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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02926
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 2, 1992
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02926

Full Text





1J08 Y
A~LBERTVILLE AL 3,r5o~


THE


USPS 518-880


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA


FIFTY-FOURTH YEAR. NUMBER 18


PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JANUARY 2,1992


... A Year of Anxiety and Drama


The year of 1991 presented Gulf County
with more tragedy than its citizens are accus-
tomed to experiencing in a single 365-day pe-
riod of time.
Three traffic fatalities, two murders and an
armed robbery and kidnapping shocked the
residents of the county as the acts set a
record of sorts for the county. It was an unu-
sual year for two people, from the same neigh-
borhood, to be murdered in the county. Cou-
pled with the three traffic fatalities and the
armed robbery, it was a dramatic year, which
left a lot, of grief behind as it faded into wher-
ever old years fade into.
Curtis Addison was shot by his wife,
Elaine, in a family dispute and Kelvin Cherry
was stabbed, fatally, and John Henry Robin-
son was charged with the killing. Addison was
ruled not guilty in Circuit Court in the killing
of her husband. Robinson has not come to'
trial yet.
The traffic fatalities all occurred during the
first half of the year, with Albert Bass of We-
wahitchka meeting death in an accident on
January 23; Jody Evans of Port St. Joe dying
in a crash on March 31 and Robert George
Kinney of Wewahitchka, suffering fatal inju-
ries in an April 14 collision.
Another tragedy was the death of Edward
Mobley, 67, who was killed by a bolt of light-
ning while fishing from his boat in St. Joseph
Bay. Mobley, a visitor here in Port St. Joe at
the time of his death, was one of three per-
sons who met death by lightning strikes with-
in a 50-mile radius of Port St. Joe this past
summer.
There was the tragedy of two Wewahitchka
brothers meeting death by drowning during
the past year. Michael Dorsey fell from a
shrimp boat he was moving from Apalachicola
to Wewahitchka in January of last year and
drowned in the Apalachicola River. In May,
his brother, Gene Dorsey was catfishing in the
Dead Lakes and apparently fell from his boat
and drowned in theLakes. -....
In Port St. Joe, Mrs. Alyce Slowe, a long-


A drilling rig pulls an eight-inch natural gas
main out of the ground after it was bored under
the Intracoastal Canal at White City.


time resident, died when her home on Eighth
Street burned.
GULF WAR ATTRACTS ATTENTION
During the year when the nation observed
the 50th anniversary of the Japanese attack
on Pearl Harbor, it also experienced an entry


Another Gulf County citizen of note who
received recognition this past year was Mrs.
Lola Costin, who was selected by the Chamber
of Commerce to receive their Citizen of the
Year award, after a life-time of helping others
in time of need.


The Year Had tar, Murder,

Robbery, Dea By Other

Violent Means But .

Important Pe Milestones

Were Also Recorded By People

and Events.


into a new war-the war in the Persian Gulf-
which called numerous young men and wom-
en from the county to duty in that desert re-
gion of the world.
Yellow ribbons were the banner of ex-
pressed support and American flags flew eve-
rywhere as the war progressed into the early
summer. Many men and women from Gulf
County were caught up in the war when the
710th Group of the National Guard, stationed
in Apalachicola, was mobilized and sent to
Saudi Arabia in the first month of the year.
Families were separated and lives were in-
terrupted as the mobilization continued, but
in the early fall of the year, the fighting men
and women came marching home again, to a
relieved and happy reunion of families and
friends which greeted the returning warriors.
PEOPLE MAKE THE NEWS
Several people marked important mile-
stones in their lives here in Gulf County dur-
ing the year of 1991.
J. C. Belin, after spending most of his
working life as an executive with the St. Joe
Paper Company, retired from some of his re-
sponsibilities after serving as the Chief Execu-

tive Officer of the nation-wide corporation,
since the death of Edward Ball, long-time
leader of the firm, several years ago.
Belin, who has lived in Port St. Joe since
his early childhood, is still chairman of the ex-
ecutive committee of the St. Joe Paper Compa-
ny.
Robert Nedley, a native of Port St. Joe,
who, like Belin, has worked his way up in the
management of St. Joe Paper, was named
President and Chief Operations official of the
company during the past year. Nedley had
been promoted to Vice-President several years
ago.
Another Gulf County resident who marked
a milestone in her life this past year, was Mrs.
Edna Patrick Hardy, who had served the Over-
street Post Office for 74 years. The office was
closed down by the U.S. Postal Service in No-
vember, with Mrs. Hardy still at the helm.


COMMISSIONER MAKES NEWS
County Commission Don Parker was re-
moved from his office by Governor Lawton
Chiles in April, after Parker was charged with
accepting unemployment payments illegally.
Parker claimed he had the approval of unem-
ployment office officials to receive the pay-
ments, but was judged guilty, nevertheless,
and was permanently removed from office by
Governor Chiles.
Al Ray, who had lost the post to Parker in
the regular election by a tie vote guessing
game, was named to succeed Parker by the
Governor. Both candidates had received the
same number of votes in the election, which
was decided by each guessing a number clos-
est to a number sealed in a box. Parker's
guess was closer.
BRIDGES MADE THE NEWS
Since Gulf County had been attempting to
secure a highrise bridge to replace an old, un-


Gulf County
young men and
^ 'women joined a
half-million other
.Americans in the
SPersian Gulf War
S1this year. In the
mm photo above, local
support is shown
for the fighting
men and women
in one of the sev-
eral support ral-
lies held during
the nine-months
a they were gone.




dependable draw span at Highland View for
many years, and a highrise at Overstreet for
even longer, the year 1991 saw the county lit-
erally overrun with highrise bridges, complete
and under construction.
The bridge at Highland View, deemed to be
the most needed by local interests, was finally
started in early October. The state had ruled
that the Overstreet and White City spans were
more important, as escape routes for coastal
residents, and had moved them up in priority.
The White City bridge was completed and,
opened to traffic on September 23, after near-
ly two years of construction. The old bridge
was completely torn down and removed out of
the way three days later.
OTHER IMPORTANT HAPPENINGS
Several other important happenings in the
county didn't make much noise at the time,
but are destined to have an important Impact
on the county in the future.
St. Joe Natural Gas Company, here in Port
St. Joe, started work on laying an additional
eight-inch natural gas supply line to Port St.
Joe, to provide more of the cheap, dependable
fuel for industry along the coast. The project
is still in progress at this writing, but is near-
ing completion.
Another important happening, which took
only a vote of a governing body to decide, was
of immense importance to the county. That
"happening" was the decision made by the
Gulf County School Board, to continue elect-
ing Gulf County's Superintendent of Schools,
rather than hiring the Superintendent to fill
the position.
Wewahitchka resident, Grady Booth, had
asked the Board to allow the question to go to
a referendum vote, but the Board turned
down his request.
SOLID WASTE
Solid waste problems continued to take
the limelight in the county, just as it has for
the past four or five years. It is still a problem
of major proportions to the county and its
County Commission, and more than likely
won't go away at any foreseeable time in the
future.
During the past year, the County Commis-
(See 1991 on Page 7)


.1- -


WiI __ -- .. / ", -. ', '.
Police and Sheriffs Deputies look for clues along a dirt road in the armed robbery of a local super-
market.


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330 Per Co
Plus 2 Tax


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THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JANUARY 2,1992


No Dummy

To be perfectly candid with you, we were Just a little cool to-
ward the candidacy of Vince Bruner, when he ran for the office
of State Senator from our district. We thought he was a little too
brash and maybe not quite mature enough for such a monu-
mental task as being a state senator from a district as far-flung
and with the diversified interests our district has.
Despite the fact we hadn't gone all out and supported his
candidacy, we were at least satisfied with the fact that he hit the
ground running, when he was elected. He didn't let any grass
grow under his feet and fought like a young Tiger [which he is]
for the interest of the people in his district.
The young legislator must have made a good impression on
the professionals up in Tallahassee, too, since he drew member-
ship and even chairmanship of some pretty important commit-
tees, the first time out of the gate.
We were pleased with the fact that he wasn't afraid to speak
up, even though he did make some mistakes in judgment in the
early days of his term. He was trying and wasn't doing a bad job,
on the whole.
You know about Senator Bruner now. I don't care who you
are, you have heard of the young senator and his energetic man-
ner of going about things. He has been after some of those
things we don't like about entrenched government here in the
Panhandle.
Now, Senator Bruner has been stripped of his committee
membership with the Department of Corrections, because he
dared to vote against the entrenched career politicians in Talla-
hassee. If it were to be a decision between Senator Margolis and
Senator Bruner here in the Panhandle as to who should be pres-
ident of the Senate, she or him, Bruner would win out hands
down. It cost him a lucrative committee post, but he voted as his
people and his conscience dictated, not as the power wanted
him to. That must have caused some agonizing on Senator
Bruner's part.
Now, he says he just might shift to the Republican Party
when he comes up for re-election. Making the point that "I didn't
leave the Democratic Party, the Democratic Party left me!" Brun-
er can point to just how and when the Party did just that, as it
has done to many here in the Panhandle. Even though there are
many in the Panhandle who had rather align themselves with
the Democratic Donkey than the best Republican alive, many
have voted for the man rather than the party, unashamedly, for
years.
One thing we have found out during the past four years, Sen-
ator Bruner isn't a dummy and If we were a betting man, we'd
have to give odds for the Senator landing on his feet, whether or
not he runs as a Democrat, or, perish the thought, as a Republi-
can.


Hoodwink the People

While we're on the subject of Senator Bruner, we were more
than satisfied the other day when he offered the opinion that the
now-famous budget cuts weren't made in order to save money,
and at .the same time, not hamper necessary state operations.
The Sfeator feels the cuts were made to hoqdwlnk the people 9f.
the state of Florida.
"Hoodwink them in what manner?" you might ask. Well, ei-
ther the Senator and this writer are both paranoid, or we're both
right on target when we feel that the people of Florida are being
led down the primrose path to insisting that the state Legisla-
ture increase taxes.
That's right: insist!
We had never seen the idea expressed anywhere but here in
The Star, but Senator Bruner put respectability to the idea the
other day when he offered the opinion that the budget cuts-
even though cuts were necessary-were made in areas which
were more visible and necessary, in order to encourage the peo-
ple to demand more taxes so the services cut could continue to
function as they did prior to the cuts.
Taking money from education makes parents demand more
taxes so their children won't be short-changed in school. We
don't believe money is why they ARE short-changed, but that's
another story. The people will demand more taxes be levied in
order to beef up social programs such as Medicaid, back to their
previous level of spending. There are any number of highly visi-
ble government programs which were given the axe, so John Q.
Public could pick up on it without having to research anything.
We agree with Senator Bruner that the cuts were selective for
this purpose. Meanwhile, other boondoggles keep on doggling
merrily along, while they cost Senator Bruner and others their
committee posts for objecting.


g I didn't adopt my New Year's
resolution year-in-review phl-
...- "losophy over night. No sir. it
\ i came in several late December
-\ 1 Kesley "sittings" around the pot bellied
stove in the back of Woodrow
Colbert Kennon's Dry Goods, Mercantile.
..-. and Grocery Store.........
I tell you what, I'll make a "It's bad; I tell you, we let
deal with you today you don't them Russians get ahead of us."
tell me your list of New Year's res- Mr. Archie Moore was explaining
olutlons and I won't tell you. the events of the year Just past.
mine. I kind'a suspect by now 'We've got to get us a Spoonik
you and me both have seen and get it up in space quickly."
enough lists. "If we don't, we'll all be speak-
They asked the country mu- ing Russian one day." Mr. Ken-
sic singer his resolutions for the non rarely joined in the conversa-
upcoming year, "Uh Uh Uh, a tion, he must'a felt pretty strong
hit record." It took him three uh's about the Russians.
and a pause before he could A couple of the men nodded.
think of "hit record." My kind of "Ike's got to do something
guyl I don't think he had a list. and fast."
He was working more on getting "It's too cold to play golf, he's
through a bad interview than he got time....."
was on where he was going to be Laughter.
come July. I didn't understand the joke.
I'll tell you something else Buddy leaned down where the
you don't need to hear from me men couldn't hear, "What's a
today the year in review. Have Spoonik?"
you seen some of those shows? I shrugged my shoulders.
"Now we go to Bernard Shaw in "Well, fellas," Mr. Abernathy
Washington for the year's top sto- was a little older than the others
ry, Bernie." but he always made sense to me,
"'The Gulf War......" "I don't think anything we do or
It's almost like they think we say right here today is going to
could have forgotten. help us catch the Russians in the


space race. I'm more concerned
with why Woodrow raised the
price on his Prince Albert to
twelve cents a can."
I saw the twinkle in his eye
but I also caught the message.
Woodrow was here, and now.
I remember the year it was so
cold. The men talked mostly of a
late spring and late crops and
loss of revenue. 'Why, If I don't
get my corn in I don't see how I
can make it........" Mr. Gleason's
voice kind'a trailed off. We all
knew exactly what he meant.
I walked home that afternoon
with Ricky Gene and Yogi. We
were all depressed on account of
we weren't sure where Mr. Glea-
son was going to survive or not.
"It doesn't look good."
"I'll say."
'"Course if Mr. Gleason don't
make it, then we won't either."
"Reckon he'll die?" Yogi was
upset.
"I don't think so. Mr. Mayo
did say some of the families
might have to move!"
The conversation slowed. We
were too depressed for talking. I
sure didn't want to move........ It
was cold and getting late. I was
glad when the car came by. "Hop
in guys, you look cold." Mr. Aber-
nathy had thrown open the door


I


U


of that old Ford pick-up. "You
boys look like your number one
coon dog Just died why the
long faces?"
Ricky Gene told him about
Mr. Gleason going under. And
how the rest of us were going to
have to move. We'd never see
each other again. I was near 'bout
down to tears by now.
Mr. Abernathy's laugh began
as a low chuckle that Just kept
growing and growing. He'd pound
us on the back, "Boys, that's a
good onel" The laughter would
overtake him again. He changed
my tears to a smile. Things
couldn't be too bad if they were
that funny to Mr. A.
"Boys, remember this forever,
men who sit around pot bellied
stoves in December and think
they can change something by
looking back or predict the future
by guessing ahead are fools or
liars or both." The laughter took
him again. 'You don't know on
December 30th whether it's going
to be an early or late spring. Mr.
Gleason is all heated up because
he is dumber than most Fellas,
be smarter than the guy bringing
you the news."
He stopped to let us out at
(See KES on Page 3)


Christmas Eve Brought Our Family A Little Babe In A 747


CHRISTMAS IS over and I
now know how Mary and Joseph
felt on that very first Christmas. I
had virtually the same kind of
Christmas Eve they experienced
over 2,000 years ago. It makes for
a different kind of Christmas, I
can tell you.
I have lived through some dif-
ferent kinds of Christmas days in
my life, but never one quite like
the one which developed at our
house on Christmas Eve of this
year.
Until this year, I guess about
,the most unusual Christmas I
ever had was a long time ago,
when I was an 11-year-old boy,
back in Oklahoma. Daddy was
here in Port St Joe working on
the construction of the paper mill
and couldn't get back home for
Christmas. So, he notified us he
was sending a present for the
family for Christmas.
Well, the day came, two days
prior to Christmas, when the
present arrived at the Frisco Rail-
road station at the bottom of De-


pot Hill, just east of town. It had
rained, the rain had frozen and
then it had snowed on top of that
ice. It was hard to walk, ride or
crawl outside without sliding
down. But, my brother Will and I
set out down Depot Hill, with a
wagon, to bring the gift home .
a treacherous walking trip down
icy Depot Hill. Mind you, we had
to come back up that hill, too.
We got the gift which was a
huge box and started trying to
wrestle it back up the hill in that
little coaster wagon, over frozen
ground, slush and snow. To this
day, I don't know how we did it,
but we did. The present turned
out to be a fine radio, which


could pick up stations all the way
to Chicago and Del Rio, Texas. .

BUT THIS CHRISTMAS was
much more satisfying than that
one so long ago, which resulted in
a radio, even though it provided
hours of entertainment as we lis-
tened to Jack Armstrong, Jack
Benny, The Shadow, Fred Allen,
Charlie McCarthy and all the oth-
er REAL programs.
This Christmas, the whole
family had gathered at our house,
as usual, to enjoy a Christmas
Eve feast and open our presents.
There was a house full, but it was
to get even more full before the
evening was over. The evening


was to provide a re-play of the
original Christmas before the day
was done.
We read the Christmas story
from Luke before the packages
were opened, and the similarity
of the two events-that one then,
and the one which we were to ex-
perience-made an impression
on me.
OUR FIRST GRANDSON had
returned recently from a duty sta-
tion in Germany and Is now sta-
tioned at Fort Benning. While in
Germany, he married and he and
his wife had a son-my first great
grandson-Just short of six
months ago. Since the grandson
was in training in Fort Benning,
he couldn't bring his wife and
child over until his training end-
ed. It ended a couple of weeks
ago, and started the wheels turn-
ing to get his family to the states.
The process met with one de-
lay after another and it started to
appear as if their arrival wouldn't
be in time for Christmas. The


grandson, who was home for the
holidays, was disappointed, natu-
rally. The grandmother, our
daughter, was also disappointed,
since she wanted to meet her new
grandson and have her daughter-
in-law here to fuss over. I'll ad-
mit, the great grandparents were
feeling a little anxious, too.
THEN, THE MIRACLE hap-
pened. Our new granddaughter
called three days prior to Christ-
mas and said she was finally
cleared to come, and with any
luck, she and the new son-
grandchild-great grandchild, may
burst on the scene as a Christ-
mas present.
Then, Christmas Eve, Beate
[pronounced Bee-Etta] called [af-
ter we had been advised of delays
in flight] and said, "I'm in the At-
lanta airport and will be in Pana-
ma City in 59 minutes."
Beate doesn't speak very
much English, so we couldn't get
a blow-by-blow on how things
worked out lfke they did, but that


doesn't matter, so long as things
DID work out.
Naturally, grandson, Richard,
"lit a shuck" for Panama City and
about 9:30, came prancing in the
house, where the entire family
was waiting for the arrival of
Beate and little Christopher Cal-
vin.
The little fella had been on an
airplane for 22 hours, but he act-
ed like he was glad to get home.
He never even whimpered the
whole evening.
From what I understand,
grandson number two and his
wife, Marion will be bringing my
first great granddaughter back
from Italy, Just in time for Valen-
tine day.
It was one of the nicest
Christmas presents I have ever
received, even though I did warn
my grandchildren that if they
made a great grandparent out of
me before I was 80 years old, I
was going to disown them.
Needless, to say, I have
changed my mind.


St. Joseph Bay
Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
Jan. 03 7:41 a.m. L -0.6 9:33 p.m. H 1.4
Jan. 04 8:21 a.m. L -0.6 10:11 p.m. H 1.3
Jan. 05 8:57 a.m. L -0.5 10:49 p.m. H 1.3
Jan. 06 9:32 a.m. L -0.5 11:21 p.m. H 1.2
Jan. 07 9:51 a.m. L -0.4 11:53 p.m. H 1.0
' Jan. 08 10:02 a.m. L -0.2
Jan. 09 12:18 a.m. H 0.8 9:57 a.m. L -0.1


Hunker Down with Kes


Who Knows, Who Cares, Why Bother


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
W-THESTAR- Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-$10.60 Si Months
SUSPHS 518880 Th Str ut of County--21.20 Year Out of County-$15.90 Six Months
Published Every Thursday at 304-308 William Avenue The Star
Port St. JoeP Florida 324 Post Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Seoond-Class Postag Paid at Pon St joe, F. Port St. Joe FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 their than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey........... Editor & Publisher
Af $. "' William H. Ramsey .......... Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
WFrenchie L Ramsey ..........Office Manaer AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 full weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ........ Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


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THE.m ST AR OT T U'! rlU -jvTuCT1AV ziAW 9 1009 aft


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell



The Day After Christmas
T'was the day after Christmas, when all through the house,
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.
The children were all nestled, all snug in car seats,
All hoping that Mamaw soon they would see,
Mom, she was with them, all ready to ride,
Sitting with purse clutched on the passenger side.
The kids were all dreaming of good things to eat,
While Mom was just hoping to survive the feat.
I had just settled back, with a "whew" from my mouth,
When all of a sudden it was quiet in the house.
Not a word from the kitchen, no steps in the hall,
No flush from the bathroom, no noise at alll
No loud tapes were playing, no door knocker banged,
No loud peals of laughter from any room came.
The cat was outside, the dog was there, too,
That's where they would stay, the day and night through.
When up in my bedroom there arose such a clatter,
It scared me to death, I didn't know what was the matter!
I scaled the steps, at least four at a time,
And when I got there, I stopped on a dime.
There on the crest of my clean dresser top,
Was my money clip dancing, and it wouldn't stop.
I jumped up and down and slid all around,
My knife soon joined in, like a silly clown.
When they finally stopped, I asked, 'Where's all my money?" '.
They both laughed and laughed till tears flowed like honey.
'Your money's all gone, your credit cards, too,
All you have left are bills that are due."
'You said Christmas was good, that Christmas was greatly
But you can't even remember all the food that you ate.
But you'll always remember what was under the tree,
Because you will be billed, there ain't nothing free."
T'was the day after Christmas, when all through the house,
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.
But tear drops were falling, on the bedroom floor,
Santa's always welcome, but not the bills any morel
C 4 > '


Girl Scouts
Help Others
Girl Scout Troop 451 of We-
wahitchka helped spread some
Christmas cheer this holiday sea-
son. The Troop helped a needy


Model Train

Show Set

for Saturday


Ricky Gene's. "Gosh, guys, I'm
too busy having fun right now, to-
day, to worry about yesterday or
care about predicting for tomor-
row."
Mr. A. was pretty hip for an
old man. And he still is.
Respectfully,
Kesley


Larry McArdle said the
show will go on Saturday and
everyone who is interested in
model trains is invited to come
by and see the collection set up
and operating.
The Fire Station is located
on Williams Avenue, behind
City Hall.


A house fire and a lost 14-
year-old boy were the only ad-
verse happenings of any conse-
quence here in Gulf County dur-
ing the Christmas holidays,
according to Port St Joe Police
Chief Carl Richter and Gulf
County Sheriff Al Harrison.
Police Lieutenant Jeff Duval
said Monday morning, a building
at 101 Main Street was slightly
damaged from a 3:15 a.m. fire
Monday morning.
'The fire started in a small
room near a water heater, with
damage confined mostly to the
small room," Duval said.
The Police spokesman said
the Florida Fire Marshall investi-



SS Incomes

Get Boost

for 1992
A 3.7 percent cost-of-living
adjustment will affect the amount
of Social Security and Supple-
mental Security Income (SSI) pay-
ments received in January.
This change raises the maxi-
mum Social Security retirement
benefit to .$1,088 a month and
the Federal SSI payment to $422
*a month for an individual and
$633 a month for a couple.
The tax rate for Social Securi-
ty remains unchanged at 7.65
percent each for employees and
employers. However, the wage
base, the amount of earnings
subject to the Social Security tax,
increases from $53,400 to
$55,500. The wage base for the
Medicare portion of the Social Se-
curity tax increases from
$125,000 to $130,200.
Benefit increases are made
annually based on the change in
the consumer price index as
measured from the third quarter
of one year to the third quarter of
the following year.
Other changes announced by
the Social Security Administra-
tion include new limits on the
amount of money a beneficiary
can earn and still receive full So-
cial Security benefits. The limits
for 1992 increase from $7,080 to
$7,440 for beneficiaries under 65;
from $9,720 to $10,200 for peo-
ple 65 to 69. The earnings limits
do not apply to people 70 and
- older.

Larry Witt Wins
Sr. Citizen Boat
The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens Association held a give-away
for a 15 foot Glystrom boat and
trailer. The drawing was held on
December 24th with Laurie Nel-
son pulling the name of the lucky
recipient, Larry Witt of Port St.
Joe.
The Association would like to
thank the following businesses
and individuals that sold tickets.
for them. Also,. a special thanks
to everyone that bought a ticket
or tickets to help the senior citi-
zens,.
First Union National Bank,
Citizens Federal Savings Bank,
Lanier's Variety Shop, .Brooks.
Barber Shops. Photo World, West-
ern Auto, Re-Sale Connection,
Piggly. Wiggly, Bill Landry, Dora.
Dykes, and Helen Smith.

FCCD Chapter
Holding Gala
Chapter 23 of the Florida
Council on Crime and Delinquen-
cy (FCCD) will hold its first 'semi-
formal winter gala affair on Janu-
ary 11 at the W.T. Neal Civic Cen-
ter in Blountstown. Social hour
Begins at 5:00 p.m. and dinner at
6:00 -p.m. CT will consist of a
steak dinner at $15 per person.
Tickets are available by calling
674-5901, ext. 193 or 205 or at
the door. Guest speaker is Kerry
Flack, State FCCD President and
special guest is Harry K. Single-
tary Jr., secretary of the Depart-
ment of Corrections.
All members, prospective
members and interested parties
are invited.


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.
9Pgpiesenting 'The Travelers'
*Auto *Home The Insurance Store Since 1943


*Business

*Flood *Life


8:30 till 6:00

Monday through Friday


*Bonds 221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We Are HERE to Service What We Sell
*


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent ROY SMITH, Agent


House Fire, Lost Hunter, Mar Holiday


family in Wewahitchka to have a Larry McArdle .and Ron
better Christmas by providing Luckie will be staging their
them with a tree, decorative lights model train show Saturday
and presents for all. from 10 a.m.to 4 p.m. in the
City Fire Station.
The show was scheduled be-
K es. i'crn.o',,'afore Christmas, but, illness'
S .. -. "'. ..r forced postponement of the
(From Lage 2) show.


Hoiiday Special


F6r Tak Out Order, Call 227-1670

Oysters $28.00 Bag
with every purchase of bag, receive 1 lb. saltine
crackers FREE

The World's Finest'
*Oysters -
*Clams
*Shrimp

*Crabs

Enjoy the best from St.
Joseph Bay and -
Indian Lagoon with us.,

INDIAN PASS

RAW BAR I
(On C-30 South of Port St. Joe)


,


rrTTP- WrAIP PnRT %T- JOE. FIL THURSDAY. JAN. 2. 1992


I


PfAG SA


i


gators were to be on the scene
Monday afternoon, performing a
routine investigation on the blaze.
Port St. Joe's Volunteer Fire
Department was called out at
3:15 a.m., Monday, to fight the
fire after the alarm was sounded
by a neighbor who saw the fire
flickering in a window of the two
story frame building.
Lieutenant Duval said it was
his information that nobody was
in the building at the time of the
fire.
YOUNG BOY LOST
Sheriff Al Harrison said his
deputies, the Gulf County Search
and Rescue Squad and the Flori-
da Marine Patrol found a 14-year-
old boy at about 5:40 p.m., Sat-
urday, just as it was getting dark.
The boy, Robbie Armstrong,
visiting from Wisconsin, was
hunting with Joe Davis of Wewa-
hitchka. The pair had put in at
Douglas Landing, on the Dalkeith
Road Saturday morning and
started squirrel hunting.


Free Books

From Arbor

Day Group

Now is the time to plan ahead
for your spring tree-planting pro-
ject, and a free booklet is availa-
ble from The National Arbor Day
Foundation to assist.
The free booklet, called Con-
servation Trees, uses colorful
photos and illustrations and
easy-to-understand descriptions
to guide tree planting and care.
The Conservation Trees book-
let includes these sections: .
*How to use windbreaks and
shad, trees to save energy in
your, home ....
yHow to attract songbirds to
your yard
*How to save trees during
construction
*How to save topsoil and help
farm profits with shelterbelts
*The right way to plant trees.
*The right way to prune trees
'The National Arbor Day
Foundation's Conservation Trees
program encourages Americans
to plant and manage trees to con-
serve soil, energy, water, wildlife,
and the atmosphere," John Ro-
senow, the F9undapJon's execu-
qlv4diyector said.
"The Conservation Trees
booklet is'a central part of this
educational project. It serves as.a
useful guide for, people in all
areas, whether they live in Ameri-
ca's largest cities or in the coun-
'try,' Rosenow added.
For your free booklet, send
your name and address to: Con-
serltation Trees, The National Ar-
bor! Day Foundation, Nebraska
City, NE 68410.


When the boy did not return
to the starting point when he was
scheduled to, a hunt was begun
by his companion. After a while of
fruitless searching, the Gulf
County Sheriffs Department was
called, and the search was start-
ed.

Whitfield Named
Gulf Chairman
Ted Whitfield, of Wewahitch-
ka, has been appointed Gulf
County Chairman by the Florida
Forestry Association. In this ca-
pacity, Whitfleld will be acting as
the Association's personal repre-
sentative in Gulf County to help
bring forestry information and
the Association's activities to
members of the local forestry
community. Whitfield is owner of
Whitfield Timber Company, We-
wahitchka.
The County Chairman post is
an effort of the Florida Forestry
Association to improve the flow of
information and communication
between the Association and peo-
ple with an interest in forestry.
Anyone desiring information
on educational seminars, forestry
regulations, membership, or oth-
er specific activities of the Associ-
ation should contact Whitfield at
904-639-5556, in Wewahitchka.


The search unit combed the
woods in the Douglas Landing
area for nearly five hours before
they located the young boy, head-
ed in the direction of the landing.
Sheriff Harrison said the boy
was lost and didn't know where
he was going, but in a short while
he would have walked out at
Douglas Landing. He was un-
harmed.

Harrelson Calhoun
County Chairman
David Harrelson of St. Joe
Forest Product Company's Wetap-
po Creek unit, has been appoint-
ed chairman of Calhoun County
for the Florida Forestry Associa-
tion.
Harrelson is a forester with
St. Joseph Land and Develop-
ment Company in Wewahitchka
and will act as the association's
representative in Calhoun
County.
Harrelson, his wife, Jana and
their son, live at Wetappo, near
Wewahitchka on State Road 22.
The chairmanship program is
an effort by the association to im-
prove the flow of information be-
tween the association and people
with an interest in forestry.


FRANK HANNON, Agent








I


Retired Educators Meeting Jan. 7
Retired Educators Associa- regular luncheon meeting at Gulf
tion of Gulf County will hold their Sands Restaurant on January 7
at 11:30 a.m. ET.
rhaM Youf All members are urged to at-
A hank Yotend this meeting on elder affairs.


PAGE 4AA-1-1 MiWAK PC Iai nUZ ItT. *- Tmr--I----A-1'--- -1A MP&
CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM

Thoughts About

0 Food and Feeding

Babies Should Be Breast Fed

," -,- -' Eli"zaet By
.' ... Elizabeth C. Jones, M.D.
*
Most babies are born fairly normal as to weight and height.
When they deviate greatly from normal values later, this can be
traced back to things that have happened to them since birth. It is
very easy to fall into traps where feeding children is involved and
this can result in a malnourished child.
With few exceptions, babies should be breast fed. Breast milk
has many advantages over cow's milk for feeding babies. When a
baby is breast fed, the balance of supply and demand is fairly easy
to reach.
Parents of formula fed babies will often say to me, "He is not
satisfied" with one or the other formula. When mixed properly there
are the same calories and food value in Similac, SMA, Nursoy, and
Isomil. The baby might be more comfortable with one or the other,
but there should be no difference in food value or satiety factor.
Many parents interpret any cry from a baby as a cry of hunger.
Babies cry frequently and for many reasons other than hunger. New
babies often need only the satisfaction of sucking and not more
food. A bottle of water or a pacifier will satisfy just as well as a bot-
tle of formula. A fat baby may please some parents and grandpar-
ents, but is not necessarily a healthy baby.
The next problem to arise after feeding too much formula is
usually the premature introduction of solid food. In the past there
seemed to be contest among mothers of new babies to see who
could start what food the earliest. It is really not good for babies to
have much in the way of foods other than breast milk or formula
before six months of age. I will usually have mother slowly begin to
introduce foods about three months of age, but this is to introduce
the spoon and establish feeding practices. When introducing a new
food, this food should be fed at least three days before introducing
another new food.
The food progression I recommend for babies goes from cereal
to vegetables to meats to fruits. It seems children are better meat
and vegetable eaters when we do it this way. Fruits are never a
problem because all babies love fruits. When a baby has recurring
diarrhea it is often caused by too much fruit and juice. Children
under two years of age often do not tolerate fruits except bananas,'
applesauce and apple juice.
After early feeding problems, the next difficulty will usually
arise between ages one and two years. The child from one year to
two years usually gains only four to five pounds. After tripling his
birth weight by one year of age, this is a drastic change. Because he
is no longer adding weight rapidly, the child does not need as much
food as he had previously been Ingesting. At this age it seems the
child eats a good meal only every two to three days.
When a child is not growing rapidly he will probably not eat a
lot. Because the eating pattern has changed, the parent feels some-
thing is wrong. They make the mistake of feeding the child at times
other than mealtimes. For example Robert does not eat his break-
fast About 10-10:30 he comes whining for something to eat. Be-
cause he did not eat breakfast, the care giver will give him some-
thing to eat. Because he eats at 10-10:30 he will also not be hungry
and will not eat at lunchtime. Instead of urging the child to eat, ad-
here to regular mealtimes. If your child does not eat at mealtime,
that is o.k., but he should not be fed between meals. If parents are
offering nutritious meals on a regular meal schedule, the child will
eat when he is hungry and he will not satisfy his hunger with non-
nutritious food between meals.
Many families are spending money that should be going for
milk, meat, breads, fruits, and vegetables on potato chips, corn
chips, candy and soft drinks. Strong bones, good muscles, good vi-
sion and general good health do not come in a candy wrapper pr a
Coca. Cola bottle.
L .. ..


Mr. an4"Mrs. Kevin Watts .".,
Jacqueline Owens

Nicholle Owens and

Kevin Watts Wed
Nicholle Gilman Owens and Technital Services, Inc. at Egli
Kevin Troy Watts, both of Froe- AFB. He is the,son of James an
port, exchanged marriage vows in Judy Watts of Iridiian Pass.
a double ring ceremony on No- Serving as, matron of honc
vember 30 at 7:00 p.m. at St. was Noelle Gilipiatn Mondragon <
Paul Lutheran Church in Nfie- Niceville, sister of the bride. Bes
ville. man was James Watts. father (
The bride-elect is: a 1983 the groom., *iJuior bridesmaid
Niceville High School graduate. was Nija Gilmian of Andros'
She is a former employee of Vitro land, .Bahamas, sister, of th
Technical Services, Inc. at Eglin bride. Flower girl was Jacquelirn
AFB. She is a senior at the Uni- Owens of Freeport, daughter,
versity of West, Florida in Pensa- the bride. Groomrsmen were Mar
cola, majoring in mathematics. Watts of- Huntsville,, Alabama
She has a prospective graduate brother of the groom, and Jame
date of April 24, 1992. She is the Brunson of Niceville. Soloist an
daughter of Roger and Louise Gil- organist, was Annette Tracy .
man of Andros Island, Bahamas, Choctaw Beach.
formerly of Niceville. '.A reception took place.at th
Comfort Inn of Niceville following
The groom-elect is a 1979 .the, wedding,.ceremony., Servirn
graduate of Port St. Joe High the .cake;,.was,,Cher.yl .Cqleman
School. He is employed by Vitro Niceville. Punch servers were Bar
^~ ~ ~ ~~hr Anni^.^ -^,^ pc rtf Pnrtlnn^l nnrl T n',,


Learn to Work With Native

Materials at the Garden Center


fliank you god forgiving us
this precious fitle angel
who created love, laughter and
happiness
throughout her surrounding
[oved ones
during this Christmas.


The Port St. Joe Garden Club
will meet Thursday, January 9,
2:00 p.m. ET at the Garden Cen-
ter, located on Eighth Street.
Hostesses greeting members,
winter visitors, and interested la-
dies will be Mary Mclnnis and
Zelda Brown.
Ethel Bridges, first vice-
president, will demonstrate the
many uses of the beautiful, dried
wild plants from Gulf County.
The arrangements and use of var-
ious containers will surprise and
please all who like working with
native materials.
The Port St. Joe Garden Club
cordially invites all winter- visi-
tors, interested ladies and mem-
bers to share in this informative
program; and then go out into the
countryside and roadsides gath-


Now Under Construction

THE COTTAGES AT...

BARRIER DUNES


Pre-Construction Offering
For A Limited Time
Furnished-Models Starting at C
* Single Family Homes
* 2 Bedrooms, 2 Full Baths
* Landscaped Lot Included
* Clubhouse With Pool
and Fitness Center


nly79,900
* Pitch and Putt Golf
* (2) Lighted Tennis Courts
* Walk to the Gulf of Mexico
(700' of beach front)
Much More


For more information call:
(904) 229-2777 or (800) 624-3964

THE COTTAGES AT BARRIER DUNES
Star Route 1 Box 223 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


ering materials and make their
own dried arrangements.
Remember, all this is on Jan-
uary 9, Thursday, at 2:00 p.m. at
the Garden Center on Eighth
Street. Do come, and start 1992
with a happy meeting.

Music Series
Begins Jan. 28
A variety of musical. entegr-
tainment has been scheduled for
the 1992 "Great Performers" Se-
ries, sponsored by the Gulf Coast
Community College Foundation.,-,
The series opens on Tuesday,
January 28, with "Brahms: A
Fairy Tale." "From Blues to
Broadway" is scheduled for Mon-
day, February 10 and Mondayi
March 16, is scheduled for a p0ro"
duction of "By George! America
Salutes Gershwin." ...
General admission tickets ar ]
available at the college bookstore
for $6 in advance or $7 at the
door. Curtain time is 7:30 p.m.
CT. '


"Let me
analyze your
insurance
needs with a
free Family
Insurance
Checkup.


CALL ME.
BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avenue
(Across from St. Joe Hardware)
Office: 229-6514
State Farm
Insurance Companies
Home Offices:
Bloomington, Illinois


Like a good neighbor
State Farm is there.


Men and Boys

SHIRT

SPORT
IA '%II1V


No cholesterol
in food preDaration
High quality food
(90
Catering S
- lllltga~ uie


HOUSE FOR RENT
4BR house at 107 Jackson
St., Oak Grove. $200 mo. Call
Donna Fuselier at 227-1854
or I.W. Duren at'227-1829.
TF1i2


=- Breakfast Lunch Dinner
-,Featuring Daily Luncheon Specials
and All You Can Eat Salad Bar
Saturday Night Special $7
Seafood Buffet 7.951 i
NOON BUFFET...........$4.95 ,
or Order from the wide selection on Our
Menu ,s
Evening Meal Begins at 5:00 PM
`7
74) 227-7400 '
'rvices Also Available
at.': '
,J,,


'SWEAR
~ ~ a A


Jmr inI I ql vvbe I lh


Patrickjs


Restaurant
4/ 2 Reid : l'erue
Port St. Joe, Florida


1 ^' *

. ': 7' .*




l '.:''..
I. ,',,,

C, ,

U,"


Ladies

SSPORTSWEAR

CASUALS

DRESSES






.~~ "vT\


Costn'sDeprtmnt tor


1


I. 1 _


__ ~_


THE TAR POT S. JO. F HURDAY.JAN 2.199


PAr AA


Thanks to mthe staff ana nurs-
es at Gulf Pines Hospital for their
care and concern while a patient
there, for Dr. Oksanen, nurses
and staff. Also, thanks to the peo-
ple of Port St. Joe for their
prayers, visits, cards and flowers
and to my family for their loving
care. Thanks again.
Mary Yates


17, -, v***i


~BWk


g


14


k










THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, JAN. 2. 1992 UAV5U~ NA


-


U
-, A~I1~. L~tAiA


r 1LL IN









By: Richard Miller
*Resolve, in the new year, to
protect your car against theft.
Steering locks and ignition or
fuel cutouts are less expensive
than regular alarms. Etching
windows with the vehicle identi-
fication number is effective and
cheap. Best bet: lock your car
every time.
*Eliminating noise isn't the
only reason for repairing or re-
placing rusted-out tailpipes and
mufflers. Noxious fumes might
enter the passenger compart-
ment if the exhaust system is
deteriorated.
*If you' must stop along the
highway, pull off to the shoul-
der. To help remain visible to
other drivers in darkness or bad
weather, turn on interior lights
and four-way flashers.
*Low-cost solution to clean
auto upholstery is made up of
one part household ammonia
and three parts water. Vacuum
up loose dirt before any wet
scrubbing. Let fabric dry thor-
oughly.
*Maintenance tip from
100,000-mile drivers: nothing
extends your car's life like regu-
lar oil and filter changes, even
more often than the owner's
manual recommends.
'*Auto Repair: Good mainte-
nance is a low-cost investment
in a longer life for your car. You
can depend on our knowhow at

GQuffFord

Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales
^^^---^^MEMO


FmHA Provided $121 on for Homes
FmHA Provided $121.5 Million for Homes


The Farmers Home Adminis-
tration (FmHA) provided $121.8
million in loans and grants in
Florida for farming, housing,
community facilities, and busi-
ness development during the fis-
cal year 1991, reported Jim Cher-
ry, Florida FmHA State Director.
"FmHA continued its signifi-
cant effort in providing affordable
housing to low-income rural resi-
dents of Florida during fiscal year
1991," said Cherry. "Our role is to
help families who cannot obtain
housing through commercial
credit sources to obtain safe, de-
cent and adequate housing
through FmHA credit," Cherry
said.
Under FmHA's rural housing
program, total loans and grants
in Florida amounted to approxi-


We have discounts
to help you drive down
the cost of car insurance.
If the-cost of your car insurance seems to be heading in the wrong direction,
-se s fAllstate an help turn things around
We have iscounts that can help you 'save money.
You can vye by having a good driving; record. Or by driving a car equipped
:with air bags or a.four-wheel anti-lock brake system. Even by insuring more than one,
,-car with'Alistale. ";
Which Allstate bar insurance discounts do"you
'quality for? Just give .us a call to find out. We'll get your You~ in o hands
car insurance costs headed in the right direction. e*i c. ea kl'
GASKIN-GRADDY
Insurance Company
Call Collect 639-5077 or 639-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
1-800-782-6802
Serving the Panhandle Since 1931

) ,-,

Scenic Riverside Dining

RIVERFRONT RESTAURANT
653-8139 123 Water Street Apalachicola
The Rainbow Inn & Marina

Daily Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner Specials
Come watch one of our lovely sunrises this week
and enjoy a breakfast of:
Lemon Pancakes with Raspberry Butter

Fresh Squeezed Chilled Orange Juice
Home of the Delicious Seafood Boat
Apalachicola Oysters on the Half Shell
Fresh Locally Caught Seafood
Live Maine Lobsters

All entrees include Garden Salad or Cole Slaw and
Accompaniment of the day.
Thursday Evening: (Senior Citizens Night) Golden
fried trigger fish filets (with outrageous dipping
sauce), cheese grits, cole slaw, corn fritters........ 5.95
Friday Evening: (Surf & Turf) Rib eye steak and 1/2
baked stuffed lobster........................................ 16.95
'Saturday Evening: Large Gulf shrimp served
Polynesian style with stir fried rice and vegetables
....................... ... .. ......... ................ .................. .. 12 .95
Sunday Evening: (Noon till 9 p.m.) -Cup of French
oriinn soup, chargrilled and large sauteed shrimp,
onion rings and twice baked potatoes............... 8.95
>- ,'J


mately $73 million. Most of the
loans provided single family
homes for low-income families
who otherwise could not have
purchased a home. Over 1100
single-family housing loans were
made for $45 million. An addi-
tional $19 million was loaned for
constructing rental housing
which provided almost 600 new
apartments for rural residents.
The agency's housing funds also
financed farmworker housing,
housing repairs, and the preser-

Seniors Sponsoring
OYM Pageant
The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens Association is proud to have
been named to be the new spon-
sor for the 1992. Outstanding
Young Woman of the Year Pa-
geant. This year's pageant will be
held January 11, at the Port St~
Joe High School commons area.
Watch The Star for further de-
tails.
Congratulations to all the
contestants.

Watch Night
Services Slated
Watch Night Services will be
held at Hickory. Hollow Church,
Pine Street, Overstreet, beginning
at 8:30 p.m. until 12:00 p.m.
Tuesday, December 31. Everyone
is: cordially invited to attend. Re-
freshments will be served.

Card of Thanks
We would like to thank every-
one for their concern, flowers, vis-
its, prayers, and phone calls
while our son, Spike, was in the
hospital. He is back home, doing
better. Special thanks to the em-
ployees of CCA. May God bless
each of you.
Thanks again,
Carmen & Peggy McLemore


ovation of homes in rural areas.
Florida FmHA is currently
providing the financing for
20,000 houses throughout the
'state. In addition, about 400 ru-
ral apartment complexes and 16
farmworker housing complexes in
Florida are FmHA-financed.
Florida's rural communities
received $19.2 million in low in-
terest loans and $7.1 million in
grants to finance 18 projects in-
cluding two landfills, a jail, a city
hall, and several water and sewer
systems.
The agency's agricultural
lending in Fiscal Year 1991 in-
cluded 175 direct and guaranteed
loans totaling $14.6 million.
Cherry stated he was
"pleased to report that our delin-




./A
M- i



-






Lauradenna Phillips

Second Birthday!
Lauradenna Phillips celebrat-
ed her second birthday December
27th. Helping her celebrate were
her four brothers, West, Wade,
'Brad, and Troy along with her
mom and dad.
Lauradenna is the daughter
of Mark and Margie Phillips. Her
grandmother is Margie Andrews.


A GRANDMA'S LOVE!
She may be old and crippled with arthritis. But the love that
Grandma brings to one makes no difference. Her pain and agony
is never shown. She brings light .to a nursing home that shows
all what old age brings. She's always there with a smile on her
face and a happy greeting for all who find the time to visit her. In
a society that moves as fast as ours, it's so easy to not make the
time. And when we do make the time to make that visit, she un-
derstands that we're busy and have things to do. I know it's hard
to make the trip down to the Nursing Home. To see the lady
tears me up for weeks afterwards, to see how old age brings a
person to the end, but it's not her loss; it's ours for not making
the time to bring a little joy into the heart of a lady who loved us
SO.
By Buddy Nachtsheim 1991



A quaint restaurant on the banks of the Apalachicola River

'BOSS OYSTER'
SEAFOOD: STEAMED & SMOKED
OYSTER ROAST, BLUE CRABS
PIT COOKED BAR-B-CUE
ALWAYS AVAILABLE:
Fresh Apalachicola Bay Oysters
(15 Different Ways)
Come and dine by the fire. Enjoy our newly en-
closed outside waterfront patio. And of course,
Bobby Wesley on guitar Thursday through Saturday
evenings.

SPECIALIZING IN FRESH CAUGHT LOCAL SEAFOOD

12 NOON 9:00 P.M. Everyday 3 P.M. until on Sundays
FEATURING
BOBBY WESLEY: Acoustical guitar, Thursday Satur-
day 7 p.m. until and Sundays 3 p.m. until


quency rates have been reduced
in every major loan program, our
loan credit quality has improved
and our number of properties in
inventory has declined. In FY91,
Florida FmHA did a better job of
serving our twin constituency of
rural Florida and the American
taxpayer."


Closed Sundays


S


in a friendly
atmosphere
with good
FRIENDS.

Serving Breakfast,
Lunch & Dhriner
8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
6 Days a Week


All You Can Eat
LUNCH BUFFET includes Salad Bar 4.O5

-Specializing In -


Our
&IVA


*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches oMeals to Go
*Fresh Seafood *Delicious Steaks

r Famous Fresh 9 8
A r% ni A r1rr .IP=I


W- F.1U ,11LDA I INn


Most Folks Noah

Good Thing When They See It.
Noah had some unique dramas, documentaries, music,
abilities. He was able to see what holiday specials, talk shows,
was coming before it arrived. As a- worship, comedy, and movies
result, he and his family (and with a message. There's never an
some of their furry friends) were appeal for funds, and no program
able to weather one of life's worst on VISN will ever criticize or
storms. condemn you for your religious


For most of us, however, seeing beliefs.
is believing. That's why you
should tune in to VISN. [
VISN's lineup of faith and V
values programs includes )
VISN


So if life is tossing some
big waves in your direction,
VISN just might be what
you're looking for.


The Faith and Values Network
GULF CABLE TV CHANNEL 24
Phone 229-8880
Ask about the VISN Discount.
iNm i N.tmmll Interfaith Cable C'oaltion. Inc.


Shop the Classifieds
for real bargains!


AARP Starts

New Year

With Meeting
The St. Joseph Bay AARP
Chapter #3425 will start the new
year with a chapter meeting on
January 8 at 2:30 p.m. ET at the
Centennial Building on Allen Me-
morial Way, Port St. Joe.
The business meeting will be
conducted by Dorothy Pfost. New
officers not installed at the De-
cember meeting will be installed
at this meeting. One of the agen-
da items is a determination by
the chapter on whether the meet-
ings should be held in the Catho-
lic fellowship hall during the next
year.
One of the foremost political
and economic subjects of interest
to the AARP membership is
Health Care Reform, sometimes
referred to as Universal Health
Care. James Anderson, the dis-
trict director, will present a pro-
gram on the subject and lead a
question and answer session.
There will be refreshments
'served after the program. Local
members are reminded that dues
are payable on January 1 and
can be paid at this meeting.


Samanie Arrives
for Georgia Duty
Army Spec. Tiffany F.S. Sam-
Sanie, an electronic warfare/
noncommunications interceptor,
has arrived for duty at Fort Stew-
art, Hinesville, Georgia.
Samanie is the daughter of
Jarred and Cojean Bums of 312
Avenue F, Port St. Joe.
She graduated from, Port St
Joe High School in 1984, and
from the University of Florida,
Gainesville, in 1989.


C.W. Roberts Firm Moves In

New Asphalt Plant This Week
C. W. Roberts Construction Company moved this asphalt
plant into the Port St. Joe area this week, to begin making
the paving agent to re-surface Port St. Joe, St. Joe Beach,
Beacon Hill and Highland View streets which will be sur-


faced under the Gulf County/City of Port St. Joe paving pro-
gram. The former asphalt firm which operated a plant at
the old LP site near the AN railroad siding east of Port St.
Joe, went broke about the time paving was to begin. Rob-
erts tried to purchase the plant from the banks holding
mortgages on the equipment, but a Wisconsin firm entered
a higher bid. Roberts then located this plant, purchased it
and overhauled it before bringing it to Port St. Joe. The
plant is expected to be in operation in about two weeks.


*


0 "


JLPJL*Ji D


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, Ft 9 THURSDAY, JAN. 2, 1992


PAGE SAK&


a









THI STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. JAN. 2. 1992


C.--0A -3 ----A .- --. .-.


I


Ros uce
I' :gg LUT 0,


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E, Port St. Joe, Florida Church Phone: 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and t6p.m. Fqo Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellowship
"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade


Catch the Slri Constitutionf am'onument
HUNTE METHOOIStCHURCm Port St.. oe

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday.............. 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ..........5:30 p.m. Thursday .................7:30 p.m.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James Episcopal Church
309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe

*+ -SERVICES-
ach .Sunday2........ 7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Sclhool...... ............ 9:45 a.m.

The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor,



S The Exciting Place to Worship"


TFirst Baptist Church
J102 Third Street
-,.-P" ort St. Joe, Florida ,

-,, HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
M!ip JAMES ENFINGER, Music/Youth




I ,, FIRST PRESBYTERIAN'
CHURCHH
Ili- 508 Sixteenth Street? 227-1756
;.Jm( :j, 9'SUNDAY WORSHIP......... '...............10 a.m.
(,. : ADULT SCHOOL......... .. ............ 11 a.m.
Us ; *SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children
Nursery Available,
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor




We Want You To Be.
Part of the Friendly Place,
BIBLE STUDY- 9;45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING.................. 11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING...................5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor


KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children


ALLEN STEWART
Min. of Education
& Youth


Bible Study
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


"IF YOU VIEW

CHTTnDREN AS A

PROBLEM, DON'T PAY

THEM ANY

ATTENTION, TH EY

WILL GO AWAY.

PERHAPS FOREVER!"
-JOHN CONGER

Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
P.O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


Vision Interfaith Satellite Network Joins Gulf Cable TV


I


Archie Shackleford
Archie Shackleford, 72, of'
Port St. Joe, passed away Friday,
December 27, in Bay Medical
Center following a brief illness, a-
native of Vernon, he served In the
Army during World War II, earn-
ing a Purple Heart and a Bronze
Star. He had been a resident here
for the past 42 years and had
worked for St. ,Joe Forest Prod-
ucts Co. until his retirement. He
was a member of Thompson Tem-,
pie. .
Survivors include his son, Ar-
chie Shackleford Jr. of Port St.
Joe; four grandchildren; and one
sister, Oneida Lee of Amityville,'
New York.
Funeral services will be held
at 2:00 p.m. ET Friday at the
First Born Church of the Living
God. Thompson Temple.' Inter-:
ment will follow in the family plot
of Forrest Hill Cemetery.
Viewing will be from 11:00
a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Friday at
Thompson Temrnple.
All services are under the di-i
reaction of Comforter Funeral
Home.

Susie B. Chason
Susie B. Chason, 88, or Port'
St. Joe, passed away Wednesday
morning, December 25, in Gulf
Pines following an extended ill-'
ness. A native of Gadsden
County, she and her husband,
the late Ary S. Chason, moved
here in 1945. She was a member.
of the First United Methodist
,Church, where she had been a
Sunday School teacher and had
worked extensively with the
young people in the church. She
was a homemaker, and for a peri-
od of time had worked for the Ap-
alachicola Northern Railroad and
the St. Joseph Telephone and Tel-
egraph Company.
Survivors include her daugh-
ter, Juanita Mull of Lindale,
Georgia; her son, Williston L.
Chason of Port St. Joe; a foster
son, Woodrow Green of Summer-
ville, South Carolina; 'seven
grandchildren and six great
grandchildren; a half sister, Ruth
Sanson of Greensboro; and a half
brother, Mulder Brown of Talla-
hassee.
Graveside funeral services
were held Friday at Holly Hill Ce-
metery, conducted by the Rev. Ze-
doc Baxter. Interment followed.
Those that wish may make
contributions to the First United
Methodist Church.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home.


Dr Rbet in


VISN (Vision Interfaith Satel-
lite Network), the award-winning
national interfaith network that
redefines religious television, will
debut in Port St. Joe on January
1 when Gulf Cable TV (Rigel) adds
the channel, it was announced by
Douglas J. Feltman, president of
Rigel Communications Inc.
VISN's diverse programming
mix of documentaries, dramas,
interviews and profiles, music,
call-ins, worship, feature films,
and children's shows .reflects and
encourages interaction and un-
derstanding between the various
faith groups. Its programming of-
fers both a variety of morality-
faith spiritual programs and se-
ries and specials that address
contemporary social and'moral is-
sues. On-air solicitations are pro-
hibited.
"VISN is a quality of life chan-
nel which focuses on faith and
values," said Feltman. "Port St.
Joe will be surprised at the diver-
sity of programs. They'll find
them informative and inspiration-'
al, thought provoking and enter-.
taining. It will be television with a
purpose, and television with a dif-
ference."
Edward Bond, manager of
Gulf Cable commented, "Gulf
Cable TV Is very pleased to add
VISN to their service in Port St.
Joe. VISN's unique format of high
quality interfaith programming.
addresses society's religious, mo-
ral and social concerns. It will be
a welcome addition to Port St. Joe
households."
The Reverend Dr. Daniel P.
Matthews, Chairman of NICC, a
consortium of 28 member faith
groups said, 'We are delighted
that Rigel will introduce VISN to
its service on January 1, and that
VISN will now be available in Port
St. Joe, which represents the'
richness and diversity of VISN's
member faith groups."
VISN's schedule includes
such diverse programs as Heart
of the Matter, a hard-hitting half
hour report which tackles the mo-,
ral and ethical Issues behind to-,-
day's headline stories; Sacred


q










J


i


WEEKLY MINDER ""
BY KEITH CLARK
Handsome, embossed, padded vinyl cover has inside front pocket.
Displays one week per double page spread, ruled, with monthly tabs
for easy reference. Includes special information pages and separate
phone/address section. Refillable. Page size 6 7/8" x 8 3/4". Black
only.
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BY KEITH CLARK
Calendar shows one month per' sheet, January through December, __
with full year calendar at bottom. Holder has black vinyl corners and V
paper headband with eyelets for hanging. Non-refillable. 22" x 17"
In LOTS OF 10 -1 ea. $2.10 1 0
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AL


The Star Publishing Co.*
OFFICE SUPPLY STORE
Phone 227-1278 FAX 227-7212 304-308 Williams Ave.

******----****************************


PAGE H


DAPx nA


I


Songs, Sacred Spaces, featuring
musical masterpieces performed
in majestic settings around the
world; A Conversation with Robert
Clary, an interview series with
noted Hollywood personalities
discussing how the life of faith,
particularly Judaism, has
touched their lives; Inside Stories,
half-hour dramas that take view-
ers inside a rich variety of ethnic
communities; live call-in pro-
grams such as Drug Line and
Common Sense Religion; Keepers
of the Earth, an hour-long docu-
mentary series on environmental
issues; and a daily hour-long
block of children's programming
filled with values-based learning.
VISN is owned by the not-for-
profit National Interfaith Cable
Coalition (NICC), is now carried
on more than 500 cable systems
nationally and launched on Sep-
tember 19, 1988.
Among the numerous inter-
national specials telecast by VISN
are the network's live coverage of
the World Council of Churches
Seventh Assembly in Canberra,
Australia; a live Christmas Eve
service in the Persian Gulf; a live
telecast hosted by Edwin New-
man exploring the influence of
Judaism, Islam and Christianity
on the Middle East; the first
Catholic Mass ever broadcast
from the Soviet Union; and Pope
John Paul II's Christmas and
Easter messages from the Vati-
can.


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3, "BARFIELD'S
328 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe 229-2727









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, JAN. 2. 1992 PAGE 7A


City crews worked frantically to make repairs when the main water line ruptured near the pumping
station cutting off the city's supply.


1991


. .Year of Anxiety From Page 1


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Friends congratulated Herman Dean on a special day held for the veteran band director.


sion has convinced itself that the best way to
deal with the solid waste program in the
county is to contract with a firm to collect,
transfer to the Bay County incinerator and
have the collected waste burned. The arrange-
ment is being designed to completely remove
the county from the solid waste collection or
hauling business and place it in the hands of
the private firm, with users paying the entire ,.
expense of collection and disposal.
The firm may even wind up with the opera-
tion of the county's two landfills at Five Points
near Port St. Joe and at Wetappo, east of We-
wahitchka.
Whatever arrangements are made, the
county will still be responsible to the State of:
Florida, for the approved handling of the,,
county's solid waste; a fact which will contin- :
ue to keep that subject in the news.
A SUBTLE BATTLE
One of the subtle, but extremely important ,
battles engaged during 1991, was the '"Water ,
War" between Florida, Georgia and Alabama,
which will dramatically affect Gulf County, no
- natter what the outcome.
Georgia wants to take a bigger slice of the
Tri-River's water supply for the people of At-
lanta to drink, wash their cars and water their
lawns. Alabama wants to shortstop more wa-
ter out of the system also, for various reasons..
Florida, which depends on water from the
Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers to form the
Apalachicola River near Chattahoochee, is ex-.
pressing stiff objections and has managed to
persuade the other two states to sit down and
talk about dividing up the water supply com-
ing down the watershed -area on a more equi-
table basis.
No decisions have been made as the year.
winds down.
HEAVY RAINS END DROUGHT
For thl past several years, north Florida
has been complaining about a lack of rainfall,
and a dropping water table. Farmers have had
crops stunted, due to lack of rainfall at the
proper time and water reservoirs were drop-
ping to the danger point. -
TI4a is no longer so. Gulf County received
record rainfalls during the spring and summer
months. The County had' received the equiva-
lent to its annual average rainfall by Septem-
ber. Heavy rains continued to fall until Octo-
ber, when they dwindled off to more of an
average level.
While the rains replenished the water ta-
ble, they destroyed or stunted crops, caused


commercial fishing to suffer tremendous loss-
es and virtually shut down the shrimping in-
dustry in St. Joseph Bay because 'of the high
volume of fresh water going into the bay up-
setting the water balance.
The water balance also seemed to be the
culprit for causing spartina grass---a growth
Important to the seafood nursery in the head
of the Bay-to begin dying out in spots. The
State of Florida has scientists surveying the
die-out. Preliminary verdicts from this study
are that the unusually heavy rains during the
year caused the water grass to die back.
The County received a total of 78.04 inch-
es, of rainfall ,for the year. It 'was almost as
much as a record set in 1975, when 78.5
inches were recorded.
LAST YEAR'S HEADLINES
Now, let's take a look,at some of the more
'important headlines of the past year. A look
at The Star's files, show them to be the follow-
ing:
JANUARY
Six Sharks make state football All-Star
team. They included Roy Campbell, Tyrone:
Hamilton, Calvin Pryor,.- Bill Ramsey, Willie&
Smith and Bobby Williams. Charles Fortner,
took office on the Gulf County Commission af-
ter being appointed to complete the term of
Doug Birmingham, who tendered his resigna-
tion the previous November. Commission asks
for toll-free telephone service in the county.
State withdraws mosquito control funds, halt-
ing spray program.
FEBRUARY
Gulf schools record best drop-out [preven-
tion rate in state at 1.8%. Jim Stanley took
over as Wewahitchka football coach [he re-
signed in August].
MARCH
Heavy rains begin causing damage. A pro-
posed Senior Citizens center at Forest Park
draws objections. High Schol Music Suite.
named in honor of Herman Dean [last living
member of John Philip Sousa band, who died
in November]. City receives $434,700 grant to
rehabilitate housing. William Lewis wins state
'high school weight lifting title, pressing 335
points and clean jerking 210 pounds. Gulf
Cable TV put on the hot seat. Williamsburg
Subdivision, near Wewahitchka, receives
grant of $571,925 for water and sewer system,
after nearly 10 years of trying.
MAY
Water main ruptures in Port St. Joe,
cutting off city's water supply for nearly two


hours. It was the first time in 50 years the city,
has been without water. Gulf County high
school students score among state leaders in
competency tests. 11 apply for post of County
Commissioner Don Parker, who was removed
from office. DNR softened its position.on Indi-
an Lagoon, but still stopped shell fishing for
at least a year. Charles Tharpe upset Bill
Fleming for his post on the City Commission.
with a 490-330 vote. The Gulf County Com-
mission initiated action for securing 911 ser-
vice. Gulf beaches gain national attention for'
beauty, being named fifth most beautiful in
nation.
JUNE
L&A Contracting Company, of Mississippi,
wins contract to build Highland View bridge.
Port St. Joe Rotary Club 50 years old; J. La-
mar Miller only remaining charter member;
Krafties win District tournament and go to:
state play-offs. Nesting turtles begin returning


Craft shows were prevalent throughout the
County this year. Here, Bob Brown shows one of
his creations at the Tupelo Honey Festival.


to St. Joe Beach.
JULY
Wes Taylor named assistant principal at
high school. Spaceport'gears for its first shot
at Cape San Bias-and still on hold. 11 ar-
rested by Police Department in' drug sweep.
Grant kicks off county recycling program.
School Board adopts $13,340,401 budget for
$251,789 increase.
AUGUST
Daring daylight robbery of Rich's IGA [still
unsolved]. County Commission sets budget of
$5,903,683, for an increase of $261,736.
Home fire claims life of Mrs. Alyce Slowe. Ba-
sic Magnesia is sold to Premier Services; Bob
Freeman assumes management. Port St. 'Joe
Commission adopts operating' 'budget of
$2,188,131; reduces village rate. Rex Buzzett
named a member of the State Pharmacy
'Board. Greg Johnson named to'the Gulf Coast
Community College Board. Raffield Fisheries
wins red fish case after six years in courts.
Soldiers return from Desert Storm to a tumul-
tous welcome. State approves grant of
$149,888 to restore old Courthouse [b.iJldifg
cosf0$90,000, new, In 19251. .
'SEPTEMBER
Ernest M. Morris, Tony Justice, Tony Mor-
gan win Wewahitchka Commission races.
White City bridge opened to traffic September
23. White City applies for $350,000 loan to
add to $200,000 grant for new water system.
OCTOBER
It rained for the first time, ever, on the
Tapper Invitational Golf Tournament. Chris
Brumbaugh becomes county's first school Re-
source officer. Wewahitchka fined $98,000 by
EPA for failure to answer criticisms about its
sewage disposal plant. Salinas Park completed
at Cape San Blas. J. C. Belin says,. "look for
more state taxes" in speech to Kiwanis Club.
NOVEMBER
William McGee takes over as county Pro-
jects Director. Al Jones named Homecoming
Queen. State subpoenas Gulf Planning Com-
mittee members. Pile driving started at new
Highland View bridge site. DER refuses permit
for Five Points landfill extension.
DECEMBER
New Gulf Correctional Institution opening
delayed three months, then at least 18
months within two week period. Phil Lanford
resigns as football coach and athletic director
at Port St. Joe High School. Solid waste collec-
tion contract being negotiated with M&O Sani-
tation. Burglars hit phone company building
on First Street.


S cr c Q b a ar q K a
Al Jones was crowned Homecoming Queen by last year's queen, Kim Davis.


Sea turtles returned to St. Joe Beach to nest this year after a long absence.










DrAII MA TIUt TAD %DI 01r.lflW PAL TuTTDifLAV .TA.Iz, 1009


Quick sale: Mexico Beach, as-
sumable 9% mortgage. Stilt home fin-
ished up and down, 2 bath, 1300 sq.
ft. on 75'x150' fenced lot. 648-8176.
2tc 12/26
3 bedroom, 2 bath brick home
in Gulf Aire Subdivision. Unfurnished
except for stove, long term rental. No
pets. Call Gulf AIre Rrealty, 648-5716
for details. 3tc 12/19
Country living overlooking We-
tappo Creek, 3 bdrm., 2 ba. 1500 sq.
ft. living space, 15x26' grand room,
ch&a, fireplace, 2 car garage, 2 util.
bldg., 2 covered porches, one 14'x26'
open deck, swimming pool w/privacy
fence, beautiful landscaped on 2 1/2
acre lots with c/l fence. $56,500. Call
648-5323 for appt. tfc 1/2
14' wide mobile home on 1/2
acre lot Airport Road, across from
Jones Homestead, $25,000. Call Billy
Carr, 229-6961. tfc 1/2

3 bedroom house, on 1 1/2 lots
at 512 9th i St., Port St. Joe. 647-
8614. tfc 11/21
2 bdrm. trailer on 3/4 acre, adja-
cent to Wetappo Creek, fenced, Ig.
screen porch, storage bldg., $19,000
assum. mortgage. 229-8581 or 227-
1566. tfc 1/2
50x150 lot w/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
tfc 1/2
50x100 lot w/12x60 MH, 16x20
shop, all improvements. $21,500. 4th
and 2nd St Beacon Hill. Financing
available. 648-5323. tfc 1/2


GULF FRONT .
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH
1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)
BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Bias, Florida
(904) 229-2777
1-800-624-3964
tfc 12/5


Owner financing. Two bedroom,
1 bath, mobile home, 90% remodeled,
new septic tank, city water, lot
75'x100'. Down payment $1,000, pay-
ments $252.05. Located in Beacon
Hill. Call 227-7411. 6tp 12/5

LOTS FOR SALK-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 5/23/92






Portable GE dishwasher, excel-
lent condition, $100. 648-8211.
Itc 1/2
Pecan trees, fruit trees available
at Barfield Lawn & Garden, 229-
2727. tfc 1/2
Trade your unwanted records,
CD's, and cassette tapes for new or
used housewares, furniture, toys, etc.
Every Friday at Wilder's Trading Post,
5th Ave., Beacon Hill. 647-8543.
Itp 1/2
12" Sylvania black and white TV,
works good, $20 obo. Call 227-1467
after 5 p.m. It 1/2
To give away: red maple trees, 2'
to 3' high. Call 647-8238. Itp 1/2
Upholstered navy arm chairs,
$25 each; matching ottoman $10; day
bed $30. Call 648-8575. ltc 1/2
1986 14'x60' mobile home, 2
bdrm., 1 bath, ceri. h&a, skirting &
porch, $5,800 cash. 647-3178, leave
message. 2tp 12/26


1989 14'x70' North River mobile,
home, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, Ir, kitchen,
until. room. Includes cen. h/a, power
pole, concrete, steps. Call Renee dur-
. ing.day at 229-6112 or evenings, 639-
5519. 4tp 12/26
HAPPY JACK TRIVERMICIDE:
Recognized safe & effective by U. S.
Center for Veterinary Medicine
against hook, round, & tapeworms in
dogs & cats. Available O-T-C at Bar-
field's Lawn & Garden, 229-2727.
lOtc 12/19


MISC.AFORSALEBOATSPET


***HAPPY JACK HI-ENERGY
DOG FOOD ***, Specifically formulat-
ed for hunting dogs, field competitors
& growing pups. Barfield Lawn &
Garden, 229-2727. 8tc 12/12
HAPPY JACK MANGE MEDI-
CINE: Promotes healing and hair-
growth to any mange, hot spot, or
fungus on dogs & horses without ster-
oids. At BARFIELD'S LAWN & GAR-
DEN, 229-2727. 10tc 10/31
Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyn-
dall Parkway, Panama City, FL
32404. 763-7443. tfc 1/2
Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOOl 227-1105.
FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.


NEW! Landau aluminum boats,
10-18 feet. Many styles to choose
from. 15 yr. warranty. Yamaha or
Johnson motors. Marquardt's Marina,
Mexico Beach, 648-8900, Chris or
Tom. 2tc 1/2
1988 Evinrude, 15 h.p. elec.
start. $1,125. 647-5336. ltc 1/2
15.6' walk-thru boat & 1979
Evinrude, 75 hp motor with galv.
trailer, $3,000. 647-5336.
Itc 1/2






"ALL expense paid" round trip to
beautiful New England. Leaving for 14
* days about January 25. All you have
to do is share the driving. Includes
skiing, snowmobiling, and breathtak-
ing scenery. Adventurous females)
preferred. Call 648-8849. 3tp 1/2


Male all white bulldog puppy;
pound puppies. All pups at the pound
need a home. 227-1322 after 7 p.m.
FREE pups need good home 6
weeks old. Weened. Comes from good-
natured, smart, small mother. Call
647-5010. Itp 1/2
FREE to a good home, female
bulldog, 10 months old, brown &
white. 227-7523. Itp 1/2

AKC reg CHOW CHOWS
1 AKC black female, 7 yrs.
old, $50;
1 AKC blue male, 16 weeks,
$150;
1 AKC blue female, 16
weeks, $150;
1 AKC black male, 6 weeks,
$175.
All shots & wormed.
JAMMS KENNELS
647-8638


Toddler wanted for home day
care in Wewa. HRS registered, Chris-
tian atmosphere, lots of personal at-
tention and TLC. 639-5108.
Itc 1/2
Wanted: Home or homesite on
Cape San Blas, prefer Gulf to road.
Call or write: Sottrel 708-530-0623,
15 W 684 Patricia Lane, Elmherst, IL
60126 20tp 10/3



Want to Buy:
USED table saw for
carpentry.
Call I. W. Duren
227-1829
4tp 12/19



SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


TRADES A 9SERVC ES


HARDWOOD FLOORING In-
stallation, sanding, refinish. Oak, ma-
ple, heart pine available in 1.5"
widths through 6". 10 years profes-
sional experience. 653-2253.
4tp 12/26
CHARMEL GROOMING SALON.
Spruce up your pet for the holidays.
Boarding service available. 653-8218.
3tc 12/19
BROKEN TV, VCR OR WHATEV-
ER? Don't throw it away. Get yourself
some free beer money. I'll pick it up &
deliver some money. Call now, Swing-
arm Jim, 647-3116. tfc 1/2
* All Types Yard Work. Mowing,
raking and trim. Reasonable. 229-
6435. tfc 1/2
Sewing and Alterations: drapes,
complete outfits, repairs. Call Daisy,
at Aline's, 229-6600. tfc 1/2
Women's Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Churc.h. 227-1145 or 227-1128.

We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns

Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-386, Howard Creek
tfc 1/2

JOHN F. LAW
LAYWER 1-2654794
24 Years of Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-tional
Diseases, Injuries and Accidents. No.
charge for first conference.
t, fc 1/2

COSTING'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581
ffc 1/2


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
647-5043


Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 1/2


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root'
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box A1C, Port St, Joe
Phone 229-6018
ffc 1/2

Remodeling SandBlasting
Decks New Construction
Free Estimates 648-5886
TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION,
GENERAL CONTRACTO6I
Mike Taylor P.O. Box 13459
Uc. #RG0051240 Mexico Beach, FL
pd. thru Jaon. 92


BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair,
Rebuild Wrecks Body
& Window Work
n Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body Work
See or Call BOB HEACOCK
Baltzell Ave. Phone 227-7229
tfc 1/2


BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

* Lawn Mowers
Weed Eaters
Chain Saws \'
Generators


Go-Karts

229-2727
328 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe tfc 12/5


Happy Holidays! SEN OR
CASH'S CHIMNEY SWEEP -
"If It SOOTS Your Fancy!" DISCOUNTS
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY $4 9.95 Call Anytime Mon.Sun.
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL 871-6527
LICENSED & INSURED 4tp 12/12


GLENN'S PAINT Rebuild Wrecks
L Body & Window Work
& BODY SHOP Expert Painting
& BODY SHOP Free Estimates
503 First Street Port St. Joe Insurance Claims
Phone 227-7133 fc 1/2


4G Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
Reg. Stated Communication
"lst and 3rd, Thursday of.ea.
month, Masonic Hall,. 207 Reid Ave.
James Brooks, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 1/2



THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m, 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. -6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off

S.,* : ^, ,,t /2

OUTBOARD ENGINE REPAIRS
Mercury Jto'40 hp I
Evlnrude/Johnson to 55 hp
STune-Ups
Repairs Overhaul
Tyler Smith Mechanic
227-1479 or 647-8021 Sc 2/6

Need It

Rent It
St. Joe Rental-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Port St, Joe 227-2112
t c 1/2

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Perms
Betty's Beauty Salon,
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
Stft 1/2



AVOIl

CATHERINE L. COLLIER.
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memoial Way Peort St. Joe
(904) 22%9460 tfi 1/2

SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!
UIL W- -vkz. \,I


Sears Catalog Sales
227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. tfc 1/2


Narcotics Anonymous
Meetings Monday Nights
8:00 p.m. at 302 Reid Ave.,
Information: Call (904) 229-6506..

COSTING INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899

tfic 1/2

STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
'Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 1/2

CHIP'S QUALITY HEATING &
COOLING
New Installations & Service
Fall Spec~aI
827-200p
Owner. Rull C. Lay, P. O. Box 841,
Port St. Joe
8tn 11/14


Helping Hand
Thrift Shop
227-1544
Good donations
needed
Proceeds to Missions
201 Hwy. 98
(across from Hull Station)
4tp 12/12


ST. JOE

RENT-ALL, Inc.
Small Engine Repairs
.* Lawnmowers
Weedeaters
Tillers.
Blowers
Chain saws
Small Engine Sales
We now make chains
for most chainsaws.
706 1st St. St. Joe
227-2112
Bob Ridgley,
Repairman
tfc 1/2


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer tfc1/2

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA tfc 1/2 904/229-6821


Terry Parrish Construction Company

New Homes
Additions & Remodeling
All Your Building Needs

WE BUILD TO LAST A LIFETIME!

For Free Estimates, Call 229-8589 ar 12


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
State Certified Residential Appraiser #0001273
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 229-8988
PORT ST. JOE
New Listing: Duplex apartment 2 BR each masonry Good condition o 50' x 170'
lot. Excellent buy at $25,000.
104 21st St.: Very nice, recently updated brick home, 3BR/2ba, living room, dining,
den with fireplace, new roof, central h/a, large kitchen, garage, covered patio,
outside storage and fenced yard $77,900.00.
139 Westcott Circle: Why build when you can walk into.this lovely, immaculate 3 .
(split) bedroom, 2 bath home with large great room, fire place, dining room, 2
car garage and many amenities too numerous to mention. Landscaped back
yard has privacy fence and screen enclosed pool with connecting walkway and
patio. A must see --$105,000.00.
419 18th St.: Spacij 4 J M tpf me with lots of built-is, living room
with fireplace,'ah'tr$om 4*agi'9ktdt'ddn, fenced back yard and workshop
located in nice neighborhood on corner lot. $72,000.00
712 Woodward A 2?-b2th "oe, central h/air, located on comer"
lot, outside sto!l l.' t, f!tI itiJ b i'iWifchnt home. $33,000.00.
1402 Long Ave.: Well kept 2 BR/1 bath home with c/h & air plus 2 rental aptsl 2 bd/
1 bath each. All for $59,500.
1314 Garrison Ave.: 2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
backyard. $35,000.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$4126,000Qg REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two fumished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investmentl Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $60,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7lh St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
OAK GROVE
105 Hunter St.: 3BR, 1 bath with extra room which could be 4th BR, living room, din-
ing room, den, screened porch, privacy fence, carpet, ch/a on 2 lots.
$29,500.00.
201 Iola St.: 2 BR, 2 bath, living room, kitchen, closed in back porch. $19,900.
HOWARD CREEK
Corner of Deer and Perch: 2 BR, 1 bath mobile home, furnished, ch/a, utility build-
ing with washer and dryer on 2 lots, covered outside patio or car port. $27,000
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2 bath home located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must see to appreciate.
S$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
1908 & 1910 Long Ave.: 2 nice high lots, 60x140 and 68x172.
Cape San Bias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part.
Gulf Aire: single family residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 corner lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue, $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.


DACtW RA


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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE. NO. 91-251
TREASURE SHORES LIMITED. a Florida Limited
Partnership

DAVID B. LANGSfON; DINERS CLUB INTERNA-
TIONALi MAAS BROTiERS, INC.; and U.& UFE
CREDIT,
Defendants.
NOTIe or ACTION
TO. DAVID B LANGSTON f lving and If not liv-
big to os heirs .uccemors and hi and
allparties clang by, through or under him-


283 Avenue D
Port St. Joe, Florida.
DINERS CLUB INTERNATIONAL
c/o Alfred Wmnn. Esquire
Post Office Box 2842
St. Petersburg. Florida 33731
MAAS BROTHERS, INC.
Franklin and Zack Street
Tampa. Florida 33602
U.S. LIFE CREDfIT
301 4th Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


: .4LLEMORE
|REAL ESTATE


Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478


Eappy New Year!



Call our office for a full listing of Homes and
Property for Sale or Rent
Property Management

ELLEN ALLEMORE, Broker 648-8939
SALES and RENTALS





LAW OFFICES OF

FRIER & USKERT, P.A.




We May Be Able To Help You

*Stop Harassing Calls, Letters, Etc.
*Stop Repossessions & Foreclosures
*Eliminate Debts
*Start Over and Re-establish Good Credit


* Call John Uskert or Randal
Frier for a free confidential
consultation.
465 Harrison Ave.* Panama City


(904)784-1361

1-800-749-2223


'The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be
based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send
you free information about our qualifications and experience."
TFC 10/24/91.


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a Mortgage on the following property in Gulf
County. Florida:
Commencing at a St. Joe Paper Com-
pany monument marking the North-
west Comer of South Half of Section
1, Township 9 South, Range 11 West;
thence N89y4'45"E along the North
Line of said South Half a distance of
466.01 feet to an Iron rod on the East-
erly Right of Way ULine of County Road
No. 30. said Right of Way being 66.00
feet in width: thence S6"30'50W along
said Right of Way Line 830.94 feet for
the Point or Beginintg thence
N89*41'45"E. 217.81 feet; thence
S630'50"W. 75.54 feet; thence
S89"4 V45"W. 217.81 feet to a point on
said Easterly Right of Way Line of
County Road No. 30; thence
N6*30BW along said Right of Way
lUne, 75.54 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning. being located In Section 1, Town-
ship 9 South. Range 11 West, Gulf
County, Florida. Lot 12, Unit IX. Bay-
co Unrecorded.
TOGETHER WITH
Description: Parcel 1
A 10 foot wide non exclusive ingress
and egres easement for access to St.
Joseph Bay along a person of the
Southerly Boundary of Treasure Bay,
a subdivision of a portion of fractional
Section 14, Township 9 South. Range
11 West, Gulf County. Florida. accord-
ing to the plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 3. Page 32, in the Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida, and being
more particularly described asfollows:
Commence at a concrete monument
marking the Southeasterly Corner of
Treasure Bay and thence go
N89V18'39"W along the Southerly
Boundary of Treasure Bay for a dis-
tance of 375.95 feet for the Point of
Beginning. From said Point of Begin-
ning, departing said Southerly Boun-
day ne go S1524'S3"W for a dis-
tance of 10.34 feet; thence go
N89F18'39"W, parallel with the South-
erly Boundary of Treasure Bay for a
distance of 281.41 feet, more or less.,
to the water's edge of St. Joseph Bay-
thence go N004121"E along said wa-
ter's edge for a distance of 10.00 feet
to a point on the Southerly Boundary
of Treasure Bay; thence departingsaid
water's edge go S89"18'39"E for a dis-
tance of 284.04 feet to the Point of Be-
Description: Parcel 2
A 10 feet wide non exclusive ingress
and egress easement for access to St.
Joseph Bay along a portion of the
Northerly Boundary of Treasure Bay, a
subdivision of a portion of Fractional
SectIon 14, Township 9 Squth., Range
11 West, Gulf County, Florlda, accord-
ing to the plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 3, Page 32, in the Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida and being
more particularly described as follows:
Commence at a concrete monument
marking the Northeasterly Comer of
Treasure Bay and thence go
N8918'39"W along the Northerly
Boundary of Treasure Bay for a dis-
tance of 254.12 feet for the Point of
Beginning. From said Point of Begin-
rdIng. continue N8918'3fW along
sad Northerly Boundary for a dis-
tance of 311.81 feet to a point on the
water's edge of St. Joseph Bay; thence
departing said Northerly Boundary
Line go NO041"21"E along said wa-
ter's edge for 10.00 feet; thence de-
parting said water's edge, go
S89*1839"E, parallel with the North-
erly Boundary of Treasure Bay for a
distance of 314.44 feet; thence go
S15s24'53'W for a distance of 10.34
feet to the Point of Beginning.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, If any, to It
on John L. Glolello, laintlns attorney, whose ad-
dress is P.O. Box 1987, Panama City, Florida.
32402 on or before the 16th day of January. 1992
and file te original with the Clerk of this court ei-
ther before service on Plaintifs attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on the 17th day of December, 1991.
Gulf County
Clerk of Circuit Court
BY: /s/ Tona Knox
Publish: December 26, January 2, 9. and 16.


FOR RJENT I ORmRNT I*ELP ANTE


2 bedroom furnished small mo-
bile home. NO PETS and deposit re-
quired. 648-8211. Itc 1/2
For Rent: 2 bedroom, 1 bath. On
4th St, Beacon Hill. Call 229-6961.
tfc 12/19

Unfurnished 14' wide mobile
home, Jones Homestead area, $200
month. Call Billy Carr, 229-6961.
tfc 1/2

Furnished trailer and trailer lot,
227-1260. 4tc 12/12

2 bedroom, 1 bath trailer, fenced
yard, partially furnished, washer/
dryer, $100 deposit, $250 month.
639-5538. tfc 1/2

Country living overlooking We-
tappo Creek, 3 bdrm., 2 ba. 1500 sq.
ft. living space, 15x26' grand room,
ch&a, fireplace, 2 car garage, 2 until.
bldg., 2 covered porches, one 14'x26'
open deck, swimming pool w/privacy
fence, beautiful landscaped on 2 1/2
acre lots with c/1 fence. $375 unfur-
nished, $450 furnished. Call 648-
9 5323 for appt. tfc 1/2
Furnished 2 bedroom mobile
home, St. Joe Beach. $275 month.
648-5323. tfc 1/2

Mobile home spaces for rent. Call
827-7261, Howard Creek. tfc 1/2

OFFICE SPACE. Call George
Duren at 229-6031 and leave mes-
sage. tfc 1/2

Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
UNFURNISHED
Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rnm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refi-g., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 1/2
Office Space for Lease: Spa-
clous, clean, well located office in con-
venient part of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378. tfc 1/2

LOT RENTALS


Cate. to S.nlorCtizens


"Sun & Sand
Mobile Home Park (386-A)
1100N. 15th St.,
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Call (904) 648-8201 ai


Warehouses, small arid large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 1/2

No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/92

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 1/2






Yard Sale: Day bed, recliner, cof-
fee table, boys/girls new & used
clothes. Odds and ends. Saturday,
Jan. 4th, 324 First St., Highland
View, 227-1760. Itc 1/2

Garage Sale: Saturday, 8 till, 115
Hunter Circle. Furniture, refrigerator,
lots of misc. Itc 1/2

We accept garage sale items for
trade at Wilder's Trading Post, 5th
Ave., Beacon Hill. Call anytime. Open
Friday, 647-8543. ltp 1/2

Garage Sale: Sat., Jan. 4, 9 a.m.
3 p.m. Microwave, baby crib, baby
pen, swing, stroller, lots of baby
clothes, children's clothes, misc. 445
Second Ave., Highland View. 227-
1704. ltc 1/2







1980 Datsun 210, mechanically
sound, good mill car, $250. Call 827-
1505. Itp 1/2

1983 GMC S15, loaded, excellent
condition, $2,950. 639-5108.
Itc 1/2
'77 Camaro, 400 c.i., 4 barrel
Holley, alum. hi-rise intake, alum.
valve covers, new tires, white letter,
90% complete, some extras. $850.
648-5922. Itp 1/2

1987 K.5 Blazer, full power, 4-
wheel drive, 229-8156. tfc 1/2







NURSES We have available:
One RN position; one LPN position. If
you prefer part-time at present and
full-time later please call to discuss.
Bay St Joseph care Center, 229-
8244. tfc 1/2


We are searching for a person
with an excellent attitude, strong
work ethic, exceptional people skills
and an inquisitive intellect. This per-
son must desire a long term career in
Dental Assisting here In Port St. Joe.
Send resume' to: Frank D. May,
D.M.D., 319 Williams Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL. No phone calls please.
tfc 1/2

Experienced tax preparers & re-
ceptionist wanted for tax season. Re-
fresher course given. Permanent sea-
sonable work available. Call collect at
785-0482. tfc 1/2

Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
Apalachlcola River, within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives Include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
1/2 overtime pay, on-call duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with water, sew-
erage, and lawn maintenance provid-

Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
(26) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten (10) paid holidays. Free continu-
ing educational courses offered by
State University $500 annual allow-
ance for job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience; or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst, P. 0. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 1/2

Earn Extra Income. Earn $1000's
stuffing envelopes. Send a self-
addressed stamped envelope to: H &
S Southern, P. 0. Box 572, Troy, AL
36081. ltp 1/2

POSTAL JOBS. $11.41 to
$14.90/hr. For exam and application
information call 219-769-6649, ext.
FL- 171, 9 a.m. 9 p.m. 7 days.
3tp 1/2


New Year's Customs from Around the World


Most countries around the
world have New Year's customs
that are different from the ones
we practice. Here are a few:
Does New Year's occur on
different days?
It does in Egypt depending
upon the religion.
Christians, known as Copts,
celebrate on January 1, just as in
the United States.
But Moslems celebrate at a
different time each year. How is
the date determined? By the
phases of the moon.
The New Year in India
The official date is January


1st. But this varies throughout
India, depending on religions or
sects, and to the regions of the
country.
For example, the Hindus cele-
brate four principle dates during
the year one for each of the
four seasons.
Hearts around the world
Regardless of race, creed or
color, our hearts are all the same.
And at this time of year, they are
all filled with the same thoughts:
thanks for the old year, and
hopes for a Joyous year ahead.
What was eggnog?
Eggnog was a favorite New


Mexico


Year's drink when the English
settled in America. They drank it
out of "wassail bowls."
The word wassail comes from
an old word that meant "good
health."
Before drinking the eggnog,
people would life their glasses
and say, '"Wassail." This is the or-
igin of toasting, 'To your good
health!"
New Year's chuckle time
Speaking of New Year's feast-
ing, did you hear about Silly Wil-
ly? He thought that the word
hunger meant what the posse did
to the lady cattle rustler.


Beach


NEW LISTINGS
15th St. Mexico Beach: Beautiful 78' x 113/88'
lot zoned for mobile homes. Lots of shade
trees. $8,000.00.
728 N. 15th St. 3 bdrm. 2 ba. 24'x52' double
wide mobile home on large shaded lot. Liv-
ing room has cathedral ceiling w/ceiling fan.
Large master bdrm. Screened porch on
front. Cen. h&elec. air. Appliances included
with washer & dryer. Good location. This
home is in mint conditoin. $43,000.00.


HOMES Mexico Beach
107 N. 26th Street, Mexico Beach: Two bedroom, two bath, two story
home, newly remodeled. All new carpet and vinyl throughout.
Large living, dining and kitchen area upstairs. Large den or family
room downstairs. Beautiful 75' x 100' shaded lot. Only 1 block to
the beach. Upstairs screened porch has view of the gulf. Nice
quiet neighborhood. $68,600,00. REDUCED TO $5600,00
$54,000.00 for Quick Sale.
Docside T.H. #2, 114 C Miramar Drive: Two bedroom, two and
one-half bath townhome on the canal, has private boatslipl
Patio area off lvingroom overlooks canall Only steps to the
Beach! completely furnished, central heat and a/c. Kitchen
equipped with refrigerator w/Ice maker, range, dishwasher.
washer and drycrl Good rental unit. $90,000.
64 Magnolia Ave.: This uniquely designed 2 story home has many fea-
tures to consider. Only 1/2 block to the beach 3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths. (1 upstairs, 1 downstairs). Liv. rm. has ceiling fan, track
lighting, & sliding doors which lead to large covered deck w/view
of the gulf. Also side sun deck off kitchen w/bar and flourescent
lighting. Completely fenced yard makes nice private outdoor liv-
ing. Lots of shade trees. 66,000.90 Reduced to $79,500.00.
Also additional adjacent lot lot for $25,000.00.
1 310 Hwy. 98 WATERFRONTI Two bedroom, one bath cottage, complete-
ly remodel X a pM ,reened porch on front overlooks the
Gulf! Spaclo i L*,Blln' and kitchen area. Maximum living uti-
lized In bedro-m writh rpe bunk. Excellent decor and beach furnli-
ture. The perfect beach get-a-way! Must see this onel $98,500.00.
140 Pine Street Large unique home on two beautiful wooded large
comer lots. Nine rooms with two full baths, Florida room, den,
large master bedroom, excellent kitchen with lots of cabinet space
and cneter work island. Two fireplaces. one in bedroom. Double,
carport, 12'x3r screened porch. Located In nice neighborhood,
only short walk to the beach. Many more amenititsll $149,900.00.
Sandollar #1 Cute A-frame design one bedroom, one bath with sleep-
ing loft. Completely furnished and equipped for summer rental.
Large front and back sun deck. 38' waterfront lot. Reduced to
$60,000.
Sandollar #2 Two bedrpoom,ne bath cottage with screen porch over-
looking thiQlflmrletly furnished and equipped for summer
rental. 48" dfaerroiltrfff Needs some TLCI $65,000.
Sandollar #3 Two bedroom, one bath cottage with screen porch over-
looking the Gulfl Completely furnished and equipped for summer
rental. 48" waterfront lot. Needs some TLCI $65,000.
Sandolier #4 Three bedroom, one bath cottage with screened porch
overlooking the Gulf. Completely furnished and equipped for sum-
mer rental. 95' waterfront lot. $110,000.00.
OWNER WILL LISTEN TO ALL OFFERSII
182 Miramar Drive, Mexico Beach: Jolliday Duplex a rare
find! This beachside duplex has 2 bedrooms. 1 bath each
side. Cen. h/ac. Only third lot from the beach. Ceiling fans
in living room and bedrooms, appliances include refrigera-
tor, range, dishwasher, microwave. Nice set up. in mint
conditions Possible owner financing, $84,900.00.
Grace Home, 107 30th Street Large BEACHSIDE three bedroom,
two bath home with game room. Living room with fireplace over-
looks the Gulf and leads to sun deck that surrounds house. Pri-
vate deck off master bedroom. Completely furnished. All the com-
forts of home. Owner will listen to offers $4 8,,00.00. Reduced to
$128,000.00.
602 Fortner Avenue Stucco DUPLEX only 1/2 block to the BEACHI 2
Two bedroom, one bath units. Completely furnished. On 50'x150'
lot. Separate entrance to each unit Excellent rentals. Presently
rented. $53,500.00.
Luxury by the Pier #7,38th Street WATERFRONTI Immaculate two
bedroom, two and one-half bath waterfront townhome. Owner oc-
cupied, never rented. Sun deck off master bedroom and screened
porch off living area with lower sun deck on beach with outdoor
shower. Ceiling fans and vertical blinds coordinate with flooring.
400,60001hB REDUCED $96,500.00.
314 Hatiley Drive Three bedroom, two bath townhomes in nice resi-
dential area. Vaulted ceiling in living, dining, and kitchen areas.
Large bar in kitchen. All appliances included. $48,500.00 to
$49,900.00.
13th Street Two bedroom, one bath stilt home 1/2 block to theBeachi
Needs some TLC. Large deck on front and side. Partial view of
the Gulfl Owner will finance. $55,000.00.
Loft by the Pier #12 & #14, Surfview and Spindrift Townhomea,
106B and 108D 37th Street Attractive two bedroom townhomes
near fishing pier and beach. Newly remodeled. Completely fur-
nished and equipped for second home or rental. Bay window ac-
cents living room with catthedral ceiling. Private patio in back, off
bedroom. Assumable mortgage. $86,000,00 each.Reduced
$63,000.
200 6th Street Three bedroom, two bath double wide mobile home.
On large 105'x112.5" comer lot. Fastened to home foundation.
Only 2 blocks to the Beachi $45,500.00
ST. JOE BEACH
Corner of Desoto St. & Hwy. 98, St. Joe Beach, two bedroom, one
bath frame home on 50'x9 comer lot. Unobstructed view of the
gulf from Florida room on front! ULiving room and separate family
room or denim PRICED FOR QUICK SALE! $54,000.00.
Hwy. 98 Near Santa Anna Newly remodeled four bedroom, two bath
home overlooking the Gulfl Unobstructed view Large living room
with stone fireplace. Large kitchen and dining area. Fenced yard,
screened porch, and raised sun deck. On 50'x90' lot. $06,000,09
Reduced $85,000.00.
End of Pine Street and Hwy. 98 WATERFRONT TRIPLEXI (1) Two
bedroom, one bath unit with screened porch. (2) One bedroom,
one bath units with screened porches. Beautiful location on the
Gulfl Completely furnished. Excellent rental units presently rented.
Possible owner financing. $115,000.00.


FEATURE
Maryland Blvd.: (4) 75' x 100' lots. Zoned for
mobile homes. Completely cleared and
filled. Nice shade trees. With septic tank
and water meter included. $14,900 each.
Owner will finance w/$2,500 down, bal-
ance at 10% for 5 years.

LOTS ON MEXICO BEACH
Residential Zoned for Homes Only
13th St., Mexico Beach: Large lot close to the beach. 120' x 100'
Mexico Beach Business Center Lot 17 Residential zoning.
$28,000.00.
Magnolia Ave.: 75'x102 lot only 1/2 block to the gulf Good gulf view.
Unit 11, BIk 8. Lot 7. $25,000.00.
Kim Kove,Grand Isle Subd. 75'x115' lot in nice residential subdivi-
sion. Grand Isle Unit 15, BIk C, Lot 22. $12,500.00.
Hwhy. 386, Mexico Beach (4) 75'x100' lots on paved street. Unit 11,
BIk 5, Lots 2, 4, 6, 8. Residential zoning. Nice shade trees.
$25,000 each.
New Mexico Drive (5) 100'x158.33' lots. Mexico Beach Unit 14, BIk
B, Lots 9, 11, 13,15,17. $6,000.00 Each.
New Mexico Drive 100'x158.33' lot. Unit 14, BIk B, Lot 3. $6,000.00.
New Mexico Drive 100'x158.33' lot Unit 14, BIk B, Lot 8. Reduced
$5,000.00.
Texas Drive 100'x108' lot. Unit 14, BIk F, Lot 6.46,800.00 Owner will
finance. REDUCED TO $6,300.00.
Arizona Drive 100'x108' lot. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot 16. $7,000.00.
California Drive (4) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk E, Lots 10, 12, 16,
18. $7,000.00 each.
Arizona Drive (5) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, Blk E, Lots 9, 11, 13, 15,
17. $7,000.00 each.
Arizona Drive (5) 110'x110' lots. Unit 14, BIk D, Lots 6,8,10,12,14.
Owner financing. $7,500.00.
Texas Drive (2) 100'x100' lots. Unit 14,k, BIk GLots 9, 10. $8.000.00
each.
7th Street 100'x108' lot. On paved street. Walking distance to the
Beach. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot 15. $10,000.00.
7th Street 100x108 lot. On paved street. Walking distance .toje
Beach. Unit 14, Bk D, Lot 9. $10,000.00.
Robin Lane (2) Large lots on paved street. Nice subdivision. Under-
ground utilities. Unit 17. BIk 3, Lots 10, 100. Owner will finance
with $2,000.00 down, balance at 9% for 5 years. $10,000.00
each.
Wysong Avenue 109'xlOO' lot. On paved street. Underground utili-
ties. Nice Neighborhood. Unit 17, BIk 1, Lot 8. $11,000.00.
Corner Oak Avenue & Palm Street 1 1/2 lots, large size irregular
shaped. ONLY 1/2 block to the Beachl Owner will finance. Unit
11, BIk 8, E 1/2 of Lot 16, All of lot 18. $29,800.00.
Gulfaire Drive, Gulfalir Subdivision 70'xl 15' home lot. BIk G, Lot 2.
Good view of the Gulf. $35,000.00.
Colorado Drive: 100' x 158.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk C, Lots 15, 17, 19.
$7,500.00 each.
Colorado Drive: 100' x 158.33' lot. Unit 14, BIk B, Lot 6. $6,000.00
Owner anxious to sell[
Pine Street: 75' x 100' residential lot with nice shade trees. Only 1/2
block off the BeachI Nice view Mexico Beach Unit 11, BLk 25. Lot
5. $18,000.00
Gulf Aire Drive, Gulf Air Subdivision: 75" x 125' residential lot. Nice
shade trees. Good location. Owner motivated to sell. $15,000.00.
Owner will finance.
Arizona Drive: (2) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk D, Lots 2, 4.
$7,000.00 each.
7th Street: (2) 100'x108.33 lots. Unit 14, BIk D, Lots 1, 3. $7,000.00
each.
California Drive: (2) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk F, Lots 1, 3,
$7,000.00 each.
Texas Drive: (2) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk F, Lots 2,4. $7,000.00
each.
5th Street: 100x108.33' lot Unit 14, BIk A, Lot 11, $4,000.00.
109 13th St.: 120' x 90' lot on paved street. Close to Beachl Residen-
tial zoned. Mexico Beach Business Center Lot 22. $28,90 Reduced
to $20,000.
LOTS ZONED FOR MOBILE HOMES
Maryland Blvd. 75'x100' lot. Unit 12A. BIk C, Lot 4. $13,000.00.
Fortner Avenue between 6th and 7th Stret 50'x150' lot. One block
from the Beachl Unit 1, BIk 8, Lot 5. $20,300.00.
WATERFRONT
Hwy. 98 WATERFRONTI End of 8th Street; 60x80' lot. $60,000.00.
Unit 2, BIk V, Lot 4. Owner will finance with 10% down.
Hwy. 98 WATERFRONTI End of 8th Street. 66'x80' lot. $66,000.00.
Unit 2, 81k V, Lot 3. Owner will finance with 10% down.
Hwy. 98 ST. JOSEPH SHORES. 120'x397 waterfront lot.
$120,000.00.
ST. JOE BEACH LOTS
Canal Street 50'x125 lot. Yon's addition, BIk 10, Lot 9. $15,950.00.
OVERSTREET
229 Forest Ave., : 3 bedroom, 2 bath double wide mobile home on 1
1/8 acres. Very well kept & maintained, in mint cond. Living room
has cathedral ceiling w/ceiling fan. Kitchen has bar, and very ade-
quate cabinet and counter space. Master bedroom has ceiling
fan, Ig. walk-in closet, and garden tub in bath. Property is com-
pletely cleared. Small fish pond, Fruit trees, nice garden spot.
Large covered porch on front. $40,0ie. Reduced to $40,900.00.
263 Forest Ave., Overetreet: Two bedroom, 1 bath mobile home on
1.12 acres. Con. gas heat/valec. a/c. Appliances include refrig.,
range. 12'x16' storage building. 50'xlO0'.stocked pond. Utility area
w/washer & dryer hook-ups. Excellent starter home. Owner wig
help with downpayment up to $2,000. $a2,000.0.Reduced to
$23,900.00.
CAPE SAN BIAS
Nautilus Way, Feather Sound Subdivision WATERFRONTI 51' on
the Gulf x 394.54' deep. Lot 8. $52,000.00.
Nautilus Way, Feather Sound Subdivision (2) interior lots. Good
view of the Gulfl $34,000.00 each.
PORT ST. JOE
106 Gautler Memorial Lane: Beautiful executive two story 3 BR, 2 1/2
bath brick home on gorgeous lot just steps from St. Joseph Bay.
Professionally landscaped and sodded yard w/underground
sprinkler system, formal living room and dining room. Large family
room w/stone fireplace, recessed spot lighting, French doors
which lead to large Florida room with jacuzzi. Gourmet's kitchen
has center island w/stone cooktop, abundance of cabinets and
counter space w/adjustable shelves, and pull out drawers. Beauti-
ful bar, dinette area, ceramic tile flooring. Master suite has full ce-
ramic tile bath and separate shower, large vanity and dressing
area w/his & her's walk-in closets.
This home is in mint condition. Many more amenities. Shown by
appointment only


Harmon Realt'


BARBARA HARMON, Broker Ann Six, Sales Associate, 229-6392


648-5767


MEXICO BEACH


Happy Wew Year!/4


TH TA-POTAI-JO-W, MTqAV.AT1 910


I


*











PAGE 10A THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY. JAN. 2. 1992


2 Sharks Named to All-State


40 Years

of Continuous Service


Dear Patrons and Friends,
B On December 31, 1991 we will bring to a
close our 40th year of serving the people of
Port St. Joe. Each of those years has increased
our realization of how fortunate we have been
* to have you select us to be your pharmacy.
Forty years have taught us that the most im-
portant part of our work has been the com-
pounding of the prescriptions you have entrust-
ed to us. Each year we have been privileged to
work with your physicians to help keep you
healthy.
Forty years have taught us to be a very care-
ful buyer of the medicines and health-aids you
get from us. We must not only carry in stock
V everything you ask for, but also buy them in just
the right quantities, so that everything will al-
ways be in perfect condition.
D Forty years have taught us that you, our loy-
al patrons, are the reason why we have been
able to conduct our pharmacy so long, and that
you deserve to be served with the same careful
attention and courtesy one gives a friend.
We hope we will have the privilege of being
your pharmacist for many years to come. We
will appreciate your patronage and loyalty, and
will try to show it by our continued effort to
please you.
We wish you a very healthy and Happy New
'] Year!

Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe
Convenient Drive-Through Window W
Revlon Cosmetics 229-8771 -


Pensacola Catholic trounced
Ponce de Leon, 73-52, in the fi-
nals Saturday night, to win the
championship in the eight-team
Holiday Classic in R. Marion
Craig Coliseum here in Port St.
Joe.


World Book Educational Products
Encyclopedias Chlldcraft
Early World of Learning
JEFFREY FURR
229-8918 after 5 cv1/2







HEARING AID CENTER
618 W. 23rd St.,
Wllbro Plaza
Panama City, FL
769-5348

FREE HEARING
TEST
Top Quality, Name
Brand Hearing
Aids
*Satisfaction Guaranteed
*Monthly Service Center
Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
1st Tuesday each month


The Pensacola team out-
scored Ponce de Leon in three of
four quarters to take the title in
the Shark's first holiday cage
tournament.
Pensacola defeated Apalachi-
cola and Marianna to advance to
the finals.
All-tournament players were
Reggie Allen of Panama City
Christian, Marcus Houston of Ap-
alachicola, DeCarlis Chapman of
Chattahoochee, Keith Williams of
Freeport, Arion Nickson of Port
St. Joe, Thomas Ephriam and Mi-
chael Granberry of Marianna,
Greg Gillman and Brian West of
Ponce de Leon and Matt Hayes
and Isaac Jones of Pensacola.
Jones was also named the most
valuable player of the three-day
event.
SHARKS LOSE FIRST GAME
TO PONCE de LEON, 70-61
The Sharks tripped in the
first game of the set, on Thursday
night, losing 70-61 to Ponce de
Leon.
The Sharks were only one
point behind at half-time, but
Ponce de Leon charged back in
the third stanza to score 24
points, while limiting the Sharks
to only 14, to gain a comfortable
edge, which they were to hold on
to for the rest of the game.
Jason Maxwell paced the
Sharks with 21 points, including
six 3-pointers. Toby Thomas and
Arion Nickson each added 13
points for the home team. Nick-
son added two 3-pointers and
Alaric Allen and Terrance Wil-
liams each added one.
Score by Quarters:
PSJ 15 16 14 16-61
PdL 18 14 23 15-70
PSJ-Maxwell 7-1-21, Addi-


When the Florida Sportswrit-
ers Association announced the
Class AA All State football team
selections last Wednesday, two
Port St. Joe Sharks had made the
first team.
Calvin Pryor, a 5'11", 250
pound linebacker, was named to
the all state team for the third
consecutive year. Pryor's sopho-


son 0-0-0, Alexander 1-0-2, Nick-
son 4-3-13, Allen 3-0-7, Williams
1-1-4, Quinn 0-1-1, Thomas 6-1-
13.
PdL-Nowling 2-0-5, Kelly 1-
0-2, McGowan 3-0-6, Gillman 11-
3-26, West 2-8-13, Powell 0-1j-
Bass 6-1-13, Hicks 2-0-1.
PORT ST._JOE 100
PANAMA CHRISTIAN 66
In the second round of play,
Friday, the Sharks kept their
chances alive to make the finals
by dumping the Panama City
Christian Crusaders, 100-66. It
was the first 100 point game for
the Sharks this year.
Behind by a single point at
the end of the first quarter, the
Sharks began to find the scoring
range and ended the first half
with a nine point bulge. During
the second half, the long shooters
went to work and poured eight 3-
pointers through the nets.
The Sh'arks had five players
scoring in double figures, with Ar-
ion Nickson and his 21 points,
taking the lead. Alaric Allen and
Des Baxter each added 13, Toby
Thomas and Jason Maxwell had
11 each and Letron Alexander
put up 10 points.
The Crusaders' Reggie Allen
led both teams with his 31
points.
In the 3-point scoring, Max-
well had three, Allen and Baxter,,
two each and Williams one.
Score by Quarters:
PSJ-Maxwell 4-0-11, Addi-
son 3-0-6, Alexander 5-0-10,
Nickson 10-1-21, A. Allen 5-1-13,
Williams 1-0-3, Allen 3-0-6, Bax-
ter 5-1-13, Quinn 2-0-4, Smith 0-
2-2, Thomas 5-1-11.
PCCS--Rutherford 2-1-5,
Holland 6-3-18, Russell 3-2-8, R.
Allen 15-0-31, Massey 1-2-4.
PORT ST. JOE 85
CHATTAHOOCHEE 79


more year he was named to the
third team as a defensive line-
man, when the Sharks finished
9-1 on the season and state run-
ner-ups to Pahokee. His Junior
year he was named to the second
team as a linebacker as the
Sharks finished 8-2 on the regu-
lar season, losing to Jacksonville
Bolles in the quarter-finals of the
state play-offs.


Perez Davis, a 6'6", 310
pound offensive lineman for the
Sharks was named to the All-
State for the first time his senior
year. Davis and Pryor were
among only five seniors on the
Sharks squad this year. Davis
was hurt during the second game
of the season against Rutherford


Boykin Selected
All Big Bend
Scott Boyk$n was named to
the Tallahassee Democrat's All
Big Bend Cross Country team
last week. This was the second
year that Boykin, a senior at Port
St. Joe High School, was selected
for the honor. Boykin's personal
best time this year on the three
mile course was 16:02 minutes.
He runs both cross country and
track for the Sharks, with the
two-mile his best event in track.


CALVIN PRYOR


PEREZ DAVIS


Sharks Travel to Graceville


The Sharks will take a 4-4
record on the road next Tuesday,
traveling to Graceville to meet the
Tigers, as they resume their regu-
lar schedule after the Christmas
holidays.
The Sharks played six games
in two holiday tournaments, win-
ning three of the six. The team
has a 1-1 record in regular sea-
son play, losing to Rutherford in
the season opener and defeating
Bay High three days later.
The Tigers are one of three
new teams on the Shark basket-


ball schedule this year.

The Sharks drew the Chatta-
hoochee Yellow Jackets in the
consolation game and used a
strong first half and last quarter
to take their fourth win of the
season.
Arion Nickson was the big
gun for the winners, with 27
points. Jason Maxwell added 21
points and Letron Alexander net-
ted 10.
The Sharks were deadly from
the foul line, putting eight points,
in nine attempts, up on the score-
board.
The Sharks had a 51-45 lead
at half time and sewed the game
up in the final period, when they
out-scored the Jackets, 23-17.
The long-distance 3-pointers
again played a big part in the
Shark victory, with Maxwell net-
ting three and Nickson and Bax-
ter each getting one.
DeCarlis Chapman led the
Jacket scoring with 28 points.
PSJ 28 23 11 23-85
Chat'chee 18 27 17 17-79
PSJ-Maxwell 8-2-21, Addi-
son 3-0-6, Alexander 4-2-10,
Nickson 11-4-27, Allen 2-0-4,
Williams 0-0-0, Baxter 1-0-3,
Quini 4-0-8, Smith 0-0-0, Thom-
as 3-0-6.
Chat-McClellan 3-0-6, Dud-
ley 11-2-25, Graham 9-0-18,
Chapman 13-1-28, White 1-0-2,
McMillan 0-0-0, Williams 0-0-0.


DOs

QO
Gulf Coast
Community College
Course Description

Port St. Joe
Western Civilization I
General Psychology
Principles of Nutrition

Wewahitchka
Western Civilization II
General Psychology


Fundamentals of Oceanography
Word Process. w/WordPerfect
(Lab Fee $6.00)
Typewriting II
(Lab Fee $6.00)


and was on the injured list until
late in the season when he was
able to return from his knee inju-
ry.
During the past three years
the Sharks have had 16 selec-
tions for All-State honors award-
ed by the Sportswriters' Associa-
tion.


SCOTT BOYKIN


SCHEDULE OF COURSES
GULF COUNTY
SPRING SEMESTER 1992


Day


M
T
H


H
T
M
T


Time


6:30-9:15
6:30-9:15
6:30-9:15


6:15-9:00
6:15-9:00
6:15-9:00
6:15-9:00


Sem.
Hrs.


, 3
3
3


3
3
3
3


6:15-9:00 3


FEES: $26.25 per credit hour for Florida residents.
(Fees are payable upon enrollment.)

REGISTRATION
January 6, 1992
6:00 p.m.


Port St. Joe Elementary School
Temple Watson, Coordinator
227-1259 (after 5:00 p.m.)


Wewahitchka High School
George Cox, Coordinator
639-2496 (after 5:00 p.m.)


CLASSES BEGIN WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1992
GCCC is an equal opportunity institution


HURY- I ITE IE-FE


~10a


IDental -Health

FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.

SMOKING AND ORAL CANCER


You already know that smok-
ing can be instrumental in the
cause of bronchitis, lung cancer,
emphysema and heart disease.
But what does smoking have to
do with oral health? It affects
your whole mouth in many ways
- none of which are beneficial.
By far, the most serious risk
is the development of oral can-
cer. Smokers have a four times
greater risk of oral cancer than
nonsmokers.
Tobacco in any form can
cause cancer of the mouth and
throat. So don't think you can
avoid cancer by switching from
cigarettes to a pipe or cigars.
This year an estimated
24,000 people will be stricken


by oral cancer. Within five years
many of these people will be
dead. Each year, approximately
8,000 people die from oral can-
cer. One of the reasons for this
high death rate is that oral can-
cer victims do not recognize the
need to see their dentist or phy-
sician until it becomes too late
for treatment to be successful.
Yet, ironically, mouth cancer is
one of the few varieties that can
be easily recognized by a visual
diagnosis in its early stages.
******
Prepared as a public service
to promote better dental health.
From the office of: FRANK D.
MAY, D.M.D., 319 Williams Ave.,
Phone 227-1123.


MESSAGE

SERVICE


Sirestone

Great Tire Value

50,000 MILE TREADWEAR

LIMITED WARRANTY*

Steel-Belted Construction
All-Season Tread Design
Super Quiet Ride

FR721 Radial


$ 95
P155/80R13
WHITE STRIPE

White Stripe Price White Stripe Price
155/80-13 $39.95 205/75-14 $62.95
165/80-13 42.95 215/75-14 65.95
175/80-13 49.95 205/75-15 66.95
185/80-13 51.95 215/75-15 69.95
185/75-14 57.95 225/75-15 72.95
195/75-14 59.95 235/75-15 75.95

DON'T MISS OUT


St. Joe Wins Consolation Game

In First Annual Holiday Classic


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER

216 MONUMENT AVE. PHONE 227-1291


~t~Z~











SBig Bend Health Council Hearing


The Big Bend Health Council
'will hold a public hearing
Wednesday, January 8 at 1:00
p.m. ET at the Gadsden County


Public Health Unit, Dr. LaSalle/
LeFall Drive, Quincy.
The purpose of this public
hearing is for the Council to ac-


f


Bags Six-Point Buck!
Rusty Ward, 10 years old of Port St. Joe, is shown happily dis-
playing a nice six-point buck he bagged behind Tyndall Air Force
Base while hunting with his dad, Melvin Ward. Rusty hopes this is
just the first of many.


cept public comments, both writ-
ten and oral, on the proposed
1992 District Two Certificate of
Need (CON) allocation factors in
accordance with requirements by

School Lunch
Menu





The Gulf County School Sys-
tem has announced the following
menus for the school lunch pro-
gram. Menus may change due to
availability of certain foods.
Monday, January 6: no
school
Tuesday, January 7: turkey
or ham sandwich, French fries,
milk and fruit pie
Wednesday, January 8: coun-
try fried steak or meatloaf, turnip
greens, mashed potatoes with
gravy, cornbread, milk and cookie
SThursday, January 9: cheese-
burger, buttered corn, milk and
cake
Friday, January 10: chicken,
applesauce, English peas, roll,
milk, rice and gravy.


the State of Florida to be used in
CON review of proposals submit-
ted requesting establishment, ad-
ditions to, etc., of health care fa-
cilities in DHRS District Two
which includes Bay, Calhoun,
Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes,
Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty,
Madison, Taylor, 'Wakulla, and
Washington counties.
The Certificate of Need alloca-
tion factors report is an updated
compilation of the program ad-
ministration recommendations
and CON relevant policies from
all sections of the District Two
health plan. The Big Bend Health
Council's CON related recommen-
dations are directed to the Florida
Department of Health and Reha-
bilitative Services, Office of Regu-
lation and Health Facilities.
The Big Bend Health Council
is a non-profit organization dedi-
cated to serving the local health
planning needs of the 14 county
area of the Florida Panhandle.
The regular monthly meeting will
follow this public hearing in the
Gadsden County Public Health
Unit conference room. The public
is invited to attend.

Need A Job?
Use the Classifieds


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY. JAN. 2, 1992 PAGE 1B



CONSOLIDATED

41 LeCTRIC SUPPLY
325 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
Hours; M-F: 7:30-5:00 Sat: 9:00-Noon
Call Herb or Charles: 227-7373

Also Serving
with Truck Deliveries: Tuesday and Thursday
Apalachicola, Eastpoint,
Carrabelle and St. George Island

( BRAND NAME ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES )

Square D, Nutone, Leviton,
Frigidaire, Makita, Klein Tools
and

( TOTAL LIGHTING SERVICES

Residential, Commercial, Industrial
FEATURING
@T THOfMS RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING
/,11 ,rTf,, ., DIVISION


ITHURS04Y fRIDA Y 9-9.1 SA TURDA Y 9-6









_____TA RV:T*YOeUJ1NEWIYEA RWd' _! iII:T7iISAt !L WA S INGS7i~~e


Family Pak Fresh
Chicken Wings ......I b. 7 9Pig Feet ................... b.29
1/4 Loin : 29 Lykes
Pork Chops .................Ib. Hot Dogs .............12 oz. 99


Family Pak Sliced o n
Slab Bacon ..............Ib. 8
Select Skinned, Deveined
Beef Liver .................Ib. 79

Bag Quartered
Fryer 23
Thighs..1b. 23


Box
Puffs Tissue .......................... 9 9
15 oz. Chef Boy-ar-dee's :
Spaghetti & Meat Sauce ....... 890
8 oz. Folgers 39
Instant Coffee...................
10 ct. Real Value 0, 6
Hot Cocoa Mix ..................... 69
6 Pack Snickers, 3 Musketeers, Milky Way, 99
M&M Candy ............................
18 oz. 19
Spic & Span Cleaner...................


Bryan's 1 99
Cooked Ham........io oz. L


Jennie 0
Turkey Franks ..12 oz.


89,


Bag Whole
Quartered Fryer
Legs.....,b.


10 lb. Bucket
Chitterlings ................
Family Pak 4 l89
All Meat Stew.......1....b.
Family Pak 59
Ground Chuck.....l....ib.
Bryans 1 39
Sliced Bacon....... 12 oz. ,L


Family Pak
Choice Fryer
Drumsticks49c


16 oz. Fountain Drink.................... 9
with 1 Discount Chip
Real Value Salt...............................
with 2 Discount Chips 39
Dozen Large Eggs...................... 39
with 2 Discount Chips Q
Loaf Old Fashion Bread ..4.........
with 2 Discount Chips .
6.5 oz. Starkist Tuna................
with 3 Discount Chips 39
Your Choice 2 Liter Soft Drink ...... .
with 4 Discount Chips
4 Rolls Charmin Tissue ...............
with 5 Discount Chips f99
10 lb. Bag White Regular Potatoes 99
with 5 Discount Chips
4 Ib. Bag Sugar......................... 39
with 6 Discount Chips
Gallon M ilk....... ......................... .


ABAfSA BA< A BA'yA 3A*WA SAtACE


Big Delicious
SUB SANDWICH

only 1.89






Individual Salads
Chef ........... 1.39
Ret. Salad. 1.19


I3AIY









111r, ZTA'LKk-UT QI'.TflUr VTr *-TTIUMMQAMI JAN.QZI OOZ DAE' OM


Charitable Contributions Deductible


Taxpayers planning on item- *travel expenses (including
IZing their deductions this year- meals and lodging) while away
may wish to contribute to their from home unless there was no
favorite charity before 1992,. but significant element of personal
should make sure they follow IRS pleasure, recreation, or vacation
guidelines. "There are restrictions *political contributions
claiming charitable contributions *dues, fees, or bills paid to
''when filing taxes,:'so taxpayers country clubs, lodges, fraternal
should be careful when figuring orders, or similar groups
their deduction,"' said James J. *value of any benefit, such as
Ryan, Jacks6nvilfe IRS district di- food, entertainment, or merchan-
rector. dise, received in connection with
Contributions or gifts.,to or- a contribution to a charitable or-
ganizations that are religilQs,, ganization. An example is paying
charitable, educational, scientific', ; tableorganization
Sor literary In purpose are valid, as $100 to, a charitable organization
/dter';gifts to.prorganizations'that. attend :a .fund-raising dinner.
work to prevent cruelty to chil- 'hT e value of the dinner, say $40,_
',dreh or animals.;- ; .', ,', c mqus4 be subtracted, so. the de-
?,.' a ayers. i.ay;-not dedt ;, .uctible contribution is $60
gfts to indvidua oregri rgan- cost of raffle, bingo, or lot-
.lzations, groups tiat are run for tey tickets
ons grops ar ",e run. ,, *cost of tUition
personal? profit, 'groups whose valet ofyourtionme or service
o;eprpo s to 'lobby lfor changes in value of your time or servic-
,laWs, I civic 'leagu:e-, 'social .6or .' .,.
)i^oprts cihbs,- labor; unions, and value of blood donated to a
*,ipniberfc.omiherce; .. blood bank
Alsonot deductible are: *transfer of future interest in-





Plant Screens Good


* Landscaping Devices


tangible personal property.
How a taxpayer makes a con-
tribution is important also. Con-
tributions may be in cash, prop-
erty,' or out-of-pocket expenses
paid to do volunteer work for the
kinds of organizations mentioned
above. Driving to and from volun-
teer work may be claimed for 12
cents a mile or the actual cost of
gas and oil. Parking and tolls may
be added to either method. Any
amount repaid by an organization
may not be claimed.
Taxpayers 'should always
keep cancelled checks, or other
'written records showing the name
of the organization and the date
the donation was made. Records
/should also be,kept of how prop-
eity value was determined at the
time of donation., If the taxpayer
chose to reduce his or her deduc-,
tion for gifts of capital gain prop-
erty, a record of how that amount


was figured should be kept. Also,
'- 'if any conditions are attached to
the gift, they should be recorded
and kept as a record.
There is a limit to the amount
taxpayers can claim for charitable
contributions. Taxpayers should
consult IRS Publication 526 for
'further guidance if:
*Cash contributions or con-
tributions of ordinary income
property are more than 30 per-
S.ent of the amount shown on
Form 1040, line 32.
r *Gifts of capital gain property
to certain organizations is more
'than 20 percent of the amount
shown on Form 1040, line 32.
*Gifts of property that in-
c reased in value or gifts of the
use of property.
S, To order Publication 526,
'Charitable Contributions" call
toll-free 1-800-TAX-FORM (829-
3676).


MESSAGE

SERVICE

A

OFiC SPLYSTR
30 Wllam Ae


*Heating & Air f.
*Major
:Appliance
Repair
*Plumbing &
Electrical Wor, ,

RER0007623*.
RFOO40131 '' 2 ,8416 or 2274,954 106 Bellamy Circle 'Port St. Joe







Sizeable Quantity of



Tongue and Grove -Prssreb;a te
No. 1 Quality


while
quantity
lasts


Linear, Foot


By Roy Lee Carter
S County Extension Agent
S' ust as we have walls in our
homes to enclose or separate dif- .
fereint use areas, plants can be
used for the same purpose in our
"landscapes. Practically every
home landscape has areas which
need to be enclosed or separated
for different uses or screened
from public view. For example, it
is usually desirable to screen gar-
bage cans, alre conditioning units
and service areas from view both
from the street and from your
home. Often your entire back
yard may be screened to provide
privacy for the family. And even
within this area, you might want
to further divide this space into a
children's play area, terrace and
a private spot for yourself.
All of these objectives and
many more can be achieved
through proper use of a hedge.
There are five general uses for
hedge plants. They can be used
as a visual screen to keep some-
one from seeing in-or-out, as a
barrier to keep people and ani-
nial's out, or keep children and
4* 4 pets' in, as a 'divider --ji 'sf as"..
P walls separate your home into dif-:;
ferent purpose areas, and as an
aesthetic part of your landscape
design. A clipped or natural
hedge can make a beautiful addi-
tion to your garden. And finally, a
hedge can be used to greatly re-
duce noise pollution. It has been
estimated that proper use of
plant screens can reduce. the
noise level as much as 60 per-
cent. Plant parts break up sound
waves, change their direction,
and reduce their intensity.
Through Judicious use of trees
and shrubs, you can reduce the
soQundof a' heavily: traveled high-
way running past your home to a
level of a suburban street in the
quiet of evening. _
Hedges can be used along or
rin combination with fences. -Make
sure ,the screen' is .ith harmony
'ith your house and 'garden. If
space is limited, consider a fence,
rather than a hedge, which re-
quies ,more' space-. Fences :-may
costmnore initially, however,; over
many ears the cost of maintain-
Ing a good-hedge may be higher.
The choice of plants for a
screen or hedge is practically un-
,7Jlmited. Flowering shrubs like
. aibella'. azalea, butterfly-bush, ca-
mellia., xora, Jasmines, plumba-,
_go,'andfeijboa can be used effec-
tively. For interesting foliage,


HARDWARE and.


Roy Lee
Carter

County
Extension
Director


consider chaste-tree, elaeagnus,
nandina or pittosporum. Podocar-
pus, anise, cherry laurel, juni-
pers, cedar, hollies, wax-myrtle
and many ligustrums make excel-
lent evergreen hedges and'
screens.








Tommy
Thomas

Chevrolet
PANAMA CITY
Announces Its
Affiliation With
James C.
"Bo" Bray









In Port St. Joe,
Frankin County Area
Chevrolet-GEO
New and Used Cars and Trucks
Business: 1-800-342-7131
or 904-785-5221
Home: 229-6836


_ OR SENIORS1
MeicreAssgnen- Accepte



0. Lee Mullis, M.D.


Say Eye'& Surgical Center



r 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City
.CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
S1-800-227-5704
"-M w m M d fa- -- -


B lUR 01M i alH i LA i LWu!"f. W i


PAG-r qR


J


TH SA. OT T JE F -TURDY.JN.2 19


I


46







BULK RATE
POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahitchka, FL 32465


HAPPY NEW Y]EA3


&


MANY THANKS"


Sale Begins Wed., Jan. 1
Sale Prices Good Thru Tuesday, Jan. 7


We would like to take this time to wisn
all our customers a very Happy New
Year and best wishes for a prosperous
1992. Our thanks are extended to you
for your patronage during the past year.


TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH PORK

Country Style


FAMILY L
PAK


TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH PORK slo 0
Boston Butt Roast lb. $ 0
TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH FAMILY PAK $ 19
Pork Steaks ............. L. L
TABLERITE QUALITY BEEF BONELESS $* $4 99
Rump Roast ............ ~., .
TABLERITE QUALITY BEEF FAMILY PAK $ 29'
Cube Steak ........... Lb. &
ARMOUR STAR $ 49
Sliced Bacon ....... i .
ARMOUR SMOKED 99
Cajun Sausage .... .. oz .I


ARMOUR
Kielbasa Sausage.


16 oz.


ARMOUR ITALIAN
Smoked Sausage .. isz.
ARMOUR RED MEAT
Hot Dogs ............. 12oz.
OLD FASHIONED
Hoop Cheese ......... m.
REDI-SERVE CHICKEN
Fried Steak ........... L..
REDI-SERVE BREADED CHUCK
Wagon Patties ...... Lb..


ARMOUR 50Z.
VIENNA SAUSAGE ............2/990
ARMOUR 3 OZ. /
POTTED MEAT ................./99
JIM DANDY 16 OZ. 2/9
QUICK GRITS ...............2.. 99
TRAILBLAZER 40 LB. BAG
HI PRO DOG RATION ...... 8.49
14 L


IVAN CAMP'S 16 OZ.
PORK N BEANS
2/89

2 LB. BAG 59
PERFECTION RICE .............. 59
DEL MONTE 32 OZ. $
PRUNE JUICE ..............S. .1 9
IGA SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY 18 OZ.
PEANUT BUTTER .......... 1.29
BI-RITE 2 LB. JAR
GRAPE JELLY .....................
BI-RITE 12 OZ. CAN
FILLED MILK ................ 2/89o
HOMEBEST BLUE OR GREEN 32 OZ.
DISH DETERGENT ................ 9
IGA 175 CT.
FACIAL TISSUE .............. 2/99
IGA 30 OZ.
SPAGHETTI SAUCE .......... 990
RONCO THIN AND REGULAR 7 OZ /
SPAGHETTI ..................... 99


NEHI PRODUCTS & 7
RC 2 LITER 7
COLA woom*o** 7,9'


IDIRY P*ODI


AMERICAN HERITAGE INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED SINGLES 10.6 OZ.
VEG. OIL SLICES ... 89
IGA BOWL CROCK 3 LB. SWEETMILK OR BUTTERMILK PRE-PRICED AT 99t 4 PAK
A RNE .SOFT BALLARD 9
WAIRGA RINE BISCUITS 9....


McKENZIE Turnips w/Roots, Turnips, Mustard, Collards 1 Ilb.
GREENS ... . .


INTERSTATE CRINKLE CUT 2 LB. BAG
FRENCH
FRIES -.--.'..'


PEPPERIDGE ASSORTED 17 OZ. .
SLAYER


WHITE
POTATOES
10 LB. BAG


49


RED EMPEROR
Grapes ...................... Ib.
HAMLIN
Oranges ............... 5 lb. bag
CALIFORNIA
Navel Oranges ......... 4 for
LARGE
Tangelos ................. 4 for
YELLOW
Onions ................ 3 Ib. bag
KILN DRIED TRAY PAK
Sweet Potatoes ......... Ib.
CALIFORNIA
Carrots ................. 2 Ib. bag
CALIFORNIA WAXED
Rutabagas ........... 3 Ibs.


990



990

990

89"
39o
89"

99,


David Ric's
FOODLINERS. .a-
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.
.1129 4ma- -,&~-.


Prices Good Jan. 1- 7, 1992


RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


$199
$199

991

$209
$159

$159


I


- ---