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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03107
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 22, 1995
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03107

Full Text








A rCN P) ESS 1iN DEER~
i5~HW~f 4l 3


L USPS 518-880

FIFTY-SEVENTH YEAR, NUMBER 45


-HE


STAR


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995


City Has


Drinking


Problem

Imbibing In City
Parks Is Unlawful
Port St. Joe's City Commis-
sion swore in Mayor Frank Pate,
Commissioner Edwin Williams
and Charles Tharpe and Acting
City Clerk Pauline Pendarvis to
kick-off their regularly scheduled
meeting Tuesday evening.
Mayor Pate began his 29th
year in office as he began his 15th
term of service on the City Board.
In a short "State of the City"
address he told those present of
his list of hopes and goals for
accomplishment by the city in the
next two years. The list included a
push for new industry in the area,
a possibility of the construction of
a city marina, as well as several
other items of need for the city.
"My Interest has always been
in the community and its people,"
Pate said, pledging to continue
serving the taxpayers.
Commissioner Edwin Wil-
liams is beginning his eighth year
on the Board while Commissioner
Charles Tharpe enters his sixth
year of service.
Pauline Pendarvis was sworn
in as Acting City Clerk following
the resignation of former clerk
Jim Maloy. Ms. Pendarvis has
been employed by the city for 13
years.-spending the past three
years as the Administrative
Assistant.
ALCOHOL ORDINANCE
The Board decided to take a
look at "beefing-up" the city's
alcoholic beverage ordinance in
an effort to stop the drinking and
littering of beverage containers on
city property..
Mayor Pate brought the issue
to the surface when he asked
S Police Chief Bucky Richter to
patrol the city's parks more fre-


High Court

To Decide

On Net Size
Both the plaintiff and the
defendant in the case to de-
cide net size for the commer-
cial taking of shrimp .have
agreed that the Florida Su-
preme Court should settle the
question of wkho's right and
who's wrong.
The decision was made
late last week to by-pass the
District Appeals Court, send-
ing. the decision of Circuit
Judge Kevin Daley directly to
the Florida Supreme Court
for a final decision which
would be in effect state-wide.
Judge Davey ruled last
month that a net manufac-
tured by Buford Golden, a
Franklin County net maker,
met the criteria set out by the
net ban scheduled to go into
effect next month. Judge Dal-
ey ruled in favor of Bruce Mil-
lender, Timmy McLain and
Ronald Fred Crum of Frank-
lin County and Panacea, and
Port St. Joe attorney J. Pat-
rick Floyd, with the Marine
Fisheries Commission and
the Florida Conservation As-
sociation, a recreational fish-
ing group, opposing the deci-
sion.
Shrimp fishermen say
they can catch shrimp with
their proposed net and make
it economically feasible to do
so.
The MFC and the sports
fishermen contend the pro-,
posed net exceeds 500 square
-feet. Floyd and the group he
represents were successful in
convincing Judge Davey last
month, that their net meas-
ured only 478 square feet
and thus met the guidelines
set out in the Constitutional
Amendment.
Attorneys representing
the state Attorney General's
office predict the Supreme
Court will not hear argu-
ments in the case for at least
another six months.
In the meantime, the
Governor and Cabinet will
rule on extension of an emer-
gency rule to allow Judge Da-
vey's decision to be in effect
until that date.


Attorney W. J. Rish administers the oath Tuesday night, as they officially begin a new
of office to Mayor Frank Pate, and Commis- two year term in office. All three were re-
sioners Edwin Williams and Charles Tharpe elected in May.


quently, possibly even using
undercover officers. Pate said he
has noticed a large amount of
beer bottles and other litter
residue scattered throughout the
city's parks, speculating that the
city's no-drinking ordinance was
being broken.
Richter told the Board he
would do what he could, noting
that it was difficult to enforce the
city's ordinance since officers had
to physically see someone drink-
ing in order to enforce the ordi-
nance.
This prompted the Board to
consider amending the ordi-
nance's wording to include "open
containers", rather than Just
drinking, on city property .and
right-of-ways. Richter sad, .that
abusers bfthe rdtnacm 'are'tur
rently playing a cat-and-mouse
game with officers attempting to
enforce the ordinance.
"When they see us they don't-
drink even though they might
have the container open in their,
hand. They wait until we lave or
are not looking." he said pointing
out, "if we don't see them drink-
Ing, we can't do anything."
The Board decided to post "No
Alcoholic Beverages Allowed"
sighs in the problem areas and to
look into changing the ordinance
wording to include "Open
Containers".
Gulf Coast Community College
Grant Support
:The Board unanimously
approved a resolution supporting
efforts by 'Gulf County Commis-
slon to secure an Economic
Development Grant in the
amount of $609,000 earmarked
See DRINKING on page 5


City Attorney William J. Rish gives Pauline Pendarvis
the oath of office Tuesday night, as she was Installed as act-
ing city clerk for the City of Port St. Joe.


Fireworks, Celebration, On Tap.

For July 4 Holiday Observance..


Port St. Joe merchants will
participate with Florida's Sesqui-
centennial celebration this year
with a July 4 observance to be
held in Frank Pate Park on Fifth
Street
The celebration, as it is lined
up at the present time, will fea-
ture some activity for all ages.
Activities are tentatively
planned to begin at 5:00 p.m. and


continue until dark when a huge
city sponsored fireworks display
will be set off along the shore of
: St. Joseph's Bay.
The evening of activity is ex-
pected to feature food booths,
games, entertainment, recogni-,
Slion of veterans and contests.
SFun and fellowship for the entire
family has been promised by Ton-
ya Nixon, chairperson of the July
4 city-wide party.


"Zack" Was Make Believe


"Hurricane Zack", a mythical
class 'four storm which was de-
signed to strike all of Florida, was
brought out of the east. Monday
to allow emergency systems in
Gulf County and throughout Flor-
ida to participate in a state-wide
preparedness drill.
Early Monday morning, Gulf
County's Emergency Management
system and the volunteer workers
from several agencies, got togeth-
er to greet the imaginary storm
with some realistic plans and ac-
tions.
"This is the secret to minimiz-
ing destruction and damage from
any storm; know what you are go-
ing to do and write it down on
paper so everyone will be going in
the same direction," Larry Wells.
Gulf County's Emergency Man-
agement director, told The Star.
STATE FUNDED EXERCISE
Funded by a grant from' the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency, the four-day exercise In-
volved federal, state, and county
officials. In Gulf County it also in-
volved the prison system, health
care agencies, nursing home,
hospital, EMS, fire departments
and law enforcement agencies.
"Everyone sat down together
and put down on paper what
each agency was charged with do-
ing and how they were going to go
about getting protection and res-
cue accomplished for a storm of
this magnitude," Wells said.
The emergency exercise last-
ed three days throughout the


state and four days In Gulf
County, according to Wells. 'We
started with, the rest of the state'
on Monday, *but our' plans. for.
preparation and the rehearsal of
those plans will continue through
Thursday, here," Wells said.
Hurricane Allison's appear-.
ance on the scene early this
month, was a mild hurricane
which allowed the system to go
into action and test their theories
after being alerted a month ago
that this exercise was pending for
state-wide alert,


a video showing damage from a
category four storm and the kinds
of damage local emergency people
. could expect from it and the pre-
, cautions they should take to pro-
tect citizens from injury. Instruc-
tions were given and carried: out
throughout the week for evacuat-
ing those who might-be vulnera-
ble to-storm injury, such as hos-
pital patients, elderly residents of
the nursing homes, home-bound
patients and what facilities could
* be counted on to protect people


r


.... .This Time!


and property and tend the in-
jured.
SIMULATED STORM PATH
The simulated storm's path
was steered across the entire
state of Florida in order to give
the entire state a look at what
they needed to do.
The storm, "Hurricane Zack,"
was designed to cross the penin-
sula of Florida, with its center
near the Cape Canaveral area,
leave the peninsula at Levy
County, then it would veer slight-


ly.north, hitting the Panhandle at
Franklin and Gulf Counties, and
run parallel to the coastline to
the Pensacola area. Such a storm
could affect 1.5 million people
and cause $1.4 billion in damag-
es.
"After this week of practice,
we feel Gulf County and its emer-
gency services are better pre-
pared to meet such a storm. We
had rather not try out our abili-
ties with the real thing; however,"
Wells said,


...-


Emergency Services Direc-
tor Larry Wells presides over
hurricane preparedness class.


Operators of emergency services in Gulf during a hurricane or other emergencies.
County gathered Monday morning for an in- The four-day activity is held each year at
doctrination into safe practices to follow the beginning of the hurricane season.


* .. I


State Takes



Steps to Stop



Leaks In Law

Assaults on Net Ban Rules Picking
Up Steam As Franklin Files Intent

The State of Florida is beginning to try to mend holes being
punched in Its net ban law this week as they go to court with the
question of whether or not Gulf County's actions last week could
hold water.
Gulf declared itself a government entity in the fishing busi-
ness to protect its sizable Investment in freezer facilities here in
Port St. Joe by applying for a state license utilizing net fisher-
men as their sub-contractors.
Local fishermen hailed the move as a glimmer of hope for re-
lief from their coming forced inactivity on July I when the net
ban Constitutional Amendment takes effect. Warren Yeager,
County Commissioner and also head of the Small County Coali-
tion, is the advocate of the new activity.
Franklin County took the same step to preserve its fishing
activity on Tuesday of this week with the Board voting unani-
mously to follow Gulf County's footsteps. Franklin is using the
fact that it has several installations financed by government
money involved in the fishing business. The Commission is also
intent on protecting the many seafood harvest related jobs which
have historically been the backbone of the County's economy.
Both Bay and Wakulla counties are also dickering with the
maverick proposal to circumvent the Constitutional Amendment
which passed by a huge majority of voters but only seven
counties in the entire state of Florida voted in favor of the
amendment.
State Gears Up For Fight
Florida's Attorney General's office this week began taking
steps to declare Gulf and Franklin's actions illegal as defined by
the Constitutional Amendment. Both counties are expected to
vigorously pursue their proposed direction as regard to net fish-
ing.
April Herrie. a spokeswoman for the Department of Environ-
mental Protection, said she didn't expect the resolutions to carry
'greatLweighLwiL ththe courts.-She predicted the courts would
rule against both Gulf and Franklin County.
Bob Jones, Executive Director of the Southeastern Fisheries,
Association, on the other hand, said. "I think they have a won-
derful idea in these counties and I support Gulfs leadership
along these lines." Jones continued by' adding that he believed
the idea was on solid ground and that the fishermen would pre-
vail.
Herrie countered Jones' statement Monday in Tallahassee by
saying, '"We do not believe it has any legal merit."
County Proceeding Despite State Move
Yeager said the County would not be deterred from seeking
its goal of relief despite the heavy artillery which is being massed
against It by the State of Florida.
With Gulfs perseverance and other counties and private in-
dividuals along the Gulf Coast getting into the fight as the July 1
deadline draws near, the matter of banning all net use in Florida
and'coastal waters is still a very much undecided fact.
The Florida Marine Patrol has said they will apply the law on
July 1 unless they receive other directions from the Department
of Environmental Protection.
It may be a last minute attempt at staving off eradication but
every indication is that at least Gulf and Franklin County fisher-
men are not going to give up their livelihood without a fight.

















THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995


After the "Wall"

,A VISIT BY BUSINESS people from the former Communist
dominated conglomeration of German states to Port St. Joe was
interesting and cordial. They seemed to enjoy their visit here and
toured the business and industrial neighborhoods with enthu-
siasm and gusto. They showed a genuine appreciation of what
they saw and were eager to improve business relations between
the United States and their own nation-recently steered toward
becoming a capitalist nation after being under the thumb of
Communist Russia since. the "Big War".
We're all familiar with that night when television showed the
first hammer being taken to the Berlin wall with the intent to
knock it down and how that activity became the news of the
hour for a couple of days while the wall was being reduced to u
rubble by the people. One might think the decision of the Rus- newspa!
sians to demolish the wall and remove the symbolic division be- streanli
tween East and West was a great moment of celebration by the stick rig
people of East Germany, but if the truth was known, the act of a quick
tearing down was done mostly by the West Germans. the 'wa
There was a unified activity by citizens of both East and shocking
West Germany to some extent to get rid of the wall, but the im- flash ab
petus was to reunite families which had been divided for so long
by the Wall's presence.
THE VISITING TRADE GROUP told some of us in private
conversation that they had been told their entire lives that the
United States was the big devil of the universe and the Russians
were trying to protect the world, through Communism. We're
sorry that the limitations of communication were of such a na-
ture to make conversation difficult; we would like to know if they
believed what they had been taught for years.
At any rate, it was easy to see how the power of suggestion
can convince people of anything, if it is repeated often enough.
The Germans seemed to be picking themselves up by the
bootstraps and recovering from their enslavement, as any group
of people or a nation can do if they only have the ambition.


Nobody's Immune

SENIOR CITIZENS, AND AMERICANS .in general, seem to
be opposed to cuts in Medicare funds in order to help balance
the budget. Congressman Newt Gingrich has been. the target of
the Medicare cut dissenters who have not been kind to Mr. Gin-
grich. This is unfortunate. They picture him as some kind, of
ogre for even suggesting such a thing,
Didn't the Senior Citizens join in the clamor for a balanced
budget "regardless of what we have to do"? Every good American
saw the wisdom of bringing spending in line 'and if they were to
be brought in line it would take either a massive tax increase or
a massive spending cut. possibly some of both.,
CERTAINLY, IT WOULD take both if we were to -carry on as
a nation, doing business as usual. It's a cinch we cannot contin-
ue to spend billions more than we,:take in each and every year.
Admittedly we can spend more than we take in some years, but
. for more than a quarter of a century at a time is a bit much ...
even for the richest nation in the world.
Drastic conditions call for drastic corrective measures. There
is no question to the fact that the budgetary condition of the
United States can be termed a drastic condition. This condition
requires drastic measures. Drastic measures must involve all of
us. They call for sacrifice and effort by all of us. No one group
can stand exempt of duty and call for sacrifice on all others.
The poor of this nation have just as arguable a position as
the Senior Citizens, to argue against cuts being made in their
largesse.
SPEAKING AS A MEMBER OF the AARP who has paid his
dues, both to the organization and to the nation for many, years,:
we believe cuts can be made without a reduction in service. We
would not be ayerse to cuts being made because we believe the
service offered would be adjusted in price so it could continue. "
The price of medical care has risen in direct proportion to
the hike in Medicare funds. For instance, cosmetic surgery is
not covered by insurance or Medicare, if elective. Yet it is a
booming business and affordable.
Double charging, unnecessary testing, unnecessary repeat
visits to the doctor and realistic charges for services rendered
would be welcomed by all... including the taxpayer. 1
The American Medical Association said Medicare would be a
boondoggle bigger than all of us. It seems they were correct. Now
we must cooperate in stopping this run-away train as part of our
nation's returning to fiscal reality.,


Hunker Down with Kes


by Kesley' Colbert


And Now, All The News


understand that in the
per game today you must
ine, organize, condense,
ght to,"the story", come to
conclusion and get out of
y to make room for the
murder story or the
g and: late breaking news
tout the Hollywood starlet
<) < .


who thinks she's a unicorn or the
four column spread on the seem-
ingly mild mannered housewife
who snaps one day and kicks in
her husband's teeth and sets fire
to his John Deere hat while the
two children sleep in the upstairs
bedroom....
We don't have time for the or-
dinary in our world today. Shock
me, thrill me, surprise me, "top
the last one" or get, out of the
way. What a pityl We've squeezed
!the community section right out
of near 'bout all of today's politi-
cally correct newspapers.
There could be folks out there


today so uptown. slick and "mod-
ern" that they never sat on the
top step. leaned back against the
porch rail and opened up to the
"Banner" to the first page of the
second section for the "communi-
ty news."
When I was a kid I'd glance at
the picture -on the front page of
one of Mr. McCabb's prize bulls
winning another ribbon, I'd check
to see if it was going to be Tarzan
or Johnny Mack Brown Saturday
and then I'd ease over to page
five. It didn't take long, to get to
section two of the McKenzie Ban-.
ner in 1958. But when you got


there you had a choice of several
communities filing reports on the
past week's comings and goings.
Hico consisted of one store
land six houses. It was about five
miles out of town on the aptly
named Hico Road. Mrs. Beulah
Finnerty was the "foreign" corre-
spondent. She was also the moth-
er, grandmother or great-
grandmother to everyone in the
community. She and the late Mr.
Finnerty founded the store.
They'd been pumping gas and
shelling out moon pies since be-
fore the first war. We also had
news from Pillowville, Como and
Christmasville but I usually
turned to Miss Beulah first..
"Mrs. Estine Hardaway un-
derwent surgery on her. ears
Wednesday last in the Bellview
Hospital in Jackson. I under-
stand she is doing fine. Clyde is
with her. Also her sister, Mrs.
Murl Dowland of Casper. Wyo-
ming. Surely hope Mrs. Hardaway
gets along fine."
"Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
Crump who moved back from
Elkhart, Indiana to the old
Thrasher house on East Road,
south of town, are building an ad-
dition to the place, and it is going
to look pretty and more roomy.
We welcome Mr. and Mrs. Crump
back home."
"Mrs. Pearlie Wakefield en-
joyed the past weekend in Mem-
phis with her daughter and son-
in-law, the Phillips' of German-
town. and attended some plays
and movies. A good time was had
by all."
"Mr. Ernest Hankins is still in
the hospital and is not doing any
better. Maybe we will have better
news next week."
"The Methodist men who put
up the lovely tree for the Christ-
mas program are now hoping
-they can. get some help. to. get it
down and put away thJxaeauUful
:-decorations f(oahotheryear'. The
people wefe sor'try nice to offer
their time and help to get it up at
an early date, so it inght get be-
fore the people of the town. If you
can help, see Jesse Earl at the
store."
"Fern Bates of Louisville,
Kentucky has been here for two

weeks visiting her sister, Mrs.
Richard Ringgold. Their niece
from Humbolt spent last Friday
with them."
Now folks. I didn't know Fern
Bates from Adam's housecat. I
didn't know Clyde Hardaway, I
wasn't a Methodist, I'd never
heard of Elkhart, Indiana, wasn't
planning on going to Louisville
anytime soon anld I hadn't 'seen
Jesse Earl or beet to the store in
probably two years. But I read
every word: And found myself
wondering what was wrong with
Emest Hankins. Why didn't Miss
Beulah come right out and list
his ailment?
I asked Dad once how you get
to be a community news writer
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


I'mNotAs Much ofAFatherMI Once Was;ButStill Neglected


MY KIDS EVIDENTLY think
I am more of a father than I really
am. Father's Day has proven
that.
Sunday was Father's Day, if'
you didn't know it, and the most
inconsequential holiday of the
year just snuck in and snuck out
again without much notice at all.
Oh, a few of the major depart-
ment stores put on a Father's
Day sale, but most stores just ig-
nored it!
What do you suppose would
have happened if they had ig-
nored Mother's Day like that? I
didn't even see the first florist ad,
pushing flowers and boutonnieres
for poppa to wear with his Sun-
day best.
Most daddies like flowers too.
They just want a little different
configuration than the ladies do.
Don't send a man a bouquet, or a
dozen roses, or an arrangement
of flowers. But a boutonniere?
Most men like to wear a flower in
their lapel for Father's Day just


ETAOIN SHRDLU


By Wesley Ramsey


as mothers do on Mother's Day..

WHY IS DADDY largely ig-
nored ori his day? He was just as
important an actor in the perpet-
uation of the species as the moth-
er. Not many mothers could pro-
duce an heir if it were not for a
father or two lurking around
somewhere.
In every society except the
human society more specifi-
cally, the American human socie-
ty the father is highly respect-
ed, even revered! Lions are kept
around by the female pride for fa-
therhood purposes, long after he


has become useless for anything
else. Bulls are prized for their
prowess at producing offspring
while the brood cows are expend-
able.
Why not human daddies?
Many are hunted down like
dogs [the male species also which
is valued for. its mating, ability]f
because they left a female alone'
with her offspring to rear without
the support and comfor-t of a dad..
On the serious side, for a mo-i
ment; absentee daddies should;
be hunted down and made to'
meet their responsibilities. Those'
who won't,, don't deserve the title,


BUT, DEAR OLD dad, the
one who sticks with his mate and
helps care for his children should
get the same undivided attention
as dear old mnom did on her day.
But, do we? Get the attention
and adulation, I mean. Hardly
.Men, especially fathers, "don't
get no respect," to quote Rodney
Dangerfield's famous line. I can
testify to that fact from my own
experience.
My kids didn't give me a Car-
ibbean cruise for Father's Day.
Nor, did I receive an all expense
paid trip to Europe not even
to the mountains! I didn't receive
a bright red, spanking new Lin-
coln Town Car. I would have even.
settled for a Cadillac!
What did I get in place of
these obviously appropriate gifts
for Dear Ole Dad? I got two pair
of shorts, a belt which I could
hang myself with, a shirt and


some barbecued meat!
Now, here comes the part
about my kids thinking I'm more
of a dad than I am: the shorts
were too bigl
I. suppose they were telling
me they wanted to see more of my
beautifully proportioned legs, but
I am modest and don't want to
make other men jealous.
The shorts were too big! A
size 40 won't stay up. I'm nearly
30 pounds less of a father than I
was last Father's Day. Didn't they
notice? I know they thought I
would pass them on to them be-
cause they wouldn't fit me. Well, I
fooled them! I exchanged them for
smaller ones.
I GOT A CARD or two. Cards
were a big item around my house
on Father's Day. I appreciate
cards as much as the next fellow.
I even got a dinner out of the deal
with all of the foods I am not sup-
posed to eat, if I am to maintain
my new svelte physique. But, I


ate it anyhow in moderation,
of course.
But the real crusher on Fa-
ther's Day; the real activity which
.let me know that fathers were
pretty far.down on the pecking or-
der so far as paying tribute goes,
happened at church Sunday
morning of all places.
Our pastor, Curtis Clark, has
been throwing himself full scale-
all 6'8" of himself-into emphasiz-
ing the importance of home and
family for the past several weeks'.
He even had a week end seminar
-with an "expert" on family mat-
ters teaching-to emphasize the
importance of maintaining a
good, solid family. I distinctly re-
member the "expert" stressing the'
Importance of fathers.
Our church has a tradition of
making a big deal out of giving
each mother a carnation on
Mother's Day, but us fathers
didn't even get a sprig of dollar
weeds! I feel down-right neglect-
ed!


St. Joseph Bay
Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
June 23 8:30 a.m. H 1.5 7:07 p.m. L 0.0
/ June 24 9:02 a.m. H 1.6 7:39 p.m. L -0.1
1June 25 9:36 a.m. H 1.6 '8:13 p.m. L -0.1
June 26 9:11 a.m. H 1.7 8:47 p.m. L -0.1
June 27 10:46 a.m. H 1.7 9:19 p.m. L -0.1
-- June 28 11:20 am. H 1,7 9:50 p.m. L -0.1
S June29 11:52 a.m. H 1.6 10:16 p.m. L 0.0
'4 2


"O WIaP os-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
S, W IN/-VT//H, U S Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-410.60 Six Months
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Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue ut of State-$20.00 Year Out of State-$20 00 Six Months
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456-0308 Post Office Box 308 ut of tate-
by The Star Publishing Conpany Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St Joe, FL. Phone (904) 227-1278 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Wesley R. Ramsey ............Editor & Publishe their than amount received for such advertisement.
S P' WSN William H. Ramsey.............Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
Frenchie L. Ramsey Office Manaer AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Frenchie L. Ramsey........... Office Manage r WEEKLY PUBLISHING roughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
Shirley Ramsey ..............Typesetter


wwwwww" -- F-


1


a


- i' 1 I


I -


"father".


.... .........


.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. -- -- -- -








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995 PAGE 3A


Hot Air Balloonist Drops In To Visit Relatives


Sunday afternoon turned out
to be pretty exciting for Port St.
Joe residents, Gus and Linda
Griffin, when their nephew,
Thomas Wayne Atwell, stopped
by to visit them with his hot air
balloon in- tow. He was on his way
home to Houston, Texas from
Lawrenceville, Georgia where he
competed in the U. S. National
Team Championships, placing
16th in a field of over 30 teams.
He detoured through Port St. Joe


just so he could take them up-
but not away-in his colorful bal-
loon.
He set the balloon up in the
open area adjacent to the football
field. Just watching how he gets
the balloon in an upright position
Is very interesting. He tethered
the passenger basket to a couple
of trucks so he could go up and
come down in the same location.
Within minutes several spectators
converged on the area to watch-
and some even braved a short
trip up in the balloon, which is
78,000 cubic feet in size and
stands to a height equivalent to a
seven story building. It is fueled
by propane burners.
An altimeter, a rate-of-climb
meter, and an envelope tempera-
ture gauge are the only instru-
ments used in the balloon. Amaz-
ingly, the pilot can control the
altitude within a matter of inches.
Hot air balloons are able to travel
as fast as the wind blows. Flights
in hot air balloons have been re-
corded at over 50,000 feet,. how-
ever, Thomas says the sport of
ballooning Is most enjoyed when
flying just above the tree tops.
When flying over populated areas,
balloon pilots maintain an alti-
tude of at least 1,.000 feet to avoid
,hazards that might hamper the
flight.
To safely launch and fly a
balloon requires a minimum crew
of three people. Duties of the
crew typically include: launch
preparation, following the balloon
in the chase vehicle, obtaining
permission of landowners for bal-
loon landing and retrieval, keep-
ing spectators out of the landing
area, and making sure the prop-
erty used to land upon is not
damaged.
Using maps of the area and
radios as well as visual contact,
the "recovery crew" try to be close
by when the balloon makes its
landing. The crew helps the pilot
deflate and disassemble the bal-
loon and return passengers and
equipment back home.
Thomas started flying in


1989 and has since logged over
450 flying hours. He flies occupa-
tionally for Pretty Balloons Unlim-
ited, a Houston based company.
He says he'd like to come
back in the winter season when


conditions are more favorable for
ballooning and take his relatives
for a real ride. Gus says he's look-
ing forward to it, but Linda feels
she'll have to give the idea some
thought.


'4


Thomas Atwell "fires it up" for more altitude while giving Casey
White, Leslie White and Jenny Patterson a taste of what it feels to
float among the clouds.


Kesley
(From Page 2)

.for the "Banner". I was, at an ear-
ly age, looking toward the future.
"Son, you've got to be old,
have very little td do-and be kin
to everybody in town."
I don't think Dad spent as
much time in the community sec-
tion as I did. He'll never know the
details of life in Hico that he let
"slip by"......
"Last Tuesday past Evaline
Foren and Bessie Mae Hensley
visited the Dixie Faye's Beauty
Salon for a complete makeover.
They had the works, including a
feet cleaning, nails trimmed and
manicure. Bessie Mae's husband
is visiting his sick brother in Clo-
vis, New Mexico."
And sadly, almost each week
it seemed Beulah Finnerty ended
her community news sec-
tion....."Funeral services were
held Thursday, May 12th at the
New Hope Missionary Baptist
Church for Mr. Harold Wayne
Huguely, the Rev. L. H. Hatcher,
officiating. Burial was in the Shi-
loh Chapel Cemetery. Mr. Hugue-
ly died Monday at his home near
Forrest Creek. Survivors include
his wife, Marian Hensley Hugue-
ly; two sons, Kenneth Huguely of
Bradford and Kevin Huguely
of...."
I wish Miss Beulah and her
kind had survived.
Respectfully,
Kesley


SAAAI




227-1670
SOysters '* Groceries


* Clams
* Shrimp
* Crabs

* Crawfish


* Beer & Wine
* Cigarettes
* Colombo
Yogurt


HOURS: Tuesday Thursday:
Friday Saturday: 12 9
and Sunday 1-8 p.m.
Closed Monday


12-8


ON C-30 SOUTH OF PORT ST. JOE


A;3








PAGE 4A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995

S.: "Miss Annie" Honored


Colton Thursbay
Look Who's Two
Colton Thursbay celebrated
his second birthday on June 1.
Colton had a Muppet Baby party
at the Frank Pate Park. Helping
him celebrate were his sister Cait-
lyn Nicole and many special
friends.
Colton is the son of William
and Teresa Thursbay of Port St.
Joe. He is the grandson of Ernest
and Donna Thursbay of Port St.
Joe, Ralph and Cathey Hobbs of
Mexico Beach, John Mann and
the late Toni Mann of Eastpoint.
Colton is the great-grandson of
Mary Mann of Port St. Joe, Char-
lie and Inky Parker of Mexico
Beach, Wilmer and Earnestine
Thursday of Panama City, Helen
Williams of South Carolina and,
Frank Williams of Columbia,
South Carolina.


Shane Knox

Shane Is 3!
Shane Knox, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Tommy Knox, celebrated his
third birthday May 13th at the
Stac House with a pizza party.
He would like to thank all his
friends and family members who
came to help him enjoy the occa-
sion.


CHIROPRACO


The Ladies Auxiliary to the
Veterans of Foreign Wars for the
State of Florida has announced
their "Most Outstanding Senior
Citizen Hospital Volunteer of the
Year".
This honor is bestowed upon
Ms. Anna Chewning of Mexico
Beach. Ms. Chewning is a mem-
ber of V.F.W. Post #10069 of Port
St. Joe and is a World War II vet-
eran.
She was selected for her un-
tiring efforts in providing 884
hours of entertaining and work-
ing in Gulf Pines Hospital, Bay
St. Joseph- Nursing Home and
church. "Miss Annie" measures
only four feet in height, but she
exudes kindness that only a giant
could provide. Her spirit and de-
votion makes us proud to be
Americans.

Summer Fun At
The G.C. Library
All area children, ages K 5th
grade are being invited to the
Gulf County Public Library in
Port St. Joe to enjoy a summer of
reading, movies, and games.
The program is a weekly fea-
ture each Tuesday until August
1. This summer's -theme is "Once
Upon a Tale".
Tuesday, June 27, the ses-
sion will feature the video, Ash-
pet; stories titled. Three Little
Wolves And The Big Bad Pig, The
Cowboy And The Black-Eyed Pea,
and Jim And The Beanstalk; and
the poem, Squishy Touch.
The Florida Youth Library
Program is sponsored by the
State Library of Florida, North-
west Regional Library System and
your local Gulf County Library.

Miss Sparkler
1995 Crowned
Elisa Ann Liegel, three year-
old daughter of Patricia Ann (Rai-
ford) Liegel and Werner Liegel,
was crowned Miss Sparkler 1995.
As Miss Sparkler, Elisa will make
appearances at all of the Alderson
4th of July activities, Including
several parades and two firework
shows. She was the overall win-
ner from a group of more than 20
contestants, ages one to five
years old.
Elisa lives with her mom and
dad and two year-old sister. Lau-
ra, in Alderson, West Virginia.
She is the granddaughter of Hen-
ry and Elizabeth Raiford (de-
ceased) of .Port St. Joe and Paul
and Trudy Gross of Decatur, Illi-
nois.- She is 'the great-
granddaughter of Molly and J. W.
Plair (deceased) of Port St. Joe
and Robert and Olive Gross of
Decatur, Illinois.


Gator Band Does Well At Contest


The Wewahitchka High
School Gator Sound Band had a
successful trip to the 1995 State
Solo and Ensemble Festival in
Jacksonville on May 1-3.

Seniors Selling
Sub Lunches
The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens Association will be selling
homemade submarine sandwich-
es on Friday, June 30th, from
11:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. at the
Frank Pate Park in Port St. Joe.
The lunch will include potato
chips, iced tea and, an 8" sub
sandwich, which will have two
types of meats and cheeses. The
price of the meal will. be $3.00
and all proceeds will be added to
their building, fund.
The senior citizens will deliver
lunches to local businesses..
Please call 229:8466 to place
your order. '

SAY YOU SAW IT-iN THE STAR!


GATOR SOUND BAND


Couple Feted
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Lindsey
will be honored with a reception
on July 2 at Lake Alice Park from
2:00 until 5:00 p.m.
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lindsey,
parents of the groom, are hosting
this celebration for the couple
who were wed on May 6 in Cali-
fornia.
All friends and relatives of the
couple are invited to attend.


a-


Jacob and
Charles Colby Gentry

It's A Boy!
Jacob Gentry is proud to an-,
nounce the birth of his baby
brother, Charles Colby Gentry.
Colby was born on June 7 at Gulf
Coast Community Hospital. He
weighed 7 pounds 15.8 ounces
and was 20 1/2 inches long.
Colby is the son of Pat and
Krissy Gentry. Colby's Grandpar-
ents are Mr. and Mrs. Charles W.
Dickson and the late Mr. and
Mrs. Malcolm P. Gentry.


Elisa Ann Liegel


Say
It In


You Saw
The Star!


S Johnathan Wayne Hammons
SCelebrated Fourth
On June 11 Johnathan
Wayne Hammons had a Power
SRanger party with his friends Da-
nielle, Jamie, and Randall as he
celebrated his fourth birthday.
Jonathan is the son of Mellis-
.- sa Hopper of St.-Joe Beach. Heis
the grandson *of the, late Sterling
Hammons and Alma Hammons of
St., Joe Beach and godson of
Wayne and Teresa FrasUre,


S.L.S.T .ER.S.S
Get Made-Up .
The S.I.S.T.E.R.S. Club will
-host a facial and cosmetic cleans-
ing demonstration on June 27 at
6:30 p.m. at the GARC confer-.
ence room building.
A professional cosmetologist
will be their guest. Free make-
over demonstrations will :be given.
Everyone is invited to attend.

In Appreciation
The family of the late Mother
Margaretta Addison Fisher would
.. like to thank each of you for your
many acts' of kindness during the
illness and passing of our loved
one. May God richly bless you is
our prayer.
The Fisher, Addison & Bolden
Families


The 14 students who traveled
to the state festival brought home
two superior ratings and received
12 excellent ratings. These ac-
complishments have not been
made by a Wewahitchka High
School band since the late 60's
and early 70's., ,
The musicians attending
were: Charlie Cole. Colin Hutchi-
son, Jason Moon'eyham and Ke-
drick Sims;~ dazzl rs were: Jessica
Cole, Jana Goodwin. Keisa Pick-
ron, Michelle Stacy -and Jahn
Wycoff; flag corps: Melissa Babb.
Shalina Freeman, Krisilna Smiley
and Tiffany Smith; and majorette,
Lisa Smile. ,
^ '**.


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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995 PAGE 5A


Congressional Hearings Set For


Programs Serving Th(


Key congressional hearings
on programs affecting elderly Flo-
ridlans needing meals on wheels,
Medicaid and Medicare have been
scheduled. The House held its
first hearing on the Reauthoriza-
tion of the Older Americans Act
(OAA) on June 13.
The hearing was conducted
by the Early Childhood, Youth.
and Families Subcommittee of
the Economic and Educational
Opportunities Committee chaired
by Rep. Randy Cunningham (R-.
CA). Florida is represented on the
committee by Rep. Weldon (R-FL).
In the Senate, the Senate Sub-
committee on Aging (part of the
Senate Labor and Human Re-
sources Committee) has tentative-
ly scheduled two hearings, on
OAA for the last week in June.
OAA funds local services


such as meals on wheels and
transportation. The federal OAA
program is the cornerstone of ser-
vices to the elderly, and links
them to many other services that
help keep older persons living in
their own homes. According to
the National Association of Nutri-
tion and Aging Service Providers,
the average local nutrition pro-
gram can provide meals for an
entire year to a homebound sen-
ior for the cost of one day's stay
in the hospital. OAA nutrition
programs raise matching funds
locally and make extensive use of
* volunteers.
A series on "how .to fix Medic-
aid" scheduled for the. House
Subcommittee on Health and En-
vironment (part of the Commerce
Committee) began June 8. Florida
Governor .Lawton Chiles testified
at the June 8 hearing, along with
other states' Governors. The
Committee is chaired by Florida
Rep. Bilirakis (R-FL). Other Flori-


e Elderly
da members are Rep. Stearns (R)
and Rep. Deutsch (D). Consumer
and provider testimony has tenta-
tively been set for June 27. Legis-
lation to revamp Medicaid is due
out by July 14. Work on Medicare
is not expected to be released un-
til September.
The .role Medicaid plays in
long term care services for Flori-
da's elderly residents is often
overlooked:
17% of Florida's Medicaid
recipients are age 60+ (Fla. HRS
Medicaid Office, '93-94 data).
28% of Florida's Medicaid
budget pays for long term care
services (Across the States, Pro-
files of LTC Systems, AARP,
1993).
68% of all Florida nursing
home days are covered by Medic-
aid ibidd).
With so much at stake for
Florida's elderly, these Congres-
sional hearings should be careful-
ly tracked and evaluated.


National Patriots Week Proclaimed
Attorney Billy Joe Rish and City Commissioners Johnny Linton, Charles Tharpe, Bill Wood and Edwin
Williams look orf as Mayor Frank Pate signs a proclamation designating the week beginning July 2, as "National
Patriots Week". The proclamation urges all citizens to participate in ceremonies and activities designed to make
,the United States, of America a better place in which to live by increasing in all of our citizens a greater love for,
loyalty to,, and pride in our nation.



Fla. Rural Water Association


Says Most Violations Are Minor


Ed Hobin, President of the
Florida Rural Water Association
states a recently released report
,by environmental groups does not
reflect the true state of protection
afforded .the public by the water
systems In Florida. The majority
of violations are technical admin-
istrative infractions of a complex
law. They do not effect public
health but they force water sys-
tens to focus their resources on
the wrong priorities.
The idea that the water sup-
ply industry is trying to gut pub-
-lic. health standards is an irre-
sponsible .characterization. The
citizens of our communities de-
serve the greatest benefit for each
dollar spent. Current law requires
customers to pay millions of dol-.
lars to monitor continuously for
susp.led contaminants even af-
iter Hfiflal tests show they 'are 'not
: present. Additionally, the current
'law does not require the use of
science or an assessment of the
health benefits and the cost of
achieving those benefits.
The over '7,100 public water
systems: in Florida check for
eighty-four regulated chemical
contaminants and 51 unregulat-
ed contaminants throughout a
:compliance cycle. In 1990-1991
of all of the Public Water Systems
tests performed, less that 1/2 of
1% of all systems had a contami-
nant level, above the maximum
allowable level with a, potential
number of contaminants tested ,
for exceeding 350.000 in Florida.
And these .Ob of the systems
took the necessary steps to re-
Sincere Thanks
Thanks so much for every-
one's thoughtfulness during and
after Mama's heart surgery.
Mama is doing much better, and I
know it can be accredited to eve-
ryone's prayers. support, and
love. Stress was eased from Dad-
dy by the caring friends who sup-
ported him and Mama before,
during and after surgery.
"Thanks" ,seems to be a small
word to express our sincere ap-
preciation for all the food, flow-
ers," cards, time spent visiting,
'caring inquires; and prayers. Our
whole family Is very grateful for
everything.
Joey Hewett and Family
(Joe. Bea. Sharon. and Caisey)

V.F.W. Holds
Joint Meeting'
V.F.W. Post #10069 and Aux-
iliary met on June 12 in a joint
Vpeeting. Post Commander Coody
presented plaques and pen and
pencil sets to Elmo Aylmer, Harry
Paul, James Dumas and Auxil-
iary President Joan Phillips for
their outstanding service to the
post and auxiliary during the
past year. ..
SSharon Call spoke on the
eed for saving the tabs from alu-
minum cans. The sale of the tabs
cpn help send children with all
linds of cancer to summer camp.
The tabs saved for this purpose
can be dropped off at Sharon's
'Cafe in Mexico Beach, the V.F.W.
Post in Highland View or given to
any post member.
S' It was announced that the
next regular meeting will be held
op July 11 at 7:30 p.m., E.D.T.
Another item discussed was the
pbst and auxiliary's plan to have
a: food booth operating at the
Fourth of July celebration in the
Frank Pate Park in Port St. Joe.


duce their contaminant levels to
an acceptable level to protect
public health.
Public water systems in Flori-
da are experiencing loss of wells
through salt water intrusion, dry
cleaner solvent contamination
and underground storage tank
leakage and contamination. In
the event a contaminant is detect-
ed above a maximum contami-
nant level (safe consumption lev-
el) the water system will either
locate a new source of water or
treat to remove the contaminant,

Drinking,
(Continued from Page 1)
to help 'finance a Gulf Coast
Community College training facil-
ity to belocated in Ward Ridge.
If the grant becomes a-reality
Gulf Coast Community College
could have a branch facility
established in Gulf County within
approximately two years.
IN OTHER BUSINESS
The Board unanimously
passed a resolution supporting
the Gulf County Commission's
net fishing resolution.
Voted to give $500 to the
Port St. Joe track team to help
defray expenses for Antwione
Allen to participate in a national
track' and field competition in,
California.

Letter to Editor
Column: To the people of Gulf
County:
What do you think of our Ju-
dicial System? An eighty-one,
year-old lady is attacked by, a
."BEAST" and luckily, I was saved
by a young boy, a relative to the
owner of the "BEAST". Later, that
same "BEAST" brutally murdered
a gentle, beautiful pet and the
"BEAST" walked. Is this Califor7
.nia or Florida?? You tell me.
Kathrvn (Kitty) L. Lopez
Port St. Joe


so you can continue to drink wa-
ter with confidence; The loss of
wells by water systems to con-
tamination has and will promote
adoption of adequate source wa-
ter and wellhead protection plans
to protect our water supplies.
The water you drink in Flori-
da is very safethrough the efforts
of your .public water system. If
citizens want the truth about the
safety of their water system, they
should call their local water utili-
ty and ask to see the state labora-
tory results. As Boards, Councils,
and professionals in the industry
they are all committed to provid-
ing the best water that they can.
They are customers of their own
utilities. Their families, friends
and neighbors drink the water
they produce. That is why the
United States has the safest qual-
ity water supply in the world. -

Heartfelt Thanks
Thanks to all of you for the
prayers, visits, food and the tasks
you shared during the loss of our
loved one. You all gave so much
and we are extremely grateful. To
the 911 squad ,and the medical
team-God bless you.
The Family of Timothy Cooper

Charter Draped
Gulf Chapter 191, Order of
the Eastern Star, has draped it
charter in mourning for James H.
Kelley, Sr. who died May 16. The
resolution of respect recognized
the faithful membership of their
mystic order.


Advertising
Pays!
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Lasheenya Phillips
Phillips Awarded
Scholarship
Lasheenya Phillips of Panama
City has been awarded a scholar-
ship to attend Gulf Coast Com-
munity College.
- Lasheenya maintained a 3.0
or above in her last four years of
high school. She graduated from
Rutherford High School on May
29.
During her school tenure
from elementary to high school,
she has held a variety of .prestig-
ious positions.
Lasheenya is the daughter of
Janice Phillips; formerly of Port
St. Joe, and Leroy Glenn. Her
grandparents are Christine Bailey
Colvin and Alvern Colvin, Annie
Mae Glen Clay and Jim and Ruth
Phillips. Special great grandpar-
ents are Carrie Bailey and the
late Crawford Bailey.


S-tlie s

on Reid
A Unique Restaurant
and Ice Cream Shoppe

-Thursday Night BBQ Ribs-
& Chicken with All the Fixin's
Slow Cooked to Perfection!
with Banana Pudding $6.95
-Friday & Saturday Nights-
Peel & Eat Shrimp

Our newu menu at night features Beef Wellington, Caribbean
Seafood Platter, varii'ty of steaks & much, much more.

Sunday Buffet
Featuring Shrimp newburg,, roast turkey, homemade d ressin-
& gravy, cranberry sauce, homerrmade lasagne, roast beef &
potatoes, rice, salad, fruit cocktail, fresh cooked vegetables,
and array of homemade desserts that will amaze all, &
\much, much more.
Sunday 11 2:30

222 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe
Free Delivery
229-8900


The Yacht Club Cafe'

First Anniversary Celebration!

Food Fun Cold Beer Prizes!





-f.e


With Live Entertainment By


The Drivin' Home Band

Charles Gaskin, Michael & Terresa Kent, Ben Bachelor
Country Rock-n-Roll Oldies -.Line Dancing
Come Join The Party Out On The Deck/


P


Saturday, June 24, 1995. Music 6:00 -10:00


Yacht Club Cafe'


Mexico Beach, Fla. #648-j50(


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DAUThBA THESTAR,'PORTTCl. J UI, r-, '- tMtJI*JUNE 22, 1990,


Assistance Is Available


For Net Ban Victims


One Hurt

In Accident
A pick-up truck and a UPS
delivery truck collided on Wil-
liams Avenue near Fourth
Street Friday afternoon, result-
ing in a total of approximately
$6,500 damages, according to
investigating officers Mark
Cutler and Butch Arendt.
Mrs. A. V. Bateman was
driving the late model Chevro-
let pick-up, in a southerly di-
rection on Williams Avenue,
when she suffered chest pains
and a shortness of breath and
veered across the street and
struck the UPS truck which was
parked and unoccupied at the
time. The two vehicles hit
head-on.
Mrs. Bateman was taken to
Gulf Pines Hospital by Gulf
County EMS.




Evelyn L. Williams
Evelyn L. Williams, 69, of
Port St. Joe, died Sunday eve-
ning, June 18 at her home in Port
St. Joe. Born in Overstreet, she
moved to Port St. Joe from Farm-
dale in 1934.' She was a loving
wife and mother and was a mem-
ber of the Long Avenue Baptist
Church.
She is preceded in death by
her mother and father.Eula and-
Peter Strange and a brother, Ed-
gar Strange. Mrs. Williams is sur-
vived by her husband. Cawthon
Williams of Port St. Joe;. one son,
Charles W. Williams and wife.
Sandra K. Williams of Cedar
Springs, Georgia; one daughter,
Wanda Gibson and husband
James of Pensacola; one sister,
Lillian Henning of Port St. Joe;
four grandchildren, Jim, Gibson,
Russell Gibson, Wendy Sutton
and Doug Williams and two
great-grandchildren, Katie and
Krista Gibson.
Funeral services were con-
ducted on Tuesday, June 20 at
2:00 p.m., EDT, in the Long Ave-
nue Baptist Church with Brother
J. C. Odom officiating. Entomb-
ment followed in the Holly Hill
Cemetery.
The following gentlemen
served as pall bearers: Jerome
Brown, Al Scheffer, Greg Burkett,
Mike Burkett,. Dave Maddox and
Frances Kirkland.
All services were under the
direction of Gilmore-Southerland
Funeral Home.

K. Satterwhite
Kathleen Satterwhite, 73, of
Wewahitchka, passed away, Sat-
urday morning in Bay Medical
Center following a brief illness. A
native of West Virginia, she had
spent most of her life in West Vir-
ginia, Maryland, and Pennsylva-
nia until moving here in 1987.
She is survived by her sister
and brother-in-law, Lillie and
Richard Hammett of Wewahitch-
ka, and numerous nieces, and
nephews.
The graveside funeral service
was held at 11:00 a.m., C.D.T.,
Monday at Roberts Cemetery con-
ducted by Rev. Lavelle Enterkin.
Interment followed.
All services were under the
direction of the Comforter Funer-
al Home, Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.

Norman Broxton
Norman Broxton, 73, of Port
St. Joe, passed away Tuesday,
June 13 in Gulf Pines Hospital.
He was a lifetime resident here
and worked as a logger.
He is survived by his sister,
Estella Purnell of Montgomery,
Alabama.
The graveside funeral service
was held at 1:00 p.m., E.D.T.,
Friday at Forest Hill Cemetery,
conducted by Rev. Luther Baker.
Interment followed.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home.


Patrolman Mark Cutler, EMT's John Tuttle and Ed
Nichols, gingerly remove Mrs. A. V. Bateman from her pi
up truck after it struck a UPS delivery truck, head-
[above] Friday afternoon. Mrs. Bateman was suffering ch
pains and shortness of breath. She was taken to the hosp
for examination.


I $I
1 Medium Pizza $399 I
w/1 Item _
1 Large Pizza $ 499
w/1 Item

S 1 Large $7991
I Specialty Pizza I
Wortaftew, T ,
PICK UP ONLY
Not valid w/other coupons
418 Monument Ave. 229-9222


( TRIPLE

TOPPER
Large Pizza with
your choice up to
3 Toppings

95 ......For 1

I 1295... For2

Not valid with other coupons
418 Monument Ave. 229-9222
-- -ii


Senator Pat Thomas an-
nounced last Friday that he re-
^. that CS/CS/HG 1317--Economic,
Assistance for Persons Affected
by the Net Ban, would become
law on Saturday, June 17, with-
out the Governor's signature. The
legislation was sponsored by Rep-
resentative Allen Boyd (D-
Monticello) in the House of Repre-
sentatives and Senator Thomas
R in the Senate.
S The economic assistance,
package allows fishermen-and-
women to receive unemployment
compensation and job training


Pierce Recognized
At FSBA Conference
Charlotte Pierce, a Gulf
County School Board member,
was recognized as a Certified
'Board Member on June 15, in
Tampa, at the Annual Summer
Training. Conference sponsored
by the Florida School Boards As-
Ssociation (FSBA). Mrs. Pierce
earned this distinction by com-
pleting a 96-hour training pro-
*gram in eleven areas of educa-
Stion.
This is, a voluntary training
'program sponsored by FSBA in
Which individual: school board
*members may participate. Mrs.
Pierce Is only one of thirty-six
school board members in Florida
'to receive this prestigious award.
The award is a culmination of in-
struction that is designed to allow
local board members to be better
prepared for their important role
of improving public education.


Receive Bachelor's
Degree From FSU
Florida State University, Pan-
ama.City Campus, awarded 207
degrees at its 1995 Commence-
ment Ceremonies on April 30.
Graduation speakers included
Scott Clemons, State Representa-
tive and David Downing, Student
Body President.
Idle Among the graduates were
Ick- Gulf County residents. Marshall
-on, Nelson and Kenny Wood, both re-
iest ceiving a Bachelor of Arts degree
ital in Business Management and
Melanie Hinote, Tonya Plair and
Kim Whitfield, each receiving a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Ele-
mentary Education.


HOURS:
Sunday Wednesday
bobby open till 9:00 p.m.,
pickup window till 10:00 p.m.
Thurs.-Saturday
Lobby open till 10:00 p.m.,
pickup window till 11:00 p.m.


Original Round Pizza
Two for One
SM MED LG
Cheese ...................... 6.95 8.95 10.95
Extra iterm or Extra Cheese....... 1.09 1:29 1.49
ITEMS TO CHOOSE FROM:
Pepperoni Mushrooms Italian Sausage Ham Green Peppers Onions
Ground Beef Black Olives Pineapple Anchovies Mild Peppers
THE WORKS 10.25 12.50 15.95
Pepperoni, Mushrooms, Ham; Italian Sausage, Green peppers
& Onions (Anchovies on request)
STICKY FINGERS .......... ... 10.95 13.50 16.95
Cheese, Pepperoni, Mushrooms, Ham, Italian Sausage,
Green Peppers, Onions, Black Olives & Ground Beef
.(Anchovies on request)


Extra Large
2 Topping Howiemongous Pizza .................. 7.99
Specialty Howiemongous Pizza .......................... 10.99
Your Choice Of THE WORKS HOWIE MAUI e TACO MEAT EATERS VEGGIE



S^ HOWIE WINGS
SClhicken Wings
4 10 Wings 20 Wings
4.59 8.95
Served w/Celery, Bleu Cheese & -Spicy Howle Sticks


jYXXXYrrrrxEIIIXINKXXX1Z YuizxxNZxN Ixxxzx.


PIZZA & SUBS
O l IIXIIXXXTZ IIXI I i s I,.Iz. II Zt. iX



229-9222

418 Monument Ave.

Port S$. Joe


Howie Bread -
[ HOWIE BREAD w/Sauce .......... .... 2.25
HOWIE BREAD w/Sauce & Cheese..................... 2.95

eA delicious dessert treat
for the whole family.
|. r O b fChoose Apple, Peach 9
I ...b. .d.rup | or Cherry.............. 2.79


Howlemongous 2-Topplng
Pizza
Howle Bread w/Cheese
& 1 Large Chef Salad
$1399

Howlemongous Specialty Pizza
Howle Bread w/Cheese
& 1 Large chef Salad
$1,69

Not vad Wtth other ccpons
418 Monument Ave.- 2229222


through federal job training pro-
grams. The package provides
funds to purchase nets rendered
illegal by .the constitutional net
ban which goes into effect on July
,1. Also, owners of equipment and
nets which can be retrofitted for
deepwater fishing will be eligible
for low interest business loans.
Counties will be eligible for
special assistance from state
agencies, including assistance in
establishing enterprise zones in
affected coastal areas to help
create new jobs. State agencies
will be required to give hiring
preference to affected fishers. The
economic assistance programs
will be administered by the Flori-
da Department of Labor.
"I am relieved that we were
able to work through all ,the con-
cerns of the many people interest-


CROWD "

IPLEAZZERI
I 1 Pizza I
w/The Works I
I &1 Pizza
w/2 Toppings
$ $10951


2 Lg .... $1395
Not valld with other coupons
418 Monument Ave. 229-9222
4.ii i W/


ed in this bill to get it passed 'The
recreational fishing industry had
a veryorganized, strongiJobbying
effort to kill parts of the original
bill, Including the proposed sur-
charge on saltwater fishing li-
censes. In the end, the legislation
does not have any surcharge, and
it does not do all ,hat we set out
to do, but it is a good law that
will provide some assistance to
these innocent people who have,
had their livelihood and their way
of life takes away," said Senator
Thomas. "We will monitor the
program very carefully and make
adjustments as necessary."
Persons interested in learning
more about the Net Ban Assis-
tance Program may call the De-
partment of Labor at 1-800-633-
3572 during business hours
(8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., EDT).


S0T WAAY-' PRODUCTS
t h i* rede1""L


White's Deluxe
5hp Self Propelled
Mulching Mower
ON SALE NOWI
$379


Powerful 12hp Lawn Tractor
With 38" TurboCut Deck
Equipped With Many Features
ON gALE NOW!
$999


COMES FULLY ASSEMBLED AND READY TO PERFORM AT:
ST JOE RENT-ALL
706 1st Street
For o 227-2112
For Ouol;F;ie Biiien. L. ,ilt-d T,( Onle -


r ---- C-O--- -- ---..

'2 Large 3 5

, PTACO$I
I PIZZA
L------------------------ --------------- --- ----


Over 130 Locations in Florida 1


Pasta Dinners Served w/Howle Bread
For 1 For 2
BAKED SPAGHETTI........................ 4.95 8.95
Layered w/Mozzrella Cheese & Served W/HOWle Bread
BAKED ZITI .................... 4.95 8.95
A generous portion of ZIU topped with Mozzarella Cheese & baked to a golden
brown.
RAVIO LI ..................................... ..... 4.95 8.95
Cheese stuffed Ravioli topped with our own sauce.
w/Meatballs or Mushrooms .99 1.25

Oven Baked Subs
Deluxe Com bination ..................................... 4.65
Filled full of Pepperoni, Diced Ham, Mozzarella Cheese,
Italian Sausage, Lettuce, Tomato, onions & Mild Peppers
Steak, Cheese & Mushrooms ............... ............. 4.65
Steak, Cheese, Mushrooms, Lettuce, Tomato, Onions & Mild Peppers
Ham & Cheese .................................................. 4.65
Ham, Cheese, Lettuce, Tomato, onions & Mild Peppers
Pizza Su b ................................. .................... 4 .65
Pizza Sauce, Pepperoni & Cheese
M eatball Sub ................................................... 4.65
Meatballs with Spaghetti Sauce & Mozzrella Cheese
Bacon Cheeseburger Sub ................................. 4.65
Ground Beef, Bacon & Onion on request

Salads SM MED LG
Antipasto Salad............... 2.50 3.95 5.50
Lettuce, Ham, Salami, Cheese, Pepper Rings. Onions.
Tomatoes & Black Olives
Chef Salad .......................... 2.25 3.25 4.95
Fresh Crisp Lettuce, Tomatoes & onions topped with Diced Ham.
Mozzrella cheese & Black Olives
Tossed Salad.................... 1.75 2.50 3.50
Lettuce, Tomatoes & Onions with your choice of dressing
EXTRA DRESSING 15C


LUNCH SPECIALS 11 am-3 pm

1 Small 1-Topping $ 45
Pizza & Small Coke I
I Pasta for One $ 95
& Howle Bread
Any Half Sub, Howie $ 45
I Bread & Coke I
I---------------I
SMTH O SLICE $129
1 Slice of Pizza 9
w/1 Topping
Not valid with other coupons
418 Monument Ave 229-9222 I


1s0i loia ih RE lvoe Pza 0st Oiinl* ute Bterhes .Gric9 sesmee opy ee- 0Ry *Cau


I


PAr.aP RA


TH..TR ~ RTq-.O. L- HU~AV.TTP 19IQt


0


- - -











THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22. 1995 PAGE 7A


Time To Renew Hunting


And Fishing
Most hunting and fishing licenses issued by
the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion expires on June 30.
Florida residents now can purchase 1995-96
hunting and fishing licenses from county tax col-
lectors and their sub-agents at the following
costs: combination hunting and fishing license,
$22; hunting license, $11; fishing license, $12.
Fishing licenses are valid for one year from the
date of purchase;, all other license are effective
June 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Licenses for non-residents are: fishing, $30;
seven-day fishing, $15; hunting, $150; hunting
(Alabama residents), $100; 10-day hunting (not
available to Georgia residents), $25; and 10-day
hunting (Georgia residents), $121; and 10-day
private hunting preserve, $15. Tax collectors and
their sub-agents are authorized to charge addi-
tional issuance fees for all licenses.
Also available to residents are Siportman's Li-
cense for $66 which includes hunting and fresh-
water fishing license; and Type I wildlife manage-
ment area, archery, muzzleloading gun, turkey.
and Florida waterfowl stamps.
The cost for five-year licenses are: freshwater
fishing, $60; saltwater fishing (excludes snook,
crawfish and tarpon tags), $60; and hunting (in-


License
cludes Type I wildlife management area, archery,
muzzleloading gun, turkey and state' waterfowl
stamps), $270. Holders of five-year licenses also
are exempt from price increases and from any
new stamp requirements created while their li-
censes are valid.
Children under age 16 are not required to
have fishing or hunting licenses, however they
must pass a state-approved hunter safety course
before hunting in Florida. Residents 65 or older
also are exempt from license fees, but must carry
a senior citizens exemption certification. These
certificates are free and are available from county
tax collectors. A similar free certificate is availa-
ble to residents who are totally and permanently
disabled.
In addition, no license is required of resi-
*dents for recreational fishing with a cane pole (no
reel) using live or, natural bait or with a hand
line, provided the fishing is not in a fish manage-
ment area and is in the resident's county of resi-
dence.
For more information contact your local tax
collector's office of the. Game and Freshwater
Fish Commission and request copies of the
1995-96 Florida Freshwater Sport Fishing Guide
and Regulations Summary and the 1995-96 Flor-
ida Hunting Handbook.


q






Kneeling in the. front 'row, from left are Kyle Livingston, Azidrea Hernandez, Daniel Welch, Gar-
rett Garland, Justin McCroan, Ryan Craig, and Coy Knox. Standing, from left are Aaron Little, Jere-
my Hart, Kenny McFarland, Bart Lowry, Chad Lucas, and Travis Burge. Standing in rear are Coach-
es Phil McCroan, Rex Strickland and Travis Burge.


7 & 8 Year Olds In Tourney


Permits Needed To Drive

On Beaches-McKeithen


With the beginning of the
summer season in Gulf County,
Sheriff Frank McKeithen re-
minds people that certain ordi-
nances and laws must be fol-
lowed while visiting the
county's beaches.
One of these rules is, no
driving on any beach is allowed
without a county beach driving
permit. Permits are available
only for the south county
beaches.
Another is that entry must
be made to the beaches, with a
vehicle, only at the designated
entry points, which are clearly
marked.
No riding on sand dunes or
driving on beach vegetation is,
allowed with or without a beach
driving permit.
Sheriff McKeithen said his
deputies will begin patrolling
the beach area more regularly
during the summer months, es-

Lion's Club BBQ
is Huge Success
Lion's Club organizers of the
chicken and rib bar-b-que held
Saturday, June 17 would like to
thank all of the club members
that worked so hard to makb the
event such a big success.
They also extend many
thanks to the Port St. Joe com-
munity, for their purchases that
support the efforts of the Lion's
Club.
All funds that are generated
by the Lion's Club fund raisers
are kept in the community to
help pay for the cost of eye glass-
es and eye examinations for those
that are in financial need. The
Lion's Club motto is 'We Serve",
arid they are proud to be able to
serve some of the needs of the
Port St. Joe area.

Whitfield Wins
Pistol Match
The Gulf Rifle Club held their
monthly FPOA Bullseye Match on
Sunday evening, June 11. David
Whitfield, won the match with his
S & W revolver and Dale Patton
took second.
The next Bullseye Match will
be held on Sunday evening, July
9, starting at 5:00 p.m. All hand-
gun shooters are invited to partic-
Ipate:" *' "" .


pecially in the Cape San Bias,
Peninsula areas, looking for vi-
olators. If you are unfamiliar
with the ordinances applicable
to beach use, the Sheriff's of-
fice' will be glad to explain
them to you. Beach driving per-
mits may be purchased at the
Gulf County Courthouse in Port
St. Joe.

Local Places In
Saltwater Classic
Despite heavy seas and high
winds, the Fifth Annual Big Bend
Saltwater Classic-held on Fa-
ther's Day weekend-proved to be
a resounding success for its non-
profit supporting charities.
A record 493 anglers braved
seas reported as high as nine feet
to compete for up to $16,000 in
prizes. Winds resulting from a
tropical disturbance forced many
competitors to trash their strate-
gies for catching winning fish and
devise new approaches that in
the end proved successful..
Placing fourth was local win-
ner Captain Chuck Guilford 'and
-Never Enough". "Never Enough"
won $551.25 in the Masters divi-
sion.


Benefit BBQ Dinner
A benefit bar-b-que dinner
sale will be held on June 23 from
10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. on
Highway 98 in the vacant lot ad-
jacent to the New Bethel AME
Church. The proceeds of the sale
will assist Desmond Baxter in his
attempt for the -ummer basket-
ball camps.
The dinner includes 1/4 bar-
b-que chicken,, baked beans, cole
slaw, bread and ice tea.; The price
is $4.00.


Tournament Planned
A men's double elimination
softball tournament will be held
on July 1 at the softball field lo-
cated on Avenue A in Port St. Joe.
The entry fee is $80.00 and you
must supply' your 'own balls. A
concession stand will be open.
The proceeds from this tour-
nament' will benefit Desmond
Baxter in his efforts to attend
summer basketball camps.
For' more information call
Barbara Baxter at (home); 229-
6170'or (woik) 229-8244 -'


Second Annual
Firemen's Feast
The Second Annual Firemen's
Feast and Cookout, sponsored .by
the South Gulf County Volunteer
Fire Department will be Saturday,
July 1, 11:30 a.m. until 2:30
p.m., rain or shine. It will be held
at the Fire Station, corner of C-30
and C-30E (Cape San Bias Rd.).
They will be featuring bar-b-
que chicken, beans, cole slaw,
Hardee's biscuits, dessert from
Jolly Rogers and tea, all for
$5.00. There will. also be Treada-
way's Karaoke, prizes, tee shirts,
kids pictures and more!


13 INCH
P155/80R13
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13

14 INCH
P185/75R14
P1i95/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14


$152.60
$182.28
$190.76
$195.00


$207.72
$211.96
$216.20
$220.44


15 INCH
P205/75R15 $224.68
P215/75R15 $228.92
P225/75R15 $233.16
P235/75R15 $237.40
Mounting Valve Stem Sales Tax
Computer Balancing Disposal Tax
City Pickup Fee










WESTERN

AUTO
,, .Phone 227-1105. ,


Port St Joe's youngest all
stars began participating, along
with teams from Apalachicola,
Bayou George, Callaway and
Parker in the District Four AA 7
& 8 Year Old (Pitching Machine)
Tournament in Parker Saturday.
At this point in tournament
play three teams remain: Calla-
way (3-0), Apalachicola (2-1), and



NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR WATER USE PERMIT
Notice is hereby 'given that pursuant to
Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following appll-
cation(s) for water use permits) has (have) been re-
ceived by the Northwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District: ,
Applictiion number S05035 filed 05/31 /1995
fDepartment of Correctons
SBill Thurber, Assist, Sec., 0MB
2601 Blairstone Road
Tallahasseei FL 32399-2500
Requesting a maximum withdrawal of 710,735
gallons per day' from the, Floridan Aqulfere
stem for Public Supply use by an existing
facility.
G 3eleral withdrawal locauun(s) In Gulf County:
Sec. 32DT3S RIOW
Interested persons may object to or comment
upon the applications) or submit a written request
for a copy of the staff reports) containing proposed
agency action regarding the applications) by writ-
Ilg to the Division of Resource Regulation of the
Northwest Florida Water Management District,
Route 1, Box 3099, Havana. Florida 32333-9700,
but such comments or requests must be received
by 5:00 o'clock p.m. on July 6, 1995.
I No further public;notice will be provided re-
garding this (these) appllcation(s). Publication of
this notice constitutes constructive notice of this
permit application to all substantially affected per-
eons. A copy of the staff reports) must be request-
ed in order to remain advised of further proceed-
hies and any public hearing date. Substantially
:Fected persons are entitled to request an admin-
Istrative hearing regarding the proposed agency ac-
tion by submitting a written permit request ac-
cording to the provisions of 40A-1.521, Florida
Administrative Code. Notices of Proposed Agency
Action will be mailed only to persons who have
filed such requests.
Publish: June 22, 1995.



Enjoy Better

Hearing Today!
Campbell's Drug Store
528 Fifth Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456

TUESDAY, JUNE 20TH.
9 a.m. to 12 noon
Hearing Aids &
Test
Repair All Makes
Call (904) 227-1441
or
1-800-616-HEAR


St. Joe (1-1). Following a loss
Tuesday night to Callaway, St.
Joe dropped into the loser's
bracket and met Apalachicola
again at 8:00 p.m., E.D.T.,
Wednesday to see who would ad-
vance to the finals against Calla-
way. Due to their previous losses
(St. Joe and Apalach) they will
have to sit Callaway down in two
consecutive games to take first
place. The final game, if forced,
will be played at 8:00 p.m. on Fri-
day.

ST. JOE VS. APALACH
St. Joe blasted the Apalachi-
cola defense with a total of 15
hits which produced 22 runs
against Apalachicola's seven hits,
yielding eight runs.
Leading hitters for St Joe
were:'Travis Burge, three singles;
Daniel Welch, a triple and two
singles; Kenny McFarland and
Bart Lowry, a single and a double
each; Chad Lucas, a single and a
triple; Coy Knox, two singles; and
Aaron Little, a double.
ST. JOE VS. CALLAWAY
The Port St. Joe bats weak-
ened, as their defense added
some costly errors, Tuesday night
in a 12-7 loss to Callaway's youth
all stars.


Garrett Garland, Chad Lucas
and Kenny McFarland drove
through a double and a single,
while Aaron Little and Bart Lowry
slapped a double each. Adding
singles were Travis Burge, Daniel
Welch, Justin McCroan, Andrea
Hernandez, Jereniy Hart and Kyle
Livingston.

Baseball Classic

Tourney Here

This Weekend
Preble-Rish summer baseball
team will be playing in the Tyndall
Federal Credit Union 'Summer
Baseball Classic Tournament this
weekend. There will be teams
from Georgia, Tennessee, Wakulla
and Port St. Joe participating in
the two-day event.
Tickets are $3.00 a game or
$5 for a weekend pass. Games
start at 10 a.m. Friday and
Saturday and the last game starts
at 9 p.m. both days. Preble-Rish
will play the first and last game
both days.
For excellent baseball action
.attend, these games pitting young
men ages 15-18 against one
another in America's favorite pas-
time. The tournament will be at
the high school field, located on
Gautier Lane.


SChildren's Personalized Books


2-FOR.l 12.VOLT
AIR COMPRESSORS
Two compresses o highpressure
Iie in or ond high volume
recreation compressor
#8991668


Offers good at these participating NAPA AUTO PARTS stores:


GOLD HAT AUTO PARTS Wewa


NAPA AUTO PARTS Port St. Joe

M1,13'[!,771'; i


$ 2


-











PAGE 8A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995


PAIN YOUR BODY'S
CRY FOR HELP
S There has never been a generally satisfactory definition
of pain or even a good method to measure it. Some rare
individuals have an inborn immunity to pain which is
called "Congenital Analgesia." Others are so sensitive that
S they feel pain at the slightest instance. But, pain is your
body's personal alarm system and should not be ignored.
Once your physician has pinpointed the condition
U causing the pain symptom, he can act to give you quick
* relief. We stock the medicines he prescribes in our
-prescription laboratory. We have the modern pain killers.
and medicines that attack the cause of pain symptoms.

"A GREAT 'MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US with their pre-
scriptions, health needs and other pharmacy products.
We consider this trust a privilege and a duty. May we be
your personal family pharmacy?"

SSTOCKING A COMPLETE LINE OF HOME HEALTH NEEDS WITH DIRECT
BILLING TO MEDICARE


V Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe
Convenient Drive-Through Window
Revlon Cosmetics Cariton Cards Russell Stover Candles


Active Styles Wins Second


In Champions
Port St. Joe's Major League
champion, Active Styles, conclud-
ed its participation in the First
Place Teams Tournament in Call-
away Friday night, taking second
place following a '14-5 loss to
Callaway's representative,. Sil's
Mobile. Homes. Callaway ended
the tourney with a record of 4-1
and Port St. Joe 3-2; their only
losses being to each other.'
DEFEATS CALLAWAY THURS.
Active Styles forced a third
and final match against the Sil's
team by defeating them In Thurs-
day night's.game 4-2. MitchOw-
ens toed the rubber and proceed-
ed to pitch a no-hitter while
yielding only five walks, against
15 strike-outs. Callaway only
managed to pull 'out two runs,
through stolen bases, against an-
errorless Active Styles defense.
.Offensively that night for the
team, Mitch Owens had a double,
Matt Caswell drove- through two
singles. Drew Tuten, Chad Had-
dock and Andy Shoaf each added
a single, giving Active Styles six
hits during the.game. They faced
four different Callaway pitchers
who walked four, while striking
out 10.
ST. JOE VS. CALLAWAY (FRI)
Friday, the host team came
out with both barrels loaded with
the knowledge that Active Styles
had used up all but one Inning of


Tournament
its experienced pitching to get to
this point in the tournament.
They scored 14 runs from 14 hits
on four errors and only left four
standing on base.
Chad Haddock and Drew Tu-
ten shared duties on the mound
for Active Styles in an attempt to
hold off the Callaway hitters. But
the pair, lacking in prior time on
the mound, were unable to shut
them down.
Facing three Callaway hurl-
ers throughout the game, Active
Styles only pulled out 'five hits.
Mitch Owens enjoyed a great
night at the plate slamming two
home runs and a triple, while
Matt Caswell drove through two
singles.


Allen Jumps for Second In Nationals

One Jump Away from National Championship;,Invited to California


This past weekend, Port St.
Joe High School's track athlete,
Antwione Allen, competed in the
Fifth Annual National Scholastic
Outdoor Track and. Field Champi-
onships. The meet was held at
Paul Derr Track on the campus of
North Carolina State University in
Raliegh, 'North Carolina.
The National Scholastic
Championships brought together
over 500 athletes from 41 states.
National leaders as well as state
champions competed in every
event.
Participates In 110 Hurdles
Antwione competed in the
110 hurdles on. Friday, and the
high jump on Friday and Satur-
day. In the 110 hurdles, 35 ath-
letes participated. in qualifying
rounds, with the top nine run-
ners advancing to Saturday's fi-
nials. Antwione placed fourth in
his heat and 14th overall with a
time of 14:76.
In the high jump, 25 athletes
participated in the qualifying
round with the top 13 jumpers


qualifying for Saturday's finals.
The competition started at 6'2 3/
4" and ended at 6'6 3/4" with 13
jumpers clearing this height and
qualifying for the finals.
In high jump finals;, eight of
the 13 jumpers had cleared at
least 7'0" during the season.
Shane Lavy of Kansas, who had a
personal best of 72" and just one
week earlier had won the Golden
West Invitatfonal at 7'0", was in
the competition. Also competing,
was Derrick Ponton of New Jer-
sey; the .National Scholastic' n-
door Champion at 7'1 3/4".
Clears 7' 1/2". to Take Sec-
ond Place
The high jump final competi-
tion began at 6'2 3/4" with the
bar being raised two inches each
time. Antwione cleared each
height on his first attempt up
through 6'10 3/4". When the bar
was raised to 7'1/2", five jumpers
remained in the competition. Ant-
wione cleared this height on his
first attempt. Shane Lavy was the
only other athlete to clear this
height, making it. on his second


The Port St. Joe Dixie Youth
organization will be hosting this
year's District Four Farm Team
Tournament beginning Saturday;
June 24. The competition .pits
four area teams of eight to ten-
year old Minior League players
from Apalachlcpla, Callaway,
Parker, and Port St. Joe against
each other.
The tournament will kick-off
Saturday on the Tenth Street Ma-
joi League -field at 7:00 p.m.
when Port St. Joe meets Calla-
way, followed by a "9:00 p.m.
game between Apalachicola and
Parker,. The winners of these _
games will pair off Monday night
at 9:00 p.m., and those taking a
loss, at 7:00 p.m. Play will contin- ;I'
ue through Wednesday, or possi-
bly Thursday night of next week.
Teams representing St. Joe"


have performed well in recent'
years in this live pitching tourna-
ment; despite the .fact that they
have only been exposed to offen-
sive and defensive play while us-
ing a pitching machine during the,
regular season.
Port St. Joe's team members
are Collins Abrams, Raye Bailey,
Stephen Besore, Micah Dodson.
Addam Duke, Ashley Haddock,
Terrence Holland, Thomas Lee,
Bo Lenox, Adam Nixon, Antonio
Smiley, Cody Strickland, and Ste-
phen Tarantino. They are
coached. by Joey Tarantino, Bill
Dodson and Alan Strickland.
A concession stand will be
operating throughout the tourna-
ment, so come out-relax, enjoy ak
ball park hot dog or hamburger,
and show your support for these
youngsters.


attempt. The bar was then raised
to 7' 1 3/4". Antwione and Shane
missed this height on their first
two attempts. On his third at-
tempt, Antwione had a great ef-
fort but knocked the bar off with
his heel. The meet came down to
one jump, as Shane hit the bar
buit it stayed up, Winning the
competition. The bar was then
raised to 73" where he cleared it
on his third attempt making him
the top high jumper in the coun-
try.
Rubs Elbows With Field Of
.Champions
Antwione really had a great
time, according to Coach Gowan.
He had the opportunity to partici-
pate in a meet with the best track
and field athletes from across the
country.. In the high jump, he
faced the top two jumpers in the
country as well as state champi-
ons from Virginia, South Caroli-
na, Georgia, New Jersey, North
Carolina, Illinois, Pennsylvania,
Tennessee, New York, California
and Maine. He performed well
clearing 7'0" for the fourth week
in a row. Antwione finished as the
national runner up and was one
jump away from being national
champion.
Antwione's trip to North Car-
olina to compete in the meet was
made possible by contributions of
several people in community.
In Nationals In California
Because: of his fine season,
and his great performance at the'
National Scholastic Outdoor
Championships has earned the,
privilege to compete in this week-
end's USA Track and Field Jr. Na-
tional Championships in Walnut,
California.
USATF Jr. National Champi-
onships is the premier meet for
all track and field athletes under


the age of 20. Athletes who com-
pete at this championship have
the opportunity to represent the,
USA in international competition.'
The top two finishers in each
event will earn a spot on the USA
Jr. Pan American Team which
will compete in the Jr. Pan Ameri-
can Games In Santiago, Chile on
September 1 through 3. As a
member of-the Jr. National Team,
each athlete will receive the offi-
cial USA Track and Field uniform
and gear and will also compete in
an International event prior to the
Jr. Pan American Games .
Anyone who is interested in
making a donation to Antwione
should send their contribution to
Port St. Joe High School.


For the deal of your life,
see me!!
TOMMY THOMAS
THEf"EPCA GF









JAMES C. "BO" BRAY
Sales Representative
(904) 785-5221
TOLL FREE
1-800-342-7131
2251 W. 23rd St.
PANAMA CITY, FL 32405
tfc 1/19


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Phone 647-3550
Corner Desoto &
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ST. JOE BEACH
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Open 6 a.m. Monday-Saturday
On Sunday 6:30-2:30
Danny's Sporting Goods
306 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
229-8933


Kneeling in the front row, from left are Drew Tuten, Matt Caswell, Michael Manley, Christopher
Knox, and bat boy Britton Brown. Standing, from left are Joey Peters, Dusty Crews, Chad Haddock,
Alex Hernandez, Chad Goebert, Andy Shoaf, and Mitch Owens. Standing in the rear are Coaches
Andy Tuten, Rusty Brown and Steve Owens.


Peterson Rep. to

Visit Gulf County
U. S. Congressman Pete Pe-
terson announced last Thursday
that Ken Davis, a representative
from his Panama City district of-
fice will visit Port St. Joe to meet
with constituents from 3:30 p.m.
to 4:30 p.m., EDT, Monday, June
26, in the Law Library on the sec-
ond floor of the Gulf County
Courthouse.
Peterson said Davis, who will
be visiting Gulf County monthly,
will provide information ahd help
to residents with questions and
problems related to the Federal
government.


Indian Pass Marine
2178 Hwy. C 30 227-1666 Port St. Joe
Simmons Bayou across from Pic's


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qklews On Dental 9Yealth


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When you think of "free-
way", you probably think of the,
high speed motorways leading
in and out of big cities. But you
also have a freeway space -
in your mouth. When your jaws
are in a normal and relaxed po-
sition, there's a space between
your upper and lower jaws that
dentists call "the freeway
space". It has nothing to do with
traffic, but it has a lot to do with
mouth comfort.
Whenever full or partial
dentures are placed in a pa-
tient's mouth, the dentist makes
sure the freeway space is not
eliminated. This may cause
temperomandibular joint (TMJ)
problems. Your temperomandib-
ular joints are located on each


FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.




The Freeway


Space


side of your head, just internal
and in front of your ear ,open-
ings, and are connected to the
lower jawbone.
If your chewing muscles or
the ligments that control them
are over-stretched, too slack,
inflamed, or in spasm, this can
cause the severe pain in the
jaw joint area. If you are feeling
any discomfort or pain in your
jaw area when you open or
close your mouth, have this
condition treated by your den-
tist.

Prepared as a public ser-
vice to promote better dental
health. From the office of
FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
Williams Ave., Phone 227-1123.


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Month
Plus Exchange Rating



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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995 PAGE 1B


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PAGE 2B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995


Busy Kids
As a Positive Action project for Port St. Joe Elementary School
Mrs. Nelson's second grade class, shown in the photo above, raised
enough money to purchase two picnic tables. The tables are locat-
ed outside the lunchroom for students to enjoy during their break
or lunch periods.


Shown in the photo above are Port St. Joe Elementary School
students who were awarded plaques during their recent graduation
ceremonies for earning an "All A" average for grades one through
six.
Front row, from left, are Jennifer Craig, Tanya Varnum, Bonnie
Belin and James Capps. Second row, from left: Tabitha Wanchik,
Angela McDowell, Susan Medina, Leslie White and Amber Daniels.
Receiving the award, but not pictured, was Amber Davis.


Advertising Pays-Call 227-1278 or 229-8997
to Place Your Classified Ad Today!




FOOT CARE
HEEL PAIN BURNING FEET
r PAINFUL FEET *A NUMB FEET
SCORNS CALLUSES
TOENAIL PROBLEMS
DIABETIC FOOT CARE
CAN BE COMFORTABLY & SAFELY TREATED
IN THE PRIVACY OF OUR OFFICE
DR. BURTON S. SCHULER
The Ambulatory Foot Clinic

229-6665
Foot Surgery Should Be A Last Resort, Not First Aid
.Most Insurance Welcome, including Medicare
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

2401 West 15th St., Panama City


This column is provided as a service of the Gulf County Guidance Clinic, Inc., a professional counsel-
ing and mental health center. It is not intended to replace psychological counseling or treatment ser-
vices.


Dear Counselor,
I have a question about my
son, Joe. He is an 8 year old, third
grade student for the 95-96
school year. Last year, Joe really
started having trouble paying
attention in class. He was out of
his seat more than the other chil-
dren, and would often yell out
answers when it wasn't his turn.
My wife and I attended several
teacher conferences, ,but the
problems remained. We are real-
ly concerned because Joe's school
work has started to suffer. What
should we do?
Perplexed Parent
Dear Perplexed Parent,
It sounds like Joe could possi-
bly have a condition called
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity
Disorder (ADHD). The three core
components for ADHD are: inat-
tention, impulsivity, and motor
hyperactivity. A reasonable course


of action would be for Joe to
receive an evaluation from his
pediatrician or family physician. If
medical causes are eliminated,
consider a referral for psychologi-
cal assessment. The referral could
go through your school. system or
your local community mental
health center (CMHC).
Sincerely Yours,
John Hartman, M.S., N.C.S.P.
Nationally Certified School
Psychologist
Note: Please address your ques-
tions and comments to:
Dear Counselor, 311 Williams
Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
Names and addresses are option-
al and will remain, confidential.
Letters may be edited for length.
Urgent inquiries and requests
for professional counseling
should be directed by phone to
227-1145.


Florida is ranked number one
among the 50 states in hurri-
canes. It is very important to pro-
tect your family and your proper-
ty, know your policy and have an
evacuation plan. Listed below are
a few tips to help you prepare for
hurricane season.,
Make sure you have prop-
er coverage. If you are new to
Florida, find a reputable insu-
rance agent. If you already have
an Insurance policy, you should
occasionally review your policy to
make sure it offers enough cover-
age in the event of a loss. You
may have made some major pur-
chases or some home improve-
ments that increased the value' of
your home. If your policy doesn't
cover the value of your home, you
may want to increase the cover-
age.
Know what your policy
covers. Some policies limit, the
coverage on certain items like val-
uable jewelry, which may require
extra coverage. It is very impor-
tant that you know whether your
policy will pay replacement cost
or the actual cash value of your
home's contents. The replace-

ment cost is the amount it would
take to replace or repair your
damaged property. Actual cash
value will only pay what your
damaged property is currently
worth.
Check your policy for
flood and windstorm coverage.
Most standard homeowners' poli-
cies usually cover damage caused


directly from wind or hafl, but do
not cover flood damage caused by
rising water. If you are in a flood-
prone area, you should talk to
your agent about adding flood
coverage to your policy.
Check into additional liv-
ing expenses. Most homeowners'
packages have coverage that will
pay some of the expenses for ad-
ditional living quarters if your
home is damaged and youcannot
stay there while it's being re-
paired.
Know the name of your in-
surance company. Memorize the
name of the Insurance company
with whom your policy is written.
The name of your carrier compa-
ny may be different than your
agent, agency or underwriter.
Safeguard your records. If
your property is damaged, it is
important for you' to be able to
access your policy quickly. Keep a
copy of your insurance policy and
an inventory of your records in a
safe deposit box or with a relative
or a friend.
For more information on
ways to further prepare yourself
for a hurricane, you may order a
free hurricane check-list for insu-
rance consumers or the 1995-96
Insuring Your Home. Consumers'
Guide. To order, please call the
Florida Department of Insurance
Consumer Assistance Helpline
toll free at 1-800-342-2762 be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:45 p.m., Monday through Fri-
day.


Year In And Year Out, You Will Do Well With Trmav
A Me
Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


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Cellular Phones Are

Booming; Get Cheaper

Covering More Area With Sending
Antennas Strategically Located


One of the fastest growing In-
dustries today is probably the
mobile telephone business and its
use as a highway emergency tool
today. Raleigh P. Sale, local rep-
resentative for Sprint Cellular
told the Rotary club last Thurs-
day why they are such a fast
growing item today. ,
Sale said, "For a basic charge'
of only $13.00 per month plus
50 a call, many people will glad-
ly install one of these phones in
their cars as an emergency tool.
They consider it cheap at the
price to have the capability to call
for assistance from their car from
beside the road, rather than be
faced with having to be left to
their own devices should some-
thing happen to them."
Sale said Sprint has the per-
mission to furnish service in the
Panhandle area and now covers
the entire area from Pensacola to

Leave Wildlife
In The Wild ,
It's the time of' year when
people find an assortment of
young wild birds or mammals but
the. best rule of thumb is if the
animal can scurry about, then
leave it alone.
Dr. Jeff Gore heads up the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission's nongame wildlife sec-,
tion in northwest Florida and
says people are usually well
meaning but it sometimes is best
to retreat and give the animal
plenty of space.
"A' lot of the calls we receive
this time of year are about young
birds falling from the nest but
many of these are nothing more
that fledgling birds that'are trying
to learn to fly," said Gore. "If it's
obviously only a day or two old
then the best thing is to return
the bird to the nest. Otherwise,
leave It alone."
Another animal he said that
people tend to see this time of
year are small, Immature gray
squirrels. If the squirrel can't
climb on its own, Gore suggested
individuals carefully return it to
its nest.
"If that's not possible," he
said, "we can provide the names
of wildlife rehabilitators who may
be able to take care of it."
Animals that present the
most problems Gore said are
young raccoons, possums, and {
foxes. "People should be careful
to avoid touching these animals
regardless of size because they '
can transmit some nasty diseas-
es," Gore said.
"It's best to avoid practices
like feeding animals other than
birds, near your home or busi-
ness. Even the small ones, al-
though they look defenseless, can
bite."


lerslnsurance
mber of TravelersGruoT'


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The Insurance Store Since 1943
8:30 till 6:00

Monday through Friday

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Perry on their own system.
"Get outside of that area and
you will still' have dependable ra-
dio telephone contact with the
world. But you must use the long
distance area, code numbers
when making calls froih outside
our service area and the long dis-
tance charge is too much just to
chat over the phone, but not too
much if you have an emergency
call of any nature," he said.
The new radio phones have a
universal information number
too. "If you need assistance with
your call, you may punch in [1*1]
611, free, for phone assistance.
The number is the same for any
company," the speaker said.
Sale said a number of sub-
scriber plans are available to suit
almost anybody's needs, from
strictly an emergency need, to fre-
quent users with numerous
phones and numbers.
"Radio phones are mostly for
emergency use, now, but with
continued innovations, who
knows what the future will
bring?" Sale asked.


Law Offices of
J. PATRICK FLOYD, P.A.


Third generation of Launyers providing
legal services to this area.


OVER 16 YEARS PERSONAL INJURY EXPERIENCE

PORT ST. JOE APALACHICOLA
227-7413 653-8056



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upon advertisements. Before you decide ask us to send you free written
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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995


HOP



ON



,DOWN

AND ORDER YOUR
COPY OF THE STAR
DELIVERED TO YOUR
DOOR EACH: WEEK
OR PICK UP A COPY
AT ANY OF THE FOL-
LOWING LOCATIONS:
SOUTH BEACHES
Cape Trading Post
Indian Pass Raw Bar
Pic's #1
Scallop Cove
PORT ST. JOE
The Star
S* Buzzett's
* Campbell's
* David Rich's IGA
* Jr. Food Store
* Motley's Big Star
* Saveway
* Sing Store
* St. Joe Hull
WHITE CITY
Hammond's Grocery
HIGHLAND VIEW
Dixie Dandy
Jr. Food Store
ST. JOE BEACH
Suwannee Swifty'
Jr. Food Store
MEXICO BEACH
Express Lane
Gulf Foods
Jr. Food Store
MexJco Beach Grocery
Suwannee Swifty
WEWAHITCHKA
David Rich's ICA
Dixie Dandy
Jr. Food Mart
Jr. Food Stpre
IMCartV's Grocer


rants (checks) each year.
Through a grant from the
state's Innovations Incentive Pro-
gram, the Comptroller's Office
worked with the Department ,of
Revenue, the Department 'of
Health and Rehabilitative Servic-
es and the U. S. Postal Service to
provide a better child support de-
livery system at a lower cost.
Milligan said the child sup-
port payments to the Department
of Revenue traditionally have
been cut into .checks by the
Comnptroller's Office and pent to
HRS, where the checks were,
stuffed into envelopes and
mailed..,
"As a result of this grant, the
Comptroller's. office has pur-
chased, equipment to cut checks
that can be mailed without enve-
lopes," Milligan said. 'uThese self-
mailer warrants are simply folded
and sealed. They are cheaper to
mall. require no envelopes and
can be processed three times fast-
er than regular checks, with few-
er employees needed."
DOR Executive Director, Larry
Ftichs pointed out, "This is a per-
fect example of agencies Working ,
together and, government working
smarter to benefit Florida taxpay-
ers and child support clients."


m~iI/ 44


Florida's 225,000 child sup-
port checks that are mailed out
each month by the State Comp-
troller's Office will have a' new
look and a double "punch" start-
ing Monday, June 19.
One that new look will
mean streamlined delivery to the
kids who need the financial sup-
port.
Two the improved produc-
tion means, all Floridians will get
the benefit of a $300,000 savings
to the state's delivery system in
reduced processing and mailing
costs.
Beginning Monday, June 19,
court-ordered child support en--
forcement checks will be con-
tained in an all in one, self-
sealed check / receipt / address
mailer with perforated, tear-apart
seams.
"Eligible parents should be
on the lookout for the new format
of their child support checks."
State Comptroller Bob Milligan
said. "Because their streamlined
appearance will be different from
past mailings, we wouldn't want
them to be overlooked when they
arrive in the mail'
The. new system 'was the:
brainchild of Ken Schroeder 'of
the Comptroller's Office, the man
who is responsible for producing
all of the states 17 million war-


Graduates and instructors of Gulf Coast Community College's Independent Dental Education for
Assistants (IDEA) included (standing, from left) Brenda Goebert, Tracy Maines, Robin Bailey, Val Bain,
Vicki R. Keel, Dr. George Daugherty, Marcia L. Sawyer, Pam L. Buchanan, Debra A. Spencer, Sue Suggs
and Connie .Gore,
Seated from left, are Salina C. Baker, Lisa Atkins McGuffin, Mary E. Thomas, Suzanne M. Deaton,
Bonnie S. Adams, ,Yolanda K. Barker and Patricia M. Antonini. IDEA is a distance learning program that
allows students to receive the majority of their instruction at home and in their own communities
through the use of video tapes.



GCCC Dental Assistant Graduates


Several local residents were
among those who graduated in
June from the- first distance
+. learning program to train dental
assistants at Gulf Coast ComImu-
nity College. Independent Den(,
Education for Assistants, or
IDEA, allows students to receive
the majority of their instruction
at home and in their own commu-
nities.
IDEA was developed two


years ago with $32,000 in grants
from the Florida Dental Health
Foundation and the Area Health
Education Center. The program
allows students to complete their
training through a combination of
video tapes developed at the col-'
lege and visits to campus on des-
ignated evenings and weekends.
The program is accredited by the
Commission on Accreditation of
the American Dental Association.


The first graduates of this
class were pinned In a Dental As-
''sisting 'Pinning Ceremony on
June 1. Guest speaker for the
ceremony was Dr. Howard Bell of
Jacksonville, past president of
the Florida Dental Health Foun-
dation and current chair of the
Florida Dental Association Coun-,
cil on Dental Education.
'Two other Port St. Joe resi-
dents, Megan M. Dean and Shel-
ley R. Fettinger were also pinned
denoting their graduation from
the traditional Dental Assisting
Program. ,

a.

GULF COUNTY SCHOOL
INVITATION TO BID
Locker Repair and Refinishing
BID 106-007
The Gulf County School Bc.rad ill receive'
sealed bids on the repair and refintish.g of 404,
dressing room lockers at vewahucihKtla Jr.-Sr.
High School. Bid specifications are on file at the
Gulf County School Board Administrative Offices.
150'Middle School Road, Port St. Joe. FL 32456.
(904) 229-8256.
The Board reserves the right to accept the
Slow/best bid or reject all bids.
2tc., June 15 and 22, 1995.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GI\EN that pursuant
to a L'nt of Execuuila. 1-ued i nile C'-uliP Court
of. Gil Couitv. Floridla. ct, the 15th do' td'1 Mitch .
;9%5. ll he cause where, JOHN L HICGlrIFbOT-
HAM w'a. pla.uilT and JERRY GIBSON m as delen-
dant, behg case No 95- 14 Il d CourT : ,
1. FRANK-M'KEI iTIEN mS Shettff of'GuIF
County. Florida.' have leved upon all the right, ti-
IJc i,,il,,ee.s' o" t Le deeii.dit JERRNY GIBSON,
:. tid to the follknhi.g dJesi.nbed propeiTs. to wit
One (1) 1985 GRAND Pr. 2 dr.
Serial No. 2G2GK37A7F2286952 ,
One (1) 12 Foot Aluminum Bass Boal
20 HP Mariner Motor
Trailer, Battery, Gas Tank. etc.
and onthe llth day of JULY, 1995. at the North
Front Door of the Gulf County'Courthouse, In the
City of Port St Joe; Gulf County, Florida at the
hour of 11:00 A.M or as 9car theretafte.c s i. si-
ble, I will offer for sale all oi the said JERRY GIB-
SON right.,title and interest ii, af.resa.id pi'perty
as public outcry aid ill .ell the sacr.e, subject rt
all prior liens, encumbrainces and judgments, If
any, to the highest and best bidder or bidders for
CASH the proceeds to be applied as far as may be
to the pavt.eiCt 'l cc st and satL.aculian of the
abote described execuuoii
FRANK M.KEIT-iE.N. Sheriff
f G, CcCiiit ly, Florinda
4tc. June 15, 22 and 29 and'July 6. 1995.

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
I .NO.'9495-37 ,
The Board of C-.,inr Cormnissiloew.-s *i Gulf
County, Florida will receive sealed bids from any.
qualified person, company or corporation interest-
el in pro.isling the Co,r,riy ith the fr.ll otitn
18) Motorola Voice Pagers. UHF
(1460,500 MHz) primary frequency, FE
code 3, two tone sequential compatible;
water repellant, with nl-cad rechargea-
ble battery, drop-in charger and-extend-
ed maintenance warranty plan. State
the color of the case and the length of
warranty.
S Delivery Date' must be specified.'
Please indicate on the envelope that this Is a '
sealed bid, the bid number and what the bid Is for.
Bids will be received until 5:00 p.m., E.D.T.,
on Tuesday, July 11, 1995, at the Gulf County
Clerk of Court's office, 1000 Fifth 'Street, Port St.
Joe. Florida. 32456. The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMIiIlSSIOlNERS
GULF COUNTY.FLORIDA i
By: /s/Michael L. Hammond, Chairman
Attest: /s/ Benny C. Lister, Clerk of Courts
2tc, June 22 and 29, 1995. '


FACTORY TRAINED

SERVICE
on All Types Small engines


REQUEST TO RECEIVE BIDS
The Gulf County School Board will receive
bids until June 27, 1995 for the annual Exterml-
nation/Pest Control contract for-all school facill-
ties. Interested parties should contact Mr. Charles
T. Watson, Director of Support Services, Gulf
County Schools. 150 Middle School Road, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456 do telephone (904) 229-8256 to ob-
tain bid Information and instructions.
2tc, June 15 and 22, 1995.

GULF COUNTY SCHOOL
INVITATION TO BID
Refurbish Bleachers
BID #96-008
SThe Gulf County School Board will receive
-sealed bids on the refurbishing of Hussey bleach-
ers at Wewahltchka Jr.-Sr. High School. Bid specl-
fications are on file at the Gulf County School
'Board Administrative Offices, 150 Middle School
Road. Port St. Joe. FL 32456. (904) 229-8256.
-The Board reserves the right to accept the
low. bet bi J Oi., recl .all bids.
2tc. Jun,, 15 i Jd 22 19IS.

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
NO. 9495-38
MTe G.,I' C i:tu- B..:.ad of' County Commissioners
uill r,,:e e sel-ed bLiJ- i.:.mr any person,,company
S r,r c:m .t-iic:. li trt .li ,J i, selling the County the
following described Insurance policies:
I. Workmen's Compensation
IT. &iiiiji & C ",lX.hL_4
$5 X1.00 Deductible
$1000.00 Deductible
$2500.00 Deductible
III. Comprehensive General Liability ,
Alternate One
Alternate Two
IV. Auti.:.m. I..ile Insurance
V... M.obile ii,-.,rafnce
VI. Ambulance Drivers-and Attendants
Malpractice
VII. FLA Ldw Enforcement Death Benefit'
VIII. Blanket Accident Policy / Volunteer Squad
Members ,,; '
IX. Public Officials Errors and Omissions
X. Public Employees Honesty Bond / Tax
Collector.
XI. Money & Securities Bond / Tax Collector
XII. Public Employees Honesty Bond / Clerk of
Circuit Court
XIII. Money & Securities Bond / Clerk of Circuit
Court
XIV. Water System Bond
S iecl'lc ,ilanc -.- L ,U i le. I 'r. r ir O Tice ,:.f
the Cleik :1 i-c,-tiull Coirt Gull" CCu ,t' C.:.Urln '
h.,u-e 1''0 Fill, 'l S ueer P:rl Si J..e FI)riJj
32456. B1.1.- 'ill tce re-lel e, il jlU 5 0 p m


E.D.T., August 22, 1995, In the Office of the Clerk
of Circuit Court. The Board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/Michael L. Hanmmond, Chairman
Attest: /s/ Benny C. Lister, Clerk of Courts
2tc, June 22 and 29. 1995.

INVITATION TO BID
Sealed proposals will be received in the office
of the City Clerk, 305 Fifth Street Port. St. Joe,
Florida, until 4:30 p.m., July 17. 1995. for fur-
nishing and delivering F.O.B.. Port St Joe, Flori-
da, a well point system as outlined int the specifica-
tions pertaining thereto.
].:Jli.:.: hJ bid documents may be
:.li .lie.l hi,.m -ir e i ,' Clerk's Office, 305 Fifth
Street PortSt Joe, Florida 32456. telephone (904)
229-8261, Monday through Friday. between 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Bids will be publicly opened
anid:read at 8:30 p.m.. July 18, 1995. in the City
Commission Chambers. Fire Station Conference
Room, Port St JoS. F..i.1. nle Th' '- e erne, the
right to accept or rele, ,,., .:r "ill i.ilzt or to Sele..t
the Bid felt to be i,. te i:.e: .ie,.--'r ,.i he Cim
/s/ Pauline Pendarvis
Acting City Clerk
Itc, June 22. 1995.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
; FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
orF mi STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
IN RE: The Matterdof the
Adoption of:
JENNIFER LYNN hORNE

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: David H. Burgess
610 High Street
Keokuk, Iowa 52632
S YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a'Petition
fCr AJ.dopJot has been filed against you and you
ate required to n.erve a copy oi' our Answer or oth-
er response to the Petition on Petitioners' Attorney:
JANICE COGBURN SCHEFFER, P. 0. Box 1059,
'Port St Joe, Florida 32456, and file the original
thereof it, the Circ.nit Court Clerk's Office, Gulf
Count) CurtIouse Port S,' Joe, Florida, on orbe-
fore the 28th day of July, 1995. If you fall to do so,
a Find Judgment of Adoption for the relief sought
may be granted by Default.,
DATED this the 20th day of June, 1995.
BENNYC LISTER. Circuit Court Clerk
! By: /s/ Candice Bndges, Deput) Clerk
4tc, June 22 & 29 and July 6 & 13, 1995.


Life Home Auto Business
Health Disability
U 5i. 5% DISCOUNT ON AUTO INSURANCE Cros
WITH HOMEOWNERS S h


(904) 227-2106 am weazy Port St. oe, FL





TIMOTm J. MCFARLAND
A TT(O R N E Y A T L A \

GENERAL P R A C TWICE
Divorce Custody Adoption
\Wills Estates
DUI Criminal Defense
Accidents Insurance Claims


509 Fourth Street Port St. Joe

227-3113












Medicare Assignment Accepted For
Eye Exam 0. Lee Mullis,
..1 M.D.
Bay Eye & I1600'Jenks Ave.

Surgical Center Panama City, FL
Board Certified
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT Eye Physician

1-800-227-5704 And Surgeon


Hometown Sales/Hometown service


BARFIELD'S

Phone 229-2727 Port St. Joe F .'....


State Child Support


Checks Get New Look


RECYCLE YOUR


NEWSPAPERS


FOR A CLEANER--


AMERICA


.5m


I I F


Recycle your old newspapers...

Tie in a bundle and place beside your

trash can. The Star is doing its part

by printing on recycled newsprint.




The Star Publishing Co.
PRINTERS PUBLISHERS OFFICE SUPPLIES

Ph. 227-1278 Fax 227-7112 208 Williams Avenue


I PFUr,;31


I


II. _, -.


PAGE 3B.


t3








PAGE 4B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995


Singing Duo at First Baptist Sunday Beach Baptist
Duo Bible School


Kyle Peddie George Roberts


Come Find Out What All the Excitement Is at 2247 Hwy. 71
(1/10 mile north of Overstreet Road)


The Church of Christ

in Wewahitchka wants to make a difference in your life.
Sunday School 10 a.m. CDT
Worship Service ... .. 11 a.m. CDT
Wednesday Bible Study 7 p.m.


FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
REV. BILL WHITE,, PASTO !:.
j f3^ ". ~ ~ ~ 2420 Long Ave;. '""" "
i tlI' l'\l Port St. Joe, FL 32456
904-229-6886
Port St. Joe's "Port of Victory "
Sunday School .............. ........... 10 a.m.
M morning W orship ........................................ 11 a.m.
Sunday Evening ................................. ....... 6 p.m.
I Wednesday Evening ............................7 p.m.



THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN GULF COUNTY

ST. JAMES' 800 22nd STREET PORT ST. JOE
4+ .. 7:30 and 11:00 a.m. (ET) '
Sunday School 9:45
-- ST. JOHN'S *.WEWAHITCHKA
8:00 a.m. (CT)

THE REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor .



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MEXICO BEACH
823 N. 15th Street
648-5776
Sunday Bible Study (all ages) .................9:00 CST
M morning W orship ....................................... 10:00 CST
Evening W orship.................... .................... 6:30 CST
Wednesday Bible Study (all ages) ...........6:30 CST






Chapel Lane Overstreet Phone 648-8144
'Bro. Harold J. McClelland, Jr., W.L. Tremain,
Pastor Pastor Emeritus
Sunday School................................................ 10:00 a.m .
Sunday Worship........................................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ......................................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ......................................... 7:00 p.m.


i A FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

1 =CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
*, U SUNDAY WORSHIP................. 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL............................ 11 a.m.
(u s N *SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children

Nursery Available
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor


Kyle and George, a dynamic
duo for Christ, will be in concert
this Sunday evening in the sanc-
tuary of the First Baptist Church
of Port St. Joe. The duo performs
their own original Christian,
music on the keyboard, and
drums. The concert will be during
regular evening worship services
at 7:00.
Powerful testimonies of God's
grace and salvation for all people
are shared in a very unique way
by both individuals during the
concert.
George Roberts is a native of
Port St. Joe, and now resides in
Hosford with his wife, Mary and
two sons, Jared and Blake. He
and his family are members of the
Lake Mystic Baptist Church in
Bristol. In addition to his role in
C., W. Roberts Constructing, Inc.,
he is the owner of Seminole
Recording, a recording/music
studio. George plays the drums,
harmonica and guitar during con-
certs. His testimony to the family
and the problems families face
will indeed touch the hearts of
lives of the people who hear him.
Kyle Peddle is a resident of,
Hosford, and is the guidance
counselor of Shadeville Elemen-
tary School in Crawfordville. He is
also Minister of Youth at Corinth
Baptist Church in Hosford, of
which he is a member. He is a
1994 graduate' of. Florida State
University. Kyle felt the call upon:
his life for ministry in 1982 as a
junior high student. He has been,
actively involved with music evan-
gelism since 1986. Kyle plays key-
boards, guitar, and a variety of
other instruments. He writes
much of the material for the min-
istry and enjoys sharing his talent,
for music and evangelism with
everyone he comes into contact.

Funding Cuts
Will Affect
Florida's Seniors
When the politicians and pun-
dits finish analyzing what the
projected Congressional cuts in
Medicare and Medicaid mean, the
bottom line will signify one thing
for Florida; it will have a crippling
effect on millions of its older citi-
zens. ,
As a growing state with a large
elderly population, Florida will
take a harder blow than most
other states.
The Republicans say they want
to balance the budget by the year
2002 or there will be. no Medicare"
or Medicaid as we knqw it'. -
TheAARP Public Policy .insti-'
fute analysis based on Congres-
sinal Budget Office and U. S.
Treasury Department estimates
maintain the proposals:
1. Would reduce Medicare ben-
efits, per year In Florida by $7.3
billion.
2. Would cost Florida $1.5 bil-
lion per year in Medicaid funding.
Medicare, the federal insu-.
rance program, now provides ser-
vice for approximately 2.6 million
older persons in Florida. Republi-
can U. S. Rep. Porter Goss of
Sanibel, says that unless the
Medicare program is overhauled,
It will run out of money by 2002.
The Medicaid program. in
which the state and federal gov-
ernments split the costs, is for
low-income people who meet cer-
tain eligibility requirements. Last
year 1.6 million Floridians re-
ceived Medicaid, primarily wom-
en,' children, low-income retirees
and the disabled.


I 308 Williams Ave.


The Beach Baptist Chapel lo-
.cated at 311 Columbus Street, St.
Joe Beach, will' be having vaca-
tion bible school on June 26-29
from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., EDT at
the Beach Baptist Church.
Ages include two years to
sixth graders.
Registration will be held on.
Saturday, June 24 at 5:00 p.m.,
EDT, followed by a parade and
hot dog supper.

Special Program
At Zion Fair Sat.
Zion Fair Missionary Church
W.I.A. will sponsor 100 Women In
White Saturday, June 24 at 6:00
p.m. Guest speaker will be Sis;
Ruth Newsome of Panama City.
Everyone is invited to attend.
The church is located at 280 Ave-
nue C in Port St. Joe.


Musical Program At
Thompson Temple
There will be a gospel singing
at Thompson Temple First Born
Church on Saturday, June 24 at
8:00 p.m. Performing will be in
and out of town choirs. Everyone .
is cordially invited to attend.

Nelson Reunion
The, annual Edward Dinson
Nelson Family Reunion will, be
held Saturday, July 1, at the Civ-
ic Center in :Alford. Edward Din-
son and Sarah Ann Register Nel-
son had 10 children born in the
Washington County area.
The children included Luve-
nia Nelson Tharp (Charles), Ever-
etta Nelson Anderson (Charles),
Lou'ella Nelson Kent '(Wesley),
Rasmus D. Nelson (Nettie Hop-
kins), Ida Nelson Shores (Joseph),
Lavonia Nelson Williams (Rich-
ard), Lillian Nelson Peel (John),
John H. Nelson (Eugenia Horn),
Clyde E. Nelson (Mary Williams),
Lena E. Nelson Grimes (Moses).
This reunion is for their de-
scendants and friends. Everyofie'
is welcome to come. Alford is lo-
cated about seven miles south of
Cottondale on Highway 231.
Bring food and drinks. Plates,
cups and ice will be furnished.


Thank You
I would like to say thank you
to the Wewahitchka Elementary
School faculty and, staff, all my
friends and 'my children, Phil,
Mary, Benny, Ernest; Doris., Mar-'
gie, Classie, Donna, Oletha and
Nate for the wonderful retirement
party given on May 25. A furi time
was enjoyed by all.

"Advertising Pays!
-Call Us-
The Star Publishing Co.
227-1278


Thank You
During times like these we
learn how much our friends
really mean to us.
Your thoughtfulness in our
sorrow has meant so much and
everything you have done is
truly appreciated . .
The Family of
Bennie C. Tiller p
I tp, 6/2g


227-1278


"THE EXCITING PLACE TO WORSHIP"
'. t .f- F Yirst Baptist Church
S 102,THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
Sunday School.... 9:45 am
Worship .............. 11:00 am
Disciple Training.................. 6:00 pm
.i Evening Worship....................7:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meetin'g ...7:00 p'm
Gary Smith Buddy Caswell
Pastor Minister of Music & Youth


St. Joe Assembfy of qod
309 6th Street.*Port St. Joe
Sunday School................... 10:00 am
Morning Worship Service ........ 11:00 am
Sunday Eveniing Service ........ 6:30 pm
Wednesday Bible Study.......... 7:00 pm
Jeff Scalf-, .
Pastor
t Empozwered by The Spiritt




[ Highland View
United Methodist Church
Corner of 4th St. & Parker Ave.
Highland View
Lynwood R. Wynne, Pastor

Sunday School......... ........... ........... ........... .............10 a.m.
Morning W orship .,.... ... ............ ........................... 11 a.mi.
Evening Worship ...... ....... ..m...... 6 p.m.



Wo rsh


Bible Study:
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednes


CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS

y
sday
Minister: Tom Skipper 229-8310


Worship:
11 a.m. Sunday
Nursery


WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P.o Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue


E We Want You To Be
A Part of the Friendly Place

BIBLE STUDY. .. .. ..... .. 45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP...........7:00 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP.................11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY .................7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ... ......5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue


CURTIS CLARK
Pastor,


MARK JONES
Minister of Music


First UnitedkMethodist Church ,
S, 1 l North, 22nd St.
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
S Morning Church.. ...............9:00 a.m. CT
Church School ................... 10:00 a.m. CT
Nursery Provided

Dr. Loule Andrews. Pastor John Anderson, Music Director
Office Phone: 648-8820 Hours: Monday-Friday, 9 am 12 noon CT


Constitution AndMonument
Catch the PortSt. oe
THE UNITED METHOISTCHURCH
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School ........ 9:45 a.m. Methodist Youth
Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m. Fellowship.............. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
Choir Practice '
Rev. Zedoc Baxter Wednesday............. 7:30 p.m.
PASTOR






the








Baptist Church
"A Church Without Walls"
First Union Bank Building Monument Avenue
Rev. Marty Martin, Pastor
Pastor's Study 229-9254
Sunday School (Bible Study) for all ages 9:00am
Sunday Morning Christ-Centered Worship 10:00am
Sunday Afternoon Discipleship Training 5:00pm
Informal Sunday Night Service 6.00pm
Wednesday Night Prayer and Praise Meeting 6:30pm


New Life Christian Center Church'
Sixth Street (Union Hall Building)
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Johnny Jenkins, Jr. Pastor


Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
(1st and 3rd Sunday Nights)
Wednesday Night Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
"We Are Covenant People'


,A


I













[ Gulf County Commission Minutes ]


The Gulf County Board of County Commission-
er met on May 23, 1995 in regular session with
the following members present: Chairman Mi-
chael L Hammond, and Commissioners Nathan
Peters, Jr., Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Jessie V. Arm-
strong, and Billy E. Traylor.
Others present were: County Attorney Barbara
Sanders, Chief Deputy Clerk Doug Birming-
ham, Deputy Clerk Debbe Wibberg, Chief Ad-
ministrator Don Butler, Administrator R. Larry
Wells, Building Inspector Richard Combs, Road
Department Superintendent Bob Lester, Solid
Waste Director Joe Danford, Maintenance Su-
perintendent Joe Bearden, Emergency. Manage-
ment/911 Coordinator Marshall' Nelson, and
Captain Ray Richter.
The meeting was called to order at 6:04 p.m.,
EDT..
Administrator R. Larry Wells opened the meet-
ing with prayer and Chairman Michael L. Ham-
mond led the pledge of allegiance.
RECEIVE BIDS #9495-32 1995 SEDAN
(PLANNING & BUILDING DEPARTMENT)
Pursuant to advertisement to receive sealed bids
for a 1995 4 dr.. Sedan for the Building Depart-
ment, the Board received the following bid: Bil-
ly Carr Chevrolet $19,375.00 1995 Caprice;
$16,595.00 -1995 Lumina.
The Board tabled this bid for further review and
recommendation by Chief Administrator Don
Butler.
RECEIVE BIDS #9495-33 1995 SEDAN W/
TRADE-IN (1994 BLAZER, BLDG. DEPT.)
Pursuant to advertisement to receive sealed bids
for a 1995 4 dr. Sedan with a trade-in allowance
for 1994 Chevrolet Blazer (Building Depart-
ment), the Board received the following bid: Bil-
ly Carr Chevrolet 1Q5 Chlevrolet Caprice -
$S,375.00 (w/$14,000 trade-in allowance for
Blazer); 1995-Chevrolet Lumina $2,595.00 (w/
$14,000.00 trade-in allowance for Blazer).
The Board tabled this bid for further review and
recommendation by Chief Administrator Don
Butler.
RECEIVE BIDS #9495 SELL 1994 BLAZER
(BUILDING DEPARTMENT) ,
Pursuant to advertisement to receive sealed bids
to sell a 1994 Blazer (Building Department), the
Board received the following bid:'Cora Sue Rob-
inson $500.00 "
The Board tabled this bid for further renew and
recommendation by Chief Administrator Don
Butler.
CONSENT AGENDA
Commissioner Traylor motioned to approve the
consent agenda. Commissioner Armstrong sec-
onded the motion. After .'discussion regarding
the payment of the Life Management billings,
the motion passed 3-2 (Chairman Hammond
and Commissioner Peters opposed).
Consent Agenda Items Approved: A. Minutes -
April 19, 1995 workshop; April 24, 1995 spe-
cial meeting; April 25; 1995 regular meeting;
May 2 1995 special meeting; May 9, 1995 -reg-
ular meeting; B Invoices a. Preble-Rish, Inc.'-
Victona Ae Bridge $10000 payment to be
made from professional eng. services); b Life
Management Center Baker Act $733 28 (pay-
ment to be made from mental health Baker
A,) "". '
COOPERATIVE` EXTENSION SERVICE -
COUNTY EXTENSION AGENT PROMO-
TION
Chief Administrator Don Butler discussed 'a let-
ter from the- L'njersity of Florida Cooperative
Extension Service regarding County Extension
Agent Roy Lee Carner's promotion Mr. Butler
state thai Mr Cartler's promotion would signtiy
an increase of .750 00 and the Florida Cooper-
ative 'Extension` Service is requesung that the
County a`-iume 33"- of the increase, which is
$1,567 50 eil'ecuve August 11, 1995. After discus-
sion, the Board requested that Mr. Butler review.
the itUration and resent hi findings by the
next regular Board neeung, June 13. 1995
PARADISE BAY SUBDIVISION (COMPRE-
HENSIVE PLAN)
Upon recommendation by Chief Administrator
Don Butler Corrmmissioner Yeager motioned to
grant a preliminary developmentt order to Para-
dise Bay .Subdj.'iston bawed on the fact; presenl-
ed to the Gult County Planning and Deselop-
ment Renew Board Commiisioner Armstrong
seconded the motion and the moon passed
unanimously.
GRANT APPLICATION ECONOMIC DE-
VELOPMENT ADMINISTRATOR / RESOLU-
TION NO. 95-21
Chet' AdminuLtrator Don Butler discussed an m-
ltation thai th e County had received to submit.
a grant application to the Economic Deselop-
ment Administration (EDAI for funds to build
an industrial park in White City. He also stated
that the funds were to be used only for the
building but that there ere sources available to
purchase the land. The Board agreed that Chief
Administrator Butler and Ms Tamara Lame
could pursue other funding source, to purchase
the land. After discussion. Commissioner Yeag-
er motioned to adopt the Resolution No. 95-21,
stating a submit -ion of pre-application for grant
funds for construction of an Industrial Park to
the U.S. Department of Commerce, as part of
the grant application to the Economic Develop-
ment Admmntration Commis-ioner Peters-sec-
onded the motion and the motion passed unani-
mously. (A copy o( resolution is on file in
Clerk's office).
TUCKER TRACT MANAGEMENT PLAN
Chief Administrator Don' Butler discussed the
time involved in preparing the Tucker Tract
Management Plan .to obtain grant funds. He
statedd that Lme plan had been approved but that
the grant fund;, were no longer available -. :
ADVERTISE TO ABANDON ALLEYWAYS -
ST. JOE BEACH
Commissioner Yeager motioned to advertise to
abandon an alley between Pine street and Canal ,
Street and an alley between. Bay Street and Ca-
nal Street in St. Joe Beach. Commissioner Arm-
strong seconded the motion and the motion
passed 4-1 (Cormmis ioner Peters opposed )
INVOICE PREBLE-RISH. INC. (1995 ROAD
PAVING PROGRAM).
Upon rcommendation by Don Butler, Crommis-
sloner peters mouoned to pay an invoice from
Preble Rith Inc. by amending the tmoal amount
to t-176 ,1. for design services on the 1995 Road
Paving Program. Commissioner Armstrong sec-
onided the motion and the motion passed unani-
mously. It was noted that Mr. Butler requested
the original amount of the invoice be changed to
be in accordance with the payment fee schedule
of which engineering services are to be paid.
WATER DEPARTMENT PAST DUE PAY-
MENTS' .'
Upon request by Chief Administrator Don But-
ler, Chairman Hammond directed County At-
torney Barbara Sanders to drift f."rm ktiTer to
send to water system users ', It, l'.ise ra-t due
accounts. '
AMBULANCE CONTRACT
Chairman Hammond stated thi based on the
previous workshop meetings, he .felt that the
Board is in agreement that it is necessary'for the
County to assume the ambulance service from
Gulf Pines Hospital. The Board also stated that
this would be necessary to provide better ser-
vice to the people of Gulf County.
ADVERTISE FOR BIDS (8) EIGHT PAGERS
FOR AMBULANCE SERVICE
Upon request by Chief Administrator Don But-
ler, Commissioner Peters motioned to advertise


for bids for (8) eight pagers for the ambulance
service. Commissioner Yeager seconded the mo-
tion and the motion passed unanimously. The
Board requested that Mr. Butler provide the bid
specifications to the Clerk's office.
AMBULANCE SERVICE COMMITTEE
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second
by Commissioner Traylor, and unanimous vote,
the Board agreed to appoint Chief Administra-
tor Don Butler, Administrator R. Larry Wells
and Deputy Bobby Plair as the Ambulance Ser-
vice Committee.
INDIGENT CARE CONTRACT
Chairman Hammond stated that he aind Chief
Administrator Don Butler would be renegotiat-
ing the indigent care contract with (Gulf Pines


Hospital.
AMBULANCE SERVICE
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second
by Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous
vote, the Board agreed that effective on Mon-
day, July 31, 1995, at 12:00 p.m. (noon), EDT.,
the County would assume the ambulance ser-
vice from Gulf Pines Hospital. Chairman Ham-
mond stated that Gulf Pines Hospital would be.
notified in writing 6f the Board's decision..
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF COUNTIES -
MEETING,
Chief Administrator Don Butler reported on a
meeting he attended in Blountstown sponsored
by the Florida Association of Counties.
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF COUNTIES -
SUPPLEMENTAL DISTRIBUTION (POPULA-
TION),
Chairman Hammond stated that he had been
notified by John Smith of the Florida Associa-
tion of Counties that Gulf County is eligible for
supplemental distribution funds for counties
with a prison population of 7% or more with a
total county population under 50,000. He also
stated that Gulf County should receive around
$75,000.00 in supplemental distribution funds.
UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION -
TOMMY SKIPPER
Chief Administrator Don Butler discussed a bill-
ing in the amount of $192.92 from the Florida
Labor and Employment Security for unemploy-
ment compensation for Tommy Skipper. After
discussion, the Board took no action.
INVOICE KETCHUM, WOOD, AND BUR-
GERT, P4A. (MEDICAL EXAMINER SERVIC-
ES)
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second
by Commissioner Armstrong and unanimous
vote, the Board agreed to table an invoice from
Ketchum, Wood, and .Burgert,: P.A. in the
amount of $3,362.00 for medical examiner ser-
vices.
RENEWAL OF SALTWATER PRODUCTS LI-
CENSE
Upon motion by Commissioner Yeager, second
by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous vote,
the Board agreed to renew the County's saltwa-
ter products license for a fee of $300.00. It was
noted that payment would be made from Other
Current Charges and Obligations.
PRISONER MEDICAL BILL- D. MILLER
Commissioner Traylor motioned to pay an in-
voice from the Gulf County Public Health Unit
in the amount of $66.00 for prisoner Dean Mill-
er. CommiSsioner Peters seconded the motion
and ,the motion passed 4-1 (Chairman Ham-
mond opposed).
JUDICIAL ORDER ST. VS. B. HAGANS
Commissioner Peters motioned to pay a judicial
order for attorney fees for 9ordon Schuler, in
the amount of '1.670.00, Case No. 94-0212-CF,
as order by Circuit Judge N. Russell Bower.
Commissioner Traylor seconded the motion and
the motion' passed 4-1 (Chairman Hammond
opposed). ,
COMMODITY CONTRACT
UPon motion by Commissioner Peters, second
by Commissioner Yeager, and unanimous vote,
the Board agreed for the chairman to sign the
commodity contact effective. July 1, 1995
through June 30. 1996.
HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN
Upon motion by Commissioner Traylor, second
by Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous
vote, the Board approved the Hazard Mitigation
Plan as pres-ented by Administrator R. Larry
Wells
The meeting recessed at 7:12 p.m., EDT.
The meeting reconvened at 7:31 p.m., EDT.
HIGHWAY 22A AND OLD BAY CITY ROAD
Mr.Bill Kennedy of Preble-Rish, Inc noted that
BayP City Road and Highway 22A would be
completed within the' week by C.W. Roberts,
Inc.:
INVOICE SOUTHEASTERN MECHANI-
CAL (STONE MILL CREEK BRIDGE)
Upon moon by Commissioner Traylor. second
by Commisi.ioner eager, and unanimous vote,
the Board approved Ihe'fOllow-ng invoices from
Southeastern Mechanical: $15,73732 for the
Stone Mill Creek Bridge Project (Bid P9495-08)
and $5,359 20 for the Victoria Avenue Bridge
Project (Bid #9495-09). It was noted that pay-
ment would be made form.the Secondary Road
and Bridge Fund.
BEACON HILL PARK PROJECT
Mr Bill Kennedy of Preble-Rish, Inc. noted that
: no inquires had been made for the bid specifica-
tions on the Beacon Hdill Park Project.
INVOICE PREBLE-RISH, INC. 11995 ROAD
PAVING PROGRAM)
Upon motion by Commissioner Traylor, second
by Commissioner Armstrong, the Board agreed
to amend their previous motion, and to pay
Preble-Rish, Inc. the total invoice amount of
$9,526.91.
ARGUS CONTRACT
County Attorney Sanders stated that she and
Chief Administrator Don Butler are still review-
ing 'the Argus Contract. After discussion, Coin-
mttsioner Armstrong motioned to approve the
Argus contract and to allow the chairman to
sign the contract,.contingent upon Chief Admin-
istrator Don Butler's final approval. Commis-
sioner Yeager seconded the motion and the mo-
tion passed unanimously. The Board requested
that County Attorney Sanders send a copy of
the contract to Argus for their review.
VENDING ORDINANCE
After discussion, the Board agreed to review the
proposed vendor's ordinance as presented by
County Attorney Barbara Sanders.
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS -
LAWSUIT (DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS)
Upon' motion by Commissioner Traylor, second
by Commissioner Armstrong and. unanimous
vote,, the Board agreed to join Holmes and
Washington Counties in a lawsuit against the
Department of Community Affairs regarding
the distribution of HUD Disaster Funds. The
Board 'also requested that County Attorney
Sanders file the necessary documents on behalf
of Gulf.County.
HUD DISTRIBUTION OF DISASTER
FUNDS
Commissioners Traylor and Yeager and Chair-
man Hammond discussed Congressman Peter-
son's involvement in the distribution f the HUD
disaster funds and his lack of support on behalf
of Gulf County. Commissioner Peters stated
that he completely supports Congressman Pe-
t person.
CHARLIE COLE INTERNATIONAL SCI-
ENCE FAIR
Solid Waste Director Joe Danford noted that
Charlie Cole of Wewahitchka, placed 4th at the
International Science Fair held in Canada.
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PRO-
TECTION'- WORKSHOP
Solid Waste Director Joe Danford noted that the
Department of Environmental Protection will
hold a workshop for the general public on
Thursday, May 25, 1995 at 7:00 p.m., EDT in the
County Commissioners' meeting room.
FILL REIMBURSEMENTS
Solid Waste Director Joe Danford discussed
whether the Board will be able to be reimbursed.
through grant funds for the'soil contamination
project at the Gulf County Road Department.
SOLID WASTE DIRECTOR SALARY PAID
FROM RECYCLING AND EDUCATION
GRANT
Solid Waste Director Danford recommended


that a major portion of his salary be paid from
the Recycling and Education Grant instead of
Small County Grant. The Board agreed to this
recommendation for the 1995-96 budget year.
INVOICE TRIANGLE CONSTRUCTION
(DOC WHITFIELD ROAD)
Commissioner Armstrong motioned to pay the
invoices from Triangle Construction in the
amount of $18,409.90 for Type II Asphalt to re-
pair Dec Whitfield Road because it was an
emergency situation. Commissioner Peters sec-
onded the motion and the motion passed unani-
mously. It was noted that the road repair was
completed by the Road Department.
INVOICE HONEYVILLE PAINT AND
BODY SHOP REPAIR OF DUMP TRUCK


Upon motion by Commissioner Traylor, second
by Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous
vote, the Board approved an invoice from Hon-
eyville Paint and Body Shop in the amount of
$13,173.00 for the repair of a 1991 Mack Dump
Truck that was involved in an accident. It was
noted that the invoice amount was different
from the original quote of $12,950.00 but that
the insurance company would reimburse the
County for the difference less the deductible.
INVOICE SOUTHERN EARTH SCIENCES
(SOLID CONTAMINATION PROJECT)
Upon motion by Commissioner Traylor, second
by Commissioner Armstrong and unanimous
vote, the Board agreed to pay an invoice in the
amount of $2,285.00 from Southern Earth Sci-
ences for the contamination assessment report:
It was noted that payment would be made from
Other Current Charges and Obligations.
GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE ADDI-
TIONAL PUMP
Maintenance Superintendent Joe Bearden noted
that the Gulf County Courthouse Complex was
in need of another well pump. After discussion,
the Board noted that this matter could wait until
the next budget year.
MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT FUEL
TANK
Maintenance Superintendent Bearden noted
that he had purchased a 550 gallon fuel tank for
the emergency generator.
GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE BIDS FOR
NEW BOILER
The Board discussed the specifications for the
new boiler for the Gulf County Courthouse. It
was noted that the bids would be received at the
next regular meeting on Tuesday, June 13,1995.
SHERIFF'S SEARCH AND RESCUE UNIT -
MEETING AREA
After discussion, Chairman Hammond stated
that the Sheriff's Search and Rescue Unit could
use the County Commissioner's Meeting Room
to hold their meetings.
GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE SIGN
WITH STREET ADDRESS (911)
Emergency Management/911 Coordinator Mar-
shall Nelson presented a cost estimate for a sign'
to display in front of the Gulf County Court-
house that would include the Sheriff's office ad-
dress. After discussion, Chairman Hammond
requested that Mr. Nelson contact Sheriff
McKeithen about Sheriff's office paying half of
the cost for the sign.
EMERGENCY MEDICAL DISPATCH TRAIN-
ING
Emergency Management/911 Coordinator Nel-
son recommended that the emergency medical
dispatch training course for the 911 dispatchers
be held on July 24 and 25, 1995 at a cost of
$204.00 per trainee. It was noted that no bids
were received for this project (Bid #9495-31).
SHIP PROGRAM DOWNPAYMENT ASSIS-
TANCE (H. NIX)
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second
by Commissioner Traylor, and unanimous vote,
the Board approved downpayment assistance.
for Mr. Hiram Nix, not to exceed $22,000.00.
BEACH PERMIT BUILDING DEPART-
MENT VEHICLE
Building Inspector Richard Combs requested a
beach driving permit for the Building Depart-
ment vehicle. The Board requested that Chief
Administrator Don Butler writer a letter to Tax
Collector Eda Ruth Taylor requesting a beach
driving permit.
INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT' BETWEEN
GULF COUNTY AND FRANKLIN COUNTY
Building Inspector Combs noted that all Gulf
County. contractors can be grandfathered-ini, in
Franklin County June I through June 30,1995 to'
work in Franklin County and that all Franklin
County contractors will be grandfathered-in
Gulf County to work in Gulf County, during the
same time period.
MEDICAL DIRECTOR SHERIFF'S OFFICE
ChiefAdministrator Don Butler noted that Dr.
Dafn Pedro resigned iasMedical ,Director for the
Shtruf Department. The Board requested that'
Mr Budler 'cdntiact he Gulf County Public
Health Unit about temporary assistance until ia
permanent director can be named. The Board
also requested that a letter be sent to Dr. San Pe-'
dro thanking him for his many years of service.
AWARD BID #9495-34 SELL 1994 BLAZER
(BUILDING DEPARTMENT)
Upon recommendation by Chief Administrator
Butler, Commissioner Peters motioned to reject
all bids received for bid #9495-34 to sell a 1994
Blazer (Building Department). commissioner
Yeager seconded the motion and the motion
passed unanimously.
AWARD BID #9495-32 -11995 4 DR. SEDAN
Upon recommendation by Chief Administrator
Butler, Commissioner Peters motioned to reject
all bids received for bid #9495-32 for a 1995 4 dr.
Sedan. Commissioner Yeager seconded the mo-
tion and the motion passed unanimously..
AWARD BID #9495-33 1 1995 4 DR. SEDAN
WITH TRADE-IN ALLOWANCE FOR 1994
BLAZER
Upon recommendation by Chief Administrator
Butler, Commissioner Traylor motioned to
award bd #9495-33 to Billy Carr Chevrolet for a
1995 Chevrolet. Lumina in the amount of
$16,595.00 minus the $14,000.00 trade-in allow-
ance for a 1994 Chevrolet Blazer (Building De-
partment), for a total sell. price of $2,595.00.
Commissioner Yeager seconded the motion and
the motion passed unanimously. It was noted
that payment would be made by the Building
Department.
TEMPORARY BEACH DRIVING PERMIT -
CONTRACTORS
Commissioner Yeager requested that a tempo-
rary beach driving permit be issued by the
Building Department in coordination with the
Sheriff's office to contractors for the sole pur-
pose of jetting pilings down Chairman Ham-
mond requested specific dates be named in each
permit. The Board had no objections.
INDIAN PASS BOAT RAMP SIGN
Upon inquiry by Commissioner Yeager, Chief
Administrator Don Butler stated that he had
contacted Signworks abouf creating a sign for
the Indian Pass Boat Ramp. :
INTERAGENC TASK FORCE ON NET
FISHING BAN
Chairman Hammond appointed Commissioner
Yeager to serve as the Board's representative to
serve on the Governor's Interagency Task Force.
on 'the net fishing ban to identify activities and
resources to help the affected individuals and
their communities'
DALKEITH DRAINAGE DITCH PROJECT
Upon motion by Commissioner Armstrong, sec-
ond by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous
Vote, the Board agreed to purchase and install
(2) two drop gates on Dalkeith Road to assist
with the drainage problem during flooding. The
Board directed the Road Dp.rtnment to pur-
chase and install the gates '.oiU the purchase
price not to exceed $2,500.00.
SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT -INVOICE HI-
LAND COMMUNICATIONS (911 SUR-
CHARGE)
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second
by Commissioner Traylor, and unanimous vote,
the Board agreed to pay (2) two invoices from
Hiland Communications in the amounts of
$100.00 and $150.00 for repair of radio repeaters
(Sheriff's office). It was noted that payment
would be made from funds received from the
$12.50 surcharge assessment fees for 911, contin-
gent upon that payment is in accordance with
the guidelines of Ordinance 93-09.


SHIP PROGRAM
Commissioner Peters noted that SHIP Program
applications for grants, rehabilitation loans and
downpayment assistance are now available
June 1, 1995, through July 15, 1995 in Port St. Joe
and Wewahitchka.
BOAT PARKS/ RAMPS USER FEE
The Board discussed establishing a user's fee for
the county boat parks/ramps. They also dis-
cus.sed the State's lack of upkeep on these facili-
ties and how the County is responsible to main-
tain these facilities with County fund. After
discussion, the Board requested that County At-
torney Sanders research this matter and report


Don't Let

Spoiled Food

Ruin Your


Cookout
Warm weather brings picnic
and cookout season, a traditional
time for family and friends to
gather, socialize and have fun.
But higher outdoor temperatures
can also help foodborne bacteria
multiply at an alarming rate,
spoiling food and causing illness.
When left unrefrigerated, var-
ious food products can become
contaminated with bacteria.
Some bacteria-undetected by
sight, smell or taste-produce
dangerous toxins that cause food
poisoning.. Especially at warmer
temperatures, they thrive on
foods that are left out. Even if the
bacteria are later killed by heat or
cold, the toxins can remain to
cause illness.
Consumers can help safe-,
guard their health by. observing
these food safety tips:
*Keep foods cold (below 40
degrees Fahrenheit) or hot (above
140 degrees Fahrenheit). Foodg
left out between those tempera-
tures for more than two hours
should be discarded.
Keep cooked foods separate
from raw foods. Cross-
contamination of foods could oc-
cur if bacteria-harboring raw food
comes in contact with cooked
Foods. Wash hands, utensils,
cutting boards and counter tops
after preparing or handling raw
meats.
Avoid interrupted cooking.
If you are partially cooking foods
indoors to finish cooking on the
grill, make sure the food goes di-
rectly from'the oven to the, hdt
grill. Don't let the food stand par-
tially. cooked for any period of
time.
Store leftovers in small, sep-
arate containers and refrigerate.' '
Meat, poultry, fish, and
eggs should not be eaten raw.
These foods should be main-
tained in a refrigerator at a, tem-
perature below 40 degrees Fah-
renheit 'and cooked thoroughly
before eating. A cooking tempera-
ture of' 160 degrees Is advised.
When cooking, use a meat ther-,
mometer or follow these tips: ,
Poultry-Cook it until the
meat is white and the juices run
clear. Don't eat it if you see blood
or pink meat.
Hamburger Because the
meat is ground and mixed, bacte-
ria is'present throughout the bur-
ger. Don't eat it if there are traces
of pink in' the center or blood in
the juices.
Steaks-Can be safely cook-
ed medium. That's because harm-
ful bacteria in beef are found on
the surface of the steak, not in
the interior.
Fish-Cook until. it flakes
easily and is no longer translu-
cent in the center.
*Eggs-Cook eggs and egg
dishes thoroughly. Don't even
sample anything containing, raw
eggs such as uncooked dough
and cake batter.
Foodborne Illness symptoms
are much like those of the flu'
which include headache, diar-
rhea, vomiting, abdominal
cramps and fever. These signs
may not appear until several
hours or even days after eating a
contaminated food.



back to them.
RE-DISTRICTING COUNTY WIDE VOT-
ING :
After discussion about re-districting and
county-wide voting, Commissioner Traylor mo-
,ionr.d to proceed with changing the consent
apeemeni rngardmng smoJe member districts'.
Comnmm,"ioner Veager 'econded the motion and
, .the motion passed 4-1 (Commissioner Peters op-
posed. .
DEPARTMENT OF AIR FORCE HURRI-
CANE PLAN (WHITE CITY PARK)
.Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second
b, Comm issioner Yeager, and unanimous vote,
thc Board agreed to allow the Depanme~r, ,r
A .r Force park (2) two drone recovery vessels at
Sthe White City Park canal. ,
There being no futher business and Upon mo-
tion by Commissioner Yeager, second by Com-
missioner Traylor, and unanimous vote, the
meeting did then adjourn at 9:05 p.m., EDT.








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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995 PAGE 5B








OUTDOORS

by AARON PASS



Lightning Doesn't


Have to Strike Twice

Lightning the thunderbolt of the gods is one of the most powerful
and cataclysmic of all natural forces. A single bolt may carry as much as
100 million volts:arid can literally.- in a flash discharge a tremen-
dous surge of energy.
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
2,869 people were killed by lightning between 1959 arid 1988. From 1980
to 1986. more people'w ere killed by lightning than by tornadoes and hur-
ricanes combined.
Lightning is a flow of electrical current between the earth and clouds.
It occurs when differential charges of positive and negative energy build
up during a storm. Because air is a poor electrical conductor, the voltage
must be very high for a lightning discharge to .occur.
Also, because air is such a poor conductor, the current will seek any
path that better conducts electricity. This includes most tall objects such
as trees, utility poles or even you, if you happen to be the tallest object in
the area. It also is dangerous to be near a lightning strike because the
electrical charge can pass through the ground to the surrounding area.
At home, you are well-protected if you follow some commonsense
precautions. Do not use the phone 'and stay away from exposed pipes,
duct work and fireplaces during electrical storms. Cars, except convert-
ibles, also offer good protection from lightning. However, if you are
caught during a storm, you should take measures to protect yourself.
The best idea is to pay' attention to the weather and not go out if a
thunderstorm is imminent. Boaters, especially, should watch the weather.
Boats on open water are not only potential lightning targets, but also may
be threatened by high winds accompanying thunderstorms.
On land, you should seek shelter during storms, but avoid sheds or
tents out in the open. Likewise, avoid hilltops, open fields or meadows
you don't want to become a lightning pole or any sort of tower.
Avoid metal when lightning threatens. Stay away from pipe lines,
fences, rails and metal gates. Don't hold on to long or metallic objects
such as guns, golf clubs or even fishirig rods.
Seek low ground such as a creek valley, hollow or a similar area low
on a'hillside, but don't go. into a flood-prone area (or dry creek bed in the
West). In the forest, avoid large trees because of both lightning and
wind danger; A'thiek stand of small trees in a low area is safer from
both hazards.
If you'get caught out in a large open field, seek the' lowest area avail-
able, but do not lie flat on the ground. The earth conducts electricity very
well. Kneel and bend forward, presenting the lowest profile possible while
minimizing your contact with the ground.
For outdoors enthusiasts, lightning is a force to be reckoned with; its
potential for danger should never be taken lightly. III
Aaron Pass has written hundreds of articles about hunting, fishing and camping
for newspapers andmadgazines. '
S1991. PM Editorial Services', "





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PAGE 6B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995

Rules Change


Escapes Slash of


Chiles' Veto Pen

Governor's Cook Shack Pique
Wins Out Over Thirst For Revenge
One bill Gov. Lawton Chiles didn't get to consider in the rush last
week is a rules reform package-two years in the making-that his aides
want him to veto because they say it is cumbersome and (bingo) gives
more power to the Legislature.
Although the self-described "he-coon" governor is cracking down on
government rules Which he says stalled his permit to bill a cook.shack
and makes voters damn mad, he is likely to veto this one if he feels it
strengthens the hand of that pesky Republican Senate and conservative
House that upsets him so.
His aides are urging him to use his executive powers to change the
rule-making process and allow agencies more flexibility to make "common
sense" decisions. Yeah.
There's a good reason Chiles didn't get to vent his anger on those law-
makers on this particular bill. Fellow Democrat Charles Williams, state
senator from Tallahassee and Branford, said Legislative leaders delayed
sending it to Chiles to consider until its supporters had time to persuade
him it was the best way to accomplish his goal of reducing government
rules 50 percent by 1997.
Good thinking.
Business groups, small counties and cities have been lobbying the
governor for his support. Most agencies and many environmentalists
oppose it. Chiles aides contend it is probably unconstitutional because it
allows a joint committee of House and Senate members to recommend
rules to be repealed or modified to the Legislature.
Bob McKnight. Florida Chamber of Commerce executive vice presi-
dent, said the bill is a good start. "If it doesn't become law, we're stuck
right where we've been for the last two years."
Me and Uncle Clem Rednek over on Flat Creek in Gadsden County
like the rules reform bill, of course. It ranks right up there with perfor-
mance-based program budgeting that most politicians dislike personally,
but know in their hearts is the right thing for the taxpayers.
And speaking of taxpayers and the intrusion of government in the pri-
vate lives of everybody, just consider what an ordinary couple in love has
to pay at the courthouse to get a simple marriage license.
,i Only $4 to the State Bureau of Vital Statistics to maintain a record in
a central statewide file. That, of course, is necessary and the price is:
about right, but it doesn't stop there.
Other fees include: $25 for the Family Courts Trust Fund; $22 to the
clerk to receive the application, process and issue the license; $30 for
Spouse Abuse Law Programs; and $7.50 for the Displaced Homemakers
Trust Fund. .
STotal: $88.50.
No wonder marriages are going to hell these days. Every liberal yahoo
in the countryside is riding on the- backs of the poor couple in love.
THOSE TURKEYS AGAIN: Our thanks to Florida TaxWatch for point-
ing out that legislators this year sneaked $36.5 million into the budget to
finance their pet projects. .. ,
Sneaked is the right word for the 43 items, the sneakers got through
that came as surprises. Most were not in the proposed preliminary bud-
gets of the governor or the legislature, but appeared miraculously with-
out public debate from the joint conference committee. They benefit spe-
cial interests or local areas of the state or they are low priority items fund-
ed over real needs of the people of the whole state. ,
Many lawmakers like it that way. The turkeys ar'e like drugs to them
and to their constituencies, causing an addiction extremely hard to elim-
inate.
These turkeys fly in cities, small towns and rural areas.
Putnam County, for instance, got $500,000 to build a crisis stabi-
lization unit and substance abuse Adetox facility not recommended by
HRS, the governor, or the Florida House. It was, however, a Senate bud-
get item (for $1.1 million originally) and-presto-came out of the confer-
ence committee where, apparently, some swapping took place.
Jacksonville and' Daytona Beach did even better with a $2 million
appropriation for Edward Waters and Bethune-Cookman Colleges.
They're. not even state institutions. The item was not in the House, Senate
or governor's budget and was not requested by the agency receiving the
funding, the Department of Commerce., But, yep, there it was in the con-
ference committee report.
It must be said that legislators are trying to reform some. They fought
off entrenched bureaucrats this year to implement something called per-
formance-based program budgeting that, was passed in 1994, and they
deserve credit for it.
But it's clear they're going to need more prodding (eternally perhaps)
by the voters and the media to do the right thing. Unmet state needs and
steadily rising taxes demand it.

Here's the Capitol News Round-up
Florida Gov. Lawton Chiles has drawn a line in the sand on his rele-
vancy as chief state administrator by cutting a whopping $103.4 million
from the state budget and a legal challenge of proposed education spend-
ing that pits him against the Republican Senate and the Democratic but
conservative House.
Chiles, the only Democratic governor re-elected in the four biggest
states in the country, also plans to bring the Florida Legislature back this
summer for his three-time defeated health care program, a special ses-
sion that Republicans say could turn into a veto over-ride route,
The 3-percent pay raise for state workers was not vetoed by Chiles,
nor was the $100 million earmarked for 3,700 new prison beds, but
Republican Education Commissioner Frank Brogan's $42 million plan to
improve education, that was approved by the Legislature, went down in
.veto flames.
Chiles said lawmakers violated their authority in trying to set state
policy rather than pass general laws. "It takes away fundamental spend-
ing decisions from the people at the local level and sends it back to the
bureaucrats in Tallahassee," Chiles said. He said Brogan's plans for the


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NEWS

ROUND-UP
by Jack Harper

$42 million to break the mold with new methods included Charter
Schools, operated privately under contract to school boards.
"I am outraged and mystified," Brogan said. "In no way would the
money be used to short-circuit the law. He complains the education bud-
get passed by the Legislature was inadequate, yet he vetoes $42 million
that could improve schools through innovation and reward districts
where students post higher test scores."
The education veto eliminated programs Chiles favors too, including
full-service schools and drop-out prevention programs. Most surprising-
ly, it struck down a program sponsored by Democratic House Speaker
Peter Wallace, a Chiles ally, requiring smaller class sizes in the first grade.
Chiles said those expenditures would widen the funding gap between
the state's school districts. He has already filed suit in the Florida
Supreme Court challenging an education budget item of $127 million
designed to lower classroom sizes from first through third grades by shift-
ing money from administration into the classrooms.
Chiles said it is mandatory cost shifting that would take away from
other educational needs.
Chiles, feeling he has been mistreated by Florida's first Republican
state Senate in more than 100 years and a conservative House, has hint-
ed for weeks he might veto the entire budget. He decided, however, to
attack it by line item vetoes and court challenges.
Most of the $39 billion budget remains intact, Including provisions to
allow commercial fishermen facing a net ban in July to draw unemploy-
ment benefits although they were private businessmen.
Chiles also let the telecommunications bill become law without his
signature. It allows cable television, long distance and local telephone
companies to compete for each other's business starting January 1, and
lifts state regulations on local phone rates.
He allowed the use of chaingangs for prisoners to work on outside
projects; streamlined the permitting process to trim mangrove trees, even
on adjacent state lands; but he vetoed a bill that would have made a
jury's recommendation advisory, but non-binding, on a judge in a death
penalty case.
TOBACCO. SUIT: A circuit judge ruled the 1994 law that gives the
state a big advantage.in suing tobacco companies for smoker related ill-.
nesses can't be applied retroactively, but he refused to overturn it.
However, if the ruling holds through appeal courts it would shrink the
state's lawsuit against 21 manufacturers from $1.4 billion to $300 mil-
lion.
Chiles vetoed a repeal of the law passed by lawmakers who said they
were duped by the governor and his legislative henchmen when it was
passed in 1994. They were not told what the bill was about and there was
no debate on it.
An override of the veto could come if lawmakers take it up again in
the special session on health care to be called later this summer.
SUGAR'S CLEANUPI: Here's a plan being proposed in Tallahassee to
use sugar profits to clean up the Everglades. It would allow the South
Florida Water Management District to buy foreign sugar for 12 to 15 cents
a pound and sell it on the U.S. market duty free for 22 cents. It would let
stand price supports that fuel Florida's $2-billiQn sugar industry.


Gulf NAACP Youth Attend
Workshop In Orlando


The Gulf County NAACP
Youth Council attended a sum-
mer educational youth workshop
hosted by the Florida State Con-
ference of NAACP branches, held
June 10 on Orlando. Local youth
participated in a variety of educa-
-tional and entertaining work-,
shops in which they received val-
uable and informative training
concerning summer employment,
testifig/SAT/ACT, and applica-
tions/interviews.
Members attending the train-
ing were Emma Yarrell, Angel
Shackleford, Kayla Yarrell, Sun-


day Bailey and Veronica Teague:"
These workshops will also be
'given at the National NAACP Con-
vention to be held July 8-13 in
Minneapolis, Minnesota. Repre-
sentatives from various major
business corporations will be
available to speak with the youth.
Scholarships will be awarded to
the youth at the Annual Florida
State Conference of NAACP
Branches Convention, held in Oc-
tober in Bradenton.
Interested youth or parents
may contact the Gulf County
NAACP branch for details'.


The Hannon

Insurance Agency
227-1133

Is Pleased to Announce
Its Association With
Gary White
Representing
Allstate & The Travelers
Life Insurance Companies
"Call Me About Your Life & Health Insurance Needs"


ELIJAH SMILEY, M.B.A.
Attorney at Law


*Incorporations

*Guardianship Minors


*Summary Probate

*Step Parent Adoptions


*rChapter 7 Bankruptcy

784-6606

538 Harmon Ave.. Panama City
BUSINESS LAW WILLS REAL ESTATE BODILY INJURY
"THE HIRING OF A LAWYER IS AN IMPORTANT DECISION THAT SHOULD NOT BE BASED SOLELY UPON ADVERTISEMENTS. BEFOREAOU DECIDE, ASK US
TO SEND YOU'FREE WRITTEN INFORMATION ABOUT OUR QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE."
AV g
,IAw ,S


Advertising Pays-Call 227-1278 or 229-8997
to Place Your Classified Ad Today!









PENCILS


New Numbers and

Old Favorites





Eberhard
Faber
UNI-BALL
XL ROLLER PENS
The fade resistant ink writes longer
than other leading roller pens.
Features redesigned point for
smoother writing. Cap ring
identifies color.


List Price $1.59


INK COLOR POINT


P2-FAB 60610 Black'
P2-FAB 60611, Blue
P2-FAB ,.I1 Red
P2-FAB 614u Black
P2-FAB 60615 Blue
:P2-FAB 60616 Red


(P2-SAN 64101) Logo 3, Black, 0.5 mm
(P2. -ri .j I t ,,,,:, Black, 0.7 mm
List Price $3.89


0.2 mm
0.2 mm
0.2 mm
0.4 mm
.0.4 mm
0.4 mm
k ix


(P2-SAN .1*. ,,-,, 4- Black, 0.5 mm
(P2-SAN 64161) Logo 4, Black, 0.7 mm
List Price $4.89


' 3f /'4


$1899




























1991 Geo Metro, a/c, am/fm cas-
sette, 5 speed, good condition. Call
647-8746 after 6:30 p.m. 2yp 6/22
1976 Holiday Rambler, runs good,
make offer. Call 229-8019 after 6
p.m. 2tc 6/22
1978 Ford 150 long bed truck, auto-
matic, pb, ps, V-8, new paint & tires,
$1,800. Phone 227-7591. ltp 6/22
1994 Ford 150 XLT extended cab,
loaded. 229-8768. ltp 6/22
'92 Nissan Maxima, 40k .miles, 229-
8573. 2tc 6/22
1990 Ford F150 XLT, a/c, p/w, p/l, 5
speed, good condition, $7,000 obo.
639-2533. 2tc 6/15
Red '90 Mercury Cougar LS, excellent
condition, must see. Original owner.
229-6437. 2tc 6/15
'92 Plymouth Voyager CC, 6 cyl.,
auto, air cond., am/fm radio, tilt
wheel, very clean. Call after 5 p.m.
229-8474. tfc 6/1
CASH NOW BUYING
Used Cars and Trucks. Local and out-
of-state vehicles. Two locations to
serve you. Mayhann Motor, Port St.
Joe, 229-6584, Mayhann Used Cars,
Wewahitchka, 639-5810. tfc 6/1





STEVE'S OUTBOARD SERVICE,
White City, anytime, 827-2902.
tfe 6/1





2 bedroom, 1 bath unfurnished trail-
er. Fenced in back yard, located on
St. Joe Beach. No pets. 647-5361.
Small 2 bdrm., 1 bath home. washer/
diyer, 5 miles from beach. $350 plus
deposit. 648-8751. 2tc 6/22


Apt. for rent, on Mexico Beach.
Ocean view, spacious, 2 bedroom, I
bath, washer/dryer hookup, cable TV,
water and garbage pickup included,
$500 per-month. No pets. 648-5903.
tfc 6/22
2 bedroom, 1 bath, mobile home, par-
tially furnished, cen. h/a, $275 rent,
$150 deposit. Bonita St., Highland
View. 647-3264. tfc 6/15
One bedroom apartment, 2 blocks
from beach on Beacon Hill. Reason-
able. 647-3331. tic 6/1
SNew storage units on St. Joe Beach
behind the Gulf Sands Motel on
Americus St. 5xl0's, lOxlO's, and
10x20's. Ask about our move-in spe-
cial. 227-7200. tfc 6/1
Two bedroom trailer,. for rent, fur-
nished or unfurnished. No pets. Call
647-5106. tfc 6/1
MOSS CREEK APTS., 904/639-
2722. 1 & 2 bedroom apartments lo-
cated 200 Amy Circle, Wewahitchka,
FL. Rent starts at $275. Cen. air &
he&t, blinds, carpeting, stove, refrig.
Equal Housing Opportunity. Hearing
impaired number 904-472-3952.
The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Private
baths. Daily or weekly rates. 302 Reid
Ave. Port St. Joe, 229-9000. tfc 6/1,
Liberty Manor Apts.. 800 Tapper
Dr., Port St. Joe. Affordable hous-
ing for the elderly and the handi-
capped.-
Cen. h &a, laundry facilities, energy
efficient const., handicapped equip-
ped apts., available. Stove & refrig.
furn., fully carpeted, 1 bdrm., apts.,
on-site manager.
Equal Opportunity Housing Com-
plex, Rent is based on income.
This complex is funded by the Farm-
ers Home Adminisutation and man-
aged by Ad'isors Realt. ,
Call 229-6353 for more information.
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
tfic 6/1

No need for wet carpets.; Dry clean
them with HOST. Use rooms right
away. Rent machine. St. Joe Furni-
ture, 227-1251. tfc6/1


PINE RIDGE APTS., (904) 227-7451.
Rents starting at $245.00 per mo. Af-
fordable Living for low to middle in-
come families. Featuring 1, 2 & 3
bedroom apts. with cen. h&a, energy
saving appliances, patios & outside
storage. For hearing Impaired call
(904) 472-3952. Equal Housing Op-
portunity. tfc 6/1
UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house. 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 6/1
Warehouses, small and large, some
with office, suitable for small' busi-
ness, 229-6200. tfc 6/1





Estate Yard Sale. Furniture, TV,
glassware, craft supplies, ladies'
clothes, fat man's clothes, fishing
tackle, tools. 223 Ninth St. Saturday
only, 8 to 12. Itp 6/22
.Yard Sale, Saturday, 8 a.m. 1 p.m.
Furniture, mattress & box springs,
clothes, odds and ends, 801 16th St.
Yard Sale, June 24, 8:00 a.m. Mov-
ing. Tools, bunk bed frame, tool box-
es, tackle, clothes, afghans, craft
items, rifle, too much to list. 34th St.,
:N., Lot 9, Mexico Beach. Rain cancels.
Yard Sale: Friday and Saturday, June
23 and 24, 7:00 a.m. till noon. 5 fami-
lies, 421 7th St., Mexico Beach. Super
Nintendo games, baby items, furni-
ture, adult & children's clothes,
paints, housewares, books, and lots
more. Come early Itp 6/22


PAGE 7B


I FO RNT I ORRET


Help wanted at Freckles Yogurt Shop,
648-4443. Itc 6/22
Gulf County Assoc. for Retarded Citi-
zens is accepting applications for the
position of SECRETARY / RECEP-
TIONIST. This position involves per-
forming general secretarial and recep-
tionist duties, and some bookkeeping
responsibilities. Hours are from 7:45
A.M. to 4':15 P.M.. Monday through
Friday. Qualifications are at least a
10th grade education, H.S. .diploma
preferred, and experience or course-
work. Additional information may be
obtained from the Association office at
200 Peters St., Port St. Joe, or call
229-6327. Closing date June 23,
1995. 2tc 6/15
People with similes, cooks, waitstaff
and dishwashers needed at Julie's on
Reid, 222 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe.
1te 6/22
SALES OPENING: Must have FL Real
Estate License. Week end hours re-
quired. Contact Parker Realty of Mexi-
co Beach, 648-5777. tfe 6/1'
The Gulf County School Board is an-
nouncing a job opening for a' School
Psychologist. The position will be for
Port St. Joe area schools. Applica-
tions are available at the School
Board office. Gulf County School
Board is an equal opportunity em-
ployer.
RN's and LPN's day or night shift
available. Apply in person. Bay St. Jo-
seph Care Center, 220 9th St., Port
St. Joe. tfc 6/1


LOOKING for mature individual to as-
sist Regional Vice President of Primer-
ica Financial Services. Take charge
and manage a portion of our multi-
faceted business. We offer high com-
mission income potential, flexible
hours, many other pluses. Could start
part time. For interview, call today.
648-8565. tfc 6/1

CNA's needed for all shifts. Training
available. Apply in person at Bay St.
Joseph Care Center, 220 Ninth St.,
Port St. Joe. tfc 6/1
POSTAL JOBS, Start $12.08/hr. For
exam and application info. call (219)
769-8301 ext. FL 515, 9 am 9 pm,
Sun.-Fri. 4tp 6/22
Advanced Home. Health Care. needs
nurse, R.N, forPort St. Joe area, Mar-
lanna, Wewahitchka, full time. Please
call for further details. (904) 769-
3398 or 1-800-554-9734. Itc 6/22
DRIVERS-Assigned equipment goes
home with.you! Home every' 10-14
days. Ex. pay and benefits including:
pay for exp., health/life, bonuses,
profit sharing. Driving school grads
welcome. Call McClendonl 1-800-633-
0550, ext. AL-77. Itp 6/22



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING PAYS!
Call 227-1278 to place yours. $3.50
for first insertion, $2.00 a week for
consecutive runs, plus 54 per word
for all over 20.


- --


TRADE &SEVIE


MIRROIft IMAGE--A-tod Detail." For -
appt. call Rich *8:-4348:- 5te 6/22
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meeting: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON '
Thurs., 8:00 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs. meetings at 1st United
Methodist Church, PSJ


MR.

MTTLTEW

REMOVER

ROOFS
EAVES
DRIVES
SIDING
*ETC.

Roof Cleaning
Involves NO Pressure.
904-784-7438
located in Panama City, FL
S3tc 6/15

r -- ------ -----

St. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
Small Engine Repairs I
Factory Warranty Center -


Lawnmowers 1
Weedeaters
o Tillers
Chain Saws
SGenerators
Pumps I
o Engine Sales


I 706 I1st St. St. Joe i
I 227-2112
L-_-- ----------- J


Troy/built, Snapper, John Deere, Ku-
bota, Stihl, Hsquarvna. Sales and
Service. 1-800-834-6744.
thru 9/95

COOPER'S WELDING
corner of Shellfish &
2449 Hayes Ave., H.V.
Aluminum boat repairs, custom
built trailers & repairs of all
types. Free, estimates. Price not
to exceed estimates.

Port St. Joe Lodge No. 11
Reg. Stated Communication
1st and 3rd Thursday of each
month, 8:00 p.m., Masonic Hall,
214 Reid Ave.
Marlen Taylor, W.M.
Bill Jordon, Sec.
pd. thru 95

C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box A1C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018


STRICKLAND ELECTRIC
All Type Electrical Work
24 Hr. Service
LIC, #ER0013168 *INSURED
647-8081
ALAN STRICKLAND

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER
1-904-265-4794
29 Years Experience
WORKER'S COMPENSATION
PERSONAL INJURY
NO RECOVERY**.NO FEE
7229 Deerhaven Road, P.C. ,4/6


904-229-8161
Faye's Nail &
Tanning Salon
TOTAL NAIL CARE
Certified Nail Technician
1905 Long Ave., Port St. Joe
Wolff Tanning System Call for Appt.


Harmon's Heavy Equipment co.
Specializing in Black Top Soil
BULLDOZERS BACKHOES "LOADERS *TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924,OR 648-5767 if no answer

LIC # RF0051042 '
FREE ESTIMAxTES RG 0051068
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODEIING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES ANI) SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 904/229-6821


Christian womah interested in baby-
sitting, in my home Monday Friday.
For more information call 227-7454.

Summer Specials
FOUR
SEASONS
PAINTING
-- Free Estimates
Pressure Washing Painting
Re-Screening Repair Work
Call 648-5029
tfe 6/22

BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair
Rebuild Wrecks
Body & Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body Work
Call or See BOB HEACOCK
Baltzell Ave. Phone 227-7229
tfc 4/6

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Perms

Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.



AVOn

Catherine L. Colier
Indenpendent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460

5x10 10x10 10x20
On Site Rentals 6. Days A Week
ASK ABOUT FREE MONTH'S RENT
St. Joe Rent-All
First St. 227-2112


St. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Port St. Joe 227-2112


TLC LAWN SERVICE
"Catering to All Your Lawn Service Needs"'
MOWING, EDGING, TRIMMING, SPRAYING,
FERTILIZING, WEEDING, CLEAN OUTS,
SPRINKLER REPAIR, AND LANDSCAPING
Free Estimates
Call 229.6435 c2 4/6


STUTZMAN ROOFING
RC #0038936
Specializing in Reroqfs *
Single-ply & Repairs
S"Where quality is higher than pride"
229-8631


THE FASHION EXCHANGE
220 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe
227-3183
New & Used Clothing
for the Entire Family.
Accessories and Misc. Items.


COSTING 'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
224 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581


A GIFT SHOP for
CHILDREN OF ALL AGES
Books *Toys Etc.
My Very Own Book
528 6th St. Phone 227-1636

'

SBARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair


* Lawnmowers
* Weedeaters
Chain Saws
Generators
Pumps
Tillers
Go-Karts

229-27
328 Reid A


MOWING RAKING WEEDING
EDGING TRIMMING
LANDSCAPING.
C.J.'S Lawn

Service
Serving Mexico Beach, St. Joe
Beach & Port St. Joe
"I Will Work for YOU!"
Mexico Beach, FL *
(904) 648-8492Pd Mar.


Piano Lessons, all ages/levels. Ex-
perienced teacher, $40/month. Mexi-
co Beach, 648-4592.. tfc 6/1


STUMP GRINDING
Average Stump $10.00
1-800-628-8733
A-1 Tree Service & Stump Grinding
,Vickery Enterprises. Inc..
'..- tfc 4/6


... ..- GULF COAST

.y- ^AWN SPRINKLERS
Nelson, Rainbird and Tore .
INSTALLATION and REPAIR
Free Estimates and Desigi
Allen Norris 229-8786 Chuck Smith 229-8536



Williamson's

Well Drilling & Pump Service
'St. ULic. #3075
WATER FILTERS
CONDITIONERS
PURIFICATION SYSTEM

Croska Williamson tf/1 P.O. Box 1173



FOSTER TREE &

LAWN SERVICE


.... Or Too Small
Jerry Foster FREE ESTIMATES *
Licensed & insured 904/639-5368
tfc 6/1




6Pet & !Property Tenders

Let us do the caring while you're away
CARE IN YOUR HOME, SERVICE LOW AS $8.00 A DAY
by Joe and Marie Romanelli
Serving Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas (904) 229-1065


27
ve,


Garage Sale: 131 Barbara Drive,
Ward Ridge. Friday, June 23, 8 a.m. -
2 p.m.





Gulf County Assoc. for Retarded Citi-
zens is accepting applications for the
position of COMMUNITY SITE SUPER-
VISOR for the lawn maintenance
crew.. This position involves supervis-
ing and training approx. 6 lawn main-
tenance workers and driving. Hours
are from 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Mon-
day thru Friday. Qualifications are at
least a high school education and
ability to maintain Class D drivers li-
cense, Additional information may be
obtained from the Association office at
.-200 Peters SL, Port St. Joe, or call
229-6327. Closing date cJune 30,
1995. ltc 6/22
Responsible, reliable sitter needed in
my home Monday through Friday.
References required. Call 647-3354
after 6 p.m. EDT. ltc 6/22
Gulf County Guidance Clinic is ac-
cepting applicants for a part-time (20
hours per week) Adult Day Treatment
Counselor. Duties include conduct-
ing: treatment planning, counseling
and regular social skill training in a
small adult mental health day treat-
ment program. Min. Req.: Bachelor's
degree (Master's degree preferred) in a
mental health discipline with applica-
ble experience and completion of HRS






HELP WANTED

Part Time Clerk
SImmediately *

Apply in Person

El Governor Motel
Mexico Beach
2to, 6/15 & 22


Sunshine-Jr. Food Wewahitchka, Florida
Looking for several full and part time associates. committed
to learning and developing its expanding deli and store oper-
ations. We offer exciting new opportunities with above av-
erage salary and room for advancement. If you have the
ambition and would like to be a part of our fast pace growing
operation apply at:'
Sunshine-Jr. Food Store #19, Hwy. 71 & Hwy. 22 (at the
light) Wewahitchka, Florida
An Equal Opportunity Employer 2t 6/15









PAGE 8B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 22, 1995


$500.00 REWARD!!
$500.00 Reward for the return of
the 16' yellow Geeneu boat and Cox
boat trailer stolen from Indian Pass
Villas around January 1, 1995, and
the arrest and conviction of anyone
involved in that theft. All replies
guaranteed to be held in strict con-
fiderice. Call 904-227-2054, if no
answer leave a message or call
404-926-6555 Collect
tfc 6/22





Queen size bed, headboard, spring,
mattress, 9-drawer dresser, mirror, 2-
drawer night stand, $500; word pro-
cessing typewriter & 2 ribbons, $165.
Antique rocking chair, $40. 227-
1364. Itc 6/22
Kitchen table and 4 chairs, $30; day
bed, $15; humidifier $5, diabetic test
kit and supplies, $40. Call Bill 227-
1893. ltc 6/22
1994 Yamaha VX wave runner, under
warranty until June, 1996. Like new,
used three times. $5,000. 647-3181.
Itc 6/22
2 bedroom, 1 bath, 12'k60' mobile
home, total electric, completely re-
modeled. Partially furnished. Call
229-1081. 2tc 6/15
Yamaha PSS-480 electronic keyboard,
amplifier with speakers,' keyboard
stand with bench, music books, $125.
Call 648-8205. 3tc 6/8
Craftsman tools and Die Hard bat-
teries are available now at Western
Auto Store, 2.19 Reid Ave. 227-1105.
tfc 6/1
Blue carpet and beige carpet for sale.
Assorted sizes, call for Information,
best offer. Also wood burning stove,
make offer. 229-8997, ask for Bill,
7:30 4:30.
MELALLEUCA Independent Market-
ing Executive. MELALLEUCA toxic-
free vitamins, health products. Pre-
ferred customers get 27% off. Money
back guarantee. Independent distrib-
utorship marketing available. Call
227-3031. 4tc 6/l
Turkeys, young and old. Call 639-
2807. tfc'5/18
Western Auto Special. Computer spin
balance 4 tires and tire rotation.
$19.95. 227-1105. tfc 6/1
Port St. Joe Western Auto now honor-
ing Panama City Western Auto Co.
store advertised tire sale prices. Com-
puterized WHEEL ALIGNMENT. Sears
Card now at Port SL Joe Western
Auto. Discover TOOl 227-1105.
tfc 6/1
Mushroom Compost, $15 yard, any-
time, 648-5165. tfc 7/6
Port St. Joe Western Auto now hon-
oring entire Panama City Western
Auto company store advertised sale
prices. 227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc 6/1
FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 6/1









skn ttfc6/-




FREE kittens to good home. Orange,
claico and black with orange. Please
call 227-7523. Itp 6/22
AKC beagle puppies, $100. Two male,
2 female. Call 229-6161 after 6:30
p.m. tfc 6/22
Two full-blooded male Shih Tzu pup-
pies. One blakc and white and one
brown and white. Call 648-3191 after
7p.m. Itc6/22
AKC golden retrievers, $150 each.
Ready July. 827-1505. 2tc 6/22
S"Once A Month"' flea program need
help? Ask B & B Feed. & Seed 639-
5488 about the HAPPY JACK 3-X
FLEA COLLAR. Kills both male & fe-
male adult fleas. Available O-T-C.
FREE puppies. 3 full blooded chow
puppies, 6 weeks old. 229-8664.
DOG GROOMING PLUS offers dip-
ping and bathing for your dog. We
also carry collars & leads. Boarding
available. Call 227-3611. tfe 6/1
Hate to Board Your Best Friend. Care
in your home low as $8.00 a day by
Joe and Marie Romanelli. Call Pet &
Property Tenders, fully insured, 1-
904-229-1065. tfc 6/1


Liquid wormers not doing the job?
Ask BARFIELD'S LAWN & GARDEN
229-2727 about HAPPY JACK TRI-
VERMICIDE. Recognized safe and ef-
fective against hook, round & tape-
worms in dogs & catsl 6tc 5/25




Wanted: Good, used steam table,
please call 639-3755. ltc 6/22


Nice comfortable 3 bd., 2 ba. home in
excel. cond. on Ig. lot in restricted
neighborhood. Brick construction,
cen. h&a, carpet, screened back
porch, ceiling fans, wallpaper, stove &
refrig., deep well for lawn & lots more,
3013 Garrison Ave., Port St. Joe,
Parker Realty of Mexico Beach,
648-5777.
Newly remodeled 2 BR house, large
spacious rooms, din. rm., Ig. utility/
3rd BR. wood floors, screened front
porch, 1g. fenced backyard w/tool
shed. Located on 8th St., PSJ. Call
229-8764 or 229-9070. 2tc6/22
Large 4 bd., 2 ba. home. Completely
renovated, like new. Has cen. h&a,
used original juniper on ceilings &
around firephlce, ceiling fans, Berber
carpet in liv. rm., hardwood floors,
ceiling fans, stucco, attic pull down &
pantry. 1 1/2 lots with Ig. trees. 212
2nd Ave., Highland View. Parker Re-
alty of Mexico Beach, 648-5777.
STARTER or RETIREMENT HOME, -
1 bd., 1 ba. home recently remodeled
on 2 1/2 lots with beautiful trees.
Has deck and front porch. Affordable
at $23.500. 208 2nd Ave. Highland
View. Parker Realty of Mexico
Beach, 648-5777.
For Sale by Owner: 3 bdrm., 1 ba.
block house w/fireplace, 1g. LR, DR,
and kitchen, car-porch, chain link
fence on 140'x130' lot, city water &
sewer, close to schools, small block
house for washer & dryer, outside
storage shed or shop. Can be seen at
124 2nd Ave., Oak Grove, 229-6163
or 912-524-2871, Harvie or Agnes
Kennedy. tfc 6/15


Wewahitchka, 12'x60', 2 BR, 1 bath,
trailer on 2 lots with privacy fence in
Lands Landing. $17,000. 639-2533.
2tc 6/15
House in Blountstown, Live Oak
Hgts., 3 bdrin.,/2 ba., cen. h/ac, fire-
place, 2 car garage, paved drive. (904)
482-4931. 6tp 6/15
Rustic wood stone home in White
City, 3 bd., 2 ba., great rm., cathedral
ceiling, stone fireplace, separate din.
mnn., breakfast rm. w/bay window,
16'x32' in ground swimming pool w/
privacy fence, nicely landscaped,
great buy at $89,500. Call after 5'
p.m., 827-6465.

For Sale by Owner: Large vacant lot,
cleared and fenced, located at 121
Hunter Circle, Port St. Joe. For infor-
mation call 904-271-1534, price nego-
tiable. ltc6/1


Lot for sale 145'x150', located at Pom-
pano St. and Hayes Avenue, Highland
View. Call 229-8079. tfc 6/1
3 or 4 bdrm., 2 ba. home on 1/3 acre
lot in nice neighborhood. Stucco over
block with wood frame additions. Ap-
prox. 1800 sq. ft. under roof. Recently
remodeled kitchen w/gas range, d.w.
& disposal. Lg. master bedroom w/
walk-in closet and Ig. master bath.
20'x20' den with gas fireplace. 12'x20'
deck. Gas central heat & air. New gas
water heater. 8'x12' outside storage
shed. Only $67,500. 229-8498.
Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with
double carport & utility bldg. on 2
large lots, all windows are new and
have vertical blinds, new carpet,
ch&a, 1/2 block off Hwy. 98. Can be
seen at 305 Parker Ave., Highland
View. Call 227-1311 or 227-3492.
1/2 acre lot with septic tank, $9,500.
Overstreet Road. Owner financing,
227-2020, ask for.Billy. tfc 6/1
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery Road,
1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9 miles
south of Wewa. Owner financing. Call
229-6961.. tic 6/1


*---------- W-----------------
I PUBLIC NOTICE .
The Florida Marine Patrol has taken custody of a
I 13'10" AMF Alcort Sunfish sailboat, white in color with I.
I no registration numbers displayed. The hull I
I identification number is AMF75265M79J. The sail is red, I
I white and blue in color. The vessel had two, green in I
color, type IV seat cushions and one paddle inside of it.
The vessel was found drifting in St. Joseph Bay just I
East of Presnell's channel. Pursuant to section 705.103 F.
S., notice is hereby given. If no ownership or lien claim is
Received by September 13, 1995, the property will be
I disposed of. Please send claims in writing to the Florida
I Marine Patrol, P. 0. Box 4238, Panama City, FL 32401. I
I Please refer to case #955A0833. .I
- 2tc, 6/22 & 29/951


"Handyman Special", 3 bdrm., 2
bath shell house, beautiful 1/2 acre.
C-30 south Cape San Bias area. Rea-
sonably priced., Financing available.
227-7506. tfc 6/1
Business for Sale: Phantry Building
and extra lot. Income producing.
Three business units downstairs and
a manager's apartment, Four hotel
rooms w/full baths upstairs. 24 cli-
mate-controlled mini-storage units
upstairs and down. Best location in
town for detail outlets. Call 1-800-
800-9894. tfc 6/1
Half acre lots for sale, Hwy. 386,
Overstreet, Creekview Subd., $500
down. $96.48. per month, '120
months. Call and leave message. 229-
6031. tfc 6/1
4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 2 car garage
home on 5 acres In White.City, 1/4
acre fish pond, gunite swimming pool.
.2,200 sq.. ft. $90,000; 827-8922.


Lot 144' wide x 297' deep in Whisper-
ing Pines Subdivision, Wewahitchka,
$15,000. 229-8577. tfc 6/1

For Sale by Owner
Spacious 3 bdrm., 2 ba. brick
home on corner of Sunset
Circle & 20th St. Lot and a
half in excellent neighbor-
hood. Formal din. rm., foyer,
Ig. eat-in kitchen w/roomy
pantry, great room w/fp &
entertainment center, big
.master bdrm.; & separate
bath & walk in closet, ap-
prox. 1700 sq. ft. of living
space. 2 car garage. Huge
yd. w/wired workshop. Auto-
matic sprinkler system &
much more. $108,000. Call
Frank D. or Carla May at
227-2008. tfc 6/1


Mexico Beach

Harmon Realty, Inc.
Corner of 14th Street and Highway 98
MEXICO BEACH, FL 32410
(904) 648-5767

NEW LISTING:
614 GULF AIRE DRIVE, GULFAIRE SUBD., NEW 3 bedroom, 2 bath
stucco home under construction. Large living room has cathedral ceil-
ing w/ceramic tile fireplace. Kitchen has breakfast bar, large pantry, and
breakfast nook with bay window and French doors that lead to covered
patio. Appliances include refrigerator w/ice maker, electric range, dish-
washer, and disposal. Separate dining room has French doors that lead
to covered patio! Master bedroom has full lighted walk-in closet and
nice dressing area at master bath. Double car garage. Central.gas heat
and electric AC! 1638 sq. ft. living area. Buyer may choose colors if un-
der contract prior to completion. $115,000.00.


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