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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03111
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 20, 1995
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03111

Full Text












HE


USPS 518-880

FIFTY-SEVENTH YEAR, NUMBER 47


STAR


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 ,THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


INet BuBack Plan Springs Leak


II,. State Plans Purchase"With,"I'dle"I Money; More Than 100-in Gulf Already Out
- Kof Work; :Economic Impactto Other Businesses Spreading Throughout County


With the Net Ban Constitu-
tional Amendrment just barely two
weeks into its enactment, ques-,
tions' muddyA the ,waters sur-
rounding funding, for the $20 mil-
lion net buy-back program, along,"
with compensating and retraining
out-of-work fishermen.
When Florida voters approved
the Net Ban Amendment in
November- they were told a $40
million program, financed
through a $5. surcharge to be
placed on saltwater fishing licens-
'es, would ease the financial bur-
'den of the fishing industry. The
program was to include $20 mil-
lion for net buy-back. $10 million
for lump sum payments to fisher-
men and $10 million to retrain
beached netters for other jobs.
The Floridc Senate threw a
snag into the' po)ns' when they
refused to allow.the surcharge on


'fishing licenses; instead sending a
$20 million buy-back plan of their
own to Governor Lawton Chiles to
he funded through unobligated,
unexpended and unappropriated
trust funds.
S Chiles is reportedly commit-
ted to finding the $20 million, but,
his staff has only been able to
identify $7 million in the, funds
thus far. They may not finish
combing through the state's trust
funds before mid-August, with no
assurances of locating the full
$20 million in funds.
In the meantime the State
Department of Labor temporarily
opened 23 aid centers across the
state to help fishermen apply for
unemployment, compensation,
register their nets to be pur-
chased by the state and sign-up
for retraining programs through
the Job Training Partnership Act.


Fishermen across the state
took advantage of the state's
assistance in signing up for
unemployment with most of them
finding out they had to pay $189
in retroactive unemployment
insurance in order to qualify for
up to $250 per week of benefits.
Since most net fishermen are self
employed they have not paid into
the state's unemployment insur-
ance pool and, according to legis-
lation, must pay retroactively into
the fund in order to qualify for the
program.
The net buy-back program is
a whole different 'story, catching
netters.right between a rock and a
hard spot. For example, a 600-
yard purse seine net 'might
require as much as $60,000-
$90,000 to rig out, but the state is
offering only $3,500 as compen-
sation to the fishermen for the


net. Beach seines which cost
$9,000-$12,000 are also bringing
$3,500 from the state. Gill nets
are worth $500 $1,000 depend-
ing upon mesh size; trammel nets
are worth $1,000 and over 500 ft.
trawls will bring $500.
According to local fisherman-
retailer Patrick McFarland, most
fishermen are taking a wait-and-
see approach before selling their
nets to the state, hoping that legal
efforts challenging the Net' Ban
Amendment or searching out
loopholes such as fishing for gov-
ernmental purposes, might save
their industry.
Gulf, Franklin and Wakulia
counties have failed in their-
attempts to secure injunctions
prohibiting the enforcement of the
net ban based on resident fisher-
(See LOSS on Page 3)


Local fishermen are shown busy preparing a long piece of
net for storage or to sell to the state on the net buy-back
program. Most nets will be held for a while, yet.


Rish to

Head State

Ethics Board
The Florida Commission on
Ethics, in a meeting held last
Thursday, unanimously elected
William J. Rish of Port St. Joe as
chairman for the 1995-96 term.
Rish, who has served as the Port
St. Joe City Attorney for over 25
years, served as the attorney for
Gulf County for. over 25 years as
well. A Democrat appointed by
Senate President Pat Thomas in
March 1994 to fill the unexpired
term created by a member's resig-
nation, Rish was reappointed by
Thomas for a two-year term com-
mencing July 1, 1994. Rish was a
member of the Florida House. of
Representatives from 1970 to
1978, during which time he was
chairman of the Judiciary Com-
mittee."
The Florida Commission On
Ethics is an independent nine
member commission formed in
1974 to review complaints filed
under the Ethics Code and to is-
sue advisory opinions to public
officials about' potential, conflicts
of interest.
The Commission is composed
of nine members appointed for
two-year terms. Five are members
appointed by the Governor, no
more than three. of whom may be
from the same political party.
Two members are appointed by
the President of the Senate, and
two members are appointed by
the Speaker of the House of Rep-
resentatives. Neither the Speaker
of the House not the President of
the Senate may appoint more
than one member from the same
political party.


Wewa Prepares

For Election
The City of Wewahitchka is
beginning to gear up for a, munic-
- -fpa.-etectiof'-to--select three City
Commissioners in September.
Voter registration is open for
registering potential voters, with
the books scheduled to close in
two weeks to further registrations
until after the election. Florida
law requires the closing of regis-
tration books 30 days prior to the
election, which is scheduled for
September 5.
Three Incumbents have their
terms in office expire this year.
The three posts up for elec-
tion are:
Group Ill, a post currently
held by Tony Justice. The new
term of office is for three years.
Group IV, a post now held by
Dallas Jones, for a term of three
years.
Group I, now held by Phillip
. Gaskin, for a two year term.

Another Judge For
14th Judicial Circuit
An additional circuit judge
position for the Fourteenth Judi-
cial Circuit has been approved by
the 1995 session of the Florida
Legislature.
All qualified applicants; being
a member of the Florida Bar for
the preceding five years, an elec-
tor of the State of Florida; and a
resident of the territorial jurisdic-
tion of the court, may call or write
the Chair of the Fourteenth Judi-
cial Nominating Commission for
an application as follows: William
G. Warner, 514 Magnolia Avenue,
Panama City, Florida 32401,
(904) 769-2788.


U 1i ^ SALTED ....


Raffield's is experimenting with several products to stay At right is a quantity of jelly fish, prepared and packed for
in business here in Port St. Joe. Here workers are unloading the oriental market. The firm has a contract to supply near-
a boat load of "golden crabs" caught off shore in deep water. ly a half million pounds of the delicacy this year.



Raffields Seeking Alternative Product

Going Farther & Deeper For Formerly Unutilized Species to Harvest


"We're a sixth generation fish-
ing family facing the worse case
scenario for survival than any of
our ancestors before us," Gene
Raffleld said as he pondered what
/ the future had in store for one.of
the state's largest fishing and pro-
cessing plants.
"If we fail it won't be from a
lack of effort," he added, as he
outlined what direction Raffleld
Fisheries intends to head as they
fight for survival after the net ban..
For at least the past 20 years
Gulf County's fishing industry
has led the state in volume of fish
landings. A normal, year for
Raffield's would include catch
averages of 11 'million pounds of
bait fish (menhaden), three mil-,
lion pounds of lady fish (before
regulation), two to three million
pounds of mullet (since regulation
200,000-300,000 pounds), along


,with catches of mackerel, blue
.fish, pompano and trout.-
These are all inshore fish and
according to Raffleld, amounted
to 95 percent of the fish products
processed at Raffield Fisheries
before the net ban.
No food fish can be caught by
entanglement nets within nine
miles of shore according to net
-ban regulations, totally eliminat-,
ing commercial harvesting of
many of the area's most popular*
food fish.
"There will never be another
mullet fish fry unless the fish are
caught with a cast net or shipped
in from Louisiana or Alabama,"
Raffield said as he emphasized
the totality of the net ban.
Deep Water Purse Seine
Fishing
Raffield's is currently rigging


two boats for offshore purse seine
fishing to be 'used outside of the
limits of the net ban. Since food
fish can no longer be caught
using a purse seine, Raffield's
intends to target bait fish such as
sardines, cigar minnows, blue
runners, and bonita.
If this works out Raffield pre-
dicts they will catch 20% of their
normal production. If not, then
considerable cuts beyond the 75-
100 employees already cut will be
forced.
"We're going to hold on till the
end of the year as we experiment
With' several alternate fishing
methods," Raffield explained.
Crawfish
For the past several years the
local firm has been importing live
crawfish from Louisiana and pro-
cessing them. After cooking them


with spices 'they are packaged
into three-pound 'packages and
are marketed under the
-Fishermen's Pride logo through-
out the southeastern United
States.
Fish Trawling
Raffield's largest boat, the
Fisherman's Pride, has been
rigged for trawling in Water rang-
ing from 400 to 600 feet deep.
Trawling is the same method used
by shrimpers to catch shrimp, but
in this case is being utilized to
catch fish in waters outside the
net ban limits.
According to Raffield, fish
caught by trawling are non-tradi-
tional or under-utilized species
which require special marketing
in order to utilize the product.
Fish with names such as star
(See PRODUCT on Page 3)


City Tip-y-toes Ahead With Ward Ridge Survey Plans

Mayor Pate Says City Must Tentatively Proceed With Plans In Order To Determine Cost
In Tuesday's regularly sched- which should fund roughly one- how much it was going to cost code to the board for review before for a 15 foot construction setback
uled meeting Port St. Joe's City third of the $650,000 price tag. them. a formal ordinance of acceptance line on all lots over 50 foot. Thi


Commission decided to enter into
phase two of their grant applica-
tion with Farmers Home
Administration to secure funding
aid for the construction of a
$650,000 sewer facility in the
Ward Ridge area of Port St. Joe.
Preapplication for the grant
had earlier been approved by the
board which was notified by
Phillip Jones, Preble-Rish
Engineering, that their eligibility
of credit had been established
through the preapplication pro-
cess.
Jones told the commissioners
that historically once an applica-
tion reached the second step 20 to
40 percent of grant application
funds were generally awarded


The next step toward grant
approval would require a techni-
cal review including an engineer-
ing agreement, environmental
information, and preliminary
engineering report on sewer im-
provements for the area.
Commissioner Charles Tharpe
made the motion to hire Preble-
Rish Engineering to complete the
technical review portion of the
application at a cost of $8,000.
The motion was seconded by Bill
Wood and passed four to one with
Johnny Linton casting the .only
dissenting vote.
JLinton argued that the people
in the area had expressed to them
that they were not interested in
sewer service without knowing


Mayor Pate responded that
the only way a price could be
established was to go ahead with
the application and find out how
much money is available to assist
in construction of the project.
Land Development
Regulation Code
Tom Gibson presented the
board with copies of the City of
Port St. Joe's Land Development.
Regulation Code, which he and
members of his committee had
reworked to comply with Gulf
County's Comprehensive Plan
requirements.
Gibson and committee mem-
bers Frank Pate, Clay Smallwood
and Don Butler presented the


would be approved by the city.
If approved by the board the
new code would replace several
ordinances relating to zoning and
building code requirements with-
in the city limits. It covers every-
thing from new building construc-
tion all the way down to the erec-
tion of a permanent sign in order
to meet state Comprehensive Plan
requirements.
Gibson asked .the board to
"look it over" and bring back any
suggestions or recommendations
for the committee at the next
meeting.
One change the board was
glad to see was the reduction of
building setback lines on smaller
lots in the 'ity. Current code calls'


nas presented a constant proobem
with variance requests brought
before the board.-
The draft of the new city code
calls for a seven foot setback on
50 foot lots, 10 foot on 50 to 100
foot lots, and 15 foot on all lots
over 100 foot.
In Other Business
* Discussed the city's composting
project and the availability of
$28,000 written into the county's
recycling grant; and
* Made plans to asphalt the new
walking track under construction
in North Port St. Joe as a joint
city/county project.
* Discussed adding more park
benches and recreational equip-
ment to Frank Pate Park;


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THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JULY 20,1995


Getting Real

A VISIT TO GULF COUNTY last week by U. S. Senator Con-
nie Mack brought Gulf County people and state and local politi-
cians face to face with a national politician who espoused reduc-
tions in federal spending. Of course, Senator Mack said the
things the Gulf County people wanted to hear. He said he, at
least, realized the 1994 election results were a mandate from the
people for a more economical government which wasn't trying to
be all things to'all people and didn't honor promises of giving the
moon to everybody by borrowing on our future.
Mack made a big hit with everyone in attendance at the
gathering, given for him at a home near Wewahitchka. It wasn't
a small gathering of merely the elite or "in" crowd, either. It was
made up mostly of "John Q. Taxpayer", just plain folks. Of
course, there were, the usual politicians present. They were the
ones who were paying the courtesy call of being present at the
Senator's public appearance, as well as those who were his per-
sonal friends.
But even the politicians present were of the same mind-set
as Senator Mack about government spending.
THE CROWD GAVE MACK spontaneous applause as a re-
sult of his Statement that he.thought Congress ought to have to
live under the same rules and regulations as everyone else in the
country. This isn't presently the case. In everything from com-
mon everyday meals to the expensive and complicated matter of
medical expense coverage sees the members of Congress head
and shoulders above everybody else in benefits.
He noted Congress still had to find a way to come together
with the President in agreement on a balanced budget by lower-
ing expenditures, not raising taxes.
That matter of "coming together with the President" is a two-
way street which will require some real diplomacy as an activity
by both sides.
WE DON'T KNOW THE Senator personally, as well as we
know some of the other members of Congress, or the Florida
Legislature; not even as well as we know Senator Mack's Demo-
cratic counterpart in the Congress. We do believe he is sincere in
his remarks, as he has been in the past. We do not believe his
remarks recently in Gulf County were made strictly for loqal con-
sumption and appeasement, like remarks from other members
of the national governing body have been in the past.


Story Causes Buzz

A STORY IN LAST WEEK'S paper caused about as much of
a buzz of speculation and approval/dis-approval on both sides of
the issue as we have heard in a long time. We say this to indi-
cate that the people who are involved and affected by the fees to
use county rights-of-way adjoining public boat landings isn't a
matter of unanimous approval.
We believe this a matter which will necessarily have to be
"sold" to the people, in order to gain that unanimous approval,
or as near so as possible.
The Star hadn't been on the news-stands 30 minutes
Wednesday afternoon before the conversation on the story's
pro's and con's were heard in this office.
: WE AGREE WITH THE need for the some sort of charge for
the use of the facilities; it may well be the annual fee is the only
way to go. Taking into consideration what we know about the ac-
tion at the present time, we agree with the Commission. The
county needs some sort of revenue to maintain the space sur-
rounding the public boat landings, what with the state's, puny
remuneration for the same purpose. We also believe those who
use the facilities should pay for the privilege and the considera-
ble maintenance involved. We also feel that had a practice, of
this or some other sort, been initiated some time ago,, money
could have been provided for keeping them in better condition
than they have been in the past.
As much as it pains us to endorse another fee, we believe a
fee of some sort is needed here.
LAST .WEEK, WE WERE in Atlanta, Georgia, to see some of
the "public" attractions in that historic city. We visited the Cyclo-
rama, Stone Mountain Park, attended an outdoor concert of the
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, presented in a city-owned band
shell--all supported and provided for the public's enjoyment
with tax money. They had as their purpose the attraction of visi-
tors and tourists to Atlanta.
But they all had an entrance fee!
That's all Gulf county seems to be doing here. trying to get'
an "entrance fee" from those who come to enjoy the facilities, so
there will be money to maintain them.


We moved to the end of
Stonewall Street in 1951. I
thought it was near 'bout as far
out as you could get. "If you
walked to the middle of that grav-
el road and squinted back toward


4)
4/


bunker Down with Kes


by Kesley Colbert


Our Miss Brooks


town you could just barely see
the old brick farm house that be-
longed to Mr. Rob Brooks., That
was it as far as neighbors went.
I was four that summer and
remember almost nothing about
moving into "our" new house. Mr.
and Mrs. Brooks were old and
they worked all the time. He was
on the quiet side-she talked a
mile a minute. I can see her now,
bent over ever so slightly, coming
out of that meticulously kept gar-
den wearing a straw .hat and a
long dress with an apron and


those big, heavy shoes. She'd
have a hoe in one hand and be
wiping sweat off her brow with
the other. She wasn't out picking
a few purple hulls, she was work-
ing her garden! And she'd be
smiling.
"Hot'er than blue blazes to-
day, Kes, what say you and I get
us a little lemonade, set on the
porch for a spell, Brooks will be
in directly."
One of my first remembranc-
es in this life was that Miss
Brooks more often than not, re-


ferred to, and called her husband
by his last name. Somehow in my
ever expanding knowledge center
I thought that was strange-
As those early years fell away
I'd hang around some down at
their tool shed. I tell you, they
had more old gadgets and doo-
dads that anybody I've ever
known. Miss Brooks would pa-
tiently explain what each of them
was and usually, as'I recall, she
would throw in the history of
each without me even asking.
And every couple of weeks
Leon, David Mark and I would
obediently march down to their
house for a haircut. Mr. Brooks
had electric trimmers. He'd set
those things on one-sixteenth of
an inch and presto-we looked
like Curly, Curly and Curly.
About the time, "Brooks" was
finishing up on David, Miss
Brooks, talking all the while,
would descend into the base-
ment. We'd not only start home
with a free haircut, but each of us
would have a jar of pickled peach-
es or blackberry preserves : or
some such stuck under our arms.
'Tell your Mom I said hello-and
you boys be careful crossing that
road!"
On occasion I would go to the
store for her. Miss Brooks didn't
drive.'if she needed the nine cent
loaf of bread she'd pop open that
small, black leather coin purse
which was showing some wear on
both sides and slowly count out a
nickel and four pennies. 'Waste
not, want not."
..'Yes ma'am." But I was think-
ing-an extra penny for some Ba-
zooka gum wouldn't a' hurt noth-
ing. I asked Mother about it once.
"Son, Mr. and Mrs. Brooks
are very conservative. They have
both worked hard all their lives.
They've earned everything, they
have and you can't fault them for
being careful with their money. I
hope you will take a lesson from
them . "
As those early years slipped
on our neighborhood grew. The
Kennons moved in. And Mr. Joe
Gooch with two sons. And the
Sextons and the Killibrews and
the Kings across the street vwth a
houTseful of kids. The bahfaklies
starte-dand -tid'ril ess visits to
the old brick-fannmhouse down the
road.
In elementary school we'd get
out several weeks in September
for cotton picking. I'd want to va-
cation-my Dad sent me to Mr.
Brook's cotton fields. They had
little sacks for the boys and the
pay for us was two, cents a
pound. Before I could get to the
end of my first row, the hide was
skint plum off both knees, my
back was breaking in two and I
was bleeding from every finger I
had. And Leon made things even
worse by bombing me with dirt
clods every time I took my eyes
off of him.
We weighed up at lunch.
'IWO POUNDS! That's impossible!
There had to be more in there
than that! The scales are wrongly I
know cotton don't weigh much
but this was ridiculously Why, I
accidentally dropped more than
two pounds worth of dirt clods
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


The Battle for AtlantaStill Comes Out the Same Way


..We Lost!


ANYONE WHO THINKS war-
fare is romantic of offers a person
a pathway to personal glory has
only to take a trip up to Atlanta
and pay a visit to the Cyclorama.
Frenchie and I took that little
trip last weekend, and visited the
Cyclorama for the first time in all
the years we have been going to
Atlanta.
I was thoroughly impressed
with the show. It's nothing but a
painting on the wall of a round
room with a moving platform
which carries the viewer around
for a panoramic view of the battle
for Atlanta during the Civil War.
Atlanta was a city of about
10,000 people in those days, but
already it had hints of the great
city it would eventually become.
It was a rail hub of the South and
a munitions' maker for the War,
which made it a tempting target
for the Union Army.
The famous battle, which
started Sherman's march to the


ETA OIN SHRDLU


,' By Wesley Ramsey


sea at Savannah, involved nearly
200,000 men on both sides of the
battle lines which would become
the struggle for victory; consid-
ered necessary for the North to
win the war, or for the South to
continue in the conflict.
WE HAD A SMALL Black
lady as our guide through the Cy-
clorama and let me tell you, she
made that presentation. She put
expression and meaning in her
monolog which made the mighty
battle come alive for those of us
who were watching the presenta-
tion on the canvas as our viewing
.platfornn slowly revolved around


the room.
The painting on the wall and
the three-dimensional display be-
tween the stage's edge and the
painting on the canvas, all blend-
ed in with each other to make
you have the impression that you
were looking at the actual.battle-
ground.
There was no "glory" or "ro-
mance" on the faces of the horde-
of troops involved in the battle ..
. ,only a struggle for survival and
a horror of the way they had died
on the faces of the many who had
fallen in battle.
It was realistic enough to re-


move any sense of glamour one
might have mistaken for being a
companion of warfare.

THE BATTLE occupied near-
ly the entire area of present-day
Atlanta.
The thing which impressed
me most was .a statement on a
plaque in the museum which is
located in the Cyclorama 'build-
ing. The plaque said there were
more Americans killed in the Civil
War than have been killed in all
American wars from the Revolu-
tionary War to and including the
Korean War.
One in five American men
were killed in that war.
That's hard to believe, consid-
ering the weapons they used in
those days. The cannons shot a
cannon ball about half-way be-'
tween a baseball and a softball in
size. They would lob it for a dis-
tance of 1800 feet! That's about
the length of six football fields. No


wonder they didn't shoot until
they saw the whites of their eyes!. '
The soldiers were armed with
muskets or rifles, which they
loaded' through the muzzle and
were able to get off about two
shots a minute if they were
proficient:with their weapon.

BUT THE SOLDIERS all
lined up, shoulder to shoulder
and shot at each other over a dis-
tance about the size of a football
field. It's hard to miss in a situa-
tion like that. Every one of the
half dozen or so battles in and
around Atlanta, leading up to the
big push, recorded about 10,000
soldiers killed in battle. ,
At that rate, more soldiers
were killed in the battle for Atlan-
ta than were killed in the entire
Korean War.
And that was only one battle.
Atlanta goes to great lengths
to show people how much like
War Hell is. They go to great


lengths to show the death, de-
struction and misery which ac-
companies war; the Civil War, at
least

THE PORTION OF the Cyclo-
rama which is made up of
mannequins and depictions of
battle debris and destruction,
contained Clark Gable, who
played Rhett Butler in the movie,
Gone iWith the Wind. It shows
Clark lying on the field of battle,
dead. The narrator said Clark,
himself visited the Cyclorama and
insisted on being placed in the
Diorama portion of the display, as
a slain soldier.
So, if you ever wondered what
happened to old Rhett after the
war, the presentation intimates
he finally did the right thing.
He, like so many others,
came to an untimely end in the
war identified as the Civil War
but actually was a very un-Civil
War!


St. Joseph Bay
Date 'Time Ht. Time Ht.
July 21 7:11 a.m. H 1.5 6:09 p.m. L 0.2
July 22 7:52 a.m. H 1.6 6:45 p .. L 0.1
July 23 8:35 a.m. H 1.7 7:22 p.m. L 0.1
July 24 9:16 a.m. H 1.7 7:58 p.m. L 0.1
July 25 9:56 a.m. H 1.7 8:31 p.m. L 0.1
July 26 10:33 a.m. H 1.7 8:59 p.m. L 0.1
July 27 11:08 a.m. H 1.7 9:23 p.m. L 0.2
S-- 2


SW-THE STAR- ostmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
USPHS 518880 Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-$10.60 Six Months
SUSPHS 518880 The Star Out of County-$21.20 Year Out of County--15.90 Six Months
Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue OThe Star ut of State-$20.00 Year Out of State-$20.00 Six Months
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456-0308 Post Office Box 308
Sby The Star publishing Company Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St Joe, FL
second-Class stage Paid at ort S Jo, FL Phone (904) 227-1278 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
ther than amount received for such advertisement.,
A, g Wesley R. Ramsey ............ Editor & Publisher CLASS POSTAG D The s
,$WSP~' William H. Ramsey .............Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
Frenchie L. Ramsey...........Office Manager AT PORST. JOE, FL3256-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thbr-
Shirley Ramsey ..................Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


Students/Volunteers Give Sea Turtles Loss


A Little Help for Hatching, Survival

Turtle Egg Laying Season Returns With A Gusto To Gulf County;
Nesting On The Rise With St. Joseph Peninsula Sands A Favorite Spot


There are six species of sea
turtles which make the Gulf of
Mexico their home and currently
at least two species are nesting
here in Gulf County according to
information Meg Lamont and Me-
linda Shaespauer, both students
at the University of Florida, re-
vealed to the Kiwanis Club Tues-
day at their regular meeting.
S. The two students are moni-
toring the sea turtles as a part of
their studies and giving them a
little human help to aid nature in
hatching the little turtles and see-
ing that they get safely in the wa-


ter to begin their life. "In. spite of
this, nearly 95% of the young
hatchlings will never make it to
adulthood," Miss Lamont told the
club members.
The two students have under-
taken the project of patrolling the
Cape San Bias Beach every night
and morning in search of signs of
a turtle "crawl". When they see
the sign, which indicates a sea
turtle has come onto the beach at
night to lay her eggs, the two
hunt the nest and relocate it if it
is in danger from high tides. If
not, they prepare the nest for pro-


tection frtn predators, such as
raccoons and coyotes and con-
stantly monitor the nests until
the little turtles hatch.
Volunteers perform the same
tasks for turtle nests in the St.
Joe Beach and Beacon Hill Beach
areas.
Lamont said, 'The current
turtle egg-laying season has been
an extremely productive year. We
have had as high as five turtle
crawls in one night."
"A turtle will lay between 100
and 150 eggs," Miss Lamont said.,
"and with a little assistance from
us. most of them will hatch.
When they do, we escort them to
the water and they will be on
their way."
Here in the Gulf of Mexico
there are six species of turtles
common to the area, with some of
them being on the endangered
rolls. Most commonly seen on
Gulf County beaches are logger-
head and green turtles. Less com-
mon species are: leatherback.
hawksbill. kemp ridley and olive
ridley, all of which are at different
levels of being endangered.
The turtles lay their eggs
mostly at night In a shallow hole
which the mother turtles dig out


of the sand for a nest and cover
up again once the eggs are depos-
ited.
Some' of the species, such as
the green turtle, lay apparently
every other year and return to the
same location, year after year, to
make their nests.\'
Volunteers who are also
working to protect the nesting
turtles are: Harry and Judy Paul,
in the Indian Pass vicinity [phone
'229-8182]; Herman and Pam
Jones [phone 647-8245] and Bar-
"bara Eells [phone 647-8238] in
the St. Joseph Peninsula area;
Paula Boone [phone 647-5031].
Cail Piccola [647-8760] and Miss
Eells. in the Dixie Belle Curve/
Tyndall line stretch of beach.
Residents who discover a
fresh turtle crawl in these areas
are urged to call either of the vol-
unteers. to help protect the
hatching turtles by having the
nests protected by someone who
understands how to best perform
this task.
Thus far there have been 96
nests in the St. Joseph Peninsula
beaches; 31 nests in the Indian
Pass/Cape San Bias area. and 13
nests in the Dixie Belle Curve to
Tyndall AFB stretch of beach.


gr4i


r.


' ence" for you.
SYou may be making "t
points" with the "vested i
group" here but you are
yourself most unpopula
many 'of the retirees wh
conscientiously followed
meetings concerning the
system.
I have enjoyed The St
number of years and hope
tinue to do so..
Yours truly,
Carolyn Dozier
Mexico Beach


Suggests Editor
Attend Meetings
Dear Mr. Ramsey,
I am sure that as a good
paper editor you are most con-
scientious about getting your
facts straight before you write an
editorial.
May I suggest that attending
some of the council meetings and
workshops at Mexico, Beach,
would be an "enlightening experi-


(Continued From Page 1)


men of the counties fishing under
the auspices of governmental pur-
poses. These and other challenges
to the Net Ban Amendment will be
making their way through the
court system over the next sever-
al months while commercial fish-
ermen hold on to a glimmer of
hope for the industry.
No Compensation for Boats or
Shoreside Facilities
The compensation legislation
passed by the Senate has nothing
to offer commercial boat owners,
nor owners of shoreside facilities
which have expensive, specialized
equipment designed to process
fish and fish products.
There are not many better
examples of this than what we
have locally at Raffield Fisheries.
"We have several hundred thou-
sand dollars of specialized pro-
cessing equipment that will be
rendered useless without fish to
be processed," Gene Raffield told
The Star.
He explained the story was
the same throughout the state as
millions of dollars worth of equip-
ment sit idle.
Hundreds of commercial fish-
ing vessels (ranging in value from
a few thousand dollars to half a
million dollars) are docked. "If the
state decided to build a bridge
over your property they would
compensate you for your loss, giv-
ing you fair market value for your
house and land," said Patrick
McFarland, "This is not the case
with the. commercial fisherman.
They have taken away our liveli-
hood and given us nothing in
return," he said.


Many fishermen are left with
debts to be paid but no income to
pay them with. They are left with
assets that may look good on the
tax rolls but in reality are worth-
less to generate revenue.
Effect on Economy
To date 75 to 100 people have
lost their jobs at Raffleld Fisheries
S' ... alone. Throughout the county
well over 100 are out of work
because of the. net ban enact-
ment. Not only are those jobs lost
but the effects of lost revenues
which normally move into the
county's economy is felt by area
merchants and businesses.
Residual impact to the econo-
my is just as far reaching as the
direct effects brought on by the
loss ofjob 's L- .. -, *-
According to Ralph Roberson,
manager of St. Joe Container Co.,
$592,000 of corrugated boxes to
be used for packing and shipping
seafood products were purchased
for Gulf, Franklin and Bay county
brownie seafood dealers during the past
interest year.
making Raffield Fisheries alone pur-'
rr. with chased, $200,000 of boxes locally
o have while spending approximately
all the $400,000 on packaging over the
sewer past year, according to Raffield.
ar for a Hardware supplies, diesel
to con- fuel,, boxes, electricity and food
items are just a few of the items
that could amount to several hun-
dred thousand dollars of lost rev-
enue for county businesses.


Kesley
(From Page 2)
into that sack!
I told Daddy that night about
being cheated. "I ain't going back
no matter wh-"--
"Son," I could tell by the way
he scraped the chair back that I'd
made him mad. 'The Brooks'," his
bottom lip was quivering, I'd
about crossed, the line, "are the
most honest people I've ever met.
I've seen you pick cotton. You:
think it's a tip toe through the tu-
lips. You need to look at yourself
and face facts-you can't pick
cotton worth a hoot They're do-
ing you a favor by letting you
hang around. They're giving you
the opportunity to learn how to
work! I can't believe a son of mine
Bright and early next morn-
ing I was down my third row, on
my knees availing myself to a
wonderful work experience. Just
before the weigh-in Miss Brooks
came by, straw hat, long dress
and all, dragging her man-sized
sack.' extra full, behind. She
reached in, pulled out big hand-
fuls of cotton and crammed it
into my almost empty bag. "Here,
Kes, I've got so much. I can't make
it back to the wagon."
They paved the road. I used
to drive by and see Miss Brooks
coming. out of her garden or I'd
wave to her enjoying the shade of
the porch.
I went off to college and
kind'a lost traqk. I know they sold
the cotton field to the school
board for the new elementary
school.
I, also remember that Mr.
Brooks died about ten years ago.
The Kennons, Goochs, and Sex-
tons have long since moved away.
I called Mother yesterday.
"Son, Miss Brooks is ninety-
four now and she's still hanging
in. She walked to town up until a
year ago to pay her bills. You may
not remember, but she doesn't


Letters


to the


Editor


drive. She is as independent as
ever and she's got the best garden
this year .... She still asks
about you boys . Do you
want me to tell her anything ....
"No ma'am." I'll be back down
at the end of Stonewall Street be-
fore long. I'm going to tell her my-
self.
Respectfully,
Kesley


STEVE RICHARDSON, OWNER/MANAGER


3ilf0tRidt N e


Product
(Continued From Page 1)
butterfish, goggle eyes, goat fish
and scad are being exported or
marketed in ethnic communities
where smaller food fish are pre-
ferred over larger fish for con-
sumption.
Golden Crabs
Raffleld's is currently under
contract with a fishing firm from
Seattle, Washington to process
golden crabs caught by the boat
St. Michael in 2,000 to 3,000 feet
of water in the Gulf of Mexico.
The two to three pound gold-
en crabs rival Alaskan snow crabs
in size, shape and taste and if the
project is successful could turn
into a thriving market for the local
fisheries.
Jelly Fish
A pilot program to catch and
process jelly fish to be exported to
Korea resulted in 68,000 pounds
of production in 1994 and orders
for 440,000 pounds for the 1995
season have already been
received.
Jelly fish are considered a
delicacy in Korea and are harvest-
ed during what is typically a slow
time in the fishing industry,
September through December.
The only catch is that they
are caught with a surface trawl in
shallow waters which would
require special permitting from
the Department of Environmental
Protection to comply with the net
ban regulations.
Raffield told The Star that
Raffield's intends to hang on to as
many jobs as possible while they
try some of these new techniques
and approaches to the fishing
industry.
n"The State of Florida is not
bigger than the good Lord. ... the
Lord has smiled on us, I don't
think He's changed,"'Gene said.


$ Trust me for
all your life
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permanent, term,
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BILL
WOOD
10i
W ilWiams
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229-6514
State Farm
Life Insurance Company
Home Office: Bloomington, Illinois




Like a good neighbor
State Farm is there'.


our own
SAccounts!
/Late^


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^^: "-.' V4"'.'^



". -^ :"


Baby turtles head to- ,
ward the sea immediately .
after hatching, running the '
gauntlet of birds, animals -
and other hazards to their
well-being. When they ..
make the safety of the
ocean they must contend
with fish, crabs, other tur-
ties and numerous other
predators. In the photo
above a new-born turtle is
held in a ,-person's hand,
showing their vulnerability -
due to their small size. *. : ,


I-


ESTABLISHED 1904


_ .


PAGE 3A


e or e'st*. Picture

ear now comes

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rom. space..


- -----


229-6195.


310 Reid Avenue








PAGE 4A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


Matthew Brooks
Look Who's One!
Matthew Brooks celebrated
his first birthday on July 3rd at
the Frank Pate Park with his fam-
ily and friends.
Matthew is the son of Robert
and Mary Brooks of Port St. Joe.
His grandparents are Bobbie
Wood of Port St. Joe, Donald
Wood of Keystone Heights and
Jim and Sue Brooks of Port St.
Joe.





To Wed
Carolyn and Edward Metcalf
of Mexico Beach would like to an-
nounce the engagement and
forthcoming marriage of their
daughter, Terri Anne Cawthron,
to Michael Duane Bird, son of
Christine and Dean Bird of Port
St. Joe.
The bride-elect is a 1993
graduate of Port St. Joe High
School and is now employed by
Metcalf Electric and A/C.
Her flance is a 1989 graduate
of Port St. Joe High School and is
now employed by Matencheck At
Your Service.
The wedding is planned for
July 22 at 4:00 p.m., EDT, at the
Beach Baptist Chapel in St. Joe
Beach. A reception will follow at
the Driftwood Inn on Mexico
Beach.
All friends and relatives are
invited to attend.


Final Plans
The wedding of Tiffany Rene
Sanders and Timothy Julain
Varnes will be held at 2:00 p.m.,
Saturday, July 22 at the High-
land View Baptist Church on the
corner of Cobia Avenue and Ling
Street.
All friends and relatives are
invited to attend.


Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Wall


To Celebrate 50th


For 12 short weeks during the
summer, people enjoy fresh, ripe
Georgia Peaches, traditionally
eaten out-of-hand or baked in
a sweet peach cobbler. But ,
because peaches offer the perfect
combination of flavor and
nutrition, they are ideal for
- summer salads and appetizers
as well as entrees.
Enjoy the following'quick
and delightful recipe from the
Georgia Peach Commission for
your next meal: A Peach of a
Pizza. Ready to eat in only 20
minutes, it's perfect for a quick,
family meal. Since it serves
eight, why not take it to an office
party or family picnic?


A Peach of a Pizza
1 (10-ounce) can refrigerated
pizza crust
2 cups chopped fresh Georgia
peaches, divided
6 ounces sliced Provolone
cheese
3 ounces sliced Canadian bacon
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
1/2 cup chopped green pepper

Preheat the oven to 4250F.
Grease a 12-inch pizza pan or a
9 x 13-inch pan. Unroll the
dough and press it into the
prepared pan. Top with 1 cup,
peaches, then layer cheese.
Arrange Canadian bacon, .
onions, peppers and remaining
peaches. Bake on lowest rack in
the oven for 20 to 25 minutes or
until the crust is golden brown.
Serve hot. Serves 8.

Calories 218/Protein 10.6 'g/
Carbohydrates 22.8 g/Fat 10.3
g/Cholesterol 21 mg/Sodium
636 mg/Fiber 1 g/Calcium 166
mg/Iron 0.4 mg.


For more information and to receive a free copy of the Georgia
Peach Commission's new recipe brochure, "Enjoy, Georgia
Peaches: A Southern Tradition," send a self-addressed, stamped
envelope to the Georgia Peach Commission, P.O. Box'38146,
Atlanta, GA 30334.

--!.^*^- -- -- ^ ^


ALL THE.


I DAA AHEAD!


Not sure if a prescription is refillable, or
when you renewed it last? Our computer
has all the facts our pharmacist needs to
give you an instant answer.
He'll also check for other medications
you may be taking to give you specialized
information regarding druginteractions.
In fact, you could say that service is the
only old-fashioned thing about us.

CAMPBELL'S DRUG STORE

Two Pharmacists and Two Pharmacy F
Technicians to serve you promptly.
5Saveway Center Phone 227-1224


On August 5, 1945, Mary W.
Harvey and Charles R. Wall were
united in marriage. On August 5,
1995, Mr and Mrs. Charles R.
Wall will renew their wedding
vows in celebration of their fifti-,
eth wedding anniversary.
In honor of their parents, the


children would like to extend an
invitation to all friends and rela-
tives, to the ceremony and recep-
tion which will take place at 2:00
p.m. at the St. James Episcopal
Church, 800 22nd Street, Port St.
'Joe.


How Much House


Can I Afford?


of the down payment. If you pay
ten percent of the purchase price
upfront, the lender probably will
figure the PITI amount at 28 to
36 percent of your gross income.
If you pay only five percent down,
the lender probably will use the
more conservative PITI rate of 25
to 33 percent.
,Assuming their debt-to-:
income ratio falls within the lend-,,..
er's guidelines. a family with a
gross annual income of $20,000,
qualifies to purchase, a house
priced at $57,971 or less. Your
mortgage amount and price range
will vary depending on the size of
your down payment, the interest
rate, and the length of time you
plan to repay the loan.
It is wise to compare interest
rates and terms among lenders to
get the best deal. Talk to different
lenders in your area and ask
questions. Remember, the 'lower
the interest rate, the more
"house" you can purchase be-
cause less of your house payment
will go towards interest.
A house is one of the biggest
purchases you will ever make.'
Take time to look at your financ-
es. future plans (children, retire-
ment). and features you need and
want in, a house. Compare loan
terms and interest rates and shop
for the best deal. With careful
thought and planning, you will be
more likely to purchase a house
that will fit your needs and bud-
get.


By Judy Corbus
Many people dream of owning
their own home,' a part of the
"American dream." If you are
thinking of purchasing a house, it
Is important to determine how
much house you can afford be-
fore beginning your search. This
will save time and frustration for
everyone: invoIved since you,.will
be able to focus on houses within
your price range.
Americans spend from 21 to
54 percent of family income on
housing, depending on family
size, location, and other factors.
Housing costs include mortgage
payments, taxes, insurance, utili-
ties,, maintenance, and furnish-
ings. When determining how
large a mortgage to grant, lenders
generally follow these two basic
guidelines:
Principal, interest, taxes
and insurance (PITI) should not
exceed 25 to 29 percent of gross
(before taxes) income; and,
PITI plus other long-term
debt should not exceed '33 to 41
percent of gross income.
Long-term debt includes car
and installment loans, alimony,
child support, and credit card
balances that will take more than
ten months to repay. Lenders
consider the potential borrower's
"debt-to-income" ratio, or.. how
much of the borrower's income is 2
being used to repay existing debt.
The more you owe, the less
"house" you, will be qualified to
buy. Lenders do not want you to
Take on more debt than you can
handle. If you are planning to buy
a house, try to pay, off as much
debt as possible before applying' :,
for a loan.
Lenders also look at the size
Yearbooks Can
Be Picked Up
The 1995 edition of Bulldog
* Memories, the yearbook of Port St.
Joe Elementary School, will be
available for pickup beginning
Monday, July 24, at the 'school
office.
Those who have already
placed their orders may pick up
their copy Monday Thursday,
from 7:30 till noon, or 1:00 3:00
each day.


Variety Nook

513 South Main Street Wewahitchka, Florida
OPEN Thursday, Friday, and Saturday
9 a.m. to 6 pam. CT Call 639-9070


"- l h



ii^
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New Gifts:
PORCELAIN DOLLS
Music Boxes
Figurines, Vases
Novelties
Shop Now!
Use Our Lay-A-Way


aUfJTll-L J IM EII


Used Books
Paperback
Magazines
Children's Books
Comics
Trade 2 for 1 of
equal price
We sell books 1/2
? cover price


We're Cleaning Up Shop!


Many Items Being Cleared Out

Many Items 25 % off


Selected Items .. .50% off


All Gourmet Foods,
Wallpaper & Fabrics .......................

Vertical & Wooden Blinds ............ 65


off

off


BRIDAL REGISTRY ACCESSORIES PAINTINGS
GIFTS
Please come see us! Hours: Tues Sat., 10- 6:00

,Interiors Etcetera
Furniture and Accessories
505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe Phone 229-6054
L. .j


What's Cooking?
Peaches Aren't Just For Dessert


sde ~e~Et ~


PERUOIRSU


Ac~teaa :'t4&~41 64~'eacate4


2E 6TH TRET aPOR *IST. JO027-63


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The Hannon

Insurance Agency
227-1133

Is Pleased to Announce
Its Association With

Gary White
Representing
Allstate & The Travelers
Life Insurance Companies
"Call Me About Your Life & Health Insurance Needs".,


r


'dA


-







THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


Summer Fun at the G.C. Library


TeGlConyeirCtznnwbidni show above.It sla n h eatsi of 't G


The Gulf County Senior Citizens new building is shown above. It is located on the east side of the Gulf County
Courthouse on Highway 71.


Senior Citizens Plan


Appreciation Day for Area


The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens Board of Directors and staff
invite the public to attend the,
Community Appreciation Day on-
Saturday, July 29, at the Gulf
County Courthouse complex. The
senior citizens will be conducting
tours of the new center. There
will be free hot dogs and drinks
provided by M & L Distributors
(Mike and Laurie McGowen, own-
ers)'and Shell Gas (owner, Teresa


Anton) from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00
p.m. or until they are gone.
This new center will be used
jointly by the senior citizens in
the day time, and the community
at night and on the weekends.
This facility will be available to
rent for any of the following activ-
ities: civic organizations, wedding
and receptions, family reunions
and parties, dances, dinners, or-
ganizational, meetings, band con-


Shows His Expertise
County Commissioner Nathan Peters, Jr. is shown being con-
gratulated by Michael Hammond, Chairman of the Board. Peters,
while attending the Florida Association of Counties meeting during
the last week of June participated in several fun events for the par-
ticipants. The meeting was held at the Marriott Marco Island Resort
with Beach Olympics as one of the highlights.
Peters, representing the Florida Gators won several ribbons in
events such as "Stuff the Ballot Box", "Kiss the Baby" and "Pass the
Buck". :" '.. '


Peters Accepted Into Dentistry
Nathan Peteirs, IHI has been
accepted into Meharry's School of
Dentistry in Nashville, Tennessee.


Attend Worship
Services Sunday

'L 1^ A* J


certs.
The public is cordially invited
to come out and see what the tre-
mendous support for this project
has made possible. Special guests
in attendance will be city and
county commissioners. Informa-
tion and guided tours will be
available. Watch The VStar for
more information.









JU


All area children, ages K 5th
grade are invited to the Gulf
County Public Library in Port St.
Joe to enjoy a summer of reading,
movies, and games.
The program is a weekly fea-
ture each Tuesday until August
1. This summer's theme is "Once
Upon A Tale".
Tuesday, July 25, the session
will feature the video, "Three Sil-
lies" and stories entitled, The Boy
of The Three Year Nap, Boots and
His Brothers, and Three Gay Tales

Chicken Dinners
The Thompson Temple First
Bornm Church youth department
will be selling chicken dinners on
Thursday, July 20.
Each dinner will consist of
fried :or baked, chicken, greens,
dressing dessert and a drink for
a $4.50 donation."'.


Year In And Year Out. You 'ill Do Well With


Hannon InsuranceAgency, Inc.


*Auto *Home
*Business
*Flood *Life
*Bonds


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent


Friday,
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saturday,
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Floor Samples, Leftover Group Pieces,
Scratch & Dent Items, Cancelled Orders,
Discontinued Merchandise & Much More!
2 Big Days To Save, Save, Save!





I JlF U\R FURNITURE


209-211 REID AVENUE PORT ST. JOE,
PHONE (904) 227-1277
OPEN MONDA Y SA TURDA Y, 9 TO 6,


(from Grimm).
The Florida Youth Library
Program is sponsored by the
State Library of Florida, North-
west Regional Library System and
your local Gulf County Library.


Say
It In


You Saw
The Star!


TravelersInsurance
A Member of TravelersGroupi


Representing "Phe Travelers"
The Insurance Store Since 1943
8:30 till 6:00
Monday through Friday
221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133


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PAGE 6A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


Correctional Officers Need ed for This Area


The Florida Department of
Corrections is recruiting for cor-
rectional officers throughout
Northwest Florida, including,
Bay, Calhoun, Escambia, Frank-
lin, Gulf, Gadsden, Holmes, Jack-
son, Jefferson; Leon, Liberty, Ok-
aloosa, Santa Rosa, Wakulla,
Walton and Washington.
At Gulf County Correctional
Institution alone, over 100 correc-
tional officers are needed begin-
ning August 18. The West Unit,
which will approximately double
the size of the prison, will house
about 900 inmates.
The correctional facility is
located in north of Wewahitchka
in the Stone Mill Creek area.
Twenty-five additional correction-
al officers will be needed in this
facility each month through
January of 1996. In addition to





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Leg/Foot Pain
!INSURANCE


these job openings there will be
positions available in security,
food service, and recreation.
Correctional officers are the


frontline security force of the
Florida Department of Correc-
tions. They are responsible for
the supervision, protection, care,


custody, and control of inmates.
I The requirements for becom-
ing a correctional officer include:


Always Test Drive A Vehicle


Before
With the average cost
hovering at around $18,0
hard to believe anyone wo
a car without driving it.
tistics show only one In fo
pie test-drive a car before
it. This can lead to some 1
prises once the car is at hc
"Buying a new car
something you should do
It takes patience and pla
said Craig Yates, Manager
Auto Club South's Car
Service. "Many people mis
believe that if you test-driv
you are obligated to buy it
not true." ,
Here are some tips frc
that may help you focus
search and make the car
process easier:
Shopping. Know wl
want before you shop. De
your price range and mak
of features you want. Bi
tive-with so many mak
models' available, you sh
have any. problem flndinj
that's right for you.
Interior. The only
determine a car's comfor
you to sit in it. The seat
adjust so you feel comfor
the driving position while
you enough support. You
also be able to read gaug
the seat and reach contr
instruments without any t
Since blind spots are
cause of accidents, be su
can see clearly out of the


Signing
of a car If you can't see
)00, it's ings, you won't
uld buy driving the car.
Yet sta- *" Powertrain
iur peo- quality. A new
buying smoothly and qu
big sur- To test this, dr
ome. gear. The engine
is not calm and quiet.
quickly. Once on the
inning," briskly. Notice th
*of AAA and how it .acts
Buying with the trans
3takenly should be harm
'e a car, two, and powe
t. That's smoothly from o
next. If there is n(
om AAA for your driving h
is your want to check out
buying gine or another ca
Road Mann
hat you how the car rides
termine not, look Into d
ke a list sion packages
e selec- same model.
ces and
wouldn't Brakes. If y
g a car ate past trouble
it, you'll need to
way to Test the brakes.
rt Is for feel and power?
should lock feature, find
table in stretch of road, 1
e giving to speed and hit
should you should feel
es from pulse and the c
ols and quickly.
rouble." "You'll be dri
a major choose for a lo:
ire you said. "Any surprise
vehicle, should be appar


I Obiture .


TIRES


P155/80R13
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13

14 INCH
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14

15 INCH
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15


$152.60
$182.28
$190.76
$195.00


$207.72
$211.96
$216.20
$220.44


$224.68
$228.92
$233.16
$237.40


Mounting Valve Stem Sales Tax
Computer Balancing Disposal Tax
City Pickup Fee










WESTERN

AUTO
Phone 227-1105


Vlmory C. Cason
Emory C. Cason, 64, of Port
St. Joe, passed away Tuesday at
his home. A native of Greenville,
he had been a resident here for
the past 58 years and was a
member of the First Baptist'.
Church; He served in the U.S.
Navy and was an Eagle Scout
Survivors include two sisters,
- Flora Maddox of St. Joe Beach
and Hazel' Goodson of 'North
Holmes County; and his nieces
and' nephews,' John Maddox of
Panama City Beach, Diane Mad-
dox and Donna Milton, both of
Miami, Rhea Young, Russell
Goodson, and MItchell Goodsqn,
all from north Holmes County.
The funeral service was held
at 11:00 a.m., EDT, Monday at
the Comforter Funeral Home
Chapel conducted by Rev. Billy
Rich. Interment followed in the
family plot in Holly Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of the Comforter Funer-
al Home.



Robert D. Little
Robert D. "Bob" Little of We-
wahitchka, passed away Wednes-
day night in Bay Medical Center.
A native of Holmes County, he
was self employed. For many
years he ran Bob Little Floor
Sanding in Panama City, and lat-
er he owned and operated fish
camps, one in South Florida and
two in Wewahitchka. For the past
28 years he had been a resident
of Wewahitchka.
Survivors include his wife,
Inez Little of Wewahitchka; his
children and their spouses, Elsie
and Charles McDaniel of Sul-
phur, LA, Maxine and Bill Mar-
shall of Panama City, Raymond
Carl Little of Leesburg, Leonard
and Jackie Little of Panama City,
:Charlie and Brenda Little of We-
wahitchka, Jimmy and Barbara
Little of Wildwood, Joyce and
Gary Plotke of Panama City, Rob-
ert and Dell Gottwald of Lees-
burg, Jerry and Joey Turner of
Mexico Beach, and Tony Turner
of Wewahitchka; 44 grandchil-
dren; 40 great-grandchildren;
seven great-great-grandchildren;
and his sister, Nettle Meadows of
Cottondale.
The funeral was held at 10:00
a.m., CDT, Saturday at the Wor-
ship Center in Wewahitchka con-
ducted by Rev. Charles Pettis and
Rev. Joe Exkstine. Interment fol-


All IFrms cf Insurance

* Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages .Group -Life *Boat
*Hospitalization *Mobile Homes
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


lowed in the fam
way Cemetery.
All services a
reaction of the Co
Home, Wewahi
Chapel.

George E


on Dotted Line
your surround- drive before you sign on the
feel comfortable dotted line."

SCheck the idle Attention Veterans
ietly, not shaky.; Funds for those needing
op the car into transportation to VA hospitals.
should remain and clinics have been exhausted
for this fiscal year. It is with re-
road, accelerate gret that this announcement
e engine's power must be made.
in conjunction Gulf County transportation la
mission. There only reimbursed for those passen-
mny between the, gers who qualify for medicaid.
r should flow Veteran travel is classified as
ne gear, to the non-sponsored and therefore no
ot enough power funds are reimbursed for their
abits, you might transportation. An example of
t an optional en- non-sponsored veteran expense is
ir. the round trip cost to the VA
ters. Do you like Medical Center in Gainesville
and handles? If which is $500. ,
different suspen- Our effort to consolidate vete-
offered on the ran trips has been successful. All
veterans are encouraged to con-
tinue this effort when funds are
'ou can't acceler- once again available.
or steer around Those veterans who have
stop short of it. scheduled and coordinated their
Do you like the transportation needs through
To test the anti- July 25 are confirmed! Transpor-
d an abandoned station after that date must be by
bring the car up private arrangements.
the brake pedal. Anyone having questions con-
the brake pedal cerning % this announcement
car should stop should contact Bo Williams, Vete-
rans Service officer at 229-6125.
ving the car you
ng time," Yates ExTh k
ses it has to offerExpress Thanks
ent on the test The family of Andrew D.
Jones (A.D.) wish to express our
Heartfelt thanks to many wonder-
ful people for the beautiful floral
arrangements, cards, telephone
calls, visits and the delicious
food.
ily plot in Calla- Special thanks to Rev. Ray-
mond Rogers, James Nickson,
re under the di- James Brown, Jake Dozier, Mary
omforter Funeral A. Kimble, Mary A. Williams and
itchka Branch many special friends for caring
and sharing throughout A.D.'s ill-
ness. May God rain his blessing
Jones on everyone.
fl 'Jp.., A T A. D. Jones' family


Gueorge 6. OkeetC 1ones, f ,
of Wewahitchka, died Saturday,
-July' 15 at his home H6e had been
a life-long resident of Wewahitch- `
ka. He was a retired lab techni-
cian for the Arizona Chemical
Company, served his country
during WWII in the U.S. Army,
and was a member of the Glad
Tidings Assembly of God Church.
He was a director of the Gulf
Coast Electric Coop, past FHA di-
rector, past Master of the Mason-
ic Lodge 289, honorary fireman
and EMT and a member of Wewa-
hitchka's Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment.
Jones is survived by his wife,
'Mildred Jones, of Wewahitchka; a
son, Eddie Jones and wife Suep of
Wewahitchka; a daughter, Donna
Drew and husband Ron of Wewa-
hitchka; his mother, Almahee
Jones of Panama City; two sis-
ters, Leola Saunders of Jay, and
Peggy Revell of Wewahitchka; a
brother, John W. (Bo) of Wewa-
hitchka; four grandchildren, Ke-
vin Gilmore, Kelli Jones, Kristin
Jones and Stephanie Drew.
SFuneral services were held on
Monday, July 17 at the Glad Tid-
ings Assembly of God Church
with Rev. Neil Miller, Rev. Charles
Pettis, and Rev. Lavelle Enterkins
officiating. Interment followed in
the Roberts Cemetery. Active pall-
bearers were Paul Whitlield.
Houston Whitfield, Roger Jones,
LeGran Saunders, Dale Marshall,
Dr. Spichael Stallings; honorary
were Freddie Branch, Charles
Clekley, Oscar Redd, Buddy An-
dersorn, Harold Nunnery, Ira
Weeks, Fletcher' Patterson, Jerry
Barnes, Harold Hinote, Bill
Quarles, Buck Booth, Keith
Creamer, Claudius Lanier,
George Knight, Houston Ramsey,
Patrick Floyd, Jack Manor, all
members of the Masonic Lodge
289 and the Gulf Coast Electric
directors.
All arrangements were under
the direction of Kent-Forest Lawn
Funeral Home in Panama City.


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9495-41
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested in sell-
ing the County the following described personal
property:
3 1 (One) ton, 12 Passenger Vans
2 Wheel Drive
Gasoline, V8
Automatic W/Overdrlve
A/C,P/S P/B
AM/FM Radio
Delivery Date: ASAP
For any additional Information, call 229-8944
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver
unit on specified date. will be set at $25.00 'per
day. "
Please Indicate. on envelope that this is a
Sealed Bid, the Bid Number, and what the bid is
for.
Bids will be received until 5:00 o'clock. P.M.,
Eastern Time, August 8, 1995, at the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Fifth Street Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
BY: /s/Michael L. Hammond, Chairman
2tc, July 20 & 27, 1995
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9495-42
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida. will receive sealed bids from any
person, company. or corporation Interested In sell-
ing the County the following described personal
Property:
One (1) 36' x 48' Pre-Engineered Metal
Building to be placed at the Highland View
Fire Department. Specifications can be ob-
,tained from the Gulf Coun-N Ph,,,,ij,,'
Building Department at the C.ii' .:.',nr,
Courthouse, or (904) 229-8944.
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver
unit on specified date will be set at $25.00 per
Sday.
Please Indicate on envelope that this is a
Sealed Bid. the Bid Number.,- and what the bid is
for.
Bids will be received until 5:00 o'clock, P.M.,
Eastern Time, August 8, 1995, at the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Fifth Street Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
BY: /s/Michael L. Hammond, Chairman
2tc, July 20 & 27, 1995


Cogburn Scfeffer

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW


* Real Estate
* Wills Probate
* Guardianship


* Incorporation
* Personal Injury


324 REID AVENUE PORT ST. JOE
229-8191


41c 7/20


19 years of age or older, high
school graduate or equivalent,
U.S. citizen, no felony convic-
tions, no first degree misdemean-
ors involving perjury or false
statement, good moral character,
physical examination/drug test
and basic recruit training. The
annual salary for certified officers
is $18,109.
The benefits offered to a cor-
rectional officer are: early retire-
ment, .paid sick leave, paid vaca-
tion time, criminal justice incen-
tive pay, comprehensive state-
supplemented insurance program
for you and your family, paid hol-
iday, professional law enforce-
ment certification training.
A non-certified officer may be
hired in trainee status.
Applicants seeking correc-
tional officer positions in the
counties mentioned, ;please sub-
mit a State of Florida employment
application to Department of Cor-
rections, Region I, 4610 Highway
90 East, Marianna, Florida 32446
by August 4. For more informa-
tion, contact Region I personnel
office at. (904) 482-9533.


ONE CALL

DOES IT

ALL

at Creditmasters

we've taken the

hassle out of pre-

qualifying for a

new or used car

or truck
CALL US
"NOW"
Confidential Hotline
24 Hours
1-800-471-6364
TOUCHTONE PHONE
5/25/95-1.0/5/95
/


Life Home Auto Business
Health *Disability
B "15% DISCOUNT ON AUTO INSURANCE ue s
WITH HOMEOWNERS "'-

(904) 227-2106 SamSweazy- Agent Port St. Joe, FL


Bait Shrimp Cigar Minnows Squid Lures
Earthworms Crickets Wrigglers ,
FULL LINE of TACKLE
Open 6 a.m. Monday-Saturday
Sunday 6:30-2:30
Danny's Sporting Goods
306 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
229-8933 tfc



6Buy Sell Trade, Open Monday Saturday

& J PAWN SHOP
JOHNNY PAUL HAROLD HOOVER
"THE LILE HOUSE WITH THE BIG DEALS"
Corner of E. Henry Ave. & Main St. Wewahitchka Phone 039-3202


4TO 5/18


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U B &B Feed & Seed
Main St. Wewahitchka, FL Phone 639-5488
5 HOURS: 8-5-Monday Friday, 7:30 3:00 Saturday u
a All Advertised Prices are for Cash Only .
H.M.C. 12% 501b. bag
Horse Pellets -I....... $5.35
H o Pllt.....................35
R H.M.C. 10% 50 lb. bag
SSweet Feed ............... .... $5.00
" H.M.C. 12% 50 1b. bag
g Hi-Bloom Pellets $5.45.
H H.M.C. 16% 50 Ib. bag 7
S'Rabbit Ration ................. $6.00

Z We also carry Caged Bird Feed

[ jJrJ)rJlrJlrJlrJlrr JrJlrJlrJlrrJl JlrJlrJlr Jriin l rJlril rJl r JlrJlrJlrJplrJlrJir Jlr JrJlrJlrJlrJlriI []








/ op lzeicz
A.- UTnjiq7ue R.esta'.irartt

-Country Buffet-
Tues., Wed., and Sat. $5.99
-BBQ Ribs &c Chickeln Buffet-
ThTiirsday $6.95
-Seafood Buffet--
Friday $8.95


Sunday Brunch
Sunday 11. 2:30

Plus!
Nigh tly specials also available



222 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe
Free Delivery

N229-8900


Janice


* Divorce
* Custody
* Adoptions


16,








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


School


,Tightens


Up On


Dress
Each year parents buy (or al-
low students to buy) clothes for
school which, in some cases, do
not comply with Wewahitchka
High School's dress code. A quick
review of pages 24-25 of the cur-
rent student handbook might
help avoid spending dollars on
items that cannot be worn at
school or school functions. The
biggest problems are usually
shorts, short shirts, sleeveless
shirts that droop (i.e., "muscle"
shirts), and pictures, cartoons,
and/or advertising slogans" that
are in poor taste. For example,
don't send your student to school
in a shirt with a cartoon about
"Big Johnson" if you don't know
what that refers to in their cul-
turel
Please take time to read this
excerpt from the handbook and
call if you have any questions-
before you spend your money.
Personal Appearance
(Dress and Grooming)
Good taste and judgement
are keys to proper attire and
appearance. Wip reserve the
,right to change any of the fol-
lowing if students fail to live up
to expectations.,'
SShirts must be worn at all
times (unless -permission to re-
move them has been given by .a
teacher, as in P.E.). They must be
buttoned i-r zipped to cover the
upper chest area. They must not
expose the underarm area exces-
sively, especially if sleeveless.
Mesh shirts may be worn with an
undershirt. All shirts must cover
the upper, torso no "short"
shirts or blouses. Short shirts.
halter tops, revealing or strapless
attire is not allowed. .
Skirt length is governed by
the style of the day, but :must
cover at least 3/4 of the thigh
area., Slits, tears, holes, etc., that
,are part of the skirt may not ex-
tend above the 3/4 thigh area.
Shorts may be worn if they
cover 3/4 of the thigh area and if
they are neat. They may not be
ragged cut-offs, excessively tight,
or contain rips, tears, or holes
above the 3/4 thigh area. Shorts
not allotted (other than in P.E.)
-include the above, plus P.E.
shorts, bathing ,tfs. and stretch
shorts such as bicycle or exercise
' shorts. Pants and shorts-will be
worn waist high above the hips as
designed, properly fastened.
Hats, caps, headbands,
headstockings may. not be worn
inside, unless specifically allowed
'for special events.
*Clothing, hats, etc., 'that'
have profane, obscene, suggestive
wording or pictures, or are con-
nected to alcohol, any type tobac-
co product or drug and/or drug
paraplenalia. may not be worn at


[(Iii I ~&~I I lii


Palm Trees Come InALarge Variey--Nearly 4,000

There Are Varieties For Seashore and Inland Planting; Cabbage Palm is State Tree


When tourists think of Flori-
da, most visualize surf rolling in
on sandy beaches, with palms
waving in the background. Palms
are not limited to coastal areas.
Of the world's approximately
4,000 palm.varieties, about 500
native and imported types are
found in the "sunshine states".
Many of these are adapted to in-
land location, as well as seaside
sites.
One of the first palms that
comes to mind is our state tree
the Cabbage Palm. My informa-
tion on palms was provided by
Extension Urban Horticulture
Specialist Dr. Robert Black.
The Cabbage Palm is found in
all parts of our state, except the
extreme western portion. It's an
upright, single-trunked palm,
with fan shaped leaves. You can
easily recognize this tree by the
crisscrossed design along its
trunk., These crisscrosses are
called "boots". They are what's
left after decayed leaf stalks fall
off the palm a process that
continues until very old age.
Other common single -
trunked varieties include the
Washington Palm, Royal, Queen,


Srs. Selling Subs
The Port St. Joe Senior Citi-
zens will be having a sub sand-
wich sale on July 27 from' 11:00
a.m. until 1:00 p.m. in the First

school or any school function.
Shoes, sandals, and appro-
priate undergarments must be
worn at all times.
Decisions involving the dress
and grooming code will be at the
discretion of the administration.
Students will be asked to, make
any necessary changes and will
be removed from classes until the
change is made.
If a student fails to comply
with these rules, they will be.
asked to change these items or
will be sent home with an unex-
cused absence.


(U ------------


1 Medium Pizza $399
w/litem _
1 Large Pizza $4/99
w/lttem I
I ------------'---- I
1 Large $799
i Specialty Pizza I

PICKUP ONLY
Not valid w/other coupons
i 418 Monument Ave.-229-9222 -


Its massive trunk resembles a
concrete pillar, and it has a green
collar that extends down from the
top. Royal Palms may exceed 80
feet in height. The Queen Palm is
a tall growing variety with a
smooth trunk and feathery
leaves. The Canary Island Date
Palm, which also has feathery
leaves, somewhat resembles a
pineapple. It's another variety
used for lining streets. The Pyg-
my, which also is a Date variety,
is a dwarf species with beautiful
dark green foliage.
Besides these popular single-
trunked palms, there are quite a
few that grow in cluster, with sev-
eral stems or trunks. Probably
the most common of these cluster
types is the Areca Palm. It's a low
growing variety, with smooth,


slim, yellow-ringed stems and
feathery foliage. The Areca is well
adapted for either indoor or out-
door use.
The Paurotis, which is more
commonly .called the Saw Cab-
bage Palm, is found in swamps
and undrained soils of extreme
South Florida. Like the Areca, the
slender trunks of this species
usually grow in large clumps. The
Saw Cabbage Palm has fan
shaped leaves, and may reach a
height of 40 feet.-
Yet another cluster type is
the Rhapis Palm. It's a low grow-
ing, fan leaved variety, having
many reed-like stems. These
palms, which prefer semishaded
locations, make very good tub
specimens. Rhapis Palms also
may be used forgroup plantings.


In addition to upright and
cluster type palms, there are va-
rieties such as the Saw Palmet-
to -which grow quite close to the
ground. The Saw Palmetto is
found throughout Florida. The
trunk of this native species usu-
ally almost parallels the soil sur-
face. However, occasional speci-
mens have inclined, or even
upright trunks.
We've mentioned only a few
palms that can be used as orna-
mentals. in Florida. There are
many more both native and
imported. From this wide selec-
tion, you're sure to find some that
are well-suited to your environ-
ment and landscape needs. Try
some palms. They add an enjoya-
ble, tropical touch to your sur-
roundings.


Canary Island and Pygmy Palms.
The Washington Palm is very tall,
with a slender trunk and fan
shaped leaves. It's often seen
along residential streets. The Roy-
al Palm is a spectacular species.


Union Bank Park.' Each meal will
include an 8-inch meat and
cheese sub sandwich with all the
trimmings, plus chips, and iced
tea for a donation of $3.00.
The group will deliver meals
to local businesses. For more in-
formation or to place an order,
please call 229-8466. Proceeds
from the sale will be added to the
new building fund.

Special Thanks
T would like to extend a, spe-
cial thanks to Gulf Pines.Hospital
and Emerald Coast Hospital for
standing by me for many months.
God bless everyone: you' are in
my prayers.
Daisy Jones

SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


" -,TRIPLE ,

TOPPER
Large Pizza with-
your choice up to
3 Toppings

$7 ...... For 2

I ... For I

Not valid with other coupons
418 Monument Ave. 229-9222
...r..n... ..../f


r--,7---- COJP N------

A tLarge
WORKS $
F2 PIZZA
L--------------------- ------------------ 7
Original Round Pizza
Two for One
SSM" MED LG
Cheese ........ ... ....... 6.95 8.95 10.95
Extra Items or Extra Cneese .. 1 09 1:29 1.49
ITEMS TO CHOOSE FROM
Pepperoni Mushrooms Italian Sausage Ham Green Peppers Onions
Ground Beef BlacH Olives Pineapple Ancnovles Mild Peppers
THE WORKS 10.25 12.50 15.95
Pepperoni, Mushrooms, Ham, Italian Sausage, Green peppers
& onions (Anchovies on request)
STICKY FINGERS ............ 10.95 13.50 16.95
Cheese, Pepperoni, Mushrooms, Ham, Italian sausage,
Green Peppers, Onions, Black Olives & Ground Beef
1 (Anchovies on request)


"_ HOWIE WINGS
wChicken wings
10 Wings 20 Wings
4.59 8.95
Served w/Celery, Bleu cheese & Spicy Howie sticks,


ALL '95 Ford &Mercur/ Cars In Sto ck
SBeing Sacrificed at nly

0 / VER Example: 1995 Taurus Station Wagon
-.i. xl/ INVOICE $21,005 Man. Sug. Retail .f -- .
) 1COST, 1 Proft Price1 ,
-COST 0o $64901
o- 2,000 Rebate


SMarketStreet 1-800-239-9650


CROWD,
P zaa PLEAZZERI
'Howie Bread w/Cheese .




&1 Large Chef Salad 2 M "
$ 9 I 1 M Pla. a I


69 4 151
$1689" 2 ,Lg.....2$13
Not vad with otte coupons I Not valld with other coupons I
418 Monument Ave. 22-9222 418 Monument Ave.- 229-9222
'1. I. 1 I.... !.. I., I ,1 I / Iir


S IYout Keep the\
Apalachicola \. Rebate!


LUNCH SPECIALS 11 am- 3'pm

I Small 1-Topping $ 45
Pizza & Small Coke :3 3
Pasta for one $ 95 I
I & Howle Bread
I Any Half Sub, Howle $345
I Bread & Coke I
I--------------I
THEMBISLICE 29
1 Slice of PIzza 29
wl Topping
I Not valid Wlth other coupons
ia 18 Monment Ave 229-9222
m .. ...... rn rn .


r.-------- COJUPON .---------

21 Large 4 -

TACO
I1 PIZZA
L-- .----- -- -- -- -- --__ j


.I Zxxx~I IXRxxxIxxINIX YNXX ZIZx xxx


Over 130 Locations in Florida


- PIZZA & SUBS ,
GmXz .x.x m m.. x zxx ...... ....



229-9222

418 Monument Ave.
SPort St. Joe


Howie Bread ,
L HOW IE BREAD W/Sauce ....................................... 2.25
HOWIE BREAD w/Sauce & Cheese.................... 2.95
A delicious dessert treat
for the whole family. I
Choose Apple, Peach
6 b fm Pl | or Cherry................. 2.79


Pasta Dinners- served w/Howle Bread
For1 For2
BAKED SPAGHETTI .................... 4.95 8.95
Layered w/Mozzrella Cheese & Served w/Howle Bread
BAKED ZITI ................ ................. 4.95 8.95
A generous portion of ZIU topped with Mozzarella Cheese & baked toa golden
brown.. -
RAVIOLI ... .................:.......... .4.95 8.95
Cheese stuffed Ravioli topped with our own sauce.
wlMeatballs or Mushrooms .99 1.25

Oven Baked Subs
Deluxe Combination .................................... 4.65
Filled full of Pepperonl, Diced Ham, Mozzarella Cheese,
Italian sausage, Lettuce, Tomato, onions & Mild Peppers
Steak, Cheese & Mushrooms ........................:.... 4.65
Steak, Cheese, Mushrooms, Lettuce, Tomato, onions & Mild Peppers
Ham & Cheese ........................................ 4.65
Ham, Cheese, Lettuce, Tomato, Onions & Mild Peppers
Pizza Sub ... ....................*........ ...... .. 4.65
Pizza sauce, Pepperonl & Cheese
M eatball Sub ....................... .............................. 4.65
Meatballs with spaghetti sauce & Mozzrella Cheese
Bacon Cheeseburger Sub .................................. 4.65
Ground Beef, Bacon & Onion on request


r -- 5 %I"toSM MED LG
Antipasto Salad................ 2.50 3.95 5.50
Lettuce, Ham, Salami, Cheese, Pepper Rings, Onions,
Tomatoes & Black Olives
Chef Salad ....................... 2.25 3.25 4.95
Fresh Crisp Lettuce, Tomatoes & Onions topped with Diced Ham,
Mozzrella Cheese & Black Olives
Tossed Salad.................... 1.75 2.50 3.50
Lettuce, Tomatoes & Onions with your choice of dressing
EXTRA DRESSING 15C


1 iF i w FE l r P ars. ,.0 -. Gl* s t -wa --C r.9m -ulzercnelqe 0 Garlic Sesamm Seed R ye- Cajun


THURSDAY thru SATURDAY
Open 11 A.M. to 11 P.M. Lobby Closes at 10 P.M.
Carry Out Window Open to 11 P.M.


SUNDAY thru WEDNESDAY
Open 11 A.M. to 10 P.M. Lobby Closes at 9 P.M.
Carry Out Window Open to 10 P.M.


I Gulf County
Extension Service


PAGE 7A


IMl-


- Ir I I I


}


~C~cc~


Salads









PAGE BA THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


DON'T GET ALL
'BURNED UP'


We are not referring in this case to losing your temper and
getting angry. For that type of "burned up" can quickly pass and
have no side effects. Much worse is over-exposure to the sun
and the resulting "burned up" lingering pain and messy peeling
of skin.
It is really simple to avoid a good sun screen and initial
exposure in small doses is all it takes even if you have sensitive
skin. If you do get a severe sunburn see a physician quickly. For
a moderate case a soothing analgesic spray can be effective.


"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US with their pre-
scriptions, health needs and other pharmacy products.
We consider this trust a privilege and a duty. May we be
your personal family pharmacy?"
*
STOCKING A COMPLETE LINE OF HOME HEALTH NEEDS WITH DIRECT
BILLING TO MEDICARE
*

Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe-
Convenient Drive-Through Window
Revlon Cosmetics Cariton Cards Russell Stover Candles
229-8771


! 10 Year Olds "Headed to State


The St. Joe 3A All-Star team
will be packing for East Lakeland
S this week after claiming the Dis-
trict 4 championship last Friday
night. The team had a long hard
fight on their hands after losing
their first game, but fought its
way out of the losers' bracket.
St. Joe 16 Bayou George 8
James Daniels took the
mound for St. Joe Wednesday
night to face a tough Bayou
George team., Daniels struck out
eight while giving up eight runs
on eight hits.
Bayou. George started strong
scoring two runs on two hits in
the first. St. Joe answered back
with four runs of their own. The
score was tied at four going into
the bottom of the third when St.
Joe heated up their bats, and
banged out six back-to-back hits
to bring in five runs. The fourth
inning seemed to be a repeat of
the previous inning with St. Joe
putting another five runs on the.
S board.
Leading hitters for St. Joe
were James Daniels and Chris
Knox, each going three for three
with two doubles and a single
apiece. Also contributing hits
were Bobby Phillips, three sin-
gles; Dustin Powell, double; Aa-
ron Hamm, double; Byron Jones,
triple; Stephen Gaddis, single;
and Adrian Peterson, single.
Despite being plagued with
injuries early in the game, St. Joe
won handily. During pre-game


warm ups, Jeremy Robershaw
was hit by a ball on the cheek-
bone, which required eight stitch-
es. In the bottom of the first, Dus-
tin Powell, St. Joe's catcher, hit a
hard shot driving in two runs.
Unfortunately, he- sprained his
ankle sliding into third. These
two fine ballplayers were out for
the remainder of the tournament.
St. Joe 6 Apalach 3
A pumped up St. Joe team
was back on the field Thursday
night, after eliminating three
teams. Only Apalachicola stood in
their way for the championship of
the double elimination tourna-
ment.
Aaron Hamm did an out-
standing job on the mound in his
Dixie Youth pitching debut.
Hamm shut down the Apalach
bats through the first five in-
nings, striking out seven batters
and giving up only one hit.
St. Joe led 6-0 going into the
bottom of the sixth when Apalach
finally caught up with the strong
right hander and was able to put
three runs on the board off two
hits.
Leading the hitters for St. Joe
was Byron Jones with a triple
and a single. Also adding hits
were Chris Knox, double; Ter-
rance Chambers, James Daniels,
Bobby Phillips and Aaron Wat-
son, each with a single.
Eliminate Apalach 18-0
With four straight wins, there


Antwione Allen


Scott Gowan

Gowan Named
Coach of the Year
Port St. Joe High School
Boy's Track and Field coach,
Scott Gowan, was recently named
the 1995 Florida Class 3A Boy's
Track and Field Coach of the
Year. This award is voted on by
the- Florida Athlete Coaches Asso-
ciation and is presented to a boys
and girls track coach in each
classification. Coach Gowan, who
has directed the boys track pro-
gram to state titles in 1994 and
1995, also won this award in
1994.
*During Gowan's nine years at
Port St. Joe High School, the boys
track team has won four district
titles and two state titles. He has
coached 19 individual state
champions, 54 All-State athletes,
had two athletes named the Talla-
hassee Democrat's All Big-Bend
Athlete of the Year, and has had
two athletes named Florida's
Class 3A Track and Field Athlete
of the Year.


For the deal of your life,
see me!!
TOMMY "HOMAS
THLE fAMERICA Gee









JAMES C. "BO" BRAY
Sales Representative,
(904) 785-5221
TOLL FREE
1-800-342-7131
2251 W. 23rd St.
PANAMA CITY, FL 32405
tie 1/19


Allen Named
Athlete of the Year
Antwione Allen, a member of
the 1995 Port St..Joe Boys Track
and Field Team was recently
named the Florida Class 3A Track
and Field Athlete of the Year. This
award was voted on by the Flori-
da Athletic Coaches Association
and in 1994, Antwione placed
runner-up to teammate Zyris Hill
for this award.
Antwione's three-year career
with the track team was filled
with many accomplishments. In
addition to being on two state
championship teams, he also set
the school record in the 110 hur-
dles (14.0), 300 hurdles (39.5),
and the high jump (7'I"). He was
,named the 1995 Tallahassee
Democrat's All-Big Bend Track
and Field Athlete of the Year and
earned seven All-State honors,
won three state individual titles
and set the new state record in
the 110 hurdles (14.40) and high
jump (7' 1/4").
At the end of the 1995 sea-
son, Antwione was invited to par-
ticipate in four post-season meets
including the Great Eight Meet of
Champions in Clearwater, the
Golden South Meet in Orlando,
the National Scholastic Outdoor
Track and Field Championships.
in Raleigh, North Carolina and
the USA Track and Field Jr. Na-
tional Champions in Walnut, Cal-
ifornia. During this time, he
.placed first in the high jump and
second in the 110 hurdles at the
Great Eight Meet of Champions
and first in the high jump and
third in the 110 hurdles at the
Golden South Meet. At the Na-
tional Scholastic Outdoor Track
and Field Championships, he
placed second in the high jump
and 14th in the 110 hurdles and
eighth in the high jump at the
USA Track and Field Jr. National
Championships.





for hoeow]ols


Indian Pass Marine
2178 Hwy. C 30 227-1666 Port St. Joe
Simmons Bayou across from Pic's'


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OUTBOARDS PARTS& ACCESSORIES
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HEADED FOR STATE-Bottom row, from left: Jeremy Robershaw.
James Daniels, Aaron Watson, Stephen Gaddis, Terrance Chambers, James
Daniels and Michael Douds. Second row. Bobby Phillips; Byron Jones, Aaron
Hamm, Adrian Peterson. Dustin Powell. Christopher Knox and back row
Coach Ronnie Robershaw,. Coach Randy Phillips. and Coach Jimmy Daniels.,


St. Joe Hosting National

AAU Baseball Tourney


Port St. Joe will host one divi-
sion of the Amateur Athletic
Union's national 18-and-under
. baseball tournament here in our;
city July 28.- August 1.
Twenty-nine different teams
from all over the United States
and Puerto Rico will be in Port St.
Joe and Panama City for the four-
day event. Some of the states that
will be represented are California, ,
New York, Texas, South Carolina,
North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee,
and Georgia.
The local Preble-Rish 18-and-
under team will play three of their
four games here with each of the
other 28 teams playing at least
one game at the local high school,
field.
The local team will play at
9:00 p.m. Friday, July 28 here


and also at 6:00 p.m. Sunday,
July 30, and Monday, July 31 at
9:00 p.m. They will play
Saturday. at Panama City
Christian School at 6:00 p.m.
They will face teams from
Hartselle, Alabama, the Cincin-
nati, Ohio JTM's, the Warrior
Diamond Club of Central, South
Carolina and the Continental
Blue Streaks of Ohio.
The Bay County Baseball
Club is host team for the tourna-
ment with games being played at
Gulf Coast Community College,
Rutherford High School, Mosley
High School, Panama City Chris-
tian School, Cain Griffin Park in
Lynn Haven and Port St. Joe.
Admission for the entire tour-
nament (good at any field) is
$20.00. Individual game admis-
sion is $4.00.


- /ews On tDental 9Health


FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.




Using Crowns


To Save Teeth


If you have a badly decayed
or damaged tooth, your dentist
may recommend a crown to
save the tooth and make it
properly ,functional again. He
will have to X-ray the tooth first
to find out if it can be saved. An
X-ray will reveal many important
facts, including whether the
roots of the tooth are healthy
and if there is sufficient bone to
support the tooth. The X-ray will
also show the size and location
of the nerve canals within the
tooth as well as the condition of
your surrounding teeth.
Another tool your dentist
may use is a study model or
plaster mold of your mouth. Us-
ing this, he can examine and
measure the size and shape of
the tooth to be crowned. The


model will also reveal the rela-
tionship of your upper jaw to
your lower jaw. If a crown is to
be made, it should fit properly
in your mouth and improve your
chewing efficiency.
Any natural tooth is far su-
perior to the best artificial tooth
that can be made, as long as it
is carefully protected and re-
stored to its natural shape.
That's why crowns are often
recommended to save teeth as
well as to improve your appear-
ance.
OOOO OOOO OOO OOoOOO OOCO0
Prepared as a public ser-
vice to promote better dental
health. From the office of
FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
Williams Ave., Phone 227-1123.


seemed to be no stopping the "St.
Joe Eliminators". St. Joe took the
field full of fire in Friday night's
championship game, as they ex-
ploded in a slugfest during the
first Inning scoring 13 runs on
six hits. After a one run second
inning, the bats came back to life
in the third, adding five addition-
al runs to bring the score to 18-0.
Adrian Peterson picked up
his third win of the tournament
pitching three complete innings.
Peterson struck out six while al-
lowing no hits. James Daniels
came in to take the mound in the
fourth to shut down the game.
Aaron Hamm went four for
four at the plate, banging out
three doubles and a single with
six RBI's. Also hitting for St. Joe


were James Daniels, two doubles;
Bobby Phillips, a double and a
single; Aaron Watson, double and
a single; T.C. Chambers, two sin-
gles; Michael Douds, single; and
Chris Knox, single.
HEADED FOR STATE
The St. Joe District 4
Champs will enter play in the
state tournament next week. The
eight team, double elimination
tournament is being held at Al-
dine Comble Park in East Lake-
land. St. Joe will face Sebring,
District 8 champs, in their first
game Monday at 8:00 E.D.T.
Anyone wishing to make a
donation to assist in sending this
team to state may call Traci Gad-
dis at 648-5474 or Cindy Phillips
at 229-8590.


~~~;rEM;~C~mcI


of Bay Co. Inc.


339 E. 15th St.


784-1600


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94 Chevy Silverado,X-cab, 350, sportside, loaded .......... $18,900
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CARS &




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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


Moonshining

Moonshine whiskey making
was an important industry in
Gulf and Franklin counties dur-
ing the 1930's and early 1940's,
George Core told the Rotary Club
at their meeting last Thursday. In
fact it was so accepted as a way
of life "it was 95% legal," Core
told the club members.
The speaker was reared in
Apalachicola. "In most small
towns back then, everybody knew
everybody else in town, their chil-
dren, their pets and their every
action," Core said. "Everybody
knew who was making whiskey
and the location of their still."


...An Economic Mainstay of Gulf and Franklin Counties During'30's


Core related a story of some-
thing which happened to him as
a boy during the 30's.
CENTERED IN INGRAM
ISLAND VICINITY
Most of the' whiskey-making
operations were centered .n the
Ingram Island vicinity; at least a
major portion of the operations
was centered there. Ingram Is-
land is a high spot in the swamp,
which lies between the Jackson
River and the head of Saul's
Creek.
The speaker and the son of
the major land owner of Ingram


This column is provided as a service of the Gulf County Guidance Clinic. Inc., a professional counsel-
ing and mental health center, It is not intended to replace psychological counseling or treatment ser-
vices. 4.


Island played together all the
time. They took several trips to
the island in their ventures and
were ordered to stay out of a large
wareliouse-type building located
there, along with a large wharf
and aBbut 300 feet of elevated
deck on whichh bee hives were lo-
cated, a pen with a number of
chickens, and a couple of houses
where they stayed when working
in the vicinity. The bees and the
chickens were the reason the peo-
ple were there, theoretically.
But like any boys told to stay
away from something, Core and
his buddy were drawn to the
warehouse building like a mag-
net.
One Sunday afternoon, they
'found a window ajar and hoisted
each other up to go through the
window and inspect the building.
Inside they found stacks of sugar,
"shorts" [a type of cow feed], and
empty gallon jugs by the cases,
stacked almost to the ceiling.
They were old enough to know
what that meant and vacated the


premises, quickly.
MYSTERY UNFOLDED
That explained the steady
traffic of supply boats to and from
the Ingram Island landing.
Later he learned the Island's
operator had at least 15 people
"sharecropping"- illegal whiskey
for him. Stills were located all
over that part of the river swamp
-around the island, Huckleberry
Creek, Pine Log Creek, Clark's
Creek, Depot Creek, and several
other locations.
All made whiskey under the
guise of working bee hives.
Two men operated stills on
the island and were the owner's
right-hand men. They also oper-
ated the 'boat 'transporting sup-
plies. After a while it became ru-
mored about that one was
cheating on the others a, little.
The suspected cheat stayed
with a woman [not his wife] part
time at a houseat the head of De-
pot Creek. His partner reported to
authorities that he was alone in


''


Dear Counselor,
It's only tlhe first of July and
already my children are complain-
ing about.beinj bored and driving
me crazy. Do you have any sug-
gestions?
Seeking Help
Dear Seeking Help,
You have a marvelous oppor-


tunity to accomplish two things at
one time. First, you can get some
relief by providing your children
with "new" things to do. Second,
you can help them be better pre-
pared for next schooll year by
making the things you give hem
to do educational. Here are some
suggestions:
1) Make an effort to accompany
your children to local museums,
parks, and historical sites. Be
prepared to answer questions
about what, when and why.
2) ,Make good use of the library.
Go at least once a week and have
your children read.,: Let them
choose topics of interest to them.
3) Read the newspaper together
and discuss current events.
4) Practice math skills using
games or flash cards. Spelling
skills can be honed the same way.
Find funny and unusual words
such as "aardvark" to get them
interested.
5). Teach your child to cook. Not
only will it be fun but fractions
will finally make sense. Where
else do you use 1/3 cup or 1/4
pound? An extra benefit is you get
to eat what's cooked; .-if it's
edible. ,
6) Be sure they have time to day-
dream. Teach them to lie on their
backs and watch the clouds go by.
Lie down with them and enjoy
being a kid again.
Have fun and good luck!
- Gloria- M. DuTmas-M.S.. S.S.P.
. Nationally Certified School
Psychologist

Note: Please address your ques-
tions and comments to:
Dear Counselor, 311 Williams
Ave., Port St. Joe, FL'.32456.
Names and addresses are option-
al and will remain 'confidential.
ILetters Imay be edited for length.
Urgent inquiries and requests
for professional counseling
should be directed by phone to
227-1145.


VFW Auxiliary
The VFW Ladies Auxiliary
met on July 11 at the John :C.
Gainous Post 10069 with nine
members present.'
The food 'booth at the Frank
Pate park on the 4th of July was
a great success. Thank you to
everyone for supporting the VFW
and Auxiliary.
The next meeting will be held
on August 8 at 7:30 p.m., EDT.


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the house, bad sick. Gulf County
Sheriff B. E. Parker went to inves-
tigate and found him dead. Park-
er called Buzzett's Drug Store in
Apalachicola .and asked them to
notify the lady friend of the death.
A judge was called in for an
inquest and pronounced that the
body had decomposed to such an
extent he couldn't determine if
death had been by other than
natural causes. The body was
taken to Wewahitchka for burial.
MOB CONNECTIONS
On another occasion, six neat
looking strange men started to
hang around the pool hall in Apa-
lachicola, naturally alerting every-
one of their presence.
Later, the six men took off
suddenly, in a speed boat they
had tied up at, Apalachicola, and
intercepted a launch. on the Apa-
lachicola River, suspected to be
transporting illegal whiskey. Core
said the launch was verified as
belonging to Al Capone, nation-
wide dealer in bootleg whiskey.
The whiskey was dumped in


the river by the launch operators
to keep from being arrested and
some was later retrieved by local
men, at the sheriffs direction.
The sheriff. gave the men
some of the bottles for their trou-
ble and stored the remainder in
the 'bull-ring" of the Apalachicola
jail.
A man was in jail at the time.
The jail was an open room with
cells around all four walls with
only bars between them and the
open room. ,During the night, visi-
tors came to the outside window
and handed the inmate a large
fishing pole. The inmate fished
the whiskey, bottle by bottle Into
his cell and passed it out the
barred window. The next morn-
ing, the sheriff wondered what
had happened to his evidence.
"Whiskey-making was a big
product of both Franklin and
Gulf counties in those days, with
those involved protecting the in-
terests of each other. It was al-
most legal, It was so accepted a
thing to6do," Core said.








..,-Q'rI2 nRTAT- J T-FT-TH DfAV JULYT20.V')l1995


PAGE 2B THE STAR, PORT 5T* JUN. k'L -'nU~b-


Special Session


Delay Maybe Due to


Possible Veto Threat

Florida Getting A Lot of
Attention from Clinton, Demos
Gov. Lawton Chiles had some good reasons to delay his call for a spe-
cial session until September, the best one being perhaps the threat of
veto-overrides. His decision shows he is probably getting enough blood to
his brain which medics say he didn't during his early warning mini-stroke
over the July 4 holiday..
Official reasons for delaying the call for a health care special session
this summer were that Congressional action on block grants to states has
slowed and many legislators and state officials want to take vacations
before coming back to Tallahassee. ,
It'll give him more time, he says, to campaign throughout the state on
a need. for adopting his healthcare plan which.he claims will prevent the
loss of some $9 billion to Florida by 2002 if Congress goes to block grants
to the states.
Better reasons, perhaps, are that Chiles' healthcare plans have been
turned down.abruptly by the Florida Legislature three times in the last 16
months and a call back of unwilling lawmakers could result in an unusu-
al veto-override session, It would be rare but not unreasonable since con-
servatives have gained control of the agendas in both the House and
Senate.
Override possibilities include Chiles' veto of the repeal of the tobacco
law he and his legislative henchmen literally sneaked through the session
a year ago that took away most of the legal defenses of the tobacco indus-
try in a state suit seeking $billions for state money spent on smoking-
related illnesses. The repeal passed overwhelmingly in both houses with
enough votes, to override the veto ,
Another,override could easily be Chiles' rather hypocritical veto of a
bill last week designed to curb overzealous rule-making by state agencies.
The Florida Chamber of Commerce is calling for an overrideon that one
which passed unanimously in both houses. ,
Chiles declared war on bureaucratic rule making this year, especial-
ly the one that caused him trouble in putting a cook shack on some of his
property in North Florida.
The bill would have eliminated the presumption that rules are legal.
It also would have required the agencies 'to prove their validity if they were
challenged and the Legislature could suspend rules that exceed an
agency's authority.
Instead of signing it, Chiles said he was issuing an executive, order
telling agencies to repeal unnecessary rules. Yeah. "-
Chiles's veto of line items in the budget he claims are illegal because
they amount to policy making decisions by the Legislature could come up
for overrides too, including several backed by liberal supporters.,
One in particular snatched $2 million from something called Cities In
Schools (CIS), a public-private corporation that, is given credit for turning
around many at-risk students in inner city schools and lowering the
drop-out rate statewide.
Chiles said a disproportionate amount of the money was going to
administration, but records cited by the program backers show it was
only 9.81 percent, a reasonable range for private, non profit organizations
that receive public dollars.
FLORIDA IS TEST FOR CLINTON
It is becoming clear that Florida's 25 electoral votes is a must-win tar-
get for President Bill Clinton if he expects to be returned to the White
House in the 1996 elections and that is Just fine with the state's
Republican Party leaders.
"Any money he spends in Florida is money he would not be able to
spend elsewhere," said GOP State Chairman Tom Slade.
So far this year Clinton has visited Florida twice for fund raising
events, rqijipg more than. $ Imlllion in one Southi-,Flarida town. He is
coming again this month: Vice President A] Gore usual-fAbllwb, Clintqn
to the s-tmshine state,. acting.as sort of.a bag man.,carrying-the money
Clinton raises back to Washington.
And GOP candidates are,showing up almost daily in Florida, building
support for the party's convention and straw vote ballot In November, this
year at Orlando that is being called "Presidency III." '.
Clinton-with the help, of Ross Perot-lost Florida to George Bush in
1992 by less than 100,000 votes of more than 5 million cast. Another
third party candidate could set up a similar scenario in 1996, but it
promises to be an uphill battle for the Democrats.
Florida Republicans hold a 15-8 majority, in U. S. Representatives,
split the U. S. Senate, control the Florida Senate and have' enough v6tes
in the Florida House that (coupled with conservative Democrats) control
the agenda.
.... Perhaps, .the real obstacle to a Clinton win in Florida is. the fact the
Motor Voter Law which was expected to help Democratic registration has
actually registered more Republicans. A trend toward conservatism that
spells trouble for Clinton, Chiles, and Sen. Bob Graham who is looking
more and more like-a Democratic carididate fo- governor in 1998&.
Graham, of course, denies his interest jin another run for governor
and perhaps it is only a dream of Democratic activists grasping for a good
candidate, to defeat young Jeb Bush who will probably be the Republican
candidate.

Here's the Capitol News Round-up
The commercial fishing net ban and the re-election of Gov. Lawton
Chiles indicates there is a political and physical split df Florida North and
South that usually defies any attempt for one statewide management pol-
icy to succeed. .
It is especially true, disgruntled fishermen' say, of the overwhelming
vote to ban net fishing in Florida's coastal waters by heavily populated
South and Central Florida counties. ,
River with the exception of Leon which passed 't,53 to 47 percent -'voted
against the ban overwhelmingly. '
The same records of the 1994 election show Chiles won election pri-
marily in the bottom half of the state with Leon once again being an
exception in the North.
Chiles, of course, cannot be blamed for the net ban which was a con-
Sstitutional amendment sponsored by the environmentalists and sports
: fishermen.
S All gill nets (mullet primarily) were banned and. mesh nets (mostly
shrimp) were limited to 500 square feet in size. '
Chiles reporteddit would probably be mid-August before the state
would be able to find the $20 million the law said would come from state


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a


Tucker Attends Mid-
land Convention
Mr. and Mrs. Ross E. Tucker,
CLU, of the Tucker Life-Health In-
surance General Agency, recently
returned from the Midland Na-
tional Life Insurance Company
sales -convention held at the
Hyatt Regency Resort, Maul, Ha-
waii.
Ross qualified for the conven-
tion by meeting Midland Nation-
al's production, persistency and
lives requirements during a 24
month qualification period.
Convention activities includ-
ed sales business sessions, pan-
els and workshops, as well as
sightseeing and recreational ac-
tivities. Highlights of the conven-
tion included the President's
Awards Banquet where Ross was
honored as a. President's Club
Member.
He is now involved in a new
qualification period for Midland's
next convention to be held in
Vancouver, British Columbia,
Canada.,

Peterson Sends Rep.
To PSJ Tuesday
U. S. Congressman Pete Pe-
terson, D-Marianna, announced
recently that Ken Davis, a repre-
sefitative from his Panama City
district office will visit Port St. Joe
to meet with constituents from
3:30 to 4:30 p.m., EDT, Tuesday,
July 25 in the Law Library on the
second floor of the Gulf County"'
Courthouse.?,.
Peterson said Davis, who will
be visiting Gulf County monthly,
will provide information and help
to' residents with questions and
problems related to the Federal
government.


SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR




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HEARING AID CENTER

618 W. 23rd St.
Publix Plaza.
Panama City, FL
769-5348

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Monthly Service Center
Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
1st Thursday each month


Wisdahl Wins
Scholarship
Miehele Wisdahl, a 1995 high
honor graduate of Port St. Joe
High School, has recently re-
ceived notification that she is the
recipient of a Robert C. Byrd' Hon-
ors Scholarship for thei;1995-96
academic year at the University of
Florida. This $1,500 annual
award may be renewed for up to
four years of study. The scholar-
ship is offered through the Flori-
da Department of Education and
funded by the U. S. Department
of Education. Awards are distrib-
uted in a geographically equitable
manner throughout the state
with each high school nominating
one outstanding senior. The fa-
culty and administration of Port
St. Joe High School is very proud
of. Michele and extends to her
their congratulations.
Another honor was bestowed
upon Michele by the Panhandle
Gator Club at their annual Pana-
ma City Gator Gathering in May.
Michele was awarded a $500
scholarship for the 1995-96 aca-
demic year. These scholarships
are given annually to selected
Panhandle students who have
been accepted at the University of
Florida.

Deepest Thanks
Gulf County Senior Citizens
Association extends their deepest
thanks to Tyndall Federal Credit
Union, First Union Bank, Wewa-
hitchka State Bank and St. Joe
Telecommunications for their as-
sistance with the brick campaign
for the new center.


S


-A


- V


E


Capitol


NEWS

ROUND-UP

by Jack Harper

trust funds to buy the nets of fishermen forced into unemployment. It
also allows displaced fishermen $250 per week for 26 weeks under work-
man's compensation after they pay $189 in retroactive unemployment
insurance.
So far 1,449 of them across Florida have signed up for the net buy-
back program, 890 have paid the retroactive fee for unemployment com-
pensation and 379 have signed up for retraining which is expected to be
financed by federal funds.
Rep. Allen Boyd, D-Monticello,/ early in the session introduced and
the House passed a $30 million economic aid package for net fishermen
to be financed by a $5 surcharge on salt water fishing licenses.
"If the fishermen and I were the only ones voting we would have fig-
ured it out the first day, but there were other interests," Boyd said.
The compromise package that passed came (as often happens) in the
closing hours of the session. It was sponsored by Sen. George
Kirkpatrick/ D-Qainesville/ when it became apparent Boyd's bill would
not make it.
$6 MILLION COMPUTER UPGRADE: Accompanied by some raised
eyebrows due to the recent computer .costs and error scandals in the
Department. of Health and Rehabilitation, members of the Florida Legis-
lature are spending some $6 million on new systems for themselves and
their aides.
The money spent on new computers comes after some 400 state
employees lost their jobs and social program spending has been drasti-
cally cut, but lawmakers claim the state-of-the-arts equipment' to be
installed over a three year period is absolutely necessary for them to do
their jobs.
'We really need to make this type of investment in technology," said
George Meir, executive director for House Speaker Peter Wallace, D-St.
Petersburg.
SUGAR-CANE LAND SALE READIED: An environmental land buying
panel will assess some 50 square miles of sugar-cane land being offered
to the state for $64 million to help restore the polluted Florida Everglades.
The CARL (conservation and recreational land) advisory purchasing
committee voted 5-1 to assess the 32,000-acres 10 miles south of Lake
Okeechobee that is being offered by St. Joe Paper Co. subsidiary
Talisman Sugar Corp.
The purchase is already being heralded as a necessary step by the
Everglades Coalition of 31 environmental groups recommending the pur-
chase.
The Florida Cabinet will decide whether to put in on the Carl list at a
meeting in February. The only vote against the assessment was cast by
Deputy Agriculture Commissioner Terry Rhodes. A law passed in 1994
calls for turning 40,000 acres of farm and public land back into filtering
marshes to combat farm runoff and urban water drainage.


of ush or


BARFIE OLD'S
Phone 229-2727 Port St. Joe h'ARDEN


TIMOTHY MFARLANDJ
A TTORN E Y A T L A \V

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DLII Criminal Defense
Accidents Insurance Claims


509 Fourth Street Port St. Joe
227-3113


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Surgical Center Panama City, FL
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT
1-800-227-5704


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Attorney at Law


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Gleanings


From
My Garden


By Stephen D. Cloud, Pastor of First Baptist Church, Lillian, AL


In an effort to live more
healthily, I -have been taking
brisk walks in the early morning.
Rumor got opt in the community
that the preather had stopped
Walking. Since school has been
out, I actually go earlier. I walk
fast, kind of a power walk. If you
have ever seen someone do this,
you know why I go early. I don't
want to be seen.
We are obsessed with power.
Power walks, power teams, power
lunches, power moves, and now
children are plagued by the Power
Rangers. Questions are raised in
all of this. fixation with, power.
What is power? Who has it? How
do I get some?
1 Kings 21 contains the inter-
esting story of Naboth's Vineyard.
Someone has said the point of
this story is that, "all kings are
not evil and all prophets are not
good. Each must be elevated case
by case according to how they
use or abusl their power." In this
story, King Ahab wanted a vine-


yard that belonged to Naboth. Na-
both did not want to sell. Queen
Jezebel intervened and hatched a
notorious plan to seize Naboth's
vineyard. Naboth was framed,
quickly tried, found guilty and
was put to death. Ahab got his
vineyard and then the Prophet
Elijah pointed a long accusing
finger at the King and Queen be-
cause of their dastardly deed.
Ahab repented and was spared.
Jezebel reaped what she had
sown.
Several kinds of powers are
demonstrated in this story. First,
there is the power of position,
possessions, and politics.' Ahab
was king. He could do pretty
much whatever he chose. He had
the power of the throne, the pow-
er of government, the power to
give but also the power to take.
We sometimes forget that. We
want the government to 'take care
of everything, but forget who pays
the government's bills. If you
don't think Uncle. Sam takes
more than he gives, take a good'


Come Find Out What All the Excitement Is at 2247 Hwy. 71
(1/10 mile north of Overstreet Road)


The Church of Christ

in Wewahitchka wants to make a difference in your life.
Sunday School 10 a.m. CDT
Worship Service 11 a.m. CDT
Wednesday Bible Study 7 p.m.



SNew Life Christian Center Church
Sixth Street (Union Hall Building)
New Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Johnny Jenkins, Jr. Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 a:m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
(1st and 3rd Sunday Nights) .
Wednesday Night Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
"We Are Covenant 'Peopfk'
ii


CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
REV. BILL WHITE, PASTOR
2420 Long Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
.904-229-6886


Port St. Joe's "Port of Victory"
Sunday School ..............................................10
Morning Worship..........................................
Sunday Evening...............................................6
Wednesday Evening ......................................7


a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.


I ---- ,-----,


THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN GULF COUNTY

ST. JAMES' 800 22nd STREET PORT ST. JOE
7:30 and 11:00 a.m. (ET)
Sunday School 9:45
ST. JOHN'S WEWAHITCHKA
8:00 a.m (CD .

THE REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor,




FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MEXICO BEACH
823 N. 15th Street
648-5776

Sunday Bible Study (all ages)............... 9:00 CST
Morning W orship....................................10:00 CST
Eve nng W orship........................................ 6:30 CST
Wednesday Bible Study (all ages) .......... 6:30 CST






Chapel Lane Overstreet Phone 648-8144
Bro. Harold'J. McClelland, Jr., W.U. Tremain,
Pastor Pasto# Emeritus
Sunday School................................................ 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ............................... 7:00 p.m.


A&14 ^ FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

S508 CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
*' g SUNDAY WORSHIP........................ 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL........................... 11 a.m.
f u S M *SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children
Nursery Available
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor


look at your next paycheck. Ahal
was king. His was the power c
who he was, where he was, an
what he was.
There is also the obvious
power of evil. This was Jezebel'
power. Be warned. Wherever yot
find the power of money and polio
tics, evil usually lurks close by
we sometimes think that it is th
politics and the money that ar
evil, but it is their abuse that i
evil. That is why the dictum so ol
ten rings true, "power corrupts
absolute power corrupts absc
lutely." But what Ahab could
get with his position, Jezebel go
for him with her depravity.
There were also other kind
of power in the story. Naboth i
an example of the power of mor
conviction. Naboth is the re;
hero of the story, a dead one, bu
a hero none the less. Naboth ur
derstood that his land was a gi
given. to his forefathers by God.I
was a sacred trust. It was not fo
sale at any price. Is there any
thing in your life that precious,
that valuable? Are there any prior
ciples you hold that dearly? The:
is great power in people who ha\
such convictions.
Then there is obviously tlh
power of the prophet. Elijah ha
the power of charisma and spirit
The power of a word timely spol
en. It -is the power of terse con
mentary, scathing critique, rad
cal dissent, poignant protest, sa:
ing the right thing at the rigI
time to the' right people (or ti
wrong ones). Like Naboth, Elija
had the courage to stand up
the power that be. It is what on
theologian. calls, '!engaging tl
powers". I call it rattling cage
but please beware that this
dangerous business. The powe:
don't like to be engaged., The
don't want their cages rattled an
if you do this, you better he;
what Jesus said, "Behold I ser
you forth as sheep in the midst
wolves; be ye, therefore, wise
serpents, and harmless as dove


(Matthew 10:16 KJV). A prophet
today as always must be tough
minded, but tenderhearted. We
must always be on guard that in
Sour battle against evil that we
don't become evfl ourselves. But
if we are not as wise as we are in-
nocent, the powers will clean our
plows.
The real power of the church.
b has never been anything but the
,f power of moral conviction, the
d power of kindness, the power of
service, and the power of truth. It'
is centered in the power of time.
s That in time truth will be known
s and justice will be done. If the
u Bible teaches anything about the
it end of the age, .it teaches that in
Y' the end everyone will have to ad-
e mit that God is just and that God
e was right. In the end, He will win.
s The power of God is mostly the
f- power of love. It' is the power of
s, sacrifice and senranthood. In
- Christ, God said I will love you
't even if it kills me. His people
t must do the same.
Noted psychiatrist, M. Scott
Is Peck in his book, To the Beat of a
s Different Drummer, tells of a'
al crushing experience when he
al went to Washington, to work in
it the Surgeon General's Office. He
- says he telt like he had arrived.
ft Finally, he was in the place where
It the real power was. He got his
:)r plow cleaned and wrote a little
yr poem about the experience in
s, which he says something like
a- this, "I hope I can come back here
one day, but I wonder will I need
ve better armor or more love." The
call of God is for us to have more
le love not better armor. One of my
id favorite Contemporary Christian
t. Groups, New Song, sings this
k- song:
a-
[i- !* We face evil foes who deliver
y- their threats, bombarding our lives
ht with words of fear and death. Sa-
he tanic attackers, destroyers of men,
1h engaged, in a war that they can.
to never win. Let's not be tempted to
ne use earthly power. It will only be
he used against us. We can bring evil
s, down, for we, hold higher ground
is when we trust in the One who de-
rs fends us. Let the Father of love be
ey our strength from above. We are
Ad strong when we yield to His way.
ar When we walk in the light, weican
id battle the night. Trust His power
of to protect us each day. Lay our
as weapons down. Our victory is
s" found in the Lord. None can de-


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOB. FL T-YURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995 PAGE 3B
stroy love, it lasts forever. We are motives. "Be wise as serpents,
soldiers, the Soldiers of the Father but as innocent as doves." This
of Love." world needs some Naboths and
Live the balance. Watch your Elijahs.


"THE EXCITING PLACE TO WORSHIP"
First Baptist Church
.102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
Sunday School 9:45 ai
Worship 11:00 ai
Disciple Training 6:00 pi
Evening Worship 7:00 pi
SWednesdav Praver Meeting ..7:00 nI


Gary Smith' ,
Pastor


Buddy Caswell
S Minister of Music & Youth


St. Joe Assembly ofGod.
309 6th Street.Port St. Joe
Sunday School ............................. 10:00 am
Morning Worship Service........ 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Service'........... 6:30 pm
Wednesday Bible Study............ 7:00 pm
Jeff Scolf '
Pastor :
t;; :: tEmpowered by iThe Spiritt




j Highland View

United Methodist Church
Corner of 4th St. & Parker Ave.
Highland View
Lynwood R. Wynne, Pastor

Sunday School..... ............... ................................. 16 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.



EVERYONEWE'L C O


Bible Study:
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednes


CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS

y
sday
Minister: Tom Skipper 229-8310


Worship:
11 a.m. Sunday
Nursery


WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue


., ,65 %W. We Want o .To..
,'L,. / :l Part of the Friendly Place O

,,BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
"MORNING WORSHIP............11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING..............5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue


Group At Oak Grove Assembly


Liberty Prison Ministnes will
be at Oak Grove Assembly of God
Church on July 23 for the 10:45
a.m. and the 6:00 p.m. services.


Vacation Bible
School Held,
The First Baptist Church of
White City will be having vacation
bible school on July 24 through
July 28 from 6:00-8:45 p.m.,
EDT, for ages three to youth.
The theme is "Windows on
the World" and a'parade will be
held on Saturday July 22 at
10:00 a.m., EDT, at the church.


Liberty Prison Ministries will,
be preaching a special ministry of
freedom in song.


Community
Gospel Sinig
The Overstreet Bible Church
is having a community gospel
sing on Saturday. July 22 at 7:00
p.m., EDT.
If you would like to sing, con-
tact Earl Peak at 229-6547 after
5:00 p.m.
Everyone is invited to attend.


CURTIS CLARK
Pastor


MARK JONES
Minister of Music


I irs nitedMet dist Church
A 111 North 22nd St.
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
L. Morning Church...................9:00 a.m. CT
Church School ............... 10:00 a.m. CT
SNursery Provided

Dr. Loule Andrews, Pastor John Anderson, Music Director
Office Phone: 648-8820 Hours; Monday-Friday, 9 am 12 noon CT


SCostitution AnMonument
Catch the tpi C onSt. oe

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School......... 9;45 4.m. Methodist Youth
Morning Worship.... 1 lO a.m. Fellowship............. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
: Choir Practice
tev. Zedoc Baxter Wednesday............. 7:30 p.m.
PASTOR
,.


227-1278


m
m
m
m
m


TIRST


308d Williams Av6..











VAUZ4b *4*4d h *r, Afl ?*. JUP S. d JULYSUflS *


School Board Minutes Oldest Building In Panhandle Demolished
FI la K -lrl- 117T-, "r^-.Ti.- fl.- ^TD -.2.T^ ^^ ^^^*a


The Gulf County School Board met in
regular session on June 6, 1995, at 9:00
A.M., in the Gulf County School Board
Administrative offices in Port St. Joe. The
following members were present: Charlotte
Pierce, Oscar Redd, David Byrd, Caroline
Norton, 'and Mary Pridgeon. The
Superintendent and Board 'Attorney were
also present.
Chairman Pierce presided and the
meeting was opened with prayer led by
Caroline Norton, followed by the Pledge of
Allegiance led by Oscar Redd.
PUBLIC HEARING, ON POLICY
CHANGE: In accordance with Florida
Statutes, the Board advertised policy
changes relating to the Pupil Progression
Plan in the local newspapers. The public
was given opportunity on this day to
provide input. After discussion, revisions
were made in the section relating to
Exemptions from Semester Exams.P'
HEAR PROM PUBLIC: Ms. Patricia
Walker expressed concern about her poten-
tial transfer from bus driver to bus aide.
Mr. James Hersey made a presenta-
tion to the Board expressing his concern
about certain student activities at Port St.
Joe Middle School.
ADOPTION OF AGENDA: On motion
by Mr. Byrd, second by Mrs. Pridgeon, and
unanimous vote, the Board adopted the
agenda.
PRESENTATION OF SCHOOL
IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS: Presenta-
tions were made by the following School
Advisory Councils' representatives on the
needs and activities being considered for
each school's 1995-96 School Improvement
Program:
Wewahitchka Elementary School -
Willie Carr
Highland View Elementary School -
Catherine Barfield
Port St. Joe Elementary School Mark
Ellmer
Port St. Joe Middle School Chris
Earley
Port St. Joe High School Wes Taylor
Wewahitchka High School David
Bidwell
Gulf County Adult. School S.M.-
Eubanks
After discussion, Chairman Pierce
'declared the consideration of renovating
Port 'St. Joe Elementary School and
Highland View Elementary School an emer-
gency item. 'On motion by Mrs. Norton, sec-
ond by Mrs. Pridgeon, and unanimous vote,
the Board directed the Superintendent to
contact the Board Architect regarding Ini-
tial consideration that should be made of
school plant needs at Port St. Joe
Elementary School and .Highland View
Elementary School Mrs. Norton expressed
concern that the initial investigation of the
plant needs of the two schools be consid-
ered independently, and at this point in the
consideration, consolidation should not be
an issue.
BUDGET MATTERS/PAYMENT OF
BILLS: On motion by Mr. Redd, second by
Mr. Byrd, and unanimous vote, the Board
approved the following budget matters and
payment of bills: .
Budget Amendment No. VIII General
Fund Budget Amendment No. VIII Special
Revenue, Food Service Budget Amendment
No. VIII Special Revenue, Other Budget
Amendment No. VIII Capital Projects,
PECO
APPROVAL OF MINUTES: On motion
by Mr. Redd, second by Mrs. Pridgeon, and
unanimous vote, the- Board approved the
minutes of May 2 and 22, 1995.
CORRESPONDENCE:. The Board
reviewed correspondence from Mr. Craig
Dunlavy, Branch Manager of Honeywell,
Inc., relating'if6the air conditioning system
at ort St. Joe High School.
The Board reviewed a card of thanks
from the family of Superintendent Roger
Stokely.
On motion by Mrs. Norton, second by
Mr. Redd, and unanimous vote, the Board
approved a request from Ms. Joan Jenkins,
that her son, Andrew Scott Jenkins, be
allowed to attend Shaw Adult Center sum-
mer school night program in Panama City,
FL.
BID MATIERS: On motion by Mrs.
Norton, second by Mrs. Pridgeon, and
Unanimous vote, the Board approved the
following bid matters:
Awarded the best/lowest 1995-96 Bus
'Brake Shoe Bids to the following vendors:
Saunders Engine Company and Bay Truck
Parts, Inc.
Approved to reject all Extermina-
tion/Pest Control bids and granted autho-
rization to rebid.
PERSONNEL MATTERS: A motion was
made by Mr. Byrd, seconded by Mr. Redd, to
advertise for a full-time Assistant Principal
position at Port St. Joe High School for the
1995-96 school year. The motion was car-
ried with Byrd,., Redd, and Pierce voting
YEA; Norton and Pridgeon voting NAY. Mrs.
Norton requested the minutes reflect that.
she is not opposed to the position, but she
wants to wait until redirection is finalized
by the Legislature.
On motion by Mr. Byrd, second by
Mrs. Norton, and unanimous vote, the
Board approved the following personnel
matters:
Accepted a letter of retirement from
Betty Bidwell effective the end of August,
1995, or the first of September, 1995, pend-
ing notification from the Division of
Retirement. The Board also approved for
her to receive reimbursement for accrued
sick leave and annual leave as well as the
10% retirement supplement.
Approved a request from Marlene
Whitfield to change her retirement date to
December, 1997.
Approved a six-weeks family medical
leave-of-absence for Lisa Kay Jordan begin-'
ning August 10, 1995.
Accepted a letter of retirement from
Charles Osborne effective June 30, 1996.
Approved Charlie Lanford for the posi-
tion of student assistant at Port St. Joe Bus
Barn' during the 1995 summer.
Approved Carol Dahlhoff be re-
employed for the 1995-96 school year con-
tingent upon the need for interpreter ser-
vices for the hearing impaired.
Approved Denise Williams for the posi-
tion of Adult/Alternative instructor for the
1995 summer school session.
Approved the following personnel to
work in the Maintenance Department for
the 1995 summer session: Josh Colbert,
Zyris Hill, Brian Jenkins, Keion McNair,
David Player, Matthew Roberson, James
Wilder, Brian Cathey, and Ryan Yeager.
Approved Mae Ella Gant and Shirley
Williams as bus drivers for the 1995 sum-
mer school session at Port St. Joe High.
Approved Barbara Gautier as bus dri-
ver and Angie Suber as bus aide for the
1995 summer school bus route from
Wewahitchka to M.K. Lewis, Panama City,
FL.
Approved Priscilla Taylor as bus driver
for the 1995 summer school bus route from
Port St. Joe to M.K. Lewis, Panama City, FL.
PROGRAM MATTERS: On motion by


Mr. Byrd, second by Mr. Redd, and unani-
mous vote, the Board approved the follow-
ing program matters:
Approved to continue child care ser-
vices as part of the Drop-Out Prevention
Program with the Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Inc. (KIDS) for the 1995-96 school
year.
Approved IDEA and PRE-K
Handicapped project application for the
1995-96 school year.
Approved FDLRS-PAEC project in
exceptional education for the 1995-96 fiscal
year.


Accepted a letter of retirement from
Betty Holloway effective May 29, 1995. The
Board also approved for her to receive ben-
efits applicable for accrued unused sick
leave.
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM:
In' compliance with Florida Statutes
s.229.592(4)(c), on motion by Mrs. Norton,
second by Mr. Byrd, and unanimous vote,
the Board approved the 1995-96. School
Improvement Plans for Wewahitchka
Elementary School, Port St. Joe Elementary
School, Port St. Joe High School, Port St.
Joe Middle School, Highland View
Elementary School, Wcwahitchka High
School, and Gulf County Adult School.


10i viaKe w vay vr .L iWtu IJLt J UveIIui


New Facility To Rise On The Dust

Of The Old: Still Carry Same Name


Approved a Pre-Kindergarten Early
Intervention Program contract between the
Gulf County School Board and the Gulf
County Guidance Clinic, Inc., (KIDS) for the
1995-96 school year.
Approved Safe and Drug-Free School
project application for the 1995-96 school
year.
Approved Florida Learn and Serve
Project application for Wewahlitchka
Elementary School for the 1995-96 school
year.
Approved Resolution, Contract, and
Invoice for Gulf County School District's
participation in the Gateway Student
System Consortium for the period of July 1,
1995 through June 30, 1996.
SURPLUS PROPERTY: On motion by
Mr. Redd, second by. Mr. Byrd, and unani-
mous vote, the Board approved a request
for property disposal of one (1) Electric
Piano, Property Record #61802201,-located
at Port St. Joe High School.
TRANSPORTATION MATTERS: On
motion by Mr. Byrd, second by Mrs. Norton,
and unanimous vote, the Board approved
the following transportation matters:
Approved a request for a bus and cer-
tified driver to transport children' to Gulf
Coast Community College Day Camp for the
periods of July 17-21 and July ;24-28,
1995.
In compliance with Florida Statutes,
approved the following designated physi-
clans to administer bus driver physical:
The Gulf County Public Health Unit, physi-
cian in charge; Any medical doctor, dually
certified by, the State of Florida and the
A.MA.
Approved a, contract for the 1995-96
fiscal year between the Gulf County School
Board and Bay St. 'Joseph Care Center for
transportation of patients to and from evac-
uation sites in the event of disaster.
S Approved an agreement for the 1995-
96 school year between the Gulf County
School Board and Franklin County School
Board, whereby, the Gulf County School
System provides transportation for Franklin
County'students to attend school in Bay
County.
Approved a contract' for the 1995-96
school year between the Gulf County School
Board and the Gulf County Guidance Clinic
(KIDS), Inc., for transporting students, K-6,
from Port St. Joe Elementary School to the
Gulf County Guidance Clinic (KIDS) facili-
ties.
SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT: On
motion by Mrs. Pridgeon, second by Mr.
Redd, and unanimous vote, the Board
approved a request to name the media cen-
ter at Wewahitchka Elementary School in
memory of Patsy Lister.
On motion by Mr. Redd, second by
Mrs. :Pridgeon, and unanimous %ote. the
Board approved a Twelve Month Holiday
Calendar for 1995-96.
The Board reviewed School Resource
SOfficer Monthly Activity Reports for Port St.
Joe High School/Port St. Joe Middle School
and Wewahitchka High School 'for the
month of May, 1995.
The Board scheduled a special meet-
ing for June 30, 1995, at 1:00 P.M., ET, for
Sthe purpose of closing out the budget year.
Board Member Redd excused himself
from the remainder of the meeting because
of employment responsibilities.
VOTE ON POLICY CHANGE: A motion
was made by' Mrs. Norton, seconded by Mr.
ByrTd, to approve policy changes of Chapter
6Gx23 relating to the Pupil Progression-
Plan. The motion was carried with Byrd,
Pierce, Norton. and Pridgeon voting YEA.
ADJOURNMENT: The meeting was
adjourned at 12:50 P.M.. to meet again in
special session on June 30. 1995..
The Gulf County School Board met in
Special session on June 30, 1995 1:00
P.M., in the Gulf County School Board
Administrative Offices in Port St. Joe. The
following members were present: Charlotte
Pierce, Oscar Redd, David Byrd, Caroline
Norton, and Mary Pridgeon. 'The
Superintendent and Board Attorney were
also present.
Chairman Pierce presided and the
meeting was opened with the Pledge of
Allegiance led by Caroline Norton.
BUDGET MATTERS/PAYMENT OF
BILLS: On motion by Mr. Byrd, second by
Mrs. Pridgeon,. and unanimous vote, the
Board approved the following budget' mat-
ters and payment of bills:
Budget Amendment No. IX, General
Fund; Budget Amendment No, IX, Special
Revenue, Food Service; Budget Amendment
No. IX, Special Revenue, Other;, Budget
Amendment No. IX, Debt IService, Bids:
Budget .Amendment No. IX, Capital
Projects, LCI; Budget Amendment No. IX,
Capital Projects, PECO
Budget Amendment No. X, General
Fund; Budget Amendment No. X, Special
Revenue, Food Service; Budget Amendment
No. X, Special Revenue, Other; Budget
Amendment No. X, Capital Projects. PECO
The Board reviewed the School Board
Trim Timetable for the 1995-96 budget
year. No action necessary.
BID MATTERS: On motion by Mrs.
Pridgeon, second by Mrs. Norton, and
unanimous vote, the Board approved the
following bid matters: ,
Awarded the Bleacher Refurbishing
Bid contract for Wewahitchka High School
to Preferred Seating, Inc., in the amount of
$13,760.00.
Awarded the Locker Repair and
Refinishing Bid contract for Wewahltchka
High School to PHP Locker Company in the
amount of $4,320.00.
Awarded the 1995-96 Typewriter and
Copier Maintenance Bid contract to McRae
Business Machines in the amount of
$33,371.79.
PERSONNEL MATTERS: On motion
by Mr. Byrd, second by Mrs. Pridgeon, and
unanimous vote, the Board 'approved the
following personnel matters:
Approved the following summer school
teachers at Wewahitchka High School: Tim
Hammon, Don Rich, Grant Grantham, Jay
Kearce, Nicky Davis and John Franzese.
Approved Shirley Williams and Mac
Ella Gant to work as office aides at Port St.
Joe High School during summer school.
Approved Carolyn Rish and Marilyn
Witten, guidance counselors, for summer
employment at Port St. Joe High School,
sharing one salary.
Approved Donna Priest for summer
employment in the guidance office at Port
St. Joe High School on a hourly basis.
Approved the following summer school
teachers at Port St. Joe High School: Tony
Barbee, Judy Williams, Laurel Riley,
Charles Osborne, Deborah Crosby, Minnie
Likely, Vernon Eppinette, Wayne Stevens,
Chuck Gannon, Curtis Ray, Christine
White, Lewana Patterson, Susan Gannon,
Scott Gowan, and John Rainwater.
Approved the following for summer
work in the Maintenance Department:
Steve Causey, Chip Field, Ernest Myers,
Jamie Rushing, Cory Owens, and Rodney
Small.


Annual PAEC/TEC Leadership Conference
in Panama City, FL, on July 12 & 13, 1995.
There being no furi her business, the
meeting adjourned at 2:15 P.M., to mCee
again in regular session on July 1 1, 1995.


It was the final encore for the
old Dixie Theatre located in his-
toric downtown Apalachicola.
Demolition crews recently yanked
down the remaining wall of this
.nearly 100-year-old theatre which
stood as one of the Florida Pan-
handle's oldest theatres.
When the demolition dust
clears, however,..owners say the
curtains will rise again on a new
Dixie Theatre which will be recon-
structed to look like the original
theatre using nearly 3,000 of the
100-year-old red bricks salvaged
from the demolition.
The reconstruction of the Dix-
ie Theatre Apalach is the latest of
many restoration/recreation pro-
jects now underway in this color-
ful "city by the seafood". It has
gained much attention because it
represents one of the area's most
ambitious reconstruction efforts.
The Dixie Theatre, now
owned by Rex and Cleo Parting-
ton, veteran theatre folk from Vir-
ginia, was originally built' in the
early 1900's. At the time, the
theatre was considered a grand
addition to Apalachicola which
had become prosperous in the
mid 1800's from steamboat river
shipping and later from extensive
timber mills and seafood indus-
try. According to William Rogers'
Outpost On The Gulf the Dixie
Theatre originally featured a main
hall with 360 folding opera chairs
and a sunken orchestra pit oppo-
site a heavily curtained stage.
The theatre lit up the downtown.
district with its colored lights
(electricity was still relatively new
to the region). The 4,500 square
foot brick building (which sits
just a block from the riverfront)
also featured a horseshoe shaped
balcony with private boxes and a
conical ticket office with glass
block windows.
In recent years, however, the
theatre, long since abandoned by
its original owners, had suc-
cumbed to the elements (the roof
had caved in, the balcony col-
lapsed and the orchestra pit was
full of debris). All that. remained
of the theatre. was the front brick
facade, and it, according to ex-
perts, was probably only being
held in place by the two brick
structures which shouldered it on
either side.. ,.
When Rex and. Cleo .Parting-
ton saw the dilapidated, theatre
while visiting in 1992, they were
entranced. Theatre performers
and owners from Virginia (he
served as artistic director for the
historic Barter Theatre in Abing-
don, Virginia-she is a renowned
actress and author), 'they felt it
was an omen.
"Our daughter's name is Dix-
ie," Partington muses. "How could
we not buy this theatre?"
Today, along with the help of
the City (City forefathers sold
them the theatre for $28,000 and
lent them $50,000 from a revolv-
ing city loan program to help in
the renovation 'process) recon-
struction begins.-
"We plan to build the theatre
back to look just as it was when
it originally opened," says Part-
ington, a softspoken man who
tends to think of the project as of
the theatre as if the monumental
task of reconstruction were al-
ready complete. The orchestra
pit? Yes, it will be there, says
Partington. The balcony? Yes. The
original ticket booth, stately red
brick facade, orchestra seating?
Yes, yes, yes.
And will it be a functioning
theatre? Absolutely! According to
Partington, the Dixie is being re-.
built to accommodate live perfor-



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT: On
motion by Mr. Redd, second by Mrs. Norton,
and unanimous vote, the Board approved
,the following matters:
Approved an Interinstitutional Arti-
culation Agreement for Tech Prep between
Gulf Coast 'Community College and Bay,
Gulf, and Franklin County Public Schools.
Approved a request for property dis-
posal for the following items located in the
Maintenance Department: One (1) 1975
Chevrolet Pick-Up, Property Record
#CCQ145A145201; One (1) 1975 Chevrolet
Pick-Up, Property Record #CCQ145-
A145463; and One (1) GMC Mini Van,
Property Record #TGY354U5048BI.
Approved proposals from Gray .
,Contracting, Inc., for changes to the Port St.
Joe Middle School Technology Lab
Renovation project that are necessary for its
'completion.
The Board reviewed information
received from the Florida Association of
District School Superintendents relating to
legislative matters. No action necessary.
The Board reviewed a request from a
support group for the Summer League
Sharks Basketball Teams for assistance
'with transportation for the teams' trip to
Gainesvillec, FL. After discussion, a motion
was made by Mr. Redd, seconded by Mrs.
Norton, to approve the use of a bus as long
as the following is provided by the request-
ing organization: a certified driver autho-
rized by the School District; fuel for the bus;
and insurance at an approved level covered
by Florida Statutes. The motion was car-
ried with Redd. Byrd, Norton, and Pierce
voting YEA, P'ridgeon voting NAY.
BOARI) MEMBER CONCERNS: On
motion by Mr. Redd. second by Mr. Byrd,
and unanimous vote, the Board approved
for Board members to attend the 28th


Advertise Your
Yard Sale.!


PROFESSIONAL

GAS STRING

TRIMMER


mances, guest artists' series, chil-
dren's theatre and theatre
workshops. "We want very. much
to make this a community thea-
tre," says Partington.
The Dixie Theatre project is
just one of several reconstruc-
tion/renovation projects currently
underway in Apalachicola. This
small coastal town (population
2,700) is, according to many, un-
dergoing a period of renaissance.
"It's amazing to see what, is'
happening downtown lately," says
Dan Davis, president of the Apa-
lachicola Bay Chamber of Com--4
merce. Davis, who owns as insu-
rance company in the heart of the.
downtown district and whose
family has lived there for genera-
tion, has seen a .dramatic In-'
crease in the downtown business
activity, real estate transactions
and in the tourism traffic.
"We've been found, in a
sense," says Davis. "ButitI think
for all the right reasons." Accord-
ing to Davis, an overwhelming
majority of visitors and new resi-
dents to Franklin County, espe-
cially Apalachicola, have come be-
cause they appreciate what
makes Apalachicola : and sur4
rounding environs so special -
history and resources.
"In Franklin County especial-
ly," says Davis, "our history and
the resources are the basis for
our economy. We're very protec-
tive of both.....and it has paid
off."
Indeed, tourism in Apalachi-
cola has grown steadily over the
fast five years, real estate values
have skyrocketed and everywhere
there is growth and activity. That.
growth has a different feel .to it
however, than say, nearby Pana-
ma City or points west of that.
.~ ~ ~ ~ ..* t


high speed two line
cutting head


REGULAR PRICE $109.95


ST. JOE RENT-ALL

706 FIRST ST. PORT ST. JOE 227-2112


RESTRICTED MOBILE HOMEY



SUBDIlVISION NEAR BEACH


For prices, sizes and covenants call


Parker Realty of Mexico Beach



904-648-5777 fax 904-648-5779


.1-800-874-5073


:1


PAMw 41R


i


THAAR ~ RTT. atF- H S1)VJMV0 Iq!


31


Features:
* 21.2 cc, Powerhead Engineered
for long life
Full Crankshaft
Hard Chrome Cylinder
-.Aluminum die Cast Fan
Housing
Primer Carburetor
15" Cutting Swath
48" Curved Shaft
Direct Drive
Adjustable "S" Handle
. ,2-line bump to feed .095"
stringhead









LIMITED
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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 13. 1995 PAGE 5B


1993 Cadillac Sedan DeVille, 36,500
miles, squeaky clean, no dents,
scratches, taupe color leather, fully
equipped, factory warranty, $22,500.
(904) 234-5990. 2tp 7/20
'81 Ford 150 pickup, 4wd, large wood
bed, $300 obo. Call 229-6097.
Itc 7/20
1992 Blazer 4x4, $12,900; 1993
Chev. S-10 $7,450; 1992 Honda Civic
$7,900; 1992 Chev. 1500 Mark 3,
$13,500; 1991 FireVlird T-tops
$6,900; 1991 GMC Jimmy $9,700.
Colin Auto Sales, Wewa, 639-3087.
2-.p 7/13





STEVE'S OUTBOARD SERVICE,
White City, anytime, '827-2902.
tfc 7/6





Two 1 bedroom apartments, one 2
bdrm. trailer, one 2 bdrm. apartment,
2 blocks from beach, Beacon Hill.
Reasonable. Call 912-246-1250 after
9 p.m., days 904-574-7356. 3tc 7/20
New storage units on St. Joe Beach
behind the Gulf Sands Motel on
Americus -St. 5x10's, 10xlO's, and
10x20's. Ask about our move-in spe-
cial. 227-7200, tfc 7/6
Two bedroom trailer for rent, fur-
nished or unfurnished. No pets. Call
647-5106. tfc 7/6


- ~~~Imm% ~~~


MOSS CREEK APTS., 9
2722. 1 & 2 bedroom apart
cated 200 Amy Circle, Wewa
FL. Rent starts at $275. Ce
heat, blinds, carpeting, stovi
Equal Housing Opportunity.
impaired number 904-472-39


The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Private
baths. Daily or weekly rates. 302 Reid
Ave. Port St. Joe, 229-9000. tfc 7/6
Liberty Manor Apts., 800 Tapper
Dr., Port St. Joe. Affordable hous-
ing for the elderly and the handi-
capped.
Cen. h '&a, laundry facilities, energy
efficient tonst., handicapped equip-
ped apts., available. Stove & refrig.
furn., fully carpeted, 1 bdrm., apts.,
on-site manager.
Equal Opportunity Housing Com-
plex. Rent is based on income.
This complex is funded by the Farm-
ers Home Administration and man-
aged by Advisors Realty.
Call 229-6353 for more information.
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
tfc 7/6
PINE RIDGE APTS., (904) 227-7451.
Rents starting at $245.0.0 pe'r mo. Af-
fordable Living for low to middle in-
come families. Featuring 1, 2 & 3
bedroom apts. with cen. h&a, energy
saving appliances, patios & outside
storage. For hearing impaired call
(904) 472-3952. Equal Housing Op-
portunity. tfc 7/6
UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
* Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
* New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2


I 0O RN I GAAGSALES I HL AI:


ba., inside laundry rm; ch&a
04/639- washer & stove, fully care
nents lo- pets.
ihitchka, FURNISHED
n. air & Small 2 bdrm. home, auto.
e refrig. air, washer/dryer hook-up.
Hearing One bedroom apartment, w
52. ; dryer hook-up.
tfe 7/6 Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.


Warehouses, small and large, some
with office, suitable for small busi-
ness, 229-6200. tfc 7/6
No need for wet carpets. Dry clean
them with HOST. Use rooms right
away. Rent machine. St. Joe Furni-
ture, 227-1251. tfc 7/6

Heritage Villas of Apalachicola now
leasing 1, 2 & 3 BR apartments, in-
cludes garbage pickup, located at 398
24th Ave., Apalachicola. 904-653-
9277. Equal. Housing Opportunity.
3tc 7/13
Attention construction workers: week-
ly rental, one bedroom house, fur-
nished at Beacon Hill, $125' weekly,
$100 refundable security deposit.
648-4148. ltc 7/20





Yard Sale: 2 families, Saturday, July
-22, 8 a.m. till. 212 Tapper Dr., Ward
Ridge. Itc 7/20
Yard Sale: 524 Fourth St., Port St.
Joe. 8 a.m. till ? Used appliances,
sliding glass door and many extras.
' Yard Sale: 8 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday,
312 Helmet, Beacon Hill. Misc. items,
years of accumulated trash.


a, dish- Moving Sale: Furniture, large and
ted. No small appliances, dishes, curtains,
bed spreads, and lots more, 1010
Palm Blvd., Saturday, July 22nd, 8
heat & a.m. till. 229-8573. Itp 7/20
rasher/ Rummage Sale: Some antiques and
old glass; lots of misc. Saturday, July
22, 8 a.m. 12 noon. 507 10th St.,
tfe 7/6 ltc 7/20


BARGAINS GALORE
FLEA MARKET
106 2nd Ave., Oak Grove, PSJ
HOURS: Tues. Sat. 8 a.m. 5 p.m;
Children & Baby Items, New & used
MISC. ITEMS, Tools, crafts
furniture, etc. 4to7/6





Licensed Real Estate person for office
position, Monday Friday,. non-
smoker. Call Rosasco Realty, 227-
1774. tfc 7/20
Advertising Agency needs 6 people
to make phone, calls, from our office,
$5.00 to $8.00 per hour. Call 227-
7170. ; tp7/20
Delivery driver needed, $300 up a
week. Call 227-7170. Itp 7/20
Front desk person. People person
with organizatonal skills. Some week-
end work. Computer knowledge a
plus. Send resume to: Anchor Realty,
SR 1, Box 223, Port St. .Joe, FL
32456. tfc6/29
Cleaning help wanted at The Board-
walk, call 229-8390. tfc 6/29


SALES OPENING. Must have FL Real
Estate License. Week end hours re-
quired. Contact P.aker Realty of Mexi-
co Beach, 648-5777 ,. tfc 7/6
\ .'
LOOKING for mature individual to as-
sist. Regional Vice President of Primer-,
lea Financial Services. Take charge
and manage a portion of our multi-
faceted business. We offer high com-
mission income potential, flexible
hours, many other pluses. Could start
part time. For interview, call today.
648-8565. tfc 7/6
The Gulf County School Board is an-
nouncing a job opening for a School
Psychologist. The position will be for
Port St. Joe area schools. Applica-
tions are available at the School
Board office. Gulf County School
Board is an equal opportunity em-
ployer. tfc 7/6
RN's and LPN's day or night shift
available. Apply in person, Bay St. Jo-
seph Care Center, 220 9th St., Port
St. Joe. tfc 7/6
CNA's needed, for all shifts. Training
available. Apply in person at Bay St.
Joseph Care Center, 220 Ninth St.,
Port St. Joe. tfc 7/6
POSTAL JOBS, Start $12.08/hr. For
exam and application info. call (219)
769-8301 ext. FL 515, 9 am 9 pm,
Sun.-Fri. 4tp 6/22

Bay St. Joseph Care' Center has an
immediate opening for a Secretary/
Receptionist. Applicant must have ex-
perience in basic bookkeeping. 40-50
cpm typing speed, good language
skills, and be multi-task oriented.
Good people skills a must. Apply at
220 9th St., Port St. Joe, FL. No
phone calls, please. 2tc 7/13


Teacher Aide: The Gulf County
School Board Is receiving applications
for a Teacher Aide at Wewahitchka
Elementary School. Application are
available at the school. Persons hav-
ing applications on file in the School
Board, office and wishing to be consid-
ered for this position must request to
have their application submitted. Ap-
plication should be sent to Mr. Jerry
Kelley, Principal, Wewahitchka Ele-
mentary School, 408 East River Road,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465. Application
deadline is July 27, 1995, 3:00 PM,
CT. The Gulf County School Board is
an equal opportunity employer.
2tc7/20
Bus Driver: The Gulf County School
Board is receiving applications for a
School Bus Driver in Wewahitchka.
Interested persons should contact S.
M. Eubanks, Coordinator, Gulf
County School Board, 150 Middle,
School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456,
227-1204 or 639-2242. Application
forms are available at the school office
or the School Board office. Transfer
requests will be considered. The suc-
cessful applicant must be fingerprint-
ed in accordance with Florida Stat-
utes. Cost for fingerprinting must be
paid by the job candidate. The appli-
cation deadline is 12:00 Noon, E.D.T.,
August 1, 1995.
The Gulf County School Board is' an
equal opportunity employer.
2tc 7/20


6 PEOPLE NEEDED
to make phone calls fr6m our
office. $5.00 per hour plus cash
bonuses paid daily. Work 9-3:30
or 4:30 9:00. Monday Friday.
Call 227-7170.
2tp 7/13


TADE ERIE


Will keep children in my home on
St. Joe Beach, CPR certified. Mon-
day Friday. Call 647-5648.
.2tc 7/20
Housecleaning, have excellent refer-
ences. Please call 227-2049. tff 71/n'
Surfside Serenity Group, 1st United
Methodist Church. 22nd SL. Mexico x
Beachl-'Monda 7:30: Fnday 7:30.
All times central. 647-8054.
r - - -

l St. Joe Rent-All, Inc. ,
I Small Engine Repairs I
' Factory Warranty Center


" Lawnmowers
e Weedeaters
* Tillers
* Chain Saws
* Generators
* Pumps


I 706 1st St. St Joe
I 227-2112 I
L---- ---- ------ .J


Port St. Joe Lodge No. 11
-Reg. Stated Communication
1st and 3rd Thursday of each
month, 8:00 p.m., Masonic Hall,
214 Reid Ave.
Marlen Taylor, W.M.
Bill Jordon, Sec.
pd. thru 95


904-229-8161
Faye's Nail & .
Tanning Salon
TOTAL NAIL CARE
Certified Nail Technician
1905 Long Ave., Port St. Joe
Wolff Tanning System Call for Appt.

C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box A1C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018

STRICKLAND ELECTRIC
All Type Electrical Work
24 Hr. Service
LtC. iER0013168 -INSURED
647-8081
ALAN STRICKLAND


FOSTER TREE &

LAWN SERVICE
No Job Too Big .
S. .. Or Too Small
Jerry Foster FREE ESTIMATES *
Licensed & Insured 904/639-5368
Sfc 6/1


CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION
and BLOCK WORK,
CLAYTON Sidewalks Patios Driveways
'C I. NRET House Foundations
CONCRETE Concrete Pumping Services
Commercial Residential
Glen Clayton
904/653-9243 t7/6


For appointment call RICH at 648-4348

MIRROR IMAGE

S AUTO DETAIL



Harmon's Heavy Equipment co.
Specializing in Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS *.BACKHOES LOADERS TRACTORS *. DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 OR 648-5767 if no answer

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 904/229-6821


Got A Car to Sell?
Use the Classifieds


JUDY TAUNTON HARRELSON
S: ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
GENERAL PRACTICE ,
639-5566
538 N. Highway 71 *Wewahitchka
12tc 7/20

MOWING RAKING WEEDING
EDGING TRIMMING
S LANDSCAPING LICENSED
C.J.S Lawn
Service
Serving Mexico Beach, St. Joe
Beach & Port St. Joe'
S 1 Will Work for YOU!"
Mexico Beach, FL
(904) 648-8492


BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair
Rebuild Wrecks
SBody & Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body Work
Call or See BOB HEACOCK
Baltzell Ave. e Phone 227-7229
tfc4/6

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Perms

Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.



AVon

Catherine L. Collier
Indenpendent Sales Representative
211 Alien Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460

5x10 10x10 10x20
On Slte Rentals ,6 Days A Week
ASK ABOUT FREE MONTH'S RENT
St. Joe Rent-All
First St. 227-2112


St. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Port St. Joe 227-2112


Wewa Serenity Group, Presbyterian
Church, Hwy. 71, Al Anon meets
Monday at 7:00. AA meets Monday
and Thursday at 7:00.

STUMP GRINDING
Average Stump $10.00
1-800-628-8733
A-1 Tree Servic.e & Stump Grinding
Vickery Enterprises, Inc.
tfc 4/6

STUTZMAN ROOFING
RC 003'. 36
Specializing in Reroofs *
Single-ply & Repairs
"Where quality. is higher than price"
229-8631
tfc7/6









TLC LAWN SERVICE,
"Catering to All Your Lawn Service Needs"
MOWING, EDGING, TRIMMING, SPRAYING,
FERTILIZING, WEEDING, CLEAN OUTS,
SPRINKLER REPAIR, AND LANDSCAPING '
Free Estimates
Call229-6435 tf04/6

THE FASHION EXCHANGE
220 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe
227-3183
New & Used Clothing
for the Entire Family.
Accessories and Misc. Items. 4/6


COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
224 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581


A GIFT SHOP for
CHILDREN OF ALL AGES
Books *Toys Etc.
My Very OWn Book
528 6th St. Phone 227-1636



BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

Lawnmowers
Weedeaters
Chain Saws
Generators
S Pumps
Tillers
*" o Go-Karts

229-2727
328 Reid Ave.


Piano Lessons, all ages/levels. Ex-
perienced teacher, .$40/month. Mexi-
co Beach, 648-4592. tfc 7/6
Troy/built, Snapper, John Deere, Ku-,
bota, Stihl, Hsquarvna. Sales and
Service. 1-800-834-6744.
thLu 9/95
JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER .
1-904-265-4794
29 Years Experience '
WORKER'S COMPENSATION
PERSONAL INJURY
NO RECOVERY...NO FEE
7229 Deerhaven Road, P.C.,-4/ -6


SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR!


Summer Specials
FOUR
.. SEASONS
PAINTING
'-- : Free Estimates
Pressure Washing Painting
Re-Screening Repair Work
Call 648-5029
tfc 7/6


CUSTOM FISHING RODS

'EXPERT ROD REPAIR
Assorted Tackle
,-.. All Work Guaranteed
229-1063 Walt 102 Second Ave. Oak Grove


Business and Personal Payroll Preparation
Financial and Estate Planning Bookkeeping Service


FRANK J. SEIFERT
Accounting and Income Tax Service
Telephone 410 Long Ave.
Office (904) 229-9292.. P. 0. Box 602
Home (904) 227-3230 tfc 6/29 Port St. Joe, FL 32456



S_ GULF COAST

ZLjAWN SPRINKLERS
Nelson, Rainbird and Toro
INSTALLATION and REPAIR
Free 'Estimates and Design
Allen Norris 229-8786 Chuck Smith 229-8536



Williamson's
Well Drilling & Pump Service
St. Lie. #3075
WATER FILTERS
CONDITIONERS
PURIFICATION SYSTEM

Croska Williamson P. 0. Box 1173
'639-2548 tc 1/19 Wewahitchka, FL 32465





'(Pet &^ 7Property Ten~ders

Let us do the. caring while you're away
CARE IN YOUR HOME, SERVICE LOW AS $8.00 A DAY.
by Joe and Marie Romanelli
Serving Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas (904) 229-1065












Tr. SrTAR PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1995


Sunshine-Jr. Food Wewahitchka, Florida E AS


Looking for several full and part time associates, committed
to learning and developing its expanding deli and store oper-
ations. We offer exciting new opportunities with above av-
erage salary and room for advancement. If you have the
ambition and would like to be a part of our fast pace growing
operation apply at:
Sunshine-Jr. Food Store #19, Hwy. 71 & Hwy. 22 (at the
light) Wewahitchka, Florida
An Equal Opportunity Employer thru July, 95


Gulf County Association for Retarded
Citizens is accepting application for
the position of part time TRANSPOR-
TATION DRIVER. This position re-
quires a High School Education, abili-
ty to obtain and maintain a C'lass D
license and clean driving record. Addi-
tional information may be obtained
from the Association office at 200 Pe-
ters Street, Port St. Joe, or call 229-
6327. Closing date July 27, 1995.
7/20
The Gulf County Clerk's Office will be
accepting applications for the position
of Deputy Clerk in the Court system
until 5:00 p.m., EDT, on July 21,
1995; Minimum qualifications include
a high school diploma, good oral and
written communication skills, ability
to work with the public, experience
with data entry and experience with
office equipment. All applicants will
be tested. Applications may be picked
up and returned to the Gulf County
Clerk's Office at 1000 Fifth Street,
Port St. Joe, Florida. The Gulf County
Clerk's Office is an equal, opportunity
employer. 2tc 7/13

DELIVERY DRIVER, local light deliv-
ery. Earn $300 up per week. Need ec-
onomical vehicle,: 18 or older. Call
227-7170. 2tp7/13
Bartender needed at Marie's Comer
Bar, comer Hwy. 71 & 386. Apply in
person, tfc 7/6






Rattan couch and, end table, used
bedroom suite, twin, size mattress,
229-6291. Itc7/20
25" console TV $150, commercial
deep fryer, 11 ov., $300. Refrigerator,
17 cu. ft. $125. Nesco roaster $35,
salad shooter $20; toaster oven $10.
Call 648-4592. Itp 7/20
19' almond colored Kenmore refrigera-
itdr. fr6tV free, excellent condition,
.$150. all -after July 21, 229-1000.
Itc 7/20

Twin size bed, complete with new
mattresses, black headboard & foot-
board, still in box, $75. 227-3412 af-
ter 5 p.m.
Couch and loveseat, $85. Call 229-
6343 after 6 p.m.
GE washer and Whirlpool dryer, like
new, less than 1 year old, $250 for
obth. 647-3366. 2te 7/20
23' Holiday travel trailer. excel. condl-
tion, air cond., awning. Call early)
morning or late evening, 639-2738.
ltc 7/20

Hoover Spirit vacuum cleaner $50;
Smith-Corona elec.' typewriter with
cas $25; Soundesikgn am/fm stereo
w/record player $50. 647-8822 after
6:00 p.m. Itp 7/20
Two room office trailer with 1/2 bath,
excellent, for camping. Generator,
pump jack, sander, hammer drill.
227-3463. ltc7/20
Beautiful cherry finished roll-top desk
w/matching swivel/roller chair. Sold
for $650. Asking $400. One set of
wooden bookcase bunkbeds, $100.
Call 827-2916 5 pm 9 pm. 2tc 7/13

Oak entertainment center, 4'wide x 4'
high, $85; 4 tires 235 75R15, $60.
639-2268. ,3tc 7/6

Don't throw your books away. Bring
them to Variety Nook in Wewa and
trade them in. We trade two for one
equal price. Large variety to choose
from. Thurs., Fri., and Sat., 9 a.m. to
6 p.m. CT. tfc 7/6
Craftsman tools and Die Hard bat-
teries are available now at Western
, Auto Store, 219 Reid Ave. 227-1105.
tfc 7/6

Western Auto Special. Computer spin
balance 4 tires and tire rotation.
$19.95. 227-1105. tfc 7/6

Mushroom Compost, $15 yard, any-
time, 648,-5165. tfc 7/6
Port St. Joe Western Auto now hon-
Auto company store advertised sale
prices. 227-1105. 219 Reid Ave.
tfc 7/6

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 7/6









J^LJ^LJIJ


FREE kittens, call 648-5736. Cute
.and adorable. Itp 7/20

FREE to a good home, 2 male pup-
pies. Born March 29th. Mother is a
German Shepherd. 514 7th St., Port
St. Joe, 227-3409. .tp
"Once A Month" flea program need
help? Ask B & B Feed & Seed 639-
5488 about the HAPPY JACK 3-X
FLEA COLLAR. Kills both male & fe-
male adult fleas. Available O-T-C.
5tc 6/22

DOG GROOMING PLUS offers dip-
ping and bathing for your dog. We
also carry collars & leads. Boarding
available. Call 227-3611. tfc 7/6
Hate to Board Your Best Friend. Care
in your home low as $8.00 a day by
Joe and Marie Romanelli. Call Pet &
Property Tenders, fully Insured, 1-
904-229-1065. tfc 7/6






14x70' single wide mobile home, cen.
h&a, dishwasher, on 75'x150' lot at
229 Selma St., St. Joe Beach. Call
647-3611, leave message. 2tc 7/20
Very nice set up 46'xl,4' trailer, on 1.3
acres in White City. Back deck.
$22,000. Call 827-2937, 5 p.m. 9
p.m. 4tp 7/20
1986 14x60' 2 bedroom, 2 ba. mobile
home qn corner lot, garage, 36x24
deck, fenced back, pump/sprinkler
sys., al appliances plus w&d. New
ac/heat, carpet, vinyl, paint & dish-
washer. 3 blocks off St. Joe Beach.
$43,500 negotiable. Must sell. 647-
5087. 2tc 7/13
Two high and dry lots, 150'x150' to-
tal, front and back access, Barbara
Dr., Ward Ridge. 229-8525. 4tp 7/13
Bright and pretty with fresh paint &
new flower boxes, 'this 3 bdrm. 2 ba.
stucco over block home Is situated on
2 lots on the comer of Ponce de Leon
and Gerogia Ave. Back yard is en-
closed in chain link fence and has a
patio, fruit trees, and plenty of room
to play or perhaps grow some veggies.
$65,500. Contact owner at 647-8003
for more information. Itc 7/20
3 bdrm., 1 ba. corner lot, good rental
property. 2360 Hayes Ave., Highland
View. 227-2049. tfo 7/6
For Sale by Owner: 3 bdrm., 1 ba.
block house w/fireplace, Ig. LR, DR,
and kitchen, car-porch, chain link
fence on 140'x130' lot, city water &
sewer, close to schools, small block
house for washer. & dryer, outside
storage shed or shop. Can be seen at
124 2nd Ave., Oak Grove, 229-6163
or 912-524-2871, Harvie or Agnes
Kennedy. tfc 7/6
House in Blountstown, Live Oak
Hgts., 3 bdrm.,/2 ba., cen. h/ac, fire-
place, 2 car garage, paved drive. (904)
482-4931. 6tp6/15

4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 2 car garage
home on 5 acres in White City, 1/4
acre fish pond, gunite swimming pool,
2,200 sq. ft. $90,000. 827-8922.
tfc 7/6

3 or 4 bdrm., 2 ba. home on 1/3 acre
lot in nice neighborhood. Stucco over
block' with wood frame additions. Ap-
prox. 1800 sq. ft. under roof. Recently
remodeled kitchen w/gas range, d.w.
& disposal. Lg. master bedroom w/1
walk-in closet and Ig. master bath.
20'x20' den with gas fireplace. 12'x20'
deck. Gas central heat & air. New gas
water heater. 8'x12' outside storage
shed. Only $67,500. 229-8498.
tfc 7/6

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with
double carport & utility bldg. on 2
large lots, all windows are new and
have vertical blinds, new carpet,
ch&a, 1/2 block off Hwy. 98. Can be
seen at 305 Parker Ave., Highland
View. Call 227-1311 or 227-3492.
tfc 7/6

"Handyman Special", 3 bdrm., 2
bath shell house, beautiful 1/2 acre.
C-30 south Cape San Bias area. Rea-
sonably priced. Financing available.
227-7506. tfc 7/6
Business for Sale: Phantry Building
and extra lot. Income producing.
Three business units downstairs and
a manager's apartment, Four hotel
rooms w/full baths upstairs. 24 cli-
mate-controlled mini-storage units
upstairs and down. Best location in
town for detail outlets. Call 1-800-
800-9894. tfc 7/6

Half acre lots for sale, Hwy. 386,
Overstreet, Creekview Subd., $500
down. $96.48 per month, 120
months. Call and leave message. 229-
6031 tfc 7/6

1/2 acre lot with septic tank, $9,500.
Overstreet Road. Owner financing,
227-2020, ask for Billy. tfc 7/6

LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery Road.
1 mile off Overstlreet Road. 9 miles
south of Wewa. Owner financing. Call
229-6961. tifc 7/6


ACREAGE for sale: 78 acres
on County Rd 386 near We-
wahitchka. Has good stand of
timber. Call or write for price
and details..
PARKER REALTY OF MEXI-
CO BEACH, P. 0. Box 123,
Mexico Beach, FL 32410.
904-648-5777 or
800-874-5073.
Itc 7/20






Want to Buy: Indian Pass house. or
land to build on. Call Susie 404-303-
7450. 6tc 7/20

FIGS, want to buy. Will buy and
pick. Call 647-3505. ltp 7/20

Need shaded, residential lot to rent or
lease near the bay. For travel trailer
on property. Call 404-948-2916.
4tc 7/13

I *v


IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY
IN RE: The Marriage of,
MICHAEL B. JOHNSON.
Husband/PetitIoner,
and
KANDI JOHNSON,
Wife/Respondent. CASE O. 95-135

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: KANDI JOHNSON
20240 Souder Street
Terris, California 92750
YOU ARE.HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
for dissolution'of marriage has been filed against
you and you are requli-ed to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to this action on DAVID C.
GASKIN, ESQ.. Petitioner's attorney, whose ad-
dress is Post Office Box 185, Wewahitchka, Florida
32465, on or before the 11th day of August, 1995.
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on plaintiffs attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter, otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in ,the
petition. .
WITNESS my'hand and the seal of this court.
on July 7, 1995.
-BENNY C. LISTER. Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ C. Bridges, Deputy Clerk


4tc, July 13. 20 & 27 and August 3, 1995.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON
ABANDONMENT OF ROAD
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of
County Commissioners of Gulf County, Florida, at
its regular meeting August 8, 1995, at 6 p.m., will
consider abandoning the interest of the county
and the public in and to the following described
land In Gulf County, Florida, acquired for road
purposes:
The alley located in. Block 10 of Yon's Addi-
tion to Beacon Hill
and


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9495-40
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County. Florida, will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation Interested in sell-'
Ing the County the following described personal
property:
I One ton Panel Van (1994 or 1995 Model)
2 Seats In front only
Gasoline V-8 Engine
Automatic with Overdrive
Engine Oil Cooler
Transmission Oil Cooler
Air Conditioning
Power Steering -
Power Brakes
AM/FM Stereo
Any Color (White, if available)
Delivery Date must be specified. Liquidated dam-
ages for failure to deliver unit on specified date will
be set at $25.00 per day. Please indicate on enve-
lope that this is a Sealed Bid, the Bid Number, and
what the bid is for. Bids will be received until
5:00, P.M., Eastern Time. August 8, 1995, at the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court. Gulf
County Courthouse, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Michael L. Hamnmond, Chairman
Publish July 20 & 27, 1995

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9495-41
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf,
County. Florida. will-receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested In sell-
ing the County the following described personal
property: -
p 3 1 (One) Ton, 15 Passenger Vans
2 Wheel Drive
GasolineV8
Automatic w/Overdrive
A/C.,P/S, P/B
AM/FM Radio-
Delivery Date: ASAP
For any additional. information call 229-8944,
Delivery date must be specified. Liquidated
damages for failure to deliver unit on specified
date will be set at $25.00 per day. Please Indicate
on envelope that this is a Sealed Bid, the Bid Num-
hber, and what the bid is for. Bids will be received
until 5:00, P.M., Eastern Time. August 8. 1995, at
the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf


caye. Plantation


"GULF COUNTY's FINEST
GOLF COMMUNITY"

Located adjacent to the St. Joseph Bay Country Club. Pri-
vate road with underground utilities.
Golf Course Lots ........................$32,000
Golf View Lots ................... $20,000
Interior Lots .............................. $16,900
Contact: Leonard Costin, Developer
P. O. Box 955
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
647-8317 or (904) 877-7189
3tc7/6



Fantasy Properties, Inc.
1200 U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478
4'REALTO
NEW LISTINGS:

Water Front! Gulf Aire Townhome Beauti-
ful 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath partially furnished.
Recently redone with gorgeous new wallpa-
per, carpeting, and vinyl downstairs. Pool and
tennis, court privileges. $135,000

Sales Rentals Vacation Rental Specialists

JOHN M. DELORME, Realtor ,ELLEN F. ALLEMORE, Realtor




LOTS
Bay Front Lot #31 In Paradise Bay 100 x 240' more or less
with Pedestrian Easement to Gulf Front. $65,000.
Gulf Front Lot #9 In Paradise Gulf 66.9' x 446' with Pedestrian
Easement to'Bay Front. Positioned on high bluff. $105,000.
Gulf Side Lot #16 In Paradise Gulf 83' x 190' with Pedestrian
Easement to Gulf and Bay Front. $35,000.
Gulf Side Lot #17 On Road Front In Paradise Gulf 95' x 166'
with Pedestrian Easement to Gulf and Bay Front. $19,500.


Gulfar$i OF BAY
CO.
Sc c (904) 648-5716
I 820 Hwy. 98 Mexico Beach
1-800-872-2782
IKE DUREN, Broker

JANICE BROWNELL, Salesperson ELLEN MEGILL, Salesperson
Res. 648-8761 Res. 648-8873
ELSE WHITFIELD, Salesperson
Res. 647-3392


County Courthouse. 1000 Filth Street. Port St.
Joe. Florida 32456. The Board reserves the right
to reject any mnid all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
By: /s/ Michael L. Hamiinond. Chairman
Publish JIulv 20 & 27. 1995




; 7- 3 0 i -W


Sandwich Sale
The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens will be having a submarine
sale, on July 21 from 11:00 a.m.
until 1:00 p.m.. This will include
and 8 inch sub sandwich with
meat and cheeses plus iced tea
and chips for $3.00. We will deliv-
er to local businesses. Call 639-
9910 to place your order. Pro-
ceeds are for meals. This sale will
be at the Wewahitchka Senior
Citizens Center.


The alley located In Block 9 of Yon's Addition to
Beacon Hill
Notice of adoption of the resolution aban-
doning the said road right of way will be published
one time in a newspaper of general circulation in
Gulf County, Florida, and the proof of publication
of the notice of hearing, the resolution as adopted,
and the proof of publication of adoption of such
resolution will be recorded in the Public Records of
Gulf County, Florida.
Adopted in open session this 23rd day of
May, 1995.
THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
BY: BENNY LISTER. CLERK
Publish date: July 20, 1995.

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf
County Board of County Commissioners will hold
public hearings to consider adopting an ordinance
with the following title:
AN ORDINANCE PROHIBITING COM-
MERCIAL, FOR PROFIT VENDING
AND PEDDLING, ON THE COUNTY
RIGHT OF WAYS IN GULF COUNTY
AND PROVIDING A PENALTY.
The first public hearing will be held at 6:05
p.m., E.D.T. on August 8, 1995, in the County
Commissioners' Meeting Room at the Gulf County
Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida. The second
and final public hearing will be held on August 22,
1995 at 6:00 p.m., E.D.T., in the County Commis-
sioners' Meeting Room.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
/s/ Michael L. Hammond
Chairman
Attest* /s/ Benny C. Lister
: Clerk
"Publish: 7/20 & 7/27, 1995

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Gulf ,County Association for Retarded
Citizens will receive sealed bids for the sale of a
1978 AMC Concord Sedan automobile. The vehi-
cle may be seen at the Association offices at 200
Peters Street-between 9'AM and 3 PM each week-
day. Bids may be mailed to the Association at P.O.
Box 296 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or delivered to 200
Peters St, Port St. Joe. Bids must be received be-
fore noon on Thursday July 27, 1995.
Publish: July 20, 1995


Tom Todd


CAPE SAN BLAS
INDIAN PASS
".4 /~' BE CHri r'i


rnid


Realt, I. ST. JOE BEACH
__ __ 'PORT ST. JOE
PORT, ST. JOE 1618 MARVIN.. Large 4 BR 2 BA home ,on double lot. Has
over 2100 sq. ft. living area. 18x24 family room. Double detached garage.
Jacuzzi. Chain link'fence. Large trees. Priced at $105,000."
CAPE PLANTATION AIRPARK, Beautiful 3/2 custom home. Only 1.5 years
young. Approx. 1400 sq. ft. Enclosed dbl. garage. 1/5 acre lot that is
professionally landscaped. Many features. $111,000.
PLANTATION AIRPARK, Pilots alert! 3 BR/2.5 BA home in nice
neighborhood, near the airstrip (4,000' grass). Only ininutes from Port St. Joe.
Enclosed garage, approx. 1800+ square feet. Large lot. Priced at $115,000:
GULF VIEW AT GULF PINES. Large lovely home w/good view of and
deeded access to, the Gulf. 4 BR/4 BA, 2,000 square feet, open and screened
decks, fireplace, heat recovery system, satellite TV, 2 car enclosed garage and
concrete parking. price. $169,000.
GULF FRONT: INDIAN PASS 75' x 500'. Excellent location on the beach.
Fantastic view of gulf. Priced at only $82,500.
BAY FRONT at CAPE SAN BLAS. Two beautiful wooded bay front lots.
75'x300'. Loads of trees. Secluded. Excellent view of the bay. Priced at $75,000
each. I ,
GULF FRONT CAPE SAN BLAS, 3/2.5 townhouse. In excellent condition.
Beautifully furnished. Great' view of gulf and beach. open and screened decks.
Great investor home. Excellent rental potential. Priced at $99,900.
BAY VIEW W/DIRECT ACCESS VIA DOCK, CAPE SAN BLAS. Great
view of the bay from this 2BR/2BA single family home. Master suite upstairs
w/private access from deck. Two storage areas on ground level, concrete
parking: REDUCED!! Now $94,000.
GULF FRONT CAPE SAN BLAS, CAPE SANDS LANDING PHASE II,
Two 2/2 condos available. Excellent gulf view. Easy access to beach. Great
rental potential. Priced at $65,000 (lower unit) and $69,900 (upper unit).
Includes existing furniture.
BAYSIDE CAPE SAN BLAS, PENINSULA ESTATES, 3 BR/2 BA Deeded
access to the gulf and bay. Almost New! In excellent condition. Located about
1/4 mile from the entrance to the state park. Concrete parking. Two decks. Priced
at $89,000.
COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL, Spacious (1800 sq. ft.) dbl. wide modular
bldg. 'on 1.25 acres. Was Convenience/ice cream storage/game room. Located
next to State Park entrance. 100' highway frontage. HIGH TRAFFIC AREA! 0
Owner financing possible. Price $120,000.
GULF VIEW THE BOARDWALK at CAPE SAN BLAS. 3&BR/2BA Great
room includes living area, dining area and kitchen. Cathedral ceiling and FP.
Furnished. Great rental potential. Boardwalk to pool and beach. Concrete
parking. $145,000.'
GULF ACCESS CAPE SAN BLAS -.THE BOARDWALK, 2 BR/2BA.
Deeded access to the gulf and association POOL. Completely furnished! Has
great rental potential for investor. View of gulf *& bay from upper deck. price
$129,000.
GULF ACCESS at CAPE SAN BLAS, CAPE DUNES. Lovely 2 BR/2BA
home located just west of Hwy. C-30 on Cape San Bias Road. Being sold fully
furnished. Has over 1400 sq. ft. of living area. Deeded access to the gulf. price
$89,000.
GULF VIEW CAPE SAN BLAS THE BOARDWALK. 3 BR/2BA home
in lovely single family development. Amenities include FP, cathedral ceiling in
LR, private master bedroom upstairs, association pool, and boardwalk to beach.
$160,0000.
GULF VIEW CAPE SAN BLAS THE BOARDWALK. Lovely 2 BR/2BA
home Amenities include new berber carpet,-FP, deck, heat recovery system,
cath. ceiling in greatroom and more. Access to pool, spa, and boardwalk to
beach. $169,900.
GULF FRONT CAPE SAN BLAS, THE BOARDWALK. This 2BR/2BA
home is located next to the boardwalk and across from the pool & spa. Is being
sold furnished. Nice view of the beach and pool area. Great rental potential for
investor. Price $169,900.


Tom Todd Realty, Inc.
HC 1 Box 150, Port St. Joe, FL 32456
800-876-2611 or 904-227-1501
Marie M. Todd, Rental Mgr. Brenda J. Lynn, Associate
Craig Todd, Associate Thomas M. Todd, Broker
Nancy Todd, Associate


PArIIT REl I


Advertising Pays-Call 227-1278 or 229-8997
to Place Your Classified Ad Today!



.---'?, Best Looking Land

On Route 71


HAN{NON (2) 5.77 acre parcels

REALTY INC. AT THIS PRICE
PORT ST. JOE $ 15,000

227-1450


Just Discovered .
Gulf County "Country" ,.
1800 s.f. Rancher. *
Like New! Perfect Lot! .
Close to Fishing
Motivated Sellers

$79,900



A& Port St. Joe
iI.
i 75x175 lot

~ ^Mature Trees

j .'Marvin Ave!

,$12,000
Frank Hannon, Sandy Smock,
Tom Mays



E RESALES


BEACH

RENTALS