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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03702
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Creation Date: September 17, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33602057
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03702

Full Text




A DOG'S LIFE

Alt "B1


YOUR HOMETOWN NEW.

YEAR 71, NUMBER 48


Thursday, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


S~s~i W sfagscean.atiw


For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com


Gardasil vaccine remains an immigration issue


By Despina Williams
Star StaffWriter
For Jeannie and Simone
Davis, the question has al-
ways been, "Which vaccine
doesn't belong?"
After first appearing in
The Star, the Davises made


national news last week
when ABC News reported
their opposition to the Gar-
dasil human papillomavirus
(HPV) vaccine's inclusion
in a list of vaccinations re-
quired for young female im-
migrants seeking U.S. citi-
zenship.


Though the English-born
Simone, 17, has received all
other vaccinations as part
of her immigration medical
exam, she refuses to receive
the Gardasil vaccine on reli-
gious and moral grounds.
Simone, a Christian who
abstains from pre-marital


sex, does not believe the
government should man-
date vaccines for sexually-
transmitted viruses.
Jeannie, Simone's grand-
mother and adopted parent,
stands by her decision.
"I don't believe vaccines
are a terrible thing," said


Jeannie, a St. Joe Beach
resident. "I believe we've
eradicated terrible illness-
es. Ijust think this is terribly
inappropriate."
Approved by the Food
and Drug Administration
in 2006, Gardasil protects
against four HPV strains


linked to 70 percent of cervi-
cal cancer cases and 90 per-
cent of genital warts.
So how did a vaccine
that is voluntary for the
general population, which
protects against a sexu-
See VACCINE A3


[I ^^^^^^^^^7zI]^^^^^^^


WITH MAX


Greg Cole will never complain about the Florida
heat again.
After spending three months in Iraq with his
dog Maximus as part of a search and rescue
team. Cole, a captain at the Gulf County
Y Sheriff's Office, spent plenty of days
where the afternoon temperatures '-..
would hit 13-138 degrees, .
He lost 15'pdinds in the first few
weeks and struggled to maintain that
weight tihrougThir Uff stint in coutlity
Maximum was m such a state when he retr ,ed
home, Cole said, his Bbi a g
teacher'in Wh ...
. bones shMe 1- b r..k .....


Gulf County celebrates first local legislative bill


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer
In a move requested by the
public, county commissioners
delayed by one hour the regular
county commission meeting of
Sept. 8.
After fielding requests from
the audience at the previous
week's public budget hearing to



0 FREEDOM
fg 1 (> i- r1 i A
, r. TI


change the Sept 8 county com-
mission meeting time, com-
missioners met at 6 p.m. ET,
announced the meeting was ad-
journed for one hour, then met
again at 7 p.m.
This came after numerous
residents told commissioners
at the Sept. 3 budget hearing
that they wanted to attend both
the Gulf County School Board


Subscribe to The Star
227-1278
For your hometown paper
delivered to your home!


meeting and the regular coun-
ty commission meeting, both
scheduled for 6 p.m. Sept. 8.
As soon as the meeting
opened, Rep. Jimmy Patronis
(R-Panama City) and former
House Speaker and current
Rep. Ray Sansom (R-Destin)
congratulated the commission
and the county as they present-
ed commissioners with a copy


ot Gulf County's first local leg-
islative bill.
The recently passed bill ex-
empted most of Cape San Blas
and St. Joseph Peninsula prop-
erty from the state's newly re-
configured 30-year erosion line.
Commissioners and prop-
erty owners in the affected area
See COUNTY A8


TABLE OF CONTEND $


O pinion ..................................... A4
Letters to the Editor .....................A5
Sports ....................... A6
O bituaries ......................................B4


Church News .................................B4-B5
l.aw Enforcement..... ............ B9
School News............... ............. B6
Legals', ........... ............... .......... 10 1


Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET
Legal ad 1, .liii ,11- Friday 11 a.m. ET
Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278
Classified deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020
1


50(


c.,.


Construction and

new property

dominate Mexico

Beach agenda

By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer

Mexico Beach may finally get
a shot at a new city hall site.
At the Sept. 8 regular city
council meeting, the council vot-
ed unanimously to proceed with
a motion to make an offer on the
former Our Lady of Guadaloupe
Catholic Church on 15th Street.
The opportunity to buy the
four-acre lot with the church
building recently came about as
the church permanently closed
its doors in mid-summer.
The city is offering $300,000
for the property, which could be
used as a possible location for
a new city hall and civic center.
The property, if sold to the city,
will be annexed into the city at
the same time.
In other business conducted
at the meeting:
* The city's second and final
public budget, hearing for the
2009-2010 budget is set for Sept.
23 at 5:03 p.m. CT.
* Chris Forehand, of Preble
Rish, the city's engineering firm
of record, told the council that
the final extension of the city
pier will begin in a few weeks.
During construction the pier
will be closed. Advance notice
will be given to the public, Mayor
Al Cathey told the audience.
Construction is expected to
take about six months. This will
be the last extension to the pier,
located at Thirty-Seventh Street.
After completion the pier will
be at its maximum length of 252
feet, with an additional 14-foot
wide by 60-fpot long T section at
the end.
* Phase Two of the city side-
walk plan is almost finalized. No
date has been set for construc-
tion to begin on the project, which
will take the city sidewalk from
Fifteenth Street to Fifth Street
on the north side of U.S. 98.
* The council read the first of
two required readings regarding
Ordinance 568, which will adopt
new land development regula-
tions (LDR) for Mexico Beach.
The new regulations are now
available for public review and
an executive summary covering
the major points of the new LDR
is also available at city hall.
* In a related issue, Mexico
Beach newcomer Ron Lucht
was unanimously elected by the
council as the city's special mas-
ter.
The city had been looking for
someone to fill the position for 15
months, Cathey said.
Lucht, who has 30 years of
construction background, will
arbitrate code violations for the
city. The special master guide-
lines and duties are available to
the public at city hall. The posi-
tion and its responsibilities are
also listed in Chapter 7 of the
See AGENDA A8


13A(ol(I






A2 I The Star Lu e1


I.,

Lit


V


L7


PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Gulf County EMS, Port St. Joe Fire Department and Gulf County Sheriff's Office
honored the victims of 9/11/2001 with a demonstration for the children of
North Florida Child Development's Head Start program. The demonstration
included talks about wearing seatbelts, fire safety, how to use 911 and a
surprise visit from Zeus the drug dog! Sirens were blaring, water was spraying
and Zeus was on patrol. The highlight of the event was a demonstration of Port
St Joe Fire Department's 75-foot ladder truck.


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A2 I The Star


I


Thursday, September 17, 2009


Local


,ngm b 9T
'f- nn M f nnnI-






Thursday, September 17, 2009


Local


The Star I A3


VACCINE from page Al


ally-transmitted virus,
become mandatory for
immigrant females aged
11-26?

A failure to
communicate
The answer is found in a
1996 addition to the Immi-
gration and Nationality Act.
Section 212 requires ap-
plicants seeking immigrant
or lawful permanent resi-
dent status to present docu-
mentation for vaccine-pre-
ventable diseases "which
shall include" mumps,
measles, rubella, polio, teta-
nus and diphtheria toxoids,
pertussis, Haemophilus in-
fluenzae type B and hepati-
tis B.
In addition to the named
diseases, the act requires
any other vaccinations
against vaccine-preventable
diseases recommended by
the Advisory Committee
on Immunization Practices
(ACIP).
Chartered under the
Federal Advisory Commit-
tee Act, the ACIP makes
vaccine recommendations
for the U.S. population to
the director of the Centers
for Disease Control (CDC).
The key word is "recom-
mendations."
In 2008, the ACIP recom-
mended a 3-dose Gardasil
vaccination for girls be-
tween the ages of 11-26.
The committee's chair-
person was unaware that
his recommendation would
become an immigrant man-
date on July 1, 2008.
"If we had known about
it, we would have said it's
not a good idea," former
ACIP chair Jon Abramson
told the Wall Street Journal
on Oct. 1, 2008.
Abramson distinguished
between the Gardasil vac-
cine and those that prevent
outbreaks of highly infec-
tious diseases like measles
and chickenpox.
About 12,000 women a
year are diagnosed with
cervical cancer, which kills
4,000 annually, according to
the CDC.
"We don't want some-
one coming into the U.S.
who hasn't been vaccinated
against measles or chicken-
pox. HPVcanonlybecommu-
nicated by sexual contact,"
Abramson said.
"This is not something
that endangers kids in a
school setting or puts your
population at risk."
Abramson, who now
chairs the Wake Forest
University Baptist Medical
Center's pediatric depart-
ment, did not return calls to
The Star by press time.
Revised criteria
Asked if there had been
a breakdown in communica-
tion between the CDC and
the ACIP, CDC spokesper-
son Christine Pearson said
it was "more important to
focus on" the CDC's efforts


II






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suuq wmam r "


HOW TO HELP
A legal fund has
been established
to help Jeannie
and Simone Davis
in their efforts
to challenge the
Gardasil vaccine
requirement.
Those interested
in helping may
make donations at
Bayside Savings
Bank in Port St. Joe.
The account is in
the name of Jean G.
Davis (Immigration
Fee).

But there is more to US-
CIS policy than the denial
letter suggests.
Though the USCIS does
not have the discretion to
change immunization policy
set by the CDC, it can grant
a waiver in individual cases.
To receive a waiver, an
applicant must demonstrate
that compliance with vacci-
'nation requirements is con-
trary to his or her religious
beliefs or moral convictions.
In formulating this pol-
icy, the USCIS reviewed
court decisions relating to
conscientious objection to
the military draft and chal-
lenges to state-mandated
public school vaccination
requirements.
Though USCIS policy dic-
tates that applicants must
be "opposed to vaccinations
in any form,'? it leaves some
wiggle room.
The fact that an appli-
cant has received certain
required vaccinations and
not others is not automatic
grounds for denial, depend-
ing on the reasons provid-
ed.
USCIS policy provides
two examples of credible ob-
jections: An applicant's reli-
gious or moral beliefs must
have changed substantially
since the date the particu-
lar vaccinations were ad-
ministered, or the applicant
must have already received
certain vaccinations under
the routine practices of an
orphanage.
The policy notes that the
two examples "do not limit"
officials' authority in consid-
ering all credible circum-
stances and evidence.
The Davises have 30
days to appeal the USCIS
decision, and are currently
seeking legal counsel.
Though she would like
the USCIS to reverse its de-
cision and grant the waiver,
Jeannie believes a change
in the CDC's vaccine evalu-
ation criteria is Simone's
best shot.
"I don't know what other
options there are," said
Jeannie. "I will appeal, but
I'm just praying that the
new criteria will come out
before she's 18."


In 2008, the Advisory Committee on Immunization
Practices recommended a 3-dose Gardasil
vaccination, manufactured by Merck and
Co., for females between the ages of 11-26.
The recommendation became an immigration
requirement on July 1,.2008.


to revise its vaccination re-
quirements.
In April, the CDC pro-
posed a set of criteria to de-
termine which vaccines rec-
ommended by the ACIP for
the general U.S. population
should be required for im-
migrants seeking admission
into the U.S. or permanent
residence.
Vaccines required under
the new criteria must be
age-appropriate and meet
one of two additional re-
quirements: 1) they must
either protect against a dis-
ease that has the potential
to cause an outbreak or 2)
protect against a disease
that has been eliminated in
the U.S or is in the process
of being eliminated.
The CDC would continue
to mandate the vaccines
named in the Immigration
and Nationality Act.
In an April 8 announce-
ment in the Federal Reg-
ister, the CDC advocated a
"scientific, evidence-based,
public health approach" to
evaluating ACIP -recom-
mendations.
The CDC expressed its
desire to ensure that vac-
cination requirements are
"grounded in public health
necessity and need in light
of a growing list of vaccines
for infectious and non-infec-
tious diseases."
During a two month pub-
lic comment period which
ended in mid-May, the CDC
received 40 responses from
public citizens and advocacy
groups.
Pearson said the CDC
was in the process of final-
izing its immunization crite-
ria, and expects to publish a
final report some time next
month.
The criteria would be.
used annually to review new


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recommendations made by
the ACIP Existing require-
ments would also be re-
viewed, Pearson said.
According to Pearson,
changes to vaccination poli-
cy would go into effect 30 to
60 days after the final crite-
ria are published.

Some wiggle room
For the Davises, the
CDC's revised vaccination
criteria can not come soon
enough.
Because she is under 18
and her adopted parent is
a U.S. citizen, Simone must
jump two hurdles before be-
coming a citizen.
She must receive ap-
proval for two immigration
forms: the 1-130, which al-
lows Jeannie to bring her
into the country lawfully,
and the 1-485, or Green Card
application, which allows an
immigrant to become a law-
ful permanent resident.
If Simone is approved
before she turns 18, she will
automatically become a citi-
zen.
However, if she turns 18
before receiving her Green
Card, she must wait five
years before she can apply
for U.S. citizenship.
All that currently stands
in her way is the Gardasil
shot.
In May, Jeannie filed a
waiver on Simone's behalf
objecting to the shot on reli-
gious and moral grounds..
The U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services (US-
CIS) issued a letter of denial
last month.
The letter stated that be-
cause Simone did not object
to vaccinations in any form,
she did not meet the quali-
fications provided under
regulation.


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Oinilon


A4 I The Star


Thursday, September 17,2009


Keyboard KLATTERINGS



Government


intrusion


Am I the only one who
sees in this Gardasil case,
the echoes of Vioxx?
As reported last week
and this week by Star
staff writer Despina
Williams, a young
woman and her
adopted mother
are fighting a
Sisyphusian battle
to have the Port St.
Joe High School
senior earn her
citizenship despite TIM4
government Star ne
mandates she
undergo the
Gardasil vaccine.
Gardasil is designed to
prevent cervical cancer
and protects against
a certain sexually-
transmitted disease.
And it is part of the
series of vaccines now
required of female
immigrants wishing to
enter and stay in this
country.
But here is a young
woman of sincere and
deep faith, who openly
touts a philosophy of no
sex before marriage and
who wants to control what
goes into her own body.
And there is Gardasil,
which is a vaccine
largely voluntary to all
naturalized citizens
and which has been
heavily advertised and
promoted with a series
of advertisements
in magazines and
newspapers and on
television.
The advertising budget
for Gardasil-maker Merck
& Co. must be enormous,
just as it was for the
maker of Vioxx, which,
surprise, happened to also
be Merck
Remember Vioxx?
For months it was
advertised as the new
panacea for pain relief.
Non-narcotic, backing
acetaminophen which is
linked to liver problems
and long-lasting, Vioxx
was prescribed for
hundreds of thousands of
patients and considered a
boon in the fight against
chronic pain.
Then folks starting
dying from the adverse
reactions, and in time,
it was found that there
was a link between heart
problems and Vioxx,
the link so strong and
so threatening that the
product was pulled from
the market, no longer to
be found on any pharmacy
shelves.
And all those patients
who were prescribed


Vioxx in good faith by
their doctors had plenty
to worry about, especially
those with existing heart
issues, and the class-
action lawsuits followed.
Now we *
have Gardasil,
kL s commercials
Sfor which are
outnumber those
for medicines
designed to, shall
CROFT we say, provide
ws editor men with more
functionality
during intimate
moments.
Of course, after
relaying all the positives
of Gardasil, there is a
lengthy list of those who
should not consider the
medicine, the infamous
fine print of such
commercials, and the
potential adverse affects.
At no time during these
commercials are women
considering the vaccine
informed that more than
40 deaths have been
linked to adverse effects
of the vaccine. Serious
adverse effects have been
reported in 7 percent of
those females who have
received the vaccine.
Nowhere in those
commercials does it
inform consumers that the
life span of effectiveness
is about five years, so
suggesting that females
as young as 11 receive
the vaccine, meaning
it will be ineffective by.
the time they are 16 and
more likely to become
sexually active, is as close
to nonsensical as one can
get.
In fact, those
agencies that regulate
such vaccines and
requirements for
immigrants entering the
country do not seem to be
on the right page.
One of the top
researchers of the drug
has questioned its long-
term effectiveness.
The Journal of the
American Medical
Association has called
for long-term studies of
Gardasil, which begs the
question how this drug
has made it to market and
been heavily marketed
without such studies.
The author of the piece
in the Journal said the
benefit of the vaccine to a
woman is "uncertain."
And after an advisory
council charged with
making recommendations

See CROFT A5


>THE STAR

USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: .Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
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Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.

)ii/�#s . , w ,ev ,- ,.<;.!, $- � &' ' 'i ,, ;, y , ,i .S-� , ,%'.%,,,t% ,


Our VIEW


The elephant in the room


During last week's final budget
hearing for the school district,
one audience member mentioned,
without garnering a response, the
unspoken issue the school board
will have to face if current trends
continue.
Consolidation.
Yes, the dirty word of this tax
season.
But if current trends of declining
enrollment, which show no sign
of abating, and declining property
values, which local realtor Jay Rish
said were certainly not changing
soon, continue, the school board must
consider consolidation.
This was one of many
recommendations from the budget
committee appointed by the district
during the run-up to the March one-
mill referendum, and it should be one
the board takes to heart.
The feasibility of maintaining
six schools in a county in which the
student population has slipped under
2,000 and continues to slide seems
more and more financially untenable
by the day. I
There certainly would be
resistance, from the communities
which derive considerable identity
from their schools and from parents
and students, but the cost savings,
and relief for taxpayers, is too
significant to ignore.
The county's economic dynamics
might change, as school officials have
noted when the subject is broached.
A new hospital will open early next
year, Sacred Heart officials reassure,
and a renewable energy plant and an
operational port figure to foster an
influx of workers and families to the
county.
The generation, if accomplished,
of a more diversified economy cries
out for consolidation, as the school
district could apply more money
to the classroom to foster broader
course offerings, especially the kind
of vocational education to prepare
students for the new industries
that could turn the county around
economically.
But there are no promises that the
hospital, port or renewable energy


plant will come to fruition until the
"doors" are open, and the reality of
today is that the school board faces
trends that seem intractable.
The school board should be
examining how school consolidation
was accomplished in counties, such
as neighboring Franklin, and how
the state might assist, in the form
of capital outlay dollars, which have
been provided to counties, such as
Franklin and Gadsden, to facilitate
consolidation.
The district has a potentially
valuable piece of property in
Highland View it could use to sell
or swap to acquire suitable land in
White City or Howard Creek or other
central locations in the county.
If not consolidation of all schools,
the district should consider another
recommendation of the budget
committee, and that is consolidating
elementary and middle schools at
each end of the county.
Although hardly ideal, given the
wide range of student ages involved,
the district long operated without a
middle school in Wewahitchka, and a
model for how to separate age groups
is already in place in the layouts
at each high school/middle school
complex.
Consolidation would foster
more concentrated and efficient
use of resources - particularly
transportation, which eats a
significant portion of the budget -
and would provide an opportunity for
more course offerings and distance
learning and dual enrollment
opportunities.
It would also bring the district
more operationally in line with the
numbers of students it serves, which
would surely ultimately mean a
lesser burden on taxpayers.
Maybe most importantly,
consolidating the schools would
serve as an example, a model, for the
county to consider true consolidation
in the form of county-wide voting and
a Board of County Commissioners
not lorded over by three votes that
hold the key to the kingdom.
A committee of smart, thoughtful
and thorough individuals provided


such a recommendation to the
district as part of the overall
campaign to pass the additional one-
mill levy for schools.
Given the source, the
recommendation is worth a look, if for
no other reason than as preparation
for contingencies if the current
trends that are buffeting the district
and taxpayers are not reversed.

Disconnection
Feeding the trends rocking the
school district is the cratering of the
real estate market and the lack of a
diversified economy.
That is why the work of the
entities charged with economic
development is so important.
So it was with dismay that Port
St. Joe city commissioners recently
heard the executive director of the
Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency
acknowledge that when considering
the impact of work at the intersection .
of Marina Drive/First Street and U.S.
98, the revenues for businesses most
impacted by the project, Subway,
McDonald's and Auto Zone, seemed
not part of the planning equation.
These same businesses provide
tax dollars to support the efforts
of the PSJRA. Other businesses
that also support the PSJRA will be
impacted by proposed improvements
to the U.S. 98 corridor.
All the PowerPoint presentations,
good ideas and public proclamations
from the PSJRA and Economic
Development Council about the
possibilities are fine, but there has to
be a payout or people just tune out.
And folks are willing to be patient
to a point; as economic development
officials have been saying for months,
change won't happen overnight.
But patience is a product of
feeling in the loop, in the know, and
businesses in the area of First Street/
Marina Drive/U.S. 98 could not feel in
the loop when their revenues were so
unimportant as to not be a factor in
the planning for a project to add left
turn lanes at one intersection.
The PSJRA and the EDC should -
both find a lesson in that episode.


Amelia Earhart was not Tokyo Rose!


Meth lab "accidentally?"
blows up house in Panama
City. Crook robs store,
then comes back to ask
clerk for a date. Dog sells
for $582,000 in China. Man
marries ex-wife and then
"remembers" during the
second reception why he
ditched her originally. Tiger
Woods hits a ball into the
water.
You talk about strange
headlines in the past week!
It's got people talking
about the apocalypse. I'm
trying to be an "anchor of
reason" amid this chaotic
exposition. As a nation,
we don't need to overreact
here. Let's hold off on the
wailing and gnashing of
teeth. We're just in that
quasi twilight zone where
the humid, hazy days of
August linger into early
September.
We called it dog
days down at the end of
Stonewall Street.
Lizzie Borden's
problems came to light
one hot August. Little
Anthony and the Imperial
recorded "Shimmy Shimmy
Koko Bop" during the late
summer of 1959. Germany
and Russia signed a 10-year
rion-aggression pact in
the waning days of August
in 1939. The Washington
Senators actually won a
pennant during the dog
days of 1924. The season
of "strange and erratic"
happenings is not without
precedent. I'm not dead
positive certain about those
spottingss" in, and around,
Roswell, N.M., but most of
them occurred at this time
of the year in the late 1940s.
I can't remember when
Joe proposed to Marilyn,
but I've got a good guess.
Amelia Earhart went


missing in the early
dog days of 1937. I
don't think she flew
her plane purposely
into the Pacific
in a jealous rage.
She was not on a
spy mission at the
request of President KE
Roosevelt. And CO
don't believe that Hunk
rumor that she
was captured by
the Japanese and forced
into radio broadcasts to
American GIs as "Tokyo
Rose" during World War II.
Our dogs would lie up
under the house all day and
then come out and howl
all night. Leon said it had
something to do with when
the Dog Star, Sirius, lined
up with one of those Vernal
Equinox guys. It bubbled
up the sun, which naturally
meant longer, hotter,
sultrier days. A body can
only take so much of the
heat. Dogs went mad, seas
begin to boil, tempers grew
short and men broke out in
burning fevers, rashes and
wild hysterics.
I've personally
witnessed all of the above
except maybe the boiling
seas! I know Duke refused
to hunt this time of year.
He'd run down the Como
Road and fight with the
Cunningham dogs. He'd
slither out to the barn and
root with the hogs. He
growled when Bro. Hatcher
came for Sunday dinner. He
took to hiding from our cat.
And danged if people
didn't act stranger than
that ole coon hound! I've
seen grown men arguing
over string versus wire for
bailing hay. Leroy Jenkins
and Mr. Hank Strayhan
came to blows out in front
of the McCadams Tractor


ESLEY
LBERT
ker down


and Implement
Company. I never
did get the low
down on that
fight, but most
folks blamed it
on a boundary
dispute and the hot
weather.
Rosemary
Totman ran off with


a wholesale grocer
from Selmer. I
didn't know Miss Rosemary
very well. She was near
'bout spinster age by the
time I went to work at the
Texaco station where she
bought gas. You could tell at
a glance that the years had
not been kind to her, but it
was hard to get a good look.
She never got out of that big
Buick; she just stuck two
dollars out the window and
roared off. When we heard
the news, Daddy laughed
out loud. He reckoned
the grocery peddler to be
either blind, broke or surely
"caught up in the malaise of
dog days."
It affected everybody!
And there was no escaping
it! Air conditioning hadn't
been invented in our neck
of the woods. You went to
bed sweatin', and you got up
sweatin'. Flies, mosquitoes,
chinch bugs, chiggers
and a host of winged
creatures swarmed up out
of Jarrell Switch Bottom
and descended on the town.
If the dog howling, mule
braying and incessant heat
didn't get you, the blood
sucking flying marauders
would!
It was enough to drive
anyone mad!
We'd be picking cotton
for six hours or so, and
Leon would start lobbing
those dirt clods on my
head from two rows over.


My back was hurting, my
fingers were bleeding,
,sweat was stinging my eyes
and I'd donated two pints to
the Jarrell Switch herd. It
was all a body could take! I
threw my sack off, jumped
both rows and leaped right
on top of his head. David
and Ricky said later that I
was foaming at the mouth.
I think I got in half of one
punch before he beat the
ever living daylights out of
me!
Dog days can bring out
the worst in a man,
Listen, I asked Mary
E. Pendleton to dance
one August. That's about
the record in going mad!
I couldn't explain it then
or now. She would make
Rosemary Totman look like ,
the Queen of Sheba. Mary
E. stepped on both of my
feet and tore my Sunday
shirt. And, as Leon pointed
out when he found out
about it, she didn't even
have a Buick.
So let's not go off
the deep end when we
read about meth lab
people blowing up their
own selves. Or Chinese
heiresses forking out half
a million dollars for a mutt.
Or congressmen yelling
and shouting on the house
floor. Or Tiger Woods
hitting an occasional errant
shot. Blame it on the sultry,
lingering heat caused by
the Sirius Star getting too
close to the sun.
Of course, I just read
about the guy in Fargo,
N.D., who claimed his cow
flew up onto the roof of his
grain elevator; the man said
he had to fly up there and
get him down! Dog Days
can't explain everything.
Respectfully,
Kes


JL












AS The Star Letters


Thursday, September 17, 2009


Drilling not an answer
Dear Editor:
I am continuing to follow
Tallahassee Democrat articles
regarding offshore oil drilling along
Florida's Gulf Coast.
It is obvious that some state
legislators continue to see that
issue as some kind of sympathetic
notion among Floridians struggling
in these tough economic times.
It is equally obvious that
some legislators see personal
profiteering in supporting the
.initiative since the Gulf Coast is
far removed from their own South
Florida back yards. Governor
Crist also seems to realize some
advantage in supporting this issue
in his quest to gain upward political
mobility with their support.
What about the rest of us multi-
generational North Floridians
who would have to live with this
initiative that sacrifices our
pristine Gulf waters and shoreline
to likely petroleum pollution?
Floridians need to wake up and
"smell the roses" (while you still
can) and take a strong position
if you want your local coastal
water protected from this planned
assault. Does Louisiana and
Katrina ring a bell?
Further, why not initiate this
offshore drilling plan in South
Florida? The Florida Keys could
easily accommodate drill rigs
because of their shallow waters.
Further up the coast we could
try Sanibel Island, Punta Gorda,
Tampa Bay, Crystal River, etc.
and depending upon our success,
eventually move into North
Florida's Gulf Coast waters to
include Panama City and Destin.
Finally, what possible benefit
could offshore drilling bring to
Floridians (other than those
referenced)? I would hope that all
who are tracking this issue will
speak out and vehemently oppose
even the thought of this very bad
idea.
Richard Dugger
Carrabelle

Photo questions
Dear Editor:
Regarding the story written
by Despina Williams, which made
the front page of The Star on Aug.


20, titled "Unsolved Mysteries," I
remember the case quite well.
The person who found the well-
published photo was my next-door
neighbor. She showed it to me the
following morning, which meant
hours had gone by before the
police were notified of the details of
the case.
I asked her why she did not
come to us so she could have
called the police that night. She
said she did not want to disturb
us as it was near midnight,
and besides, the white van had
followed her home.
It is unfortunate that her fear
prevented her from acting quickly.
But as the saying goes, "There is
no accounting for human nature."
Marjorie Parker
Port St. Joe

The Good Samaritan
Dear Editor:
Last Wednesday, my wife and
I were headed into town from St.
Joe Beach. As we reached the top
of the overpass, we heard what
seemed to be an explosion. Then
the familiar whop, whop, whop of a
tire, a blowout! Upon reaching the
bottom of the overpass, I turned
right into the service road. My left
rear tire was flat!
I opened the trunk and
proceeded to get out my spare and
jack. At this point, a gentleman
stopped and came over to survey
the damage. He proceeded t'o
take over the changing of the
tire. Shortly, the donut spare was
in place, and we were ready to
proceed on our way.
The parable of the Good
Samaritan is more than just a
nice story that Jesus told to his
followers. It is the message that
we are all responsible to our
fellow man when need arises.
My Good Samaritan understood
this message quite well and lives
his life by it. Many "Christians"
hear the message but don't get it.
Fortunately, I am still capable of
changing a tire, but this man didn't
know for sure. He did the right
thing. He knows that his reward
was in giving, not in praise for his
act of kindness. God bless you, Phil
Collier!
Winston and Lynne Wells
St. Joe Beach


A financial






basics refresher


Until you get in the
habit, putting aside
savings is never easy.
But the sooner
you start, the sooner
you'll start seeing
results. As you'll see
below, when it comes
to savings, time is JA
your best friend: ALDE
The power of ALD
compounding.
When you reinvest
interest earned on
savings accounts or other
investment vehicles, the
interest grows (compounds)
the account's value much
faster than if you withdrew
it. For example, a one-time
$10,000 investment earning
6 percent a year would grow
to $17,908 in 10 years if you
reinvest the interest; after
20 years it would be worth
$32,071 and $57,435 after 30
years.
Regular investments.
You needn't start
with such a large initial'
investment to reap big
rewards. Say you're 21, start
with a zero balance, save
$100 a month, earn 6 percent
annual interest and reinvest
the interest. After 10 years,
you'd have $16,470, $46,435
after 20 years and $100,954
after 30 years. If you retire
at age 66, then your account
would be worth more than
$276,978 - all for a $100-a-
month investment.
Timing is important,
however. Postponing your
savings by only two years
would reduce your balance
in 20 years to only $38,929


I
I



L.
S
R


- more than $7,500
less. Wait five years
to begin saving, and
your balance would
drop to $29,277 in 20
years.
Tax-deferred
_ savings.
ON Another way to
RMAN accelerate earnings
is to take advantage
of tax savings offered
by retirement savings
programs like 401(k) plans
and IRAs. With a 401(k),
you can contribute up to
$16,500 a year (or $22,000
for those 50 and older) on a
pre-tax basis. This lowers
your taxable income - and,
therefore, your taxes - and
allows your account to grow
tax-free until you withdraw
the money at retirement.
Regular IRAs offer '
similar pre-tax advantages,
or you can contribute to a
Roth IRA using after-tax
dollars, and your earnings
will be completely tax-free at
retirement. The annual IRA
contribution limit is $5,000
($6,000 for 50 and older).
Practical Money
Skills for Life, Visa Inc.'s
free personal financial
management program,
features a guide to
401(k) plans at www.
practicalmoneyskills.com/
benefits. To learn more
about IRAs, visit wwwirs.
gov.
Risk.
The riskier an investment,
the greater your potential
gains - or losses. For
example, savings accounts


offer lower interest rates
in exchange for minimal
or no risk, whereas stocks
potentially can earn double-
digit investment rates during
long periods of time, but at
much higher risk.
Inflation.
Inflation measures
the rate at which goods
aid services increase in
cost over time. If your,
investments earn 2 percent
interest but the inflation
rate is 3 percent, the net
result is a 1 percent loss.
That's why many financial
experts often recommend
that people with at least
five to 10 years until
retirement keep a portion
of their savings in higher-
risk investments, such as
stocks and bonds; otherwise,
it's hard to stay ahead of
inflation.
Keep in mind that no
matter how much interest
your investments earn, if
you carry forward credit
card or loan balances
(aside from tax-deductible
mortgage interest), then
you'll be eating into
whatever profits you might
make. For tips on managing
credit cards and debt, visit
Practical Money Skills for
Life's Credit and Debt site
(www.practicalmoneyskills.
com/credit).

Jason Alderman directs
Visa's financial education
programs. Sign up for his
free monthly e-Newsletter at
www.practicalmoneyskills.
com/newsletter.


CROFT from page A4


for the U.S. population
recommended the vaccine
for girls 11-26, the Centers
for Disease Control latched
on to that recommendation
to require immigrant
females in the same age
group to have the vaccine.
This mandate was
issued despite the fact
that the CDC in a report
noted the limitations of its
own trials in identifying
potential adverse reactions
to the vaccine.
But this young woman
and her mother have been
put through a wringer
because of 1) their concern
about adverse effects and
2) because of her faith and
belief that she should not
be forced to have a vaccine.
not mandated for the
general population.
And we are not talking
about HIN1 or leprosy
or HIV or any of an
assortment of contagious
and potentially dangerous
viruses or diseases. No one
is going to develop cervical


cancer because this young
woman chooses not to have
the vaccine.
Thus far, the
government has turned a
deaf ear, denying a waiver
based on the fact that the
young woman did not have
an issue, faith-based or
otherwise, with vaccines,
per se, only with Gardasil,
which makes as much
Sense as Vioxx as pain
relief panacea does now.
The government's
stance, and its appeal
process of a waiver, has
this young woman at a
standstill in life, unsure
of her future because of a
vaccine touted by a drug
company with millions
of dollars invested in
Gardasil.
But overriding all of
that is this: government
intervention in a personal
decision about what one
does with her own body.
How does the
government decide that
immigrants, or at least the


ones who choose a legal
route into the country,
must have a vaccine that it
does not mandate for the
population as a whole?
How does the
government determine
that, despite evidence of
potentially serious adverse
side effects, despite this
young woman's deeply- .
held faith - including the
chastity ring she wears at
all times - she should be
denied citizenship because
she would rather not take a
vaccine that might or might
not have any benefit to her
whatsoever?-
This is the height of
government intrusion into
daily lives, of government
deciding what is and is not
good for us, of government
determining when a young
woman will be sexually
active.
To call it, as the young
woman's mother does,
"terribly inappropriate" is
an understatement of the
first order.


The case of Gardasil
has all the makings of the
events that surrounded
Vioxx, a drug pushed
to market over an
ineffectual Food and Drug
Administration, advertised
tirelessly as some sort.
of panacea for which it
might or might not be
and, in the case of the
vaccine, mandated for legal
immigrants by a policy with
a shaky foundation.
I was prescribed Vioxx
for months for chronic back
pain due to degenerative
discs, which ultimately will
need to be replaced.
I wonder now whether
my heart will go before my
back finally does due to
those months on Vioxx.
And I also wonder if
there is an end to this kind
of scattershot government
intervention or laissez faire
attitude or both when it
comes to people's ability to
. take personal control and
responsibility for their own
bodies.


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SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308 *
Port St. Joe,,FL 32457

Fax: 850-227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

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+WAM� "A ';


0t.l







PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, September 17, 2009 w w w. starf 1. com Page 6


PSJMS defeats

Cottondale 36-0

The Port St. Joe Middle
School football team earned
a road last week against Cot-
tondale.
The Sharks opened the
scoring after taking the open-
ing kickoff to the 40-yard line.
The Sharks took a five-play
drive that was capped by a
2-yard run by seventh-grader
Jarkeice Davis. Natrone Lee
ran for the two-point conver-
sion.
Cottondale drove the ball
inside the Shark 5 but came
away with nothing as the
defense stood strong and
stopped the Hornets.
The Sharks answered by
going 95 yards in 12 plays, con-
suming 5:32 from the clock, to
set up a 6-yard touchdown
pass from Drew Lacour to
Morton Mclemore. Jak Riley
ran in for the two-point con-
version and Port St. Joe had
a 16-0 lead at the half.
Cottondale wasted an-
other opportunity in the third
quarter when the Hornets
fumbled at the Shark 7 and
Mclemore pounced on the
ball.
One play later, Davis broke
a 90-yard touchdown run, the
extra point failed and Port St.
Joe was up 22-0.
Another Cottondale fum-
ble opened the way for a 65-
yard touchdown run by Jaco-
bi Jones on the ensuing play
and Frankie Harris ran in for
the two-point conversion and
it was 28-0.
Lee intercepted a Cot-
tondale pass and returned it
to the Hornet 3, from where
Antonio Moree barged over
and the two-point conversion
made it 36-0.
RUSHING
Davis led all rushers with
146 yards and two touch-
downs on 13 touches. Riley
had 15.yards in four carries,
Lee 37 on six carries, Jones
65 yards on one carry and
Moree 65 yards and a touch-
down on three carries.
Seven other Sharks com-
bined for 27 yards on the
ground.
Lacor was 1 for 2 passing
for six yards and a touchdown
and Walt Wilder was 1 for 1 for
eight yards.
McLemore had one recep-
tion for six yards and a touch-
down and Reggie Smith had
one for eight yards.
"Our offense line and de-
fense play great," said Port
St. Joe coach Tracy Brown-
ing. "When you are able to
have 254 yards on the ground
someone is opening a lot of
holes."
Browning made special
mention of linemen Riley
Burke, Tyler Alford, Vern
Barth, Barrett Lake, Mosses
Jones, Nick Lewis and tight
ends McLemore and Nick
Renfro.


Rams shut down Sharks


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

A blown transformer doused
half the lights at Shark Field for
more than an hour during the
first half Friday night.
Rutherford's Cordarryl Rogers
snuffed out any victory hopes for
Port St. Joe in the second half.
The slithery senior quarter-
back, nursing a shoulder injury,
entered the game late in the third
period, the Rams (1-1) down 13-
10.
Over the final 16 minutes Rog-
ers rushed for a game-high 76
yards, scored two touchdowns
and set up a third as Rutherford
barged back for a convincing 31-
13 victory over the host Sharks
(1-1).
"He played a great game in
the second half," said Rutherford
coach Greg Rivers of Rogers.
"Our defense played really well
tonight. They forced a few turn-
overs and kept them in check. But
that team played hard to the very
end."
, The Ram defense was stout,
holding Port St. Joe to 148 total
yards on offense and bottling the
Sharks top threat, junior running
back Calvin Pryor, to just 51 yards
rushing and 104 total yards of of-
fense.
Pryor started the game at
quarterback, but the Sharks could
not find an offensive rhythm as
turnovers in Ram territory hurt
the cause.
The Sharks fumbled three
times on the Rutherford side of
the field, one setting up a 20-yard
field goal by Wesley Brown which
proved the difference as the teams
went into the locker room at inter-
mission with the score 10-7.
The opening half was a long
one for all.
The Rams took the opening
kickoff and marched 65 yards in 12
plays, consuming 6:26 of the clock,
with Nick Smith sweeping around
left end from. two yards out for the
touchdown. Brown's extra point


The lights on the home half of Shark Field
requiring the transformer to be replaced.

made it 7-0. "They
The Sharks were three-and- We knew
out on the next possession but as things a
Port St. Joe punted a light stan- kept hur
chion popped and the lights on the The
home side of the field went dark. half kic
The punt, meanwhile, was in 13 pl
fumbled, the Sharks recovering to take
at the Rutherford 49. barged
Five plays later, Pryor lofted touchdo
a 37-yard touchdown pass to the was bloc
right flag where Willie Quinn out- it was 13
jumped two defenders for the ball. Smiti
Daniel May made it 7-7 with his kickoff 1
extra-point kick. Rogers
"Turnovers just killed us," said erford r
Port St. Joe coach Vern Barth, score, R
who suffered his first home loss 19 himsi
since arriving at Port St. Joe last five tack
season. "We can't turn the ball Port
over three times on their half of Smith a
the field and expect to win. Slop- ond half
py, sloppy football. operation


TIM CROFT I The Stai
were out for over an hour after a transformer blew,


y played great defense.
w they would take some
way from us. But we just
rting ourselves."
Sharks took the second-
koff and drove 71 yards
ays while using up 7:13
the lead. Darrell Smith
over from the 1 for the
wn, but May's extra point
cked by Zach Degraff and
3-10.
i returned the ensuing
to the Ram 48 and with
providing the spark, Ruth-
needed just five plays to
togers covering the final
elf while breaking at least
Jes.
St. Joe went with Zach
t quarterback in the sec-
, but still could find little
ng room against a stingy


Ram defense.
After the teams exchanged
punts late in the third period,
Dieton West intercepted a Smith
pass at the Shark 33 and after a
illegal blocking penalty, the Rams
took over at the Port St. Joe 28.
Rogers weaved his way
through the defense for 25 yards,
a face mask penalty placing the,
ball just outside the 1 and Rog-
ers bulled his way in from there.
The Rams were up 24-13 with 11
minutes to go after Brown's extra
point.
A bungled punt snap and short
punt set the Rams up at the Shark
44 with less than six minutes left
and Rutherford, using every sec-
ond it could, used eight plays to
set up a 3-yard touchdown run by
Smith, Brown's extra point, com-
pleting the scoring.


Wewahitchka makes most of its chances in victory


Knowles again
paces Gators


By Brad Milner
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Wewahitchka made the most of
its opportunities on Friday night.
The Gators didn't dominate
Chipley, despite what a 19-point
lead would indicate in their even-
tual 25-13 victory. The Tigers, who
lost for the 15th straight time dat-
ing to 2007, had more total yards,
but two turnovers and a series of
missed tackles gave Wewahitchka
its second win of the season.
"That," Wewahitchka coach
Todd Lanter said while pointing
to the scoreboard, "is all I care
about."


Chipley (0-2) gained 308 yards
and scored two late touchdowns to
make a respectable dent in the fi-
nal tally. Wewahitchka was held to
120 total yards and leading rusher
Chance Knowles to 73 on 16 car-
ries.
Knowles sealed the outcome
with an 85-yard kickoff return for a
touchdown in which he broke tack-
les from just about every Chipley
defender. He grabbed the ball at
the 15, raced into the middle of the
field, kept his legs churning and
broke free at the Chipley 40 to race
for the score.
The return came one play after
Chipley drove 69 yards for its first
TD, capped by a 20-yard touch-
down pass from Josh Myers to
Josh Smith with 9 minutes, 22 sec-
onds to play in the game.


Wewahitchka (2-0) led 19-0 af-
ter the first half when two Chipley
fumbles set up Gator scores. The
first resulted in a 61-yard fumble
return by Dvante Baham. The sec-
ond, a muffed punt by Johnny Wat-
ford, gave Wewahitchka the ball at
the Chipley 8.
Knowles scored on a 5-yard
pass from Beau McCorvey three
plays later.
"I thought our defense played
well," Chipley coach Rob Arm-
strong said. "But you can't make
mistakes like that and expect to
win.
"I take responsibility for that.
It's the coach's fault when those
kinds of mistakes keep happen-
ing."
Watford was the offensive star
of the game, pulling in six recep-


tions for 115 yards and rushing
for 60 more. Midway through the
fourth quarter, he scored on a 25-
yard pass from Myers, who was 8
of 13 for 145 yards and two inter-
ceptions.
Watford also dropped two long
passes in the first half that could
have set up Chipley deep in Wewa-
hitchka territory and one that was'
a potential score.
All of the mistakes added up'to a
Wewahitchka win. Lanter believes
Chipley will correct the mistakes
and be formidable down the road.
"I'm glad we played them
sooner rather than later," Lantet
said. "They are gonna win some
games."
Wewahitchka is at Jefferson
County next week. Chipley hosts
Blountstown.


Lady Tiger Sharks split for the week


The Port St. Joe High School
volleyball team split a pair of
matches last week against Ruth-
erford and Mosley.
Rutherford traveled to Port
St. Joe for a match played in
front of the student body.
After dropping the first two
sets 15-25 and 21-25, Port St. Joe
went on to win the next three 25-
17, 25-17, and 15-10 to defeat the
Lady Rams. Although it was a
great team effort to come back
from being down by two sets and
win three in a row, of particular
note is first libero and senior
Chelsey Walker. Chelsey served
36 times yesterday with three
aces and 28 points during her
serve for a 97 percent serving
accuracy. Chelsey also accumu-
lated 34 service receptions and
24 digs.
On Thursday, Port St. Joe
hosted Class 5A Mosley, falling
to the unbeaten Lady Dolphins
in straight sets.
This past weekend the team
traveled to Panama City and will
play matches against Bay High
and Sneads. The other three


pools include Mosley, Marianna,
Walton, Navarre, Gulf Breeze,
Rutherford and Chipley. Match
ups against those teams will be
determined after pool play is
complete and inter-pool play be-
gins in the afternoon.
On Tuesday, the Lady Tiger
Sharks traveled to Arnold for a
varsity match and tonight Port
St. Joe hosts Liberty County.
Other volleyball news:
THINK PINK - DIG PINK.
On Tuesday, Oct. 6, Port St
Joe volleyball will host a Dig
Pink event. Dig Pink is a Na-
tional Breast Cancer awareness
rally that takes place in colleges
and high schools all across the
country in the month of October.
Television news coverage is be-
ing requested from all of the
area news stations. We want to
pack the Dome on that evening
with everyone wearing a pink
T-shirt. T-shirt sales will start
soon. A portion of all proceeds
will go to Breast Cancer Re-
search. Please mark that date
on your calendar and get ready
to Dig Pink.


Volunteers needed


for pre-game meals


Special to the Star
Attention all civic
groups, local businesses,
churches and Shark fans:
The Port St. Joe High
School Touchdown Club
feeds 45 Tiger Sharks,
coaches and managers
every Friday afternoon
before each football
game. If you would be
interested in helping
to provide one of these
pre-game meals, please
contact Carla May, at
227-5512. We also need
volunteers to help sell Ti-
ger Shark T-shirts before
each home football game.
If you can volunteer to
help sell items, please
contact Carla May, at
227-5512. Thank you and
Go Tiger Sharks!


VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
Volunteers are
needed to help
make pre-game
meals on the
following dates:
Oct. 9
Oct. 23
Oct. 30
Nov. 12

Preble-Rish is sched-
uled to feed the Sharks on
Sept. 25, and the ladies of
the First United Method-
ist Church are set to feed
the Sharks on Oct. 16.
The dates needed groups
for to volunteer for are
Oct. 9,23 and 30, and Nov.
6 and 12.


A~ A i ' .~ r *







Thursday, September 17, 2009


IRAQ from page Al


Local


The Star I A7


with a laugh. "One of the
first days I was home I was
fishing and it started to rain
and I just sat there in a lawn
chair in my shorts and just
enjoyed each drop.
"It was a gratifying expe-
rience. It was about what I
expected. It wasn't fun."
Cole, whose cadaver dogs
are almost legendary in this
part of Florida, was hired by
a private contractor in need
of:such canines for search
missions. Cole signed up for
three months with the pro-
viso that he could extend for
another three months and
argother three months until
heriad reached a year.
' But the first three months
were sufficient.
On their last mission t6-
gether, one in the desert,
Cole could tell that Maximus
was done and so too was he.
He chose to return home
and after a period of rest
- Cole figures he and Maxi-
mus slept most of the first
week home - went back to
work at the sheriff's office.
"He was a trooper," Cole
said of Maximus. "But the
last few weeks he didn't have
it. When he gets stressed
and then how hot it was, he
won't drink They know how
to keep care of themselves. I
could just see he was done.
"I knew how long we
stayed would depend on how
he held up. It's a tough coun-
try for dogs. When he was
ready, I was about ready,
too."
Cole went on a number of
missions - the exact num-
ber and locations are clas-
sified - and each one was
draining.
They would travel for
two to three days to a loca-
tion, spend up to a week in
that location, and then travel
back to the home compound,
which was part of Camp Vic-
tory, which sprawls around
Saddam Hussein's grandest
palace in Baghdad.
Cole said the longest
stretch the two went without
working was about a week
Cole and his dog were al-
ways protected by a convoy
of U.S. Army infantry, Ma-
rines or the Army Calvary,
but the toll each trip took
sapped both dog and owner
of significant strength.
"Most of the time it was
pretty good," Cole said.
"They'd set you up in a room
and we'd go out with a con-
voy and then come back. We
went all over that place. *
"But it was tough. The
heat, the environment, you
have to travel no telling
where and that could be very
noisy, and you are wearing
all that body armor. It was
tough, it challenged me, but
I think I stood up to it very
good."
The noise of the chop-
pers and other vehicles that
transported the two added
to the stress for Maximus.
On their first trip, Cole said,
he put some foam ear plugs
in Max's ears which Maxi-
mu$ promptly removed with
a shake of his head.
However, minutes later,
Maximus received a head-
set to crowd out the noise
and the headset became
something of a traveling ac-
cessory.
"You could see it in his
face, hey this is alright, I can
handle this." Cole said. "He
did not like getting on and off
aircraft."
Cole described a desert
climate that was dry and
drab. The photos he brought
back have a sepia hue bro-
ken by the occasional trees
or shrubbery. And the sand
was another story, altogeth-
er.
The sand, Cole said, was
nothing like what can be
found on St. Joseph Pen-
insula. This was not sug-
ary white sand, but yellow
chalk-like sand that clung
to everything. Cole's com-
puter, despite daily clean-
ing, still sported a thin dust-
ing of sand in the seams last
week
"Sand gets in everything,


it is hard to stay clean,"
Cole said. "That sand got in
(Max's) nose, ears, his eyes.
And all these dogs are wear-
ing fur coats."
Cole said Iraq was much
quieter, much calmer than
two or three years ago, act


Cole and Maximus at work in Taza.


Greg Cole and Maximus brought home a bounty of
A young Iraqi boy gives Maximus a high-five after his work following a bombing battle badges, plaques and commemorative coins
in Taza. awarded formtheir work in Iraq.


"I went so I could serve my country
again one last time. My main focus
was taking care of the dog and doing
my job. Would I make the same
decision again? Absolutely."

- Greg Cole


cording to soldiers he talked
to, and there were a lot be-
cause Maximus attracts a
crowd.
"One of the most gratify-
ing things of all was every-
where we went, from the
people who flew us to the
soldiers, Marines who pro-
tected us, the soldiers would
crowd around Max and they
would hug him and love him
and May was loving them
back," Cole said.
"They would tell me
what it meant to them, how
much it gave them a piece of
home. It brought tears to my
eyes. I would have done that-
for free. That would fill me
up. It got kind of emotional
at times."
The missions the two
would go on would typi-
cally involve a single target
identified by the military
through information gath-
ered in the field. Cole said
the military personnel were
always helpful and worked
with efficiency.
"I was proud of them,"
Cole said.
The concern is that as
part of a recovery or search
team, Cole and Maximus
could be targeted by the en-
emy as they arrived at a giv-
en scene they would work.
Additionally, dogs are not
looked on highly in that part
of the world, they are indeed
targets of the enemy, and
many Iraqis, Cole said, shied
away from any contact.
Rules have Ftheir excep-


tions, though, and Cole and
Maximus encountered one
at Taza, where a mosque
was bombed and casualties
were high. In this case, Cole
and Max were searching for
Iraqis.
And in general the Iraqis
at the scene invited the as-
sistance, Cole assuring them
he and Max were there to
help and were "honored" to
help. While on a break from
their work, one Iraqi man
patted Max on the head, a
young boy traded high-fives
with the dog.
"They would thank her,
which I thought was pretty
cool," Cole said.
The return from Taza
brought the highest of rec-
.ognitions. Cole and Max
received a plaque of Special
Recognition from the 9th Cal-
vary, received the units' coin
from a general and an honor
Cole could not get over.
"The biggest honor was
the lieutenant colonel ripped
off his battle patch and gave
it to me," Cole said. "He said,
'You deserve that.' You don't
get much better than that."
Cole said he could not
have done the tour without
modern technology which
allowed him to keep in fre-
quent touch with his wife
through satellite phone and
Skype.
"I could not have done it
without her support," Cole
said.
After three months, dog
and master were cooked


Cole and Maximus received special recognition, including 9th Calvary battle
badges, for their work at Taza.


and headed home. The
flight back to Germany
brought him to a Macaroni
Grill, which allowed him to
feast on a little bit of home-
like cooking and particularly
sweet tea.
"I ate so much I was
sick," Cole said.
Two flights later he was
in Atlanta and in the arms of
Debbie.
Cole, looking in hind-
sight, said he would make
the same decision to go over
to Iraq to try to bring closure
to some poor soldier's fam-
ily again. He and Max did |
what they could and went
home when they reached
their limit. "
"I went so I could serve
my country again one last
time," Cole said. "My main
focus was taking care of the
dog and doing my job. Would
I make the same decision
again? Absolutely."


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SPECIAL TO THE STAR







A8 I The Star


Local


Thursday, September 17, 2009


ALWAYS ONLINE I


WWW.STARFL.COM


Relay for Life
The Gulf County Relay
for Life Committee will
host a meeting for all past
and newly-interested com-
mittee members today at
6:30 p.m. in the Port Inn
meeting room.


committee meeting tonight


The Relay for Life, held
in Spring 2010, will be a
consolidated event, en-
compassing both the Port
St. Joe and Wewahitchka
communities. Those inter-
ested in being a part of next


year's Relay are encour-
aged to attend Thursday's
meeting.
For more information,
contact Relay for Life event
chairperson Scott Baker,
850-227-6804.


DEP encourages Florida residents and visitors

to help protect Florida marine communities


Whatever speed you choose, you'll enjoy:

* A dedicated Internet connection"
* FREE self-installation ($49.95 value)
and 24/7 tech support
* FREE security package with anti-virus and
firewall ($50 value)
* 100MB of email storage
* Support for email files up to 25MB
(great for photos and music)
* FREE activation and use of modem
* FREE Videomail
* FREE monthly eNewsletter
* No contract to sign
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Don't miss out on this great opportunity!
Call 1.877.954.8505 now.
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*After promotional period, standard rates for high-speed Internet service apply. Offer available to new customers only, for a limited time. FairPoint phone
service required. "*FairPoint delivers a dedicated connection to your home from our central office. Speed and uninterrupted service are not guaran-
teed. Taxes and additional charges may apply. Not all services available in all areas. Services subject to change. 02009 FairPoint Communications, Inc.
All rights reserved. 674AT/STAR


TALLAHASSEE - Governor
Charlie Crist proclaimed
September as Interna-
tional Coastal Cleanup
Month and the Florida
Department of Environ-
mental Protection (DEP)
is celebrating with activi-
ties at various state parks
and aquatic preserves on
Saturday, Sept. 19, 2009.
Available for the public,
the volunteer events pro-
vide an opportunity to help
protect 'Florida beaches


and coastlines.
Sponsored by the Ocean
Conservancy, the Interna-
tional Coastal Cleanup is a
worldwide annual effort to
clean and protect the en-
vironment through debris
removal. The effort is the
world's largest organized
marine cleanup.
DEP invites 'the public
to participate in the clean-
up at the following events:
Dr. Julian G. Bruce St.
George Island State Park,


Sat. Sept. 19, 8:30 a.m. -
11:30 a.m. Contact Melody
Sapp 927-2111 for more in-
formation.
Topsail Hill Preserve
State Park, Sat. Sept. 19,
8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Call
Leda Suydan at 850-267-
0299 for more information.
Apalachicola National
Estuarine Research Re-
serve, Sat. Sept. 19, 8:30
a.m. - 11:30 a.m. call Ro-
salyn Kilcollins at 850-653-
8063 for more information.


COUNTY from page Al


waged a concentrated bat-
tle to win the exemption,
since the new control lines
would have virtually per-
manently halted any con-
struction in the area.
Calling it the "most
single significant piece of
legislation I've ever been
associated with," Patronis
profusely thanked Sansom,
saying it would have been
impossible to win the bill's
passage without him.
In other business con-
ducted at the meeting:
* After a lively debate,
the board voted 3-2 (Com-
missioners Billy Traylor
and WarrenrYeager voting
no) to pass an ordinance
to control plantings of less
than two acres of the con-
troversial arrondo grass.
The grass, which is
considered by many to be
invasive, is one of the fu-
els slated to be used in the
proposed bio-mass plant


to be located in Port St.
Joe.
Governmental regula-
tions only control plant-
ings of two or more acres,
according to board mem-
bers.
* The board voted
unanimously to imple-
ment new public hours for
the county's Five Points
Landfill off of State 71 just
north of Port St. Joe.
Beginning Oct. 1, the
landfill will be open to the
public on Mondays, Tues-
days, Wednesdays and
Saturday from 7:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. ET.
There will be a mini-
mum charge to the public
of $5 and a charge of $35
per ton. Fees, including
the $5 fee, must be paid
by check or debit card.
No cash will be accepted.
Charges for commercial
tires will be $135 per ton.
* Commission chair


Nathan Peters passed the
chair to Commissioner
Carmen McLemore and
made a motion that the
county use The Star news-
paper as often as possible
for advertising.
The motion was clari-
fied to give county admin-
istrator Don Butler discre-
tion to use either The Star
or the Panama City News
Herald as he deemed best.
The motion passed 5-0.
* The board voted 4-0
(Yeager abstaining) to ob-
tain a cost estimate from
Preble Rish for an engi-
neering study for funding,
permits and repair to Byrd
Parker Road in Wewahi-
tchka.
McLemore told the
board that erosion had de-
stroyed the river bank and
the river was only 12 feet
from the road. The next
flood would take the road,
McLemore said.


AGENDA from page A]


city's land development
regulations.
* The council also read
for the first time Ordi-
nance 571, which raises
water and sewer rates for
Mexico Beach customers.
According to city ad-
ministrator Chris Hub-
bard, Bay County is rais-


ing the rates it charges
Meiico Beach and the city
is forced to pass along the
increase.
For a typical customer
who uses the minimum
category of 4,000 gallons
of water per month, the
increase will amount to
$1.80 a month (15 cents per


1,000 gallons of water and
29 cents for sewer).
Hubbard added that
Bay County has already
given notice that it will
raise rates for the next
three years. The new rates
will become effective with
the November bill, Hub-
bara said.


Washington County Chamber of Commerce


Sat. & Sun., Nov. 21-22, 2009
Washington County Agricultural Center
Chipley, Florida



Register now for booth space at the 2009 Outdoor Expo
and Gun & Knife Show in Washington County, Fla. Share
your sport and recreation products and services with
thousands of sports enthusiasts in North Florida and the
surrounding area.

The 2009 Outdoor Expo is the host site for the
area's premier Gun & Knife Show.
Multi-media Expo promotion will reach more than 92,000
consumers in an 8-county area. All exhibitors also receive
FREE advertising in the official 2009 Outdoor Expo
Program, with 12,000-plus distribution in Washington and
Holmes counties.


,JI L !
Ch1ar.
af'Wrr/ri.


For Exhibitor Application, as well as information on
the show and program advertising:
visit: www.wcexpo.org
email: info@wcexpo.org
..n C.o ; . Call 850.638.4157


For additional advertising information in the official program of the
2009 Outdoor Expo contact Washington County News at 850-638-0212.


N Wamhmlon (ount
NE\VS


PRESETINGSPONOR


OneSouth
BtANK(


4NFCH
Northwrt Florid.


4 IL1


g
a e < 0











COMMUNITY


Thursday, September 17, 2009 -


w w w. st a rf 1. co m


/49





'f)


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Seven-year-old Zoe Delmonico clutched
her newly purchased leash as if it were a bar.
of gold.
She shed the program for last week's "DAW-
GS Graduation" to her mother for safe-keeping,
largely ignored the often emotional plaudits
spoken about the "DAWGS" program and kept
her eyesight on the small mixed-breed puppy
sitting on the floor several rows in front of her.
Clutching that leash, waiting for her chance
to snag onto to the birthday present she and
her twin brother, Zane, had traveled from
Montgomery, Ala., to receive.
That would be Skye, the top dog in last
week's graduating class, the second for the
"Dawgs" program operated at the Gulf For-
estry Camp through a collaborative effort by
See DOGS B12


-4


Photos by TIM.CROFT I The Star
Bryan White gives
Chester, runner-up for
Top Dog and adopted
by a guard at Gulf
Forestry Camp, some
love before White
bids goodbye to the
DAWGS program
as he has earned
work detail out in the
community.
The canine
graduating class:
At top, from left,
Harley, Allie, Skye
and Toby. Below, from
left, Cinnamon, Maisy,
Carson and Chester.


- .1 *
-~ ,


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~\f^M~fr^^ '



*/ -'w* , \'*- . ;


*1~




4(4I


l u


Vision Bank donates to Sacred Heart


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Dr. Henry Roberts has become
used to arriving in Gulf County
with a smile he can't shake from
his face.
That smile was on display
again last week as Vision Bank
provided a five-year, $25,000 dona-
tion to the Sacred Heart Hospital
on the Gulf that is near comple-
tion by the Gulf/Franklin Center
on U.S. 98.
Roberts, president of the Sa-
cred Heart Foundation, proudly
accepted the oversized check,
chuckling about his difficulty in
cashing the check, although he
was assured it was good at any
Vision branch.
"Sacred Heart means a lot to
this community," said Joey Ginn,
president and CEO of Vision
Bank. "It will fill a huge void and
maybe be a magnet for others.
"This is important to us. We
live here, work here. This hos-
pital will provide much-needed
benefits to our employees."
Roberts wasted little time
mapping out how the money




4W








By: Hannah Henderson n


.IL --- >�----- i

TIM CROFT I The Star
Dr. Henry Roberts, center, receives a check from Joey Ginn of
Vision Bank as Johanna White, Jim Norton, Jerry Gaskin and
Joan Cleckley of Vision Bank join in the celebration.


could be used.
As he took a pen and piece of
paper, he drew a rudimentary
blueprint of the hospital layout
and noted to Ginn and other Vi-
sion Bank officials that the dona-
tion could be used in the admin-
istrative offices of the hospital,
with the donation purchasing
naming rights.
Or, Roberts added, the dona-
tion could be aimed toward a pa-


tient room or wing.
"When community banks help
us like this, it is huge," Roberts
said. "It also means they have
confidence that we are going to
be coming."
Roberts said the hospital is
. about 80-85 percent complete,
and Sacred Heart currently is re-
cruiting doctors. A March open-
ing is the target, and Roberts
said he believed Sacred Heart


would meet that target.
"It looks good; it looks achiev-
able," Roberts said. "We are al-
most there and looking forward
to opening the doors in March."
Upon opening, the hospital
will feature 24/7 emergency room
services, in-patient acute care,
diagnostics and imaging servic-
es, including CT Scanner, digital
mammography, ultrasound and
' X-ray, laboratory services, surgi-
cal operating rooms, a medical
office building for primary and
specialty care physicians, and a
helipad for rapid transport.
Thus far, Sacred Heart has
raised nearly $2 million in local
donations, and the county has
levied a half-cent sales tax for
more than three years to address
care for the indigent, uninsured
and underinsured.
Ginn noted that the donation
was directed at the hospital but
also at the community as a whole,
a vehicle, in out-sized form, for
economic development.
"I think this hospital could be
a catalyst for the growth we need
in this community," Ginn said.


B
Section


Page 1


0


A DOG'S LIFE


� ' ': i
-.46 ^*''
A �


Fighting


cystic


fibrosis


one step


at a time
By Tini Croft
Star News Editor
Striding into the fight
against cystic fibrosis is what
Shannon Chai hopes for the
second Saturday in October.
Chai, manager of Coastal
Fitness Center, is coordinat-
ing the Great Stride Walk for
10 a.m. ET on Oct. 17 with
proceeds going to the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation.
"We have a member in our
gym who has a family mem-
ber with cystic fibrosis, and
I thought this would be a fun
thing to raise awareness .and
educate people about cystic fi-
brosis," Chai said. "There is no
timing, we don't have a stop-
watch. The only way you win is
to raise the most money."
The Great Stride Walk is
a nationwide event, although
this is the first year the effort
has made it to Gulf County.
Like Relay for Life for the
fight against cancer, the Great
Stride Walk is the largest fund-
raiser of the year for the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation.
Chai has charted a 5K, or
3.1-mile, course around Bea-
con Hill Park and the Integras
Senior Center campus. Each
lap will be one mile, so each
participant, whether run-
ning or walking, will cover the
course three times.
The fundraising comes in
the sponsorships.
The aim to have partici-
pants sign up folks to sponsor
them, giving a nickel or a dol-
lar or sawbuck or whatever
can be afforded to fight cystip
fibrosis.
"Whatever they can raise
is greatly appreciated," Chai
said.
The payout comes when
the sponsored participant
completes the course.
"I've never done this before,
so I didn't really know what to
expect," Chai said. ."Every-
thing is fresh for me, and that
makes it fun.
"I am surprised by the sup-
port we are getting."
The first 50 individuals
to sign up for the walk will
receive T-shirts donated by
Coast2Coast Printing and
Coastal Insurance. Duren's
Piggly Wiggly and Subway are
on board to provide refresh-
ments and sandwiches.
Folks can come by Coastal
Fitness at 310 Reid Ave. or
contact Chai at coastalfitness
psj@yahoo.com to receive
the forms and register for the
event.
Chai emphasized that the
event is intended as a fun
gathering. The view from Bea-
con Hill provides a beautiful
glimpse of the bay beyond, and
the park provides things for
kids of all ages to do.
There is also the extra bo-
nus, at least from the viewpoint
of a gym manager and person-
al trainer, of getting folks "up
and moving" while they raise
money for a worthy cause.
"We want people to realize
it is not a race," Chai said. "You
can casually walk the whole
way. It doesn't matter how long
it takes. It matters how much
money you can raise."
Chai said he anticipates,
given the early response, that
the success of this year will
lead into similar and expanded
events on an annual basis in
the future.
"If it goes well, I think we
will do it again next year," Chai
said.
Participants in the 5K are
asked to be at Beacon Hill
Park between 9-9:30 a.m. in
order to register so the 5K can
start on time.





Thursday, September 17, 2009


B2 I ThpStrir Society
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ISpa Pedicure
I With Coupon, offer Expires 9/30/09
f Jenni Calvarese, Licensed Nail Specialist -' ' '/
1 648-1035 p..'
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Mon - Fri 8:00 - 5:00 CST Sat 8:00 - Noon CST Flexible/Walk-Ins Welcome




gof the





















SAVE A LIFE - ADOPT A PET FROM THE ST.
JOSEPH BAY HUMANE SOCIETY!!!

The St. Joseph Bay Humane Society has many
LOVING,ADORABLE puppies for adoption!
Please come out & visit at 1007 Tenth St. in Port
St. Joe or call us at 227-1103

SHOP FAITH'S THRIFT HUT! All proceeds
go directly back to the animals! DONATIONS
also needed. Please stop by Thurs. - Sat. from
10am - 4pm. 1007 Tenth St. in Port St. Joe.
CLEANERS * POLISHES
Dan & Nancy
Ostman
Jax Wax Distribution LLC
Cell: 850.832.1560
P.O. Box 13331
AcCIssORs * ADDITIVES Mexico Beach, FL 32410
ACO'SSOR ^^ ^^ES � ADDITIVES^^^^


America celebrates U.S. Constitution


Birthday

Miles Allen Butler Turns 7
Miles Allen Butler
turned 7 on Sept. 9.
Miles is the son of Rhett
and Brittnie Butler. He
is the grandson of Dit
and Debbie Butler of
St. Joe Beach, Sandy b .
Watson of Howard 20
Creek and Allen Parker
of Jonesboro, Ga. He
celebrated his birthday
with a pool party with
family and friends. Th e
theme was SpongeBob.
We are so proud of
our smart big boy, and
we love you so much,
sweetie.
Happy Birthday.


Engagement

Baker-Spohn
Jamie
and Sheila
Baker of
Wewahitchka
announce the
engagement
and
forthcoming
marriage
of their
daughter,
Halee
Christian
Baker, to
Steven Craig
Spohn, son
of Steve and
Lynn Spohn
and Carol
Keyes of
Panama City.
The bride-
elect is a 2008 graduate of Wewahitchka High School
and currently attends Gulf Coast Community
College. She is employed by Community Based
Options as a respite giver.
Her fiance is a 2005 graduate of Rutherford
High School and currently attends Florida A&M
Pharmacy School.
A Dec. 19 wedding is planned. All friends and
family are invited to attend. No local invitations will
be sent.


On Sept. 17, 1787, the
U.S. Constitution was
signed by 55 delegates to
the Constitutional Conven-
tion in Philadelphia's In-
dependence Hall. In honor
of this historic event, the
National Society Daughters
of the American Revolution
proudly promotes Constitu-
tion Week across America.
"We, the people of the
United States, in order to
form a more perfect union,
establish justice, insure do-
mestic tranquility, provide
for the common defense,
promote the general wel-
fare, and secure the bless-
ings of liberty to ourselves
and our posterity, do ordain
and establish this Constitu-
tion for the United States of
America."
With these words writ-
ten more than 200 years
ago, our forefathers laid the
foundation for our great na-
tion, adopting a Constitution
that has since proven to be
an enduring and true guide
for American government.


Revolution, accepted it.
The Constitution's powerful
framework for establishing
and preserving liberty, jus-
tice and opportunity had en-
abled us to prosper as a na-
tion and thrive as a people
through more than two cen-
turies of political change,
social transformation and
economic challenge.
The aims of the cel-


ebration are to emphasize
citizens' responsibilities for
protecting and defending
the Constitution, preserv-
ing it for posterity; to inform
the people that the Consti-
tution is the basis for Amer-
ica's great heritage and the
foundation for our way of
life; and to encourage study
of the historical events that


led to the framing of the
Constitution in September
1787.
The United States func-
tions as a republic under
the Constitution, which is
the oldest document still
in active use that outlines
the self-government of a
people. This landmark idea
that men had the inalien-
able right as individuals to,
be free and live their lives
under their' own govern-
ment was the impetus of the
American Revolution. To-
day, the Constitution stands
as an icon of freedom for
people around the world.
Known as the largest
women's patriotic organiza-
tion in the world, DAR has
over 168,000 members with
approximately 3,000 chap-
ters in all 50 states and llfor-
eign countries. The DAR has
long promoted patriotism
through commemorative
celebrations, memorials,
scholarships and activities
for children, and programs
for new immigrants.


Port St. Joe Garden Club NEWS


The Port St. Joe Garden Club held
a luncheon at noon and then called to
order its first fall meeting on Thurs-
day, Sept. 10. Many new educational
programs as well as field trips have
been planned for the upcoming year.
A discussion was held to host a sanc-
tioned flower show at the garden
club. More information is needed on
this matter and will be discussed at
the next meeting. After a delicious
lunch prepared by the garden club
members, plants were exchanged
with each other and the meeting was


adjourned. As a community service,
floral designs prepared by club mem-
bers each month were taken to The
Bridge at Bay St. Joe. A Florida's Dis-
trict II garden club meeting will be
held in Graceville, Fla., on Thursday,
Oct. 8, beginning at 8:30 a.m. CST.
Many of our local club members will
be attending this informative meet-

iPort St. Joe Garden Club is a non-
profit organization organized in 1948
"and federated in 1949. We are mem-
bers of The National Council of State


Garden Clubs Inc., Deep South Re-
gion, and Florida Federation of Gar-
den Clubs Inc., District II. Port St. Joe
Garden Club meetings are held on
the second Thursday of each month
at noon EST at the Port St. Joe Gar-
den Club Center on Eighth Street.
If anyone is interested in attending
the District II meeting or becoming
a' garden club member, please call
Mary Harrison, president of the Port
St. Joe Garden Club, at 229-6686 or
contact any Port St. Joe Garden Club
member.


Obituaries


Earl L. Burrows


Mr. Earl L. Burrows, 77,
of Overstreet, passed away
Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009,
at his home following an
extended illness. A native
of Oklahoma, he had been
a resident of Gulf County
since 1955 and was retired
from the U. S. Air Force and
served in the Korean War.
After his retirement, he was
employed by the United
States Postal Service for 25
years. He was loved and will
be missed by his family.
Survivors include his
wife, Clovette Burrows of
Overstreet; his children,
Rusty Burrows and wife,
Pam, and Leonard 0.
Burrows, Sr., and wife,
Maty, all of Overstreet,


Mareda Weeks of St. Joe
Beach, and Stacey Burrows
and wife, Tammy, of Havana,
Fla.; six grandchildren;
three great-grandchildren;
two brothers, Raymond
Burrows and wife, Carol
Jean, and Willie Burrows
and wife, Lydia; and a
brother-in-law, Andy
Mangum.
The graveside funeral
service was held at 4:30
p.m. EDT on Friday, Sept.
11, in Holly Hill Cemetery,
conducted by the Rev.
Andy Mangum. Interment
followed. Burial was with
full military honors.
All services were
under the direction of the
Comforter Funeral Home.


Garner Family Thanks


The family of Loretta
Garner wishes to express
our sincere gratitude
for each and every act of
kindness during our recent
loss. The food, flowers and
words of encouragement
were greatly appreciated;


a special thank-you to
the church family at Oak
Grove Assembly of God for
hosting the family after the
services. Please continue
to keep us in your thoughts
and prayers.
The family of Loretta Garner


PUBLIC NOTICE


SPECIAL
CODE


Thursday September 24,2009
7:00 p.m.
Commissioner's Chamber
Code Enforcement Violations


All persons are invited to attend these
hearings. Any person who decides to appeal
any decision made by the Special Master
with respect to any matter considered at said
hearing will need a record of the proceedings,
and for such purpose may need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The Code Enforcement Special Master of the
City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide a
verbatim record of this meeting.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this
proceedings should contact Jim Anderson, City
Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, Telephone
No. 850-229-8261.

THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Jim Anderson
City Clerk


Lucienne Stough
Waddail, 85, died on Sept.
9 in the presence of her
family.
Mrs. Waddail was
a longtime resident of
Decatur, Ga., who moved
to Port St. Joe in 2003.
She is the daughter
of Lucien and Willie Mae
Carmack Stough and a
1944 graduate of Auburn
University with a major
in English and education
and a minor in music.
During her teaching
career, she taught
junior high school and
elementary school. She
was a member of Decatur
First Baptist Church.
Her husband of
63 years, Richard G.
Waddail, died on June 27,
2007.
A memorial service
for both Mrs. Waddail
and Mr. Waddail was
scheduled for Sept. 15
at their beloved church,
First Baptist of Decatur,
Ga. Burial of their ashes
was to be in their family
gravesite at Lakeview


Memory Gardens in
Phenix City, Ala.
Mrs. Waddail is
survived by a son and
daughter-in-law, Rick
and Amy Waddail of
Adrian, Ga.; a daughter
and son-in-law, Willa and
Bill Cleveland of Port
St. Joe; two grandsons,
Jeff (Alicia) Waddail
of Huntsville, Ala., and
Robbie (Karen) Carter
of Swainsboro, Ga.; three
great-grandchildren; a
beloved cousin and his
wife, Donald and Nita
Cogdell of Savannah, Ga.;
and several cousins.
Mrs. Waddail's family
wants to express their
sincere appreciation to the
remarkable staff of The
Bridge of Bay St. Joseph
Care and Rehabilitation
for their compassionate
and loving care.
In lieu of flowers,
memorials can be sent
to the St. Joseph Bay
Humane Society, 1007
10th St., Port St. Joe, FL
32456 or to a memorial of
your choice.


THE CODE ENFORCEMENT
MASTER WILL HOLD
ENFORCEMENT HEARINGS:


WHEN:
TIME:
WHERE:
SUBJECT:


Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson, right, signed a
Proclamation for Constitution Week, Sept. 17-23,
and Elizabeth Stokoe, left, a member of the St.
Joseph Bay Chapter, Daughters of the American


Lucienne Stough Waddail


Revelation
Biblical sYmbohl give meaning
& understanding to our lives & our future
Dynamic study of Bible Prophecies and
their meaning for us today..
Speaker-Mel Eisele is a captivating speaker
who blends humor with heart-stirring depth.

You w ill understand:
O'f the End. Tihe Battle of Armageddon.
rael in Prophecy, The Rapture.
rk of The Beast., 666 & Antichrist.
4,000. The Mynstery of Death.
.VWVho Conquers the Beast,
� and ,more!
iday 9-11 @.-71.3
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Sat. 9-19 * 11 am & 7 pm


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Thursday, September 17, 2009


Local


The Star I B3


GALA's St. Joe Children's Theater gets $2,000 donation


On Friday, Sept. 4, The
Olive Branch Foundation
donated $2,000 to Gulf Alli-
ance for Local Art (GALA)
to help fund it's newly
formed St. Joe Children's
Theater.
Anissa and Kurt Neu-
bauer, along with Kurt's
business partner Gail
D'Silva and her husband
Bosco founded The Olive
Branch Foundation in hon-
or of the Neubauer's new
daughter, Olivia.
"We adopted Olivia at
birth last September and
she has changed our lives
for the better. In turn we
want to honor our gift
from. God by blessing oth-
ers. Olivia means "peace"
and is Latin for Olive Tree.
We hope to bring a little
peace to those in need
and promote the arts,"
states -Anissa Neubauer.
"And you couldn't find a
more worthy cause than
enhancing our children's


lives," she continues.
The check was pre-
sented to- Don Ouellette,
GALA President, by Olivia
Neubauer at her first birth-
day party. Parents, Anissa
and Kurt, gave Olivia the
presents she wanted and
needed. The party guests
were asked to bring art
supplies to donate to un-
derprivileged children at
our local schools. When
asked to comment, Olivia
said, "Goo-goo gaga a goo,"
which translated means, "I
love art!" The art supplies,
seen above with Olivia's
party guests, were present-
ed to the schools the follow-
ing week.
"It's been just amazing
the response and offers to
help and donate we've got-
ten since we announced
the formation of the St. Joe
Children's Theater," said
Don Ouellette. "People are
signing up to become mem-
bers of GALA to help sup-


port the children's theater
as well as our other proj-
ects. It truly has created
a new enthusiasm for the
arts in our area," he adds.
The first performance
by the St. Joe Children's
Theater, "The Headless
Horseman Rides Again" is
scheduled for Ghosts on the
Coast on Halloween night.
Auditions will take place
Sunday, Sept. 20 starting at
2:30 p.m. EST at the Port
St. Joe Elementary School
Auditorium. Parents of un-
derage children must at-
tenrl auditions with their
child. It will be an open
audition. Those wishing to
audition or seek crew posi-
tions simply have to show
up at the auditorium that
day to do so. There are
14 roles to be cast for girls
and boys between the ages
of 7 to 19. There are many
crew positions available as
well, such as student direc-
tor, student artistic direc-


SPECIAL TO THE STAR


Olivia Neubauer, left, hands a check to Don Ouellette.


tor, student program direc-
tor and more to give those
students who wish to par-
ticipate but choose not to


perform a chance to learn St. Joe Children's Theater
about the play production and Gulf Alliance for Local
process. Arts visit their Web site at
To find out more about www.gulfalliance.org.


GALA announces first St. Joe Children's Theater production


Gulf Alliance for Local Arts
(GALA) announced this week the
first production to be put on by its
newly-formed St. Joe Children's
Theater, "The Headless Horse-
man' Rides Again" at Ghosts on
the Coast on Oct. 31.
This adaptation of the Wash-
ington Irving's classic story of
the Headless Horseman is a
charming comedy for all ages.
Crafty Mr. Van Bloom wants
Bronco Bones for a son-in-law so
he can gain access to Bronco's
land holdings. His daughter Ka-
tie, however, is in love with the


schoolteacher Ichabod Crane.
In an attempt to force Ichabod
to leave town, Vani Bloom calls in
Old Rebecca, the town witch, to
scare the school children and lay
the blame on Ichabod for stirring
up the wrath of Will Sims, the
"headless horseman." But the
unexpected appearance of Will's
angry spirit at a stance frightens
Van Bloom away and Ichabod
emerges victorious.
"We have been working on our
children's theater project since
early Spring as part of our re-
structuring and commitment to


area children," states Don Ouel-
lette, GALA President. "It's been
a lot of work. But we know they're
worth it," he continues.
The performance will take
place at the new park on the cor-
ner of Reid Ave. and Highway 71
during Ghosts on the Coast on
Oct. 31. There will be 3 shows
starting at 6:30 p.m. EST. The
shows are free to the public.
Auditions will take place Sun-
day, Sept. 20 starting at 2:30 p.m.
EST at the Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary School Auditorium. Parents
of underage children must attend


auditions with their child. It will.
be open audition. Those wishing
to audition or seek crew positions
simply have to show up at the au-
ditorium that day to do so. There
are 14 roles to be cast for girls and
boys between the ages of 7 to 19.
There are .many crew positions
as well such as student director,
student artistic director, student
program director and more to
give those students who wish to
participate but choose not to per-
form a chance to learn about the
play production process.
"We are already planning two


additional plays to bring to the
stage, "The Best Christmas Pag-
eant Ever" in December 2009
and "The Velveteen Rabbit" in
Spring 2010," said Ouellette. "We
always need volunteers to help
pull these projects off., Any help
would be greatly appreciated. Of
course donations and/or becom-
ing a member of GALA are very
helpful too," he adds.
To find out more about "The
Headless Horseman Rides
Again," St. Joe Children's the-
ater and GALA visit their Web
site at www.gulfalliance.org.


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Last year, it rivaled the
Tupelo Festival as Wewahi-
tchka's most well-attended
event.
This year, organizers
of the First Pentecostal
Church's Super Kids Day are
preparing for the onslaught.
The 2008 family-friendly
event drew 250 people to the
church, located at 619 High-
way 71 S. in Wewahitchka,
just behind the IGA.
Pastor Joey Ethridge
said he is preparing to feed
500 people at this year's free
event, held Saturday, Sept. 20
beginning at 10 a.m. (CT).
Kids ages 5-19 and their
families will enjoy hamburg-
ers, hotdogs, cotton candy
and snowcones and a variety
of outdoor games.
Ethridge has already re-
served six inflatables, includ-
ing waterslides, a bouncy
house, bungee cord basket-
ball game and train.
Attendees can also prac-
tice their aim at the dunking
booth or witness the magic
of illusionist Tony Wilhelm
of The Magic Theater in Pi-
geon Forge, Tenn.
Attendees will earn tick-
ets .at each game, which
they can trade for items at a


church "store," filled to the
brim with donated toys.
Ethridge, who' helmed a
church in Jonesboro, Ark.,
before becoming First Pen-
tecostal's pastor three years
ago, has a special passion for
children.
"The children are the for-
gotten part of our society,"
said Ethridge, who believes
early intervention is key in
creating model adults.
"If you start working with
them while they're young,
you don't have to worry about
them when they get older."
During his travels, Eth-
ridge was moved by a stone'
plaque placed on the founda-
tion of a razed church.
' On the plaque was in-
scribed: "We were thriving,
we were growing, but we
made one mistake - we for-
got the kids."
Ethridge has taken the
words to heart.
Each Sunday, he holds a
"Children's March" offering,
with kids collecting spare
change from parishioners.
The change is placed in
a special account and funds
the Super Kids Day festivi-
ties.
For more information,
contact Ethridge at 850-819-
2458 or the church office,
850-639-5623.


This year's morsel
The Friends of St. Joseph
Bay Preserves invite you to
attend our third.Annual Bay
Day on Saturday, Oct. 3. This
event, held at the Preserves
Center, features great food,
live' music, and local nature
photography.
Bay Day is an exception-
al opportunity for everyone
to discover and enjoy the
natural splendor of the St.
Joseph Bay State Buffer and
Aquatic Preserve as well as
sensational food, music, and
fellowship. We hope to see
you there.

Birding, backcountry
trips and bay tours
We will have riding back-
country trips of the Buffer
Preserve, trips focused on
birding, and both wading
and boat trips to St. Joseph
Bay. On backcountry Buffer
Preserve tours, you will ride
in a tour wagon on the back
roads with experienced
guides (Jean Huffman, Buf-,
fer Preserve Manager, and
Bill Boothe, Photographer
and Naturalist extraordi-
naire) as they highlight our
area's beautiful fall wildflow-
ers, butterflies, and birds,
and illustrate aspects of the
Buffer Preserve's ecology
and history.
Join us again on Sunday,
Oct. 4 for a final trip through


the Buffer Preserve starting
at 10:30 a.m. EDT.
We suggest a $10 dona-
tion for guided boat tours,
but all other activities are
free. All guided trips are
weather permitting.

Low country shrimp
boil and music
Beginning at 11 a.m.
EDT on Saturday, guests
may dine with a view on
the expansive Preserves
Center deck overlooking
St. Joseph Bay. Our Low
Country Boil features lo-.
cal wild-caught shrimp,
corn on the cob, new pota-
toes, and kielbasa sausage,
along with cole slaw, gar-
lic bread and beverages.
Lunchtime will kick off live
musical entertainment.
The Shrimp Boil will
last until the food runs out.
Arrive early as the shrimp
can run out quite quickly!
There is a $10 suggested
donation for each meal
ticket.

Registration and
trip information
For the latest informa-
tion about Bay Day, be sure
to visit http://www.stjoseph
baypreserves.org/BayDay.
htm where you will be able
to view the most current
schedule and trip descrip-
tions. You may also down-


load a flyer that you can post
at your office or other public
place.
Reservations must be
made for the 8 a.m. EDT
birding and bay boat trips
ONLY. You may make ad-
vance reservations for
these trips by calling 850-


229-1787. All other trips will
be open for sign-up at the
Preserves Center starting
at 9 am.,
For 8 a.m. trip reserva-
tions and other questions
about Bay Day, you may call
850-229-1787 between 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. EDT


* ' M-w * 4 '
' : Clouvitet Ci\(,4tet,
Gourmet Food. Fine Wine,
i Espresso Bar. Micro-Brewed Beer.
Artisan Cheeses, Handmade Chocolates,
Local Art, Handmade Jewelry,
Art & Cooking Classes, Cigars.
Gifts and lots morel



f Thursday - Saturday
6-9 a.m. Smoked Sausage Biscuts
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
j A Boston Butts, Ribs, Chicken,
U.' Sausage and Sides


LG1A umn 4Action




Sunday - Oct. 18, 200
St. Joseph Bay Country Club
Port St. Joe, Florida
$65 per player -4 person team
Entry Fees Include:
Cart, green fees,
dinner & door prizes
MAKE IT A WEEKEND!
DISCOUNTS on Weekend Rentals $ pres ja-Or!
$10,000
HOLE IN ONE

l ooiimt- 1" PLACE TEAM


PARTIAL FUNDING PROVIDED
BY GULF COUNTY TOURIST


iore Cash Pmiess


DEVELOPMENT BOARD


Proees o.t.WW , Florid

Hih coo/Hg Tc, HuaneSocetyandLO


First Pentecostal Church


prepares for Kids Day


Bay Day 2009









These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.


F AITH


COMFORTER
FUNERAL HOME
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter
L.F.D.
(850) 227-1818


SOUTHERLAND FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME
507 1Oth Street Port St. Joe
(850)229-8111


Thursday, September 17, 2009 w xv w. starf 1. com in Page B4


The Race is On
Are you running your best for Jesus?
Very few can pass this test.
With the things of the world on your mind,
it's hard to do your best.
Does your attitude show you love Jesus?
A frown will give you away.
A smile will make you look happier,
and will probably make someone's day.
What is that movement in your mouth,
could it be a tongue out of control?
Gossiping or criticizing someone,
should never be our goal.
Don't be too hard on a person who sins,
for the way you judge another,
This same judgment may be used on you;
be gracious and judge not, my brother.
Overeating, drinking and lying will just about
stop the race.
You'll have to cut loose from worldly things,
to ever step up the pace.
The word of God and prayer will get your back in
the race.
Then you can run with ease and show God's
amazing grace.
Billy Johnson



St. Joseph
Catholic Church
i' 2th and Monument Ave. * Port St. Joe * 227-1417
Also Serving Mexico Beach
All Mass Tlin's ED7-
Sa rday ..................................................................... 4:00 pm
- Sunday ............................................................. 9:30 am
Monday. Thursday, Friday .............. ................. 9:30 amu
W wednesday ...........................................................5:30 pmn


St. Lawrence Mission
788 N. Hwy. 71
Wewahitchka. Ft.
Sunday Mass 11 00 am (CI')


Cape San Bias Mission
1500 fl from Stale Park entrance
at (ape Sai Bins
Closed fir the Seasoni


� TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN
Please come and meet our new
Rector Father Tommy Dwyer!
ST. JAMES'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) * Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org


Worship with us at
Long Avenue Baptist Church
Where Faith, Family &Friendship are found "
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL * For'More
Information Call 229-8691






111 North 22nd Street * Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico l h0 Uoited Methodist (hlrch
Nhn, T POeVs.,
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor * Church/Office: 648-8820


A wise lady recently told me, "It's
a matter of semantics." Few Bible
teachers would ask you to believe
that God wrote the whole Bible
the same way as He wrote the Ten
Commandments, with his finger on
tablets of stone.
So who wrote the Bible? Was it our
heavenly father? Was it Jesus? Or
was it the Holy Spirit? With regard
to the Old Testament, Scripture
says that holy men of God spoke as
they were moved by the Holy Spirit
(2 Peter 1:20,21). The Apostle Paul,
writing to his disciple Timothy, wrote,
"All Scripture is given by inspiration of
God, and is profitable for doctrine, for
reproof, for correction, for instruction
in righteousness" (2 Timothy 3:16).
The Apostle Peter, writing in 2 Peter
3:15-16, equated Paul's letters to
Scripture. Where did the Apostle Paul
get his information? Was it not from
the Holy Spirit? Will you agree with
me that it was the Holy Spirit who was
the primary author of the Scriptures?
For many years I have had
in my library a book titled "God
wrote only one Bible." Written by a
missionary and Bible teacher from
Oregon named Jasper Ray, it was
first published in 1955. Ray says the
New Testament, which he believes
that God authored, was a Greek
New Testament called the Textus
Receptus. Translations of other Greek
New Testaments, which are not


translations of the Textus Receptus,
have been written and included in
Bibles. I have an interlinear Greek/
English copy of the TR, which I
frequently use in the preparation of
my sermons apd these columns for
the Port St. Joe Star.
Ray pointed out that only a few
English Bibles found on the shelves
of bookstores are translations of the
Textus Receptus. The best-known of
these accurate Bibles are the KIng .
James Bible (KJV) and the New King
James Bible (NKJV). In his book,
Ray identifies nearly 200 differences
(variants) between the King James
family of Bibles and the modern
corrupted Bibles.
Unlike many in our area, I try
to be conservative and hesitate to
use words like infallible or perfect.
But I will tell you that after reading
the entire Bible, the KJV and
the NKJV dozens of times, and
frequently referringto the Greek,
from which those New Testaments
was translated, I have never found an
error in the original Greek.
It has been brought to my attention
that some in the Mexico Beach area
have been led to believe that I teach
something different from orthodox
Christianity. Hopefully, you now
understand that we worship the same
God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, all'
orthodox Christians worship.
And if you usually read either the


KJV or the NKJV we read the same
English translations of the New
Testament that you read. If you are
truly a Bible reader, you know that
there are some verses that are hard
to understand. When faced with these,
we research the original Greek to
help our people get the answers they
deserve.
Comments or questions? Send an
e-mail to the address below.
At the Mexico Beach Christian
Worship Center, we believe that God
wants you know the truth about the
Bible and be born again from above -
not risk your present and your eternal
future on faulty religious teaching.
At the MBCWC, we don't pass an
offering plate and plead for money or
twist your arm to join. Plan to check
us out this Sunday! Our services
begin with a time of greeting and
fellowship at 9:30 a.m. CT. Worship
begins at 9:45 a.m. Come early so you
can meet and fellowship with us, and
enjoy the praise and worship music
led by TJ. We meet and worship at
the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105
N. 31st St., behind Parker Realty and
the Beach Walk gift shop, just off U.S.
Highway 98 in Mexico Beach.
God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center
pastor@mexicobeachcwc.com
http://www.mexicobeachcwc.com


Saint Peter's ACC Church purchases property


On Monday, Aug. 31,
Saint Peter's ACC Church
purchased 9.1 acres of land
from Long Avenue Baptist
Church.
With the purchase, St. Pe-
ter's looks forward to future
plans in the construction of a
new church facility.
The property is near Gulf
Coast Community College
in a growing part of Port St.
Joe.
We are most grateful for
the gracious and helpful
considerations of Long Av-
enue Baptist Church. Both
churches are committed to


the spread of the Gospel of
Jesus Christ, and this is re-
flected in the property pur-
chase agreement.
Thepropertytransfertook
place in the office of Pat Floyd
and with the title search by
Tarpon Title. Those present
were the Trustees of Long
*Avenue Baptist Church, Mi-
chael Mize, Russell Burch
and Scott Lamberson, with
Robert Nedley, treasurer of
Saint Peter's, Tony Maige,
Fead Etheridge, Jean'Ether-
idge, and the Rev. Lou Little,
deacon, Saint Peter's ACC
Church.


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution andMonument Port St. ?oc
S(850)227-1724


SundAy:
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m. ET
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. ET
Traditional Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET
Wednesday:
Youth: 5:30 p.m. ET
V(Choir: 7:00p.m. ET


Rev. Mac Fulcher
Pastor
Ann Comforter Jeremy Dixon
Musti Director tutbhA Minister
Deborah Loyless
Dim'cor of ('illrcen Mintisnii's


Michael Mize, Russell Burch, Scott Lamberson,
Robert Nedley, Fead Etheridge, Jean Etheridge and
the Rev. Lou Little, deacon.


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting


FOR YOU AT:

382 Ling Street - Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a
Morning wVoIshilp 11 :(00
1.1-:.",i - :1- I-lice


vening Service
Disciplkship Training
Wednesday Prayerc


a.m.


/:70 p.m.
6:(0) p.m.
7:00 p.m.


Family Life

Church
Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherforc
Welcome you to worship with us:
Sunday 10:30am
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm
Wednesday 7pm


A Spirit Filled
Outreach Oriented
Word of Faith Church


HOME OFTHE
POWERHOUSE
YOUTH MINISTRIES


www.1',,I dyjJEchiurcb.ul6.1
323 Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL~ 850-229-5433 j


9'iIt Lt i P rEE i 6& an dIkawuw
F 508 Sixteenth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


R I^ A





4 (Usp


-


850-227-1756


'si
� Rev. Ruth Hemple
, Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM


-First Baptist Church
102 THIRD STREET *- PORT ST. JOE
SJeffPinder Pastor
" A Buddy Caswell, Miisiter of Music & Edirationi
. Bobby Alexander, Minister to Stidents.
New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church


Sunday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am
Sunday School ..................9:40 am
Traditional Service............ 11:00 am
Youth Groups..... .............5:30 pmin


Wednesday
Children's Choir ..............6:00 pmi
Prayer Meeting............... 6:30 pm
Children's Ministry
Activities .......................... 6:30 pm
Youth Ministry Activities ... 6:30 pin


www.fbcpsj.org


BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. * St. Joe Beanh, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET - Bible Study all ages 10 a.m. ET
Morning Worship 11 a.m. ET * Evening Worship 6 p.m. ET
Tuesday: Choir Practice 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 tate and see that tir Lord, s good: blessed ,s the rNma tina nstrutei tel /hI i"
Pies accept r his ,,tniItation to join us l i worsif. (aGod bless yo'
Please call Is fr your spiritual! lieeds.
www.beachchapel.org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950 * Home 769-8725


"Our Church can be your orme"
first Church of the Nazarene
2420 Long Avenue * Port St. Yoe, Florida 32456
(850) 229-9596

Give unto the Lord the ilonj due qis name, worship the Lord in the beauty of ioiness.
Psa/mn 29:2


3unday School............ ............ .... 10 a.m.,
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


The Christian CONSCIENCE


Did God write the Bible?


.FaithBible
C H U R C H
Michael Rogers - Pastor
9:45 A M ................ ........................... Sunday School
10:30 AM ................................... Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 A M ..................................... ................. W orship
6:00 PM ........... .......................... ............ W orship
www.faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street * Port St. Joe * 229-6707
Honitre of Faith Christian S'hsool




Thursday, September 17, 2009


Faith


The Star I BS


Faith BRIEFS


Jehovah's Witnesses Assembly planned


Homecoming Celebration
at Dalkeith Baptist
Dalkeith Baptist Church, near Wewa-
hitchka, celebrates its forty-third annual
homecoming, Sunday, Oct. 4. Events be-
gin at 10:30 a.m. CT and include special
music, preaching by Glenn Burns, direc-
tor of the Haven of Rest Rescue Mission,
and dinner on the grounds - lots of good
old-fashioned home cooking. Old friends
or new, all are welcome. Find the church
two miles east of State 71 on County 381,
about six miles south of Wewahitchka.
For more information, call Pastor Bob
Gilbert or Cindy Gilbert at 850-639-5559.

Women's Day Celebration
Philadelphia Primitive Baptist
Church will honor its women on this
fourth Sunday as it celebrates Annual
Women's Day. The observance will be-
gin at 10 a.m. with Church School and
continue with a special 11 a.m. worship
service. The guest speaker is Mrs. Lin-
da Willis, a minister in training at New
Bethel A.M.E. Church here in Port St.
Joe. The theme for the year is Trusting
an Unchanging God in an Ever-changing
World. Pastor Hawkins and this year's
program planners, Mrs. Candye Lewis
and Mrs. Evelyn Underwood, along with
the other sisters of Philadelphia, cor-
dially invite the community to come and
be a part of this great day of worship and
inspiration.

Revival Time at Zion Fair
Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church,
located at 280 Ave. C in Port St. Joe, will
conduct revival services starting at 7
p.m. nightly, Monday through Friday,
Sept. 21-25. The Rev. Jerome Williams,
evangelist and pastor of Mt. Calvary
Missionary Baptist Church in Panama
City will be the guest speaker.
Come and receive the anointing of the
Holy Spirit, the gift of eternal life. Come
and be renewed. Come and be restored.
Come and be blessed.
Romans 12:2 - "And be not conformed
to this world: but be ye transformed by
the renewing of your mind, that ye may
prove what is that good, and acceptable,
and perfect, will of God."


New Bethel Baptist Dinners
New Bethel Baptist Church will be
serving dinners beginning at 10 a.m. on
Saturday, Sept. 19.
The menu is chitterling or fried chick-
en, rice and gravy or potato salad, can-
died yams, collard greens, corn bread
and tea for a donation of $6.50.
Call Mary at 227-3400 for more infor-
mation.

Men and Women Day Observance
Thompson Temple First Born Church
of the Living God Inc., at 222 Ave. E in
Port St. Joe, will hold Men and Women
Day on Sunday, Sept. 27. Sunday School
will be at 10 a.m. and morning worship
at 11:30 a.m.
The speaker will be Minister Dorothy
Shine of Panama City.
Where there is faith and love, God re-
wards.

A Night with the King
Victory Temple First Born Holiness
Church's Junior/Seasoned Women De-
partment will host a banquet at 6:30 p.m.
on Saturday, Sept. 26, at the David Jones
Gym (Washington Recreation Center).
The theme will be: A Night with the
King.
Colors are purple and gold, and at-
tire is formal wear. The menu will be a
steak or shrimp dinner with your choice
of baked potato or French fries, tossed
salad or coleslaw, rolls or hush puppies,
drink and dessert.
The price is a $15 donation.
See anyone from the Junior/Seasoned
Women of Victory Temple to purchase a
ticket.
I Thanks in advance for your support,
Prophetess Marilyn Bolden, president,
and Evangelist Iris Gathers, vice presi-
dent.

New Bethel Pastor's Appreciation
New Bethel Baptist will hold its Pas-
tor's Appreciation at 4 p.m. ET on Sun-
day, Sept. 20. The colors are black and
white, and the guest speaker is the Rev.
Rawlis Leslie and congregation.
Everyone is invited to come and have
a Holy Ghost time.


The local congregation of Jeho-
vah's Witnesses would like to invite
you to attend a two-day Assembly on
Sept. 19-20 at the Marina Civic Cen-
ter in Panama City. The theme of the
Assembly is Safeguard Your Spiritu-
ality (Romans 8:5 and Jude 17-19).
The two-day program will alert
us to dangers, such as distractions
that threaten to consume our time
and divert our attention from what is
truly important, our services to God.
We will learn how to counteract the
spirit of permissiveness, and we will
consider what characterizes a spiri-
tual person. The Sunday symposium
will show how individuals and family
groups can take steps to strengthen
their spirituality in the face of in-
creasing pressures and serious tests
of faith. The program will help us to
safeguard our hearts, maintain our
spiritual health and keep clearly in
mind the grand blessings that await
those who safeguard their spiritual-
ity.
You won't want to miss this excit-
ing two-day program that encour-
ages all Christians, young and old, to
remain strong in their faith. The pro-
gram will start at 10 a.m. on Saturday
and Sunday. There is no admission
charge and no collections are taken.


Billy Nichols, a traveling representative of
the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society,
will be a featured speaker at the two-day
Assembly on Sept. 19-20 at the Marina
Civic Center in Panama City. The theme of
the Assembly is Safeguard Your Spirituality
� (Romans 8:5 and Jude 17-19).


BUDGET SUMMARY

CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA - FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010

THE PROPOSED OPERATINd BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA ARE 15.86 PERCENT LESS
THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES


Millage per $1,000


General Fund
Voted Debt


6.0000
0.0000


GENERAL
* FUND


ESTIMATED REVENUES
TAXES
Ad Valorem Taxes - 6.000 mills
Utility Taxes
Telecom Service Tax
Licenses & Permits
State Shared Revenue
Other Local Unit Revenues


WATER


SEWER


GARBAGE CEMETERIES


$422,666.00
$176,000.00
$75,000.00
$13,750.00
$105,850.00
$56,409.00


Other Revenues $6,309.00 $359,500.00 $320,000.00 $260,000.00 $6,920.00 $500,000.00 $1,452,729.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES $855,984.00 $359,500.00 $320,000.00 $260,000.00 $6,920.00 $500,000.00 $2,302,404.00
Cash Carry Forward (from Reserves) $254,340.00 $59,398.00 $106,792.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $1,617,000.00 $2,038,530.00
TOTAL BUDGETED REVENUES $1,110,324.00 $418,898.00 $426,792.00 $260,000.00 $7,920.00 $2,117,000.00 $4,340,934.00
Unappropriated Reserves (restricted) $0.00 $0.00 $44,936.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $44,936.00
Unappropriated Reserves (unrestricted) $484,349.00 $40,157.00 $42,620.00 $0.00 $29,940.00 $0.00 $597,066.00
TOTAL BUDGETED REVENUES
AND UNAPPROPRIATED RESERVES $1,594,673.00 $459,055.00 $514,348.00 . $260,000.00 $37,860.00 $2,117,000.00 $4,982,936.00

EXPENDITURES I EXPENSES
Administration $296,658.00 $296,658.00
Fire Department $62,504.00 $62,504.00
Health & Welfare $28,625.00 $28,625.00
Parks & Recreation $115,136.00 $115,136.00
Police $31,200.00 $31,200.00
Streets & Roads $366,061.00 $366,061.00
Water $415,477.00 $415,477.00
Sewer ' $416,792.00 $416,792.00
Garbage $260,000.00 $260,000.00
Contingency $210,140.00 $3,421.00 $10,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $223,561.00
Cemeteries (Jehu & Buckhorn) $7,920.00 $7,920.00
Grants $2,117,000.00 $2,117,000.00
TOTAL BUDGETED EXPENDITURES $1,110,324.00 $418,898.00 $426,792.00 $260,000.00 $7,920.00 $2,117,000.00 $4,340,934.00
Unappropriated Reserves (restricted) $0.00 $0.00 $44,936.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $44,936.00
Unappropriated Reserves (unrestricted) $484,349.00 $40,157.00 $42,620.00 $0.00 $29,940.00 $0.00 $597,066.00
TOTAL BUDGETED EXPENDITURES
AND UNAPPROPRIATED RESERVES $1,594,673.00 $459,055.00 $514,348.00 $260,000.00 $37,860.00 $2,117,000.00 $4,982,936.00
THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDG-[ ARE ON FILE IN THFE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED A / , 1 \AUTHO I )I IY \S A PUi I Hi (OR


NOTICE OF BUDGET

HEARING

The City of Wewahitchka has tentatively
adopted a budget for 2009-2010.
A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION
on the budget AND TAXES will be held on:


Monday, September 21, 2009
6:30 pm Central Time
at
Wewahitchka City Hall
109 South 2 Street
Wewahitchka, FL 32465


GRANTS


TOTAL


$422,666.00
$176,000.00
$75,000.00
$13,750.00
$105,850.00
$56,409.00






B6 I The Star


Thursday, September 17, 2009


School News


- - - , - .l. USL L -S u. h- o
� . l elementary School


School is off to a great start!
We have had three exciting
weeks of getting to know our
new teachers, new classes and new
friends. We would like to thank all
the parents who attended our first
PTO meeting of this school year.
We are planning a wonderful year
of events, and we want everyone
to participate. We encourage you,


as parents, to become involved
with your students. This will make
learning fun together. Here are
some upcoming dates to put on your
calendar:
Sept. 22 - School Advisory
Committee meeting at 5 p.m. ET
Open House at 6 p.m.
3rd Grade FCAT Parent Night at
7 p.m.


Sept. 28 - fifth-grade to 4-H
Agriculture Day in Quincy, Florida
Oct. 4-16 - Disability History and
Awareness Weeks
Oct. 6 - PTO meeting at 6 p.m.,
Fall Picture Day
Oct. 9 - half day early release
- no lunch served
PTO Homecoming Blast 4-7 p.m.
ET


SENIORS
New Senior Executive
Board members are:
Johnathan Williams,
president; Kayla Parker,
vice president; Chelsey
Walker, secretary; and
Krysten Keys, treasurer.
Any senior who missed
his or her appointment for
senior portraits, make-ups
will be held Sept. 30.
A class trip payment
of $60 is due by the end of


September. See Mrs. Alcorn.

CLUBS
NHS: If anyone needs


the National Honor Society
to help with community
service projects, call
Mrs. Ginger Bernal at
229-8813.


GENERAL
INFORMATION
Tomorrow, Friday, Sept.
18, is College/Career Day
from 9-10:30 a.m. Several
different college/university
and career representatives
will be visiting Port St. Joe
High School.
Yearbook Photos:
Underclassmen photos will
be taken Sept. 30.
Have a question about
Pinnacle? Contact Mrs.


Stephanie Newsome. Also,
if you need to pick up your
child's password, bring
your license.
If you haven't heard,
Port St. Joe High School
now has catered lunches
available three times
per week: On Monday, it
is Peppers Restaurant.
Tuesday brings the Great
Wall, and Thursday we
have Paul Gant's BBQ.
Each meal costs $6
- yum - and thanks to


all involved in making this
happen.

SPORTS
Anyone interested
.in playing girls or boys
soccer, there is a sign-up
sheet in the front office.
Also, a cross country
sign-up sheet is available
in the front office as well.
Let's Go Tiger Sharks!
Get involved in PSJHS
athletics.


FRONT ROW:Joshua Russ, Christian Quaranta, De'Marion Gray, Santana Causey.
BACKLJasmine Hayes, Cameron Byrd, Bryce Thomas, Tyrek Sims, Kabir Bhatka


WEWA ELEMENTARY STUDENTS OF THE WEEK


�Raith


Faith Christian School
is proud to present a semi-
new teacher, Mrs. Janice
Evans. Mrs. Janice has
been with FCS for two
years, but this year she
has embarked on a new
adventure. Every Friday,
small groups of second
through eighth grades
take piano lessons from
Mrs. Evans. This is a new
endeavor for students as
they learn basic music,
timing, note recognition
and coordination.
Mrs. Janice is also
teaching computer science
to middle-school students
twice a week. This class
teaches keyboarding and
usage of fundamental
computer programs.
Families of FCS students,
be sure to look for the
newsletter the eighth-
grade class is publishing.
It will go home once a
month and keep you on the
"'inside track" of campus
life.
The yard sale was a
huge success! Thank
you to Mrs. Regina
Washabaugh and her
helpful staff for all their
hard work.
Remember, the
Christmas cards and gifts
fundraiser kicks off Friday,
Sept. 18. There will be lots
of goodies to purchase
and lots of prizes to win.
Look for FCS studefits
with catalogs containing
beautiful gift items and
Bible-based Christmas
cards; then "shop till you
drop."

Toll Free: (888) 831-6754
Franklin County: (850) 670-5555
Leon County: (850) 926-9602
OUNICAc




Helping Hands Make
The Difference


Personal & Business

Bankruptcy

38 Years Legal Experience


850-670-3030

Office located at: Point Mall, Eastpoint, FL
"We are a debt relief agency. We can help people file
bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code."
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
information about our qualifications and experience."





:,Revelation
: Biblical symbols give meaning
& understanding to our lives & our future
Dynamic study of Bible Prophecies and
their meaning for us today.
Spe er-Mel Eisele is a captivating speaker
whlends humor with heart-stirring depth.,
Mi4You will understand:
leEnd, The Battle of Armageddon,
I1 in Prophecy, The Rapture,
of The Beast, 666 & Antichrist,
00, Th~e Mystery of Death,

mor 9-11 . ~ 7
onquers the 7Beast,

Fre -&





Fri. 9-181 * 7pm
Sat. 9-19 * 11 am & 7 pm
Te .915 � 7 pm * I I ,,


DAZZLING DOLPHINS


S MISSION STATEMENT' i
,At Port St. Joe High School, our mission is to provide t
highest quality education for all students in a secure,
.positive, and cha/l/ling environment fostered by a
cooperative effort b :wen the school and community. ,
.4,We believe that studercVs.-hould be challenged in a safe,
non-threatening atmosphere. to become self-motivated, active
learners.
We believe that it is the responsibility of each student to develop
mentally, physically, and morally so that he or she.may function
as a valuable member of society. .
We believe that there is a positive correlation between student
achievement and parent involvement..
We believe that a team-oriented, cooperativejfacult ca tter
serve the needs of our students , . "
We believe there should be an open learnig eriv nment wheie .
respect and tolerance are'-.1't just ta-14tlimlodeled.
cI We believe that teaching citizenship and ndG(esponsibllity is .
an important part of m' ninu I education in o hanging . '-
.L so ity.
"c. We believe it is imperatj"o prepare students for college,
' tec hrical trainlng,or ork force in order to foster proc '
Sand i~sporible cit s n a global society. .. .. -

4.; .





NOTICE OF


PROPOSED TAX


INCREASE


The City of Port St. Joe has

tentatively adopted a measure to

increase its property tax levy.


Last year's property tax levy:
* Initially proposed tax levy.......... $1,581,271
* Less tax reductions due to Value
Adjustment Board and other assessment
changes ..................................... $(34,195)
* Actual property tax levy.............. $1,615,466
This year's proposed tax levy... $1,809,975


All concerned citizens are invited to
attend a public hearing on the tax
increase to be held on:


September 22, 2009
6:00 EST


305 Cecil Costin Blvd. City Hall,
Commission Chambers


A FINAL DECISION on the proposed

tax increase and the budget will be
made at this hearing.


* ***t- .... ( !


SEPT. 14-18: Tyler Parrish, fifth grade; Garret Leavens, fourth; Jacob Salerno,
third; Melody McLemore, second; Landin Johnson, first; Hannah Taunton,
kindergarten. .








Thursday, September 17, 2009


Local


The Star I B7


Fundraisers planned for Wild Mammal Association


By Lois Swoboda
Florida Freedom Newspapers
A local animal welfare
group is seeking public
help.
The Florida Wild Mam-
mal Association (FWMA)
is planning two fundraisers
for this fall.
They will hold their an-
nual yard sale on Sept.
17-19 at Townsend's Nads
Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville
Road in Crawfordville. All
donations for the sale will
be greatly appreciated. If
you live in Gulf or Franklin
County and have items you
want transported to the
sale, call Lois at 653-5857.
Be sure to drop by the
sale. There will be many
bargains on hand.


LOIS SWOBODA I Florida Freedom Newspapers
Chris Beatty, director of the Florida Wild Mammal
Association, with several of her orphaned charges.


The 2nd Annual Wood-
Stork Music Festival is
coming up on Oct. 10, and
FWMA needs silent auc-


tion items.
Chris Beatty, direc-
tor and guardian angel of
FWMA said, "The silent


auction was one of our best
fundraisers last year, but
it's only successful if we
can provide great prizes
for our bidders. If you are a
business, or know of a busi-
ness, that would be willing
to donate a gift certificate,
goods or a service to this
great event, please contact
Judy at 984-9980.
Space will be available
for vendors to set up and
sell their wares at Wood-
Stork, but you must regis-
ter in advance. If you are
interested, please contact
Chris at 363-2351.
There are several levels
of sponsorships available
for this great event. For
more info, you can contact
Rob Barrett at 212-3639.
If you would like to help


plan the event, there is a
meeting every Thursday
at 10 a.m. at FWMA. Or if
you would like to help out
the day of the event, there
are many jobs that need
done! Please call Chris at
363-2351.
FWMA was established
in 1994 to rescue, rehabili-
tate and release the sick,
injured and orphaned wild-
life in Wakulla, Franklin,
Leon, Taylor and Jefferson
Counties and part of Leon
County.
FWMA has rescued
more than 7,000 mammals,
birds and reptiles.
It is supported entirely
by donations and grants
and has been a registered
501(c)3 nonprofit organiza-
tion.


FWMA offers ongoing
educational demonstra-
tions for local schools.
You can donate to
FWMA at any time. FWMA
always needs bleach, pa-
per towels, .fruit cocktail,
birdseed, nuts, pelican
fish pinfishh, finger mullet,
thread herring, butterfish),
fresh fruit and vegetables,
Pedigree wet and dry dog
food, Friskies wet and'dry
cat food, Dawn dish liquid
and gift cards from local
grocers to give FWMA flex-
ibility in purchasing when
needed items are not on
hand.
They will also gladly ac-
cept cash donations. For
more information, visit
their Web site at http://
www.wakullawildlife.org.


Fall vegetable planting time drawing near


Vegetable gardening
offers fresh air, sunshine,
exercise, enjoyment,
mental therapy, nutritious
fresh vegetables and -
economic savings, as well
as many other benefits.
Vegetables can be grown
year-round in Florida if
attention is paid to the
appropriate planting dates. Co
Planting time for many
of the crops you'll grow in your
fall vegetable garden is just a
few weeks away. Even though
summer is still very much with
us, this is the time to go over
some of our recommendations
about planting and preparing for
the garden.
In September, many
vegetables can be planted in
the garden, including beets,
broccoli, Brussels sprout,
cabbage, carrots, cauliflower,
collards, kale, kohlrabi, leek,
lettuce, mustard, onions and
radish. In October, you can plant
Chinesd cabbage, spinach and
strawberries.
The most important thing


is to grow vegetables
you and your family
likes to eat. The first
consideration in
planning your garden
is where to put it. You
want if fairly close to '
ROY LEE your house so it's shady
to work in. You want it
CARTER s near an outside water
nty extension faucet so irrigation isn't
a lot of trouble. But the
thing you really want to be sure
of is proper lighting. If possible,
locate the garden so it gets full
sunlight all day long. If you have
to choose between morning sun
and afternoon sun, full sun in the
morning is better for vegetables
than full sun in the afternoon. If
you can't get the whole garden
in full sun all day, plant root
crops, tomatoes, potatoes and
cucumbers where they get the
most sun. Most of the leafy crops
can stand a little more shade.
In some cases, you'll also have
to protect your crop from nearby
trees and shrubs. Tree and shrub
roots compete with vegetables
for nutrients and water. To give


your crops the edge, dig a trench
about 1V2 or 2 feet deep all around
the garden. Line one side of the
trench with a plastic film and
fill it in again. This will form a
barrier against the root of nearby
landscape plants.
Before planting, it is a good
time to begin gathering all the
materials you will need during
the season. These can include
seeds, stakes, string, row
markers, fertilizer and even-
fencing to keep out those pesky
garden pests.
While you can plant your
garden on whatever soil type is
available, you may improve it
by adding topsoil, a soil mix or
organic materials. Most Florida
soils are sandy and will benefit
from application of various
forms of organic matter, such as
animal manure, rotted leaves and
compost. These additives should
be mixed into the plot at least
three weeks before planting.
Then rework the soil into a fine
firm seedbed at planting time.
The organic matter most
likely will not compensate


for fertilizer. Applications of
balanced inorganic fertilizer
should be applied before and
during the garden season. A
good 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 fertilizer
should be broadcast over the
garden at the rate of 1 pound per
100 square feet before planting.
This will be enough to give the
plants a good start; however, they
probably will need to be fertilized
an additional time during the
growing season.
Too much water can cause
disease and rot in the garden.
Provide sufficient draining
for excessive rainfall while
arranging for irrigation during
dry periods. The frequency of
irrigation depends on your soil
type. Sandy soils need water two
or three times a week. You can
easily tell if your garden needs
water by digging down an inch or
two in the soil. If the soil is dry,
it's time to water.
Keeping pests out of the
garden, including weeds, can be
difficult. Weeds compete with
the vegetable plants for water,
nutrients and growing space.


Weeds are easier to control when
small. In gardens, practical weed
control is best accomplished by
hand-pulling, hoeing or mulching.
Visit your garden frequently,
looking for insects and disease.
When pests are present, spray
only affected plants. Make sure
all chemicals used in.the garden
are labeled for vegetable gardens.
Follow the label directions for
application amount and timing.
More is not better and might
actually damage your plants.
To find out which varieties
are recommended in your
locality, consult a copy of the
IFAS Extension SP 103 "The
Vegetable Gardening Guide"
at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
DOCUMENT%20VH021. Your
local garden center is also a
good informational source for
recommended practices and
varieties of vegetables.
For more information on
vegetable gardening, you may
contact the Gulf County IFAS
Cooperative Extension Service
at 639-3200 or 229-2909. Web: gulf
ijfas.ufl.edu.


BUDGET SUMMARY

CITY OF PORT ST. JOE - FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010
(THIS PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF CITY OF PORT ST. JOE ARE 60.2% LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL
OPERATING EXPENDITURES)


Millage Per $1,000
General Fund 3.5914


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD

ESTIMATED REVENUES:
TAXES: Millage Per $1000
Ad Valorum Taxes 3.5914'
Earned Interest
Fines and Forfeitures
Franchise & Utility Taxes
Licenses and Permits
Grants/Loans/Bonds
Intragovernmental Revenue
Depreciation Funds
Misellaneous Revenues
Rents and Royalties
Garbage Fees
Water Department
Wastewater Treatment Services
TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES
Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets.
TOTAL REVENUES,
TRANSFERS & BALANCES

EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES

City Commission
Administration
City Attorney
Public Works Administration
Municipal Building
Police Department
Fire Department
Operations
Parks and Recreation
Maintenance Shop
Non-Departmental
Water Distribution
Water Plant
Water Administration
Trash Collection/Disposal
Garbage Collection/Disposal
Wastewater Treatment
Sewer Collection
WW Administration
Long-Term Debt
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES,
TRANSFERS, RESERVES & BALANCES


GENERAL WATER SOLID WASTE WASTE WATER TOTAL ALL
FUND FUND FUND FUND FUNDS
$1,400,000 $1,400,000



$1,373,292 $1,373,292
$48,750 $25,000 $7,500 $15,000 $96,250
$25,084 $25,084
$435,340 $435,340
$17,200 $17,200
$7,790,818 $2,074,084 $9,864,902
$772,261 $772,261
$12,500 $12,500
$106,100 $22,600 $185,500 $20,000 $334,200
$8,700 $8,700
$755,265 $755,265
$2,061,489 $2,061,489
$2,511,164 $2,511,164
$11,977,545 $2,109,089 $948,265 $4,632,748 $19,667,647


$11,977,545 $2,109,089 $948,265 $4,632,748 $19,667,647

GENERAL WATER SOLID WASTE WASTEWATER TOTAL ALL
FUND FUND FUND FUND FUNDS
$78,870 $78,870
$427,621 $427,621
$5,500 $5,500
$1,109,177 *. , $1,109,177
$38,752 $38,752
$1,010,563 $1,010,563
$96,459 $96,459
$629,092 $629,092
$6,342,175 $6,342,175
$87,484 $87,484
$864,707 $864,707
$391,603 $391,603
$1,186,112 $1,186,112
$353,859 $353,859
$245,559 $245,559
$702,706 $702,706
$1,110,707 $1,110,707
$459,723 $459,723
$2,577,257 $2,577,257
$85,295 $177,515 $485,061 $747,871
$10,711,034 $2,109,089 $948,265 $4,632,748 $18,401,136
$1,219,316 $1,219,316

$11,977,545 $2,109,089 $948,265 $4,632,748 $19,667,647


THE TENTATIVE ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS
A PUBLIC RECORD.
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B8 I The Star


Local


Thursday, September 17, 2009


Blues on the Bay set for Sept. 26


The first Blues on the Bay music festi-
val and barbecue contest will be held on
the pristine St. Andrews Bay at Under the
Oaks Park in Parker, Fla., on Saturday,
Sept. 26, from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Organizers are now taking vendor
applications ($100) for 12' by 12" space.
There will be a limited amount of actual
spaces available, with a total of 50. Spaces
will be given on a first come, first served
basis.
The park has a 5,000 attendee capacity,
a large playground and a large stage.


The barbecue contest is available to
individuals and businesses ($50), with a
first-place $500/braggabel trophy, second-
place $200/trophy and third-place $50/tro-
phy, given on the day of event. The Bay
County Fire Chiefs will serve as celebrity
judges. Don't miss out.
For more information, call Bill Soules
at 850-340-1904 or Scott Blood at 850-625-
5292.
Proceeds will be distributed to veter-
ans on a local basis through VFW #8205
as trustee.


Changes to WIC start Oct.


Busy Bee opens for business


The Gulf County Chamber of Com-
merce is proud to announce our newest
member, Busy Bee Child Development
Center. Owners Tan and Lawanda Smiley
welcomed community leaders, friends
and family to the grand opening and rib-
bon cutting on Thursday, Sept. 10.
Busy Bee Child Development Center
offers quality, dependable and reliable
day care to children in our area from
birth to age 5. (There are currently only
five spaces available).


The Center is located at 218 Long
Ave., Port St Joe. Call Lawanda and
her staff at 850-227-1737, or e-mail bbl
smiley()yahoo.com for more informa-
tion.
The Chamber of Commerce would
like to invite everyone to an upcoming
ribbon cutting on Sept. 24 at Blue Manta
Technology Group LLC, 190 Williams
Ave., Port St. Joe. Come meet Chuck Ed-
wards and the staff at one of our newest
area businesses.


TALLAHASSEE-More than
500,000 women, infahts
and children participating
in the Florida Department
of Health's WIC Program
will receive the new na-
tionally revised WIC food
package beginning Oct. 1.
This is the first change to
the WIC food package in
nearly three decades.
"The new food package
helps reinforce key nutri-
tion messages such as eat
more fruits and vegeta-
bles, decrease saturated
fat and cholesterol intake,
and increase whole grains
and fiber," said Annette
Phelps, director for the
Division of Family Health
Services. "We are thrilled
to provide WIC partici-
pants with a greater vari-
ety of nutritious foods."
Based on the 2005
Dietary Guidelines for
Americans, the new food
choices will allow the
Florida WIC program
increased flexibility in
prescribing culturally ap-
propriate foods to WIC's
diverse population. Some
of the changes include:
* the addition of fruits,
vegetables and whole
grains for mothers and 1-
to 5-year-old children,
* the addition of baby
food fruits and vegetables
for all infants age 6 months
to 12 months
* the amount of formu-
la for infants is now vari-


able based on the age and
breast-feeding regime of
the infant, and
* the requirement that
milk for women and chil-
dren 2 years of age and
older be 1 percent low fat
or fat-free.
The new package also
strengthens WIC's breast-
feeding promotion and
support messages by pro-
viding strong incentives
for continued breast-feed-
ing, including additional
quantities and types of
foods for breast-feeding
mothers and their infants.
Eligible women and
children participating in
the WIC program receive
food checks that specify
which nutritious food
items can be purchased;
these WIC food checks
can be redeemed at any of
the 2,000-plus authorized
grocery stores in Florida.
In addition to offering
supplemental healthy
foods, WIC provides the
following additional ser-
vices at no cost: nutrition
education and counseling,
breast-feeding support
and referrals for health
care.
To be eligible for WIC,
the Special Supplemen-
tal Nutrition Program for
Women, Infants and Chil-
dren, you must be a preg-
nant or breast-feeding
woman, a woman who has
recently been pregnant, an


infant, or a child under age
5. The applicant must have
a low or moderate income,
live in Florida and have a
nutrition need that can be
helped by WIC foods and
nutrition counseling. An-
other way applicants can
be income-eligible for WIC
is if they are currently re-
ceiving Medicaid, Tempo-
rary Cash Assistance or
food stamps. Applicants
do not have to be on a pub-
lic assistance program to
qualify for WIC.
Emphasis is also placed
on reaching the migrant
population, as well as
reaching and enrolling eli-
gible women in their early
months of pregnancy so
WIC's benefits can begin
as early as possible.
Florida WIC is admin-
istered through the Flori-
da Department of Health,
and its services are avail-
able in all 67 counties at
over 200 WIC clinic sites
statewide. Anyone inter-
ested in WIC 'services
should call the toll-free
number, 800-342-3556, or
contact the local county
health department to de-
termine eligibility. For
more information about
DOH programs, visit the
DOH www.doh.state.fl.us.
To learn more about the
* Florida WIC program
or about the new WIC
food package, go to www.
FloridaWIC.org.


BUDGET SUMMARY
GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010


GENERAL
FUND


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD
ESTIMATED REVENUES:


SPECIAL
REVENUE FUNDS


DEBT
SERVICE FUNDS


$ 4,229,145 $ 3,167,799 $ 1,402,024


CAPITAL
PROJECT FUNDS


ENTERPRISE DEPENDENT
FUNDS DISTRICTS


$ 212,536 $ 116,200 $ 1,428,000


TOTAL


$ 10,555,704


TAXES: Millages
AD VALOREM: General 3.8404
AD VALOREM: Fine & Forfeiture 1.9282
AD VALOREM: St. Joseph Fire 0.5000
AD VALOREM: Tupelo Fire 0.5000
AD VALOREM: Overstreet Fire 0.5000
AD VALOREM: Howard Creek Fire 0.5000
AD VALOREM: Voted Debt Gulf Front MSTU 7.3310
AD VALOREM: Voted Debt Interior MSTU 3.4610
Sales, Use, and Fuel Taxes
Communications Service Tax
Licenses and Permits
Intergovernmental Revenue
Charges for Services
Judgments and Fines
Miscellaneous Revenue
Other Financing Sources


TOTAL REVENUES AND
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
LESS 5%
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES.
AND BALANCES

EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES:
General Governmental Services
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
Economic Environment
Human Services
Culture and Recreation
Court-Related
Capital Outlay
Debt Service
Other Financing (Uses)

TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES AND
Other Financing (Uses)
Reserves
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES


7,593,675







257,521
64,918
143,550
3,588,845
624,500
6,500
16,Q000,
61,200


3,812,522


.1,144,779

600
514,493
55,802

29,039
1,064,426


1,361,717
583,606
334,702


894,099


.7,593,675
3,812,522
643,244 643,244
53,670 53,670
26,269 26,269
16,850 '16,850
- 1,361,717
- 583,606
- 1,737,002
- 64,918
- 144,150
- 4,997,437
- 680,302
- 6,500
- 51,139
- 1,154,511


5,500
28,885


12,356,709 6,621,661 3,208,509 - 600 740,033 22,927,512
(614,776) (258,412) (158,982) - (30) (37,002) (1,069,202)

$ 15,971,078 $ 9,531,048 $ 4,451,551 $ 212,536. $ 116,770 $ 2,131,031 $ 32,414,014


4,489,335 98,269 - - - 4,587,604
2,286,896 3,895,439 - - - 304,120 6,486,455
2,475,469' 638,000 - - 55,570 - 3,169,039
912,000 1,435,486 - 197,348 - - 2,544,834
442,362 978,826 - - - - 1,421,188
936,176 1,488,355 - - - - 2,424,531
293,434 - - - - - 293,434
48,616 10,000 - - - - 58,616
" 747,992 293,322 - - - 1,730,571 2,771,885
159,372 266,965 3,064,624 - - 96,340 3,587,301
1,064,426 28,885 - - 61,200 - 1,154,511


13,856,078 9,133,547 3,064,624 197,348 116,770 2,131,031 28,499,398
2,115,000 397,501 1,386,927 15,188 - - 3,914,616

$ 15,971,078 $ 9,531,048 $ 4,451,551 $ 212,536 $ 116,770 $ 2,131,031 $ 32,414,014


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD


Ad # 2009-95


I
~ -~ - t r A


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING


The Gulf County Board of County,Commissioners has
tentatively adopted a budget for 2009-2010. A public
hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget
AND TAXES will be held on


Monday, September 21st, 2009
At 5:01 P.M., E. T.
In the meeting room at the Robert M. Moore Adm. Bldg.
Courthouse Complex
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456

Ad # 2009-94


--- --- - --- ---


lib--,









Thursday, September 17, 2009 The Stan 59


Law Enforcement


Charges against nurse practitioner dropped


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Effective Sept. 14, Bar-
bara McDermid, PhD, will
return to her regular du-
ties as a nurse practitio-
ner/licensed clinical social
worker at the Gulf County
Health Department.
Criminal charges
against McDermid have
been dropped.
McDermid, 60, was ar-
rested on charges of ille-
gally dispensing controlled
substances, practicing
without a license and iden-
tity theft after a joint in-
vestigation by the Florida
Department of Law En-
forcement, the Gulf County
Sheriff's Office and the Flor-
ida Department of Health.
The investigation began


February 2008 when FDLE
received information alleg-
ing that McDermid was il-
legally prescribing medica-
tion to patients.
The investigation re-
vealed that between Janu-
ary 2008 and January 2009,
McDermid wrote at least
29 prescriptions to patients
using the name and Drug
Enforcement Administra-
tion number of an Orlando
area physician, without his
knowledge or consent.
McDermid was sub-
sequently charged with
illegally dispensing con-
trolled substances, prac-
ticing medicine without a
license and identity theft,
all third-degree felonies.
She was placed on ad-
ministrative leave by
FDOH, pending the out-


come of the investigation.
However, further in-
vestigation showed that
McDermid was following
instructions from the Or-
lando physician, who is un-
der contract with the health
department to consult on
psychiatric patients, and
the health department was
told 20 months ago that the
process they were using
was incorrect.
"I think there was a mis-
understanding on the pa-
perwork," said Doug Kent,
executive director of the
Health Department, noting
that local physicians were
reviewing prescriptions
McDermid was writing for
patients, using pre-signed
prescription pads provided
her by the Orlando physi-
cian.


When notified that was
incorrect procedure, Kent
said the department under-
took corrective action.
"We failed to follow the
law, and now we are follow-
ing the law," Kent said. "She
has a license; she's had her
training. She was following
what she had been told, and
local doctors were review-
ing the prescriptions.
"I don't think (the
FDLE) understood what
we were doing. But all
criminal charges have been
dropped. I regret that such
actions were taken with-
out first performing a full
investigative review. Her
work actions here at the
health department have al-
ways reflected the highest
of standards and patient
care."


The GulfCountySheriff's
Office will be conducting
vehicle safety checkpoints
and DUI check points dur-
ing the month of Septem-
ber 2009; The checkpoints
will be held throughout
the county to include High-
way 98 near St. Joe Beach,
Highway 98 and Garrison
Ave, C-30 Simmons Bayou,
Highway 71 North of White
City, Highway 22 and High-
way 22A, Highway 71 and
Westarm. Creek, Highway
71 Dalkieth Area and High-
way 71 near the Calhoun
line.
On 09/05/2009, Brittany
Marie Miller, 21, was ar-


rested on DWLSR.
On 09/06/2009, deputies
responded to a disturbance
in the Overstreet area.
Ryan Presnell, 18, was ar-
rested on domestic battery.
It is alleged that he struck
his sister several times in
the side of the head.
On 09/07/2009, a vehicle
driven by Cody Dupuie, 18,
was stopped on a traffic vio-
lation. A quantity of mari-
juana was located in the
armrest of the vehicle, and
when Dupuie was placed
under arrest, he had an ad-
ditional amount of marijua-
na stuck down the front of
his pants, according to the


sheriff's office. Dupuie was
charged with possession of
marijuana.
On 09/08/2009, James
Edward Pilotti, 23, was ar-
rested on a warrant for fail-
ure to appear; the original
charge was grand theft.
On 09/08/2009, Vicki Ann
Layfield, 44, was arrested
on a warrant for failure to
appear; the original charge
was DUI.
On 09/08/2009, Brian Da-
vid Traylor, 32, was arrested
on warrants for faihlre to
appear; the original charge
was DWLSR.
On 09/09/2009, James
Albert Windham, 40, was


arrested on warrants for
violation of probation; the
original charge was DUI
and DWLSR.
On 09/09/2009, Jason
Edward Strimel, 25, was
arrested on a contempt of
court warrant; the original
charge was failure to pay a
boating citation.
On 09/10/2009, Timothy
James Pynes, 27, was ar-
rested on a warrant for fail-
ure to pay child support.
On 09/10/2009, Shame-
Ida L. Heatrice, 33, was
arrested on a warrant for
violation of probation; the
original charge was utter-
ing a forged instrument.


Free Childbirth CLASSES
The Gulf County Health Depart- and 30, and Oct. 7 and 14. please contact the health depart-
ment and Healthy Start will provide Classes will be held at the Gulf ment as soon as possible.
a series of free childbirth classes, . County Health Department on Gar- Call Patricia Richards at 227-
held Tuesdays from 5-7:30 p.m. ET rison Drive in Port St. Joe. 1276, ext. 150, or Jill Nance at ext.
on the following dates: Sept. 16, 23 Space is limited to 12 couples, so 126.

AARP Driver Safety PROGRAM

An AARP Driver Safety Program ter on Library Drive in Port St. Joe. bers and $14 for nonmembers.
will be held 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on This is a two-day, eight-hour For more information contact
Oct. 27-28 at the Senior Citizens Cen- course. Cost is $12 for AARP mem- Dick at 227-8719.

Photography EXHIBIT


The Gulf County Tourist Devel-
opment Council is hosting a pho-
tography exhibit for Regina Gossett
at the Gulf County Welcome Center
during the month of September. Re-
gina Gossett brings out the beauty
of Gulf County' s beaches and bay in
her art. Gossett captures the best of


this area's natural scenery and wild-
life in color photographs.
Gossett, a native of Bainbridge,
divides her time between her home
in Georgia and St. Joe Beach. Pho-
tography was at first a hobby for
Regina. However, as her experience
grew so did her talent and eye for


catching breathtaking pictures. Vis-
it the Gulf County Welcome Center
located at 150 Captain Fred's Place
in Port St. Joe, next to Frank Pate
Park, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. to view Gossett's impres-
sive collection of sunsets, nature
and more.


Find it online



at starfl.com


WILLIAMS AVE DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS
PROJECT #19.135
SECTION 00010 - ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The City of Port St. Joe will receive sealed bids
from any qualified person, company or corporation
interested in constructing the following project:

WILLIAMS AVE DRAINAGE
IMPROVEMENTS

*This project includes the following: Demolition
of existing asphalt, installation of three
stormwater inlets, approximately 225 LF of
stormwater pipe, sealcoat and re-striping of
existing asphalt, 240 SY of sod, and one brick
paver crosswalk.

Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-
Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform
to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public
entity crimes.

Completion date for this project will be 45 days
from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented
to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to complete the
project on the specified date will be set at $100.00
per day.

Please indicate on the envelope that this is a
sealed bid for the "Williams Ave Drainage
Improvements."

Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $ 50.00
per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be
made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.

Bids will be received until 3:00 p.m. Eastern
Standard Time, on October 1,2009 , at the City
of Port St. Joe, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456 and will be opened and read
aloud, at 3:15 p.m. Eastern Standard Time at
the same location.

The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to reject
any and all bids. All Bids shall remain firm for a
period of sixty days after the opening.

Point of Contact will be Bill Kennedy, Project
Manager, Preble-Rish Inc. Consulting Engineers
at (850) 227-7200 or fax (850) 227-7215.


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232 Reid Ave - Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 229-8040
cell (850) 527-8086


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Gulf County Sheriff's ARREST LOG


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Thursday, September 17, 2009


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1100 - Legal Advertising
1110 - Classillied Notices
1120-Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 - Carpools &
Rideshare
1130- Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 - Personals
1160- Lost
1170 - Found


-1100
3480S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CHASE HOME FINANCE
LLC SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CHASE
MANHATTAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,

VS.

LOUIS D. PARKER, et al,
Defendantss.

CASE NO.:
23-2008-CA-000385
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated July 30,
2009 and entered in Case
NO. 23-2008-CA-000385 of
.the Circuit Court of the
FOURTEENTH Judicial
Circuit in and for GULF
County, Florida wherein
CHASE HOME FINANCE
LLC SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CHASE
- MANHATTAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, is the
Plaintiff and LOUIS D.
PARKER; are the Defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
-est and best bidder for
cash at LOBBY OF THE
GULF COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:0QAM, on
the 22nd day of October,
2009, the following de-
scribed property .as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment:

LOT THREE (3), BLOCK C,
PENINSULA ESTATES
SUBDIVISION, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 11, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA.

A/K/A 7640 ROBINWOOD
LANE, PORT SAINT JOE,
FL 324560000

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
July 30,2009.

Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

**See Americans with Dis-
abilities Act*
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Gulf
County Courthouse
#850-229-6113 (TDD)

Florida Default Law Group,
PL.


1100
RO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
F08070478
September 10,17,2009
3759S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

US BANK NATIONAL AS-
SOCLATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR CSMC
MORTGAGE-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2006-5
PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOHN WAYNE WATSON;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JOHN WAYNE WATSON
IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY THROUGH, UN-
DER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE-NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO:
2008-CA-000431

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated August-
24, 2009 entered in Civil
Case No. 2008-CA-000431
of the Circuit Court of the
14TH Judicial Circuit in
and for GULF County, Port
St. Joe, Florida, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Front Lobby at the GULF
County Courthouse lo-
cated at 1000 Cecil Costin
Blvd. in Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida, at 11:00 a.m. (EST) on
the 15th day of October,
2009 the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 15, SUMMER PLACE,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED AT PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 51 IN THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 24th day of Au-
gust, 2009.

Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the GULF County
Courthouse at (850)
229-6112, 1-800-955-8771
(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770,
via Florida Relay Service.

THE LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID J. STERN, PA.,
Attorney for Plaintiff
900 South Pine Island
Road Suite 400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920


1100
(954)233-8000
08-83500 ASCF
September 10, 17, 2009
3791S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA.

RBC CENTURY BANK
SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CY-
PRESSCOQUINA BANK,
Plaintiff

vs.

PALMER, MORRIS, et al.,
Defendants
CASE No.
23-2009-CA-000316
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
MORRIS PALMER - 210
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, F; 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 209
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 208
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 205
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 204
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 210
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 209
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A, PALMER - 208
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 205
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 204
LAKESHORE, DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

AND TO: All persons
claiming an interest by,
through, under, or against
the aforesaid Defendant(s).

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the
following described prop-
erty located in Gulf
County, Florida:

UNIT 208, PARCEL K:
COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER
OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4,
IN FRACTIONAL SECTION
36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 12 WEST GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
THENCE RUN NORTH 00
DEGREES 12 MINUTES 24
SECONDS EAST, ALONG
THE EASTERLY BOUND-
ARY LINE" OF GOVERN-
MENT LOT 2 IN SAID
FRACTIONAL SECTION
36, FOR A DISTANCE OF
1200.00 FEET; THENCE
LEAVING SAID EASTERLY
BOUNDARY LINE OF
GOVERNMENT LOT 2,
RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 48 MINUTES 07
SECONDS WEST FOR
66.00 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 89 DEGREES 47
MINUTES 34 SECONDS
WEST FOR 148.05 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 12 MINUTES 26
SECONDS WEST FOR
44.84 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING THENCE
RUN SOUTH 38.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN EAST FOR
42.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 38.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN WEST FOR
42.00 FEET TO THE


| 1100!q I
POINT OF BEGINNING.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to this
action, on Greenspoon
Marder, PA., Default De-
partment, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is
Trade Centre South, Suite
700, 100' West Cypress
Creek Road, Fort Laud-
erdale, FL 33309, and file
the original with the Clerk
with 30 days after the first
publication of this notice,
on or before October 5',
2009; otherwise a default
and a judgment may be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.

WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT on
this 24th day of August.

REBECCA L (BECKY)
NORRIS
As Clerk of said Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
September 10,17, 2009
3793S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.

RBC CENTURY BANK
SUCCESSOR BY
.MERGER TO CY-
PRESSCOQUINA BANK,
Plaintiff

vs.

PALMER, MORRIS, et al.,
Defendants

CASE No,
23-2009-CA-000316

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
MORRIS PALMER - 210
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, F; 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 209
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 208
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 205
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 204
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 210
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 209
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 208
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 205
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 204
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

AND TO: All persons
claiming an interest by,
through, under, or against
the aforesaid Defendant(s).

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the
following described prop-
erty located in Gulf
County, Florida:

UNIT 205, PARCEL K:
COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER
OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4,
IN FRACTIONAL SECTION
36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 12 WEST GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
THENCE RUN NORTH 00


DEGREES 12 MINUTES 24
SECONDS EAST, ALONG
THE EASTERLY BOUND-
ARY LINE OF GOVERN-
MENT LOT 2 IN SAID
FRACTIONAL SECTION
36, FOR A DISTANCE OF
999.95 FEET; THENCE
LEAVING.-SAID EASTERLY
BOUNDARY LINE OF
GOVERNMENT LOT 2,
RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 47 MINUTES 36
SECONDS WEST 198.98
FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 00 DEGREES 12
MINUTES 24 SECONDS
EAST FOR 54.07 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING; FROM SAID POINT
OF BEGINNING, THENCE
RUN NORTH 42.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN EAST FOR
38.00 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 42 00 FEET.
THENCE RUN WEST FOR
38.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to this
action, on Greenspoon
Marder, PA., Default De-
partment, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is
Trade Centre South, Suite
700, 100 West Cypress
Creek Road, Fort Laud-
erdale, FL 33309, and file
the original with the Clerk
with 30 days after the first
publication of this notice,
on or before October 5,
2009; otherwise a default
and a judgment may be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.

WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT on
this 24th day of August.

REBECCA ' L (BECKY)
NORRIS
As Clerk of said Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith,
As Deputy Clerk
September 10,17, 2009
3794S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.

RBC CENTURY BANK
SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CY-
PRESSCOQUINA BANK,
Plaintiff

vs.

PALMER, MORRIS, et al.,
Defendants

CASE No.
23-2009-CA-000316

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
MORRIS PALMER - 210
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, F; 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 209
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 208
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 205
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

MORRIS PALMER - 204
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 210
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 209
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 208
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 205
LAKESHORE DRIVE,


1100
PORT ST JOE, FL 32456

TERESA A. PALMER - 204
LAKESHORE DRIVE,
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

AND TO: All persons
claiming an interest by,
through, under, or against
the aforesaid Defendant(s).

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the
following described prop-
erty located in Gulf
County, Florida:

UNIT 210, PARCEL K:
COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER
OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4,
IN FRACTIONAL SECTION
36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 12 WEST, GULF
'COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
THENCE RUN NORTH 00
DEGREES 12 MINUTES 24
SECONDS EAST, ALONG
THE EASTERLY BOUND-
ARY LINE OF GOVERN-
MENT LOT 2 IN SAID
FRACTIONAL SECTION
36, FOR A DISTANCE OF
1200.00 FEET; THENCE
LEAVING SAID EASTERLY
BOUNDARY LINE OF
GOVERNMENT LOT 2,
RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 48 MINUTES 07
SECONDS WEST FOR
66.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 89 DEGREES 47
MINUTES 35 SECONDS
WEST FOR 270.04 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 12 MINUTES 26
SECONDS WEST FOR
39.92 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 38.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN EAST FOR
42.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 38.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN WEST FOR
42.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to this
action, on Greenspoon
Marder, PA., Default De-
partment, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is
Trade Centre South, Suite
700, 100 West Cypress
Creek Road, Fort Laud-
erdale, FL 33309, and file
the original with the Clerk
with 30 days after the first
publication of this notice,
on or before October 5,
2009; otherwise a default
and a judgment may be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.

WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT on
this 24th day of August.

REBECCA L (BECKY)
NORRIS
As Clerk of said Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
September 10,17,2009
3873S
NOTICE OF SALE

The Space Place intends
to sell the personal prop-
erty of below listed storage
units to enforce a lien im-
posed on said property
under the Florida self stor-
age facility act (section
83-801.809 Florida stat-
utes). The undersigned will
sell at public sale by com-
petitive bidding, on Sep-
tember 26, 2009 at 9:00
a.m on the premises
where the said property
has been stored at The
Space Place, 625A 15th
Street, Mexico Beach, FL
32410.

1. Storage location 2AB4,
assorted household items
Rented to Missy James.


1100O
All sales are final, and will
be paid for in CASH, and
removed from property at
time of sale. Sale is sub-
ject to be cancelled in the
event of settlement, be-
tween owner and the obli-
gated party.
GA.E. INC.
September 10, 17, 2009
3905S
NOTICE
OF PUBLIC SALE

COASTAL TOWING AND
ROADSIDE SERVICE, INC.
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Uen and intent to
sell these vehicles on Oc-
tober 1st, 2009, at 9:00
a.m. ET at 4258 C.R. 386,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456,
pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the Florida Stat-
utes, COASTAL' TOWING
AND ROADSIDE SERVICE,
INC. reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/or
all bids.

1991 TOYOTA
# 4T1 SV21 E1 MU304741
1991 OLDSMOBILE
# 1 G3AL54N3M6341037
2000 NISSAN
# 1N6ED27T4YC367299
1995 MAZDA
# JM1BA1414S0176714
September 17, 2009
3937S
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVI-
RONMENTAL PROTEC-
TION

NOTICE OF
APPLICATION

The Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection an-
nounces receipt of an ap-
plication for environmental
resource permit from
Northwest Florida Renew-
able Energy Center, LLC
to construct a biomass
power plant. This pro-
posed project will be lo-
cated at 521 Premier Drive
in Port St. Joe in Gulf
County.
\
The application is available
for public inspection dur-
ing normal business hours,
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at
Department of Environ-
mental Protection, 2353
Jenks Avenue, Panama
City, FL 32405.
September 17, 2009
3967S
JOB NOTICE

The Gulf County Clerk of
the Circuit Court will be ac-
cepting applications for a
Deputy Clerk, Finance De-
partment position until
5:00 p.m., E.T on October
1, 2009. Applications may
be picked up and submit-
ted at the Clerk's Office,
Gulf County Courthouse,
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.,
Blvd., Room 148, Port St.
Joe, FL between the hours
of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,
E.T, Monday through Fri-
day.

Qualifications:

*High school graduate,
some bookkeeping / ac-
counting experience

*Working knowledge of
Microsoft Word and Excel

*Strong organizational
skills

*Conscientious, dependa-
ble, industrious work
habits

*Ability to maintain confi-
dentiality

The Gulf County Clerk's
Office enforces a
Drug-Free Workplace Pol-
icy and is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Ac-


| 1100 1 3220
tit E olov r :


Rebecca L. Norris
Clerk of Court
September 17, 24, 2009


2100 - Pets
2110- Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120- Pet Supplies
2130 - Farm Animals/
Supplies
2140 - Pets/Livestock
Wanted
2150 - Pet Memorials






PUPS FOR
. SALE:
Blue Pit puppies for sale
$100 ea. Only 2 males,
3 females left. Ready to
go. Call 850-227-6114.


3100 - Antiques
3110 - Appliances
3120- Arts & Crafts
3130 - Auctions
3140 - Baby Items
3150 - Building Supplies
3160 - Business
Equipment
3170 - Collectibles
3180 - Computers
3190 - Electronics
3200 - Firewood
3210 - Free Pass It On
3220 - Furniture
3230 - Garage/Yard Sales
3240 - Guns
3250 - Good Things to Eat
3260 - Health & Fitness
3270 - Jewelry/Clothing
3280 - Machinery/
Equipment
3290 - Medical Equipment
3300 - Miscellaneous
3310 - Musical Instruments
3320 - Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 - Restaurant/Hotel
3340 - Sporting Goods
3350 - Tickets (Buy & Sell)






Steel Buildings Pckg.
18x21 Door & Anchor Bolt
Incl. Reg $8,481, Now
$4,987 + Code Adj. Other
sizes avail, Big & Small
Erection Available,
www.scg-grp.com Source
#1DL phone 850-391-0204


Whirlpool, Heavy duty
washer & dryer, $250 Full
size bed, twin beds, Chest
of drawers, Sofa, Chairs,
lots of misc. Call 227-3823



I 3230
224 Balboa Street, St. Joe
Bch Sat. 19th 8am-? Some
furniture. Too many-items
to list!! Rain Cancelled!!

303 20th St., Sat. Sept
19th, 8am - 1pm, Multi
Family Sale. Lots of chil-
drens toys, household
items, some furniture, lots
of misc items.

104 Monument Ave. Sat.
Sept. 19th 8-?,
Multi Family
Yard Sale
Furniture, children's items,
exercise equip, and lots of
goodies

MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE SALE!
Saturday, Sept'19th
8:00am-1:00pm Eastern
322 Beacon Rd., GulfAire
New Items added!
Rain or Shine!








EMPLOYMENT
4100 -Help Wanted
4130 - Employment
Information







Temporary
Superintendent
Construction firm is seek-
ing a Temporary Superin-
tendent to support special-
ized electrical work in Port
St. Joe area. Construction
experience as a Foreman
or Superintendent is a
must. Electrical experience
is a plus. Total time on
work site is anticipated to
be four (4) months spread
out over approximately
one year to complete job.
Please respond with re-
sumes or questions to
Tracy Angelo at
tracya@cdeco.com or
321-799-2970

Medical/Health

Currently, The Bridge at
Bay St Joe, does NOT
have an opening for
3-11 RN Supervisor.
We apologize.


v T) PL


AFFORD&
NIcoleti
The most sexy beauty.
Hot voluptuous masseuse
to spoil you. 850-691-9991


*Free Foreclosure List-
ings* 400,000++ Proper-
ties Nationwide! Call now!
800-785-3592

SELL ALL YOUR
ITEMS
through classified.
CALL 747-5020


A


ANNOUNCEMENTS


10B * THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL * THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009


117 ffJt^iYn.^ b


6 RUM �B~e^


i~n0a1 oilB





Established 1938 * Serving Gulf County and sur,

Dental Assistant
The Gulf County Health Dept, an EO/AA/VP
Employer, has one opening for a full-time,
Career Service Dental Assistant. Annual
Starting Salary: $19,902.48. Drug Screen,
Fingerprinting and Emergency Duties
Required. Dental Assistant Certification or
Expanded Duties Required. For more info,
contact Lesia Hathaway at (850) 227-1276,
ext. 149. Electronic applications only for
this position; refer to Requisition Number
64084744. Closing date 09/20/09.
Apply at: peoplefirst.myflorida.com
877-562-7287
An Equal Opportunity .
Affirmative Action Employer







Join us for College Night
Thursday, September 17 fror
Thursday, September 17 is College Night!
universities across the southeast will be
admissions, transfer requirements, prog
and a variety of other topics. GCCC faculty
answer questions and help explore final
College Night is free and open to the pub
and universities represented. To name a fe
Riddle University, Savannah College of Ar
Cornell University, University of
Florida, Texas A&M, Vanderbilt
University, University of
Alabama, Saint Leo University,
Samford University, and
many more. Don't miss your
chance to talk with these
representatives face-to-
face. 0


CALLIOUR


rounding areas for 67 years

4100 Ln


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2009 * 11B

o 6140 6140 10


Medical/Health r -- - --- - i- Beach, 2 br, 2 ba house BMW 5251 1992 $495
Florida Lic. I I t with gulf view, $725 mo + down $3900 total 0% In-
__ . o r h Florida Lian c,. NPrI I Palm Blvd. Home dep, 850-647-9214 terest 215-1769 Daylight
Make More Mone Physician, A.R.N.P orPalmBlvR St 1 2 s e t Auto Financing 9am/9pm
Physician Assistant I1Charming 1 br garage I for Rent St. Joe Bch. 1 1/2 brlks totta
Woodmen of the World IS seeking field for fast paced medical clin- Walk to shopping. Pot I Quiet street, private home all apples, balcony $682
representatives in the Port St. Joe area. Generous ics. We offer competitive St. Joe, $495 mo., 1 yr I w 4 br, 2 ba, 2,000 + sq. first last sec. 850-233-4636
commission plus bonus opportunities and pay, excellent benefits and lease. Call for appt ft. of living space, large
exceptional benefits for those who qualify. Training great wo schedule and 850-227-7234 front family room, second
and professional sales tools provided. Must be experienced staff. Full or L - - - - - expansive family room,
dan proiessionai l lfes sio ave the i de usire to part-time position availa- large bright washroom,
disciplined, professional and have the desire to ble. Please forward re- fencedin backyard, front
help people. Contact the Port St. Joe area office sume with salary require- Duplex, 2 br, 2 ba, laundry porch & large shade trees,
for Woodmen of the World Life Insurance Society, ments to: RO. Box 7248 room CH&A, $700 mo. + close to area schools,
Omaha Nebraska. Panama City Bch, FI32413 $700 dep. No Smoking Or downtown Port St. Joe and
Resumes to: 2618 E. 22nd Ct. Web Id # 34050432 Pets, 221 7th St, PSJ, Call St. Joseph's Bay Monthly Buick LeSabre 1998 $895
Panama City, FL 32405, 850-229-8421 rental available at $1050 R _FALTAI FRSAll down $5,900 total 0% In-
Attn: Human Resources per month, with $1050 - Homes st 215-169 Daylight
or call (850) 7699212security/damage deposit 710- Open Hs Auto Financing 9am/9pm
or call (850) 769-9212 Port St Joe, 2 br 1 ba, up- Call Gulf Coast Property 7110 - Beach Home/
or fax resume to St-s stairs, CH&A $550 mo. no Services at (850)229-2706 Property
850-769-0439 Baby Sitter's smoking or pets. W/D for more information & a 7120 - Commercial
Needed for family on 850-899-0149 tour of this well kept home. 7130 - Condof/ownhouse
vacation, for the sunimer. 7140 - Farms & Ranches
Must be 18 or over. 7150- Lots and Acreage
st be 18 or over. l .- 7160- Mobile Homes/Lots
904-206-1200 a , 3 7170 - Waterfront
" ig 4 R s ---- ^ v l 7180 - Investment
r-- - - -----0Property
Logistics/Transportation 6130 Palm Breeze Way 7190- Out-of-Town
S Private Home Real Estate
I We Need Driver I Clean 2 br, 2/ ba in PSJ,- Private Home 7200 - Timeshare Ford Escort 1998 $495
6Trainees Only $75 mo + dep. Call for Rent Ford Escort 1998 $495
Trainees Only 850-545-5814 or Large, spacious, newly re. down $3900 total 0% Inter-
I No experienced Drivers I 850-442-3334. modeled private home for est 215-1769 Daylight Auto
S$800 per week rent on Palm Breeze Way 7100 Financing 9am/9pm
1-877-214-3624 -in Jones Homestead, Port 3 br, 1 ba, New carpet & .
Web id # 34048329 St. Joe. 3 br, 2 ba, large tile firs, Cedar wood walls
S- - - - - Eagle Landing open family room & all the way through, appli-
Spacious kitchen w/ new appliances. ances included. See Bay
11 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. Townhome largefront & back yard from Screenedinfront
close to downtown, St. porch. Back porch also in-
4130 New development - Fully Joseph's Bay & the new closed. Plenty of fruit trees
Representatives from colleges and furnished, beautiful & spa- hospital. Monthy rental in back yd. Asking
POSTAL & GOV'TJOB cious, 3 br, 2 ba $900, w/ an $900 $105,000 or make offer
townhome located in security/damage deposit. 850-647-9216 or
available to discuss concerns about INFO FOR SALE? Jones Homestead, Eagle Call Gulf Coast Property 850 229-7738
Landing subdivision. Close Services at (850)229-2706
rams of study, financial aid, housing C action to shopping, downtown for more information &a
Caut and St. Joseph's Bay. tour of this wel kep home. /
and staff will also be available to Monthly rental $850 w/d o8130
ncial aid opportunities. for information about Sh rte Tr ret St3Jo Beach F5 F0 C 1999
ncial aid opportunities, f or information bot avail. Call Gulf Coast Prop- 3 bd, 2 ba $1,195 down $ 5900 total
you r postal jobs. rty Services at 0% Interest 215-1769 Day-
lic.Therewillbemorethan40colleges guarantee, contact the 850)229-2706 for more in- Beautiful house n a quiet light Auto Financing
ilic.There will be formation & a tour of the neighborhood. Short walk RCREATIONAL., 9am/9pm
ew: University ofTampa, Embry- The Federal Trade townhometo hebeach 3-year lease 8100- Antique & Collectible
Commission available. $950/Month 8110 - Cars
tand Design, Stetson University, s America's consume 8120 - Sports Utiity Vehicles
t and Design, Sprotection agency Call 991-0110 8140 -"Vans
For a walk-through 8150 - commercial
wwwftc govfiobscams 186140 18160 - Motorcycles
1-877-FTC-HELP Fome d . 8170 - Auto Parts
A public service Sweet Deal! 82 0- onawatercraft
message from the FTC White City 3 br 2 bath 8230 - Saitboats
and The News Herald 1 br beach cottage fuy house 1 blk from intra- 8240- Boat & Marine
Classed Advertsng 1 br beach cottage, fully l canal & boat ramp Spplies Ford Ranger Splash 1993
o dvertient fum, utifiies and cable v coastal canal & boat t ramp, 8245 - Boat Slips & Docks Step Side $595 down $
Deprtn included, Ig deck patio/ newly updated, won't last 8310- Alrcraft/Aviatlon $4,200 total 0% Interest
carport, Hwy 98 Mexico long, call today 650 mo. 8320- ATV/DO Road Vehicles 215-1769 Daylight Auto Fi-
Beach $725 m e + $125 850-906-0095 Lease/ Op- 8330- Campers & Trailers9 to
Leach, $e 2 d P depkos .eat$a5 on to buy 8340 - Motorhiemes nancing 9a ow9pm
Call 850-648-5338

2 /3 br, 2 ba, Renovated, e e C l res
1 mi e N 1 of Mexico Bclh seN. ST ORe AB .
Pilo-I -I s 30 acres. Inclds hardwood R eal E State
INESS & RM firs, SS appl. granite UP
5'nCH&A. Cook house with Janalyn Dowden
5100- Business wrap around porch and 850-251-3432
5110 - Money to Lend much more. Beautiful pas-$1250 108 S. E. Ave. A
850-830-9342 Carrabelle, Florida 32322.
_www.seacrestre.com 8140 ]
| 100oo | 2 Bedroom 1 1/2 bath
Eagle Landing 170 Bayshore Dr Eastpoint .........70000 Chevy High Top Van 1996
6 Figure Townhome 3 Bedroom 2 Bath $895 down $5900 total.0%
Potential. New development- beauti- House on-1/2 acre pet's ok Lanark Village 1000.00 Interest 215-1769 Day ght
Work from home. ful & spacious 3br, 2ba
Work from home. townhome located in 3 Bedroom 3 Bath
www.intemetcashnow.net Jones Homestead, in the Condo unfurnished with pool ......900.00
Eagle Landing Subdivi- 1 Bedroom
sion. Close to shopping, Apt with Bay Views includes water. 500.00
- Chevy Van 1997, v-8, downtown and St. 2Bedroom
120K miaes, full of equip- Joseph's Bay. Monthly
ment, 2 portable machine rental $875 with $875 Apt Fully Furnished Bay Views ......600.00
3 fans, and more Good security/damage deposit. 2 Bedroom
opportunity to star' up a Call Gulf Coast Property Unfurnished Apt...... ............ 600.00
business. For more info, Services at (850) 229-2706 2 Bedroom
Call 850-258-7001 frmtour of the townhome. Unfurnished Apt-..........................400.00
1 Bedroom
f" G lar Fully furnished Apt-.....................500.00 a 40
SGulfaire 1 Bedroom
Executive 3 br, 2 ba, W&D, Furnished end unit with carport.. 525.00 1985 Ford, 27' Class C
garage, deck, fenced yd, Beach front houses with winter rates. motorhome, low miles,
pool, tennis court, private Call Joann for details about our short and Make an offer, Please call
beach, pets okay, $925 long term rentals at 850-323-0444 850-648-4775
mo. 850-639-2690 or
* RE l. ESTATE FRS 832-9702
616"R600 -Business/
Commercial
6110- Apartments
6120 - Beach Rentals
6130-Condf/Townhoose t St Joe
6140 - House Rentals InP t
8150 - Roommate Wanted
6160 - Rooms for Rent 229-6200.
6170 - Mobile Home/Lot
6180 -Out-of-Town Rentals 814 7400
2 l-VacationRentasm.or 814-7400R MINI-STORAGE AND OFFICE COMPLEX
6200 - Vacation Rentals Climate Controlled Units Lease Warehouse Space
"Lease Office Space - Watercraft and RV Storage
EIw.EI;ADF850-229-8014
1*www.AMERICAMINISTORAGEANDOFFICE.comI


HELP IS ONLY A


.. . PHONE CALL


o a Y AWAY


To Place Your Classified ad


Call:

Toll Free:

Fax:

Email:

Email:


APALACHIC E
& CARRABEL Mg


850-747-5020

800-345-8688

850-747-5044

thestar@pcnh.com

thetimes@pcnh.con


Port St. Joe Commercial
For Lease
Retail / Office Space
317 Williams Avenue
+/-1800sf - tenant improvements negotiable; $1350/mo gross
325 Reid Avenue
+/-4500sf - shell space; corner location; $2500/mo gross
309 Reid Avenue
+/-6000sf - renovated shell space; occupant ready; $4500/mo mod. gross
200-B Reid Avenue
+/-2100sf-finished retail space; $1750 mod. gross
310 Reid Avenue
+/-1116sf - Suite C; finished office space; lobby area with two
office suites and filing/storage room; $1000/mo NNN
230 Reid Avenue u. A �C f
+/-756sf office/ret.J l J2 ar w
322 Long Avenue
+/-1000sf - move-in ready; $900/mo gross
411 Reid Avenue
+/-2668sf office space; $9.45 psf mod. gross
Warehouse / Flex Space
110 Trade Circle West
750sf-22,500sf - PSJ Commerce Park, flex space, $5.25psf NNN (incl.
water/sewer)
160 Cessna Drive
+/-5,000sf office/flex space; Adjacent to Costin Airport; $7 psf plus utilities
and applicable sales tax; Inquire for possible incentives/concessions.
772 Hwy 98, Suite A
+/-900sf office flex space, Includes 450sf overhead storage. $500/mo
mod. gross For Sale
320 Marina Drive
Corner lot on entrance to Marina Cove, prime location w/high visibility;
.14 acres.
407 Reid Ave
+/-4988,f; Multi'tenant bldg 100% leased; Parking Incl; $549,000
317 Monument Ave
+/-4431sf; New construction located directly on Hwy 98; Parking Included;
$649,000 Also available for lease. Please inquire for terms.
401 Reid Avenue
+/- 5400sf-perfect retail space; $475,000 Also available for lease. Please
inquire for terms. -/
Marketed Exclusively by: �
850-229-6373


-I-.. . . .. . . .. . .. . . n. . . .. . . ... .. . ..


in


Call Our New Numbers Now!


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II


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/
























n







812 I The Star


S,Local


DOGS from page B1
DOGS from page BI


Thursday, September 17, 2009


the Florida Department of Cor-
rections, the Bay St. Joseph Hu-
mane Society, the Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners and Jay King's
Dog Academy out of Tallahassee.
This second graduation could
be characterized as one of pas-
sages!
For Skye, it was a passage from
potential euthanasia to the home
of the Delmonicos, a military fam-
ily represented last Wednesday by
mother Tifany and her twin chil-
dren.
"She is definitely worth it," Tifa-
ny said of Skye. Tifany read about
the "DAWGS" program onlineand
contacted the Gulf Forestry Camp.
She was provided a letter, "signed"
by Skye, outlining his likes and
dislikes so the family could be pre-
pared.
Tifany had the letter in tow, Zoe
the leash.
"(Skye) is going to be a great
addition to the family," Tifany con-
tinued. "We've gotten pictures, and
they sent us this letter. The kids
are already making a scrapbook
This will be a great birthday pres-
ent."
DAWGS stands for "Developing
Adaptable Dogs with Good Socia-
bility" and was the brainchild of
several dedicated folks who saw
the need for a program that ben-
efits both the canines and their
inmate trainers and handlers at
the Forestry Camp, as well as the
Humane Society.
The dogs spent eight weeks be-.
ing obedience trained, taught how
to sit, stay, come and walk to the
left and just behind their handlers
and be, essentially, sociable dogs
ready to be adopted.
The success of the program is
evidenced in the fact that before
graduation, all eight dogs in the
class had been adopted, with sev-
eral finding new homes in New
England, Skye headed to Mont-
gomery and two dogs being adopt-
ed locally, as in guards at the Gulf
Forestry Camp.
For instance, Skye edged out
Chester for top dog among the
eight graduates who finished the
six-week course last week But
from his arrival, Chester caught
the eye of guard Kyra Burch.
"He is a little guy, and he was
beating up the bigger dogs," Burch


Top Dog Skye plays with another graduate before they receive


their diplomas.
said with a chuckle. "I said I've got
to have him; he has an attitude like
mine.
"My kids are 7 and 13, and they
are.excited. My youngest kept say-
ing this morning she had a stom-
ach ache, and I told her she was
not coming with me to work so she
might as well get up out of bed and
go to school."
One dog, Buck, never made it
to graduation. A pure-bred blood-
hound, assistant warden Doug
Sloan noted that Gulf Correctional
Institute had recently had a K-9
dog die, and Buck seemed a per-
fect replacement.
"We saw him, saw he was a
bloodhound and the guys said
we've got to have him," Sloan
said. Buck was made an honorary
graduate, although he was already
working for the K-9 team.
The aim of the DAWGS pro-
gram, from the canine viewpoint,
is to train .dogs that have been
abandoned or lost and never
claimed, who might otherwise find
the end of the road very soon if not
adopted, and transform them into
dogs even the most hard-hearted
inmate would take home.
"This program has resulted in
a hopeful future for our animals,"
said Sandi Christy, representing
the Humane Society.
Potential dogs for DAWGS are
scoped for breed, looks and health.
Dogs are spayed and neutered
and given all the requisite shots.
A sponsor of the program donates


heartworm treatments for all the
dogs.
The dogs also undergo an ex-
tensive temperament test to as-
sess their suitability for the train-
ing ahead.
On the inmate side - all dogs
have a trainer, a handler or assis-
tant trainer and one or more care-
takers for time when they are not
undergoing training - there is ex-
tensive screening, inmates must
apply for one of the slots in the
DAWGS program and they must
commit to stay with the program,
one of at least four such programs
around the state.
"And I'm proud to report that
across the state there has been a
50 percent reduction in disciplin-
ary write-ups for the inmates in-
volved in DAWGS programs. This
program is one where everybody
wins," Christy said.
"These inmates are so dedi-
cated to this program and these
dogs. They even spend free time,
and they do have free time, with
the dogs."
Inmates, such as Daniel Gaddy
and Bryan White, demonstrate the
hoped-for impact of the DAWGS
program on the men who work
with the dogs.
During, last week's ceremony,
Gaddy read a poem he composed
as he sat down one night, penning
in about 30 minutes, he said, "Four-
Legged Friend." As he read the
poem, Gaddy left a few audience
members dabbing their eyes.


Gaddy is one of five men Jay
King identified to be lead trainers,
essentially taking over King's role
as the leader of training the dogs in
subsequent DAWGS classes, one
of which was arriving last Wednes-
day after the graduation of the sec-
ond class.
"This has meant a lot," Gaddy
said. "I have always been a dog-
lover and was taught how to train
dogs a certain way. But Jay says
to forget everything you know; and
he emphasizes positive reinforce-
ment. Working with her (Chester)
showed me a little patience and
love goes a long way.
"This touched me because we
are actually saving a dog's life. And
it has absolutely changed me. It
has taught me patience. Having
that patience means when I get
out, I won't be anxious about get-
ting things done. I am learning to
be mindful of others. We have guys
of all colors and ages and back-
grounds, and this gives me the
social skills, not just to get by but
to get things accomplished. Now I
know when I get a job, I will be able
to get along with others.
"This is not an ego boost, but it
is humbling because it is all about
the dogs."
Jarod Labrun, one of Chester's
handlers, said of graduation day,
"It is bittersweet. She is going to a
good home, but she's a great dog.
I'm going to miss her."
White is facing a passage of his
own. Although made a.lead trainer
like Gaddy, White joined a work
crew in the community. His hope:
to earn a spot over in Bay County
where he would like to work with
dogs at the Humane Society.
"I'm going to miss it, but they
are keeping me in the dorm with
the dogs, and I love it," White said.
"What I really taught these dogs is
trust. Once you get that trust, you
get respect."
Sloan, in remarks during the
program, his voice halting and
tears tracing down one cheek,
summed up the intent and content
of the DAWGS program, for dog
and inmate alike.
"This program does a great
job for the dogs and the prison,"
he said, before looking directly at
the inmates. "Some of you guys
have felt the same way as these


dogs: abandoned, lost and never
claimed. Every day you show your
commitment, the dogs feel that.
"Just as you gave these dogs
a purpose in life, give yourselves
a purpose. This is a reentry pro-
gram, not just for you, but for every
inmate in this compound. I want
you to find your purpose."
After diplomas were handed out
and a dog processional ended in
the yard outside the main building
of the camp, Zoe had her chance.
As White explained some of
the basics of using the leash and
issuing commands, Zoe attached
her precious leash onto Skye, her
brother Zane at her side, and a
family had a new addition.
All five, White, Tifany, Zoe,
Zane and Skye, had found their
purpose.

FOUR-LEGGED FRIEND
Who is this four legged
friend that I've found.
Who listens to my
complaints without making a
sound.
Who knows what mood I'm
feeling now.
And gives me comfort'
without raising a brow.
When I approach he seems
to smile,
A frown he gives if I'm gone
for awhile.
Unconditional love is all he
knows.
A real buddy indeed I've
watched him grow.
With brush and comb I
groom him well,
So in all his pictures he
looks so swell.
He knows to sit down .and
come when I call.
Everything I've taught, he
learned them all.
So a better home he must
certainly have,
A real family to love him
exactly as I have.
Who is the four-legged
friend that I've found.
Man's best friend indeed,
without making a sound.
By Daniel Gaddy


.'HIGHLAND
* VIEW


Port St Joe Commerce Park


TO Wv'~ TI


. II II f


0


CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
NOTICE OF SOLICITATION
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
BULK CHEMICALS

RFP#09-003

Notice of Solicitation
Water Plant Chemicals: Ferric Sulfate &
Caustic Soda (Sodium Hydroxide)

Notice is hereby given that the City of Port St.
Joe, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd.
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, is seeking RFPs for
bulk chemicals to be used at its Water Plant to
be provided to the City, F.O.B., on an ongoing
basis for the term of the agreement.

Chemical specification sheets are on file at
the City of Port St. Joe City Hall located at
305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe,
FL 32456, and may also be downloaded from
the City website (cityofportstjoe.com). Please
call (850) 229-6395 or 6390 with any further
questions.

Evaluation of Responses to the RFP

The RFP submittals will be evaluated by City
Staff and Board Members of the City of Port
St. Joe based upon information supplied by
each company in response to this RFP. The
City will award contracts) for the following
chemicals: Ferric Sulfate and Caustic Soda (50
% Sodium Hydroxide) based on services and
price provided by the Chemical Company. The
Board retains the right to decide what services
are in its best interest and also reserves the right
to select more than one firm if needed.

Please submit Three (3) sealed copies to:

The City of Port St. Joe
P.O. Box 278
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457

All submissions must be clearly marked Water
Plant Chemical Bid Proposal and be submitted
to Jim Anderson, City Auditor/Clerk at City
Hall by 3:00 PM EST on Wednesday September
30, 2009.


HARIZONA
CHI-MIKAl[


PORT
ST JOE