over the face of this competitor during the 2010 triathlon. Beach Blast Triathlon/Duathlon this weekend

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Page 1 Section Thursday, September 8, 2011 Downtown merchants to meet about possible committee Star Staff Report The group of downtown merchants that has been meeting for the last several weeks would like to hold a meeting to discuss the structure of a formal organization/committee and the goals and/or mission of that organization. All interested downtown merchants are encouraged to attend the organizational meeting, which will take place at 4 p.m. ET Monday, Sept. 12, at 308 Williams Ave., in the ofce building next to Donamelias. The boundaries of downtown have not been dened, nor has what is a merchant. That is part of the agenda for the proposed meeting. If you are interested and are unsure if you are downtown merchant, please come and take part in the discussion. Everyone who is interested is invited and encouraged to attend. Please notify your fellow business owners and encourage each to participate. For an organized effort to succeed, there must be involvement by all and a consensus about how to proceed. There has been a concerted effort to notify everyone, but please pass the word along incase email addresses are incorrect or unknown. If you have an agenda item, please email it to adavis@statecraft.us by Friday, Sept. 9. Agendas will be emailed out by 8 a.m. the day of the meeting. Please bring your printed copy. If possible, please RSVP so that adequate seating can be provided. Dine United tonight Event a boost for the economy and a communitys most vulnerable citizens By Tim Croft Star News Editor Fill yourself up with helping others tonight. Tonights fourth annual Dine United event will kick off the United Ways annual community campaign, which each year drops the green ag during the rst week of September. Though the number of participating restaurants has dropped, the concept of eat, drink and give is as tangible as ever as the United Way amps up its community campaign for another successful year. How successful? In 2006, the Gulf County United Way campaign raised $38,000. The following year, the amount grew to $56,000, where it remained in 2008. That is a 44 percent increase in tough times, said Ron Sharpe, United Way community development coordinator for the six-county region that includes Bay, Gulf, Jackson, Calhoun, Liberty and Washington counties. Of all of our six counties, Gulf was the only one to show an increase. With the loss of Arizona Chemical and its employee campaign, the Gulf County campaign took a dip to $41,126 in 2009 but rebounded to $49,421 in 2010 and continues a saga that has seen Gulf County outperform surrounding counties with its campaign in three of the past four years, Sharpe said. Gulf County continues to carry its own, Sharpe said. Dine United was created two years ago as a fun way to kick off the annual campaign. DINE UNITED The following restaurants will be participating: Subway (Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe locations) The Thirsty Goat Killer Seafood Sunset Coastal Grill Boon Docks Dockside Cafe The Bridge at Bay St. Joe provides aid for those with dementia By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer He stopped counting at 240. It was Clif Smiths third tour in Vietnam, and his duty that morning was to count the incoming bombs from the deck of the Navy missile destroyer. I was getting ready to become a dead 23-year-old, Smith said. I prayed and I said, God, save me from this mess, and God showed up. Smith keeps his dog tags on his key chain and an old photo dated 1972 in his ofce, taken on the Navy ship when he returned from Vietnam alive, with a young brunette named Bettie who he says his faith reunited him with by chance. Smith and Bettie, high school sweethearts from a Central Florida high school, were reunited across the country in California, where Smith was preparing to ship off to war and Bettie was employed 45 minutes away at Disney Land. They will be married 41 years this December. Smith, a born-again Christian, said his faith was with him, too, when his 11year-old sons pancreas shut down and his blood sugar spiked to 600. His son is now grown with children. Fate was also the reason he was in that grocery store in Chipley when he ran into an old friend, the chaplain from the North Florida Rehab Center in Graceland. At the time, he was working in the mens suit department at Dillards in Panama City and seeking a meaningful career change. His ticket was there in that grocery store. He believes God led him to his current position as chaplain at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing care residence, where he acts as a spiritual comfort in the lives of many residents, but also as a friend. I look back on my 63 years, and I think, God brought me here, Smith said. Chaplain One of the largest employers in Gulf County, the Bridge at Bay St. Joe employs 160 and houses 108 residents. It is one of 73 Signature HealthCARE Communities, employing 12,000 and housing 8,000 in the Southeastern U.S., and one of only nine facilities partnered with Serenity Health Care. Smith is one of only ve full-time, paid chaplains in Florida. E. Joseph Steier III, president and CEO of Signature HealthCARE, founded the company with a dedication to bringing faith to the workplace. Steier chronicled his pilgrimage to Israel in the book My God! Our God? after witnessing the divine healing of his son. He asked God to intervene, and God intervened by showing up, Smith said. Human beings have spiritual needs that need to be met. Even those who dont consider themselves spiritual can be comforted. Ive had family members that came here to watch their loved ones die in a weeks time, Smith said. One person said to me, Thank you for your comfort. Every morning, Smith gets up at 4 a.m. and drives 70 miles from Sunny Hills to Port St. Joe to bond with residents at the nursing home. One resident with Alzheimers who used to be an opera singer often accompanies Smith in his ofce while he plays his Josh Groban CD. We just sit here and put that CD in, Smith said. That part of his brain that was music is still music. Smith recalled bonding with another male resident who didnt like preachers. Smith described the man as a typical Panhandle good ol boy, one who loves to hunt, sh, drink and smoke. I got to spend a lot of time with him, and one day his wife asked him, Why do you love brother Clif so much? Smith said. He said, He makes me feel safe, he makes me feel secure, he makes me feel loved. In his three years at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe, Smith has realized chaplain is not his only title. Im not always chaplain. My name is Clif Smith, and Im happy to be your friend, he said. So what happens? We begin to bond. I meet you at your point of need. Dementia The Bridge at Bay St. Joe is a nursing home specializing in care of residents with dementia and Alzheimers. We bridge the terrible, terrible gap between traditional long-term care and specialized long-term dementia care, Smith said. Smith compared dementia, in the news recently with the announcement that legendary womens basketball coach Pat Summitt of the University of Tennessee has been diagnosed by early-onset dementia, to holding a slinky. See BRIDGE B8 They come here to live VALE R IE GA R MAN | The Star Clif Smith in his ofce at The Bridge at Bay St. Joe, where he works as the facilitys full-time chaplain. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe facility, located at the corner of Long Avenue and Ninth Street in Port St. Joe, is a faith-based nursing facility specializing in long-term dementia care. B See UNITED B8

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B2 | The Star Port St. Joe Garden Club NEWS Thursday, September 8, 2011 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Society Kosins celebrate 50 years of marriage Don and Judy Kosin of Port St. Joe are celebrating 50 years of marriage. They were wed Sept. 9, 1961, at the Sesquicentennial Chapel on the campus of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Thank you, Mom and Dad, for exemplifying a Christ-centered marriage. We are blessed to have you in our lives. With all our love, Beth and Matt, Joe and Sarah, David and Denise. Hugs and kisses to Grammie and Granddaddy Love, Matthew and Caleb, Mac and Jay I Cor. 13:13 Dave Maddox The family of Dave Maddox requests the pleasure of your company at his 90th Birthday Celebration on Sunday, Sept. 11, from 3-6 p.m. ET at The Maddox Home, 601 17th St., Port St. Joe. So easy to preserve: Canning class offered Star Staff Report A free canning class will be presented by the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Gulf County Extension Ofce. RSVP to 850-6393200 or 850-229-2909 by Sept. 12. The classes will be held on the following dates: Tuesday, Sept. 13, from 6-8 p.m. CT at the Honeyville Community Center, 240 Honeyville Park Drive, Wewahitchka Thursday, Sept. 15, from 6-8 p.m. ET at the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association Building, 120 Library Drive, Port St. Joe. What will you learn? Why to preserve foods, how food preservation methods work, safe canning methods, what foods to can in a water-bath canner, what foods to can in a pressure-cooker canner, equipment, procedures, materials to keep food safe and much more. Star Staff Report On Aug. 18, the Port St. Joe Garden Club visited the Green Gate Olive Grove. Don Mueller, owner of the grove, gave an interesting and informative talk on olive growing. After the talk, the club picked olives and brought them home for curing. Sherrie Bowen won the Port St. Joe Garden Club drawing for a years membership in the club. The next meeting of the Port St. Joe Garden Club will be today at the Garden Center, 216 Eighth St., at noon ET. The meeting will be a covered-dish luncheon to kick off the new year of programs. The club will learn paper folding of origami owers. Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board to meet Sept. 14 Star Staff Report The Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces a public meeting to which all people are invited. The Gulf County Transportation Disad vantaged Coordinating Board will meet Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 2 p.m. ET at the Gulf County Transportation Ofce, 122 Water Plant Road in Port St. Joe. In addition to regular business, the agenda includes an update to the TD Service Plan and the Annual Operating Report. A time for public comments will be afforded to anyone wishing to address the board. If anyone decides to appeal any de cision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meet ing, he or she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For more information or a copy of the agenda, or if you require special accommodations at the meeting be cause of a disability or physical im pairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Ave. E., Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424, 850-674-4571.White, Jenkins to wed It is with joy that we invite you to share in a celebration of love as we, Taneisha V. White and Travis R. Jenkins, Sr., exchange our marriage vows. The beginning of our new life together will occur at 5 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011, at New Life Christian Center, 504 Sixth St. in Port St. Joe.W ewahitchka High School All Class Reunion 2011 An All Class Reunion for Wewahitchka High School will be held Saturday, Oct. 1. Everyone in the community is invited, so make plans to come enjoy seeing old friends and catching up with one another. The reunion will be held at the Honeyville Community Center in Honeyville beginning at 2 p.m. CT. If you would like to attend, please send a check for $10 (per person) to Dianne (Lester) Semmes, 1730 CR 386 North, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. There will be a photographer taking individual, group and miscellaneous pictures during the reunion. If you would like a copy of the CD, there will be a sign-up sheet, and you will need to pay the $10 fee up front. If you need more information or would like to assist in any way, please contact Dianne at 639-5345 (home), 227-6425 (cell) or Wewamama@yahoo. com. Food and beverages will be provided, but donations of desserts are requested. The deadline for checks is Sept. 26. Class of 1980 end of summer reunion party The Port St. Joe High School Class of 1980 and friends are invited to attend a reunion party Sept. 9 and 10. Any graduate of Port St. Joe High School from around the year 1980 is invited. The party will be a two-day event, beginning Friday at Mango Marleys from 6-8:30 p.m. ET. The party will then move to the Lookout Lounge for some late-night fun. On Saturday, there will be a beach party from noon to 5 p.m. ET at Toucans in Mexico Beach, and later, the group will gather for dinner at Boondocks at 7 p.m. ET. For more information on the reunion party, visit PSJclassof1980. webstarts.com or contact Buddy Nachtsheim at 850-814-0754 or mtnachtsheim@ gmail.com. Anniversary Birthday Reunions Wedding

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The Star| B3 Thursday, September 8, 2011 SAVE 40% KINCAID UPHOLSTERY Sofa, Sectionals and Sleepers in Your Choice of Fabric HARRISON HOUSE FURNITURE EST. 1979 Best of Bay 2011 A+ Rating by the BBB 11 Harrison Ave. Downtown Panama City Closed Sun. & Mon. Great designs at 850-763-4918 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER S o u t h e r n C o o k i n g a t i t s B e s t Best Food Best Prices for Local Seafood & Steaks on Shrimp Fried or Grilled w/ 2 Sides $10.95 8 oz. Ribeye w/ 2 sides $11.95 8oz. & 16oz. Black Angus (Hand Cut) Ribeyes Fish Basket w/ 2 sides $9.95 8 oz. Burgers w/FF $9.95 Hours: 236 Reid Ave (850) 229.7121 THU RS D A Y & F R ID A Y NIGH TS 6 8:30 Haughty Heron Now Accepting New Members WI N E T A S T I N GS E DUC AT IO N ME M BER D ISCOU NT S ME M BER P A R T IES The Please call for details (850) 381-0700 117 S ailors C ove, Port S t. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-3463 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 U p c o m i n g THURSDAY 9 PM E T RANDY ST ARK ON T HE P OO P DECK FRIDAY & S A T URDAY 9 P M ET RANDY S T ARK WI T H AR T LONG ON SAX ON T HE P OO P DECK K ARAOKE & D ANCING IN T HE CROWS NES T S UNDAY P O T LUCK 7 P M E T BARRY H ENSON O P EN A T 11AM E T 7 DAYS A WEEK WWW.LOOKOU T LOUNGE.COM E v e n t s ! The rst weeks of school have come and gone. It is amazing to see how our students grow and change from year to year. It is also very exciting to see new little faces with backpacks as big as their little bodies. The bright smiles and their enthusiasm for school will make any teacher work himself or herself to the bone. The Faith Christian School staff works as a team to produce Christcentered students who are wise, healthy and well-adjusted. Every staff member works independently within the team, using his or her God-given talents and tools to attain this goal. It is not too late to enroll for the 2011-12 school year. Open slots are still available in all grades. Please call the ofce at 229-6707 for more information. (Scholarships are available.) Yearbooks are here. If you have not received your yearbook for the 2010-2011 year, just stop by the front ofce to pick it up. The yearbook editor, Janice Evans, and her staff have once again presented a fabulous book of memories. By Marcell Johnson and Troy Williams General information The varsity cheerleaders would like to thank the local businesses that have supported their program by buying ads for their 5th annual ad shirt. In these rough economic times, they have sold more ads this year than ever before. This is just a testament to the amazing businesses of Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas and The Beaches, and the great support for the children in our community. Thanks! Ad shirts are still on sale for $15. Contact Mrs. Smallwood or one of the cheerleaders to purchase one. You can still register your child, pre-K through sixth grade, for the Youth Cheer Camp on Sept. 10 from 7:30 a.m. to noon ET; fee is $25. Free after-school tutoring with Ms. Pittman and Mrs. Ethridge through Gulf Coast State College/ Franklin Center every day between 3-5 p.m. ET. Fall photographs for students and faculty continue today. Also, they will do senior portrait makeups and retakes. Patriot Day The 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on America falls on a Sunday. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School will remember the innocent people who lost their lives on that fateful day with a school assembly today during fth period. Clubs Mu Alpha Theta meeting today; $15 dues are to be turned in for membership.Sports news Jr. high football game today at home: Sharks vs. Wewa at 7 p.m. ET. Sr. high football game Friday, Sept. 9, at home: Sharks vs. Bozeman at 7:30 p.m. ET. Jr. and Sr. high volleyball game Sept. 13 at West Gadsden High, 6/7 p.m. Fall sports pictures Sept. 15: groups and individualS P E C IAL TO T HE T IME S The Lions Tale The Lions T ALE Shark T ALK Education Encore at Gulf/Franklin Campus On Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 1 p.m. ET in Room A 101, registration will open for Education Encore classes at the Gulf/Franklin Campus. Education Encore provides noncredit enrichment classes for active adults on a variety of topics: computers, exercise, art, drawing, photography, religion, writing, Spanish, home repair, story crafting, history, etc. The goal of Education Encore is to provide a fun learning environment that offers diversity, insight and wisdom in which adults explore new ideas. Classes will be held on six consecutive Wednesdays from Sept. 21 through Oct. 26. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which includes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, visit www.gulfcoast. edu/EducationEncore, or for more information, call 872-3823 or email Jim Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. Dont miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest. You are never too old to learn. Corrections class scheduled A corrections class is scheduled for Oct. 3 at the Gulf Coast State College, Gulf/Franklin Campus in Port St. Joe. According to sources within the Department of Corrections, only applicants who have completed the class and passed the state board exam are currently being considered for employment as correctional ofcers. But the institutions in our area are beginning to hire ofcers following a lengthy hiring freeze and are running out of qualied applicants. The previous class was canceled because of a lack of enrollment, but we are continuing our efforts to encourage citizens who wish to pursue a career with good benets to contact us. For more information, call 227-9670, ext. 5507 or 5511, for more details. Star Staff Reports School News Education BRIEFS

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FAITH Page B4 www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler First Presbyterian Church 508 Sixteenth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 850-227-1756 Rev. Ruth Hemple Worship Service 10:00 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Rev. Drucilla Tyler www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Sunday Night Awana .... 5 pm 7 pm Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Jerry Arhelger, COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 Thursday, September 8, 2011 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. The rich man and Lazarus Beginning in Luke 16:19, there is an account of an unnamed rich man (Church history says his name was Dives) and a beggar named Lazarus. There have been endless debates about whether this is a parable or not. This passage, was told to a group of pharisees, and contains the name, Abraham, whom the Pharisees claimed as their ancestor, and the beggar, Lazarus, whom the Pharisees probably knew. Since it was told, about the time Jesus raised his friend Lazarus from the dead, it is probably a real account about real people. It goes like this: There was a certain rich man who was clothed in purple and ne linen and fared sumptuously every day. But there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, full of sores, who was laid at his gate, desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich mans table. Moreover the dogs came and licked his sores. So it was that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels to Abrahams bosom. The rich man also died and was buried. And being in torments in Hades (another name for hell) he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham afar off and Lazarus in his bosom. Then he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus that he may dip the tip of his nger in water and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this ame. But Abraham said, Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things; but now he is comforted and you are tormented. And besides all this, between us and you, there is a great gulf xed, so that those who want to pass from here to you cannot, nor can those from there pass to us. Then he said, I beg you therefore, father, that you would send him to my fathers house, for I have ve brothers, that he may testify to them, lest they also come to this place of torment. Abraham said to him, They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them. And he said, No, father Abraham; but if one goes to them from the dead, they will repent. But he said to him, If they do not hear Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded though one rise from the dead. Whether a parable, or not, Jesus telling us, that the way we live, has serious consequences. Picture yourself, in hell, in torments, with no hope of escape, and no way of warning your relatives and friends. Maybe today is the day for you to stop trusting in religious ceremonies, and ask God to make you into what He wants you to be, and follow the leading of the Holy Spirit every day! Questions or comments are invited. Send to us at one of the addresses below: Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible, every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh. Check us out this Sunday! For the spring and summer seasons, our services begin, with a time of greeting and fellowship, at 9:45 a.m. CT on Sunday. Our worship begins at 10 a.m. For those interested, we have midweek ministry, helping people on an individual basis. Inquire for more information. Come early on Sunday morning so that you can meet us informally and join in the praise and worship music led by TJ. On Sunday morning we worship at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st Street. The Civic Center is located behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker Realty, just off U.S. Highway 98 in the western end of Mexico Beach. Look for the white building with the dark green roof. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337, Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook, look for Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com The Christian CONSCIENCE Judgment Day Isnt Far Away Well, it looks like the commissioners have it all gured out. At least they think so, but I still have doubts. The bar folks say they worry about their patrons health. Sounds to me like they want more of their wealth. Two more hours to drink, if it wasnt so sad it might be funny. The booze hounds are barking for more, and the bars keep taking their money. You commissioners are wrong to let things happen this way. Im glad to be me and not you, when it comes judgment day. Billy Johnson

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www.starfl.com B Section Highland View Baptist Homecoming The Highland View Baptist Church will celebrate 60 years of ministry with its 31st Annual Homecoming at 10:30 a.m. ET on Sept. 11. There will be special music presentations and Brother Larry DeMoss, former interim pastor, will be bringing the morning message. A covered-dish lunch will be served at noon. Everyone is invited to attend. The church is located at 382 Ling Street. Anniversary Celebration The Thompson Temple First Born Church of the Living God invites you to a celebration honoring the anniversary of Bishop Frank Hogans Jr. The celebration will be held at the church, located at 222 Avenue E in Port St. Joe, on Sept. 11 at 11:30 a.m. ET. We invite you and desire your prayers! Annual Womens Day at Victory Temple First Born Holiness Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church in Port St. Joe will celebrate its Annual Womens Day at 11:30 a.m. ET on Sunday, Sept. 11. The speaker will be Missionary Pinkie Bolden-Patterson and the theme is If the Hats Could Speak. We invite you to come on this Annual Womens Day and help us enjoy Jesus. Your presence will be well appreciated. Come and be blessed. Annual Womens Day at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church Annual Womens Day will be celebrated at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church on the 3rd Sunday, Sept. 18. The day will begin at 10 a.m. ET with Church School followed by a special 11 a.m. morning worship service with Evangelist Barbara Bell of Panama City as the guest speaker. A special invitation by the Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church membership is extended to everyone to come and be a part of this great day of blessings from God. The church is located in Port St. Joe on Avenue D. City Wide Mission Fruit Harvest Program The City Wide Missionary Society of Port St. Joe will sponsor its Annual Fruit Harvest Worship Services on Thursday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. ET at the Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church located at 315 Martin Luther King Blvd. Foreign Mission service will be the highlight of this years program and will feature Mr. Marty Rileys recent mission trip to Brazil. Marty, a member of First Baptist Church located here in Port St. Joe, will share his experiences in the mission eld through pictorial presentations and personal observations. This program is opened to everyone to attend and support the work of the City Wide Missionary Society. An offering will be taken. New Horizon AA The New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 639-3600. Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 C A LL T ODAY! GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! S IN CE 2002, D OING B U SIN E SS IN T H IS CO MMU NIT Y LAWN CARE, TREE & PA L M TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVA L DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVA L or whatever your yard needs are CALL J O E @ 850-670-5478 E -MA I L @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com FAITH Page 5 Thursday, September 8, 2011 Patricia Hogeland, 65, passed away in Kinard, where she wanted to be at home with her kids on Sunday night, August 28, 2011. She is preceded in death by her parents, Bill and Lena Findley and three brothers, Billy, Jhon, and Wayne Findley. She is survived by her sons, Jerald, and Tommy and wife Vickie, of Kinard, FL; a daughter, Teri Herring and husband Leslie of Birereld, AL; nine grandchildren, Melissa, Joey, Ritn, Kirstie, Kenny Bo, Leann, Allen, Chris, and Cody; ten greatgrandchildren, Emily, Wyett, Joey, Jr., Ashley, Kayla, Kristen, Ashley, Hope, Tori and Alane. Graveside funeral services were held Wednesday, August 31, 2011 at 10 a.m. CT at Buckhorn Cemetery in Wewahitchka with the Rev. Joey Smith ofciating. All services were under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Patricia Hogeland Riley Dennis, (19382011) age 73 of Pensacola, passed away Friday, Aug. 26, 2011. He was a loving and devoted husband, father, grandfather and friend. Riley served his country in the U.S. Army and served his customers like family at Pensacola Honda where he worked for the past 17 years. His fondest memories include shing and golng with his close friend Terry in Okeechobee, spending time with his family, and spending time in the World, committing to memory Psalm 91. Riley loved his Heavenly Father most of all. He was preceded in death by his mother, Viola, and father, Samuel Jackson Dennis, and brother, Frank Dennis. Survivors include his wife of 41 years, Carolyn Brewton Dennis; two children, Lisa Schroeder (Michael), and Ryan Dennis (Tammy); ve grandchildren, Kyle, Nicole, Blake, Derek and Tyler; two brothers, Bill Dennis and Bob Dennis (Patty); sister, Audrey Anderson (Paul); stepmother, Eloise Keels; sister-in-law, Jean Dennis; and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. A special thanks goes to the nursing staff at Sacred Heart Surgical ICU for their special care of our loved one. Funeral services were held Aug. 29 at Fail Chapel Funeral Home in Pensacola. Interment followed in Pensacola Memorial Gardens. Pallbearers were Terry Gross, Richard Holield, Bob Winn, Jerry Taylor, Bruce Morgan and Keith Dethlefs. Condolences may be placed online at fcfhs.com. Riley D. Dennis Joseph John Katynsky, 88, passed away on August 27, 2011. Born in Johnstown, PA, he was a long time resident of Wewahitchka and a decorated WWII veteran of the USAF with 26 years of service. Well known for his many years at Tyndall AFB in personnel, he also served in Korea, Iceland and Europe. He was one of the earliest members of Tyndall Federal Credit Union, a former restaurant owner and building contractor. Papa Joe was an accomplished chef and enjoyed retirement on the river with his many plants and animals. Survivors include his beloved wife, Donna, of Wewahitchka; daughter Deborah Riddle and husband James; grandson Christopher Howell and wife Angie; grandsons Matthew Howell and JP Riddle; and his greatgrandchild and namesake, Cameron Joseph Howell, all of the Panama City area. Joseph John Katynsky Mae Plair, 77, of Blountstown, left this world on Saturday, September 3, 2011, at Bay Medical Center, from an accidental injury she received the day before. Mae was born in South Carolina, but had spent most of her adult life in Port St. Joe and Blountstown. She was preceded in death by a loving and devoted husband, Ralph E. Plair; her parents Walter and Gladys Hyatt; a daughter Diane Sheldon and an adopted daughter Cindi Judkins. Survivors include her daughters, Peggy Whiteld-Plair Atkinson and husband Colby, with their children, Zachary and Wesley Whiteld, Brittany and Chris Ferrell and Dustyn Atkinson, all of Blountstown; Ruthie Rhodes and her late husband Dewayne Rhodes, with their child, Kayla Rhodes, all of Port St. Joe; one son, Michael Sheldon and wife Sandy, with their children, Heidi, Spencer, Amanda, Chad and Tyler, all of Owasso, Michigan. Services will be held at 11 am (CT)/12 Noon (ET), on September 8, 2011 at Abe Springs Pentecostal Holiness Church, in Blountstown, with the services conducted by the Rev. Michael Morris and the Rev. David Nichols. There will be no graveside services. Family will receive friends at the home of her daughter in Port St. Joe at 125 Gulf Coast Circle on Wednesday, Sept. 7 from 4-6 p.m. (CT)/ 5-7 p.m. (ET) and before the service on Thursday, Sept. 8 in Blountstown at Abe Springs Pentecostal Holiness Church. A very special thanks the family would like to give to Dr. Skipper, Calhoun EMS Medic Aaron Carter, EMT Andy Waldroff, CLH Nurse Crystal Arnold and all the Staff involved with the care of our mother/ grandmother for these two days at Calhoun/ Liberty Hospital and EMS Director Phillip Hill and his staff, Calhoun County Sheriffs Ofce, Nettle Ridge Fire Dept. and Bay Medical Center ER. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Emma Mae Plair Charles E. OBryan, Jr., age 54 of Tallahassee, passed away Sunday, August 28, 2011. Funeral Services were held at 1 p.m. ET on Thursday, September 1, 2011, at Beggs Funeral Home with burial at Oakeld Cemetery in Monticello, Fl. Family received friends from 6-8 p.m. Wednesday in the Chapel. Charles was an avid outdoorsman. He loved hunting, riding in the woods and, above all, family and friends. He worked in the construction industry as a sub-contractor. He could x or build anything and never saw the need to throw anything away. He had a quirky sense of humor that will be missed greatly. He had a love and appreciation for animals, especially his well trained cat, Sammy. He is survived by his loving wife, Susan E. OBryan; four daughters, Jennifer N. Dareing (Bruce), Kimberly R. and Rebecca L. OBryan, and Christina Lee; four grandchildren, Cassidy, Elany, Ryan, and Ethan of Polk County; his parents, Charles E. and Martha Hysmith OBryan; and a host of aunts, uncles and cousins. Beggs Funeral Home Apalachee Parkway Chapel (850) 942-2929 beggsapalachee@ embarqmail.com website: beggsfuneralhomes.com Charles E. OBryan, Jr. OBITUARIES Faith BRIEFS

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 8, 2011 The Star | B6 3491S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 340 Application No. 2011-13 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01884-010R Description of Property: COMMENCING at an iron rod marking the Southeast Corner of Southeast Quarter of Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds West (assumed) 647.27 feet to a point on the East right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being 33.0 feet from and at right angle to the centerline of said State Road; thence North 04 Degrees 46 Minutes 43 Seconds East along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 168.00 feet to an iron pipe for the POINTING OF BEGINNING, thence North 05 Degrees 11 Minutes 45 Seconds West 48.96 feet; thence North 08 Degrees 04 Minutes 27 Seconds West along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 46.68 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line curve of said State Road No. 71, said point being 33.00 feet from and radial to the centerline of said State Road, said curve having a radius of 1651.42 feet and being concave westerly, thence Northerly along the arc of said curve through a central angle of 20 Degrees 35 Minutes 55 Seconds for 593.71 feet said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of North 10 Degrees 14 Minutes 30 Seconds West 590.52 feet; thence leaving said right of way line curve North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds East, 784.10 feet, thence South 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 343.36 feet, thence South 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds West 471.08 feet, thence South 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds West 124.53 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 5.536 acres, more or less, and being subject to a drainage easement across the following portion thereof: COMMENCE at an iron rod marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds West (assumed) 647.27 feet to a point on the East right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being 33.0 feet from and at right angle to the centerline of said State Road; thence North 04 Degrees 46 Minutes 43 Seconds East along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 168.00 feet to an iron pipe for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 05 Degrees 11 Minutes 45 Seconds West 48.96 feet; thence North 73 Degrees 12 Minutes 44 Seconds East 31.22 feet, thence North 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds East 65.00 feet; thence North 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds East 470.75 feet; thence North 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 09 Seconds East 319.77 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds East 34.22 feet, to an iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 343.36 feet; thence South 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds West 471.08 feet; thence South 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds West 124.53 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. DESCRIPTION BY RECENT SURVEY: COMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (no identification) marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, as shown on the Florida Department of Transportation right of way map as prepared by David H. Melvin, Inc., with a final date of January 13, 1999, (map No. 2190041, Sheet 1 of 9); thence run South 88 Degrees 53 Minutes 21 Seconds West along the South boundary of the said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, for 622.82 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71; thence Northerly along said Easterly right of way as follows: North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 75.63 feet, thence South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds East for 3.28 feet; thence North 06 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 62.45 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 29.89 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732 for the POINT OF BEGINNING; from said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 50.49 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds West along said Easterly right of way for 9.84 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 15.90 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence along said right of way and curve with a radius of 1665.27 feet, through a central angle of 21 Degrees 23 Minutes 44 Seconds, for an arc distance of 621.85 feet (chord of said arc being North 09 Degrees 54 Minutes 20 Seconds West 618.24 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732); thence leaving said Easterly right of way run thence North 89 Degrees 00 Minutes 45 Seconds East for 751.97 feet to a found 1 and 1/4 inch iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 28 Minutes 55 Seconds West for 343.36 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds West for 471.08 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 46 Degrees 02 Minutes 21 Seconds East for 123.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 5.502 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO A DRAINAGE EASEMENT ACROSS THE FOLLOWING PORTION THEREOF: COMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (no identification) marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, as shown on the Florida Department of Transportation right of way map as prepared by David H. Melvin, Inc., with a final date of January 13, 1999, (map No. 2190041, Sheet 1 of 9); thence run South 88 Degrees 53 Minutes 21 Seconds West along the South boundary of the said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, for 622.82 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71; thence Northerly along said Easterly right of way as follows: North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 75.63 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds East for 3.28 feet; thence North 06 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 62.45 feet, thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 29.89 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732 for the POINT OF BEGINNING; from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 50.08 feet; thence North 73 Degrees 07 Minutes 39 Seconds East for 25.35 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 01 Minute 59 Seconds East for 65.00 feet; thence North 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds East for 470.75 feet, thence North 44 Degrees 29 Minutes 04 Seconds East for 319.77 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 00 Minutes 45 Seconds East for 34.22 feet to a found 1 and 1/4 inch iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 28 Minutes 55 Seconds West for 343.36 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds West for 471.08 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 46 Degrees 02 Minutes 21 Seconds East for 123.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: Taunton Truss, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T. Wednesday, the 21st day of September, 2011. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Aug 18, 25, 2011 Sept 1, 8, 2011 3495S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 366 Application No. 2011-19 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01960-000R Description of Property: Lots 1, 2 and the North 29 feet of Lot 3, in Section24, Township 4 South, Range 10 eWest, according to the Higgins and Hollinger Plat of the Town of Wewahitchka, Florida, and on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: David L & Abigail Tauton All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 21st day of September, 2011. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 18, 25, 2011 Sept 1, 8, 2011 35362S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 352 Application No. 2011-20 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01901-175R Description of Property: Lot 15, Sawmill Estates Unit 1, according to the Official map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 1, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Taunton Development, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 12th day of October, 2011. Dated this 6th day of September, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Sept 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 35247S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-196CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. MARGARET H. STEVENS, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 18th, 2011, and entered in Civil Case No. 11-196-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and Margaret H. Stevens is Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 15th day of September, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lot 14, The Village at Port St. Joe, as per plat rercorded in Plat Book 4, Page 11, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 19th day of August, 2011. REBECCA NORRIS CIRCUIT COURT CLERK BY: BA Baxter DEPUTY CLERK Sept 1, 8, 2011 35379S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 10-479CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GARY L. SMITH, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY L. SMITH, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against any Defendants, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject property, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, I will sell at public auction to the highest bidder in cash in at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on September 22, 2011, that certain real property situated in the County of Gulf, State of Florida, more particularly described as follows: The North 1/2 of Lot 29, SAN BLAS ESTATES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 20, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West; thence N 0004’21” East along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West for 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot wide right of way of State Road No. 30-E; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line as follows: S 2325’11” East for 1642.44 feet to a point of curve; thence along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 11426.79 feet and a central angle of 0208’33” for 427.29 feet; thence S 2533’44” East for 1711.69 feet to a point of curve; thence along the arc of a curve to the right which has a radius of 11415.15 feet and a central angle of 0518’49” for 1058.64 feet; thence S 2014’55” East for 6496.59 feet to the point of beginning; thence continue S 2014’55” East along said right of way line for 49.98 feet; thence leaving said right of way line S 6945’05” West for 630.70 feet, more or less, to the water’s edge of the Gulf of Mexico, thence Northwesterly along said water’s edge for 50 feet, more or less, to a point which bears S 6945’05” West from the point of beginning; thence N 6945’05” East for 635.7 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. If you are a person with a disability who needs special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, you should, within two (2) working days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation, at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Phone (850) 718-0026. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call (800) 955-8771. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Dated August 26, 2011 By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept 8, 15, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. YORKIE AKC Beautiful Female Puppy10 weeks old, 1st shots and comes with a health certificate $500 Own mom & dad. Call 850-554-0320 Panama City Mexico Beach 122 Woodlawn Rustic Sands Friday Sept. 9 & Sat Sept 10. 7:30-2:30ESTATE SALESome Furniture, Misc. Household items Text FL73873 to 56654 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Controller ARNP or PA RN Lab Technician EMT Dietician Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 34173429 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Movie Extras to stand in background for major film. Earn up to $300 per day. Experience not required. 877-824-6274 2 Br Apartments for Rent near Hwy 71 & Wewahitchka. Apply at Fisher Building Supply at 848 Hwy 22 or Call 639-5102 for more info Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 8, 2011 The Star | B7 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 401 Reid Avenue +/5,400sf: Move in ready; Inquire for terms 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16' inside clearance; Dual 12' roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $515,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 407 Reid Ave +/4,988 sf : 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $399,000 317 Monument Ave +/4,431 sf : Hwy 98 frontage w/ On-site parking; $499,000 401 Reid Avenue+/5,400 sf : Retail space; $225,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for terms260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing availableHwy 98 Retail / Of ce Vacant LotsTwo lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30' x 80' each; $69,900 per lot UNDER CONTRACT Avenue fce/retail 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates UNFURNISHED HOUSE RENTAL 3 bedrm 2 bath on Indian Lagoon. 1 year lease, $900.00 First & Security 850-866-1269 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 Eagle Landing Spacious Townhome AvailableBeautiful and spacious 3 br, 2 bath townhome located in Jones Homestead, Eagle Landing subdivision. Close to shopping, downtown, new hospital and St. Joseph’s Bay. $750 per month $750 security/ damage deposit. Gulf Coast Property Services at (850) 229-2706 for more information and a tour of this well-kept townhome. Text FL74618 to 56654 1, 2, & 3 bedroom long term rentals available in Mexico Beach. Please call 850-348-0262 Text FL75507 to 56654 3 br home with 150 ft boat dock, deep water, year round, Call (850) 348-7774 Bayview Home @ Indian Pass. 4 br, 3 ba, 2 acres, large storage and Boat shed. $1200 mo + $1200 dep. $200 pet fee. In the St. Joe school district. Call 850-229-1065 or 850-227-5025 Would like toSwap my home in a N. Georgia Mountain City, for a home in this area. No money owed, Call 478-252-4636 3 br, 2 ba home priced to sell. 85K negotiable. within 1 mi of 3 schools Central heat & air. 2105 long Avenue, PSJ. Call 850-697-2768 for appt. Buyer to pay closing costs! Text FL75911 to 56654 Price ReducedFSBO : 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Classifiedcan!If you ’ re ready to move up or are j ust starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects. The K ey to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane

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Local B8 | The Star Thursday, September 8, 2011 The event injects money into the local economy and bolsters the coffers of the United Way, which in turn injects the money back into the community. This is a concept I came up with two years ago, Sharpe said. What better way? You go out for something to eat, you support the businesses which need the support, you support the largest nonprot agency in the country and the money goes directly back into the community. The money contributed will be used to assist the elderly, children and others in need in your community. This is a great opportunity to enjoy a nice meal with your family and help your community at the same time. The needs are greater than ever given the economy. Of the $56,000 raised during the community campaign in 2008, more than $52,000, or 95 cents on the dollar, was donated back into the community, a ratio that has played out each year. It is amazing what a dollar can do, Sharpe said. The local United Way receives funds in three categories. Those who donate to the United Way can earmark those funds for specic agencies approved under the United Way umbrella. The statewide campaign also will bring in funds specied in similar fashion, donations given for specic agencies serving the community. A good thing about a United Way campaign is you can designate where you want your money to go, Sharpe said. Think about this. You live here, but you may have a loved one in Miami being served by a United Way approved agency that you can designate to receive your donation. Funds not specically earmarked are pooled into the community grant fund, which provides grants to agencies and organizations that apply for funding from the United Way. A committee of local residents reviews the grant applications and decides on recipients and amounts. North Florida Child Development Inc., Gulf County Senior Citizens, Gulf County ARC & Gulf Transportation were among the organizations that received funding from the United Way in recent years. In addition, funds were provided to organizations such as the American Red Cross, which has offered assistance for countless emergencies, such as a house re or ooding, in the community, and Life Management, which has ofces in Gulf County. Whether they are in Gulf County or not, all these agencies touch the lives of Gulf County citizens, Sharpe said, looking at a spreadsheet of the area agencies that received money from the Gulf County campaign. There are no borders. This year, seven local restaurants have agreed to donate 10 percent of their sales on Sept. 8 to the Dine United event in Gulf County. Sharpe noted that some restaurant owners dont bother with the 10 percent; they will cut a check that often amounts to more than 10 percent of what the restaurant will make on Sept. 8. We didnt put pressure on them, Sharpe said. Our goal is to drive trafc to them and benet the United Way at the same time. If we can just get citizens to go out and thank the restaurants, show that they appreciate what the restaurants are doing, that makes it a win. The main purpose of the effort, Sharpe said, is straightforward. It is all about raising awareness, education, about the United Way and the agencies we serve, Sharpe said. For more information, go to www.unitedwaynw. org. Aaron Farnsley, AIF CFP MBA Farnsley & Johnston 505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3336 aaron.farnsley@farnsley.com UNITED from page B1 At one point, the slinky is balanced, but with a slight tilt, all of a sudden, perceptions of time are greatly thrown off. Smith gave an example: Say your grandma has been diagnosed with Alzheimers, he said, and you ask, Grandma, do you remember when we used to go to Panama City Beach in the summer? Grandma just looks at you and smiles and doesnt respond. In my opinion, I think grandma has the answer, he said. We dont necessarily know what grandma is thinking. He said chances are the next time youre at the grocery store, youll pass someone who has pre-dementia. Theyll know they came for beans, but will stand in the bean aisle for a while trying to remember what kind. When this person gets in the car to drive home, he or she will drive west over the bridge to St. Joe Beach, even though they need to go home to Apalachicola. Or say your grandmother has Alzheimers and shes a wanderer. She might go outside in her pajamas one morning and just start walking and end up lost with no recollection of how she got there. Were able to hear one another, see one another, Smith said. Its the command central that makes that possible. Theyre obviously ring very well. (With Alzheimers) the synapses in the brain become disconnected and plaque over. Smith said much like a cellphone has a receptor that allows it to send and receive calls, the brain is also full of receptors that send receive signals from the sensory organs. Alzheimers and dementia obscure the sensory receptors, much like a dead zone obscures a cellphones ability to send and receive calls. With Alzheimers you cant take a shot and be made well; you cant take a pill and be made well, Smith said. The nursing home is broken up into four different halls. The rst three halls house residents that arent necessarily challenged but might have dementias. The fourth hall is designed for residents who need special care, who might be suffering from progressed dementia or Alzheimers and need extra care and direction. The special care hall is not at all a lockdown facility, Smith said. He would gladly move his ofce down there if the option was presented. When a voice comes over Smiths walkie-talkie summoning Dr. Strong and team, it could mean a confrontation has happened with a dementia patient and someone is needed to intervene. On occasion, dementia patients might wander into each others rooms on accident and cause a disturbance. It doesnt happen often, but it could happen any moment, he said. On Aug. 31, Smith and other representatives from the Bridge at Bay St. Joe conducted a demonstration for employees at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. The demonstration aimed to create how elderly dementia patients see, hear and feel. Participants put on colored goggles to obscure their vision, ear buds producing static noises and gloves lled with popcorn seeds to reduce dexterity. They were then asked to perform everyday activities like writing and folding clothes. One employee broke down and cried, because she got to experience some dementia and she didnt like it, Smith said. Were in a dark place, and were threatened by it. Like home The Bridge at Bay St. Joe aims to provide residents with a sense of homeliness in their surroundings. Last year, the company renovated its facilities, replacing the oors with a demure wood laminate with white moldings. The company spent a half million dollars last year, making this a more comfortable place for dementia patients, Smith said. Many of the room doors are adorned with wreaths or owers. The hallways are labeled like streets. Happy Lane and Victory Lane intersect near the nurses station. When I come here, I dont come to work in a nursing home building, Smith said. I come to work in your grandmothers home. Smith said they used to shine the oors really well, but they dont anymore because your grandmother has Alzheimers, and she thinks its water. Plaques in the dining hall honor outstanding residents in a Hall of Fame, recognizing the lifetime achievements and civic duties of residents who have made great contributions in their lifetimes. Smith said one of his primary duties as chaplain is to educate family members about dementias and help them to understand what their loved one is going through. Visiting family members will often become frustrated when they arent recognized or even addressed, he said. His job is to tone down the discouragement and keep them coming back. Smith went through it himself when his stepfather, once a skilled craftsman, was diagnosed with Alzheimers. What made me uncomfortable was not knowing if I was doing everything I could do, he said. In his three years as chaplain, Smith has learned that a nursing home is not a place to be feared. The people in Port St. Joe need to not be afraid of this building, Smith said. Death is just as important a consideration as living. He said the people of Port St. Joe need to come for a tour. People dont come here to die, they come here to live. VA L ERIE GARMAN | The Star Two photos dated 1972 stand in the foreground of a more recent family photo in Clif Smiths ofce. At left, he and his wife, Bettie, embrace on the deck of the USS Berkeley, and at right, Smith works the signal bridge on the USS Berkeley. BRIDGE from page B1



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Thursday, SEPTEMBER 8 2011 YE E AR R 73, NUMBER 47 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion. .......................................A4-A5Letters to the Editor. ...................A5Outdoors. .....................................A6 Sports...........................................A7School News. ................................BB3Faith. .............................................BB4 Obituaries. ....................................BB4Classieds. ....................................BB6-BB7TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By Tim CroftStar News Editor Tuesday night was one of mixed math for the Port St. Joe City Commission. Commissioners gave nal direction to staff regarding the tentative 201112 budget, including a recommendation that water and sewer rates rise less than projected over the next several years. Commissioners also got a hard look at the latest gures for acquiring the Gulf Pines Hospital property, which provided signicant pause for purchasing the property unless, as Commissioner Lorinda Gingell said, magic occurs with the numbers by next weeks Friday deadline. The commission will hold its rst public hearing on the budget at 5:01 p.m. ET on Sept. 15 at City Hall. At the same meeting, commissioners must make a decision on taking title to the Gulf Pines property or give up a claim to the land. The proposed budget for next year includes no increase in the millage rate for the fourth consecutive year. Since the 2008-09 scal year, the city has reduced personnel expenses by 24 percent and operating expenses by 16 percent. Commissioners leaned toward reducing a proposed increase in water rates to be implemented next month from 8 percent to 5 percent and on sewer from 6 percent to 4.5 percent. The proposed increases were those called for in a rate study undertaken last year, but commissioners, taking into account ongoing issues with water quality and the citys improved scal position, favored reducing the proposed rates and maintaining 5 percent and 4.5 percent annual rate increases through 2015-16. Commissioners also approved a staff recommendation for a 2 percent Cost of Living Allowance (COLA) salary increase for employees as well as a $750 one-time salary bump. Weve asked a lot of our employees the last three years, Mayor Mel Magidson said, adding that employees had not seen a pay increase in four years. While we have the ability, Id like to see us (provide the COLA and one-time increases). The city is also switching from United Health Care for employee health insurance back to Blue Cross/ Blue Shield. Deductibles are the same, but costs to the city will be slightly higher. The vast majority of employees have their insurance fully paid by the citys $700 contribution. As for Gulf Pines, the latest gures, with county property taxes and other items needed to improve the property for development, continue to move, City Attorney Tom Gibson said, in the wrong direction. The city is looking at a potential shortfall of roughly $130,000, at minimum, to satisfy tax liens, demolish the building, and survey and plat the land to put it on the market, based on projections from real estate agents of what the 2.2 acres would bring at market. Commissioner Rex Buzzett said he pushed the city to gain possession of the property from a bankruptcy proceeding to: 1) get the hospital torn down and property on the tax rolls and 2) because 1520 neighbors of the former hospital have been looking at a derelict eyesore for more than ve years. We cant afford to do anything about it now, but I will continue to push the city (to gain possession of the property, tear down the hospital and get the property on the rolls), Buzzett said.Commission addresses budget, Gulf PinesBy Tim CroftStar News Editor An appellate court unanimously reversed a lower court decision and sent a Mexico Beach land-use case back to the circuit court last week. The three-judge panel from the First District Court of Appeals of Florida, citing substantial due process issues, reversed a circuit court decision to dismiss action brought by Mexico Beach residents Joe and Mary Bush concerning a lot split application denied by the city council. The case has spanned two years and cost the city at least $60,000 in attorney fees. In a seven-page opinion written by Judge J. Van Nortwick and led Aug. 31, the judges ruled that the lower court failed to address due process issues raised by the Bushes and remanded the case back to circuit court. By failing to address the due process claims, the judges noted, the circuit court did not engage in the required review, mandated by case law, for cases involving what amount to quasi-judicial hearings, as with the Appeals court reverses MB land use decisionBy Tim CroftStar News Editor Dual enrollment numbers continue an upward arc at the county public high schools. High school students in increasing numbers are taking advantage of dual enrollment opportunities as a head start toward college degrees while working from the familiar surroundings of their home schools. So far this year, 159 students are dual-enrolled in one of three models offered by Gulf District Schools, an increase of 18 students over last year, and continuing a trend that has seen dual enrollment double in the past four years. The strides have come so far so fast that one Wewahitchka High senior, Bryce Gerber, is on track to graduate in the spring with his high school diploma and a two-year associate degree. With the technology available, it seemed to me we should do more for our kids with dual enrollment, said Sara Joe Wooten, district assistant Dual enrollment numbers climbBy Tim CroftStar News EditorThey are coming back and they are bringing friends. The Semper Fi Sisters will hold their third annual Beach Blast Oct. 12-16, with headquarters on Indian Pass, and for the second consecutive year the event is attracting additional military moms, grandmothers, sisters, wives, girlfriends and ancs. In addition, several of the Wounded Warriors who enjoyed a weekend of fun this spring during what has become the annual Wounded Warrior Weekend in Gulf County, will join the Semper Fis, along with the sisters with loved ones from other branches of the military deployed overseas. The Turtle Beach Inn and four to ve surrounding houses on Indian Pass will serve as base camp for the Sisters and their brood. We have more than 57 ladies from out of the county conrmed so far, said Brenda Garth, the local queen of the Semper Fi Sisters, event organizer and mother to sons and a daughter in the service. There are more new people coming for the rst time than we have ladies returning. We are taking over Indian Pass. And this year we are going to have ladies representing the Navy, the Marines, of course, the Army and the Air Force. We will have also have Gold Star moms (those who have lost sons to war) and some of the Wounded Warriors from this spring. They wanted to be a part of this. In fact, the event has grown had such a rapid rate Garth can barely wrap her head around it. Two years ago, 12 ladies, all Semper Fi Sisters with loved ones deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Marines, comprised the Beach Blast contingent. Last year the number was up to 29 women who traveled to Gulf County for a chance to leave the tension of everyday life for the family of one who is deployed behind for a weekend. This year, the number is already over 60 and growing. This is the least I can do to support the troops that are over there for us, Garth said. This is not about politics, its not about war. Its about love. Love of our country, love of our sons and daughters in harms way and love of those who answered the call before. This is a chance to bring women together for a release from the daily tensions you have when a loved one is deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan. They can come here and get support and they are not judged. The women range from Women up frontBeach Blast brings Semper Fi Sisters to Gulf County PP HOTOS By Y TT IM CROFT | The StarIn three years the Beach Blast has grown from 12 ladies to more than 60 conrmed for next months Blast. Last year, the Beach Blast brought 29 ladies from outside of Gulf County to the community. B B e low A highlight of the Beach Blast is the presence of loved ones, fashioned from photos, a clothes hanger and some camouage uniforms. See WOMEn N A3 See Lan AND USE A2 See En NROLLMEnNT A2 PPORT SST. JOE Dine United, BB 1

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, September 8, 2011 Sign up now for a free account and receive a towards your deal purchase.Expires October 12, 2011 CHEESE BURGER CORNER OF 2ND AND REIDAVE. PORT ST. JOE.OPENDAILY 118:30, SUNDAY 18 Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! MOSES J. MEDINA 850.527.0441MMEDINA@CRESTENTERPRISES.COM REMODELING SERVICES LICENSE#RG0058632 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an imTANNING, WAXING, EAR PIERCING, FEATHERS, FASHION EXTENSIONS & UP DOS. BRING A FRIEND & MENTIONTHIS AD & RECEIVE 10% OFF A SERVICE.NoAppointmentNecessary Walk-ins Welcome Bush case against the Mexico Beach city council on the lot split application. Among the criteria that must be considered, the judges noted, was whether procedural due process was accorded the plaintiffs. The Bushes led the lot split application in September 2009, contending that when they divided their lot into two lots in 2005 they had met all requirements under the citys land use regulations. The Bushes assertion was based on the city comprehensive plan which stated that a development shall be considered consistent with the adopted Comprehensive Plan if the development conforms to the provisions set forth in the City of Mexico Beach Land Development Code. The Planning and Zoning Board voted unanimously to deny the application following a hearing in October 2009 and the city council was to take up the application in a public hearing later that month, but tabled the application for future consideration. Over the ensuing six months the Bushes sought but were unable to obtain a hearing before the city council on their application and alleged that during this time other property owners presented and obtained approval and acceptance of division of parcels for sale or development, Van Nortwicks opinion details. The Bushes sought relief in circuit court, which issued an order to the city to show cause. A nal hearing on the application was scheduled for April 13, 2010. Again, the application was tabled to provide time for the city to retain a attorney. That attorney, David Theriaque of Theriaque & Spain of Tallahassee, has received payment for services in excess of $60,000 from the city since May 2010, according to an accounts payable summary from the city. As noted by the appellate court, while the Bushes application was pending the city council was considering the adoption of new land development regulations that in part addressed the subdivision of property and required neighborhood consistency when lots are subdivided. The new ordinance was adopted by the council on April 13, 2010 and the following month the council unanimously denied, without discussion, the Bushes application. In doing so, the council found that the application failed to comply with the new ordinance and two policies in the Future Land Use Element of the comprehensive plan, the appellate opinion detailed. In both courts the Bushes contended that the newly-passed ordinance cannot be applied to their application and they had not been advised the city was relying on future land use policies nor given any opportunity to argue in support of their application, Van Nortwick wrote. Further, the Bushes asserted that the city manager had stated during a public meeting that the changes to the LDR would not impact their application. The Bushes sought review from the circuit court based on due process violations and asserting they never received the quasijudicial hearing before the city council to which they were entitled. The circuit court found that the Bushes complaint was not timely led and while there may have been due process claims, any relief this Court could afford the (Bushes) would be of no practical purpose and would not affect the underlying validity of the City Councils Final Order denying the Lot Split Application. We cannot agree, Van Nortwick wrote. The appellate judges said that while consistency issues, as the city argues, must be raised, the judges noted that the Bushes have raised much more than consistency issues. Because the Bushes assertions were beyond the scope of simple consistency, in particular issues of due process, they were entitled to review by the appellate court. The appellate judges sent the case back to the circuit court and stated if the Bushes prevail on their contentions before the circuit court, the nal order of the City Council would be quashed and would have no force and effect. LAND USE from page A1superintendent for instruction. We are in a rural area, but why cant we? This semester, online courses are offered in English at both high schools and in digital design at Port St. Joe High. There are also two-way interactive classes in which high school students effectively sit in on classes at Gulf Coast State College through distance learning in Western civilization, algebra and biology, the latter a new offering this year. There are also students dual-enrolled at the Gulf Coast State College campus in Panama City or the Gulf/ Franklin Center in marine biology, meteorology and government. We have saved parents over $19,000 this semester in tuition and the cost of textbooks, Wooten said. Dual enrollment saves time and money for students and parents, she added. All of these courses are offered on-site at each high school. It saves tuition, textbooks, gas, extraneous money for college there are lots of little things you dont think about when you think dual enrollment. The district has long had an articulation agreement, or dual enrollment agreement, with Gulf Coast State College, formerly Gulf Coast Community College. Wooten said Dr. Cheryl Flax-Hyman, who serves as liaison between the college and Gulf District Schools, has been instrumental in the programs success. She works with me, and whatever we need, she makes it work for us, Wooten said. The district has also received nearly $2 million in grant dollars to enhance technology in the district both high schools, for example, now have Wi-Fi capabilities and GCSC has also provided grant money to bolster technology for distance learning. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board, which has a vested interest in producing a skilled workforce through the schools, has provided grant funding to broaden dual enrollment opportunities. Another key for the district is that the two-way interactive distance courses taught through GCSC three times a week during second period, students are piped in to a classroom at the college is the presence of certied teachers in each subject area at the high school. Those teachers follow along with the college lesson plans and provide tutoring and additional assistance for students in the collegelevel classes. What makes our program work is we put a certied teacher in each classroom, Wooten said. These are certied teachers who can help students. Our success rate in these classes is really, really high. Another key element of the program is its impact on school grades under the states grading formula. Beginning last school year, 50 percent of high school grades are based on results from the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test taken only by ninthand 10th-graders and 50 percent is based on participation and success rates from such things as dual enrollment and advance placement classes. ENROLLMENT from page A1

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Recently I went to the Humane Society and adopted my 4th child Slim Pickins. I was overwhemled at how many pets there were to be adopted. Animals are being dropped off or picked up daily, either because the owners can not take care of them or they are found side the road, wondering around looking for something to eat or drink. Anyone whos ever taken in an adopted dog knows that they are the most loving, and friendly pet theyve ever had. Beginning Friday, September 9th (and every 2nd Friday of each month) we will feature Dogs for Dogs. Come by the Port St. Joe Marina around lunchtime (11:00 a.m. ~ 2:00 p.m.) and enjoy an all you can eat hot dog lunch (chips, and soda) included for a $5.00 cash donation. All donations will be given to St. Joseph Bay Humane Society.This event is open to the public, so please help us spread the word.The Gift Shop has marked down all summer clothes to the minimum cost. Be sure to stop by Friday, September 9th before or after you have your hotdog for lunch and check out our deals. Dogs for DogsSeptember 9, 2011At Port St. Joe Marina 340 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Fl 32456 850-227-9393 FOOD, SNACKS AND DRINKS: Beef Jerky/Slim Jims Coffee (Ground or whole; instant or drip. Ground is preferred) Powder Drink Mix (Gatorade, KoolAid, Crystal Light) Sunower seeds and pumpkin seeds Tuna and chicken salad (in foil pouches, or ready-to-eat kits (no cans) Protein powder and protein bars Hot Chocolate packets, Herbal teas Hard Pretzels / Cheetos / Fritos / Chex Mix / Wheat Thins / Ritz Hard Candy (must be individually wrapped in large bags) Granola Bars / Power Bars / Cereal Bars / Cliff Bars Fig Newtons, Oreos, Nutter Butters, Cheese & Crackers Small Packs Trail Mix, Dried Fruit, Granola, Fruit Roll-Ups / Fruit By The Foot / Fruit Gummies Nuts: Peanuts, Mixed Nuts (salted preferred) Microwave food (Popcorn, Chef-BoyR-Dee, MacnCheese...) Cookies / Girl Scout Cookies (with chocolate: Oct. Feb. only!) Rice Krispie Treats (Store-bought only) Little Debbies & Hostess cake products Oatmeal Packs (Instant: just add water) Cereal (Small, individual boxes) Condiments, Spices; Sugar; Salad Dressing (no glass jars) Caffeinated gum or candy (to stay alert) CHOCOLATE PRODUCTS accepted from OCTOBER through MARCH (it will melt in high temperatures!) Hot Sauce small sizes (Eds Red or Tabasco) wrap glass bottle w/duct tape & double zip lock bag, bubble wrap ENTERTAINMENT AND SPORTS : Batteries: (AA, AAA, C & 9 Volt are the most requested) DVD Movies (new or used recent releases only, please!) Xbox Games, PSP, PS2 & PS3 Games (new or used) iTunes Gift Cards Computer Flash Drives & Thumb Drives Portable CD players Head phones / Ear Buds Electronic handheld games Pens but ONLY Stic Pens, do NOT send with clickers or movable parts) small note pads or small notebooks Stationery & Envelopes; blank cards to send home Double-sided tape, Small, Pocket Calendars Game Books: (Crossword Puzzles / Word Search Books / Math Puzzle books / MAD LIBS / Logic Problems / Sudoku) Yo-Yos, Dominoes, Playing Cards (new), Poker Chips & Mats, Dice Board games (UNO, Othello, Checkers travel size is great, too!) Frisbees / Hackey sacks Music CDs, or Sports DVD of basketball games, football or baseball games Sports, Hunting, Fishing Magazines & Books HYGIENE Baby wipes Hand sanitizer wipes (liquid tends to make mud on dirty hands) Body Wash, Liquid Soap, Facial Cleanser Shampoo /Conditioner (travel size) Hair Gel (for female troops to pull hair back) Combs / Brushes / Bobby Pins (in original packaging, please) Deodorant (travel size) Razors (disposable or Intuition or Mach 3 types) Shaving Cream in Tubes / Shaving Soap (No CANS of Shaving Cream, please!) Lip balm / Chap Stick / Carmex / Blistex Foot Powder (medicated Gold Bond is one often used) Tissues (individual packs; travel size only) Hand & Body Lotion / Moisturizer (travel size) Bug Spray / DEET / Skin-So-Soft Mouthwash (travel size) Toothpaste & Toothbrushes & Dental Floss Breath Mints / Breath Strips Lozenges / Cough Drops Loufa Sponges / Buff Puffs / Washcloths Nail les / Emery Boards / Nail Clippers Feminine Hygiene Products (Panty Liners & Tampons) Q-tips also used to clean guns! Cotton Balls Band-aids, Gauze Pads, First Aid Kits / Ace bandages, Icy Hot or Bengay cream Moleskin Shoe Insole Cushions (gel kind is best) Tylenol, Motrin, Advil or Aspirin Packets (individual unopened packages only) Eye Drops (i.e. Visine) Nasal Spray Vitamins (multi-vitamins are always needed! Original containers UNOPENED OTHER: T-SHIRTS: Cotton green & tan under shirts new (Sizes: M, L & XL) Long Sleeve T-shirts also Disposable Hand warmers and Foot warmers (in the wintertime) Laundry Detergent, Trial Paks or Individual Paks Bounce Dryer Sheets (used to put in boots, between clothes & sometimes to deter bugs) Air Fresheners (standalone-not plugin. Car types are also good) SOCKS: Black, Olive Green & White (cotton or wool) Small toys (Beanie babies) & school supplies for Iraqi & Afghan children Patriotic knick-knacks, USA ags, ags from your state, bandanas, baseball hats, football jerseys, banners to tack on their walls or tents. Black or Green duct tape, small tool kits, dust masks, carpentry tools, Fly swatters, y paper, mosquito netting, bug repellent in plastic pump bottles only (NO AEROSOL CANS, PLEASE!) Gun cleaning supplies (lube) such as Militec-1 & CLP Fleece Blankets Winter Hats in black, tan or green are always welcome!) Small survival MirrorsSome of the many items needed for shipping to troops:those with loved ones just entering or exiting basic training to those who have had loved ones deployed to war zones and wounded and killed in war. They all bring something to the table, Garth said. This allows them to remember. Its a constant remembrance, a constant journey. Its a support system. This is about the need for others to not feel alone. And to share. When I am reaching my hand up to receive guidance from a mom who has lost a son or had one wounded, Im also reaching back to help those women who have a loved one just entering basic training. One night last year, several of the women spent an evening on the roof of a house in Indian Pass, staring at the stars and kibitzing until 3 a.m. There was also the ocean boat cruise enjoyed by a number of women. And, Garth noted, there are those who just want to curl up on the beach with a good book. The event is a sponsor of the Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival which will coincide with the Beach Blast 2011. Last year, a group of the Semper Fi Sisters made an appearance at one performance wearing pink hats adorned by ashing tiaras. And, of course, there is the pirate in front of the Piggly Wiggly who has now appeared in personal photographs throughout the Semper Fi Sisters network. Before we got together some of us met at boot camp, said Paula Lowry of Riverdale, Ga., who attended the rst Beach Blast. When your son or daughter slaps you in the face with this, you feel like you are on an island with all these emotions. You have this lonely feeling. We were baptized as sisters by fear, pain and this hopeless feeling. To be able to come down and laugh, enjoy the scenery and the wonderful strangers who treated us so wonderfully, it was incredible. Pat Krawec of Taunton, Mass., noted, Our children enlisted; we were drafted. And for a brief weekend, the women can bask in the Oorah Sisterhood. We had a wonderful time, Krawec said. Your community was so warm and generous to all of us. It was incredible to see the patriotism and support for our troops in Port St. Joe. In the community as a whole down there they support the military. Id like to see that in other places, support like that. That community support is needed again this year. I need the community to donate, donate, donate, Garth said. Items are needed for the care packages assembled on the nal day of the Beach Blast last year the women sent more than 350 care packages to troops in war zones overseas and for postage to do all that shipping. Well pack as many boxes as we have items for and ship as many as we have money for, Garth said. The Post Ofce is excited and so helpful with all this. Drop off points for items are Harolds Auto Parts on State Highway 71 in Wewahitchka and The Star newspaper in Port St. Joe, in the Port Shopping Center by the Piggly Wiggly. Donations for postage or other items can also be mailed to Semper Fi Sisters, P.O. Box 1022, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Garth says those deployed overseas to submit the name, unit and address to her. WOMEN from page A1 LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, September 8, 2011

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Thursday, September 8, 2011 OpinionA4 | The StarVirginia had an interesting week last week, experiencing both an earthquake and a hurricane. Both of these events scared me and when I nd humor in them, please dont think that I dont understand how deadly and devastating earthquakes and hurricanes can be. I do understand, because Ive experienced rsthand Hurricane Isabel in Williamsburg, Va., in 2003 and many deadly tornadoes in Alabama, including being less than a mile away from the 1989 tornado that killed 21 people in Huntsville. That being said, it really has been an interesting time for a fellow who does what I do for a living. An earthquake measuring 5.8 was experienced in Virginia on Aug. 23 while I was sitting in my ofce. At rst, I wasnt sure what it was. Above me, it sounded like a helicopter or something malfunctioning on the roof top. Then the chalkboards in my ofce (I have many) started to shake and my computer screens wobbled. This concerned me. It felt like a ride at an amusement park, where the oor was about to drop out from under my feet. My wind up monkey clanked his cymbals one time, it scared me, but then it was over. Outside my ofce in the hallway, everyone seemed to say at the same time, That was an earthquake. It gave us something to talk about. We had the weekend to look forward to. Hurricane Irene was headed toward us and at the time, she seemed really mad. All my friends and co-workers were getting ready. Having experienced Isabel in 2003, I was going to do my best to be prepared. It is not fun going through a real hurricane; however it can be fun preparing (if you let it be). Everyone has their hurricane preparedness list. Looking at my list, I was quite proud. I had water, food for a month, ashlights, lanterns, batteries, charged cell phones, plenty of gas, charcoal and a radio that you can crank (thanks to my Mama). I wouldnt nd propane until Saturday, but I did nd it. Hurricane Irene was scheduled to hit us on late Saturday afternoon and evening, so I was in good shape. The stores were selling out of everything you needed on Thursday, Friday and Saturday morning. The hardware store had batteries and lanterns coming in by the truckload and they were being sold as fast as they were being unloaded. The shelves at the grocery stores were empty and everyone was in a panic. On Thursday evening, I was getting my batteries and ashlights and such together. I was lining them all up on the ping pong table. I was proud of myself. My younger daughter was following me around at about midnight (school hadnt started back in Virginia) telling me that she couldnt nd the hot glue gun. Of course, I didnt use the hot glue gun last and didnt know where it was. However, it was very important to her; she was making a bulletin board birthday gift for a friend she was going to see Friday morning. She had waited until the last minute, because she had been practicing eld hockey. Having worn a skirt (in the father/daughter game) and played eld hockey, I understood. I also tend to wait until the last minute to do some things. We looked and looked for the glue gun, my daughter followed me around to make sure I was looking, but we couldnt nd it. At about 1:30 a.m. on Friday morning, I decided to go to Walmart, about 20 minutes away. My daughter needed the hot glue gun; I wanted her to have it. There was one problem; everyone was still looking for food, water, ashlights, batteries, lanterns, candles and all the things they needed to be ready for Hurricane Irene. The Semper Fi Sisters are a reminder. A reminder that 9/11 is hardly over. The Semper Fi Sisters return next month to the postcard paradise we call home to relax, gab and generally forget, at least for a few days, the heightened potential for one of the women to get that knock on the door that anyone would dread telling them a loved one is not coming home. Actually, this group has become much more than the Semper Fi Sisters. Over the past three years, their annual gathering in Gulf County, called the Beach Blast, has broadened from a dozen or so Marine moms to wives, girlfriends, sisters, aunts and grandmothers of enlisted men of all branches. The Marine moms have opened their arms just as the community opened its arms to them, welcoming those with loved ones in the Army, Air Force and Navy. But at this time when the country is reminded 24/7 on stations around the television dial that 10 years ago America suffered the worst attack on native soil in history, these moms, aunts, wives, sisters and grandmothers can relate that story far more personally than the talking heads. They will remind that 10 years after America lost nearly 4,000 lives that number has tripled in the wars that followed 9/11, leaving aside a count of the wounded and maimed. They can remind that 10 years after the country was deeply scarred at its symbolic core, downtown Manhattan, the countrys business district, and the Pentagon, the countrys defense headquarters, men and women still come home with scars borne of battle with no promise of healing in 10 years, 20 years. They are a reminder that while no one with memory of that fall day when sunshine turned to ash, dust and blood will ever forget, this circle of life and death that has been the cost of the freedoms on which this country was founded and which we enjoy today is a bill paid in blood. For many of a certain generation, all that really separates 9/11 from Pearl Harbor of seven decades ago is the technology of media. In 1941 the country could not tune in as Katie Couric, Ann Curry and Matt Lauer tried to explain to viewers what was happening as planes bombed and laid waste to the countrys largest naval installation. Pearl Harbor, in fact, was located in some exotic locale that would not become a part of a state until nearly 20 years would go by. But the iconic black and white photograph of the U.S.S. Arizona engulfed in ames and smoke as thousands were buried in a watery grave, the grainy newsreel images of that carnage is, for many of a certain generation, just as stark and real a reminder of what a dangerous world it can be in which to hold on to those freedoms. And Gulf County has lived this legacy, a legacy of which a chapter, a jarring and reality-shaking chapter indeed, is being recognized this week. As the monuments at the county courthouse and Port St. Joe city hall attest, the county has sent its young off to ght and die since wars and Gulf County were rst linked together in the 20th Century. Clifford Sims Parkway, that section of U.S. Highway 98 that threads through the Port St. Joe city limits, memorializes the actions of an African-American all but lost and forgotten in his hometown while living but revered in death for throwing his body onto a grenade to save others. On Sunday, by coincidence, Capt. Dave Maddox, who served in the Navy and the Coast Guard, patrolling local waters for a time, will turn 90 years young, one of the remaining of the Greatest Generation. A local resident served with valor and distinction at one of the most horrendous battles of the Vietnam War and two county residents were on the last helicopter out of South Vietnam when it fell after 50,000 American lives were expended in attempting to preserve it. A local high school coach and teacher, a reservist no less, is now entering at least his fourth deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan. Not that any of these folks readily speak about their experiences; for them and their families there is no need for television specials or limited edition commemorative volumes about the anniversary of that dark day 10 years ago because the swirling emotions of lives cut short in an instant, of family upheaval that will span far beyond a decade, is part of life. It is an ongoing saga. In his book Where Men Win Glory author Jon Krakauer describes the journey of Pat Tillman from millionaire NFL star to Army Ranger killed by friendly re in Afghanistan. While in the end it is a book that angers in telling how the military hid the truth of Tillmans death from his family and the country, it is also a book that exhilarates in the thoughts, as reected through his journals, that roiled Tillman in the days after 9/11 as he pondered leaving behind his glory days before fans to more glorious days for his country. He had not earned his charmed life, he wrote; he owed something. The Semper Fi Sisters will arrive next month as a reminder of how that debt is being paid, every day, by so many brave men and women whose courage only those who have experienced battle can fully appreciate. And as a reminder that the legacy of 9/11, the image of 9/11 that ought to be remembered as much this week as images of burning buildings and ash-covered streets is that of the everyday men and women in uniform who sacrice so much each and every day, and have for 10 long years. Keyboard KLATTERINGSMe, myself and IreneRemembering that horrible day TiIM CrROFtT Star news editorOh, say can you seeLeon would whup on me on slow days. He was ve years older, much bigger and understood the family pecking (no pun intended, although come to think of it, he pecked on me some, too) order. In the fairly tranquil pace of the late 1950s we grew up thinking a little pushing and shoving was a natural way of life. He did the pushing and shoving I suffered the consequences. It was internal strife at its nest! It whiled away the hours, broke the tedium and entertained us before television reached our little neck of the woods. It was all in the family. When those guys from out on the Como Road pushed me down and was making off with my Western Flyer, Leon showed up out of nowhere. He whacked the one who had actually hit me so hard I swear his eyes went crossed and stayed that way through half of the fth grade! He extracted my bike from the tall guy by jerking both handlebars and the front fender through his rib cage. He lifted the third guy off the ground with one hand, pulled him up close and whispered, pre Clint Eastwood like, Dont ever touch him again. Them three young hooligans got the message. And so did I! Leon could push me around, that apparently was some God given commandment pertaining to rst born. Or maybe it was his constitutional right. It might have just been a Carroll County law, I dont know. He could distribute punishment, retribution and/or justice about like he saw t. BUT I was not fair game for any Tom, Dick or Harry that wanted my marbles, my hula hoop or my 1958 Mickey Mantle All Star baseball card. On September 11, 2001, some outsiders stepped into America. I dont need to remind you of the tragedy. There are reporters out there that are far more articulate than me to rekindle your spirit as it relates to that frightening event. There is no way I could put something of that catastrophic magnitude in perspective anyway. But for some reason this morning Leon and those Como outlaws keep rolling over in my mind. On the Monday before the attack on the World Trade Center, America was grumbling about gas prices, arguing over whether Joey ought to marry one of his Friends and still shaking our heads over the 2000 presidential race. That hotly contested and highly divisive campaign between Bush and Al Gore had half the country crying over the approaching global warming. The other half, naturally, was celebrating. We woke up on the 11th enthralled in our own little worlds. The universe revolved around each one of us! America went to bed that night with a whole different attitude. We were not Democrats or Republicans, Catholic or Protestant, Northerners or Southerners, rich or poor we were all in the same boat! America went to loving our neighbors, feeling each others pain and reaching out before the Red Cross sent the dun notice. People stuck American ags in their front yards voluntarily! God Bless America was sung at ball games. Folks started asking if they could help, and really meant it. We all were amazed, touched and inuenced by those reghters running INTO a burning, crumbling, falling down building, in hopes they could nd someone to help. I remember how I swelled with pride as Leon chased off those numskulls from down the road. They got what they deserved. Hooray for the good guys! You cant beat family. Those little licks he would give me forgotten, I counted them as love taps. He was my brother. I appreciated his very being! It was wonderful to be alive, an American, a child of God. Sadly, this country followed one tragedy with another one. I cant remember exactly when we started being Republicans and Democrats again. Im sure it was before the 2004 or 2008 elections. I dont see half as many ags unfurling as we did in the immediate aftermath of 9/11. The Red Cross has to beg for blood again. I can understand Pearl Harbor. We are admonished to remember it, .but theres not many folks left that actually were sitting around their radios on that fateful Sunday afternoon to hear it rst hand. Its a vibrant and commanding reminder of what can happen. But it is, after all, history now. The attack on the World Trade Center is not history! If you think that, you are living in a dream world. The threat is real and it continues. I believe Democrats have more in common with Republicans than they do with third world terrorist bent on taking over America. I think most congressmen believe that, they just dont act like it sometimes. I would love to love my neighbors without anyone having to die rst. I want to sing God Bless America when all is right. I want my grandchildrens biggest concerns to be long check out lines and who got thrown off American Idol. It borders on the ridiculous that we have to be dodging bullets before we can get together on something in this country. Of course, Im not really surprised. Leons magnanimous rescue out on the Como Road lasted until we got back in sight of the house. He pounded me a little for being so stupid to wander that far off by myself. I resented his size and bullying. I vowed Id grow up soon and get even. My short attention span had distanced his salvation of only an hour before. I hope Americas short attention span doesnt get us in the end.Respectfully, Kes HUnkerNKER DOWnN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CranksRANKS MY traTRACtTOrR BN HeardSee IreneRENE A5

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24-EMERGENCY SERVICE FOR OUR CURRENT CLIENTS! Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PMAfternoon Appointments AvailableDrs. Hours By Appt. 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, September 19 2011 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, September 27, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1.Variance Application by Emile & Gail Iverstine for Parcel ID # 06269-135R Located in Section 19, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Encroachment into side and road setback for ECL affected lot. 2.Open Discussion 3.Staff The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 312. 2011-68 Thursday, September 8, 2011 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S LettersA5 | The Star Two in the morning at a Walmart, could be fun. As with any Walmart, an older gentleman in a blue vest welcomed me and everyone else looking for hurricane stuff into the store. He was repeating his rehearsed speech over and over again to all of the people entering the store at 2 a.m. The older blue-vested gentleman said something like, welcome to Walmart, we are out of batteries, out of ashlights, out of lanterns, there is some water over there (he pointed) etc. I caught him in between repetitions of his out of speech. A small crowd of people gathered around, probably thinking I knew where to get propane or D cell batteries. I asked the Walmart greeter, Do you have hot glue guns, and if you do, where are they? The elderly bespectacled, blue-vested, friendly gentleman paused and thought. I had caught him by surprise. The small crowd got closer to see what his response was. After a minute, he directed me to the arts and crafts area in the rear of the store. I walked slowly at rst. After realizing that the small crowd was following me, I sped up. I had them, I had my hook in them and I had them. This was fun; at least it was for me at 2 a.m. in the Walmart. Another employee took me to the aisle with the hot glue guns. At that point, the crowd was hovering around the ends of the aisles. The employee who was helping me was very nice and we discussed the hurricane and everything the store had sold out, and when they had more trucks coming in. I sure am happy you have hot glue guns, I loudly told him. We then discussed the benets of corded versus cordless hot glue guns. I chose the corded one (because it was cheaper). After slowly walking away toward the front of the store, I turned and watched the poor fellow get swamped by the crowd of folks who had been following me, undoubtedly they were asking why they needed hot glue guns, why that fellow got a corded one, and what was he doing with it, etc. My daughter nished the bulletin board birthday gift the next morning, she was happy. I had a good time at the Walmart in the wee hours of the morning. Thank you Irene. You can nd Cranks My Tractor stories on Amazon for the Kindle and at www. CranksMyTractor.com. IRENE from page AA4 By Ed McAteerContributing Writer Iran has long sought to become the undisputed leader in its region, largely through aggressive and ambitious military development. Irans weapons program is of enormous concern to the U.S. It isnt only former Soviet weapons and weapons-usable nuclear material that Iran is getting its hands onit has also actively recruited former Soviet atomic scientists. Communist China has also supplied the Iranians with nuclear technology. It is clear Iran wants its own production capability. Under the guise of creating a civilian energy program, it is pushing to bring home whole facilities like uranium-conversion facilities spending far more each year on nuclear hardware than would be required for mere domestic energy production. It now has two nuclear power plants. Iranian diplomats state that they were built only for energy. But nobody believes that, since their country is glutted with oil. Iranian state television reported on Aug. 21 that Iran is moving its centrifuges to a secret site inside a mountain near Irans Fordo plant near the city of Qom. The Fordo plant was built in secret, and its existence was only revealed to the world in September 2009. Last month, Iran also announced that it was starting to use a new centrifuge that could enrich uranium ve to six times faster than the old type. This past Sunday, the head of Irans nuclear program, Fereydon Abbasi Davani, told state television that Iran was negotiating with Russia about the construction of new nuclear plants. In recent years, the Islamic republic has announced its intentions to build research nuclear reactors and uranium enrichment facilities as well as 10 to 20 nuclear power plants to eventually produce 20,000 megawatts of electricity. Iran is still under four UN Security Council sanctions and one-sided measures imposed by the United States and the European Union over its refusal to abandon its uranium enrichment program, a process that can be used to make both nuclear fuel and the highly enriched uranium needed for a nuclear bomb. Using the Fordo plant provides greater protection for Irans uranium-purifying centrifuges against any U.S. and Israeli air strikes. This means Iran can move more quickly toward building a nuclear bomb. On the other hand, do they have one already? Notice this quote from the European newspaper over a decade ago, in a front page article titled Iran Has N-Bomb: Iran has obtained at least two nuclear warheads out of a batch ofcially listed as missing from the newly independent republic of Kazakhstan, formerly part of the Soviet Union. This article said the Russians sent a topsecret report to the CIA disclosing that several nuclear warheads vanished from a just-closed nuclear base in Kazakhstan. Two of the nuclear weapons were smuggled across the border from Kazakhstan into Iran last year and are now under the control of Reza Amrollahi, the head of the Iranian Organization for Atomic Energy. Amrollahi is also in charge of recruiting former Soviet atomic scientists have sharpened the Wests anxiety over Irans efforts to build an Islamic bomb. Iran is now working hard to become self-sufcient in its missile production. In July 2000, Iran announced a successful test of its own Shahab-3 missile, which has a range of over 800 miles. Contacts within the Iranian regime claimed that the Shahab-4, with a range of 1,300 miles, was successfully tested in the summer of 2002. This missile uses Russian technology. Robert Walpole, a National Intelligence Council ofcial, told the Senate Governmental Affairs subcommittee on proliferation that The probability that a missile with a weapon of mass destruction would be used against U.S. forces or interests [or Europes, I might add] is higher today than during most of the Cold War, and will continue to grow. In other words, in the hands of a country like Iran, this terrifying arsenal wont sit idle for long. We must awaken to the unparalleled nuclear holocaust just ahead of us. Irans history shows that they are adept at using those means at their disposal to meet their objectives. Ed McAteer is a resident of Port St. Joe.Relations in Florida since 9/11 better, but still work to be done By Dr. Donna ElamChair, Florida Commission on Human Relations For Florida and our nation, the 10th anniversary of 9/11 serves as an appropriate time to reect on where we stand in our dealings with one another. As Chair of the Florida Commission on Human Relations, I believe we must recognize that how Americans treat each other sets the tone for how the rest of the world treats us Americans. Our country has wrestled with an internal conict since it was founded. On the one hand, we stand proudly as a nation of immigrants, a so-called melting pot that embraces people of all types and blends them into something uniquely American. On the other hand, throughout our national history we have endured staggering divisions along lines of race, ethnicity, culture, nationality and more. So how are we doing? Have the aftershocks of 9/11 brought us closer together? Or have they driven us even further apart? For the past 20 years, the Florida Attorney Generals Ofce has issued an annual report detailing hate crimes reported to the state by Florida law enforcement agencies. The most recent assessment, for 2009, shows the fewest hate crimes in the history of the report. But when we step back from that positive one-year snapshot and instead look at the bigger picture, what emerges is a pattern not of declining antagonisms but of changing targets. Not surprisingly, the period immediately following the 9/11 attacks saw a dramatic spike in hate crime incidents in Florida, particularly those based on religion or national origin. Since that terrible day 10 years ago, the percentage of reported hate crimes based on the victims religion has grown by more than one-fth and the share based on ethnicity or national origin has jumped by more than two-thirds. Over the same time period, the share of hate crimes based on a victims race or color has fallen 24 percent. Lets take time to reect on the loss of life, the families left behind and our collective responsibility for sustaining and maintaining peace in our world.Machines to enrich uranium moved to a secret site

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FreshwaterGag grouper season will reopen Sept. 16, and many anglers are eager to get back to shing. Inshore wrecks and bridge rubble sites should see good sh early on. Live bait such as small pinsh and even nger mullet will get you in the action.Inshore OffshoreScallop season continues until Sept. 27, and we still have good reports from Pig Island and in Scallop Cove. Most of the bigger shells are now in 6 to 10 feet of water, and a boat is a must. With the high surf and strong winds from the last weekend. As the storms and winds move on out of town, shing should improve over the next few days. Heavy rains mean swift water catshing. Setting bush hooks in the river for channel cats should be very productive this week. SpP ONsS ORED BY Corner of Marina Drive next to Piggly Wiggly Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Everything for your Outdoor Adventure 151 WEST HIGHWAY 98, P.S.JALLSWIMWEAR UPTO 50 % OFF REGULAR PRICE COME SEE US! The weekly reports from our new cement piers are as follows ... The City Pier: A few king mackerel late in the evening, Spanish mackerel and bluesh through out much of the day. There is all the live bait you could possibly use around the pier so take along a sibiki rig or a gold hook rig and a livewell. On the M.B. Miller pier: Large schools of redsh along with a few cobia. Some schools of cobia as large as 10-15 sh have been spotted, but most people shing now are tourists and they are not equipped to catch sh of this size. The June grass still is too thick to sh from the beach although more and more pompano are being seen from boats. At the jetties some divers have reported whiting as large as 3 pounds. Here again I dont know how you would ever be able to sh for them on the bottom due to the grass. In the pass in St. Andrew Bay the bull reds rule the day. Try to catch it on an outgoing tide and look for the crabs swimming on top in the oating ell grass. Most of the redsh are too big to keep, so do not stick a gaff into them to get them onboard. If they are so big they require gafng they are too big to keep. Remember they must be returned to the water unharmed if they are more than 27 inches long. Dont forget to pinch their tails when you measure them to get the legal length. It is the beginning of September, and that means the bigger king mackerel will start showing up from the far west. These smoker kings will start making their run back to the east which around here will last until the middle of November or when the water cools to the point they are uncomfortable and they leave. In St. Joe Bay the scallops are getting bigger and bigger. Since school is open you should have it to yourself until the weekend comes. Most people Ive talked to are getting the bigger ones in deep water. I feel uncomfortable in deep water catching scallops, but that is just one of the demons I wrestle with when Im around an area known to have big bull sharks. That is why I stay in knee-to waistdeep water. Go out this weekend and have a good time. Hooked on OutdoorsBradford Whited, right, was all smiles after a group harvested this 10-foot alligator during his rst hunt in Bay County. Sp P Ec C IAL toTO THE E St T AR Scott LindseyOutdoor Writercaptainlindsey@knology.netScallop season runs late this yearBy Frank Sargeant franksargeant@bellsouth.net For those who love to chase the tasty shellsh, it always seems to take forever for the opening of the scallop season to arrive then its over before you know it. This year, forever will last a little longer than usual. The season opened July 1 and will continue to Sept. 25, 15 days longer than in past seasons, in an effort to stimulate the economy of small coastal ports affected by last years oil spill. Open waters extend from the Pasco/ Hernando county line to the Mexico Beach Canal and so far this season the harvest has been good. Some of the largest scallops of the year will be captured in the last few weeks. The shellsh are fast-growers and those harvested in early July are signicantly smaller than those taken in September. The prime scalloping area in the Panhandle is St. Joe Bay, where clear water and lots of eel grass provide ideal habitat for the swimming shellsh. Theyre also abundant on the ats off Steinhatchee and Suwannee as well as at Homosassa and Crystal River. Scallops are an annual crop. They hatch live spawn and die in a single year, like most types of shrimp, and so the annual take by recreational divers is thought to have minimal impact. The tiny larvae develop into shellsh up to three inches across by July and August of each year and thousands of Florida families turn out to pursue these strange little animals, the only shellsh that can swim. Unlike most shellsh that afx themselves to the bottom, bay scallops can swim by clapping their shells together. Admittedly, its a slow, crazy dance, but they do manage to move from place to place and with the help of the tides can sometimes travel for miles. Bay scallops only survive where there is clear water and abundant grass. Fortunately, waters of the eastern Panhandle and Big Bend area have plenty of both, and thus plenty of scallops. The shellsh are typically found in water from 4-to-10 feet deep over turtle grass, the long-leaved greenery that sprouts abundantly from the bottom in the open areas. Because theyre lethargic swimmers, scallops are easy for a snorkeler to capture by hand and theyre a favorite target for young swimmers. Many families plan their annual summer vacation with the kids for the opening of the scallop season. Once things get rolling, nding the scallops is simply a matter of looking for the eet. Where the shellsh are abundant there will be dozens of boats drifting over them. On days when other boats are scarce, you can usually nd the shellsh by motoring slowly and looking for them on the bottom. The shells are white to gray-white and easily seen against the grass. Scalloping is a relatively safe activity, but one danger is that divers may get too far from an anchored boat and then not be able to swim back against the tide. To avoid the issue, many put divers out behind a drifting boat. The boat and the divers progress across the at at about the same rate, and one adult remains in the boat ready to pick up any divers who need a lift. The favorite scalloping ports include Steinhatchee, Crystal River, Homosassa and Bayport. Guides who specialize in scallop trips are available at all these locations, for those just getting started. A saltwater license is required to harvest scallops and the limit is two gallons whole or a half-pint, shucked, per harvester, up to 10 gallons whole and a half-gallon shucked per boat. The only part of a scallop considered edible is the adductor muscle, the white piece of esh that opens and closes the shell. Cleaning the catch is a bit of an issue. All the workings of the creature must be scooped away, leaving only the muscle, which is then severed from the shell halves with a teaspoon or an oyster knife. Some have made use of shop vacuums to clean out the entrails, which is fast, but which leaves a very smelly mess in the vacuum. Once the meat is processed, it can be used in all sorts of delicious recipes, but the best is simply to drop the bits briey into a pan of sizzling butter, scoop them out and drain. Its one of the real delicacies of the sea. For details on scalloping, visit www.myfwc. com. Photos HOTOS coCO URt T Es S Y oO F TAmp MP A BAY WAtch TCHE-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com Page 6 Thursday, September 8, 2011 OUTDoo OO RSwww.starfl.comSection A

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTs S www.starfl.comThursday, September 8, 2011 APage 7Section NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDING THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED ON THE CITYS ADOPTED EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORTNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission, of the City of Wewahitchka will hold a public hearing to adopt Amendments to the Comprehensive Plan based on the recommendations from the Citys adopted Evaluation and Appraisal Report. These Infrastructure; Conservation; Recreation and Open Space; Intergovernmental Coordination; Capital Improvements and Public School Facilities Elements of the Comprehensive Plan. This hearing is for the following Ordinance: The City Commission public hearing will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, September 26, 2011. These hearings will be held at the City of Wewahitchka, City Hall, located at 109 South 2nd Street, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465. A copy of the proposed Amendments shall be available for inspection on weekdays between and be heard with respect to the proposed Amendments. If a person decides to appeal any decisions made by the city commission with respect to any matter considered at the hearing, that person will need a record of the proceedings, and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations for this meeting as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act should contact the City Clerk at least three business days within the incorporated areas of the City of Wewahitchka. Connie Parrish,City Clerk NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS CITY OF WEWAHITCHKAThe City of Wewahitchka has declared the following items as surplus and will accept sealed bids for the purchase of these items. Minimum bid for any vehicle is $150.00. 1. sewer plant aerators (2) 2. 1989 Chevy Van 3. 1989 Ford Pick Up 4. 1978 Ford E70 bread van 5. 1985 Dodge Pick Up 6. 1983 Ford Pick Up 7. 1984 Ford Van 8. 1978 Chevy Step Van Bids must be marked SEALED BID SURPLUS EQUIPMENT and must be received by the City Clerk prior to 12 noon (CT) Monday, September 26, 2011, at the City Annex, 318 South 7 Street, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. Items may be inspected at the City sewer plant during regular business hours Monday through Friday between 8:00 AM and 3:00 PM (CT) by appointment. Please call 850-639-2605. Bids will be opened during the regular City Commission meeting on Monday September 26, 2011, at 6:30 PM (CT). CITY CLERK CONNIE PARRISHThe City of Wewahitchka is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Star Staff Report The Benders, an 8-andunder traveling baseball team recently competed in the Back to School Blow out Tournament in Do than, Ala. The team, which in cludes three players and one coach from Port St. Joe, nished the two-day tournament with a record of 5-0 and claimed the tour nament championship. The Benders opened play on Saturday with a 19-7 win over the Wiregrass Cardinals. Later on Satur day, the Benders beat the Lynn Haven Dolphins 13-5. Three wins on Sunday earned the Benders the championship. The rst was a rematch with the Wiregrass Cardinals and the Benders again outslugged the Cardinals in a 13-4 win. The next game was a rematch with Lynn Haven and again the of fense was in full swing for The Benders as they won 17-5. The Benders complete ly dominated the title game against the host Dothan Aces, winning 17-2. The Benders are com prised of kids from around the Panhandle, including Port St. Joe and Franklin County. In the photo, Clint Rest er of Franklin County is second from the left in the front row. Davis Varnes of Port St. Joe is in the second row, second from left; Gage Me dina of Port St. Joe is in the second row, sixth from left (with his mouth open); and Alex Strickland of Port St. Joe is in the second row, on the end at the right. Coach Stacy Strickland of Port St. Joe is third from the left in the third row.By Tim CroftStar News Editor For the rst eight min utes of last Fridays regu lar-season opener against county rival Port St. Joe momentum was tinted en tirely in Gator red. By the time Wewahitch ka reclaimed that edge it was too late. Senior Walt Bowers rushed for 163 yards and freshman Jarkiece Davis added 119 yards and the Tiger Sharks needed ev ery inch of their more than 450 yards of total offense to overcome a scrappy Gator team and the scintillating play of Theryl Brown for a 34-26 win. It is hard to believe you can walk away from a win feeling this bad, said Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth. I am very frustrated. We played well in spurts but we have not gured out how to put a full game together. We just had too many mistakes. At least they are xable. Wewahitchka took control on the opening kickoff which Brown who rushed for 263 yards and three touchdowns on 32 carries and scored all 26 Gator points returned 85 yards for a touchdown. After Port St. Joe which had 10 penalties and ve turnovers to mitigate the Tiger Sharks offensive out put fumbled an exchange on the next series, the Gators recovered at their 28. Brown, subbing at quar terback for starter Justin Flowers who suffered a hairline arm fracture in last weeks Kickoff Classic at Blountstown, sprinted off left tackle for 72 yards to make the score 12-0 after Wewahitchka failed twice to convert extra-point running plays. But after forcing a Tiger Shark punt on the ensuing series and driving toward mideld, the Gators fum bled away the ball and mo mentum for the next two quarters. During that span Port St. Joe scored 34 consecutive points, Davis starting things with a 31-yard sprint with three minutes left in the opening quarter and completing the outburst with a 48-yard dash around right end to make 34-12 with less than 14 seconds remaining in the third pe riod. In between, Bowers car ried for two touchdowns and Rummelo Zaccaro another, the Tiger Sharks up 28-12 at intermission. The Tiger Sharks nished the rst half with more than 300 yards rushing and nished with at least 28 rushing yards from ve players. Three minutes after Davis second touchdown, however, Austin Guffey seized momentum back for Wewahitchka when he picked off a Trevor Lang pass in the at with the Ti ger Sharks knocking at the Wewahitchka 15. Guffey returned the pick to the 26 and behind Brown, who carried seven times on a nine-play drive, the Gators pushed in a touchdown, with Brown running for the two points to bring the Gators within 34-20. Three plays later a fumbled exchange by the Tiger Sharks was recovered by Wewahitchkas Ben Hayward at mideld. Brown rushed six times in the eight plays the Ga tors needed to score, but a failed extra point conver sion and subsequent onside kick sealed the win for Port St. Joe. Brown played nearly the entire game nursing an arm contusion suffered early in the second quarter. Thats what weve got to have, the kids not giving up and ghting back like that, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah. Im proud of this bunch. Theryl Brown, that is one heck-uv-a player; if we just had one or two more like him. I thought we kind of wore them out at the end. Port St. Joe hosts Boze man on Friday while Wewa hitchka hosts Vernon. TIM CROFt T | The StarWalt Bowers (left) takes a pitch on a night during which he rushed for 163 yards and two touchdowns. Port St. Joe edges WewahitchkaFront Row Kneeling: Trace Mears, Clint Rester, Ryles Burch, Kellen Speights Second Row Standing: Waylon Crumpler, Davis Varnes, Trace Horne, McLane Baxter, Caden Mercer, Gage Medina, Alex Strickland Back Row: Coach Michael Baxter, Coach Adam Mercer, Coach Stacy Strickland. Not Pictured: Head Coach Emory HorneBenders traveling team wins Dothan tournament

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A8 | The Star Thursday, September 8, 2011By Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer The gulf will be packed Saturday morning with 250 sets of flailing arms and kicking legs as athletes be gin the Beach Blast Sprint Olympic Triathlon and Duathlon in the waters at St. Joe Beach across from Beacon Hill Park in Port St. Joe. Athletes will swim, bike and run their way to the finish line in a 30-mile endurance test, held biannually at Beacon Hill Park. All of them are in good shape, said race director Olga Cemore, a manager at the Panama City Health Club. There will be some first timers, but they must be training five days a week at least. Cemore expects more than 250 participants from all over the world. The full Olympic Race triathlon begins at 7 a.m. CT with a 0.7 mile swim on St. Joe Beach. Athletes will then cross Highway 98 to Beacon Hill Park and suit up for the 25 mile bike ride which will take them down Highway 98 to County 386. The race closes with a 6.2 mile run. The event provides op tions other than the full triathlon for athletes of different skill levels. The race is offered in a shorter Sprint Race ver sion where participants will swim 0.35 miles, bike 15 miles and run 3 miles, as opposed to the regu lar triathlon where par ticipants swim 0.7 miles, bike 25 miles and run 6.2 miles. A duathlon option is also offered, where partic ipants will run, bike, and run again, for those who may be uncomfortable with the swimming leg of the race. A lot of people are scared of the water, said Cemore, who also noted that the swimming portion is the hardest of the three for most athletes. Its not easy. Its much different than the pool. Cemore recommends all participants test out ocean swimming be fore entering a triathlon. Ocean currents can make the swimming more dif ficult, but mostly its the overcrowded waters that make swimming a chal lenge. You kick, you get kicked, Cemore said. You elbow people, and you get elbowed. The duathlon is also broken down into Spring Race and Olympic Race distances. Cemore said offering the duathlon helps attract more people, and also of fers another option if surf conditions are rough or dangerous. If the water is not friendly, it gives us the option to switch to the du athlon, she said. In her years as race director for the event, Ce more said she has only had to cancel the race once in 2007, when bad weather in the days before forced her into an abrupt decision to cancel. It rained like hell all day the day before and all night, Cemore said. But Saturday morning you would have never known there was a storm. Cemore hopes to never have to cancel the race again. You just never know (about the weather), she said. We did the race in the rain a few years be fore, and no one seemed to care. The race is a joint ef fort between Cemore, the Gulf County Tourist De velopment Council, the Mexico Beach Commu nity Development Council and a group of dedicated volunteers. Im in contact with the TDC, and we had to work hard on permits, Cemore said. Its gotten easier over the years. Everybody does their part and helps out. Cemore said the event would not be able to ex ist without volunteer sup port. It really doesnt mat ter if you have 100 (par ticipants) or 250, you have to have volunteers for safety. Cemore said. Those are super impor tant people. We love our volunteers. Cemore said anyone thinking of participating in a triathlon or duathlon should just try it. Youve got to train for the distance and youve got to be able to run whats required, she said. Cemore said more than 50 percent of race partici pants come back to race again. This is a good event, Cemore said. It has grown and brought people to the community. They come to the area and stay longer. PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the City Commission Regular Meeting on Tuesday October 4, 2011 at 6:00 P.M. EST. The Hearing will be held in the Centennial Building at 2201 Centennial Dr., Port St. Joe, Fl. 32456. The Public Hearing will be to discuss and act on the following: Development Order Request for 521 Premier Dr. Northwest Florida Renewable Energy Center, LLC. Parcel #: 04269-002R S 25 & 36 T 7 R 11 47.501 AC M/L 4 PARCELS; 1768 FF ON US CANAL ORB 87/820 FR ST JOE LD & DEV, ALSO 150 FF ON US CANAL FR CITY IN ORB 88/550; ORB 87/1092 BEING 2.144 AC M/L FR CITY & ORB 148/434-436 FR GULF CO. FL ORB 306/151 CA FR ST JOE TIMBERLAND CO LLC ORB 306/154 FR MATERIAL TRAN SFER INC MAP 49A Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments to the Planning and Development Review Board, 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at Building Department at 1002 10th Street, Port St. Joe, Fl. 32456. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk at (850)229-8261 Ext 113. VARIANCE NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe Planning and Development Review Board will hold a Meeting to discuss a Request for a Variance on October 11,2011, 4:00 EST, at the City Fire Station 402 Williams Ave. for Lester Dale Parrott located at 509 3rd Street, Parcel #04696-000R. The reason for the request is a proposed 10x20 Carport to be built on the South-West side of the property. The proposed plans can be reviewed at the Building Department located at 1002 10th St. and can be reached for questions at (850)229-1093. All persons are invited to attend this meeting. Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Planning and Development Review Board with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Planning and Review Board of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing special accommodations to participate in these proceedings should contact Jim Anderson, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, (850)229-8261 WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West PassTIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Sep 882 69 0% Fri, Sep 982 6910% Sat, Sep 1084 7440% Sun, Sep 1184 74 40% Mon, Sep 1285 7330% Tues, Sep 1385 7430% Wed, Sep 1487 75 60%9/8Thu07:42AM 1.9 H05:35PM 0.3L 9/9Fri08:41AM 1.8 H05:49PM 0.4L 9/10Sat09:36AM 1.6 H05:43PM 0.7L 9/11Sun10:36AM 1.3 H05:18PM 0.9L 11:41PM 1.1 H 9/12Mon04:41AM 0.9 L 11:48AM 1.2H 04:34PM 1.0 L 11:17PM 1.3H 9/13Tue06:04AM 0.8 L 01:42PM 1.1H 03:09PM 1.0 L 11:16PM 1.4H 9/14Wed 07:07AM 0.7 L 11:29PM 1.6H 9/8Thu03:14AM 1.3 H 07:19AM 1.3L 12:32PM 1.6 H 08:50PM 0.3L 9/9Fri 03:31AM 1.4 H 08:17AM 1.2L 01:48PM 1.6 H 09:28PM 0.4L 9/10Sat 03:47AM 1.4 H 09:04AM 1.0L 02:47PM 1.6 H 10:00PM 0.5L 9/11Sun 03:59AM 1.4 H 09:45AM 0.9L 03:37PM 1.6 H 10:25PM 0.7L 9/12Mon 04:09AM 1.4 H 10:22AM 0.7L 04:22PM 1.5 H 10:45PM 0.8L 9/13Tue 04:19AM 1.5 H 10:56AM 0.6L 05:06PM 1.5 H 11:01PM 0.9L 9/14Wed 04:31AM 1.6 H 11:27AM 0.5L 05:51PM 1.5 H11:16PM 1.0L SportsContestants line up for the swim portion of the 2010 triathlon/duathlon.PHOTOS COURTESY OF BILL FAUTHThe agony of the competition is written all over the face of this competitor during the 2010 triathlon.Beach Blast Triathlon/Duathlon this weekend

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.comPage 1SectionThursday, September 8, 2011Downtown merchants to meet about possible committeeStar Staff ReportThe group of downtown merchants that has been meeting for the last several weeks would like to hold a meeting to discuss the structure of a formal organization/committee and the goals and/or mission of that organization. All interested downtown merchants are encouraged to attend the organizational meeting, which will take place at 4 p.m. ET Monday, Sept. 12, at 308 Williams Ave., in the ofce building next to Donamelias. The boundaries of downtown have not been dened, nor has what is a merchant. That is part of the agenda for the proposed meeting. If you are interested and are unsure if you are downtown merchant, please come and take part in the discussion. Everyone who is interested is invited and encouraged to attend. Please notify your fellow business owners and encourage each to participate. For an organized effort to succeed, there must be involvement by all and a consensus about how to proceed. There has been a concerted effort to notify everyone, but please pass the word along incase email addresses are incorrect or unknown. If you have an agenda item, please email it to adavis@statecraft.us by Friday, Sept. 9. Agendas will be emailed out by 8 a.m. the day of the meeting. Please bring your printed copy. If possible, please RSVP so that adequate seating can be provided. Dine United tonightEvent a boost for the economy and a communitys most vulnerable citizensBy Tim CroftStar News Editor Fill yourself up with helping others tonight. Tonights fourth annual Dine United event will kick off the United Ways annual community campaign, which each year drops the green ag during the rst week of September. Though the number of participating restaurants has dropped, the concept of eat, drink and give is as tangible as ever as the United Way amps up its community campaign for another successful year. How successful? In 2006, the Gulf County United Way campaign raised $38,000. The following year, the amount grew to $56,000, where it remained in 2008. That is a 44 percent increase in tough times, said Ron Sharpe, United Way community development coordinator for the six-county region that includes Bay, Gulf, Jackson, Calhoun, Liberty and Washington counties. Of all of our six counties, Gulf was the only one to show an increase. With the loss of Arizona Chemical and its employee campaign, the Gulf County campaign took a dip to $41,126 in 2009 but rebounded to $49,421 in 2010 and continues a saga that has seen Gulf County outperform surrounding counties with its campaign in three of the past four years, Sharpe said. Gulf County continues to carry its own, Sharpe said. Dine United was created two years ago as a fun way to kick off the annual campaign. DINE UNITEdD The following restaurants will be participating: Subway (Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe locations) The Thirsty Goat Killer Seafood Sunset Coastal Grill Boon Docks Dockside CafeThe Bridge at Bay St. Joe provides aid for those with dementiaBy Valerie GarmanStar Staff Writer He stopped counting at 240. It was Clif Smiths third tour in Vietnam, and his duty that morning was to count the incoming bombs from the deck of the Navy missile destroyer. I was getting ready to become a dead 23-year-old, Smith said. I prayed and I said, God, save me from this mess, and God showed up. Smith keeps his dog tags on his key chain and an old photo dated 1972 in his ofce, taken on the Navy ship when he returned from Vietnam alive, with a young brunette named Bettie who he says his faith reunited him with by chance. Smith and Bettie, high school sweethearts from a Central Florida high school, were reunited across the country in California, where Smith was preparing to ship off to war and Bettie was employed 45 minutes away at Disney Land. They will be married 41 years this December. Smith, a born-again Christian, said his faith was with him, too, when his 11year-old sons pancreas shut down and his blood sugar spiked to 600. His son is now grown with children. Fate was also the reason he was in that grocery store in Chipley when he ran into an old friend, the chaplain from the North Florida Rehab Center in Graceland. At the time, he was working in the mens suit department at Dillards in Panama City and seeking a meaningful career change. His ticket was there in that grocery store. He believes God led him to his current position as chaplain at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing care residence, where he acts as a spiritual comfort in the lives of many residents, but also as a friend. I look back on my 63 years, and I think, God brought me here, Smith said. Chaplain One of the largest employers in Gulf County, the Bridge at Bay St. Joe employs 160 and houses 108 residents. It is one of 73 Signature HealthCARE Communities, employing 12,000 and housing 8,000 in the Southeastern U.S., and one of only nine facilities partnered with Serenity Health Care. Smith is one of only ve full-time, paid chaplains in Florida. E. Joseph Steier III, president and CEO of Signature HealthCARE, founded the company with a dedication to bringing faith to the workplace. Steier chronicled his pilgrimage to Israel in the book My God! Our God? after witnessing the divine healing of his son. He asked God to intervene, and God intervened by showing up, Smith said. Human beings have spiritual needs that need to be met. Even those who dont consider themselves spiritual can be comforted. Ive had family members that came here to watch their loved ones die in a weeks time, Smith said. One person said to me, Thank you for your comfort. Every morning, Smith gets up at 4 a.m. and drives 70 miles from Sunny Hills to Port St. Joe to bond with residents at the nursing home. One resident with Alzheimers who used to be an opera singer often accompanies Smith in his ofce while he plays his Josh Groban CD. We just sit here and put that CD in, Smith said. That part of his brain that was music is still music. Smith recalled bonding with another male resident who didnt like preachers. Smith described the man as a typical Panhandle good ol boy, one who loves to hunt, sh, drink and smoke. I got to spend a lot of time with him, and one day his wife asked him, Why do you love brother Clif so much? Smith said. He said, He makes me feel safe, he makes me feel secure, he makes me feel loved. In his three years at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe, Smith has realized chaplain is not his only title. Im not always chaplain. My name is Clif Smith, and Im happy to be your friend, he said. So what happens? We begin to bond. I meet you at your point of need.Dementia The Bridge at Bay St. Joe is a nursing home specializing in care of residents with dementia and Alzheimers. We bridge the terrible, terrible gap between traditional long-term care and specialized long-term dementia care, Smith said. Smith compared dementia, in the news recently with the announcement that legendary womens basketball coach Pat Summitt of the University of Tennessee has been diagnosed by early-onset dementia, to holding a slinky.See BRIIDGEE B8 They come here to live VALEr R IE GAr R MAN | The StarClif Smith in his ofce at The Bridge at Bay St. Joe, where he works as the facilitys full-time chaplain. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe facility, located at the corner of Long Avenue and Ninth Street in Port St. Joe, is a faith-based nursing facility specializing in long-term dementia care. BSee UNITENITED B8

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B2 | The Star Port St. Joe Garden Club NEWS Thursday, September 8, 2011 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Society Kosins celebrate 50 years of marriageDon and Judy Kosin of Port St. Joe are celebrating 50 years of marriage. They were wed Sept. 9, 1961, at the Sesquicentennial Chapel on the campus of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Thank you, Mom and Dad, for exemplifying a Christ-centered marriage. We are blessed to have you in our lives. With all our love, Beth and Matt, Joe and Sarah, David and Denise. Hugs and kisses to Grammie and Granddaddy Love, Matthew and Caleb, Mac and JayI Cor. 13:13 Dave MaddoxThe family of Dave Maddox requests the pleasure of your company at his 90th Birthday Celebration on Sunday, Sept. 11, from 3-6 p.m. ET at The Maddox Home, 601 17th St., Port St. Joe.So easy to preserve: Canning class offeredStar Staff ReportA free canning class will be presented by the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Gulf County Extension Ofce. RSVP to 850-6393200 or 850-229-2909 by Sept. 12. The classes will be held on the following dates: Tuesday, Sept. 13, from 6-8 p.m. CT at the Honeyville Community Center, 240 Honeyville Park Drive, Wewahitchka Thursday, Sept. 15, from 6-8 p.m. ET at the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association Building, 120 Library Drive, Port St. Joe. What will you learn? Why to preserve foods, how food preservation methods work, safe canning methods, what foods to can in a water-bath canner, what foods to can in a pressure-cooker canner, equipment, procedures, materials to keep food safe and much more. Star Staff ReportOn Aug. 18, the Port St. Joe Garden Club visited the Green Gate Olive Grove. Don Mueller, owner of the grove, gave an interesting and informative talk on olive growing. After the talk, the club picked olives and brought them home for curing. Sherrie Bowen won the Port St. Joe Garden Club drawing for a years membership in the club. The next meeting of the Port St. Joe Garden Club will be today at the Garden Center, 216 Eighth St., at noon ET. The meeting will be a covered-dish luncheon to kick off the new year of programs. The club will learn paper folding of origami owers.Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board to meet Sept. 14Star Staff ReportThe Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces a public meeting to which all people are invited. The Gulf County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 2 p.m. ET at the Gulf County Transportation Ofce, 122 Water Plant Road in Port St. Joe. In addition to regular business, the agenda includes an update to the TD Service Plan and the Annual Operating Report. A time for public comments will be afforded to anyone wishing to address the board. If anyone decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he or she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For more information or a copy of the agenda, or if you require special accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Ave. E., Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424, 850-674-4571.WWhite, Jenkins to wedIt is with joy that we invite you to share in a celebration of love as we, Taneisha V. White and Travis R. Jenkins, Sr., exchange our marriage vows. The beginning of our new life together will occur at 5 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011, at New Life Christian Center, 504 Sixth St. in Port St. Joe.WW ewahitchka High SSchool All Class Reunion 2011An All Class Reunion for Wewahitchka High School will be held Saturday, Oct. 1. Everyone in the community is invited, so make plans to come enjoy seeing old friends and catching up with one another. The reunion will be held at the Honeyville Community Center in Honeyville beginning at 2 p.m. CT. If you would like to attend, please send a check for $10 (per person) to Dianne (Lester) Semmes, 1730 CR 386 North, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. There will be a photographer taking individual, group and miscellaneous pictures during the reunion. If you would like a copy of the CD, there will be a sign-up sheet, and you will need to pay the $10 fee up front. If you need more information or would like to assist in any way, please contact Dianne at 639-5345 (home), 227-6425 (cell) or Wewamama@yahoo. com. Food and beverages will be provided, but donations of desserts are requested. The deadline for checks is Sept. 26. Class of 1980 end of summer reunion partyThe Port St. Joe High School Class of 1980 and friends are invited to attend a reunion party Sept. 9 and 10. Any graduate of Port St. Joe High School from around the year 1980 is invited. The party will be a two-day event, beginning Friday at Mango Marleys from 6-8:30 p.m. ET. The party will then move to the Lookout Lounge for some late-night fun. On Saturday, there will be a beach party from noon to 5 p.m. ET at Toucans in Mexico Beach, and later, the group will gather for dinner at Boondocks at 7 p.m. ET. For more information on the reunion party, visit PSJclassof1980. webstarts.com or contact Buddy Nachtsheim at 850-814-0754 or mtnachtsheim@ gmail.com. Anniversary Birthday Reunions Wedding

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The Star| B3Thursday, September 8, 2011 SAVE 40% KINCAID UPHOLSTERYSofa, Sectionals and Sleepers in Your Choice of Fabric HARRISON HOUSE FURNITURE EST. 1979 Best of Bay 2011 A+ Rating by the BBB 11 Harrison Ave. Downtown Panama City Closed Sun. & Mon.Great designs at 850-763-4918 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER SouthernCookingatitsBest Best Food Best Pricesfor Local Seafood & Steaks onShrimp Fried or Grilled w/ 2 Sides $10.95 8 oz. Ribeye w/ 2 sides $11.95 8oz. & 16oz. Black Angus (Hand Cut) Ribeyes Fish Basket w/ 2 sides $9.95 8 oz. Burgers w/FF $9.95Hours: 236 Reid Ave (850) 229.7121 THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGHTS 6 8:30 Haughty HeronNow Accepting New Members WINE TASTINGS EDUCATION MEMBERDISCOUNTS MEMBER PARTIES The Please call for details (850) 381-0700117SailorsCove, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-3463 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-2971 UpcomingTHURSDAY 9 PM ETRANDY STARK ONTHEPOOP DECKFRIDAY & SATURDAY 9 PMETRANDY STARK WITH ART LONG ON SAX ON THEPOOP DECKKARAOKE & DANCING IN THE CROWS NESTSUNDAY POT LUCK 7 PMET BARRY HENSONOPEN AT 11AM ET 7 DAYS A WEEKWWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM Events!! The rst weeks of school have come and gone. It is amazing to see how our students grow and change from year to year. It is also very exciting to see new little faces with backpacks as big as their little bodies. The bright smiles and their enthusiasm for school will make any teacher work himself or herself to the bone. The Faith Christian School staff works as a team to produce Christcentered students who are wise, healthy and well-adjusted. Every staff member works independently within the team, using his or her God-given talents and tools to attain this goal. It is not too late to enroll for the 2011-12 school year. Open slots are still available in all grades. Please call the ofce at 229-6707 for more information. (Scholarships are available.) Yearbooks are here. If you have not received your yearbook for the 2010-2011 year, just stop by the front ofce to pick it up. The yearbook editor, Janice Evans, and her staff have once again presented a fabulous book of memories.By Marcell Johnson and Troy WilliamsGeneral information The varsity cheerleaders would like to thank the local businesses that have supported their program by buying ads for their 5th annual ad shirt. In these rough economic times, they have sold more ads this year than ever before. This is just a testament to the amazing businesses of Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas and The Beaches, and the great support for the children in our community. Thanks! Ad shirts are still on sale for $15. Contact Mrs. Smallwood or one of the cheerleaders to purchase one. You can still register your child, pre-K through sixth grade, for the Youth Cheer Camp on Sept. 10 from 7:30 a.m. to noon ET; fee is $25. Free after-school tutoring with Ms. Pittman and Mrs. Ethridge through Gulf Coast State College/ Franklin Center every day between 3-5 p.m. ET. Fall photographs for students and faculty continue today. Also, they will do senior portrait makeups and retakes.Patriot Day The 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on America falls on a Sunday. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School will remember the innocent people who lost their lives on that fateful day with a school assembly today during fth period.Clubs Mu Alpha Theta meeting today; $15 dues are to be turned in for membership.Sports news  Jr. high football game today at home: Sharks vs. Wewa at 7 p.m. ET. Sr. high football game Friday, Sept. 9, at home: Sharks vs. Bozeman at 7:30 p.m. ET. Jr. and Sr. high v olleyball game  Sept. 13 at West Gadsden High, 6/7 p.m. Fall sports pictures Sept. 15: groups and individualSp P Ec C IAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S The Lions Tale The Lions TT ALE Shark TT ALK EEducation EEncore at Gulf/Franklin CampusOn Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 1 p.m. ET in Room A 101, registration will open for Education Encore classes at the Gulf/Franklin Campus. Education Encore provides noncredit enrichment classes for active adults on a variety of topics: computers, exercise, art, drawing, photography, religion, writing, Spanish, home repair, story crafting, history, etc. The goal of Education Encore is to provide a fun learning environment that offers diversity, insight and wisdom in which adults explore new ideas. Classes will be held on six consecutive Wednesdays from Sept. 21 through Oct. 26. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which includes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, visit www.gulfcoast. edu/EducationEncore, or for more information, call 872-3823 or email Jim Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. Dont miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest. You are never too old to learn.Corrections class scheduledA corrections class is scheduled for Oct. 3 at the Gulf Coast State College, Gulf/Franklin Campus in Port St. Joe. According to sources within the Department of Corrections, only applicants who have completed the class and passed the state board exam are currently being considered for employment as correctional ofcers. But the institutions in our area are beginning to hire ofcers following a lengthy hiring freeze and are running out of qualied applicants. The previous class was canceled because of a lack of enrollment, but we are continuing our efforts to encourage citizens who wish to pursue a career with good benets to contact us. For more information, call 227-9670, ext. 5507 or 5511, for more details. Star Staff Reports School News Education BRIEfsFS

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FAITHPage B4 www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.Pastor Josh Fidler First Presbyterian Church508 Sixteenth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456850-227-1756Rev. Ruth Hemple Worship Service 10:00 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Rev. Drucilla Tyler www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Sunday Night Awana....5 pm 7 pm Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Jerry Arhelger, COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 Thursday, September 8, 2011 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week.The rich man and Lazarus Beginning in Luke 16:19, there is an account of an unnamed rich man (Church history says his name was Dives) and a beggar named Lazarus. There have been endless debates about whether this is a parable or not. This passage, was told to a group of pharisees, and contains the name, Abraham, whom the Pharisees claimed as their ancestor, and the beggar, Lazarus, whom the Pharisees probably knew. Since it was told, about the time Jesus raised his friend Lazarus from the dead, it is probably a real account about real people. It goes like this: There was a certain rich man who was clothed in purple and ne linen and fared sumptuously every day. But there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, full of sores, who was laid at his gate, desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich mans table. Moreover the dogs came and licked his sores. So it was that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels to Abrahams bosom. The rich man also died and was buried. And being in torments in Hades (another name for hell) he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham afar off and Lazarus in his bosom. Then he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus that he may dip the tip of his nger in water and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this ame. But Abraham said, Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things; but now he is comforted and you are tormented. And besides all this, between us and you, there is a great gulf xed, so that those who want to pass from here to you cannot, nor can those from there pass to us. Then he said, I beg you therefore, father, that you would send him to my fathers house, for I have ve brothers, that he may testify to them, lest they also come to this place of torment. Abraham said to him, They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them. And he said, No, father Abraham; but if one goes to them from the dead, they will repent. But he said to him, If they do not hear Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded though one rise from the dead. Whether a parable, or not, Jesus telling us, that the way we live, has serious consequences. Picture yourself, in hell, in torments, with no hope of escape, and no way of warning your relatives and friends. Maybe today is the day for you to stop trusting in religious ceremonies, and ask God to make you into what He wants you to be, and follow the leading of the Holy Spirit every day! Questions or comments are invited. Send to us at one of the addresses below: Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible, every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh. Check us out this Sunday! For the spring and summer seasons, our services begin, with a time of greeting and fellowship, at 9:45 a.m. CT on Sunday. Our worship begins at 10 a.m. For those interested, we have midweek ministry, helping people on an individual basis. Inquire for more information. Come early on Sunday morning so that you can meet us informally and join in the praise and worship music led by TJ. On Sunday morning we worship at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st Street. The Civic Center is located behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker Realty, just off U.S. Highway 98 in the western end of Mexico Beach. Look for the white building with the dark green roof.God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337, Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook, look for Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com The Christian CONScCIENcCE Judgment Day IIsnt Far Away Well, it looks like the commissioners have it all gured out. At least they think so, but I still have doubts. The bar folks say they worry about their patrons health. Sounds to me like they want more of their wealth. Two more hours to drink, if it wasnt so sad it might be funny. The booze hounds are barking for more, and the bars keep taking their money. You commissioners are wrong to let things happen this way. Im glad to be me and not you, when it comes judgment day. Billy Johnson

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www.starfl.com BSectionHighland View Baptist HomecomingThe Highland View Baptist Church will celebrate 60 years of ministry with its 31st Annual Homecoming at 10:30 a.m. ET on Sept. 11. There will be special music presentations and Brother Larry DeMoss, former interim pastor, will be bringing the morning message. A covered-dish lunch will be served at noon. Everyone is invited to attend. The church is located at 382 Ling Street.Anniversary CelebrationThe Thompson Temple First Born Church of the Living God invites you to a celebration honoring the anniversary of Bishop Frank Hogans Jr. The celebration will be held at the church, located at 222 Avenue E in Port St. Joe, on Sept. 11 at 11:30 a.m. ET. We invite you and desire your prayers!Annual Womens Day at Victory Temple First Born HolinessVictory Temple First Born Holiness Church in Port St. Joe will celebrate its Annual Womens Day at 11:30 a.m. ET on Sunday, Sept. 11. The speaker will be Missionary Pinkie Bolden-Patterson and the theme is If the Hats Could Speak. We invite you to come on this Annual Womens Day and help us enjoy Jesus. Your presence will be well appreciated. Come and be blessed.Annual Womens Day at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist ChurchAnnual Womens Day will be celebrated at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church on the 3rd Sunday, Sept. 18. The day will begin at 10 a.m. ET with Church School followed by a special 11 a.m. morning worship service with Evangelist Barbara Bell of Panama City as the guest speaker. A special invitation by the Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church membership is extended to everyone to come and be a part of this great day of blessings from God. The church is located in Port St. Joe on Avenue D. City Wide Mission Fruit Harvest ProgramThe City Wide Missionary Society of Port St. Joe will sponsor its Annual Fruit Harvest Worship Services on Thursday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. ET at the Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church located at 315 Martin Luther King Blvd. Foreign Mission service will be the highlight of this years program and will feature Mr. Marty Rileys recent mission trip to Brazil. Marty, a member of First Baptist Church located here in Port St. Joe, will share his experiences in the mission eld through pictorial presentations and personal observations. This program is opened to everyone to attend and support the work of the City Wide Missionary Society. An offering will be taken.New Horizon AAThe New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 639-3600. Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847CALLTODAY! GET YOUR AD IN227-7847 Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn CareRobert PelcMowing Service227-5374 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE & PALM TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com FAITHPage 5 Thursday, September 8, 2011Patricia Hogeland, 65, passed away in Kinard, where she wanted to be at home with her kids on Sunday night, August 28, 2011. She is preceded in death by her parents, Bill and Lena Findley and three brothers, Billy, Jhon, and Wayne Findley. She is survived by her sons, Jerald, and Tommy and wife Vickie, of Kinard, FL; a daughter, Teri Herring and husband Leslie of Birereld, AL; nine grandchildren, Melissa, Joey, Ritn, Kirstie, Kenny Bo, Leann, Allen, Chris, and Cody; ten greatgrandchildren, Emily, Wyett, Joey, Jr., Ashley, Kayla, Kristen, Ashley, Hope, Tori and Alane. Graveside funeral services were held Wednesday, August 31, 2011 at 10 a.m. CT at Buckhorn Cemetery in Wewahitchka with the Rev. Joey Smith ofciating. All services were under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home.Patricia HogelandRiley Dennis, (19382011) age 73 of Pensacola, passed away Friday, Aug. 26, 2011. He was a loving and devoted husband, father, grandfather and friend. Riley served his country in the U.S. Army and served his customers like family at Pensacola Honda where he worked for the past 17 years. His fondest memories include shing and golng with his close friend Terry in Okeechobee, spending time with his family, and spending time in the World, committing to memory Psalm 91. Riley loved his Heavenly Father most of all. He was preceded in death by his mother, Viola, and father, Samuel Jackson Dennis, and brother, Frank Dennis. Survivors include his wife of 41 years, Carolyn Brewton Dennis; two children, Lisa Schroeder (Michael), and Ryan Dennis (Tammy); ve grandchildren, Kyle, Nicole, Blake, Derek and Tyler; two brothers, Bill Dennis and Bob Dennis (Patty); sister, Audrey Anderson (Paul); stepmother, Eloise Keels; sister-in-law, Jean Dennis; and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. A special thanks goes to the nursing staff at Sacred Heart Surgical ICU for their special care of our loved one. Funeral services were held Aug. 29 at Fail Chapel Funeral Home in Pensacola. Interment followed in Pensacola Memorial Gardens. Pallbearers were Terry Gross, Richard Holield, Bob Winn, Jerry Taylor, Bruce Morgan and Keith Dethlefs. Condolences may be placed online at fcfhs.com. Riley D. DennisJoseph John Katynsky, 88, passed away on August 27, 2011. Born in Johnstown, PA, he was a long time resident of Wewahitchka and a decorated WWII veteran of the USAF with 26 years of service. Well known for his many years at Tyndall AFB in personnel, he also served in Korea, Iceland and Europe. He was one of the earliest members of Tyndall Federal Credit Union, a former restaurant owner and building contractor. Papa Joe was an accomplished chef and enjoyed retirement on the river with his many plants and animals. Survivors include his beloved wife, Donna, of Wewahitchka; daughter Deborah Riddle and husband James; grandson Christopher Howell and wife Angie; grandsons Matthew Howell and JP Riddle; and his greatgrandchild and namesake, Cameron Joseph Howell, all of the Panama City area. Joseph John KatynskyMae Plair, 77, of Blountstown, left this world on Saturday, September 3, 2011, at Bay Medical Center, from an accidental injury she received the day before. Mae was born in South Carolina, but had spent most of her adult life in Port St. Joe and Blountstown. She was preceded in death by a loving and devoted husband, Ralph E. Plair; her parents Walter and Gladys Hyatt; a daughter Diane Sheldon and an adopted daughter Cindi Judkins. Survivors include her daughters, Peggy Whiteld-Plair Atkinson and husband Colby, with their children, Zachary and Wesley Whiteld, Brittany and Chris Ferrell and Dustyn Atkinson, all of Blountstown; Ruthie Rhodes and her late husband Dewayne Rhodes, with their child, Kayla Rhodes, all of Port St. Joe; one son, Michael Sheldon and wife Sandy, with their children, Heidi, Spencer, Amanda, Chad and Tyler, all of Owasso, Michigan. Services will be held at 11 am (CT)/12 Noon (ET), on September 8, 2011 at Abe Springs Pentecostal Holiness Church, in Blountstown, with the services conducted by the Rev. Michael Morris and the Rev. David Nichols. There will be no graveside services. Family will receive friends at the home of her daughter in Port St. Joe at 125 Gulf Coast Circle on Wednesday, Sept. 7 from 4-6 p.m. (CT)/ 5-7 p.m. (ET) and before the service on Thursday, Sept. 8 in Blountstown at Abe Springs Pentecostal Holiness Church. A very special thanks the family would like to give to Dr. Skipper, Calhoun EMS Medic Aaron Carter, EMT Andy Waldroff, CLH Nurse Crystal Arnold and all the Staff involved with the care of our mother/ grandmother for these two days at Calhoun/ Liberty Hospital and EMS Director Phillip Hill and his staff, Calhoun County Sheriffs Ofce, Nettle Ridge Fire Dept. and Bay Medical Center ER. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Emma Mae PlairCharles E. OBryan, Jr., age 54 of Tallahassee, passed away Sunday, August 28, 2011. Funeral Services were held at 1 p.m. ET on Thursday, September 1, 2011, at Beggs Funeral Home with burial at Oakeld Cemetery in Monticello, Fl. Family received friends from 6-8 p.m. Wednesday in the Chapel. Charles was an avid outdoorsman. He loved hunting, riding in the woods and, above all, family and friends. He worked in the construction industry as a sub-contractor. He could x or build anything and never saw the need to throw anything away. He had a quirky sense of humor that will be missed greatly. He had a love and appreciation for animals, especially his well trained cat, Sammy. He is survived by his loving wife, Susan E. OBryan; four daughters, Jennifer N. Dareing (Bruce), Kimberly R. and Rebecca L. OBryan, and Christina Lee; four grandchildren, Cassidy, Elany, Ryan, and Ethan of Polk County; his parents, Charles E. and Martha Hysmith OBryan; and a host of aunts, uncles and cousins. Beggs Funeral Home Apalachee Parkway Chapel (850) 942-2929 beggsapalachee@ embarqmail.com website: beggsfuneralhomes.comCharles E. OBryan, Jr. ObBItTUarARIeES Faith brBRIefEFS

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 8, 2011 The Star | B6 3491S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 340 Application No. 2011-13 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01884-010R Description of Property: COMMENCING at an iron rod marking the Southeast Corner of Southeast Quarter of Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds West (assumed) 647.27 feet to a point on the East right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being 33.0 feet from and at right angle to the centerline of said State Road; thence North 04 Degrees 46 Minutes 43 Seconds East along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 168.00 feet to an iron pipe for the POINTING OF BEGINNING, thence North 05 Degrees 11 Minutes 45 Seconds West 48.96 feet; thence North 08 Degrees 04 Minutes 27 Seconds West along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 46.68 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line curve of said State Road No. 71, said point being 33.00 feet from and radial to the centerline of said State Road, said curve having a radius of 1651.42 feet and being concave westerly, thence Northerly along the arc of said curve through a central angle of 20 Degrees 35 Minutes 55 Seconds for 593.71 feet said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of North 10 Degrees 14 Minutes 30 Seconds West 590.52 feet; thence leaving said right of way line curve North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds East, 784.10 feet, thence South 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 343.36 feet, thence South 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds West 471.08 feet, thence South 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds West 124.53 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 5.536 acres, more or less, and being subject to a drainage easement across the following portion thereof: COMMENCE at an iron rod marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds West (assumed) 647.27 feet to a point on the East right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being 33.0 feet from and at right angle to the centerline of said State Road; thence North 04 Degrees 46 Minutes 43 Seconds East along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 168.00 feet to an iron pipe for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 05 Degrees 11 Minutes 45 Seconds West 48.96 feet; thence North 73 Degrees 12 Minutes 44 Seconds East 31.22 feet, thence North 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds East 65.00 feet; thence North 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds East 470.75 feet; thence North 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 09 Seconds East 319.77 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds East 34.22 feet, to an iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 343.36 feet; thence South 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds West 471.08 feet; thence South 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds West 124.53 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. DESCRIPTION BY RECENT SURVEY: COMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (no identification) marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, as shown on the Florida Department of Transportation right of way map as prepared by David H. Melvin, Inc., with a final date of January 13, 1999, (map No. 2190041, Sheet 1 of 9); thence run South 88 Degrees 53 Minutes 21 Seconds West along the South boundary of the said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, for 622.82 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71; thence Northerly along said Easterly right of way as follows: North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 75.63 feet, thence South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds East for 3.28 feet; thence North 06 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 62.45 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 29.89 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732 for the POINT OF BEGINNING; from said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 50.49 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds West along said Easterly right of way for 9.84 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 15.90 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence along said right of way and curve with a radius of 1665.27 feet, through a central angle of 21 Degrees 23 Minutes 44 Seconds, for an arc distance of 621.85 feet (chord of said arc being North 09 Degrees 54 Minutes 20 Seconds West 618.24 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732); thence leaving said Easterly right of way run thence North 89 Degrees 00 Minutes 45 Seconds East for 751.97 feet to a found 1 and 1/4 inch iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 28 Minutes 55 Seconds West for 343.36 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds West for 471.08 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 46 Degrees 02 Minutes 21 Seconds East for 123.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 5.502 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO A DRAINAGE EASEMENT ACROSS THE FOLLOWING PORTION THEREOF: COMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (no identification) marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, as shown on the Florida Department of Transportation right of way map as prepared by David H. Melvin, Inc., with a final date of January 13, 1999, (map No. 2190041, Sheet 1 of 9); thence run South 88 Degrees 53 Minutes 21 Seconds West along the South boundary of the said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, for 622.82 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71; thence Northerly along said Easterly right of way as follows: North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 75.63 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds East for 3.28 feet; thence North 06 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 62.45 feet, thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 29.89 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732 for the POINT OF BEGINNING; from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 50.08 feet; thence North 73 Degrees 07 Minutes 39 Seconds East for 25.35 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 01 Minute 59 Seconds East for 65.00 feet; thence North 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds East for 470.75 feet, thence North 44 Degrees 29 Minutes 04 Seconds East for 319.77 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 00 Minutes 45 Seconds East for 34.22 feet to a found 1 and 1/4 inch iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 28 Minutes 55 Seconds West for 343.36 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds West for 471.08 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 46 Degrees 02 Minutes 21 Seconds East for 123.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: Taunton Truss, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T. Wednesday, the 21st day of September, 2011. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Aug 18, 25, 2011 Sept 1, 8, 2011 3495S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 366 Application No. 2011-19 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01960-000R Description of Property: Lots 1, 2 and the North 29 feet of Lot 3, in Section24, Township 4 South, Range 10 eWest, according to the Higgins and Hollinger Plat of the Town of Wewahitchka, Florida, and on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: David L & Abigail Tauton All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 21st day of September, 2011. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 18, 25, 2011 Sept 1, 8, 2011 35362S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 352 Application No. 2011-20 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01901-175R Description of Property: Lot 15, Sawmill Estates Unit 1, according to the Official map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 1, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Taunton Development, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 12th day of October, 2011. Dated this 6th day of September, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Sept 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 35247S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-196CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. MARGARET H. STEVENS, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 18th, 2011, and entered in Civil Case No. 11-196-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and Margaret H. Stevens is Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 15th day of September, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lot 14, The Village at Port St. Joe, as per plat rercorded in Plat Book 4, Page 11, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 19th day of August, 2011. REBECCA NORRIS CIRCUIT COURT CLERK BY: BA Baxter DEPUTY CLERK Sept 1, 8, 2011 35379S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 10-479CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GARY L. SMITH, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY L. SMITH, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2, and all unknown parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against any Defendants, or claiming any right, title, and interest in the subject property, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause in the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, I will sell at public auction to the highest bidder in cash in at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on September 22, 2011, that certain real property situated in the County of Gulf, State of Florida, more particularly described as follows: The North 1/2 of Lot 29, SAN BLAS ESTATES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 20, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West; thence N 00 East along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West for 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot wide right of way of State Road No. 30-E; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line as follows: S 23 East for 1642.44 feet to a point of curve; thence along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 11426.79 feet and a central angle of 02 for 427.29 feet; thence S 25 East for 1711.69 feet to a point of curve; thence along the arc of a curve to the right which has a radius of 11415.15 feet and a central angle of 05 for 1058.64 feet; thence S 20 East for 6496.59 feet to the point of beginning; thence continue S 20 East along said right of way line for 49.98 feet; thence leaving said right of way line S 69 West for 630.70 feet, more or less, to the waters edge of the Gulf of Mexico, thence Northwesterly along said waters edge for 50 feet, more or less, to a point which bears S 69 West from the point of beginning; thence N 69 East for 635.7 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. If you are a person with a disability who needs special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, you should, within two (2) working days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation, at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Phone (850) 718-0026. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call (800) 955-8771. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Dated August 26, 2011 By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept 8, 15, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. YORKIE AKC Beautiful Female Puppy10 weeks old, 1st shots and comes with a health certificate $500 Own mom & dad. Call 850-554-0320 Panama City Mexico Beach 122 Woodlawn Rustic Sands Friday Sept. 9 & Sat Sept 10. 7:30-2:30ESTATE SALESome Furniture, Misc. Household items Text FL73873 to 56654 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Controller ARNP or PA RN Lab Technician EMT Dietician Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 34173429 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 Movie Extras to stand in background for major film. Earn up to $300 per day. Experience not required. 877-824-6274 2 Br Apartments for Rent near Hwy 71 & Wewahitchka. Apply at Fisher Building Supply at 848 Hwy 22 or Call 639-5102 for more info Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 8, 2011 The Star | B7 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 401 Reid Avenue +/5,400sf: Move in ready; Inquire for terms 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16 inside clearance; Dual 12 roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $515,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 407 Reid Ave +/4,988 sf : 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $399,000 317 Monument Ave +/4,431 sf : Hwy 98 frontage w/ On-site parking; $499,000 401 Reid Avenue+/5,400 sf : Retail space; $225,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for terms260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing availableHwy 98 Retail / Of ce Vacant LotsTwo lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30 x 80 each; $69,900 per lot UNDER CONTRACT Avenue fce/retail 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates UNFURNISHED HOUSE RENTAL 3 bedrm 2 bath on Indian Lagoon. 1 year lease, $900.00 First & Security 850-866-1269 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 Eagle Landing Spacious Townhome AvailableBeautiful and spacious 3 br, 2 bath townhome located in Jones Homestead, Eagle Landing subdivision. Close to shopping, downtown, new hospital and St. Josephs Bay. $750 per month $750 security/ damage deposit. Gulf Coast Property Services at (850) 229-2706 for more information and a tour of this well-kept townhome. Text FL74618 to 56654 1, 2, & 3 bedroom long term rentals available in Mexico Beach. Please call 850-348-0262 Text FL75507 to 56654 3 br home with 150 ft boat dock, deep water, year round, Call (850) 348-7774 Bayview Home @ Indian Pass. 4 br, 3 ba, 2 acres, large storage and Boat shed. $1200 mo + $1200 dep. $200 pet fee. In the St. Joe school district. Call 850-229-1065 or 850-227-5025 Would like toSwap my home in a N. Georgia Mountain City, for a home in this area. No money owed, Call 478-252-4636 3 br, 2 ba home priced to sell. 85K negotiable. within 1 mi of 3 schools Central heat & air. 2105 long Avenue, PSJ. Call 850-697-2768 for appt. Buyer to pay closing costs! Text FL75911 to 56654 Price ReducedFSBO: 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Classifiedcan!If you re ready to move up or are j ust starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. Weve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if youre planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the markets best prospects. The K ey to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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LocalB8 | The Star Thursday, September 8, 2011The event injects money into the local economy and bolsters the coffers of the United Way, which in turn injects the money back into the community. This is a concept I came up with two years ago, Sharpe said. What better way? You go out for something to eat, you support the businesses which need the support, you support the largest nonprot agency in the country and the money goes directly back into the community. The money contributed will be used to assist the elderly, children and others in need in your community. This is a great opportunity to enjoy a nice meal with your family and help your community at the same time. The needs are greater than ever given the economy. Of the $56,000 raised during the community campaign in 2008, more than $52,000, or 95 cents on the dollar, was donated back into the community, a ratio that has played out each year. It is amazing what a dollar can do, Sharpe said. The local United Way receives funds in three categories. Those who donate to the United Way can earmark those funds for specic agencies approved under the United Way umbrella. The statewide campaign also will bring in funds specied in similar fashion, donations given for specic agencies serving the community. A good thing about a United Way campaign is you can designate where you want your money to go, Sharpe said. Think about this. You live here, but you may have a loved one in Miami being served by a United Way approved agency that you can designate to receive your donation. Funds not specically earmarked are pooled into the community grant fund, which provides grants to agencies and organizations that apply for funding from the United Way. A committee of local residents reviews the grant applications and decides on recipients and amounts. North Florida Child Development Inc., Gulf County Senior Citizens, Gulf County ARC & Gulf Transportation were among the organizations that received funding from the United Way in recent years. In addition, funds were provided to organizations such as the American Red Cross, which has offered assistance for countless emergencies, such as a house re or ooding, in the community, and Life Management, which has ofces in Gulf County. Whether they are in Gulf County or not, all these agencies touch the lives of Gulf County citizens, Sharpe said, looking at a spreadsheet of the area agencies that received money from the Gulf County campaign. There are no borders. This year, seven local restaurants have agreed to donate 10 percent of their sales on Sept. 8 to the Dine United event in Gulf County. Sharpe noted that some restaurant owners dont bother with the 10 percent; they will cut a check that often amounts to more than 10 percent of what the restaurant will make on Sept. 8. We didnt put pressure on them, Sharpe said. Our goal is to drive trafc to them and benet the United Way at the same time. If we can just get citizens to go out and thank the restaurants, show that they appreciate what the restaurants are doing, that makes it a win. The main purpose of the effort, Sharpe said, is straightforward. It is all about raising awareness, education, about the United Way and the agencies we serve, Sharpe said. For more information, go to www.unitedwaynw. org. Aaron Farnsley, AIF, CFP, MBA Farnsley & Johnston 505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3336 aaron.farnsley@farnsley.com UNITED from page B1At one point, the slinky is balanced, but with a slight tilt, all of a sudden, perceptions of time are greatly thrown off. Smith gave an example: Say your grandma has been diagnosed with Alzheimers, he said, and you ask, Grandma, do you remember when we used to go to Panama City Beach in the summer? Grandma just looks at you and smiles and doesnt respond. In my opinion, I think grandma has the answer, he said. We dont necessarily know what grandma is thinking. He said chances are the next time youre at the grocery store, youll pass someone who has pre-dementia. Theyll know they came for beans, but will stand in the bean aisle for a while trying to remember what kind. When this person gets in the car to drive home, he or she will drive west over the bridge to St. Joe Beach, even though they need to go home to Apalachicola. Or say your grandmother has Alzheimers and shes a wanderer. She might go outside in her pajamas one morning and just start walking and end up lost with no recollection of how she got there. Were able to hear one another, see one another, Smith said. Its the command central that makes that possible. Theyre obviously ring very well. (With Alzheimers) the synapses in the brain become disconnected and plaque over. Smith said much like a cellphone has a receptor that allows it to send and receive calls, the brain is also full of receptors that send receive signals from the sensory organs. Alzheimers and dementia obscure the sensory receptors, much like a dead zone obscures a cellphones ability to send and receive calls. With Alzheimers you cant take a shot and be made well; you cant take a pill and be made well, Smith said. The nursing home is broken up into four different halls. The rst three halls house residents that arent necessarily challenged but might have dementias. The fourth hall is designed for residents who need special care, who might be suffering from progressed dementia or Alzheimers and need extra care and direction. The special care hall is not at all a lockdown facility, Smith said. He would gladly move his ofce down there if the option was presented. When a voice comes over Smiths walkie-talkie summoning Dr. Strong and team, it could mean a confrontation has happened with a dementia patient and someone is needed to intervene. On occasion, dementia patients might wander into each others rooms on accident and cause a disturbance. It doesnt happen often, but it could happen any moment, he said. On Aug. 31, Smith and other representatives from the Bridge at Bay St. Joe conducted a demonstration for employees at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. The demonstration aimed to create how elderly dementia patients see, hear and feel. Participants put on colored goggles to obscure their vision, ear buds producing static noises and gloves lled with popcorn seeds to reduce dexterity. They were then asked to perform everyday activities like writing and folding clothes. One employee broke down and cried, because she got to experience some dementia and she didnt like it, Smith said. Were in a dark place, and were threatened by it.Like homeThe Bridge at Bay St. Joe aims to provide residents with a sense of homeliness in their surroundings. Last year, the company renovated its facilities, replacing the oors with a demure wood laminate with white moldings. The company spent a half million dollars last year, making this a more comfortable place for dementia patients, Smith said. Many of the room doors are adorned with wreaths or owers. The hallways are labeled like streets. Happy Lane and Victory Lane intersect near the nurses station. When I come here, I dont come to work in a nursing home building, Smith said. I come to work in your grandmothers home. Smith said they used to shine the oors really well, but they dont anymore because your grandmother has Alzheimers, and she thinks its water. Plaques in the dining hall honor outstanding residents in a Hall of Fame, recognizing the lifetime achievements and civic duties of residents who have made great contributions in their lifetimes. Smith said one of his primary duties as chaplain is to educate family members about dementias and help them to understand what their loved one is going through. Visiting family members will often become frustrated when they arent recognized or even addressed, he said. His job is to tone down the discouragement and keep them coming back. Smith went through it himself when his stepfather, once a skilled craftsman, was diagnosed with Alzheimers. What made me uncomfortable was not knowing if I was doing everything I could do, he said. In his three years as chaplain, Smith has learned that a nursing home is not a place to be feared. The people in Port St. Joe need to not be afraid of this building, Smith said. Death is just as important a consideration as living. He said the people of Port St. Joe need to come for a tour. People dont come here to die, they come here to live. VAl L ERIE GARMAN | The StarTwo photos dated 1972 stand in the foreground of a more recent family photo in Clif Smiths ofce. At left, he and his wife, Bettie, embrace on the deck of the USS Berkeley, and at right, Smith works the signal bridge on the USS Berkeley. BRIDGE from page B1


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