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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03068
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 22, 1994
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03068

Full Text














USPS 518-880

FIFTY-SEVENTH YEAR, NUMBER 4


Annual Art

and Crafts

Festival
Special Apprearance
by "Governor Stone"
The annual Arts and Crafts
Festival, sponsored by the Cham-
ber of Commerce. will be staged
in the City Park, at the Intersec-
Uon of Fifth Street and Highway
98 next Saturday and Sunday.
according to a release by Tamara
Lane, Chamber executive secre-
tary.
It will be the fifth annual Fes-
tival, which has proved to be a
popular event in Port St. Joe each
year.
According to Lalne, the festi-
val already has exhibitors from all
over the state, committed to come
to Port St. Joe for the week end
and display their crafts. Approxl-
mately 30 craft exhibitors have
reserved a space. "Experience has
shown us that several more will
express a desire to come this last
week." Laine said.
SPECIAL APPEARANCE
A special attraction at this
year's festival will be an appear-
ance of the Governor Stone. a
150-year-old restored sailing ves-
sel, froni Apalachicola. The Gov-
ernor will be docked at the City
pier and offer rides Saturday and
Sunday.
The Governor Stone is berthed
at the Apalachicola Maritime Mu-
seum as a permanent working
display of sailing methods of days
gone by.
As usual, several food booths
staffed by members of local or-
ganizations will be on hand to
prepare and serve delicious food
and cold drinks during the day.


R''HE STA


INDUSTRY -DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1994


Students Meet at the Pole

125 Strong, for Prayer and Devotional Before School


Approximately 125 stu-
dents from Port St. Joe
High School met at the
flagpole Wednesday morn-
ing, to participate in a wor-
ship program and pray, be-
fore school started.
The program, a nation-
wide show of support for
prayer by students, was
promoted and sponsored
by the High School chapter
of the Fellowship of Chris-
tian Athletes.
The entire 20 minute
program of prayer, devo-
tional thoughts and scrip-
ture reading, was organized
and presented by members
of the student body. Sever-


al adults were also present
as observers and assisting
the students present their
program.
"See You at the Pole" is
a national movement
which has been. repeated at
Port St. Joe for the past
three years. The idea is to
sound the alarm to stu-
dents, by students, to
counter the problems of
teens of today.
Some of the statistics
read during Wednesday
morning's program, includ-
ed the statistic that three
times as many teenagers
will commit suicide this
year, as the number of


Americans killed during
the attack on Pearl Harbor;
problems connected with
teen sexual activities, ille-
gal drugs, crime and even
legal drugs.
The SYATP movement
is a movement by the
youth of the nation to call
attention to and combat
these problems among
teens.
The FCA members
passed out hard-hitting
fact sheets to the youths
present at the religious
emphasis, calling attention
of the teens to the growing
problems of their peers
throughout the nation.


City Adopts $i.0,597 730 Budget uesday

Revenue From Other Sources Shrinks Causing 1/2 Mill Increase In Tax Rate: Services, Funding Change Vety Little


t4 az-a,* a vl aa 'i:a aaa i t Tv z a


The City Coirmission held
the final public hearing on its
tentative budget for fiscal 1994-
95 Tuesday evening and adopted
unanimously, their financial plan
for the coming year.
There were minor changes
made in the Wastewater Treat-
ment Plant portion of the budget
prior to adoption, but since the
changes were reductions of ex-
pense items in various parts of
' the proposed budget, there was
no need to do the whole process
over again.
The general fund portion of
the plan-that portion which fi-
nances the everyday functions of
the City-were not changed and
reflect a very slight increase over
last year's presentation.
The taxing portion of the bud-
get was increased by less than a
half mill, to reach the sum bud-
geted by the Commission.
The budget this year will total
$10,597.730, with $6,984,127 of
that amount ear-marked for the
Wastewater Treatment Plant op-
eration. The WWTP is financed
from charges to its three custom-
ers; St. Joe Forest Products Com-
pany, Arizona Chemical Company
and the City of Port St. Joe. The
',St. Joe Forest Products Company
is responsible for approximately
97% of the plant costs and Arizo-
na and the city responsible for
the other three percent.
The City ended the fiscal year
with $185,000 in cash carried
forward and the WWTP brought
forward $75,000.
EXPENDITURES
Taking up the biggest single
chunk of the new budget will be
the Police Department, calling for
an expenditure of $664,913.
The next highest expenditure
in the budget is for operations
which include salaries, operation
of the City Warehouse properties,
keeping up machinery and prop-
erties, new purchases and other
related items.
The' water plant operation
was brought nearer to a self-
supporting service with a change
in the ordinance, Tuesday, rais-
ing the rates by 30t per thou-
sand gallons. Still, taxes will fi-
nance $149,625 of that service.
In addition, the sewer service will
require $369,007 and water treat-
ment plant and re-payment of
bonds will need $257,771.
Basically, the expenditures
side of the budget is about the
same as last year, with total re-
quirements creeping updue to in-


Dilation. Outside funds dried up to
a measurable degree this year,
giving fewer state and federal
funds to finance the budget with.
A decline in the city's share of
state sales tax provided the larg-
est hit for city income and tight-
ening up of operations made for
some of the shortfall.
The new budget will have the
city levying 5.2408 mills for a to-
tal of $1,385.915 to go in the
budget pot. The remainder will
come from various taxes such as
franchise taxes, utility taxes, li-
censes, fees and state funds. The
state funds will amount to
$86,300 from revenue sharing
and $85,000 from sales tax.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other items of business to


come before the Commission, the
following action were taken:
-Tabled a change in the em-
ployee hiring practices to shift the
responsibility of approving new
hires from the various supervis-
ors to the City Commission. Com-
missioner Bill Wood said he
wasn't fully in favor of stripping
the supervisors of that responsi-
bility, saying, 'They have to work
who they hire to do the job we
have charged them to do."
-Adopted a new ordinance to
regulate "panhandling" in the
city.
-Unanimously approved and
adopted a resolution voicing their
objections to a proposed ban on
(See BUDGET Page 3)


DOT Begins


Work On 10.4


Miles of Hwy. 98
State DOT work crews put up the last of a series of
traffic warning signs from the Apalachicola Northern
Railroad overpass to the Franklin County line this week,
in preparation to commencing a road resurfacing pro-
gram of a portion of one of the main arteries in and out
of Port St. Joe.
The re-surfacing will be done in two contracts, involv-
i:: ing two paving firms and will cost approximately $3 mil-
lion, according to Information from Tommy Speights, in-
formation officer for DOT's Chipley office.
Speights told The Star Monday that work should have
already started on the portion of the job between the
eastern city limits to the Franklin county line, but it has
been delayed by the heavy rains which the county has
experienced the past two weeks. This project is expect-
ed to take some 300 working days and will cost an esti-
mated $2.1 million. C. W. Roberts Contracting Company
of Hosford, was the successful bidder on the job.
That portion of Highway 98, which runs through the
city of Port St. Joe is scheduled to get some attention
also, beginning this month. The contract, awarded to
Baxter Asphalt Company of Marianna, extends from the
intersection of Industrial Road. easterly to Ninth Street.
for a distance of 1.3 miles. It is expected to cost
$540,000. Baxter will be allowed 53 working days to
complete the project.
A contract coming up the end of this month for let-
ting will re-surface Highway 71 [Fifth Streetl inside the
city, from its intersection with U.S. 98 to the end of the
four lane at the Apalachicola Northern Railroad track
crossing. The contract is to be let at the September 28
meeting of DOT.


Four Slightly


Injured Monday

Four people were injured, but not seri-
ously, in a two car accident a quarter mile
south of the White City bridge Monday.
morning.
Carlo A. Thomas, Ernest Exum, Penny
Peterson and Ahmad Skanes, all of Port St.
Joe, were all examined and treated at Gulf
Pines Hospital after their car overturned
just before reaching the bridge.
According to Witnesses, both vehicles
were travelling north, toward the bridge,
when Bonnie Keigans, driving the lead vehi-
cle, turned left into her driveway near' White
City. The second vehicle containing the
four who suffered injuries, was attempting
to pass the first car. Taking evasive action
to avoid a collision, the driver of the second
car narrowly missed the turning car, but
flipped over in the evasive process.
None of the four injured people were seri-
ously hurt in the mishap, which is still un-
der investigation by the Florida Highway Pa-
trol.


EMT's care for injuries in wreck.


I I


I,



#1,


Cs


'I


Car overturns while attempting to pass another car attempting left turn.


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..













THE STAR

PAGE TWO. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,1994


It's Our Duty El


Hunker Down with Kes


by Kesley Colbert


PEOPLE IN OUR COUNTY are disurbed by the drug traffic
which seems to persist in our county, as well as others, regard-
less of what we do to interdict it. Along with the drug use comes
growing crime incidence, which is used to finance the drug traf-
fic., It's a nuisance to us here in Gulf county, Port St. Joe and
Wewahitchka. The crime isn't an out-of-control type problem,
but it is more serious than most of us would care to have it.
Over in Bay county, they are considering placing a police de-
partment sub-station on the very comer which has become syn-
onymous with drug traffic, in order to curb the practice; most
likely it will just move to another comer., Fast food markets are
the favorite source of obtaining drug cash by those using the il-
licit substance, causing an aggravatng situation.
In our portion of Florida, we don't have the drive-by shoot-
Ings, the stabbings, the accosting of people on the street and
robbing them. It's still safe to walk on our streets at night, but
for how long? It seems to us that it would be better to address
the problem before it gets out of hand, while we can still, hope-
fully, deal with it.
OVER IN APALACHICOLA, in Franklin county, they are do-
ing something which has worked with drunk drivers and neigh-
borhood watches in the large cities. They are creating a corps of
residents, dedicated to finding something, anything, they can do
to keep drugs off their streets and to keep the streets safe.
There have already been incidents of mugging elderly people
on the streets, discriminate shooting, drive-by shootings, shoot-
outs and stabbings. There haven't been many, but one such in-
cident is too many and the people of Apalachicola are banding
together to do something about it.
Blacks and whites are cooperating in the effort to rid their
town of youth who roam, the streets aimlessly, getting into mis-
chief and Indulging in drugs. The whole town is becoming one
big parent to watch all the children and young people, both for
protection of the children and protection for their community.
WE NEED SUCH AN organization here in Port St. Joe, Gulf
county and Wewahitchka. It is evident the .police forces and
sheriffs department can't root out all the iniscreants. They need
our help: If nothing else, they need our eyes, constantly watch-
ing and reporting anything suspicious we see.
Youths, or anyone else, on the prowl, know where law en-
forcement officers and patrols aie at all times. They can recog-
nize an undercover agent almost as soon as he hits the street.
That's how they are so successful in causing us all more trouble
than we want.'
We will. never have law and order again, until the ordinary
citizen deputies himself to the point where he is constantly
alert for criminal activities. This realization is taking hold in eve-
ry community all across the nation. We think it our duty to start
it here.


You Ruined It!
A FEW WORDS IN support of the idea presented above were
printed on the front page of Thursday's Panama City News-
Herald. A young boy over in Panama City had been tried for kill-
ing a convenience store operator. At the time of the killing, the
young lad was quoted by some of his friends as saying he was
going to find out what it felt like to kill a white man. That, appar-
ently, was the only motive for his taking the life of a man, a hus-
band, a father with family responsibilities.
The young boy, now only 17 years old, more than a year after
the slaylung of the victim, was convicted the other day. He was
sentenced by the Judge to spend the rest of his natural life in
prison.
"YOU HAVE RUINED MY future," the young man told the
prosecuting attorney, after the Judge had sentenced him. The
young man didn't see any fault in his own actions. He saw fault
only in the prosecuting attorney, pursuing his conviction for tak-
ing the life of a man.
Many problem youth, today, have the same outlook on 'their
activities as that young man had. They are not to be held re-,
sponsible for their actions, some other mythical "'They" is re-
sponsible. We're sure that if the boy's victim had been responsi-
ble for the his action--as the young man's outburst would
indicate-he would have opted for the young man not to take his
life. The man at the convenience store didn't want to die at the
hands of the youth or anyone else. He would elect to be alive
and the young man not be facing a life spent behind bars.
The young man told the prosecuting attorney, as he was be-
ing sentenced, "Look at what you have done to me. You have
ruined my life!"
No, son, you ruined your own life and took another in the
-process.


Mary Hadley Was O.K.-


'Til She Got Big


I don't know a thing about
the problems in Haiti. I don't un--
derstand why the Haitians can't
get along with each other and I
certainly don't know which side is
"right". And it is not my intention
here to make light of a very seri-
ous situation. But based on my
past experiences, I do have a
word of advice for the United
States-THE BIG GUY CANT
WIN.
1No matter how this thing
turns out,' I've got a feeling the
U.S. is going to come out the "bad
guy". We're the big brother, the
bully on the block, the six' foot,
seven inch giant wrestling the
sweet, innocent, calls- his-mother-
eveiy-Tuesday-night little guy. I
could give you a hundred exam-
ples .
David Mark is my younger
brother. In 1965, 'I was a senior


In high school and Dave was a
year behind. He was, at that time,
a lot smaller than me but let me
tell you he was an extra tough
little son of a gunl We got to fight-
ing one morning before school. I
look back on it now and I'm sure
he started it-those little guys
can aggravate you sometimes....
We wrestled and beat on, each
other while -we dressed, ate
b eakfast and walked to schoolo-
nothing unusual about this so
far, we often fought around the
house. I think it is what brothers
do. The difference with this fight
was we continued it at school. It
erupted in P.E. class. We got
down to some serious duking,
really a step beyond our normal
sibling "bonding". I know I was
bleeding from the lip and mad as
a wet hen-and a little embar-
rassed. I'm the big brother in
years and size;-but somebody for-
got to tell David Mark.
The class;, as you can -well
imagine, was cheering us on. I
was just about out of gas when I.


rolled him down between the
bleacher steps and fell on top of
him. I had him pinned.
"Dave, it's over. I'm going to
let you up-but it's over, you un-
derstand?"
"O.K." Whew! It was a reluc-
tant O.K. but I had won!
I stood up kinda' nonchalant
like so everyone would really
think I had him all the way-no
sweat. I decided against the Tar-
zan yell as I turned to be congra-
tul-
Everyone in the class rushed
to help David up.
"Are you alright?"
"Did that big oaf hurt you?'
l."He's always been a big bul-

"I feel so sorry for you having
to live with him all the time!"
'You could have' won, he had
to trick you to beat you."
! Trick him my hind foot! "Lis-
ten, I whipped him fair and sq-"
No one cared: They were too
busy gushing over what a great


fight he put up! I wiped the blood
off my lip and showered, alone.
Word, spread quickly, no one
spoke to me the rest of the school
day.
On the way home David
spoke up, "K.C., we gonna fight
some more?!'
"No, I don't think so-I'm still
pondering on exactly who won
the last one."
Those great New York Yankee
teams of the fifties are another
good example. I couldn't stand
Them because they won every
year. They were the big guys on
the block. We pulled, like our
very lives depended on it,, day in
and day out for the St. Louis Car-
dinals-and for whoever ,was
playing the Yankees.
Mary Hadley lived right down
the street. She had freckles and
dirt under her neck and played
baseball and fished and tried to
chew tobacco and was ugly as
homemade sin.>We all liked her,
(See KESLEY--- Page 3)


Famous Last Words: Sure Wish It Would Rain A Little"


NORTHWEST FLORIDA
hasn't suffered for lack of rainfall
this year. We have definitely had
our-average and part of someone
else's. average as well. The water
wells are recharged. the woods
are full, the sloughs are close to
overflowing and the river hasn't
been at good fishing level since.
before the floods.
It was only last year that we
suffered from a mini-drought.'
The river level got so low it was
running underground. The
bream, one was fortunate enough
to catch, were sprouting short
legs. Evolution, I guess. If one
could walk on the bottom of the
river and not get his feet wet, it's
only natural for fish to develop'
feet to walk with. Old man Dar-
win's theory, you know. I believe
it about as sincerely as I believe
this little exaggeration I have.
written in this paragraphs
But it is no exaggeration to
say that we have had enough rain'


for a while. By the time you read
this, it will probably be on the
way to dust bowl'status.

THE- HEAVY AND incessant
rains are no stranger to us, how-
ever. Every so often-about every
10 years or so-we have this type
weather. It starts raining anid
can't seem to stop. The dog days
are extra wet and extra long,, or
else the ''days" had puppies.q
I have a friend who can't even
get his fall garden planted be-
cause of the heavy rains. I have
another rain who had the misfor-


tune to find enough sunshine to
get his planted and now faces
having it all washed away.
I planted my fall tomato crop.'
in pots to escape the inevitable
destruction from too much water.
Maybe I'll make some tomatoes
along about the first of November.
The cats have learned to-,
swim over the past couple of
months and the squirrels have
developed cleats in their feet to
keep from slipping off the bark of
the wet trees in the back yard.
During the hours of the days-
when it isn't raining, they have
put extra pressure 'on the feeder


In my back yard; two young dog-'
woods, a plum tree and two pear.
trees have died from drowning.
The dog won't go outside beyond
the eaves of the house anymore.
,But, we're saving on the wa-,
ter bill! No watering of the yard is.
necessary! Now, if we could only.
cut the grass, "

I GUESS IT IS Just as well
the 'baseball season has been
cancelled. The Braves would have
had so many rain-outs by now,
they'd be till Christmas making
them up. -
Also, all those millionaires
are probably glad to be !out on
strike rather than face, the pros-
pect of long game delays, playing
in drizzling rain, getting all mud-
dy, messing up their shoe shine .

Chris Sabo would really have
something to scowl, about, if he
was still trying to play baseball it,,
this weather. As it is, 'he and all


the rest of them, can sit inside in
their easy chairs, watching it
rain, while they clip their cou-
"pohs and count their cash.

I'LL SORT OF BE, glad,when
the rain at least lets up to a fre-
quency of every ,other day. This
continuous precipitation is like
attending ',a church dinner-on-
the-ground. A person can get too
much.
Why, I remember back in the
summer. of '74; the rains started
in June and ended in the middle
of September, much the same as
this year. There wasn't any dry
ground anywhere. It seemed that
every shirt-tail rain cloud which
drifted up, ended up soaking Gulf
county before it moved on. Billy
Joe Rish's pasture, up near Hon-
eyville, was Billy Joe's lake before
the rains were through with it.
Willie was living at White City.
at the time, trying to grow a.gar-
den and 'live off the land. He end-


ed up growing bullfrogs in his
back yard. Then, 'it quit raining at
about the time the bullfrogs be-
gan to get large enough to eat,
and they took off into the swamp.
You can't win when it starts
to raining like it has the last
month or two. The only thing you
can do, positively, is set records
for rainfall.

BUT, I HAVE FAITH that it
will stop one day, the sun will
shine all day and before too long
it will get dry again and someone
will remark, "I sure wish it would
rain!"
I think, that about this time,
we should be able to point back
to the present. time and remind
that person of when he was wish-
ing it would quit for a while.
We .have a bright side to the
incessant and frequent rain we
are experiencing. It's cool enough
that the AC is getting a much
needed rest


-THE STAR-
USPHS 518880
Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456-D308
by The Star Publishing Company
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, FL
Wesley R. Ramsey........... Editor & Publisher
William H. Ramsey........... Production Supt.
Frenchie L. Ramsey ........... Office Manager
Shirley Ramsey................ Typesetter


Postmaster:
Send Address Change to
The Star
Post Office Box 308


SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
In County-$15.90 Year In County-$10.60 Six Mcnths
Out of County--$20.00 Tax Year; Out of County-$15.00 Tax Six Months
Out of State---$20.00 Year Out of Stai-$15.00 Six Months


Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Phone 227-1278 ments, the publishers do riot hold themselves liable ;cr damage fur-
Pho 2 their than amount received for such advertisement.
SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given.scant attention; the printed viord is thought-
AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


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The Lost Sock Blues
There are many perplexing and mysterious small occurrences in
life that I Just haven't been able to figure out. A lol of theim are little
things that dori't amount to a hill-of-beans. but they niike me won-
der just the same.
The "one shoe in the road mystery" is one I have written about
several times before. You may not recall the articles, but in them I
stated that I have found one shoe in the road(s) at different times
and in different places. I have wondered how the. one shoe hap-
pened to, wind up in the road.
After pondering this perplexing phenometion and wt iting sever-
al articles about it. I happened to be i-i ing along oil my way home
one day when I discovered .a PAIR of shoes in the toad. Yes, I did,
dear hearts! And it was a perfectly good paint ol leniils shoes. They
ivere. about 30 feet.apart. one in the middle of Highway #71; about
two miles:'outh of White City. Both shoes were sitting iighlt-side-up
and one had the shoe string neatly tied.
I stopped and picked them up and when I arrived home I tried
them on but they didn't fit, so I.saved tilemn aind gave them.to-imy
oldest son on his next birthday. If I ad thought to wash them be-
fore I gave them to him I would have gotten away with it, but the
odor gave me away .
Another of these unexplained phenomenons is "the lost sock
mystery". All of you know about the lost sock mystery. I'm sure. It's
been a mystery for years. yet, to date, I know of no one who has
come up with a plausible explanation as to what happens to the
LOST SOCK
I believe our government should fund a study to find out a.solu-..
tion to the lost sock mystery. Considering some of the, funding oure,
government has done in the. past and is presently doing, I think a
one million dollar grant wouldn't be out of line. I. of course, would
want to head the study and I would promise to keep an itemized list
of all expenditures and report them to the appropriate official on a
bi-yearly basis.
Some of you may not think' this is a serious problem, but it is.
Let me give you a few 'facts. As I write this article there are four (4)
socks in our laundry room that have no mates. All four are white
socks, but vary in length, size, and stitch. I have searched high and
low. far and wide for the mates, but to no avail.
This problem bothers me so much :I believe I could (and will)
write a song about it. I will call it. The' Lost Sock Blues, and it will go
something like this: "I got the lost sock blues, down in both my
shoes. Talot I need is a pair; I can't find one anywhere! The ole lost
sock blues: there ain't no good news!" "
Well. It may not be a No. I hit, but, who knows. George Jones
might be interested in recording it and if he did. it might make a
few biscuits for me and my dog.
In case you're wondering what brought this lost sock business
to mind. I'll be glad to tell you. About an hour before I started this
article, I was picking up some of my granddaughter's toys off the,
floor and I came across one of her socks. It was on the living room
floor, but there was no mate. I searched and looked in every nook
and cranny, but, so far. the sock has yet to be found.
It is a small, pink. thin sock and has blue lace around the top.
When she is dressed in one of her pretty new dresses with a bow in
her hair and her new shoes on, there is no prettier sight in the
world. I must find that sock!!!
-jf-fyou happen to be riding down the road and see something
S .smaUlland pink, pleasestop and pick it up..If .it matc~hes,ihe one I
S 'have here. thre Just might be a little reward in it for you.
Or. if you have a son who is about one-year-old, he just might
be Prince Charming! Who knows?


Kesley
From Page .
me especially. She got in high
school, grew six inches. started
wearing dresses, got out of those
pig tails, washed under her neck
and those older guys started tak-
ing her out 'cause suddenly she
wasn't so ugly.....I got mad at her.
didn't like her high-tone
ways..... she'd forgotten her old
neighborhood.
SMe and Ricky Gene and Yogi
wouldn't give her the time of day.
'Course, if she'd asked me.
over.....
Trenton Ryback was the,
biggest guy in our class. When he
hit that thing at the county fair
and rang the bell at the top-it
wasn't nothing special, big guys,
were. expected .to. If he missed a
tackle in football, Coach, Smith
would let him have it. "How could
a. big guy like you let that lit-
tie... : .',...
Ahd Trenton, after about the
second grade, wouldn't fight any
of us. He figured out long ago
what the U.S. from time to time


," Trust me for
all your life
insurance needs...
permanent, term,
universal and
retirement





BILL
WOOD
101
Ave.
229-6514
State Farm'
Life Insurance Company
SHome Office: Bloomington, Illinois




Like a good neighbor
State Farm is there.


seems to have trouble with.....
The Big Guy Theory holds
true whether you're duking it out
with your baby sister down be-
hind the gymnasium or carrying
guns and flying into Port-au-
Prince. ..
Respectfully,
Kes


Budget
From Page i
fishing nets..
S,-Approved a lease with Mar-
quis Home Health service for the
Ward Ridge city hall at a rate of
$1500 per month for five years
-Agreed to survey the drain-
age along Chicken House' Branch
to correct bottlenecks County
Commissioner Nathan Peters said
were causing problems 'around
the Battle Street area.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, 1994 PAGE 3A


How Gulf County Voted For Its Home-Grown Candidates


VOTE COU
Precinct # 1
DEM. COUNTY COMM. DISTRICT 1
Ricky Joe Collins
Jarrott Ken Strickland
DEM. SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 1
letty Ann Owens 174
os.r .Redd. 222
DEM. SCHOOL BOARD DIST. II
Joe Jackson
Elino Sander
TeIV iWhitfleld
REPI COUNTY COMM. DISTRICT I
Jim Beatty
BillyY Tralor
NON-PARTISAN CIRCUIT JUDGE 8
Glenn Hess 230
Michael Overstreet 198
COUNTY JUDGE
Bob Moore 224
Fred N.Witten 212


NT FOR SEPTEMBER 8, PRIMARY ELECTION BY PRECINCT
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 -14 15.


261
179
79
143
176
23
333
34
92,
288 107
324 .116
388 1180
263 115


'Abs.' Tot.


34 373
11 '229


.24 6
51 21


283
437


8 1i93
S5 80,
40 438


00 41
10 1.17


62 58
84 72
78 58
68 : 75


M.D.'s Blue
Jeans for Babies
in Port St. Joe
Beginning the month of Octo- "A ':- .
ber. employees all over Port St. '
Joe will participate in the Blue
Jeans for Babies fund-raiser .f
sponsored by the Gulf Coast Divi-
sion of the March of Dimes Birth "' '-- "
Defects Foundation.
During Blue Jeans for Babies
month, employers designate one
day as Blue Jeans for Babies
dress-down day. Employees pur-
chase a Blue Jeans for Babies B
sticker for a minimum donation
of $3. This entitles employees to
wear blue Jeans or "casual dress"
to work on the designated day.
'Today. even the most conser-
vative corporate managers recog-
nize that casual dress in the of- "'.
fice-even if only occasionally- '
can increase employee producUvi-
ty and morals," said Tammy
Woods, division chairman. "By
participating in Blue Jeans for
Babies, employees will have the Wewa Bank
opportunity to join our Campaign w t:
for Healthier Babies and support Opens
the March of Dimes research and pens ranch
programs to help Americans have at St. Joe Beachl
healthier babies."
Blue Jeans foi Babies month The Wewahtchka State
is sponsored nationally by mem- ThBank opened waits newest branch
bers of Jeanswear Communica- at St. Joe Beach last Thursday,
tions, a trade association of with a ribbon cutting ceremony
jeanswear and Jeans-related fab- attended by several supporters
rics companies. Local sponsored and interested businessmen in
include: Sprint Cellular. Apalach- the Beach area. The ceremony
Icola Northern Railroad. First Un- was held under threatening
ion National Bank. Florida Power, clouds, but dispositions were
St. Joe Forest Products Compa- Chamber of Com-
ny. St. Joseph Telecommunlca- ^'. a Chme o .
tions. and The Breeze .A. ; .e present annd loan on-
Blue Jeans for Babies will c" ... th b. Tonya Nixon-
take place in most communities ng the newest branch.y open-
during October-campaign for n the newest branch.
Healthier Babies Month. Contact The drive-in branch facility
the Gulf Coast Division of the is located on Highway 98 at St.
March of Dimes at (904) 785- Joe Beach next to the Gulf
6460 to sign up your company. Sands Motel and Restaurant.
The March of Dimes is a na- In the photo above, at the
tional voluntary health agency ribbon cutting, are: Tamara
whose mission is to improve the Lane, C. of C., Caroline Lister,
health of babies by preventing Violet Gaskin. Jerry Gaskin,
birth defects and infant mortality. Jan Traylor, David Carl Gaskin.
r W1.... t------ w-i e- R l Bill


Peterson's Rep
U.S. Congressman Pete Peter-
son, D-Marianna, announced re-'
cently that Ken Davis, a represen-
tative from his Panama City
, office, will visit Port St. Joe to
Meet with. constituents from
3:30-4:30 p.m. EDT, Monday,'-
September.26. In the Law Library'
at the Gulf County Courthouse.
Peterson said Davis, who will,
be visiting Gulf County monthly,
will.provide information and help
to residents with questions and
problems related to the Federal
government.


~. h&4 A


227-1670


* Groceries
* Beer & Wine
* Cigarettes,
* Colombo
Yogurt


Join


12 -8
12-9
1-8


Closed Monday

ON C-30 SOUTH OF PORT ST. JOE


Oysters
Clams
Shrimp
Crabs
Crawfish


53
84
58
81


159 144
191 .113
229. 165
131 109


107 4117
99 144
119 114
101 152


220,
273

2286
282


40
42
.61
31


42 124
.38 150
68 '165
10 116


1781
1996
2122
1790


Tony a Nxon, TonjyaJ i A. ...e.
Sumner, Al Cathey and George .
Core, officers of the WSB.',''.
In the photo at right, direc-
tor Al Cathey makes the first
deposit in the drive-in facility. V-'
__ifetJ:igrq '1f'e '[ f 1:4: A 111.110.1' II.~ [''l Illl:::~ &'~ I:I[e II


\ ;. *I .:.-


2-SPEED ArU
* 3 Water Ie

$39'


". i .*.. ... -..:.. .* :. .. _... ...
J~~~~~~~l9 ---7-^ :. *^.*.V -^




$5 Washer



OFF Dryer Pairs






SWhite-Westinghous -- --

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995 Ask your local Badcock Dealer about I L m SV9
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ESTABLISHED 1904


.HOME FURNISHING CENTERS
FURNITURE APPLIANCES FLOOR COVERING HOME ENTERTAINMENT
OVER 325 STORES SERVING THE SOUTHEAST


Steve Richardson
Owner, Manager
310 REID AVE.
PORT ST. JOE, FL

229-6195


I'

















I


Us for Food & Fun With Our New Electronic

IDAIT IBDARID


HOURS:, Tues Thurs:
Fri Sat:
Sunday


CUSTOMER SATISFACTION GUARANTEEDI NZCOCK WILL TREAT YOU BRIGHT


^









il,'A H TR PR T OE L*TURDY ET.2,19


Diabetes Is Controllable


Home: 227-3230


i


6



I


.


Mrs. W. T. Howell, Jr., Mrs. Paul P. Kunel, and Mrs. James J. Heathcock will represent the DAR at
state fall meeting.

Local DAR to Attend Stai


The Saint Joseph Bay Chap-
ter, NSDAR, will be represented



.""-


44.


\%


Trevor and Tiffan:
Trevor Has
A Sister
Trevor Burch proud
ounces the arrival of h
-,sister,' Tiffany Lee. on Aug
'-at 2:01 a.m. She weighed
'9.3 oz. and was 19 .-/4
long.
Proud parents are Ru
Debbie Burch. Her grand
are Roy and Verna Burch
late Mary L. Kearns. Hei
grandmother is Mary P
Ball, Louisiana.


m


Office: 229-9292


Our family works hard at keeping'your family
healthy. We provide you with only the best of
pharmaceuticals when you need them. You
can trust and depend upon us.


CAMPBELL'S .
DRUG STORE
Two Pharmacists and two Pharmacy 'I
Technicians to serve you promptly.
Saveway Center Phone 227-1224


by three members to the Florida
State Society 1994-1995 Fall For-
um. Mrs. W.H. Howell, Jr., Chap-
ter Vice Regent, Mrs. Paul P. Ku-
nel, Chapter DAR Magazine and
Magazine Advertising Chairman,,
and, Mrs. James T. Heathcock,
Committee Chairman for Genea-
logical Records, Lineage Re-
search, Seimes Microfilm Center,
Junior Membership, and FSSDAR
Recording Secretary, will travel to
Altamonte Springs for the 22-24
September meeting.
Special guest speakers will be
Mrs. Charles K. Kemper and Mrs.
Wayne D. Tiner, candidates for
President General, NSDAR. Flori-
da's Past Regent, Mrs. Anthony
Dobranski, is a candidate for Re-
porter General onh the Kemper
slate.


tion. For assistance call Mrs.
ty Fensom or Mrs. Jean H
cock.
Members are reminded
their DAR dues are payable
Bunny Mahler, Treasurer, o.
wahitchka, or at the first me
on Wednesday, October 19, a
St. Joseph bay Garden Ce
with Mrs. Archie Gardner,
gent, presiding. .


PFO


The National Office has de-
clared this 'The Year of the Jun-
ior." They are anxious to help
complete the application papers
for any female between 18 and 35
years of age who can prove her
y lineage to the American Revolu-


Final Plans for
ly an- Little, Smith
is little Final wedding plans for April
gust 28 Little and John Smith have been
16 .1bs announced. .
inches The ceremony will take place
at 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, Sep-
sty and, tember 24 in the sanctuary of the
parents -First United Methodist Church. A
and' the reception will follow in the fellow-
r great- ship hall.
?ope of All friends and relatives are
invited to attend.


William O. Norris and Angelia M. Taylor

Engaged


Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Taylor
request the honour of your pres-
ence at the marriage of .their
daughter, Angelia Marie, to Wil-

Daughters of
Confedereracy
'Met Sept. 13
The United Daughters of the
Confederacy, Apalachicola Chap-
ter No. 826, met at the home of
Mrs. W.C. Strang on Tuesday,
September 13.
The. meeting was called to or-
der by the 'President, Mrs. Strang.
Mrs. W.D. Dye led the invocation
followed by the ritual, pledge, and
flag salutes, all in unison.
A membership tea will be
held on Tuesday, November 15.
The Apalachicola Chapter No.
826 was organized in 1905.


liam 0. Norris, son of Mr. and
Mrs., H.W. Noi-ris, on Saturday,
November 5, 'at 3. p.m. at the
White City Baptist Church, High-
way 7,1.
Angella was a graduate from
Port St. Joe High School in 1986.
William graduated from Wewa-
hitchka High School in 1987 and
attended Troy State University.
Angelia and William are em-
ployed by Gulf Correctional insti-
tute.


to control it. A vast majority of all
people who suffer from the most
common form of diabetes are at
least 20 percent overweight.
Obesity and growing older appar-
ently promote the development of
diabetes in certain people.


Losing weight and boosting
physical activity might help post-
pone or prevent the onset of dis-
ease. For weight loss that lasts,
get regular, brisk exercise and eat
a diet limited iii fat and calories.


, .


by Dr. Charles Mahan, State
Health Officer
Diabetes or high blood sugar
is a serious disorder that increas-
es a person's risk of heart diseas-
es. More than 80 percent of peo-
ple with diabetes die from some
type of cardiovascular disease-
usually a heart, attack, according
to the National Institutes of
Health.
Women with diabetes are
twice as much at risk of coronary
heart disease and heart-related
deaths as men. The reason for
the high rate of occurrence is un-
known. When compared to nondi-
abetic women, diabetic women
are also more likely to have high
blood pressure and high blood
cholesterol.
Untreated diabetes also can
contribute to kidney disease,
blindness, problems in pregnancy
and childbirth, nerve and blood
vessel damage in difficulties in-
fighting infection. With the most
common type of diabetes, the
the pancreas makes insulin, but the
body does not use it well.
Diabetes has no cure. Howev-
Be er, there are steps you can take
te Wewa Dance
Bet- The Wewa Dance and Social
eath- Club will be having a dance at the
Wewa Community Center located
that on Third St., Friday, September
e to 23 from 7:30 p.m. until 11:00
f We- p.m. There will be a live western
meeting band featuring Bill Brent, A
at the $4.00 donation will let you in on
enter, all the excitement For more in-
Re- formation, please call Robert
Dansby at 639-3303.


rPatrick's
Restaurant
412 Reid Av-enue
Port St. Joe, Florida
S. J. Patrick's Restaurant
will be CLOSED in the
Evenings and Saturdays
New Hours Are: -
8 a.m. 2 p.m.
Monday Friday
11 a.m. 2 p.m.
SUNDAYS
Night-time dining will be
available by request
for parties of 10 or more,
with reservations


S"N'

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3M OOcm Deccratinu IIts
Easy Decorating Using Self-Stick,
Removable Designs of Animals, Fish, and
Cartoon Characters!


Easy tp Remove and Change Without
Damage to Walls or Appliances
By the Makers of Post-It Notes

Kits for 9.00 To 30.00
IN STOCK AT


Carpet CoRw.try


Highway 98 West
Port St. Joe


Phone 227-7241
* Highland View


BABY "THINGS"
Now In Stock!! /I ;l .

1I Baby Clothes \ :i-.j "
Blankets Accessories

More Arriving Every Day!

S More Room Means We Can Offer More at Our New
Location-Across the Street'From Old Location
Come See Our New Fall Arrivals!!!

Still A iacakof Summner Fashions at Savings


BY THE BAY


S (94) 227-.-740 ':.
atrering Services Also j Aailasle


Opening October 1


Frank J. Seifert

Accounting and Income Tax Service

410 Long Avenue
P.O. Box 602
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


PAGE 4A


.


,


I





THE STAR, PORT ST. JOB, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, 1994


11A IA


I


a~3h:. '.


AN- 11


;"


I








.'I..dl


%'








THR STAR. PORT n ST.Tv 'rF7,'- ITRe~n AV SuPT.21


Kenneth Andrew Arnold
It's A Boy!
Kenneth Andrew Arnold was
born May 20th at Gulf Coast Hos-
pital in Panama City weighing in
at 7 lbs., 3.8 oz., and measuring
19.75 inches long.
Kenneth is the son of Ken
and Melinda Arnold. Proud
grandparents are J.C. and Betty
McArdle of Port St. Joe and Neil
arid Virginia Arnold of North Car-
olina.


James Matthew Brooks


CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM


Child Health'




Elizabeth C. Jones, M.D.
October is designated as Child Health Month.. This year the
general emphasis is being placed on violence prevention and sug-
gestions for parents about television viewing.
Before considering this year's topics everyone should be certain
the basics have been covered first. Does your child have his own
doctor, and is the child seen regularly for routine appointments and
preventive care?
When seen regularly children are immunized against nine pre:
ventable and possibly fatal or crippling diseases. Regular. discus-
sions are held about what children should be eating and methods
of food preparation in light of current nutritional information. Sup-
plements may be ordered as indicated by the health of the child.
Help is available with discipline or school problems.
Illness can be treated ,as it develops and any recurring pattern
can be detected and strategies developed for treatment.
The most important thing parents can do for a child is to find
him a "medical home". The physician's office. (medical home) should
be comfortable for the child and except for out of town situations or
emergencies should be the place the child is taken when he heeds
medical care. Just as a child needs a house with parents and care-
giversmwho maintain a nurturing environment he also needs a medi-
cal home that will meet all his needs.
^ '*** : *- ^ **J


Country Store
The Ladies Altar Society of St.
Lawrence Catholic Missions on
Highway 71 North in Wewahitch-,
ka will be holding their Annual
Country Store on Saturday. Octo-
ber 1 from 8 a.m. until. They wil
have a turkey shoot, food, cake
sale, door prizes and much mdre.
The public is invited to attend..

It's ABoy!
Robert and Mary Brooks are
proud to announce the birth of
James Matthew. He was born
July 3 and weighed 7 lbs., 8 oz.
Matthew was-welcomed home
by his sister, Whitney. He is the
grandson of Donald Wood of Key-
stone Heights, Bobbie Wood, and
Jim and Sue Brooks. all of Port
St. Joe.


THANK YOU!

I appreciate the vote of confidence
given to me on September 8.
Y6ir continued support is needed in the
November election.

Ted Whitfield, Jr.
School Board Member District 2
Pd. Pol. Advertising Paid for by Campaign Acct. of Ted Whifield, Jr. Dem.


MEDICARE SUPPLEMENTS '
*Plans A; B, C, F, & G Offered *Fast Claims Service
*Insurance Company Rated A+ (Superior) by the A.M. Best Rating Service
Tucker Life-Health Insurance:
SAgency Inc.:


S Ross E. Tucker, CLU
Registered Health Underwriter
1-800-226-7005 r




SNOW OPEN
Mexico Beach 38th Street & Hwy. 98


The Yacht Club Cafe

& Water Park


Now


Serving
ALL DAY


Buffet


Breakfast Buffet ......................... $395


Lunch Buffet ................... .......$. 495

Seafood Buffet
Friday and Saturday Nights

$ 95

6 a.m. -10 p.m. CDT 7 days a week
COFFEE & TEA- BOTTOMLESS CUP ,

648-4500 Don't miss the boat


Gulf County Schools
Lunch Menu
Sept. 26 30
MON: Taco, Pinto: Beans, Milk,
Cake
TUES: Pizza, Tossed Salad,
Green Beans, Milk, Brownie
WEDS: Cheeseburger, French
Fries, Milk, Cherry Pie
THURS: Hoagie Sandwich,
French Fries, Milk, Cookie
FRI! Batter-dipped Fish or
Crab Cakes, Cole Slaw, Baked
Beans, Bun/Hush Puppy, Milk,
Tartar Sauce


Many businesses have con-
tributed to the Student Govern-
ment Association of Port St. Joe.
High School as they raise funds
to attend a Southern Association
of Student Councils meeting.



REGISTER
and
*V O*T-E*
A Last Days to Register *
August 8 for Primaries
October 11 for General
Election Dates '94 A
September 8- 1" Primary
October 4- 26d Primary
t General Election *
November 8
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Division of Elections,. (904) 488-7690


MESSAGE

SERVICE


Variety of Commemorative


Subjects on Postal Stamps


What do Juan Rodriguez Ca-
brillo, Ernest Hemingyway and El-
vis Presley all have in common?
If you're a stamp collector, or
philatelist, you probably know
that Cabrillo, discoverer of San
Diego Bay, Hemingway, the cele-
brated American novelist, and El-'
vis, the king of Rock' and Roll,
have all been subjects of U.S.
commemorative stamps.
Today an estimated 22 mil-
lion people collect stamps, mak-
ing it one of the world's most pop-
ular hobbles. Stamp collecting is
not only fun and educational, it's
also a hobby you never outgrow.
Stamps provide a window to
the world for collectors of all ages
by drawing attention to public is-
sues and bringing historical sub-
jects to life.
Getting started in stamp col-
lecting is easy. You can begin
simply by saving stamps from let-
ters, packages and postcards. Or
you can start your collection by
choosing one ,or two favorite sub-
jects and collecting those stamps
that fit your theme, whether it's
art, history, sports, or science.
The task of deciding com-
memorative stamp subjects is the
responsibility of the Citizens'
Stamp Advisory Committee
(CSAC). This group of private in-
dividuals meets four times a year
to discuss stamp designs, and
make subject recommendations
to the Postmaster General.
Individuals considered as
subjects I for commemorative
stamps, with the exception of
U.S. Presidents, must be dead for
a minimum of ten years. Events,
must be of historical significance


The local group will present a
workshop at the meeting. Shown
with Kristi Lawrence, left, and
Missy Nobles. Student Govern-
ment president, is Frenchie Ram-
sey, whose firm is one of the busi-
ness sponsors. The club extends
its thanks to all who contributed.


or have widespread national ap-
peal, and no religious institutions
can be honored.
The CSAC receives more than
40,000 letters a year, suggesting
hundreds of different subjects. It
can take three years or more be-
fore an approved suggestion be-
comes a stamp.
While much has changed
since the first commemorative
stamI was issued in 1893, some
things remain the same. Stamps
are colorful, miniature works of


art that inspire collectors of all
ages with great accomplishments
of the past, from the landing, of
the Mayflower to the landing of
men on the moon.
Get hooked on stamp collect-
ing! It's, a hobby that lasts a life-
time.
Anyone may suggest a sub-
ject for a stamp. Send your sug-
gestion to the Citizens' Stamp Ad-
visory Committee, Room 4474E,
475 L'enfant Plaza SW, Washing-
Ston, D.C. 20260-2437.


FOR SALE


?5 NEARLY NEW


Goodyear Wrangler Tires

They shake, bounce, squirm, and one blew out at only
1100 miles. They are the absolute worst tires that I
have ever owned.Il will furnish the same warranty that
Goodyear furnished me NONE



Call Bill White at 229-6914 for

further information



(I have written 5 letters to Goodyear since

June and have yet to get a response.)


September 22


o- Ai E C k Br e


SefoO6"
Gree-StyieSeQfo
C;Jl


"Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood Buffet",
Thursday and Friday..............5:00 9:00 pm
Saturday...............6:00 10:00 pm
S 1chil1 Me%

~ Friday & Sunday Lunch Specials-

iSafad___ 653-922


TH I KP K bT E L-I'ikb)A ,zze- Zlt-k iiqr l


I


PAGn 5a


IL


F


DrETall n1DHilvWf T4 il


Steaks'chicken Bu~











I"A A A e


Obituaries: I


Mamie Lou uist Church.
Funeral services will be con-
Nickson ducted on Thursday, September
S22, at 2:00 p.m. at Zion Fair Bap-
Mamie Lou Nickson quietly tist Church.
departed this life on Wednesday,
September 14, in Bay Medical Interment will follow in Forest
Center, Panama City, after a Hill Cemetery, Port St Joe.
lengthy illness. Gilmore-Southerland Funeral
She leaves to cherish her home is in charge of all arrange-
memory a devoted husband, Otis ments.
Emmitt Nickson; seven daugh-
ters, Voncile Nickson, Annie D.
Nickson and Lihda Hill, all of Port NOlie M. Anchors
St. Joe, Clementina Nickson of Nolie Marjorie Anchors, age
Tampa, Shirley Brown of Oxdn 77, of Zellwood Statort, died
Hill MDHelen aw th of Monday, September 19, following
PensaDorothy Helen Wodrow, both of a brief illness at Orange County
Pensacola;five sns, Clinton Memorial Regional Medical Cen-
Nickson, Emmitt Nickson, Jr., t
Elder Donald Nickson, and Gary ter in Orlando.
Nickson, all of Port St. Joe, and Miss Anchors, a native of Col-
James Alphonsa Nicksonof Mia- quitt County, Georgia, was born
ml; thirty-nine grandchildren, fif- to the late George M. and Flocie
ty great-grand-children; four J. Mincey Anchors of Colquitt
great-great-grand-children; a County, GA, on January 19,
brother, Marcellis McCrairyofMo- 1917. A retired Lieutenant Com-
bile, Alabama; a "special" sister, mander in the U.S.' Navy and a
Gladys Evans of Pensacola; three registered nurse, she served her
sons-in-law, William Dawson of country during World War II, the
Pensacola, Edward Brown, Sr., of Korean Conflict, arid Viet Nam.
Oxon Hill, MD, and Gene Hill of She was a member of the First
Port St. Joe; three daughters-in.-- United Methodist Church of Port
law, Jacqueline Nickson and Tan- St. Joe and member of the Order
nis Nickson, both of Port St. Joe, of the Eastern Star.
and Dorothy Nickson of Miami; a Left to cherish her. memory
god-daughter, Ossie Lee Blue of are one brother, Sidney J. An-
Blountstown; four sisters-in-law, chors of Port St. Joe; and two sis-
Louise McCrary, Claudia ters, Jeanette Anchors Patton of
McCrary, Annie Lee Maxwell, all Fairfax, Virginia, and Hazel An-
6f Pensacola, and Emma Nicksohn. chors Duren of Plymouth.
of Birmingham, AL; three special Graveside funeral services
friends, Reverend and Mrs. Pat- were held at 11:00 a.m. on
rick Bowers and Mary Hearn, all Wednesday, September 21, at
of Panama City; a host of nieces, Westvlew Cemetery, followed by
nephews, other relatives, and Interment. The Rev. Zedoc Baxter
dear friends. officiated.
Visitation was on Wednesday, Harrell-Faircloth Funeral
September 21, from 6:00 to 8:00 Home was entrusted with the ar-
p.m. at Zion Fair Missionary Bap- rangements.



Public Notices


S'";.i .




' ,.- w


. Mr. and Mrs. George Hean were presented with a plaque
for being chosen Gulf County's Small Business of the Year at
the annual Chamber of Commerce breakfast Tuesday morn-
ing to honor business operators in the county. Shown with
the Heans are Steve Barron with the Florida Department of
Commerce and Tamara Laine, Chamber executive secretary.
The Heans have recently established the George Hean Com-
pany and built a new building at Highland View. The firm
employs 10 people and manufactures and. sells coin operated
air machines, scales and vacuum cleaners for self-service
service station outlets.


God knew it was nime and called )ou
hoie, and now we feel i'o ail alone
When we hear "amazing grace," a tear
still trickles down our face. There was no
warning, death came so fast. You're in
heaven. home ail ast When our time
comet and God call u home. We'll be
togetherr and not alone And unil we
m.et- again rma God hold you





-






Lo\e A3lwas,
Your -luband. Chddren & Grandchildren


1(


NOTICE OF ALE
Notice Is hereby given that the Gulf County
Sheriffs Office will sell to the highest bidder by
sealed bid the following vehicles, all In one parcel:
1981 Chevy Van Vin#CCGI5D9B4106558
2. 1984 Ford 2 Dr. Vin#IFABPO425EW128342
3. 1981 Chevy Chevette 4 Dr.
Vin# IGAB689EY258380
4. 1987 Ford Fairlane Vin# 8K93113919328
5. 1981 Datsun MaximaVin# JN1HUO154BT0055
Vehicles may be inspected between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday at the Gulf County Sheriffs Office, 1000
5th Street, Port St. Joe, FL. Bids along with a
check for the amount.of the bid must be received
on or before Sept. 30, 1994. Vehicles will be sold
as is without warranty and without title. Sale shall_
be subject to any and all liens. Buyer must remove
vehicles within 72 hours of sale. Bids may .be hand
delivered or mailed to Sheriff James F. Coats, Gulf
County Sheriffs Office, P.O. Box 970, Port St. Joe,
FL 32456.
Publish: September 15 & 22, 1994.

IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 94-287
IN RE The Marriage of
DELMER D JONES. (
Husband/Respondent., .
And
DEBORAH S. JONES, ,
Wife/Petitioner.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DELMER D: JONES
9392 Haley Court
Jonesboro. GA 30236
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy ol your
written defenses. i an.y. to this acUon on DAVID C.
GASKIN. ESQ. PeaUoriner's attorney, whose ad-
dress Is Post Office Box 185. Wewahltchka, Florida
32465, on or before the 14 day, of October. 1994,
and file the original with the Clerk or this Court
either before service on plaintiffs anorney or a-
mediately thereafter otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in the
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court
on September 9, 1994.
BENNY C. ULISTER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By. /s/ Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: Sept. 22 & 29, 1994.

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALEDBIDBS
BID NO. 9304-28
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners of Gulf County, Florida, will receive sealed
bids from any person, company, or corporation in-
terested in contracting with Gulf County 'for its
lease/purchase of one tub grinder.
Specifications for this bid can be obtained
from the Gulf County Solid Waste Department,
1001 10th Street, Port St. Joe, FL, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m., EDT- 4:00 p.m., EDT, Monday
through Friday (904) 227-3696.
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver
unit on specified date will be set at $25.00 per
day.
Please Indicate on envelope that this is a
SEALED BID, the BID NUMBER, and what the bid
Is for.
Bids will be received until 5:00 p.m.. EDT.
Tuesday. September 27, 1994. at the Office of the
Clerk of Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000
Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The
Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
/s/ Warren J. Yeager, Jr., Chairman
/s/ Benny C. Lister, Clerk of Court
Publish: September 22, 1994.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 93-318-CA
WILLIE OTIS SMITH
Plaintiff,
Vs.
REBECCA PACE SMITH, a/k/a
REBECCA PACE THOMAS,
Defendant.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I. BENNY C.
LISTER. Clerk of the above named Court, will on
the 19th day of October, 1994, at 11:00 a.m.. EDT.
at the western door of the Courthouse In Gulf
County, Port St. Joe. Florida. offer for sale and sell
at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for
cash. the following described real property situat-
ed in the County of Gulf, State of Florida. to-wit:
Lot 15. Block 1017, Unit #2, Milllvew
Addition to the City of Port St. Joe,
Florida according to an official plat
thereon on file in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court Clerk; Gulf
County, Florida.
pursuant to the Final Judgment of Partition en-
tered In a case pending in said Court, the style of
which is listed above.
At the time of sale, the successful high bid-
der shall post with the Clerk a deposit equal to five
percent (5%) of the final bid or $1,000.00, which-
ever is less. The balance of the final bid shall be
paid to the Clerk within twenty-four (24) hours af-
ter the sale. The successful high bid shall be ex-
clusive of the Clerk's registry fee and documentary
stamps on the Certificate of Title. In the event of a
third party successful bid, the third party success-
ful bidder shall pay, in addition to the bid amount,
the Clerk's registry fee and any and all documen-
tary stamps on the Certificate of Title.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said
Court.,this 20th day of September, 1994.
BENNY C. LISTER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: September 22 and 29, 1994.
--.


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9394-29
T 'the Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners of Gulf County. Florida. will receive sealed
bids from any person, company, or corporation In-
terested In purchasing from Gulf County the fol-
lowing '
One (1) 1986 6610 Ford farm-type tractor
-tnvemnory No. 100-370 ,
S-Serial No- C755466
-New rear tires
-New Paint,
-Very Good Condition
-Can be seen at the Gulf County Road De-
partment 212 E. 7th Street. Wewahltchka. FL, be-
tween the hours of 7:00 a.m. CDT 3:30 p.m.,
CDT.
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver
unit on specified date will be set at $25.00 per
day.
Please Indicate on envelope that this Is a
SEALED BID the BID NUMBER. and what the bid
i- Bids will be received until 500 p.m.. EDT.
Tuesday. September 27. 1994. at the Office of the
Clerk of Court. Gulf County Courthouse. 1000
Fifth Street. Port St. Joe. Florida 32456. The
Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
/s/ Warren J. Yeager. Jr.. Chairman
/s/ Benny C. Lister Clerk of Court
Publish. September 22. 1994.

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Logic and Accuracy Test for the Second
Primary will be October 3. 1994. at 10:00 a.m.
EDT at the GulfCounty Courthouse
/s/ Cora Sue Robinson
Superulsor of ElecUorms
PubILqh- September 22. 1994.

NOTICE
uThe Board of City Commissioners at their
, regular meetings onr October 4 and October 18.
1994, at 8:00 p.m., in the Commissioners' Chanm-
Sher will consider d-eding to George W. Duren. el
al, approximately 5" 3 aloiig the west side of lots
17. 19'and 21. Block 4 and the north side of Lot
17. Block 4. City of Port St Joe In exchange for a
deed to all property owned by George W% Duren. et
al located between the etisung Hobb's Hotel and
the alley running aluig the east side' of Lots 17.
19. and 2 I. Block 4
All person are Invited to attend these meet-
ings. Any person who decides to appeal any deci-
sion made by the Commission with respect to any
matter considered at said meeting will need a
record of .the proceedings, and for such purpose
may need, to ensure that a 'verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based (Tne Board of City Commission of the
City of Por SL Joe. Florida will not provide a ver-
batim record of this meeUng
THE CITY OF PORT ST JOE
/s/ Frank Pate, Jr.
Mayor-Commissioner
Publish: September 22 and 29, 1994.


710 Hwy


Pate Makes Proclamation
Mayor Frank Pate, Jr., pictured here with Mrs. Archie Gardner,
a local DAR member, recently signed a proclamation designating
September 17-23 as Constitution, Week in Port St. Joe.
The constitution was signed in Philadelphia, PA, in 1787, and
the.celebration of this event .provides a historic opportunity for all
Americans to realize the achievements of the framers of the consti-
tution and the rights, privileges, and responsibilities it affords.
1994 marks the 207th anniversary of the signing of the consti-
tution.

Juvenile Justice
The September meeting of the T E
Gulf County Council for Juvenile IR
Justice will be held at 7 p.m.,
September 26, in the library con-

ference room. All interested citi-
zens are invited to attend. Elec-O
tion of new officers will be held.


New Arrivals!


13 INCH
SP155/80R13 $152.60
SP165/80R13 $182.28
P175/80R13 $190.76
P185/80R13 $195.00

14 INCH
P185/75R14 $207.72
P195/75R14 $911 .QR


P205/75R14
P215/75R14


$216.20
$220.44


15 INCH
P205/75R15 $224.68
P215/75R15 $228.92
SP225/75R15 $233.16
P235/75R15 $237.40
Mounting Valve-Stem Sales Tax
Computer Balancing Disposal Tax
City Pickup Fee













WESTERN

AUTO
Phone 227-1105


98 E. Mexico Beach


904-648-4200


jr-
awesjU~E


L Liz and

Jane


* Ruttham


EZ Legal Forms


My Very Own Book

A gift and booksfwPpefor children.
528 6TH STREET PORT ST. JOE 2 27-1636


TH TA.POTST OE Lo H Q)V-SPT 2.19


DPAGE 6 A


Girls' Athletics

Prize Giveaway
The girl's athletic program at
Port St. Joe High School and Port
St. Joe Middle School are plan-
ning to give away many prizes at
the remaining varsity home foot-
ball games.
Donations for tickets will be
$2.00 and the proceeds will be.
used to purchase equipment and
uniforms for the girls sports pro-
grams.
Thanks to the following busi-
ness who have donated the prizes
to be given away:
Active Styles, haircuts; Ath-
letic House, tee shirts; Badcocks,
candy dishes, umbrellas, salad
service set; C&M Sports, hats, tee
shirts; Citizens Federal, $25.00
savings account; Raffields Fisher-
ies, $75.00 worth of golden crab
legs; Star Publishing Co., King
James Bible; Western Auto, your
tires rotated and balanced.
Other prizes will be. listed as
donations are made. Any busi-
ness that would like to make ad-
ditional donations nmay' contact
Becky Lacour at 229-8251 or
Martin Adkison at 227-3211. .



Look who is spending his
21st Birthday in Cuba!
Happy Birthday, Dale!



S.











We Love You,
Mom, Teresa, Vaughn, Mema, Aunt
Bugg, Nikki, and Lucky
.-.*..--I ..---- _n.. we am mari'









THE STAR PORT ST. JOE FL THUR 1994


Shark Talk


Simpson is Promoted
BECKY S. SIMPSON, shown above with Interim Sheriff
James Coats, was promoted by the Gulf County Sheriffs Depart-
ment this week, to the rank of Sergeant. She has worked with
Gulf County Sheriffs office for five and a half years. She has
been in the correctional field for a total of eight years. With her
promotion, Simpson was given the position of Jail Administrator.
of the Sheriffs office. She is scheduled to attend Corrections Su-
pervisors Management Training in Orlando on September 27-29.


By Preston Farmer
I send my deepest apologies
to all the readers of "Shark Talk"
for not having an article in the
Star for the past two weeks. How-
ever, this just proves that the stu-
'dents at PSJ High are busy with
many activities.
Officers for the 1994-95 Jun-
ior and Senior classes have been
elected and are as follows:
Junior Class: President Jen-
nie Smallwood; Vice President -
Wendy Woodman; Secretary -
Laurie Cullen; Treasurer Chaka
Speights.
Senior Class: President Da-
mien Byrd; Vice President Dawi-
da Byrd; Secretary Hatlotte
Bolden; Treasurer Natalie Gant.
These- students will be in
charge of activities for their class.
The Dive Club has taken off
to a fast start. Just as the Junior
and Senior class, the Dive Club
has also elected officers. They are
as follows:
President Tim Stein; Vice Presi-
dent -' Scooter Acree; Secretary -
Shawn Cryderman; Treasurer -
Kenny Daves.
The Dive Club, along with the
Marine Biology class, lent the en-
vironment a helping hand Thurs-
day as they went on their annual
beach clean-up. Students walked
along the shore at the State Park,
in the rain, picking up:, paper,
plastic, and glass. After the rain
ended, they enjoyed a nice game
of water football and other games,
while others finally were able to


just sit in the sun.
"See You At The Pole" was
held Wednesday, September 21.
Students gathered around the
flag pole in front of our school to
pray for our world, nation,
school, and friends.
Attention sophomores and
juniors taking the PSAT on Octo-
ber 11. Be sure to study the bul-
letin you were provided to know
how to do "Student-produced Re-
sponses" on the test. Also, -review
the college major and career
.choice page of the bulletin before
you come to the test.
Students taking the SAT this
year: Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege is offering a preparatory
class for the SAT. The course will
be taught of Gulf Coast on four
Tuesday evenings begnining Oc-
tober 4. Come by the. Guidance
' Office for more details.
Attention sophomores and
juniors. How would you like to
live and study in Germany for a
year? The Congress-Bundestag
Youth Exchange Scholarship Pro-
gram could give you that opportu-
nity. Requirements are a 3.0 GPA
and be at least 15 years old. Ap-
plication deadline is November 4.
See 'Ms. Witten or your social
studies teacher for more informa-
tion.
Friday night, the Sharks con-
tinued on their winning streak
against Bonifay on the road. They
beat Bonifay 12-7.
Another Shark victory was
the J.V. team. They beat Florida
High 18-12 in overtime.


Life Home Auto Business
Health Disability
15% DISCOUNT ON AUTO INSURANCE uCue s
WITH HOMEOWNERS "i f ,

(904) 227-2106 Sweazy Agent Port St. Joe, FL



Bait Shrimp Cigar Minnows Squid Lures
Earthworms Crickets Wrigglers
Full Line Of Tackle
Open 6 a.m. Monday-Saturday
Sunday 6:30-2:30
Danny's Sporting Goods
*B 306 Reid Averfue Port St. Joe
229-8933 tf



FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
GENERAL OBLIGATION
6.10% Tax-Free
Rated: Aa/AA YTM 6.10%
SDue June 1, 2024 Priced at 100
Subject to availability or.change in price.
Call Matthew Moore at 1-800-868-6864
American Municipal Securities, Inc.
100 Second Avenue South, Suite 902, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701
Serving Florida Investors Since 1980 Member: NASD, SIPC, SIA
,.J


Correctional '
Course Has
Time Change
The: Criminal Justice Training
Academy of Gulf Coast Communi-
ty College has postponed COR-...
RECTIONAL OFFICER BASIC
STANDARDS until Wednesday,
September 28, at 6:00 p.m. CST.
The course will be held ;at the
Worship Center. 418 Second
Street. Wewahitchka. This 450
hour course will meet 4 nights a
week, for 4 hours at night, and is i :
required In order to be eligible for
the State Certification Examina-
tion for Correctional Officers.
The course requires advance
application, well as written en-
trance test. There is no charge for
the test and It can be taken on
Tuesday r4 -Thursday--afternoons
at the Port St. Jf Police Station.
For additional Information, ort St. Jo
please contact Lorne Brooks at P tl t 0
904/747-3233, Monday through Pictured front row, from
Friday. from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. dent; Melissa Hatcher, Se
CST. or call our Port St. Joe office ator; Samantha Ambrose,
at 904/229-2760 on Tuesday or mentAdvisor.
Thursday afternoons from 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m. EST.

Gibson Learning About

Rural Family Medicine


Russell; Wayne Gibson has
been spending the summer trav-
eling from Gainesville to Cross
City to learn first-hand what ru-
ral family medicine is all about.
Gibson, a second year medi-
cal student at Florida State Uni-
versity, has, been working with
Dr. Susan Turner in order to ob-
tain some experience in rural
medical care.
Y"Rural medical care has been,.
an extremely valuable teaching
experience, not: readily available
as part of my olicial training. So I
consider this a unique opportuni-
ty and I am grateful for the expe-
rience. Dr. Turner has been an'
especially exceptional physician
to emulate, both as a careprovid-
er and a person," Gibson said.
The team-up program is
sponsored by the Suwanee River'
Area Health Education Center,
whose mission is to improve Uni-
versity of Florida medical stu-
dents' access to the rewards and
challenges of rural health medi-
cine.


Gibson, the son of James and
Wanda Gibson, is the grandson of
the late Wilmoth and Addie Gib-
son and Cawthon and Evelyn Wil-
liams of Port St. Joe.

Project Grad
There will be a Project Gradu-
ation meeting Monday. Septem-
bet 26 at 7:00 p.m. in the Media
Center of Port St. Joe High
School. All-parents of the 1994-
95 seniors are urged to attend.
,There will be a project gradu-
ation drawing for a two night get-'
a-way at Treasure Bay Lodge. al
halftime of the Port St. Joe vs.
Apalach football game on Septem-
ber 30. Tickets may be purchased
from any senior parent or pur-
chased at the football game. Tick-
ets are $1.00 donation.


Spend Your $$ at Home
Shop Port St. Joe! J


RICKY COLLINS


DISTRICT II


Democratic Candidate County Commissioner

Issues a special thank you to friends for their vote
and support in the September 8 election. Please
continue to support me.


Pd. Pol. Ad. paid for bythe campaign acct. of Ricky Collins, Demn


)e Middle School SGA Officers
left, Katie Kilbourn, Senator, Julia Six, Senator; Nicole Smith, Vice Presi-
nator..Back row, from left, Calpurnia Ware, Treasurer; Nicole Royster, Sen-
Secretary; and Cory Ash, President. Margaret Ellmer is the Student Govern-


Seniors Raising Funds


The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens will be conducting a drawing
between. September 6 and Octo-
Sber 1 to raise funds for the new
Senior Citizens and Community
Center. The tickets will be sold
for a donation of $1.00 and it will
entitle the holder to be eligible for
the following prizes. The tickets
will be sold in front of the local
grocery stores and 'at football
games,-also you can purchase
tickets at the following banks:
Tyndall Credit Union, First Union

Card of Thanks
Thanks to each and everyone-
who donated to the Overstreet
Bible Church central ,A/C fund.
The drawing for .the quilt. was
held September 7 and the winner
was Mrs. Nina Harris of Over-
street. Anyone wishing to make
further contributions to this fund
may contact Archie Marshall at

648-4577 or Irma Henslay at
648-8265.


Bank and Citizens Federal. Tick-
ets, are also available at any Sen-
,ior Citizens Center in Gulf
County. The drawing will take
place at the Arts & Crafts Festival
on October 1 starting at noon:
with prizes drawn every hour.
The grand prizes will be drawn
last. The grand prizes are as fol-
lows: $100 shopping spree at PSJ
Saveway; $50 cash; $50 gasoline
at Pates Service Station.
Additional prizes are: Lunch
for two at J. Patrick's; 1 free perm
at Neva's Beauty Shop; 1 free
perm at Sheer Perfection; Ladies
wrist watch from Helig Meyers.

Gospel Sing
This month the. Community
Gospel Sing will take place Satur-
day night, September 24 at 7:00
p.m. at the Nazarene Church lo-
cated at 2420 Long Ave., Port St.
Joe. Everyone is invited to come
and worship.


TFC 9/15


Thank Y/ou ...

Thanks to the voters in Dist. 1 and Gulf County,
for the vote of confidence and support you gave
me on September 8th. Let us all work together
,to improve the school system for- ior children
and community.
Thanks to my opponent for a clean race. Thanks
again.
God Bless You,
Oscar D. Redd


Indian Pass Marine
WO i2178 Hwy. C 30 227-1666 Port St. Joe-
i Simmons Bayou across from Pic's


Saohnsoan Se STEMATCHED
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Authorized Johnson Dealer
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Breakfast,
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6 Days a Week


Friday Night Special

PRIME RIB
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EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1, 1994

Monday Saturday:

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ClosedSunday TFC 9/


PAGE 7A

















Sharks Pitch the Devils 1-7


The Sharks used a balanced
attack to score 12 unanswered
points in the first half Friday eve-
ning, then relied on defense to se-
cure their second victory of the
season, 12-7, against the Bonifay
Blue Devils.
Starting quarterback Ryari
Yeager threw for 139 yards, com-
pleting 11 of 21 passes. He twice
hit Des Baxter with touchdown
passes, a one yarder and with
time running out in the first half,
the duo teamed up on a 17 yard
fade pass for a touchdown in the
comer of the end zone.
Perhaps the biggest play of
the game came late in the fourth
quarter. Bonifay had the ball on a
fourth and one situation on the
Shark 15 yard line. Mandricka
Miller shot through the line and
hit Bonifay's Tony Staten in the
backfield as the rest of the Shark
defensive front joined In to stop
the Blue Devils. The one yard loss
ended the scoring threat, preserv-
ing the Shark victory.
St. Joe's first score of the eve-
ning came with 4:23 remaining in
the first quarter. Yeager hit Bax-


ter from one yard out. to cap off
the scoring drive. The play was
set up by a 24-yard pass to Brian
Jenkins. a 14-yard pass to Ja-
maail Fenn; Ninamdi, Frazier's 12
yard run, followed by a 14 yard
gain on: a sweep by Fenn. The
touchdown came on'a fourth and
goal.
The other Shark score came
after Chris Williams intercepted a
Blue Devil pass and returned it to
the Bonifay 20 yard line with only
19 seconds left in the half. Yeager
and Baxter hooked up again, with
only five seconds left on the
clock. Yeager hit Baxter on a 17
yard fade pass for the score. The
Sharks carried a 12-0 lead into
the locker room at the half.


the locker room at the .half.
The Blue Devils scored their
',only points of the evening early in
the fourth quarter off Tony Stat-
en's 12 yard gallop. -
DEFENSIVE STAND OUTS
Doyle Crosby led all tacklers
with 12 tackles, two for losses.
Brian Jenkins recorded ten tack-
les with one for a loss. Mandricka
Miller had tackles, including the
hit In the Bonifay backflleld to end
their scoring threat. Chad Wil-
liams pulled In two interceptions
and had four tackles. Justin
Summers recovered a fumble,
and had five tackles.
OFFENSIVE STAND OUTS
Ryan Yeager had 139 yards of


passing, completing 11 of 21,
with one touchdown. Receiving:
Baxter, 5-45; Jenkins, 2-20;
Crosby, 1-30 and Fenn 1-13.
Running: Frazier. 15-45; Miller,
3-30 and Fenn 4-14.
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
In the Chipley ball game Rob-
ert Williams was named the offen-
sive player of the week and Chad
Quinn was named defensive


Ryan Yeager had an excel-
lent night as he passed for 139
yards and one touchdown.

,standout
FRIDAY'S GAME
The Sharks will travel to
Chattahoochee, Friday for a 7:30
EDT game.
YARDSTICK


Chris Williams (2) returns .one of his two interceptions of Bonifay's quarterback. Blocking for him
are Des Baxter (10), Justin Summers (58) and Jamaall Fenn (22).


Gators E4
The Wewahltchka Gators
growled and swished their tails in
a manner just angry enough to
defeat one of their strongest foes
In District play Friday night, as
they dumped number nine
ranked Greensboro by a single
point to keep their three-game
win string going.
The Gators scored 10 points
in the third quarter to defeat
Greensboro, 22-21, for their third
straight win against no defeats.
The Gators ran circles
around their hosts, gaining 337
Yards rushing while allowing their
hosts only 46. The Bulldogs
gained 103 yards passing.
It was a safety in the third
quarter, which made the differ-
ence for the Gators. The Bulldogs
snapped the ball out of the end
zone, with the Gators covering it
for a two point safety.
Wewa made it to the score-
board first, with six points in the
first quarter. Jeff Jones, on his
first of two TD's for the evening.
slipped into the end zone from 19
yards out for the first score of the
game. The attempted kick for the
extra point was blocked by a hard
charging Greensboro line.
Then it was Greensboro's
turn at scoring and before the
Gators could get their defense
programmed, the Bulldogs had
tallied for 13 points as Gllcrease
plunged across from the three
'and Shorter took a 10 yard dash.
with the pass for the conversion
falling short.-' k .
But the Gators came roaring
back in the second quarter as Jeff
Jones. again, punched the ball
across the goal line for his second
TD of the game from three yards'
out. -
But the Bulldogs lived up to
their name, playing tenaciously
S for the remainder of the half and
took the lead once more on a 54
yard scoring pass from Shorter to
Christian and Gllcrease ran over
for two extra points.
o At half-time, the score stood
at 21-12, Bulldogs.
*But the Gators hadn't given
up.' They came roaring back in
the third quarter to put up 10
points and take the win. First,
the Bulldogs committed an error,
allowing the football to go out of
the end zone, resulting in a two-
point safety for the Gators. Then,
Tranum McLemore took over. He
pulled in a three yard pass from
Will Sumner to pull the Gators
within one point of their foes.:
Again, on a roll out pass from
Sumner, McLemore snatched vic-
tory from defeat by latching onto
the two point conversion attempt
to earn 'the win by a single point.
Both teams struggled to a
scoreless ending to the game in
the final quarter.


dge
The Ga
David Hysr
184 yards
added 116
downs. Wil
yards rush
two passes
six yards ai
The C
number 7 i
day, as a r
the Bulldog


Dle Crosby 34) is brought down after a 30 yard ss recep-
Doyle Crosby (34) is brought down after a 30 yard pass recep-


tion. -Star photo

Bulldogs, 22-21 photo
ator oflense- was led by winninngrecord and -tate ii. .Cross Cou try to .Host M eet
mith with a whopping wings against the Sneads Pirates. Last Saturday, the boys cross Eric Sellers-49th (21:20), Chad
rushing. Jeff Jones The Pirates arethought to be the country team competed in the Thompson-51st (21:39), and
yards and two touch- toughest District foe the Gators Lincoln Invitational at Tom Bryan Slmon-71 (25:07).
I Sumner picked up 34 will face this season.. Game time Brown Park In Tallahassee. Port Three members of the middle
ing. Sumner completed Is 7:30 p.m. St. Joe finished seventh among school cross country team also
In nine attempts for YARDSTICK the nine scoring teams with 144 participated in the meet. Jason
nd a TD. Wewa Green points. Gainnie recorded a time of 7:49
gators were ranked First downs 20 18 Pensacola Catholic placed for the one mile run, while Kevin
n state rankings Tues- Rushing yards 337 46 first with 49 points. Lincoln Conley turned in a time of 7:58.
esult of their win over Passing yards 6 103 placed second (73). North Florida Clay ,Smallwood recorded a
s. Com-Att-Int 2-9-1 7-12-0 Christian-third (90), Quincy time of 15:57 for the two-mile
Fumbles-lost 3-1 5-0 Shanks-fourth' (115). Wewahitch- course.
Penalties-yards 5-35 4-20 i.- fh.A nrht,, h_.-.- -.i ..,i- .. .- ...J-- "'-h- ..C .-^Ati


PLAY SNEADS FRIDAY
'The Gators will be on the
road again. Friday, testing their


Score by Quarters
Wewahitchka
Greensboro


6 6 10 0-22'
021 0 0-21


PPC Match Set for October 1


The Gulf Rille Club held a
metallic silhouette match on Sat-
urday. September 17th. with
John Fadio winning the match.
The next match will be held on
the third Saturday of October
with some changes to the match
program. The match may be shot
with any common pistol caliber
and will be called hunters pistol
silhouette. This will enable a wid-
er range of calibers to be used.
The club will hold its next
PPC match on Saturday. October


1st., starting at 9 a.m. This pistol
match consists of shooting at a
man-sized silhouette at distances
from seven yards, 25 yards, and
50 yards. Center-fire pistols are
required and a total of 60 rounds
are fired.
All pistol shooters are invited
to attend these matches. You are
not required to be a Gulf Rifle
Club member to participate. Call
229-8421 or 227-3171 for addi-
tional Information.


'Views On

DoentalHealth,,

FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.


From Partial

To Fixed

Suppose you've been 'bridge, for example, the-artifl-
wearing a partial denture for clal tooth (or pontic) is firmly
several years and find It cemented to the natural
doesn't fit as well as It once teeth on either side by means
did. This happens on normal of .crows. That ,is how the'
use even If you only, remove bridge Is secured in place.
the partial to clean It. You The anchor teeth serve as
may also prefer to have an abutments, similar to the engl-
appliance In your mouth that neering principle used In the
would -be less trouble and construction of a bridge over
more efficient than a partial a river. Again, sound natural'
denture. If that's your case, teeth must be there to make
you should ask your dentist the fixed bridge possible. Ask
about the non-removable your dentist about the advan-
fixed bridge, tages as well as the feasibility
Sfixed bride Is perma- of a fixed bridge for you.
A fixed bridge is perma-
nently cemented Into placed
and helps complement the oooooOoooooooooooo ooo,
efficiency of your natural Prepared as a'public service
teeth In chewing food. But to promote better dental health,
you must have enough natu- From the office of FRANK D.
ral teeth left to act as anchor MAY, D.M.D., 319 Williams Ave.,
teeth. In a three-unit fixed Phone 227-1123.


k 'a-IUl i(1U, I Marianna-sdll l iLl
(137). Maclay-eighth (275). Rick-
ards-ninth (317).
Germain Clark was the top
finisher for the Sharks as he
placed 12th with a time of 18:14.
I Robble Dixson placed 27th
(19:26). Gabe Clark placed 29th
(19:40). Jonathan Stripling-34th
(19:56). Matt Dlxon-42nd (20:31).


Saturday, Port t. Joe Hign
School will host its Fifth Annual
Shark Invitational Cross Country
Meet. The meet will be held at St.
Joseph Bay Country Club and
will begin at 9:00 a.m. Teams
scheduleuled to compete are: Bay.
Mosley, Rutherford. Shanks, Mar-
ianna. Maclay, North Florida. and
Wewahitchka.


First downs
Rushing yards
Passing yards
Com-Att-Int 11
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-lost
Penalties-yards
Score by Quarters
Port St. Joe
Bonifay


I.


Freshman Robbie Dixson
placed 27th among 80 runners
with a time of 19:26.
Photo by George Duren


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TiE STAR PORT ST. JO. FL THIURSDAY. SEPT. 22. 1994


Pate Tells How Fatal Accident Could Have Happened (
It's not often one gets an in- planes and was stationed in the 14 people being killed. in the air a few minutes. The hell- helicopters to kill villages of
side view of something which has Persian Gulf during and immedi- He showed on a map how the copters were flying between two Kurds in north central Iraq. 'This "
happened which made world-wide ately after the war there, ex- helicopters took off in Northeast mountain chains and the fighters is what the fighters thought the
news, but the Rotary Club had plained to the Club how the re- Iraq, checking in with AWAC buzzed nearby. The fighters sent helicopters were doing and appar-
the opportunity last Thursday. cent helicopter accident could planes which are constantly fly- out a query as to who they were, ently didn't get close enough to
Wayne Pate, who spent his [but shouldn't] have happened. ing and monitoring the no-fly a transmission which should see there were American aircraft,"
...... ..4 _..-. .-.-... .........- ,,, ',-r'h, have been monitored by the Pate said.


BacK in April, two American
helicopters were shot down over
Iraq by American fighter planes,
while ferrying diplomatic officers
to a conference in central. Iraq.
Pate described the scenario
which resulted in the accident
and the mistaken shooting the
choppers down which resulted in


zoneU or enemlUy 1air aclvity. -IlAe
AWACs knew the choppers were
in the air and the route they were
taking," Pate said.
A couple minutes later, two
F-15 fighter planes took off on pa-
trol from another airfield farther
south and spotted the helicopters
on their radar after they had been '


AWAC plane. The choppers were
on another frequency, however,
and didn't hear them. Since the
choppers didn't answer, the F-
15's fired missiles at the helic6p-
ters, shooting them down.
The patrols are in place to
keep the Iraqis frqm sending up


"As a result of the AWAC
.crew's silence throughout the
whole episode, they now face
courts-martial and charges," Pate
said. "It shouldn't have hap-
pened," he concluded.
Alan Cox was inducted as a
new member of the club.


k


School's In. ...
DRIVE CAREFULLY!


Bonfire Lounge
Y at Tyndall Parkway
WELCOMES THE
Slingshot Band
2 Weekends!
Sept. 16 & 17, and 23 & 24
8 to 1:30 CT
(904) 871-5612
(Formerly Summer Band of
The Fish House Restaurant)


If You Eat Them
Raw and Have
Health Problems
TALLAHASSEE Oysters sold
at retail must be labeled to in-
form consumers of the risk of eat-
ing them raw under a new rule
announced recently, by, Florida
Agriculture Commissioner Bob
Crawford.
"Oysters are,, an excellent
source of protein, iron and other
nutrients, and they're one of my
favorite foods, but no one needs
to be eating them raw," Crawford
said. "'This label provides the
missing link to let consumers
know how to eat oysters safely at
home."
Starting last week, oysters of-
fered for sale at'the retail level-
such as in a seafood market or a
grocery store-must be labeled as
follows:
"There is risk associated with
consuming raw oysters. If you
have chronic illness of'the liver,
stomach or blood or have im-
mune disorders, you are at great-
er risk of serious illness from raw
oysters and should, eat oysters
fully cooked. If unsure of your
risk, consult a physician."
The label must appear on the
oyster container or on a placard
or bin label where oysters are dis-
played for retail sale.
Raw oysters often contain Vl-
brio vulnificus, bacteria that can
be deadly, particularly to individ-
uals with weakened immune sys-
teams. In the past year, nine cases
of illness and six deaths linked to
Vibrio food poisoning were report-
ed.
Fully cooking oysters by
.-steamirigr-baking-or- frying--kills
the bacteria and renders them
safe to eat, Crawford said. Al-
though the consumer information
label emphasizes the risk to indi-
viduals with weakened Immune
systems and other ailments,
Crawford advised all consumers
to cook oysters and all other raw
animal protein before eating.
Currently, restaurants that
serve raw oysters must carry the
consumer Information statement
on their menus and oysters pack-
aged for wholesale distribution
must be labeled.
Last year, Crawford sought
general legislative authority that
'allowed, him to require that, the
Information label be extended to
oysters sold at retail as well.
"All consumers' need safe
handling Instructions right at the
point of purchase," Crawford
said. "Most food safety incidents
occur in .the home. It is crucial
that consumers know how to
handle food safety and avoid food
safety hazards in the home."

Thompson Temple
Youth Program
The youth department of
Thompson Temple First Born
Church would like to cordially in-
vite' everyone to join them on Sat-
urday, October 1st, at a musical
extravaganza at 7:30 p.m. The
first half of the program will be lo-
cal choirs singing and the second
half will be a concert by the group
Vision of Jacksonville, featuring
Port St. Joe native Ray Charles
Bolden, Jr.
Beginning oh Sunday morn-
ing at 11:30, annual youth day
guest speaker Elder Donald Nick-
son of Port St. Joe, a dynamic
man in the Lord, will deliver the
message. Come and receive a
blessing for your soul.

Private Z.W. Jones
Completes Course
FORT JACKSON, Columbia,
S.C. Army Pvt. Z. W. Jones Jr.
has completed a light wheel vehi-
cle 'mechanic course here.
During the course, students
were trained to perform mainte-
nance and assist in the repair of
automotive vehicles and associat-
ed equipment.
Jones is the grandson of
Maggie Bell of 180 Avenue B, Port
SL Joe, Fla.
He is a 1994 graduate of Port
St. Joe High School.

C Spend Your $$$
at Home Shop
Port St. Joe First!


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Heilig-Meyers Co. 1994


military career, flying AWAC


Oyster


Eaters


At Risk


Dl


209-211 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
.227-1277


Ir~r OAZLM, JrJL L. UW -- I --XV I ---I .-.


J.Azm 1


--


I


PAGEr 1B


ts


I


,2









THE STARPORT ST. JOE, F SEPT. 22, 1994


JTPA Meeting Needs of Employers and Employees in Area
Training and Matching Jobless People With Gainful Careers in a Variety of Job Opportunities in Panhandle


Tony Dandy works as a credit manager at Heilig-Myers Furni-
ture in Port St. Joe.



Farm Credit Surplus


Results in Refunds


Three Gulf County residents,
Rosezetta Comer, Tony Dandy,
and Mary Leonard, were honored
at the Florida Panhandle Private
Industry Council's Annual Meet-
ing as JTPA Success Stories.
Three years ago, Tony Dandy
moved back to Port St. Joe with
his wife and two sons from Bris-
tol. Tennessee. He made his move
due to a shortage of Jobs and a
desire to be closer to his parents.
Dandy's father is legally blind
and his mother suffered two
heart attacks.
This made Dandy determined
to do anything that would help
him provide for his family. During
this three year period. Dandy was
promoted to credit manager of
Heilig-Meyers Furniture in Port
St. Joe. He was named top credit
manager in bedding out of 18
stores and has received certifica-
tion in credit manager training.
"JTPA On-The-Job (OJT)
Training Program helped me get
my foot in the door. At the time, I
didn't have enough experience.
but the OJT contract made the
difference in me getting the Job,"
states Dandy.
UNUSUAL JOBS
Rosezetta Comer and Mary
Leonard are two individuals work-
ing in nontraditional jobs for
women with the City of Mexico
Beach.
Comer was looking for a
challenging Job that would also


Eligible borrowers of Farm
Credit of Northwest Florida, ACA
will be receiving checks totalling


HOP





DOWN
AND ORDER YOUR
COPY OF THE STAR
DELIVERED TO YOUR
DOOR EACH WEEK
OR PICK UP A COPY
AT ANY OF THE FOL-
LOWING LOCATIONS:
SOUTH BEACHES
*Indian Pass Raw Bar
*PICS # 1
*PICS #2
PORT ST. JOE
*The Star
*Jr. Food Store
eSing Store
eSaveway
*Pigglv Wiggly
*St. Joe Hull
*Buzzett's
.Campbell's
V WHITE CITY
,Hammond's Grocery
HIGHLAND VIEW
*Jr. Food Store
*Dixie Dandy
BEACHES
oSuwannee Swiftyv
@Jr. Food Store
MEXICO BEACH
*Express Lane
*Gulf Foods
*Mexico Beach Grocery
*Suwannee Swifty
*Jr. Food Store
*Mexico Beach Grocery
WEWAHITCHKA
*McCartyv's Grocery
Rich's IO.A-.
*Jr. Food Store
*Dixie Dandy
SJr. Food Mart


over $481,000 in surplus allocat-
ed refunds according to associa-
tion president. James R. Alberts.
"'his is a significant milestone in
the progress of Farm Credit of
Northwest Florida, ACA," "said Al-
berts. The total patronage refund
for 1988 was $610,541.73. The
revolvement of the surplus allo-
cated in five years combined with
the cash refund given in 1989
have reduced borrowers' effective
Interest cost by approximately
1.7%.
Cooperatives differ from tradi-
tional lending institutions in two
important ways. First, profits
from the cooperative are distrib-
uted back to the Agri-Business.
County Home and Land member/
borrowers in the form of a patron-
age refund. Secondly. its policies
are set by the member-elected
board of directors.
As a cooperative, Farm Cred-
S.its board.of directors can-elect .fo.A
declare patronage refund annual-
ly. A portion of the member/
borrower's earned interest is paid
in cash and a portion is retained
as surplus allocated to help capi-
talize the association for revolve-
ment back to the members at the
board's discretion. Taxes on the
patronage refund and the surplus
allocated are paid up front ren-
dering the surplus allocated pay-
ment tax-free.
The payment of partonage re-
funds and of surplus allocated
can significantly lower the effec-
tive interest rates Farm Credit
members pay. The goal of the as-
sociation and its board is to re-
volve these funds as quickly as
possible. The inherent uncertain-
ty of agriculture could affect the
length of time prior to revolve-
ment.


Phone 229-2727


Rosezetta Corner is a sanitation
Mexico Beach.


engineer for the City of


Mary Leonard is employed
City of Mexico Beach.


RECYCLE YOUR.

NEWSPAPERS:

FOR A CLEANER

AMERICA


I I


I-


Recycle your old newspapers..,
Tie in a bundle and place beside your

trash can. The Star is doing its part
by printing on recycled newsprint.



The Star Publishing Co.
PRINTERS PUBLISHERS OFFICE SUPPLIES
Ph. 227-1278 Fax 227-7112 208 Williams Avenue


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BARFIELD'S


Port St. Joe A E


PAGE ZB


- ..


1,


PAG 9BI


I


~I


provide her with work hours
which would allow her to spend
more time with her two children.
She. works as a sanitation engi-
neer. Recently, she passed the
Commercial, Driver's License
(CDL) test. Passing this test gave
her an automatic promotion and. ,
pay raise.
"What is unique about my Job
is how much I learn about people H,'
from their garbage. Some of the
residents are very neat and sort
all of their garbage. while others
are not so organized. Since I've .
held this position, I have acquired
a lot of respect for sanitation
workers," reveals Corner.
Mary Leonard was the young-
est child and only girl in her fami- i 1
ly. Her brothers never set limits
for her on what she could do. She
worked on cars and built signs -
with them. As a result of the de-
termined spirit she was raised to
have, Leonard now works as a
parks and recreation grounds-
keeper. Immediately after she was
hired, she obtained her commer-
cial driver's license. Now, one of
her new challenges is learning to
operate a backhoe.
"JTPA is a good program. It
gives people a chance to succeed.
My JTPA counselor. Jan McDo-
nald, is the type of person that
really cares. Jan didn't Just go L .
through the motions, she helped
me through every step." states Le-
onard.








THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, 1994


Hunting and Fishing Day September 24


Mighty Fishermen
This bunch from The Star and assorted hangers-on took
that deep sea fishing trip you read about in this remarkable.
newspaper last week. David Horton, son-in-law and husband
of our receptionist, sits on the rump of the Charisma,
owned and captained by Chuck Guilford of Mexico Beach,
Pat Patterson, Rev. Gary Smith, Eric Ramsey, A. J. and
yours truly, [sitting on the bulkheads and Bill Ramsey and
Chris Horton, kneeling. Lying at random on the dock in
front of the doughty fishermen is the catch of assorted king
mackerel, snapper, grouper, dolphin and trigger fish... 150
pounds B.C. [before cleaning.]


Seminar For Bookkeeping

for Small Businesses


The Gulf Coast Community,
College Small Business Develop-
ment Center and the Gulf County,
Chamber of Cojnmmerce are offer-
Ing a series offree business semi-'
nars for people who want to start,
or already own a business in Bay
or Gulf counties. The .second
seminar in the series "Basic
Bookkeeping ;and Tax: Reporting
for Small Businesses" will be of-
fered, on Thursday. September






HEARING AID CENTER

618 W. 23rd St.
Publix Plaza
Panama City, FL
769-5348

FREE HEARING
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Monthly Service Center
Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
1st Tuesday each month


22, from 6-9 p.m. at the Gulf
County Public Library in Port
St. Joe. This class will stress the
importance.. of keeping. ..good
records in business. According to
SBDC Certified Business Analyst
and class instructor Andre Brew-
ton, "The best way to stay out of
trouble with the IRS is to start
out with a basic understanding of
accounting and simple set of fi-
nancial records. This class will
show you how."
Department of Revenue Spe-
cialist Becky Fuller will also ex-
plain Florida sales tax collection
and reporting. If you must collect
sales tax in your business, take
advantage of this free class.
Seating 'is limited at this in-
formation-packed seminar. Space
reservations are recommended,
and may be made by calling
GCCC SBDC at (800) 542-SBDC.


Wish to lease or buy residence..,
Reasonable down payment and as-
sunme mortgage. Call Barnes, 648-
8432. Itp 9/22
Wanted: Small, old boat and mo-
tor or just good small outboard. Call"
evenings. 227-3293. Itc 9/22
Wanted to buy: Laying hens, mal-
lard ducks, male peacocks. 229-6961.'
2tc 9/22


THE LAW & MEDIATION OFFICE OF

JOANNA A. MAUER


ATTORNEY
Insurance Law Wills
Personal Injury &
Wrongful Death Litigation
* Property Disputes Business Law
Probate Medical Malpractice
Real Estate Transactions
Environmental Law

MEDIATOR
Certified by the
Florida Supreme Court
Mediation can help you
settle disagreements
Mediation can save you
money and time
* Business & Employment Disputes
Divorce and Family Issues


Weekend & Evening
Appointments Available


Governor Lawton Chiles has
proclaimed Saturday, September
24 as Hunting and Fishing Day in
Florida to recognize the many sig-
nificant conservation achieve-
ments of Its sportsmen.
Chlles joined a growing chor-
us of politicians, communicators
and a strong grassroots coalition
of event organizers, stating: "Con-
serving our state's natural and
wildlife -resources is one of the
most important responsibilities
we have to this and future gener-
ations of Florida and hunters and
fishermen were among the first to
realize this responsibility nearly
100 years ago."
National Hunting and Fishing
Day (NHF Day), now in its 23rd
year, has recently seen a dramat-
ic :resurgence In public Interest
This year the day will be the fo-
cus of thousands of public events
held at sportsman's clubs, shop-
ping malls and outdoor fairs
across Ainerica. "Though the rea-
son for this Impressive increase
in attention and activity is not to-
tally clear, we're extremely en-'
couraged," said Gary Kolesar, Na-
tional Coordinator, "because it
provides both sportsmen and the:
media with a unique opportunity
to inform the general public
about the value and relevance of
America's outdoor traditions."
Last year, the governors of all
fifty states issued proclamations
to establish state Hunting and
Fishing Days and a similar re-
sponse is expected for 1994. Pres-
Ident Clinton recently issued his
second official National Hunting.
and Fishing Day statement, not-
ing that "American sportsmen
launched the modern conserva-
tion movement. Since that time.
they have become America's most
ardent and effective protectors of
the environment.."
"Florida's hunters and fisher-
men...supported laws to stop un-
controlled exploitation of wildlife
and helped establish game and
fish laws, enforcement and man-
agement practices." added Gov-
ernor Chiles. "They also suggest-
ed and supported laws to
establish special hunting and
fishing license fees and special
taxes on their equipment to pay
for conservation programs."
In 1993, Florida's 191,904
paid hunting license holders
raised a total of $5,334,384 to
fund wildlife conservation pro-
grams managed by the Florida
Department of Natural Resourc-
:es. The money was raised
through purchases of hunting 1i- ;
censes, permits,'' stamps.' and*;,?N
tags. Hunting license holders also
entitled Florida to $2,192,805 in
federal funds for wildlife restora-
tion and $1,121,652 for hunter
education. The state's 1,004,444
paid fishing license holders raised
$19.707,145 for fish conserva-
tion, entitling It to $4,493,542 for
fish restoration.


'The conservation programs
supported and financed by Flori-
da hunters and fishermen have


benefited many wildlife species
such as deer, wild turkeys, otters,
bald eagles and song birds---


wildlife that all Floridians can en-
joy," said Governor Chiles.


I
' 1


, '


.BUDGET SUMMARY ,'

GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

FISCAL YEAR 1994-95


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD
ESTIMATED REVENUES:
TAXES: Millages
SAD VALOREM: General 6.009
AD VALOREM: Fine & Forf. 1.874
AD VALOREM: Courthouse & Jail 0.118
AD VALOREM: St. Joseph Fire .500
AD VALOREM: Tupelo Fire .500
AD VALOREM: Overstreet Fire .500
AD VALOREM: Howard Creek Fire .500
Sales and Use Taxes
Franchise Taxes
Licenses and Permits
Intergovernmental Revenue
Charges for Services
Fines and Forfeitures
Miscellaneous Revenue
Other Financing Sources
TOTAL REVENUES AND
OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
LESS 5%
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES
AND BALANCES

EXPENDITURES/ EXPENSES:


General Governmental Services
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
Economic Environment
Human Services
Culture and Recreation
Other Financing Sources (Uses)
Debt Service

TOTAL EXPENDITURES/ EXPENSES
Reserves
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES


GENERAL
FUNDS
$779,079

$3,307,828
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0:
S$0
$0
$3,000
$75,000
$547,167
$206,279
$9,500
$68,043
$0

$4,216,817
$210,840

$4,785,056


$2,030,313
$667,572
$751,355
$0
$300,710
$355,667
$98,728
$0
$131,409

$4,335,754
$449,302
$4,785,056


SPECIAL DEBT
REVENUE FUNDS SERVICE FUNI
$555,512 $548,165


$0
S$1,031,598
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$3,300.
$0
$0
$993,012
$8,400
$110,500
$21,600
$0

$2,168,410
$107,311

$2,616,611


. $13,750
$1,131,122
$0
$1,307,738
$10,800
$20,018
$0
$0
$0

$2,483,428
$133,183
$2,616,611


$0
$0
$64,957
$0
$0
$0
$0
$302,018
$0
$0
$171,633
$0
$0
$0
.$0

$538,608
$26,929

$1,059,844


$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$643,021

S$643,021
$416,823
$1,059,844


ENTERPRISE
DS FUNDS
$271,712


$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$3,700
$275,250.
$0
$0
$0

$278,950
$13,947

$536,715


$0
$0
$206,429
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$50,742

$257,171
$279,544
$536,715


SE DEPENDENT
DISTRICTS
$12,425


$0
$0
$0
$101,761
$15,968
$3,625
$6,293,
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0

$0
$0

$127,647
$6,381

$133,691


$0
$92,040
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$41,239

$133,279
$412
$133,691
,',.' ,


TOTAL
$2,166,893

$3,307,828
$1,031,598
$64,957
$101,761
$15,968
$3,625
$6,293
$305,318
$3,000
$75,000
$1,715,512
$489,929
$120,000
$89,643
$0

$7,330,432
$365,408

$9,131,917


$2,044,063
$1,890,734
$957,784
$1,307,738
$311,510
$375,685
$98,728
$0
$866,411

$7,852,653
$1,279,264
$9,131,917


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF
THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY.AS A PUBLIC RECORD.
Publish: September 22, 1994


NOTICE OF



TAX INCREASE


The Gulf County Board of County


Commissioners has tentatively


adopted a measure to increase its

property tax levy by 2.605 percent.



All concerned citizens are invited to


attend a public hearing on the tax

increase to be held on Tuesday,


September 27, 1994 at 5:01 p.m.,


E.D.T., in the County Commissioner's


Meeting Room at the Gulf County


Courthouse, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St.


Joe, Florida.


A FINAL DECISION on the pro-


posed tax increase add tha budget


willbe made at this hearing.


September 22, 1994


(904) 984-0017
Office Located in Wakulla County.


i rfLXIO


PAGEr .


a.


-li,









PAGE 4B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, 1994


School News


Events and Happenings From


County Schools


Wewahitchka

Elementary

News...
By Linda Whitfield


"Dear Mr. Raffield"
"How are you doing? I really
enjoy coming there. I would like
.to work there. I would try to do
everything right. I would love to
be a captain. I -work for deck-
hands some of the time. I would
not be late. I would be on time
every day that I had to work."
Your Friend, Keith Davis
(This was in conjunction with
a visit from the T.E.A.M. class at
WES.)


Red Faced But Still Okay.
Fourth grader Matthew Piercy
thought his teacher Linda Law-
rence was about to have a heart
attack on Monday and told her
so. His reasoning was that her
face was red as a beet. "No", she


by Barbara Eells
-Coastal Clean-up
Friday camel Friday went-
'rain and alll Tuesday was the
perfect day for Coastal Clean-upl
The excitement was in the
air...each of the three teachers,
Mrs. Bidwell, Mrs. Colbert,. and
Mir. Jones were going over last
minute details-how to mark


their card-don't forget to pick up
the smallest bit of trash, put your
name on your drink and
lunch...the air was cool and just
a feel of a touch of Autumn...but
the word passing around was
"cool!"
Mrs. Bidwell's group rode on
Mrs. Jo O'Barr's bus with Sherry
SParker, Traci Gaddis, and Sandra
Chancey as chaperones. Mrs. Col-
bert and Mr. J's groups rode the
bus with Linda Presnell and
chaperones Marsha Robinson,
Paula Boone, Debra Watson, Bev-


told him, 'We just went scalloping
over the weekend and I'm sun-
burned!"
STwo Educations
by James Adams
There are obviously two edu-
cations. One should teach us how
to make a living, and the other
should teach us how to live.
Fort Walton Beach Comput-
er Workshop
A group of WES teachers
journeyed to FWB on Friday to at-
tend a day's session in comput-r
ers. Reviewing the keyboard were
Judi Lister, Debbie Baxley, Linda
Lawrence, and Carol Kelley.
Student of the Week
Miss, Joyce Quinn picked
Stephanie Porter as. the First
Grade Student of the Week. She
is the daughter of Steve and Car-
ol Porter. Her favorite subject in
school is coloring and she would
like to be a teacher when she


early Crocker, 'Kathy Thomas and
Gail Blackmon ready to embark
on the beautiful St. Joe Beach
and areas to clean, clean, clean!
As clean-up time neared the
middle or end -hearty, hungry
ones were ready for a cool drink
and eats. Then a little wading and
ball playing before they left the.
wonderful, beautifully cleaned en-
vironment.
A great big gigantic "Thank
You" to all who participated!
Hawk News 2
Yesl The Hawk News-2 will be
a bi-weekly newspaper in HAWK
territory
Second grade teacher, Jo
Hernandez is coordinating the
group of fifth and sixth graders to


From the
Principal's Desk

Wewahitchka


High School
By Larry A. Mathes


grows up. Stephanie loves to visit
at her grandmother's house, es-
pecially with her mother who she
admires very much. Her favorite
book is "Goldilocks and the Three
Bears." At school she likes to play
with her little friend Megan; Mayo.
Stephanie believes school is fun!
T.E.A.M. News
The T.E.A.M. class with their
teachers Sue McDaniel and Lori
Price visited Raffield's. Fisheries
and had a fantastic tour, then
they visited the Constitution Mu-
seum, which was also great. Then
they went to the Raffield Market
and back to the, classroom to
have a picnic lunch inside. '
SWhen the. Preacher Comes,
Chicken Heads Flyl
Don't you enjoy reading or
hearing about olden times? Some
of the things I relate to the class
is as foreign to them as teaching
calculus to four year olds. For ex-
ample, making lye soap. I've seen
my grandmother make it when I


publish the news with their first
printing to be ready for Septem-
ber 23. Those members working
hard to publish it are: Melanie
Barber, Amy Voltz, Audra Wil-
liams, Stephanie- Hightower.
.Christina Colson, Erica Hernan-
dez, Charlie Foster. Joe Robinson
and Aaron Richards. Good luck to
our newspaper staff and advisors
: Advisory Council
Congratulations to our new.
1994-95 Advisory Council mem-
bers:
Michael C rocker,' Paula
Boone, Jewell Hopper, Tonya Nix-
on, Marcus Hicks, Julie Richard-
son, Jo Hernandez. Linda Elkins,
Winston Wells, Sandra Brock and
Catherine Barfield.
Campbell's .
Save Campbell's labels of all
kinds
Congratulations
Everywhere we look there are
students, teachers, and staff who
act out poslUve thinking each
and every day. It's too many little
things to name each one, but we
know as long as we keep it up,. it
has to eventually go into the life
of the persons in the environment
of the positive thinker and doer.


was small, but try to explain it.
One summer I brought back a
long forgotten slice from my
grandmother's smokehouse. See-
ing it made it a little more real.
Another olden time occurrence
happened last week in second
grade when John Milton Whitfield
Sr. visited the classrooms and
told the children all about oil
lamps. Their story was about a
small girl who had to trim the
wicks, fill the lamps with oil, and
keep the lights burning through-
out a storm. Mr. Whitfield pre-
sented, first-hand knowledge .of


the subject. Olden times are as
much a part of us as today is.
The Joy of Parenthood
By Jan Blaustone
'With children, come new
stains on the carpet, new dents in
the coffee table, and new joys in
your life."
"When you forget how to
smile, watch your child at play."
"Before we can make peace
with our neighbors, we must first
make peace within our families."
'You can run out of many
things. but never.run out of hugs
and kisses."


DEPARTMENT OF STATE
DIVISION OF ELECTIONS


PUBLIC NOTICE OF ASSISTANCE
Under Florida law persons with physical disabilities, the elderly and those
who aremunable to read are entitled to special assistance in registering and voting.

SECTION 97.061, F.S., provides that such persons SHALLberegistered
and receive assistance at the polls in casting their ballots.

SECTION 101.051, F.S., and the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965
provide that persons who are blind or unable to readmay choose a person to assist
(other than an employer or official of the voter's union), or have the help of two
election officials in voting.

ABSENTEE BALLOTS AVAILABLE
Any registered voter who cannot go to the polls without assistance from another
person may request an absentee ballot from the Supervisor of Elections by mail,
telephone or in, person .

For full information on aids available for the elderly and handicapped at
registration and polling places, call the office of your county Supervisorof Elections.

FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED
The state Division of Elections has a telecommunications device for the deaf
that will give the hearing impaired important voter and election information. The
telephone number is 904/922-9606.


d


gene


CLOSE OF REGISTRATION


You must register to vote by October 11, 1994, to vote in the November 8
ral election. Jim Smith
Secretary of State


'N

,R",









Congratulations to Our Stu-
dents of the Week!
Leland Ray, Chandler Wil-
liams, Kenny McFarland, Latrice
Larry, Sarah Quaranta, Carla
Money, and Kristy Bronson.
P.T.A. News
We had a great turn out for
our PTA Open House last week
with 276 parents attending. Con-
gratulations to the classes ofur Mrs.
Gentry and Cindy Phillips for
having the highest percentage of
parents to attend..
Positive Action News
Our Positive Action word for
next week is WELLNESS. Now
may be a good time to learn mores
about nutrition. Try to see that
food served in your home and
sent to school represents a bal-
anced, healthy diet,ioand keep
junk food to the minimum. Help
your child become aware of what
foods are healthy in what ways
and which ones have little food
value.
The Week in Review
By Lisa Curry
Last week, Port St. Joe Ele-
mentary School fifth and sixth
grade girls' basketball started.
Benny Roberts is the coach.
!About twenty-five girls are play-
ipg. With so many girls, Mr. Rob-
erts is very busy, but he is a good
coach. We learned lay-ups, foul
shots, and dribbling skills. Some
of the taller girls practiced jump
shots. All of the girls' basketball
players, short or tall, seem to be
having a blast. I know I am!
ICU
Here are some "I See You" do-
ing-something-positive messages:
Mrs. Adkison saw Mrs. Clem-
ents' class standing quietly in the
hall while waiting for Eddie. You
were so polite!!!
Lisa Curry is always helping
people.
Linette Bailey cheered Guth-
rie up when someone had made
her cry.
Teachers Would Appreciate
S Teacher's Appreciation Day
isn't until May, but if you have a
refrigerator you would like to do-
nate to our teacher's lounge, they
would appreciate it greatly!


Superstitions?


What is it about winning that brings out everyone's old super-
stitions? A stirring come-from-behind win over Greensboro, 22-21,
on a rain soaked field has everyone wearing the same clothes, doing
the same thing, etc., hoping in some way to help continue the win-
ning streak. It's great fun, but I'd rather depend on eliminating mis-
takes and continued improvement as we head to Sneads Friday
night for a 7:30 p.m. game. Try to be there!
Volleyball is sailing along, unbeaten so far but with a Thursday
match against Rutherford to serve as a tester.
Thanks to Dawn Alcorn for leading science students against the
Inclement weather to help with the annual coastal clean-up. They
had to duck the thunderstorms, but still managed to get a lot done.
I wonder who throws all that trash out on our recreational areas?
Homecoming already? Well, plans are underway to honor class-.
es starting with 1934 and then every five year interval ('39, '44, '49,
and so on), ending with the class of '94. Contact Lisa Jordan or Bet-
ty Holloway for details. I hope local businesses, churches, etc., will
join in to make the parade a success. October 14 is the day, with
Chattahoochee High being the opponent.
September 30, our seniors will bus to St. Joe for their annual
College Career day or morning, I should say. Many colleges and
technical schools send representatives to help seniors see what is
available.
The first six weeks ends Thursday, the 22nd of September. Re-
port cards go out seven work days later. Obviously, everyone, won't
be happy with every grade, but let's check and make sure you see a
grade sheet parents, and notify us if you don't.
If I had to grade our student body on our first six weeks, I'd-
have to give them an A-. They've been great (with just a couple of
exceptions) but I always like to leave a little room for improvement!
Remember to vote when you have the opportunity, in run-offs
and in the general election in November. Read what the candidate
stands for and make your own decisions based on what you know!




H Port St. Joe Middle School News |
,?;;//:;::/;:/;..;;/;;//^


The Port St. Joe Middle
School Student Government As-
sociation is pleased to announce
the results of its first election:
Cory Ash, President; Nicole
Smith, Vice-President; Samantha
Ambrose, Secretary and Calpur-
nia Ware, Treasurer.
Melissa Hatcher and Nicole
Royster are the 7th grade Sena-
tors. The 8th. grade Senators are
Julia Six and Katie Kilbourn. AA
(Homeroom) representatives are
Erica Alles, Lakeythia Filmore,
Travis Jenkins, Julie Lanford,
Clay Smallwood, Hal Kirkland,
Jennifer Butler, Jim Faison,
Shayla Gay, Brett Lowry, Latrika
Quinn, Piper Redmond and Lind-
say Williams. The S.G.A. is plan-.
ning to become actively involved
in planning for the total participa-


tion of all middle school students
in enjoyable activities.
Beginning Wednesday Sept.
20, Port St. Joe Middle School
will offer a rotating club period
for all students. Available clubs
include Sportsman Club, S.G.A.,
Intramurals Arts and Crafts, Pep
Club, Dive Club, Computer Club,
and Photography Club. These
clubs offer students and teachers
another way to explore and enjoy
special areas.'
Middle School students are
involved in athletic pursuits after
school. These activities include
Cheerleading, Football, Volleyball
and Cross Country running.
Students of the Week for 7th
grade are Erica Ailes and Rocky
Salzer and 8th grade are Katie
Kilbourn and Derek Watson.


For All of Your Publishing Needs

Call The Star 227-1278


REG.ISTER










*V* 0 *T* E




Last Days to Register *



August 8 for Primaries


October 11 for General



-kElection Dates "94


September 8 -


1s Primary


October 4- 2nd Primary


General Election


November 8



FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Division of Elections (904) 488-7690


- Y.UUE C ( Z)
dl I~ I *I.E 1194 I
.34r f~E% '
-- ,- -- -- --- ~ V


' ;


: ; I -.;.


I


















By Jackie Quarles
This has been a busy week at
Faith Christian. Grades 7-12
have enjoyed meeting and hear-
ing Dr. Alden Gannett, who was
at Faith Bible Church for a Bible
conference on the book of Job.
The Christmas card and
wrapping sale has been complet-
ed. Students who sold ten or
more items the first week were
early-bird winners of lunch from
Hardee's or Sanddollar Bills, and
students who sold fifteen or more
are eligible for a fun field trip in
the near future. Individual super
sales students are Heather Fox,
first place; B.J. Pierce, second
place; and Ryan Laine, third
place. Many thanks to all who
participated. All profits will go
into the new school building.
It is time to begin planning
for the annual fish fry. This year,
Faith Christian parents and
friends will join the local Arts &
Crafts Festival and will be selling
fish dinners and bake items on
Saturday. October 1.
The first six-weeks is drawing
to a close and report cards will go
out next week. Parents of stu-
dents in K-5, grade four and


St. Margaret's
Guild Meets
St. Margaret's Guild of St.
James Episcopal Church met at
the Gulf. Sands Restaurant at
11:30 a:m., Monday, September
19.
Eunice Kuyper was hostess
for the luncheofl meeting. The
Rev.; Jerry Huft and fourteen
members were present.
Sara Fite, Guild Chairman,
presented Jean Etheridge who
gave the program about her expe-
rience working on the Christian
Appalachian Project (CAP) last
spring in the heart of rural east-
ern Kentucky.
Working with volunteers,
staff members and local people,
CAP's aim is to help the people of
this .impovished area help them-
selves.
Mrs. Etheridge introduced
her program by reading a letter
from one of the volunteers telling
of her experience and opening the
floor for questions and answers.
A lively discussion followed.
\ CAP is a.non-profit interde-
nominational service and has ser-
viced more than 50.000 people In
one year.
, Jean-did her volunteer work
in the office and Fred, her hus-
band, volunteered his time and
expertise in the construction
field.

Thompson Temple
Selling Dinners
Thompson Temple First Born
Church will be selling dinners on
Thursday, September 29. The
menu consists of fried or baked
chicken, dressing, rice and gravy,
collard greens, green beans, pota-
to salad, cornbread, cake, and
tea, all for only $4 per plate.
To place your order, call 229-
6935 or 229-8652 (Monday
through Wednesday).. On Thurs-
day, call the church at 229-6997.
Pick up or delivery is available.


Lion's Tale

9N[ws Column
faith Christian Schoof
grade five are invited to pick them
up Monday, September 26, at an
open house at Long Avenue Bap-
tist Church Family Life Center be-
ginning at 7 p.m. Open house for
students in grades one through
three and six through twelve will
be held Tuesday, September 27,
at 7 p.m. at the main site at 801
20th Street. Report cards will be
issued the following day to those
parents who are unable to attend.
The Gulf County annual
beach clean-up was postponed
because of wet weather but
grades five and six will participate
in the cleanup and enjoy a picnic
lunch afterwards. Rain also can-
celled the second school yard
sale, but another willbe held this
Saturday, September 24. Each
class plans to collect enough
items for a table for the sale, and
anyone who wishes to contribute
their "junque" is urged to. call
229-6707 for pick up, or they
may bring it to the school.
The new school building
passed its first major inspection
last week and construction is
continuing. As of September
19th, funds have reached a total
of $3,047.94 toward the $10,000
goal for September.


Homecoming
and Revival

Sept. 25 -27
,Homecoming and revival ser-
vices will be held at the First
United Methodist Church on Sun-
day through Tuesday, Sept 25-
27. A former pastor, Rev. John
Carmichail will be the guest
speaker. Services will be held at
11:00 a.m. Sunday morning and
at 7:00 p.m. each evening. A cov-
ered dish dinner will be held in
the fellowship hall after the morn-
ing worship. Everyone is invited
to attend.

H.C. Baptist
Revival Services
Howard Creek Baptist
Church will be in revival Sunday,
September 25 through Wednes-
day, September 28. Rev. Gary
Clark from Northside Baptist
Church, Jasper, AL, will be bring-
ing the messages. Ricky Baxley.
First, Baptist: Church of Lynn
Haven. will be singing and lead-
ing the congregation in song.
Sunday morning service be-
gins at 11 a.m., and Sunday eve-
ning service begins at 7 p.m. (all
times eastern).
Mark your calendars to join
Howard Creek Baptist to receive a
blessing each night. A nursery
will be available.

In Concert
New Life Christian Center
would like to extend an invitation
to everyone to a live concert
featuring Lisa Fernandez Keels
and Willie Jenkins on September
24 at 7:00 p.m. at the Union Hall
on Sixth Street There will also be
other singers, so please come out
and have a Hallelujah good time.


Say You Saw It In The Star!


FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
REV. BILL WHITE, PASTOR
2420 Long Ave.
Port St. Joe. PL 32456

Port St. Joe's "Port of Victory"
Sunday School............................................ 10S a.m.
Morning Worship..........................................11 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............................................6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ................ ... ...............7p.m.




THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN GULF COUNTY

SST. JAMES' 800 22nd STREET PORT ST. JOE
7:30 and 11:00 a.m, (ED -
X Sunday School 9:45
S++ ST. JOHN'S WEWAHITCHKA
\ I 8:00 a.m. (CT)

THE REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor



"THE EXCITING PLACE TO WOfSHIP"
fFirst Baptist Church
-4 102 THIRD STREET. PORT ST. JOE
Sunday School 9:45 am
Worship 11:00 am
Disciple Training 6:00 pm
i Evening Worship 7:00,pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ...7:00 pm
Gary Smith Buddy 'aswell
Pastor Minister of Music & Youth
< 2


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, 1994 PAGE 5B


Children's Values: Where Do We Start?


by Blake Harris
Kids and violence, gangs,
drugs in schools, confusions that
school- children have about sex,
children giving birth to children-
these all add up to a terrifying so-
cial reality. We are faced with a
generation spinning wildly out of
control.
The majority of youngsters
are now affected.. According to a
survey by the Joseph & Edna Jo-
sephson Institute of Ethics, 61%
of all high school students say
they have cheated on an exam
once or more during the last year.
As well, 33% admit to having sto-
len from relatives at least once in
the last year.
Whether it is kids owning
gung to threaten and, on occa-
sion, kill their classmates, wheth-
er it is high school students join-
ing in "Spur Posse" games that
keep track of how many different
sexual conquests the players can
rack up, or whether it is simply
lying and cheating, these are all
the symptoms of one fundamen-
tal disease-the moral decay in so-
ciety.
Or perhaps moral decay is
the wrong way to describe it.
More factually, at least where our
children are concerned, the
biggest problem since the 1970's
has been the utter lack of in-
struction in morals and values in
our schools. The idea back then
was that children should grow on
their own and should be encour-!
aged simply to decide for them-


Card of Thanks
We would like to express our
sincere thanks to all of our dear
friends who have showered us
with love during our time of loss.
During this difficult time, we have
learned just how much our
friends really mean to us. We
thank each person who called,
sent a card, flowers and food, as
well as many other expressions of
sympathy. We are truly grateful.,
The Family of Eloise Harper
Bill Harper; Glenn, Ann, Monica,
and Bill Harper; Sheila, Glen,
Katie Beth, and Hannah Beth
Tison: Kart and Bethany Haisten

Card of Thanks
The family of Elder Otis (O.J.)
Walker Jr. wotild like to thank
you for all your prayers and kind-
ness during the time of his acci-
dent
Yours in Christ,
The Walker, Buie.,and
Whitfleld family

Card of Thanks
The Student Government As-
sociation of Port St. Joe High
School would like to thank the
businesses who donated money
to sponsor the SGA officers atten-
dance of the Southern Associa-
tion of Student Councils. Your
donations are greatly appreciated.


selves what they should believe.
"[This was] based on a mate-
rialistic idea that the development
of the child parallels the evolu-
tionary history of the race; that in
some magical way, unexplained,
the 'nerves' of the child will 'ripen'
as he or she grows older and the
result will be a moral, well-
behaved adult," author and hu-
manitarian L. Ron Hubbard
pointed out in the widely distrib-
uted booklet 'The Way To Happi-
ness."
"Although the theory is dis-
proven with ease-simply by notic-
ing the large criminal population
whose nerves somehow did not ri-
pen-it is a lazy way to raise chil-
dren," said Hubbard. "A child is a
little bit like a blank slate. If you
write the wrong things on it, it
will say the wrong things. But,
unlike a slate, a child can begin
to do the writing: the child tends
to write what has been written al-
ready."
Today, the good news is that
schools are beginning to get back
into the character development
business in a big way. In this,
they have the overwhelming sup-
port of parents. A 1992 study
showed 86% of Americans fa-
vored schools teaching moral val-
ues while only 12% were against
the idea.
However, working out the
best way to build character and
to instill important values in our
children still lies ahead. We have
learned in recent decades that
recognizing problems in our
school system does not mean that
these problems are easily fixed.
There are a number of ideas
about the classroom. Some
schools have started to use videos
that show the terrible conse-
quences of dishonesty, intoler-
ance and crime. One, for in-
stance,. starts out with vivid,
highly dramatic street arrest of a
teenager.
In another approach, Kevin
Ryan of Boston University has de-
veloped a school curriculum that
makes character education part
of everyday teaching. This relies
on different works of literature to
impact ethical values.
Many school systems are de-
veloping their own curriculums
that focus on such things as civic
responsibility, respect for oneself
and for others and respect for the
natural environment.
However, whether any of
these approaches will work is still
open to question. "Effective moral
teaching, or character education
as it is sometimes called, involves
more than simply teaching chil-
dren the difference between right
and wrong," said Glen Horton,
campaign manager of The Way To
Happiness Foundation, a non-
profit organization dedicated to
restoring moral values in society.
"Children, and especially teenag-
ers, need to have a reason to do
right and not do wrong, a reason
that makes real sense to them.
They have to be motivated by
more than the simple fear of get-


PORT ST. JOE FIRST PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH
SPastor Tommy Causey
2001 Garrison Avenue 229-6622
904-227-1493


Sunday School ............... 9:45
Morning Worship ............ 11:00
Sunday Evening.................. 6:30
Wednesday Evening.......... 6:30
Nursery Provided 227-1493


a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.


A Church Easy to Find But Hard to Forget






Pine Street Overstreet
Sunday School...................................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..........................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ......................... 3:00 p.m.
Pastor W.L. Tremain Phone 648-8144



CAkth Constitution Ani'Monument
H p Port St. oe.
THE UNITED METODISTCHH
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School......... 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m. Choir Practice
Methodist Youth Wednesday.......... 7:30 p.m.
Fellowship.........5:00 p.m.
Rev. Zedoc Baxter Charlotte Henderson
PASTOR YOUTH/ CHOIR DIRECTOR


y -
S St. Joe Assembly of God
I "309 6th Street.Port St. Joe
M f Sunday School...................... 10:00 am
Morning Worship Service........ 11:00 am
Sunday Evening Service ........ 6:30 pm
Wednesday Bible Study......... 6:30 pm
Jeffery Scalf
Pastor
t Come andReceive Gods 'Bessings t
^-------------'----------


ting caught because they never
think they will."
For almost a decade, The
Way To Happiness Foundation
has distributed 'The Way To Hap-
piness" booklet to a growing num-
ber of schools, civic-groups, par-
ents and children across the
country. Horton said that be-
cause the booklet outlines moral
values completely based on com-
mon sense, children respond to
the publication in an enthusiastic
and dramatic way. They learn
that right conduct is the, only


road to building happy and suc-"
cessful lives for themselves, both
now and in the future.
"'The Way To Happiness' is
the vital educational tool that has
been missing in the large majority
of our schools," said Horton. "Fui
several years now, the booklet
has been working to instill moral
values and build real character in
the few schools where it has been
included as part of the curricu-
lum. In the classroom setting, it
has a track record of resounding
success.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MEXICO BEACH
823 N. 15th Street
648-5776
Sun. Bible Study (all ages) ..................9:00 CST
Morning Worship..............................10:00 CST
Evening W orship............................... .6:30 CST
Wed. Bible Study (all ages) ................6:30 CST'
Rev. Tommy Doss, Pastor



Highland View

United Methodist Church
Corner of 4th St. & ParkerAve.
Highland View
Lynwood R. Wynne, Pastor

Sunday School 10 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m.
Evening Worship 6p.m.
TF9/30/93-12/30/93





CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS


Bible Study:
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


Worship:
11 a.m. Sunday
Nursery


Minister: Tom Skipper 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 t Port St. Joe; FL 32456
Corner or 20th Street & Marvin Avenue


We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place

BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP .... 00 p m
MORNING WORSHIP...............11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING..................... 5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
CHRIS CRIBBS MARK JONES
Interim Pastor Minister of Music






Full Gospel Fellowship
PETE WANCHIK, PASTOR
Office: 227-2033 103 Garrison Avenue Home: 229-9033
Sunday ....................................................................... 10:00 a.m .
Tuesday Home Fellowship........................................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Bible Study................................................ 7:00 p.m.


AN
w~



(u s IN)


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP............................ 10 a.m.
ADULT S( 1OOL............................. 11 a.m.
*SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children


Nursery Available
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor


first United Metho '-t Church.
111 North 22nd Si
Mexico Beach, FL 3 .j
Morning Church................. :00 a.m. CT
Church Schuol................... L 90 a.m. CT
'^lursery Provided


Charles M. Parker, Pastor
Office Phone: 648-8820


John Anderson, ML Director
Hours: Monday-Friday, 9 am 1 noon CT


m m


People living in the 90's can find the
answer= to lile's questions only in God's
ageless bo, .k. Come study with us.

J { C t rl

JR>,p sispl l C~iuijr'c lk


Upstairs, First Union Bank Building Monument Ave.
Sunday Morning Bible Study for all ages 9:00am
Soul Satisfying Worship Service 10:00am
Sunday Afternoon Discipleship Training 5:00pm
Informal Sunday Night Service 6:00pm Wed. Night Prayer Service 6:30pm








THE STAR, PORT ST. JO SEPT. 22, 1994


Smith's Decision


Saved Tax Dollars

But He May Get Another Shot At
Public Office in November Election
Secretary of State Jim Smith did Florida voters a big favor by realisti-
cally reading the numbers and withdrawing from the Republican guber-
natorial run-off race. This allows badly needed time for a thorough dis-
cussion of the Issues by the two contrasting candidates-Miami
developer Jeb Bush and incumbent Gov. Lawton Chiles.
The run-off for the top political job in Florida can begin now, instead
of on October 4. The two candidates have agreed to meet in a series of
debates, televised statewide from various locations-and guess what?
Neither one needs to spend more than that $5 million maximum set up
under state law.
There are enough public-private coalitions around to sponsor ample
face-to-face debates. Neither candidate heeds to tap special interest con-
tributions (aren't they all) or dip further into the public slush fund to be
competitive and-think about this--Gov. Chiles could hit a ceiling on
that public tax money to spend on his campaign.
According to his law, he would get $1 of public state matching money
for every $1 Bush gets in contributions over the campaign spending cap
of $5 million. With Smith out of the race and more time for TV debates
(newspaper sponsored interviews, too) which wouldn't cost the candi-
dates a lot of money, it is likely Bush would not have to go over that $5
million cap.
In the first pay-day under the new law sponsored by Chiles, state-
wide candidates who agreed to the cap grabbed more than $4 million
from the state -treasury for their campaigns. Chiles' trip to the trough
brought him more than $800.000; the biggest bite. Bush didn't agree to
the cap mainly because-thanks to his famous father and mother-he
has the healthiest campaign chest of all already.
Smith, a millionaire career politician with a lifetime of honorable
public service and a reputation for being cheap with personal and public
money, is probably smiling about the possibility of saving Florida taxpay-
ers a lot of money. He brags about owning just two pairs of shoes.
BAIT AND SWITCH: It's a new wrinkle in politics, developed by GOP
state chairman Tom Slade, that has Democrats in a tizzy. Republican
chiefs named Secretary of State Jim Smith to run against Agriculture
Commissioner Bob Crawford in the Nov. 8 general election. Smith be-
came eligible when he withdrew from his run-off race with Jeb Bush for-
the Republican nomination for governor. Now smith-when he comes
back off a vacation where he is licking his wounds-can get right back
into the fray with a race against Crawford.
Slade set up the switch earlier by getting Frank Darden, an unknown
Departnient of Education bureaucrat, to qualify against Crawford. Dard-
en agreed to withdraw In favor of Smith. "They call me BOB for bottom of
the barrel," Darden joked.
Crawford said he'll challenge the switch in court, claiming Smith
can't spend any more money because his campaign for governor has al-
ready surpassed the $2 million maximum allowed in Cabinet races.
"Nonsense," said Slade. "Under the election laws, Smith can return
any money left from his gubernatorial campaign and start at zero fund-
ing, as a candidate for agriculture commissioner." Tom Gallagher, Slade
said, could be selected for the race if Smith turns it down when he comes
back off vacation.:
ZERO TOLERANCE? Embattled Educadon Commissioner Doug Ja-
merson's zero tolerance policy was passed'by the Florida Cabinet, but
not without a suggestion from Secretary of State Jim Smith that it really
doesn't give teachers and parents the authority to throw disruptive or vi-
olent students out of class.
The nitty-gritty of the objections to the policy is that it gives teachers
"reasonable" force to protect themselves and other students from violent
classmates, but it doesn't describe the term.
The new policy would put kids in alternative classes, something most
school c1i scts do now, and it calls for 24-hour notice to schools that a
studentidjas been charged with an off-campus crime.
.Tallahassee Cobb Middle School Teacher Judith Birtman, who was
badly beaten by a violent student she didn't know was charged with two
crimes and released by HRS. said Jamerson's theory didn't go far
enough.
"I don't think those children should be mainstreamed. I don't think
they should be in school, period. If somebody's doing something they
should.be in jail for, they should be in jail," Mrs. Birtman said.
She said teachers should be Informed and given real authority to de-
cide with parents if a student should be allowed in a class..The decision
should not be left to school administrative officials, she said.
The News Round-Up
Florida Sen. Bob Graham became a leading defender of an invasion
of Haiti, differing'with GOP Sen. Connie Mack and most of the delega-
tion-including U.S. Rep. Pete Peterson, D-Marianna-who would have
liked to have Congress vote on whether to send troops to the unhappy,
violent island.
Graham said he had decided long ago as a close neighbor of Haiti
that democracy must be restored in Port-au-Prince. 'Here are people who
were about to enter a new era after the election in 1990, then lost it all
when Jean-Bertrand Aristide was forced out by the military rulers. Those
are emotions you can Identify with," Graham said.


Medicare


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Assignment Accepted For
Eye Exam


Bay Eye & 1600JooenksAve
Surgical Center Panama City, FL
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT
1-800-227-5704


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I '


Capitol


NEWS
ROUND-UP
by Jack Harper


Only four others in the Florida delegation to Congress were clearly
behind President Bill Clinton's invasion plan last week. They were West
Palm Beach Rep. Harry Johnson and three House members, all Demo-
crats; of the Congressional Black Caucus-Reps. Alcee Hastings of Mira-
mar, Carrie Meek of Miami, and Corrine Brown of Jacksonville.
Sen. Connie Mack said Clinton's Haiti strategy lacked credibility and
he doubted that it would allow for a quick exit, one of the criteria former
President George Bush established in Desert Storm against Iraq in the
Persian Gulf.
But Mack, like nimost Democrats and Republicans in the delegation,
said troops once committed should receive the full support of the country
and Congress no matter what.
"It is ethically inexplicable" to invade Haiti while allowing Fidel Cas-
tro.to remain in power in Cuba, said Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Bazart, of Miami.
Peterson said that he had concluded that the emergency just doesn't
exist to the level that would require sending in troops, but a Republican
candidate for his post, Carole Griffin, said he had flip-flopped on the is-
sue.
On May 24, she said, Peterson voted in favor of an amendment on a
bill that would require Clinton to certify a "clear and present" .danger to
U.S. interests before sending in troops. On June 9, when the measure
was put to another vote and defeated, Peterson voted against it, Griffin
said..
Peterson said that some of the circumstances had changed when the
bill came to the floor for a second vote.
GOIN'S FUTURE: Florida State University President Sandy
D'Alemberte said he would like to "have a hearing before the hanging",
and thus will wait until the state Ethics Commission makes its final rec-
ommendation before deciding the fate of suspended FSU Athletic Director
Bob Goin.
Goin has been on paid leave since July 2 on charges he got his son a
job with a firm that was doing business with FSU and he got a freebie
roof for his house from a contractor that also was doing work for the Uni-
versity Center.
An ethic commission prosecutor last week urges public censure and
an order to repay $5,000 for the new roof for Goin. The final hearing is
set for Oct 13.
Meanwhile, Florida's statewide prosecutor is now conducting a crimi--
nal investigation into how and why the contractor doing work on the new
center put a new roof on Coin's home.
CASINOS HIT: Gov. Lawton Chiles and Attorney General Bob Butter-
worth filed a petition with the Florida Supreme Court last week seeking
to strike casinos off the November 'ballot as a proposed constitutional
amendment because it would unfairly benefit selected property owners.
The petition cited a proposed $500 million casino in the South Pointe
section of Miami Beach as an example.
The Proposition for Limited Casinos-which has been approved for
the ballot by the high court-if passed by a majority of the voters, will au-
thorize gambling casinos starting July .1:
At one facility each in Duval, Escambia, Hillsborough, Lee, Orange,
Palm Beach, and Pinellas counties; two facilities in Broward County;
three in Dade County (two in Miami Beachi and one in South Pointe); at
all existing dog and horse tracks and jai-alai frontons; and up to five riv-
erboat facilities to be approved by the Legislature.
'The ballot proposal is 'enriching to a few to the exclusion of others',"
Chiles and Butterworth said. .,
"TOO EASY" Is how Florida TaxWatch officials described the process.
to allow constitutional amendments to become law with a majority vote.
Vice President Neil Crispo said the system allows as few as 17 percent of
the state's registered voters to write changes into the constitution.
"We are getting dangerously close to minority manipulation of the
constitution," Crispo said, "when fewer than half the registered voters
turn out for'an election and fewer of those vote on a particular amend-
ment" ..


Folk Festival
Applications
Available
WHITE SPRINGS Folk sing-
ers, musicians, dancers, storytell-
ers, craftspeople, and others who
want to take part in the 43rd an-
nual Florida Folk Festival should
contact the Florida Department of
State's Bureau of Folklife soon to
request application forms.
The Festival Is scheduled May
26-28, 1995. To receive an appli-
cation, call 904/397-2192 or
write to the Bureau of Florida
Folklife, P. 0. Box 265, White
Springs,. Florida, 32096. Please
include your name, address,
phone numberss, and area of in-
terest (performance, crafts, or
foods) with your request.
Application packets are'
mailed in early October to all Who,-.
have requested them. Completed:'
applications must be returned to
the bureau, postmarked no later
than November 15. They are re-
viewed by the Florida Folklife
Council.
The annual Florida Folk Fes-
tival takes place at the Stephen
Foster State Folk Culture Center
in White Springs every Memorial
Day weekend. It is sponsored by
the Florida Department of State
in cooperation with the Florida
Park Service.


Year In and year Out, You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


*Auto *Home sPpresenting '"it Travelers'
S. The Insurance Store Since 1943
*Business 8:30 till 6:00
-Flood -Life Monday through Friday
-Bonds
221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We Are HERE to Service What We Sell

LAURA RAMSEY, Agent ROY SMITH, Agent


Say You Saw It In The Star!!


All rcrms cT Insurance
Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages 'Group *Life *Boat
Hospitalization Mobile Homes

COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY, INC.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


FOOT CARE
S* HEEL PAIN BURNING FEET
PAINFUL FEET NUMB FEET
SCORNS CALLUSES
TOENAIL PROBLEMS
S *' DIABETIC FOOT CARE
CAN BE COMFORTABLY & SAFELY TREATED
IN THE PRIVACY OF OUR OFFICE
DR. BURTON S. SCHULER
The Ambulatory Foot Clinic
229-6665
Foot Surgery Should Be A Last Resort, Not First Aid
Most Insurance Welcome, including Medicare
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY .

2401 West 15th St., Panama City


ADVANCED


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+ 150 Channel Systems*
+ 200+ Channel Systems


+ Digital Stereo Sound
+ Full Remote Control
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-Regardless of Your Location


-I800-362-67430

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Encore! Cinema & Sound


l


We're celebrating fall and our store's great new look with falling prices on Motorola phones: the clearly
superior cellular choice. Come in any time now through September 9 and choose from four models (with $26.95
Weekend Value Plan or higher!). Autumn adventures, a cellular phone, terrific savings:
Sprint Cellular puts it all together for you.
SrDPC"-550 Flip Phone Pocket-sized, feather-weight, perfect for the business person.
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4 Ultra-H Portable 4 '* Durable person l phone for all types of use.


Sprint Cellular
Providing Nationwide
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* 107 Second Street' Port St. Joe *227-1000


' .e, viE o m'a.ce .tid o enr-Pcr aontraclt requied Atcessres e iti While quantitiKes Iasi Ofet subject to change without notei e-Sublet to medit oppfovI Some ethitlions may opply


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STHE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, 1994 PAGE 7B


AUOOIE FOR*RENT.FOR T


Wild Rose

Antiques
is having a
GRAND OPENING
Thursday, Sept. 22
A fun, unintimidating collection
of collectables as well as rare and
unusual antiques. Nearly every
category is presented with books,
glass, pottery, paintings, rugs,
jewelry, furniture, architectural
items, and much, much more.
HOURS: 10:30 5:30
Wednesday Sunday
7018 Hwy. 98
Beacon Hill, FL
Big pink house with greenhouse
1 mile east of the time change.
904-647-3524
1tc 9/22







'88 Mazda 626LX 56 spd, power
sunroof, brakes, windows & steering,
windows & steering, cruise control,
runs great. $3,200 obo. 647-3497 af-
ter 6 p.m. tfc 9/22


'76 Jeep CJ5, 6 cyl., $2,000 obo.
Great for hunting or beach, 229-
8536. Itc 9/22
1983 Chrysler Le Baron, excel-
lent running condition, $1,800. 648-
5306. tfc 9/22
'79 Ford F-150 monster truck 4
x4. Runs great, 227-3456. leave mes-
sage. Itp 9/22
S'84 Cadillac, cream puff, 1 owner,
stereo, am/frn cassette, power win-
dows, doors, loaded. $3,500. 229-
6879. 2te 9/22


f Daycare HRS registered openings
,for two to four years. Located close to
Gulf Correctional Institute. good refer-
ences & rates. 639-5150.
2tc 9/15

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYSI Call 227-1278 to place
yours.' $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 50 per word for all over 20.
Port St. Joe Lodge No. 11
Reg. Stated Communication
S 1st and 3rd Thursday of each
month, 8:00 p.m., Masonic Hall,
214 Reid Ave.
Jim Mannon, W.M.
Bill Jordon, Sec.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meeting: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m. .
Thursday, 8:00-p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m.&
Thurs.. 8:00 p.m.
All meetings at First Baptist Church
of Port St Joe. all times eastern

THE FASHION EXCHANGE
220 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe
227-3183
New &- Used Clothing for the Entire
Family. Accessories and Misc. Items.
Hours 10 .am. 6 p.m.
Closed Wed. & Sunday ,/ A


COSTING INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899



STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631

Building Electrical
Residential Commercial
Insured Licensed
ROBERT L. 'HOLLAND
CONTRACTING
Lie. #RG0007685, ER 0013401
Day 647-8664 Eve. 648-4526
Mobile 227-5634 44p/15


1978 Toyota mini-motor home,
very good condition, $2,800 negotia-
ble. Call 229-6326. 4tp 9/8
'92 Plymouth Laser Sporty, excel.
cond., burgundy w/tinted windows.
647-8058. 4tc 9/1
f 1986 Mercury Grand Marquis,
full power, cloth interior, $3,200.
,648-8990. tfc 9/1
1974 Ford truck, 4 wheel drive, 4
speed, new brakes, fresh paint, ready
to go, $2,500. 229-8577. tfc 9/1
CASH NOW BUYING
Used Cars and Trucks. Local and
out-of-state vehicles. Two locations to
serve you. Mayhann Motor, Port St.
Joe, 229-6584, Mayhann Used Cars,
Wewahitchka, 639-5810.
tfc 9/1





'86 17'7" Sling Shot bass boat, 2
depth finders, '91 Mercury 150 hp
XR4. Many extras, $7,000. Call 227-
1568 after 5 p.m. 4te 9/22
Shrimp boat, 30 foot;' good condi-
tion, ready to go. 229-8930. ltc 9/22 .
STEVE'S OUTBOARD SERVICE,
White City, anytime, 827-2902.
A4 /1


One bedroom .. apartment,
$225.00 per month. Call George Dur-
en at 229-8398. tfc 9/22
12'x40' furnished trailer. Call
648-5306. tfc 9/22
Furnished trailer, one bdrm.,
sleep sofa & day bed in large LR. Mi-
crowave, TV, washer, air cond., newly
renovated. 648-5033. ltc 9/22
2 bedroom furnished trailer In
Highland View. Deposit required. 227-
1260. 3tp 9/22


Surfside Serenity Group, 1st
United Methodist Church. 22nd St.,
Mexico Beach. Monday 7:30: Friday
- 7:30. All times central. 647-8054.
American Legion Bingo Thurs-
day night, 7:00 p.m. Cash prizes.
Early bird 5:00 p.m. Meetings 1st
Monday. of each month, 8:00 p.m.
tfc 9/1

CERAMIC TILE WORK
Floors or walls.
New or remodel.
24 years experience.
Free estimates.
Pete, 229-9033 es/i

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Perms
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A FamilySalbn".
311 Madison St. l Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.


(904) 229-8161
FAYE'S NAIL SALON WN
TOTAL NAIL CARE
Certified Nail Technician
1905 Long Ave., Port Stoe
Call for Appt .



AvoU

CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Inaepencenni Sales Represerin3i.te
211 Allen Memoilal Way Port St.Joe.
(904) 229-6460 .


A Gift Shop for
CHILDREN of all Ages
Books Toys etc.
My Very Own Book
528 6th St. Phone 227-1636


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box AIC, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018


L.IC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMIES C RG 0051008
ER 0011.618
JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 904/229-6821


2 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home.,
Ig. lot, washer, dryer, $300 monthly.
$200 deposit, references required. No
pets, 227-7322. Itp 9/22
One 2 bdrm. apartment, one 1
bdrm. apartment, reasonable. Call
647-3402. 3tc 9/15
One 2 bdrm., 1 1/2 bath apart-
ment, with washer & dryer, ch&a, en-
ergy efficient, $410 month. Call 229-
6314. tfc 9/15
Mexico Beach, 400' off water, 2/
1.5 bath, all appliances, $450 month
and deposit..647-3461. tfc 9/8
Beachfront, Beacon Hill, one
bdrm., 1 1/2 ba., furnished town-
house, $525 month. Call Parker Real-
ty at Mexico Beach, 648-5777.
tfc 9/1
Mobile home, 2 BR, 1 1/2 bath,
stove & ref. furnished, screened
porch, carport, private lot. Adults, no
pets. $275 per month, water fur-
nished, $150 deposit. 647-8772.
tfc 9/1
Apartment for rent: Beach view,
2 BR, furnished, washer, dryer, wa-
ter, trash included. Mexico Beach.
Call after 9 p.m., 648-4112.
S tfc 9/1
2 bedroom unfurnished trailer at
St. Joe Beach. 647-5327. tfc 9/1
The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. 302 Reid Ave. Port St.
Joe, 229-9000. tfc 9/1
Nice, clean, 2 bdrm., 1 bath un-
furnished trailer, located on St. Joe
Beach. No pets. Call 647-5361.
tfc 9/1
PINE RIDGE APTS.. (904) 227-
7451. Rents starting at $225.00 per
mo. Affordable Living for low to mid-
dle income families. Featuring 1, 2 &
3 bedroom apts. with cen. h&a, ener-
gy saving appliances, patios & outside
storage. For hearing impaired call
(904) 472-3952. Equal Housing Op-
portunity. tfc 9/1
OFFICE SPACE. Call George
Duren at 229-6031 and leave mes-
sage. tfc 9/1


Beach Combers salon, 647-
8664, Manicures, $10; Sea Salt
Manicures $15; Full Set $35.

COUNSELING FOR CHILDREN,
ADOLESCENTS, AND ADULTS
Barbara K. Miner, LCSW, ACSW"
License #SW0002721
518-A First St. Evenings & Sat. by Appt.
Port St. Joe, FL (904) 229-1018
tfc 8/4

STRICKLAND ELECTRIC
All Type Electrical Work
24 Hr. Service
LIC. SEROOL3168 INSURED
647-8081
ALAN STRICKLAND

We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns
*
Indian Swamp Campground
IHwy. C-387, Howard Creek



Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax ,

Wauneta Brewer -St. Joe Beach
647-5043


5x 1 10x10 10x20
On Site Rentals 6 Days A Week
ASK ABOUT FREE MONTH'S RENT
St. Joe Rent-All.
First St.. 227-2112


B Franklin
Building

Supply
Co.
From Foundation to Finish,
For All Your Building Needs

(904) 227-1199

Fax (904) 229-8470
HC-1 Cessna Drive
Costin Airport
Port St. Joe, FL
32456


Liberty Manor Apts.. 800 Tap-
pier Dr., Port St. Joe. Affordable
housing for the elderly and the
handicapped.
Cen. h &a, laundry facilities, en-
ergy efficient const., handicapped
equipped apts., available. Stove & re-
frig., fum., fully carpeted, 1 bdrm.,
apts., on-site manager.
Equal Opportunity Housing
Complex. Rent is based on income.
This complex is funded by the
Farmers Home Administration *and
managed by Advisors Realty.
Call 229-6353 for more informa-
tion.
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
tfc 9/1
UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., con. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
* Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
* New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., Inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
* Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
* One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business. 229-6200. tfc 9/1
No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture. 227-1251. thru 12/94

DOWNTOWN PORT ST. JOE
TWO DUPLEXES
Main part of 517 4th St, 2
bdrm.. I ba.. stove, refrig.. cen.
air, 5325 mo. Water included,
available 10/1/94.
Upstairs apL. 517 1/2 4th St.. 2
bdrm.. I ba.. stove. refrig.. a/c.
$235 mo. water included, availa-
ble. immediately.
S227-5443
One month deposit &
lease required.
Ct f 9/i15


'Need Your Lawn Cut or'other
Yard Work done? Call Mike or Chris
Mock, 229-6460. tfc 9/ 1









St. Joe Rental-All, Inc. ,
706 First Street '
Port St.'Joe 227-2112


COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
224 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581











MOWING RAKING WEEDING
EDGING ETC.
C.J.'S Lawn
Service
Serving Mexico Beach, St. Joe
Beach & Port St. Joe
"I Will Work for YOU!'
Mexico Beach, FL *
(904) 648-8492
LIc. #5455 tfc 9/1



BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

Lawn Mowers \
Weed Eaters
Chain Saws \
'* Generators
\ Pumps
o Tillers R
Go-Karts
229-2727
328 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe


APARTMENT FOR RENT
2 bedroom, 1 bath, ch&a,
appliances, carpet, ceiling
fan, call Kenney 227-7241
or Phil 227-2112.
tfc 9/1






Yard Sale: Friday- and Saturday,
8 a.m. until. Crafts, all size children's
clothing, bicycles, lots more, 106 2nd
Ave., Oak Grove. ltc 9/22
Yard Sale: Saturday, Sept 23, 9
a.m. till. 8 Pelican Walk, St Joe
Beach. behind Suwanee Swifty. Rain
cancels again. ltp 9/22
Attic Sale: 1912 Forest Park Ave.
Lots of girls dresses/clothes infant to
size 6, household items, toys, etc. 8-
12 Saturday, ltp 9/22
Huge Yard Sale, 5th Ave. Beacon
Hill. Clothes, dishes, sturdy wood
bunk beds, dressers. Whirlpool refrig-
erator, Sat., Sept. 24, 7 a.m. 647-
3589. 1tc 9/22
Cleaning Out Yard Sale,- Satur-
day only at 130 Bay St., St. Joe
Beach. 2tp 9/22
Yard Sale: Saturday, Sept. 24, 8
a.m. ? Clothes, toys, misc. 104
Yaupon St., (off of Monument Ave.).
ltp 9/22
Giant Moving Out Sale: Every-
thing must go. All prices are negotia-
ble. Have tools, dining room sets, liv-
ing' room sets, beds, stereo
equipment, TV, everything need in
house. Everything must -go. Sale
starts 8 a.m. Friday morning to 2:00;
sale starts 8 a.m. Saturday morning
until. Address: 161 Ave. See Scott
Bryant. Itp 9/22
"We're Back" Another Mother of
All Yard Sales. 2 Families.Tools, fish-
ing gear, boat, VCR's, much more
stuff. Saturday. Sept. 24, 7 a.m. Rt.
22, Wewahitchka. across from Dixie
Dandy. "


AMERIWAY INSURANCE
of Port St. Joe 322 Long Ave.
Phone 1-904-229-1001
Auto Homeowner Boat *
Comm.
Free quote by phone or come by office.


CENTIPEDE SOD
Free Estimates for
Top Quality Sod
BARBEE SOD COMPANY
639-5904
tf I9/1

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER
1-904-265-4794
29 Years Experience
WORKER'S COMPENSATION
PERSONAL INJURY
NO REC'OVERY***NO FEE
7229 Deerhaven Road, P.C.,,/i

T.L.C. Lawn Service
All Types of Yard Work
MOWING, RAKING, TRIMMING,
WEEDING, CLEAN OUTS
AND ROOF SWEEPING.
REASONABLE MONTHLY OR .
SEASONAL RATES AVAILABLE.
Call 229-6435



BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair
Rebuild Wrecks Body
& Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body Work
See or Call BOB HEACOCK
Baltzell Ave.; Phone 227-7229


Large rummage sale: Clothing,
dishes, picture frames & much more.
Friday and Saturday, 622 Madison
St., Oak Grove. Itp 9/22
Yard Sale: 603 Long Avenue, 8
a.m. until. Dishes, king size waterbed
and lots more, tc 9/22
Yard Sale, St. Joe Beach., Hwy.
98 and Bay St. Tools, tools, tools.
Clothes, toys and many, many .more
things. Friday and Saturday, .8:00 -
5:00. If 9/22
Four family garage sale, corer
Mississippi and Florida Ave., Mexico
Beach. Too many items to mention, 8
a.m. to 1 p.m. E.S.T., ltc 9/22













GARAGE SALE
prices on
Depression Glass
Sports Cards Old Post
Cards. 3 Pocket Knives

Jewelry Japanese
Dolls

Collectibles Store
611 Hwy. 98 Highland View
4/10 miles west of new Port
St. Joe Bridge
Open 10:00 a.m. to 5.-00 p.m.
Tuesday Saturday
Closed Sunday and Monday
2tp 9/22
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYS! Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for'consecutive runs,
plus 5t per word for all over 20.


PATRICK E. GRAY
Home: 229-9000
Truck 229-3418

CUSTOM PAINTING &
PRESSURE WASHING
Free Estimates
Sheetrock
Port St Joe, FL Decks Houses
4,9/22 Carports & Driveways


Remodeling
Repairs
New construction


W Weather Tight.
T Construction

Licensed & Insured
RR0060690
Kevin O'Neill, Owner 229-8635i
tfc9/l

r-------=-

ISt. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
Small Engine Repairs
Factory Warranty Center


I Lawnmowers


\ Chain saws I
i Generators
Pumps
Engine Sales


706 1st St.-St. Joe
227-2112 2
l_ =-m m


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer


FOSTER TREE &

LAWN SERVICE,
No Job Too Big ....
.... Or Too Small
FREE ESTIMATES *
Licensed & Insured ,.'639-5368
Pd, thru 12/


I ,


uc U/ I


I


TRADES and SERVICES


o.Y .r .-;:.












PAGE 8B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, 1994


II SC


Help Needed: Wife turning "50".
Need two 25 year olds to replace her.
See Roy at ACE Hardware or call 229-
8441, desperate. Itp 9/22

Dept. of Health and Rehabilita-
tive Services: Vacancy date: 9/23/
94. Application deadline 9/26/94.'
Public Health Nutritionist Supervis-
or, Pay plan: 01, class code: 5220, job
location: Gulf. Salary range, pay
grade: 088, $890.38 to $1,562.27 bi-
weekly.
This position serves as coordina-
tor of the Gulf and Franklin County
WIC Program. It involves travel to sat-
ellite clinics in these counties.
Submit a completed State of Flor-
ida employment application to: James
M. Cersosimo, Jr., D.O., 502 Fourth
St., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. (904) 227-
1278, Suncorm, 771-2000.'
An equal opportunity/affirmative
action employer. We hire only U.- S.
citizens and lawfully authorized alien
workers. Preference shall be given to
certain veterans and spouses of vete-
rans as provided, by Chapter 295,
Laws of Florida.:- If you need an ac-
commodation because of a disability
in order to participate in the applica-
tion/selection process, please notify
the hiring authority in advance.
Minimum qualifications: A regis-
tered dietitian as defined by the Amer-
ica Dietetic Association and two years
of professional experience in public
health nutrition;
or a bachelor's degree from an
accredited college or university with a
major in public health nutrition,' die-
tetics, food and nutrition or food ser-
vice management and two years of:
professional experience in public
health nutrition: or
A master's degree from an ac-
credited college or university in public
health nutrition, dietetics, food and
nutrition or food service management
and one year of professional experi-
ence in the nutrition.
Must be licensed as a dietitian/
nutritionist in accordance with Chap-
ter 468. Florida Statutes, or be eligi-
ble to practice dietetics in accordance
with Chapter IIM. Section 48.001.
48.002, or 48.003. Florida Adrnminis-
trative Code, and have 2 years of pro-
fessional experience In public health
nutrition. Itc 9/22

Washington Improvement
(W.l.G.). Inc. in Port St. Joe. Florida Is
accepting applications for the position
of Executive Director. This full-time
administrative position requires a
minimum of a high school diploma or
its equivalency or a BS/BA degree
from an accredited college or universi-
ty; 3 yrs. of professional experience in
community development, business
management, administration and su-
pervision. program planning /
development. or related area.
Successful candidate must plan
and implement fund raising strate-
gies. develop and prepare budgets for
non-profit organization. Salary range
between $20,000 $30.000 comrumen-
surate with experience and education.
Inquiries for application forms, Job de-
scription and qualifications may be
mailed to W.I.G.. P. O. Box 754. Port
St. Joe, FL 32456. Closing date for
application is Oct. 14, 1994.
5tc 9/15

The Gulf County School Board is
announcing a job opening for a
School Psychologist. The position will:
be for Port St Joe area schools. Appli-
cations are available at the School
Board office. Gulf County School
Board is an equal opportunity em-
ployer. tfc 9/15
Full time and part time weekends
' and weekdays. Very strong industrial
mechanical skills required. Call 904-
227-3554 after 9 p.m. or Larry, 227-
3587. tfc9/1


RN's and LPN's day or night shift
available. Apply in person, Bay St. Jo-
seph Care Center, 220 9th St., Port
St. Joe.. tfc 9/1

CNA's needed for all shifts. Train-
ing available. Apply in person at Bay
St. Joseph Care Center, 220 Ninth
St., Port St. Joe. tfc 9/1
*** POSTAL JOBS***
$12.26/hr. to start, plus bene-
fits. Postal carriers, sorters, clerks,
maintenance. For an application anid
exam Information, call- 1-219-736-
4715, ext. P2334. 9 am to 9 pm, 7
days. 3tp 9/15
JOB NOTICE
The City of Port St. Joe will be ac-
cepting applications .for the following
position at the Police Department:
Police; Fire & 911 Dispatcher
Starting Salary $6.21 /hr.
Applications and job description
may be picked up and returned to the
Municipal: Building, 305 Fifth St., be-
ginning Thursday, Sept. 15 Sept.
30, 1994, from 8;00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., Monday Friday.
The City- of Port St. Joe enforces'
a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is
an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative
Action Employer.
THE CITY OF PORT ST, JOE
/s/ Jim Maloy
City Auditor-Clerk
2t 9/15







LOST
Sunday, Sept. 18,
14' Sunfish sailboat,
white with 2 tone
green sail, lost 1
mile south of State
Park on St. Joe Bay.
REWARD!! If found,
call 229-8334
or collect at (205)
692-3524.







G.E. electric stove, white, 30"
wide, free standing. excellent condi-
tion, like new, $200. 227-2157.
New never used. Cozy Leisure-
Pedic electric adjustable bed (twin).
Easy rolling casters, also massage
unit new $1,710. Will sell for $900.
More information call 229-6858 any-
time. 2tp9/22

Baby Grand piano. antique.
sounds great, body needs some resto-
ration. $2.000 or best offer 229-9033
or 904-769-9620. 4tc 9/22

16' tandem axle trailer, 7,000 lb.
capacity. car hauler. $1,000. 20' pon-
toon trailer, $800. Both in excellent
shape, 647-5648. Itp 9/22


Western Auto Special. Computer
spin balance 4 tires and tire rotation.
$19.95. 227-1105. tfc 9/l

Female finch with cage. $15.
Rugs 5'x12', $15. 5x7. $10. Drapes
and bedspreads. $2-$5. 648-8575.
Itc 9/15


5 M mStatement of Ownership.
Management and
S Circulation
iReou,,ea d, 39 u 5 C 8as5'

rnTe car I -| S| ^| Sep. r 1
"'" ... ." Count y
-eek1y v'- : .i :.CJt o' C ,:,

F. C'. BOx )b, count o G.f i, f.rr. Sc. Je, FL ~ -''-'-?'.

Same as Above
6. Full Names and Complete Malng Addrass of Publisher. Editor, and ManagingEditor (This mAI MUSTNOThe blank)
Publi(hr uw, AlVj Cotfn"pl X MAling Ar, Adff
we Ziey ~,a;i-.-.', P.O. Eo. 08, Port 3r.. Ice, FI. 32h56-0308

Wesley R. Ramsey, P. 0. Box 308, Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308
Managing Editlo IhKa md Cople-te Mailins AddMessn



.l l.. C.mu.el- us.,,'. Aajrqll
wetLeh R. t-Fam'e P 0 fy t' 8 F.-,,-r :r "1 F i .-


8. Known Bondhold.,a. Mortgage-s. and Other Secuty Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds. Mortgages or bithe,
Sacurn-t tlflk-r a, wito, So atl~~
Full Name Complete Mailing Addrea



9. For Completion by Nonprofit Organizations Aulhorited To Mael't Special Rates fDMM StShr- 424.12 rl)
The purpose. function. and nonprofit status of this organization and ha exempt status or Federal incomee -ax purposes Chec,1 in,,-
I11 121
E]H.s Not Chingad DOunng Has Changed Ouring ... '' .1
Paading 12 Month, LJPracding 12 Month.
10. Extant and NatuIro Circulation Avarage No. Coi... Each Issue During Actual No. CoPes of Single Issue
iSf iS,,nsct n u nn Jedenl Pecading 12 Monlha Publahad Nearaes to Flng Date
A. Total No. COpl.. (Nt,, Pne" no
B. Paud andlor Ra.quested Circuloton
1. Sales through dealers and carnars, street vndos and counter sales 2 040 3J. .
2. Mail Subscipton
2PmAd oao rtd,,l 1 470 J'15
C. Total Paid andl/o Requeatd Circulation *
rs.ar oflO81ad OB1012) 3, 3,510 3 1o-__
D. Free Dltnbutmon by Mail. Catr o, Othar Mean.
Sample,. Compllmentary. and Other From Copie s 49
E. Total Diitibtion SM, ofC and D 3 -, 55 3,525
F. Copies Not Oistributd
1. Olfice use, left over, unaccounted, spoiled after prtuing 67 86
2. Returnfromn News Agants 140 139
G. TOTAL ISm ./ FI ad 2-shald etl t1 per, un hA... m A 3, 77 5 3,7 50
11 certify that the statement made by Signatur- and Title of Editor. Publisher. Business Manager. or Owner
me above are correct and complete / ( L
PS Form 3526, January I1Wl I. Sr rr,,e n .lrr r', lrufr


Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums. repairs and sales, bags, any-
Sthing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum &
Sewing Machines. Tyndall Parkway,
near Hwy. 22. Panama City. FL
32404. 763-7443 or 1-800-717-7253r
pd. thru 9 1 /94

Attention Attention Atten-
tion: Lawn service & tractor work. B
& J Enterprise, reasonable rates. Call
827-2805 or 827-2876. 52tp 1/7

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study. P. 0.
Box 758. Port St. Joe. FL 32456.


Port SL Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Computerized WHEEL ALIGNMENT.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOOI 227-1105.
Sfc 9/ 1





HAPPY JACK TRIVERMICIDE:
Recognized safe & effective against
hook, round & tapeworms in dogs &
cats. Available O-T-C at BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN, 229-2727.


HAPPY JACK HI-ENERGY DOG
FOOD: Specifically formulated for.
hunting dogs. field competitions, and
growing pups. BARFIELD LAWN &
GARDEN, 229-2727. lOtc 9/22
UKC rat terrier pups. $125 and
treeing feist. $150. Call 648-5306.
tfc 9/I

FREE to good home. yellow lab
approx. 2 years old. Male. house
trained, good dog. Carolyn, 229-1051.
Nancy. 227-2155. ltc 9/22


New full size shovels, $6 while
they last. St. Joe Pawn Shop, 212 Wil-
liams Ave. Iltc 9/22

Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring entire Panama City West-
ern Auto company store advertised
sale prices. 227-1105, 219 Reid
Ave. tfc 9/1

Nice Whirlpool refrigerator, self
defrosting, $200. Call 229-6796.
tp 9/22

Mushroom compost, $14 yard.
tall 648-5165. 2tc 9/22

Daybed, good condition, 229-
6096. .. Itc 9/22'

Oak baby crib, with aqua baby
waterbed, mattress. Call 229-6936.
Itc 9/22

Large satellite dish'with new de-
coder and all other necessary compo-
nents. $799 firm or 'trade for riding
mower. Call after 6:15 p.m., 227-
7206. Itp 9/22

Two .used sliding glass doors and
some windows. Call after 6:15 p.m;,
227-7206. ltp 9/22'

Electric dryer, $75; IBM Select-'
writer II typewriter, $150; 12 zoom
camcorder $300. Golf club set, com-
plete $125. 100% wool Oriental rug,
8'xl 0'$300. Call 639-5019. Itc 9/22

Car top carrier, like new. $40;
concrete yard items, baby bed. an-
tique vanity, antique chase lounge.
Big Barn Flea Market. I tp 9/22

Den furniture, cocoa color, $250;
sofa table all wood walnut $125: ex-
cellent condition four 50" wide rims
for Ford RangL.- $25 each. Call 227-
1234 after 5 p.m. Itc 9/22

2 bedroom mobile home, ready to,
be moved. Nice reasonable, call 647-
3402. 3tc9/15

Crafts make excellent gifts.
Christmas is coming soon so order
yours nowl Assorted types of crafts.
Can also do wedding flowers. Come
by 214 8th St.. PSJ or call Beth at
S229-6325. 4tp 9/8

Tired of flea dips & sprays? Ask'
BARFIELD'S LAWN & GARDEN. 229-
2727 about HAPPY JACK STREAKER!
One streak down the back. around
the neck and down the stomach lasts
14 days. Available O-T-C BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN. 229-2727.
Craftsman tools and Die Hard
batteries are available now at West-
ern Auto Store. 219 Reid Ave. 227-
1105. tfc 9/1


For Sale by Owner: 1.4 acres at
Simmons Bayou. close to golf cours-
es, town and beaches. Call 229-2708.
after 5 p.m. tfic 9/8

3 bedroom home, nicely land-
scaped with big deck and large pool,
plus privacy fence. Good location.
nice neighborhood. Call 229-6713 af-
ter 5:30 p.m. tfe 9/1

14'x70' Fleetwood mobile home
with lot. new cen. ac, 1/2 mile from
Lands Landing. Quiet neighborhood.
paved roads. $24,500. 904-227-1313.
For sale by owner: Brick 3 BR. 2
ba. 2,150 sq. ft. living space. 1.5
acres. Whispering Pines in Wewa. As-
sumable loan to qualified buyer. By
appL 639-2193. tfc 9/[

3 bdrm.. I ba. home. Ceiling,
fans. new carpet, wallpaper, cen. air
cond.. stor. shed & more. Friendly.
quiet neighborhood. Westcott Circle.
$58.000. 904-227-1313. tfc 9/1
Like new remodeled white &
peach block home, Hwy. 71, Honey-
ville, 2 1/2 acres. 1.325 sq. ft.. 3 bd.,
I ba. ch&a, dbl. carport, breezeway.
utility. 278' deep well. new pump &
water softener. Call 639-5804.
tfc 9/1

A MUST SEE, 301 20th St. Large
4 bedroom. 3 bath house on large cor-
ner lot. c/h&a, double garage and
carport. Deck. 4.000 sq. ft. under
roof, abundant storage throughout-.
For appt. call 229-8076 or 784-7841.
tfc 9/1

Owner financing. High and dry. 5
acre homesite. 240 ft. well, septic.
workshop, 1 1/2 mile N. Dead Lakes
Pk, 647-3581. tfc 9/1

Good, single family lot in. Gulf
Aire, 75'x 125'. access to tennis court.
swimming pool, : dedicated beach.
647-5142, tfc 9/I


For Sale- by Ownerl
Beautiful 2 story energy efficient
house on 1 1/2 corner lot. 1916
Forest Park Ave. 2 story foyer.
High ceilings throughout house. 3
lg. bedrooms on second floor.
Master bedroom 16'8"x 176", 1g.
spa tub. walk-In closet. 2 1/2 ba.
Den. vaulted living, coffered din-
ing room. kitchen, breakfast
nook, family rm.. Ig. utility rm., 3
car garage. Privacy fence, patio.
S Call 229-6859.
4tp 9/22


Fantasy Properties, Inc.
1200 U.S. Hwy. 98
S Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478

NEW LISTINGS REALTOR
"Mexico Beach: 126 Miramar Dr. Nice beach side duplex with an
excellent water View. Just steps to the water each side has 2
bedrooms,. 1 bath, with central H/A, fully furnished with dish-
washer, microwave, all appliances. Can be opened to convert to
a 4 br/2 ba;unit. Priced at $155,000.
Grand Isle Subdivision: Lot 3 & 4, Block D, Unit 15 Approx. 70' x
100' each lot Zoned houses only $13,500 each, both for
$23,000. .

. Highland View: 110 2nd St. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Wood.frame
house recently remodeled with a new roof. Includes adjoining lot
with in-place .-septic system for 2 br. mobile home All 'for
$37,900.
St. Joe Beach: 235 Selma St. -' Immaculate 3 bedroom, 2 bath
home on large lot, 1 1/2 blocks to beach. Wired workshop car-
port. Nice, fenced yard. Priced at $54,500.
PRICE REDUCTIONS
Mexico Beach: 101A Miramar Dr. 2 bedroom, 11/2 bath town-
home nicely decorated end unit landscaped lot with sprinkler
system and privacy fence. Waterview from upstairs deck. Handy
location, close to marinas and canal. $60,000. Reduced to
$65,900.

JOHN M. DELORME, Realtor ELLEN F. ALLEMORE, Realtor
ii ---- i


2 bdrm., 1 ba. house for sale,
1080 sq. ft., 5 years old. Located on
1/2 acre comer lot, 7 miles north of
Overstreet on Cemetery Rd. For more
information please call 648-8686, ask
for Patty. tfc 9/1

1029 McClellan Ave., PSJ, for
Sale by Owner: Completely remod-
eled. 3 bdrm. (1 sm., I bath, Fla. rm.,
new roof, carpet, cen. ac/h, wiring,
plumbing, etc. Well w/auto. sprinkler
system, fenced in backyard, $56,000
obo. By appt. only. 229-6861.


Nice corner parcel in Wewahitch-
ka, 200'x140'x119'. 105 Walnut Ave-
nue. For more information call 904-
265-8941. 2tc 9/22

FOR SALE OR TRADE: 44 acres
of beautiful North Georgia mountain
land on paved road, streams, 2 nice
mobile homes for living and caretaker
quarters. $3,500 per acre or will trade
for beach home or condo. Call Evelyn
Bost at 404/719-0638. 5tp 9/22

2 bdrm. two ba. brick home with
2 car attached garage in desirable
Port St. Joe neighborhood. Interior re-
cently professionally decorated w/new
floor coverings, wallpaper, window
treatments & appliances. Home has
approx. 1500 sq. ft, air conditioned
interior featuring formal dining room,
great room. spacious laundry room,
Ig. master bedroom. Many extras in-
cluding glassed in porch, covered pat-
io, 36'x17' pool, stockade fenced yard.
Ideal for empty nesters. 229-8276.
4tp 9/22

For Sale or Trade: On Cemetery
Rd., off 386, 1/2 acre lot w/septic,
electric & wells plus 2 bdrm. trailer,
needs repairs. Plus one acre lot on
386 near tower. Very reasonable. Will
finance. Call 647-8664 days or 648-
4526 evenings. 4tp 9/15

Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath brick
home in White City. No money down.
Must qualify to assume $54.500
mortgage. 827-2997. 4tp 9/15


3 bdrm.. I bath home w/double
carport and utility bldg. AND 2 bdrm.,
2 bath new mobile home w/deck to'be
sold together on 4 lots. Can be seen
at 305 Parker Ave.. Highland View.
Call 227-1131 or 227-3492.
tfe 9/15


1/2 acre lot with septic tank;,
$9,500. Overstreet Road. Owner fi-
nancing, 227-2020, ask for Billy.
tfc 9/1

LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 9/1

Beautiful bay front lot on St. Jo-
seph Peninsula, $55,000. Financing
available. Call 229-6031, leave mes-
sage. tfc 9/1


THE HOME SELLERS

(904) 227-1892 (800) 261-1892

HC I, BOX 210
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456


SUM M ER v CHERL SUMMERS, Broker (Home 229-2740)
PROPERTIES MIKE BRADY, Broker (Home 874-8726)'
TERESA VADDELL, As-ooaae (Home 229-9107)

PORT ST. JOE
515 9TH STREET: 2 or 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 50'X100' lot, excellent con-
dition, cute home. Yard building. $39,000.
523 7TH STREET: 2 or 3 bedroom, 1 bath, stucco, cottage style, par-
tially renovated. Separate building with carport, WILL NOT LAST
LONG. $37,900.
316 2ND STREET: Perfect little home, must see inside to appreciate.
Newly renovated. Underground sprinkler system. Make an offer.
WEWA COUNTRY HOME: 1992, 14'X70' mobile home, 185'X205'
lot, well and septic tank, screened in porch, carport. $34,000.
OVERSTREET: Country home, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, almost new, large
lot, all appliances included. $48,500.
SUNSHINE FARMS LOT: 2.75 acres located on a corner. Beautiful
lot to build a quiet getaway. $13,900.

Call (904) 227-1892 or (800) 261-1892




Elizabeth W. Thompson
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
Office: Hwy. 98 at 19th St., Mexico Beach
Mailing Address: Rt. 3, Box 167, Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Fax: (904) 648-424 7

904-648-5683 or 1-800-582-2990
After Hours: Jay Rish, Associate Broker, 904-229-1070,
Brenda Miller, Salesperson, 904/648-5435
PORT ST. JOE
3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath nestle on a
.. large 141'x150 comer lot. Fruit trees
& a large magnolia. Hardwood floors
throughout. Master bdrm. has its own,
1/2 bath. Kitchen & eating area,
sip'i E some new appliances, walk-in pantry.
Lg. sunken carpeted den, covered
I front porch, cen. h&a, new double
A French doors off kitchen, new insulat-
S. ed windows throughout home. Exteri-,
or trim has just been painted, large walk-in attic. Shallow well, outbuilding with elec.
power. $89,500.

41st Street. One lot 90'x75' zoned tourist residential, lot 20, blk 9, Unit 7, beach-
side of Hwy. 98, $35,000.00. Owner financing at 1% below prevailing rates with
20% down payment.

MEXICO BEACH ACROSS HIGHWAY FROM BEACH
New Listing, Sleepy Hollow Ranch Rd. (off 15th St.) Two bd.. 1 ba. on stilts, new
carpet, LR/DN/kitchen, roof 3-4 years old, new deck. W/H 2-3 years. Lot 75'x185',
$49,500.00. Ask for Brenda.
New Listing, Robin Lane, Lot #9, Block 3, in nice residential subdivision 120' street
frontage x 78' deep. OWNER SAYS SELL.. $,6oG0. Reduced to $11,000. Ask
for Jay.
NEW LISTING: 13th St.,. Mexico Beach. Lot 17, Large lot 120' wide x 90' deep, 1/
\ 2 blk from beach. Nice location for home, Has some shade trees. Good elevation.
$19,500.00.
201 Louisiana Dr.: Partially fum. 3 bd:, 2 ba. double wide on beautiful landscaped
lot w/trees, fenced yd. Cen. h &a, Stone fp. .w/blower. Many extras., including Ig.
shed'work shop, range, refrig., washer & d.w. curtains & draperies, carpet & cov-
ered patio. Some furnishings may be negotiable. 75'x112 1/2'. Reduced
$41,500.00.
COMMERCIAL
Comer of 15th St. & 380. One of the few tracts of acreage zoned 'GENERAL COM-
MERCIAL" left in Mexico Beach approx. 900' on 15th St. and over 500' on 386.
Owner says sell, make offer, price reduced $115,000. For details call or write Eliz-
abeth W. Thompson. -
BEACON HILL
ACROSS HWY. ON BLUFF: Lot 122' hw frontage x 130' deep w/20'x30' garage or
boat house w/loft stor. area. Concr c ltk brick, cedar shakes (new roof added
in '82). Water & electricity. 2 septic'nls o property. $64,750.00.
ST. JOE BEACH
ACROSS HIGHWAY FROM BEACH
New Listing: 3 blocks of LOTS on Gulf, .Selma, Atlantic and Georgia Streets
Mobile homes acceptable. 75'X180' $9,250.00 ea. 90'x150' $17,250.00 ea. and
irregular sizes $17,250.00, owner financing. 15% down payment, balance up to 10
yrs. at 9%. Call Elizabeth W. Thompson for further details.
I LOT 50'x125' on 9Pi e EW11j% < '(t lot back from Hwy.
98 (behind Coronadl't l l h ( JI'lIcllVJt lil1 homes acceptable.
Price reduced $12,500.00. Ask for Jay.
1 LOT 50'x90' with septic tank, cleared, no obstruction of view. You've got to see
this onel A great buy at $32,500.00.
,3 Adjacent Lots 50'x125' each on Magellan/Americus less than one block to
beach. OWNER FINANCING 25% down payment, balance terms negotiable or will
:sell 11/2 lots sell two (2) 75'x125. $12,000.00 each.
COMMERCIAL corner of Desoto and Americus, St. Joe Beach. Mobile home park
situated on six (6) lots (each 75'xl50') in St. Joe Beach, consisting of 12 furnished
mobile homes and 2 mobile homes renting spaces. Call or write for details to Bren-
da. .
OVERSTREET
New Listing:' South Long (Mexico Beach side of bridge) Eight acres more or less,
partially cleared w/planted pines, fenced, facing South Long. Would make excellent
homesite. $40,000.
WETAPPO CREEK (Near Intracoastal Waterway) Four one acre lots with access to
dock. Owner financed, 25% down payment, balance In 5 years at 10% interest Lot
size 130'x300' Mobile homes accepted. lot #7, $7,500.00. Lots 8, 9, 10,
$7,000.00 each. Total for the four, $25,000.00.
WEWAHITCHKA
Hwy. 71, south 1/2 mile before Wewa. Approx. 1.5 acres more or less, two comer
lots, great homesite, $15,000.00 for both. Ask for Brenda.
CAPE SAN BLAS
SECLUDED DUNES LOTS: *R-7lot size 120'x351', $189,500.00. Owner financing
25% down payment, balance in 5 years, 9% interest Prices subject to change with-
out notice. Ask for Elizabeth Thompson.
GULF FRONT LOTS
One lot 100'x692. Owner financing, 25% down, balance in 5 years at 9% interest
TR32. Reduced. $1,000.00. F.F. Ask for Elizabeth.
PARADISE GULF: Lpt #7, 66.67SOD$75,000.o00.
Lot #12, 66.67'x453', $79,500.00.
Lot 8, 66.67'x4UNDBf QMT.AR' Tbr Jay.
GULF SIDE LOTS
New Listing: Gulf Shore Dr., Lots 15 and 16, Cape San Bias Shores, Unit #1,
50'x100', $45,000.
Gulf Shore Drive, Gulf front lot, lots 15, 16 and N 1/2 of Lot 14, Cape San Bias
Shores Subdivision, 62.5'x100' $65,000. See Brenda for details.
Gulf Shores 50'x100' lot in established subdivision with a paved street & gulf ac-
'cess. $23,500. Ask for Jay.
CAPE SAN ALAS GULF SIDE
Nice highway front lot in an established area. Cape Sands Landing. 122'x160', ex-'
tra frontage. Great building site for a residence or a business. This lot comes with
access to the Gulf. A great price at $25,000.00. Ask for Jay.

We have Bayfront Lots starting at $39,500 and several Gulf front
lots starting at $65,000 in Cape San Bias. They are going fast.


Expect the best
Expect the best.!