Group Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.).
Title: The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03668
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Star
Publisher: Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: January 29, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028419
Volume ID: VID03668
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
alephbibnum - 000358020
lccn - sn 95047323

Full Text















YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937


I-,. z' ,. 2 . C_ I .- -
C S:_ *)70,.


Contest winners announced

BI


-Thursday, JANUARY 29, 2009 w w w. starfl corm 50(


District




salutes the




cream
By Tim Croft and Despina Williams
Star Staff Writers

Last Friday was a day of reckoning o
sorts for six public school teachers.
One was so nervous she told her prir
cipal she was developing blisters in he
mouth.
But when it comes to the district'
cream of the crop, as determined by thei
peers, these six teachers had little to worr
about.
Last Friday a team observed the si
nominees in the classroom as part of th
winnowing for the 2009 District Teacher c
the Year.
That group will recommend a winne
who will be named at a later date. Tha
will earn the selectee a ticket to the stat
competition for Florida Teacher of the Yea
sponsored by Macy's.
The six district teachers were vote
upon at their respective school sites, fac
ulty members casting the ballots.
Collectively, the six represent the define
tion of the passionate educator seeking t
reach youngsters and guide them forwar
in life.

Pausha Player
Player has been at Port St. Joe Middl
School the past two years
after spending several
years teaching in Central
Florida.
"When I called her
school down there I could
tell they didn't want to say
too many nice things about
her because they didn't PAUSHA
want to lose her," said Port
St. Joe Middle School prin-
cipal Juanise Griffin. "She
is excellent. She has come in and just too]
over. She's top-notch with technology an(
she is a team player. Anything I've asked c
her, she has done without question."
Player, who has Bachelor's and Mas
ter's degrees from Florida State Universi
ty, teaches sixth-grade World History, se\
enth-grade World Geography and eighth
grade American History.
She has an easy and relaxed rapport
with students, as evidenced last week whei
she had visitors in her eighth-grade Ameri
can history class to watch the inauguration
of a new president.
"She ia very mild-mannered you would
think, but she has those kids under con
trol," Griffin said. "You have to have tha
special quality to reach middle-school stu
dents and she has it."
Griffin also praised Player's adaptabi
ity and the specific skill set she brings t
the middle school and its veteran faculty.
The fact that Player, in just her secon,
year at the middle school which has mad.
earning an "A" school grade an almost ar
nual achievement, %was the faculty's selec
tion for Teacher of the Year, Griffin saic
speaks volumes.
"She is truly a team player," Griffin saic
"Her organizational skills are good an
that is important."

Melinda Roman
A 1988 graduate of Wewahitchka Higi
School, Roman, who grad-
uated magna cum laude
with her Bachelor's degree
from Florida State Univer-
sity, has made an impact
at Wewahitchka Middle
School in just three short
y ea rs. M L
"The kids love her," MELINDA
'said Wewahitchka Middle ROMAN
School principal Pam List-
er. "Her commitment to excellence, sh

See TOTY A6



FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS*INTERACTIVE


Dr. Joe Collins is guaranteed to make
you laugh even with a snake or lizard in
hand.
With his eyes aglow, his face bright-
ened by talk of his "critters," Collins is a
one-man advocate for the creepy, slimy
creatures that inhabit the crooks and cre-
vasses of this world.
At the age of 70, Collins' energy when
exploring or talking about his animals, his
students or the almost endless search for
the materials to construct what he calls
"Joe's Condos" is infectious:
A short conversation will reverse the
thought process while many will run at
the shout of "snake," Collins compels the
desire to get closer for a look, maybe even
a touch.
Collins, a world-renowned herpetolo-
gist and director of the non-profit Center
for North American Herpetology in Law-
rence, Kansas as well as author of the
Peterson's Field Guide on Herpetology,
made his annual jaunt, with entourage,
from Kansas to St. George Island recent-
ly.
He and his wife, Suzanne, along with
her 91-year-old mother and a series of
students who consider Collins a mentor
and companion, make the trek each year
to conduct what is called the Apalachicola
Herpetofaunal Survey.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF SUZANNE COLLINS | Special to
the Star
Three-lined salamander


In words the
rest of us would un-
derstand, he and his entourage are
there to find, count and document
the diversity of species in a region
encompassing Gulf, Franklin, Cal-
houn, Jackson, Leon, Liberty and
Wakulla counties.
Once an effort funded by a federal
grant the more diversity in a park or
wildlife management area or refuge,
the higher on the list for priority funding
- Collins' work after 15 years of making
this wintry migration is now as much a
continuation of a lifetime's passion as a
hobby and source of joy.
"I am looking to find out how things
adapt to the environment in the coastal
South," Collins said. "What better place to
do that."
This year the group which varies in
size depending on the number of students
who come and go during the five or six
weeks Collins is here surveyed St. Vin-
cent Wildlife Refuge, the St. Joseph Bay
Buffer Preserve, Bald Point State Park,
Ochlocknee River State Park and Florida
Caverns State Park.
By the time he and Suzanne and mom
flew home to Kansas, Collins and his en-
tourage had observed 45 species, from
the marbled salamander to the logger-
head musk turtle. The specimen count
was right at 500.
"We enjoyed it," Collins said of this
year's sabbatical to the area. "We've hit 60
specimens, but 45 is a good number. I'm
quite pleased with the whole thing."
The winter months are an especially
good time for hunting critters on the
ground, Collins explained, because his
students spend much less time looking in
the air and warding off mosquitoes.
The find of this trip, one Collins said
generated quite the buzz when his e-mail
blast went out to colleagues, was the dis-
covery near Tallahassee of a four-toed sal-
amander, which had built a nest under a
thatch of moss, a habitat tip sure to make
it into the next Peterson's Field Guide.
"They are exceptionally difficult to
find," Collins explained. "I got letters (arid
e-mails) from around the country."
The key to these surveys is "Joe's Con-
dos." Collins will not hesitate to ask for


scrap
ply-
wood or
sheet met-
al which,
by the way, he
mentioned are
getting harder and
harder to find in order to provide habitat
for creepy, crawly animals not inclined to
be in the open.
Collins encountered a contractor just
finishing a home on the peninsula and
noticed two sheets of plywood. Inquiring
if the boards were trash, the contrac-
tor said he didn't know and dialed up the
owner of the home. Within minutes Col-
lins was backing his truck up and lugging
the sheets into the back.
And homeowners should never be sur-
prised if they observe a car stopped on the
road and a stranger looking under the lids
of garbage cans only those on the road-
way for any creepy-crawlies.
"I ask for trash," Collins said with a
laugh. "It's getting harder to find that. Joe
the trash collector, I work the margins as
I like to say.
"I want structure to have things the
kids can look under. Animals are good
at hiding and that's why they are still
there."
Consider, Collins said, a couple of ex-
amples. In the South, gopher tortoise
holes have long provided shelter to all
sorts of snakes, poisonous and not, liv-
ing harmoniously out of reach of humans.
In the Midwest and Great Plains, prairie
dogs offer a similar animal hostel.
But as Florida has been paved over
and gopher tortoise holes disappeared,
there is less and less habitat for Collins'
See SNAKES A2


Constitution City celebrates historic anniversary


it By Despina Williams
- Star Staff Writer
1- On a picture perfect morning, a crow
o of dignitaries, residents and speci
guests gathered beneath the oak trees
d Constitution Park to celebrate an histor
e milestone.
a- On that same spot 170 years earlier
*- a delegation of 56 of the territory's mo
1, distinguished politicians gathered to cra
Florida's first constitution.
1. Convening in the city of St. Joseph, th
d delegates created the document by whi(
Florida was governed in its first 16 yea
of statehood.
The signing of the constitution on Ja
11, 1839 was the crowning achievement
h the lost city of St. Joseph.
Though the city was destroyed in th
early 1840s by a yellow fever epidemic an
two hurricanes, its short but noble legacy
became interwoven with the history
Port St. Joe.
The new city, founded in 1909 two mil
north of the former site of St. Joseph,
known by its predecessor's nickname, tt
Constitution City. ,
At last Friday's ceremony, Port St. J(
mayor Mel Magidson spoke of a share
e legacy.
"I'm proud to be the mayor of Port S
Joe, and that's about as high as I aspire 1

Subscribe to The Star


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be, because I don't think there's a greater
honor than to be the mayor of the Consti-
tution City of the State of Florida," said
vd Magidson.
al "Old St. Joseph is gone, but the spirit
in of St. Joseph lives still. We're proud of our
ic past and confident of our future."

ir, Proud History
st
Lft County judge Fred Witten provided
an historical overview of the Constitution
ie Convention, which began on Dec. 3, 1838.
ch St. Joseph, then its infancy, was select-
rs ed as the convention site largely through
the dogged efforts of Peter Gautier, Jr., a
n. state representative and editor of the St.
of Joseph Times.
The legislature approved the site se-
he lection on Feb. 2, 1838, with St. Joseph
id winning over older and larger cities such
cy as Pensacola, St. Augustine and Tallahas-
of see.
When the convention officially adopted
es the constitution on Jan. 11, 1839, the docu-
is ment bore the signatures of 44 of the origi-
ie nal 56 delegates.
"You may recognize some of their
oe names McClellan, Baltzell, Woodward,
ad Garrison, Long, Williams," said Witten,
referring to the city's street names, which
3t. were named after the delegates.
to Three individuals with ancestral ties

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Opinion............ ............ A4
Letters to the Editor ................... A5
Sports....................... A8-9
Obituaries..................... B5


Church News............................... B4
Law Enforcement ..................... B9
School News.................... B6-7
Legals...................B....................... B11


to the Constitution Convention received a
special welcome.
David Roche's great-great grandfa-
ther, Stephen J. Roche, was one of the 44
delegates to sign the finished constitu-
tion.
Lee Fontaine, whose daughter, Bailee,
led the crowd in the pledge of allegiance,
had a great-great-great uncle who wit-
nessed the signing.
Local historian Dave Maddox recog-
nized a fourth special guest, Rivers H.
Buford III.
Buford's grandfather, former State At-
torney General Rivers H. Buford, drafted
the 1921 House Bill 770.
The bill appropriated $10,000 for the
construction of the city's Constitution
Monument on the site of the Constitution
Convention building.
According to Maddox, the site of the
original building was identified by old
landmarks, and the Port St. Joe Dock and
Terminal Railway Company donated the
one-acre parcel.
The monument was completed in 1922
and dedicated on Jan. 11, 1923, the 84th
anniversary of the constitution signing.
Some 3,000 people attended the cer-
emony.
"It was quite a celebration," said Mad-
See CITY AI O


Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET
Display ad deadline is Friday 11a.m. ET 227-1278
Classified deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020


* ~






A2 I The Star


Local


Thursday, January 29, 2009


SNAKE from page Al


creatures.
And while in much of the
Midwest, limestone struc-
tures and their crevasses
provide excellent hiding
habitat, in the sandy soil of
Florida, creatures have to
be, well, more flexible.
"Any port in the storm
- they've adapted, they've
figured out how to do it."
Collins said.
While a self-proclaimed
pessimist, Collins sounds


unfailingly upbeat when
talking about his critters.
The acquisition of land
by the state from The St. Joe
Company along State 30 he
said was "very important"
from an environmental
standpoint. He bemoaned
the gutting of funding from
the Florida Forever land ac-
quisition program by state
lawmakers this year, but
said some of the slack is be-
ing picked up in the private


sector.
"There is still a lot of pri-
vate stewardship out there,"
Collins said. "The concern
is: what if the CEO dies?"
A foundation trust, which
would maintain conserva-
tion land in perpetuity with
funding needed only for
property taxes and man-
agement, is to Collins "the
best model."
In fact, Collins is a walk-
ing, laughing, passionate


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proselyte for his animals,
eager to share his exper-
tise and plenty of stories
to anyone who asks, eager
to provide a lesson in en-
vironmental stewardship,
whether explaining why
lands need to be protected,
how folks can create in-
stead of destroy habitat.
"I want them to under-
stand how virtuous those
little critters are," Collins
said.
A tree felled to enlarge
a lake can be turned upside
down, placed in the water
body and become a sun-
ning sauna for turtles; the
dead fish along the mar-
gins of that water body can
be cleaned up at night by
the creepy-crawlers.
All interconnected, that
circle.
As far as the health of
his critters, which pro-
vide insight regarding the


Four-toed salamander
health of the environment,
Collins said he takes the
long view.
"The reason all of us are
doing this is for is the little
critters in the next millen-
nium," Collins said. "If it


isn't for the animals, why
are you doing it anyway?
"Folks are more recep-
tive now. The kids graduat-
ing now, they are so bright.
They care so much about
the environment."


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I-- -






Thursday, January 29, 2009


Local


The Star I A3


Port St. Joe Redevelopment


Agency reminds city to pay


Water notices: Know the facts

By Despina Williams Management and other lo- For those not receiv-
Star Staff Writer cal agencies. ing CodeRED alerts, Da-
The Star places boil wa- vis suggested visiting the
Two times in the past ter notices on its Web site, CodeRED Web site, www.
30 days, Port St. Joe acted www.starfl.com. coderedweb.net, which
quickly to issue precau- Residents are advised allows visitors to update
tionary boil water notices to use bottled water for their contact information
to some 10,000 residents., drinking and cooking pur- and provide a second con-
Water line breaks on poses or to disinfect their tact number.
Christmas Eve and again tap water before using. Residents may also
last Tuesday affected Port To disinfect, add eight change their contact infor-
St. Joe, Highland View, drops of unscented house- mation via the city's Web
WindMark Beach, St. Joe hold bleach to one gallon site, www.cityofportstjoe.'
Beach and Overstreet and of water, mix well and let com, by clicking the Co-
tested the city's emergen- stand for,30 minutes. -deRED icon or by calling
cy response. Ifthewaterlooks cloudy, City Hall at 229-8261.
Glenn Davis, manager use double the amount of After'a boil water no-
of the city's water depart- bleach and let stand for tice has been issued and
ment and wastewater one hour. before water service re-
plant, explained the city's In addition to issuing sumes, the affected lines
policy regarding boil water boil water notices, the city are flushed extensively
* notices. activates the CodeRED until chlorine residuals
Davis- stressed that automated telephone alert are sufficient to insure
notices-are issued only as system to contact affected that disinfectant is pres-
a precaution in the event residential and commer- ent in the distribution sys-
of water line breaks, re- cial properties, tem, thereby reducing the
pairs, construction tie-ins, The CodeRED system risk of contamination.
planned water outages and plays a pre-recorded mes- "If the water's contami-
any other event that sug- sage describing the steps nated, I won't turn it back
gests possible bacteriologi- to take for the issued boil on," said Davis. "If I think
cal contamination in the water notice. there's a problem, I can't
city's distribution system. There are, however, a turn it on in good faith.'
I Depending on the scope few hiccups in the system. A notice of boil water
of the emergency, the city Residents will not receive rescission is issued via the
uses varying methods to the CodeRED message if same channels, the local
alert the public.' any of the following condi- media and CodeRED auto-
If the event is small, tions exist: a phone line mated messages.
with fewer than 50 service has a solicitor block the Davis welcomes calls
connections affected, door phone number isunlisted, from residents concerned
hangers are placed on indi- the phone is busy, when about the quality of their
vidual residences. the call is made, the phone drinking water.
If more than 50 connec- call is unanswered and the To request a home'
tions are affected, the city resident does not have an drinking water test or for
alerts by fax or e-mail lo- answering machine, or additional ,-information,
cal news outlets, the police the phone number is not contact the water depart-
and sheriff's departments, current or correct in the ment at 229-6390 or City
Gulf Cotunty Emetrgency system. Hall at 229-8261.


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer
The slow economy con-
tinues to affect regular busi-
ness in Port St. Joe.
Matt Fleck, director of
the Port St. Joe Redevelop-
ment Agency, reminded the
city commission at their
regular bi-monthly meeting
last week that the city's por-
tion of TIF funds allocated
for the PSJRA was due Jan.
1 and had not been received,
as required by law.
TIF funds are a portion
of the difference, in prop-
erty values from a base year
(1990) and the current fiscal
year for property with the
redevelopment boundar-
ies. The funds are collected
by both city and county and
returned each year to the re-
development agency.
Those dollars are then
funneled back into the re-
development agency for im-
provements and revitaliza-
tion projects. _
Fleck said his PSJRA
board was "waiting to un-
derstand what the city and
county, are doing" about re-
mitting the required money,
reminding the city that it had
already incurred a 5 percent
penalty levied by state stat-
ute for the delay in paying.
The county was also late in
their payment of TIF funds,
Fleck told the city.
City Administrator
Charlie Weston told the
board he and Fleck had
"been working closely on
solving the problem" and
that it was a cash flow is-
sue for the city. "Taxpayers
are not paying ad valorem
tax like we'd like them to,"
Weston said. "We don't have
a real good feel for how the
money is coming in."
Weston also said the 5
percent penalty could be


waived by the PSJRA, and
Fleck said it would be con-
sidered as he and Weston
worked to solve the issue.
In other business con-
ducted at the meeting:
Gulf County School
Superintendant Tim Wilder
gave a short presentation
about the upcoming one-mill
levy referendum on school
ad valorem taxes.
Wilder told the commis-
sioners that more drastic
cuts in the county school
system were coming and
multiple programs were in
jeopardy without a financial
infusion.
Wilder challenged the
city "as a group to stand with
the'school board."
An increase by referen-
dum in the school ad valor-
em tax rate is'the only meth-
od the school district has for
raising needed money for
operational purposes.
The vote will be a mail-in
election, with ballots mailed
to every registered county
voter around Feb. 25, ac-
cording to Wilder.
Glenn Davis, director
of the city's water depart-
ment, told commissioners
the Northwest Florida Water
Management District want-
ed all municipalities in its
area to implement stricter
water conservation through
city irrigation ordinances.
The purpose was to save
money and water and lessen
stormwater runoff, he said.
Davis presented the board
with a list of suggestions on
how to accomplish the re-
quest.
Tom Gibson, of Rish,
Gibson, Scholz and Groom,
the law firm of record for
the city, advised the board
that he and Davis also were
working on a xeriscape or-
dinance, already 25 pages
long, that was required by


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CELEBRATE "THE YEAR OF THE OX"
WITH THE GULF ALLIANCEJbr LOCAL ARTS.
As fate would have it, our Annual Meeting coincides with the
beginning of 2009 Chinese New Year of the Ox. The Ox is a sign of
prosperity through fortitude and hard work. The Ox is a born leader,
being quite dependable and possessing an innate ability to achieve
great things. The Ox is unswervingly patient, tireless in work, and
capable of enduring any amount of hardship without complaint.
Become an Ox and make-a resolution to support your Local Arts.

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*lefr.'Ur' thalork r} a'd.OSr~t 'htTn ?~,sie~St O/OCttr'~c~y. J~' nt.'vr.y. nS,/~0-'" u"-' .. 'k. v.2' -t~n + ~ ..*~ 'T~~Pts ~ '~ ',.. i ~' 'sifT' Ck~'TSZ'At'ufl" 'Sn~.Z~'.~' a,'ttT .~ ','-a


the water management dis-
trict to be in place by July.
Xeriscaping is a land-
scaping process that con-
serves water, protects envi-
ronment and utilizes native
plants. Xeriscaping matches
appropriate plants with ex-
isting site conditions to mini-
mize the use of additional re-
sources, such as water, fer-
tilizer, pesticides and labor,
and to reduce the amount
of pollutants in stormwater
runoff.
Weston told the board
it would take approximately
$10,000 to bring the former
city, hall building at Ward
Ridge up to code.
The city recently re-
gained use of the building
after the former tenant left
and has been trying to de-
cide how to use the facility.
Because no specific use
for the building was decided,
commissioners tabled the
topic and asked for public in-
put on how to use the build-
ing before making a final
decision.
Citizens' suggestions can
be sent to Weston or any city
commissioner.
The board passed a
motion granting approval
for bids to be solicited for im-
provements to Buck Griffin
Lake.
Plans are to install fish-
ing piers, extensive walking
paths and an asphalt bike
path around the seven-acre
lake, a project that will take
three to four months to
complete, according to Bill
Kennedy of Preble Rish, the
city's engineering firm of re-
cord.
The board passed the
final version of the city's
updated trash ordinance 5-0
after incorporating uniform
rates within use categories,
as suggested by commis-
sioner John Reeves.


OWN A BUINEH? NEED HELP?

AD'.icRTIE HEC II

CALL 997-1978 0






Sinion



Opinion


A4 The Star


J1


Thursday, January 29, 2009


Keyboard KLATTERINGS


A precautionary tale


The news last week
that Wewahitchka High
School's outstanding soft-
ball player Samantha Rich
had injured her shoulder
in PE class and would not
pitch again for the Lady
Gators should provide an
opportunity for pause for
all county athletes.
In the pantheon of lo-
cal standouts of
the playing fields,
Rich took a back-
seat to few if any
or her peers.
Twice the play-
er of the year in
Wewahitchka's
classification,
three times all- TIMC
state, holder of Star
the career mark in ed
home runs and an
indomitable pitcher, Rich
was headed toward great
things on the diamond.
But a shoulder injury
will put her on the shelf
for much of the approach-
ing softball season, and
when she does return,
pitching from the circle in
the middle of the diamond
might never happen again
for Rich.
The injury was an im-
mense blow to Rich and
her team and her head is
likely spinning right now
about what the future
might hold.
Here is where a lesson
is learned.
Rich did not put all her
hopes and dreams in the
middle of a chalk circle.
As her high school
coach said the day she
signed an NCAA Division
I scholarship, her signing
was the result of countless
hours of work, sweat and
dedication.
As her senior year ap-
proached, Rich didn't sud-
denly decide that college
softball had an allure. She
didn't wake up one day
and decide her sometimes
otherworldly talents on
the diamond were suffi-
cient to navigate the path
to a college degree.
And therein is a moral
that every young athlete
should soak in.
Rich not only excelled
on the mound, but also
she was a tremendous hit-
ter, as dangerous as most
any this county has seen.
Although the shoulder
injury might silence the
grunts of a fastball leaving
her fingers, it likely will
not silence the sting of her
bat, even at the next level.
And her work ethic will
carry her far, on the dia-
mond or not.
Further, Rich is by all
accounts an outstanding
student, a presence most
every nine weeks on the
high school honor roll -
which can be seen in the


B section of this edition
of this newspaper and
is an engaged student be-
yond the diamond.
She is, in short, a well-
rounded young lady who
has the brains, the family
foundation, the work ethic
and the inner constitution
to overcome her shoulder
injury.


Even if that
shoulder injury
means she has
played her last
softball game, ev-
erything Rich rep-
resents as a young,
lady seems sure
to carry her far in
life.
Jacksonville
University should


:ROFT
News
itor


be honored to have
her, whether or not her
injured right wing ever al-
lows her to let the softball
fly to the plate.

Economics? Yes
While the city of Port St.
Joe was wrestling with the
issue of Sunday sales of
alcohol, there were many
opponents who scoffed
about the economic argu-
ment that brought the is-
sue forward.
There were, many who
stood at the podium in the
commission meetingroom
and pronounced that as-
sisting small businesses
was, paraphrasing here,
something of a smoke
screen, an argument be-
ing tossed around to erode
the character of the city.
One commissioner
went so far as to assert
that if a business couldn't
make it with the six days
they could sell alcohol, a
seventh day sure wasn't
going to make a differ-
ence.
A glance at the agenda
packet for this week's
meeting of the Board of
County Commissioners
should silence that argu-
ment.
Commissioners are set
to move forward with an
amended alcohol sales or-
dinance that allows sales
in the county on a basis
that pretty much mirrors
that in Port St. Joe.
The ordinance was
brought forward after
commissioners heard
from small businesses in
the county believing they
were at a disadvantage
with Port St. Joe's deci-
sion to change the rules.
Those few extra hours
were the difference, the
argument went, between
competing or not, with
maintaining certain rev-
enue streams or losing
them.

See KLATTERINGS A5


THE STAR

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Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Our VIEW





Outside the levy lines


Superintendent of Schools Tim
Wilder and his staff currently are un-
dertaking what could be called Levy-
applooza around the county.
Speaking to as many groups as he
can put his face in front of, from the
Wewahitchka City Commission to the
rotary club to the Gulf County Demo-
cratic party, Wilder has been making
the case for the one mill levy, which
will be put before voters in a March
17 referendum. '
There are some aspects, some
arguments, involving this levy, how-
ever, that are likely not to be touched
on much during the coming weeks as
ballots begin to be mailed and filled
out for return to Supervisor of Elec-
tions Linda Griffin.

Culling a young crop
of teachers
Coincidental or not, a theme to be
gleaned from the nominations for dis-
trict Teacher of the Year is that they
reflect teachers, typically younger,
who are among the most likely to
be leaving the system and looking
elsewhere if the referendum is not
passed.
A few are not yet on annual
contract and two others have just-
achieved that status.
The nominations reflect, it could
be fairly argued, a nod to what the
district stands to lose if the levy loses,
the kind of younger people just start-
ing out in life and gifted in the class-
room, the kind you want educating
your kids for years to come.
One of those nominated would not
be in the system now if extraordinary
action by the district and U.S. Navy
had not saved the NJROTC program
at Port St. Joe High School.
When those faces, those talents,
are applied to FTEs, the dynamics
suddenly shift.

No favors
The district has received no favors
in their efforts from the county or the


state.
The county's spending binge of
the past seven or eight years has.
so sheared the wallets of taxpayers
that the thought of additional taxes
'is anathema to property owners and
voters. Never an easy sell, a school
referendum will almost certainly be
penalized by the runaway spending
and taxation of the county.
While commissioners have gnawed
and gnawed at the referendum this
week's agenda packet included the
district's audit report from last year for
reasons only commissioners can ex-
plain because they've shown scant in-
terest in school budgets before they
have been barely civil, teeth bared.
The state is also a villain.
While the state argues about local
control, local control, the funding for
public schools is anything but under
local control.
The state, for one example, could
allow districts to use the one compo-
nent of funding over which they have
control, capital outlay spending, at
the district's discretion.
And the special session just com-
pleted further slimed the bottom line
at school districts from Pensacola
to Monroe County, leaving districts
around the state scrambling to main-
tain a ledger in the black, as required
by law.
State lawmakers have throughout
the years pushed more and more of
the load on local taxpayers, while.the
Board of Gulf County Commissioners
used, with collusion from the state,
the boom in real estate early this de-
cade to pad the workforce, build spiffy
new parks and generally spend as if
the golden goose would never die.
Put it this way, is it more respon-
sible for the state to spend millions to
buy time for the county on a peninsula
that might not exist in 50 years or pour
additional resources into making sure
that 50 years from now, today's public
school students are constructive and
successful members of society?
Or on a more local level, what if
commissioners had to bring all those
double-digit tax hikes this decade be-
fore voters?


Reserve balances
Much has been made of the fact
that Gulf District Schools is one of
eight districts in the state that could
be penalized should their reserve
fund balances remain below 2.5 per-
cent of the total budget. That is the
major item noted on the state's audit
of the district and surely fodder for
some commissioners.
What those numbers don't tell,
though, is that the district's fund
balance sits below 1 percent of the
total budget for a simple reason: the
school board's desire to make the
pain of job layoffs as controllable as
possible.
The reason the district has little in
the way of reserve funds is an effort
to keep as many people as possible
employed in order to maintain high
standards.

Community
There is much research that indi-
cates schools help create a founda-
tion for community.
In Gulf County, there is a great
amount of pride in both munici-
palities regarding the quality of the
schools, which combined represent
an honor roll district in the state's
grading formula.
Consolidation is largely off the
board, the 30-mile distance between
schools makes consolidation, without
ready land, a leap of costly propor-
tions.
More than that, though, while con-
solidation might make fiscal opera-
tional sense, it would in effect change
the dynamics of two communities,
different yet joined.
And the loss of the referendum
might render consolidation the only
viable option for Gulf District Schools
moving forward.
And a fair question voters should
ask themselves is whether that con-
solidation and loss of community
identity and pride is a fair trade-off
for keeping an additional mill off their.
TRIM notices.


Oh my gosh, there's two of them!


I was sitting on a life-
guard stand in 1962 when
-Gray Oliver walked around
the corner. She was 6 or 7,
and I thought, "What a cute
Little kid." Before I could
blink, another one JUST
LIKE HER appeared right
behind her! I fell off the
stand. They both strolled
right up to me. "Are you the
lifeguard?"
"No, I'm an alien
left here when the
space ship from
Nona took off with-
out me. Are y'all
twins?"
"No, I've never
seen this girl in my
life," said Floy, who
turned out to be the HUNKE
comedian. "We just Kes
look this way to fool Co
people from outer
space."
"Our grandmother,"
Gray laughed with her
Whole face, "told us to tell
you to watch us very close-
ly while we were here."
Floy had the exact same
laugh. I'd never seen twins
up close and personal. This
was going to be fun! I would
stand them side-by-side,
shuffle them and guess who
was whom. They looked ex-
actly alike! I searched be-
hind their ears, "Does, one
of you have a mole?" I'd get
them to stand back-to-back,
"One of you has got to be a
little taller." They were so
close. "Let's see," I would
peer deeply at each face.
"I believe you are Gray;
no, wait a minute, you're
Floy!"
"Moonman, I have on
the red suit; Gray is the
one wearing blue." She
would screw her face up
in mock thought. "No, let
me think, maybe it is the


other way around. I could
be Gray. You've turned us
around so much, I'm con-
. fused!" They would roar
with laughter.
Granny didn't have to
worry. They could swim like
fish. They were great young
ladies. And they brightened
up the world around them.
They quickly learned to
switch suits to add to the
subterfuge. And
they did the, "No,
I'm Floy," "No,
I'm the real Floy"
number on/me with
such delight. I took
to calling both of
them Gr-Flo. Those
beautiful faces ac-
R DQWN tually glowed! And
sley I was hooked for
bert life. They got the
royal treatment for
the two summers
they came to visit. And
they taught me that twins
are a special gift from God.
There could be no other ex-
planation.
The profound influence
they had on me exists to
this day, and I haven't heard
from them since 1963. I do
think I saw them in a Dou-
blemint commercial a few
years back. Gray was the
one on the right.
Haley Mills played twins
in "Parent Trap." I fell in
love with both of them.
It was so neat the way
they played off each other.
Somewhere about the fifth
showing, I decided that I
wanted a set of twins.
Aunt Ruby Nell had twin.
daughters. Uncle F. D. had
twins, more girls. Charles
Rosson, a first cousin, had
twin boys. I wish I had paid
more attention to Men-
del and those peas! I don't
know if this thing was ge-


netic or skipped a genera-
tion or was just the luck of
the draw. I figured if twins
ran in the family, I had a
better chance. And maybe
I could improve my odds if
I married a twin.
I heard about the Ab-
ernathy girls before I met
them. I was in college and
figured it was time to pre-
pare for the future. I bor-
rowed John Stewart's '56
Chevy and drove over to
Pulaski. I can't remem-
ber which one I met first.
I wasn't sure it mattered.
You know what they said
around town, "If you've
seen one of those Aberna-
thy girls, you've seen them
all",
Listen, they were espe-
cially good looking, they
were fairly tall and rug-
ged (I was thinking future
football players here), and
their daddy owned the
stockyards. This had the
look of a marriage made
in Heaven! I took Susan
out. She was sweet, polite,
intelligent, congenial and
fun. This was almost too
easy! Until I ask her for a
second date. She turned
me down flat! Apparently
I was the one with a few
"social" flaws. She handed
the phone to Marsha so I
could ask her out, but she
interrupted to save us both
some time, "Don't bother;
I've already gotten the
word."
Before I proposed to
Cathy, I asked if her daddy
owned a stockyard, if she
cared for worldly trinkets
and if twins ran in her fam-
ily. No was her answer to
all three. There ain't no
accounting for love; we
decided to trust to God
and luck. No twins, but I


got to tell her about Gray
and Floy. I took her to see
"Parent Trap." And she's
met the twins in my family.
I don't remember if I men-
tioned the Abernathy girls
or not.
Christy Staab had twin
daughters. I went over-
when they were babies just
to drool on them. What a
special treat! As they grew
older, they would come to
the house and play with
the cats that somehow got
born in my closet. I had.
the honor of taking them
for ice cream. I stood 'em
side-by-side, peered deep
in their eyes and said,
"You're Kyrsten; no, wait
a second, you're Kaitlen!"
They would roll their eyes
and giggle.
I loved every second of
it and pondered again on
what I had done wrong to
miss the fun, the joy, the
blessing of having my own
set so I could finally figure
out which one was wearing
the red suit ... and which
one had on the blue.
I don't feel cheated. I'm
not blaming God, my wife,
bad karma or the weather.
My family is healthy. The
boys don't call for money.
We have a terrific grand-
son and a beautiful grand-
daughter. And Josh and
Lindsey informed us back
in October they were ex-
pecting again. My blessings
have blessings.
Josh called this after-
noon. Lindsey had been
for one of those sonogram
things that shows whether
it's going to be a girl or a
boy. "Daddy, are you sitting
down? You are not going to
believe this. It's twin girls!"
"Daddy..DadDY...DAD-
DY.."


. ............


A
El
eS
Al










A5| The Star Letters


Thursday, January 29, 2009


A special thank you
The People Helping People of Gulf
County would like everyone to know what
a great job the Gulf County Executive
Committee for the Democratic Party has
done for our food pantry. This effort was
led by Zebe Schmitt. She returned on Jan.
'26 and delivered more bags of food the
students of the Port St. Joe Elementary
School had brought in. The Democratic
National Party of Gulf County informed us
that they all wanted to play a major role in
this food drive throughout the year.


It is community minded individuals
like Zebe and her volunteers that will help
us meet the economic challenges that lie
ahead of us. Thanks to Matt and Neil for
setting up the tent tables, banners and the
other things they did so well. Karen and
Laura also helped Quen and Charles re-
ceiving the food and packing it up for deliv-
ery. A big thank you to all the people that
helped by donating food, material time or
labor in this effort.
Jerry Stokoe
Director
People Helping People


A commission love-in
While watching the Jan. 13 county com-
missioners' meeting, I felt like I was back
in the 1960s. You could just feel the love. Mr.
Traylor gushing over Mr. Peters and Mr. Pe-
ters gushing over Mr. Traylor, oh, Kumbaya,
you could just feel the love. I recall the love
when Mr. Peters last held the chair and Mr.
Traylor and Mr. McLemore orchestrated
the unjust ouster of Mr. Peters from his seat,
only to do one of their famous flip-flops and
reinstate him. I'm sure Mr. Peters remem-
bers that one. At any rate, according to Mr.


Peters times look to improve with the start
up of the hospital, the port, the jobs and the
increased tax revenues they will generate.
That will certainly instill a new gush of love
to their hearts and I'm sure it will result in
lower taxes for the overburdened residents
and businesses in the county. It may even
inspire Mr. Yeager to fulfill his campaign
promise of pursuing county-wide voting that
the voters so overwhelmingly desire.
What a far out love-in that would be,
Kumbaya, Kumbaya.
Tom Knoche
Port St. Joe


COLD-DAMAGED PLANT CARE


Protect plants


from chilly


winter weather


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
January and February
are the coldest months
in Florida, and plants
can be 'damaged by low
temperatures. But with
your help, cold-damaged
plants can often
recover.
After a freeze,
see if your plants
are dry. Even in-
jured plants need
water.
Plants, howev-
er can be greatly ROY
damaged if the CAR
temperature Coi
drops suddenly. Exte
They have no Dir
time to acclimate
to the freezing
temperatures. Plants
are damaged when ice
crystals form the plant
cells. The crystals ex-
pand, rupturing the cell
walls and preventing the
plants from maintaining
shape. If severe, this can
kill tender plants. On
hardier plants, damaged
foliage will appear wilt-
ed and curled down. In a
few hours or days, it will
darken and turn black.
Flowers and buds might
die, blacken and drop to
the ground if exposed
to cold temperatures.
Damaged flowers will
not develop into fruit.
Young branches and new
growth are especially
susceptible and might
also blacken and die.
After freezing tem-
peratures occur, remove
damaged leaves and
flowers as soon as. they
turn brown or black.
This will help prevent
diseases from attacking
the plant. Pruning should
be postponed until cold
temperatures are no lon-
ger expected and new
growth begins to appear
on the plant. This is to
make sure that live wood,
which appears dead from
losing its leaves, is not
mistakenly removed from
the plant. Cold-damaged
wood can be detected by
examining the cambium


u
n


layer (under the bark) of
the plant. If.it has black
or brown discoloration,
it is damaged and should
be pruned back behind
these points. Plants
should be fertilized in the
spring to encourage new
growth.
Protect your
plants from cold
temperatures
during the next
cold front. Do this
by moving potted
plants indoors
and covering ten-
LEE der landscape
TER plants with a pro-
tective covering.
ty.Y Protective cover-
ctor ing can include
old bed sheets,
pieces of material
or fabric, and cardboard
boxes. Be careful not to
let the protective cov-
ering touch the plants.
The surface of the cover-
ing will become as cold
as the air temperatures
and might damage any
tender leaves it come in
contact with.' Also, don't
forget to remove the cov-
ering the next day when
temperature raises.
This is important so the
plants do not "bake" in
the warmer tempera-
tures. Plants placed
near the house, lights or
other structures, which
shelter them from wind,
will be more protected
than those fully exposed
to the cold air.
Whatever you,'do, even
if your landscape orna-
mentals have already
suffered some cold injury,
do not relax your guard.
More frigid weather
might be on the way. So
be prepared to keep your
prized plants as warm as
possible each time the
weatherman predicts
freezing temperatures.
Don't encourage any new
growth until all frost dan-
ger has passed.
For more information
on freeze damage plants,
please contact the Gulf
County IFAS Cooperative
Extension Office at 639-
3200 or 229-2909.


SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: (850) 227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com Try Our
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*t, ar Ba g `MB 7 `?` y7a:!! i `! y is i t X:e : ,i: 7 'aE::V'f


KLATTERINGS from page A4


With the county's un-
employment rate spiking
last month at a percentage
greater than any county
in the state and reaching
levels not seen since the
paper mill permanently
closed, every dime counts
for every business in the
county.
And the argument that
government should provide
any assistance possible
to spur business, to assist
struggling small business-
es, outside of playing plain


favorites, gains more trac-
tion by the day.

Closing thoughts
Last week in this space,
I wondered how far we have
come as a community, as a
county, in terms of judging
folks by the content of their
character rather than the
color of their skin.
The specifics, the
names, the actions, were
not as important as the
question, a rhetorical one,


which certainly generated
plenty of discussion in the
community.
The week prior, this
space was devoted to snip-
pets of one of Martin Lu-
ther King Jr.'s most famous
essays about the measure
of a man.
The two columns were
of one cloth.
For Martin Luther King
Jr. believed that economic
and racial injustice repre-
sented conjoined twins.
And to make the case


that race and money are
not factors in our commu-
nity, that they do not serve
to divide on issues of fair
and equal treatment, that
they are not weights that
tip the scales, whether of
access to and response
from some elected officials
or simple justice and fair-
ness in the eyes of the law,
is to deny reality.
Elected and appointed
officials can protest ad nau-
seum, but they are shout-
ing at the wind.


Boyd votes to prohibit

release of remaining

financial rescue funds

WASHINGTON, D.C. Citing the lack of account-
ability and oversight in the implementation of
the financial rescue package, Congressman
Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) today voted to
prohibit the release of the remaining rescue
funds through the Troubled Assets Relief
Program, which became law
last October. Under the TARP
legislation, the U.S. Treasury
Department was provided
$350 billion last fall to stabilize
the financial industry, and the
remaining $350 billion would
be provided only after Con-
gressional authorization.
ALLEN BOYD The goal of the TARP was to
D-Monitcello inject liquidity into the financial
markets so that the banks could
turn around and loan this money
to the American people to buy a house or car, to
start a small business or to pay for college. Un-
fortunately, the treasury department has failed
to follow congressional intent on the spending
of the first $350 billion and has not tracked or
been able to explain how this taxpayer money
was spent, as indicated by the progress report
published by the nonpartisan Government Ac-
countability Office in December 2008.
"Our nation is facing serious economic
challenges, and my top priorities are to create
jobs, grow our economy, and bring back fiscal
responsibility to government," said Congress-
man Boyd. "While the Obama administration
has made it clear that they plan to set tough
standards for accountability and transpar-
ency when administering the remaining $350
billion, I am not comfortable approving any
additional TARP funding without a stronger
assurance that the program will benefit our
families, our communities and our small busi-
nesses."
Yesterday, Congressman Boyd supported
legislation that would overhaul the TARP to
strengthen accountability, close loopholes,
and require the Treasury Department to take
significant steps on foreclosure mitigation.
Unfortunately, the Senate is not expected to
consider this bill, and therefore, these guide-
lines will not become law.


I for one am real concerned
about some of the cabinet ap-
pointments coming to light in
this upcoming administration.
Either my nose is inopera-
tive or something because a
couple of those guys and gals
don't pass the smell test.
Take the individual that
has been put forth as our trea-
sury secretary The guy that is
supposed to manage the IRS
among other things. Taxes and
all that. Well, it seems like he
, has a situation hovering over
him that bears more scrutiny
than what it is being given.
. IHe worked for the Inter-
national Monetary Flnd on
a contractual basis, so I hear,
and was told by the IMF that:
he was required to file a 1099,
I think it is called, and didn't.
File, that is, for a couple years.
Actually, it was four years.
Claims it was an innocent mis-
take, just a slip up. The amount
involved was not disclosed, but
working for that outfit, it must
have been considerable. Then
to add insult to injury, he de-
ducted the expenses of send-
ing his children to a boarding
camp in the summer, which
also must have been quite a
sum,. When exposed for the
delinquent taxpayer hat he
was, he uttereda loud "oops"'
and sought to catch up. I don't
know about you, but if that was
me, I would be snacking on
prison food right now, which I
think as, an American citizen,
he should be doing. After due
! process thatis.
Now I know with my per-
sonal tax situation in the past,"
I have made a so-called in-
nocent mistake of $38.50 and
that guy making $40,000 a year
harassed the old Fox like I was
breaking the U.S. government.
It has cost me some heavy


bucks to hire some dude to
keep me straight on my taxes.
I learned my lesson from that.
Then there is the appoint-
ment of the ex-energy sec-
retary to head, guess what?
The CI and A. The man has
no experience in, the intefli-
gence community, a verysen-
sitive post if I do say so. One
charged with keeping Abdul-
lah and his friends at.bay and
protecting us from the de-
bacle of 9/11 happening again.
One of the things that I will al-
ways admire about President
'Bush is the manner in which
he forestalled any more of the
terrible things like 9/11 hap-:
pening again on his watch.
Another example is the
woman picked to be the czar'
of something or other. Envi-
ronment, I think. The wom-
an's an avowed socialist and
makes no bones about it. She
belonged to a socialist organi-
zation and now she's the czar.
I have seen socialism in opera-
tion, and I don't think that the
American people when they-
see it coming will accept it.
SAll inall, it'll be a rough
haul until it gets better. My
friends, you are not being told
the whole truth. We need to
take a stand for the things that
our wonderful cQountrywas,
based on. Nothing is changed,.
morals haven't, principles
haven't and the backbone of
the average American hasn't:
melted away. We need to con-,
front these elitist ruffians that.
are trying to take the America
that you know away.
And from where I sit oni
the beautiful beaches of Gulf
County, to the beltway is hap-!
py hollow. This is the saltwa-
ter fox and I love you all..

Reynard, the saltwater fox


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Thursday, January 29, 2009


A6 I The Star


- I..- -


TOTY from page Al


L .n ca


puts it on herself. She will
not accept mediocrity from
her students and if they do
not excel, she will examine
her teaching and ways she
could have done things bet-
ter."
Roman, who spent
two years at Tyndall El-
ementary in Bay County
prior to moving back to
her hometown, has been a
sixth-grade language arts
teacher and, when a need
arose, embraced teaching
seventh-grade mathemat-
ics as Well.
"She is wonderful," List-
er said. "She is very imagi-
native with language arts.
She does clever things that
stick with kids."
For instance, Roman
has decreed certain words
as "dying" and her stu-
dents have held full funeral
services for the words,
complete with burial and a
marker..
Her willingness to tack-
le math, which she is certi-
fied to teach but had never
taught, impressed Lister.
"She has pored over the
Sunshine State Standards
and knows them so well,"
Lister said. "I have been
impressed that she can
take on math. It was a need
here and she stepped up.
and the teachers noticed."


ii


Lister also noted Ro-
man's personality, which
serves her well when deal-
ing with students at the
middle school and the myr-
iad changes their lives and
bodies are undergoing.
"She is very mild-man-
nered," Lister said. "She
is so committed., She has
worked so well with her
students.
"Anything I ask her to do
she just does. I don't have
to look over her shoulder.

Karen Odom
Odom is a reading coach
at Port St. Joe Elementary
School as well as
Port St. Joe High
School.
As what is known
as an "itinerant"
teacher, meaning
she moves between
schools, Odom,
who has a Bache- KA
lor's from Florida 01
State University,
has made impacts at two
schools, something not lost
on her peers.
"It's pretty amazing that
the faculty would vote an
itinerant teacher as Teach-
er of the Year," said Port
St. Joe Elementary School
principal Melissa Ramsey.
"That speaks volumes."


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Ramsey calls Odom a
"phenomenal and dynam-
ic" reading coach who has
led Port St. Joe Elementary
to great strides forward in
reading by creating a team
approach since joining the
faculty in 2004, Ramsey in-
dicated.
Odom teaches fourth-
grade reading, fifth-grade
science and second-grade
writing at the elementary
school and is an after-
school reading coach and
tutor at the high school.
"She is a jack of all
trades," Ramsey said. "She
is awesome, she is phe-
nomenal and she is ener-
getic. She is most
deserving of being
the district's teach-
er of the year."
Among the
methods Odom has
employed to spark
young readers is
iREN studying novels,
DOM building classroom
libraries, school-
wide vocabulary and word
walls.. These methods,
Ramsey said, have sparked
reading as a fundamental of
what is now an "A" school.
She readily gives of her-
self, be it time, money and
energy to get the job ac-
complished, Ramsey said.
"Mrs. Odom has a


presence about her that
inspires and encourages
everyone around her to en-
gage in 'whatever it takes'
to promote reading as an
essential guiding force for
success," Ramsey wrote
in a letter of recommenda-
tion.
"Dedication, energy,
spontaneity and passion
are just a few of the words
hat come to mind when I
think of Mrs. Odom."

Kelley Gerken
After teaching kinder-
garten last year at Wewa-
hitchka Elemen-
tary School, Kelley
Gerken advanced
with her students
to first grade.
Principal Lori
Price called Gerken
a "natural born"
teacher possessed KEI
of a procedurall ER
smoothness." E
As an example,
Price cited the transforma-
tion Gerken achieved with
last year's kindergarten
crop.
"Two weeks into their
kindergarten year, you'd
never know that they hadn't
been in a school setting,"
said Priqe, who praised
Gerken's quiet confidence.


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"It's not drill sergean
everybody just knows wh;
they're supposed to do at
they do it."
A 2004 graduate ofMiar
University in Oxford, Ohi
Gerken previously taugi
at Springhill Lake Elemei
tary School in Greenbe]
MD, before joining tt
Wewahitchka Elementai
School faculty in 2007.
For two years, Gerke
has been a member of tt
school's literacy team, ar
conducted parent readir
workshops as part of tl
school's Families Buildir
Better Readers program.
Noting her e
cellence in teac
ing language, Pri(
recalled observii
Gerken tailor tl
same reading le
son to three grou]
of students wi
LLEY varying skill level
RKEN "She went w,
beyond it for thou
who were advanced ai
broke it down in very th
pieces for those who we:
struggling," she said.
Gerkens' students ha'
received high marks
standardized tests,
achievement Price credi
to the warm, stress fri
environment. Gerken h,
created.
"The kids can say an
thing to her no one
laughed at for making
error," said Price.
The Teacher of the Ye
honor came at the rig
time. Price laments th
Gerken will not return f
the 2009-2010 school year
Her fiancee, a flight si
geon working at Tyndall P
Force Base, has been rea
signed to a base in Texa
and Gerken will joih hi
there.

Martin Jarosz
Whenever there is a fl
to be raised at a common]
ceremony or school evei
Port St. Joe High
School NJROTC
Commander Mar-
tin Jarosz can-be
found with his ex-
ceptional student-
cadets.
"He runs an out-
standing program,
and he runs it by
himself. He is run-
ning all facets," said prin
pal Duane McFarland.
"Not only do you s
him around school, y
see him in the communi
His kids are involved in
much."
LCDR Jarosz (US Nav
Retired) graduated frc
the United States Nav
Academy in Annapolis, iV
in 1974.
In 1986, he earned
Masters of Arts in edu(
tion administration and
master certificate in educ
tional technology from S
Diego State University.
He also has 24 cre,
hours towards a maste:
degree in information tec
nology.
After serving as
NJROTC instructor J
over a decade at Cur
High School in Staten
land, NY, Jarosz joined t
Port St. Joe High Schi
faculty in 2006.
There, he has led t
NJROTC program and a]
served as an SAT/ACT pr


+ ~ ~ i~~- C. .


.t; instructor, physical educa-
at tion teacher and supervisor
id of in-school suspension.
McFarland described
ni Jarosz as a well-rounded
o, man with many gifts, in-
ht cluding an expansive
n- knowledge of history and
It, mathematics.
ie He also has a good sing-
ry ing voice, as those attend-
ing this year's Port St. Joe
mn High School Veteran's Day
te program can attest.
id "He is just wonder-
ig ful. He's a great guy," said
he McFarland, who applaud-
ig ed Jarosz's selection as
Teacher of the Year.
x- "He is a very good PR.
h- guy for the school and pro-
ce gram.
ig
he Jay Bidwell
s-
ps After being named We-
th wahitchka High School's
s. Teacher of the Year in 2007,
ay Bidwell has returned to re-
se claim his title.
nd Bidwell earned his
ny bachelor's
re degree in
Spanish
ve Education
on and mas-
an ters and giftde-
ts gree in ed-
ee ucational
as leadership JAY
from the BIDWELL
y- University
is of West Florida.
an Now in his 18th year at

the high scho ol, Bidwell



for hites lively Spanish class-
ht lish and gifted students in
at grades 9-12.
For Principal Debbie Baxley
studescribed Bidwell as likely
r "top-notch," and versatile
ag teacher.
s-, "Jay excels in all areas
Swhatever he is i to


es. On any given day, his
students are just as likely
ag to break into song as they
ity are to recite Spanishvo-
nt, cabulary.
them not only to
read and say the
word, but experi-
ence the word,"
said Baxley. "He
tries to appeal to
all the learning
MARTIN modalities."
JAROSZ Wanting to im-
merse his students
ci- in Spanish culture, Bidwell
hosts an annual Spanish
ee dinner, with students re-
ou sponsible for cooking the
ity. feast.
so As they dine, the stu-
dents practice their Span-
vy- ish conversational skills.
sm When the high school
val began its gifted program
ID this year, Bidwell took a
leading role.
a He teaches a gifted
ca- course once a week, with
a students responsible for
ca- completing individualized
an projects.
In addition to his teach-
dit ing duties, Bidwell has also
r's served as president of the
ch- Gulf County Education As-
sociation for the last two
an years..
for He also serves as an
tis "unofficial mentor" to new
Is- teachers, assistingwithles-
he son plans and the Pinnacle
"Jay is always willing to
he help. He will assume lead-
so ership if given the opportu-
ep nity," said Baxley.


THE CITY OF MEXICO
BEACH SUPPORTS FAIR
HOUSING

The City of Mexico Beach is committed to en-
suring fair treatment in housing by avoiding
discrimination, providing equal opportunity,
and taking affirmative action to correct past
discriminations. The City of Mexico Beach
implements civil rights laws which are de-
signed to protect persons regardless of race,
religion, national origin, family status, color,
gender, or handicap in the choice of housing.
If you believe you have been a victim of hous-
ing discrimination, contact the Office of Fair
Housing and Equal Opportunity, Room 5116,
Department of Housing and Urban Develop-
ment, 451 7th Street SW, Washington, D.C.
20410-1000; (202) 708-2878. For more infor-
mation, contact the Fair Housing Information
Clearinghouse, P.O. Box 6091, Rockville, MD
20850; (800) 245-2691.

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Thursday, January 29, 2009


Local


The Star I A7


Mexico Beach road projects explained, water system sold


By.Marie Logan
Contributing Writer

Mexico Beach's first
city council meeting of
the year included a major
utility sale and a surprise
presentation on the "back
beach toad" project slated
for the town.
The Jan. 13 meeting be-
gan with an unscheduled
appearance by two repre-
sentatives from PBS&J,
the Tallahassee engineer-
ing firm handling both the
Gulf Coast Parkway and
the Gulf to Bay Highway
projects for the Florida
Department of Transpor-
tation (FDOT).
The visit was prompted
by two things: general con-
-fusion by area residents
oyer the two road proj-
ects, and a letter mailed to
numerous Mexico Beach
residents, including May-
or Al Cathey, by a Tal-
lahassee law firm, about
possible eminent domain
seizure of their property
by the state in conjunction
with one of the projects.
At the city council's
Jan. 7 pre-agenda work-
shop, the letter was dis-
cussed by the council and
the board asked council


member Robert Ginsberg
to invite someone from
PBS&J to come to a coun-
cil meeting and explain
both projects and talk
about the implications of
the letter.
The attendance of the
PBS&J representatives
was not on the Jan. 13
published agenda, and
only about 20 people were
in the audience.

Water system sale
Concerning the sale of
a significant portion of the
city's water service, the
council voted unanimous-
ly to accept an offer from
the city of Port St. Joe for
the sale of the Beacon Hill
water system to the Gulf
County city.
The agreed-on sale
price of $235,000 for the
Beacon Hill system is part
of a long-standing interlo-
cal agreement between
Mexico Beach and Gulf
County, signed in 1991.
According to John
Grantland, Port St. Joe's
Director of Public Works,
Port St. Joe is prepared to
,present the check to Mex-
ico Beach on April 1, with
actual ownership transfer
around May 1.


Grantland said billing
and meter reading would
be coordinated between
the two cities for a smooth
transition.
When questioned,
Mexico Beach city clerk
Deborah McLeod said the
city "knew the loss [of rev-
enue] was coming and had
budgeted for it this [fiscal]
year. We feel like we're ad-
equately prepared," she
said.
"It is our full intent
not to raise water bills,"
Cathey added.
The loss of Beacon Hill
customers constitutes a
loss of approximately one-
third of Mexico Beach's
water revenue, according
to McLeod. But the city
has already transferred
affected personnel to oth-
er positions in the city to
position itself for the loss.
Chris Hubbard, Mexico
Beach' city administra-
tor, said later that the
sale and loss of revenue
"would not affect water
bills in Mexico Beach this
year. We have planned for
this," Hubbard said, "but
everything really is spec-
ulation."
Hubbard confirmed
that the numerous condo-
miniums that were built


in the city during the real
estate boom of 2004-06 are
still mostly vacant and
have not yet been added
to the city's water cus-
tomer base, as anticipated
in those years.
According to McLeod,
the $235,000 from the water
system sale will be placed
in the water department's
portion of the special fund
that will be used to make
the city's balloon payment
on its Gulf Breeze loan.
The Gulf Breeze loan,
which financed the in-
stallation of the city-wide
sewer system in 1999-
2000, allowed the city to
come off of septic tanks.
The balloon payment of
$1.4 million on the loan is
due in 2021.
McLeod reported that
the city's water depart-
ment fund, sewer fund
and general fund are each
paying into the special ac-
count for the balloon pay-
ment. The $235,000 will
complete the water fund's
required contributions;
the other two funds must
continue to set aside mon-
ey, she said.
In other business con-
ducted at the meeting:
I Mexico Beach will
hold elections on April 21


for the positions of city
mayor and two council
members. Feb. 13 is the
deadline to qualify for the
three positions.
The seats are currently
held by Cathey and coun-
cil members Curtis Dale
and Jack Mullen.
A representative of
Preble Rish, the city's
engineering firm of re-
cord, announced that the
city should have the pier
extension permit by mid-
February and could then
go out for bid on the proj-
ect.
The annual Mexico
Beach Gumbo Cookoff is
scheduled for Feb. 14 at
Sunset Park at the west
end of the El Governor
Motel on U.S. 98.
Event organizers are
still accepting entries and
are looking for volunteers.
For information, contact
Lynn Marshall, direc-
tor of the Mexico Beach
Community Development
Council (MBCDC), which
sponsors the cookoff, at
850-648-8196.
Connie Risinger (Post
1) and Shirley Miller (Post
5) were unanimously re-
appointed to the city Plan-
ning and Zoning (P&Z)
Board. The city is still ac-


cepting nominations for
the two vacant alternate
positions on the board.
Hubbard reported
that the developers of the
condominium project on
the south side of U.S. 98 at
Twenty-Third Street have
notified the city that they
plan to pay for develop-
ment orders and permits
very soon and complete
the project.
The shell of the build-
ing has been standing
uncompleted for several
years.
Hubbard also report-
ed that the city is working
on several dune walkovers
that have been completely
blocked by shifting sand.
According to Hubbard,
the state Department of
Environmental Protection
(FDEP) will not allow the
walkovers to be dug out;
the city must rebuild the
covered walkovers to pass
over the newly mounded
sand.
Hubbard said once the
dunes overtake the walk-
overs, that DEP considers
the walkovers part of the
dunes and they cannot be
cleared. Hubbard said he
expected the work to be
completed by the summer
season.


Four injured in morning accident near Bay/Gulf County line


Four people were injured,
three seriously, last Thursday
in a morning head-on collision
near the Bay/Gulf County line.
All four were transported
to Bay Medical Center and the
8:50 a.m. CT accident backed
up traffic on State 22 for several
miles in both directions.
Driver Megan Lincoln, 17,


and passenger Corri Hoedl,
18, both of Wewahitchka, were.
traveling west on State 22 when
the 1999 Honda Civic they were
traveling in crossed the center
line of the roadway just over
eight miles west of Wewahi-
tchka.
Lincoln, who was driving, at-
tempted to move back into the


westbound lane. Geoffrey Rob-
inson, 48, was traveling east be-
hind the wheel of a 2007 Chev-
rolet truck, observed the Honda
travel into his lane and veered
left to avoid the car.
The vehicles collided head-
on at the centerline.
Hoedl, a student at Wewahi-
tchka High School, and Lincoln,


a former student at Wewahi-
tchka High, suffered serious in-
juries, according to the Florida
Highway Patrol.
Robinson's injuries were
listed as minor but a passenger
in his truck, Robert Blake, 47, of
Youngstown, also suffered seri-
ous injuries. At least two of the
four people involved had to be


removed from their vehicles us-
ing the Jaws of Life.
Robinson, Blake and Lincoln
were all wearing seat belts. The
FHP report did not indicate if
Hoedl was wearing any safety
restraint.
Alcohol was not a factor in
the accident, the FHP indicat-
ed.


Gulf Coast Workforce Region's unemployment numbers spike


The unemployment rate
in the Gulf Coast Workforce
Region (Bay, Franklin, and
Gulf counties) was 8.8 per-
cent in December 2008, 4.3
percentage points higher
than the region's year ago
rate and 1.0 percentage
point higher than the state
rate of 7.8 percent not sea-
sonally adjusted (8.1 percent
seasonally adjusted) and 1.6
percent higher than the na-
tional average of 7.2 percent.
Out of a labor force of 98,470,
there were 8,629 unem-
ployed Gulf Coast residents.
In Gulf County, the De-
cember unemployment rate
was 8.1 percent, up from
6.8 percent last month, the
largest December increase
in Florida. Gulf County's
unemployment rate has not
been over 8 percent since
the years immediately after
the closing of the paper mill,
when unemployment hov-
ered around 12 percent for
at least two years.
The last time the region's
December unemployment
rate was this high was in
1993 when it was 10.0 per-
cent. The December 2008
unemployment rates in the


counties that comprise the
Gulf Coast Workforce Re-
gion were:
8.1 percent in Gulf Coun-
ty,
9.0 percent in Bay Coun-
ty, and
5.6 percent in Franklin
County.
In December 2008, there
were 74,000 nonagricultural
jobs in the Panama City-
Lynn Haven metro area
(Bay County), down 2,600
jobs over the year. The an-
nual rate of job loss in the
area (-3.4 percent) exceeded
the state's rate of -3.1 per-
cent. The Panama City-
Lynn Haven metro area job
growth rate has been nega-
tive since March 2008.
Kim Bodine, Executive
Director Gulf Coast Work-
force Board, states "we were
expecting another increase,


based on manufacturing
and leisure/hospitality job
losses that we knew of. Our
Workforce Center continues
to experience a 25 percent
increase in traffic, and we
are hopeful that our season-
al jobs, which will start up
soon, will improve at least
minimally the job loss rate
that we are seeing."
The industry losing the
most jobs over the year in
the Panama City-Lynn Ha-
ven metro area was natural
resources, mining, and con-
struction (-900 jobs). Trade,
transportation, and utilities
(-700 jobs) also declined over
the year, along with leisure


and hospitality (-400 jobs);
financial activities and man-
ufacturing (-300 jobs each);
professional and business
services (-200 jobs); and oth-
er services (-100 jobs). The
losses were partially offset
by gains in education and
health services (+300 jobs).
Information and govern-
ment remained-unchanged.
Relative to Florida's oth-
er metro areas, the Panama
City-Lynn Haven metro area
had the second largest over
the year percent decline in
financial activities (-5.4 per-
cent); leisure and hospitality
(4.1 percent); and other ser-
vices (-2.8 percent).


408 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL o
n 850-227-3472
Coin-op Laundry Wash & Fold
Dry CleaningDProp Off ,


Progress Energy


For customer service questions, call
1.800.700.8744.
To report power outages, call
1.800.228.8485.


progress-energy.com


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508 Harrison Ave.
Downtown Panama City
769-0111
Mon Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5
- Plus Special Guests -
The Rader Family
featuring
Shawn
Rader


Out of Town Ticket
Orders or Info, Call
850-234-8983


GULF WORLD MARINE PARK
15712 Front Beach Rd.
Panama City Beach
234-5211
7 days A Week 9-5


A BENEFIT SHOW FOR THE
GULF COAST CHILDREN ADVOCACY CENTER
A WAYNE RADER PROMOTION -


Note: All data are subject to revision. P = preliminary.
Source: Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation, Labor
Market Statistics Center

PUBLIC NOTICE


Pursuant to Section 163.346, Florida Stat-
utes (2007), the City Commission of the
City of Port St Joe, Florida, as the govern-
ing body of the City, does hereby give pub-
lic notice of its intention to adopt a resolu-
tion in accordance with Section 163.355,
Florida Statutes (2007), finding one or
more blighted areas, exist in the City of
Port St Joe, and further finding the reha-
bilitation, conservation, or redevelopment,
or combination thereof, of such area or ar-
eas is necessary in the interest of the pub-
lic health, safety, morals, or welfare of the
residents of the City of Port St Joe. The
blighted areas are located in that part of the
City containing approximately (399) acres
and more particularly described as:











I 0 i f --'" 11'

!lT I
g



The City of Port St Joe will consider the
resolution at a public meeting to be held on
Feb 17, 2009, beginning at 6:00 pm. or as
soon thereafter as possible, at City Hall in
Port St Joe, Florida. To obtain a copy of

the resolution and the report documenting
the blight conditions contact:
The Port St Joe Redevelopment Agency at
850.229.6899 or visit at 150 Captain Fred's
Place, Port St Joe, FL 32456


As compared to last month, below are the areas which changed: Nov'08 Dec'08 Change
Total Employment 74,600 74,000 -600
Natural Resources, Mining and Construction 5,600 5,500 -100
Manufacturing .3,400 3,300 -100
Education and Health Services 8,200 8,300 +100
Leisure and Hospitality 9,800 9,400 -400
Other Services 3,600 3,500 -100


AT ARNOLD HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
Located at 550 Alf Coleman Road Panama City Beach
(Just North of Back Beach Road)


2 CONVENIENT TICKET LOCATIONS


a E


--- ------- ... ..... .... -... - -







PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA


www. starf l.com


A
Section


rage ~


rlllauay, January ..,, ..v. ....vTv1




njury forces Rich out as pitcher for Lady Gators


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Samantha Rich has
thrown her last pitch for
the Lady Gators of Wewa-
hitchka.
Rich, a senior, injured
her right, or throwing,
shoulder this week while
playing volleyball in physi-
cal education class, said
Wewahitchka coach Coy
Adkins.
She underwent ar-
throscopic surgerylate this
week and with the start of
practice and regular sea-
son looming in the next 30
days, Rich has thrown her
last pitch as a Lady Gator,


Adkins said.
The damage to the
shoulder was unknown,
though Adkins indicated
it was fairly extensive and
included a torn labrum.
"She may be back be-
fore the end of the season,
but she is done pitching,"
Adkins said.
The injury is a huge
blow to the two-time de-
fending state Class 2A
champion.
On the mound, Rich led
the Lady Gators to those
titles, earning all-state
honors as well as being
named the Class 2A Player
of the Year last year and
finishing as runner-up in


voting for the Player of the
Year in all classifications.
Rich finishes 56-6 for
her high school career, in-
cluding 20-2 last year after
sharing pitching duties
her first two seasons. She
has lost to just one Class
2A team in her high school
career.
She has also hit over
.400 with more than 100
RBIs, 52 alone as a fresh-
man, and 26 home runs, a
school career record.
The Lady Gators have
reached the state Fi-
nal Four in each of her
three seasons, losing in
the semifinals her fresh-
man year before breaking


through with consecutive
titles. Wewahitchka has
the smallest enrollment in
Class 2A.
Rich has been first
team all-state three years
running and state Class 2A
player of the year in 2006
and 2008.
Last year, Rich also was
an ESPN (EA Sports) sec-
ond-team all-American
Rich signed a NCAA
Division I scholarship with
Jacksonville (AL) State
University.
The extent of the dam-
age and the results of re-
habilitation will dictate
whether Rich pitches at
the next level or not.


Last season Samantha Rich was the Class 2A player
of the year while Coach Coy Adkins was Class 2A
coach of the year.


Gators impressive fourth


at Arnold Invitational


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

The Wewahitchka High
School wrestling team
takes one step higher up
the rung by the week.
One week after finish-
ing fifth at the Panhandle
Invitational Champion-
ships, the Gators won the
program's first individual
titles and finished fourth,
less than 16 points out of
second, at the Arnold Invi-
tational last weekend.
"It was basically the
same teams at the Pan-
handle Classic last week
except for some teams like
Mosley and South Walton,"
said Wewahitchka coach
Todd Johnson. "We wres-
tled about how I wanted
them to. You plan to peak
at the right moment. The
district duals are next
week and the district tour-
nament in two weeks, so
we are improving at the
right time."
Daniel House, Wewahi-
tchka High School's first-
ever state qualifier last
year, and Nick Malcolm
won the first individual
tournament titles ever
won by the fourth-year
program Johnson has built
from scratch.
House won the 125-
pound bracket; Mal-
colm took the title at 103
pounds..
Wewahitchka arrived
with just eight wrestlers
and had six placed in the
top four of their respec-


tive brackets, a notable
achievement.
Jacob Taylor, wrestling
at,112 pounds, and Chase
Duckworth, competing at
119 pounds, both finished
second. And Matt Irwin
was fourth at 145 while Ja-
cob Villasenor was fourth
at 215 pounds.
House is now 33-6 and
Malcolm has also gone
past 30 wins with a 30-7 re-
cord.
Duckworth is 27-11,
Taylor 26-9 and Irwin and
Villasenor have identical
24-11 records.
"We have two weeks
until the district tourna-
ment," said Johnson said.
"If they continue to do the
work and prepare well
then they can -do well."
House and Duckworth
are seniors. Malcolm and
Taylor are both sopho-
mores.
The District 1-1A du-
als, essentially a meet to
establish seeding for the
individual district tour-
nament, will be at South
Walton this weekend. The
district tournament is at
Arnold next weekend.

Arnold Invitational
results

Team scores: 1. Nicev-
ille 154.5, 2. Arnold 143,
(tie) Rutherford 143, 4. We-
wahitchka 127.5, 5..Crest-
view 124, 6. Gulf Breeze
121.5, 7. Tate 83, 8. Pace 76,
9. Leon 65, 10. Milton 64, 11.
Bay 43.5, 12. Rickards 41,


13. Godby 40, 14. Bozeman
37, 15. Choctawhatchee
28, 16. Marianna 26.
Championship matches
103: Malcolm (Wewa) def.
Young (Mil), 13-6. 112: En-
sminger (Arn) def. Taylor
(Wewa), 11-8. 119: Ramirez
(GB) def. Duckworth (Wewa),
10-4. 125: House (Wewa) pin
Johnson (Crest), 3:48. 130:
D.Dunwald (Nice) def. Al-
len (Leon), 9-7. 135: D.Jones
(Nice) pin I.Jones (Pace), 1:30.
140: J.Dunwald (Nice) def. Vi-
gren (Crest), 7-5. 145: Fischet-
ti (Tate) pin Miles (Ruth), 1:52.
152: Moore (Arn) pin Stanley
(GB), 1:34. 160: Meyer (Nice)
pin Mitchell (Crest), 1:52. 171:
Rutherford (GB) pin Allen
(Ruth), 3:04. 189: Reynolds
(Tate) def. Carrillo (Choc), 8-5.
215: Jenkins (Nice) pin Pin-
nock (Rick), 1:02. HWT: Hard-
ing (Tate) pin Small (Mar), 1:23.
Third-place matches
103: Peffers (Arn) def. Vause
(Nice) by default. 112: Jateff
(Ruth) pin Walker (Crest), :18.
119: Kuy-Kendall (Arn) pin
Lukert (Crest), 4:16. 125: Rob-
inson (Leon) def. Gutiererrez
(Godby) by default. 130: Smith
(Crest) def. Linton (Ruth),
9-4. 135: Searles (Ruth) def.
Lippman (Bay), 8-6. 140: Lee
(Arnold) def. Todman (Leon),
9-6. 145: McKissack (GB) def.
Irwin (Wewa), 12-6. 152: Mc-
Cabe (Ruth) pin Marshall
(Boze), 1:59.160: Dixon (Nice)
def. Bragg (Arn) by default.
171: Peragoy (Nice) def. Book-
er (Bay), 7-3. 189: Parsons
(GB) pin Dean (Crest), :28.
215: Daniels (Ruth) def. Vil-
lasenor (Wewa), 12-9. HWT:
Biggs (Bay) pin Bellow (Mil),
1:09.


Gators go 2-1 in



week of district action


The Wewahitchka
High School boys' bas-
ketball team finished
last week with a win at
Liberty County to fin-
ish 2-1 in District 3-2A
action for the week.


seven points and five
rebounds and Alex
Hardin added four
points and four re-
bounds. Benjamin
Smith had three points
for the Gators.


Tuesday, Jan. 20 Thursday, Jan. 22
Wewahitchka 79, South Walton 85,
West Gadsden 64 Wewahitchka 49


The Gators jumped
to a 25-19 first quarter
lead, padded it to 42-
29 at intermission and
held off a second-half
Panther rally for the
home win.
Christian Owens
and Chris Peak both
registered double-
doubles. Owens led all
scorers with 26 points
and hauled down 13
rebounds. Peak added
19 points and a game-
high 16 rebounds and
added six blocked
shots and two steals.
Lance Griffin and
Josh Mitchell each
scored 10 points.
Mitchell also had five
rebounds and a team-
high seven steals.
Billy Naylor had


The visiting Gators
fell behind early and
a 43-20 second-half
advantage for South
Walton turned a close
game into a rout.
Owens and Griffin
both had 14 points for
Wewahitchka, which
also received 12 points
from Peak Owens also
had a team-high seven
rebounds.
Hardin added five
points and Mitchell
had four points and
eight assists.

Friday, Jan. 23
Wewahitchka 48,
Liberty County 35

The visiting Gators


dominated the second
and fourth quarters
to secure the district
win.
After a slow start,
the Gators out-scored
the Bulldogs 15-5 in
the second quarter
only to see Liberty
County bring it to 31-
26 after three peri-
ods. But Wewahitchka
turned on the jets in
the final quarter pad-
ding the margin with
a 17-9 quarter to win
easily.
Peak had 15 points,
11 rebounds, seven
blocks and two steals
and Griffin added 14
points.
Owens had nine
points and Mitchell
added six points, four
rebounds, two blocks,
three steals and eight
assists.
Naylor and Smith
each scored two
points.
Wewahitchka was
at Bozeman on Mon-
day, hosted Sneads
on Tuesday, travel to
Covenant Christian on
Friday and host Cot-
tondale next Tuesday.


The Wewahitchka Lady
Gators, who sport a roster
dominated by freshmen and
sophomores, lost three games
this week. They fell to West
Gadsden 40-10,- South Walton
48-9, and Liberty County 32-19.
Shakayla Hand was the
leading scorer against West


Gadsden with four points.
Alicia Sellars was the leading
scorer against South Walton
with five, and Shakayla Hand
contributed four points.
Shakayla Hand was the
leading, scorer against Liberty
County with 13 points, and
Jessica Parcher scored five points.


Tiger Sharks remain unbeaten in district


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

They are perfect in
district play and sport a
16-4 record, but the Port
St. Joe boys' basketball
team isn't quite there
for Coach Derek Kur-
nitsky.
After downing West
Gadsden on the road last
Friday night, the Tiger
Sharks' District 3-2A re-
cord stands at 4-0 and a
home victory over Talla-
hassee FAMU padded the
Tiger Sharks' record, but
the coach is still not quite
pleased.
"Record, definitely I
am pleased," Kurnitsky
said. "But there are some
things we have to do bet-
ter. Our goal on defense
is holding opponents to
50 points and we are not
doing that. We have to
improve defensively. In
the playoffs you win with
defense.
"I might be knit-pick-


Saturday, Jan. 24
Port St. Joe 69,
FAMU 60

After jumping on top
13-5 and building a 14-point
second-half lead the Tiger
Sharks had to hold off an-
other fourth-quarter rally to
earn win No. 16.
"We had a 14-point lead
and we just could not put
them away," Kurnitsky said.
"We controlled the second
half, but we need to keep
working on our defense, fo-
cus more when we have a
lead."
Roman Quinn and Pryor
each scored 19 points to
lead the way for the Tiger
Sharks. Willie Quinn added
12 points.
Clemons had seven
points, Smith five, Davis
four and Javion Langston
three points.
The Tiger Sharks host
West Gadsden at 7:30 p.m.
ET on Friday and travel to
Rutherford on Saturday


ing, certainly, but I don't
think we have played our
best game of the year. At
least I hope not."

Friday, Jan. 23
Port St. Joe 75,
West Gadsden 68

The Tiger Sharks
struggled out of the gate
but turned it on in a 28-16
third quarter to ease past
the Panthers, who made
a furious fourth-quarter
comeback to make the
game closer than it ap-
peared.


"We came out and
didn't have a very good
defensive first half," Kur-
nitsky said. "In the third
quarter we turned up the
defense and then we just
kind of got complacent at
the end."
Roman Quinn led Port
St. Joe with 18 points and
Fonda Davis (17), Willie
Quinn (13) and Raheem
Clemons (10) were also
in double figures.
Darrell Smith added
seven points for the Ti-
ger Sharks, Calvin Pryor
four and Quincy Welch
three.


Lady Sharks take two


With a buzzer-beating
shot and tough defense
the Port St. Joe girls'
basketball team earned
a pair of wins last week

Tuesday, Jan. 20
Port St. Joe 54,
Mosley 52

Visiting Mosley was
up two points and facing
a 1-and-1 foul situation
with just 14 seconds left.
However, the Mosley
player missed the first
shot, Port St. Joe's Kayla
Parker snagged the
rebound and drove the
length of the floor for a
tying layup.
With six second lefts,
Parker stole the ball,
took two dribbles and
launched the game-
winning shot at the
buzzer.
Fanequa Larry had


17 points to lead the
Lady Tiger Sharks, with
Parker (13 points) and
Mariah Johnson (10
points) also in double
figures.
Tayler Byrd added
nine points and Asia
Whitely five points for
Port St. Joe.

Thursday, Jan. 22
Port St. Joe 44,
Blountstown 21

Led by 10 points
each from Kayla Parker
and Mariah Johnson
the Lady Tiger Sharks
coasted to an easy road
win.
Larry had seven
points, Byrd added six
points, Whitley five
points, Tiara Smith four
points and Katie Lacour
two points for the Lady
Tiger Sharks.


JI


YOUNG LADY GATORS DROP THREE


"I might be knit-picking,
certainly, but I don't think we
have played our best game
of the year. At least I hope not."


Derek Kurnitsky
Port St. Joe boys' basketball coach


rage 8


hT d J 29 2009







PORT ST, JOE WEWAHITCHKA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, January 29, 2009 w w w. starfl co m Page 9


PHOTO BY DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star


After helping the Lady Gators of Wewahitchka High School to a second-straight
state Class 2A title, Hilary Chapman inked a scholarship with Northwest Florida
State College last week.



Wewahitchka's Chapman



signs with Northwest Florida


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
This softball thing is
working out pretty well for
Hilary Chapman.
The Wewahitchka High
School senior signed a soft-
ball scholarship last week
to play at Northwest Florida
State College, formerly Oka-
loosa-Walton Community
College.
Chapman, who played
baseball until she was 13,
has found the game of soft-
ball much to her liking.
"They say baseball is
faster with the smaller ball
and all that, but softball is
a faster game," Chapman
said last Saturday, gazing
at the distance between the
mound and plate at Lady
Gator Field. "It is a totally
different game.
"I knew I wasn't going
anywhere in baseball and
my parents, said maybe it
is time to find a new sport.
I didn't want to play softball
because I thought I don't
want to play with girls (who
aren't as good). Come to find
out, they are better than a lot
of baseball players I played
against."
Chapman's family moved
to Gulf County from Bain-
bridge, Georgia prior to
her junior season and with
experience playing under
Wewahitchka coach Coy Ad-


kins with the summer squad
Team North Florida, Chap-
man found a comfort zone.
Last season she joined
the defending state Class
2A champions and quickly
became an integral part of
the lineup.
Chapman can catch,
pitch, play infield or outfield,
ajack-of-all-trades if you will
on a softball diamond.
"She has all the tools,"
said Northwest Florida State
coach Jack Byerley, who is
in his first year at Northwest
Florida. "She will make this
program better. She has the
ability to play right away but.
it will depend on her. I am in
my first year so everybody
has a clean slate."
Chapman led the Lady
Gators last year batting
average, runs-scored and
stolen bases, hitting .500
with nine home runs and 24
RBIs.
"I have thought she was
the best pure hitter in the
area," Adkins said. "The way
she swingsithe bat, she'll be
able to play anywhere.
"She'll be a (NCAA) Divi-
sion I player in two years, no
doubt."
Chapman also added a
special ingredient, a certain
fire, to the Lady Gators as
they went on to defend their
championship with a second
state Class 2A title.


"Just her spirit," Adkins
said when asked to describe
what Chapman brought to
the Lady Gators. "She is one
of those kids you don't have
to do a lot of teaching with;
it is just a matter of focusing
her energies in the right di-.
rection."
The weight for Chapman
at Wewahitchka High be-
came a bit heavier last week
when star Samantha Rich
went down with a shoulder
injury. Rich may return this
season, but she will not pitch
again for the Lady Gators.
Chapman, who led off
last year, is likely to fill
Rich's No. 3 spot in the bat-
ting order this season, Ad-
kins said.
"She is a quality kid, No.
1," Byerley said. "She is a
super athlete. And with the
Rich girl out we will see her
leadership ability. It will be
interesting to see how the
older players step up."
Chapman is up for the
challenge because she
knows it is not all on her.
"Winning a champion-
ship here was a big change
for me, at my old school
they didn't really have good
softball teams," Chapman
said. "But what I learned
here is that a team is like
an individual. We all worked
hard to get here. We are all
in this together."


Sports BRIEFS


PSJ Dixie girls
softball coaches
meeting this Thurs.
There will be a coach-
es/volunteers meeting at
the 10th Street softball
field Thursday, Jan. 29,
2009 at 6 p.m. This will be
our annual meeting to hold
elections and set sign up
dates. Anyone interested
in coaching or volunteer-
ing in any capacity please
make plans to attend.

Gator baseball
alumni game will be
held Jan. 31st.
The Wewahitchka High
School Baseball Booster
Club is finalizing their
plans for an Alumni Base-
ball Game to be held, Sat-
urday, Jan. 31, 2009 at the
High School Field. This
event is being planned as
an additional fund raiser
to assist WHS Baseball
with the expenses associ-
ated with their upcoming
season. All interested
Alumni are asked to get
their teams together and
contact Coach Tony Muina
at 832-9657 or Carolyn Hus-
band at 639-2578 for further
details. Final game times
will be announced once fi-
nalized. We ask all former
Gator Baseball players to
show your Gator Pride by
participating in this spe-
cial Day of Baseball in our
Alumni Games.
We have had three
Alumni Teams sign up so
this will.be a tournament
beginning at noon CT. One
of the teams is from the
80's, with the other two
combinations of alumni
from late 90's and 2000's.
We hope that everyone
will come out and support
this tournament for a good
fun day of baseball as we
all work together to raise


funds to assist the WHS
Gator Baseball Team. The
"older" guys have asked
that they not have to play
their games, back to back,
as they didn't know if they
could make it through
back to back games with-
out a rest.
Therefore, game times
will be noon, 2:15 p.m. and
4:30 p.m. CT on Jan. 31.

Wewa dixie youth,
baseball and softball
registration is in Feb.
Registration will be held
on Saturday, Feb. 7 at Em-
erald Coast Credit Union
from 8:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
CT. Additional registration
will be held at Cox Trans-
mission, during the week,
up until Friday, Feb. 13, for
those who are unable to
register on Saturday. Play-
ers turning at least 5 years
old by May 1 must have a
copy of their birth certifi-
cate to register.
The cost will be $50 for
the first child and $45 for
each additional sibling.
Pony league will be $60.
If you have any ques-
tions, .please call Rudi
Madrid 819-1078; Misty
Harper 639-2038; Gloria
Wood 639-5027; or Tonya
Haddock 381-2933 or 639-
3506.

Sign up for tiger
shark baseball camp
The Tiger Shark Base-
ball Camp allows players
to learn fundamentals of
pitching, catching, hitting
and fielding at an early
age. Campers will learn
from Port St. Joe High
School coaching staff and
players how playing and
competing the right way is
always fun.
The camp is open to
boys and girls in the first


through eighth grade.
The camp will be held
at the Port St. Joe High
School Baseball Field,
which is equipped with
four bullpen mounds,
three full-length batting
cages and one of the finest
playing fields around.
Each camper must
bring his/her own baseball
equipment. Players will
need a bat and glove. If you
do not have a bat, there
will be a few on hand, but
not enough for everyone.
The camp will be held
on Monday, Feb. 16 from 8
a.m. until noon ET.
Early registration is
$30 and is due by Feb. 6.
Late registration re-
ceived after Feb. 6 is $40.
Contact Coach T.C.
Brewer at 229-8251 or e-
mail tbrewer@gulf.kl2.
fl.us.

PSJ Dixie youth
baseball registration
is coming up
The PSJ Dixie Youth
Baseball league will be
holding registrations for
the upcoming season on
Saturday, Feb. 7 from 9
a.m. until noon ET; Tues-
day, Feb. 10 from 5-8 p.m.;
and Saturday, Feb. 14, from
9 a.m. until noon ET. Reg-
istration will take place at
the STAC House located
on 8th St. Registration is
open for kids ages 5 12.
Registrants must turn 5
before May 1, and must
not turn 13 before May
1. Registration fee is $5"5
for all ages. All first time
players in the league must
bring a copy of their birth
certificate. Registratits
must be present at regis-
tration for uniform sizing.
Contact Chris Butts with
any questions at 527-0989
or chrisbutts@mchsi.
com.


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--...-.--.- .....-.---- .-------------------- communications
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET 0 PHONE I TELEVISION www.FairPoint.com
FairPoint will automatically issue a credit of S15.00 each month for six months to customer's bill, for a total savings of 590.00. Customer must keep the
service the entire six months to receive the full rebate. Offer applies to new HSD customers only (customers who have not had FairPoint High Speed Internet
for at least the preceding 180 days). Standard or above package required. After six months, Standard service will be billed at S44.95 per month, other
packages at their respective prices. Taxes and additional charges may apply. Free modem use as long as you keep the service, Pricing subject to change
without notice. High Speed Internet may not be available in all areas. Call 877.342,9396 or visit wwwv.FairPoint.com for more details. 02008 FairPoint
Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 674HSN


Candy bags for WMS now on sale
Valentine treat bags return all order forms and Bank & Emerald Coast
are being sold by the We- money to Misty Harper at (Wewa locations), Kids
wahitchka Middle School Wewa Elementary School Corner & to head start.
baseball players for $5. no later than Friday, Feb. Please specify homeroom
They include a Coke, full 11. Treat bags will be de- for the elementary orders,
size candy bar, sweet livered to the pre-K, ele- and last period teacher for
hearts, or similar candy, mentary, middle, and high the middle & high school
pencil and eraser. Please schools in Wewa, Vision orders.


__,.,__E 1


I


- As


-111", "1^i~l





Thursday, January 29, 2009


AlO I The tar I ,oea


STATE from page Al


dox. "I was there that day,
but I don't remember it.
My mother had me out in a
baby carriage."

The Heart of Florida
Though Magidson read
letters of regret from Gov.
Charlie Crist and Congress-
man Allen Boyd, several
elected officials appeared
in person.
State Sen. Al Lawson
said the anniversary Bore a
personal significance.
"In the legislature, we
take our oath of office that
we will preserve and defend
the Constitution of Florida
and the United States. To
be here this morning, 170
years later, standing on this
ground where the constitu-
tion was drafted is very sig-
nificant."
A history major in col-
lege, Lawson said he felt


honored to be standing on
the same ground where the
framers once stood.
"I was thinking, if only
the oak trees could speak
and some of the pine trees
could say what took place,"
he mused.
State Rep. Jimmy Patro-
nis spoke of Gulf County's
"magic and magnetism,"
before turning the micro-
phone over to Sen. Durel
Peadon, whom he jokingly
described as "the only liv-
ing person left when they
signed the constitution."
Though Peadon denied
any participation, he noted
that his great-great-grand-
father, "a circuit-riding
Methodist minister" was
said to have. been in town
for the Constitution's sign-
ing.
Echoing the remarks
of his colleagues, Peadon
called Port St. Joe a special


place with an important
history.
"This is the center of
Florida to me. It's changed
a lot, but the heart of Flori-
da's right here," he said.

A purposeful
celebration
In hosting the anniver-
sary celebration, the city
hoped to elevate the profile
of the Constitution Conven-
tion Museum and Park.
The complex, managed
by the Division of Recre-
ation and Parks, is one of
19 state parks facing tem-
porary closure due to state
budget cuts.
"That museum is a vital
part of the history of the
state of Florida. It's impor-
tant that we recognize that
through the maintenance
and upkeep of this park and
museum. Let's hope our


state legislature recognizes
that and finds a way to keep
it open," said Witten.
Magidson paid tribute to
the absent park ranger Bill
Wilkinson for his many years
of service to the park.
"He does a wonderful job
keeping this place clean, rak-
ing leaves, picking up pine
combs, cleaning up limbs. If
you thinkyour yard's a mess,
wait until a storm comes
through here," he quipped.


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star


Port St. Joe Mayor
Mel Magidson
expressed pride in
being the mayor
of the "Constitution
City" during last
Friday's ceremony
commemorating
the 170th
anniversary of the
signing of Florida's
first constitution.


To learn more call:
Maciej Tumiel, M.D.
Emerald Coast Research Associates
221 E. 23rd Street Suite B
Panama City, FL 32405
(850) 785-6550


Researchers are
evaluating an
investigational
medication to see
If It effectively treats
Constipation.
You may qualify for a
research study If you
experience any of the
following symptoms:
* Abdominal pain
or discomfort
* Bloating and/or
straining
* Have fewer than 3
bowel movements
per week
All study-related care will
be provided at no cost.
Insurance Is not needed.

C


he Star and The Tim'ere sponsoring a

i Valentine Prize packages this year,

along with local advertisers. j


---o lFlowers from Bayside Florist,--

or an European Facial

from LeDebut

or other prizes!

Look in next week's paper for the

Sentry form and all the details!


AiBSaM alSiaaSSBB M U V ^


2 (TWO) weeks in the Star or Times
ad size 3 col x 10"and a banner ad with 5,000
impressions on the Star or Times Website


THE STAR
850-227-1278
135 W. Hwy 98 Port St Joe, FL 32457

Kathleen Smith 850-819-5078



ITHE TIMES&h
YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR OVER 119 YEARS
850-653-8868
129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329

Joel Reed 850-370-6090


i/I


* .. *


Feel Like Everyone's Going But You?


SLocal


A10 1 The Star


-.,, .. I .. ,- ..









COMMUNITY


Thursday January 29 2009


www. starfl com


Soaki


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Maya Robbins figured
she'd be watching last
Tuesday's inauguration of
President Barack Obama
in the same fashion as her
seventh-grade classmates
at Port St. Joe Middle
School from a school
desk, on the television.
But when her grand-
father, Clarence Monette,
secured seats on a charter
bus to the nation's Capitol
out of Tallahassee, Rob-
bins and her sister, Kiara,
were quickly on board.
"I think it was because
I want to go to new states,
I want to go to all the
states," Robbins said upon
her return last week. "And
Obama is an inspiration in
everything he does. It was
my first time going to an


S


*


ing in
inauguration and it was
impressive.
"I really didn't think I'd
get a chance to go. I wasn't
thinking I was going to go
and then (her grandfather)
just asked me if I wanted
to go along."
After a quick side trip
to Delaware, home of Vice
President Joe Biden and
another new state Robbins
could add to her count, the
group arrived at the mall
in Washington.
And found their places
to watch what figured to
be an emotional once-in-a-
lifetime event.
Even if the distance be-
tween the group and the
podium could be measured
in football fields a healthy
number of football fields.
Robbins described a
sea of people, too many to
count, too few to meet in


a historical moment


PHOTO COURTESY OF CLARENCE MONETTE I Special to the Star
Kiara (left) and Maya Robbins bundled up
and soaked in the excitement surrounding the
inauguration of Barack Obama.
the period of the inaugura- There were people of all
tion, which ended for Maya colors, all heritages. And
and Kiara pretty much they were all of a common
after Obama's speech. frame of celebration, flags


waving.
"There were people ev-
erywhere, African-Ameri-
cans, Asians, everybody,"
Robbins said. "It was dif-
ferent because everybody
didn't know everybody
else. Seeing all those new
faces, it was incredible."
Robbins couldn't see the
podium, couldn't make out
Obama or Aretha Franklin
or any of the other digni-
taries and performers, but
there were large television
screens at spots among
the throng, not that she
paid much attention until
Obama spoke.
And hearing above
the proverbial roar of the
crowd wasn't easy, but the
atmosphere, well that was
something for which words
escaped Robbins for a mo-
ment, and that spoke vol-
umes about the magnitude


of the event in Robbins'
eyes.
"It made everybody
proud of what he did and
that they, anybody, can do
whatever they want to do
in this country," Robbins
said. "People become in-
spired by the change he is
going to make."
.Though she may not
have basked in warm com-
fort in a classroom back
home on Inauguration
Day, instead of warding off
the frigid temperatures of
Washington, though she
couldn't really see the
podium or Obama, other
than in the posters and
sweatshirts dotting the
crowd, Robbins said she'd
remember the experience
for a long, long time.
. "It was just amazing,"
Robbins said, her smile
growing. "I loved it."


^pai~iwa~B~it^iaiiaWS5K


B
Section


Page 1


iu iu y, j i, CL.




Thursday, January 29, 2009


R2 I The Star Local


Joseph Dale


Dye is born


United Way helps kick off Woman's Club meeting


At the January meet-
ing of the GFWC Woman's
Club, President Rosa
Feltrop introduced guest
speaker Ron Sharpe of
the United Way of North-
west Florida. Mr. Sharpe
gave a powerful program
about United Way. In
2008, $44,000 in donations
stayed in Gulf County. We
are, after all, united in our
community.
"Underneath every-
thing we are, underneath
everything we do, we are
all people. Connected, in-
terdependent, united and
when we reach out a hand
to one, we influence the
condition of all."
There are four ways
you can help United Way:
Give one suggestion is


1 percent of your salary;
Advocate champion the
cause in your county or
community; Volunteer -
give your time; and finally,
Invest in your commu-
nity.
Twenty-seven cents per
week enables Bay, Frank-
lin and Gulf Healthy Start
to make a safe bassinet
for a baby to sleep in. Fifty
cents per week furnishes
the program with supplies
needed for one girl for a
year at Girls, Inc.
There are countless
other needs that can be
met for a very small do-
nation. All in all, United
Way has 46 agencies that
depend on the generous
donations of people.
To give to the United


Valentine's Pageant)


involve locals, famil


Roget Dale Dye and April Jean Dye are proud to
announce the birth of their son, Joseph Dale Dye.
He was born Dec. 19, 2008 at Gulf Coast Hospital,
weighing 7 lbs. and measuring 20 inches long.
JD's grandparents are: Doug Middleton, Renda
Kay Almer and Raymond Almer and Pat Dye. Great-
grandparents are Sandra and Joe Brock, Gracie
Schultz, Wilma Dye and Shirley Middleton,



SILVER UEST
Weddings X. STUDIOS
Engagements
Senior Portraits
Children & Babies
Call today to reserve your photo session
850-229-9353
www.SilverQuestStudios.com


Meet Morris!

Morris is a 2 yr old domestic long hair with a
gorgeous coat. He has gorgeous golden eyes and
is fine with other cats, kittens & dogs. Morris
is a laid back guy! Morris has been neutered, is
current on his vaccinations & has a sponsor to
offset the cost of his adoption fee to his qualified
adopter. If you are interested in providing Morris
with a forever, loving home, please contact us.
You can also call the St. Joseph Bay Humane
Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody!

CONSIDER BEING A FOSTER PARENT!
Help a pet have a better chance at adoption-
foster a homeless pet until they are ready for
their forever homes. Contact us for details!


THEATRE

.APH1I.A GHIC()I.A,1[A-
BEmyily Lo-es Oal- -Iy 21- Ey1
-f hmil kiri -!m-iumr5 Ofm tlBpi"
'-tMAbhmiMd Ti mfhyMoumAwha-Tm a.13

B5D6332 wWI1EIBwiulieain

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4,


Gulf County Senior Citizens
has had the privilege of host-
ing the annual Valentine Beauty
Pageant for many years. The
pageant takes place in Wewa-
hitchka and what a wonderful
time we have. The event gives
families the opportunity to do
something together that will be
an enjoyable and memorable
experience. The outpouring
of community support is over-
whelming as businesses and in-
dividuals reach out to help spon-
sor the event. Girls from age 2
through Grade 12 will compete
in their age or grade bracket.
What a sight it is to see all the
beautiful babies and young la-
dies wow us with their poise and
beauty.
The event is co-sponsored
by Wewahitchka Elementary
School and will take place in
the school cafeteria. The date is
Saturday, Feb. 7, 2009 at,6 p.m.
CT. Last year the building was
filled with parents, grandpar-
ents and other family members
as they cheered and supported
their contestant. It is fun, en-
tertaining and just a wonderful
opportunity to spend some time
with family and friends. There
is a $5 admission fee for adults
and $3 admission fee for chil-
dren under 12 years of age. Reg-


istration packets can
up at any Gulf Coun
and completed applice
be turned in at the sc
deadline for registrati
30. Registration fee r(
$20 per entry.
Along with all the a]
tioned, the purpose of
is to help raise necess
to 'help Gulf County S(
zens continue the n
meeting as many of th(
possible of Gulf Count
State and federal bu
are a reality and senic
will be affected in m,
The mission of helpir
must be of upmost ir
ifi the mind of the w
munity. Your presenc
participation of your
will assure the senio
tion of Gulf County tI
firm their value to be
a world where many t
decreasing in value,
to always make sure
of those who have wall
us will never diminis
always increase as wE
to be blessed today
which they provided y
For more inform
may call Gulf Coun
Citizen Center in Port
229-8466.


People helping PEOPLE


Free tax assistance


Ron Sharpe of the United Way of Northwest Florida
recently addressed the January meeting of the GFWC
Woman's Club.


Way, contact them at 785-
7521. Payroll deductions
are available at most work



will


.ies
be picked
ity school
nations can
'hool. The
on is Jan.
emains at'
above men-
the event
sary funds
enior Citi-
nission of
e needs as
y seniors.
dget cuts
or citizens
any ways.
ng seniors
nportance
hole com-
e and the
children
>r popula-
hat we af-
great. In
things are
we pledge
the value
ked before
h but will
e continue
with that
esterday.
ation you A p
ty Senior
tSt. Joe at


places. Helping others
is, after all, what it is all
about.




Lordy,


Lordy


look


ho's 40


ril Linton Smith
Jan. 30, 2009


Local BRIEFS


Wewahitchka


The Gulf County Community Development Corporation and to host SC
People Helping People of Gulf County through the VITA/TCE
program are assisting people with basic income tax returns, The GFWC Wewal
such as 1040EZ, for 1040A or basic, form 1040. If you qualify as Inc. of Wewahitchka wi
very low, low, or moderate income you may be assisted, and any -Gulf County School Sup
special credits such as Earned Income Tax Credit will be in- at 6 p.m. CT on Feb. 9.
eluded. The forum will be he
Bring your tax forms and other necessary information to Center behind the Wew
Gulf County Community Development Corporation and People *The forum will be an
Helping People of Gulf County at 401 Peters Street (at the end economic factors affect
of Avenue D) in Port St. Joe beginning Jan. 21 and continuing
thereafter every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 3-7 Senior citizens
p.m. ET until April 15. Gulf County Senior
Please call for an appointment at 229-1477. need of volunteers at
Center to call bingo, p
People Helping People community needs and help with activities,
The People Helping People organization is in need of the fol- seniors. We are also in
lowing items to help our needy individuals and families in Gulf food items for our low-
County. Anyone who would like to contribute financially or has juice, tuna, fruit, soup
an item that is listed is asked to call Jerry Stokoe, Project Man- expensive bingo prizes
ager at 229-5262 or 899-1036 our clients who love toI
Items Needed 16 cubic foot working refrigerator for low a week.
income senior citizen; small card table for disabled man to hold We have two congr
musical instrument; food items such as jelly, starches, canned Port St. Joe and Wew
meats and snack foods. hot nutritious meal M
to seniors 60 and ove
Sr residents. Some of the
Commodity Distribution arts and crafts, gospel
The commodities that were provided by the Highland View checks, exercise class'
Assembly of God church will now be picked up at the offices of grams. Anyone interes
People Helping People of Gulf County. We will be giving these our sites for a hot me,
out from Jan. 26 from 2-6 p.m. We are requesting that everyone would like to volunteer
pick these up during this time. Please call 229-5262 to get fur- ed above may call Deb
ther information, information.


WHAT'S HAPPENING AT MEXICO BEACH


1. Mexico Beach Red Hats No
schedule. Contact Eileen at 648-2447
to participate in some kind of fun ac-
tivity every month.
2. Senior Aerobics Plan to at-
tend every Monday and Friday from
8:40 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. CT November
through March at the Catholic Church
on 15th Street. A $1 contribution would
be greatly appreciated.
3. BCCA Meets Tuesday, Feb. 3 at
the Methodist Church on 22nd Street.
Bingo at 10 a.m., lunch approximately
11:30 a.m. Details contact Ruth at 647-
3473.
4. A Craft Group Meets on Thurs-
days Feb. 5, Feb. 12, Feb. 19 and


Feb. 26 at 10 a.m. at the Methodist
Church on 22nd Street. Just come join
us and work on your craft, learn a
new craft or participate in community
projects.
5. Sea Oats and Dunes Garden
Club. Meets Tuesday, Feb. 10, at the
Beach Baptist Church, 311 Colum-
bus St. in St. Joe Beach at 11 a.m. ET.
Please bring a dish to pass. Details
contact Barbara at 647-5004 or Susie
at 647-8915.
6. Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-Off
- Feb. 14 (Valentine's Day) at Sunset
Park next to the El Governor Motel.
Chefs compete to see who prepares
the best gumbo for cash prizes. Sign-


Woman's Club
hool forum
hitchka Woman's Club,
ll host a public forum for
)erintendent Tim Wilder
eld at the Senior Citizens
ahitchka Public Library.
opportunity to discuss
ting our schools.

need your help
r Citizens Center is in
its Port St. Joe Seniori
rovide exercise classes
, and arts and crafts with
need of non-perishable
income seniors such as
or vegetables. Small in-
s are always needed for
play bingo several times
regate sites, located in
ahitchka. We provide a
Monday through Friday
r who are Gulf County
activities include bingo,
singing, blood pressure
es and educational pro-
sted in coming to one of
al and activities or who
or donate any item list-
bie at 229-8466 for more


in starts at 8 a.m. CT and the festival
starts at 10 a.m. CT Gumbo will be
sold by contestants with revenues go-
ing to the CDC Fourth of July celebra-
tion. For details call 648-8196.
7. BCCA Meets Tuesday, Feb.
17 at the Methodist Church on 22nd
Street. Annual auction starts at 10
a.m., lunch at 11 a.m. Details call Ruth
at 647-3473.
8. AARP Mexico Beach Chap-
ter 4325 meets Friday, Feb. 20 at the
Methodist Church on 22nd Street.
Meeting starts at 1 p.m. Please bring
any non-perishable food items. Items
will be contributed to local churches.
Details call Ed at 648-2161.


LoT ,cal


B2 The Star


a






Thursday, January 29, 2009


Local


The Star I B3


Big River Rider 4-Her's place high at equine event


--------_-_---------

j On January 10, 2009, Big River Rider
4-H Horse Club participated in the 2009 4-H
Equine Clinic & Judging Event competition
at Gadsden County Extension irnQuincy,
I, Florida.,
F Participants participated in clinics for
I different type judging events and then did
I,, hands on judging of the different type events.
I Events consisted of: Halter Mares, Halter
Gelding, Western Pleasure, and English
Equitation.
Approximately 50 participants from
I5 counties within the 7 county district
participated in this day event. Participants
scored in team levels as well as individual
I levels.
Participants are in divisions as follow:
Junior Division age 8 to 10, Intermediate
' Division age 11-I13, and Senior Division
I -14tol8.
I Gulf's Junior Judging Teams placed as
i. follows: 1 stplace Gulf No. 1 -.Elizabeth
I Cuchens; Shawn Elia, Brooke McMillian and
I Desiree Outlaw. Second place- Gulf No. 1.
I Debra Burdeshaw, Anna Frabel and Bailere
1 Fontaine. In theJuriiornlhdividual places:
I 1st place Desiree Outlaw and 2nd place
I .-.Anna. Frabel ,, i
I Gulf's Intermediate Judging Teams placed
.as follows: 2nd place Gulf No. .1 Emmie
: Hall, Tia Roney and Zackory Martin.

I._ *'


INTERMEDIATE JUDGING TEAMS COMPETITION SECON
Zackory MartinJ


JUNIOR JUDGING TEAMS COMPETITION SECOND PLAC
Bailee Fontaine


; / Mexico
@ / Beach



-0some0
Elv/i ~aft


_____ :___________X____i1CO_____________


I
I
I
.I
I
I
I
I
I
I
|
.I




I
I
















D PLACE WINNRS: At left Emmie Hall "ka loe, anil-l^ H ~ ^ ^^ l
I
7i
JUNIOR JUDGING TEAMS COMPETITIONS FIRST PLACE WINNERS: At
II left, Elizabeth Cuchens, Shawn Elia, Brooke McMillian JUNIOR JUDGING INDIVIDUAL COMPETITION SECOND
and Desiree Outlaw PLACE WINNER: Anna Frabel























D PLACE WINNERS: At left, Emmie Hall, Tia Roney and






















E WINNERS: At left, Anna Frabel Debra Burdeshaw and JUNIOR JUDGING INDIVIDUAL COMPETITION FIRST PLACE
WINNER: Desiree Outlaw



FS Time to cook your best gumbo


treatment. To schedule an appoint-
ment you will need to send or bring
by a letter to Dr. May's office giving
a brief description of your dental
needs, and please describe your sit-
uation that makes you a good candi-
date for this benefit. Send the letter
to Dr. May's office at 319 Williams
Ave, in Port St. Joe, Fl 32456. Please
no phone calls. Be sure to include
your telephone number so we, can
contact you to schedule an appoint-
ment. Dr. May will see 20 patients
in need of dental treatment, and the
hygienists Anealia Bush and Linda
Wright will see eight to 10 patients
each who wish to have their teeth
cleaned. The office hopes to serve
as many as 40 patients.
Patients must be at least 12
years of age, and accompanied by
a parent or guardian if under the
age of 18. Treatments provided will
include cleaning, x-rays, fillings,
extractions, diagnostics, and pain
control.
Dr. May and his staff participate
in "Dentist With a Heart" because
they wish to impact people who
otherwise could not afford to see
a dentist, and help those people
save their teeth, as well as relieve
them of any discomfort they may be
having. Our office cares about this
community and would like to give
those in need of our services, their
smiles back!


Mexico Beach wants to
know who cooks the BEST
Gumbo! On Saturday, Feb.
14 from 10 a.m. CT until the
Gumbo is sold out, a fierce
competition of culinary skills
will determine who's who in
the gumbo cooking arena.
This year, we will have two
categories, restaurant and
amateur. To add an incen-
tive to the proposition, a $150
first place cash prize, a $75
second place cash prize and
a $50 third place cash prize
will be forthcoming to the
amateur winner and a $150
prize will go to the restau-
rant winner. No entry fee will
be charged. A grand prize of
.$200 will go to the best over-
all! We will also have prizes
for the best team spirit, the
team that drove the farthest,
the best decorated area and
a few other fun prizes. We
will have judges that love
gumbo and have great enter-
tainment.
Entrants, wishing to be
included in the judging, will
be required to produce five
or more gallons of their spe-
cialty gumbo. They will also
be responsible -for bringing
containers and heating de-
vices to warm their product


Low Country Shrimp Boil
The Friends of St. Joseph Bay
Preserves will sponsor their annual
Low Country Shrimp Boil from 11
a.m. until 2 p.m. ET. on Saturday,
Feb. 7.
There will be good food includ-
ing shrimp, corn, kielbasa sausage,
potatoes, garlic bread and tea or
soda, all for $10 an open house and
walking and riding tours of the Buf-
fer Preserve.
The event will take place at the
St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center
(the old Treasure Bay Lodge) at
3915 State 30-A in Port St. Joe.
The Shrimp Boil is sponsored
and benefits the Friends of the St.
Joseph Bay Preserves.
For more information call 229-
1787 or visit www.stjosephbaypre-
serves.org.

Dentist gives Valentine's
S gift with a twist
Dr. Frank D. May, of Port St. Joe,
has a unique Valentine's Day pres-
ent for the needy of this area. For
the last nine years, Dr. May has
provided free dental treatment for
Valentine's Day at his office. This
year, his office will provide this valu-
able service on Wednesday, Feb. 11.
This year the office will schedule
appointments wit those in need of


dogs, Brunswick stew, beer,
wine, sodas and a lot of Mar-
di Gras-themed giveaways.
Gumbo from .the cook-off
will be sold by the taste and
various size cups ($1 to $10)
to raise money for Mexico
Beach's Special Events.
Those wishing to participate
may pick up an application at
the Mexico Beach CDC Of-
fice, or on the Web site For
more information you can
e-mail or call 648-8196 (Lo-
cally) or 1-888-723-2546.


(Crock-Pots suggested). The
committee will provide ta-
bles, electricity (please spec-
ify if needed), bowls, napkins
and utensils and the location
and crowd. Sunset Park,
next to the El Governor Mo-
tel in Mexico Beach is where
the festivities will take place.
Our goal this year is to have
at least 30 entrants!!
The Timeless Band will
kick off the festival at 10 a.m.
CT. In addition to gumbo, we
will have hamburgers, hot-


Local BRIEF







These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.

COMFORTER SOUTHERLAND FAMILY Rish, Gibson, Scholz &
FUNERAL HOME FUNERALHOME Groom, P.A.
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter Willam J, Ris, Thomai s S, Gibson, Russell Schol,
SL. F.D. 507 10th Street Port St. Joe Paul W. Groom Il
.. ,. (850) 227-1818 (850) 229-8111 (850) 229-8211

Thursday, January 29, 2009 w w w. starf1.com oPageB4


One day


to live


If you had only one day left,
what would you do with your
life?
If you're married, would you
show more love to your husband
or your wife?
Would you be nice to your
kids when you come in tired
from work?
Or would you come in
snapping heads off, and acting
like a jerk?
I'm sure a lot of things would
go through your mind.
Mostly of what, you'd be
leaving behind.
Things you said or forgot to
say, should be done this VERY
day.
Grudges are a heavy load,
unconfessed sins, not forgiven.
This likes too big a load, to try
to take to Heaven.
You'd better drop the
grudges, confess your sins,
before it's too late.
You'll never make it with that
load, through the Pearly Gate.
Billy Johnson


Once when Billy Graham
was visiting President
Kennedy at the White House,
the president asked Billy
something along the lines of:
"Does my church believe in
the second coming of Christ?"
And, of course Billy answered,
"Yes!"
I visited a Roman Catholic
Church many years ago,
and an important part of the
service involved the priest and
laity repeating, "Christ has
died. Christ has risen. Christ
will come again."
Scripture gives us
considerable detail concerning
the second coming of Christ.
You can find this information
in Matthew 24, Mark 13,
Luke 17 and 21, Acts 2, and
1 Thessalonians 4 and 5.
Information also can be found
in 2 Thessalonians 1 and
2, Revelation (Apocalypse)
Chapter 6 and elsewhere.
However, one of the most
important pieces of information
about the second coming is
found in 2 Peter Chapter 3,
beginning with verse 3:
"Knowing this first, that
there shall come in the last
days scoffers, walking after


their own lusts, and saying,
Where is the promise of
his coming? For since the
fathers fell asleep, all things
continue as they were from
the beginning of the creation.
For this they willingly are
ignorant of, that by the word
of God the heavens were of
old, and the earth standing
out of the water and in the
water: Whereby the world that
then was, being overflowed
with water, perished: But the
heavens and the earth, which
are now, by the same word are
kept in store, reserved unto fire
against the day of judgment
and perdition of ungodly men."
Did you hear that? The
very people the professors,
teachers and students who
are scoffing, and saying that
the account of Noah and the
flood is just a myth at we
all got here by evolution; that
the earth is billions of years
old, etc., are fulfilling prophesy
and showing that the Bible is
indeed true and can be trusted!
Maybe now you can see why
I place such importance on the
pieces of Noah's Ark, which
have been photographed on Mt.
Ararat right where the Bible


says they should be. I know of
four locations where pieces of
the Ark are located, and two
photos of Ark pieces can be
viewed on our Web site.
Jesus talked about Noah
as a real person, and the Ark
as a real object. If you claim to
be a follower of Christ, are you
following someone who was
a liar or didn't know what he
was talking about? I'm not. I'm
following the Lord, our Savior
- the one who told Noah to
build the Ark in the first place.
No, the Ark wasn't a boat.
That is why so many are
misinformed. Noah's Ark was
something that looked like a
gigantic floating warehouse
or a floating barn. It was not a
boat. It was an ark!
Those explorers and
researchers, who have spent
much of their lives looking for
the Ark, testify that Mt. Ararat
is-perhaps the most dangerous
mountain in the world to
climb. Comfortable conditions
on the ice pack, in the late
summer, can within minutes,
become life-threatening
and change into extremely
dangerous storms with snow,
hail, lightning, rockslides, and


avalanches. Astronaut Jim
Irwin lost four teeth and almost
died in an avalanche on Mt.
Ararat while searching for the
Ark. The armchair scoffers
haven't the slightest idea what
they are talking about.
In the next message, I
will focus on what the second
coming of Christ will be like,
and what to watch for.
At the Mexico Beach
Christian Worship Center,
we teach what Jesus taught,
not what peoplewould like to
have us teach for their own
selfish reasons. Our services
begin, with a time of greeting,
and fellowship, at 9:30 Sunday
AM CST. Worship begins at
9:45 AM. After the service,
we have a pot luck fellowship
luncheon. (Hebrews 10:24 -
25) We worship at the Mexico
Beach Civic Center on 105 N.
31st street, behind the Beach
Walk gift shop, just off U.S. 98,
in Mexico Beach, FL.
God bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach
Christian Worship Center
pastor@mexicobeachcwc.com


CONCERT AT HOPE FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER


Naomi and the Segos will be in concert at 6:30 p.m. ET on Sunday, Feb. 1 at the Hope Family Worship
Center Church located at 2001 Garrison Ave.
Everyone is invited to attend. There is no admission; however a love offering will be received. For further
information please call 850-229-6622.


Church BRIEFS


New Bethel Junior Women
luncheon
New Bethel Baptist Church Ju-
nior Women will hold a luncheon
from 10 a.m. until on Feb. 1. Call
Mary Thomas at 227-3400.
The menu will be: pig feet or fried
chicken; pea and butter beans or col-
lard' greens; rice and gravy; potato
salad; candied yams/banana pud-
ding and tea.
Donation is $6.50.

Hines for New Life Christian
Center
Dr. Tim Hines will be the guest
speaker for the 11 a.m. services at
New Life Christian Center on Feb. 1.
The public is encouraged to attend
this special event.

South revival
First Baptist Church of Wewahi-
tchka will hold a South Revival Feb.
5-7.
There will be a worship band, the
guest speaker is Bobby McGraw,
there will be basketball tournaments
on Saturday, Feb. 7, and plenty of
food.
Events are from 6-8 p.m. CT on
Feb. 5-6 and 1-7 p.m. CT on Feb. 7.
For more information contact
Randy Hightower at 628-1284.


View educational exhibition on 'Mystical Arts of Tibet' in Panama City


Florida Freedom Newspapers
Buddhist monks from Drepung Los-
eling Monastery have brought their
traveling education exhibition, "The
Mystical Arts of Tibet," to the Visual
Arts Center of Northwest Florida at 19


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
ig lanb View aptit ub't b
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
a Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Mike Wesbrook, Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
Paslor Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.


S "Our Church can be your home'"

SFirst Church of the Nkazarene
2420 Long Avenue Port St. 5oe, Florida 32456
(850) 229-9596

Give unto the Lord the gfory die His nae, worship the Lordin tfie beauty of lioness,
Psanm 29:2


Sunday School........ ...... ..........10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m.


E. Fourth St. in Panama City. It is the
group's first visit to the city since 2006,
and the exhibition will run through
Thursday.
At one time, the Drepung Losel-
ing Monastery was one of Tibet's


largest monastic universities, ac-
cording to the organization's Web
site. Khenpo Lekden established it
in 1416 as an institute of higher
Buddhist education. At its peak,
Drepung Loseling was home to some


Worship with us at
Long Avenue Baptist Church
Where Faith, Family &Friendship are found,
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety, of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More
Information Call 229-8691




effwscfa 4 L ef A eac&
111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach Uuited Methodist (hurch
NuRSER PRovIDeD
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


10,000 monk students from across the
Far East.
Mandalas constructed from sand
are unique to Tibetan Buddhism and
are believed to effect purification and
healing.


Oak Grove Church
_,foo,,9 od, f.oviu7 eoApe, Jet'woi, 0u o0,,, /- //

Come Grow With Us!


Sunday School 9:45
Sunday Worship Service 10:45
Wednesday Cafe 5 pm
Wednesday 6:15
Adult Bible Study
Children & Youth Ministries


613 Madison St.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-227-1837
www.oakgrove-church.org
y


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and fonzument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724


Sunday:
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m. ET
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. ET
Traditional Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET


Rev. Mac Fulcher
Pastor


AnnConiforter ]eremy Dixor
M i Di tor Enah Ministe


Wednesday: "
Youth: 5:30p.m. ET Deborah Loyless
hoir: 7:00 p.m. E" Director] children Mnisitres


The Christian CONSCIENCE


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ...... 7 p.m.






Thursday, January 29, 2009


Local


The Star I B5


Mildred Francis
Adkison-Wilson went home
on January 21, 2009. Born
April 13, 1919, she moved
to Port St. Joe in 1946.
She is preceded in death
by; her husband, William
Council Wilson; daughters,
Brenda Genise Wilson,
Charlotte Willie Dell
Wilson; and a son, William
Wesley Wilson.
She is survived
by; daughters, Doris
(James) Young, Glenda
(Richard) Carr, and
Sharon (Preston) Ramsey;
Daughter-in-law, Sue
Wilson; brothers, Clio
Adkison, and Carnet
Adkison; and sisters,
Lou Jean Newton, and
Linsey Walls; numerous
grandchildren, great-
grandchildren, and great-
great-grandchildren.
A pillar of the
community and Church,
a prayer-warrior, a saint,
a soft hug, a "sweet doll",
a humble heart, a lady in
every sense of the word,
a teacher, a leader, a


Mavis "Dolly" Brant
went to be with her Lord
and Savior on January
22, 2009. She was born
in Southport, Florida on
January 4, 1936, where she
met her beloved husband
of 54 years, Ray Brant.
They resided in Port Saint
Joe.
She is survived by
her husband, Ray Brant
of Port Saint Joe; four
sons, Steve Brant and
Creva, Dewayne Brant,
Stan Brant and Donna,
and Daren Brant and
Mae; four sisters, Lucille
Horton, Agnes Ellis and
Kenneth, Betty Cramer,
and Shirley Knight
and Bob; two brothers,
Willard Creamer and Ray
Creamer and Sammie;
twelve grandchildren; and
six great-grandchildren.
She was predeceased by
her parents, Jerry "Big
Daddy" and Rebecca "Big
Momma" Creamer; her


Inez Murphy, 79, of Port
Saint Joe, passed away
Thursday, Jan. 22, 2009 at
her home.
She is survived by two
daughters, Betty Jean
Bradley and husband
Dennis of Port Saint
Joe, and Brenda Burkett
and husband Eugene
of Wewahitchka; her
grandchildren, Kevin
Bradley and wife Wendy,
Richie Burkett and wife
Angel, both of Port Saint
Joe, and Kimberly Smith
and husband Michael
of Panama City; one
sister, Ruby Howard of
Callahan, FL; three great-
grandchildren, Samantha,
Savannah, and Madison


confidante, a Nilla Wafer,
a milk-n-tea after school
grandmother with a Bible
story, a prayer before
you go, a great example
of a righteous and Godly
woman, a Big Mama. She
will be missed greatly. We
love you, Big Mama, enjoy
your new home.
Funeral services were
held on Monday, January
26, 2009 at 2:30 p.m. EST
at Oak Grove Assembly
of God with Rev. Dave
Fernandez and Rev. Jean.
Shoots officiating. Burial
will follow in Holly Hill
Cemetery.'The family
will receive friends at the
church on Monday from 1
p.m. EST up until service
time.
Expressions of
sympathy may be
submitted or viewed at our
online obituary link. (www.
southerlandfamily.com)
Southerland Family
Funeral Homes
507 Tenth Street
Port St Joe, Fl 32456
(850)229-8111


brother, Millard Creamer;
and one grandchild,
"Charlie" Brant.
Dolly was a loving
and caring mother,
grandmother, mother-in-
law, and not least, a wife.
She will be missed forever
by her family, friends, and
neighbors.
The funeral service was
held on Tuesday, January
27, 2009, at 11 a.m EST at
the Oak Grove Assembly of
God Church, conducted by
the Rev. David Fernandez
and the Rev. James Wiley.
Interment followed in the
family plot in Holly Hill
Cemetery. Those who wish
may make donations in her
memory to the Oak Grove
Assembly of God Church,
P 0. Box 967, Port Saint
Joe, FL,32456
Comforter Fneral
Home
601 Long Avenue
Port Saint Joe, FL 32456
850-227-1818


Burkett.
The funeral service will
be held at 11:00 a.m. EST
Monday, January 26, 2009
from the graveside in Holly
Hill Cemetery, conducted
by the Rev. David
Fernandez. Interment will
follow. The family received
friends at the Comforter
Funeral Home from 4:00
until 6:00 p.m. EST Sunday.
Those who wish may make
donations in her memory
to the Oak Grove
Assembly of God
Church, Fish and Loaves
Ministry, P 0. Box 967, Port
Saint Joe, FL 32457.
All services are under
the direction of the
Comforter Funeral Home.


Weather Radio
Weather radios, including special needs NOAA
Weather Radios, are available in a variety of models.


The friendly place to worship!


First Baptist Church
MEXICO BEACH
Locate/ at 823 N. 15th St., Mexico Beach
Corner oj'15th c' California 648-5776
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundays ,it 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 pim.
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all ages)
Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Please note, all times central!
Revrend T LaFountaint


.. first Baptist Church
102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
; 4^- Jerome Barnes, Interim Pastor
1411 i -- Buddy Caswell, Miiistr r M-uic & Education
Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students
New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church
Sunday Wednesday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am Children's Choir................ 6:00 pmn
Sunday School ................. 9:40 am Prayer Meeing................. 6:30 pm
Traditional Service............11:00 am Children's Ministry
Awana's .......................... 5:00 pm Activities ....:.................... 6:30 pmu
Youth Choir..................... 5:30 pm Youth Ministry Activities...6:30 pm
Youth Groups .................. 6:00 pm
www.fbcpsj.org


Wolf to speak on perimenopause, menopause


Dr. Samuel Wolf will present alec-
ture on perimenopause/menopause
on Febuary 10th at 7 p.m. ET at the
Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. This
event is free and open to the public.
Dr. Samuel Wolf is a native of
Panama City and received a B.S. in
biology at Florida State University.
He earned his doctorate (D.O.) at
Nova Southeastern University Col-
lege of 'Osteopathic Medicine. At


Genesys Medical Center associated
with the Michigan State University
Health System, he was awarded In-
tern of the year. He did his OB/GYN
residency at the University of Flori-
da Health Science Center/Shands in
Jacksonville. During his residency,
Dr. Wolf served. as administrative
chief resident and was the recipi-
ent of many awards for teaching and
research, including the prestigious


Jelks Award for out-
standing resident cli-
nician of the year. He
joined Emerald Coast
OB-GYN in August of
2005 and received his
board certification
from the American
Board of Obstetrics
and Gynecology in
December of 2007.


DR. SAMUEL
WOLF


Health department offers cancer screening


The Gulf County Health Depart-
ment will host a free cancer screen-
ing day (by appointment) from 9
a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on Saturday,
Jan. 31 at 2475 Garrison Avenue,


Port St. Joe.
Come and meet Heather West,
PA-C of Gulf Coast Dermatology
and help celebrate the department's
new partnership with this outstand-


ing group. Call 227-1276, ext. 100, to
schedule an appointment.
Beginning in February 2009 clin-
ics will be held twice monthly at the
Port St. Joe location.


BBBR to award customer service excellence


PENSACOLA Your Bet-
ter Business Bureau Foun-
dation of Northwest Flor-
ida is currently accepting
nominations for the 2009
Customer Service Excel-
lence Award.
Your BBB Foundation's
Customer Service Excel-
lence Award recognizes in-
dividuals who go above and
beyond in their customer
service activities.
Any business, charity or
customer may nominate
individuals who have made
a measureable impact on


the organization for the
Customer Service Excel-
lence Award.
To enter, please submit
the following materials:
*A completed entry
form
A brief, typed response
with specific examples, ex-
plaining why the individual
deserves the Customer
Service Excellence Award
*Additional materials to
support the entry/nomina-
tion showing the individu-
al's contributions such as
honors, awards or letters


of recommendation
The Customer Service
Excellence Award will be
given in conjunction with
the Torch Award for Mar-
ketplace Ethics and the
-Student Ethics Scholar-
ship Award.
The Torch Award was
created to recognize busi-
nesses and charities that
insist on exceptionally high
standards of behavior in
dealing with customers,
vendors and employees.
The Student Ethics
Scholarship Award is given


to college-bound students
who demonstrate leader-
ship, community service,
overall personal integrity
and academic history.
The application deadline
is March 27,2009. Award re-
cipients will be recognized
at a series of luncheons to
be held in May.
For entry forms and
suggestions for complet-
ing an entry or nomination
for the awards, please visit
www.nwfl.bbb.org/TorchA-
ward or call 850.429.0002 or
1.800.729.9226.


DOH: Beware of carbon monoxide poisoning


TALLAHASSEE The Flor-
ida Department of Health
(DOH) urges Floridians
to take precautions to pre-
vent carbon monoxide
(CO) poisoning during the
cold winter months. As
temperatures drop, the po-
tential for CO poisonings
and deaths rise.
"Carbon monoxide can
be fatal if people are ex-
.posed to high levels, even
for short periods of time,"
said Dr. Lisa Conti, Direc-
tor of the DOH Division
of Environmental Health.
"Floridians who use in-
door gas heaters and fire-
places should ensure the
heaters exhaust to the out-
doors, regularly check and
maintain fuel burning ap-
pliances, have a working
CO alarm in their homes
and be aware of the signs
of CO poisoning."
Invisible, odorless and
tasteless, CO is a highly
poisonous gas produced
by burning fuels such as
gasoline, natural gas, ker-
osene, charcoal and wood.
Inside a home, CO can
come from a gas-fueled
furnace, gas water heat-


er, gas clothes dryer, gas
ranges, kerosene space
heaters, portable genera-
tors, gas or charcoal grills,
fireplaces or wood stoves.
The risk of illness or death
increases with the level
of CO in the air and the
amount of time exposed.
Dangerous CO levels can
result when home appli-
ances are not properly
maintained or when used
incorrectly. Anyone who
suspects symptoms of
CO poisoning should go
outside immediately. If a
person has collapsed or is
not breathing, call 911 for
emergency medical assis-
tance immediately from a
safer location (outside or
from a neighbor's home).
Signs of carbon monox-
ide poisoning include:
*Fatigue
*Chest pain
*Impaired vision and
coordination
*Headaches
*Dizziness, confusion
or nausea
You can prevent carbon
monoxide poisoning by do-
ing the following:
*Install and use fuel-


+ + TO KNOW CHRISTAND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN


\ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org 850-227-1845




CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS
Singing: 9 a.m. Sunday
Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue





SFirst Presbyterian Church
._ Sof Port St. Joe
508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
Reverend Reid Cameron
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.


burning appliances ac-
cording to manufacturer
instructions.
*Have fuel-burning ap-
pliances inspected and
serviced annually by a li-
censed contractor.
Inspect exhaust venti-
lation systems every year,
including chimneys, flues
and vents.
*Never burn charcoal
inside a house, garage,
vehicle or tent, even in a
fireplace.
*Avoid using unvented
gas or kerosene heaters
in enclosed spaces, espe-
cially sleeping areas.
*Never leave an auto-
mobile running in a ga-
rage, even with the garage
door open.
Do not leave the rear
window or tailgate of a ve-
hicle open while driving.
CO from the exhaust can
be pulled inside the car,
van or camper.
*Install CO alarms in-
side the house. Purchase
batteryoperatedCOalarms
or plug-in CO alarms with
battery backup according
to manufacturer's instal-
lation instructions.


*The CO alarm should
meet the most recent
UL 2034 standard, IAS 6-
96 standard or the CSA
6.19.01 standard.
*Replace CO alarm
batteries once a year and
test alarms frequently.
Replace CO, alarms
once every five years in
accordance with recom-
mendations by the U.S.
Consumer Product Safety
Commission.
*Never use a por-
table generator indoors,
including in homes, ga-
rages, basements, crawl
spaces, sheds and other
enclosed or partially en-
closed areas.
DOH promotes, pro-
tects and improves the
health of all people in
Florida. For more infor-
mation about suspected
poisoning emergencies,
call the Florida Poison
Information .Center at
1-800-222-1222. To learn
more about indoor air
quality, visit www.doh.
state.fl.us/Environment/
community/indoor-air/
carbon.htm or call 800-
543-8279.


St. Peter's Anglican Church
(Traditional Episcopal Service 1928 BCP)

Morning Prayer & Holy Communion
Sunday.................8:00 a.m .
The Rev. David Mans, Priest
Services being held at the United Pentecostal Church
309 6th Street Port St Joe. FL
"An Unchanging Faith In.4 Changing IWorld"



SA Spirit Filled
Fami Life *rOutreach Oriented
Fmily Lif Word of Faith Church

Church
Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford
Welcome you to worship with us: HOME OF THE
Sunday 10:30am POWERHOUSE
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm YOUTH MINISTRIES
Wednesday 7pm
w ww.famjiyJilfcc'hurch net
323 Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 j





[ FaithBible
IlMI C H U R C H
Michael Rogers Pastor
9:45 A M ................................................ Sunday School
10:30 AM .................................... Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 AM .................. .................... Worship
6 :0 0 P M .............................. ............................ W o rsh ip
www.faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faith Chriutian School


Obituaries


Mildred Francis Adkison-Wilson


Mavis 'Dolly' Brant


Inez Murphy






B6 I The Star


School News


Thursday, January 29, 2009


On Jan. 13, 2009, Arbor Day, Geoffrey Cummings with Florida Division of
Forestry and a forester for Bay/Gulf Counties, educated the 5th Grade classes
of Port St. Joe Elementary on what Arbor Day is and how it came-about. After
the presentation, he, with the assistance of Florida Division of Forestry Fire-
fighters Neil Goodson and Richard McGee planted two oak trees in honor
of Arbor Day. The 5th Grade class is also an in-school, 4-H program under
the Gulf County 4-H program who are Celebrating Florida 4-H Centennial in


Wewahitchka High School HONOR ROLL


9th Grade 'A' Honor Roll
Anna Gaskin, Bryce Gerber, Taylor Husband, Donia
Lanier, Lyndsey Rarsey, Katelyn Roberts and Megan
Setterich

10th Grade 'A' Honor Roll
Nathaniel Bruce, Aliya Chaudhry, Jordan Heath,
Amanda Helson, Randy Hightower and Katelynn Loyd

11th Grade 'A' Honor Roll
Candance Griffin, Laurel Manor, Kaleb Price,
Brittney Shipman, Zach Smith, Remington Wade and
Tabitha Ward
12th Grade 'A' Honor Roll
Kyle Campbell, Victoria Hightower, Jessica Hus-
band, Shawna McDonald, Jessica Messick and Dani-



Wewahitchka

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


elle Stanley

9th Grade 'A&B' Honor Roll
Heath Bailey, Quentin Carter, Austin Chumney,
Kris Cox, Azaina Goodman, Kenneth Loyd, Trey Mc-
Gill, Marylin Navarro, Irjaria Pippin, Ashleigh Rouse,
James Strickland,
Cory Walding and Stephen Whitfield

10th Grade 'A&B' Honor Roll
Alicia Allison, Andrew Bidwell, Jay Bryan, Justin.
Campbell, Jamaree Hunter, Brandon Mayhann, Trent
McLemore, Jeannie Mitchell, Chelse Strange, Jacob
Taylor, Chris Wolfram and Brooke Yarber

11th Grade 'A&B' Honor Roll
Ariel Kemp, Kaitlyn Kerrigan, Santana Majors, Da-


mon McMillion, Chris Peak, Baylen Price, Clay Prid-
geon, Victoria Rouse, Ben Smith, Robyn Turner and
Cody Wade

1,2th Grade 'A&B' Honor Roll
Rebecca Barnes, Kalyn Bidwell, Jacob Causey, Jen-
nifer Clayton, Chase Harvey, Kally Loyd, Warren Mc-
Donald, Kelley McLemore, Lena McLemore, Amanda
Morris, Billy Naylor, Chelsey Pettis, Samantha Rich,
Jennifer Rouquette and Kristin Yon


Port St. Joe HIGH SCHOOL


By Meredith Todd

Seniors, please bring
in pictures of you and
your fellow classmates
to fill up the Senior
MemoryTBoard.
The next senior trip
payment is due soon,
so please make sure to
pay the money to Mrs.
Alcorn as soon as pos-
sible.
If any seniors have
not paid for their cap
and gown, please pay
money to Mrs. Barbee
at the first possible op-
portunity.

Sports
There is a home
basketball game on
Friday, Jan. 30 against
West Gadsden at 7:30
p.m. Another basket-
ball game will be held
on Saturday, Jan. 31


against Rutherford, at
Rutherford at. 7:30 p.m.
A home basketball game
will also be on Tuesday,
Feb. 3 against Vernon at
7:30 p.m. .(senior night).
The last game before the
playoffs will commence
on Thursday, Feb. 5 at
7:30 p.m. at FAMU.
Softball and baseball
conditioning everyday
after school; please do
not miss.
Weightlifters, if you
are interested in being
a part of the weightlift-
ing team, please contact
Coach Barth for infor-
mation. Practices will
be held after school.

Junior News
Juniors, please pay
your $20 dues now. If the
dues are not paid, you
will not be allowed to at-
tend the 2009 Junior/Se-


nior prom.

Clubs
Odyssey of the Mind is
collecting blue labels for
their upcoming competi-
tion. If you would like to
help donate, please con-
tact Carla May.
The Keyettes raised
over $700 in their
last service project
"Coins for Critters."
The Keyettes presented
the check to the Humane
Society in an attempt
to better the lives of
the animals at the shel-
ter.


Briefs
National Honor So-
ciety will be holding a
blood drive on Feb. 11.
The Key Club and
National Honor Society
have teamed up in an
effort to raise money for
the reconstruction of the
Taunton House after its
unfortunate demise over
the Christmas holidays.
This fundraiser will be
held over a five week
period and your partici-
pation would be greatly
appreciated. For further
information please con-
tact Sarah Hiscock.


Wewahitchka Playbook: Coaching Kids To
Read," from the National
Elementary School Institute for Literacy. Po-
News ems 'and research about
Coach the importance of dads'
WES Reading Coach enthusiastic involvement
Alisa Walker and WES Read- in students' reading suc-
ing Specialist Rhonda Prid- cess were enjoyed. Walker
geon hosted a "Super Dads and Pridgeon want dads to
Coaching Super Readers be just as enthusiastic and
Caf6 Read A Latte on Jan. excited about helping their
12, 2009. This was a spe- children read as they are
cial 30 minute program giv- about any football game or
ing dads, grandpas, uncles, sports event! When dads
older brothers and friends are involved in academics
some great literacy ideas to success increases! Every-
help our students succeed one enjoyed the football d6-
in reading! Their Super cor as well as coffee, Pepsi,
Bowl theme started with a chips, salsa, doughnuts and
cheer supporting literacy football shaped brownies af-
as well as a motivating read ter several nice door prizes
aloud and discussing "Dad's wpre presented!
'ii^s "1 afl%^5a ~ES^a5-8


DAZZLING DOLPHINS


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO I Special to The Star


Traderian Givens and Dalton Brammer


^*L^.


:, : :.," a..






Thursday, January 29, 2009


School News


. The Star I B7


Port St. Joe HIGH SCHOOL


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
SGA members Abram Vereen, Douglas May, Kayla Minger (president) and
Stratton Miniat load a heavy box of cans into Gulf County Democratic Party
president Zebe Schmitt's car.



Student government



association gives back


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
The Port St. Joe High
School Student Govern-
ment Association is always
looking for a worthy com-
munity service project.
So when Gulf County
Democratic Party president
Zebe Schmitt asked the
group to take part in the Na-
tional Day of Service canned
food drive, the students
jumped at the chance.
In the week prior to the
Martin Luther King, Jr.
holiday, SGA members en-
couraged their classmates
to place cans and other non-
perishable items in festively
decorated receptacles locat-
ed throughout the school.
The students collected
over 200 cans, which will
be distributed locally by
the non-profit group Peo-


A' -'
A~ .~.


DESPINA WILLIAMS I The Star
The Port St. Joe High School Student Government
Association poses with some of the 200 cans they
collected for the National Day of Service canned
food.
ple Helping People. of food items collected on
Port St. Joe High Jan. 19 by the Democratic
School's contribution Party and area' residents
raised the total number to'over 800 items.


SGA Members:

Blaine Bush; Elizabeth Bryk; Dylan Dunaway; Cynthia Floyd; Katelyn German;
Rebecca Furr; Austin Howse; Raven Harris, vice-president; Katie Lacour, fresh. sen.;
Sara Hoffman, chaplin; LeGrand McLemore; Brittany Hypes; Emerald Muniz; Ash-
leigh Lewis; Sam Taylor; Chellsey O'Neill; Kaley Wilder, fresh. sen.; Kayla Parker; Jor-
don Plair; Erica.Balogh, sec.; Kasie Thompson; Torie Burgess; Chelsey Walker, jr. sen.;
Stefani Furstenburg; Sara Ward, jr. sen.; Megan Gannon, soph. sen.; Lilly Wright; Ka-
tie Graham; Fanequa Larry; Emily Baxley; Lindsey Martin; Savanah Bottkol, sr. rep.;
Katelyn Maxwell; Breanna Byrant; Katie McNeill, soph. sen.; Brennis Bush, sr. sen.;
Samantha Nicodemus; Caitlin Rich; Tayler Byrd; Sarah Sizemore; Anna Cordova, sr.
rep.; Tiara Smith; Jessie Faircloth; Brianna Sigman; Torie Greer; Natalie Tatha-Nah-
andji; Courtney Hermsdorfer; Chase Watford; Douglas May, treas.; Kayla Minger, pres.;
Stratton Miniat; Amber Nations; Chazten North; Lauren Sisk; Kayla Spilde; Heather
Strange, sr. rep.; Meredith Todd; Shalonda Whitley; Dajon Williams; Kaelyn Williams,
sr. rep.; arid Abe Vereen




Keyettes donate $700 to


local humane society




















SUBMITTED PHOTO I Special to the Star
The Keyettes at Port St. Joe High School have partnered this year with the
Humane Society. During our recent "Coins for Critters" campaign at school,
the club collected over $700 .in change for the animals. Congratulations
to Ms. Barbee's TV Production class for winning first place in the class
competition with over $200 in donations.
If you are interested in donating to the Humane Society or in adopting a
pet, please call 227-1103.


January is off to a
great start. We have be-
gun our FCAT testing
countdown. We now have
25 days left until we take
the achievement test for
each grade level. Parents
please help your child by
studying all the testing
materials that are being
sent home. This will re-
inforce what our teach-
ers are doing during the
day. All the practice we
can get will only make
us better. Thanks for all
your calls and concerns.
We will be an "A" school
again because of all the
parent support you give.
During the month of
January our fifth-grade
classes participated in
Arbor, Day. They planted
a tree in the school yard
to commemorate this day.
We would like to thank the
Florida Division Forestry
Department for their as-
sistance and guidance
with this project. Also,
fifth-graders held the an-
nual Science Fair at the
school. First place went
to Kyran Batson; 2nd
place Will Ramsey; 3rd
Place Heather Brant,
and Honorable Mention
to Clay Raffield, Anna
Frable, Morgan Gant,
Maddison Wilson, Kris-
tianna Arnold, Katelyn
Lewis, and Ty Royal.
Congratulations to all the
fifth-graders who partici-
pated.
On Jan. 26 the entire
student body enjoyed the
cultural arts performance
of Poetry Alive. The stu-
dents were able to hear
poetry and realize that
poetry plays a large part
in literature. They saw
poetry leave the pages
of a book and come alive
to them. Everyone has a
new awareness of what
poetry really was created
for.


from
Port St. Joe
Je entry School

Important Dates to Remember:

Jan. 27-Gold Cards Issued
Jan. 29-100th day of school
Feb. 9-Progress Reports
Feb. 10-Florida Writes
Feb. 11-College t-shirt Day
Feb. 16-Holiday-No School

ARE YOU SMARTER THAN A PSJE
DOLPHIN?

Week # 8 Answers are:
What do you do if you faffle? ,to stutter or
mumble
On average a fashion models career last'
about how long? about 6 years
What do you get when you add zinc to,
copper? brass
What is the lowest temperature recorded at
the South Pole? 8 degrees F

Congratulations to this week's winners:
They are David Thompson, and Shaye
McGuffin. We appreciate the interaction
you provide to our students. It is fun to learn
together!!!!

Week #9 Questions are:
What is the fastest bird on foot?
What planet is closest to the sun?
Which of the following in NOT one of the
Great Lakes?
Alberta, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and
Superior.
A heptagon is a shape with how many
sides?
How long is one regular term for a US
President?

Questions submitted by: 5th grader Shaye
McGuffin

Please email your responses to: cwillis@
gulf.k12.fl.us


GCCC has big plans


By CHRIS SEGAL
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Nearly $2.5 million in
U.S. Department of Labor
grants will give Gulf Coast
Community College mon-
ey to buy medical equip-
ment and design courses
to boost the regional work
force.
The college secured the
two grants for health care
and technology education.
New courses in the
health science division
will train students for in-
demand health care jobs.
The technology-based
grant will be used to help
companies update their
manufacturing processes.
Professors, grant writ-
ers and the college's health
care partners teamed up to
win the grants and secure
the cash to buy equipment
and create new academic
courses even in the face
of budget cuts and short-
falls.
"It's refreshing to be
able to work together and
go after new dollars for in-
novations," Kerley said.
The Northwest Florida
Health Care grant will to


create community-based
job training worth $1.9
million. The second grant
of nearly $500,000 will be
used to train employees in
the manufacturing indus-
try about computer'ahto-
mation and robotics.
Officials said they ex-
pect to create 50 new
courses and redesign 32
existing courses during a
three- to five-year period.
The college is currently
renovating labs, which are
due to open this summer.
The health care initiative
grant will fill the build-
ing with state-of-the-art
equipment, said adminis-
trator George Bishop.
"Students will see what
it is like to work in the field
before they get out there,"
said Bishop, vice presi-
dent of academic affairs
and learning support.
There will be 2,800 to
2,900 students impacted
by the grant, said Health
Science Chair Sue Suggs.
"In health sciences we
are very technologically
oriented so any upgrade is
greatly needed and appre-
ciated," Suggs said.


for grant
Nearly $1 million of
the health care grant will
be used to purchase new
medical equipment, in-
cluding patient simula-
tors, new operating suites,
ventilators and neo-natal
incubator trainers. Money
also will be set aside to
train professors to operate
the new equipment.
The changes to come
will affect the 8 out of 10 or
11 programs in the health
science division, Suggs
said.
The second grant will
create a new technical cer-
tification program, which
will use Mobile Labora-
tory Kits. The kits would
be able to be shipped to
employers to train their
workers on the newest
developments in automa-
tion and robotics. The kits
would provide laboratory
equipment, training mate-
rial and a webcam to con-
tact GCCC professors.
The new certification
program will be between
25 to 30 credit hours, de-
velop 10 different courses
and take about three years
to get started.


Parker, Watford earn honors for

fall semester at Troy University


TROY, Ala.- Troy Uni-
versity has announced
its honor students for fall
semester, according to Dr.
Ed Roach, Senior Execu-
tive Vice Chancellor and
Provost.
They included Krista
Parker and Morgan Wat-
ford of Port St. Joe, who
each earned a spot on the
Chancellor's List.
FRil-time undergradu-
ate students who earned
a 4.0 grade point average


for the fall semester are
recognized on the Chan-
cellor's List, the univer-
sity's honor roll. Full-time
undergraduate students
who earned a grade point
average of 3.65 or higher
on a 4.0 scale are recog-
nized on the Provost's
List. Troy University of-
fers associate, bachelor's,
master's and education
specialist degrees, pre-
paring students in the
fields of fine arts, commu-


nication, business, educa-
tion, sciences and the hu-
manities, applied science,
nursing and allied health
sciences.
Troy University oper-
ates four campuses in
Alabama and maintains
degree programs at more
than 50 teaching sites
in 14 states and 12 coun-
tries outside of the United
States, serving almost
30,000 students world-
wide.


Black history program will be this Febuary


Port St. Joe High School and Port St.
Joe Middle School will have their annual
Black History Program at 9:30 a.m. on Fri-
day, Feb. 20. The guest speaker will be Dr.
Joseph Smiley.Also, on Saturday, Feb. 21


at 9-11 a.m. Dr. Smiley will conduct a work-
shop at Zion Fair Baptist Church to all con-
cerned parents of upper elementary, mid-
dle school, and early high school students
called "How to be Successful in School."


Port St. Joe ELEMENTARY SCHOOL







B8 I The Star Local Thursday, January 29, 2009





Schmitt tapped as lead Democrat


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer

The historic campaign and
election of U.S. Democratic presi-
dential candidate Barak Obama
has revitalized both the national
Democratic party and the one in
Gulf County.
That is the enthusiastic mes-
sage that Zebe YC. Schmitt is an-
nouncing to the world.
Schmitt, a long-time Gulf Coun-
ty resident and community activ-
ist, was appointed in the fall of 2008
as the new chair of the Democrat-
ic Executive Committee (DEC) for.
the local Democratic party.
She took over the reins of a
county-wide Democratic party
that had barely held together for
years; a party that, for many rea-
sons, had deteriorated from a
powerful group to a single handful
of party diehards who struggled to
keep the party alive, bu.t without
new members and motivation.
Now, with renewed hope for the
Democratic party in Gulf County
due to Obama's race for the presi-
dency, long-time local Democratic
party members and a growing
cadre of new members have band-
ed behind Schmitt.
They are looking for new lead-
ership, greater momentum, a
wider influx of new members,
and renewed community activism
that they hope will lead to a much
greater showing of Democratic
strength in future local elections
and politics.
Members of the local Demo-
cratic party approached Schmitt
and asked her to chair the Execu-
tive Committee in January of 2008,
she said.
"It was those few who literally
kept the Gulf County Democratic
party alive all those lean years.
They never gave up and kept the
core group functioning," Schmitt
said. "When I saw we were all
working for Democratic Party can-
didate Obama, I decided to accept
the chair offer in September."
Schmitt came from a very po-
litically active background that
began in her childhood with her
politically active parents and fam-
ily activism.
She herself was deeply in-
volved with the administrations
of three Georgia governors, span-
ning almost 20 years.


A native of a small rural Geor-
gia town, Schmitt survived child-
hood polio, which she contracted
at age five, and as an adult worked
extensively in Georgia on disabili-
ty issues statewide and nationally.
Schmitt served as the execu-
tive director of the Governors
Council on Developmental Dis-
abilities for the state for 18 years.
Under her direction the Council
established a national reputation
of excellence in areas of advocacy,
public information and aware-
ness, early intervention, and the
building of grass roots coalitions.
She was involved in numerous
public television shows on dis-
abilities, served on the Olympic
Committee for Disability Access
and numerous other boards deal-
ing with public accessibility.
Schmitt was instrumental in
writing, and actively worked for
the passage of, the Americans
With Disabilities Act and, along
with other advocates, was a re-
cipient of the Americans With Dis-
abilities Act Award.
She has used the facilities of the
Roosevelt Warm Springs Founda-
tion in Warm Springs, Georgia,
since early childhood and has
been re-appointed several times
to its board of directors.
Schmitt was selected as Geor-
gia's Professional Handicapped
.Woman of the Year and won the
National Association of Develop-
mental Disabilities Council's Pro-
fessional of the Year.
She served as vice-chair of the
National Media Council on Dis-
abilities, where she worked to
ensure employment opportuni-
ties in the media field for people
with disabilities. During her work
on the council, Schmitt directed
and hosted the Miss Wheelchair
Georgia pageant for 10 years,
and directed the Miss Wheelchair
America pageant for one year.
But after all that time, her
health issues forced her and her
husband, Jack Schmitt, to leave
the stressful political scene.. They
moved to Gulf County for her
mandatory rest and recuperation.
"We moved here to this won-
derful, peaceful beach commu-
nity, but over the years there have
been some very negative chang-
es," Schmitt said.
"I think there is an overall
feeling of discontent and concern


SUBMITTED PHOTO I Special to the Star
New chair of the Democratic
Executive Committee for the
local Democratic party, Zebe
Y.C. Schmitt.
among the residents in this area:
My parents taught us if you don't
do anything about a problem, you
have no right to complain. I think
that's when I decided to become
more involved in the Democratic
Party."
At the first two meetings of the
local Democratic party late last
year after the November presi-
dential election, Schmitt and oth-
er party campaign workers listed
the issues they had confronted in
Gulf County during their work for
Obama's campaign.
Primary issues, which Schmitt
said the local Democratic party
needed to address before the next
election, included: matching voter
signatures; felony rights restora-
tion; lack of platform from local
candidates; Republicans running
as Democrats within the county;
registered county Democrats not
voting as Democrats; term limits;
property taxes; racism; environ-
mental issues in the county; coun-
ty landfill issues; grooming future


local Democratic candidates; and
single member districts.
"Our first priority is to build
a viable organization so people
know who we are and what we
stand for so they know they have
a place to get involved," Schmitt
said.'
"I believe there are a number
of young people in the area who
believe in the party. If we gave
them our support, I believe they
would run for office. That includes
women, blacks and smart white
men."
A second priority, Schmitt con-
tinued, was to identify local people
to run for office in the area, "to
nurture and support them so we
can help them in elections. If we
don't do this as a party, we might
as well not exist. The leaders of a
county or of any area need to re-
flect its population.
"I believe we have to find good,
solid Democratic candidates to
give voters alternatives to what
we have now," Schmitt said.
A third priority for the local
Democratic party, according to
Schmitt, is to begin dealing with
the here and now.
"There is no sense in pursu-
ing economic development when
downtown Port St. Joe is closing
its doors," Schmitt said. "People
aren't nurturing the downtown
- businesses are moving to Wind-
Mark. Port St .Joe businesses are
closing literally from the way they
are being taxed and from a lack of
local government support."
A fourth priority on
Schmitt's list is single member
districts.
"We need to have real, com-
munity-wide conversations on
this issue,". Schmitt said. "We
need to ask if the county itself is
better off with it or without it. And
we need to educate ourselves and
everyone on the topic."
Schmitt said she greatly re-
spected the local Republican
party "and what they've done to:
make themselves an active, vi-
able organization. I just hope we
can do as well.
"They've brought issues to the
forefront and begun education
programs for children. They've
worked with us for candidate fo-
rums this past election.
"There's plenty to do we
don't need to be jealous and feel


threatened by each other. We just
need to make sure people know
what the Democratic Party plat-
form is."
Schmitt also advocated a
closer joining of both ends of the
county, saying the Democratic
party must reach out to the north
end of the county as well.
In order to achieve these
goals, Schmitt and the other DEC
officials have revamped the local
DEC structure and committees.
According to Schmitt, the lo-
cal DEC is allowed two represen-
tatives from each of its county
precincts. With eight precincts
in Gulf County, 16 people will be
seated on the local DEC under
Schmitt.
According to Schmitt, the DEC
mandates diversity.
There are still several vacan-
cies to be filled on the DEC com-
mittees.
Among the realigned com-
mittees, the new local legislative
committee is probably unlike any
in the state, Schmitt said. The
head of that committee, Carolyn
Lister, is a former JAG attorney
and now a private practice attor-
ney.
Schmitt said Lister had agreed
to monitor federal and state legis-
lation and to research local leg--
islation to keep abreast of what
would affect Gulf County.
"This is really going to put us
in a great position when it comes,
to dealing with state and national
politics, Schmitt said. "She will
feed us information that would
normally take so long to learn."
One of Obama's earliest direc-
tives was to ask for ideas nation-
wide on dealing with the environ-
mentandtoadvisehimofwhatlocal
Democratic committees can do
to address environmental issues,
Scmitt explained.
"We now have Karen Her-
rington from Wewahitchka as our
environmental issues committee
chair. She works for a govern-
ment environmental agency and
her husband works for the Nature
Conservancy. They will be of tre-
mendous help to us.
"In six months time I want
the community at large to feel
the Democratic Party has made
a positive difference and use that
to fuel us to do bigger and better
things."


Be a part of this one-of-a-kind event in this area!
For booth information and advertising please contact: at (850) 522-5173 or (850) 276-2506
OR go online to www.newsherald.com and print off vendor/exhibitor form and fax it to (850) 763-4636
Vendors: FREE Internet access available, sponsored by Knology!

Major Media Sponsors:


WPAP


04
7


American SERVICES CO.
Red Cross L1 ONT4








Home YEXO.
&Garden

March 6,7,8, 2009
Bay County Fairgrounds

CALL TO VENDORS
Register now for booth space at the 2009 Home &
Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. Share your home
improvement products, services, and enhancements
with thousands of families in the Bay area looking to
renovate, decorate, and landscape their homes.

All vendors receive a FREE quarter- O 0
page ad in the official 2009 Home
& Garden Expo program, reaching 4
more than 80,000 adults in Bay and
seven surrounding counties. The 2009
Expo is also the host site for the Gulf Bf
Coast B-B-Q Cook-Off, an officially
sanctioned, crowd-drawing event!

For Vendor Application, as well as information on the
show and program advertising:
visit: www.emeraldcoast.com/events/expo
email: expostradeshows@aol.com
Call: 850-763-8618
LAST YEAR'S SHOW SOLD OUT!
Space Is Limited, So Reserve Yours NOW!

For additional advertising information in the official
program of the 2009 Home and Garden Expo, contact
The News Herald at 850-258-4163.
PRESENTING SPOSR


KNOLOGY@


NEWSHERALD


NEWSHERALD.I
SHOWSPONOR


SUNTRiST


jilagi


. 1 ,


i:", 4';: .






Thursday, January 29, 2009


Law Enforcement


AG: Be aware of scams during tax season


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Bill McCollum
today issued a consumer
advisory warning to Florid-
ians to be on the lookout for
tax-related scams.
Complaints about fraud-
ulent tax preparers are
reported to the attorney
general's office each year,
as are issues with identity
theft and fraudulent chari-
ties. The attorney general
also advised consumers
to ask about service fees
up front and avoid tax pre-
parers who claim they can
obtain larger refunds than
anyone else.
"As tax season ap-
proaches and Floridians
get ready to file for tax re-
turns, scams begin to de-
velop and con artists begin
looking for ways to take



Arrest

LOG

Gulf County Sheriff ar-
rest log

The Gulf County Sher-
iff's Office will be con-
ducting vehicle safety and
DUI checkpoints during
January. The checkpoints
will be held throughout
the county to include
Highway 98 near St. Joe
Beach, Highway 98 and
Garrison Avenue, C-30
Simmons Bayou, Highway
71 north of White City,
Highway 22 and Highway
22A, Highway 71 and We-
starm Creek, Highway 71
Dalkieth Area and High-
way 71 near the Calhoun
line.


On Jan. 16, Stevie La-
mar Johnson Jr., 26, was
arrested on a warrant for
failure to appear. The origi-
nal charge was driving with
-license suspended or re-
voked.
On Jan. 18, Donnie
Noah Whitfield Jr., 18, was
arrested on warrants from
Calhoun County. The origi-
nal charges were DWLSR
and leaving the scene of an
accident.
On Jan. 18, Byron Ber-
nard Butler, 27, was ar-
rested on warrants for pos-
session of a firearm by a
convicted felon and felony
battery.
On Jan. 19, Timothy
Lamar Tauton, 45, was
arrested for criminal mis-
chief and burglary to a
structure.
On Jan. 20, Jimmy Lee
Hayes, 43, was arrested
on a warrant for failure
to appear on an original
charge of felony DWLSR.
On Jan. 21, John Ben-
jamin Schdat, 22, was
arrested on a.violation of
probation warrant. The
original charge was mis-
use of confidential infor-
mation.


advantage of people," said
McCollum. "Floridians can
protect themselves by be-
ing educated about com-
mon schemes and report-
ing fraud to the attorney
general's office."
To avoid being scammed
by a non-legitimate tax pre-
parer, consumers should
get the credentials of the
tax preparer and ask if he
or she belongs to a state
board or bar association,
which requires continuing
education. The attorney
general's office also rec-
ommends- that consumers
shop around for quotes and
ask tax preparers if they
will represent consumers
who are audited or pay any
audit-related fees. Only at-
torneys, certified public
accountants and enrolled


agents can represent tax-
payers before the IRS in
any matter, including au-
dits, collections and ap-
peals.
One of the more com-
mon scams associated with
tax season is "phishing,"
which occurs when indi-
viduals pose as Internal
Revenue Service or other
government or banking
representatives and send
consumers .e-mails seek,
ing personal information
allegedly for the purpose
of processing refunds. The
e-mails usually are created
to look official and might
include subject lines that
read "Refund Notice" or
similarly misleading phras-
es.
However, the IRS does
not send e-mails asking


for personal information
to process refunds. Con--
sumers can visit the agen-
cy's Web site at http://
www.IRS.gov and click
on "Where's My Refund"
to check on the status of
their refunds.
Another scheme that
often surfaces during tax
season is the creation of
fraudulent charities, which
e-mail consumers seeking
contributions they claim
can be written off as tax-
deductible. Florida law re-
quires charities to register
with the Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services and provide fi-
nancial information about
income and expenditures.
Consumers have the right
to ask for an organization's
financial report and its fed-


eral tax identification num-
ber, which is necessary to
clainr contributions as tax
deductions.
McCollum offered the
following recommenda-
tions to consumers to avoid
tax-related scams:
Never give out per-
sonal identification infor-
mation to anyone who. is
soliciting money.
Do not respond to e-
mails asking for informa-
tion relating to refunds,.
The IRS's Web site is
the legitimate source for
checking on refund status.
Research charities be-
fore sending them money,
and do not respond to e-
mail solicitations for mon-
ey. The Better Business
Bureau has a charity re-
search page at http://www.


bbb.org, which helps iden-
tify legitimate charities.
Do not give money to
third parties for income
taxes on prizes. A legiti-
mate prize distributor
must send prize recipients
the IRS form 1099, which
states the value of the prize
won and must be filed with
a consumer's tax return.
Do not let anyone pur-
porting to be an agent for
the IRS into your home un-
less he or she has proper'
identification.
Consumers may file
complaints about tax-re-
lated scams and any other
types of fraud by calling the
attorney general's fraud
hotline; 866-966-7226, or by
filing a complaint online at
http://www.myfloridalegal.
com.


TRUCK CONTRIBUTION


Billy Traylor
presents GCI
Warden Randy
Tifft and Lt. Jay
McCorvey with
the title to a
pickup truck in
consideration
of the
m.ore than
$3,000,000
in labor
the prison
provides to
Gulf County.
The truck will
be used for the
Gulf C.I. K-9
unit.
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO


Field OPERATIONS


This report represents some
events the FWC handled from
Jan. 16-22; however, it does not
include all actions taken by the
Division of Law Enforcement.

NORTHWEST REGION
WALTON COUNTY
During the past two weeks, of-
ficers Randall Brooks and Espy
Letcher worked closely with pri-
vate landowners with land adja-
cent to Northwest Florida Water
Management District lands along
the Choctawhatchee River Wild-
life Management Area concern-
ing boundary issues, postings and
working illegal entry onto both the
private and water management
lands.

WASHINGTON COUNTY
This past week, area officers
focused attention on various com-
plaints on Econfina Wildlife Man-
agement Area, Carter Tract and
a 1,100-acre private tract called
White Oaks Pasture. Officers
targeted alleged deer dog viola-
tions in the still hunt areas and
on private lands, road hunting,
trespass and baiting inside the
management areas. After working
the early morning, hours, officers
Larry Morris and Warren Wals-


ingham stopped at a convenience
store and observed a small hoof of
a deer sticking up from the bed of
a pickup truck exiting the store.
An inspection revealed a subject
in possession of an antlerless deer.
The officers issued a citation for
possession of antlerless deer.
Officers Walsingham and Mark
Clements responded to assist a
Washington County.sheriff's dep-
uty who stopped two young men
for shooting a doe deer along a
roadway with a .22-caliber rifle.
The deputy handed the case over
to the officers who in turn inves-
tigated and charged the two sub-
jects with taking antlerless deer
during closed season and for tak-
ing deer by illegal methods. Wit-
nesses observed the pair shoot
the deer repeatedly on a ditch.
bank.

HOLMES COUNTY
Officer Jim Brooks responded
to a complaint of a deer shot at
night in a farmer's yard. Brooks
investigated the case well into the
morning. The investigation is still
open. Brooks receipted the trophy
8-point buck to the landowner for
processing after documenting the
evidence.
Brooks received several com-


plaints regarding dumping of il-
legal deer carcasses in Holmes
County. On one complaint near
Ponce de Leon, Brooks was sup-
plied a suspect vehicle descrip-
tion. Brooks passed the suspect
vehicle on a dirt road about an
hour and a half later and observed
other indicative signs supplied to
him and subsequently stopped the
truck. The suspect confessed and
took Brooks back to the bridge
where the carcass was dumped on
the right-of-way. Brooks charged
the subject with a litter law viola-
tion.

FRANKLIN COUNTY
On Jan. 10, officers Steven
Cook, Chasen Yarborough,
Woody Cook and John Allen
conducted a detail utilizing the
decoy deer to address deer hunt-
ing during closed season in the
Womack Creek Wildlife Manage-
ment Area. One hunter was is-
sued a citation and his rifle was
seized as evidence after shooting
the decoy.

LIBERTY COUNTY
Officer David Biandon cited
four individuals for taking dove
over bait west of the Ochlockonee
River. The area was baited with


wheat.
On Jan. 16, Officer Hank
Forehand worked a trespassing
complaint north of Hosford. He
found evidence where a hog had
been killed early that morning.
He checked the area again that
evening and found two people
dragging a deer out of the area.
Both subjects ran off -in the
woods, but Forehand apprehend-
ed them and seized one doe deer.
The subjects were arrested for
trespassing and possession of il-
legal deer.

LEON COUNTY
On Jan. 13, K-9 Officer Jeff
Babauta, Officer Chris Jones and
FWC Investigations set up a ro-
botic deer replica in east Leon
County. It was a rainy morning,
but the officers' persistence was
rewarded. At about 8 a.m., a tow
truck driver passing through spot-
ted the replica. The driver exited
the tow truck with a shotgun in
hand and shot at the replica three
times. He was transported to the
Leon County Jail and charged
with felony trespass by projec-
tile. The Remington shotgun was
seized as evidence and the tow
truck was towed away by another
tow company.


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lOB 0 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 2009 Established 1938 Serving Gulf Counly and surrounding areas for 67 years


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130 Adoptions
1140- Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found


I 1100

9765S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, acting through
Rural Development, for-
merly Farmers Home Ad-
ministration (FmHA),
United States Department.
of Agriculture (USDA),
Plaintiff,

VS.

JAMES EDWARD
LOCKSTEAD; VICKIE
RENEE LOCKSTEAD;
FLORIDA HOUSING FI-
NANCE CORPORATION;
GULF COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS;,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 2008-462CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: James Edward
Lockstead .and Vickie
Renee Lockstead, whose
last known address is PO
Box 638, Port St Joe, FL
32457 or 183 Sailfish, Port
St Joe, FL 32456 or 124
Mary Drive, Wewahitchka,
FL 32465.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
described property in Gulf
County, Florida:

Lot 11; OAK GARDEN
SUBDIVISION, Unit 11, as
recorded in Plat Book 6,
Page 20, Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
on NEAL E. YOUNG, Plain-
tiffs attorney, whose ad-
dress is 300 Third Street,
N.W., Winter Haven, Flor-
ida 33 881, on or before
and file the original with
the, Clerk of the Court ei-
ther before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
'tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.

If you are a person with a
disability who n6eds any
accommodation irt order
to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
Office of the ADA Coordi-
nator at (850)747-5338,
within two (2) working
days of your receipt of this
Notice; if you are hearing
or voice impaired, call
Florida Relay Service (800)
955-8770.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court on
January 7, 2009.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
January 22, 29, 2009


9769S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,


FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK F/K/A WASHING-
TON MUTUAL BANK, FA,,
Plaintiff,

VS.

SHIRLEY F. NEESE, et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.: 08-CA-000161
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Pursuant to an Order Re-
scheduling Foreclosure
Sale dated 2009 and en-
tered in Case No.
08-CA-000161 of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Four-
teenth Judicial Circuit in
and for Gulf County, Flor-
ida in which Washington
Mutual Bank f/k/a Wash-
ington Mutual Bank, FA.,
is the Plaintiff and Shirley
F. Neese, Thomas A.
Neese, Tenant #1 n/k/a
Thomas Neese, Jr., are
defendants, I will sell to the
hi best and best bidder for
cash in/on Gulf County,
Florida at on the 5th.day of
February, 2009, the follow-
ing described property as
set forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:

LOTS 40 AND 41, WHIS-
PERING PINES, UNIT II,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT 'THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3
AT PAGE 19, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA.

A/K/A 181 BETTY RAE
DRIVE: WEWAHITCHKA,
FLORIDA 32465

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if iny, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Us Pend-
ens must file a claim within
60 days after.the sale.

Dated in Gulf County, Flor-
ida this 7th day of January,
2009.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
Gulf County, Florida
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a
disability who needs assis-
tance in order to partici-
pate in a program or serv-
ice of the State Courts
System, you should con-
tact the Court
Administrator's office at:
(850) 747-5327, fax (850)
747-5717 within two (2)
working 'days of receipt of
this notice; if you are hear-
-ing or voice impaired,
please call
1-800-955-8771.

Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
11.0. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623,
(813) 221-4743
08-05446
January 22,29,2009


9774S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY

SPCP GROUP LLC, a Del-
aware limited liability com-
pany,
Plaintiff,

v.

VILLA DEL SOL AT CAPE
SAN BLAS, LLC, a Florida
limited liability company;
WAYNE F. ORR, individu-
ally; DEBORAH R ORR,
individually; and W. F.
ORR & COMPANY, LLC., a
Georgia limited liability
company,
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 08-291 CA
I


NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45,
FLORIDA STATUTES

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment
dated January 5, 2009, en-
tered in Civil Case No.:
08-291 CA of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit in' and for
Gulf County, Florida.
wherein SPCP GROUP,
-LLC is Plaintiff, and Villa
Del Sol At Cape San Bias,
LLG, a Florida limited lia-
bility company, Wayne F
Orr, individually, Deborah
P Orr. individually and
W.E Orr & Company, LLC.
a Georgia limited liability
company, are the Defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash in the front lobby of
'the Gulf County Circuit
Court. 1000 Cecil G.
Costin. Sr. Blvd., Fort St.
Joe, Florida 32456 at
11:00 a.m. (EST) on Feb-
ruary 5, 2009, the following
described property as set
forth in Exhibit "A'.

Exhibit "A'

PARCEL 1:

THE WEST QUARTER OF
LOT 4, SECTION 23,
TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH,'
RANGE 11 WEST, GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA; SUB-
JECT TO THE TRANSFER
OF 0.39 OF AN ACRE,
MORE OR LESS, BY.
DEED DATED AUGUST
21, 1970, TO THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, AND RE-
CORDED IN BOOK 45,
PAGE 279, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA, ALL
AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF
SURVEY BY SUSAN M.:
MARLEY, DATED JANU-
ARY 7, 1992, AS DRAW-
ING NO. 91 G-1078-C.

ALSO

COMMENCE AT THE
CONCRETE MONUMENT
AT THE POINT OF THE IN-
TERSECTION OF THE
WEST LINE OF ORIGINAL
GOVERNMENT LOT 4,
SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP
9 SOUTH, RANGE 11
WEST AND THE SOUTH-
ERN LINE OF THE 50
FOOT RIGHT OF WAY OF
U.S: COAST GUARD
ROAD AS IT EXISTS JUNE
20, 1958, AND EXTEND A
LINE EASTERLY ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE
TO A POINT THAT IS
EAST 329.91 FEET
ALONG A LINE PERPEN-
DICULAR TO SAID WEST
LINE OF SAID LOT 4, TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
FOR A POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; FROM THIS POINT
OF BEGINNING EXTEND
A LINE SOUTH ALONG A
LINE PARALLEL TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID LOT
4 FOR 1039.89 FEET,
MORE OR LESS, TO A
POINT AT THE MEAN
HIGH WATER LINE OF
THE GULF OF MEXICO;
THEN TURN LEFT AND
MEANDER SAID MEAN
HIGH WATER LINE
NORTHEASTERLY TO A
POINT THAT IS EAST 100
FEET ALONG A LINE PER-
PENDICULAR TO THE
LINE SOUTH FROM THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THEN TURN LEFT AND
EXTEND A LINE NORTH
ALONG A LINE PARALLEL
TO THE WEST LINE OF
SAID LOT 4 FOR 1,035
FEET, MORE OR LESS,
TO A POINT ON THE
SOUTHERN RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF SAID U. S.
COAST GUARD ROAD;
THEN TURN LEFT ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

ALSO

COMMENCE AT THE
CONCRETE MONUMENT
AT THE POINT OF INTER-
SECTION OF THE WEST
LINE OF ORIGINAL GOV-


I, 1100
ERNMENT LOT 4, SEC-
TION 23, TOWNSHIP 9
SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST,
AND THE SOUTHERN
LINE OF THE 50 FOOT
RIGHT OF WAY OF U.S.
COAST GUARD ROAD AS
IT EXISTS JUNE 20, 1958,
AND EXTEND A LINE
EASTERLY ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE TO A
POINT THAT IS EAST
329.91 FEET ALONG A
LINE PERPENDICULAR
TO SAID WEST LINE OF
SAID LOT 4, TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT FOR
A POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM THIS POINT OF BE-
GINNING EXTEND A LINE
SOUTH ALONG A LINE
PARALLEL TO THE WEST
LINE OF SAID LOT 4 FOR
1039.89 FEET, MORE OR
LESS, TO A POINT AT
THE MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE OF THE GULF OF
MEXICO; THEN TURN
LEFT AND MEANDER
SAID MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE NORTHEASTERLY
TO A POINT THAT IS
EAST-300 FEET ALONG A
LINE PERPENDICULAR
TO THE LINE SOUTH
FROM THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THEN TURN
LEFT AND EXTEND A
LINE NORTH ALONG A
LINE PARALLEL TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID LOT
4 FOR 1,035 FEET, MORE
OR LESS, TO A POINT ON
THE SOUTHERN RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF SAID
U.S. COAST GUARD
ROAD; THEN TURN LEFT
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY LINE TO.THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, LESS
THE WESTERLY 100 FEET
THEREOF.

MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED BY SURVEY
DATED APRIL 7, 2004,
DRAWN BY EDWIN G.
BROWN & ASSOCIATES,
D R A W I N G
#04-133.24543:

BEGIN AT A CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING
THE INTERSECTION OF
THE WEST LINE OF ORIG-
INAL GOVERNMENT LOT
4, SECTION 23, TOWN-
SHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE
11 WEST, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA WITH THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY OF STATE ROAD
NUMBER 30-E,

SAID POINT BEING THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE SOUTH
0 1 1 7 5 9 "
WEST, A DISTANCE OF
1,384.67 FEET TO THE
APPROXIMATE MEAN
HIGH WATER LINE OF
THE GULF OF MEXICO;
THENCE RUN ALONG
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATER LINE
AS FOLLOWS: NORTH
7812'47" EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 54.81 FEET;
THENCE NORTH
7 9 0 3 3 5 "
EAST, A DISTANCE OF
79.16 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 77025'24" EAST A
DISTANCE OF 78.15
FEET, THENCE NORTH
7621'08" EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 75.97 'FEET;
THENCE NORTH
7 0 5 5 0 4 "
EAST, A DISTANCE,OF
81.08 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 6625'43" EAST, A
DISTANCE. OF 75.95
FEET; THENCE NORTH
7447'00" EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 78.02 FEET;
THENCE NORTH
7 7 2 3 3 4 "
EAST, A DISTANCE OF
76.54 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 7033'26" EAST A
DISTANCE OF 59.65
FEET; THENCE LEAVING
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATER LINE
RUN, NORTH 0118'51"
EAST, A DISTANCE OF
1,278.03 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT LY-
ING ON THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE
ROAD NUMBER 30-E;
THENCE RUN ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY,
SOUTH 8348'59" WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 635.53


1100
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

AND ALSO

BEGIN AT A RE-BAR
MARKING THE INTER-
SECTION OF THE WEST
LINE OF THE ORIGINAL
GOVERNMENT LOT 4,
SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP
9 SOUTH, RANGE 11
WEST, GULF COUNTY,
,FLORIDA WITH THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY OF STATE ROAD
NUMBER 30-E, SAID
POINT BEING THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE
NORTH 0116'01" EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 278.62
FEET TO THE APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF ST JO-
SEPH BAY; THENCE RUN
ALONG SAID APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE AS FOL-
'LOWS: SOUTH. 8624'00"
EAST, A DISTANCE OF
82.66 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 5659'51" EAST A
DISTANCE OF 49.87
FEET; THENCE SOUTH
4700'28" EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 73.62 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH
1 1 2 2 .3 5 "
WEST, A DISTANCE OF,
36.03 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 3445'05" EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 24.05
FEET, THENCE SOUTH
8451'40" EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 51.74 FEET;
THENCE North 67'14'53"
EAST, A DISTANCE OF
34.41 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 8350'43" EAST, A.
DISTANCE OF 37.92
FEET; THENCE NORTH
7152'01" EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 23.82 FEET;
THENCE LEAVING SAID
APPROXIMATE MEAN
HIGH WATER LINE RUN,
SOUTH 01713'26" WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 172.43
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT LYING ON
THE NORTHERLY RIGHT
OF WAY OF STATE ROAD
NUMBER 30-E; THENCE
RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY, SOUTH 8359'00"
WEST, A DISTANCE OF
332.69 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

LESS AND EXCEPT FROM
ALL OF THE ABOVE DE-
SCRIBED LEGALS:

ALL OF THE PLAT OF,
VILLA DEL SOL, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN .PLAT BOOK
5, PAGE 44, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA.

PARCEL 2:

ALL OF THE PLAT OF
VILLA DEL SOL, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGE 44, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA.

LESS THE FOLLOWING
LOTS:

LOTS 5, 8, 9, 33, 34, 42,
44 AND 52, PLAT OF
VILLA DEL SOL, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGE 44, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

DATED at Port St. Joe.
Gulf County, Florida this
5th day of January, 2009:

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

McCLOSKY, D'ANNA & Dl-
ETERLE, LLP
ATTORNEYS FOR PLAIN-
TIFF
2300 GLADES ROAD
SUITE 400 -EAST TOWER
BOCA RATON, FLORIDA
33431
Telephone:(561)368-9200
Facsimile:(561)395-7050
January 22, 29, 2009


I 1100
9838S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

NATIONAL CITY BANK
D/B/A NATIONAL CITY
MORTGAGE
PLAINTIFF

VS.

MARY ANN CONROY;
STEPHEN L. CONROY;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAME INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE
'NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS; SAN
DUNES HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.; GJ
GRACE, LLC D/B/A
COASTAL BUILDING SUP-
PLY; SUNCOAST LAWN &
LANDSCAPING, INC.;
JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANT(S)

CASE NO: 08-64-CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January
8, 2009 entered in Civil
Case No. 08-64-CA of the
Circuit Court of the 14TH
Judicial Circuit in and for
GULF County, PORT ST.
JOE, Florida, I will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash at in the.
FRONT LOBBY OF THE
COURTHOUSE at the
GULF County Courthouse
located at 1000 Cecil
Costin Blvd in PORT ST
JOE, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on the 12th day of Febru-
ary, 2009 the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 6, SAN DUNES SUB-
DIVISION, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT RECORDED
IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, IN PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGE 6.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

Dated this 9th day of Janu-
ary, 2009.

Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the GULF County
Courthouse at NONE,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) 'or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.

THE LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID J. STERN, PA.,
Attorney for Plaintiff
900 South Pine Island
Road Suite 400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954)233-8000
08-35753(NCM)
January 22, 29, 2009
9843S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF. COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION


1100
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff

vs.

JOSEPH CASEY
YARBROUGH, et al.
Defendant(s)

CASE NO
2008-CA-000136

NOTICE OF
'RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN Pursuant to an Or-
der Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated January 8,
2009 and entered in Case
No. 2008-CA-000136 of the
Circuit Court of the Four-
teenth Judicial Circuit in
and for Gulf County, Flor-
ida in which Wachovia
Mortgage Corporation, is
the Plaintiff and Joseph
Casey Yarbrough, are de-
fendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash in/on, Gulf County,
Florida at on the 19th day
of February, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment. of Foreclosure:

LOT 4, BEACHSIDE SUB-
DIVISION, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGE
38, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

A/K/A 132 LOUISIANA
LANE: CAPE SAN BLAS,
FLORIDA 32456

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of this Lis Pend-
ens must file a claim within
60 after the sale.

Dated in Gulf Countyj Flor-
ida this 9th day of January,
2009

Clerk of the Circuit Court
Gulf County, Florida
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a
disability who needs assis-
tance in order to partici-
pate in a program or serv-
ice of the State Courts
System, you should con-
tact the Court
Administrator's office at
(850)747-5327, fax
(850)747-5717 within two
(2) working days of receipt
of this notice; if you are
hearing impaired, please
call 1-800-955-8771.

Albertelil Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
RO. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813)221-4743
08-05158
January 22; 29, 2009
9858S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR GULF COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS EUGENE WOOD
Deceased.
File Number 08-88PR

NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the
estate of THOMAS EU-
GENE WOOD, deceased,
whose date of death was
November 16, 2008 and
whose social security
number is 263-62-0228, is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Gulf County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
Gulf County Courthouse,
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate


| 1100
on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate must file their.claims'
with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is Janu-
ary 22, 2009.

Personal Representative:
RUSSELL A. WOOD
181 E. Lakeview Dr.
Wewahitchka, Fl. 32465
Attomey for Personal
Representative:
Charles A. Costin
Florida Bar No. 699070
Post Office Box 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Telephone: (850) 227-1159
January 22, 29, 2009
9859S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
WALTER RAYWOOD
Deceased.

File Number 09-04PR

NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the
estate of WALTER
RAYWOOD, deceased,
whose date of death was
November 15, 2008 and
whose social security
number is 150-28-9441, is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Gulf County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
Gulf County Courthouse,
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
'having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE BARRED.
i A


I 1100o

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
-OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is Janu-
ary 22, 2009.

Personal Representative-
KEITH McCOY
6 Ovington Dr.
Yardville, NJ 08620
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Charles A. Costin
Florida Bar No. 699070
Post Office Box 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Telephone: (850) 227-1159
January 22, 29, 2009
9879S
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

AMENDED REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL
RFP # 0809-06

SOLID WASTE COLLEC-
TION

Gulf County, Florida is
seeking proposals for pro-
fessional Selid Waste col-
lection services. The
county intends to enter
into a five (5) year contract
with a qualified and re-
sponsible firm. Any firm
desiring to furnish a pro-
posal for such services
must submit a sealed pro-
posal according to the in-
structions outlined in the
specifications.

RFP DEADLINE: February
6, 2009 at 4:30 p.m., E.T

RFP OPENING: February
9, 2009 at 10:00 a.m., E.T.

Late submittals received
after the fore mentioned
deadline date, either by
Mail, or otherwise, will not
be considered and re-
turned unopened. The
time of receipt will be de-
termined by the time re-
ceived in the Clerk to the
Board of County Commis-
sioner's office. It is the sole
responsibility of the firm for
assuring that the RFP is re-
ceived in the' clerk's office
by the designated date
and time. No faxed, elec-
tronic or oral RFP will be
accepted.

There will be a Mandatory
Pre-Bid Conference on
February 2, 2009 at 1:30
p.m., E.T in the Robert M.
Moore Administration
Building, in the Commis-
sion Board Room at 1000
Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456. To
be considered, Firm/Team
must submit an original
and seven (7) copies of
RFP in a sealed envelope
or package, clearly
marked with the
Firm/Team's name and ad-
dress, and the words
"Solid Waste Collection:
RFP NO: "0809206" ad-
dressed to: Gulf County
Board of County Commis-
sioners, Gulf County Clerk
of Court, Room 148, 1000
Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
RFP's will be received until
4:30 p.m., E.T, on Friday,
February 6, 2009. RFP's
will be opened on Mon-
day, February 9, 2009 at
10:00 a.m., E.T in the
same office.

Copies of required infor-
mation for the RFR its Ad-
dendums, Financial State-
ments and Budgets are
available in the Gulf
County Clerk of Court's of-
fice, Room 148, 1000 Cecil
G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456,
Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.,
E.T to 5:00 p.m., E.T

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners'
has implemented a Local
Bidders Preference Policy


N. -~n,,r~-"T'- vx w'ar'w~sam w~n-nwxmsmem~v~ i ~ .~.--"-w,


Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years


10B THE STAR, PORT ST JOE, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 2009





Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 29, 2009 11B


| 1100 1100 I 1100 | 1100 | 4100 I6130 6140 6140
for all RFP/BIDS. Anyone nently affixed to said prop- dresses of the personal CIVIL DIVISION Home Biz Training Mexico Beach Townhouse 805 Long Avenue
interested in bidding this erty. representative and the per- PT $400-$1,200 Mo. FT w/Boatslip, 2 br, 1.5 ba, 1stMonth'srentfree!!l Mili-
project as a local bidder, sonal representative's at- HOME LOAN INVEST- $2,000 to $6,000 Mo. Call completely fum'd, on canal tary Discount Available! '
must follow the require- The successful bidder at torney are set forth below. MENT BANK, FSB 727-865-6795 w/ gulf view, Pool $800 Spacious and private St. Joe Beach
ments of Resolution the sale will be required to Plaintiff, o. 648-6765/527-2780 home, 3 bdrm/2bthrm,
#2009-02, which may be place the requisite state All creditors of the dece- | I sm6 52 ._____________ large fenced in yard, front 3 br, 2 be. blocks from
obtained from the Clerk's documentary stamp on the dent and other persons vs. 2100- Pets p porch, hardwood floors. 3 beach $725 month
Office at the above ad- Certificate of Title, having claims or demands 2110- Pets: Free to 4130.h blocks to area shopping, 850-227-4164
dress. The Gulf County against decedent's estate MICHAEL TILLER, ET AL. Good HomeVT downtown and St. St Joe Beach
Board of County Commis- DATED this day of Janu- on whom a copy of this Defendants. 2120 Pet Supplies JPOSTAL & GOV 6140 Joseph's Bay. Monthly St. Joe Beach
sioners reserves the right ary, 2009 notice is required to be 2130 Farm Animals/ INFO FOR SALE? rental available at $750.00 Beautiful 3 br, 2 ba gu
to reject any or all bids served must file their Case No. Supplies 1 br, Some uba,.ti urn. $500 +perHow month with $750.00 view home, $1300 mo.
deemed in the best inter- HON. REBECCA L. NOR- claims with this Court 23-2008-CA-000570 2140 PetLivestock Some uil $250 dp. How- security/damage deposit. Long Term Rental Call
est of the County. RIS WITHIN THE LATER OF Divisionaution rd Creek Call 5229515 or Call gulf Coast Property (404) 545-2552.
CLERK OF COURT THREE (3) MONTHS AF- 326-0785 or 27-2906 SeCall gulfces at (850) 229-2706 45-2552.
GULF COUNTY By: Jasmine Hysmith TER THE DATE OF THE NOTICE OF ACTION for more information and a
BOARD OF COUNTY Clerk/Deputy Clerk 'FIRST PUBLICATION OF fo2100 information about 1, 2, & 3 tour of this great house
COMMISSIONERS THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY TO: Rottweilers, AKC NFL-K9, for information ab rental.
By: /s/ Nathan Peters, Jr., FRANK A. BAKER, ESQ. (30) PAYS AFTER THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF Puppies $300 14 weeks federal or postl lobs. If Bedroom rental. St. Joe Beach/TAFB,
Chairman 4431 Lafayette Street DATE OF SERVICE OF A CHARLES FREDERICK old 3 females Call you see a job Houses 1404 Long Ave.(Tenant Nice, 2 br, 1 ba, Near Bch,
Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Nor- Marianna, FL 32446 COPY OF THIS NOTICE CURRENT RESIDENCE: 850-827-2701 guarantee", contact the for rent in Port St. Joe; Call fell through avail, again) $650 + dep. Pelican Walk
ris, Clerk January 29, February 5, ON THEM. UNKNOWN FTC. Cute Bungalow, 3 br, 2 be, Real Estate 850-647-2473
January 22, 29, 2009 2009The Federal Trade 850-227-7800 newly refurbished, laundry
All292009 S other creditors of theLAST KNOWNADDRESS:Commissionrm w/d. $700 month Call wnhomes for rent,
9880S 9915S decedent anrd persons 305 AVENUE D D S is America's consumer 850-766-4601 Jones Homestead-
NOTICE TO RECEIVE PUBLIC NOTICE having claims or demands PORT ST JOE, FL, 32456 protection agency. Eage Ponderosa pines. End
SEALED BIDShag a cainst th demadnt's Ps JE FL, 34 Eagle Landing Townhome of year special. First
BID NO. 0809-09 AT&T is reviewing an exist- against must filethe ir decdnt'laims You are notified that an ac www.ftc.gov/jobscams 2 bedroom, 1 bath house New development- beauti- h r
ing 285' guyed wireless with this Court WITHIN r ion to foreclose a mort- 1-877-FTC-HELP 457 Madison St. Oak ful and spacious 2 br 2 month rent free with
The Gulf County Board of communication tower o- THREE (3) MhiCoNTTHAF- gage on te following Grove Area of Port St. Joe. be, townhome with bonus deposit and 12 month
County Commissioners cated at 550 Stone Mill TER THE DATE OF THE property in Gulf County, MERCHANDISE A public service 227-7800 upstairs living space and lease. 2 br and 3br
will receive sealed bids Creek Rd., Wewahitchka, FIRST PUBLICATION OF Florida: message from the FTC bathroom located in Jones units available. Call
from any person, com- FL 32465 for the purpose T310 UIC8N a Antiques and The News Herald 2 br, 1 ba furnished 8935 omestead, Eagle Land- 850-227-8404 or 850
pany, or corporation inter- of renewing its license with THIS NOTICE.LOTS 3 AND 5 IN BLOCK 3120 Appliances Classified Advertising hothouse Ave, Beacon ng subdivision. Close to 227 9732 for more in-
3120 ArtionsC LtsDUghihgutwnto andf
tested in purchasing the the FCC. If you have any ALL CLAIMS NOT FILEQ 1015 OF MILLVIEW ADDI- 3130- Auctions Department Hill, $500 month. Call shopph's Bay. Monthlyown an formation.
following concerns of any historic WITHIN THE TIME PERI- TION, UNIT NO.2 OF THE 3140 Baby Items 850-625-4955 or S Josephn s Bay$ Monthly
1991 FORD TRACTOR advers elyaffected igb th ODS SET FORTH IN SEC- CITY OF PORT ST. JOE 3150 Buidin Supplies580-276-1680 7 ridam
199 FORD TRACTOR adversely affected by this TION 733.702 OF THE ACCORDING TO THE OF 3160- Busiess/ 2 $750 security/damage de-
Model: 6610-2x4 tower; please write to FLORIDA PROBATE CODE FICIAL MAP ON FILE IN 3170- Collectibles 1 ba Port S, Joe ert rv at
Good Condition Doug Butler, Trileaf Corp., WILL BE BARRED THE OFFICE OF THE 3180 Computers ... 2 br, 1 ba, Port St, Joe, Property Services at (850)
S/N BC52651 2700 Westhall Ln., Ste. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT 3190 Electronics C/H/A, sml extra room, 229-2706 for more infor-
Number of Hours-757 200, Maitland, FL 32751, NOTWITHSTANDING THE COURT, GULF COUNTY 3200- Firewood BU laundry room, nice yard, mation and tour of the B -
MINIMUM BID: $5,000.00 (407) 660-7840. Please in- 3210- Free Pass It On very nice area, $525 mo, home.
NIMUM BID: $5,000.00 (407 e ower locati ME PERIODS SET FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 3220Furniture $400 dp, No pets Call home2 br, 1 ba,
Tev le ybeviewe nd te locations FORTH ABOVE, ANY 1, PAGE 47. 3230- Garage/Yard Sales B850-227-6216
The vehicle may be viewed and the location of the his- CLAIM FILED TWO (2) 3240 Guns B1_5027-216St. Joe Bch,
at the Road Department at toric resource that you be- YEARS OR MORE AFTER commonly known as 305 3250 Good Things to Eat 5100 Business 2 br, 1 b, unfurn, steps to Call 227-1795
318 South 7th Street, lieve might be affected. THE DECEDENT'S'DATE AVE D, PORT ST JOE, FL 3260 Health & Fitness Opportunitles 2 br, ba, unfur, steps to
Wewahitchka, from. 6:30 January 29, 2009 OF DEATH IS BARRED. 32456 has been filed 3270 Jewelry/Clothing 5110- Money to Lend the beach, pool, utilities Gulfaire
a.m., E.T until 4:30 p.m., -February 5, 12, 2009 against you and you are 3280 Machinery/ ncl. Mexico Beach. $1000 Executive, 1 br, private
E.T., Monday thru Thurs- 9926S The date of first publica- required to serve a copy of 3290 Equip uipmentmo. Call 850-544-2218 garden, w/d, all elec.g
day. Specifications may be NOTICE OF tion of this Notice is Janu- your written defenses, if 3300 Miscellaneous bright. Will take pets. .o
obtained and bids should SHERIFF'S SALE ary 29, 2009. any, to it on Michelle 3310 Musical Instruments 5100 3 br 1.5 ba, new carpet Private Beach, pool, tennis
be turned in at the Office Garcia Gilbert of Kass, 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ ALL CASH 1911 Cypress Ave. Large courts, $695 mo. 639-2690
of the Clerk tothe Boardof NOTICE IS HEREBY Personal Representative: Shuler, Solomon, Spector, 3330- Restaurant/Hotel BUSINESS! fenced yard with deck. or832-9702
County Commissioners, GIVEN THAT PURSUANT Judy Elizabeth Brannon Foyle & Singer, PA., 3340 Sporting Goods Explosive, Great, neighborhood near
Room 148, Gulf CountyTO A FINAL JUDGEMENT 5147 Rowe Trail plaintiff's attorney, whose 3350 Tickets Buy & Sell) Explosive, new gourmet school. $725/mo. + 1st & House For Rent, in St. R ETTE
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. ISSUED IN THE CIRCUIT Pace, FL 32571 address is rP. Box 800, energy produetl Super En- last morent dep. 1 yr Joe Beach 3 b Call bGee-a me
Costing, Sr., Blvd., by Fri- COURT OF GULF Attorney for Personal Tampa, Florida 33601, rgy! Great Taste! 15 m- lease. Call 648-86297or 11Co a 0-BHome /
-day, February 6, 2009. COUNTY DATED DECEM- Representative: (813) 229-0900, on or be- chines, only $4995 867-3336 850-830-9342. 711- Beach ertyHome/
Any questions regarding BER 23, 2008 IN THE Charles A. Costin fore March 2, 2009, (or 30 3230 __1-800-536-4514 Ext 1142 Mexico Beach 3 br 1.5 7120 Property
this bid should be directed CAUSE WHEREIN WIL- Florida Bar No. 699070 days from the first date of PSJ, 308 15th St, Sat 8 ALL CASH 3 br, 1.5 ba, Mexico' be, 2 blocks from beach, 7130 -Condo/Townhouse
to Chris Wood at () LIAM H. CARR, JR. WAS Post Office Box 98 publication, whichever is am-3 pm. Lots of treas- Beach, Canal Front, boat $600 mo, $500 sec. no 7140-Farots &Rancres
639-2238. PLAINTIFF, AND HAROLD Port St. Joe, FL 32457 later) and file the original ures, Clothes, furniture, BUSINESS! dock, fp, no pet's, $1,000 et, ref. 850-648-5058, 7160- Mobile HomesLts
Please indicate on enve- B. KEELS, SR.; LINDA E. Telephone: (850) 227-1159 with the Clerk of this Court household items, junk and Explosive, new gourmet mo $1,000 dep. Cell 850-340-1994 7170 Waterfront
lope YOUR NAME, that KEELS; AND STEVEN January 29, 2009 either before service on much much more!! energy product! Super En- 850-648-5045 7180 Investment
this s a SEALED BID and CLAY KEELS WAS DE- February 5, 2009 the Plaintiffs attorney or ergy! Great Tastel 15 ma- Property
includethe BID NUMBER FENDANT BEING CASE 9953S immediately thereafter; chines, 'only $4995 7190-Out-of-Town
on what the bid is for NO. 08-511-CA. NOTICE otherwise, adefault ill e 1-800-536-4514 Ext 1142 Real Estate
entered against you for the 3240 Mexico Beach/TAFB Nice, 7200
ids will be received unti JOSEPH NUGENT, AS THE CITYOF PORT ST relief demande in the Reuger Mini4 Stainless 1 $650, C/HA, Garage,
SHERIFF OF, GULF JOE WILL HOLD A PLAN- Complaint. range rifle, latest model,208 1oth St,3 br $650 mo$31br,2Pelic aralk
Friday February 6, 2009 at COUNTY, FLORIDA WILL NING AND DEVELOPplus E / e m an e a and $600 deposit. New$'' R eal Esa e 8067
4:30 p.m., E.T, at the Of- HAVE LEVIED UPON ALL MENT REVIEW SPECIA Dated : January 20, 2009 $700 obo, 850-728-0975 carpet. Please call Real Estate 850-647-2473 I 7100
fice of the Clerk of Court, THAVER TLEVDU NL MEANT REVIEW SPECIAL__ EI
1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., THE-RIGHT TITLEANDIN- MEETING.- HE C T"229-6066 for appt. MEXICO
Pot TEREST OF THE ODE- CLERKOF THEOURT I P ___________________
Blvd., Room 148, Port FENDNT STEVEN CLAY WHEN: Honorable Rebecca L. Century 21 Gulf Coast Re- BEACH-3 BR 2
Joe, Florida 32456. Bids KEELS IN THE INTEREST WHEN Norris 3290 ay long term rentals avail- BA Port St Joe By
will be opened at this KEELSOF A 2004 WHITEER CHEV Tuesday, February 3, 2009 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Needed A E lr long term rentals avail- BAable Owner
same location on February Blvd, Rm 148 Needed-Coronado #32 br, 1.5 b Owner
The Gulf County Board of G25V 163227 00 PortSt. Joe Florida 32456 Large Wheel Chair for eld 6100-Business/ 731 Hwy 98 $850 per 418 Texas Ave 1 Yr 4 br, 2 be LR, DR
TITLE #89741174, FL' By: Jasmine Hysmith early women. Call Commerciat
CoThe Gulfnty Commissiounty Board of TITLE #89741174 By Jasmne Hys- 53-820 6110- Apartments month Lease; $850/ mo; $850/ kitchen/den, 1 acre land,
County Commissionrs TAGF614AF AND ONTHE Deputy Clerk 850-653-8620 6120- Beach Rentals Destiny #1 2br, 1ba 115- Dep, NoPets/ No Smok- fncd in, 1 mi. from new Sa-
has implemented a Local 24TH DAY OF FEBRUARY WHERE. 6130 Condo/ownhouse 40th St. $550 per month ing. Single Family Ranch. cred Heart hosp in the
Bidders PreFPBDSence Polcy 2009 AT THE FRONT Commissioners Chamber If you are a person with a 0140- House Rentals Gulf Point. #4 2br, 2.5 ba Credit/References Re- county, good location for
interested in bidding this THGU SUBJECT: disability who needsany6150- Roommatr RWanted 7172 Hwy 98 $1000 per quired. 804-815-6577. p workers/octor's of-
project, as a local s biddI N P ORTS O UE, Variance Request accommodation in order 6170- Mobile Home/Lot month
project, as a follocareq bider IN PORT ST JOE, FLR-to participate in this pro-180- Out-of-Town Rentals Indian Lagoon Cottages 3 Port St Joe only, call 227-3100
musnt follow t Rhe requtionre- IDA AT THE HOUR OF All persons are invited to ceeding, you are entitled, 610 Timeshare Rentals br, 2 be SR-30 Indian Pass 131 Bridgeport 3br, 2 ba, Port St. Joe, St. George
2009-02 which Resaybe ob 11:00 A.M.E.ST OR AS ttend these eetings. at no cost to you, to the 6200 -Vacation Rentals $50 per month $850 127 Bellamy Circle3 Island and St James Bay
taed of fromthe erk's SOON AS POSSIBLE I Any person whodecides provision of certain assis- Palmetto Plantation 3 br, 3 br, 2 be, $800116 Hunter Previously Bank Owned
tainted 'of from the Clerk'sance. Please contact be 1120 15th St. er Circle 3 br, 1 be, $750
dress. T he Gulf County e AdWILL OFFER SAID PROB t appeal any decision tnce. Pease contact EMPLOYM802.5 Property. Priced way below
dress. The Gulf County ERTYATPUBLICOUTCRYmade by the Board with Clerk of the Court, 1000 100 month Call Ell 850-227-5152 market value! Prices start
BoadofCountyCommis JECTLL THE SAME 5th Street, Port St. Joe, 4100- HelpWanted Palmetto Plantation 2-14 Port St Joe, 2 br 1 be, up- ing at $35,000. Please call
Board of County Commis-g EN TOALL T PRIOR respect to any matter con- Florida 32456, phone (850) 4130 Employment Building for Ise in Gulf t br, 3 be 112015th Street stairs, CH&A $550 mo no CountsReal Estate Group
sioners reserves the right i S TENCUMBRANCES sidered at said meeting 229-6113 within 2 working normatin County, (St. Joe), New $975 per month smoking or pets. t 850-2493615.
to reject any o all bids ANDJUDGEMENTS, IF leed a or d fou eceof this o d f 5,000sf, warehouse w/of-Paradise Porch 2 br, 2 bea 850-899-0149
deemed in the best inter- HIGHEST proceedings, and for such ntieif ou are hearing fices, adjacent to air strip, 9135 Cockles Ave. $650
est ofthe County. O IES purpose may need to n- E. of St. Joe, will Ise w/ per month Spacious gulf view Mex-
BIDDER OR BIDDERS recordor voice impaired, call 4100 per month Spacious gulf view Mex-
GULF COUNTY BOARD ORE P sure that a verbatim 1-800-955-8771. Conf- OT w/ owner fin 46avail. Surf & Sands unit 30-1 2 ico Bch, half block from 7150
GULF COUNTY BOARD CEEDS TO BE APPLIED of the proceedings is January 292009Conflict Management Call 850-819-4600 or br, 2 ba 109-30th St. $580 gulf, 2 br, 1 be, deck, car- WA
NTY ISION AS FOR AS MAY BE TO teti o anrdi February 5, 2009 Coordinator 850763-3921per month port, C/HA, W/D, D/W, NT
COUNTY COMMISSION-THE PAYMENTOF.COSTS cludes the testimon and The Florida Fish and Wild Convenience store down- Surf & Sands unit 42-A & $1050 mo util incl. 850
ERSNathan r. AND SATISFACTION OF evidence upon which the life Conservation Commis- town Apalachicola, 47 Ave 42-b 2 br, 2 ba 121- 42ncd 899-0149 Apalachicola Area: 1/2 1
/s/ Nathan Peters, THE ABOVE DESCRIBED appeal is be based. Thesion is seeking a conflict E. Call 850-899-4512 or St. $650 per month acre wooded, vacant par-
/s/ hairman EXECUTION. Planning and Development 9976S management and outreach 850-227-5052 for info. Surf & Sands unit 42-C 4 el suitable for S/F Modu-
Attest:./s/Rebecca L. Nor- Review Board of the City of PUBLIC NOTICE specialist for a 1-year con- br, 2 ba 121-42ncd St. AmericaS lar Home, non-waterfront,
SHERIFF Port St. Je, Florida will tract. The candidate will $850 per month access road and electric
January 22, 29, 2009 JOSEPH NUGENT not provide a verbatim rec- NOTICE IS HEREBY work with government, citi- Ponderosa #18 3 br, 2 ba Mini available. 727-515-8537
9899S ord of this meeting. GIVEN that Representative zens, and businesses to #18 Ponderosa Pines Dr.
INTHEFOURTEENTHJU- IN ACCORDANCE WITH IN ACCORDANCE WITH Patronis, on behalf of the reduce human-bear con- Available Dec.1st $850 per month Storag
DICIAL CIRCUIT EEIN AND THE AMERICA WITH DIS THE AMERICCORDANCE WITH Gulf County Board of flicts. Duties involve work- 1000 sq.ft. Call 850-648-5449 or
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN A BILITIES AC WITH DIS- THE AMERICANS WITH County Commissioners, is ng with public officials, co- Consisting of 850-229-1200 for more in-
FLORIDA GULF COUNTY, WITH ABILIACT PERSONS DISABILITIES ACT, per- filing a local bill to be con- ordinating volunteers, and 3-Offices formation 18501
NEED A SPECIAL AC- sons needing special ac sidered during the 2009 delivering presentations. 1-ADA Bathroom
BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK, COMMODATIONTOPAR- co odations to partici- regular legislative session. Must to be a self-directed 500 sq.ft. Warehouse 229-8014
Plaintiff, TICIPATE IN THE PRO- pate in this proceedings The proposed legislation professional who is inde- MINISTORAGE
CEEDING SHOULD CON- should contactPauline requires the Department of pendent, motivated, and $850.00/mo Gross Climate and AUOMO MARINE
vs. TACT NO LATER THAN Pnorts,Jo Ciat C ity Environmental Protection, possesses excellent com- 1.. POt St. JO Non-Climate oREC NAL
SEVEN DAYS PRIOR TO e, ity Hall, notwithstanding section munication and problem America's Antiqe C ci
KAY W EUBANKS and THE PROCEEDING AT elephone261 Number: 161.053, FS., to permit for solving skills. Experience Mini-Storage and 229-6200 n s 8110- Cars
AMY LYNN EUBANKS, 850-227-1115 (850) a single family dwelling on in conflict management or 8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
Defendants. January 29, 2009 THE CITY OF PORT ST a parcel if: the parcel is lo- outreach is required. Can- Office Complex Boal/RV storage 8130- Trucks
February 5,12,19, 2009 JO Y T cated in Gulf County; the didate is responsible for 850-229-8014 814 7400 a office space 8140- Vans
CASE NO. 0123-CA 9946S Pauline Pendarvis applicant demonstrates project-related costs such 481507-Commercial
CASEN.08123-CA 9946S Pauline Pendrvis that the owner of the par- as travel and lodging, and 478-451-7761 810- Motorcycles
NOTICE OF SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT City Clerk cl for which the single will work in Franklin Hurry! We on have a few AcPasrt s
FOR GULF COUNTY, January 29,2009 family dwelling is pro- County, Florida. Compen- B.I IJe ef7 'o &es lees8210-Boatls
NOTICE IS HEREBY FLORIDA 9955S posed does not own an- sation is $35,000. Email a 8220- Personal Watercraft
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum- PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE OF other parcel immediately cover .letter and resume r| e t CottageS ft 8230 Sailboats
mary Final Judgment of PUBLIC SALE adjacent to and landward with 3 references to 8240 Boat & Marine
IN RE: ESTATE OFof the parcel for which the david telesco myfwc.com 1 br, 1 ba & 2 br, apart- b i ti Supplies
Foreclosuredated January RUTH ADAMS HENDRIX Hwe pry 22 Storage w el foposed;whic the dy Februe 6 2009. ment. unfurn electric/water In a beach access coiunifwit pools, plygr0unds, cub 8310- AircraftUAviatioe
15, 2009, and entered in Hwy 22 Storage .del ,ing Isop8320-ed;ith/poltFRoadaryV6bc00es
Civil Action No. 08-123-CA Deceased. 1249 Hwy 22 proposed single family .I r inc Tile floors, part cy- hs a lbs. ril ale W e aa nab 8330- C ampers & TradVhiles
of the Circuit Court of the .Wewahitchka, Florida dwelling is located land- ogisti transportation press paneng, private i 8340- Motorhomes
Fourteenh Judicial Circuit File Number 08-79PR ward of the frontal dune deck 1 block from be ch
in and for Gulf County, NOTICE OF #14 Jennie Hurley structure; and the pro- Driver Trainees 4 0 4 4 0 2 5 5 73 3br/3.5b..............................................1,050
Florida, wherein the parties ADMINISTRATION #48 Jason Lowery posed single family dwell- NEEDED 850-653-6459
were the plaintiff, BAYSIDE #70 Michelle Wilden ing will be as far landward br/. .................................................8 210
SAVINGS BANK, arid the T n istr. .a of the #99 Amber Sorensen on its parcel as is practica- No CDL? No Problem! 2 br, 1 ba 191/2 ft palm beach 2007
defendants, KAY W. The administration of the ble without being located: Apartments Hiland 18666281334 Due to health problems
EUBANKS and AMY LYNN estate of RUTH ADAMS Units wjll be opened and seaward of or on the Earn up to $900/wk. Home View. Call Phil 227-2112 must sell 115 HP 4 stroke.
EUBANKS, I will sell to the ENDRIX deceased, merchandise sold or frontal dune. weekends with TMC. Comn- or Kenny 227-7241 for Southen Coastll Mangemnent 850.229.1350 Very few hrs. Call for
highest and best bidder whose date of death was removed if payments are January 29, 2009 pany endorsed CDL Train- more info LONG TERM RENTALS Is el 80-832-2040 or
for cash, at 11:00 .a.m. September 20, 2008 an not brought up to date by ing 1-866-280-5309 m S t ailiw 850-229-1542
(Eastern Time) on the 26th whose social security ch 13,2009 at 8:30.
day of February, 2009 at number is 256-09-3857, is Mnarc 3, 2009 at 8:30. ___________ _______*
the front door of theGufCourt for Gulf County, February 5, 2009J6120 Port St.Joe C om m racial
County Courthouse, Port Fd5Ss 9 S Sale or Lease, Mexico
St. Joe. Florida, thethe address of which is IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Beach Great location. 1S ace for Iea se
following-described teal Gulf County Courthouse, OF THE FOURTEENTH The Gulf County Board of County block to Beach, 3br, 2be, S pace for Lease
property as set forth in 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF MH, deck, $199,000 con-
said Final Judgment of vd, PortSt. Jo Florida FLORIDA, AND FOR Commissioners is accepting applica- sider all serious offers or 6 Prime Retail Space
Foreclosure 32456. The names and ad- GULF COUNTY tions for fully Certified Corrections mo min. le. $875 mo +
Commence at the North- .- .... Officers. Full-time and part-time po- 803-397-4869 1800sf tenant improvements negotiable; $1800/mo gross
3, PHILLIPS SUBDIVI- sitions are available. Applications 325 Reid Avenue
SION, UNIT pNO. 1,o r and a complete job description are 4500sf flex space; corner location; $2500/mo gross
Pag 32, Public Records available in our Human Resources -- -- nell space; occupant ready; $4500/mo
and extend a line South Office (1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. 6 -p i omod-gross
along the East R/W line of Blvd., Port St. Joe, Robert Moore BAYFRONT 310 Reid Avenue
the Point of Beginning at of w .Admin Building Room 301) or at i TOWNHOME I 5750sf Suite B; perfect for clothing furniture retailer; $3000/mo N
Lot 1, Block 3, of said sub- www.gulfcountygovemment.com I
division; from this Point of Full time positions start at $27,040 I Watch beautiful sunsets I Office Space
Beginning turn 47D00' Family Daycare pa m p b from this wonderful I 452 Fourth Street
rig he n ast e- Home Childcare wparttime position pay wil be based t hom Exquisitely
scribed above for 40.0 Home.. .... =Y ow n ,, ,xu R1, Office space-576+/-sf, $800.00 per month (include utilities)


feet; thence turn 9000 care daytime, night ime
left for 150 feet, more or Has openings for four full and overnight on week- I homes on four lovely I 680sf- well appoint ross (mc. utilities)
less, to the mean high time children. Days are: ends. Housework, shop- Applications -b landscaped acres, with pC(Bayside Building) rA g w- o
water line of the Intra- mon-fri. from 8:am to 5:pm ing, in your home. Experi- Applications will be accepted un- pier. Close to town. ar- (aysideuilding)
coastal Canal; thence turn we charge $100.00 a ence with Alzheimers, se- til 5:00 p.m., E.T. on January 29, I lne 678-300-1275/I 310 Reid Avenue
left along said mean high week, Please call for more nile dementia, and special I dpdwpoperties@yahoo.co I 1116sf Suite C; finished office space; lobby area with two
water line for 208 feet, information at: 227-3831. needs child or adult. Call 2009 at the Gulf County Human m (possible lease office suites and filing/storage room; $1000/mo NNN
Sotheastor erss, oftLo the We are located in port st. 850-320-5156 Refs avail Resources Office. For more infor- purchase) 322 Long Avenue
SoutheastaCornersofdLot3,o O e r6- -
Blockdsio3,ofthenaforesaid .mation, please contact Human Re- For Rent Duplex 1000sf move-in ready; $900/mo gross
left along the South SELL ALL YOUR sources Director Denise Manuel at 2 Bedroome 1/2Bath Warehouse / Flex Space
sion for 255 feet, more or ITEMS Tired of weaking (850) 229-5335. Room, Elevator, Swimm- 110 Trade Circle West
less, to the point of Begin- waterlines in your ing Pool, Game Room, "22500sf 12500sf PSJ Commerce Park, flex space, $5.25psf/
ning; this parcel of land is through classified. Mobile Home? T.V., Ice Machine, Laundry NNN (inc. water/sewer)
in Section 5, Township 6 Full waterline replacment, Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free oom Fully Furnished, in
South, Range 11 West, CALL for extreamly reasonable Cont Drug -F e cluudes .Elec Power & Exclusively
Gulf County, Florida; TO- rates, Ray Maiden Plumb- Workplace Policy and is an Equal Water, garbage pickup Marketed Exclusively by:
GETHER with a 1994 mo- 747-5020 ngCompany 850-0 pportunity/ Affirmative Action E on0 2 i East 850-229-6373
bilehomeiD#039993A & -5717or 850-642122 OpportuityAction E L oationC30 2 m East 850-229-6373
039993B which is perma- -. ployer, pass Raw Bar on left




Thursday, January 29, 2009


--2 I Th StrLoa


From page B1


Kristen Bird, Port St. Joe Elementary


Joy Zayin Spires, 10, Port St. Joe


Sydnee O'Donnell, 9, St. Joe Beach


Alexis Wilson, Port St. Joe Elementary


Seth Goodwin, 12, Wewahitchka


Rebecca Kerigan, Port St. Joe Elementary


Destiny McLemore, 10, Wewahitchka
.. . . . ,- ^ ..^ ;- ;- .;: ;**


Eric Reid, 8, Port St. Joe


Savanna Stager, 16, Port St. Joe


Khaliyah Johnson, 9, Port St. Joe


Ob,


k *',,


Local


B 12 I The Star




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