Group Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.).
Title: The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03658
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Star
Publisher: Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe, Fla
Publication Date: November 20, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028419
Volume ID: VID03658
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
alephbibnum - 000358020
lccn - sn 95047323

Full Text













YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCt I YJ/


Wiggles winding their

way to Tallahassee


k-J


Thursday, NOVEMBER 20, 2008


www.starfl.com


1.51


CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS
KIDS ON WHEELS: Five children at a Costa Rican orphanage received wheelchairs from District 6940 Rotarians
of Port St. Joe..



The gift of mobility


Port St. Joe Rotarian provides

wheelchairs to needy children
By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Bill Crawford has not rested on his laurels since earn-
ing Rotary International's highest humanitarian honor
in April.
The Serice Above Self Award recipient recently re-
turned from a week-long mission to Costa Rica-where he
distnbuted customized wheelchairs to disabled'children.
Crawford, a 33-year member of the Port St. Joe Rotary
Club. accompanied fellow District 6940 Rotarians Ron
,,. M .:.


Gillette, Clif Payne, Sam Traughber, Doug Reynolds, Ja-
net Westlake and Carl Dickerson to Costa Rica's Central
Valley on Aug. 20.
The delegation visited a home for abandoned children,
run by nuns, and a rehabilitation school for handicapped
students.
Crawford was moved by the living conditions of the
orphans, who had spent most of their lives on a bed or
floor.
"They really are the worst of the worst," said Craw-
ford. "It would tear your heart out. Some of these kids,
they're feeding through tubes, and they've got more
things wrong with them than the law allows." ,
With Gillette taking a leading role, the delegation as-
sessed the needs of 21 disabled children and tailored the
wheelchair designs to suit a broad range of disabilities.
See MOBILITY A2


I


TIM CROFT I The Star
PERSONAL CARE: Marshall Nelson and other Gulf
County residents can receive orthopedic care twice a
month at the Gulf County Health Department in Port
St. Joe.


Yes


can


Interactive gaming
system motivates
students
By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Christmas came two months
early for the Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary School Bridges Class.
On Oct. 21, the lucky students re-
ceived a Nintendo Wii gaming sys-
tem, five interactive games, acces-
sories and a large flat-screen TV
The students were rewarded not
by the jolly patron saint of Christ-
mas but by a group of altruistic resi-
dents led by Bridges Class parent
David Whitfield.
Whitfield, a physical therapist
at the Long Avenue Sacred Heart
rehabilitation facility, discovered


a novel use for the Wii system in a
professional journal.
The Wii (pronounced "wee")
makes video gaming an athletic ex-
perience, using wireless controllers
and motion-sensing technology.
After learning that rehabilitation
facilities were using the Wii to help
patients develop balance and other
fine motor skills, Whitfield saw a
perfect application for the Bridges
Class.
The 13 students in the class, in-
cluding Whitfield's son, Harley, are
all developmentally disabled.
Though their disabilities range
from autism to Down syndrome,
most of the students have difficul-
ties with fine motor skills such as
hand-eye coordination.
To purchase the equipment,
Whitfield staged an impromptu
fundraiser through his charitable
organization, SEED Kids Inc.
The organization, which stands


for Serving Early Education for
Disabled Kids, previously funded a
handicapped-accessible playground
for the elementary school in 2005.
With the help of Port St. Joe Ele-
mentary principal Melissa Ramsey,
Ralph Rish, Carlton Rich, Warren
Yeager and other community mem-
bers, Whitfield raised $2,100 for the
complete Wii system.
Since the Wii's arrival in the
classroom, school physical and oc-
cupational therapists have utilized
games such as Wii Fit, which in-
creases core strength and balance,
as part of their treatment plans.
Wii Fit allows students to select
animated male or female personal
trainers and charts their weight and
progress.
Bridges Class teacher Joni Mock
said the Wii makes therapy seem
more like a game than a chore.
See WII A9


O FREEDOM
EFLORIDA
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Opinion ........................ ....... A4
Letters to the Editor ................... A5
Sports........................................... A10


TABLE OF CONTENTS
O bituaries.................................... B4
Church News............................... B5
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Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET
School News................................ B6 Display ad deadline is Friday 11 am. ET 227-1278
Legals........................................... B10 Classified deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020
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.<' --- *.;:.;- *;:.*^^-^^a-^ rs*^y^aKiisEH~ Jk


50(


-I


I


Another piece


in the health


care puzzle

By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Marshall Nelson was having his right shoulder looked
at by PA Michal Nuccio recently after having had surgery
a couple of months ago..
Instead of driving to Marianna, Bay County or Talla-
hassee to receive orthopedic care, Nelson drove only as
far as the Gulf County Health Department facility in Port
St. Joe.
Nelson is one of the beneficiaries of the ripples caused
by the construction of the new Sacred Heart Hospital
here, benefiting from a collaboration that is providing
color in the growing health care spectrum in the county.
Through a partnership among the Health Depart-
ment, Sacred Heart and Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic,
patients in need of orthopedic care are but a short drive
away from a path to healing.
"We've had a good partnership," said Doug Kent, ex-
ecutive director.of the county Health Department. "It's
provided specialty care in the community, and that has
always been one of our goals."
That goal became attainable through a series of con-
versations among the parties involved and the personal
relationship and skills of Rick Williams, who works for
TOC, lives in the area and helps provide orthopedic care
to young athletes around the county.
TOC has long had a partnership with the Gulf County
School Board to provide care for athletes injured during
the course of any given week. Though budgetary con-
straints have prevented a broad contracted partnership,
Williams and the team behind him have a special affinity
for the county and its young people.

See HEALTH A6






A2 I The Star


Local


Thursday, November 20, 2008


MOBILITY from page Al


Joined by the local Belen Ro-
tary Club, District 6940 members
assembled the wheelchairs, ad-
justed pads, chair backs and har-
nesses and made sure each child
was comfortable.
"Every chair we gave out we
specifically configured to the indi-
vidual who was getting it," Craw-
ford said.
The chairs, purchased from an
England manufacturer for $4,000
a piece, took three to four hours
to assemble and adjust, with the
Rotarians working in groups of
three.
All of the wheelchair recipients
were nonverbal, with the exception
of a young girl who made a lasting
impression on Crawford.
"She had such a wonderful atti-
tude, and she could converse," he
said. "She could tell us if the wheel-
chair was uncomfortable, and she
did. She was a gutsy little bird."
The American delegation left
all the spare parts with the Belen


Rotary Club to enable them to
continue the project for years to
come.
"If one of the children passes
away, they can configure that chair
to the new patient," Crawford said.
This marked the first custom
wheelchair effort on behalf of Ro-
tary District 6940.
Earlier this year, the district
provided standard wheelchairs to
a hospice, hospital and rehabilita-
tion facility in Costa Rica.
Crawford said the 300-bed hos-
pital previously had only 10 wheel-
chairs prior to receiving Rotary's
gift of an additional 10.
"The doctor said they'd be able
to improve patient care by 35 per-
cent with the 10 wheelchairs we
gave them," Crawford said.
Crawford, who lives in Callaway,
operated the Gulf Sands Motel for
25 years after retiring from the Ma-
rine Corps.
For the last six years, he has
traveled to Peru, Costa Rica and


other destinations with the Rotary
Club.
Crawford said he receives as
much as he gives on his philan-
thropic missions.
"You get the satisfaction of try-
ing to give a little back, help peo-
ple," he said. "When you see the
kids, you want to go back and try to
help some more of them."
The work also has an ancillary
benefit. It keeps the 77-year-old
Crawford young.
"People ask me why I do it," he
said. "There's two reasons: The
first is because I can, and the other
one is so I can. If you sit around all
the time, you just vegetate."
Crawford said he is eager to re-
turn to Peru and help the Rotary
Club's efforts at providing resi-
dents with indoor plumbing.
But turkey calls more insistent-


ly.
Next stop: his
Jersey home and
dinner.


family's New
Thanksgiving


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
WORLDWIDE ROTARIANS: Port St. Joe Rotarian Bill Crawford, center,
joins fellow Rotarians from District 6940 and Costa Rica to pose for
a photograph with a young wheelchair recipient.


Everything



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The City of Port St Joe Parks and Recreation Department registration for the winter
basketball League will be held over the next few weeks. Registration forms may be
picked up at City Hall, Washington Gym or at the Public Works Department.
Registration to be held at:
Washington Gym, Thursday December 4th from 5:00pm til 7:00 pm.
STAC House, Thursday November 20th from 5:00 pm til 7:00pm,
Boys and Girls ages 8 to 12 are invited to play winter league basketball. Players must
be at least 8 years old before August 1st in order to play. The registration fee is $25 per
child. A parent or legal guardian will be required to sign the paperwork at registration.
Practice times and locations will be arranged between coaches and parents. Practices
will be held the Washington Gym on Monday, Tuesdays, and Thursdays between 5:30
pm and 8:00 pm.
Practices will begin during the week of December 8th and game will begin on Tuesday
January 13, 2009.
Coaches and referees are needed. If you are interested in coaching or refereeing,
please contact Mike Lacour at 850-774-6446 or Charles Gathers at 850-340-1861.


RUS Bulletin 1780-26
Exhibit D
9/2003

Advertisement for Bids
City of Port St. Joe
Owner
P.O. Box 278
Address
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Separate sealed Bids for the construction of

"FDOT & Utility Infrastructure Improvements for Sacred
Heart on the Gulf Project"

The scope of this project includes.providing water and sewer infrastruc-
ture to the new Sacred Heart Hospital. Additionally, U.S. 98 improve-
ments are proposed as part of this project.

will be received by
City of Port St. Joe

at the office of
SCity Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456

until 9:00 AM, (Eastern Time) November 26, 2008, and then at said
office publicly opened and read aloud on November 26, 2008. at 10:00
AM (Eastern Time).

The Contract Documents may be examined at the following location:
Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive. Port St. Joe, FL 32456

Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the,specified
date will be set at $1,000.00 per day.

Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the "FDOT &
Utility Infrastructure Improvements for Sacred Heart on the Gulf Proj-
ect".

A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held at 1:30 P.M. Eastern Standard
Time on November 18, 2008 at the Port St. Joe Preble-Rish office.

Copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained at the Issuing Office,
Preble-Rish, Inc., located at 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 32456
upon payment of $200.00 for each set.

The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to reject any and all bids. All
Bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening.

All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concern-
ing licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to
the State of Florida.

' 7SS!S lS'3 V :. 4:***?: *** ** *. ,*::' .c: ". Yi. ,a l '.'7c ?^ :,? ^4^~ ^


-- I I -1-1 --.





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A4 I The Star Oinion


Thursday, November 20,2008


OUR VIEW


Referendum Realities
Port St. Joe city commissioner John Reeves hit it on the head
two weeks ago during a debate about Sunday alcohol sales in
the city.
In so many words, Reeves said that a voter referendum was
a politician's way out of a pickle.
A way to avoid the tough decisions and to have the cake with
plenty of icing to eat since there is effectively no such thing as a
binding referendum.
This page stated two years ago that a referendum on Sunday
sales of alcohol should be a non-starter; that elected officials are
voted into office to make the tough decisions, to make choices
too often divisive, to make the difficult calls.
Two years ago, the referendum on Sunday sales was exactly
that, a decision by a majority on the commission to let the voters
make the tough choice they should have made.
Former commissioner Benny Roberts reminded commis-
sioners again and again that the referendum two years ago had
shot Sunday sales down and therefore they would not be repre-
senting the voters to adopt a different stance.
Roberts noted repeatedly that three county commissioners
had held up county-wide voting contrary to what the voters, in a
referendum, had said loud and clear.
City commissioners should adhere to the voters' wishes ex-
pressed two years ago and leave the issue of alcohol sales on
Sunday alone, Roberts said.
This, however, is an example of representative democracy in
action and in this case the majority on the commission has it
right because the issue is also about government's reach.
As Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson noted, Sunday sales
are about providing people a choice. One doesn't have to have
a drink on Sunday, but dictating to all is curbing individual free-
dom, on which this country was founded.
And while there is the argument that a "dry" city on Sundays
is part of what makes the community special, that argument
presumes to cast those in, say, Highland View or Wewahitchka
or White City or Apalachicola as somehow less special, farther
from the top rung.
Additionally, as was offered from the outset by commissioner
Rex Buzzett, there's an economic rationale for allowing Sunday
sales, even if one ignores fundamental individual rights.
More than a dozen small businesses within the city limits
that employ dozens of people and produce millions in revenue
- of which the city gets more than its fair cut could be posi-
tively impacted on the bottom line by being able to serve and sell
alcohol on Sundays.
These are difficult economic times and every predictor indi-
cates things won't get much rosier in the near future.
To state, as one commissioner did, that if businesses can't
make it with six days a week they don't deserve a seventh is to
ignore the realities for too many small businesses these days
- that extra day, any opportunity to generate more revenue,
could mean the difference between red and black ink on the bot-
tom line.
Just walk up and down Reid Avenue and talk to business
owners for proof.
And consider that the county sells itself in part as a tourist
destination, promoting eco-tourism and the sugary beaches
and postcard sunsets. The aim should be to have those visitors
spend as many as their dollars as possible in the community, not
chase them from the city due to government intervention in a
personal choice.
Commissioners are correct to try to promote any economic
viability for small businesses, because Sunday sales are about
an individual freedom and government has no businesses inter-
ceding.
That is the political courage required of representative gov-
ernment. Among the majority, Mr. Reeves pushed the issue two
years ago, Mr. Buzzett brought the issue forward this time and
Mr. Magidson stated his support for Sunday sales on the cam-
paign trail.
They're doing what they believe is best for the city and if, the
next time these commissioners stand for election, a sufficient
number of people believe that is not what best represents the city
there's the opportunity to vote them from office.
County-wide voting is different by degrees.
A vote for at-large voting is to ask commissioners to act
against their personal interests, which is not likely.
Only taxpayers who have watched their property tax bill
bulge this decade and government grow exponentially, have a
personal stake in county-wide voting. Even as the county's pri-
vate sector economy slows, the county grows and takes more
from taxpayers because five fiefdoms are more costly.
Another key difference is that voters have only a one in five
say regarding their representation at the county level. If every
voter in the city had a say in every seat on the commission, then
that would be an important game-changer.
There is common ground between Sunday sales and county-
wide voting; both involve getting government out of people's
lives and pockets while reading from the same page in history
that was turned two weeks ago.
So the bottom line is that county-wide voting will remain until
the sort of political courage shown two weeks ago in Port St. Joe
City Hall suddenly rears its head in the Board of County Com-
missioners meeting room.





THE STAR

USPS 518-880
Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98
Port St. Joe, Fla. 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
News Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Star
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone (850) 227-1278


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.38 year/$15.90 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$33 year/$20 six months
TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damages further than
amount received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully
weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly
convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


KEYBOARD KLATTERINGS




Watching them Blossom


One day, a couple of
years ago, I was watching
Port St. Joe High preseason
fall football practice when
I noticed a blonde pony-tail
flailing around in the air
near the softball field.
On closer look, there
was a young lady firing
strike after strike against a
dugout wall, retrieving the
ball, pounding it in to her
glove a few times as she re-
treated to her original spot
before winding up again.
I thought of that day last
week as Samantha Rich
was signing a college schol-
arship with Jacksonville
(Ala.) State University.
During the signing cer-
emonies, her coach, Coy
Adkins, said words that
should be heard by every
aspiring young athlete in
the county.
Adkins noted that the
signing ceremony was nice,
the 15 minutes in front of
the television or newspaper-
man's cameras a good thing,
but hardly what it was all
about.
Instead, Adkins noted
that this signing, this day
of joy and achievement
for Rich, as good a pitcher
as this reporter has seen
personally in nearly two
decades of covering girls
sports, was years in the
making.
A youngster, Adkins said,
doesn't just wake up one day
during their senior year in
high school and decide to
suddenly play college ball.
There are years of work
on the field or the hardwood
or the wrestling mat, along


with a focus on Joe High School the
earning and main- same week Rich
training good grades, signed seems fit-
that must come be- ting, for Minger has
fore success on the embodied what any
high school playing parent, school admin-
fields can turn in istrator or student
to a look-see from TIM CROFT would want in a-rep-
potential college Star news editor resentative of their
suitors. school personable,
All the re- determined and hard
search points to athletics working.
being one of the last bas- Next year, Minger is
tions of true discipline in destined for Gulf Coast
high schools today and Community College, one
Rich provided a textbook of the top two-year softball
example, Adkins said in so programs in the country
many words, and here's a sawbuck that
Sure, there is innate another two years after
talent involved, but hard that she will be some-
work, during the season where in a Division I uni-
and more importantly dur- form.
ing the offseason, went There have been no
into making Rich the shortcuts for Minger and
pitcher and athlete she Rich, who I have linked
is, possessor of a college to their detriment, may-
scholarship and an oppor- be through four years of
tunity to take her career school.
to another level. In fact, it is incredible
And that young lady I to remember that it was
observed tossing the ball, just four years ago that I
alone, as she sweated was so impressed by the
and tracked her form two of them as freshmen,
and stayed focused in athletically talented but
the broiling heat of a late also, by all appearances,
summer day, well, that grounded, well-spoken
was Kayla Minger. young ladies.
We talked for a spell, Now, those youngsters
my interest in what she of four years ago have
was doing as acute as not blossomed into young
wanting to disrupt an indi- adults who would make
vidual practice, and came any parent, heck any com-
away impressed by her munity, proud.
poise, her personality and They have excelled and
the hard work she was put- spent their four years of
ting in to become a better high school becoming better
player, athletes and, by all accounts,
That Minger would better people, no small feat
earn the title of Home- in today's roller coaster they
coming queen at Port St. call high school.


Despite the individu-
ality of excellence on a
pitching mound, each will
attest to being team mem-
bers first, individuals sec-
ond once they cross those
white lines.
What they both are, and
both would likely shrug off
any such suggestion, are
role models for those who
follow them, the young
women and young men
entering the critical years
of high school.
For these are two
youngsters who took it
upon themselves early in
life to not be complacent,
to put in the long hours,
the energy and the sweat,
the sacrifice, all to im-
prove at their craft.
They were at it as fresh-
men and they have one
more season for which
Gulf County softball fans
should feel privileged.
Just as I feel deeply
privileged to have
watched them blossom.
And just as any young-
ster now entering high
school or already playing
on the middle school fields
should feel a certain honor
and responsibility to emu-
late them, to follow their
path and their example.
Fans of high school
athletics should enjoy the
next few months.
Rich and Minger are
not just special athletes,
they are special young
people. That they both ar-
rived and grew at the same
time in the same county is
also something very, very
special indeed.


I spoke at the Middle
School football banquet. I
love guys at that age. They
don't realize how fortu-
nate they are. Their whole
lives lie ahead of them. I
want them to "see it"; to
catch the significance of
this particular moment in
time; to enjoy every sec-
ond of it and understand
life is a process; it takes
intelligent choices and a
tad of application in prepar-
ing for bigger and better
things. Bless their hearts,
they just want to have fun!
They grinned and nod-
ded and were most polite
as I ambled through some
football thoughts past and
present. I told them about
my cotton picking days.
Listen, you bend over and
pull that sack very far and
your back will hurt. You
get down on your knees
and crawl a half a row and
the skin will peal right off
where the joint meets the
ground. It's hard work! I
hauled hay for a penny a
bale. You talk about hot,
dusty, dry and harmful to
your hands, back, face and
legs! A man would be crazy
to do that kind of work
for a living. It was hard. I
unloaded boards from rail
road cars where it was
140 degrees. I saw grown
men pass out. It was brutal
work! One summer I pulled
on the green chain at the
Southern Star Lumber
Company. You don't even
want to know..
I have had some tough
jobs. But, and I tried to
stress this to the young
players, nothing I have ever
done no job I've ever had
- even came close to com-
paring to football practice!
Football was the one single
toughest thing I ever got


C


through! Period!
Coach Rodgers
was stillyelling
"Run. Run! RUN!"
when I couldn't
run no more! I had
taken my last step.
I was going to die
right there on the HUNKER
spot! I was quitting Kesley
this mess. I was
crawling home!
"You've got to be kid-
ding."
John Ingram was not
talking to anyone. And it
was actually more of a
moan than speaking.
"That coach is nuts. I'm
telling you he's a crazy fool."
But a strange thing hap-
pened. John got to a knee,
then somehow got both feet
under him and he started
back across the field. I got
up and followed him. I was
trying to say, "We may be the
idiots..." I didn't have enough
wind to make a word.
It was our first year in
junior high. And this was
not the way the Chicago
Bears did it on television.
Bill Wade just threw the
ball to Harlon Hill and the
Bears scored. There were
no wind sprints and gas-
ers and up-downs! They
just played games. Over
the course of the next six
years I discovered that no
one just shows up ready to
play. It takes preparation,
inspiration, dedication,
mental toughness, fore-
thought, teamwork, self
sacrifice, desire, a little
ability and a willingness to
get up and work as hard
as you can at it every day!
Coach Rodgers said
football was just like life.
We might have believed
him until he made us
scrimmage with the ninth-
graders. Eddie Carden


:o
:ol


was a six foot, thir-
teen inch freshman.
He weighed two
tons. And he could
run like the wind.
Coach would line
us up about eight
yards apart and
)OWN have us crash head
Ibert on into each other.
Eddie would knock
me over against
the metal fence behind
the tackling dummy. My
brains were down about
where my kidneys usually
hung out. We didn't have
facemasks back then. My
nose would be combing
my hair. The helmet would
be twisted around so I
would be looking out of
the ear hole. Stars would
be shooting off toward the
eastern sky.
Life ain't no way as
hard as lining up against
Eddie Carden!
We got to high school
and Coach Scott made
Coach Rodgers look like
a Sunday School teacher
passing out Tootsie Rolls
after class. Scott was a
frustrated ex-marine drill
sergeant. We lost to Milan
one night and he waited
until after the fans left and
made us go back out on
the field and scrimmage!
He demanded that you be
perfect on every play and
then you had to improve
on that. He wouldn't let
you duck an assignment,
or half do it. He wanted
you moving straight ahead
with your eyes open. He
expected his boys to "lead
with their chin." You didn't
turn aside or take the easy
way.
I didn't tell the middle
school about Coach Scott.
They would have had to
have been there. I did try


to explain that football is
not a four-year or six-year
gig and then it's over. It is
an experience of growing
and learning that lasts a
lifetime. It is froth with
hard work, individual re-
sponsibility, teamwork and
discipline. You reckon we
could use some of that in
our society today?
None of that mattered,
to these middle school-
ers. It didn't matter to me
either, when I was them!
Shoot, in 1959 I was mostly
trying to zing somebody
in the locker room with a
wet towel. Or nail Yogi's
cleats to the floor. Or put a
glob of analgesic bomb in
Arlo's jock strap. Football,
and life, ain't all hard work
and due diligence!
I avoided like the
plague pointing out to
these guys that football
would help make bet-
ter young men, broth-
ers, sons, husbands and
fathers out of them. Of
course, it will! But that is
for them to figure out.
I look back and realize
that football is an amazing
growing tool. Life kinda
happened to us while we
were playing football,
hanging out in study hall,
figuring out the two con-
gruent sides of an isosce-
les triangle, calling Mary
Hadley and hanging up
when she answered, cruis-
ing by the Dairy Bar...
It would have taken all
night to have explained it
exactly right to those mid-
dle school guys. But you
talk about a lucky group!
I tell you, they don't have
any idea....

Respectfully,

Kes


HUNKER DOWN WITH KES


I'd Trade Places With'em!


Visit the Star online at .

www.StarFL.com


I


_ ___ _I ~~_I__L__I


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'i~j~$:i~-;h'`JI~ ~I:1U;-~T~.:;~I;~:~.~iZg31t~R~.Z4DL168 ~-











A5 I The Star Oninion


Thursday, November 20, 2008


Dear Editor,
From the first week of
October until Nov. 17, I have
been in physical therapy
at Bay St. Joseph Nursing
and Rehabilitation Center.
From the physical therapist,
exercise coach, Dr. Sutton,
nurses, CNAs, aides, clean-
ers, food provider, snack pro-
vider, pastors, the lady that
cut my hair, the ones that
washed my clothing and the
office staff. I was blessed and
taken care of as if I was fam-
ily. Each one gave tirelessly
of themselves, and to every
resident there, I thank you
all for your loving care and
I also thank my family. God
bless you all.
In gratitude and love,
Roy L. (Tommie)
Layfield

Facts of the Case
Dear Editor:
In all my career, I have
never written to a newspa-
per, but this is the exception,
and I am not hesitant to put
my name to this letter, ap-
parently contrary to those
who gave you information
for your "Our View Bottom
Line Bail" in last week's Star.
I have always appreciated
your newspaper and felt no
need to complain of its con-
tent or stance until now.
It would have been the
fair thing to do to get the
other side of the story before
printing your article. A one-
sided story such as yours
gives a completely errone-
ous impression to the public,
which was not your inten-
tion, I sincerely hope. When
you spoke of the "facts of
the case," who determined
what those "facts" were, the
persons) who gave you the
information? From one who
was actually present at the
hearing in question, here
are some aspects of the oth-
er side you apparently were
not told:
1) The person in question
was diagnosed with an ag-
gressive, fast-moving illness
shortly before his arrest. He
progressed from walking un-
aided until barely being able
to move with a walker at the
hearing. His illness will not
get better or go into remis-
sion, but will only get worse.
2) The county's position
was not that it was spend-
ing too much money on the
inmate, but, rather, that it
was doing everything pos-
sible for him and would con-
tinue to do so if he remained
in jail. It took no position on
whether the person should
be released or not.
3) As part of the court's
pre-trial release order, it
mandated the defendant not
leave his address (in another
county) unless for medical


or court appearances, shall
have no contact with the al-
leged victim/family, and shall
not even be in Gulf County
except for mandated court
appearances. For one who
cannot walk or drive, those
conditions seem stringent
enough for the public's pro-
tection.
"Innocent until proven
guilty" is not just an old say-
ing, but something I believe
in with all my heart.
Janice
Cogburn Scheffer

Dear Editor,
The letter this past week
in The Star from Mr. Bo Wil-
liams concerns me greatly.
If the people in the third
district wanted him as our
commissioner, he would
have been elected. As it is,
we re-elected Mr. Bill Wil-
liams. He has done and will
do an excellent job for all of
District 3. It is really sad to
see Mr. Bo Williams' letter
and know that I called upon
him to help my husband
when he was the Veterans
Service Officer and he al-
ways referred me to the 1-
800 number. Bill Williams
is our friend, in action and
deed. Thank you, Bill, for a
job well done. God bless you
and yours. God Bless you
also, Mr. Bo Williams.
Thelma Layfield

Workers Bear
the Brunt
Dear Editor:
Citigroup announced
they would be eliminat-
ing as many as 53,000 jobs.
U.S. automakers have an-
nounced massive layoffs.
Everywhere you look major
corporations are reduc-
ing personnel. It seems
that the workers that have
been or will be eliminated
are the "worker bees." You
know the people who actu-
ally do the work and pro-
duce something of value.
On the other hand, the ex-
ecutives in charge continue
to receive enormous sala-
ries and benefit packages.
Would Citigroup be better
off firing 53,000 low level
employees that contrib-
uted to whatever minimal
revenue was realized or
firing the top 10 executives
that led the company to its
current failures? The most
disturbing aspect of this is
that Citigroup and all of the
other companies firing their
workers are going to be the
same that ask for taxpayer
bailouts. Taxpayers include
you, me and the workers
that they are firing.

Kevin Welch
St. Joe Beach


SHAREYOUROPINIONS

Send your letters to:

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
P.O. Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

Fax: (850) 227-7212
Email: tcroft@starfl.com

Comments from our readers in the form of
letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited
and encouraged. A newspaper's editorial page
should be a forum where differing ideas and
opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest
columns must be signed and should include
the address and phone number of the author.
The street address and phone number are for
verification and will not be published. Letters
must be in good taste and The Star reserves the
right to edit letters for correctness and style.




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CALL 997-1978
yD^ 1 _TI__ EREI


Bailout bonanza destroys American prudence


Commentary by TIBOR R.
MACHAN
Freedom News Service

So you notice that your
income has shrunk, you may
even have lost your job. So
you decide to trade in your
gas guzzler for a small vehicle
and even reduce your month-
ly car payments, if you have
such. And in other realms of
your life, too, you may make
adjustments to cope with the
general economic downturn.
You cook at home instead of
eating at your favorite restau-
rant; you do not purchase that
pair of shoes you would have
otherwise, etc., etc.
In short, you act pru-
dently, tightening your belt,
as the saying goes, in the face
of the widespread economic
contraction. Never even mind
why the contraction occurred
-- some of it could actually
have come around simply
from people changing their
preferences and behavior. (In-
stead, of course, it happened
because the government has
been abandoning its proper
role as the protector of our
rights and like a rouge ref-
eree, has been inserting itself
into the game for decades on
end!)
But now that the results
of such bad government
have hit so many of us, you
are taking steps to deal with


the situation. Ah, but no such
luck. Instead of making it pos-
sible for you to deal with your
reduced resources, instead
of letting you make the bud-
getary adjustments you can
make within the context of
your own life, politicians insist
that if you refuse to spend big
bucks on those Detroit gas
guzzlers, for example, they
will tax you and hand over
what they have extorted from
you to the car makers, never
mind your prudent choices.
In time, the savings you
thought you could garner
from your good sense and
discipline will be shelled out
in extra taxes so as to bail out
those who aren't getting your
business any more. Instead
of insisting that those who
make the big cars and what-
ever else that's no longer in
demand in the marketplace
make their own adjust-
ments, tighten their own
belts, etc., politicians insist
that they continue to be paid
as if nothing had happened,
no one changed his or her
purchasing behavior, as if the
economy continued to be in
fine shape.
This is just one of thou-
sands of results of the mixed
economy, the welfare state,
in which your individuality is
abolished and you are treated
as a member of some ant
colony or bee hive. You will be
conscripted to be part of it all,


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never mind how sensibly you
may figure to deal with the
fiasco. No, you will not be al-
lowed to use your good sense,
virtue and occasional luck to
address the economic mess
that politicians, bureaucrats
and their rent-seeking clients
produced. These folks were
the ones who prevented the
realization of the free market
and instead created a top-
down, planned or managed
arena of wealth redistribution.
In such a situation it is
impossible to identify the
good vs. bad players because
the government lumps us all
into the public for which it
presumes to make decisions.
Individuals are seen as simple
cells in this public body, with
governments and their cheer-
leaders in the academy and
think tanks as the head of the
body.
All of this could be foretold.
Among those who warned
about where the planning
done in a welfare state
can take a society was FA.
Hayek, whose "The Road to
Serfdom," published in 1944,
pretty much foresaw it all.
Members of the Austrian eco-
nomic school, led by Hayek's
own teacher, Ludwig von
Mises, kept issuing warnings
in their books and articles.
but, alas, they were ignored
by the all-mighty politicians
and bureaucrats. (Von Mises'
book, "Socialism," published


in the early 1920s and trans-
lated into English in 1936,
showed, among other things,
that central planning just
cannot produce a productive
economy.)
But socialist and near-
socialist dreamers kept
pressing their wish upon
politicians that a top-down
system of economic organiza-
tion be attempted, in one or
another form, and in America
this came out to be a mixed
economy, one with capitalist
as well as socialist elements.
Such an economy can muddle
along for a while, but, in time,
it simply cannot do what it is
expected to, namely produce
wealth and forcibly distribute
it so everyone will be equally
well off. (I produced an essay
for the journal The Person-
alist, back in 1969, "Justice
and the Welfare State," now
part of my book "The Right
Road to Radical Freedom,"
in which this point was driven
home!)
So if you are appalled
that your efforts at economic
prudence get you nowhere
fast, the culprit is our blessed
mixed economy, the welfare
state.

Tibor Machan advises
Freedom Communica-
tions, parent company of
this newspaper He can be
reached at TMachan@link.
freedom.com.


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Ba I TI I t: I I o


HEALTH from page Al


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Phone (850) 229-STAR
770 Hwy. 98 FAX # (850) 227-9898
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"The needs for student athletes are
increasing, but the school system bud-
gets are decreasing," Williams said as
he prepared to put a cast on a patient.
"We are trying to forge these collabora-
tions to fill a real need.
"To meet what the county really
needs, resources need to be increased.
So we are trying to forge these collabora-
tions to increase those resources."
Enter Sacred Heart. The health pro-
vider is constructing a hospital near the
Gulf/Franklin Center and is scheduled
to open late next year or early in 2010.
As part of its entry into Gulf County,
Sacred Heart established a radiology
department at the Health Department,
where X-rays and scans can be taken
and electronically sent to Pensacola or
Destin for reading.
A diagnosis can be just a short wait.
Those diagnostics were put in place
as TOC was in discussions with Sacred
Heart about becoming the orthopedic
provider at the hospital.
"I knew I had the blessings of Sacred
Heart, which was important," said Mar-
tin Shipman, CEO of TOC, of the part-
nership with the Health Department.
"We're excited about it. The hospital is
going up, and we have a verbal agree-
ment to be the orthopedic presence at
the hospital.
"We have quality people doing the
diagnostics, which is important to ortho-


pedics. (Superintendent of School) Tim
Wilder has also been very supportive,
but Doug (Kent) was excited about us
working out of the Health Department.
That is a hand-and-glove sort of deal."
Another part of the deal that appealed
to Kent was the willingness of Shipman
and his company to handle the under-
insured, Medicaid and indigent clients,
an important aspect of the partnership
because most orthopedic groups in the
area have cut back on Medicaid pa-
tients.
TOC sends a physician's assistant,
Mike Nuccio, down from Marianna to
see patients twice a month. He has
been coming since January, and word of
mouth has built the practice, he said.
"We've done more than a dozen
surgeries and a couple of joint replace-
ments," Nuccio said, noting that surger-
ies are done either through the Marian-
na TOC satellite or in Tallahassee. "We
enjoy coming down here because the
people are so nice.
"The first month or so, I wondered if
this would work, but now the day is full
every time we come down here."
On this particular Thursday morn-
ing, there were 14 patients to be seen,
Nuccio said.
Kent added, "They stay slammed
when they come twice a month. They
are willing to increase the number of vis-
its as the patients increase."


"The last couple of months have been
crazy," Shipman said. "That's word of
mouth and Rick Williams knowing the
community The workload is steadily
growing. So far we've been pleased with
the growth.
"Rick Williams has been with us 18
years and has done a great job in the
rural areas. Port St. Joe is very special
to him, and he thought there were some
opportunities for collaboration."
The partnership could not have
worked out better for a patient such as
Nelson, who was diagnosed with a ro-
tator cuff injury that turned out to be a
bone spur on the shoulder. Mere weeks
after surgery, he was showing off his
range of motion to Nuccio.
"This is perfect for me," Nelson said.
"I run out here, and I am away from
work a few minutes instead of hours.
The treatment is excellent."
While TOC continues to work with
Sacred Heart on bringing additional spe-
cialists to the hospital, something that
excited Shipman, Williams and Nuccio
continue their care.
Maybe it is just twice a month for Nu-
ccio, but for Williams, who roams athlet-
ic sidelines at more games than he could
count, it is more than that.
"This is a personal agenda for me,"
Williams said. "If it works with Sacred
Heart and TOC and the Health Depart-
ment that is where it's at for me."


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The Star I A7


School Board takes initial step on levy. G v


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The Gulf County School Board on Tuesday took the first step
toward putting a one-mill levy before voters in March of next
year.
The board unanimously passed a resolution that effectively
forwards a request to the Board of County Commissioners to
call a special election March 17, 2009 for voters to consider the
one mill levy aimed at providing additional operating funds to
meet myriad needs, including teacher salaries and benefits.
The question the board proposes to put to voters is straight-
forward: "Shall the Gulf County School District's ad valorem
millage be increased by a total of one mill, beginning July 1,
2009, and ending four years on June 30,2013, for necessary oper-
ating expenses authorized by Section 1011.71(8) including funds
to provide for teachers and classrooms?"
Voters will be asked to answer the question "yes" or "no."
The additional mill a mill equals $1 for every $1,000 in tax-
able personal property- would generate nearly $2.5 million giv-
en current property values, though those values could change
by the July 1 certification of the tax rolls for next year. With
cuts from the state already impacting the district this year and
state officials alerting local districts to prepare for another 2-3
percent cut in funding from Tallahassee, Gulf District Schools,
which began the current year with 40-odd fewer employees due
to nearly $2 million in local cuts over the summer, is facing a
cloudy fiscal future.
"Bleak," said Superintendent of Schools Tim Wilder when


Joel Reed
Account Executive
Office: (850) 653-8869 Cell: (850) 370-6090
Email: jreed@starfl.com -


THE STAR
YOUR HOMETOi V11'SP' li'PK EROR 01 F R I") F
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850-227-1278
135 W Hwy 98
PortSt Joe, FL 32457
Fax: 850-227-7212
850-653-8868
129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Fox: 850-653-8036
)


asked to describe the current budget picture. The district is in
the black, as it must by law, but the hits keep coming and the
board hopes to avoid next summer being a rerun of the last.
"This is the only legal way to do it," Wilder continued. "We
can't afford to let the district sink and go under-funded. And we
can't lose more people because we are operating with a skel-
etal staff as it is." The board will be banking on its frugality with
the one component of public school funding over which it has
genuine sway to assist in making its case to the public. By law,
districts can levy up to two mills for capital improvement, essen-
tially bricks and mortar. However, Gulf District Schools have
been under one mill in capital improvement this entire decade
and the School Board has never levied the full two mills.
Additionally, the board, during two workshops on the issue,
has already examined ways to shave the capital improvement
component of school millage further to well below a half mill.
"In order to maintain our schools where they need to be, we
need to do certain things," said board member Billy Quinn, Jr.
Board members also emphasized Tuesday that the additional
mill levy would sunset in four years, when it either be allowed
to lapse or put back before voters for approval.
"This is the first step," said board member Linda Wood. The
county is likely to consider the board's resolution next month,
Wilder said, adding that would be within the window of time
needed to conduct the election in January.
In other business, the board reorganized as required by law,
with George Cox succeeding Wood as chairman for the next
year. Danny Little was voted into the vice-chairmanship.
Among budget cuts from the Department of Education


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pertaining to the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test is
the elimination of summer retakes of the test.
This is particularly important for high school seniors who
have not passed the FCAT prior to the end of their senior year,
putting their chances for a diploma in jeopardy
Such students are encouraged to take the ACT or SAT
tests given that high enough scores on either test would still
qualify a senior who had not passed the FCAT for a standard
diploma.









---





October 21, 2008
The City of Port St. Joe will be holding an
open night for Adult Volleyball playing at the
Washington Recreation Gym on Monday,
November 17, 2008 from 7:00 9:30 PM.
If you are interested, please contact:
Mike Lacour @ (850) 774-6446
Charles Gathers @ (850) 340-1861
Thank you,
Recreation Department


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A8 I The Star


Local


Thursday, November 20, 2008


Election helps Gulf County Democrats build base of support


By Zebe Schmitt
Chairwoman of the Gulf County
Democratic Executive Committee
Gulf County Democrats
are riding a wave of increased
volunteerism that came from
the November election cycle,
and using it to energize their
Democratic base. During this
election season, more than 50
Gulf County residents volun-
teered more than 700 hours
to "get out the Gulf County
vote."
Our volunteers are simply
amazing. For weeks before
the election, people from all
walks of life showed up daily
at our tiny little office in North
Port St. Joe to do whatever
was needed to ensure that
Gulf County residents were
registered and ready to vote.
Gulf County volunteers
held five voter registration
drives and canvassed events
to help increase the number of
registered voters in the coun-
ty, working closely with Ron
Harris, the Gulf/Bay County
field organizer for the Obama
campaign. According to re-
cords at VoteGulf.com, the
Web site of Supervisor of Elec-


tions Linda Griffin, the total
number of registered voters
in Gulf County increased from
8,962 voters in August 2008 to
its current total of 9,184, an in-
crease of 222 voters.
In the weeks before the
election, volunteer canvassers
hit the phones and the streets
to get people registered, en-
couraged people to vote early,
and answered questions about
Democratic candidates. The
teams were active in many
communities and neighbor-
hoods, including North Port
St. Joe, Liberty Manor, Pine
Ridge, Constitution Park, and
areas of Port St. Joe Beach
and Mexico Beach.
"Door-to-door canvassing
was an amazing experience
for me because I got to meet
and work with like-minded
people who wanted change,"
said Laura Blanda, a school-
teacher who lives in St. Joe
Beach. "I even canvassed with
some middle and high school
students from Wewahitchka
who wanted to be involved."
For the weeks leading up
to Election Day, several vol-
unteers helped drive people to
polling locations throughout


NEXT MEETING
Thursday, Nov. 20
7 p.m. ET
Upstairs in the Capital
City Bank building in
Port St. Joe

the county for early voting,
but no one put in more trips
than Sally Jenkins, a retired
healthcare professional who
lives in Port St. Joe and who is
currently the vice chair of the
DEC.
"I can't even count how
many people I drove to vote
early and to the polls on Elec-
tion Day," said Jenkins. "It
was very important to me to
make sure the elderly people
voted, even though I took
some young people to the
polls too. I always do this."
On Election Day, the DEC
and Obama's Campaign for
Change had 11 official poll
watchers at 5 precincts,
which is a first for the Gulf
County group. We've usually
needed to prioritize our Elec-
tion Day resources and focus'
just on getting people to the
polls, but this year we had


so many volunteers that we
had drivers, poll watchers,
informational volunteers and
even sign wavers.
Mark Deaton, one of the
Democratic Party's first-
time volunteer poll watchers
in Wewahitchka, was pleased
with the process and organi-
zation.
"The clerk, Pam McDan-
iel, had every part of the pro-
cess running like a well-oiled
machine, handling every vot-
er problem with appropriate
urgency, while also protect-
ing voter's rights," said Dea-
ton, who is self-employed and
lives on Cape San Bias.
Neil Jones, a poll watcher
at the Port St. Joe Firehouse,
also gave kudos to Linda Grif-
fin and her team.
"This is the first time in my
life that I've been this involved
in an election," said 53 year-
old Jones. "I was impressed
by the professionalism. of the
team. The poll workers really
went above-and-beyond to try
and make sure that people
could vote a regular ballot in-
stead of a provisional ballot,
which meant that their votes
would definitely be counted."


Laura Deaton, an inde-
pendent voter, also volun-
teered that day. "I'm nonpar-
tisan, so I set up a white tent
across from the Port St. Joe
Firehouse, and had signs that
simply said "ASK ME."
For 12 hours, Deaton an-
swered voters' questions
about what ID was needed,
how late the polls would be
open, how to vote for the first
time, and what to do if people
needed help to vote. "I didn't
ask or care about party affili-
ation, I just wanted everyone
to have clear information
walking in and a great voting
experience," Deaton added.
"Polling Site Deputy Harry
Lee Smith was also outside
with me, greeting most people
by name and assisting them
inside. Port St. Joe Police Ser-
geant Troy Simmons checked
on us several times, along
with other local residents, so
it created a real connection to
the community."
Democrats and Obama
supporters also did some last-
minute grassroots campaign-
ing. "It was the first time I
was able to be part of creating
history," added Fields, who


lives in Port St. Joe and works
at the Gulf County Correc-
tional Institution.
The Florida win for the
Obama/Biden ticket was
the crowning moment for
This team of volunteers who
gathered after the polls
closed to watch election re-
sults roll in.
"It is empowering to
know that ordinary people in
our small community helped
President-Elect Obama win
Florida," added volunteer
Caroline Lister. "I love be-
ing a part of this movement
of inclusiveness that is hap-
pening all over our country."
"We want to encourage
local Democrats to volun-
teer with us in Gulf County,"
said Schmitt.
Gulf County Democrats
are urging volunteers to
come join them at their Nov.
20 organizational meeting,
at 7 p.m. EST upstairs in
the Port St. Joe Capital City
Bank Building. If you can't
make the meeting, but would
like to volunteer, please call
Zebe Schmitt at (850) 227-
4296 or send her an email at
jzschmitt@gtcom.net.


,r~ *-'

23 ed v.-PotS. oF


.





1 ~ -. ........-. -.~~.-2 .Ztwfl~ruIatWW~A.&


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'~ -'' -"' ~-:r;~;: i~'`r;l'~-~Y~*~NaeJ~Para~~ ~t






Thursday, November 20, 2008


Local


The Star I A9


Will from page Al


"It's better than them
doing exercises on a mat
because it's interactive.
It's more motivating to the
kids," she said.
Mock uses the Wii sys-
tem primarily as a moti-
vational tool in her token-
based rewards program.
Students can earn to-
kens daily by completing
work, behaving, being kind
or complimentary to others
and having a good day.
Each token translates
into two minutes of Wii time
on Friday mornings before
lunch.
Last Friday, the students
enjoyed rousing matches of
Mario Kart and bowling, a
class favorite.
The students bowled
strikes using hand-held
receivers attached to their
wrists by safety straps
and steered Mario and his
friends through a perilous
racetrack.
On screen, the custom-
ized avatars, called Mii
("me"), performed the ac-
tions controlled by their hu-
man counterparts.
The class selected their
Miis on their first day with
the system, choosing their
face shapes, hair and eye
colors and adding freckles
where needed.
Once the school installs a
wireless connection, Mock's
students will be able to log
onto the Internet through
;the Wii and play additional
Video games.
Mock's long-term goal
for the Wii system is to in-
crease awareness and tol-
erance of disabled children
by increasing their interac-
tion with the larger school
population.
The idea, first espoused
by Whitfield, is to invite stu-
dents into the classroom
who ordinarily would not
associate with developmen-
tally disabled students.
If gaming together leads
to conversations in the hall-


way or even a wave of ac-
knowledgment, then Mock
and Whitfield say they will
have succeeded.
"We want the kids to see
they're really not all that
different," Mock said.
Mock also plans to share
the Wii with the rest of the
student body, using it as a
rewards system for kids in
need of motivation.
Wii time also could
be used as a reward for
students chosen as the
school's Dazzling Dolphins,
who currently earn Happy
Meals for outstanding con-
duct.
"It needs to be a school-
wide thing," Mock said.
"Our main goal for our kids
is to be a part of the main
school, not just our class-
room."


STRIKE: Christian, right, attempts to bowl a strike in Wii
bowling while Harley waits his turn.


THANK YOU:
The Port
St. Joe
Elementary
Bridges Class
sends a thank
you to David
Whitfield
and the other
community
members who
donated the
Wii gaming
system.


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A 10 I The Star


Sports


Thursday, November 20, 2008


Wewahitchka High
School's wrestling team
warmed up for the season by
placing second last week in
the South Walton Preseason
Duals Classic at South
Walton High School.
The Gators, with just


seven wrestlers, meaning
they were forfeiting at a half
dozen weight classes before
each match, managed to
down both Bay and South
Walton and missed taking
away the title for the day by
just 12 points as they lost to


Gulf Breeze in the champi-
onship round.
Standouts of the day in-
cluded Daniel House at 119
pounds, Chase Duckworth
at 125 pounds, Jacob Villase-
nor at 215 pounds and Ryan
Walding at heavyweight, all


of whom went undefeated
for the day.
Villasenor and Duck-
worth registered three pins
for the day.
The Gators open the reg-
ular season this Saturday at
the Bozeman Buck Classic.


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Special good thru
December2008


Gators take second at preseason duals


HOLIDAY SCRAMBLE SELECT SHOT GOLF
TOURNAMENT
The St. Joseph Bay Country Club will be conduct-
ing a golf tournament on Dec. 13 at 1 p.m. The entry fee
will be $60 per player. The four-person team will be re-
quired to meet the handicaps listed on the entry form.
All proceeds will be used to make capitol improvements
to the grounds, facilities and the course. This will be a
fun day complete with cash prizes, a buffet dinner, and
event prizes.
Anyone who would like to be a sponsor for this is asked
to call Jerry Stokoe at 899-1036.

Hunting & Fishing

Report

By Scott Lindsey
Contributing Writer
Let me remind everyone that red snapper season is
over, especially the two guys I talked with Sunday who
went Saturday and caught a box full. Y'all should have
just forgotten about the limit, also.
Read this very carefully, the season is over with for
2008 and you can continue catching and keeping them in
2009.
If you like flounder, and I've never met someone who
doesn't, now is the time to fish for them. Cussing Cousin
is hauling them out at phenomenal rates. He sent me a
picture of 20 his son and his grandson caught along with
some older guy they met at the dock. Cousin is known for
many things, but unfortunately photography isn't one of
them.
Looking west to Navarre Beach, the trout still can be
found on the flats. The warm weather one day and cooler
weather the next hasn't sent them heading for the creeks
and rivers. On the gulf side, whiting and pompano should
be showing up in large numbers, especially the whiting.
Unlike most other fish whiting in Florida don't have a
size limit or a limit on the number you can catch, so don't
try and take as many home as you can fit into the box.
In East Pass at Destin, the bull red drum are biting.
Live choffers work very well for them. Cut-up mullet also
will do the trick, but if you want to put the ball on the 5-
yard line, live bait always is a winner.
Roy at the Salty Bass in Fort Walton Beach is report-
ing phenomenal success fishing on top for speckled trout.
Roy said he and a friend caught 22 speckled trout and
many redfish last week. The most interesting thing Roy
talked about was the large number of pompano being
caught off the Shalimar Bridge. One customer last week
caught five pompano and numerous Spanish mackerel.
Roy said that in a day it is not unusual to see 50 pompano
caught from this bridge, and it is many miles from the
gulf.
In Choctawhatchee Bay, everyone is looking for red-
fish. I went to Black Creek last week and took along the
black cat known as the dog doctor. I don't believe the dog
flies would bite if you had the dog doctor along. I don't
know what it is about Doe, but he has a way of turning
off the fish.
It was a little too warm to be speckled trout fishing,
and we did get there a little late, but I should have been
able to catch something. Doc managed to land a sizable
redfish and two speckled trout.
I heard a good redfish report from the canal between
Choctawhatchee Bay and West Bay. The gentleman was
a little evasive as to the exact spot he caught those reds,
but he did let it slip he caught them around the rocks.
There are probably not more than 20 rock piles between
West Bay and Choctawhatchee Bay, so if you're nqt
pressed for time you should try to find his spot. He fished
with grubs if that's any help.
In St. Andrew Bay, I'm sure the redfish are still a little
shell-shocked from having more than 200 tournament
fishermen pounding the bay for two days, but I would bet
if a fellow caught some choffers and headed to the pass
he could still catch a few.
Also in the bay, flounder seem to be biting around the
entrance to the pass and in deep holes around it. Cousip
has caught more than 50 in the past few days. I'm not
sure there will be many left if he keeps up this pace.
Bluewater Outriggers in Port St. Joe reported that
flounder can be caught in the canal connecting the Iri-
tracoastal Canal with St. Joe Bay. This little stretch of
water always has been hot for flounder fishing during
the fall. Probably the reason for this is it concentrates all
the flounder leaving the Intracoastal and heading for the
gulf. In blistering cold weather, it is a magnet for speck-
led trout.
St. Joe Bay is not producing like it should this time of
the year. It seems the bait mullet haven't begun to move
like they should. Even so, around the mouth of the bay
pompano and trout can be sight fished. On the west side
of the bay around the mouth, large schools of redfish
should be in shallow enough water to sight fish.
It won't be long before we can start doing some real
hunting and put down the sticks and bows. A bow sales-
man tried to sell me a bow early on in the season, and I
told him I had never had a deer come close enough to me
to even think about shooting him with a stick. Besides,
with my shoulders I can't even pull one back.
I have been hearing more reports of turkey this year
than I have heard before. One hunter saw more than 40
last week including long beards, jakes and some about
half-grown. The area he is seeing these turkey has never
been what you could call a turkey haven. I don't know if
they are migrating down the river or if they have found
themselves a new home.
Tuesday night I walked outside and noticed the moon
had a ring around it. Old-time sportsmen know when this
happens these are ice crystals in the atmosphere and if
you count the number of stars inside this circle it will tell
you the number of days before it rains.

Watch out for alligators in river
floodplains, around lakes, marshes,
swamps, ponds, drainage canals and
ditches. Never approach an alligator, never
offer food to one, and keep all pets and
small children away from them.







SPORT ST. JOE WEWAH TCHKA





PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, November 20, 2008 www.starf com Page 11





Port St. Joe downs Marianna


a


CHELLSEY O'NEILL I Contributed photo
VICTORY: Darrell Smith, returning a punt last Friday, was one of six ball carriers provid-
ing contributions to the Port St. Joe win.


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Port St. Joe's success
in the playoffs will likely be
determined by which team
shows up next week in Mayo
to play Lafayette High.
The squad that domi-
nated Marianna (8-2) during
the first half on Friday night
or the team that scuffled a
bit in the second half while
carving out a 35-14 victory.
The Tiger Sharks (8-2)
commanded the opening 24
minutes with offensive bal-
ance and defense that bot-
tled up a Marianna offense
centered on an injured Brad-
ley Battles (a game-high 87
rushing yards) between the
tackles.
Protecting a 28-0 lead in
third quarter proved a more
difficult task, though, as the
Bulldogs forced several big
plays to cut the lead in half.
A key penalty and turn-
over combined with heavy
rain that arrived with three
minutes to play, though, and
Port St. Joe pulled away.
The Tiger Sharks rushed
for 141 yards on just 10 car-
ries and added 136 yards
passing in the first half hold-
ing Marianna to 112 yards,
none of it passing and 70 of
it coming on 15 carries by
Battles.
The Tiger Sharks had
three scoring drives of at
least 83 yards, big plays
punctuating each one.
After holding Marianna
on downs on the opening
possession, Port St. Joe
went 83 yards in seven
plays, a 35-yard run from
Calvin Pryor (58 yards rush-
ing, 46 receiving and a two-
point conversion run) the
key play.


"Iprobably tried to mix it up more
than usual, passed more than usual,
because we are going to need to practice
that kind of thing for the playoffs.
That first half was as complete a half
as we've played all year. Ijust wish we
had gotten more points out ofit."

Vern Barth
Port St. Joe coach


The Tiger Sharks stopped
Marianna near midfield and
a punt pinned them at their
own 5.
Three plays later, Daw-
son tossed a deep fade down
the left sideline to Willie
Quinn, who snagged the ball
while being interfered with
and streaked down the side-
line for a 72-yard score.
Both drives ended in
botched two-point conver-
sions the first a result of
a Tiger Shark penalty and
early in the second quarter
Dawson guided Port St. Joe
94 yards in six plays, Pryor's
acrobatic one-handed grab
of a pass in the flat which he
turned into a 46-yard gain
the difference maker.
Dawson (66 rushing
yards, 161 passing) ran 18
yards on a quarterback draw
play that worked all night
and hit Quinn with a fade to
the right flag for a two-point
conversion and it was 20-0 at
the half.
"I probably tried to mix it
up more than usual, passed
more than usual, because
we are going to need to prac-
tice that kind of thing for the
playoffs," said Port St. Joe
coach Vern Barth. "That


first half was as complete a
half as we've played all year.
I just wish we had gotten
more points out of it."
A short kickoff to start
the second half set the Tiger
Sharks up for a lightning 58-
yard march, Dawson hitting
Rakeem Quinn on a middle
seam route for 40 yards for
the touchdown. Pryor ran
around right end for the ex-
tra point.
The Bulldogs awoke with
four minutes left in the third
quarter when Poochie Bat-
son picked off a Dawson
pass that traveled through
Pryor's hands, setting up a
41-yard drive completed by
a 2-yard R.J. Bowers run.
Marianna recovered an
onside kick at the Tiger
Shark 40 and four plays lat-
er Battles went over from
the 1.
Just as momentum
seemed headed their way,
the Bulldogs gave it back,
a personal foul penalty the
critical play on the ensu-
ing drive that Port St. Joe
turned in to a 4-yard from
Pryor, and an interception
ending an excursion into Ti-
ger Shark territory minutes
later before the deluge.


Samantha Rich signs with Jacksonville State University


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Jacksonville (Ala.) State
Vniyersity's softball pro-
gram became considerably
richer Wednesday after-
noon.
Wewahitchka High's Sa-
mantha Rich, arguably the
most dominant player in
Northwest Florida, regard-
less of classification, the
past two years, signed a let-
ter of intent to play for the
Gamecocks in 2009.
Rich becomes the first
female athlete from Wewa-
hitchka to make the leap
directly from high school to
a NCAA Division I scholar-
ship just as she was on the
mound the past two years
as the Lady Gators brought
home the school's first state
championships of any kind
since the 1950s.
Rich selected the Game-
cocks from a lengthy list of
colleges suitors that includ-
ed Central Florida, Florida
State, LSU, Virginia Tech,
Michigan, Illinois, South
Carolina and Tulsa, to name
a few.
"It has been crazy," Rich
said of the recruiting pro-
cess which she ended on the
first day that high school
softball players could sign
college scholarships. "It was
one of the hardest decisions
I've ever had to make."
But a home-town touch
was a strong lure for the
small-town girl with a whip-
pet arm and heavy stick.
"The coaches (head
coach Jana McGinnis and
assistants Mark Wisener
and Julie Boland) are great
and make you feel at home,"
Rich said. "The atmosphere
is great; it's very homey and
very easy-going."
The match made on
Wednesday is hand to glove.
Rich is 56-6 on the mound
with the Lady Gators, in-
*-..,*. 'r


TIM CROFT I The Star
SIGNING DAY: With her family and coach looking on, Wewahitchka's Samantha Rich
became the first female athlete from the school to go straight from high school to a
NCAA Division I scholarship.


"It has been crazy. It was one of the hardest decisions I've
ever had to make."

Samantha Rich
Wewahitchka High School senior


eluding 20-2 last year after
sharing pitching duties her
first two seasons. She has
lost to just one Class 2A
team in her high school ca-
reer.
She has also hit over .400
with more than 100 RBIs
- 52 alone as a freshman -
and 26 home runs, a school
career record with one sea-
son to play.
The Lady Gators have
reached the state final four
in each of her three seasons,
losing in the semifinals her
freshman year before break-
ing through with consecu-
tive titles Wewahitchka
has the smallest enrollment
in Class 2A and the rings


that went with them.
Rich has been first team
all-state three years run-
ning, Tallahassee Democrat
Big Bend player of the year
the past two years, state
Class 2A player of the year
in 2006 and 2008 and runner-
up for state player of the
year in 2008.
Last year, Rich was also
an ESPN (EA Sports) sec-
ond-team all-American.
"She's going to bring
a lot to their program im-
mediately, in the (pitching)
circle and with the bat," said
Wewahitchka coach Coy Ad-
kins, who led the Lady Ga-
tors to the state title last
year in his first year as head


coach after serving as an as-
sistant the prior four years.
"Jacksonville State plays
in the Ohio Valley Confer-
ence and I think if she stays
healthy she can be a con-
tender not only for Fresh-
man of the Year but Player
of the Year. She is more of
a leader now (than as a
freshman). She's got such
a reputation now that a lot
of teams are beat before
they get on the field against
her."
The Gamecocks, in turn,
are building a reputation
as a program on the rise,
something that appealed to
Rich.
They went 40-16 last year


and won the conference reg-
ular season and tournament
titles, advancing to a NCAA
Regional championship
game by twice defeating
Florida State, 10-1 and 4-3.
"That meant a lot to me,"
Rich said with a wry smile.
Jacksonville State fell
in the regional tournament
to third-ranked Alabama
which ultimately beat Mich-
igan to advance to the Col-
lege World Series in Okla-
homa City.
McGinnis, in her 151h year
at Jacksonville State regis-
tered her 500th win last April
and has won 40 or more
games in five of the past six
seasons. She has been con-
ference coach of the year in
1996, 2001, 2005 and 2008.
"My wife and I would just
like to thank Coy Adkins for
all the work he's done with
Samantha and all the hours
he's put in helping her de-
velop as a player," said Don
Rich, Samantha's father.
"And our sincere thanks to
Coach (Charles) Fortner for
developing the softball pro-
gram that enabled Saman-
tha to accomplish what she
has."
Adkins also added some
wise words for younger
athletes hoping to follow in
Rich's footsteps.
"This 15 minutes or so
that we have the newspaper
and television here for this
signing is great, but don't
let it undermine the accom-
plishment of getting a Divi-
sion I scholarship. You don't
all of a sudden wake up one
day your senior year and
decide you want to play soft-
ball in college," Adkins said.
"This is a process that takes
years. There has been a lot
of hard work, a lot of time
and work that most people
don't see.
"She's represented her
community well and has
been a part of bringing this


community a lot of success.
But it takes a lot of work.
And the championships
are great, but being a posi-
tive impact on a young per-
son's life, that's what it's all
about."


Bears and human
food attractions
Feeding bears, either by
direct handouts or by leaving
garbage, barbecue grills,
pet food and bird feeders
outside, leads to problems
with bears.
Remember: Any
food source that
attracts dogs, cats
or raccoons also can
attract BEARS
/ Store trash in a secured
area until morning of
pickup.
/ Bring pet food inside,
store securely.
/ Protect gardens.
compost and livestock
with electric fencing.
/ Clean grills and store
them in a secure area.
/ Remove wildlife
feeders if there is a bear in
the area.





Thursday, November 20, 2008


A 12 I The Star


2...
4. 1*~~ -.
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"7


L..


Thanksgiving



Day Special


Enjoy more time with your family and friends this Thanksgiving!
Let Clark & Blake Brennan's School of Fish Restaurant
at WindMark Beach take care of everything for you!


JOIN US FOR

Thanksgiving Dinner

Thursday, November 27, 2008
Reservations are encouraged but not required.
Call 229-1122for more information.
We will be open 1 am 4pm EST
on Thanksgiving Day


THANKSGIVING DINNER
Com plete Take- Out Package

If you would like to enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner
cooked by Clark and Blake Brennan's School of
Fish Restaurant but would like to do so in your
own home we are glad to oblige!


Orders must be placed by Friday, Nov 21, 5PM,
with pick up Nov 26. Call 229-1122 for information,
or to arrange special orders and pick up times.


Thanksgiving Weekend Hours at School of Fisht
In addition to our Thanksgiving Specials we will be open all weekend serving
our complete menu. Break away and enjoy our spectacular view of the bay!


Looking for a place to host your Chr:iia ms party?
Let Clark and Blake Brennan's School of tF!' R .';. r rant
help you put your party in a class of its own!
With so much going on during the holiday season, take time out for yourself and
let our Executive Chef, Raymond Toups, create a fabulous menu for your friends,
colleagues and family. What would a holiday party be without spirits and libations?
We offer a full bar and a stunning view of St. Joseph Bay. With three dining areas
overlooking the water we are able to accommodate any party, extravagant or
intimate. Space is going fast, book today! 850-229-1122.

School of Fish will remain open for private parties only during the month of December.
January and February, 2009 we will be closed entirely. We will re-open March 1, 2009.


/7- a:;

: .1~~. .,.. i


~ttiS,.. 4a


C -


I e s t a L r a nt


Roasted Tom Turkey With Natural Gravy
Creole Oyster Dressing
Cornbread Dressing if
Green Beans i
Mashed Sweet Potatos per person!
Fresh Cranberry Sauce.


In addition to our Thanksgiving Day Special
above, we will be offering our regular, full menu.


13-lb Roasted Tom Turkey
Creole Oyster Dressing
Green Beans
Mashed Sweet Potatos
Fresh Cranberry Sauce
Green Salad, with dressing
French Bread
Apple Pie


Our complete Thanksgiving Take-Out Package
(serves 8-10 people) for $250.


Thursday, Nov 27....11AM 4PM
Friday, Nov 28.........11AM 9PM
Saturday, Nov 29.....11AM 9PM
Sunday, Nov 30.......11AM 2PM


38t,

Mexico Beach -, ^
Port Si Joe '


Local


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COMMUNITY


'-ion


Thursday, November 20, 2008 w w w. s t a r f 1. co m Page B1


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By Traci Gaddis
Contributing Writer

When I was a teenager, I was a Beatles
fan. I liked to think I was a groupie. I had
all of the vinyl albums, the books, the
teen magazines, and I ate enough of that
horrible bubble gum to have all of the
Beatles fan cards. I dreamed of going to
a concert and interviewing Paul or Ringo.
I wanted their autograph on my favorite
Beatles shirt. I was going to frame it and
put it on my wall.
So what happened? I grew up, got
married to my high school sweetheart and
had three wonderful children. I still listen to
the Beatles, but somehow the dream never
materialized, but then sometimes dreams
just wait until you get older, and sometimes
they just change altogether.
I am a grandmother now, and I am
so excited to be given the opportunity to
interview Anthony Field of the Wiggles.
Well, I might have grown up, but there is
still a groupie locked up deep inside of me.
And the Wiggles are to preschoolers what
the Beatles are to baby boomers.
I was first introduced to the Wiggles
by my granddaughter Kenzie, who at the
tender age of 6 months started watching
the DVDs and listening to the CDs. I
noticed while we were watching the DVDs
together that the children and adults
showed up at the live concerts with signs
and dressed in all kinds of Wiggle attire.
OK, I thought the tunes were pretty catchy,
there were little messages in some of the
songs and then they had dance moves and
hand gestures. I could see where a child
might like this. After watching the concert
DVDs over and over, I started noticing the
audience. The adults knew all of the dance
moves and hand gestures, and they were
performing them with their children. Little
did I know that in less than six months, I
would turn into one of those adults.
There are four Wiggles, and they
wear different colored shirts or
ski~vies: .Anthony Field Ibluel.
Jeft Fatt 'purple'. Murray
Cook I red and Sam Moran
(yellow'. Greg Page wa5
the original yellow
Wiggle but was replaced
because ot illness in
2006. They are joined
on stage by a Friendly
Pirate. Captain
Feathersword-Paul
Paddock. Doroth.y
the Dinosaur.
Henry the Octopus .
and Wags the Dog.
In ca-e y.o0u
think I an l tiist
pulling ._;.


your leg on this, let me inform you that the
Wiggles have sold more than 22.5 million
DVDs and 7 million CDs worldwide. Of
course, they were not an overnight success.
Seventeen years ago, they were borrowing
equipment, pulling a trailer and acting
as their own roadies. Their early dates
consisted of pre-schools, local playgroups
and shopping center concerts. The group
did have one thing going for them: With
three of its members being involved in early
childhood education, they understood what
approach to take when it came to
entertaining young children.
I could write a list of all
their awards but frankly Sei
speaking, it is just too long.
With their family ijg
members filling in on
videos and TV programs, What: The
plus running things Where: Tc
behind the scenes, fans County (
of the Wiggles were able When: 6:
to watch the beginning of N
an empire from the ground
up. OK, maybe empire is a
little over the top, but these
guys do everything. I noticed
one girl in particular; her name is
Claire. She is a very young girl when she
first appears in the early videos. Watching
numerous DVDs, I could track
her childhood. Claire
ha- no%%w rown
into a lonely
young lady as
witnessed
on the
latest
D\DS
Slienkr)


I l.
e
ie\
. llc
Ci
30
ov


tours with the group now and happens to
be the niece of the blue Wiggle. This is a
family-based business, but even those who
are not related by blood seem to be related
by their love of children.
OK, so here I find myself a year and a
half ago with a granddaughter who wants
to watch some guy in a purple shirt that
keeps falling asleep, a blue guy who makes
fruit salad, a red rock-'n'-roll guitarist and
a yellow guy who drives the Big Red Car.
And you have to do all the dances and
learn all the songs, which isn't
hard because you will listen
and watch the DVDs over
the and over. In fact, you will
pray for the day a new
p es one comes out. You
will hear these songs
Wiggles live in your head during
ahassee-Leon work and while you
vic Center are trying to sleep.
Sp.m. Friday, OK, I have to admit,
p.m. I liked the songs. I
even downloaded them
to my iPod. I learned all
the dance moves and hand
gestures.
Well, that's not entirely true.
I cannot do one of the trademark songs'
"Lights, Camera, Action" movements. My
family will not let me do it in public because
I am so bad at it, and my granddaughter
keeps saying "-no. Nana But other
than that. I am \Wiegle material I could
feel niself slipping from an to groupie
real last. Ist like in the old Beatles day
However unlike ny pre-teen Beatles da.s.
I am older and wiser, and I hale a car. I
found out tronm my daughter Stephanie that
the \Wiggies were coming to Tallahassee


this month for a
concert. I have
already seen
the Wiggles in
concert once; it was
my birthday present
from my daughter
Jennifer and her family.
I will never forget the look on
my granddaughter's face when she got
her first glance of the Wiggles and the Big
Red Car. We were all totally entertained at
the concert so we all decided to go again
this month. It was a couple of days later
that I got this wonderful idea I wanted
to interview the Wiggles. I wanted to
interview Anthony Field, the blue Wiggle.
My story gets really crazy when I ask and
am granted an interview with Anthony. The
funny part of this is that I actually forgot
to ask my editor if he would run the story,
but things like that happen when you are in
"groupie-mode."
I did all kinds of Internet research to
prepare for the biggest interview of my
life. I learned about how the Wiggles were
named UNICEF goodwill ambassadors
for 2008. They have opened up a Wiggly
Play Center (www.wigglyplaycenter.com)
in Frisco, Texas, for children and their
parents. It is an affordable center that is
both educational and entertaining. Six
Flags opened its first Wiggle World at its
theme park in Jackson, N.J., and it was a
bi2 success
Their coinpas- ion tor children is
real. and it transcends culture, color and
continents I haven't even touched on their
charity work. but it is extensive. They visit
hospitals and orphanages all over the
world. When the World Trade Center was
attacked, the Wiggles were one of the few
groups that did not cancel their concert
dates in New York. choosing to show their
support for the U S. by bringing a little light
and laughter to a very dark city. The
more I researched, the more I
Sliced these guys. I was getting to


* *,






B2 I The Star


Local


Thursday, November 20, 2008


Townsend Wedding


Port St. Joe Garden Club News


I ';
'~IL 1


Mr and Mrs. Travis
Townsend were married Octo-
ber 4, 2008 in an evening cer-
emony at St. John's Episcopal
Church in Wewahitchka. The
bride is the daughter of the
Rev. and Mrs. Jerry Huft. The
groom is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. James Townsend. The
bride's children, Ellen and
Matthew Randig, served as
maid of honor and ring bearer.
A reception was hosted by the
couple at the Wewahitchka
Community Center for friends
and family. The couple and
their children reside in Wewa-
hitchka.


Kenzie turns 2

Kenzie Barber celebrated
her second birthday at her
home with a Wiggles Birth-
day party. She entertained
everyone in attendance by -
dancing and singing. Ken- ., .
zie's, Mom and Dad (Jen-
nifer and Derric Barber)
hosted the cook out. It was
attended by her Nana and '
Poppa Gaddis, Grama Ellen
Barber, Great Grama Duck .
and Great Papaw Middleton, F
Great Aunt Terri McFarland, ,
Aunt Stephanie and Aunt Sa-
mantha, and Uncle Will. 1.' L


The Port St. Joe Gar-
den Club held their monthly
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 13.
Guest speaker for the noon
luncheon was Cherei Leary,
Floral Designer from Pedals
N Things in Wewahitchka,
Florida. She gave a very inter-
esting presentation and fun
tips on designs to transform
your fall floral arrangements
right into the Christmas de-
signs. Cherei talked about the
many colors that have been
popular for Christmas rather
than the traditional colors be-
ing used and demonstrated
how to work these colors be-
tween the fall and Christmas
designs. Following the dem-
onstrations, Cherei passed
out to all present a discount
coupon for Petals N Things.
Thank you Cherei for your
wonderful demonstrations
and we encourage everyone
to check out the beautiful
designs and gifts at Petals N
Things.
Next month the Port St.
Joe Garden Club will host
their Christmas meeting on
Thursday, Dec. 11 at noon
with a covered dish luncheon.
The club members will bring
their own designs for show
using natural Florida plant
materials. The Port St. Joe
Garden Club holds meetings
beginning at noon on the sec-
ond Thursday of each month.
All those who would like to
become a new Garden Club


'c IPaL F"F' m- *,,
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Cherei Leary was guest speaker at the Port St.
Joe Garden Club.


member are welcome at any
of the meetings. Please come
see what the Port St. Joe
Garden Club is all about. We
would love to have you join!
A very special class ses-
sion will be held starting at
the Dec. 11 meeting. "Biology
of Plants" part 1 of 2 sessions
with the second session at the
next meeting on Jan. 8, 2009.
We are pleased to have our
very own garden club mem-
ber, Mrs. Barbara Conway to
teach the classes. Barbara
is a recently retired school
teacher of 26 years. She was
the science chairperson of a
large urban high school and
president of the Philadelphia


Area Secondary Science
Teachers Association in Phil-
adelphia PA. This will be a
"Back to Basics" instruction
of the biology of plants. Again,
we invite the public to attend
any of these meetings. They
are free of charge!
The Port St. Joe Garden
Club is a non-profit organiza-
tion that promotes education
to all ages, environmental
Conservation, community
beautification and floral de-
signing and shows. We are a
member of the National Coun-
cil of State Garden Clubs, Inc.,
Florida Federation of Garden
Clubs, Inc. District II and
Deep South Region.


Caleb turns 2


Y. Caleb Joseph Roberson, son of Matt
and Beth Roberson of Tallahassee, and big
brother Matthew recently celebrated Caleb's
second birthday on July 31. The theme of the
party was "Firemen" and it was held at his
home. Everyone had a great time swimming
in the backyard pool and eating hamburg-
ers with all the trimmings. Caleb's paternal
grandparents Ralph and Margaret Rob-
erson, paternal great-grandmother Claire
Roberson, and his maternal grandparents
Don and July Kosin, all of Port St. Joe, were
in attendance. Caleb also had a birthday cel-
ebration "Thomas the Train" with his class-
mates at First Assembly of God Child Devel-
opment Center.


By Johanna White
If you missed out on our Fish Fry on Fri-
day you missed some fine food. We have
some of the best cooks in town. They fried
the fish just right ... the mullet and catfish
were crisp and seasoned perfect. The ladies
did a great job in preparing the coleslaw and
beans. We want to thank all of you for sup-
porting the Kiwanis Club in our Community
Events. It's the community that allows us
the ability to contribute to the organizations
that we support. And thanks to all of the Ki-


wanians that worked hard to make the Fish
Fry a success.
Now we have to get ready for our Pancake
Breakfast on Saturday, Dec. 6. More details
to come. So get ready to buy some tickets.
The Port St Joe Kiwanis Club meets ev-
ery Tuesday at 12:00 at the Gulf County ARC
& Transportation Building located off of the
Industrial Road. If you are interested in be-
coming a member of a Civic Club and a great
group of men and women dedicated in giving
back to our community you can contact Jo-
hanna White at 227-6268.


'Vuip ()U A Dd(Nous


Pecipe TPis t4oWit


SeAVosovi

I N~ \VS FPERALD I


Pick up

your

copy

at The

News

Herald

today!


H~
I'-' "


FEATURING TOP RECIPES FROM
THE NEWS HERALDS
HOLIDAY'S BEST COOKING CONTEST 2008
AND WINNING RECIPES FROM
HOLIDAY'S BEST COOKING CONTEST 2007.


Grea

gift

for ti

office

stock

stuffed

Onl$

$2.0(


Make your holiday meals fun and festive with The Holiday's Best
Recipe Collection! This recipe book features 60 top recipes in six
categories from finalists in The News Herald's 2008 Holiday's Best
Cooking Contest plus, winning recipes from
Holiday's Best Cooking Contest 2007.

All proceeds benefit The Newspaper In Education program, which
provides classroom sets of newspapers to area schools. This real-world
learning tool builds literacy and critical thinking skills in our students.
------.------- ---i--------q
Mail-In Order Form
Please send me copies of the 2008 Holiday's Best Recipe Collection at $2.00 per copy and
I I
$1.50 for shipping and handling. (Books also available for pick up at The News Herald office.)
II
Name___
Address____
City __.State Zip_
Phone Email
Make checks payable to The News Herald "'o ,
I : "
Mail order form to: The News Herald NIE .
P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402
L-mI I--m --II ----I ---m IIm .


..I. Master Gardener's
,Training
S The Gulf County Coop-
,i erative Extension Service
will possibly offer a Master
Gardener's Training.
January 2009 May 2009.
'"' Cost of the program will be
$150. A minimum of 52 hours
of class instructional time is
required for certification. In
order to take advantage of
the University of Florida's
Lt polycom system, the program
S will be offered at the Coopera-
tive Extension Office located
at the Old Courthouse build-
ing in Wewahitchka. A mini-
he mum of 10 paid students are
required to justify offering the
or program.
For more information or
.ng to register for the program,
please contact the Gulf Coun-
ar! ty Cooperative Extension Ser-

|
o:0


vice at 639-3200 or 229-2909 or
email rlcarter@ ufl.edu.

Bake Sale
The Port St. Joe High
School Freshmen are hav-
ing a fundraising bake sale
on Saturday morning from
9-11 a.m. at the Piggly-Wiggly.
They will also be accepting
donations as they bag grocer-
ies throughout the morning.

Library Tales
Library hours are as fol-
lows:
Monday 10 a.m. until 8
p.m. ET;
Tuesday 10 a.m. until 8
p.m. ET;
Wednesday- Closed;
Thursday 10 a.m. until 6
p.m. ET;
Friday 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.
ET;


Saturday 10 a.m. until 6
p.m. ET;
Sunday- Closed.
Please help the Friends of
the Gulf County Library and
donate any new or used books
that you have. We also are in
need of magazines, CD's, old
movies- classic and children's
are in demand.
Come and check out the
books, movies and non-fic-
tion to see if we can help you
with a book to relax with or a
project you would like to com-
plete.

Blood Drive in Port St.
Joe
The Bay Medical Blood-
mobile will be at the Port City
Shopping Center Friday, Nov
21 from 12-6 p.m. All donors
will receive a keepsake photo
wallet.


~! nAiIpaeper,

Lid& wI?~ii~ you re

ud~acatlbhn!


-- -.


\\ll,'. :i~.u ri : .1'. 'y '.- II put yiur NeLws Herald in a safe place the hands of
a student enrolled in our Newspaper In Education program. Classrooms
use this unique educational tool to broaden student's learning horizon.
It's an easy way to help bring newspapers to local classrooms all year long.
IcI.oic V(tu ]le vc own, rt' cinIbcr:
NDoWil l\i'vi-i y nwspIlpcrs. 1
NEWS HERALD Simply rcq -st '\*V:ition Donation"
('%,11 747-185000L iday!


4, '. *r\ ii:y


Kiwanis Korner


Area BRIEFS









T s Nv e00I v fc


Gulf County


ARRESTS

The Gulf County Sher-
iff's Office will be conduct-
ing vehicle safety check-
points and DUI check
points during the month
of November 2008. The
check points will be held
throughout the county to
include Highway 98 near
St. Joe Beach, U.S. 98
and Garrison Ave, C-30
Simmons Bayou, State 71
North of White City, State
22 and State 22A, State 71
and Westarm Creek, State
71 Dalkieth Area and
State 71 near the Calhoun
County line.
On 11/03/2008 Brandon
Keith Keller, 28, was ar-
rested on two warrants of
violation of probation.
On 11/03/2008 Justin
- Ortiz, 27, was arrested
on a violation of proba-
tion warrant. The original
charge was vehicular ho-
micide.
On 11/03/2008 Blake
Wheeler Barnes, 19, was
arrested on charges of
Fleeing and attempting to
Selude officers and reck-
less driving.
On 11/06/2008 Joel Scott
- Lewis, 28, was arrested on
a warrant for introduction
Sof contraband into a state
Correctional institute.
On 11/06/2008 Tana Re-
nee Connell, 28, was ar-
rested on a charge of child
abuse.
On 11/06/2008 Wendy
Locklear Tarr, 38, was ar-
rested of fleeing and at-
tempting to elude, theft
from a person over the
age of 65, and violation of
Probation.
On 11/07/2008 Nancy
Elaine Wolinski, 26, was
arrested on a warrant of
violation probation.
On 11/08/2008 Kami
Burke, 31, was arrested on
a warrant of conspiracy to
introduce contraband into
a state correctional insti-
tute.
On 11/08/2008 .Michael
Andrew Delozier, 27, was
arrested on charges of as-
sault.
On 11/10/2008 Gertudis
Hernandez Chow, 32, was
arrested on two warrants
of failure to appear on bail
on charges of worthless
checks.
On 11/12/2008 Della
Mae Dickens, 49, was ar-
rested on a violation of
probation. The original
charge was DUI.
On 11/13/2008 Ray Lynn
Allbriton, 40, was arrested
on a violation of proba-
tion warrant. The original
charge was DUI.
JoelK Vanaelst, 35, was
arrested on a violation of
probation warrant from
the state of Texas.
On 11/15/2008 Deborah
Stewart Webster, 55, was
arrested with a DUI.


DEP agents put a lid on waste violations


Authorities: Business owner illegally disposed of hundreds of filters, 11 barrels of oil


WALTON COUNTY Florida
Department of Environmen-
tal Protection (DEP) law en-
forcement agents last week
arrested a business owner
for allegedly violating the
Florida litter law, a third-de-
gree felony punishable by up
to five years in prison and/or
a fine up to $5,000. Jim.L.
Keeler, of Jim Keeler Enter-
prises Inc., also was charged
with two first-degree misde-
meanors, each punishable
by up to one year in prison
and/or a fine up to $1,000.
"Thanks to an anony-
mous complaint made by the


public, we were able to solve
this environmental crime,"
said DEP Division of Law
Enforcement Director Hen-
ry Barnet. "We encourage
all citizens to utilize tools
like dialing #DEP from a
cellular phone or calling the
State Warning Point (1-877-2-
SAVE-FL) to help us enforce
Florida's laws and better
protect our environment."
DEP's one-month investi-
gation of the trucking main-
tenance and repair business
located at 1279 County 2A
in Walton County revealed
the illegal disposal of busi-


ness-generated waste on an
adjacent timberland prop-
erty owned by Keeler. Ap-
proximately 30 cubic yards
of waste were discovered,
including several hundred
uncrushed, used oil filters
and 11 55-gallon barrels of
used oil.
Investigators also discov-
ered that in the eight years,
Jim Keeler Enterprises had
been in business as a com-
mercial trucking company,
the company never had
hired or used a solid waste
contractor to dispose of its
commercial solid waste. In-


stead, Keeler had directed
his employees to dispose of
the business' waste by mov-
ing the waste to the adjacent
timberland, then burning
and/or burying the debris.
DEP's Division of Law
Enforcement is responsible
for statewide environmental
resource law enforcement,
providing law enforcement
services to Florida's state
parks and greenways and
trails. Agents investigate en-
vironmental resource crimes
and illegal dredge and fill ac-
tivities, and respond to natu-
ral disasters, civil unrest,


hazardous material incidents
and oil spill that threaten the
environment.
To report an environmen-
tal crime, wireless custom-
ers can dial #DEP Callers
also can report environmen-
tal crimes to the State Warn-
ing Point by calling (877)
2-SAVE-FL (1-877-272-8335).
General environmental in-
quiries should be directed to
DEP district offices during
business hours.
For more information
about DEP's Division of Law
Enforcement, visit www.dep.
state.fl.us/law.


Department of Highway Safety: Give others a break; Share the road


The Florida Department of High-
way Safety and Motor Vehicles is
kicking off a public awareness cam-
paign, called Share the Road, to re-
mind motorists to use courtesy when
driving and to watch out for pedestri-
ans, bicyclists and motorcyclists.
"Florida's roadways are busy
with more than 18 million residents
and approximately 88 million visitors
eash year," said Electra Theodor-
ides-Bustle, executive director of the
Department of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicles. "As more of us ex-
plore cost-saving and environmen-
tal-conscious commute options, it
is important that we are aware and
considerate to everyone on the road.


Share the Road is a basic reminder
of driver courtesy and safety."
At any given time, Florida hosts
millions of passenger cars and
trucks, thousands of buses hauling
children and groups of adult workers
and visitors, thousands of large com-
mercial trucks and trailers hauling
heavy loads of products, thousands
of motorcycles that are difficult to
see at times and hundreds of bicy-
clists who use our state's roadways
for transportation or recreation and
pedestrians who walk on and across
streets and roadways.
"No single motorist or group of
motorists has an inherent right to
use the road more than any other


individual or group," said Director
of the Florida Highway Patrol Col.
John Czernis. "The laws apply to
everyone on the road, regardless of
whether you are driving, walking or
peddling: Share the Road promotes
safe driving habits, showing courtesy
to others and taking proactive steps
toward personal safety and that of
others on the road."
The Department of Highway Safe-
ty and Motor Vehicles developed the
campaign using federal grant funds
provided through the Florida De-
partment, of Transportation. Share
the Road uses radio public service
announcements, posters, flyers and
bumper stickers to drive the message


to motorists to give others a brake.
Visit our www.flhsmv.gov/Safety-
Tips/ to access and download cam-
paign materials.
The Florida Department of High-
way Safety and Motor Vehicles is
charged with the mission of pro-
viding highway safety and secu-
rity through excellence in service,
education and enforcement. The
Department is leading the way to a
Safer Florida by way of three major
components: driver licenses, vehicle
tags and titles and the Florida High-
way Patrol.
To learn more about DHSMV
and the services offered, visit www.
flhsmv.gov.


FWC FIELD OPERATIONS


OKALOOSA COUNTY
On Nov. 8, Officer Danny
Arnette organized a detail,
Operation Tree Rat, on the
Yellow River for opening day
of small game season. The
detail produced one arrest
for hunting over bait in the
management area during
archery season. K-9 Officer
Sarah Hahner and K-9 Sadie
tracked the subject to the
bait. Also, one warning was
issued for taking squirrel in
the closed area on Eglin Air
Force Base and one warn-
ing for possession of a gun
in the closed area on Eglin.
Additional officers working
Operation Tree Rat were
Officers Van Barrow, Alan
Kirchinger and Eddie Gat-
lin. They checked approxi-
mately 40 users.

BAY COUNTY
Officer Mike Nobles be-
gan an investigation that led
to the arrest of two shrimp-
ers on charges of selling
fish illegally and possession
of several species of under-
sized marine fish. Officer
Nick Price assisted Officer
Nobles with the investiga-
.tion which resulted in the
seizure of 76 undersized


flounder, 14- undersized
Spanish mackerel, and 4
small king mackerel.

Officers Dennis Palmer
and Mark Clements received
a complaint from a Bay
County Sheriff's deputy who
said he saw what he believed
to be a decomposing sea tur-
tle skull at a subject's resi-
dence. The skull was iden-
tified by the local National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration Marine Lab
as being a green sea turtle
that weighed about 150
pounds. Written confessions
were obtained that the turtle
had been found on Panama
City Beach. A citation for
the illegal possession was
issued.

FRANKLIN COUNTY
On Nov. 7-9, Officers
Woody Cook, Steven Cook,
Travis Huckeba, Don Walker,
John Allen, Chasen Yarbor-
ough and Lt. Charlie Wood
conducted a special detail
to coincide with the open-
ing weekend of small game
season in Franklin County.
Officers patrolled the Apala-
chicola, Ochlockonee and
Crooked Rivers and their
tributaries. Education and


enforcement attention was
directed toward boating un-,
der the influence of alcohol,
vessel safety equipment,
vessel navigational lights,
vessel overloading, hunt-
ing licenses, management
area permits and bag lim-
its for small game. During
the detail, 57 vessels were
boarded and 128 users were
inspected. The inspections
produced three uniform
boating citations for insuffi-
cient number of personal flo-
tation devices and improper
navigational lights and nine
written warnings for various
boating safety equipment
violations. The inspections
also produced two resource
citations for no valid resi-
dent hunting license, no
valid resident freshwater
fishing license, and one writ-
ten warning for possession
of undersized fish.

On Nov. 10, Officers Mike
Slotin and Faris Livesay
conducted inspections of
commercial oyster har-
vesters and their vessels
in Apalachicola Bay. The
officers boarded seven ves-
sels inspecting vessel safety
equipment, saltwater prod-
uct licenses and size toler-
ance on the harvested oys-


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................................,fl arra ell


ters. One resource citation
was issued to a harvester
for possession of undersized
oysters. The bag of oysters
inspected contained more
than 38 percent undersized
oysters. Nine written warn-
ings also were issued to oth-
er harvesters for violations
pertaining to vessel safety
equipment.

WALTON COUNTY
On Nov. 8-9, Lt. Dennis
Welsh and Officer Ken White
worked the lower end of the
Choctawhatchee River Wild-
life Management Area. The
officers checked 68 users
and 30 vessels on opening
weekend of small game sea-
son. Two boating citations
and four warnings were is-
sued.


LIBERTY COUNTY
On Nov. 8, Officer Ben-
jamin Johnson was patrol-
ling the Bradwell Unit of the
Wildlife Management Area
in Liberty County when he
stopped two hunters in a
pickup truck. Officer John-
son checked the two subjects
and asked them if they had
any luck, and they replied;
"No." Officer Johnson asked
them to open the tonneau
cover of the truck so it could
be inspected for wildlife. The
driver stated, "Might as well
get me now, because I've
messed up." Officer John-
son found one spike buck
taken with a shotgun during
archery season. Proper cita-
tions were issued. Buckshot,
two shotguns and the deer
were taken as evidence.


of the


Buddy is a young male lab mix, approximately 10
months old and is the sweetest boy.

Buddy is a great dog with lots of personality &
really needs to find his "forever home". He loves
playing with all his friends here but is searching
for his family to come rescue him. If you would
like to adopt Buddy or one of the MANY OTHER
WONDERFUL pets available for adoption at St.
Joseph Bay Humane Society- PLEASE COME
OUT AND VISIT!

TIME IS NOT RIGHT FOR ADOPTION BUT
STILL WANT TO HELP? CONSIDER BEING
A FOSTER PARENT! CONTACT MELODY AT
227-1103 OR 227-8652.

Don't forget your Science Diet &
Frontline products!


N


The Star 1 3


Thursday, November 20, 2008


Law'L~ Enforcement~1~


1






B4 I The Star


Church news


Thursday, November 20, 2008


Medicare drug coverage open enrollment for seniors begins Nov. 15


More than 400,000 Florida
seniors are eligible for cov-
erage, but not enrolled.
New research shows 9 in
10 seniors in Medicare Part
D program are satisfied with
coverage
The annual open enroll-
ment period for the Medi-
care Part D prescription
drug program begins on
November 15, 2008, and re-
cent estimates indicate that
more than 400,000 of Florida
seniors are eligible for the
program, but remain un-en-
rolled. Nationwide, as many
as 6.6 million, or 15 per-
cent of eligible seniors are
without prescription drug
coverage.
Extending November 15
- December 31, 2008, the en-


rollment period provides an
opportunity for those Florida
Medicare beneficiaries and
others across the country
who have not yet taken ad-
vantage of the program to do
so. It also provides a timely
opportunity for those who
are enrolled to re-evaluate
their current plan and make
a change, if appropriate.
New public opinion re-
search released today by
Medicare Today shows that
just two in 10 enrollees are
'likely' or 'somewhat likely'
to shop around and compare
Medicare plans this year.
More than half (56 percent)
of those enrolled say they
are 'not at all likely' to do
so. Conducted by KRC Re-
search in Washington, DC,


the survey also finds that 9 in
10 seniors are 'satisfied' with
their Medicare prescription
drug coverage, with 63 per-
cent reporting that they are
'very satisfied.'
"Even individuals who
have been pleased with their
coverage so far should take
advantage of this time to re-
view and evaluate their cur-
rent plan," said Mary Grealy,
president of the Healthcare
Leadership Council, which
is coordinating Medicare
Today's efforts. "Plans and
costs change, as do the pre-
scription needs of seniors
as they age. What may have
been the best plan for some-
one a year ago, may no lon-
ger be the option that pro-
vides the best drug coverage


at the best price. We encour-
age people to take advantage
of the consumer choice that
is one of the strengths of this
program."
In Florida, approximately
3.2 million individuals are
eligible to enroll in the Part
D program, according to
the Centers for Medicare &
Medicaid. Services' (CMS)
Management Informa-
tion Integrated Repository
(MIIR). Of that number,
approximately 2.7 million
have prescription drug cov-
erage either through the
Medicare Part D program,
an employer or former em-
ployer or other source. That
leaves nearly 440,000 Florida
Medicare beneficiaries who
are without prescription


drug coverage, yet don't
have to be.
Prior to the introduction
of the Medicare Part D pro-
gram in January 2006, mil-
lions of Medicare beneficia-
ries lacked coverage for their
prescription medicines. To-
day, 39 million of America's
44 million beneficiaries have
prescription drug coverage
- with more than 25 million
enrolled in the Medicare
Part D program.
"During the country's cur-
rent economic crisis, many
seniors are cutting back
and watching their spending
more than ever," said Gre-
aly. "The last thing that any
senior should have to face is
the choice between paying
for prescription medications


and paying the heating bill
this winter. That's why this
benefit is so important."
Medicare Today, a nation-
al partnership of more than
400 national and regional
organizations committed
to providing seniors with
resources and support to
evaluate and enroll in one of
the prescription drug plans
offered under the Medicare
Part D program. Medicare
Today is organizing informa-
tional and enrollment events
in communities across the
country, where seniors will
be able to receive informa-
tion and enrollment assis-
tance. For more information
about Medicare Today re-
sources and local events, vis-
it www.MedicareToday.org.


First United Methodist
Thanksgiving Dinner

The First United Method-
ist Church of Mexico Beach
is hosting a free Thanksgiv-
ing dinner for the community
on Thursday, Nov. 27 at noon
(CT) in the fellowship hall, lo-
cated on 111 N. 22nd Street.
The church will be serv-
ing turkey, dressing and all
the fixings. Don't eat alone,
come have dinner with us.
For more information, call
the church office at 648-8820.


Sale
It is time to plan for the
annual Antique Tool Show &
Sale. We are inviting exhibi-
tors and vendors from all over
the Southeast to showcase
and sell all of your different
kinds of tools and implements
from the 18th to 20th centu-


ries. There will be many wood-
working items. This event will
take place on the Saturday
before Thanksgiving, that
is on Nov. 22, 2008, from 7:30
a.m.-1 p.m.(CT). As a vendor
or displayer, you will have Fri-
day, November 21st, to set up.
There will be NO charge this
year. Tables are furnished.
General Public: $2 Admission
Local places to stay:
Cherokee Motel: 1 mile,
(850)-674-8500; Airport Motel:
2 miles, (850)-674-8168; Snow
Bird Motel: 4 miles, (850)-643-
5411, PO. Box 215, Sam Atkins
Park, Blountstown, Fl. 32424


Beach Baptist Chapel will
be having its annual Thanks-
giving Dinner on the grounds
following the 11:00 am ET
service on Nov. 23. Every-
one is invited to enjoy a time
of fellowship, special music,
worship and praise, and great
food. The church is located
at 311 Columbus Street, St.


Joe Beach. For more infor-
mation or for transportation,
call 647-3950.

Community
Thanksgiving Service

The Community Wide
Thanksgiving service will be
held on Sunday night at 7 p.m.
EST, Nov. 23, at First United
Methodist Church of Port
St. Joe. Father Phil Fortin of
Saint Joseph Catholic Church
will be giving the message
and Michael Rogers with
Faith Bible Church will be
receiving the special offering.
Everyone is invited to attend
this special service where we
as a community gather to-
gether to give thanks for all of
our blessings.

Mathis Memorial
Services

Memorial services for
Raymond Mathis, born Sept.


28, 1957 and died Nov. 7, 2008,
will be held at 2 p.m. ET on
Saturday, Nov. 22, 2008, at
the Highland Park Commu-
nity Church in Apalachic-
ola, Florida. Brother Ray
Creamer and Brother Don
Banta will be officiating.

Mexico Beach AARP
Thanksgiving Dinner

The AARP will be host-
ing a Thanksgiving Pot Luck
Lunch on Friday, Nov. 21 at
noon (CT) at the Methodist
Church, located at 111 N. 22nd
Street in Mexico Beach.
The organization will be
furnishing the turkeys and
dressing. We need a head
count now. If you will be at-
tending, please contact Lucy
Bennet at 647-3710.
Guests are welcome, and
we hope you consider joining
our group. For more infor-
mation about AARP, contact
Faye Thompson at 648-5337.
See you Friday.

Please do not feed the wild
dolphins in the bay. Remem-
ber to stay at least 50 yards
away from wild dolphins. Use
binoculars to watch them play.


You've Got It!
Somebody
Wants It!







STAR PUBLICATIONS
THESTAR
S R.. .. ,

0 FREEDOM
1 1 CPA t_ 1< INJ _1A~ 3


November is American

Diabetes Month


The Florida Department of
Health (DOH) recognizes No-
vember as American Diabetes
Month and urges Floridians
and their loved ones who have
diabetes to take small steps
to increase their quality of life
and prevent or delay complica-
tions. Diabetes is a major pub-
lic health crisis of the 21st cen-
tury, which continues to grow
in epidemic proportions.
Over 1.5 million Floridians
have diabetes and about 3.5
million obese adults are at
increased risk for developing
type 2 diabetes.
"Having dia-
betes places an Severa
individual at
increased risk havefo
for a number of d
serious, even life- diabe
threatening com- manr
plications such
as heart attack, educl
stroke, kidney
disease, blind- (88O
ness or amputa- with
tion of the foot or iti
leg," said Betsy blooC
Wood, R.N.,
M.PH., Chief of COntr(
the DOH Bureau
of Chronic Dis- hospital
ease Prevention and in
and Health Pro-
motion. "Smok- quality
ing increases the
risks of these complications."
DOH recommends the fol-
lowing steps to help Floridians
control diabetes:
Ask your doctor for
assistance in getting diabetes
self-management educa-
tion.
If you smoke, it's
never too late to quit. Contact
Florida's
Quitline for free guidance
at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW
Remember the
ABCs of diabetes care: Learn
your A1C, blood pressure and
cholesterol goals and ask your
doctor how you can achieve


oI





411
oll
ti
C

ii

I


them.
Several studies have found
that diabetes self-manage-
ment education is associated
with improved blood sugar
control, fewer hospitalizations,
lower self-reported weight and
improved quality of life. Diabe-
tes self-management educa-
tion is covered by insurance
and Medicare.
Smoking increases choles-
terol levels, blood pressure and
blood sugar levels and doubles
the risk of cardiovascular dis-
ease among those with diabe-
tes. Overall, adults with diabe-
tes who smoke
studies are three times
more likely
ind that than their non-
S1c smoking coun-
es self- terparts to die
'ement from cardiovas-
cular diseases.
tion is Furthermore,
. smoking has
lated been found
proved to be associ-
ated with an
sugar increased risk
of foot ulcers,
, fewer which may lead
!Zatios to infections
izati S and amputa-
proved tions.
DOH pro-
Of life. motes, protects
and improves
the health of all people in Flor-
ida.
For more information
about the Florida Diabetes
Prevention and Control Pro-
gram, visit the DOH website at
floridadiabetes.org. For more
information about joining the
Florida Alliance for Diabetes
Prevention and Care, visit
http://doh.state.fl.us/family/
DCP/Alliance.html.
To learn more about dia-
betes, contact the American
Diabetes Association at 1-800-
DIABETES (1-800-342-2382)
or call your local county health
department.


i First Presbyterian Church
Sof Port St. Joe
508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
Reverend Reid Cameron
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.




++++ TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN


7 ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
__ vww.stjamnesepiscopalchurclh.org 850-227-1845




Family Life ChurchSJ

Edition 00, Church,

2 x2,0

4504977, 4504977


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe


Sunday:
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m ET
Sunday School 10:00 a.m. ET
Traditional Worship: 11:00 a.m. ET
Wednesday.
Youth: 5:30p.ml. ET
in:Coir: 00 OOp.m. ET


850) 227-1724
Rev. Mac Fulcher
Pastor
Ann Comforter Jeremy Dixon
Music Director Youth Minister
Deborah Loyless
Director of Children Ainistries


"Our Church can be your home"

S First Church of t he azarene
'420 Loig a'venu iSPort St. Joec, florida 32456-
(850) 229-9596

C7ive untl tho L iord th' jforyd Hisj iu; nirne, worship tic Lord ilt the becatiI of/hofincss.
isalfm i29:'2


Sunday School................... .. 10 a.m
Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m.


Sunday Evening Worship .............6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Servce ...... 7 p.m.


OWN A BUINlEC

HEED HELP?


AD)ERPTIKE HER-!8

CALL 297-1278 (




BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. ET Bible Study all ages 10 a.m. ET
Morning Worship l a.m. ET Evening Worship 6 p in. ETl
Tuesday: Choir Practice p.m.
Wednesday: Kids for Christ 6 p.m. /Prayer Meeting & Youth Group p.m.
"0 taste and see that the Lord is good blessed is the nian that tristteIth 1 Hon
Please accept this inritiatio to join us ii iiorship God bless osu!
Please c oll isjor our o spri oil/ needs
www.beachchapel.org
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-3950 Home 769-8725





CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS
Singing: 9 a.m. Sunday
Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue
k.. t,_______________


Area NEWS


Pioneer Settlement
Antique Tool Show and Thanksgiving Dinner


i aithBible

Michael Rogers Pastor
9:45 AM ............................. ... ........ ...... Sunday School
10:30 AM ...................................... Fellowship Breakfast
S1:00 AM ........... ... ..... .... ..................... Worship
6:00 PM ................... ....... ... ,............ .......,....W worship
www.faithbiblepsj, .net
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faitl Christian School






These businesses invite you to visit the church of your choice this week.


FAITH


COMFORTER
FUNERAL HOME
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter
L.F.D.
(850) 227-1818


SOUTHERLAND FAMILY

FUNERAL HOME
507 10th Street Port St. Joe
(850) 229-8111


Rish, Gibson, Scholz &
Groom, P.A.
William J. Rish, Thomas S. Gibson, Russell Scholz,
Paul W, Groom II
(850) 229-8211


Thursday, November 20, 2008 w w w. starf 1. com Page B5


Judgment

is On the Way

We as Christians have let God down.
Sin is prevalent, it's all around.
One person caused prayer to be taken out of
school.
Some had rather teach evolution, than teach
the golden rule.
We see our government rotting at the core,
spending hard-earned tax money as they
never have before.
Spending millions on rockets tofly through the
sky,
while millions go hungry with no money to
buy.
They take away a man's judgeship for
displaying the Commandments of God.
I'm afraid there will be more taken away
before we leave this sod.
Women with women, men with men.
Our government is working on a lot more sin.
They've appointed godless judges, that can't
put a killer in his tomb.
But they seem to have no problem, killing a
baby in the womb.
Alcohol and drugs are everywhere you turn.
Some adults have ddne a good job of teaching,
that's how children learn.
God is not happy with America, it's plain to
me.
How much longer before his judgment comes,
we'll have to wait and see.
Another man was killed in a school today.
Since they took prayer out of school, Id say
judgment is on the way.
Look at the war, so many have died up till
today.
Proud and patriotic Americans, yes, I'd say
judgment is on the way.
If we who know Jesus will get on our knees
and pray,
Ask forgiveness of our sins and from them turn
away.
He said He would forgive us and cleanse us
from all sin.
Think about it, judgment is on the way, do you
know Jesus my friend?
Billy Johnson



Long Avenue

fish fry to support

youth programs


Long Avenue Bap-
tist Church will be hold-
ing a fish fry fundraiser
in support of its youth
ministry programs
from 11 a.m. until all
dinners are
gone Nov.
22. Fried
fresh
mullet
dinners
will be
available
for $6 and will
include beans, grits,
fresh hush puppies and
a drink.


For those with food
allergy considerations,
please be aware that we
use peanut oil to pre-
pare the dinners.
Dinners will
be available

or car-
S f ry-out
at the
Family
Life Center on
the church campus at
1601 Long Ave. in Port
St Joe. Contact Mike
Dunn at 229-8691 for
further information.


Dr. Tim Hines is a 1983
graduate of International
Seminary, in Plymouth, Flor-
ida, where he completed his
Bachelors and Masters de-
gree in Theology.
For the past ten years Tim
has served as alumni instruc-
tor at Brother Norvel Haye's
New Life Bible College. Tim
is married to a virtuous wom-
an of God by the name of Jodi








Cookbooks

FOR SALE


The Christian CONSCIENCE


The events of the last few weeks have
caused many to tell me that they think that
we are approaching the time of the Anti-
Christ. With that in mind, I think this is a
good time to review how one may escape
this time, and go to be with the Lord in His
kingdom.
In the 3rd chapter of the book of John
(the 4th book in the New Testament of the
Bible) look at the first 21 verses.
Jesus is approached by Nicodemus, a
man in authority in the Jewish leadership.
Nicodemus is told three times that a man
must be BORN-AGAIN, or as the Greek
says, "BORN FROM ABOVE." Jesus ex-
plains that there are two kinds of births.
The first is our natural birth. The second is
a birth by the Spirit. Jesus told Nicodemus
that without these two births, a person
could not see the kingdom of God, or enter
the kingdom of God. He then said, Do not
marvel that I said to you, YOU MUST BE
BORN AGAIN." John 3:16 is talking about
born-again people, and should be viewed in
that light.
There are many, who teach that a per-
son must be born-again, however, very few
are really born-again, understand what
this means, and know how to experience it.
The key word here is Spirit, which of course
means the Holy Spirit. Many churches be-
lieve in the Trinity, yet teach little about
the Holy Spirit. It is the Holy Spirit that


breathes life into the infant at birth, and it
is the Holy Spirit that breathes new life into
people giving them the new birth.
The details concerning how this new
birth is accomplished is found in two Old
Testament books, where Jeremiah and
Ezekiel write what the Lord taught them
about the New Covenant. In Jeremiah
31:31-34, the Lord told Jeremiah that He
would write His law in their minds, and
write it on their hearts. In Ezekiel 11:19 the
Lord told Ezekiel that He would put a new
spirit within them, take the stony heart out
of their flesh, and give them a new heart
of flesh.
Being born-again is not an experience,
which takes place in the natural. It is su-
pernatural. No human action, or ceremo-
ny, can make a person born-again and part
of the kingdom of God. It is only when God
makes a person born-again, that they ex-
perience the second birth.
Jesus, in many places and in many
ways, in the New Testament, taught that
a person must give up everything to serve
Him. (Luke 14:33 for example) The only
thing a person can do, who desires to be
born-again, is to surrender control of his/
her life, allow God to remove the old selfish
heart, and replace it with a new heart.
There is no guarantee that one prayer
will accomplish this. God looks at the inner
person, what we usually call the heart. If


a person is really sincere in asking God to
change their heart, and make them what
He wants them to be, I believe He will do
it.
At the Mexico Beach Christian Wor-
ship Center, we recommend that those
in our congregation go home and get in a
place where they can talk with God with-
out distraction, and ask God to make them
what He wants them to be. We ask them
to humble themselves, as Jesus did, taking
the form of a servant, as the Apostle wrote
in Phillipians 2:5-11.
We worship the Father, Jesus Christ,
the Son of God, Savior and Messiah, and
the Holy Spirit with our praise and sing-
ing and giving. We also demonstrate our
love for one another. Our services begin,
with a time of greeting and fellowship, at
9:30 Sunday a.m. CT. Worship begins at
9:45 a.m. After the service, we have a pot
luck luncheon so that we can fellowship
with one another, and exhort one another.
(Hebrews 10:24) We worship at the Mexico
Beach Civic Center on 105 N. 31st street,
which is behind the Beach Walk gift shop,
just off U.S. 98.

God Bless,
Pastor Tim Morrill
Mexico Beach Christian
Worship Center
pastor@mexicobeachcwc.com


and they have two beautiful
children. They are based here
in Florida, and are submit-
ted to Pastor David Garcia of
Brooksville Assembly of God.
Tim and Jodi have started
two churches and pastored
two others.
They feel the call of God to
spend a season on the road
evangelizing, and they oper-
ate with a powerful Prophetic


voice. Tim and Jodi are looking
forward to what God will do in
these meetings at Family Life
Church. We believe that young
and old will sit in expectation
during the powerful messages
and receive the Word of God,
as it becomes alive and real to
them.
Also, a children's crusade
will be conducted by Sheryl
Bradley during the meetings.


If you desire to be someone
who makes a difference in this
world, or just simply need a
touch from God, we encour-
age you to come out to Fam-
ily Life Church, Starting Sun-
day morning Nov. 30 at 10:30
a.m. ET, and Sunday through
Wednesday night at 7 p.m. ET.
You will not be disappointed!
Please see our ad in this paper
for directions.


A Collection of Recipes by Oak
Grove Church created by Ann Ballard
are available for $15, or buy 10 get one
free, at the following locations Oak
Grove Church Office, Bayside Gifts
& Florist, Beach to Bay, Sisters Res-
taurant, Portside trading Petals by
the Bay, Cooper's Cut & Style, Marina
Gift Shoppe, Paradise Coast Vacation
Rentals, Aline's Beauty Salon.
All proceeds go toward the Oak
Grove Church "Increasing His King-
dom" Building Fund.
For more information you
can call the church Office
(850)227-1837.


$5 Raffle Tickets
3 day 2 night stay at the Windmark
Beach Resort with a
$200 Gift Certificate to
School of Fish Restaurant.
Tickets Available at: Toucans, St Joe
Rent All and Persnickety.
Drawing December 6, 2008 Benefits Project Graduation


The friendly place to worship!

First Baptist Church
MEXICO BEACH
Located at 823 N. 15th St., Mexico Beach
Corner of 15th & California 648-5776
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all ages)
Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Please note, all times central!
Reverend Edi LaFountain


JL Worship with us at
ong Avenue Baptist Church
Where Faith, Family &Friendship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL *
For More Information Call 229-8691


irst Baptist Churchi
102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
.iL Jerome Barnes, ir, eri Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
lifl. Bobby Alexander, Miti'ter to Studlent\
New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church


Sunday
Contemporary Service ........8:30 am
Sunday School ..................9:40 am
Traditional Service............11:00 am
Awana's ........................... 5:00 pm
Youth Choir....................... 5:30 pm
Youth Groups..................... 6:00 pm


Wednesday
Children's Choir.............. 6:00 pm
Prayer Meeing................. 6:30 pm
Children's Ministry
Activities ......................... 6:30 pm
Youth Ministry Activities... 6:30 pm


\www.fbcpsj.org


JW United JMe&did
Ce- 4c t J'ezica 3Sead
111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship Services:
8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:45 a.m CST Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Methodist (hurch
NURSiRY PROVIDED
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


Oak Grove Church
(noiy,.,An/ioif, [monH, A'yeo//if, i wy 0ir I//o, 4
Come Grow With Us!

Sunday School 9:45 -
Sunday Worship Service 10:45
Wednesday Cafe 5 pm 613 Madison St.
Wednesday 6:15 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Adult Bible Study 850-227-1837
Children & Youth Ministries www.oakgrove-church.org


Church of Christ
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem


We meet at 350 Firehouse Road
Overstreet 850.647.1622
Sunday Baile Study 10:00 a.m EST
Sunday WWoship l00 am. ES=
Wednesday Bible Study '730 pmn. ES
"We are about our Father's business"


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
sigl)lan b iewi apti t Iju1r
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.ln.
Morning Worship 1 :00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
AMik-e W'tl'ook, Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
Poito Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.




St. Peter's Anglican Church
(Traditional I'piscopal Service 1928 IC I')

Morning Priycr & Holy Communion
Sullday.. ................. 00 a.m .
The Rev. David Mans, Priest
Ser\ ices beig held at the I hnitLed P!entecostal Cllurchl
309 6th Street Port St .oe. FI.
". I L.'iIch nIi Fuilth In ( hunc in I orl/"
K E *


Dr. Tim Hines comes to Family Life Church






B6 I The Star Local Thursday, November 20, 2008







SCHOOL NEWS B
ThursdaySection

Thursday, November 20, 2008 w w.starf 1.com Page B6


By Heather Strange and Douglas
May
As Thanksgiving quickly
approaches every Tiger
Shark ponders what exactly
he or she is thankful for.
Students are thankful for a
plethora of things; however,
one thing every Tiger Shark
is thankful for is the upcom-
ing Thanksgiving break.
Nov. 26 will be a half day
with no lunch; the following
Thursday and Friday will
be holidays. Students and
teachers are looking for-
ward to spending time with
their families and tucking
into a delicious Thanksgiv-
ing dinner.
SPORTS
On Nov. 21 the Tiger


Shark football team will
continue their contention
for the state title. They will
be traveling to Mayo and
will play at 7 p.m.
All members of the
soccer teams, both boys
and girls, need to heed all of
Coach McDonald's instruc-
tions pertaining to soccer
practice during the Thanks-
giving break.
The girl's basketball
team will be traveling
to Choctaw to play in a
Thanksgiving break tour-
nament.
On Nov. 24 both the girls
and boys soccer teams will
be playing John Paul II at
five and seven respectively.
On Nov. 25 both the
girls and boys soccer teams


will be playing at Wakulla at
five and seven respectively.
BRIEFS
SThe fall sale of the 2008-
2009 yearbook is underway.
Parents and students can
purchase yearbooks on-
line via the school's web-
site or forms are available
in room 202. The year-
book's current price is $50.
This price won't be avail-
able for long, so purchase
your yearbook ASAP It's
your life, yearbook it!
The SGA will be host-
ing their annual Pie Auc-
tion on Nov. 25 at 6:30 p.m.
in the commons area. All
parents, businesses, and
members of the commu-
nity are invited to attend.'
All members of the SGA
need to remember to bring
in their pies.
The High Tech Club
will be taking a field trip on
Nov. 21.
Parents and students
are reminded that progress
reports will be issued on
Nov. 24.


p~t t. ci
~i7c1Irn8


We had a spectacular
First Homecoming Blast
Party at the Centennial
Building. Thank you to all
the PTO parents and stu-
dents that attended and we
raised a lot of money for our
school.
On Nov. 26 Port St. Joe
Elementary School will par-
ticipate in a Read-A-Thon.


Each grade level will con-
duct the Read-A-Thon and
give students time to read
any form of literature they
choose. This is also Early
Release at 11:30 a.m. and
no lunch will be served.
Get ready, students and
parents, for our Fall Book
Fair. It will be December 1-
5. Family Night at the Book


Fair will be Dec. 2 5-7:30
p.m. in the library. Please
come to our annual Book
Fair and support the efforts
of our school as we promote
the importance of Reading.
Important Dates to
Remember
Nov. 24 Progress Re-
ports Issued
Nov. 25 Kindergarden
Pow-Wow Parade
Nov. 26 1/2 day early.re-
lease for Thanksgiving
Nov. 27-28 Thanksgiving
Dec. 1-5 Fall Book Fair,
Dec. 2 Family Night at
the Book Fair 5-7:30p.m.


ARE YOU SMARTER THAN A PSJE DOLPHIN?

Week # 5 Answers are:
What is polyester made of? Synthesized polymers
How long is the tongue of a mouse? It depends on the size of the mouse
What is the square root of Pi? 1.772454
How many hours of sleep does a cat get a day? 16-18 hours

Congratulations to this week's winners: They are Linda Wood and Shane McGuffin.
We appreciate the interaction you provide to our students. It is fun to learn together!!!!

Week #6 Questions are:
Who was the only bachelor President?
Who was the heaviest President?
What 3 Presidents were either born on or died on the 4th of July?
Which President was related by blood or marriage to 11 other Presidents?
Which President served the shortest time in office?
Which college graduated the most Presidents?

Questions submitted by: 3rd grader Cully Kerigan

Please email your responses to: cwillis@gulf.kl2.fl.us


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DAZZLING DOLPHINS


FRONT ROW: Miles Butler, Rachel Sherman, Sydnee O'Donnell, Alexis Wilson,
Alex Strickland, Kyli Wockenfuss, Leanna Baumgardner,
BACK ROW: Ethan LaFontaine, Marquez Culter, Elijah Caldwell, Levi Finley, Um-
stead Sanders, Amber Turman, Dylan Whitehead, Joy Spires.


Notice of the Availability of an

Environmental Assessment

The USDA, Rural Utilities Service has received an application for financial assistance
from the City of Wewahitchka. As required by the national Environmental Policy Act,
the Rural Utilities Service has prepared an Environmental Assessment that evaluated
the potential environmental effects and consequences of the proposed project. This
notice announces the availability of the Environmental Assessment for public review
and comment.

The proposed project consists of improvements to two separate areas within the City of
Wewahitchka. The first, improvements to the existing Lake Grove Road Water Facility,
will include four (4) new pumps, a new 315,000 gallon ground storage tank and a new
hydro pneumatic tank at that facility.

The second will include constructing a new water facility in the area of Stone Mill
Creek. These improvements will consist of two wells, a booster pump, a 315,000
gallon ground storage tank and pumping facility that includes chlorination treatment
and aeration. The Stone Mill Creek improvements will also include the installation
of new water lines in the areas shown in the map below. Not all of the water lines
will be constructed in the first phase. Preventative measures will be taken to ensure
no environmentally sensitive areas are negatively impacted by the proposed project.
No mitigation is expected to be required. The alternatives evaluated included the Do
Nothing alternative and extension of the existing system for the Stone Mill Creek im-
provements.

Copies of the Environmental Assessment are available for review at 2741 Pennsylva-
nia Avenue Suite 5 Marianna, Florida 32448-4014. For further information contact
Ms. Mary Gavin of the Marianna Rural Development office (850) 526-2610. Any
person interested in commenting on this proposed project should submit comments to
the address above by December 15th, 2008.

A general location map of the proposal is shown below. (Project No. 002.040)

















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Thursday, November 20, 2008


School news


The Star I B7


the


Fire prevention was the
subject of our assembly on
Oct. 31. Scott Baker told
the children how to keep
safe and prevent fire in the
home. In fact, he gave them
an assignment to tell their
parents that it was time
to change batteries in the
smoke alarms. Why? Be-
cause you do it the weekend
that the time "falls back."
That takes the guesswork
out of trying to remember
when. In order to help the
students remember the
fire safety rules, Mr. Baker
engaged them in three ac-
tivities. First, what do you
do if there is a fire in the
house? He yelled, "Go out"
and students yelled back,
"Stay out." Second, what do


you do if your clothes catch
fire? Copying Mr. Baker's
example, Debra Burdeshaw
and Caleb Schweikert dem-
onstrated the "Stop, Drop
and Roll" technique. Third,
what do you do if your family
burns candles in the house?
Mr. Baker yelled "blow out"
and the students yelled back
"before you go out."
Mr. Baker fielded ques-
tions from students and par-
ents alike after the program.
Barbara Eells and Shelby
Scheffer, her "aid in train-
ing," came to Faith Christian
School on Friday afternoon,
Oct. 31, to teach the first, sec-
ond and third graders about
"birds of prey." As a part of
Miss Eells' job as a permit-
ted wildlife volunteer, she


takes in injured, sick and or-
phaned animals at her place
in St. Joe Beach. She nurses
them back to health, and if
they are able, she releases
them back out to the wild.
With a special purpose per-
mit, she educates the public
using permanently dam-
aged wildlife that cannot
be released. Brave Spirit, a
wounded eagle, stayed with
Miss Eells for almost two
years before being relocated
on Eagle Mountain, which is
part of Dollywood.
The four birds of prey
that Miss Eells brought with
her were a red-tailed hawk,
a barred owl, a great horned
owl and an eastern screech
owl. Each of these beautiful
wild birds is missing a wing
or is injured in some way so
that it cannot be released.
The children gazed with rapt
attention as Shelby present-
ed each bird for them to see.
As each bird flapped and
stretched out its wings, the
reason for its being in Miss
Eells' care became obvious.
An interesting part of the
program was when Miss


Eells pulled back some
feathers to reveal on owl's
ear. Each child filed by to
get a closer look. Near the
end of the program, Miss
Eells imitated a hawk call,
and a neighborhood hawk
answered her, much to the
children's delight.
This past Tuesday, Nov.
4, the Long Avenue Baptist
Church youth praise band
led a worship service for our
school. Mike and Melanie
Dunn were accompanied
by Tyler Sarmiento on the
drums, Trevor Burch on the
guitar and Tiffany Burch on
the keyboard.
On this day, each stu-
dent was to bring in his Sa-
maritan's Purse Operation
Christmas Child shoe box. It
was a wonderful sight to see
the students come in with a
gift in hand and to see the
shoe boxes stack up along
the wall.
This is always such a spe-
cial time, because it allows
us to give to someone who
really needs and appreciates
whatever they receive, and


WHAT A HOOT: Faith Christian elementary students
observe a screech owl, the smallest of Florida owls. This


owl has an injured left wing.

to share the gospel of Jesus
Christ, with someone who
might never have heard.
Everyone went back to
class with lifted spirits and
hearts filled with songs of
praise to God.
The date for Antiquities
Studios portraits has been


changed from Nov. 15 to
Dec. 6.
Those who have signed
up for a portrait will be con-
tacted.
Due to the delay, it is still
possible to purchase a $10
coupon for a 10x13 portrait.
Call the school at 229-6707.


Faith Christian salutes those who serve


Miss Debbie's K-4 class presented Mrs.
Kelly Ramsey with a Stars and Stripes bou-
quet they made in honor of her hus-
band, Sgt. First Class Robert B.
Ramsey, presently serving in Kirkuk,
Iraq, and for others serving past and
present in the U.S. military.
Sgt. Ramsey's daughter, Madeline
R. (as she's known by her classmates)
is a student in the K-4 class at Faith
Christian School, thus making a clos-
er connection with Sgt. Ramsey and a SGT. R
better understanding of the sacrifices
that are made when soldiers have to
leave their families in order to serve and pro-
tect our country.
The children worked very hard, but very
excitedly, cutting out red, white and blue
stars and painting the clay pot that held 13
stars one for every student. A picture of
each student was placed in their star and
they wrote their names on the back (all by
themselves) so that Mr. Robert could see the
faces of those back home who love him and


are praying for him and his safe return to
Port St. Joe.
Mrs. Kelly had an unexpected sur-
prise of her own for the children from
Mr. Robert. He sent a picture of him-
self standing in front of the American
flag. Wow, what a surprise! K-4 kids
will be quick to tell you we are proud
Americans standing straight and tall
before our flag and just look at Mr.
Robert setting an example of what we
AMSEY believe. Next, Mrs. Kelly read a spe-
cial letter Mr. Robert sent to our K-4
class.
At the end of the presentation the K-4 class
gathered around Mrs. Kelly and Madeline R.
in a circle of love, joining hands and praying
for the Ramsey family and asking God for the
days to pass quickly for Mr. Robert's safe re-
turn home to his family. We will continue to
pray for God's blessings on Mr. Robert and
all the soldiers, both men and women, who
are currently serving and for our veterans
who have served to keep our country free.


BACK ROW (LEFT TO RIGHT): Mrs. Mandy, Donovan Miniat, Madelyn Gortemoller, Kris-
ten Bouington and Mrs. Debbie.
FRONT ROW (LEFT TO RIGHT): Caitlin White, Gage Medina, Ashton Burkett, Sarah Beth
Thompson, Mrs. Robert (Kelly) Ramsey (guest of honor) along with her daughter,
Madeline R. (Ruthie) Ramsey, JonMichael Rogers, Megan Saleh and Erica Ramsey.
Not pictured: Jillian Driggers and Isabella Dumas.


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Thursday, November 20, 2008


School News


School News by Ariel


Students Working Against Tobacco (or S.WA.T) is one of
the many clubs students are active in at Wewahitchka High
and all over the United States. The club unites teenagers
and helps to spread the message about tobacco companies
targeting young adults.
The message is TRUTH, which is a generation of teenag-
ers who refuse to be targeted and lured in by addictive use


Sun & Hot Weather Safety

-Wear sunglasses at all times during the day
especially on the beach
-Always wear a hat in the sun
-Stay out of the sun in the hottest part of
the day 10 00 am 2 00 pm
- Be careful of heat stroke and drink lots of
water (not alcohol'
-Never leave a child or pet in on unattended
vehicle, especially with the windows partially
or fully closed
-Do your most strenuous activities at a cooler
time of day never in the middle of the day
-Dress in loose lightweight light-colored
clothing
-Always use sunscreen to avoid a sunburn
Remember to re-apply sunscreen regularly


NOAA
Weather Radio
Weather radios, including special needs NOAA
Weather Radios, are available in a variety of models.


PUBLIC NOTICE

The City of Port St. Joe, Florida proposes to consider a
recommendation to adopt the following ordinance:

ORDINANCE NO.
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT
ST. JOE, FLORIDA, AMENDING ITS COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN; AMENDING THE GOALS, OBJECTIVES
AND POLICIES OF THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT
ELEMENT; AMENDING THE FIVE YEAR CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENT PLAN; AMENDING THE INFRA-
STRUCTURE ELEMENT; ADOPTING THE SCHOOL
DISTRICT, FIVE YEAR WORK PLAN; PROVIDING
FOR REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT
HEREWITH; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

A public hearing on the Ordinance before the Planning and
Development Review Board sitting as the local planning
agency will be held on December 2, 2008, at 5:00 p.m. at
the Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boule-
vard, Port St. Joe, Florida, and the Board of City Commis-
sioners will hold a meeting on the same date (December
2, 2008) at 6:00 p.m., ET, at the City of Port St. Joe City
Hall located at 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe,
Florida, for the purposes of authorizing transmittal of the
amendments to the Capital Improvements Element of the
Comprehensive Plan to appropriate state agencies.

All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend
the discussion and public hearing and to provide written
and/or verbal comments on the matters under consider-
ation.

The proposed Comprehensive Plan Amendments are avail-
able for public inspection during normal business hours at
the Port St. Joe City Hall.

If a person decides to appeal any decisions made with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, such person
will need to record the proceeding and, for such purposes,
such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceeding is made, which record includes the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any person requiring a special accommodation at this hear-
ing because of a disability or physical impairment should
contact the City Clerk at (850) 229-8261 at least five (5)
calendar days prior to the hearing.


CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA

BY: S/
Mayor-Commissioner

Attest: S/
Clerk


of tobacco and advertising. This message is created by teen-
agers and spread throughout the community by them. The
director of this club for Wewahitchka High is Mrs. Daphne
Lister. If you would like to join contact her or the school of-
fice.

Senior News by Kally
There are Wewahitchka Gator afghans still for sale to
help raise money for the senior trip for $45. Also seniors who
are planning on going on the senior trip the next payment of
$78 is due Dec. 12.

Sports News by Katie
I want to congratulate all J.V And Varsity football players
for a Great season! We're all looking forward to next year.
The boy's next Basketball game will be Nov. 20 at Sneads
for'a pre season tournament, and as for the girls their next
game will be Nov. 20 at Blountstown at 5 p.m. CT. Gator
Wrestling will have a match Nov. 22 at Bozeman for the Boz-




Come to the pie auction!
Everyone is invited to attend the
Port St. Joe High School
SGA Annual Pie Auction
On Tuesday, Nov. 25
at 6:30 p.m.
in the Port
St. Joe High






A variety .f
homemade pies
will be auctioned by
Pie Auctioneer Eugene
Raffield.
Not only do you have the
opportunity to select and
purchase
a delicious pie in time for Thanksgiving
dinner,
but it is really a fun event that you do
not want to miss.
All proceeds go to the Student
Government Association


eman Buck Classic starting at 10 a.m. CT Come and Support
our Gator Athletes!

Scholarship News
The Florida Association of Realtors is giving away three
$6,000 scholarships. This is an essay contest, and entries
must be postmarked by Feb. 9. See the guidance office for
information.
The Southern Scholarship Foundation has scholarship
housing programs at the following universities:
Florida State
University of Florida
Florida A&M
Florida Gulf Coast University (women only)
The St. Joseph Bay chapter of the Daughters of the
American Revolution is offering a $100 scholarship to some-
one from this school. The application deadline is Dec. 5 and
an essay is involved. Pick up an application and instructions
in the guidance office.


S( 0111-


~~~~_


Wewaliitclik:a
Elementary Sa
".:'4. js


A PLEASANT SURPRISE: Delaney McMillion, Rylee Waters
and Brook Haddock are pictured holding their newborn
chicks.

Wewa Elementary

learns about animals


"What a week!"
I'm sure many of us have
heard that before, and that's
exactly what a classroom of
third graders at Wewahitch-
ka Elementary School said
this week. During reading
class we've been learning
about "How Animals Talk"
and the jobs some animals
have like K-9 patrol dogs, so
we decided to invite some of
the animals in our lives to
visit our classroom.
On Monday, we had 12
different pets come to our


classroom and "communi-
cate" with the students. Af-
ter taking thorough notes on
the varied pets, we noticed
that it was almost time for
our baby chicks to hatch.
The rest of the week our
classroom watched excited-
ly as 15 baby chicks hatched!
We all were thrilled to follow
this progression which be-
gan on Sept. 25.
So you see, we've had
one of those weeks that will
stand out in our minds for a
long time!


TO ALL MEXICO BEACH

SANITATION CUSTOMERS

The City of Mexico Beach will observe the
following schedule for Sanitation services during
the Thanksgiving Holiday Week:


Week of November 24, 2008- November 28, 2008

Monday- 11/24/08- Regular garbage pick up

Tuesday- 11/25/08- Regular garbage pick up

Wednesday- 11/26/08- Yard Debris pick up

Thursday- 11/27/08- Thanksgiving Holiday- No pick up

Friday- 11/27/08- Thanksgiving Holiday- No pick up




REQUEST TO RECEIVE BIDS

The Gulf County School Board will
receive bids until 9:00 a.m., ET on
December 12, 2008 for School Food
Service Processed and Froze/Chilled
Food Items. Interested parties
should contact Bill Carr, Assistant
Superintendent for Business
Services, Gulf County School, 150
Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL
32456 or telephone (850) 229-8256
to obtain bid information and
instructions.

+< *..


NOTICE

The Board of City Commissioners sitting as
the Planning Board will meet to discuss a
request for a variance on Tuesday, Decem-
ber 2, 2008 at 6:00 p.m. from Hannon's
Insurance Agency regarding placing support
columns on city rights of way located on
Lot 19, Block 9 at 221 Reid Avenue.

All persons are invited to attend this meet-
ing. [Any person who decides to appeal any
decision made by the Commission with re-
spect to any matter considered at said meet-
ing will need a record of the proceedings,
and for such purpose may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceeding is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based. The Board of City Commission
of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not
provide a verbatim record of this meeting.]



IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERI-
CANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons needing special accommodations to
participate in this proceedings should contact
Pauline Pendarvis, City Clerk, City of Port
St. Joe, at City Hall. Telephone No. 850/229-
8261.

THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Pauline Pendarvis
City Clerk


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BUSINESS


B
Section


Thursday, November 20, 2008 w w w. s t a r f 1. c o m Page B9


For sale



by owner



vs. agent




sales

You have decided to sell your
property. What next? Well, first
you need to decide if you are go-
ing to sell it yourself, i.e. for sale by
owner (FSBO), or use a real estate
professional. There are pros and
cons to each.
The primary reason people
choose to go the route of FSBO is
to avoid paying a commission. In
case you didn't know, real estate
professionals do not work for free.
Are there any other reasons some-
one would choose to
be a FSBO? Maybe,
they had a previous
experience with a
real estate profes-
Ssional that didn't
work out. If you
choose to sell your-
S self, here are the
KEVIN WELCH steps.
RealEstate101 First, you need
to establish a value.
You can hire an ap-
praiser or do the research yourself.
After you get your price, you need
to formulate a marketing plan. Will
you advertise in newspapers, the
internet or utilize a service such as
FSBO.com? All of these cost mon-
ey and take time.
Once you have put your plan in
place, you will need to make sure
that you will be available to take
the calls of prospects. Your sched-
ule will need to be flexible enough
to show your property when neces-
sary. Are you going to show your
property to anyone who calls? Are
you able to qualify buyers so you
aren't wasting your time? When a
buyer asks why your property is a
better buy than other options, what
will you say? Normally, a real estate
professional is trained and experi-
enced in handling these situations.
Are you prepared? You better be,
since it is a tough market today.
As stated earlier, the primary
reason for selling yourself is to
save the commission. Do you think
a buyer realizes you aren't paying a
commission? You better know it. In
fact, the buyer is going to want to
pay less because you aren't paying
a Realtor.
Your property more than likely
is the most important investment
you ever will make. I always like
to compare selling real estate to
surgery. If you or a family member
needed surgery, would you do it
yourself to avoid paying the medi-
cal expenses? There are plenty of
sellers who sold their own prop-
erty, and with research and hard
work, it can be accomplished. Un-
fortunately, most of the .FSBOS
aren't successful.
Seventy percent eventually list
with a real estate professional.
The remaining 30 percent realize a
lower price and longer marketing
time than if they had listed their
propertywith a professional. Some
never sell their property. A proper-
ty that is listed with a professional
is placed in the multiple listing
service (MLS). This exposes the
property to more prospects, which
increases the potential buyer pool.
More prospects lead to a higher
sales price and less time to sell.
There are many things that are in-
volved in selling your real estate. If
you are going to sell your property,
you should talk with a real estate
professional so that you can make
an informed decision.
Next week, I will discuss pur-
chasing real estate.
If anyone has something they
would like discussed, feel free to
call me (850) 647-2473 or e-mail pel-
icanwalk~@~gtcom.net. I would like
to thank Tim Croft and The Star for
giving me this opportunity to edu-
cate the public on the intricacies of
real estate. I hope the readers find
it informative and interesting.
Kevin Welch is the owner of
Pelican Walk Real Estate Inc.


Edward A. Nelson Jr. brings more than 35 years of industry experience to new position.



EDC hires new




executive director


The Gulf County Economic Development
Council has announced the newest and final
addition to its executive staff. Edward A. Nel-
son Jr., CEcD, FM, HLM will begin work im-
mediately as the executive director alongside
Alma Paredes, assistant executive director, to
increase new businesses, jobs and economic
activity for Gulf County.
Nelson has an M.B.A in management from
Atlanta University. a B.S. in electronic engi-
neering from Hampton University and is certi-
fied as an economic development profession-
al. He is the founder and President of EAN
International Consulting Corporation provid-
ing economic development and business de-
velopment consulting services for domestic
and international clients. With more than 35
years of experience in economic development,
Nelson is the immediate past president and
CEO of the DeKalb Chamber of Commerce
in Decatur, Ga., and led a team that created
approximately 15,000 jobs and $1.2 billion in
investment during his tenure.


Prior to DeKalb, Nelson was the
Director of Economic Development for
Fulton County, Ga., where he was respon-
sible for marketing and business develop-
ment, international investment promotion,
structuring financing for corporate clients
and the retention and expansion of existing
businesses. During his tenure, more than
30,000 jobs were created with $3.2 billion in
investment.
"I have been coming to Port St. Joe regu-
larly for about 18 months," Nelson said. "I was
contracted to work with the (Port St. Joe) Re-
development Agency to perform various eco-
nomic development tasks and fell in love with
Gulf County. I've had the opportunity to meet
some wonderful people and have continued to
establish great friendships. I hope there is an
opportunity for me to continue to work in my
profession and live in this community in the
near future."
For information, contact Alma Paredes at
(850) 229-1901 or info@gulfcountyedc.org.


Lulu's to host Holiday Open House


The public is invited to attend a Holiday
Open House at Lulu's Sweet Expectations
located in the Piggly Wiggly Shopping Center.
Help us celebrate our third anniversary


from 5:30-7 p.m. EST Thursday, Nov. 20.
There will be hors d'oeuvres, door
prizes and a free gift bag for the first
75 attendees.


SBA aims to


boost capital


for small


businesses
In response to the credit crunch, today
SBA's ActingAdministrator Sandy K. Baruah
announced important loan program changes
to help the agency's lending partners increase
access to capital for small businesses.
First, an interim final rule allowing new
SBA loans to be made with an alternative
base interest rate, the one-month LIBOR rate
(London Interbank Offered Rate), in addi-
tion to the prime rate, which previously was
allowed. In the past 60 days, both the prime
and LIBOR rates have not returned to their
historical relationship-of roughly 300 basis
points between the two rates. The mismatch
between the rates is squeezing SBA lenders
out of the lending market, since their costs are
based on the LIBOR rate.
"This change will help more small busi-
nesses obtain capital to grow their businesses
and create new jobs," Baruah said. "By allow-
ing both rates, SBA is making its programs
more flexible, increasing opportunities to ac-
cess capital and giving both lending partners
and small business customers more options
to meet their needs."
The second change allows a new structure
for assembling SBA loans into pools for sale
in the secondary market. The enhanced flex-
ibility in loan pool structures can help affect
profitability and liquidity in the secondary
market for SBA guaranteed loans, especially
with the current market conditions. Because
the average interest rate is used, these pools
are easier for pool assemblers to create, thus
providing incentives for more investors to bid
on these loans.
"The challenge small businesses face to-
day is not the cost of capital, it is access to
capital," Baruah said. "Interest rates are at
historically low levels, meaning money is in-
expensive, yet lenders aren't lending and bor-
rowers aren't borrowing. This indicates mar-
kets are frozen due to liquidity concerns. This
interim final rule is an important step to reen-
ergize the lenders to make SBA-backed loans
and will help open the gateway of capital for
entrepreneurs."
"SBA moved quickly on these changes after
consulting with small businesses, lending part-
ners and other government agencies," said
Eric R. Zarnikow, SBA's Associate Administra-
tor for the Office of Capital Access. "We're con-
fident these solutions will help free up capital
so lenders can continue to make SBA-backed
loans."
By addressing market issues that were im-
peding the funding streams for both lenders
and small businesses, SBA is making capital
more available to America's small businesses.
The SBA will be issuing additional technical
guidance to lenders in the coming weeks relat-
ing to the implementation of these important
changes.
For more information on the interim final
rule or to share your comments, visit www.
regulations.gov.
To learn more about SBA's guaranteed loan
programs, visit www.sba.gov.


Energy-efficient homes assisted by program


The Weatherization Assistance
Program reduced heating and
cooling costs by improving the en-
ergy efficiency of the home.
Repair or replace ineffi-
cient heating and cooling units;
Address air-infiltration
- weather stripping, caulking,
thresholds, minor wall ceiling and
floor repairs, window and door re-
placement;
Install attic and floor
insulation (floors in northern cli-
mates only);
Install solar screens;
Apply solar reflective
coating to manufactured homes.


To be eligible for these pro-
grams applicants must reside in
Gulf County and the household in-
come may not exceed 150 percent
of the national poverty level.
Preference is given to
owner-occupied, elderly (60 years
plus), disabled, families with chil-
dren under 12 and households
with a high energy burden (re-
peated high utility bills).
For more information, contact
Raymond Driesbach at 227-5338
or Doug Bender of the Capital
Area Community Action Agency
Inc. at (850) 222-2043 or 510-2331
(cell).


Conservation Guidelines
Behavior affects energy usage.
The homeowner may conserve en-
ergy and save dollars by following
these common suggestions:
Pay electric bill on time
in order to avoid interest charges;
Be more aware of your
energy costs and set a goal to re-
duce consumption;
Clean or replace filters
every month;
Set heating and cooling
thermostat at a constant tempera-
ture. A setting of 78 degrees Fahr-
enheit or higher for cooling and


70 degrees or lower for heating;
Use ceiling fans to sup-
plement cooling and raise the
thermostat three or four degrees;
Keep windows and doors
closed when system is in use;
Turn off lights, radios and
televisions when not in use or no
one is in the room;
Avoid excessive trips and
keep the refrigerator doors prop-
erly closed;
Wash and dry full loads.
Use dry clothes on the clothesline
when possible;
Never use your stove
burners for heating your home.


Opportunity Florida: Training available for high-paying jobs


Opportunity Florida has an-
nounced that, because of an
expected attrition of at least 50
percent of trained workers in the
utility field during the next five
years, training dollars are avail-
able through WorkForce Florida
for jobs in this sector. The jobs
are high paying, with good secu-
rity and, because of their on-the-
spot needs, never are out-sourced
overseas.
Up to $500,000 will be made
available for training new and


existing employees in the utility
industry for jobs in rural coun-
ties. Training includes those as-
sociated with energy, alternative
energy, water, wastewater, solar,
photovoltaic and other occupa-
tions identified as critical to the
utility industry.
Utility providers throughout
the state say many of their em-
ployees will be reaching retire-
ment age within the next several
years. Unfortunately, they don't
have enough skilled workers com-


ing up behind these employees to
fill all the vacant job openings.
"In just a few years, we will be
coming to a point where many of
our experienced long-term em-
ployees will reach retirement
age," said Gary Clark of West Flor-
ida Electric Cooperative. "These
are high-paying jobs that need
skilled, highly trained people. We
need to start now to prevent a
shortage of these workers in the
future."
The training is part of an initia-


tive targeting rural areas that are
not taking full advantage of the
funding available through Work-
Force Florida's Quick Response
Training Program. The program
is designed to meet the workforce-
skill needs of expanding, new and
existing industries.
For more information about
this program and others avail-
able through the state of Florida,
contact Opportunity Florida at
(850) 718-0453. Your business may
be eligible for funding.









10B 0 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2008


Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


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ANNOUNCEMENTS
1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130 -Adoptions
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160- Lost
1170- Found


1100
9014S
NOTICE
OF SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT PURSUANT
TO A FINAL JUDGMENT
ISSUED IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF LEON
COUNTY DATED
FEBRURAY 28, 2008 IN
THE CAUSE WHEREIN
CAPITAL CITY BANK WAS
PLAINTIFF, AND C.H.
PROPERTIES LLC, CQ
DEVELOPMENT'S LLC,
JAMES A. COX, INDIVIDU-
ALLY: JEFFERY
HARTLINE, INDIVIDUALLY,
ALAN T STEWART, INDI-
VIDUALLY WAS DEFEND-
ANTS BEING CASE NO.
2007-CA 003419.

I, JOSEPH NUGENT, AS
SHERIFF OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA WILL
HAVE LEVIED UPON ALL
THE RIGHT TITLE AND IN-
TEREST OF THE DE-
FENDANTS C.H. PROPER-
TIES, LLC: CQ DEVELOP-
MENTS, LLC, JAMES A
COX INDIVIDUALLY, ALAN
T STEWART, INDIVIDU-
ALLY IN THE INTEREST
OF LOTS 26, 27, 28, 29,30
AND 31 OF OCEAN
HAVEN A CAPE SAN
BLAS ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4 PAGE(S) 47, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF GULF COUNTY FLOR-
IDA AND ON THE 1st of
DECEMBER, 2008 AT THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE-
GULF COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE IN PORT ST JOE,
FLORIDA, AT THE HOUR
OF 11:00A.M. E.S.T OR
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, I
WILL OFFER SAID PROP-
ERTY AT PUBLIC OUTCRY
AND WILL THE SAME,
SUBJECT TO ALL PRIOR
LIENS, ENCUMBRANCES
AND JUDGEMENTS, IF
ANY TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDERS FOR CASH, THE
PROCEEDS TO BE AP-
PLIED AS FOR AS MAY BE
TO THE PAYMENT OF
COSTS AND SATISFAC-
TION OF THE ABOVE DE-
SCRIBED EXECUTION.

SHERIFF
JOSEPH NUGENT

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICA WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES THAT
NEED A SPECIAL AC-
COMMODATION TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THE PRO-
CEEDING SHOULD CON-
TACT NO LATER THAN
SEVEN DAYS PRIOR TO
THE PROCEEDING AT
850-227-1115
9015S
NOTICE
OF SHERIFF'S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT PURSUANT
TO A FINAL JUDGEMENT
ISSUED IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF LEON
COUNTY DATED JULY 23,
2008 IN THE CAUSE
WHEREIN CAPITAL CITY
BANK WAS PLAINTIFF,
AND SUNSET HARBOR
OF MEXICO BEACH, LLC;
PATRICIA K. HARDMAN,
INDIVIDUALLY; SHARON
F GRIFFITH, INDIVIDU-
ALLY; KENNETH L.
CROWDER, SR., INDIVID-
UALLY; AND LINDA C.
CROWDER, INDIVIDU-
ALLY WAS DEFENDANTS
BEING CASE NO.
2008-CA-0345.

I, JOSEPH NUGENT, AS
SHERIFF OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA WILL
HAVE LEVIED UPON ALL
THE RIGHT TITLE AND IN-
TEREST OF THE DE-
FENDANTS SUNSET HAR-
BOR OF MEXICO BEACH,
LLC, PATRICIA K.
HARDMAN, INDIVIDU-
ALLY: SHARON F. GRIF-
FITH, INDIVIDUALLY; KEN-
NETH L. CROWDER, SR.,
INDIVIDUALLY AND LINDA
C. CROWDER, INDIVIDU-
ALLY IN THE INTEREST
OF LOT 63-A, BLOCK B,
CAPE BREEZES SUBDIVI-
SION, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: COM-
MENCE AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF LOT 1,
*BLOCK B OF CAPE
BREEZES, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 23 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE ALONG THE
EAST LINE OF SAID LOT
1, SOUTH 18 DEGREES
13 MINUTES 18 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 360.74 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE CON-
TINUE ALONG SAID LINE,
SOUTH 18 DEGREES 18
SECONDS EAST, 56.66
FEET; THENCE LEAVING
THE EAST LINE OF SAID
LOT 1. NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 18 MINUTES 41
SECONDS WEST, 178.05
FEET TO A POINT BEING
ON THE ARC OF A
NON-TANGENT CURVE
CONCAVE TO T HE
NORTHEAST; THENCE


1100
NORTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-
WAY, ALONG THE ARC
OF SAID CURVE, HAVING
A RADIUS OF 11409.1559
FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE
OF 00 DEGREES.17 MIN-
UTES 10 SECONDS, AN
ARC LENGTH OF 56.97
FEET (CHORD TO SAID
CURVE BEARS NORTH 19
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 27
SECONDS WEST 56.97
FEET); THENCE LEAVING
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY,
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 18
MINUTES 41 SECONDS
EAST, 178.98 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.

AND ANOTHER PARCEL
DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: PARCEL "B":
BEGIN AT AN IRON PIPE
MARKING THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF CAPE
SAN BLAS GULFSIDE
AND BAYSIDE, A SUBDI-
VISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 24-B OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA,
SAID POINT ALSO LYING
ON THE NORTHEAST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF COUNTY
ROAD NO. 30-E. FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINN-
ING AND LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN NORTH 69 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES 14
SECONDS EAST 762,74
FEET TO THE APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF ST. JO-
SEPH BAY THENCE RUN
NORTH 17 DEGREES 29
MINUTES 33 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID MEAN
HIGH WATER LINE 48.43
FEET THENCE LEAVING
SAID MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE RUN SOUTH 69 DE-
GREES 55 MINUTES 05
SECONDS WEST 765.07
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #7160) LYING
ON THE NORTHEAST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF COUNTY
ROAD NO. 30-E, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 20 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES 55
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 50.56 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. CONTAINING 0.87
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
AND ON THE 1ST DAY OF
DECEMBER, 2008 AT THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE
GULF COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE IN PORT ST JOE,
FLORIDA AT THE HOUR
OF 11:00 A.M. E.S.T OR
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, I
WILL OFFER SAID PROP-
ERTY AT PUBLIC OUTCRY
AND WILL THE SAME, TO
THE HIGHEST BIDDER
OR BIDDERS FOR CASH.
THE PROCEEDS TO BE
APPLIED AS FOR AS MAY
BE TO THE PAYMENT OF
COSTS AND SATISFAC-
TION OF THE ABOVE DE-
SCRIBED EXECUTION.

SHERIFF
JOSEPH NUGENT

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICA WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES THAT
NEED A SPECIAL AC-
COMMODATION TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THE PRO-
CEEDING SHOULD CON-
TACT NO LATER THAN
SEVEN DAYS PRIOR TO
THE PROCEEDING AT
850-227-1115
November 6, 13, 20, 27,
2008
9074S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

SHERRI M. FOREMAN,
Petitioner
and
SIDNEY T FOREMAN,
Respondent.

Case No.: 08-504DR

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MAR-
RIAGE

TO: Sidney T Foreman
424 Spruce Ave
Wewahitchka, FL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed
against you and that you
are required to serve a
copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on
SherriM Matthews Fore-
man whose address is
8880 Lighthouse Ave Port
St. Joe, FL 32456 on or
before December 5, 2008,
and file the original with
the clerk of this Court at
1000 Cecil Costin Blvd.
Port St Joe, FL 32456, be-
fore service on Petitioner
or immediately thereafter.
If you fail to do so, a de-
fault may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, in-
cluding orders, are availa-
ble at the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court's office. You
may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office
notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915)
Future papers in this law-
suit will be mailed to the
address on record at the
clerk's office
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules
of Procedure, requires cer-
tain automatic disclosure
of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, includ-


ing dismissal or striking of


pleadings.
November 13, 20, 27, De-
cember 4, 2008
9136S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

MOSES J. MEDINA, MO-
SES C. MEDINA and UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS,
Defendants,

CASE NO. 2007-436-CA

NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated October
27, 2008, in Case No.
2007-436-CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for
Gulf County, Florida, in
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK is the Plaintiff and
MOSES J. MEDINA, MO-
SES C. MEDINA AND UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) are
the Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front
door of the Gulf County
Courthouse in Port St. Joe,
Gulf County, Florida at
11:00 a.m. on December
11, 2008, the property set
forth in the Final judgment
of Foreclosure and more
particularly described as
follows:

LOT 13, BLOCK 71, CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE, AC-
CORDING TO THE OFFI-
CIAL MAP THEREOF ON
FILE IN THE OFFICE OF
THE CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURT OF GULF
COUNTY FLORIDA

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: October 28, 2008

REBECCA L. NORRIS
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahasee, Florida 32308
November 13, 20, 2008
9139S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WILMINGTON TRUST
COMPANY NOT IN ITS IN-
DIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT
SOLELY AS TRUSTEE
FOR THORNBURG
2005-3,
Plaintiff,

vs.

TIMOTHY A. HAYNES, et
al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO. 07-481 CA
DIVISION

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated October
27, 2008 and entered in
Case No, 07-481 CA of the
Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in
and for GULF County, Flor-
ida wherein WILMINGTON
TRUST COMPANY NOT IN
ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPAC-
ITY BUT SOLELY AS
TRUSTEE FOR THORN-
BURG 2005-3, is the Plain-
tiff and TIMOTHY A.
HAYNES; DAVID R.
HAYNES; JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, N.A.;
DUNES CLUB OF CAPE
SAN BLAS CONDOMIN-
IUM ASSOCIATION, INC.;
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at LOBBY
OF THE GULF COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 18th day
of December, 2008, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment:

CONDOMINIUM UNIT 9,
THE DUNES CLUB OF
CAPE SAN BLAS, TO-
GETHER WITH AN UNDI-
VIDED INTEREST IN THE
COMMON ELEMENTS,
ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF CON-
DOMINIUM THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 303,
PAGE 283 AS AMENDED
FROM TIME TO TIME OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF GULF COUNTY FLOR-
IDA.

A/K/A 1094 CAPE SAN
BLAS ROAD, PORT SAINT
JOE, FL 324560000

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October 31, 2008

Clerk of the Circuit Court


By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Gulf
County Courthouse
#850-229-6113 (TDD)
November 20, 27, 2008
9141S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CRESCENT MORTGAGE
SERVICES,
Plaintiff,

vs.

ALBERT CHURCH A/K/A
ALBERT M. CHURCH, III
A/K/A ALBERT M.
CHURCH, et al,
Defendants.


CASE
23-2008-CA-000415


NO.:


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
ALBERT CHURCH A/K/A
ALBERT M. CHURCH, III
A/K/A ALBERT M.
CHURCH
Last Known Address: 110
Sunset Circle, Port St Joe,
FL 32456
Also Attempted at: 1002
Long Avenue, Port Saint
Joe, FL 32456
Current Residence Un-
known

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ALBERT CHURCH A/K/A
ALBERT M. CHURCH, III
A/K/A ALBERT M.
CHURCH
Last Known Address: 110
Sunset Circle, Port St Joe,
FL 32456
Also Attempted at: 1002
Long Avenue, Port Saint
Joe, FL 32456
Current Residence Un-
known

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

LOT 5 AND THE EAST 1/2
OF LOT 4, BLOCK 116,
ST JOSEPHS ADDITION
OF THE CITY OF PORT
ST JOE. FLORIDA, UNIT
NUMBER NINE AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 12 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-.
ten defenses, if any, on
Marshall C. Watson, PA.,
Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE
120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL
33309 on or before De-
cember 5, 2008 a date
which is within thirty (30)
days after the first publica-
tion of this Notice in THE
STAR and file the original
with the clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
28th day of October, 2008.

Rebecca Norris
As Clerk of the Court
By Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
November 13, 20, 2008
9156S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A. AS OF TRUSTEE
FOR THE HOLDERS OF
HARBORVIEW 2006-12,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JAMES A. COX, etal,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.
23-2008-CA-000227

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated October
27, 2008 and entered in
Case No.
23-2008-CA-000227 of the
Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in
and for GULF County, Flor-
ida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, N.A. AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE
HOLDERS OF HAR-
BORVIEW 2006-12, is the
Plaintiff and JAMES A.
COX; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JAMES A.
COX: CATHERINE S. COX;
S E A G R A S S
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INCORPORATED;
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at LOBBY


1100
OF THE GULF COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 11th day
of December, 2008, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment:

LOT 5, BLOCK B OF
SEAGRASS, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 5, PAGE 1, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA

A/K/A 220 SEAGRASS
CIRCLE, CAPE SAN BLAS,
FL 32456

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October 28, 2008.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
ing should contact Gulf
County Courthouse
#850-229-6113 (TDD)
November 20, 27, 2008
9187S
NOTICE OF
APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Selected Eq-
uities Rev. the holder of
the following Tax Certifi-
cate, has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to
be issued thereon. The
certificate number and
year of issuance, the de-
scription of the property,
and the names in which it
was assessed are as fol-
lows:

Certificate No. 249

Year of Issuance: 2006

Application No. 2008 23

R.E. No.03169-110R

Description of Property:
Lot 2, of STILLWATER
SOUTH, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page 14, of
the Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida.

Name in which assessed:
Herbert Press Witt

All of said property being
in Gulf County, State of
Florida. Unless such certifi-
cate shall be redeemed
according to law, the prop-
erty'described in such cer-
tificate will be sold to the
highest bidder in the front
Lobby of the Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM,
E.T, Wednesday, the 3rd
day of December, 2008.

Dated this 12th day of No-
vember, 2008

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
BY: Donna L. Ray,
Deputy Clerk
November 20, 2008
9196S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,


VS.


JENNIFER M.
al,
Defendants


BURKE, et


CASE NO.:
23-2008-CA-000218

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
JENNIFER M. BURKE
Last Known Address:
142-A N Hwy 71,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465;
511 S Second Street,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
and 14809 Heronglen
Drive, Lithia, FL 33547
Current Residence:
Unknown

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JENNIFER M. BURKE
Last Known Address:
142-A N Hwy 71,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465;
511 S Second Street,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
and 14809 Heronglen
Drive, Lithia, FL 33547
Current Residence:
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

Commence at a 'in inch
iron rod and cap (LB 732)
marking the Southeast cor-
ner of lands described in
Official Record Book 355,
Page 102 and 103 ofthe
Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida said point
being the intersection of
the Northerly right of way
boundary of Chipola Ave-
nu ie with the Westerly right
of way boundary of Sec-
ond Street and run thence
North 01'47'33" East along
said Westerly right of way
boundary, a distance of
404 84 feet to a ', inch
iron pipe marking the


Southeast corner of lands
described in Official Rec-
ord Book 266 at pages
427-420 (Parcel 5) of said
Pubic Records; thence
continue North 0147'33"
East along said Westerly
right of way boundary, a
distance of 111.00 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
From said Point of Beginn-
ing. thence continue North
0147'33" East along said
Westerly right of way
boundary, a distance of
113.34 feet to the South-
erly right of way boundary
of East Church Avenue;
thence North 89'47'19"
West along said Southerly
right of way boundary, a
distance of 172.78 feet to
the Easterly boundary of
lands described in Deed
Book 34 at page 610 of
said Public Records;
thence South 03,12'26"
West along Said Easterly
boundary, a distance of
226.73 feet; thence North
8926'53" East, a distance
of 23.46 feet to the South-
west corner of the afore-
said lands described in Of-
ficial Record Book 266 at
pages 427-429; thence
along the Westerly and
Northerly boundary of said
lands as follows: thence
North 01047'33" East. a
distance of 111.00 feet;
thence North 8930'49"
East, a distance of 155.00
feet to the print of Beginn-
ing.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson,
PA., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE
120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
33309 no or before De-
cember 19, 2008, a date
which is within thirty (30)
days after the first publica-
tion of this Notice in THE
STAR and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
10th day of November,
2008.

Rebecca Norris
As Clerk of the Court
By: Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
November 20, 27, 2008
9199S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY

IN RE: The Estate of
PAUL WILLIAM GROOM,
deceased.

Case No.: 08-72 PR
IN PROBATE

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

TO ALL PERSONS HAV-
ING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE:

The administration of the
estate of Paul William
Groom, deceased, File
Number 08-72-PR is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Gulf County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is
Gulf County Courthouse,
1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and that
personal representative's
attorney are set forth be-
low.

ALL INTERESTED PER-
SONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT:

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is served within
three months after the date
of the first publication of
this notice must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the estate of the
decedent must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is No-
vember 20, 2008.

Personal Representative:
PAUL W GROOM II


PO Box 39
Port St. Joe, FL
32457-0039
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
PAUL W. GROOM, II
RISH, GIBSON, SCHOLZ
& GROOM, PA.
116 Sailors Cove Dr.
PO Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457
(850) 229-8211
FL BAR NO.: 0037915
November 20, 27, 2008

9210S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

ROBERT V. BISHOP JR.,
et al, Defendants.

CASE NO.:
23-2008-CA-000396

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
ROBERT V BISHOP JR.
Last Known Address: 703
16th St., Port St, Joe, FL
32456
Current Residence Un-
known

DORIS M. BISHOP
Last Known Address: 703
16th St., Port St. Joe, FL
32456
Current Residence
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:

LOT TEN (10) AND THE
EASTERLY 12 1/2 FEET
OF LOT ELEVEN (11),
BLOCK 83, UNIT #1, ST
JOSEPH'S ADDITION TO
THE CITY OF PORT ST
JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORD-
ING TO THE OFFICIAL
PLAT ON FILE IN THE OF-
FICE OF CLERK OF CIR-
CUIT COURT, GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN
PLAT BOOK 1, AT PAGE
28. THE EASTERLY 12 1/2
FEET OF LOT 11 IS MORE
PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS;
BEGIN AT THE NORTH-
WESTERLY CORNER OF
LOT 10, BLOCK 83, AND
RUN SOUTH 70 DEG. 46'
WEST ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY LINE
OF LOT 11, AND SOUTH
BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT
9, 12 1/2 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE SOUTH
19 DEG. 14' EAST PARAL-
LEL WITH THE WEST-
ERLY BOUNDARY LINE
OF 16TH STREET 165
FEET; THENCE NORTH 70
DEG. 46' EAST 12 1/2
FEET TO THE SOUTH-
WESTERLY CORNER OF
SAID LOT 10; THENCE
NORTH 19 DEG. 14' WEST
ALONG THE WESTERLY
BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID
LOT 10, 165 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson,
PA., Attorney for Plaintiff
whose address 49th
STREET, SUITE 120, FT
LAUDERDALE, FL 33309
on or before December 19,
2008, a date which is
within thirty (30) days after
the first publication of this
Notice in the THE STAR
and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before Service on
Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at
1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 or Tele-
phone (850) 229-6113
prior to such proceeding.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
12th day of November,
2008.

Rebecca Norris
As Clerk of the Court
By Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk
November 20, 27, 2008

9213S
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the City Com-
mission of the City of Port
St. Joe, Florida, at its
meeting on the 2nd day of
December 2008, at 6:00
PM., EDT, in the regular
Commission meeting
room at the Municipal
Building, Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida, will consider for final
adoption an Ordinance
with the following title:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE
CITY OF PORT ST JOE
AMENDING SECTION 6-1,
CODE OF ORDINANCES,
REPEALING ALL ORDI-
NANCES OR PARTS OF
ORDINANCES IN CON-
FLICT HEREWITH, PRO-
VIDING FOR SEVERA-
BILITY AND PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE

Copies of the Ordinance
are available for public in-
spection at City of Port St.


Joe City Hall, located at
305 Cecil G. Costin Sr.,
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida.

Interested persons may at-
tend and be heard at the
public hearing or provide
comments in writing to the
City Commissioners, City
of Port St. Joe City Hall,
305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.,
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida.
Transactions of the public
hearing will not be re-
corded. Persons wishing
to appeal any decision
made during the hearing
will need a record of the
proceeding and should en-
sure a verbatim record is
made, including the testi-
mony on which the appeal
is based. Any person who
wishes to attend and re-
quires assistance may call
the City Clerk's Office at
(850) 229-8261, Est. 114.

CITY COMMISSION OF
THE CITY OF PORT ST
JOE, FLORIDA
BY: S/,EL ,AGIDSON, JR.
Mayor-Commissioner

Attest: S/ PAULINE
PENDARVIS
Clerk
November 20, 2008



9214S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
GENERAL, JURISDICTION
DIVISION

THE BANK OF NEW YORK
AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
OF ASSET-BACKED CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES
2003-2
PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD LEE MULLINAX
A/K/A RICHARD L. MUL-
LINAX A/K/A RICHARD
MULLINAX; PATRICIA
KELLY MULLINAX A/K/A
PATRICIA KELLY A/K/A
PATRICIA E. KELLY A/K/A
PATRICIA MULLINAX, ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

CASE NO:07-446-CA

RE-NOTICE OF FORE-
CLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Granting the Motion to
Reset Foreclosure Sale
dated November 12, 2008
entered in Civil Case No.
07-446-CA of the Circuit
Court of the 14TH Judicial
Circuit in and for GULF
County, Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at
in the Front Lobby of the
GULF County Courthouse,
1000 Cecil Costin Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, Florida, at
11:00 am. on the 8th day
of January, 2009 the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth in said Sum-
mary Final Judgment,
to-wit:

THE LAND REFERRED TO
IN THIS EXHIBIT ID LO-
CATED IN THE COUNTY
OF GULF AND THE STATE
OF FLORIDA IN DEED
BOOK 257 AT PAGE 964
AND DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:

PARCEL 1:

COMMENCE AT A 6"
SQUARE ST. JOSE PA-
OM N


I 1100
DEGREES 12 MINUTES 35
SECONDS EAST FOR A
DISTANCE OF 412.59
FEET ALONG THE NORTH
BOUNDARY LINE OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER
OF THE SOUTHEAST
QUARTER (AS MONU-
MENTED); THENCE GO
SOUTH 34 DEGREES 55
MINUTES 25 SECONDS
WEST FOR A DISTANCE
OF 462.14 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 10 DEGREES 45
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST FOR A DISTANCE
OF 418.55 FEET FOR THE
POINT OF BEGINNING,
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING GO SOUTH
89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES
35 SECONDS EAST FOR
A DISTANCE OF 350.59
FEET; THENCE GO
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47
MINUTES 25 SECONDS
WEST FOR A DISTANCE
OF 321.17 FEET TO THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF FIELD-
STONE LANE (HAVING A
66 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF
WAY); THENCE GO
NORTH 89 DEGREES 12
MINUTES 35 SECONDS
WESTALONGG SAID
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE FOR A DIS-
TANCE OF 282.76 FEET
TO A POINT OF INTER-
SECTION WITH THE
EASTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF LONG
MEADOW DRIVE (HAVING
A 66 FOOT WIDE RIGHT
OF WAY); THENCE GO
NORTH 10 DEGREES 45
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID EAST-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE FOR A DISTANCE
OF 339.02 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING,
SAID PARCEL CONTAIN-
ING 2.41 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS.

ALSO

PARCEL 2:

COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH
SQUARE ST JOE PAPER
COMPANY CONCRETE,
MONUMENT MARKING
THE NW CORNER OF
THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE
1/4 OF SECTION 3,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH,
RANGE 10 WEST, GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE GO SOUTH 89
DEGREES 12' 35" EAST
FOR A DISTANCE OF
412.59 FEET ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY LINE
OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE
SE 1/4 (AS MONU-
MENTED); THENCE GO
SOUTH 34 DEGREES 55'
28" WEST FOR A DIS-
TANCE OF 349.12 FEET
FOR .THE POB; THENCE
GO SOUTH 55 DEGREES
04' 32" EAST FOR A DIS-
TANCE OF 19.97 FEET;
THENCE GO NORTH 34
DEGREES 55' 28" EAST
FOR A DISTANCE OF
285.02 FEET; THENCE GO
SOUTH 89 DEGREES
12'35" EAST FOR A DIS-
TANCE OF 194.44 FEET;
THENCE GO SOUTH 00
DEGREES 47' 25" WEST
FOR A DISTANCE OF
728.36 FEET; THENCE GO
NORTH 89 DEGREES 12'
35" WEST FOR A DIS-
TANCE OF 350.59 FEET;
THENCE; GO NORTH 10
DEGREES 45' 00" WEST
FOR A DISTANCE OF
418.56 FEET; THENCE GO
NORTH 34 DEGREES 55'
28" EAST FOR A DIS-
TANCE OF 113.02 FEET;
TO THE POB. SAID PAR-
CEL CONTAINING 5.95
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.

TOGETHER WITH A 1990
MERITT LIVESTOCK,
TRIPLE-WIDE MOBILE
HOME VIN
#HMLCP40023885930A,
HMLCP40023885930113,
A N D
HMLCP40023885930C.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the lis pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale


CREATE MONUMENT
MARKING THE NORTH- Dated this 12h
WEST CORNER OF THE vember, 2008
NORTHEAST QUARTER
OF THE SOUTHEAST Clerk of the Cir
QUARTER OF SECTION 3. By: Jasmine H
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, Deputy Clerk
RANGE 10 WEST, GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA; IN ACCORD
THENCE GO SOUTH 89 THE AMERIC


h day of No-


cuit Court
smith


NCE WITH
ANS WITH


I

H


Victory Service
James Victory
850-227-8419
Your Safety Net !
Motivational Therapist
Companion Sitter
Services




No Job Too Small Elec' &
Carpentary, low rate due
to economy, Gulf County
Only 850-814-7506 or
850-814-7316
Psssst, Have any pesky
"honey do" chores? Small
home repair's? We'll do
them We are also licensed
and insured for lawn
maintenance and pressure
washing 850-258-2463 or
850-258-1215


Land Clearing demolition,
dirt hauling, and septic.
Free Estimates, low prices
Uc & Ins. 850-527-0441








Golden Rule PET SITTING
SERVICE. Perfect alterna-
tive to kenneling your 4
legged kids. Referred by
local vet. Reliable pet
sitter/pet owner. Does
home visits while you are
away. In business 8 years
Call Diana 227-5770 & Dan
227-8225


''
ii :~~a~L~S~BIBBJ~Bls~~








u /-t r w chlaely I OR A erin ut/ muu fi arrd urmrtiotdurt areas for 67 y


S1100 1160 4100 4100 __ 6110 6110 6_6140 6 -140 710_0
DISABILITIES ACT, per- Dependable Other 2 br, 1 ba, apartments Home for Rent Drastic Reduction, Beau-
sons with disabilities need- Hiland View. Call Phil Wewa tiu home ste w/ aprx 2
ing a special accomoa- leaning service 227-2112 or Kenny acres, on Lake Allison,
lion should contact needed Attention!!! 227-7241 for more info 3 br 1.5 ba, new carpet akh 4 bed 2 ful Weahitchka $179,900
COURT ADMINISTRA- for the Port St Joe Star Of- Home Computer work!!!, 1911 Cypress Ave. Large baths, Fireplaceall appli-265-3321or 227-5883
TION, at the GULF County Lost Cat ce call 227-1278or come Flexibe hours, great pay, Efficency Rooms. Weekly fenced yad wh deck es sba y s, l a pli-n
Courthouse at, by the Star office located wllitrain, apply online or monthly rentals Down- Great neighborhood near nces stay, 1 acre in the
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1-800-9558770, via Florida St. Joefromhome.com Sale or Lease Mexico $875/mo. + st & last mo 1-507-250-079 Cottage
Relay Service. Sale or Lease, Mexico rent dep. 1 yr lease. Call House for sale by
Beach Great location. 1 648-8629 or 867-3336 Juniper Avenue Home owner, Apalachicola, 2
DAVID J. STERN, PA. Sales/Business Dev. block to Beach, 3br, 2ba, For Rent. Quiet street, pri br, 2 ba historic co-
S900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND F,. .MH, deck, $249,500 con- 3 br, 2 ba New home In- vate home with 3 br, 2 ba,, age. 3 city lots, pool
ROAD SUITE 400 Black & Whte 7mth od HospitaliyTourism Membership sid all serious offers or 6 dian Pass Hwy C30 $900 fenced in yard and large poohouse, guest
POANSUTATIONBlacMasPnit5Meg ymo win. Ise. $975 mo + mo. utilities NOT included shade trees, close to area house, privacy fenced
PLANTATION, FL cat. Male. Pine St8@ Mag- Resource until. 803-604-0289 or 850-227-8404 schools, downtown Port yard, Totally renovated,
33324-3920 noia Mexico Beach Room Attendant Liberty 803-397-4869
(954) 233-8000 648-4485 Mainstay Suites, in Port St. Development Manor Aps 3/4 br, den, office, 1 bath, St. Joe and St. Joeseph $450,000. Call
November 20,27,2008 Joes now accepting ap Sunny & bright, super Bay. Monthly rental availa- 850-323-0028
At- e is now accepting applica- clean, furnished or unfurn, ble at $850 per month with 850-841-0707
applications for an Room Ata
tendant.' Candidate must tionsfor 1 r apts.These B6ayview very convenience, $850 security/damage de-
2100maintain flexible schedule, GC FM/AM seeks an ener- units are for persons 62 6140 Avail Now Only $850 osit. Call Gulf Coast
2100 dependability is a must. If getic, hands-on person re- years of age or older, br, 1 ba, furn. cottage, month + dep. 850- Property Services at (850)
9223S you have an eye for detail sponsible for the leader- handicapped/disabled, re- $400 + utilities, $200 dep. 258-6874 or 206-542-3025 229-2706
CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA s0 and a passion for service ship / management ofgardless of age. Appli- Howard Creek Call Key W t Style ttage 2 e e
PROJECT #002.040We Want you WKGC development strat- cnts must meet income 522-9515 or 326-0785
STONE MILL CREEK Please apply in person egies & activities through requirement, located at ___________ br, Totally renovated bath. starting at $149,900. Pel-
STONE MILL CREEK Tea-Tiny Toy Mainstay Suites membership, gifts, corpo 102 Liberty Manor Circle, 2 br, 1 b house, Howard heerf and cean,B caalk RE,
WATER SUPPLY WELL Poodles 3951 E Hwy 98 rate underwriting/ spon- Port St Joe, FL, 850229- Creek, no pets $375/mo, Charming 2 br 1 ba, 605 close to Highland Viw 47-2473
NO.1 any colors to choose PortSt. Joe, FL sorship & grants. Must 6353, TDD#850-955-8771. $300 dep, Call Marvin on large lot, total boat ramp. $675 mo.(954)
from. weeks of age. EOE.............DFWP also keep accurate rec- Equal Housing Opportu- 850-340-1631 renov., $700/mo. Rent or 815 1696 Owner Finance
SECTION 00010- ADVER- fo 6 w aords of transactions, office nity buy, 850-227-4913 1800 sf Homes, Waterfront
TISEMENT FOR BIDS Please call 6473342. Logistics/Transportation management and assist 2 br, 1.5 ba, Port St, Joe, Long Avenue Home Spa- or 12 miles from St Joe
with budget requirements. C/H/A, laundry room, 10 x Eagle Landing Townhome cious and private home, 3 Beach, also 3 and 4 br TH
SNOTICE TO RECEIVE Driver Trainees Requires High School MINI ST RL&G 25 storage shed, nice New development- beauti- br, 2 ba, large fenced in 1.5 miles from Mexico
SEALED BIDS '' 'ft NEEDED diploma/equivalent + 5 yrs MIN I S aU'VI yard, very nice area, $525 ful and spacious 2 br, 2 yard, front porch, hard- Beach with pool and
3230 exp of demonstrated suc- tmo, $400 dep, No pets ba, townhome with bonus wood floors. 3 blocks to amenities Call Ron
STONE MILL CREEK- cessful membership & re- I Port St. Joe Call 850-227-6216 upstairs living space and area shopping, downtown 229-200-3221
WATER SUPPLY WELL No CDL? No Problem! source development with bathroom located in Jones and St. Joseph's Bay.
NO. 1 non-profit underwriting, a229 6200 i Homestead, Eagle Land- Monthly rental available at
WATER SYSTEM IM- Earn up to$900/wk. Home sales management, media ing subdivision. Close to $750 per month with $750 Port St. Joe, St. George
PROVEMENTS PHASE I JJ: Port St Joe, 306 16th weekends with TMC. Com- sales, or corporate pro- 814 AA 40 shopping, downtown and security/damage deposit. Island and St. James Bay
St, Fri & Sat, 9am-12noon pany endorsed CDL Train- motion/media marketing; 8 Lr t 3 bedroom, 2 bath house, St. Joseph's Bay. Monthly Call Gulf Coast Property Previously Bank Owned
This project consists of the Antiques, glassware, ing 1-866-280-5309 excellent verbal & written large yard; 2761 Oak rental $750 per month with Services at (850) 229-2706 Property. Priced way be
installation of a Floridian china, Indian pottery, skills; some evening/ Grove Ave., Oak Grove. $750 security/damage de- low market value! Prices
-Aquifer "Test Well". Once signed artwork, K & E sur- EEKING EMPLOYMI weekend work. BS degree America's 850-227-7800 posit. Call Gulf Coast Mexico Beach very nice 3 starting at $35,000. Please
upon completion of the veying transit. Designer BOOKKEEPER is preferred. Starts @ Property Services at (850) br, 2 ba. 313 Hatley Dr. call Counts Real Estate
well installation and testing clothing (women), beaded with quick books and $10.13/hr. Position Open Mini 229-2706 for more infor- Close to beach, $950 mo Group at 850-249-3615.
activities, the well will be- dresses, evening wear, Until Filled with review of nation and tour of the + $500 dep. Call
come a public supply well. cocktail dresses, career payroll experience. applications starting Storage home. 706-882-0683
Plans and specifications wear Ladies scuba suit, Over 20 years 11/25/08. Century 21 Gulf Coast Re- Office or home 6th t Pt
can be obtained at books, misc. Much more! experience. Additional info: alty long term rentals avail- St Joe FI for Rent or Sale 7150
Preble-Rish, Inc., 203 Ab- www.gulfcoast.edu/hr/ 8501 able Carr's Townhomes $1,000 monthly 2 br, 1 ba
erdeen Parkway, Panama (850) 2295269 GCCC is an #6, #8, #10 2 br, 1.5 ba lease call 229-8622 75'x160' lot of left side of
City, Florida 32405, (850) EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. -8 14 210 Watermark Way $950 Furnished home Dec-Mar, please callStone St. Serious seller,
522-0644. The bid must 33 Match per month, Coronado #32 $600 mo. 3 br, 1 ba, Port St. Joe- 3 br, 2ba, 1 special price for quick sell.
conform to Section Climate and br, 1.5 ba 731 Hwy 98 fenced in yard, 16th Street. cg, big yard, corner lot, $59,500 obo, 653-8015 or
287.133(3) Florida Stat- Dagger Kayak, $300, 3 Non-Climate $850 per month, Destiny 216-406-1821 for info new paint ext, 9/08, new 323-0219
utes, on public entity Camera surveillance $300, N' -H Control Storage #1 2 br, 1 ba 115- 40th St. roof, tile kitchen & baths.
crimes. 11 ft tanned alligator skin, INTERVIEW NOW! 4130 Units $550 per month, Gulf Point Gulf County 2br,1 ba 3285 Garrison Ave. Call Mexico Beach Like new, 3
and skull $800. plus more #4 2 br, 2.5 ba 7172 Hwy $580/mo, 3 br, 2 ba, 3285 Garrison Ave. Call Mexico Beach Like new, 3
and skull $800. plus more D 1 ---Boat/RV storage #42 br, 2.5 ba 7172 Hwy 850545-4605 br, 2.5 ba wood laminate
Cost for Plans and Specifi- items Monster h ther98 $1000 per month, In- $750/mo, Hud/Hap Vouch- a mai.ches leon.k2..us frs, ma xt wood ama
cations will be $100.00 per assigns a professional office sace an Lagoon Cottages 3 rs accepted 229-8303 floors, many extra's work-
cations will be $100.00 per assigns a professional dian Lagoon Cottages 3 leave message Port St. Joe, 3br, 1 ba, shop, landscaped, Pelican
set and is non-refundable. Like New!!! to hand-match each Mystery Shoppers. Earn br, 2 ba SR-30 Indian Pass leave mssaCH&A, fenced yard, w/d, Walk Real Estate
Checks should be made Camping gear. Men's 26" job seeker with each up to $100 a day. Under- $850 per month, Palmetto Gulfaire $8/mo + utili. Call 850-47-2473
payable to PREBLE-RISH, bike. 29 gallon fish tank. employer, cover shoppers needed to Plantation 3 br, 3 ba 1120 ___+_C8 6-
INC. Call 229-9520for info judge retail/ dining estab- available Dec. st 15th St. $900 per month, Large lightand bright 1 br, 507-744-3530
Bids will be received until Thisis a FREE Service! lishments. Exp not re- Paradise Porch 2br, 2 ba a gardenapartment Rent to Ow Vacant Lot
Bids will be received until quired. Please Call 1000sq.ft 9135 Cockles Ave. $650 W/D, Tile and Carpet, pri-125 Crane r, Port StJoe,
3:30 p.m. Central Time, 1-8003084616 ii of per month, Surf & Sands vacy. fenced with deck, 1800sf Homes, Waterfront L 468 are lot. Price
e Ier 1 e al Timi Monster Match is your 1-800-308-4616. per'm onth, Surf2&bSands Ftec p t 08mW 0re lot. Price
December18, 2008 at City Monster Match is your 3-ffices unit 30-1 2br, 2 ba 109- pool, tennis court, private or 1/2 miles from St. Joe $60,000 or make offer.
of Wewahitchka- PO. Box 4100 free, one-stop job- 1-ADA Bathroom 30th St. $580 per month, beach. Pets okay. $695 Beach, also 3 and 4 brTH Call 850-402-8015.
966, Wewahitchka Florida search resource. With POSTAL & GOV'T JOB 500 sq.ft. Warehouse Surf & Sands unit 42-A & mo. 850-639-2690 1.5 miles from Mexico Realtors Welcome
32465, and will be opened our extensive contacts, INFO FOR SALE? $850,0/mn Gross 42-b 2 br, 2ba 121- 42ncd Beach with pool Rand Reors We
and read publicly immedi- we can show your St. $650 per month, Surf & FOR RENT amenities, Call Ron p iy
ately thereafter. All Bids Sands unit 42-C 4 br2 ba 229-200-3221 Bank
shall be submitted in an CustomerServ- job seeker profile to caution America's More than your bank.
shall besbmted in an Cutomer Se America's 121-42ncd St. $850. per 3BR, 1BA House Small 3 br White City $650 More than your bank.
envelope clearly marked ce hundreds of top local ini-Storage and month, Ponderosa #183 8 h m thly st & lasYour banker.
"Sealed Bid: CITY OF L C employers in 300 job O br, 2 ba #18 Ponderosa 08 10th St $650 dep. No pets 1 child
WEWAHITCHKA STONER sa canenvomen categories. Let us find You NEVER have to pay Oice omplx Pines Dr. $850 per month, Port St. Joe only. call 229-8622 Vacant Lot
SUPPLY WELL NO A cash n store, some com- you a job that matches for information about 8502298014 Call 850-648-5449 or Lot 5A Cabell Dr., Port St
Bid Bond in the amou of puter exp., ill train, room your skills, experience federal or postal jobs. If 478-451-7761 850-229-1200 for more in- (850)675-4727 St. Joe Beach Joe..32 acre vacant lot.
Bid Bond adancmen Good ad pfe re you see a job formation Beautiful 3 bd, 2 ba gulf Price $92,500 or make of
5% of Bid shall accom- or aan c nt oo and preferences. "guarantee", contact the fom to view home, $1300mo. Call fe Call 850402-8015.
pany Bid. The City of 850-229-2501 or 206W INTERVIEW NOW FTC. (404) 545-2530. Realtors welcome.
Wewahitchka reserves the 9 206 W INTERVIEW NOW The Federal Trade POrt St. Joe Comm ercial J ,
right to reject any and all Hwy 98. forTthefollowing Commission Port S_____________ Ja Caprtl CRtY
bids. The City also re- allowing is America's consumer .n
serves the right to reject Food Services/Hospitality positions: protection agency. S pace for Lease More than your bank.
contractors who in the Warehouse/ Your banker.
City opinion are not equal CUSTOMERS Distribution www.ftc.gov/jobscams Prime Retail Space White City, big 3 br 2 ba,
City's opinion are not equal CUSTOMERS Distribution 1-877-FTC-HELP 319 Reid Avenue
based on the question WANTED / WILL Mechanical Assembler C-319 Reid Avenue FR decks, 1' block from Vacant Lot
naire. All Bids shall be firm TRAIN Electronic-Electrical A public service 1350sf occupant -e ijy ohjce or retail. Iurni rd $1000/mo boat ramp. $700/mo Lot6/A Cabell Dr, Port St
for a period of 60 days af- Assembler message from the FTC NNNp. Call 6478722 or Joe, FL. .32 acre vacant
ter opening. The NEW management of e erand The News Herald 527-6822lot. Price $92,500 or make
GRACIE O'MALLY'S PUB General Labor Classified Advertising 317 Williams Avenue offer. Call 850-402-8015.
Point of Contact will be AND EATERY has ac- Machine Operator Department 1800sf tenant improvements negotiable; $1800/mo gross Realtors Welcome
Josh Baxley,- RE., quired the services of Machinist M a p ,
Preble-Rish, Inc. Consult- Award Winning Chef Wil- ick ker 325 Reid Avenue 6 170 I ap city
ing Engineers at (850) liam Gillespie and Mark Packer Handler 4500sf flex space; corner location; $2500/mo gross 2 br 2 ba, 2 biks from bch an
522-0644 or Fax 522-1011, Heinemann (of Beach- Package Ha dlerAvenue fenced i bakr 600/ More urban.
or by email at comber's Restaurant) to Plastic Workers 30 en e fenced in backyard, $600/ More than your bank.
baxleyj@preble-rish.com. prepare our fresh new rea- 10 6000sf renovated shell space; occupant ready; $4500/mo mod- /dp.478-454-7181
sonably priced menu. Go to www.Emerald gross acantLot
All bidders shall comply Wanted: Past customers to CoastJobsEast.com A 2 br MH in Highland View, a Lo
with all applicable state try dining with us again but orcallusat3 10/Reid Avenue remod, yard maint, no Unit 207 Lot 6 BLK 'K"
and local laws concerning noprevious experience5750sf Suite B; perfect forclothing furniture retailer;$3000/mo ets, $250 dp & $450/mo. Barrier Dunes, Port St
licensing, registration, and necessary. Our benefit 866-769-5627 2 Br Apartment for rent; NNN 423-785-6978 Joe, FL. .05 .09 ML$2acre
regulations of contractors package includes: GREAT and use Dogwood Terrace Apart- Office Space .a or make offer Call
doing business in Florida. DINNER in a CASUAL AT- Job Code 24 ments; 808 Woodward ce make of-40f-80
November 20, 2008 MOSPHERE, SPORTING Ave., PSJ (850)227-7800 202 Marina Drive 850-402-8015.
EVENTS on 5 TV's, LIVE to complete yourjob 680sf well appointed office suite; $800/mo gross (incl. utilities) Realtors Welcome
MUSIC most FRIDAYS and seeker profile g U 2 (Bayside Building) 1742Cobia Ave lot forrent '1 Captal City
SATURDAYS, and a FULL Charming Updated 2 br for $300 mo. for camper or 4, ank
BAR. Apply in person at duplex on quiet Palm Blvd. 310 Reid Avenue RV. Call for more info
9248S 2238 County Road 30c (4 ot central heat, central air, 1116sf Suite C; finished office space; lobby area with two office 227-9363 or 227-4051 More than your bank.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT miles from St. Joe) in 4.- k. monster' Ct h ra 1 Your banker.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT miles from St. Joe) in asher, dryer, dishwasher, suites and filing/storage room; $1000/mo NNN
OF THE FOURTEENTH Simmons Bayou starting at ..........,.............. Pet Friendly. Some breed
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND 5PM, WEDNES- restrictions. $650 mo. $400 322 Long Avenue Vacant Lot
FOR GULF COUNTY DAY-MONDAY (closed A service of dep. 1 year lease. Availa- 1000sf move-in ready; $900/mo gross nt, Unit 207 Lot 7 BLK "K"
FLORIDA Tuesday) or call 229-1779 The Star ble now. For appointment Barrier Dunes, Port St
to set-up an appointment. please call (850) 340-0927 Warehouse / Flex Space bile Home, 2 r 2 a, Joe FL.05-.09 M/L acre
CIVIL DIVISION 110 Trade Circle West CH&A, all electric Ca vacant lot. Price $220,000
CASE NO. 08-443 CA M tc Ma th Match 22500sf -12500sf- PSJ Commerce Park, flex space, $5.25psf/ 8502296495 or make offer Call
INASE:OR R Ma a c NNN (incl. water/sewer) R F E 850-402-8015.
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF .. -i .-" Realtors Welcome
2000 DODGE CARAVAN INTERVIEW NOWI Relos Exclusively l com.
#2B4GP2437YR735082, INTERVIEW NOW! INTERVIEW NOW! NTMarketed Exclusively by: i7 oo c a
and $ 166.00 U.S. CUR- Monster Match 4 Bank
RENCY M ter Math Monster Match a nsal 850-229-6373 4 Br, 3.5 Ba More than your bank.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE assigns a professional assigns a professional to hand-match each 111 Cabell Dr, Port St Your banker.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE to hand -match each job seeker with each Joe, FL. 2,668 sqft, 4 bed-
PROCEEDINGS to hand-match each employer. ooms, 3.5 bath hme wi
job seeker with each job seeker with each pool. Price $410,000
TO ALL PERSONS O EN employeremployer. This is a FREE Service! Ca 850-402-8015. 330
employer..Call 850-402-8015.
TITINGES HAVING Th FREE Service This is a FREE Service! Monster Match is your Realtors Welcome
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY This is a FREE ServiceM .' .^^ ^ "- a ft ,^ 19 Par l vagai-
RIGHTTITLE OR INTER- i free, one-stop job- Capita l1 Cty bond, travel trailer 8 x 36
EST IN THE ABOVE DE- Monster Match is your search resource. With ank w/a 4 ft tip out in the living
SCRIBED PROPERTY Monster Match is your free, one-stop job- our extensive contacts, More than your bank. room asking $4900
More than your bank. room. asking $4900
which was seized on Au- free, one-stop job- search resource. With we can show your Your banker. 6393269
gust 16, 2008 in Gulf search resource. With our extensive contacts, job seeker profile to
County, Florida by the Gulf our extensive contacts, we can show your hundreds of top local I
o Sheriff's Ofice, we can show your job seeker profile to categories. Le t us find 3 0ln
of it. YOU ARE NOTIFIED job seeker profile to hundreds of top local you a job that matches i I
that an action for forfeiture hundreds of top local employers in 300 job your skills, experience S"..=
has been filed against the employers in 300 job categories. Let us find and preferences. .
above described property ategories. Let us find you a job that matches
and you are required to egories. Let us find skills experience INTERVIEW NOW 'i
serve a copy of your writ- you a job that matches you'for the following skills, experience W e '
ten defenses, if any, to it your skills, experience an preferences, positions: -
on Alton Paulk, Attorney and preferences. INTERVIEW NOW Dental GULF COAST PROPERTY SERVICES, LLC
for the Gulf County INTERVIEW NOW Dental U I'L,
Sheriff's Office, whose ad- for the following (Job Code 55)
dress isO. Box 1717 INTERVIEW NOW itinealth Care Assstants H ave G CPS Successfully
Lynn Haven, Florida, for the following (Job Code 57) aSe
32444 on or before De- Building General = WFR E D ELIV ERY-
cember 20, 2008, and file positions: Buildingty Gena!
the original with the Clerk (Job Code 1) Medical Recods Rent Your Property For You! FREE DELIVERY!
of this Court either before Owner Operator Job Code 5a
service on attorney for the Company Driver: Building Professional Medical Technicians
Gulf County Sheriffs Office Over the Road (Job Code 40) (Job Code 56)
or immediately thereafter; Company Driver: e* drPtP. Pr 1 2 ,!l drRrmr g.
otherwise a default will be Construction Medical Therapists .'
entered against you for the Local Route Delivery (Job Code 47) (Job Code 53) rapililised 2 bdrm LarJe beachfront Apt =
relief demanded in the Truck Mechanic
complaint. TowTruckDriver Manufacturing Nursing F'F*i a"t 1 i Eagle Landing -
(Job Code 41) (Job Code 52)
REBECCA L. NORRIS Go to www.Emerald (Job Code 41) (Joow ho Code 52)me new, 2 bdrm
Clerk of the Court Pharmacy
Gulf County Court House CoastJobsEast.com Go to www.Emerald (Job Code 54) t 91! ?Str? t LOng Avenue-
1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr or call us at CoastiobsEast.com
Blvd or call us at Go to .www EmraId 3 i rm, home spacious, large yard hrysler ee itsubishi
Port St. Joe, Florida 866-769-5627 n6CoastJobsEast corn luieilag\eerbee- 7th Street -
32456. and use 866-769-5627 or call usat JPlp'' e ith Street-=


By: Cindy Tidwell lob Code 43-schools
SDeputy Ciderk and use Job Code 866-769-5627 L, 10 SCtROOlS downtown PSI & USed Car Supercenter
November 20, 27, 2008 to complete your job listed above to and use Job Code
seeker profile complete your job listed above to Service Center ~ Parts & Accessories:
seeker profile complete your job Call us today and let us rent/manage oi =
Dr. Robert King seeker profile C H- RYS LE R i -I
S --- your property for you!
Dentist .. i. roster -- mon r II
325 Long Ave .... ................ 229-2706 1 850-785-4372
A service of A service of 2 9 78r0- 54 of
227-1812 The of Star 888-403-8998
S1111111 11111111111111111111111111 1111111i


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2008 11 B


Fstablishedl 1938 0 Serv/ina Guli~nllf Colitv and sirroundrl~n areans for 67 years


tsldullIlfleu







B 12 I The Star


Local


Thursday, November 20, 2008


WIGGLES from aeB


the Wiggles overdose level.
So how was I going to
handle this interview? I
knew Anthony would be
used to big-time reporters,
and he would figure out
pretty fast that I didn't
fall into that category.
I was afraid this would
probably be more like a
conversation than a real
interview. Should I tell
him I would like to put on
skivvies and belt buckle and
join them on stage? Would
he want to know that my
granddaughter has watched
so many Wiggles DVDs, she
pronounces some of her
words with an Australian
accent? Panic was setting in
by the time my phone rang.
By the time the phone rang
for the second time, my
mind went totally blank -
and then I heard his voice.
Oh, I was still nervous,
but I quickly learned that
Anthony Field is a very nice
man. What you see up on
stage is what you get. We
talked about the group's
work with UNICEF They
wrote and donated a song
for children to help educate
them about washing their
hands with soap and water.
Worldwide, we are losing
thousands of children a day
by the spread of waterborne
diseases. Just the simple
act of washing your hands
with water and soap can
drastically reduce that
number and save lives.
I wanted Anthony to
know that I especially like
the group's Christmas
DVDs. Yes, they have all


the fun stuff like reindeer
dancing and Santa, but
they also contain the
most beautiful traditional
Christmas songs. Children
portraying the nativity
scene on the DVD are
timeless and refreshing.
It is just so nice to see
someone remember the
real reason we celebrate
Christmas. We touched
on Anthony's work with
animals and the fact that he
is working on a book with
his cousin. It will involve
fitness and a healthy
lifestyle. We both admitted
to loving chocolate. I told
him Kenzie has a Wiggle
guitar, but she now wants
a real one so she "Play
her guitar like Murray."
And when she catches her
Poppa asleep in the chair,
she shouts "wake up Jeff,
we need you for the show."
All catch phrases used by
the group. I asked him what
the children of the blue
Wiggle like to watch, and he
reported that they do watch
and like the Wiggles show
and DVDs.
He said he is pleased
when he watches their
reaction to the show. He
gives high praises to his
wonderful wife and family.
Always mindful of seeing
life through the eyes
of a child, the Wiggles
now include bloopers on
their DVDs. It is good for
children to see everyone,
even Wiggles, makes
mistakes.
We chatted a little
more about his children


AR .. 4WW'1A44 M
JENNIFER BARBER I Contributed photo
THUMBS UP: Anthony Field (Blue Wiggle) gives our family the thumbs up at the concert
in Mobile.


and mine. He shared that
as he left for the last leg
of this tour, his daughter
presented him with a rose
and then handed him a
bunch of roses to bring
to Dorothy the Dinosaur.
During each Wiggles


concert, the action stops
while several of the Wiggly
dancers come off of the
stage to collect roses and
dog bones from the children
in the audience. I asked him
who had the idea about the
children bringing roses for


" \.' .-*'&..x<



Sthat c ni di the i 7A.h .',;if huI w i th o"'a ,n ,I .
v 11l1,1 Ti Id.q te N m Ce ha in'a t1 111' ,ies / ior ,lt ,id ,'t'lii '1
p\ laced i> c St, z ,1 ( ,adi he7,, nes.
'' i,4'7, E~qBa r I v s n SUor: ""i-
_- Thursay, Nov. 27h Issue
\'- l'( i~d Q h i ii l s L ,

Wednesday, Nov. 19th- 11:00am EDT
Ad without proof:
Thursday, Nov. 20th -11:00am EDT
IC-2 2 3; p! -lsv a ald:
Friday, Nov. 21th- close of business
', e Milt not accept ianitli ands o2 .,
'the Chanksy,1vii edition
Please call with any Questions
The Star- 227-1278 'i '
The Times- 653-8868

T t. be ;,r.,2'

,I. ,

U 'i~ii *


Dorothy the Dinosaur and
bones for Wags the Dog.
He said it just happened.
Children started showing
up with them. The real
dog bones are donated to
animal shelters after the
show, and the real flowers
go to a local hospital.
I believe Henry the
Octopus has totally been
left out on this deal, but
when you are purple and
have eight-legged pants,
that is to be expected.
During their concerts,
Capt. Feathersword
(affectionately known as the
5th Wiggle) bungles his way
throughout the entire show.
He appears on stage as the
comic relief to the Wiggles,
always a step behind or an
octave off key.
Anthony spoke with
pride about Australia and
its people, and I could have
listened to him speak for
hours about his homeland,
but I knew my time was
running out. After all,
the blue Wiggle had to
get ready for a show. I
realized I had failed at my
job of doing a professional
interview. It was what is
was, and that was simply a
conversation.
But if you walk away
from this conversation
with a different attitude


Oh, I was still
nervous, but I
quickly learned
thatAnthony
Field is a very nice
man. ... I wanted
Anthony to know
that I especially
like the group's
Christmas DVDs.
Yes, they have all
the fun stufflike
reindeer dancing
and Santa, but
they also contain
the most beautiful
traditional
Christmas
songs. Children
portraying the
nativity scene
on the DVD are
timeless and
refreshing. It is
just so nice to see
someone remember
the real reason
we celebrate
Christmas.

about how a real children's
entertainment group
should act and you pick up
one of their DVDs for your
child or grandchild and
watch it with them or if you
attend a concert with your
family and are completely
entertained, then maybe
this conversation, non-
interview has served its
purpose.
I will go back to
my classroom at the
elementary school this
week. I will put a picture of
the Wiggles up on the wall
and tell my art students
about the day their teacher
talked with a Wiggle, and I
will practice that "Lights,
Camera Action" song, just
in case they need a stand in
sometime.
So look for me at the
Wiggles concert on Nov. 21
at the Tallahassee-Leon
County Civic Center (www.
ticketmaster.com or 800-
322-3602). I will be there
with my family, a sign, a
dog bone, some roses and
a deep appreciation for a
great group of guys.


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Kathleen Smith
Advertising Mlanager
Office: (850) 227-7847 Cell: (850) 819-5078
Email: smnith@pcnh.com
850-227-1278
135 W Hwy 98
SPort St Joe, FL 32457
Fax: 850-227-7212


I T I 'ftji


850-653-8868
129 Commerce St.
Apolochicola, FL 32329
Fax. 850-653-8036


\-~- ^ ---^
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"WHICH ONE COSTS MORE TO INSURE?"
Call Us Before You Buy One.
ROY SMITH, ANDY SMITH,
LAURA RAMSEY, CINDY WARD, KAREN CLARK
HANNGN Allstate


INSURANCE



Phone (850) 227-1133


$5 Raffle Tickets
3 day 2 night stay at the Windmark
Beach Resort with a
$200 Gift Certificate to
School of Fish Restaurant.
Tickets Available at: Toucans, St Joe
Rent All and Persnickety.
Drawing December 6, 2008 Benefits Project Graduation


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