Group Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.).
Title: The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03660
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Star
Publisher: Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Publication Date: December 4, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028419
Volume ID: VID03660
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
alephbibnum - 000358020
lccn - sn 95047323

Full Text


Junior
Service
League
awards
$6,000


- -. A L IMh EAICDA DI-D lk'.JC 19.37

K Y CONG~E LIE; FL
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OAIIIESMILE FL 3-11l


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www.starfl.com 50(


I N Believers battled

AV I thePostal
V I N G Service in 1906


In December 1906, the New York Times
chronicled Brooklyn Postmaster George H Roberts' war with the U.S.
Postal Service over the distribution of Santa letters.


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Unlike the dates of JFK's
assassination and the bombing
of Pearl Harbor, Dec. 9, 1906,
does not remain etched in the
nation's consciousness.
But the events of that day
were as troubling and traumatic
as any great American tragedy.
For Santa Claus. the beloved
patron saint of Christmas, met
an untimely end that frosty
morning, killed by bureaucrats
at the United States Postal
Service.
"The Post Office Department
does not believe in Santa Claus.
Officially, the dispenser of
Christmas cheer for little folks
is a myth," the New York Times
reported on Dec. 10, 1906.
Though it began receiving
Santa letters more than a
century ago, the U.S. Postal
Service did not make a formal
ruling on the fate of the letters
until 1906.
In a landmark decision, the
Postal Service officially declared
Santa Claus non-existent and
set forth the proper manner of
Santa letter disposal.
All letters addressed to the
jolly chimney-diver were to be
forwarded to the Dead Letter
Office, the final resting place for
all letters with incomplete or
fictitious addresses.
Noting that wiunder the ruling,
philanthropic citizens no longer
would be allowed to respond
to children's Santa letters, the
New York Times chastised the
Postal Service for its failure of
imagination.
"How could letters
addressed to a person and place
that don't exist be delivered to
real persons with real abiding
places? There is no imagination
in the Post Office Department
that can cover that stretch," the
article read.
"It would be 'against the law'
to deliver letters to other than
the addressee, and the time-
honored Christmas celebration
might better be abandoned than
have the law violated in such
fashion."

Brooklyn postmaster goes
rogue
Santa might have been dead
in the eyes of the U.S. Postal
Service, but Brooklyn was still
cozy with the big man in 1906.
Twvo weeks after the Postal
Service's announcement,

See SANTA A6


investigation finds



wrongdoing in



commission race


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

An Air Force investiga-
tion into allegations that fed-
eral equipment and resourc-
es were used to promote the
campaign of a candidate for
Gulf County commission
was completed this week
with a determination by top
base officials that infrac-
tions of military policy had
occurred involving a civilian
contractor.
As a result of the deter-,
mination stemming from a
Commander Directed In-
vestigation (CDI), specific
employees of that contrac-
tor who were involved in the


conduct at the center of the
allegations no longer will be
permitted to provide any ser-
vices at Tyndall, a base press
release stated. The contrac-
tor provided multimedia ser-
vices at the base.
Additionally, other em-
ployees of the same unnamed
contractor will undergo fur-
ther ethics training to re-
emphasize the Air Force's
policy dictating conduct in
the workplace, according to
the release.
"Tyndall is committed
to reinforcing the value of
integrity, personal respon-
sibility and accountability,"

See COMMISSION A3


Christmas on the


Coast rescheduled


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

It, quite literally, rained
on their parade..
Inclement weather forced
the Gulf County Chamber of
Commerce to reschedule
last Saturday's "Christmas
on the Coast" parade and
celebration to this Saturday,
Dec. 6.
The Port St. Joe celebra-
tion, originally planned over
two weekends, will begin
early with the Reindeer 5K
Run and Fitness Walk.
Race registration begins
at 7:30 a.m. ET at the Port
Inn. The registration fee is
$20, or $10 plus a new, un-
wrapped toy to be donated to


the Christmas for the Kids
and Elderly in Gulf County
.charity.
The race. will begin
promptly at 8:30 a.m.
Overall male and female
runners will receive $50
cash prizes. Winners in five
age groups will also receive
first-, second- and third-
place awards.
The Christmas on the
Coast celebration will fea-
ture two parades, one by
land and one by sea.
Visitors will line the side-
walks along Reid Avenue to
view a parade featuring an-
tique cars, fire trucks, deco-
rative floats and golf carts.

See CHRISTMAS A6


County hears school board request


By Marie Logan
Contributing writer
Last week, Gulf County School
Superintendent Tim Wilder formally
took the second step toward placing
'the question of a one-mill levy before
voters in March of next year.
At the Nov. 25 regular county
commission meeting, Wilder placed
the issue before the board by for-
mally requesting a special election
so voters could decide the outcome.
By state law, the school board must
receive permission from the county
commission to hold the election.


The proposed March 17, 2009,
election would determine if voters
agreed to an increase of one mill in
the Gulf County School District's ad
valorem millage. (One mill equals $1
for every $1,000 in taxable personal
property.)
The increase would begin July
1, 2009, and end four years later on
June 30, 2013. The money raised by
the levy would be used for "neces-
sary operating expenses, including
funds to provide for teachers and
classrooms."
Based on current property values,
the additional mill would produce al-


most $2.5 million; however, current
property values could change by the
July 1, 2009, certification deadline of
next year's tax rolls.
Wilder made an impassioned pre-
sentation to the commissioners, the
gist of which was that the county
public schools might face dire cut-
backs and be unable to provide many
services if the additional mill was
not levied.
Because of state cutbacks, consti-
tutionally mandated classroom size
requirements, a stagnant economy,
See SCHOOL A7


S EEDOM Subscribe to The Star
EEDJOM 227-1278
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Opinion .................... A4
Letters to the Editor ................ A5
Sports....................................... All1


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Obituaries .................................... B4
Church News............................... B5
Law Enforcement................... B9


School News................................ B6
Legals........................................... B11
Classifieds..................................... B10


Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET
Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278
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-,-.*'A *


--A:A-7T'





Thursday, December 4, 2008


A2 AWI Ih I I= ioca


www.starfl.com


Not if
area


WANT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
,Mail in the Empty Stocking Fund envelope inserted in
- today's paper to the Salvation Army with your contribution!

SWith your help, the Empty Stocking Fund
can make a difference for so many
families in need during this holiday season.
The Empty Stocking Fund provides food and toy baskets
to thousands of families in Bay, Gulf, Franklin,
Holmes, and Washington counties.


NEMV HERALD

THE STA R

; IMIng4DTIiEi. R


-


VI



TH.[i


City approves Sun


'i04if1I










you are one of the l-usands in our
at-risk of going to.b.d hungry and
empty-handed on Christmas.


By the same 3-2 vote that
has characterized the pro-
cess from the outset the Port
St. Joe city commission on
Tuesday night approved the
Sunday sale of alcohol within
the city limits.
The amendment to the
city's alcohol sales ordi-
nance approved on Tuesday
effectively treats Sunday as
any other day of the week,
allowing the sale of alcohol
between the hours of 7 a.m.
and midnight.
Proponents of amending
the alcohol ordinance cited
economics: 14 businesses on
property assessed at some
$7 million and employing
dozens of people could ben-
efit by eliminating the pro-
hibition on Sunday sales. In
tough economic times, any
assistance government can
provide it should, proponents
argued from the outset.
Opponents contended
that lifting the prohibition
stripped the city of some


sales


of its character and under-
mined the thread of faith
that has long bonded the
community.
Opponents also cited a
non-binding referendum
held in the last two years in
which voters defeated Sun-
day sales by 52-48 percent.
Commissioners in the
majority of every vote as
the amended ordinance was
pushed through the process
insisted the referendum
represented little more than
an "escape clause" for com-
missioners to avoid fulfilling
their elected charge.
In other business during
Tuesday's meeting:
The 60 acres near the
Gulf/Franklin Center which
is the location for a new
county sports complex is al-
ready being cleared as sur-
veys go out to residents in
the city in their water bills
- and the county pertaining
to what sort of amenities
folks would like in the sports


Bonfire to benefit autism center


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

A successful 10K race in
October raised the commu-
nity's awareness of the new
Growing Minds Center,
which provides intensive,
one-on-one instruction to
children with autism.
The center will next host
a Beach Bonfire Benefit
on Friday, Dec. 5 from 5-
10 p.m. (ET) at the Turtle
Beach Inn, located at 140


Painted Pony Rd. in Indian
Pass.
The event will feature
food, drinks and entertain-
ment from noted local mu-
sicians Dana and Charlie
Black.
Admission is $15 per per-
son or $25 for two people,
with all proceeds benefiting
the Growing Minds Center.
Attendees are asked
to bring their own beach
chairs.
Founded this August by


board certified behavior
analyst Christine Herms-
dorfer, the Growing Minds
Center is housed in the
Long Avenue Baptist nurs-
ery facility in Port St. Joe.
Funds from the bonfire
will help Hermsdorfer and
her staff expand the cen-
ter's hours and serve more
children.
For more information on
the upcoming fundraiser or
to RSVP contact Stephanie
Petrie at (850) 229-9386.


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complex. The city and county
are encouraging residents to
fill out the surveys and sub-
mit them as citizen input will
assist in construction of the
complex.
GAC Contractors was
awarded the bid for installa-
tion of water and sewer as
well as access road improve-
ments on U.S. 98 for the new
Sacred Heart Hospital. GAC
was the low bidder by nearly
$90,000 with a bid of $450,572,
described by Bill Kennedy,
vice-president of Preble-Rish
as a "very good price." The
budget for the work was over
$1 million, Kennedy said.
Work is nearly complete
on improvements to Wil-
liams Avenue in downtown
Port St. Joe. Street paving
is complete and sidewalks
have been installed and the
project should be complete
by Christmas, said Matt
Fleck, executive director of
the Port St. Joe Redevelop-
ment Agency.


$5 Raffle Tickets 3 day 2 night stay at the Windmark
Beach Resort with a $200 Gift Certificate to School of Fish Restaurant.
Tickets Available at: Toucans, St Joe Rent All and Persnickety.
Drawing December 6, 2008 Benefits Project Graduation


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L ,ocal


A2 I The Stnr





Thursday, December 4, 2008


Local


The Star I A3


COMMISSION from page Al


the release continued. "Tyndall
holds all employees to the highest
ethical standards and expects poli-
cies outlining political activity and
proper use of government resourc-
es to be abided by at all times."
The allegations involved the
county's District 3 commission race
between challenger Bo Williams
and incumbent Bill Williams, who
won re-election on Nov. 4 by 250
votes.
The allegations, which also were
outlined in a complaint filed by Bill
Williams with the Florida Elections
Commission, were that federal re-
sources and equipment were used
to produce rack cards, signs and
other campaign literature for Bo
Williams.
Bill Williams also alleged in his
state complaint that those services
exceeded the "in-kind" donations for
those items listed on .Bo Williams'
campaign contribution report.
The allegations underscored
the tenor of a race that grew more
contentious in the final weeks of the


campaign, with the candidates trad-
ing allegations.
The simmering tension could be
traced to four years ago when both
men sought the District 3 seat, with
Bill Williams winning by fewer than
15 votes.
He subsequently was fined
$3,000 after a complaint was filed
with the Florida Elections Commis-
sion, which levied the fine for filing a
false contribution report, accepting
a donation within five days of the
election in violation of election law
and spending money on his cam-
paign without sufficient funds in his
campaign account.
And Bo Williams continued blast-
ing away at his opponent after the
Nov. 4 election.
In a thank you advertisement to
supporters, he noted that Bill Wil-
liams owed the city of Port St. Joe
rent on a business in town and had
been delinquent in paying his per-
sonal county taxes amid other al-
legations.
The allegations involving Tyndall


Bill Williams, right, won the County Commission District 3 seat over
Bo Williams, left, by 250 votes.


surfaced in the final two weeks prior
to the Nov. 4 general election.
Individuals within the civilian
contractor's unit contacted Bill Wil-
liams anonymously, he said, con-
cerning the production of campaign
material using equipment and em-
ployees at the base. The contrac-
tor at the center of the allegations


employed an individual who was
Bo Williams' campaign treasurer in
2004 and, like Bo Williams, is retired
military.
It was unclear at press time
whether that employee, Jim Belles-
bach, or any others involved in the
violations had been terminated, re-
assigned or had other action taken


against them by the contractor,
which had undertaken an internal
investigation in conjunction with
the Air Force.
"I am truly appreciative of the
manner in which Tyndall Air Force
Base handled this investigation,"
Bill Williams said. "In my opinion,
Brigadier General Roberson, Ma-
jor Schneider and Captain Farrell
(base officials and the investigating
officer, respectively) handled this
inquiry with professionalism and
integrity.
' "It is unfortunate that my pre-
vious opponent, Bo Williams, and
his colleagues chose to violate Air
Force policy to unfairly influence
a county commission race in Gulf
County. Tyndall Air Force Base is a
great neighbor to Gulf County, and
we consider this matter closed."
The investigation by the Florida
Elections Commission remains on-
going.
"I have no comment," Bo Wil-
liams said when contacted on
Wednesday.


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Thursday, December 4, 2008


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Star
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone (850) 227-1278


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457
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SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
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further than amount received for such advertisement.


,PINION


www.starfI.com


OUR VIEW




Levy levity


Last week, Superintendent of Schools
Tim Wilder went before the county
commission to ask for a call for a special
election next March to consider a school
levy.
What ensued was a discussion that
seemed to be occurring in an alternate
universe.
Procedure versus decisions.
Commissioners were certainly entitled to
express their views about the referendum
and some hesitancy about asking taxpayers
for more funding, but the request from the
school board was procedural and required
by law.
The county isn't asking for the money.
Commissioners are far more subtle than
that when tacking on additional taxes.
Wilder wasn't seeking commissioners'
votes next March: He was jumping through
the required hurdles. The histrionics can
wait for a more substantive discussion, such
as, oh, naming parks.
Misleading versus forgetful.
Anyone who believes voters were misled
about the half-cent sales tax passed last
decade for infrastructure improvements at
Port St. Joe Elementary which seemed
some kind of bargaining chip last week;
next week apple pie should go back and
check the record of the time and consult
with some of the community members who
led the campaign for approval.
The ballot language could not have been
clearer. The campaign, judging by old news
stories, could not have been clearer.
That levy was about improving the
footprint at Port St. Joe Elementary School,
nothing else.
To assert years later that anybody was
misled about that referendum means: 1)
convenient memory loss or 2) political
cynicism.


And what is the connection between.
the two, as commissioners are requiring a
pledge from the school board to sunset the
half-cent sales tax as a caveat to approving
the special election?
After all, in the past year, commissioners
had little problem adding to the local gas
tax, adding to the local sales tax with few
strings on how money would be spent, when
the tax would sunset, the very issues that
suddenly seem all-fire important.
A mill is a mill.
All due respect, but district school
officials are off to a rocky start with the
campaign to secure the levy if they can't
bring themselves to call a mill a mill.
What the district is asking for is
additional operating funds: one mill. Clear
as day in reading the ballot language and
resolution passed by the school board.
School board members have clearly
stated they intend to trim spending to bring
down the capital outlay portion of school
taxes the one of four funding components
over which they have sway to offset some
of the additional millage.
School board members also can rightfully
point to frugality in the past with capital
outlay money and the fact that school
budgets are far different than county and
municipal budgets in that Tallahassee
dictates most of the numbers falling under
the heading of school taxes on TRIM
notices.
But trying to hedge bets by calling it
"seven-tenths" of a mill or anything other
than an additional mill to operate muddies
the waters and treats voters as if they
can't connect the dots. In short, it sounds,
intended or not, misleading.
There is education school officials
must undertake to make their case for the
levy, but trying on different numbers for


size is a confusing way to go about it and
unnecessary.
Twenty-percent solution.
One argument heard from
commissioners was that a special election
was not a true reflection of how voters feel
because fewer would turn out for a one-
issue ballot. Twenty percent was the number
bandied about, and those voters would have
a vested interest in the outcome, so the
referendum could not possibly reflect the
will of the people.
A portion of that argument has some
truth: Parents, teachers, district employees
and other stakeholders in the school system
are most likely to make sure they vote on any
election pertaining to education.
But, remember, this is Gulf County.
And an election in which only 20 percent
of the registered voters even if 80 percent
turn out are able to cast ballots is known
here as an election for county commissioner.
When they hinge an argument on that
math, commissioners should back that
argument up by noting which one of them
faced more than 20 percent of the registered
voters in the county.
And see how fast that argument
crumbles.
What the discussion between school
officials and county commissioners
underscored is that there is still disconnect
between the various governing bodies in the
county. They just aren't on the same page;
they are not reading the same book.
There is a groundswell in the grassroots
for coming together fed by an understanding
that the only way out of the current
economic morass the community faces
is a breakdown of divisions, a spirit of
togetherness and broken barriers.
Those grassroots were trampled, again,
by elected officials last Tuesday night.


'This Magic Moment...


I was riding back from
Tallahassee when Johnny
Cash and June Carter
leaped out of my radio
with their energetic duet,
"We got married in a
fever, hotter than a pepper
sprout." Before they could
get to the next line,
I was thanking Tim
Peters one more
time and found
myself transported
immediately to a
small eatery on a
mountain top in
Tennessee.
The City Cafe HUNKERI
was as simple Kesley
as the setting.
Nothing changed
much in Sewanee. The
University of the South kids
came and went, but the
little town remained pretty
much the same. It was
early spring of 1966. Tim
was a junior with a car and
a little money and more
than a few accruements.


I was the freshman with
no wheels, less money an
no portfolio. I don't know
how we hooked up. Mayb
he saw the loneliness ...
baseball practice drew to
close, he'd find me.
"Let's get a Coke and
listen to Johnny
and June." We'd
spend thirty minute
"cooling it" at the
caf6. Tim paid. It w
way above being ki
We repeated this
ritual pretty much
daily for most of th
)OWN baseball season; an
lbert that song was a mu
every trip! Tim was
from New York. I w
from way out yonder. He
didn't seem to notice my
unpolished and less than
cosmopolitan background
We discussed everything
and nothing. And we'd jo
Johnny on his next line,
"When I breeze into that
city, people gonna stoop


and bow..."
id Tim was a heck of a left fielder
and lead-off man. He was an even
)e better person. I have not seen or
As heard from him since the day he
a graduated. But you let me pass
a little out-of-the-way cafe on an
early spring afternoon or Johnny
and June hit the first note of that
song and I am appreciative all over
es again.
I know it's nuts! Who keeps
'as a "record" of past events by the
nd. current song on the radio? Folks
s in their right mind would just write
it down in a diary! But somehow it
e works for me.
id I hear Ernie Ford belting out
ist "Sixteen Tons," and I'm catapulted
s back to 1955. Leon came home
'as from town with a small 45 RPM
record player and one record,
"I was born one morning, it was
drizzling rain..." I have no idea how
d. he came up with the money for that
machine, but our record collection
in grew over the years to include
Elvis, Jerry Lee, Little Richard and
a host of others. We wore a dozen
needles out listening to the latest
and greatest "Rock and Rock"
of the '50s. But the song I always
associate with that record player
(and the time) is the first one I ever
heard it play.
I worked at a swimming pool
during a large part of my formative
years. We had these giant speakers
under the high diving board blaring
out an assortment of the latest
tunes. Today I can hear "Sixty
Minute Man," "You Always Hurt
the One You Love" or The Kingston
Trio's "Reverend Mr. Black," and
my eyes automatically squint from
the glare and the chlorine smell
near 'bout bowls me over.
I'm telling you, this "record
keeping" by the "song of the
moment" makes no sense ... unless
you were there!
Leon was getting ready for his
senior prom. He put on that ultra
thin belt with the double buckles.
We're in 1960 now. He had a white
sport coat and a pair of black dress
loafers with a white lightning streak
down the side. I was much younger,
but I went down to the high school
to watch them dance. The song I
remember was "Cherry Pink and
Apple Blossom White."
I kissed Millicent Blackburn that
same summer. The hit coming out
of her grandmother's old stand up


radio was "Theme From a Summer
Place." After all these years I'm
still trying to figure out if that is
a good memory, or a bad one! I do
remember that the song was better
than the movie.
When Rollin Trull smacked
Jimmy Roy Winstead upside the
head and the fight broke out at the
Skyway Grill Joey Dee and The
Starlighters were tearing up their
version of "Peppermint Twist," I
was under a table at the back booth
as the song and the fight wound
down. I figured it was just another
case of me being at the wrong place
at the wrong time until I got a look
at Jimmy Roy's face. He was the
guy at the wrong place! When the
police finally restored order, not one
eyewitness could agree about who,
what, when, where or how the fight
started. Every person interrogated
that night got the song right!
It doesn't have to make sense,
except in my own mind. "I Love
a Rainy Night" takes me back to
a summer of American Legion
Baseball games in Paris, Tenn.
"Candy Man" by Roy Orbison
reminds me of a girl I once danced
with in that same town. I have long
since forgotten her name, but not
that red dress, beautiful face and
friendly smile.
Me, Martin, Pam, Buddy and
Charlotte got arrested for speeding
on our way to Murray, Ky., to hear
Bo Diddley sing, "You Can't Judge
a Book by Looking at the Cover."
That's another case of "a bad
memory at the moment," but we
have laughed about it and recounted
it ... well, every time we hear Bo
bend them guitar strings.
Peter, Paul and Mary sang "Puff
the Magic Dragon." We thought it
was about a pet dragon in some
place like Disneyworld. You can
imagine our surprise years later
when we learned it was about
smoking marijuana. They tricked
us! 'Course, that was pretty easy,
we were so young. And innocent.
And you can't believe the hope and
excitement and exhilaration that
sprang with each new day! The
times were simple, the future was
unlimited, our dreams were big and
the music was our backdrop.
You could do anything but lay off
our "Blue Suede Shoes"...

Respectfully,
Kos


A
Section


KEYBOARD


KEYBOARD
KLATTERINGS



Time to



step up


or off


Just as the Port St. Joe paper mill
shut down for good 10 years ago, I
was serving as a business editor at
.another paper.
A column I wrote at the time, the
theme of which has been repeated
on this page frequently, noted the
particular link between The St. Joe
Company and the town that bore its
name, Port St. Joe.
The point of the column was that
despite pressures
from other players,
such as Wall Street
and shareholders
and analysts and the
company's own goals
and aspirations,
this umbilical with
Port St. Joe and the TIM CROFT
county was to be Star news editor
carefully nurtured.
Then-CEO of the
company Peter Rummell sounded
much the same theme several years
ago during the annual Chamber
of Commerce dinner, echoing that
there was a special connection
between the company and the
community, and it was one the
company took seriously.
Expanding the port seems to be
an exception.
There is no other way to describe
the past four or five years than as an
exercise in seeing what additional
barriers the company could erect in
front of the Port Authority to prevent
the creation of an operational port in
Gulf County.
There were several years of
visioningg," a process that produced
what could be best described as a
picture of a port as seen through
shattered glasses.
No viewpoint seemed alike, and
"contrary" was the operative word
for the entire process.
The Port Authority went through
some leadership changes, and lo
and behold, an agreement was
reached on a lease for what is
known as Parcel B.
The guess is that "B" stands
for less desirable because the Port
Authority, to truly grow and create
the kind of jobs a port can generate,
needs access to what is known as
Parcel A, adjacent land that has
bay and canal waterfront, critical to
access to the shipping channel.
Now, the Port Authority is
seeking a temporary lease to the
mill site bulkhead and to purchase
and/or lease Parcel A, but that
proposal, despite assurances from
the new folks at the top of The St.
Joe Company about quick decision-
making, seems to be heading in the
direction of the visioningg" process,
or nowhere.
Sometimes in small communities,
it is too easy to buy in to street
scuttlebutt, which in this case
holds that The St. Joe Company
doesn't really want an operational
port in Gulf County, that its land
holdings here are solely resort-
oriented which is a pretty fair
characterization of how they
are reflected in the quarterly
earning statements and that a
partnership on a port would only
anchor the company's stock on Wall
Street.
In other words, The St. Joe
Company might be paying lip
service to a newly created and
expanding port, but lip service is too
often what is figuratively slapped on
an unwanted pig.
And though company officials
might protest such a description,
it is not completely off base
considering that what details are
understood about a lease agreement
on the mill site and Parcel A indicate
such a lease is not exactly primed to
boost port expansion in the future,
with restrictions that would hinder
revenue streams, access to grants
and products to be off-loaded.
The hard question that must be
asked is whether or not the company
is serious about being a partner
for expanding the job base in Gulf

See KLATTERINGS A5


Page A4


.............................................


THnESTAR

USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, Fla. 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
News Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully
weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly
convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.

+A~,;I~;?f!!^r!(P^^;^^^


ID
(ol






Thursday, December 4, 2008 ODifliOn The Star I A5


Oino


Giving money not the only way




to be charitable this season


Jason Alderman

During the holiday
season, many people reflect
on what they can do to help
those less fortunate. In 2007,
caring Americans gave
a record $306.4 billion in
charitable donations, which
doesn't even include the
countless hours spent on
volunteer activities.
But during this recent
economic turmoil, many
folks are being forced to
cut back on contributions
as they themselves face
increasing hardships. This
is particularly bad timing
because food banks, disaster
relief organizations and
other charities need our help
now more than ever.
So what can you do
to help others while
safeguarding your own
family's well being? Here are
a few ideas to stretch your
charitable contributions:

Donate your time
Charities always gladly
accept cash, but many run
on shoestring budgets with
minimal staff, so your time
and expertise might be
just as valuable. Numerous


organizations can ma
you up with local cha
that suit your interest
including Network fo
(www.networkforgoo
Volunteer Match (ww
volunteermatch.org)
Volunteer Solutions (
volunteersolutions.or
Although you can'
take a federal income
deduction for your tif
you can deduct milea
certain expenses relay
to your volunteer act
at IRS-qualified, tax-
exempt organizations
Publication 526 expla
tax deductions for ch
contributions work at
Publication 78 lists al
approved organization
(www.irs.gov).

Bang for your I
Make sure any
nonprofit organization
to which you donated
well-run and contribi
at least 75 percent of
contributions they re
to programs that serve
their beneficiaries, as
opposed to being spe
on their own salaries
and expenses. Sever
online rating services


watch
cities
ts,
r Good
d.org),
w.
and

'g).
t
e tax
ne,
ige and
ated
ivities

s. IRS
fins how
aritable
nd
H IRS-


can help you research
potential recipients of your
generosity, including www.
charitynavigatorcorg, www.
guidestanorg and the Better
Business Bureau (-www.give.
org).

Tap your employer
Many companies will
match a portion of their
employees' donations to
IRS-approved nonprofit
organizations or
educational institutions.
Ask your Human Resources
department if your company
offers such a program.

Non-cash contributions


n s If you're strapped for
cash, there are many other
valuable items you can
buck pass along to charity. For
example:
ns 0 Clean out your closets
are and donate unneeded
ute clothes, appliances,
furniture and other items to
ceive nonprofit organizations that
ve sponsor thrift shops, like
s Goodwill Industries (www.
nt goodwill.org) or your local
religious or AIDS service
al organizations. Just be sure
s they're on the IRS-approved
list above.
Many organizations
accept donated frequent
flyer miles. One great
program, the Make a Wish
Foundation (www.wish.org),
estimates it needs over 2.5
billion miles a year to fulfill
the travel needs of the sick
children theyhelp. Check
airline Web sites for links to
organizations that accept
Sa stash their miles.
astash Local food pantries
rough and homeless shelters


always need food
contributions, especially
around the holidays.
Many also will accept and
distribute toiletry items,
so the next time you buy
two-for-one toothpaste, set
one tube aside for a needy
family.

Adopt a family
Numerous social and
religious organizations
sponsor programs that
will align you with a family
in crisis. You can provide
services as wide-ranging
as helping them to pay rent
to educational tutoring to
playing Santa Claus for
homeless children.

Scam alert
Be wary of unsolicited
calls or emails seeking
contributions to
organizations that sound
legitimate but might not
be. Visit the organization's
Web site independently (not
through an e-mail link) and
look them up on the online
rating services mentioned
above. And never give out
your credit card number or
personal information unless
you initiated the contact
yourself.
One last suggestion that
won't cost a dime: Donate
blood. I can't think of any
better way to literally save
lives.

Jason Alderman
directs Visa's financial
education programs. Sign
up for his free monthly
e-Newsletter at www.
practicalmoneyskills .com/
newsletter


Dear Editor:
We came to Port St. Joe
and loved it! It is laid back
and quaint, but I am sure the
developers will ruin it soon.
We are amused by the
"outrage" over Sunday
alcohol sales. Sounds like
Iowa 50 years ago. It is the
same opposition. We have
Sunday sales, and I am not
aware that anything has
changed no moral decay
noticeable. People still go to
church and pray. It did not,
end the world as we knew it.
Any drinker with half a wit


knows enough to buy
on Saturday to get th
___ i _


aunaay.
Sunday (alcohol) sales
is a nice convenience. We
will be back in February
and March to enjoy your
village once again. Oh, yes,
if we forgot to buy a bottle of
wine on Saturday for Sunday
dinner we look forward to
picking it up on Sunday after
worship.

Ron Spears
Waterloo, Iowa


KLATTERINGS fromp.e A4


County, which could use
some expanding.
Remember, when U.S.
98 was realigned, there was
a pledge of some 70 or so
new jobs. Yet, in the last
year or so, the company has
"reorganized" several times
while shedding jobs.
And the grand plans
about turning WindMark
Beach, the mill site and the
area of The St. Joe Building
into gears of an economic
engine, well, they aren't
exactly revving up.
This is a wonderful,
postcard-hued community in
which to live.
The key, though, is the
ability to live and many in
Gulf County would attest


to a reality that the county
is being buffeted by the
economic storms clouding
the country to a greater
extent than other areas.
The question becomes
pretty simple.
Is The St. Joe Company
a willing partner in creating
jobs and helping to ensure
the sustainability of this
community in the long-term
or not?
Yes or no. This
community, from which
the company spun its
name, deserves at least a
straight answer. Straight
talk is the foundation of any
partnership.
Is there any when it
comes to the port?


.SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: (850) 227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form of
letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited
and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial page
should be a forum where differing ideas and
opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.


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,HERE THE EXPERTS .AR


After election, the


issues remain

By Lori Parham
AARP Florida state director

Pull up the yard signs, cancel the ads; the
presidential election is over. Now, the real work
begins.
For nearly two years, the Divided We Fail
initiative has been speaking out for bipartisan
action on health and lifetime financial security. If
there was ever a sign that American voters wanted
and need real change, the record-setting election
turnout clearly puts a resounding exclamation point
on that statement.
Divided We Fail allies AARP, the Business
Roundtable, the Service Employees International
Union and the National Federation of Independent
Business have spent the last two years engaging
voters and demanding bipartisan action on these
issues. According to Bill Novelli, AARP CEO, the
2008 election marks the end of the first chapter
in our effort. We have to work hard to ensure that
health care and financial security remain in the
forefront as the new administration sets its policies.
We also must hold the new president and Congress
accountable for the promises they made during the
campaign. We are asking them to reaffirm their
commitment to finding bipartisan solutions to the
issues of health care and financial security.
That means we need the continuation of our
grassroots effort to remind newly election officials
that voters are paying attention and expecting
changes, compromise and action. We all need to be
part of the national discussion.
Clearly, we need to rein in skyrocketing health
care costs and make insurance affordable. We need
to make it easier to save for retirement and ensure
Social Security is solvent.
Divided We Fail and AARP want to be at the
table helping shape policy and helping find practical
bipartisan solutions. It's not going to be easy. As
allies, we know that we don't necessarily agree on
the solutions. But for real solutions to happen, we
have to make tradeoffs and tough choices.
This much is clear: We must remain diligent.
Partisanship and gridlock in Washington, D.C., are
not going to disappear overnight. Promises made
during a campaign have a way of evaporating when
our political leaders meet opposition.
The only way to ensure we move forward lies
in your hands. We need you to e-mail or write your
members of Congress and the president-elect. Tell
them we need to find practical solutions to bring
all Americans quality affordable health care and
financial security.
Please get involved. Visit www.dividedwefail.org.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Sunday sales nol


moral decay


Vath FRANK D. MA DMD, PA
SDental care that's so gentle & so advanced


invisalign
start smiling more'


*ID


I fl*ll Tnrlnll I


Thursday, December A, 2008


The Star I AS


^-





Thursday, December 4, 2008


AG I The Star Local


CHRISTMAS
from page Al

Line-up and judging begins at 6 p.m. ET on
First Street.
The winning floats will receive banners to
show off in the parade, which will begin at 6:45
p.m. at First Street and end at the corner of Reid
and Hwy. 71.
This year, no candy will be thrown from floats.
If individuals or organizations opt to dispense
treats to parade-goers, they will walk along the.
sidewalk to hand it out.
Floats will be judged in the following catego-
ries: businesses, nonprofits, schools and golf
carts.
According to Christmas on the Coast chair
Bobbi Seward, judges will base their decisions
on the floats' creativity and overall design.
"The winner will be the best thing to look at as
it's going down the street," she said.
Santa will be on hand at the empty lot by City
Hall to take photos with children immediately
following the parade.
At 30 minutes past dark, a Lighted Boat pa-
rade, sponsored by the Port. St. Joe Yacht Club,
will depart from the St. Joe marina.
The boats will sail past Sunset Coastal Grill
and loop back to the marina.
Chamber director Sandra Chafin suggested
residents view the parade from Jetty Park.
Those interested in entering their vessels in
the boat parade are invited to attend a captain's
meeting at 5 p.m. at the marina.
Participants will enjoy a free meal after the
parade courtesy of Dockside Cafe:
After both parades have concluded, everyone is
invited to stick around for the 8 p.m. street dance
at the block between Fourth and Fifth Streets.
The Timeless Band, which has a vast reper-
toire of rock 'n' roll, country and dance numbers,
plans to keep the party going into the evening.
Entry forms for both the Christmas on the
Coast and Lighted Boat parades are available
at the Chamber of Commerce office, 155 Capt.
Fred's Place in Port St. Joe.
Forms also can be downloaded from www.
gulfchamber.org and www.Christmasonthe-
Coast.comI
For more information on any of the events
listed in this article, contact the chamber at (850)
227-1223 or e-mail Suzanne@GulfChamber.org.
. Lighted Boat parade participants are asked
to RSVP for the captain's dinner to Ray Whitney
at (850) 647-6328 or patsyray@fairpoinst.net.

Mexico Beach Tree Lighting
The Mexico Beach Christmas Tree Lighting
will be at 5:30 p.m. CT Sunday, Dec. 7, at Sunset
Park. Please bring an unwrapped toy and canned
good for the Mexico Beach Fire Department to
give out to families in need. Santa Claus will be
available for pictures with the children.


SANTA from page Al


Brooklyn postmaster George H.
Roberts denied he had received
orders to forward Santa letters
to the Dead Letter Office.
As Christmas approached,
he assured children their letters
would be delivered to the right
hands.
"Old Santa Claus is not dead,
so far as the Brooklyn Post
Office is concerned," Roberts
told the New York Times on
Dec. 23, 1906.
"Why, every boy and girl in
Brooklyn knows that the good
old fellow is very much alive and
that he will live forever, because
of his devotion to little children.
The idea of anybody presuming
to declare him dead!"
In keeping with a Brooklyn
tradition, Roberts said he would
send the letters to Santa Claus
through his special helpers.
Local philanthropists, acting
on Santa's behalf, would answer
each letter and provide presents
for poor children.
"Old Kris Kringle is neither
a myth nor officially dead, if
the Brooklyn Post Office knows
anything about him," Roberts
said.

Bloodless and childless
When word of Roberts' bold
stance appeared in the New
York Times, Postal Service
officials responded with a harsh
rebuke.
"The bloodless and childless
Post Office Department doesn't
know anything about that jolly
old friend of the children, and it
isn't at all in sympathy with the
action of Postmaster Roberts
of Brooklyn in learning the way
to deliver letters addressed to
him," the Times reported on
Dec. 24, 1906.
Roberts' decision to deliver
Santa letters to area civic
organizations drew the ire of
Assistant Postmaster General
Frank H. Hitchcock, who
said Roberts' actions set a
dangerous precedent.
"If letters to Santa Claus
were to be opened instead of
being sent to the Dead Letter
Office, why might not others
also be opened?" Hitchcock


FRANK HITCHCOCK: Postmaster General Frank H. Hitchcock,
shown handing Pilot Earle Ovington the first pouch of air
mail in 1911, allowed Santa letters to be turned over to
individuals and civic organizations instead of being sent to
the Dead Letter Office in 1912.


reasoned. "It seems too bad,
doubtless, but to give these
letters out would demoralize the
Postal Service."
To make its earlier ruling
even more explicit, Postal
Service officials set forth a
special fiat "that no such person
as Santa Claus, under whatever
alias he may be addressed, has
corporal existence, and that
therefore his official address
is the Dead Letter Office," the
Times reported.
The newspaper's sympathy
clearly rested with Roberts.
The Times called the official
responsible for the ruling a
"skeptical bachelor, who has
forgotten his own boyhood visits
from Kris Kringle."

Change of heart
Six years after taking a stand
against the rogue Brooklyn
postmaster, Hitchcock, now


Postmaster General, had a
change of heart.
In December 1912,
Hitchcock issued an order
that letters addressed to
Santa Claus arriving at post
offices between Dec. 16
and Jan. 1 be turned over
to responsible persons or
institutions in the town or
city of address.,
Postmasters were
instructed to distribute
letters at their discretion
in the event that more than
one philanthropic institution
requested the letters.
Hitchcock also eased
up on another previous
ruling. During the holiday
season, he lifted regulations
prohibiting the placing of a
stamp on the same side of
the letter as the address.
But after Jan. 1,
Hitchcock instructed his
postmasters to show no
mercy.
Letters with stamps and
addressed on the same face
would be returned to the
sender or forwarded to the
dreaded Dead Letter Office.


STAR SANTA
LETTERS
The Star will feature
Santa letters from area
school children in its
Christmas edition.
All letters must be
delivered to the Star
office by noon on
Wednesday, Dec. 17.
The Star is located at
135 W. Hwy. 98, Port
City Shopping Center in
Port St. Joe.
For more information,
call (850) 227-1278.


Operation Santa Claus
In the early 1920s, New
York Postal workers began
playing Santa Claus.
They answered all letters
addressed to Santa and dug
into their own pockets to
purchase food and toys for
needy children.
When Santa letters began
arriving by the thousands,
the postal workers asked
the public for help in what
became the U.S. Postal
Service's Operation Santa
Claus.
The annual program,
sponsored by the New
York Post Office, makes
Santa letters available to
charitable citizens and civic
organizations.
Letters from across the
country find their way to
the New York Post Office's
"Operation Santa" section,
where they are opened by
postal employees, sorted
by geographic location and
distributed to those meeting
program requirements.
Postal workers in other
cities have established local
versions of Operation Santa
Claus, modeled after New
York's successful program.
Though Gulf County does
not have its own Operation
Santa Claus, local children
need not be discouraged.
For decades, The Star has
printed Santa letters in its
Christmas edition.
Santa is an avid Star
reader and looks forward to
hearing from the children of
Gulf County each year.


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Thuirrenv December 4. 2008


SCHOOL from page Al


recent high gasoline prices and
declining enrollment, among oth-
er things, Wilder said the school
board was facing serious prob-
lems.
"The school board has done ev-
erything possible without going to
the voters," Wilder said.
He pointed out that the school
district had maintained its millage
rate for capital improvements un-
der one mill this decade and that
the school board never had levied
the full two mills that it could, un-
der law, apply to residents' taxes.
As Wilder and commissioners
Bill Williams and Warren Yeager
pointed out, the school board's
request to hold the election was
purely procedural; the commis-
sioners were not being asked to
vote on whether they approved or
disapproved the additional levy.
The sticking point for commis-
sioners Billy Traylor and Carmen
McLemore was the existing one-
half cent sales tax enacted by the
school board more than 10 years
ago to raise money for Port St. Joe
Elementary School.
Using a slide presentation to
demonstrate his calculations,
Wilder promised the commission-
ers the school board Would retire
the half-cent sales tax in June of
next year, before the proposed
one-mill levy was applied, so resi-
dents would not be paying simul-
taneous taxes.
After discussion, the board vot-
ed 5-0 to allow the special election
in exchange for a binding resolu-
tion from the school board to pay
off the existing one-half cent sale
tax in June 2009 and provided the
school board would pay all direct
and indirect costs of the special
election.


Other business
Tom Graney, chairman of the
Gulf County Economic Develop-
ment Council (EDC), told the board
the EDC recently had hosted a per-
son who specialized in locating busi-
nesses to move into areas such as
Gulf County. According to Graney,
the business locator's trip was
sponsored primarily by local private
donations.
On what Graney called a "whirl-
wind tour," the visiting business
locator toured the area from the
Apalachicola regional airport to We-
wahitchka, up to 1-10 and down to
the coast in Gulf County.
"He was incredibly upbeat about
the county," Graney reported to the
commissioners, 'adding that Gulf
County was now in the man's direc-
tory as a potential relocation area
for hundreds of businesses.
Graney said the locator told him
the county's greatest strength was
its workforce, which was "trainable,
underutilized and affordable."
According to Graney, the loca-
tor also said potential businesses
decided where to relocate accord-
ing to "how businesses are treated
and government unity," especially
between city and county govern-
ments.
He also said the EDC currently
had three "very serious" inquiries
about potential relocations to Gulf
County.
0 Commissioner Nathan Peters
said, as incoming chair of the com-
mission, he would make government
unity one of his priorities.
"We have to eliminate bashing
each other," Peters said, in reference
to the frequent verbal and turf wars
between the county commission and
the Port St. Joe city commission.


Peters becomes commission chair
in January.
The board voted unanimously to
close the county courthouse and all
county administrative offices on Dec.
26. County offices will be closed Dec.
25 for Christmas.
Commissioners voted 5-0 to
reopen all county voting precincts
after receiving numerous voter com-
plaints during the Nov. 4 election.
Commissioners had voted, dur-
ing budget workshops earlier in the
year, to close several of the county's
precincts as a cost-saving measure;
however, after seeing the result of
limited voting locations and hearing
resident's complaints, the board de-
cided to restore all previous polling
locations for future elections.
County Administrator Don But-
ler announced that he finally had
received the last of the required per-
mits and could immediately begin
work on the Stump Hole project.
The county has been trying to get
permission from the Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP) to
rebuild the rock revetment at that
location on the gulf side of County/
State 30-E, the lone road connecting
St. Joseph Peninsula to Cape San
Blas and the mainland.
The Stump Hole has been a con-
stant problem for years, as wave ac-
tion from storms has eaten away the
beach there and crashed over the
roadbed on a regular basis, occasion-
ally rendering the road impassable.
During the 2008 hurricane season,
the revetment was breached, and the
road flooded once again during two
named storms.
The final stage of the current Cape
San Blas beach restoration project,
currently under way, will restore the
beach at the Stump Hole and help
prevent road problems, as well.


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NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest
Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold
a Special Meeting, December 18, 2008 in the
Regency Room of the Ramada Inn North, 2900
North Monroe St., Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting
will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. The meeting will
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A8 I The Star Local Thursday, December 4, 2008



Corridor Authority blasted over proposed road


By Lois Swoboda
Florida Freedom Newspapers

On Nov. 27, the board of
the Northwest Florida Trans-
portation Corridor Author-
ity met at the courthouse in
Apalachicola to hear public
comment on the proposed
evacuation route to be con-
structed north of US 98.
What they heard was not
music to their ears.
Residents demanded
more information on pro-
posed road construction and
refuted the Authority's pro-
cedures and data during the
meeting.
The evacuation route, as
depicted on their website
and on pamphlets distributed
by the Authority, includes a
corridor through Tate's Hell
from St. Teresa to Eastpoint
through the relict dunes just


south of the existing power
lines. Also proposed is the
conversion of West Bayshore
Drive to a through street
joining the corridor north of
Eastpoint.
Citizens are concerned
with the environmental im-
pact of building a high-speed
two-lane road through state
and federal park -land and
that the northern route will
funnel tourists away from
the county. Residents of Bay-
shore fear their quiet resi-
dential street will become a
shortcut for tourists.
About 40 Franklin County
residents were on hand. At
their last Franklin County
meeting held in Carrabelle,
the Authority brought slick
flyers and out-of-date maps to
present their case to the pub-
lic. This time they brought
nothing but an agenda.
When attendees requested


to see a map of the proposed
roads, they were told to con-
sult the Internet.
"How can we intelligently
discuss this when we have
nothing to discuss?" asked
one woman.
"Nothing has changed ex-
cept we're lining up some fed-
eral and state bureaucrats on
this project," said Chairman
Randall McElheney.
The board discussed ear-
marking tolls from a portion
of the road for environmental
mitigation and prepared to
vote on the issue.
"Can there be some public
discussion on this before you
vote?" asked County Com-
missioner Pinki Jackel.
Looking nonplussed,
McElheney answered, "We
have a protocol that we ask
the public to wait on their
comments until the board
completes its discussion, but


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we can table this vote until
after public comment. We
don't want the discussion to
become segmented."

Jackel disputes
point of procedure

Next the board prepared
to vote to approve the invoic
es. One bill was from HDR
Engineering of Panama City
for a feasibility study of al-
ternative routes and strat-
egies in Franklin County.
McElheney said he would
recuse himself from the vote
to avoid the appearance of
conflict of interest, leaving
only four members available
to vote, less than a quorum.
Ray Reisner, project man-
ager and employee of HDR
Engineering approached
the board with a cell phone
and McElheney announced
that Maurice Langston, the
board member from Wakulla
County would be voting over
the phone to break a tie.
Jackel asked if this proce-
dure was allowed and Mike
Duncan, general council for


Pick up

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the board, said he had re-
searched the question and it
was allowed.
Vice Chairman Jay Odom,
of Okaloosa County, said that
"In abundance of caution,
we'll just wait until the next
meeting."
Jackel then produced a
copy of the "Government in
the Sunshine" manual and
read a passage stating that
telephone voting was only al-
lowed if there was a quorum
present, in extraordinary
circumstances such as ill-
ness, and if the voting mem-
ber participated throughout
the meeting over a speaker
phone or other electronic de-
vice that allowed the mem-
ber to hear and be heard by
the public.
A member of the audience
pointed out that if McEl-
heney recused himself, there
was no quorum present.

Environmental and
economic Impacts?

McElheney said beginning
with the newphase of the proj-


S .eso4.

i'0',\ liLf.-I.I


ect, there will be at least one
environmental impact meet-
ing each year for the next five
years.
Reisner said environmen-
tal impact studies have been
funded $8 million through
2009. He said the Authority
will study economic and prop-
erty impacts in addition to the
environment.
He said that in addition to
the corridor from St. Teresa
to Eastpoint, other options
like armoring US 98, beach
renourishment and offshore
barriers would be considered.
Riverkeeper Andy Smith
asked if the only issue being
considered was evacuation
and return.
Reisner said that was cor-
rect. "There is no intention to
increase capacity," he said.

No need for additional
evacuation routes?

Gathana Parmenas of
Carrabelle, a Red Cross
volunteer active with lo-
See ROAD A9


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Thursday, December 4, 2008


Local


The Star | A9


Gulf Dems hold roundtable discussion, ID local concerns


Gulf County Democrats
held a roundtable discus-
sion to identify their great-
est local concerns on a re-
cent Thursday night. The
16 Democrats in attendance
each expressed their individ-
ual priorities to tackle during
the next year.
The roundtable was the
first step in creating a clear
local platform and plan
of action for Gulf County
Democrats and the Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
(DEC). Among topics dis-
cussed were creation of jobs,
property taxes, lack of trans-
parency in county commis-
sion decision making, single-
member districts versus


county-wide voting, econom-
ic development, ad valorem
taxes, term limits for county
commissioners, education
funding and real estate mar-
ket, and the need for a county
recycling program.
"It is critical that we begin
discussing community issues
that affect our everyday lives.
We must determine a way to
begin to hold our elected of-
ficials more accountable,"
said Zebe Schmitt, Chairman
of the DEC. "The only way to
do that is to create a forum
for every citizen to be heard.
Hearing is not enough. We
have to begin to address the
issues that are so negatively
affecting this community.


Those elected officials who
do not represent the good
of the entire county, who
cannot or will not do what
is needed for us to grow and
prosper, must know that they
will have serious competition
in the next election. That is
our job."
The roundtable also
served to help local Demo-
crats become more familiar
with each other in antici-
pation of DEC officer elec-
tions which were held on
Dec. 2. "The experiences and
strengths we bring to the
table are diverse and repre-
sentative of the community
we serve. We must use that
diversity to our advantage,"


Schmitt said. Liz Schweers,
Dana Boyer and Gloria Aus-
tin in presenting their groups'
findings reported that the
organization now consists of
members who have a variety
of talents, including public
relations, journalism, leader-
ship, event planning, commu-
nity outreach and even musi-,
cal experience. The groups
found that their professional
backgrounds covered a vari-
ety of fields, including small
business owners, profession-
al educators, veterans, pub-
lic relations representatives,
lawyers, engineers, CPAs,
and retired civil servants.
Schmitt also said during
the meeting that she was


appointing nine additional
members to the DEC from
North and South Gulf County,
as well as seven alternates.
"Alternates for each seat will
not only represent a member
who may have to be absent,
but will be urged to come to
every meeting. This will in-
sure continuity in our work
and will also add more voices
to the conversation," said the
new DEC Chairman. Eight of
these new members already
have accepted their appoint-
ments. The DEC is made up
of two members, a man and
a woman, from each voting
precinct and four members,
two men and two women,
in precincts with more than


1000 voters. The DEC is look-
ing for interested Democrats
who want to get involved.
Pat McFarland, outgoing
DEC Chairman, was hon-
ored with a certificate for
his service to Gulf County
Democrats. "You were there
when no one else was, when
we were sitting around my
dining room table and need-
ed someone to lead." said
Vice Chairman Sally Jen-
kins. "You have helped keep
us together," she continued.
"We thank you for that."
Schmitt also praised the
work done by Sally Jenkins,
Vice-Chairman; Carl White,
Treasurer; and Christine
White, acting Secretary.


ROAD from page A8


mitigation strategy for eight
years, told the board that
has served on the state
hazard and mitigation task
force, gathering regional in-
formation.
"Their study does not
show any problem with evac-
uation in Franklin County.
There are limited post-event
issues, but they involve State
Route 65 and County Road
67," she said. "I would like to
see some data supporting the
need for an east-west evacu-
ation route."
' Frank Venable of East-
point said he would like to
see "some proof that the sub-
stantial objections you have
heard here today are being
passed on to the governor.


We have no need of addi-
tional evacuation routes. Ms.
Parmenas just said it. Hurri-
canes are a non issue."
An audience member pro-
tested. "You show the road
on your map," they said. "If
it's important enough to put
on the map that must mean
something."
McElheney said the Flor-
ida Department of Transpor-
tation "can give you plenty
of history on the existing US
98. It washes out every time
there's a storm. All we're try-
ing to do is take a regional
approach. If there was a Ka-
trina type event, 98 would be
gone."
Venable said, "We didn't
invite you here. All of you are


outsiders. The one person
who should be here to repre-
sent us is absent. That's very
telling and it's very telling
that this project is designed
by The St. Joe Company and
it's through their property.
This is an insult. Where is the
evidence that you passed the
public input on to the gover-
nor?"
Norris asked "What's
your recommendation? The
roads get damaged every
time there's a storm."
Venable replied there is
an offshore barrier at Two-
Mile that has protected the
road.
"There has got to be a pro-
cess that determines what is
best," Norris said.


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NOTICE OF CITY OF PORT ST. JOE CITY

COMMISSION MEETING FOR APPROVAL

OF RE-ZONING FOR A 888 ACRE PARCEL

OF PROPERTY

The City of Port St. Joe City Commission
Proposes to adopt by ordinance the following:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, RELAT-
ING TO AND AMENDING THE ZONING CODE WITH RESPECT TO
A PARCEL OF PROPERTY CONTAINING APPROXIMATELY EIGHT
HUNDRED, EIGHTY EIGHT (888) ACRES; AMENDING THE CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE ZONING MAP; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ANY
CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The public hearing for the adoption of the Ordinance will be held on Tuesday,.De-
cember 16, 2008 at 6:00 P.M., Eastern Time at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. A first reading of the Ordinance will
occur at the same time and location on December 2, 2008. Copies of the Ordinance
are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall located at 305
Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.

The hearing may be continued from time to time as may be necessary.

Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide com-
ments in writing to the City Commissioners of the City of Port St. Joe at City of Port
St. Joe City Hall 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Trans-
actions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any
decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should
ensure that a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal
is based.
Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk's
Office at (850) 229-8261 ext. 114.
N\\ V888A' \ \ 888+/-Acre Parcel







. '. .. ...




/ I "" " E =- "' -. ^ O --

CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA

By: Mayor-Commissioner
Attest: City Clerk


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PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, December 4, 2008 w w w. starf 1.com Page 10




PSJ gains revenge over West Gadsden


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

For Port St. Joe High
School, revenge was a dish
best served wet on a Friday
night.
The Tiger Sharks (10-2)
stuck to the ground in boggy
conditions and avenged one
of their two losses, and their
lone District 1-1A defeat.
The result was a 22-19 win
over West Gadsden County
to reach the state semifinals
for the third time in four sea-
sons.
Port St. Joe rushed for
311 yards to control the clock
and held off a late charge
from West Gadsden (9-3) to
win on the road for the sec-
ond straight playoff game. It
also was the Tiger Sharks'
eighth straight win overall.
First-year head coach
Vern Barth said his team


was far from dominant, but
benefited from past playoff
experience and strong play
up front.
"I wouldn't say they took
charge, they made it happen
when we needed to," Barth
said. "It's not like we blew
open holes, they got a body
on a body and slowed them
up enough for our backs to
do the work."
Port St. Joe will travel
to Tallahassee next Fri-
day night for a state Class
1A semifinal against North
Florida Christian (8-2), a
winner over Orlando Univer-
sity Christian on Friday.
For the Tiger Sharks, it
represents a chance to re-
verse the result of 2006, when
they narrowly lost at NFC to
miss out on a defense of their
state title.
Port St. Joe took advan-
tage of a second chance


against the Panthers, a team
they lost 38-0 to on Oct. 3.
Port St. Joe dominated the
first half, playing keep-away
on the ground and fielding
a defense that all but elimi-
nated the big play.
The Tiger Sharks rushed
for 174 yards on 31 carries,
with Calvin Pryor (91 yards
of 118 total) and Tyrone Daw-
son (26) leading the way.
Pryor went 35 yards on a
trap play after Victor Quin-
tanilla recovered a Panther
fumble. That set up a quar-


terback sneak from the 2 by
Dawson. Pryor ran for the
conversion with 7:14 left in
the opening quarter.
Barth said his squad's
special teams were limited
when kicker Robbie Martin
went down with what was
believed to be an ankle in-
jury in the first quarter.
West Gadsden, which
saw an eight-game winning
streak end, answered im-
mediately. Theo Robinson
turned a go pattern down the
'right sideline into a 60-yard


touchdown reception from
Antonio Bostic. Pablo Esco-
bar added the extra point to
make it 8-7.
Pryor ended a Panther
drive later in the quarter with
an interception in the end
zone, sliding out to the 4-yard
line. The Tiger Sharks then
marched 96 yards, Pryor and
Dawson shouldering most of
the load and the drive ending
with Greg Farmer going over
from the 4.
Pierre Bell ran the con-
version and it was 16-7. A
short punt helped the Pan-
thers add a 31-yard field goal
near the end of the second
quarter to make it 16-10 at
halftime.
Bell went around right
end for an 80-yard touchdown
dash through the rain and
mud early in second half and
it was 22-10 for Port St. Joe.
West Gadsden got two


points on a safety when the
Tiger Sharks kicked a loose
ball out of the end zone, and
Bostic hit Damian Lowrey
for a touchdown and Esco-
bar's kick closed within 22-
19.
The Panthers had one
last shot in the final minute.
However, after the Tiger
Sharks' rushing game had
melted nearly three minutes
off the clock, they came up
short inside Port St. Joe ter-
ritory.
"All four quarters they
never quit," Barth said. "Af-
ter we lost to them the first
time, I told the kids don't be
surprised if we play them
again in the playoffs.
"Every single game gets
harder and gets bigger. I'm
very pleased with the se-
niors taking charge and
helping us with their playoff
experience."


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. etherS Strahge became the' second" '
"".'. .directly to NCAA Division I on a scholarship. .'l... PHOTO BYTIM CROFt i esta





SIGNING DAY

Heather Strange signs with Mercer University


By Tim Croft '
Florida Freedom Newspapers

Before entering high school
Port St. Joe's Heather Strange set
a goal for herself.
Reach the next level through
her efforts on the softball field or in
the classroom.
On Tuesday afternoon Strange
more than reached that brass ring
as she signed a letter of intent to
attend Mercer University on a
combination of athletic and aca-
demic scholarships.
Strange, who has lettered in
softball as a centerfielder, catcher
and, currently, shortstop, in her
three years with the Lady Tiger
Sharks, became just the second
product of the high school's softball
program to snag a NCAA Division
I scholarship invitation to continue
her career at the next level directly
out of high school.
"This is a big deal," said Lady
Tiger Sharks coach Jim Belin.
"When you are playing Division
I softball, you are playing in the
equivalent of the big leagues for
the boys.
"Not only is (Heather) good on
the field in softball, but she is also
academically blessed and that is
even more important. That is what
makes all this so right."
In three high school seasons,
Strange has hit .352 in 233 at-bats,
with 82 hits, 19 doubles and three
home runs. She has driven in 58
runs and stolen 22 bases.


Further, Strange carries a
weighted 4.0 GPA in the class-
room, putting her near the top of
her class academically.
"Not only is Mercer getting a
good player, but she's committed,
dedicated and she's a leader in a
quiet way, by example," Belin said.
"She is one of the hardest work-
ers and one of the most dedicated
players we have ever had at Port
St. Joe.
"I'm so proud of her. This is a
goal she set as a freshman."
The Mercer Lady Bears the
school is located in Macon, Ga.
- appears a nice fit for Strange,
who also played golf at Port St. Joe
High.
A team rebuilding under sec-
ond-year Coach Mike Raynor (14-
46 last season while competing in
the Atlantic Sun Conference, but
undefeated during the fall sched-
ule), Mercer lost three starting po-
sition players through graduation
after last season and two others
departed.
Of the six returning starting
position players, three are seniors,
and other position players on the
roster include another senior and
two juniors, so Strange will have
an opportunity to contribute early.
"The indications I have been
given is that I will get a chance to
come in right away and play," said
Strange, as she veered between
laughter and tears during Tues-
day's signing ceremony.
Mercer's softball roster is also
threaded with academic excel-


lence as three players were named
All-America scholar athletes last
year by the National Fastpitch
Coaches Association.
Mercer was after Strange ear-
ly on, she said, and was the only
school she seriously considered.
"I really liked the coaches,
Coach Raynor and (assistant
coach) Joni Frei," Strange said. "I
just feel like it is the place I need
to be. It's a good school and a good
program."
The closeness to home -Macon
is about a four-hour drive from Port
St. Joe was not a factor, Strange
said.
"I would have gone to Alaska,"
she quickly replied with a wide
smile creasing her face.
Nor is Strange much concerned
about what position she might play
at Mercer.
"It really doesn't matter to me, I
just want the chance to play, wher-
ever they want me," Strange said.
The lesson in Thesday's signing
was evident on the glowing faces of
the family, friends and classmates
who came out for the signing cere-
mony and enjoy a little cake with
a bear mascot on the icing and
punch afterward.
It is the lesson Strange said she
will take away from her four years
at Port St. Joe High School and one
reinforced on Tuesday afternoon.
"Hard work definitely pays off,
not only on the field but in class,"
Strange said before joining a table
of friends for a little punch and a
few high-fives.


TIP-OFF CLASSIC
The team split two games in a Tip-Off Classic at Sneads on
Nov. 22.
In the first game, the Gators downed Altha 53-40 behind team
rebounding and double-digit scoring from three players.
Josh Mitchell led the offense with 18 points. Chris Peak had 12
points and 12 rebounds and Christian Owens added 11 points
and 11 rebounds. Alex Hardin had six points to go with 10 re-
bounds.
In the second game, the.Gators fell to Blountstown 64-59.
Mitchell had 20 points and Lance Griffin added 11 points.


The Wewahitchka High
School wrestling team fin-
ished first in the Bozeman
High School "Buck Classic
Duals" on Nov. 22 as the regu-
lar wrestling season opened.
The Gators will be at the
Wakulla Tournament this
weekend and the Capital City
Classic in Tallahassee the fol-


lowing weekend.
In the Buck Classic, the
Gators had six wrestlers go
4-0 and three grapplers fin-
ish with just a single loss in
a meet during which Wewa-
hitchka wrestled four dual
matches, beating Bozeman,
Marianna, South Walton and
Pace.


BUCK CLASSIC DUALS RESULTS


Wewahitchka 38, Boz-
eman 36
103 Nick Malcolm (W)
def. Reyes 10-8; 112 Jacob
Taylor (W) tech. fall over Saw-
yer, 15-0; 119 Chase Duck-
worth (W) p. Gilbert, 1:51;
125 D. House (W) tech. fall
over Newbourne, 18-2; 130
- Wewahitchka forfeit; 135
- Wewahitchka forfeit; 140 -
Matt Irwin (W) p. Horton, 5:26;
145 Tyler Lanter def. Hitt, 12-
10 (OT); 152 Wewahitchka
forfeit; 160 Chris Myrick (W)
p. by Marshall, 1:08; 171.- A.
House (W) def. Slaughter, 22-
12; 189 Wewahitchka forfeit;
215 Jacob Villasenor (W)
p. Gates, 2:59; Hwy. Ryan
Walding (W) p. Bullock, 1:20.
Wewahitchka 42, Mar-
ianna 27
103 Malcolm (W) won by
forfeit; 112 Taylor (W) p: Hut-
ton, :36; 119 Duckworth won
by forfeit; 125 D. House won
by forfeit; 130 double forfeit;
135 double forfeit; 140- Ir-
win (W) tech. fall over Korne-
gay, 17-1; 145 Lanter (W)
won by forfeit; 152 Wewa-
hitchka forfeit; 160 A. House
(W) p. by Robinson, 1:20; 171
- Wewahitchka forfeit; 189
- Wewahitchka forfeit; 215
- Villasenor (W) won by forfeit;


Hwy. Walding (W) def. by
Small, 8-1.
Wewahitchka 53, South
Walton 18
103 Malcolm (W) p. Klam-
er, :32; 112 Taylor (W) won
by forfeit; 119 Duckworth (W)
def. Felt, 8-2; 125 D, House
(W) p. Towne, 1:55; 130 We-
wahitchka forfeit; 135 We-
wahitchka forfeit; 140 Irwin
(W) def. Cannon, 13-12; 145
- Lanter won by forfeit; 152
- Myrick (W) won by forfeit;
160 A. House (W) tech. fall
over Pierson, 18-1; 171 dou-
ble forfeit; 189 Wewahitchka
forfeit; 215 Villasenor (W) p.
Delaney, :35; Hwy. Walding
p. Menard, 3:10.
Wewahitchka 51, Pace 29
103 Malcolm (W) p. Siy-.
usy, 1:22; 112 Taylor (W) p.
Harrison, 2:42; 119 Duck.
worth (W) def., Karslina, 7-2;
125 D. House (W) p. Jones,
2:22; 130 Wewahitchka for-
feit; 135 Wewahitchka forfeit;
140- Wewahitchka forfeit; 145
- Irwin (W) p. Cotsonis, :30;
152 Lanter p. Lemay, 2:30;
160 Wewahitchka forfeit;
171 A. House (W) p. Keisick-
er, 5:48; 189 Wewahitchka
forfeit; 215 Villasenor (W) p.
Gilbert, :48; Hwy. Walding
(W) p. Palmer, 1:06.


Gators fall twice to


open season; split in

Tip-Off Classic


Wewahitchka High
School's boys' basketball
team stumbled out of the
regular-season gate last
week with a pair of losses.
The Gators fell 72-56 to
Sneads last Monday, de-
spite 17 points, five assists
and five steals from Josh
Mitchell.
Chris Peak added 14
points and eight rebounds
and Lance Griffin had
nine points and seven re-
bounds.
"We started out slow,
but played well in the sec-
ond half," said Gator coach
Bryan Barlow.


The Gators fell behind
35-19 in the first two quar-
ters, but each team scored
37 points in the second
half.
Against Cottondale on
Saturday, the Gators again
started slow and could not
recover in an 81-41 loss.
Cottondale scored 22
points in each of the first
three quarters while the
Gators had 36 total points
over the same span.
Peak led the way with
14 points and 10 rebounds.
Griffin had eight points and
Mitchell five points with
seven assists.
VA 'A*.. ^- i :j"" i-r .-i '


The Tiger Sharks will play a Class
1-A state semifinal at 7:30 p.m.
on Friday night at North Florida
Christian. A win sends Port St. Joe
to the state title game.





PORT ST.JOE *-WEWAHITCHKA




SSection

Thursday, December 4, 2008 w w w. starf 1.com Page 11



More than 400 attend sportsman's banquet

Over 400 sports enthu- *-
siasts gathered at Box "R"
Ranch WMVIA on a recent "
Thursday evening, Nov. 6th,
to celebrate their mutual
love for the outdoors, enjoy .
a wonderful meal, and gen-
erate revenues for commu-0
nity-service projects in Gulf
and Franklin counties.0
"Even in these difficult
economic times, we were
overwhelmed by the support
from the community," noted F.
.project organizer Bob Willis. .Ru
The banquet enjoyed an
overall increase in atten-
dance of approximately 35%
over last year. Those pres-
ent, once again, enjoyed a
delicious steak supper, pre-
pared by Lions master chef,
Charlie Norton and his crew.
Add to that boiled shrimp,
Apalachicola oysters on the
half shell and all the trim-
mings, and no stomach was .
left unsatisfied.
Art, guns, knives, fishing
trips, as well as, ladies' and
youth items were among the
hundreds of items auctioned
off during the silent auction,
raffle events, and public auc- .
tion.
"There are not many
events in which you can be
involved that generate such
enjoyment while contribut- "
ing to a worthy cause," said .
Club President Dewey Blay-
lock, as he looked forward
to the challenge of an even
bigger and better event next .
*.year. -
"Without the support and
contributions of these spe-
cial people in our communi-
ties, none of this would be -.
possible," Blaylock added. ,-



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A12 I The Star


Local


Thursday, December 4, 2008


Bagging for United Way

Local elected officials and prominent folks in the community gathered last Friday at the Piggly
Wiggly to bag groceries for United Way. The United Way campaign thermometer was just pushed
past the 50 percent mark on this year's monetary goal and its an annual tradition at turkey time
for community volunteers to turn up and bag groceries with any proceeds dedicated to the United
Way
Those who bagged included Melissa Farrell of Joseph's Cottage, Kathy Balentine of Gulf
Transportation, county commissioner Bill Williams, city of Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson,
newly-elected county commissioner Warren Yeager among others.

-. W w&I


Photos Special to The Star


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1I. 1


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shipping and handling. (Calendars also available to pick up at 'the News Herald office.)
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name brand gifts with convenient online shopping, including:

veweir Bath & Body H-ome Accents
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Visit www.PerfectLittleGifts.com to see how easy online shopping can be.
Most items from $10 $100, with pick up available at Trask Design Studio
on Reid, or delivered to your door! Call 229-2727..


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COMMUNITY


B
Section


Thursday, December 4, 2008 w w w. starf 1. com Page 1


en't th


he Junior Service League
T of Port St. Joe awarded
more than $6,000 in schol-
arship money during the
Gulf County Junior Miss
Program last month. The
program was held at the
Port St. Joe Elementary
School Auditorium where 15 high school
senior girls from around the county
competed for the title of 2008-2009 Gulf
County's Junior Miss as well as several.
individual category scholarships.
Meredith Todd was named as the new
Gulf County's Junior Miss, and will repre-
sent Gulf County in the Florida's Junior
Miss Program in Perry, Fla. in March
of 2009. Meredith was awarded a $1,500
scholarship for winning the title, as well
as an additional $250 for winning the Spirit
of Junior Miss Award.
Heather Strange was 1st Runner-Up,
and winner of a $1,250 scholarship. Abby
Ard was awarded a $1,000 scholarship for
being 2nd Runner-Up, and a $300 scholar-
ship for winning the Scholastics competi-
tion.
Morgan Peak was 3rd Runner-Up and
won the Physical Fitness competition. She
was awarded a total of $1,050 in scholar-
ship monies for her winnings. Brennis
Bush was awarded $300 for winning the
Self Expression competition. Sarah His-
,pock won the Talent award of $300, and.
Shawna McDonald was awarded $300 for
winning the Interview competition.
The Gulf County Junior Miss Program
,would like to thank Carpet County, Coast-
2Coast Printing, The Haughty Heron,
* ey Electrical Supply, Persnickety, Preble
Rish, Vision Bank, Piggly Wiggly, Bayside
Savings Bank, Carley & Company, Costin
Insurance Agency, Donamelia Day Spa,
Petals by the Bay, Gulf Appraisal, White
Light Studios, Expressions from the
Heart, Wewa Lighthouse Restaurant, Port
Realty, Lemongrass Interiors, Ramsey's
Printing & Office Products, and The
Bridge at Bay St. Joesph for all of their
support.
The Junior Service League is a non-
profit organization of women, which helps
area children. The League's premier
project is Jam Packs. Each year, over 50
elementary school students from Port St.
Joe and Wewahitchka receive all of their
school supplies from the Junior Service
League, complete with a brand new back-
pck.
Later in the school year, another 50 stu-
d nts receive a new set of winter clothes,
thanks to a partnership among the Junior
Service League, The Tapper Foundation
aid Sears.
; The Junior Service League will also
award local high school seniors with over
$4,000 in scholarships this year.


Lanaston F(


[ Another year and the
Norris D. Langston Youth
Foundation, Inc. inches an-
Poher step forward.
SWith the construction of
the foundation's Education.
ahd Economic Development
Center the next item on the
foundation's wish list, the
foundation will hold its an-
nual Education Classic later
tiis month, a classics that has
expanded by an extra day of
basketball and a deeper ros-
ter of teams from the eight-
county area the foundation
serves.
S"We are pleased with
where we are right now,
bjt we want to get better,"
said Dr. David Langston,
president and CEO of the
foundation named after his
older brother who passed
too young. "Getting better is
lifetime effort."
As for the building of the
Education and Economic
Development Center, to be
located on Avenue A in Port
Sj. Joe, in these rocky e'co-
nomic times, Langston said,
"Everybody and anybody
Wishing to provide ideas
and/or revenues to get that
done should contact us.
"I "I know it is going to hap-
ppn. I have faith. You just
have to have faith."
The foundation has re-
cpntly awarded 31 college
scholarships to students
ili Washington, Holmes,
Gadsden, Gulf, Jackson and
Franklin counties, six of the


gra


Junior Service League awards more than

$6,000 to Junior Miss participants


Meredith Todd was named Gulf County's
Junior Miss, and will represent Gulf
County in the Florida's Junior Miss Program
in Perry in March of 2009.


foundation Education Classic Dec. 18-20


CLASSIC LINEUP
The lineup of games for this year's Classic, which
expands from two days to three days this year, fol-
lows. If not designated as'a girls' basketball game,
all games match boys' teams. All times are Central
Standard Time.
Thursday, Dec. 18
Bainbridge (Ga.) vs. Bay High (G), 4 p.m.
Liberty County vs. Chipley, 5:30 p.m.
Malone vs. Port St. Joe (G), 7 p.m.
Bainbridge vs. Blountstown, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 19
Marianna vs. Tallahassee Rickards (G), 2 p.m.
Port St. Joe vs. Malone, 3:30 p m
Cottondale vs. East Gadsden (G), 5 p.m.
Tallahassee Godby vs. Franklin County, 6:3,0
p.m.
West Gadsden vs. Cottondale, 8 p.m.
East Gadsden vs. Marianna, 9 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 20
Godby vs. Marianna (G), 10 a.m.
Blountstown vs. Holmes County, 11:30 a.m.
Cottondale vs. Rickards (G), 1 p.m.
West Gadsden vs. Chipley, 2:30 p.m.
Port St. Joe vs. East Gadsden (G), 4 p.m.
Cottondale vs. Franklin County, 5:30 p.m.
East Gadsden vs. Malone, 7 p.m.
Mariqnna vs. Port St. Joe, 8:30 p.m.


counties, joined by Calhoun
and Liberty, that the founda-
tion serves with after-school
tutoring classes, mentoring
and motivational programs.
Officials from several
districts, including Gulf Dis-
trict School, have credited
the foundation's programs .
for improving scores on the
Florida Comprehensive As-


sessment Test.
The Norris D. Langston
Youth Foundation, Inc. 2008
Education Classic will be
held Dec. 18-20 at Chipola
Junior College in Marianna.
The event provides three
days of boys' and girls' high
school basketball in previ-
ous years there have been
two days of hoops and


1 lNORRIS D. LANGSTON
YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP
FOUNDATION, INC.
I 2008 3CHOlW5r-IP KeCIa NT. 5 R


Special to The Star
The Norris D. Langston Youth Foundation awarded 31 scholarships to students in six
counties this year.


aims to provide exposure to
a college environment for
student-athletes and their
parents.
"Just being on a college
campus can enlighten a
child that they want to be a
part of that," Langston said.
"A lot of (the work we do)
is coming from basketball,
moving to different spots,
working as a team and be-
coming part of a productive
process."
"It is remarkable we will
have 21 teams from eight
counties at the Education
Classic. It's exposing the
kids to a post-secondary


environment," Langston
added.
The Education Classic,
though, is not just basket-
ball.
The event begins at 2:30
p.m. CT on Dec. 18 with the
annual foundation dinner.
The keynote speaker will be
E. Douglas Beach, secretary
for the Florida Department
of Elder Affairs, and Regi-
nald James, superintendent
of Gadsden County schools
will receive a Meritorious
Award.
"We really appreciate
him, for all he's done in part-
nership with the foundation,


for working with us on so
many programs," Langston
said. "He's just a very posi-
tive individual."
The classic is sponsored
by the Florida Department
of the Lottery.
Admission is $6 per day
and all games will be played
in the Milton Johnson
Health Center at Chipola
Junior College. All net pro-
ceeds from the tournament
go toward an endowment for
scholarships at Chipola.
"We are asking people
to come out and support
us from around the, area,"
Langston said.





B2 I The Star


SLoeal


Thursday, December 4, 2008


Engagement


Nobles Tucker Wedding


Mr. and Mrs. Rodney No-
bles of Crestview, Florida
are delighted to announce
the upcoming marriage of
their daughter Elizabeth
Holland Nobles to Mr. Luke
David Tucker, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Dean Tucker of
Niceville, Florida. Eliza-
beth is the granddaughter
of Mr. Robert (Bob) Nobles,
formerly of Port St. Joe
Florida and the late Mary
Nobles and Mr. and Mrs.
George Holland of Forest
City, North Carolina. Luke
is the grandson of the late
Robert and Launa Tucker


and the late Hawthorne and
Mary Tucker of Panama City,
Florida.
The bride-elect attends
Florida State University and
will graduate in May 2009
with an RN, BSN from the
FSU College of Nursing. The
bridegroom is a 2008 gradu-
ate of the Florida State Uni-
versity College of Engineer-
ing and is employed with
AMR Capital of White Plains,
New York.
A June 6, 2009 wedding
is planned at First Baptist
Church in Crestview, Flori-
da.


$5 Raffle Tickets
3 day 2 night stay at the Windmark Beach Resort with a $200 Gift
Certificate to School of Fish Restaurant.
Tickets Available at: Toucans, St Joe Rent All and Persnickety.
Drawing December 6, 2008 Benefits Project Graduation



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4 'c)' Fiday .
December 5th, 2008
9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.'




315 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe,
Orrn?%l r^f^f


?S3U-229-66UU


Happy BIRTHDAY


Alison

turns 10

Alison Faith Gay
turned 10 on Nov. 18. Ali-
son celebrated her birth-
day just hanging out with
her family and going out
for dinner.
Alison is the daughter
of Kellie and Scooter
Braswell and the late
Bobby Lewis Gay.
Alison is the grand-
daughter of Buddy and
Sue Ann Kennington and
Robert and Audrey Gay,
all of Port St. Joe.


Brooklyn

turns 6
Brooklyn Sheppard cel-
ebrated her 6th birthday on
Nov. 15 with a Barbie party.
She celebrated her day at
the park with lots of friends
and family. Brooklyn is the
daughter of Al and Heather
Sheppard of Howard Creek.
She is the granddaughter
of Ronnie and Peggy Raf-
field of Port St Joe, Greg and
Tommie Sharratt of Howard
Creek, and Thomas Shep-
pard and Elizabeth Sheppard
of Waynesboro, Ga.


Bladen

turns 4
Bladen Levins,
son of Tom and
Stephanie Levins,
turned 4 on Nov. 5.
He celebrated with
a party at the Hon-
eyville Park, attend-
ed by his parents,
brother and sister,
Stratton and Hailyn
Levins, and all fam-
ily and friends. We
love you Blade. You
are growing up so
fast.


Birth

ANNOUNCEMENTS


Aubrey Armstead
is born
Justin Armstead and Courtney Pres-
ton welcome home their precious baby
girl, Aubrey Kanani Armstead, who was
born on Nov. 4, 2008.
She weighed 7 lbs. and was 19 inches
long. Aubrey is the granddaughter of
Thomas and Christine McEniry and Alex
Leon and Lisa Fiapea-Leon.


Gavyn Heath Bryant born
Michael and Heather Bryant are pleased
to announce the birth of their son, Gavyn
Heath Bryant.
. Gavyn was born on Sept. 29, 2008 at Gulf
Coast Medical Hospital. He was 7 lbs., 12 oz
and 20 2 inches long.


Kiwanis KORNER


Kiwanis Korner
By Johanna White

Aren't we so blessed.....
This week we were blessed
to hear from Pastor How-
ard Riley of Highland View
Church of God. He spoke
to us about what the Bible
teaches of love. How we
are to love one another,
about the golden rule. His
message intertwined with
Thanksgiving in giving
thanks for our loved ones
and for the ones that need
to be loved. For us to look
around us to see how we
have been blessed by oth-
ers and to make sure we


do the same. It is the time
of year that we try sharing
extra blessing toward oth-
ers. Something we need to
do all year around. We ap-
preciate Brother Howard
taking the time to share
God's message with us.
We are now selling tick-
ets for our annual Pancake
Breakfast to be held on
Saturday, Dec. 6 from 6:30
a.m. until 10 a.m. at Pep-
pers Restaurant. Please
come and join us and enjoy
some good ole' homemade
pancakes, sausage and cof-
fee/juice. We do have some
awesome cooks. Remem-
ber all the proceeds sup-


PANCAKE BREAKFAST
The annual Pancake Breakfast to be held on
Saturday, Dec. 6 from 6:30 6.m. until 10 a.m.
at Peppers Restaurant. Please come and join us
and enjoy some good ole' homemade pancakes,.
sausage and coffee/juice. We do have some awe-.
some cooks. Remember all the proceeds support,
our community.


. port our community.
The Port St Joe Kiwanis
Club meets every Tuesday
at noon at the Gulf County
ARC and Transportation
Building located off of In-
dustrial Road.
If you are interested
in becoming a member of


a Civic Club and a great
group of men and women
dedicated in giving back
to our community you can
contact Johanna White at
227-6268.
We wish and hope all of
you a Blessed Thanksgiv-
ing.


Custom Photography


1 Debbie Hooper
J rPhotography


Aerial Views
Beach Portraits
Matted Prints
Note Cards
Postcards
Special Events
Custom Images
for Brochures
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Color, B & W, Sepia


OlWCT ti r iits Oil /1iCe f
www.joebay.com The Gallery. If there is
something you want that is not yet there
call Debbie at 850-229-1215
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S. *1 *


.,.-.


1-


p


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Thursday, December 4, 2008


Soeal


The Star I B3


Residents


thankful for


community
The Bridge at Port St. Joe is.very thank-
ful for the community and young adults,
coming together and spending time with
our residents.
We cannot tell you how it affects the
very spirit of "Thanksgiving." The area
youth and Long Avenue Baptist Youth Min-
ister Mike Dunn did a great job last week
singing and ministering to our residents.
It was simply wonderful.
With' deep appreciation,
Activities director Nancy Dimitrijevich


Duren's


Piggly Wiggly,


volunteers


feed 700

The wonderful loving, dedicated
volunteers met on Thanksgiving Eve,
to set up the serving line, decorate
the Washington Improvement Build-
ing, and to prepare the more than
35 turkeys it took to accomplish this
massive project. Mrs Tia Kilpatrick,
Connie McGee, and their families
hosted the Thanksgiving dinner and
program from 12 noon until 4:30 p.m.
on Thanksgiving Day. This group and
the volunteers prepared the food pro-
vided by the Christmas for the Young
and Elderly Committee. The WIG cel-
ebration provided music, prayer, and
hours of great socializing and fed over
400 people.
The other group prepared the food
at the Gulf County Senior Citizen's
building.
The volunteers met Wednesday
night, prepared the more than 30 tur-
keys, arranged all the supplies needed
for this massive project, received food
donated by members of the commu-
nity, and set up the serving line. This
wonderful group prepared packed
and delivered over 300 meals.
Then on Thanksgiving Day more
than 40 volunteers met, heated up the
food, arranged the food for serving,
and as is custom were lead in prayer
by Mr. James Gainey. The volunteers
consisted of many returning helpers,
children, young adults, senior citizens,
and wonderful dedicated men and
women. The volunteers came from
Wewahitchka, Cape San Blas, Mexico
Beach, St. Joe Beach, Highland View,
Port St. Joe, and Howard Creek.
The amazing thing about this is
that everyone was finished delivering,
cleaning up and on their way home by
noon. Thanks to all of the gathering.
I hope to see you Christmas Eve at 6
p.m. at the Senior Citizen's building
where we will once again serve our
calling started by Mr. Billy Dixson
several years ago to provide meals
and love for our community who are
in need.
A special thanks to Mr. George Du-
ren for his generosity in providing the
12 large pans of dressing, 400 cakes,
and the staff of the Piggly Wiggly for
helping provide the great help, great
food, and service, in making this proj-
ect happen. The committee would
also like to thank the Gulf County Se-
nior Citizen's Board of Directors for
allowing our committee to use their
wonderful facility. It makes such a
great centralized location for our
event.


Knights of Pythias donate to Food Pantry


The R.A. Driesbach, Sr., Lodge No.
77 of the Knights of Pythias last week
donated several boxes of non-perish-
able foods to the county Food Pantry.
"They gave a lot of food, it was a
very nice donation," said Jerry Sto-
koe, director of the Food Pantry.
The Knights of Pythias is an inter-
national fraternity first organized in
Washington, D.C. in 1864.
The first African-American Lodge
was organized in 1880 in Vicksburg,
Miss.


Today, the role the Knights of Py-
thias plays in the community is far
different than when the order be-
gan.
That role has extended far beyond
taking care of widows and orphans
and burying the dead, to become
much more of a catalyst in creating
strong communities through a wide
range of social and service activi-
ties.
Pythianism represents a human
ideal build upon Americanism, Pa-


triotism and the Brotherhood of man.
Friendship, charity and benevo-
lence are the cardinal principles of the
Pythian Lodge, but more than this, it
teaches the Fatherhood of God, love
of country, obedience to law, purity of
the home, obligations of clean citizen-
ship and man's duty to man.
The donation of food for the Food
Pantry is part of that mission, just as
with the recent donation of 30 used
bicycles and more than $100 to Bikes
for Boys and Girls of Gulf County.


Commodity food pick-up point changes
Effective the month of December the groceries that were previously picked up at the Highland View Assembly of God
Church will be picked up at the People Helping People Building located on Avenue D and Peters Street. Please call 229-5262
if you have any questions.
The groceries will be ready at 2 p.m. Dec. 15, 2008.
.,^ ,' ,M-aras ,t7 ';' -MK 'j 4 Tas i M^^ . .(.. i. t, ,. -. "-_'.. r,. '.<*,' -.',L :, '.. *.; *-. .-.- *,-' *- ':*. ::,'s,' *tY ;'i; ,,?r'--, s;.


Meet this week's Pet of the Week- "Golden"! Golden
is an American Staffshire Bull Terrier mix and a very
good girl! Golden does not have a problem with the
other dogs and mostly hangs out doing her own thing-
a very independent girl! Golden is very laid back and
would make a great companion for someone looking
for a low energy dog with lots of love and devotion to
share! Please contact Melody at the Humane Society
if you would like to adopt Golden or any of her other
wonderful friends here at the St. Joseph Bay Humane
Society, 227-1103.

WANT TO WORK WITH ANIMALS! St. Joseph
Bay Humane Society is anticipating a possible
opportunity for employment. If interested, please
apply in person at 1007 Tenth Street, Port St. Joe,
Tuesday- Saturday between the hours of 10am & 4pm.


772 Suite B U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Dan Ostman
(850) 227-1244 Ph/Fax
Cell (850) 832-1560 NAPA CARE CENTER
L *. ha^^-~-M-^^- -^ -l~icJ


,.TMW.






B4 | The Star


Local


Thursday, December 4, 2008


In Loving Memory of



Valerie Ann Thomas


Misty Lynn Garrett, 49,
of Panama City, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008.
Misty was born May 22,
1959 in Atlanta, Ga.
Misty is survived by her
husband, Jerry Garrett;
stepsons, Michael and wife,
Misty Garrett, and Wesley
and wife, Ritta Garrett;
three brothers, Johnny
Liles, Tommy Liles and


Robbie Gable and wife;
one aunt, Peggy Olsen and
husband.
A Celebration of life was
held Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2008 at
2 p.m. ET at Highland View
Baptist Church.
Brock's Home Town
Funeral Home
5907 Hwy 22
Callaway, Fla. 32404
850-874-0818


George E. Hieber


Mr. George E. Hieber, 77,
of Miami, FL, and Port Saint
Joe, passed away Sunday,
Nov. 30,2008. He was a
veteran of the Korean War
and a retired nurse.
Survivors include his
wife, Rhoda Hieber; a
son, George Hieber, Jr., a
daughter, Mary Beth Hieber,
a twin brother, John Hieber,
sisters, Dorothy and Anne;
a stepson, Bill Hanson and
a step-grandson, Brett
Hanson.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, his son Fred,


and a brother, also Fred.
The funeral service will
be held at 11:00 a.m. EST
Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2008
from the graveside in Holly
Hill Cemetery, conducted by
the Rev. David Fernandez
and the Rev. Larry Broom,
and Chaplain Virgil Tillman.
Interment will follow.
He will lie in state at the
Comforter Funeral home
on Tuesday evening from
4-6 p.m.
All services are under the
direction of the Comforter
Funeral Home.


Glen W. Williams


I would like to thank everyone for your time, prayers, flowers, cards of loving along with your monetary
blessings during the loss of my wonderful wife.
Sincere thanks from the bottom of my heart. May God continue to bless you all.
Robert James Thomas






Covenant Hospice offers free grief workshop


PERRY Coping with the death of
a loved one is extremely difficult, but
no one should feel alone. Covenant
Hospice and the New Brooklyn
Missionary Church in Perry invites
those who have lost a loved one or
would like to help someone who has
lost a love one or friend to attend a
free grief workshop from 10 a.m. to
12:00 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 9 at New
Brooklyn Missionary Church, located
on S. Byron Butler Parkway.
The workshop is free and open
to anyone in the community. Those
who are both newly bereaved and
those who are still coping from a


previous loss are invited to attend.
A Covenant Hospice bereavement
specialist will present current
information on coping strategies,
normal grief reactions, and
supporting someone in grief. Also,
"Coping for the Holidays" after a loss.
will also be discussed.
Attendees are encouraged to
bring a friend to learn some new
insights into the grief process.
For more information, contact
Elizabeth Robinson, MSW at
800-541-3072 or Catherine Bines at
850-584-4373.
Celebrating 25 years of keeping


the promise, Covenant Hospice is a
not-for-profit organization dedicated
to providing comprehensive,
compassionate services to patients
and loved ones during times of
life-limiting illnesses. The focus
of Covenant Hospice is to enable
its patients to live as fully and
comfortably as possible, to provide
dignified palliative care, to assist
patients' loved ones in coping with
end-of-life issues and the eventual
death of.the patient, and to improve
care for all patients at the end of
their lives by example and
education.


Glen W. Williams, 67, of
Port St. Joe, FL passed away
Sunday morning, Nov. 23,
2008, at his home with his
family by his side. He was
born in Panama City, FL to
John J. and Sybil Williams
and moved to Port St. Joe in
1966.
Mr. Williams worked for
Florida First National Bank
in Port St. Joe until his
retirement in 1991. He
was a member and deacon
of Highland View Baptist
Church of Port St. Joe and
member of the Lions Club
of Port St. Joe. Glen loved
to bowl and play golf.
He was preceded
in death by his father,
JohnJ. Williams, and
two brothers, James and
David Williams.
Survivors include his
wife of 45 years, Dorthey
Williams of Port St. Joe,
his mother and step-father,
Sybil and Roy Thomas
of Panama City, his son,
Troy Williams and wife,
Chris, his daughter, Regina
Grantland and husband,
John, all of Port St. Joe, his
brothers, Richard Williams
and wife, Pat, Bobby
Williams, all of Panama
City, and Harold Williams
of Grand Bay, AL, and his
three grandsons, Austin


Williams, Jaden Grantland,
and Owen Glen Grantland.
Funeral services for
Mr. Williams were held on
Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2008, at 10
a.m. ET at Highland View
Baptist Church with Rev.
Dave Fernandez officiating.
Interment followed at
3:30 p.m. at the Glenwood
Cemetery in Chipley, Fla.
Pallbearers for the
services were Lamar
Waymire, Robert Waymire,
Wayne McDaniel, Gary
McDaniel, Darrel Rustin,
Timothy Rustin, David
Waymire, Will Rustin, Chris
Newsom, Kyle Newsom,
and David Roche.
The family received
friends at the funeral home
on Monday, Nov. 24, 2008.
Flowers will be accepted
or memorial contributions
may be made to either the
building fund of Highland
View Baptist Church or to
any Parkinson's Disease
Research Foundation.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted and
viewed at our Web site,
www.southerlandfamily.com.
Southerland Family
Funeral Home
507 10th St.
Port St. Joe, Fla. 32456
(850) 229-8111


The friendly place to worship!


First Baptist Church
MEXICO BEACH
Located at 823 N. 15th St., Mexico Beach
Corner of 15th & California 648-5776
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all ages) '
Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Please note, all times central!
Reverend Edie LaFontain


Oak Grove Church
Yowy fof/, 4o v e',, f~e, o/,/e, e/wi'y 0(9,. f//
Come Grow With Us!

Sunday School 9:45
Sunday Worship Service 10:45
Wednesday Cafe 5 pm 613 Madison St.
Wednesday 6:15 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Adult Bible Study 850-227-1837
Children & Youth Ministries www.oakgrove-church.org


BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
A 311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET- Bible Study all ages 10 a.m. ET
Morning Worship 11 a.m. ET Evening Worship 6 p.m. ET
Tuesday: Choir Practice 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in Him."
Please accept this invitation to join us in worship, God bless you!
Please call usfr your spiritual needs.
www.beachchapel.org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950 Home 769-8725


Worship with us at
Long Avenue Baptist ChurchJ
Where Faith, Family &Friendship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL *
For More Information Call 229-8691


Michael Rogers Pastor
9:45 AM ............... ........ ............. .... Sunday School
10:30 AM ... ...,............ ..... ................ Fellowship Breakfast
11:00 A M ... .... ... ............................................ W orship
6:00 PM ....... ..... .... ........ ... ........... .. .....W orship
www,faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faith Christian School




CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS
Singing: 9 a.m. Sunday
Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue



Lightning Kills!

When a storm approaches, and lightning is
present:

-Stay away from open high ground and isolated
trees.
-Stay away from water, including lakes and
rivers. Stay off the beach and out of boats.
-Do not seek shelter in a convertible car or golf
cart.
-Stay away from doors, windows and all metal
objects, including pipes and faucets.
-Stay off corded telephones and away from all
electrical devices, like televisions and computers,
iPods, DVD and CD players.


Obituaries


Misty Lynn Garrett






These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.


FAITH


COMFORTER SOUTHERLAND FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter
L.F.D. 507 1Oth Street #Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1818 (850) 229-8111


Rish, Gibson, Scholz &
Groom, P.A.
William J. Rish, Thomas S.Gibson, Russell Scholz,
Paul W. Groom II
(850) 229-8211


Thursday, December 4, 2008 www. starf1l. com Page B5


It sounds


heavenly
When Jesus comes back for
the saved, what a glorious day
that will be.
No more influence from Satan
to sin, sure sounds good to me.
No more heartaches, sickness
or pain.
Sin and evil will not exist, not a
thing will be profane.
No more sun to burn our skin,
no more light bills to pay.
God's glory will illuminate
heaven, to guide our way each
day.
No more water bills, the
crystal river will fill that need.
No more politicians or lawyers,
in heaven there will be no greed.
No more grocery bill, you can
eat from the tree of life.
A different kind of fruit each
month, this will cut down on some
strife.
This sounds too good to be
true, but the Bible says it will be.
I don't know about you, but it
sure sounds heavenly to me.
Billy Johnson




s5 Raffle


Tickets

3 day 2 night stay

at the Windmark

Beach Resort

with a $200 Gift

Certificate to

School of Fish

Restaurant.
Tickets Available at:

Toucans,

St Joe Rent All

and

Persnickety.
Drawing December 6,2008
Benefits Project Graduation


Family Life
Church
Pastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford
Welcome you to worship with us:
Sunday 10:30am
Sunday Night Prayer 6pm
Wednesday 7pm


The Christian CONSCIENCE


In a few days, many millions
of people will be celebrating a
myth, while a few will celebrate
a miracle which took place about
2,000 years ago.
It was about 63 years ago that I
learned that my parents were not
reliable sources of information.
For about five years, they had
deceived me into believing in a
miracle, which I found to be a
myth. So, like so many others,
I turned to my friends and to
others for answers to the deep
questions that relate to the
meaning of life. Please, don't lie to
your kids.
The Christian religion is hard
for many to accept because it
demands belief in not just one
miracle, but many. What we call
Christianity today, actually is a
continuation of God's dealings
with the children of Israel.
In the Bible, which contains
the historical record of the
children of Israel, we read of
many miracles. We read of the
miracle of creation, the miracle
of the Exodus, the miracle of the


crossing of the Jordan River, the
conquering of the people in the
land of Canaan and the defeat
of Goiiath by young David. In
Daniel, we read of the miracle of
the lion's den, and of the coming
Messiah who will be "cut off" for
His people, and in Esther, the
miracle of the defeat of the evil
Haman.
In Jeremiah and Ezekiel, we
read about God's plan to make a
New Covenant with the children
of Israel. This is the covenant
that will result in miraculous
transformations in many
individuals, what we call the new
birth, or being born from above.
In the New Testament
(another term for New Covenant)
we read, that the one called
Jesus, is the Messiah and the
mediator of this New Covenant,
and of his miraculous birth. It is
this miracle, of the virgin birth,
that those of us who name Jesus
as our Savior and Messiah and
Lord, soon will celebrate
again.
When God, prayer and the


Bible basically were expelled
from the schools, we lost our
understanding of the reality of
miracles. Miracles are real. I
have experienced a number of
them myself. When I was only a
teenager, I fell asleep at the wheel
in the middle of the night. The
man who happened to be driving
the car behind me said I was
going 70 mph when I went off the
road and mowed down a number
of guard posts. Not only did I
survive, I was able to drive myself
home with only minor damage to
the vehicle I was driving.
About 35 years ago, one
morning before my family awoke,
while reading my Bible in the
kitchen of my home, the Holy
Spirit came upon me and gave
me new life whereby I wanted
to serve God. No longer was it
a struggle. It was a joy. I didn't
know it at the time, but God had
given me a new heart and a new
spirit, just as He promised to
Jeremiah and Ezekiel.
This Christmas, let us
celebrate the miracle of the virgin


birth, not some make believe
hero. Let us worship the one who
is the Messiah, the mediator of
the New Covenant, the one who
died to give us new life, and make
the new birth possible.
At the Mexico Beach Christian
Worship Center, Christmas is
just one more day to worship and
serve our Heavenly Father, and
Jesus Christ, the Son of God, our
Savior and Messiah, and the Holy
Spirit. Our services begin, with a
time of greeting and fellowship,
at 9:30 a.m. CT Sunday. Worship
begins at 9:45 a.m. After the
service, we have a pot luck
luncheon so that we can
fellowship with one another, and
exhort one another. (Hebrews
10:24) We worship at the Mexico
Beach Civic Center on 105 N..31st
St., which is behind the Beach
Walk gift shop, just off U.S. 98.

God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian Worship Center
pastor@mexicobeachcwc.com


Are you going to serve God or the Devil?


2 Timothy 3
This know also, that in the last
days perilous time shall come,
for men shall be lovers of their
own selves, covetous, boasters,
proud, blasphemers, disobedient
to parents, unthankful, unholy,
,without natural affection.
Truce breakers, false accusers,
incontinent, fierce, despisers of
those that are good. Traitors,
heady, high-minded, lovers of
pleasures more than lovers of
God. Having a form of godliness,
but denying the power thereof.
From such turn away. For this
sort are they which creep into
houses and led captive, silly


women laden with sins, led away.
Ever learning and never able
to come to the knowledge of
truth. But evil men and women
and seducers shall wax worse
and worse, deceiving and being
deceived.
God rules the world and he is
coming back soon. It is not going
to get any better. Why don't we
people live like we are people
living like Christians and stop
fooling ourselves.

1 Peter
Yet if any man suffer as
a Christian, let him not be
ashamed, but let him glorify


God on his behalf. For the time
is come to judgment must begin
at the house of God. And if it
first begins with us, what shall
the end be of them that obey
not the Gospel of God? And if
the righteous scarcely be saved
where shall the ungodly and the
sinner appear? In Hell for ever
and ever.
Don't get mad with God, this
is his world. As long as I know I
have heard a long time and thank
God I have never knew or heard
of Mr. George Duren selling
liquor at the Piggly Wiggly. Port
St. Joe is not too much out of
hand, but it will be if you all start
letting things go on. As long as


Mr. Frank Pate was mayor he
didn't let things go on and some
in city government know that
they have tried to sell on Sunday
and it didn't work. Do you all have
any fear of God? I don't think this
town should be run by the city
commission.
Get some love in your heart for
one another. And let Port St. Joe
stay Port St. Joe and look out for
one another. We are blessed and
let us stay that way and pray we
get along pretty good here.
May God forever bless us and
keep Port St. Joe a quiet little
place. God bless Mr. Duren and
love to everybody.
Mother Mary Freeman


Port St. Joe Presbyterian offers 'Christmas at Dogwood'


Several people from the Port St. Joe
Presbyterian Church have been involved
in preparing for the annual "Christmas at
Dogwood" at Dogwood Acres Presbyterian
Camp. This year's event is from 5:30-9 p.m.
Dec. 12-13 (Friday-Saturday).
The program begins with a short visit
to "Grandmother's House" where there


A Spirit Filled
Outreach Oriented
Word of Faith Church


d HOME OF THE
POWERHOUSE
YOUTH MINISTRIES


33 Rwww.familylifechurch.net
323 Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433


Sit Unted tetX di
e&ida 4 fxetia Uead
111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Meico leah United Methodist (hurch
NKusinl PovIDED
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820



St. Peter's Anglican Church
(Traditional Episcopal Service 1928 BCP)

Morning Prayer & Holy Conmmunion
Sunday..................8:00 a.m.
The Rev. David Mans, Priest
Services being held at the I hiited Pentecostal Chutch
309 6th Street Port St Joe, FL
".n Inchanging Faith In Changing IWorld"
WI 5 'E E*EE


the Christmas story is read. Travelers then
journey on a luminary-lighted trail toward
"Bethlehem," along the way encountering
various characters from the biblical story.
Including the several stops, it takes about 30
minutes to complete the trail. Refreshments
in the camp dining room conclude the
evening.


First 'Baptist Church
102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
Jerome Barnes, Interim Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students


New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church


Sunday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am
Sunday School ..................9:40 am
Traditional Service............ 11:00 am
Awana's.............................. 5:00 pm
Youth Choir........................ 5:30 pm
Youth Groups..................... 6:00 pm


Wednesday
Children's Choir.............. 6:00 pm
Prayer Meeing..................6:30 pm
Children's Ministry
Activities............................ 6:30 pm
Youth Ministry Activities... 6:30 pm


www.fbcpsj.org


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
Si lanb Vietw sapti t C( urtb
4 382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Mike Westbrook, Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
Pastor Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.


S++| TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN

t ST. JAMES'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
wwvw.stjamesepiscopalclhurcli.or 850-227-1845


Camp staff with golf carts will be available
to drive handicapped persons along the trail.
Dogwood Acres is located on State 279
just east of Vernon. If driving north on State
77 from the Panama City area, turn west on
State 279. The camp is located about 5.5 miles
on your right.
There is no charge for the event.


First Presbyterian Church
of Port St. Joe
508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
Reverend Reid Cameron
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.



"Our Church can be your home"
t First Church of the Nazarene
2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850) 229-9596
Give unto the Lordtheglfory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness.
Psalm 29:2


Sunday School.......................... 10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


' .. FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. loe


Sunday:
Contemportry Service 9:00 a.m. ET
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. ET
Traditional Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET
Wednesday:
Youth: 5:30 p.m. ET
Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET


850) 227-1724
Rev. Mac Fuldcher
Pastor
Ann Comforter Jeremy Divon
AMusic Director southh Minister
Deborah Loyless
Director of Children Ministries


ti










SCHOOL EWS


B
Section


Thursday, December 4, 2008 w w w. starf 1. c om Page B6


THANKSGIVING ABCs


The kindergarten classes of Wewahitchka Elementary School presented a delightful account of America's first thanksgiving to their parents and fellow students on Tuesday in the school commons
area. The students, dressed as pilgrims and Indians, entertained the audience by using the alphabet to retell the story of this historical feast.


DAZZLING DOLPHINS


Front row: Maria Palacios, Brian Darnell, Kerigan Pickett
Back row: Kristen Thursby, Tyler Monroe, Will Ramsey, Joseph Kerigan.


There's

more than

one way to

peel an egg

Most everyone has had
the opportunity to peel a
boiled egg. There are many
helpful hints that have been
passed down from one per-
son to another that help with
getting the shell off without
destroying the egg. The most
common of these hints is to
rinse and soak the cooked
eggs in cold water.
Mr. Brown's class was l,
shown a new way to easily
peel an egg by Carol Utzing-
er. More than 20 years ago,
Ms. Utzinger's daughter in enough t
Garland, Texas, passed this slightly.
foolproof method along to 2. Gen
her mom. The new way to part of th
peel an egg is as follows: of the par
1. Holding the egg side- The spoo
ways in your hand, take a ily under
teaspoon and tap around the 3. Aft
center of the egg just hard shell from


Wewahitchka,
Elementary School


;o break the shell
tly slide the curved
he spoon under half
tially cracked shell.
n should slide eas-
the shell.
ter removing the
n the other half, add


salt and pepper. Enjoy.
Wewahitchka Elementa-
ry School is always looking
for volunteers to share their
time, talents and treasures.
Please call the school at 639-
2476 if you are interested in
sharing with our students.
We would love to have you.


the


Jliou',!5 Tate


AL


Faith Christian students gathered in front of the
school Nov. 21 to bless the Christmas Shoe Box gifts that
were being sent to Franklin Graham's Samaritan's Purse
ministries. There, they will be checked and boxed to be
distributed to centers for dispersion around the world.
We are indeed blessed to have been able to do our small
part to help them to give to so many children who have
little to nothing, and who have little to no knowledge of
the Lord Jesus.
We are so proud of our little first-grade Indians and
second-grade pilgrims. What a wonderful performance
of the First Thanksgiving! We never tire of hearing of our
humble beginnings as a nation. We pray that God "still
our Defender will be" and that He will "forgive our sins
and heal our land." We echo the Pilgrims with "in the
name of God, amen!"


Pilgrim men remove their hats and pilgrim women bow their heads to pray and thank God for His bountiful blessings and
acknowledge Him as their provider, defender and redeemer. Pictured are, from left, Catherine Bouington, Ana Lacivita, Ebony
Alexander, Chandler Godwin, Jacob Kennedy, J.J. Laine, Caleb Schweikert and Farren Newman. Not pictured are Brieana
Bozeman, Mary Kate Wood and Jade Cothran.


FCS students gather to bless their Christmas shoe boxes, which are being sent to needy children around the world.






Thursday, December 4, 2008


Local


The Star I B7


"Art For The Sky"

?,.t ,: -: .-. . ::


GAIA helps more than 1,200 students participate in unique aerial art


Just as a plane flew
overhead that enabled Deb-
bie Hooper to snap pho-
tos, Daniel Dancer, 56, told
schoolchildren to hug the
ground and "get their sky


sight on," a phrase that re-
fers to looking at the big pic-
ture when you're struggling
with a thorny problem.
GALA (Gulf Alliance for
Local Art) was the largest


area contributor and, to-
gether with Apalachicola
Riverkeeper and numer-
ous area supporters and
volunteers, helped bring
Daniel Dancer, an Oregon


environmental photogra-
pher who travels the nation
teaching students about the
environment. "Sky Sight"
was one of six themes he
shared with students which


also included "Intention,"
"Collaboration," "Imper-
manence," "Gratitude" and
"Inter-Connection."
The students donned
black, white, red and other


color T-shirts as they par-
ticipated in the giant photo
shoot of an osprey, also
known as a seahawk, and
the new Franklin County
school mascot.


School NEWS


GCCC to host public
,forum on health care
in America
A remarkable 47 mil-
lion Americans live with-
out health insurance. The
cost to individuals and to
society as a whole is stag-
gering. When individuals
cannot pay their medical
bills, the costs are passed
on to the public at the rate
of $35 billion per year. The
rising cost of health care
is a major contributor to
government budget pres-
sures and the federal debt
as well. There are a num-
ber of proposals and plans
for what to do about health
care costs in America.
Many of them respond to
some, but not all, of the
concerns Americans have
when it comes to paying
for health-care coverage.
Furthermore, all of these
plans come with draw-
backs that the public is
rarely asked to consider.
It is these trade-offs that
need to be faced squarely.
Today, a forum will be
held at Gulf Coast Com-
munity College to spark
deliberation on the issue
of health care in America.
During the forum, citi-
zens will be asked to con-
sider how three different
approaches to the issue
of health care stack up
against the values they
hold important, as well
as to weigh the trade-offs
they might be willing to
accept. This free event is
open to the public for par-
ticipation.
This forum will allow lo-
cal citizens to voice their
opinions, weigh the opin-
ions of others, and gain a
better understanding of
the issues with America's
current healthcare system.
Furthermore, according to
Dr. Terry Jack, professor of
Social Sciences at GCCC,
this forum will "provide
the community wity with in-
sight into the political pro-


cess and give participants
a better understanding of
democracy."
This healthcare forum
will be field from 2:30 4:30
p.m. in the GCCC Student
Union West Conference
Center. For more informa-
tion about this event, con-
tact Dr. Terry Jack, 769-
1551, Ext. 2833.

GCCC promotes
wellness, health
for more than 400
employees
In an effort to promote
health and wellness for
faculty and staff, Gulf
Coast Community College
has developed a Health
and Wellness Committee
which provides various ac-
tivities and programs that
contribute to a fit lifestyle.
Not only does this com-
mittee, as well as other
members of the Gulf Coast
staff, provide wellness ac-
tivities, they also provide
incentives to participate
through prizes and sup-
port for employees who
take advantage of these
programs.
All employees are urged
to take advantage of the
Wellness Center at GCCC
and all of the benefits it
has to offer. Some of the
benefits offered include:
pool, hydro therapy pool,
weight room, and aerobics
room. Along with these ac-
tivities, classes are also of-
fered for employees look-
ing to get fit.
On Tuesday and Thurs-
days, Dr. Carolyn Dunlap,
Spanish Professor, in-
structs a dance aerobics
fitness class just for em-
ployees. On Wednesdays
and Thursdays, Carrie
Fiormonti, an adjunct with
GCCC's Health Sciences
Division, offers a yoga
class as well.


Along with fitness activ-
ities, the Health and Well-
ness Committee puts on
different events through-
out the year to further
promote healthy living.
A health fair, in conjunc-
tion with Blue Cross Blue
Shield, is offered so em-
ployees can get a health
screening and information
on health issues.
Employees are given
an opportunity to fill out
health surveys, which will
later determine the types
of healthy lifestyle semi-
nars (such as smoking
cessation, understanding
high blood pressure, and
understanding high cho-
lesterol) that will be of-
fered throughout the year.
Along with this health
fair, the wellness commit-
tee also offers periodical
blood pressure checks,
blood sugar checks, flu
shot clinics, and more.
Martha Ruder, co-chair
of the Health and Wellness
Committee at GCCC, says
that the activities and ben-
efits offered by this pro-
gram help the employees
in more ways than one.
"Not only do the staff
members who participate
have more knowledge
about health conditions,
and, ways of staying fit,
but they also experience a
savings in insurance pre-
miums, because a health-
ier lifestyle throughout
the college leads to lower
health costs," she said.
Along with promoting
a healthy lifestyle for em-
ployees, the Health and
Wellness Committee also
strives to help educate the
community, and to work
with both local and nation-
al charities to raise funds
for health related causes.
Each year, GCCC's Health
and Wellness Committee
works with the March of
Dimes, in hopes of giving


children a brighter, health-
ier future.

GCCC to offer Florida
correctional officer
certification training
A career as a correc-
tions officer is one of the
bright spots of career
growth with a higher than
average salary for this
region, and beginning
Jan. 15, 2009, the pub-
lic safety division of Gulf
Coast Community College
will offer the Correctional
Officer Basic Standards
program from 5:30 to
9:30 p.m., Monday through
Thursday, at the Gulf
Franklin Center.
This program offers
certification training to
people looking to become
employed as correctional
officers in Florida. Cor-
rectional Officer Basic-
Standards includes train-
ing in correctional facility
operations, legal issues,
interpersonal skills, emer-
gency preparedness, first
aid, CPR, defensive tactics
and firearms.
Currently, the average
annual pay rate for a cor-
rection officer in Florida
is $36,970, with additive
incentives being offered to
those who take their skills
to specified counties.
Depending on the coun-
ty to which a certified cor-
rectional officer travels,
many benefits may be
awarded.
Retirement pension,
education incentives, va-
cation time, and invest-
ment opportunities are
just a few of the possibili-
ties available once achiev-
ing Florida Correctional
Officer Certification.
According to the
Florida Department of
Corrections, the Correc-
tional Officer position is


crucial it offers a career
ladder to advance from an
entry level position into a
supervisory capacity and
ultimately into manage-
ment.
Applications and reg-
istration packets must be
submitted and approved
before registration and
are available at the Gulf
Franklin Center in Port St.
Joe.
For more information,
call Sharon Burdeshaw or
Brenda Burkett at the Gulf
Franklin Center at (850)
227-9670.
For information on an
upcoming night class in
Bay County, call Lorne
Brooks at (850) 747-3234.

Spring registration to
reopen at Gulf Coast
On Dec. 1, registration
for the spring semester at
GCCC was reopened. Reg-
istration will remain open
through Dec. 18 for new
and returning students.
During this time pe-
riod, counselors will be
available Monday through
Thursday, from 8 a.m. to 6
p.m., in the Student Union
East building, to assist
students with their regis-
tration.
New students must
meet with a counselor in
order to register; however,
online registration will
also be available for GCCC
returning students.
Gulf Coast Community
College offers a variety of
different classes, to meet
the needs of nearly every
student.
Along with conven-
tional on-campus classes,
GCCC will also be offer-
ing distance education
courses, weekend classes,
and other methods of flex-
ible scheduling, to make
attending college possible
for anyone who desires.


Along with the reopen-
ing of registration for
current and prospective
students, there is also fi-
nancial aid still available.
Students may speak with
counselors in the financial
aid office, Student Union
East, to explore the op-
tions they have, and to
begin the application pro-
cess.

GCCC recognizes
newest
Phi Kappa members
Gulf Coast Community
College is proud to an-
nounce its newest induct-
ees into the prestigious
Phi Theta Kappa, the In-
ternational Honor Society
of the Two Year Colleges.
Phi Theta Kappa's mis-
sion is to recognize and
encourage the academic
achievement of two-year
college students and pro-
vide opportunities for in-
dividual growth and devel-
opment through participa-
tion in honors, leadership,
service and fellowship
programming.
Inductees are Kelly
Ayers, Sakina Bailey, An-
gela Bannister, Olga Batt,
Chris Bibbs, Mary Clagg.
Christopher Clubbs, Mary
Beth Corbin, Jacqueline
Davis, Meredith Finch,
Brittany Flowers. Brandy
French, Madina Gukhar-
bakiyeva, Christine Hale,
Melissa llitzelberger,
Carolyn Holmes, Taylor
Jackson, Iroda Karimova,
Sarah Kirkland, Caitlin
Lawrence, Trinh Luong,
Carolyn Marley, Jessica
Mock, Jessica Mrzena,
April Nazaruk. Rob Nich-
ol, Brian Nichols. Daphne
Pitts, Jennie Radulescu.
Linda Raya, Andrew Reed.
Evin Roesle, Jacquelynn
Robbins, Timothy Rosen-
beck, Lindsay Sanders,
Andrew Shelley, Caitlyn
Smith, Jacqueline Varnum
and Donna Williams.


I;


GCCC BRIEFS





B8 I The Star


Local


Thursday, December 4, 2008


Troop No. 47 at Council (amporee


Boy Scout Troop No. 47, with its new
leader, David Oliphant, won its newest first-
place ribbons at the Council Camporee.
Scouts from left to right are: Jarret Lalu-
zerne, Zachary Harper, Aaron Braden, Wy-


att Oliphant and David Warriner. It was a
fun weekend for all. Good job Troop 47.
, Troop 47 meets Monday nights at 7 p.m.
ET at the Scout Center. New members are
always welcome.


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
The key to maintaining your live Christ-
mas tree throughout the holiday season is
to give it the proper care from the time it is
purchased until the tree is re-
moved from your home.
Maintaining a high mois-
ture level in the tree is the
single most important factor
in reducing needle loss and
keeping the tree fresh. This
is accomplished primarily
through the use of water-hold- "
ing stands and keeping the CARTER
water level in the stand above
the base of the tree.
There are a couple of reasons why a fresh
tree is important. Obviously a fresh tree will
last, and look better longer. Old, dried-out
trees are unattractive. They're also fire haz-
ards as well. Since most of us include elec-
tric lights in our tree decorations, it's easy
to see that a dried out tree becomes very
dangerous.
There are several ways to determine a
tree's freshness. Bend the needles, if the
tree is fresh, the needles will be supple and
springy. If the tree is old, the needles will
snap and break off. Bounce the trees stump
on the ground to see how many needles fall.
It's normal for a fresh tree to drop a few nee-
dles. But, if bouncing produces a shower of
needles, put the tree back and select anoth-
er. Before buying, also feel the bottom of the
stump the sap of a fresh tree is sticky. On
an old stump, it is hard and caked. A fresh
tree also should have a pleasant fragrance
one that will last thought-out the Christmas
season.
The tree you select should have a good
green color be full and bushy, and have stur-
dy branches. Strength of branches is more
a matter of the tree type that the age or
condition. White Pine and Red Cedars are
well suited for the Florida climate unfortu-
nately; they both have fairly weak branches
that won't hold decorations very well. Firs,
Spruces, Scotch and Virginia Pines, on the
other hand usually have very firm branch-
es.
If you buy your tree several days before
you plan to set it up, store it outdoors in a
cool area under shade or in a carport. Cut
the tree stump at a diagonal about one


Local writer, Michael
Lister, is using Gulf Coast
Community College stu-
dents to bring his new play
to life.
"They are so talented and
are doing such a great job,"
Lister said: "And they are
perfect for this play, which
takes place at a rape coun-
seling center on a college
campus.
The play, Lister's fourth
since starting The Tupelo
Theatre in Wewahitchka,
is a serious and dramatic
look at the global epidemic
of rape.
"Every two-and-a-half-
minutes, someone in Amer-
ica is sexually assaulted."
Thus begins "Spending the
Night with Alyson Adler", a
play that takes place during
one night at a rape coun-
seling center at fictitious
Mitchell College in Atlanta,
Georgia. Novelist David
Andrews has come to do re-
search for his next book, but
at least one of the workers
believes he's there because
he's in love with Alyson
Adler, the center's founder-
which is problematic since
she's well on her way to be-
coming a Catholic nun.
Provocative, poignant,
powerful, this timely play
shows two people strug-
gling with secrets and feel-
ings they're not sure how
to handle, while exploring
the global epidemic of rape-
from Africa to Iraq.
"Spending the Night with
Alyson Adler" is certainly
intense and intended for ma-
ture audiences," Lister said,


CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
EQUINE WARNING SIGNS FOR SALE

Equine Warning Signs for sale at
the Gulf County Extension Service.
Christmas Special cost is $8.00
per sign (regular price $20.00 per
sign). Any questions you can call
the Gulf County Extension Service at
850-639-36200 or 850-229-2909.
The Gulf County Extension Service
is located 200 N 2nd Street, We-
wahitchka, in the Old Gulf County"
Courthouse.

inch above the original cut, and place it in..a
container of water. When you bring the tree
inside, saw the stump again, this time squar-
ing off the diagonal. This creates a fresh
wound which helps the tree take up water
through the stump. Now place the tree in. a
stand that holds water. Be sure you keep the
stand filled at all times. It's surprising how
quickly a good-size tree can take up a quart
of water. Be sure to check the water level at
least twice weekly.
Place your tree in the coolest, part of
the room. Keep it away from things, like
fireplaces, heater, air ducts and even T.V.
sets. The heat from these can cause the
tree needles to dry out and drop off very
quickly.
Proper Christmas tree care is only part
of the story. There are certain safety rules
you should follow carefully. Never use can-
dles or anything with an open flame on, or
near the tree. If you're using electric light,
check them over very carefully for loose
connections and worn wire. Don't overload
you electrical circuits. If you must use an
extension cord, run it out of the way of foot
traffic, and be sure it's heavy enough for
the current load. Always turn the tree lights,
off when you leave home or go to bed.
Keep in mind that a fresh tree with good
shape and sturdy branches usually will
make the best tree for displaying and deco-
rating. Make sure you keep the tree in the
coolest possible place, and that you water it
every day. Take the time to properly care for
your Christmas tree, and it will reward your
efforts with radiant beauty throughout the


"but that shouldn't scare
people away. It's also got
some humor and romance.
It's exciting, entertaining,
dramatic. It's not propa-
ganda parading around as a
play."
"Spending the Night with
Alyson Adler" premiered at
The Gallery Above on Satur-
day, Nov. 29th-two days after
Thanksgiving, then returned
to The Tupelo Theatre for
five performances Nov. 30,
Dec. 4-5 and Dec. 7, all at
7:00 p.m. CT


"I'm very proud of this
play," Lister said, "and feel
like it not only covers a range
of important issues, but of
human emotions, as well."
"People should come
out to see the actors from
the college," Lister added.
"They're a real testament to
the strength of the wonder-
ful performing arts program
that Rosie O'Bourke has
skillfully created."
For more information, go
to www.TheTupelo.com Or
call (850) 639-4848.


Christmas Story Hour


The Charles White-
head Wewahitchka
Public Library will present


a Christmas Story Hour on for a fun-filled time of
Dec. 9, at 3:30 p.m. stories, crafts and
Come share with us fun.


NOTICE OF CITY OF PORT ST. JOE CITY
COMMISSION MEETING AMENDING THE
PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT ZONING FOR
A 92 ACRE PARCEL OF PROPERTY
The City of Port St. Joe City Commnission
Proposes to adopt by ordinance the following:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, RELATING TO AND
AMENDING THE ZONING CODE; AMENDING THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATION CODE AND ZONING MAP; AMENDING THE
MYERS PARK PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT ZONING DISTRICT; ADOPTING
CERTAIN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MYERS PARK PLANNED
UNIT DEVELOPMENT ZONING DISTRICT TO SUPERSEDE REQUIREMENTS IN
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATION CODE; PRO-
VIDING FOR REPEAL OF ANY CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The public hearing for the adoption of the Ordinance will be held on Tuesday, December
16, 2008 at 6:00 P.M., Eastern Time at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. A first reading of the Ordinance will occur at the same
time and location on December 2, 2008. Copies of the Ordinance are available for pub-
lic inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall located at 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.
The hearing may be continued from time to time as may be necessary.
' Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments
in writing to the City Commissioners of the City of Port St. Joe at City of Port St. Joe
City Hall 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Transactions of the
public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made dur-
ing the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure that a verbatim
record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based.
Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk's Of-
fice at (850) 229-8261 ext. 114.
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


By: Mayor-Commissioner
Attest: City Clerk


Local writer uses GCCC students


to bring new play to life


$ Raffle Tickets

3 day 2 night stay at the Windmark

Beach Resort with a

$200 Gift Certificate to

School of Fish Restaurant.

Tickets Available at: Toucans, St Joe

Rent All and Persnickety.

Drawing December 6, 2008 Benefits Project Graduation


.Caring for your cut



Christmas tree










LAW


ENFORCEMENT B
/ Section


Thursday, December 4, 2008 w w w. starf 1. co mn Page 9


NOV. 14- 20
This report represents some
events the FWC handled over the
past week; however, it does not in-
clude all actions taken by the Divi-
sion of Law Enforcement.

BAY COUNTY
Officer Joe Chambers checked
two hunters on East River Island in
the Choctawhatchee Wildlife Man-
agement Area and found one who
was a convicted felon. A campsite
inspection was conducted and less
than 20 grams of cannabis and drug
paraphernalia were produced. Cita-
tions were issued for the narcotics
violations and a follow-up investiga-
tion is being conducted concerning
the felon in possession of a firearm.
Officer Mike Nobles received
information that a subject had
killed a doe deer along a county
road several weeks earlier using
a shotgun during archery season.
Officer Nobles and Lt. Jay Chess-
er went to the subject's residence
and obtained a confession to the
violations. The subject was cited
for illegal method of take and road
hunting. The subject didn't have
a hunting license and stated that
he had just completed the hunter
education course and would now be
able to buy one.
Officer Dennis Palmer set up
surveillance on some deer feeding
along a roadside next to Econfina
Wildlife Management Area when a
van slowed and the occupant fired
a shot at the deer. The van was
stopped and the suspect was in pos-
session of a 12-gauge shotgun. The
violator was booked into the Bay
County Jail for gun and light-hunt-
ing from a right-of-way, and no driv-


er's license. K-9 Officer Mike Guy
and K-9 Jake arrived to assist and
located the spent shotgun casing
that had been thrown from the van.
The deer could not be located.
Lt. Jay Chesser was driving
down Highway 388 when he smelled
the distinct aroma of burning can-
nabis. Since the only source of the
odor could be the truck directly in
front of him, a traffic stop was ini-
tiated, yielding two cannabis ciga-
rettes and a bag of cannabis.
Officers Dennis Palmer and Mike
Nobles arrived to assist and cita-
tions were issued to two subjects.

FRANKLIN COUNTY
On November 15, Officer Woody
Cook and Lt. Charlie Wood were
working in the Tate's Hell Wildlife
Management Area and the Apala-
chicola National Forest inspecting
archery and small game hunters.
While on patrol, they inspected 18
individuals. Three individuals were
located running deer dogs outside
the established season just west of
the North Road in the Tate's Hell
Wildlife Management Area. The
three individuals were each issued
misdemeanor citations for the vio-
lation.
On November 16, Officer Faris
Livesay was performing saltwater
fishing license and fisheries inspec-
tions in eastern Franklin and west-
ern Wakulla counties. The inspec-
tions revealed violations with only
two fishermen encountered by Of-
ficer Livesay. Citations and warn-
ings were issued to the two fisher-
men for possession of undersized
flounder, possession of undersized
red drum, and over-the-bag limit of
red drum.


The Gulf County Sheriff's Of-
fice will be conducting vehicle
safety checkpoints and DUI
checkpoints during the months
of November and December
2008. The checkpoints will be held
throughout the county to include
Highway 98 near St. Joe Beach,
Highway 98 and Garrison Ave,
C-30 Simmons Bayou, Highway
71 North of White City,. Highway
22 and Highway 22A, Highway 71
and Westarm Creek, Highway 71
Dalkieth Area and Highway 71
near the Calhoun line.
On 11/17/2008 Timothy Ray
Stein, 38, was arrested on a vio-
lation of probation warrant. The
original charge was DWLSR.
Angelia Renee Williams, 39,
was arrested on a violation of
probation warrant. The original
charge was uttering and forgery.
On 11/18/2008 Travis William
Allen, 25, was arrested on six
warrants for failure to appear.
The warrants were from Liberty
County.
On 11/19/2008 William Steve
Mayo, Jr., 19, was arrested on a
warrant for burglary.


On 11/20/2008 Tony Howard
Beck, 26, was arrested on nine
warrants for failure to appear.
The original charge was worth-
less checks.
On 11/24/2008 Wendy Lock-
lear Tarr, 38, was arrested on 16
counts of uttering a forged in-
strument and 16 counts of forg-
ery. It is alleged that she stole a
checkbook from an individual and
wrote checks amounting to al-
most $10,000.
On 11/24/2008 Mark Sport Kel-
soe Jr., 28, was arrested on two
Bay County warrants for worth-
less checks.
On 11/24/2008 Vien Van Nguy-
en, 49, was arrested on two war-
rants for dealing in stolen prop-
erty.
On 11/26/2008 a vehicle oper-
ated by Robert James Reese Jr.,
41, was observed on Hwy C-30.
The deputy observed the vehicle
run off the road and almost strike
a metal sign. When the deputy
was speaking to Reese he noticed
the odor of an alcoholic bever-
age about his person. Reese was
asked to perform several sobriety


assessments which he did poorly
on. Reese was arrested for DUI
his breath test results were .151
and .146 almost twice the legal
limit.
On 11/26/2008 Samuel Austin,
37, was arrested on child support
warrants from Broward County.
On 11/27/2008 Arthur George
Savageau, 42, was arrested for
DWLSR.
On 11/27/2008 William Carl
Shiver, 48, was arrested on a child
support warrant from Sumter
County.
On 11/27/2008 Thomas Jean
Gortman, 58, was arrested for
Loitering of Prowling..
On 11/27/2008 Eugenia Maria
Lapura, 42, was arrested on two
failure to appear warrants from
Citrus County.
On 11/29/2008 Darion Anthony
Dawson, 32, was arrested for
DWLSR.
On 12/01/2008 Sciandra Elaine
Jones, 22, was arrested on two
warrants for violation of proba-
tion. The original charges were
possession of marijuana and giv-
ing or selling alcohol to a minor.


Medical examiners release list of drugs found in deceased


The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement has released the
Florida Medical Examiners Com-
mission Report on Drugs Identified
in Deceased Persons. The report
contains information compiledfrom
autopsies performed by medical
examiners from January through
June 2008. During that period there
were approximately 89,000 deaths
in Florida. Of those, 4,055 individu-
als were found to have died with
one or more of the drugs specified


in this report in their bodies.
The report indicates the three
most frequently occurring drugs
found in decedents were Ethyl Al-
cohol (1,923), all Benzodiazepines
(1,469), and Cocaine (955). The
drugs that caused the most deaths
were Oxycodone, all Benzodiaze-
pines (with Alprazolam accounting
for the majority of the deaths), Co-
caine, Methadone, Ethyl Alcohol,
Hydrocodone, and Morphine.
The three drugs that were the


most lethal, meaning more than 50
percent of the deaths were caused
by the drug when the drug was
found, were Heroin (91.5 percent),
Methadone (75 percent), and Oxy-
codone (60 percent).
Deaths caused by Methadone
and Cocaine declined by 10.7 per-
cent and 10.2 percent, respectively,
compared to the last six months of
2007. In addition, deaths caused by
Ethyl Alcohol, Fentanyl, and Pro-
poxyphene declined in this report.


51




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1170 Found



9074S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA

SHERRI M. FOREMAN,
Petitioner
and
SIDNEY T. FOREMAN,
Respondent.

Case No.: 08-504DR

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MAR-
RIAGE

TO: Sidney T. Foreman
424 Spruce Ave
Wewahitchka, FL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed
against you and that you
are required to serve a
copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on
Sherri M. Matthews Fore-
man whose address is
8880 Lighthouse Ave Port
St. Joe, FL 32456 on or
before December 5, 2008,
and file the original with
the clerk of this Court at
1000 Cecil Costin Blvd.
Port St Joe, FL 32456, be-
fore service, on Petitioner
or immediately thereafter.
If you fall to do so, a de-
fault may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, in-
cluding orders, are availa-
ble at the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court's office. You
may review these docu-'
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office
notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915)
Future papers in this law-
suit will be mailed to the
address on record at the
clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules
of Procedure, requires cer-
tain automatic disclosure
of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, includ-
ing dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
November 13, 20, 27, De-
cember 4, 2008
9147S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY'
FLORIDA

BANCO POPULAR NORTH
AMERICA,
Plaintiff,

vs.

TOMKIM, INC. d/b/a NA-
TIONAL SHUTTERS,
TOMMY M. ANDERSON
and KIMBERLY A. AN-
DERSON,
Defendants.
Case No. 08-02-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that pursuant to the
Final Judgment entered in
the above-captioned ac-
tion on the 3rd day of No-
vember, 2008,1 I will sell the
property situated in Or-
ange County, Florida,


1100
more particularly de-
scribed on the attached
Exhibit A, at public sale, to
the highest bidder, for
cash, at the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, FL, 32456 at 11:00
a.m. on Decembe 18,
2008.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Its pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale. The
court, in its discretion, may
enlarge the time of the
sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale. The
court, in its discretion, may
enlarge the time of the
sale. Notice of the
changed time of sale shall
be published as provided
herein.

WITNESS 'my hand and
the seal of this Court on
November 4, 2008.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

EXHIBIT "A"
Commence at a nail mark-
ing the Northwest corner
of Section 30, Township 8,
South, Range 10 West,
Gulf County, Florida and
run thence South 00 de-
grees 13 minutes 29 sec-
onds East, a distance of
32.18 feet; thence South
89 degrees 44 minutes 04
seconds, a distance of
15.84 feet to the Easterly
right of way line of Cessna
Drive; thence South 00 de-
grees 01 minutes 11 sec-
onds West along said
Easterly right of way line, a
distance of 261.96 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence con-
tinue North 89 degrees 42
minutes 15 seconds East,
a distance of 194.42 feet;
thence South 00 degrees
01 minutes 45 seconds
East, a distance of 112.00
feet; thence South 89 de-
grees 42 minutes 15 sec-
onds West, a distance of
194.45 feet to the afore-
said Easterly'right of way
line; then% North 00 de-
grees 00 minutes 50 sec-
onds West along said
Easterly right of way line, a
distance of 112.00 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. Containing 0.50 acre,
more or less.
November 27, December
4, 2008
9164S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY
CIRCUIT CIVIL CASE NO.
07-431-CA

WACHOVIA BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION,
formerly known as First
Union National Bank, suc-
cessor by merger with
First Union National Bank
of Florida,
Plaintiff,

v.

DONNA D. HARCUS n/k/a
Donna Stoppelbein; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
DONNA D. HARCUS n/k/a
Donna Stoppelbein;
JANE/JOHN DOE, ficti-
tious names representing
tenants in possession; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DE-
FENDANT TO THIS AC-
TION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO THIS DE-
FENDANT TO THIS AC-


1100
TION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated October
27, 2008, and entered in
Case No. 07-431-CA of the
Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Front Door of the Gulf
County Courthouse, 1000
Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 11th day
of December, 2008, the
following described as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment:

Commence at the
Nothwest corner of the NE
1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Sec-
tion 24, Township 4 South,
Range 10 West, a shown
on the official plat of
BRITT'S SUBDIVISION
UNIT ONE, as filed in Plat
Book 2, page 14, public
records of Gulf County,
Florida, and run West
along the North boundary
of said Britt's Subdivision
for 26.62 feet; from this
point extend a line South
along the West boundary
of said Britt's Subdivision
for 276.86 feet for Point of
Beginning; thence con-
tinue the line last above
described a distance of
267.00 feet to a point;
thence turn 89 deg. 14'41"
right for 165.17 feet to a
point on the East bound-
ary line of Lake Alice Addi-
tion to the City of
Wewahitchka, said point
also being on the East
right-of-way line of Lake
Avenue or W Second St.;
thence turn 90 deg. 42'21"
right and extend a line
North along said
right-of-way line for 267.00
feet; thence turn 79 deg,
55'19" right, for 168.24 feet
more or less to the Point of
Beginning. This parcel of
land is in the SW 1/4 of
Section 24, Township 4
South, Range 10 West, in
the City of Wewahitchka,
Gulf County, Florida;
TOGETHER WITH 1978
Mobile Home- ID#
FS56VD3FB5007GA and
FS56VD3FB5007GAA
TOGETHER WITH all of
the improvements now or
hereafter erected on the
property, and all ease-
ments rights, appurte-
nances, rents, royalties,
mineral, oil and gas rights
and profits, water rights
and stock and all fixtures
now or hereafter attached
to the property.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SAKE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM'
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS
AFTER THE SALE.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court on
October 28, 2008.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilt-
ies needing a special ac-
commodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding
should contact the individ-
ual or agency sending no-
tice no later the seven
days prior to the proceed-
ing. If hearing impaired,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or
Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
Via Florida Relay Service.

REBECCA L. NORRIS


Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hymsith
Deputy Clerk
November 27, December
4,2008
9265S
-IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE .STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 08- 77 PR
IN PROBATE

IN RE: The Estate of
MARIE J, COSTIN,
deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

TO ALL PERSONS HAV-
ING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE:

The administration of the
estate of MARIE J.
COSTIN, deceased, File
Number 08-77 PR is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for
Gulf County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address
of which is Gulf County
Courthouse, Probate Divi-
sion, 1000 Cecil G. Costin
Sr. Boulevard, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. The
name and address of the
personal representative
and that personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persohs
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is served within
three months after the date
of the first publication of
this notice must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the estate of the
decedent must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is
November 27, 2008.

Personal Representative:
ANN M. STRAIT
106 Westcott Circle
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
THOMAS S. GIBSON
RISH, GIBSON, SCHOLZ
& GROOM, RA.
116 Sailor's Cove Drive
R 0. Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457
(850) 229-8211
FL BAR NO. 0350583
November 27, December
4, 2008
9302S
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN

That the Gulf County
Board Of County Commis-
sioners will hold a public
hearing to consider adop-
tion of the ordinance with
the following title:

AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
ING GULF COUNTY ORDI-
NANCE NUMBER 2005-24
RELATING TO THE REGU-


1100
LATION, LICENSING,
VACCINATION, CONFINE-
MENT, CLASSIFICATION
AND DISPOSAL OF CATS
AND DOGS IN GULF
COUNTY, PROVIDING
FOR DEFINITIONS, CITA-
TIONS, ENFORCEMENT
AND PENALTIES FOR VI-
OLATIONS, PROVIDING
FOR REPEAL OF ORDI-
NANCES IN CONFLICT
AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.

The public hearing will be
held during the Gulf
County Board of County
Commissioner's meeting
on Tuesday, December 9,
2008 at 9:00 a.m. E.T in
the County Commission-
er's meeting room in the
Robert M. Moore Adminis-
tration Building, Gulf
County Courthouse Com-
plex, Port St. Joe, Florida.

All interested persons may
appear and be heard with
respect to the proposed
Ordinance. In accordance
with'Americans with Disa-
bilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion or an interpreter to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Lynn
Lanier, Deputy Administra-
tor, County Administrator's
office at (850) 229-6111, at
least two days prior to the
date of the hearing. -

A copy of the proposed
Ordinances are available
for inspection on weekday
between the hours of 9:00
a.m. E.T, and .5:00 p.m.,
E.S.T. at the office of the
Clerk of Court, Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 C.G.
Costin, Sr., Blvd. Room
148, Port St. Joe, Florida,
32456.

BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS, GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA

BY: BILLY E. TRAYLOR
ATTEST: REBECCA L.
NORRIS, CLERK
November 27, December
4,2008
9303S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUTH B. JOHNSON,
Deceased.

File Number: 08-75PR
PROBATE DIVISION

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
Estate of RUTH B. JOHN-
SON, deceased, File Num-
ber 08-75PR, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of
which is 1000 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Rm 148,
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. RUTH B. JOHN-
SON died testate, and the
decedent's Last Will and
Testament dated Decem-
ber 31, 2001, is in the pos-
session of the Probate
Court, Grady County,
Georgia. The name and
address of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, con-
tingent, or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of
this notice is served must
file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF


1 1100 1
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate, including unmatured,
contingent, or unliquidated
claims, must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS
OR MORE AFTER
DECEDENT'S DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is De-
cember 4, 2008.

Personal Representative:
Lequita J. Legette
1279 Sutton Mill Road
Cairo, GA 39828
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Robert S. Hightowerl
Florida Bar No. 199801
RO. Box 4165
Tallahassee, Florida 32315
Telephone: (850) 222-3363
Facsimile: (850) 222-0992
December 4,11, 2008
9305S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

FLAGSTAR BANK, F.S.B.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JAMES J. MCCORVEY
A/K/A JAMES J.
MCORVEY et. al.
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-104 CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 17, 2008,
and entered in Case No.
08-104 CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for
GULF County, Florida,
wherein Flagstar Bank,
F.S.B., is a Plaintiff and
JAMES J. MCCORVEY
A/K/A JAMES J.
MCORVEY; DIXIE M.
MCCORVEY A/K/A DIXIE
M. MCORVEY; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JAMES J.
MCCORVEY A/K/A JAMES
J. MCORVEY AS OF
10/18/07; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DIXIE M.
MCCORVEY A/K/A DIXIE
M. MCORVEY AS OF
10/18/07; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2 are the De-
fendants. I will .sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at, at 11:00 a.m.
(EST) on January 8, 2009,
the following described
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to
wit:

LOT 10, OAK GARDENS
SUBDIVISION, UNIT II AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGE 20, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.


1 1100 1

REBECCA L. NORRIS
As Clerk of the Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk

Dated this 18th day of No-
vember, 2008.

IMPORTANT

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 8502296111,
1000 C. G. COSTIN BLVD.
RM. 302 PORT ST. JOE
FL, 32456. If hearing im-
paired, contact (TDD)
8009558771 via Florida
Relay System.

Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road,
Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
November 27, December
4, 2008
9306S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JENNIFER M. BURKE, et
al,
Defendants.

CASE NO.:
23-2008-CA-000218

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
JENNIFER M. BURKE
Last Known Address:
142-A N Hwy 71,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465;
511 S Second Street,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
and 14809 Heronglen
Drive, Lithia, FL 33547

Current Residence
Unknown

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JENNIFER M. BURKE
Last Known' Address:
142-A N Hwy 71,
Wewahitchka, FL, 32465;
511 S Second Street,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
and 148809 Heronglen
Drive, Lithia, FL 33547

Current Residence
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

Commence at a 1/2 inch
iron road and cap (LB 732)
marking the Southeast
corner of lands described
in Official Record Book
355, Page 102 and 103 of
the Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida said point
being the intersection of
the Northerly right of way
boundary of Chipola
Avenue with the Westerly
right of way boundary of
Second Street and run
thence North 0147'33"
East along said Westerly
right of way boundary, a
distance of 404.84 feet to a
1/2 inch iron pipe marking
the Southeast corner of
lands described in Official
Record Book 266 at pages
427-420 (Parcel 5) of said
Public Records; thence
continue North 01*47'33"
East along said Westerly
right of way boundary,a
distance of 111.00 feet to
the Point of Beginning.


From said Point of Beginn-
ing, thence continue North
01*47'33" East along said
Westerly right of way
boundary, a distance of
113.34 feet to the South-
erly right of way boundary
of East Church Avenue;
thence North 8947'19"
West along said Sbutherly
right of way boundary, a
distance of 172.78 feet to
the Easterly boundary of
lands described in Deed
Book 34 at Page 610 of
said Public Records;
thence South 0312'26"
West along said Easterly
boundary, a distance of
226.73 feet; thence North
8926'53" East, a distance
of 23.46 feet to the South-
west corner of the afore-
said lands described in Of-'
ficial Record Book 266 at
pages 427-429; thence
along the Westerly and
Northerly boundary of said
lands as follows: thence
North 01*47'33" East, a dis-
tance of 111.00 feet;
thence North 89030'49"
East, a distance of 155.00
feet to the Point of Beginn-
ing.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson,
RA., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800
NW 49TH STREET, SUITE
120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL
33309 on or before De-
cember 19, 2008, a date
which is within thirty (30)
days after the first publica-
tion of this Notice in THE
STAR and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
10th day of November,
2008.

Rebecca Norris
As Clerk of the Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
November 27, December
4, 2008
9314S
NOTICE OF INTENT
TO VACATE PLAT

The undersigned, being
the owner in fee simple of
the property described as
Parkview at Secluded
Dunes according to the
plat thereof recorded in the
public records of Gulf
County, Florida at Plat
Book 6, page 7, hereby
gives notice of his intent to
apply to the Gulf County
Commission to vacate said
plat.

William Simpson
November 27, December
4, 2008
9336S
REQUEST FOR
QUALIFICATIONS

The Gulf Coast Workforce
Board announces the
availability of a Request for
Qualifications (RFQ) titled
"Delivery of Specialized
Program Services for Man-
datory FSET Participants".
The RFQ is to establish a
contract between a profes-
sional firm to assist with


the delivery and case man-
agement of the Food
Stamps Employment and
Training (FSET) program
in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin
Counties. It is intended
that the contract will be ne-
gotiated for a period t6 be
determined upon vendor
selection.

The Board is seeking
RFQ's from organizations
capable of providing this
service as expeditiously as
possible and with the ad-
ministrative capabilities to
manage a comprehensive
project, the ability to work
closely with required com-
munity partners, and oper-
ate on a performance-
based basis.

To obtain further inforina-
tion or a copy this 'RFQ,
please contact:

Gulf Coast Workforce
Board
5230 West US Highway 98
Panama City, FL 32401
850-913-3285
1-800-311-3685 ext. 3285
850-913-3269 Fax
dwilliams@gcwb.org

Minority businesses 'are
encouraged to apply. The
Workforce Investment Act
is an Equal Opportunity
Employer. Program and
auxiliary aids and services
are available upon request
to individuals with disabili-
ties.
December 4, 2008
9377S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,

VS.

REBECCA A. STANDING,
et al,
Defendantss.

CASE NO. 07-371 CA
DIVISION

NOTICE
OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated November
24, 2008 and entered in
CASE NO.: 07-371CA of
the Circuit Court of the
FOURTEENTH Judicial
Circuit in and for GULF
County, Florida wherein
AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC, is the Plaintiff
and REBECCA A. STAND-
IGE; IWAYLOAN, LP A
DISSOLVED CORPORA-
TION; are the Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at
LOBBY OF THE GULF
COUNTY COURTHOUSE
at 11:00AM, on the 8th day
of January, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment:

LOT 16, OAK GARDENS
SUBDIVISION. AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOQK
4, PACE 21, PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF GULF COUNTY
FLORIDA.

A/K/A 267 ABBY DRIVE,
WEWAHITCHKA, FL
32465

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on


(.


IMMER-CHKNOISE


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surroundino areas for 67 years


10B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008


^


11-11-4 1


-,--7-,






Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67.


~ii


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2008 11B


Call Our New Numbers Now!


Psssst, Have any pesky Golden Rule PET SITiNG
."honey do" chores? Small Golden Rule PET SITTNG
,home repair's? We'll do SERVICE. Perfect alterna
them. We are also licensed live to kenneling your 4
'and insured for lawn legged kids. Referred by
maintenance and pressure local vet. Reliable pet
washing. 850-258-2463 or sitter/pet owner. Does n.i.
850-258-1215 home visits while you are
away. In business 8 years.
Call Diana 227-5770 & Dan
227-8225


-S.


Call:

Toll Free:

Fax:

Email:

Email:


850-747-5020

800-345-8688

850-747-5044

thestar@pcnh.com

thetimes@pcnh.com


I


HELP
NTED
A 1 91


I


November 25, 2008. AKC Rottweers, Strong Food Service/Hospitality Earn up to $500 weekly 2 br, 1.5 ba, Port St, Joe, St. Joe Beacn
AKC Rottwelers, Strong Food Servce/Hosptalty assembling our angel pins C/H/A, laundry room, 10 x Beautiful 3 bd, 2 ba gulf
Rebecca L. Norris Euro Lineage, Will make K Fe in the comfort of your own 25 storage shed, nice view home, $1300/mo. Call
Clerk of the Circuit Court excellent working dogs or KK: Hlland View Fire Medical/Health OPS Housekeeper home. No experience 1 br, 1 ba, all utilities includ- yard, very nice area, $525 (404) 545-2530.
By: Jasmine Hysmith pet's. 2 males, 5 females, 8 Dept, Fri & Sat, 7 am- 6 Needed to clean cabins req'd. Call 813-944-3351 or ed, Apalachicola, no mo, $400 dep, No pets
Deputy Clerk wks, MFL-K9, Howard pm. Crafts and a whole lot Career Service and bathhouses, $10/hr. visit www.angelpin.net smoking, walk to groc Call 850-227-6216
Creek, 850-827-2701 cell morell Fiscal Assistant I 40hrs/wk. Weekend req., store, furn. 1 yr lease White City, big 3 br 2 ba,
**See Americans with Dis- 850-340-1395 must have valid DL Apply Other required, 1st month and FPFR decks, 1 block from
abilities Act KK:Mexlco Beach 15th The Gulf County Health at: dep req at signing. boat ramp. $700/mo +
In accordance with the Street (behind the Space Department has one open- St. Joseph State Park, Mystery Shoppers. Earn 653-6375 dep. Call 647-8722 or
Americans with Disabilities Beautiful AKC Place, look for the tent) Sat ing for a full-time, Career 850-227-1327 up to $100 a day. Under- 3 br, 1.5 ba, Mexico 527-6822
Act, persons needing a 8-5cst Service (benefits assigned) cover shoppers needed to Efficiency Rooms. Weekly Beach, Canal Front, boat
special accommodation to Fiscal Assistant I based in judge retail/ dining estab- or monthly rentals Down- dock, fp, no pet's, $1,100
.participate in this proceed- the Port St. Joe facility. Logistics/Transportation lishments. Exp not re- town PSJ on Reid Ave. mo $1,100 dep.
iFg should contact Gulf Fingerprinting and O/T quired. Please Call Call Pat @ 850-227-5747 850-648-5045 6170
County Courthouse at 0 Due To Emergency Duties Driver Trainees 1-800-308-4616. 2 br 2 ba, 2 biks from bch
(850) 229-6113 (TDD) Required. More than two NEEDED '441 4 6Adj-1 fenced in backyard, $500/
Standard poodle pup- TOO much to years medical billing ex- ,mo + sec dep. Pets ok
Florida Default Law Group, pies, home raised, vet perience required. Annual No CDL? No Problem! 6130 w/dep. 478-454-7181
PRL docks, dews, shots, store Salary Range: $18,720.00- No CDL No Problem ch 1404 Long Ave. Cute Bun-
RO. Box 25018 health crticate. Ready bdrm furn, bedding, young $22,500.00. For informa- Mexico Home CO Beach gaow br ban 1742 Coba Ave lot for rent
,Tampa, Florida on Dec 14 Accepting women's clothing, kitchen on pertaining to this posi- arn upto $9wk. Home, shed undry m w to $300 mo camper or
-33622-5018 deposits now to hold up items, too much to list. tion, contact Lesia Hatha- weekends with TMC. Con- 3 br, 2 ha Townhome, w/d $700 mo Landlord pays RV Ca fo more info
F07039295 to Dec 24. View at Port St Joe 2912 Garrison way at (850) 227-1276, ext. pany endorsed CDL Train- incl., 1/2 mi. to bch, pool, lawncare, $500 mo Tenant 227-9363 or 227-4051
phone 850-508-6865 or Baby items, little girls member 9, 2008. REAl. ESTATE FOR RENT 404-6630226 850766-4601 bile Home, 2 br, 2 be,
850-508-3315 clothes, and lots of things Other .2h1.a CH&A, all electric Call
850508-3315 clothes, and lots of things This Agency is accepting 5100 Business/ Charming 2 br 1 ba, 605 850-229-64 95 ca
-9393S to choose from. elThis Agency is accepplicating Bmmness/rc Marvin on large lot, total
S-.. son Ave. Sat. 6th, 8a- 12p, fer to Requisition Number Home Computer worklll, 6120- Beach Rentals 1 br, 1 ba, furn. $500 + buy, 850-227-4913 rent, power water and
Effective July 1, 2008 the no early birds Multi family 64081367. Flexible hours, great pay, 6130- Condo/Townhouse Some util, $250 dep. How- sewer provided, located in
1Gulf County Health Depart- Lots of Everything will train, apply online 6140 House Rentals ard Creek Call 522 9515 or Oak Grove, Please call
ment will no longer bill or Apply at: wwwlnwork 6150 Roommate Wanted 3 850 229-8959 or 340-0339
receive payment for Medi- peoplefirst.myflorida.com fromhome.com 6160 Rooms fo br 1r Rent 326-0785 or 827 290635
care services under certifi- for assistance, contact: ------6180 -Out-ol-Town Rentals 2br au Gulfaire ,
cation numbers 10-1945 & 3240 People First at 6190 Timeshar Ren Lighthouse Ave, Beacon Large light and bright 1 br, / r
10-1948. This change is for 877-562-7287 Other 6200 Vacation Rentals Hill, $500 month. Call 1 ba garden apartment.
accounting purposes only M DlSE 850-625-4955 or W/D, Tile and Carpet, pri- .
.and will not affect services An Equal GOVERNMENT JOBS 580-276-1680 vacy fenced with deck
for Medicare clients. mber 4, 2008 3110 Appliantiques *Gun Show Opportunity/Affirmative Ac- Earn $12 to $48 Per Hour, centuryy 21 Gulf Coast Re- pool, tennis court, private
December4,2008 31 Arts Ccraftis Gun Show* tion Employer Benefits, Paid Training,. Century 21 Gulf Coast Re- pool, tennis court, private
:. ____3130 Auctions Dec. 6th & 7th Homeland Security, Law 6100 alty long tem rentals avail- beach. Pts okay. $695
3140e- Baby Items Nat'l Peanut Festival Bldg. Enforcement, Administra- ableCarr's To nhomes mo. 850-639-2690REA.ESTTE FOR SALE
9398S3150 Building Supplies US 231 South tive, Clerical, Office, MINI TORA E 0WatermarkWay 5 Home f Rent 7100-Home
939N S 3160-Business Dothan, Alabama counting, Finance, Wildlife, MINI S rl GE 210 Watermark Way $950 Home for Rent- 7100- Homes
-NOTICE Equipment OVER 250 TABLES Morel 1-800-320-9353 er month, Coronado #32 Wea 7110 Beach Home/
OF SHERIFF'S SALE 3170 Collectibles Sat., 9-5pm; Sun., 10-4pm x2139 In rt St J50 per month Destiny fu 712- Commercial
3180 Computers Info: 334-279-9895 Other #1 2 br, 1 ba 115- 4oth es Dalkieth,4 bedroom 2 full 7130 Condo/Townhouse
NOTICE IS HEREBY 3190- Electronics -229-6200 nth Gulf Point baths, Fireplace, allappli- 7140- Farms & Ranches
GIVEN THAT PURSUANT 3200 Firewood O ther550 per month, Gulf Point he 7150- Lots and Acreage
TI10 AIN -FreeA PaJU GEMENCUT3220 98F urr #4t2 br, 2.5 ha 7172 Hwy country. $875 month, $875 7160- Mobile Homes/Lots
IS HE T 3230- Garae/Yard Sales I Coordinator I MOVIE EXTRAS 814-7400 98 $1000 per month, In- security deposit. 7170-Waterront
COURT OF LEON 3240 Guns GUN SHOW I Recruiting I ACTORS* br, 2 ba SR-30 Indi Pass 1-850-639-5566, or 7180- Investment
COUNTY DATED FEBRU- 3250 Good Things to Eat Ft. Walton Beach I work directly with Bay' I *MODELS* 2$850 per month, Palmetto 1-507-25-0797tf-Town
ARY 28, 2008 IN THE 3260 Health & Fitness FAIR GROUNDS Franklin & Gulf county I Earn $150-$300 Per Day. Plantation 3 br, 3 ba 1120 Real Estate
CAUSE WHEREIN CAPI- 3270 Jewelry/ClothingIArailaulento7200 12meshare
TAL CITY BANK WAS 3280 Machinery/ Dec 6th & 7th high school counselors, All Looks and Types Dec. 1 5th St. $900 per month, 7200 Timeshare
PLAINTIFF, AND C.H Equipment SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 students and other cornm- Needed, TV, Music Videos, lale Paradise Porch 2br, 2
PLAINTIFF, AND C.H. 3290 Medical Equipment FREE PARKING I munity members in re-I Commercials, Film & Print. 1000 sq.ft 9135 Cockles Ave. $650 H or R St
PROPERTIES, LLC; C.Q. 3300 Miscellaneous Info. (407) 275-7233 I cruising students and Call 1-800-340-8404 x2139 Consisting Of per month, Surf & Sands House B ea nt, in St.r a
DEVELOPMENTS, LLC; 3310-Musical instruments floridaaunshows.com assisting them with the 3-0fficeS unit 30-1 2br, 2 ba 109- oe BeardCall Gene at Mei7cc00 ----w
JAMES A. COX, INDIVIDU- 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ college admissions 31-ADA Bathroom 30th St. $580 per month, 30 Call Gen9342 Mexico Beach Like new, 3
HARTLINE, INDIVIDUALLY; 3330 Restaurant/Hotel I process. Also work with I Sales/Business Dev. 500 sq.ft. Warehouse Surf & Sands unit 42-A & 8503034pbr, 2.5 ba, wood laminate .
AND ALAN STEWART 334-Sporting Goods the community andGross br 2ba 1 2n Me Be v ce3
INDIVIDUALLY WAS DE- 3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) 3300 communitygrout. $650 permonth, csur & br,ec2 he.c313 Haley3 shop andcaped, pelican
t NT N Daer Kayake $300, 3 ecruits non-traditional Agents America's Sands unit 42-C 4 br,2 ba Close to beach, $950 mo Walk Real Estate
NO. 2008-CA-003419. Camra sueillance $300, Is t u d e n t s .121-42ncd St. $850. per + $500 dep. Call 850-647-2473
NO. 2008-CA-003419. 11 ft tanned alligator skin, 1Train/supervise student Insurance agents wanted Mini-Storage and month, Ponderosa #18 3 706-882-0683 Mexico Beach, New TH's,
I, JOSEPH NUGENT, A $ and skull'$800. plus more ambassadors. Travel re- n ean br, 2 ba #18 Ponderosa -- starting at $149,900. Pel-
I,, JOSEPH NUGENT, AS |F 3150 ditms 653-2177 quired. Requires BS de- I for a full service agency. Office Complex ne2 $ 58P rosaPstarting at $149,900. Peli-
SHERIFF OF GULF gems 532177 quired. Requires BS de-p fLicensed 220 and 215 Oc o e Pines Dr. $850 per month, Port St. Joe, 3br, 1 ba, can Walk Real Estate,
SHECOUNTY FLORIDA WILL Green metal gree + 3 yrsrelatedexp Licensed 220 and 215 850-229-8014 Call 850-648-5449 or CH&A, fenced yard, w/d, 850-647-2473
UAVE FLO I L Green metal A, (or equivalent pre- bents. Fax resumes 478-451-7761 850-229-1200 for more in- $800/mo + utili. Call
THE RIGHT TITLE AND IN- roofing I ernal com nica- 850-873-9959. e-mail formation 507-744-3530
.TEREST OF THE DE- It personal o na jmgrantham
-FENDANTSC.H. PROPER- 2 -14 ridge caps $28,10 I i granthamagencyccom Port St Joe C om m ercia
OTIES, LLC; C.Q. DEVEL- 56" 5V roofing $100, 11 with good or- or apply 1148 Jenks Ave Port St. Joe, St. George
OPMENTS, LLC; JAMES 54" 5Vmetal roofing$110, ganizational & MS OfI Panama City fo Island and St. James Bay
1EFFEcY. 5 sts. Sat !55 _skills.StartssPreviously Bank Owned
A.FER HINDIDUALL plastic ing buttons $9, ap skills. Space for Lease Property. Priced way
JDFDEALLY; AND ALAN T prox. 750 sq. ft. Titanic urn EaPp-YMET $25k/yr. Open Until below market value! Prices
S LT IDID ALLY .synthe 0 tic underlay $100ni Filled w/review starting Prime Retail Space starting at $35,000. Please
STEWART,0INDIVI Lc Help Wanted 12/8/08 call Counts Real Estate S .
IN THE INTEREST OF A Individually or take it all for 4130- Employment I Part-time e 2413o 319 Reid Avenue
2006 GREEN CHEVROLET $300 cash. 227-3600 Information 1350sf- occupant hed; $1000/mo Group at 850-249-3615
COLORADO (PICKUP), I Recruiter It's a lifestyle, not just a NNN Waterfront, Great home in
V,. I N 9081 I work with businesses I job. Travel, Work, Party, Wewal 3 br, 2 ba, Built in
#1GCCS198068213398, F .IT and industries having Play. National Company 317 Williams Avenue 2004. $219,000 Call Deb-
TITLE #94806776, FL. 4100 specific training needs, now hiring. 18+ guys and 1800sf tenant improvements negotiable; $1800/mo gross bie Holzer Realtor
TAG T725GX; A WHITE 3220 Food Services/Hospitality to develop ways for em-' gals to work and travel en- A850-774-7999 Prudential
.CHEVROLET COLORADO I ployees to obtain certifi- I tire USA. 2 weeks paid 325 Reid Avenue Shimmering Sands Realty
PICKUP), VIN -- -- --S198168211160, M -rued n- CUSTOMERS cates and degrees. De- I training, transportation and 4500sf flex space; corner location; $2500/mo gross
TITLE #9480557, FL. TAG Inlng room chairs barI WANTED/ WILL Ivelop new markets to lodging furnished. Returns 309 Reid Avenue
T721GX; A 2006 stools, desk chair, and TRAIN meet specific needs of guaranteed. Start Today!6000sf renovated shell space; occupant ready; $4500/mo mod
I .T7 GXR200 lots more. call I constituents. Develop I Call Today 1-888-741-2190 6000sf renovated shell space; occupant ready; $4500/mo mod 7120
ALUM./SILVER CHEVRO- l5-22738 The NEW management of I programs for attracting __gross
E(PICKUP), VIN GRACIE MALLYS PUB part-time and full-time 310 Reid Avenue
198368211967, AND EATERY hasac-students.ioll itwork in POSTAL& GOV'T JOB 5750sf Suite B; perfect for clothing furniture retailer; $3000/mo
TITLE #94806005, FL. Twin over full loft bed, "full quired the services of c coordinator Re- NNN Commercial
TAG T722GX; AND ON bed under/twin bed over" Award Winning Chef Wil- I tent Coordinator, Re-ffiffi ilin
T-tE 29TH DAY OF DE- guard rails, build in 3 liam Gillespie and Mark I'ton requiringPa20 hours ti n Office Space Office Building
CEMBER, 2008 AT THE drawer desk, built in lad- Heinemann (of Beach- I work per week. This is a, CIU i 202 Marina Drive 402 Reid Ave., Port St
FRONT STEPS OF THE der. Full bed on rollers. comber's Restaurant) to contractual position be- 680sf well appointed office suite; $800/mo gross (incl. utilities) Joe, FL, 2502 sq ft/.12
GULF COUNTY COURT- Paid $1500 selling for $700 prepare our fresh new rea- ginning Jan 2 2009 and You NEVER have to pay (Bayside Building)ite; $800/mo gross ( acre. Price $390,000 or
HOUSE IN PORT ST. JOE, OBO 850-229-6773 leave sonably priced menu. ininJn 009a p make offer. Call
FLORIDA AT THE HOUR msg if no answer. Wanted: Past customers to ending June 30, 200, for information about 310 Reid Avenue 850-402-8015. Realtors
OF 11:00 AM. EST. OR SSIBLE, I ry dining with us agaiexperience month. OpenUntil Filled you se a job 1116sf- Suite C; finished office space; lobby area with two office welcomed.
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, I previous experience fit w/revie starting guaranteee", contact the suites and filing/storage room; $1000/mo NNNl Ci
WILL OFFER SAID PROP- . necessary. Our benefit g/8/0 "1 guarar t 3 k
IEBTYAT PUBLIC OUTCRY package includes: GREAT I Additional info: hFeC. 322 Long Avenue Moreth k
AND WILL THE SAME, DINNER in a CASUAL AT- Additional info: The Federal Trade 1 More than your bank.
SUBJECT TO ALL PRIOR MOSPHERE, SPORTING IhttpMwww.gufocast.edu/hrt/. Commission 1000sf move-in ready; $900/mo grossyoubank
LIENS, ENCUMBRANCES 1 Family Yard Sale Sat, VENTS on 5 TV's, LIVEand G an is America's consumer Warehouse /Flex Space
AND JUDGEMENTS, IF 8am- 743 Jones Home- USIC most IA aF E /M/FVet em- protection agency. 110 Trade Circle West
BIDDER T OR BIDDERS stead Rd. Port St Joe, BAR. Apply in person at I www.ftc.gov/jobscams 22500f 12500sf PSJ Commerce Park, flex space, $5.25psf/
FOR CASH. THE PRO- lots in & Mint Sets, 2238 County Road 30c (4f ast 1-877-FTC-HELP NNN (incl. water/sewer) 7160
CEEDS TO BE APPUED miles from St. Joe) in e
AS FOR AS MAY BE TO Simmons Bayou starting at I A public service Marketed Exclusively by:
THE PAYMENT OF COSTS 1610 Palm Blvd Sat Dec 5PM, WEDNES- web Id #340180861 message from the FTC
PAM TCOSS 10 P vd Sat Y-MONDAY (clos web #340 6 s 50-229-6373 Wanted:3,in
TAND SATE ISFACTION OF 6th Starting AT 8am Tuesday) or call 229-1779 Classified Advertising Single wide, zoned 3, in
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED Children's drcloths, to set-up an appointment. Department good shape. 50-227-41
Childrend 6th, suitegood shape. 850-227-4184
EXECUTION. Children's bedroom suite,
household items, bicycles,
SHERIFF couch & loveseat, elec-
JOSEPH NUGENT tronics, & everything else. C
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICA WITH DIS- E: East of TAFB Kemp
ABILTIES ACT PERSONS Cemetery Rd. Sat Decem-
WITH DISABILITIES THAT ber 6 Community Wide
NEED A SPECIAL AC- Yard Sale and Chili Dinner
COMMODATION TO PAR- Starts 7 am ends at 2 pm,
TICIPATE IN THE PRO- Rain or shinell
TACT NO LATER THAN
SEVEN DAYS PRIOR TO Gulf Aire, St. Joe Beach
THE PROCEEDING AT 8301 Tradwinds, Dec. 5th
850-227-1115. and 6th, 7a-2p, Garage P H O N E CA LL
December 4, 11, 18, 25, Sale


JPtto 21AWAY
Juniper Aveu Sat 8an m12.

se' WeatherpS mitt ng To Place Your Classified ad

A' Dr. Robert King
2100 Pets
2110 -Pets: Free to Dentist n
2120 -Pet Suppiles 325 Long Ave wIe
'210-Peais/Lvetok 227-1812 TH E 'tSTAR AACAC IM ES












BUSINESS


B
Section


Thursday, December 4, 2008 w w w. star f 1. c o om Page 12



REAL ESTATE 101 Happy Thanksgiving and buying real estate


Contributed by Kevin Welch
Happy Thanksgiving!
Even in tough times if we
look hard we can find things
to be thankful for. The cur-
rent real 'estate market is
a good example. If you are
in the market to buy, now is
a great time. Interest rates
are low. Many sellers are
extremely motivated. There
are a lot of options. It really
is a buyers market.
So you have decided to
take advantage of the buy-
ers market. What is your
first step? Well you should
determine your objectives.
Do you want to purchase a


single-family house, a mod-
ular home, a townhouse, a
condo, or vacant land, etc.?
Are you going to pay cash
or will you need financing?
What areas best meet your
needs? Would you prefer to
be in town or in the country?
Are you the type of person
that enjoys working in the
yard? Do you have medi-
cal concerns that require
you to live near doctors and
hospitals?
After determining what
your real estate require-
ments are, you need to fig-
ure out your budget. Unless
you are paying cash, it is al-


KEVIN WELCH
ways best to see your bank-
er and have them calculate


the amount of financing
that you qualify for. Once
you know your budget, the
search can begin. There are
numerous methods for this
process. Newspapers, mag-
azines, Internet, driving
around the areas. You may
decide to utilize the services
of a real estate professional.
If you are familiar with local
real estate values, areas,
types of available financing
and all of the other facets
of real estate, you can ac-
complish your goals with-
out the aid of professionals.
If you are not experienced
in real estate transactions,


you might want to consider
working with a Realtor. A
real estate professional can
help you identify areas that
will work for your specific
needs. They are familiar
with programs that assist
with down payments and
closing costs. There may
be first time' programs that
could be beneficial. Real-
tors know surveyors, home
inspectors, termite inspec-
tors, and other profession-
als that are necessary to
use in the purchase of real
estate. In the end whatever
route you take, you hopeful-
ly will be able to conclude a


successful transaction and
enjoy the thrill of invest-
ing in real estate. Happy
Thanksgiving.
If anyone has some-
thing that they would like
discussed, please feel free
to call me (850) 647-2473 or
email: pelicanwalk@gtcom.
net. I would like to thank
Tim Croft and The Star for
giving me this opportunity
to educate the public on the
intricacies of real estate. I
hope that the readers find it
informative and interesting.
Kevin Welch is owner of
Pelican Walk Real Estate
Inc.


Public invited to share perspectives on health of Gulf of Mexico


The public is encouraged
to participate in the Gulf of
Mexico Alliance Commu-
nity Workshop hosted by the
Apalachicola National Estua-
rine Research Reserve on
Dec. 10 at the Apalachicola
Community Center.
In 2005, Florida's gover-
nor helped to establish the
Gulf of Mexico Alliance, a
federal-state partnership ini-
tiated by the five Gulf States,
with a common goal of sig-
nificantly increasing regional
collaboration. The Alliance
released the first Governor's
Action Plan in 2006, which
was endorsed by the Gulf
States' governors and the


White House. Today, more
than 90 percent of the plan
has been implemented, and
the Alliance has developed a
second Draft Action Plan to
guide priorities and projects
for the next five years.
The Alliance has' entered
the final stages of develop-
ment for its second Action
Plan, which will be released
in 2009. The purpose of this
workshop is to:
Re-engage community
members and organizations.
Provide updates on Alli-
ance accomplishments.
Identify potential future
collaborative efforts.
Light refreshments will be


provided and there is no cost
to attend. However, space is
limited, so we request that
you confirm your partici-
pation by December 5 by
contacting Rosalyn Kilcol-
lins at Rosalyn.Kilcollins@
dep.state.fl.us or (850) 653-
8063.
For more information on
the Gulf of Mexico Alliance
or the role of Community
Input Workshops, visit www.
supportthegulf.org or www.
gulfofmexicoalliance.org.
The workshop will be held
from 9 p.m. to 12:15 p.m. ET
on Dec. 10 at the Apalachic-
ola Community Center at 1
Bay Ave.


Special to The star
Sitting: (From left) Pat Williams, Brad Lowery and Tanis
Nickson Standing: (From left) Val Durham, Neat Everett,
Michelle Kavanaugh,Cathalene Bailey, Christie Pynes,
Autumn Cloud and Diane Pace

The Bridge at Bay St. Joe

receives National Silver Award


The Bridge at Bay St. Joe
has announced that dietary
manager Michelle Kavana-
ugh has received the Silver
Award from Crandall Corpo-
rate Dietitians.
This annual, national
award is awarded to dietary
managers who achieve
goals related to specific
criteria, some of which in-
clude deficiency-free sur-
veys, meeting budget re-
quirements for raw food,
supplies, supplements and
labor, completing clinical
systems that are aligned
appropriately, ensuring
restaurant style services
are provided, achieving
good resident satisfaction
surveys, and following best
practice guidelines.
Michelle Kavanaugh
states, "Through the team-
work of our dietary depart-
ment and the support of our
administrator, we strive for
excellence and nothing less
for our residents. I make it a
point to work with all of my
employees with every meal
we serve from taste to ap-
pearance. With consistency,
ongoing training, and team-
work we will continue to pro-
vide the best service to our
residents, and will success-


fully take our department
to the next level. We thank
you so very much for this
award."
The Bridge at Bay St. Joe
has in-room dining available
for residents.
Additionally, in the dining
'room, residents are served
their choice of nutritional
menu items that meet the
daily nutritional health stan-
dards.
The Bridge at Bay St. Joe
provides weekly weight loss/
gain reviews and other nutri-
tional management services
for residents needing indi-
vidualized meal plans.
The Bridge at Bay St Joe
is a 120 bed nursing facil-
ity located at 220 9th St. in
Port St. Joe. The Bridge
at Bay St Joe offers expert
care and evaluation with
programming to identify
each resident's needs. The
Bridge has support systems
to provide high quality of
life, is a Geri-psych facility
specializing in Alzheimer's
disease, addresses mental
health issues by using al-
ternative ways other than
medications for behaviors,
and has a dedicated, highly
trained staff to serve the
residents.


e'Sy with PS chase:
seStand System\,


~%? *


Florida Department of Transportation seeks

input on tentative 5-year work program
The Florida Department of Transporta- Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon,
tion District Three Program Development Liberty, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Wakulla,
Office will host a Public Hearing today to Walton and Washington. Comments and
discuss and consider the public's input on input from local and regional interest
the Tentative Five Year Work Program groups, governmental entities, business
for Fiscal Years 2009 through 2014. The enterprises and the general public are wel-
meeting begins at 11 a.m. and concludes come. Written comments will be received
at noon EST in the FDOT Midway Opera- by the department at the Public Hearing
tions Center Conference Room, 17 Com- and within 10 days after each public hear-
merce Blvd., in Midway. Project located ing. Comments should be addressed to:
in Franklin, Gadsden, Liberty, Jefferson, Larry Kelley, District Secretary, Florida
Leon and Wakulla Counties will be dis- Department of Transportation, District
cussed. Three, 1074 Highway 90, Chipley, FL 32428.
District Three encompasses the follow- Public participation is solicited without
ing counties in Northwest Florida: Bay, regard to race, color, national origin, age,
Calhoun, Escambia, Franklin, Gadsden, sex, religion, disability or family status.




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