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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03809
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 08-25-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03809

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By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Keep it clean, Port St. Joe. The dumpsters at the Public Works yard on 10th Street and at the transfer station off Industrial Road are hungry for aluminum, plastic and paper. Theyll take your soda cans, green bean cans, milk jugs, water bottles, old phone books, flat tened cardboard boxes, magazines, and even this newspaper youre hold ing. We have not had a re cycling program ever up until a few months ago, said City Manager Char lie Weston. Were try ing to get people to put their best foot forward and keep the city looking clean. Weston encourages all residents to take advan tage of the citys two re cycling centers. There is a receptacle for paper products in cluding cardboard, maga zines, brown paper gro cery bags, phone books, catalogs, newspapers and inserts, and separate receptacles for aluminum and plastic. Glass will not be ac cepted because there is no market for the resale of recycled glass, Weston said. Cans and bottles must be emptied and rinsed before being placed in the bins with any caps or straws removed. Plastic bags, Styrofoam, bulbs and ceramics are not re cyclable and should not be deposited in the bins. We dont have curb side (pickup) yet, but that would be the ulti mate goal, Weston said. Theres a huge cost associated with going 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, AUGUST 25 2011 Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Outdoors ..................................... A6 Sports ........................................... A7 Lifestyle ....................................... B1 School News ............................... B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B4 Classieds .................................... B6-B7 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 73, NUM BER 45 PSJ urges participation in new recycling program See RECYCLING A5 Commissioners mull Gulf Pines decision Chamber hires new director Name withheld as individual nishes prior job By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer The Gulf County Cham ber of Commerce has been busy cleaning house this summer. As a result of a request by the Board of County Commissioners to con solidate chamber and eco nomic development activi ties under a common roof, the chamber has been un dergoing renovations all summer. We basically red our entire staff in June, said Chamber President Bob by Pickels. And we went through a very difcult nancial audit. The chamber has been involved in a sometimes controversial political pro cess since spring, when county commissioners vot ed to disband the existing Economic Development Council in favor of a uni ed model. The commissioners ap proved it as a way to save taxpayer dollars through a consolidation that will have the executive direc tor of the chamber oversee chamber and economic development efforts. Commissioners faulted the EDC for not ling re quired spending reports. More specically, commis sioners said the money di rected to the EDC had not paid the dividends com missioners desired in the form of new jobs and busi nesses. There wasnt enough substance (with the EDC) that people could see on the ground, Pickels said. It started to create a rift. After presenting a proposed organizational structure to commission ers in March, Pickels and the chamber were charged with consolidating the du ties of the EDC into its own, with an eye toward naming a new director in July. See CHAMBER A2 DOUBLE EXPOSURE TO THE SUN On a recent afternoon, showers gave way to sunshine and this gorgeous double rainbow, which reader Bill Fauth captured with his camera on Mexico Beach. Paws in the Park, B1 By Tim Croft Star News Editor With the deadline for a decision a week away, Port St. Joe city commis sioners entered a budget workshop Tuesday hop ing for a clear picture on how to secure the old Gulf Pines Hospital site. By the time commis sioners convened the image had been further blurred. Commissioners have until Sept. 2 to notify a California receiver and the Internal Revenue Ser vice whether the city will take deed to the Gulf Pines building and the just over two acres of land the for mer hospital sits on. The focus of the work shop was a presentation of potential costs linked to asbestos abatement in the building and demoli tion in order for the city to plat the land and sell as many as five lots of .44 acres each. However, questions arose regarding sewer hookup to the land and, more importantly, an ap parent property tax cer tificate holder who has ap plied for a tax deed to the property. City staff was to ex plore the sewer issue, the thought being that the city has some $200,000 grant funds remaining from a sewer installation project on Sunset Circle both entrances to Sunset Circle border the hospital property boundaries. The money available there might allow us to ac complish (bringing sewer to the hospital land), said Mayor Mel Magidson. In addition, given a five-lot configuration, the city would realize some $25,000 in tap fees which would offset any cost for linking city sewer to the hospital property. As for the property tax T IM CR OFT | The Star Gulf Pines Hospital was shuttered by the state more than ve years ago. It has been steadily decaying since. See GULF PINES A8

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Local Thursday, August 25, 2011 Star Staff Report The Gulf Alliance for Lo cal Arts (GALA) presents Randall Big Daddy Web ster and Professor Joel C. Johnson, currently on a world concert tour, on Sept. 2 as part of the First Fridays Art and Music Se ries. Together, Randall Big Daddy Webster, of Tal lahassee, and Professor Jol C. Johnson, from Or lando, are a formidable duo with a combined 58 years performing blues and jazz music and over four years performing in concert and in the recording studio with Big Daddy & Red Hot Java. They have also part nered on national and in ternational tours and both are sponsored by Godin Guitars. Both have serious music academic accredita tions. Big Daddy is certied by the Blues Foundation and the Florida Humanities Council, and Jol is a pro fessor and scholar teach ing at Florida State Uni versity and other universi ties on the music industry, music technology, and mu sic education. They bring their world view of Blues built on its indigenous Af rican-American heritage. Its blues peppered with soul, jazz and life that ig nites your primal core, and makes you think. Webster and Johnson just complet ed their new duo CD The Wounded Healer, and they are touring Europe during the spring and summer of 2011 in support of the re cording. You cannot miss this show! First Fridays is held at the Port Inn, on the cor ner of U.S. Highway 98 and Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd in Port St. Joe, and is free and open to the public. The opening reception runs from 6-7 p.m. ET. It will be followed by music on the porch from 7-11:30 p.m. This series is present ed by Gulf Alliance for Lo cal Arts and is sponsored by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. Bow Wow Bash Masquerade Party will be on Saturday, October 29, 2011. PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR BIDS THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA WILL EXCEPT BIDS ON THE ROOFING OF THE CITY HALL AND FIRE STATION LOCATED AT 109 S. 2ND ST. THIS IS A DESIGN BUILD PROJECT TO BE DONE BY A LICENSED ENGINEER BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA AND A GENERAL CONTRACTOR ALSO LICENSED BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA. THE BIDS ARE TO INCLUDE DESIGNS, PERMITS, AND ALL MATERIAL AND LABOR TO CONSTRUCT A 26 GUAGE METAL ROOF WITH 16 GUAGE RETROFIT STEEL FRAME ON THE CITY HALL AND FIRE STATION. ALL PROPOSALS MUST MEET THE GULF COUNTY BUILDING REQUIREMENTS AND WIND LOADS. BIDS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE CITY CLERK BEFORE 12 NOON CENTRAL TIME SEPTEMBER 26, 2011 AT THE CITY ANNEX SITED AT 318 S. 7TH ST. AND WILL BE OPENED THE SAME DAY AT THE REGULAR COMMISSION MEETING AT 6:30 PM CENTRAL AT 109 S. 2ND ST. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, religion, sex, and familial status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs). To le a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Ofce of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). The City of Wewahitchka is an equal opportunity, fair housing community. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer There is only one thing more frustrating than standing in line for an hour at the Division of Motor Ve hicles: having to drive an hour to stand in line for an hour at the DMV. And coming soon: Gulf County residents will no longer need to trek to Pan ama City or Blountstown for a new drivers license or to renew their existing license. The Tax Collectors of ce at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe will provide minimum driv ers license services by the end of September, said Tax Collector Shirley Jenkins. The states Drivers Li cense Ofce in Port St. Joe closed July 30 due to bud get cuts in Tallahassee. Its just a convenience to have it here, Jenkins said. Who wants to take a whole day off work to stand in line? Currently, Gulf County residents must drive to Bay, Calhoun or Liberty County for DMV services. Representatives from the state DMV will be in the Tax Collectors ofce Sept. 9 and 10 installing the nec essary licensing software and photo equipment. The DMV is providing the equipment at a $1,200 one-time cost to Gulf Coun ty, effectively transferring the equipment from the old DMV ofce to Jenkins. In essence, Jenkins is working ahead of the curve. Under a law passed by Florida lawmakers in the spring, every county Tax Collector in Florida is re quired to provide a drivers license service by 2015, Jenkins said. Initially, the ofce will only provide minimum li cense services including renewals, replacements, re-instatements, identica tion cards, driving record searches, child support clearances and minimum written examinations. The ofce will not admin ister driving tests for rsttime license applicants. The DMV has suggested an interlocal agreement with Bay County for administer ing driving exams. Were not doing any driving on the road yet, Jenkins said. Were going to move into that eventu ally. The initial cost to the county for the rst two years will be about $5,000 collectively, Jenkins said. Once the department is established, the services will basically be underwrit ten by the fee structure. There will be a $6.25 fee for most services. As we get to (perform ing) the different transac tions, it should pay for it self, Jenkins said. More fees will be collect ed once the ofce begins administering more ex tensive services like road drivers tests. Jenkins said it will be a great convenience to Gulf County residents because they will be able to walk in the ofce and get their tags, title and drivers license all in one trip. It will be a win-win situ ation, she said. Tax Collectors ofce driving ahead with DMV services CHAMBER from page A1 Thats kind of the way it was done 15 years ago, Pickels said of the consoli dated model. Weve come full circle. With clean books and the consolidation behind them, the chamber is ready to move forward by lling their ofces with people to help guide the county and city out of the recession fog. After an exhausting can didate search and interview process, coordinated by the Gulf Coast Workforce Board to, as Pickels stated, take some of the politics out of the process, the chamber has hired a new executive director who will begin Sept. 26. Because the new director remains in their current job, attempting to close at least one major deal, they asked that their name not be made public until next month. The Chamber and Work force Board conducted a national search, resulting in three nalists, all of whom visited Gulf County in recent weeks. Pickels said they man aged to not good-ole-boy it, with the aim of the cham ber board of directors to be transparent and profession al in the selection process. The chamber also enlist ed help from a professional facilitator, an accountant, and a human relations rm to aid the search and identify quality applicants. What we did here is something that has never been done in Gulf County be fore. We got the professional help we needed, Pickels said. Does that mean were guaranteed success? Abso lutely not. Pickels hopes the new hire will help the chamber tackle one of its biggest chal lenges: creating new jobs. At the end of the day, we know the way were going to be judged is jobs, Pickels said. I hope in the future we can change the nature of the conversation from were desperate for any jobs to how do we manage the growth of our community. Pickels said with bed tax collections arcing up, and a more attractive downtown business sector courtesy of the Port St. Joe Redevelop ment Agency, there are plen ty of reasons for optimism. There were some people who told me at out that (this years) scallop festival would fail, Pickels said. And it turned out to be the biggest one weve ever seen. The Florida Music and Scallop Festival earlier this month drew record crowds despite being held after the chamber had shed its work force. Pickels credits the many volunteers who helped make the event a success. Pickels said the cham ber has a variety of events planned for this fall includ ing Ghosts on the Coast and Networking at Noon. It has been an exciting time and its going to con tinue to be an exciting time, Pickels said. Weve got a long year ahead of us. The chamber received $21,000 from the county com mission earlier this year to get everything started. Pick els said they hope to receive more next year the budget request before commission ers is for more than $80,000 and the plan is to form a public/private partnership for economic development efforts by approaching pri vate businesses for dona tions and input. Pickels hopes the cham bers new director can help the economic future of Port St. Joe by expanding exist ing businesses, growing entrepreneurs and attract ing businesses from other areas. We are very proud of the process of attracting and hiring our new director, Pickels said. Were very optimistic about the cham ber and the communitys future. Star News Editor Tim Croft contributed to the story. A2 | The Star Webster and Johnson headline Septembers First Fridays

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, August 25, 2011 By Tim Croft Star News Editor Port St. Joe and county commissioners grappled with employee benefits last week as they attempt ed to finalize budget num bers prior to public hear ings next month. For the county, the de cision for employees will be whether to stay with the same insurance plan or switch after the most recent decisions of the in surance committee. And in Port St. Joe, commissioners are re turning to a previous pro vider while contemplating a counterbalance to an other year that promises no salary increases. County administra tor Don Butler informed commissioners that at the most recent meeting of the insurance committee comprised of constitu tional officers, Commis sioner Ward McDaniel and key staff members the parameters for em ployees and their choice of insurance plan was es tablished. At least until last weeks special meeting. Butler said the county was still looking at the 5 percent increase in premi ums from Blue Cross/Blue Shield which was on the table more than a month ago after commissioners rejected a proposal that called for a 9 percent in crease. However, by the end of last weeks special meet ing, Sheriff Joe Nugent said his department would leave the county group and seek a small group policy that is cheaper and would provide suitable coverage. The insurance commit tees decision, with Nu gent the lone dissenter, was to take the 5 percent increase from BC/BS and use it as a carrot to bring more county employees into a Health Services Ac count or HSA. The HSA, which re quires more out of pocket from employees, is used by the majority of county em ployees. The alternative plan, a PPO, or preferred provider organization, is the so-called Cadillac plan with lower premiums and deductibles. The aim, Butler said, was to incentivize the plans offered to county employees to speed up mi gration to the HSA, which is more cost-effective for the county. Last year, employees in the PPO were, given claims history, in large measure subsidized by the employees in the HSA, Butler said. The insurance com mittee proposal, adopted by commissioners, would counterbalance the 5 per cent increase by providing an extra $50 per month to employees in an HSA and deducting $100 per month from the countys contribution to insurance $750 per employee for each county employee for those on the PPO. The 5 percent increase would not be borne by the board, Butler said, but pri marily by those employees still enrolled in the PPO. We have to start some where to cut costs, Butler said. We have a 5 percent increase this year and we had a very good year (in terms of claims). Next year could be worse. Those incentives to in crease the migration to the less expensive plan for the county would continue under an insurance com mittee recommendation to provide by additional incentives by Jan. 1, 2012 to those employees who do not smoke, have a gym membership, etc. Nugent objected, say ing that he could not ask his employees, the vast majority of whom are on the PPO, to pay an ad ditional $100 a month for insurance. He added that placing the additional pen alty on employees this late in the process was unfair. Nugent said all employ ees should be given until next year to make any ap propriate change based on new incentives. Lets not do something in August that takes effect in September that weve been fooling around with for months, Nugent said. Deductions must be taken from payroll checks next month so that em ployees have coverage beginning with the new fiscal year in October. Nugent said his employ ees meet the requirements for a small group plan which will mean lower pre miums and deductibles. He said commissioners had given him no choice but to seek insurance separate from the board. However, Todd Tor gorsen, the agent for the Board of County Commis sioners, said the sheriffs decision would leave the 5 percent increase in ques tion. Blue Cross Blue Shield will reevaluate the case should the sheriff leave but premiums are likely to go up, Torgorsen said. For the city of Port St. Joe, one years experiment with United Health Care which bid on the countys business was sufficient to warrant a switch back to BC/BS, though it will mean an increase in costs to the city. Commissioners noted that Uniteds provider network forced most em ployees to travel to Pana ma City for basic medical services. Further, Dr. Tom Curry of Port St. Joe, for many employees their family doctor, is not in Uniteds provider network. The most significant impact, in terms of cost, will be borne by those who have their spouse on their policy, nine total employ ees, but those on an in dividual policy would see virtually no increase in premiums and lower de ductibles. Commissioners are also considering methods to offset the fact that em ployees have not received an increase in salary for three years. Commissioners al ready approved using the 3 percent in savings the city would realize in con tributions to the state re tirement fund resulting from a state law that em ployees pay 3 percent per year toward retirement to make employees whole, as Weston described it, by adding 3 percent in pretax dollars to employee pay. While not a complete wash, it would largely make up for the 3 per cent employees will have diverted from their pay checks toward retirement. The city is considering two options for bumping pay: a 2 percent Cost of Living Allowance (COLA) increase or a lump sum bonus of $500-$1,000. Commissioners were divided about the appro priate approach, with ap proval for one, the other or both expressed during last weeks budget work shop. A concern is that a COLA increase would be a permanent salary in crease, which would be linked with increases in retirement contributions, etc. City, county wrestle with employee benets With budget hearings approaching, commissioners face tough decisions Lets not do something in August that takes effect in September that weve been fooling around with for months. Sheriff Joe Nugent

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Opinion A4 | The Star Thursday, August 25, 2011 Growing up in Alabama, we got to go on vacations to exotic places. They were exotic to us anyway. Little boys have different opinions of what is exotic. We went to Panama City Beach, Fla., and Cherokee, N.C. Every summer, we would head off to one or the other, sometimes both. The launch was always the same. We would head out with no place to stay; I think it was a game my Daddy liked to play. It was fun, sometimes it meant sleeping on the side of the road in the station wagon, but again to a little boy, thats pretty fun. Im the middle brother of three; there is almost 20 years difference between my oldest and youngest brothers. That meant we really didnt get to go on but one or two vacations all together. However, being the middle one, I went with both individually many times. My Mama tells of the time that we got to Cherokee, N.C. with no place to stay and sweet Mrs. Ruth Littlejohn let us stay in her house. Mrs. Littlejohn worked at one of the places we were trying to nd a room. We would know this sweet Cherokee lady for years to come. Mama and Daddy slept on a pull out sofa, my brother slept with Mrs. Littlejohns grandsons and I slept with Mrs. Littlejohn (I was a baby). The next day, Mrs. Littlejohn found us a place to stay. Mrs. Littlejohn became a close friend that we always stopped to see when we would go to Cherokee in the summers. We played in the creek with her grandchildren and she always knew the best shing bait to use. Sometimes I would go with my grandparents to Cherokee alone, these were also fun times. Papa knew Chief Daniel Boone Hornbuckle and I would have my picture taken with him. On one occasion, I got to have my picture taken with Darby Hinton, who played Israel Boone on the Daniel Boone series with Fess Parker. That was a big deal, he wasnt Fess Parker, but he was his T.V. son. I got a coonskin cap on more than one occasion and Cherokee spears, tomahawks and drums every time I was there. One of my most vivid memories is riding in the back of my Daddys El Camino with my baby brother all the way to Cherokee. It was fun, we were safe and we were going to see friends. We would get to see Unto These Hills for the umpteenth time, but it didnt matter. Mrs. Littlejohn would have free tickets waiting for us. Things changed over the years. The gambling folks came to town with a fancy casino and changed Cherokees image, But the memories I have of Cherokee, N.C. and the good folks there cannot be taken away. A friend recently made me aware of a story from the Cherokee Indians. The tale goes that an old Cherokee Indian was speaking with his grandson. It went something like this: The grandfather said, My son, the battle is between two wolves inside us all. One is Evil. It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority and ego. The other is Good. It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith. The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather: Which wolf wins? The old Cherokee simply replied, The one you feed. My good experiences with Cherokee, North Carolina and the Cherokee Indians made this really hit home with me. Which wolf do we feed? Where does the wolf come to feed? Does the evil wolf always come to the back door? Or is he brave enough to come to the front door? What does he look like? Does the evil wolf show his teeth or is he disguised? The wicked can only feed their evil wolf; they cannot kill the good wolf that resides within each of us. Feed the good wolf, the wicked have made their choice on which wolf to feed. You can nd more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. In a little more than two weeks, the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001 will arrive. That date which lives in infamy and has become part of the common lexicon will surely bring with it a host of remembrances and reections on what the horror all meant, what it cost, what it has wrought in the countrys psyche and pocketbook since. There will be much talk about ensuing wars, the hunt for Osama bin Laden and the cost in blood and coin over the decade since that cataclysmic day, when a bright, sunny morning turned to red and dust and rubble in New York and Washington D.C. There will be special magazine editions, television specials and newspapers across the globe will set aside considerable paper and ink to provide distillations from 10 years of distance. And surely among those many opinions from the talking heads that will permeate the public arena in the days leading up to Sept. 11, 2011 will be memories of what was and might have been. Because in some ways, Sept. 11 brought with it a high-water mark in political discourse. Suddenly, at least for a few days, weeks, maybe even a few months, we were as one as a country, the decibel-enhanced rhetoric that dominates the politics of Washington and trickles to Tallahassee and Gulf County placed on mute. On Sept. 11, 2001 the country was trying to move forward from a paralyzing presidential election the year before. The 2000 election, which extended beyond election day for an agonizing month, spotlighted for all to see the deep divisions of the country. The ght waged in the courts and the seats of power over who would reside in the White House for the ensuing four years provided sharp contrast to competing visions of governance and exposed chasms spanning between the two parties and the constituencies they serve. The tussle seemed to be far more than an electoral battle between two men. It was a caged steel match for contrary ideas about what government is and is not and, one could argue, a reection of the staleness of many of those very ideas and the two parties that espouse them. But those planes used as missiles on that fateful fall day 10 years ago changed that, at least temporarily. Beyond the death toll in the thousands and the jarring sight of seeing two majestic towers brought crumbling to the ground, was a galvanizing call for all those who love this country and what it should stand for. The carnage would bring ordinary Americans from around the country to Ground Zero in New York to work through the rubble, cleaning up a hallowed site while clinging to the hope that maybe, maybe, there was still life amid the ruins. The tragedy would send many to local military recruitment ofces to join the hunt for those who had killed so many. For a brief period of time an all too brief period of time the halls of government were devoid of Democrats and Republicans as all became Americans united in providing the leadership the country so desperately needed. In hindsight, some question the results, but in those dark days there was nothing but honor in the president standing in the rubble of the World Trade Center and rallying a rescue operation, a clean-up effort, an entire country to the cause of democracy and our standing as a beacon shining brightly against the backdrop of religious fanaticism. A national telethon to benet the victims of this act of war brought artists and politicians from across the political spectrum to a common cause. The president and Congress found in each other not partisan bickering and inghting, but a shared commitment to pull the country forward, to set aside political differences and views to forge a bond to act in the good of a wounded and frightened country. And the world was with us one of the most moving television honorics of the time was a video of crowds around the globe demonstrating in the streets their kinship with America during that dark episode, all set against the backdrop of U2s song One. We were all one, at least for a brief moment in time. And, like that, it all disappeared. A decade later we are at war with each other and in many ways with the rest of the world. People across the globe are frightened by an economy that has imploded due to the weight and degree to which greed has returned as an operative word. The country, and the world, is fraying as economic inequality becomes the norm. America ranks below even Iran in terms of economic equity, reaching, it would seem, to become a Third World country in terms of scal vision. The political partisanship in Washington is such that just 14 percent of Americans have a favorable view of Congress. A billionaire such as Warren Buffett can be labeled a socialist for suggesting that the super rich are being coddled by a tax code written in their favor, suggesting gasp that the marginal tax codes of the 1990s be restored. A different kind of religious fervor has taken hold and intransigence is the working model in Congress, compromise a fourletter word. The idea that we are as one as a country has been rendered hallow hyperbole by governance based less on ideas and vision than decibel level and verbal hand grenades. Washington seems as foreign to most Americans as Yemen. The tragedy that it took an event of the proportions of 9/11 to teach us, at least for a brief period of time, that the bickering and divisiveness of the 2000 election undermined us all, made us less of a United States, is nearly equaled by the tragedy that the lesson was so quickly forgotten. ESPN doesnt call all the shots! Keyboard KLATTERINGS Feeding the right wolf A lesson forged of tragedy TIM CROFT Star news editor The University of Miamis football program is on death alert. Coach Les Miles at Louisiana State University woke up this week with a size ten migraine over a late night fracas involving some of his players. An assortment of off the eld problems have cost Jim Tressel and Butch Davis prestigious head coaching jobs at Ohio State and the University of North Carolina. Auburns national championship was won amid claims their quarterbacks father had demanded $200,000 from the school for his sons talents. Reggie Bush had to return the Heisman Trophy for receiving money while at USC. The NCAA investigation department has been busier than a BP oil spill check writing specialist. I reckon the University of Tennessee is the only school out there that doesnt cheat. That is, of course, if you dont count hold-ups at gun point and lifting a car stereo from time to time as cheating. I was going to mention Florida State University but a couple of their players offered me a free pair of shoes to look the other way. Youd think it would mar the game. All the unwelcomed and negative publicity would sicken the publics interest in football altogether. You wonder if anyone out there is playing by the rules when it comes to recruiting, academic standards, cash limitations, housing allowances, etc. Is the game being played on the eld or behind the mahogany desks in some sports agents ofce? Is the score kept on the big screen monitor high above the stadium or by how many sponsors ESPN can reel in on a Thursday night? None of that really matters to me. It hasnt for a long time. Oh, I still love football as much as ever. I get a thrill when the Sooner Schooner comes roaring onto the eld. Nothing beats letting that eagle go! The 12th man at Texas A&M is awesome. I rise to my feet when Chief Osceola sticks that spear in the ground. And I love it when the long time announcer for the University of Tennessee fairly shouts into the microphone as the kicker approaches the game opener, ITS FOOTBALL TIME IN TENNESSEE! But the game serves a much bigger purpose. And I dont care about the money, the publicity, T.V. time or what sports star can be seen dating what swimsuit model. The ninth grader looks up at me between an array of safety bars now attached to all helmets, the sweat pouring down his little cheeks, Coach, I dont think I can. Youd suspect it would be time for a little sympathy. Hed been running and hufng and pufng for two hours. Hed charged into dummies, hit the sled a dozen times and tackled whatever object we could nd to throw in front of him. This varsity stuff was all new to him. Most all the kids were bigger, stronger, faster. Maybe, youd think, I could see myself in those young eyes. I was once a ragged freshman, green as they come, wondering what in the world I was doing out here amidst all this running and shouting and chaos Youd better believe I could relate to him. So could every youth that had ever passed this way. Son, suck it up! Weve only just begun! You havent seen me on a bad day yet! Who taught you how to walk? And you call yourself a football player! Ive been slapped away from the supper table harder than youve hit anything today! Get the lead out! We are just getting warmed up. The young man gets up, turns back to the task at hand and tries again, this time pouring his heart into it! People, you just think that Seminole spear sticking is exciting! You just think the Iron Bowl is a big football game! You just think playing for the national championship is a big deal! Ive seen more victories in front of an old worn out blocking sled than all the wins of Nebraska, Texas and Notre Dame combined! Dont be fooled by big advertising and BCS standings. This is still a game about kids. Every child on that eld has his own story, his own feelings, his own individuality to add to the mix. He gradually comes to understand this game is about working hard. Being dedicated to a cause. Trying. Its about overcoming some doubts. Its about being accepted by a group going through the exact same things that he is. Its about growing. Its about self discovery. Its about life. And all youve ever heard about teamwork is absolutely true! Football is not for everyone and everyone doesnt make it. I have gone home after practice and cried because one of the guys decided to hang it up. It hurts when you want so badly to help and you cant. And let me tell you, Im a very average coach. There are many in this game much more dedicated and wiser than me. As a matter of fact, Ive never worked with a coach on any level that didnt love the young men rst. Winning is a by product of what those coaches do. The young 9th grader catches up with me as we walk off the eld. He looks bone tired, but the smile is wide and genuine. Coach, didnt you coach my grandfather? He said he played for you in 1972. Ouch! Yeah, and he didnt look no better than you did the rst time I saw him in front of that sled. We walked a moment in silence, Im sure looking at the world from very different viewpoints. But you know what; he turned out to be a heck of a football player and an even better person! Respectfully, Coach Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard

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st. joe rent-all 706 1ST S TREET, PORT S T. JOE THE E QUIPMEN T DEPO T 301 HWY 98, PORT S T. JOE 2 LOCA T IONS T O SERVE YOU 227-2112 227-7449 227-1819 FINANCING AVAILABLE UP TO 0% FOR 36 MONTH W. A C C O M PLETE F ACTORY W ARRANTY AND SERVICE DEPART M ENT WE WORK ON MOST EQUIPMENT LIMITED TO S TOCK O N HAND, FIRST C OME FIRST S ERVED N X T SELF-PROPELLED 3 IN 1 PU S H BOTTON S TART L I S T 599. 00 NO W 425. 00 N X T TRACTOR 46 CUT PU S H BOTTON S TART L I S T 2,800. 00 NO W 2,200. 00 LT 125 TRACTOR 42 CUT H YDRO D RIVE L I S T 1,999. 00 NO W 1,700. 00 150Z ZERO T URN E LECTRIC DECK LIFT 33 L I S T 2,699. 00 NO W 2,200. 00 42 LI S T 2,799. 00 NO W 2,300. 00 S PORT 42 L I S T 3,199. 00 NO W 2,900. 00 48 L I S T 3,699. 00 NO W 3,300. 00 FASTRAK 48 L I S T 4,899. 00 NO W 4,600. 00 54 L I S T 5,499. 00 NO W 4,800. 00 P OULAN 42 T RACTOR L I S T 1,299. 00 NO W 999. 00 TILLERS GENERA T ORS PRESSURE WASHERS By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Of the 9,500 Dollar Gen eral stores nationwide, less than 1 percent are known as market stores. Port St. Joe will soon be home to a 20,000 square foot Dollar General Mar ket Store, which will pro vide fresh produce, dairy products and meats in ad dition to the normal Dollar General merchandise. Construction of the store is well underway at the corner of U.S. High way 98 and Avenue D, with the walls shooting up seemingly overnight. The market store will be more than twice the size of a regular Dollar General in terms of square footage, and will employ about twice the staff. The corporation hopes to have the store stocked and ready for service by November. We developed the market store to provide more value and a more convenient one-stop shop ping experience for our customers, said Dollar General spokeswoman Emily Weiss. So far the market stores have been very well-received by the communities. When opening a new store, Weiss said the cor poration analyzes an ar eas demographic trends, traffic patterns and cus tomer needs. This community was a great fit for a Dollar Gen eral Market, said Weiss, who added that a typical Dollar General Market employs about 40 people. Those interested in employment with Dollar General are encouraged to check out the career center at www.dollargen eral.com. The main thing is that this is going to create jobs, said David Lee, su perintendent for Concept Construction of North Florida, the Gainesvillebased company oversee ing the project. Because the construc tion has progressed quickly, Dollar General has moved up its original completion date. Lee said Dollar Gener al expects the store ready for the installation of fix tures by Oct. 15. Weve met all the schedules and demands theyve laid out for us so far, Lee said. As long as the weather cooperates and all of our subcontrac tors cooperate, we will probably meet that date. Concept Construction has overseen roughly 25 similar Dollar General Construction projects in the last year and a half, but this is the largest they have done, Lee said. Another thing that will set this store apart will be its aesthetics, Lee said. Everything is going to be appealing to the eye, Lee said. Theyre going to think theyre at Macys or something. City building inspector Bo Creel said the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agen cy, which worked with Dol lar General and the con tractor on exterior details to fit the newly-spruced downtown area, really went above and beyond to dress up the store. Its not going to be just a box look, Creel said. Its going to have prole to it. PHOTOS BY VALERIE GARMAN | The Star The new Dollar General Market Store will be 20,000 square feet, about twice the size of a regular Dollar General Store. BELOW: Construction of a new Dollar General Market Store is well underway at the corner of Highway 98 and Avenue D in Port St. Joe. New Dollar General will offer the twice the size, nearly twice the jobs green. Depending on partici pation, city officials have also expressed the desire to establish additional, more centralized drop-off points. The bins have already been emptied three times since they have been there, a span of under three months. Were happy about the reaction so far, he said. What were doing now is were trying to raise awareness about the new program. But there is always room for improvement. Weston said the citys cleanliness (or lack there of) is a significant first im pression for any visitor. Its a huge deal, Weston said. We have so much to offer here. In addition to the re cycling program, Weston urged residents to pull in their bulky trash cans from the curb after pickup to eliminate any roadside eyesores. We want to attract people to our city, he said. (Cleanliness) helps first impressions of peo ple riding through the city wanting to come live here or work here. The citys new waste management contract with Waste Pro has helped fuel the new recycling ini tiative for the city. Waste Pro officials volunteered to take the first steps in a recycling program by es tablishing the two drop-off locations. We know theres a need for it, Weston said. Waste Pro has really stepped up. Weston said the city will also provide cost-effective commercial accounts for interested businesses. Its incumbent upon all citizens to be sensitive to the resources involved here, Weston said. Were hoping it will take off. Weston said adjust ments can be made to make recycling easier, and he welcomes commu nity input. The cardboard/paper receptacles were recently lowered to help an elderly woman deposit her recy clables. Weston also hopes to move the drop off point on Industrial Road to a more convenient, centralized lo cation. Its a crawl, walk, run phase, Weston said. Were still in the crawl phase right now. RECYCLING from page A1 VALERIE GARMAN | The Star The recycling center at the Public Works Department at the end of 10th Street in Port St. Joe offers separate bins for plastic, aluminum and paper products. Its a crawl, walk, run phase. Were still in the crawl phase right now. Charlie Weston City Manager Local The Star| A5 Thursday, August 25, 2011

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It has been a hot, but busy summer on St. Vin cent Island. The staff and volun teers have been busy monitoring wildlife particularly sea turtles, birds and red wolves and per forming on going maintenance on the island. The turtle patrol has marked 61 turtle nests, in clud ing one green turtle nest, which is a rst on the island. This season has more nests on the island than any other year in this decade. This increase in the num ber of turtle nests has also been noted in most other turtle egg laying areas in the state. So far, more than 1,000 hatchlings have been recorded on the island with a large number of nests still to hatch. In early June, a lightning strike ignited a wildre west of the cabin toward the center of the island. This re, known as the C-4 Fire, burned 1,297 acres and was the largest documented wildre on the island in the last 20 years. The refuge was assisted by two three-man crews and Type 6 Engines from Bog Oaks Na tional Wildlife Ref uge in Indiana and from the Bureau of Land Management. While many high school students have been relaxing on the beach or so cializing with their friends, Sylvia She line, a senior at Port St. Joe High School, spent eight weeks of her summer on the island working with the refuge staff. Sylvia proved to be an excellent choice for this YCC (Youth Conserva tion Corp) position. She as sisted with turtle surveys, helped remove exotic veg etation, tracked red wolves, posted signs in closed eagle nesting areas, built protec tive turtle cages to protect eggs from predators and was involved in all sorts of island maintenance. Sylvia said she has lived close to the island all her life but didnt realize what was there. She didnt know you could volunteer to work on the island and had no idea how large the island was. I had no idea there was such depth to the island, Sylvia said. You cant see anything but the edge of the island from C-30. There are dunes, oak trees and so much variety on the island. Her favorite area is the far east end of the island, so different from the pine forest area on the west end across from the Indian Pass boat ramp. Sylvia said she enjoyed every aspect of the island, including working with the refuge staff and volunteers hauling posts, tracking wolves, setting coon traps, catching mullet for bait for the traps, build ing hog pens and whatever else needed doing. After spending a summer on the island, Sylvia is considering being a wildlife biologist, a career those who knew her this summer hope she will pursue. The count from the 2011 bird survey is in. It was a very active nesting season with nests and baby birds populating the nesting areas on the island. The following species were recorded on the island: anhinga, snowy egret, great egret, little blue heron, tri colored heron, cattle egret, green heron, glossy ibis, great blue, black-crowned high heron, purple gallinule and seaside sparrows. With all the national budget cuts, the National Wildlife Refuge Association is facing the possibility of some very severe funding cuts that could even result in the closing of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Though we realize that bud get cuts will be necessary to help reduce the national debt, we do hope Congress will rec ognize what a pub lic treasure national wildlife refuges are. When Congress re convenes, please let your congressmen know how much we care about these refuges, and ask them to vote no on the proposed legislation, which is titled HR 2584. You can read more about the proposed cuts and even generate a letter to your congressman at http:// refugenet.e-actionmax.com. Click on Protect Funding for Refuges. The monthly island tours will resume this fall. The rst will be Oct. 12. Our enhanced website will give you a lot of details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on Island Tour Sign Up. The tour is free, but partici pants must make a reserva tion at www.stvincent friends.com, and seats are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. Bring everything you need, including drink ing water and leave only your footprints behind. Last year the boat Gag Reex brought in the rst place kingsh, which weighed 40.35 pounds. Pictured is Chris Diehl, Russell Stewart, boat captain, Miss Kingsh Katie Prince and Larry Lemieux, who snagged the winning sh. By Tim Croft Star News Editor T he Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association has completed plans for the 15th Annual MBA RA Kingsh Tournament which will be held Saturday, Aug. 27. The tournament remains scheduled as organizers watch the path of Hurricane Irene. As of Tuesday morning, the National Hurricane Center in Miami has forecast the path of Irene to impact the eastern seaboard of Florida and the Carolinas. Gulf County emergency manager Marshall Nelson said there should be no impacts from the storm in our area. On Tuesday evening, tournament director Ron Childs said the Kingsh Tournament was a go, given forecasts that have the storm remaining well away from the area. We are ready to go, Childs said. Irene wont be a factor, and we have a great weekend ahead for shing. The Kingsh Tournament kicks off with the Captains Party, and registration will be held on the Friday night prior to the tournament, though people may pre-register online or at Half Hitch Tackle or Bluewater Outrigger in Port St. Joe. They may also register early at the Mexico Beach Marina. We are ready to go with great weather in the forecast and lots of people ready to catch the biggest sh, Childs said. The kingsh tournament is the biggest fundraiser for the MBARA and is open to the public. Since 1997 we have built over 200 new articial reefs with over a million dollars raised by an all volunteer group of men and women, which is truly amazing, Childs said. The tournament is a one-day event with the weigh-in going on from 1-5 p.m. CT at the Mexico Beach Marina in Mexico Beach. The cost is $150 per boat. Prizes will be awarded for the biggest King Mackerel, biggest Spanish Mackerel, and Wahoo. Fishing begins at 5 a.m. CT on Saturday morning. Childs said, We are expecting around 200 boats this year, so look for a 40 or 50 pounder to win it all. The event will also complete the third leg of the Panhandle Kingsh Slam which combines weights of kingsh from three tournaments to crown a champion. Full details can be found at the MBARAs website at www.mbara. org under Tournaments. Corner of Marina Drive next to Piggly Wiggly Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Everything for your Outdoor Adventure 151 WEST HIG HW AY 98, P. S .J A LL S W I MW EA R UP T O 50 % OFF R EG UL A R PR I C E COME SEE US! The Star Outdoors Thursday August 25 E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@star.com More coverage online at www.star.com Page A6SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Star Staff Report The Gator Classic Catsh Tour nament will be held Friday, Aug. 26 and Saturday, Aug. 27 at Gaskin Park along the Apalachicola River in We wahitchka. Registration is from 9-10 a.m. CT on Friday and the tourna ment begins at 4 p.m. CT the same day. The tournament ends at noon CT on Saturday, with an awards pre sentation upon the tournaments wrap-up. Prizes will be awarded as fol lowed. For atheads: Largest sh$1,400; second largest$900; third largest$850; fourth largest$400; and fth largest$250. A $500 prize will be given for the largest channel cat, and the individual with the most poundage of atheads will also re ceive $200. There will be a division of the tour nament for kids 14 and under with a $300 prize for largest catsh. Prizes will be awarded for the largest ve catsh. Registration fees are $50 per person. All advanced entries must be postmarked by Aug. 22. Checks should be made payable to Gator Cat sh Classic. Entry forms and checks can be mailed to Gator Catsh Clas sic, 211 North Highway 71, Wewahi tchka, FL 32456. Participants may also register at Gaskin Park on the day of the tournament for $55. The tournament benets Wewahitchka High School Project Graduation. For more information, call tourna ment chairman Dennis Peak at 850340-1029. Catsh Tournament to be held in Wewa MBARA tourney set to go Island news SYLVIA SHELINE BIRDS-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND Freshwater All eyes are on the Mexico Beach kingsh tournament this weekend. Gag grouper comes back into season in just a few weeks, but after much debate, the powers that be decided not to open fall snapper shing this year. Trigger sh and black sea bass are thick over the hard bottom out of Indian Pass, and this past weekend a few good kingsh were, too! Offshore Howard Creek and well into the river system have had success with bream, bass and even sheepshead. Catsh are abundant in the rivers and lakes, with large numbers of channel cats. Fly shing under limbs on downed trees in Depot Creek with Bea-Bea bugs will produce a limit of red breast bream with some patience and some bug spray. As this month comes to an end, the shing on the Forgotten Coast should improve. Water and air temps should start to decline and increase sh feeding and movement. St Joe Bay will be at a peak for scallop harvesting the next few weeks. This years crop has been great, and many reported easy pickings and bigger meat. Redsh schools have been spotted on Towns Beach in St. Joe and at Eagle Harbor on the Cape side of the bay. These sh are on the spooky side, so light tackle and small baits should get their attention without scaring them away. Flounder gigging has been on the rise with good reports from Indian Pass and also in the bay. SP ONS ORED B Y

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Special to The Star After winning the district tournament against Frank lin County last month, Port St Joes AAA team played in the state tournament in Avon Park. The rst team the boys played in the tour nament was maybe the only team that traveled further. Port St. Joe was the visit ing team against Walton County and took advantage of that fact. The boys took a 3-0 lead in the rst inning and eventually won the rst game 14-3. The second game was against the eventual state champion, West Seminole County. That team was clearly the best team in the tour nament, manager Chris Butts said. We could have played with anyone else down there, but they were in a class by themselves. West Seminole beat the AAA boys by a score of 12-1. Up next for the St. Joe team was West Volusia County, another very good team. The game against West Volusia was as good as any Little League game I have ever seen, coach Bill Ken nedy said. It was extreme ly exciting, and fortunately, we won 3-1. Coach Bryce Thomas added, It was truly a pitch ing duel. They were both good, and we just made a couple of more plays. Port St Joe felt condent going into the fourth game against Lake Placid. It showed when they jumped out to a 6-0 lead in the rst inning. That is when things turned as often happens in little league baseball and Lake Placid scored 11 un answered runs in the next two innings to take a lead it would not relinquish. All three AAA coaches expressed how proud they were of this group of kids. It will be fun watching this group get older and better over the next few years, Butts said. PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com Thursday, August 25, 2011 A Page 7 Section Port St. Joes AAA boys do well at state HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL SEASON KICKS OFF TONIGHT S PECIAL TO T H E S TARP ORT S T. JOES AAA TEAM By Tim Croft Star News Editor Old money and a new year. The Shark 100 Club provided $2,500 last week to Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High football coach and Ath letic Director Vern Barth, as the school year means a new year of fundraising for the organization that has raised an estimated $100,000 for Tiger Shark athletics since 1986. The $2,500 was left over from last school year and provides a kick-start for the 2011-12 fundraising cam paign. The money will be used to defray costs for all ath letic programs at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High. Those programs receive no fund ing from the Gulf County School Board and must rely on boosters to bolster the bottom line. The Shark 100 Club has been a huge help since Ive been here, Barth said. Whatever we need, they do it, not only for football, but for all sports. All we have to do is ask, and they take care of it. As it prepares for its 25th year of assisting Port St. Joe High athletics, the Shark 100 Club is eyeing a host of fundraising efforts in the coming year. Other than minor ex penses such as hats and programs, 100 percent of donations to the Shark 100 Club go to Port St. Joe High athletic programs. Last year, the club raised more than $6,000. And the club leverages some of those funds to lure in more dollars, par ticularly during the annual chicken dinner fundraiser, the largest fundraiser each year for the club. Athletes in all programs at Port St. Joe High sell tickets, and the programs keep all money from ticket sales. The Shark 100 Club underwrites all the food and xings through dona tions, and club members do the barbecuing. Last year, 606 chicken dinners were sold to the public, generating $3,600 for Port St. Joe High athlet ics while costing the club roughly half that amount, said Willie Ramsey, club president. The Shark 100 Club of fers several levels of par ticipation: S and S hark: For a $50 dona tion, any parent of a Tiger Shark athlete earns a Shark 100 hat and recognition in the football program. T iger Shark: For $100, in dividuals, businesses and organizations receive one Shark 100 hat, two reserved home football tickets, pro gram recognition and re served parking at football games. Mako Shark: For $250, individuals, businesses and organizations receive two Shark 100 hats, two reserved seats at home football games, special pro gram recognition and re served parking at football games. Bull Shark: For $500, busi nesses, individuals and organizations receive two Shark 100 hats, two re served seats at home foot ball games, two reserved seats at home basketball games, special program recognition and reserved parking at football games. Checks should be sent to Shark 100 Club, P.O. Box 524, Port St. Joe, FL 32457.T IM C ROFT | The Star Shark 100 Club members Willie Ramsey and Ralph Roberson present a check for $2,500 to Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High Athletic Director Vern Barth. The money, left over from fundraising during the 2010-11 school year, will go to benet Tiger Shark athletic programs and signals the kickoff to another year of support for Port St. Joe High athletics. Gulf/Franklin youth soccer fall registration Star Staff Report Final Port St. Joe Youth Soccer regis tration for the fall season will be held today and Friday, Aug. 2526, from 5-7 p.m., and Saturday, Aug. 27, from 9 a.m. to noon at the STAC House. The STAC House is on Eighth Street in Port St. Joe. Boys and girls ages 4-14 (or eighth grade) are invited to play soccer. Players must have turned at least 4 before Aug. 1 in order to play. Bring a copy of your childs birth cer ticate to the registration. No experience is necessary. Registration fee is $60 per player; sponsor fee is $300 per team. Coaches, referees and sponsors are needed. Please sign up at the time of registration. For more information, contact Mike Lacour at 7746446 or lacour6@gtcom.net. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High Aug. 29 at Bay High Sept. 6 Rutherford Sept. 13 at West Gadsden Sept. 15 at Liberty County Sept. 19 at Wewahitchka Sept. 20 at Blountstown Sept. 21 East Gadsden Sept. 26 at Rutherford Sept. 27 Franklin County Sept. 29 Liberty County Oct. 4 Blountstown Oct. 5 West Gadsden Oct. 10 at Tallahassee Rickards Oct. 11 at Franklin County Oct. 13 at East Gadsden Oct. 19 Bay High Oct. 20 Wewahitchka (Dig Pink event)Oct. 25-27 District playoffs Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High Aug. 30 at Bethlehem Sept. 1 Altha Sept. 6 Sneads Sept. 8 Cottondale Sept. 12 at Liberty County Sept. 15 at Vernon Sept. 19 Port St. Joe Sept. 20 at Graceville Sept. 22 Bethlehem Sept. 23 Tallahassee John Paul Sept. 26 at Port St. Joe Sept. 27 at Altha Sept. 29 at Sneads Oct. 4 at Cottondale Oct. 11 Vernon Oct. 13 Graceville Oct. 14 at Tallahassee John Paul Oct. 24-27 District playoffs Shark 100 Club donates $2,500 The 2011 football season ramps up tonight, with both county public junior/senior high schools in action the next two days. Wewahitchka, shown working on linemen drills, will travel to Blountstown to take on the Tigers in a Kickoff Classic at 7 p.m. CT tonight. At 7:30 p.m. ET on Friday, Port St. Joe will play host to Cottondale in a Kickoff Classic. The regular season gets under way next Friday, when the Gators host Port St. Joe at 7 p.m. CT.T IM C ROFT | The Star VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULES

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Local Thursday, August 25, 2011 question and there were several from commis sioners and city attorney Tom Gibson in reviewing the property tax records Gibson was to research and come back with a de finitive answer sometime on Wednesday, after press time for this print edition. The question over a property tax certificate is primarily two-fold: wheth er a certificate holder would still have standing given the lawsuit that has spanned over more than a year to settle all claims against the hospital and lender Medical Capital, which became the owner when former owner Hu Steeley defaulted on a $1.7 million loan; and what pri ority that lien might have given the citys interest. The city has remained in the lawsuit to protect its interest conveyed in a deed reverter clause. That clause would require the land to revert to the city if and when it was no longer used as a hospital. After the receiver for California-based Medi cal Capital, which was forced into receivership over financial issues and Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) alle gations, agreed to fund a phase one environmental assessment of the prop erty nearly two months ago, the city had 60 days to take deed to the land or give up its claim. The IRS has agreed to a payment of $75,000 from the city to satisfy a tax bill which tallies well into six figures. Another question about anybody asserting stand ing due to a property tax certificate is whether that certificate holder would have to pay the full IRS tab for back taxes to exer cise a claim. Before questions over property taxes arose, commissioners who were in a workshop and therefore could not take a formal vote seemed leaning toward paying the IRS the $75,000 to satisfy its interests and taking possession of the property with an eye toward formu lating formal plans for the land in the future. We can squeeze out $75,000. I dont think it will be a problem, said Com missioner Rex Buzzett, alluding to money the city will see from the sale of two large generators and its claim against BP, which is close to being settled. There are so many op tions out there, Id like to pay off the IRS and then that will give us a chance to look at everything ratio nally. Im open to all options. Whatever is best for the city to bring (the hospital) down and get it on the tax rolls. Estimates for an asbes tos removal survey, asbes tos removal from piping, flooring and ceilings and demolition are $202,700, with a $17,000 credit for materials that could be salvaged. Adding in the IRS tax lien and the costs of sur veying and platting the property, the total cost of purchase would be $264,700, said city manag er Charlie Weston. The caveat is that the survey would refine (the asbestos removal) figure, Weston added. The best estimate is that is on the high side. Demolition of the as phalt parking lot would likely add $2,000-$3,000. In return, the proposal before commissioners Tuesday was to plat the property into five parcels, two of which would be water view lots, and sell them to realize $240,000$315,000, according to es timates provided to the city by local realtors. That number, Weston said, could increase if a third lot was also deemed water view, as Magidson and Buzzett suggested. The overriding priori ty, several commissioners expressed, was to bring the hospital closed for more than five years and showing exterior signs of decay, which were also ev ident on the interior dur ing an auction last year down and put the property back on the tax rolls dur ing tight economic times. If we dont do any thing (by Sept. 2) the IRS at some point will auction the hospital off, Magidson said. Thats the choice, to not do anything or pay off the tax lien and have some time to maximize what we can get out of the lot. Putting that property back on the tax rolls, get ting rid of the hospital, which is an eyesore, we will come out to the good even if it costs us in the long run when we are able to sell it, and I think well be able to make at least a small profit. Check back to www.starfl.com for up dates. Gulf County Chamber of Commerce The Chamber has moved!! We are now in the Welcome Center located at 150 Captain Freds Place, Port St. Joe. Please stop by and visit us! www.gulfchamber.org BOARD O F D IRE CT OR S 2011 PRESIDENT: Bobby Pickels, Progress E nergy VICE PRESIDENT: Steve Newman, Big Fish Construction S ECRETARY: D ave A shbrook, Mainstay Suites T REASURER: R ay Thompson, Capital City Bank DIRECTOR: Johanna White, Vision Bank D IRECTOR: Melissa Farrell, Josephs Cottage D IRECTOR: Guerry Magidson, GPM Financial D IRECTOR: Brett Lowry, St. Joe Bar & Package D IRECTOR: Michael McKenzie, R oberson & A ssociates, P A Mission Statement The mission of the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce is to be an advocate for existing businesses and the community, a conduit for pursuing positive developments, and a catalyst for cooperation. VOLUNTEERS: A llison Bowling A ngie Chapman A shley Baird A shley Wolinski Bobby Pickels Boys from RO TC Brad Buzzett Brad Keating Brenda Peterson Brett Lowry Brian Cathey Carla Mock Carlene Parker Carly Pickels Carol Brittain Charlie Black Charlie Weston Chris Williams Christina Mc D ermott Christine Hermsdorfer Christine Taunton Chuck Grau City Trash Crews Clay Kennedy Crystal Follin D ana Black D ana Boyer D anielle Myrick D ave Brittain D avid A shbrook D ylan Faircloth E MS Crews Gail A lsobrook Greg Johnson Guerry Magidson Hiram Nix Jessica Patterson Jera Horton Jim Haynes Jim Norton Joan Cleckley Joey O Quinn Johanna White John Beatty John Grantland John Hanlon John Parker John Soloman Joseph Farrell Joy A shbrook Kelli Combs Kelli Newman Kenny Strange Lindsay Thompson Marie Naegele Melissa Farrell Michael McKenzie Michelle Corbell Mitch Burke Pam Mc D aniel Patricia Melvin Patrick Farrell Phillip Bowling Port St. Joe High School E xplorers R andy R afeld R ay Thompson R enee Combs R osemary Haynes Steve Newman Susan Magidson Terese Kent Tianna Hyatt Tiffany Fogle Tom Gibson Tracy Melvin Troy Williams Vicki A nderson Vivian Miller Vince Bishop EV ENT SP ONSORS: Gulf County Chamber of Commerce Gulf County T D C DIA M OND S P ONSORS Progress E nergy P LATINU M S P ONSOR R entech Centennial Bank City of Port St. Joe WMBB News Channel 13 Panache Gulf County Hitz 106 G OLD S P ONSOR Gulf Coast Property Services Vision Bank A tkins Capital City Bank Josephs Cottage PrebleR ish Kenny Strange E lectric Boyer Signs Health Cooperative Strategies Cape Tradin Post MainStay Suites Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf R amseys Big Fish Construction Work Force Center D P A udio R oberson & A ssociates SIL V ER S P ONSOR Happy O urs Kayak Boardwalk R ealty Hatch Mott Mac D onald Windolf Construction Forgotten Coast R ealty of NW Florida Haughty Heron Port I nn St. Joe Bar and Package Server Solutions, I nc. B RON Z E S P ONSOR St. Joseph Bay Golf Club The Thirsty Goat The 2011 Florida Scallop and Music Festival was the best yet! The Chamber Board of D irectors would like to thank the entire community for its support. There were more than six thousand people in attendance on Saturday! We would also like to extend a special Thank You to our dedicated sponsors and volunteers. This successful event would not have been possible without your time and backing. We are already planning next years event and hope to outdo ourselves in 2012! 317,000 7 10 www.visionbank.net Member FDIC Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im Thursday, August 25, 2011 GULF PINES from page A1 A8 | The Star There are so many options out there, Id like to pay off the IRS and then that will give us a chance to look at everything rationally. Rex Buzzett PSJ Commissioner

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By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer When her grandson came home from kindergarten one day with a coupon for one free karate class, Kari Summers didnt know how to tell him no. He said, Mama, I got something in my backpack, and I want to do it, Summers said. And Im thinking, how am I ever going to tell him he cant do this? Her 6year-old grandson, Kaydan Haisten, has cerebral palsy, a disorder causing muscular impairment and poor coordination, conning him to a wheelchair. He kept saying, I can do it, Mama, just call the man, Summers said. So she did. The man was Ralph Barwick, senior instructor of The Karate School in Port St. Joe, where he teaches Tang Soo Do, an ancient martial arts form. Barwick caught Kaydans attention during a karate demonstration at Port St. Joe Elementary School. After completing a one-on-one evaluation with Kaydan, Barwick told Kaydans grandmother he thought karate could help greatly improve Kaydans motor skills. A few months later, Kaydan had a breakthrough. Literally. All students moving from a yellow belt to orange belt are required to break through a wooden block that requires 35 pounds per square inch to dismantle. Kaydan was provided no exception to the requirement. Barwick sensed Kaydans nervousness as he approached the block of wood and whispered to him, Kaydan, I believe you can do anything. Moments later, the board was snapped down the middle. Two years ago, Summers never imagined her grandson would be participating in karate. Kaydan underwent major back surgery in Miami two years ago to release tightness in his muscles. Before the surgery, he couldnt do anything, Summers said. All he could do was lie there. Now Kaydan hopes to work toward breaking through bricks like his instructor can, and his grandmother hopes he will be able to walk someday. Kaydan has changed my life, said Barwick, who has been working with Kaydan at The Karate School for six months. He doesnt want anything to limit him, and he wants to be treated like everyone else. Kaydan attends The Karate School twice a week, where he has class with other kids at the same orange belt level. Kaydan is one of the youngest and smallest students in the class, but a hard one to miss. During his karate lessons, Kaydan uses a wheeled walker that suspends his body using a harness, so he can put some weight on his legs and perform kicks. The students are taught to perform spirit yells, a type of Haiya! that comes with the kicks and punches. In class, Kaydan yells the loudest. After a kick-punch sequence, he often yells woo-hoo while moving back to his spot. When he lets his feet drag, Barwick reminds him to use them. Kick em high; dont you get lazy on me, Barwick said during a recent practice. Kaydan responded with a loud Yes, sir! Kaydans favorite moves to practice are kicks, even though they are often the most challenging. We do have to do things a bit differently because he is disabled. His kicks are limited, but he has a lot of strength in his upper body, Barwick said. We will eventually get him breaking bricks. Barwick also plans to teach Kaydan to take someone down if he is ever attacked, a defense mechanism that requires the victim to upset the attackers center of gravity. Were not real worried about him now because hes only 6 years old and hes everybodys hero, Barwick said. But when he goes to college, he could be considered an easy target or so they Kaydan, a rstgrader at Port St. Joe Elementary, recently received his orange belt by atpalming through a wooden beam. COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, August 25, 2011 B Page 1 Section Wanted: a few good young men and women By Tim Croft Star News Editor County Judge Tim McFarland will be in the county high schools this week seeking a prosecutor, a defense attorney, jurors, a clerk and a bailiff. McFarland is ramping Gulf County Teen Court back up for another year, hoping to populate the juvenile diversion program with high school juniors and seniors seeking an out-of-thebox extracurricular activity this school year. Im trying to get it cranked up again, McFarland said. We have some Kiwanis Club volunteers who are helping out, and I appreciate that help. Gulf County Teen Court is a diversion program for rst-time misdemeanor juvenile offenders. Referrals to the program come from the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce and the Port St. Joe Police Department. This is for rst-time misdemeanor offenders so they can divert away from the judicial system and they wont have a record that will follow them around the rest of their lives, McFarland said. Most people assume that a juvenile record does not follow you into adult life, but it does and can affect what kind of job you can get, your education. The court is entirely operated by high school students, with McFarland presiding over proceedings. The prosecutor and defense attorney are teens, as are the bailiff and the clerk of the court. The jurors are also teens, some of whom have been through the Teen Court experience as a defendant. Offenders must admit guilt to enter the program, and offenses include tobacco infractions, simple possession of marijuana, a golf cart driving infraction or similar nonviolent and nonfelony offenses. They are tried in a trial in which students do all the heavy lifting, from recording the courts proceedings to serving as a juror to prosecuting the case. Jurors are deciding solely on sanctions. Community service and future jury duty are required sanctions for every defendant. They have done something Kicking a disability Teacher: We will eventually get him breaking bricks Paws in the Park set for Saturday Event to benet humane society Star Staff Report The St. Joseph Bay Humane Society presents the sixth annual Paws in the Park event Saturday, Aug. 27, at Centennial Park, featuring a 5K run, pet contests and plenty of food and fun. Registration for the 5K run (with or without your dog) will begin at 6:30 a.m. ET, with the race beginning at 7:30 a.m. ET, followed by a one-mile fun run/walk. Breakfast will be served immediately after the run until 11 a.m., and homemade desserts will be available for purchase throughout the event. The day continues with many contests for pooches and owners, including best-dressed dog, best tricks and a pet/owner look-alike contest. There will be vendors and demonstrations throughout the day. Cost is $2 for adults, and children under 15 and dogs attend free. There is a $15 fee to participate in the race ($20 the day of). All proceeds will help needy animals in Gulf County. Entry forms for the race are available online or at the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, 1007 10th St. in Port St. Joe. For more information about the event or to download a run entry form, visit BowWowBash.org. Downtown Art Stomp planned Night of art, music, shopping, dining in downtown Port St. Joe on Sept. 2 Star Staff Report Gulf Alliance for Local Arts First Fridays, with its home at the historic Port Inns Thirsty Goat, will be busting at the seams and overowing onto Reid Avenue and throughout downtown Labor Day weekend. Locals and visitors are encouraged to travel throughout downtown from 5-8 p.m. ET Friday to nd numerous shops and restaurants presenting a multidiscipline showing of artwork and live music, with great sales, culinary delights and plenty of drink specials to quench the thirst. As folks make their way throughout downtown, theyll be greeted with a free appetizer and beverage at each participating business and nd the sounds of live music carrying them down the street. Music will be in the courtyard between No Name Cafe and Bow Wow Beach Shop, as well as at the corner of Second Street at Steamers Hot Dogs. First Fridays headquarters, the Thirsty Goat, will be jammin from 7-11:30 p.m. with world-class music act Randall Big Daddy Webster and the Professor Joel Johnson. Keep your eyes open for more details in the coming days, including art showcase highlights, live music details, restaurant specials, and the happenings and drink specials offered by our downtown bars. Shop, dine and unwind in Historic Downtown Port St. Joe this Labor Day weekend. For more information or to participate, contact Amber Davis at 541-3981 or ADavis@StateCraft.us. See WANTED B8 Photos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Karate student Kaydan Haisten doesnt let disability keep him from attending class twice a week. See KICKING B8 FILE P HOTO More than 50 owners and their dogs participated in last years 5K run.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, August 25, 2011 As unique as a seashell, as deep as the sea, as eternal as the waves, our love is meant to be. It is with joy that the parents of Amanda Kent and Weston Locher announce their engagement. The brideto-be is the daughter of Terese Kent of Port St. Joe and Doug Kent of Wewahitchka. Miss Kent is a graduate of Port St. Joe High School and Full Sail University. She is a freelance graphic designer. The groom is the son of Paul and Anne Locher of Wooster, Ohio. He is a graduate of Waynedale High School and Full Sail University, where he is employed. A Sept. 17, 2011, wedding is planned to take place in Port St. Joe. The couple will make their home in Orlando. SAVE 40% KINCAID UPHOLSTERY Sofa, Sectionals and Sleepers in Your Choice of Fabric HARRISON HOUSE FURNITURE EST. 1979 Best of Bay 2011 A+ Rating by the BBB 11 Harrison Ave. Downtown Panama City Closed Sun. & Mon. Great designs at 850-763-4918 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society S o u t h e r n C o o k i n g a t i t s B e s t Best Food Best Prices for Local Seafood & Steaks on Shrimp Fried or Grilled w/ 2 Sides $10.95 8 oz. Ribeye w/ 2 sides $11.95 8oz. & 16oz. Black Angus (Hand Cut) Ribeyes Fish Basket w/ 2 sides $9.95 8 oz. Burgers w/FF $9.95 Hours: 236 Reid Ave (850) 229.7121 THU RS D A Y & F R ID A Y NIGH TS 6 8:30 Society Special to The Star NASHVILLE, Tenn. Nearly 1.5 million families have been able to positively change their nancial situation through Financial Peace University (FPU), the 13-week course taught by Dave Ramsey on DVD. FPU teaches families and individuals common-sense principles like how to make a plan with their money so they are able to free themselves of debt and build lasting wealth. FPU is available for churches, military, non-prot agencies, and businesses. FPU will be held in Port St. Joe at First United Methodist Church, 1009 Constitution Drive in Port St. Joe. A free preview session will be held Monday, Aug. 29, at 6:15 p.m. ET. The classes will begin Wednesday, Sept. 7, at 6:30 p.m. Please call 850-227-1724 for more information or to register. Dave Ramsey knows rsthand what it is like to be broke and hopeless. Because of his experiences, he decided to help other people change the way they handle their money and began teaching FPU in 1994. After each lesson there is a small group discussion that provides accountability and encouragement. Topics include saving for emergencies, budgeting, relationships and money, and getting out debt. FPU is a fun and easy-tounderstand program. Whether you are deeply in debt or nancially secure, FPU will help you gain a new perspective on how to handle your money, comments Ramsey. These lessons are especially essential right now as people are trying to regain control of their nances. The current economy has people feeling more hopeless than ever when it comes to their money. In an effort to recover the economy from the ground up, Ramsey has begun The Great Recovery that challenges individuals to take personal responsibility for their nances and leaders to educate others about nances through programs such as FPU. Each class participant needs a kit that includes a lifetime family membership to FPU, an FPU workbook, an FPU envelope system, 13 audio lessons, bonus CD, budgeting forms, debit card holders and Ramseys best-selling book Financial Peace. Dave Ramsey is Americas trusted voice on money and business. Hes written three New York Times best-selling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough and The Total Money Makeover. His latest book, EntreLeadership, will be released in September 2011. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 4.5 million listeners each week on more than 450 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. Star Staff Reports Book signing s night launch party Author Michael Lister will be reading from and signing his latest novel, The Big Goodbye, a romantic thriller set in Panama City in 1943 at a s Night Party at City Arts Cooperative on Friday, Sept. 2, from 6-10 p.m. CT. This exciting event will include live s music, s-era art by local artists, lm noir, costume contests, games, prizes and food. Step back into the Panama City of the past. 2011 annual Noma community reunion The annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in the Noma Town Hall building on Saturday, Sept. 3. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. CT, and lunch will be served at noon. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a well-lled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. Anyone desiring additional information is urged to contact Ludine Riddle at 850-974-8438. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Collins, Sr. of Port St. Joe, formerly of Cairo, Ga., are pleased to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Tessa Alicia Collins, to James (Jim) Andrew Anderson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Anderson, also of Port St. Joe. Tessa is the granddaughter of the late Lamar Clark of Cairo and Delores Faye Clark, formerly of Cairo and who now resides in Port St. Joe, and the late Malvin Collins, Sr., and Gertrude Collins of Whigham, Ga. Jim the grandson of Tommy and Evelyn Stansel of Port St. Joe and the late Hershel and Nadine Anderson, also of Port St. Joe. The bride-elect is a graduate of Rutherford High School in Panama City. She is a graduate of Gulf Coast State College and the University of North Florida in Jacksonville with a bachelors degree in business administration in marketing. Tessa has recently completed the Educator Preparation Institute at Gulf Coast State College and is pursuing a career in education. Her anc is a graduate of Port St. Joe High School. He is a graduate of Florida State University with a bachelors degree in political science. Jim is currently employed with the City of Port St. Joe as City Clerk. An October 1, 2011, beachside wedding is planned at the El Governor Motel at 5:30 p.m. EST. All friends and family are invited. COLLINS-ANDERSON TO WED KENT -LOCHER TO WED Financial Peace University course set for Port St. Joe Society BRIEFS

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The Star| B3 Thursday, August 25, 2011 Crest Enterprises and Land Development, Inc. a locally owned and operated business with more than 20 years working in the construction CALL TODAY FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! M OSES J. M EDI N A 850.527.0441 MMEDI N A @ CRESTE N TER P RISES COM REMODELI NG SER V ICES L ICE N SE #R G 0058632 CHEESE BURGER CORNER OF 2ND AND R EID A VE. PORT ST. JOE. OP EN D AILY 118:30, SUNDAY 18 A Gift of Health & For Skin Sake, LLC We have the services to help heal the internal body as well as the external appearance. Come visit us in our newly renovated facility. Marsha Mongoven, Esthetician www.forskinsakellc.com 850-819-4492 429 S. Tyndall Parkway, Suite M: Callaway, FL 32404 Brenda Cushing, LMT 7350 www.agiftofhealthvpweb.com 850-914-0313 Massage Therapy & Skincare New Sunlighten Infrared Sauna MA21854 Free Microderm is included with rst Facial Service Kids College expands beyond summer camp Special to The Star Kids College is not just a summer camp anymore! The Continuing Education Department at Gulf Coast State College has added fun new courses just for kids. Musical Theatre is an after-school workshop where students will delve into the art of dancing, singing and acting. During this 10-week workshop, students will learn proper vocal and acting techniques and prepare for a grand nale showcase performance at GCSC. A few of the course highlights include focusing on improvisation, pantomime, monologue, scene work, stage movement, singing and speaking voice development. Plus, students will gain important tips on auditioning techniques to prepare them for future plays and musicals. Classes start in September, meet once a week for one hour and are limited to 16 students. Halloween Horror Treats is a delicious new class where kids take sweet revenge on all the ghosts and goblins that can make Halloween so horrifying. Students will learn how to create edible eyes, monster toes, sweet skulls and more. This no-bake cooking class is open to students between 6 and 11 years old who want to have some Halloween fun and make yummy treats. Class is limited to 20 students. For more information or to register, visit www.gulfcoast.edu/kidscollege, contact the Continuing Education Department at 8723823 or email continuinged@gulfcoast.edu. Gulf students shine on ACT Special to The Star The American College Testing Program (ACT) has released its College Readiness Letter for Gulf School District. This letter reects the achievement of our 2011 graduates on the ACT and the extent to which they are prepared for college-level work. The ACT consists of curriculum-based tests of educational development in English, mathematics, reading and science designed to measure the skills needed for success in rst-year collage coursework. The 2011 graduates outscored the state in three of the four areas and in the composite. The report also supports the value added by taking algebra 1 and 2, geometry, trigonometry and three sciences including biology and chemistry. The 2010 scores indicate the district was slightly behind the state composite score by .1, but this year our students surpassed the state average by .6, which is a signicant gain. This gain validates the curriculum and commitment of teachers and students to excellence. PSJHS SGA says thanks Star Staff Report The Student Government at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School would like to thank the following businesses and community members for their contribution to their First Day of School Celebration: Gulf County Tourist Development Council, John C. Gainous VFW Post #10069, Highland View Church of God, Peaks Unlimited, G3 Real Estate, The Port Fine Wine & Spirits, Persnickety, Driftwood Inn, Dalys Water Sports, Beach Properties, Sea/Tow, Mexico Beach Marina, Centennial Bank, Piggly Wiggly, Long Avenue Baptist Church, Mexico Beach Sundance Realty, Steamers, BJs Auto Repair, Vision Bank, No Name Caf, Capital City Bank, Rafeld Fisheries, Deeson A/C & Heating, Mize Plumbing, Sisters Restaurant & Catering; BloomingTails, Carpet Country, Pristine Pools & Spa, CVS Pharmacy, 5 Star Paint & Collision Centre, Gulf Foods, Ace Hardware, Sharons Caf, Lisa at the Chair on Reid, Aqua Adventure, Bay Breeze Antiques, The Fish House, Bayside Florist & Gifts, Shell Shack, Parker Realty of Mexico Beach, Lees Auto Repair, Port St. Joe Marina, Catheys Ace Hardware, Ganny and Wewa Mom. By Kathleen Sarmiento Special to The Star WOO HOO! Our rst week of school was most EXCELLENT! School was kicked off bright and early Monday morning with a welcome back assembly and the dedication and presentation of yearbooks. Thanks again to Mr. Mike Chisholm, this years honoree, for the sacricial service given to Faith Christian School. On Monday, we began passing out brochures for the magazine sales fundraiser. In a few weeks, look for the envelopes in the mail to order your favorite magazines for yourself or as gifts. On Friday and Saturday, Sept. 2-3, FCS will be having our second annual Labor Day Weekend Yard Sale. This was a fundraising favorite for everyone. Free coffee and a bake sale will be offered while you shop. We are now accepting donations of all kinds, and tax receipts are available. Please call 229-6707 if you would like to schedule a pick-up or would like more information. The Lions Tale Tools for Schools Special to The Star Because it cares about the future of students and the community, Superior Bank is partnering with Port St. Joe Elementary School to provide supplies for students in need. Please join us by bringing school supplies to Superior Bank, 418 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. in Port St. Joe. The branch phone number is 227-1416. Look for the colorful collection boxes in the bank lobby. The boxes will be in place through Aug. 31. Please bring any of the following supplies: backpacks (no rolling backpacks), Crayola crayons (8-count large or 24-count), Crayola markers, colored pencils, composition books (wide-ruled, not spiral), divider tabs, Germ-X, glue (Elmers School), glue sticks, highlighters, Kleenex, notebook paper (regular-ruled loose leaf; wideruled loose leaf; or wide-ruled singlesubject spiral), pencils (jumbo and No. 2 with erasers), pens (blue, black or red), pocket folders, scissors (Fiskars blunt tip or regular tip), Ziploc bags (quart or gallon), three-ring binders (2-inch rings) and three-ring notebooks with subject dividers. School News 2011 ACT SCORES Category District State English 19.8 18.8 Mathematics 19.4 19.9 Reading 20.8 20.2 Science 20.1 19.1 Composite 20.2 19.6 FCS goes back to school Star Staff Report Port St. Joe Elementary School would like to thank Progress Energy for their $1,000 donation to our school. School staff members understand how tough times are now for businesses, and the interest in the school and students is appreciated. School administrators and faculty believe the students are very important to the school and community. Some other supporters are Current Solutions of the Gulf Coast, Vision Bank, Clayton Concrete Inc., Bo Know Pest Control Inc., Persnickety LLC, Metcalf Electric & A/C, Farnsley & Johnson Wealth Management Consultants, Centennial Bank, Scotts Quality Electric and Wood Fisheries. Thanks again for building a business partnership with PSJES. from Port St. Joe Elementary School DOLPHIN NEWS SP EC I A L TO TH E S TAR Bobby Pickels, community relations representative for Progress Energy, presents a check for $1,000 to Port St. Joe Elementary School Principal Sue Gannon. Progress Energy donates to PSJES

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First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Sunday Night Awana .... 5 pm 7 pm Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler First Presbyterian Church 508 Sixteenth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 850-227-1756 Rev. Ruth Hemple Worship Service 10:00 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Rev. Drucilla Tyler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 FAITH Thursday, August 25, 2011 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com The Christian CONSCIENCE Is anyone reading their Bible? Is anyone in this area reading their Bible perhaps a good Bible like the KJV and the NKJV? My style, calling a spade a spade, here on the Christian Conscience, and on Facebook, and on the internet, frequently generates responses. Some of those responses are sensible, and are based upon the weight of Scripture. Others are based on nothing more than emotion, and opinion that has no basis in Scripture. This latter type is frequently very hostile, and disrespectful. I get lots of positive responses likes from those who have some sense about what is taught in the Bible. Usually their responses contain one or more Scripture references, to support their opinions. I can see why some religious leaders dont want their followers to get on the internet, and it has nothing to do with pornography. They know that they will lose followers, once they have been confronted with the truth from the Bible, as presented by many real Christian ministries. Maybe, I was naive, but I used to believe that priests, pastors and other religious leaders, were among those who would take a strong public stand, against the evil around them. Now, I am beginning to wonder, if the public positions, which some in the clergy take on various issues, depends more on the size of the offerings, from certain individuals. Dont think for a moment, that I take any pleasure in saying these things. God knows that I wish, oh how I wish, I could place my stamp of approval on the many clergy in this area who promote righteousness and holiness. But I cant. Not too long ago, a pastor in this area was heard telling a youth group of about 20 that, Dont worry, youre all saved. (He knew full well that nearly all of these youths were involved in sexual relationships with their boyfriends/girlfriends.) The last I knew, the Bible called this fornication, and indicated that those who did these things cannot inherit the kingdom of God (1 Corinthians 6:9-10.) Not too long after that, He was heard telling the adults in his church that they needed to pray for the youths in the church, because they were all messed up. I guess truth depends upon to whom one is talking! No wonder this pastor, and a number of others, dont want their members reading the Christian Conscience! Is there anyone out there that isnt aware that Gods judgment is coming soon? How many out there can say what Paul spoke to the Corinthians, And, such were some of you. If thats what you were, and you have been changed, thats good. But, if thats what you still are, I wouldnt want to be in your shoes! Questions or comments are invited. Send to us at one of the addresses below Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible, every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh. Check us out this Sunday! For the spring and summer seasons, our services begin, with a time of greeting and fellowship, at 9:45 a.m. CT on Sunday. Our worship begins at 10 a.m. For those interested, we have midweek ministry, helping people on an individual basis. Inquire for more information. Come early on Sunday morning so that you can meet us informally, and join in the praise and worship music led by TJ. On Sunday morning we worship, at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st Street. The Civic Center is located behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker Realty, just off U.S. Highway 98 in the western end of Mexico Beach. Look for the white building with the dark green roof. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337 Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook, look for Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com Mens Day at Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church The Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will celebrate their annual Mens Day on Sunday, Aug. 28 at 11 a.m. ET, with guest speaker the Rev. Jerome Williams of Mount Calvary Baptist Church in Panama City. The theme for Mens Day, Trusting in God, invites men and all who profess to be Christians to acknowledge God in all ways and he shall direct our path. On behalf of the men of Zion Fair, you are invited to come and be blessed and help us celebrate our annual Mens Day. The event will be held at the church, located at 280 Avenue C in Port St. Joe. New Horizon AA The New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 639-3600. Faith BRIEFS James Thomas Bo Moon, 45, of McDonough, Georgia passed away Aug. 13, 2011. Bo was born in Grayson, Ga. and served six years in the United States Army as a combat engineer. During this period he was awarded the Army Service ribbon, National Defense Service medal, Army Achievement Medal, 3rd award, Drivers badge with T device, Overseas Service ribbon, 2nd award, Army Good Conduct, 2nd award, Noncommissioned Ofcer Professional Development Ribbon, French Armed Forces Commando badge and Army Commendation medal. Bo touched the lives of everyone around him and with his special brand of humor he could always put a smile on anyones face. He is survived by his wife, Joni C. Moon; daughter, Brittany L. Moon; a son and daughterin-law, James Travis Moon and Ashley Moon; a granddaughter Elaina C. Moon; his mother Nellie and step-father Jack Williams; father in-law and mother in-law, Willard J. and Carolyn Watson of Wewahitchka, Fla.; brothers Charles Moon (Laurie), Sean Gowan, and Zack Bissonette; sister Carol Garvey (Joe); sister in-law Rhonda Alderman (Adam); and numerous friends. Funeral services were conducted Wednesday, Aug. 17, at 3 p.m. ET from the Chapel of Haisten Funeral Home. Mr. Charles Roberts ofciated. Friends visited the family one hour prior to the service. Graveside services were conducted Friday, Aug. 19, at 11 a.m. from the Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. Haisten Funeral Home of McDonough, Georgia and Comforter Funeral Home of Port St. Joe are in charge of arrangements, www. haistenfunerals.com. James Thomas Bo Moon Obituary THE LORD IS OVER ALL The Lord is sovereign over all. Every one has to answer to His nal call. Hes coming back and there will be judgment day. But many things can happen before He comes back this way. The bars want to make more money, The booze hounds want more booze. Remember the story about old St. Joseph, its a good way for us to lose. Some of the booze hounds will call themselves a Christian is what gets my goat. When the Lord gets through with them, theyll be like the prodigal son eating with the rest of the shoats. God will let us go just so far. I hope when He returns that youre not in a bar. Folks, Ive been there and done that, I know of what I speak. Hell save your soul and turn your life around, if you just ask and seek. Hes coming soon, please dont wait. Even a day might be too late. Billy Johnson

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Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! S IN CE 2002, D OING B U SIN E SS IN T H IS CO MMU NIT Y LAWN CARE, TREE & PA L M TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVA L DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVA L or whatever your yard needs are CALL J O E @ 850-670-5478 E -MA I L @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Burrell Concrete Construction Burrell Concrete Construction 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 T ODAY! Trades & Services PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET C A LL GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 Aaron Farnsley, AIF CFP MBA Farnsley & Johnston 505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3336 aaron.farnsley@farnsley.com WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West Pass TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 227-7847 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Aug 25 90 74 20 % Fri, Aug 26 92 78 0 % Sat, Aug 27 91 78 0 % Sun, Aug 28 90 77 0 % Mon, Aug 29 90 76 10 % Tues, Aug 30 89 76 0 % Wed, Aug 31 88 75 0 % 8/25 Thu 07:20AM 2.0 H 05:43PM 0.0 L 8/26 Fri 08:18AM 2.0 H 06:16PM 0.0 L 8/27 Sat 09:17AM 2.0 H 06:44PM 0.2 L 8/28 Sun 10:22AM 1.8 H 07:04PM 0.4 L 8/29 Mon 11:37AM 1.6 H 07:04PM 0.8 L 8/30 Tue 12:26AM 0.9 H 04:58AM 0.8 L 01:15PM 1.3 H 06:19PM 1.0 L 8/31 Wed 11:53PM 1.2 H 07:03AM 0.6 L 8/25 Thu 03:31AM 1.4 H 06:56AM 1.5 L 11:48AM 1.6 H 08:38PM 0.1 L 8/26 Fri 03:54AM 1.4 H 07:58AM 1.4 L 01:01PM 1.7 H 09:20PM 0.1 L 8/27 Sat 04:13AM 1.4 H 08:47AM 1.2 L 02:07PM 1.7 H 09:57PM 0.1 L 8/28 Sun 04:30AM 1.4 H 09:32AM 1.1 L 03:09PM 1.7 H 10:31PM 0.3 L 8/29 Mon 04:44AM 1.4 H 10:15AM 0.9 L 04:09PM 1.7 H 11:03PM 0.4 L 8/30 Tue 04:59AM 1.5 H 11:00AM 0.7 L 05:09PM 1.7 H 11:32PM 0.7 L 8/31 Wed 05:17AM 1.5 H 11:49AM 0.5 L 06:11PM 1.6 H 11:59PM 0.9 L Local The Star| B5 Thursday, August 25, 2011 By Roy Lee Carter County Extension Director Late summer is a hard time to get inspired about working in the garden. Its really an in-between season, too late for summer flowers, and too early for winter varieties. But most of all, its just too hot to spend much time working outdoors. However, there are plenty of easy jobs in the garden that really need to be done at this time. My information was provided by Retired by Emeritus Professor Dr. Robert Black, of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, IFAS. If youre growing roses, its a good idea to prune them late in August. Remove the healthy top growth, as well as the dead twigs and branches, and any diseased, injured, thin or spindly growth. Shorten the main canes and lateral branches. Leave at least half the length of each main caine thats one to three years old. If you follow these pruning recommendations, the first flowers can be expected in eight or nine weeks. And the flowers will be larger than they would have grown without the pruning. If youre growing mums or poinsettias, this is the last month that you should pinch these plants to increase blooms. Weve talked about this in previous articles, so you may remember that pinching back the stem tips will increase blooms. Weve talked about this in previous articles, so you may remember that pinching back the stems tips will increase branching, and promote heavier flowering in the late fall. But dont wait too long before you do this. Otherwise youll be pinching off the flower buds instead of the stem tips and this will reduce the number of flowers that bloom in the fall. August is also the time to pinch off some of the buds on your camellias. As soon as you can distinguish the rounded flower buds from the pointed vegetative bud, twist off all but one of the flower buds at each tip. The remaining bud should develop into a large flower, so be very careful not to injure it. Some flowers, such as Sasanquas and Japonicas, are valued for their large number of blooms, and dont need to be pinched. Many common ornamentals, such as Oleander, Hydrangeas and Azaleas can be propagated by cuttings this time of year. For Azaleas, take tip cuttings, three to five inches long, with several leaves still attached. Place the cuttings in a rooting medium and keep them moist be covering them with a plastic bag, or using a mist system. Many rooting mediums can be used. The most common are sand, and mixtures of peat and perlite. You might want to use a rooting hormone to hasten root growth. If you have any cold sensitive ornamentals in your landscape, you might think about rooting a few cuttings before winter, and keeping the young plants in a protected place. That way if your ornamental plants freeze youll have replacements for the spring. If you want to plant things during August, you might try bulbs of Louisiana Iris, Ginger, Crinums, Daylilies, Amaryllis and Zephyr Lilies. You can still plant woody ornamentals as well, but hurry up so that theyll have a chance to become well established before the winter comes. Now is also the time to plan for your winter annuals, such as Babys Breath, Calendulas, and Pansies. Start ordering your seeds and preparing the flower beds now. Keep a careful watch for insects on your lawn and shrubbery. Late summer is when chinch bugs and male crickets are very active on lawns, and white floes, scales, aphids and caterpillars are damaging ornamentals. For more information visit our website at http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu or contact the Extension Office at 639-3200 or 2292909. Some tips for summer gardening Star Staff Report Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf and Jenny Stuckey, registered nurse and certied diabetes educator, will host a diabetes self-management class on Tuesday, Aug. 30, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. EDT in the conference room at the hospital. A physicians referral is required to attend. For more information call Ruthie Rhodes at 229-5620 or Jenny Stuckey at 278-3683. For more information about Sacred Heart, please visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.org. Sacred Heart to host a diabetes class Aug. 30 ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director Arrest REPOR T The Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce will be conducting vehicle safety checkpoints and DUI check points during the months of August and September 2011. The check points will be held throughout the county to include Highway 98 near St. Joe Beach, Highway 98 and Garrison Ave, C-30 Simmons Bayou, Highway 71 North of White City, Highway 22 and Highway 22A, Highway 71 and Westarm Creek, Highway 71 Dalkieth Area and Highway 71 near the Calhoun line. Aug. 2 Clyde Randall McDaniel, 47, was arrested for the second time in two days for driving on a suspended or revoked drivers license. Samuel Allen Melvin, 21, was arrested on a warrant from Washington County for violation of community control. James Anthony Reagan, 40, was arrested on a violation of probation and a failure to pay child support warrant. Aug. 3 Michael Sterling Teston, 34, was arrested on three warrants for failure to appear; all warrants were for retail theft. Timothy Carson OBryan Sr. and Timothy Carson OBryan, Jr., were arrested on charges of domestic battery. Aug. 4 Casey J. Trickey, 30, was arrested on a warrant for failure to pay child support. Aug. 6 Matthew Robert Milton, 31, was arrested for Driving under the Inuence; he refused a breath test. Aug. 8 Kevin Edward Lamb, 32, was arrested for violation of probation; he was on probation for lewd and lascivious battery. Richard Ralph Holley, 41, was arrested for failure to pay child support. John Dalton Richter, 20, was arrested on warrants for burglary, dealing in stolen property and grant theft in relation to a burglary that occurred in November of last year in the Overstreet area. Ramon Aguilar Alvarez, 40, was arrested on charges of DWLSR and DUI. Alvarez crashed his vehicle on Hwy 71 near Ourtown Road. He is currently being held for Immigration and will be deported. Aug. 9 Zachery Zacchaeus Lee, 22, was arrested on a warrant for petit theft. Paula Suzanne Aull was arrested on a violation of probation warrant.

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B6| The Star Thursday, August 25, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS Labor Day Holiday(Monday, September 5)Classified Line Ad D e a d l i n e sThe Port St. Joe Star & The Apalachicola/Carabelle TimesTo Run: Due By:Thursday, September 8 Friday, September 2, 5 p.m. (CST)The classified department and the business offices of The Star and The Times will be closed Monday, September 5. We will reopen Tuesday, September 6, at 8:00 a.m.. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 3491S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 340 Application No. 2011-13 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01884-010R Description of Property: COMMENCING at an iron rod marking the Southeast Corner of Southeast Quarter of Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds West (assumed) 647.27 feet to a point on the East right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being 33.0 feet from and at right angle to the centerline of said State Road; thence North 04 Degrees 46 Minutes 43 Seconds East along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 168.00 feet to an iron pipe for the POINTING OF BEGINNING, thence North 05 Degrees 11 Minutes 45 Seconds West 48.96 feet; thence North 08 Degrees 04 Minutes 27 Seconds West along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 46.68 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line curve of said State Road No. 71, said point being 33.00 feet from and radial to the centerline of said State Road, said curve having a radius of 1651.42 feet and being concave westerly, thence Northerly along the arc of said curve through a central angle of 20 Degrees 35 Minutes 55 Seconds for 593.71 feet said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of North 10 Degrees 14 Minutes 30 Seconds West 590.52 feet; thence leaving said right of way line curve North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds East, 784.10 feet, thence South 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 343.36 feet, thence South 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds West 471.08 feet, thence South 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds West 124.53 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 5.536 acres, more or less, and being subject to a drainage easement across the following portion thereof: COMMENCE at an iron rod marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds West (assumed) 647.27 feet to a point on the East right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being 33.0 feet from and at right angle to the centerline of said State Road; thence North 04 Degrees 46 Minutes 43 Seconds East along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 168.00 feet to an iron pipe for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 05 Degrees 11 Minutes 45 Seconds West 48.96 feet; thence North 73 Degrees 12 Minutes 44 Seconds East 31.22 feet, thence North 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds East 65.00 feet; thence North 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds East 470.75 feet; thence North 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 09 Seconds East 319.77 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds East 34.22 feet, to an iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 343.36 feet; thence South 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds West 471.08 feet; thence South 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds West 124.53 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. DESCRIPTION BY RECENT SURVEY: COMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (no identification) marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, as shown on the Florida Department of Transportation right of way map as prepared by David H. Melvin, Inc., with a final date of January 13, 1999, (map No. 2190041, Sheet 1 of 9); thence run South 88 Degrees 53 Minutes 21 Seconds West along the South boundary of the said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, for 622.82 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71; thence Northerly along said Easterly right of way as follows: North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 75.63 feet, thence South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds East for 3.28 feet; thence North 06 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 62.45 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 29.89 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732 for the POINT OF BEGINNING; from said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 50.49 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds West along said Easterly right of way for 9.84 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 15.90 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence along said right of way and curve with a radius of 1665.27 feet, through a central angle of 21 Degrees 23 Minutes 44 Seconds, for an arc distance of 621.85 feet (chord of said arc being North 09 Degrees 54 Minutes 20 Seconds West 618.24 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732); thence leaving said Easterly right of way run thence North 89 Degrees 00 Minutes 45 Seconds East for 751.97 feet to a found 1 and 1/4 inch iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 28 Minutes 55 Seconds West for 343.36 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds West for 471.08 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 46 Degrees 02 Minutes 21 Seconds East for 123.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 5.502 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO A DRAINAGE EASEMENT ACROSS THE FOLLOWING PORTION THEREOF: COMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (no identification) marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, as shown on the Florida Department of Transportation right of way map as prepared by David H. Melvin, Inc., with a final date of January 13, 1999, (map No. 2190041, Sheet 1 of 9); thence run South 88 Degrees 53 Minutes 21 Seconds West along the South boundary of the said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, for 622.82 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71; thence Northerly along said Easterly right of way as follows: North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 75.63 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds East for 3.28 feet; thence North 06 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 62.45 feet, thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 29.89 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732 for the POINT OF BEGINNING; from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 50.08 feet; thence North 73 Degrees 07 Minutes 39 Seconds East for 25.35 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 01 Minute 59 Seconds East for 65.00 feet; thence North 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds East for 470.75 feet, thence North 44 Degrees 29 Minutes 04 Seconds East for 319.77 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 00 Minutes 45 Seconds East for 34.22 feet to a found 1 and 1/4 inch iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 28 Minutes 55 Seconds West for 343.36 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds West for 471.08 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 46 Degrees 02 Minutes 21 Seconds East for 123.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: Taunton Truss, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, 3460S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 1326 Application No. 2011-17 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 06268-044R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence North 00 Degrees 04 Minutes 21 Seconds East 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly right of way boundary of County Road No. 30-E, thence run along said right of way boundary as follows: South 23 Degrees 25 Minutes 11 Seconds East 1642.44 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 11426.79 feet thru a central angle of 00 Degrees 29 Minutes 20 Seconds for an arc distance of 97.50 feet, thence continue along said curve with a radius of 11426.79 feet thru a central angle of 00 Degrees 29 Minutes 54 Seconds for an arc distance of 99.39 feet, thence leaving said right of way boundary, run South 66 Degrees 05 Minutes 29 Seconds West 520.00 feet; thence run South 23 Degrees 54 Minutes 31 Seconds East 53.35 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 23 Degrees 54 Minutes 31 Seconds East 46.01 feet to a rod and cap, thence run South 66 Degrees 09 Minutes 06 Seconds West 267.93 feet to the approximate mean high waterline of the Gulf of Mexico, thence run North 19 Degrees 21 Minutes 28 Seconds West along said approximate mean high waterline 35.62 feet, thence run North 14 Degrees 39 Minutes 38 Seconds West along said approximate mean high waterline 10.81 feet, thence run North 66 Degrees 10 Minutes 13 Seconds East 263.37 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 0.28 of an acre more or less. ALSO: DESCRIPTION: 12 FOOT INGRESS/ EGRESS EASEMENT A parcel of land lying and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, and Section 12, Township 9 South, Range 12 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of said Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, and thence North 00 Degrees 04 Minutes 21 Seconds East along the West boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly right of way fine of County Road No. 30-E, thence South 23 Degrees 25 Minutes 11 Seconds East along said right of way line for 1642.44 feet to a point of curve; thence continue along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 11,426.79 feet and a central angle of 00 Degrees 29 Minutes 20 Seconds for an arc length of 97.50 feet; thence continue along said curve to the left which has a radius of 11,426.79 feet and a central angle of 00 Degrees 29 Minutes 54 Seconds for an arc length of 99.39 feet, thence leaving said right of way line, South 66 Degrees 05 Minutes 29 Seconds West for 520.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence South 23 Degrees 54 Minutes 31 Seconds East for 53.35 feet, thence South 66 Degrees 05 Minutes 29 Seconds West for 12.00 feet; thence North 23 Degrees 54 Minutes 31 Seconds West for 53.35 feet; thence North 68 Degrees 05 Minutes 29 Seconds East for 12.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: A 12’ Easement for the Ingress and Egress as described in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, at O. R. Book 176, Page 310-321, located between County Road C-30 and the property described above. Name in which assessed: Richard J. Nelson III & Theresa R. Nelson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of September, 2011. Dated this 1st day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Aug 11, 18, 25,2011 Sept 1, 2011 3399S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 411 Application No. 2011-12 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 02387-000R Description of Property: Lots 7 and 8, of Block 1 of Harden’s Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, according to the official map or plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Clifford C. Millergren and M. Janice Millergren All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of September, 2011. Dated this 25th day of July, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2011 3388S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 589 Application No. 2011-08 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 03083-780R Description of Property: Unit 16, EAGLE LANDING SUBDIVISION, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 51, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Sand Castle Developers LLC/Swiftwater LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of September, 2011. Dated this 25th day of July, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2011 3387S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 516 Application No. 2011-07 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 02729-000R Description of Property: South 1/2 of the West 1/2 of the East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Willie Nobles & Dorothy Ruth Nobles All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of September, 2011. Dated this 25th day of July, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2011 High School Diploma from Home 6-8 weeks. Nationally accredited. Get a diploma! Get job! Call for a free brochure. 1-800-264-8330. Benjamin Franklin High School. www.diplomafromhome.com Info: TX61657 to 56654 Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centura.us.com Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 25, 2011 The Star | B7 Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 401 Reid Avenue +/5,400sf: Move in ready; Inquire for terms 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16' inside clearance; Dual 12' roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $515,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 407 Reid Ave +/4,988 sf : 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $399,000 317 Monument Ave +/4,431 sf : Hwy 98 frontage w/ On-site parking; $499,000 401 Reid Avenue+/5,400 sf : Retail space; $225,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for terms260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing availableHwy 98 Retail / Of ce Vacant LotsTwo lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30' x 80' each; $69,900 per lot UNDER CONTRACT Avenue fce/retail 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS1 BR 1 BA CONDO, FURNISHED On River, Downtown, Boat Slip .....................$1000 1 BR FURNISHED APARTMENT, DEN Carport, Utilities Incl .......................................$650 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes Water, End Unit .............$565 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 1 BR UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Lanark ............................................................$375 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates 2 BR 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Long Term .......................................................$550 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME2 Lots .........................................................$600 Price ReducedFSBO : 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 Free Single widefor scrap metal, Can be removed in whole or parts. 404-667-8907 1997 Electra33 foot, Fifth Wheel RV $4900 850-639-5721 Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 1 br beach cottage, fully furn, utilities and cable tv included, lg deck patio/ carport, Hwy 98 Mexico Beach, $775 mo. + $125 sec dep. Pet deposit extra, Call 850-648-5338 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $700 month + deposit 850-229-6403 Wewa, RV’s for rent Weekly or monthly. Includes W/S/E. Also Call 850-639-5721 2 ba, 1 ba, Neat and clean townhouse in quiet Port St Joe neighborhood, 1020B Woodward, Available now. $700/mon with 1 yr lease., 1st and last, $600 deposit. 850-819-2250 / 850-819-7815. Smoke free. Large 3 br, 1 ba, CH&A, No pets $400 dep $490 month. Call 850-227-6216 Text FL72076 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairCleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sunday’s. Needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call 850-229-6165 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 2011 Postal Positions $13.00 $32.50 + hr., Federal hire / full benefits. No Experience. Call Today 1-866-477-4953 Ext. 246 Movie Extras to stand in background for major film. Earn up to $300 per day. Experience not required. 877-824-6274 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Controller ARNP or PA RN Lab Technician EMT Dietician Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 34173429 Medical/HealthRegistered NursePosition Available The Gulf County Health Department, an EO/ADA/VP Employer, has an opening for one Career Service (benefits assigned) Registered Nurse. Annual Salary Range: $25,774.06 $41,779.00. Fingerprinting and Emergency Duties Required. Benefits include: annual leave, sick leave, nine paid holidays & one personal holiday (per state fiscal year), retirement, access to group health insurance; no nights or weekends. For more info, contact Lesia Hathaway at (850) 227-1276, ext. 149. Electronic applications only for this position; refer to Requisition number 64080028. Closing date 8/28/11 Apply at: peoplefirst.myflorida.c om for assistance, contact: People First at 877-562-7287 Web-Id 34172377 Missing from Cape Sand Blast, Bayside. Oceans brand Kayak, light blue, Venus, pink cancer decal on side. Reward! 850-229-1388 Maytag Heavy Duty Washer (Like New). $200 Electric Hispital bed, excellent condition. $450 OBO. Call 899-0905 Port St Joe 619 Marvin Ave, Friday and Saturday 9:00 a.m.-? Emptying out the Storage Unit!!! PSJ : 505 Avenue A. Sat., Aug 20th, 8AMYard/Bake SaleSomething for everyone St. Joe, 306 16th St. Thurs & Fri. 8:am-2:pm Antiques, Large amount of jewelry, antique radios early electronics, glassware, prints, picture & Misc. Install/Maint/RepairMediacomCommunicationsThe 8th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach Fl for ENTRY LEVEL Installer No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid driver’s license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, please visit our website at http://careers.mediacomcc.co m refer to jobs4316, 4648. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Install/Maint/RepairFirst Class Line TechnicianGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for the position of First Class Line Technician at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through September 2, 2011. For more information, visit our website at www.gcec.com. Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34173955 Text FL73955 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairWater Service Technician IIGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for the position of Water Service Technician II at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through September 2, 2011. For more information, visit our website at www.gcec.com. Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34173874 Text FL73874 to 56654 35187S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURIncorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. 35112S IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-488-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. LANNY BLAIR and RACHEL BLAIR, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 9, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 10-488 CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, and the defendants, LANNY BLAIR and RACHEL BLAIR, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 8th day of September, 2011, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Tract D-1: A portion of the West 100 feet of the East 350.00 feet of the West One Half of Government Lot 2, Fractional Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. lying North of the North right of way line of State Road No. 30-E, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the Point of Intersection of the North right of way line of State Road No. 30-E with the West line of the East 350.00 feet of the West One Half of said Government Lot 2; thence along said West line, N 00E48’37” E 238.28 feet; thence leaving said line, S 89E11’07” E 100.00 feet to a point on the East line of the West 100 feet of the East 350.00 feet of the West One Half of said Government Lot 2; thence along said East line, S 00E48’37” W, 215.02 feet to a point on the North right of way line of said State Road 30-E; thence along said North right of way line, S 77E43’06” W, 102.67 feet to the Point of Beginning; said lands containing 0.520 acres, more or less; [WITH A] 5 foot wide pedestrian access easement: A strip of land 5.00 feet wide, lying 2.50 feet on each side of the following described centerline: Commence at the point of intersection of the North right of way line of State Road 30-E with the West line of the East 450.00 feet of the West One Half of Government Lot 2, Fractional Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence along the North right of way line of said State Road 30-E, N 77E43’06” E, 102.84 feet to a point on the East line of the West 100.00 feet of the East 450.00 feet of the West One Half of said Government Lot 2; thence along said East line, N 00E48’37” E, 936.94 feet to the Point of Beginning of said centerline; thence N 00E48’37” E, 342.81 feet to the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay, said point being the point of termination of said centerline; [AND A] 15 foot wide ingress/egress/utility easement: Commence at the point of intersection of the North right of way line of State Road 30-E with the West line of the East 450.00 feet of the West One Half of Government Lot 2, Fractional Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence along the North right of way line of said State Road 30-E, N 77E43’06” E, 108.46 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence N 00E48’37” E, 282.35 feet; thence N 25E12’13” W, 29.58 feet; thence N 00E48’37” E, 626.73 feet; thence S 89E11’04” E, 15.00 feet; thence S 00E48’37” W, 823.27 feet; thence S 25E12’13” E, 29.58 feet; thence S 00E48’37” W, 282.32 feet to a point on the North right of way line of said State Road 30-E; thence along said right of way line, S 77E43’06” W, 15.40 feet to the Point of Beginning. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 9th day of August, 2011. HON. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Clerk/Deputy Clerk Aug 18, 25, 2011 35132S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000181 DIVISION 21st MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., etc., Plaintiff, vs. EDDIE HUNTER, JR., et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered on August 4, 2011, in Case No.: 23-2011-CA-000181 of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Florida, in which 21st Mortgage Corporation, is Plaintiff and Eddie Hunter Jr., et al, are the defendants, the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale the following described real property: Lot 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, and 54, Block D of COLLEGE PARK SUBDIVISION, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Together with 2006 Nobility, Kingswood 60x28 manufactured home, Serial No: N812598AB, located on the property The sale will be held on September 8, 2011, at 11:00am to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the first floor in the atrium of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 747-5338 at least 7 days before you scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Aug 18, 25, 2011 State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T. Wednesday, the 21st day of September, 2011. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Aug 18, 25, 2011 Sept 1, 8, 2011 3458S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 588 Application No. 2011-16 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 03083-775R Description of Property: Unit 15, EAGLE LANDING SUBDIVISION, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 51, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Swift Water, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of September, 2011. Dated this 1st day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Aug 11, 18, 25,2011 Sept 1, 2011 3495S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 366 Application No. 2011-19 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01960-000R Description of Property: Lots 1, 2 and the North 29 feet of Lot 3, in Section24, Township 4 South, Range 10 eWest, according to the Higgins and Hollinger Plat of the Town of Wewahitchka, Florida, and on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: David L & Abigail Tauton All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 21st day of September, 2011. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 18, 25, 2011 Sept 1, 8, 2011 TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2011-61 IN RE: The Estate of HELEN EDNA DELOZIER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HELEN EDNA DELOZIER, deceased, File Number 2011-61, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 25, 2011. Barbara Schadt Delozier 484 Sealy Drive White City, FL 32465 Law Offices J. Patrick Floyd, Chtd. 408 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32546 Aug 25, Sept 1, 2011 Turn to classified Y ou can bank on our bargains

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Local B8 | The Star Thursday, August 25, 2011 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 A l l o u r w e e k l y e v e n t s FRIDAY NIGHT O N THE POO P D ECK 9PM ET O N E N IGHT O N LY NASHVILLE S O N GWRITER C HARLIE BLACK S U N DAY NIGHT O N THE POO P D ECK 7PM ET LIVE M USIC W/ ON E MORE S HOT O P E N AT 11A M ET 7 DAYS A WEEK WWW.LOOKOUTLOU N GE.CO M P l u s dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Stan Siprell Please check out my website at www.sunriseconstructioncompany.com, and see some of my residential and commercial building under the projects tab. Recent and current jobs include ONeill/Pennington, Wolfe, Piper and Breyne. I think you will nd me very easy to work with to customize the home you are dreaming of. Sign up now for a free account and receive a towards your deal purchase. Expires October 12, 2011 KICKING from page B1 think for people to pick on him or take his money. Although Kaydans disability often singles him out, Barwick treats him the same as he would any other student. Hes one of my best students, I tell you, Barwick said. Theres a lot of spirit. Hes a good inspiration for a lot of folks. From the sidelines, his grandfather Ricky Summers offers sharp-witted comments: Calm down, boy! Dont hurt him! You didnt hurt him too bad, did ya? Kaydans comments channel his grandfathers, and he often has everyone in the studio laughing. His grandmother said he meets no strangers. Hes a tough little nut, I tell you, Kaydans grandfather said. He just loves karate. Kaydan often practices his new karate moves on his grandfather, a recreation that once resulted in a black eye for Summers. He just loves (Barwick) to death, Kari Summers said. If he asks (Kaydan) to do something, hes going to try his hardest to do it. Kaydan also receives plenty of support from his peers. If you ever see him at school, every time Kaydan does something, the whole school cheers him on, Barwick said. If you want to see something to make you cry its just unbelievable. VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Assistant instructor Travis Gould works on partner hits with Kaydan. wrong, but not enough to put them into the judicial system, McFarland said. They have to admit guilt, so the trial is not a whodunit. It comes down to what happens to them, what sanctions are assessed. Such sanctions, or penalties, could be a letter of apology, a house curfew, community service hours, restitution or a public apology. For example, a teen caught shoplifting a small item might end up spending time in a Dollar General for community service and apology. The defendant will then have 30-60 days to complete the sanctions. Criminal charges are dismissed for successful completion of the program. Failure to adhere to the sanctions of Teen Court will result in the case being referred back to the Juvenile Court for prosecution. I believe Teen Court is a very good deterrent, McFarland said. The sanctions they have been given will make them think about what theyve done. There are things you can do with Teen Court that you cant do in the regular criminal justice system. All students who sign up for Teen Court will be trained by adult counterparts. Students who sign up to become the prosecuting or defense attorneys will be trained by attorneys. Court bailiffs will train student bailiffs. Jurors are trained by court ofcers. Teen Court is funded through an add-on charge levied for each court case. Teen Court receives 25 percent of that add-on charge, McFarland said. Teen Court, McFarland added, aims to promote accountability, responsibility and selfworth. The program also exposes teens to career options in the law and law enforcement. And it promotes discipline, which I think is missing for a lot of todays young people, McFarland said. This is the only diversion program we have in Gulf County. I think it is one that works. McFarland is also considering the future in ramping up Teen Court. Gov. Rick Scott has made known his desire to have such misdemeanor criminal offenses of the kind entertained in Teen Court considered more as infractions and worthy of a diversion program that reduces costs in the criminal justice system. There is that movement out there, though it has not become law, McFarland said. Im trying to get ahead of that a little bit. My goal is to get Teen Court up and running and functional. Referrals have already come in, and McFarland said the rst Teen Court cases of the new school year should begin in Port St. Joe the second week of September. WANTED from page B1


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