Group Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.).
Title: The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03691
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Star
Publisher: Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Publication Date: July 2, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028419
Volume ID: VID03691
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
alephbibnum - 000358020
lccn - sn 95047323

Full Text














YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937

YEAR 71, NUMBER 37


School trains future
speed riders, B1


Thursday, JULY 2,2009 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com 50(



Season could


be bountiful

Scallop harvest has begun


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The numbers are way
up, and St. Joseph Bay will
provide an alluring entice-
ment for scallop hunters
this season.
The scallop harvest
season began Wednesday
and will continue through
Sept. 10, and St. Joseph Bay
is likely to provide some
mighty flush acreage for
securing some of the tasty
mollusks.
According to num-
bers gathered by survey
crews from the Florida
Marine Research In-
stitute, which just
completed its survey


June 20, the scallop count
in St. Joseph Bay is nearly
10 times what it was last
year, when scallopers had a
rather rough season.
"We put (surveying) off
as late as possible just so
we can get a more accurate
count," said Steve Geiger
of the Institute. "The num-
bers are way up from last
year, and that is good."
See SCALLOPS A3


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
Gulf Transportation director Kathy Balentine accepts
a $500 donation on behalf of the Gulf County
Association of Retarded Citizens from Capital City
Bank president Ray Thompson.


Foundation awards


grants to charities


Twice each year, the Capi-
Stal City Bank Group (CCBG)
Foundation donates funds to
charitable organizations in
the communities it serves.
Last Wednesday, the
CCBG Foundation award-
ed $500 grants to the Gulf
County ARC and St. Joseph
Bay Humane Society, both
in Port St. Joe. The grants
provided by the CCBG
Foundation help these orga-
nizations enhance the lives


of many citizens in the local
community.
"We believe it is impor-
tant to support organiza-
tions that provide essential
services to the residents
of Port St. Joe and the sur-
rounding area," said Ray
Thompson, Gulf County
president.
"Community involve-
ment has always been a

See GRANTS A2


Improvement work on U.S. 98 begins this week

Turn lanes to be added on First and Marina' m V _,- 2 I SR (US- :,,.:litS


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
By the time these words are read,
work should be under way to improve the
intersection of U.S. 98, First Street and
Marina Drive in Port St. Joe.
Work was scheduled to begin July 1 on
adding turn lanes on First Street and Ma-
rina Drive, providing new updated traffic
signals, sidewalks ahd drainage in the
heavily congested area.
"The (Florida Department of Trans-
portation) has approved the construc-
tion. It has all been permitted," said Matt
Fleck, executive director of the Port St.
Joe Redevelopment Agency, which is


partnering with the city, county and Pre-
ble Rish Inc. on the project.
"It is really a negative we are doing
this at the wrong time," Fleck said, al-
luding to the Fourth of July weekend and
summer tourist season. "The upside is
the deadline to be paid."
The project must move ahead now,
and be completed and contractor GAC
Contractors paid in full by the end of Au-
gust because of the funding sources for
the project.
Some $230,000 in road bond money,
nearly all of it coming from the city, with
the county likely to make up any shortfall,
See 98 A2


FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS -INTERACTIVE


Subscribe to The Star
227-1278
For your hometown paper
delivered to your home!


Opinion ................................ ..... A4
Obituaries.................. ............. B2
Church News............................... B4-5


School News ................................ B6
Law Enlborcemen ....................... B7
Legals........................ ......... B8


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I tid l J.,l lii- i TFrid,a. 11 in. ET
Di,)play ,I Jdi:ldhn is IdavI 11.a.m. E r 227-1278
Cl.a-islld l irldinie II M.ind.iv5 p.m. IT 747-5020
'>.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


NSMIS-,






A2 I The Star


Local


* GRANTS.from page Al


Thursday, July 2, 2009


and register to win a $30 Herald

Certificate. Spend your certificate only at

participating businesses on July 30th!


hallmark of Capital City
Bank, and by donating valu-
able funds for special proj-
ects and needs, the CCBG
Foundation can help build
stronger communities."
The CCBG Foundation
is a nonprofit organization
created in 1983 by Capital
City Bank Group that pro-
vides grants to nonprofit
charitable organizations
and institutions exempt un-
der Section 501(c) (3) of the
Internal Revenue Code.
The mission of the
CCBG Foundation is to in-
vest in initiatives that ben-
efit local communities.
A majority of the funds
are distributed to specific
areas of focus, including:
arts/culture, children/youth
services, economic/com-
munity development, edu-
cation, health/sciences and
human services. Grant


98 from page Al

will be used in the project,
and those funds must be
expended by the end of Au-
gust, Fleck said.
Delaying the project
even a week, until after the
Fourth, would have jeopar-'
dized the project's comple-
tion by August, he said.
"It is simply road bond
money," Fleck said con-
cerning the awkward tim-
ing of the project. "It has to
be spent by August."
The project will create
a new left turn lane with
traffic signal arrows on
Marina Drive to alleviate
the congestion that can oc-
cur during peak hours of
the day.
"Just the backup on Ma-
rina Drive of folks (turning
left and) going north, no-
body can get around them,
and it gets congested; that
warrants the turn lane,"
Fleck said.
Meanwhile, across U.S.
98 on First Street, a left turn
lane will be installed with
arrow signals which will,
with the expansion of the
roadway, eliminate the old
storm drain along the right
side of the road, which has
long been an impediment
to traffic.
"We are making out the


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
Capital City Bank president Ray Thompson presents
a $500 check to Melody Townsend and Sharon
Griffith of the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society.


applications are reviewed
twice a year. Applications
are due by April 1 and
Oct. 1.
If you would like to learn
more about the Capital City


"When the project
is completed,
everybody will.
have a turn
lane at that
intersection."
Matt Fleck
Port St. Joe
Redevelopment Agency

right-of-way" on both sides
of the highway, Fleck said
in noting that no land will
be taken from either Auto
Zone or Subway, the two
businesses most affected
at the intersection.
"And when the project is
completed, everybody will
have a turn lane at that in-
tersection," he said.
GAC has committed to
reducing the impacts on
traffic, but there will be
lane closures, flag men and
barricades around the in-
tersection, Fleck said.
The extent of any actual
closure of roads will come
when crews must install
a pipe underneath and
across the width of Marina
Drive. That will necessi-


Bank Group Foundation,
please stop by the Capi-
tal City Bank office at-504
Monument Ave. and ask
one of our kilowledgeable
bankers for an application.


tate a road closure on Ma-
rina Drive of five to seven
days.
"But the reality is, there
will be congestion during
the project," Fleck said.
The intersection work
is just the initial step in
a $1.1 million project to
improve the aesthetics of
U.S. 98 between First and
Fifth Streets, a mission the
PSJRA has long pursued.
After the intersection
work is completed, new
sidewalks will be installed
along that section of U.S.
98, along with new curbing,
lighting and landscaping.
The PSJRA received
some $340,000 in federal
stimulus funds and is put-
ting in another $300,000 in
the tax increment funds
that support the agency.
The city is adding the
$230,000 in road bond dol-
lars, the county will assist
with some additional fund-
ing, and the city/PSJRA
has received two grants
totaling $275,000 from the
FDOT to assist with the
project to improve U.S. 98
through the heart of Port
St. Joe.
Next year, the hope is
that the FDOT will add new
striping to the roadway.


M,


Apply for incentive payments or cost-


For guidelines and application materials, contact your
local Florida Division of Forestry office or visit:



www.fl-dof.com
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S'A.6





Thursday, July 2, 2009


Local


The Star | A3


SCALLOPS from page Al


Surveys effectively es-
tablish 20 transect stations,
running transect lines 300
meters and counting the
scallops on either side of
the transect line, or 600
square meters per transect
and 12,000 square meters
of the bay.
Last year; the average
number of scallops count-
ed per station in St. Joseph
Bay was 11.3, considerably
down and similar to years
such as 2004, when the bay
was almost a scallop waste-
land.
"St. Joseph Bay had a
rough year," Geiger said in
a mild understatement.
This year the average
count per transect station
was 97.2, not quite 10 times
last year's counts.
And since the Institute
began surveying the bay
in 1994, the average count
over the past 15 years has


been 48 scallops per tran-
sect station.
In 1995, the average
count was 96, but that sort
of year, mirroring what is
shaping up for harvesters
in 2009, has been more the
exception than the rule,
particularly this decade.
Additionally, large scal-
lops were already evident
in portions of the bay.
"This year there were
some patches where they
were getting normal size
scallops, 2 inches or so,
and in other patches they
found larger scallops, as
large as three inches,"
Geiger said.
In layman's terms, a
scallop smaller than 2 in-
ches provides so little
meat, it is hardly worth the
taking. To accrue the de-
sired amount ofmeat, a scal-
lop approaching 3 inches
is approaching scallop-


eating nirvana.
Geiger said identifying
the underlying reasons
for the roller-coaster in
St. Joseph Bay is difficult,
largely because of the dif-
ferences between scallops
in Florida and those in, say,
the Northeast.
In the Northeast, scal-
lops have growth rings,
so researchers can iden-
tify the age and growth of
a scallop, much like a tree.
Scallops also tend to live
two or three years.
In Florida, however,
scallops tend to live no
more than one year, and
"we normally don't see a
growth ring; we'll see al-
gae" as an indicator of age,
Geiger said.
Scallops store most
their energy in muscle tis-
sue, and in the process of
spawning and growing,
they typically expend so'


much energy that muscles
atrophy to the point of
nearly disappearing, and
there is a high mortality
rate, Geiger said.
The theory on the re-
bound in St. Joseph Bay,
which was also found in St.
Andrews Bay in Bay Coun-
ty St. Andrews has been
closed to harvesting for 15
years could be found to
the east, Geiger said.
"We are trying to better
understand the trends,"
Geiger said. "We are try-
ing to establish a long-term
trend. What we see in St.
Joseph Bay this year is
more akin to what you see
in the Northeast."


In areas of the Big
Bend, such as St. Marks,
the scallop counts are well
down, and Geiger said that
provides a possible clue to
the bounty in St. Joseph
Bay.
"The Big Bend had an
upswelling of water this
year" where cold water
is pushed to the surface
- "and I think that might
have pushed the larvae to
the west and St. Andrews
and St. Joseph bays," Gei-
ger said.
"We are just guessing,
but that is what we think
we are looking at, coastal
currents carrying the lar-
vae to the west. The other


possibility is the scallops
that were still there (in St.
Joseph Bay) last year were
just very strong and very
busy over the winter, and
that does not seem likely."
Geiger added some ad-
vice for scallop hunters.
"They are patchy right
now, so my advice if you
don't find some right away,
then move a ways away
and try again," Geiger said,
adding the annual mantra
that the later in the season
scallop hunters can hold
off, the better the chances
are of finding larger scal-
lops and nurturing the con-
tinued bounty of scallops in
the bay.


Open scalloping areas on
Florida's Gulf Coast extend from
the west bank of the Mexico Beach
Canal in Bay County to the Pasco-
Hernando county line near Aripeka.
You can take bay scallops only
within the allowable harvest areas. It
is illegal to possess bay scallops while
you're in or on state waters outside
the open harvest areas, or to land bay
scallops outside the open areas.
There is a daily limit of 2 gallons
of whole bay scallops in the shell or
1 pint of bay scallop meat per person
during the open season. In addition,
no more than 10 gallons of whole bay
scallops in the shell or '/2 gallon of
bay scallop meat may be possessed
aboard any vessel at any time.
You are allowed to harvest bay
scallops only by hand or with a
landing or dip net, and bay scallops
may not be harvested for commercial
purposes.
Unless otherwise exempt, you
will need a regular Florida saltwater
fishing license when using a boat to
harvest scallops. If wading from shore,


Ilfo-I


starting Aug. 1, you will '
need a regular Florida saltwater
fishing license or the new shore-based
license.
Divers and snorkelers are required
to display a "divers-down" flag (red
with a white diagonal stripe) while in
the water. Boaters must stay at least
100 feet away from a divers-down
flag in a river, inlet or channel. In
open waters, boaters must stay 300
feet away from a divers-down flag.
For more information on divers-down
flag requirements, visit MyFWC.
com/RULESANDREGS/RulesBoat.
htm#flag.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission encourages
you to adhere to scallop fishing
regulations and collect only the
amount of bay scallops you are willing
to clean.
More information on bay scallops
is available online at MyFWC.
com/RULESANDREGS/Saltwater
Regulationsbayscallops.htm and
http://research.myfwc.com/features/
category_sub.asp?id=2598.


Help seniors in your community:


Answer Medicare Questions

and Resolve Problems


Make Informed Choices

About Their Health Insurance


Save Money on Their

Prescription Medications


Inform Them of Programs

They May be Eligible


1-800-96-ELDER
(1-800-963-5337)


SCALLOP REGULATIONS


~


r


. IM


7;


I









Opinion


A4 'lhe Star


Keyboard KLATTERINGS




Dear ARC


In the general
spectrum of kiss-off
letters, Gulf County
ARC & Transportation
received a doozy last
week.
In response to a letter
from the ARC board
requesting a face-to-face
with the Port St. Joe
Commerce Center
Association, Inc. ,
board and for a
discussion about
an equitable
resolution to
the problem of
future services
and assessments, TIM
the association Star no
dashed back
a letter that
must have sounded
recognizable to many
a spurned paramour
during, say, war time.
"Dear John, you're a
great guy and performing
a great service, but..."
According to the
letter from a board
member representing
the commerce center
association, the board
recently met and
discussed the inquiries
from ARC & Gulf
Transportation regarding
ongoing issues on dues,
liens, etc.
That was mighty
magnanimous of the
board, but the obligation
of the board of this non-
profit organization, as
the letter stated, is to
all the members of the
association.
And while the letter's
second paragraph was
an expression of the
association's appreciation
for all the Gulf County
ARC & Transportation
public service efforts in
the community on behalf
of so many disadvantaged
people, the association
was not budging.
Sort of like describing
a blind date as having
a great personality, the
letter details that the
board is not able to make
exceptions in the case
of assessments and
dues, save for following
"the strict guidelines"
provided in the covenants
on the association.
Specifically cited
is Article 11.7 which
details the process for
termination or amending
the covenants.
The letter goes into
detail about shared
benefits and burdens
within the association,
the association operating
without profit for the sole
and exclusive benefit
of the members and
to promote matters of
common interest and
concern of the owners of


C


the property.
Then, in a nice piece
of parsing language,
the letter effectively
defuses a central claim
of ARC, that it does not
receive services from
the association -because
of its own work crews
comprised of folks with
challenges most
of us will never
experience the
letter maps out
that the claim is
for all intents and
purposes a moot
point.
S The association
s edr serves the whole,
geography and
services received
have little or no impact
with regard to a single
property owner, just the
whole.
Nice bit of smoke and
mirrors on that one.
And in respect to a
face-to-face meeting
between the respective
boards involved, well, the
ARC board was invited to
participate in upcoming
meetings as part of
the process of crafting
the 2010 budget for the
association.
In other words,
fuggadaboutit.
This invitation followed
a discourse on how the
association had worked to
reduce the budget for all
members in 2009 and how
that was accomplished
without taking into
account bad debt and
delinquent payments,
long-term contingencies
and an anticipated
increase in utility fees.
Sounds like a county
budget PowerPoint
presentation.
But the key here is
what is missing from the
letter.
Article 11.7 does
indeed spell out that
owners holding two-thirds
or more of the total votes
within the association
may amend or terminate
any of the covenants.
What was left out of
the letter is that as long
as the developer, The St.
Joe Company, owns land
within the commerce
center any amendment
or termination can only
be accomplished with
written permission from
St. Joe.
"Further, until such
time as the Developer
(St. Joe) shall not
own lands subject to
this Declaration, the
Developer shall have
the unilateral right to
amend this Declaration
without the consent or

See KLATTERINGS AS


THE STAR

USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456

VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Star
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308'
Phone 850-227-1278


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Our VIEW





Remembering the how?


The year 1776 dawned in a most
inglorious fashion.
King George III of England had,
just before the calendar turned over
a new year, declared the American
colonies in rebellion, a rebellion he
insisted would be vanquished by what
was then the mightiest military on the
planet.
The ensuing months would be
filled with intrigue, attacks and
counterattacks as the colonies
formed the second Continental
Congress the first, convened in
1775 established a united 13 colonies
and an army to consider how best
to answer draconian measures from
the King, such as the Stamp Act
which effectively taxed every sheet of
written word in the colonies.
The massacres at Lexington and
Concord in April 1775 lit a fuse to a
fire of freedom that still burns more
than 220 years later.
The Continental Congress the
following year charged a five-man
committee charged with drafting a
declaration telling the king, in effect,
to jump in a lake.
Of course, the language that
Thomas Jefferson, the primary
author of the document though the
members of that nascent Congress
made some 50 revisions, mostly minor
with the exception of the deletion of
a paragraph assailing the King for
the pox of slavery, was much more
soaring and dignified than "jump in
the lake" but the effect was the same.
The colonies had had enough, they
insisted on their independence from
their masters across the ocean, from
where many of those colonists fled to
the promise of freedom and a fresh
start on a different continent.
The push for independence and
it was a divided nation back then
with many so-called Tories wanting
nothing more than to remain under
the fold of the King risked the lives
of the founding brothers and their
like-minded countrymen in front of
a firing squad or in the hangman's


noose through their "treasonous"
actions.
And they really didn't have a
country, just an idea, a concept
conceived by ordinary men who
undertook extraordinary efforts to
forge a slice of freedom and a republic
unlike any seen before in history.
That country, in fact, looked like a
long shot in the year we celebrate this
weekend.
The representatives of thd
Continental Congress had signed the
Declaration of Independence in the
July heat, though not technically all
signed on July 4, but it was nothing
more than paper; ink and language
that would ring for two centuries and
more.
On'the farms and fields of the
colonies, the British were routing a
rag-tag band of colonial militiamen,
typically lightly-armed men from
every day walks of life, blacksmiths,
carpenters, farmers and tavern
keepers, many who had never taken
up arms before.
While George Washington had
earned something of a name during
the French and Indian War; and by
that time created something of a
force of regular army, his top
lieutenants were two men who had
little to no experience with battle or
strategy.
Washington actually spent most
of 1776 on the run, retreating from
Boston, New York and northern New
Jersey while facing a lack of supplies,
an army that was inexperienced and
lacked proper equipment, and one
that seemed to dwindle daily due to
desertions and the intent of many in
this faux "army" to serve their six
month initial enlistment and go home.
But stunning victories at Trenton
and Princeton late in the year; won
when Washington, against all odds,
divided his available troops and
surprised the British. routing them
in the field and established that this
rebellion would not be easily put to a
close by the King, his army and navy.


There would be hardships ahead
and five more years of bloodshed
before the British surrendered.
Two years later would come from
the Continental Congress a Bill of
Rights and a Constitution.
The sacrifices of those seven
years are reminders of the foundation
laid for this country that remains a
beacon of freedom and democracy
for much of the world, a country that
celebrates, but too often forgets, the
sacrifices that mere ordinary mortals
have made in the spirit of those
founding brothers in arms and pen.
The sacrifices of men such as Bill
Bricker, a survivor of the horrific
attack on Pearl Harbor that beckoned
the country into World War II.
Bricker, who died after a lengthy
illness last week, lived with the
images of what he saw that December
day in 1941 while clinging to the ideals
of what this country was made of,
often writing about his feelings about
country, freedom and democracy on
these pages under the pseudonym of
Reynard the Saltwater Fox.
The sacrifices of a man like
Clifford Sims, embraced in death by
a hometown that barely recognized
him in life, but who lived and died for
his band of brothers on the fields of
combat in another far-flung dot on the
map.
Sacrifices like those being made
today by men and women of all ages
and demographics, who continue to
battle an enemy in the Middle East
even though far too many of us have
forgotten there even is a war in Iraq
or Afghanistan, so caught up are we
in our everyday lives and the impacts
of a sinking economy.
So, enjoy a barbecue, a visit from
-the pirates, a day at the beach and
fireworks as the sun sets on July 4,
2009.
But do so while remembering
all those who made possible this
celebration of the birthday of the
finest country, even with all our foibles
and tribulations, on the globe.


What so proudly we hailed...


The corn on the cob
would stick to my teeth. The
barbeque was accompanied
with mild, hot, sweet and/
or incendiary sauce. The
potato salad was more than
adequate if they went lightly
on the mustard and the egg
halves. The hot dogs were
always a mite over done.
And the ketchup bottles
were so sticky after the first
5 people went through that
I wouldn't pick one up for
nothing. The drinks were
iced down in number 3
washtubs. And the dessert
table took up a whole
corner of the town square.
It was the same every
year. And it was ok if you
didn't mind eating off a
paper plates and weak
plastic forks. And the ants
stayed out of your food. I
was a little confused as to
exactly how corn on the
cob equated to our nation's
birthday But heck, back
then a lot of things that
grown-ups led us into didn't
make much sense to me.
The speeches were
over long. And they were
all the same. We were,
or should be, grateful for
living in this great land. I
didn't listen past the first
minute. Bobby Brewer had
that pea shooter thing he'd
made and he was unloading
some BBs upside my head.
Between speakers, I'd
mosey back to take a look
at his firearm and craned
my neck to see if I could get
a clear shot at LaRenda.
Bradfield.
Mrs. Mitchum, who
once dated Methuselah,
would always find me
as the festivities wound
down. "Kesley, wasn't this'
a wonderful celebration?
We are such a fortunate
nation." She had the kindest
face and for some unlmown
reason she took a shine
to me. Of course, in our
little town, everyone loved
everyone on the Fourth of
July.


The next year it was
more of the same. Dad
would swing by the
ice house out past the
American Legion and
buy several ice cold
watermelons. I wanted to
tell him every year that
me and Leon and David
Mark could steal'em
bigger and better from Mr.
Archie Moore's patch, but
prudence (and self survival)


clamped my mouth
shut. Dad was
almighty straight
up about what was
yours...and what
wasn't.
Dad passed
out watermelons
as we headed up
to the square for
more barbeque,
baked beans, cole
slaw and corn on
the cob. Bobby


superfluous part of this
commemoration. Shouldn't
anyone have to "talk" you
into loving this country. We
all understood Bunker Hill
and Valley Forge.
The Alamo wasn't even
part of America when it fell..
but the spirit was. We were
honored to still have several
World War I veterans at our
celebration. And Chandler
King was at Pearl Harbor


"- (

..


S- ^-a
KESLEY
COLBERT
Hunker down


would have a pocket full of
cherry bombs. We'd find
Ricky Hale and Buddy
Wiggleton and go looking
for empty garbage cans.
Listen, one of them cherry
bombs would lift the lid
right up in the air.'Course,
we hardly waited around
for the lid to come back
down. Fearing the noise
might arouse a suspicious
bystander we'd be back in
the middle of the throng,
wearing our innocent
look, and munching on a
hot dog before the smoke
dissipated. If any problems
arose, we'd blame it on
Leon, Jackie Hall or Bobby
C. Melton. That's what the
older boys were for.
The day was always the
same. We played, we ate,
we heard speeches, we
sweated, the band played
the National Anthem, we
honored America, we went
home. You'd say it was
pretty simple. You'd miss by
more than a mile.
About the umpteenth
year it dawned on me,
the long, drawn out
speeches were the most


on a pretty rough
Sunday morning
just a decade of
December ago.
Most all of the
able bodied men
in town had seen
action in World War
II; including the
man who thought
store bought
watermelons were
just as good as
stolen ones.


We might have been
young. But we were not
idiots. We were enjoying the
barbeque and the corn on
the cob for a reason. The
whole town had closed up
shop not to take a holiday
but to honor its heritage. We
didn't necessarily equate
throwing cherry bombs into
trash cans as unadulterated
acts of freedom..but we full
well knew that you couldn't
have this much fun in just
any old country.
We observed the respect
and esteem Mr. Ed Wiley
and Mr. Jim Alexander and
Mr. Jack Martin and Mr.
Robert Hall and every other
man in town showed for
our flag, the guest speakers
and the mere mention of
George Washington, Ben
Franklin or Dwight D.
Eisenhower. It wasn't lost
on me that from the first
crack of the drum on the
Star Spangled Banner my
Father's hat was over his
heart and he didn't move,
he didn't flinch, his eyes
didn't waver from that big
American flag waving in
front of The McKenzie


Banner until the last note
drifted over the Tri-County
Ford dealership. I hope and
pray we're still making men
like I once had the honor
and privilege of sharing
corn on the cob with.
Chick King scheduled an
American Legion baseball
game in Hopkinsville,
Kentucky on July 4. I didn't
think much about it until
the bottom of the second
inning. I was squatted down
behind home plate..and I
was missing the barbeque
and the speeches and the
flag waving. I wondered
what Bobby and Ricky
were up to. Who was going
to pick on Ruth Ann Wiley
and Jane Hill? For the first
time in my memory Mrs.
Mitchum was not going to
seek me out and give me
that great smile.
I didn't realize it at the
time but the interruption
was permanent. Other
ball games, jobs...life got
in the way. I was never to
celebrate another Fourth
of July "on the square"
in the little town where I
grew up. And I believe that
tradition slowly faded as
the increasing speed of life
caught up with small towns
all across our nation.
I am saddened for the
generations that came
too late. They will never
know the importance of
red checked table cloths
and bobbing for apples on
a hot July afternoon. They
would dismiss as silly a
rally around the flag. They
will never understand an
ancient army officer in a
well worn uniform droning
on and on about the price
of freedom. They can never
grasp a silent tear on an
old truck driver's face as he
stands at rapt attention as
the high school band plays
his favorite song.
There are people today
that think corn on the cob is
just corn on the cob...
God Bless America,
Kes






Thursday, July 2, 2009


Opinion


The Star I A5


Troubled waters: Low Apalachicola River flow may hurt Gulf fisheries


TALLAHASSEE
reductions in tlhe
flow of the Apalachicola
livir have far-reaching
tIl I-, that could prove
detrimental to grouper and
other reef fish populations
in the northeastern Gulf of
Mexico, according to a new
Florida State University
study that may provide
new ammunition for states
engaged in a nearly two-
decade water war
The Florida State
researchers found that
in years with low river
flow, the concentration
of phytoplankton the
microscopic plant-like
organisms that feed
into the food chain
- decreased over a large
area of the continental
shelf. This is significant
because scientists have
hypothesized that year-
to-year changes in the
phytoplankton can alter
the availability of food for
the very young fish larvae,
according to research


scientist Steven Morcy
of the Center for Ocean-
Atmospheric Prediction
Studies (COAPS) at Florida
State.
Though much of the
scientific
research examining the
consequences of low-flow
conditions, primarily
caused by extended
drought in recent years,
has focused on the
Apalachicola River and
the estuary system of
Apalachicola Bay, the
Florida State researchers
instead examined the
effect of unusually low
and high flows over the
wide western Florida
continental shelf. A number
of important reef fish, such
as grouper, spawn on the
outer shelf edge and use
the inner shelf areas as
nursery habitat.
"This work shows that
variations in the river flow
can have implications on
marine ecosystems over a
much broader geographic


region, namely much of the
continental shelf extending
out several hundred miles,"
Morey said. "This now
suggests that there might
be a link between the river
flow variations and offshore
fisheries."
Morey, Dmitry
Dukhovskoy, also of
COAPS, and Mark
Bourassa, an associate
professor of meteorology
at FSU, examined the
seasonal and year-to-
year variability of the
river flow caused by
changes in precipitation
over the watershed
encompassing much of
western Georgia and parts
of eastern Alabama and
the Florida Panhandle.
The researchers used
satellite ocean color data
and computer models
of ocean circulation to
identify a region extending
about 125 miles offshore
of Apalachicola Bay in
which the changes in ocean
color, which is indicative


of the abundance of
phytoplankton and other
organic material in the
water; is linked to changes
in the river flow.
The researchers
outlined their findings in
an article, "Connectivity
of the Apalachicola River
flow variability and the
physical and bio-optical
oceanic properties of the
northern West Florida
Shelf," published in the
journal Continental Shelf
Research.
The findings broaden
the environmental
considerations of
managed flow reductions
in the Apalachicola-
Chattahoochee-Flint
(ACF) river system. The
Apalachicola River, the
final leg of the river system,
has been the focus of a
nearly 20-year legal battle
between Florida, Georgia
and Alabama, known as the
Tri-State Water War.
At the heart of the
dispute is Georgia's


desire to divert water
from the ACF river
system to the burgeoning
population'of the Atlanta
metropolitan area, and
Florida and Alabama's
contention that this flow
reduction could have
negative consequences
for the downstream river
environment.
The Apalachicola River
is considered a "hot spot"
of ecological biodiversity,
and Apalachicola Bay
supports extensive finfish
and shellfish communities
dependent on the regular
flow of freshwater from
the river. The river is
a source of nutrients
that can contribute
to the abundance of
phytoplankton, which
are consumed by small
zooplankton, thus feeding
the marine food web in
the region. The strongest
connection between the
river flow rate and the
offshore water properties is
seen during the late winter


Boyd votes in support of responsible energy legislation


WASHINGTON -U.S.
Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-North Florida) last week
voted in support of the
American Clean Energy
and Security Act (H.R.2454),
which includes significant
investments in renewable
energy in Florida, puts
America on a path to
energy independence,
helps create new jobs, and
protects North Florida
families. The American
Clean Energy and Security
Act keeps costs low for
consumers and reforms
our national energy policy
without adding to the
federal deficit.
Among the key
components of the
American Clean Energy
and Security Act is a
reasonable new standard
for renewable energy
usage for Florida utility
companies. Under this
legislation, major Florida
utility providers would be
required to generate 20
percent of their energy
from renewable sources
by 2020. However, the
state is allowed to request
permission to meet 8
percent of this standard
through conservation
measures, such as energy
efficiency improvements.


For the state to meet the
remaining 12% renewable
energy requirement, the
American Clean Energy
and Security Act expands
biomass and nuclear
programs, while investing
in other clean energy
technologies such as clean
coal, hydropower, and
wind energy. To help keep
costs low in North Florida,
rural electric cooperatives
(co-ops) are exempt from
meeting this standard one
of Congressman Boyd's top
priorities in the legislation.
"I have long advocated
for our country to develop
a responsible and
comprehensive energy
plan that utilizes domestic
sources of energy and
puts us on a path to
energy independence,"
said Congressman Boyd.
"This important legislation
puts the tools in place
so that we, as a nation,
can begin to work toward
energy independence in a
responsible way, and just
as important, this bill is
workable for North Florida.
There is no silver bullet
for our energy problems,
but by taking a balanced,
common-sense approach to
our national energy policy,
we are heading in the right


direction."
The American Clean
Energy and Security Act
also includes a standard to
reduce carbon emissions by
17 percent by 2020. Under
this program, known as cap
and trade, utility companies
would be required to
reduce their emission or
purchase allowances to
allow them to exceed these
caps.. This will incentivize
large utility companies to
begin to shift toward clean
coal technologies and
other renewable sources
of energy. The allowances
from this program will be
kept in Florida to further
promote energy efficiency
and renewable energy -
not sent to a national fund
- while co-ops in North
Florida will receive free
allowances to help offset
energy costs and keep
prices affordable.
"The American Clean
Energy and Security Act
promotes clean energy
programs that are already
being used effectively in
Florida and paves the
way toward new nuclear
and clean coal technology
- both of which have great
potential in our state,"
Boyd said. "In addition
to investing in these new


energy industries, this bill
will create an estimated 1.7
million new American jobs
that can't be outsourced,
which is particularly
important during these
challenging economic
times."
This legislation also
creates new opportunities
for North Florida farmers
by providing incentives to
participate in a market-
based carbon offset
program. Under this new
program, farmers would
receive allowances for
reducing or sequestering
their carbon footprint.
Further, this program would
be carried out by the United
States Department of
Agriculture, rather than the
Environmental Protection
Agency, ensuring the
agriculture industry is not
regulated by cap and trade.
Congressman Boyd
applauded the legislation
for its affordability A recent
study by the nonpartisan
Congressional Budget
Office found the legislation
to be deficit neutral
and PAYGO compliant.
Additionally, the report
shows that the overall
impact of this legislation
on the average household
would be 22 to 30 cents per


day by 2020 less than the
cost.of a postage stamp a
day.
"Our country must
be willing to pay for its
priorities, and I am pleased
that this legislation doesn't
add to our federal deficit,"
added Congressman Boyd.
"It was essential that this
bill be affordable for the
people of our state, and
we've done that in this
bill. As this bill moves
through the legislation
process, it is my hope that
it will continue to focus on
keeping costs low, while
reducing our dependence
on foreign oil."
Additionally, the
American Clean Energy
and Security Act would:
Invest $190 billion by
2025 in new clean energy
technologies
Mandate new energy-
saving standards for
buildings, appliances, and
industry
Protect energy-
intensive industries like
steel, iron, and paper
industries
Include loan
guarantees to support
private investments in
nuclear power
The bill now awaits
action by the Senate.


and early spring months,
which coincide with the
spawning period of several
reef fish species.
"It is possible that if the
natural flow of the river
is reduced by water being
diverted to reservoirs
upstream, it could reduce
the natural nutrient supply
to the local food web,"
Morey said. "That could
potentially result in a
reduction of food available
for larger plankton, like fish
larvae."
The study sheds
some light on potential
effects of climate change
scenarios altering
precipitation patterns over
the southeastern United
States, Morey said, but
further study is needed to
determine if the proposed
man-made flow reductions
at the center of the water
wars will have a significant
impact on the offshore
marine systems, especially
during abnormally dry
years.


Fourth of July
weekend water
conservation
All water custom-
ers in the Port St. Joe
Water Distribution Sys-
tem, which includes Oak
Grove, the city of Port
St. Joe, White City, High-
land View, St. Joe Beach,
Beacon Hill and Over-
street, are being asked
to please be very conser-
vative with your water
usage during the Fourth
of July holiday weekend
period. The city's new
water treatment facil-
ity is not yet on line and
the old treatment facility
is at maximum capacity.
We are hoping that by
conserving water any
way you can the old plant
will not be overburdened.
With the high demand for
water during these hot,
dry summer days, low
water pressures or even
water outages could oc-
cu. So please be wary of
your water consumption
and use it wisely Thank
you in advance for your
cooperation and conser-
vation.
Have a happy and safe
Fourth of July holiday
from the City of Port St.
Joe Water Department.


KLATTERINGS from page A4


joinder from any other
party in any manner which
does not materially and
adversely affect the value
of the Lot or other building
parcel located within the
Property."
In less legal terms,
therefore, as long as St.
Joe owns land within
the commerce center,
it is judge and jury of
anything it may want to
do, provided it does not
"materially" impact other
owners of property in
the development, a word
that in a court of law has
myriad interpretations.
And, wouldn't you know,
according to the county's
property records, not only
does St. Joe own land in


the commerce center, it
owns more acreage than
any other.property owner.
This begs the question,
what has Gulf County
ARC & Transportation
done that would adversely
impact other property
owners in the commerce
center?
Theirs is one of the
most attractive and
clean buildings in the
development, the two non-
profits take care of their
own landscaping and it
is first rate, particularly
compared to the dirt lot
and decaying asphalt road
leading to the city water
plant outside ARC's front
door.
Further, while


. -I ..I,-.
-
..-i .. .. _-i .. -ci- ;-: -=- :-... -" .............. .
TIM CROFT I The Star
Gulf County ARC & Transportation has learned that
when it comes to signage, some are more equal than
others.


Gulf County ARC &
Transportation was
forced to take down its


sign on the front of their
property, an appropriate,
moderately-sized sign,


because no members
of the association are
permitted such signage,
there across the street is
the ugly, mangled upside
down metal sign with
the little white bird the
St. Joe emblem on it
promoting the commerce
center.
Can we spell hypocrisy?
This entire episode
in which the association
has threatened liens for
delinquent dues, refused
to discuss remedies to
an economic situation
Gulf County ARC &
Transportation can ill
afford and generally spit
on the shoes of folks
who perform invaluable
services for some of


the most at-risk in our
community is outrageous.
The St. Joe Company
can put an end to it
immediately.
Are you listening
Jacksonville? Port St. Joe,
the town the company
built and has often
shunted aside, is on the
line.
The foundation you
created to help fund good
works around the region
has "community" in its
name.
Time to show some of
that community spirit and
there are few better works
being performed right now
than the services provided
by Gulf County ARC &
Transportation.


SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: 850-227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form
of letters to the editor or a guest column are
solicited and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial
page should be a forum where differing ideas
and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.


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A6 I The Star


Local


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Welcome to the Tobacco Smorgasbord


By Marie Logan
('ontrihbuting Writer
,Pi ', products are
the only retail products not
required by the U.S. Food
and Drug Administration'
to list ingredients on its
packaging. "
American Lung Association
If more people realized
what is in tobacco products,
a lot more people would try
harder to quit smoking or
chewing or dipping. And
if they knew who had ap-
proved the things that are in
tobacco products, they'd re-
ally be ticked off.
While the list of additives
in cigarettes is nasty enough,
the real problem with- them
*has never been addressed.
All the substances are
approved by the FDA as in-
dividual.food additives, but
they were never tested by
burning them. It is the burn-
ing of many of these sub-
stances that changes their
properties, often for the
worse.
Nor have these additives
ever been tested for results
when combined.

What is in there?
Water bottles must list
ingredients on the back of
the bottle. Full ingredient
listings on tobacco packag-
ing is not required.
According to the Ameri-
can Lung Society, cigarette
smoke contains over 4,800
chemicals, 69 of which are
known carcinogens; hun-
dreds more are known to be
toxic.
Not every additive is
harmful. There's allspice
extract, oleoresin and oil;
apple juice concentrate, ex-
tract and skins; apricot ex-
tract and juice concentrate;
ascorbic acid (think Vitamin
C); basil oil; bay leaf, oil and


sweet oil; even beet juice
concentrate, to name a few.
But along with the berga-
mot oil, butter, caramel color
and caraway oil are'carbon
monoxide, nitrogen oxides,
.hydrogen cyanide and am-
monia.
Hydrogen cyanide is used
to make chemical weapons.
Ammonia is a commode
cleaner.
Mixed in with the beta-
carotene (good for your
eyes) is acetanisole (found
in a glandular secretion of
beavers that smells sweet
and can taste like vanilla or
cherry); plus butyric acid,
which is found in rancid but-
ter, vomit and Parmesan
cheese.
While the celery seed ex-
tract, solid, oil and oleoresin
plus the chamomile flower
oil and extract have been
included, there's also cap-
sicum oleoresin (an active
ingredient in pepper spray);
ethyl acetate (a solvent), and


farnesol (an alcohol that is
also a natural pesticide for
mites and a pheromone for
several insects).
Once you get past the
cinnamon leaf oil, bark oil
and extract; clover tops;
cocoa shells, extract, distil-
late and power; or the co-
conut oil; coffee; corn oil;
fig juice and honey, you get
to the isobutyl acetate (a
solvent used in lacquer);
magnesium carbonate (a
mineral used in flooring,
fireproofing, cosmetics and
toothpaste); and metho-
prene (a hormone used in
drinking water cisterns to
control mosquitoes that
spread malaria).
A little jasmine, kola nut,
lemongrass and nutmeg
sweeten the pot, along with
a soupqon of skatole (a com-
pound generated in mam-
mals' digestive tracts and
in beets that has a strong
fecal odor); thiazole (a flam-
mable liquid used to make


fungicides); urea (a chemi-
cal used in fertilizers and a
component of urine); and
acetone (the main ingredi-
ent in paint and nail polish
remover).
Finally some rose, rum
and vanillin add a deeper
note to the napthalenes
(used in mothballs and ex-
plosives); cadmium (found
in batteries and artists' oil
paint); hydrazine (used in
jet and rocket fuels); and bu-
tane (cigarette lighter fluid).
Then there's arsenic
(used in rat poison); formal-
dehyde; lead; the addictive
poison nicotine (for which
there is no known antidote);
and the insecticide DDT.
There's styrene (found in
insulation materials, hence
the name Styrofoam); ben-
zene (in rubber cement and
solvents); vinyl chloride (an
ingredient found in garbage
bags); acrolein (used to
make chemical weapons);
cyanide; and glycolic acid
(used to process leather).
Add to that examine (a
major ingredient in barbe-
cue lighter fluid); methyl-
amine (used to tan leather);
PCDDs and PCDFs (ingre-
dients of Agent Orange);
and toluene (a known car-
cinogen and poisonous in-
dustrial solvent).

Shine little
glowworm ...
Then there's the radioac-
tive polonium 210 and ura-
nium 235.
One of the most lethal
radioactive elements known
to date, polonium 210 is
absorbed into the tobacco
plants from the high phos-
phate fertilizers tobacco
growers use. It accumulates
over time in the soil and in
the plants and also sticks to

See TOBACCO A7


THE FACTS


1. Cigarette smoke is
biologically active.
A. Nicotine is a potent
pharmacological agent.
Every toxicologist, physi-
ologist, medical doctor
and most chemists know
that. It's not a secret.
B. Cigarette smoke
condensate applied to.
the backs of mice cause
tumors.
C. Hydrogen cyanide is
a potent inhibitor of cyto-
chrome oxidase a cru-
cial enzyme in the energy
metabolism of all cells.
D. Oxides of nitrogen
are important in nitrosa-
mine formation. Nitrosa-
mines as a class are po-
tent carcinogens.
Tobacco-specific non-
volatile nitrosamines are
present in significant
amounts in cigarette


smoke.
F. Acrolein is a potent
eye irritant and is very
toxic to cells. Acrolein is
in cigarette smoke.
G. Polonium-210 is
present in cigarette
smoke.
H. We know very little
about the biological activ-
ity of sidestream smoke.
I. We do not know
enough about the biologi-
cal activity of additives
which have been in use
for a number of years."

February 23, 1982 Brown &
Williamson memo, comments on
"Future Strategies for the
Changing Cigarette" from J.L
Charles, manager of the bio-
chemistry group/vice president
of research, to Thomas Osdene,
director of research.


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Hablo Espafol l
1252 Cape San Bias Road
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Office 850-227-7891 ext. 107
Cell: 850-227-5152
Toll Free: 877-512-9366
Email: eli@floridabeachdream.com
www.Gulf-countv.com/blog


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Thursday, July 2, 2009


Local


The Star I A7


TOBACCO from page A6


the tobacco leaves.
Uranium 235 is used for
nuclear weapons and in
shells fired from special mil-
itary weapons to penetrate
tanks and is almost as radio-
active as polonium 210.
Add to this list another
534 known additives, plus
the over 4,800 chemicals that
are formed when a cigarette
is burned, and it's a menu
that has something in it for
everybody.
After reading the list of
cigarette additives and
by the way, a similar list ex-
ists for cigars and smoke-
less tobacco one might
wonder three things: how
these things could legally be
allowed in a consumer prod-
uct, why the American pub-
lic hasn't been told of this all
along, and why these "ingre-
dients" aren't listed on every
cigarette package?
The answer is, no one can
adequately explain it.
Trade secrets
It seems that in 1984
Congress amended the
Federal Cigarette Labeling
and Advertising Act to re-
quire cigarette manufactur-
ers (tobacco companies) to
give the U.S. Secretary of
Health and Human Services
(HHS) an annual list of all
the ingredients they added


to their cigarettes.
This historic tidbit comes
from the Federal Trade
Commission (FTC) Web
site, which ironically states
in its header, "Protecting
America's Consumers."
The key here is that only
the Secretary of HHS gets
the. information, and he or
she is required by law to
keep the information con-
fidential. Things were set
up this way because the to-
bacco companies success-
fully argued that the list of
additives was proprietary
information, trade secrets.
Congress agreed.
So the Secretary of HHS
only reports to Congress in-
formation about any ingredi-
ent he or she believes poses
a health risk to smokers.
In a paper published in
Science News in 1994 by
Janet Raloff, she wrote that
Congress stipulated that "no
federal official may disclose
the identity of listed chemi-
cals, regardless of how in-
nocuous they may seem.
"This federal protection
also prohibits anyone who
views the lists from sharing
the contents with outside
toxicologists or others to
confirm the claim of ciga-
rette makers that these addi-
tives pose no risk to health,"
Raloff continued.
Her paper stated that


Rep. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.)
had signed the confidential-
ity agreement required to
access the list, and while he
could not disclose specific in-
formation to other members
of the House Sub-Commit-
tee on Health and the Envi-
ronment, of which he was a
member, he could note that
the lists cited heavy metals,
active agents, pesticides and
insecticides, with at least 13
of the ingredients listed not
allowed in foods that Ameri-
cans eat.
But, the paper continued,
cigarettes were not food, so
they were not restricted to
food-grade additives. They
were'not considered drugs,
so they were not under the
safety and disclosure re-
quirements of other con-
sumer products regulated
by the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration (FDA).
Raloff's paper indicated
(remember, the year was
1994) that Wyden also re-
ported to his committee that
some of the additives on the
list were so toxic they could
not legally be dumped into a
landfill, no matter how small
the quantity.
Wyden also noted at that
'time a letter in which then
director of the Centers for
Disease Control (CDC)
David Satcher said no
one knew what potentially


harmful byproducts might
be produced when the addi-
tives wqie burned alone or
in combination, as they are
in cigarettes.
According to another
study from the American
Journal of Public Health
(published in November
1994), National Public Ra-
dio reported on the list of
cigarette additives, causing
a public outcry. That same
year, the six major tobacco ,
companies made the list


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public, along with informa-
tion supporting the safety of
their additives.
According to the study,
this was the only time the list
was made public, and there
is no updated public list of to-
bacco additives available.
NOTE: On June 11, 2009,
the U.S. Senate passed a bill
giving the FDA regulatory
control of tobacco products.
The U.S. House of Rep-
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broad authority to regulate
the production and market-
ing of tobacco products.
The bill then went to the
Senate Health, Education,
Labor and Pensions Com-
mittee, where it passed and
was sent to a vote by the full
Senate.
The bill is now on a fast-
track to President Obama,
who has already indicated
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A*r







A8 I The Star


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Local


HOT from page Al


Jan Sapte knew the
style and wondered what
the firefighters might look
like similarly posed.
"We looked at the guys,
and we thought, 'There's no
way we could make them
beautiful,' so we went with
funny," Sapte said.
At a birthday party
for husband, David,
Sapte proposed the idea
to the firefighters, who
responded with a mixture
of enthusiasm and horror.
Though alcohol
surely played a part, the
firefighters ultimately
welcomed the chance to
support the new ER.
In 2008, the 25-member
department responded
to 99 calls, the majority
of which required
transportation to a Panama
City hospital.
A few brave souls
volunteered to be
photographed first,
including petroleum
engineer and former Navy
SEAL Les Heard.
Posing by a heavy-
duty brush truck, Heard
released a stream of water


<4
-iletndarc v :hli
At o:il fcr $E20 ecich
ajr e fo~tIcheir
u c jcfis -rdie .-.1
': n i


- ,%------


David Hasselhoff's got nothing on Preston Russ,


from a mini-pumper,
glistening all the while.
To help him channel his
inner pinup, Heard's wife,
Andrea, applied a coat of:
pre-shoot baby oil.
"It all went down hill
from there," laughed Sapte.
The firefighters had
input in determining
the calendar's scenes,
which showcased the fire
department's equipment.
The calendar also


provides a few person
details about each
firefighter, like their
careers and hobbies.
Sapte's husband, D
got in on the act, posing
with boots and first ai
supplies for the May s
Mr. July, City Mana
Charlie Weston, posed
with Rowdy, his "West
Highland terrier with
attitude," in the driver
of the department's ne


4
F-


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
shown with dogs Beau and Teal.
al pumper/attack truck.
The department's lone
female, safety captain
Melissa Larson, wrapped
)avid, herself in bunker gear and
ig little else for the August,
d shot.
hot. Others featured in
iger the calendar are Steve
Conroy who appears
to be resuscitating his
a big wife, Mary Ann Preston
Seat Russ, John Shiver, Fire
west Chief Jim Caughey, Larry


Les Heard, a petroleum engineer and former Navy
SEAL, releases a stream of water from a mini-pumper.


Wilson, James Christy, Tim
Hatcher, Vince Bishop and
Bill Kroll.
For the cover shot,
several members of the
fire department's ladies
auxiliary also got in on the
act, posing atop the fire
truck.
The participants got
their first glimpse of the
calendar last Thursday,
during a kick-off celebration
at Sunset Coastal Grill,
attended by Sacred Heart
Foundation President Dr.
Henry Roberts.
Roberts saluted the
firefighters' humor and


altruism, saying, "It
reflects the health of this
community that you can
laugh at each other and '
laugh with each other."
Announcing a March
2010 opening for the
hospital, Roberts stressed
the need for emergency
care in Gulf County.
"I seldom drive from
Panama City to Port St. Joe
without some ambulance
passing, going one way or
another," said Roberts.
"A community this
size needs a hospital,
and it needs a first-class
hospital."


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What You Need to Know.
If you are changing jobs. have been displaced from
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COMMUNITY


Thursday, .uly 2, 2009


w w w. starfl.com


PHOTOS BY DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
At left, Brooke McMillian, 9, hops off her horse after scoring a 19-second finish in the barrel race. At right, Brooke keeps a tight grip on Ike's
reigns as he runs in a clover-leaf pattern around a barrel.


NH


IORSING


AROUND


Horsemanship school trains future speed riders


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Saddled atop her horse, Ike, Brooke
McMillian, 9, traversed the Michael
Traylor Arena in a clover-leaf pattern,
-speeding by a row of barrels before
stopping at the front gate.
A scorekeeper called time 19
seconds, just shy of McMillian's dream
scenario.
"I was trying to get a 17, but two dig-
its off- I'm proud of that," said McMil-
lian.
Out of the saddle, McMillian wiped
the sweat from her face and pulled Ike
close for a congratulatory hug.
Just off in the distance, McMillian's
baby sister, Hayleigh, 7, sat in a hot pink
saddle atop Babe, McMillian's training
horse.
She'd ridden Babe as a child, start-
ing right about when she could sit up
by herself.
"He's a broke horse, real calm and
set back, not always trying to go," Mc-
Millian said. "He's 26 or 28 years old in
people years; about 49 in-horse years."
Babe may have showed McMillian
the ropes, but Ike is built for speed, just
the way she likes it.
A member of the 4-H Horse Club,
McMillian participated in the June 17
4-H Horsemanship School to improve
her scores in the barrels and poles
- two popular speed events.
"I've learned you have to be able to
trust your horse and move with him to
have a good time and a good score,"
said McMillian. "If I wasn't going with
him, I'd either fall off or hit a barrel."
In her second year in 4-H, Desiree
Outlaw, 10, wasn't looking for a perfect
score in the barrels or poles.
Her goal, she said, was "trying to
stay on a horse," after a rocky start last
year.


At top, riders have a pre-race chat before entering the Michael
Traylor Arena. At left, After a long day of racing, participants in the
Horsemanship School pose for a group photo. At right, professional
barrel racer Wendy Temple of Blountstown shared the secrets of her
sport during the June 17 4-H Horsemanship School.


. The Horsemanship School taught
McMillian, Outlaw and 16 other partici-
pants, aged 8-18, the fundamentals of
horse racing, care and maintenance.
Held six five-hour days over a two
week period, the school was led by
horse racing professionals who im-
parted the secrets of the sport.
On June 17, Wendy Temple of
Blountstown emceed the event as the
students performed on the field.
A professional barrel racer, Temple
earned her pro card this year, after
many years, attending similar 4-H a--


tivities as a child.
In his twentieth year as the coun-
ty's extension director, Roy Lee
Carter marveled at the students' pa-
tience and willingness to learn from
riding mentors.
Carter believes kids raised to care
for horses become responsible adults,
more willing to accept life's challeng-
es.
"That's a carry over," said Carter.
"Getting up and going to a job every
day shouldn't be that hard."
At the camp, Carter's 15-year-old


THANK YOU
County extension director Roy
Lee Carter extends his thanks
to those who made this year's
4-H Gulf County Horsemanship
Scfiol a success: program
director Debbie Elia, program
assistant Louise Jones, volunteers
Sherry Davidson, Kelly Smith,
Julie Wester, Anita Outlaw, Emily
Cutchins, Jean McMillian and
Russell McMillian.

grandson Quentin rode Sunshine, a22-
year-old horse ridden by his father, Roy
Lee, Jr
"He was a hot shot back in the day,"
laughed Carter, noting that Sunshine
has since lost a bit of his splendor.
All those participating in the Horse-
manship camp are members of the 4-H
Horse Club, which meets the second
Monday of every month at the arena.
4-H stages horse shows every sec-
ond Saturday for 10 months out of a
year, August and September excluded
because of the hot weather.
Riders who place in district shows
are eligible to participate in the state
competition. At the district show in
Marianna this April, six riders quali-
fied.
Though McMillian is only nine,
Carter sees her potential to one day
become a state champion.
As for sister Hayleigh, she needs a
little more training and a slightly faster
horse.
As the timekeeper clocked Hay-
leigh's score at over half a minute,
McMillian evaluated her little sister's
performance.
"It's not her fault," McMillian said
definitively. "She was going with the
horse, but he's just old."


By Hannah Henderson


Amy Rogers .

County United
Community
Corporation, w ...
Inc., and Laura '-
McKinney from
the Florida
Department 9, .
of Health
coordinated
HIV Testing Day.
last week in
Port St. Joe.
TIM CROFT I The Star

Educating on HIV


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Folks lined up, signed up and
swabbed up last week as. part
of HIV Testing Week leading up
to last Saturday's National HIV
Testing Day.
The Gulf County United Com-,
munity Corporation, Inc., in con-


junction with the Florida Depart-
ment of Health, put on the event
at the Port St. Joe Police Depart-
ment substation located on Mar-
tin Luther King, Jr Blvd.
"We are trying to get every-
body to know their status," said
Laura McKinney, the DOH's di-
See HIV B6


B
Section


Page 1






B2 I The Star


Local


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Engagement


GARY BRIDGES
ASHLEY WILLIAMS

Williams-Bridges
Bobby and the late
Carolyn Williams of
Hosford would like to
announce the engagement
and upcoming marriage
of their daughter Ashley
to Gary Bridges, son of
Harry Bridges of Port
Saint Joe and Sara Mullis
of Wewahitchka. The
wedding will take place on
July 6 with a beach side
ceremony on St. Croix,
Virgin Islands.
All family and friends
are invited to attend a
reception the evening
of August 8 at the home
of Stephanie and Steve
Hofheinz of Hosford.
The happy couple will
reside in Hosford.


TIM CROFT I hs r
Quen Lamb, executive director of the Gulf County Community Development Corporation/People
Helping People of Gulf County, Dan Van Treese, president of the CDC board, and program manager
Jerry Stokoe present a check for $3,750 raised for the Doris Johnson Whitfield account at Superior
Bank. Carla Mock is accepting the check on the part of Superior Bank. The money will be used
to pay medical expenses for Johnson Whitfield, who is need of a new liver. Joining in the check
presentation are Lisa Given, Bunny Miller, Tony Barbee and Charles Givens.


$1,100 raised for transplant patient


A group of volunteers working
tirelessly and continually held a
very successful fish fry June 26 to
help raise more than $1,100 for the
liver transplant for resident Mar--
sha Johnson Whitfield. Whitfield
and her family are very grateful to
the following volunteers, contribu-
tors and businesses for this won-
derful support.
Mark Moore owner of St. Joe


Shrimp Co, Port St Joe, George
Duren owner of Piggly Wiggly,
Port St. Joe and the CDC/PHP,
Port St. Joe, volunteers Tony Bar-
bee, Jimmy Gainey, John Presnell,
Dan Van Treese, Harry Lee Smith,
Barbara Van Treese, Temple Wat-
son, Dave May, Ty Robinson, Mar-
gie May, Teedy Nobles, Lyd Stokoe,
Bill Johnson, Peggy Heaps, Robert
Whittle, Mary Jo Walsh, Dawne


Still, Shari Guilford, Charles Giv-
ens, Brenda Givens, Quen Lamb,
Erika White and Mica'ela Robin-
son.
A very special thanks to Bunny
and Jimmy Miller. Without the ef-
forts of these two caring people,
25 percent of the funds would not
have been obtained.
Thanks to The Star for publiciz-
ing the event.


Cape San Bias

Lighthouse

hosts craft fair
The first Arts and Crafts
Fair will be held at the
Cape San Blas Lighthouse
grounds during the July 4
weekend.
There will be vendors
with homemade crafts,
such as art, paintings, pho-
tography, glassware, jew-
elry, wood cravings, stained
glass and more.
Booths will be setup with
Tupelo honey, local history
of the area's turpentine in-
dustry and blacksmithing.
In the Keeper's Cbttage
next door to the gift shop
will be several of our local
authors selling and auto-'
graphing their books.
Visitors also will be able
to climb the lighthouse tow-
er for $5, and children un-
der 10 will be able to climb
free as long as they have an
adult with them.
The fair will be held from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (ET) Fri-
day and Saturday and from
noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.
Oldies deejay Steve Mc-
Intire will be spinning tunes
all day Saturday. There will
be drinks, hot dogs and ice
cream for sale.


NASCAR Fun Show a success


Jean McMillian and Jesse Eubanks
sponsored the second annual NASCAR
Fm Show (Horse Show) to benefit Big Riv-
er Rider's 4-H Horse Club. This event was
put on to help raise money to help offset
expenses to send six members who quali-
fied to go to state competition July 9-11 in
Tampa. Those members are:
Junior/ Intermediate division: Kait-
lyn Baker, Calvin Cuchens, Tia Roney, and
Ticker Smith;
Senior division: Quentin Carter and
Trisha Davidson.
Big River Rider's 4-H Horse Club
wishes to thank the following sponsors for
sponsoring participants for this event: Tan-
ja's Beauty Salon, Wewa Lighthouse Res-
taurant ($40), Mayhann's Used Cars (two


sponsorships), Randy's Discount Grocery,
Southern Outfitters Trading Post, Jackson
Hewitt ($40), Norris Auto Repair, Cun-
ningham Auto Sales, Patti McKee, Brooke
& Suzanne Doran, HP Pool's, Great Wall
Chinese, Costin Insurance Agency ($25),
Radio Shack ($50), Mermaid's Tale, Roy
Carter Jr., B&B Feed and Seed (two spon-
sorships), Heidi Paul, Lee Hall, Outlaw
Enterprises, All-American Diner, Jimmy's
Bait, Tackle, & Feed, Broke-A-Toe Horse-
back Riding ($40), Russell McMillian (two
sponsorships) and Jaunice Johnson.
We also want to thank the spectators,
show crew and parents for your continued
support. Special thankyou to Ms. Jean and
Mr. Jesse who are two of our biggest sup-
porters in all we do.


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Obituaries


Mildred Skipper Lee
Mildred Skipper Lee
was called home to be.
with the Lord on Saturday,
June 27, 2009, at her home
in Highland View.
Born to John D. Lee
Sklipper and Easter
Richter Skipper on May 16,
1938, in Alford, Fla.
Mildred is survived
by one son, Bobby Joe
Lee (Diane), of Highland
View, a daughter, Julie
Rena Lee, of Highland
View; grandchildren,
Elizabeth Lee Guemmaz
(Abdul) of Mexico Beach,
Christopher AlanLee
(Lauren) of Highland
View, Kerry Lynn Lee of
DeFuniak Springs, and
AshleyLucas of Highland
View, and four beautiful
great-grandchildren,
Chloe, Dakota, Landon,
and Christopher, and one
sister, Mary Lou McClendon
(Fred), of DeFuniak Springs.
Graveside funeral
services were held on
Monday, June 29, at 10 a.m.
in Holly Hill Cemetery,
conducted by the Rev. Glen
Davis. Interment followed.
All services were
under the direction of the
Comforter Funeral Home.

Juanita 'Nita' P.
Foster
On Thursday, June 25,
2009, Juanita "Nita" P
Foster, 69, of Port St. Joe,
Fla., went to be with the
Lord.
She was born May 28,
1940, in Munford, Ala., to the
late Marion G. Parnell and
Mertie Davis Parnell.
Nita was a graduate of
Sylacauga Hospital School
of Nursing in Sylacauga,
Ala., and for 46 years,
she served others as a
caring and compassionate
nurse. Her gentleness and
kindness touched everyone
she met.
Nita leaves behind her
devoted daughter Eleanor
Foster of Port St. Joe,
Fla.; her brother, Luke
(Margaret) Parnell of
Crossett, Ark.; and many
other friends and relatives
who will miss her, but
cherish her memory.
She was preceded in
death by her loving husband
of 46 years, J. Wayne Foster.
A graveside service
to celebrate her life was
held at 11 a.m. Wednesday,
July 1, 2009, at Montgomery
Memorial Cemetery in
Montgomery, Ala.
Kent-Forrest Lawn
2403 Harrison Ave., Panama City, FL
763-4694

Your source
for local news
starfl.com


Mr. Gregg Hubert
Mahlkov, 68, of St. Joe'
Beach, died Wednesday,
June 24, 2009, at Bay
Medical Center.
He was born March 27,
1941, to the late Hubert
and Ena Mahlkov in
Queens, New York. Mr.
Mahlkov was the director
of sales and marketing
for the Apalachicola
Northern Railroad for
18 years. He was an avid
model railroader and
was a member of the
Pennsylvania Railroad
Historical Society, the
Angus Nev
Mr. Angus Newton
Petty, 85, passed away
Thursday, May 28, in
Chautauqua Rehab
and Nursing Center in
DeFnliak Springs.
Mr. Petty was a veteran
of World War II, serving
the U.S. Army. He was also
a member of the Masonic
Lodge in Panama City.
Mr. Petty lived in Gulf
County for 25 years,
primarily in Port St. Joe.
He was a Florida Highway
Patrol trooper in Gulf
County from 1957 to 1963
and was later a guard at a
federal prison in Atlanta.
He worked at the St. Joe
Paper Company from
1964-1993 and was also a
part-time worker at St. Joe
Stevedoring Company for
many years.
Mr. Petty was a
member of the First

Margaret Mosel
Margaret Moseley
Mixson Costin, 80, of Port
Saint Joe, died Monday,
June 29, 2009, at Bay
Medical Center.
She was born in New
Brockton, Ala., to the late
Cecil Marion Mixson and
Mineola Moseley Mixson.
She graduated from
Graceville High School
and also from Troy State
University. She moved
to Port St. Joe in 1955 to
teach high school. She was
a member of First Baptist
Church, loved to play golf,
and enjoyed fishing and
hunting, and coffee in the
afternoon with friends.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Cecil G. Costin Jr.
Surviving are two,
children, Charles A.
Costin and wife, Tanya,
and Renee C. Shoaf
and husband, Stuart, all
of Port Saint Joe; four
grandchildren, Lauren
and Matthew Costin and
Jason and wife, Ashley
Shoaf, of Tallahassee,
Andy and wife, Kimberly
Shoaf, of Port St. Joe;
two great-grandchildren,


Gulf County Chamber of
Commerce, friends of Gulf
County Public Library and
the Humane Society.
He is survived by his
wife, Sheila Mahlkov, of St.
Joe Beach; a son, Marc
Mahlkov, of Montgomery,
Ala.; and a daughter, Lisa
Sonietz, and her husband,
John, of Leesburg, Fla.
Memorialization was by
cremation.

SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOMES
507 10th St.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-8111
wton Petty
Baptist Church in Port
St. Joe until he retired, at
which time he moved to
Westville, Fla., which is
where he had lived since
1994.
Mr. Petty is survived
by his wife, Dorris Petty,
of Westville, one daughter,
Laura Nicole Richter, of
Westville; a daughter-
in-law, Lyndsie Allen, of
Westville; a grandson,
Rodney D. (Lyndsie) Allen,
of Port St. Joe; one great-
granddaughter, Paige
Brooke Allen, of Port St.
Joe; several niece and
nephews; and cousins.
Mr. Petty had many
friends and relatives.
He left a lot of friends
wherever he lived and
worked. He never met a
stranger and believed in
helping anyone that he
could.

ey Mixson Costin
William and Madelyn Shoaf
of Tallahassee, Fla.; one
brother, former Governor
Wayne Mixson and wife,
Margie, of Tallahassee;
one sister, Miriam Mixson
Johnson and husband,
the late S.D. Johnson, of
Campbellton, Fla.; and
many nieces and nephews.
The family would like to
acknowledge Debbie Lund
and Daisy Jones for the
care they gave as well as
Emerald Coast Hospice.
Funeral services will
be held Thursday, July
2, 2009, at 11 a.m. EST
at First Baptist Church
of Port St. Joe with the
Rev. Howard Browning
officiating. Interment will
follow in the family plot
in Holly Hill Cemetery.
The family will receive
friends one hour before the
service at 10 a.m. at the,
church.
In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions
may be made to First
Baptist Church Family Life
Center in Port St. Joe.
All services are under
the direction of Comforter
Funeral Home.


Gregg Hubert Mahlkov






Thursday, July 2, 2009


Local


The Star | B3


.,i^S l 7 St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge seeks community input
Willie.eek.ipu


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO I Special to the Star
David Barnhart of Barnhart Farms waving from a
row of organic okra.


Farmers' market back home


The SaltAir Farmers'
Market is back home at
Reid Avenue 'and State 71
(the new Port St. Joe City
Commons), and is prepar-
ing to celebrate the Fourth
of July in style.
Jodi Perez of Provisions
will give a cooking demon-
stration and tasting with
market produce.
The SaltAir Market is a
fun community event held
on the first and third Sat-
urdays, from April through
November. The farmers
and vendors set-up by 9:00
am, and offer plants, crafts,
jellies, cakes and fresh
fruits and vegetables.
The farmers truck in
fresh produce from around
the region. Barnhart
Farms is a new addition
this year. The Barnhart
family switched to organic
- chemical free farm-
ing over six years ago and


currently have 18 acres
under cultivation. David
Barnhart and his father,
Willard, bring a variety of
produce-peas, okra, corn,
spinach, melons, carrots,
potatoes, onions, cucum-
bers, zucchini and all man-
ner of greens and beans.
Miniature eggplants and
bags of squash blossoms
come to the market when
available.
Peaches, plums, ber-
ries, heirloom tomatoes
and citrus are at the mar-
ket as they come in sea-
son.
This year the market
offers two 'tables' at each
market for community
fundraising. Any non-prof-
it organization can sign up
for a slot by seeing Jodi or
Jason at Provisions on Wil-
lams Avenue and Third
Street to get on the calen-
dar.


American Red Cross offers


learn to swim programs


Being surrounded
by water, the Red Cross
mission is clear teach
everyone to swim. The
Central Panhandle Chap-
ter of the American Red
Cross intends to do just
that. The American Red
Cross has been the leader
in water safety since 1914,
and continues that tradi-
tion today. Only the Ameri-
can Red Cross offers six
comprehensive levels of
swimming that teach par-
ticipants how to swim skill-
fully and safely.
Registrations for the
first and second sessions.
have already ended, but
there are still two sessions
left. The third session of
this years swim program
will start on July 7, and


seats are filling up fast.
Lessons will be offered
either Tuesday though
Friday, or on Saturday's in
Gulf County starting July
llth for those that cannot
make the classes during
the week.
The Red Cross offers
lessons to everyone from
6 months through adult,
in a wide variety of differ-
ent levels from beginning
through fitness swimming.
For more information,
please call the local chap-
ter of the American Red
Cross at 763-6587, or to
register for classes in Port
St Joe, contact the St. Jo-
seph's Bay Country Club
Pro Shop at 850-227- 1751
or drop by the club to sign
up in person.


The U.S. Fish and Wild-
life Service will be hosting
two open house meetings
to request input from the
public in developing a Com-
prehensive Conservation
Plan (CCP) for St. Vincent
National Wildlife Refuge
(NWR). The CCP will set
wildlife, habitat, and pub-
lic use priorities and guide
management decisions
on the Refuge for the next
15 years. The open house
meetings will provide an
opportunity for interested
members of the public,
tribes, agencies, neighbors,
public interest groups, and
local governments to par-
ticipate in the Refuge plan-
ning process from the very
beginning. The purpose
of the meetings is to find
out what the public's ideas
are on management of the
Refuge so they can be ad-
dressed in the planning
process. Each meeting will
consist of the same infor-
mation and content.
The open houses will be


held at St. Joe Bay Buffer
Preserve, 3915 Highway'
C30, on July 15 from 6-9
p.m. ET (presentation at
6:45 p.m.) and Apalachicola
Community Building (City
Hall), 1 Bay Avenue, on
July 16 from 6-9 p.m. (pre-
sentation at 6:45p.m.). In-
terested citizens may stop
by any time to submit com-
ments. Refuge staff and
maps and exhibits will be
present. At 6:45 p.m., Ref-
uge Staff will then present
an overview of St. Vincent
NWR, including its history,
key wildlife and habitats,
public use opportunities,
and challenges. A presen-
tation on the planning and
environmental compliance
processes will then be
given by Natural Resource
Planner from the Service.
Immediately after the pre-
sentations, attendees will
be given the opportunity to
express their thoughts and
ideas on Refuge manage-
ment. In addition, comment
forms will be made avail-


MEETING TIMES
AND LOCATIONS

St. Joe Bay Buffer
Preserve
3915 Highway
C-30
July 15 From 6-9
p.m. ET (presentation
at 6:45 p.m )

Apalachicola
Community Building
(City Hall)
1 Bay Avenue
July 16 from 6-9
pim. ET (presentation
6:45 p.m.)

able so that written com-
ments can be submitted at
the meeting or mailed in to
the Refuge later. Only then
can effective management
be developed which reflects
your interests.
The Service invites the
public to provide comments


to the following questions,
as well as any other issue,
opportunity or concern
you may have for the Ref-
uge.
What makes St.
Vincent NWR special or
unique for you?
What do you value
most about St. Vincent
NWR?
What would you like
to see in the future for St.
Vincent NWR?
SThis planning project
provides a unique oppor-
tunity for the Service to in-
volve individuals and local
communities in the long-
term management of our
National Wildlife Refuges.
"We are anxious to hear
the public' s ideas and
opinions about a proposed
comprehensive conserva-
tion plan for the refuge,"
said Sam D. Hamilton, the
Service's Southeast Re-
gional Director. You can
play a significant role in
the development of this far-
reaching plan.


Community BRIEFS


Fourth of July Dance
at Fisherman's
Landing
Fisherman's Landing &
RV Park in Howard Creek
will host a Fourth of July
Dance at 7 p.m. CT on Fri-
day, July 3.
The band will be Easy
Company and there will be
fireworks.
Fisherman's Land-
ing is located at 7681 Doc
Whitfield Road in Howard
Creek.
For more information
please call 827-2255.

Summer movies
in the park
Summer Movies in the
Park from June Septem-


ber! All'movies will begin
at dark. Come early and set
up while the sun sets. Don't
forget to bring your chairs
and blanket.
Movie Locations: PSJ
- Frank Pate Park, Port St
Joe, WB -on the green just
past The School of Fish,
WindMark Beach, and MB
- on the green at The El'
Governor Motel, Mexico
Beach.
July
2 July PSJ Mamma
Mia! PG-13
3 July WB Twilight
PG-13
9 July MB Mamma
Mia! PG-13
16 July PSJ Madagas-
car: Escape 2 Africa PG
17 July WB Nights in
Rodanthe PG-13
23 July MB Happy


Feet PG
30 July PSJ Race to
Witch Mountain PG
31 July MB Bedtime
Stories PG
August
6 Aug MB Indiana
Jones and The Kingdom of
the Crystal Skull PG-13
14 Aug WB Fireproof
September
4 Sept WB Swing Vote
PG
18 Sept WB Monsters
vs. Aliens PG

Taunton Family
Children's Home
summer camp
Taunton Family Chil-
dren's Home will hold its
1st Annual Summer Camp
beginning July 6. The camp


will be for two weeks, Mon-
day though Friday, 9 a.m.
-1 p.m.
Activities: Bible School,
Soccer Camp, Music Camp,
Swimming, Beach Volley-
ball, Putt-Putt Golf, Crafts,
Canoeing, Horseshoes, etc.
Lunch will be provided
for all participants. The
camp is free. However, reg-
istration is required. For
transportation call 639-2337
or 639-5031.
AREA WIDE OUT-
DOOR YOUTH REVIVAL
SERVICES will be held
each evening beginning
at 7 p.m.. Services will be
held outside on the beach
at Lake Mary.'
For more information
please call David or Abigail
Taunton, 639-2336 or 639-
5031.


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS


FRIDAY, JULY 3RD
10am 5pm: Shopping in Historic
Downtown Port St. Joe. Enjoy fun, food
and shops!

6pm 7pm: Red, White, & Blue Cruise-
In Reid Avenue, Port St Joe. Decorate
your vehicle and drive to Reid Avenue for
a chance to win $100.

6pm 7pm: Bow Wow Meow Beach Mutt
Strut Reid Avenue, Port St Joe: Dress
your pet in Red, White, and Blue and win
great prizes from Bow Wow Meow Beach.

8pm 11pm: Patriotic Concert at
Haughty Heron


Saturday, July 4th
9am 12pm: SaltAir Farmers Market

10am 5pm: Shopping throughout the
shops of Historic Downtown Port St Joe


CHAMBtERt OF COMMERCE


Frank Pate Park
Saturday, July 4th
10am 9pm: Vendors in Frank Pate Park,
Food and Arts & Crafts, Petting Zoo for
the Kids.
10am 12pm: Pony Rides with Broke-A-Toe
11am: Kid's Kiddie Car Parade
3pm 4pm: Duck Race (for prizes)
4pm 5pm: Kid's Pirate Costume Contest
4pm 8pm: Family Games
5pm 5:45pm: Pirates Invasion
6pm 6:45pm: Kid's Feast with Pirates

6pm 7pm: Music with Tommy and
Jimmy Curry at the Haughty Heron

7pm 9pm: Patriotic Concert with
The Reggie Grantham Band.at the
Haughty Heron
9pm: First Dark Lighted Boat Parade

SStarting about 9:15pm 9:30pm (dark
thirty) HUGE FIREWORKS !!!!


.r.



Meet Ginger! Ginger is the last of the Humane Society's dogs
from our exicing new DAWGS in Prison program awaiting her
new home! Ginger will graduate from her intensive 8-week
training program on July 8th. Ginger has excelled tremendously
over the past 6 weeks and continues to make great strides each
day! All dogs graduating from our DAWGS in Prison program
are crate trained, housetrained, walk well on a leash and know
many commands like sit, stay and come. If you are interested
in adopting Ginger, please contact the St. Joseph Bay Humane
Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody.
Benefit the animals of St. Joseph Bay Humane Society while
saving money! SHOP FAITH'S THRIFT HUT where proceeds
go directly back to'support the animals of our shelter. Faith's
Thrift Hut is also in need of donations and volunteers. Please
stop by 1007 Tenth St. or call 850-227-1103/ 1109 for more
information.
CLEANERS POLISHES
Dan & Nancy
Ostman
Jax Wax Distribution LLC
Cell: 850.832.1560
772 Suite B U.S.98
ACCESSORIES ADDITIVES Port St.Joe, FL 32456


FOR MORE INFO VISIT
www. I ndependenceOnTheCoast.com
or call 227-1223

Partial funding for this event provided by the Gulf County Tourism Council


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These busin

COMFO

W. P. "Rocky"

a FErL.F.I
(850) 22

Thursday, July 2 2009 w w w. starf 1. com


esses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.


RTER Rish, Gibson, Scholz &
HOME Groom, P.A.
Comforter William J. Rish, Thomas S, Gibson, Russell Scholz,
D. PaulW, Groom Il
7-1818 (850) 229-8211


SOUTHERLAND FAMILY

FUNERAL HOME
50710thStreet, PortSt. Joe
(850) 229-8111


Page B4


i..NICA5R Franklin County: (850) 670-5555
""" Leon County: (850) 926-9602
,"- Toll Free: (888) 831-6754
MA tE MED Helping Hands Make The Difference

TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN
Please come and meet our new
Rector Father Tommy Dwyer!
ST. JAMES'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Providedfor at 11:00
vwwwi.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org



St. Peter's Anglican Church
(Traditional Episcopal Service 1928 BCP)

Morning Prayer & Holy Comnlulion
Sunday .y.................8:00 a.m.
The Rev. David Mans, Priest
Services being held at the I united Pentecostal Church
309 6th Street Port St Joe. FI.
S"An Unchanging Faiuth In A Changing l'orld"
L9 =w1= Mmwwm=wm


Family Life

Church
Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherforc
Welcome you to worship with us:
Sunday 10:30am
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm
Wednesday 7pm


A Spirit Filled
Outreach Oriented
Word of Faith Church


HOME OF THE
POWERHOUSE
YOUTH MINISTRIES


\ww.f~Itf!n!iich!J.li cI.ern ie
323 Reid Ave Downtown Port St. Joe, FL 850-229-5433


^ "Our Church can be your home"

first Church of the azarene
2420 Long Avenue 'Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850) 229-9596

Give unto the Lordi :,; -, 1 I'. I .e '..,- worship fte Lordin thi beauty of holiless.
'Psalim 19:2


Sunday School......................... 10 am.
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


508 Sixteenth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


~C~I A
kW
CS


850-227-1756


c,
Rev. Ruth Hemple
SWorship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM


The Christian CONSCIENCE



A message to church leaders


What is the difference
between so-called cult
members who don't
question what they
have been taught and
mainstream church
members who don't
question what they have
been taught?
What is the difference
between so-called cult
teachers who don't
question what they
have been taught and
mainstream church
leaders who don't question
what they have been
taught?
The point being made
here is that some extensive
study is needed beyond the
teachings of any religion
or Bible school" or
seminary. Otherwise, the
teachers and their students
may be doomed to a very
unpleasant eternity.
In most Christian
denominations, faith is
supposedly in the Bible,
or the Word of God, or
some other reference


to Scripture. In truth,
it is really faith in the
scholarship, or beliefs
of translators working
with resources, which
today we would have
to call primitive. Also,
in many cases, their
faith is dependent upon
manuscript selections that
are seriously suspect. We
cannot expect translators,
working hundreds of
years ago, no matter how
well-trained or sincere
or religious, to be able
to match the accuracy
of those today, who have
computers, many times the
number of manuscripts,
concordances, interlinear
Bibles and other resources
that early translators never
dreamed of.
A pastor or other
religious teacher has an
awesome responsibility.
He or she should have
some familiarity with the
resources available, to
adequately translate from
original languages like


Greek and Hebrew and
should be familiar with
the manuscript selection
process as well. Because
of the use of corrupt
manuscripts, many English
translations of the Bible
should be avoided. Some
even say things in their
preface or introductions
that they know to be
untruthful.
One example where the
problems in translations
rear their ugly heads-is in
the Gospel of John, Chapter
3. In the first eight verses,
Jesus tells his nightly
visitor, Nicodemus, of the
need to be born again
from above. Why don't we
read this in most English
translations? The Greek
word usually translated
"again" is another, which at
least 90 percent of the time,
means from above, or from
the top. In this case, the
context demands that "born
from above" be used. "Born
of the Spirit" obviously
means "born from above."


The context also tells us
that "born of water" is the
natural childbirth from
the water environment of
the mother's womb, not
a reference to a church
ceremony.
You might be wondering,
"Who cares?" It is
important because this
demonstrates that it is
necessary for the typical
teachings about salvation,
eternal life, heaven and
hell, etc. to be re-evaluated.
Millions believe themselves
to be "saved" and headed
for heaven, yet haven't been
born from above and are
thus in serious jeopardy.
We find another example
in John 3:36, a Scripture
that is frequently used to
teach that salvation is just
believing. When we study
the original language and
the context, we find that
those who really believe,
are those who have been
born from above, and who
obey the commandments of
Jesus. A correct translation
of the Greek is:
"The one believing into
the Son has everlasting life;
but the one disobeying the
Son will not see life, but the
wrath of God remains on
him."
Questions or comments?'
Send us an e-mail to the
address below.
At the Mexico Beach
Christian Worship Center,
we believe that God wants
you know the truth about
the Bible and to be born
again from above not
base your eternal future on
faulty religious teaching. At
the MBCWC, we don't plead
for money, or twist your
arm to join. Plan to check
us out this Sunday. Our
services begin with a time
of greeting and fellowship
at 9:30 a.m. CT. Worship
begins at 9:45 a.m. Come
early so that you can meet
us and enjoy the praise and
worship music led by TJ.
We meet and worship at the
Mexico Beach Civic Center
on 105 N. 31st St., behind
Parker Realty and the
Beach Walk gift shop, just
off U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach.

God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian
Worship Center
timl @jesusanswers.com
http://www.mexicobeachcwc.com


350) 227-1724
Rev. Mdc Fulcher
Pastor
Ann Comforter Jeremy Dixon
usic Director Yoth AMinister
Deborah Loyless
Director f 'Childre Ministries


ISchedule of Worship Services
j Sunday School 9:00 AM
Morning worship all ges 10:0l ) AM
Mid Week Bible Study 6:00 PM
lilvclivc Adult Classes 6:01) PM
SChildren & Youth Ministry 6:0( I'M
Nursery provided for all services




,afthBible
Iil ,IC H U R C H
Michael Rogers Pastor
9:45 AM ................................................. Sunday School
10:30 AM ......................... Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 A M .......................... ......................... W orship
6:00 PM ........................................... ................. Worship
www.faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faith Christian School


i t % ibed JA &tdi t
af$ Jfxict 3eac
111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Melhodist (Chrch
Nisinar Pnovitt
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


Worship with us at
Long Avenue Baptist Church
Where Faith, Fanmily cFriendship aire found
,Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More
Information Call 229-8691


First Baptist Church
102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
Jerome Barnes, Interim Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students


New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church
Sunday Wednesday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am Children's Choir................. 6:00 pm
Sunday School ..................9:40 am Prayer Meeting ................ 6:30 pm
Traditional Service............ 11:00 am Children's Ministry
Youth.Groups ...................... 5:30 pm Activities .... ................... 6:30 pin
Youth Ministry Activities...6:30 pm


www.fbcpsj.org


The Catholic Church
of Gulf County
St. Joseph Parish
20th Monument Ave. Port St. Joe 227-1417
All Mass Times EDT
Saturday 4:00 pm
Sunday 9:30 am
Monday, Thursday, Friday 9:30 am
Wednesday 5:30 pm
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday Mass..................................... ....... 11:00 am (CT)
Cape San Bias Mission
1500 ft from State Park entrance at Cape San Bias
Saturday Mass............................................................... 6:00 pm (ET)


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
Aigl]lahlb viewu aptist Cjurtdj
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 6:00 pin.
Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.



BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET- Bible Study all ages 10 a.m. ET
Morning Worship 11 a.m. ET Evening Worship 6 p.m. ET
Tuesday: Choir Practice 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and srr ,i t oire Lord is good: blessed is tbe tma bat trrrtth in Him."
Plerse rceipt this inwitotion to join us in worship. God Nless you!
Ieaseu call us for your spiritual needs.
www.beachchapel.org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950 Home 769-8725


The Boomerang
Express is pulling into
First Baptist Church
from July 13th- 17th
4.e from 9arn till 12noon.
It is open to kids from

Sage 3yrs to those
entering 5th grade.

The kids will take an exciting ride through the
Outback. They will learn that no matter where
they go or what happens in life, that everything
always comes back to Jesus. So stop by the
church office or go on-line to register your
child at fbcpsj.org. If you have any questions
call Caren at 227-1552.


It l r-s old up to
tho_,e entelrine
E IRSE 5hC1 (irude

1ack to

Je 5a5 Registration on Monday ,July 13th,
starts at 8am


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution andtffonurenet Port St. Joe


Sunday:
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m, ET
Sunday School 10:00 a.n- FET
Traditional Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET
Wednesday:
Youth: 5:30p.m. ET
Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET


r;`ii'Efr~sr~Aq-'
-~c~






yadsruhT July 2 2009


Faith


The Star B5


.-- ,__ull


God's Wrath

Micah preached to a rebellious people in his day,
just as people are today.
We're told which way to go, but many go the
other way.
It seems like people would learn, that God's way
is best.
Start living a happy and fruitful life, unlike those
in the past.
Since we know what is going to happen, when we
go down the wrong path.
Why should anyone be surprised, when they
incur God's wrath.
Do you know someone who is traveling down this
path?
If you're a Christian, help them any way you can,
to keep them from God's wrath.
Billy Johnson




Flipt Kids Camp


set for July 8-10


This is a free day camp
where you will learn the
"Hero Code" and see how
you life can be Flipt! Each
day we will learn stories
from the Bible of people
who had their lives Flipt
by Jesus! Kids will learn
that they have the choice
to either live their way or
have their lives Flipt by Je-
sus too, because his way is
best.


The camp will be held
9 a.m. until 5 p.m. on July 8-
10 at Faith Bible Church.
This camp is for children
who have completed grades
K-5.
The church is located
on the corner of Garrison
Avenue and Twentieth
Street.
For more information,
call 229-6707 or visit www.
faithbiblepsj.net.


VARIANCE NOTICE

The City of Port St. Joe Planning and Development
Review Board will meet to discuss a Request for
a Variance on July 14, 2009, 4:00 EST, at City
Hall, 305 Cecil Costin Blvd. for Sherrie Swindle
located at 1105 Constitution Drive. The reason for
the request, is to add a driveway and an accessory
building to the North-East corer of the property.
The request would reduce the side setback to 7'6"
and the rear setback to 5'. A copy of.the request can
be viewed at City Hall from 8:00-5:00 P.M., M-F.

All persons are invited to attend this meeting.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision
made by the Commission with respect to any
matter considered at said meeting will need a
record of the proceedings, and for such purpose
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal
is to be based. The Board of City Commission of
the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide
a verbatim record of this meeting.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this
proceedings should contact City Hall, Telephone
No. 850/229-8261.

THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Jim Anderson
Interim City Clerk




CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
NOTICE OF
SOLICITATION
REQUEST FOR
QUALIFICATIONS
BANKING SERVICES

RFO #09-001

Notice of Solicitation

Notice is hereby given that the City of Port St:
Joe located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456 seeking RFQs for professional services
to be provided to the City as listed below, for the period
August 1,2009 to July 31,2010.

Request for qualifications are on file at the
City of Port St. Joe office located at 305 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, and may also
be downloaded from the City website (cityofportstjoe.
corn).

Evaluation of Responses to the RFQ

The RFQ submittals will be evaluated by City Staff and
Board Members of the City of Port St. Joe based upon
information supplied by each firm in response to this
RFQ. The City will award a contract for banking services
based on services provided by the bank and anticipated
interest revenue. The Board retains the right to decide
what services are in its best interest, and also reserves
the right to select more than one bank as a depository of
City Funds.

Please submit Three (3) copies to:
The City of Port St. Joe
P.O. Box 278
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457

All Submissions must be clearly marked (Banking
Professional Services) and submitted to Jim Anderson
Interim City Auditor/Clerk at City Hall by 3:00 on
Monday July 20, 2009.


.... . ..lI --' --tJ. q JL J.9


We are pleased to announce that our drinking water meets all federal and state requirements.

We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality
water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe aund dependable supply of
drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water tremment process and protect
our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from two
wells. The wells draw from the Floridan Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of our water, the only treatments required are
chlorine for disinfection purposes and aeration for removal of hydrogen sulfide.

In 2008 the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system and a search of the
data sources indicated no potential sources of contamination near our wells. The assessment results are available on the FDEP
Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Don Minchew at (850)-639-2605.
We encourage our valued customers to be inJfrmed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our
regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the fourth Monday of each month at 6:30 PM at City Hall.

City of Wewahiitclka routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and
regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1
to December 31, 2008. Data obtained before January 1, 2008, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done
in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.

In the table below, '\ou may find unfamiliar, terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms we've provided
the following definitions:

Maximum Contamninant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as
close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or
expected risk to health: MCLGs allow for a margin of safety
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a
water system must follow.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is
convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is
no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs to not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial
contaminants.
Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water
sample.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (pigll) one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water
sample.
Picocurie per liter (pCilL) measure of the radioactivity in water
Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE): An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The
IDSE is a one-time study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of
trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their
Stage I DBPR compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DBPR.
2008 CONTAMINANTS TABLE
Contaminant and Unit of ates of MCL Level Range of. MCL MCL Likely Source of
samaplingan In-UivalCLG MCn
Measurement (mo./r.g Violation Y/N Detected Results Contamination
(mo./sr.)
Radiological Contaminants
Alpha emitters (pCi/L) Dec-03 N 2.8 N/A 0 15 Erosion of natural deposits
radium 226 + 228 or Mar-03 N 1.42 N/A 0 5 Erosion of natural deposits
combined radium (pCi/L)
Inorganic Contaminants
Erosion of natural deposits;
discharge from fertilizer and
aluminum factories. Water
Fluoride (ppm) Apr- 06 N 0.5 NIA 4 4.0 duminum factories. Water
additive which promotes strong
teeth when at optimum levels
between 0.7 and 1.3 ppm
Salt water intrusion, leaching
Sodium (ppm) Apr- 06 N 20.0 N/A N/A 100 t trin soil

Contaminant and Dates of MCL Range MCLG or MC or
Unit of sampling Violation Deeel of ic Likely Source of Contamination
Detecte o MRDLG MRDL
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N I Results
TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Chlorine (pp) Jan-Dec N 0.86 0.5-09 M MRDL 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
I:laloacetic Acids
(five) (HAA5) Jul-OS N 5.4 N/A NA MCL = 60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb)______________ ______________________________________
TT IIM [Total
Irl, i ..,I, I.| Jul-08 N 52.7 N/A NA MCL = 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb)
Cnt t an Dates of AL 90th No. of sampling AL (Action Likel Source oontintion
UCn nait of Meurnt sampling Violation Percentile sites exceeding MCLG Level)kely Source of Contamination
Unt of Measurement r. Y/N Result the AL
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Corrosion of household plumbing systems;
Copper (tap water) Jun-Sep N -0.117 0 of 10 1.3 1.3 erosion of natural deposits; leaching from
(ppm) 06 wood preservatives
Lead (tap water) Jun-Sep N 3 0 of 10 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems,
(ppb) 06 erosion of natural deposits
Ifpresent, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.
Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. City
of Wewahitchka is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in
plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure
by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in
your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, anrd steps you can
take to imnimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and
wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in
some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals orfromn human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems,
agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater
runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff,
and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including'synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of indus '
trial processes and petroleum production, and can also come front gas stations, urban stornnvater runoff" and septic
systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the 'result of oil and gas production and mining
activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants
in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for
contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.
The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about
contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water
Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and
dependable water supply, we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements
are sometimes reflected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for understanding.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immnuno-compromised
persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people
with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.
These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate
means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe
Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

We at City of Wewahitchka would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process
and protect our water resources. We are committed to insuring the quality of your water. If you have any questions or concerns
about the information provided, please feel free to call any of the numbers listed.


2008 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report
City of Wewahitchka


I






B6 I The Star


Thursday, July 2, 2009


Local


HIV from page B1


rector for HIV/AIDS in the six-county
area that includes Gulf County. "We
want everyone to know their status
and make testing routine.
"People" really need to know."
HIV is the acronym for the virus
that can cause AIDS.
The virus is potentially fatal though
advances in medications have long
ago made it possible for infected folks
to live long lives with the virus.
Across a pair of tables set up un-
der a tent adjacent to the substation,
McKinney and Amy Rogers, execu-
tive director of Gulf County United,
had spread out HIV testing kits, an
assortment of condoms, informational
brochures and gift bags provided by
the Gulf County Tourist Development
Council.
McKinney said that despite de-
cades of efforts to combat HIV/AIDS,
to change behaviors that can turn
deadly if untreated, education is still
needed.
"People just don't want to know,"
she said. "They'd have to change
some behaviors, such as not eating as
they would like or having unprotected
sex or drinking alcohol.
"People are also afraid to talk to
each other."
As Rogers noted, "There is still a
stigma to the virus."
M McKinney said making testing -
which no longer need involve needles
since cheek swabs, similar to those
for DNA tests, have replaced draw-
ing blood a routine part of health
prevention is essential when it comes
to HIV because symptoms of the vi-
rus might not present for three to six
months.
It could be two to 10 years before
the virus might morph into full-blown
AIDS.
"Testing is painless, there are no
needles," McKinney said. "We are just
trying to educate people that it doesn't
hurt to be tested."
Rogers emphasized that Gulf
County United is present at the sub-
station most every weekday, and some
Saturday, for those who wish to make
testing a routine. She has the swabs
and kits to send off for the testing.
By the end of 2007, an estimated
455,636 people were living with AIDS
in America, with California, Florida,
New York and Texas the states with
the highest number of people, with
AIDS, according to the Center for Dis-
ease Control (CDC).


TIM CROFTI The Star
McKinney and Rogers put together HIV education kits while folks
sign up for free testing.

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ENCOURAGES
FLORIDIANS TO GET TESTED FOR HIV
TALLAHASSEE 'E.er, nine and a half minutes someone becomes
infected with HIV." The Florida Department of Health (DOH) joins
community partners statewide in recognizing June 27, 2009 as
National HIV Testing Day, encouraging all Floridians to get tested. The
theme of this year's campaign, "Take the Test, Take Control," focuses
on the importance of getting tested for HIV and taking steps to protect
yourself and your partners. Persons infected with HIV should access and
stay in medical care.
Testing for HIV is widely available throughout Florida. On June 27,
many locations extended hours of operation and offer free testing.
Approximately 125,000 Floridians are currently infected with
'HIV/AIDS, with 20 percent unaware they are infected. DOH is asking
medical professionals to take a leadership role in their communities in
promoting and encouraging HIV testing and prevention.
"Florida had a record year for HIV testing in 2008, with over
370,000 tests performed by registered test sites around the state," said
Tom Liberti, Chief of the Bureau of HIV/AIDS. "Our recent expansion
of testing programs in medical settings such as hospitals and community
health centers has enabled more Floridians to be aware of their HIV
status."
DOH recommends testing if a person has participated in unprotected
sexual activity or has shared syringes or needles through drug use,
tattooing or piercing. Additionally, all pregnant women and children
iorn to HIV-positive women should be tested.
DOH promotes and protects the health and safety of all people
in Florida through the delivery of quality public health services and
the promotion of health care standards. For more information about
National HIV Testing Day, please-visit the DOH's web site at www.
floridaaids.org.
For additional information about how to get tested, please contact
your primary health care provider or local county health department.


AIDS diagnosis rates in Florida,
New York and Maryland were much
higher than the national average of
12.7 cases per 100,0000 population per
year.
The CDC estimates around 1.1


million adults and


adolescents are


living with HIV in the USA, including
those not yet diagnosed, and including
those who have already progressed to
AIDS.
Infection is most prevalent, per-
centage wise, among teenagers and
the African-American population.


School NEWS

REUNIONS
WHS All Class reunion Let's Celebrate the
On Aug. 1, there will be Whole Dang Decade
an All-Class Reunion for The Port St. Joe High
Wewahitchka High School
Wewahitchka High School School Class of 1984 is cel-
(WHS) at the Honeyville ebrating their 25th reunion
Community Center. The this year. Classmates from
event will begin at 11 a.m. 1980-1989 and their families
CST, and will be'catered will gather on Friday, July
by Gant's BBQ. The cost 3rd from 7 pm until mid-
for each person is $20 and night at Windmark Beach
should be mailed to Di-Club located on Good
anne (Lester) Semmes no Morning Street.
later than July 20. If you Entertainment will be
would like more details you provided by Pro Sound En-
can go to www.fairpoint. entertainment playing those
net/-wewa/whsreunion/ to t p t
net/-wewa/whsreunion/ to great songs from the 80's
view the flyer, or you can anhits of today Paul
email Dianne at Wewame- Gant's world famous BBQ
ma@yahoo.com. Anyone will be enjoyed by all and
who attended WHS, or if a cash bar will be provided
you would just like to join by The School of Fish with
classmates and faculty, you margarita and c Purple
are more than welcome Pos (blackberry mar-
Poison (blackberry mar-
to join us. Any monies re- tini) specialty drinks. T-
maining after all expenses shirts and koozies will also
have been paid will be do- be available for sale that
nated to a local charity, night.
Cost is $20 per person,
Washington High $40 per couple & $50 for a
class of '69 reunion family with kids under 12.
RSVP's are needed as soon
The Washington High as possible.
Class of '69 will celebrate For more information
its 40th reunion on July 4 about the reunion contact
at Emile Twine Recreation Trish Warriner at trish@
Park and Gymnasium from tappercompany.com.
12 p.m. until 6 p.m.


BRIEFS

Davida Byrd is great for your health and
i a good way to support the
Scholarship Foundation Davida Byrd Schaolarship
Fun Fest Foundation.
T heD For more information
The Da- call 227-1727.
vida Byrd
Scholarship
Foundation Honors Piano Camp
will hold a to be held at GCCC
Fourth of
July 3K Walk/ PANAMA CITY Student
Run/FmFest pianists are encouraged to
starting at 9 sign up for the 2009 Honors
a.m. on Sat- BRYANT Piano Camp at GCCC.
urday, July 4 at Peters Park Held from July 6 10 in the
in Port St. Joe. Amelia G. Tapper Center
Registration begins at 8 for the Arts, the camp will
a.m. with a light warm-up provide students instruction
beginning at 8:30 a.m. host- i music technology, jazz
ed by radio personality Tay- improvisation, music theory
or Bryant. and history and applied
The walk/run begins at 9 piano.
a.m. and the course will me- Students must be rec-
ander through North Port ommended by their music
St. Joe, ,Reid Avenue and instructor and be approved
U.S. 98. by Camp Directors. Fees for
After the walk/run, there the week long program are
will be games, face-painting $230 which includes lunch.
and snacks at Peters Park. For more information
Registration is $10. please call Carolyn Wilson
All proceeds go to schol- 784-1419 or Tanya Brooks
arship recipients. This event 769-5612.


PUBLIC NOTICE


THE CODE ENFORCEMENT
SPECIAL MASTER
WILL HOLD CODE
ENFORCEMENT HEARINGS:


WHEN:
TIME:
WHERE:
SUBJECT:


THURSDAY JULY 23,2009
7:00 p.m.
Commissioner's Chamber
'Code Enforcement violations


All persons are invited to attend these
hearings. Any person who decides to
appeal any decision made by the Special
Master with respect to any matter
considered at said hearing will need a
record of the proceedings, and for such
purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. The
Code Enforcement Special Master of the
City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide
a verbatim record of this meeting.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons needing special accommodations
to participatein this proceedings should
contactJim Anderson, Interim City Clerk, City
of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, Telephone No,
850/229-8261.

THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Jim Anderson
Interim City Clerk


NOTICE OF SMALL
SCALE MAP
AMENDMENT LAND
USE CHANGE

The City of Port St. Joe Planning and
Development Review Board and City
Commission plan to review and consider the
following:

ORDINANCE NO. 422

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE CITY OF
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY AND THROUGH
PROCEDURES REQUIRED FOR SMALL-
SCALE MAP AMENDMENTS PURSUANT
TO AUTHORITY UNDER STATE STATUTES
SECTION 163.3187, SPECIFICALLY
CHANGING PORTIONS OF PARCEL ID
#-06076-000R, 1.34 ACRES OF A TRACT
OR PARCEL OF LAND LYING AND BEING
PART OF SECTION 13 OF TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 1.1 WEST, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA FROM AGRICULTURAL TO VERY
LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (VLR); AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The City of Port St. Joe Planning and
Development Review Board will consider the
proposed Ordinance on Tuesday, July 14 at 4:00
P.M., Eastern Time. The City Commission will
consider the proposed ordinance on Tuesday,
July 21 at 6:00 P.M. Eastern Time at the regular
scheduled meeting.

Both meetings will be held at the Municipal
Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456.

Interested persons may attend and be heard at the
public hearings or provide comments in writing
to the City Commissioners of the City of Port St.
Joe at City of Port St. Joe City Hall 305 Cecil
G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.
Transactions of the public hearing will not be
,recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision
made during the hearing will need a record of
the proceeding and should ensure that a verbatim
record is made, including the testimony on which
the appeal is based.

Any person who wishes to attend and requires
assistance may call the City Clerk's Office at
(850) 229-8261.


NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The City of Port St. Joe will receive sealed
bids from any qualified person, company or
corporation interested in constructing the
following project:

SAND HILLS POND

This project includes the following: Demolition
and removal of trees on approximately 1.35
acres. Excavation of a stormwater pohd,
followed by_ irrigation and sod of site. Also
included is power service to site and an aeration
fountain.

Plans and specifications can be obtained at
Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid
must conform to Section .287.133(3) Florida
Statutes, on public entity crimes.

Completion date for this project will be 120 days
from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented
to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to complete
the project on the specified date will be set ,at
$200.00 per day.

Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $100.00
per set and is non-refundable. Checks should
be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.

There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference
held on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 at 1:30 pm
Eastern Time at the office of Preble-Rish,
Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL
32456.

Bids will be received until 3:00 p.m. Eastern
Standard Time, on July 16. 2009 at the City of
Port St. Joe, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456. and will be opened and read
aloud on July 16. 2009, at 3:15p.m. Eastern
Standard Time at the same location. The City of
Port St. Joe reserves the right to reject any and
all bids.

Point of Contact will be Bill Kennedy, Project
Manager, Preble-Rish Inc. Consulting Engineers
at (850) 227-7200 or fax (850) 227-7215.






Thursday, July 2, 2009 '


Law Enforcement


The Star I B7


FWC DAILY OPERATIONS


This report represents some events
the FWC handled June 12-18; however, it.
does not include all actions taken by the
Division of Law Enforcement.


BAY COUNTY
Officer Joe Chambers conducted a
resource inspection on a fisherman and
found him to have two outstanding ar-
rest warrants issued from Bay County for
grand theft and failure to appear. The sub-
ject was booked into the Bay County Jail.
Lt. Jay Chesser and Officer Mike No-
bles worked the Econfina Wildlife Manage-
ment Area along Econfina Creek and issued
several citations f6r underage persons pos-
sessing alcohol, overloaded vessels, insuf-
ficient number of personal flotation devices
onboard and for children not wearing the
required personal flotation, devices.
Officer Joe Chambers was patrolling
the Econfina Wildlife Management Area
when he checked two subjects exiting the
Cat Creek swimming hole.
Chambers smelled the aroma of canna-
bis, and both subjects admitted to having
just smoked a joint. Further investigation
found additional cannabis and rolling pa-
pers. Citations were issued and the con-
traband seized.
Officer Mark Clements received a dis-
position on a subject that included a fine of
$750 and incarceration in the county jail
for 364 days.
The subject was observed late one night
driving carelessly in the Cat Creek section
of the Econfina Wildlife Management Area
and found to have a suspended driver's li-
cense. The subject had previously been
cited by Clements for the same charge.
Officer Dennis Palmer worked a boat-
ing accident involving a diver who was
struck by a boat's propeller causing se-
vere lacerations to his chest, neck and
face. The investigation is ongoing.


The Gulf County Sheriff's
Office will be conducting ve-
hicle safety checkpoints and
DUI checkpoints during the
,month July 2009. The check
points will be held through-
out the county to include
Highway 98 near St. Joe
Beach, Highway 98 and Gar-
rison Ave, C-30 Simnfons
Bayou, Highway 71 North of
White City, Highway 22 and
Highway 22A, Highway 71
and Westarm Creek, High-
way 71 Dalkieth Area and
Highway 71 near the Cal-
houn line.
On 06/20/2009 deputies
responded to a traffic crash
on Lake Grove Road. They
found a vehicle driven by
Tommy Durrell Montford,
65, in a ditch near Byrd
Parked Road. The Florida
Highway Patrol worked the
traffic crash and Montford


WASHINGTON COUNTY
Officer Larry Morris responded to
transport Washington County Sheriff's Of-
fice deputies by 4-wheel drive truck to a se-
cluded area near Caryville in response to
the report of a drunk suspect threatening
some campers and carelessly displaying
his firearm. The suspect did not resist and
was arrested without further incident.

HOLMES COUNTY
Officer Larry Morris responded to as-
sist the Holmes County Sheriff's Office at
Wright's Creekjust north of Bonifayon High-
way 79. The Sheriff's Office had stopped a
19-year-old Walton County resident with fel-
ony warrants. The subject fled to the creek
and refused to cooperate with deputies. The
local Department of Corrections K-9 Team
responded and tracked him for three hours.
The suspect eluded the team after others
picked him up in a vehicle. The suspect was
identified, and additional criminal charges
will be added to the existing warrants.

LEON COUNTY
Lt. Kent Harvey and Officer Chris Jones
were on water patrol on Lake Talquin when
they stopped a vessel pulling a persontub-
ing. A boating safety inspection revealed
several safety equipment violations. While
issuing the operator a citation for insuf-
ficient number of life jackets, the officers
noticed an open beer under the console of
the boat and a marijuana cigarette in plain
:view. The operator was 19 years old.
Field sobriety tasks were conducted,
and the operator was given a breath test at
the boat ramp. His breath alcohol concen-
tration registered above .02. The operator
was charged with operating a vessel by a
person under 21 years of age while consum-
ing alcohol. He also was charged with pos-
session of less than 20 grams of cannabis.


was arrested for DUI.
On 06/20/2009 Ashley Wil-
lard Burkett, 24, was arrest-
ed on a Bay County warrant
for uttering a forged instru-
ment.
On 06/20/2009 Michael
David Carter, 37, was ar-
rested for DWLSR.
On 06/21/2009 deputies
responded to a domestic
disturbance. Paula Sue
Daniels, 30, was arrested for
battery.
On 06/21/2009 Allen
Herbert Nelson, 48, was
arrested for possession of
marijuana and violation of
probation.
On 06/23/2009 Jason Bri-
an Ward, 29, was arrested on
4 warrants for failure to ap-
pear for worthless checks.
On 06/23/2009 Bruce Lee
Yand was arrested on charg-
es of .burglary and grand


theft. It is alleged that Yand
stole some stereo speakers
out of a vehicle in October of
2008.
On 06/25/2009 Danny La-
mar Thomas was arrested
for failure to pay child sup-
port.
On 06/25/2009 deputies
responded to a call of a
women walking around the
Oak Grove area pushing a
stroller and carrying a weed
eater. They discovered that
the weed eater was stolen
and placed Brandy Leigh
Richter Pyne, 25, under ar-
rested for grand theft.
On 06/28/2009 deputies
responded to a call of a man
naked on the beach near
Beacon Hill, Deputies lo-
cated David Thomas Pries,
42, sun bathing naked on the
beach. He was arrested for
indecent exposure in public.


JEFFERSON COUNTY
Officers Stefanie Wilcox and Bucky
Higman provided law enforcement sup-
port on the Wacissa River for a six-mile
canoe race. Race organizers requested
our support due to some unfavorable
encounters with powerboats prior to


the weekend race. Prior to the race,
law enforcement officers and organizers
teamed up to inform the general public
and locals about the race and what to ex-
pect the day of the race. The preplanning
.paid off with a successful race and an en-
joyable day on the river for paddlers and
power boaters.


Attention: Arizona Chemical
Do you know that changing jobs also means
making decisions about your retirement savings?

By taking a lump-sum
'. ~. l. \ .w^ 'y cash distribution from your
retirement plan when you
change jobs, a $100,000
account balance can turn into
a $57,000 payout because of
,taxes and penalties.


When you change jobs, you can handle your retirement savings in a number of
ways. Making a suitable choice can be important for your retirement security.
Together, we can determine the most appropriate option for your objectives.
Please plan to attend this workshop.

ROADMAP TO ROLLOVERS

CHANGING JOBS

Presented by
E. Duane Southerland, MBA
Vice President, Superior Bank/Financial Consultant, Uvest Financial Service

Date: Thursday, July 9, 2007 5:00 pm 6:30 pm EST
Place: Superior Bank, 418 Cecil G. Costin Blvd. Port St. Joe, Fl.
RSVP: To attend, please call Sam Tyus (850) 227-1416
Attendance is limited. Please respond by July 6





S BANKING MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS

The workshop will include information regarding:
The importance of making an appropriate decision with retirement money when
you're changing jobs.
How to evaluate the options available to you when you change jobs.
How to build a retirement plan strategy that matches your long-term objectives
and risk tolerance.

1. Assumes 25' federal tax bracket. '8 state and local income tax rate and an early withdrawal penalty
of l10' applicable only if you are under age 50112.. unless an exception applies. IEmployer is required to
withhold 2'0%i of a cash distribution ($20.000) as prepayment toward federal income tax. This 20% will
be applied toward federal income tax owed ($25.000) for the year the distribution is made.

Securities and insuranceproducts are offered by UVEST Financial Services and its affiliates, member
FINRA/SIPC. UVEST and Superior Bank are independent entities.

Not FDIC Insured G ranked May Lose Value
Not Guaranteed by any Not a Bank Deposit
Government Agency


Sheriff's Arrest LOG


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;1!Y1~ROOM


229=1324 I.) In
GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Slervice s ~u







8B & THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009


IF--- -R-


ANNOUNCEMENTS




PETS '


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BUSINESS & FINAN





REAL ESTATE


ICIAL


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Ire


AUTO,M.ARINE,R


ANNOUNCEMENTS
1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130 -Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170- Found


1 1100
2580S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Crystal I, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are' as
follows:

Certificate No. 154

Application No. 2009 5

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 01526-001R

Descriptionof Property
COMMENCE at the NW.
Corner of the NE 1/4 of SE
1/4 of Section 4, Township
4 South, Range 10 West,
Gulf County, Florida,
thence run East 424 feet,
for the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING, thence continue to
run East for 150 feet,
thence run South for 338.6
feet; thence turn right
down center of Road for
159.10 feet West, thence
turn left and run North for
335 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, same lying
and being in Section 4,
Township 4 South, Range
10 West, and also known
as Tract No. 3 of Area "G"
of Stone Creek Acres, an
unrecorded plat, contain-
ing 1 1/3 acres, more or
less.

Name in which assessed:
Allen & Crystal Unton

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T., Wednesday, the 15th
day of July, 2009.

Dated this 4th day of June,
2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
June 11, 18, 25, July 2,
2009
2581S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Crystal I, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as
follows:

Certificate No. 552

Application No. 2009 6

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 03951-000R

Description of Property:
Lot Twenty-Two (22), in
Block One Thousand One
(1001), City of Port St. Joe,
Florida, according to the
Official Plat thereof on file
in the Office of Clerk of Cir-
cuit Court, Gulf County,
Florida.

Name in which assessed:


''
*"


1100
Lena Dukes -

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described iri such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 15th
day of July, 2009.

Dated this 4th day of June,
2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
June 11, 18, 25, July 2,
2009
2582S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Crystal I, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as
follows:

Certificate No. 461

Application No. 2009 7

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 03951-000R

Description of Property:
Lot Eight (8), Block Four-
teen (14) in Yon's Addition
to Beacon Hill, according
to the Official Plat thereof
on record in the Office of
the Clerk of Circuit .Court
of Gulf County, Florida.

Name in which assessed:
William Coleman Smith

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the 'Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 15th
day of July, 2009.

Dated this 4th day of June,
2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
June 11, 18, 25, July 2,
2009
2728S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS, INC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

RICHARD P DAVIS; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
RICHARD R DAVIS; UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS; IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.

CASE NO.:
23-2008-CA-000470

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 8th day of June,
2009, and entered in Case
No. 23-2008-CA-000470, of
the Circuit Court of the
14TH Judicial Circuit in
and for Gulf County, Flor-
ida, wherein COUNTRY-
WIDE HOME LOANS, INC.
is the Plaintiff and RICH-
ARD R DAVIS; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF RICHARD P
DAVIS; UNKNOWN
TENANTSS; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN


1100
TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defend-
ants. I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at the FRONT LOBBY
OF COURTHOUSE at the
Gulf County Courthouse in
Port St. Joe, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 30th day
of July, 2009, the following
described property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:

All that certain land situate
in Gulf County, Florida;
Commencing at the North-
west corner of the South-
west Quarter of the South-
west Quarter of Section
32, Township 5 South,
Range 11 West and run
West for 400 feet to the
West side of County Road,
thence run South 780 feet
to the Point of Beginning,
thence run West 150 feet,
thence South 180 feet,
thence run East 150 feet,
thence run North 180 feet
to the Point of Beginning,
same lying and being in
Section 31, Township 5
South, Range 11 West.

TOGETHER WITH A MO-
BILE HOME
VIN#13703158
R.P. DECAL#
0477173131A
VIN#13703159
R.P DECAL#
0477173131B

YEAR MANUFACTURED:
1977
DIMENSIONS: 23.5 X 56.3

WHICH IS AFFIXED AND
ATTACHED TO THE LAND
AND IS PART OF THE
REAL PROPERTY

WHICH, BY INTENTION
OF THE PARTIES AND
UPON RETIREMENT OF
THE CERTIFICATE OF TI-
TLE AS PROVIDED IN
319.621 FLA. STAT.,
SHALL CONSTITUTE A
PART OF THE REALTY
AND PASS WITH IT

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

Dated this 9th day of June,
2009.

Rebecca Norris
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite
120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
June 25, July 2, 2009
2779S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA
,GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

RBC CENTURY BANK
PLAINTIFF

VS.

DAVID R. HAYNES, ETAL.
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO: 08-88-CA

NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SER-
VICE

TO: TIMOTHY A HAYNES
whose residence is un-
known if he/she/they be
living; and if he/she/they
be dead, the unknown de-
fendants who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,


___1100 _]
lienors, creditors, trustees,
and all parties claiming an
interest by, through, under
or against the Defendants,
who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all par-
ties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property de-
scribed in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the
following property:

A portion of Section 16,
Township 9 South, Range
10 West; Gulf County, Flor-
ida, and being more par-
ticularly described as fol-
lows:

Commencing at the inter-
section of: the county line
common to Gulf and
Franklin Counties and the
Northerly right of way line
of County Road No. 30 (66
foot R/W) and thence .run
Westerly along said right
of way line as follows:
Along the arc of a curve
concave Northerly, said
curve having a central an-
gle of 12 degrees, 36' 52"
and a radius of 2942.86
feet for 643.95 feet, said
arc being subtended by a
chord bearing and dis-
tance of S, 82 degrees 55'
44"W. for 642.65 feet to the
point of tangency of said
curve; thence S. 89 de-
grees 14' 10" W. for 88.82
feet to the point of curva-
ture of a curve concave
Southerly, having a central
angle of 12 degrees 04' 56'
and a radius of 1867.50
feet; thence Westerly
along the arc of said curve
for 393.81 feet, said arc
being subtended by a
chord bearing and a dis-
tance of S. 83 degrees 11'
42" W. for 393.08 feet to
the point of tangency of
said curve; thence S. 77
degrees 09' 14"W for
1516.03 feet to the point of
curvature of a curve con-
cave Northerly, said curve
having a central angle of
02 degrees 11' 43" and
having a radius of
20,792.58 feet; thence
Westerly along arc of said
curve for 796.69 feet; said
arc being subtended by a
chord bearing and dis-
tance of S. 78 degrees 15'
05" W. for 796.65 feet to
the point of tangency of
said curve; thence S. 79
degrees 20' 57"W for
302.18 feet to the point of
curvature of a curve con-
cave Northerly, said curve
having a central angle of
03 degrees 34' 12" and a
radius of 10,644.42 feet;
thence Westerly along the
arc of said curve for
663.34 feet, said arc being
subtended by a chord
bearing and distance of S.
81 degrees 08' 03"W. for
663.15 feet to the point of
reverse curvature with a
curve concave Southerly,
said curve having a central
angle of 01 degrees 46' 19"
and a radius of 26,170.29
feet; thence Westerly
along the arc of said curve
for 809.34 feet, said arc
being subtended by a
chord bearing and dis-
tance of S. 02 degrees 02'
00"W. for 809,31.' feet to
the point of tangency of
said curve; thence S. 81
degrees 08' 50"W for
1275.90 feet to the point of
curvature of a curve con-
cave Southerly, said curve
having a central angle of
05 degrees 13' 30" and a
radius of 14,089.90 feet;
thence Westerly along the
arc of said curve for
1284.90 feet, said arc be-
ing subtended by a chord
bearing and distance of S.
78 degrees 32' 05"W. for
1284.46 feet to the point of
tangency of said curve,
thence S. 75 degrees 55'
20"W. for 622.41 feet;
thence S. 75 degrees 29'
08"W, for 1635.95 feet to
the point of: curvature of a
curve concave Northerly
and having a radius of
5696.28 feet; thence West-
erly along the arc of said
curve through a central an-
gle of 07 degrees 12' 28"
for 716.60 feet, said arc
being subtended by a
chord bearing and dis-
tance of S. 79 degrees 05'
22"W. for 716.13 feet;
thence continue Westerly


along the arc of said right
of way line curve through a
central angle of 01 de-
grees 24' 05" for 139.34
feet, said arc being sub-
tended by a chord bearing
and distance of S. 83 de-
grees 23' 43"W for 139.33
feet for the Point of Begin-
ning; thence continue
Westerly along the arc of
saidright of way line curve
through a central angle of
00 degrees 42' 03" for
69.67 feet, said arc being
subtended by a chord
bearing and distance of S.
84 degrees 26' 47"W for
69.67 feet; thence leaving
said right of way line curve
N. 05 degrees 12'09"W for
500.00 feet to a point on
the arc of a nontangent
curve concave Northerly
and having a radius of
5196.28 feet; thence East-
erly along the arc of said
curve through a central an-
gle of 00 degrees 42' 03"
for 63.57 feet, said arc be-
ing subtended by a chord
bearing and distance of N.
84 degrees 25' 57"E for
63.57 feet; thence S. 05
degrees 54' 07"E, for
500.00 feet to the point.of
beginning. Said lands con-
taining 0.765 acres, more
or less.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
on David Bakalar, Esq.,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 450 N. Park
Road. Suite 410, Holly-
wood, FL. 33021 on or be-
fore July 20, 2009 (no later
than 30 days from the date
of the first publication of
this notice of action) and
file the original with the
clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the com-
plaint or petition filed
herein. ,

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court at
GULF County, Florida, this
10th day of June, 2009.

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
BY: Jasmine Hysmith
DEPUTY CLERK

LAW OFFICES OF
BAKALAR & TOPOUZIS,
PA.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF
450 N. PARK ROAD,
SUITE 410
HOLLYWOOD, FL. 33021
June 25, July 2, 2009
2809S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

EMERALD COAST FED-
ERAL CREDIT UNION
Plaintiff,

Vs.

EDWARD BRUCE SMITH,
SHERRY ANN SMITH,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-138

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that
pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
June 11, 2009 and entered
in Civil Case 'No.
09-138-CA of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit of the State of
Florida, in and for Gulf
County, wherein EMER-
ALD COAST FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff
and EDWARD BRUCE
SMITH and SHERRY ANN
SMITH are Defendants, I
will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at the front
door of the Gulf County
Courthouse in Port St. Joe,
Florida,at 11:00am,,
E T
on the 13th day of August,
2009 the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment:

Lot Three (3), Block "C"
Gaulding's Addition to
Highland View, according
to the plat. thereof, re-
corded in Plat Book 1,


I'""__1100 _
Page 30, of the Public
Records of Gulf County,
Florida.

REBECCA NORRIS
CIRCUIT COURT CLERK
By Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk
June 25, July 2, 2009
2810S
In The Circuit Court Of The
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit
In And For Gulf County,
Florida

Prosperity Bank,
Plaintiff,

vs.

Jerry J. Warren, Edward
Bish and Griffin Sand &
Concrete Co., Inc.
Defendants.

Case No.: 08-585CA

AMENDED
NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE is hereby given
that, pursuant to an Order
or Final Judgment entered
in the above-captioned
case, I will sell the property
situated in Gulf County,
Florida, described as:

Lots 21 and 23, Block 9.
less the North 24.3 feet (to
the center line of wall) of
Lot 21, in the City of Port
St. Joe, according to the
official map thereof on file
in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida.

Also, the Northerly portion
of the right of way of Third
Street comnencing at the
Northeasterly intersection
of the right of way of Reid
Avenue and Third Street
and running Easterly along
Third Street an approxi-
mate distance of 90 feet to
the alleyway, said parcel
being that portion of the
right of way upon which
the existing building sits
and being .79 feet on the
Westerly extremity and .78
feet on the Easterly ex-
tremity thereof; also, that
portion of the Easterly right
of way of Reid Avenue be-
ginning at the Northeast-
erly point of intersection of
the right of way of Reid Av-
enue and Third Street and
running Northerly along
Reid Avenue a distance of
37.8 feet, said parcel hav-
ing a width of .55 feet on
the Southerly extremity
and .58 feet on the North-
erly extremity and being
that portion of the right of
way extremity and being
that portion of the right of
way upon which the exist-
ing building sits.

at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash, at the front door of
the Gulf County Court-
house, in Port St. Joe,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. EST
on July 30, 2009.

Any person other than the
property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens
claiming an interest in any
surplus funds from the
sale, must file a claim for
said funds with the clerk of
court within 60 days from
thedate of the sale.

DATED this 15th day of
June,2009.
CLERK OF COURT
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk
June 25, July 2, 2009

2850S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

NICOLE H. SEYBOLD, as
Personal Representative of
the Estate of Louis R.
Seybold,
Plaintiff,

v

ARTHUR K. SIGMAN and
KIMBERLY A. SIGMAN,
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 08-553 CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE
that REBECCA L. NORRIS,
Clerk of Court, will sell the
following described prop-
erty on July 16, 2009 at


11:00 A.M. (eastern Time)
in the lobby of the Gulf
County Courthouse, 1000
Cecil Costin Boulevard,
Port Saint Joe, Florida
32456. The sale will be
made pursuant to the final
judgment entered on June
11,2009.

A description of the prop-
erty to be sold is as fol-
lows:

Lot 20, Block D of Money
Bayou Subdivision, ac-
cording to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book
1, Page 49, of the Public
Records of Gulf County,
Florida, Parcel ID No. R
03130-050R,

also known as

Lot 20. Block D of Money
Bayou Subdivision' Unit
No. 1, according to the
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 1, Page 49, of
the Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida, a portion
of Parcel ID No.
03130-000R.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale

Dated June 19, 2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
As Clerk of Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

NOTICE TO PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES

If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order
to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact
Court Administrator, 301
McKenzie Avenue, Pan-
ama City, Florida 32401,
telephone number (850)
747-5327 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this
notice.
June 25, July 2, 2009


2863S
IN THE FOURTEENTH JU-.
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

SUPERIOR BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

BARBARA J. PALMER and
RYLAND B. MUSIC,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-72-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated June
22, 2009, and entered in
Civil Action No. 09-72-CA
of the Circuit Court of the
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit
in and for Gulf County,
Florida, wherein the parties
were the plaintiff,. SUPE-
RIOR BANK, and the de-
fendants, BARBARA J.
PALMER and RYLAND B.
MUSICK, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder,
for cash, at 11.00 a.m.
(Eastern Time) on the 23rd
day of July, 2009, at the
front door of the Gulf
County Courthouse, Port
St. Joe, Florida, the
following-described real
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, of
Foreclosure:

Lot 11, Block 17, Port St.
Joe Beach, Unit 1, a subdi-
vision as per map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 58, located
in the Public Records of
Gulf County, Florida.

The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
documentary stamps on
the Certificate of Title.

DATED this 22nd day of
June,2009.

HON. REBECCA L. NOR-
RIS


S 1100
CLERK OF COURT
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Clerk/Deputy Clerk
July 2, 9, 2009
2869S
IN THE FOURTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

SUPERIOR BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

MONICA M. TARANTINO
and BENNY JOE TARANT-
INO,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-71 CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
MONICA, M. TARANTINO
and BENNY JOE
TARATINO
1019 Marvin Avenue, Port
St. Joe, FL 32456-2067

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property in Gulf County,
Florida:

Lot 10, Block 84, St. Jo-
seph's Addition to the City
of Port St. Joe, Florida, ac-
cording to the official plat
thereof on file in the Office
of the Clerk of Circuit
Court of Gulf County, Flor-
'ida

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
on Frank A. Baker,
plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 4431 Lafayette
Street, Marianna, Florida,
32446, on or before July
29; 2009, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this
court either before service
On Plaintiffs attomey or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

DATED this 23rd day of
June, 2009.

HON. REBECCA L. NOR-
RIS
Clerk of the Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
July 2, 9, 2009
2882S
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Port St Joe Redevel-
opment Agency's regular
Board of Directors Meeting
will be held on Thursday,
July 9, 2009, at 5:00 pm at
150 Captain Fred's Place.
All persons are invited to
attend and participate. An-
yone wanting to appeal an
official decision made on
any subject at the meeting
must have a verbatim rec-
ord of the meeting that in-
cludes the testimony and
evidence on which the ap-
peal is based.
July 2, 2009
2890S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Denton II, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as fol-
lows:

Certificate No. 629

Application No. 2009 8

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 06269-980R

Description of Property:
Lot 11, Turtle Dunes, a
Subdivision, as per Map or
plat recorded in Plat Book
5, Page 7, of the Public
Records of Gulf County,
Florida.

Name in which assessed:
Booth Holdings Booth
Trust, LLC

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of


Establislhd 1938 Serving Gull County and surrounding areas for 67 years


\ _~~


Illar all


ri


--~I-


1100
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 5th
day of August, 2009.

Dated this 26th day of
June, 2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 2, 9, 16, 23, 2009
2892S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Denton II, LLC
the holder of the following
Tax Certificate, has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed dre as
follows:

Certificate No132

Application No.2009 9

Year of Issuance: 2007

R.E. No. 01432-000R

Description of Property:
Lot 14, Block 5, Unit One,
RIVERSIDE ESTATES, as
per map or plat thereof
and recorded in Plat Book
2, Page 24, of the Public
Records of Gulf County,
Florida.

Name in which assessed:
Elaine Hodges & Laurie
Duke

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such cer-
tificate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T,. Wednesday, the 5th
day of August, 2009,

Dated this 26th day of
June, 2009.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
July 2, 9,16, 23, 2009
2903S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL .CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

Flagstar Bank, F.S.B.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

HENRIETTE D .BURNS,
et.al
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08492CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
HENRIETTE D BURNS

Whose residence is: 18526
SE 43RD, VANCOUVER,
WA, 98683

TO:
UNKNOWN SPOUSE
HENRIETTE D. BURNS

Whose residence is: 18526
SE 43RD, VANCOUVER,
WA, 98683

and who is/are evading
service of process and the
unknown defendants)
HENRIETTE D BURNS;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE
HENRIETTE D. BURNS
who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, credi-
tors, trustees, and all par-
ties claiming an interest
by, through, under or
against the Defendant(s),








loo 100 1100 10oo0 _41oo 611 14o ] 61o 40)
who are not known to be known Defendants and ERLY 74.00 FEET 2 br, 1.5 ba, across from St Joe Bch/TAFB Nice Chevy Suburban 1994,
dead or alive, and all par- such of the aforemen- THEREOF St. Joe beach $700 mo + house, $695 month $595 Down, 0% Interest,
ties having or claiming to tioned unknown Defend- dep. Please call Pelican Walk Real Estate $4,900 Total. Daylight Auto
have any right, title or in- ants as may be infants, in- more commonly known as 850-647-6320 leave msg, 2 bedroom 1 bath house 850-647-2473 REALESTATE OR Financing 215-1769 9am
terest in the property de- competonts or otherwise 189 Tobago Drive f/k/a Insallation/Main/Reopair 2 bedroom, 1 bh house 85064k 2473 to 9pm
scribed in the mortgage not sui juris. 193-A Tobago Drive, Port Grove Area o P St 7100 Homes
being foreclosed herein, Saint Joe, FL 32456: Installers 2 br, 2 ba 5ove22 00 Port S Joe. eh Hm
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI- Mediacom available now2 7120 -omernlcial
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI- FIED that an action has This action has been filed Communications, Duplex apt. Jones Townhomes forrent 7140 oFarms nc
FIED that an action to fore- been commenced to fore- against you and you are The 8th largest cable Homestead.$62ulfaire Jones Homestead Pn- 7150- Lots nu Areoag
close a ogage on the close a mortgage on the required serve a copy of
cloigpoet:flownse a mortgprop required to serve a copy of company in the United 229-6941 Executive 3 br, 2 ba, W&D, derosa Pines. First month 7 Mobile Homes/Lots
following property: following real property, ly your written defense, if States and covering garage, deck, fenced yd, rent free with deposit and 71So0- nvestn,ent
ing and being and sitliated any, upon SHAPIRO &
T 1 BK 3 OF THEi l County, Forida, FISHMA, L A over 23 states, has an pool, tennis court, private 12 month lease. 2 brand 3 Property
LOT 14, BUCK36, OF THE in Gulf County. Florida, FISHMAN, LLR Attorneys immediate opening in ... beach, pets okay, $925 br units available. Call -l9 a-Out-of-Town
CITY OF PORT ST JOE, more particularly 'de- for Plaintiff, whose address mio Be 85 39 un0 available C al 0 a EsaOo-Teow
FLORIDA, ACCORDING scribed asfollows: is 10004 N. Dale Mabry M Beach For m 832-970 2690 o 8502279732 72- Timthndshae95
TO THE OFFICIAL MAP Highway, Suite 112 *Insfal f, ,' 832-9702 NIssan Pathfinder 1995,
ON FILE IN THE OFFICE COMMENCE AT THETapa, FL 33618, itin No technical experience Clean 3 br, 2 ba in PSJ, Ii $495 Down. 0% Interest.
OF THE CLERK OF CIR- NORTHWEST CORNER thirty (30) days after the necessary. Performs in $750 mo dep Cal[ 3 $2,900 Total. Daylight Auto
thiry (30) days after he stalls for cable and high 850-545-58140or
CUIT COURT OF GULF OF SECTION 7, TOWN- first publication of this no- peedinter Must 850-442-3334. 6170 Meh Financing 215-1769 9am
COUNTY, FLORIDA SHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE ice and ile the original speed internet Must 8504423334. Meic/St. Joe Bch, tp 9pm.
CONT FLOID ntice and file the original have a valid Driver's li- Townhomes, tarting at
11 WEST GULF COUNTY with the clerk of this Court McClellan St. 2 br, 1 ba, $135K. Houses $175K
a/k/a 304 6TH ST PORT FLORIDA, THENCE RUN either before service on o Libertyfenced yard, C/H/A total
SAINT JOE, FL32456 NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 Plaintiffs attorney or imme- competitive pay and Mup, Pelican Walk Real
SMINUTES 21 SECONDS iae tre after; otr- great benefits along Manor Apts electric good neighbors, Lot4 at Bryant's Landing. Estate 850-847-2473
has been filed against you EAST ALONG THE WEST wise a default will be en- with advancement now accepting applica- 600 8 551 2 br, 2 ba. C/HA, furn'd
and you are required to LINE OF SECTION 6, tered against you for the opportunities. For im- tions for 1 br apts. These W/D hkJp, Carport
serve a copy of your writ- TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, relief demanded in the mediate consideration, units are for persons 62 w/storage.$454.75 mo ncl
ten defenses, if any, to it, RANGE 11 WEST FOR Complaint. please visit our website years of age or older, Port St. Joe Still Avail. Water/Sewer and sales 7120
on Nwabufo Umunna, At- 1341.09 FEET TO THE at handicapped/disabled, re- Please Call again 3 br 1 tax. No pets. Close to boat St Joe Bch.
tomey for Plaintiff, whose SOUTHWESTERLY WITNESS my hand and careers.mediacomcc. gardless of age. Appli- ba, hrd wood firs, Irg stor- ramp. 1/2 block to Lockey Hwy 98, Sell or lease. Pel-
address is 2901 Stirling BOUNDARY OF THE 100 seal of this Court on the com cants must meet income age shed w/ W/D hkups, Lake & Chipola river. Call ican Walk Real Estate
Road, Suite 300, Fort FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF 22nd day of June,'2009. Equal Opportunity requirement. located at $600 mo 850-227-7234 850-227-3777 850-647-2473
Lauderdale, Florida 33312 WAY OF COUNTY ROAD Employer 102 Liberty Manor Circle, -
either on or before July 27, NO. 30-E (FORMERLY REBECCA L. NORRIS Web Id # 34042063 Port St Joe, FL, 850-229-! l fw 8130
2009. STATE ROAD NO. 30-E): Circuit and County Courts 6353, TDD#850-955-8771. Hurr0 We onl Fve ew Ford F-150 X/Cab 4X4,
THENCE SOUTHEAST- By: Jasmine Hysmith -Logiscs/Transportation- Equal Housing Opportu- 7150 1 998 $995 Down,
and file the original with ERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT Deputy Clerk unity Barefoot Cotta ges lef. tL O%lnterest, $4,500 Total.
the Clerk of this Court ei- OF WAY LINE AS FOL- 09-137841 IWe Need Driver I -- Daylight Auto Financing
their before service on LOWS: SOUTH 23 DE- July2, 9, 2009 with poolsplgroun 215-1769 9am tp 9pm.
Plaintiffs attorney or imme- GREES 25 MINUTES 11 I Trainees Only I Ine mmuniw pgrund,u 3.5 acres Howard Creek.
diately thereafter; other- SECONDS EAST FOR I No expeicede iI~ I No experienced Drivers 6120 015 0( U5 l S aclearir reque.
wise a default will be en- 1642.44 FEET TO A POINT $800 per week house, and hot tub. Pre inludes watersewer and grbge No clea ring required
rd against you for the OF CUR00perweek Great quiet homesite
tered against you ior the OF CURVE THENCE 1160 1-877-214-3624 ST. JOE BEACH. 3br, and/or plenty of room for
relief demanded in the ALONG THE ARC OF A I Web Id #34041480 1ba, 2 blocks to bch. $795 3........................................... 00 livestock or horses. Great
complaint. CURVE TO THE LEFT Lost Stroller ------. mo. Pets ok. Military dis- fishing Call 827-4290 or
WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF Phil & Ted's black jogging count. 10 min. to TAFB. 2br2.Sb..................................7....... 950 767-3191
WITNESS my hand and 11426.79 FEET AND A stroller Last seen in the Days 850-648-1115 eve-
the seal of this Court this CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 parking lot behind the Tin nings 850-647-3871 1,866,628,1334
19th day of June, 2009. DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 Shed antique store. Please
SECONDS FOR 427.29 make two children very The MainStay Suites ,,,, ,t ,ot
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT FEETTO THE POINT OF happy and let us know if is now accepting applica- Ford X/Cab Stepside 1995
COURT TANGENCY OF SAID you have found it! Thank tions for the following posi- ... T ._: ,8,SefCLas com $695 Down, 0% Interest
BY: Jasmine Hysmith CURVE; THENCE SOUTH you! 850-867-0671 tions. | 130 $4,500 Total. Daylight Auto
DEPUTY CLERK 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES Financing 215-1769 9am
44 SECONDS EAST FOR Full Time Director of America's Mini Storage & Office Complex :. If=. tp 9pm.
A copy of this Notice of 1711.69 FEETTO A POINT Sales. This position re- s C P Now Lain" A I ARINE
Action, Complaint and Lis OF CURVE; THENCE quires an outgoi Center N LeasinN
Pendens were sent to the ALONG THE ARC OF A gressive personality who 2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm, Lcationi Location! Near the PortI 8" A""""e & collectibles
defendants and address CURVE TO THE RIGHT plays well with others. Carrabelle, large deck 8110 Carsrts Uy
named above. WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF Prior sales experience is $650 mo. $650 dep. 130 Trucks
11415.15 FEET AND A required. Some day travel Available 08/01/09 Call for New brick offices with 12' x 12' office, 140 ans
In accordance with the CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 will be required, an appt. 850-562-4996. private Bath, Storage Closet, with easy 8150 -ommercial
Americans with Disabilities DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 MERCANDE _____ Motorcycles
Act, persons needing a SECONDS FOR 1058.64 Part Time Weekend Front access bay to a 24' x 40' warehouse 81700-Auto Parts
reasonable accommoda- FEET TO THE POINT OF 3100-Antiques Desk Sales Agent. The Eagle Landing & Accessories
tion to participate in this TANGENCY OF SAID 3110-Appliances Spaciouspace. Gated, Secured 1 year lease at 2 naltMudBogger!
proceeding should, no CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 3120- Arts & Crafts ideal candidate will have Spacious sSe 220- PersonaloWatercraft
proceeding should, no CURVETHENCESOUTH 1 Auctions previous computer and townhome $550 per month, $550 deposit. 8230 Sailboats Ford Ranger 1991, Excel-
later than seven (7) days 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 3140 Baby Items guest service skills, but we T n e 8240 Boat & Marine lent!, 5 speed, $2,900 To-
prior, contact the Clerk of 55 SECONDS EAST FOR 3150- Building Supplies are willing to train the right New development Fully Supplies tal. 0% Interest, $695
the Court's disability coor- 2813.88 FEET; THENCE 3160 Business person furnished, beautiful & spa- Toye or Gina Roberts 8310- Aircraft/Aviation Down Dayight Auto Fi-
dinator at 8502296111, LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF Equipment If you are great with cious, 3 br, 2 ba 850-229-8014 r 850- 258 4691 833- Camerad rag 2iles
1000 C. G. COSTIN BLVD. WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 69 3170 lectles guests, an excellent prob- townhome located in 8340 Motorhoes 9pm.
RM. 302 PORT ST JOE DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 3180- Computers guests, an excellent prob- townhome located in 8340- Mtrmes 9pm.
3190 Electronics lem solver and have a de- Jones Homestead, Eagle
FL, 32456. If hearing im- SECONDS WEST 574.11 3200 Firewood sire to be the best, we Landing subdivision. Close
paired, contact (TDD) FEET TO A RE-ROD FOR 3210- Free Pass it On want you. Come join our to shopping, downtown
8009558771 via Florida THE POINT OF BEGINN- 3220 Furhiture family! E.O.E. D.FW.P and St. Joseph's Bay.
Relay System. ING. FROM SAID POINT 3230 Garage/Yard Sales Apply in person at:3951 E. Monthly rental $900 w/
OF BEGINNING CON-,3240- Guns ApplyinpersonaD3951 E.
OF BEGINNING C 325 Good Things to Eat Hwy 98 Port St. Joe, FL $900 sec/damage deposit. -
This is an attempt to col- TINUE SOUTH 69 DE- 3260 Health & Fitness 32456 Short Term rental option
lect a debt. Any informa- GREES 45 MINUTES 05 3270 Jewelry/Clothilng avail. Call Gulf Coast Prop- A
tion obtained will be used SECONDS WEST 319.00 3280 Machinery/ arty Services at _____
for that purpose. FEET TO THE APPROXI- Equipment (850)229-2706 for more in-
July 2, 9, 2009 MATE MEAN HIGH 3290- Medical Equipment formation & a tour of the 125 Venus Drive
WATER LINE OF THE 3300- Miscellaneous 4130 townhome.
3310- Musicallnstnments.O
GULF OF MEXICO, 3320- Plants& Shrubs/ POSTAL & GOVT JOB | (off Garison Ave) 14
2904S THENCE RUN NORTH 15 Supplies INFO FOR SALE? T(o r riso Ay
N THE CIRCUIT OF THE DEGREES 27 MINUTES 03 3330 Restaurant/Hotel INFOFORSALE? TownhouseBaier P rtSt. Joe, FL 32456 Toyota Van 1995, $450
14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT SECONDS WEST ALONG 3340 Sporting Goods Dunes, Cape San Bias, B2-i 7 Down 0% Interest $2,900
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR SAID APPROXIMATE 3350 -Tickets (Buy& Sell) ) Port St. Joe, F 6 mo min- (850) 227- 40 Total Daylight Auto Financ-
GULF COUNTY MEAN HIGH WATER LINE Caution imum term 3 br, 3 b, Ex- ing. 215-1769 9am tp 9pm
59.78 FEET, THENCE RUN cellent condition, custom TTY Acs 71 ,
Deutsche Bank National NORTH 69 DEGREES 45 furnishings and decor,
Trust Company, as Trustee MINUTES 52 SECONDS 3310 You NEVER have topa Complete PC, printe
on behalf of the Certifi- EAST ALONG A PARTY for information about wireless hardware set-up 1 2 & 3 bedroom s
catehodersorAeriquest WALL AND A PROJEC- federal or postal jobs. If available Renter refs and Family apartment community
Mortgage Securities Inc. TION THEREOF 314.00 you see a job credit check required.
gSeues 2002rC, FEET TO A RE ROD w guarantee", contact the $1.100 mo. Please Call income guidelines apply
Baldwin Baby Grand. FTC. 850-425-8505 qual Opportunity Provider and Employer
Asset-Backed Certificates, THENCE RUN SOUTH 20 Ideal for church or home. The Federal Trade
Plaintiff, DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 $3600. Living Waters As- Commission In accordance with Federal law, this institution is prohibited from discriminating
SECONDS EAST 59.50 sembly of God in Apalachi- is America's consumer o n the basis or race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability.
-vs.- FEET TO THE POINT OF cola. Call 653-8015 oron on the basis or race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability.
BEGINNING SITUATE, LY- 323-0219 protection agency. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.)
Parties in Possession #1; TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, www.f c.govlobscams
Unknown Parties in Pos- RANGE 11 WEST, GULF 1 877-FTC-HELP
session #2; If living, and COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUB- / Yamaha Majesty, 2006
all Unknown Parties claim- JECT TO AN INGRESS A public service 400 cc, Excellent Con-
ing by, through, under and AND EGRESS EASEMENT message from the FTC 1, 2, & 3 edition 11,200 miles, Great
against the above named OVER AND ACROSS THE and The News Herald Bedroom gas saver, asking $4,300
Defendant(s) who are not SOUTHEASTERLY 18.00 Classified Advertslng Ho eTT Call 648-2121
known to be dead or alive, FEET AND THE SOUTH- Department Houses C 4- 12
whether said Unknown WESTERLY 12.00 FEET EMPLOYMENT for rent in Port St. Joe; Call
Parties may claim an inter- OF THE NORTHEAST- 8I _-.. I 850-227-7800
est as Spouse, Heirs, Devi- 4100 Help Wanted
sees, Grantees, or Other 4130 E t 2 bedroom, 1 bath house 26 Am Circle 8210
Claimants Need ToU 457 Madison St. Oak (ff N) 1986 Sea Ray 57 10
Defendant(s).SGrove Area of Port St. Joe. (offdrivN)eCaluin ra ilew7Or
Case #: 2009-CA-000254 Furniture? ooo r ba om- (850) 639-2722 o
UNC: We have buyers for Baby Sitter's I .EAT RR f 2 or 3 br, 2 be, Comn- (8,50 639-27 22 best (850) 628-4182
SWe he byers fay ESTATE FOR RENT pletely renovated, Historic
NOTICE OF ACTION gently used leather & tin, for the summerMust 100o- Business Early School house, North TTYA 711
FORECLOSURE fabric furniture, bedroom be 18 or over Commercial of Overstreet & Gulf
PRC[EDt[/PROP9 bedr2 over A t 6110- Aparments County. Sits on 30 acres, 1 & 2 bedrooms
PROCEEDINGS/PROP- & dining furniture. 904-206-1200 120 Beach Rentals includes hardwood floors, & 2 bedrooms
ERTY C ntact Housekeeping 0130 s wnh I SS appliances, granite Family apartment community
Contact us Housekeepin 6140- House Rentals
TO:Sueen Feming; AD- today! PT, weekend help, needed 6150 Roommate Wanted counters separate outdoor incomeguidelinesapply
Sullen Fleming; AD oay forhousekeeping 60 Rooms for Rent cook house, wrap around o.,,o1'11
ESS fN r housekeeping pos- 170-MobileHome/Lot porch and much more. Br- Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer
DRESS UNKNOWN BUT Decorator's tons, apply in person 4693 6180 Out-of-Town Rentals ing your horses and enjoy In accordance with Federal law, this institution is prohibited from discriminating
WHOSE LAST KNOWN i A IOIUSE Cape Sand Blast Rd. Port 6190- Timeshare Rentals the beautiful pasture land. on the basis or race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. 1998 24 Carrabe, Off
DRTago Drive F/K/A 850-227-3344 St Joe 6200- Vacation Rentals $1,400 mo Call Gene @ (Not alt prohibited bases apply to all programs.) shore boat, 225 HP
193-A Tobago Drive, Port 850-830-9342 -Yamaha 2 stroke, windlass
Saint J~oe, FL 3245 P anchor, lots of extras, New
SaintJoe, F32456America's EagleLanding rt St Joe C om m erciaelectronics, Everything
Residence unknoTHE ITYOF P rt St Joe Commercial works, in good condition,
ing, including any un- MinStorage nhme $8,000 850-247-9995
known spouse of the said l M EXIC BEACH Newdevelopment- beauti- For Lease
.i- ,art ,1 .,.hS, ra Jpeciai of M EXICO BEACH ful & spacious 3br, 2ba S a
t E T i1 .i the M ofnth Is currently accepting applications townhome located in Retail / Office Space
t-oir, ,.i .:,,t i,:,,-r ,i, ,-, l i I isc e c t p Jones Homestead, In the 317 Williams Avenue
a, ire,. ,e .,,- 10 X 10' to fill a vacant fulltime position inthe Eagle Landing Subdivi- + 800sf tenant improvements negotiable; $1350/mo gross
C,5'-"'-$ .:, ,.:e.' ,:.3, $99 per month fROAD AND S TREET downtown and St. 325 Reid Avenue
ft.- i.-r,...: ,a,"'u'; Climate DEPARTMENT Joseph's Bay. Monthly +/-4500sf-shell space; corner location; $2500/mo gross
and ,: .r, n :. er. ,n rental $875 with $875 309 Reid Avenue Lhurs Open
ci,,-,,,. c, ir,,,:.u..r, u'. Controlled Units Qualified candidates will have a valid driver's license security/damage deposit. +/-6000sf renovated shellspace; occupant ready; $4500/mo mod. gross Fisherman Boat
S-,,,-, r NO Minimum and heavy equipment experience preferred. Servicesat(8 22r9p2 407 ReidAvenue, SuisS 34' l 83
ai,:..,-..mr,i,:,-.,3 ree n-. time required Applications will be accepted at: for more information and a +/-1824sf, Twn 8.2 Detroit Die-
D,.- ,,:,,,ri :,-,i r .... rq 229-8014 Mexico Beach City Hall, 118 N. 14th Street. tour of the townhome. 310 Reid Avenue sels, Fly Bridge, Out
lt i,: .rm.,-,,:.-,:n u.n (850) 2298014 Job closes July 10, 2009 at 4:00 p.m. +/-1116sf Suite C; finished office space; lobby area with two Riggers, Diesel Genera-
paiopase call 0580-4 645MINI STORAGE office suites and filing/storage room; $1000/mo NNN tor (new), full cabin,
For more information plae all 850-648-5700. 230 ReidAvenue Galley, Trim Tabs, Bait
lStation, Platform with
I POrt St Joe +/-756sf office/retail; $12 psf mod. gross ladder, Bottom and
..... '|L, 322 Long Avenue Zinc's good. Runs
U\, ^'-)1,,,* .o, 2,9-6200 +/-1000st- move-in ready; $900/mo gross Good! Will Tradel Ask-
T o Mexo a i workp d rovir. 411ReidAvenue ing $39,000 OBO At
',C ". UC ex4-74 o +/-2668sf office space; $9.45 psf mod. gross 60.nama Cell 8508719300
WarehoUse / Flex Space or850-258-0996
9 l CNA's FT, PT 110 Trade Circle West
PlN All Shisl 2500s. 12500sf- PSJ Commerce Park, flex space, $5.25psf NNN (incl.
water/sewer)
Private _~_ DIETARY ,-PT 160 Cessna Drive 240o
Housekeeper, REIIAB PT, OT +/-5,000sf office/flex space; Adjacent to Costin Airport; $7 psf plus utilities Boat Taller for sale, triple
Have openings on my Handyman COTA- PT and applicable sales tax; Inquire for possible incentives/concessions axle, 2002, Quicksilver,
schedule, excellent ref. A l, 772 Hwy 98, Suite A $2,000 OBO 227-5060
850-639-9694 in a Truck We believe in ability, not disability. Our residents swim +/-900sf office flex space, Includes 450sf overhead storage. $500/mo
Due to economic collapse wittl dolphillns and enjoy growing their own garden mod. gross
been played off, with 12 yrs vegetables. We believe in changing, revolutionizing the F or S a le
of all types of electrical exp Waal ill wlici healthcare is provided to our resildelts. .


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Pure Pleasing Massage of carpentry experience. taC that Iakes tils change possible Corner lot on entrance to Marina Cove, prime location w/high visibility; FROM
by Gorgeous Nicole We must resort to inde- sta"t i.at makes d.ll i.iaialge possibie. .14 acres. $4
850-691-9991 pendent contracting Gulft 407ReidAve $4o995
SELL ALL YOUR nty only. C80 +/-4988sf; Multi tenant bldg 100% leased; Parking Incl; $549,000 AlWelded, AllAlumiu
E 850Stop bI and complete an application or fax resume to 317MonumentAve Boats
ITEMS 850-229-7129 +/-4431sf; New construction located directly on Hwy 98; Parking Included; AT
through classified. 220 9th Street, Port St Joe, FL $649,000 Also available for lease. Please inquire for terms.
CALL D & D Landscaping CoIpefitiivhe wages, PTO, Tuition Rehnlmrsement and Marketed Exclusively by: SA
Mowing, Weeding, letiremeat are just a few of the benefits offered tovely
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EOE, Dnag Free Work Place.


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, JULY 2, 2009 0 9B


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B 10 I The Star


Local


Thursday, July 2, 2009


MINI-STORAGE AND OFFICE COMPLEX
850-229-8014
Storage
Climate Controlled Units *-

i c- nsd .n In-,G1 58 F1060

-229-5354
;-.9 .


Perpenders Gallery, founded by Leon and Frances Wiesener, is
located at 409 Tallahassee St. in Carrabelle.
S0 * * * *


In addition to works by Picasso and other masters, the gallery
will feature the work of local talents like Carrabelle watercolorist
Joseph Kotzman.


GRAND OPENING
Perpenders Gallery, 409 Tallahassee St. in Carrabelle, will
host a grand opening ceremony at 10 a.m. Friday.


Sunrise Construction
& Company, Inc.
Commercial & Residential
Stan Siprell
850-227-9444
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106 Trade Circle
West, Suite D
Port St. Joe. FL
277-1411 NO
FAX:277-1413 i (J I 0j
Nlon.-Fri. 7:30-4:30 -


POH


ON DISPLAY
Fine art pieces on display at
Perpenders Gallery include:


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Local artist showcases


thoughtful masterpieces

By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Carrabelle artist Leon Wiesener is a thoughtful sort,
so it's not surprising his new art gallery would be a bit
high concept.
Located at 409 Tallahassee St. in Carrabelle,
Perpenders Gallery, which Wiesener founded with wife,
Frances, does not peddle "regional art."
It doesn't sell mermaid portraits, dolphin oil paintings
or trinkets made out of seashells.
"No more seagulls, no more pelicans," Wiesener said
with a chuckle.
Wiesener has opted for a fine-art approach, including
works from his personal collection of drawings and
lithographs by Picasso, Matisse, Chagall and other
masters in the gallery's two exhibition rooms.
Wiesener has installed motion sensors on all windows
and doors to protect the pieces, which range in price from
$100 to $1,500.
Though he and Frances have enjoyed the artwork
for many years, they are ready to let the pieces go,
particularly because their children have no interest in
inheriting them.
"Our children told us to get rid of it before we die,"
Frances said with a laugh.
Wiesener hopes interior decorators designing
million-dollar homes will visit the gallery to "match the
quality of artwork to the home."
The high-profile work will share gallery space with
the best of the area's artistic talent, such as Tallahassee
photographer Ed Babcock, Crawfordville jeweler Mary
Reynolds, Carrabelle watercolorist Joseph Kotzman and
Wiesener himself.
An award-winning pastel artist, Wiesener will exhibit
some of his drawings, along with playful mixed media
creations he calls "travel boxes."
The large boxes, which are 6 inches deep, combine
pastel drawings with other images depicting places he
has traveled.
The works showcase Wiesener's offbeat sense of
humor.
"Dog Island vs. Hand Island" offers a comparison
* of pests found in both locations, including yellow flies,
mosquitoes and "no-see-ums."
Another work is-titled "Where the Giant Squirrels
Live." (The answer: Iowa.)
The gallery also will showcase Wiesener's handcrafted
"nasty boxes," take-offs of Appalachian children's toys
that bite.
Gallery visitors should handle Nasty Duck and Nasty
Scotty, a silver-toothed dog, with care.
Perpenders will exhibit 25 to 30 pieces at a time, with
artwork rotated every two to three weeks.
The Wieseners have been diligently sprucing up the
gallery, housed inside a charming old home, for Friday's
grand opening.
"We've had a lot of three T-shirt days," Frances said of
the sweltering summer heat.
Wiesener studied under German Expressionist Karl
Zerby at Florida State University and was an associate
professor of art at the University of Tennessee for a
decade.
In naming the gallery "Perpenders," Wiesener chose a
word that means people who ponder a solution diligently,
which speaks to his passionate commitment to his craft.
"Perpend means to ponder. As a verb, it's an act,
an intellectual act, and as a noun, it's someone who
participates in that act," said Wiesener, who hopes the
gallery's visitors will become perpenders as well.
"Whoever comes here is going to be put in the
situation of trying to ponder the difference of what other
galleries are offering and what we're offering..
"Whether it's their taste, we don't know. But at least
it's an alternative."


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