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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03799
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 06-30-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03799

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YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937


YEAR 73, NUMBER 37 P , "'

Thursday, JUNE 30,2011 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com 50(




Rescue Mission office under fire

the Panama City Rescue Mission, there, Atkinson insisted. Rescue
Director promises and the Rev. Joe Atkinson during a Mission employees would talk to
Port St. Joe City Commission work- people who needed help and then
to find a different shop Tuesday night. The meeting either get them help or send them
ended with Fox assuring the crowd somewhere else for long-term
location for of ce he would find a different location, help.
"If you build it, they will come," Which actually is what has been
Mayor Mel Magidson said at one happening all along, according to
By S. Brady Calhoun point in the meeting. Chief David Barnes of the Port St.
Florida Freedom Newspapers All this because Fox and Atkin- Joe Police Department. Barnes
son leased an office on Reid Av- told the commission there was not
PORT ST. JOE - The people of Port enue across the street from "Bo a homeless problem in Port St. Joe,
St. Joe want to help the helpless, Knows" pest control and near a but there was a drug and alcohol
the hungry and the homeless. Radio Shack, The St. Joe Firniture problem among local residents.
But most of them, including sev- Co., several small restaurants and However, when it gets bad, those
eral business owners and members a large Goodwill store. people go to facilities in Panama
of the City Commission, do not want Fox told the business leaders City, he said. TERRY BARNER I Florida Freedom
to come face to face with them on and the commission that the office In an interview with The Pana-
the nice, clean, vagrant-free streets would house one employee who ma City News Herald, Barnes clari- Port St. Joe Police Chief David Barnes, left, and the
of downtown. would perform a needs assessment fled his position, saying that in four Rev. Joe Atkinson, director of the Panama City Rescue
That was the message delivered for Gulf, Calhoun and Franklin years, the department has taken Mission's Gulf Coast Hope Center, talk during a public
repeatedly and forcefully to the Rev. counties. No one would be fed at meeting Tuesday at Port St. Joe City Hall concerning
Billy Fox, the executive director of the office, and no one would sleep See MISSION Al 2 the opening of the mission's administrative office.


WARRINERS PURCHASE CHATEAU NEMOURS


Drought prompts call


for water conservation


A natural fit'


Tapper & companyy purchases

(hateau Nemours, plans to
link to Port Inn

By Tim Croft
Star News Report
Owning the Chateau Nemours was a
long-time dream for Trish and David War-
riner.
Last week, the dream was fulfilled.
Tapper & Company, of which David War-
riner is president, was the winning bidder
in Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
(FDIC) auction of the Chateau property, lo-
cated at 505 Monument Ave. in Port St. Joe.
The Chateau, dating to 1930, was a former
home of Jessie Ball duPont and is a longtime
landmark in downtown Port St. Joe.
The property was in the possession of the


FDIC after the failure of Coastal Communi-
ty Bank, which had purchased the Chateau
and transformed it into a bank branch sev-
eral years ago.
Coastal Community Bank was seized by
federal regulators last year, and the branch
was ultimately sold after it was consolidated
under the Centennial Bank banner at the
former Bayside Savings Bank building on
Marina Drive.
"We were the high bidder," Warriner said.
"We have 30 days to close on the contract."
Warriner's high bid was $420,000, below
the reserve requested by the FDIC. Warri-
ner said he had to negotiate the final con-
tract, which resulted in his adding $30,000 to
the contracted price.
"We are real pleased, very excited about
getting the property," Warriner said. "We
have wanted it for years, and the price was
always (unreasonable). It is such a natural
See CHATEAU A7


TIM CROFT I The Star
The Chateau Nemours building, above, dates to 1930. It was purchased in an
FDIC auction last week by David and Trish Warriner. The long-term goal is to
connect the Chateau, below right, with the Port Inn, left, to create one seamless
property between Fifth and Sixth streets along U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe.


Local officials are
optimistic residents
will see few impacts

By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
While water manage-
ment district officials urge
water conservation as the
drought in Northwest Flor-
ida continues, local officials
are optimistic that residents
will see few if any effects.
The Northwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
trict officially issued Wa-
ter Shortage Warning for
the district's 16 counties
last week, citing declining
ground and surface water
resources and increased
use because of drought con-
ditions.
The NWFWMD cited
that several surface water
sources in the district are
at or near record daily low
flows, and groundwater
levels continue to decline
and are approaching record
lows.
The water management
district urged all water us-
ers to conserve water.
"Everyone is urged
to voluntarily reduce wa-
ter use as much as pos-
sible," said Douglas E.
Barr, executive director of
the NWFWMD. "Extreme
to exceptional drought

See DROUGHT A6


FLORIDA DROUGHT MONITOR


Intensity:
DO Abnormally Dry
D1 Drought - Moderate
D2 Drought - Severe
D3 Drought - Extreme
D4 Drought - Exceptional


Source: http://drought.unl.edu/dm .-


DROUGHT FACTS
* Rainfall was below normal
in Northwest Florida at the end
of the 2010 calendar year,
averaging about 10 inches below
normal across the 16 counties
of the Northwest Florida Water
Management District. Normal district-
wide rainfall for January-May of this
year is 24.90 inches. At the end of
May, rainfall deficits were between 5
and 14 inches below normal across
the district.
* Surface water levels on
streams and rivers from the Perdido
Basin in Escambia County to the
Apalachicola River are very low,
with flows in the 1-2 percentile
range.
* Groundwater levels in the
district are following a downward
trend and approaching the historic
low levels observed during previous

See FACTS A6


Fireworks still a go on Forgotten Coast


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
There is a cure for the potentially
combustible mix of dry conditions
and Independence Day fireworks:
St. Joseph's Bay and the Gulf of
Mexico.
The cities of Port St. Joe and Mex-
ico Beach will enjoy fun-filled Fourth
of July events this Monday as both
communities use the surrounding
waters for a safe fireworks display.
Port St. Joe will hold its fireworks
at "dark-30," or sometime between 9
and 9:30 p.m. ET on Monday, July 4.
The fireworks will be shot over
the bay from the bulkhead at the for-


mer paper mill site, as with last year.
There will be plenty of advantageous
viewing spots along the waterfront,
from Jetty Park in Port St. Joe to
bayside locations along St. Joseph's
Peninsula.
The city will block off vehicle
traffic on Marina Drive at the Local
Color center just past the marina.
From that point, it will be pedestrian
traffic only.
Mexico Beach will begin its fire-
works display at roughly 8 p.m. CT
on Monday night.
"They will be shot from the City
Pier and will be visible up and down
See FIREWORKS A3


O FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS -INTERACTIVE


Subscribe to The Star
800-345-8688
For your hometown paper
delivered to your home!


TABLE OF 4
Opinion ................................... A4-A5
Letters to the Editor ................... A5
Outdoors ..................................... A10
Sports....................................... All1


CONTENTS


Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET


School News................................ B3 Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET
Faith.uaries........................................ B4 Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278
lassifeds................................... 8-9 Classified deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020


NE ~*I





A2 I The Star


Local


Thursday, June 30, 2011


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St. Vincent


biologist


dies in


plane crash

By Katie Tammen and Lois Swoboda
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Friends and family and the
environmental movement lost a wild
and golden heart when Thom Lewis,
of St. George Island, died in a small
plane crash last week.
Lewis, 50, a former wildlife
biologist at St. Vincent Island
National Wildlife Refuge, was
one of two people killed Thursday
morning, June 23, after an Aero
Club Beechcraft crashed at Eglin
Air Force Base.
David A. Miles, of Shalimar, and
Lewis were the only people onboard
the Beech C24R Sierra.
The accident occurred around
4:30 a.m. near a grassy area next
to the 46th Test Wing side of the
runway at Eglin, Col. Michael T.
Brewer, commander of the wing,
said during a press conference June
23 at the Aero Club.
"This always hits an Air Force
family hard," Brewer said. "Our first
condolences go out to the family,
and obviously, whatever we can do
in order to help the family ... that's
where our thoughts and prayers
are."
The plane was in the air doing
training exercises for about 30
minutes before the crash. Brewer
said it isn't uncommon for pilots
to practice such maneuvers in the
early morning.
"In essence, it's flying around ...
the general runway area and setting
up to practice takeoffs and landings
or approaches to takeoffs and
landings," he said of the training
exercises the pilot was doing before
the crash.
Who was in control of the plane
at the time of the crash is under


COURTESY OF ROBIN VROEGOP
Thorn Lewis was the biologist at St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge
until 2008.

"He was a stickler for rules and regulations,
but he also just had a passionate love for the
out-of-doors. I backpacked extensively with
him in the Appalachians, and we always had a
really good time. I think later that passion for
the outdoors became one of the things that led
him into flying."

Dan Garlick, friend and fellow pilot


investigation, said Andy Bourland,
director of Eglin's public affairs
division.
Bourland confirmed Miles
was acting as training pilot for
Lewis, employed with U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, at the time of the
crash. Miles was a retired Air Force
colonel who was last stationed at
Hurlburt Field.
"Dave Miles was a very
experienced pilot with thousands of
hours in the cockpit," said his son-
in-law Richard Johnson. "Flying was
his passion. His family is devastated


by the loss of such a good and holy
man."
The four-passenger plane was
owned by Eglin Air Force Base and
rented to the civilian pilot through
the base's Aero Club. Use of the
club's planes is open to the general
public, provided the pilot has the
proper credentials. Both Miles and
Lewis were members of Eglin's
Aero Club.
The club has just one Beechcraft
C24R Sierra, base officials
See BIOLOGIST A3


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Thursday, June 30, 2011


Local


The Star I A3


BIOLOGIST from page A2


confirmed, and it was
deemed airworthy in 1980.
Passengers on
the earliest flights at
Northwest Florida
Regional Airport
experienced about a 15-
minute delay Thursday
because of the crash, said
Bill Potter, operations
manager for the airport.
The crash will be
investigated by a safety
board appointed by the
Air Force that will include
officials from the Federal
Aviation Administration
and the National
Transportation Safety
Board, Brewer said.

Lewis coordinated
red wolf program
Lewis, who studied
biology at the University of
Maryland and Texas A&M
University, co-authored
the protocol for rearing
wolves in island refuges.
He served as coordinator
of the St. Vincent Island
National Wildlife Refuge's
red wolf breeding program
from its inception in 1990
until he left the refuge in
2008.
Lewis fought for the
wolves and the program on
many fronts.
When budget cuts led
to the loss of his position
as wildlife biologist for
the refuge, he reinvented
himself as a wildlife pilot.
He left St. Vincent for a
position as a wildlife pilot
intern for the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service at the
Patuxent Wildlife Research
Center in Laurel, Md.
Over the past three
years, he obtained his
pilot's license and began
work as a migratory bird
pilot. He was seeking to
qualify in a Beechcraft
C24R Sierra when
Thursday's accident
occurred.
"He was a stickler for
rules and regulations,
but he also just had a
passionate love for the
out-of-doors," said Dan
Garlick, a friend and
fellow pilot. "I backpacked
extensively with him in
the Appalachians, and we
always had a really good
time. I think later that
passion for the outdoors
became one of the things
that led him into flying."
Family friend Bruce
Hall, of Apalachicola, said,
"He loved what he was
doing. I spoke to him very
recently, and he was so
happy and full of plans."
He is survived by his
wife of more than 20 years,
JoAnne Lewis.
Funeral services will
be held at Pasadena
United Methodist Church,
61 Ritchie Highway,
Pasadena, Md., at 11
a.m. Tuesday, July 5. The
Thom Lewis Fund to help


FIREWORKS
from page Al
the beach," said Kimberly
Shoaf of the Mexico Beach
Community Development
Corporation.
The festivities actually
get started early on the
Fourth in Mexico Beach.
There will be a 5K race
beginning at 7 a.m. CT at
Under the Palms Park.
Runners can register the
day of the race or in ad-
vance at www.mexico-
beach.com.
At 9:30 a.m. CT, there
will be a kids fishing tour-
nament at Canal Park in
Mexico Beach. All registra-
tion for the fishing tourna-
ment will occur on July 4.
In Wewahitchka, fire-
works were still planned
at press. The fireworks will
take place between 8:30
and 9 p.m. CT July 4 at T. L.
James Park.
The Dixie Youth base-
ball and softball teams
from Wewahitchka will
set up around 5 p.m. CT


for a number of games
and activities including a
home run derby, a hardest
throwing contest, a dunk-
ing booth, grease pole and
concessions.


Perhaps Lewis'greatest legacy is more
than 20 wolf cubs returned to the wild
from the pack he loved and protected.


with burial and funeral
expenses has been set
up at Superior Bank, PO.
Box 699, Apalachicola, FL
32329.
Condolences may be
sent to JoAnne Lewis, PO.
Box 712, Apalachicola, FL
32329.
Thom Lewis was
instrumental in founding
the Supporters of St.
Vincent volunteer group.
He and JoAnne were
strong supporters of the
Florida Wild Mammal
Association wildlife rescue
facility and fostered injured
and orphaned wildlife in
their home.
JoAnne has asked
that in lieu of flowers,
contributions be made to
the Florida Wild Mammal
Association, 198 Edgar
Poole Road, Crawfordville,
FL 32327. Donations may
be made at www.wakulla
wildlife.org.
Perhaps Lewis' greatest


legacy is more than 20 wolf
cubs returned to the wild
from the pack he loved and
protected.
The red wolf made
history as the first U.S.
species to be successfully
reintroduced after
extinction in the wild, and
Lewis' work on St. Vincent
Island was pivotal to this
victory.
"It's not without a heavy
heart that I leave," Lewis
told St. Vincent volunteers
and staff at his farewell
luncheon in 2008. "I've
grown to love the refuge
and the volunteers. On my
last day of work, I tracked
the wolves on the island,
and I had at least five of
them grouped together.
I thought what a fitting
way this was to spend my
last day. I howled to them,
and four of the five howled
back. So I howled again,
and I told them to be good
and stay on the island."


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
In February 2008, the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge bid farewell to Thorn
Lewis, who oversaw the refuge's red wolf program since its inception in 1990.
He had just accepted a new position as wildlife pilot intern for the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Md.


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A4 The Star Oinion


Thursday, June 30, 2011


The marionette


Being a researcher,
I enjoy using fancy
equipment to collect data
and then analyzing the
data after it has been
collected. Graphs, tables
and numbers really
do crank my tractor.
Therefore
when given the
opportunity, I
enjoy "figuring
things out." My
Daddy always took
things apart and
put them back
together to figure CRA
them out, I prefer TR


to take more of a


B


ANK!
ACT
N He


"stand back and
watch it" approach.
Recently, I went to
see the "Sleep Doctor." I
have issues sleeping and
there are those who say
that I make noises when
I sleep. Personally, I think
it's the dogs making all the
noises, but I was willing
to seek the advice of a
professional.
There was a long
list of questions I had to
answer before going to
see the Sleep Doctor. The
list had questions about
my diet, my dreams, my
nightmares, my state of
mind and some other
things they didn't have
any business knowing
about. However, being a
researcher and a good
sport, I did the best I could
to answer the questions
honestly.
After talking to the
doctor, we decided that I
needed to have a "sleep
study" done. It sounded
like fun at the time and I
enjoy sleeping in hotels,
so I said "Yes, let's do it as
soon as possible." The nice
folks took me on a tour of
the facility and showed
me the room where I'd
be sleeping. They made
it a point to tell me I'd
be sleeping on a Sealy
Posturepedic mattress
and that it was really
comfortable.
The bed looked OK.
There was no television
or internet, but I thought
I'd be able to sleep well. I
did notice that the walls
and the door had carpet/
padding on them; this fact
worried me a little. The
tour guide showed me a
picture of a fellow with a
few sticky things on his
face and implied that this
is what I would look like. It
didn't look too bad.
The first open night
they had was Good Friday,
I took it. They sent me
home with a list of things
not to do on the afternoon
of my sleep study. I'm
pretty sure I did them all.
I just wanted an excuse if
something didn't go well.
I had to leave a friend's
birthday party to go to the
sleeping place, but at this
point I was still looking
forward to it. It took me


a while to figure out how
to get in the building, but
they finally buzzed me in.
By the tone of the woman's
voice, it didn't sound like
she was having a good
time. I was a little worried.
The sleep facility had
Four rooms for
overnight guests;
they took me to the
'M room they showed
me on my original
visit. As I walked
.4 by the first room,
I noticed an older
S MY fellow with all sorts
TOR of stuff hooked up
ard to him, he looked
dead. I was more
than a little worried.
After we got in the
room, the sleep monitoring
woman turned into
something else. I'm not
sure how to describe
her, but a constipated
Czechoslovakian
governess who had
been left at the altar on
multiple occasions then
forced to watch children
much worse than those
in the Sound of Music
came to mind. The kind of
governess that would give
you Paregoric and laugh
about it, then take a swig
for herself.
I was scared.
She gave me a long list
of questions to answer and
told me to get ready for
bed. She said, "Open the
door when you're ready."
I did not want to open the
door.
I sleep in boxer shorts.
The instructions said that
you could only sleep in
boxer shorts if they had a
button. I didn't have any
with a button so I brought
a safety pin. I decided
against even bringing the
safety pin up, this woman
did not have a sense of
humor. I slept in flannel
pants that I brought in
the unlikely event I had
to deal with a constipated
Czechoslovakian
governess. Be prepared.
The questions bothered
me. Do you feel sad? Are
you pessimistic? Are you a
failure? Are you guilty? Do
you hate yourself? Do you
want to cry?
After looking at all the
equipment that was on
the Sealy Posturepedic
mattressed bed and
knowing they were going
to hook it up to me, I felt
a lot of things. I felt sad,
I was pessimistic, and
I knew I had made a
mistake, I hated myself
and I wanted to cry. I was
expecting a few sticky
things on my face and
neck, I was about to be
turned into a marionette.
The last question on
the list had to do with my
interest in romance. Yes,
I changed the wording a
little. I'm a man and I'm

See MARIONETTE A5


THE STAR
USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: 1-800-345-8688


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
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P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone 850-227-1278


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Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.

TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Keyboard KLATTERINGS






Independence Day


A recent poll of teenagers found
that those surveyed identified most
with traits such as "courage" and
"perseverance" as most prized when
pondering the origins of the Fourth of
July holiday.
Some 235 years since a group
of men gathered in a sweltering
Philadelphia
courthouse to sign
the Declaration
of Independence,
courage and
perseverance are
needed in large
supply.
TIM CROFT These were bold
Star news editor men, these Founding
Fathers, but they were
also men of a passion for one thing.
They wanted a say into how they
were governed. They had become
upstarts, in the eyes of their king.
Royal decrees no longer suited them.
At the same time, they were more
of a theory than an actual country.
That was the view of King George
who saw in the rebellion a group of
miscreants who needed a noose over
their heads or to face a firing squad.
The Founding Fathers faced death
- they were traitors after all - for
speaking their minds and lambasting
a king who took his ransom and
provided little beyond an occupying
army and navy ready to suppress any
dissent.
A series of taxes represented the
gasoline to the flame, but those were
merely the final straws in what had
become a protracted rebellion by an
unhappy youngster.
The king had better things to deal
with than this rebellion and since he
had the finest navy in the world and
one of the finest armies, this folderol
of requesting independence had to
stop.
But the toothpaste, as they say,
could not be put back in the tube.
Men such as Thomas Paine and
John Adams and Samuel Adams had
clearly written about the ideal of a free
country, of a country that shed the
shackles of perceived tyranny.
They published, often under
pseudonyms to avoid detection,


essays on the rights of the common
man, mapping out the concepts of
liberty and freedom that Thomas
Jefferson would so eloquently put into
words and which would become the
foundation of the Bill of Rights.
But they were seen as rabble
rousers.
There were many citizens of the
original territories who were just fine
under British rule and wanted no part
of any new country.
There was also internecine
squabbling among the states, with
the idea of a centralized federal
government anathema to many, who
perceived such a system and the later
election of George Washington as a
replacement of one aristocracy with
another.
To understand what these men
and women overcame is the stuff of
history books too often ignored and
goes to the heart of what many hold as
the American ideals of self-reliance,
liberty, freedom and the rights of man
to not be unjustly shackled by religion
or government.
They hardened folks for hardened
times.
When the Declaration of
Independence was signed, there was
no Constitution - that would come
nearly a decade later - and there was
no army.
Washington would be appointed
general but even he, according
to history books, wondered what
precisely he had been placed in
charge of.
Washington had under his
command rag-tag troops comprised
of militias from throughout the
13 original colonies. Disease and
defections were common. Marching
on command and in step was a
challenge.
The British military looked on their
foes as vanquished from the outset.
Washington himself had only limited
experience in the French and Indian
War and was considered inferior to his
English counterparts.
And what Washington and his
men had to defend, detailed in the
Declaration of Independence, was
not so much ground as it was ideals,


soaring words that detailed the
grievances against the king and a
desire for freedom.
The marriage was irrevocably
broken, a divorce inevitable.
Saying so, however, did not make it
so, as the king reminded the colonies
when he sent troops to quash the
rebellion.
And within weeks and months of
July 4,1776 the prospects for this new
United States of America appeared
bleak.
Washington was routed on the
battlefield and attempts to secure
funding for the war effort were
hindered by game-playing in France
and slow communication in an age
when the horse and buggy was the
equivalent of an Internet portal.
After five years Washington pulled
an upset on the battlefield and the
British surrendered. The king washed
his hands of his prodigal "children."
A Constitution would follow and
though the boil of slavery was left
to fester, a country was birthed, a
country that would expand by leaps
and bounds in the ensuing decades
as the Louisiana Purchase pushed
France from the nation and Lewis and
Clark fully discovered the vastness of
this "New World."
To call it all a long shot does not
give gamblers credit.
And on this weekend, never
has it seemed more appropriate to
acknowledge and honor the courage
and perseverance these founding men
and women, who braved so much with
so little prospect of the success to come.
We face great anxiety over
a teetering economy, partisan
brinkmanship in Congress, two wars,
government - local, state and federal
- that speaks and acts as if occupying
another universe.
But if there is a lesson from that
signing in a hothouse courtroom in
Philadelphia 235 years ago, one to
be celebrated during this holiday
weekend, it is that common men
and women can enact change of
monumental proportions.
Courage and perseverance:
characteristics that seem as critical
today as they did 235 years ago.


The Apocalypse must be close


The sign above the
watermelons clearly stated
$6. I stopped a nearby
attendant. "How many
watermelons do you get for
six dollars?"
"One, sir." I
couldn't tell if he
smirked or was
just mystified that I
apparently couldn't
read the obvious
marked price
dangling over the
melons. He said HUN
something else but DOI
I missed it. Voices, Kesley
motion, time ...
life itself suspended as I
stood transfixed before the
extravagantly priced fruit. A
six dollar watermelon!
Are the farmers in
Georgia on strike? Is this
someway tied to the real
estate market? Is it a
hot day in January? Has
Birnam Wood been moved
to Dunsinane? I looked
around, "Are we on Candid
Camera?"
This could mean
the end of the Fourth of
July! Parades, speeches,
firecrackers and
watermelons... you can't
leave one of'em out and
still say you presented a
worthy Independence Day
salute! How are we going
to celebrate the birth of
our nation if we can't afford
to share a watermelon
with the neighbors?
Does this mark the end
of the watermelon eating
contests? Will there be
no more seed spitting for
distance and accuracy?
Four dollar a gallon gas is
bad enough. And removing
the small bottle Cokes
simply to sell more cola was
a sure fired insult. But this
about takes the cake.


I remember when
watermelons didn't cost
nothing. We grew'em by
the dozens out in the little
garden behind the clothes
line. The biggest problem
we had was eating
them too early. It was
hard to wait. As soon
as they took on a hint
of green we wanted
to pull them. Daddy
said not yet, but Leon
didn't listen. And
IKER David Mark was just
WN as bad... and, well,
Colbert I naturally joined
right in. We'd wait
till Dad was listening to the
Cardinal game and we'd
ease out the back door and
bust open the biggest one
we could find. Of course,
it was still about as green
on the inside as it was on
the outside. We'd wait one
whole day and try again. We
were pretty slow learners!
Mr. Archie Moore had
about the best melons in
town. And he had them in
carefully cultivated hills
spread out along the Como
Road. We'd wait till after
dark and then sneak down
through the big ditch that
angled toward Mr. Archie's
pond. We'd survey the lights
from the house for a few
minutes to make sure no
one was out and about and
then crawl on our bellies
toward the unsuspecting
watermelons. There is an
art to easing up to a hill in
the dark and feeling around
for the biggest melon. A
little thumping is required.
You then had to back out
of sight on your stomach
rolling the watermelon
along just inches from your
noise. We'd hunker down
in the big ditch and bust
them things open. They


were not cold. We had no
salt. No knives or spoons.
And the light was so poor
we could hardly tell exactly
what we had. Listen folks,
they were the absolute
best watermelons I've ever
tasted. We'd eat the heart
out and go back for another!
Mr. Archie stopped by
the house one hot July
afternoon and told us that
he had plenty of melons
left. "Just come by anytime
boys and get all you want."
Shoot, we never went back.
He took all the joy out of
watermelon gathering.
By junior high we
devised a plan that would be
the envy of any little town.
Since the watermelons
were mostly free we
organized watermelon
drops. We climbed up top
of the little shed behind
Bobby Brewer's house and
shoved melons off the side
to see who could make the
biggest splatter pattern. Of
course, it didn't take long
before we needed a higher
launch pad. We moved to
the two story house over
by Bethel College. I think
it was rented to students
during the school year but
it was mostly empty in the
summer. We shinnied up
the trellis on the side of the
house and leaped over to
the porch. We hauled the
melons up in buckets. A
good toss could splatter
mass portions of rind,
seeds, juice and "innards"
all the way to the middle of
E. Cherry Street!
We had watermelon
races. We'd roll the melons
off the big hill over on
Forrest Avenue. The first
melon to hit the far side
curb on Main Street was
the winner. We had seed


spitting wars. We set them
on the railroad tracks to see
what the L&N Central could
do with one. We had rind
throwing toss-offs. We rolled
them toward home plate
and whacked them with
Louisville Sluggers ... We
enjoyed our watermelons to
the limit!
The Fourth of July
was the biggest day of the
year in our little town. We
appreciated being American
and we celebrated it. It
was the only day my Dad
would buy a watermelon.
We'd swing by the ice house
down past the American
Legion hall. Dad would
hand over fifty cents for
the largest, greenest,
coldest watermelon you'd
ever seen. If we pushed
him a little, he'd buy two.
We weren't purchasing
watermelons mind you, we
were paying for the cold!
Those were the days my
friend. I was thinking about
the time we got to shooting
melons with a 30/30 rifle just
to see them explode and
was calculating how many
millions of dollars at today's
prices that we smashed
away when that same young
clerk brought me back to
the present. "Sir, would
you like for me to take a
watermelon out to your
vehicle?"
Do I look like a
communist? Is my head
nothing more than a hat
rack? I wasn't about to
pay six bucks for one
watermelon that wasn't
even stored in the ice house!
"Son," I finally found my
tongue, "no, I reckon not,
I still know where Archie
Moore lives..."
Respectfully,
Kes


NE ~*I










A5 The Star Letters


Thursday, June 30, 2011


Are we losing our place in the world?


By Ed McAteer

Do you feel the
massive earthquake that
is shaking up the Middle
East? According to the
Washington Post, the U.S.
relationship with Saudi
Arabia is at an all-time
low. There is an increasing
friction with the Obama
administration and the
Saudi government feels that
America has proven to be
an incompetent ally, and
incapable of conducting a
coherent foreign policy.
Did Obama make a
mistake in driving out
Mubarak from Egypt?
Now Egypt is headed
down a path to an Islamic
fundamentalist takeover.
Also, what are we doing
in Libya? Our meddling
has encouraged elements
of Saudi Arabia to stir
up trouble. Qadhafi has
already pledged to align
with Iran should he hang
on to power. In addition, in
Syria, Iran's most important
ally, America is doing little
to support the democratic
uprising. Can America
continue this journey of
being the police of the world
and survive?
Bahrain is a small gulf
nation that seems to be


the new ground zero in
the developing Middle
East power struggle.
Approximately 70 percent
of the population is Shiite,
and the ruling monarchy is
Sunni, like the majority of
the Saudis. This year, high-
level Iranian officials have
commented about retaining
control of the country. This
is something Saudi Arabia
is aware and cannot let
happen.
While Bahrain is not
a major oil exporter,
the majority of Saudi oil
fields are located close
to its border. Shiite's are
dominant in this area.
Saudis now fear with good
reason that a revolution in
Bahrain could easily spread
to its regions and jeopardize
revenues and power.
The Wall Street Journal
reports this fear of Iran and
the lack of trust with the
U.S. is so great, Saudis are
rallying Muslim nations
across the Middle East and
Asia to join an Arab alliance.
Bahrain has become the
symbol of Arab defiance
against Iran.
This massive earthquake
I speak about will cause the
ground to split and divide
the Middle East into two
entities: Iraq, Syria, Egypt,


The concern is that both China and
Russia seek a closer alliance with the
European Union as American and
British clout continue es to decline.
This will have a profound influence
on the future of this world, especially
in the Middle East and Eurasia.


possibly Libya and the
Ethiopian Horn of Africa
region centered on Iran,
and the Arab alliance being
assembled in Saudi Arabia.
As Saudi Arabia and
other states in that region
seek to incorporate more
allies to protect themselves
from Iran, keep a watchful
eye as they eventually begin
reaching out to Germany
and the Europeans for
protection.
In my last article,
Nuclear Abyss or Human
Survival, it mentioned the
North and South Kings that
are lighting up the radar
screen and with a passion
and desire as great as it
was told in Old Testament
days. Russia and Germany
announced that on May 5,
2011 they had completed
Nord Stream, a 760-mile


undersea natural gas
pipeline through the Baltic
Sea.
They expect to begin
operations the last quarter
of 2011. When operational
in 2012, the two pipelines
will supply 55 billion cubic
metres of Russian gas a
year to the European Union
for at least 50 years.
Europe's anti-nuclear
reaction to Japan's
earthquake is playing right
into the hands of Russia
and Germany. If nuclear
power plants begin shutting
down across the Continent,
Europe will have to produce
its energy using another
fuel. Natural gas seems the
most likely alternative-
meaning that Europe's
imports of Russian gas will
only go up in the future.
Germany and Russia


have partnered to maximize
the power they each can
gain through controlling
Europe's natural gas
supplies. Watch for them to
use this power in the future.
China is rising quickly
to power. Most Americans
are beginning to realize
that two markets now
dominate world trade.
No, not America and the
Brit's; it's the European
Union and China. In the
last decade of the 20th
century, a united Germany
powered the European
Union into position as the
most dominant trading
bloc in the world. Then,
a few months ago, China
edged above the European
Union. Now, these markets
are becoming mutually
dependent on each other
to maintain their present
growth and economic
standards.
Few people
understand the great
prophetic significance
of this strengthening of
relationships between
the European Union-in
particular, Germany-and
the great Eastern trading
bloc led by China. European
Union Parliamentary
President, Jerzy Buzek
recently mentioned in the


EU Observer that China's
increasingly important role
in the global economy is one
theme he will address when
meeting China's leaders in
Beijing.
The concern is that
both China and Russia
seek a closer alliance
with the European Union
as American and British
clout continues to decline.
This will have a profound
influence on the future of
this world, especially in the
Middle East and Eurasia.
These developing events
surrounding the EU and
China will eventually affect
every human being on this
planet.
Radical events are on
the move in the Middle
East. America is shrinking
in power. Iran is becoming
the undisputed king of the
region, Russia, China, and
Germany project extreme
growth, and Saudi Arabia
is banding together with
new allies for protection.
Is Biblical prophecy
being fulfilled? Despite the
troubles ahead for us, it is
all leading to the best news
ever... the return of Jesus
Christ.

Ed McAteer is a
resident of Port St. Joe


SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: 850-227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form
of letters to the editor or a guest column are
solicited and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial
page should be a forum where differing ideas
and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.


- w


MARIONETTE from page A4


not dead so I answered
"I have not noticed any
recent change in my
interest in romance."
About 30 minutes, 30
electrodes, two big black
bands around my chest,
a duct tape chinstrap
and two sensors up each
nostril, I decided that
"I had noticed a recent
change in my interest
in romance." I asked
the governess and her
assistant if I could change
the answer to that last
question. They weren't
amused.
The governess ordered
me to go to the bathroom
before I got into bed. I did.
I was really scared.
After getting in the
bed, I was instructed to


do a series of exercises
and movements. The
governess gave these
instructions from her
command center with
big glass windows out in
the hall, barking orders
through a speaker that
reminded me of the
intercom in elementary
school. She was watching
my every move on infrared
video. I was her personal
Czech marionette.
I went to sleep in about
three minutes.
I had terrible dreams. I
woke up numerous times
with cords and wires
wrapped around my neck
like a boa constrictor. The
governess woke me up to
stick an electrode back
to the top of my head (I


had nine up there). They
had told me originally
that I had to be out by
6 AM, so I woke up at 5
AM in anticipation. The
governess yelled through
the intercom to go back to
sleep.
I tried.
I gave up.
The governess told me
through the intercom that
I was going to have to sign
a statement saying that
I ended the study early. I
looked into the camera and
yelled back, "Get it in here,
I want to sign it right now."
She opened the door pretty
quickly.
As I signed the papers,
she asked if I'd like any
coffee, tea or water.
Fearing Paregoric, I asked


"Are you kidding?" Then I
followed with "No, thank
you though."
I went into the
bathroom, changed clothes
and brushed my teeth. By
the time I came out, the
governess had already
changed the sheets and
made up the bed for the
next victim.
The Cracker Barrel
was calling me. I ate a
"Country Boy Breakfast"
and was treated kindly. I
then went to the farmer's
market and talked to
people that didn't want to
turn me into a puppet.
I slept well on Saturday
night.
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IN "






A6 I The Star


Local


Thursday, June 30, 2011


DROUGHT from page A1


conditions exist across the Dis-
trict's 16 counties, and monthly
rainfall totals have been below
normal for nine months."
Though rains over the past
four or five days have helped
"green up" lawns, Chris Bar-
rios, a hydrologist with the NW-
FWMD, said it would take more
than the sporadic rainfall of re-
cent days to alleviate drought
conditions.
"(The rain) has been benefi-
cial, but it is not enough to catch
us up," Barrios said Tuesday, not-
ing that the region has seen be-
low-average rainfall for months.
"It does help, but not enough."
The U.S. Drought Moni-
tor indicates extreme drought
conditions (the second most in-
tense drought conditions on the
monitor) in counties east of the
Apalachicola River and in Gulf
County.
Exceptional drought condi-
tions (the most intense) are in-
dicated in counties west of the
Apalachicola River and northern
portions of Gadsden, Leon and
Jefferson counties.
No water supply shortages
have been reported in the dis-
trict.
"Should the drought contin-
ue, we urge people to voluntarily
reduce water consumption and
maximize conservation," Barr
said.
Officials with the City of Port
St. Joe, which in the past 18
months has moved from ground-
water wells to tapping a fresh-
water canal fed by the Chipola
River surface water source, are
monitoring the situation but are
confident of low impacts. The
city supplies potable water to
much of the southern end of the


COURTESY OF THE NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
The Look and Tremble rapids on the Chipola River to the north in Jackson County nine months
ago (left) and last week, after nine months of below average rainfall.


county.
"No, we do not believe it is
going to be a problem," said city
manager Charlie Weston. "We
have 17 miles' worth of water
(the distance of the freshwater
canal from the Chipola River).
We have plenty of water coming
from the Chipola River."
Weston emphasized last week
that burning trash or yard debris
is illegal by city ordinance and
urged residents to be careful
with any outdoor fires, such as
barbecues.
County emergency manager
Marshall Nelson said county ac-
tion is largely limited to regulat-
ing burning and fireworks.
"The biggest thing is people
going out on the river (Chipola
or Apalachicola)," Nelson said.
"They could bust a motor, and
then we have to go out and try to
get them. It can be a real safety
issue.
"You at least have more flow
on the Chipola side. The Chipola
River is spring-fed."
Wewahitchka city manager


Don Minchew also expressed
optimism that the city's deepwa-
ter wells would not be affected.
In early 2000, when ground-
water levels dropped to historic
low levels, the city's deepwater
wells, nearly 600 feet deep, were
not affected. The Florida Rural
Water Association assessed the
city's wells after that drought.
"We were at excellent levels,"
Minchew said. "We are always
conscious of water levels and
dangerous drought conditions.
"We know the fire index is
high, and we are monitoring the
situation carefully."
Minchew added that some
shallower residential wells had
been affected and that levels
in the Apalachicola River were
down to a half-foot in some plac-
es last week.
However, some rain received
late last week and over the week-
end aided conditions for the Gas-
kin Park Flathead Catfish Tour-
nament last weekend, and river
levels were slightly up this week.
"It's been awful," Minchew


said of river levels.
The water management dis-
trict is urging residents and
businesses not under local util-
ity restrictions to follow these
guidelines:
* Limit outdoor watering to
no more than two days per week;
water only during the low evapo-
ration hours of 5 p.m. to 10 a.m.
* Limit hours of golf course
irrigation.
* Reduce recreation if it re-
quires pumping, diverting or oth-
erwise using water supply, such
as filling duck ponds.
* Discontinue aesthetic uses
of water that are primarily deco-
rative (such as fountains).
The Water Shortage Warning
and a weekly drought report can
be found on the District's web-
site, www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/.
The "Publications" link also
offers several water conserva-
tion brochures. Ideas include us-
ing rain barrels to harvest roof
runoff, planting drought-tolerant
native species, washing cars on
grass and fixing plumbing leaks.


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NE ~*I


S


FACTS
from page Al

drought periods. Though
current water levels in both
the Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer
and Floridan Aquifer are
below normal, they are 1 to
5 feet above previous lows
of 2000-01 and 2006-07.
* During the most severe
period of the drought
in Northwest Florida in
recent years (May-June
2000), groundwater levels
dropped to historic low
levels. The majority of
problems were experienced
by private well owners
who had water levels
drop below their pump
intakes. All these problems
were solved by extending
the depth of well pumps
and/or wells and were
not because of insufficient
supply of groundwater.
Some water utilities issued
water use restrictions
to customers because
of water distribution
limitations during peak use
periods. These distribution
problems were alleviated
by restricting law watering
and other non-essential
water uses. The water
management district issued
a Water Shortage Warning
at that time, but no further
action was necessary.





Thursday, June 30, 2011


Local


The Star I A7


CHATEAU from page Al


fit for what we already
have."
What the Warriners al-
ready have is the adjacent
Port Inn, another historic
building they purchased
and renovated more than
a decade ago into the oper-
ating hotel it is today.
A Port Inn in some
form has been in existence
in Port St. Joe since the
1930s. The original burned
to the ground in the 1940s.
"Our plan is to inte-
grate the two together
and expand on what we
are doing," Warriner said,
adding that he hopes to
expand while maintaining
the integrity and historic
aesthetic of the Chateau.
Warriner said plans for
the Chateau are still taking
shape as he and his wife
were reluctant to get too
ahead of themselves be-


fore the June 22 auction.
But he said winning the
auction sent a buzz of cele-
bration through the staff at
Tapper & Company, which
also owns and operates the
Mainstay Suites on U.S.
98 near the Gulf/Franklin
Center.
"Not only are Trish and
I and our children excit-
ed, but the staff is beside
themselves about it," War-
riner said. "There is a real
team spirit to pulling this
thing together."
Once the sale is closed,
Warriner said the offices of
Tapper & Company likely
will move to the Chateau
from the current location
in the 200 block of U.S.
Highway 98.
"That will free up some
rental space downtown
right there," Warriner
said.


How exactly to inte-
grate the Chateau with the
Port Inn operations will
require more long-term
thinking and input from
architects and designers,
he said. First, fences and
other barriers between
the two buildings will be
brought down to enhance
the look of being part of
one property.
Warriner said the most
likely outcome would be to
use the Chateau to expand
food and beverage and en-
tertainment options at the
Port Inn.
He said the Chateau
would provide additional
and more appropriate
space for entertainment
that currently is performed
on the front porch of the
Port Inn and inside the
Thirsty Goat, requiring the
delicate balance between
entertaining visitors while


keeping the noise levels
down for guests of the Port
Inn.
He said there would
some kind of covered walk-
way/pathway between the


Port Inn and Chateau to
allow visitors to travel be-
tween the two facilities.
Beyond that, Warriner
said long-term plans for
the Chateau and its link to


The Chateau
Nemours was
once a residence
of Jessie Ball
duPont.











TIM CROFT I The Star

the Port Inn will have to be
worked out and designed.
"It will be great when it
is finished," Warriner said.
"And it will be great for the
city."


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A8 I The Star


Local


Thursday, June 30, 2011


PSJ Commissioners request workshop on Rescue Mission


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Port St. Joe city com-
missioners called for a
brief timeout last Tuesday
night.
Commissioners, with
a room full of residents
wishing to speak about
any plans for a county
presence at the Panama
City Rescue Mission,
unanimously motioned
to hold a workshop this
coming Tuesday, June 25,
to discuss the matter and
hear from the public.
The workshop is sched-
uled for 5:30 p.m. ET in
the commission meeting
room at City Hall. (See
story page Al)
City manager Char-
lie Weston said he would
have to contact officials
at the Rescue Mission to
ensure a representative
would be there - a previ-
ous workshop on a propos-
al to establish a satellite
facility in Gulf County was


cancelled when Rescue
Mission officials could not
attend.
However, Commission-
er Rex Buzzett said the
city should not operate
on the Rescue Mission's
schedule and Weston
was requested to inform
Mission officials that a
workshop was being held
if they wished to send a
representative to present
their case.
In particular, Port St.
Joe residents object to
the presence of an out-
reach office in the down-
town business district on
Reid Avenue and what
they understand are ef-
forts to broaden the scope
and reach of the office and
bring a satellite shelter to
the county.
Christine McElroy and
Jim Norton noted that new
Panama City Mayor Greg
Brudnicki has a stated
goal of moving the Rescue
Mission out of downtown
Panama City.


McElroy further noted
crime statistics linked
to residents at the Mis-
sion and the efforts of
the Mission to expand its
Bethel Village facility in
Springfield, which is being
met with resistance from
Springfield city officials.
"This is the wrong
place for a right-intended
entity," Norton said.
Jay Rish said the city
and community have al-
ways met the needs to its
most vulnerable, whether
through churches or orga-
nizations such as the Care
Closet and Junior Service
League.


He said too much work
had been undertaken in
recent years to upgrade
the look of downtown to
allow an office that may
attract the homeless from
outside the county.
"I'm concerned we
might become a magnet
for a growing problem we
do not have," Rish said.
"Reid Avenue is not the
proper venue for what is
proposed."
Commissioners were
skeptical of the Rescue
Mission's efforts when
Rev. Billy Fox, the CEO of
the mission, appeared be-
fore the board June 7.
Buzzett said he could
not support any presence
in the business district
and commissioners also
questioned the extent
of any problem with the
homeless in Gulf County.
The current system of
transporting the home-
less to the Rescue Mission
seemed to be working and


Police Chief David Barnes
said his department deals
with a homeless person,
on average, every three to
four months.
In addition, commis-
sioners voiced concerns
about the varying infor-
mation about the Rescue
Mission plans.
"Reverend Fox, when
he was here, was very
sketchy about the details,"
said Commissioner Lorin-
da Gingell.
Fox could not provide
information concern-
ing community meetings
about Rescue Mission
plans and there was con-
fusion about the current
membership of a group
that contacted the Rescue
Mission for insight on how
to help any homeless in
the county.
As expressed in a letter
to the editor in the June
23 edition of The Star, at
least one of the original
committee members has


Im coiceried we might become a magnet for a
growing problem we do not have. ReidAvenue is
not the proper venue for what is proposed."

Jay Rish


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* Birth certificate
* Social Security Card
* Medicaid Card or Medical Insurance Card
* Parent/Guardian Picture ID
* Guardianship Documents
* Proof of Address
* Current Well Child Check within the last 12 mo: which includes Hemoglobin
or Hematocrit for children over 9 months; Lead Screening for children 12 and 24
months; Blood Pressure for children over the age of 3.
* Name, Address, and Phone numbers for child's doctor and dentist
* Immunization or shot record (must be printed not hand written)
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employment and any other types of income. If you have NO INCOME the
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* Food Stamps or WIC cards
* Proof of program enrollment with programs such as Healthy Start or similar
programs.
* Proof of current enrollment or participation with any education programss.


South Gulf County Early Childhood Development Center
153 Redfish Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
850-229-6415
Kathy Krum-Family Case Manager, Ext. 10
Sherry Bolden-Family Case Manager, Ext. 18
*Ask about bus transportation
*Ask about extended day


left due to philosophical
differences regarding the
approach Fox was taking.
Mayor Mel Magidson
said the city has not been
asked to take action and
can't prevent the Mission
from renting office space
downtown. As for a shel-
ter on Reid Avenue, he
said city zoning regula-
tions would prohibit such
a move.
Several residents,
however, noted that Mis-
sion board members were
already exploring other
locations for a possible
shelter.
Magidson noted that he
was one of many county
residents who contribute to
the Rescue Mission and he
doubted the mission would
want to antagonize those
contributors by establish-
ing a facility the community
did not want.
He also noted that if
there is not a homeless
problem in the county- and
no quantifiable numbers
have been gathered by Fox
- the Rescue Mission could
hardly afford to expend re-
sources where their servic-
es were not needed.
And he said "I will not
allow that to happen" to
questions about a reversal
of progress in beautifying
and enhancing the aesthet-
ics of downtown.


Farnsley & Johnston





Thursday, June 30, 2011


Local


The Star I A9


Street dance hours extended; new commissioner sworn in


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

The annual Street Dance
in the neighborhood known
as North Port St. Joe will be
shaking for an extra hour
this year.
Port St. Joe city commis-
sioners voted 4-1 (Commis-
sioner Rex Buzzett dissent-
ing) last week to allow orga-
nizers of the annual Street
Dance, which will takes
place this Sunday as part of
the Fourth of July holiday,
to extend the hours of the
event by one hour.
The extension of time
comes with a caveat: the
speakers used for the dance
must be facing to the north.
Last year commission-
ers restricted the time of the
celebration to 1 a.m. ET in
large measure due to noise
complaints from as far away
as 16th Street, or roughly 19
city blocks from the dance
and the speakers.
In response, organizers
moved the speakers so they
were oriented north, away
from the city proper. Noise
complaints were significant-
ly reduced.
Organizers asked this
year that the event be al-
lowed to extend from 9 p.m.
to 2 a.m. ET.
Buzzett said he would not
favor any event taking place
outdoors to last beyond 1
a.m. and would not support
the extension. Other com-
missioners, however, agreed


as long as the speakers
remained oriented as they
were last year.
There was some con-
fusion during last week's
regular bi-monthly meeting
whether that could be ac-
complished, but commis-
sioners voted that the permit
would not be issued unless
assurances were provided
from organizers that the
speakers would face north.


CDBG funds
The city found itself in
an enviable position as
Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) funds
earmarked for the con-
struction of an entry road
and installation of utilities
at the new North Florida
Child Development, Inc.
learning center far exceed-
ed construction costs.
Bruce Ballister with
the Apalachee Regional
Planning Council said
some $227,000 remained,
but with a catch: the funds
could only be used to "re-
move barriers" or in simple
language to bring a facil-
ity, specifically in the city's
case city hall, up to ADA
compliance.
"It is a very limited gift
horse," Ballister said.
The options were lim-
ited to installation of an
elevator to make city hall
more handicap-accessible
or to renovate bathrooms
in city hall and the fire sta-


�MAkI L -4 m :NJm
TIM CROFT I The Star
County Judge Tim McFarland did the honors in swearing in new commissioners
Bo Patterson and Bill Kennedy.


tion next door.
The problem with the el-
evator was exactly where it
could be constructed with-
in city hall and how that
construction might impact


aesthetics of the building.
Commissioners decided
instead to approve spend-
ing funds to renovate the
restrooms in city hall and
the fire station to trans-


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form them into handicap-
accessible facilities.

No burn
City manager Charlie


Weston noted to commis-
sioners that city ordinance
bans the burning of trash
or yard debris within the
city limits. The dry, hot
conditions of recent weeks
have created a climate ripe
for wildfires and Weston
emphasized that even in
perfect weather, burning is
not allowed within the city.

Transition
Last Tuesday's meeting
marked the end of service
for Group I Commissioner
Greg Johnson and Group
II Commissioner Charles
Stephens.
Johnson, completing his
first term, chose not to run
and Stephens, a two-term
incumbent, lost in a runoff
earlier this month.
Sworn in as new com-
missioners were Bill Ken-
nedy, who won the right to
succeed Johnson, and Bo
Patterson, who earned the
Group II seat.
Sworn in for a fifth term
was Mayor Mel Magidson.


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Email outdoors news
to tcroft@starfl.com


Page A10
More coverage
online at www.starfl.com


The Star
Thursday, June 30


eVON







See meN


/


Vinson wins Gaskin Park Flathead tourney


Star Staff Report

The Employees Club of the City
of Wewahitchka hosted the 7th
Annual Gaskin Park Flathead Catfish
Tournament last weekend at Gaskin
Park Landing in Wewahitchka. The
tournament is the second leg in
the Apalachicola Flathead Catfish
Tournament Trail series.
Tournament stats include 77 anglers
(10 women) in 39 boats, some coming
from as far away as Oklahoma and many
coming from various areas of Georgia
and Florida.
The 112 fish weighed-in totaled
1,239.12 pounds and were brought to the
scales by 34 men and five women out of
the 77 total competitors. The tournament
lasted 20 hours from 4 p.m. Friday to
noon on Saturday.
Only flathead catfish are eligible for
this particular tournament and they
must be at least 14 inches and alive
when weighed. Entry fees include a door
prize ticket and tournament ball cap.
Door prizes awarded to the participants
were various rods and reels at a total
value of around $700. Every fish weighed
in gives the angler another door prize
ticket as well as adding to his cumulative
Trail total from this season's four
tournaments.
The individual with the most flathead
weight at the end of the Trail wins an
additional $800 prize to go with any other
winnings he or she may get along the
way.
For 2011, the Trail started in Bristol
(Liberty County) with the Liberty County
Senior Citizens tournament (benefiting
that organization) in April then moved
on to Gulf County with the Gaskin Park
tournament (benefiting the Employees
Club scholarship fund), Gator Classic in
August (benefiting Project Graduation),
and ending with the Florida Catfish
Classic in September (also benefiting the
scholarship fund) as the last of the Trail.
For more information on the
tournaments, please visit Gulf County's
Tourism Council at www.visitGulfCounty.
com or the official tournament website
www.FloridaCatfishClassic.com or
on Facebook with the Employees
Club under "City of Wewa". You can
even make a simple old fashioned


Tim Pynes
holds the
fifth-place"
fish, caught Iti I --
by Crystal
Hamlin, -
which
weighed in
at 28.32
pounds. Far
right, Parley
Shuler took �
third with
this 31.85-
pounder



PHOTOS SPECIAL _
TO THE STAR


.to


' -^ - -
:I
J~ *
� . .,
a' " ).21 ,: '


telephone call to 850-639-2605.
Tim Ake of Wewahitchka was first
on the leaderboard with a 16.8 pound
flathead catfish caught just before dark
on Friday evening. By 10 p.m. Ake was
knocked into second place by Crystal
Hamlin of Bristol, Fla. with a 28.32
pound flathead. By 8:30 a.m. Saturday
morning, Tim was off the board, Crystal
was in fourth place and Chris Vinson of
Bristol was in first with a 34.61 pound
catfish. Anglers could weigh in at any
time during the night and the board
constantly changed until the noon
whistle.
At that time, the first-place holder
took a lie detector test to become the
official winner.
Those official winners are:
1st: Chris Vinson; Bristol, Fla;
34.61 pounds; $1,000
2nd: Ken Sumner, Bristol, Fla;
33.20 pounds; $500
3rd: Parley Shuler; Bristol, Fla;
31.85 pounds; $400
4th: Jack Foskey: Vidalia, Ga;
29.30 pounds: $300
5th: Crystal Hamlin; Bristol, Fla;
28.32 pounds; $200
And the individual with the most
flathead pounds for the Gaskin Park
Flathead Catfish Tournament was Jamie
Lee with 21 fish totaling 177.10 pounds.
Individual fish ranged in weight from 2.29
pounds to 18.28 pounds garnering him
$250.
"We had a respectable tournament
with some respectable size fish pulled
out," Minchew said.
The fishing usually takes place on the
Apalachicola and Chipola Rivers as well
as areas of the Dead Lakes, but because
of low water on the Apalachicola, many
anglers had to run down the Chipola
River to the convergence of the two
rivers and come back up to get to


water deep enough for fish on the
southern part of the Apalachicola.
There were sections of the river
where a person could actually walk
from one bank to the other. A couple
of the fishermen joked about having
shovels with them to travel the rivers.
"I told one fellow who called and
asked about the river levels that
maybe he might want to bring a
four-wheeler," joked tournament
director Don Minchew.
Hazards on the rivers
abound when it is high and fast
or low and dry. Such hazards of
a low water table are the many stumps
and deadfalls in the rivers and the Dead
Lakes as well as sunken boats from
the late 1800's including cotton barges,
steamboats, and paddle wheelers. The
Apalachicola River is connected to part
of the toll-free 3,000 mile Intracoastal
Waterway which was authorized by
Congress in 1919. The Waterway was
maintained by the Army Corps of
Engineers running from the Apalachee
Bay in Northwest Florida to the Rio
Grande in Brownsville, Texas, along the
Gulf of Mexico coast. The Atlantic Coast
section runs from Boston, Mass., to Key
West, Fla.
The Wayne County Tourism Board
(Jesup, Ga.) together with several county
officials brought the state record flathead
catfish (83 pounds and 54 inches long)
mounted in a transparent traveling
exhibit. It was caught in June 2006 on
the Altamaha River demonstrating just
how big these catfish can grow. These
visitors were promoting their catfish
tournaments for August 2011 and May
2012. They also had a transparent 600
gallon tank for the use of Gaskin Park
anglers to show off their catch of the day
for the spectators. For more information
on the Wayne County tournaments,


83 pounds
when
caught,
was orn,
Thmore Fht d
83 pounds

caught h
w as on
display
in Gaskin
Park last
weekend.










please visit www.waynetourism.com.
Wayne County generously provided
a drawing for their May tournament
which was awarded to Tripp Barrier of
Wewahitchka.
The Florida state record flathead
is 49.39 pounds and 42.5 inches long
caught in April 2004 on the Apalachicola
River according to the Florida Wildlife
Commission website at wwwmyfwc.
com. Flathead catfish are non-native to
Florida and Georgia migrating here from
states west and are excellent table fare.
The Apalachicola Tournament rail does
not release these catfish; if they are not
kept by the fishermen, most are donated
to fish fry fund raisers for a variety of
causes.
This year, catfish from the Gaskin
Park tournament were donated to
Florida baseball's District 4 Champions,
the 12 and under Wewa Dixie Youth Boys
from Wewahitchka to help them raise
funds to travel to East Lakeland for the
state tournament.
In addition to the donation of fish by
tournament participants, Richard Keele
of Keele's Fishin Shack in Blountstown
donated a Tica rod and Tica Cayman 205
reel combo to be auctioned off with the
funds going to the baseball team. Bidding
started at $50 for this $300 value set and
finally ended with the highest bid of $140
by Rudy Sumner of Hosford, Fla.
Tripp Barrier, proprietor of Snow
King Snowballs, helped the anglers and
spectators cool down with delicious icy
treats, donating a portion of his proceeds
to the ball team as well.


RSH REPORT TSPONSOREDBY

y ULUE WAT E 1R-

9OUTRIGGERS -

Freshwater

Worm fishing is all but over until water temps drop again.
Most action has been on deep running crankbaits or
topwater early in the morning. Creek fishing has had good
reports of shellcraker and catfish.

Inshore

Hot water temps are making inshore fishing a challenge even
to the most experienced. Topwater trout action is about the
best thing in the bay right now. Early in the morning or late in
the afternoon will prove to be the best time of day.

Offshore

Red snapper action is still KING! Huge fish are in the 100-
150 ft range. Bring along plenty of big live bait because the
snapper are just about tired of cigar minnows. Keep your
baits of the bottom and even right under the boat.


LeA


:irl r vi rs::,r
lirii Vinii on I

.::f -: A i I







S PORT ST.JOE WEWAH TCHKA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, June 30, 2011 w w w. starfl . com Page 11


FLORIDA AAU JUNIOR OLYMPIC TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS


By imll (rol Class IA track and field champion-
Nt. N L,.. ,i.ht,, ships d(unn1 tie 2'Il high school


eVegan walker r raised heri per-
sonal bar on Sunday at tlhe
Flonda AM\ .Junio(r Oi(mpic
Track and Field Championships in


Jacksonille
Thie rising senior at Port
St Joe High School tuwce set
personal bests in the pole
vault while leaping past the
conlpetition and oant( the gIld
inedal stand, winning tlie
state title in her age group
and easily qu alityin for next
month's national challmpion-
ships in New\ Orleans


MEG
WALI


S"She had all excellent meet." said
Coach Keith Chiles --She 'set person-
al records, htice She cleared exelry
helilt ,up to 131-teetI on her
first jLump Sle as jLump-
1ing really well "
Thie field (of 18 com-l
petitors \\as \lhit-
tied to ho,. Walker
andl one other: I)y
tile time tie bar9
reached 1Il- et
11dun0ng SIunday's
I' Iinals
That was the
h eiglhIt Walker
I aulted iIn taking
second ill thie fi-
1 nals ot tlie state


(
i,



g


season
\Valker reaclied the lireilit with-
out a miss allnd continuedI her pertec-
tion in clearniI 11-teet on he-r first
attenipt Her opponent also cleared

to 11-6
tile height and the Lwo wvent

-"Mlegan sailed over that."
SChiles said ot 11-6. the other
firl falling to clearL,: iini
A walkerr the title
Already tile winner, but
\witli three misses in her
AN pocket lett to use. Walker \as
KER allowed t(o raise tile lar to
whlateer height she desired
Having cleared 12-teet (tldunng
qualifying rounds at the state hihli
school meet. Chiles anid WValker de-
cided on 12-1, a personal best
We lknew she could (do it. \\e
w anted her to at least set a personal
best," Chiles said
Walker nailed it on her first ti'y
�"She w\as on." tChiles said "Thel
impressive thing was she was doing
it with the shorter pole "
Not yet entirely comitortable wmul
the lo'ier 14-foot (pole she had been
practicing with this summnel lWalker
retullired t(o her uisulal 13-6 pole tor the
XAU 1.Juinior Olymipic meet There is no,
restnlction o(n whlch pole lialker uses
d(unnI tlie AA or high school season
Chiles noted, hower'er.i tliat Valk-
er relished in at lIC, at the state
AAU meet, 22 poundsI(I
less than tihe 13,1
pounds the lonieri
m , f pole is geared(I tor
SChiles noted,
"That she is jump-
% ing with a pole that
is 20 pounds beyond
her weight is an
accomplishment in
itself."
However, Chiles
said Walker was just


not ending her marks. hitting her
stnde with1 the Ilonger pole on tihe
Jacksonmille track.
H"\\e i)racticed with it before the
meet andi she just wasn't there so wee
decided to just use tle slhoIrter pole."
Cliiles said "-The track wasn'tt hlong or
tast enough t(r tile 1-I-foot pole
"W\Vhen she gets on the 14-toot pole
there is n1o telling hol highl she'll
9o
And HValker \%as no(t vet finished in
Jacksonille
The bar \\as raised to 12-6, and
again Halker \"as perfect on the first
attempt, increasing her personal
best
-"Slie \as jumping 11-6 last sum-n
imel and this summller she is at 12-6
so that is an increase it one toot in
tlie course (t one year" Chiles said
--That is pretty goodv(i
-And 12-6 is a big mark tor her'
('hiles explained that wit h a height
of 12-6; on her resume, and Walker not
yet in her senior year ot h(ih school.
\\alker's pIrofile for colleges and
scholarships increased significantly
The University ot North Flohnda.
which has a vwell-respectedI pole
vaulting program, has been paI'ticu-
larly interested. Chiles said
Chiles said thle next step on Sun-
day wvas to try and put Walker in the
top 1in nationally in lherae group11) this
summer bIy leaping 1 3-teet
Walker had three solid attempts.
Cliles said, but tile bar clanled to tie
pit each time
"Slie had three ood0(1 tiles., and o(ne
time I tlh utI lht slie 1t there, but slihe
didn't (qute clear it," Chiles said "But
she had a good day."
Walker will prep for the AAU Ju-
nior Olympics National meet by com-
peting at the Disney Club Track and
Field Championships in July.
Then off to New Orleans where
Walker, a national champion as a sev-
enth-grader, will attempt to win her
second national title.


Port St. Joe AAA Dixie Boys win District 4 title


Star Staff Report
The Port St. Joe AAA Di-
xie Boys won the District 4
title last week with a victory
over Franklin County in the
championship game of the
district tournament played in
Wewahitchka.
This same group won the
AA title two years ago when
they were 8 years old.
The AAA team will travel to
Avon Park for the state tourna-
ment which begins July 15. The
tournament features the best
16 AAA teams in the state.
"We are very excited to be
returning to another state
tournament with a great group
of young men," said manager
Chris Butts.
"They fought hard and nev-
er gave up, which ultimately
paid off with a come-from-
behind win," Butts said. "We
were down 5-0 early in a pres-
sure-packed game (against
Franklin County). This was


Bottom row, from left, Caleb Butts, Jacob Kennedy, Jacob
Hopper, Josh Butts, Joel Bogaert and Jaden Grantland.
Middle row, from left, Elijah Hester, Gene Quinn, Bryce Thomas,
Matthew Costin, Jarrett Browning and Cameron Harmon.
Back row, from left, Coach Bryce Thomas, Coach Bill Kennedy
and Manager Chris Butts.
very impressive and what added, "These boys started
we look for in championship playing together in T-ball when
caliber teams." they were 6 years old, and this
Coach Bryce Thomas is their second district title;


that is exciting."
Coach Bill Kennedy said, "I
agree with Chris and Bryce,
and I would add that not only
are these boys good athletes,
they are great bunch of kids. A
real pleasure to coach."
The District 4 champs will
be fundraising at various lo-
cations, including bagging for
bucks at the Piggly Wiggly and
a huge fish fry at Frank Pate
Park on Friday, July 1.
Coaches sent a shout-out
and thank you to George Du-
ren and the staff at Piggly Wig-
gly for their support of youth
athletics year after year.
"George Duren and the
folks at the Piggly Wiggly
are our go-to guys when we
start fundraising," said all
three coaches. "They are al-
ways there for us and have
always helped support youth
sports"
Parents, coaches, family
and friends are all so proud,
Kennedy added.


Andy Hersh


ties record at


Johns Hopkins

Special to The Star

Andy Hersh of Valrico, Fla., grandson
of Tom and Mary Knox, had a stellar year
at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore,
Md.
In the classroom, Andy earned the dis-
tinguished honor of making the Dean's
List in both the fall and spring semesters
for the 2010-2011 school year.
Athletically, he helped lead the Johns
Hopkins men's tennis team to the Centen-
nial Conference Championships while ty-
ing the university's single season record
for wins with 24.
Hersh finished the year 24-4 and has a
two-year combined record of 45-9.
His next goal: surpassing 80 wins in a
career! With two years remaining, he has
a chance to do just that.
Andy studies economics at Hopkins
and plans to enter the world of investment
banking upon earning his degree.


Gene Raffield

Football discusses

6th-graders

Special to The Star

When the Gulf County School Board
decided that the sixth grade would be-
come a part of the elementary school,
suddenly there was nowhere in St. Joe for
sixth-graders to play football.
The Gene Raffield Football League had
two teams, the 7- and 8-year-old Dolphins
and the 9- and 10-year-old Jaguars. Most
sixth-grade boys are 11 years old, not eli-
gible for the Jaguars and now not eligible
for Junior High School football.
There was a time when GRFL had an
11- and 12-year-old team, the Buccaneers.
The great success of the middle school
program caused an exodus of players
from the Bucs to the middle school. With
the middle school team eliminated, now
is the time to start a Bucs team again.
Plans are being made by GRFL officials
to do just that. New equipment must be
purchased and a new coaching staff put
together. Anyone interested in coaching
on the Bucs, or any GRFL team, should
call Mal Parrish at 227-9540 for more in-
formation.
Last year there were 11- and 12-year-
old teams fielded by Chattahoochee,
Blountstown, Liberty County and Wewa-
hitchka. It is anticipated that all these
teams will continue so it will be possible
to work out a good schedule.
Discussions between the high school
football staff and GRFL have taken place
regarding seventh grade students who
are eligible for the Junior High School
team. We all will recommend that play-
ers capable of earning regular playing
time should play for the school. Others
will gain more experience and enjoy their
season more if they play for the Bucs.


County ladies softball

league seeks players

Star Staff Report

A group of ladies in the community are
seeking to form a women's slow pitch soft-
ball league of 2-4 teams. There are about
20 players participating, but several more
players are needed.
Games are played on Tuesday and
Thursday at 7 p.m. ET at the 10th Street
ball fields in Port St. Joe. Anyone inter-
ested in playing is urged to show up with
a glove ready to play. For any questions,
call Misty Wood at 340-1389 or RSVP at
the league's Facebook event under Soft-
ball League for Ladies (Port St. Joe).


NE ~*I





A12 I The Star


Local


Thursday, June 30, 2011


MISSION from page Al


four people to the Panama
City Rescue Mission, and
those people were not
from Port. St. Joe. He add-
ed that the people of Port
St. Joe always have been
generous, and anyone who
needs help gets it.
Also, a long line of local
reverends said they most-
ly see people who are hav-
ing trouble paying power
bills or buying food. None
of those people are home-
less, they added.
Fox and his associates
were grilled by Commis-
sioner Lorinda Gingell,
who wanted to know what
would happen if the home-
less started showing up


"I have caught a bunch
of heat this week."
Matthew Scoggins
mission supporter

downtown when Rescue asked. "Do they have cell-
Mission employees were phones?"
not around. Another vocal critic of
Rescue Mission offi- the plan was Jim Norton,
cials said they were avail- who said he lives in Port
able day and night, and all St. Joe but works in Pan-
anyone had to do was call ama City. Also, Norton's
and they would come and wife owns a business in
handle the situation. downtown Port St. Joe.
"How are they go- "The Rescue Mission
ing to call you?" Gingell did not do their home-


work before they came to
town," Norton said in an
interview with The News
Herald. "We support the
work of the mission (but)
we certainly can't afford to
put it in the heart of where
our business district is."
During the meeting,
Norton repeatedly pointed
to the vagrants in down-
town Panama City as proof
a mission or mission work
in Port St. Joe would cre-
ate the same problem. Op-
ponents also said Fox and
Atkinson keep changing
their story about the Port
St. Joe office. One min-
ute it is for fundraising,
the next they are doing a
needs assessment, oppo-
nents said. The opponents
also seemed convinced
Fox is being forced out of
Panama City and Spring-
field and is trying to relo-
cate the entire mission to
Port St. Joe. They said this
even though the office the
mission is leasing in Port
St. Joe looks, from the out-
side, like it barely could
hold 10 people, and even
then only if those people
slept standing up.
Fox countered that the
mission is the solution
to the problem, not the
cause.
Not every Port St. Joe
resident was opposed to
the mission.
Matthew Scoggins,
the owner of 5 Star Colli-
sion, a large, well main-
tained business near the


PHOTOS BY TERRY BARNER I Florida Freedom
Above, the Rev. Billy Fox, left, the executive director
of the Panama City Rescue Mission, speaks to Port
St. Joe city commissioners and 45 residents who
packed City Hall on Tuesday to hear from those for
and against the mission's satellite office in Port St.
Joe. Fox said the office, pictured below, is only for
administrative needs and won't house or feed the
homeless.


entrance of the city, said
he wants the mission and
city leaders to find a com-
promise. Scoggins is part
of the group who wanted
to bring in help in Port St.
Joe.
He said there is a large
drug problem in the city
and that children, who
show up to school in dirty
clothes and get picked on,
are the ones who are suf-
fering.
In 1992, Scoggins was
a homeless single father,
but a Rescue Mission in
Georgia helped him turn
his life around. They also
rescued his innocent son,
who is about the graduate
college, Scoggins said.
If they had known there
would be such opposition


to leasing an office for
charity work in downtown
Port St. Joe, they would
have gone someplace else,
he added.
"I have caught a bunch
of heat this week," he
said.
Ultimately, Fox prom-
ised that if the business
leaders and city commis-
sioners who are opposed
to the location of the office
will help the mission get
out of its lease, they would
move. No one volunteered
to help the mission get out
of its lease or pay the rent,
but Fox still promised that
he would shut the doors
and find a new location.
Immediately.
"What we want to do is
meet the need," Fox said.


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COMMUNITY


B
Section


Thursday, June 30, 2011 w w w. starfl . com Page 1



First Fridays to feature Clyde Butcher photos, J.B. Zydeco Zoo


Star Staff Report
First Fridays will bring a bit
of old and new Florida to Port
St. Joe to kick off this holiday
weekend.
The event runs from 6-9
p.m. ET on Friday, with music
by J.B. Zydeco Zoo out of
Tallahassee beginning at 7 p.m.
ET.
First Fridays is held at the
Port Inn, on the corner of U.S.
Highway 98 and Cecil G. Costin
Blvd. in Port St. Joe, and is free
and open to the public. The
opening reception is from 6-7
p.m., followed by music on the
porch.
J.B. Zydeco Zoo, and its
eclectic mix of Cajun-dipped
sounds, guarantees listeners
will have the urge to "get up
and dance," according to the
band's website.
First Fridays this month
will feature the photography of
renowned Florida native Clyde
Butcher.
For more than 40 years,
Butcher has been preserving on








s. .... ..


film the untouched areas of
the landscape. His images
are captured with an
8-by-10, 11-by-14 and 12-
by-20-inch view camera.
The large-format
camera allows him to
express the elaborate
detail and textures
that distinguish
the intricacy of
the landscape. The
photographs range from
8-by-10 inches to 5-by-8
feet.
Butcher has been honored
by the state of Florida with
the highest award that can
be given a private citizen: the
Artist Hall of Fame Award. He
was also privileged to receive
the Lifetime Achievement
Award from the North
American Nature Photography
Association and given the honor
of being the Humanitarian
of the Year for 2005 from
International University. He
has also received the Heartland
Community Service Award
from the state of Florida for


companion book to the
documentary of
the same name by
Blountstown native
Elam Stoltzfus.
The two also
teamed up on a book
and documentary
e oon Florida's aquatic
Se preserves called
"Living Waters:
Aquatic Preserves
of Florida," which
featured a segment
on St. Joseph's Bay.
A palachicola River:
An American Treasure"
is graciously on loan from
educating people about the the Calhoun County Preble-
beauty of their state. The Rish Gallery for the public's
Sierra Club has given him the pleasure during First Fridays.
Ansel Adams Conservation This exhibit, which will
Award, which is given to a be on display at the Port Inn
photographer who shows through July, would not have
excellence in photography been possible without the
and has contributed to public dedication and commitment of
awareness of the environment. Kristy Terry, executive director,
The exhibit will Calhoun County Chamber of
feature photographs from Commerce, and Ralph Rish,
"Apalachicola River: An Preble-Rish Engineering
American Treasure," a president.


Photos SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Above, The photography of Clyde
Butcher will be the featured exhibit.
Left, J.B. Zydeco Zoo will perform
as part of First Fridays this Friday.


MAN'S JOURNEY SHEDS LIGHT ON S.S. EMPIRE MICA


I -
I *


a PHOTOS FROM THE COLLECTION OF RODERICK MCILRAITH JR. I| ...... 1.. 1- i ..
Chief Officer Roderick Mcllraith of Cheddar received Commendation to the King for his gallant behavior aboard the sinking
Empire Mica.






Iar o our shores


By Lois Swoboda
Florida Freedom Newspapers
he story of the Empire
T Mica and her fiery
destruction off Cape
San Blas is widely known, but
a new translation and a visitor
from across the big pond have
shed some light on the human
face of a tragedy that took place
69 years ago next Wednesday.
In September 2010, Roderick
"Rod" Mcllraith Jr., came to
Florida looking for traces of his
father, Chief Officer Roderick
Mcllraith who died on the
Empire Mica.
For most of his life, Rod
believed his father died
somewhere off the coast of
Argentina.
In 2009, at age 59, he married
for the first time. His bride
Denise was a computer buff.
One afternoon, Rod brought
home a friend who wanted to
learn about the Internet.
Denise typed Rod's name
into Google, an online search
engine, and what popped up
on the monitor surprised them
all. The very first hit was a
list of the crew members who
served on the Empire Mica,
on an excellent webpage
created by Gordon Steele at
http://homepage.eircom.net/
-gordonsteele/.
A year later, Rod and
Denise set off on their first trip
to the states in search of the
Empire Mica, accompanied
by three friends: David and
Annachristina Smith, and
Barbara Croydon, three friends
who visit the U.S. every year.

Prowling U-boat has
success off Key West
The S.S. Empire Mica was a
British merchant oil tanker on
lease to the Anglo- American Oil
Company.


The ship, 463.5' long with
a 61' beam, was small by
supertanker standards, but
large for the 1940s. The crew
loved her. She was just 11
months old and featured an
early form of air conditioning,
a luxury few seamen had
experienced.
Armed with a half-dozen
deck guns, she was traveling
from Baytown, Texas to Key
West carrying about 11,200 tons
of kerosene. Although the U.S.
government downplayed the
possibility of German U-boats in
the gulf, sailors knew they were
there and dangerous.
Capt. Hugh Bentley's orders
were to run during the day
and hide at night, staying in
shallow water to avoid trouble.
U-boats required 60' of water to
maneuver and, more important,
to submerge. Without sufficient
depth, they were vulnerable to
attack by deck-mounted guns
and airplanes.
Bentley, 70, a retired seaman
called back into service,
intended to dock in either St.
Andrews or St. Joe Bay on the
evening of June 28, but the draft
of the Mica was too deep to
enter either safe haven.
So Bentley was forced to
make a run for it, crossing the
open gulf.
Three days earlier, U-Boat
67, nicknamed "Raider," under
the command of 27-year-old
Kapitanleutenant Gunter
Mueller-Stockheim began
patrolling the coast of Gulf and
Franklin counties.
Raider was a Type IXC, the
largest of three designs among
the 25 German U-boats that
operated in the gulf during 1942
and 1943. She was 250' long, 22'
wide, weighed 1,120 tons and
carried 22 torpedoes and 52
men.
Her size gave her the
capacity to hold more fuel and
supplies than most submarines


of the era, so she could operate
for months at a time without
returning to a base for refueling.
Although American leaders
suppressed the fact to avoid
panic, there were as many as 20
U-boats operating at any given
time in the gulf during the first
half of World War II.
The U-boats' job was to
cut the flow of oil carried by
tankers from ports in Texas and
Louisiana and prevent military
hardware and supplies from
reaching Europe. The U-boats
prowling the gulf effectively cut
off the U.S. oil and gas supplies
to Europe for the first half of the
war, sending 56 vessels to the
bottom of the gulf.
Raider sailed out of Lorient
in Nazi-occupied France in May
1942, and after crossing the
Atlantic, sank the Nicaraguan
ship Managua off Key West on
June 16. Mueller then headed
for the northern gulf. This was
his fifth war patrol and was to
be his most successful. In all,
he would attack and damage
or sink eight merchant marine
vessels carrying a total of
almost 45,000 tons of cargo.

'Cat and mouse games'
A comprehensive website
dealing with U-boats, created
by retired U.S. Navy Capt. Jerry
Mason, http://uboatarchive.net,
displays Mueller's log including
a detailed account of the Mica's
destruction.
Mason has translated
this and a number of other
documents from the original
German.
On June 20, Raider attacked
but failed to sink the Norwegian
vessel Nortind near New
Orleans. He fled when the
ship signaled to shore with
floodlights.
Mueller then worked his
way east following what the
Germans correctly believed was


a shipping route. His intended
destination was Cape San Blas
where he planned to lie in wait
for cargo vessels.
The trip was dogged
with difficulty. Raider's
communication equipment
failed. There was often fog
and rain, and other times he
remained submerged because,
as the log reads, "nights bright
as day and a dead calm sea" left
Raider vulnerable to aircraft.
The signal from the sounding
equipment was so distorted
it was all but useless. Few
ships were spotted during the
passage.
"The fact that we have found
nothing the last two nights I
ascribe to the bad visibility,"
Mueller wrote. "The traffic must
be there! Nothing is to be seen,
as far as the eye can see. Since
nothing was met during the
advance to the east, it is logical
to assume that if traffic is in fact
evading to the east, it moves to
the north just offshore."
On June 25, Raider was
spotted by an aircraft that
attempted to bomb the U-boat.
"I am angry that I was seen
after all. Will remain submerged
until darkness," Mueller wrote.
When Raider reached Cape
San Blas, her loneliness came
to an end.
The ship lay submerged
off the cape during the day,
watching through a periscope,
and surfaced at night. Surfacing
was necessary to renew
the ship's supply of air and
recharge the batteries. When
on the bottom, the engines
were shut down to conserve
fuel. Mueller found that below
150', the temperature was
comfortable.
The silent stalker watched
the fishing fleet and sailboats
come and go and, on one
occasion, saw a tug boat towing
a tanker.
Mueller sized her up for an


attack but spared her.
"I let them go because, for
a torpedo, the case is hopeless,
and I do not want to disturb the
apparently favorable area for
me with artillery," he wrote.
On June 28, Mueller saw
what he believed was another
U-boat surface near his lair.
He speculated it could be
Korvettenkapitan Wolf Henne
in U-boat 157, not knowing
Henne's boat had been sunk
two weeks earlier in the Keys
and Henne was dead.
Problems with the radio
kept Mueller from contacting
the other ship directly. He came
closer to investigate.
In his log he wrote, "Now
it is recognized as a U-boat,
resembling a German type IX
boat. Can not be recognized
with certainty however,
therefore, to clarify and, if
necessary, attack dived. Cat
and mouse games have no
purpose."

'Two hits after
67 seconds'
At 5:53 a.m. on the morning
of June 29, Raider surfaced
again. A brilliant full moon hung
in a cloudless sky. Mueller noted
there was summer lightning.
At 6:25, Mueller spotted the
Empire Mica and at 6:50, he
fired on her.
'A shadow, initially assessed
as two small (vessels), is an
approaching tanker with
prominent bridge and rear
superstructure," he wrote in
his log. "From the type and size
estimate like 'British Unity'
8,407 GRT (gross register
tonnage), armed. Enemy
(tanker) zigzags with long legs.
"It (the night) is very
bright, but I hope, he does not
recognize too much, bow wave

See WAR Bl0


NE ~*I






B2 I The Star


Society


Thursday, June 30, 2011


Marlene Womack



book signing


Star Staff Report
Noted local author
Marlene Womack will be
signing copies of her most
recent book, "The Magic
of Cape San Blas and Sur-
rounding Area" on Satur-
day, July 2, from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. ET and Monday, July
4, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET
at the Cape San Blas Light-
house Gift Shop.
Read about the lost
town of St. Joseph, ship-
wrecks and disasters, the
Civil War and salt-making,
Mexico Beach, buried trea-
sure, Native Americans
of the area, the growth of
Port St. Joe, World War II,
Cape San Blas and other


lighthouses and many
other stories.
Copies of Womack's
book are available at area
bookstores and the Cape
San Blas Lighthouse gift
shop.


Birth


Branton Patrick Herring is born
Peyton Herring would like to announce the birth of
her baby brother, Branton Patrick Herring.
Branton, son of Matt and Sherry Herring, was born
Feb. 1 and weighed six pounds, 14 ounces and was 18.6
inches long.
God blessed our family with a beautiful baby boy and
he is a gift from God. Praise be to God.


PET OF THE

SPET WEEK
St. Joseph Bay Humane Society


I


Lv


"OH DUKE

BOY"!
Meet Duke a Great
Dane and Labrador
mix. Duke is around
a year old now and
is very loving and
playful. He walks
well on his leash and


Scout Logan Haddock, Tenderfoot Lane Harris and
Chaplain Tommy Dwyer at the completion of the
Scout's Horsemanship merit badge.


Garden show winners
Star Staff Report
The Port St. Joe Garden Club
held its small standard flower
show, "The Garden Gate to Sum-
mer" on June 11.
The show was judged by three
judges certified by the Florida
Federation of Garden Clubs.
The top prizewinners were
Mrs. Betty Lewis for Design Ex-
cellence and Mrs. Elaine Jackson
for Horticultural Excellence.
Mrs. Barbara Oksanen re-
ceived the Arboreal Award.
Awards of Merit were given
to Ms. Jean Fortner, Ms. Elaine
Jackson, Ms. Barbara Oksanen
and Ms. Era Daniels.
First-place ribbons in floral
design were given to Ms. Betty
Lewis, Ms. Jean Fortner and Ms.
Barbara Conway.
First-place ribbons in Horti-
culture were given to Ms. Era
Daniels, Ms. Mary Harrison, Ms.
Elaine Jackson, Ms. Betty Lewis,
Ms. Frenchie Ramsey, Ms. Deb-
bie Maudling, Ms. Barbara Ok-
sanen and Ms. Barbara Conway.
A collage of show pictures can
be seen on Facebook under Port
St. Joe Garden Club.


listens to his basic commands. He would love nothing
more then to come home with you and be your forever
companionship. Around here at the shelter he is just
a big ol baby who wants your attention and love so if --.
you can give Duke a forever home and the love and
companionship he deserves then please do not hesitate
to contact us.
PLEASE HELP US! If you are not able to adopt a pet ,
then please help us save a life by sponsoring one
today just Contact Melody at 227-1103 or Shelter Mom .
Melissa at 625-5676 for more information on how to
help! You may also find more information about our - .
other dogs and cats we have here on our website at
www.SJBHumaneSociety.org. Our hours for the
shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Also
Faith's Thrift Hut is in great need of donations also and
all the proceeds go directly to support the animals in
our care! Faiths Thrift Hut Has Expanded! We now have
more furniture & appliances. Plus lots of other great thrift
store treasures. The hours for the store are Thursday-
Saturday from 10 am-3 pm. Volunteers are always
welcome at both our store and our shelter! Our store
and shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe!
Hope to see you all there soon!

25 S. Franklin St.
. wEastpoint, FL
p., S p 32328 Establh1

Professional Pet Grooming o n e se A+ Ra'tingb�heB
Pot Sitting arcling
650-070-2257 7
Phone/lFmx
penelopespetstop.com w r sn


Scouts travel to


summer camp


Star Staff Report
Boy Scout Troop 47 of
Port St. Joe enjoyed a camp-
ing trip to Camp Daniel
Boone in North Carolina.
Eight scouts and three
leaders left June 11 and
joined about 700 other scouts
at the camp.
Scouts attended a two-
evening course at Stockton
Farms in Canton, N.C. to
learn basic horsemanship.
On the second evening
they completed a 50 ques-
tion quiz to show they had
learned the badge require-
ments. Following the quiz
was a game called "Last
Man Standing."
All the scouts attempt-
ing the Horsemanship Merit
Badge were lined up around
the barn. Mr. Ricky Stockton
then asked each scout in turn
a question about the course.
A correct answer meant you
continued to stand and com-
pete; an incorrect answer
and you sat down.
There were 80 Scouts
competing in the "Last Man


IT
Hi' "
',-4*
(pe


Standing" game. It came
down to the last three who
had to then touch the specif-
ic part of the horse (Spade),
pictured above, that Ricky
told them to identify; in this
case it was the fetlock.
The first two scouts were
incorrect. Logan Haddock
of Troop 47 was correct and
won the trophy he is pic-
tured holding. Logan so im-
pressed Mr. Stockton that on
the next evening, during a
different merit badge class,
he told the Scouts how this
young man amazed him
with verbatim answers from
the course handout he had
been given just a few days
before.
This course is difficult.
Routinely there are scouts
who do not earn the badge.
Mr. Stockton also tells each
class that life is not fair, but
you can accomplish what-
ever you wish if you try
with everything you have.
Congratulations Logan for
winning the Horsemanship
Merit Badge and the Last
Man Standing trophy!


KEITH L. JONES, CPA
AUDIT, ACCOUNTING, TAX & CONSULTING SERVICES


America Counts on CPAs
202 Marina Drive, Suite 303 * Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-1040 PH 850-229-1050 FX
keith@keithionescpa.com * www.keithionescpa.com
MEMBER: AMERICAN AND FLORIDA INSTITUTES OF CPA'S







Rob Garver, MD

NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER
Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe

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* Castle Connolly Best Doctor List 2005-2010

Expertise in:

* Shortness of breath
* Coughs
* Wheezing


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Appointments


Call Toll Free
888-681-5864

For more info
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Books available at area bookstores:
Bluewater Otrighhousers,
Cape San Bias Lighthouse Gift Shop i


I -,.


II






Thursday, June 30, 2011


School News


The Star I B3


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Faith Christian School offers an "extended day" for
students from K3 through the fourth grade. Here,
extended day kids participate in afternoon activities.

The Lion's TALE


Faith Christian School
offers an "extended day"
for students from K3
through the fourth grade.
Preschool extended day
kids eat lunch, take a nap
and enjoy playtime until a
parent picks the child up or
until 5 p.m. ET. Elementary
school extended day kids
do homework and socialize
until the a parent picks
the child up or until 5 p.m.
Extended day is of great
value to parents who work


c"Faith
lhri-aiili Schuol


or have afternoon errands.
Open enrollment is now.
Call 229-6707 or stop by the
office at 801 20th St. in Port
St. Joe to enroll your child
in preschool with extended
care.
Office hours are 9 a.m.
until noon ET.


S 2 PSJHS students selected to receive laptops


Special to The Star
CameronPryorandWill
Hammons, both members
of the High School High
Tech (HSHT) club at Port
St. Joe High School, were
two of 20 students select-
ed statewide to receive
almost-new refurbished
laptops from Dell.
These two students
were selected because of
their participation over
the past two years in
HSHT.
HSHT is a program
funded through the Able
Trust and Vocational Re-
habilitation, providing
high school students with
the opportunity to explore
jobs and/or post-second-
ary education.
Students participate
throughout the year in
job fairs, community ser-
vice, career mentoring
and summer internships.
Cameron and Will are in
summer internships, and
both have also been se-


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
From left are Patricia Hardman, Dyslexia Research Institute; Cameron Pryor, a
junior at Port St. Joe High School; Cathy Cox, activities director for High School
High Tech; Will Hammons, a junior at PSJHS; and Guinevere Crum, senior vice
president for the Able Trust.


elected to attend the Youth
Florida Leadership con-
ference in Tallahassee
later this summer.


HSHT would like to
thank Steve Howells of
The Florida Alliance for
Assistive Services and


Technology and Dell Com-
puters for making this
Christmas in June for
Cameron and Will.


2011 Project Graduation THANK-YOU


The 2011 Port St. Joe
High School graduating
seniors and their parents
wish to thank the following
sponsors for their
generosity in donating
money, talent and time to
help give our seniors a safe
and fun-filled 2011 Project
Graduation:
Gulf County School
Board, Port St. Joe High
School, Badcock, Port St.
Joe High Welding shop,
FairPoint Communications,
Port Inn, Shell Shack,
Seabreeze BBQ, Oak
Grove, Paul Gant BBQ,
Bennie Sherrill, George,
Sassy Nails, Frank D. May
Jr., Tim Wood, Centennial
Bank, Sunglass Hut, Jim
Norton, George Cox, Susan
Wilder, Blake Rish, Carol
Faison, Piggly Wiggly, John


Wiley, David Rich, Mayor
Mel Magidson, Tommy T's,
Ellis and Julie Sizemore,
Cathey Construction &
Development, Provisions,
Captain's Cove Marina,
Steve and Becky Norris,
Preble-Rish, Fred and
Carolyn Witten, John
James Jenkins, Family
Life, Hannon Insurance;
New Life Christian
Center, Bo Knows, Mel
Magidson Jr. PA, Kerigan
Marketing Associates,
Subway, Waterfront Auto
Sales, Watson Brothers,
Bluewater, Gulf County
Beaches Volunteer Fire
Department, Law Offices
of J. Patrick Floyd, Ailine's,
Persnickety, Lulu's Sweet
Expectation, Galloway,
Ramsey's Printing,
The Laundry Basket,


Roberson & Associates,
Windolf Construction, Joan
Cleckley, Boyd and Paula
Pickett, Sheriff Joe Nugent,
Kimberly P Shoaf, William
and Sandra Chafin, Charles
and Brenda Galloway, Van
and Judith Schaffer, Jack
and Zebe Schmitt, Howard
Creek Baptist, Tyndall
Federal Credit Union, St.
Joseph Catholic Church;
Apalachicola


Pentecostal, Clint Moore,
Beach Baptist, Linda and
Gus Griffin, First Baptist,
13 Mile, Bell Foundation
Company, Billy C. Quinn,
Carpet Country, David
and Patricia Warriner,
Lovelace Electronics,
Kesley Colbert, St. Joe
Pool, Scallop Cove,
Shoreline Medical Group,
Raffield Fisheries, Randy
Raffield, Eugene Raffield,


Williams Plumbing, Luana
Granger Ramsey, Kincaid
Coach Lines, The Christian
Community, Vincent Ivers,
Phil Collier Construction,
Extreme Clean, Current
Solutions, John Miller,
Cape San Blas Vacation,
GW Services Heating and
Cooling, Methodist Church
Charity, Jimmy Hambrick,
St. Joe Auto Parts, Danny
Little;


Wood's Fisheries, Gulf
Coast Datacom, Capital
City Bank, Mark Moore,
John and Linda Wright,
Debbie Wibberg, Christy
Wood, Emerald Coast
Federal Credit Union, Gulf
Coast Vacation Rentals,
Garner Huntsinger, St. Joe
Rent-All, Beach Properties
Real Estate, Stuart and
Rene Shoaf, and Melissa
Ramsey.


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OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA, INC


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* Security-cleared personnel
* Fort Walton Beach's leading mobile
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Sit Back & Relax! Let Us Do The Driving!


CASI*INO TRIPS


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PENSACOLA NAVAL MUSEUM JULY 19
One of the world's
largest aviation museums. Call for details


Over 20 yrs.
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Call todiay a6:t8850-23:4-3459or visit us online at:
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MARIANNA CAVERNS
Tour the largest cave in Florida


Call for info


I













FAITH


This business invites you to visit the
church of your choice this week.


COMFORTER
FUNERAL HOME
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter
L.F.D.
(850) 227-1818


Thursday, June 30, 2011 w w w. starf 1. com Page B4


The Christian CONSCIENCE



God's covenants - part 2


When a covenant is
not working, due to man's
failure to keep a covenant,
God institutes another
covenant. The second
major covenant was with
Abraham.
For those, who have
been brainwashed, to read
and believe only those
writings of their particular
church, the early life of
Abraham is a mystery. In
Genesis 11, we read that
originally his name was
Abram. If we look at the
genealogy that runs from
Noah to Abram, we find
that there is no record
as to what happened to
Abram in his childhood.
In the early books of
the Bible, we have two
mentions of a book called
the book of Jasher. We find
those in Joshua 10:13 and
2nd Samuel 1:18. In both
cases it appears that the
authors of these two books,


of the Bible, considered
the book of Jasher to be a
reliable source of historical
information. The book
of Jasher is available on
the web, if you simply
do a search for "book of
Jasher." If you haven't
read the book of Jasher, it
is very interesting reading.
I'm not suggesting that
you substitute the book of
Jasher for your Bible, but
let's face it: Even if your
religious leader is trying
to get you to read only the
writings of his/her church,
you still read a lot of stuff,
other than your Bible.
Even if the book of Jasher
was fiction, it is very
interesting reading.
According to the book
of Jasher, Abram was
persecuted by an evil
king named Nimrod. He
was hidden by one of the
maids of his father Terah,
until he was 10 years old.


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe


Sunday:
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m. ET
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. ET
Traditional Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET
Wednesday:
Youth: 5:30 p.m. ET
KChoir: 7:00p.m. ET


850) 227-1724
Rev. Mac Fulcher
Pastor
Ann Comforter Jeremy Dixon
Music Director Youth Minister
Deborah Loyless
Director of Children Ministries


(--^-------

A Spirit Filled
Fa i * * Outreach Oriented
am ly Life Word of Faith Church

Church
Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford
Welcome you to worship with us: HOME OF THE
Sunday 10:30am POWERHOUSE
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm YOUTH MINISTRIES
Wednesday 7pm
www. familylifechurch. net
323 Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL~ 850-229-5433


9'7Zt 'LPt&i L&tfan Cflhah
508 Sixteenth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


SlA^





� (U s N"5


850-227-1756

t Rev. Drucilla Tyler
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM


Then Abram was taken to
live with Noah and Shem.
If you compare the life
spans of the three, you will
see that for 10 years the
lives of Noah and Abram
overlap. And for a longer
period of time the lives of
Abram and Shem overlap.
According to the book of
Jasher, Abram lived with
Noah and Shem, for about
39 years. Is this true? We
can only speculate. But if
this is true, this answers
a lot of questions, like how
did Abram come to trust
in God?
In Genesis 15 and
17 we read about two
covenants that God
made with Abram. The
first was to give Abram
many descendants. The
second was the institution
of circumcision, and
giving Abram the name

See CONSCIENCE B7


Are you on track?
What is keepingyou from
getting on track?
The world has led so many
off some will never get back
Chastisement is coming,
check the news each day
People see it all the time,
but fail to change their way.
Look at Alabama,
Missouri, and many states
across the U.SA
Lives have been lost,
businesses, homes and
schools blown away
God is trying to get
everyone's attention; the lost
and those off-track too.
The ones off-track should
see it first and know what they
should do.
We can only experience
His blessing, if we get on-track
with the Lord.
To avoid His chastisement,
we must be in one accord.
- Billy Johnson


Obituaries


Robert Charlie (Bobby) Rish


Robert Charlie (Bob-
by) Rish, 84, of Wewahi-
tchka, FL went to be with
the Lord on Thursday,
June 23, 2011. He was
born to Roy P and Lucy P
Rish on August 6,1926.
Bobby was a lifelong
resident of Wewahitchka
and graduated Wewahi-
tchka High School in May
1944. He was self-
employed at Wewa
Plumbing and Heating,
which later became West
Florida Gas Company. Af-
ter retiring from his busi-
ness, he went to work like
his dad as a tag inspector
with the Division of Mo-
tor Vehicles and was later
promoted to Administra-
tor of District 5. After
retiring in 1992, he lived
life to the fullest enjoying
his wife of sixty-one years
and his family, especially
his grandchildren and
their many adventures on
the farm. Uncle Bob loved
his nieces and nephews


Charles W. Dickson,
Sr., 93, of Beacon Hill, FL
died peacefully at home
on Monday, June 20, 2011.
Charles was born on Octo-
ber 13, 1917 in Greenwood,
FL, son of the late
Forman J. and
Annie C. Dickson
of the Nubbin
Ridge area of
Greenwood.
Charles was a
member of "The
Greatest Genera- CHARI
tion" as Captain DICKS(
in the U.S. Army
Air Force. During WWII he
successfully completed 67
missions flying B-26 bomb-
ers over France, Belguim,
and Holland. For his gal-
lantry, he was awarded the
Air Force's highest honor,
the Distinguished Flying
Cross, the Air Medal with
11 Oak Leaf Clusters and
the European Theater


LI


as if they were his own.
Bobby was a Master
Mason of Tupelo Lodge
#289 in Wewahitchka for
57 years. He was a mem-
ber of the First United
Methodist Church for
59 years. He was also a
Navy Veteran.
He was predeceased
by his parents, Roy P and
Lucy P Rish; brothers,
Roy P Rish, Jr., Henry I.
Rish, and William J. Rish.
Survivors include his
beloved wife, Betty Jo
Batson Rish; daughters,
Ann Morris Johnson
(Mitchell); Doris Jean
Whitten (Byron) of We-
wahitchka, FL; grand-
children, Chris Morris
(Kim), Charlene Ellis
(Sean), Meagan Forrest
(Ryan), Robbie Morris
and girlfriend, Allison
Lewis; Chaz Whitten and
girlfriend, Michelle Holly;
and Tyler Whitten; great-
grandchildren, Walker
Morris, Ashlyn, Alexis,

Charles W. Dickson, Sr.


Victory Medal. After retir-
ing from the U.S. Air Force,
he became a flight instruc-
tor at Graham Air Base
in Marianna, FL. He was
the owner of the Dickson's
IGA in the '70s. He
also farmed the
family farm in Nub-
bin Ridge for many
years.
He is preceded
in death by his wife
of 48 years, Esther
ES W. A. Dickson, and a
N, SR. sister, Christine D.
Smith.
He leaves to cherish his
memory his children, Greg
Dickson of Santa Rosa
Beach, FL; Chuck Dickson
of Greenwood, FL; Kathy
Arnold (John) and Krissy
Gentry (Pat) all of Bea-
con Hill, FL.; his grand-
children, Patty Thames,
Zachary and Lavonia
Dickson, Kathryn, Jared


and Kody Ellis, Aidan
and Cooper Forrest, and
Landon Whitten.
Funeral services were
held Saturday, June 25,
2011 at 10 a.m. CT at the
First United Methodist
Church in Wewahitchka,
FL. Masonic Rites will be
conducted at graveside
by Tupelo Lodge # 289 at
Jehu Cemetery in Wewa-
hitchka, FL.
The family would like
to extend a special thank
you to Dr. Michael Barnes
and staff, A & A Home
Healthcare, and Covenant
Hospice for your care and
concern throughout the
years.
Active pallbearers are
Blake Rish, Steven Bode,
William Jay Rish III, Herb
McGuire, Al Millergren
and Charlie Little. Hon-
orary pallbearers will be
members of the Tupelo
Masonic Lodge #289.

Wilson Funeral Home


and Kristiana Arnold, Ja-
cob and Colby Gentry; his
great grandchildren, Pat-
rick Duncan and Charlie
Dickson; one brother, EJ.
Dickson (Jean) of Hatch,
New Mexico.
A celebration of his
life was at 10 a.m. CST
on Thursday, June 23 at
James and Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel in
Marianna, FL with Rev
Ronnie Wright officiating.
Burial followed in Green-
wood Baptist Cemetery
with military honors from
Elgin AFB and the Warrior
Watch Riders.
In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions
may be made to Covenant
Hospice or Greenwood
Baptist Church in memory
of Charles. Expressions
of sympathy may be made
online at www.jamesand
sikesfuneralhome.com.


, "Our Church can be your home"
first Church ofthe Nazarene
2420 Long Avenue * Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850) 229-9596

Give unto the Lord the gfory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness
Psalm 29:2


Sunday School....... ................. 10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


SOUTHERLAND FAMILY


FUNERAL HOME

507 10th Street * Port St. Joe


(850) 229-8111


SU united X t",
\- ffi" 4 d
111 North 22nd Street * Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Methodist churchh
NURSERY PROVIDED
Rev. Jerry Arhelger,Pastor * Church/Office: 648-8820


Nursery provided for all services


TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN
Come worship with us!
Rector Father Tommy Dwyer
ST. JAMES'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) * Sunday School 9:45

www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
Sig lanb 0ieW apti t CjQura
S 382 Ling Street - Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 & 6:00 p.m.
Pastor Josh Fidler Discipleship Training 600 pm
Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.




St. Peter's Church, ACC
(Traditional Services 1928 BCP)
Morning Prayer & Holy Communion
Sunday...............10:00 A.M.
Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M.
4th Thursday of Every Month
The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest
The Rev Lou Little, Deacon
Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center,
120 Library Drive
"An Unchanging Faith In A ( World"


NE ~*I


t Faith Bible Church
1t www.faithbiblepsj.net
80120" Street, Port St. Joe, Fl. (850) 229-6707
9:45 AM.............................................. ......................... Sunday School
10:30 AM..................................................... Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 AM ........................................................... ............................ W worship
6:00 PM ................................................................................................. W orship


Home of Faith Christian School
www.faithchristianpsj.net


If you're life isn't going well, It's not 6od's fault.

If you're life isn't going well, It's not God's fault. If you ask Him sincerely from your heart, He will give
you a new life. It's called being born again (John 3:3-7) or born of God (John 1:12,13).Ask God to
make you what He wants you to be. Keep on asking until you find you are changed. Come, worship
with us, enjoy real worship music, and meet others, who have been changed, at the Mexico Beach
Civic Center, each Sunday, at 10:00 AM central. We follow Jesus, and His teachings, and are not
affiliated with any other church. For Info: www.mexicobeachcwc.com or 850-348-0711


First Baptist Church
102 THIRD STREET * PORT ST. JOE
JeffPinder Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students


New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church
Sunday Wednesday
Sunday School ................... 9:00 am Children's Choir................ 5:30 pm
Worship Service................ 10:30 am Prayer Meeting............... 6:30 pm
Children's Ministry
Sunday Night Awana....5 pm - 7 pm Activities....................... 6:30 pm
Youth Groups................ 5:30 pm Youth Ministry Activities... 6:30 pm
I www.fbcpsj.org





Thursday, June 30, 2011 The Stan BS


Local


UndrNm


^ *'
3/4


Proudly Serving the Panhandle


wned and Operated


EQ


Chevron


NE ~*I


.. ..................


...............


Thursday, June 30, 2011


The Star I B5





B6 | The Star


Local


Thursday, June 30, 2011


TOBACCO PREVENTION PROGRAM




It pays to drop the habit


By Gulf County Health
Department,
Tobacco Prevention Program
Special to The Star

It chases you out of
houses. It sneaks in when
nobody's home and even
when you are. It makes
well people sick and sick
people sicker. It costs you
money when it's there, and


even when it's not. The
culprit is tobacco smoke in
multi-unit dwellings, and
it's under the microscope
nationwide.
People are tightening re-
strictions on smokers, and
with good reason. Death
by smoking is the No. 1
preventable cause of death
in the United States, cost-
ing U.S. private and public
health care $96 billion a


year in smoking related or
caused illnesses. But even
with the American attitude
of "I can do what I want
in my own home," if that
home is a multi-unit dwell-
ing - meaning any unit with
at least one common wall
or shared infrastructure
to another unit - then what
you do in your home isn't as
private as you think.
In the last few years, the
policy of establishing or re-
quiring smoke-free multi-
unit housing has been
growing rapidly. And in
this savage economy, there
are not just health issues
at stake: going smoke-free


saves big bucks for the bot-
tom line.

Why Bother?
Why would apartment
management companies
and private landlords want
to even look at applying a
smoke-free policy on their
tenants? Lower rehabilita-
tion costs, for one thing. In
smoke-free units, when a
tenant leaves, there is no
need to repair or replace
carpeting, floors, drapes,
fixtures, countertops or
appliances damaged by
burns, nicotine stains and
the stink of cigarettes. That


means a faster turnover
time of the apartment due
to less preparation and re-
painting (one coat of paint
versus washing walls,
priming and then painting).
Rental industry reports say
that the cost of preparing
a unit for a new tenant can
more than double or triple
if the previous tenant was
an indoor smoker. On the
plus side, if a landlord de-
clares units smoke-free,
he can often get govern-
ment "green" building and
U.S. Department of Hous-
ing and Urban Develop-
ment (HUD) points applied
to funding, tax credits and


tax incentives.
Then there is the re-
duced risk of accidental
fires in the apartments,
which often reduces fire
insurance premiums. The
No. 1 cause of fire fatali-
ties is cigarette-related
fires. The death rate due to
careless smoking is nearly
four times higher than the
overall residential fire rate,
and injuries are more than
twice as likely to happen.
An often overlooked dan-
ger included in apartment
dwelling is that some ten-
ants use oxygen in their
See HABIT B7


II I'II

A� D


A * ISSMEJEAN S 40 OF
ALLOFSPURE WEN LOTIN AD IFS50%OF

MAN NE JUI TH MR( RESES JUST I H
MOEYELWB OXSHE S ARRVINGE EKLY!


22 Reid AvenuDwnonPrtSitJo 5-2779
Hou I. rsMona-Strdy1i0:0 J i:
* OfF in a usii ii IIIii iofriHi oDel*g


NE ~*I


AS YOUR

BEST FRIEND,

I ENCOURAGE YOU

TO BE

TOBACCO FREE.


Your secondhand smoke can give me
nasal cancer, a form of cancer that P..
normally leads to death in
less than a year.


So call the Florida Quitline at the
number below and stop today,
for your sake...and mine.



1-877-U-CAN-NOW




FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
For more information, contact the Gulf County Health Department, 850-227-1276, ext 205. HEALT[T


I


I


,**il






Thursday, June 30, 2011


Local


The Star I B7


HABIT from page B6


apartments - and they are
frequently the ones who
smoke. Smoking near por-
table oxygen equipment is
dangerous and can result
in explosions and oxygen-
fed fires. The National Fire
Prevention Association
recommends no smoking
during home oxygen use
in any portion of a resi-
dence, including multi-unit
dwellings.

Blowin' Smoke
On top of the sheer costs
of rehab and fire dam-
age comes the landlord's
vulnerability to lawsuits
by nonsmoking tenants
dealing with secondhand
smoke (SHS). Because the
health dangers of second-
hand smoke are now clear-
ly documented, landlords
can face potential legal li-
ability due to nonsmoking
tenants' exposure to SHS.
Tenants with pre-existing
physical conditions ag-
gravated by SHS may file
complaints under the Fair
Housing Act. If a resident
or prospective tenant has a
disability or chronic illness
that is made worse by expo-
sure to tobacco smoke, Fair
Housing laws will require
the landlord to make rea-
sonable accommodations
for that person. That could
mean moving the person to
another unit, or moving the
smoker to another unit. If a
resident is injured or made
seriously ill by involuntary
exposure to tobacco smoke
in a landlord's building,
and chooses to take legal
action, the landlord's in-
surance coverage may not
cover that liability. If there
is a pollution exclusion in
the landlord's commercial


Liue Smoke Free


t J..


MORE INFORMATION
For more information on smoke-
free multi-unit housing, visit
www.TobaccoFreeFlorida.com/
smokefreehousing.


general liability policy, cov-
erage for a claim result-
ing from exposure to sec-
ondhand smoke could be
denied.
Secondhand smoke has
been medically proven to
be especially hazardous to
infants, children, the elder-
ly, and people with chronic
diseases, cancer or breath-
ing disabilities. People are
also recognizing that pets
are highly susceptible to
the dangers of SHS, which
can give animals cancer,
just like humans. And
there is evidently no way,
using today's technology,
to remove tobacco smoke
entirely from circulating
air in multi-unit dwellings.
According to the Ameri-
can Association of Heat-
ing, Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning Engineers
(ASHRAE), currently the
only way to effectively elim-
inate health risks associ-
ated with indoor exposure
to tobacco smoke is to ban
smoking entirely.
What a smoker does
in his or her apartment,
duplex or condo can send
SHS straight into his neigh-
bors' homes, putting the
nonsmokers at risk every


time that one smoker lights
up. SHS can seep through
lighting fixtures, cracks in
walls, around plumbing,
under doors, and through
shared ventilation, as well
as permeate building mate-
rials and then enter adjoin-
ing units.
The U.S. Surgeon Gen-
erals reports of 2006 and
2010 have bluntly stated
that there is no known safe
level of exposure to SHS.
Secondhand smoke is a
Class A human carcino-
gen, according to the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency, putting it in the
same danger category as
arsenic, asbestos, formal-
dehyde and mustard gas.

No Guarantees
Because the U.S. Consti-
tution does not guarantee
the right to smoke, it is legal
to prohibit smoking in multi-
unit dwellings. Smokers are
not considered a legally
protected group, so smoke-
free housing policies are not
considered discriminatory
because legally, smoking
is considered a choice, not
a mandatory action or ge-
netic state. Landlords may


write clauses into new leas-
es or lease addendums that
prohibit smoking. And
smoke-free policies are
not made to evict smokers,
but to prohibit the act of
smoking anywhere in the
building. The right to adopt
smoke-free housing poli-
cies also extends to afford-
able housing. HUD permits
smoke-free adoption policy
in affordable housing man-
aged by local housing au-
thorities. And smoke-free
housing policies can apply
to Section 8 housing by mak-
ing a simple rule change.
Because there is no
"right to smoke" under
state or federal law, prop-
erty owners have the legal
right to adopt policies that
protect their investments
and the health of their ten-
ants. The courts look at
this type of policy as no dif-
ferent, legally, than not al-
lowing pets or loud music.
HUD issued policy memos
in July 2009 and September
2010 strongly encouraging
public housing authorities
and subsidized housing
programs to implement
non-smoking policies in
some or all of their public
housing units.


CONSCIENCE

from page B4

Abraham (father of a multitude). Both were given
to Abraham, with the expectation that he would
continue serving and worshipping God over his
entire lifetime. Once again, we see that when God
makes a covenant, there is an expectation that it
will continued to be observed and obeyed.
In our next article, we will be looking at the
covenants between God and Isaac, Jacob, and the
children of Israel. Don't miss the next one!
Questions or comments are invited. Send to us
at one of the addresses below.
Are you concerned about your eternal destiny?
At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center,
you get vital teachings from a trustworthy Bible,
every Sunday morning. We don't pass an offering
plate, or plead for money, or pressure you to join.
We believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit,
and we believe that Jesus was God in human
flesh.
Check us out this Sunday! For the spring and
summer seasons, our services begin, with a time
of greeting and fellowship, at 9:45 a.m. CT on
Sunday. Our worship begins at 10 a.m. For those
interested, we have midweek ministry, helping
people on an individual basis. Inquire for more
information. Come early on Sunday morning so
that you can meet us informally, and join in the
praise and worship music led by TJ. On Sunday
morning we worship, at the Mexico Beach Civic
Center on 105 N. 31st St. The Civic Center is
behind the Beach Walk Gift Shop, behind Parker
Realty, just off U.S. Highway 98 in the western end
of Mexico Beach. Look for the white building with
the dark green roof.

God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center
Box 13337
Mexico Beach, 32410
timl@jesusanswers.com
On Facebook, look for Tim Morrill
http://www.mexicobeachcwc.com




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Fri, July 1 90� 75� 30 %
Sat, July 2 92� 76� 30 %
Sun, July 3 93� 76� 30 %
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Wed, July 6 900 760 60 %
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Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
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HIGH LOW
Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03

St.Joseph Bay
6/30 Thu 09:27AM 2.0 H 08:06PM -0.4 L
7/1 Fri 10:10AM 2.0 H 08:42PM -0.4 L
7/2 Sat 10:53AM 2.0 H 09:13PM -0.4 L
7/3 Sun 11:34AM 1.9 H 09:38PM -0.2 L
7/4 Mon 12:18PM 1.7 H 09:52PM 0.0 L
7/5 Tue 01:04PM 1.3 H 09:47PM 0.3 L
7/6 Wed 01:59PM 0.9 H 09:04PM 0.6 L

Apalachicola Bay, West Pass


6/30 Thu 06:03AM
02:OOPM
7/1 Fri 06:30AM
02:50PM
7/2 Sat 06:53AM
03:42PM
7/3 Sun 07:14AM
04:35PM
7/4 Mon 12:29AM
12:20PM
7/5 Tue 01:01AM
01:19PM
7/6 Wed 01:33AM
02:28PM


1.3
1.6
1.3
1.6
1.3
1.6
1.3
1.6
-0.2
1.1
0.0
0.9
0.2
0.7


09:14AM 1.4
10:48PM -0.4
09:59AM 1.4
11:23PM -0.3
10:42AM 1.3
11:56PM -0.3
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I ANNOUNCEMENTS
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2993
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE 14TH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA

CASE NO.
23-2010-CA-000117

WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A. AS SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO
WACHOVIA BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,

vs.

W. MICHAEL
MASCH- MEYER A/K/A
MASHMEYER A/K/A
MICHAEL
MASCHMEYER, ET AL
Defendants.

NOTICE OF
SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to the
Summary Final Judg-
ment in Foreclosure
dated May 26, 2011
and entered in Case
No. 23-2010-CA-
000117 of the Circuit
Court of the 14TH Judi-
cial Circuit in and for
GULF County, Florida,
wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, N.A. AS
SUCCESSOR BY MER-
GER TO WACHOVIA
BANK, NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION is Plaintiff
and W. MICHAEL
MASCHMEYER A/K/A
W. MASHMEYER A/K/A
MICHAEL MASCH-
MEYER; JUDITH H.
MASCHMEYER A/K/A
JUDITH MASCH-
MEYER; WINDMARK
BEACH COMMUNITY
ASSOCIATION, INC.;
JOHN DOE OR ANY
OTHER PERSON IN
POSSESSION; all un-
known parties claiming
by, through, under or
against the named
Defendant(s), whether
living or not, and
whether said unknown
parties claims as heirs,
devisees, grantees, as-
signees, lienors, credi-
tors, trustees, or in any
other capacity, claim-
ing by, through under
or against the named
Defendant(s) are the
Defendant(s), I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
FRONT LOBBY OF
THE COURTHOUSE of
the GULF County
Courthouse, in GULF
County, Florida, at 11


1100
a.m., on the 14th day of
July, 2011, the follow-
ing described property
as set forth in said Or-
der or Final Judgment,
to wit:

LOT 90, WINDMARK
BEACH, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT RE-
CORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 1, IN
THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURT OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA.

Street Address: 217
SIGNAL LANE, WIND-
MARK LOT 90, PORT
SAINT JOE, FLORIDA
32456

Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of
the lis pendens, must
file a claim within sixty
(60) days after the sale.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of the Court
this 03rd day of June,
2011.

Rebecca L. Norris,
Clerk
By: BA Baxter
As Deputy Clerk

This notice is provided
pursuant to Administra-
tive Order No.2.065. In
accordance with the
Americans with Disabil-
ities Act, If you are a
person with a disability
who needs any accom-
modation in order to
participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are enti-
tled, at no cost to you,
to provisions of certain
assistance. Please con-
tact the Court Adminis-
trator at 1000 Cecil
Costin Boulevard,
Rm.148, Port St. Joe,
FI 32456, Phone No.
(850) 229-6112 within 2
working days of your
receipt of this notice or
pleading; if you are
hearing impaired, call
1-800-955-8771 (TDD);
if you are voice im-
paired, call 1-800-995-
8770 M (Via Florida Re-
lay Services).

Submitted by:
MOSKOWITZ,
MANDELL, SALIM &
SIMOWITZ, PA.
800 Corporate Drive,
Suite 500
Fort Lauderdale,
FLORIDA 33334
File # 3023.82
June 30, July 7, 2011
2874S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

LAWRENCE T. LEE
A/K/A LAWRENCE
THOMAS LEE, DEBRA
L. LEE A/K/A DEBRA
LYNN LEE, and UN-
KNOWN TENANTS)


S 1100
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 11-24-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursu-
ant to a Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated
June 2, 2011, in Case
No. 11-24-CA, of the
Circuit Court of the
Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit, in and for Gulf
County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff
and LAWRENCE T.
LEE A/K/A LAWRENCE
THOMAS LEE, DEBRA
L. LEE A/K/A DEBRA
LYNN LEE are the De-
fendants, I will sell to
the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
front door of the Gulf
County Courthouse in
Port St. Joe, Gulf Cou-
nty Florida at 11:00
a.m., Eastern Time, on
July 21, 2011, the prop-
erty set forth in the Fi-
nal Judgment of Fore-
closure and more par-
ticularly described as
follows:

Lot 1, Midway Estates,
according to the plat
thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 2, Page 24,
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida

Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of
the lis pendens, must
file a claim within sixty
(60) days after the sale.

DATED: June 3, 2011.

REBECA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the
Circuit Court
By: BA Baxter
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden,
PA.
1300 Thomaswood Dr.
Tallahassee, Florida
32308
June 23, 30, 2011
2875S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLOR-
IDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

SUSAN E. WHITE, DO-
NALD C. GOODSON
A/K/A DONALD CARL
GOODSON, and HE-
RON WALK HOMEOW-
NERS ASSOCIATION,
INC., and UNKNOWN
TENANTS)
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 11-60-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursu-


1100
ant to a Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated
June 2, 2011, in Case
No. 11-60-CA, of the
Circuit Court of the
Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit, in and for Gulf
County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff
and SUSAN E. WHITE,
DONALD C. GOOD-
SON A/K/A DONALD
CARL GOODSON,
HERON WALK
HOMEOWNERS ASSO-
CIATION, INC. are the
Defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
front door of the Gulf
County Courthouse in
Port St. Joe, Gulf Cou-
nty Florida at 11:00
a.m., Eastern Time, on
July 21, 2011, the prop-
erty set forth in the Fi-
nal Judgment of Fore-
closure and more par-
ticularly described as
follows:

Lot 19, Heron Walk
Subdivision, according
to the plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 5,
Page 31, in the Public
Records of Gulf Cou-
nty, Florida

Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of
the lis pendens, must
file a claim within sixty
(60) days after the sale.

DATED: June 3, 2011.

REBECA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the
Circuit Court
By: BA Baxter
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden,
PA.
1300 Thomaswood Dr.
Tallahassee, Florida
32308
June 23, 30, 2011
2887S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT, FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLOR-
IDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

IN RE: The Estate of
BETTY MAE HILTON,
deceased.

CASE NO.:11-0042 PR
IN PROBATE

NOTICE TO
CREDITORS

TO ALL PERSONS
HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE:

The administration of
the estate of BETTY
MAE HILTON, de-
ceased, File Number
11-0042 PR, is pending
in the Circuit Court for
Gulf County, Florida,
Probate Division, the
address of which is
Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Port
St .Ine Florida 3 456


1100
The name and ad-
dress of the personal
representative and that
personal representa-
tive's attorney are set
forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:

All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is served within
three months after the
date of the first publica-
tion of this notice must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of
the decedent and per-
sons having claims or
demands against the
estate of the decedent
must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NO-
TICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of the first
publication of this No-
tice is June 23, 2011.


S. RUSSELL SCHOLZ
RISH, GIBSON &
SCHOLZ, PA.
116 Sailors Cove Drive
P 0. Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida
32457
(850) 229-8211
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
FL BAR NO. 0224839
PATRICIA LUANN
REDD
3052 Highway 71
South
Wewahitchka, Florida
32465
June 23, 30, 2011
2899S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA

IN RE: ESTATE OF
PROBATE DIVISION

SUSIE F. COOPER
File Number 11-30PR
Deceased.

NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION

The administration of
the estate of SUSIE F.
COOPER, deceased,
whose date of death
was April 3, 2011 and
whose social security
number is ***-**-****
is pending in the Circuit
Court for Gulf County,
Flonrida Probnhate Divi-


S 1100
sion, the address of
which is Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil
G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The names and
addresses of the per-
sonal representative
and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are
set forth below.

All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice is
required to be served
must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY (30) DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of
the decedent and per-
sons having claims or
demands against the
decedent's estate must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLOR-
IDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE BARRED
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publi-
cation of this Notice is
June 23, 2011.

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Charles A. Costin
Florida Bar No. 699070
Post Office Box 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Telephone:
(850) 227-1159

Personal
Representative
TIMOTHY COOPER
910 Coble Dr.
Tallahassee, FL. 32301
June 23,30, 2011
2903S
NOTICE OF SELL

Notice is hereby given
that Bayou Storage,
pursuant to FS83.806,
will dispose of or offer
for sale after July 7,
2011, the travel trailer
Belonging to the follow-
ing tenants:
TINA and ADAM List,
RV#030. Storage con-
tent may be redeemed
by owner prior to July
7, 2011 for cash only.
June 23, 30, 2011
2905S

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL


S 1100
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLOR-
IDA
CASE NO.
2011-CA-000066

MIDFIRST BANK
Plaintiff,
vs

THE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, GRANTEES,
DEVISEES, LIENORS,
TRUSTEES, AND
CREDITORS OF DAVID
B. LANGSTON,
DECEASED, et al.
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

THE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, GRANTEES,
DEVISEES, LIENORS,
TRUSTEES, AND
CREDITORS OF DAVID
B LANGSTON, DE-
CEASED, AND ALL
CLAIMANTS. PER-
SONS OR PARTIES,
NATURAL OR CORPO-
RATE, AND WHOSE
EXACT LEGAL STA-
TUS IS UNKNOWN,
CLAIMING BY
THROUGH; UNDER
OR AGAINST DAVID B.
LANGSTON, DE-
CEASED, OR ANY OF
THE HEREIN NAMED
OR DESCRIBED DE-
FENDANTS OR PAR-
TIES CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TI-
TLE OR INTEREST IN
AND TO THE PROP-
ERTY HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED

Current residence un-
known. but whose last
known address was:
107 LIBERTY STREET,
PORT SAINT JOE, FL
32456

YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on
the following property
in Gulf County, Florida.
to-wit:

LOT 15 AND 17,
BLOCK 1024, UNIT
THREE, MILLVIEW AD-
DITION TO THE CITY
OF PORT. ST. JOE. AS
PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RE-
CORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 53 OF
THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA.

has been filed against
you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy
of our written defenses,
if any, to it on
DOUGLAS C. ZAHM,
PA., Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is
12425 28th Street
North, Suite 200, St.
Petersburg, FL 33716,
on or before June 13,
2011, or within thirty
(30) days after the first
publication of this No-
tice of Action, and file
the original with the
Clerk of this Court at
1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Blvd.. Port St. Joe.
FL 32456, either before
service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise, a
default will be entered
against you for the re-


S 1100
lief, demanded in the
complaint petition.
WITNESS my hand and
seal of the Court on
this 28th day of April,
2011

Rebecca L. (Becky)
Norris
Clerk of the Circuit

By: BA Baxter
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE
WITH AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITY ACT
ANY PERSONS NEED-
ING SPECIAL ACCOM-
MODATIONS TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THIS
FUNCTION SHOULD
CONTACT THE FIlE
CLERK OF THE
COURT NO LATER
THAN ONE DAY PRIOR
TO THAT DAY AT (850)
229-6113.
June 23, 30, 2011
2923S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
Case No.
23-2010-CA-000278

REGIONS BANK, SUC-
CESSOR BY MERGER
WITH AMSOUTH BANK
and REGIONS BANK
d/b/a REGIONS MORT-
GAGE,
Plaintiff,

vs

STEVEN SULLIVAN,
et al.,
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that pursuant to
the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on
16th 2011 in Case No.
23-2010-CA-000278 of
the Circuit Court of the
Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit for Gulf County,
Florida, in which Re-
gions Bank, Successor
by Merger with
AmSouth Bank and Re-
gions Bank d/b/a Re-
gions Mortgage, is
Plaintiff, and Steven
Sullivan et al., are De-
fendants, I will sell to
the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the
courthouse lobby, at
11:00 am ET or as
soon thereafter as the
sale may proceed, on
the 7th day of July,
2011, the following de-
scribed real property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment to wit:

Lot 28, Block B of SUN-
SET POINTE SUBDIVI-
SION, as per plat
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 4, Page 41, in the
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida.

Any person or entity
claiming an interest in
the surplus, if any, re-
sulting from the foreclo-
sure sale, other than
the property owner as
of the date of the l is


1100
Pendens, must file a
claim on the same with
the Clerk of Court
within 60 days after the
foreclosure sale.

If you are a person with
a disability who needs
any accommodation in
order to participate in
this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision
of certain assistance.
Please contact Court
Administration, P.O.
Box 826, Marianna
Florida 32447; Phone:
850718-0026; Email:
ADARequest@judl4.fl
courts.org, at least 7
days before your
scheduled court ap-
pearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving
this notification if the
time before the sched-
uled appearance is less
than 7 days: if you are
hearing or voice im-
paired call 711.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the Circuit
Court

By: BA Baxter
As Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY
FOR PLAINTIFF
LEAH H. MAYERSOHN,
ESQ.
Mayersohn Law Group,
PA.
101 NE 3rd Avenue,
Suite 1250
Fort Lauderdale, FL
33301
(954) 765-1900
(954) 713-0702 fax
June 23, 30, 2011
2971S
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLOR-
IDA

IN RE: ESTATE OF
File No. 11-38PR

DONNA ROCCO
BUCCIERI
Deceased.

NOTICE
TO CREDITORS

The administration of
the estate of Donna
Rocco Buccieri, de-
ceased, whose date of
death was December 4,
2009, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 1100
Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd.. The name and
address of the per-
sonal representative
and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are
set forth below.

All creditors of the de-
cedent and other per-
sons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PURl ICATION






Thursday, June 30, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS S The Star I B9


| 1100 1100 1100 3110 4100 4100 6110 6140 6140
OF THIS NOTICE OR they shall be declared ply with all applicable T i 3 br, 2 ba, ch&a, din-
30 DAYS AFTER THE fortfeted to Gulf County State and local laws - Education/Training Education/Trang I 1 bedroom unfur- 2 & 3 br, on St. Joe ng room, wreck room
DATE OFSERVICE NOOF Courts. hav concerning licensing I Infant/Toddler nshed apt; Dogwood beach and Mexico laundry room, nice
COPY OF THIS NO- Persons having or registration and regula- I I Caregiverei Terrace Apartments; Beach. 1 br, Eft. on yard, $625. month,
TICE ON THEM. claiming any interest in tion of contractors do- Kenmore washer & caregivers 808 Woodward Ave, Mexico Beach. Nice $450. security deposit
such funds or any por- ing business to the Dryer. 18 months old, I are needed to pro- PSJ;(850)227-7800. Areas Please call cal 850-227-6216
All other creditors of tion of them shall file State of Florida. Like new. $300. Call | vide quality early 850-34J; (8508-) 227800. Areas Pleas7774 Text FL63154to56654
the decedent and other their written claims with 850-227-1654 i care and education TExt FL64758 to 56654
persons having claims the Clerk of Circuit This project is federally _o children ages 0-3
or demands against Court of Gulf County by funded with assistance I I yrs. AA/AS preferred; _
decedent's estate must September 1, 2011 and from the Florida De- I Gulf Coast I FCCPC (CDA) ac-I Publisher's
file their claims with this shall make sufficient apartment of Transporta- a p State College | cepted with a willing- Notice Gulf Aire Sub. 3 Br 1 ba, house in
court WITHIN 3 proof to the Clerk of tion (FDOT) and the 3230 Nursing I to furtherba ncludesac- Oak Grove very large
MONTHS AFTER THE their ownership and Federal Highway Ad- g education. Expe- All real estate advertis- 4 br, 2 ba, includes ac- ol t.,ar
DATE OF THE FIRST upon so doing shall be ministration (FHWA). Faculty |ence working with ng in this newspaper s cess to pool,tennis Joe (8502277800
PUBLICATION OF entitled to receive any By submitting a bid, (Gulf/Franklin Ctr) -| preschool children is subject to the Fair court, private beach. StJoe; (850)227-7800
THIS NOTICE. part of the moneys so the bidder certifies that teach didactic, labo- a must. Excellent Housing Act which $1250 month minimumPSJ, 3 br 1 ba all
claimed. no principal (which in- St, Joe, 1308 McCallan I ratory & clinical for I I benefits package! makes it illegal to ad- 6 months lease, long brick 404 Battles
ALL CLAIMS NOT Unless claim is filed cludes officers, direc- Ave July2nd 8:am-until Practical Nursing | Apply at Early vertise "any preference, term only rental. Call Streetcorner lotlarge
FILED WITHIN THE within such time as tors, or executives) is Estate Sale Program in Port St. Education and Care, station or discrinmina- 229-881-2700 yard, $700 moth
TIME PERIODS SET aforesaid, all claims in presently suspended, EstateJoe. I Inc. on based on race, Text FL63537to 56654 deposit 850 22month403
FORTH IN SECTION reference thereto are proposed for debar- inside the house Design/implement |1450 Jenks Avenue, colo, region, sex deposit 850- 40
733.702 OF THE FLOR- forever barred. Florida ment, declared inelig- Text FL65730 to 56654 curriculum. Assess, Panama City, FL handicap, falmilialor status
IDA PROBATE CODE Statute 116.21. ble or voluntarily ex- plan, implement & 32401 intention, to make any MINI STORAGE
WILL BE FOREVER cluded from participa- I evaluate courses, I EOE M/F/V/D DFWP I such preference, limita- 6VI170
BARRED. NOTWITH- Clerk's Trust Fund: tion on this transaction --*.. program objectives| Web-Id : 3413931 tion or discrimination" ln A t
STANDING THE TIME Robert Scarabin- by any Federal Depart- & NLNAC require- Text f163931 to 56654 Familial status includes I IPort S Joe
PERIODS SET FORTH $205.00; ment or Agency. 3240 ments. Requires ------ children under the age
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM Marshall Watson- MSN + 2 yrs general Hospitality of 18 living with parents 9
or legal custodians, 229-620
FILED TWO (2) YEARS $6.00; If you have any ques- _ r medical surgical pregnant women and 1 7400 RV Lots at Kristiana RV
OR MORE AFTER THE Emily Mackey- tons, please call Clay nursing exp & a cur- Housekeeping people securing cus- 8 Park at Beacon Hill , 2
DECEDENTS DATE OF $18.00; Smallwood at (850) rent FL RN license. Part Time weekend tody of children under blocks from the Gulf,
DEATH IS BARRED. 227-7200. GUN SHOW Salary based on de- help needed for all po- 18. $250 month, W/S in-
Registry of the Court June 30, July 7, 14, nd rd gree + exp. Posl- sitions, apply in per- cThi n r eluded. Call John
The date of first publi- Charles Isler III- 2011 July 2nd & 3rd tion is Open Until son 4693 Cape This newspaper will no.,t .| , ,, oI,
cationda ofhis ntice is $100.00; lesslerll-Nat I Peanut Fest. Bldg. tio lis Open Until sns 4693 Cape San ...... ..r I t8:-17
cation of this notice is $100.00;Nal eanut est. Bldg Filled Bias Rd or 1200 Hwy ,. r,. r re, o
June 23, 2011 Charlie Brock 5622 US Hwy 231 S Application & I 98 Mexico Beach , : r~
$237.78. Dothan, Alabama additional info: .:___e___ _,_,ur reder
Attorney for PersonalLaAILsM OVER 275 TABLES ht/ uare Iere -. ,nh.rnrmed
Representative Rebecca L. Norris, 1110 Saturday 9-5pm GCSCis ,r . .er 3 bedrm 2 bath I
Mel C. Magidson Jr. Clerk of the Circuit Sunday 10-4pm an EA/EO/M/F/ rJ i. ii, ,e=.paper Th
Florida Bar Number Court Incorrect Info: 334-279-9895 Vet employer. ,re a.,a,.e .:. a e06a' On Indian L
261629 Gulf County, Florida Insertion GCSC Equity Officer Human Resources .:..:.,,_i, .Ir , L.," T:.
528 6th St. I (850).873-3569 I J B1Tcompi,n , r . i, H rnJI ..l-goo.
PO. Box 340 By Carla O'Dell Policy GUN SHOW Webd 34165502 JOB NOTICE :,.:. ii6H._ LH. ,,e EAiLESrE FOR
Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Deputy Clerk, Santa Rosa County Text fl65502 to 56654 The GCountounty Board 1"" r nu r ori 1 year lease, ? .
Telephone: July 1,2011 For Classified Auditorium, Milton, L - - - -- 1 of County Commission- ,ear,,'a ,r,',,ed Aflfl 7100 - Homes
(850 227-7800 June 30, July 7,2011 In-column Ad- FL July 9th/10th ers is accepting appll- ,- UUU.UU 7105 - Open House
Fax: (850) 227-8778 3004S vertisere 9am 5pm call cations for a Human Fist & .ri' 7110 Beach Home
Attorney for Stephanie CiTY OF PORT S (850957-4952or Resources/Risk Man- First & Scu Properly
Wilbanks JOE GARRISON - All ads placed by (850) 261-8407 agement Director. Ap- J 7130 - Condo/Townhouse
Personal MADISON SIDEWALK phone areread back General piMedcations anddeacrom 7140 - Farms Ranhes
Personalpone arerea Admission $6. Medical/Health plete job description 7150 Lots and Acreage
Representative to the advertiser to are available in our HR 7160 - Mobile Homes/Lots
Stephane Wilbanks PROJECT #019.183 insure correctness. Veterinary office or at 7170- Waterfront
StephanieW aThe newspaper will vtrnay o fcyor at 7180 - Investment
3105 Garison Ave. NOTICE TO RECEIVE assume correctnessA Technician OE. Appfcaony dead- 7190 - Out-o-Town
Port St. Joe, FL 32456 SEALED BIDS at the time of the Apalachicola Bay line is Thursday, Julyd 7 Rea Estate
June23,30,21 RFP 2011-07 read-back procedure 3300 Animal Clinic is add- 15th, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. 7200 - Timeshare
2987S The City of Port St. Joe unless otherwise in- ing a Veterinary ET For more informa -e l Ste e
IN THE CIRCUIT will receive sealed bids formed. Whirlpool Jacuzzi 42 x Technician to our tion, please contact Janalyn Dowden
COURT IN AND FOR from any qualified per- 72 tub, Two Kohler team. This is a vital Lynn Lanier, Deputy 108 S. E. Ave. A * ]
GULF COUNTY son, company or cor- sinks, Matching 77 inch position in our clinic Administrator at Carrabelle, Florida 32322. 700
FLORIDA portion interested in Please your ad vanity top. (Dusty Rose and we are seeking 8502296106. Gulf wwwseacrelore.com 3 br 2 ba beautu
constructing: Color) Best offer. Call a. str ong individual County enforces a eacrestre. 3 br, 2 ba, beautiful
Case No.: 11-13 CA 850-229-6822 who will be a valua- Dru Free Worklace 1 BR 1 V2 BACONDO, FURNISHED home, 1900 sq. ft. quit
CICENTENNIAL BANK, PORTST. JOE quested to check re- ble asse in the Policy and is an Equal On River, Downtown, Boat Slip ......$1000.00 neighborhood, fenced
CENTENNIAL BANK, PORT ST JOE quested to check the areas of customer Opportunity / Affirma- 1 BR 1 BA LANARK APT, REMODELED back yard Call
formerly known as GARRISON- MADISON advertisement on the service and client tiveAction Emplo er Water Incl, Street Entrance................$425.00 850-229-1542 or
BAYSIDE SAVINGS SIDEWALK first insertion for cor- multi-tasking, Web ID#: 34165412 1 BR FURNISHED APT, DEN 850-832-2040
BANK, rectness. Errors ....ation and 34165412 Carport, Utilities Incl ..........................$650.00
constructing approxi- immediately. h asi z es NOw Hiring! BackDeck,NiceLocation.................$700.00
vs. mately 700 LF of con- x Ih al ty med- Are You Making Less 3 BR 1 BA APARTMENT 1
create sidewalk and Your Florida Free and excellent Than $40,000 Per Year? Front & Back Porch............................$600.00
MILES C. BRY and SU- 5,700 LF of multi-use dom newspaper will ** customer service Covenant Transport 3 BR2 BAFURNS COND 00WKY
SAN T BRY HUS- asphalt path within the not be responsible EMPL__MEN We offer competitive Needs Driver Trainees Boat&CaPakin ONDO S..........850.00WKLY StJoe,3br, 1 bath,
BAND AND WIFE, and City of Port St. Joe for more than one in- E Ne1 BR 1 BAFURNISHED CONDO fenced backyard with
BAND AND WIFE, and City of Port St. Joe for more than one in- wages and benefits Now! No experience re- Long Term, Includes Utilities ............. $910.00 fenced backyard with 2
WINDMARK BEACH from the High School correct insertion, nor 4100 - Help Wanted fow fulaime staff quired. Lo TmIldes storage buildings, new
COMMUNITY ASSOCI- to Gulf Coast Commu- will it be liable for 4130-Employment for full-time staff q 2BR IBA COTTAGE
COMMUNITY ASSOC- to Gulf C ommu- wll t be liable for Information members. Only *Immediate Job Place- Pool, Clubhouse, Beach.........$700 00WKLY metal roof and paint on
ATION, INC., nity College. any error in adver- team-players seek- ment Assistance 3BR3BA FURNISHEDCOND house, near school and
Defendants. tisements to a ing long-term em- *OTR, Regional, & Lo- Pool, Downtown.................$700.00 WKLY Lake Griffin, Call (850)
Plans and specifica- greater extent than ployment need ap- cal Jobs 3BR3BAUNFURNISHEDCONDO 227-8295 for appt.
NOTICE OF SALE tons can be obtained the cost of the space 400 ply CALL NOW FOR MORE Long Term, Pool, Downtown .............$750.00
at Preble-Rish, Inc., occupied by the er- 4100Ply INFORMATION 20BRUNFURNISHEDAPARTMENT
NOTICE IS HEREBY 324 Marina Drive, Port ror. Team Member Char- 1-866-280-5309 Lanark.................................................. 375.00
GIVEN pursuant to a St. Joe, Florida 32456, acteristics: Friendly RENTALS NEEDED 7150
Summary Final Judg- (850) 227-7200. The Any copy change, personality with out- LET US MANAGE YOUR PROPERTY FSBO: 5.5 acres White
ment of Foreclosure bid must conform to during an ordered standing phone eti-
dated June 16th, 2011, Section 287.133(3) schedule constitutes Medical/Health quette and excellent Beach fronthouses with interrates City Fl. Nice property,
and entered in Civil Ac- Florida Statutes, on a new ad and new c o m m u n i c at i o n Other short & long term rentals. Water Way. Convenient
tion No. 11-13 CA of public entity crimes, charges. Kennel Tech skills. Respectful and PLEASE CALL JOANN 850-697-9604 to beac reaso
the Circuit Court of the PLEASE CALLJOANN 850-697-9604 to beaches, reasona-
Fourteenth Judicial Cir- All bidders shall be We do not Part Time friendly to others. JUST OR 850-323-0444 FOR RENTALS. ble offers considered.
cuit in and for Gulf FDOT Qualified per guarantee position Apalachicola Bay to d careful attention, GRADUATE? call 904-626-1482
County, Florida, where- Section 2-1 of the of ANY ad under Animal Clinic is hir- self-motivated, follow Play in Vegas, Hang in
in the parties were the FDOT Standard Speci- any classification ng a pa rt time ken- company policies, LA, Jet to New York!
Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL fications for Road and nel technician. We dependable and Hiring 18-24 girls/guys
BANK, and the Defend- Bridge Construction, are seeking a re- punctual. .$400-$800 wkly. Paid
ants, MILES C. BRY latest edition in the fol- sponsible, reliable, expenses. Signing Bo-
and SUSAN T BRY lowing work classes: organized individual Duties include: Pro- nus. Are you energetic
Husband and Wife, and Drainage, Grading, ' to help care for our vide professional, ef- &fun?
WINDMARK BEACH Flexible Paving, and I':'"- pets in their ficlent and except Call 866-574-7454
COMMUNITY ASSOCI- Hot Plant Mix- Bituml- , away from tonal service at all Web id 34165061
ATION, INC., I will sell nous Course. Our animal times. oEducate clih- Text f165061 to 56654
to the highest and best clinic provides medi- ents on wellness MI
bidder for cash, at Completion date for cal servicesand care care, preventative Sales/Business Dev * Climate Controlled Units * Lease Warehouse
(Eastern Time) on the days from the date of -The kennel teh is words and hospital Cashier * Lease Office Space * Watercraft and RV Storage
04th day of August, the Notice to Proceed 210 :Pet lo responsible for the services. Draw PT. Walkers Dixie *NOW Available* 10 x 30 Storage Units
2011, at the front door presented to the suc- Good Home care and mate od, operate & Dandy 2176 Hwy 98
of the Gulf County cessful bidder. 2120 - Pet Supplies nance of the kennel maintain lab equip Highland View. Apply 8 5 0 -2 2 9 -8 0 14
Courthouse, Port St. 2130 - Farm Animals/ and its guests. Du- met, IV catheter in person.
Joe, Florida, the follow- Liquidated damages Supplies ties include, but are lacent, radiol- p_______ www.AMERICAMINISTORAGEANDOFFICE.com*
ing described real for failure to complete 2140 - Pets/Livestock not limited to: walk-
Wanted on dogs, feeding g & ogy, dental prophy-
property as set forth in the project on the 2150 - Pet Memorials ngdogsfeeding & laxs, assist in sur-
said Final Judgment of specified date will be watering pets, medi- gery handle emer-
Foreclosure: set at $200.00 per day. eating pets, bathing agencies, clean and 41rt St Joe C om m ercial
- pets, cleaning cages maintain facilities, Airlines Are Hiring P ro St. Joe C omI iercial
Lot 44, Windmark Please indicate on the | 2100 & runs, and main- understanding hos- Train for high paying For L..9 - e
Beach, a subdivision as envelope that this is a 2100 taming the overall p protocols, re- Aviation Career. FAA
per map or plat thereof sealed bid, for the Extra Mile cleanliness of all spending appropr- approved program. Fl-
as recorded in Plat "Garrison - Madison kennel areas, clinic, ately to clients' ques- nancial aid if qualified Retail / Office Space
Book 4, Page(s) 1 Sidewalk". Pet Sitting and grounds. This is tons. Job placement assis-
through 5, inclusive, Home visits/overnight a part time position tance. CALL Aviation 31OReidAvenue
Public Records of Gulf Bids will be received in the comfort of your which requires you Weekday hours plus Institute of Mainte- Suite A +/- 1100 sf; $1100 mo mod gross
County, Florida. until 3:00 p.m. Eastern pets home. Exc. local to work every other one weekend per nance (877)741-9260 325 ReidAvenue
TAnyme, onperson July 21st Ref. since 1993. Gulf weekend. Weekday month Must be in Heat & Air Jobs +/- 4,500 sf : Shell space; Corner location; $2,500 mo mod gross
Any person claiming an 2011 at the City of Port Co. Mexico Bch & Ap- hours are in the late terested inaa career Heat & Air Jobs -
interest in the surplus St. Joe City Hall, 305 palach Exotics wel- afternoon and early inthe veterinary field Ready to work? 3 week 309 Williams Avenue
from the sale, if any, Cecil G. Costin Sr. come! Diana 227-5770 evening, and willing to be a accelerated program. +/- 3,000 sf : Former day school w/ outdoor play area; Recent
other than the property Blvd, Port St. Joe, Flor- Dan 227-8225 part of a learning Hands on environment, interior upgrade; $2,250 mo mod gross
owner as of the date of ida 32456, and will be extramilepetsitting.com Skills Required: community at Apa- Nationwide certifica- 101 ReidAvenue
the lis pendens, must opened and read aloud -Must be able to lachicola Bay Animal tons and Local Job Seven office suites avail starting at $400 mo plus pro rata CAM
file a claim within 60 at 3:15 PM. Eastern handle catsand Clinic. Placement Assistancel 103ReidAvenue
days after the sale. Time. The City of Port dogs of all sizes (877)994-9004 Great office/retail location ready for occupancy; $10 psf mod gross
St. Joe is an Equal Op- -Professional and Please email letter 190 Williams Avenue
The successful bidder portunity Employer/ positive attitude of interest and Stand alone building located at the corner of Williams and 1st
at the sale will be re- Handicapped Accessi- -Outgoing personal- resume to abacjob@ Street; On-site parking; $10 psf mod gross
quired to place the req- ble/ Fair Housing Juris- Ity yahoo.comrn
uisite state documen- diction. -Reliabletransporta- '. o W warehouse / Flex Space
tary stamps on the Cer- _ _ _ __tlon
tificate of Title. Cost for Plans and -Mustbe 1 11 Trade icWt _
aTSpecificatons will be MSCHANDISE self-motivated and These tiny ads .110- 7ra,0 Iqe fo EASED
DATED this 20th day of $50.00 per set and is 3100-Antiques comfortable working +/-7,500 sf :Inquire for'erms
June, 2011. non-refundable. 3110-Appliances alonesometimes sell, hire, rent BUSINESS&INANCIAU 2790Hwy98
Checks should be 3120 - Arts & Crafts -Perform closing du- and inform for +/- 5,640 sf : Office / Warehouse; $8 psf mod gross; Property also
REBECCA L. NORRIS made payable to 3130 - Auctions ies 5100 - Business available for sale; Inquire for terms; 17 separate storage units
CLERK OF COURT PREBLE-RISH, INC. 3150 - Building Supplies Must be comforta 5110 - Money to Lend available
GULF COUNTY 3160 - Business ble with cleaning families each
FLORIDA The City of Port St. Joe Equipment (Including pet waste) week. Let a little * * For S ale
By: BA Baxter reserves the right to 3170 - Collectibles -Attention to detail week L a lie * S
Deputy Clerk waive informalities in 3180- Computers -desire to be part of Classified ad do a | 5100 2852 Victoria Avenue LD
June 30, July 7, 2011 any bid, to accept - 30Electronics a dynamic team of big job for you. Pia & Wing +/- 11,000 sf office/warehd"a
3000S and/or reject any or all 3210 - Free Pass it On professionals igjobfor Loggerhead Restaurant
bids, and to accept the 3220 - Furniture emerald oast available. Cape San Bias, +/-3000sf, FFE incl., .47 ac, on site-parking, sewer
Notice of Unclaimed bid that in their judg 3230 - Garage/Yard Sales Please send letter of Marketplace Dine in and/or delivery, asking $350,000. Short Sale
Moneys held by the ment interest. If ther con 3250- Good Things to Eat rto: abacjob@s 747-5020 Call (800) 310-8848. 256 Hatfield Street, Eastpoint, FL
Gulf County Clerk of eshrt I fsto b e rcon- 320 - Health & Fitness +/-7,500 sf : 16' inside clearance; Dual 12' roll-up doors; $150,000
Circuit Court tract is to be awarded, 3270 - Jewelry/Clothing yahoo.com ---- 60 IslandDrive, Eastpoint, FL
it will be awarded to the 3280 - Machinery/ ________||||.__" .__ _ +/-19,620sf: Fully climate controlled office & retail show space;
The following is a list of dowestA responsTIve bd- Equ ipment ' located on primary SGI access corridor; $675,000
unclaimed moneys main firm for a period 3300-Miscellaneous l 5161st Street
held by the Clerk of the sxty das after the 3310 - Musicallnstmments +/-11,400 sf office/warehouse : .09 acres; Four roll up and/or high
Circuit Court. Unless si ays ater e 3320 - Plants & Shrubs/ clearance entryways; $515,000
such, moneys are opening. Supplies 320 Marina Drive
claimed on or before All bidders shall com- 3340- Sporting Goods Corner lot entry to Marina Cove : .14 acres; High visibility site; Call
September 1, 2011, 3350 - Tickets (Buy & Sell) REM .TE O for details
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - O ------0 Business/ 407 ReidAve
.>~8 1 . .. . . .0 - MCommercial +/- 4,988 sf: 100% leased multi tenant bidg; On-site parking; $450,000
SIndependence Day I 6110- Apartments 317MonumentAve
S12B-each Rentals +/-4,431 sf : Hwy 98 frontage w/On-site parking; $499,000
| i4da0 Airlines are hiring. 1:40HouseRenotals 401 ReidAvenue
I V I IU y . I Train for a high paying 6150- Roommale Wanted +/- 5,400 sf: Retail space; $225,000; Avail for lease; Inquire for terms
S-, l,.,,lh.,,..Old Maid Aviation Career. FAA 6160- Rooms for Rent 260 Marina Drive


III nu ay, July '-)1 Now has opening for approved program. Fl- 6170 - Mobile Home/Lot +/- 3,200 sf : Multi tenant building in Marina Cove; New Construction
C s f Li AdI Ivacation rentals, resi-nancial Aid if qualified. 6100-Out-of-Town Rentals
lassified Line Ad dental also pressure Job Placement Asss- 6100- TimeshareRentals w/ample parking; Also avail for lease; Inquire for details; $345,000
Swashing call tance. CALL Aviation 6200 - Vaation Rentals PSJ Commerce Park
D e a l 850 229_1654 Institute of Mante- +/- 6.5 acre site : $119,900; owner financing available
D e a d lI n e s 850-229-1654 Ins 877-206-9405a.n- l Hwy 98 Retail/Office Vacant Lots
nane_____________ 8Two lots avail w/ frontage on Hwy 98; 30' x 80' each; $69,900 per lot
Attend College Online | 6100
The Port St. Joe Star & I Afrom Home. *Medical FOR RENT
Th o St. o ta & SELL ALLYOUR *Business *Paralegal J storage units
The Apalachicola/Carabelle Times ITEMS criminal ust icralegal Jumbo storage units
To Run: Due By: Placement assistance. 25x 50 with office & xl vl y
Thursday, July 7 Friday, July 1, 5:00 p.m. (CST) through classified. Computer available. Fi bathroom. 12 x 12 roll Marketed Exclusively by:
nancal Aid if qualified, up door monthly leasesto -
The classified department and the business offices CALL 747-5020 SCHEV certified. Call w/ 1tmonth dep $450 850-229-6373 NORTH FLORIDA
of The Star and The Times will be closed Monday, July 4. 8 6 6 - 4 6 7 -0 0 054 . Store boats, camp- AND & CAPITAL
www.Centura.us.com ers+ personal items in LAND&CAPITAL
We vill reopen Tuesday July 5, at 8:00 a.m.. 6one unit.F850-814-7911
S----------------------8 to 56654






B10 I The Star


Local


Thursday, June 30, 2011


WAR from page B1
is already evident. Initiated the
shot. Target (is so close) it barely
fits in the optic. Two hits after
67 seconds, center and aft 20
meters. High flash, tanker bums
immediately over entire length.
Sags in the middle bow and stem
lift," Mueller wrote.
Aboard the Empire Mica, all
hell broke loose. Most of the 48
crew members were asleep below
decks in air conditioned comfort.
It is believed all the survivors
were either on deck or on their
way up when the torpedoes
struck.
Survivors recounted the
fire damaged the rigging for
the lifeboats, which could not
be lowered normally. Bentley
ordered McIlraith and Ronald
Mowatt to board a lifeboat and
free it. With both men in the boat,
the ropes holding the lifeboat
burned through, and she was
cast adrift. McIlraith was thrown
into a fiery sea, and disappeared.
Mowatt, who could not swim,
clung to the seat of the lifeboat.
Mowatt managed to get the
lifeboat forward in order to rescue
three or four men huddled against
the break of the forecastle head
with flames all round them.
The lifeboat was rowed toward
the stern of the ship. Although
they could see their shipmates
struggling, they were unable to
rescue them because the fire was
so intense. Only 14 men, including
the captain, were saved. One man
later died of burns.

'Has the morning paper
got here yet?'
Willie Fred and Rebecca
Randolph and Louise Pendleton
had been fishing offshore on the
41' Sea Dream and drinking beer.
They were heading back in with
Pendleton sleeping on deck when
the explosion awoke her. She
came below to ask the others if
they had heard it. They told her
it must be some kind of military
test.
When they reached the
Apalachicola dock, two girls drove
up and shouted that a ship had
been torpedoed. The women came
ashore and Randolph went for
help, intending to head back out.


The attack quickly caught the
city's attention. Elgin Wefing, the
Coast Guard commander of port,
commandeered the Countess, a
pleasure craft belonging to Dick
Heyser because his own boat, the
Sinbad, was in dry dock.
Wefing and Coast Guardsman
Will "Mac" McCormick headed for
the blaze, with Belton Tarantino
and Heyser aboard. The heat was
so intense it was hours before
they could approach the tanker.
They circled the inferno looking
for survivors as Mueller watched,
submerged nearby.
According to his log, a second
U-boat was also submerged on
the scene. The identity of this
boat is uncertain, but it might
have been one spotted by a Mr.
Thigpen earlier in the month
during an uneventful excursion
to St. George Island aboard the
pleasure boat Sadie J. Other
members of the party scoffed at
Thigpen's story, but he insisted he
saw the submarine surface in the
gulf and ducked behind the dunes
for fear of being shot.
The Sea Dream joined
the Countess near the Mica.
Randolph steered while John
Hathcock searched.
The Countess located the
single lifeboat to escape the
flaming Mica.
Wefing asked the passengers
"Are you alright?"
One replied, "We're alright.
Has the morning paper got here
yet?"
Wefing took the men aboard
and headed back to Apalachicola
while the Sea Dream continued to
search. Finding nothing, she then
headed for home and found the
Countess taking on water, so the
survivors were transferred to the
Sea Dream.
Randolph brewed coffee for
the men as they headed for port.
Meanwhile, Joe Barber, up
early, was headed to Ten Foot
Hole when he encountered his
friend, Carol McLeod, in Battery
Park. McLeod was racing to his
boat, the Trouble, to aid the Sea
Dream, which had run out of fuel.
Barber joined him, and the two
were able to tow the bigger boat
ashore.
By the time the survivors


reached the Apalachicola pier,
townsfolk had put out blankets
and mattresses on the pier for the
men. They were then taken to the
Coombs Armory.
The survivors were later
taken to Panama City where they
remained until they could be
returned to Great Britain.
Barber said what struck him
most was the age of the British
sailors, some of whom appeared
to be in their early teens. The
ship's roster lists a number of
sailors who were 16 and 17 years
old.

'We must save the children'
An article published in the
St. Joe Star, two weeks after the
attack, praised Apalachicola for
its readiness in the face of the
disaster.
The British government
sent letters of condolence to the
families of the men lost on the
Mica. With so many men were
lost in World War II; thousands
of British families were left to
survive without a father.
Roderick McIlraith was born
three months after his father's
death. His mother, Isabella,
received a small widow's pension
but was forced to reenter the
work force with two small
children.
She never remarried.
"I never thought much about
not having a father," he said.
"About half of my friends had
none."
Isabella McIlraith worked as
a housemother at the Arcadia
Bellows Children's Home, one
of two houses purchased by the
British American Bellows Society
(BABS), a charity founded to
provide a refuge for children
whose homes had been destroyed
in the Blitz.
They were called "Bellows"
because the first house
purchased contained an old
blacksmith's forge. Organizers of
the retreat created a ceremony
using the old bellows to welcome
new children to the fold.
Frank Whittaker, of Bristol,
Somerset, whose own children
were evacuated to the United
States, conceived of the project
and secured the houses with the


aid of his children's American
foster parents and several Bristol
businessmen. The society's
motto: "We must save the
children."
The Bellows homes were
heavily supported by both
American and British soldiers,
and became a symbol of Anglo-
American cooperation during the
dark days of the war.

A mysterious
stranger in Berlin
Before her husband's death,
Isabella and Roderick worked
as volunteers with BABS, the
pair known to the youngsters as
Uncle and Auntie Mac. On June
29, 1943, one year to the day after
the sinking of the Mica, Isabella
took a position as senior hostess
at Arcadia Bellows, where she
continued to work until 1947.
Roderick, aged 31 at his
death, received the King's
Commendation for Brave
Conduct posthumously for his
actions on the Empire Mica.
Korvettenkapitan Mueller
died July 16, 1943 at the age of
29 when Raider was bombed in
the Sargasso Sea. The surviving
crew members, who were all in
their early 20s, said the Mueller,
nicknamed "Alligator," was an
excellent officer, friendly, good
humored, with the interests of
the crew at heart. Raider's crew
listened to radio broadcasts of
music on Tuesday and Friday
evenings. There was a collection
of records on board. On Sundays
a "concert" lasting several hours
was held, with the crew choosing
records to play. Music was
broadcast over the loudspeaker
system. On Saturday nights or
on Sunday, the men were given
beer, also served whenever a
crewmember had a birthday.
After 1943, the practice
of merchant ships traveling
in armed convoys and the
availability of very long range
reconnaissance bombers released
the German stranglehold on the
gulf and the Atlantic, too.
After the war, Harry Buzzett,
a member of the West Point Class
of '44 newly commissioned as a
second lieutenant, was stationed


in occupied Berlin.
One day, seeking directions,
he encountered a German who
spoke excellent English, who said
he learned the language while
a prisoner of war in the United
States.
Even more amazing, he
claimed to be familiar with
Apalachicola.
Buzzett didn't believe him
until he pointed the town out on
a bookstore globe and described
various features visible from
West Pass including water towers
and the bridge. He claimed to
have watched the coast through
binoculars.
The German claimed to be the
captain of U-boat 67, which seems
impossible.
The man Buzzett spoke to
might have been executive
officer of U-67 Lieutenant Walter
Otto, one of three survivors of
the sinking of the submarine.
He spent years in Norfolk as a
prisoner of war, and as first officer
would have taken over as captain
after Mueller died.
When Rod McIlraith Jr. visited
Apalachicola last fall, he hoped
to see the Sea Dream and was
disappointed to find she was gone.
She fell into disrepair and was
destroyed around 2000. Rod and
his friends did see the sink and
anchor from the old boat at the
Tin Shed, and a lifeboat reputed
to be from the Empire Mica at
another downtown business.
They went to Carrabelle to
meet Joe Barber who told them
about the night the Mica sank.
"(The survivors) did not want
for anything once they got to
Apalachicola," he said
Barber gave McIlraith an 18th
century ceramic ginger beer
bottle he found on the banks of
the Apalachicola River.
"This came over from England
as ballast," he told McIlraith.
"Now you can take it back. If you
come from a small town, this
might make a good newspaper
story."

Issues of the Apalachicola
Times published January
through October 1942 cannot
be located. If you have copies,
please call the Times at 653-8688.


/ "4


s=- -�" -.


AUG 5-7,2011


LIVE MUSIC
ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION
Kevin Jacobs Band Bo Spring Band Brian Bowen The Curry Brothers








m FOOD VEP

ARTS & CRAFTS I KID'Z ZONE
CLASSIC CAR & BOAT SHOW I 5K RUN


GULF www.scallopfest.net
S r more adinfomaaon or vendor regiiaon, ca M 850-22712.23


i u,,


Welcome New Members!
BAYOU RV SUPPLIES & STORAGE
Richard Todd
2880 State Road 30-A
Port St. Joe FL 32456
Phone: 850-229-8397
Fax: 888-374-1130
EMAIL: rick@bayoustorage.net
www.bayoustorageandrvsupplies.com

STEAMER'S HOTDOGS & ICE CREAM
Darren McDaniel
112 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe Fl 32456
Phone: 850-229-9364
Fax: 850-991-0012
EMAIL: artesanremod@aol.com
www.steamershotdogs.com


BOON DOCKS
Hilary Head
51 Good Moring St.
Windmark Beach, FL 32456
Phone: 850-229-6060
EMAIL: hildocks@hotmail.com
www.boondocksfl.com


SCALLOP FESTIVAL VENDOR SPACE STILL
AVAILABLE AT THE FLORIDA SCALLOP &
MUSIC FESTIVAL!!!
Would you like to be a volunteer?
Let us know. Call 850-227-1223
Or email us at info@gulfchamber.org
Help us make this year's festival the best!


FIREWORKS OVER THE BAY!
Come join us for a unforgettable July fourth
Celebration, As we set off a spectacular firework
display over beautiful St. Joseph Bay. Monday,
July 4th when the stars come out.


, IM
Vision Bank
"Your (Conmmuni Bank"
www.visionbank.net


Amber Lowry
Mortgage Banker


529 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Member FDIC ...


Office 18500 636 7988
Cell (850) 2274492
Fax (850) 227-1149
aloAriavisionbanfl loom


BBB.
StartWithTmrust


Call
80.729922


Consumers trust us
Let them know they can trust you
Your Better Business Bureau
Serving Northwest Florida had
over 317,000 inquiries from
consumers last year.
7 in 10 consumers say they'd be
more likely to buy from a company
designated as a "BBB Accredited
Business."*
Do you make the cut?
*Princeton Survey Research Associates 2007


Air, Video, Land
Beach Portraits o
Debbie Hooper


NE ~*I


GulI County
Chamber of Commerce
The Chamber has moved!! We are now
in the Welcome Center located at 150
Captain Fred's Place, Port St. Joe.
Please stop by and visit us!
850-227-1223 * 800-239-9553
www.gulfchamber.org

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2011
PRESIDENT:
Bobby Pickels, Progress Energy
VICE PRESIDENT:
Steve Newman, Big Fish Construction
SECRETARY:
Dave Ashbrook, Mainstay Suites
TREASURER:
Ray Thompson, Capital City Bank
DIRECTOR:
Johanna White, Visions Bank
DIRECTOR:
Melissa Farrell, Joseph's Cottage
DIRECTOR:
Guerry Magidson, GPM Financial
DIRECTOR:
Brett Lowry, St. Joe Bar 7 Package
DIRECTOR:
Michael McKenzie, Roberson & Associates, PA

Mission Statement
The mission of the Gulf County Chamber of
Commerce is to be an advocate for existing
businesses and the community, a conduit for
pursuing positive developments, and a
catalyst for cooperation.


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