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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02922
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: December 5, 1991
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02922

Full Text



12/31/99
ARCHIVES BINDERY
1508 HWY 431-5
ALBERTVILLE AL 35950


See Santa Saturday In Port St. Joe






THTSTTU1




SUSPS518-880 INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA Pe
Plus 20 Tax. ... J5
FIFTY-FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 14 PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 -THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5,1991


Vaccine


On Tap


for Flu

Gulf Still Has
, Good Supply
Influenza and colds are
sweeping Gulf County and appar-
ently, the rest of the south at the
present time, with the threat of
flu vaccine being depleted.
Dr. Owen Oksanen, a local
physician says, 'Though not eve-
rybody's cold is the flu, a flu-like
illness is definitely running
through our area." The symptoms
of this wide-spread ailment are;
whole body aches, fever, a dry
cough and weakness. The Illness
generally lasts an average of five
to seven days, with lesser symp-
toms sometimes persisting for
weeks afterwards.
Dr. Oksanen says is not prac-
tically possible to tell the patient
whether he has the flu or a cold,
but with the epidemic sweeping
the south, it is reasonable to as-
sume that the flu is,the bug mak-
ing so many people ill.
Of the three kinds of flu, type
(See FLU on Page 3)

Man Dies from
Attack on Job
K. I D. Todd ,of Howard Creek
was pronounced dead at Gulf
Pines Hospital Tuesday, after col-
lapsing on his job at Premiere
Services. He had suffered an ap-
parent heart attack shortly after
returning to his work station fol-
lowing a morning break.
Todd, who was 60 years of
age, apparently had no previous
record of heart trouble. He was
working on a high platform at the
plant, when he suddenly col-
lapsed at about 10:30 a.m. Gulf
County Search and Rescue strug-
gled for several minutes to get
Todd's body to ,the ground from
its difficult location on top of the
platform.
Funeral arrangements were
still uncertain at press time
Wednesday.


A Third


---, P 2
-~- .

Lack of funds from state sources and weather conditions tion date for Gulf County's new correctional facility by at least
during the late summer months have shoved back the occupa- three months ... maybe longer.



Prison Put on 'Hold' 'Til July

Senator Bruner's Aide Says Occupancy Put Off by Lack of Funds


Gulf County's new correc-
tional institution, north of We-
wahitchka, will have its opening
delayed by at least three
months, according to Senator
Vince Bruner's administrative
assistant, Monica Lemieux.
Lemieux reported on the
"state of the county" with the
state of Florida Tuesday night of
last week, at the Gulf County
Commission meeting, saying the
state budget crunch has set
back the-assignment of the first
prisoners to the new facility un-
til July, 1992.
The prison was scheduled to
begin receiving inmates in April,
1992, but inclement weather
causing construction delays and
state budget problems has
caused the delay. Full utilization
of the prison by inmates is not
expected until January, 1993.
Lemieux. said the three
month delay was set by the De-
partment of Corrections, after
their budget was slashed several
million dollars. She said, "Both
Senator Bruner and Representa-
tive Robert Trammell have
joined together to fight any fur-
ther delays of the prison open-


ing which might be suggested in
months to come."
Lemieux also said the Sena-
tor has flatly stated he will vote
for no new taxes, fees, charges,
etc., in the coming session. 'The
Senator feels that it's time to
ask people to start helping
themselves. The state cannot be
all things to all people."
Reading ,from a prepared
script provided by Bruner, she
read, 'The role of government is
not to provide for everybody .. .
only for those trying to help
themselves or those who are un-
able to do so." The Senator also
observed, "This is not going to
be an easy year .to be a Legisla-
tor."
ENGINEERS UNDER FIRE
The county's engineers,
Baskerville-Donovan, came un-
der fire from the Board, espe-
cially its chairman, Billy Traylor,
Tuesday night. Traylor stated, "I
am totally fed up with BDE.
They've been dragging their feet
on all our projects. We have had
on-going problems with them."
Representatives from the
firm, Ted Biddy. and James
Waddell, were present, reporting


they were replacing former engi-
neers who were working on Gulf
County projects, saying they
were getting right on the job of
taking care of the four projects
their firm is now working on.
Chairman Traylor countered,
saying they were the first BDE
representatives to appear at a
Board meeting this year.
One of the four projects the
firm is working on is securing a
pe it for an extension to the
Five Poiris landfill, which will
be filled up under the present
permit limits about the middle
of this month.
The permit application, sub-
mitted last month to DER in
Pensacola, was denied last
week, and part of the reasons
for objection were discussed
Tuesday night.
One of these reasons was
design problems. BDE wasn't re-
sponsible for that one, with spe-
cial projects director, Bill McGee
saying DER wanted some
changes made in the design,
and BDE representative, James
Waddell saying the changes had
largely to do with moving back
from the property line a certain


distance before any use of the ,c
site began.
SOMEBODY GOOFED
DER was also disturbed be-
cause ditching work had already
started on the new site but was
in the wrong place.
Waddell said Mosquito Con-
trol director, Sam Graves had
instructed the ditch to be dug,
and dug in the wrong place.
"DER asked why work had al-
ready started on the new site,"
Waddell said,
Chairman Traylor said, "I
know Sam Graves and he didn't
start digging unless someone
told him it was all right to do so,
and he didn't start digging in a
certain spot unless he was di-
rected to do so."
Waddell retorted, 'Well,.
BDE didn't tell him."
Graves was home recovering
from a stay in the hospital, but
others on his staff and former
projects director, Ralph Rish,
verified that BDE had directed
Graves to start digging and
where to dig.
Waddell continued to deny
(See PRISON on Page 3)


Permit


Needed

to Allow Work
On Boat Basin
Only one permit remains to
be received before the City of Port
St. Joe can begin repairs to the
boat basin on Fifth Street, it was
revealed Tuesday night.
The City Is trying to get the
necessary permits to extend the
concrete launch apron into deep-
er water to remove a hazard and
a problem with a sudden drop-off
at the end of the current launch
apron.
Some $5,000 has been re-
ceived, through the Gulf County
Commission, from the state boat-
ing fund, to help pay for the pro-
ject. The boating fund is collected
from boat registrations for the
, purpose of providing launch facil-
lities throughout the state.
Deputy Clerk, Pauline Pen-
darvis reported permits had been
received from the Department of
Environmental Regulation. and
the U.S. Corps of Engineers. A
permit is yet to be received from
the Department of Natural Re-
sources.
The three permits are neces-
sary for the 10 foot extension of
the present concrete launch
ramp.
.T.he. ,Commission has been -
trying to cut through the red tape
of state and federal government
for the project, since about mid-
year.
CABLE TV AGAIN
The almost bi-weekly subject
of cable TV was a part of the
Commission meeting again Tues-
day night, with the Commission
receiving communication from
Gulf Cable TV owner, Douglas
Feldman. Feldman said his firm
was rescinding their plans to as-
sess every cable outlet a $10.00
one-time charge at the Commis-
sion's urging. But, beginning Jan-
uary 1, the monthly charge will
be raised by $1.00 per month on
the basic service. The firm is fur-
(See PERMIT onPage 3)


Large Parade Will Welcome Santa to Port St. Jo(


Santa Claus and his friends will meet here
in Port St. Joe Saturday afternoon for his an-
nual visit. Ushering in the world's favorite resi-
dent of the North Pole will be a huge parade,
sponsored by the Port St. Joe Merchants Asso-
ciation.
Bob Bearden, chairman of the parade com-
* mittee, said Wednesday morning that the event
was shaping up into an entertaining affair with
several entries already committed to appearing
in the march down Reid Avenue.


STARTS AT 3:00 P.M.
The parade will begin at 3:00 p.m., at the
Fifth Street intersection of Reid Avenue. The
parade route will go north on Reid to First
Street, then to Williams Avenue and back to
the point of origin on Fifth Street. Bearden said
the parade will make up along the north lane of
Fifth Street.
Leading off, of course, will be cars from. the
Port St. Joe Police Department and the Gulf
County Sheriffs office, followed by the colors,


carried by the NJROTC of Port St. Joe High
School.
Following the parade, the Merchants have
arranged for a photographer to be set up in
Badcock's Furniture Store to take pictures of
their children with Santa Claus for all who
wish them, at a small charge.
Bearden said the parade will feature several
unique floats, which will be judged for following
the Christmat spirit, with cash prizes awarded
to the top three entries. 'We have floats, an-


e Saturday
tique cars, several kids' marching groups and
several other entertaining groups penciled in,"
Bearden said. 'We'll have entries phone in right
on up to Friday afternoon," the parade director
said. "If past years are any indication, we will
have a big parade this year," he said.
STREET CLOSED TO TRAFFIC
Police Chief, Carl Richter, said Reid Avenue
will be closed to vehicles during the parade
hours. He said his department will begin clear-
(See PARADE on Page 3)


White City Accident Mars Holiday Safety Record
One severe accident early Fri-
day morning, marred the other-
wise safe holiday week end here
in Gulf County.
Two White City men, Craig
Hamm and Tommy Chavois, were
severely injured when their car
was struck by a loaded 18-
wheeler pulpwood truck.
According to witnesses, there
was a dense fbg at the time of the
accident, which happened about .
7:30 a.m. on the north side of the
White City bridge near the Stebel
Street intersection. Apparently
Chavols, the driver of the car,
pulled into the path of the truck,r
which struck the vehicle in the
passenger side, causing severe in-
Juries to both Hamm and Cha-
vois.
Florida Highway Patrol inves-
tigated the accident, but no
charges and few details have
been revealed by the agency.
Both young men suffered se-
4) rious injuries and were trans- ... ..
ferred to a Panama City hospital
by Gulf County Ambulance Ser- Two young men received serious injuries wood truck Friday morning, in a heavy fog. Both
vice. when this car pulled in front of a loaded pulp- men are still hospitalized.


Kids,Write Those


Letters to Santa
You, better not pout,
you better not cry, you
better be good, rm telling
you why...Santa Claus is
coming to town.
It's December and
time to get to the task of
S writing those letters to
Santa Claus for the
young and young at
heart. Santa has already
started checking his list
and going over it twice
*.-'_. with his helping elves.
The Star will print all
S- > letters to Santa in the is-
sue just before Christ-
mas, just as it has in the
-/ past. All letters received
prior to publication time
will be printed.
In order to help out in this project, The Star is asking that all
kids get busy now and get those letters in, so they may be typeset
and forwarded on to Santa Claus at the North Pole.
Drop your letters by The Star at 308 Williams Avenue in Port
St. Joe or mail them to: The Star, P.O. Box 308, Port St. Joe, FL
32456.


1


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THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5,1991


Good Business

Each Christmas season community newspapers across the
nation-including The Star-urge their readers to "shop at
home." Chamber of Commerce officials and local leaders echo
the theme.
Yet, many, many shoppers flee to malls miles away to spend
their Christmas money. In Port St. Joe and Gulf County, statis-
tics show that up to one-half of family spendable income is
spent outside the county.
The result? Poor local sales for retailers during the year's
most important season. For stores in Port St. Joe and similar
communities, Christmas sales often spell the difference in a
profit or loss for the entire year.
But, why should I shop locally, buyers ask? Prices may be
higher, selections limited and stores aren't open at convenient
hours, they maintain.
In some cases the arguments may be valid. However, as
these same shoppers speed toward malls in Panama City, Talla-
hassee, Dothan, etc., they are overlooking an important argu-
ment:
Every dollar spent at home stays HERE. That same dollar
spent elsewhere stays THERE.
Shopping dollars spent in Port St. Joe and Gulf County, flow
through our economy in channels which strengthen the commu-
nity. Each time you spend a single dollar in a Port St. Joe store
you are starting a chain reaction leading to more jobs, an im-
proved educational system, better roads, stronger government
and police and fire protection and other benefits to your person-
al life.
When you spend that same dollar out of town, you are subsi-
dizing strangers and their lifestyle. At the same time you are
chipping away at the economic health of your own community and
the services it provides.
We certainly do not intend to tell readers how and where to
spend hard-earned dollars. That is your choice.
However, this newspaper encourages each area resident to
weigh the many factors favoring doing as much Christmas buy-
ing in Port St. Joe and Gulf County as possible.
You'll be helping yourself in the long run.



Remember Pearl!
Where were you on December 7, 1941? That's a common
question about this time each year. It will be asked more often
this year, since this is the 50th anniversary of the Japanese at-
tack on the United States at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.
We remember where we were. We were lying in a sickbed, un-
able to get out where we were to stay for nearly two years.
Actually, the attack helped us, since it spurred on the develop-
ment of sulfa and penicillin, both of which were instrumental in
getting us out of that bed.
But selfish reasons aside, the attack shocked the nation at
the time and devastated a lifestyle, upsetting thousands of fami-
lies and.their futures forevermore. .. -
The attack on Pearl Harbor was no Vietnam. It was no Desert
Storm. It was a war which affected the entire world, keeping it in
a turmoil during the years which followed and resulted in the
detonation of the most powerful force ever exploded on this
earth. This explosion has caused the world's people to live in a
constant state of suspense ever since, just waiting on someone
to grow mad enough to explode another one.
The Japanese really started a chain reaction they didn't
count on. In reality, they caused the 45 years of stand-off be-
tween the United States and the Soviet Union. They initiated the
nervous four decades experienced in Europe. They were respon-
sible for Fidel Castro holding this nation hostage for the past 30
years with his threat of possession of a nuclear bomb.
Much has been said in recent days about the United States
and Japan having a need to apologize to one another--Japan
for the sneak attack and the United States for dropping THE
bomb.
We feel the only apology due is from Japan, for starting the
war in the beginning. The manner of the attack-even though it
was sneaky-was just a part of warfare. War is never pretty. The
matter of dropping THE bomb was another of the inhuman tools
of war being employed to win the conflict. There are no civilized
ways to kill another human being.
The Bible says to turn the other cheek, go the second mile,
forgive those who wrongfully use you, but after 50 years, we still
find it hard to follow these admonitions toward someone who be-
gins shooting in our direction with killing and conquering as
their goal.
But, we both need to work on it.


Hunker Down with Kes


Ah-h, So!


Kesley
Colbert

Pearl Harbor didn't mean a
whole lot to me until April of
1968. Before that it was Just an-
other story in a history book. Af-
ter all, that sneak attack on an
early Sunday morning 50 years
ago took place six years before I
was born. I'd heard mother men-
tion several times about a second
cousin or a great uncle or some
kin that was serving on the Arizo-
na that fateful day. But to tell you
the truth, I didn't feel the loss of
a relative I never knew.
We lost a lot of good men at
Bunker Hill. And Valley Forge.
And at the Alamo. My wife's
great-great grandfather, Elijah
Parker, was also killed on a Sun-
day morning. He fell in a peach
orchard on April 2, 1862, near a
small church in West Tennessee
call Shiloh. And everyone didn't
make It to the top of San Juan
Hill.
Black Jack Pershing, what a
dashing path he cut, but a lot of
farm boys from Kansas and Ken-
tucky and Georgia were buried
"over there." Once, when Uncle
Clifford was plowing without his
shirt, I saw the scars on his back
and shoulder where the shrapnel
entered. That happened in anoth-
er December, in Germany at the
Battle of the Bulge. He was eight-
een years oldl Uncle Clifford came
back but he talked of cows and
cotton, not war and dying. In one
brave moment, totally disregard-
ing mom's stem warnings to the
contrary, I asked him about the
fighting he'd seen. He said it was
cold as all get out and he was ab-
solutely scared to death. Didn't
sound like no war hero to me.
Now understand, I was proud
of him. I was proud of all of them
--.those who didn't comeback
like Colonel Travis and Stonewall
Jackson and those who did, like
Alvin C. York and Audie Murphy.
I'd read all the books. I'd seen
the pictures. I had all sorts of
knowledge about wars and de-
struction and senseless dying -
but I didn't have the feel.
In April of 1968 I was in the
locker room at the University of
the South dressing for a baseball
game. Someone came by and
said, "Kes, your dad's outside."
Son of a gun, he'd driven two
hundred miles to see a baseball
game After the game, we were
just walking and visiting like you
do before he started the long trip
back home. 'One of the students,
who happened to be from Korea
or China or Japan, came by.
"What's he doing here!" The
question came so quick and so
strong that it startled me.
"Dad, he just--"
"Does he work in the kitch-
en?" I knew my father. He was
boiling mad.
"Dad--"
'You can pack your things.
You're not going to school here-


any more."
He was dead serious. I'd nev-
er seen him like this.
"I've got two-and-a-half years
here, I can't leave." It took me
twenty minutes to calm him down
enough so I could stay. I was so
embarrassed. "Not so loud, Dad."
We moved quickly toward the
car. My goodness, that war had
been twenty-five years ago! I was
a junior in college, he'd made it
only as far as the third grade. He
just didn't understand. Sure, I
knew he'd spent four years in the
South Pacific but that was long
ago. And I know that it was a
dastardly attack on Pearl Harbor
while the Japanese envoy in
Washington was feigning peace.
I'd read all about that "Day of In-
famy." But Sewanee, Tennessee,
in 1968 was far removed from
Tora, Tora, Toral
I was relieved when Dad's car
went out of sight He left still
mad. And I was kind'a mad my-
self. How could he be so out of it!
I guess he's just not as learned as
I am.
I went back to my room, laid
down and pondered on it some.
Dad, like Uncle Clifford, never
mentioned the war. David Mark
and I, years ago, had taken those
bronze stars and bronze arrow-
heads and all those colored rib-
bons off of that green Jacket .and
pinned them on our T-shirts
when we played war. We lost eve-
ry one of them. Dad never said a
word. I tried to remember the
places he'd been, New Guinea,
Biak, Midway, Guam, Minda-
nao... there were too many of
them. You know, he didn't read
about those places in a book.
They weren't a back drop for a
John Wayne movie. And for Dad,
those G.I.'s lying face down in the
sand on the cover of Life Maga-
zine had names
I remember exactly where I
was and what I was doing that
November John F. Kennedy was
shot. That is still so real to me.
So close. I remember mother say-
ing they'd just gotten up from
Sunday dinner when they heard
the news of Pearl Harbor. She
had on a blue dress and she was
holding two spoons in her hand.
Leon was born in October of
1942. Daddy left home a couple
of months later. Can you imagine
leaving a son to fight a warl A son
that had trouble accepting this
"stranger" when he returned four
years later and twenty years
older. If the war hadn't
a'happened, I would be graduated
from this college by now.
Maybe my father knew a little
more about this than I did. And
to not say a word for all these
years.......... I realized that dad
took Pearl Harbor very personal-
ly. Listen, if it is personal to him,
then It's personal to me.
"Hello, mom, is dad home
yet?"
"No, son, what time did he
leave from up there?"
'You tell him that I love him
and, mom, tell him I understand."
Respectfully,
Kesley


Christmas!
Ricky Farmer attaches a piece of Christmas decoration to a
utility pole on Fifth Street Monday morning, as he, Roosevelt
Beard, Chandler Ash and Raymond Rogers were about the
business of decorating the City. Public Works Superintendent,
Frank Healey said the job should be complete and the lights
shining bright by the end of the week.


Fall Season Brings Its Own Peculiar Foods to Our Diet


SOMEBODY LEFT ME a
mess of fresh, young turnip
greens the other day. The greens
were the product of someone's fall
gardening prowess and were the
satisfaction to some very selective
taste buds. minel
I don't know who brought the
turnip greens. I went home and
they were simmering in a pot. I
was informed that "someone" had
brought them to The Star and left
them there. I had no need to
question the turnip greens' origin
any further. They were there and
they were cooked with a hunk of
ham hock lying in the bottom of
the boiler, so what else was there
to ask?
Since there was a pan of
cornbread sitting on top of the
cook stove, off to the side, supper
was right there in front of me. So,
I did what any normal human be-
ing would do. I dipped me up a
platter of those turnip greens,
fished a piece of ham hock out of


the bottom of the pot, broke off a
chunk of the cornbread, looked
up a generous slab of butter and
fished the pepper sauce out of the
back of the refrigerator.
That's fall eating, first class!

FALL BRINGS IN A lot of
good food which is available at no
other time of the year. I guess
that's why Thanksgiving is cele-
brated in the fall of the year, rath-
er than in the springtime.
It's true, the spring and early
summer brings such southern
delights as peas, tomatoes, corn,


watermelons, etc, but these prod-
ucts of the soil, even though they
are delicious, are not the same as
a pot of turnip greens.
Here in the shank of the year,
we can all enjoy other things
which are peculiar to this time of
the year. There are sweet pota-
toes, fresh pork, pumpkins, cit-
rus fruit, apples, fresh cane syr-
up and a number of other things
which serve only to make your-
mouth water at the thought, if
you don't happen to have a sam-
pling handy.
Combine these foods peculiar
to autumn and the weather we


have been enjoying during Octo-
ber November and they all get to-
gether to make fall a right enjoya-
ble season.
FOR THE PAST four or five
weeks, I have been enjoying the
fresh, fat, juicy, sweet satsumas
from the tree in my back yard.
This little lone tree has been over-
loaded with this particular fruit
and I pull one off the tree nearly
every morning and every evening.
They make an enjoyable snack.
I don't know whether it's an
actuality, or if it's all in my imagi-
nation, but somehow, the satsu-
mas coming off the tree in my
back yard, taste immeasurably
better than those one purchases
at the grocery store.
Two years ago, that poor tree
had every limb and every leaf
coated with ice. It looked as if the
tree had gone to that large or-
chard in the sky, after that De-
cember freeze got through with it.
But, I tossed a piece of plastic


over it, more or less as a gesture,
and it lived and flourished. Fren-
chie said she counted 121 satsu-
mas on it about a month ago.
That number has been de-
pleted considerably since that
time.
THEN, A FEW weeks ago,
one of the banana trees in the
back yard started putting out
hands of bananas. I had been
marvelling at other peoples' bana-
na trees bearing fruit and even
took several pictures of other
trees during the past month or
so. Now, lo and behold, mine has
fruit.
I'm afraid it's so late In the
year, now, that mine will never
mature to the eating stage. But.
for the first time, we have banana
trees bearing fruit in our back
yard.
Frenchie Is a plant nut, as
you probably know. She'd buy an
icicle tree if someone had one for
sale. She may never get around to


planting it, but she'd buy It with
all good intentions of getting it in
the ground.
I have to admit, though, I be-
lieve she has the touch to make a
fried potato sprout and produce
at least a bushel. She puts vege-
table peelings, fruit cores, melon
rinds, spoiled vegetables, etc.,
around whatever is growing in
the yard. There's a pile of garbage
here and a pil4 of garbage there.
But, like I say; they grow for
her. They bloom their little hearts
out. If there are plants In buckets
or pots at our house, they seem
to just hang on to life until they
can get their feet into the ground
in the yard and get a taste of that
unusual fertilizer diet Frenchie
feeds them.
Like I say, it seems to work. If
the squirrels would just leave me
a quart or two of pecans on my
tree, I could put them with the
bananas and satsumas and have
some home-grown ambrosia for
Christmas.


St. Joseph Bay
Time Ht. Time
2a.m. L -.5 10:14 p.m. H
6a.m.L -.5 10:54 p.m. H
7a.m.L -.4 11:32 p.m. H


10:26 a.m. L
12:07 a.m. H
12:34 a.m. H
12:55 a.m. H


10:55 a.m. L
11:20 a.m. L
11:21 a.m. L


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
SUSPHS 518880 Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-$10.60 Six Months
WI USPHS 518880 ut of County-21.20 Year Out of County-$15.90 Six Months
Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue The Star
Sby .The Star Publishing Corany Post Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St Joe, FL Port St Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 their than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
A/E WP William H. Ramsey .......... Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
Frenchie L. Ramsey Office Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ................. Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


8:2
9:0
9:4


Date
Dec. 06
Dec. 07
Dec. 08
Dec. 09
Dec. 10
Dec. 11
Dec. 12


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THE ST_.PO T T.JO .. ...T .. DEC... 1991


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


Another Shoe In the Road
Several months ago I wrote a series of two or three articles
about the baffling and mysterious appearance of shoes in the
road. If you remember, I reported that on many occasions over a
number of years I have noticed single shoes in the road, at many
different locations, of course. I have constantly wondered how
they got there.
Since I first wrote about this particular phenomenon, several
people have concurred with me and have reported sightings as
far away as Chipley to the north, Pensacola to the west and Car-
rabelle to the east. I have had no reports south of here, but I ex-
pect a boat captain or crew member to call any day and report a
shoe floating in the Gulf or St Joseph Bay. A floating shoe report
will be just as mysterious as a shoe in the road, as far as I'm con-
cerned.
If you remember either of my previous articles, you will recall
that I reported sightings of many different kinds and brands of
shoes, the most unusual of which was a laced-up, brand new
converse tennis shoe I spotted about halfway between Port St.
Joe and Wewahitchka on Hwy. 71.
,, In the course of my investigation over the years, I have also
spotted work shoes of all kinds, wing-tip dress shoes, loafers,
boots of all kinds, tennis shoes and one day I spotted, right here
in Port St. Joe, a pair (this was a first) of house shoes that were
in "mint" condition. This pair of slippers still sit in my wife's clos-
et and she steadfastly refuses to wear them, although I washed
them before giving them to her. She is rather picky about some
things.
Anyway, it wasn't until one day last week that I discovered
what I feel was the ultimate of my discoveries; the last link in the
great "Shoe In The Road" mystery. .-
On November 25, at about 7:36 a.m., I walked out of the
Third Street exit of my office, turned right to Reid Avenue and lo-
and-behold, there sat, in the middle of a parking space, right in
front of 302 Reid Avenue, right across from Wee Beginnings, a
baby shoe in the road! Well, in the street, if I must talk city talk.
Actually it was not a baby shoe, but a toddler shoe because it
had been wornmby a child who was walking or attempting to walk.
?Either that or someone had been dragging the child by his arms
because the toe of the shoe has scuff marks on it.
A detailed examination revealed the following: It was a white
shoe with 10 lace-up holes, five on either side. It had a dirty but
sturdy shoe string that was half tied when I found it. It is the
right shoe of a pair and the tongue is listing to the outside as
shoes with loose tongues will do.
I. is a "Buster Brown" shoe because the inside of the heel
plainly shows Buster and the bulldog and has the name, Buster
Brbwn, written plainly under them. Buster is winking and the
bulldog is looking at Buster and smiling or growling, I can't tell
which. It is a size 5 1/2 and other than the scuffs on the toe,
there appears to be many miles of toddling left in it.
Although I have yet to solve any of the shoe in the road mys-
teries, I would love to solve this one because a child is involved.
At this very moment there may be a child walking around with
one shoe on and the other one sitting on my desk. This could
cause him to walk with a limp for the rest of his life. It breaks my
heart just thinking about it.
I feel compelled to take action This is what I'm going to do.
I'm going to wash the shoe string, clean and polish the shoe and
leave it at The Star. If your child, boy or girl, has lost one of their
shoes and this is it, please come by and pick it up. No questions
will be asked as long as you can identify it by showing the other
shoe. I don't want to take the chance of having two kids walking
I around with'one shoe on. I 1 ......
And, besides, it-will make my Christmas holiday season
much brighter knowing the child is walking around with a shoe
on each foot. Who knows, the shoe may belong to a little girl and
she may grow up to be Cinderellal
<. J


Flu


A is the most prevalent in this
area at the present time. Doctors
have a medication for treating
.his illness and, to a great degree,
preventing its onslaught if taken
early..
Dr. Oksanern suggests that if
you are worried about the flub,
that you get a flu shot now.
"Ideally, this should have been
done in early October, but there's
still vaccine available here in Port
Ober, but there'


From Page 1

St. Joe and the shot will give a
measure of protection against the
common ailment if taken now."
"If you're sick with a flu-like
illness, see your doctor. He can
help you with this uncomfortable
illness," Dr. Oksanen said. He
particularly advised people with
other serious illnesses or an eld-
erly person who becomes ill, to
see their doctor.
"Flu is a serious illness that


ing the, street of vehicles at about 2:00 p.m.,
and asks that motorists voluntarily refrain
,from parking on the street beginning at that
time. 'There will be a lot of people-especially
children--at the, parade. When you mix all
those people with vehicles on the street, you
get a dangerous situation and we want the
whole thing to be safe!" Rchter said.


Prison Delayed


that BDE had anything to do
with the error.
Traylor said, 'Well, when we
find out who did, we'll bear the
cost involved if our people are at
fault, but- if you are at fault,
we're going to expect you to pay
for the mistake." Traylor called
Graves at 'home, later in the
meeting, to fnd out if BDE had
instructed him in the dig.
Graves said he had dug under
the directions of BDE and that
the directions had been verified.
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
Another job which BDE was
scored on was their alleged
dragging of feet on preparation
of the County's Comprehensive


Plan. With the Department ot
Community Affairs saying the
County must have the docu-
ment in and approved by Janu-
ary 1, or face disciplinary ac-
tion, it still hasn't been
' completed.

v Administrative Assistant
Larry Wells and attorney Robert
Moore have been dealing with
DCA for the past two months,
trying to set up a conference
with their representatives to dis-
cuss the matter. A meeting was
finally held Monday, with the
county agreeing to meet two
DCA demands. One of the de-
mands was to repeal a local or-
dinance setting an effective date


for the ordinance and another
was to set an adoption schedule
for land development regula-
tions.
Attorney Moore said last
week the county was receiving
help in this area from private
land owners who were entering
the negotiations with DCA as af-
fected parties.
In the meantime, the state
is still going ahead with their
procedure to set up an adminis-
trative hearing, which is de-
signed to discuss penalties for
non-compliance and late filing
with the County.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other actions, the Board:


From Page 1


-Awarded a one-year con-
tract to monitor test wells at
closed landfills to Toxicon with
Preble-Rish, Inc. assisting. The
successful bid of $22,300, was
$800 higher than the other bid,
but was awarded because of the
involvement of a Gulf County
firm. It was awarded for only
one year to allow early termina-
tion if the county is dissatisfied
with the work. The Board has
had problems with other firms
in the past performing this ser-
vice.
-Refused to take over re-
sponsibility for maintenance of a
road in Wewahitchka, after a re-
quest to do so was presented by
the City.


Community Blood Drive Set for Dec. 17


There will be a community
blood drive December 17 from
1:00 to 7:00 p.m. ET at the First
United Methodist Church.
To be eligible to give blood,


persons must be 17 years of age
or older, but not over 66 unless
with a doctor's statement of good
health. They must weigh more
than 110 pounds. Donors should
eat and drink adequately before


donation to avoid reaction. Do
not give blood on an empty
stomach.
Pre-registration may be done
by calling the church office at
227-1724 between the hours of


9:00 a.m. to noon and 1:00 to
3:00 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday, and 9:00
a.m. to noon on Wednesday.
Please, give blood to give an-
other a chance.


Letters to the Editor...


To the Editor:
It struck me as extraordinary
that Wesley Ramsey condones
over indulgence in cancer-
causing, body-degenerating
foods, especially at Thanksgiving,
a time of the year, he correctly
points out, synonymous with
American appreciation.
Does Mr. Ramsey find it ac-
ceptable to raise health care cost
for all tax payers by encouraging
obesity a condition unneces-
sary in view of today's nutritional
information and the elevation
of Americans' cholesterol levels?
In these ecologically-sensitive
times, physicians and other
health care experts throughout
the nation stress a less meat-
based diet and urge people to eat
more grains, vegetables, and le-
gumes, all of which "ain't awful
sounding."
The production of meat is en-
vironmentally destructive and
wasteful the amount of grain
used to feed livestock in the U.S.
could put an end to the country's
hunger problem.
Perhaps Mr. Ramsey is una-
ware of these facts. Or can it be-


can make anyone ilL ,For the eld-
erly, though, the flu can be more
than just serious," the doctor
said.
It's true, -though, that sup-
plies of flu vaccine are dwindling.
'While it takes only about two
weeks for the vaccine to take ef-
fect, the problem now is that
we're past the 'shot season' and
supplies of the vaccine are dwin-
dling. Some offices still have
them, however. If one doctor is
out, another may still have a sup-
ply," Dr. Oksanen concluded.

Permits
From Page 1
nishing five new channels to their
service here in Port St. Joe.
I the meantime, the Com-
mission will be meeting with rep-
resentatives from Suncoast Com-
munications on December 18, 19
and 20 to discuss the possibilities
of a wireless system for the City.
Rigel Communications, own-
ers of Gulf Cable TV, have also
made an application to have its
non-exclusive franchise renewed.
Their current franchise expires in
1994.


that he simply enjoys reinforcing
the opinion of many residents of
Gulf County that he is only capa-
ble of expressing personal, out-
dated ideas?
Sincerely,
Mrs. C. Batten
Port St. Joe

Toys for Tots
To All Gulf County Residents:
The United States Marine
Corps' Toys for Tots Program was
started over 20 years ago to col-
lect new and reparable toys to be
distributed to underprivileged
and -'needy children for Christ-
mas.
The Gilmore family asks that,
you jin us in this worthy project
by dropping off a new or repara-
ble toy at Gilmore Funeral Home,
503 10th Street, Port St. Joe. The
Marine Corps Reserve will collect
and package these toys for distri-
bution in time for Christmas
through local agencies who are
familiar with those in need. Toys
will be accepted until December
13.
A sincere thank you,
John V. Gilmore, Sr.
-Veteran, U.S. Marine Corps


* No cholesterol '- "
in food preparation
* High quality food
(9C
Catering S


J. Patricks

fes tau rant |
41 2 Reid .-.entue
Port St. Joe, F/lorida ,
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
-Featuring Daily Luncheon Specials ,
7 and All You Can Eat Salad Bar
Saturday Night Special $
Seafood Buffet 7 .95
NOON BUFFET............$4.95
or Order from the wide selection on Our
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~ Evening Meal Begins at 5:00 PM


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services Also Available
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Is Made Easy When


Together,


We're Strong!


We're proud to serve you-our neighbors and friends. Because, working
together, we've made this community strong.
Please, visit us often. And let us know how we're doing. We care
about making our services as complete and convenient as possible.
Through continued teamwork, we'll ensure your success...and the
success of the entire community. Now that's financial muscle!

Together, We're Strong!


Citizens Federal Savings Bank


Port St. Joe
227-1416


Apalachicola
653-9828


Wewahitchka
639-2111


LENDER 999 8a~e's Syst..n~s r'c SI GlOnd MN Fen, TWS AOP'NA


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PAGE 3A


I


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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOB. FL THURSDAY. DEC. 5. 1991


7. *


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raV 4U' AA O'PA '-11W, *fl 5, A = A = **tbASA.AAA ; .,-- -


Overstreet VFD Christmas Party


DAR Visited by George Washington


The SL Joseph Bay Chapter,
Daughters of the American Revo-
lution was entertained Wednes-
day. November 20, by special
. guest, Brian Sanders.
He is a board certified civil
trial attorney with offices in Fort
Walton Beach. He recently com-
pleted a successful term as presi-
dent of the Okaloosa-Walton
County Bar Association. He was
born and completed his public
school education in Orlando. In
1957, he graduated from the Uni-
versity of Florida with high hon-
ors. From 1957-1960, he was an
officer and pilot in light army avi-
ation, flying small aircraft. Fol-
lowing his military service, he
graduated from the University of
Florida Law School. He began his
career as special assistant to the
Florida Attorney General.
In 1960, he married Judy
Fensom of Port St Joe. They have
two sons and a daughter, Eliza-
beth, who assisted her father
with his program.
Mr. Sanders, dressed in an
authentic costume of 1787,
brought to life the drama of the
scene of Congress during the time


the Bill of Rights was being intro-
duced and discussed.
Portraying the characters of
Washington, Gorman, Gerry, Ma-
son, Sherman, and Hamilton, Mr.
Sanders returned the audience to
the days of yesteryear when in
the Pennsylvania Statehouse in
the City of Philadelphia, the
words of men who fought in those
early days for a new order of law
and justice in this land, came to
life. On June 8, 1789 in the City
of New York, Mr. Madison
brought forth his proposed Bill of
Rights.
On December 15, 1791, 10 of
the 12 proposed amendments
were ratified by the 11lth state
(Virginia), and the Bill of Rights
was born.
Personal papers from the ar-
chives of the original Bill of
Rights were displayed. The exam-
ple of the working copies of the
Bill of Rights of the notations
made by members of the Senate
on the House version revealed the
uncertainty, controversy, and
second thoughts by the members.
The drama of history was en-
lightening as well as entertaining.
A standing ovation to you, Mr.


Sanders.
A big thank you from the
DAR.


Teressa Renia Cozart and Mi-
chael Boyer Ramsey have an-
nounced their engagement and
forthcoming marriage. The cere-
mony will be a joyous event of
Saturday, January 4, 1992 at the
First United Methodist Church of
Springfield at 4:00 p.m. CST. A
reception will be held at the Trini-
ty Center, Panama City, following
the speaking of the vows.
The bride-elect's parents are
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry R. Cozart of
Mexico Beach. Grandparents are
Mrs. Cumi Cozart of Florence, Al-
abama, and Mrs. Christine Hodg-
es of Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
The groom-elect is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Ramsey
of Birmingham, Alabama. His
grandparents are Mr. and Mrs.
Edwin D. Ramsey of Port St. Joe,
and Mrs. Massillon M. Heuser,
also of Birmingham.
Miss Cozart is a Port St. Joe
graduate. She is presently attend-
ing the University of Alabama as
a senior and will complete her
last semester in December. Grad-
uation is expected for December
20.
The groom-elect graduated
from Vestavia High School in
Birmingham, and Florida State
University. He is presently at-
tending graduate school at Emory


The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Overstreet Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment will meet one week early
this month on Monday, December
9 at 7:30 p.m. ET. Christmas
goodies will be exchanged at this
time.
The Overstreet Volunteer Fire
Department will meet Tuesday,
December 10 at 7:00 p.m. ET
with a covered dish dinner. All
Overstreet residents are invited to
attend. Everyone is asked to
bring non-perishable food items
for a food basket to any of these
events.
Tickets may be purchased for
only $1.00 for three chances to
win. First prize is a queen size
quilt, hand stretched. Second
prize is a 48"x65" afghan and
third prize is a 36"x48" afghan.
These items have been donated
by Leonie Egler. Buy your tickets
now while they are still available.
The drawing will be held Decem-
ber 21. All proceeds will be used
for expansion of the Overstreet
Volunteer Fire Department.
For more information, call or
leave a message at 647-5722 or
648-8103.


University,
Theology.


the Candler School of


Bo wsPn


Things

Christmas Crafts
301 Fourth Street
Port St. Joe
-Across from Linda's
Restaurant-

Dec. 6 and 7
9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
-4'


Costin's Dept. Store Port St. Joe, FL

"Featuring" f
Photography at
its finest

1 11x14
2- 8xl0's
2 5x7's
and
Groups add $1.00 per person
8 Wallets Age 12 & up pay additional deposit

$3.00 deposit and Saturday, Dec. 7
$15.95 on delivery 10 a.m. 1 p.m.
2 p.m. 4 p.m.

*PORTRAITS BACK BEFORE CHRISTMAS
*LAST CHANCE BEFORE CHRISTMAS BARNARD PORTRAIT PROMOTION


Get Your New


C


up to 50 sq.
yd. sculptured
carpet with
pad installed


Cas &CarySain


$49995


No Wax Vinyl ............................. starts at $3.99
Indoor/Outdoor Carpet................. $3.99


90 DAYS SAME AS CASH
With Approved Credit


Carpet Couwtry


W. Hwy. 98 Highland View


Phone 227-7241


Your Satisfaction Is _j

Our Top Priority a
Our philosophy is simple: treat people right and -
they'll become loyal customers.
That means filling your prescriptions quickly and
accurately, taking time to answer your questions,
and providing you with advice on a whole range of
health care needs.
Place your trust in us and discover why so many of
your friends and neighbors have made us their phar-
macy of choice.

CAMPBELL'S

DRUG STORE
Phone 227-1224 528 Fifth St.
Saveway Center


2 Registered Pharmacists
and A Registered Clerk to fill your prescription
needs quickly and completely.


WEWA STATE BANK


PRESTIGIOUS HOLIDAY GIFTS

We are pleased to announce the availability
of three exquisitely-detailed American Eagle
coins. An American Eagle Silver Dollar
priced at only $21.50, an affordable Five
Dollar Gold Coin at only $69.00, and a
prestigious Two Coin Set with a Ten Dollar
Gold Coin and Silver Dollar for S195.00.


Available at
Both Bank
Wewahitchka 639-2222 Locations
Port St. Joe 229-8226 oc on


*


Michael Boyer Ramsey and Teressa Renia Cozart

Engaged


carpet In Time for the Holidays



3 ROOMS CARPETED


I


s~asi ---~aPalaam I


OAr 4AA


f


TH -TA -PnT T-Tn,-M.- HUSDY.DE. 99


I


'


- ..T~g~~


I








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, DEC. 5, 1991 PAGE 5A


SJulia Six to Sing Lead Role In


Christmas Musical Drama


The Ilse Newell Fund for the
'Performing Arts is extremely
:proud to present the delightful
Christmas musical drama "Amahl
and the Night Visitors" by Gian
Carlo Menotti, produced and di-
rected by Nancy Totman and per-
formed by some of the area's fin-
est singers. Following "Amahl",


Julia Six

the Bay Area Choral Society will
perform a specially arranged
medley of familiar Christmas car-
ols.
The lead role of Amahl will be


sung by Melea Gunter, a seventh
grader at Apalachicola High
School in the Carrabelle perfor-
mance and Julia Six of Port St.
Joe in the Apalachicola perfor-
mance.
Miss Julia Six, 10-year-old
student from Port St. Joe Elemen-
.tary School, will perform the role
of Amahl Sunday, December 8 at
the Apalachicola Trinity Church,
beginning at 4:00 p.m.
Amahl, a crippled shepherd
boy with a reputation for a vivid
imagination, is visited by the
three Magi, played by Wesley


Chesnut of Apalachicola, Tom
Loughridge an Apalachicola High
chemistry teacher, and David
Walker, a PE teacher from Brown
Elementary. Nancy Totman, who
holds degrees in Music and Thea-
tre and has directed numerous
musicals, sings the role of
Amahl's mother and Jimmy Mill-
er, the page. Bedford Watkins will
accompany.
Admission is a $2.00 suggest-
,ed donation for adults, $1.00 for
children over five, or by member-
ship. All children must be accom-
panied by an adult.
Julia is the daughter of Hu-
bert and Ann Six of Port St. Joe.


Garden Club Members to

Enjoy Christmas Music
The Port St Joe Garden Club yule tide music. Do attend and
will enjoy their Christmas covered listen to these fine young singers
dish luncheon on Thursday, De- and encourage them in their mu-
cember 12 at 12:30 p.m. ET at sic.
the Garden Center on Eighth Port St. Joe Garden Club
Street. members cordially invite friends,
The hostesses, Barbara Halli- winter visitors and garden plub-
nan, Frenchie Ramsey, and bers from other clubs to share
Elaine Jackson, have planned the 'New St Joe Singers' special
very special holiday decorations Christmas program.
to make the Center extra special.
All members are asked to bring
friends and guests to see the love-
ly decorations.
To celebrate Christmas, Ann
Comforter and the 'New St. Joe
Singers' will present a program of


Enfingers Celebrate
Fourth Anniversary
On October 27, James and
Darlene Enfinger celebrated their
fourth anniversary at First Bap-
tist Church as their minister of
music and youth.
James and Darlene were hon-
ored on that evening with a recep-
tion by the membership.
Everyone enjoyed finger foods
and an anniversary cake in the
reception hall following the wor-
ship service.


Lacey Nicole Brownell
It's A Girl!
James and Annette Brownell
are proud to announce the birth
of their daughter, Lacey Nicole
Brownell, born October 25 at
9:40 p.m.
Proud grandparents are Sally
Nixon of Mexico Beach, Jerry Nix-
on of Beacon Hill, and Mr. and
Mrs. Clenton Brownell of Over-
street.

Tour of Homes
In Wewa Dec. 15
The Wewahitchka Woman's
Club is again sponsoring a
Christmas Tour of Homes featur-
ing four local homes recently
completed. The event will take
place on Sunday, December 15
from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. CT.
Tickets are $3.00 per person
and can be obtained prior to De-
cember 15th at both Wewahitch-
ka State Bank locations and May-
hann's Department Store. On the
day of the tour, tickets can be
purchased at any of the four
homes.
Place this event on your
agenda of Christmas activities to
help a worthy organization raise
money for community property.
Watch this paper for further
details.

Historical Society
Meets Saturday
Members of the St. Joseph
Bay Historical Society will meet at
3:00 p.m. Saturday, December 7
at the public library.
All members are urged to at-
tend.

Girl Scout Leader
Going to New York
In January 1992, Bunny Mill-
er will travel to Briarcliff, New
York. to attend a conference for
camp directors at the Edith
Swcyy- Conference "Center. Edith
Mhcy is the training center for
Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.
Congratulations Mrs. Miller.
All the Girl Scouts in Gulf County
hope that you have a wonderful
trip.


Christmas Bazaar
The Wewahitchka Woman's
Club Christmas Bazaar will be
held December 7 from 9:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m. in front of the Wewa
I.G.A.
Due to printing problems, the
club cookbook will not be availa-
ble until after the first of the new
year. Advance sales will begin at
the bazaar, and cookbook Christ-

Retired Educators
The Gulf County Retired Edu-
cators Association will hold their
annual Christmas party Tuesday,
December 10 at the home of
Jacque Price, 1401 Monument
Avenue, at 3:00 p.m. ET. Hostess-
es for the occasion will be Jacque
Price and Sadie Gardner. All re-
tired educators in the county are
invited to attend.


'Miss Charlotte",
Celebrates Birthday
On October 20th, the mem-
bership of First Baptist Church
honored the wife of their pastor
with a birthday celebration.
"Miss Charlotte", as she is af-
fectionately known, was honored
in the worship service with spe-
cial music by her daughter and
granddaughter, Barbara and Au-
drea Browning. She was also sur-
prised by the reading of a poem
written in her honor by her hus-
band, the Rev. Howard Browning.
The deacons of the church pre-
sented Miss Charlotte with one
dozen long stem pink roses.
After the worship service, the
membership enjoyed a covered
dish dinner ending with the
cutting of a birthday cake.


Gilmore

MUSIC

Store
CLEARANCE SALE
FOR CHRISTMAS
We Need Room!
Elect. Guitars from ..... $99
1/2 Size Accoustis ...... $49
Stocking Stuffers:
Drumsticks......... $2.50 pr.
*Harmonicas Kazoos
Automatic Tuner *
Pitch Pipes
Guitar Accessories
*New Casio Keyboards
eSome Used Keyboards
New Gikey Stereo Multi-
Select ................ ...... $379
PIANO DRUM
Lessons Available by
Mike Roland, BA
509 10th St. 227-7535
Next to Gilmore FUneral Home
Open 10-5


Let

St. Joe Furniture Co.
be your Holiday Gift Giving Center

3 Weeks 'til Christmas


A New Recliner Is Always A Welcome Gift


Our selections include famous names like


*Barcalounger
Bench Craft


*Frankline


The Ultimate In Reclining Comfort Is
Our New Chase Vibrating Recliner


Over 100 Chairs To Choose From


% S sI .J... .
~z
, s o.,I




20 Ri Ae Phoe 2725
95T Prt t.Jo


Christmas Safle
Friday, Dec. 6-Saturday, Dec. 14

25% off Fabric, Yarn,
Sewing Notions

0 % Selected
500 off group of Yarn


Jeanie's Let's (nit Yam Shop y
234 Reid Ave. Ph. 229-6350
-,. ^~9 *- u .j


4


C's P .1


mas gift certificates will be availa-
ble. Cost of the book is $5.00.



Happy

Birthday

Gwendcie

Love You,'
Wayne

W "It's Great to
be a Florida
Gator!"









FAU1E tjA THE CTAK, FlfT' a.' JOBfI, rL IitbL)AfL.Ft* S0,OI


Tommy
Thomas
Chevrolet
PANAMA CITY
Announces Its
Affiliation With
James C.
"Bo" Bray








In Port St. Joe,
Frankin County Area
Chevrolet-GEO
New and Used Cars and Trucks
Business: 1-800-342-7131
or 904-785-5221
Home: 229-6836


Bible Study
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


COFFEE?
'THE best part of waking up is Folgers in your
cup."
What about those of us who don't drink coffee?
What is the best part of waking up for us?
I don't know what it is for non-Christians, but
for Christians it's waking up knowing... "I am cru-
cified with Christ, nevertheless I live, yet not I but
Christ liveth in me and the life that I now live in
the flesh. I live by the faith of the Son of God who
loved me and gave Himself for me." (Gal. 2:20) Boy,
what a way to start the day! "If God be for us, who
can be against us?" (Rom. 7:31)
Coffee is said to be rich in flavor. In Ephesians
Paul tells the riches we have in Christ.
Wouldn't you like to have riches untold? Riches
that no one can steal from you? Read Ephesians
and see some of the riches you can have in Christ
if you will make that decision to follow Jesus and
know that the best part of waking up for you is
CHRIST.

Presented by the church of Christ
,: The church meets at the corner of
-. 20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
P.O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 -
I


pers.
"Acceptance and participa-
tion" in the program is the same


for everyone without regard to
race, color, national origin, age,
sex, or handicap.


~1 11111I


i


U.S.D.A. commodities will be
distributed in Gulf County on De-
cember 10 and 12 to those who
are eligible. Recipients will receive
two (2) months commodities on
these dates, therefore it is very
important that everyone bring a
bag or box.
The distribution will take
place in Port St. Joe at the Gulf
County Senior Cityzens Building
on Tuesday, December 10, from -
1:00 until 3:00 p.m. ET. The dis-
tribution in Wewahltchka will
take place at the Wewahitchka
Senior Citizens Center, from
12:00 until 2:00 p.m. CT, Thurs-
day, December 12. Recipients
must have a current commodity
card to receive their commodities.
There will be no registration at
the distribution centers. If anyone
has questions concerning their el-
igibility, they should call 227-
1735 or come by the Commodity
Office in the Gulf County Court-
house prior to these dates. Wewa-
hitchka residents may come to
the Old Courthouse on Wednes-
day, December 11, from 12:30
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. CT, to certify
for commodities. To certify or re-
certify, you will need to bring
proof of income or food stamp pa-


Giving Away Sunflower Quilt


White City Senior Citizens
will give away a beautiful sun-
flower quilt on December 20. A
$1.00 donation is requested for
tickets.
The quilt is completely hand-
made with even the gentlemen
helping. It has been two years in
the making and has been a lot of
fun.


By Patricia Nedley
Any senior wishing to order
graduation invitations needs to
order them in Mrs. Turner's room
sometime Thursday.
Senior portraits and I.D. card
make-up pictures will be made
Friday, December 6th. If you have
not had your picture taken, this
will be your last opportunity to do
so.
Attention seniors: The Inde-
pendent Florida Alligator is proud
to announce the 15th annual
$500 Alligator Scholarship availa-
ble to a fall semester, 1992 fresh-


The money from the quilt will
be used to provide activity materi-
als for the senior citizens. This Is
White City's once-a-year money-
making project.
You may contact Sondra Bal-
lew at 827-6830 or 648-5774 for
an opportunity to win this beauti-
ful and unique quilt.


should write to:
Channel 13 Golden Apple
Award
P.O. Box 1340
Panama City, FL 32401
The SAT will be given at Bay
High School on Saturday, Decem-
ber 7 and the ACT will be given at
Bay High on Saturday, December
14.
Attention parents: Just to let
you know reports were mailed
Tuesday.
On December 19 at 7:00
p.m., the Music Department will
kick off the holiday season with a
Christmas concert. Everyone is
cordially invited to attend.


Patricia Nedley
man majoring in print journalism
at the University of Florida. For
an application, write to:
C.W. Barber, General Manag-
er
The Independent Florida Alli-
gator
P.O. Box 14257,
Gainesville, FL 32604
Oglethorpe University an-
nounces the 1991-92 James Ed-
ward Oglethorpe Scholarship
Competition. The deadline is De-
cember 13. For more information,
come by the guidance office. ,
Auditions and interviews for
the Florida State University
School of Theatre, Bachelor of
Fine Arts Programs in acting, mu-
sical theatre, and design technol-
ogy will be held February 1, 2,
and 9. For information and appli-
cation, contact:
Office of Academic Services
School of Theatre
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306 or call
904-644-5548.
Any parent or student wish-
ing to nominate a teacher for the
Channel 13 Golden Apple Award


I HAVE YOUR PICTURE TAKEN WITH SANTA I


Saturday, Dec. 7
9 a.m. 5 p.m.


2-5x7 & 8-3x5= $10.00 4 5x7 & 12 3x5 = $18.00
2 8x10, 2 5x7 & 18 3x5 = $25.00
Bonuses: Available only with the purchase of one of the above packages.
8x10 = $8.00 ea. 5x7 = $3.00 ea. 2 3x5 = $1.00
PLACE
BADCOCK HOME FURNISHINGS CENTER
S310 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe
S Sponsored b The Port St. Joe Merchants Association and Photo World f'318 Reid Ave, Port St. Joe, 227-7428


Friday,
December 6

S* Ribbon Cutting

12:30 p.m.

Sale Prices
on all Motorola
Telephones


Free
twifRefreshments
















REGISTER FOR

Free CARRY PHONE
To Be Given Away At 12:30 p.m.





CENTER

CELLULAR

112 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe 227-1000


Commodities Distribution December 10 and 12


A


Henderson's Restaurant,
Produce & Oyster Bar
309 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-7226
Oyster Bar Open: 1/2 Shell, Bags
Restaurant Open
Breakfast ready by 5 a.m., Lunch, Supper
All kinds of Sandwiches & BBQ
Buffet Every Day
Hours: 5:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m.
We Carry Out Lunches & Deliver!
Open 7 Days A Week
s 2


Shopping at

BARFTT1)'S Lawn &
Garden Center
for those on your gift list from the selection of
Mowers Weed Trimmers Blowers Chain Saws
Hedge Clippers Mulchers Tillers Birdhouses
Yard/Garden Tools Metal/Cypress Furniture
Trellis Fertilizer Spreaders
Hummingbird Feeders and More
328 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
229-2727
HOMETOWN SALES
HOMETOWN SERVICE


)^


4tf"


W E C O E D I


..


PAG~ SA


I


T~.%A -lnR T.nr f. MrqrA nr1-I9


I











r CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM

Complex Problems:

Complex Solutions

Adolescent Pregnancy

By
A -- Elizabeth C. Jones, M.D.

The following is a reprint of an editorial by Dr. Elizabeth McAn-
arney in the April 1991 American Journal Diseases of Children. It is
reprinted with the permission of Dr. McAnamey and the Journal.
The challenge of adolescent pregnancy has evoked responses
from many sectors: society at large, religious groups, educators,
health care professionals, parents, and adolescents themselves. We
have every reason to engage in this dialogue, for adolescent preg-
nancy is one of our greatest challenges. As pediatricians, we are
concerned about the health of adolescents and their children.
Adolescent pregnancy is a complex sociocultural and biologic
condition. Attitudes about sexuality, sexual activity, pregnancy,
contraception, and abortion are all rooted in the cultures and sub-
cultures of our pluralistic society. The biologic capacity to repro-
duce is one of the hallmarks of adolescence and, for many young
people, provides opportunities to fulfill lives that previously have
had few accomplishments. To be close to another person (if only
transiently), to attempt to prove one's femininity or masculinity by
becoming pregnant or impregnating another, and/or to become a
parent with new status are powerful motivators for some young
people.
There may be few reasons for some young people to plan ahead,
either by delaying sexual activity or, if sexually active, delaying
pregnancy by using effective contraception. Adolescents, as they
have in the past, will continue to become pregnant. Assuming,
therefore, that adolescent pregnancy is an ongoing problem, we
might ask a question similar to that asked by former New York City
Mayor Edward Koch: How are they (adolescents and their children)
doing? The answer to that question might be, "not too bad, but not
too good."
The "not too bad" part reflects those successful prenatal inter-
disciplinary adolescent maternity projects that have resulted in im-
proved short-term (ie, obstetric, neonatal, and psychosocial) out-
comes as shown in several studies. There have also been long-term,
promising outcome data for the majority of mothers who were cared
for in an adolescent maternity project in the late 1960s and were
followed up 17 years later. The majority of these mothers had fin-
ished their educations, were not receiving public assistance, and
were working at the time of follow-up.
The "not too good" part comes from data indicating distressing
long-term outcomes for the children of these adolescent mothers,
who themselves did so well. These children, as adolescents, had
distressingly poor outcomes, eg, school failure, early sexual activity,
and adolescent pregnancy. In addition, the United States still has
the highest adolescent pregnancy, birth, and abortion rates com-
pared with those of other industrialized countries (the rate is ex-
pressed as the number of pregnancies per 100 women in that age
group). The following data compare the United States and the Neth-
erlands: pregnancy rate, 109.9 vs 15.0, respectively; birth rate, 51.7
vs 7.7, respectively; and abortion rate 43.5 vs 5.3, respectively.
Overall, these data, which are far from complete, indicate the
complex nature of adolescent pregnancy and outcome. The solu-
tions to adolescent pregnancy are complex; we should not promise
simple panaceas for the challenging sociocultural-biologic phenom-
enon. Merely dedicating more financial resources to "solving" ado-
lescent pregnancy is not the only strategy. If we articulate clear,
nonjudgmental basic principles and follow them, adolescents and
society will be well served. These basic principles might include the
following:
1. It is better to delay sexual activity during early and middle
adolescence and to avoid pregnancy. This principle could be sup-
ported by modeling dignity and respect between the sexes, demon-
strating responsible sexual behavior, and providing decreased me-
dia attention to irresponsible sexual activity.
2. If young people become sexually active, they need to consider
the consequences, not only to themselves, but also to their poten-
tial offspring and to society. Some may believe that most adoles-
cents do not have the capacity to consider consequences meaning-
fully; some obviously will not be able to. Nevertheless, we must
reinforce this basic principle by educating our young people in their
families, schools, and health care settings about responsible sexu-
ality. Parenthetically, we need better contraceptive methods that are
independent of adolescents' behavior.
3. If a young person becomes pregnant and decides to keep her
infant, she must enter prenatal care early and continue with it to
optimize her outcome as well as her infant's. Other goals include re-
turning to school to finish her education and securing the best
child care possible to make sure the children have the best chance
of achieving healthy futures.
If we follow these principles and perhaps others, we shall have
served society and its young people honestly and consistently.


Give A Christmas Wish


The Wish Upon A Star trees
are now up at Saveway and We-
wahitchka State Bank in Port St.
Joe and the Wewa Restaurant in
Wewahitchka. If you would like to
purchase a gift for a child, disa-
bled adult or elderly person, re-
move a card from the tree, and
purchase a gift (gift wishes and
sizes are printed on the card). Re-
turn the wrapped gift, with card
attached, to the HRS office in Port
St Joe or Wewahitchka by De-
cember 16th.
Applications for assistance
will continue to be accepted
through December 2nd. If anyone
you know is in need this Christ-
mas, come by the HRS offices and


complete an application.
With your help, Christmas
can be a joyful time for everyone.

Ladies GolfAssn.
Christmas Party
The Ladies Golf Association
will have their annual Christmas
party Thursday, December 12 at
12 noon at St. Joseph's Bay
Country Club.
Co-hostesses are Larrie An-
chors and Laurie Rivers.
Members are requested to
bring a wrapped present, tagged
for a lady or a gentleman. It has
been requested that no food be
given.


Donna Haddock and Laurie Cobb, R.N., right, watch as Mayor
Frank Pate signs proclamation.

Home Care Week


Port St. Joe citizens of all
ages and economic levels are con-
cerned about high-quality, afford-
able, long-term health care. Home
care provides a wide range of
these needed health and suppor-
tive services to the ill, elderly, dis-
abled and infirm in their own
homes. The concept of home care
is the oldest and most enduring
tradition of health service delivery
in the United States of America.
Surveys show that most peo-
ple prefer to receive medical care
and related'supportive' sernices'ind
their own homes. There is also a
significant and growing body of
evidence that home care services
stimulate quicker and fuller re-
coveries and improvements than
comparable services within insti-
tutions.
Home care allows disabled
and chronically ill citizens of all
ages to remain with their loved
ones in surroundings that are fa-
miliar and comfortable. In so do-
ing, home care helps preserve one
of the country's most important
social values, keeping families to-
gether.
With rapidly rising health
care costs, home care offers a
practical means of providing
health care and related services
to those who desperately need
them.
Therefore, Mayor Frank Pate
of Port St. Joe has proclaimed De-
cember 1 through 7 as "Home


Ramsey Elected
Vice President
Michael R. Ramsey, a junior
at the University of Central Flori-
da, has been elected to the posi-
tion of Grand Procurator of the
Lambda Epsilon Chapter of the
Kappa Sigma Fraternity. He will
be serving a one year term during
which he will be responsible for
committee functioning, scholar-
ship, and general discipline.
Ramsey is a 1989 graduate of
Port St. Joe High School.


R. A quaint restaurant on the banks of the Apalachicola River
Scenic Riverside Dining 'BOSS OYSTER"
RIVERFRONT RESTAURANT 'BOSS OYSTER"
653-8139 123 Water Street 653-9364
SPECIALIZING IN FRESH CAUGHT LOCAL SEAFOOD
6:30 A.M. 9 P.M. Sunday-Thursday 12 NOON 9:00 P.M. Everyday -
6:30 A.M. 10 P.M. Friday & Saturday 3 P.M. until on Sundays
I NE ADITINDLV AIELOSE


Sunday Dinner: 12 p.m. 9 p.m.
DINNER FOR TWOI Oven Roasted Cornish
game hens filled with fruit and nut stuffing,
creamed sweet potatoes, pan gravy, Brussel
sprouts, sauteed baby carrots and home-
made strawberry cream cheesecake
.......... 14.95
Single servings also available

DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS

PACKAGED LIQUORS TO GO

FEATURING
SANDY TAPLIN at the keyboard Friday,
Saturday & Sunday, 7-10 p.m.


SEAFOOD: STEAMED & SMOKED
OYSTER ROAST, BLUE CRABS
PIT COOKED BAR-B-CUE
ALWAYS AVAILABLE:
Fresh Apalachicola Bay Oysters
(15 Different Ways)
Come and dine by the fire. Enjoy
our newly enclosed outside water-
front patio. And of course, Bobby
Wesley on guitar Thursday through
Saturday evenings.

FEATURING
BOBBY WESLEY: Acoustical guitar, Fri-
day, Saturday and Sunday, 7-10 p.m.


Care Week" in Port St. Joe. He
urges all citizens to recognize the
efforts of home care providers,
and the families and friends of
the elderly and disabled, who pro-
vide such important services in
the home.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. DEC. 5,. 1991 PAGE 7A



G-- -- -- --J --- --



Chain Saws, Trimmers SNAPPER.-
SRis A Snap With A Snapper
BARFIELD'S Lawn & Garden Center :
328 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe

PHONE 229-2727

Beautiful Blooming $ 39
POINSETTIAS
B HOMETOWN SALES
HOMETOWN SERVICE









Listing highlights from our large, fast moving inventory!
St. Joe Beach
113 Gulf Street -
nice older home
with over 1 1/2
lots fenced, and
shaded. 3 bed-
rooms/2 baths,
central h&a, at-
tached porch and
..,workshop. Close to
beach. Owner
wants to sell.
GREAT PRICE at
$38,000.00.
409 Fortner Ave.
MEXICO BEACH
Beautiful cedar stilt
home with Gulf view.
Used 3-4 days a month.
Central heat/air, 2 bed-
rooms/2 baths,
screened porch, under-
neath parking and stor- -'
age. Very clean and in good condition. $79,000.00
ERA PARKER REALTY

904-648-5777
Cathey Hobbs 648-5653, Debbie McFarland 648-5421 after hours
L J


DieHard...America's #1 PowerMate SAVE $50 L
auto replacement battery 4. 3-HP vac SAVE $50 10u
tests 3 times better than industry
standards Has double GoldStar
Low as brushes and VCR_ _
to r beater bar
$49.99* 39-function remote control
with trade-in (43221 $ 99 99 *2-week/8-event timer $ t89.99
IMPORTANT NOTE: Some states impose afee on e $10 MONTHLY* Up to 155 channels, $10MONTHLY*
purchase of each new lead-acid batre/ unless a used (DR21435) i ncl. cable (NV53274)
On SearsCharge (or SearsCharge Plus plan on most purchases totaling $699 99 or more) Actual payments depend on existing account balance Shpg ncl to store
UElectric dryer requires cord t S25 or less Shpg handling, taxes not mincl Not to be combined with other offers Not for existing WishBook orders Valid thru 12/31/91



Items shown are readily available as advertised
MOST ITEMS IN STOCK FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY! not on display oor, items may be specially ordered.
SPECIAL 227-1151 Owned and Operated by Michael Kilbourn
HOLIDAY Open 9 to 5:30 Mon., Tues., Thurs., & Fri. 401 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
HOURS g 9 to 12 Wed & Sat. 401 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe


S









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, DEC. 5, 1991


Hawk NHighland View
Elementary


The Indians and Pilgrims met
on common ground (the lunch-
room) last. Wednesday at High-
land View Elementary for a deli-
cious Thanksgiving meal of
turkey, cranberry sauce, vegeta-
bles, popcorn, and pumpkin pie
to end their study of the First
Thanksgiving.
The Indians (second grade)
made beaded necklaces for the
Pilgrims (first grade) and the Pil-
grims in turn made placemats for
the Indians.
The Highland View kinder-
garten class has been busy, busy,
busy. the week of study on fire
safety was concluded with a visit
by the fire truck and Fireman
Richardson.
The classroom resembled a
bird sanctuary for one entire day.
the students were invited to bring
their pet birds to spend the day.
The birds frequently tried to "out-
do" Mrs. Weston and the students
on fhe noise level. All in all, the
day proved a success as each stu-
dent introduced his/her pet and
gave a few secrets away on what
birds .do at home.

Special Services at
Thompson Temple
The Youth Department of
Hallowed Be Thou Name First
Born Church of Hyde Park will be
rendering services at Thompson
Temple F.B.C. on Saturday, De-
cember 7 at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Day will climax on
Sunday, December 8 at 11:30
a.m. ET. Guest speaker will be
Minister David Wood of Panama
City.
Everyone is cordially Invited
to attend these special services.


', Paslode
SI, 3150-W16R


II I


Looking for
Girl Scout
Uniforms
Beginning Saturday, Novem-
ber 30, anyone wishing to buy,
sell or donate girl scout uniforms
are invited to do so by visiting the
Gulf County Public Library. Every
other Saturday, Dorothy Logue
will be available at the library
from 10:00 a.m. until noon to as-
sist all Girl Scout moms in locat-
ing a uniform for their daughter.
Uniforms to be sold will be
priced by the owner and left with
Mrs. Logue at the library. Once
the uniform has sold, she will
contact you. There is no funding
available for the Scouts to pur-
chase the uniforms outright. Do-
nated uniforms will be priced by
Mrs. Logue according to condi-
tion. Please look in those closets
and help the Girl Scouts find as
many uniforms as possible. Your
hep is needed as there are many
girls who are finding it hard to lo-
cate used uniforms. All proceeds
from the Uniform Depot will be
used to purchase new books for
the library. Mrs. Logue may be
contacted at 229-8941.


Stapler
puts roofing
in a whole
new light.
* Lightest Roofing Stapler
on the market-just 4.6 lbs.-
delivers heavyweight power.
* Exclusive adjustable depth
of drive eliminates need to
adjust compressor pressure.
* Easy, top-loading magazine
holds up to 150 wide-crown
staples from %" to I h-" long
for new or re-roofing.

Light weight for
reduced fatigue,
easy handling,
high steed.

90 days same


as cash


.


CT If DhIdT.A II I


aI.
227-2112


UJl-- .1ilI "I L.L., II IL;.
Port St. Joe 706 First Street
Rental/Sales Small Engine Parts and Repairs


'1


CUT



YOUR



WATER



HEATING

Dil II



...when you switch
from electric to
natural gas
water heating!


There is one time when it pays to be in
hot water, and that is when you switch from
an electric water heater to a more efficient
and economical natural gas water heater.
You will enjoy being in hot water and at the
same time save more than $200 per year
when you make the switch. Our company of-
fers an Energy Conservation Rebate for up to
$225 just for switching from an electric water
heater to a natural gas water heater.

For more information contact:


St. Joe Natural Gas Co.


301 Long Ave.


229-8216


in a friendly
atmosphere
\ ,with good
FRIENDS.
Serving Breakfast,
Lunch & Dinner
8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Closed Sundays 6 Days a Week
All You Can Eat 50
LUNCH BUFFET IncludesSalad Bar 4. I

-Specializing In -
*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches *Meals to Go
*Fresh Seafood *Delicious Steaks
Our Famous Fresh $ m.85
SEAFOOD PLATTER Only


30Furh S I@. 2710 Pr t-St.Joe


0


K


iTwPaslode
Power Fastening Systems
Reg. $335.00 0 0(
Now ................


JrU ?A


1%4 Now


DPAGE 8A


I


N


l


* w
a-


;r


. W
r7-













Rotary Cancels

Charity Ball

The POA St. Joe Rotary cancelled their Charity Ball
plans last week, when the band contracted to play for the
affair advised the club they had a conflict with the date of
the Ball. A mix-up in the dates caused the band to con-
tract two engagements on December 7, and the other en-
gagement was contracted first, causing them to back out
Sof the Charity Ball agreement.
:. Difficulty In obtaining a quality group to play for the
B1i on unch short notice, caused the club to decide to re-
schedule the affair for a later date.
,, The Chairty Bal had been advertised for, and had al-
s-- been built around a band to play easy listening.
danceable tunes.
Dr. Jorge San Pedro, chairman of the Ball, which. Is
: uced by the Rotary Charity Ball, Inc.. to raise funds
6or .ciUb charitable activities, said the organization re-
grets. having to cancel, but said, '"We'd rather postpone
the event, than half do it and have those who come be
disatisfled with the evening."
,An announcement will be made at a later date as to
the new schedule. for the Ball.
1.
DAR Holds Memorial

Service for Edith B. Stone


A memorial service for Edith
0 Bryan Stone was held in Jehu Ce-
metery, Saturday, November 23,
in Wewahitchka by the St. Jo-
seph Bay Chapter, Daughters of
the American Revolution.


Mrs. Stone was a charter
member of the DAlR. She served
the organization as parliamentari-
an and insignia.
Mrs. William Howell Jr.,
chaplain, and Mrs. E.H. Wilson
III, vice regent, officiated at the
impressive ceremony.
A bronze marker with the na-
tional DAR insignia was placed by
the graveside in recognition of
DAR's beloved daughter, Edith.
Family, DAR members, and.
friends shared in the last and
highest hondr to the memory of
Edith Bryan Stone.

Receives Medal
Air Force Staff Sgt. Gilbert E.
Turner has been decorated with
the Good Conduct Medal.
The medal is awarded for ex-
emplary conduct while in the ac-
tive service of the U.S.
He is an aircrew egress sys-
tems technician at Tyndall Air
Force Base, Panama City.
Turner is the son of Vivian V.
Carmack of Bronx, New York.
His wife, Stephanie, is the
daughter of Thadus and Lola B.
Russ of 319 Ave. D, Port St. Joe.
The sergeant is a 1977 gradu-
ate of Churchland High School,
Portsmouth, Virginia.


IOBITUARIES...


Herman R. Dean
Herman R. Dean, 91, of Port
St. Joe, passed away Thursday
afternoon, November 28, in Park-
er. He was a native of Greenville,
Texas, and grew up in nearby De-
nison. He played clarinet in the
high school band and joined the
Navy in 1917, playing with John
Phillip Sousa's Naval Band. He
was the last surviving member of
that band. In 1939, he retired
from the Navy, moving to Marian-
na and organizing the first Marl-
anna High School band. He was
recalled to active duty in 1941,
and was discharged in 1944. He
returned to Marianna with their
band, resigning in 1948. He came
to Panama City in 1950, founding
the Everitt Jr. High School band.
In 1953, he came to Port St. Joe
to organize the Port St. Joe High
School band and Music Depart-
ment, retiring in 1966. For the
school year of 1967, he was the
director of th Wewahitchka High
School band. He was a member of
the First United Methodist
Church of Port St. Joe.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Virginia Wilkinson of Hepp-
ner, Oregon, and Olive Suarez of
Washington, D.C.; one son, Her-
man Ray Dean of Washington,
D.C.; two stepdaughters, Diane
Christo of Panama City, and Deb-
bie Allen of Woodland Park, Colo-
rado; 17 grandchildren and a
number of great grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Monday at the First United Meth-
odist Church, conducted by the
Rev. Zedoc Baxter. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot of Holly
Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home.

Cecil Bodiford, Sr.
Calvin Cecil Bodiford Sr., 76,
of Port St. Joe, died Friday, No-
vember 29, at his home. He was a
native of Altha, a former resident
of Marianna, and had lived in
Port St. Joe for the past 15 years.
Survivors include one son,
Cecil Bodiford Jr. of Altha; three
daughters, Jean McMilllan of Port
St. Joe, Jackie Wise and Carolyn
Williams, both of Blountstown;
11 grandchildren and 13 great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held


Sunday at the chapel of Bailey
Funeral Home. The eulogy was
delivered by Virgil Mayo. Inter-
ment followed in Mt. Olive Ceme-
tery.

Calla P. Gibson
Calla Perritt Gibson, 90, of
Panama City, died Wednesday in
a nursing home. She was a re-
tired school teacher in Port St.
Joe. She was a member of th
DAR the Retired Teachers Asso-
ciation, and the St. Andrew Unit-
ed Methodist Church.
She was the widow of the late
James E. Perritt. She is survived
by a daughter and son-in-law,
Gladys and Bill Brown of Panama
City; and three grandchildren,
Bethany B. Reece of Fayetteville,
North Carolina, Theresa B. Robin-
son and James R. Brown, both of
Panama City.

To Buy or Sell,
Place Your Ad In
The Classifieds!l


/


(


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY. DEC. 5, 1991 PAGE 9A

Senior Citizens to Give

Away Boat and Trailer


The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens Association, Inc. will be
holding a drawing on December
24th at the Port St. Joe City Hall
at 1:00 p.m. to give away a 15-
foot Glystrom tri-hull boat and
trailer.
Tickets are being sold for
$2.00 or three for $5.00. These
may be purchased in Port St. Joe
at Brooks Barber Shop, First Un-
ion Bank, Citizens Federal Sav-
ings Bank, and the Resale Con-


section. Tickets are also on ale
in Wewahitchka at Lanier's Varie-
ty Store.
The boat will be on display at
the Port St. Joe grocery stores the
week of December 2-6 and at the
Christmas Festival on the 7th
and 8th. The boat will also be on
display in Wewa on December
14th. They are also available at
each of the five Senior Citizens
sites in Gulf County.


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Electrical Work
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For Take Out Orders, Call 227-1670
Let Us Shuck Your Oysters for You!
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Lemieux to Attend D.C. Conference


WE PERMANENTLY Brian Lemieux, of Port St.
Joe, has been selected to attend
RECORD ALL PRESCRIPTIONS The National Young Leaders Con-
S ference from December 10 to 15
S No matter how long ago you secured a prescription from in Washington, D.C. Having dem-
us, we can locate it quickly if you wish to repeat it, or if any onstrated academic achievement,
physician you consult needs information about what you leadership and citizenship, Brian
have taken. will be among 350 outstanding
| There are some medicines which can only be refilled if high school students from across
your physician instructs us to renew them. Sometimes a the nation at the conference
new prescription is needed. We have wise pharmacy laws sponsored by the Congressional
which protect you against harm. We gladly obey them. Youth Leadership Council.
When you wish to refill such prescriptions, at your The th Young Leaders Conference is The
request we will phone your physician for his permission Young Leaders of Tomorrow Meeting the
and if necessary ask for a new prescription. This sometimes Leaders of Today Throughout the
S takes time till we can speak to the physician, but we are glad uniquely designed six-day confer-
to- supply this extra service. ence, Brian will meet with key
"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US with their prescriptions, health leaders and newsmakers from the
'needs and other pharmacy products. We consider this trust a privilege three branches of government,
and a duty. May we be your personal family pharmacy?" the media and the diplomatic
corps.
SZ tt's Dru Highlightsof Brian's week in
Suzz t D rug Store S Washington will include welcom-
ing remarks from a Member of
317 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe Congress on the Floor of the Unit-
Convenient Drve-Through Window ed States House of Representa-
Revlon Cosmetics 229-8771 fives and a panel discussion led
-~ii by prominent journalists at the
National Press club. Brian will ex-
M 0 plore presidential decision-
&I- -a ; making in a simulation entitled


New Rules Set for King


Mackerel and Tarpon


The Governor and Cabinet
approved on November 14, the


Card of Thanks
Words alone cannot express
our appreciation and gratitude for
the many acts of kindness shown
us during the passing of our
wife/mother, Nellie D. McCor-
mick.
The loving concern you
showed our family through food,
flowers, calls, prayers, visits and
other tokens of affection will not
be forgotten..
A special thanks to Rev. Neal
Miller, Rev. Jean Shoots, active
and honorary pall bearers (The
Golden Agers), and those that
provided the beautiful music.
God bless and be with you.
Preston T. McCormick
Betty Folsom & Family
Faye Schroeder & Family
Gene McCormick & Family
Pat Hartley & Family
Sue Richter & Family



ItLet me

analyze your
insurance
needs with a
free Family
Insurance


CALL ME.
BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avenue
(Across from St. Joe Hardware)
Office: 229-6514
State Farm
e' Insurance Companies
Home Offices:
Bloomington, Illinois


Like a good neighbor
State Farm is there.


following Marine Fisheries Com-
mission proposed rules:
KING MACKEREL
This rules sets commercial
harvest limits for this fishing sea-
son for the Eastern and Western
Regions of the Gulf-Atlantic
Group of king mackerel by estab-
lishing a 1,000 pound daily vessel
and landing limit in each region
from July 1 through December
31. Then a 15,000 pound daily
vessel and landing limit shall ap-
ply in each region until the date
the total regional commercial har-
vest is projected to reach 476,000
pounds. Then a 300 pound vessel
and landing limit shall apply in
each region until the date the to-
tal regional commercial harvest is
projected to reach 685,000
pounds, and then no commercial
harvest will be allowed until the
following July 1. Note: if the total
regional commercial harvest is
projected to reach 476,000
pounds Drior to December 31, a
limit of 300 pounds per vessel per
day shall apply'until the date of


Correctional

Courses Set
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege will'hold two Correctional Of-
ficer Basic Standards classes in
January 1992. One class will be
held at the main GCCC campus
in Panama City and the other will
be held in the Gulf/Franklin
county area. This 450-hour class
prepares the graduate for entry
level certification into the correc-
tional officer career field. This is
the fastest growing public service
career field. The class covers a
wide range of topics including
law, firearms, psychology, correc-
tion operations, defensive tech-
niques, and first aid. Graduates
receive not only basic certification
but 12 hours of college credit as
well.
Enrollment in one of these
classes requires an application
process but does not require any
previous experience. To start the
application process, call Gulf
Coast Community College at 872-
3878 or contact the Port St. Joe
office in the Port St. Joe City Po-
lice Station at 229-2760, Monday
through Thursday from 1:00 to
5:00 p.m.


total regional commercial harvest
is projected to reach 635,000
pounds. In order to prevent one
region from exceeding its 50 per-
cent share of the total Gulf-
Atlantic commercial quota, either
region that reaches its full region-
al quota will close regardless of
the date.
Tarpon
This rule sets the number of
tarpon tags allowed to be sold in
1992 at 2,500. One half of this to-
tal (1,250) will be reserved for
fishing guides.
These rules take effect De-
cember 4, 1991.


"If I Were President." Brian will
also visit the diplomatic embassy
of either Argentina, Ireland, Phi-
lippines or Sri Lanka.
Brian will meet with Senator
Bob Graham, Senator Connie
Mack, Representative Pete Peter-
son, or designated staff members.
These meetings provide students
an opportunity to discuss impor-
tant policy issues and focus on
topics of personal concern to
Brian. Culminating the National
Young Leaders Conference will


Brian Lemieux
the The Mock Congress on Gun
Control during which scholars as-
sume the roles of United States
Representatives by debating, lob-
bying, and 'voting on proposed
handgun legislation.
Founded in 1985, the Council
is a non-profit, non-partisan edu-
cational organization committed
to recognizing outstanding youth
like Brian and providing them
with a "hands-on" civic learning
experience in the nation's capital.
Over 375 Members of the United
States Congress join in the com-
mitment to educational excellence
as members of the Council's Hon-


III. 1
L









All Forms of Insurance
Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages *Group -Life *Boat
*Hospitalization *Mobile Homes

COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899
C. .


orary Congressional Board of Ad-
visors.
"I firmly believe that by
touching one life, the National
Young Leaders Conference en-
riches thousands more," said
John Hines, Council Executive
Director. "Scholars return to their


schools and communities charged
wit the lifelong duty of leading all
Americans to better understand
their rights and responsibilities in
this participating democracy."
Brian is the son of Chris and
Charmaine Earley of Simmons
Bayou.


We have discounts
to help you drive down
the cost of car insurance.
If the cost of your car insurance seems to be heading in the wrong direction,
see if Allstate can help turn things around.
We have discounts that can help you save money.
You can save by having a good driving record. Or by driving a car equipped
with air bags or a four-wheel anti-lock brake system. Even by insuring more than one
car with Allstate. AX9.-
Which Allstate car insurance discounts do you Ai I| j
qualify for? Just give us a call to find out. We'll get your You in food hands.
car insurance costs headed in the right direction. o,
GASKIN-GRADDY
Insurance Company
Call Collect 639-5077 or 639-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
1-800-782-6802
Serving the Panhandle Since 1931


Santa's


Sleigh Is Arriving

Early At


Come buy and get your present while its still on the
truck and receive SUPER SANTA SAVINGS during this
special Christmas sale.

*12 and 14 Foot Jon Boats

14 Foot Riverboats

14 Foot Kanu's

15 Foot Bassin' Boats

With purchase of boat, any motor in stock at dealer's
cost till December 24th. Sale begins December 4th, come
early while still on the truck.

229-6330


- ~ CENTER~


'1/


Views On'

Dental HJ-ealth

FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.

ARE PRIMARY TEETH IMPORTANT?


Want to make your dentist
cringe? Tell him not to waste his
time on your child's severely de-
cayed tooth because, "It's only
a baby tooth and he's going to
lose it anyway".
Don't kid yourself! Primary
teeth (a much better phrase
than "baby teeth") play a very
important role in the develop-
ment of a child's future dental
health. Obviously, they are nec-
essary for chewing. Even more
important, primary teeth create
the proper spaces for permanent
teeth. A primary .tqpth that is
prematurely lost can no longer
do this job. The teeth nearby will
crowd into the empty space, and
when the follow-up permanent
tooth tries to enter there may be
no no. As a result, it may be-
*. :.H-. ..', ... -t ;


come impacted (lean sideways
inside the gum). It may come
out in the wrong place (for exam-
ple, through the front of the
gum). Or, it may crowd its way in
and destroy the delicate balance
of the mouth.
Losing primary teeth prema-
turely is one of the commonest
reasons for orthodontic treat-
ment waterr on. Prompt treatment
with a space-maintaining appli-
ance is generally called for to re-
serve the room for the next ten-
ant.

Prepared as a public service
to promote better dental health.
From the office of: FRANK D.
MAY, D.M.D., 319 Williams Ave.,
Phone 227-1123.


-7-4
SWhite Sidewall White and Black White Sidewall

15 B0, 3 MILE TREADWEAR
5 OUUU LIMITED WARRANTY

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I Irdlife may vary. See us for a copy of our treadwear limited warranty and speed rating and tire safety Information.






SPATE'S SERVICE CENTER HMOONN |









qTTD'T 0'AF ORTST. a' B. & D ''UTTAY ftlY 0. 1001 A.r.A" ----- --


" News from Wewahitchka Elementary Seniors Selling Chili
By Linda Whitfield The Gulf County Senior itiPortSt.Joe,8278
The Gulf County Senior Citi- Port St. Joe, 827-8,


Star Student of the Week
Diana Taunton, the 11-year-
old daughter of Judge David and
Abigail Taunton, is the star stu-
dent of the week. Diana is in the
sixth grade and claims math as
her favorite subject Diana ad-
mires her parents very much and
wants to be either a model or a
swimmer when she grows up.
Diana would like to visit a
town near Boston named Taun-
ton one day. She loves traveling
and reading and says the Bible is
her favorite book. At school Diana
likes to play with Rita Dietz.
Diana said this about herself:
"I like to model, swim, shop, read,
and sing. I'm good at most of
school and P.E. classes. School is
fun and sometimes exciting. You
can learn a lot if you pay atten-
tion well." Wise words, Diana.
Take A Slice Out of Life
That's the name of the fifth
and sixth grade teachers' social.
The hostesses and hosts were:
Debbie and Bryan Baxley, Rebec-
ca Birmingham, Lori Price, Joe
Walker, and Theresa Redd. They
served delicious pecan pie, pump-
kin pie, pound cake, butterscotch
brownies, lemon squares, and
plenty of strong coffee. The age
old cliche was heard, "Pie are
square. No, cornbread are
* square, pie is round." Anyhow, it
was a fun way to end the week
before the holidays.
What Some First Graders Did
Over Thanksgiving
Some of Mrs. Gaskin's little
ones would like to tell us what
they did for fun over our holiday.
Here are a few samples:
Kelly Hysmith "I rode my tri-
cycle at the shed. We had some
turkey and some'cake."
Kelli Jackson "My daddy
and my cousin, and his daddy
went to the softball field and slid
down the hill." a
Jermale Keith "I played
hide-and-seek, freeze tag, and
played games. I ate turkey, and
some dressing, and some corn-
bread and ham. I want to say we
had a nice Thanksgiving day."
Fred Kemp "I played chase,
football, then we played hide-


Holiday

Plants


and-go-seek. I had turkey, ham,
cake, and another cake, and
dressing."
Laura Spivey "I went to my
grandmother's house and my Un-
cle Steve brought Pappy and his
wife. Pappy taped us on a video
for Thanksgiving. I played with
my cousin Daisy and I had a good
time. We played volleyball."
Third Graders Learn About
Drugs
The third graders in Mrs. Lin-
da Tremain's and Mrs. Linda
Whitfleld's classes are learning
ways to "Say No to Drugs." A


counselor from the Chemical Ad-
dictions Recovery Effort (CARE) is
on campus this week. She uses a
multi-media approach in a posi-
tive setting to teach the students
about drugs.
Thanksgiving
It should be celebrated every
day of the year and not just the
fourth Thursday in November. As
we had our Thanksgiving parties,
we were reminded of just how
much we have to be thankful for.
I know I'm going to try to be
thankful 364 days and not just
the one day it is legalized.


zens will be holding their annual
chill dinner on December 13th
from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.
These dinners will be sold from
the Senior Citizens' centers in
Port St Joe, Wewahitchka, and
Howard Creek. They will also be
sold from the First United Metho-
dist Church in Port St. Joe.
The dinner will consist of a
large 10-ounce cup or bowl of chi-
li, dessert, iced tea and crackers.
The price will be only $2.50.
The Senior Citizens will be
happy to deliver to homebound
senior -citizens and to local busi-
nesses. Please call 229-8466 in


117 in Howard


Creek, and 639-9910 in Wewa-
hitchka. Please call the center
nearest you prior to December
12th. All proceeds will be used to
help pay for meals and transpor-
tation.

VFW Meeting
The members of the John C.
Gainous Post 10069 V.F.W. and
the Ladies Auxiliary will hold
their regular meeting on Tuesday,
December 10, at the Post Home,
115 Fifth Ave., Highland View, at
7:30 p.m. All members are urged
to attend.


Jolley Wins
Bass Tourney
The Panhandle Backlashers
Bass Club November Tournament
was won by Ray Jolley. He
weighed in a total of 15 pounds,
13 ounces. Second place went to
Eddie Price for a total of 13
pounds, 8 ounces, and third
place winner was James Melvin
with 11 pounds, 15 ounces.
Ray Jolley's largest fish
weighed 5 pounds, 8 ounces.
A total of 17 members partici-
pated and weighed in a total of 86
pounds. The next tournament will
be held December 21 at White
City.


. Enhance

Season
Many plants are synonymous
with Christmas. Probably the ear-
liest association is that of frank-
incense and myrrh. The Boswelia
carterii, the tree from which
frankincense is extracted, is relat-
ed to the turpentine or terebinth
tree. It has star-shaped flowers
and its aromatic resin can be
made into incense. At one time
frankincense was considered to
be as precious as gold. Thus, the
gift of frankincense to the Christ
Child was indeed a special one.
The commniphora myrrha is an
unlikely-looking plant to be asso-
ciated with the holiday season.
But, it was from this shrub -
bearing sharp, ugly thorns, that
the Magi's gift of myrrh was ob-
tained.
Christians aren't the only
ones who've decked their halls
with boughs of holly; the ancient
Druids started this custom. Be-
lieving that sylvan spirits dwelled
within the holly, the Druids
sought to protect the spirits from
frost and wintry winds, by bring-,
ing the plants indoors.
0 I The early Romans sent
branches of holly to friends and
neighbors during the Saturnalia
festival, which was celebrated in
December. Missionaries com-
bined such pagan customs with
those of Christianity during the
seventh century. thus, holly came
to be a symbol of Moses' burning
bush, and its prickly points and
red berries reminded the faithful
of the crown of thorns that await-
ed the Christ Child.
Mistletoe was well-known to
the Druids by the name of all-
heal. Later, Christians would use
mistletoe as a symbol of Christ,
the Divine Healer. The Druids
also used mistletoe as a symbol
of peace and goodwill. Enemies
would embrace under the plant
which is how our custom of kiss-
ing under the mistletoe originat-
ed.
Perhaps no plant is as synon-
ymous with Christmas as the
poinsettia. Brought back from
Mexico by Dr. Joel Poinsett dur-
ing the 19th century, the plant
flourished here in the United
States. Today, It is a popular dec-
oration in churches and homes
during the holiday season. Its red
bracts resemble the star of Beth-
lehem, which is probably why
Mexicans call it the flower of the
Holy Night.

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A 4A


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Holiday Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. 9 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. 6 p.m.


Il L


PAGE. 1K


a


THP.qTAR POR qT-TnP- IW a TT~qnV- nrC.I. 93


I




























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DOG FOOD ................ 379
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3 LB.
CRISCO .................... 229
SCOTT
MEGA TOWELS ........ 880
112 OZ. RINSO
DETERGENT .............. 299
5 LB. REAL VALUE
FLOUR ..................... 79
48 OZ. BOTTLE
CRISCO OIL............... 209
8.25 OZ. DELMONTE
P/A WEDGES...........39u
3.5 POUND G. Whiskers
CATFOOD .................. 189


"""' ." .Family Pak Choice
-; DRUMSTICKS...............Ib. 590
Family Pak Country Style Bag Quartered
BACKBONE ............... lb. 1.39 THIGHS ...................... Ib. 29
Pork Family Pak Boneless
TENDERLOIN................. 2.89 SIRLOIN STEAK.......... Ib. 1.89
Center Cut Pork Family Pak Boneless
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QUARTER LOIN 29
PORK CHOPS .... I.


FAMILY PAK CENTER CUT 79
PORK CHOPS ... 1


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GROUND CHUCK ......... lb. 1.59
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BACON ENDS ........... box 1.19
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HOT DOGS ......... 12 oz. pkg. 99
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LITTLE SIZZLERS ........ lb. 1.19
FAMILY PAK COUNTRY STYLE 39
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Real Value Mozzarella or Mid Cheddar
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Light & Lively 24 oz. Pound
Cottage Cheese .............. 1.89 Pound

- .. .. .* ,- .--- *-----^


A A A A A AA A A A A A A A A A A A A A A


0 -N








THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. DEC. 5. 1991


Honor Roll.


Last Call for Sr. Citizens Festival


Catherine Barfleld, principal
of Highland View Elementary
School, has announced the honor
roll for the second six week grad-
ing period.
All A's
First Grade
Danielle Barnes, Brad Black-
mon, Ashley Burkett, Christina
Colson, Stephen Gaddis, Michelle
Keith, Traci Richardson, Jennifer
Tillery, Sherri Watson
Second Grade
Kim Tillery, Chris Varnadoe,
Shenna McDuffie, Joe Robinson,
Jesse Stoutamire
Third Grade
Stephanie Blackmon, Melissa
Haun, Karissa Thomas
Fourth Grade
John Gainous


CatchM the.Siit
TmE N1TD MET140015?CHORCH


Sixth Grade
Kim Lamberson, Tommie
Richter, Jodie Wear
A's & B's
First Grade
Vickie Burrows, Donnie
Brake, Aaron Hamm, Jeremy Ow-
ens, Dustin Powell, Jessica Vise,
Daniel Wilder
Second Grade
lan McFarland, Josh Posey,
James Smith, Daniel Carter,
Stephanie Hightower, Michael
Hopper
Third Grade
Danielle Gardiner, Heather
Hayden, Christy Jones, Michael
York
Fourth Grade
Nicole Smith, Megan John-
son, Amanda Marquardt, Ricky


Constitution andMfvonument
'Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship.....11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............ 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ..........5:30 p.m. Thursday ...............7:30 p.m.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E, Port St Joe, Florida Church Phone: 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellowship
"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade.



You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James Episcopal Church
309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe

+ E --SERVICES-
.: + Each Sunday........... 7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School....................... 9:45 a.m.

The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor



"The Exciting Place to Worship"


iFirst Baptist Church
102 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Florida

SHOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
JAMES ENFINGER, Music/Youth




^ FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
W %* CHURCH
S* > 508 Sixteenth Street 227-1756
S T t0 -SUNDAY WORSHIP..;.,................10 a.m.
SdU. ADULT SCHOOL........... .............11 a.m.
*SUNDAY SCHOOL Young Children
Nursery Available
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine, Pastor




Ti!Qf We Want You To Be
\1q Part of the Friendly Place
BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ...........7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING ..................11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ..................5:45 p.m.,
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor
KEITH PATE ALLEN STEWART
Min. of Music Min. of Education
& Children & Youth


Lamberson, Jinny Stoutamire
Fifth Grade
Carrie Gardiner, Jason Rich-
ardson, Sabrina Stomp
Sixth Grade
Casey Clark, Jennifer Gaddis,
Amanda Haney, Sabrina Hanson,
Sara Hayden, Shelia Hightower,
Ben McCroan, Carmen McFar-
land, Chris Pendley, Layth West,
and Kristina Witter.

M.B. Group

Sale Rated

A Success
CIP's November 2 flea market
sale at Mexico Beach was a great
success, thanks to all the fine do-
nations from our community and
nearby neighbors. CIP members
worked hard pulling everything
together and shared a lot of
laughs through it all, too. All our
proceeds will to toward more
community improvements.
Thanks to a well organized
adopt-a-highway clean up last
week by Billy and Shirley Ander-
son, our project organizer for
adopt-a-highways, West Hwy. 98
from Tyndall Air Force Base
boundaries to our East Gulf
County line, is cleaned up once
again. Willing hands from our
AARP members as well as CIP
members combined forces and
made a long, hot job much easier
to complete. Thanks all.
Next to come up for CIP mem-
bers is our Christmas give-away
sale starting December 1 through
December 19. For a $1.00 dona-
tion, you get a chance to win a
first prize of an original oil paint-
ing by Bob Barber, second prize
Is a VCR and third prize is a tele-
phone answering machine. Door
prizes will be awarded. The draw-
ing will be held December 19 at
7:00 p.m. CT at the Mexico Beach
Chamber of Commerce building.
Winner need not be present to
win. All proceeds will go toward
community improvements.
CIP members will host a
Christmas party immediately af-
ter the 7:00 p.m. drawing with
hors d'oeuvres, cookies, refresh-
ments and Christmas music to
celebrate the Community Im-
provement Program's first year
and to give thanks to the true
meaning of Christmas. Please,
come join us.


The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens are going to hold the third
annual Arts and Crafts Christ-
mas Festival on December 7 and
8 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, and from noon to 5:00
p.m. on Sunday.
There will be lots of things for
the entire family to participate in.
A children's activity area will be
set up. There will be rides and
carnival games, arts and crafts
including finished and unfinished
furniture, canvas paintings, T-
shiits, polished wood items and


much more.
Delicious baked goods will
also be sold. So plan on stocking
up for your holiday get together.
There will be a drawing for a
handmade Dresden Plate Quilt
and rack that will be given to a
lucky winner. Also, tickets will be
sold for a 1975 15-foot Glystrom
tri-hull boat with a 85 hp out-
board motor and trailer.
Reservations for booths are
being accepted now. Rental is
$25.00 for crafts for both days.
Organizations wishing to sell food


HOW MUCH HEAT DOES


A HEAT-PUMP PUMP?


Too often when a cold
snap comes, the answer
is "NOT ENOUGH."
Do you know that you
can heat TWO homes
with natural GAS for
the cost of heating one
with electricity?


But you can realize BIG
savings by heating your
one home with a high
efficiency NATURAL
gas furnace.
You will be TOASTY
warm, and at far
LESS cost.


For more in formation call:



St. Joe Natural Gas Co.
301 Long Ave. 229-8216


items can also rent a booth. It is
on a first come basis, there will
be no duplicate food booths.
Gulf County Senior Citizens
198 Peters Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


tDCUL IN









By: Richard Miller
*If you pump your own gas, be
careful not to overfill the tank.
Dangers are: raw gas entering
the vapor canister; gas spills
on- the finish of the car; and ex-
cess fumes released in the air.
*Tire-changing equipment in
your trunk should include a
blanket to kneel on and heavy
work gloves in addition to a
spare tire and a jack. Some
people include a hunter's
orange cap to wear so other
drivers will see them.
*Slow down when you see chil-
dren playing on a street where
you're driving. And if you see a
ball, stop. It's likely to be fol-
lowed by a youngster, say safe-
ty experts.
*Fan belts should be checked
periodically. There should be
half an inch of play when you
press on a belt. Loose belts
may be tightened or replaced.
-Replace any that are glazed,
worn or frayed.
*They haven't used horses in
years to measure horsepower.
Officially, one horsepower (hp)
is the power needed to lift 550
pounds one foot in one second.
*Auto Repair: We're not into
horses but horsepower-- keep-
ing your car's engine running at
its best. You can rely on our
mechanics at

GuffFord

-Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales
I NNNNNE- w^^^0


^.^.: >>.-.fa*.~~ ^:^~ ^ i j i *..-.. /' -,


The menus have been an-
nounced for the Gulf County
Schools system. Some meals may
change due to the availability of
certain food items.
Monday, December 9: cheese-
burger, buttered corn, milk and
cookie
Tuesday, .. December 10:
chicken with rice or noodles, Eng-
lish peas, fruit cup, rolls and milk
Wednesday, December 11;
spaghetti with meat sauce,. tossed
salad, green beans, roll and milk
Thursday, December 12: chili
dog, cheese wedge, tossed salad,
French fries, milk and cookie
Friday, December 13: pizza
burger, sliced tomato, lima
beans, milk and fruit cobbler.,

Barr Completes
Repairer Course
Pvt. Ricky T. Barr has com-
pleted a wheel vehicle repairer
course at Aberdeen Proving
Ground, Maryland.
Students were taught trou-
bleshooting, replacement, and ad-
justment of components and as-
semblies of wheeled vehicles. Use
of publications, tools, and diag-
nostic equipment were also in-
cluded in the training.
Barr is the son of Horace W.
Barr Sr. of 102 Robbins Ave., Port
St. Joe, and Doris Johnson of
Gainesville.
His wife, Lisa, is the daughter
of Curtis and Inez Rowe of
Gainesville.


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


*Auto *Home

*Business

*Flood *Life


P*Rpresenting 'The Travelers'
The Insurance Store Since 1943

8:30 till 6:00

Monday through Friday


J


A message brought to you by:
Port St. Jo./GutO County Chamber of Commerce*
and the
Downtown Merchants Asocrlaton

-- --


@||1| ^ X. JLi


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent ROY SMITH, Agent FRANK HANNON, Agent


DPAfl/r


*Bonds 221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


Ir.Ltzl4=


i


SHOP PORT ST. JOE FIRST


:3


~-r -cre


ROY SMITH, Agent


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent










PAGE 4B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, DEC. 5, 1991


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYSI Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,


Owner financing. Two bedroom,
1 bath, mobile home, 90% remodeled,
new septic tank, city water, lot
75'x100'. Down payment $1,000, pay-
ments $252.05. Located in Beacon
Hill. Call 227-7411. 6tp 12/5
3 bedroom house, on 1 1/2 lots
at 512 9th St, Port St Joe. 647-
8614. tfc 11/21
For Sale by Owner: 1 1/2 acres
across, from Newman's Construction
on C-30. Five minutes from town, Bay
view, close to golf course and beach-
es. Call (904) 229-2708 after 5 p.m.
4tc 11/14
2 bdrm. trailer on 3/4 acre, adja-
cent to Wetappo Creek, fenced, Ig.
screen porch, storage bldg., $19,000
assume. mortgage. 229-8581 or 227-
1566. tfc 12/5
50x150 lot w/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
tfc 12/5
50x100 lot w/12x60 MH, 16x20
shop, all improvements. $21,500. 4th
and 2nd St. Beacon Hill. Financing
available; 648-KENT. tfc 12/5
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 5/23/92

GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)
BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Blas, Florida
(904) 229-2777
1-800-624-3964
tfc 11/7


SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


2 bedroom. 1 bath 12'x65' trailer,
located on Pineda. No pets, call 647-
5361. tfc 12/5
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 1/2
bath unfurnished townhouses. 508
9th St. No pets. Call 1-576-1125 day
or 1-893-1586 evenings. 4tc 12/5
4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, large cor-
ner lot, fenced, 2 car garage, $775
month. Call 647-3024. Itc 12/5
House for rent: at Howard
Creek, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, $200 per
month plus deposit. Call 1-256-1217.
tfc 12/5

1 bedroom apartment, carpeted
and well furnished. Good neighbor-
hood. 1505 Monument Ave.
tfc 11/28
2 bedroom, 2 full bath mobile
home, washer & dryer, partially fur-
nished at St. Joe Beach. 648-5416.
4tc 11/14
Furnished 2 bedroom mobile
home, St. Joe Beach. $275 month.
648-5323. tfc 12/5
Looking for a' nicely furnished 3
bdrm., 2 ba. bay home to rent on
Cape San Blas? This home is on one
of the best locations on St. Joseph
Bay. $600 per month + cost of utili-
ties. 6 months to 12 months rental
agreement. For more details call Top
Sale Realty, Inc., 229-2500.
tfc 12/5

Triplex, 2 bdrm., 2 ba. on the
Gulf, Cape San Bias. $375 month
plus utilities. Call 227-1322.
Mobile home spaces for rent. Call
827-7261, Howard Creek. tfc 12/5
OFFICE SPACE. Call George
Duren at 229-6031 and leave mes-
sage. tfc 12/5
Mexico Beach: Two small trailers
$55 and $65 weekly, utilities fur-
nished, adults only, no pets. 648-
5659. tfc 12/5

Office Space for Lease: Spa-
cious, clean, well located office in con-
venient part of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378 or come by 322 Long
Avenue. tfe 12/5


UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
* Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
* New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
* Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
* One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 12/5


Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 12/5

No need for wet carpets. Dry.
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/90
The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 12/5
Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfc 12/5


plus 54 per word for all over 20.





LOT RENTALS
Cater to SeniorCitizens

Sun &Sand
Mobile Home Park (386-A)
O1100N. 15th St.,
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Call (904) 648-8201 de 12/5


'87 Ford conversion van, 1 own-
er, 49,000 miles, $9,495. 827-6019.
tfc 12/5,

JEEPS. 1953 $1,000; 1979
$2,500. Call 653-2219, 653-9701 or'
653-2191, Apalachicola. 3tc 12/5'
'87 Ford Ranger XLT 4x4,- tool:
box, bed mat In exceL condition, 5,
speed, call 1-482-7492.
2tc 11/28
'82 Isuzu TU pickup, diesel, looks'
& runs good, $995. '89 Chev. pu,.
350 V8, stepside, loaded with options,
brown, 51k miles, 1 owner, $0,500.
$8,400. 648-5659. tfc 12/5


T RADES&SERVI CES


Just in time for Christmas
shopping. Will keep children in my
home week nights and Saturday. 229-
8474. tfc 12/6
IN-HOME HAIR CARE: Licensed
professional with years of experience.
Call 648-5381. 2tp 11/21
BROKEN TV, VCR OR WHATEV-
ER? Don't throw it away. Get yourself
some free beer money. I'll pick it up &
deliver some money. Call now, Swing-
arm Jm, 647-3116. tfc 12/5

NEED CASH? WE BUY MORT-
GAGES. PHONE PANAMA CITY 265-
2792. 6tp 11/14



COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899

tfc 12/5

THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 am. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
c 12/5

C. R. SMITH & SON .
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2. Box AIC, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfc 12/5

We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns

Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-386, Howard Creek
tfc 12/5

JOHN F. LAW
LAYWER 1-265-4794
24 Years of Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-tional
Diseases, Injuries and Accidents. No
charge for first conference.
tfc 12/5


BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair
Rebuild Wrecks Body
& Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body Work
See or Call BOB HEACOCK
Baltzell Ave. Phone 227-7229
ti 1i2/5


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.

Narcotics Anonymous
Meetings Monday Nights
8:00 p.m. at 302 Reid Ave.,
Information: Call (904) 229-6506



COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581
tfc 12/5


SEWING & ALTERATIONS
of All Kinds.
Fashion, Weddings, or
Domestic
Men's, Women's & Children's
Call 229-6154
after 6 p.m.
Itc Dec..


STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 12/5

CHIP'S QUALITY HEATING &
COOLING
New Installations & Service
Fall Special
Heater Check $15.00
827-2009
Owner. Rull C. Lay, P. 0. Box 841,
Port St. Joe
8tn 11/14


Need It
Rent It
St. Joe Rental-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Port St. Joe 227-2112
tfc 12/5

Remodeling SandBlasting
Decks New Construction
Free Estimates 648-5886
TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Mike Taylor P.O. Box 13459
Lik. #RG0051240 Mexico Beach, FL
tfc 1.1/28


BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

Lawn Mowers
Weed Eaters
Chain Saws \
Generators
*Pumps
S *Tillers -
fK Go-Karts
229-2727
328 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe tfc 12/5


CASH'S CHIMNEY SWEEP c' o
"If It SOOTS Your Fancy!' D A RY
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY 95 Call Anytime Mon.-Sun.
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL 871-6527
LICENSED & INSURED 871-6527


GLENN'S PAINT Rebuild Wrecks
L*NN P N Body & Window Work
& BODY SHOP Expert Painting
& BODY SHOP Free Estimates
503 First Street Port St. Joe Insurance Claims
Phone 227-7133 ftfc 12/5


All Types Yard Work. Mowing,
raking and trim. Reasonable. 229-
6435. tfc 12/5
Sewing and Alterations: drapes,
complete outfits, repairs. Call Daisy,
at Aline's, 229-6600. tfc 12/5
Port St Joe Lodge No. 111
Reg. Stated Communication
"./Ist and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
G. Godwin, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 5/23

Residential Interior
Commercial Exterior
JEFF THIMMER
Painting & Wallpaper Services
Reliable, Dependable, tfc 12/5
Quality Custom Work
Free estimates Lic. #90373
227-2737' 15 yrs. experience
Leave message

WEDDING CAKES
Designed especially for you.
Original recipe.
Call 229-6154 evenings
and weekends.
Itc Dec.


Thomas Heat/
Air/Eectrical
S 10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 12/5



AVOn


CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460 tfc 12/

SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!




-44


Sears Catalog Sales
227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. tfc 12/5


Women's -Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Church. 227-1145 or 227-1128.


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043


BADCOCK
TV SERVICE
229-6195
310 Reid Avenue
2tc 12/5


Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Prems
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc 12/5


ST. JOE

RENT-ALL, Inc.
Small Engine Repairs
Lawnmowers
Weedeaters
Tillers
Blowers
Chain saws
Small Engine Sales
We now make chains
for most chainsaws.
706 1st St. St. Joe
227-2112
Bob Ridgley,
Repairman
tfc 12/6


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer f V 12/5

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA tic 12/5 904/229-6821


PJ'S ROOFING
ALL TYPES OF ROOFS tfc2/5
Hot Roofing, Built-Up, 1-Ply Syster
Free Estimates
Phone (904) 229-6201 PAT TOUSIGNANT



Terry Parrish Construction Company

New Homes
Additions & Remodeling
All Your Building Needs

WE BUILD TO LAST A LIFETIME!

For Free Estimates, Call 229-8589


HANNON REALTY, tInc;.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 229-8988
PORT ST. JOE
New Listing: Duplex apartment 2 BR each masonry Good condition o 50' x 170'
lot. Excellent buy at $25,000.
104 21st St.: Very nice, recently updated brick home, 3BR/2ba, living room, dining,
den with fireplace, new roof, central h/a, large kitchen, garage, covered patio,
outside storage and fenced yard $77,900.00.
139 Westcott Circle: Why build when you can walk into this lovely, immaculate 3
(split) bedroom, 2 bath home with large great room, fire place, dining room, 2
car garage and many amenities too numerous to mention. Landscaped back*
yard has privacy fence and screen enclosed pool with connecting walkway and
patio. A must see -$105,000.00.
419 18th St.: Spacious stucco 3 BR/2 1/2 bath home with lots of built-is, living room
with fireplace,UiM ERn,0C l located in nice neighborhood on comer lot. $72,000.00
712 Woodward AcYM l e, central h/air, located on corner
lot, outside std&' 1 i#c=fe" bfMreffdent home. $33,000.00.
1402 Long Ave.: Well kept 2 BR/1 bath home with c/h & air plus 2 rental aptsl 2 bd/
1 bath each. All for $59,500.
1314 Garrison Ave.: 2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
back yard. $35,000.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$425-000.00. REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $50,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
OAK GROVE
105 Hunter St.: 3BR, 1 bath with extra room which could be 4th BR, living room, din-
ing room, den, screened porch, privacy fence, carpet, ch/a on 2 lots.
$29,500.00.
HOWARD CREEK
Corner of Deer and Perch: 2 BR, 1 bath mobile home, furnished, ch/a, utility build-
ing with washer and dryer on 2 lots, covered outside patio or car port. $27,000
OVERSTREET
2 BR, 2 bath, with fireplace is on approx. 6.1 acres. Approx. 1,512 sq. ft. plus large
deck. Only $52,000
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2 bath home located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must see to appreciate.
$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassedin front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large comer lot Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
1908 & 1910 Long Ave.: 2 nice high lots, 60x140 and 68x1 72.
Cape San Bias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part.
Gulf Aire: single family residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd SL: Nice. canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 corner lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue, $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.


' I










'T' 'T'AR Rq' TnP* ~T~~ 10~rA. rmrfqt)AV. mA.t. 5.1991


SSweet Spicy Scents of the Season


From the gentle fragrance of
pine and the musky scent of
burning candles, to the spicy-
sweet smell of ginger-laden cook-
ies and citron-infused fruitcakes,
the special scents of holiday deco-
rations and celebrations provide
an added dimension to our enjoy-
ment of the sights and sounds of
the holiday season.
At the time of the earliest
Christmas observances, certain
herbs were identified as having
particular religious significance,
among them, rosemary, which
was said to have Its fragrance be-
cause Mary laid the Christ Child's
garments on its branches, and


thyme, which was said to have
been Mary's bed in the Bethlehem
stable. Subsequently, thyme was
used to adorn the creche, and
rosemary was scattered on floors
during the Christmas season, its
sweet aroma released when
stepped on.
Pomanders were frequently
seen in Victorian homes; their
sweet scent masked the smell of
liquor, tobacco and cigar smoke,
which often were part of holiday
socializing.
POMANDERS
Make a pomander
You will need the following to
make a pomander:


Firm, thin-skinned oranges or
apples. These should be free of
blemishes. Lemons or limes
would also be suitable.
Whole, large-headed cloves.
Buy top quality for visual effect
and make sure they have a good,
strong smell.
Curing spice mixture (see reci-
pe below).
A thin, metal crochet hook or
knitting needle. For piercing the
fruit. This makes the job quicker
and easier on the fingers.
Large glazed pottery bowl in
which you'll cure the pomanders.
Small bowl for mixing spices.
1. As you insert the cloves,


hold the fruit firmly but don't
squeeze it. The cloves can be
placed into the fruit at random or
in a linear pattern, which is
much neater looking. Be sure the
cloves are close together but not
crowding one another. They
should be far enough apart so as
to prevent splitting the skin of the
fruit. A thin, metal crochet hook
or knitting needle can be used for
piercing the fruit wherever you in-
sert a clove. If you want to hang
your pomander from a ribbon,
leave a 1/2-inch "path" around
the fruit. This will act as a groove
to hold the ribbon in place. (It
also cuts down on clove-studding


time.) The insertion of cloves
should be finished on the same
day as it's begun. If you leave the
pomander unfinished overnight,
the unstudded part of the fruit
may begin to rot.
2. Blend the curing spice
mixture in the small bowl.
3. Sprinkle about half of this
mixture Into the bottom of the
large bowl and place the studded
pomanders on top.
4. Sprinkle the rest of the
spice mixture over the pomand-
ers.
5. Each day, turn the po-
manders and sprinkle them with
the spice mixture. Continue this


process daily until the pomanders
are totally hardened. This may
take anywhere from two weeks to
over a month, depending on the
size of the fruit. When the po-
manders have hardened, they are
ready.
Curing Spice Mixture
4 ounces powdered cinnamon
2 ounces powdered cloves
1/2 ounce powdered allspice
1/2 ounce powdered nutmeg
1 ounce powdered orrisroot
Yield: 8 ounces, or enough to
keep several pomanders curing at
once. This mixture can be used
over and over again. Store in a
plastic bag between uses.


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I 4.AAA4.4.A4.4.4.4.4.4.4.AA4. g..4AA~4.frAA
4.4.4.4.4.4.4. A A 4.
4.4.64.4.4.6 4.4.4. 4.4.4. 4.4.4. 4.4.4. dA AA AAAAA~ db A JbA
~ ,E.y4.4.A


LPN's needed all shifts, competi-
tive salary. Apply in person at Bay St
George Care Center, Eastpoint, FL or
phone Jan Lambert, DON, 670-8571.
4tc 12/5

Pianist/organist for the First
United Methodist Church of Apalachi-
cola. Call 653-9530 or 653-8881.
2tc 12/5

Q* Part time or full time opportunity
selling World Book, the #1 selling en-
cyclopedia and child craft. Call Loren
Parkinson in Panama City, 235-2644.
Itp 12/5

Help Wanted: build fences, oper-
ate, maintain tractors and bush hog,
general laborer. Call 227-7506.
tfc 11/28

We are searching for a person
ivith an excellent attitude, strong
Work ethic, exceptional people skills
and an inquisitive intellect. This per-
son must desire a long term career in
Dental Assisting here in Port St. Joe.
Send resume' to: Frank D. May,
D.M.D., 319 Williams Ave., Port St
Joe, FL. No phone calls please.
tfc 11/28

NURSES We have available:
One RN position; one LPN position. If
you prefer part-time at present and
full-time later please call to discuss.
Bay St Joseph care Center, 229-
8244. tfc 12/5

Experienced tax preparers & re-
ceptionist wanted for tax season. Re-
fresher course given. Permanent sea-
sonable work available. Call collect at
785-0482. tfc 11/21

Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
S kpalachicola RiVr, 'within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
,1/2 overtime pay, on-call duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with water, sew-
erage, and lawn maintenance provid-
ed free.
e Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
(26) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten (10) paid holidays. Free continu-
ing educational courses offered .by
State University $500 annual allow-
ance for job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience;- or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
* plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst., P. 0. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 12/5
Earn, Extra Income. Earn $ 1000's
,stuffing envleopes. Send self ad-
dressed stamped envelope to: H & S
*Southern, P. 0. Box 572, Troy, AL
i36081. Itp 12/5

NURSING ASSISTANT
POSITIONS
No Experience Necessary
Training Program
Certification Program
Competitive Salary & Benefits
BAY ST. JOSEPH
CARE CENTER
Apply in person
tfc 11/7






Wanted: Tree planters. For more
,information call 227-1313.
Wanted: Home or homesite on
Cape San Bias, prefer Gulf to road.
Call or write: Sottrel 708-530-0623,
15 W 684 Patricia Lane, Elmherst, IL
60126 20tp 10/3

LAND WANTED. National
Company looking for rural & recrea-
tional acreage for subdivision. Also
paper & approved subdivisions in any
*, stage. Up to 1000+ acres. Can close
in 30 days. Write: Acquisitions, Attn.
Ray, 5295 Town Center Rd., Boca Ra-
ton, FL 33486. 4tp 11/14


Three year old innerspring sleep-
er sofa, call 229-8474. Itc 12/5

Fiberglass camper top, excel.
condition, $150. Small chest freezer,
$100. Work 227-1744 or home, 229-
6604 Itc 12/5

Sofa sleeper, queen size, almost
new, very nice, $500. Call 653-9701
or 653-2219, Apalach. 3tc 12/5

Day bed, $40. Chest of drawers,
$25. ltc 12/5

25" color TV, Curtis Mathis con-
sole with entertainment center,
19"x53"x34" high. 229-6879.
ltc 12/5

Boston style solid wood rocker
$75; queen/king peach & lavender
comforter, 2 pr. Priscilla curtains,
peach table round, peach & brass
lamp, $75 for all. 229-8229 day/ 227-
7377 after 5 p.m. ltc 12/5

Matched love seat & hide-a-bed
sofa, $200 for the pair. 227-7367.
2tc 12/5

Thomasville sofa & chair, rust
color, $100. Magnavox stereo $40,,
rowing machine, $25. Call 227-1708
after 12 noon. ltc 12/5

GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFTS:
Floral mauve sofa chairs, beautiful
& new, swivel rockers, $130 off origi-
nal cost, Oak Roll Top Desk and
Chair, $700, Thomasville Dining
Suite, glass top table, 6 side chairs,
china cabinet, color pearl, $800, 639-
5678 afternoons. 2tc 11/28

Help Me, rIve Fallen Medical
Alert. Call M. E. Telker, (904) 784-
6394. 2tp 11/28

1990 Suzuki 4 wheeler model
LTF 250L, excel. cond., $1,800. 1986
Chevy C-10 pickup, silver on black,
auto., air, stereo, needs carburetor &
pb booster, $3,500. 14 ft fiberglass
boat & trailer, $300. Call 827-2133.
4tc 11/21

1965 22' Holiday travel trailer,
$995. 1951 31 ft. Spartan aluminum
travel trailer, good for store room or
camp, $695. 1969 22' Terry travel
trailer, $1,350. 648-5659.
tfc 12/5

Several loads of dry firewood, $35
load. You haul. 648-5659.
tfc 12/5

35 gallon aquarium, including fil-
ter, heater, stand, etc. $150. Call
229-6752. tfc 11/21

Side Band base 40 channel Presi-
dent radio, $100. Call 227-1568 after
5 p.m. tfc 12/5

HAPPY JACK MANGE MEDI-
CINE: Promotes healing and hair
growth to any mange, hot spot, or
fungus on dogs & horses without ster-
oids. At BARFIELD'S LAWN & GAR-
DEN, 229-2727. 10tc 10/31

To buy or sell Avon call Sarah
Kemp at 229-6495 after 5 p.m. or
weekends, thru Dec. 91

Nature's Diet Tea. Weight man-
agement, digestive aid, appetite sup-
pressant Natural cleanser, over-
whelming response. For more
information call Beth at 229-8919.
tfc 12/5

Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyrn-
dall Parkway, Panama City, FL
32404. 763-7443. tfc 12/5

Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOOl 227-1105.
tfc 12/5

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 12/5






Back Porch Sale: Pool table,
clothes and misc. Saturday, Dec. 7, 8
till. 2001 Cypress Ave. Itc 12/5

Yard Sale: Friday and Saturday,
9-5. New, used, salvage and surplus
Items. Bargains. Wilder's Trading
Post, 5th Ave., Beacon Hill. Rain or
shine. Itp 12/5

Big Yard Sale: Saturday, Dec. 7,
8 a.m. at corner of 20th St. & Long
Ave. All kinds of good bargains from
four families. Drapes, light fixtures,
Christmas trees, ornaments (some
new), household items, men's and
women's nice clothing. Lots to look at


Christmas Puppies & Kittens
from the pound. Two 3 months old
black kittens, 1 small tan-colored
long-haired male puppy; 1 black-tan
short haired neutered male dog; 1
part lab, male, young puppy (black); 1
black cocker spaniel female (part).
:229-8247 or 227-1322. Remember
the County has a pound tool

Unique Pets for Sale: Large red-
tail boa, approximately 8.5 feet, with
tank, stand & light Very gentle. Fam-
ily pet for over 4 years, $500 or best
offer. Also 4 foot ball python with
tank and light, $100. Moving overseas
and must sell. Kids heartbroken to
:sell, Mom delighted Also Nintendo
games for sale. Call 647-5946 be-
tween 5:00 & 10:00 p.m., EST.
2tc 12/5
Christmas Puppies: Schipperke,
6 available for Christmas gifts. Male
and female, Wormed and first shorts,
weaned and ready for delivery Christ-
mas week. $300. 229-8737.
tfc 11/7






Garage Sale, Saturday, Dec. 7, 8
a.m. 12 noon. 440C Gulf Aire Drive.
Several families. ltc 12/5

Yard Sale, Boyett residence, Hwy.
98, St. Joe Beach, Friday, December
6. Itc 12/5

Yard Sale: Saturday, Dec. 7th. 9
a.m. till. Crafts, clothes, furniture,
lots of odds and ends. 517 4th St.,
Port St. Joe.

Yard Sale: 603 Long Avenue, 9
a.m. 1 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 7.

Garage Sale: Saturday, 9 a.m. to
5 p.m., 445 2nd Ave., Highland View.
Baby, children's, newborn clothes,
baby bed, stroller and misc. items.

Big Garage Sale: Saturday, Dec.
7, 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 100 duPont Dr.
(across from hospital). 1tc 12/5


WAREHOUSE

CLEARANCE

SALE

200 Williams

Ave.

Friday, 9-12


Peace on Earth
In Malaysia, it's Aman. In
Sweden, it's Fred. In Italy, it's
Pace and in Costa Rica, Paz.
Wherever you travel, every
nation will have a word for it, and
people everywhere a prayer for it.
We call it Peace.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
STATE OF FLORIDA.
CASE NO.: 91-1"44
GENERAL JURISDICTION
FLORIDA BAR NO.: 060980
CHASE FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIA-
TION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GEORGE S. JACKSON, if living, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, As-
signees, Creditors, Lienors and Trustees, and
all other persons claiming by, through, under
or against GEORGE S. JACKSON, deceased.
Whose residence address is unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a'mortgage on the following property In Gulf
County, Florida:
Villa 2D-1 of Parcel 2a. of CAPE
SANDS LANDING, which consists of
the following portion of Lot Two (2),
SAN BIAS SUBDIVISION, according to
the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book
3, Pages 20, 21 and 22, Public
Records of Gulf County. Florida.
A. Fee simple title to the following-described
parcel of land together with the improvements lo-
cated thereon (the following consisting of the Vil-
la's residence building and Villa 2D-1L of Parcel 2J2
of CAPE SANDS LANDING, which consists of the
following portion of Lot Two (2), SAN BIAS SUBDI-
VISION, according to the plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 3, Pages 20, 21 and 22, Public Records
of Gulf County. Florida:
A. Fee simple title to the following-described
parcel of land together with the Improvements lo-
cated thereon (the following consisting of the Vil-
la's residence building and the land on which it is
located):
SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION BELOW AS EX-
HIBIT "A".,
B. A one-half undivided fee simple interest
as tenant in common with the adjacent Villa-
owner in the parcel legally described as follows (be-
ing the Common Areal:
SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION BELOW AS EX-
HIBITB'".
EXHIBIT "'A"
FOR VILLA 2D- 1
A. Fee simple title to the following-described
parcel of land together with the improvements lo-
cated thereon (the following consisting of the Vil-
la's residence building and the land on which it Is
located):
Commencing at the Southeast (SE)
corner of Lot Two (2), SAN BIAS SUB-
DIVISION, also known as SAN BIAS
ESTATES, according to the plat there-
of recorded in Plat Book 3. Pages 20.
21 and 22, Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida; thence South
6945'05" West along the Southerly
line of said Lot 2 a distance of 243.00
feet; thence North 2014'55" West
65.04 feet; thence South 6945'05"
West a distance of 0.66 feet for the
Point of Beginning; thence South
18'29'26' West 62.25 feet; thence
North 7132'18" West 26.13 feet;
thence North 1829'26" East 62.25
feet; thence South 71*32'18" East
26.13 feet to the Point of Beginning.
FOR VILLA 2D-1
B. A one-half undivided fee simple Interest
as tenant in common with the adjacent Villa-
owier'liiYtheparcel legally described as follows (be-
ing'the Common Areal].
Commence at the Southeast (SE) cor-
ner of Lot Two (2), SAN BIAS SUBDI-
VISION, also known as SAN BIAS ES-
TATES, according to the plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 20, 21
and 22, Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida; thence South
6945'05" West along the Southerly
line of said Lot 2 a distance of 243.00
feet for the Point of Beginning; thence
continue South 6945'05" West along
said. Southerly line for 81.00 feet;
thence North 20'14'55" West 122.00
feet to a point on the Northerly line of
said Lot 2; thence North 69*45'05"
East along said Northerly line a dis-
tance of 81.00 feet; thence South
2014'55" East 122.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
The northerly fifteen (15.00) feet of the
above-described property being sub-
ject to an easement for the purpose of
ingress and egress;
LESS the property described in Exhib-
it '"A" above; LESS the following-
described property (being part of Villa
2D-2):
Commencing at the Southeast (SE)
corner of Lot Two (2), SAN BIAS SUB-
DIVISION, also known as SAN BIAS
ESTATES, according to the plat there-
of recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 20,
21 and 22, Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida; thence South
69o45'05" West along the Southerly
line of said Lot 2 a distance of 243.00
feet; thence North 2014'55" West
65.04 feet; thence South 69'45'05"
West a distance of 0.66 'feet; thence
South 1829'26" West 62.25 feet;
thence North 7132'18" West 26.13
feet for the Point of Beginning; thence
continue North 7132'18" West 26.13
feet; thence North 1829'26" East
62.25 feet; thence South 7132'18'
East 26.13 feet; thence South
18*2926" West 62.25 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE, and all other persons in possession of


325 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
Hours; M-F: 7:30-5:00 Sat: 9:00-Noon
Call Herb or Charles; 227-73,73

Also Serving
with Truck Deliveries: Tuesday and Thursday

Apalachicola, Eastpoint,

Carrabelle and St. George Island


( BRAND NAME ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES j


Square D, Nutone, Leviton,

Frigidaire, Makita, Klein Tools

and


(a






@1


TOTAL LIC


;HTING SERVICES


subject real property, whose real names are uncer-
tain, and you are.required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO, ESQUIRE, Plaintiffs
attorney whose address is:
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite 2720, Tampa,
Florida 33602 on or before the 18th day of Decem-
ber, 1991, and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Amended Complaint.
DATED on this 21st day of November, 1991.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: Tonya Knox, Deputy
Joseph M. Paniello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33601
Publish: November 28, December 5, 12, and 19,
1991.
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NUMBER: 9192-04
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation Interested in con-
structing facilities at Wimico Park, White City:
The construction project proposed will
include development layout plans for a
park picnic area; plans and specifica-
tions for park lighting and park water;
procurement and placement of picnic
tables and charcoal grills; and con-
struction of a park gazebo on an exist-
ing concrete base.
Plans and specifications are available
at the Office of Charles A. Gaskin,
State Road 22, Wewahitchka, Florida.
Plans may be procured by contractors
upon deposit of $50.00 per set of
which $25.00 will be refunded to each
contractor who submits a bid. All doc-
uments must be, returned within ten
(10) days of bid opening.
Project completion Is required within
sixty (60) calendar days of award.
Contractors must comply with all na-
tional, state and local building codes.
Liquidated damages for failure to complete
the project on specified date will be set at $100.00
per day.
The Bid must conform to Section 287.133.
(3) Florida Statutes, on Public Entity Crimes.
Please Indicate on envelope that this is a
sealed bid, the bid number, and what the bid is
for.
Bids will be received until 5:00 P.M., E.T.,
December 9, 1991, at the Office of-the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The Board re-
serves the right to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Billy E. Traylor. Chairman
Publish November 28 and December 5, 1991
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-88
ASSOCIATES FINANCE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MINNIE LYNN and husband, AUDIE E. LYNN, and
THE CITIZENS AND SOUTHERN BANK.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the under-
signed;'Clerk of'the Circtit tCourt of Gulf Coyulty.
Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment
of mortgage forecl sure entered ,n this Cause..l.al.I
sell at the Front Lpbby of the Gull County Co.rt-
house In Port St." Joe, Gulf Co)unty. FIrnd a, ida,
11:00 a.m., EST, (10:00 a.m. CST), on the 18th
day of December, 1991, the following described
real property lying and being in Gulf County, Flori-
da, to-wit:


Begin at the Northeasterly corner of
Lot 30, Block 18, City of Port St Joe,
Florida, according to the official Plat
thereof on file in the Office of Clerk of
Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida.
for a point of beginning, thence run in
a southerly direction along the right-
of-way line of Woodward Avenue to a
point on said right-of-way which inter-
sects and is perpendicular to an Imag-
inary line running from the easterly
boundary line of Lot 30 to the westerly
boundary line of Lot 30 and parallel
with the northerly boundary line of Lot
30, 3 feet North of the base of a pecan
tree, thence turn 90* right and run
along said line described above to the
westerly boundary line of Lot 30,
thence turn 90 right and run along
the westerly boundary line of Lot 30 in
a northerly direction to the Northwest-
erly corner of Lot 30, thence turn 90
right and run along the northerly
boundary of Lbt 30 to the Point of Be-
ginning.
The above described property includes
a house which is basically 42 1/2 feet
long at the back of the house parallel
to Woodward Avenue and 24 feet wide
at the northerly end of the house run-
ning parallel to 3rd Street. That it fur-
ther includes a storage building which
is 6 feet by 6 feet and which is pres-
ently situated at the southwesterly
corner of the house and approximately
3 feet northerly of the southerly boun-
dary lines described above. The above
property is a portion of Lot 30, Block
18, City of Port St Joe, Florida, and
constitutes approximately the norther-
ly half of said Lot
THIS NOTICE dated this 25th day of Novem-
ber, 1991.
BENNY C. LISTER, CLERK
Gulf County Circuit Court
By. Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: December 5 and 12, 1991.
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9192-05
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested in sell-
ing the County the following described personal
property:
One (1) 25' x 50' addition to the
Beaches Fire Department on St Joe
Beach. Plans and specifications may
be inspected at the office of Charles
Arthur Gaskin, State Road 22, Wewa-
hitchka, Florida, and may be procured
by general contractors upon a deposit
of $25.00 per set of plans and. specifi-
cations of which $15.00 will be re-
funded to each general contractor who
submits a bid. All documents must be
returned within ten (10) days of the
opening of the bids.
The Bid must conform to Section 287.133
(3) Florida Statutes, on Public Entity Crimes.
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver
unit on specified date will be set at $25.00 per
day.
Please indicate on envelope that this is a
Sealed Bid, the Bid Number, and what the bid is
for.
Bids will be received until 4:30 o'clock, p.m.,
-Eastern Time, December 19, 1991, at the Office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
:.house. 1000 Fifth StreeL. P.:.rt-St. Joe. Florida-.
324563 The Board reseres the night u) reje,:t any 4
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ Billy E. Traylor
Publish: December 5 and 12, 1991.


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MINU ES...

Gulf County Commission
:GC.O '* ," .


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OCTOBER 15, 1991
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners met this date in special session with the
following members present: Chairman Billy E.
Traylor. Commissioners Nathan Peters Jr., Charles
S. Fortner and Al Ray.
Others present were: County Planner/Solid
Waste Coordinator Ralph Rish. Clerk Benny C. Us-
ter. Chief Deputy Clerk Douglas C. Birmingham!
Deputy Clerk Renee Stripling and Building Inspec-
tor Donald Butler.
The meeting was called to order at 6:10
p.m.., ET.
Wesley Ramsey opened the meeting with
prayer and Attorney Robert M. Moore led the.
Pledge of Allegiance to the flag.
Minutes Highland View Water System:
Upon motion by Commissioner Fortner, second by
Commissioner Peters and unanimous vote, the
Board agreed to adopt the action of the Highland
View Water Board meeting ofOctober 15, 1991.
Beaches Water System: Upon motion by
Commissioner Peters, second by Commissioner
Ray and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to pay
an assigned county employee his current hourly
pay rate for the hours worked on the Beaches wa-
ter system from the Beaches Water System Opera-
tion and Maintenance Fund.
White City Water System: County Planner
Rish gave the Board a report on the status of the
application for FHA funds for the White City Water
System.
Upon motion by Commissioner Fortner and
there being no further business, the meeting did
then adjourn.
BILLY E. TRAYLOR, CHAIRMAN.
ATTEST: BENNY C. LISTER. CLERK
888888
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OCTOBER 21, 19091
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners met this date in special session with the
following members present, Chairman Billy E.
Traylor, Commissioners Nathan Peters Jr., James
E. Creamer and Al Ray.
Others present were: Clerk Benny C. Lister,
Chief Deputy Clerk Douglas C. Birmingham, Dep-
uty Clerk Renee Stripling Admin. Asst/Civil De-
fense Director Larry Wes. County Planner/Solid
Waste Coordinator Ralph Rish and Attorney Rob-
ert M. Moore,
The meeting was called to order at 4:40
p.m., ET.
Admin. Asst. Wells opened the meeting with
prayer and Commissioner Peters led the Pledge of
Allegiance to the flag.
County Planner/Solid Waste Coordinator
Interviews: The Board interviewed the following
applicants for the County Planner/Solid Waste Co-
ordinator position: 'Bo" Williams. Ken Patton,
John Goodson. Larry Witt. and William McGee.
After each applicant was questioned, the
Board agreed to study these applicants and make
a recommendation at the regular meeting on Octo-
ber 22, 1991.
Commissioner Ray stated he was called re-
garding Greg Pierce's application. County Planner
Rish informed Commissioner Ray that the applica-
tion was brought Into the Clerk's office two days
after the deadline date to receive applications.
The Board discussed whether or not any
Commissioner had any other people they wanted
interviewed. Commissioner Peters discussed a
couple of applicants he was interested in. Commis-
sioner Peters then reported that the Committee
had done a wonderful job on their selections.
Upon motion by Commissioner Ray, second
by Commissioner Creamer and there being no fur-
ther business, the meeting did then adjourn.
BILLY E. TRAYLOR. CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: BENNY C. LISTER, CLERK
8
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OCTOBER 22, 1991
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners met this date in regular session with the
following members present: Chairman Billy E.
Traylor, Commissioners Nathan Peters Jr., Charles
S. Fortner, James E. Creamer and Al Ray.
Others present were: Clerk Benny C. Lister,
Attorney Robert M. Moore. Deputy Clerk Renee
Stripling, Chief Deputy Clerk Douglas C. Birming-
ham. Admin. Asst./Civil Defense Director Larry
Wells. Building Inspector Donald Butler, County
Planner/Solid Waste Coordinator Ralph Rish and
Road Superintendent Bob Lester.
The meeting was called to order at 7:05
p.m., ET.
Admin. Asst. Wells opened the meeting with
prayer and Commissioner Peters led the Pledge of
Allegiance to the flag. .. ., .
Approve Minutes: Upon motion by Commis- .
sooner Fortner, second by Comrmnqsioner Petqrs
and unanimous vote, Board approved ihe miniiuti
of the following meetings.
October 8, 1991-Special Meeting
October 8, 1991-HVWB Meeting
October 8, 1991-Regular Meeting
Receive Bids Mosquito Control Equip-
ment (9091-31): Pursuant to advertisement to re-
ceive sealed bids for a heavy duty track type loader
for the Mosquito Control Department, the following
bids were received:
Thompson Tractor Co., Inc. $80,201.00
plus terms
The Board agreed for Road Superintendent
Lester and Admin. Asst. Wells to review this bid.
check specifications and report to the Board with a
recommendation after the break.
Receive Bids Road Department Building
(9091-32): Pursuant to advertisement to receive
sealed bids for a new Road Department Building,
the following bids were received:
Richard Money Construction, Inc.
$104,781.00
Cumbaa Enterprises, Inc. $103,117.00
Fisher's Construction $101,196.00.
The Board agreed for Building Inspector
Butler and County Planner Rish to review these
bids and report to the Board with a recommenda-
tion after the break.
Property St. Joe Beach Ditch: Roy Dan-
ley spoke to the Board about a certain ditch which
he feels encroaches on his property at St. Joe
Beach. He informed the Board that the area of
property he Is referring to is a lot on the corner of
Santa Anna & Americus Avenue. After discussion.
the Board agreed for Commissioner Creamer and
Mr. Danley to meet regarding this situation and for
Commissioner Creamer to report to the Board at a
later date with more information.
Stop Sign St. Joe 'Beach: Mary Carver of
. St. Joe Beach requested the Board place a stop
sign at the intersection of Pineda and Georgia Ave-
nue or Balboa and Georgia Avenue. Ms. Carver ex-
plained that several young children lived in the
area and some vehicles were continually traveling
this avenue at high rates of speed. Chairman.Tray-
lor asked Commissioner Creamer and Road Super-
intendent Lester to review the sites and determine
where a sign could be placed.
Solid Waste Funding Financial Consul-
tants: Jay Bertoch of David M. Griffith and Asso-
ciates presented a proposal to the Board on ways
to eliminate the funding of Solid Waste from ad
valorem taxpayers of Gulf County. Mr. Bertoch in-.
formed the Board that his fee for the first phase
would not exceed $8,500.00 and would be billed at
an hourly rate. The Board agreed to review Mr.
Bertoch's proposal more closely and advise him of
their decision.
Property Overstreet: Earl Burrows in-
formed the Board that the contractor paving the
roads out at Overstreet had cut into his property
with the blade of a bulldozer. Mr. Burrows request-
ed the County restore his property to Its former
state. Chairman Traylor asked Road Superinten-
dent Lester to handle this problem.
Invoices Medical Examiner. Clerk Uster
presented three Invoices from the Medical Examin-
er. Attorney Moore requested the Board table these
Invoices as he would make a recommendation on
these and others later in the meeting.
Invoices Prisoner Medical Bills: Upon
motion by Commissioner Peters, second by Com-
missioner Ray and unanimous vote, the Board ap-
proved paying the following prisoner medial bills
Bay Radiology Assoc., P.A. $35.00
Gulf Pines Clinic $30.00
Jorge J. San Pedro $30.00
Commissioner Creamer again requested
Sheriff Harrison be asked to use the Gulf County
Health Department as It is funded partially by the
County. Chairman Traylor asked commissioner
Peters to speak with Sheriff Harrison on this mat-
ter. *
Invoices Health Care Responsibility Act
(HCRA):: Upon motion by Commissioner Fortner.
second by Commissioner Peters and unanimous
vote, the Board approved payment of the following
HCRA invoices:
Bay Medical Center HCRA applicant Car-
rie Cook- $2,069.51
Bay Medical Center HCRA applicant Wil-
liam Bruner $1,653.12.
The Board agreed to take no action on the
Invoice from Bay Medical Center for HCRA appli-
cant. Luther Cannon, because the UB82 was not
filed in a timely manner.
White City Water Systcm: Clerk Uster pre-
sented an invoice from Baskervllle-Donovan Engi-
neers, Inc. for evaluation services on the White
City Water System Plant Site. After recommenda-
tion by County Planner Rish, Commissioner
Creamer moved to pay this invoice dated Septem-
ber 30, 1991. In the amount of $230.44, contin-


gent upon BDE providing the Information as re-
quested by the County. Commissioner Ray
seconded the motion and It carried with a unani-
mous vote.
Award Bid Mosquito Control Department
Equipment (9091-31): Upon recommendation by
County Planner Rish. Commissioner Ray moved to
award bid 49091-31 for the Mosquito Control
track type loader to Thompson Tractor Company,
In the amount of $80,201.00 (this amount in-
cludes a credit of $8,000.00 for the 955L traded
in) on a five year lease purchase type plan of


$19.572.47 per annum, first payment being due
October. 1992. Commissioner Fortner seconded
the motion and it passed with a unanimous vote.'
Award Bid Road Department Building'
(9091-32): Upon recommendation by County Plan-
ner Rish. Commissioner Peters moved to award
bid #9091-32 for the new Road Department build-
ing to Fisher's Construction f Wewahltchka in the
amount of $101;196.00, aslow bidder. Commis-
sioner Fortner seconded the motion and it passed
with a unanimous vote.
Road Paving Change Order #8 Contract
IE: Upon recommendation by County Planner Rish.
Commissioner Fortner moved to approve road pav-
ing Chinge Order #8 (Contract II) for Stone Mill
Creek Road. Whispering Pines and Canal Drive.
Commissioner Ray seconded the motion and it
*passed with a unanimous vote.
Invoice Road Paving: Upon motion by
Commissioner Fortner, Pccond by Commissioner
Ray and unanimous vote, the Board approved In-
voice #134401-17 from C.W. Roberts Contracting
in the amount of $67,845.00, for road paving on
Contract IIL
Courthouse Renovation !Orant Amend-
ment: Upon recommendation by County Planner
Rish. the Board agreed for Chairman Traylor to
sign the Wewahitchka Courthouse Renovation
GrantAmendment
St. Joseph Bay Aquatic Reserve Manage-
ment Plan: Upon recommendation by County
Planner Rish, Commissioner Peters moved to ap-
prove the St Joseph Bay Aquatic Reserve Manage-
ment Plan contingent upon the Departmentof Nat-.
ural Resources agreeing to the,modifications made
to the plan by the City of Port St Joe.
Recycling Signs: Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Creamer, second by Commissioner Ray and
unanimous vote, the Board approved County Plan-
ner Rish obtaining Recycling Signs at an approxi-
mate cost of $1,241.00 to be paid from Recycling
Funds.
Recycling Building: Solid Waste Coordina-
tor Rish informed the Board that the Recycling
Building is almost complete. Commissioner
Creamer asked Mr. Rish what the ultimate plant
for the Recycllng Building was. Rish stated he
hoped eventually that the building could be used
for a total Recycling Center.
Invoice Beach Access Grant: County
Planner Rish informed the Board that he had re-
ceived an itemized statement from Mike Tucker re-
garding the Beach Access Property obtained re-
cently with the Beach Access. Grant Funds from
Mr. Tucker. Mr. Rish reported this had been ap-
proved by the Board at an earlier meeting but he
wished to submit the itemization (to be paid by the
county) as follows:
Appraisal Fee $1,500.00
Survey $512.00
Title $840.00
Signs Wimico Park: Upon motion by Com-
missioner Creamer, second by Commissioner Ray
and unanimous vote, the Board approved for
County Planner Rish to purchase main entrance
signs for Wimico Park at an approximate cost of
$1,230.00.
Upon motion by Commissioner Creamer,
second by Commissioner Ray and unanimous
vote, the Board approved for County Planner Rish
to purchase accessory signs for Wimico Park at an
approximate cost of $1,195.00.
White City: County Planner Rish asked for
approval to advertise to receive bids for a gazebo,
grills and picnic tables for the White City Park.
The Board discussed that this would be paid for
out of grant.funds and agreed that this was previ-
ously approved by the Board.
White City Boat Ramp: Upon motion by
Commissioner Creamer, second by Commissioner
Ray and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to
build an addition to the White City Boat Ramp and
to also do some erosion control there.
White City Water System: County Planner
Rish informed the Board that an extension had
been granted by the Department of Environmental
Regulation to allow the County until June 1992 to
begin construction of the White City Water Sys-
tem.
Boating Improvement Grant: County Plan-
ner Rish reported that the signed documents have
been received on the Boating Improvement Grant
for the City of Port St Joe. Attorney Moore report-
ed nothing has been received from the City indem-
nifying the County at this point
Solid Waste Five Points Landfill: Solid
Waste Coordinator Rish reported several people
have contacted him complaining about not being
able to see the entrance to Five Points Landfill. The
Board agreed for a four by eight foot sign to be
constructed at. an approximate cost of $200.00
and to pay for this out of the Small Counties
Grant.
industrial Ioad Solid Waste: Upon rec-
omnmendatlon by Solid Waste Coordinator Rish,
the Board agreed to have the public take their
trash directly to Five Points Landfill as opposed to
having it dumped in the sway cars. Mr. Rish stat-
ed this would save quite a bit of time for Mosquito
Control employees in trying to pull the sway cars
to Five Points Landfill.
Financial Responsibility Landfills: Solid
Waste Coordinator Rish stated that changes had
been made In the law requiring financial responsi-
bility for landfills. The Board agreed for Solid
Waste Coordinator Rish and Attorney Moore to
schedule a meeting with Fred Wick, the DER rep-
resentative, as soon as Is convenient The Board
thanked Solid Waste Coordinator Rish for his
work.
County Wide Toll Free. Calling: Chairman
Traylor asked Admin. Asst Wells the status of the
County Wide Toll Free Calling. Admin. Asst. Wells
reported he understood that the request is before
the Public Service Commission. Mr. Wells will
check the status of this and report back at the
next meeting. :'
ARPC Designated Official Planning Agen.
cy Admin. Asst. Wells Informed the Board that
the deadline for Gulf County to apply to be the
Designated Official Planning Agency for the Coordi-
nated Transportation Agency or fiscal year 1991-
92 has already passed. Mr. Wells recommended
the Board look at this possibility for fiscal year
1992-93 and get an earlier start in the application
process.
Hazardous Waste Verifications: Upon mo-
tion by Commissioner Peters, second by Commis-
sioner Creamer and unanimous vote, the Board
agreed to approve the Hazardous Waste Verifica-
tions Contract with minor modifications and a
stipulation that the requested estimate comes in at
$1,000 or less. Admin. Asst Wells stated work is
continuing on the local ordinance to rid the
County of the Hazardous Waste Verifications.
911 Surcharge St. Joseph Telephone &
Telegraph: Admin. Asst. Wells reported the Attor-
ney General had issued an opinion that Division of
Communication Office in Gulf County are exempt
from the .50 per month surcharge to fund the 911
system. After discussion, the Board requested At-
torney Moore research this matter and report back
to the Board.
National Emergency Number Association
Conference: Admin. Asst Wells reported he had
attended the National Emergency Number Associa-
tion Conference in Orange Beach, Alabama. Mr.
Wells stated he felt that Gulf County's 911 system
will be enhanced by his attendance at the Confer-
ence.
Small County Coalition: Admin. Asst Wells
reported Rep. Trammell had called to remind the
Board of the Small County Coalition meeting in
Tallahassee on October 23, 1991.
The meeting recessed for a break at 8:30
p.m., ET."
The meeting reconvened at 8:45 p.m., ET.
Art: LUlle Egleo asked permission for local
artists to display their work in the lobby of the
courthouse. Ms. Egleo discussed having some
showcases built to place the pieces behind glass
for security. Ms. Egleo Informed the Board that
there was a grant that could be applied for to fund
a this. Chairman ITraylor appointed Clerk Lister,
Chief DeputyClerk Birmingham and Deputy Clerk
Stripling as a committee to assist Ms. Egleo in ap-
plying for grant funds for this project.
Invoice Salinas Park: Upon motion by
Commissioner Ray, second by Commissioner
Creamer and unanimous vote, the Board approved
payment of $3,185.00 for signs for Salinas Park to
L&W Custom Builders and Seaside Signage to be
paid from grant funds.
Florida Rural Water Assoclation Rate
Study: Building Inspector Butler stated he hoped
to have the results of the rate study on the county
water systems from the Florida Rural Water Asso-
ciation in about a week.
Friends of'Indian Lagoons Upon recom-
mendation by Attorney Moore, Commissioner Ray
moved to pay $2499.50 to Friends of Indian La-
goon as final payment out of the $5,000 previously
allotted to Friends of Indian Lagoon. Commission-
er Creamer seconded the motion and it passed
with a vote of 3 to 2 with Commissioners Peters
and Fortner voting no.
Litter Law: Attorney Moore stated he'd re-
ceived a letter from the State Attorney's office in-
forming the Board exactly how the Litter Law
works. The letter stated that a certain amount of
litter must be found to prosecute the Individuals
who are littering.
Library: Attorney Moore reported that Nolan
Trleglown from the Libroary Board had delivered a
copy of a proposed contract to him. Attorney
Moore recommended the Board withhold action.


Chairman Traylor asked Commissioner Peters to
relay to the Library that the only amount which
could be funded was the budgeted amount.
Resolution Court Costs Judicial Sys-
tem: Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, sec-
ond by Commissioner Fortner and unanimous
vote, the Board agreed to adopt a resolution re-
questing the State of Florida adequately fund the
judicial system of the state.
Proposed Ordinance Petroleum Storage
Facilities: The Board agreed to table the proposed
ordinance on Petroleum Storage Facilities.
"No Wake' Zone: Attorney Moore reported


that the Florida Statutes specifically stated that a
"No Wake" Zone cannot be established on an inter-
coastal waterway.
Invoices Medical Examiner. Upon recom-
mendation by Attorney Moore. Commissioner Pe-
ters moved to pay the following medical examiner
Invoices:
Billy R. Mayhew $35.00; Mattle Bragdon -
$35.00; W.S. Quarles, Sr., $35.00: James Pitts -
$35.00; Rosa Lee Jones $35.00; Oswell Orie Oli-
ver $35.00; Gregg Oliver $35.00; Daisy Porter -
$35.00; Sanford Armstrong $35.00; Jimmy
Burke $860.00: Robert George Kinney $375.00;
Bessie Boyett $35.00; Ervin Forehand $861.00;
Christopher Layfield $35.00.
Commissioner Ray seconded the motion and
it passed with a unanimous vote.
ARPC Financial Assistance: Upon recom-
mendation by Attorney Moore, Commissioner Pe-
ters Imoved to request ARPC to assist Jean Arnold -
in finding financing sources for a business which
3 will benefit Gulf County. Commissioner Ray sec-
onded the motion and It passed with a unanimous
vote.
Resolution Impact Fee Legislation: Upon
recommendation by Attorney Moore, Commission-
er Ray moved to adopt a resolution supporting the
position of the Florida Association of Counties by
opposing legislation restricting or limiting local
government's use of Impact fees. Commissioner
Fortner seconded the motion and it passed with a
unanimous vote.
Resolution Dedication and Naming of
White City Bridge: Commissioner Creamer moved
to adopt a resolution recommending the dedication
and official naming of the new White City Bridge s
the James Wesley Sealey Bridge. Commissioner
Ray seconded the motion for discussion. Commis-
sioner Peters recommended getting Input from
SWhite City residents. Commissioner Ray withdrew
his motion. Commissioner Creamer withdrew his
motion. The Board asked Mike Hammond of Ham-
mond's Store to assist in obtaining a response
from the residents of White City.
County Planner Position: Chairman Tray-
lor asked the Board for a recommendation for the
position of County Planner. Commissioner Peters
moved to hire Ken Patton and If he declined to ac-
cept then offer the position to William McGee.
Commissioner Fortner seconded the motion for
discussion. The Board discussed the quality of the
five people Interviewed. After further discussion,
Chairman Traylor called for the vote. Commission-
er Fortner, Commissioner Ray, Commissioner
Creamer an Chairman Traylor voted no. Commisl-
soner Peters voted yes.
Commissioner Ray moved to hire Larry Witt
for the position advertised. Commissioner Former
seconded the motion. The motion failed with Com-
missioner Peters, Chairnran Traylor and Commis-
Sstoner Creamer voting no. Commissioner Fortner
and Ray vote dyes.
Commissioner Peters moved to hire William
McGee for the position advertised. Commissioner
Creamer seconded the motion and it passed with a
vote of 3 to 2 with Commissioner Fortner and
Chairman Traylor voting no.
Commissioner Fortner moved to pay Mr.
McGee a starting salary of $25,000 and to adjust
at the end of six months If he performs satisfactor-
ily. Commissioner Peters seconded the motion. Af-
ter discussion by the board. Commissioner Peters
withdrew the motion. After discussion by the
Board Commissioner Peters withdrew his second
and Commissioner Fortner withdrew his motion.
Commissioner Peters moved to pay Mr.
McGee a starting salary of $27,000.00 and review
after one year. Commissioner Ray seconded the
motion by. discussion. After discussion by the
Board, Commissioner Ray withdrew his second
and Commissioner Peters withdrew his motion.
Commissioner Peters moved to negotiate
with Mr. McGee on a salary. Commissioner Ray
seconded the motion. The motion passed with a
vote of 3 to 2 with Commissioner Fortner and
Chairman Traylor voting no.
Commissioner Fortner then moved that if
Mr. McGee did not accept the job as offered, Lhen
the job be offered to Mr. Larry Witt. Commissioner
Ray seconded the motion and It passed with a vote
of 3 to 2 with Commissioner Peters and Commis-
sioner Creamer voting no.
Chairman Traylor called a special meeting
on Thursday, October 24, 1991, at 5:30 pm., ET
to discuss the Solid Waste Funding Issue and the
County Planner's salary.
Union Negotiations: Commissioner Peters
inquired of the status of the Union Negotiations.
Admin. Asst. Wells reported that the Union Repre-
sentative did not have the revised contract pre-
pared at the last meeting. Admin. Asst Wells re-
ported that the committee is working on job
classifications at this point.
White City Water System Engineers:
Commissioner Peters asked County Planner Rish If
BDE had selected a site for the White City Water
Plant County Planner Rish informed Commission-
er Peters that BDE did recommend a sit but did
not Inform the County whether or not a permit
could be procured by the site. County Planner
Rish informed the Board that the property recom-
mended was owned by Joel and Deborah Martin.
Gulf County Work Crews: Commissioner
Peters moved to use Castledera Watts' work crew
in Districts 3, 4 and 5 and to use B.:,b Lesters
,,work crew in District I and 2. Commissioner Fort-
ner seconded the motion and. It passed with a
unanimous vote.
Cape San Blas Beach Access Grant: Com-
missioner Peters discussed a letter from Attorney
Moore Indicating the Board approved buying prop-
erty at Cape San Blas for Beach Driving Access
(this property was purchased with grant funds).
Attorney Moore stated the property was bought for
Beach Access. The Board assumed that it was for
Beach Driving Access, but never clarified this.
Commissioner Peters moved to follow through with
providing beach driving access on the property at
Cape San Bias recently purchased with grant
funds. Commissioner Ray seconded the motion
and it passed with a unanimous vote. I -'. '
Highland View Water System Water
Lines: Commissioner Creamer questioned County
Planner Rish and Building Inspector Butler about
the water lines in .Highland View. County Planner
Rish informed the Board that the road paving con-
tractor had a meeting with Building Inspector But-
ler and agreed to cut the line, shut off the water to
do the work and then the contractor would replace
Sthe line.
White City Bridge Lights: The Board re-
quested Attorney Moore write a letter to the De-
partment of Transportation requesting that they.
Install lights on the White City Bridge. Attorney
Moore stated he would be glad to write the letter,
but DOT normally requires a county to pay for
them to be installed and maintained.
Invoice Bill Powers: Upon motion by Com-
missioner Ray. second by Commissioner Peters
and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to pay In-
voices dated July 12, 1991 and August 6. 1I91.
from Bill Powers (attorney for Gulf County in the
Unfair Labor Practice Complaint) In the amount of
$2,550.65 from Professional Services out of the
General Fund.
Union Negotiation: Admin. Asst. Wlls
again reported to the Board on the status of the
Union Negotiations. Attorney Moore reiterated to
the Board that the Union Negotiations and the rep-
resentation by Bill Powers as the Attorney for the
Unfair Labor Practices Complaint are completely
separate issues.
Mosquito Control Equipment: Comnmis-
sioner Peters discussed the bid awarded to Thomp-
son Tractor Company. He stated that If the pro-
posed lease/purchase program was implemented
the County would pay over $20,000.00 in Interest
The Board discussed trying to acquire a lower In-
terest rate than the 7% Interest rate quoted by
Thompson Tractor Company, checking into other
financing and the possibility of paying a bigger
down payment as ways of reducing the Interest
amount. Chairman Traylor asked Clerk Lister to
meet with him to discuss these options. .
Purchase (Bid) Limit: Commissioner Ray
moved to raise the purchase (bid) limit to
$2,000.00. Commissioner Fortner seconded the
motion for discussion. Clerk Lister asked the
board for clarification on the bid rule. The Board
related that the purchase (bid) limit was a per pur-
chase amount The motion carried with a vote of 4
to 1 with Commissioner Peters voting no. Chief
Deputy Clerk Birmingham is to provide examples
of purchasing policies to the Board for considera-
tion.
Commercial Driver's License: Commission-
er Peters discussed with Mr. Wells if it would be
possible for an instructor/tester to come in and
test and training the County employees for the
new Commercial Driver's License exam. Chainnrman
Traylor asked Commissioner Peters, Admin. Asst
Wells and Commissioner Ray to check into this
matter further and report back to the Board.
Upon motion by Commissioner Fortner, and
there being no further business, the meeting did
then adjourn.
BILLY E. TRAYLOR, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: BENNY C. LISTER, CLERK
888ss
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OCTOBER 24, 1991
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners met this date in special session with the
following members present Chairman Billy E.
Traylor, Commissioners Al Ray, James E. Cream-
er, Nathan Peters Jr., and Charles Fortner.


Others present were: Admin. Asst/Civil De-
fense Director Larry Wells. Building Inspector Don
Butler, Deputy Clerk Renee Stripling. Clerk Benny
C. Lister and Attorney Robert M. Moore.
The meeting came to order at 5:40 p.m., ET.
County Planner Payroll: Attorney Moore
reported that a meeting was held on October 23,
1991 with William McGee. Attorney Moore stated
Mr. McGee was out of town today and unable to
attend this meeting. Commissioner Creamer re-
ported that after meeting with Mr. McGee. he was
very impressed with him. The Board discussed
what Mr. McGee's beginning salary should be.
Commissioner Peters moved to start William
McGee at a salary of $26,500.00 to be reviewed at
the end of six months. Motion died for lack of a
second.
Commissioner Ray moved to start William
McGee at a salary of $27,000.00 to be reviewed at
the end of six months. Commissioner Creamer sec-
onded the motion for discussion. Commissioner
Creamer asked If Mr. McGee turned down the sala-
ry of $27,000, would negotiations still be contin-
ued with him. After discussion, the motion failed
with a vote of 3 to 2 with Commissioners Creamer
and Ray voting yes.


Commissioner Fortner suggested meeting
with Mr. McGee and talking with him. The board
agreed. Chairman Traylor called a special meeting
for Monday. October 28. 1991, at 6:00 p.m. ET to
negotiate a salary with William McGee.
Solid Waste Consultants David M. Grif-
fith & Associates: Chairman Traylor asked for the
Board's feeling on whether or not to hire David M.
Griffith and Associates at a cost of not more than
$8,500.00 for phase one of the solid waste consult-
ing. Commissioner Peters recommended allowing
the new county planner to come up with ideas for
the solid waste funding problems first, then pro-
ceed with David M. Griffith and Associates if nec-
i essary. The Board discussed possibly forming a
committee of people from Wewahitchka and Port
ST. Joe to work as a committee with David M. Grif-
fith and Associates and then after phase one the
committee could proceed on their own. The Board
i discussed ways of funding the solid waste problem
such as special assessments and tipping fees. Mr.
"Bo" Williams stated he felt maybe David M. Grif-
fith and Associates could give the County a good
"jump start' and then the committee could go on
their own. Mr. Williams stated there would be a lot
of information that could be obtained from David
lX Griffith and Associates as they are experienced
in these matters. Attorney moore also informed the
Board that if they do decide to hire David M. Grif-
flth and Associates then they might need to bid
this item as It is over the bid limit Chairman Tray-
lor asked Admin. Asst. Wells to Investigate David
M. Griffith's work history and also to ask Eda
Ruth Taylor, Tax Collector, to come and give the
Board a report on special assessments at Mon-
days special meeting.
Upon motion by Commissioner Ray, second
by Commissioner Fortner. and there being no fur-
ther business, the meeting did then adjourn.
BILLY E. TRAYLOR. CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: BENNY C. LISTER, CLERK
SSSSSSgs
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OCTOBER 28. 1991
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners met this date in special session with the
following .members present, Chairman Billy E.
Traylor, Commissioners Charles S. Fortner, Na-
than Peters, Jr., Al Ray and James E. Creamer.
Others present were: Attorney Robert M.
Moore, Deputy Clerk Renee Stripling, Chief Deputy
Clerk Douglas C. Birmingham, Clerk Benny C. Us-
ter, Building Inspector Donald Butler, County
Planner/Solid Waste Coordinator Ralph Rish and
Admin. AssE/Civil Defense Director Larry Wells.
The meeting was called to order at 6:09 p.m.
ET.
Admin. Asst Wells opened the meeting with
rayer and Commissioner Ray led the Pledge of Al-
Mosquito Control Employee: Chairman
Traylor discussed with the Board some problems
that had been iincurred with Mosquito Control em-
ployee Sandy Hobbs. After lengthy discussion by
the Board, Chairman Traylor appointed County
Planner Rish to speak with Ms. Hobbs and report
to Vice-Chairman Ray on October 29, 1991.
Salinas Park: Upon motion by Commission-
er Fortner, second by Commissioner Ray and
unanimous vote, the Board agreed to pay L&W
Custom Builders' invoice dated October 22, 1991,
in the amount of $3,005.00 for additional footage
on the seaward end of each boardwalk at Salinas
Park. Building Inspector Butler reported that Sall-
nas Park would be 100 percent completed on Oct.-
ber 31, 1991. Commrssiloier Peters discussed a
place on one of the Gazebos here the step is too
hgh and also the ramps being very steep and
slick. Chairman Traylor asked Commissloner Ray
and Building Inspector Butler to get together on al-
levioung these problems.
Sign Salinas Park: Upon moiion by Com-
missioner Peters. second b) CommLssioner Former
and unanimous vote, the Board approved paying


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$1,030.00 for the bronze sign for Salinas Park con-
tingdnt upon Building Inspector -Butler approving
the sign.
Solid Waste: Chairman Traylor informed the
Board that he felt that by forming a good commit-
tee, the Solid Waste funding problem could be
solved by suing County employees and volunteers.
Upon motion by Commissioner Creamer, second
by Commissioner Ray and unanimous vote, the
Board approved supporting the Chairman's opin-
ion in forming a committee.
Admin. Asst. Wells gave a report on what he
discovered in his investigation of David M. Grlffith
and Associates.
After discussion by the Board on County
Planner Rish assisting County Planner McGee with
the new committee. Commissioner Ray moved to
keep County Planner Rish on regular payroll for
one extra week. Commissioner Fortner seconded
the motion and it passed with a unanimous vote.
Chairman Traylor recommended the solid
waste funding problem be a priority for all mem-
bers of the committee.
Chairman Traylor asked Ms. Taylor to speak
with the Board about special assessments. Ms.
Taylor stated to enact a special assessment, an in-
tent Resolution must be adopted and published
four times. Ms. Taylor reported a public hearing
must be held. Ms. Taylor discussed step by step
the procedures that must be followed to enact a
special assessment.
County Planner Salary: Upon motion by
Commissioner Ray, second by Commissioner Pe-
ters and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to
start Bill McGee at an annual salary of $26,500.00
effective October 29, 1991, with an evaluation af-
ter six months and if the Board is satisfied, that
his salary be increased to $28,000.00 annually
and again a salary and performance review after a
period of one year.
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, and
there being no further business, the meeting did
then adjourn.
BILLY E. TRAYLOR. CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: BENNY C. LISTER, CLERK
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
NOVEMBER 6, 1991
;The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners met this date in special session with the
following members present: Chairman Billy E.
Traylor, Commissioners Al Ray, James E. Cream-
er. Charles Fortner, and Nathan Peters Jr.
Others present were: Admin. AsstL/Ciil De-
fense Director Larry Wells, Attorney Robert M.
Moore, Deputy Clerk Renee Stripling, Chief Deputy
ClerkDouglas C. Birmingham, Clerk Benny C. Us-
ter, County Planner/Solid Waste Coordinator Bill
McGee, Building Inspector Donald Butler and for-
mer County Planner Ralph Rish.
The meeting was called to order at 5:40
p.m.. ET.
Admin. Asst Wells opened the meeting with
prayer, and Chairman Traylor led the Pledge of Al-
legiance to the flag
Road Paving Projects: The Board discussed
who would be handling the road inspections and
contract administration for the remaining road
paving projects in the County. Upon motion by
Commissioner Peters, second by Commissloenr
Fortner and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to
hire Ralph Rish and Robert Nations to do the road
inspections and contract administration on the re-
maining road paving projects.
Road Department Building: Upon motion
by Commissioner Fortner, second by Commission-
er Peters and unanimous vote, the Board approved
change order #1 on the new road department
building. This change order deducted four heaters
in the shop area, deducted the price of fill and site
grading., added the canoples and one 3" x T metal
personnel door and created a total Increase to the
cornact of $7.804 00.
Landfill Monitoring Wells: The Board dis-


IEADY MONTHLY DESKIWALL
DAR by KEITH CLARK
hwo one month per sheet, January through December, with full year
bottom. Holder has black vinyl corners and paper headband with eye-
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cussed an error made regarding the cost of the an-
alytical work and physical work to be done on the
monitoring wells by Savannah Labs. The error left
out some of the parameters to be tested. A quote
was received from Savannah Labs Increasing the
price from approximately $17,000 to $23.500. The
Board suggested accepting bids for better prices.
Attorney Moore stated this could be done on an
emergency basis as this was an ongoing project
Upon motion by Commissioner Ray, second by
Commissioner Creamer and unanimous vote, the "
Board agreed to get three telephone quotes and ac-
cept the best price.
County Planner. Chairman Traylor appoint-
ed Ralph Rish as primary representative and Bill
McGee as alternate representative to the ARPC
Technical Review Committee.
County Planner McGee distributed to the
Board a break down sheet listing the duties he as
County Planner and Building Inspector Butler
would be responsible for. The Board discussed the .
list of duties in detail.
Upon recommendation by County Planner
McGee, Chairman Traylor appointed Building In-
spector Butler as direct supervisor of Sandy Douds
as approximately 75% of her work is for the Build-
ing Department
Commissioner Peters asked Building Inspec-
tor Butler to contact the Rural Water Association
and make sure the rate study report on the
County's water systems would be here on Novem-
ber 12. 1991.
Solid Waste Management: County Planner
McGee gave a report to the Board on the studies
done by the Solid Waste Management Committee.
The Board discussed privatization, special assess-
ments, tipping fees, etc.
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, sec-
ond by Commissioner Fortner and there being no
further business, the meeting did then adjourn.
BILLY E. TRAYLOR, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: BENNY C. LISTER, CLERK



Bacterial Growth

Occurs at Low

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Cooking below 325 degrees F.
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To ensure that the turkey is
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insert a meat thermometer into
the thickest part of the thigh next
to the body but not touching the
bone. Cook until the thermometer
registers at least 180 degrees F.
The stuffing should reach 165
degrees F.


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I Phone 227-1278 FAX 227-7212 304-308 Williams Ave.


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We're Proud of Our Merchants Who Are Bringing You the


Each year one of theC h
season for young and
old alike is the annual
Christmas parade. We TAI
are proud of our
merchants who stage B O
this annual parade, and
of the various groups,
industries and
organizations which
participate. We're proud
of them ... and we're
proud of our hometown.



ROAST


ristmas I


arade


BULK RATE
POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahitchka, FL 32465


3LERITE QUALITY

INELESS


$


59


TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS
Chuck Steaks


.......... Lb.


IGA HOT OR MILD
Roll Sausage,
IGA
Meat Wieners


TABLERITE QUALITY
Red Rind Cheese....... Lb.


OL' SPRINGHILL
Corn Dogs


*.....EEEEEEEUUU Lb.


BREADED
Fish Sticks or Portions ... u.


99,

89,

$239


$119


TRAILBLAZER 40 LB. BAG .
HI PRO DOG RATION....... $9.49
TRAILBLAZER CHUNK OR RATION 40 LB. BAG_
Trailblazer Dog Food........7.99
BI-RITE 50*CT.
FOAM PLATES ................. 1.0 9
IGA STANDARD 25 FT. 2/99
ALUMINUM FOIL ............ 2/99
DUNCAN HINES 18.25 OZ.
CAKE MIXES ..................... 89o m
NATURE'S BEST 12 OZ.
SNACK CRACKERS .......... 79 o C
PINK BEAUTY 14.75 OZ.
PINK SALMON ............... 1.79'


STAR KIST PACKED IN WATER OR OIL 6.125 OZ.
CHUNK LIGHT TUNA ........... 590
MANCO 12 OZ.
CORNED BEEF ............ 1 .49
ARMOUR PRE-PRICED AT 99$ 15 OZ.
CHILI WITH BEANS .............. 899
KRAFT 7.25 OZ.
MAC. & CHEESE .............. 2/99
3 LB. BAG
PERFECTION RICE ............. 890
SUMMERTIME 64 OZ.
APPLE JUICE BLEND .......... 990
LIBERTY GOLD CHUNK, SLICED, OR CRUSHED 20 OZ.
PINEAPPLE ....................... 69
IGA 15 OZ. 3/
TOMATO SAUCE ............. 3/999
IGA SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY 18 OZ.
PEANUT BUTTER ........... 1,49
BAMA 2 LB. JAR
GRAPE JELLY ..................... 99
NATURE'S BEST 18 OZ.
CORN FLAKES .................... 990
BI-RITE 100 CT.
TAGLESS TEA BAGS ........... 79o


I. 111104 TM


AIGA 52% MARGARINE 3 LB. TUB
SPREAD CROCK .


1 BUTTER-ME-NOT 10 CT.
i MERICO
IBISCUITS ....... 59


I OENODS


IGA 12 OZ. JU
ORANGE JUICE ....


. .


BRIGHT N EARLY ORANGE 64 OZ.
Breakfast
DRINK ...........


99*


'ORE IDA 2 LB. BAG
FRENCH
FRIES ..


IUE EU EUEU EU E


.9


RUSSET
POTATOES
10 POUND BAG


$


49


VINE-R~~~IPNDTAPK
TOMATOES:~ i. m 3hB 490


BLACK RIBIER
Grapes


lb.


ZIPPERSKIN
Tangerines ............. dozen
HAMLIN
Oranges .............. 5 lb. bag
WHITE
Grapefruit ............ 5 lb. bag
FRESH
Broccoli ................. bunch
YELLOW
Onions ................. 3 lb. bag
LARGE
Green Pepper ........... 4 for
GREEN
Cabbage .................3 Ibs.
ICEBERG
Lettuce ................... head


IGA
$179 Sliced Bacon ..........M12oz. 99
$1 89 IG $49
Cooked Ham ......... 0oz.2


BIRDSEYE 8 OZ.
59 COOL 11
W HIP .............. ...


I


991
$j49

$S99
999

99,
990
990

690


David Rich's
FOODLINERS ...
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.
lin l* &


RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


mmmmd


......... .. w..

OZ.

12 oz.





T3Z53A(7UCTrm


AL AAL A


New


*I Thw.u irs. Dec, 5t,INf1rom3 o 6 p Eau m tandard TPJII ime-uAndiYou're .r it i& w eu


Our New Port St. Joe Office, 501 Fifth Street

We're celebrating the opening of our new Port St. Joe
branch office building.
And we're inviting everyone to join us!
Come, have some refreshments and meet our Port St. Joe
staff the friendliest bunch you'll ever get to know!
Thursday, December 5th from 3 to 6 pm. Hope to see you
there!




TYNDALL FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION
501 Fifth St., Port St. Joe, (904) 227-7500 / Also Panama City, Parker & Tyndall AFB


.N UACUAa-y


P


THE TAR.POR ST.JOE.FL THUSDAY DE. 5.199


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