Group Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.).
Title: The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03662
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Star
Publisher: Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Publication Date: December 18, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028419
Volume ID: VID03662
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
alephbibnum - 000358020
lccn - sn 95047323

Full Text





IL


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937


Bonfire benefits Autism Center


Page B1

Thursday, December 18, 2008 www.starf I. com 50(


An aerial view of the planned lease agreement between the Port of Port St. Joe and the St. Joe Company.







A PORT IN A STORM


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Some remembered what once was,: and
others envisioned what could be, but all
who gathered Tuesday agreed a signifi-
cant milestone had been achieved.
Under a sun-dappled sky with the crys-
talline waters of St. Joseph Bay providing
a postcard backdrop, signatures were af-
fixed to a lease agreement that is aimed.
at injecting the port, in upper-case letters,
back into Port St. Joe.
The Port of Port St. Joe and the .St. Joe
Company formally ratified a long-term
lease agreement that provides the Port
Authority with waterfront access to the
bay and Intracoastal Waterway to expand
port operations while also agreeing on a
short-term lease for a portion of the old
paper mill site bulkhead to facilitate the
immediate start-up of operations by the
port.
Port officials also announced they are
near an agreement with Gulf Cargo Fa-
cilities (GCF) of Port St. Joe LLC to move
as much as 1 million tons of aggregate
through the port annually beginning in
2009.
GCF already is operating on a large
scale in Gulf County, charged with bring-
ing in the immense granite boulders that


will be. used to reinforce the so-called
Stump Hole area of State 30-E, to protect
the lone land artery to St. Joseph Penin-
sula and Cape San Bias.
The aggregate, used for such things as
roads and road beds, will be transported
by rail throughout the region.
"(The lease agreements are) giving us
the footprint," said Port Authority chair-
man Allen Cox. "We can now begin get-
ting customers and ships into the port and
starting to create jobs.
"This is a strategic resource for the
state, the only deepwater port in the
Southeast that has not been developed."


The agreements signed on Tuesday
provide the Port Authority a 41-year lease
on a 63-acre site that is bordered by the
bay, Gulf County Canal and U.S. 98, under
the George Tapper Bridge.
The Port Authority already purchased
from St. Joe a 68-acre site across U.S. 98
from the lease site and began work earlier
this year on bulkhead construction and
dredging to allow smaller draft ships ac-
cess to the port facility.
The 63-acre leased site was seen as es-
sential for future port expansion because it
is roughly the place where the waterfront
is closest to the deepest water in the bay
and therefore advantageous to accessing
the shipping channel.
The two parcels are considered contig-
uous given the long and high bridge clear-
ance over the two sites, allowing for cargo,
to move freely between the two.
The second lease agreement lasts three
years and is for 20 acres, with an option for
another 20 acres, on the old paper mill site
with access to roughly 1,000 feet, or more
than half, of the existing bulkhead, which
been has largely dormant since the paper
mill was shuttered in 1998.
That will allow the port to begin rev-
enue-generating operations immediately

See PORT A9


County




approves




special



election


By Tim Croft
Star News.Editor
Having stirred the pot enough to
draw a lawsuit from the Gulf County
School Board, the Board of County
Commissioners on Tuesday changed
course a third time.
By a unanimous 5-0 vote, county
commissioners agreed to call for a
special election in March 2009 to al-
low voters' to consider a one-mill ad-
ditional levy referendum proposed by
the school board.
Commissioners initially voted the
same way in late November only to
reverse last week and vote 3-2 to deny
the school board's request for a spe-
cial election.
The sticking point was the sunset
of a half-cent sales tax which serves
as collateral for the 1997 series bonds
used to fund capital improvements at
Port St. Joe Elementary School.
Originally, Superintendent of
Schools Tim Wilder told commission-
ers the school board would retire the
tax and bonds eight years early;' in
June of next year, prior to the certifi-
cation of tax rolls and the preparation
of Truth in Millage (TRIM) notices.
However, as the school board in-
formed the county last week and as
was reiterated Tuesday by county
commissioner Nathan Peters Jr., any
sales tax begins on the first calendar
day of the year and only ends on the
last day of the calendar year.
Though the school board will retire
the bonds nearly eight years early
and has passed a resolution mapping
that timeline, the sales tax will be col-
lected through the end of 2009 by the
Florida Department of Revenue.
.That caused last week's reversal of
approval from county commissioners,
See ELECTION A7


Storm system whips up a froth


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The warnings had been issued
for two days: A storm system
spanning from the Great Plains
to the Gulf of Mexico was going to
make things pretty miserable in
the county last Thursday and Fri-
day, with forecasts of more than
three inches of rain.
Thursday brought sporadic
showers of varying intensity until
the bottom dropped out late in the
afternoon.
High waves churned the bay
and the gulf into a frenzy, white
caps dominating a view of the
water regardless of the vantage
point. Several businesses and
homes along Simmons Bayou
were inundated with water, which
also washed over portions of U.S.
98 in Port St. Joe.
Front yards were flooded, the
boat basin at Frank Pate Park all
but disappeared and the white
caps buffeted the gazebo at the
end of the rock pier that extends
from the park.
The Stump Hole was kept open,
even though some of the rocks from


the revetment were tossed onto
the roadway like Ping-pong balls,
and the beach restoration project
area lost some sand but generally
held its own in one of those winter
storms that have brutalized the
peninsula in recent years.
The National Weather Service
recorded sustained winds of 39
mph at one point on Thursday eve-
ning, not far below tropical storm
intensity and almost identical
to what the county experienced
- in terms of wind, high surf and
waves when Hurricane Gustav
passed hundreds of miles to the
south during the summer.
"This was a whole lot like Gus-
tav," said county emergency man-
ager Marshall Nelson concerning
the county impacts.
Another concern was river
flooding, but the Apalachicola
River crested just over 20 feet on
Monday and created some minor
flooding in the north end of the
county that was receding Tuesday,
and the Chipola River appeared
to pose little threat, emergency
management officials said.
Thursday was a different story.
"I have never seen a river rise


so fast," said county commissioner
Carmen McLemore on Tuesday.
"You could watch it rise. I have
never seen it come up so fast."
Back to the beach restoration
project, as county officials are
working to access more grant
money to address several issues.
The county hopes to secure
mitigation money from the im-
pacts of Gustav early next year
- the restoration project is ex-
pected to wrap up late this month
or early next month at which time
the company contracted for the
project will travel to Mississippi
for a 90-day job to both touch
up areas where sand was lost
during Gustav and extend the
restoration project to the Stump
Hole to provide additional protec-
tion to State 30-E.
The reinforcement of the re-
vetment is already underway as
rocks for the task began to arrive
in the county this week. Ferry-
ing the rocks to the site for the
beginning of the reinforcement
project was expected to begin
Wednesday.


PHUIU5 BY IIM .KUfI | The star
Water rolls over U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. Below,. The
boat basin at Frank Pate Park disappears under the waves.


O FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS INTERACTIVE
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Subscribe to The Star
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For your hometown paper
delivered to your home!


Opinion..... .......................... A4
Letters to the Editor................. A5
Sports.............................................. Al 0
Obituaries.................................... B4


Church N ews............................... B5
Law Enforcement....................... B7
School N ews................................ B6
Legals ........................................... B8


Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET
Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278
Classified deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020


a~


TABLE OF CONTENTS





A2 I The Star


Local


Thursday, December 18,2008


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
The greening of Gulf
County continues.
The Florida Department
of Environmental Protection
recently designated the Port
Inn and MainStay Suites
"Florida Green Lodges."
The Port St. Joe facilities,
owned by David and Trish
Warriner, join Indian Pass'
Turtle Beach Inn in being
recognized by the state for
their environmentally friend-
ly practices.
The DEP reports that 65
percent of all Gulf County
transient lodging facilities
are now green, an impres-
sive statistic for a small


LODGING
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection


county.
The Port Inn and Main-
Stay Suites earned DEP's
One Palm certification by
demonstrating water con-
servation, energy efficiency,
waste reduction and clean
air practices.


Turtle Beach Inn's Steph-
anie Petrie mentored Port
Inn manager Kaycee Krum
and MainStay Suites manag-
er Dave Ashbrook through
the lengthy process, which
began in February.
By mentoring other lodg-
ing facilities, Petrie will help
Turtle Beach Inn earn its
Three Palm certification.
The Inn earned its Second
Palm this year by improving
upon its environmental ef-
forts from the previous year.
In making their facilities
green, Krum and Ashbrook
got a few lucky breaks.
Both the Port Inn and
MainStay already had low
flow shower heads and fau-
See GREEN A3


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Port Inn Manager Kaycee Krum and MainStay Suites Manager Dave Ashbrook
show off a flag honoring the Inn's One Palm certification.


Saturday (Decem6er 20V
for refreshments and holiday sales


25-50 % off or shopping CocaCy.


101 Good Morning Street
Windmark Village Center
Open Sunday,
December 21st 12:00-4:00
and
Monday and Tuesday.
December 22 and 23rd from 10 5
Closed Christmas Eve and we
re-open,
Monday December 29th
'til the New Year!
Happy Holidays!


4 1


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cutting tasks around the home a


FS 45 TRIMMER


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STIHL PolyCut'" head
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Includes many of the excellent design
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706 1st Street, Port St Joe, FL

227-2112

Gift Certificates Available


stihiusa.com @2008STIHL Areyou readyforaSTIHL?
** --- -- 7


Bicycles For C4ri4tmas
In honor and loving memory of Valerie Thomas,
please join Valerie's family and friends in continuing
her great generosity and support of her community by
donating a bicycle for a needy child this Christmas
season.
You can donate by either making a deposit of any
amount to "Valerie's Memorial Fund" at Capital City
Bank here in Port St Joe branch or by donating a new
or used (in good repair) bike for children of all ages.
Capital City Bank will be taking your donated bikes in
their lobby during normal banking hours. Arrangements
also can be made for picking up your bike donation by
calling Barbara Sowers at 227.4063.
Thank you in advance for allowing us to keep Val's
great gift of giving to continue. We will continue this.
year round so that needy children can receive a bike
for his/her Birthday. God Bless you and have a Merry
Christmas and a Happy New Year!
..: **


M,
"WHICH ONE COSTS MORE TO INSURE?"


Call Us Before You Buy One.
ROY SMITH, ANDY SMITH,
LAURA RAMSEY, CMIY WARD, KAREN CLARK


ANN AN aIIstate
HAN NIN You're in good hands.
INSURANCE


Phone (850) 227-1133


m Iwwt


MainStay, Port Inn go green


*s


I (W





Thursday, December 18,2008


Local


GREEN from page A2


cets, and MainStay has been using
compact fluorescent lights since open-
ing its doors.
The Port Inn switched 90 percent of
its lights to compact fluorescents (iden-
tified by their spiral shape).
STo purify the air, Krum and Ash-
brook replaced existing air filters with
those having a Minimum Efficiency
Rating Value (MERV) of 8 or higher.
Two eco-friendly "green" cleaners,
manufactured by Ecolab, replaced ex-
isting chemical cleaners.
Waste reduction proved one of the
managers' trickier challenges.
Because the county lacks a recy-
cling program, Krum and Ashbrook
transport aluminum cans to Franklin
County and Mexico Beach for recy-
cling.
The Port Inn and MainStay also re-
use previously discarded items, like pa-
per and stained washcloths and donate
others, like old linens and newspapers,
to the Humane Society.
In earning the One Palm certifica-
tion, Krum and Ashbrook were also
tasked with communicating the new
policies to their staff and customers.
Binders detailing the facilities'
green practices were placed in all guest
rooms and staff members began turn-
ing off lights in vacant rooms and elimi-
nating waste.
"Consciously, you have to think
about it everyday. You have to think
green," said Ashbrook, who has even
begun recycling cans at home.
DEP officials completed a final in-
spection of the facilities on Dec. 9, and
awarded both sites certificates and
One Palm flags.
"We both got our Palm within 30
minutes of each other," said Ashbrook,
noting for the record, "I got mine first."
Ashbrook and Krum have already
begun thinking about earning their
Second Palm, possibly by converting
the facilities' hot water heaters to solar.
Mentoring other area lodging facili-
ties is also on the list.


The owners of Port St. Joe's Tiki
Palm and 10th Street bed and break-
fasts have expressed an interest in pur-
suing the Green Lodge certification.
With the St. Joseph Peninsula State
Park on its way to becoming a Green
Lodge, Ashbrook predicts a domino ef-
fect.


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
MainStay Suites and the Port Inn
in Port St. Joe have been desig- '
nated by the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection as
certified Florida Green Lodges.
The facilities earned the distinction
by implementing environmentally
friendly policies.
"There's the possibility of us having
six in Gulf County. We could possibly
get that done by next year." .
Despite the hard work involved
in obtaining the certification, Krum
and Ashbrook encouraged other
lodging facilities to become Green
Lodges.
"Where we live is so beautiful.
Not to take care of it and keep it
pristine is insane," said Krum.
And where there's pristine prop-
erty, there are tourists looking for a
place to spend the night.
"Ecotourism is growing, every
day. People are traveling to destina-
tions that are green," said Ashbrook.
"Now we can promote we have a
green county."


The Star I A3


Cooperative Extension


Service to sponsor


Coggins Clinic Jan. 2


Equine test will cost $30


Dr. Carla Hubbard
will administer the
Coggins test Friday,
Jan. 2, 2009 at Michael
Traylor Arena at T.L.
James Park, starting at
8:00am CT.
The cost for the
clinic will be $30 and is
mainly for Wewa and
the general vicinity. A
clinic for Port St. Joe
and the general vicin-
ity will take place at a
later date.
If transporting hors-
es to the arena is a
problem please call the
Gulf County Extension
Office at 850-639-3200.
You must contact the
Gulf County Extension
Office at 850-639-3200
to be put on list for this
clinic by December 31,
2008.
The Coggins test is
a sensitive diagnostic
test for equine infec-
tious anemia developed
by Dr. Leroy Coggins in
the 1970's. Equine In-
fectious Anemia (EIA),
also known by horse-
men as "Swamp Fe-


* ver," is a horse disease
caused by a retrovirus
and transmitted by
bloodsucking insects,
such as the horse-fly
and deer-fly. EIA can
also be transmitted
through blood, saliva,
milk, and body secre-
tions.
Symptoms of EIA
include high fever, ane-
mia (due to the break-
down of red blood cells),
weakness, swelling of
the lower abdomen and
legs, weak pulse, and
irregular heartbeat.
The horse may die sud-
denly.
A negative Coggins
test is mandatory. in
Florida if transporting
horses.
If you travel with-
out a Coggins, you may
face a hefty fine.
A Coggins test
should be done on an
annual basis.
For more informa-
tion contact the Gulf
County Cooperative
Extension Service at
(850) 639-3200.


JAMES D. CAMPBELL, DDS, MS

ORTHODONTICS
This highly respected practice is dedicated to providing the finest
orthodontic care available, in surroundings that are peaceful and
relaxinrig. Dr. Campbell has been providing the latest orthodontic
treatment for 34 years. They feature: Invisalign, Standard Metal" Braces, Clear
Braces, Self Ligating Braces, and Ceramic Braces. Orthqdontics isn't just for
improving.your smile; orthodontic treatment also improves bad bites that affect the way
you chew and clean your teeth. The American Association of Orthodontists
recommends an orthodontic check-up at age seven and the average age to start braces
is 11 to 13. And it's never too late to do something about your smile. Adults can
correct crooked teeth, close spaces between their teeth and correct jaw
misalignment. Office hours are by appointment and new patients are welcomed. The
editors of this Medical Review are proud to recommend Dr. James D. Campbell and
his staff as our Orthodontics Practice of Choice.


Emerald Isle
Pulmonary Medicine
TIMOTHY G. MORIARTY, MD, FCCP
Board Certified Internal and Pulmonary Medicine
Providing current, comprehensive health care in the diagnosis,
prevention and treatment of Pulmonary Care and Sleep Disorders, this highly regarded
practice treats illnesses ranging from the common cold and sinusitis to respiratory
failure, requiring intensive care and ventilator assistance. Dr. Moriarty specializes in the
treatment of: Emphysema, Chronic Bronchitis, Asthma, Pulmonary Fibrosis,
Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Lung & Breathing Disorders, Pneumonia, Sleep
Disorders and Occupational Lung Disease. Office hours are by appointment, Medicare
and most insurance is accepted and new patients are welcomed. The editors of this
Medical Review are pleased to feature Dr. Timothy G. Moriarty and the staff at Emerald
Isle Pulmonary Medicine for the quality of health care they bring to their patients.
850 872-0502
221 EAST 23RD STREET SUITE B PANAMA CITY


Helping tone
Helping the world hear better


Panama City
Your Local Independent Dispenser


850 229-6848 850 785-0278
325 LONG ST., PORT ST. JOE 7 WEST 23RD ST., PANAMA CITY
www.campbellsbraces.com




you have a choice with hospice care,
Hospice is a specialized form of home healthcare for patients wit life-limiting illnesses.
Hospice care can be provided in the home. hospital, long-term care facility or assisted
living facility.

At Emerald Coast Hospice, our focus is on living. Through compassion and teamwork.
our expert staff creates a kind. caring atmosphere for patients and their fambes.
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Medical social workers
Home health aides

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* Pain and symptom management
SBereavement program
* Reimbursed by Medicare /


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pliap crrntart u- at
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SKIN CARE FOR THE 21st CENTURY


JON R. WARD, MD MICHAEL A. STICKLER, MD
NICHOL C. RAULERSON, PA-C HEATHER WEST, PA-C
Board Certified
This highly regarded practice has been providing comprehensive care of skin for
patients of all ages. Dedicated to encouraging those with heavy sun exposure, to be
regularly examined because of increasing rates of skin cancer, they provide professional
care for: Diseases of the Skin, Hair and Nails, Acne, Skin Cancer Evaluation and
Treatment, (including MOHS Surgery), Hair Loss, Psoriasis, Eczema, and Rosacea.
Their aesthetic services include: Facial Rejuvenation for Aging Skin and Wrinkles,
Chemical Peels, Juvederm, Radiesse, and Botox. Same day and extended hours
appointments are available, new patients are welcomed, and most insurance is
accepted. The editors of this Medical Review are pleased to feature and recommend the
physicians and staff at Gulf Coast Dermatology as our Dermatology Practice of Choice.
850 233-DERM (3376)
2420 Jenks Avenue, Suite C-1, Panama City, FL 32405
www.gulfcoastderm.com
PLEASE CALL ABOUT OUR NEW PORT ST. JOE LOCATION, OPENING SOON.


Many hearing losses may be simply helped by the use of hearing aids. For
almost 70 years Beltone has combined the latest technology with unparalleled service.
They offer: FREE Hearing Tests, Digital Hearing Aids are Competitively Priced and
use The Exclusive Beltone Follow-up Program. The Panama City office hours are
Mon Fri, 8:30 4:30. You'll find Beltone's pricing very affordable, accepting most
insurance with Hearing Aid benefits. Beltone also offers many financing, plans, WAC.
They'll go out of their way to insure that you have been fit with an aid that will serve you
well, now and in the future. Call today to schedule your FREE consultation.
The editors of this Medical Review are pleased to recommend Beltone
Hearing Center for the quality of products and service they offer their patients.
850 763-0801 or 877 608-HEAR (4327)
2633 HIGHWAY 77 SUITE A PANAMA CITY


PA'


Nephrology Associates, PA
KIDNEY DISEASE & HYPERTENSION
RICHARD F. WALKER, JR., MD RONALD A. SINICROPE, MD
SCOTT E. DEAN, MD A. OUSSAMA RIFAI, MD
PATRICIA J. ANDERSON, MD TODD E. MINGA, MD
SUSAN COMPTON, MD


Specializing in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of kidney problems, this highly
regarded practice is currently accepting new referrals for evaluation of: Kidney
Disease, Hypertension, Diabetes, Hemodialysis, Home Dialysis and Training, and
Transplantation Evaluation, and Follow-up. This renowned practice has earned an
excellent reputation throughout our area and sees outpatient referrals by appointment.
The staff is proud to announce that Dr. Susan Compton has joined the practice. The
editors of this Medical Review are pleased to feature and commend Nephrology
Associates for the quality of healthcare they provide.
769-2158
504 NORTH MAC ARTHUR AVENUE PANAMA CITY




Emerald Coast
Research Associates
TIMOTHY G. MORIARTY, MD, FACCP MACIEJ TUMIEL, MD
Emerald Coast Research Associates is dedicated to improving
healthcare through clinical trials. Their clinical research team has
extensive knowledge regarding the conduct of clinical trials in the
areas of pulmonology and gastroenterology. Medical Director, Dr. Timothy Monarty,
has been involved in the research of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary
Disease/Emphysema since 1991. Dr. Tumiel, a board certified Gastroenterologist, has
been involved in the research of chronic constipation and Irritable Bowel Syndrome
since 2001. Trials are currently enrolling. Participants who qualify will receive nil study
related procedures at no cost, and may be compensated for time and travel. The editors
of this Medical Review are proud to feature Emerald Coast Research Associates for
the many benefits they hrinnq o our community.
For more information, please contact;
Jessica Elkins, RN, CCRC Director of Cllnical Research
850-785-6550
221 EAST 23RD STREET SUITE B, PANAMA CITY









A4 I The Star Ouinion


Thursday, December 18, 2008


OUR VIEW




History lesson


If the ongoing tussle between the county and the school
board over an election an election? is anything, it is a les-
son that sometime in the distant future will inform a histo-
rian about county government in the new millennium.
The issue flipped again this week, as a circuit court is-
sued a show cause order on Monday as part of a filing of a
lawsuit by the school board and the county commission held
a special meeting Tuesday morning to reverse course a third
time and approve the special election.
That will be the second special meeting in addition to
debating the issue during two regular meetings added to
the first circuit court intervention and the attorney billable
hours, for the county and school board, and who picks up the,
tab: taxpayers.
Commissioners want to have it both ways.
They don't want any additional burden on taxpayers, they
proudly assert for the cameras, as if they are the final vote
on the school referendum.
Voters are, not any elected officials.
And commissioners spew this kind of soapbox rhetoric
despite having raised property taxes a nibble after binging
most of the decade- in the past year.
They weave their populist poppycock despite adding to
the sales tax with few strings attached and adding to the gas
tax, also in the past year.
They harp against a governing body that will actually pay
its bonds off eight years early, meanwhile not long ago com-
missioners chose to consolidate the county's long-term debt
while adding to it and extending the lifespan of payments.
Commissioners also insist that the referendum should
have been held last month, when 80 percent of the county's
registered voters cast ballots in a historic election.
The one-mill question would have been more representa-
tive of the people's wishes compared to a special election in
March, commissioners insist.
Indeed, more than 7,200 voters cast ballots last month,
voting for President, sheriff, congressman, state attorney,
constitutional amendments and whether appellate judges
should be retained.
And inDistrict 5, all of 1,800 voters cast ballots, in District
1 it was 1,500 and in District 3 a whopping 1,300 voters repre-
sented the entire county. In each race, voters eligible to cast
a vote did not.
In 2006, Commissioner Billy Traylor, who has led the push
back against the school levy referendum despite paying no
ad valorem taxes in the county, was re-elected with a mere
892 votes cast, or 18 percent of the number who voted in the
race for the State Representative District 6 race won by
Jimmy Patronis.
What is the difference?
If the school referendum isn't representative in March,
how can the commission races in November be representa-
tive, or more importantly what do they represent?
The difference is the ability of some county commission-
ers to throw their weight around just for kicks and know that
at least two others will have his back because none of the
three want county-wide voting.
Given the lack of comments how else to explain the other
votes that constituted the majority last week as commission-
ers once again flip-flopped on an issue within the span of just
a, few days?
This flip-flop, a 3-2 vote against calling for the special
election last week, served as a complete reversal of the com-
mission's 5-0 approval the week prior.
This is the same sort of antics that have been witnessed
over the past few years on subjects from windstorm insur-
ance to county-wide voting to naming of parks to Mosquito
Control to economic development to the budget.
And in the case of the school board business, this postur-
ing comes while pushing what is largely a procedural func-
tion to the point that the school board is compelled to seek
relief in circuit court, where a judge issues a show-cause
order that gives commissioners 20 days to come up with a
plausible answer on why they are holding up the referen-
dum.
Every dime of it at taxpayer expense; every single dime
used as if public money was available to grind individual
axes at will.
And wasn't it just a few short weeks ago one commis-
sioner was talking about a time to heal divides, a time to stop
bashing one another? Some olive branch the county is car-
rying right now.
What, additionally, a lesson commissioners have provided
any casual observer in how this beast called county govern-
ment operates, in every sense of the word.
The priority isn't about public service, as it should be, par-
ticularly as times toughen for many. County government, too
often, boils down to how to operate.




....HE STAR

USPHS 518-880
Published Every Thursday at 135 West Highway 98
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Star
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone (850) 227-1278


PERIDICALRATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
PORT ST. JOE, FL.32457
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.38 year $15.90 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$33 year- $20 six months

TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the publishers do
not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for
such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Give the gift that lasts


* The economy has hit everybody
hard.
And with the holidays upon us
the stress about gifts and what
and how much and who spiral
through the brain like galaxies in a
Star Wars movie.
But some gifts
are just a phone.
call, e-mail or fax
machine away and 2
do not cost a thing
and can make a aI
genuine difference
in a youngster's life,
self-esteem, general TIM CROFT
outlook on life. Star news editor
That is to rec-
ognize their effort
on the athletic fields, to note that
they sacrificed, put in the work,
the hours when other things were
happening, the discipline to com-
pete in scholastic athletics.
This has become almost a sea-
sonal plea in this space, but as the
transition into basketball, soccer,
wrestling and then onto spring
sports, the plea is renewed.
Please, please, call in results of
games and tournaments and have
statistics at the ready.
The deadline for most any week
without some kind of national holi-
day is Monday at the end of the
day, the phone number is 227-7827
and the e-mail is timc@starfl.com.
The opportunity is always open to
any coach, athletic director or par-
ent willing to call in the games.
The economy has done its tune
on the newspaper business also.
These are challenging times and
we are trying to-do more with less.
That is why it is even more im-
portant to receive an assist from
those involved in athletics.
If it were up to me, every kid
out on the field, the mats, the
pitch, the diamond, would get their
names in the paper.


KEYBOARD

KLATTERINGS

For me, it's not all about foot-
ball and sports coverage should
not slide because football season
is over.
But as any reader could note,
even during football season, given
travel games and two county
teams, coverage needed an as-
sist and got it from a variety of
sources.
That is the nature of the beast
right now.
Unfortunately, once football
season is over, coverage becomes
even dicier as there are more
games during more nights of the
week, more teams, more sports
overall.
There is more of everything
and less of the resources we need
to get it all covered unless we can
get a hand from coaches, with a
little push from principals and
athletic directors to ensure that
everybody gets their fair share of
ink and newsprint and spot on the
Internet.
Because from here any child,
male or female, good or bad, are
all winners just for getting out
there and giving it their all.
All research shows athletics to
be one of the last true bastions of
discipline in our schools, particu-
larly high school.
There is something about
learning about team, about push-
ing yourself, about learning suc-
cess and failure on fields that can
prepare kids for life.
They should enjoy some re-
ward, whether they scored two
points.or 20, whether they knocked
in a goal or not, were pinned or
not, won or not.
And anybody who believes that


kids don't care is sadly mistaken.
From personal experience it
can be attested here that young
athletes keep track of their men-
tion in the paper, save those
scraps for books as keepsakes.
They want their accomplishments,
their effort, to be recognized.
But we can't do it alone. No
newspaper can.
It has long been a practice at
even the large dailies to rely on
local folks involved in scholastic
sports to provide results, game
highlights and statistics.
At a community newspaper it
seems even more relevant and
important because we want to
reflect the community and this
community cares very much about
its scholastic sports, from pee-wee
football and soccer right into high
school ball.
This one is a freebie, something
that can be provided a young ath-
lete that doesn't cost a dime, and
that is to get that child's name
into the local newspaper on those
sports pages.
Sure, it helps us, we are being
pragmatic after all, but the pas-
sion exists to honor the young-
sters who get up and get out and
try, no matter the result. Who
have the discipline to stick with it,
enjoy, relish it; for the sheer joy of
competition and athletic participa-
tion, for, at the most basic level,
the exercise everybody gets too
little of these days.
Consider it a gift of the heart,
to honor an athlete for forgoing in
these hectic times for youngsters,
in order to compete and be a part
of fabric that has warmed this
community through many a tough
summer, winter, fall and spring.
Remember, 227-7827 or timc@
starfl.com. Any assist would be
truly appreciated in this holiday
season and beyond.


HUNKER DOWN



It's not your father's Western Auto!


Shopping used to be
so simple. We needed a
baseball. We pooled our
money, went down to
Robert Hall's Western
Auto and purchased said
ball.
We didn't waste time
fooling around with com-
parative shopping. Only
one store in town had
baseballs. We didn't hook
up to eBay. We didn't
need a bell ringer sale.
We didn't have to fool
with coupons or rebates.
We parked our bikes
right beside the front
door. We didn't stand in
line. We didn't have to
fumble for a credit card.
We didn't sign nothing.
And we didn't have to
get up at four am to beat
them Johnsonius boys to
the store.
Mr. Hall thought-
fully kept enough Wilson
A1010 balls on the shelf'
for everybody.
We didn't waste any
time looking around. We
didn't have enough mon-
ey to buy anything else.
Nor did we really have an
inclination to do so.
This was back when
your wish list was basi-
cally one thing at a time.
We could buy a baseball
in under two minutes!.
Now, we might fight for
an hour over who got to
carry the new ball back
to the house but that is a
different story.
Christmas shopping
was just as simple. We
hinted around as to what
we wanted, making sure
it was in the "acceptable"
range.
It wouldn't do no good
to wish for a Browning
over/under or a televi-
sion set. They were way
too expensive. But a
good Case knife or anti-
magnetic, shock proof
Timex were great pos-
sibilities. Come to think
of it, I didn't Christmas


shop at all. I just
told Santa what I
wanted.
We had five
gifts under the
tree. One for each
of us. And you can
bet your bottom
dollar they were HUNKE
affordable and Kesley
bought locally. My
folks didn't range
far in their shopping hab-
its. If they couldn't buy
it from one of the mer-
chants up on the square,.
we didn't get it!
If Daddy couldn't pay
cash when the dealer
laid it on the counter
we didn't get it. Today's
society would think that
simple or plain or maybe
outright ridiculous.
Let me tell you, they
should have been at our
house on Christmas
morning...
As we grew shopping
did not necessarily get
more difficult. Mother
liked anything you
brought her. You could
come in holding a broken
willow branch with a fad-
ing white petal and she
would grab a vase and
oooh and awww for two
days. Work gloves suited
Dad just fine.
I figured I'd buy Leon
something when he quit
beating on me. And I'd
get David Mark whatever
he wanted just as soon as
he got old enough to ap-
preciate it.
I'm telling you we over
complicate this shopping
game today!
The first big purchase
I made was a pair of Levi
jeans. I was in junior
high and the chicks didn't
dig guys wearing those
cheap Tuf Nut britches.
I picked up trash at
the swimming pool "for
a while" to come up
with the four dollars and
twenty-five cents I need-
ed. You could say I was


R
y G


shopping. But ac-
tually I went uip to
the National Shirt
Shop, told Mr.
Beagles exactly
what I wanted and
he handed them
to me. I traded my
DOWN hard earned mon-
:olbert ey for a pair of
501's and walked
back to the house.
It was shopping ala
carte.
I was a little disap-
pointed when the girls
didn't flock to me the
first day I showed up in
my new jeans. If Daddy
would have only let me
grow my hair out like
Elvis! Maybe I should
have saved a little more
money and looked for one
of those trendy madras
shirts..
Billie Jean Barham
made shopping easy. I
dated her for a whole
year and she'd tell me ex-
actly what she wanted for
her birthday, Christmas,
Easter, Fourth of July,
Thanksgiving, Mule Day,
the second Tuesday after
the summer solstice.. I
had to find another job or
rob a bank! It didn't take
long to buy the Channel
#5 or the scarab bracelet
or the genuine Merino
wool sweater or the dia-
mond pendant. Shopping
was not the problem!
Fortunately, she ran off
with a piano player from
Dyersburg before I got to
the bank!
The first couple .of
years Cathy and I were
married Christmas shop-
ping was still fairly sim-
ple. She'd buy me a tool
box. I'd buy her a mixer.
It was a match made in
heaven!
I don't remember any
red tag, door buster or
pre dawn sales. We didn't
throw away catalogues
by the thousands or turn
off infomercials or try to


read through the dreaded
cash back incentive
clauses.
I thought all was right
with the world. Then we
had kids. I started look-
ing for He-men, Atari's,
live rodents, Dallas
Cowboy jerseys, multiple
swing sets, three wheel-
ers, Rick Flair's Wrestle-
mania, French hens, tur-
tle doves, baseball gloves
and a partridge in a pear
tree... And this was all
the same Christmas!
My brothers hapd kids.
And Cathy's family had
kids. And the kids mul-
tiplied and covered the
earth! Mattel and Tonka
heard about this, explo-
sion. Somebody invented
Walmart. Billie Jean
went to work for Rev-
lon. Microsoft jumped
into the fray. Wall Street
and ABC prods us into .
thinking the economy of
the entire free world de-
pends how many Christ-
mas gifts we purchase
for each other this "shop-
ping" season.
All of a sudden we are
pushing and shoving and
running and shouting
and standing in line to
get things I'm not so sure
we need in the first place.
Whew! It is enough to
take your breath away!
They have toys and gad-
gets today that Mr. Hall
never dreamed of.
The Sears and Roe-
buck Catalogue is not
the only one out there
enticing us with pretty
pictures.
And, naturally, we've
got to keep up with the
across-the-street neigh-
bors. It's the American
way.
I think we will be al-
right...just as long as we
pay cash.

Respectfully,
Kes


. l-,- *^ ?+









A5 I The Star Letters


Thursday, December 18,2008
a6


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Sunday Sales
Dear Editor:
The airing of my thoughts
are in response to the Mark
Lamberson letter regarding the
changes in Port St. Joe.
I have lived in Gulf County
on and off since 1979, almost 30
years. I always looked upon it
as unspoiled. In the years that
followed after I moved away,
I was amazed at the changes,
and rumors of changes that I
saw and heard on my weekend
visits. I never believed that, in
my lifetime, that we would see
the removal of our rights by The
St. Joe Company and the State
of Florida, that always bends to
them, to drive along the beach,
in the area that is now known
as Windmark Beach, known
to most of us that have been
around awhile, as the. Dixie
Belle curve.
I don't understand why the
big deal is about changing the
Sunday alcohol sales from the
current status after so many
years. Why fix what is not bro-
ken? Why not maintain some
dignity as one of the few towns
that does not find it necessary
to bow to the few that think that
this will significantly boost their
Sunday sales?


Selling on Sunday would im-
prove the economy in Port St.
Joe? How? People that didn't
purchase their Sunday suds
on Saturday would either drive
to Highland View, or Simmons
Bayou in earlier years. Also, a
local bar or two in the city lim-
its may have been closed to the
public on Sundays, but what a
crowd was there, at least in the
parking areas judging from the
cars and local lore........ if there
was a big game on television.
Perhaps I am uninformed. To
my knowledge, all of this start-
ed when a local business owner
whined about "losing custom-
ers" on Sunday because they
could not have a glass of wine
with their meal. I worked for a
large restaurant group with lo-
cations in many different states
at the corporate and operations
levels. Some had statewide
laws, some left it up to the coun-
ties. None of these restaurants,
over 200, EVER felt a crunch
from funky local laws keeping
them from enjoying beer or a
glass of wine with a fantastic
Sunday meal: If booze is so im-
portant with a Sunday meal, or
any meal, perhaps it's time to
reevaluate priorities.
I don't hold any of the Com-


missioners or the Mayor re-
sponsible. No one should. They
are carrying out the wishes of
the people that elected them,
are they not? I have nothing
but the deepest respect for the
pharmacist and the attorney, as
Mr. Lamberson referred to two
city officials in his letter, others
I don't know or just don't care.
People, take back your town!
It has long been my opinion that
Port St. Joe has prostituted it-
self for the almighty dollar, and
look what has been lost. Mea-
sure that against a glass of wine
or a beer with your meal on Sun-
day.

Sincerely,
Laura Burnette Richards

Tiger Sharks are All
Winners
Dear Editor:
I wish to congratulate the 2008
Port St. Joe High School football
team.
They came up short against
North Florida Christian but you
young men are. winners in my
eyes.
You played the whole season
with class and sportsmanship.
So many memories of a great


season: defeating Lafayette on a
cold night in Mayo with a great goal
line stand, a rainy night in Greens-
boro against West Gadsden.
Thanks Tyrone, Calvin, Greg,
Rock, Javan, etc. too many to
name.
But you are all winners.
Go Sharks.

A Shark Fan for Life,
Norma Hobbs
Port St. Joe

Full Moon Climb
a success
Dear Editor,
I want to thank The Star
for helping us out these last
two months. We did not know
how much the idea of doing a
Full Moon Climb would be but
thought it was a great thing to
do and a big experience for folks
that enjoyed a good sunset and
night time view. of the moon.
Tim, you even took our
idea and ran with it. I want to
THANK YOU for that move.
The come-back was unbeliev-
able; we got phone calls in No-
vember that you would never
imagine. It was too bad that the
weather could not cooperate
with us and we had to cancel


that month. But folks still called
and want to mak& registrations
for the December climb. And
so thanks to "The Star" we had
the best turn out that we could
have ever known. The weather
was perfect and the sunset was
indescribable and the moon......
well words can not express that
experience, it was the biggest
and best we have had in a long
tim e.............
THANK YOU! Tim, Despina,
and Lisa. As for the lighthouse
members, it was a blast for all of
us too! The next full moon and
climb with be Jan. 9, 2009. But
don't wait until then, come NOW!
We will be open during the
Christmas weekend. We will be
closed only on Christmas Day, but
open for that Friday, Saturday, and
Sunday. Come on out and see the
lighthouse in the daytime.
And don't forget to come and
check out our Christmas deco-
rations that the 2nd grade class
at Port St. Joe Elem. classes did
for our first tree in the gift shop.
Also we got lots of Christmas
gifts for those who love light-
houses as we do.
Thanks always,'
Beverly Douds, Bob Sperling, and Paula
Boone
& The St. Joseph Historical Society


Boyd votes



against auto


bailout bill


WASHINGTON, D.C.
-CongressmanAllen Boyd
(D-North Florida) last night
voted against legis-
lation to bailout the
U.S. auto industry, .
citing his concern
that this bailout will .
not be beneficial to
the taxpayers in the
. long run. The Auto
Industry Financing
and Restructur- ALLEI
ing Act (HR 7321) D-Mo
passed in the House
of Representatives
by a vote of 237 to T70 and
now awaits consideration
by the Senate.'
"My top priorities are to
grow our economy and pro-
tect the taxpayers, and I
am not convinced that bail-
ing out the U.S. auto indus-
try will do either of those
things," said Congress-
man Boyd. "I believe that
American capitalism is the
greatest economic system
in the world, and we have to
let the markets work. The
U.S. auto industry has been
struggling for quite some
time, and ites very clear that
they need to make substan-
tive, structural changes so
that they can compete in a
global economy."
The Auto Industry Fi-
nancing and Restructuring,
Act would provide up to $15
billion in short-term bridge
loans to aid the U.S. auto
industry. Under this legis-
lation, the President would


N
Ion


designate one or more in-
dividuals, -known as a "car
czar," to hold the car com-
panies accountable
for developing and
implementing vi'
able long-term .re-
structuring plans
s and to ensure com-
pliance on financ-
ing efforts.
"Our nation is
I BOYD facing serious eco-
nilcello nomic challenges,
and there is a role
for the federal gov-
ernment to play in stimu-
lating our economy," Boyd
said. "However, commit-
ting taxpayer dollars to a'
specific industry without
any clear strategy that the
money will be put to good
use or repaid is not the ap-
propriate role for the fed-
eral government."
"I am hopeful that this
economic downturn will
result in a renewed in-
terest in Washington to
clean up the federal bud-
get and address our long-
term fiscal challenges,"
Boyd continued. "The
first step is for our gov-
ernment to stop spending
more than it has and start
living within its means. I
look forward to working
in the next Congress to
implement fiscal policies
that will put our country
back on a path toward
economic prosperity for
years to come."


SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: (850) 227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form
of letters to the editor or a guest column are
solicited and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial
page should be a forum where differing ideas
and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.


Christmas letter brings holiday home


After a couple of years
of losing loved ones, a
29-year-old grandson in
2004, her husband in 2005,
her mother in 2005, Pas-
tor Lois Long wrote this
letter to her children and
grandchildren at Christ-
mas 2005.
That Christmas they
had to come home with
no daddy or granddaddy
to greet them. So, they sat
around the table with the
following letter and talked
about it all and agreed that
their celebration would be
both sweet and sour that
year and every year there-
after.
But in facing it all, it be-
comes easier to cope with
and we can find at least a
measure of happiness as
well as joy.

Christmas at My
Home
Or, it may be "Down
Home" to you.
By Lois Long
Today we celebrate
Christmas at "my home."
Today, our grandchil-
dren gather to smell the
smells, see the tree, and


open gifts.
Today, our great-grand-
children gather to see if
Santa Claus will be there
and give them a gift and
some gooooood cookies!
But, today our cel-
ebration will be mixed
with "sour" along with
the "sweet." We call this
"Sweet and Sour."
Now, when you mix the'
two together you have a
mixture that is quite tasty.
That is the way our
lives are. They are "Sweet
and Sour."'
Sour sorrow, rejection
and disappointments, loss
of jobs, loss of finances,
etc.
Sweet "fruity taste" of
love, joy, peace, goodness,
meekness, temperance,
longsuffering, faith and
gentleness.
Sour alone is horrify-
ing to the taste. Turn up
a vinegar bottle and take
a swig. Why it will crinkle
your mouth and expres-
sion. Or try dipping your
chicken nuggets or taco
into just vinegar or lemon
juice. What frowns we
"would make. Wow! How
unhappy we would look.


And, take sweet alone. Try
mixing sugar and water
and try dipping your nug-
gets, or taco into it. How
horrifying! Or try pouring
this over your ham and
baking it. How distasteful.
You probably would not be
able to eat it. You would re-
fuse to eat horrifying tast-
ing stuff.
But, mix together, vin-
egar, sugar and catsup.
Mix well, and begin to dip
and dip and dip. It's called
"sweet and sour" and it's
good for dip, and to our
over your ham when you
bake it. How delicious it
tastes. It makes you say
"mmmmmmmm good." It
gives you a smile but not
a frown. It makes you lick
your lips and your fingers
and ask for more. Your
ham is sooooo good..
Today, at my home, we
will be sharing a mixture
of "sweet and sour" are
our Christmas meal. But,
we won't be sharing only
"sour" (the sad things of
life, alone). On the other
hand, we won't be trying to
share only "sugar" or the
sweet things of life. Our
lives are mad of "sweet/


sour" every day as well as
Christmas.
Jesus' life consisted
of "sweet and sour." The
sweet love, joy, peace,
etc. But also the "sour" of
suffering and death. His
cup was filled with "sour"
- "bitter" for him to drink.
But, on the "last supper"
table was a "sweet and
sour" dip (a mixture of
fruits 'used as a dip and a
bitter cup his blood).
Now, seeing all this,
let's share our lives that
are mixed with the "sweet
and the sour" and not try
to avoid the sour things
that make us unhappy, or
avoid the sweet things in
order to be able to show
the sadness only. Life con-
sists of both.
With this mixture, you
can smile, be joyful, be
happy, and enjoy sharing
Christ at Christmas.
But, we might also
share some sour, sad mo-
ments, also. We will inten-
tionally mix all together to
produce a well-balanced
day that is called Christ-
mas at my Home!
Love,
Mother


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A6 I The Star


T ,oal


Thursday, December 18,2008


Local cookbook benefits members of community


Life Management Center's
Life's Delicious cookbook is cur-
rently available for purchase. The
cookbook is a collection of recipes
from Life Management Center's
family and friends. It features
recipes from Rep. Jimmy Patro-
nis, WJHG's Donna Bell and many
others. At $10 per cookbook, they
make an excellent holiday gift for
that someone who is hard to buy


for: co-worker, grandparent, out-of-
state relative, etc. The cookbooks
are available at Life Management
Center's main campusin Panama
City at 525 East 15th Street, Build-
ing A.
All proceeds from the cookbook
sales will benefit the programs of
Life Management Center in Bay,
Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson
and Washington Counties.


Life Management Center of
Northwest Florida, Inc., estab-
lished in 1954, provides compre-
hensive, highly skilled, affordable
behavioral health and family sup-
port services for children, adults,
and families in the communities of
Northwest Florida.
For additional information, con-
tact Tricia Mayo at (850) 522-4485,
ext. 1107.


Changes boost


deer hunt quality

on Tate's Hell


Two new rules in place
on the 187,700-acre Tate's
Hell Wildlife Management
Area in Franklin and Lib-
erty counties this hunting
season are designed to
improve the quality of the
hunting experience.
The first new rule re-
quires that legal buck deer
must have at least one ant-
ler with two or more points.
Each point has to be at
least 1 inch long, and the
antler has to be a minimum
of 5 inches long.
Under the second rule,
no one can shine or look for
deer from midnight until
30 minutes before sunrise.
There is an exception to
the light-shining rule for
raccoon or opossum hunt-
ers.
Both rules were put
in place after numerous
requests from members
of the hunting public, ac-
cording to Adam Warwick,
a Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
.wildlife biologist.
"The two-points-on-a-
side antler rule is an effort


to improve the quality of
deer available to hunters
on Tate's Hell," Warwick
said. "Also, we'll be collect-
ing harvest data from deer
killed on the area and con-
ducting deer track counts
on designated area roads.
The goal is to improve the
deer herd."
The "no-shining rule" is
in place on Tate's Hell and
the nearby 582,700-acre
Apalachicola National For-
est this season.
"This is one of those
things where a lot of hunt-
ers felt like those trying to
shine or locate deer after
midnight and during the
wee hours of the morning
were gaining an unfair ad-
vantage over other hunt-
ers. This is just to make
sure there's a level playing
field," he said.
Upcoming general gun
season hunting dates for
both Tate's Hell and Apala-
chicola WMAs are Dec. 13
to Feb.4. A quota permit is
required for anyone hunt-
ing on Tate's Hell through
Dec. 21.


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Thursday, December 18,2008


Local


The Star I A7


ELECTION from page A]


an ensuing exchange of
correspondence between
county and school district
attorneys and a lawsuit
filed last week in the cir-
cuit court by school offi-
cials to compel the county
to put the referendum to
the people.
The county had 20 days
to respond, and county at-
torney Tim McFarland as-
serted again that though
the statutes say the board
"shall" place the referen-
dum on the ballot when a
formal resolution is brought
forward by the school board,
the statute does not speak
to parameters of the elec-
tion, and commissioners
were within their bounds to
press for answers to ques-
tions in the 20-day period.
The dispute is partly
one of legal semantics.
Though school board attor-
ney Charles Costin wrote
in his letter to McFarland
that the commission's role
was a "ministerial" one,
McFarland said he had
case law that said the issue
was a "discretionary" as to
whether or not to put it on
the ballot.
Given a looming lawsuit,
McFarland said the board
should decide whether de-
fending the suit was the way
they wanted to spend tax-
payer dollars.


"I am not here to waste
taxpayer money on a
lawsuit. Let them have
their election. I think it
will fail in the end, but
let them have it."

Carmen McLemore, Gulf County commissioner


Peters, who said he
asked for the meeting, said
his questions were regard-
ing how the half-cent sales
tax and accompanying bond
debt would be paid off and
that he was sufficiently sat-
isfied to allow the election to
move ahead.
"I am not here to waste
taxpayer money on a law-
suit," said Commissioner
Carmen McLemore. "Let
them have their election. I
think it will fail in the end,
but let them have it."
Commissioner Billy
Traylor, an outspoken crit-
ic of the levy, expressed
his displeasure to several
school district employees
in the room to observe the
outcome.
"If you say you didn't
know in November this
wasn't going to be a problem,
somebody wasn'tdoingtheir.
homework," Traylor said.


"If you didn't anticipate this,
you didn't budget right." If
notified by Nov. 1, the FDOR
could have stopped collec-
tion of the half-cent sales tax
on Dec. 31.
"The fact is this should
have been held in Novem-
ber when 80 percent of the
people voted. It is the worst
political decision I've seen
in my 20 years on the board.
We are not in the same pat-
tern we were four or five
years ago. Everywhere
things are being cut."
Traylor continued to note
that given current property
values, the one-mill addi-
tional levy proposed by the
school board would cost
taxpayers $8 million to $10
million during the four-year
span of the levy and doubted
voters would be in favor.
Commissioner Bill Wil-
liams noted, however, that
the school board was fac-


ing difficult economic times,
had cut jobs and slashed its
budget prior to the school
year and was facing the
same challenges given the
state's budget as other gov-
erning bodies.
"We have met (several)
times and aggravated this
situation and we are back to
where we were," Williams
said, adding that he never fa-
vored stopping the election
and was pleased that the
board had reversed itself.
"The public now has
an opportunity to decide
whether they want to spend
this money on education,"
said Commissioner Warren
Yeager, also a supporter of
calling the election from the
outset.
But Traylor reminded
everybody in the room that
all commissioners had was
a resolution from the school
board that it would retire


the bonds by June 2009,
a resolution that could be
changed or forgotten given
the results of the special
election, Traylor said.
"I will take them at their
word," Peters responded as


Traylor chuckled.
In addition to adopting
a resolution calling for the
special election, commis-
sioners also passed another
resolution to settle the law-
suit with the school board.


NOTICE OF HEARING
The Gulf County Legislative Delegation will be
holding a public hearing in Port St. Joe, Florida, on
Monday, December 22, 2008 at 5:30 PM 7:30 PM,
EST. The hearing will be held in the County Commission
Chambers at 1000 Cecil G. Cos.tin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, FL 32456
A proposed local bill amending FS 161.053 relating
to Coastal construction and excavation will be heard.
All residents and elected officials are invited
to attend. This hearing will allow the citizens the
opportunity to meet their legislators, discuss concerns,
ask questions and offer comments for the upcoming
2009 Legislative Session.
Reply to: 210 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
(850) 487-5004





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AS I The Star


L ,ocal


Thursday, December 18,2008


Mexico Beach crosswalks enter testing phase


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer

Mexico Beach city
leaders recently tried to
get a handle on the city
crosswalks issue. They
made progress, but the
issue is still a work in
progress.
The Mexico Beach
city council held a public
workshop Dec. 9, hoping for
public input on the thorny
topic, but only four people
attended.
In the end, council
members agreed that they
could not keep what was in
place "without changes"
and decided to have the
Florida Department of


Transportation (FDOT)
permanently remove the
crosswalk sign at the Thirty-
Seventh Street site; install
a solar-powered signal
light at the Eighth Street
location, (in front of Toucan's
Restaurant) as a test case;
and leave the remaining
four crosswalks as they
currently are until later in
2009.
If the light at the Eighth
Street crosswalk works
successfully, the council will
then consider the fate of all
six crosswalks in town..
According to Mexico
Beach city administrator
Chris Hubbard, the city did
include $40,000 in this year's
budget to purchase solar


crosswalk lights.
Mexico Beach Mayor Al
Cathey opened the meeting
by reviewing that the city
had "problems [with the
crosswalks] since DOT left
town. DOT has said, 'Give
us a defined action and we'll
look at it.'" Cathey told the
audience. "My indication
with talking with DOT is that
they don't understand why
we have a problem."
He added that if the
council could not find a
solution, he was not in favor
of keeping any of the six
crosswalks.
Council member
Gary Woodham, who had
consistently voiced support
for crosswalks, recognized


that the current crosswalks
were not working and
said he was not in favor of
crosswalks without signal
lights at each one.
Suggestions from
the audience included
the observation that
currently the crosswalks
were "useless," but did not
need to be removed since
the soon-to-be-installed
sidewalks would help guide
people to the crosswalks..
Another person
suggested that the issue
was a matter of "training
drivers" to recognize
crosswalks and obey
Florida traffic laws
regarding crosswalks and
pedestrians.


Cathey admitted the
education component of
the crosswalk plan was
"very difficult" because
U.S. 98 is a state highway
and everything related to
the highway falls under
DOT's control, not the city
of Mexico Beach.
All agreed that DOT
regulation signs noting the
presence of crosswalks
were "way too small to be
effective."
One sign is positioned
at each end to town in
the DOT right-of-way
along U.S. 98. Council
members also noted that
the seemingly excessive
number of roadside signs
- all DOT signage was


confusing and distracting
for motorists.
One option suggested
was to incorporate some
type of sign denoting
crosswalks ahead onto the
bottom of the city welcome
signs at either end of town.
Cathey closed the
meeting by saying that
one DOT official noticed
the city's-unique traffic
problem last summer when
she toured Mexico Beach
during tourist season.
Cathey said the DOT
official described the
scene as "chaotic, with
people crossing [U.S.] 98
at each street end and
not accessing the five
crosswalks."


Short Shots from the Mexico Beach Meeting


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer

The city of Mexico
Beach will soon,, offer
credit' card services for,
any bill owed to the city,
except the payment of
property taxes.
This was one of sev-
eral announcements
made during the Dec.
9 regular city council
meeting.
The council unani-
mously approved a.
proclamation honoring
all service members and
particularly Sergeant
First Class Glenn Nor-
ris, a captain in Mexico
Beach's police depart-
ment.
Norris is currently
serving his second tour
of duty in Iraq. The proc-
lamation will be soon
presented to Norris's.
wife Terry, by the city
council, in a small cer-
emony.
Mexico Beach Chief
'of Public Safety Brad
Hall recognized several
local business owners
who sponsored the print-
ing of numerous pieces
of literature on safety.
The literature covered
emergency situations


ranging from home in-
vasion to natural disas-
ters to homeland and
personal security. The
material has been dis-
tributed to area schools,
throughout the town,
and is still available to
the public at the police
department.
Hall presented cer-
tificates of thanks to El
Governor Motel, Look-,
out Lounge and Pack-
age, Driftwood Inn, Surf
City Subs, Shell Shack,
Mexico Beach Sundance
Realty,. and Arizona
Chemical Company for
their help, in printing the
material.
Mexico Beach Mayor
Al Cathey announced
that he had recently
received word that the
necessary Florida De-
partment of Environmen-
tal Protection (FDEP) per-
mits needed to proceed
with construction of the
city's new boat ramp
would arrive no later
than next month.
He said construction
of the long-anticipated
boat ramp would begin
in March 2009, and that
the St. Joe Company still
had funds allocated for
the project.


. The St. Joe Compa-
ny donated the land at
the west end of Mexico
Beach and had agreed
to construct the new
ramp as part of an an-
nexation agreement
with the city.
The St. Joe proj-
ect would in-
clude a new
boat basin
and ma- For
rina for inform
the com- on tr
pany's operatic
project- and
ed de-d a
velop- conta
ment. Mexico
In Comm
other 'Develo
busi-
ness Cou,
conduct- 850-64
ed at the or 1-
meeting: 723-1
Mexico
*Beach city
council member
Robert Ginsberg
was recognized as the
new president of the
Bay County League of
Cities.
Ginsberg gave a
brief report from the lat-
est meeting of that orga-
nization on the new Bay'
County International


1
r



II




I


p
r


Airport, currently under
construction.
He said that interna-
tional companies that
would 'come to the Pan-
ama City area to use
the new airport facilities
would make it "a major
hub. It will be great
for our commu-
nity, although
not good for.
,.ore us in terms
action of get-
olley ting to
)n hours the air-
port,"
;tops, Gins-
ct the berg
W Beach said.
Unity *
pmenty For the
pm t. annual
cil at "Cel-
8-8196, ebrate
888- Twice"
2546; New
Year's Eve
festivities in
Mexico Beach
and the adjoin-
ing west side of Gulf
County, the trolley will
run this year from The
Thirsty Goat in Port St.
Joe to Ruby Rumrunners
and Mango Marley's in
Mexico Beach.
The annual event al-
lows revelers to ride the


trolley free of charge so
.no one need drive, and
to celebrate the New
Year twice by crossing
the time zone from East-
ern to Central Time at
the Mexico Beach east-
ern city limits.
For more informa-
tion on trolley operation
hours and stops, contact
the Mexico Beach Com-
munity Developrment
Council -at 850-648-
8196, or 1-888-723-
2546.
Hall encouraged
residents again to. place
house numbers on the
sides of their homes fac-
ing the street, in addi-
tion to having the house
numbers on mailboxes.
He reminded people
that personnel from the
Department of Safety
would assist homeown-
ers in, installing the num-
bers on the houses, but
the homeowners must
supply the numerals.
City clerk Deborah
McLeod reported that a
first draft of the city au-
dit should be available
in early January.
She said there wer no
major problems uncov-
ered by the audit, that
only a few minor prob-


lems came to light as the
city converted to new
software in the fall.
City administra-
tor Chris Hubbard re-
ported that the city will
receive some funds., from
the Federal Emergency
Management Agency
(FEMA) for repairs to
the seeawall at the west
end jetty.
The area was dam-
aged slightly-during Hur-
ricanes Ike and Gustav
in the 2008 hurricane
season.
The city will apply
for a portion of the pro-
posed federal economic
stimulus package for
already engineered in-
frastructure projects for
state and local govern-
ments.
Hubbard told the
council that he woyld
see 'what projects the
city could use for the
funding. Projects must
already have complete
engineering plans final-
ized and could begin
actual construction with-
in 120 days.
The city is pursu-
ing a Waterfronts Com-
munity designation, at
Cathey's request, to help
gain points for grants.'


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PUBLIC NOTICE

'CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA

A public hearing will beheld by the Planning and De-
velopment Review Board of Wewahitchka on January
06,2009 at 6:00 P.M. central time at the Wewahitchka City
Hall located at 109 South Second Street. The public hear-
ing will be to discuss and act on the following:

Small Scale Land Use Change. Owner: Gary S. Gib-
bens, Parcel Number 02174-005R, Section 25, Township
4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, FL, 2.5 acres on
Beeline Street in the City of Wewahitchka, changing the
subject parcel from MIXED AG/RESIDENTIAL TO
RESIDENTIAL LD, subject to covenants, restrictions and
easements of record, if any; and subject to all development
regulations required by the City of Wewahitchka.

The Public is encouraged to attend and be heard on this
matter. Information can be reviewed at the City Hall in
Wewahitchka, Florida.

Gwen Exley, City Clerk
PROPERTY -: O2174-005R

BEELINE ST
2.5 ACRES
EXISTING MIXED AG/RESIDENTIAL LD
PURPOSED RESIDENTIAL LD


1


\


J


I






Thursday, December 18,2008


Local


The Star I A9


PORT from page Al


while permitting the 131-
acre lease/purchased site
for long-term use moves
ahead.
"We've been working
hard for the past decade
to re-establish Port St. Joe
as an active deepwater
seaport and bring jobs and
economic development
to Gulf County," said port
executive director Tomniy
Pitts. "It's been a long and
sometimes difficult jour-
ney, but we've had the sup-
port of the community.
"Now we're ready to
hit the ground running to
make this a viable econom-
ic engine for our region."
At one time, as was
noted during Tuesday's
ceremonies, the Port of
Port St. Joe was exactly
that, an economic engine
for the region. A timber
and railroad boom brought
prosperity at the turn of the
20th century, and the port
once played host to the Old
Ironsides, the U.S.S. Con-
stitution, which brought
people from far and wide to
see the big ship.
The paper mill came
along in the 1930s, and an
oil terminal and pipeline
created another ripple in
the port economy during
the early 1940s. The bay
served as an excellent nat-
ural protector of merchant
ships eluding German sub-
marines in the Gulf of Mex-
ico during World War II.
The pipeline was, gone
in the 1950s, and the paper
mill activity slowed and


TimLKuriO ilne Star
St. Joe Company CEO Britt Greene and company vice-president for Gulf County
Clay Smallwood sign a lease agreement aimed at expanding the Port of Port St.
Joe and creating an economic engine for the region.


the last oil tanker left from
the port in 1985. From 1986
to 1990, only seven ships
docked at the port. The last
four ships came and went
in 1998 as the mill closed.
"Hopefully things are
going to improve and we'll
have more ships and jobs at
the port again," said Capt.
Dave Maddox, a long-time
harbor pilot operating in St.
Joseph Bay.
The public/private part-
nership which provides
that hope was forged over
more than four years of
visioning and negotiations
among the stakeholders:
the city of Port St. Joe, the


county, the Port Authority
and the St. Joe Company.
There were times it
appeared the sides never
would reach agreement on
the kind of lease/purchase
.arrangement that would
make the port viable again.
The praise for new St.
Joe Company CEO Britt
Greene and Clay Small-
wood, a long-time vice
president of the company
and its face in Gulf County,
was effusive for their work
in making the lease agree-
ment a reality.
"This is a rebirth of Gulf
County, not just Port St.
Joe," said county commis-


sion chairman Billy Traylor.
"We are in desperate need
of jobs, good-paying jobs. ,
"This is a public/private
partnership that would
not have happened with-


out Mr. Greene and Clay
Smallwood. They believed
in Gulf County and what we
are trying to do."
Greene said the com-
pany was making a com-
mitment to the region, rec-
ognizing that the port can
provide benefits for both
company and community.
"We saw that the com-
mitment to economic de-
velopment in the region
and this community was
just the right thing to do,"
Greene said. "We are here
to support this as an eco-
nomic catalyst for the re-
gion. This isn't about the
past, it is about the future."
Smallwood added, "The
most important thing I
heard was about a public/
private partnership. This
just gives us the chance
to expand the port. We are
looking forward to the suc-
cess."
The Port Authority
hopes to begin moving car-
go across the port-owned
68-acre site by the end of
this year or early in 2009.
Meanwhile, though


there was much to cel-
ebrate on Tuesday, it was
only a beginning, Pitts
noted.
"There is a lot of hard
work to be done," Cox said.
"This is one part of our to-
morrow."
In addition to being one
of just 14 deepwater ports
in Florida, the Port of Port
St. Joe has considerable
industrial infrastructure
bolstering its future pros-
pects. There is a rail line,
a shipping channel with
authorized depth of 35 feet,
the Gulf County Canal and
Intracoastal Waterway for
inland shipping and barge
traffic, a wastewater treat-
ment facility, a long-term
sustainable water supply,
two natural gas pipelines
and industrial electrical
capacity.
The port is also on the
state and federal radar
screens, as state and fed-
eral grants are facilitating
the bulkhead construction
and dredging work cur-
rently taking place at the
port-owned parcel.


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However, these benefits can't be realized if a light is inoperative.

If you're aware of a malfunctioning light on our lines, let us know.
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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA





SPORTS


.A
Section


Thursday, December 18, 2008 w w w. s t a r f 1. com Page 10



Langston Foundation Education Classic opens today


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The Norris D. Langston
Youth Foundation's annual
Education Basketball Clas-
sic gets underway today at
Chipola Junior College.
With the foundation
growing in .several direc-
tions, the Education Classic
expands from two to three
days and attracts teams
from across Northwest
Florida as the foundation
moves ahead with its most
important project.
The construction of the
Education and Economic
Development Center on Av-
enue A in Gulf County is the
major effort the foundation
is taking on as it moves into
its next phase of growth.
"We are pleased with
where we are right now,
but we want to get better,"
said Dr. David Langston,
president and CEO of the
foundation name after his
older brother who passed
too young. "Getting better
is a lifetime effort."
As for the building of the
Education and Economic'
Development Center, in
these rocky economic times,
,Langston said, "Everybody
and anybody wishing to pro-
vide ideas and/or revenues
to get that done should con-
tact us.


I NORRIS D. LANGSTON
YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP
FOUNDATION, INC.


Lei .........


The Norris D. Langston Youth Foundation awarded 31
six counties this year.


"I know it is going to
happen. I have faith. You
just have to have faith."
The foundation has re-
cently awarded 31 college
scholarships to students
in Washington, Holmes,
Gadsden, Gulf, Jackson
and Franklin counties, six
of the counties, joined by
Calhoun and Liberty, that
the foundation serves with
after-school tutoring class-
es, mentoring and motiva-
tional programs.
Officials from several
districts, including Gulf Dis-
trict School, have credited


the foundation's programs
for improving scores on the
Florida Comprehensive As-
sessment Test.
The Education Clas-
sic will be held Thursday
through Saturday.
The eventprovides three
days of boys' and girls' high
school basketball in previ-
ous years there have been
two days of hoops and
aims to provide exposure
to a college environment
for student/athletes and
their parents.
"Just being on a college P
campus can enlighten a


scholarships to students in


child that they want to be a
part of that," Langston said.
"A lot of (the work we do) is
coming from basketball,
moving to different spots,
working as a team and be-
coming part of a productive
process."
"It is remarkable we will
have 21 teams from eight
counties at the Education
Classic. It's exposing the
kids to a post-secondary
environment," Langston
added.
The Education Classic,
though, is not just basket-
ball.


The event begins at 2:30
p.m. CT on Dec. 18 with
the annual foundation din-
ner. The keynotespeaker
will be E. Douglas Beach,
secretary for the Florida
Department of Elder Af-
fairs, and Reginald James,
superintendent of Gadsden
County schools, will receive
a Meritorious Award.
"We really appreciate
him, for all he's done in
partnership with the foun-
dation, for working with
us on so many programs,"
Langston said. "He's just a
very positive individual."
The classic is sponsored
by the Florida Department
of the Lottery.
Admission is $6 per day
and all games will be played
in the Milton Johnson
Health Center at Chipola
Junior College. All net pro--
ceeds from the tournament
go toward an endowment
for scholarships at Chipola.
"We are asking people
to come out and support
us from around the area,"
Langston said.
' The lineup of games for
this year's Classic, which
expands from two days to
three days this year fol-
lows. If not designated as
a girls' basketball game, all
games match boys' teams.
All times are Central Stan-
dard Time.


Thursday, Dec. 18
Bainbridge (Ga.) vs.
Bay High (G), 4 p.m.
Liberty County vs. Chi-
pley, 5:30 p.m.
Malone vs. Port St. Joe
(G), 7 p.m.
Bainbridge vs. Blount-
stown, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 19
Marianna vs. Tallahas-
see Rickards (G), 2 p.m.
Port St. Joe vs. Malo-
ne, 3:30 p.m.
Cottondale vs. East
Gadsden (G), 5 p.m.
Tallahassee Godby vs.
Franklin County, 6:30 p.m.
West Gadsden vs. Cot-
tondale, 8 p.m.
East Gadsden vs. Mar-
ianna, 9 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 20
Godby vs. Marianna
(G), 10 a.m.
Blountstown .vs. Holm-
es County, 11:30 a.m.
Cottondale vs. Rick-
ards (G), 1 p.m.
West Gadsden vs. Chi-
pley, 2:30 p.m.
Port St. Joe vs. East
Gadsden (G), 4 p.m.
Cottondale vs. Franklin
County, 5:30 p.m.
East Gadsden vs.
Malone, 7 p.m.
Marianna vs. Port St.
Joe, 8:30 p.m.


Wewahitchka makes solid show in Tallahassee


With just eight wrestlers
competing and one of
those injured after the first
day of competition the
Wewahitchka High School
wrestling team put on a
solid showing in its first in-
dividual invitational tourna-
ment of the young season.
After opening the sea-


son with a pair of dual meet
tournaments, the Gators
traveled to Tallahassee for
the Capital City Classic, a
showcase of 27 teams from
all classifications in Florida
and Georgia.
The Gators finished 16,th
a rather remarkable fin-
ish considering the odds


stacked against them.
With eight wrestlers, the
Gators entered knowing
no points would be coming
from at least four weight
classes out of the shoot.
Then heavyweight Ryan
Walding, who was 1-1 in the
opening day, went down
with a knee injury after the


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without notice. High Speed Internet may not be available in all areas. Call 877.342,9396 or visit www.FairPoint.com for more details. 02008 FairPoint
Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 674HSN


first day.
The wrestler who beat
Walding, by the way, fin-
ished third in the tourna-
ment.
Despite the odds,
though, the Gators placed
three wrestlers .and had
only one, Allen House, who
Coach Todd Johnson said
did not have his best tour-
nament, failed to win at
least one match.
"Overall we had a really
good weekend," Johnson
said. "We saw some things
we need to improve on and
things we did well. We did
fairly well. I would've liked
to have seen a few more


wins, but last year we didn't
have anybody place and
this year we had three.
"This is a huge tourna-
ment, with a lot of teams
from larger classifications
and a lot of good wrestlers,
so we did pretty well."
Chase Duckworth led
Wewahitchka, finishing
third with a 3-1 record at
119 pounds.
Also placing were Dan-
iel House, who went 3-2 at
125 pounds to finish fourth,
and Nick Malcolm, fifth at
103 pounds with a record
of 3-2.
Jacob Taylor (112
pounds) and Matt Irwin


(145) each finished with a 2-
2 record in the tournament
and Jacob Villasenor (215)
was 1-2 for the two-days of
wrestling.
"They are improving
and hopefully they will be
ready come February for
qualifying for region and
state, which is the most im-
portant part of the season,"
Johnson said.
Wewahitchka hosts the
Gator Quad Duals, which
will also include Ruther-
ford and South Walton at
5 p.m. on Thursday and
hosts another quad dual
meet after the Christmas
break on Jan. 9.


Wewahitchka boys split two


The Wewahitchka High
School boys' basketball
team dropped its first Dis-
trict 3-2A contest against
Port St. Joe but swamped
Poplar Springs as the Ga-
tors raised their overall
record to 2-4 with a 1-1
mark in the district. -
Tuesday, Dec. 9
Wewahitchka 76,
Poplar Springs 23
The visiting Gators
jumped to a 19-0 lead after
one period and scored in
double figures in all four
periods while playing their
most complete offensive
game of the season.
Chris Peak had 17


points to lead Wewahi-
tchka, with Lance Griffin
(15), Christian Owens (14)
and Josh Mitchell (10)
also in double figures. Ow-
ens also had a team-high
13 boards and Peak also
had nine rebounds.
Billy Naylor added
eight points, 11 rebounds,
three assists and a steal.
Benjamin Smith had
six points, Alex Hardin
four and Jonathan Nobles
two.
Mitchell had a game-
high 11 assists.
Friday, Dec. 12
Port St. Joe 79,
Wewahitchka 54


The visiting Tiger
Sharks opened up a 10-
point lead after one quar-
ter and doubled it to 20
points by halftime in coast-
ing to a district victory.
Christian Owens led
the host Gators with 18
points and 11 rebounds.
Billy Naylor had six points
and 10 rebounds.
Benjamin Smith had
nine points, Chris Peak
seven, Lance Griffin six
and Josh Mitchell and
Alex Hardin four points
apiece.
The Gators are off until
Jan. 2 when Altha comes
to Wewahitchka.


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PORT ST.JOEWEWAHITCHKA




SPORTS


A
Section


Thursday, December 18, 2008 w w w. starf1.comm Page 11


Roundup
oun


On Nov. 15 the Consolidated
Bassmaster Club hosted its second
annual Catfishin' Roundup for area
kids 12 and under at Dead Lakes
Park just north of Wewahitchka. An
absolutely beautiful setting, the park
was a great site for the event. It has
a playground, two lakes (ponds.,
camping facilities, hiking trails,
bathrooms, and a boat launch. If you
haven't visited the park, you have
missed a Gulf County treat.
We had a blue bird day (fisherman
talk for a clear sky and rising
barometer). Even though it was
rather cold and windy, a great day
was had by all. Kids caught some of
those fierce fighting' kitties (catfish),


managed to get their feet wet and
mud on their clothes while under
the watchful eyes of parents, aunts
and uncles, grandparents and older
siblings.
The playground was a great
attraction for some the kids after they
had their fill of haulin' in those big ole
cats. In addition to the fishing' and fun,
young anglers managed to eat about
150 hotdogs, bags of chips and chased
it with as many drinks. Each child also
received a rod and reel combo.
Many thanks to all who helped
make this a very special day for some
great kids and other caring individuals.
Consolidated Bassmasters would
like to thank Prebble Rish for being so


generous for the second year in a row.
We would like to express our gratitude
to first year sponsor BASS PRO
SHOPS as well.
, Consolidated Bassmasters is a
Sbass club with outstanding fishermen
from the Florida Panhandle. We are
affiliated with BASS, the Florida Bass
Federation Nation, and FLW and the
FLW Florida Federation:
If you are interested in becoming a
member of our club, you may contact
Jerry Kelley (850-639-2855). Leave a
message. I'll get back to you when I
get off the water.
Tight lines,
Catdaddy


Bay Point Invitational Billfish Tournament raises bar


Annual event pledges proceeds to the St. Joe Community Foundation


Heading into its 26th year,
the Bay Point Invitational
Billfish Tournament contin-
ues to raise the billfish tour-
nament bar by announcing
its commitment to donate
proceeds from the 2009 tour-
nament to the St. Joe Com-
munity Foundation.
Along with proceeds from
the event set for July 15-19 at
Bay Point Marina, the entire
entry fee from the 71st and
final boat will go directly to
the Foundation. The Invita-
tional's commitment to the
Foundation is a natural evo-
lution for the tournament,
which from its inception
has been deeply rooted in
the Florida Gulf Coast com-
munity and has consistently


supported local charities.
In 2008, the Invitational
added two successful com-
munity-focused programs
-- the Soldier Salute and Al
Hubbard Kids Fishing Ex-
perience. Event-goers and
participants welcomed the
events with open arms, and
both events will be expanded
for the 2009 tournament. The
wonderful reception of these
events helped affirm the de-
cision by event organizers to
take the tournament's long-
standing commitment to the
community a step further by
pledging its proceeds to the
St. Joe Community Founda-
tion.'
"We are absolutely
thrilled about the Invita-


tional's partnership with the
St. Joe Foundation," says
Tournament Director Scott
Burt. "We have the oppor-
tunity to take the success of
our tournament and use it
to support an organization
that has a proven record in
helping so many people and
organizations in Northwest
Florida."
The St. Joe Community
Foundation serves Florida's
Bay, Franklin, Gulf and Wal-
ton counties. Since its start
in 1999, the non-profit Foun-
dation has given more than
$14 million in grants' and
pledges back to these North-
west Florida communities
with a focus on improving
quality of life by supporting
-1 -__1 1 1 1-1 41 1- 1--11- .


education, healthcare, con-
servation and cultural proj-
ects. In Bay County alone,
the Foundation has spon-
sored the Aquatics Cen-
ter, teaching and learning
grants, literacy programs,
scholarship funds, transpor-
tation for disabled adults,
Special Olympics athletes,
children's home renovations,
arts and nature programs,
and most recently the Audu-
bon of Florida's conserva-
tion efforts near St. Andrews
Bay. For more information
on the St. Joe Community
Foundation, visit http://www.
stjcf.com.
Along with its ongoing
community efforts, the Bay
Point Invitational reigns as


the premier social event of
the Panama City Beach area
with more than 13,000 spec-
tators over the tournament
weekend enjoying live enter-
tainment, the Sponsor Vil-
lage, the Invitational's World
Famous Dock Walk and, of
course, the Friday and Sat-
urday night weigh-ins. New
to the 2009 event is the 40/40
Shootout a separate divi-
sion within the Invitational
geared specifically to small-
er competitive fishing boats.
The "tournament within the
Tournament" will feature
40 boats of 40 feet or less in
length fishing for tuna, wa-
hoo and dolphin.
With more than two de-
cades of success under its
F


belt, the Invitational is rec-
ognized as one of the most
prestigious billfish tourna-
ments along the billfish cir-
cuit and continues to make
waves. The tournament
made. history during its 25th
anniversary by going full
release for all billfish a
significant change that was
embraced by participants
and spectators alike.
In fact, 47 boats vied for
nearly millionn in pii,:e
money.
The Bay Point Invita=
tional Billflsh Tournament
is hostld by the' St. Jo Co'm
pany and i\ %Point Marina,
For more iiriln.-Ation. \vsit
comr,
pt%!; WIMA





A12 I The Star Local Thursday, December 1 8,2008


While you're away, we'll put your News Herald ln ase place the hands of
a student enrolled in our Newspaper In Education program. Classrooms
use this unique educational tool to broaden student's learning horizon.
It's an easy way to help bring newspapers to local classrooms all year long.


NEWS, HERALD


Before you leave town. remember:
Donate your newspapers.
Simply request "Vacation Donation"
Call 747-5050 Today!


10O111


T Us


F'OR .OVAR. SXCOIND ANNUAL


r r,


AT WISNDA.D AR E


BDEA clII


Featuring a movie and marshmallows over the bonfire!


Saturday December 20, 2008

Movie starts at RPM EasternI


Join us for the final event of our 2008 Sight & Sound Series. Bring your blankets
and chairs and spread out on the Village Green for this family-friendly movie nighl
featuring Jim Carrey's How the Grinch Stole Christmas on our big inflatable screen.


1 1ast ywBP'S raUBStStitm in our I r Fire Pit was & btuge bit1so Wing pur mashnlbDwsl


Live Music on the Village Stage starting at 5pm Eastern, Movic starts at 6pm Eastern.
Call 227-2400 for more information.


7


TICI


~,rw*,~***** _


As Christmas nears,
Dorothy Ingram's
Beacon Hill patio
table fills with tasty
cakes decorated in
the shapes of the
season. Ingram gives
many of the cakes
- she described them
as a sort of German
fruitcake to friends
and the area's elderly
and handicapped
residents.


Thursday, Decem6er 18,2008


Local


A 12 1 The Star


Yr


0111VIV To ITI-II: PLrBjllc
AckfILVII-rly's V-Ilxv or cliAlLcio


!* -











COMMUNITY


B
Section


Thursday, December 18, 2008 w w w.starfl. com Page BI


Christmas




on 2 wheels


Gulf Forestry Camp

inmates provide bikes

for 220 local children
More than 220 Gulf County
children are in for a pleasant
surprise this Christmas, thanks
to a partnership among Gulf
Correctional Institution's staff
and inmates, the Gulf County
Fire Department and North
Florida Child Development
Inc. (NFCD). Those kids will
be getting bikes and trikes
that have been collected by


fire departments countywide,
repaired by inmates at Gulf
Forestry Camp and distributed
by NFCD, a nonprofit early child
development program serving
Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty, Wakulla
and Madison counties.
The bike program is the
brainchild of Gulf CI Warden
Randy Tifft, who approached
Sharon Gaskin at NFCD with
the idea, and she ran with
it. Five inmate elves at Gulf
Forestry Camp do the repairs
throughout the year, with Major
Ronnie Segers overseeing
the project and Correctional
Officer Michael Stringfellow


supervising the inmates and
assisting with rebuilding the
bikes for the kids. Gaskin
solicits donations of bikes,
paint and supplies for the
project through newspaper
ads, and Harold's Auto Parts
donates many supplies at cost.
Gaskin also works closely
with county school guidance
counselors, churches and local
organizations to determine
which children get which bike.
"The bikes are selected with
specific children in mind, and
the counselors label each with
the child's name. So if one child
likes red, he gets a red bike,"
Tifft said. "They concentrate on


giving to children who wouldn't
ordinarily get a bike."
Tifft said one mother
thanked him last year for her
child's bike, saying it was the
only gift her child would receive
that year.
"That made it all
worthwhile," he said.
When the inmates get the
bikes, they sand, paint and
repair them. They also replace
their tires, handles, pedals and
grips, and even add stickers
once the paint dries.
"By the time they're finished,
it looks like a new bike," Tifft
said.
Gaskin agreed, noting "They


look like they just rolled out of
Walmart. And the inmates are
so proud of those bicycles, it is
just really humbling. I hope they
realize how much we appreciate
what they did."
When the bikes are turned
over to Gaskin, she arranges
their distribution with all her
local contacts. This year, the
bikes will be presented to their
eager new owners at the "Lights
in the Park" ceremony at Lake
Alice Park in Wewahitchka,
starting at 10 a.m. CT Dec. 20.
The event is sponsored by the
city of Wewahitchka and the
Gulf Federation of Women's
Club of Wewahitchka.


. MOONSTRUCK


MARIE LOGAN I Contributed photo
The Cape San Bias Lighthouse held its first full-moon
climb Friday night.

Lighthouse has first

full-moon climb


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Attendees at the Cape
San Blas Lighthouse's first
full-moon climb observed
a rare celestial event last
Friday night.
The moon, then at the
nearest point to Earth in its
orbit, appeared 14 percent
larger and 30 percent
brighter than any moon
seen this year.
"It was like a big orange
ball in the sky. It was
gorgeous," said lighthouse
volunteer Beverly Mount-
Douds.
Volunteer Bob Sperling of
the Sable Points Lighthouse
Keepers Association in
Michigan led lighthouse
tours throughout the night.
A total of 57 people
attended the climb, many
traveling long distances to
the cape.


"It was a huge success.
We had people as far away
as Pensacola, Panama City,
Fort Walton and Niceville,"
Mount-Douds said.
The next full-moon climb
will be Jan. 9.
Visitors may climb the
tower from one hour before
sun-up and one hour after
sunset. Children will not be
permitted to climb.
Admission fee is $5.
The lighthouse
will be open four days
during Christmas week:
Wednesday, Friday,
Saturday and Sunday.
Hours are 11 a.m. to 5
a.m. on weekdays, 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. on Saturday and 1-5
p.m. on Sunday.
For more information,
contact Beverly Mount-
Douds at 850-229-1151
or visit the lighthouse's
new Web site, www.
capesanblaslighthouse.com.


Bonfire benefits


autism center


By Despina Williams
Star Staffti n'ter

A gathering of civic-minded individuals hit the beach on Dec. 5
to enjoy a bonfire and support a worthy cause.
About 50 people attended the Beach Bonfire Benefit at the
Turtle Beach Inn, raising $1,000 for a new Port St. Joe center for
children with autism.
Founded this August by board certified behavior analyst Chris-
tine Hermsdorfer; the Growing Minds Center provides intensive
instruction to autistic children, who have difficulties with commu-


nication and social inter-
action.
The bonfire featured
food, drinks, live enter-
tainment from local mu-
sicians Dana and Charlie
Black and an autism pre-
sentation by Hermsdor-
fer, who also fielded audi-
ence questions.
Proceeds from the
fundraiser will help the
center stay afloat as it
pursues nonprofit status.
The Growing Minds
Center will next raffle off,
a month-long stay on St.
George Island. The fund-
raiser is planned for Jan-
uary or early February.
For more information
on the Growing Minds
Center or upcoming fund-
raisers, contact Christine
Hermsdorfer at 227-4392.


DEBBIE HOOPER I Contributed photos
Above, more than 50 people at-
tended a Dec. 5 bonfire benefit
for the Growing Minds Center
in Port St. Joe. Below, the Beach
Bonfire Benefit at the Turtle Beach
Inn raised $1,000 for the Growing
Minds Center in Port St. Joe.


THANK YOU
The Growing Minds
Center thanks the Turtle
Beach Inn and Johnny Mize
Plumbing for their help with
the Dec. 5 Beach Bonfire
Benefit.

GROWING MINDS
CHRISTMAS WISH LIST
The Growing Minds
Center lacks a few essential
supplies necessary to provide
its students with the highest
quality services.
It has, therefore, crafted
a Christmas Wish List and
asks the community for
help in purchasing the .
following items:
DVDs and
CDs from www.
helpingtogrow.com
and www difflearn.com
(Discrete Trial Trainer,
Computhera, Preschool
Playtime 1 and 2,
Watch Me Learn Vol. 1
and Fitting in Vol. 1)
Laptop computer
Printer/copier
Portable DVD
player
Games (ages 3 to

Puzzles (25 to 100
piece)
Building activities (ages
3-10)
Sensory books (have
something t6 feel, smell or
hear)
Activity books
(beginning learner
workbooks, mazes,
connect the dots)
Sequence cards
Primary writing
tablets
1- and 2-inch
binders
Kid's-song CDs
Computer paper
Stapler and staples
Notebook paper
For more
information, contact
Christine Hermsdorfer
at 227-4392.


* ~ ~


I





Thursday, December 18,2008


Local


Geoghagan-Joffe wedding

Dennis and Kay
Geoghagan of Port St. Joe
are pleased to announce
the approaching marriage
of their daughter, Katie
Elizabeth, to Benjamin
Aaron Joffe.
Katie is a 2003 graduate
of Port St. Joe High School
and a 2007 graduate of
Mercer University in
Macon, Georgia, with a
degree in Sociology. She
is currently employed by
the Gulf County Health
Department as a Health
* Support Technician.
Benjamin is the son of
Don and Margaret JoffeNof
Snellville, Georgia. He is a
2000 graduate of Brookwood
High School in Snellville, a
a 2004 graduate of Berry
College in Rome, Georgia, "
and a 2008 graduate of
Mercer University School of "
Law. Benjamin is currently
employed at the law firm place at 4:30 p.m. on local invitations are being
of Webb, Tanner & Powell, Saturday, Jan. 3, 2009 in sent. All family and friends
LLP the Long Avenue Baptist are cordially invited to
The wedding will take Church in Port St. Joe. No attend.


The Wewahitchka Woman's
Club will host the third an-
nual "Christmas Lights in the
Park" from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m.
CT on Saturday, Dec. 20 at
beautiful Lake Alice Park in
Wewahitchka.
There will be arts and craft
booths, .food booths, free activi-
ties for children, music and en-
tertainment. Santa will be arriv-
ing at the park after the Christ-
mas Parade, which will start
around "dark thirty."
The Jingle Bell 5K Run/Walk


will precede the festival, begin-
ning at 8 a.m. at Petals 'N Things.
The first 25 entrants will receive
free T-shirts.
The winner of the Jingle Bell
Run gets to flip the switch to light
up the park.
Race admission fee is $15
in advance or $20 on race
day. Registration begins at
7:30 a.m. Make checks pay-
able to the GFWC Wewahitchka
Woman's Club. Proceeds
will benefit the community's
children.


Big River Rider's 4-H. Horse Club

Community service kick off

Celebrating 2009 Florida 4-H Centennial

and more than 50 years for the Gulf County 4-H
Big River Rider's 4-H Horse Club is having an early kick off of its community
service in support of celebrating 2009 Florida 4-H Centennial and more than 50
years for the Gulf County 4-H. The Big River Rider's 4-H Horse Club has been in
existence for 20 years. Community service is key in the 4-H program, along with
citizenship, leadership and education.
Big River Rider's 4-H Horse Club has pledged to collect at least 100 non-perish-
able food items per month to be given to our local food banks in Gulf County, to. sup-
port our communities in honor of the celebration.
So in honor of this great celebration, we are asking for community support to
make this pledge happen from now through 2009 to show Gulf County's support to
all their local youth 4-H Club programs and our communities.


The 4-H Pledge
I pledge
My head to clearer thinking,
My heart to greater loyalty,
My hands to larger service,
My health to better living,
For my club, my community, my country and my world.


p Up A D aiou-s
i, .
uipeTe s 4o[idc'.u tj
S 1
<^ r\r\C\r\\I


Pick up

your
copy

at The

News

Herald

today!


D Uq SAAu VL











AM 'ffl tii.
FEATURING TOP RECIPES FROM
THE NEWS HERALD'S
HOLIDAY'S BEST COOKING CONTEST 2008
AND WINNING RECIPES FROM .
HOLIDAY'S BEST COOKING CONTEST 2007.


Great

gift

for the

office or

stocking

stuffer!
Only

$2.00!


Make your holiday meals fun and festive with The Holiday's Best
Recipe Collection! This recipe book features 60 top recipes in six
categories from finalists in The News Herald's 2008 Holiday's Best
Cooking Contest plus, winning recipes from
Holiday's Best Cooking Contest 2007.

All proceeds benefit The Newspaper In Education program, which
provides classroom sets of newspapers to area schools. This real-world
learning tool builds literacy and critical thinking skills in our students.

Mail-In Order Form
Please send me copies of the 2008 Holiday's Best Recipe Collection at $2.00 per copy and
$1.50 for shipping and handling. (Books also available for pick up at The News Herald office.)
I
i Name IL
Address I"
City State Zip
Phone Email_
Make checks payable to The News Herald iK''"
U-
Mail order form to: The News Herald NIE
P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402
----7
\ \ ja


Library Hours are as follows
Monday- 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. ET;
Tuesday 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. ET;
Wednesday Closed;
Thursday- 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET;
Friday 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET;


By Johanna White
How many of you have
been out to see the new
Gulf County Association
of Retarded Citizens &
Transportation Building?
Well, as you know this is
where the Kiwanis Club
meets weekly but this
week we were treated with
a program from the Gulf
ARC and Transportation.
These are a very special
group of people who pro-
vide services to a very,
Very special group of our
citizens. So many times
we focus on the children in
our schools and the senior
t citizens and there is noth-
ing at all wrong with that.
But there is another group
of special people that we
sometime forget about
and those are our mental-
ly disabled citizens. That
is where the Gulf ARC and
Transportation provide as-
distance to these special


Did you miss the
commodity pick-up?
If you missed the com-
modity pick-up previously
scheduled at Highland
View Assembly of God
Church, don't worry. You
may pick them up at the
People Helping People
building on Tuesday
through Friday from 10
a.m. until 2 p.m. ET.
Please call 229-5262 for
directions to our facility.


sure everyone has a deli-
cious dinner on Christmas
Day. The volunteers will
be preparing, packing and
delivering from the Gulf
County Senior Citizen's


Please help the Friends of the Gulf
County Library and donate any new or
used books that you have. We also are
in need of magazines, CD's, old movies-
classic and children's are in demand.
Come and check out the books, movies
and non-fiction to see if we can help you


Saturday 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET; with a book to relax with or a project you


Sunday Closed.


would like to complete.


people. They try to make
their lives as comfortable
and normal as mine and
yours. They go on trips,
they go to work, they have
a social life and many of
their daily activities are fo-
cused on making their life
worth meaning.
I have the wonderful
opportunity of serving as a
board member for the Gulf
County ARC and Transpor-
tation and I have to say it is
one of the most rewarding
boards I have ever served.
on. As a child I grew up
around my cousin who is
retarded and blind. So I
was involved with her and
where she worked and
went to school. I would
go with my aunt, my cous-
in and the other special
need clients bowling, on
trips or sometime I would
I just help them out doing
projects. So being around
special needs people is
nothing new to me, it's re-


building.
Anyone who would like
to reserve a meal to be
picked up or if needed de-
livered to them, please call
899-1036 and we will see
that you receive one.
Meals will also be pre-
pared and served at the
WIG building, as they were
on Thanksgiving Day. The
wonderful volunteers will
be serving from 11:30 a.m.
until 3 p.m.
Please call 229-5262 to
reserve a seat.


There will be a gather-
ing of the wonderful volun-
teers who have helped in
the past with Thanksgiv-
ing Day Christmas Day


SILVER UEST
Weddings F STUDIOS
Engagements
Senior Portraits
Children & Babies
Call today and ask about our Children & Babies specials
850-229-9353
www.SilverQuestStudios. corn


warding and fun.
The ARC & Transporta-
tion Agency could always
use your help. Of course,
as, with all state and fed-
eral funded programs
their budget has been cut,
so monetary funds will be
truly appreciated. But
your time is also some-
thing the Agency could
use in spending with the
clients. So, if you ever lost
of whom to make a special
contribution to think about
the Gulf County ARC &
Transportation.
The Port St Joe Kiwanis
Club meets every Tuesday
at noon at the Gulf County
ARC & Transportation
Building located off of the
Industrial Road. If you are
interested in becoming a
member of a Civic Club and
a great group of men and
women dedicated in giving
back to our community you
can contact Johanna White
at 850-227-6268.


Dinner. The meeting will
be held 7 p.m. on Dec. 18
at the Senior Citizens Cen-
ter in Port St. Joe. Anyone
who plans to help is asked
to call Jerry at 899-1036 if
you can't make the meet-
ing. We will need 35 turkeys
for this project. We plan to
feed as many people as we
did on Thanksgiving Day
or more. Please call Jerry
Stokoe of People Helping
People of Gulf County if
you have any questions.

Donations needed
for needy
The People Helping
People project manager
for the food pantry and the
Chairman of the Christmas
Program for the Young and
Elderly is asking for your
help. We need Christmas
food donations to pass out
at our food pantry, and toys
and clothing for the com-
munity needy.
Please drop off these
items at the following loca-
tions.
Dec. 15- 19 at the STAC
House on 8th Street from
1-4 p.m.
Dec. 22-24 on Monday
through Wednesday from 9
a.m. until 5 p.m.
Please call People help-
ing People at 229-5262 for
further information.


B2 I The Star


Christmas lights


in the park


Library TALES


Kiwanis KORNER


People helping PEOPLE


Christmas dinner on Christmas volunteers
Christmas Day meet to plan the
Yes, those wonderful meet to he
volunteers want to make Christmas Day dinner


V






Thursday, December 18,2008


Local


Experience 12 Days of Greenness


DEP encourages Flo-
ridians to have a green
holiday season -

Tallahassee "Twas the
holiday season and all
through the state, Florid-
ians learn to make holi-
days green but still great.
Recycling,: reducing- en-
ergy, water and waste,
thesertips from the Florida
Department of Environ-
mental Protection IDEPi
old-habits replace."
First day of greenness:
Save energy, money. Use
energy-saving LED lights
for holiday decorating.
Choosing Light Emitting
Diodes (LEDs which are
four watts per strand of
50) rather than traditional
incandescent bulbs (300
watts per strand of 50) re-
sults in both energy and
cost savings. LEDs have a
lower wattage and gener-
ate less heat than tradition-
al strands, increasing the
lifespan of the bulbs and
providing a safer method
for illumination. Set LED
lights on a. timer for in-
creased energy efficiency.
Second day: Wrap
green. Use recycled or
tree-free wrapping paper.
Tree-free paper is avail-
able in woven grass, lokta,
tree bark, banafia fiber,
spun silk, recycled office
paper and recycled rag. Af-
ter the holidays, keep used
paper for reuse or recycle.
Try giving gifts that don't
require much packaging,
such as gift cards, concert
tickets or services.
Third day: Prevent pol-
lution. Choose reusable
bags rather than plastic
or paper when holiday
shopping. According to
reusablebags.com, an es-
timated 500 billion to one
trillion non-biodegradable
plastic bags are consumed
worldwide each year and
are among the 12 items of
debris most often found in
coastal cleanup. Opting
for a reusable shopping
bag can prevent hundreds,
if not thousands, of plastic


bags from being used.
Fourht day: Shop green.
Consolidate shopping
trips, shop locally or skip
driving by shopping on-
line. Choosing to cut down
on travel reduces air pol-
lution, fuel consumption
and lowers costs. Shop-
ping online also reduces
the need lor print catalogs
and purchasing a down-
loadable item eliminates
the need for any kind of
material goods
Fifth day. Drive green.,
For most. driving is inevi-'
table during the holiday
season Consider the fol-
lowing tips to drive green
and save gas' this holiday
season:
Keep tires properly in-'
flated. This reduces tread
wear and conserves fuel.
Don't idle. It is estimat-
ed one minute of sitting in
neutral or park uses the
same amount oi gas con-
sumed as when starting
the engine.
Don't overfill. Gaso-
line vapors are a source
of toxic ahir pollutants and
spillage of gas from over-
filling can contribute to air
pollution.
Sixth day: Give a green
gift. Have a gift-giving
dilemma? Try giving ap-
pliances that are eco-
friendly and protect air
quality such as an electric
grill or lawn mower, rather
than gas-powered appli-
ances. These gifts save
gas, money and reduce
noise and air pollution.
Using an electric mower
costs about $5 per year in
electricity costs. Using a
gas-powered lawn mower
costs that much in just
two cuts.
Seventh day: Use green
cleaners. When preparing
for holiday guests, trade
in harsh household clean-
ers for natural, non-toxic
cleaners that are safer for
both human health and the
environment. Hundreds of
environmentally friendly
products are widely avail-
able through stores and


the Internet. The Green
Seal, EcoLabel or other
third party certification
assures environmentally
friendly contents. Consum-
ers can also create home-
mixed cleaners with reci-
pes available at www.dep.
state.fl.us/pollutionpreven-
tion/green_cleaning.htm.
Eigth day: Choose
green lodging. If travel-
ing or hosting out of town
guests, consider utiliz-
ing a designated Florida
Green Lodge. Properties
are located throughout
the state and range from
local bed and breakfasts to
five star resorts with more
than 1,000 rooms to suit
any traveler's needs. Des-
ignated properties have,
implemented a variety of
environmentally friendly
practices. Visit www.dep.
state.l.us greenlodging
lodges.htm to find the ide-
al Green Lodging property
for holiday arrangements.
Ninth day: Recycleelec-
tronics. If giving or receiv-
ing an electronic gift be
sure to recycle or properly
dispose of unwanted used
electronics. Electronics
are one of the fastest grow-,
mg portions of America's
trash. Donating or selling
old electronics to schools
or charity organizations is
a way to both help those in
need and prevent harmful
electronic waste from end-
ing up in landfills. Before
throwing away an old cell.
phone, call local county
or city services to see if
they accept donations, or
if they recycle cell phones
For more information,
visit www.dep.state.fl.us
Waste'categories elec-
tronics default.html.
Tenth day. Choose to
use rechargeable batter-
ies. About 40 percent of all
battery' sales occur during
the holiday season. Buy
rechargeable batteries
to accompany electronic
gifts, and consider giving
a battery charger as well.
Rechargeable batteries
reduce the amount of po-


tentially harmful materi-
als thrown away, and can
save money in the long
run.
Eleventh day: Eex-
perience green visit a
state park. Open 365 days
a year, Florida's 160 state
parks offer affordable holi-
day fun for all ages. Span-
ning more than 700,000
acres and 100 miles of
sandy white beach, state
parks offer a glimpse into
natural Florida. Feeling
the crunch this holiday
season? With most state
parks costing a mere $4.00
per car, they are a great al-
ternative to costly theme
parks and offer activities
for persons of all ages
and abilities. For more
information about Florida
State Parks, visit www.flo-
ridastateparks.org.
Twelth day: Holiday
tree recycling. Floridians
buy several hundred thou-
sand trees each holiday
season. This year, choose
to prolong its usefulness
by recycling or finding
another use for the tree.
Other uses include placing
a tree in the yard for use
by bii'ds and other wildlife
or pruning or chipping
the branches for use as
mulch. Local government
offices or sanitation ser-
vices should be contacted
for information on holiday
tree disposal programs.
Some communities have
central collection areas,
while others collect the
trees at curbside.

Green isn't just for the
Grinch this year, saving
water, energy and money
makes everyone cheer.
Hang up the LED lights.
with care, and breathe
easier knowing they con-
tribute to clean air.
Take these simple steps
to protect and conserve,
Florida's environment you
help to preserve.
For more of DEP's
green tips, visit ww-wwdep.
state.fl.us/green .tipsitips
htm#general.


Area BRIEFS


Boyd staff holds office hours
in Port St. Joe
5M' A member of Congressman Allen
S b. Boyd's, D-North Florida staff will be
4A2 visiting Port St. Joe on the third Thurs-
day of every month so the people of Gulf
County have the opportunity to discuss
ALLEN BOYD issues of concern.
D-Monitcello Congressman Boyd's staff is trained
to assist constituents with a variety of
issues relating to various federal agen-
cies. It is important to Congressman Boyd that his staff
is available for those who are not able to travel to either


his Panama City or Tallahassee office.
Office hours with Congressman Boyd's Staff 9:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. EST on Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008 at the
Gulf County Courthouse Administrative Annex, Port
St. Joe.

Health Department
hosts open house
Open house for the Gulf County Health Depart-
ment's Women's Clinic of Excellence takes place from
4-5 p.m. ET on Dec. 18, 2008. The event is in Memory of
Sylvia "Cindi" Judkins, ARNP
Please join us.


Local author to give away more than


1,000 books this holiday season


Every year, local author, Michael Lister, sets aside
several copies of his novels to make available free of
charge during the holidays. This year, because of the
weakened economy and how many fewer people
are employed-or possibly will be in the near
future-Lister is giving away more
copies of his books than ever be-
fore.
"My goal is to give away over
a thousand copies of "Blood of the
Lamb" by the end of the year," Lister
said. "And hundreds of my other titles,
"Power in the Blood," "Flesh and Blood,"
"North Florida Noir," and "Another Quiet
Night in Desperation." "It's something
we've done for the last several years, but
we're kicking it into overdrive this year. It's
a small contribution, but it's something."
Perhaps as a single gift, a hardback book ranging
from $20 to $24.95 is small, but it adds up. If Lister
meets his goal, he will have given away over $20,000
in books away just this Christmas alone.
"It feels so good to .give," Lister said. "Giving
any kind of gift is rewarding, but when it's some-
thing you've created yourself, it's all the more
special, all the more personal."
Those receiving copies of Lister's novels,
which are all set here in the Panhandle,
can accept them as a gift for themselves *
or give them to someone on their list.
"A book is the best entertainment
value around," Lister said. "As Ste-
phen King wrote in "Entertainment
Weekly" this week, the average price of going


to see a movie is around $24 (not including babysit-
ting or travel). 'For that same $24-less, with a dis-
count-you can buy a new book and be entertained for
days,' King says. 'My point? Books are still the best
bang for your entertainment buck.'
Lister adds, "I hope that during this time when
we all have less disposable income, more people
will begin reading again. And it's not just about
entertainment. Books nourish us, make us bet-
ter people. Few things enrich our lives or make
the world a better place more than reading.".
S But this isn't just about giving away books
to people who might need an extra present
this year. Lister is quick to add he has an-
other goal, too.
"This isn't me just being altruistic," List-
er said. "In addition to the joy of giving, I hope to
gain more readers. Anytime someone reads one of
my books my hope is that they will find the experi-
ence rewarding enough to read another one some-
day."
To receive a free copy of one of Michael
Lister's novels, all you have to do is drop
by one of these locations: Puzzle's
S USA, The News Herald, The Gallery
Above, Willie Pollard's State Farm
(in Panama City), Palm Tree Books,
Lulu's Sweet Expectations, (in Port St.
Joe), or The Tupelo Theatre (in Wewahi-
tchka).
You can also email your address to Mi-
chaelLister@mshci.com or mail it to Michael
* Lister, PO. Box 35038, Panama City, FL 32412
and a copy will be mailed to you.


The Star I B3


Meet this week's Pet of the Week- "Golden"! Golden
is an American Staffshire Bull Terrier mix and a very
good girl! Golden does not have a problem with the
other dogs and mostly hangs out doing her own thing-
a very independent girl! Golden is very laid back and
would make a great companion for someone looking
for a low energy dog with lots of love and devotion to
share! Please contact Melody at the Humane Society
if you would like to adopt Golden or any of her other
wonderful friends here at the St. Joseph Bay Humane
Society, 227-1103.

WANT TO WORK WITH ANIMALS! St. Joseph
Bay Humane Society is anticipating a possible
opportunity for employment. If interested, please
apply in person at 1007 Tenth Street, Port St. Joe,
Tuesday- Saturday between the hours of 10am & 4pm.


4


holiday


0insettias


/ ._. By Roytlee Caroer
i / County Extension Director
Highly prized throughout Florida and
widely beloved as a symbol of the Christmas
season is the Poinsettia. No other flower
can make such a brilliant show of bright red
throughout the festival weeks
Si., of December and January.
B The Poinsettia, Euphorbia,
i Pulcherrima, is a member
of the spurge family which
includes common ornamen-
S- 'i tals like Crown-of-Thorns,
Copperleaf, Castor bean and
Florida's colorful Crotons.
ROY LEE When shopping for a poin-
CARTER settia, look for several things.
Be sure the plant has green
foliage almost to the soil, line. A plant, which
has lost most of its bottom leaves, is probably
getting old. Factors such as sudden tem-
perature changes, soil pests, and insect also
can cause leaf drop. A good supply of lower
leaves are a basic key to healthier as well as
younger plant.
The showy parts, which most people call
flowers, aren't flowers at all. They're special
kinds of leaves call bracts. These should be
large enough to extend well beyond the low-
er green foliage, and they should be brightly
colored. The most popular poinsettia color is
red. But, you also can find numerous shades
of pink, white and every color combinations.
The real poinsettia flowers are small
green and yellow cluster growing in the cen-
ter of the bracts. You should select a plant
with small, green undeveloped flower parts.
If a poinsettia already has open, yellow flow-
ers a good portion of the plant's display life is
over and the bracts soon will begin to fade.
Poinsettias are native to the warmer, hu-
mid regions of Mexico. So, potted Poinset-
tias need special care.
As house plants, Poinsettias should be lo-
cated so they'll enjoy uniform temperatures
of 60 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit during the
day, and about 60 degrees at night. They also
should receive bright light, but not direct
sun.. avoid areas subject to drafts, sudden
temperature changes, low humidity, and dim
light.
If you have Poinsettias in your landscape,
you'll probably use them as cut flowers, to
brighten your home's holiday d6cor. To keep
the bract from wilting, the stem ends should
singed to coagulate the milky sap and pre-
vent its loss. Also, it helps to "condition"
poinsettias, by placing cutting in water and
holding them in a cool area overnight, before
bringing them indoors. Arrangements of cut
poinsettias should be placed in cool, draft-
free area where there's good light. But, like
potted plants, they should not be exposed to
the direct rays of the sun.
If carefully selected and properly cared
for, poinsettias can add a festive touch to
your home during the Holidays.
. J_____________






B4 I The Star


Obituaries


Thursday, December 18,2008


Gary Clay Cox


Marcia Cimpher


Max T. Jackson


Gary Clay
Cox 41, of Wewa-
hitchka, Florida
passed away
Tuesday, Dec. 9,
2008. Gary was a
life long resident
of Wewahitchka.
He was the own-
er of the Bayou


Restaurant and resided at
Cox Landing. In 1985 Gary
graduated from Wewahi-
tchka High School. He was
preceded in death by 'his
father, Clay Lister Cox, his
grandparents, Larry White
and Eddie Belle Lister
White and his grandfather,
Carlos Cox
Gary left behind his son,
Chase Cox, his mother,
Pat Forehand, grandmoth-
er, Louise Cox, brother
Donnie Cox and wife Rose,
sister Tanja Oliver and
husband Skip, a nephew
Kane Cox, a niece Rebecca


Willie M. McIntyre, 81
of Wewahitchka went to be
with the Lord on Tuesday,
December 9, 2008. Shewas
born March 15, 1927 in Hol-
mes County.
She was predeceased by
her husband, Donald Mc-
Intyre, her parents, Clif-
ford and Maebelle Hagans,
a twin sister, Lillie DeMont
and two brothers, Jim .and
Bobby Hagans.
She is survived by a
daughter, Nadine Mann and
Mike of Wewahitchka and
a son, Willard Moseley and
wife Becky of Youngstown.
She left behind four grand-
children: Mark Ludlam
and wife Kim and Kim Mc-
Daniel of Wewahitchka and
Jeremy and Joseph Mose-
ley of Youngstown. She
was blessed to have four
great-grandchildren, Bryan
McDaniel, Beau and Hope
Ludlam of Wewahitchka
and Emily Ludlam of Pana-
ma City, Fl. She is also sur-
vived by two sisters, Wynell
Tate, and husband Billy of
Sneads, Fl, and Pearl Sapp


Clarence E. "Bud"
DePuy, Sr., 86, died Thurs-
day, Dec. 11, 2008, in Port
St. Joe.
A memorial service
will be held at 2 p.m. EST,
Thursday, Dec. 18, 2008,
at Beacon Villa, Kaelyn
Lane, Beacon Hill.
Bud was born Sept.
3, 1922, in McKeesport,
PA, but he lived most of
his life in Florida as a
general contractor. He
was a veteran of World
War II and loved to trav-
el and see the sights of
America.
Survivors include his


Gunther; aunts
and uncles and
extended family
as well as many,
many friends.
The family
received friends
Saturday, Dec.
13, from 6-8 p.m.
CT at 115 Lister
Drive, Wewahitchka, Flor-
ida.
Mr. Cox lay in state one
hour prior to the service
which was held at 2 p.m.
CDT on Dec. 14 at The First
United Methodist Church
of Wewahitchka. The Rev.
Joey Smith, Michael Lister,
and the Rev. Ted Spencer
officiated. Asked to serve
as honorary pallbearers
were the Wewahitchka
High School Class of 1985.
Funeral arrangements
were made by Com-
forter Funeral Home -
Wewahitchka.


and husband Earl of Pana-
ma City,Fl. She is also sur-
vived by one brother, Sam-
my Hagans and wife Pat of
Panama City, Fl., as well as
many nieces and nephews,
who loved her as a mother.
Willie was a member
of the Assembly of God
for many of her Christian
years. She was a loving
Mother, Grandmother and
Aunt. She will be missed by
many, for all who knew her,
loved her.
Her, family would like
to take this opportunity to
thank her caregivers: Nik-
kie, Lee, Brenda and Su-
zanne. We thank Covenant
Hospice for their love and
help.
Viewing will be from 9:30
a.m. at Glad Tidings Assem-
bly of God in Wewahitchka.
Funeral services were held
on Dec. 13. Rev. J. Smith
and Claude McGill will pre-
side.
All services are under the
direction of the Comforter
Funeral Home, Wewahitch-
ka Branch Chapel.


children: Peggy Land
and Ed DePuy of Talla-
hassee, and Tim DePuy
(Crystal) of Port St. Joe; a
brother, Meade DePuy
(Kathy) of Pittsburgh,
Pa.; a nephew, Bernie
Miller (Halla) of Greens-
burg, Pa. and numerous
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers, me-
morial contributions
may be made to the
First Baptist Church
of West Palm Beach, the
Senior Center of Port
St. Joe or a preferred
charity.


Marcia Cimpher
of Wewahitchka went
home to heaven on Dec.
9, 2008 after a short ill-
ness.
She was born June
14, 1934 in Canadaigua,
NY. She is survived by
her husband Hilly Cim-
pher.
Marcia was an active
member of Messiah Lu-
theran Church, Panama
City, FL. She served her
country in the United
States Navy. Marcia
loved to spend time with
her husband Hilly and
their many family and
friends.
Maria was preceded
in death by two sons,
Jeffrey and Rick. She
is survived by two sons:
Paul (Vickie) and Mike
(Tina); five daughters,
Brenda, Beverly (Don),
Vicky-(Ken), Ann, Deb-


bie (Dave); 29 grand-
children: Amanda, Keri,
Chris, Tiffany, Stacey,
Robert, Chris, Jenny,
Jessica, Andy, Jake,
Joyce, Janet, Kailey,
Casey, Dustin, Sarah,
Brian, Heather, Chris,
Alex, Quincy, JoHanna,
Samantha, Brittany,
Jennifer, Michael, Ki-
leen, Patrick and Del-
aney. She is also sur-
vived by a sister, Judy,
great-grandchildren
and a host of family and
friends that she loved.
A memorial service
will be held 10 a.m. on
Dec. 20, 2008 at Messiah
Lutheran Church, 3701
W. Hwy. 390, Panama
City.
In lieu of flowers, the
family is requesting that
donations be made out
to Messiah Lutheran
Church.


Joyce Bishop Clayton


Mrs. Joyce Bish-
op Clayton, age 55,
of Panama City for
the last five years
and previously of
Port St. Joe, passed
away Tuesday eve-
ning, Dec. 2, 2008 at
a local hospital. She
was employed for 24
years with the Gulf
County Health De-
partment, attended
the First Assembly
of God of Panama
City, and enjoyed line
dancing. She was a
loving mother and
grandmother fully
devoted to her family
and friends through
the generous giving
of herself.
She was preced-
ed in death by her
parents, Theodore
and Myrtle Bishop;
sister, Joann Hug-
gins; and brother-
in-law, Clayton
Huggins.
She is survived by
her daughter, Kim-


berly Joy Clayton;
sister, Diann McFar-
land and husband
Perry; grandchild,
Ashton Clayton
Wright; nephews,
Mike Huggins and
Tim McFarland and
wife Kim; niece,
Sherrie Lynch and
husband Mike; great
nephew, Zachary
McFarland; great
nieces,Taylor Hug-
gins and Heather
Lynch; and many
close friends. Fu-
neral services for
Mrs. Clayton were
conducted 11 a.m.
CST on Friday,
Dec. 5, 2008 in the
Southerland Fam-
ily Funeral Home
Chapel.Burial was
in the Holly Hills
Cemetery .in Port
St. Joe, Florida. Ex-
pressions of sympa-
thy can be submitted
and viewed at www.
southerlandfamily.
com.


Rose Amelia Rinaldi


Rose 1.M
Amelia Rin-
aldi, 81, the
oldest sur-
vivor of pan-
creatic can-
cer in the na-
tion, passed
away on Dec.
12 due to the
after effects of a fall in
August.
Rose was born in
Oyster Bay, NY and
spent five wonderful
years in Port St. Joe.
She is survived by
Renee Carroll and
husband, Phillip, and


granddaugh-
ters Saman-
tha and Robyn
Carroll, all of
Port St. Joe;
daughter Kar-
en Bennett and
husband Gerry,
granddaugh-
ters Zachary
and Rachel Bennett, all
of Atlanta, Ga.;and son
David of Spanish Fort,
Ala.
The family wishes
to acknowledge the
gracious words of kind-
ness and good wishes
during Rose's illness.


CARD OF THANKS Hill/Owens family
The family of Alfredia Hill Owens would like to thank each of you for the acts of kindness expressed during
our time of bereavement. We sincerely appreciate your love, support and prayers.
The Hill/Owens Family


Max T Jack-
son, 85 of Las J
Vegas, NV and
formerly of
Portland, ME '
and Falmouth, -'
Maine passed ^4.
away peacefully J
after a brief ill-
ness on Satur-
day, Dec. 6 with his family
by his side.
A long time resident
of Maine, Max was born
in Augusta, Maine on
March 5, 1923 to Harold
H. and Gladys F Jack-
son. Max attended Cony
High School and Wiltoh
Academy where he then
enlisted in the Air Force.
Max served his country in
World War II.
After the war, Max
found a career in truck
driving working for com-
panies such as Maine
Freightways, Quinn
Transportation, and Old
Colony until a tragic acci-
dent in 1973 left him with-
out the use of his legs.
Those of us who knew
Max know that didn't hold
him back. After spending
a year in the hospital and
extensive physical thera-
py, Max came home and
the first thing he did was
call the department of
motor vehicles and within
a month Max was behind
the wheel of a handicap
controlled Oldsmoblie.
He drove until the end
of 2006 and still held his
driver's license until his
death, driving from Maine
to Florida for 14 of those
years.
Max was an inspira-
tion to all. People were
amazed to see him ma-
neuver into the car and
pull his wheelchair in
behind him. He was of-
ten seen at many high
school baseball games
behind Deering and was
also seen at many Deer-
ing football games where
they would open the gates
and allow him to pull in
and sit in the car to watch
the game.
Everyone knew Max,
they would see him com-
ing with the mack bulldog
on the hood of his car.
Every car he owned he
had that dog placed on it.
He would always say to
people "Do you know how
many years I been follow-
ing that dog?"
He was involved with
the Caldwell Post Legion
Baseball team where he
and his wife Shirley de-
voted countless hours in
keeping the team alive,
raising monies for uni-
forms and equipment
plus retrieving all of the
sponsors and car pooling
the boys to tournaments
inside and outside of the
state.
Max was inducted into
the Maine Baseball Hall
of Fame in 2004 where he
received the President's
Award for his contribu-
tion to the youths and
adults of Maine. Max was
also recognized at Port St.


COMFORTER SOUTHERLAND FAMILY Rish, Gibson, Scholz &
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME Groom, P.A.
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter William J. Rish, Thomas S. Gibson, Russell Scholz,
L.F.D. 507 10th Street Port St. Joe Paul W, Groom 1
(850) 227-1818 (850) 229-8111 (850) 229-8211


CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS
Singing: 9 a.m. Sunday
Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue





St. Peter's Anglican Church
(Traditional Episcopal Service 1928 BCP)

Morning Prayer & Holy Commnuniori
Sunday .................8:00 a.m.n
The Rev. David Mans, Priest
Services being held at the United Pentecostal Church
309 6th Street Port St Joe, FL
"An Unchanging faith In A Changing World"
agil ;ggg"x g txx g xl


V Vorship with Ss at
oLo ng Aveti ,e Bap twist Cburcd

W7uei fitAf, fr. miay &Friendship awiBfr/"


~~A W 1kU m trkg 6 3


11M I mu g Awnumm 14Part St. JmB .FL La
M or-Mm.m In9mzrmtluiR i CrBir-R2


+ I ITO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN


ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org 850-227-1845


Oak Grove Church

Come Grow With Us!

Sunday School 9:45
Sunday Worship Service 10:45
Wednesday Cafe 5 pm 613 Madison St.
Wednesday 6:15 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Adult Bible Study 850-227-1837
Children & Youth Ministries www.oakgrove-church.org


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and' Monument Tort St. Joe


Sunday:
Contemporary Service 9:00 a. m. El
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. ET
Traditional Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET
Wednesday:
Youth: 5:30p.m. lET
Choir: 7:00p.m. ET


850) 227-1724
Rev. Mac Fulcher

Ann Comnforter Jeremy Dixon
Mtliic Dirctor }oath Miniver
Deborah Loyless
Dircrtor of Childrn Ministrif-O


Willie Melba Mcintyre


Clarence E. "Bud" DePuy, Sr.


SOWN A BUSHCE? M HCCD HCLP?

ADLIERTIEC HERE! 0

CALL 99QQ7-178


Joe High School
in Florida by the
boys' basketball
team where the
*" boys present-
ed him with a
v signed basket-
ball and a cham-
pionship ring for
his support. Max
had his own way of inde-
pendence and staying in
touch. Like visiting Pape
Chevrolet, Rowe Ford or
pulling up to the Quality
Shop or Amatos Bakery
while they provided car
delivery service of a fresh
Italian sandwich or some
fresh baked rolls. Or he
would just pull into your
driveway or in front of
your homes and blow the
horn till somebody came
out.
Max touched so many
lives and will be greatly
missed by all who knew
him. To Max, there were
no strangers, only people
he had yet to talk with.
Max was a lifetime mem-
ber of the American Le-
gion Stephen Manches-
ter Post 62 and a lifetime
member of the Veterans
of Foreign Wars Deering
Post 6859. To all the won-
derful people of Portland
and Falmouth, Maine and
Port St. Joe, who cared
for Max in many differ-
ent ways, we thank you.
You all have made his life
complete. May god bless
each and every one of
you.
Max was predeceased
by his loving wife Shirley
P in 1982 they married
in February of 1954 and
are now together again
- a daughter Joan Pease
and his only sister Bev-
erly Morris, and also his
good friend and travel-
ing companion of many
years to Florida, Rachel
Duncan. Max is survived
by his three sons Joseph
M. and his wife Linda of
Las Vegas (with 'whom
he resided) Richard L.
and his wife Linda of Las
Vegas and Stephen H. of
South Portland; a daugh-
ter Carole Mosher and
her husband Nye of Wil-
ton, Maine; and a special
grandson James P of Las
Vegas. And of course, his
dog Haley, whom he loved
dearly.
In addition, Max
leaves his cousin Priscilla
Redmond of Augusta, 12
grandchildren, and many
great grandchildren, one
nephew John Morris of
San Bernadino, CA, and
one niece Cheryl Pytel of
New Hartford, NY
. In lieu of flowers, Max
and his family request
donations be made in
his memory to the Deer-
ing High School Baseball
Team 370 Stevens Avenue
Portland, ME 04103. A
memorial service will
take place in the spring
at Central Square Bap-
tist Church in Portland,
ME and burial will be at
Lakeview Cemetery in
Wilton, ME.


a-













F AITH


These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.

COMFORTER Rish, Gibson, Scholz & SOUTHERLAND FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME Groom, P.A. FUNERAL HOME
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter William J, Rish, Thomas S. Gibson, Russell Schob,
L.F.D. Paul W.Groom1 1 507 10th Street, Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1818 (850) 229-8211 (850) 229-8111


Thursday, December 18, 2008 w w w. star f 1. c o m Page B5


Share


God's


word
Paul's burden to preach
the Word of God should be
every Christian's burden
as down life's road we
trod.
We should be prepared
to witness, each and every
day.
Though most of the
world is going the other
way.
Pray for those who
preach the word, each day
God let's you live.
Many who do this are
in harm's way, but in faith
their lives they'll give.
For the freedom in
which we live each day,
pray for each other, that it
will stay that way.
Pray also for those who
have never heard.
Lead them to Jesus
through His Holy Word.
Thank God for America
the land of the free.
Thank Him for Jesus,
and all the others, who
have died for you and me.
Billy Johnson


Bears ana numan,
food attractions
Feeding bears, either by
direct handouts or by leaving
garbage, barbecue grills,
pet food and bird feeders
outside, leads to problems
with bears.
Remember: Any
food source that
attracts dogs, cats
or raccoons also can
attract BEARS
/ Store trash in a secured
area until morning of
pickup.
/ Bring pet food inside,
store securely.
V Protect gardens,
compost and livestock
with electric fencing.
/ Clean grills and store
them in a secure area.
/ Remove wildlife
feeders if there is a bear in
the area.


The Christian CONSCIENCE


The overwhelming majority of religious
people I have met will readily admit that
the people they attempt to convert are very
turned off to God and to religion in general.
I would like to propose an explanation as to
why this is true.
There is education. There is indoctrina-
tion. And there is research. Most of what is
called education, whether it is secular educa-
tion or religious education, is not education at
all. It is simply indoctrination or brainwash-
ing. Someone becomes a professor and per-
suades his students that he is the only one
telling the truth. Then his students go on and
teach their students that they are the only
ones with the truth.
Before long, you have an entrenched be-
lief system that is alien to those outside that
belief system.
As most religions have a holy book or
books, and try to convince everyone else that
other books are not trustworthy, conflicts are
inevitable. Some claim to believe in and follow,
what they call the bible, while others have a
different bible that they claim is the only true
bible. The easy way out is to say, "They are all
messed up, and I don't want any part of it."
When I was younger, that was my attitude.
Somehow, somewhere about 1985, I be-'
came convinced that the God of the Bible, the
God of Israel, was real. I went to a number of
different churches and found out that none of


them had a doctrine that totally agreed with
my Bible. So I started studying on my own.
I learned that the Old Testament part of
the Bible was written mostly in Hebrew and
the New Testament part was written mostly
in Greek. In order to make any sense of this,
I realized that I had to learn more about how
a bible is put together, and figure out which
bible or bibles are the most trustworthy.
It didn't take long for me to learn that 100
percent perfect English translations of the
Bible don't exist. The variations are small,
but sometimes they are important. I knew
that I had to become able to work with the
original languages. I could see that the way
Greek and Hebrew words are translated into
English has a lot to do with the beliefs of the
translators, and some differences in transla-
tions are extremely important. One needs to
investigate the beliefs of the translators of
Bibles such as the King James versions, the
New International Version, the New Ameri-
can Standard Bible, the New World Transla-
tion (Jehovah's witness Bible) and the Ro-
man Catholic Bibles.
Let's take a look at a specific scripture.
2 Timothy 3:16 says, "All Scripture is given
by inspiration of God, and is profitable for
doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for in-
struction in righteousness." Some would
like to change "inspiration of God" into "God
breathed." The Greek in question could be


translated either way. However, looking at
the context and the context of the New Tes-
tament as a whole, the only translation that
makes sense is "inspiration of God." If it said,
"God breathed," why did it say, "it is profit-
able for doctrine, for reproof, for correction,
for instruction in righteousness"?. If it were
God breathed as some claim, there would be
no need to say that it is profitable for doctrine,
for reproof, etc.
With all the various Christian churches
claiming to be the only one with the truth and
the right Bible, no wonder people are turned-
off!
At the Mexico Beach Christian Worship
Center, we believe that the original scriptures
were divinely inspired and are totally trust-
worthy. We usually use the New King James
Version, but do not blindly follow any specific
English translation. We always seek to deter-
mine the intent of the original writings. Our
services begin, with a time of greeting, at
9:30 a.m. CST on Sundays. Worship begins at
9:45 a.m. After the service, we have a pot luck
fellowship luncheon (Hebrews 10:24-25). We
worship at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on
105 N. 31st Street, behind the Beach Walk gift
shop, just off U.S. 98.
God bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center
pastor@mexicobeachcwc.com


God's most precious gift to you and me The world
God so loves you and I that He didn't stop there. God con- an awesome gift. to come in your life. That is all
he gave his only son because tinued to allow his only son to be He didn't stop there, he looked you need to do for God to come
he does not want you and I to wounded for all our transgres- down and saw you, and he knew into your life and give you a heart
die. He wants us to live forever sions and sins. you were worth it. of repentance and so that you can
(John 3:14). These are the wounds that God would go further and be start receiving this gift today.
He loved you and me enough Jesus bore all over his body, just chastised for you and I to have If people everywhere knew
to send his only son to die on the for the forgiveness of the sins peace while on earth, that if they would ask God for
cross for every person in the that you and I have committed You could be in a storm, a war, the faith to be healed from all
world. in this life. fire, financially disabled or a di- diseases of the flesh, to have
He gave his life for all races, First, ask God to forgive you. saster just know this, God is peace that passes all under-
genders and creed. Just think This forgiveness will help you to in the midst of you. standing, and the forgiveness
for one moment, who loves you forgive others. You have to know by now that of all and any sin, that he would
so much that they would allow Did you know he forgives ly- God really does love you. do it you tell me, can you give
their son to be beaten with many ing, hate, stealing .and he for- This chastisement was not a better gift to your loved one?
stripes, just to heal .you from gives killing, also. I know it is easy for Jesus. Every moment Nothing compares.
cancer, sugar diabetes, AIDS, lu- hard to believe, but he does. was agony. God was thinking of Accept the greatest gift on
pus, bad heart and any disease He loves you so much. You you, Martha, James, Lois, Bar- earth, God's only son Jesus. This
you can have in your body right cannot allow this type of love to bara, Billy and all the others to is a great package accept it.
now. 'be given in vain. come on earth to receive peace God Bless,
Oh, what a marvelous gift. He did this all for you. This is today. You only have to ask Jesus Mother Mary Freeman


Family Life

Church
Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford
Welcome you to worship with us:
Sunday 10:30am
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm
Wednesday 7pmr


A Spirit Filled
Outreach Oriented
Word of Faith Church


HOME OF THE
POWERHOUSE
YOUTH MINISTRIES


I www.famiilylifechurch.net
323 Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 J





C H U R C H
Michael Rogers Pastor
9:45 AM ............... .... ... ...,..................Sunday School
10:30 AM ......,... ..................... .... Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 A M .......... ...... .. .. .... ..................... W worship
6:00 PM ........... ..... ......... ........ .......... W orship
www,faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faith Christian School




&A of Maw Xwd
S ua AJteaict Seac
111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m: Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexito Beocb hiled Melthodist (beunh
Nu.sin PoVIDmi
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


[First 'Baptist Church.
102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
Jerome Barnes, Interim Paostor
Buddy Casw'ell, Minister of Music Education
Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students


New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church


Sunday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am
Sunday School ..................9:40 am
Traditional Service............ 11:00 am
Awana's.............................. 5:00 pm
Youth Choir........................ 5:30 pm
Youth Groups..................... 6:00 pm


Wednesday
Children's Choir................ 6:00 pm
Prayer Meeing................. 6:30 pm
Children's Ministry
Activities..................... 6:30 pm
Youth Ministry Activities... 6:30 pm


www.fbcpsj.org


, BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Cohlumnbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET- Bible '...I, .11 ll. 10 a.m. ET
Morning Worship 11 a.m. ET Evening Worship 6 p.m. ET
Tuesday: Choir Practice 7 p.m.
Wednesday:. Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meering & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and sec that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusethin t Him,"
Please accept this invitation to join u in worship. God bless you!
Please call osfor your spiritual needs.
www.beachchapel.org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950v Home 769-8725


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
igjlan b Vietw apti t Clurdl)
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:415 a.m.
Morning Worship It1.I .i in
Evening Serv\ice 7;00 p sr.
Mike Wlestbrool, )icipleship rlaiing 6:o(l) p.m.
Pastor Wednesdla Prayer 7.X) p tl


I First Presbyterian Church
Sof Port St. Joe
SS508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
SReverend Reid Cameron
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.



/ i The friendly place to worship!

SFirst Baptist Church
MExico BEACH
Located at 823 N. 15th St., Mexico Beachr
Corner of 15th & California 648-576
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all agce.
Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study at :301 p im
Please note, all times central!
Redve ren/ lic l.al'otiunitri



"Our Clhur li art bt ,',i '

.first (lirh11 f \:..:
2420 Lon .qgvenue sI'srt C, l t.5 1v ..


Givee unto tle Loa t r e .;t, ir, .1. ,1 I.. '.5Ai W {00 l.i ; 1 i iN l N ,m l lw 0 ltiett.ss


Sunday School 10 ... , ,,1)dl
Sunday Morning Wotstip Iai.1


sil~lbid haling wolship ..... p....6PM
l'i,,Iii,'i iii bump qStIvice .7 p.m.


:5-


0 HOLY NIGHT


ANNUAL LIVE NATIVITY: The First United
Methodist Church of Port St. Joe will
present its annual Live Nativity at 6
p.m. on Dec. 19-21. The evening wor-
ship service will be presented at the
creche by the youth of the church at 6
p.m. on Dec. 21.


------------






B6 I The Star


School News


Thursday, December 18,2008


The teachers and staff
came together on Friday,
Dec. 5 for a Faculty Christ-
mas Dinner. The school
provided the turkey and the
faculty brought their favor-
ite vegetable and dessert
dishes. Mmmm; good! San-
dy Kennedy and Catherine
Godwin did a wonderful job
preparing the tables. After a
delicious meal, delightful fel-
lowship, andawhite elephant
exchange, faculty members
were treated to gifts by the
PTF and the school board.
We so much appreciate the
dedication of our parents,
teachers and staff and board
members.


Faith Christian School
participated in the Port St.
Joe Christmas Parade on
Dec. 6. Our float, "Invite
Christ to Christmas," was
awarded"BestSchoolFloat."
The float depicted a family
sitting in front of a fireplace.
Behind them, presents were
arranged under a Christmas
tree. In front of the family,
Jesus (Simone Davis) was
standing beside the fire-
place holding an invitation
to the Christmas celebra-
tion. Many thanks to Sharon
Burdeshaw for heading up
the committee, to Michelle
Davis and her Beta Club
kids, to Jeannie Davis for


her artistic direction on the
fireplace, to Wendy Baker
for the CD player, chairs and
the generator that powered
the lights, and to the many
people who donated lights,
candy, time, and effort to get
our Christian School into the
Christmas Parade. We hope
everyone will remember to'
"Invite Christ to Christmas"
forever.
On Dec. 11, the third and
fourth grades presented
"Joy to the World," the Faith
Christian Christmas play for
this year. The emphasis was
on missions and on a world-
wide Christmas celebration
of the birth of Jesus. The


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
FCS third- and fourth-graders present their Christmas
play, "Joy to the World." Kneeling: David Davis,
Thomas Miniat, Elijah Sarmiento, James Durham and
Matthew Costin. Standing: Kaitlyn Baker, Courtney
Davidson, Debra Burdeshaw, Cecilia Ivester, Morgan
Peiffer and Alison Gay.


focal point was a manger in
the center-front of the stage.
The boys and girls were ar-
ranged behind the manger
and came forward to recite
Scripture verses or nar-
ration. At one point, third-
graders Debra Burdeshaw
(Mary), Thomas Miniat
(Joseph), Matthew Costin
(shepherd), and Courtney
Davidson (Magi) gathered


around the manger to de-
pict the wonderful things
that happened in Bethlehem
Christmas evening over 2,000
years ago. Later, the third
graders again came forward
to say "Merry Christmas!"
in languages from many na-
tions. An additional treat was
a recitation of a Christmas
poem by pretty little Mag-
nolia Sarmiento. The sweet


sound of the children sing-
ing joyous Christmas car-
ols, praising our God for the
wonderful gift of our Lord
Jesus, surely must have
warmed the listeners' hearts
and lifted their spirits as they
went their way. Thank you to
Mrs. Jeannie Davis and Mrs.
Kathie Sarmiento, our third-
and fourth-grade teachers.
Thanks also to Mrs. Dianne
Pitts, who catered the recep-
tion after the evening perfor-
mance, and to the parents of
the children who also added
cookies and cakes and such
to complete a delicious offer-
ing to the attendees.
As Christmas time rap-
idly approaches, it would be
good for all of us to remem-
ber why we celebrate Christ-
mas. It is not about delicious
meals, gift getting or even
gift giving, not about fam-
ily gatherings. It is not about
caroling or cantatas or send-
ing out Christmas cards, as
good as these things may be.
It definitely is not about San-
ta Claus and reindeer. This
is a celebration, after all, of
the birthday of Jesus, who is
the Christ, the Savior of the
word. Merry Christmas.


Realtors offer scholarship awards


Planning for college?
The Florida Association
of Realtors offers a total
of $28,000 in scholarship
awards
Florida high school
seniors: Are you filling
out college applications
and poring over potential
scholarship programs?
Then make plans to enter
the Florida Association of
Realtors' 2008-2009 Schol-,
arship/Essay Contest for
High School Seniors for a
chance to win up to $6,000
in scholarship funding.
Entering the contest
is easy. Students write a
typed, double-spaced es-
say 500 words or less
- on the topic, "How Does
a Realtor Professional
Benefit the Community?"
This topic allows students
the freedom to write about
the wide range of Realtor
professionals who work in
a variety of fields, includ-
ing residential brokerage,


commercial brokerage, in-
dustrial and office broker-
age, farm and land broker-
age, real estate apprais-
ing, property manage-
ment, land. development
and real estate counsel-
ing, to name just a few of
the general specialties. Or
essays may address such
points as the benefits of
homeownership to society,
or to families on a person-
al level, or how.the selling
of commercial real estate
encourages economic
growth.
FAR's scholarship pro-
gram benefits students
from across the state,
with first-place winners
honored in each of the
Association's 13 districts
in the state.
Students turning in the
top district-winning es-
says will each receive a
$1,000 scholarship award.
The 13 district-winning
essays will go on to com-


pete to win three $5,000
FAR scholarships on the
statewide level, for a total
of $28,000 in scholarship
awards.
All essays, along with an
official Essay Cover Form,
must be postmarked be-
fore or on Feb. 9, 2009, and
mailed to the Florida As-
sociation of Realtors, 7025
Augusta National Drive,
PO. Box 725025, Orlando,
FL, 32872-5025,
Check with your high
school guidance office, go
to the media section of
FAR's Media Center Web
site, media.floridareal-
tors.org to download the
scholarshiplessay contest
application kit, official
cover form and list of FAR
District Vice Presidents,
or stop by the REALTOR
Association of Franklin &
Southern Gulf Counties
at 78 Eleventh Street in
Apalachicola and pick up
the application kit.


D 0


SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Front Row: Trenton Sutton, Michael Sherrill (Happy Meal), Garett Mason, Tey-
ler Rudd, James Smith, Sara Whitfield, Bella Johnston.
Back Row: Emily Whitfield, Tyler Guthrie, Shaye McGuffin, Emma Doran, May-
liah McNair. All Dazzling Dolphins get Subway Meals!


ase send me __ copies of the 2009 Pet of the year calendar at $10.00 per copy and $1.50 for
shipping and handling. (Calendars also available for pick up at The News Herald office.)


4 .4' 4
*


NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION

THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD

Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County School Board proposes to amend and
adopt policies, as provided for in the Administrative Procedures Act, for the
purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and
State Board of Education Rules.

Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change.

2.70 Prohibiting Discrimination, Including Sexual and other forms of
Harassment.
4.19 Physical Education
5.14 Homeless Students
5.70 Physical Education
6.10 Employment of Personnel
6.17 Appointment or Employment Requirements
6.27 Professional Ethics
6.29 Report of Misconduct
6.30 Violation of Local, State and/or Federal Laws.
6.36 Complaints Against Employees
6.542 Family and Medical Leave
6.546 Personal Leave
7.20 Accounting and Control Procedures
7.40 Fund-raising for School Projects and Activities
7.71(1) Selecting Professional Services
8.33 Bus Emergency Evacuation Drills
8.502 Prequalification of Contractors for Educational Facilities Construc-
tion

Economic Impact: These proposals may result in direct costs associated
with implementation.

IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT:

Time: 6:00 PM EDT
Date: January 13, 2009
Place: Gulf County School Board Room
150 Middle School Road
Port St. Joe, FL 32456

The entire text of the proposed rules can be inspected during regular office
hours at the Gulf County School Board Office, 150 Middle School Road,
Port St. Joe, FL.

Special Legal authority under which the adoption is authorized and the law
being implemented and interpreted is made specific.

The addition and changes are proposed by Bill Carr, Assistant Superinten-
dent for Business Services and approved for consideration by Tim Wilder,
Superintendent.

Amendments: See above. :






Thursday, December 18,2008


Law Enforcement


The Star IB7


FW FISH AND WILDLIFE REPORT


:11


The Gulf County Sheriff's Of-
fice will be conducting vehicle
safety checkpoints and DUI
check points during the month of
December 2008. The check points
will be held throughout the county
to include Highway 98 near St. Joe
Beach, U.S. 98 and Garrison Ave.,
C-30 Simmons Bayou, State 71
north of White City, State 22 and
State 22A, State 71 and Westarm
Creek, State 71 Dalkieth Area and
State 71 near the Calhoun County
line.

Nov. 24
On Nov. 24 Wendy Locklear
Tarr, 38, was arrested on 16
counts of uttering a forged instru-
ment and 16 counts of forgery. It
is alleged that she stole a check-
book from an individual and wrote
checks amounting to almost
$10,000.00.
On Nov. 24, Mark Sport Kelsoe
Jr., 28, was arrested on two Bay
County warrants for worthless
checks.
On Nov. 24, Vien Van Nguyen,
49, was arrested on two warrants
for dealing in stolen property.

Nov. 26
On Nov. 26, a vehicle operated
by Robert James Reese, Jr., 41,
was observed on Hwy. C-30. The
deputy observed the vehicle run
off the road and almost strike a
metal sign. When the deputy was
speaking to Reese he noticed


m%~ -o,


the odor of an alcoholic bever-
age about his person. Reese was
asked to perform several sobriety
assessments which he did poorly
on. Reese was arrested for DUI
and his breathalyzer test results
were .151 and .146, almost twice
the legal limit.
On Nov. 26, Samuel Austin, 37,
was arrested on child support
warrants from Broward County.

Nov. 27
On Nov. 27, Arthur George
Savageau, 42, was arrested for
DWLSR.
On Nov. 27, William Carl Shiver,
48, was arrested on a child support
warrant from Sumter County.
On Nov. 27, Thomas Jean Gort-
man, 58, was arrested for Loiter-
ing of Prowling.
On. Nov. 27, Eugenia Maria
Lapura, 42, was arrested on two
failure to appear warrants from
Citrus County.

Nov. 29
On Nov. 29, Darion Anthony
Dawson, 32, was arrested for
DWLSR.

Dec. 1
On Dec. 1, Sciandra Elaine
Jones, 22, was arrested on two
warrants for violation of proba-
tion. The original charges were
possession of marijuana and giv-
ing or selling alcohol to a minor.


Field Operations weekly
report Northwest Region

BAY COUNTY
Officer Joe Chambers was
working muzzleloading sea-
son in the Choctawhatchee
Wildlife Management Area
when he found a subject who
failed to have the proper per-
mit and was also a convicted
felon. A citation was issued,
the firearm seized, and charg-
es for felon in possession of a
firearm will be sought.

Later, Officer Chambers
checked another hunter who
didn't have the proper permit
and was found to have an out-
standing arrest warrant from
Washington County for failure
to appear on drug charges. A
citation was issued and the
hunter was booked into the
Washington County Jail.

K-9 Officer Mike Guy and K-
9 Jake responded to two calls
for assistance from the Jack-
son County Sheriff's Office.
The first involved a Crime
Stoppers tip that was received
concerning the location of a
firearm used in a recent mur-
der. The tip proved to be false.
The second involved locating
a pistol used in an armed rob-
bery. K-9 Jake located the pis-
tol buried under dirt and pine
straw in a large wooded lot.

Officer Joe Chambers was
working the Pine Log Wildlife
Management Area during the
muzzleloading season when
he found a hunter in the ar-
chery only area hunting with
a firearm.
A citation was issued.

Lt. Jay Chesser and Of-
ficer Mike Nobles were con-
ducting resource inspections
at the Deer Point Lake boat
ramp when they observed a


subject wearing his seatbelt,
passed out behind the wheel
of a truck that was running. A
check found the subject's driv-
ers license was suspended
from a previous charge of driv-
ing under the influence (DUI).
The subject was arrested and
taken to the Bay County Jail
where he was charged with
DUI and refusal to submit to
a breath test.

Officer Joe Chambers
checked a hunter in the Choc-
tawhatchee Wildlife Manage-
ment Area who was exiting
the woods carrying a bobcat.
He was cited for killing the
bobcat during closed season.
Later, Officer Chambers found
a hunter who didn't possess a
hunting license and was found
to be a 12-time convicted felon.
A citation was issued for the
license violation, the weapon
was seized, and charges for
felon in possession of a fire-
arm are forthcoming.


GULF COUNTY

Gulf County officers worked
a night hunting detail targeting
the Overstreet area off County
Road 386. At approximately
10 p.m. Lt. Raz Castaneda and
Officer Arnie McMillion posi-
tioned themselves near some
deer feeding off the highway.
They observed a vehicle
pass by their location, slow
down, and make a U-turn.
The vehicle came by the loca-
tion again and as the vehicle
passed they heard a high pow-
ered rifle shot. The officers
made a stop on the vehicle
which was still located off the
right of way moving at a slow
pace. The front passenger
stated to Officer McMillion,
"I did it. I shot that deer!" A
Ruger 22-250 caliber rifle was
lying in the front seat of the


vehicle. The three suspects
were given citations for tak-
ing/attempting to take deer at
night with a gun and light. The
doe deer could not be located.

Officer Tony Lee set up
surveillance in a secluded
area known to be a launching
point for illegal netting activ-
ity. Officer Lee noticed a ves-
sel, blacked out with a net on
the stern, leave the dirt ramp
headed into the head of St. Joe
Bay. Later, Officer Lee heard a
vessel containing two subjects
come in from the head of the
bay, load the vessel on a trailer
and pull out of the water.
As Officer Lee approached,
he noticed a large monofila-
ment gill net on the stern with
295 head of mullet (542 pounds)
on the floor of the vessel. The
net and fish were seized and
both subjects were taken to
the Gulf County Jail.
The suspects were arrest-
ed for net carriage violation
(monofilament), simultane-
ous possession of mullet and
gill net, failure to mark gill
net with saltwater products
license (SPL) number, and no
ice on fish. The two suspects
were charged with four felo-
nies, five misdemeanors, two
uniform boating citations and
one written warning.

Officer Arnie McMillion
was working night hunting in
the Overstreet area, when he
observed a vehicle shining a
spotlight on County Road 386
near Robert's Landing Road.
He stopped the vehicle and
discovered the suspect to be
in possession of two loaded
firearms.
The suspect was charged
with the illegal use of a gun
while using a light at night.
A .270 caliber rifle, 20-gauge
shotgun, and a spotlight were
seized as evidence in the
case.


~t ,.~ 4


JLJ"Vv








BBS THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL S THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2008 Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


- B.2L flK

-4


5. Fi7~T!w~ a ,,.. ~0'~*

2

--I I
*AMsflC~I

c~,uhe _____________
ISA m ___


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130 Adoptions
1140 Happy Ads
1150- Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found


1100
9272S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO.:08-CA-000161

WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK F/K/A WASHING-
TON MUTUAL BANK, FA.,
Plaintiff, -

vs.

SHIRLEY F. NEESE, et al,
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IF HEREBY
GIVEN Pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 17th,
2008, and entered in Case
No. 08-CA-000161 of the
Circuit Court of the Four-
teenth Judicial Circuit in
and for Gulf County, Flor-
ida in which Washington
Mutual Bank f/k/a Wash-
ington Mutual Bank, FA.,
is the Plaintiff and Shirley
F. Neese, Thomas A.
Neese, Tenant #1 n/k/a
Thomas Neese, Jr., are
defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash in/on, Gulf County,
Florida on the 8th day of
January, 2009, the follow-
ing described property as
set forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:

LOTS 40 AND 41, WHIS-
PERING PINES, UNIT 11,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3
AT PAGE 19 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 181 BETTY RAE
DRIVE: WEWAHITCHKA,
FLORIDA 32465

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pend-
ens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated in Gulf County, Flor-
ida this 18th day of No-
vember, 2008.


If you are a person with a
disability who needs assis-
tance in order to partici-
pate in a program or serv-
ice of the State Courts
System, you should con-
tact the Court
Administrator's office at:
(850) 747-5327, fax (850)
747-5717 within two (2)
working days of receipt of
this notice; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired,
please call
1-800-955-8771.

Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
PRO. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813)221-4743
08-05446
December 18, 25, 2008
9274S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WACHOVIA MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JOSEPH CASEY
YARBROUGH, et al,
Defendantss.

CASE NO:
2008-CA-000136
DIVISION

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN Pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 17, 2008,
and entered in Case No.
2008-CA-000136 of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Four-
teenth Judicial Circuit in
and for Gulf County, Flor-
ida in which Wachovia
Mortgage Corporation, is
the Plaintiff and Joseph
Casey Yarbrough, are de-
fendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash in/on, Gulf County,
Florida at on the 8th day of
January, 2009, the follow-
ing described property as
set forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:

LOT 4, BEACHSIDE SUB-
DIVISION, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGE
38, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF GULF COUNTY
FLORIDA

A/K/A 132 LOUISIANA
LANE: CAPE SAN BLAS,
FLORIDA 32456

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of this Lis Pend-
ens must file a claim within


Christmas Holiday
Classified In-column


DEADLINES

To Run Thursday, December 25,
Due Friday, December 19,5:00 p.m.
To Run Thursday, January 1,2009
Due Friday, December 26, 5:00 p.m.


;THE STAR

The classified department The Star
will be closed Thursday, December 25th
and will re-open Friday, December 26th 8 a.m.
(850) 747-5020


Dated in Gulf County, Flor-
ida this 18th day of No-
vember, 2008.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
Gulf County, Florida
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk
Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
RO. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
08-05158
December 18, 25, 2008
9388S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

EMERALD COAST FED-
ERAL CREDIT UNION
Plaintiff,

vs.


WESLEY
HARWOOD,
Defendant


JAMES


CASE NO.: 08-292CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that
pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
November 24, 2008 and
entered in Civil Case No.
08-292CA of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit of the State of
Florida, in and for Gulf
county, wherein EMERALD
COAST FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION, is Plaintiff and
WESLEY JAMES
HARWOOD, is Defendant,
I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at the front
door of the Gulf county
Courthouse in Port St. Joe,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. ET
on the 15th day of Janu-
ary, 209, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment:

Lot 5, Block 4, C.L. Mor-
gan Subdivision, accord-
ing to the map or plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, Page 33, of the
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida.

DATED this 24th day of
November, 2008.

REBECCA NORRIS
CIRCUIT COURT CLERK
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk
December 11, 18, 2008
9389S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

EMERALD COAST FED-
ERAL CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JOHN A. BALLARD
Defendant.

CASE NO.: 08-377CA

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that
pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
November 24, 2008 and
entered in Civil Case No.
08-377CA of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit of the State of
Florida, in and for Gulf
County, wherein EMER-
ALD COAST FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff
and JOHN A. BALLARD is
Defendant, I will sell to the
highest bidde r cash at
the front door of the Gulf
County Courthouse in Port
St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. ET on the 15th day of
January, 2009, the follow-
ing described property as


1100
set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:

Lot #6, Block "I", Howard
Creek Properties, an unre-
corded subdivision of a
portion of Section 31,
Township 6 South, Range
8 West, and a portion of
Section 6, Township 7
South, Range 8 West, Gulf
County, Florida. Com-
mence at the Northwest
comer of the Southwest
1/4 of Section 6, Township
7 South, Range 8 West,
Gulf County, FL. Thence
South 00*08'41" West
along the West line of said
Southwest 1/4 of Section
6, for 168.19 feet to the
South right-of-way line of
State Road #387; thence
South 7439'12" East along
said South right-of-way
line for 611.05 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Thence
continue South 74*39'12"
East along said
right-of-way line for 100.00
feet; thence South
1520'48" West for 218.00
feet; thence North
74039'12" West for 100.00
feet; thence North
0008'41" East for 218.00
feet to the Point of Beginn-
ing, containing .50 acres,
more or less.

DATED this 24th day of
November, 2008.
REBECCA NORRIS
CIRCUIT COURT CLERK
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk
December 11, 18,2008
9398S
NOTICE
OF SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT PURSUANT
TO A FINAL JUDGEMENT
ISSUED IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF LEON
COUNTY DATED FEBRU-
ARY 28, 2008 IN THE
CAUSE WHEREIN CAPI-
TAL CITY BANK WAS
PLAINTIFF, AND C.H.
PROPERTIES, LLC; O.Q.
DEVELOPMENTS, LLC;
JAMES A. COX, INDIVIDU-
ALLY; JEFFERY.
HARTLINE, INDIVIDUALLY;
AND ALAN T. STEWART,
INDIVIDUALLY WAS DE-
FENDANT BEING CASE
NO. 2008-CA-003419.

I, JOSEPH NUGENT, AS
SHERIFF OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA WILL
HAVE LEVIED UPON ALL
THE RIGHT TITLE AND IN-
TEREST OF THE DE-
FENDANTS C.H. PROPER-
TIES, LLC; C.Q. DEVEL-
OPMENTS, LLC; JAMES
A. COX, INDIVIDUALLY;
JEFFERY. HARTLINE, IN-
DIVIDUALLY; AND ALAN T.
STEWART, INDIVIDUALLY
IN THE INTEREST OF A
2006 GREEN CHEVROLET
COLORADO (PICKUP),
V I N
#1GCCS198068213398,
TITLE #94806776, FL.
TAG T725GX; A WHITE
CHEVROLET COLORADO
(PICKUP), VIN
#1GCCS198168211160,
TITLE #9480557, FL. TAG
T721GX; A 2006
ALUM./SILVER CHEVRO-
LET COLORADO
(PICKUP), VIN
#1GCCS198368211967,
TITLE #94806005, FL.
TAG T722GX; AND ON
THE 29TH DAY OF DE-
CEMBER, 2008 AT THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE
GULF COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE IN PORT ST. JOE,
FLORIDA AT THE HOUR
OF 11:00 A.M. E.S.T. OR
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, I
WILL OFFER SAID PROP-
ERTY AT PUBLIC OUTCRY
AND WILL THE SAME,
SUBJECT TO ALL PRIOR
LIENS, ENCUMBRANCES
AND JUDGEMENTS, IF
ANY, TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDER OR BIDDERS
FOR CASH. THE PRO-
CEEDS TO BE APPLIED


1100
AS FOR AS MAY BE TO
THE PAYMENT OF COSTS
AND SATISFACTION OF
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
EXECUTION.

SHERIFF
JOSEPH NUGENT

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICA WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES THAT
NEED A SPECIAL AC-
COMMODATION TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THE PRO-
CEEDING SHOULD CON-
TACT NO LATER THAN
SEVEN DAYS PRIOR TO
THE PROCEEDING AT
850-227-1115.
December 4, 11, 18, 25,
2008
9442S
NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS
BID #0809-04

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners
will receive bids from any
person, company, or cor-
poration interested in pur-
chasing the following:

1 1973 Ford 900 Fire
Truck
VIN #: F90KVR31600
($500 Minimum Bid)

To see this piece of equip-
ment you must make con-
tact with authorized per-
sonnel at the Gulf County
Road Department.

Please indicate on the en-
velope that this is a
SEALED BID, the BID
NUMBER, and what the
BID is for. Please include 3
Copies of your proposal.

Bids will be received until
Friday, December 19,2008
at 4:30 p.m., E.T., at the
Office of the Clerk of
Court, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. The
Board reserves the right to
reject any and all propos-
als received.

GULF COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS
/s/ Billy Traylor, Chairman
/s/ Becky Norris, Clerk
December 11, 18, 2008
9457S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

SUNRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,

VS.

LARRY C. PANKEY A/K/A
LARRY PANKEY; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
LARRY C. PANKEY AKA
LARRY PANKEY; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S) IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.

CASE NO: 07-483 CA

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTCE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
the day 4th day of Decem-
ber, 2008, and entered in
Case No. 07-483 CA, of
the Circuit Court of the
14TH Judicial Circuit in
and for Gulf County, Flor-
ida, wherein SUNRUST
BANK is the Plaintiff and
LARRY C. PANKEY A/K/A
LARRY PANKEY; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
LARRY C. PANKEY AKA
LARRY PANKEY; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S) IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY are
defendants. I will sell to the


1100
highest and best bidder for
cash at the FRONT LOBBY
OF COURTHOUSE at the
Gulf County Courthouse,
in Port St. Joe, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 22nd
day of January, 2008, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment, to wit:

LOT 4 OF SOUTH LA-
GOON SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE
25 OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADR), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

Dated this 4th day of De-
cember, 2008.
Rebecca Norris
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49 Street, Suite
120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954)
453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
December 11,18,2008
9458S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK, FA,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JAMES ALLEN COX A/K/A
JAMES A. COX; VISION
BANK; WINDMARK
BEACH COMMUNITY AS-
SOCIATION, INC.; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
JAMES ALLEN COX A/K/A
JAMES A. COX; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S) IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.

CASE NO.:
23-2008-CA-000083

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 4th day of 2008,
and entered in Case No.
23-2008-CA-000083, of the
Circuit Court of the 14TH
Judicial Circuit in and for
Gulf County, Florida,
wherein WASHINGTON
MUTUAL BANK, FA is the
Plaintiff and JAMES ALLEN
COX A/K/A JAMES A.
COX; VISION BANK;
WINDMARK BEACH COM-
MUNITY ASSOCIATION,
INC.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JAMES ALLEN COX
A/K/A JAMES A. COX;
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANT
(S) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROP-


County Courthouse, in
Port St. Joe, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 22nd
day ofJanuary, 2009, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Fi-
rial Judgment, to wit:

LOT 47, WINDMARK
BEACH, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES
105, IN THE OFFICE OF
THE CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT CURT OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

Dated this 4th day of De-
cember, 2009.

Rebecca Norris
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite
120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954)
453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll free: 1-800-441-2438
December 11, 18, 2008
9467S
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA -

SUPERIOR BANK,
Plaintiff, '.

vs.

MICHAEL JOSEPH WAHL
and GRAMERCY PLANTA-
TION OWNERS ASSOCIA-
TION, INC.,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-000355-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 26, 2008,
and entered in Civil Action
No. 08-355 CA of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein the parties were
the Plaintiff, SUPERIOR
BANK, and the Defend-
ants, MICHAEL JOSEPH
WAHL and GRAMERCY
PLANTATION OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC., I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at 11:00
a.m. (Eastern Time) on the
8th day of January, 2008,
at the front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola, Flor-
ida, the
following-described real
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

Lot 102, Gramercy Planta-
tion, Phase 2, according to
the plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book 8, pages 41


through 43, of the public
records of Franklin
County, Florida

The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
documentary stamps on
the Certificates of Title.

DATED this 2nd day of De-
cember, 2008

Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County, Florida
By:Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
December 18, 25, 2008
9491S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL COURT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
IN RE: The Estate of
GWENDOLYN L. HAM-
MON,
Decedent.

CASE NO.: 08-52PR
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the
Estate of GWENDOLYN L.
HAMMON, File. No.
08-52PR, is pending in the
Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which is 1000 Fifth Street,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
The name and address of
the Personal Representa-
tive and the Personal Rep-
resentative's attorney are
as set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:

All persons on whom this
Notice.is served who have
objections that challenge
the qualifications of the
Personal Representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of
this Court, are required to
file their objections with
this Court within the latter
of three (3) months after
the date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice or
thirty (30) days after the
date of service of a copy of
the Notice on them.

All creditors of the Dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against Decedent's Estate
on whom a copy of this
Notice is served, within
three (3) months after the
date of the first publication
of this Notice must file their
claims with this Court
within the latter of three (3)
months after the date of
the first publication of this
Notice or thirty (30) days
after the date of service of


a copy of this Notice on
them.

All creditors of the Dece-
dent and persons having
claims or demands against
Decedent's Estate must file
their claims with this Court
within three (3) months af-
ter the date of the first pub-
lication of this Notice.

ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is De-
cember 18, 2008.

Timothy Alan Hammon
Personal Representative
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Timothy J. McFarland, Es-
quire
RO. Box 202
326 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
FL Bar No.: 0984868
(850) 227-3113
Attorney for Personal
Representative
December 18, 25, 2008
9493S
IN THE FOURTEENTH JU-
DICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

COASTAL COMMUNITY
BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

WENDY BATTS, HOWIE
BATTS, JOHANNA WHITE
and CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 07-499-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated Decem-
ber 1, 2008, and entered in
Civil Action No. 07-499-CA
of the Circuit Court of the
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit
in and for Gulf County,
Florida, wherein the parties
were the plaintiff,
COASTAL COMMUNITY
BANK, and the defend-
ants, WENDY BATTS,
HOWIE BATTS, JOHANNA
WHITE, and CAPITAL CITY
BANK, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder,
for cash, at 11:00 a.m.
(Eastern Time) on the 15th
day of January, 2009, at
the front door of the Gulf
County Courthouse, Port
St. Joe, Florida, the
following-described real
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

Lots Ten (10) and Twelve
(12), Block Sixty-Five (65),


Ul


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Established 1938 0 Serving Guff County and surrounding areas for 67 years


8B 0 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2008







S 1100 J4100 | 61110 6140 I140 7100 I 7150|
City of Port St. Joe, Flor- Logistics/Transportation 2 br, 1 ba, apartments 3 br, 1.5 ba, Mexico
cial Plat thereof on file in Driver Trainees 2272112 or Kenny dock, p, no pets, $1,100 Port St. Joe, St. George Vacant Lot
the Office of the Circuit 227-7241 for more info 1 2, & 3 $1,100 dep. Island and St. James Bay 125Crane Dr, PrtStJoe,
Court Clerk of Gulf County, NEEDED 1A2,O3 850-64RE5045 Previously Bank Owned FL, .468 acre lot. Price
Florida. No Problem AL ESTATE FOR R Bedroom 1404 Long Ave. Cute Bun- Property. Priced way below $60,000 or make offer.
Thae sc bid.r at 311 Ai omro a Bedroom mak l n Av e u et value! Prices start. Call 850-402-8015.
3100 Antiques No CDL? N e i0 Business/ Houses galow, 3 br, 2 be, newly re- ing at $35,000. Please call ealtors0Welcome
the sale will be required to 3120 Arts & Crafts Earn up to $900/wk. Home eiie Apartments for rent in PortSt. Joe; Call furbished, laundry rm w/d. Counts Real Estate Group
place the requisite state 3130-Auctions weekends with TMC. Com- 6120-Beach Rentals Efficiency Rooms. Weekly 850-227-7800 $700 mo Landlord pays at 850-249-3615. ,p'k I City
documentary stamps on 3140 Baby Items pany endorsed CDLTrain- 6130- Condorownhouse or monthly rentals Down- 2 br, 1 b, furnished, 8935 lawncare, $500 moTenanank
the Certificate of Title. 3150- Building Supplies ing 1-866-280-5309 6140-House Rentals town PSJ on Red Ave. Lighthouse Ave, fu Beacon 8935 pays l76awncare. Call More thanyour bank.
3160 Business 6150 Roommate Wanted Call Pat @ 850-227-5747 Lghthouse Ave, Beacon 850-766-4601
Equipment 6160 Rooms for Rent Hill, $500 month. Call Your banker.
DATED this 2nd day of De- 3170 Collectibles .'al 6170 Mobile Home/Lot 850-625-4955 or Gulfaire
member, 2008. 3180- Computers 6180-Out-of-Town Rentals 580-276-1680 Large light and bright 1 br Waterfront, Great home in
3190 Electronics 6190- Timeshare Rentals Large lig an g 1 r,
HON. REBECCA L. NOR- 3200 Firewood Math Adjunct 6200 Vacation Rentals 6 1 2 br, 1.5 be, Port St, Joe, 1 ba garden apartment. a r a eb
R 3210- Free Pass It On Math A 40C /H/A, laundry room, 10 x W/D, Tile and Carpet, pri- 2004. $219,000 Call Deb-
CRIS C R 3220- Furniture (Gulf/Franklin Center) 1 br 1 be, furn $500 + 25 storage shed, nice vacy fenced with deck, bie Holzer Realtor
CLERK OF COURT 3230- Garage/Yard Sales instruct Pre-Calculus Al- Some util, $250 dep How- yard, vey nice area, $525 poo, tennis court, private 850-774-7999 Prudential
By: Jasmine Hysmith 3240- Guns gebra5(MACn1140)cat
Clerk/Deputy Clerk 3250- Good Things to Eat gebra (MAC 1140) at ard Creek Call 522-9515 or mo, $400 dep, No pets beach. Pets okay. $695 Shimmering Sands Realty
3260 Health & Fitness the Gulf/Franklin Center, 326-0785 or 827-2906 Call 850-227-6216 mo. 850-639-2690
FRANK A. BAKER, ESQ. 3270 Jewelry/Clothing starting spring 2009. 1 br, 1 be, all utilities includ- 3 br 1.5 ba, new carpetHouse For Rent, in St.
4431 LafayetteStreet 3280 Machnery/ Requires MS degree ed, Apalachicola, nonsmok- Century 21 Gulf Coast Re- 1911 Cypress Ave. Large Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba,St.
Marianna, FL32446 3290 Medical Equipment mathematics and/orsta ing, walk to groc store, alty long term rentals avail- fenced yard with deck. large yard, Call Gene at *
December 18,25,2008 3300 -iMiscellaneous tistics. For more in fum. 1 yr lease required, able Great neighborhood near 850-830-9342. AUTOMOTVE MARINE
3310 Musical Instruments cs more i 1st month and dep req at Coronado #3 2 br, 1.5 ba school. $875/mo. + 1st & ECRE
3320 Plants & Shrubs/ contact the Math Divi- signing. 653-6375 731 Hwy 98 $850 per last mo rent dep. 1 r Long Avenue Home Spa- | 7120 8100 Antique & Collectibles
Supplies sion @ 872-3852. month lease. Call 648-8629rcious and private home, 3 8110 -Cars
3330 Restaurant/Hotel Additional info: Destiny #1 2 br 1 ba 115- 648-8629 o br, 2 b, large fenced in 8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
3350 Destiny #142 br, 21 ba E a115-86 b2e w-laorge fce is
S3340 Sporting Goods htto://www.ulf 40th St. $550per month 867-3336 yard, front porch, hard- 813- Trucks
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) coast edu/hrl. Gulf Point #4 2 br, 2.5 be Eagle Landing Townhome wood floors. 3 blocks to Commercial 8140 Vans
SGCCC is on 7172 Hwy 98 $1000 per New development- beauti- area shopping, downtown Office Building 8160 Motorcycles
SEA/EO/M/F/ 2 bedroom unfurnished; month ful and spacious 2 br, 2 and St. Joseph's Bay. 402 Reid Ave., Port St 8170 Auto Parts
3230 Vet employer. Dogwood Terrace Apart- Indian Lagoon Cottages 3 ba, townhome with bonus Monthly rental available at Joe, FL,2502 sq .12. & Accessories
ments; 808 Woodward br, 2 ba SR-30 Indian Pass upstairs living space and $750 per month with $750 acre. Price $390,000 or sona waterraft
1 L A S( lf acre. Price $390,000 or 822Fs Person al.watercr0r
SPET M 1405 Long Ave. Sat 8-7 u Ave, PSJ (850) 227-7800 $850 per month bathroom located in Jones security/damage deposit. make offer. Call 8230 Sailboats
Furniture, tools, clothes Palmetto Plantation 3 br, 3 Homestead, Eagle Land- Call Gulf Coast Property 850-402-8015. Realtors 8240 Boat & Marine
2100 Pets Yard Sale ba 1120 15th St. $900 per ing subdivision. Close to Services at (850) 229-2706 welcomed Supplies
2110 Pets: Free to month shopping, downtown and 8310 Aircraft/Aviation
Good Home -Other Paradise Porch 2 br, 2 ba St. Joseph's Bay. Monthly Several long term rentals 8320 A/Offad Vehicles
2120- Pet Suppiles mab 9135 Cockles Ave. $650 rental $750 per nionth with available in Mexico Beach/ t Bank 8330 Campers & Trailers
21S0- Pspliest ) Attention!!! Available Dec. 1st per month $750 security/damage de- St. Joe Beach call More than your bank. 8340 Motorhomes
2140 Pets/Livestock Home Computer worklll, 1000 sq.ft. Surf & Sands unit 30-1 2 posit. Call Gulf Coast 648-1012 Your banker.
Wanted Port St Joe, 455 Dolphin Flexible hours, great pay, Consisting of br, 2 ba 109- 30th St. $580 Property Services at (850) St. Joe Beach
St, Sat, 8 am -4pm will train, apply online 3-Offices per month 229-2706 for more infor- Bauti 3 bd, 2 a
iiscI sw.iwrk 1-ADA Bathroom Surf & Sands unit 42-A & mation and tour of the Beautiful 3 bd,2 be gulf$
SMisalc tems fromhome.com 500 sq.ft. Warehouse 42-b 2 br, 2 bae121- 42ncd home. vi816ew home, $100/mo
LIZ---QQ 500 I D/m Garehouss St. $650 per month C a I-1--1A0
2100 Yard Sale Dec 19th and $850./ Gross Surf & Sands unit 42-C 4 (404) 545-2552.
20th 674 Jones Home. o br, 2 ba 121-42ncd St. MINI STORAGE Townhomes for rent, 2002 Suzuki VS800 In-
stead Rd. Furn. household 4100 I America's $850 per month J o e. ones Homestead truder 40K miles, new
Beautiful AKC items, mens, wonens and Wewa flea market, 2475 Mini-Storage and Ponderosa #18 3 br,2 ba In Ii Joe Ponderosa pines. End Towing & Roadside Serv- exualst new throttle cable,
children clothes, if rain Hwy 71N, 2.4 miles N of a #18 Ponderosa Pines Dr. Ponderosa pines. End ice Co for sale. $185,000 new saddle bags, 2 hel-
canceled. stop light, Large Christmas Office Complex $850 per month 29 6200 of year special. First all remainingequp, serv- mets, 1 leather jacket,
sale, Open Thur, Fri Sat 850-229-8014 Call 850-648-5449 or 229-6200 month rent free with ing Bay, Gulf, & Franklin. $3200 obo 850-227-1192
i 1 8-5 639-5721 850-229-1200 for more in- 4 deposit and 12 month 647-5788 leave message, or 850-227-5354
9 478-451-7761 formation 8 4'740 lease. 2 br and 3br
17 3280[ *units available. Call
Standard poodle pup- 850-227-8404 or 850
pies, home raised, vet King Kutter Post hole 4 30 8 50 f e 227 9732 for more in-8 50= B^-
docks, dews, shots, digger for 3pt-PTO, 40 in t's a lifestyle, not just a rt St J e C om m ercial formation re in-
on Dec 14. Accepting 12 in. bits, $450 Play National Company Space for Lease White City, 6650 Cedar St, 0-
deposits now to hold up 850-653-2897 now hiring. 18+ Guys and big 3 br 2 ba, FR decks, 1 Wl
to Dec 24. View at Gals to work and travel en- block from boat ramp.
www.palmpups.com or tire USA. 2 weeks paid Prime Retail Space $700/mo + dep. Call W J2 f
phone 850-508-6865 or training, transportation and 319 Reid Avenue 647-8722 or 527-6822
850-508-3315 lodging furnished. Returns 1350sf occupant a ( shed; $1000/mo
I 3300 guaranteed. Call Today, NINNI $ J
1-877-856-6960 Start To-4 QI
STEEL dayl 317 Williams Avenue I 617o I 1T M
BUILDINGS Other 1800sf- tenant improvements negotiable; $1800/mo gross For Rent, clean 14x70 Mo-
ERotweilers, AKC Strong ly23 ,325 Reid Avenue bile Home, 2 br, 2 be, EE
Euro neage, Will make 4 Oy 20x64,45x4.2, Mystery Shoppers. Earn 350 sRdA e corner location; $2500/mo grCH&A, all electric Call
excellent working dogs or 4500sf flex space; corner location; $2500/mo gross 5--
pet's. 2 males, 5 females 8 Must Move Now! up to $100 a day. Under -850-229-6495u L IVR Y --
wks, NFL-K9, Howard Will Sell for Balance cover shoppers needed to 309 Reid Avenue Mexico Beach, 2 br, 2 ba
Creek, 850-827-2701 cell Owed./Free Deliveryl judge retail/ dining estab- 6000sf renovated shell space; occupant ready; $4500/mo MH newly refurbished, 3 k- EL IW E E
850-340-1395 1-800-411-5869x82 lishments. Exp not re mod-gross blocks from dedicated -
_quired. Please Call beach, adjacent to parks,
1-800-308-4616. 310 Reid Avenue large screened porch.
POSTAL & GOV'T JOB 5750sf Suite B; perfect for clothing furniture retailer; $3000/mo $575 month + utilities. De-
INFO FOR SALE? NNN 'posii required A. ;lablt
cautionn Of c r Jar. 1 2':1: -
Office Space 6,.,1-0371o. .-..
2110 CaUtiOn 202 Marina Drive
680sf well appoint e t oss (incl. utilities)
(Bayside Building)
YYou NEVER have to pay
Sfor information about 310 Reid Avenue
4100 Help Wanted federal or postal jobs. If 1116sf- Suite C; finished office space; lobby area with two Chr sler leeop M iSubisIE
6'week old small mixed 4130- Employment you see a job office suites and filing/storage room; $1000/mo NNN a Supercenter
breed puppy.Dad is a Lab "inormtion "guarantee", contact the 3 L Avn e Used Car Supercenter
Please call 648-2039 The Federal Trade 1000sf- move-in ready; $900/mo gross Serice Centr PartS & ACcSSOrl68
1 4100 I Commission 71000-Homes
- 00 is America's consumer Warehouse I Flex Space 711o- Beach Home/ :yNLYINA
Dr Robert King Food Service/Hospitality protection agency. 110 Trade Circle West 7120Prperty
22500sf 12500sf'- PSJ Commerce Park, flex space, $5.25psf/ 7130 Condo/Townhouse
entOPSHouskeeper www.ftc.gov/jobscams NNN (incl. water/sewer) 7140 Farms & Ranches 85 37
Dentist Needed to clean cabins 1-877-FTC-HELP 7150 Lots and Acreage
40325hrs/wk. Weekend req., A public service Marketed Exclusively by: 7170 Waterfront
must have valid DL Apply |message from the FTC 7180 Investment
22m7-1812 at: andThe News Herald 850-229-6373 NORTH FLORIDAP ropel sta
2271812 St. Joseph State Park, Classified Advertising LAe tT
21-97.1r27 Department 7200 Timeshare


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THE STAR, PORT Sl JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2008 0 9B


Established 1938 0 Serving Guff County and surrounding areas for 67 years


I 11 -- - - -..- --












BUSINESS


B
Section


December 18, 2008 w w w. starf 1. corm Page 10



Vishing scams Florida plays role in $12 million


Your Better Business
Bureau serving north-
west Florida is warning of
phone messages and text
messages about individu-
al's credit card accounts
being suspended or com-
promised.
According to the FBI,
there is a sudden and seri-
ous rash of vishing across
the country. "Vishing" is
the term for automated
calls or text messages to
phones and cell phones
with the specific goal of
gaining personal informa-
tion for the purposes of
identity theft. "Phishing"
is when the scam is perpe-
trated by e-mail.
The calls being reported
have a similar message:
"Your account has been
suspended due to unusual
activity" or "Your VISA
card has been temporar-
ily suspended." Following
this, you are requested to
call the number 818-824-
4023, sometimes stating
the name of a credit card
issuer or even a local finan-
cial institution.
The BBB serving north-
ern Colorado and Wyoming
called the number to find
out what kind of informa-
tion is being requested
from victims who fall for the
ruse. The number connects


the caller to an automated
system with this script:
Welcome to our 24-
hour telephone banking
system. If you would like
to reactivate your account,
press 1.
To leave, press 2.
Please enter your 16-
digit account number.
Please enter your ex-
piration date.
Please enter your 4-
digit pin number to com-
plete the verification pro-
cess.
Please wait while your
card is verified.
Your card has been
activated. Thank you for
banking with us.
BBB advice: Never pro-
vide personal or financial
information to anyone who
contacts you. If you have
reason to think you have
been contacted by a com-
pany or bank that you have
a relationship with, pull out
your original documenta-
tion and contact them using
the phone numbers or Web
sites that are listed on your
contract or statement.
If you receive an offer or
call that sounds suspicious,
check it out with your BBB.
For additional information
, and advice you can trust to
stay safe this holiday sea-
son, start with bbb.org.


Gulf Coast Medical Center
Primary Care in Port St. Joe

tM~~ha-- M~ m ^


settlement with toy maker


39 states join

effort to make

toys safer

Attorney General Bill
McCollum recently an-
nounced that Florida will
receive more than $587,000
as part of a $12 million
multistate settlement with
toy maker Mattel, Inc. and
subsidiary Fisher-Price,
Inc. The settlement re-
solves a 16-month inves-
tigation into the events
surrounding a voluntary
-recall of the companies'
toys for excessive levels of
lead paint in 2007.
From August to Octo-
ber 2007, the United States
Consumer Product Safety
Commission recalled ap-
proximately two million
Mattel and Fisher-Price
'toys manufactured in
China,. alleging the toys
contained excessive lead


in accessible surface coat-
ings. At the time of the
recalls, the Commission's
standards permitted lead
in accessible surface coat-
ings to be 600 parts per
million.
Lead levels taken of the
recalled toys during the
course of the states' in-
vestigations revealed that
levels not only exceeded
the federal standard, but
in some instances tested
at 10,000 ppm to 50,000
ppm. One toy, the Big Big
World 6-in-1 Borrgo Band
Toys, tested over 100,000
ppm.
Approximately two mil-
lion Mattel toys were re-
called, and a significant
number of toys manufac-
tured before Nov. 30, 2008,
underwent further testing,
which resulted in some ad-
ditional recalls.
The agreement
reached by the attorneys
general requires more
stringent standards for


Forgotten Coast Realtors

Association Holidqy Food Drive
All donations will be de l*,Yed to Gulf County
Senior Center. "
Drop-off locations. Mexico Beach and Port
St. Joe Harmon Realty. Bluewater Realty, Cen-
tury 21 Gulf Coast Realty. Beach Realty, Coldwell
Banker Forgotten Coast Realty, Cape San Bias C-
30. Boardwalk Realty; One Source Mortgage and
Coastal Realty'Group
For additional information, call 850-653-3322.


TIEFIHE E\PErIrt)A RE -


accessible lead effective
for toys manufactured af-
ter Nov. 30, 2008. Mattel
will immediately drop the
acceptable lead level in
surface coatings from 600
to 90 ppm. This imposi-
tion of stricter standards
means all toys manufac-
tured by Mattel as of Nov.
30, 2008 will meet the new
90 ppm standards.
The standards will be
enacted ahead of the dead-
lines called for in the Con-
sumer Product Safety Im-
provement Act, passed by
Congress earlier this year.
Under the settlement,
Mattel must also notify the
attorneys general if the
company confirms exces-
sive lead .levels in any of
its products, which would
violate state or federal
law and will work with the
states to remedy any such
violations.
The states were led by
an executive committee
consisting of assistant at-
torneys general in Florida,
Arizona, Kentucky, Massa-
chusetts, Missouri, Ohio,


Pennsylvania and Ver-
mont. Florida's share of
the settlement is $587,000,
which will go toward future
monitoring and enforce-
ment in this area.
More information about
toy recalls can be obtained
online at the Consumer
Product Safety Commis-
sion's website, http://www.
cpsc.gov.
Consumers may also
call the CPSC Recall Hot-
line at 1-800-638-2772.
Shopping tips for par-
ents are available on-
line at http://www.cpsc.
gov/cpscpub/prerel/prht-
ml08/08086.html.
Examples of the re-
called toys are available
online at http://myflori-
dalegal.com/webfiles.nsf/
WF/KGRG-7MCJ5J/$file/
ToyRecallExamples.pdf
A copy of the settle-
ment with Mattel is avail-
able online at http://my-
floridalegal.com/webfiles.
nsf/WF/KGRG-7MCJ6L/
$file/MattelConsentJudg-
ment.pdf


Florida's Great Northwest

awards $150,000 to six

workforce development boards


Florida's Great North-
west, Inc. is pleased to an-
nounce the award totaling
$150,000 to six of Northwest
Florida's regional Work-
force Development Boards
to fund innovative projects
that focus on addressing
specific workforce needs.
The Workforce Innovation
Project was developed in
August 2008 as part of Flor-
ida's Great Northwest's
WIRED Northwest Florida
Initiative, which is funded
through the U.S. Depart-
ment of Labor.
The objective of the pro-
gram is to fund innovative
workforce development,
training, entrepreneur-
ship, and other industry-
specific education and
training projects that en-
courage employment or
employee advancement in
target industries. Florida's
Great Northwest's target
high-growth, high-tech in-
dustries are aviation, aero-
space, defense and nation-
al security; health science
and human performance
enhancement; renewable
energy and environment;
transportation and logis-
tics services; and the two
supporting industries of
information technology


services and research and
engineering.
The Workforce Innova-
tion Project grants were
awarded to Northwest
Florida' s'workfored devel-
opment boards to admin-
ister and/or provide the
training and related activi-
ties to assist workers, both
unemployed and employed
and students aged 15 years
or older, in gaining skills
and competencies needed
to obtain or upgrade their
employment positions in
Florida's Great North-
west's targeted industry
sectors. In addition, these
projects will promote spe-
cific occupational needs,
the educational require-
ments for those occupa-
tions, and direct trainees
toward those talent devel-
opment programs.
The following six pro-
grams were selected to re-
ceive grant funding:
Chipola Regional
Workforce Development
Board, Inc.
Workforce Escarosa:
Gulf Coast Workforce
Board:
Jobs Plus
WORKFORCE Plus
North Florida Work-
force Development Board


Workforce System responds to demand
for unemployment compensation


The Agency for Work-
force Innovation issued
a statement to regional
workforce boards around
the state regarding unem-
ployment compensation.
In the statement, the
agency listed doing the fol-
lowing items in response to
the increased demand on
the unemployment com-
pensation system:
Hired an additional 255
employees to ensure better
customer satisfaction.
Added an additional
345 lines to the phone sys-
tem for a total of 1,012 lines
so that more customers
can call in.
Extended the hours
when a person can file for,
seek or verify unemploy-
ment compensation infor-
mation over the telephone.
The hours are Monday-Fri-
day 7:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. and
Saturday from 8:00 a.m. -
4:00 p.m.
Working 7-days-per-
week to handle and process


claims.
Added two new servers
to increase performance of
the online claims system.
For additional informa-
tion on unemployment
compensation, call 1-800-
204-2418, or visit http://
www.floridajobs.org/unem-
ployment/index.html.
The Gulf Coast Work-
force Board is a public/pri-
vate partnership chartered
by the State of Florida to
administer workforce de-
velopment programs in
Bay, Gulf, and Franklin
counties. Their mission
is to provide leadership,
oversight, guidance and
assistance to institutions
and agencies delivering
training and workforce
services in order to meet
the economic development
and employment needs
of Bay, Gulf, and Franklin
counties. The Gulf Coast
Workforce Board is a mem-
ber of the Employ Florida
network.


--." ~. n


break out


Better Business Bureau warns of phone,

text message scams during holidays


Extended




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