<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03104
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 1, 1995
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03104

Full Text






ARCHIVES- BIND'ERY
1508 HVWY 43-
hLII:H LLE A4L 3'- 5 0


[HE


USPS 518-880

FIFTY-SEVENTH YEAR, NUMBER 42


STAR


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 .THURSDAY, JUNE 1,1995


Would Be Built Around Pier, Boat
Becoming An Extension of Newest


Port St. Joe may have its
dreams of possessing a marina
come true if plans from a special
meeting bear fruit. The City Com-
mission met in a special session
Thursday afternoon to adopt a
resolution backing up the appli-
cation for an Economic Develop-
ment Administration grant.
The city applied for a grant of
$900,000 which would necessi-
tate the city coming up with, 25
percent matching funds to con-
struct the marina. The applica-
Uon was, mailed immediately to
the Economic Development Ad-
ministration to get the process
under way.
EXPANDING CITY'S
FRANK PATE PARK
Plans for the marina would
be to locate it to the south of the
city pier at the end of Fifth Street


, utilizing the existing boat launch
ramp and sea wall protection sys-
tem which has been built up over
the years. The proposed marina
would consist of 40 uncovered
slips, 35 covered slips, ship store
with shower and rest room, head
pump out station, gas and diesel
fuel ptimp, housed, fuel storage
area, and additional parking to
service the marina..
The aquatic installation
would be directly west of the ex-
isting Frank Pate Park, utilizing
that area for further recreational
facilities. A marina has been a
long time dream of the City of
Port St. Joe and, the current
plans are the result of a special
committee working hand in hand
with the Chamber .of Commerce
to promote its creation. The idea
of a marina was inaugurated
when a committee of boating en-'


Launch Site;
City Park Complex
thusiasts realized that Port St.
Joe was the only community be-
tween Mobile, Alabama and Ce-
dar Key which did not have recre-
ational boating facilities.
SEVERAL ATTEMPTS
IN PAST HAVE FAILED
Several attempts in past
years have been made to estab-
lish marinas in Port St. Joe, all of
which flourished for a while and
then died out. If the $900,000
E.D.A. grant is approved--as the
Chamber and committee feel it
will be-this latest project will be
.the only one of several attempts
which has- been adequately fi-
nanced.
The estimated costs of the en-
tire project as proposed by design
engineers Preble-Rish, Inc., is
projected to be somewhere in the
neighborhood of $1.2 million.
^f^ 0 \X\ :


-~ Architects rendering of marina lay-out




From Trash to Cash


conducted by the VFW, Sadie Gard- George Coody and W. E. Walker, of the Recycling P
ner, of the St. Joseph Chapter of the VFW place a wreath in memory of fallen vete- Rey li r(
Daughters of the American Revolu- rans, as a Color Guard stands at attention, What was oncea stink in the
tion, placed a wreath at the base of top photo. Sadie Gardner and Coody place a a isbeginning to smell more'like
the veterans memorial at the Court- wreath at the monument in front of the a breath of fresh air as Port St
.house. Courthouse, Memorial Day, in bottom photo. Joe's recycling program begins to
show its worth. In an age where


Medical Group Has Plans For Maintaining Children's Clinic


After five years.of treating the
ailments of children in this area,
Nemours Children's Clinic closed
its doors yesterday afternoon. The
clinic was one of a half dozen set
up in small .north Florida towns.
by the Nemours Foundation to
bring a heeded service to each of
the rural areas. Recently they an-
nounced plans to close the clin-
ics, stating that each of the areas


was able to provide the service on
its own.
'Dr. Elizabeth Jones, pediatri-
clan with the local Nemours Clin-
ic, said that all of the clinics had
attempted to find a private opera-
tor to take over the facilities and
keep the service available.
Nemours made a certified pe-
diatrician available for all chil-
dren in the service area, regard-


less of the families' ability to pay.'
All families were expected to pay
something, even though it may be
very little.
Dr. Jones told The Star the
Nemours Clinic located here in
Port St. Joe had tentatively locat-
. ed a doctor team to take over the
local operations, but that will not
happen for another two months.
Meanwhile, the Clinic will be


closed during the interim until
the change over in operations is
complete.
DRS. CURRY TELL PLANS
Last week, Dr. Thomas L.
Curry and his wife Dr. Elizabeth
F. Curry, operating under the
name of Shoreline Medical Group,
P. A., announced they would be
'(See CHILDREN pg 3)


ogram Is Savim
recycling is quickly becoming
norm, Port St. Joe's direc
places them far ahead of i
communities which. main
their own garbage collection
vices.
Frank Healy, Public W
Superintendent, is charged"
the responsibility of managing
city's garbage collection servi
"Just to give you an idea of
direction we're heading--the
sent 50 less tons of garbage tc
incinerator in April, 1995 t
they sent in April 1993," H
said.
At a cost of $31 per toj
incinerate garbage, the tonn
reduction reflects a direct sav
of $1,550 for the city in garl


ng City Big Bucks
the dispersement fees.
2tion
most Dollarg for Garbage
tain Savings in tipping fees
ser- through the tonnage reduction of
garbage just grazes the surface of
' the true reduction as the recy-
oarks clable garbage collected is turned
with into cash at the City's Material
Sthe Recovery Facility (MRF). The MRF
ices. building is located off Industrial
the Road on the grounds of what used
City to be the county's compacting sta-
Sthe tion.
han The key to the success of the
early program is the use of inmate
labor to sort recyclable garbage
1 to collected in the city. Glass, tin
nage cans, cardboard, aluminum,
Ings
bage (See CASH on Page 3)


* 7 M MM MM MM l MNA 6,6 M % MM ,A7M 7 7 M V7 A7MM MM MM MM MM MM MM MM 4MM MA M7MqMnk, NA? M M M M M M M MAM M M M M M M M M M M MA7 NT Mr MT MT N^ Nr

Complaints Make DEP Ears Burn at Local Hearing, In A Nice Way


Representatives from DEP
weren't greeted 'by a very big au-
dience attending their "reality
check" public hearing here Thurs-
day evening, but they got an ear-
ful from the few who did attend.
Antoinette McCoy, Gary Schaeffer
and Cliff Kldd, representing the
Department 'of Environmental
Regulation were at the Court-
house in Port St. Joe on orders of
the Governor to conduct their re-
ality check and perhaps change
some of their more obnoxious
rules.
DEP conducted hearings in
all of the 67 counties of Florida in
order to get first-hand reports of
just what the people of the vari-
ous locations in the state think of
their people, their rules and regu-


lations, which DEP claims are
protecting the environment.
"LET US USE
COMMON SENSE"
In Port St. Joe, they heard
several "horror" stories about how
the red tape involved with dealing
with DEP is hampering the pub-
lic. As Joe Danford, Gulf County's
solid waste department director
said: 'We're not allowed to use
just plain common sense in ap-
plying the rules, we must at all
times wait for weeks ,in getting a
set of directions and purchase
permits from DEP."
Danford gave the visiting DEP
officials an example: "A county
dump truck collided with a truck
owned by a private contractor. A
small quantity of spilled diesel


fuel resulted. We took other
county trucks and scooped up
the contaminated soil. Since it
was near the end of the day, we
were going to dump the soil in an
area we have approved for stock-
piling contaminated objects for
later proper handling. DEP ruled
that we had to keep the dirt load-
ed in our trucks, tying them up
for a period of time until they
could make a decision. When
they finally ruled on, the matter,
we had to haul ,the dirt to Bay
County to be burned in the incin-
erator."
AFTER 5 YEARS AND OVER
$10,000, STILL NO PERMIT
Don Butler, Gulf County's ad-
ministrator, said the county had
acquired property on the Penin-


sula to make a public access way
to the beach. 'We spent a lot of
money on the property, over
$6,000 for permits and surveys,
nearly $4,000 worth of engineer-
ing time on the property; waited
on permits for five years and still
are not able to use our property
for the purpose which it was in-
tended, because of lack of the
proper approval from the state of
Florida."
Frank Healy, Port St. Joe
public works superintendent, had
a personal .complaint example to
give the DEP representatives. ."I
want to put a roof over a deck
which has been in place at my
home at St. Joe Beach for many
years. I was told I can't do it until
I have approval and a permit from


the agency which supervises
beach construction, inspecting
'my project for its effect on the sea
turtles. There is a U.S. highway
between my home and the beach,
so how could it possibly affect sea
turtles?" Healy asked.
YEAGER ISSUES
OFFICIAL COMPLAINT
County Commissioner War-
ren Yeager told the visiting envi-
ronmentalists of problems Gulf
county was having with property
owners along C-30. 'They must
get a $100 permit from DEP to
place piping in a ditch for a drive-
way along the county road. DEP
never looks at It, so why the need
for a permit? Why can't the
county set these specifications for
driveway pipe and see that it is


done properly at a less expensive
fee?"
Yeager had a number of other
complaints -about requirements
which delay the county unneces-
sarily and at an exorbitant cost
for no purpose.
After all the input they re-
ceived in an hour of hearing such
testimony, the representatives
said the other DEP representa-
tives were undoubtedly hearing
some of the same things all over
Florida.
'There will, no doubt, be
some changes in our organization
as a result of the hearings," Kidd
said, but he didn't give any hint
about how great or how tiny
these changes might be.


'. I


City Applies For Grant



To Finance Marina


A A A A. A A A A A A A A A A


A A A A tL I A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A I I A A


wWW~~WWWWWWWWWWWWWW~WWWWWWWWWWWW~W~WWWWW


WWW~WWWWWWWW~WWWWWWWWWWWW~~WWW~WWWWWWW~~












THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995


.. ..............0 ...........W- 0 ; 958ix -------- ---- -----


Responsibility -


Hunker Down with Kes


by Kesley Colbert


WE'RE NOT SAYING the county should not take over the am-
bulance service, in this piece; neither are we saying Gulf Pines Hos-
pital did or didn't do an adequate job in its operation of the service.
The County Commission say they didn't and have all kind of stories
to tell abouttheir attempts at arriving at agreement on a new con-
tractural arrangement with the hospital.
Luckily, we have never needed the service, personally, nor for
any of our immediate family. If we ever were to need the service, we
would have considerable hard feelings at whoever was operating it,
if the service were lacking in some way or other.
The County Commissioners say they have far too many com-
plaints that the operators now fail to provide adequate back-up ser-
vice, if there is more than one run happening at one time. There
were no complaints about the quality provided; the'amount of ser-
vice available at one time is another matter, they claim. The Com-
mission and the hospital have been unable to reach agreement about
what will comprise this adequate service and how much is the Board
willing to pay for it.
AS A CONSEQUENCE, the Commission has decided they will
get into the service once again. The county operated the south Gulf
County service before contracting it to Gulf Pines a few years back.
Things have changed since they were last in the ambulance busi-
ness, which may make it easier than it previously was .
As we recall, the Commission at the time was almost as glad to
get.rid of that responsibility as the more recent Board was glad to
get rid of the responsibility of solid waste collection and disposal.
The Board has no choice in either service. They must see that
the solid waste is collected and disposed of in a manner acceptable to
the state of Florida. Likewise, they are charged by the state to pro-
vide an adequate and safe ambulance service.
With money tightening, up, the County is as responsible for see-
ing that its services are affordable, as well as adequate.
Neither decision is one to be taken lightly and acted on in a flip-
pant or spiteful manner. We can only hope they remember the prob-
lems of previous administrations and take steps to see that they
aren't repeated.



Budget uts Hurt!
THE BIG FIGHT OF the century is going to be between the
Republicans and the Democrats to see which of the two can more re-
alistically balance the nation's budget, stopping run-away deficit
spending. For many years now, it has been a contest between the
two parties to see who could borrow the most money each and every
year in order to give us more and more of what we couldn't pay for.
Somehow, our grandchildren and great-grandchildren are going to
-be forced to find a way to pay the bill for our easy living.
The Republicans are now in the driver's seat and they say they
have a plan. Meanwhile, the Democrats say the Republican plan will
hurt too much. People will have to do without top many things, so
let's ask the public which of the "things" they had rather do without.
WITH BOTH PARTIES trying to out-do the other in slashing
spending, it's no longer a question of "if', it's onlyya questio of
"!how". What are we going to give up?
!- President Clinton has been placed in the position of having to,
exercise his veto if he is going to have any influence, about what does
and what does not get pared from the spending plan, and there's no
guarantee even his Presidential veto can be sustained.
Newt and his Republican pals seem to be right on course for
chopping everything; from social security to foreign aid.
TIME MAGAZINE, in its last issue had taken a poll of what
portions the public would like to see trimmed. It's easy, using the
poll results, to see where certain, segments of the population stand
on certain portions of the budget, but one thing it seems everybody
agrees on. A whopping 84% of the people polled would prevent any
cuts to social security and 81% would not cut medicare, if given the
opportunity. Both are paid for by the workers of the nation, express-
ing the desire, it would seem to us, that they are willing for their fu-
ture dollars to be spent for the two services. A lesser percentage
would approve of continuing to provide for student loans, hospitals
for veterans, and medicaid. From there on, the agreement to contin-
ue has less and less approval.
WITH A PLURALITY of only two percentage points favoring
. continued farm programs, and three points for mass transit, the ap-
proval drops rapidly into the "cut" category, until it falls to only 29%
supporting continued welfare and 16% to continue support of foreign
aid.
When you get right down to it, agreeing to cuts depends on who
receives the benefits, for the most part, but no one will deny that
cuts are necessary. and they are going to hurt someone.


Come On Down!


SFolks. I drove through Missis-
sippi once-and I'm afraid to go
back. Kudzu has gotten the entire
state by the throat. As Ray Ste-
vens so eloquently says, "It's eve-
rywherel It's everywhere!"
I don't know how familiar you
are with kudzu so allow me to,
perform a public service-you
may have rich kinfolks, over in
William Faulkner's home state
and will naturally have to visit
them from time to time. If your
kin is like mine, dirt poor, you
can disregard the rest of this
news letter-they are at your
house every other week so you
can get a first hand report.
I have no earthly idea how or
where kudzu originated. By the
name I'd guess it was first intro-
duced in the Orient back In the
1800's. By its very nature I'd say
it was an invention of some dia-
bolical yankee sorehead from
West Orange, 'New Jersey who
was trying to get even for all the


plaid shorts long long black
- socks northerner visits alli-
gator farm Jokes.
In the 1930's in the rural
south (which was all of us back
then) we were having a terrible
time with erosion. The topsoil of
nine southern states was rapidly
washing toward the Gulf of Mexi-
co. The depression was on and
folks were hungry. It got gown to
a choice between saving the top-
soil or moving to Detroit and
working for Ford. Desperate times
call for desperate actions!
Someone discovered that the.
kudzu vine would grow near 'bout
anywhere. And 'it put down deep
roots to hold the soil and it grew
rapidly. Some even thought the
violet-purple flower produced by
the kudzu was attractive. When
those southern farmers realized
that it would indeed help check
erosion they planted it on every
hillside, roadside, track side,
ditch, gully, by way, side way, in
way, out way-some who were
tired of sweeping even planted the
stuff in their front yard.
The key word in the preced-
ing paragraph is rapidly. People,
that mess started growing and
spreading and growing AND
SPREADING AND GROW-


ING ......
I saw a movie years ago star-
ing a young Steve McQueen enti-
tiled, 'The Blob". Do you remem-
ber how that thing, the blob, just
'kept coming and coming. They
couldn't stop it. They called out
the armed forces. They couldn't
kill it, bury It, stomp it out-it ate
whole cities, and just kept com-
ing.
Same thing with kudzu .....
and kudzu' doesn't bum.
Seems we planted that stuff
years ago with every good inten-
tion and it did, indeed, help with
the erosion. We just didn't think
about the consequences if we
couldn't stop the kudzu. There is
no known antidote. We tried to.
cut it back, No use. It grew.back
twice as thick and, reached fur-
ther out overnight! Our cows
wouldn't eat it. They didn't like
the Oriental flavor I suppose.
Kudzu is an equal opportuni-
ty plant. It grows up telephone
poles and runs down the line. It
Jumps concrete sidewalks. It
creeps up any standing wall. It
devours forces be they chain link.
barbed wire, chicken wire, split
rail, post, board or picket. The
Dale Render Sign Company
stopped putting up billboards in


West Tennessee years ago.
Much of the south has been
hit by 'The green blob". But for
some reason Northeast Mississip-
pi seems to be thl place kudzu
likes the best. A large boat tied
up on the bank of the Tombigbee
River for a few minutes and the
kudzu "had it" before it could
shove off. A ninety-eight Olds
missed a turn just south of Tupe-
lo and ran, head long into the
kudzu covered woods. Folks, it
never came out again!
Ethelsville, Fernbank, Highto-
gy and Bexar, Alabama have
joined together to form the Kudzu
Border Patrol in an attempt to
keep the worst of it contained in
-N. E. Mississippi. I understand
the stuff has completely sur-
rounded and cut off Aberdeen. No
one can get in or out! People in
the, outlying' areas have had to
evacuate.
Me and Willie Ramsey have
been working on the problem. We
'are trying to locate a kudzu eat-
ing boll weevil. We have written
Ted Turner about the possibilities
of a kudzu pulling contest. Ted
will sponsor anything. How about
a kudzu folk festival? We could
pass the stuff off as poke salad.
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


A Ride In A Car To The Grocery Store Was A Treat


MY, HOW TIMES change!
Things which seemed normal and
every-day several years ago are
no longer apropos. And it seems
the more they change the more
they are wont to change.
Life would be pretty dull, I
suppose, if there was never any
change in the way we lived.
When I was a child, it was
considered'an adventure to get to
go somewhere with someone in a
car, even if it were only to the gro-
cery store. Now, almost every kid
wants his own car, beginning
'about age 14, even if he can't
drive yet.
The other day I read where
Schwinn bicycles were making a
comeback. I always wanted a
Schwinn. I had a bike, .which I
shared with my brother, Will, but
it wasn't a Schwinn. They were
the "cadillac" of bikes and my
parents could barely afford the
economy model.
Bicycles have grown out of


ETAOIN SHRDLU


SBy Wesley Ramsey
y


style with the kids today. Momma
provides transportation in the
car, instead of kids going where
they need to go on a bicycle.
Bikes today are expensive and
provide adults the exercise they
miss by going everywhere in the
car.

THINGS HAVE changed in
other ways, too. The Ed Sullivan
Show replay last week on TV re-
minded us of the more recent
past when Ed Sullivan was THE
show to watch each ,and every
week ... IF... you had a televi-
sion.


Did you notice the show was
in black and white? TV didn't be-
come multi-color until a few years
later. The screen wasn't square,
either. They were either round or
rounded on the comers. All TV
tubes were round. Now they are
square-cornered.
Now, it is unusual to see a
black and white set.
WHAT REALLY SPAWNED
this venture into antediluvian
days was my grandson getting
married a couple of months ago
and a decision he and his bride,
the beautiful "Miss Lisa" have
made.


They have decided to pur-
chase my parents' former home-
the house where I lived as a child
and grew to adulthood in.
But there are a few things
they would change about the
house. It's a good house but there
are a few amenities they want to
add, which jogged my memory to
what was good enough for my
parents to rear five boys in, which
isn't quite adequate now. Really,
if we had something else available
and obtainable at the time, I don't
Suppose what's there now would
have passed muster either.
S. For instance, the -first thing
the young couple decided was
that the old home was just a little
bit too cramped for space.
The house was a normal two
bedroom, one bath bungalow, like
80% of the ordinary homes were
in the early 1940's. All five of us
boys slept in one bedroom on two
double beds. Of course we were a
mite smaller then. Each and eve-


ry one of us would need a double
bed to himself today.
Too, as we boys began to
leave home, Momma and Daddy
added another bedroom to the
house.
The newly-wed couple doesn't
see enough space in the old
home, so they are going to en-
large one of the bedrooms and
add a bath.
Those two have been reared
in more spacious quarters and
don't know there's enough room
there, If you make accommoda-
tions! Too, it'll be more comforta-
ble than having to sleep five to a
room, with the dog at the foot of
one of the beds!

THEY HAD ANOTHER
change in mind, too. They wish to
remove a wall and make more
room in the dining room and en-
large the door to the kitchen,
making the living portion of the
home into a "great room" of sorts.


Another "necessary" move
was to add a dish washer.
Well, I want to tell you, if
Momma had owned a dish wash-
er, she would probably never
*have gotten rid of us boys until
much later in life. We were the
dish washer morning, noon
and night! And as for more room
in the tiny dining room; we never
would have been able to afford
the grocery bill if we didn't have
to eat in shifts.
I can't argue with Lisa and
Bill. The house needed a little
work on It and some. changes
made on the inside. It will be a
much more liveable place with
the changes they propose.
I noticed, though, they didn't
have to take down Momma's
strap from behind the kitchen
door she used to "train" us 'with.
Somebody had already done that
The nail it hung on was still in
place, though, in case it is ever
needed again. ,


1


W W-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
N /V// U H Send Address Change to In County--415.90 Year In County--10.60 Six Months
I USPHS 518880 The Star Out of County---21.20 Year Out of County--$15.90 Six Months
SPublished Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue ut of State-20.00 Year Out oState20.00 Six Months
Ponrt St. Joe, Florida 32456-0308 Post Office Box 308
by The Star Publishing Coarpany Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
ecnd-ass stage Pad at rt St Joe, FL Phone (904) 227-1278 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
ther than amount received'for such advertisement.
S William H. Ramsey ............. Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
Frenchie L. Ramsey ...........Office Manager AT PORTST. JOE BFI'B32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ..................Ter WEEKLY PULISHINGypesetter oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
Shirley Ramsey ..............TypesetterS1


-- -------- -____~~_~ _I_ I I I U U ~UL~ ~i~C~ C


85


I


I


I


C(omm( int
.................... --- ----------


LIA

Ed llt(orl tj
--- -- --- ---------------------- -- --------- ............








THE STA PORT ST. JOEFLy- THURSDAYTYE1, 1995


class and their parents in honor of sixth grade teachers
Plant A Tree Judy Campbell, Pam Jones, Ann Six, Carmel Dodson and
Karen Butts and principal Gerald Lewter. The class also do-
A newly-planted tree and monument is dedicated, given nated a book, "The Giving Tree", to the library. Student
to the Port St. Joe Elementary School by the sixth grade Council President Ben Ashcraft, made the presentation.


From Trash To Cash


newspapers, and plastics ar.e
hand-sorted by the inmates from.
the recycled bags collected
throughout the city.
Glass is sorted into three cat-
egories by color-clear, dark and
green. It's then crushed, boxed
and put on pallets, ready for ship-
ping. Cardboard and newspapers
are compacted and banded before
being placed on skids .to, be sold
as fuel or to make recycled paper
products. Plastic products get the-
same treatment with plastic milk
bottles being sold to one customer
who uses the bottles to make
thread for clothing manufacture.
Tin and aluminum is also recy-
cled using the same process.
Healy said the City should
recoup somewhere in the neigh-
borhood of $40,000 this year from
the sale of recycled materials
based upon the current levels and
prices for the products. He further
pointed out the success of the
program depends on the coopera-
tion of the residents of the city in
sorting their, recyclable products
properly. Cans and containers
- must be rinsed out and paper
products need to be dry and not
contaminated. with food in order
to be marketable.
Composting
Port St Joe recently received
permits from the state to build
composting facilities to dispose of
table scraps such as vegetables,
fruit, meat, fish, etc. These items
have historically proven to be the

Kesley
(From Page 2)
We are also working on a plan to
convert kudzu into. nuclear ener-
gy. It would be a cheap, never
ending power supply.
There's got to be away to
manage this situation.
Perhaps we could mark off all
ofN. E. Mississippi as a giant alli-
gator farm. We could advertise
the kudzu as a native wild plant'
found only in the natural habitat
of the big, wild, authentic, mid-
south, romping, stomping,
crazed, mad dog, bull alligator.
We could sell the leaves as souve-
nirs to the tourists in the-plaid
shorts and high, pulled up black
socks from West Orange and oth-
er such northern parts.
Aberdeen would be free in
two days. 'Course, 'it would prob-
ably take a month or so to com-
pletely wipe the south free of the
problem.
Respectfully,
Kesley


most difficult to dispose of
through customary landfill opera-
tions because of their bacteria-
carrying characteristics. But, just
as with other recyclable opera-
tions, something bad 'can be
turned into something good.
through composting.
Composting is far from a new
idea. Individuals have used the
concept throughout history to
create mulch and natural fertiliz-
er through nature's own deterio-
ration process. The City intends
to cap nature's powers in a con-
trolled environment to dispose of
food scraps and produce a usable
compost material in the process.
According to Healy the City
Will construct a 370' x 6' concrete
covered trough. At one end of the
structure sorted table scraps will
be mixed, with a medium (grass
clippings or leaves) and with the


Children
-from Page 1
taking over the Clinic operations.
Dr. Elizabeth Curry is a
board certified pediatrician and
operated the Nemours Clinic at
Eastpoint. Dr. Thomas L. Curry is
board certified in Internal medi-
cine.
Shoreline [the Drs. Curry]
has announced the Port St. Joe
office will be temporarily closed
and re-opened at a new location.
still to be identified.
ADULT PATIENTS
According to Dr. Elizabeth
Curry, Shoreline will expand the
operations of the former Nemours
Clinic to include adult patients
under their care specialty, as well
as children. Shoreline also oper-
ates the former Nemours Clinic of
Eastpoint.
In the meantime, spokesmen
for Shoreline, the Drs. Curry, ad-
vise parents who have been tak-
ing their children to Nemours, to
acquire their patient charts,'
which will be located at the office
in Eastpoint until the Port St. Joe
office is re-opened. Patients may
either receive care at the East-
point office or gain possession of
the charts in order to move their
care to another practice. Patients
who were participating in the Ne-
mours funding program may con-
tinue ,to receive services through"
the program until December 31,
of this year.
The Drs. Curry say their tar-
get for reopening the Port St Joe
office is August.


aid of moisture and aeration exit
the other end of the structure 30
days later as usable compost 75%
less by volume than when it start-
ed.
"In other words what might,
start as 12 tons going into one
end should end up as three tons


from Page 1
of compost coming out 30 days
later," Healy explained.
The process requires 30 days
of controlled environment to prop-'
erly decompose the food scraps.
The product is allowed .to go
through a natural heat for three
days to kill all pathogens that are


City public works superintendent Frank Healy, pours out
a sample of the compost product being produced by the city
recycling operation.


G.R.C. Meeting
The Gulf Rifle Club will hold
its monthly meeting on Thursday,
J4ne 1 at 6:30 p.m. All members
or others interested are invited to
attend. Following the meeting,
those attending will enjoy meat-
ball sandwiches;
At the monthly FPOA Bulls-
eye Match on May 21 David Whit-
field was match winner, with Dale
Patton firfishing second. Satur-
day, June, 3 the club will host the
monthly PPC Match with registra-
tion starting at 8:30 a.m. and the
match at 9:00. Two trophies will
be awarded in the law enforce-
ment and civilian divisions.
Information about the club
can be obtained by ,contacting
Yank Lyle at 227-1323 or John
Fadio at 229-8421.
Who To Call
To find out how to receive a
free safety examination of your
boat by a Coast Guard Auxiliary
Marine Examiner, ball Boat U. S.
Foundation at 1-800-336-2628.


( Trust me for
all your life
insurance needs...
permanent, term,
universal and
retirement




CALL ME.
BILL
WOOD
101

229-6514
State Farm
Life Insurance Company
Home Office: Bloomington, Illinois


INSURANCE

Like a good neighbor
State Farm is there.


* Oysters
* Clams
* Shrimp
* Crabs
* Crawfish


HOURS:


* Groceries
* Beer & Wine
* Cigarettes
* Colombo
Yogurt


12- 8
12-9


in it, reaching a temperature of
about 130 Fahrenheit in the pile.
The pile is then aerated while a
moisture content of 40% by
weight is maintained controlling
the temperature of the pile as it
makes its way down the trough
during the decomposition
process.
Funding to start construction
of the project will. come from a
state recycling grant furnished to
the city through Gulf County. The
$28,000 of grant money should be
enough to get the project opera-
tional in about six months, with
mechanical handling equipment
being added to the facilities fur-
ther down the road.
Success Depends Upon Proper
Sorting
Success of Port St. Joe's recy-
cling program depends on the
proper sorting of garbage by the
residents of the community. The
City is currently under a manda-
tory two bag garbage collection
system, coupled with a three bag
voluntary system. According to
Healy those using the two bag,
system should put their recy-
clables and dry/clean garbage
into either. the orange or blue
garbage bag. Table scraps and
wet/smelly garbage should be


placed into the green garbage
bags. Printed instructions and a
supply of all three colors of
garbage bags are available at the
city's warehouse on Tenth Street.

Adult Summer
School Begins
Gulf County Adult School will
begin its summer session on
June 5. School hours will be from
8:00 until 1:44 p.m., Monday,
through Thursday.
Courses offered are Adult Ba-
sic Education and Adult General
Education for those trying to earn
a high school' diploma. They also
offer classes for Alternative Edu-
cation to those students who
have been previously enrolled in
the 1994-95 school year.
If you have any questions,
please feel free to call the school
at 227-1744.

W. I. G. Meeting
The Washington Improve-
ment Group will meet on Satur-
day, June 3rd at 10 o'clock at the
Senior Citizens Center.
All interested citizens are en-
couraged to attend.


D&J PAWN SHOP
Main Street Wewahltchka, FL *Phone 639-3202 FAX # 639-3766
HOURS: Monday Friday, 10-5; Saturday 9-12
We Buy Gold & Guns and Loan Cash
on Most Anything of Value
WE ALSO HAVE FAX & COPY SERVICE-
LO.ANS N
4TCE5/18


[] IrJarJ-IrJIrJIrJlrJirIlrJI rJIrJIrJI rJirJI rJ I rJilrJ I rJIrI rJ-I rJIirJ-I rJiI rJiI rJI rJIIrJIrJIrJIrJIrJirJ IrJIrJ rI

B & B Feed & Seed
U Main St. Wewahitchka, FL Phone 639-5488
^ HOURS: 8-5 Monday Friday, 7:30 3:00 Saturday
U All Advertised Prices are for Cash Only
ALL
| Hi-Yield Products .............. 10% off I
| ALL ADAMS
- Flea & Tick Products ........... 1 0% off I
21% REX $ 89
Dog Food .................. 50 lb. $7.89

Hydrated Lime .............. 50 b. $4.75'
S10 Inch Blooming p7 9
5 Hanging Baskets ............. ea. / .77
| We also carry cock-a-tiel, parrot, parakeet and wild bird
- seed.
, jr ir-rJi lrJirJi lr-iri lririJ l -iri piirJrJilrr iir -ir. rir.iir.irJ.iri irir.ir -irrJ iirJlirir-.i rirJ lr -irJ-IIr-i r-ilrJI i


SThe e ursChildren's .Clinic
Sis pleased to announce the transfer of ownership
and operation of the Port St. Joe and Eastpoint
Clinics to


SHORELINE MEDICAL GROUP, P.A.n

The Port St. Joe office will be temporarily closed after 5/31/95 while it is
moving to a new location in Port St., Joe. Patient charts will be located
in Eastpoint until the Port St. Joe office reopens.
The target date for reopening the Port St. Joe office is August, 1995.
All Port St. Joe patients are invited to receive care atthe Eastpoint
office during the summer months. However, we will be happy to copy
charts and assist in any way those patients who wish to move their care
to another practice.
All patients who have received services at the Nemours Children's
Clinic are invited to continue to receive services at Shoreline Medical
Group. New patients are encouraged and invited to call the office for
appointments'
Patients who were participating in the Nemours funding program may
continue to receive services through the program until December 31,
1995.
By midsummer, Shoreline will begin to accept adult patients as well as
children. An announcement will be made at the time the offices are
opened for adult patients.
SHORELINE MEDICAL GROUP, P.A. is a multi-specialty medical prac-
tice offering quality primary care by BOARD CERTIFIED PHYSICIANS
for children and adults.

SHORELINE MEDICAL GROUP, P.A.
accepts Medicare, Medicaid and most major health insurance
ELIZABETH F CURRY, M.D THOMAS L. CURRY, M.D.
Board Certified in Pediatrics Board Certified in Internal Medicine

Call (904) 670-8585 for appointments


227-1670


Join Us for Food & Fun With Our New Electronic
fDART BEOAID


Tues Thurs:
Fri Sat:


Closed Sunday and Monday


SON C-30 SOUTH OF PORT ST. JOE


A'r 3A&'


til


- lrID 3nD'rQr-TIM-VT rTTTT;Pqn V TTN. I I Qr







PAGE 4A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995


Paula Pendarvis
Gets Dual Degrees
Paula Marie Pendarvis, the
daughter of Pauline W. Pendarvis
of Port St. Joe, has completed the
requirements for a bachelor of
arts degree in both political sci-
ence and sociology-anthropology
at Agnes Scott College in Decatur,
Georgia. Paula received her de-
gree at commencement exercises
on May 13.
Agnes Scott College, the pre-
mier liberal arts college for wom-
en in the South, attracts students
from all over the country and is
consistently listed among the top
liberal art institutions in the na-
tion.
Thank You
The. Highland View Volunteer,
Fire Department would like to
take this opportunity to thank
everyone who bought, bar-b-que
dinners from us. Support from
the community enables us to be
better prepared in all areas to'
serve if we are needed.


Frederick Wayne Taylor, Jr. and Libia Gemina Duarte

Engaged


The parents of Libla Gemina
Duarte and Frederick Wayne Tay-
lor, Jr. are happy to announce
their engagement and approach-
ing marriage. Libia is the daugh-7
ter of Rev. and Mrs. Eliseo Duarte
of Columbia, South America,
presently serving in Miami. Rick
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne
Taylor of Port St. Joe.
Libia's grandparents are the
late Juan and Julia Duarte of
Santander, Columbia, South
America and Mrs. Edelmira Dela-
torre Nieto and the late Mrio De-


Cassie Lynn McCall
Look Who's Two
Cassie Lynn McCall celebrat-
ed her second birthday on May
24 with a Barney party.,
There to help her celebrate
her special day was .her sister,
Victoria, and her cousins, aunts,.
uncles, Granny and friends.
Cassie is the daughter of Sta-
cey McCall.


latorre of Bogota, Columbia,
South America. Rick's grandpar-
ents are Mrs. Forrest Taylor and
the late Q. M. Taylor, and Mrs.
Elwyn Blount and the late John
G. Blount, Jr., all of Port St. Joe.
Libia is a 1981 graduate of
Bethlemitas High School in Buca-
ranmanga, Columbia, South
America. She. received her B. A.
degree in Hotel Administration
from the University of Nevada at
Las Vegas in 1991. Rick is a 1980
graduate of -Port St. Joe High
School, and received his B. S. de-
gree in Business Administration
from Florida State University in
1987.
Rick and Libia are presently
teaching school in Miami. biut will
make Port SL Joe their home af-
ter their wedding. Libia hopes to.
secure a position in elementary
education, and Rick will be going
into business with his parents at
St. Joe Furniture Company and
The Rug Room. and also estab-
lishing an accounting business.
Their wedding is planned for
July 1st at 2 o'clock in the after-
noon. E.D.T. The ceremony will
be performed by Rev. Zedoc Bax-
ter and Rev. Ellseo Duarte at the
First United Methodist Church of
Port St. Joe. A nursery will be
provided and all family and
friends are invited to join in the
wedding celebration and recep-
Ution following in the church fel-
lowship hall.

In Appreciation
Fannie Quarles and family
acknowledge with grateful appre-
ciation your kindly expressions of
sympathy during the time of loss
of her sister, Clemmie Werts in
' Alabama.


RELAX
in a friendly
atmosphere
with good
FRIENDS.
Serving Breakfast,
Lunch & Dinner
S8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
6 Days a Week


-Specializing In --
*Buffet Lunch Sandwiches
*Meals to Go
*Fresh Seafood
*Delicious Steaks


Linda "s Restaurant I J ]oe
302 Fourth St. 227-1109 Port St. Joe
(Corner of Fourth Street and Hwy. 98)
Owned and Operated by Charles & Linda Smitht't St


Tiffany Rene Sanders
Timmy Julian Varnes

To Wed
Mr. and Mrs. Stanly Sanders
of .Port St. Joe would'like to an-
nounce the engagement and
forthcoming marriage of their
daughter, Tiffany Rene Sanders,
to Timmy Julian Varnes, son of
Betty Peterson and Dennts
Vames of Apalachicola.
The bride-elect is a 1993
graduate of Port St. Joe High
School and is currently ,enrolled
at Gulf Coast Community College.
Her fiance is a 1991 graduate
of Apalachicola High School. He
is employed by St. Joe Forest
Products Company.
A,July 22 wedding is planned
for 2:00 p.m. at Highland View
Baptist Church. Invitations are
not being sent in town; however,
all friends and family are invited
to attend.


Genealogical
* Society to Meet
The Bay County Genealogical
Society will hold its regular
monthly meeting Saturday, June
3 at 1:00 p.m. in the Meeting
Room of the Downtown Library,
25 West Government Street in
Panama City.
Anyone who has an interest
in genealogy is invited to join the
meeting whether you are a mem-
ber of the society or not, .or
whether or not you live in Bay
County.
For additional information
call Berniece Loper at (904) 872-
9882
'Thanks From the
Bottom of Our Hearts"
We would like to thank each
and every one of our friends who
called, came byt to visit and for
many other things that were done
during the loss of our best friend,
Nanny and Mother, Louise Wise.
Most of all we praise the help
of Bay Medical Hospice during
the last six months. We could not.
have done many of the things we
did for Mother-we had all the
love, but they had the backing we
needed. Special thanks to Barba-
ra. Sapp, R.N., and to. Karen, the
L.P.N.
Also, to Mary Lou Cumbie,
who sang "A Picture of Me With-
out You" during the services. She
is a very special friend, as she
also sang for Q. P. Wise, Daddy
and Papa, three years ago.
To Tessie Myrick and the en-
tire Grace Church family, for the
help they provided with Stephen
during the last days. Many
thanks and much appreciation,
from every one of us.
Also to Mrs. Katie Rogers and
Mrs. Eva Weston, who were there
at the drop of a hat when we
needed them most.
George Lemois has been a
part of our family for the past 15
months and has stood by us
through everything. Most of all
during this past week, he stepped.
in and helped as any father or
son. would have done-Thank
you'll
With all our love ...
Diane Wise Frye, Wendy Whit-
field, and Kim Bateman.


" -Vr Vf n,
.'--.., ...


No Wax
Outdoo
Indoor/(


Carpet

HIGHWAY 98 WEST PORI


WELL- CONNECTED

SWe OfferMore Than Just


Technology


We keep track
your prescrp-
tions and
your. special
orders 0on
computer, i
so there's L\
virtually
no chance
of a foul-. (D
up. And


we're familiar with
your,history, our
pharmacist
will be
happy to.
answer all
your
specific
questions,
.no matter
how many


you can al- you have!
I ways call us to So let us fill
order whatever your prescrip-,
,.you need. Eut the most tions' and help yob feel
important thing we can good about getting your
provide to you is person- money's worth and
alized attention. Since more! '

: CAMPBELL'S :
DRUG STORE
Jly Two Pharmacists and Two. Pharmacy
Technicians to serve you promptly.
Saveway Center Phone 227-1224










All Remnants in Stock Marked Down

.Starting from $3.00 to $300!


CASH AND CARRY .
(Vinyl 'R
r TURF 9
Outdoor st YD
""at


! 0 *


Ceramic Tile
1 9 x 1 9"


starting at 59 ea.


y PnrSBUH PITTSBURGH
T Jr y PAINT
SS SUPPLIES
T ST. JOE PHONE 227-7241


,-I


olC sed Sundays


instalea mwitn ra I in (mo o CK) A" *1-9
Ceramic Tile starting atl ea.

Sq. Yd. Installation Available

Yd.R CO PLTFCReeETImatCEs TE
Capt*iy Ceaic arwod lid


I


II -- .


I


,i


I


I


-1


I








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995


Organ Dedication At St. Joseph's

This Saturday Evening at 6:00 Featuring Pietranczyks


St. Joseph's Catholic Church
decided in recent years to pur-
chase a pipe, organ for musical
Accompaniment for their congre-
gation. After contacting the Organ
Clearing House they were notified
in 1993 that a suitable organ had
been located, the Hutchings,
Opus 157. The 107-year-old
'organ had been commissioned in.
1886 for the Centella Chapel in
San Jose, California' and was
builf by renowned organ builder,
George S. Hutchings. ,,,:
It served that location,for,7,0
years before the church merged
with another, and the organ was
.moved to a new location. It was
)purchased in 1988 by a physician
in California who later, decided to
sell it St. Joseph's purchased the
historic musical instrument in
September, 1993 and hiredJdohn
Huening. an organ builder from
Tampa to restore It to its original
condition.
In March of 1994, the organ
was installed in the local church


Warren E. Waldrop, son pf
the late James L. Waldrop, Sr., of
Cook Bayou, and Geraldine Wal-
drop, of Wewahitchka, recently
graduated from Florida State Uni-
versity with a Bachelor's degree'
in Communications.
Waldrop also received special
awards at the F.S.U. Banquet
held at Bay Point Marriott. He
also graduated in 1994 from Gulf
Coast Community College with an
Associate's degree. He will be de-
parting In June for two weeks of
special training in Louisiana with
the Army National Guard.



ONE CALL,

DOES IT

ALL

at Creditmasters

S we've taken the
hassle out of pre-
qualifying for a

new or used car
S or truck
CALLUS
"NOW"
Confidential Hotline
24 Hours
1-800-471-6364
TOUCHSTONEE PHONE. 2t ,
-2tc5/25


and has been used to accompany
the congregation since that time.
The organ dedication ceremony
will be this Saturday evening at
6:00 p.m. with Michael J.
Pietranczyk, organist, and his
wife, Kimberly Pietranczyk, sopra-
no, presenting a musical selec-
tion.
Pietranczyk is doing graduate
studies at Florida State University
School of Music with Dr. Michael
Corzine and holds an organist /
choirmaster position at St.
Thomas Episcopal Church in
Thomasville, Georgia. He hopes to
complete his doctoral degree in
/Organ Performance and go on to
instruct at the university level
while continuing his love of play-
ing the organ and conducting
choirs, for parishes seeking to
build and enhance their sacred
music programs.
':Mrs. Pietranczyk is also con-
tinuing her graduate studies at
Florida State University. She has
appeared in numerous solo and
operatic performances and was
awarded a Rotary International
Scholarship to study voice
abroad. She has appeared in
"FSU's fall production of Rigoletto
as the countess and on June 16,
17 and 18 she will perform the
role of Angelina in Gilbert and
Sullivan's Trial by Jury.,
The congregation of St.
Joseph's Catholic Church and
their pastor, Father Thorn
Crandall invite the public to
attend and worship with them as
they dedicate their organ. The
dedication is also in memory of a
deceased parishioner, Joel R.
Gainous.

Srs. Building--
One Step Closer
The new Senior Citizens and
Community Center will be com-
pleted framed by June 30, includ-
ing the roof.
The organization is now ask-
ing businesses and individuals to
help further by donating or help-
ing pay for the cost of a: door or
'window for the new center.
Also, Tyndall Federal Credit
Onion, First Union 'Bank, St. Jo-
seph Telecommunications and St.
Joe Communications will be sell-
ing bricks for the building at a
cost of $2. $5. and $10; just ask
your teller or cashier. This "brick
campaign" is being conducted to
raise funds to pay for the brick
veneer to match the adjacent Gulf
County CostUn Library. '
The association appreciates
the support of the community re-
ceived In the past and that yet to
'come in the future.


This organ, built in 1886, has been renovated and is in
use at St. Joseph's Catholic Church. It will be featured in a
dedication ceremony Saturday.


Gant Elected as
Episcopal Monitor
Lela Shari, Gant was recently
elected to the highest student
leadership organization'at Episco-
pal High School in Alexandria,
Virginia. Ms. Gant, a junior, will
serve as a student Monitor for the
1995-96 school year. The 400-
member student body and the fa-
culty elected 38 rising seniors to
serve as student Monitors. They
supervise student dormitories
and act as informal peer counse-
lors to' younger students.
Ms. Gant is the daughter of
Lenora Peters Gant of Oxon Hill,
Maryland, formerly -of Port St.
Joe. She is a Peer Counselor, a
campus Tour Guide, and is active
in the Spectrum Club and'the
school's chapter of Youth in Phi-
lanthropy. As an athlete, Lela is a
member of the varsity track team.
Episcopal High School is a
coeducational, boarding school
that prepares, students in grades
9 12 for college. Founded in
1839, the school offers strong ac-
ademic and athletic programs
that are enhanced by an equally
strong extracurricular program.
Episcopal's valued Honor Code is
the oldest among secondary
schools in the country. Episcopal
High enrolls 400 students from
25 states and 14 foreign coun-
tries, and its 130-acre campus is
minutes from the nation's capital.

Friends Thanked
The, family of Betsy Palmer
would like to thank friends .for
their help at the time of her
death.
The food, flowers, prayers,
phone calls and other acts of
kindness at this time were of
great support and it lifted our
spirits to know you care.
Thank you.
Hughie and Karen' Palmer,
Tara Palmer, Melissa Palmer
Vickers, and nephews.,


RudyM 9 .
.


Whiplash
Auto Accident
'Work Injuries
Headaches
Back Pain
Arm/Hand Pali
J Leg/Foot Pain
N JSURANCE


sI


Thanks To All
We want to thank everyone
for their many acts of love and
kindness shown us during our re-
cent illnesses. ,,,
Mr. & Mrs. C. H. Birmingham


New Cable TV

Programming

Save $ $

We Can Hook-Up Anywhere
164 Free Channels -5 Movie

Free Installation No Sigin Up Fee

No Payment for 4-6 Weeks

4 ESPN'S, 7 Sports Stations
No Cable Bill in 8-10 Years

In PC for 12 years
Hundreds have called and signed up
Call for Free On-Site Inspection to see if you quality

ALTERNATIVE "CABLE

1-800-255-7878





City of Port St. Joe's

RECREATION SCHEDULE

June 5-July 28
STAC HOUSE
1:00 P.M.-9:o00 P.M
FREE AFTERNOON SNACK

WASHINGTON GYM
11:00 A.M. 7:00 P.M.
FREE LUNCH & AFTERNOON SNACK
June 12-July 28.
PORT ST. JOE ELEMENTARY.SCH9OL .
8:00 A.M 4:00 P.M.
Brown Bag-It, No Food Program
(Free lunch & snack offered through the Dept. of
Education's food program.)
2teW'25


HEARING AID CENTER

618 W. 23rd St
Public Plaza
Panama City, FL
769-5348

FREE HEARING'
TEST
Top Quality, Name
Brand Hearing Aids

* Satisfaction Guaranteed
* Monthly Service Center
Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
1st Thursday each month'


ST JOSEPH BAY ARTS EXHIBIT REGISTRATION

NAME': .

ADDRESS

PHONE NUMBER
TYPE OF ARTWORK TO BE DISPLAYED
NUMBER OF ART PIECES (Limit 3)
Will you bring your own display props? Y N
We encourage you to use your own props.
EXHIBITOR INFORMATION
* Exhibit runs from Monday, June 5 through Friday, June 9
Opening Night Showing on Monday, June 5
* Please have art at First Union Bank PSJ on or before Friday,
June 2 (Special arrangements will be made for pick up in
Wewa) p .
* Please label your props .
* Please make a description card for each of your pieces with
title of art; type of medium used, name of artist, and where in

Gulf County you live.
* All art may be picked up on Friday, June 9
MAIL ENTRY BLANK.TO PORT ST. JOE/GULF COUNTY CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE, P. 0. BOX 964, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456


1. FFLUE ZiM


V


""


PAE RSA


11


n
n.









'mm QTAT2 l flflfl'r 9 r ,TnP. tT. T n IT JAnn TTT7VP. I I nfl


Pick Up Report Cards


Davida Lori Byrd
Miss Davida Lori Byrd, 18,
passed away Thursday morning
at her home from heart complica-
tions. She was born with her
twin, Damien Byrd, on December
5, 1976 to her parents, David and
Lois Byrd.
Davida was an active member
of the Church of God in Christ,
the Port St. Joe High School
Choir and the Truette gospel
group. She was the 1995 District
Winner of the 'Voice of Democra-
cy" contest, Vice President of the
Senior Class of 1995. and was an
Honor Graduate of the Port St.
Joe High School Class of 1995.
Davida shared her love, talent,
and gifts with many by singing,
giving, and lending a caring hand
wherever needed.
Survivors include her par-
ents. David and Lois Byrd; her
brothers, Clarence, Damien, Dan-
iel, David, Dexter and Eric Byrd,
Durey Cadwell, and Augusta
Sims: her sisters, LaTonya Nelson
and Antoinette Sims; her grand-
parents, Gladys and Otis Stall-
worth; and many other relatives.
The funeral service was held
at 1:00 p.m., E.D.T.. Monday,
May 29 at the Port St. Joe High
School Gymnasium, conducted
by Rev. John Haley. Interment
followed in the family plot in For-
est Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home of Port St. Joe.

Ann 0. Iverson
On May 24, Ann Oliver Iver-.
son, the wife of Dr. William
Tharpe Iverson,. of Miami, a for-
mer pastor of First Presbyterian
Church of Port St. Joe, died in'
Brentwood, Tennessee.
Other survivors include two
sons, Bill Iverson of Brentwood,
Tennessee and Daniel Iverson III
of Tokyo, Japan; a daughter, Mrs.
Kirk (Jennifer) Hoffman of Santa
Barbara, California; a sister,; Ger-
trude Culpepper of Bryson City,
North Carolina; and 10 grandchil-
dren.
Memorial services were con-
ducted Saturday, May 27, at the
home of her son, Bill, Jr. arid Liz
in Brentwood, which was her
gateway to heaven.
Memorial services will also be
conducted at the Key Biscayne
Presbyterian Church, 160 Harbor
Drive, Key Biscayne, FL 33149 on
Saturday, June 3 at 11 a.m. For
details call 361-2058.
Memorials may .be6 made to
the Ann Iverson Memorial Fund
c/o Bill Iverson. 1524 Sam Hous-
ton Drive. Brentwood, Tennessee
37027.


Bennie Tiller
Bennie Clarence Tiller, 55, of
Port St. Joe, passed away Mon-
day morning in Port St. Joe. A na-
tive of Gordon, Alabama, he
served in the Army for 22 years,
including two tours of duty in
Vietnam, and earning 11 medals,
the highest being two Bronze
Stars. He retired as a Sergeant
First Class. After his retirement,
he worked as a patrolman for the
City of Port St. Joe Police Depart-
ment. He attended Zion Fair Bap-
tist Church.
Survivors include his wife,
Anita V. Tiller of Port St. Joe;
children, Bennie Tiller, Jr., and
Sherri Tiller, both of Panama
City; two brothers, Charles Tiller,
and Walter Tiller, both of Port St.
Joe; and two sisters, Shirley
Brown of Panama City and Clau-
dine Clark of Daytona Beach.
Funeral services will be Sat-
urday at 2:00 p.m., EDT, at Zion
Fair Baptist Church, conducted
by Rev. Chester Davis. Burial will
follow in the family plot in Forest
Hill Cemetery, with military hon-
ors provided by the Fort Rucker
Honor Guard.
All services are under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home.

Betsy Palmer
Betsy Palmer, 23, died Tues-
day near Daytona Beach, as a re-
sult of injuries sustained in an
automobile accident. A native of
Florala, Alabama, she lived in We-
wahitchka for' 19 years before
moving to Daytona last August.
She was a 1990 graduate of We-
wahitchka High School and was
of the Holiness faith.
Survivors include her daugh-
ter, Tara. Elizabeth Palmer, her
parents, Hughie and Karen Palm-
er; her sister, Melissa Palmer
Vickers; two nephews, Jamie and
Allen Vickers, all of Wewahitchka,
her fiance, Bobby Gene Shiver,
and a number of aunts and un-
cles..
The funeral service was held
at 10:00 a.m., CDT, Saturday at
the Frst Baptist Church of We-
wahitchka conducted by the Rev.
Richard Maddox and the Rev. La-
velle Enterkin. Interment followed
In Clear Springs Cemetery near
Florala at 3:00 p.m. Saturday.
All services were under the
direction of the Comforter Funer-
al Home, Wewahltchka Branch
Chapel.

Carl Laverell Lester
Carl Laverell Lester, 66, of
Wewhitchka, passed away Mon-


IGNITE YOUR IMAGINATION!
These rockets from Estes are a snap to
build and are full of exciting features:


ASTROCAM'" 110
ROCKET LAUNCHED
AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY
SYSTEM


E2X OMLOID'
EGGLOFTER AND
PAYLOAD BOOST
VEHICLE


E2X SKYWINDER'"
THE ROCKET THAT
TRANSFORMS INTO
A HELICOPTER IN FLIGHT!


Check out these and other great new releases at:


The 1994-95 school year is
history and final grades have
been recorded. Parents of Port St.
Joe High School and Port St. Joe
Middle School students may pick
up report cards at the respective
school's main office on Thursday,
June 1, between the hours of
7:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.

Parents are reminded that
Gulf County Scholarship Program
tally sheets are attached to the
report card. The sheet must be
completed, signed and returned
to the school office no later that
June 15 for the student to earn
points for the year. Points turn
into scholarship dollars when the
student registers for post-


Memorial Day Fire Burns Home
Fire, said to be caused by deteriorating electrical wiring, de-
stroyed the St. Joe Beach home of Mrs. Lila Brouillette Monday
evening. The fire occurred about 6:,45 p.m. St. Joe Beach fire de-
partment answered the call and was assisted, by Highland View's
department. The two story home was said to be a total loss. Dep-
uty Bobby Plair surveys some of the damage in the photo above.


Wewa Woman's Club in Workshop


Tweeta Gaskin and Dottie
Taylor, members of the Wewa-
hitchka Woman's Club, attended
the FFWC District 2 Spring Work-
shop held on May 18, hosted by
the Chattahoochee Woman's
Club. Loucile Volk, District 2 Di-

day morning at his home follow-
ing an extended illness. He Was a
native and lifelong resident of We-
wahitchka. He served in the U. S.
Navy, and was a retired beekeep-
er.
Survivors include his son,
Francis Carl "Buddy" Lester of
Naples; daughter, Teresa "Sister"
Lykins of Bucyrus, Ohio; two
grandchildren; mother, Helen
Lester of Wewahitchka; and
brother, Bill Lester of Wewahitch-
ka.
Funeral services were incom-
plete at press time.
All services are under the di-
rection of the Comforter Funeral
Home, Wewahitchka Branch.
Chapel.


HELP WANTE


1The Gulf County Board of County
Commissioners will. accept applica-
tions until 5:00 p.m., EDT, June 16,
1995 for/ the position of South Gulf
County Ambulance Director. Applica-
tions can be obtained from the Plan-
ning/Building Department M-F, 8-5
at 1000 5th Street, Port St. Joe.
1) Applicant must be a Florida Certi-
fled Paramedic; '2) Director must re-
side within the service area: 3) Duties
of the Ambulance Director will in-
clude but not be limited to the follow-
ing: A) Responsible for budget; B) Re-
ponsible for scheduling; C)
Responsible for equipment mainte-
nance; D) Assist with calls as needed;
E) Write necessary grant applications;
F) Staying up to date on new rules.
and regulations.
Pay will be negotiable, based upon:
prior experience and qualifications-.
pay will include excellent benefit
.package. '
Gulf County enforces a- Drug-Free
Workplace Policy and is an Equal. Op-
portunity/Affirmative Action Employ-
er..
/s/ Michael L. Hammond, Chairman
Attest: Benny C. List6r,/ Clerk of
Courts
3tc 6/1
The Gulf County Board of' County
Commissioners will accept applica-
tions until 5:00 p.m., EDT, on June
23, 1995 for Florida Certified Para-
mnedics and Florida Certified Emer-
gency Medical Technicians. Employ-
ment will be with the South Gulf
County Ambulance Service. Applica-
tions can be obtained from the Plan-
ning/Building Department M-F, 8-5
at 1000 5th Street. Port St. Joe.
Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free
Workplace Policy and is an Equal Op-
portunity/Affirmative Action Employ-
er.
/s/ Michael L. Hammond, Chairman,
Attest: Benny C. Lister, Clerk of
Courts
3tc 6/4


Call for a quote on your auto

or homeowners insurance.

Compare Allstate for value.
Absolutely no obligation. Leave
Call now for an itto The
estimate. Good Hands
ROY SMITH
Agent


A IISt 221 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
904-227-1133


rector, chaired the meeting.' The
devotional was given by Nell Rob-
erts, District Chaplain, Chipley
Woman's Club; Nell Williams.
First Vice-President, Blountstown
Woman's Club, led the pledge;
the welcome was given by Lann
Boyd, President, Chattahoochee
Woman's Club; and the response
by Dottie Taylor.
The 'meeting workshops in-
cluded: Protocol, Opal Reaver,
District Parliamentarian; Leader-
ship, Boots Tate, District Leader-
ship Chair; Reporting, Carol
Crisp, President, Gulf Coast
Woman's Club; Membership, Jua-
nita Sanson, District Membership
Chair; Centennial, Betty Russell,
District Centennial Chair and
Yearbook / Newsletter, Imogene
Vickers, District Newsletter
Chair.
The theme of the day's enter-
tainment was "act, dance, 'sing
and serve with gladness". Under
the direction of their president,
Lois Lawrence, the Sunshine
Singers, members of the Woman's
Club of Panama City, sang a
medley followed by dancers Tom
and Juanita Sanson, Rick Mat-
tias and Loucile Volk who demon-
strated several types of ballroom
dances. Judy Houser and Jean.
Cockrell, Gulf Coast Woman's
Club, presented a comical "Ro-
meo and Juliet" skit.
A delicious lunch buffet was
prepared and served by the Chat-
tahoochee club members.
Before adjourning, Loucile
Volk emphasized the importance
of club members attending both
district and state meetings. The
next district get-together will be
in October when. the Chipley
Woman's Club will,, host the
GFWC Florida Federation of
Woman's Club State Officer's Fall
Tour.


13 INiCH.
P155/80R13
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13

14 INCH
P185W75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14

15 INCH
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75FR15
P235/75R15


$152.60
$182.28
$190.76
$195.00


$207.72
$211.96
$216.20
$220.44


$224.68
$228.92
$233.16
$237.40


Mounting Valve Stem Sales Tax
Computer Balancing Disposal Tax
City Pickup Fee










WESTERN

AUTO
Phone 227-1105


Obitaries.


The Hannon

Insurance Agency
227-1133

Is Pleased to Announce
Its Association With

Gary White
.Representing
Allstate & The Travelers
Ufe Insurance Companies
"Call Me About Your Life & Health Insurance Needs"'





TMOTHI' J. McFAR ND
TTORNE Y A T L A

GENERAL PRACTICE il1
Divorce Custody Adoption
Wills E~states
DUI Criminal Defensei
Accidents Insurance Claims
/I n/tia/ crimnat I ef0n1e,- ; ,' cC

509 Fourth Street Port St. Joe
-- 227-3113












Medicare Assignment Accepted For
SEye Exam 0. Lee Mullis,
M.D-
Bay Eye & 1600 Jenks Ave.

Surgical Center Panama City, FL Bod Cered
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 'Eye Physician

1-800-227-5704 And Surgeon










PROFESSIONAL

GAS STRING

TRIMMER




Features:
21.2 cc, Powerhead Engineered
for long life
S* Full Crankshaft
Hard Chrome Cylinder
Aluminum die Cast Fan
Housing
Primer Carburetor
15" Cutting Swath
48" Curved Shaft
Direct Drive
Adjustable "S" Handle
2-line bump to feed .095"
stringhead
s tlnhigh speed two line
cutting head

REGULAR PRICE $109.95



LIMTED 99
WARRANTY -


ST. JOE RENT-ALL

706 FIRST ST. PORT ST. JOE 227-2112


PAEA H SAPOTST O. L- HRSAJUE1,19


secondary education, so parents
* are urged not to miss this oppor-'
tunity.
Middle school and high
school summer classes begin
Monday, June 5. As in past
years, courses will be taught
Monday through Thursdays,
with the first three weeks com-
prising first semester work and-
the final three weeks covering
second semester work. Middle:
school students will begin each;,
day at 7:55 a.m. and end at 1:39
p.m.; high school will meet from
8:00 a.m. until 1:44 p.m.
Questions regarding report
cards or summer school may be
directed to PSJHS at 229-8813 or
to PSJMS at 227-3211.


nVA .1 A


I


5








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE2 FL THURSDAY JUNE 1 5


Sharks Look Good

*In Spring Jamboree


RUTHERFORD 3, ST. JOE 0
The Sharks football team


.Des Baxter catches a pass.
gAve the fans a little of what to
expect next season, in. the Bay
County Spring football jamboree.
The Sharks played the second
and third quarters of the spring
jainboree against Rutherford and















Christina Egler
Christina Egler
Wins Xerox Award
Christina Egler, junior _.at
Faith Christian .School. received
the Xerox Award in the. humani-
ties/social sciences, presented by
Xerox Corporation.
Xerox Award winners are se-
lected on the basis of scholarship
In the areas of humanities or so-
cial sciences, leadership, and
S community service.
Christina received her Xerox
Award during a presentation on
-May 27. She also will be eligible
to apply for a special Xerox Schol-
arship at the University of Roch-
ester in Rochester, New York.
The Xerox: Award in the hu-.



EARTH-

WORMS

Fresh Daily



HUNDRED

Home Delivery Available
Phone 647-3550
Corner Desoto &
Americus St.
4 i ST. JOE BEACH
4tp 5/4

For the deal of your life,
see me!!
,OMMY IHOMAS
THf/44^AO vAMEICA G<3.








JAMES C. "BO" BRAY
Sales Representative
(904) 765-5221
TOLL FREE
1-800-342-7131
2251 W. 23rd St.
PANAMACITY, FL 32405
Sutic 1/19


Bay, 5A powerhouses in Bay
County.
St. Joe held their own against
a much stronger and bigger
Rutherford team in the second
quarter, falling just short 3-0 on a
controversial field goal with less
than one minute remaining in the
game. The Sharks' defense held
Rutherford on a goal line stand,
forcing the Rams to kick a filed
goal on fourth down from the
three yard line
The offense finished with 68
total yards on 11 plays to the
Rams' 17-play 85 yard total. St.
Joe was five for eight passing for
60 yards, and eight yards rushing
with Des Baxter catching two
passes for 35 yards and Doyle
Crosby one reception for 20
yards.
BAY 7, ST. JOE 7
The Sharks played the Bay
High Tornadoes immediately after
Rutherford in the third quarter.
St. Joe settled for a 7-7 tie against
the Tornadoes. Bay scored on
their first possession after stop-
ping St. Joe and forcing a short
kick that found the Tornadoes on
the Sharks' 26 yard line. The
Tornadoes went 26 yards on five
plays to take the lead 7-0.
The Sharks immediately
started a drive of their own, going
54 yards on seven plays to tie the
score at seven. Their drive began
on the 46 yard line where Ryan
Yeager hit Brian Jenkinson a go
pattern for a 42 yard pass play


inanities/social sciences, recogniz-
es the academic achievements of
outstanding students and seeks
to emphasize the importance of a
broad educational background In
preparing students for future ca-
reers. The awards program recog-
nizes students at high schools in
all 50 states.
Christina is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Egler of Over-
stieet and will be a senior at
Faith Christian during the 1995-
96 school year.

What's Free?
For a free, five-page brochure
on how to check your credit file
and medical record, handle
phone sales, and have your name
removed from mailing lists, write
for "Protecting 'Your Privacy,"
-GConsume. IRfoiwnaUon Center,
Department 583A, Pueblo. Colo-
rado 81009.


U A, .... i ........ ...
Congressman Pete Peterson Files
Bill Favoring Military Veterans


Last week, Congressman Pete
Peterson (D-Marianna) intro-
duced, HR 1648, a bill that ex-
pands the requirement that a
five-point preference be, assigned
to military veterans applying for
federal jobs. Requiring a five-
point preference for veteran's
serving during particular circum-
stances was initially established
by the Veterans Preference Act.
'Today we have a system that
penalizes veterans on random
and arbitrary factors that are be-
yond the veteran's control," Peter-
son said. "Under the current law,
if a person enlisted .on October
15, 1976 and retired twenty years


Barry Adkison, quarterback for the Sharks, throws a pass in
the jamboree as Justin Summers blocks for him.


over the middle to set up the
touchdown. Barry Adkison con-
nected on a four yard drop pass to
the tight end Doyle Crosby for the
score.
St. Joe was four for seven
passing with one touchdown and
one intercepUon for 51 yards and


'Thanks"
During a time like this we
learn how much our friends really
mean to us.
Your thoughtfulness in our
sorrow in the loss of our precious
daughter, Davida Lori Byrd, has
meant so much and everything
you have done is truly appreciat-


four yards rushing to Bay's 47
total which included 36 yards
rushing and 11 passing.
Totals: Passing -Adkison 6-9
for 34 yards and a touchdown.
Yeager 3-6 for 77 yards and an
interception. Rushing, 12 total
yards.


-May God richly bless you.
The Byrd Family

"Advertising Paysf
-Call Us--
The Star Publishing Co.
227-1278


Bait Shrimp Cigar Minnows Squid Lures
Earthworms Crickets Wrigglers
FULL LINE of TACKLE
S Open 6 a.m. Monday-Saturday
"z Sunday 6:30--2:30
Danny's Sporting Goods
306 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
229-8993
S 'c


r --------- CO --------N

S: Large fa


L__--__------- ----------------- ----- _


Original Round Pizza
TWO for one
SM MED LCG
Cheese ................:..... 6.95 8.95 10.95
Extra Items or Extra Cheese....... 1.09 1:.29 1.49
: I ITEMS TO CHOOSE FROM:
Pepperoni Mushrooms Italian Sausage Ham Green Peppers Onions
c Ground Beef *-Black Olives Pineapple Anchovies* Mild Peppers
THE WORKS 10.25 12.50 15.95
Peoperoni Mushrooms. Ham, Italian Sausage, Green peppers
& Onions (Anchovies on request)
STICKY FINGERS ............. 10.95 13.50 16.95
Cheese, Pepperoni, Mushrooms, Ham, Italian Sausage,
Green Peppers, Onions, Black olives & Ground Beef
1 lAnchovies on request)

rJWZ ANYWAY YOU SLICE ITI


Extra Large
2 Topping Howiemongous Pizza ................. 7.99
Specialty Howiemongous Pizza .......................... 10.99
Your Choice Of THE WORKS HOWIE MAUI 4 TACO MEAT EATERS VECCIE



r HOWIE WINGS
Chicken Wings
10 wings 20 Wings
4.59 8.95
Served w/Celery, Bleu Cheese & Spicy Howle Sticks


HOURS:
SSunday Wednesday
Lobby open till 9:00 p.m.,
pickup window till 10:00 p.m.-
Thurs.-Saturday
Lobby open till 10:00 p.m.,
pickup window till 11:00 p.m.


... XX xx xx ,,.XX N, = x...... X ....xX S-,K ...= =A



229-9222

418 Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe


Howie Bread
SHOW IE BREAD w/Sauce ...................................... 2.25
HOWIE BREAD w/Sauce & Cheese ....................... 2.95
A delicious dessert treat\
for the whole family. i
bakedfruChoose Apple, Peach
b kefrp or Cherry................. 2.79)


later with a record of distin-
guished service, he or she would
be eligible to retire in late 1996
but would NOT be eligible for any
hiring preference. Had that per-
son enlisted one day earlier, he or
she could have served just six
months and received a five-point
preference".
Presently, the Veterans' Pref-
erence Law gives a five-point pref-
erence in hiring for federal jobs.
Peterson's bill amends the
current law by allowing a five-
point preference to any veteran
who served a total of 24 months
of active duty and was honorably
discharged.


GRAND OPENING!!!!

BEACHSIDE BAKERY
Baked Goods Fresh Daily
June 3rd at Mexico Beach
4003 Highway 98
S"648-5622
Operated by Thelma Grantland



GOLDEN DREAMS
'N' SILVER LININGS

-_ will be opening its doors on Thursday, June 1
at 12:00 noon
501 Monument Avenue (904) 227-1697
"A Unique Gift Experience"
Bring in our ad and receive 10% off each item. Expires 6-30-95
3tp6/i


I-ndian Pass Marine
2178 Hwy. C 30 227-1666 Port St. Joe
Simmons Bayou across from Pic's


Jahnsan MSYSTEMATCHED
OUTBOARDES PARTS &ACCESSORIES
Authorized Johnson Dealer
OMC Systematched
Parts & Accessories


SERVICE & REPAIRS
: Call Ken


r- COT 3 --- .-----

I L'arge

TACO
-PIZZA **
L-_-------------------_-_---__-_------_---.


Over 130 Locations in Florida

Pasta Dinners --. Served / IowieBread -
For 1 For 2
BAKED SPAGHETTI ..................... .. 4.95 8.95
Layered w/Mozzrella Cheese & Served w/Howle Bread
BAKED ZITI .................................... 4.95 8.95
A generous porton of Zit topped with Mozzarella Cheese & baked to a golden
brown.
RAVIOLI .. ..... .... .................. 4.95 8.95
Cheese stuffed Ravioli topped with our own sauce
w/Meatballs or Mushrooms .99. 1.25

Oven Baked Subs
Deluxe Com bination ........................................... 4.65
Filled full of Pepperoni, Diced Ham, Mozzarella Cheese,
Italian Sausage, Lettuce, Tomato, onions & Mild Peppers
Steak, Cheese & Mushrooms .......................... 4.65
Steak, Cheese, Mushrooms, Lettuce, Tomato, Onions &.Mild Peppers
Ham & Cheese ................................................... 4.65
Ham, Cheese, Lettuce, Tomato, onions & Mild Peppers
Pizza Sub ............................ ....... ........... 4 .65
Pizza sauce, Pepperoni & Cheese
M eatball Sub ................................................... 4.65
Meatballs with Spaghetti Sauce & Mozzrella Cheese
Bacon Cheeseburger Sub .................................. 4.65
Ground Beef, Bacon & Onionon request '
, Salads SM MED LGC
Antipasto Salad............ .... 2.50 ,3.95 5.50
Lettuce, Ham, Salami, cheese, Pepper Rings, Onions,
Tomatoes & Black Olives
Chef Salad ......................... 2.25 3.25 4.95
Fresh Crisp Lettuce, Tomatoes & onions topped with Diced Ham.
Mozzrella Cheese & Black Olives
Tossed Salad .................... 1.75 2.50 3.50
Lettuce, Tomatoes & onions with your choice of dressing
L EXTRA DRESSING" 15 C


0 6inFlrid wthFRE Favre PizaCrsts* riina-*Bute e uterh.ee- Grli 9-ea*opp Sed* Re cju


1 Medium Pizza $399 I
w/1 Item I
I Large Pizza $499
w/1 Item I
I ----- ----------I
I 1 Large $799
I Specialty Pizza I
I wrT, #HOWH II,
PICK UP ONLY
Not valid w/other coupons
.. 418 Monument Ave. 229-9222


fRIPLEE
TOPPER
I Large Pizza with I
your choice up to ,
I s33 Toppings I

I I ...... For 1 I

I 12 ... For 2

Not valid with other coupons
S418 Monument Ave. -2299222


nGHowiemongous 2-Toppling
I Pizza
I Howle Bread w/Cheese
I & 1 Large Chef Salad
i $1399
I Howlemongous Speclalty Pizza
Howle Bread w/Cheese
S1 Large Chef salad

S$1699
I Not vald with other coupons
I 418 Monument Ave.. 229-9222


CROWD

PLEAZZER
1 Pizza
w/The Works I
I & 1 Pizza
I w/2 Toppings I
I ~$1 f95 I
S$1095
12Lg ..... $
I Not valid with other coupons
S418 Monument Ave. 229.221


LUNCH SPECIALS 11 am- 3 pm

I1 Small 1-Topping $ 45
Pizza & small Coke
I Pasta for One $ 95
& Howle Bread -$3
I Any Half Sub, Howie $ 45I
I Bread & Coke $3 I
I----- -------I
THE BIc SLICE 29
1 Slice of Pizza $j
w/1 Topping
Not valid with other coupons
S 4183 Monument Ave. 229-9222 .
------.. W/


PACR 7A


I _;


;-al'~F,













Antwione Jumps Up To The Big Times ,

7 Feet Plus Leaps Put Him In National Competition Invitational Events


Last Saturday, two members
of the Port St. Joe High School
boys track and field team compet-
ed in the 19th annual Golden
South Classic in Winter Park.
450 athletes from ten states,
Washington, D. C., Bahamas,
British Virgin Islands, Canada,
Cayman Islands, Puerto Rico, and
South America took part in the
invitation only meet.
Antwione Allen competed in
the high jump and 110 hurdles,
battling against the best high
jumpers he had faced all year. He
began the competition by clearing
6'4". He missed his first attempt
at 6'6", but cleared it on his sec-
ond attempt. At .6'8", Antwlone
struggled with his approach and.
missed his first two attempts
leaving only. one shot to remain in
the competition. He made it on
his last attempt.
After Antwione cleared 6'10"
and 7'0" on his first attempts,
tried for 7'2 1/4" but missed all
three times. His 7'0" jump won
first first place in the event, and
he has now cleared 7'0" or higher
for the third meet in a row.
In the 110 hurdles, 21 ath-
letes, including many state cham-


pions, competed in the meet. Ant-
wione's time of 14.44 in the
preliminaries qualified him for
the finals with the second fastest
time. In the finals, Antwione
placed third with a time of 14.48.
Finishing first was Terrence
Trammell of Decatur, Georgia and
placing second was Anthony
Bolden of South Broward.
Williams Scores High
In 'the discus competition,
Robert Williams competed against
16 athletes. In the preliminaries.
Robert recorded an effort of
154'9" and qualified for the finals.
In the finals, he improved his
standings in the competition by
tossing the discus 158'0". This
throw placed him fourth overall
in the competition.
In the shot put, Robert
placed ninth overall with a put of
47'8".
This meet was a great experi-
ence for Robert and Antwione.
They had the opportunity to com-
pete against some of the best
high school athletes in this hemi-
sphere and had the chance to
."talk" with them and exchange
different views and ideas, accord-
ing to Coach Gowan.


Antwione Allen clears 7'0" on high jump.


All Star Games Highlight Season
Port St. Joe's Dixie Youth Star players. Recognition was giv- across the district. The first of Year Olds Pitching Machin
.Baseball League wrapped up its en to each of the 20 team spon- these is the First Place Teams Tournament, hosted by Parke
regular season activities last Fri- sors and the many other individ- Tournament which will be held in from June 17 23; Farm Team 1
day night with the playing of the uals who had contributed to Callaway June 10-16. During this and Under Tournament, hoste
annual All Star games, featuring make this a successful year for week, Port St. Joe's first place by Port St. Joe from 'June 24
Minor and Major League players. the youth. major league team, Active Styles 30; 10 and Under All Stars Tour
The evening was highlighted Some of the League's players will face off with other major nament, hosted by Bayou Georg
with trophy presentations to the will continue play through the league first place teams from the from July 8 14; and the Majc
first place team members from summer months by participating. district. (12 and. Under) All Stars Tourna
each league and the selected All in five post-season tournaments Other tournaments -sched- ment, hosted by Apalachicol
uled to follow will include: 7 & 8 from July 15-21.


e.
;r
0
d
r-
;e
or
l-
a


Minor League All Stars-Front row (1 to r): Bart Lowiy, Antonio Smiley,
Dennis Warren, Brett Tarpley, Hal Tarpley, B. J. Strickland and Thomas Lee.
Second row (1 to r): Joshua Smith. Addam Duke, Micah Dodson, Raye Raye Bai-
ley, Ryan Harmon, Bryan Thomas. Stephen Besore, and Ashley Haddock. Stand-
ing in rear are Coaches Bill Dodson, Harlan Haddock and Rex Strickland.


1995 Minor League Champions-Kneeling (1to r): Ryan Craig, Jarrod
McArdle, Terrence Holland, Preston Wigsten, Ryan Laine, Collins Abrams and
Tra'is Burge. Standing (1Uto r): Patrick Fitzgerald. Tyler Weimorts, Cody Nobles,
Adam Nixon, Stephen Tarantino. Michael Douds and Charlie Baucom. Standing
in rear are Coaches Travis Burge, Kenneth Weimorts and Joey Tarantino.


Major League All Stars-Front row 0 to r): Christopher Varnadoe. Jarrod
Wester, Christopher Knox. Matthew Caswell. Drew Tuten, Jason Peak, bat boy
Britton Brown, and Chad Haddock. Second row 0 to r): Joshua Todd, Billy Bel-
linger, Woodrow Cherry. Tyson Dai1s. Bradley Edge. Chad Goebert, Andy Shoaf
and Mitchell Owens. Standing in rear are Coaches Steve Owens, Billy Stephens i
-and Rusty Brown.


1995 Major League Champions-Kneeling.,.( to r): Drew Tuten, Mat-
thew Caswell, Andy ShoaL Reko Watson, Dustin Crews, Michael Manley and
Christopher Knox. Standing (1 to r): Mitchell Owens, Joey Peters, Chad Goebert,
Chad Haddock and Alex Hernandez. Standing in rear are Coaches Steve Owens,
Rusty Brown and Andy Tuten.


'Oews On Dental tHealth

FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.




,- .Discolored


Front Teeth


If you have discolored front
teeth that detract from your ap-
pearance, your dentist can help
them look natural again. There
are many reasons why teeth be-
come stained or discolored.
Sometimes it is caused by cer-
tain childhood diseases accom-
panied by high fever. It can also
be caused by certain medica-
tions, such as antibiotics or oth-
er drug therapies used to cure
illness. Personal habits, such
as heavy smoking or chewing
tobacco can also cause teeth
discoloration. Whatever the
cause, no one wants to be em-
barrassed by exhibiting ugly,
stained teeth when smiling.
To solve this problem, your
dentist may recommend use of


a composite resin. This is a ver-
satile and useful material that
has many important applica-
tions in the restoration of teeth.
He can apply a thin veneer of
composite resin and bond it di-
rectly over the surface of the
stained teeth in a color that will
match your natural teeth, or he
may recommend a porcelain ve-
neer; The next time you see
your dentist for a checkup, ask
him about these techniques to
cover badly stained teeth.
ooooooo0000ooooooooooooooooooo
Prepared as a public ser-
vice to promote better dental
health. From the office of
FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
Williams Ave., Phone 227-1123.


Major League All Stars-Front row (1 to r): Joshua Posey, Stephen Gad-
dis, James Daniels, Adam Hamm, Prince Jones, Terrance Chambers. and Timo-
thy Gainous. Second row (1.to r): Benjamin Ashcraft, Craig Phillips, Larche Ware,
Jacob Tankersley, Buck Burkett, Tremaine Lewis, Isaiah Jenkins, and Travis
Wright. Standing in rear are Coaches Don Ashcraft, Mark Scott and Randy Phil-
lips.


Minor League All Stars-Front row (1 to r): Bo Lenox. Ryan Laine, Kenny
McFarland, Terrence Holland, Austin Horton, Zachary Williams, Timothy King.
Second row (1 to r): Brian Bizek, Stephen Tarantino, Tyler Weimorts, Adam Nix-
on, Cody Nobles, Christopher Shearer and Kale Guillot. An All Star team mem-
ber not present is Charlie Baucom. Standing in rear are Coaches David Horton,
Joey Tarantino and Alan Strickland.





BOAT




RENTALS


1/2 Day

Full Day


$119 4 hours

$179 8 hours


* 20 ft. Mako center console, 185 hp Johnson
* 20 ft. Galaxy Bow Rider 140 hp Johnson
Deposit Required. All renters must be at least 21 years old.

Rod & Reel Rentals

We Also Have A Full Line of Tackle and
Guy Harvey Originals
Costa Del Mar Sunglasses
Signature Series / Tervis Tumblers
Ultimate Hats
Nautical Gifts & Belts

Call 904-648-8900
for Reservations
Let us book your next Fishing Charter on a 34-42 ft. Sport Fisherman.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK


MARQUARDT'S MARINA
Highway 98 Mexico Beach, Florida


rntxn am THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995


HE TREAD MILL
State Approved & ASE Certified Air Conditioning Repair In Town
Stan Price and Tim Pope owners/operators 1 \ pm
pen Monday Friday, 8:00 a.m 6:00 p.m. and Saturday 8:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
TUHE ALIGNMENT r4EwTIRES USED OIL & LUBE


PAGE 8A


,Cooper
TIRES
ME


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOB, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995


Vrl R yc oA


I


-.111,
Co '-"p)ebr
s)]
L:TIRES








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1. 1995 PAGE 1B


Citizens of Tomorrow:


Pictures of these youth were taken recently


in Port St. Joe and copies furnished to The Star to be printed over the next several weeks until all have been used.


Joshua Dylan, 6 month old son
of Emily Cabaniss.


steven, t years and sne'noya, 3 Lacey Lowery, 7 & Lauren Brock,
months, children of Steven and 2 1/2, children of Pam Lowery,
Sheila Fennell. Alien Lowery & Johnny Brock.


Ashton, 16 month old daughter
of David and Elizabeth Davis.


Samantha, 20 month old daugh-
ter of Nic and Tina Nicodemus.


Andrew, 6 years and Erin, 16
months, children of Gary and Su-
zanne White.


We hope you

have enjoyed

seeing this series

of children's

photos.


Davida, 2 year old daughter of
Steve and Kim Odom.


Austin, 9 year old son of David Lakia, 2 yearolddaughter of La-
and Carol Horton. Kitcha Underwood and Chris
Keys.


Trevor, 5 years and Tiffany, 6 Jelaine Elizabeth, 3 week old
months, children of Rusty and daughter of David and April Mas-
Debbie Burch. sengill.


Watch For Common Sources of Poison While Enjoying Summer Activities


summer season, the Florida Pol-
son Information, Center in Jack-
sonville at University Medical
Center reminds Floridians to be
aware of common summer poi-
soning hazards. Approximately
90 percent of poisonings are acci-
dental, and 60 percent occur In
children under the age of six. The
poison center encourages every-
one to learn about the potential
poisoning hazards that are com-
mon during the summer monriths.
Many of these hazards are listed
below. Anyone who suspects a


poisoning exposure should imme-:
diately call the poison center at 1-
800-282-3171 statewide.
Snake/Insect Bites
* Coral Snakes are characterized
by bands of black, red and yel-
low. They are the most poison-
ous snake in North America
and can be found in any habi-
tat. .. .
* Pigmy Rattlesnakes, usually
12 to 24 inches long, are dark
gray with gray-brown circular
markings on the back.
* Cottonmouths (Water Mecca-


sins) are water -snakes that
grow up to five feet long. They
are olive-brown to black in color
and rarely bite unless provoked-
or stepped on.
Eastern Diamond Rattle-
snakes are up to eight feet long
with yellow-brown diamonds
down the back. They are com-
:monly found in pine flatwoods
near wet areas.
* Brown Recluse Spiders are yel-
low-orange with a violin-shaped
marking on their quarter-sized
body. They hide in bathroom


closets, over door frames and in
comers.
* Black Widow Spiders are easily
identified by a shiny black (or
brown) body with a'red hour-
glass on the underbelly. They
prefer dark, quiet places like
garages or meter boxes.
Prevention Tips:
S>Snakes generally attack only
when provoked. stepped on, or
* threatened. !
>If you see a snake, walk away.
Should a poisoning exposure oc-


cur from one of these snakes or.
insects, Floridians are. encour-,
aged to call the Florida Poison
Information Center.
S Insect Repellents
A common Ingredient in in-
sect repellents is "DEET .
(strengths range from 14-100 per-
cent). Choose a product with less
than 30 percent concentration for
children. Read directions careful-
ly. Some repellents are meant to.
be applied to clothing, tents,
screens, and bedrolls ONLY.
Prevention Tips:


>To apply. repellent to the face,
spray on hands and rub onto
the face, being careful to avoid
the eyes and mouth.
>DO NOT spray on- 'children's
hands because they may rub
their eyes or mouths,
FPIC/Jax provides poison as-
sessment and treatment advice
through a statewide, toll-free
number. Open 24 hours a day,
seven days a week, FIPC/Jax
serves 43 counties in the north-
ern and eastern coastal regions of
the state.


---- -,a- ~1'~.-'-- .-.. ....,~..-- ..~, -
I -


P PROJECT


1995


Apalachicola Northern Railroad
Ellen Allemore
Arizona Chemical
Alvarez'Lehman & Assoc. Inc
Abundant Life
Access.Catalog Comrpany
Aline's Beauty Shop
Ard's Florist
Active Styles
Athletic House
Anita's Styling Salon
Butler's Restaurant
Zedoc Baxter
Bay St. Joseph Care Center
Beach Lumber
Bob's Paint & Body
Blue Water Inn
Maggie Bell.
Bill's Dollar;Apalachicola
* Buzzett's Drug Store,
Big Barn
Boutique by the Bay
Beachwalk
Barfield's
Bayside Lumber
Buffalo Rock Pepsi
Big Star Foods
City of PSJ City Commissioners
Dr. James Campbell
City of Mexico Beach
Comforter Funeral Home
* Citizens Federal
Cathey's ACE Hardware
Church of God in Christ
Church of God Highland, View
Costin Insurance Agency
Charles Costin, Attorney
James A. Cox & Associates
Clipper Shoppe,
Cooper's Cut & Style
Captain Jacks


Project Graduation and the Senior Class of Port St. Joe High School

would like to thank all who participated in making Project Graduation c

success Please show your aIpreciation to the listed contributors

by-acknowledging and utilizing the services I

and/or products of the following:


Costin's Bookkeeping
Cape Cafe
Campbell's Drug Store
Costin's Dept. Store
Charisma Charters
Consolidated Electric
Carpet Country .
Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
City Police Department
David Rich's IGA
Dollar General
Driesbach Cleaners
Danny's Sporting Goods,
RA Driesbach #77 Knights of Pythias
Walker's Dixie Dandy
El Governor Motel
Elizabeth Thompson Realtor
Patrick Floyd
Fantasy Properties
First Pentecostal Holiness Church
First Baptist Church PSJ :
First United Methodist Church
First Union Bank
First Baptist Church White City
Finest Kind Charters
Florida Power Corp. :
Fashion Exchange
Freckles Yogurt
Fish 'House Restaurant
Fat Jacks
Flour Mill
Gulf County County Commissioners
Gulf County School Board
Gulf Co. Beach Fire Dept.
Gulf Sands Restaurant
Grace Baptist Church
Guilford Charter Service
Gulf Correctional Institution
Gifts from the Heart
Golden's Jewelers
Gulf Foods


George's Jewelry.
Gulf Fabricating
Paul Gant
Griffin CD
Gulf. County Sheriff's Dept. ,
Gulf County Sheriffs Auxiliary
Hannon Realty
Hannon Insurance
Harmon Realty
Harmon's Heavy Equipment
Highland View Baptist
Highland View Assembly of G)d
Howard Creek Baptist*
Holey
.Hill Manufacturer
Heilig Myers
Hungry Howies
Henderson Restaurant
IC Contractors
Islander RV Park
Imperial Furniture Co..
Interiors Etc.
.Indian Pass Marine
Indian Pass Raw Bar
J Patrick's Restaurant
Jeannie's K lit Shoppe
Jolly Rogers
Julie's Restaurant
W. Glenn Kent
Keefe Supply Company'
Robert King DDS
Kmart Callaway
Kirk's Ice
Laundry Room
Linda's Restaurant
Long Avenue Baptist
Venita K. Lane
Larry's Bike Shop
Lions Club
Matincheck at Your Service
Miller Agency


- Material Transfer
Melvin Lehman
Mexico Beach Grocery
Mexico Beach Chamber of Commerce
M'ary's Jewelry
Millie's Beauty Supply Co.
Frank D. May DDS
Mae's Hair
Marquardt's Marina
Mexico Beach Video
Moore's Seafood
Mayhann's Auto Parts
New Bethel AME Church
New York Deli
Dr. Tim Nelson
North PSJ Community Choir-
Newberry Eye Clinic
Neva's Hair Salon
New Bethel Missionary Baptist
James Newsome
Oak Grove Assembly of God
Preble-Rish Inp
Pate's Service Center
Port Inn
Philadelphia Primitive Baptist
Piping,& Equipment Inc
Panama City Mall
Parker Realty
James A Padgett DDS
PSJ Chamber of Commerce
Petal Shoppe
Photo World
Picture Perfect
Presnell's Boat Rentals
Peters Laundry
Pic's Food Store
Rotary Club
Rish & Gibson
Renfro's Auto Parts
Richard Quackenbush
St. Joe Papermakers Fed. Cred. Un.


'-ORT ST.jOF
The Star
St. Joe Shell Co
St. Joe Natural Gas
St. Joe Container
St. Joe, Fire Department
St. Jos ph Telephone Co
Sharon's Cafe
St Joe Lions Club
Saveway
St. Joe Rent All
Southern Cleaning
St. Joseph's.Altar Society
St Joe Machine Shop
St Joe Forest Products
Starlight Restaurant
Sandman Motel
St. Joseph's Catholic Church
St Joe Communications
St. Joe Auto Parts
Scallop Cove Deli
Showtime Video
Subway
Sharon's Hair
St. Joe Furniture

Seahorse Gift & Florist
Seifert Acct. & Tax Service
Smith Southerland Funeral Home
Suwannee Swifty Mexico Beach
St Joe Hardware
Sub Shop
Toucans
Tyndall Federal Credit Union
Tom Todd Realty
Tommy T's
Treadmill
The Star
Treasure Bay
Top of the Gulf Restaurant
Video Merchant
Western Auto
Zion Fair Baptist Church


We apologize for any name inadvertently omitted.


m .


Here's to the Celebration

of Project Graduation '95


F-


I


p









PAGE 2B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995



Depression Is An Illness


by Edwin R. Ailes,
Executive Director
Gulf Co. Guidance Clinic, Inc.

Depressive disorders afflict
nearly 10 million Americans and
cost this nation more than $16
billion annually. Yet few people
realize that depression can be an
illness as serious and disabling as
heart disease, and one that can
be successfully treated. As many
as 80 to 90 percent. of persons
experiencing serious depression


Dear Counselor,
My child has been having a lot
of trouble academically in school.
The school did some testing on
him and now they tell me has a
"specific learning disability." Can
you tell me what that means?
Worried Mom
Dear Mom,
The "technical" definition of a
specific learning disability (SLD)
refers to a disorder. in one of the
-basic psychological processes
involved in understanding or in
using spoken or written language.
These disorders may affect listen-
ing, thinking, reading, talking,
writing, spelling, .or arithmetic..
Dyslexia. is one example of a
learning disability involving a
reading disorder.
Students identified with SLD
are usually of average intelligence
and being identified does not-
mean you have a mentally
impaired child or a "dumb" one.
At school age, this is a student
who might read "on" for "no",
writes 41 for 14, "p" for "d" or "q"
for "b", and can't remember the
sequence of letters that make up a
word. The learning disabled child
is not ready on time. He is disor-
ganized. He can't make sense of
what he receives through his


The Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission, approved a
rule to ban gill nets and entangle-
ment nets from fresh waters
.where saltwater fish occur on
May 12. The new rule is to bring
freshwater net-fishing rules into
line with the constitutional
amendment that bans such nets
effective:July 1.
During Thursday's workshop
session, Dr. Jerome Shireman,
interim 'director of the Commis-
sion's Division of Fisheries, re-
ported the stars recommenda-
tions regarding use of gill nets for
taking fish in fresh water. He said
that in some water, not accessible
to saltwater bodies, there is no
reason to ban gill nets for taking
certain freshwater fishes. '
The Commission approved
the new rule, eliminating use of
gill nets and entanglement nets
in fresh water, except to allow the.
use of gill nets on certain lakes in
Bay, Calhoun, Holmes and Jack-
son counties where only freshwa-
ter species occur. In addition, gill
nets will be allowed for scientific
research or governmental purpos-
es.


can be helped some fully
recovering, others having their
symptoms dramatically alleviated.
Like heart disease, depressive dis-
orders vary. Some people have
only one or two episodes in a life-
time. Some have recurrent
episodes. Others have a chronic
form of depression, requiring
maintenance on medication to
avoid disabling symptoms.
Also like heart disease, many
people do not recognize that they
are ill. They do not seek treat-,
ment, and some die. Each year,


senses, even though his sight.
hearing, and other sense organs
are intact. He is distractable,
which most people think Is not
paying attention, when he's actu-
ally paying too much attention to
too many things.
Be supportive and encourag-
ing. Don't demand your child be
an honor roll student. Ask the
teacher to give you ways you can
help at home.
Stop by our office and pick up
a free copy of, "Plain Talk About
Children with Learning Disabili-
ties," produced by the U. S. Dept.
of Health, Education, and Welfare.
Good luck!
Sincerely,
Gloria M. Dumas, M.S., S.S.P.
Nationally Certified School
Psychologist
,. *
Note: Please address your ques-
tions and comments to:
Dear Counselor, 311 Williams
Ave., Port St. ,Joe, FL 32456.
Names and addresses are option-
al and will remain confidential.
Letters may be edited for length.
Urgent inquiries. and requests
for professional counseling
should be directed by phone to
227-1145.


approximately 16,000 suicides
are attributed to depression, and
many more die prematurely from
various other illnesses due to
increased vulnerability associated
with depression.
Depressive disorders affect
one's body, feelings, thoughts and
behavior. In fact, depression is a
"whole body" illness. Anyone who
experiences four or more of the.
following symptoms for more than
a few weeks should seek treat-
ment:
Sad, depressed or "empty"
mood
Loss of interest or pleasure
in ordinary activities
Decrease in sexual drive
Sleep disturbances (Insom-
nia, early-morning waking, over-
sleeping)
Eating disturbances'
(appetite and/or weight loss or ,
ga in) ,
Decreased energy. fatigue,
Feelings of pessimism,"
guilt, worthlessness, helpless-
ness, hopelessness
Thoughts of death or sul-'
cide, suicide attempts ,
Activity level slows down or
increases
Diminished ability to think
and/or concentrate.
Depression can be triggered'
by an environmental stress -
loss of a loved one, change of Job
or home, or economic problems -
or it can appear "out of the blue.*
Some people may inherit a genet-
ic vulnerability.. But whether


Social Security

Rep. Coming
Most Social Security business
can be handled over the phone.
You are invited to call the Social
Security office at 1-800-772-
1213.
If this Is not possible, you
may come to the office located at
30 West Government Street in
Panama City. The office is open
Monday through Friday from 8:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m., C.D.T., except
,on national holidays.
If you cannot come to Pana-
ma City, you may meet the Social
Security representative at the
Gulf County Courthouse on the
first and third Monday of each
month from 11:00 a.m. until
12:00 pm., E.D.T.
; ..:In June, the representative
will meet next in Port St Joe on
the 5th.


$18,500 a Year to Start...
If that sounds like a salary you would like to earn, the Correctional Officers Training
Program at Gulf Coast Community College could be the first step towards that goal.
JTPA at GCCC has scholarships to help you get there. If you are unemployed and
qualify, JTPA will pay for your books, uniforms and tuition for the Correctional Officers
Training Program. We'll help you find ajob when you graduate, tool
This is your chance to enter a financially stable, secure, rewarding career. In Bay
County call Jennifer German, GCCC JTPA at 747-3211. In Gulf and Franklin
Counties, call John Craig, (904) 227-1759.
Oj Gulf Coast
Community College GCCC is an equal opportunity/access employer.




All Frms Of insurance

Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages -Group *Life *Boat
*Hospitalization 'Mobile Homes
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


Attention


Gulf County Contractors


can be grandfathered-in, in


'Franklin County, from 1 June through 30 June, 1995. Any

Gulf County contractor not registered with Gulf County

may register during this time for grandfathering in Gulf

County for their competency cards. All contractors regis-

tering will need state license, copy of insurance, workers


genetic, environmental or bio-
chemical, depressive disorders
are among the most responsive to
'treatment.
Some patients respond well to
antidepressant medications such
as Elavil, Sinequan, Prozac, Paxil
or Zoloft. Others do as well with
psychotherapy alone. Two forms
of psychotherapy have been care-
fully studied for use with serious
depression and found to be effec-
tive. One, cognitive/behavioral
therapy, addresses the distorted
and negative perceptions of one-
self,' the, world and the future
which form the basis for depres-
sion in some people. The other,
interpersonal therapy, focuses on
improving social and personal
relationships that may be causing
depression in others.
Combinations of medication
and psychotherapy may be the
very best treatment for some:
medication relieves symptoms
more quickly than psychotherapy
and psychotherapy provides more,
effective ways to deal with life's
problems.
Because depressive disorders
are a major public health problem
in the country, Gulf County
Guidance Clinic. Inc. Joins with
other community mental health
centers throughout the United
States in treating depressive con-
ditions. Gulf County Guidance
Clinic has provided treatment for
depression and other problems
since 1967. Clinic staff, consist-
ing of 'a psychiatrist,- nurse,
school psychologists, counselors
and a family therapist provide
medication monitoring and psy-
chotherapy routinely for depres-
sion and other difficulties. Help
and treatment are available for
you and your family. For further
information on depression and/or
for appointments, call tI1
Guidance Clinic in Port St. Joe at
227-1145.


ILCWAZ. Y' I



,' E,, "DUTDO0R PRODUCTS
001 It's "Incwedible"


White's Deluxe.
5hp Self Propelled


Powerful 12hp Lawn Tractor
With 38" TurboCut Deck


Mulching Mower Equipped With Many Features
ON GALE NOWI ON GALE NOW!
S$379 $999



COMES FULLY ASSEMBLED AND READY TO PERFORM AT:
ST JOE RENT-ALL
706 1st Street
227-2112
For Qualified Buyers limited Time Only


STATE HOUSING INITIATIVES PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (SHIP)


ATTENTION: HOMEOWNERS & HOMEBUYERS
The SHIP program was created for the purpose of providing funds to local governments as an incentive for
the creation of local housing partnerships, to expand production of and preserve affordable housing, and to
increase housing related employment. Gulf County will receive $250,000 for Fiscal Year 1994-1995.
The procedure for receiving funds under the program is through an application process as outlined.
Distribution and qualification fqr the funds is determined by the combined household gross (before taxes) income
as indicated in the chartbelow. ... ..
The program has been divided into three trategies;, .....
Strategy 1:
Purchase Assistance ($150,000 has been allocated for this strategy) applications will be accepted on a
continuing basis until all funds allocated have been encumbered.
The process for selection of recipients for this strategy will be based on the applicant having an approved
loan application from a qualified lender; meeting the affordability criteria (monthly mortgage payments, including
taxes and insurance, does not exceed 30%7 annual gross median income for the family size), meeting the income
guidelines established for low (LI) and moderate income (MOD)families.
It is estimated that 13 households will benefit from this strategy ( 7 low income (LI) and 6 moderate income
(MOD) families).
The median purchase price for this strategy will be $50,000, for new and existing homes with a maximum
loan of $10,000 for downpayment and a maximum of $2,000 for closing cost with a total not to exceed $12,000 @
3% for 10 years.
Strategy 2:
Rehabilitation Grant ($30,000 has been allocated for this strategy).
Selection of applicants for this strategy will be by. a lottery method. Each.application will be numbered and
numbers will be randomly drawn. As numbers are drawn applicants will be placed'in numerical order.
Eligibility for this strategy is based on income level for persons in the very low income (VLI) households (see
chart below).
It is estimated that 10 households will benefit from this strategy. Persons receiving a grant in the Fiscal Year
1993 1994.program are not eligible.
The maximum grantraward will be $3,000.
Strategys3:
Rehabilitation Loan ($40,000 has been allocated for this strategy).
Selection of applicants for this strategy will be the same as above for Strategy 2, Rehabilitation Grants.
Eligibility for this strategy is based on income level for persons in the very low income (VLI) and low income
(LI) households. (see chart below).
It is estimated that 13 households will benefit from this strategy (8 very low income (VLI) and 5 low income
(LI) households).
The maximum loan amount will be $5,000.
SHIP FUNDS MAY NOT BE USED TO PURCHASE, REHABILITATE, OR REPAIR MOBILE HOMES!
ALL APPLICANTS WILL BE REQUIRED TO ATTEND HOMEOWNERSHIP CLASSES PRIOR TO THEIR
APPLICATIONS BEING'PROCESSED.
Point of contact for this program is Bo Williams, 229-6125 (Tues. Fri.), County Courthouse, and in
Wewahitchka (Old County Courthouse) each Monday, 639-3019.
Applications are available: County Courthouse Rm. 147 and 204; and in
Wewahitchka (Old Courthouse) County Extension Office.
APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED BEGINNING JUNE 1,;1995 THRUJULY 15,1995 FOR REHAB
GRANTS AND LOANS. THE LOTTERY DRAWING WILL BE ADVERTISED AND CONDUCTED SHORTLY
AFTER THE WND OF THE APPLICATION PERIOD.
1NCUXX AM rAN10. -T: L UiU L' LUUN I I riir L'PD DO nt D A


Household Size
One Person
Two Persons
Three Persons
Four Persons


Five Persons
Six Persons
Seven Persons
Eight Persons .
Median Area Income:


INCOME. RANGESi: GULF COUNTY SHIP PROGRAMt
Income Type: VLI (50%) LI (80%) M
$10,350 16,600 2
11,850 18,950 2
13,300 21,300 3


14,800
16,000
17,150
18,350
19,550
29,400


23,700
25,550
27,450
29,350
31,250


3
3
4
4
4


MO0D(120%)
8,840
8,440
1,920
5,520
8,400
1,160
4,040
6,920


comp. or exemption.


This will be the last chance for


grandfathering.


THE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS PLEDGES THAT NO INDIVIDUAL, OR GROUP
OF INDIVIDUALS WILL BE DISCRIMINATED AGAINST IN THE ENJOYMENT OF PARTICIPATION IN, OR
BENEFIT FROM, ANY PROGRAM OR ACTIVITY INCLUDED IN THIS PROGRAM ON ACCOUNT OF
HANDICAP, AGE, SEX, RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, CREED, COUNTRY OF NATIONAL ORIGIN, FAMILIAL
STATUS, MARITAL STATUS, OR FROM ANY OTHER CONDITION OR CIRCUMSTANCE WHICH
SEPARATES ONE INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP OF INDIVIDUALS FROM ANOTHER.


GULF COUNTY PLANNING/BUILDING DEPARTMENT


PUBLISH MAY 4, 11, 18, 25 AND 6/1, 1995


Life Home Auto Business,
Health Disability
15% DISCOUNT ON AUTO INSURANCE ue Cres
WITH HOMEOWNERS I

(904) 227-2106 Sam Sweazy Agent PorSt. Joe, FL


This.column is provided as a service of the Gulf County Guidance Clinic, Inc., a professional counsel-
ing and mental health center It is not intended to replace psychological counseling or treatment ser-
vices.


Commission Approves Rule to Ban
Certain Nets From Fresh Water


Gulf County


Contractors


Dear Counselor.










THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995 PAGE 3B


The theme of the service will
be 'Youth, Only What You Do For
Christ Will Last". Their guest
speaker will be Rev. Carl Bailey of
New Bethel Baptist Church;
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend.


Place: Oak Grove Assembly
613 Madison Street, 0. G.
Dates: June 4th 8th, 1995
Time: 6 p.m., Nightly
For More Information, Call 227-1837.
come F ore Ou.htAlteEctmnsa 227487Hw. 71"


Come Find Out What All the Excitement Is at 2247 Hwy. 71
(1/10 mile north of Overstreet Road)

The Church of Christ'

in Wewahitchka wants to make a difference in your life.
Sunday School 10 a.m. CDT
Worship Service ............... 11 a.m. CDT
Wednesday Bible Study 7 p.m.


FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
REV. BILL WHITE, PASTOR. JO
S 7:30,and11:2420 Long Ave.
;- Port St. Joe, FL 32456
904-229-6886
Port St. Joe's "Port of Victory"
Sunday School............................................10 a.m.
Morning Worship..........................................11 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..............................................6 p.m.
Wednestlay Evening ....................................7... p.m.



THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN GULF COUNTY

ST. JAMES' 800 22nd STREET PORT ST. JOE
+ 7:30 and 11:00 a.m. (ET)
+ S Sunday School 9:45
ST. JOHN'S WEWAHITCHKA
8:00 a.m. (CT)

THE REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MEXICO BEACH
823 N. 15th Street
648-5776
Sunday Bible Study (all ages) ..................9:00 CST
M morning W orship....................................... 10:00 CST
Evening W orship.......................................... 6:30 CST"
Wednesday Bible Study (all ages) .........6:30 CST





Chapel Lane Overstreet Phone 648-8144
Bro. Harold J. McClelland, Jr., W.L. Tremain,
Pastor Pastor Emeritus
Sunday School............................................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship........................................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ............................................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening .................................... 7:00 p.m.


L^-I A FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
S508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
at SUNDAY WORSHIP............................. 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL...................11 a.m.
U S *SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children
Nursery Available
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor


*


James E. Messer, Sr.


Plan Revival
Evangelist James E. 'Messer,
Sr., who has been called the "Mel
Tillis of Evangelists",will be lead-
ing First Baptist Church of White
City in revival on June 11,15.
With his humorous and heart.

Pies on Sale Sat. at
New Bethel A.M.E..


dessert this Weekend?
Strawberry pies will be availa-,
ble for $4.00 on! Saturday, June
3. To place your order for pies
call Christine White at 229-6693.
Simona Pittman at 229-6971, or
Ruth Dumas at 229-8926. ,
The pies may be picked up at
New Bethel A.M.E. Church Annex
between the hours of 11 a.m. and
1 p.m. on June 3.
All proceeds will go towar~i
this year's Women's Day fund.


stirring messages,, he is a bless-
ing .to those who allow him the
opportunity to preach in their
midst. Being fortunate to have
spent four years in radio minis-
try, he has the uncanny ability to
keep you on the edge of your seat
and wanting to hear more of
God's promises to his people.
Please join him in revival at
11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday; 7
p.m. Monday through Thursday
from June 11th through the
15th.

Methodists Plan
Bible School
First United Methodist
Church 'of Port St. Joe will be
holding Vacation Bible School
during the week of June 12th
from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00.
All children, ages K-3
through sixth grade are invited to
attend. Please call the church of-
fice at 227-1724 to pre-register.


SSt.oe:Assembfy of God
^. 309 6th Streete*Port St. Joe
SSunday School......:................1...0:00 am
Morning Worship Service........ 11:00 dm
,Sunday Evening Service ........... 6:30 pm
Wednesday Bible Study.......,:7.O;7:00pm
JeffScalf, ,. o s ,:l 1. ;.
Pastor
t "Empoweredby Iie Spiritt



Highland View
SUnited Methodist Church
Corner of 4th St. & Parker Ave.
Highland View
Lynwood R. Wynne, Pastor
S unday School....... ............ ....... .................. ................... 10 a.m .
.Morning Worship ..................... 11 a.m.
Evening W orship'............ .......:.. .... ............................. 6 p.m.

--" ~ ,


LongA


Baptist

June

6:00 to 8:


Classes for Children

3 yrs. 6th grade,
All Children
invited to attend


yenu e

Church -

5-9

30 P. M.


EEO WLCM


Bible Study:
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS


Worship:
11 a.m. Sunday
Nursery


Minister: Tom Skipper 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON IIBLE ST'Ui)Y
P. O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue


Generosity Noted
Gulf County Adult School
would like to, thank Saveway for
donating a sheet cake and punch
and also Big Star for donating
cups and napkins for the recep-
tion following their graduation
ceremonies.
Without the businesses' con-


tinued support and generosity,
they would not have been able to
provide such a meaningful recep-
tion for the graduates.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING PAYS
Call 227-1278 to place yours. $3.50
for first insertion, $2.00 a week for
consecutive runs, plus 54 per word
for all over 20.


cf New Life Christian Center Church
Sixth Street.(Union Hall Building)
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Johnny Jenkins, Jr. Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship. 6:30 p.m.'
(1st and 3rd Sunday Nights) :
Wednesday Night Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
.'We Are. Covenant Peaopfe"



PENTECOST SUNDAY
is June 4
Attend A
Pentecostal Church on
Pentecost Sunday
You are invited to attend the
United Pentecostal Church
211 Tarpon St.
(in Highland View)
Port St. Joe, Florida
Sunday morning 10:00 a.m.
Sunday evening 7;00 p.m.
Wednesday evening 7:00 p.m.



"THE EXCITING PLACE TO WORSHIP"
;[First Baptist Church
S 102 THIRD STREET. PORT ST. JOE
Sunday School 9:45 am
o Worship 11:00 am
Disciple Training '6:00 pm
IA Evening Worship 7:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting.... 7:00 pm
Gary Smith Buddy Caswell
Pastor Minister of Music & Youth



We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place
BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP ..................11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING .................5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
CURTIS CLARK MARK JONES
Pastor Minister of Music


[ 'First UnitedMetfodist Church
111 North 22nd St.
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Morning Church......................9:00 a.m. CT
Church School............... 10:00 a.m. CT
Nursery Provided

Charles M. Parker, Pastor John Anderson, Music Director
Office Phone: 648-8820 Hours: Monday-Friday, 9 am 12 noon CT


, Co titutionstittioAnd Monument
Catch the !n -ortst.Yoe
STHE UNITED METHOoIST CHURCH
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School ......... 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m. Choir Practice
Methodist Youth Wednesday................ 730 p.m.
Fellowship.......... 5:00 p.m.
Rev. Zedoc Baxter Charlotte Henderson
PASTOR YOUTH/ CHOIR DIRECTOR


Come,
join
the
Family!


Baptist Church
. 3"A Church Without Walls"
First Union Bank Building Monument Avenue
Rev. Marty Martin,, Pastor
Pastor's Study 229-9254
Sunday School (Bible Study) for all ages 9,00am
Sunday Morning Christ-Centered Worship -.10:00am
Sunday Afternoon Discipleship Training 5:00pm
Informal Sunday Night Seivice 6:00pm
Wednesday Night Prayer and Praise Meeting 6:30pm


Youth Day Service
There will be a special Youth
Day Program held at Thompson
Temple First Born Church on
Sunday, June 4th, beginning at
11:30 a.m.


Vacation Bible School ,
Games A Crafts I Songs'lI Snacks A Bible Stories.


*








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995


Why Price Of Gas Is So High Capitol


And Keeps Going Higher NE

State Wants $5.5 Million From Oil
Companies To Drill In Gulf Of Mexico ROU


The Florida Cabinet minus Gov. Lawton Chiles who was politick-
ing in Washington D. C. missed the point when it took the usual holi-
er-than-thou stance against drilling for oil off the Gulf Coast Nowhere
in all those impassioned political statements did this old reporter hear
anyone mention the skyrocketing cost of gas for us poor old jalopy driv-
ers.
I don't know about where you live in Florida, but up here in old
Taxahassee the price of regular gas has gone up to $1.26 a gallon regu-
lar and $1.36 high test. And Tallahassee has a refinery over in St.
Marks about 20 miles away.
The action the cabinet took in requiring a $5 million surety bond
for Coastal Petroleum to drill in the Gulf, if extended nationwide, would
assure oil and gas prices are going to get a lot worse.
It may be (judges being what they are) the slick move the Cabinet
took will be legal. Two months ago an appeals court ruled the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection couldn't require Coastal to put
up $5.5 million to drill on its leases it has had since 1941. The Florida
Supreme Court upheld the appeal court ruling.
Cabinet members were told by DEP Secretary Virginia Wetherell
and Attorney General Bob Butterworth they could do as a board what
the DEP couldn't do as a department.
The usual crocodile tears were shed as a fearful worst-case scenario
was presented by the DEP of what would happen on Florida beaches if
there was an oil spill.
Baloneyl This old reporter has been around long enough to have
seen how offshore drilling, even drilling in the Apalachicola National.
Forest, really .doesn't fatally wound the environment as all these so-
called nature lovers would have you believe.
I was flown out to an offshore Chevron site off Destin in the Pan-
handle back in the 1960's with a group of news-media types. It struck
oil and was capped. Destin and Fort Walton and none of those other
sugar-white beaches along that strip were injured. Mobil Oil drilled 16
wells on Coastal's 880,000-acres of offshore leases 30 years ago, Coast-
al President Phil Ware told reporters outside the Cabinet meeting room.
Offshore oil drilling has been going on off Louisiana's coast for years
too.
This old reporter also covered a well-drilling operation in the Apa-
lachicola National Forest in the 1970's. No oil was found, but the drill-
ing did not damage the forest. I have been back there since. Only a
clearing with a lot of feed-grasses planted by the oil company for the
deer remains.
The key' in this argument is that a good number of these "nature
lovers" are, in fact, "power lovers." Environmental causes are a means
for them to get financing, control and votes. That last, of course, isn't
lost on the politicians.
Ironically, the same day Cabinet members were voting. 6-0 on the
$5.5 million bond, Floral City farmer John Thomas was telling officials
at a DEP hearing in Inverness to start setting common sense priorities
and stop wasting taxpayer money buying land.
Thomas got a big hand when he recommended the DEP should re-
duce its size and replace some of the academics in charge with people of
common sense.
Incidentally, John, the Cabinet approved several more expensive
land purchases while you were letting them have it down there in Inver-
ness.
The meeting in Inverness last week was one of a series set up by
Gov. Chiles in an effort to find out why voters "are so damn mad with
government (his words)." Chiles was in Washington arguing against the
feds sending block grants back to the states to handle their own wel-
fare. He is a long-time opponent of offshore oil drilling.
Yep, DEP officials brought up the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill off Alas-
ka, claiming a spill of such magnitude would cost more than the $500
million sturetv,bohd., What they didn't tell cabinet members, of course,
was that the'salmon catches two-years after the spill there and to this
day have been bigger than they were -before the spill. Nature, like bu-
reaucracy in government, has a surprising capacity to survive and come
back.
I know this is a minority view, but I'm too old to worry about it I
also felt the great majority of Floridians were wrong when they voted a
ban on fishing nets in offshore waters last year. They were hoodwinked
by the organized environmentalists. I wasn't. Anytime you let one seg-
ment of our people start fooling around with the livelihood of another
segment particularly something as historic as commercial fishing -
you're headed for trouble.
You city voters can win, but you're still not right. Remember what
I've said when the water wars come to Florida. They're coming and
they'll pit the thirsty city voters against the rural, small county voters
with the water. Guess who's going to win? You'll know then how the
commercial fishermen are feeling now.


Capitol News Round-Up
Visions of a part-time Congress with members living mostly back
home under the laws they have helped to pass were dealt a blow by the
U. S. Supreme Court decision declaring term limits unconstitutional.
The high court ruling, however, did no harm to Florida's eight-year
term limit for state legislators, cabinet members and the governor that
voters passed 3-1 in 1992. Florida's governor has long been under an
eight-yeiar term limit requirement. Gov. Lawton Chiles has until 1998.
U. S. Rep. Pete Peterson, D-Florida, who favors a 12-year term limit
on Congressmen, said term limits would probably become a focal point'
of the 1996 election campaigns. U. S. Sen. Bob Graham/D-Florida, said
he welcomed the ruling because states imposing the limits would allow
/ *'


ws


'ND-UP,


by Jack Harper


those which didn't to gain an advantage in seniority. U. S. Sen. Connie
Mack, R-Florida, said Congress must now fill the void by passing a con-
stitutional amendment limiting terms.
At the heart of the legal dispute is the question: Did the framers of
the Constitution intend to write the only qualifications for members of
Congress, or did they mean to allow states to add other qualifications?
The Constitution requires a minimum age and length of citizenship
for the House and Senate and requires members to live in the states
from which they are chosen.
WHAT HAPPENED?: Somebody got lost on the way to a repeal of at
least 50 percent of Florida's bureaucratic rules as requested by Gov.
Lawton Chiles and promised by a Republican Senate and conservative-
dominated ,House. Not only are the 3,500 unnecessary rules Chiles held
up in his session-opening speech still around, Lt. Gov. Buddy MacKay
said', but the total number of rules the state has increased from 28,725
to 29,302.
THE OTHER SHOE: Florida's "he-coon" Gov. Lawton Chiles is ex-
pected to drop that other shoe when he gets back to Florida after his bo-
journs to Mexico, Haiti and Washington D. C. The other shoe, of course,
is his vetoes of bills passed by the Florida Legislature which will if he
doesn't veto them become new law.
Organized groups and many newspapers are urging Chiles to veto
bills they have selected. They include:
The deregulation of local phone companies, the most highly lob-
bied bill in the last session. Consumer groups oppose it on a claim it
will result in higher prices and unregulated profits by giant phone com-
panies. The companies contend it will provide' competition and bring
lower prices and better service. Chiles'and Attorney General Bob But-
terworth say the main fault with it is it frees local exchange companies
from state regulations before competition is proven to exist
A bill that would grant two-year restricted medical licenses to sev-
eral hundred Cuban and Nicaraguan trained doctors without requiring
them to pass a qualifying test. The Florida Medical Association wants
Chiles to veto it because the foreign trained doctors took and failed the
test. Under the bill, they would work under licensed physicians for two
years.
A mangrove tree-trimming bill that allows private property owners
to trim them when they obstruct their view. It even allows them to trim
them when they are on state waterways adjacent to the private proper-
ty.
A bill that allows a judge to ignore a jury's recommendation of a
sentence in a capital crime that could bring the death penalty. Past law
required the judge to give "great weight" to a jury's recommendation ei-
ther of mercy and a life term or the death penalty.
Although Chiles has some specific requests for vetoes he could take
out some of his disappointments of the session on the Republican Sen-
ate and conservative House.
For instance, he could veto some of the line-items in the budget
pertaining to building prisons. He wanted enough prisons to allow an
average of 85 percent of the sentences to be served. The bill calls for 85
percent of all sentences.
By the veto, Chiles could also do what he couldn't get done in doing
away with the Chamber of Commerce and turning many of its duties
over to the private-public corporation, Enterprise Florida.
He didn't show much support for some of the tough-on-welfare
bills, including one that would cut welfare payments to mothers who
keep onl having children while on the program. The bill-a Senate show-
plece--does-not take welfare awyy from the mothers who get pregnant
again. It just doesn't allow thertf to'collect mote fot that next child born
out-of-wedlock.' "
He could also veto the money set up in the budget allowing Educa-
tion Commissioner Brogan to experiment with charter'schools.
He might also call for a special session on educational financing,
something he said he might do as the session opened,
But he'd better be careful about that. It may turn out to be what
Sen. Fred Dudley, R-Cape Coral, called a "veto override" session.,
LOBBY SUIT: Former House Speaker turned lobbyist Donald Tuck-
er, D-Tallahassee, has reached an out-of-court settlement of undis-
closed amount in his suit against Palm Beach Jai Alai Fronton for non-
payment of part of his $50,000 a year fee for 10 years for getting the
legislature to extend their season. Tucker did and collected $305,000 in
six years. Then the payments stopped leaving $195,000. Wonder how
much he got? The legislature in 1993 banned contingency fees for lob-
byists based on whether they passed or killed legislation.
ROSEWOOD: State officials hope to close out compensation pay-
ments by early June for survivors and descendants of the Rosewood
rampage 72 years ago in Dixie County wheh whites destroyed almost
every building in the community of about 120 people.
The Florida Legislature approved $2 million for that purpose in
1993. Some 60 to 70 descendants of families which lost property will
share $500,000 set aside by lawmakers. Nine elderly survivors received
$150,000 apiece from the state in January. Hundreds of claims from
people who said their families were driven from Rosewood during the
several days of violence following charges of a black man raping a white
women have been checked by the attorney general's office.
There is also a line item in this year's budget allowing $100,000 for
scholarships for descendants of the survivors.


Hospice Open
House Saturday
Bay Medical Center's Hospice
Program invites you to attend "A
Celebration of Life" honoring Hos-
pice's' past and current patients
and their families. The open
house will take. place on Sunday,
June 4th, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the
Green Room of the Martin Thea-


Law Offices of
J. PATRICK FLOYD, P.A.


Third generation of Lawyers providing
legal services to this area.


OVER 16 YEARS PERSONAL INJURY EXPERIENCE

PORT ST. JOE APALACHICOLA
227-7413 653-8056



' The hiring of a lawyer iS an important decision thai should not be bazed
uporn advertciements. Before you decade ask us to send you tree s nriten
information about our qualifications & expenerce



tre at 409 .Harrison Avenue in
Panama City.
Hospice is a program that
takes care of patients during their
final six months of life. They help
the patient and family accept the
illness, remain at home, and to
be as comfortable as possible.'
For more information about
the commemorative open house
or Hospice services,' call 747-
5400 or 1-800-700-1236.


FOOT CARE
I HEEL PAIN BURNING FEET
-* PAINFUL FEET NOMB FEET
SCORNS CALLUSES
f TOElNAIL PROBLEMS
*DIABETIC FOOT CARE
CAN BE COMFORTABLY & SAFELY TREATED
IN THE PRIVACY OF OUR OFFICE
DR. BURTON S. SCHULER
The Ambulatory Foot Clinic

229-6665
Foot Surgery Should Be A Last Resort, Not First Aid
Most Insurance Welcome, including Medicare
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

2401 West 15th St., Panama City


Sanford 6.
LOGO 3 AND LOGO 4
MECHANICAL PENCILS
The black barrel is equipped with a rubber grip
for greater writing control. Each features a jumbo..
eraser 6' times larger than other mechanical pencils'
which advances or retracts with a twist. A sliding metal
sleeve protects the lead as you write. Refillable.
(P2-SArJi L,,I,:, I Black, 0.5 mm (P2-SAN64151) Logo 4 :Black, 0.5 mm
(P2-SAN .Jill t,':,o 3, Black, 0.7.mm H i 1:Jr :, 1' F mm
ListPrice $3.89 1 : '




dwka t^/^'^*e Adtawaa n tew va


I


FAUN 451


Advertising Pays-Call 227-1278 or 229-8997
to Place Your Classified Ad Today!



F? '"E IJ





PENCILS


..rNew Numbersand

Old Favorites






SEberhard
Faber
,UNI-BALL
XL ROLLER PENS
The fade resistant ink writes longer
than other leading roller pens.
Features redesigned point for
smoother writing. Cap ring
identifies color.

$109
t,1 P '. 1 -

STOCK NO NK COLOR POlT .

1: I 3-I' i, ,, I ,l i'

"2- P l 3l'., I,1 ,l J Wi I-lT


PDArE 4B








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 1995 PAGE 5B


School News


Events and Happenings From County


Schools


HAWK


NEWS

Highland View
Elementary School
By Barbara Eells

Third Grade
Battle of the Book?
Linda Elkins' third graders
had two and a half months to
read 50 designated books. The fi-
nal day came when she asked the
students questions from the
books that had been read. Three
students continued to answer
questions until the end of the
battle and were awarded trophies.
Congratulations to the follow-'
ing winners: Ashley Sander first
place; Shawn Reynolds second;
and Austin Horton third place.

Sixth Grade
Mr. J's sixth graders enjoyed
an outing to the beach the day
before school was out, for them.
Thanks to all chaperoriest

Thoughts and Prayers
Our thoughts and prayers are
with David and Lois Byrd and
their family on the death of their
special angel" Davida.


The







This will be the last Lion's
Tale until school resumes in Au-
gust. It has been a good year and
I need to tell our readers about a
few of our awards.
We had three perfect atten-
dance awards for the year. They
were given to Joey Peters, Za-
chary 6rris and Renee Lewis.
There Were 12 wh6 had a perfect
record in Hbmewdok. These
"Homework Heroes" didn't miss a
single assignment, nor forget to
have 'a parent sign their home-
work pads for the entire thirty-six
weeks of school They are Ashlyn
Parker. Jeffrey Pitts, Laura Seay,
Joshua Cope, John-Patrick Floyd,
Rachel Geoghagan, Jenny Alkan-
nin, Joey Peters, Ranee Vinson,
Rebekah Peterson, Crystal Allyn.
and Micah Peterson.
Presidential Athletic Awards
went to Nicholas Blake, Ranee
Vinson, Joey Peters. A National


Shown in the photo above are Austin Horton, Linda Elkins,
Shawn Reynolds, Lois Miller, Librarian, and Ashley Sander.


Retirement
Lou Eaker was surprised with
a retirement dinner last Friday.
Wanda and Jimmy Pate fried
some of the most delicious fish
and hush puppies, served with
baked beans, cole slaw and pota-
to salad.
Special guests at. the dinner
were Howard and Virginia Blick
and Temple Watson. Mr. Watson
presented a reminiscing review of
the last 36 years and a gift of ap-
preciation from Highland View fa-
culty and staff.
First Grade
Mrs. Weston's first graders
wrapped up their unit on the
study of Hawaii by presenting
their information to the students
in grades K through sixth.
The girls were dressed in tra-
ditional hula skirts and leis; the
boys were dressed as tourists.


Lion's


Tale


News Colui1mn
Faith Christian School
Athletic Award went to Rachel
Geoghagan who also had the
record for the fastest mile run for
a female. Jessica Hill won the
Coach's Award.
Presidential Academic Awards
went to Chad Goebert, Jessica
Tarpley and Andy Shoaf in sixth
grade and to.Bryan G.qebert, Re-'
bekah Cope, Micah Peterson,
Crystal Allyn, Heather Fox, Nich-
olas Blake and Jessica Hill in
eighth grade. Extraordinary effort
awards went to Misti Waddell,
Christa Dykes, Jessica Slate and
Rebekah Peterson.
In all our grades we consider
the citizenship award the most
prized. These students are cho-
sen for exhibiting Christian 'char-
acter in the classroom, both to-
ward teachers and fellow stu-
dents. Students earning this
award were: Zachary Norris, Kelly
Geoghagan, Laura Seay, Jenna


The students gave informa-
tion about the history and cus-
toms of Hawaii. The group con-
cluded their presentation with an
Aloha hula to Hawaiian music.
School Improvement Goals
Goal #1: To improve the
scores on the Florida Writing As-
sessment for fourth graders so
that our scores are equal to or
better than the state average.
Goal #2: To improve the gen-
eral appearance of the school
while exploring the possibility of
constructing a rest room facility,
purchasing additional playground
equipment, and doing necessary
construction repairs.
Goal #3: To establish a mu-
sic/art program for our students.
Goal #4: To emphasize the
use of and acquisition of appro-
priate technological material for
the school.


Teat, Lyndsey Hill, Rachel Geo;-
ghagan, Katie Geoghagan, Aaron
Watson, Brandon Lyles, Ranee
Vinson, Joshua Cope, Jessica
Tarpley.

At our high school gradua-
tion, awards were given for vari-
ous subjects to the best average
for the year. In addition Amy Goe-
bert and Christina Egler were rec-
ognized as Distinguished High
School Students by the Associa-
tion of Christian Schools Interna-
tional. Christina also was award-
ed the Xerox Award' in the
humanities and social sciences.

S Our .dgrdate,. Tennele 'Johp-
, son, was recognized for her work
in art and .music. She was given
the Principal's Award for Chris-
tian character and effort and was
presented with a plaque of her fa-
vorite Bible verse, "I can -do all
things through Christ, which
strengtheneth me" Phil. 4:13.
May I remind our summer
school students that the session
starts at 8:00, Monday, June 12.
Students who are new to the
school need to call for an appoint-
ment for testing which will be
held Friday, June 9., 1


Honor Roll Students


PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL
Wes Taylor, Port St. Joe High
School principal, has released the
names of the students who
achieved placement on the honor
roll for the sixth six weeks grad-
ing period.
Making "All A's" were:
Ninth grade: Dorthy Davis,
Jeremy Dixon, Sabrina Hanson,
Quint Klingbeil, Casey White and
Casie Williams.
Tenth grade: Jesse Colbert,
Karen Falbe, Robbi Funderburk,
Tina Klope, Kayce Knpx, Olivia
Kumarickal, Stephanie Maxwell,
Priscilla Medina, Harmony Priest
and Misty Wood.
Eleventh grade: Destiny Dan-
iels, Leslie Faison, Heather
Fields, Kristi Lawrence, Elizabeth
Redmond, Jennifer Smallwood
and Alyson Williams.
Twelfth grade: Terri Arthur,
Harlotte Bolden, Dyshanda Boy-
kins. Christopher Brant, Wil
Hale',' Jennifer Harris, Melissa No-
bles, Jesse Raffleld and Michele
Wisdahl.
Making "All A's and B's"
were:
Ninth grade: Kyle Adkison,
Equillar Bailey, Heather Calva-
rese, Christopher Cathey, Jason
Gammill, Lisa Hambrick, Sheila
Hightower, Adam Lee, Jarred Pat-
terson, Amanda Phillips, Leontine
Ross and Jodie Wear.
Tenth grade: Ronisu Bird,
Gabriel Clark,. Germain Clark,
Doyle Crosby Michael Groh,
Gena Johnsoni Jennifer Martin,
Latrina McNeal, Christopher
Richardson, Adrian Richbourg,
Eric Sellers, Bryan Simon, Macde
Tapper, Karen Thomas, William
Todd, Matthew White, Clifford
Whitfield, Joshua Whitfleld, Eric
Wisdahl and Christy Wood.
Eleventh grade: Erica Beard,
Brigette Godfrey, Serena Little-


ton, Jeff Player, Jacob Richards,
Matthew Roberson, Chaka
Speights and Charrish White.
Twelfth grade: Charron Ad-
dison, Pamela Barnhill, Jennifer
Bell, Jamie Besore, Christopher
Buchanan, Damien Byrd, Davida
Byrd, Kristi Capps, 'William Ca-
they, Leigha Davis, William Davis,
Stephanie Gaddis, Natalie Gant,
Clyde Gentry, Cheyenne Harri-
son, Jon Hawkins, Tawanda Jen-
kins, Alice Kennington, Rachel
Lane, Mario Larry, Rebecca Lind-
sey, Delana Linton, Veronica
McCloud, Johanna McMullon,
Tara Mullis, Latresha Quinn, Mi-
chelle Tapia, Candice Upchurch,
Georgette Walden, Damon Walk-
er, John Wear, Shelly Weston,
Jessica White, Neil WhiteEagle
and Joyelle Whitfield.

MIDDLE SCHOOL
Principal of Port St. Joe Mid-
dle School, Chris Earley, would
like to announce the honor roll
students for the sixth six weeks
grading period.
Students making "All A's"
were:
'Seventh grade: Erica Ailes,
Brandon Davis, John Gainous,
Lacey Johnson, Justin Kent,
Amanda Marquardt, Rocker Salz-
er, Henry Smallwood, Nicole
Smith, and Lea Todd.
Eighth grade: Anna Duren,
James Faison, Tracey Fitzgerald,
Laura Kilbourn, Rachel McCroan,
Julia Six, and Nathan Wisdahl.
Those earning "All A's and
B's" were:
Seventh grade: Ashley Adki-
son, Alicia Christie, Connie
Combs, Kevin Conoley,'Jesse Ev-
erett, Lakeythia Filmore, Megan
Johnson, Candice Kennedy, Greg-
ory Knox, Clyde Lamberson, Tyler
Lane, Julie Lanford, Joshua
McCulley, Daniel Parker, Randall
Phillips, Alicia Sanders, Ashley


* 0


Stephens, Daniel Stephens, and
Rachel Watson.
Eighth grade: Mindy Banks,
Crystal Follin, Meredith Godfrey,
Rikki Johnson, Wade Kenning-
ton,' Lauren Locke, Andrew
O'Barr, Wendy Sander, James Te-
neyck, Krystal Tharpe, Kiki Wil-
liams and. Lindsay Williams.

PSJ ELEMENTARY
Principal Gerald Lewter of
Port St. Joe Elementary School
has announced the names of stu-
dents attaining the distinction of
being named to the honor roll for
the final grading period.
Making All A's are:
Third graders, Brittany
Alford, Tommy Curry, Molly
Garrett, Terrance Holland, Randi
Sasser, Stephen Tarantino, and
Preston Wigsten;
Fourth graders James
Daniels, Susan Ellmer, Colleen
Falbe, Patrick Fitzgerald,
Margaret Gibson, Tessi Layfleld,
Bryan Thomas, Jonathan
Wanchik and Tyler Weimorts;
Fifth graders: Ashley Bryan,
Lisa Curry and Anna Kate
Reynolds;
Sixth graders: Ben Ashcraft,
Bonnie Belin, Jennifer Craig,
Amber Daniels, Angela McDowell,
Susan Medina, Jessie Pate, Tanya
Varnum, Tabitha Wanchik, Leslie
White and Travis Wright.,
Making "A's and B's" were:
Third graders: Becky Belin,
Tiffany Bellew, Stephen Besore,
Jessica Bland, Ashby Davis,
Micah Dodson, Jessica Ford, Kale
Guillot, Ashley Haddock, Beth
Haisten, Brian Jones, Caycee
Kennedy, Chris McMullon, Moses
Medina, Evan Nichols, Melissa
Nixon, Nicholas Reynolds, Nicole
Shiver, B.J. Strickland, and
Joshua Watkidns;
Fourth graders: Alisha


Bulldog News
PORT ST. JOE,
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Bulldog Computer Camp
Port St. Joe Elementary
School is offering a computer
camp June 5-9. There is sUll
room in session 2 2:00 p.m. un-
til 5:00 p.m. Computer Technolo-
gy Programs to be presented in-
clude: .Basic Word Processing.
Hyperstudio, learning games,
creativity software and other pro-
grams.
The cost is $30.00 (cash
only). To enroll please come by
Port St Joe Elementary School or
call 227-1221.
Picnic Tables Donated
Thanks to Mrs. Nelson's sec-
ond grade class, our school now
has two new picnic tables. The
picnic tables make eating lunch a
lot of fun on beautiful, sunny
days.


Register For 1995-96
If your child is not presently
attending Port St. Joe Elementary
School and plans to attend Port
St. Joe Elementary School in Au-
gust, please come by the front of-
fice to register or call 227-1221
Monday through Thursday.
School Year
School will begin for students
at Port St. Joe Elementary School
on Thursday, August 10. 1995.


Barber, Tessa Collins, Julia
Comforter, Crystal Dawson, Amy
Doster, Kainon Douglas,' Addam
, Duke, Jolle Hogan, Carla
Johnson, Christopher Knox,
Adrian Peterson, Sarah Quaranta,
Jennifer Raffleld, Matthew Rose,
Jessica Sherrill and Bobby White;
Fifth graders Mary Amerson,
Natalie Burge. Amy Canington.
Joshua Dandy, Rob Dykes. Carla
Money, Ken Peak Paula Pitts,
Brittany Reeves, Alex Richards,
Crystal Watkins, and Heidi Wells;
and
Sixth graders Kristin Abrams,
Mary Beck, Buck Burkett, James
Capps, Matt Caswell, Nick
Comforter, Amber Davis, Loretta
Dykes, Quatina Fennell, Laura
Jeffcoat, Julie Levins, Tremaine
Lewis, Angela Martinez, Crystal
Pitts, Kevin Price, Reginald
Quinn, Jessica Seymour. Josh
Todd, Tynetta Towner, Jarom
Trent, Larche Ware, Jarrod
Wester, Adam White and Skyler
Wood
WEWA ELEMENTARY
Jerry Kelley, principal of We-'
wahitchka Elementary School has
released the names of those stu-
dents who achieved placement on
the honor rolls for the sixth six
weeks grading period.
Students included in the "All
A's" listing are:
Third Grade: Sean Burch,
Ashley Cloud, Shanna Collier,
Stephanie Grimes, Dawn Hall,
Dottie Hall, William Harrell, Lau-
ra Husband, Candace Little,
James McCorvey, Holly Merritt,,
Casie Ward and Jessica Wells.
Fourth Grade: Christopher
Adkison, Barbara Alderman,
Sheena Barnes, Aleasha Hand,
Judith Husband, Kelli Jackson,
Jesse Knee, John Lillle, Derrick
.McMIllion. Meagan Morris, Mo-
nique Sirmons, Laura Spivey and
Jana Traylor.
Fifth Grade: Lindsey Carter,


From the Desk of: Chris Earley
It seems unbelievable that we
have already completed another
school year. What is more unbe-
lievable is the overwhelming suc-
cess that the Middle School has
experienced during its historic
first year of existence. This' suc-
cess is due to the support of the
Middle School, Task Force, com-
munity, parents, teachers, and
staff members. Thank you all for
the extensive asserted effort that
you each made.
A special thanks should be
extended to the teachers and of-
fice staff for their work and dedi-
cation in establishing Port St. Joe
Middle School. Also, .a special
thanks to Julia Six for writing the
Middle School News for the news-
paper during the 1994-95 school
year. Thanks,:Julial
Summer School Schedule'
Summer school classes at
Port St. Joe Middle School will be-
gin at 8:00 a.m. on June 5.
Course offerings are as follows,
depending upon enrollment.
These are:
Language Arts Grades 7 & 8
Mathematics Grades 7 & 8
Science Grades 7 & 8
Social Studies Grades T7 & 8
E. S. E. Grades 7 & 8
Summer school at the Middle
School is based upon promotional
requirements only.
The summer program will op-
erate on a four (4) day schedule,
Monday through Friday, for six
weeks, beginning Monday, June 5
and extending through Thursday,
July 13. July 4th will be observed
as a school holiday.
,Below you will find a daily
bell schedule for the summer
school program.
Port St. Joe Middle School
Summer Bell Schedule
7:55 ............. .. 1st Bell


Nicholas Chan and: Kimberly
McMillion.
Sixth Grade: Jeremy Duna-
way. .Teresa Jackson, Kristent
Jones and Scott Sherrod. .,
Students included in the "All
A's and B's" listing are:
Third Grade: Shelbie Adams,
Trampus Andrews, Blake Butler,
Shawn Davis, Edward Dunkle,
Joni Grice, Drew Hall, Kyle 'Hall,
Bobbi Hester, Tocarra Jones, Ve-
ronica Marsh, Jennifer McElwain,
Lindsey Miller, Hunter Nunnery,
William Owens, Jonathon Smith,
Dirk Sylvester, Elisha Tillery,
Brandi Williams, Omer Worley
and Monica Sito.
Fourth Grade: Jonathon Ad-
ams, Justin Barnes, Henry
Hands, Cortne Hoover, Erika Pip-
pin, Cody Poe, Cecil Reeder, Rob-
ert Rouse, Brandon Simpson,
Timothy Slay, Jonathon Thomas
and Tony Werts.
Fifth Grade: Terrance Addi-
son, Joshua Alderman, Candese
Burke, Jamie Cain, Joshua Con-
ley, Maquita Culver, James Desti-
find, Spring Hall, Tonya Hall, Ta-
nisha Helium, Anthony Hysmith,
Joseph Lea, Ryan Martin, Travis.
Russell, Myron Vann and Jeffrey
Yoder.
Sixth Grade: Colby Anderson,
Becky Andrews, Renee Ardire,
Jeremy Cain, Joseph Chambliss,
Crystal Daniels, Nicholas Hall,
Lindsey Harvey, Falcon Hughes,
Tanisha Keith, Justin Marshall,
Stephanie McDaniel, David Ortiz,
John Poe, Michael Slack, Melissa
Smiley, Peter Taunton, Billy Vas-
quez and Joshua Walters.


Special Thanks
I would like to give special
thanks to everyone that made
Graduation and Project Gradua-
tion such a memorable occasion.
Christopher Buchanan


7:55 9:50 ........................ Class
9:50 10:00 ............ ........Break
10:00 11:55.......................Class
11:55 12:15.................. Lunch
12:15 1:39 ........................Class
1:39 .............................. Dismissal
Transportation Schedule
Summer school at Port St.
Middle and High Schools begins
June 5,5 Monday through Thurs-
day of each week.
The transportation depart-
ment of the Gulf County School
Board will provide transportation
as follows:
The Beach Route will be op-
erated with driver, Shirley Wil-
H liams on bus #56.
-Stops:
*Bus begins route at Hidea-
way Harbor at 7:15 a.m., ET.
*Mexico Beach: 30th Street
and.7th Street.
*Beacon Hill: 4th Street,
2nd Street, Gulf Aire.
*St. Joe Beach: Columbus
and Alabama, Pineda and Ala-
bama, Gulf and Alabama, Bay
and Alabama, Pine and Americus.
*Highland View: HV Ele.
mentary School. HV Baptist
Church.
The North Port St. Joe
Route will be operated with driv-
er, Mae E. Gant on bus #61.
Stops:
*Bus begins route at Apollo
and Marvin at 7:30 a.m., ET.
*North Park Avenue and Ave-
nue B
*Battle and Avenue D
*Main and Avenue D
*Main and Avenue B
Buses will be provided to
these and other areas, contingent
upon number of students riding
from each location. If you have
any questions, please' call 227-
1204 or 229-8251.


VICA Students
SWeldat State

Two Port St. Joe High School
welding students, Chris Brant
and Clyde Gentry, recently com-
peted in the state welding compe-
tition in Jacksonville.
Clyde Gentry placed third In
the event. Both students repre-
sented their school with high
marks .in their skills and leader-
ship.
The 1994-95 welding .class
would like to say thanks to the
following companies and individ-
uals who contributed to the'weld-
ing, program this year: ABB -
Combustion, Big Star, BPS Con-
struction Stony Peacock, George
Hean Company, Mark Moore,
Saveway, St. Joe Forest Products,
St. Joe Machine and Fabricating
Company, St., Joe Natural Gas
Company, and The Star.
Also, thanks to all the fine
people of Gulf County' who
bought tickets during the raffles.


GCCC Summer
Registration
Registration for the Summer
B semester at Gulf Coast Com-
munity College will be held June
5 through June 16, during regu-
lar office hours, Monday through
Thursday from 7:30 a.m to 6:00
p.m., CDT, and on Friday from
7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., CDT, in
the Office of Admissions and
Records.
Students are required to see
a general counselor in Student
Development in order to receive a
Course Approval Card.
All registration fees for Sum-
mer B are due June 16. Students
are responsible for all fees due.
Summer B classes begin June 20.


ALLSTATE INSURANCE COMPANY
/llltlCll ALLSTATE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

GASKIN-GRADDY INSURANCE AGENCY
Serving The Panhandle Since 1931 ...

Aut Hoe S omeria *Prpety Foo -a ieBa


Open 8:00 5:00 Monday through Friday
148 N. Second Street Wewahitchka

Phone: 639-5077 Night: 639-2743


Cindy Traylor
AGENT


Violet Gaskin Graddy
AGENT, OWNER
36 YEARS


June Green
CUSTOMER REPRESENTATIVE


* I


2 Middle School News





-










PAGE 6B THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, JUNE 1. 1995
\P ___ _


r AMVVi/ZA, I
aBBa g^a^Aftjeai^^^^ ^^^ g'A


Dept of Health and Rehabilitative
Services: Community Health Nurse,
application deadline June 12, 1995.
Pos. #943354. in Port St Joe/Gulf.
Salary range $916.73 to $1.606.49 bi-
weekly, pay grade 072. Applicants are
usually hired at the minimum of the
salary range. Pending classification
incumbent will spend approxidmatley
60% of time in the management, coor-
dination and performance of the
School Health Program.
Submit a completed state of Florida
employment application to: Verna
Mathes, R.N., HRS Dist 2 Gulf CPHU.
502 4th St., Port St. Joe. FL 32456
(904) 227-1276. Suncom, 771-2000.
An Equal Opportunity/Affm. Action
Employer. We hire only U. S. citizens
and lawfully authorized alien workers.
preference shall be given to certain
veterans and spouses:of veterans as
provided by Chapter 295. laws of Flor-
ida. If you need an accommodation
because of a disability in order to par-
ticipate in the application/selection
process, please notify the hiring au-
thority in advance.
Minimum qualifications:' a bach. de-
gree from an acc. college or uhiv. w/a
major in nursing or a related field &
licensure as a Reg. Prof. Nurse in ac-
cordance with Fla. statute 464 or eli-
gible to practice nursing in accor-
dance with Fla. Admin. Code 210-
8.22 or 8.27.


Taking applications for night
Apply at El Governor Mexic
Must be 21 years old. No ph


CASE MANAGER
The Gulf County Senior Citizens are
now accepting applications for a part-
time Case Manager. Must have own
transportation, be willing to, travel
and work with elderly. Receives refer-
rals, completes assessments, develops
care plans. maintains files, and ar-
range services. Applications will be
S accepted from May 19 through June
2. Interviews wiltbe held on June 9.
'1995. Minimum qualifications are a
S Bachelor's degree in social work, soci-
ology, psychology. nursing, or related
field. Other directly related job educa.
tion or experience may be substituted
for all of some of these basic require-
ments upon approval of the Area
Agency on Aging. Social work raining
or experience will be given preference.
We are an Equal Opportunity employ-
er. Information is available at 229-
8466 Monday Friday, 8:00 5:00
ET. 3tc 5/18
Cooks and'cashiers needed. Must be
reliable and willing to work. Will train.
Apply In person at Hardee's, 601
Monument Ave. 3tc 5/18
Wellsprings Home Health is now ac-
cepting applications for RN's to cover
the Gulf/Franklin County area. 904-
653-8870 or 904-229-B636. 4tc 5/11

SALES OPENING: Must have FL Real
Estate License. Week end hours re.
quired. Contact Parker Realty of Mexi-
co Beach, 648-5777. ifc 6/1





Blue .carpet and beige carpet for sale.
Assorted sizes, call for information,
best offer. Also wood burning stove,
make offer. 229-8997, ask for Bill,
7:30 4:30.
TV satellite system dish. Toshiba re-
ceiver, purchased 1993, with module.
Excellent condition. Call 334-702-0851
after 6 p.m. 2tp 6/1.
Moving Sale: Sears gas dryer, $150,
Sears washing machine, $50. Mauve
recliner, $25. Call Donald Keith, Sr.
at 227-1843 or Donald Keith, Jr. at
227-7512. ltp6/1
Cedar chlffarobe for sale. Also 3 FREE
puppies, call 227-1583 anytime.
Store counters, chest of drawers, gar-
ment rack, doors, other used items.
Call 904-653-9378, J. J. Nichols, Ap-
alachicola, lt 6/1
Top of the line Benchcraft sectional.
Dark blue end recliners, with hide
away table and sleeper. $600, Call
229-6245 or 227-2144. itc 6/1

General Electric stove, white $75,
Gen. 'Elec. refrigerator, almond, $75.
Garage refrig, $25. Kenmore elec. dry-
ei, .like new $75; couch and hide-a-
bed loveseat, pastel colors, $50. Call
229-1000. ltc 6/1


MELALLEUCA Independent Market-
ing Executive. MELALLEUCA toxic-
free vitaminS, health products. Pre-
ferred customers get '27A off. Money
back guarantee. Independent distrib-
utorship marketing available. Call
227-3031. 4tc6/1

'Frisbee" hybiscus, color, maroon, $5
ea.,Banana trees, $10. ea. Elephant
ears and more. Come seel Daryl and
Marian Parker, 514 7th St. Port St.
Joe, 227-3409./ After 1:00 p.m. week
days and any time weekends.
2tp 5/25

Turkeys, young and old. Call 639-
2807. tfc 5/18
Western Auto Special. Computer spin
balance 4 tires and tire rotation.
$19.95. 227-1105. tfc6/1
Beautiful day lilies. Red. cream, pink.
salmon, yellow and more. Perfect for
this climate. Jean Stebel, 6760 Hwy.
71, White City. 5tp5/11

Port St. Joe Western Auto now honor-
ing Panama City Western Auto Co.
store advertised tire sale prices. Com-
puterized WHEEL ALIGNMENT. Sears
Card now at Port St Joe Western
Auto. Discover TOOI 227-1105.
tfc 6/1

Mushroom Compost. $15 yard. any-
time, 648-5165. fec 7/6


Port St. Joe Western Auto now hon-
oring entire Panama City Western
Auto company store advertised sale
prices.. 227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc 6/1

' FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 6/1

Craftsman tools and Die Hard bat-
teries are available now at Western
Auto Store, 219 Reid Ave. 227-1105.
tfc 6/1

-- - - -


COMPLMENTRYtFCI6/1

Pesnlzdskiaepo

gam customized for your.11 ~
skin typeb~f.,Dermatoalogis ..t-l


2tc 6/1 uftcu eA s. U, z maut, e. i l
weeks old, veiy cute. Call 227-21
t security.
o Beach. DOG GROOMING PLUS offer
one calls. ping and bathing for your dog
3tc 5/18 also carry collars & leads. Boa
available. Call 227-3611. t


Hate to Board Your Best Friend. Care
in your home_- low as $8.00 a day by
Joe and Marie Romanelll. Call Pet &
Property Tenders, fully insured, 1-
904-229-1065. tfc 6/1
Liquid workers not doing the job?
Ask BARFIELD'S LAWN & GARDEN
229-2727 about HAPPY JACK TRI-
VERMICIDE. Recognized safe and ef-
fective against hook, round & tape-
worms in dogs & cats! 6tc 5/25


House for sale. 3 bdrm.. 2 bvath with
Gulf vie~w. 2 years old. S108.500. Call
227-3137. Itp 6/1.
4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 2 car garage.
home on, 5 acres in White City, 1/4
acre fish pond, gunite swimming pool,
2,200 sq. ft. $90,000. 827-8922.
tfc 6/1

Lot for sale 145'x150', located at Pom-
pano St. and Hayes Avenue. Highland
View. CalB 229-8079. tfc 6/1

For sale by owner: 3- bdrm., 2 ba.'
brick/large den,' screened porch/vinyl
trim, new roof. Call 229-8356 after
6:00 p.m. $72,900. tfc 6/1
3 or 4 bdrm., 2 ba. home on 1/3 acre
lot In nice neighborhood. Stucco over
block with wood frame additions. Ap-
prox. 1800 sq. ft. under roof. Recently
remodeled 'kitchen w/gas range, d.w.
& disposal. Lg. master bedroom w/
walk-in closet and Ig. master bath.
20'x20' den with gas, fireplace. 12'x20'
deck. Gas central heat & air. New gas
water heater. 8'xl2' outside storage
shed. Only $67,500. 229-8498.
tfc 6/1

Newly remodeled 2 BR house, large
spacious rooms, din. rm., Ig. utility/
3rd BR, wood floors, screened front
porch, Ig. fenced backyard w/tool
shed. Located on 8th St, PSJ,
$45,000. Call 229-8764 or 229-9070.
2tp 5/25

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with
double carport & utility bldg. on 2
large lots, all windows are new and
have vertical blinds, new carpel.
ch&a, 1/2 block off Hwy. 98. Can be
seen at 305 Parker Ave., Highland
View. Call 227-1311 or 227-3492.
tfc 6/1

Lot 144' wide x 297' deep in Whisper-.
ing Pines Subdivision, Wewahitchka,.
$15,000. 229-8577.. tfc 6/1
2 bedroom, 1 ba. house for sale, 1/2
acre corner lot, located north of Over-
street. For more information please
call 648-8686. tfc 6/1
"Handyman Special", 3 bdrm., 2
bath shell house, beautiful 1/2 acre.
C-30 south Cape San Bias area. Rea-
sonably priced. Financing available.
227-7506 tfc 6/1
Business for Sale: Phantry Building
and extra lot. Income producing.
Three business units downstairs and
a manager's apartment, Four hotel
rooms w/full baths upstairs, 24 cli-
mate-controlled mini-storage units
upstairs and down. Best location in
town for detail outlets. Call 1-800-
800-9894. tfc 6/1.


Owner financing. High and dry, 5 acre
homesite, 240 ft. well, septic. work-
shop, 1 1/2 mile N. Dead Lakes Pk.
647-3581. tfc 6/1
Half acre lots for sale. Hwy. 386,
Overstreet, Creekview Subd., $500
down. $96.48 per month, 120
months. Call and leave message. 229-
6031. tfc 6/1
1/2 acre lot with septic tank. $9,500.
Overstreet Road. Owner financing,
227-2020, ask for Billy. tfc 6/1
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery Road,
1 mile off Overstreet Road. 9 miles
south of Wewa. Owner financing. Call
229-6961 tfc 6/1
For Sale by Owner: Large vacant loi.
cleared and fenced, located at 121
Hunter Circle. Port St. Joe. For infor-
mation call 904-271-1534. price nego-
tiable. Itc 6/1


:What Contaminating Source



Is More Risky to Your Health?


INVITATION TO BID
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners. as part of the 1993-1994 State Housing
Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program will be ac-
cepting bids for minor rehabilitation of ten (10)
housing units.
Job Specifications and information of the
scope of work can be obtained by contacting Gulf
County Building Department at (904) 229-8944.
All bids must be received'no later than 4:00
p.m.. local time on Friday, June 9, 1995. at the
Gulf County Building Department. Gulf County
Courthouse. 1000 5th Street Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity/Fair
Housing Jurisdiction.
2tc. May 25 and June 1. 1995.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 95-26
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
LEO S. POGORZELSKI,
deceased.,
/


NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
THE ADMINISTRATION of the Estate of LEO
S. POGORZELSKI. deceased. File Number 95-26.
is pending In the Circuit Court for Gulf County,
Florida. Probate Division, the address of which is
Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the
Personal Representative and his attorney are set
forth below,
All interested persons are required to file
WITI-IIN THREE (3) MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, (1) All
claims against the estate and (2) any objection by
an interested person on whom notice was served
that challenges the validity of the Will, the qualifi-
cations of the Personal Representative, venue or
Jurisdiction of the Court .
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
DATE of the first publication of this Notice of
'Administration is May 25, 1995.
/s/ ALICIA C. JONES '
RISH & GIBSON. P. A.
303 4th Street
P.. 0. Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(904) 229-8211
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
FL BAR NO. 0048674
/s/ LEO S. POGORZELSKI, JR.
224 Santa Anna Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
2tc, May 25 and June 1, 1995.:


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
The Florida, Department of Environmental
Protection will be accepting sealed bids for the sale
of the following used equipment:
Four (4) 10' x 20' Floating Dock Section
(Barge) with an approximate 5' z 10'
"house" and open cover.of approximate-
ly 7'x 10'.
This equipment can be inspected at the Sci-
plo Creek Boat Basin located at the end of Market
Street in Apalachlcola. Each, piece of equipment
will be marked for bid purposes.
Bids will be accepted individually on each
barge until 2:00 PM. Friday, June 16 1995. Bids
can be mailed or otherwise delivered to the Florida
Department of'Environmental Protection, 260 -
7th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Bidders can.
pick up Conditions of Sale and Information Sheet
and Bid Forms, Monday through Friday, from 8:00
AM until 5:00 PM. or call 904/653-8317.
2tc. June 1 and 8. 1995.
IN THE CIRCUITCOURT, FOR
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
S PROBATE DIVISION
S"* File Nim.ber 95 0023 CP
IN RE:-ESTATE OF --- .
THOMAS F. NEAL.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DE-
MANDS AGAINST'THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the ad-
ministration of.the estate of Thomas F, Neal, de-
ceased, File Number 95-0023-CP, is pending In the
Circuit Court for Gulf County; Florida. Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 1000 Fift Street,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The personal repre-
sentative of the estate is W. Russell Neal whose ad-
dress is 2722 Regal Way., Tucker, GA 30084. The
name and address of the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written statement of any claim
or demand they nay have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor or his agent
or atneirnc and the amount claimed. If the claim
is r.not et due, the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliq-
uidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be:,
stated. If the claim is secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to enable the clerk
to mail one copy to each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the estate to whom
a copy f this Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections they may
have that challenges the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the personal representa-
tive, or the venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this Notice of
Administration is June 1, 1995.
/s/ W. Russell Neal
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Thomas F. Neal
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
/s/ John L. Boling. Esquire
Suite 700. 76 South Laura Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904) 354-6543
2tc. June 1 and 8. 1995.


NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the City Com-
mission of the City of Port St Joe, sitting as the
Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at
City Hall at 8:00 p.m.. Tuesday. June 6, 1995. to
decide whether the City will authorize a deviation
to Zoning Ordinamnce No. 5 for, a variance of ap-
roximately six feet (6') on the easterly property
line and eleven feet (Il') on the northerly property
line to construct an addition to a residence, locat-
ed at 520-1/2 Eighth Street the southerly fifty-sixI
feet (56') of LoLS 18 and 20. Block 47.
Pauline Pendarvis,
Acting City Clerk
Itc, June i. 1995.





For Sale by Owner
Spacious 3 bdrm., 2 ba. brick
home on corner of Sunset
Circle & 20th St. Lot and a
half in excellent neighbor-
hood. Formal din. rm., foyer,
Ig. eat-in kitchen w/roomy
pantry, great room w/fp &
entertainment center, big
master bdrm., & separate
bath & walk in closet, ap-
prox. 1700 sq. ft. of living
space. 2 car garage. Huge
yd. w/wired workshop. Auto-
natic sprinkler system &
much more. $108,000. Call
Frank D. or Carla May at
227-2008. tfc 6/1


Which is more dangerous to
your health? Eating food contami-
nated with pesticides, drinking
chlorinated water,' or breathing
fumes from new carpeting? A new
Florida project is, for the first
time, looking ,at a variety of envi-
ronmental problems to determine
which ones are most risky to Flo-
ridians' health. The information
will be used to spend environ-
mental dollars more wisely.

"So often we focus on one en-
vironmental problem at a time,
without comparing what we know
about each," said Nancy Muller,
the project's manager. 'The whole
point of this project is to compare
the risks from each and, in the
log run, to more effectively target
Florida's resources."
The .project has also com-
pared risks to the state's natural
resources and our quality of life,
looking at such notions as eco-
nomic well-being, people's feel-
ings and concerns about a prob-
lem, or "peace of mind," and
aesthetic considerations such as
scenic beauty and. odor problems
from air pollution.
The "Florida Comparison of
Environmental Risks" project is
part of a nationwide effort to com-
pare problems and rank risks.
Many states and even some cities
are bringing together experts and
the public to consider these ques-
tions.

An initial ranking of environ-
mental risks has just been com-
pleted. According to the ranking,
the highest risk to human health
is from the variety of pollutants in
the indoor air, including second-
hand tobacco smoke, fumes from
carpets and problems from air
conditioning systems. Outdoor air.
is ranked next, followed by
ground water. The majority of the
population gets its drinking water
from aquifers, under ground,
mostly from' a very safe public
water supply. However, approxi-
mately twenty percent of the pop-
ulation uses often untreated, un-
protected drinking water from
private wells, and the major risk
lies with possible contamination
of these wells.

The initial ranking of risks to
Florida's natural resources shows
alteration and loss of ecosystems
to be the highest risk. Florida's
growing, problems' with water sup-'
- ply was also ranked very high, as
well as risks to water quality and
the plants and animals living in
the state's lakes, rivers, and estu-
aries. The quality of -life ranking
also shows water supply prob-
lems and the alteration and loss
of ecosystems'as high risks.

Six open houses will be held
around the state for. people to re-
view and comment. on the techni-
cal findings. The open house
scheduled in this area of the state
will be on June 12 from 7:00 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. in the Tallahassee
City Commission Chambers in
Tallahassee City Hall at 300
South Adams Street.

The 'project Is being run by
the Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection from a
grant by the U. S. Environmental
Protection Agency. For a complete
list of the risks analyzed or more
information on the project, call





LOST: A set of keys the week of
May 22 27 in Port St. Joe area.
Call.229-8944. ltp6/1

FOUND on Highway by IGA in Wewa.
Small dog, call to ID, 227-2155.
Itc 6/1


Nancy Muller, the project manag-


er at (904) 922-6177.


HEADQUARTERS


For Your Small Engine Equipment,

Pet and Garden Needs



CIOD- E ENGINES
I 7 a me FRM

ItS FERTILIZERS -Feed
^^ater Hoses'-fo 7
id Feeders O' i I
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR- -

Repalrs Husquarna Chain Saw Bars
Chain Saws & Chains
L Chainsaw & Trimmers Happy Jack Pet SupplieE


O SPRAYERS



k o, Snapper Mowers Zp


qudAntifreeze




Hometown Sales/Hometown Servicre



BARFIELD'S 5


Phone 229-2727


Port St. Joe


GA~F~N


ELIJAI-I SV MILEY, MI.3B.A.|
Attorney at -Law





"'Strah T9- efees"


^rChapter 7 Bankruptcy


784-6606


538 Harmon Ave.. Panama City
BUSINESS LAW WILLS REAL ESTATE BODILY INJURY
"11'1 LIt i!C OF A I.AWYIR IS AN IMPORTANT DECISION 111A Si SHOULD NO1 BI- liASID SO1 l Y UPON ADV\'lnISISMFNT'S. BEFORE YOU DECIDE, ASK'US
TO SEND YOU FREE WRI1IT-N INFORIMA1ION ABOUT OLUR QL'AL.IFCATIONS AND EXPIRIENCET,"


H Elizabeth W. Thompson
REALTOR LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
Office: Hwy. 98 at 19th St., Mexico Beach
Mailing Address: Rt. 3, Box 167, Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Fax: (904) 648-4247

904-648-5683 or 1-800-582-2990
After Hours: Jay Rish, AssociateBroker, 904-229-1070,
Brenda Miller, Salesperson, 904/648-5435 *
NEW LISTINGS:


... ..
-7








U. 1 ..


104 S. 30th St., Mexico Beach. Very nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath home,
'beachside just steps to beach, 1800 SF living area and over 700 SF deck-
ihg and porch area. Completely remodeled, ch&a, large living room and
kitchen, appliances include refrigerator, stove, dishwasher, washer and
dryer. Lot size is 75' x 105'. Price $160,000.00. Call Brenda for more de-
tails.
1407 Constitution Drive: Enjoy breathtaking view of St. Joe Bay from
this 3 bdrm., 3 bath executive home. Approx. 1700 sq. ft. with too many
extras to list. Master suite has his and her walk-in closets and a tub jacuz-
zi. There is ceramic tile, formal living room, formal dining room and a den
with a view of the bay from each room. This home also has a double gar-
age' in the rear and a very nice covered porch. There is also a large stor-
age/workshop in the rear of the property. Much more!!! Don't let this once
in a lifetime home get away! A great price at $168,500.00.. Call Jay Rish
today.


Call us for copies of our many other sales'
and rental listings.


*JIncorporations


^Guardianship Minors


- Summary Probate


*Step Parent Adoptions









THE5, STARPORDT S'T. JO E. F L THTtDTAV1. *JV 1'. 1


.92 Plymouth Vogager CC, 6 cyl.,
auto, air cond., am/fmn radio, tilt
wheel, very clean. Call after 5 p.m.
229-8474. tfce6/1
1988 Pontiac 6000, 4 dr., 4 cyl., load-
ed'. $3,000. Call 229-6245 or 227-
2144. ltc 6/1
1976 Holiday Rambler, 30 ft.' motor
home. 61.000 miles, runs good, new
awning, new electric steps. Just had
6.2 k generator and the braking sys-
tem rebuilt. Asking $6,000. Phone.
229-8019. tfc 5/25
CASH NOW BUYING
Used Cars and Trucks. Local and out-
of-state vehicles.. Two locations to
serve you. Mayhann Motor, Port St.
Joe, 229-6584, Mayhann. Used Cars,
Wewahitchka, 639-5810. tfc 6/1.





Like new 1992 40 hp Mariner Mag-
num. ELPTO, with controls, prop and
gas tank, call 647-8524. 2tp 6/1
STEVE'S OUTBOARD SERVICE.
White City, anytime. 827-2902.
tfic6/1

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING PAYS
Call 227-1278 to place yours. $3.50
for first insertion, $2.00 a week for
consecutive runs, plus 5t per word
for all over 20.


FO RNT I OR R NT m GAR GEA LESI HE P W N D I


Mexico Beach, 41st St, Car Wash for
rent. Ready to operate for business.
Two businesses. more for rent.
4tc 5/25
Nice unfurnished 2 bdrm., 1 ba. trail-
er, located on St. Joe Beach, no pets.
Call 647-5361. tfc 5/25
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, unfurnished
trailer, St. Joe Beach, available May
23. $150 deposit, $325 per month.
Call 647-5327. tfc 6/1
One bedroom unfurnished apartment
$200 1per month with deposit. On
Monument Ave. Call George, 229-
8398. tfc 6/1
One bedroom apartment, $300 month
rent plus $200 deposit: Dogwood Ter-
race, 229-6314. tfc 6/1
One bedroom apartment, 2 blocks
from beach on Beacon Hill. Reason-
able. 647-3331. tfe 6/1l
New storage units on St. Joe Beach
behind the Gulf Sands Motel on
Americus St. 5xl0's, 10xlO's, and
10x20's. Ask about our move-in spe-
cial. 227-7200. tfc 6/41
Two bedroom trailer for rent, fur-
nished or unfurnished. No pets. Call
647-5106. tfc6/1

No need for wet carpets. Dry clean
them with HOST. Use rooms -right
away. Rent machine. StL Joe Furni-
ture, 227-1251. tfe 6/1


1st Annual Carrabelle

BOAT AUCTION!
at the Waterfront Festival & Saltwater Fishing Classic

JUNE 15th and 16th Consign Now!
'akeCtar AUCTIONS
904-229-9282
Bus. Lic. #AB0001239
AuC. Lic. #AU0001737, Auc. Lc. AUOOO1743 tp 6/1, 1to 6/


UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
* Large 2 bedroom apartment. stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up. :
* New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house. I 1/2
ba., Inside laundryrm. ch&a. dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted.,No
pets.
FURNISHED
* Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. ,heat &
air. washer/dryer hook-up.
* One bedroom apartment, washer/
. dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 6/1
Warehouses, small and large, some
with office, suitable for small busi-
ness, 229-6200. tfc 6/1
MOSS CREEK APTS., 904/639-
2722. 1 & 2 bedroom apartments lo-
cated 200 Amy Circle, Wewahitchka,
FL. Rent starts at $275. Cen. air &
heat, blinds, carpeting, stove. refrig.
Equal Housing Opportunity. Hearing
impaired number 904-472-3952.
tfc6/1

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Private
baths. Daily or weekly rates. 302 Reid
Ave. Port St. Joe, 229-9000. tfc 6/1
Liberty Manor Apts., 800 Tapper
Dr., Port St. Joe. Affordable hous-
ing for the elderly and the handi-
capped.
Cen. h &a, laundry facilities, energy
efficient costt, handicapped equip-
ped apts., available. Stove & refrig.
furn., fully carpeted, 1 bdrm., apts.,
on-site manager.
Equal Opportunity Housing Com-
plex. Rent is based on income.
This complex Is funded by the Farm-
ers- Home Administration and man-
aged by Advisors Realty.
Call 229-6353 for more information.
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
PINE RIDGE APTS., (904) 227-7451.
Rents starting at $245.00 per mo. Af-
fordable Living for low to middle in-
come families. Featuring 1, 2 & 3
bedroom apts. with cen. h&a, energy
saving appliances, patios & outside
storage. For hearing impaired call
(904) .472-3952. Equal Housing Op-
portunity. tfc 6/1.


Yard Sale: June 3, Saturday. 207 Ar-
kansas Dr., Mexico Beach, 8th St. to
Georgia, left. next street is Arkansas.
Also signs. Garden tools, small tools,
lawn mower, folding table, dining
room chair, TV, bikes, plants, dolls.
household items, and rifle-automatic
carbine type cal. 22 L.R. with case.
And much more. Rain or shine.
ltp 6/1
Multi-family yard sale: 1705 Garrison
Ave. Entertainment center, end ta-
bles, curtains, lots of misc. Saturday,
June 3, 8 a.m. 12 noon. Itc 6/1
2 Family Yard Sale: Saturday, June 3,
8 a.m. till. Men's and women's Ig. size
clothing, baseball cards, magazines,
dishes, books, stereo system, IBM P{C
3.5 games, lots of misc. 106 Bayside
Dr., Highland View. Parallel to Hwy.
98. Rain cancels. ltc 6/1
Yard Sale, 1400 Monument Avenue,
Saturday, 8 a.m. Lots to choose from.
Yard Sale, Saturday, June 3, Miscel-
laneous items, Beacon Hill, end of
Nutmeg Street. Itc 6/1
Yard Sale: Friday, June 2, 1014
Woodward Ave., 8:00 12:00.
5 Family yard Sale- Friday and Satur-
day, 8 a.m. I p.m., EST, lots of
stuff, 218 Ponce de Leon St., St. Joe
Beach.. No early sales. Itp 6/1
Garage Sale: June 3rd, 1201 Monu-
ment Avenue. 8 a.m. till. Baby items,
lots of'nick nacks. ltc 6/1
B & D Bargain Thrift Shop & Flea
Market open Monday through Satur-
day. Baby items, new and used, tools
and miscellaneous, 106 2nd Ave.,
Oak Grove. 3tc 5/25


Downtown Port St. Joe
517 1/2 4th St., 2 bdrm.,
stove, refrig., a/c, $250 month.
1402 1/2 Long Ave., 2 bdrm.,
I ba., cen. h&a, stove, refrig.,
$300 mo.
Deposit and lease required.
Call 227-5443
tfr 6/1


Newberry Eye Clinic-part-time recep-
tionist. Bring by or mail resume to
Newberry Eye Clinic, 528B 5th St.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456. tfc 6/1
LPN's/RN's, 90-bed Superior-Rated
skilled nursing facility needs your ex-
pertise on our 11-7' shift. You have
the opportunity to make a difference
in our residents
lives, while working with some of the
best people you'll ever know. Competi-
tive salary, benefits. Call/send re-
sume/visit Bay St. George Care Cen-
ter. Hwy. 98 at Begonia St.. P. 0. Box
589. EastpoinL FL 32328. (904) 670-
8579. EOE/Affirmative Action em-
plover. Itc 6/I
School Food Service Manager: The
Gulf County School Board is receiving
applications for a School Food Service
Manager at Wewahltchka Elementary
School. Applications are available at
the School Board office. Persons hav-
ing applications on file in the School
Board office and wishing to be consid-
ered for this position must request to
have their application submitted. Ap-'
plications should be sent or presented'
to Mr. Temple Watson, Food Service
Director, Gulf County School 'Board,
150 Middle School Road. Port St. Joe.
FL 32456. Application deadline Is
June 16, 1995, 12:00 noon, ET. The
gulf County School Board is an equal
opportunity employer. 2tc 6/1
School Food Service Employee: The
Gulf County School Board is receiving
applications for a School Food Service
employee at Highland View Elemen-
tary School. Applications are available
at the School Board office. Persons
having applications on file in the
School Board office and wishing to be
considered for this position must re-
quest to have their application sub-
mitted. Applications should be sent or
presented to Mr. Temple Watson.
Food Service Director. Gulf County
School -Board. 150 Middle School
Road. Port St. Joe. FL 32456. Applica-
tion deadline Is June 26, 1995,
12:00 noon, ET. The gulf County
School Board is an equal opportunity
employer. 2tc 6/1


Full-time person to work in ceramics
manufacturing. Experience in ceram-
ics preferred. Pay depending on expe-
rience. 227-1339. 1tp.6/1


DepLt. of Health and Rehabilitative
Services: Custodial worker, applica-
tion deadline June 12. 1995. Pos.
#954768. in Port St. Joe/Gulf. Salary
range $409.85 to $637.73 biweekly.
Applicants are usually hired at the
minimum of the salary range. Pending
classification incumbent will be re-
sponsible for traveling to the Wewa-
hitchka Clinic once a week to perform
custodial duties.
Submit a completed state of Florida
employment application to: Joy Cram-
er. HRS Dist. 2. 502 4th St.. Port St
Joe, FL 32456 (904) 227-1276, Sun-
comn, 771-2000.
'An Equal Opportunity/Affm. Action
Employer. We hire only U. S. citizens
and lawfully authorized alien workers.
preference shall be given to certain
veterans and spouses' of veterans as
provided by Chapter 295. laws of Flor-
ida. If you need an accommodation
because of a disability in order to par-
ticipate in the application/selection
process, please notify the hiring au-
thority in advance.
Minimum qualifications not applica-
ble for this class.
2tc6/1

LOOKING for mature individual to as-
sist Regional Vice President of Primer-
lea Financial Services. Take charge
and manage a portion of,'our multi-
faceted business. We offer high com-
mission income .potential, .flexible
hours, many other pluses. Could start
part time.. For interview, call today.
648-8565.' tfc6/1
The Gulf County School Board Is an-
'nouncing a job opening for a School
Psychologist. The position will be for
Port SL Joe area schools. Applica-
tions are available at the School
Board office. Gulf County School
Board is an equal opportunity em-
ployer.;
RN's and LPN's day or night shift
available. Apply in person. Bay SL Jo-
seph Care Center. 220 9th SL. Port
St. Joe. tfc 6/1


CNA's needed Tor all shifts. Training
available. Apply in person at Bay SL
Joseph Care Center. 220 Ninth St..
Port St. Joe. tfc 6/1


TRDE &SEVIE


Christian woman to do houseclean-
Ing. Residential or commercial. Excel-
lent references available. Call day or
night. 227-7311 or 229-9091.
Wewa Serenity Group, Presbyterian
Church. Hwy. 71. Al Anon meets
Monday at 7:00. AA meets Monday
and Thursday at 7:00.









THOMAS ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
S#ER009863
POWER POLES
200 amp overhead ............$200
200 amp underground ......$135
100 amp overhead ...............$80
S Al Types Electrical Work
Ucensed and Insured







SMall Engine Repairs
S1-800-499-9423

2 tp'5.18







Factory Warranty Center


I Lawnmowers I
I Weedeaters I

Chain Saws //
o Generators




I 706 1st St. St. Joe I
I 227-2112
l- ------------ J


Piano Lessons, all ages/levels. Ex-
perienced teacher, $40/month. Mexi-
co Beach, 648-4592. tfc 5/4

Will clean your home. Have referenc-e
es. Call 229-6039. 2tc 5/25
Surfslde Serenity Group, 1st United
Methodist Church. 22nd St.. Mexico
Beach. Monday 7:30: Friday 7:30.
All times central. 647-8054.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meeting: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & :
Thurs.. 8:00 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs. meetings at 1st United
Methodist Church, PSJ
Sunday meetings at Big Barn
Flea Market


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt, 2, Box AIC, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018


STRICKLAND ELECTRIC
All Type Electrical Work
S24 Hr. Service
UC. #ER0013168 .INSURED,
647-8081
ALAN STRICKLAND

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER
1-904-265-4794
26 Years Experience
WORKER'S COMPENSATION
PERSONAL INJURY
NO RECOVERY***NO FEE
7229 Deerhaven Road, P.C. 1,4/6

904-229-8161
Faye's Nail & &
Tanning Salon
TOTAL NAIL CARE
Certified Nail Technician
1905 Long Ave., Port St. Joe
Wolff Tanning System Call for Appt.


Harmon's Heavy Equipment co.
Specializing in Black Top Soil
BULLDOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS -TRACTORS DUMPTRUCKS
648-8924 OR 648-5767 if no answer

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 904/229-6821


Port SL Joe Lodge No. 11
Reg. Stated Communication
Ist and 3rd Thursday of each
month, 8:00 p.m.. Masonic Hall.
214 Reid Ave.
Marlen Taylor, W.M.
Bill Jordon. Sec.
pd. thru 95

MOWING RAKING WEEDING
EDGING TRIMMING ,
LANDSCAPING SODDING,

C.J.'S Lawn
Service
Serving Mexico Beach, St. Joe
Beach & Port St. Joe
"I Will Work for YOU!"
Mexico Beach, FL *
(904) 648-8492d.

Phone 227-1782,
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Perms
Betty's Beauty Salon
'"A 'Family Salon",
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.



Avon

CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460


STUMP GRINDING
Average Stump $10.00
1-800-628-8733
A-1 Tree Service & Stump Grinding
Vickery Enterprises, Inqc.


5x10 10x10 10x20
On Site Rentals 6 Days A Week
ASK ABOUT FREE MONTH'S RENT
St. Joe Rent-All
First St. 227-2112


St. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Port St. Joe 227-2112


TLC LAWN SERVICE
"Catering to 411 Your Lain Semnce Needs"
MOWING. EDGING. TfRIMMING. SPRAYING.
FERTILIZING. WEEDING. CLEAN OUTS.
SPRINKLER REPAIR. AND LANDSCAPING
Free Estimates
Call 229-6435 .c,,


STUTZMAN ROOFING
RC .0038936
Specializing in Reroofs *
Single-ply & Repairs
"Where quality is higher than price"
229-8631
tfc6/1


THE FASHION EXCHANGE
220 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe '
227-3183
New & Used Clothing
for the Entire Family.
Accessories and Misc. Items. 5do4/


ren'sVideosraphIics
CUSTOM PHOTOGRAPHY
for Any Occasion .
Commercial Portrait Wedding.,
For Details Call
KEN HORNE Photographer
229-8722 ttc4/6


COSTING'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
224 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581


A GIFT SHOP for
CHILDREN OF ALL AGES
Books *Toys Etc.
My Very Own Book
528 6th St. Phone 227-1636



BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

Lawnmowers
Weedeaters-.
Chain Saws ,
Generators
Pumps
e* Tillers
Go-Karts

229-2727
328 Reid Ave.


Troy/built. Snapper. John Deere. Ku-
bota, Stihl, Hsquarvna. Sales and
Service. 1-800-834-6744.
thru 9/95



GRIFFIN'S CDT'S
Tapes .*CD's Airbrush
Up to Date Releases
106 Reid Avenue
Phone 229-9228


BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair
Rebuild Wrecks
Body & Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIAL4TES on Your Body Work
Call or See BOB HEACOCK
SBaltzell Ave. Phone 227-7229
t c 4 '6


GULF COAST
-LAWN SPRINKLERS

Nelson, Rainbird arid Toro -
INSTALLATION and REPAIR
Free Estimates and Design
Allen Norris 229-8786 Chuck Smith 229-8536



Williamson's

Well Drilling & Pump Service
St. c.#3075
WATER FILTERS
CONDITIONERS
PURIFICATION SYSTEM
Croska Williamson tc6/ PO. Box 1173



FOSTER TREE &

LAWN SERVICE
No Job Too Big .....
S... Or Too Small

Jerry Foster FREE ESTIMATES *
Licensed & Insured 904/639-5368
tfc6/1


Pet & Property Tenders
Let us do the caring while you're away
CARE IN YOUR HOME, SERVICE LOW AS $8.00 A DAY
by Joe and Marie Romanelli
Serving Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas (904) 229-1065


Business and Personal Payroll Preparation
Financial and Estate Planning Bookkeeping Service

FRANK J. SEIFERT
Accounting and Income Tax Service -
Telephone 410 Long Ave.
Office (904) 229-9292 P. 0. Box 602
Home (904) 227-3220 fc 6w Port St. Joe, FL 32456


alt1 rucr jur, k-1 -1nuj Yjay juVj5 jLuu-


PAGE .7R


0












iSAUB bb 'i3 'iAK iSIS I' @1' TflWV1, -*TnUX51DsAY J U Ia, a-1, W*O


~ocxuwCi~jBb~y0


U.S. Army Reservists Provide


Medical Care at Reservation


The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners
met on April 18, 1995, in workshop session with the
following members present: Chairman Michael L.
Hammond, and Commissioners Billy E. Traylor,
Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Nathan Peters, Jr., and Jessie
V. Annstrong.
Other present were: Deputy Clerk Debbe Wibbers,
Chief Administrator Don Butler, Administrator R.
Larry Wells, Building Inspector Richard Combs,
Maintenance Superintendent Joe Bearden, Solid
Waste Director Joe Danford, Emergency Manage-
ment/911 Coordinator Marshall Nelson and Vete-
rans' Service Officer.
The workshop was called to order at 5:07 p.m., EDT.
Administrator R. Larry Wells, opened the meeting
with prayer and Chairman Michael L Hammond led
Sthe pledge of allegiance.
PERSONNEL
Commissioner Traylor discussed a memorandum that
he had addressed to Larry Wells and Marshall Nel-
son and expressed his concern that the Board is being
misrepresented to the 911 Committee. He stated that
the Board had always been supportive of the 911
Committee, as well as Mr. Wells and Mr. Nelson. He
stated that he was disturbed by Mr. Well's actions
and attitude over the past year. Mr. Traylor specifi-
cally addressed the Hazard Mitigation Funding and
that Mr. Wells did not handle that situation in the
best interest of the Board. Commissioner Peter Petes stat-
ed that Commissioner Traylor was completely wrong
in issuing a memorandum to Mr. Wells and Mr. Nel-
son and that Mr. Traylor did not attempt to contact
Mr. Wells to address these issues. Chairmnnan Ham-
mond stated that an employee of the Board must sup-
port the Board. Commissioner Peter stated that he
opposed Mr. Hammond's remarks. Commissioner
Yeager stated that the Board and the employees of
the Board must be supportive of each other even
thought everyone may not always be in agn.ement.
commissioner Traylor stated that he is always direct
when addressing a problem and would address the is-
sue with Mr. Wells in the meeting. Commissioner
Yeager recommended that Mr. Traylor meet with
Mr. Wells and address the issues and problems he is
concerned about.
There being no further business, and upon motion by
commissioner Yeager, second by Commissioner
Traylor and unanimous vote, the meeting did then
adjourn at 5:39 p.m., EDT.

The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners
met on April 24, 1995 in special session with the fol-
lowing members present: Chairman Michael L Ham-
mond, and Commissioner Billy E. Traylor, Nathan
Peters, Jr., and Warren J. Yeager, Jr. Commissioner
Jessie V. Armstrong was absent
Others present were: Deputy Clerk Debbe Wibberg,
Chief Administrator Don Butler, and Solid Waste Di-
rector Danford.
The meeting was called to order at 12:07 p.m. EDT.
Chairman Michael L Hammond opened the meeting
with prayer and Commissioner Nathan Peters, Jr. led
the pledge of allegiance. .
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Tamara Laine of the Chamber of Commerce request-
ed guidance from the Board regarding incentives
when she is preparing a packet for prospective busi-
nesses. The Board agreed that they would consider
tax breaks on a case by case situation. After discus-
sion, the Board agreed that Ms. Laine could repre-
sent them to any perspective businesses. Upon mo-
tioni by Commissioner Yeager, second by
Commissioner Traylor, and unanimous vote, the
Board agreed for Tamara Laine of the Chamber of
Commerce to apply fora CDBG matching grant to
acquire funds to promote business opportunities (i.e.
business park) in Gulf County. The Board requested
that Ms. Laine work with Chief Admtinistrator Don
Butler with regard to the grant and meetings with
prospective businesses.
DALE JONES FLORIDA GAME AND FRESH
WATER FISH COMMISSION
Mr. Dale Jones discussed a letter from the Board re-
questing that any easements and/or existing agree-
ments between Gulf County and the Florida Game
and Fresh Waler Fish Commissioner for Wayside
Park/Boat Ramp and the ChipoLs Cutoff Park/Boat
Ramp. Commissioner Traylor stated that he felt that
the Count) maintains these facilities at an extend, ve
costs and should be able to control these fasdit es
completely. He also stated that the Florida Game ai d
Fresh Water Fish Commission inspects these faci -.
ties about three limes but that the County maintain
the parks and boat ramps. along with the parking
lots. on a regular basis. Mr. Traylor also discussed
charging a permit fee to maintain these facilities
(Chairman Hammond left the meeting at 12:32 p.m.,'
EDT.) Mr. Jones stated that the County cannot
charge a fee as long as the Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission mamainis the easements on
the park/boat ramps. (Chairman Hammond returned.
at 1i2:3-1 p.m. EDT) After discussion, Mr. Jones stat-
ed that he would forward the Board's request to Dr.
Allan Egbert of the Flonrida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission in Tallahassee. Chairman Ham-
mond stated that the Board would write a letter to Dr.
Egbert in Tallahassee officially requesting the boat
ramps from the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission. The Board thanked Mr. Jones for at-
tending the meeting.
There being no fuflher business, and upon motion by
Commissioner Yeager, second by Commissioner Pe-
ters, and unanimous vole, the meeting did then ad-
joumrn at 1:01 pmn., EDT.

The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners
met on April 25, 1995, in regular session with the
following members present:. Chairman Michael L.
Hammond and Commissioners Nathan Peters, Jr.,
Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Billy E. Traylor. Commission-
er Jessie V. Armstrong was absentL
Others present were: County Attorney Barbara Sand-
ers, Clerk Benny C. Lister, Chief Deputy Clerk Doug
Birmingham, Deputy Clerk Debbe Wibberg, Chief
Administrator Don Butler, Building Inspector Rich-
ard Combs, Solid Waste Director Joe Danford, Vete-
rans' Service Officer Bo Williams, Road Department
Superintendent Bob Lester. .
The meeting was called to order at 6:05 p.m., EDT.
Mr. Willie Ramsey opened the meeting with prayer
and Commissioner Warren J. Yeager. Jr. led the
pledge.
CONSENT AGENDA
Upon motion by Commissioner Warren J. Yeager,
Jr., second by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous
vote, the Board approved the consent agenda: Con-
sent A enda Items Approved: A. Invoices a.-
Preble-Rish, Inc. Beacon Hill Park $5,000.00
(payment to be made from FRDAP grant); b. Preble-
Rish, Inc. Dalkeith Drainage Ditch $500 (payment
to be made from Professional Services); c. Gulf
County Public Health Unit Sampling Fee $40.00
(payment to be made from Other Current Charges &
ObL). B. Inventory Transfer a. Transfer Fire Truck
(#170-17) from White City Fire Department to Dal-
keith Fire Department's Inventory.
MEDICAL EXAMINER



teenth Judicial Circuit, effective April 18, 1995
through September 30,1995.
CHARLIE COLE SCIENCE PROJECT DEM-
ONSTRATION
Charlie Cole of Wewahitchka presented a demonstra-
tion of his science project using recycled paper to the
' Board of County Commissioners. The Board com-
mended 'Mr. Cole for his hard work and ingenuity of
this project.
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT -JUDY KOSIN
Upon recommendation by Chief Administrator Don
Butler, the Board agreed to change Emergency Man-
agement Employee Judy Kosin's working hours to
8:00 atm. 5:00 p.m., effective April 26, 1995.
VARIANCE NELLIE ANDREWS
Uponi recommendation by Chief Administrator Don
Butler, Commissioner Traylor motioned not to grant
a variance, previously requested on April 18, 1995
(regular meeting), to Ms. Nellie Andrews to allow
her to lower her mobile home below the base flood
elevation. Commissioner Yeager seconded the mo-
tion and the motion passed unanimously. Mr. Butler
state that the situation had been resolved.
LETTER CDBG (FINANCIAL AUDIT RE-
PORT)
Chief Administrator Don Butler noted a letter from
County Auditor Michael Tucker explaining the delay
for the 1994 audit report. Chairman Hammond stated
that he would request that Mr. Tucker's office being
the annual audit earlier.
AMNESTY DAY
Solid Waste Director Danford noted that Amnesty
Day would be held on Saturday, May 20, 1995 at the
Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe and at Lis-
ter's Hardware Store in Wewahitchka.
SEA OATS PLANTING PROJECT/ BUDGET


AMENDMENT
Upon request by Solid Waste Director Danford,
Commissioner Yeager motioned to give $500.00, if
no other financial source is available, to purchase sea
oats-to be planted on area beaches by amending the
1994-95 General Fund by reducing Reserve for Con-
tingencies $500.00 and increasing Other Current
Charges and Obligations $500. Comrmissioner Tray-
lor seconded the motion and the motion passed unan-
imously.
JTPA WORKERS
The Boaid requested that the JTPA workers be in-


formed that their employment is only temporary not
permanent.
AWARD BID (#9495-30) WELL MONITOR-
ING
Upon recommendation by Solid Waste Director Joe
Danford, Commissioner Peters motioned to accept
the low bid, $14,400.00, from Davis Laboratories for
the quarterly ground water sampling service for the
GulfCounty Landfills. Commissioner Traylor sec-
onded the motion and the motion passed 4-0.
SHIP HOUSING PLAN
Commissioner Traylor to approve the State Housing
Initiatives Partnership Program (SHIP) for fiscal
years 1995-96 and 1996-97 for Gulf County. Com-
missioner Yeager seconded the motion. The motion
passed 3-1 (Commissioner Peters opposed because it
is mandatory that each applicant attend theHome Ed-
ucation Class).
SHIP PROGRAM PARTNERSHIP COMMIT-
TEE
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Yeager, and unanimous vote, the
Board reappointed the following members to the
Partnership Committee, as part of the SHIP Program,
for (2) two year term: Mr. Jerry Stokoe, Mr. Jerry
Gaskin, Mr. Rawlis Leslie, Mr. Gil Williams and Mr.
Johnny Jenkins. /
SHIP PROGRAM ADVERTISE
Ship Administrator Bo Williams stated that he would
be advertising the entire month of May regarding the
availability of funds from the SHIP Program. He stat-
ed that the advertisement would be handled through
the STAR.
INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT (CONTRAC.-
TORS) FRANKLIN COUNTY
Building Inspector Richard Combs stated that the
Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is
reviewing an interlocal agreement between Gulf
County and Franklin County regarding area contrac-
tors operating within the (2) two counties.
GULF COUNTY CONSTRUCTION LICENSE.
ING BOARD
Building Inspector Richard Combs discussed a re-
cent meeting of the Gulf County Construction Li-
censing Board held on April 14, 1995. He stated that
they are conceded with specialty contractors and
that Ordinance 94-05 does not address specialty con-
tractors. He also stated that he has requested County
Attomey Sanders review Ordinance 94-05 and that
the Board may want to.consider amending this ordi-
nance to specifically address specialty contractors.
ORDINANCE 95-04 AMENDING THE GULF
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
Upon motion by Commissioner Yeager, second by
Commissioner Traylor, and unanimous vote, the
Board adopted Ordinance 95-04, amending the Gulf
County Comprehensive Plan. (Copy on file in
Clerk's office).
ORDINANCE UNLICENSED CONTRAC-
TORS.
Building Inspector Combs discussed civil penalties
received from unlicensed contractors and that an or-
dinance may need to be adopted stating how these
monies can be used.
The meeting recessed at 6:55 p.m., EDT.
The meeting reconvened at 7:05 p.m., EDT.
(Commissioner Traylor left the meeting at 7:05 p.m.,
EDT)
INSURANCE CLAIMS LITIGATION
Commissioner Peters inquired about the number of
insurance claims that had been filed against the
County.
UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION
CLAIMS JTPA
Upon discussion by Chairman Hammond regarding
unemployment compensation claims of JTPA work-
ers, Chief Administrator Butler stated individuals
'who have resigned their employment, through the
JTPA program, would be notified in writing that they
had chosen to resign.
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS -
"TOMAHAWK" MISSILE LAUNCHES
Chairman Hammond stated that he would attend the
meeting in Tallahassee, May 4, 1995 regarding the
Tomahawk Missile Launches from Cape San Bias.
PROCLAMATION IN HONOR OF THE 30TH
ANNIVERSARY OF PROJECT HEAD START
Upon motion by Commissioner Yeager, second by
Commissioner Peters, and unanimous vote, the
Board adopted a proclamation in honor of the 30th
anmi ersary of Project Head Start.
PROCLAMATION WORKER'S MEMORIAL
DAY
Upon motion by Commissioner Yeager. secop~ by
Commissioner Peters, and unanimous vote, the
Board adopted a proclamation claiming a "Worker's
Memorial Day" in Gulf County on April 28. (Copy
on file in Clerk's office).
AMBULANCE CONTRACT RENEWAL SPE-
CIAL MEETING MAY 2,1995'
Chairman Hammond requested that Mr. Brian Upton
and Mr. Billy J. Rish, representing Gulf Pines Hospi-
tal, be notified that a special meeting between them
and the Gulf County Board of County Commission-
ers would be held May 2, 1995, at 5:00 p.m., EDT to
discuss the ambulance contract renewal.
ROAD DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT DUMP
TRUCK REPAIR
Road Department Superintendent Lester discussed
the repair problems that had been incurred regarding
the repair of the Road Department's dump truck.
COUNTY WIDE VOTING
Ms. Amy Shackleford discussed the confusion
around county wide voting and recommended that
the Board meet with various committees to explain
county wide voting. The Board discussed meeting
with different individuals and noted that the majority
of the Board is in favor of county wide voting.
RESOLUTION 95-08 VOTING ON EASTERN
TIME
The Board discussed the necessary procedures that
are involved to enable the entire county to vote on
eastern time.
There being no further business, and upon motion by
Commissioner Peters, second by Commissioner
Yeager, and unanimous vote, the meeting did then
adjourn at 7:34 p.m., EDT.

The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners
met on May 2, 1995 in special session with the fol-
lowing members present: Chairman Michael L. Ham-
mond, and Commissioners Jessie V. Armstrong, Na-
than Peters, Jr., and Warren J. Yeager, Jr.
Commissioner Billy E. Traylor was absent.
Others present were: County Attorney Barbara Sand-
ers, Deputy Clerk Debbe Wibberg, and Chief Admin-
istrator Don Butler.
The meeting was called to order at 5:01 p.m., EDT.
Mr.Billy J. Rish opened the meeting withprayer and
Chairman Michael L. Hammond led the pledge of al- '
legiance.
AMBULANCE CONTRACT RENEWAL
The Board met with Mr. Billy J. Rish and Mr. Brian
Upton representing Gulf Pines Hospital to discuss
the renewal of the ambulance contract between Gulf
County and Gulf Pines Hospital. The Board ex-
pressed their concern over the response time by the
ambulance service and the problems that have been
incurred regarding the backup service. (Commission-
er Traylor arrived at 5:19 p.m., EDT) After discus-
sion, the Board requested that Mr. Upton provide a
profit and loss statement for the Board to review by
their next regular meeting, Tuesday, May 9, 1995.
There being no further business and upon motion by
Commissioner Peters, second by Commissioner
Yeager, and unanimous.vote, the meeting did then
adjourn at 5:29 p.m., EDT.

The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners
met on May 9, 1995 in regular session with the fol-
lowing members present: Chairman Michael L. Ham-
mond, and Commissioner Jessie V. Armstrong, and
SNathan Peters, Jr. Commissioners Billy E. Traylor
and Warren J. Yeager, Jr. were absent.
Others present were: County Attorney Barbara Sand-
ers, Chief Deputy Clerk Doug Birmingham, Deputy
Clerk Debbe Wibberg, Chief Administrator Don But-
ler, Building Inspector Richard Combs, Administra-
tor R. Larry Wells, Emergency Management/911 Co-
ordinator Marshall Nelson, Mosquito Control
Superintendent Paul Wood, Road Department Super-
intendent Bob Lest and Captain Ray Richter.
The meeting was called to order at 6:06 p.m., EDT.
Mr. Willie Ramsey opened the meeting with prayer
and Chairman Michael L. Hammond led the pledge
of allegiance.
CONSENT AGENDA
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the


Board approved the consent agenda: Consent Agen-
da Items Approved: A. Minutes April 18, 1995 -
Regular Meeting; B. Invoices a. Florida Associa-
tion of County Attorneys Dues $50.00 (payment
to be made from County Attorney Dues); b. Ketch-
um, Wood & Burgert, P.A. (Csondor) $1,162.00
(payment to be made from medical examiner); C.
Travel Requests a. Wells and Nelson to attend 9th
Annual Hurricane Conference, June 5-9, 1995 in
Tampa; b. Commissioner Peters to attend FC Board
of Directors meeting June 2, 1995 in Tampa: c. Com-
missioner Peters to attend conference June 9-10,
1995.
RECEIVE BIDS (#9495-31) EMERGENCY
MEDICAL DISPATCH TRAINING
Pursuant to advertisement to receive sealed bids
(#9495-31) for emergency medical dispatch training


for the 911 dispatchers, the Board received no bids.
Chairman Hammond directed Emergency Manage-
ment/911 Coordinator Marshall Nelson to receive
verbal quotes and take the "best" quote.
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION JIM-
MY ROGERS
Jimmy Rogers apd Gene Martin of the Department
of Transportation updated the Board on the various
Projects that the Department of Transportation will
be conductingin the County. Mr. Rogers also stated
that they would review having a "no passing" zone
from Beacon Hill to St. Joe Beach. After discussion
by Chairman Hammond about transferring C-30E
back to the State, Mr. Rogers stated that there are no
immediate plans to transfer any roads, unless it mutu-
ally benefits both parties involved. Chairman Ham-
mond thanked Mr. Rogers and Mr. Martin for their
work in Gulf County.
COUNTY EXTENSION AGENT ROY LEE
CARTER
County Extension Agent Roy Lee Carter informed
the Board about the various activities and camps he
will be involved with during the summer. He also
noted the dates he would be out of the County while
attending the various camps. The Board thanked Mr.
Carter for updating them on his activities.
S'BUILDING PERMIT DORA J. GORTMAN
(REFUND)
Mrs. Dora J. Gortman requested a refund on a build-
ing permit that she had purchased, since she will not
.be needing the permit. Upon recommendation by
Building Inspector Combs, Commissioner Peters mo-
tioned to reimburse Ms. Dora Gortman (2/3) two-
thirds of the total building permit fee paid. Commis-
sioner Armstrong seconded the motion and the mo-
tioni passed unanimously. '
INVOICE COUNTY ATTORNEY MONTH-
LY BILLING (APRIL, 1995)
Upon motion by Commissioner Armstrong, second
by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous vote, the
Board approved the monthly billing (April, 1995) in
the amount of $934.75 from County Attorney Barba-
ra Sanders.
INVOICE PREBLE-RISH, INC. (SAULS
CREEK ROAD)
Commissioner .Armstrong motioned to pay an in-
voice from Preble Rish, Inc. for engineering servic-
es on Sauls Creek Road in the amount of $828.54.
Commissioner Peters seconded the motion. Mr. Pe-
ters inquired if the invoice had been "signed,off" by
the appropriate department head. After discussion,
Commissioner Peters withdrew his second. Chair-
man Hammond passed the chair to Vice-Chairman
Peters and seconded the motion, contingent upon
Road. Department Superintendent Bob Lester "sign-
ing off" on the invoice. After discussion, the motion
passed 2-1 (Commissioner Peters opposed). Acting
Chairman Peters retumed the chair to Chairman
Hammond.
INVOICE PREBLE-RISH, INC (STORMWA-
TER PLAN)
Upon motion by Commissioner Armstrong, second
by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous vote, the
Board approved an invoice from Preble-Rish, Inc. for
engineering services, in the amount of $2,000.00 for
the Gulf County Stormwater Plan. It wag noted that
payment would be made from Professional Engineer-
ing Services.
INVOICE PREBLE-RISH, INC (BEACON
HILL PARK)
Upon motion by Commissioner Armstrong, second
by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous vote, the
Board agreed to pay an invoice from Preble-Rish,
Inc. in the amount of $5,220.00 ($3,000.00 for engi-
neering services and $2,220.00 for surveying servic-
es) for the Beacon Hill Park Project. It was noted that
payment would be made from the FRDAP Grant
funds.
SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT DONATIONS'
FOR SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the
Board agreed that the Sheriff's Department can re-
quest, in writing, the funds received in the Sheriff's
Department can request, in writing, the funds re-
ceived in the Clerk's office in memory of E. Briggs.
It was noted that donations to the Sheriff's office had
been made in the memory of Mr. Briggs.
SEA TURTLE NEST WATCHERS LETTER
OF PERMISSION
Upon motion by Commission Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong. and unanimous vote, the
Board .approved a letter of permission for Barbara
Eells, Paula Boone and Henry Boone to operate an
ATV from the Dixie Bell Curve to the Bay County
Line to obsene the sea turtle nests.
RESOLUTION 95-17 APPLICATION FOR
FUNDING (OVERSTREET BOAT RAMP)
Upon motion, by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the
Board approved the Resolution No. 95-17 recogniz-
in the importance ofa boat ramp at Overstreet.
(Copy on filein Clerk's office).
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS -
STIPULATED SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT
COMPP PLAN)
Pursuant to advertisement of a notice of public hear-
ing regarding the Stipulated Settlement Agreement
between Gulf County and the Department of Com-
munity Affairs regarding he comprehensive plan
amendment for Guf County, the Board received no
public comment. Commissioner Armstrong motioned
to approve the stipulated settlement agreement be-
tween Gulf County and the Department of Communi-
ty Affairs. Commissioner Peters seconded the motion
for discussion. After discussion, the motion passed
unanimously. Commissioner Armstrong motioned to
declare Ski Breeze Campsite in Cape San Blas locat-
ed on both sides of the highway, "grandfathered in",
as a part of the Gulf County Comprehensive Plan.
Commissioner Peters seconded the motion and the
motion passed unanimously. It was noted that
County Attorney Sanders would draft the agreement.
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS -
CDBG PROGRAM SITE VISIT NOTICE
Chief Administrator Don Butler noted that represen-
tatives from the Department of Community Affairs
will be in Gulf County, may 25, 1995 to conduct a
site visit concerning the Board's CDBG applications
for road paving.
HAZARD MITIGATION FUNDS
Chief Administrator Butler noted that a' meeting
would be held with a representative from Congress-
man Scarborough's office, Thursday, May 11, 1995
at 10:00 a.m., in Chipley regarding the recent.distri-
bution of HUD flood funds. Mr. Butler stated that he
and Mr. Wells would be attending this meeting. He
also stated that Gulf County would be requesting re-
allocation of these funds.
INDUSTRIAL ROAD
Chairman Hammond inquired about the paving of
the turn lane of Industrial Road from Highway 98.
Bill Kennedy of Preble-Rish, Inc. noted that C. W.
Roberts had begun work on that particular project.
CHANGE ORDER 1995 ROAD PAVING PRO
GRAM (VICTORIA AVENUE BRIDGE)
Chairman Nathan Peters and motioned to have C. W.
Roberts, Inc. "cap" the bridge on Victoria Avenue.
SCommissioner Armstrong seconded the motion and
the motion passed unanimously. It was noted that
payment would be made from Secondary Road and
dge funds. Acting Chairman Peters returned the
chair to Chairman Hammond.
CHANGE ORDER 1995 ROAD PAVING
Commissioner Peters motioned to allow Road De-
partment Superintendent Bob Lester to negotiate a
change order, not to exceed $5,000.00,. with C. W..
Roberts, Inc., on the 1995 road paving contract, to
"cap" a section of Howards Creek Road. Commis-
sioner Armstrong seconded the motion and the mo-
tion passed unanimously. It was noted that this
change order would be in addition to the
$350,000:00 previously approved for the 1995 road
paving program.
911 STREET NAME CHANGES
Upon recommendation by Emergency Management/
9 Coordinator Marshall Nelson, Commissioner Pe-
ters motioned to change the following street names.
Commissioner Armstrong seconded the motion and
the motion passed unanimously.
INDIAN PASS
Arrowhead Avenue (map 90C) to Deepwater Avenue
CAPE SAN BLAS
South Cliff Way (map 5A) to Turtle Walk
TREASURE BAY SUBDIVISION
Oleander Way (map 54) to Sand Bar Drive
The meeting recessed at 7:08 p.m., EDT.
The meeting reconvened at 7:29 p.m., EDT.
SHIIP PROGRAM


SHIP Administrator Bo Williams noted two (2) let-
ters of denial.for SHIP funds that he had sent SHIP
applicants because their income exceeded the limits
set by the SHIP plan.


FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF COUNTIES AN.
NUAL CONFERENCE VETERANS' SERVICE
OFFICER
Upon motion by Commissioner Armstrong, second
by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous vote, the
Board agreed for Veterans' Service Officer Bo Wil-
liams to attend the Florida Association of Counties
Annual Conference, June 28-30, at Macro Island.
ADVERTISE FOR BIDS BEACON HILL
PARK
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the
Board agreed to advertise for bids for the construc-
tion of Beacon Hill Park. It was noted that Preble-
Rish, Inc. would provide the specifications.
DALKEITH DRAINAGE DITCH PROJECT
Bill Kennedy of Preble-Rish, Inc. discussed a meet-
ing he had with the Corps of Engineers and represen-
tatives of the Department of Environmental Protec-
tion regarding the Dalkeith Drainage Ditch Project
He stated a permit would not granted for the project,
but that each property owner could place a small
berm on their property as long as it did not extend
into the wetlands area. After discussion, Chairman
Hammond requested a letter of explanation regarding
this meeting and for copy to be sent to Mrs. Margaret
Adams.
RESOLUTION NO. 95-18 SUPPORT GRANT
APPLICATION FOR CENTENNIAL BUILD-
ING IN PORT ST. JOE
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the
Board adopted the Resolution No. 95-18 in support
of a grant application by the City of Port St Joe for a
Historic Preservation for the Centennial Building.
(Copy.on file in Clerk's office). ,
.GULF COUNTY DISADVANTAGED TRANS-
PORTATION
Gerald Swan, Executive Director of Gulf County
Transportation, thanked Veterans' Service Officer
Bo Williams for his efforts in coordinating transpor-
tation of county residents.
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF COUNTY AT-
TORNEYS INVOICE FOR DUES
County Attorney Barbara Sanders stated that she had
been contacted by the Florida Counties Foundation
concerning grant funds available to pay the member-
ship dues to the Florida Association of County Attor-
neys. Commissioner Peters motion to rescind the mo-
tion approving .payment of an invoice, (B-16 in
consent agenda) from the Florida Association. of
County Attorneys, in the amount of $50.00. Commis-
sioner Armstrong seconded the motion and the mo-
tion passed unanimously.
PENDINGLITIGATION
County Attorney Sanders stated that she is monitor-
ing the situation regarding a lawsuit that has been
served against the county.
PARADISE BAY SUBDIVISION
County Attorney sanders stated that she does not
have the necessary information, previously request-
ed, regarding Paradise Bay Subdivision being
"grandfathered in" as part of the Gulf County Com-
prehensive Plan.
ARGUS CONTRACT
County Attorney Sanders stated that she. does not
have the contractprepared between Gulf County and
Argus Services, Inc. because she is awaiting addi-
tional information.
ADVERTISE FOR BIDS VEHICLE FOR
PLANNING/BUILDING DEPARTMENT
Commissioner Peters motioned to advertise for bids
for the following: to sell the Building Department's
1994 Chevrolet Blazer, to purchase a 1995 full size
4-door sedan with the Blazer as a trade-in allowance,
and to purchase a 1995 full size 4-door sedan. Com-
missioner Armstrong seconded the motion and the
motion passed unanimously. It was. noted that Chief
Administrator Butler iould provide the specifica-
tions.
SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT REPEATER
Commissioner Peters motioned to allow the/Sheriff's
Department to purchase and/or repair a repeater, not
to exceed $2,500.00, from the funds receive from Or- .
dinance 93-09. Commissioner Armstrong seconded
Sthe motion and the motion passed unanimously.
ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER WEEKEND
CALLS .
Chairman Hammond discussed the problems that the
Sheriff's office is having with animal control service
on .eekends. He stated that the Sheriff suggested
that an officer be placed on call for weekends and
also requested that the County consider paying for
the weekend service.
AMBULANCE SERVICE CONTRACT RE-
NEWAL ,
Commissioner Peters inquired about the status of the
negotiations for the renewal of the ambulance service
contracL Chairman Hammond stated that they are
awaiting figures from Brian Upton of Gulf Pines
Hospital and wlml make a recommendation to the
Board by the neit regular Board meeting.
ADVERTISE FOR BIDS BOILER FOR GULF
COUNTY COURTHOUSE
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the
Board agreed to advertise for bids for a new boiler
for the Gulf County Courthouse. e
FLORENCE BAILEY
Commissioner Peters introduced Ms. Florence Bai-
ley to the Board who is working on her master's de-
gree in political science from FAMU. He also ex-
pressed his appreciation that Ms. Bailey will be
conducting her intemship for the next three months
in Gulf County.
RESOLUTION NO. 95-19 FLORIDA PAN-
HANDLE JOB TRAINING CONSORTIUM
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the
Board adopted Resolution No. 95-19 recognizing
common principles for the creation of a workforce
development strategy for Gulf County. (Copy on file
in Clerk's office).
SOLID WASTE PROPOSAL FOR SMALL
QUANTITY GENERATOR ASSESSMENT
GRANT
Chairman Hammond stated that the Board would ta-
ble the proposal submitted by Solid Waste Director
Joe Danford, for a small quantity generator assess-
ment grant It was noted that Mr. Danford was out of
town attending a conference.
GULF COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT
Chairman Hammond discussed a request from the
Gulf County Public Hea th Unit requesting that their
parking lot be paved by the County. He requested
that Administrator Wells write a letter explaining the
lack of funds available at this time for any projects of
this nature. ,
SOLID WASTE PROPOSAL FOR SMALL
QUANTITY GENERATOR' ASSESSMENT
GRANT
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the
Board approved the proposal for a small quantity
generator assessment grant, contingent upon the
Chairman signing off on the prposal.
911 ADDRESS NUMBERS FOR GULF
COUNTYCOURTHOUSE
Emergency Management/911 Coordinator Marshall
Nelson noted that the Gulf County Courthouse does
not have address number in a visible location. Chair-
man Hammond requested that Mr. Nelson present a
recommendation by the next regular meeting.
COUNTY RIGHT OF WAY VENDORS SELL-
ING GOODS
Veterans' Services Officer Bo Williams inquired if
vendors using the county right of way were required
to.purchase permits. He discussed vendors using the
right of way in Beacon Hill near the county line at
the intersection of Highway 98 and 386. Chairman
Hammond requested that County Attorney Sanders
review the Board's options in adopting an ordinance
prohibiting vendors selling there goods on the county
right of way.
COUNTY RIGHT OF WAY INTERSECTION
OF HIGHWAY 386 AND HIGHWAY 98
Chairman Hammond requested that Road Depart-
ment Superintendent Bob Lester contact Bay County
about the placement of "stubs" to prevent individuals
from parking on the county right of way next to
-Lookout Lounge.
VICTORIA AVENUE BRIDGE
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the
Board agreed that the change order to "cap" Victoria
Avenue Bridge, not exceed $2,500.00. It was noted
that payment would be made from the Secondary
Road and Bridge Fund.


There being no further business, and upon motion by
Commissioner Peters, second by Commissioner
Armstrong, and unanimous vote, the meeting did
then adjourn at 8:07 p.m., EDT.


@In Arizona's arid, high desert, the U.S.
Army Reserve is offering a medical oasis
for thousands of Native Americans from
the nearby Navajo reservation.
At this site in Winslow, Army
Reservists from throughout the country
are performing their annual training by
treating hundreds of people each week
.in an Army Reserve deployable
medical system, or DEPMEDS.
DEPMEDS is the Army's state-of-the-
art, primary care facility for the field. It
was set up last September as a tempo-
rary replacement for Winslow's main
public health services building current-
ly under renovation.
The Army Reserve is playing an
important role in this community by help-
ing to maintain normal patient services for
the Winslow Indian Health Center, which
logs 60,000 patient visits a year.
The main building, built circa 1933,
badly needs renovations. Beginning
repairs, however, without an alternate
facility would have curtailed health care


the Winslow Indian Health Center. The
services provided include pediatric and
obstetric care, as well as care for chronic
conditions like diabetes. Supplementing
the work.of local personnel, Army
Reservists have been providing primary
health care, like diagnostic services,
checking blood pressure, changing
wound dressings, performing basic lab -
work and treating viral infections.

DEPMEDS is made from specially
designed tenting material and provides'
a safe, climate-controlled environment
for consistent, quality care under
extreme circumstances. Multiple
rooms and running water enable the
medical staff in Winslow to perform
X-rays, assess patient illnesses in
triage and administer primary care.
In addition, to working in the
Winslow facility, Army Reservists
travel to satellite health centers in
more remote locations on the reserva-
tion. During a recent unit rotation,


U.S. ARMY RESERVE MAJOR Frank Amato, a member of the 349th
Combat Support Hospital from St. Petersburg, Fla., examines a Navajo
infant- while the baby's mother- looks on. Amato, a resident of Tampa,
recently performed two weeks of annual training by staffing an Army
Reserve deployable medical system in Winslow, Ariz. Army Reserve
resources are being used in Winslow to help -meet the health care needs
of local Native Americans.


for thousands of local Native Americans.
"During the renovation, the Army
Reserve has given us a lot of help provid-
ing personnel and the structure to work
in," comments Dr. Michael Tutt, clinical
director of Winslow Indian Health
Center. Dr. Tutt was raised in Shiprock,
N.M., on the Navajo reservation that
spans all the way north from Winslow to
Colorado and Utah. He studied medicine
,in Boston and returned to the reservation
to share his newly acquired medical skills
with fellow Navajo people.

Serving in two-week rotations, Army
Reservists will continue to help out
until work on Winslow's permanent'
health services building is completed
next summer. Throughout the duration
of the program, more. than 200 Army
Reservists are expected to perform
their annual training in Winslow.
Many patients travel more than an
hour through the Navajo reservation to


some four-legged patients even
received treatment when Arm,
Reservists administered rabies shots to
dogs and cats on the reservation.

Recently, Major Frank Amato, a med-
ical surgical nurse with the Army
Reserve's 349th Combat Support
Hospital in St. Petersburg, Fla., traveled
, to.Winslow to assess patient ailments in-
the DEPMNEDS. "The Winslow mission
is giving our unit the opportunity to
work with patients who need our care
and to see ho%% the DEPMEDS really
functions." said A.mato. "Also, it is really
rewarding to glue high-quality medical
care to people who need and deserve it."
"This mission is a win-win situa-
tion," says Maj. Gen. Max Baratz,
Chief, Army Reserve. "We're able to
help our fellow Americans while get-
ting the training we need to maintain
our combat readiness." PH958452


GARLIC-PARMESAN Mashed Potatoes, made with Ore-Ida Frozen
Mashed Potatoes, add Italian flavor to any meal.


Spring Into Great-Tasting,



Quick-Cooking Meals


@Now that spring has sprung, time
spent on meal preparation should be
kept to a minimum but is it pos-
sible to have meals that taste great
in minutes?
Yes! The secret to reducing prepara-
tion time is to keep a freezer well-
stocked with high-quality prepared and
convenience foods, like quick-cooking
cuts of meat and frozen vegetables,
including Ore-Ida Mashed Potatoes.
Found in the freezer section, frozen
mashed potatoes are made from fresh
russet potatoes that have been peeled,
boiled and mashed for you. All you.
have to do is add milk and microwave,
and in minutes, you'll have the home-
made taste of mashed potatoes without
the fuss.
While mashed potatoes are a
favorite side dish just the way they are,
your family may also enjoy a little
variety. Add spice by stirring in salsa,
spring scallions or crushed red pepper.
Or, add an Italian touch with the recipe
for Garlic-Parmesan Mashed Potatoes.
They'll keep coming back for more.

TIMESAVING TIPS
FOR SPEEDY SUPPERS

Spice up your life: Keep your
pantry stocked with basic spices and
seasonings, like parsley, basil, oregano,
garlic and onion powder, and celery
and other flavored salts.


Get a head start: Plan your
menus in advance; shop once and
pick up all the ingredients you'll
need for the week.
A jarring experience: Keep pre-
pared foods, like spaghetti sauce, salsa
and salad dressing, on hand they
can be used as toppings, ingredients or
even marinades.
-A meaty situation: Stock the freez-
er with small cuts of meats, like chick-
en cutlets and beef cubes.' They cook
quickly and easily.

GARLIC-PARMESAN
MASHED POTATOES
Serves 6


cloves garlic
cups firmly packed. Ore-Ida
Frozen Mashed Potatoes
cups half-and-half
whole egg yolk
cup freshly grated Parmesan
cheese


Boil garlic in water until soft and
tender; remove skins and mash.
Combine Ore-Ida Frozen Mashed
Potatoes, half-and-half and garlic in
saucepan. Bring to boil over medium
to medium-high heat, stirring occa-
sionally. Cook and stir 6 minutes; stir
in egg yolk. Cook and stir 1 minute;
stir in Parmesan cheese. Let stand 1 to
2 minutes; stir and serve. PH958460


For All of Your Publishing Needs

Call The Star 227-1278


PAir AR


I


TH1P STR nR T OE LaTHRDV.JTPI q


AJ IFj F ( (