Group Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.).
Title: The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03695
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Star
Publisher: Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Publication Date: July 30, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028419
Volume ID: VID03695
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
alephbibnum - 000358020
lccn - sn 95047323

Full Text














YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 A A 'A

YEAR 71, NUMBER 41


Thursday, JULY 30, 2009


For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com


A Home for a homeless veteran


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Walter Refour cut the red
ribbon on his new house Tues-
day morning and a wide smile
creased his face as his feet
performed a quick gleeful jig.
Refour, 77, had become
the proud owner of a two bed-


room, one bath home in the
Oak Ridge subdivision of We-
wahitchka, the house a prod-
uct of a deep faith mixed with
a heaping dose of intestinal
fortitude.
"This is much better than
the street," Refour said, while
preparing for an interview and
greeting guests. "I'm all done


in. I'll lose it if they let me. But
I'll hold it together.
"I was in dire straits for a
long time and this shows that
the Lord helped get me out of
those straits."
Refour is a Korean War
veteran and spent time in
two branches of military ser-
vice, the U.S. Army and U.S.


Air Force.
"I ran up a few hills, shot a
few people, got shot at a few
times," Refour recalled.
After he left the service in
the 1960s, he had a business in
Seattle and spent more than a
decade in Atlanta but returned
in recent months to his home-
town of Wewahitchka and his


family's ancestral home.
The problem was there
were 10 ancestors with at least
a partial claim on the home-
stead so addressing living
conditions proved a challenge
given 10 minds and opinions.
Activity inside the house
See VETERAN A6


New water pla


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
A few more passing tests and the
city of Port St. Joe's new $21 million
water plant should be making the
grade.
Plant workers have been testing
daily as they address elevated lev-
els of manganese in the water being
pumped out of the new plant and are
close to finding just the right balance
in the water to start it flowing toward
consumers.
If the test samples continue on
their current track downward, plant
manager Glenn Davis said, the plant,
already operational, could go on line
by sometime next month.
"We completed another compli-
ance sample this morning (Mon-
day)," Davis said, noting that the


Inside a microfiltration tank rank (left) and (inset) the clarity of the water
aher going through this step in the process from canal to tap.



ALMOST







L READY





TO




t could go live next month


manganese levels were the lone is-
sue in current testing. "The numbers
have been looking very good. We've
been running these samples every
day.
"We have to check a lot of things
before we send the watei out to the
public."
Davis said if the sample taken
IMonday comes back with good lev-
els of manganese a tentative date for
going live at the plant would be mid-
August.
"We're excited," he said. "We've
studied, we've worked hard. It's pret-
ty awesome. It's unbelievable where
we're coming from and what we are
going to.
"It's been a long learning curve.
We are still on the learning curve, but
we have a major walk-through with
our contractor (this past Tuesday)."


The plant is a testament to mod-
ern technology, as a stroll through
the facility this week highlighted.
The plant takes the city off the
Floridan Aquifer a priority for the
Northwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District for all, coastal cities
- and taps into the city's freshwa-
ter canal, which is fed by the Chipola
River.
The Chipola River is considered a
more bountiful and sustainable sur-
face-water source than the Econfina
Creek system that feeds Deerpoint
Lake, the main water source for Bay
County.
The impacts of the new plant, and
its modern system of micro-filtration,
are first evident at the. pump and bar
screens and strainers that welcome
See WATER A7


I


O FREEDOM
1 0 ( 1T A


Subscribe to The Star
227-1278
For your hometown paper
delivered to your home


Opinion ..................................... A4
Letters to the Editor................... A5
Sports.... ........................... A8
Socify .... ................................... B2


Obituaries............... ............... B5
Church News............................... B4
School News ................................ B6
g ls......................................... B8


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i .i ld ,\l dk.nlinr t.I, FrulI v I I am. Eni
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50(


REFOUR


TABLE OF CONTENTS


County sets

tentative

millage

By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer

SBudget concerns contin-
ued to consume the county
commission meeting last
week.
The regular meeting
was held one. week early,
on the third Tuesday of the
month instead of the fourth,
because commissioners
were scheduled to attend
a meeting of the National
Association of Counties the
last week of July.
The result was more
back and forth on proposed
budget items, a slight re-
duction in the total amount
of the budget, and a ten-
tative millage rate set of
5.77G2.
One mill equals one dol-
lar for every $1,000 of prop-
erty value.
With only six non-county
employees in the audience,
commissioners added an
across-the-board tipping
fee of $35 per ton to landfill
users.
They estimated the fee
would produce approxi-
mately $350,000 in revenue
per year, which would be
used to offset the. more
than $900,000 annual cost
of landfill operations.
This would be added to
the one-half cent sales tax
commissioners passed two
weeks ago, all of which was
See COUNTY A3


City approves
tentative

millage rate

By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

The Port St. Joe budget-
ing process officially began
last Tuesday, with the city
commission approving 4-r
a tentative millage rate of
4.5914, a one mill increase
from last year
The board is required to
submit a tentative millage
rate to Gulf County prop-
erty appraiser Kesley Col-
bert. The final millage rate
cannot exceed this number,
but may be reduced during
the budgeting process.
One mill represents $1
per $1,000 in taxable per-
sonal property. A 4.5914
millage rate would levy
slightly over $1.8 million.
During the July 21 regu-
lar meeting in City Hall,
Mayor Mel Magidson
See CITYA3


mow





Thursday, July 30, 2009


Local


A Weekend of Music, Food & Fun hosted by the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce

iNo SaturdayIn August,


.-T /, .



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1 . "*


Schedule of
Events
13th Annual Scallop
Festival 2009
August 1st & 2nd

Festival Location
Marina Cove, Port St Joe
(Behind CVS Pharmacy,
off Hwy 98)

Saturday, August 1. 2009
11:00 am Opening
Ceremony with MC Jerry
Tabatt of News Channel 13

11:00am 6:00pm EDT

Scallops served by PSJ
Lions Club
Saturday


Vendors in the Park, lots
of Arts & Crafts and Many
Varieties of Food Vendors
Scallop Shucking
Demonstrations, Seafood
Cookbooks featuring scallop
recipes,
,.....-' Children's Activities, Smokey
Sthe Bear, Educational Activities
& Displays, Bounce Castles,
Pony Rides, Petting Zoo
Kids' Trackless Train
0 Free Kids' Zone Arts and
Crafts

1:00pm 10:OOpm EDT

AWESOME MUSICAL
LINE-UP:


Ctl r
lo~ri


Partial Funding For This Event


'- L E WAT E F,..
-O LUTRIGGERS'


-AI I1-A,, on


cIC/IIS


SCapital City
Bank,


j Progress Energy
People. Performance. Excellence.

Provided By The Gulf County Tourist Ieye a
A t , ,


N enny


W\ >f

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TFTHE STA

CURREnT A
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PREBLE-RISHINC


great southern
school of fish
CestauCaft


NORTH FLORIDA
LAND & CAPITAL


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sata 6 S


i A .. V


1:00pm Opening Act:
THINK?

2:15pm 3:15pm:
BO SPRING

3:45pm 5:30pm:
AMANDA SHAW

5:45pm 7:45pm:
ERIC LINDELL


8:00pm
TAB


- 10:00pm:
BENOIT


Sunday, August 2. 2008
10:00am 6:0m EDT

Scallops served by various
vendors

The fun continues with
Arts & Crafts and Food
Vendors in the Park
Children's Activities
Bounce Castles
Free Kids' Zone Arts and
Crafts
There is a $5.00 Entrance
Fee on Saturday
(for 18 years and older only)
No charge to enter on
Sunday


DUREN'S
ipigly wiggly


Amber Lowry
Mortgage Banker
Vision Bank.
"Your C(' mm nalv Bank" Office (850) 636-7988
www.visionbank.net Cell (850) 227-4492
529 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Fax (850) 227-1149
Port St. Joe, FL 32456 alowry@vlslonbankfl.com
Member FDIC


Debbie Hooper
Photography
850-229-1215
Family Beach
Portraits,
Aerials, Web &
Brochure Images


Go to www.joebay.com to view new online
galleries for special events like Kids Win...


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go "L


RIMBB
NewsI3


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Thursday, July 30, 2009


T ,oal1


The Star I A3


City-County "train wreck" forestalled for now


By Marie Logan
Contributing W\itcr

Port St. Joe city com-
missioners and Gulf County
commissioners met in a
first-of-its-kind joint work-
shop July 22 to see about
getting on the same page,
politically speaking.
The meeting was an olive
branch offered by the county
to the city in an effort to cre-
ate a friendlier working en-
vironment between the two
entities, after years of what
could often be described on
many occasions as an adver-
sarial relationship.
After a brief opening
comment by county com-
missioner Nathan Peters,
who also chaired the joint
meeting, county administra-


tor Don Butler said that the
city "may not hear all the
details we hear This could
be the first of many such
meetings. We probably have
similar visions so today let's
lay out the issues and we can
work out the details later"
The first topic covered
the water and sewer infra-
structure projects involving
Overstreet, Beacon Hill, St.
Joe Beach and White City.
The long-running project
came out of the interlocal
agreement:between the city
and the county over the an-
nexation of the WindMark
development into the city
in exchange for water and
sewer lines being installed
by the city to the outlying
areas.
After reports on the sta-


tus of the projects by Port.
St. Joe public works director
John Grantland and Preble
Rish engineer Bill Kennedy,
no one seemed to have any
questions.
Butler added a request
to notitj the county ahead of
time about city water/sewer
rate increases, since that
was also an issue, he noted.
The city was also asked to
keep the county informed
about road projects, road
closings and other issues
and projects that affected
county maintenance or op-
erations.
The joint sports complex
project was next for discus-
sion.
The end result was that
both sides agreed to go
ahead and fund approxi-


mately $62,500 each in this
budget year to complete
the project study, the design
plan, all the permitting and
the elevation grading plan in
order to bring the project to
a shovel-ready point. Then,
as money becomes avail-
able, the project could be
built in phases.
Both commissions
agreed that the complex
could be used as an eco-
nomic engine to greatly help
the local economy, once the
complex was built.
Tempers began flaring as
discussions moved on to up-
coming city utility rate hikes,
which are tied into the city's
bond money and bond debt.
That segued into the
county's newly implement-
ed tipping fee, which the


city will have to pay, and the
recently passed county half-
cent sales tax, which also
hits city residents.
No agreement was
reached on the issues, al-
though county commission-
er Warren Yeager pushed
for the city to give its portion
of the half-cent sales tax to
the landfill in exchange for
not paying the tipping fee.
The county wanted to dis-
cuss the Port St. Joe Rede-
velopment Agency (PSJRA)
and the substantial amount
the county is required to pay
to the agency annually. How-
ever, Matt Fleck, executive
director of the PSJRA, left
the meeting about halfway
through and the county com-
missioners wanted Fleck to
answer questions.


Port St. Joe Mayor Mel
Magidson told the panel that
he had already had discus-
sions with Fleck about the
budget and reported "he's
sensitive to that issue and
he's open to discuss that."
Magidson continued, say-
ing it was a new reality, that
the government could not do
everything.
"If the people want it,
they should expect to pay
The government should be
in the business of providing
what the people cannot do
themselves," he said."
The meeting concluded
with a general consensus
that more meetings were
needed in the future or, as
one commissioner put it, "if
we don't, it will be a train
wreck."


COUNTY from page Al


earmarked for landfill op-
eration costs.
The hope was that with
both new revenue sources,
the county landfill could be
operated without using ad
valorem tax dollars, as it
has been in the past. The
object was to pass the sales
tax and reduce ad valorem
taxes by the same amount.
The county currently
spends about $900,000 on
landfill operations. The
half-cent sales tax and tip-
ping fees are estimated to
cover about two-thirds of
that cost.
The motion to pro-
ceed with the tipping fee
plan, beginning October 1,


passed 5-0.
The board passed a mo-
tion 5-0 to shift one full-time
employee from the pro-
posed consolidated road de-
partment and public works
into a second full-time ani-
mal control position.
The idea had been bat-
ted around for months as
commissioners repeatedly
noted that the county's sin-
gle animal control officer,
Roland Jones, simply could
not respond to all the calls
for animal control county-
wide.
Commissioner Bill Wil-
liams was again the pro-
ponent of the idea and the
move was backed by Com-


missioner Billy Traylor,
who agreed with Williams
and noted that "if it were
not for the Humane Soci-
ety, we [the county] could
not do this," referring to
the capture and care of
roaming, abandoned and
nuisance animals.
Other budget items
were discussed and either
retained, omitted or kept at
the current funding levels.
Included was cutting
just over $34,000 from the
Mosquito Control budget,
a sunset of the conflict
resolution counsel's use
of courthouse space, with
the clerk's office taking the
space for storage, saving


$6,000, dropping property/
casualty insurances to save
$25,000, saving $300,000
by delaying funding for a
county/city sports complex
and a savings of more than
$200,000 by cutting money
from the jail budget.
In addition, the county
would save $23,000-plus by
not paying building insur-
ance or providing mainte-
nance of the county health
department's facilities and
over $10,000 by having the
each fire district pay the in-
surance on their respective
buildings.
After a short break to al-
low Clerk of Court Rebecca
Norris time to refigure the


budget, the meeting re-
convened and the tentative
millage rate of 5.7762 was
announced.
That would reduce the
county's ad valorem taxes
from the public from rough-
ly $12.6 million to $11.4 mil-
lion.
Commission chair Na-
than Peters then said he
wanted the meeting to ad-
journ so, that commission-
ers could "absorb tonight's
information.
"We know for sure we
can't increase it [budget]
from 5.77, so let's chill out
and look for more cuts," he
said.
Commissioner Carmen


McLemore wanted to con-
tinue the meeting and set-
tle the budget completely
that night, saying the board
could do better, could do
it in the meeting, and he
would not support the ten-
tative millage rate.
The motion to adopt the
tentative rate passed 4-1
(McLemore voting no.)
The board then set the
,first of two required public
budget hearings for Thurs-
day, Sept. 3 at 5:30 p.m.
ET. The second will be an-
nounced later.

Star News Editor Tim
Croft contributed to this
story.


CITY from page Al


championed the one mill
increase, saying, "We have
to be careful we don't paint
ourselves into a corner"
by prematurely setting the
millage rate too low.
Saying he would be
comfortable only with a
maximum half-mill tenta-
tive increase, Commis-
sioner Greg Johnson was
the lone voice of dissent.
City manager Charlie
Weston briefed the board
on his search to fill three
staff vacancies at City
Hall..
In total, Weston inter-
viewed 33 candidates, 19
for the accounts receivable
position and seven apiece
for city auditor/clerk and
finance director.
Weston offered the ac-
counts receivable position
to Darla Lyle, whom he
praised for her "good ex-
perience and expertise."
Jim Anderson, who has
been the acting city clerk
since Pauline Pendarvis'
retirement earlier this
month, earned Weston's
recommendation for the
city auditor/clerk position.
The board approved the
hire 5-0.
Calling the finance di-
rector position still under
review, Weston asked to
"lay out other options" to


the commission during a
workshop, scheduled for
July 28 at 5:30 p.m. in City
Hall.
In other business:
*Commissioners re-
viewed proposals from
Capital City, Vision and
Superior banks on a six-
month construction loan to
pay for infrastructure and
drainage improvements
along Sunset Circle.
Capital City Bank of-
fered the lowest interest
rate, at 3.45 percent.
Though the city initially
asked for a $252,000 loan to
help complete the $395,000
project-funds will be reim-
bursed by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Rural
Development Johnson
pushed for a revised loan
in the full amount.
"That way all the eggs
are in one basket the
money's all there," said
Johnson, who convinced
commissioners to ap-
proach Superior Bank with
an amended proposal.
*Public works director
John Grantland gave an
update on the Overstreet
Water Distribution proj-
ect.
With all project infra-
structure, the city -may
submit for clearance from
the state by the end of next


week.
*City Police Chief Da-
vid Barnes submitted a
proposal to alleviate a
parking problem on the in-
tersection of Baltzell Ave.
and State 71.
Barnes, who reviewed
the parking situation near
the boat ramp at Frank
Pate Park, proposed clos-
ing off parking on both
sides of State 71 south of
Baltzell, approximately
135 feet from the intersec-
tion.
The proposal, Barnes
said, would eliminate four
or five parking spaces and
give drivers a clear line of
sight before turning onto
State 71.
Commissioner Rex
Buzzett made a motion
to approve Barnes' plan,
which died for a lack of a
second.
Commissioners agreed
to meet at the intersec-
tion prior to an upcoming
meeting in hopes of find-
ing a more acceptable so-
lution.
*Toye Roberts, owner
of American Mini Storage
on Industrial Road, lob-
bied the board for a sign
directing traffic on U.S. 98
to Commerce Park.
Citing 20 businesses
currently operating in


Phase 1 and 2 of the Com-
merce Park, Roberts said
business owners "deserve
just as much recognition
as people on Reid Avenue
or Williams Avenue."
City attorney Russ
Scholz said the city is be
bound by state law, which
provides for directional
signs along state road-
ways, but not signs adver-
tising specific businesses.
The board voted 5-0 to


direct Grantland to pur-
sue state permitting for a
directional sign advertis-
ing Commerce Park.
*Two upcoming meet-
ings have been scheduled
to discuss the proposed
BG&E biomass energy
plant.
The first, a joint city/
county public meeting,
will be held on August 12
at 6 p.m. ET in the Gulf
County Commission Meet-


ing Room.
A second meeting will
be held on August 26, with
time and location to be de-
termined.
Executives frdm BG&E,
including president and
CEO Glenn Farris, will
give presentations on the
plant, which will be built
at the former Material
Transfer Industries parcel
on the Intracoastal Canal:


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amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and the rules
and regulations of the U. S. Department of Agriculture which provide that no
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The person responsible for coordinating this organization's nondiscrimination
compliance efforts is Roy Barnes, CEO/General Manager. Any individual, or
specific class of individuals, who feels that this organization has subjected
them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes
and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this
organization; or the Secretary, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington,
D. C. 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Utilities Service, Washington,
D. C. 20250. Complaints must be filed within 180 days after the alleged
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A4 The Star inion


Thursday, July 30, 2009


Keyboard KLATTERINGS


Home of the brave
The news hit like a the rearview mirror do
thunderbolt on Monday we see what we easily
morning, forget.
The son of former And in doing so, we
Port St. Joe city manager can disengage from a
Lee Vincent was killed in war that began eight
action in Afghanistan. years ago, that had its
The young deadliest month
man had hardly for Americans
arrived, and now last month and
he comes home that was the
in a flag-draped good" war that
coffin, to full ..- turned into the
military honors, one most of us
as though that forgot.
provides solace. We forgot.
A family TIM CROFT Forgot that
grieves, friends Star news editor the right to make
recoil in disbelief, those subprime
and tomorrow, for mortgages and
far too many of us, our engage in practices
little narcissistic plays of intended to enrich the
life will continue, few at the cost of our
We have become economy comes at a
numbed to war. price that cannot be
Maybe because calculated, cannot be
we have never had to carried on a ledger sheet
make the sacrifices that and cannot be counted
generations past have on or off the books.
had to make. Forgot that across
Possibly because in the globe, in lands where
this technology age, the sun beats down in
there is always a Web degrees much higher
site to visit, a blog to than in North Florida
read, a way to disconnect in the summer, in lands
from the real world where victory is defined
that surrounds us by by who moved the rubble
connecting to the ether last, American men and
and its world of wonders women in uniform serve
and shamelessness. and die.
Several weeks ago, it Forgot that news
was a young man from that matters in the
Alligator Point, just grand scheme doesn't
deployed to Afghanistan, involve the governor who
who lost his life doing strays to his mistress in
what his mother believed South America, Michael
to be a mission, a sort of Jackson's legacy, Barack
redemption to make a Obama's birth certificate
difference, or what happened in that
More and more house in Cambridge,
young folks make such Mass.
choices, choices that Forgot that the
for many of us seemed political maneuvering and
unreachable, especially partisan demagoguery
for a generation that over issues such as
many of a certain age health care, energy
have written off as sustainability or the
incapable of making budget and deficits serves
the stark life-and-death no purpose in advancing
choices that have defined the ideals we have
the country's fabric in charged our youngest and
threatening times. brightest with advancing
Only now, too many half a world away.
see those threats at Forgot that we are not
home. the sun, with everything
On Wall Street, in elite in rotation around us.
banking circles, in the We forgot that young
marketplace of Congress men with the last name
where votes are bartered of Vincent, and many
like cap-and-trade on others, were still dying in
carbon emissions a hot, dusty chaotic land.
exceed limits, and there We forgot about those
is always a way to push who remember.
the dividing line further Talk to Brenda Garth
up the road. for a few minutes, and
We have become it becomes evident that
caught up in remaining Brenda and her husband,
in our houses, remaining Jim, not only have not
on the job, keeping food forgotten; they can not
on the table, maintaining forget.
a lifestyle of too often In addition to their
easy consumption, to daughter, their son,
scan much beyond our desiring to accomplish
horizons. something of substance,
The mortgage, the to make a difference,
car loan, the insurance enlisted, is undergoing
premiums, the monthly basic training and might
bills have taken the
front seats, and only in See KLATTERINGS A5



THE STAR

USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
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P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone 850-227-1278


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POSTAGE PAID AT
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In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
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received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Aw, shucks!
The ball bounced
weakly on two hops
right back to the
pitcher. My heart
sank. With men on
second and third,
I had dug in just
seconds before KE!
thinking I was COL
going to be the Hunk
hero. It was not to
be the case this at
bat. A thousand thoughts
raced through my head
as the ball sank into the
pitcher's mitt. None of
them good! Failure is not a
pleasant companion. I was
already two steps toward
first base, going through
the motions of hustling out
the play.
"Run," I heard the
distinct voice of Chick King
from the third base dugout,
"you can't never tell!"
Chick was the best
baseball coach I played for
in a career that began in
the backyard and ended 54
years later when I could no
longer lift my right hand
over my shoulder to throw
BP to the high school guys.
I couldn't count the teams,
players or uniforms I'd
worn.
I was 15 and in my
first year with Chick as a
wannabe catcher for his
American Legion Team. I
put my head down and ran
with all my might. Chick
was not one for doing
anything halfway. The
pitcher's toss to first base
beat me by 20 steps!
My next at bat, again
with runners in scoring
position, I took my best
swing of the day ... and
lifted a lazy fly ball behind
second base. The shortstop
was already in motion, and
my bat, tossed disgustedly
in the air, hadn't found the
earth when I heard that
familiar voice, "Run, you


Our VIEW





Tipping point


In his bestselling book "The
Tipping Point," Malcolm Gladwell
defined tipping points as "the levels
at which the momentum for change
becomes unstoppable."
Against that template, it is hard to
dismiss the feeling that Gulf County
is near a tipping point in terms of
economic development.
No question these are difficult
times. It does not take a newspaper
column or a wise, or as is too often
the case, a nonsensical adage
emitted during a commission
meeting to underline the point.
During a recent county
meeting, a local resident lauded
the commissioners for attempting
to diversify their revenue portfolio
in order to take some burden off
beleaguered property owners.
Meanwhile, there is much talk in
recent months about diversifying the
economy and that the county can no
longer afford to put all its eggs in one
basket, as one resident put it, be that
a paper mill or real estate.
Recovery from tough economic
times will come by diversifying the
private sector.
And it seems plenty of irons are in
the fire, as evidenced by last week's
edition of this newspaper.
The Sacred Heart hospital chugs
ahead, a staffing plan crafted, job
descriptions being reviewed and
construction apace for a March 2010
opening.
Sacred Heart has had to make
some sacrifices to the economy in
advance of opening, but this is still
a facility that will employ up to 95
people during its first year with a
payroll of roughly $5 million.
A "green" energy plant seems
tangible, the land purchase and
financing moving forward on a $160
million plant that will employ as
many as 200 during construction and
25-30 upon opening in 2011.
The Port of Port St. Joe continues
to build on its land resources,
its barge terminal along the
Intracoastal Canal nearly complete.


The Port Authority nears a potential
land swap, with The St. Joe Company
as a partner, which would allow the
port the operational footprint on the.
bayside to become what some are
calling a "boutique" port.
The Port Authority is also
pursuing, and seems cautiously
optimistic about receiving, a $30
million federal stimulus grant that
would provide a huge push forward
toward an operational port creating
high-paying, high-skilled jobs.
There are also series of potential
projects and prospects that the
county Economic Development
Council is moving ahead on,
including a possible waterfront
hotel along.U.S. 98 and a "green"
energy park on up to 1,000 acres
near the canal that is being
sponsored in large part by Florida's
Great Northwest, an economic
development organization in the
Panhandle.
There are commerce/industrial
parks that provide a base at each
end of the county for prospective
businesses and a push for the
completion of connector highways,
or the use of existing waterways, to
link Gulf County with Interstate 10.
SWhile the national economy
is buffeted by a host of forces, in
Gulf County there is a foundation
for optimism, hinging on two key
factors.
The first, government has to
stand aside, cheerlead and lessen
the tax burden.
All taxing authorities should be
working as diligently as possible to
whittle spending. That government
is one of the few growing business
categories in the region in.terms of
employment.
What spending cuts that have
been seen, while.laudable, have been
insufficient in comparison to the
spending of the go-go years of the
real estate market.
The concept of basing spending
on actual need might remain elusive
for too many elected officials.


But lessening the burden,
while playing the role government
should play, as facilitator to and
cheerleader for efforts in the private
sector to create jobs and bolster the
sustainability of this county, is the
role for the public sector.
Secondly, the private sector has
to buy into and support the many
tentacles of change being extended
throughout the county.
One can't sit on the sideline
complaining about government and
taxes, the lack of a cohesive vision,
the lack of firm tracking of public
dollars and the spendthrift ways with
which some elected officials treat
other people's money and choose to
do-nothing, save complain.
Sacred Heart is something that
can be touched, the port's efforts
are taking shape off the drawing
board and on the ground, a proposed
"green" energy park has critical
support, BG&E seems on its way, and
the EDC has other fires smoldering,
but the private sector must invest
and engage, if for no other purpose
than providing a united front to
elected officials.
An economic development
specialist made a tour of Gulf County
months ago and said the advantages
of Gulf County from the viewpoint of
a business interested in relocation
started with a trainable and
available workforce.
And, he said, Gulf County could
not afford to sit back and wait for
new businesses to come.
A stable government and a
clear long-term vision from elected
officials was crucial, but more so was
an engaged private sector lending
expertise and support to increase
the county's profile as a place where
things can happen.
So it would seem the county has
arrived at that juncture of which
Gladwell wrote.
Tip one way and the county
seems on the cusp of unstoppable
economic development. Tip another
and, well, maybe not.


SL
LB
er


can't never tell!"
Chick could
be a little crazy
at times! There
was more than a.
good chance that
even an American
Legion shortstop
LEY could dart 20 feet
RERT to his left and
Down settle under this
weak pop fly. Chick
felt that if you
didn't run every time, you
wouldn't be ready when
your break finally came.
The groan from the home
team stands told me I'd
killed another rally.
The three years in
Paris, Tenn., as a member
of that team were
most remarkable and
memorable. We played
every day. And I mean that.
Chick would work us out
one Saturday in May, and
we'd play a game every
day for the next three
months! He was adamant
that baseball was a great
reflection of life.
"Kes, the best way to be
a better baseball player is
to play! You don't get much
practice in life. It's real
every day."
It didn't make much
sense to me. Fifteen is a
tough age ... and I was all
mighty green to boot. If I
hit a screamer up the left
field ally, he didn't say a
word. When I shot a bullet
into right field on the hit
and run, he didn't move a
muscle. But when I hit the
lazy can of corn toward
center, it was, "Run, you
can't never tell."
You talk about a broken
record!
The second week of
college, I realized life was
a little tougher than facing
that tall right-hander
from Jackson. It was my
first time ever away from
home. School was hard.


Professors didn't sugar
coat it or wait for you to
catch up. Mom wasn't
there to tuck me in at
night. My girlfriend's Dear
John letter was short and
to the point. At football
I was being used as a
tackling dummy. I thought
long and hard about
packing it in and going
home.
"Run, you can't never
tell." In my despair I could
hear Chick from 200 miles
away. Only now I realized
he wasn't talking so much
about baseball. Easy to run
when you've blasted one
off the right-center field
wall. Easy to race around
those bases of life when
everyone is cheering you
on. Easy to strut your stuff
when you are on top of the
world. ... It's the weak pop-
ups where you'd better
bear down.
No lightbubs came
on. No great revelation
befell me. No one at the
university gave me any
quarter. But I put my nose
to the grindstone and went
digging "down the line"
like life itself depended on
it. You're sure not going to
get anywhere standing at
home plate!
I graduated on time.
Chick King is smarter
than he looks.
And I've tried to repay
him by passing his wisdom
on to every young person
that I've ever had the
privilege to work with.
Some get it immediately.
Some who, like me, are a
little slower on the uptake,
hopefully will understand
at some point down the
road.
You don't get many
practice days in life. And
there ain't no easy runs!
There are too many out
there now looking for
something for nothing. I


don't think it works that
way. If we are waiting for
the world to start cheering
us on. I don't think it works
that way either.
Chick wasn't in the
baby-sitting business! He
played you if you got the
job done. If you didn't, he'd
drive down to Cottage
Grove or out to Buchannan
and find someone who
would. You didn't have
to be around too long to
figure things out. The
games were real for him.
And so was life.
,Chick amazed me with
some great Mickey Mantle,
Al Kaline and Bob Gibson
stories. He paid for every
meal I ate with him. He
looked me right in the eyes
when he talked to me. It
was obvious that he liked
me from the very start.
... And he told me to take
care of my family. Make
some money. Listen to my
heart. Don't trust 'em until
you know 'em. Stay out of
bad places. Folks, I was 15
years old!
Chick figured I was
old enough. He made you
old enough! And a blind
guy could see you were
important to him. To say
he gave my life and I
was only one of hundreds
a boost would be the
understatement of the
century. I love Chick King.
He recently spent a
little time in the hospital.
I stood by his bed in
'the antiseptically clean
room and tried to think
of something witty or
uplifting or profound to
say. The only thing I could
manage was a weak,'"Run,
you can't never tell."
He got the message.
Chick and I hope you
do, too!

Respectfully,
Kes


What goes around ...










A5 I The Star Letters


Thursday, July 30, 2009


KLATTERINGS

from page A5

soon be on his way to
the Middle East with a
Marine unit.
Brenda described a
network of fellow moms,
and even a dad, who
use technology such as
satellite phones, cell
phones, Skype and the
like to form what amounts
to a support group for
families of soldiers in
battle zones.
Brenda offers a brave
face, but it is one shaped
by a community of parents
and sisters and brothers
who can do nothing
stateside but pray and
hope together that they
will be more fortunate
than the Vincents, that
the next time they see
their children it won't be
a photo adorning a flag-
draped coffin.
They are there for
each other, a shoulder,
a disembodied voice or
a distant face to lean
on, to commiserate with
and pour out the mix
of emotions that race
through them on a daily
basis.
Emotions the rest of
us can hardly relate to,
emotions that most of us
spend much of every busy
day of our lives avoiding.
So we forget, until
a day such as this past
Monday.
But a death, a
calamitous injury should
not be required to jolt us
back to reality.
Daily we should remind
ourselves we enjoy the
life we do in part because
there are still those who,
even after two, three, four
and five deployments,
are demonstrating a
definition of bravery and
honor at odds with suicide
bombers and improvised
explosive devices.
And when we forget
that reality in the daily
hubbub of our lives, we
disserve those in uniform,
not to mention the final
line of the national
anthem we sing before
every ball game.


Letter to the EDITOR


Insane or incompetent?
Attention taxpayers of
Gulf County!! Our county
commissioners have tentative
plans to lay off up to 16 employees,
some of your neighbors and
friends, while at the same time
spending 2-3 million dollars on
frivolous ideas. This would lead
you to believe that the economy
is hurting our county just as
much as the rest of the country
in these difficult and challenging
times. If this is so, why does
our leadership already have
plans to spend 2-3 million of our
dollars to consolidate most of
the county departments to a site
in Howard Creek? How much
work is actually performed in
that general location? The theory
is that by consolidating Public
Works, Courthouse Maintenance
and Mosquito Control from PSJ
and the Road Department from
Wewahitchka into one location that
we will save money by reducing to
one electric bill, one water bill, etc.
How many years of saving these


few dollars each month would it
take to actually cover the initial
2-3 million expense? Keep in mind
that all county vehicles would
now have to travel from Howard
Creek to either Wewahitchka or
PSJ to actually perform their daily
work, burning more fuel each day
and adding unnecessary wear
and tear. Moving all departments
15-20 miles away from the work
concentration areas of PSJ and
Wewahitchka doesn't make
sense to me. This also affects
the employees, as now they have
to travel farther and burn more
fuel daily. It is estimated that
to make the chosen site high
enough for development, they
will have bring between 6,000-
9,000 loads of fill dirt, essentially
building the site in a swamp with
no city water or sewer services.
With large commercial-grade
vehicles including dump trucks
and loaded tractor-trailer trucks,
you can expect the fuel costs to
more than make up for any saved
expenditures.
Let's discuss spent funds


which would go down the drain.
Gulf County Public Works has
recently spent money for a new
trailer to include set up for a
$10,000 deck built around it. The
trailer has warrantees included
from the installer, which would not
transfer with the building if moved.
The building used by the Road
Department is in very good shape
and would no longer be used. The
oldest department building is the
Public Works building in PSJ, and
it is still in great shape. There
are plans to move this building
to the new site, which I'm sure
would never be the same after it
is rebuilt. The state paid $300,000
to build a Mosquito Control
building. It is the building behind
the courthouse that is how one
large storage building because the
county couldn't find the money to
finish the inside. Can you imagine
building a $300,000 storage shed?
A lack of funds to finish the inside
of a brand-new, and free, building
but we have millions to construct
an entirely new site? This free
building isn't exactly moveable.


How does it feel to be the proud
new owners of a very expensive
and very nice storage building
compliments of the state?
I am under no delusion that the
weakened economy has affected
us and the county may need to cut
a couple jobs to make ends meet.
Some cuts may need to be made in
order to make up for the reduced
gross income 6f Gulf County
inhabitants and the associated
lower spending and reduced sales
tax income.
Consolidation has its uses, but
a cost vs. benefit analysis should
be performed and public opinion
weighed before decisions are
made. In these times of going
"greener," I would think we would
be doing things to decrease fuel
consumption instead of acting
on poorly thought out whims
that will increase our county's
carbon footprint. If consolidation
is still considered to be the best
choice, move the only county
department in Wewahitchka
(Road Department) down to PSJ.
Gene Dykes


The future of Gulf Coast Community College


By Dr. Jim Kerley
GCCC President

In their last two
meetings, members of the
Gulf Coast Community
College District Board
of Trustees discussed
in detail the idea of our
college moving forward
with state college
designation. The trustees
are charged to ensure
that Gulf Coast meets
the highest standards of
excellence, and they take
their duty to safeguard
the interests of this
institution in a purposeful
and thoughtful manner.
Earning the state college
designation is a rigorous
progression, and the
trustees and I intend to
hold our core community
mission first and foremost
throughout the process.
There is a considerable
outline to follow before this
change can be granted
to our college, and we
will be deliberate in
our approach to ensure
all avenues have been


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SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: 850-227-7212
Email: tcroft(eistarfl.com

Comments trom our readers in the form
of letters to the editor or a guest column are
solicited and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial
page should be a forum where differing ideas
and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
light to edit letters for correctness and style.


discussed and reviewed
prior to submission. At
this writing, 15 of the
current 28 community
colleges in Florida have
made the shift or are in
the process of changing
to state colleges. The 2009
legislature even changed
the name from the Division
of Community Colleges
to the Florida College
System. This newly named
system encompasses all
public community and
state colleges and allows
community colleges
across the state to offer
baccalaureate degrees.
One reason for this change
to a state college model is
that Florida is not keeping
pace with the number of .
bachelor's degrees needed
for the modern workforce.
The state's universities
are unable to meet these
growing needs, especially
in key workforce areas.
As a state college, we
would not be allowed to
offer master's or doctoral
degrees, and we have
absolutely no interest in
these areas. Our primary
Goal is to meet regional
workforce needs where


lia Ri


F1..MGit 5t0


there are documented
voids and not duplicate
universities. Offering
degrees in this manner
provides cost efficiencies
to the state and substantial
savings in tuition to our
students.
Our primary community
college mission will
not change if we were
to offer baccalaureate
degrees; we will still
focus on open access
and hope for all students,
workforce education
programs, outreach
to the underserved,
remedial education and
complying with current
articulation agreements
with universities. The
beauty of the colleges
within the Florida College
System is that we are all
locally controlled and are
able to meet needs of our
communities more rapidly
and more economically.
We will expand our
mission to give individuals
opportunities to stay
in this region and earn
certificates, associate and
bachelor's degrees. Again,
it is our intent to work
in cooperation with our


ifll .


re

i


I~I~III I


educational partners and
not to duplicate services.
A growing trend in our
student population is an
increase of more non-
traditional students. For
example, this summer
we had a substantial
enrollment growth and 57
percent of our students are
over the age of 25, and 22
percent are over the age of
44. Many are seeking new
opportunities to retrain
or upgrade their skills
and would like to have the
opportunity to access a
full range of baccalaureate
degree programs without
extensive and burdensome
travel or expense.
Our goal at Gulf Coast J
Community College, as
espoused by our five-year
strategic plan, is to work
in partnership with our
educational and economic
partners. We believe our
future direction should
be more college and
university partnerships
with less duplication.
We will continue to work
closely with our valued
FSU PC partners, and
we recognize that no one
college or university can


offer all that is needed.
With a college/university
partnership approach, we
could offer a multitude
of degrees to meet the
needs in this region. Why
not join the efforts of Gulf
Coast, FSU PC, University
of West Florida, Troy
University and others in a
university/college center
partnership? We all have
strengths and excellent
programs to put on the
table, so why not team up
to meet the growing needs
for our changing area?
We are dedicated and
passionate about our
college and this region
we serve, and with our
talented faculty and great
staff, we will continue
to offer cost-effective
programs for Northwest
Florida. We will always
keep our open access
mission and will strive
to serve this community
at a higher level,
working together to reap
tremendous dividends.
"Coming together is
a beginning; keeping
together is progress;
working together is
success." Henry Ford


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A6 I The Star


Local


Thursday, July 30, 2009


Budgets and sidewalks


dominate Mexico


Beach meeting


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer

The July 14 Mexico Beach
city council meeting covered a
lot of territory, including budget
hearings and sidewalks. Council
member Curtis Dale was absent.
Council member Jack Mullen
gave a brief report on the success
of the town's July 4 celebration,
reporting that almost 300 run-
ners participated in the holiday
run and several hundred children
took part in the fishing tourna-
ment. As for the July 4 fireworks
display, yes, he said, the finale
accidentally was fired off first be-
cause of a computer glitch.
According to city engineer
Chris Forehand of Preble Rish,
plans for the city's new water
plant are 90 percent complete and
will soon be sent to the city for ap-
proval. From there the plans will
be sent to the U.S. Department of
Agriculture as part of the city's
grant application.
Two current cases of hom-
eowners moving forward with
work on their properties with-
out proper permits had the city
council debating over the proper
procedure for handling such
cases. Adding to the debate were
other property owners arguing
that some property owners face
no punishment for breaking city
code while others face penalties
or denial of work.
The council decided to con-
sider fines for property owners
working without permits to be
added to the current pity codes,
which currently do not address
the issue of penalties for such ac-
tions.
The first reading of Ordinance
569 passed unanimously, which
will allow golf carts on Fifteenth
Street on the proposed eight-foot
wide sidewalk.
The council passed Resolution
2009-06 at the June 9 city council
meeting (4-0) to apply for Florida
Department of Transportation
funding to construct the sidewalk
from Fifteenth Street (at U.S. 98)
along the north side of Fifteenth
Street to County 386 at the east
side of town.
At the July meeting, the motion


BUDGET HEARING
Sept. 14, 5:01 p.m.
CT- tentative first of two
required public budget
hearings for Mexico Beach


passed 4-0 to continue the U.S. 98
sidewalk from Fifteenth Street to
Fifth Street, in accordance with
the sidewalk master plan.
The city has recently complet-
ed new sections of the sidewalk
and connected a variety of exist-
ing sidewalk sections from the
Charles M. Parker Bridge at the
western entrance of town along
the north side of U.S. 98 to Fif-
teenth Street.
Mexico Beach city manager
Chris Hubbard reported that
the former restaurant Top of the
Gulf, at the corner of Forty-Sec-
ond Street and U.S. 98, will soon
be demolished beginning in early
August. The city will plant grass
on the lot after demolition, Hub-
bard said.
City clerk Deborah McLeod
confirmed that the city had re-
ceived its certification from the
Bay County property appraiser
showing Mexico Beach property
values dropping by 19.2 percent.
However, McLeod said that
the city of Mexico Beach and the
property appraiser's office used
differing baselines for their data
and Mexico Beach was using
their own figures that showed a
23 percent drop in property val-
ues from last year's certification.
That equates to approximately
a drop of $517,000 in budgeted
revenues from last year, McLeod
said.
In a switch to some pleas-
ant news, Mexico Beach Chief
of Public Safety Brad Hall re-
ported to the council that long-
time Mexico Beach police officer
James G. Norris was now back in
Mexico Beach from his second
tour in Iraq and had decided to
stay in town permanently instead
of being activated back into the
military. Norris has resumed his
position as captain on the Mexico
Beach police force.


WELCOME HOME: Walter Refour, center, cuts the ribbon on his new two bedroom home in
Wewahitchka as representatives from the local, state and federal agencies and Taunton Truss
who made the house a reality enjoy the moment.


VETERAN from page A1_


also proved a difficult environ-
ment for Refour, a devout, soft-
spoken man.
"I see him today and I am just
so proud," said Mike Ubias of
the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture's Rural Development office.
"I've been inside what was his
home. I've seen the conditions
he was living in. He is too proud
to talk about it, but I've seen it
first-hand.
"I'm proud to be in his pres-
ence today. It makes my job a
pleasure." '
A home for Refour his fam-
ily property was not, so he had
taken to spending days in his car,
often parking for the day under
the large shade tree at one end
of the IGA supermarket parking
lot, witnessing for his faith.
He would be there the entire
day. Sometimes the car would
provide his head a place to lie at
night.
But, Refour said, he formu-
lated a plan. He was a property-
less man who needed a property
on which to build a home, but he
had limited resources or assets
outside of an automobile.
But he had his faith.
That faith, Refour added, in-
formed his plan, guided his plan
and that plan led him to the office
of Joe Paul, the affordable hous-
ing expert for Taunton Truss.
"Being a Christian myself
and a disabled veteran myself,
like Mr. Refour, I thought this is
my job," Paul said. "This is part


T% '-


.-.-.. -


'I,


of Mr. David's (David Taunton of
Taunton Truss) vision of provid-
ing housing for those who can't
afford it.
"I spent enough time educat-
ing myself on all these, (govern-
ment affordable housing) pro-
grams. I know the ropes. I know
the questions to ask."
So Paul applied the educa-
tion he had gained research-
ing the various programs and
crafted a package that would
work. Months were needed, but
the payoff Tuesday came in that
bright, wide smile on Refour's
face.
"This is what our family is all
about," said Taunton. "Whether
they are two years old or 77, that
is what we have always been
about, helping people who can't
help themselves."
The price of the 1,000 square
foot home, in a subdivision the
Taunton family had dedicated to
affordable housing, was $99,000,
including closing costs and ap-
pliances. The home is Energy
Star rated.
The Florida Home Ownership
Pool (HOP) provided $24,000 and
the State Housing Initiative Pro-
gram (SHIP) kicked in $17,500 in
down-payment assistance.
USDA, which had been deal-
ing with requests from Refour
since 2004, Ubias said, provided
the rest, including a mortgage at
1 percent interest with a monthly
payment of roughly $300.
As Ubias put it, the USDA can


provide more bang by leveraging
bucks from other programs.
"Joe Paul was the arms and
legs to all this and the process-
es," Refour said.
Paul countered, "It is great
to know a person who wouldn't
have a home now has a home. I
wasn't going to take no for an an-
swer. We kept pushing until we
were able to get the money for
his house."
And on Tuesday morning,
with workers finishing up some
small work in the bathroom, Re-
four cut a bright red ribbon in
front of representatives of the
various agencies, members of
the Taunton Truss family and
some friends, old and new.
Refour's first thought?
"Does this lady need this rib-
bon back because if she does I
need to be careful where I cut,"
Refour said with a laugh as oth-
ers around, hearing his story,
shed a tear or two: .
"I just look at this house .:.
Anybody who touches this house
will be blessed. All this means to
me is that I am a servant of Je-
sus Christ and he will take care
of his own. Everything that had
to do with this, God aligned."
As-the ribbon was sliced and
drooped, Paul had a more secu-
lar take on Tuesday morning's
event.
"A home for a homeless veter-
an," Paul boomed as Refour cut
the ribbon and took in the glory
of his new home.


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Thursday, July 30, 2009


Local


The Star I A7


PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT I The Star
At left, a critical element to the new city water plant is a two million gallon storage tank. Water will be pumped from the tank to public consumers when the plant
comes online, possibly by mid-August. At top right, the new city water plant taps into the freshwater canal fed by the Chipola River. At bottom right, this series of
pumps will send the water from the storage tank to the general public. The four pumps in the rear will service the city of Port St. Joe, the seven in the foreground will
service the Beaches area, including Highland View.

WATER from page Al


the canal water and remove
the "large stuff," as Davis
termed it, from the water.
"This water has gone
from looking like tea to
looking like ginger ale," Da-
vis said at the canal pump
area. "We are capable right
now of processing up to six
million gallons of water per
day."
The water then routes
under the ground across
Water Plant Road to a
large-bore pipe in front of
the new plant.
There the addition of
chemicals to address ph
levels, cleaning of danger-
ous biological agents, cor-
rosion inhibitors and the
like proceeds in a series
of pipes that lead to row of
clarifiers, three of the four
currently operating as they
should.
This is also where the
city is experimenting with
adding polymers to the wa-
ter to provide cleaner water
without as many chemicals
in play.
"If you can make the
best water with the fewest
chemicals, that is the best
to me," Davis said.
Polymers are quite
sticky and additional care
must be employed .with
using them in the clari-
fier tanks, four huge round
tanks'located behind the
main building of the plant.
A view from the top of
two clarifiers, one using
polymers and the other
not, showed a distinct dif-
ference in the process in
the clarifying tank using
polymers the residue that
one would not want to drink
even under threat of death
was clearly visible near the
surface of the main tank
pump, where the water is
brought up.
Polymer or not, the wa-
ter flowing out of both clari-
fiers was clear and far dif-
ferent than that emerging
from the canal.
Davis provided the anal-
ogy of tea. Put in ice to
make it cold, heat it for hot
tea, add sugar for sweet
tea, but the key was the fi-
nal product.
"We've come a long way
since we first started," Da-
vis said. "We are doing real
well with the three clarifi-
ers we have on line."
The clarifier tanks send
the water through more


The "brains" of the plant, the microfiltration system and tanks. Plant operators plug
to produce safe potable water and the system does the rest.


underground pipes two
clarifiers share a central
pipe into the plant to the
membrane filtration sys-
tem.
There are four mem-
brane tanks that can be
operational at any ohe time,
but part of each day also in-
cludes a backviash to clean
the membrane system in
each tank or at times a tank
may not be operating due to
demand.
The membrane tanks
are effectively the brains
of the system; plant staff
plugs in the proper num-
bers as far as various levels
of aspects like turbidity and
ph and the system adjusts


by computer to fit those
numbers.
An operators' room in
the plant includes a com-
puter on which an operator
can observe all that is hap-
pening at the plant. Simi-
lar computer screens are
located at key points in the
plant.
,The plant also has a
backup generator system
that will allow it to remain
fully operational in the
event of a power outage.
The water coming out
of the membrane area is
nearly as clear as that in St.
Joseph Bay.
Water travels to what is
known as the contact area,


essentially a series of tanks
with baffles that create
what amounts to a maze in-
side each tank in order that
the water makes sufficient
contact with the chemicals
used to treat it.
Adjacent to the contact
tanks are a series of above
ground storage tanks that
provide the chemicals to
address corrosion, ph lev-
els, turbidity and purifica-
tion of the water.
Davis said plant op-
erators have been working
with various vendors to find
the right balance and be-
lieve they have done so.
The water; ever clearer
from each stage of the op-


eration, is then pumped to
a two million gallon storage
tank that Davis said is the
key structure on the plant
campus.
"If they had told me they
could not build a new plant
and if I could choose one
thing to be built, it would be
that storage tank," Davis
said. "That's the one thing
we have to have."
The waterwill go directly
from the storage tank to the


public by way of the pump
house, which encloses a
series of 11 pumps four
pumping to the city of Port
St. Joe and seven to the
Beaches, including High-
land View, St. Joe Beach
and the Beaches Volunteer
Fire Department.
"We have the capability
to pump a lot of water," Da-
vis said with a smile.
As per Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection mandate, the
new plant also includes a
Plan B which would use
some of the infrastructure
from the old plant across
the road.
.At the headworks for
the water coming out' of
the canal, plant operators
have the ability to tap back
into the deepwater wells
currently sating the city's
water needs in the event of
issues with the new plant.
The city is currently
producing roughly 1.5 mil-
lion gallons of potable wa-
ter per day and the initial
DEP permit for the new
plant was for approximate-
ly three million gallons per
day as a Class B plant.
When the city reaches
4.7 million gallons per day
the plant will be considered
a Class A plant, requiring
24/7 staffing, which Davis
said is nearly the current
staffing level..
The last remaining
items to be tested at the
new plant are the 11 ser-
vice pumps.


End


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Thursday, July 30, 2009


Snnrtg


FHSAA rescinds rules that would


have limited sports


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The Florida High School
Athletic Association board
of directors met on July
15 and voted unanimously
to rescind amendments
passed in April that would
have limited high school
sports seasons in all com-
petition but football.
Facing a Title IX law-
suit filed on behalf of par-
ticipants in girls' sports,
the FHSAA board called
an emergency meeting to
consider its April 27 order
reducing in-season games
in all sports but football by
20 percent.
At that meeting, the
board rescinded its earlier
decision limiting the num-
ber of games in all sports
but football.
"I believe what we did in
April was the best thing for
the membership then, and
given the situation, what
we did today was in its best
interest now," said. Board
President Greg Zornes.
The decision to man-
date a cut in the number of
games played by any team
in a scholastic sport other
than football was intended
as a balm for the pain felt
in district school budgets
across the state.
The move was one ap-
plauded by school officials
facing tough budget years.
And exempting football


made sense as the primary
feeder of revenue into high
school athletic depart-
ments.
"Football is the genera-
tor of most of the (athlet-
ics) funds across the state,"
said Superintendent of Gulf
County Schools Tim Wilder,
one of two superintendents
currently sitting on the
FHSAA board.
However, in an effort to
address a Title IX challenge
brought in South Florida,
the FHSAA considered ex-
empting girls' sports, such
as softball, basketball and,
in order to balance the
numbers, even competi-
tive cheerleading from the
schedule reduction man-
date.
But with roughly 43,000
high school football players
around the state, the num-
bers never could be brought
fully into equal balance for
female sports; Wilder said
the disparity was narrowed
to roughly 10,000 athletes
statewide, and a Title IX
suit was filed.
Wilder said this seemed
like the better course at this
time to rescind the April
decision rather than fight a
Title IX lawsuit that could
drag out over several years
and drain tight coffers fur-
ther.
And any decision to re-
scind the April decision
had to be completed quick-
ly because scheduling for


seasons

next year is under.way, and
high school athletic direc-
tors needed to know the
number of games that can
and cannot be played next
year.
The concern for Wilder
is that by rescinding the
maximum game reduction,
athletics, such as junior var-
sity sports, could be jeopar-
dized.
"We are going to rescind
it and give all games back
to the schools," Wilder said.
"Some districts will have
to eliminate junior varsity
sports. We are sick about
it."
FHSAA Executive Di-
rector Dr. Roger Dearing
said, "I know there have
been a lot of blogs and news
articles about the FHSAA
and this particular issue
regarding gender equity. In
actuality, the FHSAA is rec-
ognized by its peer mem-
,bers from other states as
leading the nation in terms
of providing equal and eq-
uitable opportunities for
both boys and girls in high
school.
"We were yesterday, are
today and will be tomorrow
advocates for both boys and
girls equally in creating life
experiences that will make
them healthier, happier and
more competitive, while
at the same time creating
memorable experiences
they will have for a life-
time."


Football season 1 month away


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
As July turns to August, the gridiron
heats up as high school teams anticipate
the start of fall practice in a couple weeks
in preparation of the regular season,
which begins Sept. 3 for both county high
schools.
Scheduling proved a battle this year
for second-year Port St. Joe coach Vern
Barth, who found few Class 1A teams in
the area willing to play the Sharks and
not many team wishing to pay a visit to
Port'St. Joe, where the Sharks were un-
beaten last year, at all.
Port St. Joe starts the season against
larger schools Bay High,(on the road)
and Rutherford High (at home) and trav-
els to Interlachen before beginning the
district schedule.
The Sharks also have just four home
games, three bunched in a row in the
middle of the season followed by a four-
game road trip, including a 22-mile ride
to county rival Wewahitchka, to finish the
season.
The Wewahitchka Gators also face
tough early tests as they go on the road
for three of their first four games, includ-
ing trips to Tallahassee Maclay, Jeffer-
son County and Blountstown, which joins
District 2-1A this season.
The Gators also play a series of home
game in the middle of the season before
finishing the season with two of their final
three games on the road, the lone home
game against Port St. Joe on Nov. 6.
District 2-1A has a slightly different
look this season as Jay, Freeport and
Sneads exit the district and Blountstowh
joins, turning an eight-team district into
a six-team league.
The top two finishers qualify for the
playoffs, with the district champion host-
ing the first round, the runner-up on the
road.


PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL
2009 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

9-3 at Bay High School
(Panama City)
9-11 Rutherford High School
(Panama City)
9-18 at Interlachen High School
(Interlachen)
9-25 Liberty County High School
.* 10-9 Franklin County High
School
10-16 West Gadsden High
School
10-23 at Blountstown High
School
10-30 at Marianna High School
1.1-6 at Wewahitchka High
School
11-12 at Maclay High School
(Tallahassee)

WEWAHITCHKA HIGH SCHOOL
2009 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

9-4 at Maclay High School
-(Tallahassee)
9-11 Chipley High School
9-18 at Jefferson County High
School
9-25 at Blountstown High School
10-2 Bozeman High School
(Panama City)'
10-9 Liberty County High School
10-16 Franklin County High
School
10-23 at West Gadsden High
School
11-6 Port St. Joe High School
11-13 atJay High School


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COMMUNITY


Thursday, July 30, 2009


www. st arfl comi


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
At top, using a sharp carving tool, Bobby Pollock shapes a wooden salad bowl on a hand-ccafted lathe. Pollock has opened a woodturning studio/shop in Port St.
Joe. At left, To construct this segmented maple and mahogany bowl, Pollock used a miter saw to build up the individual joints before turning and shaping the bowl on
his lathe. At center, Pollock crafted this unfinished collection of small and large bowls from one pecan tree log. At right, Pollock applied a coat of green tinted lacquer
to bring out the grain in this spalted sycamore vessel.



Artist coaxes shapes out of unfinished wood


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Snakelike wooden coils
from a 70-year-old pecan
tree climbed Bobby Pol-
lock's right arm, gathering
in heavy layers above his
smocked sleeve.
Pollock's gloved hand,


barely visible beneath the
coils, steadied the base of.
a long-handled knife slic-
ing through a spinning
disc of wood today, an
unwieldy slab of pecan, to-
morrow a salad bowl.
On the 1,400-pound
steel lathe he built with a
retired Georgia machinist,


Pollock defined the shape
of the bowl's bottom, let-
ting the shavings fall
where they may.
"I tell people I make
shavings more than I make
bowls," Pollock laughed.
A decades-old pecan
tree is a rare find for a
woodturner, and Pollock


has wasted no time get-
ting to work.
A collection of a dozen
rough cut bowls, all carved
from the same 100-pound
log, rest beneath Pollock's
outdoor workshop.
Pollock received the
pecan tree from a Blount-
stown couple who felled


S i By Hannah Henderson


it while clearing land for a
home renovation.
Obtaining the raw ma-
terial for his work is a con-
stant challenge, particular-
ly during an inactive hurri-
cane season.
"If you've got bad weath-
er, you can get big trees. If
you don't have bad weather,
you really have to look,"
said Pollock.
Originally from Gaines-
ville, Ga., Pollock and his
wife Jackie settled in Mexi-
co Beach four years ago.
Theyrecentlypurchased
a home on 521'4th Street,
which they've converted
into a studio/workshop,
called Studio on 4th.
When it opens, the studio
will feature a wide range of
pieces, including bowls,
candlesticks, vases, pepper
mills, wineglass holders
and wall hangings.
Though local stores like
The Grove in Mexico Beach
and Avenue E in Apalachic-
ola carry his work, Pollock
relishes his face-to-face in-
teractions with customers.
The Pollocks view their
gallery as an interactive
space. They welcome the
chance to teach visitors the
art of woodturning.
"So many people don't
knowwhatawoodturneris,"
said Jackie, standing on the
backyard deck overlooking
her husband's workshop.
"They can sit here, have a
Coke and watch him turn a
bowl."
Pollock began tinkering


with the art of woodturning,
which has its roots in an-
cient Egypt, a decade ago
in Georgia.
He crafted wooden pen
and pencil sets on a com-
pact pen lathe and gradu-
ally worked his way up
to bowls, learning the art
from his late friend, Phillip
Keen.
A private exhibit of work
by celebrated father/son
woodturning duo Ed and
Phillip Moultrip inspired
Pollock to aim higher.
Wanting to make bowls
up to 40 inches in diam-
eter, Pollock linked up with
a Gainesville .machinist
named "Rabbit" Farmer.
Pollock, who ran a ma-
chinist shop for 35 years be-
fore retiring, designed the
lathe and helped Farmer
with its construction.
The lathe features a mo-
torized pulley system that
rotates wood from 600 to
2,000 revolutions per min-
ute (rpm).
Pollock lifts the wooden
pieces using a two-ton ca-
pacity hydraulic engine
hoist, and bolts them onto
the lathe. ,
Around 800 pounds of
lead and sand in a rear
chamber prevents the lathe
from tipping over.
After roughly shaping
his designs on the lathe,
Pollock lets each piece dry
to 10-12 percent moisture
content inside a covered

See WOODTURNER B10


B
Section


Page 1





Thursday, July 30, 2009


R2 I Tklm oi S


Birthday and BIRTH


Wedding and ENGAGEMENT

Tharpe-Costabile
Cathey Kim Tharpe
of Mexico Beach and
Gary John Costabile of
Panama City have finalized
their wedding plans. The
r wedding will take place at
-; ,, WindMark Beach on Aug.
8 at 7 p.m. EST. No local
invitations have been sent.
All family and friends are
invited to attend.
S After their honeymoon,
the couple will reside in
Lynn Haven.


Wyatt Husband turns 2
Happy 2nd Birthday Wyatt Husband!
Love, Mommy and Daddy


Powell-Rosado
Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Powell of Port
St. Joe announce the engagement and
forthcoming marriage of their son,
Mr. Dustin Lynn Powell, to Tera
Renae Rosado, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Tim Stockdale of Hot Springs,
Ark., and Mr. Rey Rosado of Ashland,
Mass.
Dustin is the grandson of Mr. and
Mrs. Lavernon Powell and Mr. and
Mrs.Wayne Ernst, all of Port St. Joe.
Tera is the granddaughter of Mrs.
Dean Chenault and Mr. and Mrs.
Reinaldo Rosado, Sr.
An Aug. 15 wedding is planned for
7 p.m. ET on the beach at WindMark
Beach. A reception will immediately
follow the service at 105 Washboard
Court, WindMark Beach.
No local invitations are being sent.
All friends and relatives are invited to
attend.


Wewa Woman's CLUB


Isabella Lila Marie Fox is born
Isabella Lila Marie Fox was born July 1 and weighed 6
pounds and 15 ounces.
She is the daughter of Jason and Jade Fox of
Wewahitchka.
Isabella's maternal grandparents are Tim and Angela
Davis of Wewahitchka and Albert Fincher of Apalachicola.
Paternal grandparents are Jim and Kim Fox of
Wewahitchka.
Maternal great-grandparents are Jerry and Gloria
Jackson of Apalachicola and the late Angelo Quinones.
Isabella was welcomed home by her uncle Briceson
Davis.


By Linda Whitfield
At the July 13 meeting of the Wewa-
hitchka Woman's Club, Vice President
Sharon Gaskin called the meeting to
order. The meeting was held at the
Fellowship Hall of the United Meth-
odist Church. After the pledge to the
American flag, devotional, treasurer's
report, and the reading of the min-
utes, items of old and new business
were discussed.

Relay for Life
A little bit of a change this year
for this fundraising event for Cancer
Research. It will be held at Lake Al-
ice Park on Aug. 8 from 10 a.m. CT till


10 p.m. There will be food and drinks
sold, and teams are being organized
now. Please make an effort to help
with this noble cause.

Upcoming events
At the Aug. 10 meeting, plans for
the Wewahitchka Jr. Miss Program
will be finalized. This will be the first
such program in our town. The event
is set for 6 p.m. CT on Nov. 7 at We-
wahitchka Elementary School Com-
mons. Neysa Wilkins has graciously
consented to be the mistress of cer-
emonies. Advanced tickets will be $5
and at the door they will be $8. This
event is for high school senior girls
who live in the Wewahitchka ZIP code


(32465) area. For more information,
contact any member of the Woman's
Club.

September meeting
On Sept. 14, the Woman's Club will
host its annual Recruitment Tea. This
will be to invite prospective members
to join our organization. It will be held
at the Fellowship Hall of the United.
Methodist Church and will begin at 5
p.m. CT. If we are to m.ke Wewa an
even greater place to live and work,
we need lots of help with new ideas,
etc.
The October meeting will be Oct.
12, when the Woman's Club will host a
forum discussing medical issues.


We will be closed for vacation from
Wednesday July 29th to Friday July 31st
We will re-open on Saturday August 1st
.Coin-op Laundry Dry Cleaning Wash & Fold


"FHA REVERSE
MORTGAGE"
Refinance or Purchase
Helping Seniors Every Day

No Payments on the loan
(850) 522-4078
* No Taxes, No income Required or Toll Free
(877)-422-9667
* No We DO NOT own your home, you do
* No Your home DOESNOT have to be paid for
* No Restrictions on the money you receive
BOB DALLAS, SR. LOAN OFFICER
STOLL FREE: 877-422-9667
You must be 62 or over to qualify for this offer
A "-W ,YMO TGG


Kiwanis KORNER


By Johanna White
At last Tuesday's meeting, we had
James Wiley, the pastor of Oak Grove
Assembly of God, come and tell us
about the Fishes & Loaves Ministry
that is offered at the church. Most of
us had heard about the program but
didn't know the details.
Fishes & Loaves was a heartfelt
calling of Bill and Jackie Brickers'
who are members of the church. In
2002, the Brickers' felt God tugging
on their hearts to start a food minis-
try for the shut-ins, the disabled and
the elderly, making sure that they
would get at least one hot and nutri-
tious, meal a day. At the beginning of
the program, Fishes & Loaves start-
Sed by preparing 17 meals a day; they
now serve 70-80 meals a day, Monday
through Friday.
Pastor Wiley gave several testimo-
nies of how Fishes & Loaves has been
and continues to be a ministry to the
ones they reach out to. He told us.
that the income of the recipient has


no bearing on whether or not they
qualify for the program. It's based on
the recipient's ability of being able.
to prepare a meal for themselves or
not.
The Fishes & Loaves Ministry is
paid out of the annual budget of the
Oak Grove Assembly of God. Pas-
tor Wiley noted that they do receive
some contributions outside of their
budget, but for the most part, Oak
Grove Assembly budgets the funds to
make sure this ministry will continue
from year to year. He also mentioned
that they are at full budget with 70-80
meals being prepared each day.
Most of us know someone that may
have or continues to benefit from this
program. Pastor Wiley commented
that they could always use more vol-
unteers to help with the cooking and
deliveries. And of course, donation to
the Fishes & Loaves Ministry is al-
ways a blessing.
If you would like to know more
about the Fishes & Loaves Ministry
at Oak Grove Assembly of God, you


can contact the church at 227-1837.
On a Kiwanis note of business, we
will be serving jambalaya this Satur-
day at the Scallop Festival. We will be
serving from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. and
then again from 4-7 p.m. Come and
enjoy some of Kathy and Dianna's fa-
mous jambalaya and the Scallop Fes-
tival. Support your community and
your Chamber of Commerce.'
I want to encourage all of our
members to be faithful in attending
our weekly meeting. If you are inter-
ested in being a part of civic organi-
zation, please consider Kiwanis. The
Kiwanis Club is a group of business
men and women taking part in giving
back to the community. The Kiwanis
Club meets every Tuesday at noon at
the Gulf County ARC & Transporta-
tion building located on Industrial
Road. For more information, you can
contact Kathy Balentine or Dianna
Harrison at 850-229-6327 or me at 850-
227-6268.
The Kiwanis Motto: Serving the
children of the world.


ow


I \ [H1,,., *> p,.r[ l, e Ne. i,. ihe Pi '-'-. I, \'I i_
Display Advertising
II Deadline Fridays at 2 p.m.
for the following Thursday Paper
Classified Advertising
Deadline Mondays at 4 p.m. J
I for the following Thursday Paper
I Birthdays, Weddings
I Obituaries and
t Public Service Notices
I Deadline Mondays at 4 p.m.
Sfor the following Thursday Paper

18501227-1278
L. *, .. ^- ^ -,,.*a


From D


of Oil Change Express
Our sincere thanks for the past Six
and half years of working with you.
We are still in the community and
available for any help you may need.

CLEANERS POUISES
Dan & Nancy
Ostman
Jax Wax Distribution LLC
Cell: 850.832.1560
P.O. Box 13331
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
ACCESSORIES ADDITIVES


I


.-A


Snocnetv


BR I The Stanr


, .,cs~,


Aduil



A-A 19

14






Thursday, July 30, 2009


Local


The Star I B3


Wewahitchka gears up for Relay for Life


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The Wewahitchka Relay for
Life to benefit the fight against
cancer will be held from 10 a.m.
to 10 p.m. CT on Saturday, Aug.
8.
"This is going to be a real
community event in the fight
against cancer," said Cyndi Ara-
ni, community representative for
the American Cancer Society's
Panama City office.
This year's relay will be held
in Lake Alice Park, the walking


trail skirting the shoreline of
beautiful Lake Alice.
Arani said a host of vendors.
have been lined up for the event.
"We have great food that will
be out there and arts and crafts,"
Arani said. "We will also have
things for the kids to do."
Those will include a petty zoo
and children's train rides around
the park.
There is also a lineup of bands
and musical performers who will
be providing a backdrop of rock,
bluegrass, country and western
music, the performers entertain-


A "We just want the whole com-
S[ munity to come out," Arani said.
"It will be like a festival."
After the opening ceremonies
RELAY there will be a survivors'walk for
the first lap around the park fol-
FOR LIFE lowed by a lunch and reception
-[ for those who have survived a
SI bout with cancer.
"They are the reason we do
relay, those who have survived
and those who are stricken,"
Arani said, adding that there is
ing from the central park amphi- still a need for survivors for the
theater all day long and into the opening lap.
night. The luminaria ceremony,


remembering those who have
fought valiantly and lost the bat-
tle against cancer, will take place
at 9 p.m. Folks can still purchase
luminarias from the American
Cancer Society.
Arani added that there is al-
ways room for more vendors and
anyone interested in either be-
ing a vendor can contact Arani
at 850-785-9205, ext. 3508 or by e-
mail at c.arani@cancer.org.
For more information about
the Wewahitchka Relay for Life
go to www.relayforlife.org/Wewa-
hitchkafl.


Davida Byrd Scholarship Foundation Run a success


The Davida Byrd Scholarship
Foundation would like to thank every-
one for their generous monetary do-
nations and participation in the First
3K Walk/Run Festival. Your commit-
ment to helping the future of our chil-
dren in the community assisted us
in raising a record amount. Through


the foundation many students have
made their way through college, and
because of your giving many more
will do the same.
In addition to individual donations,
we would like to thank our sponsors
Duran's Piggly Wiggly, Paul Gant's
BBQ, Tan Smiley's Car Wash, and


Subway (Port St. Joe). Each donation
pushes the Davida Byrd Scholarship
Foundation closer to successfully ac-
complishing its mission.
Thankyou again for your generous
support to the Davida Byrd Scholar-
ship Foundation. Looking forward to
seeing you next year.


TOPS Club offers ways to eat smart at games


Taking friends or family
to the stadium can mean
coming face to face with a
major league selection of
high-fat foods, such as hot
dogs, pizza, nachos, brat-
wurst and soft drinks.
A smaller venue doesn't
necessarily mean a health-
ier one. Vendors peddling
fatty treats like heavily but-
tered popcorn, ice cream,
and chips are selling out at
little league games across
the country. TOPS Club,
Inc. members know it is
possible to be both health-


conscious and a time-
crunched, hungry baseball
fan.
"Eat before arriving at
the park," said TOPS Club,
Inc. member and regional
director Judy Pettit. Pet-
tit is a member of TOPS
Club, Inc. (Take Off Pounds
Sensibly) in Albany, New
York, home of the Yankees.
Her favorite team, how-
ever, plays at the local little
league park.
"I carry a diet soft drink
or bottled water to my
grandchildren's games,"


Pettit said. "We either pack
a light supper with chicken,
baked, fat-free chips, and
grapes or watermelon.
Sometimes we take fat-free
cheese chunks and healthy
crackers."
TOPS Club members
keep weight off by learning
to choose low-fat, heart-
healthy foods. These in-
clude soft pretzels, turkey
sub sandwiches (hold the
fatty mayo and cheese, add
fresh spinach & tomatoes),
veggie dogs and low-carb
wraps, fat-free yogurt and


fresh fruit cups and salads.
TOPS Club, Inc. is a net-
work of nonprofit, noncom-
mercialweight-loss support
groups. Members learn
about nutrition, food plan-
ning, exercise and more.
Weekly weigh-ins, group
feedback and support help
members achieve their
goals. TOPS Club, Inc. has
chapters throughout the
U.S. and Canada, and its in-
ternational headquarters is
based in Milwaukee, WI.
Visit: www.tops.org or
call 800-932-8677.


20th Annual Exotic Bird Fair and Festival will begin August 29


TALLAHASSEE The Big
Bend Bird Club, Inc. of Tal-
lahassee will host its 20th
Annual Exotic Bird Fair and
Festival on Aug. 29-30 at the
North Florida Fairgrounds.
Come experience the tropi-
cal setting with exotic birds
- it's a step above the ordi-
nary. See some of the most
beautiful birds from around
the world--macaws, cocka-
toos, cockatiels, lovebirds,
parrolets, finches, African
Greys, and more. In addi-
tion, you can choose from
a huge variety of bird toys,
bird food, birdcages in all


price ranges, and much
more!
Headlining the 20th an-
niversary celebration will
be .The Paradise Parrots
from Tampa Bay. They tlk,
roller skate, do gymnastics,
play basketball and more.
Taught by circus animal
trainer Vickie Howle, the
birds that were once aban-
doned by former owners
have appeared on Animal
Planet's Pet Star cable TV
show.
This relaxing family ex-
perience includes special
raffles, balloons, and face


painting for the kids. On
both Saturday and Sunday,
educational programs, will
give new pet owners tips on
appropriate bird behavior,
health, training tricks, and
proper techniques of care
from an avian vet and a pro-
fessional parrot trainer from
ZooWorld. You will see baby
birds being fed, and meet lo-
cal artists with bird related
jewelry, pottery, and cards.
Enjoy mouth-watering
foods, hotdogs and snacks.
Admission is $5; children 10
and under are free. A two-
day admission is $8. Park-


ing is FREE.
Vendors and visitors are
coming to Tallahassee from
as far away as Missouri,
Mississippi, Alabama, North
Carolina, Georgia and Flor-
ida. Make new friends and
relax with some of nature's
most beautiful and wonder-
ful winged creatures!
For more information,
please visit www.bigbend-
birdclub.com or contact: Jill
de Bedout, President, The
Big Bend Bird Club, Inc.,
PO. Box 16453, Tallahassee,
FL 32317-6453 orjillsbirdz@
yahoo.com.


Kathleen Smith
Advertising Manager
Office: (850) 227-7847 Cell: (850) 819-5078
Email: ksmiith@pclh.com


TE -STAR


IH TIMES


850-227-1278
135W. Hwy98
Port St Joe, FL 32457
F&x: 850-227-7212
850-653-8868
129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Fax: 850-653-8036


The Girl Scout Council of
the Florida Panhandle, Inc.
is hosting the Panhandle
Connection Kickoff Carni-
val and Concert on August
1 from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.
CST. The event will be at
the Jackson County Agri-
cultural Center, 3631 High-
way 90, Marianna, FL.
For more informa-
tion contact Holly Jones
at 850- 386-2131 or e-mail
hjones@gscfp.org
The Kickoff Carnival


is open to all families who
wish to attend a fun filled
day of carnival games,
food, and a concert fea-
turing songstress Teresa.
Special GSUSA guest Ja-
clyn Libowitz will also be
on hand to join in on the
day's festivities. Families
are encouraged to dress
casual with tennis shoes.
For directions, overnight
accommodations, or other
fun family activities please
visit www.gscfp.org


always online

www.starfl.com


THIS WEEK ONLY
TAROT CARDi $1
READING 10
I :11 1J.K^MOl JI JJl:{o J. r:e; I [o:1lh:rIAY-JJS ^ lCt 'Ta l i


SUMMER MOVIES IN THE PARK
Summer movies at 'he park will be from June
4 until September 18, and will begin at sunset
at Port St Joe, WindMark Beach and Mexico
Beach. Come early and set up while the sun
sets. Don't forget to bring your chairs and
blanket.
Movie Locations: PSJ Frank Pate Park,
Port St Joe, WB on the green just past The
School of Fish, WindMark Beach, and MB on
the green atThe El' Governor Motel, Mexico
Beach.
July
30-'July PSJ Race to Witch Mountain PG
31 -July MB Bedtime Stories PG
August
6-Aug MB
Indiana Jones
and The
Kingdom of
the Crystal Skull
PG-13
14 -Aug WB { J
Fireproof 1
September '
4 -Sept WB p
Swing Vote PG O
18-Sept WB
Monsters vs. Aliens PG



E Elder Care Service
of Franklin County

Improving the Quality of Life for
'Seniors in Franklin County
Are you:
*Age 60 and older?
On a limited income?
Interested in becoming active
and involved in your community
20 hours per week?

(850)245-5935 or (850) 921-5554




of the






A4-













Meet Peter! Peter is a friendly, handsome young
Aussie/Shepherd mix. Peter plays well with other
dogs & is a very laid back guy. If you are interested
in adopting Peter or any of the other terrific pets for
adoption here at St. Joseph Bay Humane Society,
please give us a call at 850-227-1103 and ask for
Melody. You may also stop,by at 1007 Tenth St. We
are open Tues. Sat. from 10am 4pm (est).

SHOP FAITH'S'THRIFT HUT where proceeds go
directly back to support the animals of our shelter!
Faith's Thrift Hut is also in need of donations and
volunteers. Stop by Thur. Sat. from 10am 4pm-
same location as Humane Society.




IJxtWl Distributik n LLC


.i i.I.miHi I Ai,,ii t., MBuilo Bedch, FL32410


Girl Scouts celebrate Council

with free carnival and concert


JC






142 N Hwy 71
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
639-2929
Hours: Mon Sat 9:30am 7pm.
Appt or Walk In Welcome
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JeC

10% off
Full set and _
Spa Pedicure Combo Must present Coupon
Offer expires 8/12/09
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C~IIII~IL~













AITH


Thursday, July 30, 2009



The Empty Pew

The empty pew holds a message therein.
The excuses for these are to cover up sin.
I work six days, I need a day to rest.
I go fishing one day, that's how I do it best.
To a visitor it whispers this church is nearly
dead.
It looked like rain so many stayed home in bed.
To the preacher, who wonders if his sermons are
up to par?
It was rumored a few of his members were seen
last night at a bar.
We had company all week and there was so
much they wanted to do.
We were worn out Sunday morning, so we left an
empty pew.
Do you love the Lord
and give Him His due?
Or do you put your
pleasures first and leave
an empty pew?
Billy Johnson










'S2ii Ay~yiazian wmzan
508 Sixteenth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


(Uis P\.


850-227-1756

Rev. Ruth Hemple
9 Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM


BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET- Bible Study all ages 10 a.m. ET'
Morning Worship 11 a.m. ET Evening Worship 6 p.m. ET
Tuesday: Choir Practice 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and seerh that e Lord is good: blessed is the man tat trustee in Him."
Please accept this invitation tojoin tus in worship. God bless you!
Please call us foryour spiritual needs.
www.beachchapel.org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950 Home 769-8725


First Bap tist Church
102 THIRD STREET -* PORT ST. JOE
Jerome Barnes, Interim Pastor
..- r Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
S* .. Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students
New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church
Sunday Wednesday
Contemporary Service........8:30 am Children's Choir................. 6:00 pm
Sunday School .................9:40 am Prayer Meeting............... 6:30 pm
Traditional Service............11:00 am Children's Ministry
Youth Groups..................... 5:30 pm Activities............................ 6:30 pm
Youth Ministry Activities... 6:30 pm

www.fbcpsj.org


Sunday:
Contemporary Service 9:0
Sunday School: 10:00 a.
Traditional Worship: 11i:
Wedned a


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724
0 a.m. ET Rev. Mac Fucher
. ET Pastor
0 a.m. ET Ann Comforter Jereny Dixon
Mtaic Director Youth Minister


wenesy:
Youth: 5:30p.m. ET DeborahLoyless
\ hCoir: 7:00p.m. ET Director o"f Children Ministries


w w w. sta


These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.

Rish, Gibson, Scholz & SOUTHERLAND FAMILY COMFORTER
Groom, P.A. FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME
William J, Rish, Thomas S.Gibson, Russell Scholz, W. P. "Rocky" Comforter
PaulW. Groom 507 10th Street Port St Joe L.F.D.
(850)229-8211 (850) 229-8111 (850) 227-1818

Sr f 1. c o m Page B4


The Christian CONSCIENCE



The Jesus way to heaven


This may be the most important
message, outside of the Bible, that
you have ever read!
Man has invented a way to
heaven that doesn't work. It goes
something like this:
Experience a natural birth (be
born of your mother).
Then: Do something like say a
sinner's prayer, or walk forward
in church, or be baptized, or join a
particular religion. This supposedly
makes you "saved," but it is actually
being saved by a "work." By this
way, you are supposedly "saved" by
something that you have done.
Then: Live life the way you want
to live it. Maybe go to church once in
a while. Don't worry about judgment.
You're all set.
Then: Die and go to heaven (only
if man's way works).
Is this what Jesus taught? No!
No! No! You can find the Jesus way,
beginning in the Gospel of John,
Chapter 3:3-21. Here's the way to
heaven the Jesus way:
Experience a natural birth (be
born of your mother).
Then: Experience a spiritual
birth. Scripture calls it by many
different names. Be "born of God"
(John 1:12, 13) or be "born again,"
or according to the original Greek,
be "born from above." This makes
a person a "new creation."
(2 Corinthians 5:17)


According to the Jesus way, you
will be saved at judgment, when.you
need to be saved, by something that
God has done, not by something that
you have done. God is in charge, not
you!
Then: Live your life like Jesus
did constantly being led by the
Holy Spirit. Jesus showed us how,
and died on the cross, to make
this new life possible. Live a life in
service to God, not to yourself or an
organization. Be a part of the body of
Christ, meeting with other servants
of God at least once a week. Be
ready for the return of Jesus, should
He return in your lifetime.
Then: Die, or be raptured, and go
to be with Jesus, in what is usually
called heaven.
Do you need to believe? Do you
need to repent? Do you need to
accept and confess Jesus as your
Savior and Lord? Do you need to be
baptized in water? Yes. Yes. Yes. But
all these things are a result of God
giving you the new birth things
that God grants, not things that you
initiate.
So how do you become born of
God? If you really want to serve God
for the rest of your life, get alone
with God somewhere, somehow.
Pray, asking Him to make you a new
creation. Ask Him to make you what
He wants you to be. It's not what you
say with your mouth. It's what you


Long Avenue Baptist

welcomes new pastor


The members of Long
Avenue Baptist Church
would like to welcome
our new pastor, the Rev.
Royce C. Williams Jr., and
his family to our church
and community.
Bro. Royce graduated
in May 2006 with a mas-
ter's degree from South-
eastern Baptist Theologi-
cal Seminary in Wake For-
est, N.C., and comes to us


Family Life

Church
Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford
Welcome you to worship with us:
Sunday 10:30am
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm
Wednesday 7pm


from Donalsonville, Ga.
He and his wife, Con-
nie, have three children,
Kyle and his wife, Ali, who
live in North Carolina,
Kelsey, 17, and Conner,
12.
Please join us as we
welcome Bro. Royce and
his family to our church
and as we praise God for
His blessings and faithful-
ness to us.


A Spirit Filled
Outreach Oriented
Word of Faith Church


HOME OF THE
POWERHOUSE
YOUTH MINISTRIES


I www.familylifechurch.net
323 Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL~ 850-229-5433


W i united MAet&dit


111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Servites:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
ihe people of Mnico kh k Olitld letlodist (hirt(
NlinSEr IonPII
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


WorLship with us at A
Long Avenue Baptist Church
Where Faith, Family &Friendship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am.and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More
Information Call 229-8691


TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN
Please come and meet our new
Rector Father Tommy Dwyer!
ST. JAMES'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Providedfor at 11:00
www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org


say from your heart. If the prayer is
from your heart, He will grant your
request, and you will find yourself
changed. Things, which have kept
you in bondage, won't keep you in
bondage any more. Your goals and
desires will change. You will want to
please God and be led by the Holy
Spirit. You will want to be baptized in
water and be baptized with the Holy
Spirit.
Questions or comments? Send us
an e-mail to the address below.
At the Mexico Beach Christian
Worship Center, we believe that God
wants you know the truth about the
Bible and be born again from above
- not base your eternal future on
faulty religious teaching. At the
MBCWC we don't plead for money, or
twist your arm to join. Plan to check
us out this Sunday. Our services
begin with a time of greeting and
fellowship at 9:30 a.m. CT. Worship
begins at 9:45 a.m. Come early so that
you can meet and fellowship with
us and enjoy the praise and worship
music led by TJ. We meet and
worship at the Mexico Beach Civic
Center, 105 N. 31st St., behind Parker
Realty and the Beach Walk gift shop,
just off U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach.
God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center
timl @jesusanswers.com
http://www.mexicobeachcwc.com


GLORY night planned


at New Bethel Baptist

New Bethel Baptist Church, located on N. Park Av-
enue in Port.St. Joe, presents "G-God's L-Ladies O-
Ordained R-Renewed and YYielding to His Will" night
starting at 7 p.m. on Friday, July 31.
Various guests, local and out-of-town will be pres-
ent and there will be solos, words of encouragement
and testimonies.
Come on out and experience the Glory of the Lord
- "I shall supply all of your needs according to my
riches in glory."





IUFaithBible
C H U R C H
Michael Rogers Pastor
9:45 AM ............................................... Sunday School
10:30 AM .......................... ....... Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 AM ..................... ......................... W orship
6:00 PM ..................................... ....... ...... W worship
www.faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home r .jFa-ih (hrusian Schioo


e "Our Church can be your home"

First Church of the Nazarene
2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, loritda 32456
(850) 229-9596

ti, unwlr ti Lord tin du l-n, ,l .'u n.m., athl ti LOri t n rh tbi urt I A,'lnlre.i'
PT,.I .M


Sunday School........................ 10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 am.


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


Jesus ts Lord and He is waiting


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
Sigljlanb view aptit tClurtlj
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45
Morning Worship 11:00
Evening Service 7:00


Discipleship Training
Wednesday Prayer


7:001
7:00 I


anm.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.


St. Peter's Anglican Church
(Traditional Episcopal Service 1928 BCP)

Morning Prayer & Holy Communion
Sunday................8:00 a.m.
The Rev. David Mans, Priest
Services being held at the United Pentecostal Church
309 6th Street Port St Joe. FL
"An Unchanging FlaithJ In A Changing World"


The Catholic Church
of Gulf County
St. Joseph Parish
20th Monument Ave. Port St. Joe 227-1417
All Mass Times EDT
Saturday 4:00 pm
Sunday 9:30 am
Monday, Thursday, Friday 9:30 am
Wednesday 5:30 pm
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday M ass......................................... ................ 11:00 am (CT)
Cape San Blas Mission
1500 ft from State Park entrance at Cape San Bias
Saturday Mass......... ............................... 6:00 pm (ET)


I











PSJ's Cosoast2oast



achieves milestone -

PSJ business awarded Silver Level b
status for Crown Products sales


Coast2Coast Printing
and Promotions Inc. of Port
St. Joe announced it has
been recognized by Crown
Products as a Silver Level
distributor. Crown is a lead-
ing supplier of imprinted
promotional products
based in Mobile, Ala.
Steve Kerigan, owner
of Coast2Coast, reported
that the company received
a June 25 letter from Bob
Bickert, president of Crown,
advising them of their sales
growth over the past year
and that they wanted to
send over a company rep-
resentative to deliver the
award. On Friday, July 10,
Estella Alvarez-Tinch, Re-
gional Sales Manager for
Florida and Puerto Rico,
arrived from Orlando to
present the award and out-
line its benefits.


Coast2Coast is an area
leader in imprinted promo-
tional products, including
mugs, pens, key rings, can
huggers and other items
serving businesses in Port
St. Joe, Panama City and
Apalachicola. The company
employs a team of six local-
ly and features its products
at www.c2cprinting.com:
Crown Products opened
in 1995 as a small, fam-
ily-owned business and
has grown to become the
recognized leader in the
promotional products in-
dustry, operating out of a
new state-of-the-art plant'
in Mobile, with over 250
employees. Since its incep-
tion, the company has been
guided by its.basic mission:
To do "Whatever it Takes"
to satisfy its customers and
employees.


Northwest Florida business, community leader input sought


DESTIN Florida's Great
Northwest and Enterprise
Florida Inc. are calling on
Northwest Florida's busi-
ness, education, govern-
ment and economic devel-
opment leaders to assist in
updating Enterprise Flor-
ida's plan for the state's
economic future by par-
ticipating in strategic plan-
ning workshops. Northwest
Florida. participants have
the option of attending a
forum in Pensacola and/or
Tallahassee.
The Pensacola meet-
ing will be held at the Hil-
ton Pensacola Beach Gulf
Front, 12 Via de Luna Drive,
on Wednesday,July 29, from
1-4 p.m. CT. The Tallahas-


see meeting will be held at
TCC Capitol Center, 300 W
Pensacola St., on Thursday,
July 30, from 1-4 p.m. ET.
Attendees are requested to
RSVP to Tabatha Tucker at
Florida's Great Northwest,
850-337-3469, to ensure am-
ple seating.
Ideas and recommen-
dations from the planning
meeting will be used to en-
hance the state's blueprint
for economic development
-- The Roadmap to Flori-
da's Future: The 2007-2012
Strategic Plan for Eco-
nomic Development. The
Roadmap details Florida's
priorities for furthering
economic expansion and
diversification.


FLORI DAY'S
Gre~o NortffWlft
"As we continue our
progress in strengthening
Northwest Florida's eco-
nomic outlook and busi-
ness opportunities, we call
on our local leadership to
participate in this critical
strategic planning pro-
cess," said Fred Leopold,
Florida's Great Northwest
Chairman. "This is an
ideal opportunity to ex-


press ideas, concerns and
suggestions that will help
shape Florida's long-term
economic development
strategy."
Each half-day workshop
will provide a forum for
high-level Florida officials
to work with Northwest
Florida business and com-
munity leaders in identify-
ing key economic priorities.
Topics will include creating,
retaining and attracting
high-value jobs, building
a world-class workforce;
strengthening infrastruc-
ture; and protecting Florid-
ians' quality of life.
"Perspectives from a
wide range of industries
and service areas can be


fuel for sparking .further
growth and diversifica-
tion of our economy," said
former Florida House
Speaker Allan Bense, who
serves as vice chairman of
Enterprise Florida's board
of directors. "This valu-
able feedback will help us
focus on the most impor-
tant needs and set the right
goals for making Florida
more competitive and eco-
nomically much healthier."
In partnership with re-
gional and local economic
developmentorganizations,
seven additional workshops
will be held throughout the
state to encourage par-
ticipation and involvement
from all communities.


"It's important that we
have input from as many
business and community
sectors as possible," said
John Adams Jr., Enterprise
Florida's president and
CEO. "This is a grass-roots
effort, so we want to hear
the voices and opinions of
everyone, whether they're
leaders in the arts, trans-
portation officials or work-
force providers, as well as
from those who work in
economic development."
Additional opportuni-
ties also are available for
public contributions to the
Roadmap's development.
An Enterprise Florida mi-
crosite is at www.eflorida.
com/roadmap.


Ed was born
on May 7, 1950,
in Holdenville,
Okla. He died
in his sleep on
July 21, 2009, iii
Glendale, Ariz. -
He is
survived by his EDM
wife of 31 years, CHI
the former Mary
C. (Cathy) McInnis.
He leaves behind
two sons, Justin and
Jamie Chaplin, and
two daughters, Catey
Chaplin and Angel
Renault, and a special
"daughter," Alicia
Lawson, all of Glendale.
In addition, Ed
is survived by his
"mother" Alice
Thomason of San
Lorenzo, Calif.; one
brother, Lewis Chaplin
III (Grace) Chaplin,
of Illinois; three
sisters, Ella Mae Clem
(Jimmy), of Frankfort,
Ky., and Anne Hoy and
Carol Thomason, both
of San Lorenzo, Calif.;
five granddaughters,
Christina and Kayla
Watson of Chandler,
Ariz., Hayley and
Brianna Renault of
Buckeye, Ariz., and
Nicole Chaplin of
Glendale. He also
leaves behind six
nephews and four
nieces.
Ed was preceded in
death by his parents,
Lewis Chaplin II and
Lena Mae (Ringgold)
Chaplin, his "father"
Charles E. Thomason,
and his son Edmond L.
Chaplin.
Ed began his
military career in the
Army National Guard
and was later inducted
into the Army. He left
the Army and joined
the Air Force. He
moved up in the ranks
to staff sergeant and
left briefly to finish
his bachelor's degree
at the University of
Southern Mississippi
in Haftiesburg. He
re-entered the Air


S Force as an
officer and
,was stationed
at Keesler
AFB, Miss.
He moved
his family to
Arizona in
MOND 1982 and was
APLIN stationed
several times
at Luke AFB, where he
was a communications
officer and chief of
maintenance. He spent
two years in the Arctic
on the D.E.W. Line
as the only military
officer for several
thousand miles, in
charge of all civilian
contractors in Alaska,
Canada, Greenland
and Iceland. Ed was
handpicked for Gen.
Schwarzkopf's staff
at Central Command
during Desert Shield/
Desert Storm, where
he was in charge of all
equipment long haul
transport to the Middle
East from August 1990
to February 1993. He
was forced to take a
medical retirement
following an injury
during Desert Storm.
He and Cathy bought
and managed a
number of rentals
while in Arizona, and
after retiring from the
military, Ed enjoyed
doing much of the
maintenance and
remodeling himself.
Graveside services
with military honors
were held at Holly
Hill Cemetery on
Wednesday, July 29,
with Elder Jim Gainnie
officiating. Cindy
Romano provided
music. Honorary
pallbearers were
Justin Chaplin, Allen
Dadkhah-Zaitooni,
Jason Gainnie, Paul
Formby, Gordon (Bebo)
McInnis and James
(Jimbo) McInnis III.
All local services are
under the direction of
the Comforter Funeral
Home.


Obituaries


Danny Christopher
Hallinan died on Monday,
July 20, 2009, from cancer.
Danny was a graduate
of Port St. Joe High School.
Following high school, Danny
served in the United States
Marine Corps.
He is survived by his father,
Harry Hallinan, Sr., of Port
St. Joe; a brother, Patrick
Hallinan of Acworth, Ga.; a
daughter, Crystal Frazier, and
two granddaughters, Naya
and Ahdana, all of Hinesville,
Ga.; a niece, Kelly Hallinan ,
and a great-niece, Cheyenne


Othel (Jack) Pierce, Jr.,
56, of Lake Talquin and Port
St. Joe passed away July 21 in
Port St. Joe.
Jack was diagnosed
with cancer May 20. He
was Under Ground Utilities
Superintendent for Gulf
Asphalt of Panama City Jack
enjoyed racing his green mud-
bogging truck, Jack's Pride, at
Clarksville.
He is survived by wife Anne
Hicks Pierce; one daughter,
Jasmine Faye Pierce of
Arkansas; two sons, Tony and
Chad Pierce of Swamps of


His name was
Firman and he was
a Marine, the finest
the Corps has ever
seen.
He was my
Mother's friend and
spouse. For 41 years
they lived, loved and FIR
shared the same WI
house.
To my siblings and
myself, he was a loving Dad,
the very best we could have
ever had.
To our children he was
PaPa or Grandpa, whose
love, stories and funny
noises left them in awe.
His hero was the man
they called '.The Duke."
Yours too unless you wished
a rebuke.
He had both a laugh and
snore you couldn't ignore.


Glassford, of Cartersville, Ga.,
as well as Dawn Hallinan of
St. Joe Beach.
Danny's brothers, Harry
and Mike, and mother,
Barbara, preceded him in
death.
Claudia Edwards, Danny's
longtime companion, joins the
family in requesting donations
to any hospice organization or
the American Cancer Society.
We will celebrate Danny's
life in a memorial service
at Veteran's Park on St. Joe
Beach, Saturday, August. 1, at
3 p.m. EDT.


Morgan City, La.; two brothers,
Kenneth Pierce of Casper,
Wyo., and Mike Pierce of
Morgan City; stepchildren,
Cindy Mathews (Larry) of Lake
Talquin, Carol Pettis (Jason)
of Brewton, Ala., and Alex
Barfield (Meilan) of Atlanta,
Ga.; eight grandchildren; and
six great-grandchildren.
Visitation was July 23 at
Charles McClellan Funeral
Home in Quincy, with
cremation interment to be
scheduled later at Centerville
Cemetery in Blakely, Ga., Rev.
Michael Horsley officiating.


The former was
infectious, the latter
required a closed
door.
When he cooked
it was always "finger
lickiri'." I know
first-hand no one
MAN ever fried a better
ILLIS chicken.
I'm sure in his
life there were other things
desired. Yet he chose to
stay, to love my Mother, the
one he had, and the ones he
had not sired.
To describe what he
meant to me I'd have to say
he was,100 times the man
that he didn't have to be.
For these and so many,
many other reasons, we will
miss and love him until the
end of our seasons.
Steve Eilers


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Most programs are approved for training of qualified
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Edmond Eugene Chaplin


Danny Christopher Hallinan


Othel (Jack) Pierce, Jr.


Memories of My Dad Firman Willis


1


Thursday, July 30, 2009


Business


REISE


The Star B 5


k .


..l .






B6 I The Star


Thursday, July 30, 2009


School News


School board reviews First Amendment rights


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writcr

The Gulf County School Board
received a refresher course on
the First Amendment during a.
recent workshop at the school
board meeting room in Port St.
Joe.
In her presentation, Joy.
Frank, the general council for the
Florida Association of District
School Superintendents, submit-
ted two informational binders to
the board.
One detailed the results of the
recent legislative session and the
other was devoted exclusively to
First Amendment rights, with an
emphasis on religion in public
schools.
The Panhandle Area Educa-
tion Consortium (PAEC) asked
Frank to share her knowledge
of First Amendment rights with
area school systems, including
Madison, Walton and Bay coun-


ties.
Speaking after the June 25
meeting, Frank said her intent
was "to train school board mem-
bers and administrators on what
they can and cannot do as far as
religion is concerned."
Primarily, Frank hoped to con-
vey to teachers that they must not
share their religious faith with
students in a classroom setting.
"You cannot proselytize; you
can't denigrate. You have to be
neutral, and that's hard for peo-
ple to get in their minds," said
Frank.
In closely knit, religious-mind-
ed communities, such as Port St.
Joe and Wewahitchka, teachers
often find it difficult to maintain
appropriate boundaries, Frank
said.
"Though your community may
be homogenous in its religious
faith, you have to be conscious of
the fact that you're going to have
folks who differ from those beliefs


and remain neutral at least when
you're in a professional setting."
Though she acknowledged
that most of the rules were well-
known, Frank reviewed several
topics relating to religion in pub-
lic schools.
Noting that students need not
"check their first amendment
rights at the door," Frank de-
scribed ways in which students
could share their faith in a school
environment.
Students may pray alone or in
groups in informal settings, such
as dining areas and hallways, de-
bate religion with their peers, and
form religious or political clubs.
Teachers may attend such
student-led clubs only in a su-
pervisory capacity and may not
interject their own religious or
political views.
Though student/athletes are
allowed to pray before games and
practices, coaches may not initi-
ate, plan or participate in such


prayers.
On the issue of student prayer
at graduation or other school-
sponsored events, Frank said the
lower courts are divided.
In general, a prayer must be
strictly an expression of faith by
a student, and the message may
not be controlled by any teacher
or school administrator.
To avoid the appearance of
impropriety, schools must not en-
dorse or mandate attendance at
baccalaureate services in which
prayers are given by clergymen
and others.
Many school systems have
opted to turn baccalaureate ser-
vices over to area churches, mak-
ing student attendance at the
events voluntary, not required.
This year, St. James Episco-
pal Church hosted baccalaure-
ate services for Port St. Joe High
School graduates.
Ministers, youth pastors and
other community members rou-


tinely offer prayers before foot-
ball games and other sporting
events throughout the county.
Though Madison, Walton,
Santa Rosa and Holmes counties
have all faced First Amendment
challenges to school policies,
Gulf County has been spared any
litigation.
Superintendent of Schools
Tim Wilder described a "safety
net" around Gulf County, which
he believes will fall away in time.
"I hear this a lot, those stories,
and I know it's headed our way,"
said Wilder. "It's such a hot topic
around the state, and it's coming
up to North Florida."
Wilder said the school board
"just listened" to Frank's presen-
tation and did not discuss making
any major policy changes.
"I think all of us kind of took
it in and are going to digest it,"
said Wilder, adding, "Ultimately,
I believe it will be something the
board will look into."


GCCC REGISTRATION


Nearly $1 million awarded to Florida Workforce Programs


PANAMA CITY Fall
2009 registration is con-
tinuing for new and re-
turning students at. Gulf
Coast Community Col-
lege.
Early Registration:
Now through Aug. 7
Registration: Aug. 13
- 25
The College will be
closed on Aug. 10 for an
In-Service Day.
Classes begin: Aug. 19
Drop/Add Period: Aug.
20-25
Students can register
online at www.gulfcoast.
edu or visit one of the
GCCC campuses during
the hours listed below:
Panama City Campus:
Monday through Thurs-
day from 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m.
CT; Friday from 7:30 a.m.
- 4 p.m.; and Friday, Au-
gust 21 from 7:30 a.m. 6
p.m.
Gulf/Franklin Cam-


pus: Monday through
Thursday from 9 a.m.
- 6 p.m. ET; Friday
from 9 a.m. 3 p.m.
Tyndall AFB Campus:
Monday through Thurs-
day from 9 a.m. 4 p.m.
CT
North Bay Cen-
ter: Monday through
Thursday from 8 a.m. 6
p.m.
All registration fees for
2009 fall semester are to
be paid on or before Au-
gust 7.
Please note registra-
tion dates exclude Satur-
days, Sundays and holi-
days.
For more information,
call: 850-872-4892 for the
Panama City Campus,
850-227-9670 for the Gulf/.
Franklin Center, 850-283-
4332 for the Tyndall Air
Force Base Education Of-
fice or 850-747-3233 for the
North Bay Center.


TALLAHASSEE The
U:S. Department of La-
bor awarded the Florida
Department of Education
and Workforce Florida Inc.,
$933,944 for exceeding their
target performance levels
for education and employ-
ment activities. Dispersed
under the Workforce In-
vestment Act (WIA), the
grant was awarded to
nearly a dozen states for
continued achievement in
improvements in literacy
levels, job placement after
training and retention in
employment.
"I'm very proud Flor-
ida's workforce divisions


Faith Christian School
is now taking applications
for new students. If you
would like your child to
experience academic ex-
cellence through Godly in-
struction, FCS is the place
for you. Interactive learn-
ing will be a part of your
child's day, along with
Spanish for all grades.
Discovery learning days
are incorporated into the
academic year, and tech-
nology classes enhance
the elementary program.
Faith Christian has a


are being recognized with
these grant dollars," said
Education Commissioner
Dr. Eric J. Smith. "These
funds will ensure students
have continued access to
proven programs, giving
them the tools they need
to be successful after high
school."
The funds are available
to use through June 30,
2011, to support innovative
workforce development
and education activities.
The Florida Department of
Education's Division of Ca-
reer and Adult Education
will partner with Workforce
Florida Inc., to use the


Web site, www.FaithChris-
tianPSJ.net. We urge you
to take a few minutes and
browse through our differ-
ent links. Communication
with teachers will be avail-
able through this site, as
well as the latest news.
Partial scholarship op-
portunities for tuition are
available for K-5 through
the eighth grade. Please
feel free to stop by and
visit our school; the doors
are always open.
For more information,
call 229-6707 or 229-8550.


GCCC leads the State with Dual

Enrollment participation


For the second con-
secutive year Gulf Coast
Community College has
the highest number of
high school students dual
enrolled in college cours-
es. According to a recent
report by the Florida Col-
lege System, Gulf Coast's
dual enrollment participa-
tion rate was 49.0 percent
for 2005-06 and 47.4 per-
cent for 2007-08. Participa-
tion rates are calculated
by dividing the yearly dual
enrollment headcount by
public school membership
for grades 11 and 12 in the
same year.
Dual enrollment pro-
grams provide a way for
high school students to
simultaneously meet high
school requirements while
earning college credits
providing families with
cost savings for college
tuition and decreasing the
time it takes students to
earn a degree.
"Dual enrollment is
an incredible opportunity
for high school students
who are academically
ready and socially mature
enough to thrive in a col-
lege environment," says
Dr. Cheryl ,Flax-Hyman,
GCCC's Dean of Off-Cam-
pus & Community Devel-
opment. "It is a unique op
portunity to earn college
and high school credit
at the same time-tuition
free. These students will
significantly cut down the
time and expense to an


associate or baccalaure-
ate degree."
Another noteworthy
statistic is that GCCC also
has the highest participa-
tion rates for Hispanic
and black students and is
the only college where the
dual enrolled participation
rate for Hispanic students
surpassed that of white
students (54.3% versus
51.6%, respectively).
The success rates for
students that are dual-
enrolled at Gulf Coast are
high, because in order to
be accepted into the pro-
gram, students must have
a minimum 3.0 grade point
average and pass the ap-
propriate section of the
College Placement Test
(CPT). Thus students ac-
cepted into the program
have already demonstrat-
ed an ability to succeed at
the college level.
Gulf Coast places a
high priority on working
with teachers and guid-
ance counselors through-
out Bay, Gulf and Frank-
lin counties to ensure
the community's needs
are being met. However,
expanding learning op-
portunities and fostering
success of our students is
always a team effort. Dr.
Flax-Hyman comments,
"We are so very fortunate
to have strong partner-
ships with the school dis-
tricts we serve, which is
the main reason for the
program's success."


grant funds for the follow-
ing activities:
Postsecondary Tran-
sitions To establish
demonstration projects for
developing and/or improv-
ing transition services for
adult education students
moving into a postsecond-
ary education.
Florida's "Talent Sup-
ply Chain" To develop an
alignment model for Flori-
da's "Talent Supply Chain"
linking workforce, educa-
tion and economic develop-
ment.
Both agencies will col-
laborate to further develop
the system that will assist


in creating an educated
and well-trained workforce
for Florida.
The Division of Ca-
reer and Adult Education
collaborates with school
districts, community col-
leges, community-based
organizations and cor-
rectional institutions to
provide adult education
and literacy services to ap-
proximately 265,000 adult
students each year. For
more information about
the Department of Edu-
cation's Career and Adult
Education Division, visit
http://www.fldoe.org/work-
force/.


School Board.approves budget


SBy Tim Croft
Star News Editor

The Gulf County School
Board on Tuesday night ap-
proved the millage rate and
budget for the 2009-10 school
year.
The budget and millage
rate reflect a one-mill ad-
ditional levy approved by
voters this past March 'and
a change in the way the edu-
cation budget is crafted, as
nearly all of it is, in Tallahas-
see.
The district's budget will
increase by roughly $1.5 mil-
lion, less than the additional
mill, which would represent
$1.97 million this year, pro-
vides the district.
The board also adhered
to pledges made during the
campaign for the additional
one-mill levy.
Capital outlay dollars, the
lone component of the overall
budget over which the board
has actual sway outside the
additional mill levy, was cut
in half, from .600 mills to .300
mills.
Given the drop in prop-
erty values that 50 percent
slice in capital outlay millage
is more expensive for the
district by about $200,000.
School budgets are craft-
ed differently from county or
municipal budgets in part be-
"cause of a difference in how
homestead exemptions are
treated, so where the county
lost 24.1 of its tax base, the
decline was 12 percent for
the school district.
Further, the board has
retired the half-cent sales
tax for improvements to Port
St. Joe Elementary School,
which has been paid by tax-
payers for more than a de-
cade, so as of January 1 that
will tax will off the books.
The board and Super-
intendent of Schools Tim
Wilder collectively cut their
salaries by 20 percent in Feb-
ruary through the rest of the
current fiscalyear, and board
member Linda Wood en-
sured with the district's chief
financial officer Sissy Worley.
that the option remained
open for board members on
an individual basis.
The millage rate and
budget adopted Tuesday
includes an increase in the
millage rate over the ore
mill additional levy approved
by voters. Taxpayers can
look to Tallahassee and de-
clining property values for


the reasons.
The required local effort
portion of the budget, that
required of local taxpayers
to secure any state funding,
declined slightly in dollars
- local taxpayers are now
picking up seven of every 10
cents instead of eight, in ef-
fect but declining taxable
property values in the county
pushed the village rate up.
In addition, compression
funding, the state's term for
placing both discretionary
operating categories of fund-
ing from previous years into
a single category with a cap
on what a district can bring
in, also pushed the millage
component for discretionary
operating expenses higher.
The overall millage rate,
in turn, rose from 4.876 last
year to 6.648 this year, with
one mill of that increase vot-
er approved for the next four
years in March.
That millage rate is more
than 3.3 mills lower than the
school district could be ask-
ing, Worley noted.
The board is authorized
by state law to levy up to 1.5
mills in capital outlay dol-
lars, it could have approved
a quarter-mill for operating
expenses as authorized this
year by the Florida Legisla-
ture and by super-majority
vote of the board approved
up to a total of 10 mills, or an-
other 1.8995 mills.
The budget also reflects
a reserve balance of at least
3 percent of the budget, as
currently required of school
districts at threat of addi-
tional state oversight into
the financial operations of
the district.
The district also received
two rounds of stabilization
funds from the state and
through federal stimulus
dollars about $1.2 million
in federal funds but Wilder
emphasized the difference
between those dollars and
the one-mill referendum.
Those stabilization dol-
lars, aimed at stabilizing lo-
cal school budgets teetering
due to state budget short-
falls, will last just two years.
The referendum will provide
dollars for four years. That
two year difference is criti-
cal for long-term planning
and maintaining sufficient
manpower
The board's final public
budget hearing will be held
at 6 p.m. ET on Sept. 8 at the
district offices.


Faith Christian School accepting

new student applications


NOTICE OF HEARING
FOR PURPOSES
OF ADOPTING AN
ORDINANCE AMENDING
THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AND AUTHORIZING
TRANSMITTAL OF THE
COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AMENDMENT TO
APPROPRIATE STATE
AGENCIES
.The jPlanning and Development Review
Board, sitting as the local planning agency will hold a
public hearing at 4:00 p.m., ET, on August 11, 2009, tc
review the amendment and recommend it to the City
Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, and the Board of
City Commissioners will hold a public hearing on August
18, 2009 at 6:00 p.m., ET, at the City of Port St. Joe City
Hall located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr:, Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida, for the purposes of reviewing the Ordinance
and authorizing transmittal of the Comprehensive Plan
Amendment to appropriate state agencies.
The title of proposed Ordinance is as follows:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST JOE.
FLORIDA, RELATING TO COMPREHENSIVE
PLANNING; SETTING FORTH AND ADOPTING
AMENDMENTS TO THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN RELATING TO THE CONSERVATION AND
INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENTS TO COMPLY WITH
STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS RELATED TO THE
WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES PLAN; PROVIDING
FOR TRANSMITTAL OF THE PLAN AMENDMENT
TO THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY
AFFAIRS; PROVIDING FOR THE REPEAL OF
PRIOR INCONSISTENT ORDINANCES AND
RESOLUTIONS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Copies of the Ordinance are available for public
inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305
Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida.
The hearing may be continued from time to time
as may be necessary.
Interested persons may attend and be heard at
the public hearing or provide comments in writing to
the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall,
305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida.
Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded.
Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the
hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should
ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony
on which the appeal is based:
Any person requiring a special Accommodation at
this hearing because of a disability or physical impairment
should contact the City Clerk's Office at (850) 229-8261.
at least five (5) calendar days prior to the hearing.
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA






Thursday, July 30, 2009


Local


The Star B7


Managing St. Vincent Island's cultural resources


By Nancy White
Professor of Anthropology andl
Registered Professional Archaeologist
University of South Florida

Two weeks ago, the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service sponsored a
public input meeting as it drafts
a management plan for St. Vin-
cent National Wildlife Refiuge.
Prior to that meeting, we
published the input from Dr Joe
Collins, a nationally-renowned
herpetologist who has done ex-
tensive work at St. Vincent -the
past decade.
This week, here is the input
provided by Dr Nancy White,
who like Dr Collins, has worked
with her students in studying St.
Vincent Island for the past de-
cade or more.
Here is her input on the man-
agement planfor the island.

Background
.These recommendations are
submitted for consideration in
producing a management plan for
the St. Vincent NWR. I have just
completed 3.5 weeks of fieldwork
on a cultural resources (re)survey
of St. Vincent Island from 22 May
to 13 June 2009, with my six Uni-
versity of South Florida field
school students, one graduate
student assistant, and additional
volunteers. We returned to the ar-
chaeology lab in Tampa to process
data and materials recovered;
therefore these recommendations
will necessarily be preliminary.
The cultural resources on the
island had been inventoried and
described by earlier research-
ers: Florida State University ar-
chaeologists sporadically investi-
gated prehistoric sites; a formal
survey was done in 1980 (Miller
et al.1981); limited excavation of
one site (Paradise Point, 8Fr71,
also called cabbage top, on the
east side of the north shore) was
conducted in 1981 (Braley 1982).
Occasional mention of the cul-
tural resources and donation of
prehistoric artifacts collected by
various people has taken place
over the past decades.
The Refuge system has cared
for the historic sites (Hornaday
1909, Kanaski 2007), especially
the early 20 th-century cabin,
which is now being renovated.
One purpose of my current work
is to compile knowledge on all the
prehistoric sites and seek man-
agement solutions to the adverse
impacts they are currently suffer-
ing. (Other purposes of course are
the research on prehistoric hu-
man cultures and the public edu-
cation concerning archaeological


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resources).

Cultural resources
and threats
While the historic cultural
resources of the island are con-
centrated at the southern end,
with the century-old construc-
tion, grave, and so forth, virtually
all the prehistoric sites appear to
be concentrated along the north
and east shores. Native people
doubtless preferred these more
sheltered environments, greater
amounts of fresh water, and easy
availability of aquatic animal and
plant species in the presumably
less treacherous waters of the
bays, bayous and streams.
The original archaeological
surveyors gave official site names
and numbers to many places
along the north shore, drawing
circles and ovals on the map for
locations. But our current survey
shows that the entire north shore,
northern 2/3 of the eastern shore,
and south shore of Big Bayou,
were inhabited by prehistoric peo-
ples. It's difficult to draw boundar-
ies on the map, as one numbered
site blends into the next. The
sites were mostly fishing camps,
probably used repeatedly and
seasonally. They are shell mid-
dens, garbage piles of oyster and
other shells, fish and other animal
bones, and pieces of pottery or
stone implements.
The fact that the island is fairly
remote, with no significant altera-
tion beyond road construction and
maintenance, has protected ar-
chaeological sites to some extent;
significant remains are still there.
The alkaline shell in the middens
also lessens the effect of Floridas
acidic soils, resulting in preserva-


" .I


tion of bone and other organic re-
mains that give us even more clues
to past human fishing, hunting and
other activities.
Most materials date to the
many time periods of.the original
Florida natives (whose names we
don't know), during at least the
past 4,000 years (with some pos-
sible evidence of older artifacts).
There are a few sites attributable
to the historic Creek Indians who
entered Florida from Georgia and
Alabama after the original natives
were gone.
These archaeological sites
provide information about not
only past human lifeways, but
also human effects on environ-
ments (fishing, shellfishing, other
resource utilization and manipu-
lation) and the environments ef-
fects on people (floods, storms,
sea-level rise). Data on past spe-
cies harvested by people can help
inform current scientific investi-
gations of wildlife and habitats. In
addition, geological studies (Sta-
por and Tanner 1977, Walker et
Al. 1995) have targeted St. Vincent
Island's prehistoric sites to inves-
tigate the times of past higher and
lower sea level and the impacts of
the first global warming people
lived through.
Therefore, the prehistoric cul-
tural resources on St. Vincent
NWR are not only significant in
their own right, but also full of
scientific potential for addressing
biological and environmental is-
sues today.
Unfortunately, every single ar-
chaeological site on the Refuge
'faces two major threats: destruc-
tion by natural processes: wind,
waves, not only storms but daily
cycles (possibly enhanced by hu-
man action such as global warm-


ing), are washing them away de-
struction by human looting and
collecting, which is illegal on fed-
eral land but takes place regularly
anyway.

Management challenges
Since you can't really stop the
sea, addressing the first threat
would be expensive and ultimate-
ly fruitless. Some archaeological
sites on shorelines have been pro-
tected with rip-rap, webbing other
materials, but these are all costly
and ugly, and the sites usually, get
washed away anyhow.
The Archaeological Resources
Protection Act recognized that
archaeological sites are an irre-
placeable part of our nation's heri-
tage; unlike endangered species,
they are non-renewable resourc-
es. As they become commercially
important and as people gain in-
terest in enjoying visits to natural
areas and sometimes collecting
souvenirs, prehistoric artifacts
and sites are increasingly lost.
Some visitors don't even realize it
is illegal to collect artifacts; others
know and do it anyway. Many peo-
ple in the region have collections
from the island that they've kept
for a long time and now don't want
anymore, as well. As they throw
them away, or sell them, or even
donate them to some local institu-
tion, the information contained in
these collections becomes lost to
science.
Part of the reason for my cur-
rent work is to compile informa-
tion on past artifact collections
from St. Vincent Island and pre-
vent any more such collection. I
am helping to set up a monitor-
ing program with the Supporters
of St. Vincent organization. With


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this program interested, trained
volunteers can record materials
being washed out of the shore and
gather information about them
but not pick them up and thereby
break the law. Support for this
program, and for archaeological
resources protection in general,
along with public archaeology at
every opportunity, are very much
needed.

Recommendations
Provide support for the Sup-
porters of St. Vincent archaeologi-
cal monitoring program to help
archaeological conservation.
Put better (or any) signs along
the north and east shore that
clearly state the law concerning
cultural resources and the penal-
ties for picking up prehistoric pot-
tery and stone artifacts. (I have
examples I can share.)
Insert a section into the visitor's
brochure/map that indicates it is
illegal to pick up artifacts and the
penalties for breaking the law (and
perhaps suggesting that people
pickup some modem garbage!).
Start a program of periodic
monitoring by Refuge staff of the
archaeological sites, both on a
regular basis and after big storms
or other events that might expose
more shoreline.
Plan a primary cultural re-
sources survey on the Pig Island
and mainland tract areas, just to
inventory what archaeological
sites are there in the first place,
so they can be protected.
Recognize the importance of
cultural resources on the Refuge
and how they are just as crucial as
natural resources.
Recognize that prehistoric
cultural resources on the Refuge
are more numerous andpossibly
more significant than the few his-
toric sites/structures.
Work with archaeologists and
repositories to achieve proper
curation and management of ar-
chaeological collections from the
Refuge so they can be scientifi-
cally useful.
Hold a workshop for Refuge
staff and other interested parties
to explain the laws and the moni-
toring program, the distribution of
archaeological sites, the locations
of each of them, and the best way
to protect them or at least con-
serve the scientific information in
them.
Support archaeological re-
search that utilizes the Refuge
sites, materials and data to inves-
tigate past human systems.
I am happy to work with the
Refuge to help implement any of
these recommendations.








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ANNOUNCEMENTS
1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Noties
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 Carpools &
Rideshare
1130 Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 Personals
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1100
2930S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Denton II, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as fol-
lows:

Certificate No. 315

Application No. 2009 -11

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No.03169-155R

Description of Property:
Lot 11 of Stillwater South,
according to the map or
plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page 14, of
the Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida.

Name in which assessed:
Herbert Press Witt

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 12th
day of August, 2009

Dated this 30th day of
June, 2009

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 9, 16, 23, 30, 2009

3042S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JASON B. WRIGHT, MI-
CHELE WRIGHT and UN-
SKNOWN TENANT (S),
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-260-CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO JASON B. WRIGHT
and MICHELE WRIGHT:

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property in Gulf County
Florida:

Lot 11, Block 5, Ward
Ridge Florida Unit Two,
according to the map or
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 2, Page 4, Pub-
lic Records of Gulf County,
Florida.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
on GARVIN B. BOWDEN,
the plaintiff's attorney,
, whose address is Gardner,
Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth &
Bowden, PA., 1300 Thom-
aswood Drive, Tallahas-
see, Florida 32308, within
30 days of first publication,
and file the original with
the clerk of this court either
before service on the
plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.

DATED: July 7, 2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk
July 23, 30, 2009

3047S
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE

Hwy 22 Storage
1249 Hwy 22
Wewahitchka, Florida

#89 Chris Douglas
#52 Paula Fowler
#L-2 Deloris Stacy

Units will be opened and
merchandise sold or
removed if payments are


1100 _
not brought up to date by
August 7, 2009 at 8:30.
July 16, 23, 30, 2009
3075S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, acting through
Rural Development, for-
merly Farmers Home Ad-
ministration (FmHA),
United States Department
of Agriculture (USDA),
Plaintiff

vs

JAMES EDWARD
LOCKSTEAD; VICKIE
RENEE LOCKSTEAD;
FLORIDA HOUSING FI-
NANCE CORPORATION;
GULF COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS;
Defendants

CASE NO. 2008-462CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that
pursuant to a Summary
Judgment entered in the
above entitled cause in the
Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida, I will sell
the property located in
Gulf County, Florida, being
specifically described as
follows:

Lot 11, OAK GARDEN
SUBDIVISION, Unit II, as
recorded in Plat Book 6,
Page 20, Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida

at public sale to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash in the front lobby of
the Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin Sr., Blvd, Port St.
Joe, Gulf County, Florida,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 13th
day of August, 2009.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order
to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you to the
provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
Office of the ADA Coordi-
nator, (850)747-5339,
within two (2) working
days of your receipt of this
Notice: if you are hearing
or voice impaired, call
Florida Relay Service (800)
955-8770.

Dated July 9, 2009.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
July 23, 30, 2009
3105S
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE

NOTICE OF SOLIC-
ITATION REQUEST FOR
QUALIFICATIONS
for US-98 STREETSCAPE
IMPROVEMENTS CEI
SERVICES

RFQ #09-002

Notice is hereby given that
the City of Port St. Joe is
seeking Proposals of Qual-
ification for Construction
Engineering & Inspection
Services for the US-98
Streetscape Improvements
Project in Port St Joe, FL.

RFQ details are on file at
the Port St Joe City Hall lo-
cated at 305 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, FL 32456, and on the
City's website at
www.cityofportstjoe.com.

Proposals of Qualification
will be evaluated by the
Port St Joe City Manager
and the City Commission.
The City retains the right to
reject any or all proposals.

Please submit Three (3)
copies to:
The City of Port St. Joe
PO. Box 278
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457

All Submissions must be
clearly marked "US-98
Streetscape Improvements
- CEI Services" and sub-
mitted to Jim Anderson In-
terim City Auditor/Clerk at
City Hall by 3:00 pm EST
on Thursday, August 6,
2009.
July 23, 30, 2009
3142S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK F/K/A WASHING-
TON MUTUAL BANK, FA,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JOHN C. WEBB, et al,
Defendant(s).


1100

CASE NO. 2007-22-CA
DIVISION

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated July 9,
2009 and entered in case
No. 2007-22-CA of the Cir-
cuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in
and for GULF County, Flor-
ida wherein WASHING-
TON MUTUAL BANK F/K/A
WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK, FA, is the Plaintiff
and JOHN C. WEBB; ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOW TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA; are the Defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at LOBBY OF THE
GULF COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00AM, on
the 22nd day of October,
2009, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in Final Judgment:

PARCEL A

BEGIN AT A ROD AND
CAP MARKING THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 43 (ALSO BEING THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 44) OF SAN BLAS
ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 20-22 OF
THE OFFICIAL RECORDS
OFFICE OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID
POINT ALSO LYING ON
THE WESTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY OF COUNTY
ROAD NUMBER 30-E;
THENCE RUN ALONG
THE NORTHERLY
BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT
44 SOUTH 70 DEGREES
18 MINUTES 05 SEC-
ONDS EAST 28387 FEET
TO A POINT LYING ON
THE APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATERLINE
OF GULF OF MEXICO;
THENCE LEAVING SAID
BOUNDARY LINE RUN
ALONG SAID APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH WA-
TERLINE NORTH 27 DE-
GREES 39 MINUTES 41
SECONDS EAST 55.56
FEET; THENCE LEAVING
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATERLINE
RUN NORTH 68 DE-
GREES 13 MINUTES 11
SECOND EAST 41.68
FEET TO A ROD AND
CAP; THENCE NORTH 59
DEGREES 04 MINUTES 56
SECONDS EAST 108.14
FEET TO A ROD CAP;
THENCE NORTH 70 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES 05
SECONDS EAST 58.20
FEET TO A ROD AND
CAP; THENCE SOUTH 19
DEGREES 41 MINUTES 55
SECONDS EAST 67.50
FEET TO A ROD AND
CAP; THENCE NORTH 70
DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05
SECONDS EAST 86.42
FEET TO A POINT LYING
ON THE WESTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID
COUNTY ROAD NUMBER
30-E; THENCE RUN
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY SOUTH 19 DE-
GREES 41 MINUTES 55
SECONDS WEST 10.00
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

AND

PARCEL B

COMMENCE AT A ROD
AND CAP MARKING THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 43 (ALSO BEING THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 44) OF SAN BLAS
ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE
20-22 OF THE OFFICIAL
RECORDS OFFICE OF
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
NUMBER 30-E; THENCE
RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY NORTH 19 DE-
GREES 41 MINUTES 55
SECONDS WEST 10.00
FEET TO A ROD AND CAP
FOR THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING CONTINUE
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY NORTH 19 DE-
GREES 41 MINUTES 55
SECONDS WEST 89.91
FEET TO RE-BAR,
THENCE LEAVING SAID
RIGHT OF WAY RUN
SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18
MINUTES 05 SECONDS
WEST 297.84 FEET TO A
POINT LYING ON THE AP-
PROXIMATE MEAN HIGH
WATERLINE OF THE
GULF OF MEXICO;
THENCE RUNi ALONG
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATERLINE
SOUTH 27 DEGREES 39
MINUTES 41 SECONDS
EAST 45.33 FEET;
THENCE LEAVING SAID
APPROXIMATE 'MEAN
HIGH WATERLINE RUN
NORTH 68 DEGREES 13
MINUTES 11 SECONDS


EAST 41.68 FEET TO A
ROD AND CAP; THENCE
NORTH 59 DEGREES 04
MINUTES 56 SECONDS
EAST 108.14 FEET TO A
ROD AND CAP; THENCE
NORTH 70 DEGREES 18
MINUTES 05 SECONDS
EAST 58.20 FEET TO A
ROD AND CAP; THENCE
SOUTH 19 DEGREES 41
MINUTES 55 SECONDS
EAST 67.50 FEET TO A
ROD AND CAP; THENCE
NORTH 70 DEGREES 18
MINUTES 05 SECONDS
EAST 86.42 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

A/K/A 4047 CAPE SAN
BLAS ROAD, CAPE SAN
BLAS, FL 32456

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
July 7, 2009.

Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,
RL.
RO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
F07000013

**See Americans with Dis-
abilities Act
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Gulf
County Courthouse
#850-229-3116 (TDD)
July 23, 30, 2009
3149S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

PEOPLES FIRST COMMU-
NITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

HAYES S. LISTER.
BRANDY W. LISTER. WIL-
LIE PAYNE, ELIZABETH
ASHLEY PAYNE.
CITIBANK FEDERAL SAV-
INGS BANK, MAGNOLIA
BLUFF SUBDIVISION
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC.,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-79 CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE is hereby given
pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
July 6, 2009 entered in
case Number 09-79-CA of
the Circuit Court of the
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit
in and for Gulf County,
Florida, wherein PEOPLES
FIRST COMMUNITY BANK
is the Plaintiff and HAYES
S. LISTER, BRANDY W.
LISTER, WILLIE PAYNE.
ELIZABETH ASHLEY
PAYNE, CITIBANK FED-
ERAL SAVINGS BANK,
and MAGNOLIA BLUFF
SUBDIVISION
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC., are Defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at the front steps of
the Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Cecil Costin
Boulevard, Port St. Joe,
Florida, Gulf County, at
11:00 a.m. Eastern Time,
on the 13th day of August,
2009, the following de-
scribed property situated
in Gulf County, Florida,
and set forth in the Order
or Final Judgment, to-wit:

Lot 6 of MAGNOLIA
BLUFF, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in
plat book 5, Page 3 of the
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida.

In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing at 300 East Fourth
Street, Panama City, Flor-
ida, 32401; Telephone:
(850) 763-9061, ext. 327;
1-800-955-771 (TDD); or
1-800-955-8770 (V), via
Florida relay Service.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

WITNESS my hand and
the official seal of the
Honourable Court on this
9th day of July, 2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS,
CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

Sherri Denton Mallory,
Esq.
MALLORY & MALLORY,
PA.


1100
Post Office Box 2178
Panama City, Florida
32402
July 23, 30, 2009
3151S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

RBC CENTURY BANK
PLAINTIFF

VS

TONY O MARTIN;
BRENDA C MARTIN; SUN-
SET POINTE AT SE-
CLUDED DUNES
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC.
DEFENDANTS

CASE NO: 08-321-CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated July
6th, 2009 entered in Civil
Case No. 08-321-CA of the
Circuit court of the 14TH
Judicial Circuit in and for
GULF County, Florida, I
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at
THE FRONT LOBBY OF
THE GULF COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED
AT 1000 CECIL COSTIN
BLVD, PORT ST. JOE,
Florida at 11:00 a.m. on
the August 13th, 2009 the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment,
to-wit:

LOT 13, BLOCK A. OF
SUNSET POINTE, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGE 41, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Dated this 9th day of July,
2009.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the is pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

THE LAW OFFICES OF
BAKALAR & TOPOUZIS,
PA.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF
450 N. PARK ROAD,
SUITE 410
HOLLYWOOD, FL. 33021

If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order
to participate in this pro-
ceeding you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
office of the Court Admin-
istrator, BROWARD
County Courthouse, at
within two (2) working
days of your receipt of this
Notice of Sale;
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) for
hearing impaired or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
July 23, 30, 2009
3166S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
EARL F. OWENS
Deceased.

File Number 09-42PR

NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the
estate of EARL F OWENS,
deceased, whose date of
death was August 1, 2008
and whose social security
number is ***-**-0304, is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Gulf County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
Gulf County Courthouse,
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN


THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is July
23,2009.

Personal Representative:
La'TRINA Y'VETTA
McNEAL
149 Sims Ave., A3
Panama City, FL 32456
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
Charles A. Costin
Florida Bar No. 699070
Post Office Box 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32.457
Telephone: (850) 227-1159
July 23, 30, 2009


3175S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Verona V, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as fol-
lows:

Certificate No. 339

Application No. 2009 -13

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 03186-125R

Description of Property:
BEGINNING at a 5/8" di-
ameter iron rod and cap
marked L.S. 1718 on the,
Southerly right of way line
of County Road No. 30
(Formerly State Road No.
30) at a point of intersec-
tion with the Westerly
'boundary line of Section
20, Township 9 South,
Range 10 West, Gulf
County, Florida, thence go
Northeasterly along said
Right of Way line along the
arc of a curve to the left
having a radius of 2346.20
feet through a central an-
gle of 01 Degrees 51 -Min-
utes 16 Seconds for an arc
lengthof75.93 feet (Chord
bearing North 77 Degrees
26 Minutes 34 Seconds
East for 3 feet) to a 1/2" di-
ameter iron rod and cap
marked L.S. 1999; thence
departing said Southerly
right of way line go South
00 Degrees 02 Minutes 35
Seconds East for a dis-
tance of 270.45 feet to a
5/8" diameter Iron Rod,
and cap marked L.B. 2372
on the Northerly right of
way line of a 20 foot wide
access road; thence go
North 83 Degrees 03 Min-
utes 05 Seconds West
along said Northerly right
of way line for a distance
of 74.71 feet to a point on
the West boundary of
aforesaid Section 20;
thence go North 00 De-
grees 02 Minutes 12 Sec-
onds West Along the West
Boundary line of said Sec-
tion' 20, for a distance of
244.91 feet, to the POINT
OF BEGINNING. Said par-
cel of land lying and being
in Section 20, Township 9
South, Range 10 West,
Gulf County, Florida, and
having an area of 0.44 ac-
res, more or less. ALSO
KNOWN AS: Lot 7, PELI-
CAN PINES SUBDIVISION
(Unrecorded). Easement
for Ingress and Egress:
GrAntors grant an ease-
ment for ingress and
egress to the beach in Gulf
of Mexico located between
Lots 8 and 9, Pelican Pines
as described in the Decla-
ration of Restrictions and
covenants of Pelican Pines
recorded in the Public
Records of Gulf County,
Florida, at ORB 137, Page
764. (Lot 8 and 9 are de-
scribed In these cove-
nants).

Name in which assessed:
John M. Chivetta

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such certifi-
cate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
ET, Wednesday, the 26th
day of August, 2009.

Dated this 21st day of July,
2009,

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,


| 1100
Deputy Clerk
July 23, 30, August 6, 13,
2009
3176S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Verona V, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed tobe issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as fol-
lows:

Certificate No. 351

Application No. 2009 -14

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 03191-245R

Description of Property:
Lot 9, MYSTIC PALMS, a
Subdivision, as per map or
plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page 8, of the
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida.

Name in which assessed:
James Bailey IV

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T., Wednesday, the 26th
day of August, 2009.

Dated this 21st day of July,
2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 23, 30, August 6, 13,
2009
3178S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Verona V, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as fol-
lows:

Certificate No.419

Application No.2009 15

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 03607-000R

Description of Property:
Lots 12, 14, and 16, Block
7, of Beacon Hill Addition,
according to the Plat
thereof on file in the Office
of the Clerk of Circuit'
Court, Gulf County, Flor-
ida.

Name in which assessed:
Charlie Mack Brock

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such certifi-
cate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 26th
day of August, 2009.

Dated this 21st day of July,
2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS '
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 23, 30, August 6, 13,
2009
3208S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITA-
KER MORTGAGE CORPO-
RATION,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JASON BRIAN WARD;
MARTHA WARD; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
DEBBIE FOREHAND
HANNA A/K/A DEBBIE
FOREHAND/ DROP; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF JA-
SON BRIAN WARD; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
MARTHA WARD; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 08-00336

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE


1100
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 21st day of May,
2009, and entered in Case
No. 08-00336, of the Cir-
cult Court of the 14TH Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for
Gulf County, Florida,
wherein TAYLOR, BEAN &
WHITAKER MORTGAGE
CORPORATION is the
Plaintiff and JASON BRIAN
WARD; MARTHA WARD;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
DEBBIE FOREHAND
HANNA A/K/A DEBBIE
FOREHAND/ DROP; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF JA-
SON BRIAN WARD; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
MARTHA WARD; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY are
defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at the FRONT LOBBY
OF COURTHOUSE at the
Gulf County Courthouse in
Port St Joe, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 15th day
of October, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:

LOTS 10 AND 12, BLOCK
15, CORRECTIVE REPLAT
OF TWIN -LAKES, UNIT
NO. 1, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, REO
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
2, PAGE 42, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA. TO-
GETHER WITH A 2006
DEER VALLEY DOU-
BLEWIDE MOBILE HOME
WITH VIN #'S;
DVAL10601231A,
DVAL1 0601231 B.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

Dated this 14th day of
July, 2009.

Rebecca Norris
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite
120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
July 30, August 6, 2009
3227S
STATE OF FLORIDA DE-
PARTMENT OF ENVI-
RONMENTAL PROTEC-
TION

NOTICE- OF CONSENT
ORDER

The Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection gives
notice of agency action of
entering into a Consent
Order with Bay
Environmental, Inc. and
Bay Environmental Labora-
tory, Inc. pursuant to Sec-
tion 120.57(4), Florida
Statutes. The Consent Or-
der addresses the im-
proper application of resid-
uals at a residuals land ap-
plication site located at
Highway 22, nine miles
east of Wewahitchka, in
Gulf County, Florida, at ap-
proximate Latitude: 30 08'
0" North, Longitude: 8518'
0" West and at a residuals
land application site lo-
cated at 8481 Highway 22,
Wewahitchka, in Gulf
County, Florida, at ap-
proximate Latitude- 30 08'
13.99" North, Longitude
850 21' 4.99" West. The
Consent Order is available
for public inspection dur-
ing normal business hours,
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at
the Department of Environ-
mental Protection, 160
Governmental Center,
Pensacola, Florida
32502-5794.

Persons who are not par-
ties to this Order, but
whose substantial interests
are affected by it, have a
right to petition for an ad-
ministrative hearing under
Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes.
Because the administrative
hearing process is de-
signed to formulate final
agency action, the filing of
a petition concerning this
Order means that the De-
partment's final action may
be different from the posi-
tion it has taken in the Or-
der.

The petition for administra-
tive hearing must contain


1100
all of the following informa-
tion:

a.) The OGC Number as-
signed to this Ordpr;

b.) The name, address,
and telephone number of
each petitioner; the name,
address, and telephone
number of the petitioner's
representative, if any,
which shall be the address
for service purposes dur-
ing the course of the pro-
ceeding;

c.) An explanation of how
the petitioner's substantial
interests will be affected by
the Order;

d.) A statement of when
and how the petitioner re-
ceived notice of the Order;
e.) Either a statement of all
material facts disputed by
the petitioner or a state-
ment that the petitioner
does not dispute any ma-
terial facts;

f.) A statement of the spe-
cific facts the petitioner
contends warrant reversal
or modification of the Or-
der;

g.) A statement of the rules
or statutes the petitioner
contends require reversal
or modification of the Or-
der; and

h.) A statement of the relief
sought by the petitioner,
stating precisely the action
petitioner wishes the De-
partment to take with re-
spect to the Order.

The petition must be filed
(received) at the
Department's Office of
General Counsel, 3900
Commonwealth Boule-
vard, MS# 35, Tallahas-
see, Florida 32399-3000
within 21 days of receipt of
this notice. A copy of the
petition must also be
mailed at the time of filing
to the District Office at the
address indicated in Para-
graph 30, below. Failure to
file a petition within the
21-day period constitutes
a person's waiver of the
right to request an admin-
istrative hearing and to
participate as a party to
this proceeding under
Sections 120.569 and
120.57,.Florida Statutes.
Before the deadline for fil-
ing a petition, a person
whose substantial interests
are affected by this Order
may choose to pursue me-
diation as an alternative
remedy under Section
120.573, Rorida Statutes.
Choosing mediation will
not adversely affect such
person's right request an
administrative hearing if
mediation does not result
in a settlement. Additional
information about media-
tion is provided in Section
120.573, Florida Statutes
and Rule 62-110.106(12),
Florida Administrative
Code.
July 30, 2009,
3236S'
IN THE FOURTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
NETTIE SUE LEWIS
Deceased.

File No.: 09-08-PR

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Nettie Sue Lewis,
deceased, File Number
09-08PR, is pending in the
Circuit Court. for Gulf
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which is 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St.
Joe, FL 32456. The names
and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and
the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of
this notice is served must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against the
decedent's estate, includ-
ing unmatured, contingent
and unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is July
30, 2009.


PETS


MERCHANDISE EMPLOYMENT


L,1..0 0-,1
3







Estb/shd 93 0Sev/n G/fCont ad t~rrondngatasfo 67yersTH SAR PRT T.JO, L TURDAY JLY30 209 9


1 1 -0 0 .. . / 6-. 0 8 07-4 1
01100 001100 3130 i O oni .awrd 41i
Personal Representative: year of issuance, the de- WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 Estate Auction Baby Sitter's Gulfaire Nissan 300 ZX, 2+21985,
Peggy Hammond scription of the property, MONTHS AFTER THE Needed or family on Executive 3 br, 2 ba, W&D, One owner, new radio,
TRAPPE & DUSSEAULT, and the names in which it TIME OF THE FIRST PUB- Saturday Aug 1st Nee for the family on Execuve 3 2 b,
PA. was assessed aleO as LICATION OF THIS NO- 10AM Viewing 8;30 AM vacation, or the summer garage, deck, fenced yd, ,never wrecked, great paint
STAN TRAPPE follows: TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER 12114 Krocus Rd. Must be 18 or over. pool, tennis court, private job, motor seized up from
Florida Bar No. 176562 THE DATE OF SERVICE Fountain Florida 904-206-1200 REAL ESTATE FOR RENr beach, pets okay, $925 AUrOMOE M NEun storage, running 6 months
236 McKenzie Avenue Certificate No. 216 OF A COPY OF THIS NO- Take Hwy 231, to Krocus m-t. 850-6f 2690 or uu ag. $500 oo 2&Colle2cbles
R. BOX2526 TICE ON THEM. Rd. Follow signs. Very Deputy Sheriff 60- eslness/ 832-9702 8100 -Antiquae&Collectibles
PD. BOX 2526 TICEONTHEM.Flo signsCay pty Verery Coerceal _________ 8110 Cars
Panama City, FL 32402 Application No. 2009 17 Large iron fountain, large Taking Applications for 6110- Apartments Townhomes for rent, 8120- Sports Uliy Vehicles
850/769-6139 All other creditors of the cement fountain and table, Deputy Sheriff. Must be 0120- Beach Rentals Jones Homestead- Pon 830- Trcks
Attorney for Personal Rep- Year of Issuance: 2007 decedent and other per & 3 benches Large iron statecertified and 18 years 130-Cd wnhouseo nes estead-
resentative sons having claims or de- bell, many garden statues. of age. Come by Gulf 6140- oousmae noted rent free with deposit and 81 Momercales Jeep Cherokee 1995
6150 Roommate Wanted rent free with deposit and 81800- Motorcycles Jeep Cherokee 1995
July 30, August 6, 2009 R.E. No. 02154-OOOR mands against decedent's Two large cement gargols, County Sheriff's Office for 6160- Rooms for Rent 12 month lease. 2 br and 3 8170 Auto Parts $ 5 9 5
5 estate must file their claims and 2 lions. Planters and application. 6170 Mobile Home/Lot br units available. Call & Accessories down. $3,900 Total 0% In-
3275S DesciptionofProperty with this court WITHIN 3 plants. 10X20 green Contact Malor Bobby 6180 Out-of-Town Rentals 850-227-9732 8210 Boats terest Daylight Auto Fi-
NOTICE OF LOTS 18 AND 19, Block 4, MONTHS AFTER THE house, yard furniture, wal- 6190- Timeslare Rentals 8220 Personal Watercraft r Dlight A F-
APPLICATION LAKE ALICE ADDITION to DATEOFTHEFIRST PUB- nut 7 pc Europeaon Wall (850) 227-1115 6200 Vacation Rentals --8230 -Saiboats nancing, 850-215-1769
FOR TAX DEED Wewahitchka, Florida, ac- LICATION OF THIS NO- unit, old halltree, ridgeway for any questions. B & M Supplies
NOTICE IS HEREBY cording to Official Plat TICE. grandfather clock, leather 8245 Boat Slips & ocks
NGIVEN that V a thereof on file in Plat Book couch and chair, lamps, 4 8310 Airraft/atlons
G N that eriona V, L 1 Page 9, of the Public ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED oak roll top desk, very 8320- AT/Off Road Vehicles
the holder of the following Records of Gulf County, WITHIN THE TIME PERI- large unique redwood cof- :8330 Campers & Trailers
Tax Certificate, has filed Florida. ODS SET FORTH IN SEC- fee table, large elephant nt/Re 8340 Meotorhomes
said certificate for a tax TION 733.702 OF THE collection, small to large nstallation/MaRepair
deed to be issued thereon. RlephnETATEcFoRlArg
The certificate number and Name in which assessed: FLORIDA PROBATE CODE elephant collection, large 1 br, apt., all until included,
year of issuance, the de- Dean Highfield WILL BE FOREVER wicker el elephant, 3 ft Installers Small pets ok, Furnished,
year of issuance, the de- BARRED, ivory clad temple, lion and Mediacom Walk to grocery & shopp-7100 Homes
scription of the property All of said property being dragon pair. Big brass col- Communications, ing, call 653-6375 7105 Open House 110
a7105 OpBe House
and the names in which it in Gulf County, State of NOTWITHSTANDING THE election, lots of assorted fig- The 8th largest cable 2 b aoss from roerh e
was assessed are as Florida. Unless such cer- TIME PERIODS SET urines, records, diamond company in the United Joebeach$700 7120Cosmmeclal o
follows: tificate shall be redeemed FORTH ABOVE, ANY rings and other estate jew- states and covering St.Joe beahse ca$700 me + 7130 CondTownhouser Honda Accord 1996 $695
CertificateNo.350 accordingto law, the prop- CLAIM FILED TWO (2) elry, African carvings, 8 tate a e n dep. 1 -anhos wn,
erty described in such cer- YEARS R MORE AFTER cart & other signedate an 850-647-6320 leave msg.. 7150o Lots and Acreage terest Daylight Auto Fi- Chevy Dually 1993 $895
immediate opening in 7160- Mobile HomesLots nancing 850-215-01769 down $5,900 Total 0% In-
Application No. 2009 16 t be sold to frthe THE DECEDENT'S DATE brzedscuptlures. Large Mexico Beach Fl & Ap- Clean 3 br, 2 ba in PSJ, 7170 Waterfront 9am to 9pm rest Daylight Auto Fi-
Yearf an 007 Lobby of the Gulf County ment center, glass cabi technical experience 850-545-5814or Propely 9am tp pm
Yearof Issuance 2007 Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. The date of first publica- nets, wood ships, two necessary. Performs in- 850-442-3334 710-Ou-of-Town
RE. No. 03191-012R Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. lion of this notice is July birthing chairs, large mir- stalls for cable and high Real Estate
R.E. No. 031012R Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, 30,2009. ror, black laquer dresser speed internet. Must 7200- Timeshare
Deiptn of E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd and chest, 3 pc bedroom have a valid Driver's li- T
Description of Property: day of September, 2009 Personal Representative: set, crystal, kerosene cense. Mediacom offers 6130
PARCELNO. 2: Timothy L. Beard lamps, misc hand tools, competitive pay and 13
COMMENCE at the Point Dated this 28th day of 4701Copper HillDrive bench grinder, hardware, great benefits along 710
of Intersection of the North July, 2009. Spring Hill, Florida 34609 dishes, and many, many with advancement Trade 3.96 acres, 300 yards
right of way line of County Attorney for Personal more items. The Tillgman opportunities. For im- more or less from public
Road S-30-B, and the East REBECCA L. NORRIS Representative: Estate Many years of col- mediate consideration, 2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm, boat landing on the Appa-__
boundary line of Indian CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT Mel C. Magidson Jr. electing. 10% buyers pre- please visit our website Carrabelle, large deck .lachicola River in
Pass Beach, Group No, COURT, GULF COUNTY, Attorney for Timothy L. mium, Bay County Auction at $650 mo. $650 dep. Blountstown, FL. Mixed Honda Prelude 1995$695 own Totar r 997, 695In
asre-onda Prelude 1995 $695 down Total $3,90090 In-
as recorded in Plat Book FLORIDA Beard Service AB 964, Larry Bay- careermedla Available 08/01/09 Call for zone use. Boundry & ele- down $4,900 Total 0% In- terest Daylight Auto Fi-
, Page48, of the Public Donna L. Ray Florida Bar No. 261629 les AU#1384, an appt. 850-562-4996. action survey done. Would terest Daylight Auto Fi- nancing 850215-1769
Florida, and thence runty tyClerk 5286th St. 850-722-9483 Equal Opportunity make for an Ideal nancing 850-215-1769 9am to9pm
Florida, and thence run July 30, August 6, 13, 20, PR. Box 340 Employer Eagle Landing campground/RV park w/ 9am o9pm
South 82 Degrees 47 Mi-2 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Web Id # 34044971 Spaci s bat and tackle store or
along said Right of Way for 3277S Telephone: (850) 227-7800 Spa bar. Property borders 2
along said Right of Way for 3277 Fax: (850) 227-7878 1 3230 rC--is --r P a; Townhome paved streets, both dead
Curve668.88 feet to the Point of NOTICE OF July 30, August 6, 2009 ,sportan New development Fully ends. Property is free and
Curve of a Curve: thence APPLICATION 424 Arizona Dr. Mexico furnished, beautiful & spa- clear with no mortgages or
along the arc of a curve to FOR TAX DEED Beach, Saturday August 1 I We Need Driver urnished, 3 beauul & spa lear with no tradeora
the loft which has a radius at 7am CT; 2 Families:cious, 3 br, 2 ba liens. Want to trade for a
the left which has a radius at 7am CT; 2 Families: I Trainees Only I townhome located inlot on Beacon Hill, St. Joe
of 1585.37 feet and a cen- NOTICE IS HEREBY chest of drawers, Jenny Tranees nly on omesead i lo Beach, or Mexico Beach
trial angle of 46 Degrees 59 GIVEN that Verona V, LLC Linde crib with accesso- I No experienced Drivers 1 Jones Homestead, Eagle h at is zoned that wi ao
Minutes 14 Seconds for an the holder of the following 3308S ries, fishing equipment, $800 per week t L ing di o that trailed. Proprt
arc length of 1300.13 feet, Tax Certificate, has filed NOTICE OF SALE ies, fishing equipment, $800 per week shopLanding subdivision. Clos that is zonedl that will allowperty
thence South 39 Degrees said certificate for men's and women's cy- 1-87-214-3624 and St. Josep'sust be free & lear of any
thence South 39 Degrees said certificate for a tax TeSn ecles, cameras, dark room Web id # 30- Monthly rental $900 w/ liens with no mortgages on
46 Minutes 56 Seconds deed to be issued thereon. The e Place intends equipment, and lots more. 0 s c/damage deposit. parcel Call 850-674-5026, 8140
East for 100.00 feet, to the The certificate number and to sell the personal prop- equipment, and otsmore.. sMonthlyc/damage deposn l parcel. Call 85674-526,
East for 100,00 feet, to theThe certificate number and Medical/Health Short Term rental option 674-5887 or 643-1723 8
Southeast Right of Way year of issuance, the de- erty of below listed storage ic/ Ht Short Term rental option Dodge Caravan, 1998,
line of said County Road scription of the property, units to enforce a lien im- Receptionist/ avail. Call Gulf Coast Prop- r --D $595 down. Total $4,200
S-30-B; thence with a tan- and the names in which it posed on said property Office Manager er 0% interest At
gent bearing of South 50 was assessed are as ude the Florida self stor- 850)229-2706 for more in- Jeep Cherokee Sport 0% Interest Daylight Auto
Degrees 13 Minutes 04 follows: age facility act (section 2001 Garrison Ave. (Hope with good computer skills formation & a tour of the I I 4WD 1995, mechanically Financing. 850-215-1769
Seconds West run along 83-801.809 Florida stat- Family Worship Center) oreterinaian Clinic PT townhome. U.S. I sound, well maintained oen- 9am to 9pm
the arc of a curve to the Certificate No. 343 utes). The undersigned will Sat Aug, 1st, from 8-4pm, or FT Call 850-227-7270 gine good brakes & tires,
right that has a radius of sell at public sale by com- lotsofmiscitems. TreasuryDeptIrunsgreat, good buy be-
1685.37 feet and a central Application No. 2009 -18 petitive bidding, on August Verification PublCAw retail-only $1,800
angle of 11 Degrees 44 15, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. on Analysts Wed, Aug 12th,10am I850-229-7750
Minutes 18 Seconds for an Year of Issuance: 2007 the premises where the F Full Time Position PSJ, ,, 67 acre residential
arc length of 345.29 feet to said property has been 3 FL, M-F 9-5:30. 20k/year r land, 2327 Ma gntia
the POINT OF BEGINN- R.E. No. 03186-560R stored at The Space Place, Knowledge of Microsoft Dr.Panama City Beach i
ING, from this POINT OF 625A 15th Street, Mexico ^*t Word/Google required. Ex- 2 /3 br, 2 b, Completely Zoned, single family IMustangConvertible1993
BEGINNING, run South 26 Description of Property: Beach, FL 32410. cellent Phone Skills are renovated, historic, early residence. M $495 down $2,900 Total
Degrees 58 Minutes 51 Lot 12, SUMMERSANDS necessary, school house. North of Located in Magnolia Es- 0% Interest. Daylight Auto
SecondsEast 420.61 feet, Subdivision, as recorded 1. Storage location 2AB4, GUN SHOW Email Resume to: Overstret in Gulf County states w/privatepaved Financing 850-215-1769t Auto
more or less, to the ap- in Plat Book 3, Page 41, of assorted tools and house- Panama C andreaobrooks on 30 acres. Includes driveway, dock w/ea 9am p 9pm 51769
proximate mean high the Public Records of Gul hold items. Rented to Panama CGROUNS alaho.com har d frs, was dwal along canalpen ga p 8160
water line of the Gulf of County, Florida. Krystal Russ. FAIR GROUNDS .avahoocoi hardwood floors, walls allalong canal, Open
erine o the u o out o t Aug. 1st&2nd ceiling with stainless TueAug 1th from Yamaha Majesty 2006
exc sth3enc Miuth8 Name4inwhichassessed All sales are final, and will SAT. 9- & SUN. 10-4 appliances, granite coun- An, DepRosit $lOk 400 cc, Excellent Con
Seconds West 17.91 feet, Wesley P. Knight &Gal H. be paid for in CASH, and FREE PARKING tertops, CH&A. Cook ICashier Check, paid to: I diton 11200 mce le s
thence North 27 Degrees Knight removed from property at Info. (407) 275-7233 4130 house with wrap around EG & G Tech Services G great gas saver, asking
18 Minutes 15 Seconds time of sale Sale is sub- foidaunshowsco POSTAL & GOV'T JOB prch and much more. wwan au t v a
West 7.76 feet, thence All of said property being ject to be cancelled in the INFO FOR SALE? Bringyourhorsesand en- s(703)273-7373 I 648-
South 55 Degrees 09 Min- in Gulf County, State of' event of settlement, be- joy the beautiful pasture (703) 2737373
utes 45 Seconds West, Florida. Unless such cer- tween owner and the obli- land. $1250 m Call Sale# 0966901
along said approximate tificate shall be redeemed gated party. 3300 Caution --- 8210
mean high water line-98.83 according to law, the prop- G.A.E. INC. 2 br, 1 ba 226 Sailfish
es te tificate will be sold to the whd aand You NEVERhave topay Call 817-789-3527 shore boat, 225 HP
grass 32 Minutes 38 Sec- tiicate will be sold to the Cowhide chair and otto- for information about Yamaha 2 stroke, windless
onds West for 432.00 feet, highest bidder in the front ma.$2 for information abou Y
more or less to the South- Lobb of the f ont man $250. Antique Pie federal or postal jobs. If 3br, 1 ba house for rent or anchor, lots of extras, New
moreor lessoheSouth- Lobby oftheGulfCounty safe $200 Please Cal yRe tE s 'ele.ectronic, Everthi"n9
.em right of way line of the Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. 850-9910277 or381973 you see a job forsale. Rentis$800 electronics,
No. S-30-B, and a curve Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, FTC. Call 227-1804 Jai alyn Dowden $7,500 850-247-995
concave to the Northwest, E.T, Wednesday, the 2nd The Federal Trade
thence run along said right day of September, 2009. Commission C-30 near 850-25 -3432
of way line along the arc of is America's consumer 108 S. E. Ave. A
a curve which has a radius Dated this 28th day of protection agency. Indiaen Pass E Florida 3232 8330
of 1685.37 feet and a cen- July, 2009. between Apalachlcola Ca belle, Floria 32322.
tral angle of 03 Degrees 20 www.ftc.gov/jobscams and Port St. Joe WW eacreStre.com 20056x12 Cargo craft
Minutes 20 Seconds for an REBECCA L. NORRIS MERCHANDISE a 1-877-FTC-HELP 1 bedroom, 1 bath, en- utility trailer, single axel,
arc length of 98.22 feet to CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT closed patio, new reno- 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, spare tire, drive up gate,
the POINT OF BEGINN- COURT, GULF COUNTY, 3100 -Antiques EMPLOYME A public service ovation, $58/loor & title toos, too
ING. Containing 1.04 ac- FLORIDA 3110 -Appliances message from the FTC w&d, $15 unfum, back- House n 1/2 acre120000 many to list. $3,000
3120 Arts & Crafts 4100 Help Wanted and The News Herald m, 2
res, more or less. BY: Donna L. Ray, 3130 Auctions 4130 Employment and The News Herald ground/credit check. 3 Bedroom, 2bath, 50-247-99
Deputy Clerk 3140 Baby Items Information Classifiled Advertising 850899-1093 for appt Mobile Home 650.00
Name in which assessed: July 30, August 6, 13, 20, 3150 Building Supplies Department obie H ................... 650.00
K. Legrand McLemore 2009 310- Equipment Shop our new Eagle Landing 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
A2lS 3sdrey g170 Collectibles h Tow Apartment .........................400.00
i olf sa oprn e IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 3180- Computers 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathshowroom COMPLETE PACKAGES
in Gulf County, State of OF THE FOURTEENTH 3190 Electronics Newdevelopment-beauti- 1 Bedroom, 1 BathETE
Florida.Unlesssuchcer-OFTHEFOURTEENTH30with Fwdevelooment beauti-1B o 1Bath FOM
Florida. Unless such cer- JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN 3200- Firewood packed withful & spacious 3br, 2ba Apartment ...................... 500.00
tificate shall be redeemed townhome located in .............. $
accrdit all e redeemed AND FOR GULF COUNTY 3220- Furniture high quality townhom e located in 1 Bedroom, 1 ath
erly desc in such car- FLORIDA3 al ig Jones Homestead, in the 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
according to law, the prop FLORIDA 3230 Garage/Yard Sales -
erty described in such cer- 3240- Guns furniture at Eagle Landing Subdivi- Apartment, incl. water......550.00 AllWelded, AAluminum
tificate will be sold to the iMnRE: ESTATE OF 3250 Good Things to Eat sion. Close to shopping,
3260 -d e Health &h FitnessrontINI
highest bidder in the front ROOSEVELT BEARD, S. 3260 up t 60% of BUINSS & FNANCIAL downtown and St. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Boats
Lobby of tho e Gulf Ceountyi a 3270 -Jewelry/Clothing Joseph's Bay. Monthly River Front,w/ Dock ..... :1200.00 BOAT SHOW
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Deceased 3280 Machinery/ regular retail. 5100 Business rental $875 with $875 '
n Sr Blvd. File No. 0936PR 3290 E uipment D 0Us 10 lone s security/damage deposit. Bedroom,1 Bath FRI. & SAT.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St Equipment Opporlunlles
Costin, lvdPrtSt.File No. 09-36PR 3290 Medical Equipment Decorator's s110- Money to Lend i B t
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, 3300 Miscellaneous IMWAREI l)IJSE ,d Call Gulf Coast Property IApartment .........................650.00 Bonifay Florida
E.T, Wednesday, the 2nd NOTICE TOCREDITORS 3310 Musical Instruments Services at (850) 229-2706
day of September, 2009. 332- plants Shrubs/ 212 Williams Ave for more information and a Call about our Beach front and www.xtremeindustries.com
Dated this 28th day of The administration ofthe 3330- Restaurant/Hotel DowntownPSJ tour of thetownhome. Condo w pool action rentals
Jul 2009.estate of Roosevelt Beard, 3340 Sporting Goods 850-227-3344 EARN GREAT
July, 2009. Sr., deceased, whose date 3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) AS
REBECCA L. NORRIS of death was February 21, $$$ WORKING
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT 2009, is pending in the Cir- FROM HOMEJoem er
COURT GULF COUNT cult Court for Gulf County, ROli iNOANDO ICI. cial
COURT, GULF COUNTY, Probate Division,53 Year Old Distribution INISGAN0FICE P
FLORIDA the address of which is Company looking for America's For Lease
BY: Donna L. Ray, Online Trainers.For Lease
Deputy Clerkay, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Online Trainers
uy Blvd. PortS Joe FL www.awake our Mini Storage Retail I Office Space
Juy y30. August 6,13, 20. 32456. The names and ad- dreams.com
20093 T m d dreams and Office 317 Williams Avenue
3___276S009 ___ dresses personal U i +/-1800sf- tenant improvements negotiable; $1350/mo gross
3276S representative and the per- MINISTO GE Units325ReidAvenue
NOTICE OF sonal representative's at- 325 Reid Avenue
APPLICATION torney are set forth below. In POrt St. Available +/-4500sf shell space; corner location; $2500/mo gross
FOR TAX DEED 850-29-8 nA 309 Reid Avenue
All creditors of the dece- High School Diploma at 850 229 801 +/-6000sf renovated shell space; occupant read $4500/mo mod. gross
NOTICE IS HEREBY dent and other persons G r Home. 6-8 Wks. Low tui- 4i U v ell RiAen u
GIVEN that Verona V, LLC having claims or demands GorgeouS tion, Free Brochure Pay- 407ReidAvenue, a S E
the older of the following against decedent's estate Yamy Nicole Call ment Plan 1r800- 814-7400 850-58- 4691 +/-1824sf, L gSJ,,
Tax Certificate, has filed on whom a copy of this 850-691- 9991 264-8330. www.diploma 310 Reid Avenue
said certificate for a tax notice is required to be fromhome.com i 230Reid* +/-1116sf Suite C; finished office space; lobby area with two
deedto be issuedthereon. served must file their cou**6 office suites and filing/storage room; $1000/mo NNN
The certificate number and claims with this court 230 Reid Avenue


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Call:
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Email:


850-747-5020
800-345-8688
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SL kr as +/-756sf office/retail; $12 psf mod. gross
A America's Mini Storage & Office Complex 322 Long Avenue
nes ni Now Lasg" +/-1000sf- move-in ready; $900/mo gross
"Business Center Now Leasing" ; 411 Reid Avenue
SLocationi Locationi Near the Port! l +/-2668sf office space; $9.45 psf mod, gross
New brick offices with 12' x 12' office,! Warehouse / Flex Space:
*private Bath, Storage Closet, with easy 110 Tiade Circle West
access bay to a 24' x 40' warehouse: 750sf-22,500sf -PSJ Commerce Park, flex'space, $5.25psf NNN'(incl.
space. Gated, Secured 1 year lease at* water/sewer)
$550 per month, $550 deposit. 160 Cessna Drive
bToye or Gina Roberts -+/-5,000sf office/flex space; Adjacent to Costin Airport; $7 psf plus utilities
5 0 y1 or 8in 28 4 and applicable sales tax; Inquire for possible incentives/concessions.
850-228-8014 or 850- 258 4691 772 Hwy 98, Suite A
ka**** k*** ****k** k** +/-900sf office flex-space, Includes 450sf overhead storage. $500/mo
Hurry! We only have a few mod, gross o S .
For Sale
Barefoot Cottages left. 320 Marina Drive
Corner lot on entrance to Marina Cove, prime location w/high visibility;
In a bueah access community with pools, playgrounds, club .14 acres.
house, and hot tubs. Price includes water, sewer nd garbage. 407 Reid Ave
he, ad ht ts, Price in s wr, sr nid g ge +/-4988sf; Multi tenant bldg 100% leased; Parking Incl; $549,000
3b ............................................ 00 317Monument Ave
3br/3.5ba.......,....,............ .............. I +/-4431sf; New construction located directly on Hwy 98; Parking Included;
S2b/2.5b,,..................................................950 $649,000 Also available for lease. Please inquire for terms.
s 1,866.628,1334 Marketed Exclusively by:
souhriiC M y nr n 850.229.1350 850-229-6373


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I CAL Ou N1 NUME1s ow


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, JULY 30, 2009 0 9B


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years






510 I The Star


Local


Thursday, July 30, 2009


W:OODTURNER from page B1


garage.
After drying, the pieces
are turned on the lathe a
tinal time.
Pollock employs a vari-
ety of carving implements,
including detail tools that
hollow out the bowls' cen-
tors.
Contact with wood dulls
the tools, and they must be
sharpened constantly.
Pollock finishes his
pieces with wax or lacquer,
which he occasionally tints
to bring out the grain in
light colored wood like syca-
more.
A sycamore bowl tinted
a vivid blue green and a tri-
colored maple candleholder
are on display in the studio.
Pollock approaches each
piece with a sculptor's -eye,
visualizing completed forms
in rough logs.
"The wood tells you more
of what it's going to be than
you do," said Pollock.
"He should be a wood
talker instead of a wood-
turner," quipped Jackie.
A row of pecan tree logs
in the backyard has been
talking to Pollock for days.
A forked log promises an
interesting pattern of grain,
and a knobby piece of wood
not yet stripped of its bark
has captivated Pollock's
imagination.
Bark appeals to Pollock,
and he frequently incorpo-
rates natural edges in his
finished designs.
Because of the hand-
crafted nature of his work,
Pollock can never produce
the same bowl twice, despite
customer expectations.
He once spent three
years making one customer
three similar looking salad
bowls.
Though most appreciate
his pieces for their unique
qualities, Pollock has a
ready-made response to
those who don't.
"I tell them, 'It's not your
mama's biscuit bowls."'


WOODTURNING
STUDIO
Bobby Pollock's new
woodturning studio,
Studio on 4th, is located
at 521 4th Street in Port
St. Joe.
When completed,
the gallery will open
on weekends and by
appointment.
Also in the works are
special events showcasing
work by other area artists.
For more information,
call 850-227-1910.


At top left, Pollock likes to leave a "natural edge" on his work, like this walnut
vase. At top center, Pollock began turning wooden pen and pencil sets and other
small projects before working up to large bowls. At top right, To prepare wood
for turning, Pollock uses a chainsaw to cut logs into workable segments. He
frequently leaves some of the bark on the log to add interest to his pieces.
Above, Carving tools require constant sharpening.

ONLINE:
To view a photo gallery of Bobby Pollock at work in his woodturning studio,
visit www.starfl.com.


j- 1


T C Iei


1


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Class begins September 21!
You could be on your way to earning a starting salary of
$24,000 a year as a Pharmacy Technician in just eight
weeks with our new continuing education program. This
comprehensive 50-hour course will prepare you to enter the
pharmacy field and take the Pharmacy Technician Certification
Board's exam.
Pharmacy Techs work in hospitals, home infusion pharmacies,
community pharmacies and other health care settings.
Course content includes medical terminology specific to
the pharmacy, reading and interpreting prescriptions and
defining drugs by generic and brand names. You will learn
dosage calculations, I. V. flow rates, drug compounding, dose
conversions, dispensing of prescriptions, inventory control and
billing and reimbursement.

When: Tues/Thurs, Sept 21 Nov 9 from 6:00pm-9:30pm
Where: Gulf/Franklin Center
Fee: $999, includes study materials and textbook
Section: 0049

How to Register: Visit www.gulfcoast.edu/ContinuingEd or
call 850.872.3821. Seats are limited! Claim yours today!


106 Trade Circle
West, Suite D
Port St. Joe. FL
277-1411
FAX:277-1413
Mon.-Fri. 7:30-4:30 A


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