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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02951
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 25, 1992
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02951

Full Text





12/31/99
ARCHIVES BINDERY
1508 HWY 431-5
ALBERTVILLE AL 35950


USPS 518-880

cIrTV-ci BIRTH YEAR. NUMBER 43


tHE


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992


ReBliving ATragedy


ABC-TV
lffl 0 -


uoing

Story On


Violence

Port St. Joe Is going to
make It to network television,
but the community Isn't par-
ticularly proud of the distinc-
tion which drew it to the at-
* tention of the "20-20" show on
ABC-TV.
Producer Dean Irwin was
in Port St. Joe, Monday, inter-
viewing Sheriff Al Harrison on
the matter of Clyde Melvin,
who murdered three people in
the Gulf County Courthouse,
here in Port St. Joe, while at-
tending a divorce hearing.
During the hearing, which
was being conducted in
Judge's chambers, upstairs in
the Judicial Suite, Melvin shot
and killed Circuit Judge W. L.
Bailey, who was conducting
the hearing; attorney Tom
Engles, attorney for Melvin's
estranged wife, and Peggy
Paulk, sister of his former
wife, outside the Courtroom
on the stair landing.
Melvin prolonged the tense
afternoon, by pursuing his
wife through the upstairs hall-
way, through an overhead ac-
cess passageway to the jail
and across roof of the j all por-
tion of the building, threaten-
* ing-to kill her with- a .357
magnum pistol with which he
had taken the life of his three
victims. Sheriff Harrison shot
Melvin in the throat from the
ground outside the building
as Melvin looked over the roof
to shoot at the Sheriff.
Irwin has said the show
"20-20", is doing a program on
courtroom violence and is


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Sheriff Al Harrison shows Dean Irwin of the ABC Telev
Network where he was standing when he took a shot at (
Melvin, who killed three people in the Gulf County Courthouse


scouring the country-seeking
out the most violent cases to
feature on the program.
The producer of the show
was in town Monday, getting
the lay of the land and ques-
tioning Sheriff Harrison on the
events which took place that
day in July of 1987. He was to


have' returned Wedne
with a camera crew to flln
Sheriff being interviewed.
Irwin told The Star
show would be aired in
gust or September ovei
network which is carrie
Station WMBB-TV v
broadcasts from Panama


Buckhorn Landfi


Close to Meeting


EPA Closure Rulc


Ronald "Pic" Pickett
Pickett Seeking
District 5 Seat
Ronald Pickett has an-
nounced his candidacy for Gulf
County Commissioner, District 5.
Ronald has been a resident of
Gulf County, and District 5 for
the past 17 years. After graduat-
ing from Port St. Joe High in
1979, he attended Florida State
University. Since returning home
in 1982, he has been actively in-
volved in the workings and man-
agement of his parents' conven-
ient food stores. Recently he
received his Florida Real Estate
Brokers license and has began
Working part-time with Cape San
Blas Realty, Ink., along with his
duties in the food stores.
Ronald feels that his qualifi-
cations for the commissioner's
seat lies in his experience in man-
aging employees and the account-
ing and financial aspect of run-
ning a business. But most
importantly the daily contact he
has had with the people of Gulf
County for the past 10 years.
His hopes are that everybody
is as concerned with the future of
Gulf County as he is, and that
they will take the time to weigh
the issues, get involved with
* county government, exercise their
right and VOTE.


After being closed for two
years, administrative assistant
Larry Wells told the County Com-
mission the 10-acre landfill at
Buckhorn will finally be sealed by
July 26.
The sealing operation has
been in progress since the solid
waste burial site was declared full
to capacity and ordered closed by
the Department of Environmental
Regulation.
The landfill, located about six
miles north of Wewahitchka, has
been a continuous thorn' in the
side of the Commission since its
de-activation. It has also been the
site of some expensive work to
cover it up to the satisfaction of
EPA, including covering the entire
area with 18 inches of clay, which
had to be trucked to the site and
spread out.
The landfill has also had an
extensive monitoring well field
put down to test the ground wa-
ter in the years to come. Since
the clay covering was put down,
six inches of top soil was hauled
in to cover the entire area. The lo-
cation has been provided with a
pond to contain storm water for a
period of time and a storm water
ditch to move water off the site at
a reasonable rate of speed.
The county still needs ap-
proval of several aspects of the
closure process. They still need to
furnish as-built drawings of the
site, closure documentation, cer-
tification of the earth cover sys-
tem and show financial responsi-
bility for long-term care.
At first EPA said the County
must put $40,000 in escrow to
cover any future work to the site
should periodic testing show that
water or soil is being contaminat-
ed by the landfill.
Ralph Rish, representing the
firm of Preble-Rish Engineers,


told the Board that only a few
matters remained to be taken
care of and that all should be
completed within two weeks. Clo-
sure deadline has been by DER at
July 26.
'That doesn't mean DER will
approve of all we have done, but
so far as we understand their di-
rections, we will have all the clo-
sure work completed within two
weeks," Rish said.
The ground water monitoring
system is the most ticklish re-
quirement of DER. The original
field of monitoring wells was
turned down. DER claimed they
were built on the wrong side of
the abandoned landfill site and
could not be used to properly
monitor water flowing through
the strata.
The County placed the wells
where they were advised to put
them.
CURB REQUIREMENTS
In other requirements by
state agencies, Wells announced
changes in curb rulings on State
highways.
Wells said that access points
to commercial property from state
roads will be limited in the fu-
ture. A permit must be secured to
provide an access to business
property, from the DOT. Cutting
curbs to allow entry will be se-
verely limited by the Department.
In some cases it will be denied.
Wells said the Department
has a formula to follow for cutting
curbs "which isn't very generous,"
he pointed out. The County Ad-
ministrator advised owners of
such property to contact DOT be-
fore they begin making plans to
develop their property.
'They've got some pretty
tough requirements," Wells said.


'County Balks At



Beach Front Trade

Tallahassee Couple Makes An Offer for Two-Way Swap


A, Tallahassee couple peti-
tioned the County Commission
through an attorney, Tom Gib-
son, Tuesday night, to trade a
parcel of property near Beacon
Hill, which he said would benefit
both parties.
It seems the County has its
dune walk-over to the beach,
near Beacon Hill, in a position
i where people who use the walk-
over trespass on Munford's prop-
erty. Munford owns the property
to the south of the County prop-
erty. The property line runs at an
angle coming to a point on the
north side, adjacent to the
County land, about seven feet
from the end of the walkway.
Munford wants to trade the
county a piece of his property
next to the beach for a piece of
County property adjacent to the
highway.
Commissioner Ed Creamer
claims the property Munford
owns adjacent to the end of the
walkway isn't his property to
trade. 'That's property belonging
to the state of Florida from the
vegetation line: to the water," he
said. Attorney Gibson kept point-
ing out that Munford owned to
the mean high water line, not the
vegetation line. But, Creamer
stuck to his position.
Creamer also interjected that
the property was deeded the
County by the U. S. Government
for a specific use and the County
isdon would probably not be able to
Clyde trade a parcel because of a deed
e. restriction.
/ i Gibson offered the case for
sday, -he. Munford's to trade 113 feet of
n the 'beach property for 113 feet of
highway property, now owned by
the County. "This would square
the up both parcels and remove the
Au- possibility of trespass on Mun-
r the ford's property," Gibson said.
d on The offer was not entirely
which turned down by the County.
City. Chairman Traylor said that re-
search could be done as to
S,,, whether or not Monford actually
owned the beach property he was
claiming and also see if deed re-
strictions would prevent the
County from making a trade.
"When we find this out."
Traylor said, "We can begin dis-
cussion about whether or not we
want to trade or even if Munford
has any property to trade. Then
we can begin discussions about
31SH facts, not possibilities."
TO BUY OR NOT TO BUY
Howard Lovett, a resident of


Chipley, building a house at Indi-
an Pass, had a problem with the
county building department.
Lovett said he had been
building on the house since 1988
and had received a permit at that
time. He said he was building the
house as he could pay for it and
when he had time .to come to In-
dian Pass to work on it. "As a re-
sult, the process has been a slow
one," he said.
Lovett was wanting to move
into the partially completed home
and work on it full time. His prob-
lem was that building officer Don
Butler said he would need plumb-
ing and electricity and would
need permits for these two servic-
es.
The real problem was that
Butler had told him he would
need to re-permit the home since
he has not worked on it for a peri-


od of six months. The County
permits have information printed
on the permits that this is the
case.
Lovett contended that he had
worked on the house during each
six-month period since he started
it. The point of contention was in
the year of 1990, when the build-
ing officer contended that he had
done no work during that year.
Lovett contended that he had.
"It goes slow when there's only
one working and then only a day
now and then."
Chairman Traylor advised Lo-
vett that if he was unable to
prove that he had worked on the
house as he said, they would
have no alternative but to back
up their building officer. "Don
Butler is an honest man," he
said. "If he said you didn't do
(See COUNTY on Page 3)


Accused Killer

.Released On


$250,000 Bond
County Judge David Taunton ordered accused murder-
er David Bryant of Wewahitchka released on $250,000
bond last Wednesday. Bryant is accused of pouring gaso-
line on his brother Johnny Bryant and igniting It with a
cigarette lighter. David Bryant was also seriously burned
in the altercation and was only recently released from the
hospital where he was receiving treatment.
Bryant was brought from the hospital to Gulf County
Cotrthbuse Wednesday of last week for arraignment and
for release on the sizable bond.
"There are some requirements with his release," Sher-
iff Harrison said. "First, let it be understood there are cir-
cumstances involved in the release which prompted the
Judge in granting baiL First, the release is only for as
long as his physical condition remains as it is today. Mr.
Bryant Is in need of constant medication, he changes
bandages several times a day and he can't tolerate the
summer temperatures in our jail, which has exhaust fans
for ventilation instead of air conditioning."
The Sheriff said the accused Is under house arrest,
which means he may leave only to see his doctor. He
must report the time he is leaving, what route he will
travel to his doctor and when he will return. The prisoner
is also subject to constant and periodic visits to his home
by Sheriffs Deputies 'and unscheduled phone calls, check-
ing on him.
Sheriff Harrison said the case will be reviewed in 30
days and make a decision, based on his condition, on
whether to continue the bail or revoke it.


.- ..-. '
. ... ...


Fire Guts Avenue C Home
Fire gutted this home on Avenue C last faulty wiring.
Wednesday afternoon, severely damaging the The Port St. Joe Volunteer Fire Department
dwelling and destroying everything inside. arrived on the scene quickly, but the fast-moving
The fire started about 7:00 p.m. and quickly fire did considerable damage before they could
engulfed the entire attic of the home, sending a get to it. The home was entirely gutted by the
dark column of smoke into the air. Investiga- flames before it could be contained.
tions by the Fire Marshal determined that the The home was occupied at the time of the
fire started in the attic, apparently from old or fire by Connie Richards.


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Deserved

We honestly hate to have to do this, but we feel it is
duty, both as a citizen and a conscience of the communal
sorts. We labored over the decision for a couple of days, sc
the counsel of other, wiser, heads than ours and finally cax
the decision that it had to be done. It had to be done, main
that it doesn't happen again.
Our County deserves better. It deserves civilized dec,
when it comes to official meetings. It doesn't deserve two i
missioners who express their animosity toward each oth
every opportunity. And, the outburst at the special me
Wednesday certainly cannot be condoned, especially so since
subject of the outburst had nothing to do with what was 1
discussed.
These two Commissioners shall remain nameless, unlh
continues to be a problem at the meetings, or until one or
of the parties involved decides that the better course of a
would be to publicly apologize for his actions and vow it will
er happen again.
For months-even years-the two Commissioners have i
advantage of numerous opportunities to "pick" at each
during the course of business of the Board. Such things as
surprised at Comriiissioner ------- for agreeing with me," a
go along if Commissioner --------hadn't suggested it.I
must be a catch somewhere."
This sort of thing has gone on, back and forth, to such
gree that Wednesday an outburst occurred which was just
to overlook. Gutter words were used in their expletives t(
another, in the presence of ladies, which were entirely unt
for. Gutter words should not be permitted at any time durir
Commission meetings and certainly not when ladies are pre
County Commission meetings are a time for voting or
tions because of their merit, not because one Commiss
does or doesn't like another Commissioner. It is a time for
ized disagreement, if disagreement is called for, and a civ
discussion of the issues. The outburst Wednesday cert
wasn't civilized.
r
Let's keep a cool head, men, in doing the business c
County and if you can't keep a cool head, then step down at
somebody have the job who can.
And, before you attempt retaliation against us for this
epistle, let us say, you deserved it... every word.



Priced Out of the Mart,
The newspapers the other day gave forth with the new.
the state Democratic party was laying off workers for la
funds. Four of their staff were getting a pink slip.
It's terrible for anybody to lose his or her job. It's more
terrible, it's devastating, if he or she doesn't have another j
go to.
The Democratic Party receives its funds, for the most
from candidates' qualifying fees and they have become
hefty recently. A fee of 7.5% of the salary of the positic
which a candidate is running, is charged as a qualifying fee
state party headquarters gets approximately 60% of this si
operate with and finance state-wide campaign assistance. .
In Gulf County, some of the constitutional County of
are currently being paid $45,000-$55,000 a year, depend]
the office. That gets to be expensive campaigning and a con;
able gamble for a potential candidate to take in the hopes ol
ning election.
For instance, they understarid that so well, that in Fra
County, there are some 48 people seeking the various po
offices open over there this year. But, the vast majority of
people are getting petitions signed by the voters to be placo
the ballot; much the same as Ross Perot is doing in so r
states across the nation. Nothing wrong with that; if a cand
can get a very small percentage of the voters in the distri
plans to run in to sign one of the petitions, he is on the bal
no outlay of some $4,000-$5,000 as a qualifying fee.
The state Democratic Committee gets no fees from this
filing. Hence, they are having budget problems because c
dates are doing this all over the state.
The Democrats-and the Republicans-are likely to con
to have budget problems as long as the candidate salaries a
lowed to continue to climb out of reason and if the qualifyir
remains at a hefty 7.5%.
In Gulf County, we would say any public servant w
$55,000 annual salary is overpaid. But his salary is set b
State Legislature. The 7.5% fee for the privilege of seeking
also serves to keep a lot of people at home instead of tryi
become one of our public servants.


AfiLA7ILI


THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992


h Hunker Down with Kes |


j


"Kes, you want to play with
the men you need to chew like
one here, try this."
Hank was the manager and
sometimes right fielder. He was a
terrible baseball player. But he
had that long scar that ran from


Up Side Wes I'm the Last


lbet of the Big Time Spenders


his right ear to underneath his
chin. He looked wild dog let's -
get down in the dirt and -
rumble mean. Nobody would
tell him he couldn't play. This
was way back when every little
community had a team. And let
me tell you, they took their base-
ball seriously.
I reached out and kind'a non-
chalant like grabbed the chewing
tobacco he offered. Warren
County Twist! Whewl If I'd only


known! But I was fifteen years
old. I didn't have a clue about
chewing. Hey listen. I was on the
town team. I was playing with the
men! Bobby Jack Cantrell was
the next youngest and he was
twenty seven. I couldn't let these
guys see me sweat.
I'd seen people chew, before. I
twisted off a fair size piece and
threw it back in my jaw. 'Thanks,
Mr. Hank."
You know that warning they


put on the side of all chewing to-
bacco today about the risk of
mouth cancer listen, they
should have had some kind of
warning on that Warren County
Twist In 1962. And it should have
read, "Please take two aspirins
before inserting!"
Col. James T. "Birddog" Reed
was our first baseman. I was at
third. I got to noticing that when
Birddog covered first there were
two of him. You might think that
this would be a problem but the
first ball they hit to me, I look
down and there are two of them! I
threw one to each Birddog! And
you know how this field always
tilted a little toward right field,
well today it Just kept going and
going and going.........
I struck out in the first. I
didn't know which ball to hit.
I had a pretty good headache
by the third inning and my stom-
ach was on the rinse cycle. Jim-
my Leaper hit a screamer right at
me. I dropped down to keep it
from getting under as I
reached out the ball took a
funny hop, right over my Frank
Bolling model Spalding and
caught me flush in the chest.
I swallowed my Warren
County Twist.
Folks, have you ever tried to
play third base on a merry-go-
round; on a tilted way over to the
left s-o-o-o-o far you're about to
fall off any second merry-go-
round. For the next twenty min-
utes I thought I was going to die.
After that I wanted to.
It was several years before I
chewed again. Somebody gave me
some Beech-Nut in that old stand
up pouch. Listen, after my bout
with Warren County Twist, this
loose leaf chew tasted like a Baby
Ruth. I reckon I chewed it all:
Day's Fork, Black Maria, Mail
Pouch, Kentucky Twist, Red Man,
Red Horse. Peach, Brown Mule
and one of my favorites, although
it was hard to find, R.T. Junior.
I've chewed so much over the
years that I've near bout become
an expert on it I'm even writing a
book. It's going to give you some
helpful hints on good meals to
chew after, picking the right chew
for you, how to spit out of a mov-
ing automobile without hitting
the side, the quick hip, neck-
snap method of long distance
spitting, things you definitely
need to know about che
working title of my book is
There's No Polite Way To Get It
Out"
'Course, my book has hit a
little snag. I've stopped chewing.
Now, I like it just as much as
ever. And if I could find me a slab
of R.T. Junior, I'd jump on it like
a dog on a bone. But for now I've
laid the stuff down.
I know what you're thinking -
- the cancer scare got to me.
Well, it probably should have, but
it didn't. And it wasn't the con-
stant haranguing I was taking
from my wife and boys about
stopping, although I did appre-
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


My Idea of a Thrill Varies Considerably from that of a Bungee Jumper


HAVE I BEEN missing out on
something or have I been fortu-
nate not to have had the urge to
participate in the latest fad?
I am a "first story" [person
who likes his feet firmly planted
on old terra firma. Even looking
out a second story window fs an
adventure to me. A ladder is use-
less if it Is more than six feet tall,
since I am not going to knowingly
get higher than six feet.
Heights do not thrill me at
all. A ferris wheel is on my list of
Things not to ride.
I get on the ground and look
up at the top of a tall pole or
building and it doesn't seem so
tall to me. But get up on top and
look down it's twice as far
down as it is upl.
I have always been this way.
You know, not particularly
thrilled with heights, nor elated
over the opportunity to get higher
than my head. It Just doesn't
strike me as an opportunity to get
to climb up on something tall


Etaoin Shrdlu


by Wesley Ramsey


without ample protection, such
as a steel cage, held by substan-
tial supports.
FOR THIS REASON, I have
given bungee jumping scant at-
tention. Somehow it just doesn't
seem the prudent thing to do. Ty-
ing a long elastic cord -to your
lower body and diving off a 200
foot tower for the thrill of it leaves
me ... scared!
I have been reading in the
News Herald about the bungee
jumping over at Panama City
Beach. They are getting bold with
their foolishness. There is a bung-
ee jumping tower under construc-


tion for all those foolish people to
Jump off of. They now are using a
tall dragline boom.
Can't you feel what it must
be like? Can't you just feel the
thrill of stepping off a 150 foot
platform into thin air? A rush of
wind as you hurtle to earth, pass-
es by your ear. Your eyes and
mouth distort with the wind
rushing by and suddenly-Snap!
The elastic cord [hopefully]
pulls you to a stop before you
spatter into a grease spot on the
ground. Can't you just imagine
the thrill of such a thing happen-
ing to you? Can't you imagine the
relief which comes from knowing


the cord didn't break?
I can just imagine one of the
signs of a maturing bungee jump-
er is getting to where you can go
through the whole procedure
without messing up your pants.
Or having a heart attack.
Or surviving without being
scared into a hopeless state of
fear.
I UNDERSTAND PEOPLE are
actually lining up and waiting for
their chance to divel They can
watch somebody else do it and
actually strap themselves in the
harness and do the same thing
themselves.
I would sky dive before I
would bungee jump.
At least in a sky dive you
would have time to plead with
God to save you if the parachute
didn't open. You could promise to
do better; ask for forgiveness;
bargain and plead with the hope
you might, somehow, be spared.
With bungee Jumping, by the


time you realize something is
wrong Splatl .. You are a
greasy spot on the pavement.
Actually, it is my opinion that
God would never forgive you for
doing either-sky diving or bung-
ee jumping!
MAYBE I COULD satisfy any
thirst I might have for such thrills
as bungee jumping by playing
Russian roulette or holding my.
breath for an hour under water,
or driving my car, full speed, into
a brick wall. Or, if that fails to
thrill me enough, I can take up
race car driving as a vocation, or
join the circus and train to be-
come a human cannon ball.
My idea of thrills is to find a
new way to cook shrimp that is
more delicious than the last
batch I ate.
The Sharks have given me an
adequate titillation to satisfy my
insatiable quest for thrills when
they pull a close one out at the
last second. I had more than an


adequate "high" last fall when
Ron Gant hit the run scoring
double in the 11th inning to beat
the Dodgers and win the National
League, West, pennant. I was
there, soaking wet after the hour
long rain and from the steaming
temperatures which followed.
Those are genuine thrills.
They are the kind of thrills one
gets without having to wonder
why you did it; without having to
sit down for a while and let your
heart quit racing.
I had a real thrill the other
day when my first tomato ri-
pened. It was repeated the day af-
ter when a pair of woodpeckers
showed up in the yard at my bird
feeder.
It doesn't take much to give
me my quota of thrills on any giv-
en day. A
You might say I live a seden-
tary life, what with my definition
of thrills. Well, I take the attitude
that it's better to be sedentary
than in the cemetery.


St. Joseph Bay
Time Ht. Time
7:50 a.m. H 1.6 6:28 p.m. L
8:28 a.m. H 1.8 7:10 p.m. L
9:14 a.m. H 2.0 7:59 p.m. L
10:02 a.m. H 2.1 8:48 p.m. L
10:51 a.m. H 2.1 9:38 p.m. L
11:37 a.m. H 2.0 10:20 p.m. L
12:27 p.m. H 1.8 10:56 p.m. L


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
p \/At "USPHS518880 Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-$10.60 Six Months
ND V ,A1 Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue The Star Out of County-$21.20 Year Out of County-$S5 90 SLx Months
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456-0308 Post Office Box 308
by The Star Publishing Company TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 their than amount received for such advertisement.
t-e Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
4'j ,<, William H. Ramsey ........... Production Supt. SECONP-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
SPI P Frenchie L. Ramsey .......... Office Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ............. Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Date
June 26
June 27
June 28
June 29
June 30
July 1
July 2


L-AL.AILIkmg iff Wvjffk-v


I


~albr I-


1


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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992 PAGE 3A


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


A Happy Father's


Day to Daddy
It's too late, I know, but I want to wish my daddy a Happy Fa-
ther's Day. My father passed away February 14, 1958.
Daddy (that's the only name any of- the nine children called
him) and I were not close, nor was he close to any of our family, in-
cluding our mother. One might think he was close to mother, hav-
ing 10 children (one died as an infant), but he wasn't Daddy was a
quiet man and one whose only show of emotion was that of anger.
Later, toward the end, he softened some, but not much.
Daddy and I were on our best terms when we were working.
Later, when his health became so bad he couldn't work, he loved to
see me and my brothers and sisters work. Work was his forte: He
loved it and when he was able he would work from daylight until
dark and beyond.
I've given a lot of thought to daddy in the past few years. As a
matter of fact, my brothers, sisters and I have discussed our rela-
tionships with him at length, from time to time. The older we get, I
think, the more we tend to analyze relationships and events on a
more even and fair basis. Maybe it's because the shoes we step into
seem to fit somewhat better than they did a few years before.
Daddy never took me hunting or fishing. he didn't have time for
such. I don't recall him ever going to a single school event except
one football game 'when I was a freshman in college. The game was
in Mississippi (Pearl River) and I couldn't believe he made the trip
from Pensacola because he was sick at the time and it was only
.about five months before his death. l *
We never had a "father and son" talk about anything except
work. If there was something of a manly, personal nature I needed
to know, I had to rely on my older brothers, relatives or friends.
Daddy and I didn't discuss personal things. And it wasn't that I was
dying to talk to someone and wished I could talk to him; that's just
the way things were back then.
But daddy wasn't without. feelings of care and love. He wanted
his family healthy and well fed. One of his greatest joys that I can
.remember was watching me eat. "Look at that boy eat, Leola," he
would say" to mamma. "I wish I could eat like that!" And there was
always plenty to eat and although we wore a lot of "homemade"
clothes, they were always decent and clean. When one of us needed
medical attention, it was provided, no matter what the cost.
o Daddy was not one to show love or affection. I never heard him
tell anyone, including my mother and sister, Melba (his favorite),
that he loved them'. He almost said it to me in a letter he wrote to
me after I left home in 1957 when he said he missed me, but he
never, to my knowledge, said, "I love you" to anyone.
One might think I'm complaining about my father and our rela-
tionship, but I'm not. He had his faults, as we all do, but his ways
were a giant step forward from those of his generation. Fathers were
not suppose to be loving and emotional in those days of country
life. Their job was that of provider and leader and my daddy did his
well.
My brothers, sisters and I owe much to our father. He brought
us out of the country to the "country-in-the-city" where we had a
chance to live a more modem, civilized life than he and his father
did. And regardless of his faults, he was a good man who wanted
the best for his family. There's one thing certain: Daddy was no
"wimp" and he was the bosst
And there were many things I didn't say to daddy. One was,
'Thanks, Daddy, for all the things you did for us and Happy Fa-
;ther'sDayl" ..
-I loveyou,-t6o. '.
< ** ., .. .. . J


C county
From Page 1
something, to the best of his
knowledge, you didn't."
Traylor suggested that Lovett -
come up with a receipt or some-,

Kesley
Continued from Page 2'
elate their concern. I'll 'tell you
what did it for me. I went down to
the store a-heie-while-back to'
pick up a pack of Levi-Garrett'
and it was "on sale" for $1.58.
,One dollar and fifty eight
cents And it was on salell Folks,.
I got to thinking, "I'm chewing up
dollar bills here!".
Now listen, I'm not as tight as
Wes Taylor, I will spend a little
money every once in a while -
for a good cause. But I'll be
danged if I'm going to eat any
more of it.
Hey, I almost forgot to tell
you how Hank came by that aw-
ful scar he got throwed off that
* tilted merry-go-round.
Respectively,
Kesiey


"Good
Neighbor service
makes State Farm
unique...
my policyholders
swear by it
year after
year.99




CALL ME.

Bill
Wood
101 Williams Ave.
229-6514

InsuLirancc (' oniupi lic,
hom : ()t'ficcs 'IfloOl)miigti in Illlmii,



Likc a good ncighlhor.
Statc Farm i.s there


thing, proving that he had pur-
chased construction material
during the questioned period of
time and the Commission would
work something out for him.
INDUSTRIAL ROAD
Consideration was given for
resurfacing a portion of Industrial.
Road which angles off from High-
way 71 and leads to the St. Joe
Forest Products paper mill.
Ralph Rish reported to the
Commission that Roberts Con-
struction Company had offered to
resurface the road's trouble spots
and smooth out the undulations
at the same rate they had used in
the recent county road paving
program. The total bill would
come to about $5,000.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters,
the Commission:
-Received a grant, of
$129,300 to replace two bridges
in the Red Bull Island subdivi-
sion.
-Agreed to purchase a van
to transport Gulf Forestry Camp
work crews to and from the job
site. The vehicle, costing an esti-
mated $4,500, will paid for out of
recycling money and other funds.


- ~ .~' S


Project Underway

Work was well underway this week on the new, improved
boat landing at the County park in White City. The landing is lo-
cated on the Intracoastal Canal on the site of the old Corps of En-


gineers headquarters. Cumbaa Construction Company of Blount-
stown is doing the work which includes widening the launch
ramp into being able to accommodate two boats at a time, putting
in new containment walls around the banks and installing walk-
ways alongside the launch ramp. According the County engineer,
Ralph Rish, Cumbaa is scheduled to be completed by the end of
the week.


Community Blood Drive June 29 & 30

Will Be At Three Different Locations In Port St. Joe


How would you like to do
something great for your friends,
your community and the entire,
Northwest Florida region? Just to
make it better, it doesn't cost a
dime. Northwest Florida Blood
Center's new bloodmobile "Share",
will be visiting Port St. Joe on
June 29 and 30 and the entire
community is invited to partici-
pate. This is the first trip the
blood center has made to Port St.
Joe in over six years and now
that the new mobile unit is on the
road, they would like to make
this an annual event.
Northwest Florida Blood Cen-
ter is a non-profit health care
support organization licensed by
the Food and Drug Administra-
tion and the Florida Department
of HRS. They are accredited by
the American Association of
Blood Banks and have the sole
mission of collecting blood from
volunteer donors for the use of
patients in our hospitals. "Volun-
teer" is a key word because Flori-
da, like most other states, re-
quires that, blood which goes. to
patients must come from volun-
teer donors. Northwest Florida
Blood Center is the sole supplier
of blood for Gulf Pines Hospital as
well as many other hospitals in
our region of Florida. They will be
on location at the Port St. Joe
Paper Mill from 2 to 5 p.m. on the
29th, at City Hall from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. on the 30th, and at Arizo-
na Chemical from 2 to 5 p.m. on
the 30th.
Here are some details that
may encourage you to become a
blood donor and may help you
decide if you are eligible.'
*72 percent of our population
will need blood at one time or an-
other during their lifetime. Less
than 5 percent of those eligible to
give blood will donate the "gift of
life." We all need to help increase
the 5 percent so that blood will be
available if and when we need it.
*Northwest Florida Blood
Center will provide over 28,000
units of blood to patients in the
12 hospitals which they support
this year. They must receive 100-
110 blood donations per day to
meet that requirement.
*The single biggest reason
people do not give blood is that
no one asks them. Chodse to be a
blood donor and ask a friend
to come with you.


For Take Out Orders, Call 227-1670

Oysters $28.00 Bag


with every purchase of bag, receive
crackers FREE


1 lb. saltine


The World's Finest
*Oysters
*Clams
*Shrimp

*Crabs


Enjoy the best from St.
Joseph Bay and
Indian Lagoon with us.

INDIAN PASS

RAW BAR
(On C-30 South of Port St. Joe)


*The second biggest reason is
fear of needles. We can't help you
with the fear but can tell you that
you are probably hurt at least 20
times a day more severely than
the slight prick you will feel when
you make your donation. The
good feeling you get when you re-
alize that you are' helping to save
a life more than makes up for the
small discomfort.
*The third, biggest reason is
fear of AIDS. Everything used
during your blood donatiori is
sterile, one-time use only equip-
ment. There is no way that you
can be exposed to anything while
donating blood. Nobody ever has
been nobody ever will be. This
is a very important point and one
you need to understand and com-
municate to others. One of the
biggest causes of blood shortages
around our country is this very
much misunderstood point. Now
that you know, don't be stopped
from donating.,


*If you are between 17 and
80, in general good health, weigh
at least 105 pounds, and have
eaten a good meal prior to donat-
ing, you more than likely are eli-
gible. Those who are 17 must
bring a picture ID. The entire pro-
cess takes 30-45 minutes with
most of the time going to filling
out a medical questionnaire, tak-
ing a mini-physical (blood pres-
sure, temperature, pulse, and
iron level), and going through a
short interview with a nurse. The
actual .blood donation takes 8-10
minutes followed by a short peri-
od of time to relax, eat cookies
and drink juice. You will be
through with everything in about
45 minutes.
*Most medications are ac-
ceptable. The nurse will be able
to answer specific questions dur-
ing the interview.
Please visit the bloodmobile
and make your lifesaving dona-
tion to the community blood cen-


ter while they are in Port St. Joe
on June 29th and 30th. If noth-
ing else stop by and take a look
at the new mobile unit. It was
funded by contributions from in-
dividuals, corporations, charities
and civic groups in Northwest
Florida. Please choose to support
this vital community function.
There are very few things which
you can do that mean more than
giving the gift of life. Who knows?
The life you save could even be
your own.


What Do You
Need?
A car, boat, motor,
home, etc.
Shop the
Classifieds!












Try This Delicious


Grilled Seafood Salad


Try this hot new idea for a de-
liciously cool, quick summer sal-
ad supper ready to serve in less
than 15 minutes. It features light,
white Flounder or Grouper fillets
from the pristine waters of Flori-
da, world famous for its premium
quality fish.
Delicate in flavor, high in pro-
tein and low in fat, Florida fish
are the perfect choice for today's
healthy tastes.
For this low-calorie salad,
brush Grouper or Flounder fillets
with teriyaki sauce, quickly sau-
te, then cool and serve with any
combination of pre-cut fresh veg-
gies and greens.
A ready-to-serve honey mus-
tard dressing adds the final tangy
touch.
GRILLED SEAFOOD SALAD
Serves 4
pound Florida Flounder or
Grouper fillets


3 tablespoons teriyaki sauce
4 tablespoons vegetable oil, divid-
ed
1 cup diced tomato
2 1/2 cups any combination of
fresh vegetables, sliced, diced
or grated
Salad greens
1 cup bottled honey mustard sal-
ad dressing
Combine teriyaki sauce with
2 tablespoons oil; brush fish fil-
lets with mixture. Let stand 15
minutes.
Heat remaining oil to very hot
in heavy skillet or griddle; saute
fish 2-3 minutes per side. Re-
move from skillet; cool and flake.
In large mixing bowl, combine
vegetables and half the dressing.
Divide greens among four sal-
ad plates; top with vegetable mix-
ture and flaked fish.
Drizzle remaining dressing
over top or serve separately.


PAGE 4A


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Q: Also Available
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SERVING THE GULF COAST EXPIRES 6/30/92


Florida Seafood Meets

High Quality Standards


Seafood sold by Florida retail-
ers generally meets high stan-
dards for food safety, according to
the results of an intensive sea-
food testing program conducted
by the Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Services.
According to Department la-
boratory results, seafood from
Florida retailers fared better on
several measures of food safety
than did seafood sold by retailers
in other rparts of the country. An
independent survey published in
the February issue of Consumer
Reports magazine showed a high
incidence of E. coll bacterial con-
tamination in seafood obtained at
retail outlets in New York and
Chicago.
However, the Department's
Florida study did indicate that
lower-priced fish are frequently
substituted for more expensive
varieties of fish, such as red
snapper a problem that was
also noted in the Consumer Re-
ports study.
"This is the most intensive
seafood testing program ever con-
ducted by our Department, and
overall we're encouraged by the
results," Florida Agriculture Com-
missioner Bob Crawford said.
"People expect Florida seafood to
meet- high -standards -of -quality,-
safety and taste. This survey is
part of a continuing effort to
make sure that Florida meets the
test."
The seafood industry is not
as closely regulated as the meat
and poultry industries, which are
subject to more frequent inspec-
tions and extensive regulation,
Crawford said. Federal legislation
to create voluntary seafood in-
spection programs has been
pending for several years, but has
never passed.
Crawford said the Depart-
ment's seafood survey is a pre-
cursor to developing a voluntary
seafood inspection program in
Florida. This week Crawford ap-
pointed a group representing
commercial fishermen, seafood
processors, retailers and food
safety experts to develop a sea-
food quality program and set
standards for freshness.
"This survey gave us a base-


line, and fortunately, Florida is
doing quite well," Crawford said.
"But we need a program in place
to ensure that seafood sold in
Florida consistently meets high
standards for safety and quality."
Crawford said the Depart-
ment will follow up the survey
with additional testing of species
that are prone to histamine for-
mation an index of decomposi-
tion such as tuna, mahi-mahi
and mackerel.
Crawford said the Depart-
ment will also sample fish being
sold as red snapper statewide
and take action against stores
that are substituting less expen-
sive fish.
Department inspectors pur-
chased 254 seafood samples
packaged for public retail sale
and sent them to the Depart-
ment's Food Laboratory for analy-
sis throughout April and May.
Samples were analyzed for bacte-
rial counts, which can indicate
whether the fish is fresh and
whether it was properly handled,
and species identification.
All samples were obtained
from retail outlets ranging from
large grocery store chains to
small, independent seafood mar-
kets. The samples were conven-
--tionallyo-packaged- for general re-
tail sale and represented seafood
items that are popular with con-
sumers.
Types of seafood tested for
microbiological contamination in
the Florida survey were: fish fi-
lets, crabmeat, shrimp, fish prod-
ucts (smoked, marinated,
stuffed), surimi and surimi prod- -
ucts, and crab products.
Preliminary results showed
that of 190 microbiological sam-
ples analyzed for aerobic plate
count a measure of the num-
ber of bacteria on the surface of
the fish 189 were found to be
within acceptable guidelines.
Only one sample, represent-
ing one-half of 1 percent of the to-
tal, was considered adulterated
because of an unacceptable level
of E. coll bacteria (more than
k1,000 per gram). Two samples,
representing 1 percent of the to-
tal, contained E. coli at a level- of
10 per gram. That level of E. coli


Mary and Coleman Kirkland

Kirklands to Celebrate

Their 60th Anniversary


Coleman and Mary Kirkland
of Ward Ridge in Port St. Joe will
celebrate their 60th wedding an-
niversary with a, reception at the
Oak Grove Assembly of God
Church fellowship hall on Sun-
day, June 28th from 2 to 4 p.m.
The reception is being hosted by
their children and grandchildren.
The couple was married June
26, 1932 in Dale County, Ala-
bama.
They have two children, Ru-


is not sufficient to present a hu-
man health risk, but still fails to
meet good manufacturing practic-
es (GMP's).
E. coli are bacteria present in
the intestinal tracts of' humans
and animals. They can be intro-
duced to fish through contact,
with polluted waters, cross-
contamination with another spe-
cies during processing, or poor
hygiene practices on the part of
processors or retailers.
The Consumer Reports mi-
crobiological survey revealed non-
compliance of E. coll bacteria in
one-third of the Chicago samples.
and more than one-half of the,
New York samples. Overall, the,
incidents of New York and Chica-
go samples that did not comply
with GMP's for E. coli was more
than 40 times that of Florida.
In addition, of the seafood an-
alyzed in Florida, 141 samples
(74 percent) had low total bacteri-'
al loads and levels of Staphylo-
coccus auerus and Listeria two:-
common causes of food poison-
ing. Forty-eight samples (25 per-
cent) had higher levels, which in-
dicate that the retailers may have'
failed to practice model seafood'
handling procedures, although
the levels were not high enough
to pose a health risk.
When samples do not meet
the GMP's, the Department's in-'
spectors advise retailers of the
findings and instruct them to,
take measures to comply witl&
model practices.
'"We work with stores on an'
individual basis to correct inap
propriate handling, sanitationr'
and hygiene practices," Crawford,
said. "But I believe the industryf
could benefit from a statewide
quality program to make sure
food handlers know and observe
the highest food safety practices."
The Department's species
identification testing revealed
that half of the 10 samples of red


dolph Kirkland of White City and
Betty Gay of Port St. Joe, seven
grandchildren and 16 great
grandchildren.
All friends and relatives are
cordially invited to celebrate and
enjoy the fellowship of this happy
occasion with the Kirklands.
Coleman is retired from the
Florida Department of Forestry
and Mary is a housewife. They at-
tend the Oak Grove Assembly of
God Church.


snapper tested were actually oth-
er less expensive species of fish
or varieties of snapper.
According to U.S. Food and
Drug Administration (FDA) guide-
ilines,; only one .species of fish,
Lutjanus campechanus, can be
sold as "red snapper." It lives
along the Atlantic coast off Flori-
da and in the Gulf of Mexico. It
commands a high price at the
marketplace, which may explain
its high rate of substitution by
suppliers or retailers wishing to
increase profits.
The Department collected 63
samples of various seafoods for
testing to determine if the pack-
age label accurately reflected the
contents. Results are still pend-
ing on eight samples. Eight of the
(See SEAFOOD on Page 6)







HEARING AID CENTER

618W. 23rd St.,
Wilbro Plaza
Panama City, FL
769-5348

FREE HEARING
TEST
Top Quality, Name
Brand Hearing
Aids
*Satisfaction Guaranteed
*Monthly Service Center
Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
1st Tuesday each month


r

Helping Hand Missions /

Thrift Shop
201 Hwy. 98 Port St. Joe, Florida* 227-1544 7J

Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Thursday
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday & Saturday


Good Donations Needed

Proceeds to Missions


Come In and Browse
k, (2TP6/18


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 9 THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992


Am4na


18 CUBIC FOOT FROST-FREE
REFRIGERATOR
Textured steel door
Ice maker adaptable
On adjustable rollers
Humidity controlled crispers
Stor-Mor door shelves
Sealed deli-drawer
In White or Almond

$599Q95




A^"" HOME FURNISHING CENTERS
S .......... PU .T .r--...... .LOO COV...O.O.. .. *TM.TAIMT
Steve Richardson, Owner/Manager
/. 310 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
229-6195


Flowers and
Their Meaning
Many people believe flowers
are a great way to express
thoughts and feelirlgs for one an-
other. So, if you ever give or re-
ceive a flower as a gift, keep these
meanings in mind.
*Violet: friendship and mar-
riage
*Rose: think of me
*Ivy: remembrance
*Red Chrysanthemum: cou-
rage
*Pansy: long life
*Rue: regard
*Rosemary: faithfulness
*Thyme: hate and love
*Sage: blushes and joy
oDaffodil: understanding
*Sweet Marjoram: love
*Basil: I love you.


fHappy Sweet 16

"Crystar
June 22,1976








TH T P R ST.. .. T.. .. ..... ...2 A... ..


S.S. Checks Will
Arrive July 3
Social Security checks for 42
million beneficiaries will be deliv-
ered on July 3 although Social
Security offices will be closed.
While that Friday is the date that
federal offices are closed for the
Independence Day holiday obser-
vance, the U.S. Postal Service will
deliver mail as usual on July 3.
Beneficiaries who have direct
deposit will also have their July
payments deposited on July 3.


Supplemental Security in-
come recipients will receive their
checks on the first day of the
month.
Anyone who has a question
about Social Security check deliv-
ery or deposit should call their lo-
cal Social Security office.

Help Yourself
By Shopping
At Home!


HOLIDAY CLOSING
5 Point Landfill and Wetappo C&D
Landfill will be closed July 3, 4, and
5. They will re-open Monday, July 6
for their regular hours of 9 a.m. until
5 p.m.
2TC 6/25/92


Shown from left to right are Bill Lyles, President of Senior Citizens; Jerry Stokoe, Director of Senior Citizens; Sher-
rie Bowen, Activities Director at Bay St. Joseph Care Center; Sharon Lipford, Past Director of Gulf County Association
for Retarded Citizens; and Cheryl Fitzgerald, New Director of Gulf County Association for Retarded Citizens.


Seafood Festival Committee


Says, 'Thanks, Gulf County"


The Gulf County Seafood Fes-
tival committee is extremely
proud of the following volunteers
that helped make the May 2nd
festival such a great success.
Thanks to caring and sharing of
your time and talents with us,
each of the three collected $1,600
for their respective organization


after expenses.
Julia B. Owens, Joy McClam-
ma, Louella Pickron, Mary Lee
Pitts, Thomas Gene Gortman,
Kathryn Katynsky, Elizabeth
Rose, Betty Sabai, Mary Reeves,
Cookie White, Norma Hall, Helen
Smith, Wendy Varner, Evelyn
White, Vera Sullivan, Martha Da-


vis, Lillie Chism, Addle Morris,
John Best, Ethel Byrd, James
Kirkland, Mary Kirkland
Pat Anderson, Alva Kemp,
Ometa Osborne, Blondell Owens,
Debbie Sumner, Sara Allen, Lid
Stokoe, Annie Dawson, Yolanda
Coachman, Edna Laramore, Betty
Jean Godwin, Pat Blaschum,
Dena Parker, Mary Ann Byrd, La-
donna Price, Tonya Lyles, Kim
Williams, Tonya Nixon, Sherri
Wood, Phyllis Beaman, Rusanne
Montgomery, Delores Gawer and
family, Cheryl Combs and family
Ann Pridgeon, Sharon Tillis,
Dawn Ford, Beverly Hambric, Rae
Ann Suber, Karla Weston, Vicki
Griffin and family, Barbara Man-
non, Sandra Cannon, Frances
Baxter, all staff members of the
Association for Retarded Citizens
and their Board of Directors.
The Seafood Festival Commit-
tee hopes that everyone enjoyed
the festival. We are making plans
for a full day of activities and en-
tertainment for 1993. Thank you
for your support for the three or-
eganizations that sponsored this
,event. See you all next year.


HRS officials announced that
application forms are available for
the Low-Income Home Energy As-
sistance Program; however,. the
process for receiving application
forms has changed.
Previously the forms were dis-
tributed and returned to local
HRS public assistance offices. As
of June 1, the program is man-
aged by local non-profit agencies
and city and county governments.
In Gulf County, the organiza-
-tion to be contacted is the Capital
Area Community Action Agency,
Inc. at 227-7533.
Applications will be accepted
on a first-come, first-served basis.
The forms must be submitted
along with a fuel bill or receipt for
a bill to show an obligation to pay
for heating or cooling and proof of

GCREA Annual
Picnic July 7
The Gulf County Retired Edu-
cators will hold their annual pic-
nic July 7 at the home of Sara
Fite, 118 S. 42nd Street at Mexi-
co Beach. All area educators,
their spouses (and'grandchildren,
if they're here), are invited to at-
tend. You do not have to be an
active member to be welcomed.
Just bring a dish and share
in the food and fellowship. The
gathering time is noon ET, but if
you want to go swimming or walk
on the beach, come earlier.
There will be a business
meeting following .the dinner to
plan for the coming year.


income to be considered for bene-
fits.
The Low-Income Home Ener-
gy Assistance Program provides a
one-time benefit on an annual ba-
sis, as well as crisis energy assis-
tance, to households who meet
income and other requirements.
The program does no pay month-
ly utility bills. Last year, more
than 161,000 households re-
ceived assistance with their home
energy costs.-The average amount
of assistance was $99.,


Introducing. ..

THE ADDITION OF



RCME


Automotive Finishes

TO OUR LINE OF AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES

Colors mixed to order in our store
for foreign and domestic applications


We Now Offer
the complete one stop store for
the Body Shop's Needs.


You'll Find It At Carquest!


MAYHANN'S AUTO PARTS

Phone 229-6584 401 Reid Ave.


in a friendly
-\atmosphere
with good
FRIENDS.

Serving Breakfast,
Lunch & Dinner
8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Closed Sunridays 6 Days a Week
All You Can Eat
LUNCH BUFFET Incudes SaladBar 4.95

-Specializing In -


*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches *Meals to Go
*Fresh Seafood *Delicious Steaks
r Famous Fresh $ 95
IPltrtrP DI ATTrl $9 9


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Low Income Program

Provides Energy Help


ROLL I1





II


By: Richard Miller
*Check drive belts and hoses
frequently. They may last three
to four years, but when they
go, they go. When one belt
goes, the water pump, cooling
fan, alternator, power steering
and/or air conditioning may
stop.
*lf one hose is soft or splits,
have them all replaced. It
saves hassles and it's less ex-
pensive in the long run.
*Never leave children or ani-
mals locked in a closed car in
the summer sun. Even with the
window rolled down a bit, the
temperature can rise to 120 de-
grees within 15 minutes.
*Use of retreaded tires is more
widespread when you might-
think. They're used on airliners,
school buses racing cars, and
construction equipment.
They're processed according to
federal safety standards and
are available in high-
performance sizes in all tread
designs.
*Smart drivers know to wait for
a left turn with their car's
wheels straight ahead. If the
car were struck from behind,
wheels turned left might take it
into the path of oncoming traf-
fic.
'New-Used Cars: Smart drivers
know they get good deals on
terrific cars at

Guff Fordf

Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales


PAGE 5A


I


-1


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOB, FL o THU~RSDAY, JUNE 25,19922


-* .a. s .nf.









PAGE 6A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992

Gulf County ACS Unit

.Planning "Jail and Bail"


The Port St Joe Unit of the
American Cancer Society have
been busy for several months pre-
paring for their fund raising pro-
ject Jail and Ball. The event will
be held Tuesday, July 7 from 9
aim. to 4 p.m. at the Fire Station.
The Unit is anticipating raising
$.10,000 for aiding education, re-
search and patient services.
. Some of the local citizens par-
ticipating in the Most Wanted cat-
egory will be Jim McNeill, Stuart
Shoaf, Sandy Quinn, Frank Pate,
C~ora Sue Robinson, J. Patrick
Howard, Rocky Motley, Al Harri-


son, Bucky Richter, Harry Lee
Smith, Billy Joe Rish and others.
Several of those in the Pre-
Arrest category will be Dr. and
Mrs. Owen Oksanen, Nathan Pe-
ters Jr. and Amy Tapper.
Many other local citizens will
be taking part in the function.
Please help these folks as they
ask for your pledges for the Amer-
ican Cancer Society by calling
friends and encouraging them to
also come to the site or call in
pledges to help those on the Most
Wanted list reach their goal.


r -


Elementary Office
Work is progressing on construction at the Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary School on a project to enlarge the office area. Money from
Capital Improvements Fund is being used to finance the project
Money supplied by this source can be used only for construction.
Principal Gerald Lewter said the school has been direly in need of
more office space. "We have two little rooms for the secretary, my-
self, and all the general school supplies such as a copy machine
and other items ordinarily kept at the office. I can't deal with a
student or have a conference with a parent in privacy. It's just
been a bad situation for all these years."


GFWFC Offering Instructions

for Boating Safety... Free!


m*ILIImI


Begging for Dollars!


Wait, Sheriff!!! No amount of begging is going to get
lyou off the hook July 7th when the Port St. Joe unit of the
-American Cancer Society will hold their Jail and Bail
Day.
Remember those watermelons taken from you know
.whose field and enjoyed by you. We know about that and
&now you are on the Most Wanted List to help raise
'$10,000.00 for the Cancer Society. The Society is working
to eradicate cancer and help patients in the areas of medi-
cations and services.


The Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission (GFC) is now of-
fering free boating safety classes.
The six-hour classes will be
taught by volunteers with the
GFC's Wildlife Reserve Program
said Lt. Gary Applewhite, North-
west Region Reserve Coordinator.
Participating reservists have all
received training to equip them as
boating safety instructors.
Topics covered in the safety
clinic include: legal requirements,
boating basics, navigation rules,
rules-of-the-road, effects of alco-
hol, trailering, first aid and other
related subjects.
A boating safety clinic will be
held in Port St. Joe June 29 and
30 from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the
Student Activity Room at Port St.
Joe High School.
Applewhite said most of the
classes are, limited to -30 people
and urged, anyone wanting to- at-
tend to call the GFC's Panama
City office at (904) 265-3678 to
enroll. He said other organiza-


Seafood
From Page 4
55 samples tested (14.5 percent)
were adulterated because of spe-
cies substitution or misrepresen-
tation.
Types of seafood tested to de-
termine species were: red snap-
per, orange roughy, cod and
grouper.
In the Consumer Reports spe-
cies identification survey, at least
one-third of various seafood sam-
ples obtained in New York and
Chicago retail stores were misla-
beled.
Crawford said the Depart-
ment will intensify sampling of
red snapper and take action
against retailers that are substi-
tuting a less expensive fish.
The Department routinely
analyzes samples of food prod-
ucts offered for retail sale in the
state. Periodically, the Depart-
ment conducts extensive testing
programs that focus on a particu-
lar type of food product. In addi-
tion to the recent seafood survey,
the Department has conducted
extensive testing programs on yo-
gurt, soft cheeses, low-fat ground
beef, fruit juices and juice drinks,
snack foods and cereals.


MESSAGE
SERVICE


tions including fishing clubs can
contact him' to schedule a clinic
for their membership.'
Florida led the nation in
1988, 1990 and 1991 in boating
fatalities with 105, 102 and 103
respectively. At the present rate
of accidents and fatalities on
state waters, Applewhite said
1992 may surpass last year's
number of fatalities.


Mexico Beach CIP
Gives Fest. Report
The Community Improvement
Program of Mexico Beach held a
special meeting June 16th at the
Mexico Beach City Hall. A finan-
cial report was given on the sale
of the Mexico Beach logo T-shirts
and polo shirts sold at the Ling
Festival June 13th.
There are still some shirts left
to be sold. If you would still like
one, you may contact Shirley an-
derson at 648-5458.
All proceeds from the sale of
items goes back into making the
community a more beautiful
place in which to live.
Also discussed was the ap-
proval of dedicating the latest
dune walkover in memory of Mar-
jarie Rogers who was project offi-
cer for the dune walkovers for
1992.
The next meeting of the C.I.P.
will be September 3.

Thank You
We would like to send thanks
to everyone for all the cards, flow-
ers, food, and everythirig you did
during the loss of our loved one.
Thank you.
The Family of
Maxine Farmer


Turtle Patrol
The Apalachicola National Es-
tuarine Research Reserve will be
hosting two public sea turtle pa-
trols on Cape St. George Island in
July. Space is available to the
first 24 participants, at least 10
years of age, to sign up. Children
under the age of 18 must be ac-
companied by an adult on this
overnight excursion. For details
and dates, call the Reserve at 1-
653-8063. The Reserve is located
at 261 Seventh Street, Apalachi-
cola, adjacent to the Scipio Creek
Marina.





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m Supplies Hardw,
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Trash Bags
Large trash bags for all your clean-
Large Trash Bags up needs Contains recycled plastic
S20.:."~ supplied, in port. by Ace's national
distribution network. 20/pkg. 61721


While
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Seals windows and door frames. Acrylic
formula with silicone applies easily and
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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992 PAGE 7A


New Fishing Rules Take Effect July 1


The Governor and Cabinet
approved the following Marine
Fisheries Commission rule propo-
sals on June 2. These rules take
effect July 1, 1992:
Fishing Gear
The Commission received a
large amount of scientific and
public testimony regarding fish-
ing gear, and voted to direct staff
to draft a proposed rule on state-
wide gear regulations to consider
at a final public hearing during
the Commission's next regular
meeting in August The proposed
rule would:
*require hook and line gear to
be continually tended
*require gill nets, trammel
nets, and seines to be fished in
an active manner, meaning that
nets may not be soaked for more
than one hour, beginning with
the first mesh in. and ending with
the first mesh out with the net to
be continuously and completely
removed after retrieval has begun
*set a maximum mesh size
for seines at 2 inches stretched
mesh, excluding the wings
*set a minimum mesh size for
gill or trammel nets at 3 inches
stretched mesh, beginning Janu-
ary 1, 1995
*set a maximum length of
600 yards for all gill and trammel
* nets and seines


Used trailer for 15' boat, approx.
1,000 pounds, 647-8092 leave mes-
sage, 9 a.m. 9 p.m. 2tc 6/18


HOP


ON


DOWN
AND ORDER YOUR
COPY OF THE STAR
DELIVERED TO YOUR
DOOR EACH WEEK
OR PICK UP A COPY
AT ANY OF THE FOL-
LOWING LOCATIONS:
SOUTH BEACHES
*Indian Pass Raw Bar
*PICS # 1
*PICS #2
PORT ST. JOE
*The Star
*Jr. Food Store
*Sing Store
*Saveway
*Piggly Wiggly
eSt. Joe Hull
*Buzzett's
*Campbell's
WHITE CITY
*Hammond's Grocery
HIGHLAND VIEW
*Jr. Food Store
*Dixie Dardy
BEACHES
*Suwannee Swifty
*Jr. Food Store
MEXICO BEACH
*Express Lane
*Gulf Foods
*Mexico Beach Grocery
*Suwannee Swifty
*Jr. Food Store
WEWAHITCHKA
'C&J Grocery
*Rich's IGA
*Jr. Food Store
*Dixie Dandy
*Jr. Food Mart


*allow only a single net to be
fished by an vessel or individual
at any time
*allow no more than two nets
to be in possession, and require
that the nets must differ in mesh
size or depth if two nets are pos-
sessed
*prohibit the use of power-
heads in state Waters except for
personal protection; the posses-
sion of fish which have been har-
vested with explosive devices on
any vessel in state waters will be
deemed Drima face evidence that
such fish have been harvested in
state waters
*prohibit the use of spotter
airplanes to assist the harvest of
any species other than Spanish
mackerel during the unlimited
harvest segment and species al-
lowed to be harvested by purse
seines
*prohibit the use of treble
hooks with natural bait in all
state waters
*prohibit the use of gill and
trammel nets by recreational fish-
ermen
prohibit the use of seines
greater than 100 feet in length by
recreational fishermen
*prohibit the use of longline
gear
*prohibit the use of gill and
trammel nets and seines on
weekends and holidays.
The Commission also voted to
conceptually accept additional re-
gional regulations for fishing
gear. The Commission directed
staff to schedule public work-
shops on these proposed regional


regulations and on previous re-
quests for local/regional net re-
strictions. The Commission also
voted to establish a Commission
policy to support the prohibition
on the use of gill and trammel
nets and seines in all residential
manmade saltwater canals, and
to direct staff to develop options
regarding aggregate bag limits for
recreational fishermen statewide.
Spotted Seatrout
The Commission received
public testimony on spotted sea-
trout, however scientific data re-
garding the current status of this
fishery is incomplete, and the
Commission expects to receive
this information at its next regu-
lar meeting in August before con-
sidering further regulatory action.
Spanish Mackerel
The Commission voted to di-
rect staff to draft a rule proposal
that would increase the recrea-
tional bag limit from five to 10
Spanish mackerel per person dai-
ly in state waters and in adjacent
federal waters effective January
1, 1993. The Commission also
voted to adopt a federal proposal
regarding the commercial harvest
for Spanish mackerel on the
state's east coast by directing
staff to draft rule language that
would:
*set a daily vessel limit of
1,500 pounds from April 1
through November 30 each year
*allow unlimited harvest be-
ginning December 1 on Mondays,
Wednesday, and Fridays and set
daily vessel limits of 1,500
pounds on Tuesdays and Thurs-


days and 500 pounds on Satur-
days and Sundays until 80 per-
cent of the federal quota is
reached
*set a daily vessel limit of
1,000 pounds until the remainder
of the federal quota is reached
and then set a 500 pound vessel


limit through March 31.
The Commission intends to
hold a final public hearing (if re-
quested) on these rule proposals
at its next regular meeting to be
held August 4-7 at the Ponce de
Leon Resort in St. Augustine.


New Black Bass Law


Beginning July 1, the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission. will begin enforcing new
bag and length limits for black
bass. The black bass family in-
cludes largemouth, Suwannee,
redeye, spotted and shoal basses.
Under the law, anglers will be
subject to:
r A statewide five-fish daily
bag limit of which no more than
one fish can be over 22 inches
long.
A 14-inch minimum length
limit for all waters south and east
of the Suwannee River.
r.A 12-inch minimum length
Limit for the Suwannee River and
its tributary rivers, creeks and
streams and all other waters
north and west of the Suwannee
River. (The Santa Fe, Withla-
coochee in Madison and Hamilton
counties, Alapaha, New Ichetuck-
.nee rivers and Olustee and Swift
creeks are tributaries of the Su-
wannee River.)
-a Fish may not be filleted,
nor their head or tail fin removed,
until after the angler has com-
pleted fishing for the day.


OBITUARIES


Marjorie Carr
Marjorie Carr, 67, of Port St.
Joe, passed away Monday after-
noon, June 22, at her home fol-
lowing an extended illness. She
was a native and lifelong resident
of Port St. Joe. She managed Co-
stin's Department Store for a
number of years, and was a mem-
ber of the First Baptist Church.
Survivors include her hus-
band, William H. "Bill" Carr, of
Port St Joe; a daughter, Carolyn
Phinizy of Tallahassee; a son, Bil-
ly Carr of Port St Joe; two grand-
children, Amanda Phinizy and
Trey Carr, both of Tallahassee;
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil
G. Costin, Sr. of Port St. Joe; two
brothers, Ashley Costin and
James E. Costin, both of Port St.
Joe; two sisters, Dorothy Magid-
son and Sarah Jo Williamson,
both of Atlanta, Georgia.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday at the First Baptist
Church, conducted by the Rev.
Howard Browning. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot at Holly
Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home.

Effie Cason
Effie Parker Cason, 88, of
Port St. Joe passed away sudden-
ly Wednesday afternoon, June
17, in Gulf Pines Hospital. She
had been a resident of Gulf
County since 1935. She was an
active member of the First Baptist
Church.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Flora Maddox of St. Joe
Beach, and Hazel Goodson of Ca-
ryville; one son, Emory Cason of
Port St. Joe; many grandchildren,
including: Rhea Young, John
Maddox, Diane Maddox, Donna
Milton, Mitchell Goodson, and
Russell Goodson; one great
grandchild; four brothers, Gilbert
and Ernest Parker of Lake City,
Woodrow Parker of Gainesville,
and Carlton Parker of Live Oak;
and one sister, Virginia Lamb of
Jacksonville.
Funeral services were held
Friday at the First Baptist
Church, conducted by the Rev.
Billy Rich. Interment followed.
Those that wish may make
donations to the Florida Baptist
Children's Home.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home.

Edwin Ramsey
Edwin D. Ramsey, 83, of Port
St. Joe, passed away Sunday
morning, June 21, in Gulf Pines
Hospital following a brief illness.


A native of Missouri, he was
reared in Oklahoma, and came to
Port St. Joe in 1935. He helped to
widen the Intracoastal Waterway,
and then went to work for St. Joe
Paper Co., retiring as Supervisor
of the Woodyard. He was a mem-
ber of the First United Methodist
Church and had served on the
Board of Trustees. He had been a
member of the Port St. Joe Port
Authority, and was a member of
the Port St. Joe Rotary Club, hav-
ing served as president. He was
preceded in death by a son, Paul
Edwin Ramsey.
Survivors include his wife,
Ruth Boyer Ramsey of Port St.
Joe; one son, Donald B. Ramsey
of Birmingham, Alabama; two
daughters, Lynn Ramsey Kerigan
of Mexico Beach, and Mary Dell
Ramsey Holman of Roswell, Geor-
gia; 15 grandchildren; two great
grandchildren; one sister, Edna
Lansford of Palm Springs, Califor-
nia; and a brother, Arthur Ram-
sey of Bartlesville, Oklahoma.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday at the First United Meth-

Gospel Sing
The community is cordially
invited to participate in a commu-
nity gospel sing to be held at the
Church of God in Highland View
Saturday, June 27th at 7:00 p.m.
If you wish to join in the fun,
please call Earl Peak at 229-
6547.
The church is located at 323
Sixth Street in Highland View.


Tribute to Shorty Williams
Beloved Husband and Father
We know you have gone to be
with our Lord! As we go on with our lives,
as you would want, the memories will
live on In our minds and you In our hearts
wherever we go and whatever we do.
Fishing, hunting, reunions (eating) or just
ride the dirt roads around the creek,
you'll be with us. You were a very special
person not only to your family but also to
your friends. We aren't saying good-bye
Shorty, but so long for now until that glo-
rious day we'll come home. You will be
missed by all.
We love you.
Your Wife & Family



ESTATE SALE
Bids will be received on 2
bedroom house and 2 lots at
529 Third Street, Port St. Joe,
Florida beginning June 26,
1992 thru July 15, 1992. Mail
bids to Philip Lewis, 812 Garri-
son Ave., Port St. Joe, FL
32456.
For further Information, call
229-6777.
2TC 6/25


odist Church, conducted by the
Rev. Zedoc Baxter, assisted by
the Rev. Oliver Taylor. Interment
followed in the family plot at Hol-
ly Hill Cemetery. Pallbearers wre
Tom Coldewey, Charles Shoaf, Er-
nest Lightfoot, Mickey Stone, Dr.
Bob King, and Leonard Belin.
Honorary pallbearers were his 12
grandsons.
Those that wish may make
contributions in his memory to
the First United Methodist
Church or to a favorite charity.
All services were under the
direction of the Comforter Funer-
al Home.


Adetsn
Pay Yo
Mony!


'The new limits should help
restructure the state's large-
mouth bass populations," said
Scott Hardin, a Commission fish-
eries biologist. 'We expect that af-
ter the regulations are in place for
(See BASS on Page 8)


1992-93

School Registration
If you are new to the area and have children
who will be attending Port St. Joe or Highland
View Elementary School, please contact the
school as soon as possible and register your
child so proper staffing plans can be made.
School Office Hours
Port St. Joe Elementary: Mon. Fri. 7:45-3:15
Highland View Elementary: Mon. Thurs. 6:30-3:15'
TF 6/25-8/6/92




NOW AVAILABLE AT ST. JOE RENT-ALL


MINI-WAREHOUSES

5x10
5lx 10

10x10


10x 20

ON SITE RENTING MONDAY-SATURDAY

ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC.
706 First St. Port St. Joe 227-2112
U-Haul Rentals Sales SMall Engine Repairs LPLGas r
arc 625


I ~- *-.~r* i..i;",~l~~"~"'t~~- i .


T
'* '.. i.'',
t -. -..-
.^* *


Capt. Carl and Ronnie Raffield In Raffield's modem, seafood display center.


NOW OPEN

RAFFIELD SEAFOOD MARKET
Ronnie Raffield, Owner
Highway 98 and Butler Road Phone 227-7220


FOUND
1 key ring with
heart and "Lisa" en-
graved on the heart
with several keys at
the corner of High-
way 71 and Garrison
Avenue. May be
picked up at the City
of Port St. Joe Police
Department.


NOTICE
Highway 98, from First Street to Avenue A, in
Port St. Joe, Florida, will be closed to vehicular
traffic beginning at 7:00 A.M. June 29, 1992.
Highway will be re-opened at 3:00 P.M. on July
3, 1992. Alternate route will be indicated. This
closure is necessary to enable the Apalachico-
la Northern Railroad Company to install a rub-
ber crossing.
/s/ R.W. Parrish
Vice-President
Publish: June 25, 1992


. -











PAGE BA THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. JUNE 25.1992


Tournament Team Traveling to Lynn Haven


G.C. Baseball Team Evens

Record for Week of Play
The Gulf County Baseball Liberty Co. 002 40-6
team. evened their record this Gulf County 000 00-0


weeK at 5-5 as they
Chattahoochee Tuesda
17-7, in a game shorten
10-run rule.
Since last Tuesday
has played seven gam
both ends of a double
Wednesday in Quincy,
0 and Quincy 7-2. Frid
the local team hosted
County at the Centen
splitting a doubleheade
8-5. Saturday Gulf spli
County losing the first
doubleheader 9-5 and
the 7-2 nightcap win.
Gulf County
Perry
Quincy
Gulf County

Adjust A


defeated
y evening
ned by the
the team
les, losing
leader last
tn PerrP 1-


Liberty Co.
Gulf County
Bay County
Gulf County
Bay County
Gulf County


lay evening Gulf County 00
ad Liberty Chattahoochee 01
nial Field, Saturday the Gul
,r, 0-6 and team will play a double
t with Bay Quincy against Cairo,
end of the Quincy. Tuesday the l
picking up will host Liberty County
bleheader at 6:00 and W
they will host Chattahooc
000 00-0 Local games are p
000 Ix-1 Centennial Field under
tower. Go out and sup]
011 00-2 Port St. Joe and Wev
016 Ox-7 players.

Wuto Headrest


More Neck S
As Americans take to the
highways for their summer vaca-
tions, a safety and health author-
ity warns that most auto head-
rests and seat belts are misused.
President of the Florida Chiro-
practic Association, Donald
Woeltjen, D.C., cited reliable
studies showing that many of the
estimated 20 million car accident
victims in North America suffer-
ing from whiplash injuries could
have prevented the injury if their
headrests were positioned proper-
ly.
Many of the victims seek out
chiropractic care immediately if
they are suffering discomfort, but
often the cervical damage done by
the thrust is not noticed for some
time as much as two years af-
ter the trauma has occurred. Or
in some cases, the effects may be
felt in some other area than the
neck region.
Dr. Woeltjen cites studies
which show 74 to 90 percent of
male drivers have their car head-
rests set too low to be effective. In
some cases, headrests are set so
low they exacerbate the problem.
The sudden force of an accident
whiplashes the head, often caus-
ing nerve, tissue and vertebrae
damage in the neck.



NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9192-27A
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested in pur-
chasing the following described personal property:
(1) Loraine Crane/Shovel, 12.5 for
H6.33915
*Equipment available for viewing at
the Gulf County Public Works Depart-
ment
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver
unit on specified date will be set at $25.00 per
day.
Please Indicate on envelope that this is a
Sealed Bid, the Bid Number, and what the bid is
for.
S Bids will be received until 1:00 o'clock, P.M.,
Eastern Time, July 14, 1992, at the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
house. 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ Billy E. Traylor
Publish: June 25 and July 2. 1992.
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9192-28
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County. Florida, will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation'interested In sell-
ing the County the following described personal
property:
2,000 recycling containers according
to the plans and specifications on file
with the Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida.
The Bid must conform to Section 287.133
(3) Florida Statutes, on Public Entity Crimes.
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver
unit on specified date will be set at $25.00 per
day.
Please Indicate on envelope that this Is a
Sealed Bid, the Bid Number, and what the bid is
for.
Bids will be received until 1:00 o'clock. P.M.,
Eastern Time. July 14. 1992, at the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
house. 1000 Fifth Street. Port St. Joe. Florida
32456. The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ Billy E. Traylor
Publish: June 25 and July 2, 1992.


Support
"Most people never
adjust their headrest," I
jen said. 'They just le,
way it came when the
the car."
He said the correct
for the headrest is even
head and no more than
es behind the center of
of the head. "If it's low
hind the neck, the force
cident could bend the h
over the headrest, cau
ous injury to the cervi(
area."
Dr. Woeltjen also a
cupants of a car not to r
seat while the car's in r
cause it increases the
between the head an
straint, plus it puts the
in a more hazardous
should an accident occu
Dr. Woeltjen is criti
safety devices offered
cars because of their
adaptability to the
heights of occupants.
head restraints don't ex
enough for a tall pers
enough forward to really
support required in an
I'm afraid that many au
facturers have given av
for style," Dr. Woeltjen s


Thirteen young players will
be representing Port St. Joe in
the Double AA District IV 7 & 8
year old baseball tournament
beginning this Saturday in Lynn
Haven. Ten eight year olds and
three seven year olds brought up
from T-ball will form Port St.
Joe's team.
The .seven year olds are
Byron Jones, Christopher Knox
and Bobby Phillips. Eight year old
players are Samuel Bell, Michael
Bouington, Santiel Chambers,
Joshua Dandy, Ricky Farmer,
Chad Haddock, Samuel Littleton,
Patrick 'Mastro, Joshua Posey,
and James Smith. Coaches are
Tom Bouington, Harlan Haddock
and Mark Scott.
Play will begin in the double
elimination tournament at 5:00
Saturday EDT with Port St. Joe
meeting Callaway Red. If the local
team wins they will play Monday
evening at 9:00; a loss will put
them playing at 7:00 p.m. Mon-
day.
Other teams participating will
be Bayou George, Lynn Haven
Blue, Lynn Haven Red, and Calla-
way Blue.
Tournament play will be off a
pitching machine with each
player limited to 4 pitches per at-
bat. A new twist for Port St. Joe
players will be limited stealing of
bases.
The community is encour-
aged to travel to Lynn Haven to
support these young players as
they participate in the tourna-
ment. There's nothing more fun


311 00-5
103 4x-8 s
-t% l Bas


0U UUJL 0-5
011 020 1-5


From Page 7


000 11-2 two to three years anglers will
003 4x-7 catch larger bass."
The reduced bag limit and
11 60-17 minimum length limits are de-
2 30- 7 signed to improve the quality of
f County bass fishing by increasing the
!header in abundance of larger fish. The re-
Ga. and striction on bass over 22 inches
local team long will help reduce overharvest
in a dou- of trophy bass during certain
Wednesday times of the year.
ichee. Hardin said Commission
played on goals are to protect bass resourc-
the water es and to ensure quality fishing
port these opportunities for anglers in the
wahitchka future.
In addition, Georgia fishing
laws will apply on the Jim Wood-
for ruff Reservoir (Lake Seminole)
and St. Mary's River. These areas
have a 10 black bass daily bag
limit and a 12-inch minimum
length limit.
bother to The new law does not replace,
Dr. Woelt- regulations on areas with special
ave it the bag and length limits already in
ey bought place.

t position Sr. Citizen
with the
two inch- Outreach
the back
v and be- The staff of the Gulf County
of the ac- Senior Citizens will be visiting
lead back Liberty Manor Wednesday, July 1
sing seri- to discuss the services available.
cal (neck) This will take place Wednesday
afternoon.
The staff is looking forward to
advises oc- meeting with the residents and
motion be- discussing their individual needs.
notion be- "
distance
d the re- B Q Dinner
occupant BBQ Dnner
position The White City Volunteer Fire
ir. Department is sponsoring a
ical of the chicken barbecue dinner sale on
in most Saturday, June 27, 11 a.m. to 2
lack of p.m. The dinner plate will include
varying chicken, baked beans, cole slaw,
Many car roll, tea and cake for only $3.00.
tend high The dinner will be held at the
on or' far White City Park.


y offer the
accident.
ito manu-
way safety
aid.


Say You Saw It In The Star


'Views On'

SDental Health

- FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.

TIMING AND

STOOTHBRUSHING


Does toothbrushing prevent
tooth decay? One has to won-
der because tooth decay is
widespread despite the in-
creased sale of toothbrushes
and dentifrices.
There are reasons for this
paradox. One is that the tooth-
brush is usually not used at the
time when it could be the most
aii=.tive. Acid formation on the
tooth surface begins within mo-
ments after sugar has entered
into the secluded areas and
reaches a maximum in 15 to 30
minutes. This is why the tooth-
brush should be used immedi-
ately after eating if it is going to
exert its greatest effect in dis-
rupting acid formation. Brushing
teeth after getting up or before


going to bed has a beneficial
cosmetic effect and a stimulat-
ing action on the gum tissue, but
is not of much help in controlling
tooth decay.
If the teeth cannot be
brushed promptly after meals or
snacks that have a high sugar
content, rinse the mouth thor-
oughly with water. The flushing
action can remove the soluble,
fermentable sugar from the shel-
tered areas before the acid at-
tack takes place.


Prepared as a public ser-
vice to promote better dental
health. From the office of:
FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
Williams Ave., Phone 227-1123.


in life than watching a group of


seven and eight year olds play


baseball.


Shown left to right, front row are Sheila Hightower, Katie Kilbourne, Meredith Godfrey, Lindsay Wil-
liams, Ashley Brownell, and Amanda Bateman. Back row from left, Coach Lisa Kostic, Leigh Lawrence,
Brooke Kostic, Piper Redmond, Dottie Davis, Lisa Hopper, Carmen McFarland, and Coach Steve Law-
rence.


Girls In

Softball

Tournament

The Port St. Joe Girls Softball
League tournament team will be
traveling to Niceville Saturday,
June 27 to play in a double elimi-
nation tournament. The team was
picked from the leagues of four
different teams. The girls have
been selling fund raising tickets
to earn money for expenses.
The team would like to thank
all who participated in helping
make the fund raiser a total suc-
cess.


Softball Tourney
A six-team round robin soft-
ball tournament will be held July
4th at the field behind Port St
Joe High School. Entry fee is
$85.00. Each team must furnish
two 11-inch softballs. For more
information, call Polly at 227-
7151.

Car Wash Saturday
The Port St. Joe High School
band will be sponsoring a car
wash on Saturday, June 27 from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the First Un-
ion Bank. Proceeds earned will be
used to send the percussion and
auxiliary members to camp.
Please, support your school
by participating.


Horse Show
The Big River Riders 4-H
Horse Club will be hosting a
horse show on Saturday, June 27
beginning at 3:00 p.m. CT. The
show will be held at the Michael
Traylor Arena at T.L. James Park
in Wewahitchka. The community
is cordially invited to attend and
enjoy the show.


B FOR SALE

._ 2 bedroom/full tile
bath stilt house, fur-
nished. Two lots, total
*75' x 185'. :5 mile off
-beach. 648-5892.
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-5

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RHU, LUTCF
Tucker Life-Health Insurance Agency, Inc.
Life, Health, Disability &
Dental Insurance
serving Gulf County

1-800-226-7005
52T 12/19/91


Tirestone

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Phn


92 1 f

























































Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege is offering a series of Small
Business seminars in "Under-
standing Business." The three-
hour seminars on various busi-
ness topics are presented on
Thursday evenings from 6:30 to
9:30 p.m. CT.
The "Americans With Disabili-
ties Act (ADA): What Employers


Kendall and Ruth Wade, El Govern-
or Motel, Top of the Gulf Restaurant,
Ken Murphy and Ronnie Hogan Ken's
Kountry Krafts, Ronnie Butler, Dan
Troy Barrier Dunes, Wendell Camp-
bell- Sure Shot Pest Control, Jack Sum-
mers Capt. Jack's, Cakes By Linda,
Carpet Country, Debbie Butler, Herff
Jones, Gulf County School Board
Wewahitchka State Bank, Port St.
Joe Rotary Club, Gulf County Commis-
sioners, Costin's Insurance, Rish &
Gibson, Citizens Federal Savings Bank,
Amelia G. Tapper, Apalachicola North-
ern Railroad, St. Joseph Telephone &
Telegraph Company
St. Joe Natural Gas, Florida Power,
Pate's Service Station, Tyndall Federal
Credit Union, Mary Washington, St. Joe
Papermakers Federal Credit Union, Fr.
Thom Crandall, Beard Equipment, St.
Joseph Catholic Church, Allemore Real
Estate Howard Creek Country Mart,
Stac House, Sure Shot,
Dr. Brewer, Mrs. Ray Ramsey, Ju-
dith Wood, St. Joe Forest Products, Al-
tar Society St. Joseph Catholic Church,
Sharon Parker, Robert and Charlotte
Nedley, Teresa Mann, Heilig-Myers, Pot-
pourri Club, Elizabeth Thompson Real-
tor, Golden Jewelers, Dollar General,
Dr. Dusty May DDS,
St. Joe Container Company, Bad-
cock's Home Furnishing Center, St. Joe
Machine Shop, Gilmore Funeral Home,
Gilmore Music Shop, Sears, Sing Store,


Need to Know" seminar will be
held on July 2 and will cover
practical information on the law
and Its potential impact on busi-
ness.
The "How to Profitably Price
Goods and Services" seminar will
be held on July 9. This seminar
will discuss tactics and tech-
niques of effective pricing.


The cost of each seminar is
$10 for Florida residents. Ad-
vance registration is required.
Participants must register-in per-
son at the Lifelong Learning Cen-
ter on the second floor of the Stu-
derit Union East. Registration
hours are from 8 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. CT Monday through Thurs-
day.


Vicki Morgan, Marilyn Witten, Cooper
Cut & Styles, Toucans, Sunshine, Elec-
tric, International Machinist Local 1435
Florida Telecom, Tommy Ts, Peggy
Heaps, Anonymous, Nemburs Clinic,
Barrier Dunes Development Corpora-
tion, St. Joe Communications, NAPA
Auto Parts, Johnny Mize Plumbing,
Comforter Funeral Home, Patrick
McFarland, General Chemical Corpora-
tion, The Petal Shoppe, New Bethel
AME Church
First Union National Bank, Hall-
mark, Sears (Panama City), McNeill's,
St. Joe Hardware, Johnson's Hardware,
White City Baptist, Sarah Maddox, Fred
Witten, Long Avenue Baptist, First Bap-
tist, Nazarene, Zion Fair Baptist, Mar-
vin Clenney, Highland View Assembly
Alma Baggett, First Methodist
Church of Port St. Joe, St. Joe Rent-All
Inc., Long Avenue Baptist, First Pente-
costal Holiness, Beach Baptist, Church
of God in Christ, Philadelphia Primitive,
Baptist Church
Saveway, Rich's IGA, H.B. Hender-
son's Restaurant, Rooster's Fried
Chicken, St. Joe Motel, Sub Shop, Sand
Dollar, Butler's, Linda's Restaurant,
Brenda's Bakery, J. Patrick's, Rhonda
Tull, Gulf Sands Restaurant, Raffield
Fisheries, Food World, Buffalo Rock-
Pepsi, Coca-Cola Bottling Company,
Frito-Lay Co., Woods Fishery, Gene Ab-
rams, Hardees of Port St. Joe, Piggly
Wiggly, Bob Ridgley, Stacey Strickland


Franklin Feeds the Recycling Stream


Franklin County and St. Joe
Forest Products Company' have
demonstrated an increased com-
mitment to recycling in the past
few months. In the first sale of its
kind, St. Joe Paper company is
purchasing a load of old corrugat-
ed cardboard from the County.
Franklin is the first county to sell
recyclable material to the paper
company.
The County has launched a
voluntary drop-off recycling pro-
gram this year. In addition, resi-
dents have been urged to bring
corrugated cardboard to the Re-
cycling Center at the Central
Landfill. The effort has been suc-
cessful and Solid Waste Coordi-
nator Van Johnson said that ap-
proximately 15 tons of the
material is crushed, baled and
ready to sell.
St. Joe Forest Products Com-
pany recently upgraded their op-
erations and improved their recy-
cling capability. Dave Bricker, St.
Joe Forest Products Company's
Recycling Coordinator said, "We
completely rebuilt our #2 ma-
chine. This is a major quality im-
provement. It will allow increased
use of recycled fiber and increase
the quality characteristics of the
paper as well."
The State of Florida has set
* specific recycling goals for local
governments. The solid waste
stream is to be reduced 30 per-
cent by 1994. State grants have
enabled counties to implement re-
cycling programs in order to


reach that goal.
Paper manufacturers have
practiced recycling for a number
of years. In fact corrugated boxes


have an extremely high recovery
rate around 54 percent. The
United States paper industry has
set a national goal of 40 percent


paper recovery and reuse by
1995. St. Joe Forest Products
Company intends to do their part
in reaching that goal.


B MESSAGE

SERVICE








NOTICE OF EXPLANATION
Gulf County, Florida intends to undertake the following to
be funded by the Small Cities Community Development
Block Grant Program:
Replacement of one bridge and repairs to another on
Red Bull Island.
These improvements are needed for the following rea-
sons:
1) There are no alternatives to this project that would
meet the community's objective of eliminating the safety
hazards that now exist because of the deteriorated bridg-
es.
2) The impact of the project on the floodplain does not
outweigh the benefits to the residents of Gulf County, es-
pecially those of Red Bull Island.
Additional agencies involved in this project include the
Florida Department of Community Affairs, the U.S. De-
partment of Housing and Urban Development, the Apa-
lachee Regional Planning Council, the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Regulation, and the Florida
Department of Transportation.
Comments on the proposed project will be accepted until
July 13, 1992. All written comments should be sent to
Mr. Benny Lister, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 5th Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
A more detailed description of the project and the appli-
cable Flood Insurance Rate Maps are available for citizen
review at Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 5th Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
/s/ Billy Traylor, Chairman
Environmental Certifying Official
Publish: 6/25/92


Franklin County Commission Chairman Buford 'Dink"Braxton, left, and Solid Waste Coordinator
Van W. Johnson discuss the impending sale of corrugated cardboard to St. Joe Forest Products Company.
. . . A A A A A A A A AA AA A-A-


(WA Ag
aggaggaggggggggy At 4tt

Chipl y's Annual Watermelon Festival Saturday


Coming to Chipley for The Big
Watermelon Fe'stival, June 27, is
the Ocean Opry Music Show fea-
turing The Rader Family. Three
generations of' this family will
thrill your hearts with country
music, clean comedy, bluegrass
and gospel music in a free con-
cert scheduled at 1:45 p.m. CT at


the Agriculture Center.
Featured weekly on Fox 28
Television from Panama City, The
Rader Family's fan list is growing
by leaps and bounds.
This show is geared to all
ages. Comedian "Ole Moonshine"
will bring tears to your eyes with


his delightful comedy routines.
Billy Rader's ballads and mu-
sical talents on many instru-
ments is admired by everyone. He
also demonstrates a very special
talent with his impersonations of
various artists.
The Raders also are very


proud and quick to say they fea-
ture the youngest full time drum-
mer in America. Brent Rader has
been playing the drums since he
was two years old. He took ,over
as full time drummer at age nine.
Most of all The Rader Family
!demonstrates family togetherness
as they perform all over the coun-
tryNow in their 13th year, they
are the featured group at The
Ocean Opry Concert Theater at
Panama City. Beach, featuring
1,000 seats with state of art
sound and lighting. Don't miss
this show appearing at Chipley's
Watermelon Festival. Remember
it's worth the drive. Come and see
them make memories for you.


PUBLIC



NOTICE


Notice is hereby given that the

Board of City Commission of the


City of Port St.


Joe, Florida will


hold A Final Public Hearing at 8:00

p.m., EDT on July 7, 1992 in the

Municipal Building, 305 Fifth Street,


Port St.


Joe,


Florida to consider


adopting the changes in the Com-


prehensive Plan


as contained in


the Stipulated Settlement


Agree-


ment entered between the City of


Port St.


Joe and the Department


of Community Affairs, State of Flor-

ida, dated March 20, 1992.


All interested parties are invited,

to attend and be heard.

Frank Pate, Jr.

Mayor-Commissioner


Publish: June 25. 1992


Small Business Seminar Offered by GCCC


A"

I


A YIeartfeft





Than OU



from the parents of Project graduation to the citizens

and businesses of Port St. Joe for your generosity in

making the 1992 graduation Party one to remember!


VAM j


I A


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOB, PL THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992


ParGE I1


i









n.T.THTORSAV.JUrNE 95 1992


Agricultural Science.
One of the first things you
might do before leaving home is
ask a neighbor to check your
plants periodically while you're
gone. All plants need some care.
But, during an extended vaca-
tion, container grown plants re-
quire special attention and differ-
ent species have different needs.
Be sure you give your friend spe-
cific instructions for the care of
each type.
Even if you can't find some-
one to personally look after your
plants while you're away, there's
plenty you can do prior to depar-
ture to make sure you don't come
home to a limp landscape and
sickly house plants. Outdoor,
container grown plants should be
placed in a shady area to con-
serve moisture. Under a-tree, or


You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James Episcopal Church
309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe

+ --SERVICES-
.. Each Sunday ...........7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School............... ....... 9:45 a.m.

The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor


"The Exciting Place to Worship"


first Baptist Churchf

-102 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Florida

S HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E, Port St Joe, Florida Church Phone: 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon. Pittma ,. -
S ,SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER-
Worship: 1 tI'I."ar'id'6 p.hi'. For Prayer or Counseling; Call obr
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellowship
"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-5 thru 6th Grade
Does not discriminate based upon race, creed, color, or origin.


1 AA
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
= CHURCH
1 508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
S V SUNDAY WORSHIP..........................10 a.m.
; S O ADULT SCHOOL........................... 11 a.m.
uS N *SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children

Nursery Available
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor




First United Methodist Churchf
111 North 22nd St.
Mexico Beach, FL 32410

Morning Church .........1....... 9:00 a.m. CT
Church School ................... 10:00 a.m. CT
Nursery Provided

Charles M. Parker, Pastor John Anderson, Music Director


Catch the Sjril
1Jt IE w o mrrOOsiom'cm4UC


Constitution andMionument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............... 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ............5:30 p.m. Thursday ..................7:30 p.m.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


Part

BIBLE STUDY ...................... 9:45 a.m.
MORNING TRAINING.................. 11:00 a.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ................... 5:45 p.m.


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


e Want You To Be
of the Friendly Place
EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY.................... 7:00 p.m.


ALLEN STEWART
Min. of Education
& Youth


Florida Garden

Extension Notes
By

Roy Lee Carter
Gulf County Extension Service


on the north side of a building
are good locations. A thick layer
of mulch will help conserve mois-
ture for landscape plantings.
Mow your lawn just before leav-


ing, cutting the grass a little clos-
er than usual. An unkept lawn
can encourage disease, and it's a
telltale sign that no one's home.
Give lawn and landscape


Rex Buzzett Outlines

Pharmacy Board's Duties


Summertime is vacation time
for people, not plants! While get-
ting ready for that long awaited
trip, it's easy to forget about your
lawn, landscape, vegetable gar-
den and' house plants. A little
time spent preparing your leafy
friends for your absence could
save you needless worry and
hours of extra work when you get
back.
A vacation may be relaxing
and rejuvenating for you and
your family, but it can be hazard-
ous even deadly for your plants.
Unless you make' adequate prep-
arations before leaving, you could
return to vegetative disaster. My
information on vacation plant
care was provided by Extension
Urban Horticulture Specialist Dr.
Robert J. Black, of the University
of Florida's Institute of Food and


Bible Study
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


Rex Buzzett, Port St. Joe's
member in the state pharmacy
regulation board, spoke to the Ro-
tary Club Thursday, outlining
some of the duties of that organi-
zation.
Buzzett, who was appointed
last year as one of five pharma-
cists to make up board member-
ship, is one of a group of seven.
Two of the members are consu-

Series of

Evangelistic

Services at

First Baptist
The First Baptist Church of
Port St. Joe will begin a series of
evangelistic, family worship ser-
vices Wednesday, July 1, 7:00
p.m. The emphasis will continue
through the entire month and is
billed as the "Wonderful Wednes-
days of July."'
Every service through the
month will have a different
theme, but each'will be centered
on the family worshipping togeth-
er. The meetings will highlight
praying, praise, evangelism, mu-
sic, preaching, and glorifying
God.
Scheduled to preach is the
pastor, Howard Browning on July
1, Burney Enzor, pastor of First
Baptist of Lynn Haven on July
15, and Robert Strickland, pastor
of Kinsey Baptist Church, Do-
than, Alabama, on July 29. The
puppet ministry of First Baptist
of Wewahitchka will conduct the
services July 8, while an all mu-
sic night is set for July 22.
The entire community''i fi-'
vlted to attend any or all of the
services. A nursery for children
birth through three years will be
provided.

Whitfield Named
on Dean's List
Huntingdon College Academic
Dean Willard Top named 178 stu-
dents to the Dean's List of Aca-
demic Honors, at the conclusion
of the spring 1992 semester.
Students named, to the
Dean's List of Honors include
Heather Whitfield, a freshman.
Heather is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Houston Whitfield of
Wewahitchka, and the grand-
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jim
Roberts of Livingston, Tennessee.
There were 58 students on
the Dean's List of Honors for at-
taining a grade point average of
:3.5 on a 4.0 scale and 1200 stu-
dents on the Dean's List of High
Honors for attaining a GPA of
3.75 or better, including 72 stu-
dents who maintained a straight-
A, 4.0 grade point average for the
Spring Semester.
Established in 1854, Hun-
tingdon College is an 800-
student, Methodist-related liberal
arts college located in Montgom-
ery, Alabama's historic Old Clo-
verdale District.

Spiritual Warfare
Conference Slated
Beach Baptist Chapel of St.
Joe Beach will be hosting the
third annual Spiritual Warfare
Conference on June 28 through
30 at 6:30 p.m. ET nightly. All in-
terested persons are cordially in-
vited to attend.


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


"THERE IS THEREFORE NOW
NO CONDEMNATION TO THEM
WHICH ARE IN CHRIST JESUS,
WHO WALK NOT AFTER THE


FLESH,


BUT


AFTER


THE


SPIRIT" (Romans 8:1).


P.O. Box
K


Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


But Not for Plants!

Summer Is Vacation


Time for People


PAGE 2B TESAPR T OF TU5AjUNziz-


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MONDAY 75 TUESDAY 50
CATFISH ........... 4 MULLET ............. 4
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY .50
SEAFOOD BUFFET MEATLOAF. ........ I
FRIDAY .99 SATURDAY
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mers.
/ The board meets every other
month, and routinely consider
the rules and regulations under
which pharmacists operate. The
regulators also hear an average of
40 cases of pharmacists doing
something they should not do, at
every meeting. With over 17,000
pharmacists in the state of Flori-
da, the number of hearings indi-
cate that Florida keeps close tabs
on its pharmacists and investi-
gates every complaint filed.,
The Board of Pharmacy is one
state agency which has an impor-
tant duty and functions faithfully
performing that duty. "Our con-
cern is protecting the general
public from mistakes and sloppy
performance of their duty by
members of their profession."
The Board licenses pharma-
cists and pharmacies. It disci-
plines errant pharmacists and
pharmacies.
"It isn't a social organization,"
according to Buzzett. "We earn
our $50.00 a day and expenses."

Computers

Grew from

the Ancient

Abacus
The abacus is the earliest
form of computer. This instru-
ment was first made over 2,000
years ago, and is still being used
in Japan and Eastern Europe.
In 1642, a great development
in the history of computers took
place: Blaise Pascal invented the
first adding machine..-
-6ottfried' von 'LiebnitU devel-
oped a calculator that could mul-
tiply and divide, 29 years later,
In 1834, Charles Babbage de-
signed the world's first working
computer, the Analytical Engine.
Babbage believed that his
machine could be programmed to
do mathematical tasks.
In 1936, his belief was proved
correct by a man named Alan
Turning. Turning created the
computer, Colossus, which was
used during World War II to
break secret codes.
The .development of comput-
ers quickly progressed at the end
of World War II. In 1946, the
world's first valve computer, ENI-
AC, was built.
During the 1950's, computers
were large and complicated ma-
chines that only governments and
large companies could afford to
operate.
In the 1960's, scientists de-
veloped the Integrated Circuit.
From this point on, circuit de-
signs could -be printed onto a
small piece of silicon chip. Com-
puters could finally be made
smaller and cheaper; thus, they
became more available to every-
one.
Today, they are commonplace
in businesses, schools, and
homes maybe you just finished
playing a game or doing your,
homework on the computer in
your home

Card of Thanks
The family of Effie Cason
wishes to thank the many friends
who expressed their love with
food, flowers and encouragement
in our recent sorrow.
We also wish to express our
appreciation to the Rev. Billy Rich
for helping us to share warm
memories of Effie's life.


Head Crisp
BROCCOLI.. hd.79 CAULIFLOWER....79
A GO FRESHFISHBA4T


COSTIN'S BOOKKEEPING SERVICE
"TAX RETURNS A SPECIALTY"
(904) 229-8581'
302B Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456
In March, 1992, the government established new tables for
withholding taxes from an employee's paycheck. Married
couples will see their after-tax paycheck increase up to
$345.00 annually, while single people will see after-tax pay go
up by as much as $172.00 annually.
IMPORTANT NOTE
Taxes themselves are not reduced therefore, many people
who normally receive a refund when filing taxes will be .pay-
ing money in for 1992.
We urge you to make an appointment with our office to see if
you need to have more money withheld from your regular ,
paycheck!! It is much better to be safe, than to end up owing
taxes on April 15.
TFC lost week of each month begin 5/28














0. Lee Mullis, M.D.




*I





Bay Eye & Surgical Center

S1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
1-800-227-5704
nm 8 O O 2 2 7 5 7 O 4
*


.4


Fresh Shelled Or Unshelled
PEAS
Head 20
CABBAGE..... Ib. 20'


LAW OFFICES OF
FRIER & USKERT, P.A.


10# 139
POTATOES .... .....
Head Crisp
LETTUCE ..........60


Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor


KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children
**- -- J ~ -- .,- *- '


I


r,


I


im


plants a heavy watering espe-
cially recently planted beds,
which will need extra moisture.
Also, thoroughly spray or dust
your plants to protect them from
insects and diseasases while you're
away. If you have flowering annu-
als, cut the blossoms before de-
parting. If you don't, they'll soon
stop blooming. And, harvest all
ripe or nearly ripe fruits and vege-
tables. Like flowers, they will con-
tinue to produce only if they're
picked frequently. Otherwise,
they'll go to seed.
Do a thorough job of weeding.
If weeds are allowed to go to seed
while you're away, you can expect
to encounter much more difficult
problems later in the season -
even next year when the seeds,
sprout, And, remember. that
weeding eliminates a major
source of competition for your


--------


landscape plants' food and water,
which may be in short supply
during your absence.
Plants kept indoors require
special consideration. Before leav-
ing home, place your house
plants in a room which receives
indirect sunlight. Direct exposure
to the sun will dry the soil too
quickly. Of course, you don't
want to put your plants in a room
that's too dark, either. Too little
light will almost always result in
leaf drop. And, just before you de-
part, be sure to water your house
plants thoroughly. This is espe-
cially vital, because unlike
lawngrass and landscape orna-
mentals house plants cannot
benefit from any rain that may
fall while-you're gone.
You'll enjoy your vacation
more by making sure your plants
are well prepared for your ab-
sence.


I I --


SQUASA lb.r-kV I














































































I RAL ESAT


3 bdrm. house, 1 bath, new wall- Port SL Joe: 2 bedroom frame
paper & carpet,-stove, refrlg. includ- house, Ig. country kitchen & appli-
ed, $38,000. 639-2585 after 5 or 639- ances on quiet boulevard. Cen. heat,
2222 (8 to 5, Mon.IFri. asksf6i'Ela'lii '- window air,' ceiling fanis;, like new
^ or). "0-,-i ........ 35 Lt^t6^. l gffasher-&-4d-yer,;udiaette, chiriacabi-
.. ......... ,net,. couch, cair,, curtains & blinds
For Sale by Ownei. 24 bedroom, 2 included, $29,500. Call 227-1803 be-
bath custom built home, fireplace, ap- fore 10 a.m. tfc 6/4


2 bedroom house, oak floors,
deck, carport, stove & refrigerator in-
cluded. $37,000. .107 Hunter Circle.
Call for appointment, 229-8305..
tfc 6/4
1/2 acre mobile lot, no down
payment, Overstreet. area, $93.63
month.
2 1/2 acre country living, Over-
street area, $9,500.00. Financing
.available.
87' beachfront lot
Small parcels, Dalkeith Road.
Call Oeorge at 229-6031.
tfic6/4
Country. living overlooking We-
tappo Creek,:3 bdrm., 2 ba. 1500 sq.
ft living space, 26'x56' mobile home,
15x26' grand room, ch&a, fireplace, 2
car garage, 2 util. bldg., 2 covered
porches, one 14'x26' open deck,
swimming pool w/privacy fence,
beautiful landscaped on two 1/2 acre
lots with c/1 fence. $56,500. Call 648-
5323 for appt. tfc6/4
50x150 lot w/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
tfc 6/4
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 5/28


GULF FRONT.
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San'Bias, Florida

(904) 229-2777
1-800-624-3964
tfc 6/4

SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR





LOST. 2 lemon Walker females, 1
brown & white and 1 cream & white,
Howard Creek area. 827-1505, leave
message. Itc 6/25






Country & line dance lessons,
Tuesdays. 7-9 p.m., 106 2nd Ave.,
Oak Grove. Learn the Achy Breaky &
more. $2.00 week cover charge. For
more information call 229-8056 or
229-8970 after 5. 4tc 6/25


pllances & furniture, double garage,
2,280 sq. ft.; on double lot, 4 yrs. old,
shallow well for lawn. Must see to ap-
preciate at Mexico Beach. $78,500.
648-5662. 2tp 6/25
2.73 acres at Sunshine Farms,
Overstreet. Partially cleared comer
acreage.- $15,000 negotiable. Call B.
Given, 227-1467 after 6 p.m.
tfc 6/18
Two adjoining lots for sale meas-
uring 75'x150' each. For more infor-
mation please call 827-1865 after
5:00 p.m. tfc 6/18
S3 bedroom,, 1 bath brick home,
nice neighborhood, central' h/a, all
elec. appliances, dishwasher, new
carpet, wallpaper, landscaped w/large.
fenced backyard, sprinkler system,.
20'x24' workshop. $58,500. 120
Westcott Circle, 227-1795; by appt.
only. 4tp 6/18
House for sale: fresh paint, an-'
tique bathroom, new kitchen w/Jenn-
Aire stove, 16'x20' workshop, 3
bdrm., 2 ba., large decks front & rear,
ready to move in. No painting or re-
pairing, Insulation top & bottom.
pump/lawn. 229-6965 nights, 229-
2727 days. tfc 6/4
14'x70' mobile home set up and.
ft ready to move into. Great condition,
1/2 mile from Land's Landing, call
227-1313. tfc 6/4
Want one year lease or sale. 3
bedroom, quality furnished town-
house, lighted tennis, pool,..Gulf. Nev-
er rented. Cape San Blas.' 229-2631.
4tc 6/4
Nice lots for sale, 3/4, 1 and 1/4,:
2 and' 1/4, 2 and 1/2;and 5 acre lots
on Hwy. 30 fin Gulf. County near
Franklin County line. 'Call Top Sale-
Realty, Inc., 904-229-2500 or 1-800-
653-8689. tfc 5/28
Nice 3 bedroom 1 bath hormerl has
cen. heat & ir new cabinets.' 2Q6,.
10th St. Call 229-6055 for more ifor-'
mation. tfc 6/4
Mobile home; 14'x70', 2 bath, 2
bedroom on 2 lots (150'x150'), mini
blinds'; stove, refrig.,'dishwasher, gar-
den tub; screen porch and large deck.
229-6112, 9-5; 647-8514 after 5:00.
Ask for Tonya. -: tfe 6/4.'
Four bedroom,; 2 bath remodeled
brick h6ie In great neighborhood.
1600 sq. ft. split plan has great ;rm.
w/fireplace, ceiling fans, and' a large
master bdrm.; large lot has oaks arind
sago palms.' E 'rgy 'efficient. '.'29-
8457 nights, 545'-446 days. '-
tfc 6/4
4,bedroom, 2 bath, cen. heat and
air, ceiling fans, patio, masonry con-
struction, conveniently located in Port
St. Joe. Call 229-8706. tfc 6/4
FOR SALE BY OWNER: 1.5 acres
with lots ,of. old shady oak- trees on
Hwy. C-30 directly across from New-
Sman's Construction Co. Five minutes
from town, beaches and golf course.
Call (904) 229-2708 after 5 p.m.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. 1L THURSDAY. JUNE 25.1992 PAGE 5B


Officers on the Water During 4th


Boaters Should Expect to be Checked for Violations


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
State Certified Residential Appraiser #0001273
Mortgage Rates Are Low, Now Is The Time To Buyl
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 229-8988
PORT ST. JOE
124 Hunter Circle: Exceptionally nice 4BR, 2 ba. brick home wiht split floor plan, re-
cently remodeled & upgraded. Energy efficient with insulated windows & ceiling
fans throughout Fireplace in great room. Located on large lot with beautiful oak
trees in great neighborhood. A must see at $66,000.00.
526 6th St.: 3 BR, 1 ba. home close to town. Good retirement or starter home.
$26,000.00.
1616 Long Ave.: 2 story duplex, newly redecorated, good rental record. $49,000.00.
2004 Cypress Ave.: Lovely well maintained brick home with 3 BR/2 bath, living
room, dinign room, den, and Florida room connecting to covered patio, inground
pool, double garage and many extras. $86,000.00.
805 Long Avenue: 3 fr /4 air enclosed porch, fenced
yard. $28,500. UW W l. I.tw llni.
127 Plantation Drive, Cape Plantation: 3 BR, 2 bath brick home with shower in
double garage. Total electric; Exclusive neighborhood. Ideal for golfer, retired
people or young family. Many extras Small equity and assume. $95,000.00.
1402 Long Ave.: Well kept 2 BR/1 bath home with c/h & air plus 2 rental aptsl 2 bd/
1 bath each. All for $69600 $66,600.00. $55,000.00.
1314 Garrison Ave.: 2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
back yard. $8600. $29,500.00.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$14.000-0.0. REDUCED TO4 ,000.00,$87,500.00.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
,AND
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments:. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $60,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
CAPE SAN BLAS
Gulf front Beach Cottage: Completely furnished 2 BR, 2 BA, kitchen with eating
area, living room, ready to move in! $Asking $122,900.00.
THE BEACHES
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Ponce De Leorn St Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck aMd screened porch on two 75'xI50' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,0000.
LOTS & LAND
100 x 200'town lot, choice location.
Overstreet: 13 acres near bridge and canal with many nice oaks and fronts on
paved street
8th St.: 1 1/2 nice lots, 75'x1 70', only $12,000.00.
1908& 1910 Long Ave.: 2 nice high lots, 60x140 and 68x1 72.
Cape San Beias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port StL Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00
$8,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice.home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.


Boaters should expect to be
checked by officers of the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission if they launch their ves'-
sels during the Fourth of July
holiday.
Capt. Bob Poole, boating safe-
ty coordinator for the agency,
said, "Our visible presence on the
state's fresh waters seemed to
work to keep things safe during
the Memorial Day holiday. We
had fewer accidents, and no fatal-
ities. We believe that, by stopping
boats to check for safety equip-
ment, we make operators more
aware of potential hazards on the
water and how to prevent them."
Poole said that, like on Me-
morial Day, officers will watch for
persons boating under the Influ-
ence of alcohol (BUI), which is a
leading contributor to boating ac-
cidents and fatalities. GFC boat-
ing safety officers made BUI ar-
rests during Memorial Day
weekend.
'Wave action and the dehy-
drating effects of the sun and
wind make people less aware of
their intoxication," Poole said.
"Stopping BUI is one of the best
ways this agency can reduce
boating accidents and deaths."
Poole said it is legal under
state laws to drink alcohol while
boating in Florida, but it is
against the law to drive a boat
while intoxicated. Florida is one
of few states with laws specifically
against vessel manslaughter.
Also, Poole said some counties
and cities have ordinances
against possessing alcoholic bev-
erages in a boat.
To further combat Florida's


I *:.: : '-::.:::.:::: :::::::::::: ~:':I:.:::'
*~ *: ,'~
V..~ .:. :.~:~


IN THE COUNTY COURT, IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 92-23
JACK JOHNSON,
Vs.
CHARLES DON WALL, a/k/a CHARLIE D. WALL,
Defendant
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Charles D. Wall
General Delivery
Angleton, 7X 77515
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED an Amended
Statement of Claim has been filed against you. You
are required to serve a copy of your answer or oth-
er response to the Amended Statement of Claim on
Plaintiffs Attorney: Robert M. Moore, P.O. Box
248, Port St Joe, FL 32456. and file the original
thereof in the County Court Clerk's Office, Gulf
County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on or
before the 17th day of July, 1992. If you fald to do
so, a'Final Judgement for the relief sought in the
Amended Statement of Claim may be granted by
Default.
The Amended Statement of Claim among
other relief seeks to establish a lien in favor of the -
Plaintiff against the Defendant for personal proper-
ty left by the Defendant with the Plaintiff. The
Items of personal property include but are not lim-
ited to a travel trailer, boat, motor and any other
Items of personal property left by the Defendant on
the premises on the lower landing at Howard
Creek. Gulf County, Florida. Part of the relief re-
quested by the Plaintiff is the transfer of the Items
left by the Defendant on the premises to the Plain-
tiff.
,DATED this 17th day of June, 1992.
BENNY C. LISTER
Clerk of Circuit Court
Publish: June 18 and 25, 1992.
GULF COUNTY CDBG-WILLIAMSBURG/
METHODIST HILL
-. PROJECT NUMBER 00303
BID NO. 9192-26
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County. Florida, will receive sealed bids from any
qualified person, company or corporation interest-
.: ed In constructing the following project
WILLIAMSBURO/METHODIST HILL
WATER AND SEWER EXTENSION
SPlans and specifications can be obtained by
calling Preble-Rish, Inc., 1648 Metropolitan Circle,.
Tallahassee, Florida 32308. Telephone (904) 422-
8450. Costs for plans and specifications will be
$100.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks
should be made payable to Preble-Rish, Inc.
The project is subject to the final review and
approval of the Florida Department of Community
Affairs.
Bids will be received until 1:00 p.m. Eastern
Daylight Time, July 14, 1992, at the Gulf County
Clerk of the Circuit Court's Office, 1000 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, and will be
opened and read aloud on July 14, 1992, at 1:15
p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. ALL BIDS SHOULD
BE SEALED AND MARKED "WILLIAMSBURG/
METHODIST HILL WATER AND SEWER EXTEN-
SIONS".
.OThe Owner has the right to waive any infor-
malities or to reject any or all bids. Each bidder
must deposit his/her security in the amount, form
and subject to the conditions provided in the Infor-
maton to Bidders. Sureties used for obtaining
bonds must appear as acceptable according to the
Department of Treasury Circular 570.
Attention of bidders Is particularly called to
the requirements as to conditions of employment
to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid
under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Stan-
dards Clauses, Section 3,. Segregated Facilities,
Section 109, Executive Order 11246, and all appli-
cable laws of the Federal Government and State of
Florida.
Any Florida licensed contractor may bid. Lo-
cal and minority contractors are especially encour-
aged to bid.
IN PARTICULAR BIDDERS SHOULD NOT
THE REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS AND CERTIFICA-
TIONS TO BE EXECUTED AND SUBMITTED WITH
THE FORM OF BID PROPOSAL
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLODYER/FAIR
HOUSING AND HANDICAPPED ASSISTANCE PRO-
VIDEZ COMMUNITY
BY: /s/ Billy E. Traylor
Publish: June 18 and 25, 1992.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City
Commission of the City of Port St Joe, Florida at
its meeting on the 7th day of July, 1992 at 8:00
p.m. ET in the Municipal Building, 5th Street, Port
St. Joe, Florida, will consider for adoption an Ordi-
nance with the following title:
An Ordinance amending Ordinance
Number 200, (which Is the Compre-
hensive Plan) by adopting the changes
contained In Exhibit B of Stipulated
Settlement Agreement entered by the
City of Port St. Joe, Florida and-the "
Department of Community Affairs,
State of Florida, dated March 20,
1992.
All interested parties are Invited to attend
and be heard. Copies of said Ordinance are on file
at the Office of the City Clerk and may be inspect-
ed by the public during normal working hours.
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST.
JOE, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ Frank Pate. Jr.
Attest: /s/ L.A. Farris
City Auditor/Clerk
Publish: June 18 and 25, 1992.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf
County Board of County Commissioners, at their
meeting on July 14, 1992 at 2:00 p.m., ET, in
their meeting room at the Gulf County Courthouse
In Port St Joe, Florida, will consider adopting an
ordinance with the following title:
An ordinance declaring abandoned
personal property, noxious plants, un-
lawful accumulations and unsafe
buildings to be unlawful; Imposing a
duty on the property owner or occu-
pant to maintain property: establish-


Ing procedures for determining and
Correcting conditions of property In vi-
olation oFthis ordinance; establishing
definitions; establishing penalties; es-
tablishing the cumulative effect of the
ordinance, enacting a severabilty
clause; enacting a repealer clause and
establishing the effective date.
THE BOARD WILL FURTHER CONSIDER
said ordinance for adoption at their meeting on
July 28th, 1992, at 8:25 p.m., ET, in their meeting
room at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St.
Joe, Florida. A copy of the proposed ordinance is
on file in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
SBy: /s/Billy E. Traylor, Chairman
Attest: /s/ Benny C. Lister, Clerk
Publish: June 25 and July 2, 1992.

'NrICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9192-27
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County. Florida, will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested in pur-
chasing the following described personal property:
(1) SwaCar (Garbage Trailer)
(1) 1968 Ford Truck
(1) International Bus
(1) Ford Bus
-Equipment available for viewing at
the Gulf County Public Works Depart-
ment.
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver
unit on specified date will be set at $25.00 per
day.
Please Indicate on envelope that thissI a
'S~aled Bid, the Bid Number, and what the bid Is
for.
Bids will be received until 1:00 o'clock, P.M.,
Eastern Time, July 14, 1992. at the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ Billy E. Traylor
Publish: June 25 and July 2, 1992.


For more information about
safe boating, contact your region-


al office of the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission.


high boating fatality numbers,
Poole said the agency is launch-
ing its first boating safety course
as early as July in some parts of
the state. The free six-hour
course will be taught by volun-
teers trained by the agency and
will stress preventive, defensive
boating techniques.
"Boaters need to know that it
is not enough for them to be care-
ful boat drivers. They have to re-
member that not everyone is that
conscientious," Poole said. "That
means wearing your personal flo-
tation device in case someone
else causes you to be in an acci-
dent, and avoiding intoxication
while in charge of a boat's opera-
tions."



Estuarine Walk

Exhibit Opening

The Apalachicola National Es-
tuarine Research Reserve will be
hosting the grand opening of a
new exhibit titled the ESTUARINE
WALK. Come visit with some of.
the native animals that make our
area so unique and attractive.
This event will take place on Sat-
urday, June 27 from 10:00 a.m.
until 3:00 p.m. Apalachicola's
Mayor, Robert L. Howell, will
present a brief dedication address
at 11:00 a.m.
For more information, call the
Reserve at 1-653-8063. The Re-
serve is located at 261 Seventh
Street, Apalachicola, adjacent to
the Scipio Creek Marina.


Fantasy Properties, Inc.
formerly Allemore Real Estate


Comer 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478

Interested in
Purchasing A Home?
*, Selling A Home?
Renting A Place to Reside or
Take AR6laxing Vacation
Call Our Office
One of our Agents Would Be Glad'to Assist You

NEW LISTING: 1301 Monument Ave., Port St. Joe. 2 bdrm., 2
bath, new kitchen appliances, plus vinyl & carpoet, new
electric central air. Also Includes small rental house. $62,000.

JOHN DELORME, Broker
ELLEN ALLEMORE, Broker
SALES and RENTALS






ESTATE SALE


of Walter Duren

* Cabover GMC 650Q V-8 with van
body & refrigerating unit..................... $4,900 obo
* 1984 Brown Ford pickup truck............ $1,750 obo
* 1974 Dodge pickup truck ............. $750 obo
* Concrete mixer w/good engine,
will work .................................... $750 obo
* 200 amp Lincoln welder on
15" W heels ............................................... $850 obo
* 300 lb. Sandblasting pot w/mask
& hoses .................... $500 obo
* Gooseneck heavy duty 3 axle
20' trailer .. ..................$2,800 obo
* 18' 3 axle farm tractor
or front end loader trailer ..................... $1,800 obo
* Chain saws ........................... ..... $100 ea. obo
* Power poles ............... 500 per ft. obo
* Used pine lumber, good cond. $265 per mbf obo
* 1984 4 dr. Cadillac, loaded,' .
good cond. .... .,................................ $4,500 obo
* Old dump bodies,.............................. $250 ea. obo
* Large winch, 14" gear box ................. $350 obo
* Over 200 10:00-20 truck tires & rims
* Cable
* Upright floor standing service station
compressor w/o 5 hp motor ................... $450 obo
* Used Steel
* Truck tire tubes
* Used PVC & conduit


CALL GEORGE AT 229-8398
and leave message if I'm not in,
and I'll call you back
4tc 6/1I 1


RECYCLE YOUR


NEWSPAPERS


FOR A CLEANER


AMERICA


Bundle or sack your old newspaper, boxes and other

paper products and leave them by your .garbage

can for collection by your garbage colle6f6r.




jThe Star Publishing Co.

OFFICE SUPPLY STORE
Phone 227-1278 FAX 227-7212 304-308 Williams Ave.


TE
REAL ESTA j












PAGE 4B THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992


19' camper trailer, good for hunt-
er, $800. 25 ft. shrimp net, 18 x !6
doors, $150. (904) 227-1318. / .
Itc 6/25

12 drawer pedestal king size wa-
terbed with beautiful mirrored head-
board and the matching chest of
drawers. Must see. Will sacrifice at
$700 for complete set.iCall 227-7486.
Itp 6/25

American Camper screen house,
12'x12', 90" center height, heavy duty
fin mesh, zipper entrances front &
back. Used one time only, $50. 647-
8028. 2tc 6/25
Hotpoint washing machine, like
new, $150 firm. 228 6th St., or 229-
8941. Itc 6/25
King-size waterbed, Scaly Hydro-
pedic mattress, heater with child-
proof control, almond padded frame.
Cost $600+ new, ready to sell for
$250. 827-8703 anytime.
2tp 6/25

Two little girls' pageant dresses,
multicolor, size 4, $40 and blue size
8, $60. Call 227-7486 to see.
Itp 6/25

5 hp tiller, chain drive rear tine
$200. Man's 27' 10 speed bicycle,
$25. 1902 Sypress Ave. 227-1364.
Itp 6/25

Quality used baby clothes (girl).
Not yard sale tuffi Jerrie Todd, 227-
7164. It 6/25
Great color TVs. 25" portable
$85; 19" portable $65; 19" RCA $75;
19" remote $95. Dryer $45. 647-3116.
2tc 6/18

David's Home Repairs, Remod-
eling, Plumbing, Painting and Addi-
tions of all types. Free estimates.
Call 229-2775. 2tp 6/25
DISHWASHER, works great, a lit-
tle- noisy, $90. WASHING MACHINE
works great, leaks a little, $75. Call
227-2008 after 7:00 p.m.
tfc6/18

16' Kennedy craft with 25 hp
Johnson with trailer, $2,000 obo. 6
-months old Whirlpool washer & dryer,
$500 obo. 647-8024. tfc 6/4


MS.FRSALE FOR RENT FOR REN


HAPPY JACK TRIVERMICIDE:
Recognized safe & effective by U. S.
Center for Veterinary rndicine
against hook, round & tapeworms in
dogs & cats. Available O-T-C at BAR-
FIELD'S LAWN & GARDEN, 229-
2727. 5tc 6/4
Western Auto Special. Computer
spin balance 4 ties and tire rotation.
$P9.95. 227-1105. tfc 5/28
Mobile home, 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
cen. h&a, deck, dishwasher. Call for
appointment, 227-7245. tfc 6/4
To buy or sell Avon call Sarah
Kemp at 229-6495 after 5 p.m. or
weekends. tfc 6/4
Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyn-
dall Parkway, Panama City, FL,
32404. 763-7443. tfc 6/4
Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOOl Also Com-
puter Wheel Alignment. 227-1105.
tfc 6/4

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. O.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
,tfc 6/4


NEW & USED
Snapper, John Deere, & Ku-
bota equipment. Trade for
anything. 100% financing.
Call 1-800-834-6744. Sowell
Tractor Co. 2/2 thru 9/92






STOP high credit card interest
rates. No annual fees. Low APR. Erase
bad credit. Obtain Visa/Mastercard
easy. Free details. Write: PAXMAX,
9310 Northcote, Saint John, IN
46373. 3tp 6/25


Mexico Beach, Mobile home spac-
es for, rent, $65 month. Call 648-
5659. tfc 6/25
One bedroom house, $200 a
month, $100 deposit. Ideal for single
person, located in Oak Grove. 229-
8121. 2tp 6/25
Two bedroom, 2 1/2 townhome,
across from beach. Unfurn. $450 per
month plus deposit and one year
lease. 647-8314. Itp 6/25
2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath town-
home, unfurnished, long term lease.
$575 month, plus utilities, 229-2777.
tfc 6/11

2 bedroom, 1 bath trailer, partly
furnished, air cond. Highland View.
639-5980. tfc 5/28
40 ft. furnished trailer, 5 miles
from Overstreet Bridge, Hwy. 386. .De-
posit $100, no pets. 648-5306.
tfc 6/4

For Rent: 2 bedroom trailer, de-
posit, no pets. 648-8211 tfc 6/4
Nice one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge Apartments, 227-7451. Equal
,Housing. tfc 6/4
For Rent: '83 Fleetwood 2 bed-
room furnished mobile home in High-
land View and one trailer lot. 227-
1260. tfc 6/4
For Rent- Furnished apartment
at 1508 1/2 Long Ave. Deposit re-
quired. Phone after 6 p.m., 229-6825.
tfc 6/4

OFFICE SPACE. Call George
Duren at 229-6031 and leave mes-
sage. tfc 6/4
Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tif ,/AI
The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 6/4


UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
* Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
* New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
* Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
* One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryet hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 6/4

Warehouses,' small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 6/4
No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean 'them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/92





Gigantic Yard Sale: 422 First St.,
Highland view. Flowers, bright brass,
clothes, lots of misc. Friday and Sat-
urday,- 8 a.m. 4 p.m. Rain cancels.
.tc 6/25

Yard Sale: Beach, 120 Gulf Aire'
Drive., Saturday, 8 a.m. 1 p.mr.EDbt.
Furniture, appliances, sporting goods.
ltc 6/25

Yard Sale: Saturday, from 7:30
a.m. 1:00 p.m., 503 Main St., Port
St. Joe. Itp 6/25
Yard Sale: Howard Creek, 6552
Bass St., Baby furniture & items,
couch, chair, recliner, bedspreads,
curtains, toys, clothes & much more.
Saturday, June 27, 8:00 3:00.
Itc 6/25

Yard Sale: Saturday, June 27, 8
a.m. 12 noon EDT. Corner 1st St. &
1st Ave., Beacon Hill. Miscellaneous
items. Itc 6/25
Garage Sale: Friday. and Satur-
day, 8 a.m. 12 noon. 123 Monica
Drive. Clothes, furniture, jewelry.
SItc 6/25


Housekeepers weekend work.
$4.50 per hour. Call 648-5362.
Itp 6/25

Top of the Gulf, Mexico Beach,
taking applications for experienced
cook. Apply in person between 3 & 6
central time. Itc 6/25
J. F, Cullen Construction, Inc.
experienced carpenters, laborers,
plumbing, electric & dry wall sub-
contractors needed. Call 653-2246.
tfc 6/18

I House cleaners, mostly Satur-
days. Experience required, The Board-
walk, 229-8390. tfc 6/18
Nursing assistant positions, no
experience necessary. Apply at Bay
St. Joseph Care Center. tfce 6/4
Hair stylist needed. Call Sharon
at Cross Cut, 648-8977. tfc 5/21
Alaska Jobs! Salmon, Halibut
And Herring fishing. Earn up to,
$30,000 in three months. Most living
expenses paid. Hiring nowl 1-504-
641-7778, ext. K6800, 24 hrs.

AU- MTV


1971. Thunder Bird, excellent
condition, $1,500. (904) 227-1318.
Itc 6/25

1971 V8 Ford 1 ton with dual
wheels, 12' body, $700. Call 227-
1626. 2tc6/25
1979 Ford truck s/w/b 4/w, a/t,
new paint, good condition, $2,000.
Can be seen at 1019 Marvin Ave. after
5:00 p.m. or call 227-1745.
2tp 6/25

1985 Buick Riviera, fully loaded,
clean, needs paint job & minor work,
must sell, $2,975 obo. 227-1795.
4tp 6/18

'81 VW Sport truck, 5 speed, 60k
miles, nice condition, $2,000 obo.
648-8007. Itp 6/18
1991 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 4-
dr., ps, pb, pw, pl, cc, tilt, am/fm cas-
sette, 6 cyl., red, 21K miles, 227-
751,2. tfc 5/28


FREE to good home, 14 months
old female Springer Spaniel, all shots,
copper & white, call Troy at 229-6393
or 229-8265. Itp 6/25
FREE to good home, adult, male
collier, needs fenced in yard, great
family dog. Call after 5:30 p.m., 229-
8120. Itp 6/25
Part miniature collie/part lab
beautiful pups, 229-8427. Small
square face terrier, young male needs
good home. White American Husky
older dog, neutered, call 227-1322.
Itc 6/25

Know what happens to' fleas &
ticks when sprayed with HAPPY JACK
DROPDEAD FLEA-TICK MIST? They
drop deadly For dogs & cats. Water
based. BARFIELDS LAWN & GAR-
DEN, 229-2727. 8tc 5/14





14' Bayliner/50 hp motor/trailer,
trolling motor/am/fm cassette, powre
trim, $4,500. 1985 LTD 4 dr. V-6,
$2,200. Must sell due to health. 209
Balboat St., St. Joe Beach, 647-5327.
( Itp 6/18

Aluminum boat motor, trailer &
gas can, used only a few times, $500.
639-2584, Wewa. 2tp 6/25
19 1/2' Ib/ob boat w/tandem
axle trailer, $1,200. Boat tower, all
aluminum, $200. Tan) em axle boat
trailer, $550. (904) 227-1318.
Itc 6/25

13 1/2', fiberglass boat, $300.
229-6336 after 5:00. tfc 6/4
OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR -
Call Steve at 227-1687 after 6 p.m.
tfc 6/4





Need Cash? Individual will pay
cash for your mortgage. After 1 p.m.,
call Panama City 1-265-2792.
1 Itp 4/23


. '


TRADESandSERVIC


YARDS CUT, raked and ferti-
lized. Trees and bushes cut or
trimmed. Call Tommy Johnson at
229-8829 or 647-8494. 4tp 6/4
OUTBOARD MOTOR REPAIR -
Call Steve at 227-1687 after 6 p.m.
tfr R/4
BROKEN TV, VCR OR WHATEV-
ER? Don't throw it away. Get yourself
some free beer money. I'll pick it up &
deliver some money. Call now, Swing-
arm Jim, 647-3116. tfc 6/4

Researching Educational
Assistance for College
or Vo-Tech
Regardless of your grades.
Regardless of family income.
Scholarship, financial aid
source
Located guaranteed.
REA Enterprises
1-800-872-1221 ext. 4180
14tc 5/28


DROOPY HEADLINERS
REPLACED





$69.95 Most Cars
$39.95 Most Pick-Ups
We have over 50 different shades and
colors In stock and ready to install.
Call Oakley's Cars & Trucks
Corner 2nd Ave. & Madison St., Oak Grove
227-1294 tfc 6/4



BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

Lawn Mowers
Weed Eaters '.-
Chain Saws
Generators _.,
*Pumps
Tillers
Go-Karts

229-2727
328 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe trfc 5/7


ALL TYPES YARD WORK mow-
ing, raking, trim. Reasonable price.
Charles, call 229-8492. tfc 6/4.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church. all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.

Narcotics Anonymous
Meetings Monday Nights
8:00 p.m. at 302 Reid Ave.,
Information: Call (904) 229-6506


Remodeling New Construction
Decks
Free Estimates 648-5886
TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Mike Taylor P. 0. Box 13459
Lic. #RG0051240 Mexico Beach, FL
tfc 6/4


BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair
Rebuild Wrecks Body
& Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body-Work
See or Call BOB HEACOCK
Baltzell Ave. Phone 227-7229
trfc 6/4


Sewing and Alterations: drapes,
complete outfits, repairs. Call Daisy,
at Aline's. 229-6600 or 227-7193.
tfe 6/4
Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
*y'- Reg. Stated Communication
/st and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
James Brooks, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 2/6


COSTING INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 6/4

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
26 Years of Experience
Worker's Compensation
Occupational-Diseases,
Injuries and Accidents,.
No charge for first conference.
7229 Deer Haven Road, P.C. tic6/4

COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581
tfc 6/4


Wauineta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer- St. Joe Beach
647-5043


Air conditioner, refrigerator, or
freezer not working? I do good
work and will try to save you some
money. Phone 827-6239. 2tp 6/25


AVOID

CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allin Memorial Way Port St. Joe
.(904) 229-6460 tfc 6/4


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, roof
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt,
Rt, 2, Box A C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018 .
S. .lffc 6/4

We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns

Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-386, Howard Creek
t. fc 6/4

STUTZMAN CONAT. CO.
,All Types Roofing and Remodeling
S30 years experience
.Lie. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tc 6/4

r 1 i..- 1 .i


,


I


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. tfc6/4


St. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
Small Engine Repairs

Factory Warranty Center


LCwnmowers'
*Weed,eaters ,
-, Tillers
S Chain saws
Generators
Pumps
Engine Sales '


706 1st St.-St. Joe
227-2112
tfc /


NEED IT? RENT ITr

St. Joe Rent-All, Inc.
706 1st St.
Phone 227-2112
Heffc 6/4



T.L.C. Lawn Service
All Types 6f Yard Work
Mowing, Raking, Trimming,
Weeding, Clean Outs
and Roof Sweeping.
Reasonable Monthly or
Seasonal Rates Available.
Call 229-6435 tfc 6/4


Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 6/4


Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Perms
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc 6/4


Terry Parrish John C. Maddox
Construction, Inc. Properties, Inc.
RG 0056216 RG 0062723 Mobile Phone 227-5100
* New Homes
Additions & Remodeling WE BUILD TO LAST
All Your Building Needs A LIFETIME!
For Free Estimates, Call 229-8589 tfc6/4

ER0010992 Mexico Beach Ph. 648-5474
RA0054218
-. GARRY'S ELECTRICAL,
AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION SERVICE
Electrical, Heating & Air Condition
New Construction & Remodeling Installation
SERVICE & REPAIR i-
tfc 6/4 VISA, MasterCard & Discover accepted. ".'". ow. oo s


WARD'S CONSTRUCTION CO.
WAYNE WARD
ALL TYPES CONSTRUCTION
Custom Homes, Commercial, Additions, Etc.
647-8639 tc6/11

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AN)I COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA tfc 6/4 904/229-6821


Hot Tar
Shingles
Repairs
Re-Roofing


ROOFING
JESSIE CONTRACTING
Free Estimates


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 of 648-5767 if no answer tfc 6/4


GLENN'S PAINT Rebuild Wrecks
/ Body & Window Work

& BODY SHOP Expert Painting
& BODY SHOP Free Estimates
503 First Street Port St. Joe Insurance Claims
Phone 227-7133 tic 6/4









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 25,1992 PAGE 3B





Not Much Was Recorded In St. Joseph Between 1784-1819


This is the ninth in a series of articles of Harvest
of History.

There is little known of the immediate vicinity of
St. Joseph from 1784, and the purchase of Florida
by the United States in 1819, followed by its occupa-
tidn in 1821. History tells us there were a few Span-
ish fishermen located on the shores of St. Joseph
Bay.
There was constant fighting between North and
West Florida, between the Indians and their aides;
the runaway Negroes from Georgian plantations; and
the United States forces, twice under General Jack-
son; with the Creek Indians of Georgia making fo-
rays upon the Seminoles of this section. It was a hid-
ing place for renegades from both the British army
and the Colonial forces which had been stationed in
the Carolinas and Georgia; no progress toward devel-
opment of the country could take place, and North-
west Florida became but little other than a barren
fighting ground, a "no man's land", occupied by a
few people.
Under this date (1823) the Journal of John Lee
Williams, the Commissioner appointed 'with W.H.
Simmons, to locate the seat of Government of the
Territory of Florida, gives us this glimpse of St. Jo-
seph's Bay:
"October 8th Early this morning we sailed
around Cape False, supposing it to be San Bias, and
entered St. Joseph's Bay, thinking it was the Apa-
lachicola. I was unable to procure in Pensacola ei-


their map or chart of the coast. It was, late in the eve-
ning before we reached the head of the bay and
discovered that we were land-locked; our boat at
length got on a shoal from which we were unable to
remove it. Being much fatigued, we soon fell asleep
and rested until the morning.
October 9th This morning we took much
pains in examining the coast. Upon crossing the pe-
ninsula we immediately discovered that we could not
be in Apalachicola Bay as there was no outlet to the
southward. We here saw many waterfowls and shell
fish of which the conchs were extremely large. This
bay, although very deep at the entrance, is very shal-
low after proceeding fifteen or sixteen miles inland.
The cape which surrounds the south and east sides
is narrow and formed of several sharp parallel ridges
of sand, amongst which were some pools of fresh wa-
ter. A large bayou at the southwest penetrates within
five rods of the Gulf. The south shore is paved with
beautiful shells. This bay will afford a harbor for
large vessels, safe and of easy approach. We an-
chored at 12 m., just behind the northwest point of
the north. On this cape we discovered the finest cab-
bage (Palm) trees."
In 1829, on the eastern shore of St. Joseph Bay
was now established the new settlement of St. Jo-
seph. An individual, by the name of Captain Gotts-
borough is said to have selected the site of this new
settlement.
The Proprietor, G.J. Broughton, St. Joseph, May
1st, 1829, of the Mansion House said that those that


re desirous of procuring a pleasant and healthy resi-
dence during the summer season, the City of St. Jo-
seph offers many unparalleled advantages; the heat
of the day is constantly tempered by the cool and in-
vigorating sea breeze......... sea bathing, that impor-
tant preservative of health, may here be enjoyed in
greatest perfection, having a large and commodiou
building expressly for that purpose......... extensive
stables are attached to the establishment........*
For the short period of its existence, (1835-
1845), the city of St. Joseph's importance in the an-
nals of Florida history is without parallel. St. Joseph
was located about one mile southeast of modem Port
St. Joe.
The old city was begun in 1835 as a direct result
of a United States Supreme Court ruling. The court
decision declared The Forbes Company, successors
of the powerful English trading firm of Panton, Les-
lie, and Company the legal owners of some
1,250,000 acres of land which included the city of
Apalachicola.
Immediately following the court ruling, St. Jo-
seph was begin. The site of the new city was just be-
yond the limits of the vast acreage held by the
Forbes Company and was located on one of the fin-
est natural harbors on the entire Gulf coast.
The rapid growth and development of St. Joseph
was a phenomenon hitherto unequaled in the
sparsely settled Territory of Florida. It appeared that
St. Joseph mushroomed overnight into a city and


seaport ranking commercially with the ports of Mo-
bile, New Orleans, and Apalachicola in the exporting
of cotton. The prime economic function of St. Joseph
was to divert the rich cotton traffic of the interior of
Georgia and Alabama from the rival port of Apalachi-
cola.
This goal was to be accomplished first by means
of a canal. The canal plan, however, was abandoned
before it was begun and changed to that of a rail-
road.
The St. Joseph and Lake Wimico Railroad was
begun in 1835 and it was Florida's first railroad to
use steam locomotives. The line, nine miles in
length, ran from St. Joseph to a point on what is
now Depot Creek. The line was completed in March,
1836, and was formally opened with two Baldwin lo-
comotives in September, 1836. After a short period
of operation the line was abandoned due to the con-
stant running aground of the cotton barges in Lake
Wimico. It was the forerunner of the longer St. Jo-
seph and Iola Railroad which was completed in
1839. The St. Joseph and lola Railroad was 28 miles
in length and was the longest railroad in the Territo-
ry. It was Florida's third steam powered railroad.**
The capital stock of the Lake Wimico Canal and
Railroad Company was $250,000.00.*

*Porter, Louise M., The Lives of St. Joseph, pp.
15-17. 23.
**From the files of Charles B. Smith.


.Space Shuttle Columbia Going Aloft Carrying Flatworms


When the Space Shuttle Co-
lumbia lifts off from Kennedy
Space Center in late June, the
dream of a Florida fifth grader -
now a 21-year-old college senior -
- will also come to life. Aboard
Columbia will be the 12-18 pla-
narian flatworms, the subjects of
a biological experiment developed
by Dena Rashkover who, as a 10-
year-old in 1982, won a scholas-
tic competition for her idea.
Ms. Rashkover's experiment,
formally title "Investigation of Ani-
mal Tissue Regeneration in a Mi-
cro-Gravity Environment," will


entail cutting the tiny worms in
half to observe how space affects
their unique ability to regenerate.,
- Ms. Rashkover, together with the
Spaceport Florida Authority and
the University of Central Florida,
will begin cutting the Space
Worms, together with an Earth-
bound control group, on the day
before Columbia's launch. Re-
searchers will compare the regen-
erative progress of the two groups
after Columbia's mission.
'The experiment will provide
clues to help scientists better un-
derstand the regeneration phe-


HRS Board Formed


for 14-County Area


As part of the reorganization,
of the Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services, a Health
and Human Services Board is be-
ing created in this area. Prospec-
tive board members need to be a
resident of this district which is
composed of Ba., "Gulf, Franklin,"
Calhoun, Holmes, Washington,
Gadsden, Jackson, Liberty, Leon,
Jefferson, Wakulla, Madison, and
Taylor counties. Additionally they
need to represent this area's pop-
ulation with respect to age, gen-
der, and ethnic background, and
have demonstrated an interest in
meeting our community's health
and human services needs.
The nomination and selection
process is currently underway.
Any resident of the community
may now apply to.serve on the
Board. Their application will be
reviewed by a committee of per-
sons selected by the chief circuit
judges, school boards, county
commissioners and the governor.
This committee will then recom-
mend board candidates to the
governor and county commis-
sions. Of the 23 members of the
District 2 board, 18 will be ap-
pointed by the county commis-
sions and five will be appointed
by the governor. The establish-
ment of boards will increase local
control over how money is spent
and targeted to meet community


* Thank You
We would like to thank all
those in the community for the
food, visits, concerns, and espe-
cially the prayers during our time
of loss. Your expressions of con-
cern and lover were very much
appreciated.
We are especially thankful
and grateful to our Howard Creek
Baptist Church family and Pastor
Ottis Mann.
God bless each and every one
of you.
Our Love In Christ,
The Family of Shorty Williams


needs.
The most important element
of a successful board will be the
appointment of persons commit-
ted to human services and able to
represent the diverse interests of
this community. ,z .: ._ ..
For more information on our
health and human services
board, or to receive an applica-
tion for board membership,
please contact Ralph Harmsen at
(904) 488-0569 or Norton Kil-
bourn at 653-8883.


nomenon," said James A. Ralph,
Director of the Launch and Pay-
load Systems for the Spaceport
Florida Authority. "Insight into
this unique biological process
could benefit similar research
into human nerve tissue, and the
effects of long-duration space
flight on other living organisms."
Donn L. Hennessy, General
Manager of the Spaceport USA
Visitors Information Center at
Kennedy Space Center, one of the
original sponsors of the experi-
ment competition, expressed his
excitement about finally having
this experiment flown aboard the
Space Shuttle.
'We owe a special thanks to
the Spaceport Florida Authority
for arranging this opportunity to
fly aboard STS-50, and especially
Jim Ralph, who originally admin-
istered the scholastic competition
in 1982 and pursued the realiza-
tion of this experiment with Ms.
Rashkover for over a decade,"
said Mr. Hennessy. "All of us at
Spaceport USA join with the
Spaceport Florida Authority and
Mr. Ralph in; reflecting a great
Seal of pride for her experiment."
Ms. Rashkover's experiment
was proposed .when she was a
fifth grade student at Cooper City
Elementary School in Cooper
City. While working with planaria
for a science fair project, she


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learned of the space experiment
competition sponsored by the Ca-
naveral Council of Technical Soci-
eties, and TW Recreational Servic-
es, Inc., operators of the
Spaceport USA Visitors Informa-
tion Center at Kennedy Space
Center.
She conceived the notion of
sending the worms into space,
and entered her proposal in the
competition. Although the contest
included over 100 entries from
high school and college students,


Ms. Rashkover's idea won first
prize: a flight for her experiment
aboard one of NASA's space shut-
tles.
The project was intended to
fly years ago, but technical prob-
lems with the experiment appara-
tus sidetracked the program until
it was revived earlier this year.
While aboard Columbia, the
Space Worms will be under the
care of Mission Specialist Carl
Meade. Mr. Meade will be respon-
sible for operating the experiment


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During the past week and for the
month to come, tournament
teams in the Dixie Youth Program
of Port St. Joe and the Little
Major League program. in
Wewahitchka will be competing in
tournament play. We are proud of
these young players and the fine
job they do of representing their
county in the surrounding
communities. They are a credit to
Gulf County. We're proud of them.
. their coaches ... parents and
fans .... and we're proud of our
hometown. .


TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS


CHUCK


ROAST


(Family Pak)


CARNATION 12 OZ. CAN K 5
EVAPORATED MILK ........... 9
EASY-ON PRE-PRICED AT 99t 22 OZ.
SPRAY STARCH ............... "a
24 USE 70 OZ. BOX
TIDE ULTRA ............... $5.49
BONUS PACK 45% FREE 32 OZ. $ 9
409 CLEANER ............... $1. 9
DOVE PRE-PRICED AT $1.29 22 OUNCE
DISH LIQUID ....................... 99
RQNCO THIN & REGULAR 7 OUNCE
SPAGHETTI ................. 3/991
DOWNY 64 OZ. .
FABRIC SOFTENER ...... $2.99.
RONCO 80Z. '../
ELBOW MACARONI ........2/9.,.
KRAFT 7.25 OZ. '
MAC. & CHEESE DINNER ... 59'
BUTTERFIELD 1.5 OZ. 9/
POTATO STICKS .....9.....9. 9
-CHARMIN 4 ROLL PACKAGE
BATH TISSUE .................. 9
1/2 GALLON CHECK STORE FOR BRAND, ON SAL o f
APPLE JUICE ................ ...L. 9
DUNCAN HINES 18. 50Z. (excluding Angel Food)
CAKE MIX .........................9. 9
BUMBLE BEE PACKED IN OIL OR WATER 6.125 OZ /99
CHUNK LIGHT TUNA ......
IGA 16oz. 9
COFFEE CREAMER ............ 99
RINSO ULTRA 10 USE 16 OZ. .
SOAP POWDER ................. 99


me..... Lb.


TABLERITE QUALITY
Chuck Tenders ........ Lb.


TABLERITE QUALITY
Top Blade Steak
S SLICED FREE 10-12 Lb. Avg. Weight
Sirloin Tip Roast

-3- f' -
r f~ ~ uwul nictxl J^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


mm... Lb.

n...... Lb.


Lb. a169


FARMER'S CHOICE
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s199
$199

$199


* THORNE APPLE VALLEY SLICED
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FROZEN
Turkey Breast ......... Lb.


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TORTILLA CHIPS-..................
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Catsup "

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i


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YELLOW
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ears

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FOODLINERS ...
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.
Prices Good June 24-30.'.".,






RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


TABLERITE QUALITY FAMILY PAK
Chuck Steak ..
TABLERITE QUALITY FAMILY PAK
Shoulder Steak


.I.u.m .


TENDER FRYING
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