Group Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.).
Title: The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03659
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Star
Publisher: Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Publication Date: November 27, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028419
Volume ID: VID03659
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
alephbibnum - 000358020
lccn - sn 95047323

Full Text






Gulf-Franklin

: Center graduates

6 ESOL students


HPK yI-GE L!T IBFL

S TIN E3.Vi LL.F FL 3326!1



YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937


Thursday, NOVEMBER 27, 2008


www.starfl.com


By Despina Williams
Star StaffWriter

In the summer of 1948, upon learning
that Port St. Joe dentist Bill Lewis was
poised to retire, 23-year-old Robert King
boarded a Jacksonville bus.
King had just passed the Dental Board
Exam and sought a location for his first
dental office.
Not knowing where he might land, King
also passed the boards in Alabama and
Georgia. A traveling dental supply sales-
man gave King the heads up on Lewis, who
was being forced by illness to retire.
The trip marked King's Horatio Alger
moment, his chance to rise above humble
beginnings and make it big in a land of op-
portunity.
But when he awakened in Panama City
after a long nap, King found he had missed
his Port St. Joe connection.
A $15 taxi ride carried King into the city
on a barely paved two-lane road.
Stopping to refresh himself at the White
Spot restaurant, King stared down a glass
filled with black water.
He had never seen anything like it, not
in his hometown of Luverne, Ala., or any-
where he'd been.
It was, King recalled, the "worst water
in the world."
Despite the less-than-stellar water qual-
ity, King stuck around, founding a dental
practice that still thrives 60 years later.

Drafted
On his way to becoming a dentist, King
got an unexpected boost from Uncle Sam.
In 1943, King had completed one year at
Auburn University when his oldest sister,
Mary Lou, gave him some bad news.
Mary Lou worked as a draft board exec-
utive secretary and knew her brother soon
would be drafted.
"She told me there wasn't any need to
go back to school because my name was
coming up," King said.
King never saw combat in World War
II. After completing Infantry Replacement
Training at Camp Fannin in 'TYler. Texas.
King was among a group oi young men se-
lected for the Army Specialzed Training
Program.
"The Army knew there'd be a gap be-
tween dentists and physicians for the next
few years," said King. who enrolled in
Washington University in St. Louis.
The program allowed King to study den-
tistry for one term. Upon his acceptance
at Emery University's dental school. the
Army released him alter less than a year
and a half of service.
King studied at Emery under t he G I Bill.
alongside young men who had returned
from the war.
"Practically all the boys were vets -
just about everybody." he said.


Lone dentist
In Port St. Joe, King set up shop in a
two-story building on Cecil G Costin Blvd.,
across from the current CVS Pharmacy.
The building, owned by the late Sally
Costin, also housed the Modern Beauty Sa-
lon and Wall Electric Company.
In the fashion of the times, King's
dental office, with its single examination
room, was on the second floor.
As the town's only dentist, King fre-
quently found himself summoned to the
office at odd hours to perform emergency
procedures.
"If anything happened, I had to do it.
Broken jaws, things like that," said King,
who did not always oblige small requests.
"I didn't mind getting up for an ac-
cident, but I wouldn't get up for a tooth-
ache."
With the nearest oral surgeons in Pen-
sacola and Thomasville, Ga., King also
performed surgeries such as root canals,
King charged $100 for the procedure, a
price he now calls a bargain.
"Soon as I quit, they're making $400-
$500 a piece," he said
Dentistry in the late 1940s was not for
the faint of heart. King hired one female
helper who quit after only two days on the
job. Her reason for leaving: "I have not
been able to eat since I started that."
When King arrived in Port St. Joe in,
1948, the paper mill, in its first decade,
employed most of the city's residents.
King was no stranger to small-town
living. His hometown of Luverne had a
,population of 2,50u people and not much
in the way of industry.
Every family who lived in the agricul-
tural community had a small farm. A back-
yard cow supplied the Kings with milk and
butter. King's father. Christopher, owned a
See KING A12


CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS
AT TOP: Dr. Robert King's first office was
in a two-story building on Cecil.G.
Costin Boulevard, across the street from
the present CVS Pharmacy. His present
office is located at 325 Long Ave.
ABOVE: King was a Private First Class in
the U.S. Army during World War II and
completed his dentistry training under
the GI Bill.


AT THE SHOP: Robert King's father, Christopher Rutledge King, left, and young clerk
John Travis (Tab) King are shown inside King's Market and Grocery in 1927. At the
time, the market was one of the most successful in Luverne, Ala.


Conversation

with a King


with a King


Santa, Mrs. Claus guests of honor at Christmas on the Coast


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Santa and Mrs. Claus will be the guests of
honor at Port St. Joe's "Christmas on the Coast"
celebration, which kicks off Saturday, Nov. 29, and
resumes the following weekend.
In its eighth year, the celebration adds a new
feature: a street dance, with live music from Pana-
ma City band Timeless.
The fun begins with a tree-lighting ceremony
and caroling at 6 p.m. (ET) at the corner of Reid
Avenue and Hwy. 71, in the empty lot by City Hall.
Santa and his lovely wife will be on hand for
photo ops, with Santa keeping a look out for any
naughty behavior.
Following the ceremony, visitors will line the
sidewalks along Reid Avenue to view the parade,
which will feature antique cars, fire trucks, deco-
rative floats and golf carts.


This year, no candy will be thrown from floats. If
individuals or organizations opt to dispense treats
to parade-goers, they will walk along the sidewalk
to hand it out.
Floats will be judged in the following categories:
businesses, nonprofits, schools and golf carts.
According to Christmas on the Coast chair-
woman Bobbi Seward, judges will base their deci-
sions on the floats' creativity and overall design.
"The winner will be the best thing to look at as
it's going down the street," she said.
Lineup begins at 5 p.m. ET on First Street, with
judging continuing until 5:45 p.m.
The winning floats will receive banners to show
off in the parade, which will begin at 6:45 p.m. at
First Street and end at the corner of Reid and
Hwy. 71.
After the parade, everyone is invited to stick
around for the 8 p.m. street dance.
See CHRISTMAS A6


Subscribe t 8 The tor
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Obituarie......................................... B4
Church News ............................... 85
Law Enfi cemc c nt ....................... 88


S hool News........................... ..... B3
Seg;ls............................. .......... BIO
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Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET
Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278
Classified deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020


LITy moves


forward



on Sunday



sales


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

Early in the City Commission
meeting last Tuesday night, Port
St. Joe commissioners approved
with scant debate the first reading
and advertisement of an ordinance
to permit sales of alcohol within the
city limits on Sunday.
It proved the calm before the
storm.
After rapidly moving through the
rest of the agenda, commissioners
arrived at public comment and re-
ceived an earful. What ensued was
a testy series of exchanges between
commissioners and members of the
audience, including dueling Bible
quotes and comments from a Talla-
hassee-based representative of the
restaurant and lodging industry.
The end result was that early
next month, commissioners will take
up final approval of the ordinance,
which establishes Sunday alcohol
sale hours that mirror the rest of the
week, allowing sales between 7 a.m.
and midnight.
The division in the audience re-
flects that among commissioners.
Commissioners moved ahead with
drafting the amended ordinance on
a 3-2 vote and mustered a first read-
ing Tuesday by a 3-1 vote Commis-
sioner Perky White, an opponent of
the ordinance, was absent that re-
quired Mayor Mel Magidson to pass
the gavel to second each motion to
read the ordinance by title and send
it out for public advertisement.
"What kind of hypocrisy is it to
allow alcohol sales six days a week
and make people spend extra money
(driving out of the city) to buy alco-
hol on Sunday?" Magidson said.
"This makes the city consistent each
day. Losing an election isn't much of
a threat to me. It's about doing the
right thing.
"We are elected to make deci-
sions we feel are best for the major-
ity of the people. Not everybody's
values are the same as your values
or my values."
The right thing in the minds of
many in the audience was to leave
things as they are.
Opponents of the ordinance pro-
vided two central arguments.
First was a referendum held
within the last two years that re-
sulted in a majority roughly 52 to
See SUNDAY A6


50(


- I





A2 I The Star


Local


Thursday, November 27, 2008


By David Vest
Florida Freedom Newspapers
An Air Force wife and for-
mer Fort Walton Beach resi-
dent is the winner of the SPC
Digital Idea House at Wind-
Mark Beach.
The winner, Leisa Tobler,
lives in Maryland where her
husband, Rob, is stationed,
says an announcement on the
Web site myhomeideas.com.
She told SPC Digital she
has wanted to return to the
Panhandle, and her husband's
approaching retirement and
her winning entry will give
her family that opportunity.
WindMark Beach is a new St.
Joe Co. coastal community on
U.S. 98justwest of Port St. Joe.


SPC Digitalis an Internet/digi-
tal division of Time Inc., which
also owns Southern Progress
Corp. in Birmingham, Ala.
Southern Progress publishes
Southern Living, Southern
Accents, Coastal Living and
Cottage Living, among other
publications. The Web-based
home giveaway was a mar-
keting device in which SPC
Digital struck advertising and
promotional deals with the St.
Joe Co. as well as the home's
architects, designers, decora-
tors and furnishers.
Tobler told SPC Digital
she has a particular interest
in decorating and interior de-
sign. The family will use the
home for vacations until her


husband retires. Their three
children's birthdays are in Au-
gust, she said, and they plan
to celebrate each year in the
WindMark house.
According to Ray Mark-
well, director of sales at Wind-
Mark Beach, Southern Prog-
ress Co. partnered with The
St. Joe Co. in launching its
new Web site, myhomeideas.
com.
The Idea House contest
was intended to help draw
interest to the site and the
companies decided to auc-
tion a $1 million beach home.
Southern Progress bought
the home, St. Joe agreed to
buy some contest marketing,
as the contest home was one


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Thursday, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ y Noebr2, 08LeL h trIA


Sidewalks, crosswalks on short list in Mexico Beach


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer

Even with only two resi-
dents attending the Novem-
ber city council meeting,
Mexico Beach officials made
decisions that will impact
the entire town.
The installation of side-
walks, Phase One, is set
to begin soon, according
to Mexico Beach Mayor
Al Cathey. The project will
cover Fifteenth Street to the
Charles M. Parker Bridge
(canal bridge) at the west
entrance of town.
According to Cathey, the
council is waiting for aerial
photographs of the city so
they can determine exactly
where the sidewalks will go.
He acknowledged that
"we have to do some PR
work in town, there are
some issues," referring to
opposition from a number
of residents over proposed
construction of a sidewalk
along the eastern mile of the
city across from the dedicat-
ed public beach.
In a meeting this past
summer, numerous prop-
erty owners and residents
expressed opposition to
a proposed sidewalk run-
ning from Seventh Street to
CR386.
If this section of sidewalk
were to be constructed, it
would happen in Phase Two,
according to council mem-
bers, though funding for
Phase Two is not yet avail-
able.
In last week's meeting,
according to Chris Forehand
of Preble Rish, the plan is to
build the sidewalk in small
phases so there will be no
need to require contractors
to secure bonding on an ex-
tensive single project. That
way, Forehand noted, the
project "can put locals to
work."
The council passed the
motion 5-0 to approve the
scope of work as outlined for


Phase One, with $200,000 for
the set cost already allotted
in the city budget.
Cathey said that until the
city receives the aerial pho-
tographs, no date could be
set for beginning the proj-
ect, but he said he expected
it would be completed be-
fore the 2009 Memorial Day
weekend.
In order to save money,
the city will oversee the proj-
ect, not Preble Rish, Cathey
said.
The city's crosswalks
have also been generating
controversy.
"We have been displeased
with the effectiveness of the
crosswalks since they've
been here," Cathey stated.
"There has been a variety of
near disasters and we need
to decide if we need correc-
tive action by the [Florida]
Department of Transpor-
tation (DOT) or if we need
crosswalks at all."
Six crosswalks were in-
stalled over U.S. 98 inside
the Mexico Beach city limits
in April 2006, after the Mex-
ico Beach Civic Association
petitioned the Florida De-
partment of Transportation
for five of them.
Cathey noted "there are
52 places to cross U.S. 98
within the three-mile city
limits, and DOT officials
chose to install six cross-
walks."
He also said he could
not find any other place in
the state where FDOT has
crosswalks "as they do on
U.S. 98 without specific traf-
fic control.
"DOT claims it does
have crosswalks in Panama
City Beach on Front Beach
Road, but it's not the same
as Mexico Beach," Cathey
said. "Front Beach Road
does not have log trucks go-
ing 40 miles per hour on it."
For the Nov. 12 meeting,
council member Jack Mullen
wrote a memorandum de-
scribing the six crosswalks,


and listing possible options
and recommendations.
Mullen offered three op-
tions: aggressive enforce-
ment as things currently
stand; modifying the cross-
walk structure to reduce the
number of crosswalks and
make enforcement more
manageable; eliminating the
crosswalks altogether.
His initial recommen-
dations were to: move
the Thirty-Seventh Street
crosswalk to Thirty-Sixth
Street; keep the Twenty-
First Street crossing and
eliminate the Nineteenth
Street crosswalk; move the
Fifteenth Street crossing to
Seventeenth Street; keep
the Ninth Street crosswalk
and remove the Fifth Street
crossing.
At the four remaining
crosswalks Mullen also rec-
ommended providing pedes-
trian activated crosswalk
lights which could be acti-
vated from either side of the
highway.
The lights are easy to in-
stall, solar powered and ra-
dio linked to alert all traffic
near the crosswalk, Mullen
reported.
With a consensus to tell
DOT to remove the Thirty-
Seventh and Fifth Street
crosswalks, Mexico Beach
city administrator Chris
Hubbard was instructed to
immediately write FDOT
and set a meeting with city
officials to urge FDOT to im-
mediately remove the cross-
walk sign at Thirty-Seventh
Street.
The sign, which has been
replaced several times, has
impeded boat launch traffic
in that location since its first
installation.
(See Mexico Beach
Crosswalk History for Mex-
ico Beach Chief of Public
Safety Brad Hall's report to
the city council on the city's
crosswalks from a law en-
forcement view.)
In other business con-


1I ~

ki

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mike.brandon@joe.com; or learn more online at:
www.windmarkbeach.com
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* Panama City



Port St. Joe


)rSTJOE'


B I i \ C II


Located39 miles east ofPanama City Beach and 22 miles west of
Apalachicola on the shores ofSt. Joseph Bay overlooking Cape San Blas.
0 2008 The St.Joe Company. Sle Community Sales, Inc., Licensed Real Estate Broker.OE ,"S loe,""WindMark
Beach" and te makingg Rigt'" design are s ice marks of The StJoe Company.
Apalachicola. OBTAIN THE PROPERTY REPORT REQUIRED BY FEDERAL
S AWAND READ IT BEFORE SIGNINGANYTHING. NO FEDERAL m
AGENCY HAS JUDGEDTHE MERITS OR VALUE, IFANY, OF
THIS PROPERTY. JOE


ducted at the meeting:
Lynn Marshall, direc-
tor of the Mexico Beach
Community Development
Council (CDC), announced
that the city's annual Christ-
mas tree lighting festivities
will be Dec. 7 at about 5:30
p.m. CT, about an hour and a
half earlier than in previous
years.
The event will be in Sun-
set Park on the western side
of the El Governor Motel on
U.S. 98.
She said this year's event
will be geared more toward
children, with a shorter pro-
gram and more social time.
The Mexico Beach Vol-
unteer Fire Department
will be collecting toys at the
tree lighting for their annual
community Christmas drive,
and Marshall encouraged
everyone to bring new toys
to the event to donate.
Marshall also said that
for the "first time in years"
the city's bed tax collection
was down, about 7 percent.
The CDC is looking for new
advertising and marketing
avenues, Marshall said, and
she asked that anyone in
the community who had any
ideas on the topic to please
share those ideas with her.


Mexico Beach crosswalk history


By Marie Logan
Contributing Writer
At the April 11, 2006,
Mexico Beach city coun-
cil meeting, residents
learned that the Florida
Department of Transpor-
tation (DOT) had decid-
ed to install crosswalks
along U.S. 98 within the
city limits.
It was announced that
the Mexico Beach Civic
Association had held talks
with DOT, and five cross-
walks had been approved
for installation.
According to DOT of-
ficials, the approval had
been granted one week
prior to the deaths of
an elderly couple killed
in Mexico Beach while
crossing U.S. 98 at twi-
light in March of 2006.
It was reported at the
April 11, 2006, meeting
that signs for the cross-
walks had been ordered
and would arrive in about
six weeks. Forty-eight
hours later the cross-
walks were installed.


At that meeting, Mexi-
co Beach mayorAl Cathey
expressed concern over
the idea of crosswalks on
U.S. 98, citing the city's
lack of control over the
state highway. Mexico
Beach Chief of Public
Safety Brad Hall also ex-
pressed his concern over
the crosswalks.
At the May 9, 2006, city
council meeting, Mary
Anne Koos, a DOT rep-
resentative, addressed
the meeting and said that
the problems with the
crosswalk sign at Thirty-
Seventh Street would "be
studied."
The city had already
received a number of
complaints about the
placement of the sign,
which blocked the city's
boat ramp and impeded
boaters as they tried to
maneuver their boat trail-
ers around the sign.
The council unani-
mously told Koos at the
meeting that the sign
See HISTORY A9


See SHORT LIST A9



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NOTICE OF CITY OF PORT ST. JOE CITY

COMMISSION MEETING FOR APPROVAL

OF RE-ZONING FOR A 888 ACRE PARCEL

OF PROPERTY

The City of Port St. Joe City Commission
Proposes to adopt by ordinance the following:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, RELAT-
ING TO AND AMENDING THE ZONING CODE WITH RESPECT TO
A PARCEL OF PROPERTY CONTAINING APPROXIMATELY EIGHT
HUNDRED, EIGHTY EIGHT (888) ACRES; AMENDING THE CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE ZONING MAP; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ANY
CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The public hearing for the adoption of the Ordinance will be held on Tuesday, De-
cember 16, 2008 at 6:00 P.M., Eastern Time at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. A first reading of the Ordinance will
occur at the same time and location on December 2, 2008. Copies of the Ordinance
are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall located at 305
Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.

The hearing may be continued from time to time as may be necessary.

Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide com-
ments in writing to the City Commissioners of the City of Port St. Joe at City of Port
St. Joe City Hall 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Trans-
actions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any
decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should
ensure that a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal
is based.
Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk's
Office at (850) 229-8261 ext. 114.
a] ExhAb\t\ A E t 888 +-iAr parcl



-' U.--





-- --(-l ..---. ..-






CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA

By: Mayor-Commissioner
Attest: City Clerk


Thursday, November 27, 2008


The Star I A3


Local











A4 I The Star Ouinion


Thursday, November 27, 2008


OUR VIEW




The time


1S r


As he ascends once again to become chairman of
the Board of County Commissioners, Nathan Peters Jr.
stands at a potential crossroads in history.
As we celebrate this Thanksgiving and are
reminded of the bounty that we have come to take so for
granted, Peters is handed an opportunity to show the
kind of political courage discussed in this page a week
ago.
The time is now to end single-member districts, and
Peters alone can do it with one sweep of a pen on a legal
document.
We will leave aside many of the reasons stated
previously in this space, overwhelming referendum
numbers, overwhelming poll results, the consensus
on the street north and south that at-large voting
must return before the train reaches an incline,
government inefficiency, politics of favor based on name
and connection and skyrocketing taxes and simply note
the nature and result of single-member district
voting.
By evolution, single-member districts are a product of
division; their continued thriving existence perpetuates
that division.
Peters himself, during a recent conversation, spoke of
a need for a time of healing.
He emotionally spoke at a recent county commission
meeting about a president-elect swept into office earlier
this month who ran as an agent of change, of breaking
down partisanship to solve the real problems facing our
country.
Those problems are visiting us in Gulf County.
The School Board faces genuine fiscal issues. City
and county governments soon will see shrinking grant
avenues, some state revenues dammed altogether, parks
closing and services sliced.
Small businesses need a boost, job creation has
slowed to a crawl and the list goes on and on.
If ever there was a time to come together as a county
to solve the county's problems as to its immense
credit the newly reconstructed Economic Development
Council seems to be accomplishing as well or better than
any organization in the community it is now.
There might have been a genuine reason for
seeking court relief for a minority voice in county
government that ultimately resulted in the court
decree that keeps the county hostage to single-member
districts.
That was then, more than 20 years ago; this is
now.
Commissioner Carmen McLemore in
commenting about his recent re-election said it was "all
about work."
Every citizen in this county deserves the kind of
effort McLemore clearly puts into his district in their
neighborhood, and not from just one commissioner but
from all five, every day, every week.
As they also need from the school board and
municipal governments.
The time in history has arrived, Mr. Peters, when
the right thing to do, the correct thing to do in this
representative democracy, is to step in and stop the
divide.
Knock down the walls that now can be seen
clearly as barriers to the county's future growth and
prosperity now and in the future as the obstacles
taxpayers face each day seem to increase by the
hour.
Eliminate the hammer, that 3-2 vote, that allows for
the kind political divisiveness that we have witnessed
this year over windstorm building requirements, parks,
fiscal accountability and on and on.
The forge is white hot, stoked to higher temperature
by the election of an African-American to become
president, the arrival of the holiday season and the
sobering reminders all around of the difficult times that
lie ahead.
Time to strike the iron, Mr. Peters, time to strike the
iron. The time has arrived to actually mark this as a
crossroads in the county's history.



THE STAR

USPHS 518-880
Published Every Thursday at 135 West Highway 98
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Star
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone (850) 227-1278


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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the publishers do
not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for
such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


On Thanksgiving Day
1978, I spent all day along
with my fellow mortuary af-
fairs specialist processing
the remains from the Jon-
estown, Guyana, massacre
where more than 900 follow-
ers of Jim Jones committed
suicide.
It was a cold morn-
ing when I went to the .
Dover Air Force Base
mortuary to await
the arrival of the C-
141 aircraft to land
with the remains to
be processed. I was DAVID
assigned to the U.S.
Army Escort Detach-
ment as the operation ser-
geant. Our mission was to es-
cort Army deceased to their
final resting place after they
were processed at the Dover
mortuary. This was a very re-
warding and sometimes dif-
ficult time meeting with the
next-of-kin and laying to rest
a soldier who gave his life for
his country.
That morning, I would


,
E.
JR


be processing the remains.
Air Force volunteers were
brought in to offload the
transfer cases (an alumi-
num case that most people
call a casket). The transfer
cases were opened, and the
remains were placed on
stretchers (most
S were placed in re-
frigeration trucks
while awaiting pro-
cessing). Then be-
gan the processing
of identification to
the embalming room
.KELLY and then casketed
and stored waiting
for where to ship the
remains.
The first transfer case I
opened up was the body of
a young girl, maybe 8 to 10
years old in a beautiful white
dress, looking like she was on
her way to a party. The next
three transfer cases I opened
and began processing were
children. I couldn't stop think-
ing, "How the hell could a par-
ent do this to their children?"


On the fifth transfer case was
the first adult I began to pro-
cess. We processed remains
till 5 p.m. that day and were
going to start again at 6 a.m. I
arrived home about 5:15 p.m.,
and my wife made me take
off my clothes in the kitchen
because they smelled so bad.
My daughter, Melissa, was sit-
ting on the couch in a beauti-
ful white dress waiting for our
Thanksgiving meal to begin,
now that I was home. When I
looked at her, I could see the
little girl in the first transfer
case, and every Thanksgiv-
ing, I always picture that. At
dinner, I was so thankful for
my two children, Melissa and
Jack, and vowed that nothing
like what I had seen that day
would happen to them.
We needed more people
to help. Many of the soldiers
who recovered remains at
Jonestown came back to
help us. The FBI identifica-
tion teams and the Armed
Forces Institute of Pathol-
ogy showed up to run the


process. This process took
months and more than 200
remains could not be identi-
fied. The carpets and paint
in the mortuary had to be re-
placed after all the,foot traf-
fic into the office areas of the
mortuary.
I made a lot of extra mon-
ey after duty working for the
contractor who ran the mor-
tuary operation, but I don't
think any amount of money
would let me go through that
again. It never fully goes
away; something always re-
minds you of the 900-plus re-
mains. Looking at Jim Jones'
body, I couldn't understand
how a man like this had the
power to convince more than
900 people to commit suicide,
and to this day, I still don't. I
guess I never will understand
or don't want to understand.
David E. Kelly Jr.
Sergeant Major
U.S. Army Retired
St. Joe Beach


Waiting might have been best part


Mother used to tell us Thanksgiving
was for family. We knew better than that.
We had to sit still and listen or get
swooshed outside. We were forewarned
to be on our best behavior. And we
always had to wait for the grown-ups to
finish eating before they would let us in
to graze through the leftovers. You show
me where the "family" is in that.
The aunts would crowd into
Granny's kitchen and go to
stirring and baking and frying and
talking. That's what the Kennedy
women were famous for. Well,
Aunt Ruby Nell couldn't cook
quite like the others, but she
made up for it with extra chatter.
I'm telling you, she could talk the HUNKE
ears off of Alfred E. Neuman. Kesle
Aunt Beatrice was the best cook.
Well, Gran wasn't a slouch. And Mom
was pretty good. Adell would be telling
how she met Uncle Ben at college. Aunt
Sula would be pregnant out to here.
Delia was the quietest and, in my 8-year-
old view, the prettiest.
J. C. and I would try to sneak a fried
apple pie "Hey, you boys go on
outside and play. Those pies are for
dessert." There were 50 pies piled up on
that side table. Nobody would miss one
or two. And it was 38 degrees outside.
We would go out the back door and
race around to the front. We could hear
Uncle Hugh laughing before we slid into
the living room. He was the happiest one
of Mom's brothers. He was so big and
strong. He would toss us up in the air
like we were babies and laugh us back
into his big hands.
"Uncle Hugh, can you sneak us a bite
of something, we're starving."
He would roar with laughter, sit us
down gently in the big chair and saunter
off toward the hullabaloo emanating
from the kitchen. He would be back in
a flash with a piping hot biscuit hidden
in each hand.
Uncle Clifford belonged to Delia.
He came home from World War II still
carrying shrapnel in his shoulder and
went back to plowing the ground like


I





R
qC


nothing ever had happened. He was
thoughtful and sincere. If ever the term
"salt of the earth" fit a man, it was him.
"Uncle Cliff" I had to do the
talking, J. C. was his oldest son and he
wouldn't cater to J. C. like he might me
- "We're kinda hungry. It is a long way
till afternoon." He slowly would make
his way toward the kitchen. He
never seemed to hurry. But he
finally would make his way back
with a giant sweet potato. J. C.
and I gladly shared it.
J. C. and I had lots of
company. There were dozens of
cousins at these gatherings. We
would play chase and "hit you
DOWN last." Leon, Patricia and some
olbert of the older ones would drift off
by themselves. The smaller kids
would try to hang out with us, but mostly
we waited for the food to get ready, Pa's
big blessing and the old people to finish
eating.
Daddy would talk a little and listen a
little. Mostly, he smoked his Camels and
waited like the rest of us. I remember
Daddy wouldn't call them Pa and Gran
like everyone else. He said "Miss Jessie"
and "Mr. Kennedy." I think he always
remembered walking across that field
to ask for Mother's hand. J. C. talked
Daddy into bringing us a couple of those
sugar cookies.
As the turkey roasted and the baking
pumpkin pie aroma drifted through
the house, the uproar in the kitchen
picked up a notch. There were pots or
pans on every eye. And someone was
peeking through the oven door every
four minutes. Granny could be heard
over the din, telling about Bert Freeman
coming to call on Ophelia. Daddy hated
that story. Beatrice would be telling the
group how many jars of pickled peaches
she had "put up." Sula would be talking
about one of her kids. You couldn't hear
Delia at all. Adell would be recounting
(again) how she met Uncle Ben. Ruby
Nell would just be talking.
The trick here was not that they were
all speaking at once. That was easy.


The amazing thing is that everyone was
listening to each other.
Womack was the quietest of the
whole group by far. "Uncle Womack,
my breakfast is long gone." He didn't
say anything, but he eased up and
moved toward the maddening roar. He
was back in a few minutes and handed J.
C. and me each a cornbread square. He
grinned silently from ear to ear when we
thanked him.
E D. was only 10 years older than
me. He was not quite treated like a full-
fledged adult at these things, but he
definitely out ranked the "youngins." He
seemed to really enjoy the "kids" and
took up the most time with us. "Uncle F
D., we're hun-"
"I gottcha, hang on." He was back
in a nanosecond with a hand full of
fried apple pies. Jackpot! I crammed a
pointed side in my mouth and asked him
how he got away with so many.
"I stole them. Eat'em as quick as you
can." He smiled with his eyes.
Aunt Delia was the first. Cancer took
her at such a young age. We lost the
beautiful one. Uncle Hugh was next.
The laughter stopped in a truck accident
in the fall of 1968. I sat at his funeral and
watched the light go out of Pa forever.
My Father passed away a couple of
days after Thanksgiving in 1979. "Mr.
Kennedy"joined themin 1984. They said
at his funeral Gran wouldn't last a year.
She didn't. E D. was the one who shook
me. I cried like a baby. And I never have
touched a fried pie since. Uncle Ben's
death was so sudden. I sat in the floor
and cried some more. Clifford, Beatrice
and Womack went in rapid succession in
the last couple of years. If I could get just
one of those old Thanksgivings back.
Mother was right. It is about
family. You look around carefully and
thoughtfully on this Thanksgiving Day.
And don't pay so much attention to the
turkey, biscuits, sweet potato souffl6 and
whatnot.

Lovingly,
Kes


Long-term care in Florida often overlooked


By Judy Thames
Florida's AARP State President
More than 1.7 million Floridians
care for frail older loved ones, so near-
ly one in 10 Floridians are caregivers.
Yet millions of other Floridians either
have yet to focus on the need for long-
term care for loved ones or are having
trouble finding high-quality services
for those they love.
One critical issue is where your
loved one receives care. People of all
ages who need help with regular daily
activities such as dressing, bathing,
preparing meals or eating might need
long-term care, but only 3 percent of
Floridians age 35 and older want to
receive care in nursing home settings.
Some 77 percent want to receive care
at home.


YetFlorida spends 91 percentof Med-
icaid long-term care dollars on nursing
home care, far more than the national
average of 75 percent. In 2006, the bud-
get for Medicaid in Florida was $15 bil-
lion, and two-thirds of this amount was
spent on nursing homes. Florida ranks
41st in the nation in achieving a good
balance of care between community-
based and nursing-home care.
Boomer children are worried about
the care of their older parents, but
unfortunately fewer than half of adult
children are making specific plans for
that care. The key to creating a specific
plan of care for your loved ones is by
talking to them and strategizing in case
of emergency.
According to AARP research, peo-
ple often underestimate the costs of
long-term care and often think they are


covered by Medicare. Generally, Medi-
care offers full coverage for 20 days of
skilled nursing home care. In 2006, the
average cost of a nursing home was
about $75,000 per year, while private in-
home care was about $20 an hour.
"There is no substitute for careful
advance planning," said Lori Parham,
AARP's Florida state director.
Even if your older loved ones don't
require assistance, there are many
ways for you to give back to your com-
munity by assisting older Floridians
who need assistance. Caregiving pro-
vides ways for individuals to give back
to their community.
Statistics were taken from a 2006
AARP commissioned survey entitled
"Let us Choose: A Survey of Florid-
ians Age 35+ on Long-Term Care
Choices."


* 5..~ 'H-e


Taking care of the dead




from the Jonestown Massacre










A5 I The Star Letters


Thursday, November 27, 2008


A Thanksgiving



message


Being Truly Thankful for
Earthly Things as Welf as
Heavenly Things
Thanksgiving is a
wonderful time of the year.
Just the word, Thanksgiving,
conjures up thoughts of a full
table of food, a roasted turkey
and dressing, sweet potatoes,
green beans, casseroles, corn
bread, sweet potatoes, pies,
cakes, just an abundance of
delicious foods. In addition to
that, the word, Thanksgiving,
brings thoughts to us of
relatives coming to visit,
watching football games on
television, frying mullet in
the backyard and just a lot
of fellowship with family and
friends. How could life be any
better?
S Without a doubt, we in
America are truly blessed,
especially those of us who
enjoy good health. The Lord's
blessings and favor truly are
,and have been upon us.
With the steady flow of
blessings that we continue to
enjoy day in and day out, with
practically no interruption, it
is no wonder we must admit
our level of Thanksgiving now
is what it would be should we
be deprived of these things, if
only for a short time.
A story is told of two
boys who were stranded
at sea. One day not long
before Thanksgiving, they
decided to row out from
shore in their rowboat.
Almost immediately after
they pushed off from shore,
a rip current caught hold of
'their boat and pushed them
,out of sight of shore. They
were lost, inexperienced and
had no idea which way to
row. All efforts to find their
way to shore failed. They
had no food, no water, no life
,preservers and no means of
communication. They waited
-hours to be missed and have
a rescuer come for them.
'The hours turned into days of
anxiety as with fading hope
they drifted.
And freezing nights, with
,the chill factor hovering
around freezing, caused
'them to lie in the bottom of
the boat shivering with fear
and hypothermia. A few
'days turned into nearly a
week with them spending
their days talking about fond
memories of best friends,
banana splits and Mountain
Dews. Their tongues
,hardened with thirst, and
their mouths blistered. On
the sixth day, they carved a
farewell message to loved
'ones in the boat's hull and
waited for death.
SBut the following morning,
they woke to a dazzling
rainbow. As they drifted
along, a swell rose beneath
them lifting their boat high
enough to see another
vessel close by. There were
two fishermen on board,
a grey-bearded captain
and his weather-beaten
comrade, "angels," as the
boys later called them. The
men helped the boys from
their craft, gave them water
and returned them safely


home. Now they celebrated
their Thanksgiving Day
like no other that they had
celebrated before.
As we prepare to enjoy
Thanksgiving this year we
must think of these boys and
their experience of suddenly
losing the blessings of each
day that they previously had
taken for granted.
What does Thanksgiving
mean to us? Are we still
able to count each and every
blessing from God that we
enjoy on a daily basis, or have
we become so accustomed to
having them that we simply
take them for granted?
Do we recognize that the
fragrant turkey and steaming
dishes that will be on our
table represent God's great
blessing all year long? We
have everything we need and
so much more.
In contrast to the
desperate boys stranded at
sea, we are warm, secure
and we have plenty. And yes,
we are thankful. But imagine
what our Thanksgiving
would be like if we had an
experience similar to those
boys. Our gratitude would
overflow, bubbling out of
us with tears, laughter,
immeasurable relief and joy.
We would be overwhelmed,
desperate to bring our
famished friends to the table
as well. Simply put, those
who have been rescued from
starvation, thirst or being
seriously deprived in other
ways are thankful in a way
that others are not.
The spiritual parallel
is obvious. Those who are
blessed with the realization of
the enormity of their spiritual
rescue from sin and death,
overflow with gratitude for
God's grace. They consume
his word and can't get enough
of it. They simply want to
tell everyone how they were
lost and now found by Jesus.
They just can't get over
the fact that, even with the
lifestyle they had led, God
still loved them so much to
have delivered them from
their sins and spiritual death
through His son's death on
the cross. They simply want
their friends to know Jesus
and be saved as well.
But what about those of
us who have been on the safe
road of faith for a very long
while? What can we do to
raise our consciousness of
our manifold blessings? Can
we sit down at the holiday
table this year with the wild
exhilarating thankfulness as
those boys had for not only
the food and our creature
comforts but also for God's
saving grace?
In summary, ajoyful and
exhilarating Thanksgiving
would be one that included
time to truly stop and reflect
the favor and grace that our
loving heavenly father has
shown us.

George and staff at Duren's Piggly
Wiggly, Bluewater Outriggers and
Bluewater Realty


SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to :

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: (850) 227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form of
letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited
and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial page
should be a forum where differing ideas and
opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.


Sunday sale of alcohol
Dear Editor:
The following is a letter sent to
Mayor Mel Magidson
Dear Mayor Magidson:
As the Port St. Joe Board of City
Commissioners considers allowing
the above within the Port St. Joe city
limits, I ask that the following also be
considered: Alcohol causes serious
health and behavioral problems.
I agree with you that our
community should look at the sale of
alcohol as a value judgment. Factored
into that value judgment should be
that 1) 75 percent of the population do
not consume alcohol on a daily basis;
2) two drinks with a meal and then
driving would most likely result in a
DUI if stopped; 3) if a person would
not dine at a facility that does not
serve alcohol, they are most likely
struggling with alcoholism; 4) The
most important value to consider is
the message we project to our younger
generation that social drinking is
acceptable as long as you do not get
caught driving from a restaurant or
bar. So values are the key to the law's
policies. What is acceptable or truthful
should not be exchanged for monetary
gain; legally adopting more protective
policies should be our goal. We have
alcohol and drug abuse coalitions,
with major community leaders,
trying to prevent teen drinking and
then are faced with the threat of
revocation of a local ordinance that
will hinder our efforts. We need to
strengthen our position on alcohol
and not turn back. We should provide
encouragement to servers to provide
notice to patrons that over two drinks
and driving could result in a DUI. We
should encourage DUI stops and road
sobriety screens to ensure responsible
drinking. Too many years now and too
many wonderful lives have been lost
because we as leaders don't make the
hard choice to do what is right and
not provide a double standard. I
would advise that we uphold the
Sunday sale of alcohol ordinance and
ensure warnings to establishments
that serve alcohol products that


Issued by President George Wash-
ington in 1789
"Whereas, it is the duty of all na-
tions to acknowledge the providence
of Almighty God, to obey his Will, to be
grateful for His benefits and humbly
to implore His protection and favor;
and Whereas, both Houses of Con-
gress have, by their joint committee,
requested me to recommend to the
people of the United States a day of
public thanksgiving and prayer, to be
observed by acknowledging with grate-
ful heart the many and signal favors of
Almighty God, especially by affording
them an opportunity peaceable to es-
tablish a form of government for their
safety and happiness.
Now, therefore, I do recommend and
assign Thursday, the twenty-sixth day
of November next to be devoted by the
people of these States to the service of
that great and glorious Being Who is the
beneficent Author of all the good that
was, that is, or that will be; that we may
then all unite in rendering unto Him
our service and humble thanks for His
kind care and protection of the people
of this country previous to their becom-
ing a nation; for the signal and manifold
mercies and the favorable interposi-


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

serving more than two to a patron
is wrong. We must accept that DUI
driving is wrong, and alcoholism is
destructive. The unwavering value
and truth of a strong anti-drug
message is the only stand that is
acceptable to me as a health officer for
this community. Drinking alcohol as a
social beverage has long been looked
upon as acceptable; but to change an
ordinance that affects the health and
behavior of the user and cause a risk
to the other 75 percent of our citizens
is unacceptable and not a fair value
trade.
Douglas Kent, M.P.H.
Administrator/CEO


Cutbacks destroy vital services
Dear Editor:
The Department of Health has
included the complete elimination of
the Rape Crisis Program Trust Fund
(RCPTF), the state's main source
of funding for rape crisis centers, in
its recommended cuts for 2009. This
$2 million cut would destroy vital
services for thousands of victims of
rape but do nothing to improve the
state's budget outlook because all
funds in the RCPTF are derived from
fines on offenders none of these
funds come from general revenue. It's
an ingenious system to have offenders
pay for victim services. The Salvation
Army Domestic Violence and Rape
Crisis Program, which covers Bay,
Calhoun, Holmes, Gulf, Jackson and
Washington counties, would have
to eliminate services to victims of
sexual assault from our program,
leaving hundreds without free and
confidential services. Victims of sexual
assault who do not receive recovery
services are at increased risk for
substance abuse, suicide, depression,
post traumatic stress disorder as well
as serious physical health effects.
Florida is asking innocent survivors
of sexual violence to make do with a
bare minimum safety net. We cannot
ask those traumatized by crime to get
by with no help and stand by as rape
crisis centers close their doors. Many


tions of His providence in the course
and conclusion of the late war; for the
great degree of tranquility, union and
plenty which we have since enjoyed; for
the'peaceable and rational manner in
which we have been enabled to estab-
lish constitutions of government for our
safety and happiness, and particularly
the national one now lately instituted;
for the civil and religious liberty with
which we are blessed and the means
we have of acquiring and diffusing
useful knowledge; and, in general, for
all the great and various favors which
He has been pleased to confer upon us.
And also that we may then unite in
most humbly offering our prayers and
supplications to the great Lord and
Ruler of Nations, and beseech Him to
pardon our national and other trans-
gressions, to enable us all, whether in


of you reading this have been affected
by sexual violence either through your
own experience or a loved one. Write
your legislators and encourage them
to oppose this cut.
Amy Thomas, M.A.
Sexual Violence Program Coordinator

No Bailout for Big 3
Dear Editor:
After a grueling week staying
in Washington, D.C., luxury hotels,
eating at the finest restaurants and
hobnobbing with political movers and
shakers, the CEO's of the Big Three
auto manufacturers had to pack up
their tin cups and go back to formulate
another strategy that will extract
money from the taxpayers and enable
them to continue their extravagant
lifestyles while they mismanage their
respective companies. Apparently
there weren't sufficient kickbacks
and rewards offered to convince the
politicians that they should sign off
on the deal. Don't fret; as you read
this letter, lobbyists are diligently
gathering in Detroit to raise the funds
necessary to sway opinions in their
favor.
I am not in favor of a bailout for
companies that have caused their own
demise. Instead, these companies
should try to succeed the same way
as everyone else. How about they
make a product that people want to
and can afford to buy? Maybe they
should see if employees would be
willing to take a pay reduction or pay
for a portion of the lucrative benefits
that are currently provided. Would
the CEO's be willing to forego two
years of salary in the best interest
of company survival? It would stand
to reason that someone who made
$28 million this year should be well
off enough to donate to the cause.
In fact, that person might feel that
because of their involvement in this
crisis, he really didn't earn or deserve
the compensation that was given and
return it to help the company survive.
Kevin Welch
St. Joe Beach


public or private stations, to perform
our several and relative duties properly
and punctually; to render our National
Government a blessing to all the peo-
ple by constantly being a government
of wise, just and constitutional laws,
discreetly and faithfully executed and
obeyed; to protect and guide all sov-
ereigns and nations (especially such
as have shown kindness to us), and to
bless them with good governments,
peace and concord, to promote the
knowledge and practice of true religion
and virtue, and the increase of science
among them and us; and generally, to
grant to all mankind such a degree of
temporal prosperity as He alone knows
to be best."
Given under my hand, at the city of
New York, the third day of October, A.D.
1789 President George Washington.


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A6 I The Star


Local


CHRISTMAS from page Al


Thursday, November 27, 2008


SUNDAY from page Al


The block between Fourth and
Fifth streets will become a dance
floor. Timeless, which has a vast rep-
ertoire of rock 'n' roll, country and
dance numbers, plans to keep the
party going into the evening.
Reindeer Run and Boat Parade
Two town favorites are planned
for the following weekend.
On Dec. 6, the Gulf County Cham-
ber of Commerce will host a Rein-
deer 5K Run and Fitness Walk and
Lighted Boat Parade.
Race registration begins at 7:30
a.m. (ET) at the Port Inn. The reg-
istration fee is $20, or $10 plus a new
unwrapped toy to be donated to the
Christmas for the Kids and Elderly in
Gulf County charity.
The race will begin promptly at
8:30 a.m., with the course to be deter-
mined.
Overall male and female runners
will receive $50 cash prizes. Win-
ners in five age groups also will re-
ceive first-, second- and third-place
awards.
The Lighted Boat parade begins
that evening 30 minutes after dark.
Boats will line up at the buoy line
at the St. Joe marina, sail past Sun-
set Coastal Grill and loop back to the
marina.
Chamber director Sandra Chafin
suggested residents view the parade
from Jetty Park.
As of Nov. 20, 10 boats had signed
on to participate.
Entry forms for both the Christ-
mas on the Coast and Lighted Boat
parades are available at the Chamber
of Commerce office, 155 Capt. Fred's
Place in Port St. Joe.
Forms also can be downloaded at
www.gulfchamber.org.
For more information on any of
the events listed in this article, con-
tact the Chamber at (850) 227-1223 or
e-mail Suzanne@GulfChamber.org.


48 percent of city voters cast-
ing ballots turning away Sunday
sales.
"Why don't you do what the
people want?" said Harry Lee
Smith, echoing the sentiments
of several speakers.
Magidson responded that
referendums "are a crutch.
They are an escape clause for
elected officials who don't want
to do their jobs."
Ralph Roberson, president
of the county Chamber of Com-
merce, noted that voters long
ago turned down a referendum
to build a prison in the county.
But elected officials went the
other direction, Gulf Correction-
al Institute was constructed and
roughly 500 people have jobs as
a result, Roberson said.
Clay Keels expressed support
for the commission's decision.
"I appreciate you taking a
stand and not tossing it back to
the people," Keels said.
The second argument from
opponents of the ordinance cen-
tered on the city's character, its
long history as a community of
faith and how the prohibition of
Sunday alcohol sales reinforced
that character and sense of
faith.
"One thing, one very small
thing, separates us from other
towns: We have character," said
one speaker, reflecting a view
shared by many who spoke.
Smith added, "Alcohol hasn't
changed; the damage it does
hasn't changed. (The entire
county) should be dry."
The bottom line for propo-
nents of lifting the prohibition is
the bottom line.
The issue was brought for-
ward several weeks ago by Com-
missioner Rex Buzzett, who


cited that 14 small businesses,
with an assessed property value
of some $7 million and employ-
ing dozens of people, were ad-
versely affected by the Sunday
ban.
In these increasingly tough
economic times, Buzzett con-
tended, it was the right thing to
provide increased revenue op-
tions for small businesses.
That view was echoed Tues-
day by the owner of the Dixie
Belle Motel, who said business
is falling, the city has to grow
and he sees people leaving the
motel on Sundays for other des-
tinations because of the alcohol
ban.
Ray Green of the Florida
Restaurant and Lodging Asso-
ciation, a lobbying and advocacy
group, noted that tourism drives
the economic engine of the state
and the county. He said until the
county becomes more economi-
cally diversified, the need for
tourism will remain a reality,
and prohibiting Sunday sales in
the city is unfair while neighbor-
ing areas such as Wewahitchka,
Mexico Beach, unincorporated
Gulf County and Apalachicola
allow it.
"I'm not here to debate the
morality of the issue," Roberson
said. "It's not about the availabil-
ity of alcohol. The issue is where
do you buy it and whether city
businesses have the same op-
portunity as county businesses
to compete.
"It's about jobs and compet-
ing on a level playing field."
In other business during last
Tuesday's meeting:
Marking his first year in
Port St. Joe, Police Chief David
Barnes provided figures for drug
operations in the city. The city


has arrested 49 people, including
30 identified as drug dealers, on
77 charges in the last 12 months.
Of those, 28 were on the north
side of town, 21 on the south.
Those numbers represented in-
creases year over year ranging
from 400 to 1,000 percent.
Barnes recognized Sgt. Rusty
Burch, Sgt. Chris Teeter, Inves-
tigator Jake Richards, Officer
Larry Diekey, Sgt. Tim Wood and
Sgt. Troy Simmons of his own of-
fice as well as cooperation from
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, the Gulf County
Sheriff's Office, Mexico Beach
Department of Public Safety, the
Bay County Sheriff's Office and
the Florida Department of Cor-
rections.
SCommissioners tabled
until next budget cycle bids re-
garding privatizing recreational
landscaping and grounds main-
tenance. The bids were higher
than current city costs, though
the hope is to ultimately priva-
tize those operations to allow
parks and recreation director
Mike Lacour to be more proac-
tive in developing programs.
The city is sending out in wa-
ter bills a survey concerning the
new recreational complex. They
are encouraging citizen input re-
garding what they might want in
the new complex to be built near
the Gulf/Franklin Center.
Magidson emphasized that
the city was doing everything
in its power to prevent the pro-
posed closing of the Constitu-
tional Convention Museum,
which the state is considering.
He said there is an invite going
out to Gov. Charlie Crist to come
to Port St. Joe to celebrate the
107th anniversary of the signing
of the Florida Constitution.






Thursday, November 27, 2008


Local


The Star I A7


Toucan's owner


called a

By DAVID ANGLER
I I,,ili., I r ...I.. t Newspapers
A federal magistrate de-
nied Toucan's Restaurant
owner Paul Francis' request
for bond, saying he repre-
sents a "danger to the com-
munity."
U.S. Magistrate Larry
Bodiford did not explain that
label, which, along with be-
ing a flight risk, is an express
reason for denying bond to
federal defendants.
Francis, 62, was arrested
in September and charged
with felony gun possession
and possessing metham-
phetamine with intent to dis-
tribute. Federal authorities
then raided Toucan's and
moved to claim the property
in forfeiture proceedings if
Francis was convicted.
Francis is facing 40 years
to life in prison if convicted
as charged.
Francis' lawyer, Jim
White, asked Bodiford to re-
lease Francis on bond pend-
ing trial. Prosecutor Gayle
Littleton argued that Fran-
cis possessed more than 28
grams of methamphetamine


and seven firearms, five of
which were loaded, when he
was arrested.
"Even though Francis
has a prior drug-trafficking
conviction, he was engaging
again in this unlawful pur-
suit, indicating that he could
reoffend if on bond," Little-
ton wrote in her response to
White's motion.
Littleton wrote that Fran-
cis was charged with traf-
ficking in Massachusetts in
1986. She said he absconded
"and was a fugitive for ap-
proximately five years."
"He was arrested in Pan-
ama City, Florida, in 1991,
and at the time of his arrest
he possessed fraudulent
documents in an alias," she
wrote. "He was subsequent-
ly sentenced to 15 years' im-
prisonment."
"Given that Francis has
been a federal fugitive, faces
a lengthy sentence and pos-
sessed a large amount of
methamphetamine and sev-
en guns," Littleton wrote,"
no condition or combination
of conditions would reason-
ably assure his appearance"
in court.


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Place your Christmas Greetings Ad* in our annual
Letters to Santa Pull out Section, December 25th Issue,
deadline is Wednesday, December 17th at noon.
Ad Size Color Ad Cost
Full Page $670B&W Ad Cos
Half Page $350 $480
Quarter Page $200 $250
?ighth Page $150$150
sixteenth Page $89 $99
business Card $50 $49
'all Joel Rep e -om $- $29
5 IFbJoo


... .-- Xuv o 3 .J0-6090 or
Kathleen Smith (819) 819-5078
to get your greeting in this special section and
then sit back and enjoyreading the Letters to
Santafrom area children
These letters are publishedfree of charge in
the Star and the Times each year.

AJ Christmas reeting ad are limited o
generic "Chjmsrmas Card" -%pe adter-ising and
excludes an! ad\%ertlin. that promores holiday
sales. holiday, open hounsesIreal esa sat'.e s es .
r ..h. a etc.


| Enjoy more time with

old b your family and friends
ucouldAbe;. during the holidays!
ASs I davc jin> *M I


For all your billing questions contact:

Gail Brannan

Office: (850) 227-7851
850-227-1278
S T 135 W. Hwy 98
THE TAR Port St Joe, FL 32457
YOUR HOMETOWN EWSI4ER FOR OVER69 YEARS Fax: 850-227-7212


850-653-8868
129 Commerce St.
Apolachicola, FL 32329
Fax: 850-653-8036


Kathleen Smith
Advertising Manager
Office: (850) 227-7847 Cell: (850) 819-5078
Email: ksmith@pcnh.com


850-227-1278
135 W Hwy 98
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax: 850-227-7212
850-653-8868
129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Fax: 850-653-8036


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school of fisi
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Thursday, November 27, 2008
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\Ve will be open I lam -pm EST
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A8 I The Star


LTocal


Thursday, November 27, 2008


Emergency Management database identifies local special needs


By Despina Williams
S tar 1 1 .i ,,. i

Ernest Hemingway appre-
ciated the virtues of a clean,
well-lighted place. Marshall
Nelson would settle for a good,
clean database.
For years, Gull County's
Emergency Management
director has compiled a data-
base of the county's special
needs residents, with names
provided by area health care
providers.
The database enables
Emergency Management to
identify those requiring trans-
portation to special needs
shelters in the event of a natu-
ral disaster.
But sifting through names
in a database that is rarely up-
dated has proven a challenge
for Marshall and his staff.
Many listed in the data-
base have moved, died or


should have never been clas-
sified as special needs in the
first place.
What Nelson seeks is a
"'good clean database that has
all the correct information."
In achieving that goal, Nelson
will be helped immeasurably
by Florida State University's
Center for Disaster Risk Pol-
icy.
Chris Floyd, the Center's
Project Development Man-
ager, invited Gulf County to
become one of three Florida
sites to participate in the Spe-
cial Population Information
Registry (SPINREG) Pro-
gram.
During a Nov. 13 meeting
at the Emergency Manage-
ment office, Floyd asked area
health care providers to begin
entering special needs client
information into a web-based
national database.
Floyd assured the pro-
viders that the application


meets Health Insurance Por-
tability and Accountability Act
(HIPAA) guidelines for online
applications. "We are very
concerned about confidenti-
ality of private records," said
Floyd, who described several
built-in confidentiality fea-
tures.
Representatives from
health care providers includ-
ing home health care and
hospice must first log onto the
website to request authoriza-
tion from Emergency Man-
agement.
When granted access, the
health care providers will re-
turn to the site to create pass-
words.
Each agency will only be
allowed to review its own cli-
ent records, and not those of
other providers.
Emergency Management
and the Department of Health
(DOH), which is responsible
for the care of special needs


residents during their stay
in an evacuation shelter, will
have the highest level access.
The database allows pro-
viders, Emergency Manage-
ment and DOH to view com-
prehensive medical records
for special needs individuals.
Each client profile con-
tains an address, phone num-
ber, next of kin, emergency
contact, information on pets,
medications, physicians,
pharmacies, dietary require-
ments and medical equip-
ment requiring electricity.
The database also contains
fields listing a wide range of
medical conditions, such as
insulin-dependent diabetes,
Alzheimer's, dementia and
others.
"It's as comprehensive as
we could make it, based on
what's acceptable in a special
needs shelter, using standard-
ized terms," said Floyd, who
worked closely with the Flori-


da State College of Medicine.
The database generates
reports and client cards and
has a unique napping feature
similar to Google Earth.
The mapping feature will
help Nelson plan for evacua-
tions, with all clients listed on
a single map.
The nearest special needs
shelter is in Marianna. Ac-
cording to Nelson, the hour-
and-a-half drive can take any-
where from four to six hours
during an evacuation.
"The map will eliminate
duplicate trips," said Nelson.
"During evacuations, you
need to save as much time as
possible."
The client cards will help
DOH more easily register
special needs residents upon
their arrival at the Marianna
shelter.
When the website goes live
in January, caregivers and the
general public will be able to


enroll qualified special needs
individuals into the database.
For now, Floyd has asked
area providers to continue
posting their client informa-
tion online. FSU will test the
system during a simulated
hurricane event on Nov. 25.
Nelson, who has whittled
the Emergency Management
database to less than 200, will
be able to compare his list
against the SPINREG data-
base in January.
Nelson believes that only
around 50-75 residents meet
state special needs require-
ments. Of that total, less than
a dozen will require transport
to a special needs shelter.
Nelson urged all residents
to visit the website floridadi-
saster.org and complete the
steps for a Family Disaster
Plan. The plan allows families
to have preparations in place
in the event of a hurricane or
other natural disaster.


Area BRIEFS


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'- H-S A
/ @alD 227-7S7 J





THE U STAR

Special good thru
December2008


FHP will begin
inspection checkpoints
Florida Highway Patrol
will conduct driver license
and vehicle inspection check-
points during the month of
December on the roadways
listed below in Holmes, Jack-
son and Washington counties.
Recognizing the danger
presented to the public by
defective vehicle equipment,
troopers will concentrate
their efforts on vehicles being
operated with defects such
as bad brakes, worn tires and
defective lighting equipment.
In addition, attention will be
directed to drivers who would
violate the driver license laws
of Florida.
Officers will be on State
Roads No. 2, 10, 69, 71, 73, 77,
79, 81, 273, 276, 277, and 286
during the month.
County roads with inspec-
tion points include No. 69A,
162, 164, 165, 165A, 167, 169,
173, 177, 177A, 179, 181, 185,
271, 276, 279, 280, 284, and
Snow Hill Road.
The Patrol has found these
checkpoints to be an effective
means of enforcing the equip-
ment and driver license laws
of Florida while ensuring the
protection of all motorists.

Bonfire to benefit
autism center
A successful 10K race in
October raised the commu-
nity's awareness of the new
Growing Minds Center, which
provides intensive, one-on-
one instruction to children
with autism.
The center will next host
a Beach Bonfire Benefit from
5-10 p.m. EST on Dec. 5 at the
Turtle Beach Inn, 140 Painted
Pony Road, Indian Pass.
The event will feature
food, drinks and entertain-
ment from local musicians
Dana and Charlie Black.
Admission is $15 per per-
son or $25 for two people. At-
tendees should bring beach
chairs. For more information
or to RSVP contact Stepha-
nie Petrie at (850) 229-9386.


AARP looking for tax
counselors
AARP is looking for Tax-
Aide counselors to help mid-
dle to low-income taxpayers.
Most of the returns are
done on the computer and
filed electronically. Neither
counselors nor clients need
to be members of AARP
Counselors receive train-
ing and are certified in the
basics of the U.S. Individual
Tax Code and in the use of
the IRS tax preparation soft-
ware, Taxwise.
Volunteers commit to six
hours for four days in Janu-
ary for training and one day a
week for 10 weeks from Feb. 1
through April 15.
Those interested in vol-
unteering at one of the four
Walton County sites should
contact Dave Doring at (850)
835-5470. To help in other
counties, call (888) 227-7669.

Reappraisals to force
half-million dollar cut
Franklin County will face
about $500,000 in budget cuts
as the county's latest com-
bined property valuation has
dropped by about $142 million.
Property Appraiser Doris
Barber Pendleton told county
commissioners Tuesday she
has revised downward the
preliminary valuation of about
$3.597 billion she gave them in
July.
The final valuation now
stands at about $3.454 billion,
representing a drop of about
4 percent, and the valuation
could drop further following
a Value Adjustment Board re-
port this week by Special Mag-
istrate Paul Cureton.
No specific cuts have been
proposed by the county to ac-
count for the loss of tax rev-
enue.
This is the second consec-
utive year in which the pre-
liminary valuations, certified
in July, and the final valuation
have varied by a significant
amount.
Last year, the difference
was about $100 million.


Joel Reed
Account Executice
Office: (850) 653-8869 Cell: (850) 370-6090
Email: jieed@starfl.com


THE STAR

TI I TI Apalachicola
H TIfMES & Carrabelle


850-227-1278
135 W. Hwy 98
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax: 850-227-7212
850-653-8868
129 Commerce St.
Apalachicolo, FL 32329
Fax 850-653-8036


f y ..**- '""" *ar. . 33i


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Thorsday, November 27, 2008 The Star A9 Local _______________


HISTORY from page A3_


must be removed immedi-
ately. It never was.
At the June 13, 2006, city
council meeting, Hall re-
ported that the crosswalks
were not working, after
his department dealt with
motorists and pedestrians
in town over the Memorial
Day holiday.
He said he sent a letter
at that time to DOT, tell-
ing the agency that it must
correct the crosswalk
problem.
He also noted that the
three most congested
streets in town were at
Thirty-Seventh Street (the


city pier and boat ramp);
Eighth Street at Toucan's
Restaurant, and Seven-
teenth Street, the entrance
of the El Governor Motel
RV campground, across
from the main motel on
U.S. 98.
Crosswalks were in-
stalled at Fifth, Eighth,
Fifteenth, Nineteenth,
Twenty-First and Thirty-
Seventh Streets.
The original request
did not include Nineteenth
Street, according to DOT
officials.
After crosswalks were
installed, employees of


the El Governor said no
one from any agency or
organization had ever
approached them ask-
ing about the need for a
crosswalk at Seventeenth
Street.
At the Nov. 11, 2008,
meeting, Hall told the city
council that the single
crosswalk warning sign at
each end of the city limits
was hard to see and was
confusing to motorists,
since all the crosswalks
were located far away from
the signs.
The Fifth Street cross-
walk was a problem for


motorists, he said, be-
cause the area appeared
to be a residential area and
motorists did not expect to
encounter pedestrians.
The Eighth Street
crosswalk problem, along
with Fifth Street, was more
of a poor lighting problem,
according to Hall, but little
could be done because of
turtle lighting ordinances.
At Fifteenth Street the
actual crosswalk and the
sign on U.S. 98 were on op-
posite sides of Fifteenth
Street and were confusing
to motorists and pedestri-
ans alike, he said.


At night, Nineteenth
Street was a dark area and
Twenty-First Street even
darker, according to Hall.
In the daytime, he said, the
crosswalks were so close
together (Fifteenth, Nine-
teenth and Twenty-First)
that motorists became
frustrated.
The Thirty-Seventh
Street location had signage
blocking access to the city
boat ramp and created ma-
jor problems for boaters
trying to use the ramp.
As for law enforcement,
Hall said, the Nineteenth
and Thirty-Seventh Street


locations were adequate
for enforcement, that
Fifteenth Street was non-
enforceable because the
signs and the crosswalk
markings were on op-
posite sides of Fifteenth
Street; and the crosswalk
at Eighth Street at Tou-
can's made enforcement
difficult because there
was no place for police to
observe because of the
congested space. Pedes-
trians also crossed U.S. 98
between Eighth and Sev-
enth Streets shelterr skel-
ter," Hall added, in spite of
the crosswalk.


SHORT LIST from page A3


Hall reported that
city workers had recently
watched a black bear cross
C.R. 386 at Fifteenth Street,
and reminded people that
wildlife activity in town was
on its annual fall increase.
He asked that residents
not place garbage cans out
on the street the night before
pickup in order to help keep
animals out of the garbage.


Hall also asked residents
to make sure they had house
numbers not only on their
mailboxes but on the side of
the house facing the street,
as well.
He said safety personnel
were having difficulty iden-
tifying houses when they
made emergency calls.
According to Hall, if a ho-
meowner is unable to install


the numbers on the house,
the Department of Public
Safety will do it for him. The
homeowner will have to pur-
chase the numbers.
Council member Gary
Woodham instructed Hall to
immediately begin enforc-
ing the recently passed city
ordinance requiring hom-
eowners to place garbage
receptacles behind or to the


side of houses. No garbage
receptacles are now allowed
to be stored in front of hous-
es or on the street.
The council urged the
public to attend the ongo-
ing Planning and Zoning (P
and Z) board meetings dur-
ing which board members
are updating the city's Land
Development Regulations


(LDR).
Anyone who wants to
have a say in how the city
uses its land in the future
should attend the meetings,
they said.
P and Z meetings are cur-
rently held the first Tuesday
of each month at 6 p.m. CT.
There was also an additional
meeting Nov. 18 to continue


discussing the city's LDR.
The city's Sanitation
Department (garbage pick-
up) will only run one day dur-
ing Thanksgiving week (Nov.
24-28). City hall will only
be open Monday through
Wednesday of that week.
The city council work-
shops of Nov. 25 and Dec. 23
have been cancelled.


SeaH,weLIKe
TURKeV anD
FamlLY TOO...


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Thursday, November 27, 2008


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A 10 I The Star


Thursday, November 27, 2008


Local


Ole Ellis selected for the 2008 Spirit of Freedom award


JAY FELSBERG
Managing Editol


CHIPLEY Ole Ellis deliv-
ered more than one pleas-
ant surprise during his long
involvement in the economic
development of Washington
County.
He helped bring in a 156-
acre industrial park and over
800 jobs. He helped establish
the Chipley Area Develop-
ment Corp., which led to the
first shopping center here.
During a visit to the new
Washington County Cham-
ber of Commerce offices here
Thursday, he received a sur-
prise of his own from those
seeking to recognize his un-
wavering efforts to better his
community.
Ellis was selected as win-
ner of the 2008 Spirit of Free-
dom Award.
The award is presented
annually to Northwest Flor-
ida residents who exemplify
Freedom Communications'
core values of respect for in-
dividual freedom, self respon-
sibility, integrity, community
and life-long learning.
"I'm honored by this
award," Ellis said when he
was told at the Washington
County Chamber of Com-
merce office. "Thank you."
Washington County News
and Holmes County Times-
Advertiser Publisher Nicole
Barefield said the announce-
ment made for a happy occa-
sion. "We're very glad to pres-


ent this award to Ole Ellis."
Barefield said. "In all of his
endeavors in this commu-
nity, Ole Ellis has certainly
sustained those core val-
ues."
Florida Freedom Newspa-
pers' Regional Vice-President
and Publisher Karen Hanes
said while the award might be
a surprise for Ellis, it was not
to those who worked with him
over the years.
"I can't think of a more de-
serving winner," Hanes said.
"He is the epitome of commu-
nity service."
It certainly was the right
thing to do according to Ted
Everett, who nominated El-
lis for the honor. "The man
responsible for this (develop-
ment) in so many ways was
Ole Ellis," said Everett, exec-
utive director of the Washing-
ton County Chamber of Com-
merce. "Ole has served his
community for many years
and we certainly appreciate
his sacrifice."
Freedom Communica-
tions is the parent company
of 10 newspapers in North-
west Florida. They include
the Washington County News,
the Panama City News Her-
ald, Holmes County Adver-
tiser, Northwest Florida Daily
News, Destin Log, Walton
Sun, Santa Rosa Press-Ga-
zette, Crestview News-Bul-
letin, Port St. Joe Star News,
and Apalachicola Times.
Ellis was honored on the
east end of Freedom's cover-
age area. On the west end,
Bob and Nancy Garcia -


long-tine volunteers
on everything from
education efforts to
running a thrift shop
at Eglin Air Force
Base shared the
award.
Both Ellis and the
Garcias will receive a
$1,000 check to donate


OLE ELL


to the charity of their choice.
Judges were five editors of
Freedom's newspapers.
Ellis' long involvement in
economic development has
paid off in many ways, with
several major industries
brought to Washington and
Bay counties, largely through
his efforts. Ellis grew up on
a small farm near Carthage,
Mississippi, and graduated
from the University of South-
ern Mississippi with a degree
in marketing.
Ellis already had one full
career in U.S. Army Aviation
before he came to Washing-
ton County in 1979, and quick-
ly became involved in trying
to make his county a better
place to live. He immediately
became involved with the
Chamber of Commerce.
"The Washington County
Chamber of Commerce was,
at that time, basically dor-
mant," Everett said. During
his first four years from 1979-
83 Ellis was a major player in
building the Chamber as a de-
velopment agency.
"His greatest desire was to
see things done in Washing-
ton County so young people
could get jobs, said Ole's
son, Chris Ellis, in a video on


his father made earlier
this year for the Cham-
ber of Commerce.
One of Ellis' major
accomplishments was
his role in bringing the
now WestPoint Home
facility to Washington
LIS County. Bridgett Merrill
of Enterprise Florida
was a state development of-
ficial when Ellis and fellow
local leaders convinced West-
Point corporate officials to lo-
cate here.
"We didn't even know what
was going on in Washington
County until Ole had every-
thing pretty much sewed up,"
Merrill joked.
Community leader and for-
mer Chamber President John
Daughtry said the Chamber
found out that West Point was
looking to expand by running
down an Alabama license
plate spotted in Washington
County and finding out it be-
longed to a WestPoint vehicle.
The driver had visited the
Chamber office but did not tell
what company he represent-
ed. Ellis and Daughtry drove
all the way to Opelika, Ala., to
visit WestPoint officials.
"They were real surprised
to see us," Daughtry said.
"We got to talk to the boss and
that's how we got started."
Hundreds of jobs came to
Washington County as a re-
sult.
The Industrial Develop-
ment Board chaired by Ellis
was responsible for arranging
terms to bring WestPoint to
Washington County, and the


board was also responsible
for arranging the bonds to
bring the nursing home and
rehab center to Chipley.
Ellis was also well known
at the state and regional lev-
el.
"He was one of the found-
ing members of the Rural
Counties Working Group,"
Merrill said. That organiza-
tion was formed to make sure
state leaders knew the con-
cerns of smaller counties and
the impact on those counties
by state legislation and regu-
lations.
"He realized that one size
does not fit all," Merrill said.
"He laid out articulate argu-
ments on why state policy was
or was not working for Wash-
ington County."
In 1983, Ellis was named
executive director of the Bay
County Committee of 100,
where he and that organiza-
tion played a major role in the
development of Bay Industrial
Park, Westinghouse Resource
Recovery System, Century
Boat Co., The Natural Light,
Stolt-Neilsen, Midwest Pipe
Cutting and Atlantic South-
east Services.
Ellis returned to Washing-
ton County in 1987 and again
worked with the local Cham-
ber until his retirement in
1999. He served as director
of Economic Development,
director of the Chipley Re-
development Agency, coor-
dinator of the Washington
County Enterprise Zone, and
secretary of the Washington
County Industrial Develop-


ment Agency.
During his tenure, the
Walmart Super Center, the
UPS distribution facility,
two major motels and nu-
merous small businesses
came to the county. Wash-
ington Corrections Institu-
tion (now Northwest Flori-
da Reception Center) came
to Greenhead.
Ellis also served as in-
terim Chamber director
from June to August 2005
after the death of Director
Tommy McDonald, Sr.
Ellis also served two
times as interim city man-
ager for the City of Chipley.
He has served in numer-
ous civic and non-profit
organizations, including
United Way, Chipley Kiwan-
is Club, Florida State Rural
Development Council, Flor-
ida Economic Development
Council (including director
and treasurer), Northwest
Florida Regional Economic
Development Coalition,
Habitat for Humanity, the
Washington County Coop-
erative Extension Advi-
sory Committee, legislative
Committee for the Washing-
ton-Holmes Technical Cen-
ter Advisory Committee.
"He taught me so many.
things about economic de-
velopment and about life in
general," Gary Clark of West
Florida Electric Co-Op said.
"He is a role model, a men-
tor and a true friend."
"Thank you for your wis-
dom and thank you for just
being Ole," Everett said.
FILE PHOTO






ALL IN THE FAMILY: Ole Ellis'
family joined him when he
was honored.at the Wash-
ington County Chamber of
Commerce banquet earlier
this year.


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TWO GENEROUS DONATIONS: Progress Energy Corporation Community Relations Man-
ager Bobby Pickels (center) presents Gulf County Chamber of Commerce director San-
dra Chafin (left) and SaltAir Market president Amber Davis with $1,000 and $750
checks, respectively.


Progress Energy gives generously


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Amber Davis and Sandra
Chafin are always happy to
see Bobby Pickels, especial-
ly when he's doling out cash
for their organizations.
Last Wednesday, Pickels,
the Community Relations
Manager for Progress En-
ergy Corporation, presented
$1,000 to Chafin, the Gulf
County Chamber of Com-
merce director, and $750 to
Davis, the president of the
SaltAir Market.
The Chamber of Com-
merce donation will ben-
efit two community holiday
events, Ghost on the Coast
and Christmas on the Coast.
The SaltAir Market dona-
tion will help the organiza-
tion continue to provide lo-


cally grown produce to area
residents.
In presenting the checks,
Pickels said Progress En-
ergy focuses its community
outreach in three key areas:
education, the environment
and economic development.
Pickels praised the Sal-
tAir Market for embracing
both environmentally-friend-
ly practices and economic
development.
"The SaltAir Market,
with its focus on local ven-
dors and organic produce,
is an environmentally sensi-
tive way of providing food to
the community. At the same
time, it offers the opportuni-
ty for economic growth and
development and creates a
new market in Port St. Joe."
Pickels likewise applaud-
ed the efforts of the Cham-
ber of Commerce, which has


been a longtime recipient
of Progress Energy funds,
most notably for its annual
Scallop Festival.
"Chamber events are
focused on the Chamber's
commitment to serving our
existing businesses by cre-
ating events in downtown
Port St. Joe," said Pickels.
"We're happy to partner
with the Chamber in high-
lighting local businesses
in town trough these and
other festivals we have sup-
ported."
Chafin and Davis both ex-
pressed their gratitude for
Progress Energy's generos-
ity.
"In these hard economic
times we're grateful Prog-
ress Energy is still able to
support us," said Davis.
"They're critical to the suc-
cess of our organizations."

Ii


; '







PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA




PORTS


Thursday, November 27, 2008


WNN yT w. s t a r f I. c 0 iII


PHOTOS BY PAUL BUCHANAN I www.suwanneesports.com


TOUCHDOWN: Greg Farmer scored the first touchdown of the game.





PSJ slips past


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Fourth down was the differ-
ence Friday night in a rerun of
a regional semifinal match-up
from 2006.
The Tiger Sharks (9-2) made
the plays on fourth down that
were critical as for the second
time in three seasons Port St.
Joe traveled to Mayo Lafayette
and beat the top-ranked and un-
beaten Class 1A team.
This time the score was
18-13 on a chilly night similar to
three years ago when the Tiger
Sharks downed a then-No.1 and
undefeated Lafayette en route
to the state semifinals, where
Port St. Joe lost to North Florida
Christian.
Port St. Joe plays at West
Gadsden next Friday in the
Region 1-1A final.


The difference Friday was
fourth down, as the Tiger
Sharks twice scored touch-
downs on fourth down while
twice shutting down the Hor-
nets (10-1) on fourth down in-
side the 10.
The first swing came in the
opening period when Greg
Farmer went over from the 1
on fourth-and-goal at 4:15. On
the ensuing drive Lafayette
marched to set up a first-and-
goal from the 1 but could not
break the goal line in four tries.
The Tiger Sharks went into
halftime up 6-0.
The Hornets came out of
intermission and sprinted to a
touchdown, aided by a key face
mask penalty on Port. St. Joe,
but Blake Herring's extra point
was wide and it was 6-6.
The Tiger Sharks answered
immediately, a 42-yard touch-


Mayo

down run by Calvin Pryor set-
ting up a 1-yard run by quar-
terback Tyrone Dawson putting
Port St. Joe back on top late in
third quarter 12-6.
Jamal Reed, the Miami sign-
ee from Lafayette, returned a
fumble 41 yards and Herring
nailed the extra point and La-
fayette was on top for the first
time at 13-12 late in the third
period.
But Pryor went over from
the 7 on a, fly sweep on fourth-
and-goal, the pass conversion
failing and it was 18-13 with 8:53
remaining.
Lafayette reached the red
zone one more time, first and
goal from the 5 with less than.a
minute left, but were stopped on
another fourth down.
Port St. Joe plays at District
1-1A foe West Gadsden (9-2) at
7:30 p.m. on Friday.


INTERCEPTED: Willie Quinn had a key
interception in Port St. Joe's win over
Lafayette at Mayo.


Shark soccer

sweeps

Chipley

The Port St. Joe High
School soccer teams swept
their counterparts at Chi-
pley last Thursday night as
both teams moved over .500
for the young season.

Boys
Chase Watford had 11
saves as the Sharks topped
Chipley 4-2 in an offensive
battle.
Parker Harris led the at-
tack for Port St. Joe, scor-
ing twice. Austin Burke and
Daniel May each had a goal
and an assist for the Sharks,
who also received an assist
from Jared Arnold.
The Sharks are now 2-1-
2.

Girls
The Lady Tiger Sharks
registered a 3-0 shutout as a
stifling defense kept keeper
Angela. Canington well-pro-
tected with the Lady Tigers
managing just three shots
on goal.
Sara Hoffman, Courtney
Hermsdorfer and Cristina
Cordova each scored goal
as Kayla Minger and Jo
Williams each assisted on a
goal.
The victory raises the
girls' mark to 4-3-0 on the
season.





I A
Chase Watford had
11 saves as the Sharks
topped Chipley 4-2 in
an offensive battle.


Wewahitchka's


Naylor runs to state
Wewahitchka High Those top four finishers
School's Billy Naylor fin- out of Region 1 had the top
ished 20th in last Saturday's four times among the state
state Class 1A boys cross qualifiers in their respec-
country meet after running tive region meets, mean-
a personal best time of 16:50. ing Naylor had entered the
The Gator senior was the state Class 1A meet with
lone county qualifier the fourth-fastest
to the state meet held time.
in Dade City near However, as
Tampa. Stallworth noted,
"We're proud of there had been
him, he had a per- faster times turned
sonal best, we just i in during the sea-
wish it could have ." son and ranking
been a little higher BILLY NAYOR runners by regional
(place)," said Wewa- results is difficult.
hitchka coach Tom The Top 15 finish-
Stallworth. ers from each region qualify
Naylor reached the state for the state meet. No other
meet through what might runner out of Region 1 regis-
have been the toughest Class tered one of the top 10 times
1A district in the state. entering the Saturday's
Naylor finished third in meet.
the District 1-1A meet be- This was Naylor's third
hind two Tallahassee run- straight trip to the state
ners, both of whom also cross country meet. He has
beat Naylor in the Region 1 also competed at the state
meet, where Naylor finished track and field meet the past
fourth with a runner from three years.
the Jacksonville area joining "We are looking forward
the three District 1 runners to track season," Stallworth
at the top. noted.


Reserve your spot in the Dome


Reserve seats for home basketball
games inside the R. Marion Craig Coli-
seum are now on sale and they've been
discounted this year by Tiger Shark coach
Derek Kurnitsky.


For more
information call
coach Kurnitsky
at 229-8251


The price for each reserved seat the
seats are in glass-enclosed sections above
the lower tier of seats is $60 this season,
down from $100 in previous season.
That includes all home Port St. Joe High
School boys basketball games.
And this year, with the Tiger Sharks
hosting the district tournament and pos-
sibly a playoff game or two or three, the
reserved seating will extend beyond the
regular season.
For more information or to reserve your
seat please contact coach Kurnitsky at the
high school at 229-8251.


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A
Section


Page 11


HOLIDAY
SCRAMBLE
SELECT
SHOT GOLF
TOURNAMENT

The St. Joseph Bay
Country Club will be
conducting a golf tour-
nament on Dec 13,
2008, at 1 p.m.
The entry fee will
be $60 per player. The
four-person team will
be required to meet
the handicaps listed
on the entry form.
All proceeds.will be
used to make capitol
improvements to the
grounds, facilities and
the course.
This will be a fun
day complete with
nice cash prizes, a
delicious buffet din-
ner and special event
prizes.
Anyone who would
like to be a sponsor
for this is asked to
call Jerry Stokoe at
899-1036






A12 I The Star


Local


KING from page Al


meat market and butchered cattle
raised on his brother's farm.
When the Depression hit,
King's father took a job at the local
sawmill, making $5.50 a week.
"All he ended up with was the
house, but he didn't owe anybody,"
King said.
In Port St. Joe, King settled
into a home on Palm Boulevard.
He married Janet Whitaker, an
"old farm girl" from Montrose,
Ga., who had come to Port St. Joe
with two friends seeking work as
teachers.
The couple had three children,
Karen, Chris and Cuyler.
Though being the town's only
dentist kept King busy, he found
time to dabble in other things.
King and his wife founded the
Fish House restaurant in Mexico
Beach, which formerly had been a
dress shop.
Janet King, who retired from
teaching to raise her children,
worked seven days a week in the
restaurant.


King vouched for his wife's cu-
linary expertise: "Mrs. King is a
good cook. Man, she can cook."
On Wednesday, Friday and Sat-
urday nights when he did not have
to rise for work in the mornings,
King broiled seafood in the area's
first infrared broiler.
King said the restaurant also
boasted the area's first tap beer.
When he was not serving up
seafood, King dedicated his time
to Kiwanis Club projects.
He joined the civic club in De-
cember 1948, when it was a male-
only society, and is now the lon-
gest-standing member.
Among the Kiwanis Club's
many accomplishments, King is
most proud of the club's estab-
lishment of one part-time and two
full-time scholarships at the Gulf
Coast Community College Gulf/
Franklin Center.
King recalled one scholarship
recipient, a Highland View girl,
who went on to become a college
professor and author of a math-


Robert King and his wife, Janet,
owned and operated the Fish House
Restaurant in Mexico Beach for 20
years.

ematics book.
Despite his distinguished ten-
ure as a Port St. Joe Kiwanian,
King still gets no respect from his
peers.
To commemorate his recent
84th birthday, the club presented
King with two gifts: a dirt cake
and balloon that read "Older Than
Dirt."


'Patch it up'
During his early years in Port
St. Joe, King sometimes would
work six days a week.
He now works Monday through
Wednesday at his Long Avenue
office, leaving him plenty of time
to work in his garden, planting
radishes, carrots and all types of
greens.
King is no longer the town's only
dentist Dr. Frank May and the
Gulf County Health Department
are competitors but he still has
patients who have been loyal to
him for decades.
King also has found an assistant
with a stronger stomach than the
one who fled so many years ago.
Mary Carmel Griffin has been at
his side for the last 37 years.
In his 60 years in the business,
King has witnessed many changes
in the dental industry.
He described the high-speed
drill as the most significant tech-
nological advancement, saving
dentists time and effort.
Though a media culture that
prizes straight, white teeth has


Thursday, November 27, 2008

made cosmetic dentistry a big
business, King prefers to stick
with the basics.
King never has added teeth
straightening and other cosmetic
procedures to his repertoire.
He still favors amalgam fillings,
made of liquid mercury and an al-
loy powder composed of silver, tin
and copper, and worries modern
crowns are ''too white they
don't match the other teeth."
Today's economic climate has
affected King's business, with
customers rejecting costly proce-
dures in favor of quick fixes.
"People don't want a crown
anymore. They say, 'Patch it up,'
and I understand that, too,'" he
said.
A boy when his father lost his
meat market, King said he be-
lieves today's economic woes
never will rival those of the Great
Depression.
"As bad as it can get his time,
it cannot be that bad today," said
King, who is confident the econo-
my will rebound.
"We survived that one. We're
going to survive this one."


SLBr newspaper

ide while you're

racatlon!
i;-':,-^'


Everything



50% Off
Excludes marked gift items
Sale Good Nov. 22 thru Dec. 6
SClosed Thanksgiving Day

Open 10am 4Pm CT



2802 Unit C Hwy 98 Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(850J 648-5861


While \ou re awa\. we'll put your News Herald in a safe place the hands of
a student eiiolled in our New-spaper In Education program. Classrooms
u-se this unique educatuLmal tool to broaden student's learning horizon.
It's u l eas-v \\\ to help bring newspapers t,- loc, laJ llsrooms all year long.
B-lfor> \oii le.-if'v town. reiiit b r
Donate your newspapers. ,,
NEW\S HER.ALD Simply request "Vacation Donation"
Call 747-5050 Today!


The rstDn btyf


Ko)liJdy Ex 5,




Southern Charm blended with Metropi l tci 1
Style and sprinkled with Holiday Cheer'

S2Hi Port St Joe


Store open for Christmas ShoppingO 10-o ,', ,,, M. li .'.
throughout the day, with a chance to wun i i'. -n I. k-, 1 -,i
gift certificate.


New Store Opens in Aptlac lik ol
The River City gets a little Persnickety r-' I I In 1. ,I i
Apalachicola, visit Persnicketys brand n- .. ,ii. ; 1. I L .-- I
downtown. The store brings irresistib' Iinl III: I' I ..ti d I.11I'l '11'
fashion accessories to a city known for 1 .. '.r t1nI11,,
and shopping.

CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE
Join us at the Port StJoe store for our ( In I .,- i.i I II ,, .'
This year's event offers Trish McEvoy I. .. i i'. I'. I I' i"'i n
and She BeadsTrunk show, and special 11. I~ I..-in n.i : '1
- 7:30. The She Bead Artist and founder Sandy Rueve will be here
make personalized Solo Beads.. Its also the perfect time to order
monogrammed gifts and greeting cards. Call for details.

Men's Night Port St Joe 5pm 8pm
Ladies, make outyour Wish List in preparation for Men's Night! This
one is strictly for the boys with cold beer, free gift wrapping, and a
fine cigar with 5100 p IrchmmasP


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Downtown Port St Joe

850-227-7224
Across from ACE Hardware
Also Visit what has been called Port St Joe's "Hidden Gem"
RSR Recording Studios. Located behind the Store.
<* - *


-r
~





*i


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ill :
t





I

~1/11;11


I












COMMUNITY


Thursday, November 27, 2008


w w w. st a r f 1. co In


Gulf-Franklin Center


graduates 6 ESOL students


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

On Nov. 10, Gulf Coast Community
College proudly hosted a graduation
ceremony for a group of special stu-
dents. Six students of English as a sec-
ond language (ESOL) received certifi-
cates for completing 72 hours of study.
Honored were Beatriz Castillo, Mir-
ian Barahoma, Maria Torres, of Apala-
chicola and Oscar Aguilar, Guillermo
Mendez and Isabel Morales of Port St.
Joe.
Three students, Castillo, Mendez
and Morales, moved up a level com-
pleting their textbook.
"These people have done exception-
ally well moving up a whole level," in-
structor Nancy Montanez said. "What
they have completed in eight weeks
takes some people a year."
Eric Bidwell, program coordinator
for Gulf Cbast's ESOL, was on hand
for the graduation. He said ESOL
is well funded and seeking to ex-
pand. J


"Our only issue is attendance," he
said. "We are trying for 15 students
next term. We have the funding if we
can only get the students. We will now
have classes both at the Gulf Franklin
Campus and at St. Patrick's Catholic
Church in Apalachicola.
"Please come back," he told the
graduates. "This is my hometown, and
I want this class to make it."
He said the class and textbooks are
free of charge, and anyone can attend.
Three-hour classes are held three
times a week for eight weeks.
Class spokesperson Castillo told
Bidwell and Montanez,
"Thank you very much for
the opportunity. I hope I will
be here next year too."
After diplomas were
awarded, the students sat
down to a feast prepared by
the class, their
friends
and


the instructor.
Featured on the menu were pupu-
sas, a flatbread containing meat and
spices; tamales wrapped in banana
leaf; chicken flautas; ceviche; chiles
rellanos; refried beans; arroz con glan-
dules and churros and flan for dessert.
For immigrants, learning English
can mean better employment and
easier communication with neighbors,
health care workers and government
officials.
If you wish to join a class to study
English, call (850) 769-1551, ext. 3396.


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA I Staffwriter
GRADUATES: Guillermo Mendez, who was one of
three students to complete a level, displays the
pictorial dictionary he received as an award. At
left, Isabel Morales of Port St. Joe, right, poses
With instructor Nancy Montanez after receiving
her diploma.


i stui iantes de Ingles


reciieron certificados


Translated by Sister Mary Alice
Lunes, 10 de Noviembre, Gulf-Franklin
Center graduo un grupo de estudiantes es-
peciales. Seis estudiantes de Ingles (ESOL)
recibieron certificados por cumplir 72 horas
de studios.
Los quo recibieron honors eran Beatriz
Castillo, Miarian Barahoma, Maria Torres
de Apalachicola, y Oscar Aguilar, Guillermo
Mendez y Isabela Morales de Port St. Joe.
Tres estudiantes, Castillo, Mendez, Mo-
rales progresaron una nivel por cumplir
sus textos.
"Estas personas hicieron progress
excepcional," dijo su maestro Nancy
Montanez, "cumplieron en ocho se-
mansa material quo muchos estudi-
antes cumplen en uno ano."
Eric Bidwell, coordinator del pro-
grama de ESOL, estuvo present por


eesta graducacion. Dijo que el program ya
tiene bastante recursos y puede crecer. "El
problema es asistencia. Estamos tratando
tener 15 estudiantes el proxima semester.
Tenemos los fondos. Tenemos classes ahora
en Gulf Frankli y en el Centro de San Patri-
cio en Apalachicola. Por favor, regresen,"
les dijo a los estudiantes graduados.
Las classes y los libros son gratis y cu-
alquier personal puede asistir. Clases de
res horas se reunen tres dial por semana
por ocho semanas.
Beatriz Castillo hablo por sus campane-
ros.
"Gracias por las oportunidad. Espero es-
tar aqui el ano que entra."
Despues de recibir sus certificados, to-
dos, disfrutaron una comoda preparada por
los estudiantes, sus amigos y su maestro.
Se sirvieron comida tipica de Mexico, El
Salvador y Guatemala.


PORT ST. JOE HIGH
SCHOOL HOMECOMING
COURT AND ESCORTS

The 2008 Port St. Joe High School
Homecoming Court and their escorts
posed for pictures recently at the
Warriner home prior to the Homecoming
game.
The court and their escorts were
Natasha Allen and Chazten North, Emily
Baxley and Jacob Thompson, Heather
Brinkmeier and Brandon Strickland,
Brennis Bush and Johnathon Graham,
Tayler Byrd and Billy Martin, Anna
Cordova and Robbie Martin, Sarah
Hiscock and Abram Vereen, Kayla
Minger (crowned Homecoming Queen)
and Stratton Miniat, Jessi Moore and
Jacob Gentry, Meredith Todd and Austin
Burke and Kaelyn Jo Williams and Hunter
Wall.
Congratulations to the court and their
escorts.


Bonfire


to benefit


autism


center
By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
A successful 10K race in
October raised the commu-
nity's awareness of the new
Growing Minds Center, which
provides intensive, one-on-
one instruction to children
with autism.
The center next will host
a Beach Bonfire Benefit from
5-10 p.m. EST Friday, Dec. 5,
at the Turtle Beach Inn, 140
Painted Pony Road in Indian
Pass.
The event will feature
food, drinks and entertain-
ment from noted local mu-
sicians Dana and Charlie
Black.
Admission is $15 per per-
son or $25 for two people,
with all proceeds benefiting
the Growing Minds Center.
Attendees are asked to
bring their own beach chairs.
Founded in August by
board certified behavior ana-
lyst Christine Hermsdorfer,
the Growing Minds Center is
housed in the Long Avenue
Baptist nursery facility in Port
St. Joe.
Funds from the bonfire
will help Hermsdorfer and
her staff expand the center's
hours and serve more chil-
dren.
For more information on
the upcoming fundraiser or to
RSVP contact Stephanie Pet-
rie at (850) 229-9386.


* ,- A-- - - -- ------ ~-----


B
Section


Page B1


I I


I





Thursday, November 27, 2008


-- I ThelStar1I oa1


Laura Beth Hill welcomes

sister Emma


Laura Beth Hill would like to an-
nounce the birth of her sister, Emma
Lee Hill.
She was born July 26, 2008,
at Gulf Coast Community
Hospital. She weighed 8 pounds,
1 ounce, and was 19 inches
long.
Her parents are Brian and Sonya
Hill of Port St. Joe.
Her maternal grandparents are


Etheridge honored at

Pre-Teen Alabama


Mollie Etheridge from
Dothan, Ala., recently at-
tended the Pre-Teen Alabama
Scholarship and Recogni-
tion program in Birmingham,
Ala.
Mollie won the talent
division, top academic achieve-
ment award and first place
overall in the program. Mol-
lie was awarded educational


savings bonds. She will travel
to Baton Rouge, La., this sum-
mer and compete in the Pre-
Teen America program with
other girls from across the
country.
Mollie is the daughter of
Tim and Linda Etheridge. She
is the granddaughter of Edna
Gilmore and Fead and Jean
Etheridge.


Stanley and Jeanette Ash of Mayo,
Fla., the late Joe and Lena Pearson
of Mayo, and the late Roy and Alice
Ash of Branford, Fla.
Emma's paternal grandpar-
ents are Hershel and Patsy Hill
of Lynn Haven, Fla., the late Cur-
tis and Alma Padgett of Canton-
ment, Fla., and the late Stan-
ford and Sara Hill of Pensacola,
Fla.


You've Got It!

Somebody
Wats -It!









STAR'PUBLICATIONS
THESTAR



FREjEDOM^
NEWSPAK SWl ERACTVE


Master Gardeners


training planned


January to May

The Gulf County Cooperative Extension Service
might offer a Master Gardener's Training from Janu-
ary to May 2009. Cost of the program will be $150. A min-
imum of 52 hours of class instructional time is required
for certification. In order to take advantage of the Uni-
versity of Florida's polycom system, the program will
be offered at the Cooperative Extension Office located
at the Old Courthouse building in Wewahitchka. A mini-
mum of 10 paid students are required to justify offering
the program.
For more information or to register for the pro-
gram, contact the Gulf County Cooperative Extension
Service at 639-3200 or 229-2909 or e-mail rlcarter@ufl.
edu.


Peggy Waters of Port St.
Joe is pleased to announce the
marriage of her daughter, Lin-
da (Susie), to John McCracken
Jr. (Mike). The wedding took
place Nov. 8 in Chesterfield,
Va.


The bride also is the daugh-
ter of the late Roy Waters of
Jones Homestead.
The groom's parents are
Dorothy McCracken of Powa-
than, Va., and the late Lt. Col.
(Ret.) John McCracken.


Woman's clubs offer 3 cheers for November


The Florida Federation of Woman's
Club and the Wewahitchka Woman's
Club announces three cheers for
November.
Cheer No. 1- At the November meet-
ing at the Charles A. Whitehead Library,
club members heard an inspiring talk
from Pam Martin, victim's advocate,
dealing with domestic abuse. Brochures
titled "Cut it Out" were passed out for
members to give to their hairdressers.
These informational items, with toll
free numbers and signs of abuse, can be


Christmas

Parade

Sit Duc.1.



11.1. ,1 .1 i *i



SLII~td .LIuSC


';' I n J I t ''1.1 L : 1 1,- i


lr i c r IL .c i


made readily available to those in need.
Members then enjoyed a bevy of refresh-
ments, compliments of the Executive
Board. President Rosa Feltrop presided
over the meeting and everybody had a
wonderful time.
Cheer No. 2 At the St. John's Epis-
copal Church Bazaar in Wewahitchka,
club members Carol Vlahos and Linda
Whitfield gave out brochures to shop-
pers who came by to enjoy the many
crafts, delicious food, music and good
times.


Cheer No. 3 The Gulf Correctional
Institute held its annual Health Fair on
Nov. 13 at the Training Building. Doctors,
dentists, nurses, insurance reps, United
Way, Woman's Club, etc. had informa-
tion to hand out to the employees during
their shift change. Lots of freebies were
given out such as pens, pencils, candy, T-
shirts, toothbrushes, toothpaste, mugs,
cups, etc. Woman's Club members Diane
Semmes and Linda Whitfield handed
out brochures telling what the Woman's
Club does in the community.


$5 Raffle

Tickets
3 day 2 night stay
at the Windmark
Beach Resort
with a $200 Gift
Certificate to
School of Fish
Restaurant.
Tickets Available at:
Toucans,
St Joe Rent All
and
Persnickety.
Drawing December 6, 2008
Benefits Project Graduation


Waters-McCracken

wedding


Meet this week's Pet of the Week- "Golden"! Golden
is an American Staffshire Bull Terrier mix and a very
good girl! Golden does not have a problem with the
other dogs and mostly hangs out doing her own thing-
a very independent girl! Golden is very laid back and
would make a great companion for someone looking
for a low energy dog with lots of love and devotion to
share! Please contact Melody at the Humane Society
if you would like to adopt Golden or any of her other
wonderful friends here at the St. Joseph Bay Humane
Society, 227-1103.

WANT TO WORK WITH ANIMALS! St. Joseph
Bay Humane Society is anticipating a possible
opportunity for employment. If interested, please
apply in person at 1007 Tenth Street, Port St. Joe,
Tuesday- Saturday between the hours of 10am & 4pm.


--


SLocal1


B2 I The Star


I


' I I








Thursday, November 27, 2008


Honor ROLL


DAZZLING DOLPHINS


Faith Christian First
Nine Weeks Honor Roll
All A's
First grade: Catherine
Bouington. Jade Cothran,
Farren Newman. Caleb
Schweikert and Mary-Kate
Wood.

Second grade: Ebony Al-
exander, Jacob Kennedy and
Ana Lacivita.

Third grade: Debra
Burdeshaw and Matthew
Costin.

Fourth grade: Elijah
Sarmiento.

Sixth grade: Elisha Ver-
een.

Seventh grade: Lauren
Costin, Allen Davis, Chris-
tian Lane and Lexie Mc-
Ghee.

Eighth grade: Mary Cait-
lin Bouington and Abagail
Davis.


A's and Bs
Second grade: Chandler
Godwin.

Third grade: Court-
ney Davidson and Thomas
Miniat.

Fourth grade: Kait-
lyn Baker, David Davis,
James Durham and Alison
Gay

Fifth grade: Reid Ken-
nedy

Sixth grade: Rachel
Douglas, Marcel Duarte and
James Austin Wiley:

Seventh grade: Kallie
Bateman.

Eighth grade: Dylan Ca-
baniss and Daniel Jones.

Ninth grade: Tif-
fany Burch and Trisha
Davidson.


Tenth grade:
Pitts.


Brian


' .k'


FRONT ROW: Hannah Young and Ashley Erale
BACK ROW: Chloe Burke, Mary Butts, Austin Nobles, Joseph


Cunningham, Ziya Fedd.


t!l e

zlon. qITate


The FCS science class-
room had a different look on
Tuesday, Nov. 11. Mark God-
win was kind enough to allow
FCS science classes from
grades five through ten to
come observe the harvest-
ing of approximately 10,000
pounds of shrimp. These
shrimp are purchased in
the spring and then fed and
maintained in ponds un-
til the fall. The shrimp are
retrieved by draining the
ponds at a specific rate, al-
lowing them to swim with
the current to the opening
where the pump is located.
There, the shrimp are ex-
tracted from the water. The
crustaceans then fall into a
wide tube and are dumped
into a storage bin where ice
is then added. If the pond is
not drained correctly, the
shrimp can become trapped
on the way to the opening
causing workers to have to
pick them up by hand. After
being placed in the storage
bins, the shrimp will then
be transported to the fish-


ery and packaged based
on the demand. Once the
shrimp are removed, the
ponds will be allowed to dry,
and possibly grated, while
waiting to start the process
all over again. The classes
and teacher Kathe Jones
are most appreciative to Mr.
Godwin for allowing them to
witness the shrimp harvest.
Now, when they see shrimp
in the grocery store meat
market, they will have a
better understanding of the
work that goes in to. getting
them there.
The first and second
grades at Faith Chris-
tian presented the an-
nual Thanksgiving play on
Wednesday, Nov. 26 in the
multi-purpose building at
the school. In this year's
cast, Governor Bradford
was played by Jacob Ken-
nedy, Mr. Brewster by Chan-
dler Godwin, Mrs. Brews-
ter by Ana Lacivita, Sarah
Brewster by Ebony Alexan-
der, Miles Standish by J.J.
Laine and Mrs. Winslow by


Brieana Bozeman. In the
Indian camp, Squanto was
played by Catherine Bou-
ington, Samoset by Caleb
Schweikert and Chief Mas-
sasoit by Ferren Newman.
Other Indians were Mary
Kate Wood and Jade Co-
thran, who also narrated
the play. In the prologue and
epilogue, the mama, daddy
and child were played by
Ana Lacivita, Jacob Ken-
nedy and Ebony Alexander.
The cast wishes to thank
Mrs. Janice Evans for play-
ing the piano, Mrs. Melanie
Dunn for leading the music,
Mr. Michael Rodgers for
operating the sound sys-
tem and their parents for
patiently practicing with
them. The purpose of this
Thanksgiving production
was not only to provide an
entertaining history lesson,
but also to present a more
exact account of the truth.
With the Pilgrims from
Plymouth Colony, we wish
to exalt the name of our
Lord and Savior, Jesus
Christ, and we pray that all
who attended were blessed
by a more accurate portray-
al of the first Thanksgiving.
While we could by no means
tell the whole story, it is
hoped the message "that
it is God Who brought us
here, Who has sustained us,
and Who has provided for
us" was well understood.


Everyone is invited to attend the


Port St. Joe High School

SGA Annual Pie Auction

On Tuesday, Nov. 25at 6:30 p.m.in the Port

St. Joe High School Commons Area.


A variety of homemade pies
will be auctioned by Pie
Auctioneer Eugene Raffield.
Not only do you have the
opportunity to select and
purchase delicious pie
in time for Thanksgiving dinner,
but it is really a fun event
that you do not want to miss.
All proceeds go to the Student
Government Association.


GCCC to offer class schedule in


format based on students' needs


Like most Americans,
college students find that
they are busier thanever.
The shift to non-convention-
al classes, such as distance
learningor weekend cours-
es, has helped somewhat
ease this burden, but has not
solved it completely. From
this need for more class flex-
ibility, as well as from fac-
tors of the recent economic
downturn, Gulf Coast
Community College has
chosen to reformat its on-
campus class scheduling be-
ginning in the spring of 2009.
The conventional aca-
demic schedule, utilized
by GCCC for many years,
consists of classes either
being offered on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday for
fifty minutes each meeting,
or on Tuesday and Thursday
for anhour and fifteen min-
ute meetings. This schedule
required students to attend
campus more frequently and
for shorter time intervals,
which could be a burden
for a student who must fit
the school schedule along-
side work, family, or other
schedules. This old schedule
also provided a "free hour"
where no classes were of-
fered at 10:00 a.m. on Mon-


day, Wednesday, and Friday,
which detracted from the
time that a student could be
in another class instead of
waiting for their next class
to start.
The new schedule being
adopted by GCCC begins
January 8 and students will
have the option to attend
Monday/Wednesday classes
for one hour and fifteen min-
utes and Tuesday/Thursday
classes for the same time
interval.
This schedule will leave
Friday open for extended
classes, such as labs and
higher credit hour courses.
By utilizing this schedule,
most students, in general,
will not have to drive back
and forth to class as often,
which will help them eco-
nomically, and they will be
better able to schedule other
commitments around their
school schedule.
Not only will this new
format provide more flex-
ibility for the student,it will
also allow GCCC to offer
more afternoon classes
which is something that
many students have been
interested in for some time.
This scheduling option will
still provide a version of the


"free hour" from the older
schedule which gives clubs
and organizations time to
meet. Inthis schedule the
"free hour" will take place
on Tuesday and Thursday-
sat 12:30 p.m. and a light
load of classes will still be
offered at that time. All of
the classes available dur-
ing that hour will also be
offered during a different
time during the week so
that students do not miss
the chance to participate in
a club or organization be-
cause of scheduling issues.
According to Dr. George
Bishop, Vice President of
Academic A\I ii ; &
Learning Support, "Gulf
Coast will closely monitor
the outcome of this sched-
uling change and make any
necessary adjustments as
issues arise.
More than anything, we
just want to offer flexibility
and ease for our students
and prospective students."
This change has been great-
ly supported by the GCCC
Administration, faculty, staff.
and the academic council.
and should make attending
college classes much easier
for students within the com-
munity.


4 f.I ...IrI ,,'I -. i ,.r .
i. 1... r



II


nw PI,. M-


* I~E


OWN A BUSINHS%? HCCD HCLP?

ADLICRTIE- HECR!!

CALL 997-1978-


i


I


The Star I B3


School News\-








B4 I The Star


Church news


Thursday, November 27, 2008


Don't wait; come to the Lord before it is too late


Proverbs 15
Soft answer turneth away
wrath. But grievous words stir up
anger. The tongue of the wise useth
knowledge aright. But the mouth
of fools poureth foolishness. The
eyes of the Lord are in every place,
beholding the evil and the good.
Proverbs 1
Don't wait to come to the Lord.
Wisdom crieth without she ut-
tereth her voice in the streets.
She crieth in the chief place of


concourse, in the openings of
the gates in the city. She uttereth
her words saying 'How long ye
simple ones, will ye love simplic-
ity? And the corners delight
in their scorning and fools hate
knowledge?'
Turn you at my reproof: behold,
I will pour out my spirit unto you.
Because I have called and ye re-
fused, I have stretched out my
hand. And no man responded. But
ye have set at naught all my coun-


sel and would none of my reproof.
I will also laugh at your calam-
ity, I will mock when your fear
cometh. When fear cometh, as
desolation and your destruction
cometh as a whirlwind. When dis-
tress and anguish cometh upon
you, then shall they call upon me,
but I will not answer. They shall
seek me early, but they will not find
me. For that they hated knowledge
and did not choose the fear of the
Lord.


They would have none of my
counsel. They despised all my re-
proof. Therefore shall they eat of
the fruit of their own devices, for
the turning away of the simple
shall slay them and the prosperity
of fools shall destroy them. But who
so hearkeneth unto me shall dwell
safely and shall be quiet from fear of
evil.
We must come together and
love one another. Jesus died for us
all. Jesus is coming and you better


be ready when he comes.
Chronicles 7:14
If my people which are called by
my name shall humble themselves
and pray and seek my face and
turn from their wicked ways then
will I hear from heavens and will
forgive their sin and will heal the
land. Jesus is not talking to the sin-
ner but people who live for him.
Mother Mary Freeman
With love for everybody but the
Devil


QUARTET IN CONCERT Obituaries


- M.AL ITT. .' QA ..


EMERALD CITY QUARTET: The Emerald City Quartet will be in concert at 6 p.m. EST Sunday, Nov. 30, at Highland
View Assembly of God. For more information, call (850) 832-0989 or visit www.emeraldcityquartet.com.





A&A hosts Pick an Angel Open House


A&A Homecare Inc. will be spon-
soring its fourth annual "Pick an An-
gel" Christmas Open House from 11
a.m. until 5 p.m. CST Dec. 4. Light hours
d'oeuvres will be served. The public is
invited to come by, greet the staff and
pick an angel off the Christmas.tree.
Each angel will have a local senior
citizen's wish list. Pick one or all items
off the list; bring back gift-wrapped to


A&A by Dec. 15. A&A staff members
will deliver the items to the senior citi-
zen.
A&A asks the public to assist in
this event to ensure the elderly are
remembered during their holiday
season, which can be a lonely time for
those in need.
The A&A office is located at
211 N. State 71 in Wewahitchka.


The "angels" consist of local senior
citizens who reside in the Kinard area,
Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe and the
Beaches.
Last year was a big success, with
all the gifts greatly appreciated.
If you are unable to attend the
open house, you may adopt an angel
over the telephone or stop by anytime
during the month of December.


Franklin W. Chandler


Franklin W.
Chandler, 95,
of Linden, Ala.,
passed away
Monday, Nov. 17,
2008, at Bryan
Whitfield Memorial
Hospital in
Demopolis, Ala.
Services were
held Wednesday,
Nov. 19, 2008, at


CHANDLER


O'Bryant Funeral Home in
Linden, Ala. Burial followed
in Union Cemetery in
Brewton, Ala.
He was born in Marietta,
Ga. His youth was spent in
Holt, Ala. He attended the
University of Alabama.
He moved to Port St. Joe,
Fla., in the 1930s, working
for St. Joe Paper Co. with
the start-up of the paper
mill. He served several
terms as Port St. Joe city
commissioner over the
police department.
Since 1959, he had lived
in Linden, Ala., and worked
20 years for American Can/
James River Paper Co. as
pulp mill shift supervisor. He
was a longtime past member
of Port St. Joe United


Methodist Church
and helped with -
the building of the
present church. He
has been a Mason
in Port St. Joe
Lodge 111 for more
than 60 years. He
was loved and liked
by everyone he met
for he helped and
cared for others.


He was preceded in
death by wife, Phyllis
Chandler; and sister, Francis
McLean.
He is survived by his
wife, Faye Chandler; sister,
Lillian Worth of Tampa, Fla.:
sons, Bob Chandler (Bessie)
of Moundville, Frank
Chandler Jr. (Deborah)
of Northport and Victor
Chandler (Brenda) of Eagle
Lake, Fla.; grandchildren,
Leigh Ann Poole (Phil),
Kathy Chandler, Fred
Chandler (Summer),
Jon Chandler, Summer
Chandler, Lara Chandler
and Paul Chandler; one
great-grandchild, Charlee
Chandler; four stepchildren;
10 step grandchildren and
13 step great-grandchildren.


Jessie Louise Johnson,
75, of Wewahitchka passed
away at her home Friday,
Nov. 21, 2008.
She was born Feb. 19,
1923, in Fountain, Fla.,
and was a resident of
Wewahitchka for more
than 50 years. She was a
very loving mother and
grandmother.
Mrs. Johnson is survived
by her children out of 12,
Minnie Price and husband,
Charles, Idella Williams
and husband, Julian,
Lavon Johnson and wife,
Teresa, Lamar Johnson and


wife, Katrina, and Kenny
Tomlin and wife, Quinda;
numerous grandchildren,
great-grandchildren and
great-great-grandchildren;
and many nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends.
Graveside services
were held at 2 p.m. CST
Monday, Nov. 24, 2008,
from the graveside at
Fountain Cemetery in
Fountain, conducted by
the Rev. Dallas Presley.
Interment followed.
All services were
under the direction of the
Comforter Funeral Home.


Church of Christ
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem


We meet at 350 Firehouse RPoad
Overstreet 850.647.1622


&LALMaly nUmI- IL u2y .JLUU ai. IMMJ
Sunday Worship t-00 am. ESr
Wednday Bhsa Study 730 pjm. ESI
"We are about our Father's business" First Presbyterian Church
Sof Port St. Joe
S508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
Oak Grove Church Reverend Reid Cameron
o;,/, foo, y 4eof,,l/,,,. ,., 0,,. Jo,9 / ^11 Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Come Grow With Us! VIIV Sunday School 11:00 a.m.

Sunday School 9:45 1 W -


Sunday Worship Service 10:45
Wednesday Cafe 5 pm
Wednesday 6:15
Adult Bible Study
Children & Youth Ministries


613 Madison St.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-227-1837
www.oakgrove-church.org
J


Lightning Kills!


When a storm approaches, and lightning is
present:

-Stay away from open high ground and isolated
trees.
-Stay away from water, including lakes and
rivers. Stay off the beach and out of boats.
-Do not seek shelter in a convertible car or golf
cart.
-Stay away from doors, windows and all metal
objects, including pipes and faucets.
-Stay off corded telephones and away from all
electrical devices, like televisions and computers,
iPods, DVD and CD players.


Glen W Williams, 67, of
Port St. Joe, Fla., passed
away Sunday morning, Nov.
23, 2008, at his home with his
family by his side.
He was born in Panama
City, Fla., to John J. and
Sybil Williams and moved to
Port St. Joe in 1966.
Mr. Williams worked for
Florida First National Bank
in Port St. Joe, Fla., until
his retirement in 1991. He
was a member and deacon
of Highland View Baptist
Church of Port St. Joe, Fla.,
and a member of the Lions
Club of Port St. Joe, Fla.
Glen loved to bowl and play
golf.
He was preceded in
death by his father, John J.
Williams; and two brothers,
James and David Williams.
Survivors include his
wife of 45 years, Dorthey
Williams of Port St. Joe, Fla.;
his mother and stepfather,
Sybil and Roy Thomas
of Panama City, Fla.; his
son, Troy Williams and
wife, Chris; his daughter,
Regina Grantland and
husband, John, all of Port
St. Joe, Fla.; his brothers,
Richard Williams and wife,


Pat, Bobby Williams, all of
Panama City, and Harold
Williams of Grand Bay, Ala.;
and his three grandsons,
Austin Williams, Jaden
Grantland and Owen Glen
Grantland.
Funeral services for Mr.
Williams were held at 10 a.m.
EST Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2008,
at Highland View Baptist
Church with the Rev. Dave
Fernandez Officiating and
Mr. Tom Magnum assisting.
Interment followed at
3:30 p.m. at the Glenwood
Cemetery in Chipley, Fla.
Pallbearers for the
services were Lamar
Waymire, Robert Waymire,
Wayne McDaniel, Gary
McDaniel, Darrel Rustin,
Timothy Rustin, David
Waymire, Will Rustin, Chris
Newsom, Kyle Newsom and
David Roche.
Memorial contributions
may be made either to the
building fund of Highland
View Baptist Church or to
any Parkinson's Disease
Research Foundation.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted
and viewed at www.
southerlandfamily.com.


CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS
Singing: 9 a.m. Sunday
Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue


Jessie Louise Johnson


Glen W. Williams


Worsbip gar s as Aw
T c~otrg.Aro in e Baprisir Churr 1jT
lvbe;~w Iwitb gy ckFs,,iejzdsl-4p -a raA t "muursd
B~r sautrScmakyi gE1Em
Wu..mml `I oaumm EEL 77i KtnJ
A umxey Fi -I F wat PM

1601 Tow Ln w mdai t S JIm! FL 9
Fw Mu C Tull.&irn m 2r-.I9 =qHag


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
Siglinb l viel u laptiSt lCjurcl)
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe. Florida 32456
(50))227-1306
Sunda, chool 9:45 a.11
MoIllilll lli 1rl0\ a.m.
Bl.i ing, Scr'\ ice 7:00 p.i ,
Mi IW t frfo, pI)l.cl llcshl p"'rlln.ilnl (,6:00 p1
P I \VcdneIIda) P'lIIayer 7:00 pm.


L Slow Down At
School Crossings!


-.-.Or


'10
.94)
quo


!


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Ch *-qm-- pb-tm G&I. 1 a


IC14'k-l -- I








These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.


FAITH


COMFORTER
FUNERAL HOME
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter
L.F.D.
(850) 227-1818


SOUTHERLAND FAMILY

FUNERAL HOME
507 10th Street, Port St. Joe
(850) 229-8111


Rish, Gibson, Scholz &
Groom, P.A.
William J. Rish, Thomas S. Gibson, Russell Scholz,
PaulW. Groom ll
(850) 229-8211


Thursday, November 27, 2008 w w w. starf l. co m Page B5


Greed


leads


to sin

God made the
world in six days
and everything there
in.
Man came along
and fouled it up with
a three-letter word
called sin.
It's been going
downhill since Adam
and Eve.
Satan started
back then with his
lies to deceive.
Do you remember
stories of old St. Joe,
the most sinful city
around?
God destroyed
it way back then, is
this what you want
for your town?
God rested after
six days, this is what
He told us to do.
Not because he
was tired, He was
thinking of me and
you.
God blessed
the Sabbath and
hallowed it, He
wanted us to rest.
Not a thing was
mentioned about
Mogen David or
even Milwaukee's
best.
I've heard it said
times are changing,
not really so, they're
already changed in
Port St. Joe.
Whoever said
we asked for this
change, surely did
include me.
I know afew
hundred others, too,
so tell me who are
we?
If you add another
day of drinking, who
will foot the bill?
It will be John Q.
Taxpayer, it won't
come out of a bar
till.
The Bible has the
answer for all this,
you can find it in
1 Timothy 6:10.
For the love of
money is the root
of all evil, it comes
under the heading
ofsin.
Billy Johnson


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First United Methodist congratulates confirmation class


The church family of First United
Methodist Church would like to con-
gratulate and welcome the Confirma-
tion Class of 2008. The six members
are Lindsay Furr, Bobby Joe Hanson,
Megan Hubbard, Walt Wilder, Nicole
Windolf and McKayla Woodham.
After weeks of gathering together


under the leadership of Don and
Judy Kosin, they have made a per-
sonal commitment to Jesus Christ
and to the church. Mark 12:20 says,
"Love the Lord your God with all
your heart and with all your soul and
with all your mind and with all your
strength."


Through study, prayer and worship
that is exactly what the Class of 2008
has done.

Thanksgiving dinner
The First United Methodist
Church of Mexico Beach is hosting


a free Thanksgiving dinner for the
community at noon CST Thursday,
Nov. 27 in the fellowship hall, located
on 111 N. 22nd St. The church will be
serving turkey, dressing and all the
fixings. Don't eat alone; come have
dinner with us. For more information,
call the church office at 648-8820.


The Christian CONSCIENCE


It was many years before George
Washington made the First Thanks-
giving Proclamation on Oct. 3, 1789,
that the first Thanksgiving feast was
held.
It was in the fall of 1621, when the
pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians
joined in the first Thanksgiving feast.
It began as a time of prayer, not of
feasting. The pilgrims had lost more
than half of their people during the
voyage across the Atlantic and the
subsequent hard winter. But they had
had a good harvest, and the friendly
Indians had welcomed them and
helped them.
That brings up a question. Would
we hold a feast and give thanks to God
after a year of hardship and the death
of half of our companions? Their story
gives real meaning to the term survi-
vor.
Even though I was horrified by the
much publicized outburst of the Rev.
Jeremiah Wright and still am offended
by the way he said it, I am beginning
to understand what he was talking
about.


America is overcome with the pur-
suit of pleasure and self-serving rath-
er than the pursuit of God and truth..
Make no mistake about it. America ei-
ther will repent or suffer severe judg-
ment. Does anyone think this present
economic mess is just accidental?
Many today in America don't
understand the sins in the Ten Com-
mandments still are wrong and they
include those in authority as well. The
failure to devote a day to God still is
wrong. Murder still is wrong. Idolatry
still is wrong. Disrespect to parents
still is wrong. Desiring what belongs
to someone else still is wrong. Stealing
still is wrong. Adultery and fornication
still are wrong. Many today don't even
know the meaning of these last two
words because they haven't received
this teaching in their schools. In other
words, having sexual relations outside
of a real husband and wife marriage
still is wrong. Even if the majority of
the American people and our Ameri-
can court system say otherwise, it still
is wrong.
The Apostle wrote in 2 Timothy 3:


"But know this, that in the last days
perilous times will come: For men
will be lovers of themselves, lovers of
money, boasters, proud, blasphemers,
disobedient to parents, unthankful,
unholy, unloving, unforgiving, slander-
ers, without self-control, brutal, de-
spisers of good, traitors, headstrong,
haughty, lovers of pleasure rather
than lovers of God, having a form of
godliness but denying its power. And
from such people turn away!"
Does this mean that we are in the
last days? Many who I have encoun-
tered lately think so. This is not the
time to be watching TV or playing golf
on Sunday mornings. Get out of bed
and go to a good church where people
really worship God. If you find it hard
to get up early on Sunday morning,
try going to bed earlier on Saturday
nights.
In addition, it's time to bring back
the real Christmas carols, not the
ones devoted to myths and selfish get-
ting rather than giving. If one more
person asks me what Santa is going
to give me for Christmas, I pray that


God will not let me say something that
I shouldn't.
At the Mexico Beach Christian Wor-
ship Center, we teach the whole Bible,
not just a few verses, and not just an
English translation of the Bible. We
ask people not to serve us, but to
serve the living God. We worship our
Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ,
the Son of God, Savior and Messiah,
and the Holy Spirit, with our praise
and singing. We also demonstrate
our love for one another, and exhort
one another. Our services begin, with
a time of greeting and fellowship at
9:30 a.m. CT Sunday. Worship begins
at 9:45 a.m. After the service, we have
a pot luck luncheon so we can fellow-
ship with one another and exhort one
another. (Hebrews 10:24) We worship
at the Mexico Beach Civic Center on
105 N. 31st St., which is behind the
Beach Walk gift shop just off U.S 98.
God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian Worship
Center
pastor@mexicobeachcwc.com


BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET- Bible Study all ages 10 a.m. ET
Morning Worship 11 a.m. ET Evening Worship 6 p.m. ET
Tuesday: Choir Practice 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in Him."
Please accept this invitation rto join us in worship. God blessyou'
Please call us foryour spirital needs.
www.beachchapel.org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950 Home 769-8725





,FaithBible
C H U R C H
Michael Rogers Pastor
9:45 AM .............. ..... .. ........ ....... Sunday School
10:30 AM ............................................ Fellowship Breakfast
1 1:00 A M ........ ............... .. ... .......... .......... W o rship
6:00 PM .........,.... ............ .... ............................ .. W o rship
www.faithbiblepsj.net
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faith Christian School



St. Peter's Anglican Church
(Tradlitioinl l.piscopal Serv.ice 1928 IlCPT) \ /

Morning Prayer & Holy Communion
Sunday...................8:0 am. I
The Rev. David Mans, Priest
Services being held at tle I united Peniccostal Chulrclh
309 6th Sitreet Por St ,tloe. Il.
".in l'ricI' ttiuin lith In ( hi lun FTin ii- rld"


The friendly place to worship! 7


First Baptist Church
MEXICO BEACH
Locatedl at 823 N. 15th St., Mexico Beacl
Corner of I5th & California 648-5776
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all ages)
Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.I
Please note, all times central!
ReverenE/ili t .a.Foisitain,


First 'Baptist Church
102 THIRD STREET PORT S'IT. JOE
Jerotne Hartnes. Itt't'im cri istor
If tddly ('a.swell, Mtnister w / Altus il'dla, isi.r
.. ABobbhy Alexander, aMlinriMr to St ithrei.ts
New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church
Sunday Wednesday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am Children's Choir................. 6:00 pm
Sunday School ................. 9:40 am Prayer Mceing .................... 6:30 pm
Traditional Service............ 1:00 am Children's Ministry
Aw ana's.............................. 5:00 pm A activities ............................ 6:30 pin
Youth Choir....................... 5:30 pm Youth Ministry Activities... 6:30 pmi
Youth Groups ..................... 6:00 pm
www.fbcpsj.org


++.++ TO KNOW CHRISTAND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN


ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Suttday School 9:45
Chill Care Provided for at 11:00
iuwww.stiaitiesepiscopalchuirclh.org 850-227-1845


Sit UniWted Jietdidi
C- fu 4 -M A ead
111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Methodist Church
Nlsmar PROVIDED
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


"Our Church can be your home"

First Church of the Nazarene
2420( Long Avernue Port St. Joe, florida 32456
(850) 229-9596

Give unto the Lord tie glon dlte {is name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness.
Psalm 29:2


Sunday School............................ 10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m.


f FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and ionumentt Port St. Joe


I asir'oSaatasaiaora'/ 90:0 ()ai.m El,
Jiwiaitaaioal lass sluaja 11:00a,. assET

(sItat 5.-. 30,v isE, I


350) 227-1724
Rev. Mac Fulcher
Pastor
Ann Comforter jeremy Dixon
Music Director Youth Ahnister
Deborah Loyless
Director of C'/ildren Ministries


::,. ,. 5"-it~~~
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B6 I The Star


Thursday, November 27, 2008


Law enforcement


At left, senior team members were, from left, Dylan Hester, Hayley Smith, Alicia Allison and Gauge Combs. At right, junior team members were, from left,
Desiree Outlaw, Elizabeth Cuchens, Tori Lanter and Shown Elia.


Gulf County 4-Hers place high at North Florida Fair


On Nov. 15, Gulf County 4-Hers
participated in the annual Consum-
er Choices and Agriculture Judging
at the North Florida Fair in Talla-


hassee.
The agriculture judging contest
consisted of corn, hay, oats, soybean,
perennial peanut, poultry, beef heif-


ers and beef steers.
Gulf's JuniorTeamplaced second
among 14 teams competing, scoring
1,000 points of a possible 1,200.


NOTICE OF CITY OF PORT ST. JOE CITY
COMMISSION MEETING AMENDING THE
PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT ZONING FOR
A 92 ACRE PARCEL OF PROPERTY
The City of Port St. Joe City Commission
Proposes to adopt by ordinance the following:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, RELATING TO AND
AMENDING THE ZONING CODE; AMENDING THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATION CODE AND ZONING MAP; AMENDING THE
MYERS PARK PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT ZONING DISTRICT: ADOPTING
CERTAIN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MYERS PARK PLANNED
UNIT DEVELOPMENT ZONING DISTRICT TO SUPERSEDE REQUIREMENTS IN
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATION CODE; PRO-
VIDING FOR REPEAL OF ANY CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The public hearing for the adoption of the Ordinance will be held on Tuesday, December
16, 2008 at 6:00 P.M., Eastern Time at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. A first reading of the Ordinance will occur at the same
time and location on December 2, 2008. Copies of the Ordinance are available for pub-
lic inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall located at 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.
The hearing may be continued from time to time as may be necessary.
Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments
in writing to the City Commissioners of the City of Port St. Joe at City of Port St. Joe
City Hall 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Transactions of the
public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made dur-
ing the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure that a verbatim
record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based.
Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk's Of-
fice at (850) 229-8261 ext. 114.
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
By: Mayor-Commissioner
Attest: City Clerk


Gulf's Senior Team placed sec-
ond among 18 teams competing,
scoring 1,008 points of a possible
1,200.


*5 Raffle Tickets
3 day 2 night stay at the Windmark
Beach Resort with a
*200 Gift Certificate to
School of Fish Restaurant.
Tickets Available at: Toucans, St Joe
Rent All and Persnickety.
Drawing December 6, 2008 Benefits Project Graduation



NOTICE


The Board of City Commissioners sitting as
the Planning Board will meet to discuss a
request for a variance on Tuesday, Decem-
ber 2, 2008 at 6:00 p.m. from Hannon's
Insurance Agency regarding placing support
columns on city rights of way located on
Lot 19, Block 9 at 221 Reid Avenue.

All persons are invited to attend this meet-
ing. [Any person who decides to appeal any
decision made by the Commission with re-
spect to any matter considered at said meet-
ing will need a record of the proceedings,
and for such purpose may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceeding is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based. The Board of City Commission
of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not
provide a verbatim record of this meeting.]



IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons needing special accommodations to
participate in this proceedings should contact
Pauline Pendarvis, City Clerk, City of Port
St. Joe, at City Hall, Telephone No. 850/229-
8261.

THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Pauline Pendarvis
City Clerk


Plants


prepare


for winter

When there is a change
in the season, there are
also changes taking place
in plants. In the fall,
deciduous plants lose their
leaves and become dormant
for winter. Evergreen
plants, those
not losing
all their
leaves in the
fall, also are
undergoing
changes,
although you
might not ROY LEE
see signs CAR
of these
changes. County extension
Azaleas director
might lose a
few leaves now. These are
the older leaves on the stem
near the center of the plant.
They turn reddish and drop
from the plant. Do not be
alarmed by the loss of a few
older azalea leaves from
now until spring. However,
if the younger leaves, those
nearest the tip of the shoot,
turn yellow or brown,
there is cause for concern.
Poor drainage, lack of
water or alkaline soils can
cause this condition. Be
sure to keep azaleas and
other ornamental plants
well watered during dry
weather that might occur
from now until spring.
Yellow leaves also are
showing up on camellias,
gardenias, cherry laurel
and sweet olive. Again, as
with azaleas, these are the
older leaves on the stem
near the center of the plant.
It is normal for these leaves
to drop from the plants
from now until spring.
However, do not confuse
scale damage on camellias
for normal aging or leaves.
Scale insects feed on the
lower surface of camellia
leaves, causing them to
become splotched with
yellow.
Although Florida is not
known for exciting fall
color, there are enough
temperate region plants,
especially here in North
Florida, to provide some fall
color. Many of the pigments
that contribute to the-bright
colors are present in leaves
from the time they unfold in
the spring. During spring
and summer, the green
pigment (chlorophyll)
dominates the other
pigments, making green
the major visible color for
vigorously growing plants.
In the fall, the production
of new chlorophyll slows
and is finally depleted while
other pigments become
more evident. The red, blue
and purple anthocyanin
pigments are responsible
for the red and purple color
of dogwoods, crape myrtle
and Chinese tallow.
Lawn grasses also
experience some seasonal
changes. Much to the
delight of most of us,
the growth rate of lawn
grasses decreases in the
fall. Although the slowdown
in growth means less
mowing is required, it
also means lawns will not
be as attractive as they
were during the spring
and summer. Because of
this reduced growth rate,
grasses cannot produce
enough new leaves to
replace the leaves that are
dying naturally or being
damaged by foot traffic. The
end result is a dull, yellow-
green lawn.
Bermuda, Zoysia, Bahia
and Centipede will turn
brown with the arrival
of the first major frost.
St. Augustine will turn
purplish as a result of cool
temperature and light frost.
With freezing temperatures,
St. Augustine grass will
turn brown in unprotected
areas.


Many plants go through
a "hardening process"
with the advent of low
temperatures in the fall.
This process induces a
natural protective device in
plants, making them better
able to survive freezing
temperature.


1 *













Thursday, November 27, 2008


www. starfI1 com


Capital City Bank names Gulf County president


Capital City Bank re-
cently named Ray Thomp-
son as president for the Gulf
County market. Ray has a
wealth of knowledge and ex-
perience in the banking in-
dustry. In his new role, he is
responsible for identifying
and defining new growth
and development opportu-
nities, partnering with other
banking departments, over-
seeing retail banking activi-
ties, demonstrating sales
and service leadership, as


well as serving as a commu-
nity liaison for Capital City
Bank.
"Capital City is pleased
that Ray accepted this posi-
tion," said William G. Smith
Jr., Chairman and CEO of
Capital City Bank Group.
"We are confident in his
abilities to lead this talented
group of associates.
"Ray will continue to
build on a fine tradition
of client satisfaction and
relationship-building in


the community."
Ray is a graduate of the
Florida School of Bank-
ing and holds a bachelor's
degree from Florida State
University. He is cur-
rently enrolled in the LSU
Graduate School of Bank-
ing. During his banking
career, Ray has served in
many capacities, including
vice president and loan of-
ficer for Ameris Bank, vice
president for Coastal Com-
munity Bank and director


of associate product de-
velopment for the Florida
Bankers Association. Ray
has also held the position
of operations manager for
the family-owned and oper-
ated business, Bio-Chem
Cleaning Service, Inc. and
served in the United States
Army. Ray is a member the
Crawfordville Lions Club
and a past vice president
and board member for the
Carrabelle Area Chamber
of Commerce.


Southern Resorts Vacation Rentals expands


Southern Resorts Vacation Rentals
is pleased to announce the expansion
of the company into Pensacola Beach,
Florida. While the new office located
at 33 Via de Luna on Pensacola Beach
has an anticipated opening date of De-
cember 8, 2008, Southern Resorts has
already begun marketing the area and
potential rentals through our proven
website and via additional off-line me-
dia.
"Moving into Pensacola Beach is a
natural direction for our company be-
cause of its location and all it has to of-
fer visiting guests," says Mike Shoults,
co-owner of Southern Resorts. "Our
staff is excited to grow the business
and represent even more of Northwest
Florida's Gulf Coast," agrees co-owner
Kevin Veach.
In addition to the short term vaca-
tion rentals, this new Pensacola Beach
office will also offer Long Term Lease
management through sister company
Southern Coastal Management and a
variety of condominium and homeown-
er association services through South-
ern Association Management.


Southern Resorts welcomes new

employee to guest services


Southern Resorts is pleased
to announce the addition of
Georgette Young to its Guest
Services/Property Management
team. As an assistant to the
Branch Manager, Josh Kline,
she will be involved with both the
guests and owners. "As Southern
Resorts grows along THE Beach,
we welcome Georgette to our
team, helping us remain the most
caring vacation rental company
in Northwest Florida", states
Branch Manager, Josh Kline.
Georgette brings extensive
Industry experience to Southern
Resorts and strong familiarity
with our region. "We are very ex-


cited to have Georgette join our
team in Panama City Beach.
With her expertise as well as
many years in the area, she has
proven to be very dedicated and
we know that she will be very
valuable to our operation", adds
Director of Operations, Marie
Babin.
In business since 1995, South-
ern Resorts represents more
than 500 vacation beach homes,
cottages and condos on Florida's
Gulf Coast in Pensacola Beach,
Fort Walton Beach, Destin,
Beaches of South Walton, Pana-
ma City Beach and the Forgotten
Coast.


Hiram Nix of Port


St. Joe winner of


state football contest


Hiram Nix of Port St.
Joe will be heading to Tal-
lahassee Nov. 29 with four
tickets to the FSU-Florida
football game. Steve Ker-
igan, of Coast2Coast Print-
ing and Promotions in Port
St. Joe said over 500 entries
were received in the con-
test which ran from Oct. 21
through Nov. 20.
Kerigan said the contest,
which was conducted online
and open to the public with no


purchase required, allowed
daily entry and generated in-
terest from a wide area. Nix
was selected at random and
announced on the air Nov. 20
by "The Colonel" Billy D of
Oyster Radio.
Coast2Coast Printing and
Promotions Inc. is a local
leader providing innovative
graphic design, specialty
printing, logo apparel and
signs with customers from
Carrabelle to Panama City.


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8B e THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2008 Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


ANNOUNCEMENTS
1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130- Adoptions
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160- Lost
1170 -Found


1100
9015S
NOTICE
OF SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT PURSUANT
TO A FINAL JUDGEMENT
ISSUED IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF LEON
COUNTY DATED JULY 23,
2008 IN THE CAUSE
WHEREIN CAPITAL CITY
BANK WAS PLAINTIFF,
AND SUNSET HARBOR
OF MEXICO BEACH, LLC;
PATRICIA K. HARDMAN,
INDIVIDUALLY; SHARON
F. GRIFFITH, INDIVIDU-
ALLY; KENNETH L.
CROWDER, SR., INDIVID-
UALLY; AND LINDA C.
CROWDER, INDIVIDU-
ALLY WAS DEFENDANTS
BEING CASE NO.
2008-CA-0345.

I, JOSEPH NUGENT, AS
SHERIFF OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA WILL
HAVE LEVIED UPON ALL
THE RIGHT TITLE AND IN-
TEREST OF THE DE-
FENDANTS SUNSET HAR-
BOR OF MEXICO BEACH,
LLC, PATRICIA K.
HARDMAN, INDIVIDU-
ALLY; SHARON F GRIF-
FITH, INDIVIDUALLY; KEN-
NETH L. CROWDER, SR.,
INDIVIDUALLY AND LINDA
C. CROWDER, INDIVIDU-
ALLY IN THE INTEREST
OF LOT 63-A, BLOCK B,
CAPE BREEZES SUBDIVI-
SION, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: COM-
MENCE AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF LOT 1,
BLOCK B OF CAPE
BREEZES, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 23 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA;
THENCE ALONG THE
EAST LINE OF SAID LOT
1, SOUTH 18 DEGREES
13 MINUTES 18 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 360.74 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE CON-
TINUE ALONG SAID LINE,
SOUTH 18 DEGREES 18
SECONDS EAST, 56.66
FEET; THENCE LEAVING
THE EAST LINE OF SAID
LOT 1, NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES 41
SECONDS WEST, 178.05
FEET TO A POINT BEING
ON THE ARC OF A
NON-TANGENT CURVE
CONCAVE TO 'THE
NORTHEAST; THENCE
NORTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-
WAY, ALONG THE ARC
OF SAID CURVE, HAVING
A RADIUS OF 11409.1559
FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE
OF 00 DEGREES .17 MIN-
UTES 10 SECONDS, AN
ARC LENGTH OF 56.97
FEET (CHORD TO SAID
CURVE BEARS NORTH 19
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 27
SECONDS WEST 56.97
FEET); THENCE LEAVING
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY,
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 18
MINUTES 41 SECONDS
EAST, 178.98 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.

AND ANOTHER PARCEL
DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: PARCEL "B":
BEGIN AT AN IRON PIPE
MARKING THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF CAPE
SAN BLAS GULFSIDE
AND BAYSIDE, A SUBDI-
VISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 24-B OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING
ON THE NORTHEAST
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF COUNTY
ROAD NO. 30-E. FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINN-
ING AND LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY, RUN NORTH 69 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES 14
SECONDS EAST 762.74
FEET TO THE APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF ST. JO-
SEPH BAY, THENCE RUN
NORTH 17 DEGREES 29
MINUTES 33 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID MEAN
HIGH WATER LINE 48.43
FEET, THENCE LEAVING
SAID MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE RUN SOUTH 69 DE-
GREES 55 MINUTES 05
SECONDS WEST 765.07
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #7160) LYING
ON THE NORTHEAST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF COUNTY
ROAD NO. 30-E, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 20 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES 55
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 50.56 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. CONTAINING 0.87
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
AND ON THE 1ST DAY OF
DECEMBER, 2008 AT THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE
GULF COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE IN PORT ST. JOE,
FLORIDA AT THE HOUR
OF 11:00 A.M. E.S.T OR
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, I


WILL OFFER SAID PROP-


ERTY AT PUBLIC OUTCRY
AND WILL THE SAME, TO
THE HIGHEST BIDDER
OR BIDDERS FOR CASH.
THE PROCEEDS TO BE
APPLIED AS FOR AS MAY
BE TO THE PAYMENT OF
COSTS AND SATISFAC-
TION OF THE ABOVE DE-
SCRIBED EXECUTION.

SHERIFF
JOSEPH NUGENT

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICA WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES THAT
NEED A SPECIAL AC-
COMMODATION TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THE PRO-
CEEDING SHOULD CON-
TACT NO LATER THAN
SEVEN DAYS PRIOR TO
THE PROCEEDING AT
850-227-1115
November 6, 13, 20, 27,
2008

9014S
NOTICE
OF SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT PURSUANT
TO A FINAL JUDGMENT
ISSUED IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF LEON
COUNTY DATED
FEBRURAY 28, 2008 IN
THE CAUSE WHEREIN
CAPITAL CITY BANK WAS
PLAINTIFF, AND C.H.
PROPERTIES LLC, CQ
DEVELOPMENT'S LLC,
JAMES A. COX, INDIVIDU-
ALLY: JEFFERY
HARTLINE, INDIVIDUALLY,
ALAN T. STEWART, INDI-
VIDUALLY WAS DEFEND-
ANTS BEING CASE NO.
2007-CA 003419.

I, JOSEPH NUGENT, AS
SHERIFF OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA WILL
HAVE LEVIED UPON ALL
THE RIGHT TITLE AND IN-
TEREST OF THE DE-
FENDANTS C.H. PROPER-
TIES, LLC: CQ DEVELOP-
MENTS, LLC, JAMES A
COX INDIVIDUALLY, ALAN
T. STEWART, INDIVIDU-
ALLY IN THE INTEREST
OF LOTS 26, 27, 28, 29,30
AND 31 OF OCEAN
HAVEN A' CAPE SAN
BLAS ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4 PAGE(S) 47, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA AND ON THE 1st of
DECEMBER, 2008 AT THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE
GULF COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE IN PORT ST. JOE,
FLORIDA, AT THE HOUR
OF 11:00A.M. E.S.T. OR
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, I
WILL OFFER SAID PROP-
ERTY AT PUBLIC OUTCRY
AND WILL THE SAME,
SUBJECT TO ALL PRIOR
LIENS, ENCUMBRANCES
AND JUDGEMENTS, IF
ANY TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDERS FOR CASH, THE
PROCEEDS TO BE AP-
PLIED AS FOR AS MAY BE
TO THE PAYMENT OF
COSTS AND SATISFAC-
TION OF THE ABOVE DE-
SCRIBED EXECUTION.

SHERIFF
JOSEPH NUGENT

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICA WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES THAT
NEED A SPECIAL AC-
COMMODATION TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THE PRO-
CEEDING SHOULD CON-
TACT NO LATER THAN
SEVEN DAYS PRIOR TO
THE PROCEEDING AT
850-227-1115

9139S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WILMINGTON TRUST
COMPANY NOT IN ITS IN-
DIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT
SOLELY AS TRUSTEE
FOR THORNBURG
2005-3,
Plaintiff,

vs.


TIMOTHY A.
al,
Defendantss.


HAYNES, et


CASE NO. 07-481 CA
DIVISION

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated October
27, 2008 and entered in
Case No. 07-481 CA of the
Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in
and for GULF County, Flor-
ida wherein WILMINGTON
TRUST COMPANY NOT IN
ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPAC-
ITY BUT SOLELY AS
TRUSTEE FOR THORN-
BURG 2005-3, is the Plain-
tiff and TIMOTHY A.
HAYNES; DAVID R.
HAYNES; JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, N.A.;
DUNES CLUB OF CAPE
SAN BLAS CONDOMIN-
IUM ASSOCIATION, INC.;
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at LOBBY
OF THE GULF COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 18th day
of December, 2008, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment:

CONDOMINIUM UNIT 9,
THE DUNES CLUB OF
CAPE SAN BLAS, TO-
GETHER WITH AN UNDI-


VIDED INTEREST IN THE
COMMON ELEMENTS,
ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF CON-
DOMINIUM THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 303,
PAGE 283 AS AMENDED
FROM TIME TO TIME OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF GULF COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.

A/K/A 1094 CAPE SAN
BLAS ROAD, PORT SAINT
JOE, FL 324560000

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October 31, 2008.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Gulf
County Courthouse
#850-229-6113 (TDD)
November 20, 27, 2008

9164S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY
CIRCUIT CIVIL CASE NO.
07-431-CA

WACHOVIA BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION,
formerly known as First
Union National Bank, suc-
cessor by merger with
First Union National Bank
of Florida,
Plaintiff,

v.

DONNA D. HARCUS n/k/a
Donna Stoppelbein; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
DONNA D. HARCUS n/k/a
Donna Stoppelbein;
JANE/JOHN DOE, ficti-
tious names representing
tenants in possession; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DE-
FENDANT TO THIS AC-
TION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO THIS DE-
FENDANT TO THIS AC-
TION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated October
27, 2008, and entered in
Case No. 07-431-CA of the
Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the
Front Door of the Gulf
County Courthouse, 1000
Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 11th day
of December, 2008, the
following described as set
forth in said Summary Fi-
nal Judgment:

Commence at the
Nothwest corner of the NE
1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Sec-
tion 24, Township 4 South,
Range 10 West, a shown
on the official plat of
BRITT'S SUBDIVISION
UNIT ONE, as filed in Plat
Book 2, page 14, public
records of Gulf County,
Florida, and run West
along the North boundary
of said Britt's Subdivision
for 26.62 feet; from this
point extend a line South
along the West boundary
of said Britt's Subdivision
for 276.86 feet for Point of
Beginning; thence con-
tinue the line last above
described a distance of
267.00 feet to a point;
thence turn 89 deg. 14'41"
right for 165.17 feet to a
point on the East bound-
ary line of Lake Alice Addi-
tion to the City of
Wewahitchka, said point
also being on the East
right-of-way line of Lake
Avenue or W Second St.;
thence turn 90 deg. 42'21"
right and extend a line
North along said
right-of-way line for 267.00
feet; thence turn 79' deg.
55'19" right, for 168.24 feet
more or less to the Point of
Beginning. This parcel of
land is in the SW 1/4 of
Section 24, Township 4
South, Range 10 West, in
the City of Wewahitchka.
Gulf County, Florida;
TOGETHER WITH 1978
Mobile Home- ID#
FS56VD3FB5007GA and
FS56VD3FB5007GAA
TOGETHER WITH all of
the improvements now or
hereafter erected on the
property, and all ease-
ments rights, appurte-
nances, rents, royalties,
mineral, oil and gas rights
and profits, water rights
and stock and all fixtures
now or hereafter attached
to the property.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SAKE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE


OF THE LIS PENDENS


1 1100
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS
AFTER THE SALE.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court on
October 28, 2008.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons with disabilt-
ies needing a special ac-
commodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding
should contact the individ-
ual or agency sending no-
tice no later the seven
days prior to the proceed-
ing. If hearing impaired,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or
Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770,
Via Florida Relay Service.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hymsith
Deputy Clerk
November 27, December
4, 2008

9196S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JENNIFER M. BURKE, et
al,
Defendants

CASE NO.:
23-2008-CA-000218

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
JENNIFER M. BURKE
Last Known Address:
142-A N Hwy 71,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465;
511 S Second Street,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
and 14809 Heronglen
Drive, Lithia, FL 33547
Current Residence:
Unknown

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JENNIFER M. BURKE
Last Known Address:
142-A N Hwy 71,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465;
511 S Second Street,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
and 14809 Heronglen
Drive, Lithia, FL 33547
Current Residence:
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

Commence at a '/2 inch
iron rod and cap (LB 732)
marking the Southeast cor-
ner of lands described in
Official Record Book 355,
Page 102 and 103 of the
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida said point
being the intersection of
the Northerly right of way
boundary of Chipola Ave-
nue with the Westerly right
of way boundary of Sec-
ond Street and run thence
North 01047'33" East along
said Westerly right of way
boundary, a distance of
404.84 feet to a 1/z inch
iron pipe marking the
Southeast corner of lands
described in Official Rec-
ord Book 266 at pages
427-420 (Parcel 5) of said
Pubic Records; thence
continue North 0147'33"
East along said Westerly
right of way boundary, a
distance of 111.00 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
From said Point of Beginn-
ing. thence continue North
0147'33" East along said
Westerly right of way
boundary, a distance of
113.34 feet to the South-
erly right of way boundary
of East Church Avenue;
thence North 89'47'19"
West along said Southerly
right of way boundary, a
distance of 172.78 feet to
the Easterly boundary of
lands described in Deed
Book 34 at page 610 of
said Public Records;
thence South 03,12'26"
West along Said Easterly
boundary, a distance of
226.73 feet; thence North
89026'53" East, a distance
of 23.46 feet to the South-
west corner of the afore-
said lands described in Of-
ficial Record Book 266 at
pages 427-429; thence
along the Westerly and
Northerly boundary of said
lands as follows: thence
North 010047'33" East. a
distance of 111.00 feet;
thence North 89030'49"
East, a distance of 155.00
feet to the print of Beginn-
ing.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson,
PA., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE
120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
33309 no or before De-
cember 19, 2008, a date
which is within thirty (30)
days after the first publica-
tion of this Notice in THE
STAR and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

in accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this


1100
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
10th day of November,
2008.

Rebecca Norris
As Clerk of the Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
November 20, 27, 2008

9147S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

BANCO POPULAR NORTH
AMERICA,
Plaintiff,

vs.

TOMKIM, INC. d/b/a NA-
TIONAL SHUTTERS,
TOMMY M. ANDERSON
and KIMBERLY A. AN-
DERSON,
Defendants,
Case No. 08-02-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that pursuant to the
Final Judgment entered in
the above-captioned ac-
tion on the 3rd day of No-
vember, 2008, I1 will sell the
property situated in Or-
ange County, Florida,
more particularly de-
scribed on the attached
Exhibit A, at public sale, to
the highest bidder, for
cash, at the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, FL, 32456 at 11:00
a.m. on Decembe 18,
2008.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale. The
court, in its discretion, may
enlarge the time of the
sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale. The
court, in its discretion, may
enlarge the time of the
sale. Notice of the
changed time of sale shall
be published as provided
herein.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court on
November 4, 2008.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

EXHIBIT "A'
Commence at a nail mark-
ing the Northwest corner
of Section 30, Township 8,
South, Range 10 West,
Gulf County, Florida and
run thence South 00 de-
grees 13 minutes 29 sec-
onds East, a distance of
32.18 feet; thence South
89 degrees 44 minutes 04
seconds, a distance of
15.84 feet to the Easterly
right of way line of Cessna
Drive; thence South 00 de-
grees 01 minutes 11 sec-
onds West along said
Easterly right of way line, a
distance of 261.96 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence con-
tinue North 89 degrees 42
minutes 15 seconds East,
a distance of 194.42 feet;
thence South 00 degrees
01 minutes 45 seconds
East, a distance of 112.00
feet; thence South 89 de-
grees 42 minutes 15 sec-
onds West, a distance of
194.45 feet to the afore-
said Easterly right of way
line; thence North 00 de-
grees 00 minutes 50 sec-
onds West along said
Easterly right of way line, a
distance of 112.00 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. Containing 0.50 acre,
more or less.
November 27, December
4, 2008

9199S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

IN RE: The Estate of
PAUL WILLIAM GROOM,
deceased.

Case No.: 08-72 PR
IN PROBATE

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

TO ALL PERSONS HAV-
ING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE:

The administration of the
estate of Paul William
Groom, deceased, File
Number 08-72-PR is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Gulf County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
Gulf County Courthouse,
1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and that
personal representative's
attorney are set forth be-
low.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:

All creditors of the dece-


1100
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is served within
three months after the date
of the first publication of
this notice must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the estate of the
decedent must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is No-
vember 20, 2008.

Personal Representative:
PAUL W. GROOM II
PO Box 39
Port St. Joe, FL
32457-0039
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
PAUL W. GROOM, II
RISH, GIBSON, SCHOLZ
& GROOM, PA.
116 Sailors Cove Dr.
PO Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457
(850) 229-8211
FL BAR NO.: 0037915
November 20, 27, 2008

9210S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

ROBERT V. BISHOP, JR.,
et al, Defendants.

CASE NO.:
23-2008-CA-000396

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
ROBERT V BISHOP JR.
Last Known Address: 703
16th St., Port St, Joe, FL
32456
Current Residence Un-
known

DORIS M. BISHOP
Last Known Address: 703
16th St., Port St. Joe, FL
32456
Current Residence
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

LOT TEN (10) AND THE
EASTERLY 12 1/2 FEET
OF LOT ELEVEN (11),
BLOCK 83, UNIT #1, ST
JOSEPH'S ADDITION TO
THE CITY OF PORT ST
JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORD-
ING TO THE OFFICIAL
PLAT ON FILE IN THE OF-
FICE OF CLERK OF CIR-
CUIT COURT, GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN
PLAT BOOK 1, AT PAGE
28. THE EASTERLY 12 1/2
FEET OF LOT 11 IS MORE
PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS;
BEGIN AT THE NORTH-
WESTERLY CORNER OF
LOT 10, BLOCK 83, AND
RUN SOUTH 70 DEG. 46'
WEST ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY LINE
OF LOT 11, AND SOUTH
BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT
9, 12 1/2 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE SOUTH
19 DEG. 14' EAST PARAL-
LEL WITH THE WEST-
ERLY BOUNDARY LINE
OF 16TH STREET 165
FEET; THENCE NORTH 70
DEG. 46' EAST 12 1/2
FEET TO THE SOUTH-
WESTERLY CORNER OF
SAID LOT 10; THENCE
NORTH 19 DEG. 14' WEST
ALONG THE WESTERLY
BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID
LOT 10, 165 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson,
PA., Attorney for Plaintiff
whose address 49th
STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE, FL 33309
on or before December 19,
2008, a date which is
within thirty (30) days after
the first publication of this
Notice in the THE STAR
and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before Service on
Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities.
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
12th day of November,


1100
2008.

Rebecca Norris
As Clerk of the Court
By Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
November 20, 27, 2008

9074S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

SHERRI M. FOREMAN,
Petitioner
and
SIDNEY T FOREMAN,
Respondent.

Case No.: 08-504DR

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MAR-
RIAGE

TO: Sidney T Foreman
424 Spruce Ave
Wewahitchka, FL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed
against you and that you
are required to serve a
copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on
Sherri M. Matthews Fore-
man whose address is
8880 Lighthouse Ave Port
St. Joe, FL 32456 on or
before December 5, 2008,
and file the original with
the clerk of this Court at
1000 Cecil Costin Blvd.
Port St Joe, FL 32456, be-
fore service on Peitioner
or immediately thereafter.
If you fail to do so, a de-
fault may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, in-
cluding orders, are availa-
ble at the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court's office. You
may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office
notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915)
Future papers in this law-
suit will be mailed to the
address on record at the
clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules
of Procedure, requires cer-
tain automatic disclosure
of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, includ-
ing dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
November 13, 20, 27, De-
cember 4, 2008

9265S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 08- 77 PR
IN PROBATE

IN RE: The Estate of
MARIE J, COSTIN,
deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

TO ALL PERSONS HAV-
ING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE:

The administration of the
estate of MARIE J.
COSTIN, deceased, File
Number 08-77 PR is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for
Gulf County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address
of which is Gulf County
Courthouse, Probate Divi-
sion, 1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Boulevard, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. The
name and address of the
personal representative
and that personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is served within
three months after the date
of the first publication of
this notice must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the estate of the
decedent must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is
November 27, 2008.

Personal Representative:
ANN M. STRAIT
106 Westcott Circle
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
THOMAS S GIBSON
RISH, GIBSON, SCHOLZ
& GROOM, PA.
116 Sailor's Cove Drive
R O. Box 39
Port St. Joe. Florida 32457
(850) 229-8211
FL BAR NO. 0350583
November 27, December
4, 2008


S1100
9156S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A. AS OF TRUSTEE
FOR THE HOLDERS OF
HARBORVIEW 2006-12,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JAMES A. COX, et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.
23-2008-CA-000227

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated October
27, 2008 and entered in
Case No.
23-2008-CA-000227 of the
Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in
and for GULF County, Flor-
ida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, N.A. AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE
HOLDERS OF HAR-
BORVIEW 2006-12, is the
Plaintiff and JAMES A.
COX; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JAMES A.
COX; CATHERINE S. COX;
S E A G R A S S
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INCORPORATED;
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at LOBBY
OF THE GULF COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 11th day
of December, 2008, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment:

LOT 5, BLOCK B OF
SEAGRASS, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 5, PAGE 1, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

A/K/A 220 SEAGRASS
CIRCLE, CAPE SAN BLAS,
FL 32456

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October 28, 2008.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Gulf
County Courthouse
#850-229-6113 (TDD)
November 20, 27, 2008
9302S
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN

That the Gulf County
Board Of County Commis-
sioners will hold a public
hearing to consider adop-
tion of the ordinance with
the following title:

AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
ING GULF COUNTY ORDI-
NANCE NUMBER 2005-24
RELATING TO THE REGU-
LATION, LICENSING,
VACCINATION, CONFINE-
MENT, CLASSIFICATION
AND DISPOSAL OF CATS
AND DOGS IN GULF
COUNTY, PROVIDING
FOR DEFINITIONS, CITA-
TIONS, ENFORCEMENT
AND PENALTIES FOR VI-
OLATIONS, PROVIDING
FOR REPEAL OF ORDI-
NANCES IN CONFLICT
AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.

The public hearing will be
held during the Gulf
County Board of County
Commissioner's meeting
on Tuesday, December 9,
2008 at 9:00 a.m. E.T in
the County Commission-
er's meeting room in the
Robert M. Moore Adminis-
tration Building, Gulf
County Courthouse Com-
plex, Port St. Joe, Florida.

All interested persons may
appear and be heard with
respect to the proposed
Ordinance. In accordance
with Americans with Disa-
bilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion or an interpreter to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Lynn
Lanier, Deputy Administra-
tor, County Administrator's
office at (850) 229-6111, at
least two days prior to the
date of the hearing.

A copy of the proposed
Ordinances are available
for inspection on weekday
between the hours of 9:00
a.m. E.T., and 5:00 p.m.,
E.S.T at the office of the
Clerk of Court, Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 C.G.
Costin, Sr., Blvd. Room
148, Port St. Joe, Florida,
32456.

BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS, GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY: BILLY E. TRAYLOR
ATTEST: REBECCA L.
NORRIS, CLERK
November 27, December


F 1100 I
1100
9248S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-443 CA

IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
2000 DODGE CARAVAN
#2B4GP2437YR735082,
and $ 166.00 U.S. CUR-
RENCY

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
PROCEEDINGS

TO ALL PERSONS OR EN-
TITIES HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHTTITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE ABOVE DE-
SCRIBED PROPERTY
which was seized on Au-
gust 16, 2008 in Gulf
County, Florida by the Gulf
County Sheriff's Office,
who presently has custody
of it. YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action for forfeiture
has been filed against the
above described property
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
on Alton Paulk, Attorney
for the Gulf County
Sheriffs Office, whose ad-
dress is PO. Box 1717,
Lynn Haven, Florida,
32444 on or before De-
cember 20, 2008, and file
the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before
service on attorney for the
Gulf County Sheriff's Office
or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the Court
Gulf County Court House
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
By: Cindy Tidwell
Deputy Clerk
November 20, 27, 2008


9305S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

FLAGSTAR BANK, F.S.B.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JAMES J. MCCORVEY
A/K/A JAMES J.
MCORVEY et. al.
Defendants.

CASE NO. 08-104 CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated November 17, 2008,
and entered in Case No.
08-104 CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for
GULF County, Florida,
wherein Flagstar Bank,
F.S.B., is a Plaintiff and
JAMES J. MCCORVEY
A/K/A JAMES J.
MCORVEY; DIXIE M.
MCCORVEY A/K/A DIXIE
M. MCORVEY; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JAMES J.
MCCORVEY A/K/A JAMES
J. MCORVEY AS OF
10/18/07; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DIXIE M.
MCCORVEY A/K/A DIXIE
M. MCORVEY AS OF
10/18/07; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2 are the De-
fendants. I will .sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at, at 11:00 a.m.
(EST) on January 8, 2009,
the following described
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to
wit:

LOT 10, OAK GARDENS
SUBDIVISION, UNIT II AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGE 20, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

REBECCA L. NORRIS
As Clerk of the Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk

Dated this 18th day of No-
vember, 2008.

IMPORTANT

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 8502296111,
1000 C. G. COSTIN BLVD.
RM. 302 PORT ST JOE
FL, 32456. If hearing im-
paired, contact (TDD)
8009558771 via Florida
Relay System.

Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road,
Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
November 27, December
4, 2008


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


8B 0 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2008


4,2008 1









Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 20080 9B


9306S the seal of this Court this Dagger Kayak, $300, 3 Medic '/Health
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 10th day of November, Camera surveillance $300,
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL 2008. 11 ft tanned alligator skin, Career Service
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR and skull $800. plus more Fiscal Assistant I
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Rebecca Norris items
CIVIL DIVISION As Clerk of the Court The Gulf County Health
By: Jasmine Hysmith Like New!!! Department has one open-
AURORA LOAN SER- As Deputy Clerk or a ull-time, Career
VICES, LLC, November 27, December Camping gear. Men's 26 ng for a fulltime, Career
PlaintiffCES, 2008 bike. 29 gallon fish tank Service (benefits assigned)
Plaitiff, 4,2008 Call 229-9520 for info Fiscal Assistant I based in
the Port St. Joe facility.
vs. 9314S Fingerprinting and O/T
NOTICE OF INTENT Due To Emergency Duties
JENNIFER M. BURKE, et TO VACATE PLAT Required. More than two
al, years medical billing ex-
Defendants. The undersigned, being perience required. Annual
the owner in fee simple of Salary Range: $18,720.00 -
CASE NO.: the property described as $22,500.00. For informa-
23-2008-CA-000218 Parkview at Secluded tion pertaining to this posi-
Dunes according to the tion, contact Lesia Hatha-
NOTICE OF ACTION plat thereof recorded in the EMPLO.MENf way at (850) 227-1276, ext.
public records of Gulf 149. Closing date is De-
TO: County, Florida at Plat 4100 Help Wanted cember 9, 2008.
JENNIFER M. BURKE Book 6, page 7, hereby 4130 Employment
Last Known Address: gives notice of his intent to Information This Agency is accepting
142-A N Hwy 71, apply to the Gulf County electronic applications
Wewahitchka, FL 32465; Commission to vacate said e only for this position. Re
511 S Second Street, plat. fer to Requisition Number
Wewahitchka, FL 32465 4100 64081367.
and 14809 Heronglen William Simpson tm r r-
Drive, Lithia, FL 33547 November 27, December Customer Serv Apply at:
4, 2008 ice peoplefirst.myflorida.com
Current Residence Payday Loan Company, for assistance, contact:
Unknown safe clean environment, no People First at
cash in store, some com- 877-562-7287
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF puter exp., will train, room
JENNIFER M. BURKE for advancement. Good An Equal
Last Known Address: starting pay, Call Opportunity/Affirmative Ac-
142-A N Hwy 71, 850-229-2501 or 206 W. tion Employer
Wewahitchka, FL, 32465; Hwy 98.
511 S Second Street,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
and 148809 Heronglen Is_&g .IMA I ,
Drive, Lithia, FL 33547 2100 Pets Other
2110 Pets: Free to Food Service/Hospitality
Current Residence Good Home Attention!!!
Unknown 2120 Pet Supplies OPS Housekeeper Home Computer work!!!,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that Supplies Needed to clean cabins Flexible hours, great pay,
an action for Foreclosure 2140 Pets/Livestock and bathhouses, $10/hr. will train, apply online
of Mortgage on the follow- Wanted 40hrs/wk. Weekend req., ww work
ing described property: must have valid DL Apply fromhome.com
at:
Commence at a 1/2 inch St. Joseph State Park,
iron road and cap (LB 732) 2100 CO850-227-1327
marking the Southeast AKC Rottweiler's, Strong Food Services/Hospitaly 4130
corner of lands described Euro Lineage, Will make Earn up to $500 weekly
in Official Record Book excellent working dogs or CUSTOMERS assembling our angel pins
355, Page 102 and 103 of pet's. 2 males, 5 females, 8 CUSTOMERS in the comfort of your own
the Public Records of Gulf wks, MFL-K9, Howard WANTED/ WILL home. No experience
County, Florida said point Creek, 850-827-2701 cell TRAIN reqd. 813-944-3351 or
being the intersection of req'd. Call 813-944-3351 or
being the intersection of 850-340-1395 visit www.angelpin.net
the Northerly right of way The NEW management of
boundary of Chipola GRACIE O'MALLY'S PUB Other
Avenue with the Westerly AND EATERY has ac-
right of way boundary of quired the services of Mystery Shoppers. Earn
Second Street and run Award Winning Chef Wil- up to $100 a day. Under-
thence North 0147'33" Beautiful AKC liam Gillespie and Mark cover shoppers needed to
East along said Westerly Heinemann (of Beach- judge retail/ dining estab-
right of way boundary, a comber's Restaurant) to lishments. Exp not re-
distance of 404.84 feet to a prepare our fresh new rea- quired. Please Call
1/2 inch iron pipe marking sonably priced menu. 1-800-308-4616.
the Southeast corner of Wanted: Past customers to
lands described in Official try dining with us again but -
Record Book 266 at pages Standard poodle pup- no previous experienceMa
427-420 (Parcel 5) of said pies, home raised, vet necessary. Our benefit .a .'.
Public Records; thence docks, dews, shots, package includes: GREAT m -
continue North 0147'33" health certicate. Ready DINNER in a CASUAL AT- INTERVIEW NOW!
East along said Westerly on Dec 14. Accepting MOSPHERE, SPORTING
right of way boundary,a deposits now to hold up EVENTS on 5 TV's, LIVE Monster Match
distance of 111.00 feet to to Dec 24. View at MUSIC most FRIDAYS and assigns a professional
the Point of Beginning. www.palmpups.com or SATURDAYS, and a FULL to hand-match each
From said Point of Beginn- phone 850-508-6865 or BAR. Apply in person at
ing, thence continue North 850-508-3315 2238 County Road 30c (4 job seeker with each
01'47'33" East along said miles from St. Joe) in employer.
Westerly right of way Simmons Bayou starting at
boundary, a distance of 5PM, WEDNES- This is a FREE Service!
113.34 feet to the South- DAY-MONDAY (closed
early right of way boundary Tuesday) or call 229-1779 Monster Match is your
of East Church Avenue; to set-up an appointment. free, one-stop job-
thence North 89047'19" search resource. With
West along said Southerly Hospitality/Tourism search resource. With
right of way boundary, a -.our extensive contacts,
distance of 172.78 feet to Room Attendant we can show your
the Easterly boundary of MERCHNDISE job seeker profile to
lands described in Deed Mainstay Suites in Port St. hundreds of top local
Book 34 at Page 610 of 3100 -Antiques Joe is now accepting ap- o o
said Public Records; 3110 -Appliances plications for an Room At- employers in 300 job
thence South 03012'26" 3120-Arts & Crafts tendant. Candidate must categories. Let us find
West along said Easterly 3130 Auctions maintain flexible schedule, you a job that matches
boundary, a distance of 3140 Baby Items dependability is a must. If your skills, experience
3150 Building Supplies you have an eye for detail and preferences.
226.73 feet; thence North 3160 Business a an efor ei preferences.
89"26'53"-East, a distance Equipment and a passion for service,
of 23.46 feet to the South- 3170 Collectibles We Want youl INTERVIEWNOW
west corner of the afore- 3180 Computers Please apply in person INTERVIEW NOW
said lands described in Of- 3190 Electronics Mainstay Suites for the following
ficial Record Book 266 at 3200 Firewood 3951 E Hwy 98 positions:
pages 427-429; thence 3210- Free Pass It On Port St. Joe, FL
along the Westerly 3220- Furniture EOE.............DFWP BuildingGeneral
along the Weserly and 3230 Garage/Yard Sales
Northerly boundary of said 3240 Guns (Job Code 51)
lands as follows: thence 3250 Good Things to Eat Logistics/Transportation
North 01047'33" East, a dis- 3260 Health & Fitness Building Professional
tance of 111.00 feet; 3270 -Jewelry/Clothing Driver Trainees (JobCode 40)
thence North 89030'49" 3280 Machinery/ NEEDED
East, a distance of 155.00 Equipment NEEDED
feet to the Point of Beginn- 3290 Medical Equipment Construction
ig. 3300 Miscellaneous No CDL? No Problem! (Job Code 47)
ing. 3310 Musical Instruments
has been filed against you 3320 Plants & Srubs Earn up to $900/wk. Home Manufacturing
Supplies weekends with TMC. Com-
and you .are required to 3330- Restaurant/Hotel weekends with TMC. Co- (Job Code 41)
serve a copy of your writ- 3340 Sporting Goods pany endorsed CDL Train-
ten defenses, if any, to it, 3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) ing 1-866-280-5309 Go to www.Emerald
on Marshall C. Watson, ,. a
PA., Attorney for Plaintiff, CoasobsEast.com
whose address is 1800 W'. .,-' or call us at
NW 49TH-STREET, SUITE 3220 a 8 6 -
120, FT LAUDERDALE FL 866-769-5627
33309 on or before De- Twin over full loft bed, "full INTERVIEW NOW!
member 19, 2008, a date bed under/twin bed over" and use Job Code
which is within thirty (30) guard rails, build in 3 Monster Match listed above to
days after the first publica- drawer desk, built in lad- assigns professional complete your job
tion of this Notice in THE der. Full bed on rollers assigns a professionalprofile
STAR and file the original Paid $1500 selling for $700 to hand-match each seeker profile
with the Clerk of this Court OBO 850-229-6773 leave job seeker with each
either before service on msg if no answer, employer. monst
Plaintiffs attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other- : This is a FREE Service! ..................
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the 3230 Monster Match is your A service of
relief demanded in the onst o re
complaint. Estate Sale 111 Heritage free, one-stop job- TheStar
Lane, (S of 20th st off of search resource. With
In accordance with the Garrison) Nov 28, 29 9-5, our extensive contacts,
Americans with Disabilities ANTIQUES, Rattan furni- we can show your P rt St.
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa- ture, washer, dryer, house- job seeker profile to
bled persons who, be- hold items, much more job seeker profile to
cause of their disabilities, hundreds of top local Spa
need special accommo- employers in 300 job
nation to participate in this Dr. Robert King categories. Let us find Prime Retail
proceeding should contact a. ,, Ji
the ADA Coordinator at Dentist you a job that matches 319 Reid Aven
1000 5th Street, Port St. your skills, experience 1350sf occupant r(
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele- 325 Long Ave and preferences. NNN ?
phone (850) 229-6113 317 Williams A
prior to such proceeding. INTERVIEW NOW 1800sf tenant impr
WITNESS my hand and for the following 325 Reid Aven
positions: 4500sf flex space;
Owner Operator 309 Reid Aven
Company Driver: 6000sf renovated
Over the Road gross
Company Driver: 310 Reid Aven
Local Route Delivery 5750sf Suite B; pe
.. Truck Mechanic NNN
TowTruck Driver Office Space
202 Marina Dri5
Go to www.Emerald 202 Marina Dri
680sf- well appoint
Land Clearing demolition, CoastJobsEast.com (Bayside Building)
No Job Too Small Elec. & dirt hauling, and septic, or call us at
Carpentary, low rate due Free Estimates, low prices 310 Reid Aven
to economy, Gulf County Lic & Ins. 850-527-0441 866-769-5627 1116sf Suite C; fin


Only. 850-814-7506 or and use suites and filing/stor
850-814-7316 O ES Job Code 43 322 Long Aven

Golden Rule PET SITTING to complete yourjob 1000sf move-in re
Golden Rule PET SITTING
Psssst, Have any pesky SERVICE. Perfect alterna- seeker profile Warehouse/
"honey do" chores? Small tive to kenneling your 4 110 Trade Circi
home repair's? We'll do legged kids. Referred by 22500sf 12500sf -
them. We are also licensed local vet. Reliable pet -, monster' NNN (incl. water/sei
and insured for lawn sitter/pet owner. Does
maintenance and pressure home visits while you are *** .........* Marketed
washing. 850-258-2463 or away. In business 8 years.
850-258-1215 Call Diana 227-5770 & Dan A service of 850-229-
227-8225 The Star
L~~n-V.lps~~Paa~


Joe Com

ice for Le
Space
ue
a, dylV ic.ijrritelurni
". s '- ,- - .

vements negotiable; $1
'ovements negotiable; $1
uie
corner location; $2500/r
uie
shell space; occupant re

Mue
rfect for clothing furniture


ve
ed office suite; $800/mo

ue
ished office space; lobby
age room; $1000/mo Nt\
7ue
ady; $900/mo gross
Flex Space
e West
PSJ Commerce Park, fl
wer)

Exclusively by:
6373


lE s0iools downtown PSJ

Call us today and let us rent/manage
ex space, $5.25psf/ your property for you!


S 229-2706
d.11 I ii * .


V-- j ^ .' I` '~ . ,'`~: ;i


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2008 0 9B


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


4130 6140 1 6140 7100
POSTAL & GOVT JOB 1 br, 1 ba, furn. $500 + White City, big 3 br 2 ba,
INFO FOR SALE? until, $250 dep. Howard FR decks, 1 block from
Creek Call 522-9515 or boat ramp. $700/mo +
326-0785or 827-2906 dep. Call 647-8722 or Waterfront, Great home in
caution 527-6822 Wewa! 3 br, 2 ba, Built in
caution 2 br, 1.5 ba, Port St, Joe, 2004. $219,000 Call Deb-
C/H/A, laundry room, 10 x ,S bie Holzer Realtor
You NEVER have to pay 25 storage shed, nice 850-774-7999 Prudential
for information about yard, very nice area, $525 6170'. Shimmering Sands Realty
federal or postal jobs. If mo $400 dep, No pets 2 br 2 ba, 2 blks from bch
you see a job C 850-227-6216 fenced in backyard, $600/
"guarantee", contact the mo + sec dep. Pets ok 75
FTC. 3 br 1.5 ba, new carpet w/dep. 478454-7181 7150
The Federal Trade 1911 Cypress Ave. Large 75'x160' lot of left side of
Commission fenced yard with deck. 1742 Cobia Ave lot for rent Stone St. Serious seller,
is America's consumer Great neighborhood near for $300 mo. for camper or special price for quick sell.
protection agency, school. $875/mo. + 1st & RV Call for more info $59,500 obo, 653-8015 or
last mo rent dep. 1 yr 227-9363 or 227-4051 323-0219
www.ftc.gov/jobscams lease. Call 648-8629 or
1-877-FTC-HELP 867-3336 For Rent, clean 14x70 Mo- Vacant Lot
bile Home, 2 br, 2 ba, 125 Crane Dr Port St Joe,
A public service 3 br, 2 ba New home In- CH&A, all electric Call FL, .468 acre lot. Price
message from the FTC dian Pass Hwy C30 $900 850-229-6495 $60,000 or make offer
and The News Herald mo. utilities NOT included Call 850-402 8015
Classified Advertising 850-227-8404 Raltors Welcome
Department
Department Realtors Welcome
-Travel trailer space for IBatlnl
rent, power water and More than your bank.
Century 21 Gulf Coast sewer provided, located in Your banker.
5100 Realty long term rentals Oak Grove, Please call
Make $30 in an hour No available Carr's 850 229-8959 or 340-0339 Vacant Lot
Fees, No Investment, No Townhomes #6, #8, #10 Lot 5/A Cabell Dr., Port St
Risk. Just Sensible Solu- 2 br, 1.5 ba 210 Watermark Joe. .32 acre vacant lot.
tions to Make Ends Meet Way $950 per month, 40 E1 Price $92,500 or make of-
at: www.Netlncome Coronado #3 2 br, 1.5 ba 7100 O fer. Call 850-402-8015.
Solutions.com 731 Hwy 98 $850 per Realtors welcome.
ions.comonth, Destiny #1 2 br, 1 4 Br, 3.5 Ba
ba 115- 40th St. $550 per 111 Cabell Dr., Port St O C, dk
Month, Gulf Point #4 2 br, Joe, FL. 2,668 sqft, 4 bed- W
2.5 ba 7172 Hwy 98 $1000 rooms, 3.5 bath home with More than your bank.
per month, Indian Lagoon pool. Price $410,000 Your banker.
Cottages 3 br, 2 ba SR-30 or make offer.
Indian Pass $850 per Call850-402-8015. Vacant Lot
month, Palmetto Plantation Realtors Welcome Lot 6/A Cabell Dr., Port St
3 br, 3 ba 1120 15th St. Joe, FL..32 acre vacant
REAl ETAT FOR Porch 2br, 2 ba 9135 t offer. Call850-402-8015.
Cockles Ave. $650 per More than your bank. Realtors Welcome
6100 Business/ month, Surf & Sands unit Your banker.
Commercial 30-1 2br, 2 ba 109- 30th St. % 'O"
6110 -Apartments $580 per month, Surf & Drastic Reduction, Beau- IBrt
6120 Beach Rentals Sands unit 42-A & 42-b 2 tiful home site w/ aprx 2 More than your bank.
6130- Condorownhouse br 2ba 121- 42ncd St. acres, on Lake Allison, Your banker.
6140- RHouse Rentals $650 per month, Surf & Wewahitchka $179,900 -
6160 Rooms or Rent Sands unit 42-C 4 br,2 ba 265-3321 or 227-5883 Vacant Lot
6170 Mobile Home/Lot 121-42ncd St. $850. per Unit 207 Lot 6 BLK "K"
6180- Out-of-Town Rentals month, Ponderosa #18 3 Historic Barrier Dunes, Port St
6190 Timeshare Rentals br, 2 ba #18 Ponderosa CtaJoe, FL. .05-.09 M/Lacre
6200 Vacation Rentals Pines Dr. $850 per month, Cottage vacant lot. Price $220,000
Call 850-648-5449 or 850- House for sale by or make offer. Call
l -- 229-1200 for more infor- owner, Apalachicola, 2 850-402-8015.
nation br, 2 ba, historic cot- Realtors Welcome
| 6100 tage. 3 city lots, pool,
Charming 2 br 1 ba, 605 pool house, guest o h Cft
peel house, guest
S Marvin on large lot, total house, privacy fencedB
Americas en $700/m. Rent or yard, Totally renovated, More than your bank.
buy, 850-227-4913 $450,000. Call Your banker.
m__ini _________ 850-323-0028
Gulfaire 850-841-0707 Vacant Lot
St raUnit 207 Lot 7 BLK "K"
Storage Large light and bright 1 br, Mexico Beach Like new, 3 Barrier Dunes, Port St
1 ba garden apartment. br, 2.5 ba, wood laminate Joe, FL..05-.09 M/L acre
(8501 W/D, Tile and Carpet, pri- floors, many extra's work- vacant lot. Price $220,000
vacy fenced with deck, shop, landscaped, Pelican or make offer. Call
229-8014 pool, tennis court, private Walk Real Estate 850-402-8015.
beach. Pets okay. $695 850-647-2473 Realtors Welcome
Climate and mo. 850-639-2690
Non-Climate Mexico Beach, New TH's, a pdt" ty
Control Storage starting at $149,900. Pell- Bink
Units -- can Walk Real Estate, More than your bank.
Bat/RVta850-647-2473 Your banker.
a office space Home for Rent -
Wewa
Dalkieth, 4 bedroom 2 full S oe t in
baths, Fireplace, all appli-
Available Dec. 1st ances stay, 1 acre in the
1000 sq.ft. country. $875 month, $875
Consisting of security deposit.
3-Offices 1-850-639-5566, or
1-ADA Bathroom 1-507-250-0797
500 sq.ft. Warehouse
Key West Style Cottage 2
$850.00/mo Gross br, Totally renovated bath.
Cheerful and clean, Bay
America's views from back deck,
Mini-Storage and close to Highland View E
Office Complex boat ramp. $675 mo.(954) FREE DELIVERY!
850-229-8014
478-451-7761 Mexico Beach very nice 3
478-451-76 br, 2 ba. 313 Hatley Dr.
C Close to beach, $950 mo
+ $500 dep. Call .
706-882-0683
610 Port St. Joe, 3br, 1 ba,
2 br, 1 w be apartments CH&A, fenced yard, w/d,
P2 br, 1 ba, apartments +e utili. Call
Hiland View. Call Phil $800/mo + t
227-2112 or Kenny507-7443530
227-7241 for more info
Charming Updated 2 br Chrysler Jeep Mitsubishi
duplex on quiet Palm Blvd.
Central heat, central air, St. Joe Beach & Used Car Sun ercenter
washer, dryer, dishwasherBeautiful 3 bd 2 ba gulf s
Pet Friendly. Some breed view home, $1300/mo. Call
restrictions. $650 mo. $400 (404)545-2530. Service enter Parts & Accessories
dep. 1 year lease. Availa-
ble now.For appointment 9 `11V C M M So EEM II
404-663-0226 MINI STORAGE C Y S
please call (850) 340-0927MINISTO
Efficiency Rooms. Weekly In Port St. Joe
or monthlyrentalsDown-00 850-785-4372
town PSJ on Reid Ave.
Call Pat @ 850-227-5747 8 888-403-8998
fil814-7400 8911111 111111111111111111111111

6130
Mexico Beach

3 br, 2 ba Townhome, w/d
incl., 1/2 mi. to bch, pool, -
clbhse No Smoking Brian -
404-663-0226


imercial ;;
hase


isrer: $1000/mo
GULF COAST PROPERTY SERVICES, [LLC

1800/mo gross" Have GCPS Successfully

no gross w Rent Your Property For You!,

ady; $4500/mo mod-


a retailer; $3000/mo IW A LDrm 0 rXontApt

1)@* Eagle Landing-

gross (incl. utilities) new,2bdrm
gros 70 LongAvenue-

Sarea with two office ome spacious, large yard
NN IiIe raWra l 7th Street -


~P~BB~B~IB~L~ I_ I






B10 I The Star


Local


Thursday, November 27, 2008


Port bulkhead construction on schedule


Construction continues to
progress well on the port's
new bulkhead project on the
canal by the Tapper Bridge.
The $5 million project will re-
sult in a waterfront improve-
ment where shallow draft
vessels and barges can dock
and transfer cargo.
The Port St. Joe Port Au-
thority, which purchased the
site and initiated this project,
views this as an important
first step toward the bigger
goal of eventual deep water
port development. It also is
an important first step to-
ward accomplishing the port
commissioners' No. 1 goal of
creating well-paying jobs for
the community.
The contractor, GLF Con-
struction Corporation, has
responded positively to the
urging of the port group to
"spend and hire locally." Lo-
cal subcontractors and some
workers have been hired, and
accounts have been opened
with local businesses.
GLF Project Superinten-


dent John Bryant reports
that GLF has benefited from
the good work ethic of those
locals.
"Working with them has
been great; it has been a
very positive experience for
us," he said.
Though most of the
project's cost has been on
specialized equipment and
high-cost steel sheet piling
not available locally, through
the first several weeks of the
project, in excess of 10 per-
cent of GLF's revenue has
been expended locally.
The project continues on
schedule and is expected to
be completed by end of Feb-
ruary.
Port Authority Chairman
Allen Cox stated: "The work
has begun for what will be
an economic legacy for the
future of our community
and region. Many additional
steps will be taken in the
months and years ahead to
establish the port as an eco-
nomic engine."


A ITAl)IUL
BITE OF
INNOVATION


i1"


Port St. Joe's Appliance Source Since 1960,


The Best Quality.
The Best Price.
Whirlpool
Maytag
Amana
KitchenAid
Estate

^k~h...ai


WE WILL HAUL THE OLD APPLIANCE OFF.
ICE ST. JOE HARDWARE CO.
201 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe 229-8028
Hardware Monday-Friday 8:00-5:30 EST
aware Saturday 8:00-4:30 EST. Closed Sundays


TIM CROFT / THE STAR
Warren Yeager,
center, was
honored for
his service as
chairman of the
Port St. Joe Port
Authority with
a plaque and
certificate from
returning chairman
Allen Cox, left,
and Port Authority
executive director
Tommy Pitts.


5 Star
Collision Centre'

MATTHEW SCOGGINS
Owner

Phone (850) 229-STAR
770 Hwy. 98 FAX # (850) 227-9898
Port St. Joe, FL 32456 MVr# 41279


Pool and Jacuzzi Care, LLC
Gulf County and Mexico Beach
Residential & Commercial

-- Harry Paul
Ph: 229-8182
Cell: 227-5820
Bryan Paul
SPh: 639-3942
/ Cell: 340-0734
Lic. & Ins. CPO 32-148993 Locally Owned and Operated



Full Service Marina & Boatyard



Haul Out, Pressure Wash,
Scrape Barnacles, & *Install Zincs

Up to 40'- $300.00
40' to 50' $350.00
Over 50' $400.00
f *Zincs Extra

FREE Boat Bottom condition evaluation
DISCOUNT on Future Haul-outs
We will MEET or BEAT any BOTTOM JOB PRICE!r
Call for Scheduling
Due to HIGH DEMAND Offer Extended
Expires December 1, 2008

Ask about WINTERIZING Your Boat!!
"-5eI- oc I U E
M A A R, I R- E
292 Graham Drive Carrabelle Florida 32322
(850) 697-3337
Email: info@docksidecarTabelle.com


LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS!
CRIBS TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
HIGH CHAIRS CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
TENTS LINENS PUNCH BOWLS
DINNERl4RE BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN



Jon R. Ward, M.D. Heather Wst, M... tI f.. M D
Board Certified P.A. C k' .t.IdC ,'l.i
Dermatologist rn..i



DERM TOLOGY
www.gulfcoastderm.com
Acne Skin Cancer Rashes Warts

160 Lightkeeper Dr. Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850.647.4262
















"WHICH ONE COSTS MORE TO INSURE?"

LAURA RAMSEY, CDY WARD, KARIN CLARK

HANNGN Allstate.
HSANN GN You're in good hands.
INSURANCE


Phone (850) 227-1133


THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT


I want to thank everyone who worked so hard
on my behalf during my recent bid for County
Commissioner District 5. 724 voters believed in
me and my message for a new era in Gulf County
government. I will continue to work in various
capacities to make our community an even better
place to live. You will continue to see me at the BOCC
meetings, taking notes and preparing for the future.


During this season of Thanksgiving, let us pause and reflect on
blessings we enjoy everyday.


the many


/(i F JI Merle Norman
Friday, December 5, 2008 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Special discounts throughout the studio.
Refreshments will be served.
Door prizes will be given away!
315 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe, Fl 229-6600
mERLE noRmRn
ck r nc k dNo ,,c,, tth Io ba-c h indetcca Ip -n o, nd .lc: di ,~'l I
) 2008 M[erle Norm G ....... 1-


I am grateful for the new friends made during the campaign, old friends
who persevered with me, and for my family who supported me unfailingly.
I have been truly blessed and am thankful for living in this little slice of
paradise, in the greatest nation on earth.


Happy Thanksgiving!

P apaibara R adcfi-i
'! Political ad approved and paid for by Barbara Radcliff, Democrat, for County Commissioner District 5.


C~~~~~ih-o' *- ?-::-~s~ :;~~


Serious Injury & Death Cases

Kerrigan
Estess
Rankin
McLeod.
Thompson, LLP
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
202 Marina Drive, Suite 302,
Port St. Joe

229-3333


--~---


tch or
L e tc aA mny A verti'seod Price
Ma 0
on parable m dels!
a


FA TACCCI I




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