Group Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.).
Title: The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03693
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Star
Publisher: Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Publication Date: July 16, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028419
Volume ID: VID03693
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
alephbibnum - 000358020
lccn - sn 95047323

Full Text














FOOD AND FUN, PAGE B1


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937


YEAR 71, NUMBER 39 "-A .

Thursday, JULY 16,2009 For breaking news,. visit www.starfl.com 50<


DAE


I )
\K7 (~~


E1T fl#JS


City considers



budget, Gulf Pines


Photos by TIM CROFT I The Star
One of the graduates was adopted by the family of Sterling Ivey, the
governor's press secretary. Here is Ivey with wife Denise, son Caleb and
Caleb's sixth birthday present, Hank. Below, the graduating class keeps
eyes trained on the "professors" who helped them earn the certificates. At
bottom, "Top Dog" Rasha showed off why she earned the honor with some
tricks after graduation.


Program teaches dogs, inmates lessons


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer
Before a tiny audience
Sand with one commission-
er (Charles Stephens) ab-
sent, the July 7 Port St. Joe
city commission conducted
the following business:
Jim Anderson, acting
city clerk, gave the com-
mission an update on the
city's ad valorem situation.
The city received its
ad valorem figures July 1
from Gulf County Property
Appraiser Kesley Colbert
and, according to Ander-
son, had 35 days from July
1 to establish the proposed
millage for fiscal year 2009-
2010 and set the dates for
the required public budget
workshops.
According to Anderson,
at the same millage as last
year (3.5914), the city will
collect $1,415,765, about
$200,000 less from last.
year.
He said Colbert re-
ported about $55 million
in taxable value reduction


for city property. roughly
12 tol3.5 percent less than
last year.
Anderson also told com-
missioners that the up-
coming millage rate will be
based on new legislative
rules just established in
the last legislative session.
The millage rate will now
be based on how the com-
mission voted on the mill-
age issue last year.
SCity attorney Russell
Scholz gave an update of
the Gulf Pines Hospital
story, stating that legal pro-
ceedings have moved from
Chapter 11 bankruptcy to
Chapter 7 bankruptcy.
Scholz told the commis-
sion that of the two reverter
clauses in the hospital con-
tract (one for the city and
one for the St. Joe Compa-
ny), no legal decision had
been made as to which one
took precedence. There
was a creditor's meeting
on July 10 to continue the
proceedings.

See BUDGET A3


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
David "Popeye" Lyon contemplated
the imminent departure of Dalton, a
Labrador retriever he has helped train
the past eight weeks, and his eyes red-
dened, his voice halted.
"In here I had a wall up," said Lyon,
an inmate at the Gulf Forestry Camp.
"You think you're hard, that nothing
will touch you. Until you do this. I am
going to miss (Dalton). I really can't
talk about him...
Dalton and seven fellow "class-
dogs" comprised the initial gradua-
tion class of the "DAWGS" program, a
partnership between the Department
of Corrections, the Board of County
Commissioners and the St. Jo-
seph Humane Society.
DAWGS stands for "Develop-
ing Adaptable Dogs with Good -
Sociability" and was the brain-
child of several dedicated folks
-who saw the need for a program
that benefits both the canines
and their inmate trainers and
handlers at the Forestry Camp as
well as the Humane Society.
The dogs spent eight weeks
being obedience trained, taught.
how to sit, stay, come and walk to
the left and just behind their han-
diers.
The inmates, 30 participated
See DAWGS A2


Sacred Heart

launches 'School

Kits 4 Kidz' program


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

In tough economic
times, purchasing school
supplies for one's children
can become a hardship.
Sacred Heart Rehabili-
tation Center at Port St. Joe
recognizes this fact, and is
stepping forward to help.
Taking a cue from Sacred
Heart's Pensacola office,
the rehabilitation center
has launched its first ever
"School Kits 4 Kidz" back-
to-school supply drive.
School supplies, donat-
ed from area residents, will
help deserving children be-
gin the 2009-10 school year
with the tools they need.
"This is a long-time
mission project at Sacred
Heart, because the mis-
sion is to serve all people,
with special attention to
the poor and the vulner-
able, elderly and children,"
said Sacred Heart Reha-'


bilitation Center physical
therapist David Whitfield.
"We thought it would be
a good idea to carry it over
in our community."
In launching the supply
drive, Whitfield acknowl-
edged the Port St. Joe
Junior Service League's
"Jam Packs" project, which
provides fully loaded back-
packs to needy kids.
"The Junior Service
League has done an abso-
lutely-fantastic job of do-
ing this," said Whitfield.
'There's such a greater
need this year that we are
trying to supplement what
they normally do."
"There are a lot of ser-
vice-oriented organiza-
tions where the people are

See KITS A3


Gulf County Health Department to conduct swine flu exercise


On Friday, July 17, 2009 at 9
a.m. the Gulf County Health De-
partment will be having a POD
(Point of Distribution) Exercise
at the Port St. Joe Elementary
School to prepare for the pos-
sible influx of H1N1, otherwise
commonly known as the swine
flu, this upcoming flu season.
While mass inoculations will
not actually be given, prepara-
tions will be the same as if they
were. We will set up in the drive
and have four stages: 1) Sign-In;
2) Intake and Information; 3) In-
oculation; 4) Checkout.



O FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE


Staff from the Gulf County
Health Department and volun-
teers will be acting as partici-
pants for the event. This mock
exercise allows "practice time"
for the staff so that if and when
the need arises, Gulf County will
be prepared to act upon an influx
of H1N1 in our area.
A tabletop exercise will be
held in Marianna on Thursday,
July 16, 2009. Regional Emer-
gency Management and County
Health Departments will par-
ticipate in the tabletop exercise
to prepare for the actual POD


Subscribe to The Star
227-1278
For your hometown paper
delivered to your homel


Exercise the following day.
In addition to these events,
key staff from the Gulf County
Health Department will be trav-
eling to Kissimmee to attend a
H1N1 Conference. As part of the
state's initiative to prepare for
implementation of a likely H1N1
Mass Vaccination Campaign this
fall, our organization has been
invited to the H1N1 Influenza
Mass Vaccination Campaign
Workshop.
The purpose of this workshop
will be to:
*Use the draft County Tech-


nical Assistance Guide for H1N1
Mass Vaccination Operations
to identify implementation con-
straints, planning gaps, resource
issues, policy considerations,
and guidance adjustments nec-
essary to support county opera-
tional needs.
*Discuss and identify specific
community partner participation
and emergency management
support issues and/or needs.
*Develop contingency plan-
ning considerations for mass
vaccination operations
The target audience for the.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Opinion ............ ................... A4
Lethlrs to the Editor. .................. A5
Sports................ ..... A6-7
Obituaries........................... B4-5


Church News.............................. B4
School News................................ B7
Legals..................... ............ B8


workshop is CHD leadership and
designated planning leads for
County Mass Vaccination Opera-
tions. The H1N1 Influenza Mass
Vaccination Campaign Work-
shop is scheduled to be held in
Kissimmee, Florida at the Omni
Champions Gate on July 27 from
1-5 p.m. and July 28 from 8 a.m.-4
p.m.
If you have questions or con-
cerns, please feel free to contact
Clarissa Herndon, Operations
Manager and Public Information
Officer at the Gulf County Health
Department, 227-1276 ext. 106.


SReal Etstc tAd deadline is Thursda' II ,i 111 F
iegadl I .l adilum i F. rid.i, II i. m. ET'
Disphly, i.1 .k ilin. is Fl id.i ll in. ET 227-1278
CIl.tilicd id ulint il Mond,.w 5 p in El 747-5020


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Thursday, July 16, 2009


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806,4 2


DAWGS from page A]


in the training, adapted to
a program crafted by Jay
King's Dog Academy, Inc.
of Tallahassee, and found
that in over eight weeks,
they had also adopted a
friend.
"He's a people dog, he
just keeps giving," Lyon
said of Dalton.
Lyon was one of Dal-
ton's caretakers. Each. dog
was assigned a trainer, a
handler or trainer assistant
and at least one caretaker
to be the dog's guardian
in the prison during times
when it was not undergo-
ing training.
Ronald Kendrick, an
inmate who was Dalton's
trainer, said King's ap-
proach was easy to under-
stand.
"The big thing was get-
ting used to his way," Ken-
drick said of King. "Most of
us had training and have
pets. His training is easier
and gives you more of the
dog-to-man relationship.
"The team approach re-
ally helps all of us. We all
have a day, a day when you
don't always wake up hav-
ing a good attitude or want-
ing to work with the dog.
There was always some-
body ready to step in."
Kendrick was drawn to
Dalton from the start.
"From the first day (Dal-
ton) and I really clicked,"
Kendrick said. "When they
told me he was getting ad-
opted, that's when it hit
me he was leaving. I'll be
a man about it, especially
since a new class will be
.coming in."
As warden Randy Tifft
noted, there is no "lose"
in the DAWGS program,
which adhered to a suc-
cessful template found in
Taylor County.
For the dogs, the win is
life itself. The eight dogs
in the class that graduated
last week may have faced
euthanasia as a final des-
tination if adoption did not
come soon.


drawn that it would not eat
even the tastiest of treats See DAWGS A3


St. Joe Rent All


227-2112

706 1st Street, Port St. Joe

"Quality at a Fair Price"


A2 I The Star


But after spending the
eight weeks becoming so-
ciable and gentle animals,
all but one has been adopt-
ed outright and the last dog
will spend two weeks or
so in a foster home before
moving into its adopted
home.
After last week's gradu-
ation, the dogs were des-
tined for Port St. Joe, Al-
ligator Point, Maine, Con-
necticut, New York and
Massachusetts.
One canine will be head-
ing to Tallahassee where
he will become part of the
family of Sterling Ivey, the
governor's press secretary.
"This is for my birth-
day," said Ivey's son Caleb,
who turns six this week and
was on hand to take his dog
upon graduation.
Denise Ivey, Sterling's
wife, heard about another
dog in the DAWGS program
and traveled down to take a
look. But once she set eyes
on Hank, a lab mix, she was
hooked.
"I found another dog
on PetFinders and heard
he was in the DAWGS pro-
gram," Denise Ivey said.
"I came to look at him and
then they brought out Hank
and I just fell in love with
him."
This pretty much de-
scribed the inmates' feel-
ings.
Jason Griffiths, .the
trainer for Stanley, a collie
mix, asserted that, "We're
keeping him, right Stanley,
or the Staminator as we
call him."
Bryan White, a handler,
said his team received the
toughest canine to crack in
the class.
Ginger, a former hunting
dog, arrived at the camp
with tail firmly wrapped be-
tween legs and, as Officer
Donna Haddock put it, "her
emergency brakes always
on."
The dog was so with-


and hid most of the time.
But once White estab-
lished a trust with the dog
- by, for example, walking
through the general popu-
lation while ensuring Gin-
ger was not messed with
- the dog gradually came
out of her shell.
"All my life I've had
dogs," said White, who had
tattoos from eyelids to fore-
arms. "I talked and spent
time with the dog like it was
my three-year-old daugh-
ter. After about three weeks
she started improving.
"I was stern with her
and built a trust with her.
I earned her trust, she
earned my trust. To see
that in her, that's special."
So special that Gin-
ger was named the Most
Improved member of the
graduating class.
The DAWGS program
in Gulf County came about
when Sandy Christy, a board
member for the Humane
Society, Melody Townsend,
the director of the Humane
Society and county com-
missioner Billy Traylor
traveled to Taylor County
to get a look at a similar
program, one of four now in
the state, there.
That was 18 months
ago.
"We came back so excit-
ed about the possibilities,"
Christy said.
Traylor, owner of two
dogs, was similarly im-
pressed.
"The best thing to hap-
pen to me was going over
there," he said. "I was so
impressed with the DOC
and their dog program.
Today is a day we can all
be proud of, what these in-
mates have done.
"I asked the inmates
what was the worst part of
the program and they said
letting them go. I can see
why."
But despite first impres-
sions, there was much work






Thursday, July 16, 2009


Local


BUDGET from page Al


The Star I A3


KITS from page Al


The city's new xeri-.
scape ordinance had its
second reading and was
adopted by a vote of 4-0.
Amending the city's
comprehensive plan, the
ordinance came at. the
request of the Northwest
Florida Water Manage-
ment District as part of
the District's continuing
effort to lessen the use of
water from the Floridan
Aquifer.
City manager Char-
lie Weston told announced
that the fireworks contrac-
tor who staged the city's
July 4 fireworks display
would like to receive pub-
lic comments about the
event.
Weston said anyone
who wanted to make com-
ments on the fireworks
should bring their written
comments to him at city
hall.
Weston reported that
the city had received six
applications for the posi-


lion of finance director, 10
for the accounts receiv-
able position, and four for
the city clerk position.
Matt Fleck, director of
the Port St. Joe Downtown
Redevelopment Agency,
reported that there was a
June 25 community meet-
ing to continue North Port
St. Joe's request to be re-
annexed into the down-
town redevelopment area.
The next steps in the
process, according to
Fleck, were a city review,
then a county review, and
finally a joint city-county
meeting to accept or deny
the application.
In answer to the re-
cent "olive branch" ex-
tended to the city commis-
sion by the Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners, the city
selected July 15, July 20 or
July 23 as possible meet-
ings dates for a joint city-
county workshop to try to
end apy tensions between
the two commissions.


out of work, and it's going
to be harder for them to
supply their kids."
Requested supplies
include: backpacks (no
wheels), No. 2 pencils, pa-
per, glue, scissors, cray-
ons, colored markers,
rulers, binders (small),
70-page spiral notebooks,
school box, highlighter
and hand sanitizer.
"They can drop off
some of these items, or
put a backpack together
- whatever they want to
do," said Whitfield.
The supplies will be
distributed in both Port
St. Joe and Wewahitchka,
with the school system
determining needy recipi-
ents.
Whitfield said he hoped
to conclude the drive at
the end of July, just before
school starts.
Supplies may be
dropped off during regu-
lar business hours at Sa-
cred Heart Rehabilitation


*1
~a~ .:;

i. .

,k
a~*..LI;:: 'J'
i LL';~
gi~ I-.: --~.I.


* 'I


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
Sacred Heart Rehabilitation Center at Port St. Joe employees David Whitfield,
Karen Kemp, Tina Richter and Jennifer Webb are collecting school supplies for
needy children during the month of July.


Center's two area loca-
tions: 502 Fourth Street
in Port St. Joe (Monday -
Thursday, 7 a.m. 5 p.m,;


Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.) and
190 Light Keepers Drive
in Beacon Hill (Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 8 a.m.


-noon).
For more information,
contact 850-227-7778 or
850-647-2600.


DAWGS from page A2


to do.
The DOC had to sign
off on establishing the
program and a memoran-
dum of understanding was
crafted between the DOC,
county commission and
the Humane Society, which
provides dogs, funding and
support for the program.
"It was a slow process,"
Tifft said. "It takes a lot of
work to get this program off
the ground. But I said if we
are going to do it, it has got
to be better than any other
program. I feel we've done
that."
After working through
channels for more than a
year, the approval came
and Haddock was placed
in charge of administering
the program at the Forest-
ry Camp.
Tifft said he went into
the program with two
goals.

,------
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([8501227-1
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One was assist those in-
mates not already assigned
to outside work crews or
the like, seeking something
to "capture that idle time
and assist the inmates in
sending them back into so-
ciety."
That comes from pro-
viding inmates a sense of
responsibility, bonding with
others and the dogs and
learning how to love some-
thing, Tifft added.
"They've all seen
changes in each other and
they've seen changes in
themselves," Tifft said. "We
can make a difference with
one small program in one
small county."
Kendrick is a case in
point. After eight weeks the
inmate already has plans
for his release that involves
working with dogs.
"I have my certification
now and it gives me some-




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S278


thing for when I go home,"
Kendrick said. "I can train
dogs at my house. It's not
hard, it's fun."
The second goal for
Tifft was providing some-
thing for the inmates to do
that would benefit others,
for some inmates for the
first time in their lives. The
inmates provided a child a
friend, a family another
family member, Tifft said.


"The inmates are hesi-
tant to let the dogs go, but
they are excited about get-
ting in the next bunch,"
Tifft said. "No way to lose
in this program. We are a
success because of people
outside this institution. We
are a success because of a
community. I am proud of
this program."
But the beaming was
left to the inmates and the


folks at the Humane Soci-
ety, overloaded and over-
worked, who have found
a sort of railroad for their
dogs to travel from close
proximity to the death
needle to a new home.
"This has been an ex-
citing eight weeks for us,"
Christy said. "The whole
purpose was to enable the
dogs ... to become man's
friend. I could not have


hoped for a better group of
men to train these dogs.
"All the staff has been
extremely supportive
and dedicated to our pro-
gram."
The Humane Society is
seeking donations to help
support the DAWGS pro-
gram. Donations can be
sent to SJBHS DAWGS in
prison, 1007 10th Street,
Port St, Joe, 32456


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Opinion
Opinion


A4 The Star


Keyboard KLATTERINGS



Natural input


St. Vincent Island
National Wildlife Refuge
is a terrific place to go for
a day in woods, sand and
sun.
Shell hunters find
nirvana, hikers a pristine
walk in the woods and
visitors a snapshot of old
Florida.
A sambar deer might


leap from the
underbrush,
an Eastern
diamondback
rattlesnake might
slither out of the
woods. There is a
thriving red wolf
population.
This week the


the Red Wolves, etc.).
Some of the
herpetological
conservation projects
that might be considered
for the St. Vincent NWR
15-year Management
Plan (Comprehensive
Conservation Plan CCP)
include:


TIM CROI
Star News Ed


U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service will
host a pair of open house
meetings to seek public
input on the management
of St. Vincent Island.
The Fish and Wildlife
Service is developing
a Comprehensive
Conservation Plan (CCP)
for the refuge over the next
15 years.
The purpose of the
meetings is to gauge
the public's ideas on
management of the Refuge
as part of the planning
process.
On such things, we in
this space, tend to trust
the input of Dr. Joe Collins,
the king of ick and one of
the most highly-regarded
herpetologists in the world.
For more than a
decade, Dr Collins, his
wife, his wife's mother and
his students have trekked
to St. Vincent to survey
the things that most of us
might run from snakes,
lizards and all things slimy
and icky.
Dr. Collins not only
injects education and
humor into his annual
visits, he also provides
critical knowledge and
perspective about the
resources.
His words are worth
heeding, if for no other
reason than understanding
the some of what makes
this a postcard part of the
world.
Dr. Collins provided
his input from his
herpetological center in
Kansas, which follows in
full below.
"St. Vincent National
Wildlife Refuge presents
one of the greatest
biological opportunities
for research in the
southeastern United
States because it is an
island with limited human
access. This also makes
it one of the few places in
the southeastern United
States where conservation
of sensitive species can be
maintained and controlled
on an ongoing basis (i.e.,


1. Re-introduction
of Eastern
Indigo Snakes
(Drymarchon
couperi). While
the first attempt
in the 1980s was
not successful,
new information
FT indicates that
itor a different


approach and/or'
methodology might
show success. If this can
be funded, I am ready to
do it.
2. A study of the
Eastern Diamondback
Rattlesnake (Crotalus
adamanteus) on the island
would be useful; these
reptiles will probably
become extinct on the
mainland of Florida.
Thus, the SVNWR island
population may become
the last of these creatures
in the region.
3. A study of the
population dynamics
and status of the state-
protected Gopher
Tortoises (Gopherus
polyphemus) on the island
would be of great benefit in
increasing our knowledge
about these chelonians.
4. A study of the status
of the Diamondback
Terrapin (Malaclemys
terrapin) on the island'
would be of great benefit in
increasing our knowledge
about these chelonians;
they live in such a narrow
environment along the
Atlantic and Gulf coasts,
and their conservation
statusis uncertain.
'5. A study of the Salt
Marsh Snake (Nerodia
clarkii) on the island would
be useful in preparing a
contingency conservation
plan for them. Populations
elsewhere in Florida are
federally protected.
6. Dr. Emily Moriarty
Lemmon at Florida State
University has expressed
an interest in having her
students do field research
on the island. Most of the
students would work with
amphibians.
7. Amphibians
need fresh water. Any
management plans or
upgrades that could
increase the freshwater
acreage on SVNWR
would be very helpful.
Again, many amphibian
populations may be
decimated or go extinct

See KLATTERINGS A5


.. .-T A

USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456

VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


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The Star
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone 850-227-1278


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POSTAGE PAID AT
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
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received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely assertsthe printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Thursday, July 16,2009


Our VIEW




Special lessons


Lessons learned during a special
meeting of the Board of County
Commissioners, the lone item on the
agenda the budget.
No. 1--Time is not on the side of
commissioners
To hear chairman Nathan Peters,
Jr. invoke over and over during the
roughly hour-long meeting that
commissioners had plenty of time,
there were still eight weeks before
deadlines for the county budget, was
astonishing.
As the property appraiser put it
succinctly last week, it was easy to
predict the numbers were going down
two years ago. The day of budget
reckoning has been looming like a
cloud for more than a year
Commissioners considered a
host of alternative tax options over a
period of months before being painted
into a corner by their dithering.
Their options narrowed to three,
commissioners, like a student pulling
an all-nighter for a test they haven't
studied for; waited for the last minute
to consider an additional gas tax, and
then voted it down.
Remember, the property tax
system is broken, as commissioners
repeat as a mantra, and they sought
alternatives to relieve property
owners of some of the burden.
Procrastination, deliberate or not, won
out, not the public.
And how much in staff time
and attorney's fees did that cost
taxpayers?
Further; commissioners have been
looking at the same numbers for
nearly three months, losing a quarter
of the tax base one of the best-case
scenarios provided by an appointed
budget committee.
Commissioners are going to spend
less money, that seems clear, the issue
is where are the cuts going to come
and if the chairman indeed wants a
deliberative, careful process, then
eight weeks is a mighty short period of
time to do it right.
No. 2 Requirements+
mandates=bottom line
The budget committee provided
commissioners, as they did in April,
with a list of state mandates, general
fund and operational "requirements"
as the base line for considering the


budget.
As mapped out by the presentation,
these were items that the county was
on the hook to pay out of ad valorem
dollars.
Then cap it there.
If the committee report is the
black and white of the county's budget
situation, then whatever is "required"
of the county should be the cap of
what commissioners ask of taxpayers
this year.
That will mean minor, and minor
as in the amounts at the current
village rate are just $300,000 apart,
adjustment of the millage rate, but a
decrease in spending of roughly 25
percent.
The non-recurring costs that won't
have to be paid next year, put them
in reserves. Any other savings from
this fiscal year, carry them over in
reserves.
That balances the years in which
commissioners scooped in 10-30
percent increases in property taxes
and spent like crazy.
What taxpayers have pleaded for
over the past five or six years will
be accomplished by the real estate
market.
No. 3 If consolidation isn't
going to cut it, cut it
One of the more astounding
remarks made last week was that
consolidation of departments should
have happened 10 years ago.
A fair question to ponder is why
didn't it? Can we spell f-i-e-f-d-o-m-s?
And the process proposed last
week was to move Public Works to the
Road Department to facilitate moving
of buildings and equipment to a new
facility in Howard Creek.
Can we smell f-i-e-f-d-o-m-s? The
odor was distinct last week.
But almost unanimously
commissioners seemed to indicate
that any savings the budget
committee projected $500,000 would
not happen be realized this year, so ,
why the rush to make the move when
the money is so tight.
If it could wait during the flush
years it can wait during the lean years.
No. 4 Budget cuts or hit list
As is so frequently the case in such
settings, still another excellent exhibit
in favor of county-wide voting was


provided, this time by Commissioner
Carmen McLemore.
To his credit he at least came to the
meeting with a plan for making cuts,
which beat his peers by a mile.
However, one of his main cuts
was funding for the Economic
Development Council, for which he
has expressed little love in the past.
And Mr. McLemore proposed to
cut 16 positions, asserting they were
"across the board."
More than half those positions,
though, would be eliminated by
gutting the Mosquito Control
Department, for which Mr. McLemore
has a bee in his bonnet that has
buzzed for over a year since caught
commandeering a spray truck, and
five more would come from the
constitutional officers.
Constitutional officers, again
for which Mr. McLemore often
demonstrates sporadic ill-patience
and disrespect, who have been
operating with staffs roughly'equal
to those they had five, 10 years ago
and who also bore the brunt, as a
kind of shield for the county, of initial
Amendment I property tax relief
mandates two years ago.
Commissioner Billy Traylor
answered Mr. McLemore's
presentation by indicating he had one
of his own.
The private sector is awash with
companies who have had to cut
salaries, cut staff, cut overtime, cut
hours in today's environment, so Mr.
Peters' continued assertion that no
jobs will be cut is absurd, and frankly
insulting to the small-business owners
he serves.
Cutting positions, though, should
not hinge on personal agendas.
What is best for the county, as a
whole?
Such concepts prove elusive
when the going gets tough because
there is little to no consensus, just
five personal agendas often at odds.
That is a product of single-member
districts.
The argument favoring county-
wide voting was strong in good
economic times; the most important
lesson to come from a special meeting
like last week's is that the argument is
overwhelming in bad economic times.


No polite way to get it out


Mr. Raymond Mercer
would ease a "chaw" of
Days Work from one side
of his jaw to the other. He'd
squint off toward the back
of the Parke Theatre. He'd
squat down on his haunches
and expertly ease a load
of juice equal distance
between the toes of his trail
worn Red Wings. He'd peer
up at Mr. Luke Finley's dark
colored mule. He'd squint
back toward the Theatre
again, spit and slightly nod
his head up and down. We
all breathed a sigh of relief.
He bought the animal.
Now, it wasn't our mule
mind you. Me and Ricky
Gene and Hollis were way
too young to take an active
part in the trading. [ reckon
we just didn't want Mr.
Raymond to pass up that
big Finley mule. And in
the days before television
this was our "Gunsmoke",
"Ozzie and Harriet" or "I
Love Lucy".
They gathered up every
third Monday in the parking
lot north of town. As a boy it
was a treat to hang around
on Mule Day and watch
the local farmers swap and
sell the same old animals.
They actually traded more
knives, guns and horses
than mules but that's beside
the point. They wouldn't
barter over hardly nothing
until they chewed (literally)
on it for a while. They'd pull
a half used roll of Warren
County Twist or a plug of
Old Honesty tobacco out of
the front of their overalls,
cut or bite off a generous
portion, and work it around
just right before getting on
with the haggling.
Me and Ricky Gene and
Hollis grew up believing
it wasn't an official "mule
exchange" unless you
had chewed over it first. It


was like serious business
necessitated a wad of
tobacco and long periods
of silence punctuated with
rounds of expectoration. We
couldn't wait to grow up and
be just like'em.
The art of chewing
reached its zenith with the
men relaxing in the shade
of the porch up at Woodrow
Kennon's Mercantile, Dry-
Goods and Grocery
Store. We watched
in fascination as Mr.
Leroy Cunningham ,
would use his
thumb and first two
fingers to carefully
extract the perfect
amount of Mail
Pouch loose leaf KE!
tobacco out of that COL
stand up pack he Hunk
carried in his hip
pocket. He'd insert
it in the left side of his jaw
while not missing a beat of
the yarn he was spinning
about the summer it was
so hot the boll weevils
left the cotton and drown
themselves in the Obion
River.
Mr. Cunningham could
lean back on that RC Cola
crate he used for a seat and
shoot a stream of tobacco
plumb over the top rail of
Woodrow's porch banister.
Me and Ricky Gene and
Hollis quickly learned to
hunker down on one side or
the other of Mr Leroy But
never between him and the
street. Mr. Manning was a
spray spitter. He chewed
Old Kentucky Twist. It
was about as dry as you
could find. And strong, let
me tell you. With today's
standards and cautions,
they'd make you write on
the label "take two aspirin
before inserting." If you
were in three or four feet
of Mr. Manning when he let


SL
LB
er


go, you were going to get a
little wet.
I was fifteen the year
the men's team asked me
to play baseball with them.
This was back when every
little town worth its salt
fielded a lineup. We played
on Sunday afternoon and
the rivalries were fierce
as the pride of an entire
community rode on every
pitch. Now listen,
there were some
character on that
squad. And I can't
remember if it was
Colonel James T.
"Birddog" Reed,
Goat Hayes or
Bobby Jack Cantrell
LEY that started the
ERT plug of Black Maria
Down down the dugout.
I telt quite grown
up as I bit off a
healthy portion and clumsily
"tongued" it to the side of
my jaw.
It took about three
pitches and a high fly to
left for my mouth to start
burning. By the time David
Paschall grounded out
to second my head was
spinning. When Jerry
Williams popped up to end
the inning I wasn't sure
I could find third base.
You know where we are
headed here. The second
batter for Trenton hit a two
hop screamer right at me.
I played it off my chest,
picked it off the ground and
threw a strike to Birddog at
first to nail the runner by a
step. I swallowed about half
my chew on the play.
Folks, I didn't remember
much about the rest of the
game. I remember the
cold sweats. I remember
throwing up behind the
dugout. I remember the
green demons and the hot
flashes. And I distinctly


remember seeing three
baseballs coming at me
When I had to bat. I thought
for the first five innings
of that game I was going
to die. For the last four, I
wanted to. Friends, if you're
studying on a career in
chewing tobacco ... don't
start with Black Maria.
Not long after that
someone handed me a
chew of Beech-Nut. Hey,
after a bout with that plug
tobacco, this tasted like a
Baby Ruth. It was 12 cents
by the pack. It used to be
called "scrap" tobacco but
lately the companies were
using the term "loose-leaf"
which sounded a whole lot
better. I quit relying on what
Bobby Jack or Goat might
pass down the bench and
started carrying my own.
We couldn't smoke. That
cut down on your wind.
And I was trying to play
every sport known to man.
Drinking was out because
Mom was almighty dead
set against it. No one had
ever heard of mouth ulcers
of oral cancer We were
emulating our elders and
enjoying life.
I chewed for twenty-
five years. I enjoyed every
one of them. And please
believe me I understand
the down side of chewing
better than most. And I'm
not advocating anyone take
up the habit. We are a little
wiser now than we were
in 1962. But, man, there
are some great benefits to
chewing tobacco. It keeps
down the worms, makes
a good meal last longer,
wards off ugly girls... I'm
writing a book about it. If
you remind me later; I'll
give you the details.

Respectfully,
Kcs











A5 The Star Letter


Thursday, July 16, 2009


Now is the time
Dear Editor:
It is high time for Gulf County
and Port St. Joe to wake up and
make some changes. Owed back
taxes from all need to be paid.
How far are we (Gulf County) in
debt due to these owed taxes?
All have noticed no real
building going on in this area
while our neighbor counties
are. Yes, they do have shopping
centers, discount sores and
more than one large grocery
store and nice family-priced
eating place. Why don't we in
Gulf County?
One "Wally World" and a
steak buffet, this would keep our
local citizens here, also bring in
some from other counties and
make create more local jobs.
Ask the question, "Why we
don't have the above" to your


county commissioners or city
officials. If we don't wake up
soon Gulf County will be left
behind. Condos and new motels
are not the answer. We need jobs
and new large businesses. Why
spend our local money going
shopping or out to eat in Panama
City?
The least thing we need
in Gulf County is more taxes
assessed or added to our county
residents. Most are on fixed
incomes, retired or out of work
and trying to make it on the little
they have.
To support some of our parks,
one suggestion: Collect a fee
for out of state or county usage
of our boat ramps. Gulf County
residents would be exempt of
this fee and have a free sticker
issued at the county courthouse
with proper ID. It is sad to see all


the out of state and county tags
using these ramps when locals
can not even find a parking
space. Little if any income comes
to our county, they will pack their
needs in from home, dump in the
bay or at the best use the cans at
the ramps, then leave with zero
dollars spent in our county/city.
Yes, it is time for a "change."
-John Parker
Highland View


Small town angels
Dear Editor:
This afternoon as we were
leaving the Piggly Wiggly store
in Port St. Joe my husband lost
his balance and fell. I was trying
to get him up when several
men came over to help with
several others on the way. I
thanked them but did not get


their names. They know who article (written in humorous
they are and maybe they will tongue-in-cheek style) and the
read this message. In a small great photos, calendar sales
town you can be sure there are got a jumpstart and added
angels around to help. We think an invaluable impetus to our
of them as just residents of the fundraising event. Articles such
community but in reality they as this by The Star emphasize
are angels, why a local paper is so important
Thank you each and every in a small community. The net
one who helped. Thank the proceeds of calendar sales will
Good Lord he was not hurt. go to the new Sacred Heart
Farris Aston hospital's emergency room.
Port St. Joe We appreciate everyone
who has already purchased a
calendar and encourage others
Smokin' Hot Thanks to get their copies which are
Dear Editor: available at most businesses,
Many thanks for the superb shops, and stores in the area.
article by Despina Williams in Copies are also available at the
the July 2 edition of The Star fire department's Web site www.
featuring the South Gulf County sgcfire.com.
Volunteer Fire Department's On behalf of the SGCVFD-
"Smokin Hot Firefighters" Nancy Swider
2010 calendar. Thanks to the Port St. Joe


New Survey: Recession hurting rural afterschool programs


Just as America's
children need more help,
afterschool leaders in rural
areas say they are being
forced to increase fees and
reduce staffing, activities
and hours to cope with
budget cuts and rising costs.
Ninety-five percent of rural
respondents to a survey of
afterschool programs say
the recession is affecting
their communities, and
most report higher food
prices and more families
struggling to provide for
children. Yet afterschool
programs are unable to
offer as much help as
children need because their
budgets are down. Eighty-
three percent of rural
respondents say children
in their communities need
afterschool care and are
unable to access it.
Those are among
the findings from a web-
based survey that was
completed by 489 rural
afterschool leaders across
the country. More than
1,400 afterschool leaders
in all. (urban, suburban
and rural) completed the
survey; they represent 8,587
afterschool sites that serve
1.2 million children. The
survey was conducted by
the Afterschool Alliance in
April and May.
"Uncertain Times 2009:
Recession Imperiling
Afterschool Programs and
the Children They Serve"
finds that about half of
rural programs report
a loss in funding due to
the recession. Eighty-
nine percent expect the


recession to impact their
budget for the coming
school year. Ten percent
report a significant loss
of funds that will cause
cutbacks, or force one or
more of their-sites to close.
In response to funding
woes, many rural programs
are being forced to add
or increase fees. Rural
communities report a
higher number of youth who
are unable to participate
in afterschool programs
because of transportation
costs caused by higher
gas prices than urban and
suburban programs.
Four in five rural
respondents offer summer
programs and 43 percent
expect enrollment to be
higher this summer, adding
more strain to program
budgets.
"This survey documents
a world of hurt all across the
country," said Afterschool
Alliance Executive Director
Jodi Grant. "We're not
protecting our kids from
the economic pain, or
even maintaining the
safety nets they count on.
Afterschool programs serve
a high need population;
62 percent of students at
rural afterschool programs
qualify for free or reduced
price lunches. When
programs must charge
or raise fees or reduce
hours, more children will
be unsupervised and at risk
after the school day ends.
It is alarming that nearly
half the rural respondents
to our survey (46 percent)
say their budgets are


inadequate to meet the
needs of students and
families. We have to do
better by our kids."
A "Roadmap to
Afterschool for All" released
by the Afterschool Alliance
in April found that there
are afterschool programs
for children whose parents
and guardians can afford
to pay tuition and fees, but
our afterschool system is
leaving behind millions
of low-income children
whose parents cannot
pay. This assessment
found that the federal
government covers only
eleven percent of the cost
of afterschool, even though
29 percent of children in
programs qualify for federal
assistance. It concludes
that a federal investment
of less than $18 billion
would give 5.6 million
low-income youth access
to the academic support,
supervision, mentoring
and fitness opportunities,
snacks, and other benefits.
Yet federal funds are
lacking. ending for 21st
Century Community
Learning Centers (21st
CCLC), the chief federal
funding; stream for
afterschool programs, is
stalled at $1.13 billion even
though the No Child Left
Behind Act authorized $2.5
billion. President Obama's
FY2010 budget proposal
would flat fund 21st CCLCs.
In recent weeks, federal
lawmakers have introduced
bills in the House and
Senate to provide additional
support to rural afterschool


programs. The Investment
in Afterschool Programs
Act calls for a pilot program
to establish or improve
rural afterschool programs.
The bill would grant $25,000
or more to programs
to invest in projects
or activities needed to
create or strengthen rural
afterschool programs.
Finds could be used-
for expenses including:
transportation, professional
development and training,
access to technology,
staffing and planning
grants, among other
things. Senators Blanche
Lincoln (D-AR) and Mark
Begich (D-AK) are the
Senate sponsors, and
Representatives Blaine
Luetkemeyer (R-MO)
and Phil Hare (D-IL) are
cosponsors in the House.
"We will work hard
to convince Congress to
pass this bill this year,"
Grant added. "Quality
afterschool programs do
incredible work keeping
kids safe, inspiring them to
learn and helping working
families. These programs
also provide students with
healthy snacks, sometimes
dinner and breakfast,
and a range of social
services that students
and families urgently
need. But afterschool
programs cannot serve
all the children who need
them when they are badly
underfunded. Even in
these tough economic
times when there's
tremendous pressure for
resources, we have to find a


way to do better. Investing
in afterschool programs
pays off over time in
healthier, more successful
students and youth."
Methodology: Uncertain
Times 2009 used web-
based survey software.
The Afterschool Alliance
emailed a link to the
survey to more than 10,000
contacts in April 2009. In
rural areas, 489 programs
responded. Recipients
were encouraged to
forward the survey to
afterschool program staff,
and programs were asked
to be certain that only
one person per program
completed it, and to


provide responses from
a site-level coordinator
when possible. 1,834
national responses were
reviewed. 387 of them did
not provide sufficient data
to be included in the final
analysis or were duplicates.
(Many respondents are
responsible for multiple
sites.)
The Afterschool Alliance
is a nonprofit public
awareness and advocacy
organization working to
ensure that all children and
youth have access to quality
afterschool programs.
More information
is available at www.
afterschoolalliance.org.


for IIn o rI Sles F r clsueCll m


1I' Boardwalk
' ....,,..Realty


Eli Duarte
Sales Associate, Realtor
Hablo Espahol rl
1252 Cape San Bias Road
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Office 850-227-7891 ext. 107
Cell: 850-227-5152
Toll Free: 877-512-9366
Email: eli@floridabeachdream.com
www.Gulf-countv.com/blo-


Your Dealership
Alternative

850-763-0555
A James Auto Center
1301 E. 111 St. Panama City, FL 32401
' www.jamesautocenter.com
website coupons


=11


KLATTERINGS from pageA4


on the mainland; SVNWR
might become the last
refuge for some of them.
8. A better system of
roads might be adopted
for the island, possibly
one with fewer roads than
at present, but also more
strategically located than
the current ones. However,
I am thinking in terms of
biological research; there
may be other perfectly valid
reasons for the current road
arrangement (i.e., safety,
maintenance, fire control).
9. Upgrading and


enlarging the cabin (on
the island) to create
a small field research
station might be a good
idea; it would attract more
biologists to do research
on the island. I suspect the
cabin would lend itself well
to more modern means
of generating heat and
electricity such as wind and
solar.
10. Having a permanent
contract with St. Vincent
Shuttle Service to transport
authorized field biologists
to SVNWR would be useful,


and would relieve having to
take folks over in the barge.
The preferred work times
of researchers often are
not in synch with the barge
schedule.
11. Small all-color
booklets covering the
wildlife of SVNWR,
sponsored and paid for by
USFWS and distributed to
visitors gratis, would build
a strong sense of ownership
with the public. There is
nothing more exciting than
seeing a living creature
in the wild and being able
to identify it with a handy


booklet given to you by
USFWS.
St. Vincent National
Wildlife Refuge is a gem in
the federal refuge system
and has the potential to
play a more significant
role in conserving the
biological diversity of
the southeastern United
States. The above points
are but a few of the many
ideas that passed through
my mind. Please feel free to
share this information with
anyone."
Nobody could put it
more appropriately.


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Helping Seniors Every Day

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r BOB DALLAS, SR. LOAN OFFICER
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SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: 850-227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form
of letters to the editor or a guest column are
solicited and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial
page should be a forum where differing ideas
and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.


MM


Are You Leaving your
Company?
What You Need to Know.
If you are changing jobs, have been displaced forn
employment or nre ictiring. you are making one of the most
important firnocinl decisions you've ovel faced. What
will you do with the money you've hccumulated in your
,etilenilent plan?


I will reviw with you your available choices and take an
in-depth 1, of thie adva.otaipls, disadvantages and tax
bonse uentees o[f Itoie opItont.
VellI tirrl Arvisr' irs I'. tit a tax or lrraid ravisoit


SChrils udon, CnP(
Fnillnd Alvlsor
201 E, 19111Slit
Prrt.t. [Cily, FL 32405
(85h0)785-0273
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A6 I The Star


Sports


Thursday, July 16, 2009


Warsw whopper Bay City anglers land
Warsaw who ernear-record grouper


By David Adlerstein
Florila lFrccdom Newspapers
It could been a world
record.
It would been among
the biggest groupers ever
landed.
And it certainly should
been weighed.
Four men fishing out of
Bay City Lodge the morn-
ing of June 25 landed a levi-
athan-size Warsaw grouper
that arguably eclipsed the
world record of 436 pounds,
12 ounces, set by Capt. Steve
Haeusler, fishing out of Des-
tin on Dec. 22, 1985.
Based on its length of 82
inches and girth of 66 inch-
es, and using one of several
conventional formulas de-
signed to estimate weight,
the behemoth grouper
might well have tipped the
scales at about 446 pounds
had they tried to weigh it.
"No, we didn't weigh it,"


said the group's leader, Billy
Daniels, from Moody Ala.
"We wanted to go back out
fishing."
The magnificent speci-
men of Epinephelus nigritus
was landed about 15 miles
southeast of St. George Is-
land, off the artificial reef
made from remnants of the
old Apalachicola Bridge.
The four men were all
aboard Daniels' 23-foot Po-
lar Bay boat they had driv-
en down from Birmingham
on one of their twice-yearly
trips to the legendary fish
camp.
"This is about our third
year," Daniels said. "The
last week of June, we come
down to Bay City for seven
or eight days."
The men, Daniels' son-
in-law Clint. Haley and
friend Ken Debrick, both
from Paola, Kan., son Shawn
Daniels, from Stanley, Kan.,
and Billy Daniels had come


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Pictured with their enormous Warsaw grouper, hanging from a backhoe, are,
from left, Clint Haley, Shawn Daniels, who landed the fish, Billy Daniels and Ken
Debrick. Photo courtesy Bay City Lodge.


prepared to outsmart the
giant-sized groupers that
bedeviled them in the past.
The men had fretted how
they kept getting their lines
snagged in the reef
"We kept getting hung
up, do two cranks on the
reel, and it would stop," he
said. "We got back to Bay
City, and they told us 'You're
not getting hung up. You're
feeding the groupers.'"
So Daniels studied up
on how these huge reef fish
would watch to see the littler


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guys snagged on a hook and
then snack on them as they
struggled against the tug.
"This year I bought a real
big pole just for that," Dan-
iels said.
The crew outfitted the
100-pound rod, custom made
in Texas, with an Okuma Ti-
tus Silver 50 Wide 2-Speed
Trolling Reel, and 200-pound
Momoi Diamond monofila-
ment leader.
"It's one of the best lines
you can buy," Daniels said,
noting the line has a tensile
strength of up to twice that
of stated line tests.
On the end was a 16/0
circle hook, among the larg-
est out there, baited with
croaker caught by Haley, the
crew's "gruntmaster."
The crew got to the reef
about 8 a.m., and got the
anchor set about 8:20 a.m.
They were ready.
"The day before we
hooked another fish; my son
fought the fish, and it had' a
20-inch grouper unharmed
in its mouth," Daniels said.
"You put a really good tug on
it, and he tries to spit it out."
First to come up that
Thursday morning was "'a
nice cobia," and then came
the big one.
"We caught a nice black
snapper, and that fish took it,
so we fought him, and we fi-
nally got him," Daniels said.
He said it took his son
only about 15 minutes to


bring the Warsaw to the
surface from about 80 feet of
water.
"When we saw that thing
coming up, I thought, 'My
goodness, that can'tbereal,'"
he said.
Daniels said the crew
at first prepared to release
their catch, thinking it was a
goliath grouper, the so-called
jewfish, which is a prohibited
species.
"You can't keep those,"
he said, recalling how he and
his wife caught and released
a 50-pound goliath grouper
at Sikes Cut over Memorial
Day weekend.
"But it's a complete dif-
ferent-looking fish," Dan-
iels said. "(Warsaw) has a
square tail and doesn't have
a banded stripe."
Once they got over their
amazement, the men took
another 15 minutes to figure
out how to get the enormous
fish into the boat.
"We all got to a corner of
the back of boat, and once
we got his head on to the
boat, the boat kind of leaned
over, and we backed up and
pulled him back in," Daniels
said. "There was no way we
can lift him; we just had to
slide him."
Whether it was snapper
or something else that at-
tracted the attention of the
Warsaw's appetite will never
be known.
"The hook was in his lip,
but whatever was on there
was gone," Daniels said.
"We don't know."
With the fish crowding
them on the 23-foot boat, the
crew headed back to Bay
City, and pulled in a little be-
fore 10:30 a.m.
"I went into the office and
I said 'We got a problem. We
have a fish we can't get out
of the boat,"' Daniels said.
When Bay City manager
Buddy Renfro went out to


see it, he was flabbergasted.
"He thought I was joking
with him," Daniels said.
"It had eight big old hooks
in its mouth," Renfro said.
He said the men told
him, before realizing it was
a Warsaw, "The'first thing,
they were fixing to let him
go. They done unhooked him
and they gaffed him back"
The staff got a backhoe
to lift the fish out of the boat
and then suspended it over-
head as the men posed with
their catch.
Unable to find a suitable
scale and unwilling to trans-
port the fish to a second lo-
cation to have it weighed,
the men proceeded to clean
it right on the Bay City dock
"It took about three-and-
a-half hours," said Daniels.
"There was about 20 people
who came over and looked
at it."
The fish yielded six five-
gallon buckets of filleted
meat, which was then vacu-
um-packed.
"They took about 80
pounds of meat back to Kan-
sas City," Daniels said. "We
took the rest back to Bir-
mingham."
A vice president of engi-
neering for Precision Husky,
a Leeds, Ala., firm that spe-
cializes in building heavy
equipment, Daniels was off
the next week to Vancouver,
British Columbia, where
he was able to take a break
from working on a track ma-
chine that grinds material
for biomass, to fish for trout
in one of the nearby glorious
Canadian lakes.
Meanwhile, his crew's
digital picture now graces
the walls of Bay City, near
the black-and-white snap-
shots of decades ago, when
Milton Houseman, Louis
Roux and other local fisher-
men can be seen with mas-
sive catches of their own.
"I figure that fish was
about 25 years old," Roux
said.
"They're kind of rare,"
he added. "You don't, catch
them every day."
Bay City owner Jimmy
Mosconis, who was out fish-
ing the morning the fish
came in, said that in 35 years
as the fish camp's owner, he
had "never seen a fish that
was remotely close to that
size."
Haeusler, the world re-
cord-holder, said he heard
rumors of a Louisiana fish
that might have rivaled that
state's 359-pound record,
and of the Bay City catch.
He Said he didn't recall the
dimensions of his 436-pound
record breaker, but that
"when it laid in the back of a
pickup, it filled it up.
"I wish they had weighed
it," he said. "That's a pretty
good fish right there."


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I
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ThursdLay, July16, l2009


PORT ST. JOE WEWAH TCHKA





PORTS


w w w. s t a r fl c


A
Section


Page 7


Wewa Dixie Darlings stand strong at state


You could see their convoy of
decorated vehicles for miles as the
Wewa Darling All-star team made
their way to the state tournament
in Brooksville July 2-6. They had
the support of family and their
community encouraging them
along their way Their goal was to
play hard, win some games and be
remembered. All would happen.'
The Darlings division consist-
ed of seven teams from all over
the state, including Wewahitchka.
Many of the teams had no knowl-
edge of Wewa, but by the end of
the tournament this all changed.
The girls started off the tourna-
ment with a 11-10 win against Bel-
leview. The game had an amazing
triple play that had onlookers al-
ready talking about their talent.
The girls then defeated Hardee
17-4 in only four innings.
With the two wins under their
belt, they were determined to
keep their defense consistent and
bats strong. Game 3 against West
Pasco was intense, yet Wewa
won 11-10. Their hopes remained
high after yet another win of 25-


The Wewa Dixie Darlings receive the state runner-up trophy
from the Dixie softball director.


14 against the defending state
champs, Wahneta. The Wewa Dar-
lings were the only team with an
undefeated record going into the
championship game on Monday.
Wewa was hopeful, with only
one win to claim to clinch the
title. Their glory came up short,


when West Pasco defeated Wewa
17-12. Though sad, Wewa was de-
termined not to give up as they
advanced into the final champion-
ship game. The continuous rain
delays caused much dismay, but
the rallies from the dugout and
cheers from the crowd kept their


spirits high. The girls stood strong
during the up-and-down battle
against West Pasco. Their offense
was equally matched with West
Pasco, which led to a continuous
tie in score throughout the game.
Coming into the fifth inning, the
score was tied 17-17. Unfortu-
nately, West Pasco had the last
at-bat, and with a successful hit,
they managed to score and break
the tie and win 18-17, claiming the
title of state champs.
Many spectators admitted that
this was one of the most exciting
ballgames fo" this age group they
had ever seen. Head Coach Tony
Price was delighted to see many
of the opposing teams and their
fans show their support for Wewa.
Heartbroken and tired, the coach-
es and players were still very
proud of the success that they had
endured the past four days. To be
a town from North Florida and
go this far at this young age still
amazes so many of us.
Throughout the tournament,
Wewa's team motto was Bible
verse Phil 4:13, which reads: "I


can do all things through Christ
who strengthens me." It was evi-
dent during the week with their
determination and sportsman-
ship that they were a compelling
team.. They were told many times
by other teams, "Your team is dif-
ferent." They took this as a com-
pliment. They began each game
with p prayer on the mound. This
was one thing that set them aside
from all the other teams.
Wewa not only proved how
competitive they could be, but
most of all, the character of the
coaches, players and fans was
well-noticed. Although the Dixie
Darlings finished the tourna-
ment as state runner-ups, their
most prized honor was receiving
the Sportsmanship Award. That
award alone speaks volumes
about our ball team, coaches, fans
and our community.
Thank you to all who support-
ed the 2009 Wewa Darlings All-
star team. We are so very proud
of each of you girls and thankful
for the dedication of the coaching
staff.


MAJORS ALL-STARS STATE-BOUND


Back row:
Coaches Buddy
Hamm, Mitch
Burke and Stacy
Strickland.
Middle row: Walt
Wilder, Tony
Yowell, Cole
Cryderman, Coy
Burke, Caleb
Hamm, Dave
Warriner and
Elijah Caldwell.
Front row: Troy
Williams,
Jimmy Wagner,
Clay Raffield,
Tanner Moses


.and Hunter
. . ..":...' .- .dBaumgardner.

Port St. Joe Majors All-Stars will be leaving this week to compete in the 2009 Florida
Major Dixie Youth State Tournament to be held in Mulberry, Florida, July 18- 24. There
will be 12 teams from across Florida competing in this tournament. The winning team
will represent Florida in the Dixie Youth World Series next month in Laurel, Miss.

PSJ track competes at qualifier


The Port St. Joe track
team competed in a Junior
Olympic Qualifier held re-
cently in Tallahassee.
The top four finishers
qualified for the U.S. AAU
Junior Olympics in Iowa lat-
er this month, but because
of expense issues, the team
will not travel to the national
meet.
Kayla Parker was out-
standing in the Young Wom-
en division. Parker won the
100 meter hurdles in 14.88
and the longjump with aleap
of 18 feet 10 inches. Parker
was also second in the 100
meters in a time of 12.36 and
third in the 200 meters with
a time of 25.59.


Also competing in the
Young Women division, Mari-
ah Johnson finished third in
the 400-meter hurdles in. a
time of 1:07 and was sixth in
the 100-meter hurdles in a
time of 16.19.
In the Intermediate Girls
division, Fanequa Larry was
first in the triple jump with a
leap of 34-feet-5, sixth in the
400 meters with a time of
1:01.60 and eighth in the 200
meters with a time of 26.60.
Alyssa Parker also com-
peted in the Intermediate
Girls division and was third
in the triple jump (28-5),
fourth in the 100-meter hur-
dles (18.52) and eighth in the
.long jump (14-7) and also


competed in the 400 meters
(1:20.91).
In the Bantam Girls di-
vision, Arianna Alien was
seventh in the 100 meters
(15.56) and200 meters (32.20)
and ninth in the 400 meters
(1:20). Teiyahna Hutchinson
was eighth in the long jump
(10-6).
In the Sub-Bantam Girls
division, Brooklyn Quinn fin-
ished second in the shot put
with a throw of 17-feet-4.
On the boys' side, Devin
Crew competed in the 100
and 200 meters in the Pri-
mary division, and Xaiver
Coachman competed in the
100 and 200 meters in the
Bantam Boys division.


Locals place at FSU track meet


Joseph Kerigan had
never competed in a track
meet, let alone a gathering,
ofhundreds of athletes from
across the. state, when he
stepped onto Florida State
University's Mike Long
Track last Saturday. But
after his three attempts
in the long jump, he came
away with third place and
a bronze medal in the Tal-
lahassee event, with a leap
of 11-feet-7.
The Port St. Joe group
entered just three competi-


tors. Ashley Lewis, a Port
St. Joe High School senior,
took first in the pole vault.
Kerigan, a 10-year-old
and student at Port St. Joe
Elementary, competed in
the Ernie Sims Classic
with teams from Pensaco-
la, Orlando and West Palm
Beach. Ernie Sims, a for-
mer FSU linebacker, now
Detroit Lion, was on hand
to visit with the kids, along
with other NFL players and
Walter Dix, USA Olympic
medalist in track.


BIG BEND BASEBALL LEAGUE OF FLORIDA INC.


ROUND 2: SCORES, JULY 12
Jackson Jays @
Chattahoochee Red Birds
Game 1: Red Birds 13
-'Jackson Jays 2
Calhoun County Horsemen @ Bay
County Brewers
Game 1: Brewers 9
Horsemen 0
Game 2: Brewers 9
Horsemen 0
Gulf Drive @ Liberty Dawgs
Game 1: Liberty Dawgs 10


Gulf Drive t
Game 2: Liberty Da
Gulf Drive
LEAGUE STANDING
W L
Liberty Dawgs
11 4
Calhoun Horsemen
10 5
Bay Brewers
9 6
Gulf County Drive
7 8
Chattahoochee Red Birds


5
wgs 12


7 9 ,438
Jackson Jays


6 1 13 .071
GS NEXT GAMES, DOUBLEHEADERS
Pct. Sunday, July 19, first game
1 p.m. CT/2 p.m. ET
.733 Chattahoochee Red Birds
@ Bay Brewers (Cain Griffin
.667 Field, Lynn Haven)
Jackson Jays @ Gulf Drive
.600 (Wewahitchka High School)
Liberty Dawgs @ Calhoun
.467 Horsemen
(Altha High School)


26th Annual Bay Point
Invitational Billfish Tournament
July 16-19, 2009 5 P.M. 11 P.M.
HostedBy the ST. JOE Company and Bay Point Marina


family Frienl FantastiMosic"


.. .-reaFood ,"

AAi




,.. -World faIsR5ck Walk' r at"Show-5 PM,
S.LikEterain. ent a
.. .. !-. _"- ...4,. PhM. -
' & i lrisng ii aradf i

Firing of the Cannon leading'ti t boa rade -9


The Al Hubbard Kids Fishing Experience 11:30 AM .- 6:00 P.M-
...... ... i a, l ..* -" ;.
Bo .* WoP aMhal ,I 4, 40s 5 P.M. .

:* *'. *a. t .! i. _. lioni. ..weigh-in..-
Kids combn' ot an tPtrick frdio Spong6 B6b UVE preter y Kn


*Vi.. rFerit Village a4d get rea
; '..; v Wet ih!ns for th Ivitatiohal Fleedt a'j

\thereturn of'Bi -6Bluel- 6 PM.. "
SKids come out and meet Pat'nk from Sponge Bob LIV pisented'byI
.M1irBtob LIVE reseted- by ol


The St Joe Company

Bay Point Marriott
Galati Yacht Sales & Viking Yachts
Ample Energy
Yamaha & Century Boats
Hart's Marine
Local Edge
Panama City Beach CVB
Phillips Oil/ Fill Ups Convenience
Coastal Marina Management
Miller & Coors
MTU & Florida Detroit Diesel


Clear Channel Radio
Knology
The News Herald
WJHG & My 7


Anchorage Children's Home
Boys & Girls Club of Bay County
Gulf Coast Children's Advocacy
Center


Guy Harvey's Island Grill
Hammerhead Fred's
Hottie Hawgs BBQ
Shipwreck Island


. ................




AS I The Star


Local Thursday, July 16, 2009
Local m c,/, I-.
_____ x;VA
- IWIF PIZ A 'e
LeCLI~II-~skk~~qw~5:d: w 1.1 ~


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Register


To Win


Grand Prize


Grand Prize Drawing
will be held
August 6, 2009.


TWO
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916109 Sprint Cup Race
tlanta Motor Speedw
1 $120 Value Vt
S W Visit any
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Thursday, July 16, 2009




-CALLOP


COMMUNITY


S w w w. s t a r f 1. c o m




SCALLOPS,


B
Section


Page 1




SCALLOP


Arts and crafts, food and fun planned for Aug. 1-2


Special to the Star
It is growing every year,
the turnout that is, for the
Scallop Festival.
The 13th Annual Scallop
Festival will be held August
1-2 in Port St. Joe and offers
something for the whole
family: Arts and crafts ven-
dors, classic cars, great live
entertainment, kid's activi-
ties and of course, the major
attraction the succulent
scallop.
Festival goers can pur-
chase scallops fried to per-
fection by the local Lions
Club members and flash
frozen.in 5 lb. bags ($25) to
take home or to the beach
cottage to prepare and enjoy
later. Forget your cooler?
No problem the Chamber
will have coolers for sell.
The Port St. Joe Lions
Club will be cooking the
scallops for the sixth con-
secutive year.
This year, extra scal-
lops have been ordered to
accommodate the crowds.
French fries are eliminated
from the menu since the
fries slow down the cooking
process.
Baskets will be available
with scallops and hushpup-


DEEP FRY: At left, city manager Charlie Weston
last year's Scallop Festival.
PRETTY AS A PICTURE: At right, arts and crafts,
always a big part of the Scallop Festival.


pies for $7. This year only
baskets will be served,
since in pervious years the
majority of sales came from
baskets instead of plates.
"People drive from all
over the state of Florida,
Alabama, Georgia and... to
eat scallops," reports board
president, Ralph Roberson.
"We talked to a lot of
festival attendees last year
to see where they were
from and how they heard


about the festival."
In addition to scallops, a
variety of foods will be avail-
able from the many vendors
- everything from barbe-
cue to Cajun fare.
Activities will be in full
swing at 11 a.m. ET with
an opening ceremony by
longtime emcee, Jerry Ta-
batt, weather forecaster for
Channel 13.
Live music will be a spec-
tacular part of the Saturday,


*st.L


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Stau
joined his fellow Lions Club members in frying scallops at

like these hand-painted wooden roses from last year, are


Aug. 1 event schedule. Fes-
tival attendees will be en-
tertained by local favorites
from years past.
Jeremy Novak, vice
president of the board, has
a super line-up including
local favorites from years
past.
Tab Benoit, Eric Lindell
and Amanda Shaw will per-
form on Saturday. Return-
ing this year is local favor-
ite Bo Spring. Opening act


THINK is from West Vir-
ginia. This will be their first
performance at the festival.
Sunday's activities will
begin at 11 a.m. and con-
tinue until 6 p.m.
Arts and crafts vendors
come from near and far
for festival goers' shopping
pleasure. This year's ven-
dors include old favorites
like "Dr. Meow" as well as
a variety of new festival
vendors.


"Vendors have been
contacting the chamber for
months now in order to se-
cure a space," Gulf County
Chamber of Commerce
executive director, Sandra
Chafin reports.
"Their excitement in at-
tending makes all our hard
work worthwhile. A few of
them have been with us for
the past eight years. They
continue to be favorites that
are requested each year.
First time vendors always
add a new dimension to the
festive atmosphere."
Port St. Joe is approxi-
mately 36 miles east of Pan-
ama City. Gulf County and
Port St. Joe made national
headlines in 2002 when St.
Joseph Peninsula State Park
was named the No. 1 Beach
in America by "Dr. Beach,"
a.k.a. Dr. Steven Leather-
man. Visitors and locals
alike will enjoy the marina,
the restored 100 year-old
Port Inn, shopping in our
historic downtown and eat-
ing in some of the finest res-
taurants.in the state.
Call the Gulf County
Chamber of Commerce at
800-239-9553. Visit www.
GulfChamber.org for more.
information.


MAKING A SPLASH


4


.,.r-..~


KAREN LLOYD COHEN I Special to The Star
Tiffany Buck and Courtney Cohen of Atlanta frolic in the surf at Indian Pass. Courtney, mom Karen and seven
best friends spent the Fourth of July with grandparents Jim and Daphne Lloyd.


Star papers earn eight journalism awards


The Star and sister paper
The Times took home eight
journalism awards at the Flor-
ida Press Association's Better
Weeldy Newspaper Contest
reception, held Saturday at
The Breakers in Palm Beach.
Star staff writer Despina
Williams took first and second
places in the Best Obituary
by a Newspaper category for
profiles of the late Apalachic-
ola residents Genaro "Jiggs"
Zingarelli and Albert "Corky"
Richards, respectively.
Williams also won third
places in the Headline Writing
and Shining Star categories.
The Shining Star award hon-
ors an individual's outstanding
contribution to a newsroom
during the contest year.
Star contributing writer
Marie Logan won second place
in the Photo Series in the One
Issue category for her photos
of a turtle release exhibition.


At The Times, city editor
David Adlerstein and staff
writer Lois Swoboda earned
an honorable mention in the
News Story category for their
joint coverage of the destruc-
tion of Apalachicola State
Bank by a seafood truck last
November.
Adlerstein also won an hon-
orable mention in the Photo
Series in the One Issue cat-
egory for his coverage of Pam
Nobles' annual dance recital.
Swoboda took home second
place in the Outdoor Writing
category for a story on wildlife
biologist Adam Warwick's res-
cue of a over-300-pound bear
near Alligator Point. ,
The Star and The Times
competed against newspapers
with circulations under 7,000
in all categories except Best
Headline and Shining Star,
which were open circulation
divisions.


Gulf County Health

Department receives

stimulus dollars

By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The Gulf County Health Department
has received a second injection of federal
stimulus dollars.
Health department officials recently
learned from the office of Rep. Allen Boyd
(D-North'Florida) that the department
will receive $561,570 in funding from the
American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act.
"Improving the quality, affordability
and availability of health care is extremely
important to me and the people of North-
Florida," Boyd said in a statement. "The
Gulf County Health Department provides
essential, comprehensive health services,
and I am pleased that the health depart-
ment and our community will be able to
benefit from this funding."
Doug Kent, executive director of the
health department, explained that the
money the health department ear-
lier received $196,485 in stimulus funds
- represents capital dollars that can only
be used for infrastructure at the depart-
ment.
The biggest ticket on the list of items
to be addressed is a new digital X-ray ma-
chine for the health department's facility
in Wewahitchka.
During construction of the new facility
'on State 22, a room was identified for ra-
diology and the walls were lined with lead
in preparation for the arrival.of an X-ray
machine.
"We are trying to put the same type of
system in Wewahitchka as we do in Port
St. Joe," Kent said, noting that the Port St.
Joe facility has a digital X-ray machine, a
technician and a network to provide read-
ings of X-ray films.
The machine, Kent said, would cost
$250,000-$300,000 complete with servers
and the necessary software.
The health department will use some
of the stimulus funds to "pre-plan" for e-
records by updating computer systems.
"When electronic medical records
come, we'll have the equipment here,"
Kent said.
Further, Kent said the department will
purchase a sonogram machine for the
women's department at the Port St. Joe
facility and provide a system for real-time
conferencing for physicians with mental
health patients and their providers to re-
view what medicines those patients are
taking and what adjustments might need
to be made.
What money remains will go to tile var-
ious areas in both the Wewahitchka and
Port St. Joe facilities, as well as tile some
areas where carpeting has become worn
or where tile would be more appropriate
than carpeting.


By Hannah
Henderson


















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B2 I The Stt


Thursday, July 16, 2009


Society


HAPPY BIRTHDAY


' .


CHRISTINA CLAYTON I Special to The Star
Clayton Turns 1
Christina Clayton turned one on June 2. She
celebrated her birthday with all her friends and
family at the Country Club swimming pool. Christina
is the daughter of Jamie and Mary Clayton,
granddaughter of Debbie and Keith Ford and Sam
and Jeannette Amerson and the great-granddaughter
of Barbara Lawder.


Resident receives free cell phone










.4,.


TIM CROFT I The Star
Pictured is Elmer Howe a resident of Port St. Joe who is receiving a free cell phone provided by the Self
LinkWireless Co. Howe resides with his sister Beata Wolf. Howe, who enjoys walking or driving his dog
Boo to different parts of the city, recently had a mild heart attack. He now is confident wherever he goes
he is in contact with emergency services if needed. Maggie Parker informed The CDC/People Helping
People of Gulf County about this free program. Information can be obtained by calling the CDC/People
Helping People at 229-5262


Award-winning


artist offers


beading workshop

WALTON COUNTY Award winning Panama City Artist
Emilie Pritchard will guide students in making beaded
necklaces in a July 25 workshop sponsored by the Cul-
tural Arts Association.
Pritchard will use a technique that creates a spiral
rope and offers students a choice of colors. Pritchard,
whose work is on exhibit in the Tampa Museum of Art
and at the Laguna Beach Art Center in Rancho Palos
Verdes, California, won an award for beadwork at the
Destin Festival of the Arts last year. She is also known as
a rug maker, and her rugs have won Best of Show at Arts-
Quest, the Destin Festival of the Arts and the Spring Fes-
tival of Art in Panama City. She also served as a juror for
ArtsQuest this year. More information about Pritchard's
work can be found at www.eprugweaver.com.
Pritchard's class will run from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. The
cost is $65 for CAA members and $75 for "not-yet" mem-
bers. The kit including the beads will be an additional
$10.
For more information, or to enroll, please contact the
Cultural Arts Association at 850-622-5970 or visit Cultur-
alArtsAssociation.com.


- SUMMER MOVIES IN THE PARK


Enjoy Summer Movies
in the Park going on now
until September. All mov-
ies begin at dark. Come
early and set up while
the sun sets. Don't forget
to bring your chairs and
blanket.
Movie Locations: P9rt
St Joe (PSJ): Frank Pate
Park, Windmark Beach
(WB): On the green just
past The School of Fish
and Mexico Beach (MB):
On the green at The El'
Governor Motel.

July
July 16 PSJ Mada-
gascar: Escape 2 Africa
PG


July 17-- WB Nights
in Rodanthe PG-13
July 23 MB Happy
Feet PG
SJuly 30 PSJ Race
to Witch Mountain PG
July 31 MB Bed-
time Stories PG
August
Aug -6 MB Indiana
Jones and The Kingdom
of the Crystal Skull PG-
13
Aug 14 WB Fire-
proof
September
Sept 4 WB Swing
Vote PG
Sept 18 WB Mon-
sters vs. Aliens'PG


Sunset Park Concert offers

an evening of musical fun


The Mexico Beach Sun-
set Park Concert, to be held
July 17 at 6:30 p.m. CT, will
feature three talented sing-
er-songwriters.
Nicole Dean is a gifted
singer-songwriter who has
just released her first CD
of original and cover tunes.
Dean's professional acous-
tic style has drawn her
many fans throughout the
South.
Bill Small is one of the
directors of the Nashville
Songwriter Association
International in Panama
City. He leads worship at
Woodlawn United Method-
ist Church on Panama City
Beach.
Small is a talented sing-


er-songwriter, musician
and entertainer. His skills
on piano and guitar are a
great blessing to all who
hear him.
Jerry Arhelger is an
international singer-song-
writer, professional musi-
cian and entertainer. Arhel-
ger's songs air on some of
the largest stations in the
world. Through the years,
he has had great success
on the national and inter-
national charts with re-
cordings of his self-penned
hits.
Come out for a great
evening of fun, entertain-
ment and inspiration. Re-
member: bring your beach
chairs.


i


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Thursday, July 16, 2009


Local


The Star l B3


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PHOTOS-BY DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
A new business incubator, located at 305 Peters Street in Port St. Joe, will provide office space at a nominal fee for two fledgling businesses.





Business incubator open to tenants


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
The city of Port St. Joe is current-
ly accepting applications for tenants
in its new business incubator.
Located at 305 Peters Street, the
incubator formerly George Wash-
ington Elementary School class-
rooms can accommodate two
businesses, with separate entrances
for both.
An $117,870 Rural Busidess
Enterprise Grant from the United
States Department of Agricul-
ture (USDA) Rural Development
funded the renovations, with the
city contributing an additional
$30,000.
Business owners will pay a nomi-
nal rent and stay in the facility for a
short time. As their businesses grow
and expand, they will leave the incu-
bator, freeing up space for new busi-
nesses to begin.
At the May 21 ribbon cutting cere-
mony, Port St. Joe mayor Mel Magid-
son spoke of the importance of nur-


turning new businesses in the city.
"This will be our contribution, in
the way of space to free up capital for
other things," he said.
The city is working closely with
the National Association of Business
Incubators (NABI).
NABI will screen applications to
determine which potential tenants
have the greatest chance of surviv-
ing long-term.
A board of directors, comprised
of business people, bankers and law-
yers, will serve as mentors to incu-
bator tenants.
The goal, said Magidson, is to
identify "appropriate businesses that
can be able to grow and move out of
the incubator as a fledgling business
and provide jobs to the area."
Those interested in obtaining a
business incubator application may
contact Gulf County Community De-
velopment Corporation executive
director Quen Lamb at 850-229-1477
or Port St. Joe grant writer coordina-
tor/human resources officer Char-
lotte Pierce, 850-229-8261.


An interior view of one of the office spaces. The building
Washington Elementary School classrooms.


once housed two George


Arrest LOG

The Gulf County Sher-
iff's Office will be conduct-
ing vehicle safety check-
points and DUI check-
points during July. The
checkpoints will be held
throughout the county to
include U.S. Highway 98
near St. Joe Beach, U.S.
Highway 98 and Garrison
Avenue; C-30 Simmons
Bayou, Highway 71 North
of White City, Highway 22
and Highway 22A, Highway
71 and Westarm Creek,
Highway 71 Dalkieth Area
and Highway 71 near the
Calhoun line.
On 06/30/2009, Michael
Anthony Naquin, 36, was
arrested on DWLSR.
On 07/01/2009, Donald
Wayne Brake Jr., 24, was
arrested on possession of
controlled substance.
On 07/01/2009, William
Lee Penamon Jr., 34, was
arrested on aggravated
child abuse and battery.
On 07/01/2009, Tommy
Wayne Bailey, 53, was ar-
rested on possession of
ammunition by a convicted
felon.
On 07/02/2009, James
Anthony Penn Jr. was ar-
rested on two warrants
for failure to pay child sup-
port.
On 07/02/2009, Charles
Dewayne Brant, 49, was
arrested on two counts of
child support.
On 07/02/2009, Gary
Scott Adkison, 41, was ar-
rested on failure to pay
child support.
On 07/02/2009, Buford
Lavern Rice, 74, was ar-
rested on a warrant for
lewd and lascivious on a
child younger than 16.
On 07/02/2009, Shayla
Leighann Gay, 28, was ar-
rested on resisting an of-
ficer without violence, giv-
ing false information to a
law enforcement office and
DWLSR.
On 07/03/2009, Brian
Keith Anderson, 48, was ar-
rested on DUI and assault
on a law enforcement of-
ficer.


r lNIICAlcJ Toll Free:
(888) 831-6754
IS Franklin County:
... (850) 670-5555
"O -r I, Leon County:
Al lMMEDI (850) 926-9602

Helping Hands Make The Difference


Preacher Glass Park and

Boat Ramp

Grant Proposal Public

Opinion

To Whom It May Concern:

The City of Wewahitchka is applying for a Boating Improvement
Grant and needs public input to submit with the grant application.
The purpose of this project is to provide the residents of the
City of Wewahitchka with a public boat ramp which. provides access
to Lake Alice. These grant funds, if received, will be utilized for the
construction of a boat ramp, dock, restrooms, and parking facilities
on Lake Alice (northeast side). A location map is available at City
Hall.
Please provide the following information and whether you
support or oppose the City of Wewahitchka's application for these
grant funds.
Your response may be emailed to citvwewa@fairpoint.net or
this page can be returned by mail or hand delivery to Wewahitchka
City Hall, PO Box 966, 109 South 2 Street, Wewahitchka,- Florida
32465.

Thank you for your attention on this matter, and please respond by
July 31, 2009.
*******************************************************
Preacher Glass Park and Boat Ramp


Name:


Address:





Please Circle One: Support Oppose


Additional Comments:


This- is the very Handsome "Howie"! Howie is a 3-yr
old American Bulldog mix with LOTS & LOTS of LOVE to
give. While patiently waiting for his new family, Howie spends
his days continuing to work on his socialization. He has
mastered leash walking, & is house & crate trained. Howie is a
FANTASTIC pet with a great personality! If you-are looking for
a new faithful, obedient & loving companion- COME OUT &
MEET HOWIE!
St. Joseph Bay Humane Society is located at 1007 Tenth St.
in Port St. Joe. We'are open Tues. Sat. from 10am 4pm (east.).
You may also call us at 850-227-1103.
SHOP FAITH'S THRIFT HUT where proceeds go directly
back to support the animals of our shelter! Faith's Thrift Hut is
also in need of donations and volunteers. Stop by Thur. Sat.
from 10am 4pm- same location as Humane Society.
1. 11 -. --- I


CLEANERS POLISHES


Dan & Nancy
Ostman
Jax Wax Distribution LLC
Cell: 850.832.1560
772 Suite B U.S. 98
,s Port St.Joe, FL 32456


AccESsoRIES ADorITiv


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These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.


Thursday, hi__ _16, 2009_ ___


w w. s tar


Rish, Gibson, Scholz & SOUTHERLANDFAMILY COMFORTER
Groom, P.A. FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME
William J, Rish, Thomas S Gibson, Russell Scholz, W. P. "Rocky" Comforter
Paul W, Groom I 50710th Street' Port St. Joe L.F.D.
(850)229-8211 (850) 229-8111 (850) 227-1818

rfl. com Page B4


Nothing Lasts

Forever, Except


Nothing lasts forever
except salvation.
Many don't believe
this, but it's a true
revelation.
Some folks don't think
they sin, so they see no
need for Jesus.
But when He returns
and they don't know
Him,
It's going to be mighty
grievous.
Everyone sins; the
Bible says this is true.
It says that none are


righteous, not even me
or you.
When you accept
Jesus as your Savior,
There is nothing that
tie can sever.
If Jesus comes back
or we die first, we'll live
with Him forever.
So to say that nothing
lasts forever is just not
true.
This could happen at
any time. I'm ready to
go, are you?
Billy Johnson


Philadelphia Primitive
Baptist Church will be in
Revival Services July 20-
24, starting at 7 p.m. each
night. The Elder Ches-
ter Brown III, Pastor and
Teacher of Shady Grove #1
Primitive Baptist Church
in Tallahassee, will be the


evangelist for the, week.
Local choirs will minister
through songs of praise
and worship. Pastor Jessie
Hawkins invites everyone
to come out for this week
of spiritual renewal. The
church is located at 261 Av-
enue D.


508 Sixteenth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


CI) C

y (LSA,'


850-227-1756

Rev. Ruth Hemple
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM


BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbtus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET' Bible Study all ages 10 a.m. ET
Morning Worship 11 a.m. ET Evening Wotship 6 p.m. ET
Tuesday: Choir Practice 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 r, iiand see i/r the Lord is good blessed is he man iha t rusnteh in Him."
Pleaseaccep t hi to join u iiritio j n urhi.woris God bless you!
Please call ts for your spiritual needs.
www.beachchapel.org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950 Home 769-8725


First Baptist Churchf
__ 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
Jerome Barnes, Interim Pastor
'*- o Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Educlation
_.. Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students
New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church
Sunday Wednesday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am Children's Choir........ 6:00 pm
Sunday School .................9:40 am Prayer Meeting ............... 6:30 pm
Traditional Service............11:00 am Children's Ministry
Youth Groups.................... 5:30 pm Activities........................... 6:30 pm
Youth Ministry Activities... 6:30 pm


<-


Contemporary Service 9:0
Sundsty School: 10:00 sa.mn
Traditional Worship: 11:0
IWdnesday:
Youth: 5:30p.m. EL
Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET-


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724

0 a. m ET Rev. Mac Fulcher
. ET Pastor
)0 a. m. El' Ann Comforter Jeremy Dixont
Music D)irector Youth Minister
Deborah Loyless
Director afhi Cidrl Ministries


Schedule of Worship Servtces
S" Sunday School 9:00 AM
Morning worship all ages 10:00 AM
Mill,Wcek Bib8le Study 6:00 PM
I lilectlive Adult Classes 6:00 PM
S"ur Children & Youth Ministry 6:00 PM
Nursery provided for all services


Are you sure of heaven? Since
the 1500s, there have been two
competing philosophies concerning
salvation. One was proposed by
Jacob Arminius (1560-1609). The
second was a response to Arminius,
by the followers of John Calvin,
called the "Five Points of Calvinism."
The followers of Arminius believe
that after conversion, a person can
be lost again,
As a result, Christians are seen
as jumping in and out of salvation.
Those that accept the Calvinistic
view believe that once "saved,"
a person is eternally secure. The.
result is people who believe that
since they have been "saved," they
are sure of heaven, and their sin is
no longer important.
I hope that you can see problems
with both of these views. First of all,
as I have stated before, salvation is
not complete until judgment at
death, or at the return of our Lord.
There are at least 28 Scripture
passages that speak of salvation
as a future experience. There are
only about five verses that seem to
teach salvation as a present-day
experience. When read in their
context, it can be seen that salvation
is not complete until the end!
The first step in salvation is to
experience what Jesus called in
John Chapter 3, being born again,
or more correctly, being born from
above. He calls this a spiritual
birth and contrasts this with the


natural birth. Those verses, which
seem to teach a way of salvation,
assume that the "born from above"
experience has already taken place.
Is a person who has been born
from above eternally secure? It
seems very unlikely that a person
can undo something that God
has already done and that a "new
creation" can then become an
old creation again. I like what the
Apostle Paul wrote in 2nd Timothy
1:12: "... for I know whom I have'
believed, and am persuaded, that
He is able to keep what I have
committed to Him, until that Day."
I am also persuaded that
He is able to keep what I have
committed to Him, but I do not
take it for granted. Scripture has
many warnings against taking our
salvation for granted.
Consider all the various
commands to watch Matthew
24:43-51, the entire chapter of
Matthew 25, Mark 13:35-36, Luke
21:34-36 and Revelation 3:3.
Also consider that Jesus said:
"He who endures to the end will be
saved." (Matthew 10:22, Matthew
24:13, Mark 13:13) And consider
the other verses that talk about
enduring, continuing and all the ifs.
Consider what the Apostle
Paul wrote in 2 Corinthians 13:5,
"Examine yourselves as to whether
you are in the faith. Test yourselves.
Do you not know yourselves, that
Jesus Christ is in you? unless


indeed you are disqualified."
Have you examined yourself? Put
yourself to the test in 1 Corinthians
6:9-11. Are the actions described
what you are, or what you were? If
they are what you still are, you have
not been born again, and you are not
eternally secure!
While it may be that those who
have been born from above are
eternally secure, it is a big mistake
to assume that you, personally, are
eternally secure.
Questions or comments? Send us
an e-mail to the address below.
At the Mexico Beach Christian
Worship Center, we believe that God
wants you to be born again from
above, as Jesus said not base your
eternal future on faulty religious
teaching. At the MBCWC, we don't
plead for money or twist your arm
to join. Plan to check us out this
Sunday. Our services begin with a
time of greeting and fellowship at
9:30 a.m. CT. Worship begins at 9:45
a.m. Come early so you can meet
and fellowship with us and enjoy the
praise and worship music led by TJ.
We meet and worship at the Mexico
Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st
St., behind Parker Realty and the
Beach Walk gift shop, just off U.S. 98
in Mexico Beach.
God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center
timl @jesusanswers.com
http://www.mexicobeachcwc.com


Obituaries

Thomas Albert Newsome


Thomas Albert Newsome
passed away Monday, July 6, 2009,
where he resided at The Bridge
at Bay St. Joseph Care & Rehab
Center.
Mr. Newsome was a retired
technical sergeant in the Air
Force, and he also had retired from
the Port St. Joe Paper Company.
He is survived by his three
sons, James A. Newsome, Paul G.
Newsome and Donald J. Newsome,


I--,


Family Life

Church


their wives, Stephanie Newsome,
Becky Newsome and Charlene
Newsome; four grandchildren,
Megan Langley, Dani Newsome,
Cherish Jacobs and James J.
Newsome; five sisters, Essilee
Jackson, Annie Mae Farmer,
Mamie Lee Kirkland, Kate
Anderson and Dorothy Matlock;
one brother; George Newsome;
and several nieces and nephews.
The funeral services were held


Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford
Welcome you to worship with us: HOME OF THE
Sunday 10:30am POWERHOUSE
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm YOUTH MINISTRIES
Wednesday 7pm
www.faniilvlifecuchuc.net
S323 Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433.



1f fUteaid wl ead

111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of exico Beao Uailed Melhodist (burh
Nlliorl PIovlsil
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


Worship with us at
Long Avenue Baptist Church
'Where Faith, Family &Friendship arefound
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pn
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More
Information Call 229-8691


TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN
Please come and meet our new
Rector Father Tommy Dwyer!
ST. JAMES'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.mn. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Providedfobr at 11:00
www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org


Thursday, July 9, at 11 a.m. ET at
The White City Baptist Church.
Interment followed at Pleasant
Rest Cemetery in Overstreet, Fla.,
with full military honors.
In his honor, donations can be
made to: The White City Baptist
Church, 7210 Highway 71, White
City, Fla.
All services were under the
direction of the Comforter Funeral
Home.

See OBITUARIES.B5


-FaithBible
CHURCH
Michael Rogers Pastor
9:45 AM ................................................ Sunday School
10:30 AM ..................................... Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 AM ...... ........... .. ............. ... ........ W orship
6:00 PM ....................................... ............. W worship
www.faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707,,
,, Home of Faith Christian School' ,


"Our Church can be your home"

Sirst Church of the azarene
420 Loing vetue Port St. Joe, forinda 32456
(850) 229-9596

5II' N rit t 'il 0 I/,1 i1, I ,,1 i ,0 1 ,1: r h l i,'r.Irn fa r,i t 5i n itn i ,tfira i v i i. l.t,


Sunday School......... ....... .....).. a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship ............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT: .
Sigllanb vieti u aptis't Cljurr(
382 Ling Streel Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
,5 5 1i 227- 131l()
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 1 :00 a.m.
tEvening Service 7:00 p.m.
Discipleship 'Training t:(X) p.m.
Wednesday' Prayer 7:00 p.m.




St. Peter's Anglican Church
(Traditional Episcopal Service 1928 BCP)

Morning Prayer & Holy Communion
Sunday..................8:00 a.nm.
The Rev. David Mans, Priest
Services being held at the I United Pentecostal Church
309 6th Street P1ort St Joe. Fl.
"An Urnchanrging P saith In A Changig World"


'The Christian CONSCIENCE



Are you eternally secure?


Revival Services planned at

Philadelphia Primitive Baptist


A Spirit Filled
Outreach Oriented
Word of Faith Church


www.fbcpsj.org


The Catholic Church
of Gulf County
St. Joseph Parish
20th Monument Ave. Port St. Joe 227-1417
All Mass Times EDT
Saturday 4:00 pm
Sunday 9:30 am
Monday, Thursday, Friday 9'30 am
Wednesday .5:30 pm
St. Laiwrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday M ass ........................................................ ...... 11:00 am (C T )
Cape San Bias Mission
1500 ft from State Park entrance at Cape San Blas
Saturday M ass........... ................................................ 6:00 pm (ET)


I


I






Thursday, July 16, 2009


Local


The Star I B5


OBITUARIES from r B4


Crape myrtle blooms long


Richard (Dick)
Charles Walker,
born Sept. 16,
1932, in Benzonia, .
Mich., passed away
peacefully Tuesday,
July 7, 2009, at
home in Mexico
Beach, Fla., with RII
his loving family at (D
his bedside. CHi
He was raised in WA
the Detroit, Mich.,
area and graduated from
Mekenzie High School.
Dick served his country
in the Korean War as an
Army forward observer;
he was very proud that his
45th Infrantry Thunderbird
Division returned to the
U.S. and marched down
Fifth Avenue in New York
City in a ticker-tape parade
with their full colors. After
leaving the military, he
joined the Farmington
(Mich.) Police Department,
where he served 10 years,
retiring as a sergeant.
He later owned and
operated two businesses
in Michigan, The Golden
Rooster Bar and The Quik
Pik Convenience Store. In
1974, Dick and his family
moved to Mexico Beach.
Dick loved to fish whether
from a boat or on shore
across the street from his
business, Walker's Dixie
Dandy, which he owned
and operated for 34 years.
Dick was instrumental in
re-establishing the Mexico
Beach Fire Department.
He was a member of First
United Methodist Church
in Mexico Beach and a.
lifetime member of VFW


Martha Mapes, a
longtime resident of
the Port St. Joe area,
died Thursday, July 2, at
her daughter's home in
Dothan, Ala.
Martha was born on
April 5, 1924, in Remus,
Mich. She was the
youngest of four children.
During World War II,
Martha worked as a lab
technician in Detroit,
Mich., and later with


HARD
ICK)
ARLES
LKER


Post 10069 in Port
St. Joe, Fla.
Dick was
predeceased by
his parents, Harry
and Margaret
Vervinck Walker;
two brothers,
James Walker and
Lary Walker; and
two sisters, Betty
Manley and Delores


Thomas.
Survivors include
his loving wife and best
friend of 54 years, Wanda
Coolman Walker, of Mexico
Beach; sons, David Walker
of Mexico Beach, Dan
"The Bud Man" Walker
(Katherine) of Lynn Haven,
Fla., Scott Walker (Beth)
of Crawfordville, Fla., and
Steve Walker (Donna)
of LaFayette, La.; three
grandsons, Daniel Walker,
Austin Walker and Cody
Walker; one granddaughter,
Celestia Walker; and his
loving pet, Rolex.,
The family received
friends at the United
Methodist Church on 22nd
Street in Mexico Beach on
Sunday, July 12, 2009, from 1
p.m. CT until the Memorial
Service at 2 p.m. CT.
Plants and flowers may
be sent or donations to
Mexico Beach Methodist
Church, Post Office Box
13652, Mexico Beach, FL
32410, or Emerald Coast
Hospice, 2925 Martin
Luther King Blvd., Panama
City, FL 32405, in Mr.
Walker's memory.
All services were
under the direction of the
Comforter Funeral Home.

Martha Mapes
Michigan Chemical in St.
Louis, Mich. It was here
that she met her future
husband and love of her
life, James Mapes.
In 1960, Martha and her
family relocated to Port St.
Joe, Fla. She loved the area
and its provisions. Martha
was a great lover of nature
and a good friend.
SMartha is survived by
her daughters, Crystal
Lewis of Dothan and Carol


Richard (Dick) Charles Walker


Carr of Tallahassee, Fla.;
and her granddaughters,
Tiffany Carr of Tallahassee
and Alex Naus of
Overstreet, Fla.
Memorial gifts may be
made to the Port St. Joe
Senior Center, 120 Library
Drive, Port St. Joe, FL
32456. The family very
much appreciates the love
and support received from
our many friends during
this special time.


Ronald A. Miller
Ronald A. Miller; 67, of
Mexico Beach, Fla., died
on Monday, July 6, 2009,
at Gulf Coast. Medical
Center:
Ronald was born
Sept. 12, 1941, to the late
Marvin Anderson Miller
and Mildred Garrison in
Kansas City, Mo. He lived
in Camden Point, Mo.,
and was a member of the
Masonic Lodge until he
moved to Marietta, Ga.,
where he was a manager
for General Electric for
more than 30 years.
Mr. Miller then moved
to Mexico Beach in 2000,
where he was member
and avid golfer of St.
Joseph Bay Country
Club.
Other than his wife,
Doris, he is survived
by one son, James Lee
Miller; of Clemons,
S.C.; one daughter,
Belinda Ann Neely, and
her husband, Jim, of
Chattanooga, Tenn.; one
brother, Brent Miller, and
his wife, Janie, of The
Villages, Fla.; and three
grandchildren.
A memorial service
will be announced at a
later date.
Donations may be
made to a charity of
choice.
Expressions of
sympathy may be
made at www.souther
landfamily.com.
SOUTHERLAND FAMILY
FUNERAL HOMES
507 10th St.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-8111


Crape myrtle is among the most
popular landscape plants in Florida.
It's easy to propagate, has a long
blooming period (10-120 days) and
will grow on just about every kind of
soil in the state. My information on
crape myrtle production was pro-
vided by Extension retired Orna-
mental Horticulture Specialist Dr. ROY
Robert J. Black. CAR'
Originally from Asia, crape myr- County e
tle has been naturalized throughout direct
the U.S. as far north as Massachu-
setts, where it grows as an herba-
ceous perennial. First introduced to Eng-
land and the U.S. in the 18th century, crape
myrtle is now widely cultivated.
The standard upright variety may reach
a height of 20 feet, so it can be used as a
small tree or large shrub, depending on
pruning. There are two other common clas-
sifications of crape myrtle, a new improved
weeping type and the dwarf varieties.
Crape myrtle gets its name from the'
flower, which is crinkled and crape-like.
Crape myrtle blooms during the summer;
blossoms vary in shades of red, pink, laven-
der; and white. As the plant gets older, the
bark peels off in irregular patches, leaving
an interesting mottled design.
The crape myrtle forms during the win-
ter and produces tender green foliage in the
spring, large spikes of showy flowers in the
summer and colorful foliage in the fall.
Crape myrtle needs full sunlight for


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most of the day. Crape myrtle does.
well in most Florida soils if the soils
are well drained. When planted in
poorly drained soil, crape myrtles
grow very little and often die.
December through March, the
normal dormant season, is the best
time to plant crape myrtles. You
LEE can plant container-grown crape
IER myrtles anytime if you provide ad-
Ktension equate water after transplanting.
tor Compared with much other land-
scape ornamentals, crape myrtles
are easy to transplant.
Flower production in crape myrtles can
often be increased by fertilization. Apply
about 12 pound of 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 for every
100 square feet. The plants need four ap-
plications of fertilizer per year early spring,
late spring, summer and early winter.
To make the blooming last longer, lightly
prune the faded flowers clusters. To get
large, specimen-type blooms, prune heavily
each year.
New crape myrtle plants can be obtained
from seeds or cuttings. Hardwood cuttings
will root in November or December, and
softwood cuttings will root in mid-summer.
Insect pests of crape myrtle include
aphids and white flies. They excrete a hon-
eydew material, which leads to the build-up
of sooty mold on the plants. For more infor-
mation on pest control, contact your local
garden center or Cooperative Extension
Service.


Congratulations,

Gulf County, on the progress of

your new hospital!

SWhile you WAIT for
your new hospital to be completed,
Weems Memorial Hospital in
Apalachicola is WAITING for you.....

Visit our:
New mammography suite
Uncrowded 24-hour emergency department
Experienced emergency room physicians
For convenience and quality,
make the short drive to Franklin County!


WEEMS

GEORGE I WEEMS /

135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida 32320
(850)653-8853 www.WeemsMemorial.com


I
1
x
c






B6 I The Star School


Florida's Great Northwest funds scholarships at


DESTIN Florida's
Great Northwest recently
announced its investment in
certificate and degree pro-
grams in information tech-
nology (IT) and engineering
at seven Northwest Florida
colleges. Participating in
the scholarship program
are the University of West
Florida, Pensacola Junior
College, Northwest Florida
State College, Gulf Coast
Community College, Chipola
College, Tallahassee Com-
munity College and Flprida
State University. Through
its post-secondary educa-
tion scholarship program,
Florida's Great Northwest
is awarding two grants,
totaling $1,150,000, to be
used for scholarships to aid
in developing a qualified IT
and engineering workforce
within the region.
Research conducted by
Florida's Great Northwest
has identified the busi-
ness sectors of informa-
tion technology and engi-
neering as critical support
industries for growing a
knowledge-based economy
in Northwest Florida and
for supporting the growth
in technology-based busi-
nesses such as aerospace
and defense, medical tech-
nologies, health services
and renewable energy. This
grant award is a response
to the workforce deficit in
computing and engineering
occupations in Northwest
Florida as identified in a
recentstudyconductedjoint-
ly by Florida's Great North-
west and the University of
West Florida's Haas Center
for Business Research and
Economic Development.
The study revealed a dra-
matic shortage of graduates
from certification through
graduate degrees in com-
puter engineering, indus-
trial engineering, computer
specialist programs and
engineering technician pro-
grams in Northwest Florida
as well as at the state and
national levels.


i....~~;r-,~ I
''
~32~~;'~ .i
~'I ~-r .i' I
,3~~''''

a bp ''n a;.n~I aC
, j


Representing the Northwest Florida Consortium are (from left to right): Dr. Ed
Meadows (Pensacola Junior College), Dr. Gene Prough (Chipola College), Mr.
Al Wenstrand (Florida's Great Northwest), Dr. Judy Bense (University of West
Florida), Dr. Jill White (Northwest Florida State College), Dr. Jim Kerley (Gulf
Coast Community College) and Mr. Fred Leopold (Community Bank and Florida's
Great Northwest Board Chair.)


Furthermore, the study
revealed sufficient IT and
engineering courses are
already offered throughout
the region. The capacity at
the region's colleges and
universities exists, but there
are not enough graduates
from the programs to meet
the region's growing de-
mand. To address the issue,
Florida's Great Northwest
developed the post-second-
ary scholarship program
to spur enrollment in the
region's existing IT and en-
gineering programs.
"IT and engineering are
driving forces in the expan-
sion of Northwest Florida's
increasingly high-tech,
knowledge-based indus-
tries," said Al Wenstrand,
president of Florida's Great
Northwest. "The businesses
in the region have identified
a critical workforce need,
confirmed by the Haas Cen-
ter study. Through partner-
ships between Florida's
Great Northwest and the re-
gion's post-secondary insti-


tutions, we are attempting
to meet that need by grow-
ing a workforce from within
Northwest Florida.
"Growing our own tal-
ent in high-wage, high-skill
occupations is a long-term
'strategy that reflects a sig-
nificant benefit for the citi-
zens of Northwest Florida
while creating a workforce
that will meet the needs of
the technology businesses
that even in this recession
are growing and demanding
additional employees."
A unique six-college
alliance, the Northwest
Florida Consortium, com-
prised of the University of
West Florida, Pensacola
Junior College, Northwest
Florida State College, Gulf
Coast Community College,
Chipola College and Talla-
hassee Community College,
will use the grant to award
approximately 378 scholar-
ships to IT and engineering
students. Eligible programs
range from certification to
master's degree and span


programs such as Master
of Science in Software En-
gineering and Database
Systems, Associate's in
Computer Engineering,
Networking Services, Tech-
nical Support and as well
as certificates in Technol-
ogy Systems, Information
Technology Management,
Web Development and
Computer Programming,
among others. The consor-
tium will match the $1 mil-
lion grant with $2,631,935 for
a total program investment
of more than $3.5 million.
"Our higher education
consortium is pleased to re-
ceive this grant," said Judy
Bense, president of the Uni-
versity of West Florida. "It
will enable us to better serve
our region in measurable
ways as we seek to expand
our knowledge-based econ-
omy. Our six institutions
are committed to working
together so we can provide
streamlined and easier ac-
cess to higher education
and expand our ability to


offer academic prof
that will give our stu
a much greater oppor
to get a high-paying jo
a great future right h
Northwest Florida."
"Just as rewarding
scholarship program
its future impact on t
gional workforce is th
laboration at the pre,
and provost levels b
consortium's six region
stitutions," said Wens
"Our thanks and conga
lations go to Univers
West Florida Pre;
Judy Bense who led tl
mation of the consortium
well as to the preside
the other five institufi
"The level of coope
and coordination a
the institutions is trul
standing and deserve
nificant praise."
Florida State Univer
College of Communic
and Information will
the funds to offer 50
arships for students
ing a Bachelor of Sc
degree in IT speci
'in Computer Netwo
Computer Security, Ge
Computer Support, We
sign or Health Inforn
Florida State Universi
match the $150,000
with $153,016.
"The Florida State
versity is pleased to
part of this effort to
strengthen the econ
environment of the re
said Dr. Larry Dennis
of the College of Co
nication and Inform
"Florida's Great I
west's support enabl
to provide scholars
50 students seeking ca
in IT. This commitm
growing a high-tech
omy is helping to de
and retain talent with
community."
At the seven college
universities, all of the
warships will target stu
who plan to live and
in Northwest Florida
graduation. Students


Thursday, July 16, 2009


ocal colleges
grams ing an IT or engineering
dents degree who are interested
tunity in these scholarship oppor-
b with tunities should contact each
ere in college for specific program
information and require-
as the ments.
Sand Florida's Great North-
he re- west provides regional
ie col- leadership in economic
sident and workforce develop-
y the ment, serving 16 counties
nalin- in Northwest Florida from
trand. Pensacola through Talla-
gratu- hassee. Its primary mission
;ity of is the creation of a diversi-
sident fled and sustainable econ-
he for- omy in Northwest Florida
un, as that creates nationally and
nts of globally competitive advan-
ons. tages for the development
ration of key industry clusters,
imong increases the income and
y out- prosperity of workers and
s sig- families and preserves the
region's vibrant quality of
rsity's life.
cation Florida's Great North-
utilize west is the administrator
schol- and facilitating organization
seek- for the U.S. Department of
science Labor WIRED (Workforce
alizing Innovation in Regional Eco-
)rking, nomic Development) Grant.
general Florida's Great Northwest's
eb De- WIRED Northwest Florida
latics. Initiative, funded in part
tywill through the U.S. Depart-
grant ment of Labor, is designed
to create high-wage, high-
e Uni- skill jobs within the region
be a in the four target industries
help of Aviation, Aerospace,
nomic Defense and National Se-
gion," curity; Health Sciences
,dean and Human Performance
mmu- Enhancement; Renewable
nation. Energy and Environment;
North- Transportation.and Logis-
es us tics Services; and the two
ips to strategic support industries
careers of Information Technology
ent to Services and Research and
econ- Engineering.
develop Note: This program is
in our funded through Florida's
Great Northwest's WIRED
sand Northwest Florida Initia-
schol- tive which is funded in part
dents through a U.S. Department
work 'of Labor Federal grant pro-
upon gram and financed with
purs- Federal Funds.


NOTICE OF INTENDED
ACTION THE GULF
COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD


Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County
School Board proposes to amend and adopt
policies,as providedforintheAdministrative
Procedures Act, for the purpose of bring
said policies into compliance with Florida
Statutes and State Board of Education
Rules.


Summary: The following is a brief
description of each proposal change.
Student Progression Plan
Code of Conduct


Economic Impact: The proposals will
result in no direct costs associated, with
implementation.


IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE
HELD AT:
Time: 5:15 p.m., ET
Date: July 28, 2009
Place: Gulf County School Board
150 Middle School Road
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


The entire text of the proposed rules can be
inspected during regular office hours at the
Office of Instructional Services, 150 Middle
School Road, Port St. Joe, FL.

Special legal authority under which the
adoption is authorized and the law being
implemented and interpreted are made
specific.


The addition and changes are proposed by
Sara Joe Wooten, Assistant Superintendent
of Instruction and approved for consideration
by Tim Wilder, Superintendent.

Amendments: See above


NOTICE OF HEARING
FOR PURPOSES
OF ADOPTING
AN ORDINANCE
AMENDING THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AND AUTHORIZING
TRANSMITTAL OF THE
COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AMENDMENT TO
APPROPRIATE STATE
AGENCIES
The Planning and Development Review Board, sitting
as the local planning agency will hold a hearing at 4:00 p.m., ET.
on July 28, 2009, to review the amendment and recommend it to
the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, and the Board of
City Commissioners will hold a meeting on August 4. 2009 at 6:00
p.m., ET, at the City of Port St. Joe City Hall located at 305 Cecil G.
Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, for the purposes of adopting
an Ordinance and authorizing transmittal of the Comprehensive Plan
Amendment to appropriate state agencies.
The title of proposed Ordinance is as follows:
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN TO THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, BY AND THROUGH
PROCEDURES REQUIRED FOR SMALL-SCALE MAP
AMENDMENTS PURSUANT TO AUTHORITY UNDER
STATE STATUTES SECTION 1633187, SPECIFICALLY
CHANGING PORTIONS OF PARCEL ID)#03072-005, 2.5
ACRES, MORE OR LESS OF A TRACT OR PARCEL
OF LAND LYING AND BEING PART OF SECTION 19,
TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST; GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA, FROM AGRICULTURAL TO LOW INTENSITY
COMMERCIAL; PROVIDING FOR THE AMENDMENT
OF THE ZONING MAP OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE;
AND PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ANY CONFLICTING
ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection'
at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr.,
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida.
The hearing may be continued from time to time as may be
necessary.
Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public
hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners,
City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded.
Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will
need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record
is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based.
Any person requiring a special accommodation at this
hearing because of a disability or physical impairment should contact
the City Clerk's Office at (850) 229-8261, at least live (5) calendar
days prior to the hearing.
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY
QF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
60 ACRE SITE






. . . .... I
-------------------------------


NOTICE OF VOLUNTARY
ANNEXATION

NOTICE is hereby given that the owners have
requested the City of Port.St. Joe to voluntarily annex
the lands shown on the map attached hereto. The lands
are located contiguous to a portion of the City of Port
St. Joe city limits, located East of Jones Homestead
Road. The parcel is approximately 750' South of U.S.
Highway 98. An exact description of the property and
the Ordinance No. 424 are on file with the City Clerk
at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr..
Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida, and may be inspected
there.
The City will have a first reading of Ordinance
No. 424, AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR
THE VOLUNTARY ANNEXATION OF CERTAIN
LANDS LYING IN SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP
8 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA; PROVIDINGALEGALDESCRIPTION
OF THE LANDS TO BE ANNEXED; PROVIDING
FOR THE REDEFINING OF CITY BOUNDARIES
TO INCLUDE SAID LANDS; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE, which will be the' annexing
Ordinance applicable to the above land at its regular
meeting on July 21, 2009, at 6:00 o'clock p.m., EDT,
in the City C6mmission' Meeting Room, Municipal
Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St.
Joe, Florida, and will consider the Ordinance for final
adoption at its regular meeting on August 4, 2009, at
6:00 p.m., EDT, in the City Commission Meeting
Room, Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.,
Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida.' All interested persons
may appear and be heard
Interested persons may attend and be heard at
the public hearing or provide comments in writing to
the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall,
305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida.
Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded.
Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during
the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and
should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the
testimony on which the appeal is based.
Any person requiring a special accommodation
at this hearing because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact City Clerk at (850) 229-
8261 at least five (5) calendar days prior to the hearing.


CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY
OF PORT.ST. JOE, FLORIDA


r`
-






Thursday, July 16, 2009


The Star I B7


School News


Openings available at Advanced AT&T STEM summer camp


PANAMA (ITY The first
Advanced AT&T Science,
Technology, Engineering
and Mathematics (STEM)
Summer Camp for area
high school students will
be held at the Florida State
University Panama City
campus on July 30 and 31
and August 3 through 7.
The camp was made
possible by a $100,000
grant from AT&T which
was received by FSU Pan-
ama City in 2009.
The specialized camp
will expose students to
hands on engineering in
areas such as electronics,


digital systems, robotics,
structures and environ-
mental engineering. The
students will work in the
new state-of-the-art FSU
Panama City engineering
laboratories in the Holley
Academic Center along
with FSU Panama City
students, engineering fac-
ulty members, scientists
and engineers from the
Naval Surface Warfare
Center and high school
science and mathematics
teachers.
There are still a few
openings for students in-
terested in participating


SUMMER CAMP
Advanced AT&T Science, Technology,
Engineering and Mathematics Summer Camp
for high school juniors and seniors will be held
at Florida State University Panama City July 30-
31 and August 3-7. Deadline for applications
is Friday, July 24th. For an application or more
information, contact Ginger Littleton at 850-770-
2270 or email glittleton@pc.fsu.edu.


in the Advanced AT&T
STEM Summer Camp.
Applications are being
sought from students en-
tering their junior or se-
nior year of high school.


Juniors and seniors will be
given first priority but ex-
ceptional sophomores will
also be considered. All ac-
tivities associated with the
camp will take place at the


FSU Panama City campus.
The camp is free of charge
and will run from 8:30'a.m.
to 3 p.m. each day. Lunch
will be provided. Those
interested in participat-
ing in the camp should
contact Ginger Littleton at
850-770-2270 or by email at
glittleton@pc.fsu.edu for
an application. Applica-
tions must be submitted
no later than Friday, July
24.
"The AT&T grant offers
a great opportunity to pro-
vide STEM experiences to
more high school students
and teachers", explained


David Skinner, Ph.D., co-
ordinator of the grant and
Electrical and Computer
Engineering professor at
FSU PC.
"Through the funds
provided by AT&T, we can
bring these advanced stu-
dents and teachers into
the brand new academic
labs at FSU Panama City
and let them use state-of-
the-art equipment. This
will enrich the background
of the teachers and give
students an opportunity to
test the collegiate waters
before high school gradu-
ation."


SUPPORT THE LADY TIGER SHARKS


0
C)'-


0*


I~ ~
I I I I
I


-O il
*U' r, -


SUBMITTED PHOTO I Special to The Star
The Port St. Joe Lady Tiger Sharks girls' basketball and track teams are
selling banners to be hung inside the R. Marion Craig Coliseum during the
2009-10 school year. The cost of each 2-foot-by-4-foot banner is $100 and
can be renewed next year at the same cost. Company logos can be placed
on the banner in support of "Tiger Sharks" athletics. To place an order
contact Kenny Parker at 899-5037 or Alisa Parker at 340-0399.



FSU-Panama City fall registration now open


Fall 2009 online registra-
tion at FSU Panama City for
continuing, degree-seek-
ing, graduate and under-
graduate students will open
on July 13 and continue
through July 31. The first
day of classes for the fall
2009 semester is August 24.
New undergraduate
students admitted for fall
semester 2009 should con-
tact the FSU Panama City
Office of Student Affairs at
850-770-2170 or toll-free at
1-866-693-7872, to attend an
orientation session. New
undergraduate students
will register at orientation.
Former students who
have not been enrolled for
more than two semesters
or new students who are


interested in pursuing a
bachelor's degree at FSU
Panama City should sub-
mit admission applications
online at www.pc.fsu.edu by
August 1.
Students interested
in graduate degree pro-
grams may contact the
FSU Panama City Office of
Admissions and Records at
850-770-2160 or toll-free at
1-866-693-7872 for further
information.
Students who wish to
register as transient or spe-
cial student status may reg-
ister July 30-31 and again on
August 21. Students in this
category should contact the
FSU Panama City Office of
Admissions and Records to
verify their student status


and eligibility to register.
SIf further information
regarding admission or,
registration for the fall 2009
semester is needed, stu-
dents should contact the
FSU Panama City Office of
Admissions and Records or
visit the office at 4750 Colle-
giate Drive, Barron Build-
ing, Room 104.
The Florida State Uni-
versity was recently rec-
ognized as a top 50 public
university by U. S. News
and World Report and a
top 5 best value institution
by the Princeton Review.
Many of the more than 30
degree programs offered
at the Panama City campus
also appear individually in
national rankings.


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NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION
THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD

Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County School Board proposes to amend and adopt
policies, as provided for in the Administrative Procedures Act, for the purpose of
bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Edu-
cation Rules.

Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change.

4.12 Exceptional Student Education
5.14 Homeless Students
6.17 Appointment or Employment Requirements
6.173 Responsibilities of School Bus Operators
6.33 Alcohol and Drug-Free Workplace
6.50 Leave of Absence
6.501 Leave Application
6.542 Family and Medical Leave
7.31 School Food Service Funds
7.70 Purchasing and Bidding
8.12 Toxic Substances in School Work Areas
8.38 Automotive Equipment
8.45 School Breakfast Program
9.80 School Concurrency

Economic Impact: These proposals may result in direct costs associated with imple-
mentation.

IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT:

Time: 5:15 PM EDT
Date: July 28, 2009
Place: Gulf County School Board Room
150 Middle School Road
Port St. Joe, FL 32456

The entire text of the proposed rules can be inspected during regular office hours at
the Gulf County School Board Office, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL.

Special Legal authority under which the adoption is authorized and the law being
implemented and interpreted is made specific.

The addition and changes are proposed by Bill Carr, Assistant Superintendent for.
Business Services and approved for consideration by Tim.Wilder, Superintendent.

Amendments: See above.


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I aNNOUNCEMENTS
1100 Legal Advertising
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1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130 Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
117 Found


1100
2890S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Denton II. LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as fol-
lows:

Certificate No. 629

Application No. 2009 8

Year of Issuance: 2007 '

R.E. No. 06269-980R

Description of Property:
Lot 11, Turtle Dunes, a
Subdivision, as per Map or
plat recorded in Plat Book
5, Page 7, of the Public
Records of Gulf County,
Florida.

Name in which assessed:
Booth Holdings Booth
Trust, LLC

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 5th
day of August, 2009.

Dated this 26th day of
June, 2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
6Y: Donna L, Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 2, 9, 16, 23, 2009
2892S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Denton II, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as
follows:

Certificate No132

Application No.2009 9

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 01432-000R

Description of Property:
Lot 14, Block 5, Unit One,
RIVERSIDE ESTATES, as
per map or plat thereof
and recorded in Plat Book
2, Page 24, of the Public
Records of Gulf County,
Florida.

Name in which assessed:
Elaine Hodges & Laurie
Duke

All of said property being


1100 |
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 5th
day of August, 2009.

Dated this 26th day of
June, 2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 2, 9, 16, 23, 2009
2929S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Denton II, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as
follows:

Certificate No. 293

Application No. 2009 10

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 03039-635R

Description of Property:
Lot 47, Southgate Subdivi-
sion, according to the Plat
thereof recorded in the
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida, in Plat
Book 4, Page 17.

Name in which assessed:
Paradise Properties & De-
velopment LLC

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 12th
day of August, 2009

Dated this 30th day of
June, 2009

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 9, 16,23, 30, 2009
2930S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Denton II, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed dre as fol-
lows:

Certificate No. 315

Application No. 2009 -11

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 03169-155R

Description of Property:
Lot 11 of Stillwater South,
according to the map o(
plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page 14, of
the Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida.


Name in which assessed:
Herbert Press Witt

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tifibate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 12th
day of August, 2009

Dated this 30th day of
June,2009

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 9, 16, 23, 30, 2009
2931S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GMIEN thatDenton II, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as
follows:

Certificate No. 259

Application No. 2009 -12

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 02624-455R

Description of Property:
Lot 16, Block C, Seven
Springs Lake Subdivision,
according to the Plat
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 5, Pages 17 and 18,
of the Public Records of
Gulf County, Florida.

Name in which assessed:
John G. Gustine

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 12th
day of August, 2009.

Dated this 30th day of
June,2009

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT GULF COUNTY
FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 9, 16, 23, 30, 2009
3004S
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVI-
RONMENTAL PROTEC-
TION

NOTICE OF INTENT
TO ISSUE PERMIT

This Intent to Issue Permit
(File No. 23-0284354-
001-DF) Ralph R. Rish, 324
Marina Drive, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, to impact
approximately 0.305 acres
of jurisdictional wetlands
for the construction of an
upland cut commercial
marina, install a 1,550 foot
seawall along the waters'
edge and to dredge a sec-
tion of the Gulf County Ca-
nal to a depth of minus
eight feet is hereby
granted unless a sufficient
petition for an administra-
tive hearing is timely filed
under sections 120.569


and 120.57 of the Florida
Statutes as provided be-
low. The activity is located
on the west side of county
road 382 on the Gulf
County Canal, Floridaf
Inter-coastal waterway,
Class III Waters of the
State, Section 17,18,19,20,
Township 07-South, Range
10-West, Longitude 85" 16'
27" West, Latitude 29" 51'
46" North, in Gulf County.

The procedures for peti-
tioning for a hearing are
set forth below.

A person whose substan-
tial interests are affected
by the Department's action
may petition for an admin-
istrative proceeding
(hearing) under sections
120.569 and 120.57 of the
Florida Statutes. The peti-
tion must contain the infor-
mation set forth below and
must be filed (received by
the clerk) in the Office of
General Counsel of the
Department at 3900 Com-
monwealth Boulevard, Mail
Station 35, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3000.

Because the administrative
hearing process is de-
signed to re-determine fi-
nal agency action on the
application, the filing of a
petition for an administra-
tive hearing may result in a
modification of the permit
and lease, or even a denial
of the application. Accord-
ingly, the applicant is ad-
vised not to commence
construction or other activ-
ities under this
permit/lease until the
deadlines below for filing a
petition for an administra-
tive hearing, or request for
an extension of time have
expired.

Under rule 62-110.106(4)
of the Florida Administra-
tive Code, a person whose
substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's
action may also request an
-extension of time to file a
petition for an administra-
tive hearing. The Depart-
ment may, for good cause
shown, grant the request
for an extension of time.
Requests for extension of
time must be filed with the
Office of General Counsel
of the Department at 3900
Commonwealth Boule-
vard, Mail Station 35, Tal-
lahassee, Florida
32399-3000, before the ap-
plicable deadline. A timely
request for extension of
time shall toll the running
time period for filing a peti-
tion until the request is
acted upon. If a request is
filed, late, the Department
may still grant it upon a
motion by the requesting
party showing that the fail-
ure to file a request for an
extension of time before
the deadline was the result
of excusable neglect.

In the event that a timely
and sufficient petition for
an administrative hearing
is filed, other persons
whose substantial interests
will be affected by the out-
come of the administrative
process have the right to
petition to intervene in the
proceeding. Intervention
will be only at the discre-
tion of the presiding officer
upon the filing of a motion
in compliance with rule
28-106.205 of the Florida
Administrative Code.

In accordance with rules
28-106.111(2) and
62-110.106(3)(a)(4), peti-
tions for an administrative
hearing by the applicant
must be filed within 21
days of receipt of this writ-
ten notice. Petitions filed
by any persons other than
the applicant, and other
than those entitled to writ-
ten notice under section


1100
120.60(3) of the Florida
Statutes, must be filed
within 21 days of publica-
tion of the notice or within
21 days of such notice, re-
gardless of the date of
publication.

Under section 120.60(3) of
the Florida Statutes, how-
ever, any person who has
asked the Department for
notice of agency action
may file a petition within 21
days of such notice, re-
gardless of the date of
publication.

The petitioner shall mail a
copy of the petition to the
applicant at the address
indicated above at the time
of filing. The failure of any
person to file a petition for
an administrative hearing
or pursue mediation as
provided below within the
appropriate time period
shall constitute a waiver of
those rights.

A petition that disputes the
material facts on which the
Department's action is
based must contain the
following information:

(a) The name and address
of each agency affected
and each agency's file or
identification number, if
known;

(b) The name, address,
and telephone number of
the petitioner; the name,
address, and telephone
number of the petitioner's
representative, if any,
which shall be the address
for service purposes dur-
ing the course of the pro-
ceeding; and an explana-
tion of how the petitioner's
substantial interests are or
will be affected by the
agency determination;

(c) A statement of when
and how the petitioner re-
ceived notice of the
agency decision;

(d) A statement of all dis-
puted issues of material
fact. If there are none, the
petition must so indicate;

(e) A concise statement of
the ultimate facts alleged,
including the specific facts
that the petitioner con-
tends warrant reversal or
modification of the
agency's proposed action;
and

(f) A statement of the spe-
cific rules or statutes that
the petitioner contends re-
quire reversal or modifica-
tion of the agency's pro-
posed action;

(g) A statement of the relief
sought by the petitioner,
stating precisely the action
that the petitioner wishes
the agency to take with re-
spect to the agency's
proposed action,

A petition that does not
dispute the material facts
on which the Department's
action is based shall state
that no such facts are in
dispute and otherwise
shall contain the same in-
formation as set forth
above, as required by rule
28-106.301. Under sec-
tions 120.569(2)(c) and (d)
of the Florida Statutes, a
petition for administrative
hearing must be dismissed
by the agency if the peti-
tion does not substantially
comply with the above re-
quirements or is untimely
filed,

This action is final and ef-
fective on the date filed
with the Clerk of the De-
partment unless a petition
is filed In accordance with
the above. Upon the timely
'filing of petition this order
will not be effective until
further order of the De-


_ 1100
apartment.

This permit constitutes an
order of the Department,
The applicant has the right
to seek judicial review of
the order under section
120.68 of the Florida Stat-
utes, by the filing of a no-
tice of appeal under rule
9.110 of the Florida Rules
of Appellate Procedure
with the Clerk of the De-
partment in the Office of
General Counsel, 3900
Commonwealth Boule-
vard, Mail Station 35. Tal-
lahassee, Florida,
32399-3000; and by filing a
copy of the notice of the
appeal accompanied by
the applicable filing fees
with the appropriate dis-
trict court of appeal. The
notice of appeal must be
filed within 30 days from
the date when the final or-
der is filed with the Clerk of
the Department. Requests
for review before the Land
and Water Adjudicatory
Commission must be filed
with the Secretary of the
Commission and served
on the Department within
20 days from the date
when the final order is filed
with the Clerk of the De-
partment.

The application is available
for public inspection dur
ing normal business hours,
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at
Department of Environ-
mental Protection, 2353
Jenks Avenue, Panama
City, FL 32405.
July 16, 2009
3047S
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE

Hwy 22 Storage
1249 Hwy 22
Wewahitchka, Florida

#89 Chris Douglas
#52 Paula Fowler
#L-2 Deloris Stacy

Units will be opened and
merchandise sold or
removed if payments are
not brought up to date by
August 7, 2009 at 8:30.
July 16, 23, 30, 2009
3048S
CITY OF PORT ST JOE

NOTICE OF SOLIC-
ITATION REQUEST FOR
QUALIFICATIONS LIA-
BILITY AND CASUALTY
INSURANCE

RFQ #09-003

Notice of Solicitation

Notice is hereby given that
the City of Port St. Joe lo-
cated at 305 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St,
Joe, Florida 32456 seeking
RFQs for professional ser-
vices to be provided to the
City as listed below, for the
period October 1, 2009 to
September 30, 2010. '

Request for qualifications
are on file at the City of
Port St. Joe office located
at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL
32456, and may also be
downloaded from the City
w e b s i t e
(cityofportstjoe.coin).

Evaluation of Responses
to the RFQ

The RFQ submittals will be
evaluated by City Staff and
Board Members of the City
of Port St. Joe based upon
information supplied by
each firm in response to
this RFQ. The City will
award a contract for insur-
ance services based on
services provided by the
insurance company and
anticipated rates. The
Board retains the right to
decide what services are in


its best interest.

Please submit Three (3)
copies to:
The City of Port St. Joe
PO. Box 278
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457

All Submissions must be
clearly marked (Liability
and Casualty Insurance
Professional Services) and
submitted to Charlotte
Pierce at City Hall by 3:00
R M. ET, on Thursday July
30, 2009.
July 16, 23, 2009
3051S
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE

NOTICE OF SOLIC-
ITATION
REQUEST FOR QUALIFI-
CATIONS HEALTH
INSURANCE

RFQ #09-004

Notice of Solicitation

Notice is hereby given that
the City of Port St. Joe lo-
cated at 305 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456 seeking
RFQs for professional ser-
vices to be provided to the
City as listed below, for the
period October 1, 2009 to
September 30, 2010.

Request for qualifications
are on file at the City of
Port St. Joe office located
at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL
32456, and may also be
downloaded from the City
w e b s i t e
(cityofportstjoe.coin).

Evaluation of Responses
to the RFQ

The RFQ submittals will be
evaluated by City Staff and
Board Members of the City
of Port St. Joe based upon
information supplied by
each firm in response to
this RFQ. The City will
award a contract for insur-
ance services based on
services provided by the
insurance company and
anticipated rates. The
Board retains the right to
decide what services are in
its best interest.

Please submit Three (3)
copies to:
The City of Port St. Joe
PR. Box 278
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457

All Submissions must be
clearly marked (Health
Insurance Professional
Services) and submitted to
Charlotte Pierce at City
Hall by 3:00 R M. ET, on
Thursday July 30,2009.
July 16, 23, 2009
3053S
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE

NOTICE OF SOLIC-
ITATION REQUEST FOR
QUALIFICATIONS SUP-
PLEMENTAL HEALTH
INSURANCE

RFQ #09-005

Notice of Solicitation

Notice is hereby given that
the City of Port St. Joe lo-
cated at 305 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456 seeking
RFQs for professional ser-
vices to be provided to the
City as listed below, for the
period October 1, 2009 to
September 30,2010.

Request for qualifications
are on file at the City of
Port St. Joe office located
at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL
32456, and may also be
downloaded from the City
w e b s I t e
(cityofportstjoe.coin).

Evaluation of Responses
to the RFQ


I 1100

The RFQ submittals will be
evaluated by City Staff and
Board Members of the City
of Port St. Joe based upon
information supplied by
each firm in response to
this RFQ. The City will
award a contract for insur-
ance services based on
services provided by the
insurance company and
anticipated rates. The
Board retains the right to
decide what services are in
its best interest, and also
reserves the right to select
more than one bank as a
depository of City Funds..

Please submit Three (3)
copies to:
The City of Port St. Joe
RO. Box 278
Port St. Joe. Florida 32457

All Submissions must be
clearly marked
(Supplemental Health
Insurance Professional
Services) and submitted to
Charlotte Pierce at City
Hall by 3:00 R M. ET, on
Thursday July 33, 2009.
July 16, 23, 2009
3068S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF HUGH
F. SMITH

File No.: 09-50-PR

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Hugh F Smith,
deceased, whose date of
death was January 1,
2009, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Gulf County,
Florida, probate Division,
the address of which is
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd. Rm. 148, Port St.
Joe, FL. 32456. The
names and and addresses
of the personal represent-
ative and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate must file their claims
or demands against
decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
,TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tion of this notice is July
14; 2009.

Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
Julie Ann Sombath y


| 1100
Attorney for Wachovia
Bank
Florida Bar No. 0009740
Isler, Sombathy,
Sombathy, RA.
PO. Box 430
434 Magnolia Avenue (Zip:
32401)
Panama City, Florida
32402-0430
Telephone: (850) 769-5532
Fax: (850) 785-5852
Personal Representative:
Wachovia Bank as succes-
sor in interest to AG Ed-
wards Trust Company
RO. Box 2554
Birmingham,. Alabama
35290
July 16, 23, 2009
3072S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

US BANK NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR CSAB
MORTGAGE-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2006-3
PLAINTIFF

VS

GERALD S. SHEARER
A/K/A GERALD C.
SHEARER: CHRISTINE T
SHEARER F/K/A CHRIS-
TINE T. MONEY; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO:
23-2008-CA-000220

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated. July
6th, 2009 entered in Civil
Case No.23-2008-CA-
000220 of the Circuit court
of the 14TH Judicial Circuit
in and for GULF County,
PORT ST. JOE, Florida, I
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at IN
THE FRONT LOBBY OF
THE COURTHOUSE at the
GULF County Courthouse
located at 1000 CECIL
COSTIN BLVD in PORT
ST JOE, Florida at 11:00
a.m, on the 13th day of Au-
gust, 2009 the following
described property as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 10, BAY BREEZE
SUBDIVISION, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 45, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 9th day of July,
2009.

Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By. Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-


d


rIlIo s


III~~I1III


L 81






Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


11041o0 4100
Baby Sitter's Housekeeping
lion should contact PT, weekend help, needed
COURT ADMINISTRA- Needed for family on for housekeeping. posi-
TION, at the GULF County a vacation, for the summer, tions, apply in person 4693
Courthouse l (850) MERCHANDISE Must be 18 or over. Cape Sand Blast Rd. Port ESTATE F REN
Courthouse at (850) MERCHANDISE 904-206-1200Cae- RIN
229-6112, 1-800-955-8771 904206-1200 St. Joe
(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, 3100 Aniliqees 6100 Business/
via Florida Relay Service. 311- Appliances Verification Commercial
via Florida Relay service. 3120 Arls& Cralts Job Notice 6110- Apartments
3130- Auctions Notice Analysts 120- Beach Rentals
THE LAW OFFICES OF 3140- Baby Items The City of Port St. Joe is Full Time Position PSJ, 6130- Condo/ownhouse
DAVID J. STERN, PA. 3150 Building Supplies accepting applications for FL, M-F 9-5:30 20k/ear 6140 Rouse R antals
Attorney for Plaintiff 3160 Business the following position: Knowledge of Microsoft 610 Roommate Wanted
900 South Pine Island Eipment Equipment Operator P Word/Googlerequired. Ex- 170-Mo H ot
Road 3170 Collectibles vious hean equipment oK- cellent Phone Skills are 6180 -'Out-of-Town Rentals
Suite 400 Co rs perience required and at n ssa e Tlme h al
Suite 400 3190 Electronics necessary.s
Plantation, FL 33324-3920 3200 Firewood minimum the candidate Emal Resume to 6200 Vacation Rentals
(954) 233-8000 3210 Free Pass it On must possess a Class B andreapbrooks
08-49122 (ASCF) 3220 Furniture CDL License. Position ah
July 16, 23, 2009 3230 GarageYard Sales shall be open until filled.ahoo.co
3240- Guis Salary DOQ. Please sub-
3250 Good Things to Eat Salary DOQ. Please sub-
3260 Health & Fitness mit an application to The 6110
3270 Jewelry/Clothing City of Port St. Joe, Attn: 4130
3097S 3280 Machinery/ Charlotte Pierce, RO. Box
PUBLIC NOTICE Equipment 278, Port St. Joe, FL POSTAL & GOV'TJOB
3290 Medical Equipment 32457. Applicants and a INFO FOR SALE? 2 br, 1.5 ba, across from
3300 Miscellaneous St. Joe beach, $700 mo +
The Regular Meeting of the 3310- Musical Instruments full job description can be
Port St. Joe Port Authority 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ found on our web site, Cau n dep. Pease cal
which was cancelled on Supplies cityofportstjoe.com. If you Caution 850-647-6320 leave msg.
July 13, 2009, has been re- 3330 Restaurant/Hotel have any questions,
scheduled for Monday 3340 Sporting Goods please contact Charlotte
July 20, 2009, at 8:30 a.m. 3350 -Tickets (Buy& Sell) Pierce, Human Resource You NEVER have to pay
at the offices of Rish, Gib- Officer, at (850) 229-8261. for information about
sbn, Scholz, & Groom, 116 The City of Port St. Joe is federal or postal jobs. If Clean 3 br, 2 ba in PSJ,
Sailors Cove Drive, Port St. an Equal you see a job $750 mo + dep. Call
Joe, Florida. Oppurtunity/AffirmativeAc- "guarantee", contact the 850-545-5814 or
Joe, Florda 3190 tion Employer and a Drug FTC. 850-442-3334.
If any person decides to Free Workplace. The Federal Trade
appeal any decision made Commission
with respect to any matter Dell Computer, $400; 3 ion is America's consumer
considered at the meeting, Panasonic land line pho- Logistics/ransportation protection agency. MINI STORAGE
he or she will need a rec- nes, $50 all; (850) I I
ord of the proceedings, 227-5438 I We Need Driver I www.ftc.gov/obscams Inl Prt St. JOe
and, for such purpose, he I Trainees Only 200



upon which the appeal is -| 3230 I -------' -Department
based.Clssied Advertisig
July 13, 2009 Hurry! We only have a few

Pool Maintenance Barefoot Cottages left.
Moving/Yard Sale 187 Technician
SBarbara Dr. Wardridge Sat Port. St. Joe In a be0ch access cOmmiunity with pools, playgrounds, tlub
18th 7:30-1:30 3 complete Pool maintenance techni-
2 bedroom sets, comforters,
curtains, bedroom skiets, match-s cian needed for a rapidly house, and hot tubs. Price includes water, sewer and garbage.
ing pictures, many can-growing local company.
es, table lamps, linens, Position includes a com- 3b3 5b........................ ............. 00
Ipetitive salary and health
SKodak slide projector, ac- petitive salary and hea- h
PE.r AN cordion, much more, benefits. Must have relia- 2br/2.5.............................................
ome and see. ble transportation, valid
2100- Pets drivers license, be self mo- 1.86 8.134
2110-Pets: Free to tivated and responsible. 866.628.1
Good Home Certified Pool Operator
2120 Pet Supplies 50ut2r1m350
2120 aPet supplies with prior experience pre- uthm Coasta M mt 0.2 .13
2130 Farm Animals/ B LONGTERM RENTALS :
Supplies Yard Sale at 307 Beaon feared. Only serious inquir- LONGTERMRENTA.
2140- Pets/Livestock Rd. Sat July 18th, 8-12 ies need apply. Please call
Wanted Huge Moving Sale in Gulf 850-229-2706 for more in-
AiHugre Moving Sale in Gulf formation. America's Mini Storage & Office CompleX
Iire_ e. e te _. .


---I------

I I

I Busy Bee Child I
I Development
Center
SIs Now Open. Mon-Fri
17:30 am to 7:30 pm. For I
More info Contact |
SLowanda Smiley @|
S850-227-1737
16-------


Private
Housekeeper,
Have openings on my
schedule, excellent ref.
850-639-9694
ESCORT/

Gorgeous
Yamy Nicole Call
850-691- 9991


"Business Center Now Leas
0 Location! Location! Near th
Property Manager New brick offices with 12' x 1
Port. St. Joe private Bath, Storage Closet, v
Property manager position
available with rapidly access bay to a 24' x 40' w;
growing local company. space. Gated, Secured 1 year
Position includes a comn-
petitive salary and health $550 per month, $550 deposit.
benefits. Prior experience
with grounds and pool Toye or Gina Roberts
maintenance as well as
property management is 850-2298014 or 850- 258
preferred. Must have relia-
ble transportation, valid
drivers license, be self mo-
tivated and responsible.
Only serious inquires need
apply. Please call C re
850-229-2706 for more in- ,r >
formation. Reel E Stelt<
.- .. ,' Janalyn Dowden
850-251-3432
108 S. E. Ave. A
Carrabelle, Florida 3
W, wwseacrestre.c
B 3 Bedroom, 2 bath,
House on 1/2 acre............l
... ,3 Bedroom, 2 bath,
-1 -ohileH l e Home .................
O 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Apartment.......................
Handyman 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
in a Truck Apartment ........................
Due to economic collapse 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
of new construction, I have Apartment, incl. 1ater......
been played off, with 12 yrs
of all types of electrical exp 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
and my dad with 30 years River Front,w/ Dock .......1
of carpentry experience.
We must resort to inde- 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
pendent contracting Gulf Apartment........................
County only. Call Richie at
850-814-7506 Call about our Beach fr<
Condo w/ pool vacation


HELIX


'P


To Place Your C


THE, JS TAR
xl l' .3 1J


in


Call Our Ne


Call:

Toll Free:

Fax:

Email:

Email:


ing"
ie Port!
2' office,
vith easy
warehouse
lease at


4881








2322.
om

1200.00

.650.00
AfOf) Of)


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 0 9B

6120 61314 i2 6140
S 2 b 2 8228 Hwy 98, St Joe
Mexico Bch 2 br, 2 ba, Eagle Landing Beach, 2 br, 2 ba house
MH. Within Walking dis- with gulf view, $795 mo +
stance to dedicated bch. Spacious wth gut yew $795 me +
tance to dedicated bch. dep, 850-647-9214
Recently refurbished. $500 Townhome 2 br, 1 ba 226 Sailfish d 850
mo. 1st & Last Pet's Neg. New development Fully Highland View $500 mo Eagle Landing
& Lse Neg. 850-227-2549 furnished, beautiful & spa- Call 817-789-3527 Townhome
or KN-O7 r-0n71 :-... h ________womeu


00.00 320 Marina Drive .REL .ATE FOR
Corner lot on entrance to Marina Cove, prime location w/high visibility; 7100 Homes
500.00 .14 acres. 7110 Brph Hom'
Plop, rb
407ReidAve 7:20 c .v.m.rec.I
.550.00 +/-4988sf; Multi tenant bldg 100% leased; Parking Incl; $549,000 ;'10 C .fnoo-'o. anobs
317 Monument Ave 7150 Lots and Acreage
S+/-4431sf; New construction located directly on Hwy 98; Parking Included; 7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
200.00 $649,000 Also available for lease. Please inquire for terms. 7180-envestment
Property
.650.00 Marketed Exclusively by: -70- IO"'s'Tate
7200 Timeshare
ont and 850-229-6373 7 _,
rentals
7150
3.5 acres Howard Creek.
No clearing required.
Great quiet homesite
Sand/or plenty of room for
Livestock or horses. Great
fishing Call 827-4290 or
767-3191


P IS ONLY A


HONE CALL
8100- Antique & Collectibles
S8110-Cars
8120 Sports Utilty Vehicles
8130- Trucks
AA814Y0-Vans
8150 Conlmerclal
8180-Motorcycles
SAassifccessoed ad ries
8210-Boats
assified ad 8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 Sallboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8310- Alrcraft/Avlatlon
8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
_e 8330- Campers & Trailers
DAP AtCH 8340 Motorhomes
& CARRABELL M ^ES
8160
Yamaha Majesty, 2006
400 cc, Excellent Con-
dition 11,200 miles, Great
gas saver, asking $4,300
w Numbers Now! Call648-2121


850-747-5020 COMPLETE PACKAGES
850-747-5020 FROM,

800-345-8688 $4,995
All Welded, All Aluminum
850-747-5044 BOHOW

thestar@pcnh.com FRI. &SAT.

thetim s@ pcnh com www.xtremeindustriescom


o mu~-out-uf IOUs, UI, 2
townhome located in New development- beauti-
Jones Homestead, Eagle ful & spacious 3br, 2ba
townhome located in
Landing subdivision. Close Jones Hometead ninth
to shopping, downtown 3 br, 1 ba 1307 Long Ave., Eagle Landing Subdivi-
6130 and St. Joseph's Bay. PSJ, HW firs, 2 car gar, Ig sion. Close to shopping,
2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm, monthly rental $900w/ storage shed, Lg fcnd yrd, downtown and St.
Ca2 br, 2 rabe, large1200sf Twnhm, $900 sec/damage deposit. $650 mo,+ $650 sec. dep Joseph's Bay. Monthly
Carrabelle, large deck Short Term rental option 770-337-0432 rental $875 with $875
$650 mo. $650 dep. avail. Call Gulf Coast Prop-
Available 08/01/09 Call for erty Services at security/damage deposit.
an appt. 850-562-4996. (850)229-2706 for more in- Call Gulf Coast Property
formation & a tour of the Services at (850) 229-2706
townhom&. for more information and a
Eagle-- Ladn ow n omeeh B
Eagle Landing 3 br, 2 ba,Apalach.tour of theownhome.
SpaciouS WD, DW CH&A, fenc'd,
Townhome Mfans thruout covered
porch, $800 mo. + $500
New development Fully 40 sc. Call Brenda (850) Eagle Landing
furnished, beautiful & spa- Eagle Landing
cious, 3 br, 2 ba 2 or 3 br, 2 ba, Com- 2275380 Townhome
townhome located in pletely renovated, HistoricNew O e
Jones Homestead, Eagle Early School house, North New development- beaut 2ba
Landing subdivision. Close of Overstreet & Gulf '30 near ful & spacious 3br, 2ba
to shopping, downtown County. Sits on 30 acres, Indian Pass Jones Homestead, in the
and St. Joseph's Bay. includes hardwood floors,
Monthly rental $900 w/ SS appliances, granite between Apalachlcola Eagle Landing Subdivi-
$900 sec/damage deposit. counters separate outdoor and Port St. Joe sion. Close to shopping,
Short Term rental option cook house, wrap around 1 bedroom, 1 bath, en- downtown and St.
avail. Call Gulf Coast Prop- porch and much more. Br- closed patio, new reno- Joseph's Bay. Monthly
erty Services at ing your horses and enjoy ovation, $580 urn with rental $875 with $875
(850)229-2706 for more in- the beautiful pasture land. w&d, $515 unfurn, back- security/damage deposit.
formation & a tour of the $1,400 mo Call Gene @ ground/credit check. Call Gulf Coast Property
townhome. 850-830-9342 850-899-1093 for appt Services at (850) 229-2706
for more information and a
tour of the townhome.

PINE RIDGE
ARTM NTS Gulfaire
A PN Executive 3 br, 2 ba, W&D,
N 1 garage, deck, fenced yd,
/V 1 25 Venus Di rive pool, tennis court, private
SVen Driebeach, pets okay, $925
(off Garrison Ave) mo. 850-639-2690 or
/ 832-9702
/ Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 227-7451
TTY Acs 711, Hunter Circle
Home For Rent
S1,2 & 3 bedrooms Home For Rent
S, 2 & 3 bedr m Furnished 2 bedroom, 1
Family apartment communitybath house brand new ap-
pliances, large front/back
income e guidelines apply yards, located in quiet
Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer schoolsand downtown
In accordance with Federal law, this institution is prohibited from discriminating Pot St. Joe. $700 a month
on the basis or race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. Call Gulf Coast Property
(Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Services at (850) 229-2706
SMcClellan St. 2 br, 1 ba,
fenced yard, C/H/A total
Port St. Joe Commercial electric, good neighbors
$600 mo + $500 dep
For Lease 1-770-851-4551
Port St. Joe Still Avail.
Retail I Office Space Please Call again 3 br 1
be, hrd wood firs, Irg stor-
317 Williams Avenue age shed w/ W/D hkups,
+/-1800sf tenant improvements negotiable; $1350/mo gross $600 mo 850-227-7234
325 ReidAvenue Townhomes for rent,
+/-4500sf shell space; corner location; 2500/mo gross Jones Homestead- Pon-
309 Reid Avenue derosa Pines. First month
+/-6000st renovated shell space; occupant read ; $4500/mo mod. gross rent free with deposit and
407 Reid Avenue, Su 12 month lease. 2 br and 3
+/-1824s0 Avenue, SutE br units available. Call
+/-1824sf, 850-2279732
310 Reid Avenue
+/-1116sf Suite C; finished office space; lobby area with two
office suites and filing/storage room; $1000/mo NNN 617o
230 Reid Avenue
+/-756sf office/retail; $12 psf mod. gross
322 Long Avenue
+/-1000sf move-in ready; S900/mo gross Lot 14 at Bryant's Landing.
411ReidAvenue 2 br. 2 ba. C/HA, furn'd,
+/-2668sf office space; $9.45 psf mod. gross W/D hkup, Carport
w/storage. $454.75 mo IncI
Warehouse / Flex Space Water/Sewer and sales
110 Trade Circle West tax No pets. Close to boat
750sf-22,500sf PSJ Commerce Park, flex space, $5.25psf NNN (incl.. 1/2 block to Loa riverCa
Lake & Chipola river. Call
water/sewer) 850-227-3777
160 Cessna Drive -
+/-5,000sf office/flex space; Adjacent to Costin Airport; $7 psf plus utilities ,
and applicable sales tax; Inquire for possible incentives/concessions.
772 Hwy 98, Suite A
+/-900sf office flex space, Includes 450sf overhead storage. $500/mo
mod. gross
For Sale


I I


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CALORNWI


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Thursday, July 16, 2009


BUSINESS


www.starfl. com


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Several years ago, Leon Wiesener stumbled upon an
Appalachian children's toy that captivated his attention.
The small box held a dirty little secret.
As Wiesener slid the lid forward, a snake rose, jack-in-
the-box style, and.pecked him on the finger.
Call it love at first bite.
The toy, called a "nasty box," amused and inspired Wi-
esener. He set out to recreate the toy, on a larger scale, in
his Carrabelle art studio.
Wiesener constructed ornate wooden boxes out of
cherry wood from his native Tennessee and hand carved
a series of "nasty" figures.
These were not just simple snakes, but truly fearsome
creatures named Nasty Duck, Nasty Scotty and Nasty
Hippo-Snail.
After applying coats of vivid paint and glaze, Wiesener
accessorized the creatures using found objects.
Wife Frances' dangling pearl earring became Scotty's
distinctive tongue ring, and Nasty Duck received fluffy
white locks courtesy of Wiesener's standard poodle.
Like the Appalachian toys, Wiesener's nasty boxes
bite. An interior rope system elevates the creatures as
the lids slide forward.
The boxes sell for about $400 at Wiesener's new art
gallery, Perpenders, at 409 Tallahassee St. in Carrabelle.
The gallery, which had its grand opening July 3,
also features works by Chagall, Matisse, Picasso and
other established artists of the past century, along
with paintings, photography ahd jewelry by area art-
ists Ed Babcock, Mary Reynolds, Joseph Kotzman and
Wiesener.
For more information, contact 850-697-9620 or 850-653-
7197.


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
Nasty Duck's fluffy white locks came courtesy of artist Leon Wiesener's standard poodle.


HIGHLAND
VIEW


O ARIZONA
CHEMICAL


TOjyW'7l.


,, i ,.. fBA I I:Aa
;' ;; I' t ClKl ,t tA~i
COMMERCE BLVD
Port St Joe Commerce Park


0


PORT
ST JOE


Pulling the wooden handle of the nasty box summons
forward the Hippo-Snail.


Nasty Scotty sports a tongue ring, whiskers made
from an old broom and Mercedes leather upholstery
ears.


B
Section


Page 10




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