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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02953
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 9, 1992
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02953

Full Text






12/31/99
ARCHIVES BINDERY
1508 HWY 431-5
ALBERTVILLE AL 35950


USPS 518-880

FIFTY-FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 45
L


HE


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1992


Gulf Prison Opening In Octobb


Facility at Stone Mill Creek Has Stood Complete but Empty for Nearly a Year


Hiring of 57 Personnel to Begin
as Early as Next Week
With More Hiring to Follow

Representative Robert Trammell of Marianna, told The Star
yesterday that the new state prison, located here in Gulf County
would be opening in late September or early October, to accept
prison inmates.
The news has been a long time in coming to the County,
'which has been chafing under the inactivity which has sur-
rounded the source of a possible 200 jobs for residents of the
County. The prison has been ready for inmates ever since July
of last year, but the budget crunch in Tallahassee has prevented
it from opening as early as planned.
George Sweeney, personnel director for the prison system,
said his office would begin hiring personnel, possibly as early as
next week. Sweeney said the facility would hire an initial staff of
57 people to handle the first load of 149 prisoners which will oc-
cupy the first completed dormitory. Sweeney said, 'We will be
hiring 42 security guards, and 15 support people, including cler-
ical help, maintenance and support people initially for the first
phase of getting the prison open. We will begin immediately on
the second phase and continue until we have the full comple-
ment of employees and prisoners." The prison has been built to
house 900 inmates.
Sweeney said he would be in Wewahitchka, personally,
some time next week, to take applications and explain how
they should be filled out as an initial action by his office.
Sweeney said, "I can't be definite about when we will be
there, because we don't have a location nailed down as yet,
but as soon as the plans are finalized, we will make it public
information."
According to Sweeney's statements, the location for taking
applications will not be available until after Wgdnesday of next
week, and the time, place and dates of his people being in Wewa-
hitchka to meet with possible employees.will be printed in next
week's issue. Sweeney did say that the visit would be just as
quick as'arrangements cokld-be-made; as early as next week:


NOT ALL COMPLETED
The prison is not all completed, according to Sweeney. 'We
have two dormitories and some support facilities finished. The
inmates along with private contractors will complete the installa-


tion after we occupy it."
The Department of Corrections started moving some equip-
ment and furnishings into the prison site in June, in order to be-
(See Prison on Page 3)


Gulf County's state-operated prison, located northwest late September, to receive an initial 149 inmates and em-
---of Wewahitchka, Will be opehtftg for closing?] its doors in ploy a staff of 57 people immediately.


City Adopts Comprehensive Plan; Hires City Clerk


The City of Port St Joe offi-
cially approved its Comprehen-
sive Plan Tuesday night, but is
still working on its state-
mandated Land Use Plan.
According to attorney William
J. Rish, who has been dealing di-
rectly with the State for the City,


'They're [the Department of Com-
munity Affairs] happy with what
we have finally agreed upon."


The Plan has been some four
years in the preparation and
hammering out the fine points in


Fireworks Attracts

Crowd of Thousands


People by the thousands
poured into Port St. Joe Saturday
at dusk, to view the fireworks dis-
play set off by the City Fire De-
partment. The fireworks display
has grown each year during the
time the City has been providing
the Independence Day entertain-
ment.
Attendance has grown, also.
Saturday night, every street
which had a view of the Bay was
clogged with cars full of people


Al Ray
Ray Asking for

Re-Election
County Commissioner Al Ray
announced this week that he in-
tends to seek re-election to the
District 5 seat.
District 5 extends from the
south side of 10th Street, in Port
St. Joe, to the southern county
line.
Ray was appointed to fulfill
the unexpired term of Don Parker
by Governor Lawton Chiles a year
ago, and is now preparing to seek
re-election to his first full term in
the office.
The candidate said, "I've en-
joyed my year as a County Com-
missioner. We've done some posi-
tive things for the County. I'd like
the opportunity to serve the peo-
ple of this County for a full four-
year term."
Ray has been active in the
community for the past 20 years.
He is an employee of the City of
Port St. Joe, where he holds the
position of purchasing officer. He
said, "I feel my experience with
city government in my particular
position adds to my qualifications
to serve the people of District 5 as
* an effective County Commission-
er."


Jessie Armstrong
Armstrong to
Seek District 1
County Seat
Jessie Armstrong, a 49 year
native of Wewahitchka, has an-
nounced his candidacy for the
post of County Commissioner
District 1. Armstrong has owned
and operated his own business
since 1984. Previous to that, he
was shop manager for Circle J.
Farms from 1969 to 1983.
"I am a working man and
have worked all my life and will
do the same for the citizens of
Gulf County," said Armstrong. "I
would consider it an honor to
serve the people of District 1 and
Gulf County. Your vote and sup-
port will be very much appreciat-
ed," he ended.


enjoying the spectacle.
The Boulevard was lined on
both sides all the way to Wood-
ward Avenue for a clear view of
the end of Fifth Street, where the
display was presented. Highway
98 was packed solid all the way
to the City Limits, sometimes two
or three cars abreast. People
brought along their folding chairs
and placed them on the shoulder
of the Highway or in the beds of
pick-up trucks for a leisurely view
of the display.
Police had no way of deter-
mining just how many people
turned out for the show due to
the area covered by spectators,
but, according to Police Chief
Carl Richter, 'There was a
bunch" The Chief continued with
"According to our officers who
have been present at past dis-
plays, there were considerably
more people present this year
than in past years."


Let the

Races

Begin!
Political season official-
ly opens in Gulf County,
and Florida, Monday when
all declared candidates can
officially get in the race for
the particular omce they
are seeking.
Candidates will be able
to pay their fees and offi-
cially become a candidate
beginning at noon Monday.
The qualifying period will
end Friday at the close of
the business day.
After Friday passes, the
qualification season will of-
fIcially close and those who
have not filed their entry
papers cannot seek elec-
tion.


the final document. According to
Rish the final document was es-
sentially the same as initially pre-
sented to the DCA, but with some
changes in language. "They
agreed to essentially the same
thing we presented to them ex-
cept they wanted changes in lan-
guage, which said the same
things we had presented them,
but just used different words to
say it," Rish said.
One of the biggest [for DCA]
hang-ups of the Plan was the lan-
guage describing drainage, in
which the City finally agreed to
allow DER rules to apply, which
was essentially what they had
prescribed in the first place.
DER rules have a formula
prepared detailing when and
what size storm water detention


pond is needed for a particular
size piece of property and build-
ing, drain pipe size, etc.
CLERK SEARCH ENDED
The Commission decided to
end their search for a new City
Clerk to replace Alden Farris,
who is retiring in October. The
Board ended the search by em-
ploying Jim Maloy to fill the posi-
tion.
Maloy is 50 years of age and
has 20 years in city administra-
tive work with the City of Panama
City and the City of Tallahassee.
He comes to Port St. Joe from
Tallahassee, where he has been
serving as risk manager for the
city.
Maloy has reported to his
new job this week and will be fa-


miliarizing himself with his new
position until he officially takes
over in October.
GARBAGE CHANGES
The Commission discussed
needed changes in the garbage
ordinance Tuesday, but decided
to wait until the new fiscal year,
which begins October 1, to ini-
tiate any new rules and charges.
Primarily, the Commission
will introduce curb-side pick-up
to offset some of the labor inten-
sive recycling activities. In the
meantime, the City is making a
request that citizens place their
garbage cans at curb-side on gar-
bage pick-up days, for easy ac-
cess. The curb-side is especially
needed on streets which have no
(See Comprehensive on Page 3)


1 makes the presentation.
$1,000 Contribution The Chamber plans to use the $1;000 to pro-
duce a brochure, along with other Chambers of
Florida Power Corporation presented .the Commerce in the area, to promote industrial pos-
Chamber of Commerce with a check for $1,000 sibilities in the vicinity. With the coming of the
this past week, to be used for Chamber promo- new super computer to Florida State University,
tional purposes. In the photo above, Tamara it is expected there will be a definite industrial
Laine, left, accepts the check for the Chamber impact on the area within 200 miles of Tallahas-
and Florida Power manager, Mike McDonald see.


[ *


er


STAR












THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JULY 9,1992

Ii


What's 'Enough'? Z

The sky didn't fall in for Florida because the Legislature
failed to give Governor Lawton Chiles all the budget money he
wanted. Taxes were finally increased, to the chagrin of Florida
citizens and to the consternation of the Senate and House, as a
compromise to keep state services running. Of course the servic-
es never did stop. There was money there all the time, just as we
suspected. Not in the quantities which the Governor wanted, but
a sufficiency to keep services operating at a level commensurate
with the economic level of the day.
The Governor said, 'We didn't do enough, not nearly
enough." To which we reply, 'There isn't ever 'enough'. It always
takes more, where government is concerned." I dc
Florida has been held at hostage for the past six months worst th
while the battle of the budget was being fought. A few services to me. I
were cut back, but no cuts were crucial. No services we needed way up
were curtailed. We had as much as we could afford, but not as tainly w
much as the Governor wanted. super d
Educators of Bay County [whoever they are] said, publicly in tuan me
Friday's News Herald that the education money was not enough, somebody
even at a $242.2 million level. We contend that had it been set Here
at a level of $242.2 BILLION, the educators of Bay County or look up
somewhere in Florida, would say, "That's not enough." through
But, nobody was satisfied with the final budget figure, so we enough
will probably have to go through this same exercise in futility and I st,
next budget year. The Governor was miffed and disgusted be-
cause the Legislature gave him less than half the new funds he
wanted, and the Legislature is out of sorts because they felt they
had to give something to prevent chaos in the State.
For the first time in our memory, the Legislature was reluc-
tant to impose new taxes on the people. Usually, they are all too
ready to fund their pet projects with new taxes. A message pow-
erful enough from the public to get that kind of reaction from a
free-taxing body like Florida's Legislature, should have filtered 4
down to the Governor, too.
While we're at it, that ploy given by the Governor to increase
taxes tied with reduction in local school taxes sounded like the
lottery all over again. Lowering local school taxes through ma-
nipulation of tax sources would really hold the schools of the
state at ransom. We just thought they were the source of bar-
gaining for new taxes this year. Remove half the local funds from
school budgets and replace them with more state funds, distrib-
uted at state whim, and we could really get caught in the
squeeze at budget time. That savings in local school taxes would
disappear overnight through other tax increases, all for the pur-
pose of "educating our kids!"
And, still the school system would be at the funding mercy of
Tallahassee. That's part of what's wrong now. Tallahassee has
too much power over schools.


Bully for You!

You have to admire County Commissioner Billy Traylor for
having the fortitude to suggest that the County return to the at
large system of picking our representatives in county govern-
ment The courts wll probably shoot him down from the very be-
ginning, but we admire him for standing up and saying, "Hey,
the present system isn't working. We have five guys representing
five different districts, who are answerable to nobody but the
voters in their district, and it shows!"
Traylor is absolutely correct in his thinking that if a person
has voters from the entire County looking over his shoulder at
his activities, with the power to cast a vote against him, come
election time, his performance as a County Commissioner would
be vastly different. He would think about how his actions were
affecting the County as a whole, rather than just the people of
his small district.
We never did think highly of the single member district con-
cept. We think a different system could have been arrived at to
guarantee the minorities a seat on county government, without
polarizing the entire county.
To our belief, the single member district hasn't worked all
that well for the minorities, either. It has placed a man on the
Board, but it has diluted his influence by 80%. Everybody has
lost in the deal.
Even though the single member district concept is like eating '.-,
soup with a fork, it is almost a foregone conclusion that there
will be no changes in Gulf County. The present system was man-
dated by the courts-that same institution which said it is un- ..
American to pray at graduation exercises, so please stop it-and
as we see it, the same misguided reasoning will prevail in the fu-
ture.
Anyhow, bully for you, Billy, for giving it a try.


Hunker Down with Kes I


-U-.


Kesley
Colbert


don't reckon it was the
ing that's ever happened
Although right now, it's
high on that list. It cer-
asn't the first king size,
iper, extra large, gargan-
ss up I ever made. I keep
myself it's not like I shot
ly or something...........
e's the really bad part. I
and see Cathy coming
the office with a box big
to have a horse inside
Ill don't know The pretty


I Forgot to Remember...


wrapping paper and big box
should have given me a clue........
She flops it down on my desk. I
could tell by that little wry smile
on her face that she knew by the
look on my face that I still didn't
know.
"I came right at 3:30. It's the
exact -"
Oh no, nuts, son-of-a-gun,
holy cow, Mother Maybellell What
a dummy!
"-time. HAPPY ANNIVER-
SARY."
Listen folks, I couldn't even
fake it I didn't even try to pre-
tend that I knew all along. I felt
the embarrassing heat rising up
in my temples. I started sliding
down in my chair.
'Ya'll bring in the cake and
ice cream and we'll eat."
Everybody knew about this


but me! I went under my desk.
"Open your present!"
Yeah. open it up."
"We want to see what you
got.'
I hate it when everyone
stands around watching me open
"my gift." If it's something I don't
like I have a hard time pretending
it's just what I wanted, you know
what I mean?
"Cathy, I think I'll wait--"
"Oh, go ahead, Honey."
"Well I, uh, I-"
"Open it."
It's my eighteenth wedding
anniversary and everyone and his
brother is watching me unwrap
my brand new...........
ELECTRIC EDGER! I could
see the people in the background
nudging each other, "It's their
eighteenth anniversary and she


got him an edger?"
Hey. I thought it was a great
gift. I needed one. Cathy leaned
over and patted my arm. "I know
it's not as good as the veg-i-matic
you got me back in '77.......
It's not like I didn't know that
I got married on June 30th. I re-
member it well. I remember how
hot it was. I remember getting to
the church at 12:30 for a 3:30
wedding. I remember playing bas-
ketball with those little boys
across the street. I remember I
waited and waited and waited.
Why was I suppose to be here so
early? I remember the St. Louis
Cardinals were playing on TV and
I'm not watching I'm out in the
parking lot of the church sweat-
ing through my underwear. I re-
member being glad when folks
started showing up it must be
about time to start I helped
them out of their cars, "I hope
ya'll enjoy the show."
I remember the gasp when I
stepped out into the church; and
the murmur that went through
the crowd, "It's the parking lot at-
tendant, Alma Jo's granddaugh-
ter is marrying a parking lot at-
tendant!"
I remember thinking, "What
am I doing here?"
I remember as we got down
close to that "I do" part Leon and
Jackie and John Stewart and a
couple of other idiots unfurled a
banner and stretched it across
the back of the church that read,
'Test, test, can you Hear me al-
right?"
I remember Cathy peering at
the sign and turning to me and
giving me that look. Folks, it was
the first time I had ever received
that look I knew exactly what it
meant what are your crazy
brothers doing, what does that
sign mean, and it, you and them
are not going to mess up my wed-
ding.
"I do." I was afraid not to. You
ought to see that look.
I remember the reception
line. Cathy's family, and there are
literally thousands of them, were
looking me over. They'd kind'a
play like they were just coming by
to shake hands but they were
checking me out, believe me.
Aunt Jane stops, backs up a mite
to get a better view, looks me up
and down a couple of times and
smiles. Hey, she was a breath of
fresh air. Aunt Kathryn gives me
a hug, and while she's close, she
whispers, "Loved you as a park-
ing valet."
What class!
I remember! I remember!! Ca-
thy was happy. I was happy. Leon
and Jackie were happy they
were mingling with the home
folks, telling them that this was
my fourth wedding. How could I
ever forget!
And I am trying to make up
for my little lapse last week. I
promised Cathy that we'd go to a
movie if and when True Grit
comes on again.
I have remembered seventeen
out of eighteen times. That ought
to count for something. And I
have made arrangements to see
that this never happens again.
Leon and Jackie have promised
(See KESLEY on Page 5)


Hot Weather Brings Out the Politicians In Droves, Pounding the Pavement for Votes


IT'S GETTING HOT and the
politicians are beginning to stir in
earnest. Anybody who would run
for a political office in this kind of
weather would have to really
want to serve the people. Or, as
the state legislature showed us
over the past month, they would
have to be just plain stubborn.
I think, sometimes, the rea-
son the elections are held in the
fall, necessitating a hot summer
for politicking, was by design. It
roots out all the lazy people. It
takes a worker to get out in this
weather and beat the bushes for
votes.
Either that, or those looking
for votes are kind of thinking
about that salary they will get if
they are elected, or, they are gen-
uinely interested in serving the
people in any capacity they can.
Take your pick
But, we don't do bad by our
politicians. We keep them up in
the style in which anyone would
like to become accustomed.


But, I don't begrudge them
the salary, because, believe me,
they earn it if they do their Job
like they are supposed to. \And
then there is the chore of running
for office and paying for a cam-
paign every four years.
ACTUALLY, THE SALARY of
some constitutional officers are
pricing the opposition out of the
market. True, they can go the pe-
tition route, where a particular
candidate can get a petition up of
people asking that their candi-
date be placed on the ballot.
But, if the candidate opts to
run and pay his way as he goes,


it is getting expensive to seek
election to one of the higher pay-
ing offices. It costs seven percent
of the salary for a qualifying fee
and that's a hefty amount of
money to risk to find out if you
are as popular with the people as
you think you are.
That can make a reasonable
campaign for a constitutional of-
fice cost a potential candidate a
conservative total of about $6,000
or $7,000. That's no risk. That's a
big time gamble for high stakes.

CANDIDATES ARE NOW to
the point where they have to put
up or shut up. Qualifying in ear-


nest begins Monday at noon and
continues through the week until
noon on the following Friday. Ei-
ther a candidate puts his name
on the dotted line during this
time frame or forget it until two
years from now.
Several are running already,
with cards, posters, folders, etc.,
but they won't be counted until
they sign that little slip of paper
in the Elections Supervisor's of-
fice and pay their fees.
Next week will separate the
sheep from the goats.
I take it that all who have an-
nounced their intention to run
are dead serious about it. If they
all are, it will be a long hot sum-
mer for sure. One won't be able to
turn around without running into
a candidate or two with out-
stretched hand offering a hand-
shake or a piece of literature say-
ing, "I'm your man, you can
count on me!" [or, "I'm your wom-
an" whichever the case may
be.


PEOPLE OF GULF County
are certainly going to have a
choice this year. In spite of the
hefty qualifying fees, nearly a
record number are turning out to
try their hand at the game of get-
ting elected to office.
It's presently a trying time to
hold public office. Local govern-
ment is being forced to pay for
more and more of its local service
while expecting more and more
money from federal and state
sources. It has come to the time
where we just decide what we
want, tell our public servants our
wishes, and then instruct him to
"apply for a grant" to pay for it.
Grant money is drying up, so
local servants of the public will
find it harder and harder to fulfill
the desires of their constituents.
They'll find it hard, that is, if
they expect to pay for it with any-
thing but local, come-from-our-
pocket taxes, that is; not tax
money which has been given a


diet by ieing passed through Tal-
lahassee or Washington to make
it leaner than when it originated.
It's going to be a tough term
ahead for those getting elected
this year. The free ride is just
about over and it's coming time to
pay back some of that which we
have already been riding on.
I don't want to discourage
anyone from seeking election to
office. Nor do I want to appear to
be a bearer of bad news. Every-
body ought to try to get elected to
some public office at least once in
their life. It is an experience you
will never forget and one which
will probably cost you enough so
you won't soon forget it if you
should happen to be one of the
unfortunate ones to lose the elec-
tion.
And, If you get elected you
will probably experience one of
two feelings. You will probably be
elated beyond all imagination or
you will utter the phrase, "How
did I get myself into this?"


St. Joseph Bay
Time Ht. Time Ht.
8:02 a.m. H 1.9 6:55 p.m. L -0.2
8:48 a.m. H 1.9 7:45 p.m. L -0.2
9:34 a.m. H 1.9 8:27 p.m. L -0.2
10:19 a.m. H 1.9 9:07 p.m. L -0.1
11:01 a.m. H 1.8 9:47 p.m. L -0.1
11:36a.m.H 1.7 10:16p.m.L 0.1
12:15 p.m. H 1.6 10:36 p.m L 0.2


-THE STAR-_ Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
SUSPHS 51888Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-S10.60 Six Months
n WI/AJ USPHS 518880 Out ol County--s21.20 Year Out of County-$15 90 Six Months
l /V' / Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue The Star Out of ou 20 Year Out of y SixMonths
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456-0308 Post Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 their than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
William H. Ramsey ............Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
FrenchiL. Ramsey..........ffice Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ............TypesettMer WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
L _____ Shirley Ramsey ................. Typesetter ____ ^ ^ _________- ,


Date
July 10
July 11
July 12
July 13
July 14
July 15
July 16


)


afiL L12)A









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 9,1992 PAGE 3A


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


It Happened On

July 4th...
It was an exciting and eventful weekend, this past July 4th! A
number of things happened to make it so in our neck-of-the-woods.
It started on Friday, as most weekends do, when I took off work
a little early because everyone else, it seemed, had already started
the weekend without me. One reason I don't sleep much is I'm
afraid I'll miss something.
Anyway, everything seemed so festive that I was surprised when
I arrived home to find an empty house. The serenity, however,
didn't last long. At about "a-quarter-till-dinner" our two teenagers
arrived home from summer camp where they are working and
brought two unexpected weekend guests with them. Wesley and
Bryan are also teenagers and are working at the summer camp with
our two in Tallahassee.
We already had one in the stall at home, but add four more
teenagers to that and that's almost a half-dozen and a weekend of
cooking and washing dishes and clothes. Fortunately, we had been
to one of those "dog-and-pony" shows before so it didn't bother us
too much. As a matter of fact, the two guests, Wesley and Bryan,
proved to be two of the most courteous and well-mannered young
men I have ever met. It was a real pleasure for us to have had them
visit in our home. We have several items of value missing from our
home, but we don't think they took them... intentionally. But, just
in case, I kept a few things of theirs; Bryan's car and half of Wes-
ley's clothes.
After we had the mess hall and laundry duties all lined out at
about mid-afternoon Saturday, my wife and I departed for a party
W hosted by George and Deborah Newman. (We didn't want to be dnr-
barrassed so we sent all the teenagers to the store and left while
they were gone.) George and Deborah are just about perfect hdsts. '
They have the unique ability of making everyone feel special and,
more importantly, making all guests feel at home. It was a grand
but quiet party. We visited with George and Deborah, their family
members, some old friends and met some new friends of George
and Deborah's from assorted towns in Georgia, mainly Albany and
Cairo. What a wonderful group of people to spend the 4th of July
with!
And then they brought on the food. There was boiled shrimp,
fried shrimp, fresh fried mullet, hushpuppies, chicken, ribs (pork),
cole slaw; potato salad (did I spel "potato" right?) and delicious
baked beans. There was also plenty of iced tea and cold beer and
for dessert someone had brought several Key Lime pies. Just think-
ing about it makes me hungry all over again.
The entertainment, although unplanned, started just as dinner
was being finished. One of the condos caught on fire. It was an elec-
trical fire and everyone was scurrying around trying to put it out
and before we knew it, the Marine Patrol, the Cape San Blas Fire
Department, the ambulance and a big Florida Power truck was
there. They were all armed to the teeth and ready to do their part,
but there was nothing left to do.
No one was injured, thank goodness, but one man came close
when he offered to put out the fire by natural means. He had drank
a considerable amount of beer and felt he could do it until I in-
formed him it was an electrical fire. He was almost shocked!
After that the fireworks show at the city pier was anti-climatic.
Early Sunday morning we discovered that Bryan, one of our
guests and now an adopted family member, had locked his car keys
in his trunk. I called our only locksmith but he wasn't home. I then
called others but no one knew how to open a locked Volkswagen
trunk without tearing out the back seat A short time later we
, waved good-byeto the teenagers asthey departed for Tallahassee in_ ,,
our new van.
All in all it was a wonderful weekend. It wasn't real exciting, but
we visited with some wonderful friends, got to see half our children
and half of someone else's children, ate some wonderful food and
had a "down-home" good time. It was a typical "small town" Ameri-
can holiday for us!
HAPPY BIRTHDAY AND GOD BLESS AMERICA!
Whew! I'rh glad those kids are back at camp



Prison From Page 1
gin the process of getting the prison open. It wasn't until the
budget stand-off in Tallahassee was completed that the actual
opening was put on the DOC agenda.
Gulf County Sheriff Al Harrison, a strong supporter of the
prison, said, 'There are a lot of people who will be glad to hear
this news. Not only will it mean an economic shot in the arm,
but a lot of people have spent their savings, borrowed money
and spent a lot of time taking the special course they will need
to be qualified to work there. They have been waiting a long time
for this day to come."
Representative Trammell, who has been working for the pris-
ons' opening ever since last year, said, "I'm not due all the credit
by any means. Senators Vince Bruner and Pat Thomas have
been there too. They did more than their share."
The prison has been funded for nine months in this fiscal
year, which is the reason for opening the doors in late Septem-
9 ber.


Sheriff AL Harrison has a properly contrite
look as he is charged with "impersonating a
sheriff' in the Cancer Society's Jail for Bail, con-
ducted Tuesday, here in Port St. Joe. Bailiff Ken


Murphy reads the charges to "Judge" Nol
glown. Mrs. Jorge San Pedro listens
charges, and waits to collect the fine
"Judge" Treglown passes sentence.


Jail For

S Bail Gets

S Pledges
The Port St. Joe Unit of the
American Cancer Society is
pleased to have received the sup-
port of the citizens of the commu-
nity at their Jail and Bail activi-
ties held Tuesday, July 7th.
A total of $7,800 in pledges
and cash has been turned in. All
those who made pledges are
urged to please respond to your
notice when received. The Unit
* was disappointed that their goal
of $10,000 for 1992 was not
reached but was still happy with
S the community's response.
Unit members said it was a
lot of work and a real fan day.
Anyone wishing to donate or
pledge to the American Cancer
Society may mail their donation
to A.C.S., P.O. Box 617, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456.
Monies collected in the
an Tre- county are used to further cancer
to the research, help patients with med-
, after ications, services and transporta-
tion.


GCCC, City, Part of Town Meeting Forum


Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege will be conducting one of
three sessions of a nation-wide
forum on national issues during
the month of August. Gulf Coast
is one of three colleges in the
southern states, hosting the for-
um for the Kettering Foundation,
on national issues.
Port St. Joe will be the loca-
tion for one of the Gulf Coast ses-
sions, which will involve 100 peo-
ple discussing the questions of
national importance at the time.
The panel will be furnished from
national competition, to choose
the members.


Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege is the only host college in
Florida, and Port St. Joe is the
only host audience, outside Gulf
Coast, where the forums will be
held. The Port St. Joe session will
be Thursday, August 6, at 7:30
p.m., in the High School Com-
mons Area.
The University of Alabama
and the University of Georgia are
the only other colleges in the
South who have been endowed by
the Kettering Foundation to con-
duct the forums.
Representatives from Gulf


Coast Community College were in
Port St. Joe Monday and Tues-
day, meeting with the Board of
Directors of the Chamber of Com-
merce and the Kiwanis Club to
present their program. They are
expected to meet with the Rotary
Club today.
Operating the preparation for
the forum, for Gulf Coast, are,
Dr. Virginia York, Professor Joyce
Buttermore and Professor Lynn
Gager.
Dr. York explained that the
program would be conducted for
a period of three years, with dif-


Election Officer Expands Hours to


Register All
In preparation for the Pri-
mary and General elections this
fall, Supervisor of Elections, Cora
Sue Robinson, has set up special
hours and opportunities for citi-
zens of Gulf County to make

Comprehensive
(From Page 1)
alleys for the truck to enter.
Frank Healy, director of Pub-
lic Works, says he has three extra
men from his force, working with
the recycling program, which is
escalating costs. "It's taking all
our manpower," Healy said.
"Curb-side pick-up would be a-
big help to us."
The City will probably need to
increase rates in October, also, to
cover the recycling and disposal
fees for non-recyclables.,
OTHER BUSINESS
'In other business matters,
the City;,
-Agreed to send representa-
tives to attend a seminar which
would result in from five to 45%
.reduction in flood insurance for
residents.
-Discussed the need for a
new fire truck to replace the 1978
model truck which Is continuing
to give trouble.
-Accepted NAPA's bid of
$3,519.62 for a refrigerant recov-
ery system. The bid wasn't the
lowest received, but it was the
only one to meet specifications.
-Accepted purchase of an
above ground fuel storage tank
from Thickstun Brothers Equip-
ment Company at a price of
$10,602.


Voters Before August 1
preparations for voting. Terry or Sally Jenkins, Port St
The Supervisor's office will re- Joe; David Turner, County-wide:
main open each Saturday until Mary Lou Marshall, Indian Pass
August 1, when registration must area; Ruth and James Dumas,
cease for the first primary. The of- Port St. Joe; Lola Simmons, Ho-
fice will be open each Saturday ward Creek; Tonya Knox, St. Joe
from 9:00 to 5:00. Peoplewishing Beach; Oletha Bowers,, Wewa-.
t, update their voting status or hitchka; Glenda Carr, OverstreetL
Who wish to register for the first Voter registration may also be.
time rfay do so at the Supervis- accomplished at the Public Li-,
or's office or at the Wewahitchka brary in Port St. Joe.
City Hall.
SPECIAL VOTER DRIVES
REGISTRATION DEPUTIES Special voter registration
Those unable to register at ei- drives will, be held at night
their of the two permanent places throughout the month for those
may do so at any of the locations who cannot.get to one of the loca-
of one of several deputies, located tions during the day. .The first
throughout the County. Deputies special drive will be Monday, July
and their location are: Louise 13 from 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at
Jones, Wewahitchka; Elizabeth the White City Fire Department.


ferent subjects being discussed at
each meeting. "The purpose of the
forum is to publicly explore every
avenue of items of importance for
our nation at any given time,
making the facts known so people
, in the grassroots can express an
opinion on them," Dr. York stat-
ed.
'We want participation in the
forums and attendance from eve-
ryone who will come," Professor
Buttermore added. "We and Ket-
tering, the financial sponsor, are.
vitally interested in the public's
reaction."

Certification
for Commodity
Recipients
Certification only for Wewa-
hitchka commodity recipients will
take place on Wednesday, July
15, from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
CT at the Old Courthouse. Those
in Wewahitchka whose cards
have expired should bring their
necessary papers on that day to
Sre-certify..- '',
- .: The Commodity Ofide at th9
Gulf County CourthoUse in Port
St. Joe is open Monday through
Friday (except holidays) from 9:00
a.m. to noon and 1:00 p.m. to
5:00 p.m. ET for certification..
Please note that the next
commodity distribution will be in
August. For further information,
feel free to call 227-1735, 639-
5068, or 639-5069.
Say You Saw It In The Star


4Good
Neighbor service
makes State Farm
unique...
my policyholders
swear by it
year after
year. 99



CALL ME.

Bill
Wood
101 Williams Ave.
-A 229-6514
Su ite Farm
InS ra. nc' c C o1ip inic'.,
ll ike a gBlood ini h Illri



Likc a goo1 d ncighhllr.
State Farm is thitre


For Take Out Orders, Call 227-1670

Oysters $28.00 Bag


with every purchase of bag, receive
crackers FREE


1 Ib. saltine


The World's Finest
*Oysters
*Clams
*Shrimp

*Crabs

Enjoy the best from St.
Joseph Bay and
Indian Lagoon with us.

INDIAN PASS

RAW BAR
(On C-30 South of Port St. Joe)


NAPA Auto Parts


y~l`;:









PAGE 4A THE STAR,PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 9,1992

CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM

( Children and

Animals -

Bites Are Likely
By

.a. .* % Elizabeth C. Jones, M.D.

Every year there are numerous animal bites recorded by the
Public Health agencies. Usually only the more severe bites reach
medical attention and are reported. For 1991 Florida recorded 104
bites and Gulf County 13.
The statistics record all bites dogs, cats, ferrets, pet rats, ex-
otic animals, raccoons, horses.
Pets are often an integral part of the family, but discretion in
selection of the pet and in care of handling the pet needs to be an
absolute requirement of ownership.
Many parents select a pet for a child who is too young to under-
stand that he cannot pull on the cat's tail or step on the dog while
he is eating.
Birds can transmit psittacosis to humans. This is a chronic res-
piratory disease that causes a lot of health problems and general
decline in health. This can come from pet birds or from raising
birds such as pigeons.
Turtles often carry salmonella. Salmonella is usually manifest
in humans as a rather severe episode of diarrhea. There can be as-
sociated fever and general illness.
Rabbits, hamsters, gerbils and mice do not usually cause any
major health problems to the handlers.
Pet pythons have been known to kill adult humans by squeez-
ing them to death.
Animals in the wild should be given the utmost respect and ex-
treme caution should be used. Children should never try to feed
squirrels, birds or raccoons no matter how "cute" they seem. Rabies
vaccine is very much improved over past years, but it is still no triv-
ial thing and involves injections the child will not need if he avoids
wild animals that could be rabid, Foxes, bats, squirrels and other
wild animals carry rabies virus.
Children riding horses are often injured. Head injury causes
the most damage. Children who ride horses should wear protective
head gear and receive careful instruction from experienced adults.
Snakes usually are given a wide berth. This caution should be
encouraged and children given careful instructions for behavior if
they encounter a snake.
There are undoubtedly other incidents involving children and
animals but these are the common situations that cause trouble.
y< 2


One-Dish Supper

POT"- ,,
----AM


Is Healthy and Fast


To Wed


Rev. and Mrs. Chester Mid-
dleton are pleased to announce
the forthcoming marriage of their
daughter, Dollie Middleton
Young, to Ainnan Anthony Hol-
thaus. The ceremony will be held
at 8:00 p.m. at the First Pente-
costal Holiness Church of Port St.


'S..)

",-7.,


Joe. All friends and relatives are
cordially invited to attend and
share in this Joyous event.


WANTED
Good Used Stove
229-6961
TFC 7/9/92


CARPET CLEAt ING SPECIAL!
':,-\ Also Available- >'-
*'s.otchgard 0
:*("-ol Aid Removal 95
*Pet Deodorizing
SOFA .Truck Mounted Steam Cleaning
$29.95 *No Electricity Needed
SERVING THE GULF COAST EXPIRES 7/15/92


Col. and Mrs. Raymond W. Long, Sr.


To Celebrate 50th


Col. (Ret.) and Mrs. Raymond
W. Long, Sr. celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary on Monday,
.July 6.
Raymond Willis Long and
Mary Ruth Jenks met while he
was a Staff ,Sergeant Pilot sta-
tioned at Tyndall Field. They were
married on Monday, July 6,
1942, at the Bay County Court-
house in Panama City.
Two sons were born to this
union, Raymond W. Long, Jr. of
Port St. Joe, and Jack Stanley
Long, who passed away shortly
after his birth. They also have
four grandchildren and nine great
grandchildren.


While serving 28 years in the
United States Air Force, they
were privileged to see or live in
most of the states in the United
States and lived in Brazil for
three years. After retiring in
1968, they returned to Wewa-
hitchka to make their home and
are still enjoying fishing, garden-
ing, and being on a perpetual va-
cation.
They were treated to dinner

at the Red Lobster by ,their son,
Ray, and his wife, but the high-
light of their day was a call from
their grandson, Tres, who is at-
tending Symphonic Band Camp
at FSU.


(DM)-With time at a premium, more families are turning to fast food,
frozen dinners and takeout. While convenient, these choices may be high in
sodium and fat, and lacking fruits and vegetables.
Raisin Chicken Santa Fe is a one-skillet dish for today's busy families. It
uses wholesome ingredients, such as chicken, peppers and tangy California
raisins. Total cooking time? Just 30 minutes!
Versatile and convenient, raisins also are a good value. It takes four
pounds of grapes to make a pound of raisins.
RAISIN CHICKEN SANTA FE
4 chicken breast halves, 1V2 cups chicken broth or
skinned bouillon
1 tablespoon olive oil 1 cup raisins
2 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup tomato paste
1 onion, chopped 1 teaspoon ground coriander
2 red or gieen bell peppers, Salt and pepper, to taste
seeded and sliced into strips
1 fresh or canned jalapeno
pepper, minced
In large skillet over medium heat cook chicken in oil until lightly
browned, turning once. Add garlic, onion, and bell and jalapeflo peppers;
saute 2 minutes. Mix in broth, raisins, tomato paste and coriander. Bring to
boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer 10 minutes. Uncover; cook about 10
minutes until chicken is tender and sauce is slightly reduced. Season with
salt and pepper. Makes 4 servings.


CARE Meets Tonight, July 9


The Chemical Addictions Re-





NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION
THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County
School Board proposes to amend and adopt poli-
cies, as provided for In the Administrative Proce-
dures Act, for the purpose of bringing said policies
Into compliance with Florida Statutes and State
Board of Education Rules.
Sumrnary The following is a brief descrip-
tion of each proposal change of Chapter 6GX23.
3.4458 Establish policy regarding par-
ticipation In graduation com-
mencement ceremonies.
Economic Impact: These proposals will re-
sult in no direct costs associated with implementa-
tion.
IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE
HELD AT:
Time: 5:15 p.m., ET
Date: Tuesday, July21. 1992
Place: Board Room, Gulf County School
Board Office
Gulf County Courthouse, Highway 71
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
The entire text of the proposed rules can be
inspected during regular office hours at the Gulf
County School Board Office, Gulf County Court-
house, Highway 71. Port St. Joe, FL.
Special legal authority under which the
adoption is authorized and the law being imple-
mented and interpreted are made specific.
The addition and changes are proposed by
Charles T. Watson, Director of Support Services,
and approved for consideration by B. Walter Wild-
er, Superintendent.
Amendments:
3.4458 Graduation/Commencement
Ptiblish: July 9 and 16, 1992.


cover Effort (CARE), Inc. will be
having its monthly board meeting
on July 9 at 6:00 p.m. CT, at the
Regency Professional Center, lo-,
cated at 4000 East Third Street,
Springfield.
CARE is a non-profit organi-
zation that is licensed by the
State of Florida's Health and Re-
habilitative Services and monthly
board meetings are open to the
public. CARE provides communi-
ty alcohol and drug services to
Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes,
Jackson, and Washington
counties. If you would like addi-
tional information, please call 1-
872-7676.


Mr. and Mrs. James Nickson
would like to announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Pre-
nita Nickson to Nicholas Rolack,
the son of Linda Rolack and Gene
Hill.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Port St. Joe High School and
Haney Vocational Center. She is
employed .at Spectrum Home
Health Inc.
The groom-elect is also a
graduate of Port St. Joe High
School. He is currently enlisted in
the United States Army.

LOST
Charcoal gray Weimaraner. Orange
collar with name and phone number,
lost in Cape San Bias, near St.
Park. Call 904-229-6026, 904-454-
1275, or 904-229-8650. REWARD


*Heating & Air
Major 0
Appliance "
Repair
*Plumbing &
Electrical Work
RERO007623
RF0040131
RA0043378 229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle, Port St. Joe


Final wedding plans will be
announced at a later date.


SPITTSBURGH PAINT

INVENTORY REDUCTION


LIMITED QUANTITY OF READY MIX, BASE, EXTERIOR
S r3stu I PAINTS & STAINS LATEX and OIL
;"uq i S1


Reg. up to
$25.00
Gal.


'J.UUU gal.


ONE PALLET OF MIX-MATCH
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR ......... 5.00 gal.


, 9.0


Y4 CStcc


CASH AND CARRY SAVINGS SELECTION OF
NO-WAX VINYL from m99yd ASTROTURF from 3.,w9


Carpet Couwtry


Phone 227-7241


West Hwy. 98 Highland View


Nicholas Rolack and Prenita Nickson

Engaged


I







THE STAR PORT ST. JOE 2


Local Group Performs

Eighth Annual Recital
Cindy's Darlin' Dolls and the of each student followed by solo
Port St. Joe Twirlers presented twirling routines and a jazz rou-
their eighth annual recital recent- tine. The performance concluded
ly at the Centennial Building. The with a trophy presentation to
recital began with an introduction each student.


p. -


I V ~* ~'


Spectrum Home Health, Inc.,
has recently promoted Anne Wil-
son, R.N., to Assistant Director of
Professional Services. Wilson,
who has been with Spectrum
since 1989, was educated in
Clearwater, and holds a nursing
degree from St. Petersburg Junior
College.
According to Martha Ste-
phens, Corporate Director of
Health Care Services, Wilson's
promotion, "signals a vote of con-
fidence in Ann's leadership abili-
ties." In her new position, Wilson
will assume all clinical responsi-
bilities for the Port St. Joe office
as well as the Carrabelle office.

Kesley
(From Page 2)
to come down on June 30th each
year. They are bringing this ban-
ner...........
Respectfully,
Kesley


4


Happy 28th
Sam Sr.
Love
Mama & Daddy


5SE IT

Mia


0. Lee Mull




1 S


Commenting on her new posi-
tion, Wilson said, "I believe that
home health in this area of Flori-
da is growing in astronomical
proportions because we are able
to offer our patients the option of
staying at home' and receiving the
treatment they might otherwise
have had to travel some distance
to receive." Citing such examples
as patients who require speech,
physical or IV therapy, Wilson
said, "Our patients are happy
that they don't have to stay long-
er in the hospital. And more im-
portantly, I believe that they get
well more quickly at home."
The Wilsons moved to Carra-
belle in 1984 after her husband
took a job operating a marine re-
search boat for Florida State Uni-
versity. The couple has one
daughter who is three years old.


From left, front row: Susan Elmer, Jennifer Craig, Becky Belin, Jessica
Vise and Amy Canington. Back row, from left: Rachel McCroan, Bonnie Be-
lin, Kristen Weimorts, Keesha Linton, and Angela McDowell.


Shagena Named
to 'Who's Who"
Shane Shagena, who formerly
attended Port St. Joe High
School, has been named to
'Who's Who In American High
Schools."
While in Port St. Joe, Shane
was inducted into the Jr. Nation-
al Society and was in the Gold
Card Club.
He now attends high school
in Cocoa and will be a senior this
year.
Shane is the son of Joe and
Melissa Shagena of Mexico
Beach.
Card of Thanks
Our heartfelt appreciation to
each of you for your many expres-
sions of love and kindness to our
family during the loss of our
loved one. May God's blessings be
with you.
Mrs. Edwin Ramsey & Family


Glisson Reunion
Slated for July 18
The 16th annual Glisson
Family Reunion will be held Sat-
urday, July 18, at Sunland Envi-
ronmental Park in Marianna. All
relatives and friends are invited
to attend and bring a covered
dish.
For further information, you
may call Jeannette Woodham at
904/592/2685 or Winton Glisson
at 812/533/4409.


Advertising

Pays!


Vacation Bible School


at White City
The White City Baptist
Church will have Vacation Bible'
School this year beginning July
13th and running through July
17th. As a special kick-off for Va-
cation Bible School, there will be
a parade on July 11th at 10:00
a.m. in White City at the church.
Also, a musical entitled Bow
Down, the story of Esther and
Mordecai, will be performed on
Sunday, July 12 at 7:00 p.m.
This performing group will be
coming from Salem Baptist
Church in Florissant, Missouri,
and directed by Judy Dupree,
Minister of Youth and Education.
A youth team, from Pleasant
Hill Baptist Church in Elkin,
North Carolina, directed by youth
minister Al Turner, will conduct
classes each day from 9 a.m. un-
til noon for ages three through
youth. All community children


O'R"5-
I
JRTSTI


lis, M.D.


ZOS
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(


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I.
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I.
U
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I I


IBay Eye & Surgical Center!
1 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT:
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Baptist
are urged to attend this "Fantas-
tic Journey" which will be based
on Philippians 4:13. A bus will be
running for those needing trans-
portation.
Everyone is invited to this
special presentation on Sunday
night and all children are urged
to make plans for lots of fun at
Vacation Bible School.


ROLL IN








By: Richard Miller
*The federal government has a
new grant program to encour-
age states to get tougher on
drunk drivers. To qualify for the
,grants, states must lower
blood-alcohol limits, take away
licenses of drunk drivers, set
up checkpoints to catch them
and raise the drinking age.
*A new tire has been designed
to cut down on dangerous hy-
droplaning in wet weather. De-
sign features a single groove up
the middle and a web of
grooves to channel water away
from the tire. The tire is said to
improve traction 20 percent
and cut stopping distance by
25 percent.
*Brake warning light usually
goes on as you start the car,
then goes off. If it stays lit,
check to see if the parking
brake is still on. If light still
stays on, have the brake sys-
tem checked; don't drive.
*Gas price in the "good old
days" how about 1947? -
was only 23 cents per gallon.
Sounds terrific until you make
adjustments for inflation. In
1991 dollars, that bargain price
is the equivalent of $1.49 a gal-
lon!
*New-Used Cars: Get more
miles for the gas you buy with a
well-engineered new (or late
model used) car from
Gulf Ford

Mercy
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales


PARTS STORES

PRICES EFFECTIVE
THRU JULY 12


V VOTE

I DAVID YOUNG
FOR

County Commissioner
District 3
Pd. Pol Adv., paid for by the campaign account of David Young, Dem.
5/21-8/27/92


VOTE FOR and ELECT

MICHAEL L.

"" "-HAMMOND
Democrat
County Commissioner District 3
"The people first and foremost."
Pd. Pol. Adv., pd. for by campaign acct. of Michael L.
Hammond.


Vote for

RONALD


PICKETT
Gulf County Commissioner
District 5
Pd. Pol. Adv., paid for by the campaign account of Ronald Pickett,



Ross E. Tucker
RHU, LUTCF
Tucker Life-Health Insurance Agency, Inc.
Life, Health, Disability &
Dental Insurance
serving Gulf County
1-800-226-7005
52T 12/19/91


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Anne Wilson


Spectrum Promotes

* Wilson to Asst. Dir.


Fresh Shelled and Unshelled Peas
Butterbeans Tomatoes...290 Ib.
All Kinds of Produce

A--


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PDAGEr A


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P rAH. C A ITHU' CTAD UT bT. JT15, k-L TDC11AV JUY10zA St A


New Rules In Effect for Water Projects


Residents within the North-
west Florida Water Management
District's (NWFWMD) 16-county
area who plan to construct, re-


pair or alter a dam, impound-
ment, road crossing, erosion con-
trol structure or any other water
management project related to


agriculture or forestry uses
should contact the District for
more information about new per-
mit requirements.


COOKING
a__W-- a -A -


(DM)-Cool and creamy with a
light peanut butter flavor that melts
in your mouth and oh so easy to
whip up. That is what you get when
you prepare this recipe with the
KitchenAid Ultra Power Soft Start 7
Hand Mixer This mixer is designed. ,'f
within minutes. The slower speeds
provide a slower start for incorpo
rating the heavier weight of the pea-
nut butter with the cream cheese.
This recipe can be prepared quickly
and easily with the KitchenAid
Hand Mixer and that gives you more "
time to spend with your family and
friends.
FROZEN MARBLED
PEANUT BUTTER PIE


Crust
2 cups finely crushed chocolate
covered graham crackers
'/s cup sifted powdered sugar
4 tablespoons butter or
margarine, melted
Combine all ingredients and
press into bottom and sides of a
9-inch pie plate. Bake at 350"F for 3
to 5 minutes. Chill in refrigerator
while preparing filling.
Filling
2 cups heavy cream
1 cup creamy peanut butter
3 ounces cream cheese,
softened
/4 cup powdered sugar
Place cream in a large bowl. At-
tach beaters to mixer. Gradually
turn to Speed 7 and beat for 1/2
minutes, or until soft peaks form.
Set aside.
Place peanut butter, cream
cheese, and powdered sugar in a
large bowl. Mix on" Speed 4 until
smooth, about 1 minute.
Add /2 of the whipped cream to
the peanut butter mixture. Mix on
Speed 4 for 1 minute. Stop and


scrape bowl. Fold in remaining whipped cream until completely blended.
Spoon into prepared pie crust.
Topping 1 tablespoon butter or margarine
%/ cup semisweet chocolate 1 tablespoon creamy peanut
chips butter
.Place chocolate chips, butter, and peanut butter in a small saucepan.
Melt over low heat; stirring until smooth. Cool to lukewarm. Drop by
tablespoons over top of pie filling. With a knife, swirl together gently for a
marbled effect.
Freeze 4 hours or overnight. Remove from freezer at least 15 minutes
before serving. Yield: One 9-inch pie.


Seafood Safety Tips...


Trust your nose. Fish
shouldn't smell "fishy." Fresh fish
has virtually no odor. When
ocean fish begins to spoil, it pro-
duces a chemical called trimeth-
ylamnine, which causes the fishy
oator that people associate with,
bkd fish. If it smells bad, don't,
bfyity.
Ideally, fish should be kept
between 30 and 32 degrees Fah-
renheit during all phases of
transport, storage, display and
sale.
When visiting a grocery store
or seafood market, look around
for signs of general cleanliness -
the appearance of floors, walls,

Pre-Advising
Sessions at GC
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege is holding a series .of one-
hour pre-advising sessions for
first-time college students
through July 30.
These sessions will explain
the admission process, degree
programs, the language of college
and the scheduling of classes.
Those who attend these ses-
sions will be eligible to register for
the fall semester during the.
month of July. Information on
specific dates and times is availa-
ble from the Student Information
Desk at 1-769-1551, extension
2805.
Advising and registration will
be held through July 30 from
12:30 to 5:30 p.m. CT., Monday
through Thursday. Students
must have a Course Approval
Card in order to register.


Tommy
Thomas

Chevrolet
PANAMA CITY
Announces Its
Affiliation With
James C.
"Bo" Bray


In Port St. Joe,
Frankin County Area
Chevrolet-GEO
New and Used Cars and Trucks
Business: 1-800-342-7131
or 904-785-5221
Home: 229-6836


glass cases, countertops, aprons
worn by personnel, etc. Strong,
fish odors may indicate inade-
quately cleaned display cases or
old fish. The presence of flies in-
dicates unsanitary conditions,
high temperatures or spoiling
-Aflsh. .. .
Look closely at seafood dis-
play cases for signs that the tem-
perature may be too high. If a
thermometer is present in the
display case, check the tempera-
ture reading. Bright, hot lights
and open display cases promote
bacterial growth. Fish that are
piled high and not touching ice
should be avoided; select the fish
that are resting directly on or par-
tially covered by ice.
After purchasing seafood, re-
frigerate it quickly. Keep it in the
original wrapper and store in the
coldest part of the refrigerator.
Prepare it witlhfin a day.
Thoroughly cook all seafood.
Thorough cooking kills the bacte-
ria, along with the parasites that
sometime inhabit raw fish. Thor-
oughly cooked fish is opaque and


flakes easily. Eating raw or un-
'dercooked seafood is risky and
should be avoided.
Avoid cross-contamination in
the kitchen. Don't place other
foods such as vegetables, fruits-
or already cooked foods -- on a
cutting board or ; coutterttopl
where raw seafood was sitting.
Wash hands and affected kitchen
surfaces thoroughly after han-
dling or preparing raw seafood.
Be mindful of the potential
for cross-contamination in the
seafood display case at the super-
market. Don't buy cooked seafood
salads that are displayed immedi-
ately next to raw seafood.
When buying whole fish, look
for bright, clear, bulging eyes.
Cloudy, sunken, discolored or,
slime-covered eyes often indicate
that the fish is beginning to spoil.
When buying steaks or fillets,
look for moist flesh that still has
a translucent sheen. Flesh that is.
dried or gaping, where the muscle
fibers are beginning to separate,,
signals an old fish that should
not be purchased.


GOTTA D. U. I.?
State Approved
D.U.I. Counseling now available with flexible
hours and no waiting list in Wewahitchka
Serving Port St. Joe and Blountstown
Call Collect 769-4400
Oscar L. Zeitvogel, Jr., M.A.
Licensed Mental Health Counselor
41P 7/*




Food for Thought


press On


Nothing in the world can take the place of per-
sistence. Talent will not; nothing is more com-
mon than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius
will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb.


Education will not; the world is full of educat-
ed derelicts. Persistence and determination
alone are omnipotent.


AAAAMr IL
Fe~l;AV AI


Gulf County's

Local

Industrial

Contractor


The District's 16-county area
includes Leon County, the west-
ernmost portion of Jefferson
County and extends across the
Panhandle to Escambia County.
Concern that the manage-
ment, storage and drainage of
surface water not prove harmful
to the area's water resources and
that the safety of life and property
be protected prompted the rule
changes, revisions and clarifica-
tions.
The rule changes which have
been incorporated into Chapter
40A-44, Florida Administrative
Code, Regulation of Agricultural
and Forestry Surface Water Man-
agement Projects, took effect on
July 1.
New standards and criteria
for the design of agricultural pro-
jects have been established. Im-
poundments are prohibited with-
in Outstanding Florida Waters,
Class I Waters (potable supplies)
and steephead ravines (stream
valleys found throughout the
Panhandle). Impacts to the envi-
ronment and to threatened and
endangered species (plants, fish
and wildlife) must be avoided.
Best management practices must
be used and a soil and water con-
servation plan must be Imple-
mented.
Information related to wet-
land impacts, known threatened
and endangered species, adjacent
landowners, agricultural status of
the project and engineering calcu-
lations is required as part of a
permit application.
The NWFWMD, rather than
the Florida Division of Forestry,
must be notified of the intent to
use a forestry authorization. New
forms for permit applications, fo-
restry authorizations, and copies
of the revised, rule may be ob-
tained from the NWFWMD Divi-
sion of Resource Regulation,
(904) 539-5999, Route 1, Box
3100, Havana, FL 32333-9700 or
at the Pensacola and Marianna
District offices.


Impact Team at
Nazarene Church
Pastor George Malone and
congregation of the Nazarene
Church extend a cordial invita-
tion to the community to hear the
North Florida Impact Team on
Tuesday evening, July 14 at 8:00
p.m. The church is located at
2420 Long Avenue in Port St. Joe.






: ..









-. _
^K T*^.A,:...t **i,-j;


Info Requested
on Past Judges

The Florida Supreme Court
Historical Society is compiling in-
formation for a book on the Flori-
da territorial judges and Supreme
Court Justices from 1819-1917.
They are asking for copies of biog-
raphies, letters, diaries, family
histories, or any other informa-
tion available. Please mail to Pro-
fessor Walter Manley, 210 South
Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL
32301 or call (904) 224-1215 or
(904) 385-8848.


FED


229-227 30 Rei


1 FOR SALE
BY OWNER
2 bedroom/full tile
..- bath stilt house, fur-
nished. Two lots, total
,.75' x 185'. .5 mile off
.beach. 648-5892.
TFC 5/21/92




PIRATE'S LAIR

Video Games &
Miniature Golf (coming soon)
Fast Food, Beach Goods, Ice Cream
LOCATED AT ENTRANCE TO ST. JOSEPH STATE PARK
OPEN 10 to 10 7 Days a Week
4TP 7/2



ELECTRONIC
WHEEL
ALIGNMENT
'AND
BALANCE


Computerized Alignment
TIRE THRUST ANGLE 34.88
SALE ONE YEAR-12,000 M!LE WARRANTY
Call for Prces TOTAL FOUR WHEEL 44.88
Call for rces ONE YEAR-12.000 MILE WARRANTY
Sears Card TWO WHEEL FRONT 24.88
SIX.MONTH-6,000 MILE WARRANTY


Western Auto
Dave May, Owner 227-1105 219 Reid Ave.


NOTICE OF
\ PUBLIC
HEARING-
INVOLVING A
CHANGE OF
ISLAND USE

S RELATED TO A
-4 -., PLAN AMENDMENT
FOR THE
'-:-. -- GULF COUNTY
^'" "COMPREHENSIVE.
*1 %"$~'.i PLAN






- .


Gulf County will hold a Public Hearing on July 14, 1992 at 2:00 p.m. for the
purpose of receiving public comments on the Comprehensive Plan Amend-
ment related to the Stipulated Settlement Agreement with the Department
of Community Affairs, regarding remedial actions to be taken to bring the
adopted Comprehensive Plan into compliance. The Comprehensive Plan
Amendment will change the use of land within areas depicted on the map
included on this Notice. The Hearing will be held in the County Commis-
sion Chambers of the Gulf County Courthouse. Interested parties may ap-
pear at the Hearing and be heard, regarding adoption of the Comprehen-
sive Plan Amendment.

A copy of the Plan Amendment is on file in the office of the County Clerk
and may be inspected by the public during normal business hours prior to
the hearing. Comments may be submitted in writing to the Gulf County
Clerk's Office, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, or in person at the
Public Hearing.
'ulimh: Juh ;9. :199'.


- ilori- ~rru


IPl*r. R A


T~r TAR.PORTST. OP- T, THIRSDA- JUV 9.199


z


'' *


-












I0


Thank You!
The parents, players, and
President Earnest Morris would
like to thank Head Coach Oscar
Hysmith and his assistants,
Charles Grice, Donnie Cox, and
Tommy Traylor, for all the time
and effort they have put into the
Florida Little Major League
Playoffs. It is through their hard
work that we have come this far.
Thanks again coaches


SharlyenA Pridgeon
Sharlyene Raffield Pridgeon,
49, of Wewahitchka, passed away
Tuesday morning, July 7th, at
her home. She was born and
reared in Panama City, and had
been a resident of Gulf County for
the past 30 years. She worked for
St. Joe Forest Products Company
and was a member of the Wor-
ship Center.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Anthony Pridgeon; two
sons, Keith "Bud" Pridgeon, and
Mark Pridgeon; one daughter,
Kelli Pridgeon; two grandchildren,
Shana Pridgeon and Matthew
Clay Pridgeon, all of Wewahitch-
ka; and two brothers, Dick Raf-
field of Panama City, and Bobby
Raffield of Eufaula, Alabama.
Funeral services will be held
at 11:00 a.m. CT Thursday, July
9th at the Worship Center, con-
ducted by the Rev. Charles Pettis.
Interment will follow in the family
plot at Pleasant Rest Cemetery,
Overstreet.
All services are under the di-
rection of the Comforter Funeral
Home, Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.


Frank J. Klein
Frank JX Klein, Jr., passed
away Friday afternoon, July 3rd,
in Port St. Joe following an ex-
tended illness. A native of Du-
luth, Minnesota, he attended the
University of Florida, and was ed-
itor of the Gator Growl. For over
30 years, he was the sports editor
for the Tampa Times.
Survivors include two sisters,
Grace Weeks of Port St. Joe and
Kathryn Mayo of Tampa; and one
brother, the Rev. John Harvey
Klein of Miami.
Mr. Klein was taken to F.T.
Blount Funeral Home in Tampa
for funeral services and interment
on Tuesday.
All local services were provid-
ed by Comforter Funeral Home.

Rex Allen
Rex Allen, 40, of Wewahitch-
ka, passed away Saturday morn-
ing, July 4th, in Wewahitchka.
He was a native of Tallahassee,
and had been a resident here for
a number of years.
Survivors include his mother,
Essie Estridge; and two brothers,


"The Exciting Place to Worship"'


SFirst Baptist Church

102 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Florida

HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor




Sv, l FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
S = s CHURCH
o 508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
SSUNDAY WORSHIP......................... 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL............................. 11 a.m.
S N' *SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children
Nursery Available
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor




First United Methodist Church
111 North 22nd St.
Mexico Beach, FL 32410

Morning Church....................9:00 a.m. CT
Church School ............... 10:00 a.m. CT
Nursery Provided
Charles M. Parker, Pastor John Anderson, Music Director



You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James Episcopal Church
309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe

.+5+ I .-SERVICES-
'. Each Sunday........... 7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
S-1-4. Sunday School....................... 9:45 a.m.

The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor


Catch the Silrit
t iiir UNftD OMETI400ISCt4URC


Constitution and Monument
Port St. Yoe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School ........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship...... 7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ............:30 p.m. Thursday ...............7:30 p.m.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E, Port St. Joe, Florida Church Phone: 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellowship
"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-5 thru 6th Grade
Does not discriminate based upon race, creed, color, or origin.




We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place
BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING .... ........ 11:00 am, WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING .................. 5:45 p.m,
Long Avenue Baptist Church


1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor


KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children


ALLEN STEWART
Min. of Education
& Youth


Bryan Britt Allen and Chesley Al-
len, all of Tallahassee; and sever-
al nieces and nephews.
Graveside funeral services
were held at 1:00 p.m. CDT Mon-
day at Roberts Cemetery in We-
wahitchka. Interment followed.
All services were under the
direction of the Comforter Funer-
al Home, Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.


1992-93

School Registration
If you are new to the area and have children
who will be attending Port St. Joe or Highland
View Elementary School, please contact the
school as soon as possible and register your
child so proper staffing plans can be made.
School Office Hours
Port St. Joe Elementary: Mon. Fri. 7:45-3:15
Highland View Elementary: Mon. Thurs. 6:30-3:15
TF 6/25-8/6/92


Florida Power Wins


4 Enviro Awards


Some Florida Power Corpora-
tion power poles do more than
help deliver electricity. In north
central Florida, poles are provid-
ing a home for young kestrel bird
nests. And along the beach com-
munities in Pinellas County, pow-
er poles are carrying streetlights
designed to aid baby sea turtles
find their way safely to the open
waters of the Gulf of Mexico.
These programs are two of
four environmental efforts spon-
sored by Florida Power that are
being honored by Renew America,
a national environmental organi-
zation based in Washington, D.C.
Each program will receive a
Certificate of Environmental
Achievement as "a model of envi-
ronmental success" that can be
replicated around the country.
"Renew America attempts to
identify programs that set a posi-
tive example that can help other
communities meet similar envi-
ronmental challenges," said Tina
Hobson, executive director for Re-
new America.
The programs must conserve,
nurture or improve the environ-
ment. Florida Power, the state's
second largest utility and head-
quartered in St. Petersburg, sub-
mitted the following winning en-
tries:
"Kestrel Research, A Busi-
ness Partnership With The Uni-
versity of Florida," a program
which outfitted 140 Florida Power
poles with southeastern Kestrel
nest boxes, resembling the natu-
ral condition of a cavity in a large
tree. In the first year of the study,
about one-third of the next boxes
were occupied.
'"Water Conservation," in-
cluding formal power plant water
audits and actions to conserve;
xeriscaping of power plants and
other facilities with drought-

Smokey Bear's
Birthday Party
Smokey Bear an enduring
American symbol of fire preven-
tion spanning six decades will
be 48 years old on August 9. To
celebrate the special bear's birth-
day, a festive event titled
"Smokey's Birthday Run" will be
held July 25 at Edward Ball Wa-
kulla Springs State Park near Tal-
lahassee. The Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices, through the Florida Forest-
ry Arson Alert Association, is
sponsoring the event in conjunc-
tion with the U.S. Forest Service
and the Florida Department of
Natural Resources.
Smokey was created by artist
Albert Staehle as an animated
symbol which the public could
identify in connection with the
forest fire prevention program.
The fictitious bear first appeared
in a 1945 ad campaign-and soon
afterward, Smokey, clad in blue
Jeans and forest hat, became one
of the most widely recognized
symbols in America.
Smokey's birthday celebra-
tion will include a special appear-
ance by Smokey, birthday cake,
refreshments, multicolor T-shirts
for all finishers, and door prizes.
The celebration will include a 1K
fun run/walk (.62 miles) and a
5K footrace (3.1 miles).
Pre-registration is required
for both runs by July 18. Checks
should be made payable to
"Smokey's Birthday Run," and
mailed to: John Fort, Registration
Chairman, Route 6, Box 7514,
Crawfordville, FL 32327.
The Edward Ball Wakulla
Springs State Park is located 11
miles south of Tallahassee on
Highway 61.
For details, contact Jim Har-
rell at 904-488-5168.


Bible Study
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


tolerant vegetation; recycled car
washing systems at all company
facilities and "grassroots" recom-
mendations by employees to re-
duce water usage.
"Recessed Lighting in Log-
gerhead Sea Turtle Nesting
Areas," where Florida Power in-
stalled a new type of streetlights,
called "cut off luminaires," for
beach communities where there
are sensitive turtle hatching
areas.
"Environmental Education
Program" Florida Power has
had an energy education program
for 10 years, which has reached
more than 40,000 children in one
recent year alone. Several new
components include an environ-
mental poster contest, Energy
and The Environment education-
al grants and participation in the
National Energy Education Devel-
opment (NEED) project by acting
as a business sponsor/partner
for a middle school program on
conservation and alternative en-
ergy sources.
Each program evaluated by
Renew America Searching For
Success undergoes a rigorous
verification process and will be
listed in the 1992 Environmental
Success Index directory.
The index is a clearinghouse
of information that will be made
available to policy makers, citi-
zens' groups, private and public
organizations, the media and oth-
ers interested in finding solutions
to environmental problems.


Some Nursery
Rhyme Origins
"Humpty Dumpty had a
great fall..."
Scholars believe this rhyme is
500:y.arsold.
Richard III was a British
monarch during the 15th centu-
ry. Humpty Dumpty was one of
his noblemen. Supposedly,
Humpty Dumpty displeased Rich-
ard II, thus "falling from the
king's favor."
"There was a little girl and
she had a little curl..."
Poet Henry Wadsworth Long-
fellow wrote this rhyme. He had a
little daughter named Edith. Ap-
parently, Edith was very stub-
born, especially about curling her
hair, and Longfellow decided to
write about it.
Surprisingly, Longfellow de-
nied this writing until 1881, be-
cause he thought "some of the
words were inelegant."
"Little Miss Muffet sat on a
tuffet..."
Back in the 16th century, Dr.
Thomas Muffet wrote this for his
daughter, Patience.
What's a tuffet?
A tuffet is a three-legged
stool.
And what are curds and
whey?
Curds and whey are a type of
custard.
And who's Dr. Muffet?
He was an entomologist.



I NOTICE
The Wewahitchka
City Commission meet-
ing has been changed
from Monday, July 13,
1992, to Tuesday, Jply
14, 1992 at 5:00 p.m.
CDT.
Publish: July 9, 1992


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


"I AM THE RESURRECTION
AND THE LIFE: HE THAT
BELIEVETH IN ME, THOUGH
HE WERE DEAD, YET SHALL
HE LIVE." (John 11:25).

Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
P.,O Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


All Forms of Insurance
Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages *Group *Life *Boat
*Hospitalization *Mobile Homes

COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899







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Sb


r
Listing highlights from our large, fast-moving inventoryll
LA CONCHA
.S .-- 1st St.
Mexico Beach


good condition. $59,900.00.

BLUE WATER "C"
TOWNHOUSE
Hwy. 98 & 28th St.
Mexico Beach
Nice modern 2 bedroom,
1 1/2 bath with gulf view
from upstairs deck. Cen-
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appliances, furnished

and equipped. Assumable lo
$56,000.00.
NOTICE


Comfortable beach retreat,
short walk to Gulf. 3 bed-
room, central heat & A/C,
Ig. deck, furnished and
equipped and underneath
parking. Cottage is in very


an and low down payment.

CE!!!!


Real Estate Auction July 29th
Call for details!!!
Serving our area since 1946!

ERA PARKER REALTY
904-648-5777
Cathey Hobbs 648-5653,
Debbie McFarland 648-5421 after hours


PAGE 7A


Mm h -


. .


A


THE, STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 9,1992















HERE IS OUR RX FOR
A GOOD VACATION
If you take any continuing medicine, be sure you have
enough to get through your vacation. You should also have
a copy of your prescription so that, if your luggage is lost or
stolen, you can replace your medicine. While some copies of
I a prescription are not renewable you could obtain a new
prescription from a physician.
When traveling outside the country the prescription
should also have the name of the manufacturer. Mention U
when you are taking a trip and we will cooperate with your
physician to make certain you have the medicines you may
need.

"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US with
their prescriptions, health needs and other phar-
mnacy products. We consider this trust a privilege
and a duty. May we be your personal family phar- 1
macy?


Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe
Convenient Drive-Through Window U V
Revlon Cosmetics 229-8771
IS~Iii'iWasla


Wewa All-Stars Undefeated


Wewa All-Stars started off the
District Playoffs against Cedar
Grove with a 17 to 5 win. Ike Min-
cy pitched the entire game with
Bubba Dickens catching as Wewa
defeated Cedar Grove at Hiland
Park field in Panama City, on
Monday, June 29th. Leading hit-
ters for Wewa were: Lee Linton -
two singles and a double; Hys-
mith double; Bubba Dickens -
double and single; and Forehand
- single and double.
The All-Stars' second game
was against Springfield on
Wednesday, July 1st, with Wewa
coming out on top 14-7. Jack
Husband pitched almost five
complete innings and gave up
only two walks. He was replaced
by Jeremy Hysmith, then Thad
Morris and Mark Kelsoe. Ike Min-
cy and Jack Husband each hit a
home runs over the six-foot fence.
An in-the-park home run was hit
by G.T. Morgan.
Key hitters in the game were:
Hysmith-double (2); Dickens-
sacrifice, two singles; Mincy-
homerun, double and single; Mor-
gan-two singles and an in-the-
park home run; Forehand-two
doubles and a single; Husband-
two singles and a home run;


St. Joe to Host 10 Year Old


Tournament on Saturday


Port St. Joe will host the AAA
Dixie Youth District IV tourna-
ment for ten year olds, with play
beginning Saturday evening. St.
Joe will take the field at 7:00
against Parker, and Lynn Haven


and Callaway will meet at 9:00.
Play in the four team tournament
will be held at the Major League
field on 10th Street, with admis-
sion being charged to help defray
the expense of the tournament.


Recognize Ways to


Boa


Boating is really making a
splash it's the fastest growing
family sport 'in America, with
nearly 15 million recreational
boaters nationwide. These mil-
lions of recreational boats share
the waterways with 7,000 tow-
boats and tugboats and over
30,000 barges which carry com-
merce on the 26,000 miles of nav-
igable inland and coastal water-
ways of the United States.
U.S. Coast Guard statistics
show that this crowded situation
has resulted in far too many acci-
dental deaths and serious inju-
ries directly involving pleasure
craft and commercial vessels -
and the annual rate of reported
accidents of this type has also
doubled in the past seven years.
Most such accidents are caused
by a lack of knowledge, poor exe-
.cution of a maneuver or sheer
carelessness by boaters a situ-
ation the American Waterways
Operators (AWO) wants to correct
with its Lifelines safety sugges-
tions, which include:
*Assign one person to look
out for commercial traffic, both
day and night.
*Recognize the misleading
speed of commercial vessels and
their lack of maneuverability.
*Keep in mind that a com-
mercial pilot has a "blind spot"
that can extend hundreds of teetf
in front of ships, tugs and tows
pushing barges.
*Make your craft as visible as
possible, especially at night.
*Avoid water skiing and jet
skiing around towboats, tugboats
and other commercial vessels.
*Avoid drugs and alcohol.

Women's Class C
Softball Tourney
Kensinger Softball Team will
be sponsoring a women's Class C
double elimination tournament
on July 25 at T.L. James Park in
Wewahltchka. Entry fee is
$100.00. Deadline for entry is
July 20. Each team will hit their
own balls.
Call Tony after 5 p.m. at 639-
5518.

-----





618 W. 23rd St.,
Wilbro Plaza
Panama City, FL
769-5348

FREE HEARING
TEST
Top Quality, Name
Brand Hearing
Aids
*Satisfaction Guaranteed
*Monthly Service Center
Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
1st Tuesday each inontll


ting Safe
Even though the barge indus-
try is acknowledged by the U.S.
Coast Guard as the safest form of
transportation, the industry be-
lieves efforts to assure the safety
of the crews, general public, boat-
ing public and cargoes can al-
ways be improved.
For a free Lifelines brochure,
which has more safety tips, send
a stamped, self-addressed enve-
lope to: Lifelines, the American
Waterways Operators, 1600 Wil-
son Boulevard, Suite 1000, Ar-
lington, VA 22209.


Losers of the Saturday games
will meet Monday evening at
7:00, with the winners playing at
9:00. All times are Eastern Day-
light time. Play will continue
through Wednesday and possibly
Thursday of next week.
All Stars selected to represent
St. Joe are: Seneca Chambers,
James Daniels, Brad Knox,
Kedrick Larry, Stephen Lowrey,
Randall Moore, Brett Parker, Mosi
Quinn, Clay Smallwood, Ashley
Stephens, Ryan Stephens, Bran-
don Williams and Travis Woul-
lard.
Admission is $1.00 for adults
and 50 cents for children seven
years of age and older. A full, con-
cession stand will be offered each
evening, with hot dogs and ham-
burgers hot off the grill, along
with an assortment of other re-
freshments.
Anyone wishing to volunteer
to work in the concession stand
or in another capacity during the
tournament is urged to call Don-
na Haddock at 229-6807.


Time to Apply for

Hunting Applications


The St. Marks National Wild-
life Refuge now has hunt applica-
tions and regulations available for
the 1992-93 season. Interested
persons may call/write/come by
for applications and information
at the following:
St. Marks NWR (Hunt), P.O.
Box 68, St. Marks, FL 32355,
904/925-6121.
Disabled hunters are encour-
aged to apply for all quota hunts,
or the mobility-impaired person
hunt for 1992-93. If you are in-
terested in that hunt, please let
the Refuge know at the above ad-
dress/phone number.
Also, the Refuge will require a
$10 permit fee for those hunters
successfully drawn for the Refuge
quota hunts. Information about
the fee is in the application.


Dates and areas for the quota
hunts are as follows:
Archery: Nov. 6-15, both
units; Muzzleloader: Nov. 20-22,
Wakulla unit; General Gun: Nov.
28-29, Wakulla unit; General
Gun: Dec. 12-13, Panacea unit;
Mobility-Impaired Person Hunt:
General Gun, Dec. 12-13, Pana-
cea unit; Spring Gobbler: April 9-
18, 1993, both units.
The non-quota small game
hunt will be held December 26
through January 24' in both
units. All permits are only availa-
ble at the above address and tele-
phone number. Applications. for
quota hunts (except spring gob-
bler) must be received back at the
Refuge office by 4:00 p.m. Au-
gust 14, 1992. Spring gobbler
applications will be taken be-
tween January 4-29, 1993.


Views On '

Dental ifealth
" FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.

THE ABSCESSED

TOOTH


When an abscess hits you,
you'll know it! The pain is severe
and constant and results in
swelling of the face in a few
days. This is a dental emergen-
cy.
The abscess normally starts
with a cavity which is left un-
treated. The bacteria begin their
treacherous work by destroying
the outer case of enamel, then
i',- inner (more sensitive) part of
the tooth called the dentin.
Eventually, the cavity will invade
the innermost part of the tooth,
called the pulp where the nerves
and blood vessels are. Now,
you've got trouble and you'll
know by the pain. It is caused
by the swelling of the blood ves-
sels against the nerves since
the pulp is surrounded by rigid


walls.
The pulp loses the battle
and slowly dies, leaving the
tooth full of decomposed tissue
and swarming with germs.
When the germs reach the tip
they will set about making an
abscess. Then they will proceed
to gradually destroy the tissue
and bone around the tooth root.
A filling will not help a root
abscess. The decision now (af-
ter the infection is treated) is
whether to save the tooth by
root canal therapy or have it ex-
tracted.

Prepared as a public ser-
vice to promote better dental
health. From the office of:
FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
Williams Ave., Phone 227-1123.


)1v


The Wewa All-Stars are shown from left to right, front row: Kelly Forehand, Lee Linton, James Taunton, Mark
Kelsoe, Tripp Atchison. Middle row: Andrew Davis, Chad Roberts, Eric McDaniel, Nathan Foster, Gary Carter, Champ
Traylor, Jeremy Hysmith, and Johnny Jackson. Back row, from left: Asst. Coach Charles Grice, Thad Morris, G.T.
Morgan, Ike Mincy, Jack Husband, Bubba Dickens, Asst. Coach Tommy Traylor, and Head Coach Oscar Hysmith.


Wewa was treated to a pizza
party at Pizza Hut after the game
by Wewa Little Major League and
President Earnest Morris.
The All-Stars hosted garie
three to Tyndall on Friday night,
July 3rd and downed Tyndall 12-
2 after only five innings. Ike Min-
cy pitched a no hitter and helped
his cause with a home run. Jere-
my Hysmith also added a home
run. Byrous Gortman announced
the game.
Wewahitchka hosted Fred
Bishop Monday night, July 6th.
and picked up another win 14-7.
Leading hitters were: Hysmith
with a double, Minty with a sin-
gle and a home run, Forehand
with a home run. Jack Husband
was the pitcher for Wewa and
was relieved by Hysmith in the
fifth.
Both the Wewa and Hiland
Park All-Stars remain undefeated
in the tournament. Cedar Grove
will host Wewa against Hiland
Park for the Eastern Division
Championship Wednesday night,
July 8th at 6:00 p.m. CT.


7 & 8 Year Olds
Lose 16-11

Port St. Joe's 7 & 8-year old
All-Star baseball team lost last
Thursday evening to Bayou
George 16-11 knocking them out
of the double elimination tourna-
ment. The young St. Joe players
hit the ball well off the pitching
machine, recording only three
strikeouts in 36 at-bats, but Bay-
ou George's defense played well.
Collecting hits for the locals
were James Smith and Joshua
Posey, each with two singles,
Chad Haddock with a double,
and Samuel Bell, Byron Jones,
Samuel Littleton, Santiel Cham-
bers and Joshua Dandy each
with a single.
Earlier in the tournament St.
Joe had defeated Callaway Red
14-10 and lost to Lynn Haven
Blue 22-2.
Other team members were:
Ricky Farmer, Christopher Knox,
Bobby Phillips, Michael Bouing-
ton, and Patrick Mastro.


IKA-RA\ -I(ILUNG IFU
Excellent physical fitness and self-defense training
for men, women and children.

MARATHON

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227-7506 -St."Joe
6TC 6/18 Port St. Joe


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Closed Sundays 6 Days a Week
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LUNCH BUFFET ncludesSalad Bar4, f 1


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P185/70-13 61.95 P215/70-14 78.95
P195,70-13 65.95 P215/70-15 81.95
P205 ,'70-13 67.95 P225/70-15 85.95
,E.P225/70-15 85.95
P185,75-14 68.95 P235/70-15 89.95
P195.70-14 71.95 P245/70-15 92.95
P195 75-14 72.95
SALE ENDS SOON




A SRC ET


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PAGE 8A


I~~


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 9,1992












SIt's Hot Outside,


But Don't Forget


Garden Maintenance


By now, most of us have just
about finished harvesting and
storing all the vegetables from
our spring gardens. Although it's
not yet time to begin making
preparations for fall planting, you
should not completely forget
about your present garden. Even
during this interlude, there are
things to think about and tasks
to perform to insure continued
gardening success.
Maintaining a successful,
productive vegetable garden is a
never ending enterprise. Even
though you may be experiencing
a lull between spring harvest and
fall planting, there's still work to
be done. I will talk about how to
take advantage of this period by
performing those fine-tuning


tasks that can make the differ-
ence between good and a great
garden.
If you still have vegetables in
your garden, you should continue
perhaps even intensify a regular
pest protection program. We're
into the rainy season now, which
means hot, wet days, .and warm,
humid nights, just the conditions
that stimulate insect and disease
pest activity. Tomato and corn
fruit worms and pickle worms
can be very destructive at this
time. Even those pests which
haven't been overwhelming thus
far, often become severe during
the rainy months. Things like
aphids, cabbage worms, squash
borers, and corn bed worms are


- By Richard K. O'Hern,
M.D., Ph.D.
Since 1970 the federal gov-
ernment has spent almost $3 bil-
lion of our taxes to promote con-
traceptives and "safe sex" among
our teenagers. It is time we
asked, 'What have we gotten for
our money?"
Up from 60% in 1976, 76% of
all high school seniors have now
taken sex education courses.
Since that time,'unwed pregnan-
cies have increased 87% among
15-19 year olds, abortion among
teens rose 67% and unwed births
went up 61%. According to testi-
mony provided before the U.S.
Senate Committee on Labor and
Human Resources, "In 15 states
with similar social-demographic
characteristics and rates of teen-
age pregnancy in 1970, those
with the highest expenditures on
family planning showed the larg-,
est increases in abortion and ille-
gitimate births among teenagers
between 1970 and 1979."
What we've gotten for our
money is the highest teenage
pregnancy rate of any developed
nation. More than one-half of
* America's young people. have had
sexual intercourse by the time
they are 17 and a staggering 1
million teenage girls in the United
States become pregnant each
year, according to the Centers for
Disease Control (CDC). That is al-
most 3,000 each day. Almost one-
half of those pregnancies end in
abortion.
What we've .gotten for our
money in this age of contracep-
tive education is an unprecedent-
ed increase in sexually transmit-
ted diseases, like AIDS, herpes,
syphilis, gonorrhea, and chla-
mydia, that infect 3 million teen-
agers annually, according to
CDC. Many of these diseases can
cause serious, permanent dam-
age including sterility, genital
warts, cervical cancer, and in the
case of AIDS, death.
What we've gotten for our
money, after 22 years and nearly
$3 billion of taxpayer dollars, is
58% of teenage girls under the
age of 18 still not using contra-
ception at their first intercourse.
Furthermore, teenagers continue
having unprotected intercourse
for a full year, on average, before
starting any kind of contracep-
tion. Even if we spent another
$50 billion to promote condom
usage, most teenagers would per-
sist in using them inconsistently
and improperly. The nature of
human beings and the passion of
the act simply do not lend them-
selves to a disciplined response in
young romantics. Even Planned
Parenthood's own data shows
that educating teens about sexu-
ality and contraceptives does not
result in increased condom use.
These alarming statistics re-
flect what scientific review of the
available evidence indicates -
that there is little or no effect

from comprehensive, contracep-
tive-based sex education pro-
grams on sexual behavior, con-
traceptive use, and teenage
pregnancy.
If these costly programs
aren't working, then what will
work? In contrast to the typical
sex-ed classes that promote con-
doms, abstinence-based sex-ed
programs are showing great suc-
cess in curtailing teen pregnancy
and teen promiscuity. Studies of
several abstinence-based pro-
grams conducted by the Office of
Adolescent Pregnancy Programs
of the U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services yielded en-
couraging results.
Data from four junior high
schools in 1988 of the Me, My
World, My Future program, pro-
!; duced by Teen Aid, used by over
2,500 schools nationally, indicat-
ed that students who completed
the program became more aware


of the benefits qf abstaining from
sexual intercourse at tieIr age
and that they would be less ,likely
to engage in intercourse before
,marriage.
Likewise, studies of Sex Re-
spect, an abstinence-based sex
education program adopted in
over 1,000 school .districts across
the country, found that students
who completed the program had
a greater awareness of the bene-
fits of abstinence and a greater
sense of self-control. Sex Respect
yielded significant results at 14
schools in six Midwestern states,
with 1,841 students participat-
ing. Before taking the course, 36
percent of the students said sexu-
al intercourse among teens is ac-
ceptable, provided no pregnancy
results. Only 18 percent agreed
after the course, and 65.5 percent
disagreed. Data in 1990 for 3,500
students showLed that only 5 per-
cent of the females who partici-
pated in the Sex Respect program
had become pregnant both one
and two years later, whereas the
control group of females not tak-
ing the program had a 9 percent
pregnancy rate.
While some people believe it
is necessary to include a section
fi sex-ed curricula on contracep-
tives for teens who are sexually
active, they must realize that
such an inclusion weakens the
emphasis on abstinence and
sends a mixed message to our


Florida Garden

Extension Notes

Roy Lee Carter
Gulf County Extension Service


common problems. Ybu should be
especially alert for signs of dam-
age, and be prepared to apply in-
secticides as needed.
In addition, maintain a sharp
lookout for the spread of plant
diseases. Any diseased plants
should be pulled out and dis-
posed of as soon as possible.
Plants remaining in the garden
should be sprayed weekly with a
good fungicide.
Summer is a good time to
evaluate the seed varieties you se-
lected for the spring garden. Ask
yourself such questions as Did
the variety produce strong, vigor-
ous plants?... What about the
quality of the vegetables them-


selves?... How about disease re-
sistance? Try to make a note of
the varieties which did well and
those that didn't, so you'll have
some idea of the ones you'll want
to include in your fall vegetable
garden.
Also, summer offers a good
opportunity to observe the benefi-
cial effects of mulching. If you
mulched your spring garden,
you'll notice that you have very
few weeds, whereas your neigh-
bor's unmulched garden may be
overrun with weed growth. Nema-
tode injury also is much milder
on mulched vegetables. While
nematodes will attack mulched
plants, their effects are not as se-
vere, because of the healthier root
zone in a mulched garden.
The most striking observation
you'll make about mulching is
how it controls soil moisture. Veg-
etables grown on unmulched, not
sandy Florida soils will droop,
while those grown in mulched
gardens will stand tall.. We've
seen all kinds of materials used
for mulching, including plastic,
pine straw, hay, oak leaves, and
wood shavings even such
things as peanut hulls, newspa-
pers, and gravel.
You may think of other sum-
mer chores and new gardening
ideas. Meanwhile, don't forget the
care of any plants that are still
producing. A little extra effort
may squeeze some valuable pro-
ductivity from your old plot. And,
be sure to use any extra time
during this slow gardening sea-
son to formulate future plans -
plans that could pay off in a bet-
ter fall harvest.


U_


children. The Louis Harris poll
commissioned by Planned Parent-
hood confirms the danger of
mixed messages. Teens whose
parents have discussed contra-
ceptives have a greater likelihood
of- being sexually active than
those whose parents do not dis-
cuss contraceptives in their sex
education. Furthermore, while
Florida law pertaining to sex-ed
curricula in public schools does
not mention contraceptive educa-
tion, it does require that the in-
struction in public schools "shall
teach abstinence from sexual ac-
tivity outside of marriage as the
expected standard for all school
age children while teaching the
benefits of monogamous hetero-,
sexual marriage."
As we've seen from the mil-
lions of dollars spent, the contra-
ceptive approach does not work.
It has not reduced pregnancy,
abortion or sexually transmitted
diseases, has promoted promis-
cuity, and has confused our chil-
dren by sending mixed messages.
But values like prudence, forti-
tude and self-control are not con-
fusing and never change. Absti-
nenice before marriage, then
marriage and mutual fidelity for
life is the only underlying way to
decrease teenage pregnancy,
AIDS and other sexually trans-
mitted diseases. To tell ourselves
or our children anything else is
deadly, deceitful, and expensive.


Our homeowners

discountscould helpyou


nail down real savings.
ilthe nsingcost of your homeownerscoverage is raising the roof at your
house. call Allstate
\\e have :i .inetr Of discounts. And we'll trto help ,
vouL nail diown .1 homeowners quote you can live with.

ROY SMITH


221 Reid Ave.
227-1133 A
Port St. Joe, FL You'
Allsnire 1inur.Lrl( .iiinpaIIn, Northhrook. Illinois


lll late
're in good hands.
Subjec to qualhficavons and local a:ulailhri


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 9,1992 PAGE 1B



For All of Your Publishing Needs

Call The Star

227-1278




TIME FOR



REPAIRS

to Your Lawn Equipment


CALL ON EXPERIENCE!

CALL ON BARFIELD'S
Mowers Lawn Tractors *Trimmers
Edgers Chippers Mulchers
If a motor runs it, we repair it!
Blades Belts Parts *Decks Available

FACTORY WARRANTY SERVICE
Snapper, Briggs & Stratton, Tecumseh, Stihl

SHometown Sales
Hometown Service



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COLLEGE WRAPPING PAPER
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The Star Publishing Co.
OFFICE SUPPLY STORE
Phone 227-1278 FAX 227-7212 304-308 Williams Ave.


Sex Education: What Have


We Gotten for Our Money?


LAW OFFICES OF
FRIER & USKERT, P.A.


We May Be Able To Help You

*Stop Harassing Calls, Letters, Etc.
*Stop Repossessions & Foreclosures
*Eliminate Debts
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* Call John Uskert or Randal (904)=784-1361
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consultation. 1 800-749-2223
465 Harrison Ave.* Panama City
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be
based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send
you free information about our qualifications and experience."
TFC 10/24/91


Is I I k


1rr 1 w f


rey. j.u.u, C











THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 9,1992


DEADHEAD Cypress Lumber for
decks, boats exteriors. Custom Cut or
Standard Sizes Available. Roy Harper
I Iwy. 71 White City 827-6869
2tc 7/2

One set iron bunk beds $35; 1
Sears truck tool box, full size, good
shape, $50; 1 iron bed Spanish style
white $20; 1 mattress set full size, ex-
tra firm, barely used $40; 1 antique
claw ft. tub $75. 229-8530 nights,
229-8238 days. 2tc 7/9
Electric stove $50 or best offer.
Call 229-6055. ltc 7/9
14,000 btu air cond. unit, will
cool good size home, $350. 647-8155.
Itc 7/9

Two bicycles, 26" boys or girls,
good cond. Banana trees, any size,
$6. Call 648-5279. Itp 7/9
Field Corn at Gulf County Farms,
Elmo Ford, 639-2758. 2tc 7/2
Color console 25" TV $85; 19" GE
color $70; large microwave $65; 25"
color TV $65. Call Jim 647-3116.
3tc 7/9

David's Home Repairs, Remod-
eling, Plumbing, Painting and Addi-
tions of all types. Free estimates.
Call 229-2775. 8tp 7/9
DISHWASHER, works great, a lit-
tle noisy, $90. WASHING MACHINE
works great, leaks a little, $75. Call
227-2008 after 7:00 p.m.
tfc 7/2

16' Kennedy craft with 25 hp
Johnson with trailer, $2,000 obo. 6
months old Whirlpool washer & dryer,
$500 obo. 647-8024. tfc 7/2
Western Auto Special. Computer
spin balance 4 tires and tire rotation.
$19.95. 227-1105. tfc 7/2
Mobile home, 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
cen. h&a, deck, dishwasher. Call for
appointment, 227-7245. tfc 7/2
To buy or sell Avon call Sarah
Kemp at 229-6495 after 5 p.m. or
weekends. tfc 7/2


I I C O R* '0 S SA EIF R R N O E T I H L WA NT D


Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any' vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyn-
dall Parkway, near Hwy. 22, Panama
City, FL 32404. 763-7443.
tfc 7/2

Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
.Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOOl Also Com-
puter Wheel Alignment. 227-1105.
tfc 7/2

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 7/2


NEW & USED
Snapper, John Deere, & Ku-
bota equipment. Trade for
anything. 100% financing.
Call 1-800-834-6744. Sowell
Tractor Co. 2/2 thru 9/92





FREE puppies to a good home.
Mother pure bred Dalmation; father
very sly yellow lab. 647-3162 after
5:00 p.m. ltp 7/9
AKC Samoyed puppies, 12
weeks, trained, vet checked, shots,
wormed. Loves children. Beautiful
protection bargain. $250. 647-8913,
St. Joe Beach. Itp 7/9





STOP high credit card interest
rates. No annual fees. Low APR. Erase
bad credit. Obtain Visa/Mastdrcard
easy. Free details. Write: PAXMAX,
9310 Northcote, Saint John, IN
46373. 3tp 6/25


3 bedroom, 2 1/2 ba. San Bias,
Barrier Dunes, long lease or sale.
Lighted tennis, pool, club, call owner
229-2631 or your broker. 3tc 7/9
One bedroom house in Highland
View, unfurnished, very nice, $200
plus deposit. 229-8530 nights, 229-
8238 days, ask for Linda.
2tc 7/9

Studio apartment, fully fur-
nished, call 647-8481. tfc 7/2
One bedroom apartment, well
furnished, very good air conditioning,
good neighborhood, 1505 Monument
Ave. tfc 7/2

Mexico Beach, Mobile home spac-
es for rent, $65 month. Call 648-
5659. tfc 6/25
2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath town-
home, unfurnished, long term lease.
$575 month, plus utilities, 229-2777.
tic 7/2

For Rent: 2 bedroom trailer, de-
posit, no pets. 648-8211 tfc 7/2
Nice one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge Apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing. tfc 7/2
For Rent: 2 bedroom furnished
mobile home in Highland View and
one trailer lot. 227-1260.
UNFURNISHED
Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.


For Rent: Furnished apartment
at 1508 1/2 Long Ave. Deposit re-
quired. Phone after 6 p.m., 229-6825.
tfc 7/2

OFFICE SPACE. Call George
Duren at 229-6031 and leave mes-
sage. tfc 7/2
Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfe 7/2
Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 7/2
No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/92
The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 7/2

APARTMENT FOR RENT
2 bedroom, 1 bath, carpet,
ceiling fan, dish washer, refrig.,
stove. Come r9th St. & Long
Ave. Call Kenny 227-7241 or
Phil 227-2112, tfc 7/9





FOUND: Ring at Salinas Park on
July 4th. Call to identify, 647-5733 or
647-3109.






Good Country & line dance les-
sons, Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m., Centennial
Building. Learn the Achy Breaky &
more. $2.00 week cover charge. For
more information call 229-8056 or
229-8970 after 5. 4tc 6/25


Licensed Real Estate Salesmen/
Brokers. Call United National Real Es-
tate Rosasco Realty, 227-1774.
tfc 7/9

J. F. Cullen Construction, Inc.
experienced carpenters, laborers,
plumbing, electric & dry wall sub-
contractors needed. Call 653-2246.
tfc 7/2

House cleaners, mostly Satur-
days. Experience required, The Board-
walk, 229-8390. tfc 6/18
Nursing assistant positions, no
experience necessary. Apply at Bay
St. Joseph Care Center. tfc 7/2
Hair stylist needed. Call Sharon
at Cross Cut, 648-8977. tfc 7/2


Marquis Home Health Agency
is seeking polished profes-
sionals to Join prominent and
aggressive team. R. N. Super-
visory position available. Ex-
perience preferred. For inter-
view call 229-6566. Itc 7/9


*POSTAL JOBS *
PORT ST. JOE AREA ,
$23,700 per year plus
benefits. Postal carriers,
sorters, clerks. For an
application and exam
information, call
1-219-736-9807, ext.
P-2334,
9 am to 9 pm, 7 days.
2tp 7/2



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYS! Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 5 per word for all over 20.


News and used handicapped.
equipped vans.. Call 904-942-2036.
4tc 7/9

1970 Ford Falcon, good condi-
tion, runs good, 4 new tires. Great for-
first car, $600. Call 229-8268.
Itp 7/9

'88 Chrysler Fifth Ave., silver/
silver leather, like new inside & out,
always garaged, 44,000 miles. If you
want a like new car call James at
227-2357 or 647-5194. Cost new
$21,000. Sell $7,500. tfc 7/9
'79 Ford LTD. Auto. transmis-
sion, 302 engine, $900. Jmaes Yates,
223 7th St., PSJ, 226-6894.
ltp 7/9

'72 Ford Courier, running, '73
Ford Courier for parts, both $500 or
best offer 827-8429. 2tp 7/2.
1985 Buick Riviera, fuUlly loaded,
clean, needs paint job & minor work,
must sell, $2,975 obo. 227-1795.
4tp 6/18

1991 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4-
dr., ps, pb, pw, pl, cc, tilt, am/fm cas-
sette, 6 cyl., red, 21K miles, 227-
7512. tfc 7/2







YARD SALES: Anyone who
purchased a yellow baby afghan in St.
Joe Beach on June 26, please call
647-5608. 4tc 7/9

Garage Sale: Saturday, July
11th, 8 a.m. till 12 noon. 909 20th
St., Port St. Joe. ltp 7/9
Yard Sale: New Bethel A.M.E.
Church, corner of Ave. C and Hwy.
98, Saturday, June 11, beginning at
9 o'clock a.m. Clothing, household
goods, large assortment of hand-
painted crafts. Rain cancels.
Itc 7/9


TR*ADES3 and SERVICES


BROKEN TV, VCR OR WHATEV-
ER? Don't throw it away. Get yourself
some free beer money. I'll pick it up &
deliver some money. Call now, Swing-
arm Jim, 647-3116. tfc 7/2

Widowed person's support grQup
will meet every Thursday at First
Baptist Church, Mexico Beach on
15th St., 7 EST, 6 CST.
Call 648-8827 for information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.


Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Perms
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tf c 7/2

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
26 Years of Experience
Worker's Compensation
Occupational Diseases,
Injuries and Accidents.
No charge for first conference.
7229 Deer Haven Road, P.C. tfc?/2

r-m-- m

ISt. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
Small Engine Repairs

Factory Warranty Center


I Lawnmowers
e Weedeaters
e Tillers
Chain saws
Generators 1 I
\ Pumps
C Engine Sales

I
| 706 1st St.-St. Joe
227-2112 J
k ___---- __ 11


-. Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
' yReg. Stated Communication
Y'fst and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
James Brooks, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.


tfv 2/6
OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR -
Call Steve at 227-1687 after 6 p.m.
tfc 7/2

STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lie. #RB130030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 7/2

Remodeling New Construction
Decks
Free Estimates 648-5886
TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Mike Taylor P.O0. Box 13459
uc. #nG0051240 Mexico Beach, FL
tfc 7/2




D&P Painting Service
Residential & Commercial
Interior & Exterior
"Free Estimates"
David & Penny Stump
904-229-6683
4tp 7/2

Researching Educational
Assistance for College
or Vo-Tech
Regardless of your grades.
Regardless of family income.
Scholarship, financial aid
source
Located guaranteed.
REA Enterprises
1-800-872-1221 ext. 4180
14tc 5/28


BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair
Rebuild Wrecks Body
& Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body Work
See or Call BOB HEACOCK
Baltzell Ave. Phone 227-7229
trc 7/2


4tp 7/2
Screen Rooms Carports Patio Covers
lu n I rAwnings Vinyl Siding Soffit & Fascia
Roof-Over Roofs Skirting
tV O fl minWe Now Offer SEAMLESS ALUMINUM GUTTER
q Of vr -ljninurn 120colorsavaibe
Specializing in all types of aluminum & vinyl products.
FREE ESTIMATES BOBBY MONTGOMERY 648-5372


Sewing and Alterations: drapes,
complete outfits, repairs. Call Daisy,
at Aline's, 229-6600 or 227-7193.
tfc 7/2


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 7/2


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2. Box A1C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
ffc 7/2

We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns

Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-386, Howard Creek
tfc 7/2

DROOPY HEADLINERS
REPLACED





$69.95 Most Cars
$39.95 Most Pick-Ups
We have over 50 different shades and
colors In stock and ready to Install.
Call Oakley's Cars & Trucks
Corner 2nd Ave. & Madison St., Oak Grove
227-1294 tfc 7/2


COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax ReturnsA Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581
tfc 7/2


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer- St. Joe Beach
647-5043



AVORI

CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460 tfc 7/2


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!








Sears Catalog Sales
227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. fc 7/2



BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

Lawn Mowers f
Weed Eaters '
Chain Saws
'* Generators

Tillers
Go-Karts
229-2727
328 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe f 7/2


LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDe NTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA tfc 7/2 904/229-6821


Narcotics Anonymous
Meetings Monday Nights
8:00 p.m. at 302 Reid Ave.,
Information: Call (904) 229-6506

T.L.C. Lawn Service
All Types of Yard Work
Mowing, Raking, Trimming,
Weeding, Clean Outs
and Roof Sweeping.
Reasonable Monthly or
Seasonal Rates Available.
Call 229-6435 tfc 7/2


Cancer Support Group meeting
at the Wewahitchka Medical Center,
2nd and 4th Thursdays, 7 p.m., CST.
Interested persons welcome to attend.


NEEl) IT? RENT ITr

St. Joe Rent-All, Inc. *
706 1st St.
Phone 227-2112
tfc 7/2


ER0010992 Mexico Beach Ph. 648-5474
RA0054218
GARRY'S ELECTRICAL,
') AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION SERVICE
Electrical, Heating & Air Condition
New Construction & Remodeling Installation H"WA
SERVICE & REPAIR I Eo
tfc 7/2 VISA, MasterCard & Discover accepted. :n'air


Terry Parrish John C. Maddox
Construction, Inc. Properties, Inc.
RG 0056216 RG 0062723 Mobile Phone 227-5100
* New Homes
Additions & Remodeling WE BUILD TO LAST
All Your Building Needs A LIFETIME!
For Free Estimates, Call 229-8589 tfc 7/2


GLENN'S PAINT Rebuild Wrecks
SBody & Window Work
SBODY SHOP Expert Painting
D Free Estimates
503 First Street Port St. Joe Insurance Claims
Phone 227-7133 ffc 7/2


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer tIc7/2


WARD'S CONSTRUCTION CO.
WAYNE WARD
RG0044249 ALL TYPES CONSTRUCTION

Custom Homes, Commercial, Additions, Etc.
647-8639 tfc7/2


HotTar ROOFING

Repairs JESSIECONTRACTING
Re-Roofing Free Estimates




e 648-3009
"The Beaches"
Eddie '', Smarter Than Water' Rich
tc 7/2


rt '
'1. '


PAGE 2B






















































































A


3 bedroom, 2 1/2 ba. San Bias,
Barrier Dunes, long lease or sale.
Lighted tennis, pool, club, call owner
229-2631 or your broker; 3tc 7/9

Lot for sale Mexico Beach, 490
Texas Drive. 100'x100' cleared,
$5,500 firm. 648-5662. ltp 7/9
2.73 acres at Sunshine Farms,
Overstreet. Partially cleared corner
acreage. $15,000 negotiable. Call B.
Given, 227-1467 after 6 p.m.
tfe 6/18

Two adjoining lots for sale meas-
uring 75'xl50' each. For more infor-
mation please call 827-1865 after
5:00 p.m. tfc 7/2
3 bedroom, 1 bath brick home,
nice neighborhood, central h/a, all
elec. appliances, dishwasher, new
carpet, wallpaper, landscaped w/large
fenced backyard, sprinkler system,
20'x24' workshop. $58,500. 120
Westcott Circle, 227-1795, by appt.
only. 4tp 6/18

House for sale: fresh paint, an-
tique bathroom, new kitchen w/Jenn--
Aire stove, 16'x20' workshop, .3
bdrm., 2 ba., large decks front & rear,
ready to move in. No. painting or re-
pairing, insulation top & bottom,
pump/lawn. 229-6965 nights, 229-
2727 days. tfc 6/4

14'x70' mobile home set up and
ready to move into. Great condition,
1/2 mile from Land's Landing, call
227-1313. tfc 7/2


Nice lots for sale, 3/4, 1 and 1/4,
2 and 1/4, 2 and 1/2 and 5 acre lots
on Hwy. 30 fin Gulf County near
Franklin County line. Call Top Sale
Realty, Inc., 904-229-2500 or 1-800-
653-8689. tfc 7/2

Nice 3 bedroom 1 bath home, has
cen. heat & air, new cabinets. 206
10th St. Call 229-6055 for more infor-
mation. tfc 7/2

Mobile home, 14'x70', 2 bath, 2
bedroom on 2 lots (150'xI50'), mini
blinds, stove, refrig., dishwasher, gar-
den tub, screen porch and large deck.
229-6112, 9-5; 647-8514 after 5:00.
Ask for Tonya. tfc 7/2

4 bedroom, 2 bath, cen. heat and
air, ceiling fans, patio, masonry con-
struction, conveniently located in Port
St. Joe. Call 229-8706. tfc 7/2

FOR SALE BY OWNER: 1.5 acres
*ith lots of old shady oak trees on
IRwy. C-30 directly across from New-
man's Construction Co. Five minutes
from town, beaches and golf course.
Call (904) 229-2708 after 5 p.m.
tfc 7/2

Country living overlooking We-
tappo Creek, 3 bdrm., 2 ba. 1500 sq.
ft. living space, 26'x56' mobile home,
15x26' grand room, ch&a, fireplace, 2
car garage, 2 util. bldg., 2 covered
porches, one 14'x26' open deck,
swimming pool w/privacy fence,
beautiful landscaped on two 1/2 acre
lots with c/l fence. $56,500. Call 648-
5323 for appt. tfc 7/2

50x150 lot w/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
tfc 7/2


Port St. Joe: 2 bedroom frame
house, Ig. country kitchen & appli-
ances on quiet boulevard. Cen. heat,
window air, ceiling fans, like new
washer & dryer, dinette, china cabi-
net, couch, chair, curtains & blinds
included, $29,500. Call 227-1803 be-
fore 10 a.m. tfc 7/2

2 bedroom house, oak floors,
deck, carport, stove & refrigerator in-
cluded, $37,000. 107 Hunter Circle.
Call for appointment, 229-8305.
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 7/2




BOBBIE I 4ILLERf

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
904 648-3022
P. 0. BOX 13281 Associate:
MEXICO BEACH, FL 32410 JIM VICKERS

Mexico Beach Summer Retreat
Enjoy 2 story, 2 bdrm. unit w/
upper deck & adjoining studio apt.
Unobstructed view of Beach. Call
for appt. today. $84,000.
BEACH GETAWAY 3 BLKS TO
BEACH 2 bdrm., 2 ba., mobile
home w/deck & garden tub.
$35,000.
GULF AIRE PATIO HOME: PRI-
VACY PLUS. Beautiful 2 bdrm.,
plenty of extras, landscaped yard,
garage, $54,500.00


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 9,1992 PAGE 3B



Historic Forest Patterns Being Restored


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
State Certified Residential Appraiser #0001273
Mortgage Rates Are Low, Now Is The Time To Buy!
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 229-8988
PORT ST. JOE
201 Woodward Ave.: 3 BR, 1 bath home located on lot zoned commercial with 95'
on Woodward and 287' on First Street. $25,000.
124 Hunter Circle: Exceptionally nice 4BR, 2 ba. brick home wiht split floor plan, re-
cently remodeled & upgraded. Energy efficient with insulated windows & ceiling
fans throughout. Fireplace in great room. Located on large lot with beautiful oak
trees in great neighborhood. A must see at $66,000.00.
526 6th St.: 3 BR, 1 ba. home close to town. Good retirement or starter home.
$26,000.00.
1616 Long Ave.: 2 story duplex, newly redecorated, good rental record. $49,000.00.,
2004 Cypress Ave.: Lovely well maintained brick home with 3 BR/2 bath, living
room, dinign room, den, and Florida room connecting to covered patio, inground
pool, double garage and many extras. $86,000.00.
805 Long Avenue: @ Athframh3f air enclosed porch, fenced
yard. $28,500. U E1CNTA
127 Plantation Drive, Cape Plantation: 3 BR, 2 bath brick home with shower in
double garage. Total electric. Exclusive neighborhood. Ideal for golfer, retired
people or young family. Many extras! Small equity and assume. $95,000.00.
1402 Long Ave.: Well kept 2 BR/1 bath home with c/h & air plus 2 rental aptsl 2 bd/
1 bath each. All for $60,699 $66,600.00. $55,000.00.
1314 Garrison Ave.: 2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
backyard. $6,900. $29,500.00.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$1 a5,00.00. REDUCED TO. $9,-00000, $87,500.00.
517 4th St.: Oparming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $60,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
CAPE SAN BLAS
Gulf front Beach Cottage: Completely furnished 2 BR, 2 BA, kitchen with eating
\ area, living room, ready to move in! $Asking $122,900.00.
THE BEACHES
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS & LAND
100 x 200 town lot, choice location.
Overstreet: 13 acres near bridge and canal with many nice oaks and fronts on
paved street.
8th St.: 1 1/2 nice lots, 75'x170', only $12,000.00.
1908 & 1910 Long Ave.: 2 nice high lots, 60x140 and 68x172.
Cape San Bias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $40,000,00,
$8,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.


Moving Sale: One double stove,
excel. cond., $125; 1 refrigerator, ex-
cel. cond., $150. 1 wooden table & 6
chairs, $150. Call 229-8919 for more
information. Itp 7/9

MOVING: Amana refrig. 19' side
by side, 4-in-I microwave oven .4 cu.
ft., 26" commode lamp table, Magna-
vox stereo console, MCA exercycle like
new, Panasonic 10" TV, dehumidifier,
hydraulic jacks, work benches,
shelves, lumber, yard tools and misc.
items. SAT. & SUN. only, 8:00 a.m.,
236 Santa Anna St., St. Joe Beach.
Itp 7/9






Trac 16 Catamaran, excel. cond.
with new trampooline, multi-color
sail. $4,200 new in '85, now $1,500
with trailer & equipment. 229-8892.
Itp 7/9

'88 Four Winns, Freedom 160,
low hours, excel, cond. 130 hp OMC
Cobra stem drive, with trailer,
$5,500. 229-8892. Itp 7/9
Vision Bass boat for sale, 1990,
16' long, 1896 140 Suzuki motor,
traile with spare tire, 2 depth finders,
45 lb. thrust Motor Guide trolling mo-
tor, 3 heavy duty batteries. $6,500.
827-8703 call anytime. ltc 7/9

14' Collin Craft, 8 hp Mariner
and trailer, all bought new in 1985,
less than 50 hrs. running time.
$1,500. Call 229-6858. 2tp 7/2

OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR -
Call Steve at 227-1687 after 6 p.m.
tfc 7/2






1/2 acre mobile lot, no down
payment, Overstreet area, $93.63
.month.
2 1/2 acre country living, Over-
street area, $9,500.00. Financing
available.
87' beachfront lot
Small parcels, Dalkeith Road.
Call George at 229-6031.
tfc 7/2


GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Blas, Florida

(904) 229-2777
1-800-624-3964
tfc 7/2


Douglas E. Barr, Executive Direc-
tor of the Northwest Florida Wa-
ter Management District. "Resto-
ration of these traditional
southern forests is crucial if the
ecological diversity of the Florida
panhandle is to be maintained."
Over 100 acres of forests
have now been restored by
NWFWMD through the reforesta-
tion program which began in
1987. An additional 170 acres are
slated for restoration during the
remainder of 1992 and in 1993.
Future restoration efforts will in-
clude 90 acres of longleaf pine


habitat along the Choctawhatch-
ee River, 80 acres of mixed bot-
tomland hardwood forests along
the Apalachicola and Chocta-
whatchee rivers, and several
areas along Holmes Creek in
Washington County.
"Areas selected for reforesta-
tion were chosen because of the
lack of species diversity or be-
cause of the poor quality of resid-
ual trees remaining after earlier
timfiber harvesting activities," stat-
ed William 0. Cleckley, Lands Co-
ordinator.
Among the hardwood tree


species which have been planted
were bald cypress, green ash,
sweetgum, sycamore, Florida elm,
and a variety of oaks.

In Appreciation
We the family of the late
George Bryant, Jr. wish to thank
the wonderful people of Gulf
County for their kindness in our
time of bereavement.
Thanks, everyone, so much.
The Bryants, Williams,
Mills, Lenox, Smith, Jennings,
and Eddings Families


Restoring historic forest pat-
terns throughout the Northwest
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict's (NWFWMD) 16-county area
is a priority for the District's Divi-.
sion of Land Management and'
Acquisition.
NWFWMD recently planted,
approximately 18,000 longleaf
pine and 22,000 hardwood trees
along the Apalachicola and Choc-
tawhatchee rivers. The hardwood
trees were purchased through a
Pollution Recovery Trust Fund
grant administered by the Florida
Department of Environmental
Regulation. The area restored in-
cluded 40 acres of environmental-
ly sensitive lands which had been
acquired by the District to help
protect and preserve important
water resources in its region.
"A critical part of the Dis-
trict's land management plan is
to re-establish historic forest pat-
terns within its river corridor
management areas," explained


NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
BID NO. 9192-29
Sealed bids will be received until July 28,
1992. 5:00 p.m., ET by-the Gulf County Board of
Commissioners, Courthpuse, Port St. Joe, Florida.
Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud for
Historic Restoration, Old Gulf County Courthouse,
located in Wewahitchka, Florida.
Plans, specifications and contract docu-
ments may be inspected at the office of the Archi-
tect, State Road 22, Wewahltchka. Florida and
may be procured by General Contractors, upon a
deposit of $50.00 per set of plans and specifica-
tions, of which $25.00 will be refunded to each
General Contractor who submits a bid. All docu-
ments must be returned in good condition within
ten (10) days after the date of the opening ofblds.
Cashier's check, certified check, or bid bond,
for not less than 5% of the amount of bid, must
accompany each proposal.
Performance, labor, and material bonds, and
workmans' compensation insurance will be re-
quired of the successful bidder.
Right is reserved to reject any and all propo-
sals and waive technicalities.
No bidder may withdraw his bid for a period
of thirty (30) days after the date set for opening.
/s/ Billy E. Traylor, Chairman
Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners
Port St. Joe, Florida
/s/ Charles A Gaskin, ARA
Architect
P.O. Box 7
Wewahltchka, Florida 32465
PLEASE INDICATE ON ENVELOPE THAT
THIS IS A SEALED BID, THE BID NUMBER, AND
WHAT THE BID IS FOR.
Publish: July 2 and 9, 1992.


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The Gulf County Sheriffs Department is ad-
vertising for sealed bids on five 1986 patrol cars.
Bids will be accepted until July 30 and should be
addressed to Gulf County Sheriffs Office, Sheriff
Al Harrison or Captain Jack Davila. 1000 Fifth
Street. Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
Publish: July 9, 16, and 23, 1992.
GULF COUNTY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ENGINEERING SERVICES
Gulf County hereby requests proposals from
qualified firms or individuals to provide engineer-
ing services for the replacement of two bridges at
Red Bull Island. The project will be funded by a
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Neighborhood Revitalization: Emergency Set-Aside
Category.
Engineering services will include needs and
feasibility Investigation, surveying, testing, design,
cost estimating, permitting, construction manage-
ment, and resident inspection.
All proposals will be considered on an equal
competitive basis and evaluated on the following
criteria:
*'Specialized experience or technical
expertise of the firm and its personnel
in connection with the types of servic-
es to be provided and the complexity
of the project.
**Past record of performance, includ-
, ?- g .quality of work. timeliness, and
1r6tc"' ctrol '
"Capacity of the firm to perform the
Work within time limitations, 'taking
into consideration with current and
planned workload of the firm.
*Familiarity of the firm with the types
of problems applicable to the project.
"Knowledge of federal and state rules
and regulations applicable to CDBG
projects.
"Registration/certification with the
State of Florida.
Questions concerning the proposals should
be directed to David L. Hines, Julian Webb and As-
sociates, Inc. Telephone (904) 627-2363.
Five (5) copies of the proposal marked,
"SEALED PROPOSALS FOR ENGINEERING SER-
VICES CDBG PROJECT' must be received no
later than 4:00 p.m. ET, August 6, 1992 at the
Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Fifth Street, Port
St. Joe, FL 32456. Attention: Mr. Benny Lister,
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County. Proposals
delivered after the deadline will not be considered.
Gulf County reserves the right to reject any and all
proposals, and to waive any Irregularities or infor-
malities in the proposal process.
GULF COUNTY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNI-
TY/FAIR HOUSING/HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
COMMUNITY.
Publish: July 9, 16, and 23, 1992.


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
CDBO ADMINISTRATION
Gulf County hereby requests proposals from
qualified Individuals or firms to provide grant ad-
ministration services regarding the Florida com-
munity Development Block Grant (CDBG) pro-
grams administered by the Florida Department of
Community Affairs (DCA).
Administrative services will include complete
management and reporting for each project The
scope of services required will be those listed in
the DCA CDBG Implementation Manual. Examples
of tasks include environmental reviews, veri=ca-
tion of LMI beneficiaries, contract development, la-
bor standards monitoring, construction monitor-
ing, financial supervision, and development and
review of required policies and procedures.
Fees will be quoted as lump sum for the to-
tal administrative package. Proposal must Indicate
a fee for administration and an explanation for the
basis of the fee.
Proposals will be evaluated using the follow-
ing criteria: (1) Available efficiency of the firm due
to proximity of the firm to the recipient, taking into
consideration the type, number, and geographic
distribution of grants administered by the firm, 30
points; (2) Past experience of the firm in success-
fully administering CDBG projects, 20 points; (3)
Reputation of the proposer for credibility and de-
pendability based on knowledge, references, and
research, 20 points; (4) Experience with similar
state/federal programs, 10 points; (5) Cost, 10
points; (6) Small, minority, or woman business en-
terprise, 10 points.
Selection will be done in accordance with 24
CFR Section 85.36; 0MB Circular A-102, Attach-
ment 0; and DCA memorandum HCD: CDBG-90-
1, dated February 27, 1990.
Proposal will be scored individually by the
selection committee.
The contract will be awarded to'the proposer
who is determined to be most advantageous to
Gulf County when all factors are taken into con-
sideration. Gulf County reserves the right to reject
any or all proposals, and to waive any irregulari-
ties or informalities in the proposal process.
Five (5) copies of the proposals, sealed and
labeled "CDBG ADMINISTRATION PROPOSAL",
may be mailed or hand delivered to the Office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Fifth Street Port St Joe, Florida
32456, on or before 4:00 p.m., ET, August 6,
1992. Proposals delivered after the deadline will
not be considered. Questions concerning the pro-
posals should be directed to Mr. Benny Lister
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County, Telephone
(9041 229-6112.


GULF COUNTY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNI-
TY/FAIR HOUSING/HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
COMMUNITY.
Publish: July 9, 16, and 23, 1992.
NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION
Be it known that I, Jim' Smith, Secretary of
State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice
that a GENERAL ELECTION will be held in Gulf
County, State of Florida, on the first Tuesday after
the first Monday in November. A.D., 1992, the said
Tuesday being the THIRD day of NOVEMBER, to
fill or retain the following offices:
President and Vice President
United States Senator (1)
Representative in Congress for the
2nd Congressional District
Retention of Four Justices of the Flori-
da Supreme Court: Ben F. Overton,
Parker Lee McDonald, Rosemary Bar-
kett, and Major B. Harding
Retention of District Court of Appeals
Judges, 1set DCA 7 Judses
Circuit Court Judge(s). 14th Circuit,
Group(s) 2and5
State Attorney: 14th Circuit
Public Defender 14th Circuit
State Senate. Districts) as determined
by reapportionment
State House of Representatives, Dis-
trict(s) as determined by reapportion-
ment
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Sheriff
Property Appraiser
Tax Collector
SSuperintendent of Schools
Supervisor of Elections
Board of County Commissioners, Dis-
trict(s) 1. 3- and 5
Members of the School Board. District
(s) 3 and 4
Harbor Master Port of Port St Joe 1
Tupelo Soil and Water Conservation
District Groups 2. 3 and 4
IN Testimony Whereof, I have Hereunto set
my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of
Florida, at Tallahassee, The Capital, this the Sec-
ond day of July, A.D., 1992.
/s/ JIM SMrITH
SECRETARY OF STATE
Publish: July 9 and 16, 1992.


SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


..~ *~:* ~ ~ **: **.. **~. ~,.* .~ .~ .~ .~ .~ .~ .~ .~ .~ .. .. . .

I
I.........
**~. ..


/ Fantasy Properties, Inc.
Formerly Allemore Real Estate


S ... Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
M'. ico Beach, FL 32410 '
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478

Interested in
Purchasing A Home?
Selling A Home?
Renting A Place to Reside or
Take ARelaxing Vacation

Call Our Office
One of our Agents Would Be Glad to Assist You


JOHN DELORME, Broker
ELLEN ALLEMORE, Broker


SALES and RENTALS


RECYCLE YOUR



NEWSPAPERS


FOR A CLEANER



AMERICA


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Bundle or sack your old newspaper, boxes and other

paper products and leave them by your garbage

can for collection by your garbage collector.




The Star Publishing Co.

OFFICE SUPPLY STORE

Phone 227-1278 FAX 227-7212 304-308 Williams Ave.











We're Proud Of Those Hometown People Who Fill Their Homes With



f your rooms seem drab and dull, a
simple, economical pick-me-up is to
Sadd green plants that not only look
good but are good for the environment.
Plants take in carbon dioxide and
produce oxygen. They also help filter
out pollutants that are found in our
living or work areas. During the winter,
plants help to replace some of the
humidity lost in the air from today's
central heating systems.
We're proud of the people who know
the importance of plants to help keep
-- their homes beautiful, clean & fresh ...
and we're proud of our hometown.
IIIIIIIl III ll illllllll~l llll~llll illlll I II ll~ l lllll~llllll~lllll illlllll i


TABLERITE QUALITY FAMILY PAK $I09 LB.
Cube Steak ........ Lb. $2


TABLERITE QUALITY BEEF BONELESS
Sirloin Tip Steak
DELICIOUS
Ground Turkey


HYGRADE
Lb. $29 Franks


.. Lb. 790


SMOKED
Ham Hocks ........ Lb.
BRYAN SMOKED
Pork Chops ......... Lb.


SUNNYLAND CARDINAL
Sliced Bacon


$119

$269


*.u.......uummumuu i 12 oz


LYKES FAMILY FAVORITE'SMOKED
Link Sausage


mm.... 16oz.


BRYAN REGULAMtOR GARLIC
Bologna 12o.
TABLERITE SKINNED, DEVEINED
Beef Liver ...........* .... Lb.


79'
$ 99

$j129

79*


LYKES CABIN COOKIN19
.... 120o. 59 Boneless Ham ........ b. 2


Our meat depart-
ment prides itself
on our excellent
cuts of beef, pork
and poultry prod-
ucts. If you don't
see what you want
in the case, ask a
meat department
employee and
they'll be glad to
cut it for you.


ARLINGTON ONE GALLON
PURE WATER .............59........
SNUGGLE 64 OZ. $
fABRIC SOFTENER ...... -2.99
SPARKLE SINGLE ROLLS
PAPER TOWELS .................
BI-RITE TAGLESS 100 COUNT
TEA BAGS ......................... 79,
SOUTHERN TOUCH 64 OZ.
APPLE JUICE .............. $.V. 2 9
CARNATION 12 OZ. C
:EVAPORATED MILK .........5... 9
EASY-ON PRE-PRICED AT 99t 22 OZ.
SPRAY STARCH .................
KRAFT 18 OUNCE
BARBECUE SAUCE ............ 99
KRAFT 7.25 OZ.
MAC. & CHEESE DINNER..... 59
RONCO THIN & REGULAR 7 OZ. /99
"SPAGHETTI ..................... 99
GRAHAM CRACKERS .......... 99
NATURE'S BEST 16 OZ. 5
SALTINE CRACKERS ..........


-T. I i*i *L


~ :* jl ,HILL BROTHERS HIGH YIELD 11.5 OZ. BAG
COFFEE .........................
CHARMING ASSORTED 4 ROLL PKGS. FRITO-LAY RUFFLES
B ath Tise POTATO CHIPS ................

Limit 1 Bonus Buy Item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entitles you to two Ite s, 2 LITER
and $30 purchase entitles you to 3 bonus buy Items. Excluding Cigarettes, AL NEHI PRODUCTS
Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales .. ALL NEHI PRODUCTS

FAB 39 O Z.BOX Si'
E ET 4 "9 COLA


Limit 1 Bonus Buy item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entitles you to two
Items, and $30 purchase entities you to 3 bonus buy Items. Excluding Cigar-
ettes, Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales


,


NATURE'S BEST ASST. FLAVORS 1/2 GALLON ROUND

ICE CREAM ,
Limit 1 Bonus Buy Item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entitles you to two
Items, and $30 purchase entitles you to 3 bonus buy Items. Excluding Cigar.
, ettes, Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales


I FROZEN OOSl


DIRY PRODUCT


SHEDD'S SPREAD 48 OZ. L

Crock Margarine ..
AMERICAN HERITAGE Indiv. Wrapped 10.6 oz. BUTTER-ME NOT 5 COUNT
VEG. OIL SINGLES ............. 99 Merico
NATURE'S BEST 64 OZ.$3 Biscuits 99'
ORANGE JUICE ...........1.59 Biscuits ..
S -- RAINBOW PAK
Grapes,


FANCY
Nectarines


BIRDS EYE REGULAR 12 OUNCE

COOL WHIP


$


S. p .m .


INTERSTATE 2 LB. BAG

Crinkle Cut Fries


....m............. mm


EE EU E ME EU E ME M


RED
Plums .........................
BLACK
Plums ........................


CELLO
Carrots
FRESH
Broccoli
GREEN BOILING
Peanuts


2 lb.

.E.. EE....M E .. ti


TENDER FRYING
Okra ...........................


lb. 89

lb. 690

lb. 690

b. 690

bag790

ray 990

lb. $119

lb. 59
Ib. %if V


TABLERITE QUALITY BEEF BONELESS

Bottom Round or Rump


1.49
991


69.


David Rich's
FOODLINERS.. .
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.
Prices Good July 8-14. 7






RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


I