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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03699
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Creation Date: August 27, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33602057
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03699

Full Text














YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937

YEAR 71, NUMBER 45


A


I[i


Compassion fund to

help those in need, B1


Thursday, AUGUST 27,2009 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com 50<


NEW SCHOOL YEAR


THIE D ARI


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

of new faces, fresh worries about
declining enrollment and new con-
cerns about a virus as students re-
turned to class on Monday.
The district's schools came alive north'
to south with welcomes, introduction to
new programs and some fun as the' sum-
mer ended and the 2009-10 school year got
under way.
"We are ready," said Superintendent of
Schools Tim Wilder. "It's been a smooth
summer. We've had to hire about 30 people,
and that has been average the past few
years with retirements and people moving
away.
"We'll be watching enrollment through-
out the week, but we won't have a solid
count for at least a few weeks. It's hard to
tell where you are heading the first week."
If anecdotal evidence provides any clue,
Port St. Joe Elementary School is looking
at a significant rise in enrollment - the
kindergarten classes were near capacity -
while enrollment at the two middle schools
and Wewahitchka Elementary appeared to
See SCHOOL A3


At top
right, the
freshmen
girls,
foreground,
faced off
against
the senior
girls in the
tug-of-war
challenge.
At bottom
right, the
boys rushed.
on to the
court to
ensure the
senior girls
were the
winners in
the tug-of-
war that
turned
into a tug-
of-melee
for a few
seconds.


Port St. Joe native's success inspires youth


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
As a kid growing up in Port St.
Joe, Dr. Nathan Peters III looked
to two uncles for inspiration.
Dr. Raymond Gant and Dr. Ed-
ward Peters, both dentists, served
as powerful male role models, in-
spiring Peters with their profes-
sional success.
The 1989 Port St. Joe High
School graduate followed in his
uncles' footsteps, founding a den-
tal practice in Atlanta's Buckhead
neighborhood in 2004.
Peters considered himself for-
tunate to have had two outstand-
ing mentors in his youth.
When he received a chance
to mentor children from Port St.
Joe, Peters welcomed the oppor-
tunity.


FREEDOM
FI E - -

Peters' father, Nathan Peters
Jr., and Pastor David Woods Jr. of
Church of God in Christ sought a
way to encourage African-Ameri-
can youth to achieve academic
success.
Noting a lack of African-Ameri-
can male teachers in the Gulf
County school system, Peters Jr.
regarded his son as a perfect men-
tor.
He had come from the students'
neighborhood, achieved profes-
sional success and needed to pay
his dues.
"My vision really was to give my
son the impression that he has to
give back," said Peters Jr.
Peters Jr. called his son and
suggested taking a group of kids
for a tour of his office, the Alpine
See INSPIRE Al 0


Subscribe to The Star
227-1278
For your hometown paper
delivered to your home


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Dr. Nathan Peters III extols the benefits of good oral hygiene to,
Port St. Joe youths who traveled to his Atlanta office Aug. 17.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Opinion ...................................... A4 Church News............................... B4-5
Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Law Enforcement ................... B7
Sports............ .... A8-9 School News................................ B6
Obitti ries.................................... B8-9 Legals.................................... ....... B8


City opens


'Pandora's


box'


with logo


change

By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer
The city jumped into po-
tentially rough waters last
Tuesday by opening up the
constitutionality of mixing
church and state.
The issue of adding the
motto "In God we trust" to
the city's logo was debated
after having been post-
poned from the Aug. 4 com-
mission meeting.
The first part of the is-
sue was to determine which
city seal to use, the original
seal or a newer, less formal
one that was put in place
on water bills and shirts by
former City Manager Lee
Vincent. Commissioners
voted to use the official seal
with the constitution monu-
ment incorporated in it.
The second part of the
issue was adding a poten-
tially religious motto to a
state symbol.
The topic was first
broached by Commis-
sioner John Reeves at the
Aug. 4 meeting. Reeves
said he only wanted to add
the motto in keeping with
a patriotic theme, not for
any religious purposes. He
pointed out that the federal
government and the state
of Florida already incorpo-
rated it.
Mayor Mel Magidson
pointed out that it was
"opening Pandora's box to
bring attention to things we
do not want to," adding his
reservation was that the
city might get sued. He also
pointed out it would spot-
light the fact that the city
commission prays before
every meeting and "some
people will go to jail and it
will have started tonight,"
he told the board.
Magidson referenced
the legal problems and
costs involved in a lawsuit
that the city of Kissimmee
was fighting about the
same thing.
Reeves said it was from
a misunderstanding by a
Kissimmee commissioner
and continued to cite other
cases where the addition of
the motto was successful.
The question of costs
in changing the city seal
was discussed, and it was
decided to change the seal
only when something ex-
pired or ran out.
Commissioner Greg
Johnson argued that with
the city's current budget
problems, he felt the city's
time and money could be
better spent on more im-
portant things.
"It's unbelievably inap-
propriate in these tough
times," he said. "Some
employees are not get-
ting raises. It's the wrong
time and the wrong place.
We need to table this for a
more appropriate time."
City Attorney Russell

See LOGO A7


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A2 I The Star
, st .,,.. ,'


Thursday, August 27, 2009


Local


Saturday, Sept 12th WE WELCOME OU
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NEW MEMBERS:


Friday Night. September 11th
Port St. Joe, Florida
Ron Patrick and Eddie McFarland at the
Sunset Coastal Grill
Galen Curry and Jesse DelGizzi at
The Thirsty Goat
Tupelo Railroad at The Haughty Heron
Tommy Curry and Jimmy Curry at
Dockside Cafe
Charles Peterson and the Tones of
Harmony at
The First United Methodist Church

Windmark Beach, Florida
Cowlick at
The Great Southern School of Fish

Apalachicola, Florida
Broken Silence at The Oasis

Ochlockonee Bay, Florida
Two Foot Level at Hamaknockers Oasis

Mexico Beach, Florida
Rick Ott Band at Toucan's Restaurant


Marina Cove Stage on the Bay
Ron Patrick 10:30 am - 11:30 am
Eddie McFarland 11:45 am - 12:45 pm
Charles Peterson and the Tones of
Harmony 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Cowlick 2:15 pm - 3:15 pm
Caitlin Nicole Eadie 3:30 pm - 4:15 pm
Tommy and Jimmy Curry 4:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Broken Silence 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Two Foot Level 6:20 pm - 7:20 pm
Tupelo Railroad 7:40 pm - 8:40 pm
Rick Ott Band 9:00 pm - 9:45 pm
Brett Kelly 9:45 pm - 10:30 pm
Caitlin Nicole Eadie 10:30 pm - 10:50 pm
Ultraviolet Ballet 11:10 pm - 12:25 am
FINALE 12:45 am - 1:00 am


Mulberry Court on Reid Ave
Where is Mulberry Court you ask?
Sandwiched right in between
Palm Tree Books and
Bow Wow Meow Beach


,10:30 am to 2 pm


Look for special promotions
in stores in our Downtown
Shopping District!


Forgotten Coast Realty of NW Florida
Carol Erwin, Broker
900 C. Hwy 98
Mexico Beach, FI 32456
Phone: 850-648-3000
Fax: 866-325-2114
Email: Carol@buytheforgottencoast.net
Website: www.buytheforgottencoast.net


Toucan's Restaurant
Renee' Carroll, Manager
812 W. Hwy 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Phone: 850-648-8207
Phone: 850-648-4904
Fax: 850-648-1183
Email: Toucans01@yahoo.com
Website: www.toucansmexicobeach.com

Studio on 4th
Jackie Pollock, Owner
521 4th Street
Port St Joe, FL 32456
Phone: 850-648-4905
Email: repjcp@mchsi.com

Fit as a Fiddle
Dana Black
104 Good Morning Street
WindMark Village
Port St Joe, FL 32456
Phone: 850-229-1920
Email: makeit2@fairpoint.net

Xtreme Clean Professional
Floor Care, Inc.
Michael Mock, President/Owner
122 Bridgeport Lane
Port St Joe, FL 32456
Phone: 850-229-1324
Cell: 850-227-5610
Fax: 850-227-9366
Email: xtremeclean77@hotmail.com


Thank You to the Sponsors of the
13th Annual St. Joseph Bay Scallop Festival!


, Progress Energy

People. Performance. Excellence.


GOLD
Duren's Piggly Wiggly
Bluewater Outriggers
Capital City Bank
Vision Bank
Novak Law Offices
Raffield Fisheries

ENTERTAINMENT SPONSOR
Roberson-Friedman

SILVER
Bayside Savings Bank
Coastal Community Bank
Current Solutions of the Gulf coast
Realtor Assn of Franklin & Gulf County
(new logo}
Kenny Strange Electric


www.VSISJGULFCOUNTY.com.
WJHG TV
WMBB TV
The Star
Gulf Alliance for Local Arts
Big Fish Construction
Ramsey's Printing & Office Supplies
Preble-Rish
Gulf Coast Property Services

FRIEND OF THE CHAMBER


North FL Land & Capital
NVDi
Server Solutions
Buffalo Rock
joseph's cottage
Bluewater Realty
Pepsi


Mission Statement
The mission of the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce is to be an advocate for existing businesses and the
community, a conduit for pursuing positive developments, and a catalyst for cooperation.


Start Your Search
With Trust

Lots of companies say they
are trustworthy. Those with
BB the Better Business Bureau
B B. Seal have proven It. So next
I . , time you look for a business,
find one you can trust.
Start at bbb.org.
Stat a bb 0br


S' Bbby "Pickel. , Pr.ogress Energy F1orida ,i

All content pro\ ided by and approved by the
Gulf County Chamber of Commerce.
Chamber CutTents is published monthly in
conjunction \ ith the Gulf County Chamber of
Commerce and Star Publications, Inc.
Contact us: Star Publications
The Star. 135 W. H\i\ 98
Port St. Joe. FL 32456
Phone t850)227-1278
Fax i850(1i227-7212
.- '- -? :". .. -r: ,. ... - -. . ." , . ' . ,..-," .v , "...... .'"...:. -..


An
Mor

Vision Bank
'. II "., i.l d, l l A I,
www.isintbk.p~ et
529 Cecil G Costlin Sr. Blvd.
Pan St Joe. FL 32456
Member


tmber Lowry
tgage Banker


Office (850) 636-7988
Cell (850) 2274492
i FaA 1850)227.1149
aiowry@vislonbankfl.com
icr FDIC


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SCHOOL from page Al


be relatively even with, or slightly down
from, last year.
However, the concern is the high
schools. Wewahitchka High School is
down as many as 30 students heading
into the first week, and the empty bleach-
ers on one side of the gym at Port St. Joe
High School evidenced that the freshman
and sophomore classes were smaller
than the junior and senior classes.
There was cautious optimism that
the NJROTC class at Port St. Joe High
would maintain the numbers needed to
keep the program humming, with more
than 30 already signed up and more in-
quiring as to the status of the class, said
Lt. Commander Marty Jarosz.
Behind the games and easy-going
manner of the opening of school, though,
sat concerns about the approaching flu
season and a potential outbreak of the
H1N1 virus, commonly known as the
swine flu.
The school district has established a
committee, comprised of representatives
from teachers, non-instructional person-
nel, administrators and district staff,
which is working closely with the Gulf
County Health Department and monitor-
ing the situation.
"We are very involved," Wilder said.
"The committee is going to meet with
the health department folks about once
a month, and we are in contact with the
health department two or three times a
week.
"We are going to be very protective of
our staff and students."
School health officials have provided
presentations to faculty and administra-
tors at all schools, and students were
shown a brief video on Monday about the
H1N1 virus and the importance of per-
sonal hygiene.
Isolation areas have been established
in each school health room, and the hand
sanitizers at school entrances and in hall-
ways have been loaded and operational.
The health department has provided
the district with masks and hand sanitiz-
ers, and the district will take an aggres-
sive approach in dealing with sick chil-
dren.
Teachers will be checking for any
children with flu-like symptoms each
morning, and children who are sick will
be sent immediately to the health room
until a parent or guardian can pick them
up from school.
District and health officials are strong-
ly urging parents to keep sick children
home, though Wilder acknowledged that
not all parents can afford day care or to


lose jobs, and sick SYMPTOMS
children will still
be likely setting OF Hi N FLU
foot on school (SWINE FLU)
campuses.
To date, the The symptoms
county has had of swine flu in
four confirmed people are similar
cases of HiN1 in- to the symptoms
fection. All those of seasonal flu
cases have been and include
mild, and three fever, cough,
cases have in- sore throat, body
evolved individu- aches, headache,
als 21 or younger, chs
underscoring that chills and
the H1N1 virus fatigue. Some
seems to have a people have
target age group reported diarrhea
younger than 30, and vomiting
with an average associated
age for infection with swine flu.
currently 17-19. Like seasonal
The concern influenza,'
for Wilder is not the swine flu
so much having 50 the swine flu
sick students, but might cause
having 25-30 sick a worsening
faculty members, of underlying
which would im- chronic medical
pact school days. conditions.
He emphasized
there is no thought of school closures at
this time.
"I don't know what we are facing, but
we are going to be proactive, I can tell
you that," Wilder said.
As presented by county health offi-
cials earlier this month, in the event of
mass inoculations, school sites, includ-
ing health rooms, could potentially be
used.
Meanwhile, the district will welcome
17 new hires among the teaching ranks
and six new hires among non-instruc-
tiofial personnel.
Some of the new hires are familiar
faces, teachers who have left and re-
turned to the district, and Wewahitchka
Elementary led the district with seven
new teachers in place this year. No other
school had more than four.
There were also eight transfers
among teachers, including Don Rich,
former district supervisor for transpor-
tation and maintenance, moving to We-
wahitchka High School to teach science,
and Judy Eppinette, the district's first
nationally certified teacher, who moved
from Port St. Joe Middle School to We-
wahitchka High to be closer to home.
There were also four transfers among
non-instructional personnel.


JC


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'' 2009 The St lot Comp.w. 'JOE. St Joe." WindMark Beach" the "Taklng Flight" design, School of Fish
ind the "School of Fbh' deIign, arc een :ce mark of The Sr. Joe' Cumpan).


Saturday,

September 5, 20
Village Center at WindMark Beach
Beats start at 7pm eastern!

If you missed BeachBeats last summer you
missed a great day of beach parties, boats and
live music. Get ready to join your friends and
celebrate another great summer here. Center
stage takes place on the Village Center lawn so
set your beach blanket and chairs, or anchor the
boat to enjoy the beat from the water!


%:eats & drinks
School of Fish Restaurant will have


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an outdoor bar set up with spirits and more.

JCoolers are not allowed at the event but great
food and drinks will be available for purchase.


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Designed to offer a comfortable
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coastal tranquility, our vacation
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HEALTH ROOM POLICY FOR STUDENTS
WITH FLU-LIKE SYMPTOMS:

* Teachers are encouraged to: At the beginning of the day
send any students that appear sick or demonstrate flu-like
symptoms to the health rooms for evaluation.
* Students with flu-like symptoms (fever, cough, sore throat
and vomiting) will be put in isolation areas of the health rooms,
given a mask to wear until a parent or guardian arrives to take
them home (create a three-foot barrier if possible).
* Students who do not have a fever but do have a cough,
sore throat or vomiting will be treated the same.
* Students should be symptom-free for 24 hours before
returning to school and should check back in through the
health room.
* All students entering the health rooms will wash their
hands before being evaluated.






www,,starflScom


a music infusion at WindMo


Thursday, August 27, 2009


Local


Tke Star I A3


IE











A4 I The Star 1Ou nion


Thursday, August 27,2009


Keyboard KLATTERINGS



Tough truths


There is a line from an
old Jack Nicholson movie
that has made its way into
the current lexicon and,
paraphrased, pertains to
the ability to handle the
truth.
That will be tested, it
would be the guess here,
Sin the coming days as
TRIM (Truth in
Millage) notices
go out in the mail. (
We requested '
a sampling ,
of notices for
property around
the county and
the most common TIM i
denominator is Star ne
that not many
folks are likely
to catch anything
resembling a break in
property taxes this year.
In fact, while the value
of their property was
dropping - a phenomenon
against which a
homestead exemption
is even of no use - taxes
are heading up for the
majority of people in
the county, be it those
collected by the cities or
the county.
The school board is
effectively a separate
entity, any increase
in taxes - and most
all will feel a pinch on
those lines - are almost
entirely connected to
the one mill referendum
that voters approved in
March and the mandates
of lawmakers in
Tallahassee.
We also leave aside
the additional property
taxes certain property
owners voted onto their
shoulders to fund the
county's match of the
beach restoration project
on St. Joseph Peninsula.
The Catch-22 exists as
it does around the county,
while property values
slide, taxing authorities
increase the burden, but
the Municipal Services
Taxing Units are a
different animal than five
men determining tax and
spend parameters for the
coming year.
The county and the
cities have their state
mandates and baseline
requirements, yes, and
this is not about assigning
blame or for providing
or dismissing spending
rationale.
This is a simple
exercise in the arithmetic
property owners will
face this year, given the
tentative millage rates
submitted by the taxing,
authorities.
Note the word
tentative - we'll be back
to that later.


(


THE STAR

USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Star
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone 850-227-1278


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year - $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year - $21 six months

TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Our VIEW





Policy or tyranny


First, a look at some
examples at the impact of
property taxes this year,
and at properties within
municipal limits.
Property in Port St..
Joe valued last year at
$128,695, was assessed
this year at $116,787, a
drop of nearly $12,000, or
9 percent.
That property
owner, however,
4i will see his
property taxes
increase by more
than $270, from
$1,725 to $1,992, or
CROFT 15 percent.
ws editor The increase
from the county
will be $45 while
the increase from the
city will be greater, $74.
Again the largest gainer
will be the school board,
but for reasons far
different than a simple
majority vote among five
commissioners.
Another property in
Port St. Joe lost about
$12,000 in value, or
roughly 11 percent, but
the taxes owed on that
property will rise by
almost 28 percent, the bill
that was $254 and change
last year rising to just
over $324 this year.
The county tax
increase will be 20
percent and the city's 28
percent, or precisely the
drop in the property's
value.
The trend is similar in
Wewahitchka.
A property assessed
at $35,663, a drop of 9
percent from last year,
will pay 9 percent more
in property taxes this
year, and more to the city
of Wewahitchka, $226.66,
than to the county, $206,
though the city is paring
less than half a tenth of
a percentage point while
the county's bill is going
up by 8 percent.
For another property
in the city, however, the
property owner will again
pay the city more than
the county, but while the
taxpayer lost 5 percent
in value to their property,
the city will take in 6
percent more in property
taxes and the county 2
percent.
An examination
of property in
unincorporated areas is a
mixed bag, though a rule
more than an exception
is a taxpayer who will
see taxes increase in a
year that property values
crater.
Two stick out as
excellent exhibits.

See CROFT A5


The illness plaguing county
government has been long diagnosed
by voters but remains elusive to
commissioners who have yet to grasp
the nuances of their roles.
. All the words expended, the votes
cast, regarding what ails the county
- and commissioners are delusional if
they believe those words only appear
on printed pages - have a central
thread in the role of government.
That role, at the commission level,
is one of policy, to provide the guiding
principles and mission of governing
and serve citizens, the taxpayers who
provide that slop for the public trough,
and to nourish public discourse on the
state of the county.
County commissioners have
demonstrated over the years that
policy is not a strong suit.
Broad visions, long-term problem
solving and governing beyond the
snapshot of the day is lost because
commissioners, or at least a majority,
believe governing is about lording over
day-to-day operations.
Where commissioners should be
directors, they are despots.
Consolidation is a fine example.
There is no real price tag on the
effort and as yet no explanation from
commissioners about the benefits of
their particular plan, just an assertion
from a budget committee that it will
be a money-saver at some point in the
future.
Therefore, consolidation is not
about the long-term or short-term
fiscal or operational health of the
county as much as it a reach by certain
commissioners for more control over
day-to-day operations.
Fbrget about the costs or the
wetlands-permeated acreage in
Howard Creek on which consolidation
is taking route. Forget about the time
lost in transport to and from Howard
Creek and where actual work will be
done.
Those would be factors that feed
into policy. This is about lording over
county operations.
If consolidation is such a fine idea,
so good for the county and operational
efficiency, why has it taken this long?
Remember, Commissioner Billy


Traylor said consolidation was 10 years
too late, though, as he again proved
recently, Mr. Traylor's words and
actions often lose track of each other.
And why consolidation in Howard
Creek, as opposed to, say, the land
behind the county courthouse in Port
St. Joe, a far more sensible, not to
mention dry, spot of acreage from
which to launch the county's business
each day?
From a policy viewpoint,
consolidation as currently offered.
makes zero sense. Only when
considering it as a dictatorial move to
control county operations does it find
any rationale.
Spending is another excellent
example of where sensible policy and
dictatorship go their separate ways.
There was scant debate on the
commission's spending decisions
in the go-go years of the real estate
market to pull in double-digit increases
- two years of 25 percent or more - in
property tax dollars.
Instead, those dollars were wielded
like a baseball bat to feather nests of
power, bloat a workforce into branches
of a family tree with commissioners at
the root and avoid accountability for
how public money was spent because
the commission was flush with green.
Too often spending proposals came
in multiples of five just to ensure that
each commissioner received his taste,
regardless of need. Want, not need,
dominated any budget debate.
That is not a policy but an exercise
in tyranny over the public's money
How commissioners deal with the
public, or more pointedly those who
are not directly their constituents,
offers another glimpse at this
phenomenon.
This commission has long
suppressed public comment,
particularly dissenting comment;
putting people on the clock,
unprofessionally and disagreeably
arguing with and even threatening
those who disagree, taking a position
that the biggest brains in the room
belonged to commissioners.
A dissenting voice? Certain
commissioners seem more willing to
silence those out back than during a


We never did ride trigger


It was late August when
me and Ricky and Hollis
Mayo decided to quit school.
We figured we had gone
about as far as we could go.
"We can read and cipher.
How much more do you
need?" is the way Rick put
it We made a pact not to
show up for the
new school year.
We decided to go to
California and make
movies with Roy and
Gene. It looked like a
lot of fun and Hollis
maintained "The
way the teachers
dote on Pam, Susie,
Ruth Ann and the KE
rest of the girls, they COl
won't nobody miss Hunk
us till Christmas!"
We had graduated from
the third grade just two
months before. We spent
the summer berating Mr.
Mclver, Miss Belle, the
excruciating confinement,
the insufferable heat and
the constant (and almost
overwhelming) knowledge
being crammed into our
noggins whether we wanted
it or not! We would have
complained about the food
in the lunchroom but we
were several years away
from adding a cafeteria to
our school facilities.
"Mr. Mclver ran a chain
gang in Louisiana before he
became principal." Ricky
said it so matter of fact-like
that you couldn't doubt it.
It was just one day of
"study this, cut out that,
memorize the whole thing,
which is the numerator,
sound out the word" after
another! I realized early in
life that I was not destined
for the Blue Bird reading
class. If it hadn't a'been for
recess and clay modeling I'd
a'dropped out before now.


S

er


Reggie Lawrence's end
of school proclamation,
"They say it is even hotter
up stairs" rang in our ears
all summer. The elementary
school had two floors. The
first three grades were on
ground level. Grades four,
five and six were upstairs.
And we
remembered
Terry Kennon's
voice raising an
octave in honest
disbelief at Reggie's
statement, "That
can't be possible!"
My sentiments
exactly! I had done
LEY arithmetic with
BERT sweat running
r down down my back. I
stood in the spelling
bee line across the room
from the girls and mopped
my brow with my shirttail
before spelling "arbor."
I've "rested my head" after
lunch and passed the time
silently blowing sweat
beads across the back of my
hand. Terry paused briefly,
before adding, "They'd
be bringin'em down on
stretchers if that was the
truth."
The confinement might
have been the worst part.
I loved the summers. We
played baseball in every
lot, side yard and field we
could gather up a crowd
in. We walked to town. We
spit on ant hills and made
swords out of cane poles.
We laid on our backs and
spotted racing buffalos,
grand touring cars, dog
faces and upside down
hornet nests in the passing
clouds. We chased lightning
bugs and played kick-the-
can in the evenings. The
sweat didn't bother you if
you were outside actually
accomplishing something! I


was wondering if Roy would
let me ride Trigger when
Daddy interrupted to tell me
to get dressed for school.
"Dad, it's like this. Me
and Ricky and Hollis have
decided..."
"Class," Miss Dinwiddie
looked us over slowly, "The
first thing we want to do is
write a paper on what you
did over the summer, the
new friends you met, maybe
an exciting trip you took
with your family It only has
to be two pages long."
Ye, gads! If Daddy wasn't
so much bigger and so
stubborn I could have been
to the Arkansas line by now!
I was sweating like a stuck
hog strung up for rendering
and this was only our first
day on the second floor!
Miss Dinwiddie was just
like Miss Belle, she didn't
take a day off. She didn't
stop teaching. She didn't put
up with no foolishness. She
acted like you'd insulted her
personally if you didn't cross
every t and dot every i.
In the sixth grade
Miss Mary Ann made us
memorize "Little Boy Blue."
It was enough to make you
want to puke. And when I
had to stand up in front of
the whole class and recite
it, I did!
Letting us play basketball
in junior high helped. Finally,
some organized mayhem!
We got to compete against
other towns. I was tired of
getting run over by Wesley
Beal and Scotty McCullar.
We finally got to play on the
same team. Of course, those
big ole boys from Paris,
Gleason and Huntingdon
ran over us for the next six
years! But shucks, it was
a heap better than getting
out-spelled by Vicki Fields
and Diana Morris back in


the third grade!
It was almost "cool"
to make it to high school
(although Ricky, Hollis and
me would never say it out
loud). Those August days
were filled with anticipation.
We were not, mind you,
interested in Shakespeare,
Lucky Lindy, x and y graphs
or the smoke rising out of a
Bunsen burner. We huddled
in groups around the water
fountain for the background
check regarding the
new math teacher. We
synchronized schedules
so we'd all have American
history right after lunch. We
got the inside scoop on why
Bobby and Nola broke up.
We read "It was the best
of times; it was the worst of
times" and scratched our
heads. Surely Dickens was
trying to tell us something
but we couldn't figure it out.
"Maybe school is bad for us
and good for us at the same
time." Mary E. never made
the Blue Bird reading class
either. "It could be Dickens
had Miss Mary Ann in the
sixth grade and he didn't
like poetry any better than
us." I tended to agree with
Buddy.
"Perhaps school is bad
now but it might be good for
us later."
"Give it a rest Mary E.!"
Hollis looked off toward
the west, scrunched up his
face a mite and declared,
"Charles Dickens obviously
wanted to be a cowboy and
Kesley's Daddy wouldn't let
him go to California either!"
We spent those years
trying to figure out life...and
we've spent the rest of life
trying to get back to those
years. Could be Dickens was
right after all.
Respectfully,
kes


m


civil and courteous debate.
That is not policy, but tyranny.
That tyranny has grown from a
sense of entitlement to office, a sense
that being county commissioner is a
right, one fed by a governing system
in which commissioners face just
20 percent of registered voters and
must "serve" only a fraction of that 20
percent to maintain public office.
So you can hear Commissioner
Carmen McLemore in one moment
chiding his fellow commissioners
about the work that goes into serving a
district and in another his feeling that,
hey, if they wanted to erect a wall at
White City to segregate the county that
would be fine by him.
That is not policy but tyranny
courtesy of the World Wrestling
Federation rule book.
No wonder certain commissioners
are so openly hostile to constitutional
officers. Those officers, the sheriff,
tax collector, property appraiser,
supervisor of elections, represent
everything commissioners are not.
Officers face all voters at election
time. They operate with bare-bones
staffs, maintaining financial efficiency
and through that public accountability.
They serve the public with respect
and courtesy, even those who might
disagree with a tax bill, a property
assessment, an arrest or a change in
voting procedures.
And they establish policy and
procedures for their offices, instead
of relying on dictatorial fiat or force
of personality, choosing service over
tyranny
The county, in contrast, is a cartel,
lorded over by three men who hold
the power to ensure they do not have
to face voters, who use threat and
intimidation as policy to keep in line
fellow commissioners and silence
critics.
And they have no use for the input
from the public, no use for any other
opinion but their own and skins so thin
they have become transparent for who
they are - bullies in some cases, non-
factors in others.
That, unfortunately, is both
the policy and tyranny of county
government.










A5 I The Star Letters


Thursday, August 27,2009


Countywide
promises broken
Dear Editor:
County-wide voting is an
issue of importance to most
Gulf Countians; important to the
majority of voters who endorse
it and to our commissioners who
do not.
Mr. Peters feels it is irrelevant
due to a judicial ruling. Mr.
Yeager made the pursuit of
it a campaign promise, but
after a little lip service has
not mentioned it. A few years
back Mr. Williams and then-
Commissioner Gerald Barnes
made a motion regarding
endorsing county-wide that went
down to defeat in the usual 2-3
fashion. Mr. Williams claims that
according to Robert's Rules of
Order he cannot bring the issue
up again, however at the same
meeting a motion was made and
passed that Robert's Rules be
suspended in regard to reopening
the discussion on county-wide.
Mr. Traylor and Mr.
McLemore vowed to honor the
wishes of the voters for county-
wide by taking the issue all the
way to the Supreme Court if
necessary. These two gentlemen
also promised the people of Gulf
County that they would resign
their seats if they did not fulfill
that vow. Breaking one's promise
is not an admirable trait. Do the
right thing gentlemen and step
down.
Lastly, this commission would
be well advised to spend funds
that would achieve county-wide
voting rather than spending two
million dollars on an unnecessary
consolidation of the Public Works
and Road Departments.
Oh, and Mr. McLemore, I don't
need lots of ink and paper; e-mail
works just fine, thank you.
Respectfully,
Tom Knoche
Port St. Joe


Creative teamwork key to conservation


By FWC Chairman Rodney Barreto
How do you gather the information
necessary to make informed
management decisions when your area
of responsibility covers approximately
5.8 million acres of land and almost
6,000 square miles of water? Well, if you
are the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC),
not only do you depend on a well-
trained and dedicated staff, you
also form a variety of partnerships,
coordinate with a network of
volunteers and depend on the
voluntary efforts of Florida's
residents and visitors. Conserving
and protecting Florida's fish and BAR
wildlife can be a daunting task
- one that is bigger than just one
agency.
Collaboration is a concept that extends
throughout the FWC. Agency staff
members regularly cross internal lines to
form teams. Bringing the agency's best
expertise together helps the FWC more
effectively address the conservation
challenges that face our state.
This collaborative approach goes
beyond the internal procedures of the
FWC. To help accomplish common
goals, the FWC forms and sustains
relationships with outside entities
and individuals. While the reason for
collaborating may often be quite clear,
sometimes creativity plays a role in
aligning the FWC with another group
or individual to focus on a conservation
issue.
At the FWC's Fish and Wildlife
Research Institute (FWRI), the research
arm of the agency, scientists understand
the importance of developing creative
partnerships and working with the
public to leverage their reach. Whether
for land, marine or freshwater -based
research, scientists pursue a variety
of opportunities to for-m collaborative


relationships. Linking FWRI's research
expertise with private sector businesses,
non-governmental organizations and
public entities help accomplish goals that
benefit all those involved.
With a study area the size of Florida,
it isn't too surprising that FWRI
researchers conducting surveillance
for avian influenza in wild bird
populations have incorporated
public participation into their
work. As it is in everyone's best
interest to collect the information
necessary to monitor for the
disease effectively, citizens readily
report their observations of dead
birds through the agency's online
RETO reporting system at MyFWC.com/
bird. In addition, many of Florida's'
hunters voluntarily participate
by allowing scientists to collect samples
from the ducks they harvest.
The size of the study area is also
a challenge when you consider the
vastness of Florida's marine and
coastal waters. Given this challenge
and the need to enhance their sampling
coverage, FWRI scientists established
the volunteer-based Red Tide Offshore
Monitoring Program. The program's
purpose is to help monitor and detect
red tide and other harmful algal blooms
in Florida's waters. Scientists rely on
volunteers of all kinds - charter boat
captains, commercial fishermen, private
citizens, divers and more - to collect
water samples from offshore areas by
boat. This program provides increased
coverage of the Gulf of Mexico and
enables the potential for early warning of
offshore algal blooms.
As citizen scientists, FWC's volunteers
and partners not only contribute to
science, but also learn from their
experiences. This is especially true in the
FWC's collaboration with SCUBAnauts
International, a youth education
organization. This summer, Dr. David


Palandro, an FWRI research scientist
who volunteers as Chief Scientist for
SCUBAnauts International, accompanied
some of the group's students to Key
Largo to participate in a coral reef
research project. Working hand in hand
with scientists from the FWC and the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, the students made a
discovery that was the first of its kind.
The students documented the spawning
of farm-raised staghorn coral that had
been transplanted in the Florida Keys
National Marine Sanctuary, proving that
the transplanted coral is doing well.
The students described the experience
as "a great honor" and "awesome" and
discussed how they would share what
they had learned when they returned to
school.
Sometimes volunteers walk away from
assisting a research project with more
than just the satisfaction of helping out
and gaining a better understanding of
the science. Sometimes volunteers can
benefit from an additional incentive. This
was the case this past year for anglers
fishing in Lake Griffin. Anglers fishing
this lake had the opportunity to assist
biologists with the research necessary
to manage the black crappie fishery. In
doing so, anglers also had the chance to
receive a monetary reward. As part of
the study, FWRI scientists placed tags on
hundreds of fish in the lake. Each tag was
marked with a monetary value. Anglers
who caught the tagged fish provided
details about their catch and in return
received the assigned reward.
Creative collaboration enhances the
FWC's ability to gather the information
needed to form sound management
decisions for the conservation of
Florida's fish and wildlife. We hope
you will consider how you can become
involved. To learn more about these
and other FWRI research projects, visit
http://research.MyFWC.com.


CROFT from page A4

One is a property that realized a drop in value of
23 percent, but will pay 27 percent more in property
taxes this year, an 18 percent increase from the
county. A home valued at $58,413 will carry a tax bill
of $255.64.
The owner of a second property in an
unincorporated area will see much the same thing
in their tax bill. The value of the property fell 23
percent, taxes went up 26 percent, with the county
bill 18 percent higher. A property valued at $42,018
will carry a property tax bill of $191.40.
What is it about taxing levels and economic
development, about how the level of the former
helps feed the level of the latter? A thought for all,
most especially the Economic Development Council,
to chew on.
These are just examples. There are several
examples in which taxes are going down, though
from highs in the stratosphere, but for a vast
majority of owners, the value of their property is
retreating but their taxes continue to charge ahead.
This brings us back to the "tentative" aspect
of this. These taxing levels are based on tentative
millage rates, which had to be turned into the state
by the first week of August.
There are still public budget hearings. No
property owner can complain about what they are
seeing in the TRIM notices being sent out this week
if they choose to sit out and not be heard at final
budget hearings.
The beauty of this land is that we all have a say,
use it.
Be it 5:30 p.m. ET on Sept. 3 in the county
meeting room, 6 p.m. ET on Sept. 15 in the city of
Port St. Joe commission meeting room or 6:30 p.m.
CT on Sept 10 in the Wewahitchka commission
chambers, those are the final scheduled budget
hearings.
Those are the final opportunities to make the
truth clear to those administering it; from those who
are being flogged by it - in the wallet.



SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: 850-227-7212
Email: tcroft@'starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form
of letters to the editor or a guest column are
solicited and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial
page should be a forum where differing ideas
and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.


Protect your health during tough times


In this challenging economy, many
people have curbed discretionary
expenses, such as vacations,
entertainment and shopping
excursions. Unfortunately, many folks
- even those with medical insurance
- are also cutting back on
health care services they can
no longer afford, including
preventive care, check-ups
and medications for chronic
conditions.
This short-term budgetary
fix. could have disastrous long-
term effects, as easily treated
or preventable conditions JA
morph into much more serious ALDE
- and expensive - illnesses.
While our government
wrestles with solving the national
healthcare crisis, here are a few
suggestions for stretching your health
care dollars and ensuring your family
receives proper care:
Use your plan wisely.
Most health insurers supply
educational materials on preventive
care, such as quitting smoking, weight
loss and chronic disease management
(such as diabetes and high cholesterol).
Many even provide financial incentives
for completing treatment programs,
getting immunizations and using
generic drugs, since these practices
save money in the long run.
Check your carrier's Web site
for details, or visit the HHS's
"Prevention" site (www.hhs.gov/
safety) for information and web links
on such topics as fitness, nutrition,
risky behavior modification and much


more.
Free screenings.
Many pharmacies, clinics and
health organizations, such the
National Kidney Foundation (www.
kidney.org) and the American
Academy of Dermatology
(www.add.org) provide free
screenings for illnesses, such
as kidney disease, skin cancer,
diabetes and heart disease.
Search "free screenings"
at www.hhs.gov for nearby
screenings.
Bargain with providers.
SON Before going without needed
:RMAN care, speak to your doctor,
dentist or hospital about your
financial difficulties and see
if they'll work with you to reduce
fees or allow installment payments.
They might also be able to suggest
alternate treatments or connect you
with programs that will help pay for
your care.
For example, most pharmaceutical
companies offer patient assistance
programs (PAPs) that provide
uninsured and low-income people
access to drugs they couldn't
otherwise afford. Ask your doctor,
pharmacist or clinic how to proceed,
or visit Partnership for Prescription
Assistance (www.pparx.org), which
has enrollment information on more
than 475 public and private PAPs,
including links to Medicaid programs.
Laid off?
File for COBRA. Under the
2009 economic stimulus plan, the
government will pay 65 percent of


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the cost of COBRA coverage for up
to nine months for employees laid
off between Sept. 1, 2008, and Dec.
31,2009. Granted, coverage is still
expensive, but far less so than if
you were uninsured and incurred a
serious accident or illness.
Use public resources.
The U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services (HHS) helps fund
more than 7,000 community health
centers serving millions of uninsured
and underinsured Americans.
Patients pay based on what they
can afford for services, such as
routine checkups; maternity care;
immunizations; prescription drugs;
and dental, mental health and
substance abuse care.
To learn more about this program
and find the closest HHS-supported
center, visit http://bphc.hrsa.gov. In
addition, many university teaching
hospitals and dental schools operate
clinics on a sliding payment scale.
Medicaid.
Many uninsured people not yet
eligible for Medicare can obtain
medical coverage through state-
administered Medicaid programs. To
learn more, visit www.cms.hhs.gov/
MedicaidGenInfo.
Don't let financial worries cause
you to ignore your family's health
needs. Resources are available; you
just need to seek them out.
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financial education programs. Sign
up for his free monthly e-Newsletter
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A6 I The Star


Thursday, August 27, 2009


I ,Lnpa


Ready,


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer


We've all heard the news:
The U.S. is about to be hit
again with the "swine" flu,
and it's probably going to
"e bad.
That might be, but
fhed with background


information and ways to
protect yourself and your
family, it's a situation that
can be weathered.
Here's what you need to
know.

2009 Swine Flu
The H1N1 influenza vi-
rus that appeared this year,
commonly called "swine"
flu, is a new strain of influ-
enza virus that emerged in
early 2009 in Mexico.
According to the Cen-
ters for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC) and
the U.S. Department of
Health (DOH), it is a vari-
ant of H1N1, but it is not
like other recent human
H1N1 viruses.
Medical researchers
say that this new virus
has pieces that came from
birds, pigs and people, and
several pieces have been
identified as descendants
of the 1918 virus.
This year's strain of in-
fluenza has the highest at-
tack rate in children (ages
5-14) and young adults
(ages 15-34); indeed, adults
born before 1957 seem to
be mostly spared, accord-
ing to the CDC.


set,


Ironically, older people
are more likely to have an-
tibodies against the H1N1
strain that circulated be-
fore 1957. This might help
explain the age distribution
of the current pandemic
and why young people seem
to be more at risk with the
novel H1N1.
A fairly mild case of this
novel H1N1 influenza swept
across the United States
during our spring months.
While the virus is still very
much present in the U.S.,
having never left, the brunt
of the epidemic has trav-
eled very quickly around
the globe since March,
causing a pandemic.
Gulf County has had
four confirmed cases as of
this writing. Walton County
has had one death so far
from the H1N1 virus.
The virus never left af-
ter its initial pass across
the U.S. in the spring. Out-
breaks have occurred all
summer in places such as
summer camps, day care
centers, nursing homes
and prisons, even though
influenza usually dies off in
the hot summer months
But with schools open-
ing for the fall semester, the


flu


virus is already sweeping
back into the northern hemi-
sphere even before our tra-
ditional winter flu season.
As schools do re-open,
government and health offi-
cials are bracing for a diffi-
cult flu season, in which the
novel H1N1 influenza is ex-
pected to create problems.
That is why health officials
are working so diligently to
prepare communities for
probable, not possible, out-
breaks of novel H1N1.
They warn people to ex-
pect one to three months of
community H1N1 influenza
activity before the H1N1
vaccine becomes available,
and they caution people
that the vaccine will not be
100 percent effective.
According to the CDC
and DOH, infection with
seasonal flu provides no
protection against this
year's novel H1N1. Vaccina-
tions using recent seasonal
vaccines also do not pro-
vide any protection against
this novel H1N1.
But it is encouraging to
note that, according to the
CDC and DOH, this year's
novel H1N1 is consistently
See FLU A7


COMMUNITY CAN HELP


Here in Gulf County, the
community can help itself by
doing several simple, but highly
effective things.
First, WASH YOUR HANDS,
WASH YOUR HANDS, WASH
YOUR HANDS!
This cannot be emphasized
enough because washing your
hands is the No. 1 way of
stopping the spread of the virus
and keeping yourself healthy.
If you cannot wash your
hands, then use an alcohol-
based (at least 60 percent) hand
sanitizer. Carry it with you in
your purse, car and truck, and
make sure you and every family
member, especially children, use
it religiously.
Remember to wipe down and
disinfect all communal surfaces,
such as door knobs, refrigerator
handles, sink faucets, car doors,
car seat belts, milk cartons
inside the fridge, computers
and keyboards, TV remotes,
toothbrushes, hairbrushes,
eyeglasses, light switches, all
telephones (both cell phones and


land lines), grocery carts, gas
pumps, anything that is touched
by multiple people.
Take voluntary measures to
reduce person-to-person spread
of the virus.
That means self-isolation of
sick people.
Use surgical masks on sick
people, at home and in public.
Think of sensible, practical
ways to reduce face-to-face-
contact with anyone in public
and private settings.
Most importantly, if you are
sick, STAY HOME.
This virus is both air-borne
(through respiratory droplets
from coughing or sneezing) and
transmitted by touch (if someone
touches a contaminated surface
then touches his/her mouth,
nose or eyes). It can also be
transmitted by sharing food and
eating utensils.
People can have the flu for
three days before any symptoms
appear.
During those three days, they
are contagious.


JLJ"%-Ctx


Shaun S. Dona hoe
Licensed Florida Real Estate Broker
850-653-8330
shaundonahoe.com





Thursday, August 27, 2009


Local


The Star I A7


FLU from page A6


sensitive to Tamiflu, with only a few cases
showing resistance to antiviral drugs.
However, the government announced
just last week that the H1N1 vaccine will
probably be ready for distribution about a
month later than originally planned (now
mid to late November); even then, the
initial numbers of available doses are ex-
pected to run about half of what was first
announced.
The H1N1 vaccine must be given in
two separate shots, three to four weeks
apart, in order to be effective.
The Gulf County Health Department
already has plans in place to establish a
series of continuous, county-wide points
of distribution, or PODS, in order to in-
oculate all county residents as soon as
the H1N1 vaccine is delivered to the
county.

Pardon Me...But You're Shedding
In a vaguely disreputable sounding
announcement released Aug. 5, the CDC
dispensed recommendations for the
amount of time people with influenza-like
illness should stay away from other folks.
It has to do with something called "shed-
ding."
From data collected during the spring.
2009 H1N1 wave, the CDC discovered that
most people with the H1N1 virus who


were not hospitalized had a fever lasting
two to four days. This would then, accord-
ing to the CDC, require an isolation period
of three to five days in most cases.
Even though most people had fever,
the data also showed that a minority of
infected people did not, so it is impossible
to keep all sick people out of general cir-
culation, especially if they do not know
they are sick.
But staying home if you have a fever
is vital in reducing the spread of the vi-
rus because, according to the CDC, an
elevated temperature is associated with
increased "shedding" of influenza virus.
That is why people are told if they have
a fever, then they are contagious. Tem-
peratures make viruses "shed" off of sick
people faster. But that's not the end of it.
Many people with flu will .continue
shedding influenza viruses for 24 hours
after their fevers go -away, just not as fast.
Data shows that people can continue to
shed the virus for 10 days or more, in
some cases, according to the CDC an-
nouncement.
The announcement also said that be-
cause some people might shed influenza
virus before they feel ill, and others with
influenza will not have a fever, it is vital
that all people cover their cough and wash
their hands often to lessen the chance of
spreading the virus.


STATE HINI INFORMATION LINE
The Florida Department of Health will be launching a toll-free number to
provide public health information and updates on Hi N1 swine flu. The
information line will be available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET, seven days a
week. Information is available in English, Spanish and Creole.
Details are as follows:
Time: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily, beginning Monday, Aug. 24.
Telephone Number: 877-352-3581.






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LOGO from page Al


Scholz said he was expect-
ing legal research from the
Kissimmee city attorney on
the issue and would share
it with the board when it ar-
rived.
Commissioners voted 3-2
to add the motto to the city's
logo and other things, such
as stationery, over time.
Commissioners Greg.
Johnson and Charles Ste-
phens voted against the
motion.
In other business con-
ducted at the meeting:
* The city voted to al-
low a directional sign along
U.S. 98 at the eastern foot of
the George Tapper Bridge,
guiding people to the com-
merce park off of Industrial
Park Road.
Because the Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion (FDOT) does not allow
signs on FDOT right of way,
the city will ask the St. Joe
Company for permission to
locate the sign on St. Joe
land just off FDOT prop-
erty.
* The city voted unani-
mously to adopt the county
animal control ordinance
and allow the county's ani-
mal control officer, Roland
Jones, to enter Port St .Joe
city limits to handle animal
control issues.
Under the new interlo-
cal agreement between city
and county, Jones can now
issue citations, and pick up
animals inside the city lim-
its.
* The board voted unan-
imously to approve the boat
ramp parking plan and
parking restrictions along
Fifth Street beside Frank
Pate Park, as proposed at
the Aug. 4 meeting..
The vote included add-
ing additional parking for-
boat trailers and making
the new lot south of the boat
ramp a trailer-only lot.
* After talking with offi-
cials from the state Crimi-
nal Justice Office, Weston
recommended the city not
pay overtime to Port St. Joe
police Chief David Barnes
and his deputy chief.
Citing a recent change
.,Jin criminal .justice grant
.guidelines, Weston recom-
mended the city reverse
an earlier decision allowing
the two police officers to
collect overtime,
* The board voted 3-2
(Reeves and Stephens vot-
ing no) to pay acting City
Clerk Jim Anderson a sal-
ary of $55,000 for the posi-
tion, while he retains his
duties as city utility officer
and some human resourc-
-es duties in addition to the
clerk's job.
7 Reeves said he had a
problem with the amount
of the raise, noting that
former City Clerk Pauline
Pendarvis also handled
budget preparations, hu-
man resources; accounts
payable and received, and


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supervised other city em-
ployees while fulfilling her
duties as city clerk.
Pendarvis had worked
up to the $55,000 sal-
ary throughout 25 years,
Reeves noted; Pendarvis
retired in June.
* The board argued
the merits of conducting a
utility rate study at a cost
of approximately $55,000
sometime in January for
use in. the 2010-11 budget
process, which will begin in
the spring of 2010.
According to Weston,
the upcoming. October util-
ity rate increase is the last
one scheduled, and the city
will have to devise another
method of paying the bonds
associated with the new
water plant, which are be-
ing paid through a series of
utility rate hikes that began
last year.
Magidson pointed out
that the city is now facing
a crisis, in collecting util-
ity revenues for the bond
repayment since the clos-
ing of Arizona Chemical in
July.
"It's called Arizona
Chemical has left the build-
ing," he said.
* Work began . last
Wednesday 6n the. Sand


-~ O~


Hills project, part of the
waterfront park project
between Maddox Park and
the marina.
A number of trees have
been taken out already in
order to dig a large storm
water retention pond on
the property.
* The city voted 5-0 to
pass the first reading of
Ordinance 426, amending
the city's comprehensive
plan and transmitting it to
the Florida Department of
Community Affairs for ap-
proval, after argument by
Johnson.
He was concerned that
the wording of the ordi-
nance locked the city into
projects for which it could
not pay.
City Attorney Russell
Scholz explained that all
projects listed in the comp
plan had already been ap-
proved and adopted by the
city.
"The city doesn't have to
do them, but if we decide to,
it must be in the [compre-
hensive] plan," Scholz told
the board.
He also reminded com-
'missioners that none of the
projects could be started
without proof of the city's
ability to pay for them.


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SPORTS


Thursday. August 27, 2009


www.starf l.com


Artificial Reef Association tournament Saturday
The Mexico Beach Artifi-
cial Reef Association will hold
its'13th annual Kingfish Tour-
nament on Saturday, Aug. 29,
2009. The tournament will
begin fishing at 5 a.m. CT and
stop at 5 p.m. CT on Saturday.
The weigh-in for the tourna-
ment will be at Marquardt's
Marina in Mexico Beach from
1-5 p.m. CT on Saturday and
is open to the public. Miss
Kingfish will be there for pic-
ture taking with the anglers.
The payout will be $3,000
for the first place kingfish,
$2,000 for the second place
fish, and $1,000 for the third
place. The largest Wahoo will
pay $1,000, and the largest
Spanish will get $500.
People can pre-register
right now at Blue Water Out- "
rigger in Port St. Joe, Half
Hitch Tackle, and at Mar-
quardt's Marina in Mexico : - -
Beach. The .cost is $150 dol- -' -4. ..
lars per boat. You eqn fish as
many people on the boat as O t
you choose.
The Captain's Party and RON CHILDS I Subniithtl phI, ..'I
registration is on Friday Mia Northington and Angus
night at the El Governor Mo- Nicholson, both from Atlanta '
tel. Registration begins at 5 and frequent participants in the
p.m. On Saturday night there MBARA Kingfish Tournament,
will be a dance at Toucans for
all the participants. ". show off kingfish weighing
.MFll details and rules can:� between 26-28 pounds that
be found at the MBARA Web- .they caught this summer off
site at www.mbara.org. Mexico Beach.


PARKER, MINGER, BELIN STATE AWARD WINNERS

SThe plaques finally
arrived so the formal
S duties were carried out
this week as Port St. Joe
athletes and coaches
were recognized for
, ' outstanding achievement
during the spring sports
season.
Coach Jim Belin was
named thelstate Class
2A softball Coach of
the Year and Minger the
state softball Class 2A
SPlayer of the Year by the
SFlorida Dairy Farmers
Association.
Belin and Minger,
who won more than
25 games each of the
past two years, Were
recognized for leading
theLady Sharks to district
and regional titles as Port
St. Joe finished as state
Class 2A runner-up.
S Kayla Parker, returning
for her senior year, was
awarded the state Class
2A girls' track and field
athlete of the year by the
j Florida Dairy Farmers
Association. Parker won
three events and finished
second in another to lead
the Lady Tiger Sharks to
second place in the state
Class 2A track and field
meet.


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Football league registration


The Gene Raffield Football
League will hold registration
for the upcoming season each
of the next two Saturdays.
Registration will be 9 a.m.
until 1 p.m. ET on Aug. 22 and
Aug. 29 atthe Port St. Joe Fire
Station on Williams Avenue.
Athletes should bring their
$50 registration fee, evidence
of health insurance, a copy of
their birth certificate and a
doctor's release to play, foot-
ball.


There will be three teams:
the Dolphins (7-8 years old),
the Jaguars (9-10 years old)
and the Buccaneers (11-12
years old). The Buccaneers
will register with Coach Tra-
cy Browning at Port St. Joe
Middle School.
Equipment distribution
will be done immediately fol-
lowing registration. Call Mil
Parrish at 227-9540 or Dona
Sander at 229-8985 for more
information.


Lady Lightning registration

The Panama City Lady Lightning 10-U girls' fastpitch soft-
ball organization is seeking players tor the fall season. Prac-
tice/evaluations will be held Saturday, Aug. 29, at 8 a.m. CT
at H.G. Harders Sports Complex in Panama City. For more
information, please call Michael Bailey at 850-596-9658.


Gator booster club

membership drive ongoing

The Wewahitchka Gator Booster Club wishes
to extend to everyone a special invitation to join
the Wewahitchka High School Gator Booster
Club. The Gator Booster Club is actively solic-
iting new and renewing members who are in-
terested in being a part of our local High School
Athletic Booster Club. Any business or individual
who is interested in being a part of this club is
urged to join.
The primary purpose of the Gator Booster
Club is to serve as a means of additional finan-
cial support for all of the WHS athletic teams and
athletes, while also establishing a formal schol-
arship program for our athletes. We hope that all
WHS Gator fans, including the family members
and friends of WHS athletes and our local busi-
nesses will consider joining the Gator Booster
club. Your contribution is Tax Deductable. WE
NEED YOUR SUPPORT!!
Anyone needing more information may call
Dennis Peak at 227-6999 or Carolyn Husband at
Vision Bank at 639-2222.


A
Section


-n___ 0i


COUNTY

OPEN


Championship


golf coming to


Forgotten Coast

On the second weekend in
September, avid professional and -
amateur golfers will gather at St.
Joseph Bay Country Club in Port
St. Joe to vie for the title of Gulf
County Open Champion. Tourna-
ment play is scheduled to begin
at 8 a.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 12,
and conclude at 6:30 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 13. Competitors will compete
for fantastic prizes, including a
professional purse up to $4,500, an
amateur purse up to $7,500, skins
games worth up to $2,250, hole-in-
one prizes worth up to $80,000 and
more.
Tournament Coordinator Carol
Anderson is looking forward to an
exciting event. "Generous sponsor-
ship by the local business commu-
nity has made this event possible,"
she stated. "Must See Magazine,
the Gulf County Tourist Develop-
ment Council, FairPoint Communi-
cations, and many others have been
enthusiastic and supportive. This
tournament will be something spe-
cial."
The Gulf County Open, a 36-hole
individual stroke play event, was
conceived and organized by Daniel
Anderson, publisher and editor of
Must See Magazine.
"Just a month or two ago, the
tournament was only an idea," An-
derson said. "Now, the Gulf County
Open has become an exciting addi-
tion to the regional event calendar.
Promotional efforts have created
quite a buzz in the golf community,
and players are signing up."
Entry fees are $225 for profession-
als and $185 for amateurs. Entries in-
clude greens and cart fees for three
rounds of golf (practice Friday and
tournament Saturday and Sunday),
range balls, skins games, on-course
contests, and the "Big Money Aces"
hole-in-one contest (for amateurs
only). Interested golfers are advised
to register early. The competitive
field is limited to 140 players. Specta-
tors attend for free.
Event organizers expect local im-
pact to be very positive.
"Everybody wins at the Gulf
County Open," Carol Anderson stat-
ed. 'The players enjoy a great event
with incredible prizes, businesses
see increased traffic from golfers
and their families, SJBCC has a busy
weekend and local charities benefit
from event proceeds."
In addition, Port St. Joe hosts the
Yellow Fever Music Festival that
weekend. It's a great time to visit
Gulf County.
The Gulf County Open offers
residents and visitors to Florida's
Forgotten Coast the opportunity to
experience the excitement of cham-
pionship golf and compete for fan-
tastic prizes. For more information
or entry forms, call Carol Anderson
at 850-227-4252 or visit www.must-
seemagazine.com/gco.


rage 8


I







PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, August 27, 2009 w w w. s t a r f 1. c o m Page 9




Gators hope: growth into contenders


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

Fourth-year Wewahi-
tchka High School football
Coach Todd Lanter believes
he and his team have grown
and learned during the past
three years while encounter-
ing more than a few bumps
along the way.
Coming off a 3-7 season,
all evidence indicates the
Gators have been sold on
the coach's conditioning
and weight room programs,
clearly more chiseled and
faster during a recent prac-
tice than a Wewahitchka
team has looked in several
years.
Coach and players are
also consistently on the same
page in the playbook, the
players better grasping the
system and reacting more
instinctively. For his part,
Lanter better understands
the limits of demands he can
place on a team fielded from
one of the smallest, if not the
smallest, student popula-
tions in state Class 1A.
"I have learned you have
to practice differently when
you have 30 kids instead of 70
like we had at (Tallahassee)
Godby," Lanter said.
That has meant, he said,
shorter and more structured
practices and less hitting.
Lanter believes that will
pay off during the season,
particularly late in games.
Last season Wewahitchka
had the lead early in several
key district games, particu-
larly against the district's
playoff teams Port St. Joe
and West Gadsden, but faded


The Gators worked through several offensive sets and
plays during a practice last week.


late.
"The kids have been prac-
ticing really hard, very well,"
Lantersaid. "They have been
doing this for three years.
One of the great things about
coaching a smaller school is
you have the opportunity to
watch the kids grow up. A
lot of these kids have really
grown up."
The difference is evident
in the confidence level and
camaraderie that filled a re-
cent practice.
"I have a tremendous
amount of confidence, and
I think we feel much better
about ourselves than we have
the past two years," Lanter
said. "I think we can playwith
everybody on our schedule.
We might not always win, but
we can compete. I haven't al-
ways been able to say that the
past two years.
"I've told the kids that
there is going to be one good
team in our district, one
team that goes 7-3, but will
not make the playoffs. We
have to be able to walk off the


field at the end of the season
and look at each other and
know that we did everything
we could do to make the
playoffs."
The Gators, Lanter em-
phasized, would be doing
"the exact same thing" they
have been doing for three
seasons, but with the add-
ed benefit from additional
weapons on offense.
Senior Cody Wade, on
the field since a freshman,
returns to handle the quar-
terbacking duties with junior
Beau McCorvey providing
backup.
Chance Knowles, a senior,
and Colton Price, a junior,
will handle the bulk of the
workload on the ground, but
this year, Jonathon Nobles,
a junior, and Kenny Fisher,
a senior, will also be in the
backfield rotation.
And while the Gators were
strictly a two-back team - I-
formation or pro set - the
past three years, they figure
to show opponents more
three receivers with one-


back schemes this year.
Chris Peak, a senior, is
a tall, fast target with good
hands and will be comple-
mented at wideout by Theryl
Brown, who reached state
as a region champion in the
high jump last year while a
freshman, and senior Rex
Veasey.
Fisher, Knowles, Price
and Nobles can all line up
outside, in the slot or in the
backfield.
"I feel like I haye more
weapons now than any time
since I've been here," Lanter
said. "I think by going with
one-back sets I can get more
athletes on the field at the
same time. That will help
spread defenses and make
them accountable for more
athletes."
The offense will oper-
ate behind a veteran line of
Ryan Walding and Quenton
Carter at tackle, Marquis
Hurley and Greg Hurley at
the guard and center Cory
Walding. Ryan Walding and
Marquis Hurley are seniors,
Greg Hurley a junior and
Cory Walding and Carter
sophomores.
Dee Hurley, a junior and
brother to Marquis and Greg,
will be at tight end.
Wade will handle the
punting duties and Knowles
the place-kicking.
The Gators will stick to
their 4-4 base scheme on de-
fense.
"It is much easier to ad-
just out of," said Lanter. "It's
the easiest defense to make
adjustments out of and you
have eight people right from
the start who are in the box.


Not a lot of teams at this level
are going to beat you throw-
ing the ball."
Greg Hurley and Ryan
Walding will be at the de-
fensive tackle spots with
Knowles and Marquis Hur-
ley at the ends.
Billy Peak and Nobles will
be inside at linebacker with
Price on the outside strong
side and Veasey the weak
side outside linebacker.
Fisher will be at safety
with Tyler Lanter, the coach's
senior son at one corner and
Baylen Price at the other.
The number of play-
ers going both ways in the
trenches underscores what
Lanter believes is critical to
success this season.
"Staying injury-free is the
main thing," Lanter said.
"We have a very stable offen-
sive line, but injuries could
really change that. Our kids
play hard, they've always
played hard. But when we
can't compete with our best
players because of injuries,
we can't put the people out
there with the best ability, it
makes it tough.
"We have to stay injury-
free."
The Gators open fall
play this Friday when they
travel to South Walton for a
Fall Jamboree. They hit the
road to Tallahassee Maclay
to open the regular season
the following week before re-
turning home to play Chipley
and then travel to Jefferson
County before opening dis-
trict play.
District 2-1A has a dif-
ferent look this year with
Blountstown joining the


district and Jay, Freeport
and Sneads exiting. Lanter
said the changes make the
district a tougher slog, but
believes four years of growth
will pay off this fall.
"Dub Palmer used to say
when he was asked how he
was going to handle this
team's this or that, 'We are
going to tighten our chin
straps tighter and go after
it,'" Lanter said. "We have
to be consistent with what
we do and adjust where we
need to. We need to stay on
the same track we are on
throughout the season.
"It really boils down to
them. There are things I can
do to help them be success-
ful, but it boils down to what
they do on the field. Not so
much for me, but for them I
want them to win. They've
taken their lumps and stuck
together with me during bad
times. They have worked
hard. They deserve it."
WEWAHITCHKA HIGH
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
Sept. 4 - at Tallahassee
Maclay
Sept. 11 - Chipley
Sept. 1 8 - at Jefferson
County (Monticello)
Sept. 25 - at Blountstown
Oct. 2 - Bozeman
(Panama City)
Oct. 9 - Liberty County
Oct. 16 - Franklin
County
Oct. 23 - at West
Gadsden (Greensboro)
Oct. 30 - open
Nov. 6 - Port St. Joe
Nov. 13 -at Jay


KATHY JOHNSON I Submitted photo
League runners-up Gulf County Drive with Western Division Commissioner Don
Stephens.

Gulf County Drive falls to


Liberty County for Big Bend


Baseball League championship


By Hi.W. Bailey
Special to The Star
It took the full three games, in a best
two out of three game championship se-
ries, but the Liberty Diamond Dawgs
emerged as champions of the Big Bend
Baseball League of Florida, defeating
the Gulf County Drive Sunday, in the final
game at the Liberty County High School
baseball field in Bristol. The Gulf County
Drive won the first game Sunday, 6-3, mak-
ing it necessary to play a third game for
the championship of the League.
The first game on Sunday proved to be
an outstanding pitching duel between Jus-
tin McCroan for Gulf Drive and the Parish
brothers, Jamie and Jody, for the Diamond
Dawgs, the win going to McCroan and Ja-
mie Parish suffering the loss in a 6-3 game.
Gulf Drive scored three runs in the top of
the second, when Austin Horton doubled,
driving in Adam Nixon, who had earlier
singled. Eric Ramsey and Stephen Besore
earned walks, and McCroan singled to
drive in Horton for the 3-0 lead. Gulf Drive
added one more run in the fourth with
back-to-back doubles by McCroan and
Justin Rhodes, then two more in the top of
the seventh on hits by Ryan Leaman, Kel-
ley Forehand and Horton.
The Diamond Dawgs scored three in


the seventh when the bases were loaded
by three walks. A hit batter and a single
by Boo Morris scored three runs, but not
enough.
In the final game, it was a different sto-
ry as the bats came alive for the Diamond
Dawgs to win the championship by a score
of 11-1. The Dawgs wasted no time as they
put six runs on the board in the bottom of
the first on a three-run homer by Richie
Smith, followed by a solo homer by Travis
Anderson.
The Dawgs continued to add runs in
the second and third innings and held an
11-0 lead after three innings of play. The
only run by Gulf Drive came in the top of
the fifth. Starting pitcher for the Dawgs,
Tim Young, got the win, but was relieved
by Boo Morris in the third inning to com-
plete the game that ended in the fifth on
the 10-run mercy rule.
The championship series ended the in-
augural season for the Big Bend Baseball
League of Florida. Congratulations to the
Dawgs, and also the runner-up, the Gulf
County Drive, on an outstanding season.
And to the remaining teams - the Cal-
houn Horsemen, the Bay County Brew-
ers, the Chattahoochee Red Birds and the
Jackson County Jays - congratulations
on a great baseball season, and, as they
say, "Just wait 'til next year!" ,,







A 10 I The Star


Local


Thursday, August 27, 2009


INSPIRE from page Al


Dental Group.
Peters III consented,
agreeing to give the kids
a full tour and free clean-
ing, as well.
Peters Jr.'s wife, Mar-
jorie, and Woods chaper-
oned seven kids during
the Aug. 17 trip: Dominik
Boston, 7; Johnny Jones,
11; Demeriyah Alexan-
der, 13; Renz'e Williams,
13; She'Noya Fennell, 14;
Ramello Zaccaro, 14; and
Javarri Beachum, 14.
The kids were selected
based on need and a lack
of dental insurance.
The group arrived at
just past noon on a Mon-
day afternoon and re-
ceived a grand welcome.
Following an office
tour, Peters III lectured
the children on the im-
portance of good oral hy-
giene and related topics,
including anesthesia and
braces.
During a discussion of
future goals, the major-
ity of the children hoped
for professional careers,
pleasing Woods enor-


PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Dr. Nathan Peters III gives Javarri Beachum a free cleaning. All the students received cleaning, fluoride
treatments and basic screenings during their visit.


mously.
"I think our goal was
accomplished because
when Dr. Peters asked
the children what they
wanted to be, they all


wanted to be something
that required academic
excellence, except one
who wanted to be a wres-
tler."
Afterward, the children


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filed one-by-one into the
dentist's chair, where Pe-
ters III gave them a good
cleaning, fluoride treat-
ment and basic screen-
ing.


Each received a chart
to take back to his or her
home dentist, which indi-
cated any cavities or other
dental problems needing
immediate attention.


Students, from left, Ramello Zaccaro, Johnny
Jones, Javarri Beachum, Dominik'Boston and
Renz'e Williams are all smiles after meeting Dr.
Nathan Peters III. Peters III hopes other Port St. Joe
professionals will take the time to mentor area youth.


The kids capped off
their day with dinner at
Gladys Knight's and Ron
Winans' Chicken and Waf-
fles restaurant and a dip
in the hotel pool.
On the way home the
following day, the children
compared notes.
Witnessing a success-
ful African-American man
in his work environment
made a strong impression
on the kids.
"What they talked
about more than anything
was Dr. Peters being over
all his employees," said
Peters Jr. "They were
shocked and surprised
about an African Ameri-
can being in control - the
head man in charge."
Whether the children
would find lasting inspi-
ration in a fellow Port St.
Joe native's success re-
mained to be seen.
"Only time will tell,"
said Peters III. "It's hard
to say one day will change
someone's life, but some-
one inspired me.
"You have to have
some type of mentor,
and I wanted to be what
my uncles were to me
- a beacon of hope and a
light. They may not have
that uncle, but they have
me if they need me at any
time."
Peters III hopes the
trip will encourage other
African-American leaders
to mentor children.
"We need to motivate
other professionals to
take part to get kids moti-
vated and open their eyes
to other things," he said.
The kids, it seems, are
already on board.
"The kids that traveled
with me spread the word.
I've got kids calling me
saying they want to go on
the next trip," said Peters
Jr., who isn't quite ready
for round two.
"I told the kids I wasn't
rested up yet. I was
tired."


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i















Thursday, August


27. 2009


COMMUNITY


w w w. s t a rf 1 com


THE BRIDGE AT BAY ST. JOE
..,,- . - , , ,.7 1.


Compassion fund to help those in need


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
The Bridge at Bay St. Joe
launched a new initiative last
Friday intended to aid employees
and area residents who have
experienced unexpected
catastrophes.
The Compassion Fund, an
initiative of The Bridge's parent
company, Signature HealthCARE,
would provide financial assistance
to those-with financial hardships
caused by house fires, natural
disasters, family deaths or other
unforeseen tragedies.
Blake Bell, Signature
HealthCARE's vice president of
business operations, outlined the
fund's goals at Friday's launch
party at The Bridge, a 120-bed
nursing home facility located at 220
Ninth St. in Port St. Joe.
"Everybody has had to deal with
some form of tragedy," Bell told an
audience of community members
and Bridge employees.
"It's a good idea for us to put
forth'a fund with money set aside
to help people get back on their
feet."
In a video screened at the event,
Dianne Timmering, Signature
HealthCARE's vice president of
spirituality, said the Compassion
Fund grew out of a companywide
"prayer chain."


The prayer chain gave the
Signature family a peek into the
lives,of its employees, many of
whom were suffering through
personal hardships.
Citing the Biblical passage
"Faith without works is dead,"
Timmering said the company
sought to become not mere prayer
partners, but "first responders"
attuned to the needs of others.
"We had the faith and we had
the prayer, but we also needed the
works,i' she said.
The Compassion Fund, a
501(c)(3) tax-exempt corporation,
is governed by a seven-member
board comprised of Signature
employees from several different
facilities.
The board reviews applications
and distributes financial awards
to those who meet the following
criteria:
* Signature employees must
have been employed with the
company for at least 90 days.
* Non-Signature employees
must live or work in a community
in which a Signature affiliated
facility is located (i.e., The Bridge
at Bay St..Joe).
* Recipients must have
experienced a catastrophic event
beyond their control and must
be unable to meet basic financial
needs without assistance.
Donations to the fund may be


given through payroll deductions,
one-time gifts, or in-kind services
from community supporters.
All Signature employees are
encouraged, though not obliged, to
make payroll deductions, and non-
employees can contribute as well.
Though all donations will be
placed in the same fund and be
available to all employees and
Signature-affiliated communities,
Blake said the company hopes to ,
establish separate subsidiaries for
each facility location in the future.
Those needing assistance may
apply after Sept. 1, the fund's official
launch date. Applications will be
available through The Bridge's
human resources department.
The Bridge's administrator,
Ron Reid, said he will provide
more information about the
Compassion Fond during town hall
facility meetings and upcoming
community events.
I Though The Bridge's staff has
historically aided co-workers by
collecting informal donations, Reid
said th'un' iwil' help the facility,
extend'itN outreach.
�"We really appreciate that we
can have a program like this to
benefit the community but also
stakeholders working for us," he
said.
For more information on the
Compassion Fund, call The Bridge
at Bay St. Joe, 850-229-8244.


Super Kids Day scheduled for Sept. 20


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Last year, it rivaled the
Tupelo Festival as Wewahi-
tchka's most well-attended
event.
This year, organizers
of the First Pentecostal
Church's Super Kids Day
are preparing for the on-
slaught. - ,
The 2008 family-friendly
event drew 250 people to the
church, located at 619 High-
'way 71 South in Wewahitch-
ka, just behind the IGA.
Pastor Joey Ethridge
said he is preparing to feed
500 people at this year's free
event, to be held Sept. 20)


beginning at 10 a.m. (CT).
Kids ages 5-19 and their
families will enjoy ham-
burgers, hotdogs, cotton
candy and snow cones, and
a variety of outdoor games.
Ethridge has already
reserved six inflatables,
including 'waterslides, a
bouncy house, a bungee
cord basketball game and
a train.
Attendees can also prac-
tice their aim at the dunking
booth or witness the magic
of illusionist Tony Wilhelm
of The Magic Theater in Pi-
geon Forge, Tenn.
Attendees will earn tick-
ets at each game, which
they can trade for items at


a church "store," filled to
the brim with donated toys.
Ethridge, ,who helmed
a church in Jonesboro;
Ark., before becoming First
Pentecostal's pastor three
years ago, has a special
passion for children.
"The children are the for-
gotten part of our society,"
said Ethridge, who believes
early intervention is key in
creating model adults
"if you start working.
with 'them while' they're
young, you don't have to
worry' about them when
they get older."
During his travels, Eth-
ridge was moved by a stone
plaque placed on the foun-


dation of a razed church.
On the plaque, was in-
scribed: "We were thriving,
we, were growing, but we
made one mistake - we
forgot the kids."
Ethridge has taken the
words to heart.
Each Sunday, he holds
a "Children's March" of-
fering; with kids collecting
spare change from parish-
ioners.
The change is placed in
a special account and funds
the Super Kids Day festivi-
ties.'
For more information on
the Sept. 20 event, call Eth-
ridge at 850-819-2458 or the
church office, 850-639-5623.


By Hannah Henderson


Dine United


Boost the economy and

the community fabric


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Have a good meal, boost
the economy and assist the
needy in one trifecta of a
day..
The second annual Dine
United event on Sept. ,3
will kick off the United
Way's community cam-
paign, which annually drops
the green flag on the first
Thursday in September.
With more local res-
taurants participating, the
concept of eat, drink and
give is even more tangible
than last year as the United
Way amps up its commu-
nity campaign for another
successful year.
How successful, you
ask?
, Well, in 2006, the Gulf
County United Way cam-
paign raised $38,000. The
following year, the amount
grew to $56,000, where it re-
mained in 2008.
"That is a 44 percent in-
crease in tough times," said
Ron Sharpe, United Way
community development
coordinator for the six-
county region that includes
Bay, Gulf, Jackson, Calhoun,
Liberty and Washington
counties. "Of all of our six
counties, Gulf was the only
one to show an increase.' ."
Sharpe noted, however,
that with the shutdown of
Arizona Chemical's Port St.
Joe plant, given its employ-
ees' contribution of. $8,500
last year, this year's cam-
paign already faces a steep-
er incline to reach its goal.
Dine United was cre-
ated last year as a fun way
to kick off the campaign.
The event injects money
into the local economy and
bolsters the coffers of the
United Way, which in turn
injects the money back into
the community.
"This is a concept I
came up with last year,"
Sharpe said. "What better
way? You go out for some-
thing to eat. You support
the businesses which need
the support, you support
the largest nonprofit agen-
cy in the country, and the
money goes directly back
into the community.
"The money contributed
will be used to assist the
elderly, children and others
in need in your community.
This is a great opportunity
to enjoy a nice meal with
your family and help, your
community at the 'same
time.
"I went to as many res-
taurants as I could. We help
promote your restaurant,
and you donate to the Unit-
ed Way." -
Not to mention the com-
, munity.
Consider' that of the
$56,000 raised during last
year's campaign, more
than $52,000, or 95 cents
on the dollar, was donated
back into the community.
The local United Way
receives funds in three dis-
tinct categories.
Those who donate to the
'United Way can earmark
those funds for specific
agencies approved, under
the United Way umbrella.
The statewide campaign
will also bring in funds
specified in similar fashion,
donations given for specific
agencies serving the com-
munity.
"A good thing about a
United Way campaign is
you can designate where
you want your money to
go," Sharpe said.
"Think about this. You
live here, but you may have
a loved one in Miami being
served by a United Way-ap-
proved agency that you can


DINE UNITED
Participating
Restaurants
* Provisions "
'* Subway
(Wew6hitchka
and Port St. Joe
'locations)
* Toucans
* Mango Marley's
* The Thirsty Goat
* The Fish House
* Two Crabs
* Killer Seafood
* The Sea Blue Iguana
* Sunset Coastal Grill
SGreat Southern
School of Fish
* Dockside Cafe6

designate to receive your
donation."
RFnds not specifically
earmarked are pooled into
the community grant fund,
which provides grants to
agencies and organizations
that apply for funding from
the United Way .
A committee comprised
of local residents reviews
the grant applications and
decides on recipients and
amounts.
Last year, North Florida
Child, Development Inc.,
Gulf "County Senior Citi-
zens and Gulf County ARC
& Gulf Transportation were
among the organizations
that received funding from
the United Way.
In addition, funds were
provided to organizations
such as the American Red
Cross, which --provided
considerable assistance
during flooding events last
year on the north end of the
county, and Life Manage-
ment, which has offices in
Gulf County.
. "Whether they are in
Gulf County or not, all
these agencies touch the
lives of Gulf County citi-
zens," Sharpe said, .look-
ing at a spreadsheet of the
area agencies that received
money from the 'Gulf Coun-
ty campaign. "There are no
borders."
This year, 13 local restau-
rants have agreed to donate
10 percent of their sales on
Sept. 3 to the Dine United
event in Gulf County.
That is up three restau-
rants from last year, and
Sharpe noted that some
restaurant owners don't
bother with the 10 percent,
but instead cut a check that
often amounts to more than
10 percent of what the res-
taurant will make Sept. 3.
"We didn't put pressure
on them," Sharpe said.
"Our goal is to drive traf-
'fic to them and benefit the
United Way at the same
time. If we can just get
citizens to go out and thank
the restaurants, show that
they appreciate what the
restaurants are doing, that
makes it a win."
This year, the United
Way is also involving select
regional restaurants from
the six counties served by
the local United Way com-
munity campaign.
By donating one hour of
your time, the equivalent of
one hour of work, regard-
less of wage, an individual
can earn a gift card for
discount dining at a host of
restaurants in the region,
including Sunset Coastal
Grill and Dockside Cafe.
The main purpose of all
the effort, Sharpe said, is
straightforward.
"It is all about raising
awareness of the United
Way and the agencies we
serve," Sharpe said.
For more information, go
to www.unitedwaynwfl.org.


B'
Section


Page 1









B2 |'The Star


Society


Thursday, August 27, 2009.


Birth


Jackson Davis Cherry is born


Brooke and
Caroline would
like to announce
the birth of their
baby brother.
Jackson was
born July 15
at 8:38 a.m.,
weighing in at
7 pounds, 8.4
ounces and
measuring 19
inches long.
The proud
parents are
Stephanie
Hysmith and
Kevin Cherry.
Grandparents
are Terry and
Debra Watson,
Carol and Erik
Mann and
Ronnie Cherry.


* ,-. .


Stratton turns 1
Stratton Levins,
son of Tom and
Stephanie Levins
and brother of
Bladen and Hailyn
Levins, turned
1 on July 30. He
celebrated with
first a family party
at his Aunt B's
house on July 29,,
followed by a fun-
filled party at the
Noah's Ark Zoo in
McDonough, Ga.
Happy Birthday,
big man! We can't
believe how fast
your first year went
by! We all love you
so much!


Courtney Cooley turns 21
Happy 21st Birthday, Courtney Lynn
Cooley.
We love you,
Nanny and Grandad Cooley


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Caroline Braylee
Hysmith is 5
Caroline Braylee
Hysmith turned 5 on
July 18 and celebrated
her birthday on July 26
at Honeyville Park with
a Strawberry Shortcake
theme. Helping her
celebrate were her family
and friends and a new baby
brother, Jackson.


Obituaries


Thomas Edward
Haddock, II "Eddie," 35, of
Wewahitchka, Fla., passed
away Friday, Aug. 21,2009.
Thomas was born on
Jan. 16, 1974, in Port St. Joe,
Fla. He graduated from
Florida State University and
was a longtime employee
of Bay Medical Center for
10 years. Thomas was a


THOM~
EDWA
HADDOi


member of First United
Methodist Church of Wewahitchka.
He was preceded in death by
a granddad, Eldridge Haddock;
grandmother, Irene Lewis; aunt, Gail
Richter; two brothers, William "Willie"
Temples and Chris Horton; and an
infant nephew, Addison Whitfield.


Thomas Edward Haddock, II
He is survived by his wife of
13 years, Georgette Haddock;
three sons, Logan, Cole and
Gavin; his granny, Eunice
Haddock of Highland View; his
father; Thomas Haddock and
wife, Gail, of Port St. Joe; his
mother, Claudia Birdsong, of
Gordon, Ala.; his uncle, Harlan
RD Haddock and wife, Donna, of
CK, II Port St. Joe; his uncle, Kenny
Haddock of Highland View;,
aunts Patricia Smith of Port St. Joe,
FL, Ann Guess of Gordon, AL, Linda
Benton of Gordon, AL; Uncles Earl
Foxworth of Mobile, AL and Dural
Foxworth of Huntsville, AL his two
sisters, Sherrie Campbell and DeAnna
Buchanan and husband, Chris, of Port


St. Joe; his brother, Lavone Flowers of
Gordon; and three nephews, one niece
and numerous cousins.
A memorial will be held noon
\ EST Wednesday, Aug. 26, at First
Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, with
the Rev. Harry Johnson and the Rev.
Steve Irwin officiating. The family
will receive friends Wednesday from
10 a.m. until noon EST at the
church.
Thomas was a loving father,
brother, son, husband and friend.
In lieu of flowers, make �
contributions to the Gideon Bible
F�nd.
Expressions of sympathy may
be expressed or viewed at www.
southerlandfamily.com.


Vernon Dallas Pate


Meet HARLEY- a gorgeous 1 1/2 yo male yellow lab mix
with an outstanding temperament! Harley is also calm arid
obedient and easy to train. Harley is one of the candidates
being trained in the DAWGS in prison program and will
graduate in early Sept. Graduates of the program are crate
trained, house trained, walk well on a leash, and know
many commands like sit, stay, come, and down. Harley has
fast became one of the favorites there- with his outgoing
personality, he never meets a stranger!
If you are interested in adopting Harley, contact the St.
Joseph Bay Humane Society. at 227-1103 and ask for
Melody. You may also more information at -our website:
DAWGSinprison.com.
SHOP FAITH'S THRIFT HUT! Thurs. - Sat. from 10am
- 4pm. 1007 Tenth St.. in Port St. Joe.


CLEANERS * POLISHES


- V


ACCESSORIES * ADDITIVE


Dan & Nancy
Ostman
Jax Wax Distribution LLC
Cell: 850.832.1560


P.O. Box 13331
SMexico Beach, FL 32410


Mr. Vernon Dallas
Pate, 52, of Blountstown,
passed away early Monday
morning, Aug. 24, at the
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital in
Blountstown.
Dallas was born Sept.
15, 1956, in Port St. Joe and
had lived in Blountstown
most of his life. He was a
mechanic and had worked
for the city of Blountstown
for the past four years.


Dallas was a member of the
South Side Assembly of God
Church in Blountstown.
He is survived by his
wife, Debra Ann Pate; sons
Phillip Pate (Barbara)
of Blountstown, Rusty
Wayne Shiver (Courtney)
of Blountstown and
Kody Pate; daughter,
Kristi Glass (Mark) of
Tallahassee; brothers,
Melvin Pate (Wanda) of


Wewahitchka and Tommy
Pate; sisters Alma Shiver
of Wewahitchka, Jean
Brackin of Blountstown,
Margene Martin of Howard
Creek, Sara Barfield of
Bristol, Nancy Holt of
Blountstown and Dale Pate
of Blountstown; and four
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. CT on Thursday,
Aug. 27, from the Peavy


Fumeral Home Chapel,
with the Rev. Larry White
officiating. Internment will
follow in the Pine Memorial
"Cemetery in Blountstown.
The family will received
friends Wednesday at Peavy
Fumeral Home.
All arrangements
are under the direction
of Marlon Peavy at
Peavy Fhmeral Home in
Blountstown.


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Thursday, August 27, 2009


Local


The Star I B3


Environmental Film Festival opens Aug. 29


The Apalachicola Riverkeeper
is hosting the Wild and Scenic
Environmental Film Festival
(WSEFF) on Tour. The WSEFF,
which is presented by Patagonia,
is the largest environmental film
festival in the U.S. The event is or-
ganized and hosted by the South
Yuba River Citizens League. For
26 years, this grassroots environ-
mental organization has been
bringing their community togeth-
er around the protection of the
Yuba watershed.
The festival tour brings to-
gether the best of the home festi-
val's films. With a growing public
awareness for the environment,


the festival aims to increase this
groundswell through inspiring
and educational films, which aim
to motivate people to go out and
make a difference in their com-
munity and around the world.
Whether it is the struggle for en-
vironmental justice, information
on renewable energy or an educa-
tional tale about an endangered
species, the films expose people
to forward-thinking ideas and
global awareness. The films not
only highlight concerns but pro-
vide solutions, reaching people
through beautiful imagery such
as the sweeping landscapes of the
Tallgrass Prairie or the grandeur


of the rivers around the world.
Schedule and Venues:
The festival will open Saturday,
Aug. 29 in Carrabelle and close in
Apalachicola on Saturday, Sept.
5, at the historic Dixie Theater.
Tickets are on sale now. Tickets
can be purchased online, by call-
ing Apalachicola Riverkeeper at
653-8936, or at the door immedi-
ately preceding the event if tick-
ets are still available. However,
seating is limited, so advance
purchases are recommended.
Tickets can also be purchased
at the Apalachicola Riverkeeper
office, open Monday-Friday from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 232-B Water


Street in Apalachicola.
The schedule:
* Saturday, Aug. 29, Carrabelle
City Auditorium, 1001 Grey
Ave. The children's program
begins at 5 p.m. ET, recep-
tion at 6:30 p.m. and general
audience program at 7 p.m.
* Wednesday, Sept. 2, St.
George Island Volunteer
Fire Department, 324 Pine
Ave., St. George Island. Chil-
dren's program at 5 p.m.,
wine and cheese reception
at 6:30 p.m. and general au-
dience program at 7 p.m.
* Thursday, Sept. 3, Tupelo
Theater, 136 State 22 in


Wewahitchka. Wine and
cheese reception at 6 p.m.
CT, with general audience
program at 7 p.m.
* Friday, Sept. 4, FSU Coastal
and Marine Laboratory, 3618
U.S. 98, St. Teresa. Wine and
cheese reception at 6 p.m.
ET with general audience
program at 7 p.m.
* Saturday, Sept. 5, Dixie The-
ater, 21 Ave. E, Apalachicola.
Children's program at 3 p.m.
ET, general audience pro-
gram at 5 p.m., wine and
cheese reception at 6:30
p.m. and general audience
program at 7 p.m.


Mighty Mullet


Maritime Festival


set for Oct. 3

Event to feature cook-off, fashion show


The Fourth Annual
Mighty Mullet Maritime
Festival is coming up on
Saturday, Oct. 3, and it's
not to be missed! The cook-
off will feature innovative
mullet dishes and offer
prize money of $150, $100
and $50. These prizes can
be won by creative nonpro-
fessionals, so dig out your
favorite recipes and start
rattling those pots and
pans!
The all-day festival will
begin at 10 a.m. at Pan-
acea's Wooley Park, just
off Coastal Highway 98 on
Dickerson Bay. Parking is
free, and admission is only
$3 per person and free for
children 12 and younger.
Folks can learn how to
prepare fresh Florida sea-
food from Florida's State
Chef, Justin Timinari, who
will demonstrate his win-
ning techniques, while
Atlanta food and wine col-
umnist Doc Lawrence pro-
vides guidance on the per-
fect wine paring.
Another main attraction
is the hilarious Fishy Fash-
ion show, whose artistic
creator, Joan Matey, fash-
ions "found beach objects"
into wearable art for local
celebs who strut their stuff
along the festival's runway.
This action-packed day
has it all: maritime history
re-enactors, displays and


presentations, arts and
crafts vendors, toe-tapping
live music, the crowning of
a festival king and queen,
and (for children) toy boat
building, white boot races,
live sea encounters, rides
and much more. Kayaks will
be available to glide along
the marshes, and be sure
to come hungry, because
mullet and all the rest of
our great local seafood will
be served up by some of the
best Big Bend restaurants
and food vendors.
Bill Lowrie, Festival Di-
rector, said the event "is be-
ing planned as a day for the
entire family to celebrate
our Big Bend heritage with
food, music, and maritime
activities."
Proceeds from the Fes-
tival will benefit the Big
Bend Maritime Center, a
living museum to be situ-
ated next to Woolley Park
to preserve and honor the
maritime heritage of the
Big Bend, from Cedar Key
to Apalachicola. National,
state and local dignitaries
will be on hand to dedicate
the site officially during the
festival.
For more information
and to obtain sponsorship,
vendor, and cook-off rules
and registration Forms,
visit www.mightymullet.com
or contact Bill Lowrie at
850-984-0662.


Local BRIEFS


Senior Citizens Accepting New
Meal Clients at Meal Sites
Gulf County Senior Citizens at its
Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka meal
sites is accepting new clients.
We provide a hot, nutritious meal
Monday through Friday to seniors 60
and over along with activities. Some
of the daily activities include bingo,
arts and crafts, gospel singing, shop-


ping trips, blood pressure checks,
exercise classes and educational
programs. There is no charge for the
meal or activities but donations are
always welcomed as we are a non-
profit agency. Transportation may be
available.
Anyone interested in coming to
our sites for meals and activities is
asked to call Debbie at Port St. Joe
at 229-8466 and Maureen at Wewahi-


tchka at 639-9910.

September Story Hour
The Charles Whitehead Wewahi-
tchka Public Library would like to an-
nounce an upcoming event:
September Story Hour to be held
on Sept. 8 at 3:30 p.m. CT Join us for
stories, crafts and fun.
For more information call 639-
2419.


BUMG-C V9VO


SEA UTliFUL DESIGN
Doesn't Have To Be Expensive

Let our professional & affordable design service
by a former Ethan Allen Designer
transform your home
into a work of beauLty & function.

Visit our showroom at:
20720 Panama City Beach Parkway
PANAMA CITY BEACH
Com enient to 30ANRosemary Beach
850.249.7666
Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 - 5:30
Manhattan Style Boutique - Located Within


WWWPCCIARSCO


..-. . . . . . . .


-M a p- -u ----T


S~ WL'1IJkL~ I I ~'


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FAITH


These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.

SOUTHERLAND FAMILY COMFORTER
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter
507 1Oth Street, Port St. Joe L.F.D.
(850) 229-8111 (850) 227-1818


Thursday, August 27, 2009 w w w. starf 1. co mI Page B4

Th e hritva n DCON llIFNCF


I 1'.L. L% . J..411LAJClL.LIJ.X WE ~U~E


Born of water?


I


Wisdom


is in the


Word
When we have trials that
seem too hard to bear,
Remember a loving father,
for He is always there.
The Father of lights is over
all.
Always there when we
stumble and fall.
We have to walk in the light
each day.
It's the only way to keep
Satan at bay.
When sin entices and allures
us,
Its lies must be ignored.
The strength to gain the
victory comes when we trust the
Lord.
We need to know God's truth
to see through Satan's lies.
All of life's problems are in
His Word, everything applies.
Billy Johnson


should believe and what your religious
practices should be. No wonder they
want to have you take part in their "Bible
study." You should study the Bible, and
unless you can't read, you don't need
their help.
Questions or comments? Send us an
e-mail to the address below.
At the Mexico Beach Christian
Worship Center, we believe that God
wants you know the truth about the Bible
and be born again from above - not risk
your eternal future on faulty religious
teaching. At the MBCWC, we don't pass
an offering plate and plead for money or
twist your arm to join. Plan to check us
out this Sunday. Our services begin with
a time of greeting and fellowship at 9:30
a.m. CT. Worship begins at 9:45 a.m. Come
early so you can meet and fellowship
with us, and enjoy the praise and worship
music led by TJ. We meet and worship
at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on 105
N. 31st St., behind Parker Realty and the
Beach Walk gift shop, just off U.S. 98 in
Mexico Beach.
God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center
timsr64@yahoo.com
http://www.mexicobeachcwc.com


Faith Bible


Church plans


garage sale

Faith Bible Church members are
planning a garage sale to raise mon-
ey for Faith Christian School. It will
be held Labor Day weekend, Sept. 4-
5. Please take some time to look for
items that you can spare for a good
cause. This is a great time to get that
new set of dishes or furniture and
bring in your old ones for the sale.
Clean out your garage - tools are
great - and go through closets and
kitchens. Good toys, books, mov-
ies, CDs, Christmas stuff, plants and
working electronic items are wel-
come.
Drop items by the school at 801
20th St. or call 227-7340, 877-8647 or
229-6707 for pickup. The sale will be-
gin at 7:30 a.m. ET on Friday, Sept. 4,
at 801 20th St.

Emerald Coast

Hospice seeking

volunteers
Emerald Coast Hospice is seeking
a few outstanding volunteers to assist
with patient support. Our next Volun-
teer Orientation will take place in Au-
gust. It only takes a couple of hours
each week to make a real difference
to the people in your community. Con-
tact Karen Peeples at Emerald Coast
Hospice, 769-0055 or karen.peeples@
gentiva.com. Call now to reserve your
spot!


True Friends

Dedicated to JoJo, Jud
and Kyle

By William Kelly

True friends, like true
treasures,
Aren't easy to find.
They're rare and they're
priceless,
Each one of a kind.
They're caring and loving
And ready to share
Your happiest moments,
Your deepest despair.
They're there when you need
them;
They'll stand by your side,
No matter the weather,
In low or high tide.
True friends are forever,
Whether near or apart.
True treasures to cherish,
In spirit and heart.


*W

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Illustration by KENNETH BURNS


A Spirit Filled
Outreach Oriented
Word of Faith Church


Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford
Welcome you to worship with us: HOME OF THE
Sunday 10:30am POWERHOUSE
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm YOUTH MINISTRIES
Wednesday 7pm
3www.family!jifeeurch rh.net
323 Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433


91tu 'cl lykvLan (c/uzaw
508 Sixteenth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


IA A

wo


s iiib


850-227-1756

� Rev. Ruth Hemple
? Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM


SFirst Baptist Church
102 THIRD STREET * PORT ST. JOE
Jeff Pinder Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students
New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church
Sunday Wednesday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am Children's Choir................. 6:00 pm
Sunday School ....................9:40 am Prayer Meeting................... 6:30 pm
Traditional Service............11:00 am Children's Ministry
Youth Groups..... ............. 5:30 pm Activities......................... 6:30 pm
Youth Ministry Activities ...6:30 pm

www.fbcpsj.org


BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. * St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET. Bible Study all ages 10 a.m. ET
Morning Worship 11 a.m. ET* Evening Worship 6 p.m. ET
Tuesday: Clhoir Practice 7 p.m.
Wednesday Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in Hin."
Please accept this invitation tojoin us in worship. God bless you!
Please call us for your spiritual needs.
www.beachchapel,org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950 A Home 769-8725


c"Our Church can be your home"
2 4 First Church of the Nazarene
2420 Lon .9Avenue * Port St. Joe, florida 32456
(850) 229-9596
Lf'' ant I,' t. Leard rlie lianJ di ! '.l ,I nfame. ,YisrV hilp lII Le 'lr in Oli P'i ., tri h.t', susV


Sunday School.......... . .............'.10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


FAa ithBible
5C H U R C H
Michael Rogers - Pastor
9:45 AM ................................................ Sunday School
10:30 AM ................................. Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 AM ............................ .. ..................... W orship
6:00 PM .......................................................... W orship
www.faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street * Port St. Joe * 229-6707
Hos'me ,,f alitih Chrla Sian .I olol


Jesus said, "Most assuredly, I say to
you, unless one is born of water and the
Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of
God." (John 3:5).
Have you been born of water? Have
you been born of the Spirit?
Those who blindly believe what they
have been taught would say that being
born of water is being baptized in water.
They are confident that since they have
been baptized in water, they are OK.
Actually, we all have been born of water!
But that has nothing to do with water
baptism. And you quite possibly haven't
been born of the Spirit, no matter what
religion you follow.
This illustrates the utter foolishness
of taking a verse and basing a belief on
it without looking at the things stated
before and after a verse. Go back one
verse. What does it say? Nicodemus
asked Jesus, "How can a man be born
when he is old? Can he enter a second
time into his mother's womb and be
born?" (John 3:4).
Even the poor student of biology knows
that in the months before our birth,
we lived in a water environment in the
womb of our mother. So if you have are
living today, you have already been born
of water, no matter what your religious


Family Life
Church


teacher might say!
You think I am wrong? Then see what
Jesus says in the next verse: "That which
is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which
is born of the Spirit is spirit." (John 3:6).
Do you see it now? When Jesus spoke
of being born of water, He was speaking
of being born in the flesh - a normal
physical birth.
If you have been born again of the
Spirit (or born from above, as it says in
the original Greek), and only if you have
been born of the Spirit, you should be
baptized in water. That is a picture of
what happened to you, when you were
born of the Spirit, you were filled with the
Holy Spirit.
Some religions don't want to talk
about being born of the Spirit, being
born of God, or being born from above,
because this is something they cannot
control. It is spiritual suicide to follow
a religion that wants to control your
thinking and your life. Are you a slave to
a religion? Or are you a slave to God, as
you should be?
It sounds very religious to say things
like "God wrote the Bible." Or "The Bible
is infallible." Yet these same religious
teachers want to dictate which Bible you
should read and believe, which verses you


I


. 11,S
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. I







alcsruhT August 27 2 9


TALLAHASSEE - The Big Bend Bird
Club Inc. of Tallahassee will host its
20th Annual Exotic Bird Fair and
Festival on Aug. 29-30 at the North
Florida Fairgrounds. Come experi-
ence the tropical setting with exotic
birds - it's a step above the ordi-
nary. See some of the most beau-
tiful birds from around the world
- macaws, cockatoos, cockatiels,
lovebirds, parrolets, finches, Afri-
can Greys and more. In addition,
you can choose from a huge variety
of bird toys, bird food, birdcages in
all price ranges.
Headlining the 20th anniversary
celebration will be The Paradise
Parrots from Tampa Bay. They talk,
roller-skate, do gymnastics, play


basketball and more. Taught by
circus animal trainer Vickie Howle,
the birds that were once abandoned
by former owners have appeared
on Animal Planet's "Pet Star" cable
TV show.
This relaxing family experience
includes special raffles, balloons
and face painting for the kids. On
both Saturday and Sunday, educa-
tional programs will give new pet
owners tips on appropriate bird be-
havior, health, training tricks and
proper techniques of care from an
avian vet and a professional parrot
trainer from ZooWorld. You will see
baby birds being fed and meet lo-
cal artists with bird related jewelry,
pottery and cards.


Worship with us at
Long Avenue Baptist Church J
Where Faith, Family &Frietndship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL * For More
Information Call 229-8691



J 'Ut ed Mdit


111 North 22nd Street * Mexico Beach, FL 32410
1 Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Meinco Beach United Mlehodist C(hurch
NulsIIr PIOVIDED
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor * Church/Office: 648-8820


FiTfih IT nal


Enjoy mouthwatering foods, hot-
dogs and snacks. Admission is $5;
children 10 and younger get in free.
A two-day admission is $8. Parking
is free.
Vendors and visitors are
coming to Tallahassee from as
far away as Missouri, Mississippi,
Alabama, North Carolina, Georgia
and Florida. Make new friends and
relax with some of nature's most
beautiful and wonderful winged
creatures!
For more information, please
visit www.bigbendbirdclub.com or
contact Jill de Bedout, president,
The Big Bend Bird Club Inc., PO.
Box 16453, Tallahassee, FL 32317-
6453, or jillsbirdz@yahoo.com.


The Star I B5


By Johanna White
Most of us here in Port
St. Joe/Gulf County think
very little about identity
theft. We live in a very
unique place where we
leave our doors unlocked,
our keys in our car, go
walking after dark - we
have a very free and safe
life here.
We are very fortunate
to still be able to do these
types of things. However,
there are thieves out
there lurking on Web sites,
dumpster diving, hacking
personal computers and
finding numerous other
ways to steal our identity.
Even one of our best
friends or family members
can make our life miserable
by stealing our identity.
Two weeks ago, our
guest speaker was Chris
Hudson of Wells Fargo
Financial Services. Chris
presented a slide show
outlining some of the things
I described above. Did
you know that one out of
three people will have their
identity stolen during their
lifetime? And the estimated


cost will most likely be
somewhere around $500-
$1,500, and you could spend
around 30-170 hours (80
on the average) trying to
resolve all of the problems
that occur with identity
theft. Chris made some
recommendations that
could help prevent you from
being a victim of identity
theft.
* Safeguard your
personal information;
* Pay close attention
to your credit card(s) and
bank statements; and
* Use a shredder to
destroy any papers that
might contain personal
information.
If you want any
additional information
regarding identity theft, I
know that the bank that I
work at, Vision Bank, offers
identity theft information.
I have personally done
identity theft seminars
for local businesses and
groups. Please feel free
to contact me at 227-6268
(cell) or the office at 229-
8226.
During our meeting,
we also had the incoming


Kiwanis Lt. Governor Russ
Mathis as our guest. Mr.
Mathis gave a short talk
about his expectations for
Kiwanis during the coming
administrative year.
The Port St Joe Kiwanis
Club is a Civic Organization
composed of local business
men and women doing
their part to give back
to our community. If you
are interested in joining
a Civic Club, consider
the Kiwanis Club. The
Kiwanis Club meets
every Tuesday at noon at
the Gulf County ARC &
Transportation Building,
located on Industrial Road.
For additional information,
you can contact Kathy
Balentine or Dianna
Harrison at 229-6327 or me
at 227-6268.
To all of our current
members, try to be faithful
in attending our weekly
meetings. We have several
projects in line to do, and
it takes all of us to make it
happen.

The Kiwanis Mott:
"Serving the Children of
the World"


Faith BRIEFS


New Bethel
pre-anniversary serve
New Bethel Baptist Chu
cated on North Park Avenue
St. Joe, invites the commune
pre-anniversary weekly
Aug. 31 through Sept. 4 at 7
ET nightly.
The services will honor thi
pastor and first lady, the Rev.
ter Cyril Mills.
For more information,
227-3400.

Appreciation service
at Thompson Temp
An Appreciation Service
ing Bishop Frank Hogans
tor of Thompson Temple Fi
Church of the Living God In
Ave. E in Port St. Joe, will
Sunday, Sept. 13.
Sunday School will be at


and worship at 11:30 a.m.
The speaker will be retired Pre-
rices siding Elder O.C. Williams of Quincy.
arch, lo- Come and praise the Lord with
Sin Port us.
ity to its
services Men and Women Day
7:30 p.m. Observance

e church Thompson Temple First Born
and Sis- Church of the Living God Inc. at 222
Ave. E in Port St. Joe will hold Men
contact and Women Day on Sunday, Sept. 27.
Sunday school will be at 10 a.m. and
morning worship at 11:30 a.m.
ce The speaker will be Minister Dor-
othy Shine of Panama City.
le Where there is faith and love, God
honor- rewards.
Jr., pas-
rst Born New Harvest
1c. at 222 Assembly Revival
be held
New Harvest Assembly Fellow-
10 a.m. ship of God, located at 1800 N. State


71 in Wewahitchka, will be in revival
Sept. 2-4, with the anointed singing
and preaching family the Kirklands.
Services will begin each evening at
6:30 p.m. CT.

Founders Day Celebration
Port St. Joe Church of God In
Christ, 163 Ave. D, will be observing
its Fourth Annual Founders Day Cel-
ebration on Sunday, Aug. 30, at 4 p.m.
ET.
Come and join us as we commem-
orate 69 years of Holiness; Yesterday,
Today and Forever.
The theme of the celebration:
Build on a Good Foundation (Mat-
thew 7: 24-27; Luke 6: 47-49).
The guest speaker will be Pastor
Johnny Jenkins Jr., New Life Chris-
tian Center.
For more Information, please
call Deacon John Crosby at 850-229-
8983.


TERRY DAVIS


Night of musical ministry

set for Saturday


Come join the congre-
gation at First United
Methodist Church of
Mexico Beach, located
at 111 22nd St. A, for an
evening of ministry be-
ginning at 6 p.m. CT on
Saturday, Aug. 29.


Special guests will be
Terry Davis, a record-
ing artist and former
tenor for the Florida
Boys Quartet, and Neysa
Wilkins, music artist and
news anchor at WJHG-7
in Panama City.


4.
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4~t'
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a..:.


NEYSA WILKINS


The Catholic Church
of Gulf County
St. Joseph Parish
20th Monument Ave. * Port St. Joe * 227-1417
All Mass Times EDT
Saturday 4:00 pm
Sunday 9:30 am
Monday, Thursday, Friday 9:30 am
Wednesday 5:30 pm
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday M ass................................................................... 11:00 am (CT)
Cape San Blas Mission
1500 ft from State Park entrance at Cape San Bias
Saturday M ass .................................................................. 6:00 pm (ET)


TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN
Please come and meet our new
Rector Father Tommy Dwyer!
ST. JAMES'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) * Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org




St. Peter's Church, ACC
(Traditional Services 1928 BCP)
Morning Prayer & Holy Communion
Sunday...............10:00 A.M.
The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest
The Rev Lou Little, Deacon
Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center,
120 Library Drive
"An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World"



Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
Sigl)llab viewt apti t CIjurd)
382 Ling Street - Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.


Exotic Bird Festival starts Saturday


Sl FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution andvMonument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724
Sunday: Rev. Mac Fulcher
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m. ET Pastor
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. ET st
'., i,.../ Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET Ann Comforter Jenrey Dik
Wednesday: Music Director Youth Minis,
Youth: 5:30 p.m. ET Deborah Loyl/ss
Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Director of Chikren Ministries


ote
iter


i


FIRST UNITED METHODIST
OF MEXICO BEACH

Kiwanis KORNER






B6 I The Star


Thursday, August 27, 2009


School News


GCCC registration begins


PANAMA CITY - Fall 2009
registration is continuing
for new and returning stu-
dents at Gulf Coast Com-
munity College.
Registration: Aug. 13
-25
The College will be
closed on Aug. 10 for an In-
Service Day.
Classes begin: Aug. 19
Drop/Add Period: Aug.
20-25
Students can register
on-line at www.gulfcoast.
edu edu> or visit one of the


GCCC campuses during
the hours listed below:
Panama City Campus:
Monday through Thursday
from 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. CT;
Friday from 7:30 a.m. - 4
p.m.; and Friday, August 21
from 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Gulf/Franklin Campus:
Monday through Thursday
from 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. ET; Fri-
day from
9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Tyndall AFB Campus:
Monday through Thursday
from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. CT
North Bay Center:


Monday through Thursday
from 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
All registration fees for
2009 fall semester are to be
paid on or before August 7.
Please note registration
dates exclude Saturdays,
Sunday and holidays.
For more information,
call: (850) 872-4892 for the
Panama City Campus;
(850) 227-9670 for the Gulf/
Franklin Center; (850) 283-
4332 for the Tyndall Air
Force Base Education Of-
fice; or (850) 747-3233 for
the North Bay Center.


Faith Christian School begins 36th year


The 2009-2010 school
year started for all grades
on Monday, Aug. 24, at 8
a.m. Students and parents
met with teachers and staff
the previous Friday for the
FCS Open House to find
their rooms and desks, see
their schedules and to en-
joy a snack lunch with each
other. .
In addition to the usual


curriculum, students will be
offered courses in computer
skills, beginning conversa-
tional Spanish and music.
There will be team teaching
in grades 1-8, and high school
students will be incorporated
into a home school/umbrella
school plan. All students will
be in Bible classes each day,
studying and learning God's
Word. There are openings in


all grades, but only one or
two in the three-year kinder-
garten class.
If you want a safe, small,
quiet Christian setting for
your child at minimal cost,
please come visit our facili-
ties. There is an extended
school day for working par-
ents.
Call 229-6707 for addition-
al information.


GCCC develops new certificate program


The Technology Division
at Gulf Coast Community
College recently developed
a new certificate program
and is growing an existing
Associate in Applied Sci-
ence degree program.
In response to increased
demand from state and lo-
cal employers, GCCC has
created the new Computer
Integrated Manufactur-
ing Technology certificate
program, which includes
mobile laboratory kits that
dramatically increase ac-
cess to high-quality, hands-
on training.
Each mobile laboratory
kit contains industrial com-
puters, robotics equipment,
and DVD course materials.
For maximum flexibility
and mobility, the entire kit
can be shipped to employer
sites anywhere to provide
online and on-site training
for up to 20 employees.
According to Dean'
Eavey, Associate Profes-
sor with the Business and


Technology Division, the
certificate program will ini-
tially be marketed to Flor-
ida employers with future
plans to target Alabama
and Georgia markets. Lo-
cal companies that have
already sent personnel
for CIM training at GCCC
include Trane, Merrick In-
dustries, and Tyndall Air
Force Base.
The Computer Integrat-
ed Manufacturing Tech-
nology (CIM-AAS) degree
program is gearing up for
more students as interest
continues to grow in com-
puter automation and ro-
botics.
GCCC is one of only
two Florida colleges cur-
rently offering CIM-AAS in
a state that houses more
than 16,500 manufacturing
employers.
The CIM program spe-
cializes in computer auto-
mation, robotics, arid pro-
cess control with emphasis
on computer controlled


systems for industrial man-
ufacturing, system integra-
tion, instrumentation, sim-
ulation and animatronics.
Graduates of this pro-
gram are in high demand
and able to pursue careers
as process controls engi-
neers/technicians, systems
integrators, robotic techni-
cians, industrial program-
mers or industrial sales
engineers. Places of em-
ployment include manu-
facturing plants, military
applications, theme park
industries, water filtration
and purification plants, just
to name a few.
"We are so pleased with
our new programs - the
new CIM program is inno-
vative and meets the need
of manufacturing jobs,"
said Dr. Jim Kerley, Presi-
dent. "Gulf Coast continues
to address community and
regional needs in a creative
format, giving more hope
and opportunity to more
students."


CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS
Darrell Smith and Colton Thursby discuss what they have learned during a
recent career day.


Interns complete summer jobs


Florida High School/
High Tech students
from Port St. Joe High
School completed sum-
mer internship positions
at various businesses
in Gulf County This
was a great partnership
supplying businesses
with workers and giving
young people the experi-
ence of working in differ-
ent career fields.
Denise Manual, Hu-
man Resource Officer in
Gulf County, assisted in
supplying locations for
several of the students.
Armaine Bailey worked
in the GIS department
repairing computers.
Darrell Smith worked
Darrell Smith worked


for the county and has a
very different perspec-
tive of what is required
in a business world.
Several of the stu-
dents worked in the
medical field. Graduat-
ing senior Ryan Thomp-
son worked at Beacon
Villa Retirement Center.
He helped plan games
for the residents and as-
sisted in basic patient
care. Ryan will begin
Gulf Coast Community
College looking forward
to a career in medicine.
Kristine Mathes assist-
ed in reception at The
Bridge at Bay St. Joe.
Samantha Haiar
volunteered at The Hu-
mane Society. She had a


great time caring for the
dogs and cats. Even the
smelly jobs couldn't dim
her enthusiasm in carry-
ing for animals.
Florida High School/
High Tech is a program
sponsored by Vocational
Rehabilitation and The
Able Trust. It is a career
mentoring program.
The grant is facilitated
by Dyslexia Research
Institute of Tallahassee.
Funding for the summer
internships was obtained
through grants by The
Able Trust, the Washing-
ton Improvement Board,
the Lion's Club and a golf
tournament sponsored
by the Ladies Golf Asso-
ciation.


The Port St. Joe High School High Tech class shows offtt their new shirts
earned for participating in the program.


p Y.Y..s .- lant'to enroll in Pigskiyp Gedgrapt 'witR, e idon ..
. 1 .Wil receivee' Monday classroom delhiery. oT 6tTsNew d
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Teacher. Name Grale

J School . ,', ', ' .. #, of students.

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. email-order tO cshuller@pcnh.corm by August 31s.; ., . ..
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unPiant
communications







Thursday. Auaust 27, 2009


T Lnoa


Wax Myrtle desirable for Florida climate


Wax myrtle is a native
Florida Plant. It matures
into a small tree or shrub,
depending on how your
raise it. It can be grown
anywhere in our state. Wax
myrtle produces attractive
flowers and fruit. Its foli-
age has unique fragrance.
In this article we'll describe
some of this popular plants
uses and characteristics.
And offer some informa-
tion on it and how it can
be grown as an attractive
landscape specimen.
Being a native plant,
wax myrtle is well-suited
to Florida's soil and cli-
mate. You often see this
plant growing wild, along
highways and in unculti-
vated areas. Wax myrtle
does well in a moist envi-
ronment. So, it would be
an excellent choice if you
have a drainage problem in
your landscape. However,
it also grows very well in
drier soils.
Wax myrtle also is cold
hardy, salt tolerant, and
relatively free of insect and
disease problems. My in-
formation on his desirable
native Floridian was pro-
vided by retired Extension


Urban Hor-
ticulture
Specialist
Dr. Robert
Black of
the Uni-
versity of
Florida's
ROY LEE CARTER Institute of
County Extension Food and
Director Agricultur-
al Sciences.
Wax myrtle is unisexual,
which means that male
and female flowers are pro-
duced on separate plants.
Female flowers are pro-
duced on separate plants.
Female flowers grow in
close bunches, and produce
fruit and are round, light
green and about an eighth
of an inch in diameter.
The fruit are coated with a
thick, bluish wax that may
be used in making candles.
Crush a few leaves of the
wax myrtle, and you notice
that the plant gives of very
nice aroma, known as bay-
berry. In fact, this popu-
lar fragrance is one of the
plants most attractive fea-
tures. A northern relative
of the 'fragrant bayberry
candle.
Wax myrtle is important


for wildlife that depends
on the persistent fruits for
fat and fiber in their winter
diet. Birds, such as wild
turkey, Bobwhite quail, vir-
eos waterfowl, catbirds',
thrashers, bluebirds, vir-
,eos and warblers are fre-
quent visitors to wax myr-
tle thickets, the berries are
the main food for wintering
tree swallow in Florida.
Wax myrtles may reach
a height of 25 feet. Their
leaves are evergreen - nar-
row at the base and broad-
er toward the upper end.'
About midway up the leaf,
coarse teeth appear on the
edges.
Wax myrtles produce
suckers, which are small
plants that sprout from the
roots. These suckers grow
in clumps or clusters, and
if undisturbed, they will
eventually form very large
dense plants. However, if
you remove these suckers
from the main trunk, at-
tractive, small trees can be
produced. The trunk of a
wax myrtle is grayish white
in color.
Wax myrtles can be
grown from seeds, cuttings,
and by simple layering. You


should sow seeds as soon
as they mature. The seeds
can be started in a mixture
of equal parts of sand and
peat moss. Another meth-
od of propagating wax myr-
tles is to dig the established
plants during the winter
months. Cut the plants
back to within a few inches
of the ground. Dig out the
root clumps, and set them
in containers. Within sever-
al months, you'll have good
sized plants, which may
develop into small trees, in
just a few years.
Fortunately, there's only
one serious pest of wax
myrtle. It's a caterpillar,
which chews leaves and
ties terminal shoots togeth-
er. For details on control
of these pests, and further
cultural suggestions, check
with you favorite garden
supply center or your coun-
ty extension office or visit
our website at
In summary, wax myr-
tles are among the most
desirable native plants to
use in Florida landscapes.
They thrive in moist sandy
soils, and need very little
maintenance or pest pro-
tection.


FWC Field Operations WEEKLY REPORT,


August 7 - 13, 2009

This report represents
some ' events the FWC
handled over the past
week; however, it does not
include all actions taken
by the Division of Law
Enforcement.


BAY COUNTY
Officer David Erdman
recently received two fa-
vorable dispositions for
boating under the influ-
ence cases. Two subjects
were adjudicated guilty
and fined $1,155 and $1,055
respectively. In addition,
both individuals received
probation for 12 months
and shall serve 50 hours
of community service.
They must complete a
substance abuse aware-
ness course in addition to
the boater's safety course.
Both had their vessels im-
mobilized for 10 days.

GULF COUNTY
Officers Arnie McMil-
lion and Scott Hoffman
were on patrol in St. Joe
Bay and conducted a re-
source inspection of a
vessel that had two per-
sons on board. The offi-
cers observed a five gal-
lon bucket in plain view
that was not quite full of
whole scallops. Officer
Hoffman found a plastic
water bottle full of scallop
meat hidden under the
console between some life
jackets. He also found a
bag of scallop meat under


The Gulf County Sher-
iff's Office will be conduct-
ing vehicle safety check-
points and DUI check
points during the month
of August 2009. The check
points will be held through-
out the county to include
Highway 98 near St. Joe
Beach, Highway 98 and
Garrison Ave, C-30 Sim-
mons Bayou, Highway 71
North of White City, High-
way 22 and Highway 22A,
Highway 71 and Westarm
Creek, Highway 71 Dalki-
eth Area and Highway 71
near the Calhoun line.
On 08/17/2009 Roger
Dale Pace, 32, was arrested
for violation of probation;
the original charge was
possession of marijuana
On 08/17/2009 Barbara
Ann McDermid, 60, was
arrested on warrants for
medical fraud, criminal
use of personal identifica-
tion and practicing medi-
cine without a license.
McDermid was released
on bond.


a tray in the bottom of the
ice chest. The meat was
determined to be the bag
limit for the two people on
board (two pints) and the
remaining four gallons of
whole scallops were re-
turned alive back to the
water. Both subjects were
issued notice to appear
citations for over the daily
bag limit of bay scallops.
Officers Arnie McMil-
lion and Scott Hoffman
were on patrol in St. Joe
Bay and conducted a re-
source inspection of a ves-
sel with four juveniles on
board. While inspecting
the vessel, Officer McMil-
lion was shown a bag that
had approximately two
pints of meat inside. When
asked if that was all the
meat or scallops they had
on board, they said that
was all they had. Further
inspection of the vessel
revealed two more bags of
scallop meat in the front
compartment in a five gal-
lon bucket under a cast
net. The four subjects had
a total of six pints of meat
and were allowed to keep
their limit of four pints.
The two extra pints were
seized by Officer McMil-
lion and later donated to
the Taunton Family Chil-
dren's Home. Two of the
subjects on board claimed
responsibility for the bag
limit violation and were
issued citations.
Officer Tony Lee ob-
served a small 13-foot
vessel with two males on
board heading south into
St. Joe Bay. A short time
later, Officer Lee noticed


On 08/17/2009 Ivan Alex-
is Ramos, 38, was arrested
on a violation of probation
warrants.
On 08/18/2009 April De-
nise Strickland, 37, was ar-
rested on a violation of pro-
bation warrant the original
charge was retail theft.
On 08/18/2009 Arsenio
Santiez Sims, 21, was ar-
rested on a warrant for
violation of probation; the
' original charge was tres-
pass and affray.
On 08/20/2009 Kevin
Dennis McKenzie, 44, was
, arrested on a violation of
probation warrant; the
original charge was pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance.
On 08/21/2009 Lawrence
Scott Woodman, 34, was
arrested on a warrant for
lewd and lascivious acts
on a child under 16; the
warrant was from Duval
County.
On 08/22/2009 Paul
Thomas Hendriks, 56,
was arrested for DUI. His


that they came back to
a small secluded ramp
briefly before they headed
back out in their vessel,
again heading south into
the bay. Later, Officer Lee
observed the vessel com-
ing back in for the second
time from the southern
end of the bay. Officer
Lee pulled up to the sub-
jects at the ramp. One
subject had already gone
to retrieve their truck
and trailer. Officer Lee
made contact with the
subject who was waiting
with the boat and inquired
how many scallops they
had on board. The sub-
ject showed Officer Lee
four gallons of whole bay
scallops in a cooler on the
floor of the boat. Officer
Lee continued his inves-
tigation and both subjects
admitted that there were
more scallops in the back
of the truck that they had
harvested earlier that
morning. Between both
subjects, they were found
to be in possession of 7
1/2 gallons of whole bay
scallops. The remaining 3
1/2 gallons were returned
back to the water alive.
Both subjects were issued
notice to appear citations
for over the daily bag limit
of bay scallops.

HOLMES COUNTY
The Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture con-
ducted their annual mari-
juana spotting school in
Holmes County. Two FWC
helicopters along with lo-
cal FWC officers located


breath test results were
.285 and .297, over three
times the legal limit.
On 08/22/2009 Heath Del
Johnson, 24, was arrest for
DWLSR.
On 08/23/2009 Leonard
Ray Bailey, 50, was arrest-
ed on charges of DUI and
resisting without violence.
On 08/20/2009 Tammy
Jo Mosley, 49, was arrest-
ed on warrants for grand
theft. It is alleged that she
stole several hundred dol-
lars from a friend's ATM
account. `
On 08/23/2009 Stephen
Edward Norris, 33, was ar-
rested on violation of pro-
bation warrants from Bay
and Holmes counties.
On 08/24/2009 Bonnie
Peterson, 36, was arrested
on charges of DUI and pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance.
On 08/24/2009 Gary Dale
Nichols, 33, was arrested
on a violation of proba-
tion warrant; the original
charge was DWLSR.


and pulled over 400 plants
in two days.

WASHINGTON
COUNTY
Washington County
Emergency Services re-
ceived a 911 call from an
unknown male saying that
he was "trapped under a
car in a place where people
fish." Officers Lane Kin-
ney and Kathy Jackson
along with 50 other county
officers searched for four
hours before the man was
located at a pond in Holmes
County. The subject was lo-
cated by local officials and
was not trapped under a
vehicle. He did have mul-
tiple outstanding warrants
and was arrested.


Activity

Road Improvements
Sewer Improvements
Water Improvements
Administration


A local alligator farmer
reported that someone had
killed one of his alligators
and he could provide the
names of the subjects. Of-
ficers Lane Kinney, Mike
Guy, and Larry Morris be-
gan an investigation and
met with and interviewed
four suspects. All four in-
dividuals gave written con-
fessions indicating theyhad
killed the alligator to eat
back in January. Charges
will be filed through the
State Attorney's Office.

GADSDEN COUNTY
Officer Ben Johnson per-
formed a saltwater resource
inspection -on a roadside
vendor. The vendor was
in 'possession of undersize


Budget
(Approximately)
$241,000
$173,000
$111,000
$50,000


flounder. Officer Johnson
issued the proper citations.

LEON COUNTY
The Leon County Sher-
iff's Office requested the
use of an FWC K-9 in re-
covering a pistol used at
a shooting. Deputies had
searched for the weapon
previously and could not
locate it in the woods or
open field. Officer Jeff
Babauta and K-9 Mack
arrived at the scene and
located a .380 pistol hid-
den in the bumper of a
camper that was parked in
the open field. The detec-
tive stated that they had
searched the camper and
would have never found it
in the bumper.


CG,.NICAfe Toll Free: (888) 831-6754
SFranklin County: (850) 670-5555
V Leon County: (850) 926-9602

Oe MM oV Helping Hands Make The Difference



Public Hearing Notice
2nd CDBG Public Hearing

The City of Port St Joe is applying to the Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA) for
a grant under the Economic Development category for an amount up to $650,000 under the Small Cities
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-ED) Program. For each activity that is proposed, a minimum
of 51 percent of the beneficiaries will be low to moderate incomehouseholds. Theqproposed project will
extend a roadway,, water, sewer, electrical and telecommunications services to a proposed new facility
for North Florida Child Development, Inc. As this project will assist the NFCD in retaining its existing
workforce and allow the hiring of additional staff, this is an Economic Development grant.


LMI %
(Approximately)
>51
>51


The City has an adopted anti-displacement and relocation plan; however, no displacement of
persons is anticipated at this time. If relocation assistance is required as a result of the project, the City will
provide assistance as indicated in the policy. .
A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the application will be held at
City Hall, located at 305 Cecil Costin Blvd., Port St Joe, FL 32456, as a part of the regular City Commission
meeting scheduled to begin at 6:00pm on Tuesday, September 1st, 2009. A final copy of the application will
be made available at the Port St Joe City Hall, office of the City Clerk Monday through Friday, from 8:00am
to 5:00pm upon completion of the application on or about September 1st. The application will be submitted
to DCA on or around September 15th, (or later, if necessary). To obtain additional information concerning
the application and public hearing, contact Charlotte Pierce, City Grants Coordinator, at the City Hall, 305
Cecil Costin Blvd. or by phone at (850) 229-8261.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped in-accessible location. Any handicapped
person requiring special mobility accommodation at this meeting should contact Charlotte Pierce at the City
Hall, or by phone at (850) 229-8261, at least five calendar days prior to the meeting. Any handicapped person
requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact Charlotte Pierce at
the City Hall, 305 Cecil Costin Blvd. or by phone at (850) 229-8261 at least five calendar days prior to the
meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public
hearing should contact Charlotte Pierce at the City Hall, or by phone at (850) 229-8261 at least five calendar
days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. To access a Telecommunication Device
for Deaf persons, (TDD) please call (850) 229-8261.
Pursuant to Section 103 of the HUD reform act of 1989, the following disclosures will be made to DCA with
the application. The disclosures will be made available by the City of Port St Joe and DCA for the public
inspection upon request. These disclosures will be available on or after the date of the application and shall
continue to be available for a minimum period of five years.
1. Other government (federal, state and local) assistance to the project in the form of a gift, grant, loan,
guarantee, insurance payment, rebate, subsidy, credit, tax benefit, or any other form of direct or indirect
benefit by source and amount.
2. The identities and pecuniary interests of all developers, contractors, or consultants involved in the
application for assistance or in the planning or development of the project or activity.
3. The identities-and pecuniary interests of any persons with a pecuniary interest in the project that can
reasonably be expected to exceed $50,000 or 10 percent of the grant request (whichever is lower).
4. For those developers, contractors, consultants, property owners, or others listed in 2) or 3) above which
are corporations or other entities, the identification and pecuniary interests by corporation or entity of
each officer, director, principle, stockholder, or other official of the entity.
5. The expected sources of all funds to be provided to the project by each of the providers of those funds
and the amount provided; and,
6. The expected uses of all funds by activity and amount.

A FAIR HOUSING/ IQUAL OPPORTUNITY, HANDICAP ACCESS COMMUNITY


The Star I B7


Extension to host equine

management school

The Gulf County Extension Service will
be hosting the Northwest Florida Equine
Management School at the Gulf County Extension
Service Office in Wewahitchka. This event will be
held via polycom (internet video). This event will
be broadcast live in 12 locations in Florida and 3 in
Alabama.
Topics covered will be: Health - Signs of a
Healthy Horse and Preventive Health Care, Basic
Nutrition - Forage That Works Well in Horse
Pastures and Nutrition Requirements, Pasture
Weed Control - Poisonous Weed I.D. and Weed
Control in Pastures and Safety for Horses, and
Facilities and Safety - Equine Emergencies
and First Aid and Fencing and Layout of Barnes.
Instructors are University of Florida Specialist
and Agents, and Veterinarians.
Classes will be held from 6-8 PM CT (7-9 PM
ET) on:
September 14,2009
September 28, 2009
October 12, 2009
October 26, 2009
The registration fee for the course is $40.00
per farm (one set of reference books) and $10.00
for each additional person. Included with the
registration is a notebook with UF/IFAS fact
sheets and presentation handouts pertaining to
each session.
Registration deadline is Wednesday, September
2, 2009. For further information contact the Gulf
County Extension Service at 850-639-3200 or 850-
229-2909.


Gulf County ARREST LOG


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8B o THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 Established 1938 * Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


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1110 - Classified Notices
1120 - Public Notices/
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1125 - Carpools &
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1130 - Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 - Personals
1160 - Lost
1170 - Found



3539S
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE

NOTICE TO
RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
RFP# 2009-002

The City of Port St. Joe will
receive sealed bids from
any qualified company or
corporation interested in
providing construction ser-
vices for the following proj-
ect:
US-98 STREETSCAPE IM-
PROVEMENTS

Project is located in the
City of Port St. Joe, Florida
and consists of
improvements ,to Four (4)
blocks of US-98 including
demolition, concrete and
paver sidewalks, concrete
curbs, storm drainage,
driveways, landscaping, ir-
rigation, street lighting and
street furniture.

Bids will be received until
3:00 p.m. Eastem Time,
on Sept 10 , 2009 and will
be opened and read aloud
by Jim Andersonr City
Auditor/Clerk at the City of
Port St. Joe City Hall, 305
Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd,
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.

The complete Bid Solic-
itation, Plans and Specifi-
cations can be
downloaded from the City
of Port St. Joe website at
www.cityofportstjoe.com
August 20, 27, 2009
3565S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JAMES L. MORTON,
SHARON K. MORTON
A/K/A SHARON MORTON,
and UNKNOWN
TENANTSS,
Defendants.

PASE NO. 09-186-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated August
10, 2009, in Case No.
09-186-CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit, in and for
Gulf County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
JAMES L. MORTON and
SHARON K. MORTON
A/K/A SHARON MORTON
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front
lobby door of the Gulf
County Courthouse in Port
St. Joe, Gulf County, Flor-
ida at 11:00 a.m. on Octo-
ber 15, 2009, the property
set forth'in the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure and
more particularly de-
scribed as follows:

Lot 16, 17, 18, 19, 28, 29,
30 and 31, Block B, Beaty
Subdivision of White City
in Gulf County, Florida, ac-
cording to the map or plat
thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 23, Public


S 1100
Records of Gulf County,
Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: August 11, 2009
REBECCA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: Jasmine Hysmith

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, . Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
August 20, 27, 2009
3569S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JOHN C. DOING, DE-
ANNA HANSEN-DOYING,
.BEACON BY THE SEA
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC., and UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-134-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated August
10, 2009, in Case No.
09-134-CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit, in and for
Gulf .County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
JOHN C. DOING and DE-
ANNA HANSEN-DOYING
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front
lobby door Of the Gulf
County Courthouse in Port
St. Joe, Gulf County, Flor-
ida at 11:00 a.m. on Octo--
ber 15, 2009, the property
set forth in the Final Judg-
merit of Foreclosure and
more particularly de-
scribed as follows:

Lot 9, Beacon by the Sea,
Phase Ill, according to the
map or plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 4,
Page 13, Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pe dens,
must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

DATED: August 11, 2009

REBECCA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith,
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
August 20, 27, 2009
3570S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE .FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

VS.
ROGER VALECILLO, RAY
McDANIEL, , LAURIE
McDANIEL and UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-142-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
'i


1100 I
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated August
10, 2009, in Case No.
09-142-CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit, in and for
Gulf County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
ROGER VALECILLO, RAY
McDANIEL and LAURIE
McDANIEL are the De-
fendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at the front lobby
door of the Gulf County
Courthouse in Port St. Joe,
Gulf County, Florida at
11:00 a.m. on October 15,
2009, the property set forth
in the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and more par-
ticularly described as fol-
lows:
Lots 1, 3, 5 and 7, Block 1,
Douglas Landing Unit One,
according to the map or
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 2, Page 25, Pub-
lic Records of Gulf County,
Florida.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
bns, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: August 11, 2009

REBECCA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
August 20, 27, 2009
3586S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY
IN PROBATE

IN RE: The Estate of
BILLY KNIGHT REYN-
OLDS, SR.,
Deceased.

CASE NO.: 9O-67-PR

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

TO ALL PERSONS HAV-
ING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE
ESTATE:
The ancillary administra-
tion of the estate of BILLY
KNIGHT REYNOLDS, SR.,
deceased, Case Number
09-67-PR, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which is Gulf County
Courthouse, Probate Divi-
sion, 1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL
32456. The name and ad-
dress of the ancillary per-
sonal representative and
the, personal
representative's attorney
are set froth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of
this notice is served within
three months after the date
of the first publication of.
this notice must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THE NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of 'the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands


against the estate of the
decedent must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is Au-
gust 20, 2009.

Ancillary Co-Personal Rep-
resentative:
Billy Knight Reynolds, Jr.
491 Boutwell Road
Climax, GA 39834
Ancillary Co-Personal
Representative:
Edward Franklin Reynolds
2001 Douglas Drive
Bainbridge, GA 39819
Attorney for Ancillary
Co-Personal Representa-
tives:
THOMAS S. GIBSON
RISH, GIBSON, SCHOLZ
& GROOM, RA.
116 Sailor's Cove Drive
RO. Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457
(850) 229-8211
FL BAR NO.: 0350583
August 20, 27, 2009
3639S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

FINANCIAL FREEDOM
SFC,
Plaintiff,

vs.

CAROLYN DELOACH
DIXSON-KING AS PER-
SONAL REPRESENTATIVE
OF THE ESTATE OF,
PHILIP KING A/K/A PHILP
ROY KING, DECEASED, et
al,
Defendantss.

CASE NO.:
23-2009-CA-000391
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST,
PHILIP KING A/K/A PHILP
ROY KING, DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES, CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose'a
mortgage on the following
described property in
GULF County, Florida:

LOTS SIXTEEN (16) AND
EIGHTEEN (18), BLOCK
ONE THOUSAND FIF-
TEEN h'i*4 OF REVISED
MILLVIEW ADDITION OF
THE CITY OF PORT ST.
JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT NO.
2, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
1, PAGE 42, PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA.


has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30
days after the first publica-
tion, if any, on Florida De-
fault Law Group, PL.,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and
file the original with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court on
this 13th day of August,
2009.

Douglas C. Birmingham
Clerk of the Court
By: Lynn M. Barnes
As Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
RO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
F09074330

**See Americans with Dis-
abilities Act
Inr accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Gulf
County Courthouse
#850-229-6113 (TDD)
August 27, September 3,
2009
3645S
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE
14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

Mid-Island Mortgage Cor-
poration,
Plaintiff,

-vs.-

Patricia Leigh Paulson
a/k/a Patricia Leigh Hunt
a/k/a Patricia
Meli-Wischman; Unknown
Parties in Possession #1;
Unknown Parties in Pos-
session #2; If living, and
all Unknown Parties claim-
ing by, through, under and
against the above named
Defendants) who are not
known to be dead or alive,
whether, said Unknown
Parties may claim an inter-
est as Spouse, Heirs, Devi-
sees, Grantees, or Other
Claimants
Defendantss.
Case #: 2009-CA-000370
Division #:
UNC:

NOTICE OF ACTION
FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDINGS -
PROPERTY

TO:
Patricia Leigh Paulson,
a/k/a Patricia Leigh Hunt
a/k/a Patricia
Meli-Wischman; ADDRESS
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
IS: 909 20th Street, Port
Saint Joe, FL 32456

Residence unknown, if liv-
ing, Including any un-
known spouse of the said
Defendants, if either has
remarried and of either or
both of said Defendants
are dead, their respective
unknown unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, as-
signees, creditors, lienors,
and trustees, and all other
persons claiming by,
through, under or against
the named Defendant(s);
and, the aforementioned
named QDfehbant(s) and
such of the aforemen-
tioned unknown Defend-
ants and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown De-
fendants as may be in-
fants, Incompetents or oth-
erwise not suit juris.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that


| 1100 |
an action has been com-
menced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
real property, lying and be-
ing and situated in Gulf
County, Florida, more par-
ticularly described as fol-
lows:

LOT SEVEN (7) IN BLOCK
NINETY (90) OF UNIT NO.
2 OF ST. JOSEPH'S ADDI-
TION T6 THE CITY OF
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA,
ACCORDING TO THE OF-
FICIAL MAP ON FILE IN
THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK
1, PAGE 29.

more commonly known as
909 20th Street, Port Saint
Joe, FL 32456,

This action has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of
your written defense, it
any, upon SHAPIRO &
FISHMAN, LLR Attorneys
for Plaintiff, whose address
if 10004 N. Date Mabry
Highway, Site 112, Tampa,
FL 33618, within thirty (30)
days after the first publi-
cation of this notice and
file the original; with the
clerk of this Court either
before service.on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
there after; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Com-
plaint.

WITNESS my hand and
seal of this Court on the
13th day of August, 2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
Circuit and County Courts
By: Lynn M. Barnes
Deputy Clerk
August 27, September 3,
2009
3658S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION,,

COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS, INC,
Plaintiff,

vs.

MICHAEL R. HARPER;
MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION'
SYSTEMS, INCORPO-
RATED AS NOMINEE FOR
COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS, INC.; CYNTHIA A.
HARPER; JOHN* DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY,
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 08-00422


| 1100 I

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE. IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 5th day of Janu-
ary, 2009, and entered in
Case No. 08-00422, of the
Circuit Court of the 14TH
Judicial Circuit in and for
Gulf County, Florida,
wherein COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS, INC. is the
Plaintiff and MICHAEL R.*
HARPER; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-
TION SYSTEMS, INCOR-
PORATED AS NOMINEE
FOR COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS, INC.; CYN-
THIA A. HARPER; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY are
defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at the FRONT LOBBY
OF COURTHOUSE at the
Gulf County Courthouse in
Port St Joe, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 15th day
of October, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:

COMMENCING AT THE
SW CORNER OF SEC-
TION 11, 17S, R10W,
THENCE RUNNING 2523
FEET IN A NORTHEAST-
ERLY DIRECTION,
THENCE RUNNING 454
FEET IN A NORTHEAST-
ERLY DIRECTION,
THENCE RUN OR CON-
TINUE IN THE SAME
NORTHEASTERLY DIREC-
TION FOR 150 FEET,
THENCE RUN SOUTH-
EASTERLY FOR 175 FEET
TO THE POB, THENCE
RUN NORTHEASTERLY
FOR 280 FEET THENCE
RUN SOUTHWESTERLY
ALONG NEW COUNTY
ROAD FOR 75 FEET,
THENCE RUN SOUTH-
EASTERLY FOR 280 FEET
TO A LOT OF LAND OR
THE HOME LOT OF F.H.
CAUSEY, THENCE RUN
NORTHEASTERLY FOR 75
FEET TO THE POB, SAME
BEING LOT NO. 6, AC-
CORDING TO CAUSEY
SUBDIVISION TO MMITE,
CITY, FLORIDA, . SAME
BEINGIN .SEC. 11, T7S,.
B10W,' GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

ALSO: COMMENCING AT
THE SW CORNER OF
SEC. 11, T7S, B10W, AND
RUN 2523 FEET, IN A
NORTHEASTERLY DIREC-
TION; THENCE RUNNING
454 FEET IN A NORTH-
EASTERLY DIRECTION;
THENCE RUNNING 454
FEET IN A NORTHWEST-
ERLY , DIRECTION;


THE -STAR






", ^ Call:


Fax:
Toll


V . �Ema
/ .. Ema


| 2100 I
THENCE RUN IN THE
SAME NORTHWESTERLY
DIRECTION FOR 150
FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTHWESTERLY FOR
175 FEET TO' POB.
THENCE RUN NORTH-
WESTERLY FOR 190
FEET, MORE OR LESS,
TO COUNTY ROAD;
THENCE RUN NORTH-
ERLY ALONG THE RIGHT
OF WAY OF SAID
COUNTY ROAD FOR 39.5
FEET TO THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF JIM ROB-
ERTS LAND; THENCE
RUN EASTERLY 190
FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTHERLY 39.5 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
ADDRESS: 6948 GARDE-
NIA STREET;
WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465
TAX MAP OR PARCEL ID
NO.: 02801-050A
ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST -IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

Dated this 17th day of Au-
gust, 2009.

Rebecca Norris
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

,Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite
120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
August 27, September, 3,
2009
3662S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN AND FOR' 'GULF
COUNTY
SUNTRUST. MORTGAGE,
INC.,
Plaintiff,,


HELP IS ONLY A

PHONE CALL

C Our AWAY


To Place Your Classified ad


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il:
il:


850-747-5020

800-345-8688
850-747-5044
thestar@pcnh.com
thetimes@pcnh.com


| 1100
vs.

JAMES BAILEY IV, et.al
Defendants.

CASE NO..09-331 CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
JAMES BAILEY IV
Whose residence is: 318
4TH AVE, MERLBOURNE
BEACH, FL, 3251

TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
-JAMES BAILEY IV
Whose residence is: 318
4TH AVE, MELBOURNE
BEACH, FL, 32951

and who is/are evading
service of process and the
unknown defendants)
JAMES BAILEY IV; UN-
.KNOWN SPOUSE OF.
JAMES BAILEY IV who
may be spouses, heirs, de-
visees, grantees, assign-
ees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, 'and all parties
claiming an interest by,
through, under or against
the Defendant(s), who are
not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having
or claiming to have any
right in the property de-
scribed in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the
following property:

LOT 10, MYSTIC PALMS,
A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 5, PAGE 8, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA.

a/k/a 2441 INDIAN PASS
ROAD PORT ST. JOE, FL
32456

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Nwabufo Umunna, At-
tomey for Plaintiff, whose
address is 2901 Stirling
Road, Suite 300, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida 33312
within 30 days after 4he
first publication of this no-
tice and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
13th day of August, 2009.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT


\


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tin, U nC
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BY: Jasmine Hysmith SCHOLZ, PA. JOHN DOE; JANE DOE file their claims with this r-. Medical/Health Egle Ladi Camper Lot or camper for 3.5 acres Howard Creek.
DEPUTY CLERK 116 Sailors Cove Drive AS UNKNOWN court WITHIN THE LATER Steeol Buildings ~ Big cElHeah rent, for 1 or 2 people in No clearing required.
P 0. Box39 TENANT(S) IN POSSES- OF 3 MONTHS AFTER I Discount Available1 Therapists Spacious Highland View Call Great quiet homesite
In accordance with the Port St. Joe, FL 32457 SION OF THE SUBJECT THE DATE OF THE FIRST I30x40-105x105 Call for Functional Pathways is hir- Twnhome 850-227-1260 and/or plenty of room for
Americans with Disabilities 850229-8211 PROPERTY PUBLICATION OF THIS Deal, Erection Avail newest location New dev me Fully Eale-Landi livestock or horses. Great
Act, persons needing a ATTORNEY FOR PETI- Defendants. NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF- Iwww. scg-grp.com ing Carrabelle fornewest location& New development - Fully age Landing fishing Call 8274290 or
reasonable accommoda- TIONER TER THE DATE OF SERV- IS o u r c a # 1 D L IRN: PTs PTAsbellefor FT, T furnished, beautiful& spa- TOWnhme 767-3191
tion to participate in this FL BAR NO. 0350583 CASE NO.: ICE OF A COPY OF THIS 850-3-0N T COTAs, SLPs & a F Re- t ome 3 located in New development-beauti-
proceeding should, no August 27, September 3, 23-2008-CA-000160 NOTICE ON THEM. hab Manager Call Angel Jones Homestead, Eagle ful & spacious 2br, 2ba
later than seven (7) days 2009 - - for details @ 888.531.2204 Landin subdivision Close townhome located in j
prior, contact the Clerk of 399S NOTICE OF All other creditors of theory aknorr@fprehab.com to shopping, downtown Jones Homestead, in the
the Court's disability coor- 3N THE CIRCUIT COURT FORECLOSURE SALE decedent and other per- Web Id # 34048134 andshoppisewn Bwn Eae ubd- | 7160
dinator at 8502296111,OFNTHEC OURTEENTH sons having claims or de- 3220 Web Id #34048134 and St. Joseph's Bay. Eagle Landing Subdivi-[1-16
1000 C. G. COSTIN BLVD. JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN NOTICE IS HEREBY mnds against decedent's Must Se Queen size bed Verification 900 c/mage ost downtown and St. Wanted To Buy
RM. 302456. IfPORT STi JOE AND FOR GULF COUNTY, Judgment of Foreclosure turned, contingent or unliq- w/ headboard, king size Analysts Short Term rental option Joseph's Bay. Monthly used mobile home, must
aired, contact (TDD) FLORIDAdate the 13th day of Au- uated claims, must file headboard, dresser and Full TimePosition - PSJ, avail.CallGulf CoastProp- rental $750 with $750 be zone 3. Call
8009558771 via Florida gust, 2009, and entered in their claims with this court mirror, round dinette table FL, M-F 9-5:30. 2Ok/year. arty Services at se.curity/damage deposit, 850-647-9055
Relay System ANNE B. PATRICK, Case No. WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF 4 chairs, Sharp TV 27"., Knowledge of Microsoft (850)229-2706 formore in- Call Gulf Coast Property
August 27, September 3, 23-2008-CA-000160,ofthe TER THE DATE OF THE computer desk, Dell Word/Google required. Ex- formation& a tour of the more information and
2009VCircuit Court of the 14TH FIRST PUBLICATION OF computer optic plex, air ceslent Phone Skills are townhome, for more information and a
3682 ---_0S09vs. Judicial Circuit in and for THIS NOTICE.ALL CLAIMS hockey fable 6', gas GE necessary.. .-tour of the townhome. ".
PUBLIC NOTICE WILLIAM L. SHURRUM, Gulf County, Florida, NOT SO FILED WILL BE washer and dryer, ken- Email Resume to:
PILLIE SYSMA, SURVIV- wherein CHASE HOME FI- FOREVER BARRED. more electric dryer, set of andreapbrooksecGuaire
NOTICE IS HEREBY ING SPOUSE OF JOHN NANCE, LLC is the Plaintiff 4 wooden tv trays with @yahoo.com Executive 3 br, 2 be, W&D
GIVEN that the City Co SYTSMA, DECEASE and KENNETH L. The date of first publica- stands, Lincoln Arc welder 6140 garage, deck, fenced yd,
GINft the City of - SYTPSMAD DUECK W CROWDER, SR.; LINDA C. tion of this Notice is Au- tanks also, oxygen and pool, tennis court, private
mission of the City of Port AND THE UNKNOWN CROWDER; JOHN DOE; gust 27, 2009. settling torch set, 5 seater - beach, pets okay, $925 i
St. Joe, Florida, at its HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN jacuzzi, one phone desk, 4130 mo. 850-639-2690 or AurOM MAIMNE
meeting on the 15th day of DEVISEES, ASSIGNEESTENANT(5) IN POSSES Brian G Craft Cf I1850-648-1180 - 832-9702_________I
September, 2009, at 6:00 LIENORS, CREDITORS, TENANT (S) IN POSSES-Brian G. Craft POSTAL & GOVT JOB 2/3 br, 2 ba Renovat ed, 8100-Ant que& Co eTIbALes
M., EDT in the regular TRUSTEES AND A SION OF THE SUBJECT Co-Personal Representa- INFO FOR SALE? 2 /3 br, 2 ba, Renovated, Antique &11 Ca collectibles
Commission thmeetinglar TRU S WH MALL PROPERTY are defend- tive of the Estate of John 10miles N. of Mexico Bch 8120- Sprts Utility Vehicles
ess ants-I will sell to the high- S Craft 30 acres. Inclds hardwood 8130-STrtcks U
Building, Port St. JoMunicipal CLAIMor THE ESTINTEREST IN t and bes bidder or 7 Big Savannah Road au-frs, SS app. granite Bea Fll81 -Vans
Building, Port St. Joe, Flor- THE ESTATE OF JOHN cash at the FRONT LOBBY Dawsonville, GA 30534 3230 C u io CH&A. Cook house with Mexico Beach br, Fully 8140 - CVommercians
ida, will havethe2ndead- SYTSMA, DECEASED, et OF COURTHOUSE at the Michael JCraft GARAGESALEAu. 28th wrap around porch and Furn. Mother In Law cot- 81 - Motorcyces
ing and consider for final at. GulContyCorthuseinCo Perso much more. Beautiful pas- tage. Util inlcd. $725 mo 8170 - Auto Parts
adoption an Ordinance Defendants. Gulf County Courthouse in Co - Pe rso n a & 29th. FRI. & SAT, 7am You NEVER have to pay much more . $1,250 o $200 dep. 850-648-5338 & Accessories
with the following title Defendantsort St. Joe, Florida, atRepresentative of the Es-CST 100 3rd St., Mexico for information about 8210 - Boats
with the following ttle09-476CA 11:00 a.m. on the 15th day tate of John S. Craft Beach. Day lilies, crate federal or postal jobs. If 850-830-9342 Ho e8220 - Personal Watercraft
AN ORDINANCE OF TH Case No 6 of October, 2009, the fol- 3 North Hinterlands Drive myrtle trees, Irishes, ladies you see a job w t Dal 8230 - Sailboats Mrne
CITY OF PORT ST JOE AMENDED NOTICE OF lowing described property Rhinebeck, NY 12572 & misses clothes, gilrs "guarantee", contact the Sweet Deal! 240 - Bat & Marine
AMENDING6.03(e)2) OF ACTION FOR PUBLICA as set forth in said Final Thomas S. Gibson clothes 7-12, air compres- FTC. White City 3 br 2 bath Bat Sps & cks
ARTICLEVA OF THE LAND TION Judgment, to wit: Rish, Gibson & Scholz, sor, desk chair, too many The Federal Trade house, 1 blk from intra- 8310 - Aircratll/Avlatlon
ARTICLE VI OF THE GULAND TION PA.Items to list Commission . , coastal canal & boat ramp, 8320 - ATV/Otf Road Vehicles
DEVELOPMENT REGULA- LOT 12 AND 13, BLOCK E 116 Sailor's Cove Drive ems _______ Is America's consumer 1 b2ba St Jo Beach, newly updated, won't last 8330 - Campers & Trailers
TIONS OF THE CITY OF TO: MONEY BAYOU SUBDIVI- R 0. Box39 1 blk from Beach. Open long, call today 650 mo. 8340 - Motorhomes
PORT ST. JOE, AND PRO- UNKNOWN HEIRS,'BENE- SION AS PER MAP OR Port St Joe FL 32457 Wanted, Items or Huge protection agency. floor plan, fenced yard, 850-906-0095 Lease/ Op-
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE FICIARIES, DEVISEESSION AS PER MAP OR Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Wanted, Items for Huge
VIDNG AN EFFECTIVE RIES DE VISEES, LAT THEREOF RE- (850) 229-8211 Yard Sale for FathChris- wwwftgov/jobscams 95mse + .llOr se tionobuy
SDATE CREDITORS, TRUSTEES CORDED IN PLAT BOOK ATTORNEY FOR PER- tian School, Bring them to 1-877-FTC-HELP 6r7358239 Cl J tn,
Ordinance A ITOTERUS 1, PAGE 49, IN THE PUB- SONAL REPRESENTA- 801 20th St. or Call 678-358-5239 8110
Copies of the Ordinance AND ALL OTHERS WHO LIC RECORDS OF GULF TIVE 227-7340, 899-8647, or A public service
are available of Por public- MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST COUNTY FLORIDA. FL BAR NO. 0350583 229-6707 For pickup message from the FTC 8228 Hwy 98, St Joe 6170 NIssan Maxima 1989,
section at City of Port St. IN THE ESTATEOF JOHN August 27, Seiptember 3, and The News Herald Beach, -2 br, '2 ba house 1 br, furn, travel trailer for $375 down, $2,900 total.
Joe City Hall, located at SYSMA, DECEASED, et ANY PERSON CLAIMING 2009 Classified Advertising with gulf view, $795 mo + rent. Incld's utility, pvt lot, 2 0% Interest, Open, 9am to
305 Cecil G. Costing Sr., at, whose last known d- AN INTEREST IN THE. . .Department dep, 850-647-9214 blks from bch. $525 mo + 9pm Daylight Auto Financ-
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. dress and current locationSURPLUS FROM THE . ______________$500 dep. Call (941) Ing LLC 850-215-1769
Interested persons may at- is unknown. SALE, IF ANY OTHER C-30 Near Indan Pass 0-4941 r (941)
tend and be heard at the YOU ARE NOTIFIED that aOWNER AS OF THE DATE / between Apalachicola and 72Pontac Grand Prix 1997,
public hearing or provide Complaint to foreclose a O E S PENDENS Port St. Joe 1 bedroom, 1 2 br 2 ba, 2 blks from bch 45 n $3 900 Total
comments in writing to the mortgage has been filed MUST FILE A CLAIM bath, enclosed patio, new fenced in backyard, CH&A 0% $425 interest, $3,9am to 9ptal,
City Commissioners, City against you regarding the WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER renovation, $580 furn with $600/ mo + sec dep. Call Daylight Auto Financing
of Port St. Joe City Hall, property located in Gulf THE SALE EMPLOYMNT w&d, $515 unfurn, back- 478-454-7181 LLC, 850-215-1769
305 Cecil G. Costiri, S., County, Florida, and moreground, & credit check. -----
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. fully described as follows: In accordance with the - m 850-899-1093 for appt
Transactions of the publicAmeri Aecans&Apom with Disabilities 3 Emation tBSI.N F850-899-109.3 for ppt
hearing will not be re- Parcel A: That portion of A ic with Disabilities- 5100Business
corded. Persons wishing the East � of the South- bled persons who, ibes- 2110- Pets :F tu Opportunities coastal Cottage, 2 br,To- Wewahitchka
to appeal any decision west / of the Southwest , cause of their disabilities, Gd e 5110- Money to Lend tally renovated bath Wewahi
made during the hearing of Section 32, Township5causepoftherdisablites, Goodome5-lMoneystLend0Cheerfullvand clean,bBay 4 br, 2 be, double wide
made ringhehea ofecn need special accommo- 2120-et Sppies 4100 views from back deck, $650 + dep. 850-639-5721 Chevy 1500, X-Cab 1998,
will need a record of the South, Range 11 West, ly 2130 - Farm Anim1als/ ico to gldVw-$ 5 00, Total,
ceeiancshoue iWe S ouo e o ule in tac - sppies Baby Sitter's close to Highland View- $995 down $4,200 Total.
sure a verbatim record is Intracoastal Waterwa proceeding should contact w2140 - Pets/Livestock 5by SitterS S100 boat ramp. $625 mo. Also . 0% Interest, Open 9am to
made, including the testi- lessandexcept the West the ADA Coordinator at Wanted Needed for family on 1 br avail, $500 mo. 1st ' 9pm, Daylight Auto Fi-
mony on whichthe appeal 160.00 feet thereof. 10005th Street, Pot St. 2150- Pet Memorils vacation, for the summer. Build Wealth and last required. Call " " nancing LLC,
is oased. Any person who Joe, FL 32456 or Tele- Must be 18 or over. and Better (954) 815-1696a c 850-215-1769
wishes to attend and re- Parcel "B": Begin at the phone (850) 229-6113 904-206-1200 8526Health.
quires assistance may call Southeast comer of'West prior to such 'proceeding.--Health..--------- Lkin fr mr a anin
the City Clerk's Office at � of Southwest A of Sec- Dated this 17th day of Au- 21Logisics/Transportation ' s intcomer e Ea le engO
(850) 229-8261, Est. 114.' tion 2, Township5SouthDated,200917thVday of Au- F - - -b u- - thbetter more Eagl e Land' I
Range 11 West, Gulf Igust,2009. We Need Driver I . healthcoim New development- beauty - - 8140
CITY COMMISSION OFCounty, Florida, and runClerk Of The Circut Court We eed Driver I ful & spacious 3br, 2ba 7100-Homes
THE CITY OF POR T ST un East for 4016 0 feet; thence By: Jasmine Hysmith PUPS FOR I rainees Only- Joeab Inc ForSale townhome located in 7105- Open House Dodge Caravan 1998
JOE, FLORIDA run North for 400 feet; Deputy Clerk FNoexperienced Drivers Cal for details. Don't ask Jones Homestead, in the 7110 - Beach Home/ $475 Down, $4,200 Total.
BY: MEL MAGIDSON, JR. thence run West for 160 SALE: I $800 per week * the driver, call this number Eagle Landing Subdivi- 7120 - Property 0% Interest, Open 9am to
Mayor-Commissioner .feet; thence run South for Law Office of Marshall C. Blue Pit puppies for sale 1-877-214-36W 4 $19,000 (902) 645-2251 sion. Close to shopping, 7130 - Conda/Townhouse 9pm, Daylight Auto Fi-
Attest: JIM ANDERSON 400 feet to the Point of Be-Watson $100 ea Only 2 males, Web Id #34044847 - downtown , and St. 7140o - Farms & Ranches nancing LLC 850-215-1769
Clerk ginning, said land lying 1800 NW49th Street, Suite 3 females left. Ready to - - -- - - -, e' Joseph's Bay. Monthly 7150 - Lots and Acreage
August27, 2009 and being in Section 32, 120 '" go. Call 850-227-6114 rental $875 with. $875 7160 -Mobile Homes/Lots
3684STownship 5 South Range Fort Lauderdale, Florida 71''-i ---" �W'r osecurty/damage deposit. :717n Waterfrnt
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, 11 West, Gulf County, Flor- 33309 CLogisicsrdrt ortatn all Gulf Coast Proprty Propestment
IN AND FOR GULF ida, Telephone: (954) 453-0365 I We Need Driver I Services at (850) 229-2706 710 - t--Town
COUNTY FLORIDA You are required to serve a simile: (954) 771-6052 for more information and a Real Estate
qFacsuilrse:e(95)a1.6052 I Trainees Only'I tour of the townhome. 720 - Timeshare
IN RE: The estate of copy of your written de-August 27, September 3, ' . , I No experienced Drivers
MARY FRANCIS MclINNIS, fenses, if any, to this action 2009 $800 per week REAL ESTATE FOR RENT -4
deceaPlaintiffs' attorney, whose 3711S i W 4d 3Z4 I" 100 - Business/ sonr an 1993C27Km m-
CASE NO.:09-47-PR address is Ra. Box 340, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,S - L- -Web id -me-i-t.. 1 on, Funl o12p aKi
INPRBTE Port St. Joe, Florida FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL 3 44$996120-BeachRentals e I E $000 Sale $5500'Call
IN PROBATE 32457, on or before Sep- CIRCUIT OF THE STATEC 6130-Condo/Townhouse e 65-4300 866400
NOTICE TO CREDITORS tember 28, 2009, and file OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR Room 6140 - House Rentals Janalyn Dowden265-3430 o 866-3400
the original with the clerk GULF COUNTY. ECIwSE Attendant 6150 - Roommate Wanted 850 -251- 3432_
TO ALL PERSONS HAV- of this court at Gulf County IN PROBATE ' 61560- Roenms or Rent 850-251-3432 I|
INGACLAIMS OR DE- Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. 3100- Antiques Mainstay Suites in Port 170 - Mobile Homea/Lt 10 S. EAve.
ING CLAIMSCostin Blvd, Port St. Joe, IN RE:The Estate of 3110-.Appliances St. Joe is now accept- 6180-Out-ofl-Town Rantals 108 S. E.Ave.A
MANDS AGAINST THE Florida 32456 either be- JOHN SCRAFThe 3120 - Arts & Crafts ing applications for a 100 - TImeshareRentals Carrabelle, Florida 32322. .8160
AB3OVE ESTATE be- JOHN S. CRAFT, 3130 - Auctions Room Attendant. Candi- 6200 - Vacation Rentals also
fore service on Plaintiff's Decedent. 3140 - Baby Items date in WWW.5eacrestre.com
The admin sT i f oe attorney or immediately 3150 - Building Supplies date must maintain flexi-" - -
The administration of the rafter; otherwise a de- CASE NO. 09-70 PR 315 8- Business be schedule. Depend- 2 Bedroom 1 1/2 bath Yamaha Majesty, 2006
estate of ,Mary Francis fault will be entered Equipment ability is a must, If you 6110 _ 170 Bayshore Dr Eastpoint......... 700.00 400 cc, Excellent Con-
Mclnnis, deceased, File 3190-lectrhave n eye for detail , yn 1 i e
Number 09-47-PR is against you for the relief NOTICE TO CREDITORS 3170 - Collectibles an eye for eta 1 br, plus bonus room, 1.5 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Great gas saver, asking
ending in the Circuit demanded in the petition. 3190 - Elctronicmputers and a passion for serv be, Duplex, $585 mo. + House on 1/2 acre pet's ok Lanark Village 1000.00 $4,300 Call 648-2121
Court for Gulf CountThe administration of the 3200 - Firewood Beds Make Frieands, dep. Call850-229-6941 3 Bedroom 3 Bath -
oia, rob t D on, DATED this 21st day of Au- estate ofJOHN S. CRAFT, 3210- Free Pass t On s, Mke Jones Homestead. room ish a with 900.00
the address of which is gust, 2009. deceased, File Number 3220 - Furniture and Make Moneyll Condo~unfulnished withpool. ...... 900.00
the address of which is 09-70 PR, is pending in the 3230 - Garage/Yard Sales Please apply in person Charming 1 br garage apt, 1 Bedroom
d0 Prt Jo rid CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT Circuit Court for Gulf3240- Guns Mainstay Suites . overlooks Bay. Walk to
Cecil G Costin RCLERK OF THE CIRCUIT Circuit Court for Gulf 3250- Good Things to Eat 3951EHwy98 shopping. Port St. Joe, AptwithBay Views includes water. 500.00 Bs
B2vd5. PTh.Joe, Floridad- COURT County, Florida, Probate 3260 - Health & Fitness Port St. Joe, FL $495 mo., 1 yr lease. Call 2 Bedroom
dress of the personal rep- By: Jasmine Hysmith Division, the address of 3270 - Jewelry/Clothing ort . FL or ppt 850-227-7234 Furnished 2 roCOMPLETE PACKAGES
ress of the personal r Deputy Clerk which is Gulf County 3280 - Machnery/ EOE........DFWP for appt 850-27-7234 Apt Fully Furnished Bay Views...... 600.00 FROM
resentative and the per- August 27, September 3, Courthouse, Probate Divi- ,, Equipment Clean 3br, 2 ba in PSJ, 2 Bedroom 4 995F
sonal representative's at- 209 sion, 1000 Cecil G.Costin, 3290- Medical Equipment$750 mo br dep. Call Unfurnished Apt.........oom................ 600.00
tomey are set forth below. SortSt' '3300 - Miscellaneous$ + C U it .."04
3706S Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 3310- Musical slmments 850-545-5814 gr 2 Bedroom Al IWelded, AlAluminum
ALL INTERESTED PER- IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 32456. The names and ad- 3320 - Plants & Shrubs/ 850-442-3334. Unfurnished Apt....4....0000 a
SONS ARE NOTIFIED OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL dresses of the personal Supplies0..........Boats
SONS ARE NOTIFIED OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL representative andthe per- 3330 - Restaurant/Hotel The City of Port St. Joe is Duplex, 2 br, 2 be, laundry 1 Bedroom
THAT: CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR sonal representative's at- 3340 - Sporting Goods accepting applications for room CH&A, $790 mo. + Fully furnished Apt.................500.00 BOAT SHOW
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA torney are set forth below. 3350 - Tickets (Buy & Sell) the following positions: $700 dep. No smoking or 1 Bedro FRI & SAT
All creditors of the dece- CIVIL DIVISION . Electrical / pets, 221 7th St, PSJ, Call 1 Bedroom FRI, & SAT,
dent and other persons ' creditors of the dece- Instrumentation 850-229-8421 Furnished end unit with carport.. 525.00 BonifayFlorida"
having claims or demands CHASE HOME FINANCE, creditors of the de- instrumentation Beach front houses with winter rates. -
against decedent's estate LLC, dent and other persons Technician Call Joann for details about our short and www.xtremeindusties.com
on whom a copy of this Plaintiff,e having claims or demands. Water Plant Operator
noti ace is served within Plaintiff against decedent's estate, 330 Trainee 613 ong term rentals at 850-323-0444
three month afterthe date vs. including unmatured, con- Positions shall be open un-
of the first publication of tingent or unliquidated til filled. Please submit an r l
this notice must file their.KENNETHthis notice is served must 'application to .The City of
claims with this Court SR.; LINDA C. CROWDER; ' e d Port St. Joe, Attn: Char- r t om m er ia
WITHIN THE LATER OF otto Pierce, R O. xCh 278, 2 br,.2 ba, 1200sf TwnhmSt Joe C om m ercial
THREE MONTHS AFTER Auction Port St. Joe, FCarrabelle, large deck F r' ea
THE DATE OF THE FIRST Auction Applications and a full job $650 $65$0 dep. Avail- Retail I Office Space
N IC OTHIRT DA Hwy 386 Mexico Bch tione appt. 850562 317 Williams Avenue
SAFTER THE TE OF Florida 6:30pm Central. cityofportstjoe.com If you +/-1800sf - tenant improvements negotiable; $1350/mo gross
STERVICE OF A COPYE OF 7:0 Eastes . Follec ignites, have any questions, MINI STORAGE 325 Reid Avenue - -
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. iques co lease contact Charlotte +/-4500s - shell space; corner location; $2500/mo gross
* H N I ON- ~ THE M. ^wel of misc. Consignmens3 Pierce, Human Resource I n f S.t Joe 309 Reid Avenue ,
All other creditorsofthe 850-819-0773 or off a 9-826 +/-6000sf - renovated shell space; occupant ready; $4500/mo mod, gross

against the estate of the 964 A Opportunity/Affirmative Ac- +/-2100sf-finished retail space; $1750 mod. gross
decedent must file their *Free Foreclosure List- 964, AU#1384 tionEmployer and a Drug 814-7400 310 Reid Avenue
claims with this Court Todd's Family 'Home Da inags* 400,000++ Proper- Free Workplace. .+/-1116sf- Suite C; finished office space;, lobby area with two
WITHIN THREE MONTHS Care Have opening avail, ties Nationwidel Call now off ce suites andfiing/storage room; $1000/mo NNN
AFTER THE DATE OF THE Call Jacqueline Nickson 800-785-3592 Shop our new J 'h. 230 Reid Avenu g*| "
THI CNTICE for rates. 850-229-6430 Showroom Y-l/-756sf office/ret ,M"
THSN Ew ih o322 Long Avenue
ALL CLAIMS AND DE- -w packed with . +/-1000sf - move-in ready; $900/mo gross
MANDS NOT SO FILED Promachine *and Engi- hih Sit ouutihem Coastal Management 411 ReidAvenue
WILL BE FOREVER nearing, Specializing In high quality LONG TERM RENTALS +/-2668sf office space; $9.45 psf mod. gross
BARRED. Short & Long Run Pro- furniture at
BAR . duction, CNC Milling & . iue a Warehouse / Flex Space
The date of the first publi- Turning, Wire EDM, Proto- up to 60% of * Psi-Brefo0tCtntage-3br/35hbindludeswtersewer,trsh....Sl20 110 Trade Circle West
cation of this Notice is Landscain types, Tooling, Fixturing* 750sf-22,500sf - PSJ Commerce Park, flex space, $5.25psf NNN (incl.
August 27,2009. MoD&D Weding Special Machines, Stamp- regularetail.. PSJ-.BarefootCottge-2br2.5Sbintludeswatler,sewer,tash..$1,000 water/sewer)

RU5 LuMe FOrR ad ng&S eetrimmcng OUR WEBShI E promaad Di WRLUOUSE a Wewa - ]Riversideiit.-3br/2ba1Osq fi.................................S900 -,O00s offic x space; Adjacent to Costin Airport; $7 psi plus utilities
Wewahitchka, FL 32465 227-8225 engineeringinc.corn 212 Williams Ave ' and applicable sales tax; Inquire for possible incentives/concessions.
THOMAS S. GIBSON 719-533-1948 Downtown PSJ fl850229135 * 18666281334A 72 Hwy 98, Suite A
RISH, GIBSON & U^ - - H| f - 850qn-227-3344 Oww.Sal__U.~&&V.1 Ii O u mU. O I Jt +/-900sf office flex space, Includes 450sf overhead storage. $500/mo

Labor Day Holiday 320 Marina Drive
\I Corner lot on entrance to Marina Cove, prime location w/high visibility;
(Monday, September 7) .14 acres.


D e a d l i n e s L0 407ReidAve
I . d i s +/-4988sf; Multi tenant bldg 100% leased; Parking Inci; $549,000
317 Monument Ave
The Port St. Joe Star & C 7+/-4431sf; New construction located directly on Hwy 98; Parking Included;
STh e Apalachicola/C arabelle Times MINIi-OAE AD OFFICE i fi $649,000 Also available for lease. Please inquire for terms.
The ApalachicolalCarabelle Times MINI-STORAGE AND OFFICE COMPLEX 401 Reid Avenue s
Thursday, September 10. Friday, September 4, 5:00 p.m. Climate Controlled Units * Lease Warehouse Space +/- 5400sf-perfect retail space; $475,000 Also available for lease. Please
(CST) * Lease Office Space * Watercraft and RV Storage inquire for terms.
The classified department apd the business offices of The Star and The Times 8 5 0 - 2 2 9 -8 1 4 Marketed Exclusively by:
will be closed Monday, September 7. 802937850-229-8014 4 Ms b
We will reopenTuesday,September 8at8:00a.m.. *WWW.AMERICAMINISTORAGEANDOFFICE.com11 I
. .. I-*} * -L, i


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009 0 9B











USINESSl


Thursday, August 27, 2009


www. starfl.com


Mobile banking now available at Capital City


In today's busy world, ev-
ery one is looking for ways to
save time and money. New
.innovations, such as Mo-
bile Banking, make banking
even easier and more af-
fordable. Capital City Bank
now offers Mobile Banking
as part of their free online
banking service.
With Mobile Banking, cli-
ents may pay bills, transfer
funds, view transactions or
check their balances on the
go - anywhere, anytime.
Just like Capital City Bank


OnLine, Mobile Banking is
safe, secure and reliable and
it only takes a few minutes
to sign up. Mobile Banking
is available to all clients who
are currently using Capital
-City Bank OnLine and have
mobile phones with Internet
access.
"The key to successful
financial management is
keeping your finances or-
ganized," said Gulf County
President Ray Thompson..
"With these nontraditional
online services, it's now


easier than ever to do." Cli-
ents can take advantage of
the many free, value-added
services that are available
,with Capital City Bank de-
posit accounts, including
Capital City Bank OnLine
with Bill Pay, e-statements
and online alerts.

Online Banking
Clients can view account
activity, transfer funds be-
tween accounts and sign up
for personalized alerts with-,


out ever going to the Bank.
Reviewing bank account
activity regularly makes it
easy to check for fraudulent
charges and track account
balances.

Online Bill Pay
One late fee a month over
the course of a year plus
the cost of postage stamps
could total more than $400.
With automatic bill pay, cli-
ents can set up automatic
payments from their check-


ing account and avoid pay-
ing late fees or penalties.

E-Statements
This feature allows cli-
ents to receive their check-
ing and savings account
statements electronically
through Capital City Bank
OnLine. E-statements
have the same look and
feel as the paper state-
ments delivered to their
mailboxes and are avail-
able online for 120 days.


Online Alerts
Overdrawing an account
twice a month for a year
could cost hundreds of dol-
lars. Online' alerts can be
sent via e-mail or a text mes-
sage, delivering important
information to help manage
finances. These alerts can
be set up in several catego-
ries such as events, balance,
items and personal.
Stop buy your local Capi-
tal City Bank office for more
information.


Group accepting applications for housing program


The Gulf County Board
of County Commissioners
through the Gulf County
CDC and the Sate Hous-
ing Initiatives Partner-
ship Program will be ac-
cepting applications for
the Florida Homebuyer
Opportunity Program
starting on Sept. 14.
The FHOP Program
will provide down pay-
ment assistance loans to
those who are eligible for


the IRS Homebuyer Tax
Credit, part of the fed-
eral government's mas-
sive stimulus .package,
the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act of
2009.
The down payment as-
sistance loans will be in
the amount of $8,000 or 10
percent of the property's
purchase price, which-
ever is less. ,
To receive the down-


payment assistance loan
the buyer must close on
a property by the end of
November. Buyers who
receive a down payment
assistance loan must
file for the tax credit on
their federal tax return
next year and then repay
the Gulf County Board of.
County Commissioners.
To qualify you must be
a first time homebuyer or
not have owned a home


for at least the past three
years, as an individual
you must earn $75,000 or
less a year and couples
must earn $150,000 or
less. '
For more information
please call Erika White at
229-5399 or come by the
office at 401 Peters Street,
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. Assistance through
this program is based on
the availability of funds.


Bronson recognizes National Honey Bee Awareness Day


TALLAHASSEE - Florida
Agriculture and Consum-
er Services Commission-
er Charles H. Bronson is
joining with beekeeping
associations in Florida
and across the country to
recognize the importance
of honey bees in our lives.
Governor Charlie Crist


has also issued a procla-
mation recognizing Aug.
22 as Honey Bee Aware-
ness Day.
The first, National
Honey Bee Awareness
Day is dedicated to gen-
erating public awareness
about the contributions of
honey bees and promotes


awareness of how people pollinate dozens of fruit
can protect the . small and vegetable crops,"
insects. Beekeeping Bronson said. "With-
organizations in many out them, we would see,
areas are holding local a huge drop in our food
educational events to supply. We need to learn
connect with their com- more about these iinpor-
munities. tant contributors and
"Agriculture relies! help ensure their viabil-
heavily on honey bees to ' ;ity in the future."


PORT �T JOC

COMICRCC PPARk


w


* Climate Controlled Units 1(:F T
* Lease Office Space . ...... ..
.s Lease Warehouse Space

IMSTOIAGt AND OFR* COMPLEX Watercraft and RV Storage
850-229-8014
*www.AMERICAMINISTORAGEANDOFFICE.com* 80 -


July employment


numbers released


. The unemployment
rate in the Gulf Coast
Workforce region (Bay,
Franklin, and Gulf coimn-
ties) was 8.6 percent in
July 2009, 3.4 percent-
age points higher than
the region's year ago rate
and 2.4 percentage points
lower than the state rate
of 11-percent. Out of a la-
bor force of 101,721, there
were 8,795 unemployed
Gulf Coast residents.
"Overall our area's un-
employment rate has sta-
bilized. We are more than
two percentage points
below the state's rate and
we're seeing additional
job opportunities," said
Kim Bodine, Executive
Director for the Gulf Coast
Workforce Board. "One of
our local manufacturers'
is adding a third shift and
the Workforce Center is
currently assisting a ma-
jor retailer find and re-'
cruit workers."
The July 2009 unem-
ployment rates in the
counties that comprise
the Gulf Coast Workforce
Region were:
.* Gulf County, 8.4 per-
cent (down from 8.8 last
month and even with 8.4 of
two months ago
* Bay County, 8.7 per-
cent, and,
* Franklin County, 7.1
percent.
"Franklin County's un-
employment rate did see
an increase and we are


looking into the causes,"
said Bodine.
In July 2009, there were
73,300 nonagricultural
jobs in the Panama City-
Lynn Haven-Panama City
Beach metro area (Bay
County), down 3,200 jobs
over the year. The annual
rate of job loss in the area
(-4.2 percent) was not as
steep as the state's rate of
-5.1 percent. The Panama
City-Lynn Haven-Panama
City Beach metro area job
growth rate has been neg-
ative since May 2008.
The industry losing
the most jobs over the
year in the Panama City-
Lynn Haven-Panama City
Beach metro area was
trade, transportation, and
utilities (-900 jobs). The
following industries also
lost jobs; mining, logging,
and construction (-800
jobs); manufacturing and
professional and business
services (-700 jobs each);
financial activities (-400
jobs); and other services (-
100 jobs). The losses were
partially offset by gains in
leisure and hospitality and
government (+200 jobs
each).
Information and educa-
tion and health services
remained unchanged over
the year. Government
(+1.6 percent) and lei-
sure and hospitality (+1.5
percent) annual rates of
growth exceeded those of
the state.


Sunrise Constructio
& Company, Inc.
Commercial & Residential ___
Stan Siprefl H
850-227-9444 ..


I I I


HIGHLAND
VIEW


ARIZONA
CHEMICAL
/]


'I 7


COMMERCE BLVD ark
Port St Joe Commerce Park


PORT
ST JOE


I'


The Gulf County Tour-
ist Development Council is
pleased to announce that
2009 is proving to be one
of the best scallop seasons
Port St. Joe has experi-
enced in many years. Ac-
cording to the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission, since 1994
the St. Joseph Bay has
been surveyed by biolo-,
gists to monitor the scallop
population. Scallops , are
tallied and averages taken
show healthy growth. This
year's bumper crop of scal-
lops has brought visitors
from all over the panhan-
dle and beyond to enjoy a
day on the water in St. Jo-
seph Bay. .I
To those who haven't
tried their luck yet recre-
ational scalloping in the
bay will continue until
Sept. 10. Please note each
person is limited to two
gallons of whole scallops
or one pint of meat per day.
A boatload of five or more
people can take not more
than 10 gallons of whole
scallops or four pints of
meat per day. All scallop-
ers operating from a boat
must have a valid saltwa-
ter fishing license from the
state. Persons wading in
shallow area at low tide do
not need a license, but they
cannot use dive masks or
snorkels to help them find


the scallops. Be sure to
display a diver down' flag
to inform boaters nearby
of your presence in the wa-
ter.
The Gulf County Visitor
Guide produced annually
by the Tourist Develop-
ment Council has been
nominated for, a 2009 Fla-
gler Award. Gulf County's
Visitor Guide was selected
as one of the top three best
guides in the state. If your
visitor friendly business
would like to be included
in this informative publica-
tion distributed nationwide
please contact the Gulf
County Welcome Center
850-229-7800.
The Gulf County Tour-
ist Development Council's
marketing grant program
is providing funding for lo-
cal events to promote area
tourism. Coming soon:
* 13th Annual MBARA
Kingfish Tournament Aug.
29
* Yellow Fever Music
Fest Sept. 11-12.
* Beach Blast Triathlon
and Duathlon Sept. 12
* Gulf County Open
Sept. 12-13
* Apalachicola River
Flathead Catfish 'Tourna-
ment Trail & Festival Sept.
25-26
To see more upcom-
ing events check online at
www.visitgulf.com.


B
Section


Page 10


Tourist Development

Council News


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