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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03808
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 08-18-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03808

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By Tim Croft Star News Editor Gov. Rick Scott last week tapped Port St. Joe businessman and Gulf County native Jim Norton as Gulf County Superintendent of Schools. Norton will ll out the unexpired term of former Superintendent Tim Wilder, who resigned in June to take a similar job for Do than (Ala.) City Schools. Wilders term was due to expire next fall. Home is where the heart is, Norton said after learning of his appointment last Thursday. My love and passion is right here. This was a rare opportunity. I fought for the chance to get in there. I really had to do my homework. I am humbled and appreciative of the trust the governor has put in me. To me, this is not about names or titles; it is about doing the job. We have a wonderful school system and a great life in Gulf County. I am excited and honored. Im glad to be home to do this job. Norton, 45, comes from a family that has been part of Gulf County for three genera tions. His father, Charlie, graduated from Wewahitchka High School. His mother, Car oline, taught in Gulf District Schools for 40 years and she spent six years serving on the Gulf County School Board. Gov. appoints Jim Norton superintendent of schools By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer When they see his truck pull into the driveway, they hold their breath. For every additional cat or dog Gulf County Animal Control Ofcer Roland Jones brings to the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, one must go. On Aug. 9 shelter director Melody Townsend and Humane Society board president Sandi Christy watched and sighed as Jones approached the building with a shivering Jack Russell terrier in his arms. Less than an hour later he returned with another trembling pup. Were at capacity right now, Christy said. We love Roland, but we dont like to see him here. To make room for new intakes, animals must either be adopted or euthanized. But with the average adoption rate at 20 per month and the average intake in the 60s, the numbers do not swing in favor of the animals, especially those rendered unadoptable. As often as every other day, Townsend is faced with the difcult task of selecting which dogs she believes have the slimmest chance of adoption and Humane Society bursting at the seams doggy Is that your window? in the Lend a paw! Where: 1007 Tenth St. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 When: Tuesday -Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Contact: (850) 227-1103 VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Dogs are crate-trained in the lobby of the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. TOP, Animal Control Ofcer Roland Jones holds a Jack Russell Terrier he picked up in Stone Mill Creek on Aug. 9. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Of the 585 designated Coastal Barrier Resource Areas (CBRAs) in the na tion, 84 percent remain un developed. Cape San Blas in Gulf County is one that falls in the minority. Cape San Blas is one of those that has experienced a high level of development, said Gulf County Chief Ad ministrator Don Butler. Were in the 16 percent. Cape San Blas has been a CBRA since 1982, mean ing building in the area is not restricted, however no fed eral funds can be earmarked for the area, including as sistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and federal ood insurance. It discourages people from building, Butler said. The idea is to leave the area in its natural state to protect it. Midway through a $22 million beach restoration project in 2008, disaster struck. Half of the project was being funded by the state, the other half by area landowners, who chose to tax themselves to meet the local match for state fund ing. The pricey project was signicantly impacted by Hurricane Gustav and FEMA initially stepped in to cover the $15 million in damage that was done to the area. The U.S. Fish and Wild life Service later intervened, claiming FEMA should not supply any relief money be cause of the CBRA designa tion, and FEMA in turn de ferred to the Fish and Wild life Service. Butler said the Florida Fish and Wildlife Service pushed the CBRA designa tion in the 80s to protect the coastal barriers of Cape San Blas and St. Joseph Penin sula. FEMA appeal critical in restoration of undeveloped peninsular beaches See FEMA A2 See DOGGY A2SPECIAL TO THE S TAR Norton spent several days interviewing with Gov. Rick Scott and his top education advisors prior to being appointed last week by the governor to ll out the remainder of the unexpired term of former superintendent Tim Wilder. See NORTON A3 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, A ugust 18 2011 Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion .......................................A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ...................A5 Outdoors .....................................A6 Sports ...........................................A7 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B6 Classieds .................................... B6-B8 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 73, N UM B ER 44 CSB Lighthouse restoration recognized B1 By Tim Croft Star News Editor John Ford is back on the county medical bus. A contrite Ford apolo gized to county commission ers Tuesday during a special meeting, saying his decision to allow an EMT who was not a county employee to drive an ambulance on a busy July night was wrong. The 16-year county para medic and EMS supervisor added that county staff had not made the call, he did, and it was made after a third service call came in with two ambulances on the road. I guarantee it wont hap pen again, Ford told com missioners, noting that the episode exposed disharmo ny within the EMS ranks. I would like to move forward and pull this back together as a unit. County administrator Don Butler said he had talked with Ford at length on Monday Butler said it was a shame the conversation had not occurred a month ago and they agreed Butler had little choice but to terminate Ford when EMS medical director Dr. Gary Pablo emailed a request to have Ford re moved from work ing under his li cense because of the incident. Butler added that had there been the close working relation ship that existed under pre vious medical director Dr. Tom Curry, the email may not have been sent. I think it can work with or with out the vote of the board, Butler told commissioners as they seemed poised for a vote on whether to bring Ford back. I think we can work it out and move for ward. EMS director Houston Whiteld agreed and he, Butler and Ford huddled after the meeting to resolve some lin gering issues. Ford is expected back at work Thursday morning. However, commissioners made clear they hoped Ford would serve as a leader in addressing what Commis sioner Warren Yeager called systemic problems within the county EMS depart ment. These tracks are all torn up and they need to be re paired, said Commissioner Bill Williams, alluding to the ill-will sown by the episode as well as a number of op erational and billing issues. That department is an arm of this county, it represents this county. Commissioner Ward McDaniel noted that many of the problems within EMS date to the tenure of former director Shane Mc Gufn, who resigned last year amidst the cloud of a Florida Department of Law Enforcement investigation that remains open. We cant keep going like weve been going, McDan iel said. We have to be on the same page and work as a team. Ford pledged to do ex actly that. Ford apologizes, is reinstated to EMS For more on Tuesdays county meeting, go to star.com

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, August 18, 2011 Cape San Blas Realty, Inc. presents their EXECUTIVE SALES AGENT TOMMY LAKE A Professional Sales Agent for the Gulf Coast. (850) 227-2160 Ofce (850) 227-8388 Cell THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW! www.CapeSanBlasRealty.com Cape San Blas Realty, Inc. says Aaron Farnsley, AIF CFP MBA Farnsley & Johnston 505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3336 aaron.farnsley@farnsley.com and requesting they be euthanized. Hard doesnt even begin to describe it, but it has to be done, Townsend said. We only do it as often as we have to. While the well-socialized, purebred Jack Russell brought in by Jones is considered highly adoptable, another dogs in the shelter might not be so lucky. Meanwhile, a pair of stray dogs crosses Marina Drive and meander through the Advanced Auto Parts parking lot. People have been leaving Tupperware containers of water and kibble in the Piggly Wiggly parking lot, where the dogs hang out. Christy said the citizens of Gulf County need to be more responsible by spaying and neutering all pets. And dont let youre animal wander, Christy said. If theyre not spayed or neutered they breed. The St. Joseph Bay Humane Society has room upon room of animals waiting for homes. Dogs are lined up in crates near the front door, in kennels out back, down a cement hallway and in the room leading to the cement hallway. Every step is met by echoes of barking. There are large kennels for mothers with puppies, and plenty of outdoor space for the dogs to exercise, but next to no empty cages. Gulf County cannot sustain 60 animals a month, Christy said. When the shelter was rst opened, we were averaging 43 intakes a month, and now its 50 percent higher. As long as the numbers are up, we need more help. Although at capacity, Humane Society employees make sure the animals they can accommodate are well cared for. We do what we can for the ones that are adoptable, Christy said. We have a good reputation and we have a dedicated core group of employees. We have a volunteer here now walking dogs, so were lucky in that respect. Townsend said she is very selective when it comes to her employees. I always ask Why are you doing this? Youve got to be in it for the animals, Townsend said. Its a labor of love. By walking through the kennels you can learn that Caesar, a one-yearold brindle boxer, can be a little timid at rst, but will warm up to you after a bit. A tag detailing the animals personality traits, estimated age, special needs and intake date hangs outside each kennel. When Christy walks through the kennels she addresses each dog, Youre pretty, youre pretty; yes you are. The dogs are walked frequently and rotated into a large, fenced area to ensure plenty of outside play time. The kennels feature a guillotine door that pulls up and offers dogs the option of being inside or out. In the cat room, kittens share cages and the cats are rotated out so each can have time to climb the cat tower and use the scratching posts. Townsend said they hope to take out the window soon and enclose an outside space, creating a cat atrium. Various kennels and cages are sponsored, one of many ways to help the Humane Society. The Society also operates a thrift hut next door, with all proceeds beneting the shelter. About 80 percent of our budget has to come from donations and adoptions, Christy said. We have very limited county and city funding. Volunteers are needed to walk dogs, play with kittens, take pictures for the web site and help socialize the animals. Christy said the shelter has a dedicated group of volunteers, but they can always use more. She noted that you dont have to be an animal person to help out. Others interested in helping can do so through direct donations, animal sponsorships, dedicating a brick, or fostering an animal waiting for adoption. What we desperately need is foster homes, Christy said. If we had more foster homes we wouldnt have to euthanize as often. Not all stories at the shelter are dim ones. Townsend pointed out Hobson, a small, shaggy dog in the puppy room waiting to be picked up by his new adopted family. Hobson was found in an old, abandoned home. It is believed that his last family left him behind. (Animal Control ofcers) had to use a catch pole because he was backing up, hiding and snarling, Townsend said. When we bathed him it took a lot of time and coaxing. The timid Hobson was put in a quarantine cage because of his unpredictability and limited sociability. Soon after, a woman came in looking for a small dog. Although Hobson was still in a quarantine cage, the woman found him and they took to each other immediately. All of us were shocked, Townsend said, when she observed the difference in Hobsons nature. Shes coming today to pick him up. She couldnt wait. Christy said the woman didnt pick Hobson, he picked her. The Gulf County Com mission is now writing its second appeal to FEMA, which will be heard in Washington D.C., after the rst appeal to FEMA, heard in Atlanta, was rejected. Butler is hoping the ap peal will convince FEMA that this situation should be deemed an exception to the CBRA rules. When we engineer a beach, when we put sand on the beach, it becomes an asset of the county, Butler said. Its washing away something that was engineered and that has been paid for by the county and it should be covered by FEMA. The Coastal Barrier Resources Act states any non structural projects for shoreline stabilization that are designed to mimic, enhance, or restore natural stabilization systems, as an exception. Were trying to get them to understand why we meet the exception to the (CBRA) rule, Butler said. If the same situation were to occur in St. Joe Beach of Mexico Beach, for example, FEMA would cover the damage costs be cause those areas are not designated CBRAs. It takes awhile to learn how to spell CBRA, But ler said. What does it all mean? Its huge. Butler met with repre sentatives from the De partment of Environmental Management on Aug. 11 to discuss the second appeal process. The county has until the end of September to submit a second appeal letter. But ler said they might hire a lobbyist to assist in the pro cess if they nd a candidate familiar with FEMA and CBRAs. Gulf County Commis sioners Bill Williams and Warren Yeager both voiced a need for assistance at the federal level during the county commission meet ing Aug. 9. If we could nd some one thats done this before, that gives us a warm, fuzzy feeling inside, it would be worth spending the money, Butler said. Those people need that beach put back in front of them. An estimated 600 prop erties on the Gulf side of Cape San Blas and along St. Joseph Peninsula; another 400 on the bay side will be dramatically affected by the appeal decision, Butler said. It would be a hard lick for them to handle if FEMA doesnt pay for (restora tion), Butler said. Then these people just bought $22 million of sand that got washed away. Owners with lots direct ly on the Gulf in Cape San Blas already pay an addi tional 10 mil millage rate, and those with Gulf interior lots pay 4.8 mils in addition to the set county millage rate. I do think that the economy is bad, and hous ing value is going down, Butler said. Its probably one of the most devastating things that could happen to them, if FEMA doesnt end up paying for this. FEMA from page A1 DOGGY from page A1

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, August 18, 2011 Nortons wife, Erika, was a teacher for two years in Port St. Joe. I am respectful to the community pride garnered on each end of the county by the schools, Norton said. We have two communitybased school systems. In my heart I always want that to be the case. Norton, a 1985 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, a class it was noted during his swearing-in on Friday that also included County Com missioner Tan Smiley and County Judge Tim McFar land, earned a bachelors degree, as well as a masters degree in education, from Troy State University and a law degree from Faulkner University Jones School of Law. He spent seven years as an aide to former Congress man Allen Boyd before mov ing into banking. Norton has been the se nior vice president and se nior trust ofcer at Vision Bank since 2007. Previously, he was the se nior vice president and direc tor of business development for the Coastal Community Bank from 2002 to 2007. He is past president of the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce and of the Port St. Joe Lions Club. Nortons roots in the county, degree in education and his background in busi ness were cited by Scott in his press statement an nouncing the appointment. As a third-generation Gulf County resident who at tended Gulf County schools from elementary through high school, Jim possesses strong connections to his community and the public schools of his home county, Governor Scott said. In ad dition, his valuable admin istrative experience in pri vate business has provided him the leadership skills necessary to effectively op erate Gulf Countys public schools. Norton said his hope was to build upon prior suc cess Gulf District Schools have earned an A each of the past four years under the states grading formula with an eye toward bring ing additional accountability to the business operations of the district. We need to become more efcient at teaching our children, Norton said. We need to not put any ad ditional burden on the tax payers. I bring local knowl edge. I am a known quantity. Im consistent. I hope to be a consensus-builder so we can literally make our schools shine a little brighter. His approach, he said, would revolve around three elements budget, philoso phy and plan. Norton said he wants to turn over every rock to realize savings in the school budget, from reviewing con tracts to seeking a 15 per cent cut in the cost of edu cating our children. Norton noted that the school board and staff had already made signicant cuts to the budget this year, had moved toward more ef ciency through the consoli dation of middle and high schools and lauded their ef forts. A lot of people rolled up their sleeves and did the hard work, Norton said. Norton said he does not favor additional taxes and when the voter approved one mil operating levy sun sets next year, he does not favor the district seeking re newal of the levy but instead tightening belts a bit more to balance the lost revenue. He also lauded the Stu dent Success Act passed by the Florida Legislature and said that during his in terview with Scott the gov ernor talked of his desire to move away from assessing schools on standardized test toward quantifying student outcomes. I am hoping that the system will make a more well-rounded student more capable of competing in the global economy, Norton said. Each student is spe cial and can be somebody if we set expectations and standards high enough and create a positive and sup portive environment in our schools. Norton said he hoped to create a working group within 60 days comprised of local business leaders, school advocates and dis trict staff to identify current needs and develop a com mon vision for the public schools. We are going to be s cally responsible and nancially prudent, Norton said. Hopefully that will be contagious. Norton is also an advo cate for school choice, be lieving residents pay enough in taxes to be allowed to choose the school they feel right for their child. Norton added that he will also be a candidate for su perintendent when the elec tion of 2012 rolls around. It was my intention to run when I sought this ap pointment, Norton said. I am very appreciative of the governor. I want to rally the sup port of our community schools, eliminate wasteful spending and lower the tax burden on property own ers. SPECIAL TO THE S TAR County Judge Tim McFarland congratulates Jim Norton after swearing Norton in as the new superintendent of Gulf County Schools. Norton was accompanied by his wife, Erika, and parents Charlie and Caroline. NORTON from page A1

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Opinion A4 | The Star Thursday, August 18, 2011 Sometimes we have a hard time deciding what to call our relatives spouses, children and such. You have in-laws and they are pretty easy to identify, then you have folks like your nephews wife. Is she my niece, my cousin or is she just my nephews wife? As far as Im concerned, my nephews wife is family and I will love her as such. I will also call her pretty and strong and on this day, I will call her fortunate. She said that I could share this story with you, so I will. If I add anything to it, you will be able to tell. Otherwise, its a true story, just like all of the others I share. Blake and Meghan have been married for less than a year; they are young and good looking and enjoy the outdoors. Weekends are spent hunting, fishing, swimming and enjoying nature. Our family has a piece of land we simply call the bottoms. Blake makes full use of the land and it makes us all very happy. On this day, Blake and a friend were working on a tractor or a bush hog or both. Im sure he was planning on planting something to bring critters into the bottoms to shoot at. Dont worry, hell eat it and he will only shoot at it if its in season. This is Alabama, we eat what we shoot. Theres another part of that phrase that I cant seem to remember. While Blake was working on the tractor, his wife Meghan and her friend decided to cool it in the Tallapoosa River. August in Alabama is hot. The R.L. Harris Dam (Lake Wedowee) had let the water through about 15 minutes earlier, so the girls were being very careful (the water gets high and the current gets fast). Meghans friend fell in, and Meghan attempted to help her. In the process of trying to get her friend back to shore, Meghan was holding on to a tree branch. The branch broke, Meghan went in. Fortunately, she and her friend had the branch to hang on to. Unfortunately, the current was very strong. At this point, you had two good looking girls in bikinis going down river on a branch really fast. They didnt have their cell phones and they were a good piece from the cabin and their voices couldnt be heard. The boys were trying to crank the tractor or run the bush hog or something else noisy that boys do. So Meghan and her friend had one choice to hang on for dear life. For six miles, they prayed, they laughed, and they cried and tried not to panic. The boys, being good southern boys, did start to wonder where they were. They couldnt find them and they got worried fast and started looking for them and calling them and getting sick. They drove the dirt roads until they could get cell service and called 911. It did not look good. My nephew and his friend waited for what seemed an eternity. He later figured out that it was only about 15 minutes. Within 15 minutes, in rural Alabama, the sheriff and a posse of do-gooders were there. This is Alabama, and this is America, where people show up when you need them. They show up and start looking. They show up with pickup trucks and boats and dogs. The Sheriff noted that this was not good at all. The current is very strong, he said. I think he may have even noted that they may be looking for bodies. I dont even like to think that. Blake continued driving the property and searching the riverbank. As he walked through the corn fields with a fellow who had showed up to help, he heard trains go by (the tracks run close to the river). The sound of the trains drowned out his screaming and calling his wife and her friend. Blake also heard a railroad service truck squealing down the tracks following the trains. He was sick and exhausted and scared. Time kept passing, hour by hour. No word of the girls. My older brother (Blakes father) showed up as soon as he got word. My brother and Blake went through the heavy brush of the woods with a bush axe, still calling and hoping for some sign. They didnt find it. Meanwhile, the girls were going down river for about six miles, where they spotted a flat place on the riverbank and Meghans friend talked her into letting go and swimming for the riverbank. She must be a Countywide voting suffered another setback two weeks ago and it is not likely to take a step forward in the foreseeable future. It is hard to find much to like in setting aside $500,000 to litigate a move away from single-member districts at a time of considerable economic strain for private and public sector alike. County commissioners all but sealed the fate of county-wide litigation for the coming fiscal year when they set a tentative millage rate without addressing the issue. Actually, not addressing it with an up and down vote was modus operandi for the commission, regardless of the names on the podium, since voters expressed a desire to end singlemember districts they perceived had brought, at a minimum, so much fiscal inefficiency. But by setting the tentative millage rate to be placed on Truth In Millage (TRIM) notices property owners will receive from the Property Appraiser, commissioners pretty much boxed themselves in on county-wide. To move forward with litigation, the commission is proposing to set aside $500,000, the high end of the cost range an attorney hired to consult the county on the litigation. Commissioners, having set the tentative millage rate, cannot raise it. Therefore, they would have to find spending cuts elsewhere to offset the addition of a half million dollars in order to at least maintain the current rate. And that kind of money does not seem to be there. Commissioners should be credited for having brought an out-of-control budget down to reasonable levels in the past three to four years. Spending $13 million in ad valorem dollars just a few years ago, commissioners will spend less than $9 million this coming fiscal year. It represents the kind of growth to be expected given where the county was in 2000, though commissioners did go from point A to C by way of D and F rather than B. But finding an additional $500,000 in spending cuts at this point outside of privatizing the landfill and the $600,000 that facility sucks from taxpayers each year those are cuts not likely to be realized. Being fiscally incapable at this point is entirely on commissioners, however. The reality is, in reading the summary report from the consulting attorneys, the delay tactics of commissioners over the past seven years is in many ways responsible for the hefty price tag. The attorney makes clear that the largest single mitigating factor working against the county is the most recent voting results, particularly 2008. No matter to what extent 2008 represented a watershed year for the county, in the election of U.S. president, congressman, state senator, which, it could be argued, skewed normal trends, a judge could only consider outcomes. The attorney makes clear that the county could have had far greater odds of success had the case been pressed earlier in the decade, using election results from 2004 and 2000, when, for example, Shirley Jenkins, an AfricanAmerican woman, won a county-wide race for tax collector against a field of white males. Had commissioners pressed the fight while the issue was hot, after voters overwhelmingly approved moving ahead with countywide litigation, before redistricting this year which would raise the case on the radar according to the attorney, the odds in court would be vastly improved. And it is worth considering that the onetime county-wide was put to voters with a hefty price tag, at the time $750,000-$1.5 million was attached, voters balked. So logic dictates that now is not the time, given the economic climate, to be trying to carve out $500,000 from the budget to chase litigation that even the attorney gives less than 5050 odds of succeeding. Yet its also worth recalling the primary reason voters fatigued of single-member districts the voting bloc the system created that gave rise to so many spending decisions based on district wants, not county needs. That remains on display, at the same budget meeting during which commissioners approved the tentative millage. Commissioners from Districts I, II and IV, familiar numbers to any long-time county voter, approved spending nearly $14,000 for a park within the city limits of Wewahitchka even though the county does not pay one dime for any park within the city limits of Port St. Joe. That logic is unfathomable and speaks strictly to district desires over county necessities. So, while even countywides staunchest supporters must blanch at spending $500,000 for litigation, the fundamentals of the need to move away from single-member districts remain. And while the economic climate may not improve much, according to experts, in the months ahead, longterm county taxpayers cannot afford not to press for county-wide voting. So, in this instance, commissioners should address the issue longterm. Set aside some funds this year, again next year, do it again the following year. Budget what is needed to keep the case, which the attorney contends should not be abandoned, alive. Because though the economic way to countywide voting appears challenging, the will to move from single-member districts remains as voters have stated time and again when the price tag is not the issue. We got inoculated in more ways than one! Keyboard KLATTERINGS What do you call your nephews wife? Commissioners homemade county-wide box TIM CROFT Star news editor The McKenzie, Tennessee, elementary school was tall ... especially if you were short! I remember the very first day, looking up at all those windows on the second floor and wondering what went on up there. How much learning could take place in a building so large? And I couldnt quite believe the teachers could be as mean as Leon made them out to be. This wasnt Miss Katie Owenbys kindergarten class; that was for sure! Miss Katie would pick you up in her big station wagon. She would hug you when you looked lost. She let us color and draw. Shed serve us ice cream anytime someone had a birthday. The whole kindergarten operated out of one small room in her well-kept house over on Cherry Street. Somehow in my little heart I realized life was never going to be as simple, as easyas safe as Miss Katies friendly living room. I had to walk to school on that first day. Of course, Leon was with me, and as always, spewing forth the advice, You dont understand grade school teachers! They skin little boys like you alive! You cant move, or spit. And heaven help you if you say the wrong thing or make the slightest mistake! I knew better than to believe anything my big brother would say. Still, he had been through this. You dont suppose he could be right! In spite of all his chatter, he walked me up the front steps and led me down to the first grade room and spoke to Miss Carolyn Blades almost like a grown up. He gave me a pat on the arm and said hed be right up the stairs and if anything went wrong, just yell. I was glad to see Pam Collins and Bobby Brewer. Both were Miss Katie graduates. If ever a fellow needed some comradesinarms it was me right now! Miss Carolyn didnt look all that foreboding. Maybe this was going to work out after all. She lined us up right off the bat and we marched down the hall to where some nurses were stationed. They took us one at a time through this makeshift curtain.. and had us pull up our sleeves and commenced to give us a shot in each arm at the same time from both sides LEON.. HELPPPP.!!! Fifty-eight Augusts later, I can still smell the alcohol and feel the sting from that encounter. I can see those brown tiles with the white flecks that lined the hall way. Some fainted. Several got sick. I was a little dizzy myself. Our formal education was off and running! I enjoyed Miss Carolyn, who turned out to be the nicest person you could ever imagine. And although I would never say it out loud, I came to love Pam, Bobby, LaRenda Bradfield, Ricky Hale, Bob Edwards, Jimmy Carter, Ruth Crocker, Graylene Lemonds, Buddy Wiggleton, Suzie Cozart, Jane Hill ... I could go right down the list. To this day they are the best friends that I will ever have. You march through the needle line, cut out those presidents heads, exchange Valentine cards, chase each other at recess, dust erasers and live through the Blue Bird reading class together and you cant believe the bond that grows among you. You dont realize it, but the education falling upon you comes from a lot more directions than the spelling bees and the multiplication tables. Those shots they gave us in the first grade must have been pretty strong. I dont ever remember taking them again. And come August of the second grade we were back for more of the same. The spelling words were a little longer but those president heads looked just the same. We moved upstairs in that old building for the fourth grade. You could get a little better look at the houses across Stonewall Street but the learning kept coming, relentlessly, whether we wanted it or not. August became a mixed bag for me. I loved the summers. I enjoyed the ball games, the swimming pool, kick-the-can, the freedom of an idyllic time and place. America was not at war with anyone. Everybody liked Ike. Unlocked doors were the norm. You could wander about anywhere in town un-tethered. You could chase fireflies or throw rocks at street lights. And I couldnt start to recount the stories and good times that took place on near bout every front porch in town on any evening of the summer. But August rolled around like clockwork and it meant the end of summer, and back to a life of endless books, lectures, confinement. We understood the necessity of school. Oh, wed grumble and complain and make fun of teachers, coaches, principals and anyone else who looked official. Mostly it was just in good fun. We knew we had to be there. I think most of us even appreciated the moment. But again, it wasnt cool to appear too eager. August perked up a might by our high school days. We were old enough to really be thankful for each other. We could relish even the difficult times. We knew the learning was setting us in the right direction. I got to kiss Charlotte Melton. Fast times at McKenzie High? We didnt think so then! I remember the water cooler discussions about how slow things moved. What a small town! And what a big world awaited! Perhaps it was this exact scenario Dickens was referring to when he penned, It was the best of times; it was the worst of times. I know they were special. And its why during the August of our lives, we look back and remember those smells, feelings, trepidations, loves, friendships..with such vividness. We can almost touch what was! Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See CRANKS A5

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Letters A5 | The Star CRANKS from page A4 dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs S o u t h e r n C o o k i n g a t i t s B e s t Best Food Best Prices for Local Seafood & Steaks on Thursday & Friday Nights 6-8:30 Shrimp Fried or Grilled w/ 2 Sides $10.95 8 oz. Ribeye w/ 2 sides $11.95 8oz. & 16oz. Black Angus (Hand Cut) Ribeyes Fish Basket w/ 2 sides $9.95 8 oz. Burgers w/FF $9.95 Hours: 236 Reid Ave (850) 229.7121 WEEKLY ALMANAC St.Joseph Bay Apalachicola Bay, West Pass TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 227-7847 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Aug 18 89 75 10 % Fri, Aug 19 89 75 30 % Sat, Aug 20 89 76 30 % Sun, Aug 21 88 77 30 % Mon, Aug 22 89 77 30 % Tues, Aug 23 89 78 40 % Wed, Aug 24 88 76 60 % 8/18 Thu 01:34AM 1.3 H 09:42AM 0.7 L 8/19 Fri 01:51AM 1.4 H 11:26AM 0.6 L 8/20 Sat 02:24AM 1.6 H 01:09PM 0.4 L 8/21 Sun 03:11AM 1.7 H 02:30PM 0.3 L 8/22 Mon 04:10AM 1.8 H 03:33PM 0.2 L 8/23 Tue 05:15AM 1.9 H 04:23PM 0.1 L 8/24 Wed 06:20AM 2.0 H 05:05PM 0.0 L 8/18 Thu 12:13AM 0.8 L 06:16AM 1.5 H 01:12PM 0.6 L 07:25PM 1.2 H 8/19 Fri 12:32AM 0.9 L 06:39AM 1.6 H 02:00PM 0.5 L 08:34PM 1.1 H 8/20 Sat 12:55AM 1.1 L 07:08AM 1.6 H 03:02PM 0.5 L 10:03PM 1.1 H 8/21 Sun 01:20AM 1.2 L 07:43AM 1.6 H 04:22PM 0.4 L 8/22 Mon 08:27AM 1.6 H 05:46PM 0.4 L 8/23 Tue 09:23AM 1.6 H 06:55PM 0.3 L 8/24 Wed 03:11AM 1.3 H 05:17AM 1.4 L 10:32AM 1.6 H 07:51PM 0.2 L Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S H A RE Y O U R OPINION S A5 | The Star good friend. They let go of the limb, the limb that had literally kept them alive for six miles, to try to make it to the shore. Meghan said she swam like she never had before. She swam like her life depended on it it did. Fighting the current, the girls made it to the riverbank. When they made it, they broke down, cried and kissed the muddy, snaky riverbank, thanking God for the strength to get there. Still no one knew of their fate. The posse, the sheriff, my brother and Blake were looking for them. My older brother was waist-deep in the Tallapoosa River still calling for the girls. Blake followed his Daddy into the water, doing the same. Blake grew up hunting and fishing this land and noted it was the first time he had seen his Daddy in the water. Seeing his Daddy in the water, he got his second wind and wasnt about to quit looking for his wife and their friend. My big brother has this effect on people; you follow him, knowing things will be alright. Blake couldnt help thinking that this land, which had always been heaven to him, was turning into hell. He noted that it was the scariest day of his life. At this point the good ole girl kicked in. Im pretty sure Meghan can field dress a deer and run a trot line, but I still would have liked to have seen them for the rest of this trip. Two blondes in bikinis, covered in mud, tromping through the deep woods of Alabama. The girls (in bikinis) fought through a briar patch and made their way to a fenced pasture where they broke the fence down (Blake will fix that) and headed toward the railroad track. Their luck was changing; a train was coming down the tracks. Meghan and her friend screamed and yelled and waved and the fellows in the train just waved back. It must have been the second train that Blake had heard on the tracks. Fortunately, the fellow in the rail service truck following the second train, decided to stop. The driver seemed to be a little concerned about giving the girls a ride in the company truck and was probably scared to call in his find. I doubt he picks up girls in bikinis every day in the middle of the woods. The girls rode eight miles down the tracks to Cragford, Alabama (population ~ 1,000, real spread out). Once in Cragford, the girls walked to a nearby house, where an older couple let them use their telephone to call 911. An older man, two mudcovered girls in bikinis, a 911 call. I wont go there. The 911 folks were happy to get her call, word spread that they were OK and it turned out to be a good day. Somewhere in the midst of all of this, Blake had made his way back to the riverbank and was looking down river from under a shade tree. He was talking to the Lord and begging. Weve all been there and sometimes it doesnt work out like we want it to. This time it did. He heard people screaming down river, They found them, theyre alright! He was overcome with joy and thankfulness and Im sure he cried. I sure would have. The deputies probably fought over who got to drive the two blond bikini-clad girls back to Randolph County, Alabama. I dont blame them. It will be a hot topic in Randolph County for a few days. They had scratches, cuts and bruises, but they were just fine (in their bikinis). Blake told Meghan that it would probably be a good idea if she stayed inside the house for a while. She said something about the tractor, and I wont say anything else. These kinds of stories are all around us. The lessons they teach us are plenty. What lesson do we pick? Helping a friend in need? Learning to let go? Wearing bikinis in the woods? Never quitting? Find a train track to follow? Nah ... I think the best lesson we can learn is to be like Meghan and her friend and kiss the muddy, snaky ground and give thanks. Most of us make it to the riverbank every day. We are in a river every day, the current is very strong and we have to swim like we never have before. Then tomorrow, we do it again. You can find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com By Marcus Sturdivant When I was a boy if someone dared call me ignorant, unless they were much bigger than me, a fight was sure to follow. Back then I equated ignorance with being stupid. Granted, it would have been ignorant or perhaps a better word would be stupid, of me to get offended by a much bigger person. Why initiate a fight with someone bigger than you are when the prospects for a bad outcome are high? On the other hand, if the other person who called me ignorant was much smaller than me then I was more apt to engage in pugilism. Although I had a confidence problem when I was younger I never really considered myself to be stupid. However, as I grew older and wised up a bit I did come to the conclusion that I was ignorant about many things. Being ignorant can be a bad thing; however, not being ignorant about other things can be good. For example I am ignorant concerning the experiential effects of marijuana since I have never consumed marijuana in any form. On the other hand, being ignorant about certain cost/benefit scenarios can be bad. When my daughter graduated from high school, my wife and I bought a used Mustang as a way of enticing her to go to college. She did not want to go so I surmised that the appeal of having a car would far outweigh any objection she might have about school. Was I ever wrong? All it took was two short semesters of almost straight Fs to convince me I was ignorant on the best ways to motivate a recalcitrant teenage girl. Anyway, after her disastrous college experience, she went to work full time. At the time my wife and I decided not to charge her anything for living with us. She kept all her money and I again surmised she would start saving for the future. Again, was I ever ignorant about teenage girls and money. One evening she came home driving a brand new car. When I raised my voice in objection, she quickly stated I can afford it. She was right, because I was ignorant and had been subsidizing her reckless spending habits. After she married and moved out. she and her new husband decided the new car she had did not suit their lifestyle. They told me they had decided to trade her now slightly-used car in on a brand new Ford Mustang convertible. When I questioned them about the cost they quickly told me what her new payments would be. Granted, her payments would not increase all that much, but when I asked them how many payments were involved and did some quick math I was able to point out the true cost. What happened next caught me by surprise, because believe it or not they got it and did not buy the car. I said all that to say this people are indeed ignorant but the problem is they dont even know it. I have a difficult time understanding why a huge part of our society is ignorant concerning the finances of our nation. Like my daughter, many of our less advantaged citizenry are accustomed to getting a free lunch. Not once do they consider the fact that the lunch they so readily eat is not truly free, as someone has to pay for it. However, they do not care just so it isnt them. A couple of years ago Gulf County taxpayers were asked to raise the millage rate by 1 percent in order to fund certain school activities. The question was placed on the ballot and, much to my dismay, was approved. How anyone could vote to give government more money is beyond my ability to comprehend. The icing on the cake for me was when a young man who did not own a home and had fathered a child out of wedlock told me he voted for passage because he didnt want his son going to a school that did not have all the bells and whistles. I didnt say anything to him but I sure wanted to. Like so many he wanted the best life has to offer as long as someone else pays for it. I have come to the conclusion that many of our citizens are just plain ignorant. I am convinced that if Adolf Hitler was alive today and ran as either a Democrat or Republican he would garner a high percentage of votes from the registered voters of whichever party he ran on. To me that is totally ignorant. As I said earlier, when I was younger, I picked fights based on the probability of winning. However, today I realize that some fights are worth taking a beating over even if it hurts. If this country is to survive then ignorant voters need to educate themselves and resist the urge to vote for someone just because he or she happens to be Democrat, Republican, black or white. We are broke on the local, state and federal levels and we can no longer afford irresponsible elected officials. Cut, cap and balance is the right thing to do for our nation. Marcus Sturdivant is a resident of Port St. Joe. Generally speaking, people are ignorant People are indeed ignorant but the problem is they dont even know it. --Marcus Sturdivant Thursday, August 18, 2011

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By Carol Cox Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association Research Diver Special to The Star Like Carrie Anne watching the blue screen of her TV in the movie Poltergeist, Bob Cox looked into the blue and saw something that looked out of place. He was diving on the wreck of the Empire Mica when it appeared in the deep blue depths an apex predator known to devour everything up to a third its body size. There, waving its stunning ns like the feathers of a tom turkey, was a lone lionsh proof the invasion had reached our waters. My husband, Bob, and I are research divers for the Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association (MBARA) (www.mbara.org). As research divers, we conduct frequent surveys on the articial reefs to determine their stability and survey the marine life. On our dives, we have been looking out for lionsh as we watched their gradual progress toward our shing grounds. In the summer of 2010, two lionsh were collected off Pensacola, then one off Panama City. Could Mexico Beach be far behind? Personnel from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission who knew us through the MBARA asked Bob and me to be on the lookout and collect a specimen for DNA testing by the Lionsh Tissue Foundation (http:// lionsh-invasion.blogspot. com). Lionsh are an invasive species from the Pacic rst found off the southeastern coast of Florida in the 1980s. By 2000, they had spread up the eastern coast of the U.S. and into Bermuda. They have since spread into the Caribbean and have slowly been making their way into the northern Gulf of Mexico. Their initial appearance is a mystery; theories include accidental release of sh during Hurricane Andrew, and aquarists who released their pets when they became too big. Lionsh have voracious appetites. When diving in the Red Sea at night, Bob and I watched as lionsh wandered over the sandy bottom, vacuuming up any unwary sh in their path. There is real concern lionsh will affect local sheries by eating juvenile sport sh such as snappers and groupers. In addition, they are fast breeders. They reach sexually maturity at two years, can spawn several times a year and produce up to 30,000 eggs each time they spawn. It was once hoped that lionsh would not be able to survive the winters this far north, but early this summer, there were several stories of divers seeing lionsh on MBARA articial reefs. Bob and I had our rst encounter with a lionsh when diving with friends over the Fourth of July weekend. Sea conditions were great, so we headed out to the Empire Mica. On Bobs rst dive, he found the lionsh in 95 feet of water on the bow wreckage. Bob didnt have the right equipment to collect the lionsh, but we were armed with cameras and were able to take photos of it. The lionsh let us get our cameras within inches of it; we were cautious because of the shs venomous spines. Lionsh have spines that can inict a painful injury; however, they are not known for being aggressive. The day after the Empire Mica dives, we took our friends to dive the Red Sea Tug off Tyndall Air Force Base. Near the end of the dive, I surprised a lionsh that quickly ed for cover under a railing of the wreck. This lionsh must have encountered divers before, because it did not stand its ground like the one encountered the day before. It saw me as a dangerous predator and did its best to hide from me. I had just enough bottom-time on my dive to wedge my camera under the railing and try for a couple of lucky shots to get more photographic evidence. Once again, we had a photograph but no physical evidence to send to the DNA repository. In mid-July, Bob and I went out to a permit site called the North Site to do some articial reef surveys. We had completed two surveys on some pyramids and then decided to stop by the Progress Energy Reef, also known as the Shady Lady shrimp boat, to check on the goliath grouper population, another study we are involved in. The Shady Lady is always one of our favorite dive locations, and as usual, we werent disappointed. The usual habitants came out to greet us rst the barracuda that hovered under our boat, then the large amberjacks that swam up to meet us at 40 feet, followed by bluerunners and red snappers. On the wreck itself, we saw two of the resident goliath groupers along with beautiful butterysh and damselshes. On this particular day, we didnt discover anything out of the ordinary for this wonderful site. However, the next day, while reviewing his photos, my husband made a discovery. Unknowingly, he had captured the image of a lionsh in one of his photos. We had both passed right by this sh without seeing it. Two weeks later, we were back on the wreck, armed with cameras, nets, a paralyzer spear, puncture-resistant gloves and a heavy-duty catch bag made for safely transporting lionsh. I snapped one photo of the lionsh before Bob used the spear with a paralyzer tip to collect it. He didnt get it on the rst try, but the lionsh, thinking he was in charge, didnt go far. On the second try, Bob was able to spear the sh and place it in the collection bag. After getting the sh on board, we placed it in its own ice chest. Once we got home, we took photos of the lionsh with a ruler for a record of its size. The lionsh is now in our freezer while we make arrangements to send samples to different organizations. A snipping from the tail will be sent to the Lionsh Tissue Repository (LTR) for DNA testing; they are trying to nd ways to mitigate the invasion. The head will also go to the LTR because they can use the ear bone to determine the age of the sh. The rest of the body will go to the Food and Drug Administration lab at Dauphin Island, Ala. They have just begun testing lionsh meat to make sure it is safe to eat, primarily because a few specimens in the Virgin Islands have shown traces of ciguatera toxins, which can build up in predatory sh; this is a known problem with predatory sh in the Virgin Islands. Ciguatera is not usually a problem in our area, with the possible exception of the largest apex predators, such as large barracudas. Since collecting the lionsh from the Shady Lady, we saw another small lionsh on the limestone ledges about 20 miles off of Indian Pass. That makes four of these invasive sh that we have seen; its a safe bet they are here to stay. Not all the news concerning lionsh is bad. They are an excellent food sh and in a blind taste test came in second only to hogsh. In southern Florida, many restaurants are putting lionsh on their menus. Scuba divers have been getting their commercial licenses and selling the llets to restaurants for as much as $13 a pound. If you handle lionsh, be aware that they have venomous spines that must be avoided. The toxin can be very painful, but usually not lifethreatening. Treatment consists of soaking the injury in hot water for 30 minutes, then seeking medical treatment for removal of spines, prevention of infection and observation for possible allergic reactions. You can search YouTube to nd videos of how to llet lionsh. The venom is not located in the very tasty esh of lionsh. Many people even use the spines as cocktail toothpicks by rst heating them to 350 degrees F to break down the venom. The Reef Environmental Education Foundation sells a lionsh cookbook on its website, www.reef.org. Anyone who sees a lionsh is encouraged to report it to the U.S. Geological Survey. They have an online reporting form at http://nas.er.usgs. gov/sightingreport.aspx. For a map of lionsh reports, go to http://nas. er.usgs.gov/taxgroup/ sh/lionshdistribution. aspx. You can also report the location of lionsh to MBARA at fundraising@ mbara.org, and we will try to collect it. If you want more information on lionsh, please visit the MBARA websites education page at www. mbara.org. Although we are only seeing a few small lionsh in our area right now, history has shown that once they take hold, they quickly become a common sight on the reefs. I believe that over the next few years, lionsh will become entrenched in our shery, for better or for worse. It may not be long before lionsh becomes the sh of the day at your favorite local restaurant. If you do see lionsh on the menu, do your part for the environment and give it a try. Well show it who the apex predator really is! Corner of Marina Drive next to Piggly Wiggly Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Everything for your Outdoor Adventure SELECTED GUNS ON SALE C O M E BY AND C H EC K OUT OU R FIR EA RM I N V ENTO RY AND LET US Q UOTE Y OU ON T H AT M ODEL Y OU V E B EEN W ANT I NG HUGE INVENTORY OF HUNTING SUPPLIES Freshwater Good kingsh and Spanish are still close to land. The buoy markers out of Mexico Beach are still holding good bait sh and loads of nice Spanish mackerel. Slow troll cigar minnows or spoons around the channel markers for some good action. Hundreds of small cobia are staying close to the markers as well. Inshore Offshore With less boat trafc on the bay, trout and red shing should improve this month. Hot spots for trout are also hot spots for scallops. Good schools of red sh have been reported on Towns Beach and down to Pressnells in the grass. Flounder have been more plentiful lately. As summer ends, many anglers look forward to the great fall freshwater shing on the Forgotten Coast. Fishing has been pretty good this past week, with good reports from Howard Creek and Lake Wimico. Shellcraker and red breast bream are biting on surface poppers in Depot Creek with good numbers. SP ONS ORED B Y Page A6 Above research diver Bob Cox carefully snares a lionsh. Right a lionsh on the Progress Energy reef off Mexico Beach before its capture by research divers. Thursday August 18 The captured lionsh before being sent off for testing. Photos S P ECIAL TO T HE STAR Courtesy of Carol Cox Theyre here! Lionsh: The Star Outdoors Email outdoors news to tcroft@star.com More coverage online at www.star.com

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RT S www.starfl.com A Section Bow Wow Bash Masquerade Party will be on Saturday, October 29, 2011. Notice for Interested Contractors/ Request for Qualications (RFQ) Multi-Family Capital Area Community Action Agency has received federal funds for weatherizing Multi-Family units in Franklin and Gulf counties. Weatherization includes air inltration reduction, insulation, repair/replacement of doors and windows, lowow showerheads and compact uorescent light bulbs repair/replacement of heating/ cooling systems and water heaters. Work will begin October 1, 2011 and must be performed under the supervision of a state licensed contractor and is subject to DavisBacon requirements. Current contractors must re-apply. A Pre-BID conference will be held on Friday, August 19, 2011, 1:00pm-3:00pam at the Franklin Promise Community Room, 192 14th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Apalachicola, FL. The RFQ is due no later than 5:00pm, Monday, August 29, 2011. To attend the Pre-BID conference, request an RFQ, or for more information, contact Mecarlo Richardson or Debbie Mabry, (850) 222-2043, fax (850) 270-9561, or debora.mabry@cacaainc.org. By Tim Croft Star News Editor Vern Barth needs the few Port St. Joe seniors on his roster to step up as navigators for a youthful but surprisingly veteran team as the program enters a new football landscape. The four-year coach of the Tiger Sharks will have the same quarterback as the previous season for the first time, returns a slew of players with playing time from last year and will have several long-time coaches returning to the sideline. But Port St. Joe brings back just five starters on each side of the ball and must overcome a lack of overwhelming size and the greenness of a roster dominated by sophomores and juniors, with at least two freshmen figuring to see significant playing time. That has Barth hoping the handful of seniors on his roster will provide the guidance that brings the Tiger Sharks back to the kind of play that pushed them to complete a 4-6 campaign in 2010 winning four of its final six games. Trevor Lang has shown great leadership, Daniel May has, Arion Ward, Walt Bowers, they all need to step up, Barth said. I need this team to return to where we were at the end of the season. Last year was definitely a learning curve for a lot of guys. But at the end of the season they were figuring some things out. We are in pretty good shape as far as bringing back guys with playing time at key positions. And we need that because we are not that big. The Tiger Sharks enter the new realm of Class 1A football, which now falls under the umbrella of the Rural Classification. Port St. Joe will compete in Region 2, District 4 against Blountstown, Liberty County, West Gadsden and Franklin County. Because they were no longer district foes, coaches at Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe Junior/ Senior High middle and high schools were consolidated in Gulf County over the summer chose to play their annual rivalry game as the opener to the season, with Port St. Joe traveling to Wewahitchka on Sept. 2. The key to a playoff berth for the Tiger Sharks is likely to come in the last week of October and the first week of November when Port St. Joe hosts West Gadsden and Liberty County on consecutive Fridays. I feel excited about the season and about the new classification, Barth said. The Rural Classification gives everybody at one level an even chance. We have a schedule where we will be competitive with everybody. With the coaches and players we have, that gives us a great chance to succeed. We had one of the best springs since Ive been here. The summer conditioning has been good. Barth has several familiar faces back on the sideline with him. Chuck Gannon returns as defensive coordinator after spending two years coaching middle school. Kenny Parker returns to coach defensive backs after concentrating solely on basketball and track duties the past couple of seasons. You cant say enough about Coach Gannons enthusiasm and passion for the game, Barth said. Coach Gannon is very spirited and his players know they have to play that way or they are not going to play. I dont have to worry about that side of the ball at all. I can concentrate on all the others parts of the game. On the field, Lang returns under center. It is a big asset having him back, Barth said. This is the first year Ive had a returning quarterback. I dont have to spend as much time with him and can spend it with other players so everybody is on the same page in the offense. We have quite a bit of overall speed in the backfield. I think well be able to be a fast-hitting team, run fast-hitting plays and put some stress on the defense, vertically and horizontally. Corey North, Natron Lee, Bowers and Rumello Zaccarro will be joined by freshmen Jarkeice Davis in the backfield, providing overall depth and speed. North, Lee, Bowers and Zacarro all had significant minutes last year. Davis had over 1,200 rushing yards in middle school play last season. Lang will have more speed, if not great size, at wideout with freshman Jak Riley, another middle school standout arriving at the varsity level, joining Austin Clayton and Josh Cabaniss in the mix on the outside. Vern Barth, the coachs son, will return as center, where he was the starter at the start of 2010 before suffering a knee injury, with LaGrand McLemore, who sat out last season, back at guard along with Ward. Ricky Pennington and May will be at tackle and Joe Love at tight end. Ward, Pennington, Tyler Worley, Jacobie Jones and Barth are in the mix on a still unsettled defensive line. If they grow into it and learn, they can help us, Barth said of the defensive linemen. But they have to show it. Lee, Davis and Bowers will be at linebacker. Lang will man safety with North and Riley at corner as the Tiger Sharks will again rely on considerable two-way play. Dallas Burke, one of the better players on both sides of the line according to Barth, was lost, likely for his career, in the spring due to a major shoulder injury and subsequent surgery. I feel real good, Barth said. As long as the kids provide the effort, I think we have a chance in every game and a chance to be successful for the season. I think the kids feel that. They trust us and we trust them. We just need the effort. PORT ST. JOE JUNIOR/SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 2011 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Sept. 2 at Wewahitchka Sept. 9 Bozeman at Shark Stadium Sept. 23 at Blountstown Sept. 30 at Holmes County Oct. 7 Franklin County at Shark Stadium Oct. 14 at Rocky Bayou Christian Oct. 21 at FAMU Oct. 28 West Gadsden at Shark Stadium Nov. 4 Liberty County at Shark Stadium Nov. 11 Sneads at Shark Stadium Tiger Sharks seek leadership as new era arrives T IM C ROFT | The Star Chuck Gannon, center, returns to the sidelines as defensive coordinator for the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks. Thursday, August 18, 2011 Page A7 Final registration for Gene Rafeld Football Star Staff Report This Saturday, Aug. 20 is the final day to register to play in the Gene Raf field Football League. The registration will be held in the fire house on Williams Avenue from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Please bring a copy of the play ers birth certificate and $50 for registration. It will be necessary for each applicant to have a physi cal exam prior to playing. The player must be pres ent because equipment will be distributed imme diately after registration. To be eligible to play for the league, applicants must be between the ages of almost seven to 12. There will be three teams Dolphins, Jaguars and Buccaneers. There is room on the rosters of all three teams. The first practice will be held on Monday, Aug. 22, with the first competi tion being a jamboree on Saturday, Sept. 24. By Brad Milner Florida Freedom Newspapers Roman Quinn was one happy teenager on Monday. The former Port St. Joe standout signed with the Philadelphia Phillies for $775,000. He agreed to terms less than four hours before the midnight ET deadline. If he hadnt signed, he would have attended and played baseball for Florida State University next season. Quinn, 18, didnt have to worry about being a Seminole at around 7 p.m. It feels really good; its a blessing, Quinn said while celebrating with family and friends. The scout said can you ask for a little bit more? then they came with their final offer and it was big. He was selected in the second round, 66th overall, in Junes Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft. His signing bonus was $200,000 more than the MLB suggestion for the draft slot, according to Baseball America. Quinn was the fastest player in Baseball Americas Top 200 list of prospects. He played shortstop for the Tiger Sharks, but his speed may eventually prompt a move to the outfield. He also has worked on switch hitting this summer. Im going to go down there (Clearwater) on Thursday, be there Friday and meet everyone, Quinn said. Its late in the season (for the Rookie League) so Ill work out some and in a couple of weeks instructional leagues start. He was the highestdrafted player from Gulf County. Former county standouts Brian Jenkins and Brandon Jones were taken in the fifth and sixth rounds, respectively. Quinn said he will purchase a vehicle with some of the money. He also said he will give some of the money to his mother and father. Phillies sign PSJs Quinn for $775,000

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A8 | The Star Thursday, August 18, 2011 BARLOWS Well Drilling Pump Repair & Water Services Well Drilling & Pump Repair Deep or Shallow Wells Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties 850-639-9355 or 850-814-7454 LI C EN S E D & I N S U R E D Stan Siprell Please check out my website at www.sunriseconstructioncompany.com, and see some of my residential and commercial building under the projects tab. Recent and current jobs include ONeill/Pennington, Wolfe, Piper and Breyne. I think you will nd me very easy to work with to customize the home you are dreaming of. CHEESE BURGER CORNER OF 2ND AND R EID A VE. PORT ST. JOE. OP EN D AILY 118:30, SUNDAY 18 Sports A year of change and promise in Wewahitchka By Tim Croft Star News Editor The Wewahitchka Ga tors are hinging hopes that a series of changes will lead to a change in fortunes for a team that will be inexpe rienced but more athletic than in recent years. The changes begin with the schedule as the Gators, who nished 2-8 last sea son, move to a revamped Class 1A, known as the Ru ral Classication. Wewahitchka will com pete in Region 1, District 2 of the new class, in a district with Bozeman, Sneads, Graceville and Vernon. The Gators also shufed coaches on the sideline. Offensive coordinator Dennis Kizziah, a longtime coach at a host of stops in Florida, including Blount stown, takes over as head coach as Todd Lanter con centrates solely on defense as defensive coordinator. Wewahitchka will also employ slightly different schemes on both sides of the ball in an effort to bal ance a lack of size and playing time with athletic aggression. We have some kids who dont have a whole lot of experience, but they are athletic, very coach able and work hard, Kiz ziah said. We cant afford any injuries, but I think we have kids who I think will be able to compete. They are excited about the sea son. Lanter decided to step aside as head coach after six seasons at the reins of the program. He cited a host of personal reasons for his decision. Kizziah, who joined the staff last year, was the perfect t given his head coaching experience and past success. The Rural Classica tion, both agreed, will be a plus for a school that last year had the smallest en rollment of any Class 1A team in the state. I think it will help us some just changing the district, Kizziah said. Well see new faces to play. Sometimes the same old faces can get stale. Our chances are better at com peting with the Rural Clas sication. We will just have to see how it plays out. The new district align ment brings its rst twist in the schedule the open ing weekend of the regular season when the Gators host Port St. Joe. We decided it would be good, since we arent in the same district, to just play it and get it out of the way, Kizziah said. Plus, the rst game, everybody will come out and want to see what youve got. We need a good gate to kick off the season. The Gators are a bit on the inexperienced side, de spite a roster dominated by seniors, because of a lack of prior playing time. Justin Flowers, one of those seniors, will call the signals at quarterback on offense with senior Theryl Brown, a multisport athlete fully healthy after a knee injury last year, at running back alongside junior Jalyn Addison, a stocky fullback. Justin has looked good, Kizziah said. Hes grown up a lot and is mak ing good decisions. We will probably be much more run-oriented this year. It all changes with the play ers and who your opponent is. Theryl is going to have to touch it 20-25 times a game. Hes worked hard this year, and hes put on some girth. We have to get our kids tough. When you are play ing in our league and you have only 20-23 players, you have to play tough. And running the ball, hav ing success running the ball, energizes your whole team. That backeld will op erate behind a line com prised of seniors David Russ at center, right tackle Quentin Carter and left guard Austin Guffey along side sophomores Chris tian Turner at right guard and Trey Knowles at left tackle. Carter, at 6-foot-2, 250 pounds, and Russ, at 210 pounds, are alone among the linemen in tipping the scales over 200 pounds. Seniors Casey Dauphin and Chris Myrick will be the wide receivers, with Ben Hayward, also a se nior, at tight end. A key, Kizziah said, is players who are willing to lead and avoid the selsh ness that at times under mined the team last year. Weve got Justin, Ther yl and Jalyn, who have been providing the leader ship, and that is something weve got to have, Kizziah said. Justin not so much verbally, but in showing them how to do it, how to work hard, do what you are supposed to do. We didnt have that last season. We didnt have the guys who stepped up and did that, provided an ex ample for the rest of the team. The lack of size along the offensive front is also represented on the defen sive front and is the prima ry reason for the change to a 3-4 scheme that will be more aggressive and fea ture a variety of blitz pack ages. We are small. Weve got to be able to stunt and send people from different directions, Kizziah said. We cant play a conven tional scheme. Weve got to send players on almost every down. Weve got to be aggressive and swarm to the ball. Turner will play nose guard, with Hayward and Guffey at the tackles up front. The ends Kizziah noted they are more line backers than ends will be Jay Shiver and Flow ers. This is a good group of kids who work hard, Kiz ziah said of his linemen. The linebacker depth chart remains a work in progress. Seniors Corey Walden and Randy Roth and junior Brandon Price are making progress, Kizziah said. Taylor Husband also gures prominently in the linebacker mix. Brown will be at safety, and Dauphin and Myrick at the corners. Practices have been going good, and the kids are really working hard, Kizziah said. Coaches and players, we are excited about the season. Catsh Tournament to be held in Wewahitchka Star Staff Report The Gator Classic Catsh Tournament will be held Friday, Aug. 26, and Saturday, Aug. 27, at Gaskin Park along the Apala chicola River in Wewahitchka. Registration is from 9-10 a.m. CT Friday, and the tournament begins at 4 p.m. CT the same day. The tournament ends at noon CT Saturday, with an awards pre sentation upon the tournaments wrap-up. Prizes will be awarded as fol lows. For atheads: largest sh, $1,400; second-largest, $900; third-largest, $850; fourth-larg est, $400; and fth-largest, $250. A $500 prize will be given for the largest channel cat, and the indi vidual with the most poundage of atheads will also receive $200. There will be a division of the tournament for kids 14 and younger, with a $300 prize for largest catsh. Prizes will be awarded for the largest ve cat sh. Registration fees are $50 per person. All advance entries must be postmarked by Aug. 22. Checks should be made payable to Gator Catsh Classic. Entry forms and checks can be mailed to Gator Catsh Classic, 211 North High way 71, Wewahitchka, FL 32456. Participants may also register at Gaskin Park on the day of the tournament for $55. The tourna ment benets Wewahitchka High School Project Graduation. For more information, call tournament Chairman Dennis Peak at 850-340-1029. Photos by VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Wewahitchka will move into the new Rural Classication this fall. The Gators will rely on Theryl Brown getting 20-25 carries a game to push their offense. WEW AHITCHKA FOOTBALL SCHEDULESept. 2 Port St. Joe at Gator Field Sept. 9 Vernon at Gator Field Sept. 16 at Robert F. Munroe Sept. 30 Franklin County at Gator Field Oct. 7 at Graceville Oct. 14 at Tallahassee John Paul II Oct. 21 Sneads at Gator Field Oct. 28 Bozeman at Gator Field Nov. 11 at West Gadsden

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, August 18, 2011 Star Staff Report Legal Services of North Flori da (LSNF) announced last week the receipt of a grant for $200,000 to provide outreach and legal help to low-income residents and small businesses who were affected by the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Franklin, Gulf, Bay, Oka loosa, Walton, Escambia and San ta Rosa counties will be served by the Gulf Coast Oil Spill Legal Support Project (GCOSLSP) with funding through the Fund for Gulf Communities-Florida (FGCF). Initial funding for the FGCF was provided by an anonymous do nation to the Rockefeller Philan thropy Advisors to enhance the resiliency of Floridas Gulf Coast communities. Legal Services of North Flor ida has received $200,000 for the next 18 months to provide out reach and support to low-income individuals and small businesses who have not been able to le claims or are having difculties with the claims process. Parale gal/outreach workers in LSNFs ofces in Panama City, Fort Wal ton Beach and Pensacola will be reaching out into the Gulf coun ties to communities most affected by the oil spill. The project will utilize regional media and com munity groups to aid in reaching individuals and small businesses to let them know there are still recovery funds available and how to obtain free legal help with the claims process. The Gulf Coast Oil Spill Support Project will also provide legal representation to low-income residents with a vari ety of other legal issues related to the oil spill. The BP oil spill coupled with other economic stresses on north Florida families has been disas trous, said Kris Knab, LSNF executive director. The increase in families falling into poverty has created enormous stress, threat ening previously healthy family units and bringing people to their knees. LSNF can help relieve the legal issues and claims process hindering a family or small busi ness from nding their way to a brighter future. LSNF will be able to use these funds to reach hun dreds of our neighbors through outreach, media and direct ser vice. LSNF is a private nonprot corporation dedicated to provid ing free legal representation to low-income people with civil legal problems from ve ofces in Talla hassee, Quincy, Panama City, Fort Walton Beach and Pensacola. For information on the ofce location nearest you, go to www.lsnf.org. Low-income residents and small businesses may contact their local LSNF ofce for help or utilize the regional toll-free hot line number 855-299-1337. For Gulf County residents, please contact the Panama City ofce, 211 E. 11th St., at 769-3581. If a civic, business, community organization or faith group would like LSNF to make a presenta tion and/or speak with members, please call the number above and ask for the Gulf Coast Oil Spill Le gal Support Project. ACS celebrates 35th anniversary of R.O.C.K. Camp Star Staff Report Founded in 1976, the American Cancer Societys Reaching Out to Cancer Kids, or R.O.C.K. Camp, celebrates 35 years of bringing children with cancer together for a week of fun and adventure at summer camp. R.O.C.K. Camp was the rst camp of its kind exclusively serving cancer kids in the United States. Today, more than 5,000 children living in Florida have participated in the R.O.C.K. Camp experience. This year, Mekena Taunton from Wewahitchka set off for a week of fun, friendship and the opportunity to go camping at R.O.C.K. camp in partnership with Camp Boggy Creek. On July 26, the American Cancer Society and the campers families bid the children goodbye as they boarded the bus for Camp Boggy Creek in Eustis. The campers are children with cancer ages 7-16 who are given an opportunity to experience the excitement of summer camp without feeling different from other children. While in a safe environment, they enjoy traditional camp activities like canoeing, swimming, music, arts and crafts, archery, sports, shing, talent shows and campres, free of charge. This summer, more than 280 children experienced Camp Boggy Creek. This 232-acre camp near Orlando includes an extensive medical center, medical professionals including pediatric oncologists, dining hall, airconditioned cabins, arts and crafts center, indoor recreation center, boathouse and docks, horseback riding trails and a heated pool. Its a sharp contrast to the sterile, stressful medical environment of a hospital. Children from South Florida and the Tampa Bay area attended the rst camp session from July 7-13. Children from North Florida and Orlando attended the nal session from July 26 through Aug. 1. R.O.C.K. Camp is one of three R.O.C.K Programs offered by the American Cancer Society. Other R.O.C.K. programs include Families R.O.C.K. Weekend and the R.O.C.K. College Scholarship Program. For more information on the American Cancer Societys childhood cancer programs, call 800-227-2345 or visit www.cancer.org. For more information about Camp Boggy Creek, call 352-483-4200 or visit www. boggycreek.org. For more information on how to get involved locally, contact your community representative, Stephanie Bird, at 785-9205, ext 3509. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer Connie Lamberson used to pick up pennies; now she picks up pop tabs. Lamberson was introduced to the power of the tiny, silver soda can toppers in March after her infant granddaughter, Alyssa Bell, was rushed to the hospital for severe acid reux that caused her to aspirate and turn blue. It happened repeatedly, Lamberson said of the aspirations, which landed 2month-old Alyssa in Gulf Coast Medical Center the previous week. Alyssa was home for less than 24 hours when she had the worst of her choking spells. She was taken by ambulance to Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola on March 22. She was just 2 months old and helpless, Lamberson said. To hold a baby that tiny and that small and just have her thirsting for oxygen; its just a very scary thing. Alyssa was admitted to Sacred Heart Hospital indenitely and was scheduled to undergo fundoplication surgery, a procedure in which a gastrointestinal tube is inserted to vent off acid in the patients stomach, the following Tuesday. Unsure of the duration of Alyssas hospital stay, Lamberson and her family were encouraged to consider the services offered at the Ronald McDonald House, a charity offering a place to stay for families displaced during their childrens hospital treatment. Lamberson was oored by the hospitality and encouragement the Ronald McDonald House provided. Everything from the avalanche of food in the kitchen to the pristine facilities to the surplus of toiletries amazed her. What shocked her more was how the utilities were paid for: pop tabs. The thing is with the pop tabs is, we just take some of the smallest things for granted, she said. From January to June, the Pensacola Ronald McDonald House raised $6,577.05 solely from pop tab donations, enough to cover the cumulative water bill with money left over for other utilities, said marketing director Danielle Glaze. Since 1999, the Ronald McDonald House of Northwest Florida has raised $56,656.99 with donated pop tabs. Donations come from all over the world, Glaze said. Pop tabs were mailed in from Korea earlier this year. They come through the door in garbage bags, boxes and 5-gallon water jugs, she said. Lamberson cried when she saw 10 large garbage cans of pop tabs on the back porch of the Ronald McDonald House in Pensacola. You dont realize until you stand there and you see them, she said. After witnessing the effects pop tabs have at the Ronald McDonald House, Lamberson immediately began collecting and quickly spread the word around the community. She posted a note on Facebook titled Its just a pop tab, describing her journey from a skeptic to a believer. Dont underestimate the power of the pop tab, Lamberson said. It makes a tremendous difference over there in the lives of people who need it. After publishing the Facebook post, she was overwhelmed with community support and news of others who have started collecting pop tabs. It brought tears to their eyes, Lamberson said. I was standing at Steamers one day, and this lady came up to me and just cried and said, Im collecting pop tabs now. Alyssa is now a thriving 6-month-old. Lamberson said shes been gaining weight and has done extremely well with the surgery. Its my dew drop ministry, Lamberson said. It doesnt take a thunderstorm. Even a dew drop does the work of God. By Valerie Garman Star Staff Writer The Cape San Blas Lighthouse is no stranger to disaster. The original brick structure is now situated on the ocean oor, and the present tower almost met the same fate. The Coast Guard used to call this the hard luck station, said Beverly Mount-Douds, the self-proclaimed history nut who runs the lighthouse gift shop. The rst structure was destroyed during a storm in 1851, and the ship carrying the current lighthouse sank. Although the structure was salvaged, it has seen its share of restorations. The current 98-foot skeletal tower is the fourth to occupy the same spot off County 30-E. The lighthouse is now being honored by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation for its perseverance, receiving an outstanding achievement award for restoration and rehabilitation. Its something great, because we can take care of the building, Mount-Douds said. Anything metal out here corrodes in no time. Restoration was needed because of structural deterioration and foundation cracking. The property also was contaminated by lead paint. Its nature, you know; we have four (tropical) depressions out there right now, said Mount-Douds, who noted that the top question from visitors is about the structures corrosion. Mount-Douds, who has managed the front desk since October 2007, keeps a bulletin board with a photo display of the lighthouses history. Faded black-and-white photos chronicle the everchanging life of the structure, the decades shaped by angry storms and eroding shorelines. The constant restorations have helped continue to lure tourists to the spot in record numbers. In July, Mount-Douds counted 2,599 visitors, a new record for the lighthouse. So far this month, they are averaging about 200 visitors per day, she said, pointing out that this weeks good turnouts even happened on rainy days. The gift shop is stocked with a variety of local goodies: tupelo honey, painted bottles, shell jewelry and books by local authors, including Mount-Douds three published historical texts. Mount-Douds pointed out that her desk is situated in what used to be the living room of the keepers quarters. We managed to salvage 80 percent of the house, she said. It still has no plumbing or insulation. In 2008, the Sleeping Beauty keepers quarters were honored for outstanding restoration at the Tallahassee/ Leon County Historic Preservation Awards. To me, (preservation) is important because of the children, Mount-Douds said. I love to see their faces when they come down off that tower. The lighthouse restoration was made possible with money from several grants, local contributions and dollars from the U.S. Air Force, said Charlotte Pierce, president of the St. Joseph Historical Society. The restoration of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse property has been an ongoing team effort, Pierce said. It has taken a number of years to get the project where it is today. Pierce said the lighthouse is quite a tourist attraction, with visitors from all over the world stopping by to climb the towers 131 steps. Without restoration projects, these visits wouldnt be possible. I think (the award) recognizes the joint efforts of the St. Joseph Historical Society, the Gulf County board of commissioners, and the United States Air Force and their desire to preserve our local history, Pierce said. Pierce also referenced the lighthouses history of bouncing back from catastrophe. To have been around since 1885, it had to persevere, she said. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Mekena Taunton of Wewahitchka recently attended R.O.C.K. Camp. Outreach program given funding for BP oil claimants VALERIE GARMAN | The Star Lighthouse lady Beverly Mount-Douds points to board display of antique photos of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Cape San Blas Lighthouse restoration recognized The power of the pop tab CONNIE LAM B ER S ON | Special to The Star Bags and trash cans full of pop tabs line the back porch of the Ronald McDonald House in Pensacola.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, August 18, 2011 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society SAVE 40% KINCAID UPHOLSTERY Sofa, sectionals and sleepers in your choice of fabric HARRISON HOUSE FURNITURE EST. 1979 Best of Bay 2011 A+ Rating by the BBB 11 Harrison Ave. Downtown Panama City Closed Sun & Mon Great designs at 850-763-4918 850-769-1232 Mon.-Fri. 8:00am to 4:00pm 50-75% Off! All In-stock Lighting! *Offer expires 8/26/11 Clip & Save for an Additional 10% Off! Clip & Save for an Additional 10% Off! Clip & Save for an Additional 10% Off! Clip & Save for an Additional 10% Off! Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im Believe it or not, wasps are benecial insects. They feed on other insects, destroying many harmful bugs that attack our landscape ornamentals and home vegetable gardens. But though they befriend man through their dietary habits, wasps certainly are not friendly. They often inict painful stings. Some even build unsightly nests on the walls and eaves of our home. Benecial or not, we dont want them as close neighbors. Five members of the wasp family are commonly encountered in Florida: hornets, yellow jackets, polistes (poe-list-eez), mud daubers and cicada killers. Hornets, yellow jackets and polistes are likely to sting if you go near their nests. Mud daubers and cicada killers usually will not sting, unless you touch them. My information on wasps was provided by retired Extension entomologist Dr. Don Short, of the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Hornets build football-shaped, pearlike nests, usually in trees and away from populated areas. Like hornets, yellow jackets seldom live near people. They sometimes build above-ground nests, similar to those of hornets, but more commonly nest in the ground. On the other hand, polistes are frequently found around homes, where they construct their honeycomb nests in shrubbery and under eaves. Mud daubers often build their mud-cell nests on the walls and under the eaves of homes. Cicada killers, which are least troublesome of all, nest in the ground. Hornets, yellow jackets and polistes are social insects. They live in colonies, like bees and ants. Their larvae are fed freshly killed insects. Mud daubers and cicada killers are solitary wasps. The female of each species builds her own nests, without help. The Mud dauber constructs mud cells on above-ground structures, while the cicada killer builds her nest below ground. Both species stock their cells with sting-paralyzed prey on which their larvae feed: spiders for mud daubers and cicadas for cicada killers. The severity of reaction to a wasp sting varies drastically, depending on an individuals sensitivity to the venom. At best, a sting will cause painful swelling. In extreme cases, serious illness, or even death, may result. If a sting victim has a history of hay fever, asthma or other allergies or if allergic symptoms develop. a physician should be contacted immediately. In cases of normal pain and swelling, application of an ice-pack, followed by a paste of baking soda and water, will help reduce the victims discomfort. The kind of control measure to employ will depend on the nesting habits of the type of wasp you want to kill. Open, above-ground poliste nests can be sprayed with a ying insect bomb containing pyrethrums. To eliminate football-shaped hornet and yellow jacket nests, call a certied exterminator, or if you are an experienced do-it-yourself homeowner, spray the opening with a potent wasp and hornet pressurized spray normally found at your local garden center or hardware store. After treating any of the aboveground nests, leave immediately and wait until the wasps are dead. Then return, knock down the nests and burn it. To control mud daubers, scrape down their mud cells and spray the area with an insecticide pyrethrum or possibly Malathion to discourage renesting. To treat underground nests, spray with a pyrethrum or Sevin and seal the opening with soil to keep the insects from escaping. All types of wasp nest should be approached with caution. The best times to apply insecticides are in the early morning or late evening when most of the wasps are in the nest and least active. For more information, visit http:// edis.ifas.u.edu or contact your local Cooperative Extension Ofce 6393200 or 229-2909. Star Staff Report The annual Noma Community Reunion will be in the Noma Town Hall building on Saturday, Sept. 3. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. CT, and lunch will be served at noon. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a well-lled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. This gathering, held on the Saturday before Labor Day, strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsmen. Anyone desiring additional information is urged to contact Ludine Riddle at 9748438. Star Staff Report The Central Panhandle Aquatic Preserve Ofce, which is responsible for the management of St. Josephs Bay Aquatic Preserve, was closed July 1 because of recent state budget cuts. As a result, the ofce no longer will monitor long-term changes to the bays natural resources or offer education and outreach opportunities to the public. You can become a steward of this fragile bay and continue to help protect the valuable natural resources by volunteering and/or making a donation to the Friends of the St. Joseph Bay Preserves Inc. There are two long-term monitoring projects the Friends wish to continue with the help of the community: water quality monitoring and seagrass monitoring. Please join staff at the Buffer Preserve Center, 3915 State 30A, from 10 a.m. to noon ET Aug. 24 if you are interested in volunteering for these projects. The Friends are seeking people with boats and/or kayaks who sh, swim, scallop, etc. in the bay. The preliminary meeting will initiate community involvement, gauge interest, assess resources and include a presentation on how we can work together to protect the habitats in the bay for future generations. Contact Kim Wren at 670-7718 or sjbseagrass@yahoo.com for information. The Friends thank you for the support. By Johanna White In July, the Kiwanis Club continued to stay busy even though attendance was a little low. The club sponsored its rst blood drive July 22 in the Vision Bank parking lot. The drive was a success with 17 donors volunteering to donate blood. It was my rst time donating, and I will have to say it wasnt as bad I thought it was going to be; my plans are to donate again. The members of the Kiwanis Club would like to thank all of those who donated blood. We never know when a time might come when we need the blood or one of our loved ones does. For the July 29 program, we had Bret Barnes, a 2011 graduate of Port St. Joe High School who received a $1,000 Kiwanis technical scholarship to attend the electrical line worker program at Southeast Lineman Center in Trenton, Ga. Good luck and congratulations! School began on Aug. 15; we will be looking forward to the Key Club and Keyettes attending our weekly meetings. We have a new member: Pam McDaniel, owner of Steamers on Reid Avenue. The Kiwanis Club welcomes Pam. The Kiwanis Club meets at noon Tuesdays at the Gulf County ARC/ Transportation on Industrial Road. If you would like any additional information, please feel free to contact Johanna White at 227-6268 or 229-8226. Kiwanis Kalendar Aug. 4: Lt. Gov. Kings last meeting as LG in Panama City Beach Aug. 9: Ann Gingell Girl Scout Presentation Aug. 16: Deon Long Attorney from Tampa (candidate for U.S. Senate; introduction only) Aug. 23: Gerald Alcorn, Sacred Heart Hospital Services Aug. 30: Kiwanis business meeting Wasps are they benecial? ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director 2011 Noma community reunion Sept. 3 Help protect St. Josephs Bay Kiwanis KORNER Society

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The Star| B3 Thursday, August 18, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR BIDS THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA WILL EXCEPT BIDS ON THE ROOFING OF THE CITY HALL AND FIRE STATION LOCATED AT 109 S. 2ND ST. THIS IS A DESIGN BUILD PROJECT TO BE DONE BY A LICENSED ENGINEER BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA AND A GENERAL CONTRACTOR ALSO LICENSED BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA. THE BIDS ARE TO INCLUDE DESIGNS, PERMITS, AND ALL MATERIAL AND LABOR TO CONSTRUCT A 26 GUAGE METAL ROOF WITH 16 GUAGE RETROFIT STEEL FRAME ON THE CITY HALL AND FIRE STATION. ALL PROPOSALS MUST MEET THE GULF COUNTY BUILDING REQUIREMENTS AND WIND LOADS. BIDS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE CITY CLERK BEFORE 12 NOON CENTRAL TIME SEPTEMBER 26, 2011 AT THE CITY ANNEX SITED AT 318 S. 7TH ST. AND WILL BE OPENED THE SAME DAY AT THE REGULAR COMMISSION MEETING AT 6:30 PM CENTRAL AT 109 S. 2ND ST. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, religion, sex, and familial status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs). To le a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Ofce of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). The City of Wewahitchka is an equal opportunity, fair housing community. Notice for Interested Contractors/ Request for Qualications (RFQ) Single Family Capital Area Community Action Agency has received federal funds for weatherizing residential homes in Franklin and Gulf counties. Weatherization includes air inltration reduction, insulation, repair/replacement of doors and windows, low-ow showerheads and compact uorescent light bulbs repair/replacement of heating/ cooling systems and water heaters. Work will begin October 1, 2011 and must be performed under the supervision of a state licensed contractor and is subject to DavisBacon requirements. Current contractors must re-apply. A Pre-BID conference will be held on Friday, August 19, 2011, 1:00pm-3:00pm at the Franklin Promise Community Room, 192 14th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Apalachicola, FL. The RFQ is due no later than 5:00pm, Monday, August 29, 2011. To attend the Pre-BID conference, request an RFQ, or for more information, contact Mecarlo Richardson or Debbie Mabry, (850) 222-2043, fax (850) 270-9561, or debora.mabry@cacaainc.org Star Staff Report More than 350 Florida 4-H teens arrived in Gainesville July 25 for Lights, Camera, 4-H, this years theme for Florida 4-H Congress. The ve-day event, called Congress, is a culmination of events for Floridas 4-H youth. Held on the campus of the University of Florida, Congress publicly recognizes the work of 4-Hers who have been making an impact in their local clubs and communities. The 2011 Florida 4-H Congress brought youth together from 67 counties throughout the state and provided an environment for 4-H members to exchange ideas, hear success stories and learn by doing. 4-H members were able to learn alongside other 4-Hers and participate in educational workshops, activities and competitions covering a range of subject matter including science and technology, citizenship, leadership and environmental education. Gulf County was well represented with six participants attending this years Congress: Mike Burke, Quentin Carter, Gauge Combs, Jamaree Hunter, David Russ and Witt Shoaf. They were chaperoned by Gulf County Extension Agent Melanie Taylor, who also taught and assisted with workshops and programs throughout the week. After checking into UF dorms, the 4-Hers headed over to UFs student union to meet other 4-Hers from all over the state. A high-energy opening rally rocked the Reitz Union ballroom with enough noise to do a rock concert proud. Attendees were welcomed and entertained by youth speaker Bill Cordes, who kept the energy high for more than an hour straight. Tuesday opened with the state competitive events for youth who had projects in events ranging from clothing, leisure arts, mechanical and electrical projects to communication and media arts. The evening ended with a fashion show in which youth modeled clothing they designed and hemmed for a variety of occasions including sportswear, formal gowns, business attire and casual wear. These were just some of the categories youth earned recognition from their designs. Midweek events highlighted youth selecting new state council ofcers, a Clovers and Company performance and scholarship interviews. Wednesday also marked the Florida-initiated 4-H National Day of Service, during which 4-H members attending Congress invited 4-H members across Florida and the nation to join them in a day of service. Florida 4-H volunteered time to 13 community service projects within Gainesville. On Thursday evening, the week was highlighted with an awards banquet to recognize senior level 4-Hers for their hard work and accomplishments. The awards banquet recognized graduating seniors, scholarship winners and youth selected to represent Florida 4-H at national events. Jamaree Hunter and Alicia Allison (unable to attend) were recognized as Gulf County senior 4-Hers and were wished the best as they prepare to leave for college. The youth state council ofcers were installed during the ceremony. The 2011 Congress ended Friday morning as youth packed to return home. For more information about 4-H in Gulf County, contact Melanie Taylor at the local extension ofce at 639-3200, 2292909 or metaylor@u.edu. From Staff Reports Tools for Schools Superior Bank is partnering with Port St. Joe Elementary School to provide supplies for students in need. Please join us by bringing school supplies to Superior Bank, 418 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. in Port St. Joe. The branch phone number is 227-1416. Look for the colorful collection boxes in the bank lobby. The boxes will be in place through Aug. 31. Please bring any of the following: backpacks (not rolling), Crayola crayons (8-count large and 24-count), Crayola markers, colored pencils, composition books (wide-ruled, not spiral), divider tabs, Germ-X, glue (Elmers School), glue sticks, highlighters, Kleenex, notebook paper (regular-ruled and wide-ruled, loose leaf and single-subject spiral), pencils (jumbo and No. 2 with erasers), pens (blue, black or red), pocket folders, scissors (Fiskars blunt-tip and regulartip), Ziploc bags (quart or gallon), threering binders (2-inch rings) and three-ring notebooks with subject dividers. GCSC Passport Program changes Recently passed legislation is changing Adult General Education tuition and fees across the state. Senate Bill 2150 affects the Gulf Coast State College GED Passport Program. Beginning with fall 2011, instate students will be charged $33.95 per semester and out-of-state students $123.95 for the Passport Program. Students new to the program must ll out an application, which can be found in Student Union West, Room 82 or 93. Applications must be dropped off to Room 93 no later than 4 p.m. CT Friday, Aug. 19. After the application is processed, the student will be contacted for testing and registration. Returning students who were in the Passport Program between August 2010 and June 2011 can register from 8:3011:30 a.m. or 1-4 p.m. today, Aug. 18; or 8:30-11:30 a.m. or 1-4 p.m. Friday, Aug. 19. The GCSC GED Passport Program has exible hours, computers, workbooks and a college environment for adults who want to succeed. After graduation, counselors are available to help with career counseling, resume and employment search assistance. For additional information, please contact Lisa Keeton at 769-1551, ext. 3341. Correctional class scheduled A basic correctional ofcer course is scheduled to begin the end of this month at the Gulf/Franklin Center in Port St. Joe. An exact date has not been decided because of low enrollment. This course is required for all who wish to become correctional ofcers in the state of Florida. Because of the recent hiring freeze enacted by the state, it does not appear that the Department of Corrections will be hiring trainees, which means a need for trained ofcers will exist in the near future. Correctional ofcer positions are still some of the best the state has to offer in our area. Call 227-9670, ext. 5507 or 5511. Special to The Star The Faith Christian School staff is geared up to begin another school year. The halls are freshly painted, and the smell of crayons is in the air. A new addition to FCS is Mrs. Pallas Gandy. Mrs. Pallas is a retired schoolteacher and is devoting her time to help Mrs. Lynne Wells in the library. We are very pleased to have Mrs. Lynne back with the Faith Christian family. Library skills, story time and research are a few of the activities that Mrs. Pallas and Mrs. Lynne will be coordinating. The FCS family would like to thank Mrs. Stephanie Bareld for volunteering in the library for the past two years. Students enjoyed Mrs. Stephanies inspiring personality and the welcoming atmosphere she maintained while helping them become better researchers and readers. Thank you, Mrs. Stephanie, for all of your hard work and dedication. There are still spaces available in all grades just waiting for your child. Its not too late to register. Call the school at 229-6707 for more information. The Lions TALE The Lions Tale Education BRIEFS Education Gulf County attendees to the 4-H Congress last month in Gainesville, from left, are Witt Shoaf, Gauge Combs, Jamaree Hunter, David Russ, Quentin Carter and Mike Burke. S P E C IAL T O THE S T AR Gulf County youth attend 4-H Congress

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How long will God be patient? Im glad God is patient, especially with me. Had He not been, I wouldnt be here you see. Should the truth be known, Id not be alone. Many are going to heaven now, That would never have made it their home. Sadly, many are still lost, Maybe thats why were still here. We need to get the Word to them, That time is drawing near. One day it will all be over, We really dont know when. His patience will run out one day, Lets witness for Jesus till then. Billy Johnson Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World 5:00 & 6:00 p.m. Pastor Josh Fidler First Presbyterian Church 508 Sixteenth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 850-227-1756 Rev. Ruth Hemple Worship Service 10:00 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Rev. Drucilla Tyler First Presbyterian Church 508 Sixteenth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 850-227-1756 Rev. Ruth Hemple Worship Service 10:00 AM Sunday School 11:00 AM Rev. Drucilla Tyler COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School .................... 9:00 am Worship Service ................ 10:30 am Sunday Night Awana .... 5 pm 7 pm Youth Groups ..................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Childrens Choir ................. 5:30 pm Prayer Meeting ................... 6:30 pm Childrens Ministry Activities ............................ 6:30 pm Youth Ministry Activities ... 6:30 pm FAITH Thursday, August 18, 2011 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com The Christian CONSCIENCE Any real Christians in PSJ? After reading last weeks Star, I had to ask the question, Are there any real Christians in Port Saint Joe? You know what? I usually enjoy reading the Star. But last week it was down right disgusting. Its not the fault of editor Tim Croft. Hes just reporting the news thats there. But on the front page, the headlines tell of possibly expanding the hours for selling alcoholic beverages from midnight to 2 a.m. ET. Its not bad enough that people will be drinking until midnight, and then drive somewhere else, endangering the lives of themselves, or others. Now, for the sake of making a little more money, there are some who want to make one of societys most severe problems, even worse. Putting money ahead of the welfare of your neighbors is about as evil as you can get. Shame, Shame, Shame! My background is not in theology. I am a lifelong chemist. And, many times, as part of my job, I had to deal with the subject of toxicology. And, I can tell you, with some authority, that alcoholic beverages are just plain poison. Its just a matter of how long it will take for it to kill you, or make you disabled, and useless. If you think I am wrong, ask your doctor if you should be drinking the stuff. Any reputable doctor will tell you to reduce your consumption, and most will advise you to stop entirely. About 35 years ago, I lost a neighbor, and a good friend. He had been an amateur boxer, and was once the police chief of the town where we lived. He died of that alcohol-caused liver problem that takes many lives every year. The number of ways that alcoholic beverages can damage your health are many, and that doesnt take into account all of the abuse, and marriage problems, that it causes. There was one really great article in last weeks paper. It was by my Christian brother, Billy Johnson. The headline said, A homeless person died for you. At least one person in PSJ had the intestinal fortitude necessary to tell it like it is. Where are all the pastors of the PSJ churches in all of this? Are they supporting the exclusion of the homeless, and expanding the hours in which alcohol is sold also? You have to wonder what they are teaching! Their silence is not golden. Its just plain yellow. 1st Corinthians 6:9,10 says, Do not be deceived. Neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor homosexuals, nor sodomites, nor thieves, nor COVETOUS, nor DRUNKARDS, nor revilers, nor extortioners will inherit the kingdom of God. It looks to me like there wont be too many from Port Saint Joe present at the judgment seat of Christ. I pray that I am wrong. Show me that I am wrong, please! Questions or comments are invited. Send to us at one of the addresses below Are you concerned about your eternal destiny? At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center, you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible, every Sunday morning. We dont pass an offering plate, pressure you to give money, or pressure you to join. We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and we believe that Jesus was God in human esh. Check us out this Sunday! For the spring and summer seasons, our services begin, with a time of greeting and fellowship, at 9:45 a.m. CT on Sunday. Our worship begins at 10 a.m. For those interested, we have midweek ministry, helping people on an individual basis. Inquire for more information. Come early on Sunday morning so that you can meet us informally, and join in the praise and worship music led by TJ. On Sunday morning we worship, at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st Street. The Civic Center is located behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker Realty, just off U.S. Highway 98, in the western end of Mexico Beach. Look for the white building with the dark green roof. God Bless, Pastor Tim Morrill Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center Box 13337 Mexico Beach, 32410 tim1@jesusanswers.com On Facebook: Tim Morrill www.mexicobeachcwc.com Faith BRIEFS Womens Day at New Bethel A.M.E. Church New Bethel A.M.E. Church will have its annual Womens Day program Sunday, Aug. 21. The celebration begins with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. ET and culminates with the 11 a.m. service. Guest speaker for the program will be Minister Tenecia Monette of New Life Christian Center in Port St. Joe. All women are asked to wear their most glorious crown or hat in honor of this years theme: We are Wearing our Crowns. Dinner will be served following the 11 a.m. service. New Horizon AA The New Horizon AA Groups new schedule is Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. EST or 10 a.m. CST; call 850-639-3600. The Family of Inez McMillan Chambers would like to extend our greatest thanks and deepest gratitude for the outpouring of love and support during this difcult time. Your warmth and generosity are unparalleled. We would like to acknowledge Rev. S. Hooper-Clark and the New Bethel AME Church Family; the Community Choir who traveled from far and near; the North Port St. Joe Community; the Comforter Funeral Home and the classes of 1966 and 1967 for your gracious support. Mrs. Inez McMillan Chambers was laid to rest on Saturday, July 30 in an uplifting home-going celebration. Thanks to the joyous singing of the choir, especially the solos by Sis. Cora Curtis and Sis. Sally Jenkins and the dynamic music ministry of Bro. Hubert Beard. Thank you to Elder Robert (Pop) Lowery for delivering such a moving eulogy. Thank you to everyone who participated in the celebration of the life and legacy of Inez McMillan Chambers. CHAMBERS F AMILY CARD OF THANKS

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Yard Cleanup Affordable Lawn Care Robert Pelc Mowing Service 227-5374 From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! S IN CE 2002, D OING B U SIN E SS IN T H IS CO MMU NIT Y LAWN CARE, TREE & PA L M TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVA L DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVA L or whatever your yard needs are CALL J O E @ 850-670-5478 E -MA I L @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Burrell Concrete Construction Burrell Concrete Construction 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction GET YOUR AD IN C A LL 227-7847 T ODAY! Trades & Services Public Notice A Public Hearing will be held at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, August 23 at 6:00 p.m. EST. The public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE GULF COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PER THE REQUIREMENTS OF FLORIDA STATUE 163 BY AMENDING THE ELEMENTS OF THE GULF COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN THROUGH TEXT ADDITIONS, REMOVALS AND REVISIONS TO THE GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES OF THE RESPECTIVE ELEMENTS; ADDING AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ELEMENT; PROVIDING FINDINGS FOR ADOPTION; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ORDINANCE IN CONFLICT THEREWITH; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABLITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on this Clerk of Court and at the Planning Department, Room 312 in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, FL. Ad #2011-60 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-2971 U p c o m i n g THURSDAY 9 PM E T RANDY ST ARK ON T HE P OO P DECK FRIDAY & S A T URDAY 9 P M ET RANDY S T ARK WI T H AR T LONG ON SAX ON T HE P OO P DECK K ARAOKE & D ANCING IN T HE CROWS NES T S UNDAY P O T LUCK 7 P M E T BARRY H ENSON W EDNESDAY C ROWS N ES T K ARAOKE & D J 9:00 P M E T O P EN A T 11AM E T 7 DAYS A WEEK WWW.LOOKOU T LOUNGE.COM E v e n t s ! Sign up now for a free account and receive a towards your deal purchase. Expires October 12, 2011 Law Enforcement The Star| B5 Thursday, August 18, 2011 Star Staff Report Deputies from the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce, aided by investiga tors from the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce, today discovered a grow eld off State 22 near the county line, said Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent. Investigators found some 60 plants ranging in size from 4-6 feet tall. Nugent placed the value of the plants at about $1,000 upon maturity. Late on Wednesday afternoon, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce re ceived a tip concerning a marijuana grow area along State 22 near the Bay County line. Deputies investigated and located several marijuana plants. Today, Bay County Sheriffs Ofce deputies ew a helicopter over the area, locating the additional plants. No arrests have been made at this time. Deputies nd marijuana plants SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Investigation leads to Tallahassee mans arrest Star Staff Report Investigators from the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce said last Friday they had solved numerous vehicle burglaries that began back in March 2011 with the arrest of a Tallahassee man. Through multi-agency inves tigation and cooperation of local media outlets, Vonnie Ray Tinsley, 30, was arrested at his Tallahassee home on Aug. 3, by the Wakulla and Leon County Sheriffs Ofces. The rst local incident occurred March 25 when a suspect broke the window out of a vehicle and stole a purse and GPS device. The credit card inside the stolen purse was used to make purchases at several different businesses in Bay and Okaloosa counties. The second in cident occurred July 20 when two different vehicles were broken into at a local business. Both vehicles had broken win dows and a purse was stolen out of each vehicle. Both stolen purses con tained credit cards that were used at the Callaway Walmart to make unauthorized pur chases. Area news media aired pho tographs of the surveillance video from the Walmart which resulted in a citizen recognizing the photos as Tin sley and contacted local Law Enforce ment. Witnesses reported Tinsley shaved his head and facial hair after the news me dia ran the photograph of him with long hair in an effort to conceal his identity. This investigation was suc cessful due to the fact citizens were willing to come forward and report their observations and be ing involved in the events in their communities. Excellent working relationships between the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce and outside law enforcement agencies has cre ated an environment where multijurisdictional operations have led to successful results as seen in this case. Vonnie Ray Tinsley is currently being held at the Wakulla County Jail on three counts of illegal use of a credit card and grand theft. Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce has placed a hold on Tinsley for active warrants for this investigation. More charges are pending in other neighboring counties relating to this investigation. VONNIE TINSLEY BEFORE VONNIE TINSLEY AFTER

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B6 | The Star Thursday, August 18, 2011 B6 | The Star Thursday, August 18, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 3259S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 11-197CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. CARLA S. PATTERSON and H. C. LISTER CORPORATION, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CARLA S. PATTERSON YOUR ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on real properties in Gulf County, Florida which is more particularly described as follows: Description: Lots 1 thru 5 and Tract A, Block M, Howard Creek Properties, unrecorded subdivision of a portion of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, and a portion of Section 6, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida. Thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East along the South line of said Southeast Quarter of Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 232.89 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 331.90 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 2234.30 feet: thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 197.22 feet; said arc having a chord of 197.16 feet bearing North 27 degrees 47 minutes 03 seconds West; thence North 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds West for 224.90 feet; thence South 59 degrees 41 minutes 14 seconds West for 218.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds East for 224.90 feet to the P.C. of a curve concave to the Southwest and having a radius of 2016.30 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 177.98 feet, said arc having a chord of 177.92 feet bearing South 27 degrees 47 minutes 03 seconds East: thence South 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds East for 227.39 feet: thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East for 41.76 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT Lot 3. Block M Description: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 8 West. Gulf County, Florida: thence South 89 degrees 38 minutes 25 seconds East along the South line of said Section 31 for 213.28 feet; thence North 25 degrees 15 minutes 19 seconds West for 564.79 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 105.13 feet, the chord of said are bearing North 26 degrees 36 minutes 12 seconds West for 105.12 feet, to the Point of Beginning. Thence South 62 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West for 218.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2016.30 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve for an arc distance of 83.1 feet, the chord of said arc bearing North 29 degrees 07 minutes 56 seconds West for 83.10 feet; thence North 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds West for 12.40 feet; thence North 59 degrees 41 minutes 14 seconds East for 218.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 18 minutes 46 seconds East for 12.40 feet to the beginning of a curve concave to the Southwest having a radius of 2234.30 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 92.09 feet, the chord of said arc bearing South 29 degrees 07 minutes 56 seconds East for 92.09 feet to the Point of Beginning. has been filed against you and referenced in the Complaint to Foreclose Mortgage, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, on J. Patrick Floyd, Esquire, Law Offices J. Patrick Floyd, Chtd., 408 Long Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, who is counsel for the Plaintiff on or before thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this notice and file your original defenses with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint to Foreclose Mortgage. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on July 12, 2011. CLERK OF THE COURT By: Tonya Troy Deputy Clerk July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2011 3316S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 1027 Application No. 2011-05 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 03924-000R Description of Property: Lots One (1) and Three (3), in Block Eleven (11) of Yons Addition to Beacon Hill, a subdivision of parts of original Lots 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10, in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, as per plat on file in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Also, a Portion of Alley vacated by Co. Resolution 77-2. Name in which assessed: Oliver Monod All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 31st day of August, 2011. Dated this 18th day of July, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2011 3317S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 221 Application No. 2011-06 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01369-110R Description of Property: BEGINNING at St. Joe Paper Company monument marking the SE. Corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 86 Degrees 39 Minutes 48 Seconds West along the South boundary line of said Section 35, for 228.13 feet to a point on the Easterly R/W line of State Road No. 71; then turn right along said R/W line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 4384.04 feet and a central angle of 05 Degrees 10 Minutes 23 Seconds for an arc length of 395.82 feet; thence leaving said R/W line run North 85 Degrees 55 Minutes 02 Seconds East for 634.98 feet; thence South 03 Degrees 21 Minutes 05 Seconds East for 390.04 feet; thence South 85 Degrees 55 Minutes 02 Seconds West for 484.24 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being in Sections 35 and 36, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and having an area of 261,338.22 square feet of 6.00 acres, more or less. LESS AND EXCEPT THAT Deeded to Ladora L. Mombi, as per Deed recorded in O.R. Book 237, Page 267, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Donna K. Nickell All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless Classieds George Daniel Knight George Daniel Knight passed away on Aug. 6, 2011, after an extended illness. Knight was born July 28, 1935, in Randolph County, Ala. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and served in the Korean War. Knight was the son of Ben and Maude Knight of Roanoke, Ala., where he lived with his eight sisters until moving to Atlanta, Ga., and then to Panama City, Fla. He retired in Wewahitchka, Fla. He was preceded in death by his wife of 30 years, Doris Othell Knight of Roanoke, Ala. They are survived by their children Dorinda Lynn Swindell, George D. Knight Jr. and Thomas Warren Knight; four grandchildren, George D. Knight III, Aaron D. Knight, Alexis Ann Kelley and Brandy Lea Kelley; and two great-grandchildren, Landon Thomas Knight and Kinley Rae Knight, all of Florida. He was also preceded in death by his second wife, Willie L. Knight of Wewahitchka. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. CT on Aug. 20 at the Dalkeith Baptist Church in Wewahitchka. Hazel Millergren Mrs. Hazel Millergren, 75, of Wewahitchka, passed away Wednesday, Aug. 10, at her home in Wewahitchka. Hazel was born on March 4, 1936, in Blountstown and had lived in Gulf County for most of her life. She retired as Postmaster in Wewahitchka with 15 years of service. She was preceded in death by her husband, Nils Alfred Millergren; son, Nils Andrew Millergren; and brother, William Gordan (Bill) Lamb. Hazel was a member of the Order of Eastern Star and was a member of the First Baptist Church in Wewahitchka. Survivors include one son, Cliff Millergren of Wewahitchka; two daughters, Terri Knowles and her husband Tony of Wewahitchka and Cherlyn McNamara and her husband Mark of Brewton; one brother, John C. Lamb and his wife Barbara of Burke, VA; and grandchildren Drew and Michael Millergren of Wewahitchka, Carol Ann and Nils Millergren of Tarpon Springs and Derek and Alex Knowles of Wewahitchka. Funeral services were held at 4 p.m. CT on Friday, Aug. 12, at the First Baptist Church in Wewahitchka with Rev. Mike Stroud ofciating. Interment followed in Jehu Cemetery in Wewahitchka. The family received friends from 3-4 p.m. CT on Aug. 12 at First Baptist Church in Wewahitchka. All arrangements were under the direction of Marlon Peavy at Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown. Sylvia Jopes Mimi Sanders Sylvia Jopes Mimi Sanders passed away August 11, 2011, in Tallahassee. She is survived by her loving husband of 54 years, Ernest; her children, Guy Sanders (Hollie) and Leigh Mallard (Rick) of Tallahassee, and Carolyn Royal of Port St. Joe; her grandchildren, Lindsey, Chase, Connor and Ty; her brother, Terrell Jopes (Mary Joy) of Picayune, Mississippi; as well as her loving rst cousins Marguerite Morris and Carolyn Moody and numerous cousins, nieces, and nephews. Sylvia was born on September 11, 1934, in Picayune to the late Guy and Legon Jopes. After graduating from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, she married her high school sweetheart, Ernie, and moved to Montgomery and then New York before settling in Tallahassee. Throughout her entire life, Sylvia had a deep passion for music. She loved musicals and was a member of the marching band in college. Sylvia was also an avid tennis player. Between caring for her family and all the animals she gave a home to, Sylvia found plenty of time to give back to her community. She was a member of the Ivy-Daisy Garden Circle, PEO, Tallahassee Historical Society, and Trinity United Methodist Church. Sylvia and Ernie also devoted a lot of their time to Goodwood, where Ernie worked as a docent and Sylvia manned the visitors table selling tickets for his tours. A funeral service was held at 3:30 p.m. ET on Saturday, August 13, 2011, at Trinity United Methodist. Sylvia Sanders was incredibly beloved and spread love and compassion to every life she touched. Our family would like to thank the wonderful medical professionals who helped care for our dearly loved wife and mother. Memorial contributions may be made to Trinity United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 1086, Tallahassee, FL 32302. Jack Barton Schmitt Jack Barton Schmitt, beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother, and uncle, died on Saturday, August 13, at his home in St. Joe Beach. Born on April 18, 1934, in Scranton, Pennsylvania, he earned an undergraduate degree in biology at Kent State University and a Masters in sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he continued work on his doctorate in social psychology and anthropology. He spent much of his life in Georgia, where he worked in human services administration, community organization, research, and planning, including eight years as chief executive ofcer of non-prot organizations. He worked for the Atlanta Area Community Council, the Institute for Social Research, the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation, the Council for Standards in Human Services Education, and the Georgia Department of Human Resources. Throughout these years he developed the long range plan for parks and recreation for the city of Atlanta and developed social policy and citizen participation in Atlanta urban renewal and community development. Later he directed the development of ways of assisting people with spinal cord injuries and their families to adjust to a normal and independent life in their home community. Twice he represented the national rehabilitation community in Poland when he was sent to provide consultation to the Invalids Cooperative in their efforts to serve spinal cord injured people after hospitalization. He chaired the state advisory committee to plan Georgias response to new independent living legislation intended to assist people with severe disabilities in living as independently as possible in the mainstream of life and became the Director of the states rst Independent Living program. He received a special assignment to the Governors staff to plan a new structure and mission for the Warm Springs Institute. Jack served as president of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Atlanta. He coauthored The New U: An Orientation Program for New Members of Unitarian Universalist Congregations. Much of his energies were targeted at strengthening the UU programs for children and youth for his own children and those who would follow. He lived a life of respect for the inherent worth and dignity of every person. After retiring to St. Joe Beach in 1994 he volunteered with the Beaches Turtle Patrol and coached youth soccer, mentoring many of his players throughout their high school years. He was a member of the Port St. Joe Lions Club, and pursued his lifelong love of the natural world while sailing, snorkeling, birding, kayaking, and running on the beach with his dog, Madison. Most recently he spent time on the family farm in Jesup, Georgia, working to re-establish long leaf pines on the property and helping to restore much of the original shrubberies and trees that surround the farmhouse. He is survived by his loving wife, Zebe Schmitt; three sons, Erich Schmitt, Michael Schmitt, and Cannon Schmitt; a daughter, Debbie Archer; nine grandchildren, Alexis, Jessica, Ren, Ellis, Sam, Brianna, Julian, Beckett, and Dylan; Cannons partner, Dana Seitler, and Debbies husband, Steve Archer; a sister, Libby Ann Dick, and her children, Kyle, Kelly, and David; goddaughter Terry Newton and husband Bill and godchildren Zach, Colby, Kenzie, and Joey; close family friend Carolyn Sims; and godchildren Rock Quinn, Dakota Quinn, and Nijah Quinn. A memorial service for family and close friends will be held at 7 p.m. ET on Saturday, August 20, behind the Schmitts home on St. Joe Beach. The celebration of Jacks life will end at sunset. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to the Port St. Joe High School Soccer Boosters, the Beaches Turtle Patrol, or the Gulf County Relay for Life. Local | Classieds Obituaries

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 18, 2011 The Star | B7 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 31st day of August, 2011. Dated this 18th day of July, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2011 3399S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 411 Application No. 2011-12 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 02387-000R Description of Property: Lots 7 and 8, of Block 1 of Harden’s Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, according to the official map or plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Clifford C. Millergren and M. Janice Millergren All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of September, 2011. Dated this 25th day of July, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2011 3387S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 516 Application No. 2011-07 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 02729-000R Description of Property: South 1/2 of the West 1/2 of the East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Willie Nobles & Dorothy Ruth Nobles All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of September, 2011. Dated this 25th day of July, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2011 3388S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 589 Application No. 2011-08 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 03083-780R Description of Property: Unit 16, EAGLE LANDING SUBDIVISION, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 51, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Sand Castle Developers LLC/Swiftwater LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of September, 2011. Dated this 25th day of July, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2011 3460S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 1326 Application No. 2011-17 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 06268-044R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence North 00 Degrees 04 Minutes 21 Seconds East 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly right of way boundary of County Road No. 30-E, thence run along said right of way boundary as follows: South 23 Degrees 25 Minutes 11 Seconds East 1642.44 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence Southeasterly along said curve with a radius of 11426.79 feet thru a central angle of 00 Degrees 29 Minutes 20 Seconds for an arc distance of 97.50 feet, thence continue along said curve with a radius of 11426.79 feet thru a central angle of 00 Degrees 29 Minutes 54 Seconds for an arc distance of 99.39 feet, thence leaving said right of way boundary, run South 66 Degrees 05 Minutes 29 Seconds West 520.00 feet; thence run South 23 Degrees 54 Minutes 31 Seconds East 53.35 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 23 Degrees 54 Minutes 31 Seconds East 46.01 feet to a rod and cap, thence run South 66 Degrees 09 Minutes 06 Seconds West 267.93 feet to the approximate mean high waterline of the Gulf of Mexico, thence run North 19 Degrees 21 Minutes 28 Seconds West along said approximate mean high waterline 35.62 feet, thence run North 14 Degrees 39 Minutes 38 Seconds West along said approximate mean high waterline 10.81 feet, thence run North 66 Degrees 10 Minutes 13 Seconds East 263.37 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 0.28 of an acre more or less. ALSO: DESCRIPTION: 12 FOOT INGRESS/ EGRESS EASEMENT A parcel of land lying and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, and Section 12, Township 9 South, Range 12 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of said Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, and thence North 00 Degrees 04 Minutes 21 Seconds East along the West boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly right of way fine of County Road No. 30-E, thence South 23 Degrees 25 Minutes 11 Seconds East along said right of way line for 1642.44 feet to a point of curve; thence continue along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 11,426.79 feet and a central angle of 00 Degrees 29 Minutes 20 Seconds for an arc length of 97.50 feet; thence continue along said curve to the left which has a radius of 11,426.79 feet and a central angle of 00 Degrees 29 Minutes 54 Seconds for an arc length of 99.39 feet, thence leaving said right of way line, South 66 Degrees 05 Minutes 29 Seconds West for 520.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence South 23 Degrees 54 Minutes 31 Seconds East for 53.35 feet, thence South 66 Degrees 05 Minutes 29 Seconds West for 12.00 feet; thence North 23 Degrees 54 Minutes 31 Seconds West for 53.35 feet; thence North 68 Degrees 05 Minutes 29 Seconds East for 12.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: A 12’ Easement for the Ingress and Egress as described in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, at O. R. Book 176, Page 310-321, located between County Road C-30 and the property described above. Name in which assessed: Richard J. Nelson III & Theresa R. Nelson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of September, 2011. Dated this 1st day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Aug 11, 18, 25,2011 Sept 1, 2011 3458S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 588 Application No. 2011-16 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 03083-775R Description of Property: Unit 15, EAGLE LANDING SUBDIVISION, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 51, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Swift Water, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of September, 2011. Dated this 1st day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Aug 11, 18, 25,2011 Sept 1, 2011 3471S IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-31-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER D. LEONE, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 26, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the defendant, CHRISTOPHER D. LEONE, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 25th day of August, 2011, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 5, Block B, Sweetwater Shores at Money Bayou, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3 at Pages 39 and 40 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 1st day of August, 2011. HON. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Clerk/Deputy Clerk Aug 11, 18, 2011 3476S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2010-CA-000354 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDER OF ASSET BACKED SECURITIES CORPORATION HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2004-HE7 ASSET BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-HE7 Plaintiff, vs. JENNY L. ACREE A/K/A JENNY ACREE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNY L. ACREE A/K/A JENNY ACREE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants, RE-SCHEDULED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated June 28, 2011, entered in Civil Case No.: 23-2010CA-000354, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDER OF ASSET BACKED SECURITIES CORPORATION HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2004HE7 ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES., SERIES 2004-HE7 is Plaintiff, and JENNY L. ACREE A/K/A JENNY ACREE, is Defendant. Clerk shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m.,ET in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL. 32456 on the 25th day of August, 2011 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgement, to wit: LOTS 43, 44, 45 AND THAT PORTION OF LOT 46 LYING NORTH OF THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 20, BLOCK B, BEATY SUBDIVISION OF WHITE CITY, IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 23, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd, Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442 (954) 354-3544 This property is located at the Street address of. 227 Road 20, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the Its pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 1st, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544 Facsimile (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Telephone 850718-0026 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800955-8771. Aug 11, 18, 2011 3477S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2010-CA-000138 Division OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE P. HAMM, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE P. HAMM; SURFSIDE ESTATES OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT # 1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants, RE-SCHEDULED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated June 28, 2011, entered in Civil Case No.: 23-2010-CA000138, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC is Plaintiff, and GEORGE P. HAMM, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE P. HAMM and SURFSIDE ESTATES OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION’, INC., are Defendants. The Clerk shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m.. ET in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costm, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL. 32456 on the 25th day of August, 2011, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 3, SURFSIDE ESTATES, UNIT I, AS PER 1VIAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 18, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of. 149 Boardwalk Ave, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days. only the owner of record as of the date of the Its pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 1st, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran, Blvd., Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544 Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Telephone 850718-0026 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800955-8771. Aug 11, 18, 2011 3489S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-124-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES BAILEY IV and MYSTIC PALMS SUBDIVISION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendant. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 2, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time) on September 8, 2011, the following described property: Lot 9, Mystic Palms, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 8, of the Public of Gulf County, Florida Dated: August 3, 2011 Gulf County Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Aug 11, 18, 2011 3486S IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO.: 23-2009-CA-000459 RBC CENTURA BANK Plaintiff,’ vs. WILSON, LINDA A., et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pusuant to an Order in Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2009-CA000459 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, is Plainitiff, and, WILSON, LINDA A., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 am ET, on the 8th day of September, 2011, the following described property. Lot 23, SUNSET VILLAGE SUBDIVISION, as per Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 19, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after after the sale. DATE this 3rd day of August, 2011. REBECCA L (BECKY) NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 11, 18, 2011 3491S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 340 Application No. 2011-13 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01884-010R Description of Property: COMMENCING at an iron rod marking the Southeast Corner of Southeast Quarter of Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds West (assumed) 647.27 feet to a point on the East right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being 33.0 feet from and at right angle to the centerline of said State Road; thence North 04 Degrees 46 Minutes 43 Seconds East along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 168.00 feet to an iron pipe for the POINTING OF BEGINNING, thence North 05 Degrees 11 Minutes 45 Seconds West 48.96 feet; thence North 08 Degrees 04 Minutes 27 Seconds West along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 46.68 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line curve of said State Road No. 71, said point being 33.00 feet from and radial to the centerline of said State Road, said curve having a radius of 1651.42 feet and being concave westerly, thence Northerly along the arc of said curve through a central angle of 20 Degrees 35 Minutes 55 Seconds for 593.71 feet said arc being subtended by a chord bearing and distance of North 10 Degrees 14 Minutes 30 Seconds West 590.52 feet; thence leaving said right of way line curve North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds East, 784.10 feet, thence South 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 343.36 feet, thence South 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds West 471.08 feet, thence South 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds West 124.53 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 5.536 acres, more or less, and being subject to a drainage easement across the following portion thereof: COMMENCE at an iron rod marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence South 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds West (assumed) 647.27 feet to a point on the East right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being 33.0 feet from and at right angle to the centerline of said State Road; thence North 04 Degrees 46 Minutes 43 Seconds East along the Easterly line of an existing ditch 168.00 feet to an iron pipe for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 05 Degrees 11 Minutes 45 Seconds West 48.96 feet; thence North 73 Degrees 12 Minutes 44 Seconds East 31.22 feet, thence North 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds East 65.00 feet; thence North 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds East 470.75 feet; thence North 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 09 Seconds East 319.77 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 05 Minutes 50 Seconds East 34.22 feet, to an iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 34 Minutes 00 Seconds West, 343.36 feet; thence South 40 Degrees 43 Minutes 09 Seconds West 471.08 feet; thence South 46 Degrees 07 Minutes 04 Seconds West 124.53 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. DESCRIPTION BY RECENT SURVEY: COMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (no identification) marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, as shown on the Florida Department of Transportation right of way map as prepared by David H. Melvin, Inc., with a final date of January 13, 1999, (map No. 2190041, Sheet 1 of 9); thence run South 88 Degrees 53 Minutes 21 Seconds West along the South boundary of the said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, for 622.82 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71; thence Northerly along said Easterly right of way as follows: North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 75.63 feet, thence South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds East for 3.28 feet; thence North 06 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 62.45 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 29.89 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732 for the POINT OF BEGINNING; from said POINT OF BEGINNING, continue North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 50.49 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds West along said Easterly right of way for 9.84 feet; thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 15.90 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence along said right of way and curve with a radius of 1665.27 feet, through a central angle of 21 Degrees 23 Minutes 44 Seconds, for an arc distance of 621.85 feet (chord of said arc being North 09 Degrees 54 Minutes 20 Seconds West 618.24 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732); thence leaving said Easterly right of way run thence North 89 Degrees 00 Minutes 45 Seconds East for 751.97 feet to a found 1 and 1/4 inch iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 28 Minutes 55 Seconds West for 343.36 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds West for 471.08 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 46 Degrees 02 Minutes 21 Seconds East for 123.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 5.502 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO A DRAINAGE EASEMENT ACROSS THE FOLLOWING PORTION THEREOF: COMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (no identification) marking the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, as shown on the Florida Department of Transportation right of way map as prepared by David H. Melvin, Inc., with a final date of January 13, 1999, (map No. 2190041, Sheet 1 of 9); thence run South 88 Degrees 53 Minutes 21 Seconds West along the South boundary of the said Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 24, for 622.82 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71; thence Northerly along said Easterly right of way as follows: North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 75.63 feet; thence South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 28 Seconds East for 3.28 feet; thence North 06 Degrees 49 Minutes 25 Seconds East for 62.45 feet, thence North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East for 29.89 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732 for the POINT OF BEGINNING; from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 Degrees 47 Minutes 33 Seconds East along said Easterly right of way for 50.08 feet; thence North 73 Degrees 07 Minutes 39 Seconds East for 25.35 feet; thence North 46 Degrees 01 Minute 59 Seconds East for 65.00 feet; thence North 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds East for 470.75 feet, thence North 44 Degrees 29 Minutes 04 Seconds East for 319.77 feet; thence North 89 Degrees 00 Minutes 45 Seconds East for 34.22 feet to a found 1 and 1/4 inch iron pipe; thence South 44 Degrees 28 Minutes 55 Seconds West for 343.36 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 40 Degrees 38 Minutes 04 Seconds West for 471.08 feet to a Set one half inch iron rod and cap LB0732; thence South 46 Degrees 02 Minutes 21 Seconds East for 123.95 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: Taunton Truss, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T. Wednesday, the 21st day of September, 2011. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Aug 18, 25, 2011 Sept 1, 8, 2011 3495S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 366 Application No. 2011-19 Year of Issuance: 2009 R.E. No. 01960-000R Description of Property: Lots 1, 2 and the North 29 feet of Lot 3, in Section24, Township 4 South, Range 10 eWest, according to the Higgins and Hollinger Plat of the Town of Wewahitchka, Florida, and on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: David L & Abigail Tauton All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 21st day of September, 2011. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 18, 25, 2011 Sept 1, 8, 2011 Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centura.us.com Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 3507S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County

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B8| The Star Thursday, August 18, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS Port St. Joe CommercialFor LeaseMarketed Exclusively by:850-229-6373Retail / Of ce Space308 Reid Avenue Suite A +/1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross 401 Reid Avenue +/5,400sf: Move in ready; Inquire for terms 101 Reid Avenue Seven of ce suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM 103 Reid Avenue Great of ce/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross 190 Williams Avenue Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod grossWarehouse / Flex Space110 Trade Circle West +/2500-7500sf suites, 14ft roll-up doors, dock high loading; inquire for terms 2790 Hwy 98 +/5,640 sf : Of ce / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 seperate storage units availableFor Sale306 Williams Avenue +/2400 sf of ce/retail Loggerhead Restaurant Cape San Blas, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer, asking $350,000. Short Sale 256 Hat eld Street, Eastpoint, FL +/7,500 sf : 16' inside clearance; Dual 12' roll-up doors; $150,000 60 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled of ce & retail show space; located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000 516 1st Street +/-11,400 sf of ce/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high clearance entryways; $515,000 320 Marina Drive Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call for details 407 Reid Ave +/4,988 sf : 100% leased multi tenant bldg; On-site parking; $399,000 317 Monument Ave +/4,431 sf : Hwy 98 frontage w/ On-site parking; $499,000 401 Reid Avenue+/5,400 sf : Retail space; $225,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for terms260 Marina Drive+/3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction w/ ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000PSJ Commerce Park+/6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner nancing availableHwy 98 Retail / Of ce Vacant LotsTwo lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30' x 80' each; $69,900 per lot UNDER CONTRACT Avenue fce/retail Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 INDIAN PASS AREA3/2 WITH PORCH OVER LOOKING LAGOON $900.00 MO 1 YEAR LEASE850-866-1269 BEAUTIFUL 7TH STREET PSJ HOME FOR RENT:Two bedroom, one and a half bath, excellent cottage in downtown Port St. Joe for rent. Newly painted, brand new central HVAC, large fenced-in back yard, new trellis and large back deck, located in quiet neighborhood with alley access. Walking distance to downtown, minutes from schools, close to city walking trail, and all area attractions including Sacred Heart Hospital. Low utilities and energy ef cient home. $900.00 a month plus security deposit. Call Gulf Coast Property Services at (850) 229-2706 for details. 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS1 BR 1 BA CONDO, FURNISHED On River, Downtown, Boat Slip .....................$1000 1 BR FURNISHED APARTMENT, DEN Carport, Utilities Incl .......................................$650 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes Water, End Unit .............$565 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 1 BR UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Lanark ............................................................$375 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates 2 BR 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Long Term .......................................................$550 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME2 Lots .........................................................$600 Price ReducedFSBO : 5.5 acres White City, Fl. Nice property, minutes to Intercoastal Water Way. Convenient to beaches, reasonable offers considered. call 904-626-1482 Free Single widefor scrap metal, Can be removed in whole or parts. 404-667-8907 Mexico Bch roommate wanted. $150 month. Shared utiltities. Please call 850-832-5516 Bryants Landing1 br, apartment furnished $350 month. 2 br, 2 ba, funrished $550 month. 773 Bryants Landing 850-249-4888 Large 3 br, 1 ba, CH&A, No pets $400 dep $475 month. Call 850-227-6216 Text FL72076 to 56654 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot large yard, $700 month + deposit 850-229-6403 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2 ba, 1 ba, Neat and clean townhouse in quiet Port St Joe neighborhood, 1020B Woodward, Available now. $700/mon with 1 yr lease., 1st and last, $600 deposit. 850-819-2250 / 850-819-7815. Smoke free. See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldn’t you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. The Apalachicola Bay Charter School (ABC School) is accepting applications for the following positions: Instructional Staff and Substitutes for all positions. Please send resume to: Chimene Johnson, Principal ABC School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or email to abcschool@live.comEqual Opportunity Employer Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Route DriverAverage 10 stops. Home base -Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8823 Web ID#: 34173134 Text FL73134 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairCleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sunday’s. Needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call 850-229-6165 Now Hiring!Are You Making Less Than $40,000 Per Year?Covenant TransportNeeds Driver Trainees Now! No experience required. *Immediate Job Placement Assistance *OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 1-866-280-5309 PSJ 9341 Olive Ave, Friday & Saturday 8:00 a.m.-? Louis Vuittons, huge pottery from 10”-40”, huge plumeria plants, paint sprayer, love seat, misc furniture, call for questions. 819-5093 Craftsman 13” planer, automatic feed, 16,000 cuts per minute. $350. call 850-247-9135 Text FL72413 to 56654 Compound Bows,PSE Polaris express $200. High Country Supreme $250. Browning Cayote $100. Call 850-247-9135 Text FL72411 to 56654 Huffy3 Bikes$100 for all three bikes. call 850-247-9135 Text FL72411 to 56654 Admin/ClericalCommunity Association ManagerPortfolio Manager for Association Management Company serving Bay and Gulf counties. Florida CAM License required. CMCA designation a plus. Fax resume & salary requirements to 850-235-9002 Web ID 34172816 Text FL72816 to 56654 Medical/HealthRegistered NursePosition Available The Gulf County Health Department, an EO/ADA/VP Employer, has an opening for one Career Service (benefits assigned) Registered Nurse. Annual Salary Range: $25,774.06 $41,779.00. Fingerprinting and Emergency Duties Required. Benefits include: annual leave, sick leave, nine paid holidays & one personal holiday (per state fiscal year), retirement, access to group health insurance; no nights or weekends. For more info, contact Lesia Hathaway at (850) 227-1276, ext. 149. Electronic applications only for this position; refer to Requisition number 64080028. Closing date 8/28/11 Apply at: peoplefirst.myflorida.c om for assistance, contact: People First at 877-562-7287 Web-Id 34172377 35112S IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-488-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. LANNY BLAIR and RACHEL BLAIR, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 9, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 10-488 CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, and the defendants, LANNY BLAIR and RACHEL BLAIR, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 8th day of September, 2011, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Tract D-1: A portion of the West 100 feet of the East 350.00 feet of the West One Half of Government Lot 2, Fractional Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. lying North of the North right of way line of State Road No. 30-E, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the Point of Intersection of the North right of way line of State Road No. 30-E with the West line of the East 350.00 feet of the West One Half of said Government Lot 2; thence along said West line, N 00E48’37” E 238.28 feet; thence leaving said line, S 89E11’07” E 100.00 feet to a point on the East line of the West 100 feet of the East 350.00 feet of the West One Half of said Government Lot 2; thence along said East line, S 00E48’37” W, 215.02 feet to a point on the North right of way line of said State Road 30-E; thence along said North right of way line, S 77E43’06” W, 102.67 feet to the Point of Beginning; said lands containing 0.520 acres, more or less; [WITH A] 5 foot wide pedestrian access easement: A strip of land 5.00 feet wide, lying 2.50 feet on each side of the following described centerline: Commence at the point of intersection of the North right of way line of State Road 30-E with the West line of the East 450.00 feet of the West One Half of Government Lot 2, Fractional Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence along the North right of way line of said State Road 30-E, N 77E43’06” E, 102.84 feet to a point on the East line of the West 100.00 feet of the East 450.00 feet of the West One Half of said Government Lot 2; thence along said East line, N 00E48’37” E, 936.94 feet to the Point of Beginning of said centerline; thence N 00E48’37” E, 342.81 feet to the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay, said point being the point of termination of said centerline; [AND A] 15 foot wide ingress/egress/utility easement: Commence at the point of intersection of the North right of way line of State Road 30-E with the West line of the East 450.00 feet of the West One Half of Government Lot 2, Fractional Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence along the North right of way line of said State Road 30-E, N 77E43’06” E, 108.46 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence N 00E48’37” E, 282.35 feet; thence N 25E12’13” W, 29.58 feet; thence N 00E48’37” E, 626.73 feet; thence S 89E11’04” E, 15.00 feet; thence S 00E48’37” W, 823.27 feet; thence S 25E12’13” E, 29.58 feet; thence S 00E48’37” W, 282.32 feet to a point on the North right of way line of said State Road 30-E; thence along said right of way line, S 77E43’06” W, 15.40 feet to the Point of Beginning. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 9th day of August, 2011. HON. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Clerk/Deputy Clerk Aug 18, 25, 2011 35132S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000181 DIVISION 21st MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., etc., Plaintiff, vs. EDDIE HUNTER, JR., et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered on August 4, 2011, in Case No.: 23-2011-CA-000181 of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Florida, in which 21st Mortgage Corporation, is Plaintiff and Eddie Hunter Jr., et al, are the defendants, the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale the following described real property: Lot 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, and 54, Block D of COLLEGE PARK SUBDIVISION, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Together with 2006 Nobility, Kingswood 60x28 manufactured home, Serial No: N812598AB, located on the property The sale will be held on September 8, 2011, at 11:00am to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the first floor in the atrium of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 747-5338 at least 7 days before you scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Aug 18, 25, 2011 35126S PUBLIC NOTICE POTENTIALLY INELIGIBLE REGISTERED VOTER’S NOTICE The Gulf County Supervisor of Elections has received information the person listed below is potentially ineligible to be registered to vote. Failure to contact this office within 30 days after this notice is published may result in a determination of ineligibility by the supervisor of elections and removal of the registered voters’ name from the statewide voter registration system. You should contact this office by calling 850-229-6117 to receive information regarding the basis for the potential ineligibility and instructions on how to resolve the matter, or request additional assistance if needed. An administrative hearing will be held regarding the potential ineligibility of these persons on September 19, 2011 at 9:30 AM EST in the Supervisor of Elections Office -401 Long Ave, Port St Joe, FL 32456. The Supervisor of Elections will make a determination no less than 30 days after this published notice and will notify the voter of the determination and action taken. POTENTIALLY INELIGIBLE REGISTERED VOTERS: Rebecca L. Causey 111 Griffin Rd. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 August 18, 2011 35145S NOTICE TO PROPOSERS Notice is hereby given that the City of Mexico Beach Florida will accept sealed proposals until 4:00 PM (local time), on August 30, 2011, for a qualified “Design-Build” Team for the design and rebuild of The Parker House. The project consists of evaluating the existing structure, designing full architectural plans for the rebuild of the structure (to include bringing the entire structure up to current Florida Building Code and the ground floor to ADA compliant standards), and reconstruction of the structure to meet those plans. Firms shall be limited to those certified under 489.119 F.S. as a General Contractor, Building Contractor, under 471.023 F.S. to practice engineering, under 481.219 F.S. to practice architecture. Copies of the provisions, forms, and specifications may be obtained from Mr. Chris Hubbard, City Administrator, at 850-648-5700 during normal working hours. At 4:00 PM (local time), on August 30, 2011, the proposals will be opened and read aloud. All proposals must be in sealed envelope reflecting on the outside thereof the proposer’s name and “City of Mexico Beach RFQ for the DesignBuild Team to be opened on August 30, 2011. There is no obligation on the part of the City to award the proposal to any proposer, and the City reserves the right to award to the proposer submitting a responsive proposal with a resulting negotiated agreement which is most advantageous and in the best interest of the City of Mexico Beach and to waive any irregularity or technicality in proposals received. The City of Mexico Beach shall be the sole judge of the proposal and the resulting negotiating agreement that is in its best interest and its decision shall be final. Any bidder failing to mark outside of the envelope, as set forth herein, may not be entitled to have their proposal considered. All proposals should be addressed as follows: City of Mexico Beach Attn: Chris Hubbard, City Administrator P.O. Box 13425 Mexico Beach, FL 32410 Chris Hubbard City Administrator Aug 18, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Missing from Cape Sand Blast, Bayside. Oceans brand Kayak, light blue, Venus, pink cancer decal on side. Reward! 850-229-1388 School Board is accepting bids for lockers at Wewahitchka Elementary School. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road or faxed by calling 850229-8369. Bids will be accepted starting August 11, 2011 and ending August 25, 2011 at 12:00 p.m. E.S.T. August 11, 18, 2011 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. L et a little Classified ad do a big j ob for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020


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