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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02967
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 15, 1992
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02967

Full Text






12/31/99
ARCHIVES BINDERY
1508 HWY 431-5
ALBERTVILLE AL 35950


USPS 518-880

FIFTY-FIFTH YEAR, NUMBER 07
L.


I'HE


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,1992


911 FundReaches 1/3



o Mark In First Year


Emergency Officials


Getting Anxious for Completion


*










Bob Freeman and Mr. and
Buzzett go through the food
and about 120 other people

120 Turn

Out to Join

'Tig-Pickin'

About 120 people turned
out for the first "Pig-Pickin"
barbecue dinner Friday night
and picked pig until there was
no pig left to pick.
The "Pig-Pickers" consumed
an entire roast pig and all the
trimmings in an event to raise
funds for the Chamber of Com-
merce' attempt at securing
Main Street designation for
Port St. Joe. The event was la-
beled "a complete success" by
g Chamber Manager, Tamara
Laine, who..put the evening of
activities together.
The barbecue was held in-
side the remains of the old
Hobbs Hotel at the north end of
Reid Avenue. The party site
was selected as a symbol of
what "Main Street" is designed
to accomplish.
The Keyettes served at the
affair and the pig was cooked
by Paul Gant. The Highland
View Fire Department helped
with the arrangements.
Brian Upton served as auc-
tioneer during the evening, per-
suading the guests to purchase
everything from a bottle of car
wash to a week end at Barrier
Dunes, for top dollar.
Laine said she was very
pleased with the support and
attendance at the party. "We
raised a good bit of money for
our project. It appears as if we
will clear around $2,000. We
haven't finished totaling up the
final amount as yet, but we did
all right for Main Street," she
said.
The Chamber already has
its application ready and the
necessary papers filled out to
apply for the slots which will be
available next August. An appli- '
cation was filed with the state
committee for the program,
this year, but Port St. Joe was
one of two cities which failed
to make the final three this
year.
Membership in the Main
Street program has helped
many small communities to re-
vive themselves and create a
more vibrant downtown area in
this time of attraction from
large shopping centers. It is
helping small communities sur-
vive.


SMrs. Gannon
line as they
joined in the


Chamber's 'Pig-Plckin" barbecue Friday
night in the old Hobbs Hotel on Reid Avenue
to support Downtown Redevelopment.


Larly Wells, Gulf County's li-
aison man with the planned 911
emergency telephone network for
the County reported Tuesday to
the County Commission that the
first year of collecting sur-charge
money from telephone use was
complete.
'We're about a third through
with our fund collection, but
We're a little under our goal for
purchasing the system we hope
to install," he said. 'We're 11
months into the program and we
have collected about $32,000 and
spent about $2,100 in our prep-
aration work. We feel we will need
about $90,000 minimum and
that figure could just about dou-
ble according to the amount of
sophistication we go for."
Wells said the law allows the
County three years to collect
funds for the 911 system installa-
tion and also requires the pur-
,chase price to be raised from the
surcharge, limited by state, law,
and any grants the County may
secure for the program.
; "I'm just making this report
so you wilt be notified that the
surcharge on the phone bills is
falling a little short of providing
the funds we need to install this
system," Wells said.
CRITICAL OF GFWFC
Billy Traylor offered criticism
of the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission, currently mak-
ing 'improvements to the boat
landing on the Apalachicola River
at the end of State Road 22.
'They have spent $50,000 al-
.ready and have not made the
quality of improvements we made
-at White City for only $15,000,"
Traylor said. The Board was also
critical of the Commission for tak-
ing so long to do the job. "It's
been under construction for more
than a month," Traylor added.
County-Road Superintendent,
Bob Lester, was also critical of
the manner in which the repairs
were being made. "they could
dam off both sides of the ditch,
drying the site up and do their
work in a few days," he said. "In-
(See 911 on Page 3)


City employee Ricky Farmer checks out a recycle con-
tainer and instructions for its use, Tuesday.

"Cooperation Fantastic"
Healy
Public Works Superintendent Frank Healy told The Star
Wednesday morning that 870 special recycle containers had
been checked out to residents on the first two days of distribu-
tion.
Healy said the City plans are to require their use by Novem-
ber .1 andt, 4appars ;as if distribution of the. special containers
S'i be complete by that time. "We passed out containers, a free
supply of bags and printed instructions on what to place in the
bags Monday and Tuesday after 5:00, at the Centennial Building
and the response and cooperation was fantastic," Healy said.
The containers are serially numbered. They are equipped
with wheels for easy, handling and should be placed on the
shoulder of the street on your pick-up day with the bagged de-
bris inside.
The Centennial Building distribution center will remain ac-
tive all this week. Beginning Monday of next week the containers
will be available at the City Warehouse on Tenth Street.


Lagoon Oysters Returning

After Nearly A Two-Year Ban On Their Harvest by DNR


Indian Lagoon will be opened
once again to the taking of oys-
ters during the month of Novem-
ber. The Lagoon has been closed
to oyster taking for nearly two
years because of a claim by the
state Department of Natural Re-
sources that the Lagoon had poor
water quality.
During the meantime, Gulf
County has closed a drainage
ditch which has emptied into In-
dian Lagoon for several years.
During past months of monitor-
ing water quality the state's con-
cerns have been eased about
health risks of eating oysters pro-
duced in the Lagoon. At its meet-
ing last week the Cabinet adopted
a recommendation to reopen 498
acres of the lagoon for six months
of the year.
QUALITY STILL MARGINAL
'The water quality is still
marginal," said David Hell, chief
of the Department of Natural Re-
sources', bureau of marine re-
sources. The opening is designed


to accommodate the leaseholders
and the public.
Back .in 1990, the U.S. Food
and Drug Administration was so
critical of Florida's water quality
monitoring program that it hinted
of banning the export of all Flori-
da shellfish. DNR acted quickly to
close some shellfishing areas
where water quality was poor and
to concentrate on improving mon-
itoring of other areas. The west-
ern portion of the Lagoon was
closed to oyster harvesting.
The oyster producers also at-
tacked DNR's testing methods
which produced the closure or-
der. They claimed the testing was
not definitive enough to fully de-
termine just what the so-called
pollution was and if it was, in-
deed, definitely harmful.
NURSERY CLOSED
An oyster nursery had been
established in the Lagoon to raise
oysters for the half-shell trade
which was forced to suspend op-


erations when the Lagoon was
closed two years ago. "I don't
know if we will start up the nur-
sery again,, or not," Jim McNeill,
III, of Indian Pass Oyster Compa-
ny, told The Star, 'Thursday.
'Things are too uncertain right
now. We don't even know, yet,
what day in November we will be
able to resume oyster harvesting.
DNR hasn't told us. We Just know
it will be 30 days after they date
the order."
The areas to be re-opened will
be designated "conditionally ap-
proved," meaning they will be
closed temporarily after heavy.
rainfall. Otherwise, they will be
open April 1 through June 30
and October 1 through December
31.
The eastern portion of the La-
goon is open then and from Janu-
ary 1 to March 31.
'We already have producers
who are ready to go," McNeill
said. "There is no shortage of oys-
ter gatherers."


Fishermen Plan Protest of Proposed Mullet Rule


Tallahassee may never be the same again.
The Florida Seafood Producers and Consu-
mers Association will be in the State Capitol
Tuesday, in attendance at the monthly meet-
ing of the State Cabinet. For the second
month in a row, the Cabinet will make a deci-
sion of vital interest to a segment of Gulf
County's seafood industry. The decision,
Tuesday, is not limited to Gulf County fisher-
men, however.
The Florida Marine Fisheries Commission
is attempting to place more limits on mullet
fishermen which the fishermen claim will cut
their income in half. Last year, limits were
placed on mullet harvesters, limiting the tak-
ing of mullet to Monday through Friday noon
during the roe season months of October


through December.
These regulations had as their stated pur-
pose, protecting the spawning mullet, thus
preserving the species. Mullet have long been
a delicacy along the Gulf Coast, along with
their roe.
NEW PROPOSED RESTRICTIONS
New regulations to be presented to the
Cabinet for approval Tuesday, would limit the
harvesting action to every other week, October
through December. Naturally, the producers
are up in arms and will advance on the Cabi-
net meeting in force Tuesday. "We should
have upwards of 2,500 fishermen there," said
Pat McFarland, of Port St. Joe, chairman of
the Seafood Producers' group. "We can't stand
still and allow the Marine Fisheries Commis-


sion to cut our livelihood in half."
The fishermen aren't going empty handed
either. With the support of county and city
governments all along the coastline, McFar-
land says they will present resolutions of sup-
port from virtually every county and city rep-
resented by their membership. That means
practically every coastal county in the state of
Florida.
Senator Pat Thomas and Representative
Robert Trammell have declared themselves on
the side of the fishermen and promised to be'
present and help present the fishermen's case
to the cabinet.
BIOLOGIST SAYS MULLET PLENTIFUL
"I feel we have a good chance to win this
one, but we can't take this thing for granted,"


McFarland said. "Even their own biologist,
Behzed Mahmoudi, has said in an open Ma-
rine Fisheries meeting in just recent weeks
that the mullet are not a threatened species.
He said there are a sufficient number escap-
ing harvest each year to more than keep the
species plentiful. With a report like this we
can't see how they can continue to pursue a
mullet restriction of such magnitude," McFar-
land said.
The Marine Fisheries Commission is treat-
ing its proposed mullet restrictive rule as an
emergency to "save the species."
'There's no emergency," McFarland said.
"We mullet fishermen are certainly not going
to fish ourselves out of business. There is a
next year, too!" McFarland concluded.


Brian Upton, auctioneer, shouts, "Sold to the man hid-
ing behind the post; a $25 gift certificate for $35!"


The 'Pig-Pickin" roast pig was picked about as much as
a delicious pig can be picked at Friday night's affair.


a


rrAL













^STHE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15.1992


EPA Sues El


"Shotgun" Tactics Doesn't

Spare Even the Smallest City
Last week we were moaning over the fines EPA had placed
against the City of Port St. Joe; unjustly, we thought. It doesn't
seem fair to fine a City, trying its best to comply with EPA's
wishes, no matter how unfair these wishes may seem to be.
A matter we forgot to mention last week is that the City of
Port St. Joe has paid an average of $18,000 a month for a period
of more than two years for independent testing to make sure
they are not polluting the Bay or anything else. It seems as how
that should be a show of good intent and evidence of "going the Decec
extra mile" to comply with EPA's rules and regulations. believe I'
But enough of that. You have read the news and seen the TV pretty spiful
beautiful
reports of the last week of what EPA has done to a host of small me up an
northwest Florida towns. Towns like Vernon with 900 popula- ing me or
tion, Apalachicola, with its 2500 people, Blountstown with their Ing me "1
3000 people. All of these small towns have been levied hefty kind'a lke
fines, just like Port St. Joe. This is devastating to them. Port St. down anc
Joe has St. Joe Forest Products Company as a customer for its good look
Wastewater Treatment Plant to charge a part of the fine against, don't say
but St. Joe Forest Products Company even has limits as to how can tell he
deep its pocket is and it has been levied fines of its own. every time
deep I can see
How will these small towns make it? By raising their water What I an
anrid sewer rates to unnatural levels, is how. We can't help but that other
wonder if EPA would rather have the populations of these small waits till
communities using septic tanks, or would they rather have them he makes
using their present sewer treatment facilities, regardless of their me. And
supposed frailties? close to ti
It would seem that EPA would try to work with the communi- reach rigid
ties and assist them in providing sufficient sewage treatment
rather than put them all into bankruptcy trying to meet their de-
mands and pay hefty fines also. Especially with the larger cities
getting by with dumping untreated wastes into rivers, creeks
and bays, with impunity every day.

Welcome, Vince!
We want to welcome former Senator Vince Bruner to the
fourth estate. He and two partners are, starting up a south Wal-
ton County newspaper which they will publish twice a week in a
growing area of Walton County.
We wish him luck because he will need it, along with a lot of
hard work and plenty of money. Starting a newspaper these
days is no penny-ante project. The machines needed to produce
a newspaper come pretty dear, as the Senator will find out.
[ The Senator gave us a call several weeks ago to talk about
his" new venture, asking how we thought the new newspaper
would do in the area it was to serve. We told him it ought to do
fine if he could sell enough advertising to support it. 1
Bruner is a young man with a lot of energy and good sense.
He should do just fine, if he doesn't try to get too big before his
finances will support it. Bruner quit the Senate for all the right
reasons at a time when we needed young men of his stripe. He
should do well in the publishing business, if he concentrates on
publishing a newspaper for the right reasons also. A newspaper
is something like a Senator, a servant of the people.


Watching the Series

The World Series of baseball is getting underway and for the
next few days they will have our undivided attention for about
three hours each day. Sort of a mini-vacation, you know. -
The series comes later in October than it formerly did before
all the different play-off games started. If the leagues keep ex-
panding and the play-off games increase, the baseball season
will soon last longer than the basketball season, which runs
from October through July.
The high salaries of baseball players these days, causes the
team owners to do some strange things, just to meet the payroll.
Concessions at the ballpark are sky-high in price, tickets aren't
exactly cheap, and every team is looking for a television station
to carry their games and supply them with a sizeable royalty.
Here We are in our twilight years of life, and we have never
been to a World Series baseball game. We're not likely to get the
opportunity to go, either.
With a big league team here in our back yard, so to speak,
it's just as difficult to attend as if they were in New York. Calling
their number for Series tickets on the first day of offering, we
were told the tickets were sold out in an hour. Only 800 tickets
were available and a million and a half fans tried to buy
them.


Hunker Down with Kes


1


I Can't Tell You Everything !


mnber 1947 O.K., I
ve figured out that I'm
cial to that dark haired,
lady who keeps picking
.d feeding me and hold-
n her shoulder and call-
'her little angel." And I
e that big guy that leans
d peers at me over the
ing lady's shoulder. He
hardly anything and I
&'s a little uncomfortable
he picks me up but
the pride in his eyes.....
m having trouble with is
r guy. The little one! He
no one is looking, then
these weird faces at
I know not to get too
hose bars why, he'll
ht through those slats


and try to pull me out of this bed.
He throws things like baseball
bats and ice skates and dirty
clothes hampers and kitchen
sinks over that top bar. He
bombs me with sadistic glee! Who
is that guy?
October 19, 1948 -
"....happy birthday dear L-E-O-N,
happy birthday to youl" O.K., I've
had his name for a while now. I
don't think he likes me very
-much. Back there where I was
trying to get up on my hind legs
and move around like everyone
else, he'd come flying off the top
of the couch yelling "bombseye"
and pile drive me into that tall Ze-
nith radio.
You could understand I was
having a little trouble liking him.
What I really didn't like was MY
Mother making such a fuss over
him. And you should have seen
them for the last month or so -
Leon had started in the first
grade back in August. My Mother
carried on so about how he was
growing up, becoming her little
man near 'bout made me want
to throw up.


August 1953- "........Kenny
BuUer,"
"Here."
"Pam Collins," Miss Carolyn
was a'calling roll. It was my first
day and I was scared to death.
Leon had told me about the beat-
ings and the needles and the elec-
tric shocker she kept in her bot-
tom right hand drawer.,
"Here."
"Kesley Colbert."
"He-"
"COLBERTI Are you Leon's
little brother?"
'Yes, ma-"
"I'll tell you one thing. You're
not going to be jumping out that
window like your brother. And I
don't want any glue in our clay.
And we do not eat chalk or throw
erasers. And you're not going to
the bathroom EVER if I catch you
one time pulling that fire
alarm....."
It had been five years but I
believe she remembered ole Leon.
August 1955 .....Kenny
Butler, Pam Collins, Kesley Col-
bert COLBERTI Listen class,


Folks In Gulf County Are Concerned Over Your Welfare


FOLKS IN GULF County are.
sure concerned over your welfare,
I have found out. For the past
seven weeks I have explained at
least a 1,000 times that my right
digit Is all done up in a cast and a
cumbersome bandage because I
had surgery on my hand.
Everywhere I go, someone
asks about my hand, tries to help
me navigate at whatever task I'm
doing, serve my plate at dinner
meetings, etc.
Old "Care Bear" out at Radio
Station WMTO even offered to
make a recording of my answer to
keep me from having to repeat it
every time.
I have had my wife putting on
my socks for the past seven
weeks and buttoning my collar
button on the occasions where I
needed a collar button fastened. I
had to learn to eat left-handed, in
order to get as much as I wanted.
Frenchie thought she had me
where she wanted me. She
thought she would have to feed


Etaoin Shrdlu


by Wesley Ramsey


me and could regulate the
amount of the portions I ate. I
learned to eat left-handed.
I learried to bathe, comb my
hair, shave, brush my teeth,
dress myself, hold a newspaper
up with one hand to read, drive
the car, operate this computer, of
sorts, with one hand and put my
shirt tail in. But, I never learned
to operate the lawn mower, or
weed trimmer, nor how to carry
things, such as garbage, with my
only hand.
I HAVE ONLY one more week
to go of wearing this cast. It's


about time I was getting rid of it,
too. There are those who live
around me who are beginning to
have second thoughts about my
not being able to do certain
things. Some heartless folks are
beginning to feel like I am taking
advantage of my right hand all
bundled up inside a cast.
There are no thoughts, any
more, of sympathy for the huge
six-penny nails the doctor put all
the way through my wrist. They
had no feelings about having to
get a pair of vise-grips to pull
them out. No sympathy at all.
One lady, who is a nurse, ex-


amined my hand at church one
day, turning it over and examin-
ing it from every angle. She didn't
-ask about what kind of procedure
the doctor performed. She didn't
ask how long the incision was,
nor how many stitches, nor the
pain, nor the blood, nor the dis-
comfort. No, she didn't ask about
any of that.
She patted my bandaged arm
with a sort of self-satisfied look,
and remarked, "My. whoever
bandaged your arm certainly did
a neat jobi"
I appreciated that. I think.
I had to direct congregational
singing at my church one Sun-
day, so I had to use my left hand
to do it. I have to get special in-
structions on how to get a drink
of water with my left hand!.
One guy thought he was pay-
ing me a compliment when he
told me, 'You do a better job with
your left hand. I didn't even real-
ize I was singing left-handed."
I must do a terrible job with


my right hand.

THAT'S THE SORT of thing
which has me concerned about
the use of this left hand. Back
when I first became left-handed,
Arden Stephens, who is afflicted
with having to use a left hand as
his primary appendage, told me,
'You just let yourself go and en-
joy that left hand. Why, after a
while of using it, you won't want.
to go back to that right hand
again."
Wrong! I'm counting the days
when I can use my right hand
again. To be able to cut my meat,
to chase down a green bean on
my plate, to wash my face and
hands normally, and a number of
tasks.
Just don't you expect mira-
cles. I will still make mistakes.
That hasn't been repaired, but
one would think, that after being
out of commission for seven
weeks, everything should be re-


paired.
Kesley had a similar idea the
other day. He came by and re-
marked, "Boy, I feel greatly I got
up early this morning and ran
three miles. I haven't done that in
a long time."
But he didn't make it by the
office the next day to tell me he
couldn't get out of bed that day.
When you don't use these
things for a while, they get.rusty.

IT'S ALL COMING off next
Friday. If the doctor even looks
like he wants to put another one
back on--even if his neat bandag-
es get raves from retired nurses--
I may just pick up my used cast
and hit him over the head with it
or otherwise resist any effort he
may use to replace one cast with
another. A person can go Just so
long without bathing under his
left armpit without causing social
problems among his friends and
acquaintances.


Dt fSt. Joseph Bay
S Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
\ Oct. 16 1:22 a.m. H 2.0 12:16 p.m. L 0.0
\ Oct. 17 2:12 a.m. H 2.0 1:20 p.m. L 0.0
SI Oct. 18 3:12 a.m. H 2.0 2:09 p.m. L 0.1
.- Oct. 19 4:10 a.m. H 1.9 3:02 p.m. L 0.2
Oct. 20 5:15 a.m. H 1.7 3:41 p.m. L 0.4
Oct. 21 6:36 a.m. H 1.4 3:45 p.m. L 0.7
:j Oct. 22 12:00 a.m. H 1.0 2:27 a.m. L 0.8
9:06 a.m. H 1.1 2:54 p.m. L 0.9
-., 9:45 p.m. H 1.2


*-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
SWAIN/ USPHS 518880 Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-$10 60 Six Months
I W// Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue The Star Out of Couny-21.20Year Out of County-S,5.90 Six Months
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456-0308 Post Office Box 308
by TheStar Publishing Corpany TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 other than amount received for such advertisement.
"ifgv Wesley R. Ramsey........... Editor & Publisher
William H. Ramsey .......... Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
'VSPA' Frenchie L. Ramsey .......... Office Manager* AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ......... Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


41 Mljkl2)A


do not bring any B-B's in this
room and no one is to re-arrange
the pictures of our presidents and
don't ever think about putting a
dead animal on the radiator."
Does everyone remember
Leon?
Any Saturday Afternoon Be-
tween July 1952 and Septem-
ber 1958 "Leon, here's your
quarter and one for Kesley and
here's David's. You watch your
brothers, make surp they get in
the show all right And get them
some popcorn. You make sure
ya'll get home together. Son,
you're the oldest. You take care of
'em."
Leon opened up my world to
Roy, Gene and Hoppy.
June 1956 "Leon, I can't
catch another ground ball, my
hands-"
"Listen, you didn't have a
very good year last year. Every-
thing went by you this year
you're going to be the best 9-year-
old this little league has ever
seen.....we've still got daylight
and you've got room for improve-
ment."
March 1960 "Kesleyl
Come look at this!" I was eating
lunch in the cafeteria. "Larry Ri-
dinger is hanging upside down
from the top of the flag pole! Now
who would have tied him......."
August 1962 "What are
you doing home?"
"Ah, Leon, I quit football.
Those coaches hollering, all that
running. I never did -"
'You're not going to quitr' He
had me by the shirt collar lift-
ed me plum off the ground.
'You're going back out there. No-
body in this family quits not
ever! You understand! If I'd had
half of your ability.........."
April 1963 "Son, did you
hear that some boys took the red
light off of Mr. Pinsom's police
car?"
'Yes, ma'am."
'You weren't involved were
you?"
"Oh, no, ma'am."
"Have you seen Leon today?"
July 1963 We were down
at the river, swimming. We'd been
talking about fighting alligators
and that picture show, Tarzan
Goes to New York and taking
turns seeing who could stay un-
der the longest when I heard the
Tarzan yell. I looked up in time to
see Leon diving off the bridge. It
had to be a hundred feet to the
water........
October 1992 A lot of folks
are amazed that he has made it
to his 50th birthday. It also
amazes me what my mind recalls
as I travel back over 40 years or
so with him. I'll tell you this, fol-
lowing him was never dull.
I called Paula, wife of 30
years and saint of all saints, to
say that I was coming to be with
him at the half century mark.
Hes not at home He'd heard
about a group that was trying to
shoot some rapids on the Cas-
cade River in a 1954 style phone
booth. Paula said he was in Wyo-
ming or maybe Colorado. She
said he was excited.......the group
had voted to let him steer........
Thanksfor everything,
K.C.


I-'









THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. OCT. 15, 1992


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


Helen Keller and


the Other Woman
A week or so back, while flipping through the TV channels try-
ing to find a decent show to watch, I came across a program that
caught my eye. The scene was a group of people sitting at a table
drinking and suddenly two of the men stood up and started kissing.
Their kiss wasn't a kiss on the cheek, as in a father and son
kiss, either. It was a full-on-the-mouth, man-and-woman type kiss
that lasted for several seconds. It was a raunchy, repulsive kiss
that almost made me sick. I couldn't believe what I was seeing.
Then the camera focused on TOW (the other woman) and she
laughed and made a statement that cannot be printed in a human
publication. I' couldn't believe what TOW said, either, because she
is a famous singer. Well, maybe infamous.
Suddenly' it seemed, the scene changed to a bedroom where
TOW was perched on a bed with a sheet partially covering her. I
can't describe the details of what happened there-under, but for a
few minutes it looked like a men's shower and appeared that TOW
was the proctor.
All of this happened within a few minutes and just before I was
about to throw up, I changed channels.
I don't consider myself a prude. As a matter of fact, I've seen
some dog-and-pony shows in my life, but never in my wildest did I
think I would ever see anything like the show TOW put on that
night, especially on public television.
Shortly thereafter I went to bed. When I lay down I picked up
the May edition of Reader's Digest. The second article I read was,
"Quotable Quotes" and the third quote on the list was: "Don't con-
fuse fame with success.. 'TOW' is one; Helen Keller is the other."
Erma Bombeck, one of my favorite authors, said that.
My wife, I think, put things in proper perspective when I told
her what I had -seen. She said, "Why does she have to do those
things? She has all the fame and money anyone would ever want."
Erma said, basically, the same thing. The inference I drew from
Erma's quote was that the line between being famous and infamous
is sometimes very, very thin. Believe it or not, there are those in our
society who think Ted Bundy is a famous person. I believe he is ex-
actly what he should be; a dead person.
There is no doubt, however, about the "Star" quality of Helen
Keller, and her star makes TOWs fame invisible by comparison.
Helen Keller, for those of you who don't know her or have for-
gotten who she was, was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama in 1880. Be-
fore ,she was two-years-old "brain-fever" destroyed her sight and
hearing. For almost five years she was a "wild and unruly" child,
unable to show pleasure except by giggling or chuckling. Displeas-
ure was shown by kicking, scratching or uttering the choked
screams of the deaf-mute.
Shortly before she was seven, arrangements were made for
Anne Sullivan to take care of and teach-Helen. The rest is history.
By the time Helen was 16 she was able to speak and enrolled at
Radcliff where she graduated with honors in 1904.
The rest of her life was devoted to helping others, especially the
blind. She toured the world making speeches that were beacons of
hope to others with disabilities like hers. She wrote many articles
and books and later started the Helen Keller Endowment Fund, a
organization to help the handicapped.
Helen Keller died in 1968, but remains a legend in the annals of
heroic women; a woman who overcame insurmountable odds to
achieve success and happiness, and then passed it on to others.
As for TOW, cqmnedian Steve Allen, said it best in the paper this
morning. He said, "On'e worsyimbolfzes the decline of contempo-
rary Western culture. Madonna."
Amen, Brother Allen, amen!


Hospital Improving

After Hard Struggle


After getting the attention of
his audience with., a couple. of
card tricks, Brian Upton, Gulf
Pines. Hospital.: administrator,
gave the Kiwanis ..Club a short
.synopsis of the services-provided
by the Hospital and the role :of
the U.S;. government' in medical,
care.. -
Upton said all hospitals oper-
ate under strict government regu-
latioris with the 'federal goverri-
ment telliflg doctors how long a
patient' can be hospitalized with
particular ailments. 'This power
was taken by the government in
1985 and is steadily becoming
more restrictive "eery yedr," the
speaker said. "In the medicare
program, the rules regulate the
amount to be charged for treating
certain illnesses, the medication
to be given and the length of stay
in a hospital."
"And it's going to get worse


The Star
Your Hometown
Newspaper!


before it gets better," Upton said.
Gulf Pines must operate un-
der- these rules just as all other
hospitals do.
Upton said the, owners of Gulf
Pines are making progress toward
furnishing quality medical care to
their service area at a reasonable
cost, 'in a pleasing setting. "It's
been hard though," he said.
"When we took over the hospital
it had an enormous debt. which
we had to assume. That debt is
gradually disappearing and we
are keeping our head above wa-
ter. We are steadily improving the
quality and number of our servic-
es and our image with the pub-
lic."
Gulf Pines operates 29 beds
of its allotted 45. 'The hospital
has never operated with its full
capacity of beds," Upton said. The
hospital furnishes clinic service
and a full emergency' room.
'"We're beginning to get compli-
ments because' the service is
quicker at Gulf Pines than in area
emergency rooms," the speaker
said. Upton said the hospital is
one of the major employers in the
Port St. Joe area. 'We employ 80
well trained professionals on a
round-the-clock basis."


l

For Take Out Orders, Call 227-1670
Closed Sunday & Monday

The World's Finest ,.
*Oysters
*Clams
*Shrimp
*Crabs


Enjoy the best from St.
Joseph Bay and Indian
Lagoon with us.

INDIAN PASS

RAW BAR
(ON C-30 SOUTH OF PORT ST. JOE


Gulf Coast College "Adopts" PSJES
Gulf Coast Community Col- ed the formal "adoption certifi- During the year GCCC facul- ers will visit the GCCC campus.
lege has "adopted" Port St. Joe cate" to school principal Gerald ty from each academic division The purpose of the program
Elementary School. GCCC Presi- Lewter on October 7 during a spe- will present a program to elemen- is to enhance the current educ
dent Dr. Bob McSpadden present- cial assembly program, tary students and all sixth grad- tional experiences of these sti


m
a-
u-


dents, according to GCCC Adopt-
A-School liaison Alexandra Mur-:
phy. The Adopt-A-School program .
is designed to be both an enjoya-
ble and interesting experience.
Hopefully it will lead to increased
interest in school and, eventually
continue on to higher education..


Shown in the photo is Meredith Godfrey, president of the Student
Council, Gerald Lewter, left, principal and Dr. Bob McSpadden, presi-
dent of Gulf Coast College.


The '92 Gulf Follies Revue
will be held on Thursday, Novem-
ber 5th at Port St. Joe' High
School. Come on out and support
your local talent from Gulf
County and Mexico Beach.
You'll be entertained by sing-
ers, dancers, magicians, comedi-
ans and much more.
The event is co-sponsored by
Gulf County Association for Re-
tarded Citizens (GCARC) and the
Port St. Joe Rotary Club.
For further information on
specially priced advance tickets,
call 229-6327 or 229-6599 or see
any Rotarian or employee of
GCARC.



(Continued from Page 3
stead, they're trying to pour the
slabs on the hill and push then
under water into place."
TRAYLOR HONORED
Billy Traylor, chairman for
the past year, was congratulated
for his activities as chairman and
presented with the gavel he had
used during his tenure.
Al Ray assumed the position
of chairman at Tuesday's meet-
ing.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters to
come before the Board during the
short session, the Commission:
-Paid Fisher Construction
$26,500 for the new roof on the
Library building, after agreeing to
replace items damaged by water.
-Heard a report from Sheriff
Al Harrison that a "No Passing"
zone was needed for both sides of
.the White City bridge.


Guidance BOD
The Board of Directors of the
Gulf County Guidance Clinic, Inc,
will hold its regularly scheduled
meeting on Tuesday, October 27
at 5:30 p.m. ET. The meeting will
be held in the Guidance Clinic
conference room in Port St. Joe.


"Good
Neighbor service
makes State Farm
unique...
my policyholders
swear by it
year after
year. 9 9


CALU NIE.

Bill -
Wood
101 Wllliams Ave.
229-6514






likc .t (1)(d n( cighbor


Highland View (Creel) 12:15
Highland View (Pate) 12:45
Port St Joe High 12:30.
If you have any questions re-
garding this schedule, call S.M.
: Eubanks at 227-1204.


Gulf Coast Community College professor Dennis Poole presented a
lesson in marine biology to students at Port St. Joe Elementary
School.


TWogether,


We'll Make It Happen


We know what it's like to find that perfect home. Just the right size, looks
great and has everything you've always wanted. With a loan from us,
you can own your dream home...affordably!
That's because'we'll work with you to find the financing that's just right
for your budget. And, we won't keep you waiting. From application to
approval, you'll get the prompt, personal service you truly deserve.
Ask us for details today. we'll do all we can to make that ideal home
Vour Very O\n.
Together, We're Strong!

CITIZENS FEDERAL

SAVINGS BANK


PORT ST. JOE: 401 5th St. & Williar
APALACHICOLAK 58 4th St. & Ave.


ms 227-1416 \
D 653-9828 '*....**
"* t ,:--,- '--,: ., ; ,' MN ',' P' S ACP NA13 l q 01 90


.t", '.,-


PAGE 3A


_________ ____ __~


: ::~I-


1
]
(


...


A"DA`R,











Couple Exchanges Wedding Vows


Sissy Burke

Engaged
Mrs. W.T. Burke of Port St. rently employed by Faith Chris-
Joe is proud to announce the tian School.
'forthcoming marriage of her Scott is a 1991 graduate of
daughter, Alicia Francine Burke Port St. Joe High School, and is
to Scott Taylor Godwin, son of currently attending Haney Tech-.
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Godwin, nical School.
also of Port St. Joe. The couple plans to unite in
Alicia "Sissy" is a 1986 gradu- the Christian covenant of mar-
ate of Port St. Joe High School. riage on April 3 at 7:30 p.m. at
She recently received a Master of the First Baptist Church of Port
Science degree in Education from St. Joe. All friends and relatives
Troy State University, and is cur- are invited to attend.



Come Join




for our

FALL CRAFTS BAZAAR

October 17 8:30 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
Highland View Assembly of God Church
Highland View, Florida

*Crafts *Fish Fry *BBQ Sandwiches

*Homemade Cakes and Pies


Melissa Lynn Adkison and
William A. Mosley were joined in
marriage on September 12 at the
First Baptist Church in Wewa-.
hitchka. Judge David L. Taunton
performed the double-ring, can-
dlelight ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
Tim Adkison of Chipley and Patsy
Whitfield of Wewahitchka. She is
the granddaughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Floyd Adkison of Chipley.
The bridegroom is the guardi-
an son of Mr. and Mrs. Arlan Guf-
fey of Wewahitchka. He is the,
grandson of Helen Roberts and
Thomas Roberts, both of Wewa-
hitchka.
The bride was beautifully at-
tired in a full length white satin
gown with dropped v-shaped
waist in front and back. The scal-
loped neckline, sleeves, waist,
and train were heavily scrolled
with baby seed pearls and irides-
cent sequins. The fingertip illu-
sion veil was accented within"
strands of baby seed pearls. She
carried a cascading bridal bou-
quet of white roses accented with
small cranberry red roses, ribbon,
and seed pearl streamers. *
Amanda Moore of Jacksorn-
ville was the matron of honor.
Mildred Adkison, Katrina Guffey,
and Stacle McGill of Wewahitch-
ka, and Monica Collins of Talla-
hassee were bridesmaids. The
bride's attendants were attired in
tea length, drop-waist style ba-


roque satin dresses in the bride's
chosen color of cranberry. They
carried bouquets of small white
roses with cranberry accent flow-
ers and ribbon streamers.
Anisa Chaudry of Panama
City and Brittany Brock of Chi-
pley were flower girls. They wore
tea length dresses made of white
voile with a cranberry satin sash.
The bride's book was attend-
ed by Wendi Usery and Joy Adki-
son of Chipley.
Arlan Guffey of Wewahitchka
was the bridegroom's best man
and Kody Bidwell of Wewahitchka
was the ring bearer. Philip Adki-
son of Chipley, and Billy Joe Smi-
ley, Jamey Guffey and John Guf-
fey of Wewahitchka were
groomsmen. Jarrod Adkison of
Chipley, Haywood Shealy of We-
wahitchka, and Toby Perez of Or-
lando were ushers. Grey tuxedos
were chosen for the groomsmen.
The wedding was directed by
the bride's aunt, Sue Hanlon of
Port St. Joe. She was assisted by
Julie Whitfield of Panama City
and Nicole Watts of Chipley. Pre-
nuptial musical selections and
wedding marches were played by
Amy Waldorf, organist, of Wewa-
hitchka. Dwayne Layton of Wewa-
hitchka assisted with sound- and
lighting.
After the lighting of the can-
dles and seating of the mothers,
In This Very Room was sung by
-Jenny Hammon, vocalist, of We-


wahitchka. The groom and bridal
attendants entered to Trumpet
Tune and the flower girls and
bride, escorted by her father, en-
tered to Lohengrin's Bridal Chor-
us, after which Mrs. Hammon
presented the couple's chosen
theme song All I Have.
Following the wedding vows
and exchanging of rings, the
couple celebrated the lighting of
the unity candle while the vocal-
ist sang Love Is The Reason. The
marriage was blessed and prayer
was offered by Judge Taunton,
and Mrs. Hammon sang The Wed-
ding Prayer. The bridal party exit-
ed the church to the recessional
march Trumpet Voluntary.
Following the wedding, a re-
ception was held in the church


* AUTO
ACCIDENTS
* WORK
INJURIES
* INSURANCE
ACCEPTED
* ATTORNEY
CASES


social hall. Sue McDaniel of We-
wahitchka was kitchen hostess,
and the bride's aunts, Lyndal
Richardson and Marileigh Adki-
son of Chipley, attended the
bride's cake. Gloria Wood and
Shannon Whitfield of Wewahitch-
ka cut the groom's cake, and De-
bra, Jennifer and Tammy Davis of
Wewahitchka served punch. Jen-
nifer Rogers of Panama City
passed around the basket of
Thank You scrolls and handed
out rice bags.
After a wedding trip to Gatlin-
burg, Tennessee, the couple is re-
siding in Norfolk, Virginia. The
groom is a Navy Electronics Tech-
nician II in the field of nuclear
power aboard the carrier U.S.S.
Eisenhower.


HEADACHES
NECK PAIN
BACK PAIN
ARM/HAND
PAIN
LEG/FOOT
PAIN
S 2nd
OPINIONS


EXPERIENCED CONVENIENT CARING


Mo.- r.yApponten

Evnng at MAvailable


1301 Monument


PORT ST. JOE Corner 13th 82Monument


DAR Meets
Wednesday
The St. Joseph Bay Chapter,
Daughters of the American Revo-
lution, will meet Wednesday, Oc-
tober 21 at 12:00 noon ET at the
Garden Center.
Lee "Pal" Rivers, Clerk of the
Circuit Court, Franklin County,
will present the program. "Apa-
lachicola, Past and Present."
Hostesses will be Mesdames
Gerald Stokoe, Mark Lamberson,
Eda Ruth Taylor and M.D. Allen.


Top of the Gulf
Restaurant and Lounge
Hwy. 98'* Mexico Beach
Overlooking Canal Park
S Winter Hours
Mon-Thur: 4-9 CT
Ji Fri & Sat: 4-1I0 CT
Closed on Sunday

Leisurely Dining at its Finest!
Featuring PRIME RIB and SEAFOOD


NIGHTLY SPECIALS -
M o n:. C a tfish ..........................................
S Tues.:' G rouper .....................
` -. W ed.: Flounder ...................
-': Thurs.: Mate's Prime Rib


Fashion Tea


New Bethel A.M.E. Church
Senior Missionary Society will
sponsor a Fashion Tea (Hats on
Parade)' on -Saturday, October
17th at 6:00 p.m. at the church,
located corner of Highway 98 and
Avenue C.
Please come and witness an
array of beautiful spring, sum-
mer, ,and winter fashions and
hats.


$7.95
10.95
10.95
10.95


Fri.: Mate's Platter.............. 10.95
Sat.: Mate's Platter ............. 10.95
Sun.: Lasagna ........................8.95


Samuel D. Sweazy (Sam)

named Farm Bureau

Insurance

agent for Gulf

County
We are pleased to an-
nounce that Sam Sweazy has
been named as the Farm Bu-
reau Insurance Agent for the
Gulf County Farm Bureau.
The agency manager is Ray-
mond Russell of the Calhoun Sam Sweazy
County office.
Mr. Sweazy will serve the Farm Bureau member
families with a full range of insurance coverage;
needs, including life, fire, and casualty.
Sam is the son of Billy Joe and Joyce Sweazy of
Port St. Joe, and grandson of Pelham and Beatrice
Revell of Panama City. It is with much anticipation
that Sam looks forward to serving the Farm Bu-
reau families as he returns to Port St. Joe with his
family: wife, Stephanie and children, Rachel and
Zane.


Gulf Co. Farm Bureau
528 A 5th St.
227-2106


PAG 4AA


THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 15, 1992


'11 I l~ilt~~ -1 IEJ


e*I


Mr. and Mrs. William A. Mosley


'4
Li


_____ __ ___


VAU 4


k


!










* New Covenant Hosting

MWOC Conferance


During the week of October
24-30, New Covenant MWOC,
252 Ave. E, will be preparing
leaders and believers to effectively
reach their areas and regions for
Jesus. Special guests are Dr.
Mack and Brenda Timberlake of
Christian Faith Center in Creed-
moor, North Carolina, known by
many as The Bread From Heaven
T.V. program; Pat Carver of St.
Luke United Methodist'Church in
Mableton, Georgia; Pastors Na-
thaniel and Valerie Holcomb,
Cooperas Cove, Texas; Dr. La-
Salle and Portia Vaughn of San
Antonio, Texas; Bishop Cynthia
A. Phillips of Atlanta, Georgia;
John and Betty Joe Duncan of
Tulsa, Oklahoma; and many oth-


ers.
Daily workshop will be held
Tuesday through Friday, begin-
ning at 10:00 a.m. and nightly
services Saturday Thursday (Oc-
tober 24-30) at 7:30 p.m. Work-
shop registration fee is $60.00.
Nightly services are open to every-
one.
There will be a special mar-
ried couples and singles banquet
Friday, October 30th in Panama
City (must purchase a meal tick-
et).
For more information, call
229-8137 on Monday, Wednesday
or Friday from noon to 1:00 p.m.
or on Tuesday and Thursday
from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., ask
for Denise or Lolli.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 15, 1992 PAGE 5A

Mexico Beach AARP Meets Friday
Mexico Beach AARP will hold es. Each will be given five min-
its monthly meeting at the Mexico utes to state his platform. After
Beach Chamber of Commerce all six have given their views,
Building, Friday, October 16th at questions will be accepted from
1:00 p.m. CT. The program, "Meet the floor.
Your Candidates", will feature the The meeting is open to all
six individuals running for offic- members and non-members.


Mr. and Mrs. Leon F. Pollock III

Couple Wed


'- iAmong th' 2,900 gradtiates
receiving their-degrees at Florida
State University's Spring Convo-
cation which took place in April
was Donna Karol Young. She re-
ceived her Bachelor of Science
Degree in Social Studies.
Donna is now pursuing a


Master's Degree in the Social
Studies Education program at
F.S.U.
Donna is the daughter of
Donnie and Carolyn Young of
2009 Juniper Avenue, Port St.
Joe. She is a 1987 graduate of
Port St. Joe High School.


Stacey Mullett and Leon
Franklin Pollock III, both of Talla-
hassee, were married September
12 at Tallahassee Heights United
Methodist Church with Rev.
Rusty Belcher officiating.
The bride is the daughter of
Harold Mullett of Tallahassee and
Betty Mullett of Sarasota.
Parents of the groom are the
late Mr. and Mrs. Leon Pollock of
Port St Joe.
Maid of honor was Cathy
Kreiensleck, friend of the bride, of
-Tallahassee.
Bridesmaids were Nancy
Roth, friend of the bride, from
Emporia, Kansas, and Elizabeth
Pollock, sister of the groom, of
Tallahassee.
Acting as best man for the
groom was his brother, William
Pollock, from Tallahassee.
Ushers and groomsmen were
Kepper 'Mullett, brother of the
bride, from Lawrence, Kansas,
and: Scott Walker, friend of the
groom, from Tallahassee.
A reception was given at the
fellowship hall of the church.
After a wedding trip on a Car-
ibbean cruise, the couple will live


in Tallahassee.
The bride and groom are both
employed by the State Depart-
ment of Banking and Finance in
Tallahassee.


Scheffer Named as Officer
The Florida Panhandle Private Industry Council recently held its
annual meeting at the W.T. Neal Civic Center in Blountstown. Incom-
ing officers for the 1992-93 program year, left to right, include Al
Scheffer of Gulf County, vice-chairman; and Eric Mathis of Bay
County, chairman.


*Heating & Air

*Major. G
Appliance p.
RepairS24
*Plumbing &
Electrical Work
RER0007623
R0043 9-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle, Port St. Joe
RA0043378 2 9-46oP2-


* BILLY CARR, Inc. Jeep
Chevrolet/GEO, Chrysler, Plymouth/Dodge and Eagle
BLOUNTSTOWN PORT ST. JOE MARIANNA EASTPOINT


Donna Karol Young

Donna Young Receives B.S. Degree


.. Re-Elect









Harrison



SYour Sheriff


Al Harrison has proven he is an excellent administrator.
When Al Harrison took control of the Gulf County Sheriffs Office
the department was involved in a law suit with the Department
of Corrections. Within six months the law suit was dropped. The
Department of Corrections statistics show that the Gulf County
Jail has the lowest cost per prisoner in the State of Florida.
Al Harrison has shown during the last eight years that he will do
a good job as your sheriff. He has the experience, training, and
the common sense to make important decisions.

November 3 Re-Elect



AL HARRISON



SHERIFF
Pd Pol Adv. paid for by the camp, acct of Al Harrison. Republican








THP'. ATAR- PRTST-TOR VT. TTDCTqAV n5fT- 1 r-100")


----------------------------------I
SIf you have any questions, please contact Carolyn Rish or Cindy Be-
at 229-8813.


WHS Honor Roll S


Principal Larry Mathes has
Announced the honor roll stu-
dents for the first six week grad-
ing period at Wewahitchka High
School.
: All A's
7th Grade
* Holly Atkins, Jennifer
Barnes, Joshua Baxley, Jessica
bDavis, Rita Dietz, Crystal Hand,
Miranda Harvey, Lloyd Husband
III; Mandy Little, Jasmine McMil-
lion, Ike Mincy Jr., Tammy Nun-
hnery, April Parker, Aimee Prid-.
,geon, Joseph Whitfleld
Ji 8th Grade
- Judith Birmingham, Charles
tole, Amanda Davis, Stacey King
10th Grade
Corrina Copeland, Lori Lay-
ton, Misty Loftin
11th Grade
Mari Goodrich
A's & B's or All B's
o 7th Grade
, Jason Carter, Gesa Castle-
berry, Alisha Collins, Beth Dan-
iels, Ashley Hanlon, Jeremy Hys-
mith, Ashley Lister, Richard
Maddox, Thaddeus Morris, Bele-
na Nunery, Jennifer Odom, Amy
Owens, Jodi Reynolds, Diana
Taunton, Joshua Taunton
".. 8fth Grade
Gary Bridges, Justin Jack-
son, Linda Jones, Margaret Kel-
soe, Virginia McClellan, William
Mims, Jeffery Mullis, Jennifer
Oaks, Carina Patterson, Amber
Rowland, Adam Taunton, Dana
Walker '
9th Grade
Tamara Anderson, Kimberly
Dietz, Lindsay Dorman, Charles
Field, Milton Fisher, Crystal Ga-
skin, John Gibbs, Joseph Jack-
son Jr., Ayesha Noble, David
Pitts, Augustus Russ, Cameron
Totman, Heather Webb
10th Grade
Shannon Daniels, Tammy
Demille, Shanna Forehand, Kelli
Jones, Cynthia Jordan, Latrell
Kent, Evela Loveless, Jennifer
Marquez, Robert Mooneyham, Ra-


chel Myers, West Sketoe, William
Sumner
11th Grade
Tammy Davis, Kimberly
Douglas, Heather Goodwin, Jessi-
ca Hayes, Michael Morgan, Ste-
ven Nelson, Jeremy Pridgeon.
Amy Rich, Catherine Tremain


Calendar of Events

for Port St. Joe High
Parents of Port St. Joe High School students are asked to please clip
and save the following Calendar of Events for October and November.
rOctober 18-21 Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Visiting Committee on campus
i October 22 PSAT given to grades 10 and 11
* October 24 ACT given at Bay High School
4 October 25 Time Changes --- Fall BACK 1 Hour
October 30 Homecoming Early Dismissal
Deadline for Juniors & Seniors to register for the
SAT to be given on December 5 at Bay High
$ School
November 11 ASVAB given to Juniors
November 12 ASVAB given to Seniors
I -November 13 Report Cards Distributed I
I Deadline for Juniors and Seniors to register for
I the ACT to be given at Port St. Joe' High School
on December 12
November 17 NJROTC Annual Inspection
1 November 19 Gold Cards Distributed
November 20 Dive Club Dance
November 24 Talent Show
November 26-27 Thanksgiving Holidays


NFWMD Adds 15,590

Acres to Hunt Area


The Northwest Florida Water
Management District recently
added 15,590 acres to the lands
that will be open for hunting dur-
ing the 1992-93 season.
The new property is almost
all river bottomland in Jackson,
Holmes, Washington, and Walton
counties that has not been open
in the recent past for public hunt-
ing. Included in the new hunting
areas are 7,400 acres along -the
Upper Chipola River and Cowarts
and Marshall creeks, two sections
of land in the Econfina Creek ba-
sin in southwest Jackson County
and seven miles of the Holmes
Creek floodplain. The District also
added nearly 5,000 acres to its
existing Choctawhatchee River
Water Management Area, result-
ing in a total of almost 42,000
acres 'of bottomlands that are
protected and available for hunt-
ing in the Choctawhatchee and
Holmes Creek Basin.
The hunting seasons and al-
lowed uses vary somewhat on
these properties. All parts of it
are open for archery hunters Oc-
tober 17 through November 15.
Muzzleloading gun hunting is set
for November 20-22, with a Spe-
clal Archery and Muzzleloading
Season from February 18-28. The
Small Game Season runs contin-
uously from: November 14
through March 7. The. General
Gun Season is in two parts: No-


SUPER XL-


vember 26-29 and December 12
through February 17. Doe days
are December 19-20 on the Choc-
tawhatchee, Holmes Creek, and
Econfina Creek lands only. There
are also three separate Bearded
Turkey Seasons: November 26-
29, December 12-23, and March
20 through April 25. Hunting
with dogs is allowed on the Choc-
tawhatchee and Econfina Creek
additions but no free-running
dogs are permitted on the Holmes
Creek or the Upper Chipola
tracts.


Goat Day Festival
The 6th Annual Goat Day will
be held in Blountstown' on Satur-
day. October 17 at Sam Atkins
Park.
The Festival features some of
the finest arts and crafts in the
state. There will be a variety of
country-style cooking for break-
fast and lunch, championship
horseshoe pitching and rolling-
pin throwing contests, penny dig
and races for the children just
to name a few. Also, country mu-
sic entertainment Will be on stage
for the entire family.
For more information, call
904-674-5425 or write Goat Day,
Inc., 305 Fannin Avenue, Blount-
stown, FL 32424.


'OL BLUE


30th Anniversary


S


special


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unparalleled years of performance this Fall. With step-up improvements in performance
and safety over the years, this multi-million unit seller has earned a nationwide reputa-
tion for reliability and superior value.


Join the celebration this year as Homelite
in its Fall '92 promotion programs.
'Features:
*Powerful 3.5 cu. In. (57cc) engine for fast cutting.
*Electronic solid-state Ignition.
*Large fuel capacity for extended running time.
*Power Tip@, gas welded and sprocket tip guide bars in 16 to 24 inch (40 to 60 cm).
* Automatic chain oiling with manual override.
*Professional style front and rear hand guards.
*Multi-chamber Softoner muffler.
Raker Ill0 series 38 chromed chain.
-Convenient throttle latch.


proudly presents the Limited Edition '01 Blue




$32900


Rushing Assumes
Command In
Baton Rouge, LA
Army Capt. Tammy S. Rush-
ing has assumed command of the
U.S. Army Recruiting Company at
Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
Rushing is the daughter of
Lucious L. and Mary E. Rushing
of Port St. Joe.
She graduated in 1976 from
Port St. Joe High School, and in
1983 the captain received a bach-
elor's degree from Florida State
University, Tallahassee.

Bowen Completes
Basic Training
Pvt. Pamela N. Bowen has
completed basic training at Fort
Leonard E. Wood in Waynesville,
Missouri.
During the training, students
received instruction in drill and
ceremonies, weapons, map read-
ing, tactics, military courtesy,
military justice, first aid, and
Army history and traditions.
She is the daughter of Sherrie
J. and Karl H. Bowen of 1313
Long Avenue, Port St. Joe.
The private is a 1992 gradu-
ate of Port St. Joe High School.


students
12th Grade
Teresa Cain, Theresa Dietz,
Clara Dykes, Jason Flowers, Sta-
cy 'Hall, Jeffery Hill; Tameka
Jackson, Ernest Jones, Casi
Lindsey, Janice Mincy, Kenneth
Parsons, Carrie Redmon, Michael
Stringfellow, John Worley.


Celebrating
Anniversary
The North Port St. Joe Young
Adult Community Choir will be
celebrating its anniversary on Fri-
day and Saturday, October 23rd
and 24th. Services will convene at
7:30 p.m. nightly at the Church
of God in Christ.
Area churches, choirs,
groups and individuals are asked
to join and support this endeavor.
If you would like to participate in
these programs, please write Bar-
bara Baxter, 318 Avenue D, Port
St. Joe, FL 32456, or call Iris
Gathers at 229-8241. or Bonita
Robinson at 229-6918.
Your support and participa-
tion will be greatly appreciated.

Green Promoted
Michelle A. Green has been
specially identified for early pro-
motion to senior airman in the
U.S. Air Force.
The airman was awarded the
new rating ahead of other Air
Force members by a "below-the-


zone" promotion board which
considered job performance, mili-
tary knowledge, bearing, and self-
improvement efforts.
Green, a personnel systems
management specialist, is the
daughter of Sharon L. and Tom


E. Hayden of Waverly, Kentucky.
Her husband, Robert, is the
son of Johh D. and June S.
Green of Wewahitchka.
She is a 1989 graduate of
Rutherford High School, Panama
City.


PAEU TE5AH O. L-THRDYOT 1.19


PtArr R~W fA


I


11


STm JOE HARDWARE CO.
201 WILLIAMS AVENUE PHONE 229-8028


Commodity Distribution

Set for October 20 and 22
U.S.D.A. commodities will be distributed in Gulf County on October
20th and 22nd to those who are eligible. Eligibility is based on total
household income -not in excess of the State-established maximum per-
centage of the poverty line for the appropriate household size. Recipients
will receive two (2) months' commodities on these dates, therefore it is
very important that everyone bring a bag or box.
The distribution will take place in Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka at
the Senior Citizens' buildings. The distribution in Port St. Joe will be on
Tuesday, October 20th from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. ET and in Wewahitchka,
distribution will be on Thursday, October 22nd from noon until 2:00
p.m. CT. Recipients must have a current commodity card to receive their
commodities. There will be no registration at the distribution centers. If
anyone has questions concerning their eligibility, they should call 227-
1735 or come by the Commodity Office in the Gulf County Courthouse
prior to these dates. Wewahitchka residents may come to the Old Court-
house on Wednesday, October 20, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. CT, to certify
for commodities. To certify or re-certify, you will need to bring proof of in-
come or food stamp papers.


Water Management Hunting Permits

Permits for hunting, camping or fishing on nearly 106,000 acres of Northwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District lands along the Lower Escambia, Apalachicola, Choctawhatchee and Upper Chipola Rivers and
on Holmes and Econfina Creeks are now available. Within these river bottomlands, a permit is required for
camping or hunting, or for fishing from the river banks or in lakes
within the posted areas.A hunting stamp is required for all persons
S .wishing to hunt.
S--The fee for an annual permit that is valid for all District
hunting areas is $11.00 if purchased from a County Tax Collector,
4~.... ^....--- or $11.50 if from a subagent. A hunting stamp costs an additional
$5.00. There is no charge for those 65 or older, under 16 years of
age, or physically handicapped.
Permits, hunting stamps and detailed hunting maps can be
acquired from the Tax Collector's Office in the following counties:
Bay, Calhoun, Escambia, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson,
t Liberty, Santa Rosa, Walton and Washington.

Northwest Florida Water Management District
Please call (904) 539-5999for information.







Yes, I Am



Qualified to be



Your Sheriff

The Sheriff must oversee a budget of approximately one million dollars and supervise
over twenty-five employees with a goal of providing the citizens of Gulf County with the
highest level of services and protection that can be produced from this expenditure of funds
and manpower. Accordingly, the Sheriff must be a capable administrator and see that each
dollar and employee is utilized in the most appropriate manner. To do otherwise would
waste precious resources that are needed elsewhere.
Because of my background, I believe I am a capable administrator and can bring con-
siderable management skills to the Gulf County Sheriffs Office. I have an A.A. degree from
Chipola Junior College in Business Administration, and I spent twenty-five years in man-
agement and eight years as Personnel Director for Sylvachem Corporation. I served as. As-
sistant Chief of the Port St. Joe Fire Department for many years and as such successfully su-
pervised men in dangerous emergencies. Additionally, I served on the Gulf County School
Board for sixteen years and as chairman five of those years. This combination of training
and experience provides me with the necessary background for the management of large
sums of money and people.
In addition to my training and experience in management, I am a Certified Law En-
forcement Officer. Two years ago when I decided to run for Sheriff, I made up my mind
that if I was was going to undertake this challenge I was going to be properly prepared. I.en-
rolled in the Basic Law Enforcement Standards program at Gulf Coast Community College
and underwent nine months of intensive law enforcement training. I attended classes Mon-
day through Thursday from 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. at the college campus in Panama City. I
spent every weekend studying my materials and working on class projects, and during this
period of time I continued to work full-time at Arizona Chemical. Nevertheless, I never wa-
vered from my commitment and my determination paid off because I graduated in the top
five percent of my class with a perfect attendance record.
e Should the voters of Gulf County elect me as their Sheriff, I am now prepared to hit the
ground running and fully intend to do just that. I will not have to spend the first nine months
of my term attending Basic Law Enforcement Standards at the County's expense. And for
those of you who might think I intend to hide behind a desk and be strictly an officer man-
ager, I can assure you that nothing could be further from the truth. I fully intend to be a
working Sheriff by being in the community and on the streets with my officers. In doing so,
I am certain there will be times when I will be confronted with situations that are new to
me; but I am not one to run from a challenge, nor am I ashamed to ask for advice and help
from those around me.
In summary, I am confident that with my willingness to work hard and your willing-
ness to assist me, we can produce a Sheriffs Office that we can all be proud to call our own.


Isn't It Time to Elect

A Democrat for Sheriff?

ELECT


WAYLON GRAHAM


SHERIFF
Pd. Pol. Adav., paid for by the camp. acct. of Waylon Graham, Dem.











TIHE a1AK rxD'Ib-1- .Tu ,'TVI -T-TTDQTLAV (U'T.10,. 3 PAGE 7A


Watch TV and Get Your GED


Burrows Retires from Post Office Duties

Dennis Geoghagan, postmaster, is shown presenting a plaque of appreciation to Earl Bur-
rows, retiring letter carrier for the Port St. Joe office. His fellow city carriers, Robert Rouse,
second from left, Jim Harper, Gene Hanlon and Patrick Richardson were also at the presenta-
tion. Burrows retired after 40 years of experience with the United States government, 20 in
the Air Force and 19 years, 1i months with the postal department.

Kuyper Speaking

Shark New atApalachicola
Shk Ws Estuarine Reserve
J


Sophomores and Juniors, re-
member that Friday, October 16
is the deadline to sign up for the
PSAT. The cost is $7.00 and
checks should be made payable
to Port St. Joe High School.
Sophomores are eligible to
apply for the Hugh O'Brian
Award. HOBY has conducted an-
nual, all expense paid seminars
since 1958. HOBY's purpose is to
bring together a select group of
high school sophomores who
have demonstrated leadership
ability so that they can interact
with groups of distinguished lead-
ers in business, government, edu-
cation, and the professions to dis-
cuss present and future issues.
The deadline to apply is October
30, 1992.
Parents are asked to notify
the Guidance Office if you have
had a change of address or phone
number.


POPS club members will be
selling red ribbons to area mer-
chants in observance of Red Rib-
bon Week. The cost is $2.00. If
you would like to purchase a red
ribbon, please contact Cindy Be-
lin at 229-8813.
Due to the SACS 10-year
study at Port St. Joe High School,
students will be dismissed from
school early on Wednesday, Octo-
ber 21.

Poetry Day
Poets from all over the nation
will be observing National Poetry
Day on Thursday, October 15.
Select a volume of your favor-
ite works and reflect upon the
beauty of the written word.

Say You Saw In
The Star


- Hawkr News Hleant View
AlHWkV 1Zw' Elementary


Congratulations to our Stu-
dents of the Week:
Kindergarten: Michael Pad-
gett
First grade: Billy Raker
Second grade: Damon Eaker
Third grade: Amanda Goddin ,
Fourth grade: Seth Williams'
Fifth grade: William Burrows
Sixth grade: Jerry Martin
ESE: Joseph Lee
The first graders are continu-
ing their study on music and with
this they gave a special treat to .
the whole school last Friday.
The "Crack-Pot" Symphony'

-*' 'II


from the First Baptist Church in
Panama City is made up of senior
citizens who have made their own
instruments and play various
numbers on them with great en-
thusiasm.
They played old time favorites
such as Yankee Doodle Dandy, In
the Good Old Summertime, and
patriotic tunes for the students to
join in singing with them.
This was a really special treat
- an interaction between "old"
and young that made a lasting
impression.
Cathy Colbert's fifth graders
presented a Christopher Colum-


.rv


This month's lecture at the
Apalachicola Reserve will be pre-
sented by Bill Kuyper, who has
worked with NASA technology for
the State of Florida. He will be
showing a slide presentation of a
series of aerial photos taken from
the U-2 coverage as it flew over
the Florida Panhandle. He will
show the dynamics of the Florida
estuarine system of Apalachicola
and St. Joseph Bay, using digital-
ly processed satellite images and
high altitude aerial photography.
Come view how space tech-
nology is used in displaying imag-
es of the estuaries that are rarely
made available for the general
public's viewing. Join the staff
Thursday evening, October 22,
from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. in the Ap-
alachicola National Estuarine Re-
search Reserve's auditorium lo-
cated at 261 Seventh Street, Apa-
lachicola.

bus Day program to the school on
Monday.. The-program consisted,
of readings, a video, songs and
each student receiving a memen-
to of the event a cookie shaped
like the Santa Maria with brown
icing, white sails, and a red cross
on the main sail.
The Book Fair is going on in
the Hawk Library. It is open dur-
ing school hours until 3:00 p.m.
this week, October 13-16.
Thank youl
Boss' Day is October 16. The
Hawk staff and students would
like to thank our principal and
co-worker, Catherine Barfield, on
this day for her loyalty and lead-
ership she had given us over the
past four years.
Mike Carroll, owner of St. Joe
Tree and Stump Removal, is
shown presenting his son, Den-
nis, a donation toward an Aplril
field .trip to St. Augustine. Dennis
is a fifth grader at Highland View.
Mr. Carroll challenges other
businesses in town to become.-in-
volved in helping students to
have meaningful and enriching
out-of-class experiences. The fifth
grade thanks Mr. Carroll for his
generosity.


North Florida adults who lack
a high school diploma can now
study at home by watching "GED
On TV," thanks to the Public Tele-
vision Center (WFSU Tallahas-
see/WFSG Panama City). Begin-
ning October 24, the 43-lesson
telecourse, which covers all areas
of the General Educational Devel-
opment Test, will air Saturdays, 9
a.m. ET/8 a.m. CT, and repeat on
Sunday, I p.m. ET/12 noon CT.
According to Carol Schave,
director of educational outreach
for the Public Television Center,
adults who wish to take advan-
tage of this second-chance educa-
tional opportunity can do so by
enrolling through their local
Adult and Community Education
Center. Free "GED On TV" work-
books, provided by a grant to
PTC, will be given to all enrollees
in the north Florida 18 counties
served by the Public Television
Center.
'This program really works,"
said Schave, who has been in-
volved with "GED On TV" projects
in other states for the past five
years. "In some areas there has
been a 100% pass rate for all stu-
dents who have completed the tel-
evision course and tested. The
key to this success is the readi-
ness of the student for GED
study, so county Adult and Com-
munity Education staff will han-
dle the enrollment procedure.
They will also provide tutorial as-
sistance as needed."
One out of every four Floridi-
ans over age 25 lacks a high

Good Samaritans
I found out how many caring
people'live in this section of Flori-
da, when my car btoke down on
Friday.
There I was on the stretch
from Port St Joe to St Joe
Beach, no habitation in sight,
feeling very helpless.
There were so many people
who stopped to help, and rode
ahead to notify the gas station.
Someone even used her car
phone to make sure that help
was on the way. I don't know the
names of any of the people but I
hope they know how grateful I am
and proud to be living in such a
caring community.
Sincerely,
Dot Pfost


school diploma. "GED On TV" is
designed to help adults unable to
attend a traditional adult educa-


tion class. For more information,
call 1-800-237-5113, the Florida
Literacy Coalition Hotline.


Mullet Plates 3.95 Oyster Plates 6.50
Shrimp Plates 6.50 Vegetable Plates 3.50
Friday Night Seafood Buffet 5:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Tomatoes lb. 490 Potatoes 10 lb. 1.49
Apples lb. 390 Cabbage lb. 200


"I WANT TO SERVE GULF COUNTY"
Vote for

W .S. "Bill"

1"Quarles
Independent
'County Commissioner District #3
November 3
Resident of Gulf County for 54 years.
. Pd. Pol. Adv., paid for by the camp. acct. of W.S. "Bill" Quarles, Ind. 2TC 10/15



SPECIAL NOTICE TO MEMBERS OF


= TYNDALL FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION


As part of the annual audit, the Supervisory Commit-
tee of Tyndall Federal Credit Union is conducting
routine account verifications as of September 30,
1992. If you have not received your quarterly State-
ment of Account, contact:

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
PO BOX 40009
TYNDALL AFB, FL 32403-9980


NCUA Your savings insured to $100,000 by the National Credit Union
Administration, a US Government agency.


2


Mike Carroll and son, Dennis.


THANK YOU
My family and I would like to thank you for the vote
you gave me on October 1. I did not win the race
for School Board this time but my love and concern
for the children of Gulf County will continue. I en-
courage everyone to become involved and stay
abreast of the happenings in the school system.
PAUL SEWELL
PD. POL ADV., PAID FOR BY THE CAMP. ACCT. OF PAUL SEWELL, DEM.


Computerized Alignment
Thrust Angel ........... 34=
Total 4-Wheel .......... 440'
2-Wheel Front Align... 24"
Many vehicles. Parts & labor for the rear swimming extra.

Western Auto
227-1105
219 Reid


TIF qTR PRTS. OE L TURDV.Or-11 10


'I


lp ak-v 7


k ,











._ .. T ... PO S. L T RD .


14


fire of an undetermined origin early
Fire Destroys Home Wednesday morning. The Port St. Joe Vol-
unteer Fire Department answered the call
This home, owned by Willie Bryant, at at 4:30 a.m., but the fire was too far ad-
114 Harbor Street, was heavily damaged by vanced to save much of the home.


Homecoming at First Nazarene


The First Church of the Naza-
rene at 2420 Long Avenue will
hold its annual homecoming ser-
vice on Sunday, October 18th.
The festivities will begin with a
'Vote for Sunday School" rally at
10:00 a.m. Rev. Oliver Huff of
Mexico Beach will be preaching in
the 11:00 a.m. worship hour. Im-
:mediately following the morning

BBQ Plates
Being Sold
5The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens will be selling those dell-
clous BBQ sandwich plates with
/baked beans, corn on the cob,
h. iced tea, and a 5 ounce bun with
"chipped BBQ beef for only $3.50.
Plates will be delivered to local
businesses. Please call 229-8466
to order. These dinners may also
.......be picked up at the First Union
S Bank Park in Port St. Joe. Din-
ners will be sold from 11:00 a.m.
until 2:00 p.m. on Friday, Octo-
ber 23rd.
.. ....All proceeds will be used to
pay for meals for 1992.

Band Boosters
Giving Away Car
H u *y The Band Boosters of Port St.
Joe High School are giving away a
Me1980 Crown Victoria at Home-

Andrew's Devastation coming ceremonies October 30.
Donations are $2.00.
Myrtice Dean, public health nurse at the Gulf County Public The car is in excellent condi-
Health Unit, traveled to Miami during the week of August 31 through tion with low mileage.
September 4 to help victims of Hurricane Andrew. Friends and co- Proceeds are going to the
workers at the Department honored Mrs. Dean at a small gathering Band Boosters to purchase equip-
last week to celebrate her birthday and welcome her back home. ment for the school.
Tickets may be -purchased
Countfrom any Band Booster or at the
concession stand at the game.



Team Finishes 3rd


Last Saturday, Port St. Joe
High School hosted the 3rd An-
nual Shark Invitational Cross
Country Meet at St. Joseph Bay
Country Club.
Lincoln High of Tallahassee
captured the girls team champi-
onship with 43 points. Maclay
was second with 69 points, fol-
lowed by Mosley (71), Rhtherford
(92), Bay (101), and Wewahitchka
(116).
High School All-American Ka-
thi Ward of Lincoln set a new
course record with a time of
-11:11 to win the girls two mile
race. Vino Darmarajah of Mosley
.placed second (12:47), and Jean-
ette Kane of Maclay placed third
(13:07).
In the boys competition,
Quincy-Shanks totaled 56 points
to win the meet for the third
,straight year. Lincoln was second
with 64 points, followed by Port
St. Joe (78), Marianna (82), Ma-
clay (128), Bay (161), Mosley
(168), and Wewahitchka (201).
Rutherford participated but failed
.to score as a team.
In the individual competition,
Donald Kunish of Lincoln placed
'first among the 60 runners in the
boys three mile race with a time
of 16:33. Darrin Taylor of Quincy-
Shanks placed second (16:34),
and Jeremy Edwards of Marianna
placed third with a time of 16:52.
Kenny Daves recorded the
highest finish for the Sharks as
he placed 10th with a time of
17:29. Shannon Gant placed
I 14th (17:56), Zyris Hill placed
16th (17:58), Steve Alles placed
17th (17:59), Lee Duren placed
21st (18:23), Lance Hanson
placed 49th (21:31), and Chad
' Thompson placed 53rd (22:26).
'We really had a great meet,"
praised Coach Scott Gowan. ']YS
had five runners establish new
personal bests, and we had four
runners run under 18:00 in a
meet for the first time in school
history. Also, we defeated district
rival Marianna by four points.


This is the first time we have de-
feated them in two years," he end-
ed.
This Saturday, the Purple
Pack will compete in the Eagle In-
vitational in Niceville. Last year
the Sharks placed fourth in this
meet. Their goals Saturday are a
top three finish and have six run-
ners run under 18:30.


4 Z

Sophomore Kenny Daves
placed 10th among the 60 run-
ners with a personal best time of
17:29.


Views On


SDental fHealth

FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.

FACIAL PAIN IN

MOTORCYCLISTS

With the onset of cooler tooth area of the face which is
weather, dentists around the why these patients usually make
country especially in colder a bee-line to the dentist.
climates usually have an in- The cause has nothing to
flux of young adult patients com- do with the teeth but rather the
plaining of severe facial pain. A sensitivity of the branches of the
little research will find that most trigeminal nerve. The pain will
of these patients are motorcy- be severe enough for many pa-
clists who had recently ridden tients to ask to have some teeth
their cycles without any face extracted. However, the symp-
protection from the wind. This toms are easily treated in the of-
can drop the effective tempera- fice. The best therapy, however,
ture by many degrees as a com- is for motorcyclists to wear face
bination of cold and increased protection during cold weather.
wind against the face.
The pain usually involves ...........
both sides of the face and sets Prepared as a public ser-
in about two hours after the mo- vice to promote better dental
torcycle ride. It will be a con- health. From the office of:
stant, rather than intermittent FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
pain. It will be located in the Williams Ave., Phone 227-1123.


worship service will be an old
fashion dinner-on-the-grounds at
the Centennial Building. The cele-
bration will climax with a gospel
sing at 2:30 p.m. featuring the
Bouington Family Singers from
Port St. Joe. Pastor George Ma-
lone and his congregation invite
everyone to come and share in
this joyous occasion.


Football Game
The Sharks will travel to
Blountstown Friday night to take
on the Tigers in a non-district
game. Blountstown was trans-
ferred to another district last
year. Game time will be at 8:30
p.m. EDT. This will be the first
test of the Sharks against a rival
of their own size thus far this sea-
son.


Seafood

Gumbo

Dinner
The Booster Club is again in
the planning stages for their
annual fund raiser for the athletic
department of Port St. Joe High
School. As a departure from the
usual fish fry the club will be
offering seafood gumbo this year.
The gumbo will be prepared
from a 100-year-old recipe which
has been passed down in the Raf-
field clan for five generations. The
gumbo, full of fish, shrimp and
crab meat, will be served over a
fluffy bed of rice, accompanied by
cole slaw, rolls and tea. This reci-
pe is so delicious that it is cur-
rently in the process of being
introduced as a national product
line in the frozen food department
of major stores.
The Gumbo Dinner will be
served as usual on Homecoming
afternoon, October 30, from 4:30
- 6:30 in the Commons Area of
Port St. Joe High School. Patrons
may eat in or carry out. Tickets
are available at $3.50 each and
may be purchased from any ath-
lete.
Each year the Booster Club
pays for all the expenses of the
fund-raiser with the entire pro-
ceeds going to the sport selling
the ticket. Each ticket sold is a
100% contribution to the sport
which sold the ticket.
Support sports by purchasing
a gumbo ticket, not only will you
help the hundreds of athletes
involved, but you'll get a delicious
dinner.


Shown sitting, from left, tal Allyn and B.J. Presnell. and Amber Daniels.
Ashley Jones and Jessica Hill. Not pictured: Kristen Wei-
On bars, from left, Julie morts, Kristin Abrams, Lisa
Standing, from left, Crys- Lartford, Rachel Geoghagan, Curry, and Brittany Reeves.


Gymnasts Qualify for State, Sectionals


Members of Carousel Gym-
nastics attended the U.S.G.S.
first local meet held in Pensacola
at Pensacola Junior College on
September 26 and 27. Two girls
qualified for state and two *girls
qualified for sections during the
meet.
Rachel Geoghagan qualified


for sectionals with a 27.30 A.A.
She placed fifth on floor and re-
ceived an honorable mention on
the .beam and all around. Amber
Daniels qualified for sectionals
with 28.5 A.A. Kristen Weimorts
qualified for state with honorable
mention in vault and all around.
Kristin Abrams qualified for state


with a score of 31.30 and took
9th place on vault and received
an honorable mention on floor
and all around. The girls will be
competing at Ron Galimore's Ath-
letic Training Center in Tallahas-
see in an upcoming event.


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175-13 46.95 205/70-14 63.95
185-13 48.95 205-15 68.95
195..70.13 50.95 215/70-15 70.95
185,'70 14 58.95 225-15 74.95
185/14 59.95 235-15 76.95
195.'14 62.95


LIMITED TIME OFFER


PAT' SEVCCNE


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 15, 1992


PArnrS RA










1'k*'U''A PORT ST.aJOBW THURSDAY. OUT. 15.I1992.,P AGEr HS


By Lenohr Clardy
Salt was so valuable in early times that
it gives us our word 'salary' from the Latin
salarium meaning "salt money" the allow-
ance given Roman soldiers to buy salt.
Among the ancients, to "eat salt" with a man
was to create A sacred bond of friendship.
The OLD SALT WORKS was an estab-
lishment at the head of St. Joseph Bay
where salt was made on a commercial scale.
Men boiled seawater in large black iron ket-
tles and sheet-iron boilers to make salt. Fuel
obtainable in the adjacent woods fired the
furnaces.
Hiram William Pickett built and operat-
ed the Old Salt Works. It is not known exact-
ly when the Salt Works was first started, but
it was in operation before completion with a
daily capacity of 150 bushels of salt by 1861
at the beginning of the War Between the
States. Pickett served in the 2nd Florida
Cavalry, Company A and is buried in Chest-
nut Cemetery, Apalachicola, Florida. Mabel
Flower Teague of Apalachicola, was his
granddaughter. She was a faithful member
of the United Daughters of the Confederacy,
Apalachicola Chapter #826. Pickett was the
great uncle of Ida Ethel Brown.
The process of saltmaking involved ster-
ilizing heaters, brine filters, evaporators,
centrifugal driers, steam driers, sifters, and
finally, the packing of the salt in cotton
bags. Tradition tells us that much of the
brick employed in these Salt Works were
from the foundations of the old homes,
chimneys and buildings of "Old" St. Joseph,
dug out from beneath the sands and sea
from the devastating Storm of 1844. At that
time St. Joseph Bay was landlocked no
outlets of impurities from the low lands and
wet lands could seep into the bay and spoil
the clear blue-green salt water.
Before the Confederate Salt Works, salt
apparently was brought in from somewhere
else to St. Joseph. The following advertise-
ment appeared in the March 23, 1839, issue
of the St. Joseph Times. Subscribers for the-
advertisements were referred to as the
"MERCHANTS OF ST. JOSEPH".
"SALT FOR SALE.
1000 Sacks Liverpool coarse salt in
store
1.500 Sacks Liverpool coarse salt afloat.
Just received per barque Champion, di-
rect from Liverpool. Apply to E. W. DOUBLE-
DAY, Bay Street."
It was with the tons of salt evaporated
from the seawater at this, and other coastal
Salt Works that the meats, fish and other
foods, were preserved that fed not only the
armies, but the peoples of the Confederacy.
On the 10th.day of January, 1861, Florida


Union Soldiers raiding and attacking St. Joe Bay Saltworks.


was the third state to withdraw from the Un-
ion.
Although many thousands were engaged
in making salt along the secluded waters of
the Gulf shore, salt kept increasing in price,
and was selling early in the war at $1.00 per
pound in parts of the state. Alabama de-,
pended largely on the salt made here. Evap-
oration of sea water was one of Florida's two
chief contributions.
The primary mission of the United
States Navy during the War Between the
States was to blockade the Confederate
coastline.
It was late in winter of 1861 that Presi-
dent Lincoln enforced his Blockade Procla-
mation to blockade the Gulf ports around
Florida. During that time, the squadron's of-
ficers and men captured or destroyed 283
blockade runners, nearly eliminating salt
and sugar industries along the Florida
Coast.
The Saltmakers were organized into
companies by the State, and furnished with
arms and ammunition. Such was the de-
mand for this necessity that many profit-
eered in salt, and a salt-corner at one time
threatened the supply of the country.
By the fall of 1862, the Salt Industry on
the Gulf had grown in production and bold-


ness and had become so important it could
no longer escape that watchful eye of the
United States Government. Raids began to
take place against the works, workers, and
workers' families,
'The armed ,Confederate guerrillas were
first routed and, put to flight by the shell,
shrapnel, and cannister with which the hous-
es, woods, and underbrush were searched;
then the small-arms men landed, deployed
as .skirmishers, on each flank of the guns;
while the working parties destroyed the boil-
ers, which proved to be of various shapes
and curious construction. After the houses
of the workers in the immediate vicinity had
been set afire, the boats proceeded to the
next station. At one point, it was thought
necessary to put howitzer shells through tvwo
very thick cast-iron kettles and through two
wrought-iron boilers."
Raids recorded on the Florida coast by
"U.S. Bark 'Kingfisher' is from A Journal of
Civilization, Vol. 6, p. 307, November 15,
1862, Harper's Weekly, states
"SALT WORKS IN FLORIDA"
"\U.S. Bark 'Kingfisher,' St. Joseph's Bay,
Fla., Sept. 15, 1862.
"I am glad to say, after waiting all this
time I have had, a chance to see active ser-
vice. You can imagine with what pleasure we


received the order to up anchor, as we knew
our destination was the Salt Works, at the
head of the bay.
"About two weeks since we had a lot of
contrabandists come off, who informed us
that there were extensive Salt Works at the
town of St. Joseph, making from 100 to 150
bushels a day, and not yet completed. We
sent a flag of truce and politely informed
them that they must stop or we should de-
stroy them. They paid no attention to us but
continued their fire day and night.
'We got underway at daylight, sailed up
the bay with a fair wind, and came to anchor
about a quarter of a mile from the works. As
we came in sight we could perceive an unu-
sual excitement, and observed wagons driv-
ing inland at a furious pace. We gave them
two hours to quit, and then fired a few shells
into the works, which had the effect of bring-
ing two contrabandists to the beach with a
salt-bag, which they waved most furiously.
We sent a boat for them, and found out that
they had removed about 200 bags of salt,
and some provisions, but that everything re-
mained with this exception; and also the in-
telligence that there were about 80 guerril-
las, mounted three miles back in the
country, and would probably be down to see
what was going on. As soon as we obtained
this information we manned all the boats,
leaving enough men' on board to man bat-
tery. I have been ordered to take command
of picket-guard, and station them about
one-quarter of a mile inland, surrounding
the works. You may imagine that was rather
skittish work with twenty men to go into the
woods out of sight of the ship; but we all
drew up on the beach, the pickets in front
(in all about fifty men), loaded muskets, and
fixed bayonets the whole under command
of Mr. Hallet, executive officer. We started
whistling Yankee Doodle. I advanced my
men in a straight line to the other side of the
works, when we entered the woods and ex-
tended our lines entirely around the place.
The main body then began their work of de-
struction, and in less than two hours the
whole place was in flames, and the machin-
ery broken up.
"I send you a sketch. The whole coast of
Florida is lined with these works but of a
smaller size. This one, when finished, would
have been capable of making five hundred
bushels a day, at $10.00 per bushel.
"When the new military Colony is fairly
underway the salt factories will probably be-
come of some national importance."
Rear Admiral Lardner, Commander
U.S. Bark Kingflsher'
.....................destruction came, memory
continues.


IFourteenth In A Series: Harvest of History


Seawater Magnesia Plant Has Ups, Downs


Robert Freeman, manager of.
Premier Services here in Port St.
Joe, gave the Rotary Club a re-
port Thursday on the plant and
its place in the future. .
Freeman, who came to Port
St. Joe right after the plant start-
ed operations, gave his listeners a
short history of the plant and its
troubled past.
The seawater magnesia plant
started in 1956, after a construc-
tion cost of $7 million. "It would
cost about $60 million to build a
similar plant today," Freeman re-


marked.
Initially making a refractory
material utilizing oyster: shells
and seawater magnesia, market-
ing of the product became so'spe-
cialized in production that the lo-
cal plant soon was out-dated.
'The plant was nearly dis-
mantled and sold foi-r junk in
1967," Freemain said. 'The own-
ers had an offer of $500,000 for
the plant, to turn it into scrap
iron and haul it off. Instead, it'
was sold as a going business to
Basic, Inc., for about $1.2 mil-


lion."
Over the years the operation
of the plant began to deteriorate
and parts of the machinery were
cannibalized to keep other parts
running. During this' time' the
plant was sold again, to Combus-
tion Engineers. Operation contin-
ued on limited scale until C-E fi-
nally got out of the seawater
magnesia business because of the
pollution laws which they wanted
no part of.
Premier Services purchased


Volksmarches in
Pine Log Forest
The Panama City VolksSports
club will host two kilometer (6.2)
walks.in Pine Log State Forest on
October 24. The walks are free to
the public. Two clearly, marked
routes through the forest will fol-
low nature trails and unpaved
roads. These events are noncom-
petitive; participants proceed at
their own pace. Stopping to look
at the scenery, trees, wildflowers,
and wildlife is strongly encour-
aged. The only requirements are
that participants start between 8
a.m. and 2 p.m. and complete the
walk by 5 p.m. Drinking water
will be provided at checkpoints
along the route. Members of the
American VolksSports Associa-
tion can receive both event and
distance credits for the events.
Anyone finishing a walk may pur-
chase the commemorative patch
if they wish, but the walk is free.
Pine Log State Forest is located
south of Ebro on Highway 79.
Both walks start at the picnic
area.


the plant in 1990. Since that time
it has been diversifying its prod-
ucts until it now produces a wide
spectrum of seawater magnesia
related products.
"When the plant first started,
it was producing 120 tons of
product a day. That dwindled
down to about 30 tons or none.,
Today, we produce 100 tons of
product per day and are diversify-
ing more in what we produce,
every day," Freeman said.
"I can't tell you what the fu-
ture holds for us," Freeman said,
"But if we can afford to keep up
with changes and permits, we
should continue to do well."


ri


Special

registered

of Mexico


invitati

voters

Beach


on


invited to a barbecue cookout


Saturday,


October


p.m. CT at the Mexico Beach

Marina.
Mayor Tom Hudson


an.hl o II[1 M11gfra/m nl.
Convertt,'(e v-....,"



Rei.v. L. o .1.5 -veaI 'ort '*M **
anact a-. baho-a ig bthrom


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


*Auto *Home

*Business

*Flood *Life


*presenting ''The Travelers'
The Insurance Store Since 1943

8:30 till 6:00

Monday through Friday


iniu-nf I crisI s

old.a.,,' einth o
get ailice i '''ac-fi


/


*Bonds 221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


What have you been meaning to buy, build or repair?
We have $6 billion to lend, so chances ere, we can cover
anything you need. We've made the application simple
and the approval process fast. So come talk. We like to
listen. And we're ready to help.
When it comes to service, everything matters.'

LEN'DE 1992 First L'nion Corporation


First Union National Bank
of Fmorda

Branch Offices Statewide Member FDIC


Old Saltworks at St. Joseph Bay

Sizeable Installation Operated on Site Now Occupied by Schreck's Cabins


to all


of "the City

7, you are


17, 5:00


/ would like to thank all the

voters that supported and voted

for me in the past two elections

and ask for your continued

support in the General Election on

November 3.

Your vote and support will be

very much appreciated.


Thank you,
JESSIE ARMSTRONG
Pd. Pol. Adv., paid for the camp. acct. of Jessie Armstrong, Dem.


The Star
Your Hometown
Newspaper for
Hometown
Folks!



ROLL ,IN









By: Richard Miller
*Longer lasting tires with an
80,000-mile guarantee have
been introduced by a major
maker. Computer studies sug-
gested that rather than add
layers of rubber and deeper
tread, the pattern of .the
grooves be changed to equal-
ize the load and alter the "foot-
print.'
*Problems in the cooling sys-
tern usually result from a leak.
Cracked hoses, a hole in the ra-y
diator or a leaky gasket cause
gradual loss of coolant; loose
or broken water-pump belt
stops water circulation.
*Head restraints should be ad-
justed correctly to be effective.
in reducing neck injuries in
case of a crash. The cushion
should be behind the middle of
the head when you sit in the.
front seat.
*To protect your car's finish,
don't use anything stronger
than dish-washing liquid. Avoid
synthetic fabrics: get better re-
suIts with cotton, terrycloth,
cheesecloth or flannel.
*Real savings: regular use of a
$2 pressure gauge to keep
tires inflated properly can save
you $20 a year in gas.
*New-Used Cars: You get sav-
ings when you buy a new (or
late-model used) car at

QuffFord

Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales -


1.


TH SA C11TQrInr f..TMCnA V.-1.-1 Q


PArflr Il*0


5


a~r;ra;raa~$-~la~aaa~n~cra-~j-aaa~-~~r aaa a aaa~i~3~~~i-at~t~Taaaa a6-~-~~ri~aa~i~~aaaaaacraaaaad'a~aa


'


I















The City of Port St. Joe is embarking
this week on a mandatory recycling
program to remove recyclable products
from the waste stream. These recycled
products will be sold to industries to
be used as raw materials to produce
new goods with, thus helping the
environment... by reducing the need
for valuable resources and by
preventing these products from having
to be disposed of in the incinerator.
We are proud of those that recycle .
they are helping not only their
community but their environment also.
We're proud of them ... and we're
proud of our hometown.


TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH CENTER CUT
Pork Chops Lb.


GRADE A WHOLE FROZEN
Cut-Up Fryers .............. 6 9 Yam Patties ................ 9 9.
TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH FAMILY PAK
Cubed Pork Cutlets .... ,. Meat Franks ............... o. 99D
MeatFr nk nnunnnnnnnnu


TABLERITE QUALITY SMOKED
Ham Boiling Pieces ..... L,.
TABLERITE QUALITY SMOKED
Pork Knuckles .............. Lb.
TABLERITE QUALITY SMOKED
Pork Neckbones ........... ,.


99I

79

79


SUNNYLAND CARDINAL
Sliced Bacon
GWALTNEY BONELESS 2-3 LB.
Dinner Ham


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AVG.
muu..i...... mLB.


NATURE'S BEST
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IGA GALLON
BLEACH ..........................
QUICK & REGULAR 1 LB. BOX
JiMY DANDY GRITS ........
ALIUNGTON NATURAL SPRINGS GALLON
DRINKING WATER .........
BI-RITE TAGLESS 100 COUNT
TEA BAGS .....................


891
990
69"

/Sl$oo

79"


ARMOUR 5 OZ.
VIENNA SAUSAGE .'..... 2/99
ARMOUR 3 OZ.
POTTED MEAT ..... ... /991
PORTELLA THIN OR REGULAR 16 OZ.
SPAGHETTI .......ss................ 3 9
IGA 4ROLLPKG.
BATH TISSUE .................... 780
BUSH 15 OZ. /7
CHILI HOT BEANS ............ 2/79
SUGAR ROSE 16 OZ. CAN
TOMIATOES .................... 00
6 PACK OF 12 OZ. CANSII
SHASTA SODA .."................. 99
FRITO-LAY LAY'S Reg. $1.39
RUFFLES ............................ 9 91


LIPTON 100 COUNT
TEA BAGS ................. 299
HEFTY 20 COUNT
Compartment Trays ....... 259
SOLO TRANSLUCENT 18 CT. $1
PLASTIC CUPS ............. $19
HOMEBEST 10 CT. $149
TRASH CAN LINERS .....
HOMEBEST 100 FT .... ,
PLASTIC WRAP ....... 991
IGA 10 OZ.
CHEESE CRACKERS ..... 990
IGA 10 OZ.
WHEAT CRACKERS ...... 99

GOLDEN FLAKE
Flavored 99
Chips......9 99


HEALTH &BEAUTY AIDS


ALBERTO 15 OZ.
VO-5 Conditioner


ARM & HAMMER ASST. VARIETIES 5 OZ. $0
TOOTHPASTE ..............
ALBERTO 15 OZ.
VO-5 SHAMPOO ................
BARBASOL BONUS PACK 14.75 OZ.
SHAVE CREAM ..............


97"
1.99
97*
88


EXTRA LARGE EXTRA FANCY RED DELICIOUS
Apples 1.... ,............... b.
JUMBO RED GLOBE
Grapes .................. b.
GREAT FOR DECORATING
Indian Corn ........... 3 ears
YELLOW
Onions ............... 3 lb. bag
GREEN
Cabbage .............. 4 Lbs.
CELLO
Carrots ............... 2 lb. bag
FANCY
Cauliflower ............ head


691


3


691




$199


790

$100


790

$129


*. *


...I.III.I.


Hill
11111










THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 15, 1992 PAGE 3B


Principal Gerald Lewter of
Port St. Joe Elementary School
has announced the honor roll
students for the first six 'veek
grading period.
All A's
First Grade
Brittany Alford,, Becky Belin,
Tommy Curry, Ashby Davis, Rob-
ert Davis, Johnathon Gay, Kale
Guillot, Ashley Haddock, Jimmy
Hall, Terrence Holland, Caycee
Kennedy, Rushelle Lamboy, Na-
brisha McGowIn, Moses Medina,
Melissa Nixoiy, John Patrick,
Sheena Quinn, Randi Sasser,
B.J. Strickland, Stephen Taranti-


Wewahitchka

Jerry Kelley, principal of We-
wahitchka Elementary School,
takes great pleasure in announc-
ing the honor roll students for the
0 first six week grading period.
All A's
First Grade
Sean Burch, Shanna Collier,
ShAwn Davis, Dawn Hall, Dottie
Hall, Laura Husband, Tocarra


The Gulf County Schools
have announced the lunch menu
for the week. Menus may change
due to the availability of certain
food items.
Monday, October 19: manag-
er's choice
'1 tuesday, October 20: chicken
with rice, english peas, fruit cup,
rolls, milk, and dessert
Wednesday, October 21: spa-
ghetti with, meat sauce and
cheese, tossed, salad, green
beans, roll, and milk
Thursday,, October 22: chill
dog, cheese wedge, tossed salad
or cole slaw, french fries, milk,
and cookie
Friday, October 23: pizza bur-
ger, sliced tomato, lima beans,
milk, and fruit cobbler.

Parent Awareness
. Group Meets Tues.
SBetty-Bidwell, Coordinator of
Special Services, will give a spe-
cial presentation on 'The Middle
School Transition" to the Parent
Awareness Group on Tuesday,
October 20.
Mrs. Bidwell will be discuss-
ing the developmental stages of
this age group, including physi-
cal, emotional, social and intellec-
tual stages.
Join the Parent Awareness
Group in .the County Commis-
sioners' meeting room at the Gulf
County Courthouse on Tuesday,
October 20 at, 7:00 p.m. Learn
what is "normal" for this difficult
age group, 'so you will be able to
recognize abnormal behavior.
Mrs., Bidwell will also 'be
available to answer questions on
"Blueprint 2000."


no, James Walker, Preston Wig-
sten
Second Grade
Renee Bell, James Daniels,
Amy Doster, Susan Ellmer, Mar-
garet Gibson, Melinda Holley,
Tessie Layfield, Bryan Thomas,
Tyler Weimorts
Third Grade
Mary Amerson, George Bor-
den, Ashley Bryan, Dustin Crews,
Lisa Curry, Rob Dykes, Ricardo
Filmore, Christina Neel, Cody No-
bles, Brittany Reeves
Fourth Grade
Kristin Abrams, Benjamin
Ashcraft, Bonnie Belin, James


Capps, Nicholas Comforter, Keria
Driesbach, Angela McDowell, Da-
vid Patrick, Jessica Tarpley,
Joshua Todd, Jarrod Wester,
Adam White, Leslie White
Fifth Grade
Erica Ailes, Alicia Christie,
Brandon Davis, Joshua McCul-
ley, Clay Smallwood, Lea Todd
Sixth Grade
Aaron Bearden, Anna Duren,
Jim Faison, Tracey Fitzgerald,
Meredith Godfrey, Rikki Johnson,
Rachel McCroan, Julia Six, Don-
na Thomas, Tracy Watkins, Mikki
Whaley
A's & B's or All B


Elementary School...


Jones, James McCorvey, Lindsay
Miller, Hunter Nunnery, William
Owens, Jimmy Robbins, Cassie
Ward
Second Grade
Barbara Alderman, Justin
Barnes, Sheena Barnes, Aleasha
Hand, Cortne Hoover, Judith
Husband, Kelli Jackson, Matthew.
Ludlam, Meagan Morris, Brandon
Simpson, Laura Spivey, Jonathan
Thomas
Third Grade
Jamie Cain, Lindsey Carter,
Nicholas Chan, Tonya Hall, Brady
- Jordan, Christy McCain, Kimber-
ly McMillion
Fourth Grade
Nicholas Hall, Teresa Jones,
Tiffany Wills
Fifth Grade
Sarah Bailey, Stevie Johnson,
Russell Knee, Daniel Miller, Me-
lissa Myers, Keisa Pickron, Ste-
phen Price
n P Sixth Grade
Kenneth Ardire, Tana Cope-
land, Kelly Forehand, Kristi Gay,
Victoria McClellan, Amy St. Clair,
Jessica Williams
A's & B's or All B's
First Grade
Trampus Andrews, Justin
Body, Byron Brooks, Randall
Buffkin, Amanda Feltrop, Bobbi
Hester, Candace Little, Veronica
Marsh, Holly Merritt, Sarah San-
difer, Courtney Addison, William
Harrell, Trey Murphy, Rashel
Strange, Brandi Williams
Second Grade
Jesse Knee, Derrick McMfl-
lion, Tracy Price, Jesse Tauntoni,
Kalisa Taylor, Jana Traylor, Apol-
lonia Williams, Brandon Carter,
Kelly Hysmith, Jermale Keith,
Travis Myers, Terrn Myers, Erika
SPippin, iCecil Reeder, Robert Buff-
kin, oFrankie Stanley, Amy Wil-
liams, Andrae Williams
Third Grade
Judson Camrnley, Joshua Con-
ley, Jonathan Gates, Nicole Hall,
Amanda Kent, Ryan Martin, Ali-
cia Mooneyham, Ansley Williams,
Jennifer Williams, Clarissia Allen,
Kyle Brown, Gregory Carter, Cas-
sidle Daniels, Joseph Lea, Phillip
Pollard, Josie Whitfield, Ashley
Wolinski, Brooke Grice, William
Jenkins. Brandon Jones, Ricky
Mamoran, Christopher Nelson,
Anthony Hysmith, Adam Flowers,
Gregory Barnett, Derrick Myers,
James Roberts, Jeffrey Yoder
Fourth Grade,
Colby Anderson, Renee :Ar-
dire, Stephen Pippin, Mandy
Vickery, Christina Williamson,


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Tera Kent, Justin Marshall, Stefa-
nie McDaniel, Richard Barfleld,
Joseph McLemore, Jeremy Suber,
Joshua Webb, Phillip Addison,
Joseph. Chambliss, Crystal Dan-
iels, Aaron Gray, Jeremy Sams,
Jeremy Cain, Hope.Coleman
Fifth Grade
Brandy Ake, Gayla Carter,
Jessica Cole, Silvia Daniels, An-
drew Davis, Kevin Minchew, Me-
lissa Babb, Mark Carithers, Crys-
tal Collins, Ryan Fortner, Daniel
Gray, Joel Hughes, Rebecca Pitts,
Joseph Causey, Timothy Harvey,
Brenton McClellan, Tiffany
Smith, Krystal Foster, Todd Law-
rence, Rocky Traylor, Colin
Hutchinson, Jr., Lydia Kent
Sixth-Grade
Amanda Atchison, Daniel
Babb, Thelma Bryant, Michael
Hammond, Sandra Lance, De-
Wayne Jones, Elizabeth Dietz,
Champion Traylor, Jennifer Wil-
liams, Stephanie Ake, Tripp Atch-
ison, Kristal Bailey, Brandi
McDaniel, James Taunton, Ste-
ven McDaniel, Michael Pabis,
Bridgett Williamson, Steve Ake,
Jessica Thomas.


St. Joe Elementary School.


First Grade
Collins Abrams, Samuel
Amerson. Schcora Baker, Ste-,
phen Besore, Jessica Bland, Si-
mon Collins, Jessica Ford, Drew
Hall, Sammie Manning, Ria Harri-
son, Philippa Lieber, Brandon
Stitt, Cassandra Taylor, Joshua
Watkins, Sasha Watkins, Melody
Zimmerman
Second Grade
Alisha Barber, Julia Comfort-
er, Daphne Crosby, Colleen
Falbe, Patrick Fitzgerald, Sherry
Foster, Kristen Garcia, Shena
Glenn, Julia Hogan, Emily Ho-
ward, Kayla Jefferson, Carla
Johnson, Christopher Knox, Bob-
by Phillips, Jennifer Raffield, Jes-
' sica Sherrill
Third Grade
Joshua Carter, Joey Dimarti-
no, Reko Gainer, Sarah Gammill,
Cheskia Gant, Wesley Garrett,
Chad Haddock, Adam Hamm,
Benjamin Henderson, Samuel Lit-
tleton, Patrick Mastro, Amanda
Matthews, Carla Money, Brooke
Moore, Lee Ann Motley, Ken Peak,
Dwayne Piergiovanni, Blake Rish,
.Tanashia Rouse, Heidi Wells
Fourth Grade
Bucky Burkett, Jennifer
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Gay, Ashley Jones, Angela Marti-


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B.J. Presnell, Matthew Sasser,
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Olympia Arendt, Robert
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Samantha Ambrose, Nicole


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Honor Roll Students: Port


'A, Some Personal Uses Of Life Insurance:
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VRoss E. Tucker
RHU, LUTCF
Tucker Life-Health Insurance Agency, Inc.
serving Gulf County
1-800-226-7005
52T 12/19/91


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Phone 227-1278 FAX 227-7212 304-308 Williams Ave.


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Grade 2
Tony Werts
Grade 5
Kenny Smith
Grade 6
Courtney Beachum, Tannis
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Gulf County Senior Citizens Center
in its continuing effort to
serve our seniors
is offering foot care at the Gulf County Senior Citizen Center
in Port St. Joe on Wednesday, October 21 from 10 a.m. to noon and
at Cypress Medical Clinic in Wewahitchka on Thursday, October 15
and Wednesday October 21 in the afternoon by Dr. Stephen Gross
For more information about Wewa times, please call 639-2935.
904-229-8466
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,rizi Av Tnp- L-~ TTHURSDAY.OCT.15. 1992


Schwarz Helping Victims


of Hurricane Andrew


a'

. ,


-.6





SeaBee Jay Schwarz is among many men assigned to clean-up duty in storm ravaged South Florida
area.


McDonald Introduces Florida

Power Programs to Lions Club
''- The Port St. Joe Lions Club gram is to allow Florida Power the distance that helps pay bills f
was honored to have Mike McDo- ability to interrupt the power to electricity, gas, oil and even fiu
nald from Florida Power Corpora- certain appliances during periods wood. Your tax-deductible cont
tion speak at their regular meet- of peak demand. Each customer button is matched by the stoc
ing held October 7. McDonald can save as much as $17.00 per holders dollar for dollar up
.presented several programs now month on their electric bill de- $150,000 total and Is set asi
-being offered by Florida Power pending on what appliances they for Gulf County customers t
that can save customers money, would like to apply to the pro- have a hardship. Contribute
provide financial help to the gram. can be made in three differe
needy, and smooth out monthly The second program being of- ways: a one time contribution
-electric bills. fered is the Energy Neighbor your next bill, or you can mak(
: : The first program introduced Fund. Through the Energy Neigh- monthly contribution for o
:was the Energy Management Pro- bor Fund Florida Power Corpora- year, and finally, you can have
-gram. The purpose of this pro- tion and its customers provide as- specified amount added to yo
bill until you tell Florida Povw
SACorporation to make a change.
lUlo AttendsU WP Florida Power 'also offers
1 1-0 nthaIve rageT bil lUng... 13r


for
re-
ri-
:k-
to
de
hat
on'
nt
on
Sa
ne:.
Sa
iur
ver'*.,
a.:
ro-'


Most of the Navy ships that
raced to the Port of Miami in the
aftermath of Hurricane Andrew
have returned, now, to their own
home ports. After off-loading vast
quantities of food, relief supplies
and other equipment and having
mobilized the energy and talents
of young crew members for volun-
teer working parties used to cope
with the initial backbreaking
clean-up, the ships are back to
pursuing the Navy's more tradi-
tional missions. That does not
mean, however, that the Navy has
pulled out of South Florida. On
the contrary.
Jay Schwarz, the son-in-law
of Donnie and Carolyn Young of
Port St. Joe, is one of the mem-
bers of the elite construction
force. Formed immediately after
the attack on Pearl Harbor that
brought America into WWII and
whose spirit, as well as their non-
traditional approach to getting
the job done, was popularized in
as disparate entertainment vehi-
cles as the movie The Fighting
Sea Bees starring John Wayne
and the Broadway musical South
Pacific, the SeaBees have once
again answered the call to help.,
Indeed, the SeaBees motto
"Can Do" is being put to the test
in storm-ravaged Dade County,


where temperatures range from
80 to 100 degrees and the humid-
ity feels like 100 percent.
Schwarz, 31, is an engineer-
ing aide. Describing his reaction
to the task at hand, Schwarz
said, 'We've come to South Flori-
da with the right equipment and
the right attitude. We're doing our
best to help in the clean-up."
There is plenty of work for all
hands. As an example, through-
out Dade County countless trees
were felled by Hurricane Andrew's
reported 140-to-.160 mph winds.
Palms, pines and oaks blocked
the roads immediately after the
storm, but of long-term concern
were those ensnarled in power
and utility lines.
Initially Schwarz and his
companions helped remove the
.trees and bulldozed them into
piles. Later they returned to cut
the trunks into manageable piec-
es and hauled the remains to one
of 34 open burn pits authorized
by the Department of Environ-
mental Resources Management.
There the trees and other storm
debris were set on -fire, forming
dark pillars of smoke and an ee-
rie haze that stretched over areas
of the South Florida turnpike.
The lack of adequate housing
or utility service in South Florida


Conference in Texas


Wewahitchka resident Jean
Mallorv has recently returned
-fiem San Antonio, Texas, where
-s e attended the 15th National
.Widowed Persons Service (WPS)
Conference. 'The conference
theme 'Taking Charge of Change'
really defines WPS," said Anne
Studner of the American Associa-
tion of Retired 'Persons (AARP).
"WPS is the nation's largest pro-
gram serving the newly widowed.'
Our purpose is to help newly wid-
owed people cope with the


TEAMWO
The war against illegal
we cannot afford to lose.
that drug dealers and espec
well organized and well final
cessfully combat these indiv
that all law enforcement ag
another in a cooperative e
work tirelessly to develop a I
work with area law enforcer
to marshal our forces and
gree of pressure to bear upo
trade.

PROFESSION
I will devote whatever ti
essary to develop the Gulf
into one of the most efficier
fices in the entire state. All
of the highest caliber and e
cluding myself, will undergo
and training in order to keep
est changes in criminal proc
ment techniques.

SENIOR CIT
Because I have a closi
mother and mother-in-law %
seventies, I have a firsthand
needs and concerns of oi
Sheriff, I would immediately
funds a bi-weekly home cc
home security inspection s
contact program would enal
to closely monitor the well-b
zens and the home secure
would lessen the likelihood
come victims of crime.


mourning process and to take
charge of their lives."
AARP's Program Division Di-
rector C. Anne Harvey remarked,
'"When AARP founded this pro-
gram 19 years ago, it was decided
to inake it available to widowed
men and women of all ages be-
cause death is no. respecter of
age." .- -
The newly widowed of this
,area areserved, by Panama City
WPS. To contact WPS, call 639-'
5322 or 904/784-7109.


gram. The basic purpose of this Is
to reduce the big swings in
monthly energy bills from one
season to the next. For details on
this and other programs, stop by
the local Florida Power Corpora-
tion office on Reid Avenue and get
some of the free pamphlets that
are available.
The Lions Club wishes to
thank Mike McDonald for provid-
ing them with this valuable infor-
mation. A Lions Club Zone Meet-
ing will be held Inr the near-
future. Anyone'. interested in at-
tending should contact Jim
Krebs.
'I


Waylon



Graham



Is ForM..

)RK ACCESSIBILITY
drugs is a battle that I can assure the citizens of Gulf County that I
It is apparent by now will make myself available at any time whether it is
ally drug suppliers are after hours or on the weekend to discuss any rec-
inced. In order to suc- ommendations or complaints concerning the Gulf
viduals, it is imperative County Sheriff's Office. I. fully recognize that the
agencies work with one job of Sheriff is not an eight to five job but instead
effort. As Sheriff, I will is one that requires the Sheriff to be on duty at all
evel of trust and team- times. I accept that and promise the citizens of
nent that will allow us Gulf County that I will be a full-time Sheriff seven
bring a maximum de- days a week and will devote as much time as nec-
on the illegal narcotics essary to provide the citizens of Gulf County with
the best possible Sheriff's Office.

JALISM YOUTHi
me and energy is nec- Those of you who know me recognize that I
County Sheriff's Office have spent the last thirty-five years working with
nt and professional of- the kids of Gulf County as a baseball umpire and
deputy sheriffs will be coach, basketball official and timekeeper, football
each and everyone, in- coach, President of the Quarterback Club and a
continuing education school board member for sixteen'years. Because
p us abreast of the lat- of these experiences, I recognize that Gulf
edure and law enforce- County's most valuable asset is its children. Con-
sequently, I will immediately establish with existing
funds a drug and. alcohol awareness program de-
IZENS signed to better educate our children concerning
e relationship with my the dangers of alcohol and drugs.
who are both in their
d understanding of the
ur senior citizens. As
establish with existing Is 't If Tim e to
contact program and a
service. The bi-weekly
ble the Sheriff's Office Elect A Democrat
ieing of our senior citi-
rity inspection service
d that they would be- for Sheriff


Elect



Waylon Graham


Sheriff
Pd. Pol. Adv. paid for by the camp. acct. of Waylon Graham, Dem.


Diamondback
Rattler Killed
Chester LeGrone is shown
beside the diamondback rattle-
snake he found on 16th Street
Tuesday afternoon. Chest quickT
ly called for help and Deda Gil-
bert responded.
Mr. Diamondback was 3
feet, 9 inches long and sported
nine rattlers.

Call 227-1278 to
Place Your
Classified Ad


"IF I CAN GET IT,YOU CAN TOO"!

m m =e ="@m m


SATURDAYS
9 AM E.T.
8 AM C.T.


SUNDAYS
1 AM E.T.
12 NOON C.T.


PUBLIC TELEVISION CENTER


WFSU 11
TALLAHASSEE


WFSG 56
PANAMA CITY


rC"i L-800-237-5113
FQORDALIERCYCO LIIO*H TLN


Medicare patients could pay more

for Cataract Surgery performed

after the January 1 Deadline.


Medicare patients who have met their deductible for 1992 can save out-of-pocket
expenses for any cataract or other eye surgery performed before January 1, 1993.

In fact, Medicare patients who have met their 1992 deductible and have an adequate
co-insurance can have cataract surgery performed at no cost, but only if the procedure
is performed before January. 1, 1993.

The dawn of the new year will require all Medicare patients to nmeet their deductible
again for any eye surgery in 1993, and it is possible that the deductible could increase
on January 1,1993 resulting in an even greater payment requirement. Ifyou have been
postponing cataract or other eye surgery, acting now, before 1993 arrives, could mean
significant savings for you.

Call your eye doctor or Eye Center South today and we will be happy to answer your
questions or assist you in scheduling your surgery before the new year brings a new
deductible.


EYE CENTER SOUTH
2800 Ross Clark Circle, SW Dothan, AL
For directions or other information, call:
(205) 793-2211 or 1-800-447-7134


Marnix E. Heersink, M.D.
John A. Cone, M.D. Irene H. Ludwig, M.D.
John G. Fortin, M.D. Peter Zloty, M.D.


PAGE 4B TESAPR T OL-L


I


--


I


has not been a problem for the
construction forces,- said
Schwarz. Living in tents, eating
MRE's, and generating their own
power, the SeaBee encampment
bustles with activity from before
the rising of the sun into the eve-
ning hours.
At night, as the crews return
from work, the daily parade of in-
sects reaches its frenzied peak.
Mosquitoes, black flies and
clouds of nearly invisible gnats
settle down. for dinner alongside
the returning construction men.
Through it all, Schwarz says
that the morale of the active duty
SeaBees, augmented by members
of the reserve force, remains
steadfast.
Schwarz, who joined the Navy
in 1979, said that although tired,
he was proud to be able, to be
part of the effort. '!Our& primary
goal here is to make the schools
safer for the students. Once the
schools are cleaned up and- re-
paired, the kids can get started
with their work: Education is the
strongest tool we have it
:,should never be taken from any-
body," Schwarz concluded.
Schwarz and his wife, the for-
mer Pamela DeAnn Young of Port
St. Joe, reside in Charleston,
South Carolina..


iC1


. -














m.Iybe to watclh a gan< tlhiri. Al
school. lic likes to play will Kvh'
Brown. Hi s favorite book is Ti<'
S-'cr,1 (ardien. Thlat's a Lavorilt ol
mine too. Jeff said (his about
himself. "I like to play Iobollbll. go
fishing ami hunting. Scliool i,
nice." Jeff. you make school irce
lor those around you.
Third Grade Pep Rally
After doing a unit on 'loot
)all'. the classes enjoyed hearing
Irom Athletic Director amnd Head


"The Exciting Place to Worship"


'First 'Baptist 'Chiurcf

102 Third-Street
Port St. Joe, Florida

HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
< -" *J


Highland View
United Methodist Church
Corner of 4th St. & Parker Ave.
Highland View
Lynwood R. Wynne, Pastor


Sunday School ............................................... .................... ...........10 a.m.
Morning W orship ....... .......... .................................-- ................ 11 a.m.
Evening W orship ..... ............................................................... .......6 p.m.
Pd. thru 12/92


Catch theS rit
" THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH


Constitution and'Monument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............... 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ............5:30 p.m. Thursday ..................7:30 p.m.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
A '~ CHURCH
__ < 508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
U T SUNDAY WORSHIP..........................10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL............................... 11 a.m.
4"1 *SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children
SUS P Nursery Available

The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor



You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James Episcopal Church
309"'ixth Street Port St. Joe

++ -SERVICES-
Each Sunday..........7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School........................... 9:45 a.m.

The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor




[First United Methodist Church
111 North 22nd St.
Mexico Beach, FL 32410

Morning Church..................9:00 a.m. CT
Church School............. 10:00 a.m. CT
Nursery Provided

Charles M. Parker, Pastor John Anderson, Music Director


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E, Port St. Joe, Florida Church Phones 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellowship
"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-5 thru 6th Grade
Does not discriminate based upon race, creed, color, or origin.




FR IENDL) We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place
BIBLE STUDY.......................... 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP................ 11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY................... 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ...................5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor


KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children


ALLEN STEWART
Min. of Education
& Youth


Student of the Week
Jeff McNeil, the sion of June
and Colin Hditchison. is the spot-
lighted student this week. He is
in, the third grade classroom of
Mrs. Linda Tremain. Jeff claims
math as his favorite subject and
when he grows up he would like
to be a policeman. When asked
who he admired, he didn't hesi-
tate to say, "My dad." JelT likes to
watch football on TV. He hopes
to visit San Francisco one day.


THE STAR, PC


Wewahitchka

Elementary

News...
By Linda Whitfield


Football Coach Wayne Flowers.
'o;aili Flowers brought live of his
p)l;:'Iers to tell about particular
,area ol football. PI'layers coming
were: Roy l.ee (Ca'rter. ,h'Jeiy
Pridgcoii. Michael Morgan. Will
Si illir. andl Icau Whllllrld. The
Iollowilu dlay. Mrs. Marilyn G(ood
will broughtli hlc Varsity ('Clhee
Ileulers i) explain sol; ln s ile of I I '
jumpss, anil have a Ipp rally wi(li
thie classes. Those coming were:'
l;Ilrclle Kent. Heather Goodwin,.
Casi Lindsay, hJennifler Marquez'i,
C'arrie Rediiion, Amy Rich, land
('athy "T'remain. Afterwards, I be
lieve we all leaned a little inorc
alout fool)all. Much Ilanks to
all who ('alle over.
It's the Thought That Counts!
Oine usually expects one's 1or
iller students to come round, or
call out hello or give a hug in the
lunchroom. One also gets notes,
calls, etc. and that is a real warni
feeling to a teacher. The other clay
one of my former students from
last year, Heidi Wiley, came to my
room with a card. She is one of
the ones that usually remembers
me fondly with a wave, etc. I
opened my card and it was a pic-
Lure of lavender lilies with the
words, "In Sympathy". The inside
was even better. It said, "With
thoughts of deepest sympathy to
let you know we care." We both
smiled at the same time, then she
said, "It was the only card we had
left and I wanted. to bring you
something." I loved the card, but
much more the kind-hearted giv-
er. I will put it In my box of things
to save. Thanks, Heidil
Mr. Walker Breaks Right Wrist
Our heartfelt sympathy goes


From the
Principal's Desk

Wewahitchka

High School
By Larry A. Mathes

"It's Easier to Go Home"
I'm convinced that students used to be tougher than they are
now I know they must be sicker now just judging by how many
have to call home for someone to come get them because they are
sick each day. I can't ever remember getting to go home because I
got sick at school. Maybe it was because we lived 9 miles from
school with no close neighbors, and there was no car at home dur-
ing the day. Being faced with a nine mile walk home was a fantastic
medicine. In fact. I guess just the thought of that walk served as a
preventive medicine. . ... : ..
Homecoming.activiles crank up next week,, October 19-23. The
parade and game on Friday the 23rd complete fliesow. This year's
King and Queen will be crowned at half-time of'the Chattahoochee
game, a return to the way the crowning took place several years
ago. This Friday, the Gators tackle a very strong R.F. Munroe team
at Quincy, 6:30 central time.
There have been some changes on the Gator squad, as some
players elected not to finish the season. This is not unusual when
you're trying to rebuild some All fall by the wayside. But those
that stick it out will be that much stronger for having paid the price
that's required to rebuild the program. There are no guarantees in
football, as in life. Those that thought it would be easy, with lots of
glamour, will sort themselves out as the going gets tougher and
tougher. Those that survive will be the winners in the long run.
It's time again for Progress Reports to go out. At the halfway
point of each 6 weeks, a reminder is sent out, especially to those
students who are not doing well. But even if a student is doing O.K.
at the 3 weeks mark, he/she may still experience difficulty the last
3 weeks or on a final test. Hopefully, there won't be any last min-
ute surprises.
How closely do you monitor your student? Do you observe what
he/she watches on 'IV or listens to on the radio? Do you take time
to discuss school and schoolwork? Do you make sure he/she eats
properly and gets sufficient sleep? All of these things directly affect
how well your student does in school and he or she will know
you're interested
Hey middle school parents are invited to attend the Hallo-
ween Dance, October 30th, 6th period in the commons
The Wewahitchka boys and girls Cross Country teams compet-
ed this past weekend in the Port St. Joe Invitational Cross Country
Meet. In the boys division, Luke Taunton finished first for Wewa
and 11th overall with a time of 17:38 on the 3-mile course. Jason
Flowers (20:46) and Daniel Taunton (21:07) finished 2nd and 3rd
respectively for Wewa.
In the girls division, Holly Adkins finished first for Wewa in a
time of 14:27 on the 2-mile course, which was good for an eighth
place finish overall. Heather Webb (15:51) and Diana Taunton
(16:03) finished 2nd and 3rd for the Wewa Lady Gators. Wewahitch-
ka will travel to the Marianna High School Invitational on Saturday,
October 24th.
k.


Accreditation
Review Slated
Fourteen inquiring minds will
focus on Port St. Joe High School
October 18-21 when the South-
ern Association of Colleges and
Schools (SACS) evaluate the
school's programs and facilities to
determine accreditation.
Accreditation assures that
the school and community have
made a commitment to quality
education. A committee of area
educators will visit Port St. Joe


High to observe and comment on
strengths and limitations. They
will be sitting in on classes,
checking out facilities and review-
ing teacher certification. Every
aspect of the school program will
be under scrutiny.
The SACS study will begin
with a dinner for the faculty,
staff, and SACS visiting team at
Port St. Joe High School on Octo-
ber 18. Students will 'be dis-
missed at 12:30 p.m. October 21
so that the visitors may have time
to report to the faculty and staff.


Bible Study Worship
10 a.m. Sunday 11 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday Attended Nursery Provided

DID YOU KNOW THE GATE THAT LEADS
TO ETERNAL LIFE IS STRAIT AND NAR-
ROW? THERE WILL BE FEW THAT FIND
IT. WON'T YOU BE ONE OF THOSE FEW?
(Matt. 7:14)

Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of *
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
P.O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
k_ ^-


JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 15, 1992 PAGE 5B


I


the PTO is sponsoring a poster
contest. All students are encour-.
aged to participate. Cash prizes
will be awarded. Poster board
(half or whole sheet) is accepta-
ble. Student's name, grade and
homeroom teacher must be listed
on the back of the poster. Posters
must be student made. The fol-
lowing information must be in-
cluded:
What: WES Fall Festival
When: October 30, 1992 *
12:00 2:00 p.m.
Where: Linton Site. Tickets
are 254 each. The public is invit-
ed. The deadline for turning in


Jeff McNeil Student of Week


to Joe Walker, fifth and sixth
grade science teacher, as he
broke his right wrist on Saturday.
Mr. Walker, who is an avid arch-
er, will have to wait a bit before
lhe gets his bow ready. Thank
goodness hie can still teach.
Mr. Kelley to be Arrested
(ACS Jail & Bail)
I have heard it from the ifigh-
est authority Mr. Kelley is go-
ing to be arrested. Boys and girls,
start bringing in your nickels and
dimes and let's help him pay his
bail. He's a good principal and we
don't want him to go to jail. The
arraignment will be Friday, No-
vember 6.
Wewa Volunteer Fire Dept.
Gives Demonstration and
Donates
Members of the WVFD, Jack
Husband, Ronnie Martin and
Dale Marshall, came to school
with the fire truck and equip-
ment, and delighted the young-
sters in kindergarten. In addition
to the demo, students in grade
one and kindergarten received
fire hats and all students in pre-k
through sixth received pencils
and badges. This was done in
conjunction with Fire Prevention
Week. Many thanks to our volun-
teers.
WES PTO Sponsoring Poster
and Door Decorating Contest
To advertise 'the Fall Festival,


LAW OFFICES OF
FRIER & USKERT, P.A.


We May Be Able To Help You

*Stop Harassing Calls, Letters, Etc.
*Stop Repossessions & Foreclosures
*Eliminate Debts
*Start Over and Re-establish Good Credit
Call John Uskert or Randal (904)784-1361
Frier for a free confidential ,(904)784-1361
consultation. 1-800-749-2223
465 Harrison Ave. *Panama City
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be
based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send
you free information about our qualifications and experience."
, TFC 1 o24/91a,




EYE EXAM FOR


I
I
I

I
I
I


0. Lee Mullis, M.D.








Bay Eye & Surgical Center
1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City


CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
1-800-227-5704


K


'L .----- ----- -------------


GET A
GOOD

THING _


EVERYTHING FOR 4
FALL PLANTING
* Cabbage, Broccoli, Collard,
Onion, Cauliflower Plants
* Chrysanthemum, Pansy.
Carnation, Snapdragon,
Plants
* Fertilizer. Lime -.
* Rye Grass Seed

It's Getting Close to Wood Cutting Time


CHAINSAWS

Sales and Service


BARFIELD'S


329 Reid Ave.


Ph. 229-2727


GARDEN


posters is October 19. The out-
side doors of the classrooms are
to be judged also. Cash prizes will
be awarded to the winning class-
rooms.






HEARING AID CENTER

618 W. 23rd St.
Wilbro Plaza
Panama City, FL
769-5348

FREE HEARING
TEST
Top Quality, Name
Brand Hearing Aids

Satisfaction Guaranteed
Monthly Service Center
Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
1st Tuesday each month


a -


"\


I


Medicare Assignment Accepte7d


.


.:-.-


~~0~~


I











PAGE 6B THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY. OCT. 15, 1992


1954 Chevy Bel-Air 2 dr., all orig-
inal, blue/light, $3,100. First come,
'first buy. Call 648-8852. ltp 10/15
'89 Chevrolet Camaro R/S,
46,000 miles, am/fm cassette;, a/c,
standard shift, $6,500 obo. Excel.
cond. 229-6314. 2tc 10/15
'91 Ford Ranger pickup, $250 for
camper top and take over notes. 639-
2254. 2tp 10/8
'79 Ford 150 4x4, $1,200. Call
227-1687 after 6 p.m. 2tc 10/8
1985 Kawasakil 700 LTD. For more
Information call 229-8513 after 3:30
p.mi. 2tp 10/8
1987 Nissan Maxima. Must Sell.
.Power sun roof, leather interior, cli-
nmate control a/c, completely loaded.
Day 229-8265, night 229-8352.
: 2tc 10/8
.- 1988 Camaro, V-6, auto trans., pw,
cruise, t-tops, call 648-5414.
tfc 10/1
1983 Buick 4 door Regal in good
condition. Call 229-8383 after 5 p.m.rr
$1,700. tfc 9/24





16' 61 Aristo Craft boat with 40
hp motor, tilt trailer, $500. Call 229-
8931 work 648-8810. 3tc 10/15
22' Cabin Cruiser, 190 OMC, toi-
let, CB, stereo, new carpet, uphol-
stery, batteries, new paint, sleeps 6,
must see. $6,500. Call 648-5994.
ltc 10/15
OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR -
Call Steve at 227-1687 after 6 p.m.
tfc 10/1

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
?AYSI Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
,$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 54 per word for all over 20.


FOR ENT7FOR ENT 11 GE ALE


Office Space for Rent. Excellent
location on Reid Avenue. Reception
space and 3 or 3 offices. Utilities in-
cluded. Available Dec. 1, 1992. Call
229-8723 for details. tfc 10/15
One bed bom upstairs furnished
apartment. 8gh Street. $65 week. Call
eynings, 229-69@3. Itp 10/15
Small two bedroom trailer. De-
posit, no pets. 648-82 l1. tfc 10/15
V


Liberty Manor Apts., 800 Tap-
per Dr., Port St. Jos. Affordable
housing for, the elderly and the
handicapped.
Cen. h&a, laundry facilities, ein-
ergy efficient const., handicapped
equipped apts. available, stove & re-
frig. fum., fully carpeted, 1 bdrm.
apts., on-site manager.
Equal Opportunity Housing
Complete. Rent is Based On I-,
come.
This complex is funded by the
Farmers 'Home Adihinistration and
managed by Advisors Realty.
Call 229-6353 for more informa-
tion.
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
2tc 10/8
For Rent: 'Mobile home or travel
trailer space. For Sale, 10'x27' alumi-
num carport. Call 229-8959 after 5
p.m. 4tp 9/24-
One bedroom apartment for rent,
unfurnished. Call after 5 p.m., 227-
2118. tfe 9/24'
Furnished mobile home, quiet
area, 2 bdrm,. 1 ba., privacy fence,
carpet & sheetrock throughout. Air
cond., furnace, ceiling fans. New din-
ette set & stove, nice fridge. 647-8743
evenings. tfc 10/1
Mobile home lots, 14 x 70, or
R.V.'s permanent. Quiet clean park.
1100 N. 15th St., Mexico Beach. 648-
8201. tfc 10/1
S1 ,bedroom unfurnished energy
efficient apartment, good neighbor-
hood, $285 month. Also for rent or
sale: Nice 3 bdrm. 2 bath home on
Country Club golf course. Call 229-
2783. tfc 10/1


Mexico Beach, Mobile home and
r.v. spaces for rent, $65 month. Call
648-5659. tfc 10/1.
Nice one, two & three bedroom,
apartments. Cen. h&a; stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-'
come. Handicap -units available. Pine
Ridge Apartments, 227-7451. Equal'
Housing. tfc 10/1
OFFICE SPACE. 'Call George,
Duren at 229-6031 and leave mes-
sage. tfc 10/1


Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfc 10/1
UNFURNISHED
.* Large 2 bdrrh. house, stove & re-
Sfrig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ha., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
* Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
* One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p,m.
Warehouses, small and 'large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfe 10/1
No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/92
The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 10/1

Exclusive Office Space
2 story, 410 Long Avenue
(adjacent to Citizens Federal)
Port St. Joe
Call 227-7413 e1


Tamara Barnes Country Victori-
an Craft Sale, 210 Bay View Dr.,
Highland View (west on Hwy. 98). Sat-
urday, Oct. 17, 9 a.m. Itc 10/15
4 Moving Sale: (Cash only). Price
firm. Freezer (full) $300; elec. stove
$75; ITV $25; buffet & table $50;
heather $150; new apt. fre $250; ta-
(ble w/2 chairs $50; rocker $15; quilts
$50 up; 1970 Chev. truck, $1,000.
Jut .redone trailer $4,000. Antique
pink bed $75. Sanderson, Douglap
Landing, 639-5695. 2tp 10/8
Moving. Sale: Saturday, Oct.
17th, 9 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Stove, rugs
and miscellaneous items. 1511 Monu-
ment Ave. It 10/15
Yard Sale: Thursday, Friday only,
Oct. 15 & 16. 120 Westcott Circle.
Dresser, night stand, baby & materni-
ty clothes, what nots, toys, etc. 8 a.m.
until 2:00. ltc 10/15
2 Family Yard Sale: Twin bed &
bedding, king elec. blanket, trucker's
equipment, lots of good stuff cheap.
Sat., Oct 17, 8 am. till noon. Hwy.
98, 4.5 miles west of Highland View
Bridge. 647-3070. Itp 10/15

S Garage Sale. Saturday' Oct. 17,
1606 Garrison Ave. 8 a.m. 12 noon.
Rain. cancels. Love seat, women's
dresses, skirts, tops & 2-pc. lined
suits, sizes 7 to 11. Children's
* clothes. Come early. Itc 10/15
Carport Sale: Friday, October
16th, 8:30 2:00, 113 Monica Drive
(Ward Ridge). 2 families. Children's
and adult's clothes, toys and other
items. Itp 10/15,
Yard Sale: Friday and Saturday,
9-5. Comer Gulf & Americus SL, St.
Joe Beach. Itc 10/15
Yard Sal: Sat, Oct. 17th, 8:00 -
1:00. Pine St., St. Joe Beach. Men's,
-women's, Ids & baby clothes, house-
hold Items. Recliner. Rain cancels.
tp
Yard Sale: Misc. -Items, house-
hold and clothing, Friday and Satur-
day 9 a.nr. 5 p.m., St. Joe Beach.,
.2nd block of DeSoto St. Itc 10/15


Yard Sale: Saturday, October 17,
212 2nd St., Highland View. Lots of
miscellaneous items, 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
1tc 10/15
Garage Sale: Jinny Lind baby
bed, keyboard, misc. Saturday, Oct.
17th, 57 First St., Mexico Beach. 8
a.m. cst. Call for information, 648-
5697. Rain cancels. Itc 10/15
Five Family Yard Sale: Lots of
toys, children's clothes, dishes, com-
forter set Saturday, Oct. 17, 307
20th St., PSJ. Itc 10/15
Yard Sale: 803 Marvin Ave. Octo-
ber 15, -16 and 17. Rain cancels. 8:30
. a.m. till 1:00' p.m. Lots of children's
clothes. Itp 10/15


Yard Sale: Saturday, Oct. 16,
9:00 until 3:00. 707 Long Ave.
Yard Sale of the Year Coming
Saturday, Oct. 24. Brass, collectible
Christmas ornaments, kitchen wares,
books, and much more.




1990 GMC S-15 truck with Brah-
ma camper & bedlinr, p/s, p/b, air,
tilt wheel, only 16+K miles & very
clean, cellular phone option. Asking
$8,295. Call 648-8128. ltp 10/15
Couch and loveseat, tan with
blue & mauve print, $150. 229-6411
after6:00 p.m. Itp 10/15
Cellular phone by Harris. Car
mount with all accessories. Asking
$495. Call 648-8128. ltp 10/15




Want to Buy: 135 mm telephoto
lens, 2.8 f to fit Canon 35 mm came-
ra. Call 229-8997 or 229-6343, ask
for Willie.
Want to Buy: 2 good used mobile
home tires with rims. Call 648-5162.
2tc 10/15


Butler's Restaurant & Lounge
will be accepting applications
Wednesday through Saturday, Oct.
14-28th after 4 p.m. Opening for bar-
tender, waitress only. No phone calls.
2te 10/15
Tree trimmer, crew leader, 1 1/2
years experience utility line clearing,
CDL class B required. Call 407-644-
5695. Must have transportation.
3tp 10/1
Sales. Help Wanted: Rainbow
Sales & Service. New business. 526
Sixth St., Port St. Joe. 11 a.m. 4
p.m. 4tp 9/24
Immediate opening, established
company seeking full' time licensed
sales agent, ERA Parker Realty, Mexi-
co Beach, 648-57771 tfc 10/1
Alaska Jobs! Earn up to $30,000
in three months fishing Salmon. Also
construction, canneries, oil fields plus
morel For immediate response call 1-
504-646-4513 ext. K6800. 24 Hrs.
Itc 10/15
POSTAL JOBS $11.41/hr. to
start, plus benefits. Postal carriers,
sorters, clerks; maintenance. For an
application and ,exam information,
call 1-219-736-9807, ext. P-2334, 9
am to 9 pm, 7 days. 3tp 10/15






Black or yellow lab puppies, 8
weeks old. Call 827-7261.
tfc 10/8
For internal parasites, tender-
pads, and ear problems, ask BAR-
FIELDS LAWN & GARDEN, 229-2727
about Trivermicide, Padkote, Mitex &
Ear Canker Powder. Available. O-T-C.
8tc 9/24
Control Fleas Mother Nature's
way without pesticides. Ask BAR-
FIELD'S LAWN & GARDEN, 328 Reid
Ave. about HAPPY JACK TABLICKS.
Chewable & nutritious tablet for Dogs
& Cats. 5tc 9/17


TRADES-and SERVICE-S


Child Care Available in my
home. Clean, safe environment. Call
,lay or night, 229-6527; 2tp 10/15
SHouse Cleaning available. Rea-
sonable rates. Call day or night, 229-
6527. 2tp 10/15
Lawn Mowing and All Types of
Yard Work. Trimming, Clearing,
Etc. Also Roof Sweeping and lhinor
House Repair. Very reasonable'
rates. Call 229-8399. 2tp 10/8


SPECIAL!
CHINEY SWEEP

$49,95
OfA.TQCL-OQ C1


-
4tp 10/1

C. R. SMITH & SON
' Backhoe work, dozer work, root,
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
11septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
! Rt. 2. Box A1C. Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
; tfc 10/1

Good Work Doesn't Cost, It Pays
ST. JOE Py
TREEAND
STUMP REMOVAL,
Bush Chipping, Stump Grinding '
INSURED
Rt. 2 Box 73D Port St. Joe,
MIKE CARROLL
647-8070
tfc 10/1


Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
, Reg. Stated Communication
". .st and 3Md Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
James Brooks, W.M.
Fred Nehring,-Sec.
Sewing and Alterations: drapes,
complete outfits, repairs. Call Daisy,
at.Aline's, 229-6600 or 227-7193;.
tfc 8/6

We Buy. Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns

Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-386, Howard Creek
tfc 10/

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
26 Years of Experience
Worker's Compensation
Occupational Diseases,
Injuries and Accidents.
No charge for first conference.
7229 Deer Haven Road, P.C. fc i0/i


COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581
tfc 10/1


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
647-5043


ER00S4 18 Mexico Beach' Ph. 648-5474,
GARRY'S ELECTRICAL, EN*
N SERVICE, inc.
Electrical, Heating & Air Condition ,,
New Construction & Remodeling Installation
SERVICE & REPAIR
c l10/, VISA, MasterCard & Discover accepted.

Terry Parrish John C. Maddox
Construction, Inc. Properties, Inc.
RG 0056216 RG 0062723 Mobile Phone 227-5100
* New Homes
Additions & Remodeling WE.BUILD TO LAST
All Your Building'Needs .A LIFETIME!
For Free iEtlmates, Call 229-8589 trc 10/

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618
JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES-AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL ,
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA tic 10o/ 904/229-6821


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
'Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. ,James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.

SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


Critton Construction
All Work Guaranteed
Concrete Finishing Brick/Block
State Licensed
FREE ESTIMATE -
653-9780 or 653-8024 2
Located In Apalachicola &


NEEDI) IT? 11ENT ITr

St. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
706 1st St.
Phone 227-2112
tfc 10/1


BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

Lawn Mowers
Weed Eaters -
Chain Saws
T,* Generators I.
*Pumps

Go-Karts
229-2727
328 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe f. 10/1


R&T
Sheetrock Painting
No Job Too Small'
Call Anytime 10 yrs. experience
227-7192
Leave Message If no answer 4' 15


LAWN MOWING
service now offered by
BARFIELD LAWN & GAR-
DEN CENTER,
229-2727.
S tfc 10/1

Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 10/1

T.L.C. Lawn Service
All Types of Yard Work
Mowing, Raking, Trimming,
Weeding, Clean Outs
and Roof Sweeping.
Reasonable Monthly or
Seasonal Rates Available.
Call 229-6435 tfc 10/1


BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair
Rebuild Wrecks Body
& Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body Work
See or Call BOB HEACOCK
Baltzell Ave. Phone 227-7229
tfc 10/1

FI- -----5

SSt. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
Small Engine Repairs
Factory Warranty Center


Lawnmowers
Weedeaters ,
Tillers |
S Chain saws
Generators
Pumps
-. Engine Sales


706 1st St.-St. Joe

S -tfc10o/


Widowed person's support group
will meet every Thursday at First
Baptist Church, Mexico Beach on
15th St., 7 EST, 6 CST.
Call 648-8827 for information.

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Perms
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc 10/1



Avono

CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 AlIen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 22946,0 Utc 10/1


STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lie. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
Stc 10/1


DROOPY HEADLINERS
REPLACED





$69.95 Most Cars
$39.95 Most Pick-Ups
We have over 50 different shades and
colors In stock and ready to Install.
Call Oakley's Cars & Trucks
Corner 2nd Ave. & Madison St., Oak Grove
227-1294 ffcw10/1


American Legion Bingo Thurs-
day night, 7:30 p.m. Cash prizes.
Early bird 5:00 p.m. Meetings 1st
Monday of each month, 8:00 p.m.


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tic 10/1

PAINTING CARPENTRY DECKS PORCHES
REPLACEMENT WINDOWS ADDITIONS
WINDOLF HOME
REPAIR & IMPROVEMENT
European Craftsmanship
Free Estimates Ucensed Insured
Reinhard Windolf
tf 8/6648-5647 or 227-1420

Save on Your
AUTO INSURANCE
CALL
Mitchell Williams
747-8970
1-800-239-8977
Callaway/Panama City
tfc 10/1



WEIMORTS

ROOFING .

and REPAIR

New and Old Roofs

For Free Estimate,
Call:

229-8505
Sfc10/1i


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer trc zo/

Hot Tar ROOFING
Shingles OO IN G
Repairs JESSIE CONTRACTING
Re-Roofing Free Estimates




%, 647-3219
S"The Beaches"
Eddie "Smarter Than Water? 10/1 Lydia


I














-.z' e n, .*
---. .. .- .Ntce


-. ,. ..-


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY .
CASE NO. 92-224
TERRILL NEAL,
Plaintiff
vs.
DWA REALTY, INC.. SHERWOOD FURNITURE IN-
DUSTRIES. INC., DEVILLE FURNITURE MANU-
FACTURERS, INC., TRUSTMARK NATIONAL
BANK. CARLOS REY. BERTA REY, MARTHA CAI-
RO and RAUL GOMEZ.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DEVILLE FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS,
INC.
P.O. Box 2398
12024 CENTER STREET
SOUTHGATE, CA 90280
DWA REALTY, INC.
P.O. BOX 601
GLENN DRIVE
AMORY, MS 38821
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on real property situate in
Gulf County. Florida described as follows, to-wit:
EXHIBIT "A"
Lot 4. San Bias Plantations, an unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South, Range 11
West. Gulf County. Florida. being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Intersection of the
south right of way line of County Road
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-
ment Lot 3,. said Section 22; thence
N.78*13'53"E. along said south right
of way line for 509.50 feet; thence
leaving said south right of way line
S.0 17'22'W. for 1094.58 feet; thence
N.7148'29sE. for 198.00 feet; thence
S. 18ll'31'E. for 92.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence
N.1811'31nW. for 92.00 feet; thence
N.7148'29"E. for 86.00 feet; thence
S.1811'31"E. for 43.00 feet; thence
S.0117'22'W. for 660 feet. more or
less, to the water's edge of the Gulf of
Mexico; thence southwesterly along
said water's edge for 72 feet more or
less, to a point which bears
S.017I22'W. from the Point of Begin-
ning; thence N.0117'22"E. for 624
feet, more or less, to the Point of Be-
ginning,
SLot 10, San Bias Plantations, an unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South. Range 11
West, Gulf County, Florida, being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Intersection of the
south right of way line of County Road
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-


ment Lot 3. said Section 22; thence
N.7813'53'E. along said south right
of way line for 1022.86 feet; thence
leaving said south right of way line
S.0117'22'W. for 1033.68 feet; thence
S.7148'29'W. for 125.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence continue
S.7148'29'W. for 70.00 feet; thence
N. 1711'54'W. for 206.12 feet: thence
N.7059' 1"E. for 85.00 feet; thence
S.1304'28"E. for 208.14 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Subject to a 30 ft.
easement on the southerly side.
Lot 16, San Bias Plantations. An unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South, Range 11
West, Gulf County, Florida. Being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Intersection of the
south right of way line of County Road
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-
ment Lot 3. Said Section 22: thence
N.7813'53"E. along said south right
of way line for 509.50 feet; thence
leaving said south right of way line
S.011722'W. for 500.90 feet to the
Point of Beginning thence continue
S.0117'22'W. for 208.00 feet; thence
S.88'53'26"E. for 114.80 feet; thence
N.0117'22"E. for 66.87 feet to the
P.C. of a curve concave to the south-
west and having a radius of 60.00
feet; thence northwesterly along said
curve for an arc distance of 57.60 feet
said arc having a chord of'55.41 feet
bearing N. 2612'33'W. to the P.T. of
said curve; thence N.5342'25'W. for
53.26 feet to the P.C. of a curve con-
cave to the northeast and having a ra-
dius of 60.00 feet; thence northwester-
ly along said curve for an arc distance
of 57.60 feet said arc having a chord
of 55.41 feet bearing N.26'12"31"W. to
the P.T. of said curve; thence
N.017'22"E. for 16.75 feet; thence
S.7741'19'W. for 20.58 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 ft.
easement on the easterly and norther-
ly sides.
Lot 22, San Bias Plantations, an unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South, Range 11

West Gulf County, Florida. Being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the intersection of the
south right of way line of County Road
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-
ment Lot 3, said Section 22; thence
N.78*13'53"E. along said south right
of way line for 1022.86 feet; thence
leaving said south right of way line
S.0117'22'W. for 495.00 feet to -the-
Point of Beginning; thence


S.7741'19'W. lor 126.50 feet; thence
S.0129'20'E. for 129.59 feet: thence
N.6800'58"E. for 127.00 feet; thence
N.0117'22"E. for 109.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 ft.
easement on the south side and a
5.00 ft. utility easement on the west
side.
Lot 29, San Bias Plantations, an unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South, Range 11
West, Gulf County. Florida, being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Intersection of the.'
south right of way line of County Road
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-
ment Lot 3, said Section 22; thence
N.7813'53'"E. along said south right
of way line for 1022.86 feet; thence
leaving said south right of way line
S.01*17'22'W. for 495.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning thence
S.7741'19'W. for 126.50 feet; thence
N.08'07'19"E. for 132.84 feet thence
N.7813'53"E. for 110.00 feet; thence
S.0117'22'W. for 127.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 ft
easement on the north side and a 5.00
ft utility easement on the west side.
Lot 26, San Bias Plantations, an unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South. Range 11
West Gulf County, Florida, being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the intersection of the
south right of way line of County Road
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-
ment Lot 3, said Section 22; thence
N.7813'53'E. along south right of way
line for 1022.86 feet; thence leaving
said south right of way line
S.0117'22'W. for 495.00 feet thence
S.7741'19'W. for 373.50 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence
N.0514'0oTW. for 141.32 feet; thence
S.835735'W. for 122.00 feet thence
S.0117'22'W. for 158.00 feet thence
N.7741'19"E. for 141.02 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 ft.
easement on the north side and a 40
ft. easement on the west side.
Lot 32, San Bias Plantations. An unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South, Range 11
West Gulf County, Florida. Being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence, at the intersection of the
south right of way line of County Road -
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-
ment Lot 3, said Section 22: thence
N.7813'53',"E. long said south right
of way line for 1022.86 feet; thence
leaving said south right of way line
S.01'17'22'W. for 170.00 feet: thence


A I i-


New 3 bdrm., 2 ba. home, 1400
ft. heat/cooled, on beautiful Chipola
River, Ig. deck, dock on river .2 car
carport, 200 ft waterfront. Applianc-
es, owner financing with down pay-
ment Call 904-762-8597 after 5 p.m.
2tc 10/15

Large comer lot in Ward Ridge.
Call 229-8094. 3tp 10/15

3 bdrm., 2 ba. home in Wewa.
$500 down, easy term financing. Call
1-800-283-4041. 2tc 10/15


1312 Marvin Ave., 3 bdrm., 2
ba., all elec. cen., h&a, refrig., stove,
inside utility, w/d, double driveway,
walks, outside 12'x16' storage. shal-,,
loW 'Wvl. No ba'ckdodf neighbors. ac-
cess to city golf-course. Appointment
only, 227-1848. 2tc 10/15

3 bdrm. brick, carpet, fans &
blinds all rooms, carport, util., 1/2
acre, fenced back, cul de sac. Land-
scaped and well maintained. Owner
pays closing. $42,000. 827-7375.
4tc 10/1

Best Neighborhood in the World.
3 bdrm., 2 bath, decks front & rear,
new kitchen, huge workshop, nice
yard, 2 lots, Long Ave. 229-6965
nights, 229-2727 days. 4t 9/24

Oak Grove Fish Camp: 2 bdrm.,
bath & 1/2, frame dwelling, deep
well, fireplace, kitchen furnished, in-
cludes washer/dryer. Also includes 3
window a/c. Sell at appraised value.
Call'747-8137. 4tp 9/24

1989 General 14'x60' trailer, ply-
wood floors, 2 bdrm., 2 ba., $1,000
down, take overpayments of $167.02.
One acre lot inriBayou George w/well
& septic tank,' $1,500 down, $135
month. Call 722-1330. 4tc 9/24

3 Wetappo Creek waterfront par-
cels, 1 3/4 acres each. For Rent: Mo-
bile home lots, Beacon Hill Beach.
Call John 647-5915 tfc 10/1

For Sale or Rent: 2 bedroom, 1
bath brick house, Indian Pass Beach.
* Chain link fence, new air cond. &
heat, call 1-482-7492. tfc 10/1

525 8th St. Top floor 3 bdrm., 2
bath, bottom apartment one bedroom,
one bathroom. House in back. All on
one big lot See Harry Lee Smith.

MEXICO BEACH, '77 FIRST ST.,
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Priced to sell
quick. Big house, can be used as sin-
gle or duplex. Owner moved out of
state. Back on premises to show dai-
ly. Excellent neighborhood. 2 blocks
from beach Would consider financing.
648-5386. tfc 10/8

4.bdrm., 1 bath frame home on 2
,lots, cen. h&a, fenced back yard, alley
access, conveniently located near
business district. Quiet neighbor-
hood. Lg. pecan trees, lots of poten-
tial. No collect calls 229-8444 day or
night, $35,000. 514 4th St., Port St.
Joe. tfc 10/1

BUSINESS LOCATIONS FOR
SALE: Two prime income-producing
business location for sale. One is a
prime office space that is currently
leased, but suitable for a medium to
large size office. The other is a retail
location that is currently rented and
is located in the prime shopping area
of Port St. Joe. Could be renovated
into two offices or maintained as a re-
tail store. Will sell individually or both
together.
For more information call Wen-
dell Campbell at 229-8723 or Panama
City 1-785-8304. After 8:00 p.m., call
227-7304. tfc 10/1

For Sale, Rent or Rent with Op-
tion to Buy: 4 bdrm., 2 ba., 1,600 sq.
ft. brick energy efficient home. Great
room, fireplace, ceiling fans, etc. In-
cluded in recent remodel. 545-6446
days, 229-8457 nights. tfc 10/1


1310 Palm Blvd. 2 bedroom
frame house, Ig. country kitchen &
appliances. Cen. heat, window air,
ceiling fans, like new washer '& dryer,
dinette, china cabinet, couch, chair,
curtains & blinds included, $29,500.
Call 227-1803 after 5 p.m. tIc 10/1

For Sale White City, Hwy. 71. 3
bedroom, 2 bath brick home on 4.5
acres, pond. Call 229-8735 after 5
.p.m. tfc 10/1

2.73 acres at Sunshine Farms,
Overstreet. Partially cleared comer
acreage. $15,000 negotiable. Call B.
Given, 227-1467 after 6 p.m.
tfc 6/18

"Nilce 3 bedroom I 5ath home. has
cen. heat & air, new cabinets. 206
10th St. Call 229-6055 for more infor-
mation. tfc 10/1

4 bedroom, 2 bath, cen. heat and
air, ceiling fans, patio, masonry ;con-
struction, conveniently located in Port
St. Joe. Call 229-8706. tfec 10/1

Country living overlooking We-
tappo Creek, 3 bdrm., 2 ba. 1500 sq.
ft. living space, 26'x56' mobile home,
15x26' grand room, ch&a, fireplace, 2
car garage, 2 uti bldg., 2 covered
porches, one 14'x26' 'open deck,
swimming pool w/privacy fence,
beautiful landscaped on two 1/2 acre
lots with c/l fence. $56,500. Call 648-
5323 for appt tfc 10/1

50k150 lotw/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
tfic 10/1

LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 11/5


GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Blas, Florida

(904) 229-2777
1-800-624-3964
tfc 10/1








Round library 36" table, solid ma-
hogany, suitable home or business,
$75; office chair, arms, casters, all
metal, super strong, $20. Call 639-
2921.

Tamara Barnes Country Victori-
an Craft Sale, 210 Bay View Dr.,
Highland View (west on Hwy. 98). Sat-
urday, Oct. 17, 9 a.m. Itc 10/15

40 gallon fish tank with stand
and accessories. Luggage set. 229-
6859. ltp 10/15

Green & beige plaid couch &
matching chair, $150. Burnt orange
recliner $50. 229-8830. Itc 10/15

Camper top for 1/w base pickup.
Color gray w/sliding window. Great
buy only $100. Small chest type freez-
er, $35 ea. 19" RCA color 'IV. great
picture. Can be seen at corner of 7th
St., 607 Park Avenue, Highland View.
229-8340.
ltp 10/15

Brass and glass vanity with stool,
$75. Call 227-1192 after 5 p.m.
Itc 10/15


32' Holiday Rambler travel trail-
er. Built-in roof & screen porch. For
further information call Gratde at
639-2882. 4tp 10/8

Mobile home, 12'x65', 2 bdrm., 1
ba. cen. h/a, covered deck, lattice
skirting, 9'x10' storage bldg., ready to
move in. Sits on rented lot 1 block
from beach, beautiful view to water
Call today 227-1718 or 648-5063,
leave message. tfc 10/1

2 Mec 600 reloaders; one 12
gauge and one 20 gauge, with extras.
229-6506 after 2:30. tfc 10/1

Super single water bed. excel.
cond., 6 drawers underneath., head- -
board, sidepad, all accessories. $250.
Call 229-6639 after 5 p.m.
tfc 10/1

Accepting offers for Gulf County
Package/Lounge liquor license. For
further information call 639-2578.
4tp 9/24

Moving Sale: Washer/diyer, din-
ing rm. suite, trailer, 647-8070.
tfc 9/24

HAPPY JACK HI-ENERGY DOG
FOOD, specifically formulated for
hunting dogs, field competitors &
growing pups. BARFIELD LAWN &
GARDEN, 229-2727. 12tc 9/3

Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring entire Panama City West-
ern Auto company store advertised
sale prices. 227-1105, 219 Reid
Ave. tfc 10/1

HAPPY JACK TONEKOTE: Liquid
food supplement contains essential
nutrients to.eliminate dull coat, dry
skin, shedding & itching. For dogs &
cats. BARFIELD'S LAWN & GARDEN,
229-2727. 8tc 8/27

Western Auto Special. Computer
spin balance 4 tires and tire rotation.
$19.95. 227-1105. tfc 10/1

To buy or sell Avon call Sarah
Kemp at 229-6495 after 5 p.m. or
weekends, tfc 10/1

Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyn-
dall Parkway, near Hwy. 22, Panama
City, FL 32404. 763-7443.
pd. thru 9/1/93

Port St Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOOl Also Com-
puter Wheel Alignment. 227-1105.
tfc 10/1

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 10/1








Still have flea problems? Ask
Barfield's Lawn Garden, 229-2727
about HAPPY JACK STREAKER! New,
easy to use, lasts 14 days. Available
O-T-C. 12tc 8/20


Beautiful FREE puppies. Excel-
lent hunting dogs. Father is a
trig walker and mother Is a lem-
on and white walker. No shots,
but have been wormed. Will be
ready to go this weekend. 7
weeks old. Please call Kathy Es-
tep at 229-6366 Mon-Fri. even-
ings and weekends call 827-
7201.


S.78'13'53'W. for 159.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning thence
S.0117'22"W. for 198.00 feet; thence
S.7813'53'W. for 81.00 feet; thence
N:0117'22"E. for 198.00 feet; thence
N.7813'53"E. for 81.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 ft.
easement on the south side.
Lot 33, San Bias Plantations, an unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South, Range II
West, Gulf County, Florida. Being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the intersection of the
south right of way line of County Road
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-
ment Lot 3. said Section 22: thence
N.7813'53"E. along said south right
of way line for 1022.86 feet: thence
leaving said south right of way line
S.0117'22'W. for 170.00 feet; thence
S.7813'53'W. for 240.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning thence
S.0117'22'W. for 198.00 feet; thence
S.7813'53'W. for 15.00 feet: thence
S.8357'35'W. for 64.82 feet; thence
N.0117'22'E. for 191.36 feet; thence
N.78'1353'"E. for 81.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 ft.
easement on the south side.
Lot 34. San Bias Plantations, an unre-
corded subdivision of a portion of Sec-
tion 22, Township 9 South. Range 11
West, Gulf County, Florida. Being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the intersection of the
south right of way line of County Road
No. 30-E and the west line of Govern-
ment Lot 3, said Section 22; thence
N.7813'53"E. along said south right
of way line for 1022.86 feet; thence
leaving said south right of way line
S.0117'22'W. for 170.00 feet thence
S.7813'53'W. for 321.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning thence
S.0117'22'W. for 191.36 feet; thence
S.8357'35'W. for 79.56 feet thence
N.011722"E. for 183.21 feet; thence
N.7813'53"E. for 81.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 ft.
easement on the south side.
YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to the action on Petition-
er's attorney whose name and address Is THOMAS
S. GIBSON, Post Office Box 39, Port St Joe, Flori-
da 32456, on or before 10/30/92, and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of circuit court, either before
service on Petitioner's attorney or Immediately
thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered to
the relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of this court on
the 25th day of September, 1992.
BENNY C. LISTER as
Clerk of Circuit Court
Gulf County. Florida
Publish: October 1, 8, 15, and 22, 1992.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
FILE NUMBER 92-108
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FANNIE MAE MCMILLAN
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of FANNIE
MAE MCMILLAN, deceased, File Number 92-108,
is pending In the Circuit Court for Gulf County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Fifth Street Port
St Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
ALLAM INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTI-
FIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served
who have objections that challenge the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of the first pub-
lication of this notice must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS.' DEMANDS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
Is October 1, 1992.
Personal Representative:
Buford J. Griffin
1803 Marvin Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Charles A. Costin, Esq.
413 Williams Avenue
Post Office Box 98
Port St. Joe. Florida 32456
Telephone- 904/227-1159 :
Flonda Bar No.- 699070
Publish: October 1, 8, 15, and 22' 1992
ADVERTISING FOR BIDS
The Gulf County Sheriffs Office is advertis-
ing for bids on a full size 4-wheel drive vehicle. See
Captain Jack Davila or call at 227-1115 for specifi-
cations.
The Gulf County Sheriffs Office Is advertis-
ing for bids on a radio repeater, see Captain Jack
Davila or call 227-1115 for specifications. .
'The Gulf County Sheriffs Office is advertis-
ing for bids on a video-camera, recorder and
V.C.R. See Captain Jack Davila or call 227-1115
for specifications. The Gulf County Sheriffs Office


308 Williams Ave.


THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY. OCT. 15, 1992


will advertise for bids on all items listed for two
weeks before final bids are accepted.
Publish: October 8 and 15, 1992.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
'CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 92-111l
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
DANIEL E. GAINOUS,
deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
THE ADMINISTRATION of the Estate of
DANIEL E. GAINOUS, deceased, File Number 92-
111, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 5th
Street, Port St Joe, Florida 32456. The name and
address of the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All interested persons are required to file
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, (1) All
claims against the estate and (2) any objection by
an interested person on whom notice was served
that challenges the qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue orjurisdiction of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
DATE of the first publication of this Notice of
Administration, October 8, 1992.
/s/ Rhonda Gainous, Personal Representative of,
the Estate of DANIEL E. GAINOUS, deceased
555 2nd Avenue, Highland View
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
1st William J. Rish
Rish & Gibson, P.A.
303 Fourth Street
P.O. Box 39
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(904) 229-8211
FL Bar No. 0066806
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Publish: October 8 and 15, 1992.
NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION
THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County
School Board proposes to amend and adopt poli-
cies, as provided for in the Administrative Proce-
dures Act, for the purpose of bringing said policies
Into compliance with Florida Statutes and State
Board of Education Rules.
Summuzr. The following is a brief descrip-
tion of each proposal change of Chapter 6GX23.
3.4458 Establish policy regarding partici-
pation in graduation commence-
ment ceremonies.
Economic Impact: These proposals will re-
sult in no direct costs associated with implementa-
tion.
IF REQUESTED. A HEARING WILL BE
HELD AT:l
Time: 5:30 p.m., ET
Date: 'Tuesday, November 10, 1992
Place: Board Room, Gulf County School.
Board Office
Gulf County Courthouse, Highway 71
Port St Joe, FL 32456
The entire text of the proposed rules can be
inspected during regular office hours at the Gulf
County School Board Office, Gulf County Court-
house, Highway 71, Port St Joe, FL. '
Special legal authority under which the
adoption Is authorized and the law being imple-
mented and interpreted are made specific.
The addition and changes are proposed by
Charles T. Watson, Director of Support-Services,
and approved for consideration by B. Walter Wild-
er, Superintendent.
Amendments:
3.4458 Graduation/Commencement
Publish: October 15 and 22, 1992.
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION __-
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
Pursuant to Section 403.088 (3), Florida


Statutes, the Department of Environmental Regu-
lation gives notice that It Is reviewing an applica-
tion for a temporary operation permit for the fol-
lowing pollution source:
Source Name: City of Port St. Joe In-
dustrial Wastewater Treatment Plant
Applicant: Honorable Frank Pate, Jr.,
Mayor-Commissioner
Source Location: City of Port St Joe
Effluent Discharge Point, St Joseph
Bay
Proposed Permit Duration: Until Octo-
ber31, 1997.
If Issued, the permit will allow the pollution
source to temporarily operate in violation of rules
and standards of the State of Florida. The appli-
cant Is proposing positive steps to Improve and up-
grade its treatment facility in order to attain fun
compliance with Department rules and standards
by the expiration date of the proposed permit.
Any comments or objections to the issuance
of a temporary operation permit to this facility
must be submitted in writing and be received with-
in fourteen (14) days from the date of this nodcein
order to be granted consideration by the Depart-
ment Comments must be submitted to: '
Florida Department of Environmental Regu-
lation I
160 Governmental Center
Pensacola, Florida 32501-5794
This application is being processed and is
available for public inspection during normal busi-
ness hours, 8:00 am. to 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday, except legal holidays, at the ad-
dress shown above.
Publish: October 15, 1992.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE will accept
sealed bids for the following:
Group 1. Rehabilitation of (1) substandard
unit located at 303 Ave. A. Port St.
Joe, Florida
Group 2. Rehabilitation of (1) substandard
unit located at 143 Ave. C. Port
St Joe, Florida
Group 3. Rehabilitation of (1) substandard
unit located at 324 Ave. C. Port
St Joe, Florida
Group 4. Rehabilitation of (1) substandard
unit located at 124 Robbins Ave..
Port St. Joe, Florida.
Bids will be received until October 29, 1992,
no later than 11:00 a.m. local time in the Port St
Joe Fire Station Meeting Room in the City of Port
St Joe.
A pre-bid conference will be held on October
22, 1992, beginning at 11:00 am. local time In the
Fire Station Meeting Room. ATTENDANCE AT
THE PRE-BID CONFERENCE IS MANDATORY.
FAILURE TO ATTEND THE PRE-BID CONFER-
ENCE WILL RESULT IN AUTOMATIC REJEC-
TION OF BIDS.
%,Bids will not be valid unless sealed in an en-
velope marked "SEALED BID. GROUP._ .
PORT ST. JOE HOUSING REHABILITATION: PRO-
GRAM.:and identified by the name of the firm, and
'the date and time of the'bidopening.
Bidders are hereby'notified that they must
comply with the following federal requirements:
Sectibn 3, Certification of Non-segregated Facili-
Sties, Setion 109 and Executive Order 11246 re-
garding Equal Opportunity Employment.
Work write-ups and specifications may be
obtained at the pre-bid conference on October 22,
1992. '1 '
Additional information may be obtained -by
contacting Julian,Webb and Associates, Inc.. 518
South 6th Street, Chipley, Florida 32428. (904)
638-8380. ,
The City of Port St Joe reserves the right to
reject any and all bids and to waive any Informali-
ty.
The signing of the contract is contingent
upon the approval of and/or the release of funds
by the Department of Community Affairs.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE IS AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY. FAIR HOUSING COMMUNITY.
Publish: October 15, 1992.


227-1278 I


S. Fantasy Properties, Inc.

formerly Allemore Real Estate


Comer 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478 ,

RENTALS:

-. Seyerl iongjterm -rentals available. 2 bedroof a-f 5
- bath townhomes, furnished, $450 month iAs
utilities.



JOHN DELORME, Realtor
ELLEN ALLEMORE, Realtor

SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


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Prices are "Fall"..ing at


SPECIALS FOR OCT. 14-21, 1992
George W. Duren, Owner/Mgr.
510 5th St. 229-8398


$


$40 or more food order


2 to Bag
with other Meat Purchase
Whole
Cut Up ................ Fry e rs '
...........ry e rs lb.
Irregular Cut
FRESH C HIC KEN BREAST......................................... ........................... b. 6 9


or with $20 or
od more food
order
SO990


with $10 or
more food
order


Family Pak
GROUND BEEF................. I b. 8
Family Pak Boneless 79
RIB EYE STEAK............... Ib.3.79
Prime Standing
RIB ROAST.................. Ib 2.99


Family Pak Regular Center Cut
PORK CHOPS...............b.


1.79


Family Pak Boneless
CHUCK STEAK .............. b. 1.69
Sunnyland Cooked
HAM ........................... 0 oz. .99


Family Pak Boneless
SHOULDER STEAK....... b. 1.99
Family Pak All Meat
STEW. ..................... b. 1.89
Family Pak Boneless
BLADE STEAK................ Ib. I .99
Our Best Small 3-Down
SPARE RIBS...................b. 1 .39
Bar-b-que
BEEF RIBS...................... Ib. 1.69
Sunnyland
BOLOGNA ................. lb. 1.19


Family Pak Breakfast
CHOPS..............................Ib.2.19
Boneless Pork
LOIN ROAST................. b. 1.89


Boneless Extra Lean Pork
LOIN CHOPS...............
Fresh Pork
TENDERLOIN..............


Ib. 2.49
lb. 2.69


Sunnyland All Meat
FRANKS...................... 12 oz.y991
Boiling
HAM ENDS........ lb. -89


SALT PORK^b. 89"
3Dixie3Lan


Bounty
Paper


B Dixie Land,
1/2 Gal. Carton -
cI Ice

Cream


Towel


5 *W *C


6.5 oz. Can
Starkist 2/

Tuna


1 DAY FILM

SERVICE
COMING SOON


MRS. SMITH'S 26 oz.
PPLE, DUTCH APPLE, PUMPKIN


"PIES 1.99
SWANSON'S 7 OZ.
POT PIES 2/100
POT PIES........ ............. 1 .00
INLAND VALLEY
POTATOES... ....32 oz.149
MCKENZIE PEAS W/SNAPS AND
CROWDER PEAS......................... 16 oz. 990


TROPICANA REG. OR HOMESTYLE
Ak ORANGE JUICEdi


64 oz.


REAL VALUE
MARGARINE PATTIES.


1.6


611.00


REAL VALUE BUTTER-ME-NOT
BISCUITS .................................................. 9 oz. 590
KRAFT PRE-PRICE 1.79
CHEESE SINGLES ............................... 1.69


REAL VALUE 3/ 1 1o
RICE ............16o3 3 .00
12 OZ. DISINFECTANT AEROSOL 2.99
LYSOL SPRAY2


CAMPBELL'S
VEG.


10.5 OZ.
SOUP


... 59


CAMPBELL'S 46 OZ.
TOMATO JUICE. 997
REAL VALUE 16 OZ. 2/
SALTINES. ........ 1.00


Th R WD FARM 1111-


Firm Head
LETTUCE


KELLOGG'S 15.5 OZ.
Nut & Honey
Crunch O's
$3.29
w/coupon
$2.79
KELLOGG'S 15.5 OZ.
Nut & Honey
Crunch
$3.29
w/coupon
$2.79


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good ordy at


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DOUBLE DECK ASST. FLAVOR 2 3/4 OZ.
I At=%r% K, I n rn 4/1


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mm....


3 lb. Bag Rome and Red Del.
SAPPLES ................... 1.49
Green Head
CABBAGE..........5 Ib. 1.00
Firm Head
CAULIFLOWER........ 1.39


SwetPoate
0 S 0-


. M 8 89'
Loose Apples
Granny Smith, Red Rome,
Golden & Red Delicious

lb.79


FIRM RIPE
Tomatoes 49


.00


DELI
DELI SLICED
HAM
L. 2.99
MILK o-


SHAKE........ 59
CRAB
SALAD. LB. 2.39
COLE
SLAW.......LB. 99,
Have Lunch With Us


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