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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02917
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 31, 1991
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02917

Full Text









ALBER1TILLE AL


! USPS 518-880

FIFTY-FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 9


I HE
JLHE


STAR


INDUSTRY -DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1991


33 Per Copy
Plus 2 Tax ...


Look for Even More



Taxes In the Future

Belin Says State Growth and Environment Needs
Will Require Drastic Hikes In Additional Income


J. C. Belin said Florida's future is going wanis Club Tuesday. He
to take more taxes, as he spoke to the Ki- to sales tax exemptions.


predicted an end


Self Defense Claimed In Trial

Defendant Claims Beatings by Victim Frightened Her


The State of Florida is at-
tempting to prove a second de-
gree murder charge against
Elaine Addison this week, in Gulf
County's second murder trial this
year. Addison is attempting to
prove that the shot which killed
her estranged husband, Curtis
Addison, was fired accidentally,
as she used a .357 magnum pis-
tol to scare the victim from her
* home after an argument, in:
which sworn testimony said, she
had been struck by the victim.
The trial in which Elaine Ad-
dison, a corrections officer for the
Gulf County Sheriffs Department
is charged with the killing, is ex-
pected to go to the jury today af-
ter two and a half days of taking
testimony in the matter.
Tuesday, attorney Paul Kom-
arak, Addison's attorney, said the
defendant was beaten and threat-


ened by her estranged husband
on several occasions. In Tues-
day's testimony, Addison's
daughters said that just prior to
the shooting, their father had
argued with their mother, striking
her in her home at 239 Avenue D.
The defendant testified that
she secured the gun after she
had been struck by her husband,
and used it to drive him from her
home. During the emotion
charged interchange between the
two, she testified that the gun
went off, striking Addison in the
back, but that she doesn't re-
member the shooting.
The medical examiner said
the bullet entered the lower back,
severed the spinal column and
lodged in Addison's abdominal
cavity.
"I just wanted to scare him,"


Elaine Addison said.
All through the defense testi-
mony Tuesday, Komarak used
the theme that Elaine Addison
was abused and frightened. He
brought out that she had secured
restraining orders against her
husband in the past because of
the violence of their meetings.
Prosecutor, Fred Witten was
expected to make his case against
Addison Wednesday, in which the
State of Florida is pursuing the
second degree conviction.
Witten was expected to com-
plete his questioning of witnesses
by Wednesday evening, with sum-
mation scheduled for this morn-
ing [Thursday] after which the
case will be placed in the hands
of the jury for a decision.
Circuit Judge Dedee Costello
is presiding over the trial.


J. C. Belin, Chairman of the Executive
Committee of St. Joe Paper Company, and a
67-year resident of Port St. Joe, told the Port
St. Joe Kiwanis Club Tuesday that Florida will
have a population of 16 million people by the
turn of the century and will need a tax base
which produces considerably more money than
the current system does.
Belin, the only member of the state's Tax
and Budget Reform Commission residing west
of the Apalachicola River, said the committee
would be presenting several suggestions to
Governor Lawton Chiles and the Cabinet in a
short while.
The committee has been active for some 20
months, and, as Belin pointed out, none of
them were named by current elected officials to
Florida office. 'We were named by former Gov-
ernor Bob Martinez and his group. Now, they
are out of office and we're probably not the fa-
vorite people of the current administration."
Still, the committee, made up of business-
men and leaders from throughout the state are
working on a plan to make Florida's tax struc-
ture more productive as well as more equitable.
Belin commented on the complexity of the
task before the committee by quipping, 'We
may find a cure for AIDS, but not for our
spreading bureaucracy." The speaker said he
was one of very few on the committee who was
not an attorney or connected with bureaucra-
cy.
HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT
The St. Joe Paper Company executive said
the reason for a growing unemployment rate in
Florida is because Florida has decided to dis-
courage smokestacks. 'We are encouraging a
:service economy these days, in the interest of
environmental protection," he said. He pointed
out that the largest percentage of the unem-
ployed all over the nation is made up of service
industry workers. '"You see bank presidents
and engineers walking the streets every day,"
he pointed out.
Belin predicted that the unemployment rate
would remain high for Florida as long as the
emphasis, on a service economy remained.


Belin said that 30 of the 50 states in the
nation were in financial trouble-including
Florida. The largest problems with Florida's
budget are in the areas of education and social
services. 'These two areas of state government
require from 70 to 75 percent of the state bud-
get," he said, pointing out that these were the
only places where significant reductions could
be made.
SOMETHING TO LOOK FOR
In short statements on what to look for in
the future, the speaker said Florida could look
for continued growth in population, predicting
the 16 million people by the year 2000. 'This
will require an overhaul of our tax system," he
said.
-He suggested possibly two constitutional
amendments would be placed on next year's
ballot. One would remove the homestead ex-
emption as it now stands, tax 50% of the first
$50,000 in valuation, and apply the regular
taxing schedule to all value over and above
$50,000. He said a question concerning state
income tax may be on the ballot, but said he
and four others can kill the matter. He didn't
say there were four others who would vote with
him in the matter. 'There's a lot of liberals on
that committee," he remarked.
He predicted that many or most of the sales
tax exemptions would be removed. "Basic
needs seem safe at the present time," he said.
He suggested the state become concerned
about privatization of government services. 'We
also need home rule. Let the counties, cities
and school boards operate their own business,"
he recommended. He even suggested that each
county set its own mill limits. The speaker also
suggested that the-state fund the entire-judicial
system.
In closing, Belin said, 'We need to be con-
cerned over the environment, but presently
over-concern is hurting us. We need to be con-
cerned about our economic situation, but we're
not going to suffer too much from cutbacks and
economies."
In essence the speaker said, the future is
going to be to tough, but with the proper steps
Florida can handle it.


Trick or


Treat
Hallowe'en will be different for the kids in Po~t. Jo t is
year. Members of the Port St. Joe Elementary School PTA and
the Port St. Joe Retail Merchants have pooled their resoui ces
and their efforts to provide the children a night out in an e ivi-
ronment which will provide for a maximum of safety.
Port St. Joe Police and the Gulf County Sheriffs Departn ent
have long been nervous about the prospect of hundreds of small
children walking the streets, trick or treating, after dark. 'It's
just inviting one of them to get hurt," Port St. Joe Police Chief,
Carl Richter said.
This year will be different. A night out, including a trick or
treat foray will be provided under controlled conditions. The ac-
tivity, which will begin this evening at 6:00, will give the chil en
an opportunity to parade downtown in their Hallowe'en os-
tumes, participate in a carnival atmosphere at the intersec on
of Fifth Street and Reid Avenue and to take a tour throu a
haunted house, which has been placed in the Fire Station by the
PTA parents.
The carnival operation will provide games, snow cones md
other goodie treats, as well as a maze and the haunted house .
In addition, merchants will be providing treats in front of var-
ious locations on Reid Avenue during the evening. All automo-
tive traffic will be cleared from the street, to allow the child n to
do their thing without the danger from passing automobiles.
Merchants from all over the city are moving their treat cen-
ters to Reid Avenue tonight for the special activities.
GATHER FOR PARADE AT 5:45
In preparation for the big Hallowe en parade, the children are
asked to gather at 5:45 in front of the Apalachicola Nort-iern
Railroad Company office building. They will also be given free
tickets to participate in the carnival booths, the maze and the
haunted house. I
Participating in the Trick or Treat activities on Reid Av ue
will be Dr. Tim Nelson, Linda's Restaurant, Hardee's, Cosin's
Department Store, Re-Sale Connection, Badcock Furniture,
Hedy's Florist, Sears, The Petal Shoppe, Hannon Insurance, C iti-
zens' Federal, Rich's IGA, Ard's Florist, Sand Dollar Restaurant,
Ready Arts and Crafts, Athletic House, Video World, Flor da
Power, Gulf Cable TV, Helig-Myers, St. Joe Furniture, The Sar,
Costin & Costin, Sure Shot Pest Control, Saveway, St. Joe ?a-
permakers, Photo World, JTPA, J. Patrick's Restaurant, Kilxk's
Ice, Barfield Lawn and Garden Center and Cowboy's Tradition
Game booths are being operated by Apalachicola Northern
Railroad, St. Joseph Telephone and Telegraph, Piggly Wiggly,
Wewahitchka State Bank, First Union Bank and Tyndall Federal
Credit Union.
Donations to the activities were made by the Merchant's As-
sociation, St. Joe Container, WMTO Radio, Aline's Beauty S ion
and Consolidated Electric.
BeuI ~


Gulf County Commissioner, Al Ray, new anti-littering signs at Port St. Joe's
Special Projects director, Ralph Rish and boat basin at the west end of Fifth Street
Mayor Frank Pate place one of about 36 early this week.


Don't Even Think It!


Gulf County's anti-pollution activities
took on another educational process early
this week, as projects director, Ralph Rish
took delivery on 36 anti-litter signs to be
erected at gathering spots throughout the
county.
The signs were paid for with one of sever-
al state grants the county has been able to
secure to help with the considerable expense
of getting into recycling and mounting an ed-
ucational campaign against littering and for
the recycling operation.
The new signs were delivered this week
and the unit erected at the Fifth Street boat
basin here in Port St. Joe, was the first to be
erected. Rish said the signs will be placed


throughout the county in locations where an
accumulation of trash and garbage has his-
torically proven to be a problem.
"I'm real pleased with the way these signs
turned out. They won't clutter up the places
where they are put in order to discourage lit-
tering," Rish said.
The signs are made of wood, with the let-
tering sand-blasted on the face to give them
a permanent message. They are painted a
two-tone blue, with the lettering light blue
and the sign and post a darker blue.
Rish, who has resigned his position to
open an engineering office, said, 'This will be
my last project, but it's one I'm proud of. I
think it will be real effective in helping to
control litter throughout the county."


County

Hires New

Director

Meeting in a special session
Monday afternoon, the Gulf
County Commission took care of
some unfinished business, left
hanging after their regular ses-
sion last Tuesday.
Three important matters were
left pending, with decisions to be
made over the hiring of a new
special projects director to take
over the position being vacated by
Ralph Rish at the end of this
week. Another final decision was
made on awarding a construction
bid to build a new Road Depart-
ment equipment barn and repair
shop in Wewahitchka and to
make a decision on what to do
with a consultant firm's offer on
providing guidance on dealing
with the problems with the grow-
ing expense of solid waste opera-
tions.
McGEE HIRED
William McGee of Indian Pass
agreed to requirements set down
by the Commission in a confer-
ence Monday, and was hired as
the county's second projects di-
rector.
McGee will assume the duties
formerly filled by Ralph Rish, who
has been with the county for two
years, directing such operations
as getting into an approved recy-
cling program, as mandated by
the State of Florida; dealing with
the solid waste disposal arrange-
ments; serving as a liaison with
the state concerning such mat-
ters as seeing that proper proce-
dures are followed in closing the
county's two former landfill oper-
ations, operating monitoring wells
placed on the old landfill sites
and many other growing respon-
sibilities connected with following
state guidelines for proper solid
(See HIRES on Page 3)


35"


I


-'. !1". -.am












THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1991


Cut What?
Things are in a dither over in Tallahassee these days. With
the Governor and the Cabinet trying to reduce expenditures to
match income, there are all kinds of special interest groups
sniping from the sidelines, making a hard job harder.
We don't know what there is about the nature of cutting ex-
penditures which makes it a much harder task than increasing
expenditures. Whatever it is though, it is present and active in
Tallahassee.
Some of the pressure groups are losing credibility with the
public, it seems to us, with their demands, going to court, politi-
cal maneuvering, cutting deals and generally manipulating
things in order to keep their favorite activity funded as planned
back when we had an adequate income.
The public school lobby-with Betty Castor at the forefront-
has done the public school system far more damage with the
people than they have earned sympathies. Betty has been crying
crocodile tears about how education should be exempt from any
thoughts of cutting expenditures. The lobby group has turned
on the dire prediction machine about how much damage cutting
education dollars will do. If cutting of expenses has to be done, it
should be somewhere-anywhere-but education.
Of course, HRS has another thought to add to that idea. That
agency has been a prime target of cuts, also, and they are just
as insistent as the education people that the state will once
again sink under the ocean in a tide of malaria, encephalitis, yel-
low fever, small pox, etc., while fighting off a cloud of mosqui-
toes, if their budget is cut. They feel that cutting the education
budget rather than that of HRS is the safest thing to do.
When all the while, the ruling of DER, banning use of any ef-
fective insect spray, requiring retention ponds be built to catch
run-off water, allowing and encouraging prime mosquito breed-
ing sites and some of their other bureaucratic rules will probably
cause us more discomfort that any cut of a budget.
The law enforcement people of the state feel that their budget
cuts will result in run-away crime throughout the state. As if it
wasn't running away already
Let's not cut funds from law enforcement. Take it from some-
where else.
So, what is left to cut? Roads? Dog fly spraying? Governor's
salaries? Legislator's salaries?
Now, you're meddling.
This situation is why you read so much about tax increases.
We can't reduce expenditures anywhere, so we consider raising
taxes to compound our financial problems even more.


Facing Reality

At last, the Gulf County Commission is beginning to stare re-
ality down and come to grips with the fact that there is a need to
require citizens other than a handful of ad valorem tax payers to
pay for some of the services which are required of every individu-
al of the County.
You see, it isn't a matter of choice, any longer, whether or
not you wish to have your solid waste collected by a collection
specialist and properly disposed of. If it were still a matter of
choice, we could all do like we did 10 to 20 years ago. We could
all sit a 55-gallon barrel out in the back yard and pour our com-
bistible waste inside, set it on fire, and burn it up. In the mean-
time, the table scraps could be fed to the pig or chickens out by
the back fence and whatever was left over could be discretely
placed in an out-of-the-way place where it couldn't readily be
seen.
We could handle our waste problem.
Things aren't that way any longer. The vast majority of our
nation's citizens said we should quit burning trash in the back
yard, stop keeping hogs or chickens in heavily populated areas
and quit messing up the green vistas of our countryside with old
refrigerators, rusting cars, old tires and trash we can't bum or
the pigs won't eat.
We said our solid waste should be disposed of so as not to be
a health hazard to anyone; not just ad valorem tax payers, but
to everyone.
Now, we're talking big bucks If we place all our solid waste
in a place where it is a nuisance to NOBODY, then we all have a
stake in it. Which means to us, that we all should pay for the
privilege of not seeing, smelling or being associated in any man-
ner with the solid waste of the world.
We feel the County Commission has pussy-footed around
with this question long enough. We're glad to see them face up
to the problem. Now, we hope they carry it a step further and try
to arrive at a final plan which will cost all of us a minimum
amount of money, even if it means changing some of the things
we now do.


This is getting si
me. It's the editors ag
think. It was their p
don't say. Too much.
subjects I choose. To g
week. But they can r
work themselves into a
how I say it You kno
mean? It's run on sen
time. They say. Street
Use some conjunction
flow. Write like you a
gent. Whether you a
Most of all. Make y
Readable. Readable? L
you ever read anythir
by an editor? I rest My
Well, I aim to p
promised that I woul
my run on sentences a
try to write like they


to so I could stay in their paper
I Kesley 'cause, they said that they would
Give me one more chance but if I
Colbert couldn't get better with my shortL
choppy sentences they would
take my pencil away and put me
serious. For back to folding those inserts each
gain. You'd week and I needed to understand
aperr. They that it was their paper and be-
About what cause of that I'm suppose to take
;o into each my time and think about what
manage. To I'm saying and try to be coherent
tizzy. Over and make a neat story with a
ow. What I bang of a beginning and a little
itences this descriptive stuff there in the mid-
tch it out. dle and a quick wrap up at the
ins. Let it end, haw, little do they know, I
are. Intelli- Just dash my insignificant blurbs
ire or not off each week with little or no
rour story. thought. I mean it would be em-
isten. Have barrassing with my stories if
ng. Written someone actually thought that I
case. spent any time on them
A- an


)elase so i
d work on
and I would
wanted me


And I guess that is why the
editors are on me near 'bout eve-
ry week concerning something I'm


not doing. like they say my sto-
ries are too wordy, that I am not
concise, that It takes me too long
to get to the point, well. I disagree
I can get to the point and finish if
I feel that I have told it all but I
am not going to skimp on words if
I haven't got it all down just right
but to tell me that I run on and
on saying very little I think is un-
fair 'cause some stories just natu-
rally take more time to tell and
that in itself will make your sto-
ries stretch out a mite and I have
promised myself that I will finish
no story before its time,
I reckon it's this hurry up
world we live in, we've got drive
through hamburger places, in-
stant oatmeal, 24-hour bank tell-
ers, microwavable lasagna and
two-minute offenses, nobody
wants to wait on nothing no more
and that includes newspaper edi-
tors, they must'a all graduated
from M.I.T. or some place like


that. I have explained to them
that I didn't graduate from no-
where but I've heard Mr. Joe Hen-
ry Latham stand on the front
porch of Mr. Woodrow Kennon's
Drygoods, Mercantile and Gro-
cery Store and tell great stories
all day long and the more he
"went on" about whatever yarn he
was a'spinning the more I realized
that the "story" wasn't so much in
how it ended but in the way Mr.
Joe Henry worked it up to the fin-
ish, you know what I mean, Gone
With the Wind wouldn't 'a been
much if it had started with those
red headed twins sitting out on
the front steps and then immedi-
ately gone to the part where Rhett
tells the skinny girl that he
doesn't care what she does and
walks out into the smoke,
'course I've got to be com-
pletely honest here, the editors
have tried to help me, they said it
(See KES on Page 3)


o"(







.... 2 X ..
.


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Fi 2

**~ .~ ~coal


The Little Devils and Goblins Will Be Out Tonight


TRICK OR TREAT and all
that good stuff.
Tonight is the night the devils
and demons travel forth, looking
for some devilment to perform, or
some delicious treats to collect.
All the little kids get to be in-
volved in the once-a-year adven-
ture of roaming around after
dark, with the grown folks stand-
ing aside at a respectable dis-
tance while they ply their trade.
I don't live on a particularly
much traveled street in town, but
for about an hour or so, just after
dark tonight, the street will look
like a country downtown on a
Saturday night.
There will be a steady stream
of young goblins at the front door,
shrilling, 'Trick or Treati" We
don't get many of the "profession-
als" down on our street By "pro-
fessionals", I mean those bigger
kids who are out roaming the
town, taking advantage of the
unique celebration to fill a bag
with candy and other sweets.


f -


Etaoin Shrdlu


By Wesley Ramsey


THE HAUNTED HOUSE in
downtown Port St. Joe this eve-
ning is designed to take the place
of some of this nocturnal roaming
by the little ghouls, but I imagine
that tonight will be a double fea-
ture for a great number of kids.
Those of you who are under
40 years of age probably don't re-
member back when you could go
to the picture show [movies, to
you young whipper-snappers]
and see two feature movies, plus
a cartoon and a multi-part serial.
The serial served the same pur-
pose as today's soap operas on
television. They were designed to
keep you interested in coming


back, Saturday after Saturday, in-
order to see what was going to
happen next.
The kids will get a double fea-
ture tonight. They won't see the
serial, nor the cartoon, but they
will be involved in two feature at-
tractions which will keep them in-
volved in pleasurable activities for
a couple of hours.

I'VE TOLD YOU before about
the Hallowe'en celebrations when
I was a small boy, so I won't get
into that one again. Suffice it to
say, they were considerably differ-
ent then than they are now.


Kids then were hoping they
wouldn't be 'treated' because they
were more interested in 'tricking'.
Actually, the reason they were
out roaming around was to per-
form tricks. Most of them didn't
give their victims the opportunity
to buy off disaster by furnishing
treats.
Back in those days, kids
didn't need a costume to make
them look like little devils. Their
actions made one refer to them as
such, without the costume.
I remember one man who
lived down at the end of the
street, who had his peach tree
raided every year about the time
the fruit got ripe. He referred to
all us kids on the block as 'little
devils' all year round. We didn't
have to wait for Hallowe'en to get
the identification.
He thought the kids were
made for Hallowe'en; not Hal-
lowe'en for the kids.
I REMEMBER Hallowe'en of
last year. At our house, we had a


momma and a poppa come to our
house, all dressed up like pump-
kins and pigs, under the guise of
escorting their kids on a 'trick or
treat' foray. I'm sort of expecting
them to come back again this
year and if they do, I'm toying
with the idea of turning my hog
dog loose on them.
I didn't have the heart to last
year, because they seemed to be
having as much fun, out on their
adventure, as the kids were.
And, speaking of dogs, Hal-
lowe'en is fun for everyone in the
family, except the dogs. They
have problems with all those
spooks, ghosts, and screaming
banshees dashing up on the
porch, with their flashlights or
jack-o-lanterns shining, and
screaming out the time-honored
phrase, 'Trick or Treati"
The two poodles who live at
our house, are the nervous sort,
who bark at pine cones falling on
the roof; who bark at the cats
walking by the back door, who
bark at birds singing in the lo-


quat tree beside the back door;
who bark at other dogs barking,
half-way across town ....
I think the only reason our
dogs might actually like Hal-
lowe'en is that they have still an-
other excuse to barkl

I'M GOING TO HAVE the
treats handy tonight for those lit-
tle goblins who come by and
brave the water sprinklers going
in the front yard, the poison ivy
hanging from the porch eaves,
the black snake lying in the
planter beside the front door, or
the two miniature "attack" poo-
dles who will bark from the time
they cross the edge of the yard
until they are safely over in the
neighbor's territory.
You brave all this, kids, and
you will receive a morsel from a
selection of candies, fruits and
other goodies.
That is, so long as you don't
disturb my pre-going-to-bed, after
supper nap.


St. Joseph Bay Tide Table
Date Time HL Time HL
9:36 p.m. H 1.0
Nov. 02 3:15 a.m. L .7 8:00 a.m. H .9
12:00 p.m. L .7 8:24 p.m. H 1.2
Nov. 03 5:05 a.m. L .5 8:18 p.m. H 1.4
Nov. 04 6:03 a.m. L .2 8:40 p.m. H 1.6
Nov. 05 6:53 a.m. L .0 9:12 p.m. H 1.8
Nov. 06 7:38 a.m. L -.1 9:49 p.m. H 1.9
- "----'- Nov. 07 8:27 a.m. L -.2 -10:26 p.m. H 1.9j


Hunker Down with Kes


I Have Never Ended A Sentence

With A Preposition That I Know Of


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County---10.60 Six Months
OW USPHS 518880 Out of County-$21.20 Year Out of County--15.90 Six Months
Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue The Star
Port Joe Florida 3245-008 Post Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 their than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey........... Editor & Publisher
A. ,^" William H. Ramsey........... Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
FWSP' Frenchie L. Ramsey ...... Office Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ............. Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Ll L W5A hL
-Liz 12)j












Shad

i .Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


The Game of Baseball
Baseball season is finally over, thank goodness. I hate that
the Braves lost the World Series, but they did well and everyone
should be proud of them.
I am not a baseball fan. Little League was as far as my base-
ball career went. It was then that I discovered football, a game
that is a little more fast-moving and exciting than baseball.
Although I never watch a baseball game during the regular
season, I always try to catch the World Series. A game or two at
least. This year I caught all of the games in the series except one,
but I never saw the end of any of them. Baseball games on TV
put me to sleep.
It was refreshing, though, the times I did watch, to see all the
fans doing all the crazy things they do, the players going through
their usual unusual motions and it's always great to see the um-
pire call an important strike.
Baseball is a great game, but have you noticed that the kids
who go to games almost never watch the game. Those who do
.usually have a glove on, waiting to catch a foul ball or a home
run ball, if they are in position.
Speaking of foul balls, have you noticed that they never try to
retrieve a foul or home run ball? When I was playing little league
they would chase a person 10 miles to get the ball back. We usu-
ally carried only two or three and they cost a lot of money in
those days.
Another thing I noticed while watching the World Series this
year is that many of the players still don't know that they are on
television. Surely they don't or they wouldn't do some of the
things they do. If they must do some of the things they do, like
adjusting parts of their bodies. I think they should have a signal,
like holding up one finger, so the television cameras could focus
on something or someone else. Also, some of them chewv tobacco
and gum sometimes you can't tell which and they don't
make any bones about it
Seeing the outfielders reminded me of my little league days. I
used to stand out there and wonder if the next ball would come
to me; hoping it would and wouldn't at the same time. If it did,
would I catch it? If it didn't, I wondered what Joyce would be do-
ing tonight Minds tend to wander if not fully engaged.
I don't remember seeing an abundance of hot dog and drink
vendors in the stands during the games. Were they there and I
didn't see them or have they stopped this service at baseball
games, too? I thought all the people up North had to have several
glasses of beer just to get through a baseball game.
I couldn't help but notice that the baseball fans are just
about as crazy as some of the football fans. Some of them are.
Did ~you see the way some of them dressed and the way they
painted their bodies. I saw one man who had cut his hair, took
off his shirt and painted his body to the waist and had a hatchet
in his hand. He made Tonto look like a Sunday School teacher.
I'll bet he had a bad head the next morning and was out of a job
if his boss saw him.
You see, I know plenty about baseball, even though I don't
watch it a lot. I still wish the Atlanta Braves had beaten the Min-
nesota Vikings that last game


Hires
waste handling practices.
Rish also was responsible for
securing and properly expending
* the county's state funds received
for solid waste disposal and recy-
cling. The County got into the re-
cycling program required by the
state, after Rish was hired.
It will now be McGee's re-
sponsibility to keep the county in
compliance with state mandates
in these two important and sensi-
tive matters.
NEW BUILDING
The county's Road Depart-
ment headquarters building in
Wewahitchka has been in a bad
state of repair for some time. Hur-
ricane Kate almost finished off
the old building in 1985, but a
patch job put it back into use.
Recently, insurance companies
have refused to write policies on
the building, so it is now being re-
placed with a steel building, con-
taining four bays for making re-
pairs and space for an office for
the director of the Department.
Fisher Construction Compa-
ny of Wewahitchka was the low
bidder of three prospective firms
for the job. Fisher bid $101,196
to construct the steel building.
CONSULTANTS
With costs for collecting and
disposing of solid wastes becom-
ing too large for the county's tax
base to bear, a consulting firm
* had offered to make suggestions
as to how the Commission might
handle this sizeable item as a
user fee service at last week's
meeting.
David M. Griffith Associates


From Page 1
had offered to provide an in-
depth study of the problem and
some possible solutions to the
Commission for a fee not to ex-
ceed $8,500. On a suggestion by
Commissioner Al Ray, a decision
on Griffith's offer was delayed un-
til the Commissioners could think
aboutthe proposal for a few days.
Monday afternoon, the Board
decided to study the offer even
further, and appointed an in-
house committee made up of new
projects director, William McGee,
Administrative Assistant, Larry
Wells and former special projects
director, Ralph Rish to consider
all aspects of the offer and deter-
mine just what usable informa-
tion the county would receive for
its fee.


Energy Audit
Free energy audits are now
available to small businesses in
18 North Florida counties
through a new program at Florida
State University.
The program, administered
through the FSU Small Business
Development Center, designed to
help small businesses conserve
energy costs; At no charge, a spe-
cialist will visit a business, ana-
lyze existing energy costs and rec-
ommend ways to conserve
electricity, gas and fuel oil that
can burn into profits.
The new energy program at
FSU is funded by the Governor's
Energy Office.


r -
Listing highlights from our large, fast moving inventory!
BLUEWATER TOWNHOUSES


HWY. 98 & 28th STREET
MEXICO BEACH
Modem 2 bedroom, 11/2 baths, fur-
nished or unfurnished, decks & pati-
os. Low down payment and assume.
Priced inthe $50's. Beachside.



32nd Street
MEXICO BEACH
"Adventure" Townhouse Nice 2 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath in very good condi-
tion with Gulf view. Good rental poten-
tial. $65,000. Beachside



4 ERA PARKER
REALTY
904-648-5777
Cathey Hobbs 648-5653, Debbie McFarland 648-5421 after hours
I'.-


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY. OCT. 31. 1991 PAG 3SA






Florida Sportsmen Can Now



Buy License Good for Lifetime


Forever more...that's like a
hundred zillion-skillin-katillion
years. And even if you live to be
that old, you still won't every
have to buy another Florida hunt-
ing or fishing license...if you get
one of the state's new lifetime li-
censes that is.
For the past couple of years
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission has studied the con-
cept of lifetime licenses, checked
with other states, consulted with
financial wizards and hammered
out all the details. Now the agen-
cy is ready to lay the new licenses
on the line.
"Lifetime licenses will go on
sale December I," said Susan
Wood, who heads the Commis-
sion's license section. "Prices
range from $125 for a lifetime
fishing license for a four-year-old
child to $1,000 for a lifetime
sportsman's license for an adult."
Five-year hunting and fishing
licenses also go on sale December
1. They will cost between $60 and
$270.
The sportsman's lifetime li-
cense is a bargain for people 64
years old only $12. It's cheaper
than the annual hunting license
($11) and the same as a fishing li-
cense ($12).
Although 65-year-olds are en-
titled to exemption certification
for most licenses and permits,
Ms. Wood said they may choose


Open House at
St Vincent Refuge
Project leader Donald J. Ko-
sin announces an open house is
scheduled for November 2 at the
Refuge's Visitor Center. It is in
conjunction with the Florida Sea-
food Festival that is held in Apa-
lachicola the first weekend in No-
vember. The Visitor Center is
located in the John B. Meyer Har-
bor Master Building at Scipio
Creek Mooring Basin, 479 Market
Street, Apalachicola. The public
is encouraged to attend.
The Visitor Center features
educational/interpretive exhibits
on St. Vincent Island, the Apa-
lachicola Bay and River System
and the area's marine resources.
A variety of exhibits can be
viewed including natural history
dioramas, interactive displays,
wall and three-dimensional maps,
interpretive panels and an aquar-
ium. The Center will be open to
the public Saturday from 1:00 to
5:00 p.m.


Kes
(From Page 2)
was all right to use a little ono-
matopoeia from time to time if it
fit the story but to stay away from
those split infinitives and dan-
gling participles and to watch my
syntax I don't have to worry
about those infinitives, I haven't
ever done a story on outer space,
it's too warm down here for parti-
ciples and I reckon they'll tax
anything these days,
boys, I tell you this writing
game is tough, here I am practic-
ing on eliminating my run on sen-
tences and they have buzzed me
with this onomatopoeia thing, I
don't have a clue but I think one
of Uncle Clifford's horses came
down with that once, and near
about died, the Doc said it was a
very rare disease usually found
only in M.I.T. graduates.
Respectfully,
Kes



*"Let me
analyze your
insurance needs
with a free
Family Insurance
Checkup. 9


CALL ME.
BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avenue
(Across from St. Joe Hardware)
Office: 229-6514
State Farm
Insurance Companic:,
Home Offices: Bloomington. Illinois


-.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there


to purchase a lifetime license to
help promote conservation. Ms.
Wood said people who are 65 or
older and have not already. ob-
tained exemption certificates can
purchase lifetime licenses as a
way of helping out the resource
and ensuring that the wildlife
they love and appreciate will be
here for future generations to en-
joy.
"Revenue from the sale of ex-
tended licenses will be deposited
into trust accounts," Ms. Wood


said. 'We will be able to spend
the interest from these accounts
to 'fund our programs, but it
would be illegal for us to touch
the principal."
The system was setup this
way to earn Florida a greater
share of federal wildlife restora-
tion funds (such as Dingell-
Johnson). Each state's share is
determined in part by the num-
ber of licenses sold. An annual li-
cense counts for one year only,


DCA After Money for


Affordable
The state Department of
Community Affairs (DCA) has
been coordinating the work of a
new plan expected to provide an
additional $65 million in federal
money administered by the state
to provide affordable housing for
Florida residents. The Compre-
hensive Housing Affordability
Strategy (CHAS), describes the
conditions of housing in the state
and outlines Florida's one and
five-year plans for increasing the
availability of affordable housing.
The CHAS has been distributed
to the County Clerk's office in
each of the state's 67 counties so
citizens can offer their comments
on the document.
DCA has been working on the
plan along with the state Depart-
ment of Health and Rehabilitative
Services and the Florida Housing
Finance Authority. In addition,
DCA officials recently met with
interested citizens in various
areas of the state to receive sug-
gestions on different components
of the plan. By the time the final
CHAS is submitted to the federal

Road Closed by
Bridge Work
Beginning October 31, a por-
tion of Forest Road 309 on the
Apalachicola National Forest will
be closed due to bridge recon-
struction. The bridge is located
,approximately 11.5 miles west
form the intersection of Forest
Road 309 and State Highway
267.
Reconstruction is scheduled
for the bridge across the East
Branch of the Sopchoppy River
on the Apalachicola National For-
est. Traffic will be routed around
the reconstruction project along
Forest Roads 311 and 353. Heavy
traffic will not be permitted to use
Forest Road 353 due to restricted
load limits on the bridge located
along this road.
The road will remain closed
until completion of the bridge re-
construction. The completion
date is projected for the end of
December provided favorable
weather conditions persist.
For further information con-
tact the Wakulla Ranger District
office, US Highway 319, Route 6
box 7860, Crawfordville, FL
32327 or phone (904) 926-3561.
Office hours are Monday through
Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.


SYLVANIA .',


25" STEREO SUPEREMOTE
CONTROL SUPERSET
COLOR TV
* 178 Channel capability
* Picture-In-Picture
* Stereo sound system


Housing
government, public workshops
will have been held in Miami, Or-
lando, Tallahassee, Pensacola
and Ft. Myers.
'"We feel it is extremely impor-
tant to hear from the public be-
cause there are so many citizens
in this state who will benefit from
this comprehensive statewide
housing strategy," said DCA Sec-
retary William Sadowski. "I hope
that people with an interest in af-
fordable housing will visit their
County Clerk's office, read the
CHAS plan and send me their
comments."
Sadowski said the new hous-
ing strategy is a step toward one
of Governor Lawton Chiles' goals
for his administration. In a letter
transmitting the CHAS draft to
Secretary Jack Kemp of the feder-
al Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD),
Chiles wrote, '"We recognize hous-
ing to be a key component in eco-
nomic development and in the so-
cial well-being of our citizens.


- un-screen display v- --r W
* On concealed castors SAVE
$5999,5X $100
Regular $699.95 $ 0
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* On concealed castors

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ESTABLISHED 1904

Famous Double
GUARANTEE
Of Complete Customer
Satisfaction or Your
Money Back. Backed by
your local dealer and
by the Badcock Corpo-
ration.


but a lifetime license counts every
year until the holder is at least
72. This means that a lifetime li-
cense purchased at age 64 will
continue to earn federal dollars
for eight days or more, even
though the license holder pur-
chased only one license.
If the new licenses prove pop-
ular, they could generate funds to
help finance the agency's re-
search and management pro-
grams which will directly bene-
fit Florida's wildlife and
freshwater fisheries resources for
years to come.

Tennessee
Fugitive Nabbed
In Gulf County
The Gulf County Sheriffs de-
partment apprehended a fugitive
from Tennessee last Thursday
morning, who had three felony
counts filed against him.
Johnnie T. Vowell, 35, was lo-
cated and arrested in the Over-
street area, after the Gulf County
department had been alerted that
Vowell was thought to be in the
area.
Sheriff Al Harrison said offi-
cers converged on the place
where Vowell was believed to be
living with a woman and her
brother. The house was sur-
rounded and a K-9 search dog
was sent into the house to locate
the fugitive.
Vowell is facing warrants for
aggravated burglary, aggravated
assault and possession of a
sawed-off shotgun in the Volun-
teer State.
He offered no resistance to
the arresting officers.


SYLVANIA

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,y$30v


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* 178 Channel capability
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* Hi-performance chassis
* Random access tuning
* Programmable channel
scan

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HOME FURNISHING CENTERS
FURNITURE APPLIANCESI FLOOR COVERING HOME INTIRTAINMENT
*. OVER 250 STORES SERVING THE SOUTHEAST

; V"A Steve Richardson, owner/mgr.
Phone 229-6195 310 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe

AT MOST LOCATIONS "'7ad c a We'Treat yo R "


Open Tuesday thru Saturday
for the Winter Months


For Take Out Orders,
Call 227-1670

Steamed or Raw!
The World's Finest a
*Oysters
*Clams

*Shrimp
*Crabs

We now have
frozen yogurt
Enjoy the best from St.
Joseph Bay and
Indian Lagoon with us.
INDIAN PASS

RAW BAR
(On C-30 South of Port St. Joe)


emm B.~coc -I


., A









PAGE 4A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 31, 1991

r CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM

Regular School

r Attendance Required

Steady I earning Is Key

..' '" "". By
^'v :* ,*:,
Regular school attendance is required for consistent steady
learning. A child who goes to school one day and is then out for sev-
eral days becomes discouraged and school attendance becomes less
and less attractive.
Teachers have the responsibility to teach, but parents have the
responsibility to get the child to school well rested, well fed and
ready to learn.
When a child is seriously ill, parents will want to remain with
the ill child. Most of the time, parents are not faced with serious ill-
nesses. For minor illnesses parents should plan ahead and have
some arrangement made whereby they would not need to miss work
just because the child can not go to school.
Occasionally a child who is not too fond of school will soon fig-
ure out if he says he is sick he will be allowed to go to grandmoth-
er's house and spend the day being coddled by grandmother. Not
that all of us wouldn't enjoy a day of coddling but after one or two
times being conned by the child, you soon put your foot down and
off to school he goes.
Acceptable reasons not to go to school:
1. Fever
2. Vomiting
3. Diarrhea
4. Chicken Pox
5. Pink Eye
6. Head Lice
7. Impetigo
8. Strep Throat (until on medicine for 24 hours)
Unacceptable reasons to be out of school:
1. Late waking up (better to arrive late than not at all)
2. Babysitting another child
3. Going fishing or hunting
4. Trouble with school work or children at school (this needs to
be worked on and gets worse if the child is continually absent)
5. Not finishing homework
6. Not having the "right" clothes (be sure the clothes are clean
and neat but because they are not the latest fashion is no excuse)
7. Missing the bus (take them any way)
8. Because it is a nice day.
K.


Reception to
Honor Mills
Michelle Martin Mills and
Travis E. Mills wish to invite
friends and relatives to attend the
ceremony to commemorate their
wedding vows of August 11.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon (Marty)
Martin of Wewahitchka. The
groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Vaughantaze Mills of Panama
City.
The ceremony will be held at
Glad Tidings Assembly of God
Church in Wewahitchka on Sat-
urday, November 2 at 6:00 p.m.
CT. There will be a reception fol-
lowing the ceremony at the Com-
munity Center in Wewahitchka.
All friends and relatives are invit-
ed to attend.


Retired Educators
Meet Tuesday
The Gulf County Retired Edu-
cators Association will hold its
regular meeting on Tuesday, No-
vember 5, 10:00 a.m. ET at Gulf
Sands Restaurant. This is the an-
nual breakfast meeting and all
members are urged to attend.
Virgie H. Cone, Legislative
Committee Chairman of the Flori-
da Retired Educators Association,
will meet with the group and
bring it up-to-date on the priority
issues that will be supported by
the FREA and brought before the
Legislature during the 1992 ses-
sion.
The program chairman and
hostess for this meeting are Sadie
Gardner and Lila Brouillette.


Tracy C.W. Simmons

Engaged
Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Sim-
mons and family are announcing
the engagement and forthcoming
marriage of their son, Tracy C.W.
Simmons, to Lucretia Ann
McCoy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
J.W. McCoy of Chattahoochee.
Tracy and Lucretia plan to re-
side at 221 Ninth Street, Port St.
Joe.
The wedding is planned for
November 30 at Calvary Baptist
Church in Blountstown. A recep-
tion will follow.


Aiyana Shanteze Jefferson
Aiyana Is Nine!
Aiyana Shanteze Jefferson
celebrated her ninth birthday Oc-
tober 29th at Hardees with family
and friends.
She is the daughter of Mi-
chael and Monette Jefferson and
the granddaughter of Lamar and
Bernice Speights of Port St. Joe,
and Lenward and Cleo Jefferson
of Henderson, North Carolina.


Prize Winning
Chicken Recipe


Shown is birthday cele-
brant, Myrthel Sapp and son,
Jimmy Sapp.
Sapp Is 87!
Myrthel Sapp of Bonifay cele-
brated her 87th birthday Tues-
day, October 22. Helping her to
celebrate this happy occasion
were her children.


Happy 16th
Birthday
"Pookie"


Chicken Mexicana garners
the grand prize for its taste ap-
peal, ease of preparation and
originality. Ready to serve in
short order, it relies on picante
sauce to add garden-fresh flavor
and jalapeno pepper "punch" to a
lively cheese sauce served over
chicken and rice.
Chicken Mexicana
2 whole chicken breasts, split,
boned and skinned
1/4 teaspoon garlic salt
2 tablespoons butter or marga-
rine
1/2 cup sliced green onions with
tops (1/2-inch pieces)
1/2 cup chopped green pepper
1 cup picante sauce
4 ounces pasteurized process
cheese spread, diced
2 to 3 cups hot cooked rice, as
desired
1/4 chopped cilantro
Sprinkle chicken with garlic
salt. Heat butter in 10-inch skil-
let over medium heat. Add chick-
en; cook 5 minutes. Turn chicken
over. Add onion and green pepper
around edges of chicken. Cook 5
minutes or until chicken is ten-
der. Place rice on serving platter.
Remove chicken from skillet and
place over rice; keep warm. Add
picante sauce and cheese to skil-
let. Cook and stir until cheese is
melted and sauce is hot. Pour
over chicken and rice; sprinkle
with cilantro. Serve with addition-
al picante sauce. Makes 4 serv-
ings.


,. I
~ "U


Joshua Ryan Montgomery
It's A Boy!
Bobby and Ricci Montgomery
are proud to announce the birth
of their son, Joshua Ryan. Josh-
ua was born October 4 at 10:48
a.m. at Bay Medical Center in
Panama City. He weighed 6
pounds, 14.5 ounces.
The proud grandparents are
Ruth Dannelley, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert L. Montgomery, all of Port
St. Joe, and Mr. and Mrs. Felipe
Cariscal of Panama City. Great
grandmothers are Fannie Mont-
gomery of Port SL Joe, and Beu-
lah Clark of Milton.
Joshua's proud big sister is
Sarah Montgomery.


Fall Carnival
Thursday Night
Join the fun at Express Lane
#5 at Mexico Beach for their Fall
Carnival Thursday night, Hallo-
ween night, from 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m.
A costume contest will be
held at 6:30 p.m. All games are
free. There will be prizes for eve-
ryone.
Parents, this is a fun alterna-
tive to trick-or-treating.


Safe Halloween Thursday Night


North Port St. Joe will once
again host its annual Safe Hallo-
ween on Thursday, October 31
from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Da-
vid Jones Recreation Center. The
halloween festivities have been so


Mr. and Mrs. Willie Key
To Celebrate
50th Anniversary
Willie and Allie Key were mar-
ried November 9, 1941. They will
be honored with a party this No-
vember 9 from 2 to 4 at the Oak
Grove Assembly of God Church
social hall. The reception is being
hosted by Melissa Webb, grand-
daughter of the couple.
All friends and relatives of the
celebrants are cordially invited to
attend.


* No cholesterol--
,n food preoaration
* H;gn quality, food


successful that It is now in its
fifth year of operation.
For more information, con-
tact Sarra Harris at 229-8913 or
Winnie Hamilton at 229-6405.


JY Patricks

SRes tauran t
-/I2--" Rei de',/-I t;'
SPo.rt S'. Jot'. F/ori.da
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
,,Featuring Daily Luncheon Specials
^ and All You Can Eat Salad Bar
Saturday Night Special $ _
Seafood Buffet I.n95
NOON BUFFET...........$4.95
or Order from the wide selection on Our
Menu
-- Evening Meal Begins at 5:00 PM


S(9'04) 227-7400
are rrng Servies A/Aso Available
-I~


k2.,


Kristin Posey

Kristin Is One!
Kristin Posey turned one on
October 1 with a Little Mermaid
party at her home. Helping her to
celebrate were her mom and dad,
big brother Josh, Granny and
Granddaddy Posey, Aunt Gwen
and Uncle David, Aunt Eunice,
cousins Brian and Melanie, and
lots of friends.
S Kristin is the daughter of
Marty and Marsha Posey.


Birthday Party
for Annie Cook
Members of the Overstreet
Bible Church at Overstreet will
honor Annie Cook on her 88th
birthday Saturday, November 2,
7:00 p.m. ET at the church. Re-
freshments will be served. No
gifts please.


fr n of osa hi ev n n. I


BC JEWELERS

Has Moved
NOW LOCATED AT

302A Reid Avenue
(Phantry Hotel)
at the stop light

229-6969
Jeweby Repair @ Watch Repair
Work Done on the Premises


.,';> w, .


Our fittlegir i~s sweet
andnicefitff ofspice
And this weekjsfe is 15
twice/
H7-appy rBirthidayj
VDdy, M~amna Donna, I'Wtam, .oIhn,
L Char6 elr, 9,G-D4addy & G-M.otier


DEPARTMNT STM


Y*-


.


- -









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 31, 1991


Try These to Snack On During Games


Jesse Dalton Shearer

It's A Boy!
Jesse Dalton Shearer was
born October 10 at 7:48 p.m.,
weighing 7 pounds, 4.75 ounces
at Bay Medical Center.
Proud parents are Gerald and
Jennifer Shearer of St. Joe
Beach.
Jesse is the grandson of John
and Linda Hill of Beacon Hill,
Tommy Parrish of North Carolina,
Sharon Shearer and the late Clif-
ton Shearer of St. Joe Beach.
Jesse was welcomed home by
big brother Danielaniel and cousins
Chris, Joey and Cody.


Football season is a great
time to take a dip... to the living
room, family room or wherever
armchair athletes gather to watch
the game. Armed with chips and
vegetable dippers, they can dip,
dunk and munch as they please
without missing a bit of the ac-
tion.
This fall, fuel football fans
with two fast and far-from-ho-
hum dips. Great served hot or at
room temperature, both dips take
their garden-fresh flavor and spi-
cy jalapeno "heat" from versatile
picante sauce, in the cook's
choice of mild, medium or hot
Black Bean-Bacon Dip is a
crowd-pleasing blend of beans,
bacon, garlic, cream cheese and
picante sauce that's especially
good with vegetable dippers such
as carrots and bell peppers. Crab-
by Con Queso is a richly flavored
mix of cheese, veggies, picante
sauce and imitation crab meat
that tastes great with tortilla
chips.
Expecting a crowd? No prob-


[Obituaries..... I


William Linton
William H. Linton Sr., 76, of
Wewahitchka, passed away Mon-
day morning, October 28, at his
home. He was a native of Grove-
land. He served in the U.S. Navy
during World War II, and had
lived in Gulf County since 1937.
A graduate of Florida Southern
College, he earned his Master's
Degree in Education from Florida
State University. He worked for
the Gulf County School System
for 35 years as teacher, coach,
and administrator, retiring in
1977, and was a member of the
First United Methodist Church of
Wewahitchka.
Survivors include his wife,
Onita J. Linton of Wewahitchka;
two sons, William H. Linton Jr. of
Port St. Joe, and Terry Wayne
Linton of Wewahitchka; six
grandchildren, Steve Linton, Tony
Linton, Michael Linton, and Sher-
ri Prindle, all of Clearwater, Ben-
jamin Linton and Lee Linton,
both of Wewahitchka; two great
grandchildren; one brother, Gary
Linton of Inverness.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday at the First United
Methodist Church of Wewahitch-
ka, conducted by the Rev. Bill
Barry and the Rev. Bill Parsons.
Interment will follow in the family
plot at Jehu Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home, Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.


Everline Mobley
Everline Mobley, 105, died
Sunday, October 27th at Bay
Medical Center after a short ill-
ness. She had been a resident of
Port St. Joe for the past two
years.
She is survived by her neph-
ew, Willie Bryant of Port St. Joe,
and one granddaughter, Evelyn
Ross of Atlanta, Georgia.
Funeral services will be held
Friday, November 1, at 2:00 p.m.
ET at the Philadelphia Primitive
Baptist Church of Port St. Joe.
Burial will follow in the family
plot at Forrest Hill Cemetery.
Services are under the direc-
tion of Gilmore Funeral Home.

Ruth E. Lamb
Ruth E. Lamb, 74, of Wewa-
hitchka, passed away Wednes-
day, October 23, after a long ill-
ness. She had been a resident of
Wewahitchka since 1946. She
was a member of the Eastern
Star and the Senior Adult Sunday
School Class.
She is survived by two sons,
John Lamb of Fairfax, Virginia,
and Bill Lamb of Wewahitchka;
one daughter, Hazel Millergren of
Wewahitchka; two brothers, Tom
Harrell of Blountstown and Owen
Owens of Marianna; two sisters,
Mary Lawley of Ft. Walton Beach,
and Alice Roper of Blountstown;
seven grandchildren and five
great grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Saturday, October 26 at the First
Baptist Church of Wewahitchka
with Reverend Richard Maddox
officiating. Burial was in the fami-
ly plot of Jehu Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Gilmore Funeral
Home, Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.

Eleanor Hopkins
Eleanor Belle Hopkins, 59, of
Mexico Beach, died Saturday
morning, October 26, after a long
illness. She was a native of India-
na and a resident of Mexico
Beach for 10 years.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Jessie Hopkins of Mexico
Beach; two sons, Tim King of
Brooksville, and Scott Hopkins of
Laurel, Maryland; one daughter,
Carrie Stomp of Mexico Beach;
four brothers, Tommy Devine of
* DeMotte, Indiana, Jim Devine of
Tennessee, John Devine of Over-
street, and Bill Devine of El Cag-


on, California; four sisters, Gla-
dys Norman of Highland, Indiana,
Mary Muese.nbrock of Hammond,
Indiana, Rose Anne Canuick of
Overstreet, and Ida Mae Fitch of
DeMont, Indiana; and seven
grandchildren.
A visitation was held Monday
at the chapel of Gilmore Funeral
Home concluding with a prayer
service with Rev. Charles Parker
officiating. Cremation followed.
Arrangements were by Gil-
more Funeral Home.

Violet A. Foster
Violet A. Foster, 78, passed
away Thursday morning, October
24, in Panama City at the home
of her granddaughter following an
extended illness. She spent the
past four years in Panama City.
She was a member of the First
Church of the Nazarene. Besides
her family, she cared for a num-
ber of foster children.
Survivors include three
daughters, Edith Homan of Sea
Isle City, New Jersey, Elaine C.
Cox of Port St. Joe, and Tammy
Canington of Oak Grove; one son,
Roland S. Foster of Melbourne;
13 grandchildren, 11 great grand-
children, and one great-great
grandchild; and one brother, Al-
bert Noble of Pennsylvania.
Funeral services were held
Saturday at the First Church of
the Nazarene, conducted by the
Rev. Lawrence Cox and the Rev.
George Malone. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot at Holly
Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home.


lem! Both recipes are easily dou-
bled.
BLACK BEAN-BACON DIP
6 slices bacon, diced
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 can (16 ounces) black beans,
drained
2/3 cup picante sauce
1 1/2 ounces cream cheese,
cubed
1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
Chopped cilantro


crisp; remove and reserve. Pour
off all but 1 tablespoon drippings.
Add onion and garlic; cook until
tender. Transfer to food proces-
sor, add beans and process until
smooth. Return to skillet; add re-
maining ingredients. Cook until
cheese melts; stir in bacon.
Sprinkle with cilantro to serve.
Makes 1 3/4 cups.
CRABBY CON QUESO
3/4 cup chopped onion
3/4 cup chopped green pepper
1 clove garlic minced


1/2 cup picante sauce
1/2 pound process cheese
spread, cubed
1/4 pound imitation crab meet,
finely shredded
1/2 cup chopped tomato
Saute onion, green pepper
and garlic in oil until tender. Add
picante sauce and cheese; cook
and stir until cheese melts. Stir
in crab and tomato. Makes 2
cups.


Visits Family
Mary Mclnnis returned home
recently after, visiting with her
daughter and family, Captain and
Mrs. Ed (Cathy) Chaplin in Glen-
dale, Arizona.
Captain and Mrs. Chaplin
had the honor of being invited
and attending the retirement din-
ner for General H. Norman
Schwarzkopf in Tampa.
Captain Chaplin worked with
communications in the office with
General Schwarzkopf during Op-
eration Desert Storm.


Cook bacon in skillet until 1 tablespoon vegetable oil '..S^


Citizens Sentenced to Jail Christmas Beauties Pageant

for Muscular Dystrophy Dec. 1 Port St. Joe
Boys and Girls/Infant to 25 Years
On Wednesday, November 6, from WJOE as the arrests are Boys and Girls/Infant to 25 Years
citizens of Port St. Joe will turn made and sentences set. Entry Deadline Nov. 25
themselves in to authorities of the For more information, or for ($10 LATE CHARGE)
Muscular Dystrophy Association. fellow partners in crime wanting
The charge they will face is that to turn themselves in to help Jer- (904) 265-0468 For Information
of aiding and abetting in the ry's Kids, call (904) 681-6763.
search for a cure for netromus- A


cular disease.
These jailbirds will be incar-
cerated in the park beside First
Union State Bank from 8 a.m.
until 5 p.m. Each will be detained
for one hour and given the oppor-
tunity to make bail by calling
friends, family, and business as-
sociates.
Live reports will be broadcast

Senior Citizens

PlanningFest

The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens are going to hold their third
annual Arts and Crafts Christ-
mas Festival on December 7 and
8, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sat-
urday, and from 12 to 5 p.m. on
Sunday.
There will be lots of things for
the entire family to do. A chil-
dren's activity area, rides, carni-
val games, arts and crafts includ-
ing finished and unfinished
furniture, canvas paintings, T-
shirts, polished wood items and
much more will be featured.
The delicious baked goods
you all enjoyed last year will be
on sale. There will be a drawing
for a handmade Dresden plate
quilt and rack that will be given
away to a lucky winner. Tickets
will also be sold for a 1975 15-
foot Glystrom tri-hull boat with
an 85 hp outboard motor and
trailer.
Reservations for booths are
being accepted now. The rental
fee is $25.00 for crafts for both
days. Organizations wishing to
sell food items may also rent a
booth. It is on a first come basis,
there will be no duplicate food
booths. Please call 229-8466 for
additional information or mail
your check to:
Gulf County Senior Citizens
198 Peters Street
Port St Joe, FL 32456


^^^ --- W --.---'-..s-.. -* j

Amber Nicole Wagner

Amber Turns Two!
Amber Nicole Wagner, daugh-
ter of Terri and James Wagner of
Overstreet, turned two on Octo-
ber 3, and celebrated her birth-
day with a Minnie Mouse party at
her home on September 29. Help-
ing her celebrate her special day
was Nanny and Papa Montgom-
ery, Grandma and Grandpa Wag-
ner, Uncle Bobby, Aunt Ricki and
Sarah Montgomery, Uncle Rolo
and Jessie Wagner, Mr. Jeff, Miss
Kim and Dustin Powell, and Me-
lissa, Becky and Christopher
Schell.
Amber and her guests en-
joyed ice cream and cake. Her fa-
vorite present this year was the
Mickey Mouse rod and reel that
Daddy gave her.


ARE YOUR VALUABLES SAFE?


They Are, If They're In One of Our


PAUZ DA%


PAGE SA


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THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. OCT. 31. 1991


Honey The Natural Sweetener


HV Elementary Costume Winners


Highland View Elementary
School held their annual Hallo-
ween Carnival and Parade this
past Saturday. Winners of the
parade are shown from left to
right. In the pre-school to kin-
dergarten division, Nicholas
Burrows as a scarecrow won


first place and Stephanie
Strayer as the Little Mermaid
was second place winner.
In the first through third
grade age group, Ashley Bur-
kett as a cave man came in
first and Donnie Brake as
Count Dracula placed second.


The fourth through sixth
grade division found a pair of
winners for first place, Carrie
and Alicia Gardiner portrayed
Indians. And in second place,
Rochelle Lee as a witch and
Joey Latta as a ninja tied for
second place.


Are you aware that it takes
one year for a bee colony to pro-
duce 60 to 100 pounds of honey?
And did you know that it is al-
most impossible for honey to
spoil because of its remarkable
keeping qualities, such as its
ability to retain moisture?
Have you ever used honey in
a recipe that required sugar?
Honey is an extremely useful
cooking ingredient. When people
run out of sugar, they may not re-
alize that in many cases, honey
can be a tasty and healthy substi-
tute.
This recipe is a scrumptious
dessert made with honey and def-
initely worth a try:
OLD-FASHIONED OATMEAL PIE
Makes 6 servings
3/4 cup honey
2 eggs, beaten
3/4 cup each quick cooking oats,
coconut and packed brown
sugar
1/2 cup each butter or marga-
rine, currants and chopped
walnuts
9-inch pie shell
Whipped. cream
Combine all ingredients ex-

Paper Trail
More than 450 tons per day
of old corrugated containers are
recycled and used to produce new
linerboard and containerboard at
Georgia-Pacific's Monticello, Mis-
sissippi, plant. Nationally, the
company recycles more than one
million tons a year.


Charterboat Captain's License Being Offered


Experienced boaters Interest-
ed in acquiring a charterboat cap-
tain's license may want to enroll
in a five night, two day course
starting November 18 in Apalach-
icola before a proposed new user
fee goes into effect.
Sea School, the Southeast's
largest and most successful mari-
time license prep school, is offer-
ing this class in Apalachicola for
the special one-time price of
$395.


This may mean a total sav-
ings of more than $250, if the
Coast Guard is allowed to initiate
the newly proposed user fee on li-
censes.
One year's boating experi-
ence, 360 days in a lifetime on
any boat, is enough to qualify to
test for the license. This test in-
volves knowledge of nautical
rules of the road, first aid, weath-
er, navigation and similar nauti-
cal subjects.


Sea School can help ease the
way through this exam. The Apa-
lachicola course will be held five
evenings from 6:00 to 10:30 p.m.
and a weekend.
"Most of our students pass
the exam the first time," says Bob
Arnold, director of Sea School.
"But our guarantee is that we'll
stick with the student until he
has a license, and in fact we'll
stick with him throughout his li-


News from Wewahitchka Elementary
By Linda Whitfield


Veteran's Day Program to be
Held November 11
It is a week or so early, but I
thought I'd announce the Vete-
ran's Day program which will be
held at"WES 'on Monday, Novem-
ber 11 at 9:00 a.m. All veterans
are.urged to attend. You will be
our special guests. We hope eve-
ryone in town will come for the
program. A guest speaker from
Tyndall AFB along with the Naval
ROTC and the Wewahitchka High
School band will be there. The
third graders will be singing spe-
cials also. Please come out and
support this.
Red Ribbon Week
Last week, October 21-26,
was designated Red Ribbon Week
at our school. Teachers, staff and
students wore red ribbons and
each morning on our Wewa War-
rior 'IV station we saw a puppet
show or heard more about saying
no to drugs.
Over 300 Turned Out for the
First PTO Meeting
Last Tuesday night, the first
PTO meeting of the year was held.
We were privileged to hear Dr.
Jones of the Nemours Clinic of
Port St. Joe speak on "How to
know when to keep your child at
home." This is a great concern be-
cause if a child is absent too
much, it's for sure they are going
to get behind. We teachers have a
right to teach and the parents
must make sure the child is in
school unless he/she is sick. The
classrooms that had the highest
percentage of parents was Debbie
Baxley and Rhonda Pridgeon.
Both their classrooms will be
treated to a pizza party. Discus-
sion was also about the Fall Fes-
tival which will be held on Octo-
ber 31.
Wall of Fame Theme
The Wall of Fame theme for
this past week was having nice
manners in the lunchroom. Mem-
bers of the lunchroom staff chose
the recipients. The pictures of
each winner are displayed on a
bulletin board in the lunchroom
and then the color picture is sent
home as a keepsake for the senti-
mental box.
Star Student of the Week


Rock-A-Thon Set
for Saturday
The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens invite the public to come out
and watch the senior citizens
rock the day away. They have
been obtaining pledges for the
last two months for the Rock-A-
Thon.
A bake sale is being planned
to coincide with the rock-a-thon.
The Senior Citizens are thankful
to all of the people that made
pledges to help with the program.
The place to see all this is the
Centennial Building, Allen Memo-
rial Way, Port St. Joe. The action
starts at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday,
November 2.


Third grader Theresa Jackson
is the student of the week. There-
sa is in the classroom of Mrs. Lin-
da Whitfield and she is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Jackson. Theresa's favorite sub-
ject in school is math, especially
addition and subtraction. When
she grows up, she would like to
be a lawyer because "some cases
would be interesting." Her favorite
TV shows are L.A. Law and the
Cosby Show.
Theresa couldn't think of a
favorite book. She just likes them
all. She would like to visit in New
Jersey because her aunt lives
there. Theresa admires her Aunt
Lula Jackson in Panama City. At
school, she likes to play with her
cousins, Brittany Turner, Adrien
Jackson, and classmate Kristin
Jones.
Theresa said this about her-
self, "I like sports, cartoons, read-
ing, and playing school. I like my
brother and I like art. I want to go
to college." Theresa finished the


sentence, "School is" by saying,
"School is a fantastic place to be
and you can learn a lot here." Yes
you can, especially when you're
interested as Theresa is.
Teachers Attend Workshop
Teachers Linda Tremain and
Sue Abreu attended a workshop
on Saturday, October 26. They
were studying ecosystems on a
barrier island. It was held at
Cape San Blas.
WES Extends Its Sympathy to
William Linton Family
Coach of a state champion-
ship basketball team, teacher of
math and biology, principal, and
then supervisor at the County
level are some of the many things
William Linton did In his years in
the school system of Gulf County.
Mr. Linton passed away early
Monday morning, October 28, at
his home.
Mr. Linton left behind his
wife Nita, sons Terry and Hamp,
and grandchildren. Mr. Linton
was a member of the United
Methodist Church and will be
greatly missed by all.


Tommy Thomas Chevrolet
PANAMA CITY
Announces Its Affiliation With

James C. "Bo" Bray
























In the Port St. Joe, Franklin County Area

Chevrolet-GEO

New and Used Cars and Trucks

Business Home
1-800-342-7131 or
904-785-5221 229-6836


censed career.
'We're proud our guaran-
tee," says Arnold. "Nobody has to
read any fine print. We strongly
suggest than anyone looking at li-
cense prep schools ask for the
guarantee in writing.
"Most of them are conditional
-guarantees. Ours is uncondition-
al."

All arrangements for stu-
dents, from Coast Guard applica-
tions and paperwork through re-
serving an exam date, are taken
care of by Sea School.

Boaters can get more infor-
mation on this course and the
special price by calling Sea
School's headquarters in St. Pe-
tersburg, toll-free at 1-800-237-
8663.


cept pie shell and whipped
cream; mix well. Pour into pie
shell. Bake at 350F 40 to 45
minutes or until filling browns
and knife blade inserted near
center comes out clean. Cool. Top
with whipped cream and serve.
Note: This is an extremely
rich pie. You may wish to de-
crease the serving size to 1/10 of


the pie. The calories per serving
would then be 425.
Honey is sweeter than sugar,
requires no refrigeration, and can
be absorbed into the system im-
mediately upon digestion.
Celebrate National Honey
Month this September by includ-
ing this natural, delicious sweet-
ener in your diet it's easy!


$$REWARD$$


An original thing of


stroyed at Mexico
FACTS ONLY.


Culprits


please


beauty


de-


Beach business.


get professional


heCl

Contact Mexico Beach Police


De-


apartment.





Top of the Gulf

RESTAURANT and LOUNGE
Hwy. 98 Mexico Beach
Overlooking Canal Park

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
4 PM CT TILL


Leisurely Dining at its Finest!
Featuring PRIME RIB and SEAFOOD

-NIGHTLY SPECIALS- Fri.: Seafood Quiche......................9.95
Mon.: Steak & Shrimp Kabobs.... $9.95 Sat.: Fish of the Day ...............s9.95
Tues.: Seafood Platter................ 10.95 Sun,: Hamburger Steaks ................6.95
Wed.: Maine Lobster.... ........... 12.95 or
Thurs.: Prim e Rib ....................... 10.95 Fried Chicken .............................. 6.95


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Broken Arrow Band
Friday & Saturday 9-1
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___ ____.________


rALLrIOI


r- -- 4cl- [- - -


I


Johnson'* 1-11111ARE and
,S BUILDING SUPPLY
Phone 229-8232 212 Williams Ave.


DPAGE 6A


I


R-3









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, OCT. 31. 1991 PAGE 7A


'Tyndall AFB Air Show to Commemorate Golden


The gates to Tyndall Air Force
Base will open Sunday, November
3, as the base celebrates its Gold-
en Anniversary Salute with an air
show featuring the U.S. Air Force
Thunderbirds and the Army Gold-
en Knights parachute team.
A full day of events is
planned to help Tyndall celebrate
its 50th year in the Florida pan-
handle with the gates opening at
10:00 a.m. ET. Some of the at-
tractions people can expect to see
are an F-15 Eagle aerial demon-


Sober Men
An Open Letter to My Friends
and Neighbors of North Port St.
Joe:
GIVE US SOBER MEN
Give us sober men for leaders
Men who never take a
drink;
Men who love our God and
country,
And whose minds are dear
to think;
Men who strive to do their
duty
In the places that they fill;
Men who can't be bought with
money,
Nor with evils that would
* thrilL
Walter E. Isenhour
It is impossible for me to hold
my peace. My heart is broken
over the murder that happened
here and the beating that oc-
curred in Bay County a few
weeks ago. It is horrible that
young men's lives are lost, brok-
en, and interrupted because of
criminal activities.
I do hope that there are oth-
ers who feel as depressed and
ashamed as I do. How and why
have we allowed such malady to
afflict our young male popula-
tion? The community has to be
responsible to some extent.
How long can a community
the size of North Port St Joe af-
ford to lose nine young men a
week to crime? That is where we
are now. One is dead. One is in-
dicted for second degree murder.
One is in the hospital in critical
condition. Five are accused of ag-
gravated battery according to the
news media. The situations above
are all results of anti-social be-
havior.
Over the years, we have expe-
rienced isolated episodes of a bi-
zarre nature, but now the inci-
dence has reached the level of an
epidemic. How did we fall into
* such a sad state? I don't know
how long it took for us to reach
this point; however, I do have
some opinions about factors
which contributed to the prob-
lem.
Mistakes are made when
there is a lack of adequate infor-
mation and/or guidance. It seems
that these two factors are the un-
derlying causes of our problems.
Many young men are not made
aware of their moral obligations
to themselves and society. Too
much emphasis is placed on ac-
tivities that hinder positive devel-
opment socially and academical-
ly. Not enough time is devoted to
learning and refining skills neces-
sary for assuming the role of a
productive adult. And last but not
least, is the prevailing notion by
too many young men, that they
have no control over their exis-
tence this is the way it has to
be.
Every community should af-
ford a wholesome environment for
future generations. Therefore, it
should insure that there are spiri-
tual leaders who have a genuine
concern for its members. Special
care should be taken to choose
elected officials who will be re-
sponsive to the needs of citizens.
Civic and social organizations
should be required to offer servic-
es that enhance the overall quali-
ty of life in the community, or fl-
* nanclal support should be
withheld. Parents and elder citi-
zens should be concerned and
more actively involved in all
things that affect the lives of


station, military working dog ex-
hibition and the Air Force's tour-
ing entertainment show 'Tops in
Blue."
'We want to make this year's
air show the best it can be," said
Lt. Col. Brian Badger, project offi-
cer for the event 'We want to
show the people of Bay County
and the tri-states region how
much we appreciate their help
and support at Tyndall."
More than 20 aircraft that
make up the greatest Air Force in


young people in North Port St
Joe. Unfortunately, every area
mentioned above is grossly ne-
glected.
If you are not guilty of shirk-
ing your responsibility in either of
the above categories good. You
don't have anything to be upset
about However, if you have
shirked your duties, it is now
time to face reality. Positive ac-
tions need to be taken. Reverence
for life, law and order must be in-
stilled in our youth before all of
our sons are gone the way of the
wayward.
I do hope that in my life time
I will see my community (North
Port St. Joe) a small, clean town
with no drug problem, young peo-
ple speaking to each other in
standard English and the order of
the day being respect, care and
concern for self and others.
Give us sober men as fathers,
Sober teachers for our
schools;
Men with sound, exalted stan-
dards,
Far removed from those of
fools;
Men who love the Holy Bible
And obey it, day by day'
Give us men to lead us up-
ward-
Men who watch and fast


and pray.


Isenhour
Maxine E. Gant


City Cable TV
To the Editor
For the Citizens of Port St.
Joe:
First of all, I would like to
take this opportunity to thank
the people, who took the time to
respond to our questionnaire
about the City owning its own
cable television company.
Secondly, this letter is to as-
sure our citizens that payment
for such a cable company would
be made by the revenue the City
would receive from the service,
and WILL NOT be paid by tax


the world will be on display
throughout the day including
some of the same type that per-
formed during Operation Desert
Storm. Some of these aircraft in-
clude the B-l bomber, the E-3
Sentry Airborne Warning and
Control System, the F-16 Falcon,
the F-18 Hornet and many more.
At 3:00 p.m. the Army's para-
chute demonstration team, the
Golden Knights, will take to the
skies with an aerial demonstra-
tion sure to dazzle onlookers be-


money.
The City Commission has
done extensive investigation on
this matter and would not have
suggested this possibility to our
citizens without thorough re-
search.
We are not the first city to
consider owning a cable compa-
ny. Some cities currently in the
cable business are Springfield,
Milton, Niceville, just to name a
few. After expenses, they are
making a profit on this venture,
and the additional funds are put
into their city revenue to help pay
for city services. If anything, a
city owned cable company could
reduce taxes, or at least prevent
taxes from being raised.
On Tuesday evening, NoVerm-
ber 5th, there will be a meeting at
the City Hall. This will give every-
one an opportunity to express
their views, or to have any ques-
tions they might present an-
swered.
With all the "doom and
gloom" we see on television con-
cerning 40 percent of all local and
city governments in this country
being in the red, I feel that any-
thing which can make a city gov-
ernment money is well worth the
time, effort, and research put into
it
The survey we ran was 680
for and 20 against
Yours very truly,
Johnny Linton
City Commissioner


HELP WANTED
Carpenter: minimum 3
yrs. experience. Referenc-
es required. Top pay for
qualified person.
Carpenter's Helper:
References a must. Pay
depends on experience.
Work sites in Gulf and
Franklin counties. Call 227-
1222, 8 a.m. 5 p.m. ET.


low. Since 1959 the team has
performed more than 6,300 times
in all 50 states and 42 foreign
countries. They also find time to
compete in the US. National Sky-
diving Championships in which
they have won an impressive 12
world team titles.
The skies above Tyndall will
be filled with the roar of the U.S.
Air Force Thunderbirds aerial
demonstration team at 4:00 p.m.
with perhaps the greatest show
"off' earth. The team performs all
over the world to exhibit the ca-
pabilities of modem, high perfor-
mance aircraft and the high de-
gree of professional skill required
to operate them.
The event is free to the public
and parking will be plentiful.
However, carpooling is highly en-
couraged to ease traffic conges-
tion. Get the family and friends
together and come out early to
ensure a good seat for the full day
of activities. There will be plenty
of food and beverages for sale as
well as souvenirs commemorating
the day's events. Pets, bicycles
and skateboards will not be al-
lowed.
Security police and signs will
direct visitors to the various park-
ing locations where attendants
will assist them in finding a shut-
tle bus to the air show or give di-
Odom Completes
Basic Training
Pvt Steven D. Odom had
completed basic training at Fort
Jackson, South Carolina.
During the training, students
received instruction in drill and
ceremonies, weapons, map read-
ing, tactics, military courtesy,
military justice, first aid, and
Army history and traditions.
He is the son of John T. and
Karen L. Odom of Rt. 2, Port St.
Joe.
The private is a 1991 gradu-
ate of Port St. Joe High School.
Hogan Arrives
for Duty at TAFB
Air Force Staff Sgt. Daniel J.
Hogan, a security supervisor, has
arrived for duty at Tyndall Air
Force Base.
He is the son of Robert and
Patricia Hogan of Muskegon,
Michigan.
His wife, Jane, is the daugh-
ter of Hilario Aliman of 2 Casa del
Mar, Mexico Beach.
The sergeant is a 1978 gradu-
ate of Catholic Central High
School.


reactions on the
Feel free to bri
blankets as se,
ed.
Cameras
many opportu
some of the I
dall's Golden A


Phone 227-1156


Anniversary
best way to walk. The Golden Knights will also
Ing lawn chairs or perform an aerial demonstration
acting will be limit- over the Panama City Mall Satur-
day, November 2, at 2:00 p.m.,
are welcome with with a follow-up photo opportuni-
nities to capture ty after the Jump on the east side
highlights of Tyn- grassy area of the complex free of
anniversary Salute. charge and open to the public.


*Heating & Air

*Major
Appliance
Repair
*Plumbing &
Electrical Work

RER0007623
RF0040131 229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle, Port St. Joe
RA0043378


- ,' -,- '-'-',-
Just For You!l
Just In Time For The Holidaysl!
A Real Recession Beating Sale
O ALL CRAFT SUPPLIES
25% OFF IN STOCK!
From Nov. 1 thru Nov. 16th -
You Will Receive 25% off all purchases totaling .
$20.00 or more!
(Does Not Include Frames or Framing!)
"eb Arts & raft(g"







Henderson's Restaurant,
Produce & Oyster Bar
309 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-7226

Oyster Bar Open
1/2 Shell, Bags, Pints
Restaurant Open
Breakfast, Lunch, Supper
Buffet Every Day
Hours: 5:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m.
y -- -- ---__ -<


530 Fifth Street


NEW and USED




CARSAL


Friday and Saturday, Nov. I and 2

BAY COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS Panama City


St. Joe Papermakers Federal Credit Union is offering
special interest rates for vehicles purchased in this sale to
qualified applicants.



New Car Rates


9.50% for 66 Months


9.25% for 60 Months


8.75% for 48 Months


8.00% for 36 Months


7.00% for 24 Months


USED CARS 10%


Stop by St. Joe Papermakers FCU for details and have your loan
pre-approved.



ST. JOE PAPERMAKERS

FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


5TIHL Authorized Dealer

"AS TOUGH AS ITS NAME"
S*STIHL CHAINSAWS
SSTIHL TRIMMERS
SSTIHL INDUSTRIAL SAWS
STIHL ENGINE OIL
S*STIHL BAR OIL
*STIHL TRIMMER
SUPPLIES
SMALL ENGINE REPAIR
All Makes and Models Parts and Service
Protective clothing and accessories
Lawn and garden tools, supplies, seeds, etc.

Hometown Sales and Service A H


BARFIELD'S
328 Reid Ave. 229-2727 AnfF


I


I ,











THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 31 1991


Sharks Drop Close One to Braves


Cross Country Team


Wins Bay Invitational


Saturday, the Port St. Joe
High School Sharks cross country
team competed in the Bay County
Invitational Cross Country Meet
at Tyndall Air Force Base. The
Purple Pack competed against
Bay, Mosley, and Rutherford in
the meet
Port St. Joe captured the
team championship as they to-
taled 36 points. Bay finished sec-
ond with 52 points while Ruther-
ford placed third with 63 points
and Mosley was fourth with 81
points.
In the individual competition,
Scott Boykin placed first among
the 28 runners with a time of
19:18.
Lee Duren placed sixth with a
time of 20:49, Shannon Gant
placed seventh 21:00, Bryan
Earley was eighth 21:01, Steve
Alles 14th 21:51, Tyrus Rudd
placed 17th 22:15, and Keith
McDonald placed 23rd with a
time of 23:25.
"These times seem to be very
slow, but the course was about
3.25 miles instead of the stan-
dard 3.0 miles. Also, the wind
was blowing pretty hard and this
slowed us down a bit," stated
Scott Gowan, coach of the team.
"Overall, I was pleased with the
effort the boys gave. Our goal for
the week was to win the meet. We
accomplished this and extended
our winning streak over the Bay
County schools to 10 meets over
the past three years," said Gowan
encouragingly..
"Saturday, we will host the
second annual Shark Invitational
at St. Joseph Bay Country Club.
The met will begin at 10:30 and
will field between 8-10 schools.
Schools that have committed to
participate along with Port St. Joe
include district rivals Marianna,
Pensacola Catholic, Chipley, and
Quincy-Shanks. Also, Bay High,
Mosley, and Rutherford are
scheduled to attend," continued
Gowan.
For the people who have nev-
er attended a cross country meet,
the team would like to invite you
to attend. The meet figures to be
a very good one as five of the top
20 runners in the state among
Class AA schools are scheduled
to compete. This meet will also
give the district teams a chance
to race on the district course. The


Say No
to Drugs

The week of October 19-27
was Red Ribbon Week, nation-
wide. Students and teachers were
involved in a variety of activities
in observance of the campaign
which originated when Federal
Agent Enrique Camarena was
murdered by drug traffickers in
1985. The Red Ribbon became
the symbol of citizen intolerance
to the destruction of drugs.
All staff members were pro-
vided with a large red ribbon,
which they displayed prominently
on their classroom doors or in-
side their classrooms. All advisors
were also provided with informa-
tion on the history and purpose
of the campaign to share with
their students. Middle school stu-
dents participated in a variety of
activities with their advisory
groups. These activities included
videos, demonstrations by Officer
Otto Cook and Jake, his dog, of
the Gulf County Sheriffs Depart-
ment, and classroom presenta-
tions by Officer Chris Brum-
baugh. School Resource Officer.
The faculty and administra-
tion would like to thank all who
helped prepare materials, make
red bows, secure video material,
and make presentations. Without
your help, Red Ribbon Week
would not have been the success
it was at Port St. Joe High
School.


district teams will meet again in
Port St. Joe on November 16 as
Port St. Joe will host the District I
Championships.


Freshman Shannon Gant
placed seventh overall in the
Bay County Invitational.


In 1945, New York's State
health department conducted
one of the first and most rigor-
ously controlled research pro-
jects in medical history. Teams
of dentists examined the teeth
of thousands of school children
in the Hudson River cities of
Newburgh and Kingston which
both had fluoride-free water. In
both towns, they found the
same high incidence of tooth de-
cay. Then on May 2, 1945, a
small feeder machine was
turned on in Newburgh's filtra-
tion plant; from that moment on,
Newburgh's water contained 1.2
parts of fluoride per million.
Over the next 10 years, doc-
tors and dentists repeatedly
checked the children medically


The Atlanta Braves and the
Port St. Joe Sharks had some-
thing in common this past week.
Both had the advantage over
their opponents until the waning
moments of the contest, but lost
it to big plays which sent them
both down in defeat.
The Sharks had come from
behind to gain a one point advan-
tage over the Walton County
Braves Friday night, in the final
period, when the Braves struck in
the waning moments of the game
to take a 24-19 win home with
them.
The Brave's final touchdown,
which came with only three min-
utes remaining in the game on a
35-yard fly pattern pass reception
by DaVonn Fields shattered the
Shark hopes for their second win
of the season.
The Braves had drawn first
blood Friday, as they zipped
down the football field on their
very first possession of the ball,
to score after a 65 yard drive
highlighted by the running of De-
Vonn Fields and Rodney Ship-
man. Fields ripped off a 37 yard
gallop to the Shark 10, where
Shipman came around right end
for the final 10 yard gallop for the
first score of the game.
The Sharks came right back,
with a little over a minute re-
maining in the first stanza, tying
the score on a Jason Maxwell to
Tony Thomas pass play for a 19
yard scoring strike. A bad snap


Wewahitchka's Gators came
roaring back in the second half
last Friday night, to dump the
Chattahoochee Yellow Jackets,


Alumni Band to
Practice Sunday
The Port St. Joe High School
alumni band will perform at the
homecoming game November 8.
All alumni band members are
urged to participate in this event.
Practice will be held Sunday
at the high school band room.


Gymnasts Participating

In USGF Sectional Meet


Lindsay Williams, Kristen
Weimorts, B.J. Presnell, and Kris-
tin Abrams will be traveling to
Ron Galimore's Athletic Training
Center in Tallahassee this Satur-
day for the U.S.G.F. Sectional


Meet.
Lindsay, Kristin A., and Kris-
ten W. have also already qualified
for the state meet which will be
held in Jacksonville November
23.


From left, bottom, B.J. Presnell, Kristen Weimorts, Anna Duren
and Kristin Abrams.
Back row, from left, Bonnie Belin and Lindsay Williams.


and dentally. When the decade
ended, they had found only one
difference. In Newburgh, children
between six and 10 who had
been drinking fluoridated water
all their lives had 60 percent
fewer decayed, missing or filled
teeth than youngsters from the
same age group in Kingston.
Today, fluoridation is accept-
ed and endorsed as a major
public health measure in pre-
venting tooth decay by virtually
every scientific and health organ-
ization in the country.

Prepared as a public service
to promote better dental health.
From the office of: FRANK D.
MAY, D.M.D., 319 Williams Ave.,
Phone 227-1123.


from center kept the Sharks from
taking the lead with an extra
point kick.
Walton went into the half
time rest period with the lead,
however, as they rallied for two
touchdowns in the second period.
Fields, who carried most of
the offense for the Braves, scored
at the seven minute mark on an
eight yard gallop to put his team
up, 12-6. Then it appeared as if
the Sharks had shut down the
Brave machine when Davey
Young sacked quarterback Chris


with the Gators collecting their
second Division win for the sea-
son.
The Gators bulldozed the Yel-
low Jackets for 453 yards on the
ground, behind the hard running
of Marcus Vann and Marcus
Jones. Vann was virtually un-
stoppable with 265 yards on 26
carries and Jones had 150 on 23
jaunts.
The Gators were behind at
half time, 20-14, "But they really
got with it in the second half and
Just demolished the Jackets,"
coach BoBo Owens said.
The Gators ran up 20 first
downs in their winning effort.
Quarterback Denny McGlon
connected on three passes out of
seven attempts, for 88 more
yards offense, as the Gators
chalked up 503 big yards of of-
fense for their most productive
outing of the season.
The Gators are now 2-2 in
District play and 2-4 overall.
FRIDAY NIGHT
Friday night, the Gators will
be trying to make it two wins in a
row, as they travel to Carrabelle,
to take on the Green Devils in an-
other District game.


Floyd for a five ya
Sandy Quinn interce
pass at the five ya
Braves were called
and the Sharks were
vin Pryor had ju
through the line fo
gainer, when the
Fields stripped th
Pryor's grasp, picked
pigskin and zipped
goal line to make th
at half time.
A.holding penalty
first Shark drive of


Eric Monteiro's kick put the Sharks ahead 19-18.
(80) held the ball for the extra point kick.


half, but on their ne
Sharks started on t)
and worked the ball
28 yard line before S
broke loose on a
closed the scoring g.
with the Sharks still
Then, with 3:38


ard loss and game, Maxwell and Tony Thomas
epted a Brave teamed up on a 45 yard pass play
ird line. The to pull the Sharks even with the
for holding Braves, who had not been able to
moving. Cal- make their extra points. Eric
ust steamed Monteiro came on to kick the
r a six vard point which would give the
ever-pesky Sharks the lead and sent the ball
e ball from sailing right between the up-
I up the loose rights.
I across the With the Sharks in a tight de-
ie score 18-6 fensive formation, the Braves
quarterback turned Fields loose
y stopped the up the field and hit him right on
f the second the numbers with a desperation
pass, scoring from their own 38
yard line on their second play
from scrimmage. The Braves
failed for the fourth time to make
their extra point, and the game
ended, 24-19.
Again, the Shark offense was
Improved over the previous week,
but still fell short of a win. The
Sharks had eight first downs, to
10 for the Braves. Quarterback
Jason Maxwell's passing had nine
completions in 17 attempts, good
for 120 yards. Tony Thomas
caught five passes for 71 yards;
Randy Smith had two for 31
yards and Jason Hathaway, two
for 18 yards.
The Sharks had 190 yards of
offense on the ground, with big
-- Calvin Pryor leading the way.
Pryor plowed for 69 yards on 16
S- carries. Sarabia Tiller had 56 in
12 carries; Sandy Quinn account-
Andy Smith ed for 57 in a dozen runs and
Devon Thomas added three on
two carries.
-xt drive, the Eric Ramsey punted five
he Brave 45 times for an average of 33 yards.
down to the FRIDAY'S GAME
3arabia Tiller Friday night, the Sharks will
jaunt which be on the road, as they travel to
ap to 18-12, Tallahassee to meet the Florida
trailing. High Demons in an 8:00 p.m.
left in the game.


Tony Thomas (4), scores on a 19-yard pass play for his first
touchdown of the evening.


* For domestic & imported Metric sizes for small For domestic cars
cars imported cars Longest-mileage /v
* Long-mileage all-season Long-mileage tread radial
radial


vichelin


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER


216 MONUMENT AVE.


PORT ST. JOE


PHONE 2271291


.Wewa Gators Demolish

Yellow Jackets 44-20


Views On

Dental fHealth

FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.

FLUORIDE'S FIRST BIG TEST


,_ _


FRUM 0A


PAGE SA


I










THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 31. 1991 PAGE 1B


Wewahitchka Elementary Announces Honor Roll


Jerry Kelley, principal of We-
wahitchka Elementary School,
has announced the honor roll for
the first six weeks.
First Grade
All A's
Justin Barnes, Ashley De-
shotel, Wanda Hall. Aleasha
Hand, Michael Hill, Cortne Hoo-
ver, Judith Husband. Kelli Jack-
son, Jesse Knee, John Lillie, Der-
rick McMillion, Meagan Morris,
Terry Myers, Erika Pippin, Tracy
Prince, Jesse Taunton, Kalisa
Taylor, Jonathan Thomas, Jana
Traylor, Amy Williams
A's & B's
Barbara Alderman, Sheena
Barnes, Robert Buflkin, Allen
Easter, Amy Griggs, John Hig-

State Parks

Offer Fall

Promotions
Discover the Real Florida this
Fall. The Florida Park Service is
offering two special promotions
for camping and visiting parks
throughout the state. From Octo-
ber 1 through December 15, 1991
the promotions are outlined as
follows:
1) Visit two state parks and
visit the third free.
2) Camp two nights in one
park and get the third night free.
Call your local park for fur-
ther details.
Florida State Parks heralds
autumn in a special way...with a
variety of colorful wildflowers and
peacefulness that brings wildlife
out of hiding. Visitors sometimes
catch a glimpse of deer, fox, or
rabbits in the early morning
hours and at dusk. As the weath-
er cools, swarms of monarch but-
terflies flutter through the parks,
stopovers on a journey from
Northern states to wintering sites
in Mexico.
Birders will be especially
thrilled with the annual flight of
raptors through St. Joseph State
Park and St. Andrews State Rec-
reation Area; hawks, falcons,
kites, and endangered Southeast-
er kestrel are often sighted.
Florida State Parks are open
8:00 a.m. until sundown every
day. The entrance fee is $3.25 for
each vehicle with as many as
eight passengers.


gins, Jeffrey Marshall, Brandon
Simpson, Laura Spivey, William
F. Stanley Jr., Chante Stevens,
Andrew Williams, Apollonia Wil-
liams, Jevonne Jones, Travis
Myers, Terrance Riley, Anthony
Turner, Patrick Woodcock
Second Grade
All A's
Lindsey Carter, Nicholas
Chan, Joshua Conley, Blaine Da-
vis, Tonya Hall, William Jenkins,
Brandon Jones, Brady Jordan,
Amanda Kent, Ryan Martin,
Christina McCain, Kimberly
McMillion, Cathrine Page, Phillip


Pollard, Ansley Williams
A's & B's
Clarissia Allen, Ryan Baker,
Kyle Brown, Jamie Cain, Gregory
Carter, Cassidie Daniels, Krimzon
Deloach, Jonathan Gates, Nicole
Hall, Ricky Mamoran, Alicia Moo-
neyham, Derrick Myers, Christina
Ward, Jessica Whitfield, Josie
Whitfield, Jeffrey Yoder, Maquita
Culver, Joseph Lea, Justin Taun-
ton, Jennifer Williams, Ashley
Wolinski, Judson Carnley, Bran-
don Causey, Nora Dykes, Brooke
Grice, Brandi Stokes, Justin Mac-
arages, Cerelle Hanes, Harold


Receives Scholarship

Lisa Atkins, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Atkins, is
shown, left, being presented with a $750.00 scholarship check by
Dennis Geoghagen, president of the Port St Joe Kiwanis Club re-
cently. Atkins was selected by a screening board at Gulf Coast
College. The scholarship was provided from a perpetual fund de-
posited by the Kiwanis Club with Gulf Coast, which funds annual
assistance to a selected student The Club built the fund with pro-
ceeds from various fund-raising projects.


FREE HEARING TEST
Set For-
SENIOR CITIZENS

GULF COAST HEARING AID
CENTER of Panama City will be
offering to anyone' 55 or older a
few hearing test. If you have
-been exposed to loud factory
noise, if people seem to mum-
ble or you ask people to repeat
what they have said, come see
us at:
JAMES W. DAME
Hearing Aid Specialist / V


ST. JOE MOTEL
501 Monument Ave.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5
9:00 A.M. 12:00 NOON
This is our regular monthly Service Center and we will service anyone's
hearing, aid free of charge. We have the lowest battery prices in the area.
One pack FREE with this ad!




CONSOLIDATED


L CLCCTRIC SUPPLY
325 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
Hours; M-F: 7:30-5:00 Sat: 9:00-Noon
Call Herb or Charles: 227-7373

Also Serving
with Truck Deliveries: Tuesday and Thursday
Apalachicola, Eastpoint,
Carrabelle and St. George Island

( BRAND NAME ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES

Square D, Nutone, Leviton,
Frigidaire, Makita, Klein Tools
and


c


Residential, Commercial, Industrial
FEATURING


@THOMAS
^^ ~ ~~ ~~ i .\ /f\/\


RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING
DIVISION


GCCC Offers

Course In

Handguns
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege will offer a Handgun Safety
course on Tuesday, November 12,
and Thursday and Friday, No-
vember 14 and 15 from 6:30 to
9:30 p.m. CT. This course is re-
quired for a concealed weapon
permit, and all classes must be
attended for certification.
The instructor is Bart Furey.
Class will be held in the Lan-
guage Arts Lecture Hall on No-
vember 12 and 14 and at the fir-
ing range on November 15. There
is a $9.00 fee for Florida resi-
dents. Students should provide
50 rounds of ammunition, ear
protection and eye protection.
Advanced registration is re-
quired and students must regis-
ter at the Lifelong Learning Regis-
tration Office in the Student
Union East. The office is open
Monday through Thursday from
8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on
Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. All times are central. Regis-
tration deadline is November 6.
For further information, call 1-
872-3823.


Card of Thanks
The Cherry Family would like
to thank each and every one for
their many acts of kindness dur-
ing the passing of their loved one.


MESSAGE

SERVICE


4x -( -x -x 4x -( ix -t 4x -x -[ -K -K -K -t -K -( -K -Ix ix -x ix -x -:tx 4x


Scenic Riverside Dining
RIVERFRONT RESTAURANT
.653-8139 123 Wat
SPECIALIZING IN FRESH C)
6:30 A.M. 10 P.M.


Sunday: 12 p.m. 10 p.m.
Sunday Special
Prime Rib, parsleyed new potatoes,
squash casserole, homemade bread,
pineapple cream cheesecake
..........8.95
DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS


I PACKAGED LIQUORS TO GO

FEATURING
SANDY TAPLIN at the keyboard Friday,
Saturday & Sunday, 7-10 p.m.


Champ Traylor, Bridgett William-
son, Billie Jean McLemore, Don-
ald Dickens, Kelly Forehand,
Mack Kent, Chris Woodcock,
Brandi McDaniel, Michael Pabis,
Christopher Sims, Jessica Thom-
as, Daniel Babb, Shannon Boyer,
Aaron Kent
Sixth Grade
All A's
Jennifer Barnes, Joshua Bax-
ley, Beth Daniels, Rita Dietz,


Lloyd Husband III, Mandy Little,
Ike Mincy
A's & B's
Crystal Hand, Jasmine
McMillion, Jennifer Kemp, Holly
Atkins, Alisha Collins, Miranda
Harvey, Ashley Lister, Almee Prid-
geon, Joseph Whitfleld, Lee Lin-
ton, Richard Maddox, William
Hughes, Jay Laster, Thad Morris,
Chad Roberts, Luke Taunton.


Williams
Third Grade
All A's
Colby Anderson, Teresa Jack-
son, Kristin Jones, Brandy Mac-
arages, Stefanie McDaniel, Mandy
Vickery, Christina Williamson,
Tiffany Wills
A's & B's
Nicholas Hall, Stephen Pip-
pin, Renee Ardire, Jeremy Cain,
Crystal Daniels, Victor Easter,
Crystal Lucas, Joseph McLemore,
Jamie Peters, Jeremy Suber, Jus-
tin Marshall, Bradley Shavers,
Andrea Marquez, Joshua Webb,
Miriam McLemore, Hope Cole-
man, Aaron Gray, Lindsey Har-
vye, Vertis Hysmith, Peter Taun-
ton
Fourth Grade
All A's
Sarah Bailey, Jessica Cole,
Andrew Davis, Russell Knee, Ste-
phen Price
A's & B's
April Clayton, Silvia Daniels,
Brandy Ake, Crystal Collins, Tim-
othy Harvey, Melissa Babb, Gayla
Carter, Joel Hughes, Tiffany
Smith, Rocky Traylor, Keven
Brown, Renece Jackson, Daniel
Miller, Chad Patterson, George
Wolinski, Colin Hutchison, Katri-
na Melvin, Rebecca Pitts
Fifth Grade
All A's
Amanda Atchison, Austin
Atchison, Thelma Bryant, Tana
Copeland, Elizabeth Dietz, Jeffery
Foster, Kristi Gay, Victoria
McClellan, Amy St. Clair, Jennifer
Williams, Jessica Williams
A's & B's
Stephanie Ake, Steven Ake,
Kenneth Ardire, Kristal Bailey,
Dave Davis, James Taunton,

Sr. Citizens

Offer Booths

For Festival
The Gulf County Senior Citi-

zens are accepting applications
for booths for the third annual
Arts and Crafts Festival. The Fes-
tival will be held December 7th
and 8th. The booth spaces will be
12' x 12'. You may rent as many
as you desire for $25.00 for both
days. The festival grounds is lo-
cated at the First Union Bank
park by the bay in downtown Port
St Joe. There will be live enter-
tainment, all kinds of food, kiddy
rides and attractions, drawing for
a handmade quilt, delicious sea-
food and much more.
There will be an information
booth, live broadcast, security
and a lot of friendly people to
help wherever they are needed.
The booths will be open from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday,
December 7, and from 12 noon to
5 p.m. on Sunday, December 8th.
There will be prizes for Best Over-
all and Best in Each Category.
Prizes will depend on the number
of entries. The judging will be
conducted Saturday around 1-2
p.m.
Please call the Gulf County
Senior Citizens for additional in-
formation at 229-8466.

Davis Speaks to
Lions About Drugs
Sherry Davis, supervisor of
the Gulf Outpatient Clinic, spoke
at the weekly meeting of the Port
St. Joe Lions Club last Wednes-
day. Mrs. Davis gave a detailed
presentation on the Chemical Ad-
diction Recovery Effort (CARE)
that the clinic manages for six lo-
cal counties, including Gulf.
CARE is a private non-profit
organization to help families and
individuals to evaluate their
needs for treating chemical addic-
tion. Families are involved, be-
cause often a family member's
addiction can be more devastat-
ing to those close to them than it
is to the individual.
For more information about
this very worthwhile service, con-
tact Sherry Davis at 227-1128.
The office is located at 302 Third
Street, Port St. Joe.


A quaint seafood restaurant on the Apalachicola River

'BOSS OYSTER"


er Street 653-9364
AUGHT LOCAL SEAFOOD
12 NOON 10:00 P.M.


SEAFOOD: STEAMED & SMOKED
OYSTER ROAST
PIT COOKED BAR-B-CUE
* *
ALWAYS AVAILABLE:
Fresh Apalachicola Bay Oysters
(15 Different Ways)


WATERFRONT PATIO DINING

FEATURING
BOBBY WESLEY: Acoustical guitar, Fri-
day, Saturday and Sunday, 7-10 p.m.


TOTAL LIGHTING SERVICES


We have discounts
to help you drive down
the cost of car insurance.
If the cost of your car insurance seems to be heading in the wrong direction,
see if Allstate can help turn things around.
We have discounts that can help you save money.
You can save by having a good driving record. Or by driving a car equipped
with air bags or a four-wheel anti-lock brake system. Even by insuring more than one
car with Allstate. _Ail tfa
Which Allstate car insurance discounts do you
qualify for? Just give us a call to find out. We'll get your You're In good hands.
car insurance costs headed in the right direction. t*ae hNe riaNoyttliro. kh.il
GASKIN-GRADDY
Insurance Company
Call Collect 639-5077 or 639-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
1-800-782-6802
Serving the Panhandle Since 1931





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DA(l *)Z 'rTmuv UTAD DirUT UT 15 -.aR ftq 1


Only the Legislators Toward Understanding
Rev. Jerry Huft, Rector St. James and St. John's Churches

1an IVJS app ropri ate don't generate your own faith given faith on those blind spots
don't you? See Romans 12:3. Any *you will begin to see things in a
Faith you may have Is a gift from different light.
tGod.) To do this you must take
IState's L otto F un ds The old expression, "If you charge of your own actions. If you


A news article this week tells
of a couple who faked the win-
ning Lotto number. At this writ-
ing they were both in Leon
County jail facing a possible five
year sentence and a $5,000 fine.
Every once in a while some-
body tries to cheat the Lotto. No-
body can do it with a faked card
because of the system's built-in
checks and balances. Only legis-
lators can misappropriate Lotto
funds. So why do mere citizens
even try?
I think it is because of a kind
of blindness to values' that we
learn from the world. Value-
blindness easily replaces value-
awareness. It even happens to de-
vout and successful Christians.
We probably all know people
who have good records of church
attendance, raise fine families,
and behave like perfect ladies and
gentlemen. That is until you
touch their value-blind spot.
That blind spot may deal with
your race. gender, ethnic origin,


Catch (lie jkrii
t UE uItEO METHOMTSCNURCH


your social station, the amount of
money you have, the state you
are from, or even the school you
attended. Sometimes the blind
spot extends into sexual and fi-
nancial malfeasance.
It's not only the televangelist
who has his shortcomings parad-
ed across the front pages who
have these problems. It's all of
us.
I know of a grandmother in a
city not far from here who was a
stellar volunteer in her church.
Every child loved her and she was
highly respected by her peers. Yet
an audit disclosed that she had
absconded with several thousand
dollars from her church, where
she served as the treasurer.
What is it that makes us be-
come blind to values? How can
we ignore the very things we hold
to be important in life?
I would like to suggest that
we have value-blindness because
we don't use the faith God has
given us. (You know that you


Constitution and9 onutuint
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........ 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday ...............9:30 a.m.
Fellowship .............5:30 p.m. Thursday ..................7:30 p.m.


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


"The Exciting Place to Worship"


First Baptist Church
102 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Florida

HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
i JAMES ENFINGER, Music/Youth





We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place

BIBLE STUDY...... ............... 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING ..................11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY .... ............. 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ...................5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor
KE!-H PATE ALLEN STEWART
Min. of Music Min. of Education
& Children & Youth


S.,te Study
10 a.m. Sunday
v' :;-/*. : W .esday


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


,: ,KT INGDOM AND THE CHURCH
The terms "church" and "kingdom" are used
nte changeably in Matthew 16:18, 19.
2. The kingdom and the church had the same
i (Matthew 16:18; Mark 1:15; 9:1;
s'e 19:11; Acts 1:6; 2:1-4, 47; 5:11;

J) The kingdom and the church have the same
head. (Colossians 1:18; Revelation 17:14;
.. .Ts 1:22, 23; Acts 17:7; 1 Timothy

', centers the church and the kingdom
upon the same conditions. (John 3:5; Titus
3:5; Acts 2:38; 2 Corinthians 5:17; Gala-
tians 3:27)
5) The church and the kingdom have the same
laws. (Matthew 13:19; Luke 8:11; Matthew
7:21; 1 Corinthians 15:1-3; 1 Thessaloni-
ans 2:13; 2 Thessalonians 1:8)
6) The church and the kingdom have the same
subjects. (Colossians 1:2; 1 Corinthians
14:33; Colossians 1:13; Revelation 1:4-6
ASV: Hebrews 12:23-28)
7) The kingdom and the church have the same
worship. (Luke 22:30; 1 Corinthians 11:17-
30; 1 Corinthians 10:21)
8) The kingdom and the church have the same
owner. (Colossians 1:13; Acts 20:28; Ephe-
sians 5:23, 4:12)
9) The church and the kingdom have like ben-
efits. (Colossians 1:13, 14; Acts 2:38, 47)
10) Members of the kingdom and the church
produce like fruits. (Romahs 14:17; Gala-
...,.., ., Q ?99-9.5; Romans 8:1)


Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
":- Port St. Joe, FL 32456


don't use, you lose it." applies to
faith as much as it does to talents
and skills. If you use your God-


are having trouble with value
blind-spots, I suggest you read
Romans 12 several times. Get to


know that chapter as you know a
good friend.
My prayers are with you as
you apply God's word to your
blind spots. This is especially
true for my recent anonymous
telephone conversationalist, and
for the person who has recently
written a letter of correction to
me.
I ask that you return the fa-
vor of a prayer for me. I don't pre-
tend to know it all. And I have a
policy of taking my own advice


New Doctors At Wewa Center


Three new physicians have
joined the medical staff at the
Wewahitchka Medical Center and
will begin providing services im-
mediately according to Jim,
McKnight, Chief Executive Officer,
at North Florida Medical Centers,
Inc. Dr. Les Wilson, Dr. Beth Cur-
ci, and Dr. Vicki Erwin-Wilsor'x
will have office hours each week'
at the center in Wewahitchka.
All three physicians are
Board Certified in Family Practice
and received their education and
training in Florida.
Dr. Les Wilson is originally.
from Green Cove Springs, and'
completed his undergraduate ed-
ucation at Florida State Universi-
ty. He received his medical degree
from the University of Florida and'
completed his residency at the'
Family Practice Residency at Tal-
lahassee Memorial Regional Medi-
cal Center.
Dr. Elizabeth Curci was
raised in Stark and Key Stone
Heights, where her father was the
town physician. Curci attended
Florida State University where
she received a bachelor degree in
biology. Dr. Curci graduated from
the University of Florida medical
school and completed her family
practice residency at Tallahassee
Memorial Regional Medical Cen-
ter.
Dr. Vicki Erwin-Wilson is
originally from Tallahassee, and
is the wife of Dr. Les Wilson. She
completed her undergraduate ed-
ucation and medical school at the
University of Florida. She also
completed her residency in the
family practice program at Talla-
hassee Regional Medical Center.
'These doctors were recruited
to help us meet our commitment

Honeyville Meth.
Homecoming
The Honeyville United Metho-
dist Church will celebrate its an-
nual homecoming on Sunday, No-
vember 3.
The worship services begin at
10:00 a.m. CT with special music
as well as congregational singing.
Dinner on the grounds will be
served at approximately 12 noon.
Please plan on attending and
worshipping with the Honeyville
Methodist Church congregation.


Dr. Elizabeth P. Curci
to provide the highest quality of
health care for our community,"
said McKnight "They are the first
step to our offering people a
choice of physicians and special-
ists and eventually in-patient ser-
vices."
All these doctors enjoy serv-
ing a variety of patients, includ-
ing children. Dr. Curci, and Dr.
Erwin-Wilson intend to improve
and expand services to women.

Special Services at
HV Church of God
The Highland View Church of
God, located at 323 Sixth Street,
Highland view, will host the Fami-
ly of God Ministry this Sunday,
November 3, with Rev. and Mrs.
John A. Hillis of Homerville, Geor-
gia.
Rev. Hillis is an ordained
minister with 38 years of pastoral
experience in Ohio and the
South. He and Mrs. Hillis both
studied at Lee College and the
Church of God School of Theolo-
gy, Cleveland, Tennessee.
The Hillis' reach-out to the
family of God children, youth,
and adults through anointed
singing, preaching, and visuals
for family involvement.
Dr. Clifton Elmore and con-
gregation extends a cordial wel-
come to all for this weekend. Sun-
day schedule is Sunday School
10 a.m., Morning Worship 10:45
a.m. and Evening Worship 6 p.m.


Dr. Les Wilson
Dr. Vicki Erwin-Wilson








(LUS Nt

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP .. 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL....... 11 a.m.
*SUNDAY SCHOOL
Young Children
Nursery Available
227-1756
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine
Pastor


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church


Worship: I
W7


252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Flordia Church Phone 229-8187
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
r.TWEDNESD'AV Write the Church.


7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellow-
ship "A CHURCH


WITH VISION"


Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade



You are always welcome and visitors are desired at


St. James' Episcopal Church
.. 309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe


EPISCOPAL:

IA

chuc


-SERVICES-
Each Sunday.............. 7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School............................... 9:45 a.m.
The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor


I I


in a friendly
atmosphere
with good
FRIENDS.

Serving Breakfast,
Lunch & Dinner
8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Closed Sundays 6 Days a Week
All You Can Eat
LUNCH BUFFETi ncudesSaladBar4. U

-Specializing In -


*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches eMeals to Go
*Fresh Seafood *Delicious Steaks
r Famous Fresh $9 85
i A P- .tI IA m 1 ma


SEAFOOD PLATTRK


302 FourthSt 27-10 9 PrtSt.Jo


Our
%- A


Only


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


Come And



Talk With



The Talking



Pumpkin






















Thursday, October 31

6:00 to 9:00 p.m.
WMTO will be broadcasting LIVE At
Port St. Joe City Hall
Brought to you by WMTO and
Costin's Insurance, Citizens Federal, Pic's
Convenience Store, Centell Cellular, Pate's,
Hannon Insurance, Linda's
k______________


1"- '


before I offer it to others. So I will
continue to look for my blind
spots, and I will do my best to ap-
ply the measure of faith God has
appointed to me.
I pray that all of us will find
our value-blind spots. Then with
God's help we will see things
more clearly.


OCIL IN

WHEELS






By: Richard Miller
*Good news: the death rate
from motor vehicle accidents
has dropped 20 percent in the
last decade, according to the
National Safety Council.
*What causes car first? Acci-
dents, faulty wiring and/or leak-
ing fuel. Poor insulation can
cause a short and, eventually,
a fire. On fuel lines, the prob-
lem is often a poorly tightened
connection, or a leaking fuel
pump diaphragm. Be alert to
the odor of gas in your car.
*It's never wise to pass a truck
on the right, and worse yet to
drive side by side with the
truck. The driver of the truck
may not see a car alongside its
right front fender, and ray side-
swipe it.
*A knocking or pinging noise
under the hood when a car ac-
celerates is an indication of
too-low-octane gasoline or the
need for improved timing or oth-
er tune-up adjustment.
*Old truth: a large percentage
of cars that are stolen had
been left -just for a moment,
of course unlocked with the
keys in the ignition. To protect
your car, lock it and pocket the
key.
*New-Used Cars: New truth:
our new models are well-
engineered for a better ride.
Come in for a test drive at
Qufford

Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales


`----";


DPArG 2H


I


THESTR.POT S. OB F e HUSDY.OCT 3. 99


I


-----








We're Proud of Gulf County's


SENIOR CITIZENS .....


Gulf County's Senior Citizens contribute greatly to
their community .. and the community is invited to
help them raise funds in their annual Rock-A-Thon
this Saturday at the Centennial Building. Monies
raised will help fund the Meal on Wheels program
which delivers hot, nourishing meals to senior
citizens who are unable to leave their homes. 4
We're proud of this organization which helps its ,
fellow citizens ... and we're proud of our
hometown.


TABLERITE QUALITY 1/4 LOIN


.8tA~-


TABLERITE QUALITY CENTER CUT $ 99
Pork Chops .............. Lb.


TABLERITE QUALITY 1/2 or WHOLE CUT & WRAPPED FREE
pnr I/nin 14-17 lb.,avg.
Pork Loin mmim*.m m i. i....i Lb.
TABLERITE QUALITY BONE-IN FAMILY PAK
Strip Steak ............. Lb.
TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS BEEF
Rump Roast .......... Lb.
TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS BEEF
Round Roast ......... Lb.


IGA GOOD & CRISP 12 OZ.
SNACK CRACKERS ........ 79o
CREAM STYLE OR WHOLE KERNEL 16.5 OZ. '2/99
DELMONTE CORN ..... 2
DELMONTE FRENCH STYLE OR CUT 16 OZ. 2 /99
GREEN BFANS ........ 99
IGA 18 OZ.
CORN FLAKES ............... 99
BAMA 32 OZ. JAR
GRAPE JELLY ............$1.29
24 CT.
FANTASTIK SWIPES $1.79
IGA 16 Oz.
SALTINE CRACKERS ....... 590
IGA 64 OZ. BTL. 1 19
APPLE JUICE ............. .19
IGA STANDARD 25 FT. /99
ALUMINUM FOIL .......... 2/99
KEEBLER
DELUXE GRAHAMS ... $1.59
KEEBLER
FUDGE STRIPES ........ *1.59
GOLDEN FLAKE PLAIN & FLAVORED
POTATO CHIPS ...............9..


TABLERITE QUALITY BEEF FAMILY PAK
Cube Steak ........... Lb.
IGA
Sliced Bacon......mm... 1oL2oz.

KLEENEX 4ROLL PKG,

Toilet Tissue .
Limit 1 Bonus Buy Item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entities you to two
Items, and $30 purchase entitles you to 3 bonus buy Items Exaluding Cigar-
ettes, Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales


$169

$2 79

$189

$189

$219
89,


I


EIe]MLkI:i


6.125 OZ. IN OIL OR WATER


Starkist Tuna


Limit 1 Bonus Buy tem with $10 Food Order. $20 Order ntites you to two
Items, and $30 purchase entitles you to 3 bonus buy Items. Excluding Cigar-
ettes, Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales --


9W9

J


:Is1~II~zI:1Ikin~ -,


BRYAN CENTER CUT
Smoked Pork Chops. u.
IGA MEAT
Sliced Bologna ...... o.
JIMMY DEAN HOT OR MILD
Roll Sausage ........ 16 oz.
IGA SLICED
Cooked Ham ......... 16oz.


BRYAN
Juicy Jumbos


.m..mmmm. 16 oz.


ZEN SLICED
aef Liver ............... Lb.
JIM DANDY 1 LB. BOX
\ QUICK GRITS ................
BI-RITE SINGLE ROLLS
PAPER TOWELS .........


JIFFY 8.5 OZ.
CORN MUFFIN MIX .... /89
IGA SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY 18 OZ.
PEANUT BUTTER .......1.59
FRITO-LAY LAY'S REG. $1.39
POTATO CHIPS .............. 99"


2 LITER
PEPSI
& Pepsi Products


KRAFT REGULAR 32 OZ.

MAYONNAISE(
Limit 1 Bonus Buy Item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entitles you to two
Items, and $30 purchase entities you to 3 bonus buy Items. Excluding Cigar-
ettes, Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales


FROENFODS


I DAIY PODUTS.


OZARK TURKEY, CHICKEN OR MAC & CHEESE 8 OZ.
PO PIES l


McKENZIE SPECKLED 16 OZ.
BUTTER-
BEANS ......,


BUTTERMILK OR REGULAR 8 CT.
990 EGGO
WAFFLES,


LIGHT N LIVELY ASSORTED 8 OZ.
100 YOGURT


SEALTEST REGULAR 12 OZ.
COTTAGE
CHEESE


jm..


.... 891


* U U U
SNOWCROP 64 OZ. CTN.
Five Alive


PARKAY 16 OZ.
Squeeze Margarine


Hamlin Oranges


White Grapefruit


WHITE SEEDLESS
Grapes ........................ Ib.
D'ANJOU
Pears ........................ Ib.


FRESH
A Broccoli .................


990

89o


bunch 99o


FANCY
Pole Beans ................ lb.
YELLOW
Onions ................ 3 Ib. bag


5 lb. bag


P~~4- :~
-~.
- S -~ -
~


Pink
Grapefruit


VINE-RIPENED TRAY
Tomatoes
CALIFORNIA
Carrots
DELICIOUS
Yellow Cco


990

880

39o

69

990


$279
$169

$199

$279

$189


89,


2/991
2/790


FLORIDA


m.u.ummmuummm


g09


FOODLINERS .
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
'for your shopping convenience.
Prices Good Oct. 30-Nov. 5),. S


RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


Y PAK
............... lb.

.............. 2 Ib. bag.

)rn ......... 4 ears


a


dl59


,, ---dC~-S~P


jig


f








VA Ai41T3TM ti'AAD DfUDI-OT T.hU U'T ''UTTQ1AV (Ut"I Z5It1001


I FlordaGeingAdvi


Landscaping Harm

This May Sound Strange but It's a Proven Reality


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
This may sound hard to be-
lieve, but some landscape im-
provement projects can end up
causing more harm than good.
We're talking about a particular
problem that's more likely to af-
fect you if your house is on an
uneven lot, or if you're planning
some major change, such as add-
ing a pool, building a deck or pat-
io, or even creating a special flow-
er bed, any work that will change
the soil level ar und plants.
Quite oftel. projects that in-
volve changing the land level
around your home, even the addi-
tion of what seems like a small
amount of soil fill, can have a dis-
astrous effect on established
trees and shrubs. When you add
fill around trees and shrubs, you
may block some or all of the air
and water they need to survive.
Sometimes symptoms appear
within or so. They may not show
up for several years. But, you can
just about bet that if you make a
significant change in the soil level
around a tree or shrub, it will be
seriously affected and probably
killed.
In this article I'll describe
some of the symptoms of soil fill
injury, and I'll offer some advice
on how to prevent such difficul-
ties. My information was provided
by Extension Urban Horticulture
Specialist Dr. Robert Black, of the


University of Florida's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences.
The damage shows up first as
small, yellowed leaves, a lot of
dead twigs, and numerous suck-
ers along the main trunk. Some-
times, the very large branches on
a tree will die. The extent of the
injury depends on the type, age,
and condition of the tree or
shrub, the depth and type of fill,
the available drainage and some
other minor factors.
Obviously, the deeper the fill,
the more serious the problem will
be. But, the type of soil also is
important. For example, clay soil
causes the most injury. It's so
fine in texture that it almost com-
pletely shuts out air and water.
Just an inch or two of clay fill can
cause trouble. On the other hand,
you can usually add up to four
inches of sandy soil without caus-
ing root problems. Gravel fill is
the safest because it lets air and
water through freely.
You also need to think about
the kind of tree you have. You
can expect serious fill problems
with maples, oaks, and ever-
greens. On the other hand, such
trees as ash, locust, white elms
and sycamores are hardly both-
ered. Time is another critical fac-
tor. If you leave fill around a tree
for an extended period it isn't
likely that you'll be able to save it,
once injury symptoms appear.
The key to solving the problem is


0-m


All forms Of Insurance
Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages -Group *Life *Boat
*Hospitalization *Mobile Homes

COSTING INSURANCE AGENCY
SInc.
1-r- 0322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899







A






0. Lee Mullis, M.D.










,Bay Eye & Surgical Center,
A


I I





11600 Jenks Ave;, Panama City
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT,
1-800-227-5704
mmmmmmmmmmm Irm a n m wagram a-m Imm m mmm m m


to prevent damage from occurring
- by taking steps to insure that
the tree will have adequate air
and water after the fill is added.
We should point out that this
can be expensive. So, if you need
to add soil around a young tree,
one that's already in poor condi-
tion, or a tree of a species you
aren't particularly fond of, you're
probably better off replacing it af-
ter you've raised the land level.
But, if you're determined to
save the tree, you really need to
build what amounts to a custom
drain field around it, using agri-


Roy Lee
Carter

County
Extension
Director


a Trick or Treat at BSJCC

Hobgoblins, ghouls, witches, and the like are invit-
ed to trick or treat with the residents at Bay St. Joseph
Care Center on Halloween night. The residents are
31 looking forward to handing out treats (with no tricks)
to all the little outfitted in their Halloween costumes in
the lobby from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Have a safe trick or treat night!


cultural tiles short lengths of
pipe made for this kind of job.
You'll also need a brick or stone
well around the tree trunk. As we
said, this is fairly expensive and
complicated. Actually, it's a pro-
ject for a qualified professional.
However, if you want to tackle
this kind of job yourself, you
should seek expert advice before
you begin. Check with a local
nurseryman, or your county ex-
tension agent.


Allen de Hart, a 25,000-mile
hiker and author has described
his Florida explorations in Adven-
turing in Florida. Published by the
Sierra Club Books as one of its
world-wide travel guides and dis-
tributed by Random House, the
446-page book goes on sale in
Florida bookstores this month.
From the Okefenokee Swamp
to the Perdido River to the Florida
Keys, Adventuring in Florida is a
comprehensive coverage of more
than 21 million acres of forests,
parks, preserves, wildlife refuges,
lakes, rivers, marshes, beaches,
springs, savannahs, islands and
reefs.
Some of the areas described
in or near Port St. Joe are St. Jo-
seph Peninsula State Park, Indi-

Venipuncture
Course Offered
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege is offering a four-contact
hour course titled "Venipuncture"
on Saturday, November 16, from
8:00 a.m. to 12 noon CT. The
course will be taught by Theresa
Macintosh and the fee is $12.00
for Florida residents.
"Venipuncture" is designed
for experienced healthcare profes-
sionals who want to improve
blood withdrawal skills. It in-
cludes both didactic and techni-
cal training. Upon completion of
this course, students will be able
to perform routine phlebotomies
using standard aseptic, venipunc-
ture techniques.
Advanced registration is re-
quired and is limited to health-
care workers only. Students must
register at the Lifelong Learning
Registration Office in the Student
Union East. Registration dead-
line is November 3. For further
information, call 1-872-3823.

School Lunch
A Menu





The menus have been an-
nounced for the Gulf County
Schools system. Some meals may
change due to the availability of
certain food items.
Monday, November 4: coun-
try fried steak or meatloaf, turnip
greens, mashed potatoes and gra-
vey, cornbread, milk and cookie
Tuesday, November 5: turkey
or ham sandwich, French fries,
milk and fruit pie
Wednesday, November 6:
sloppy Joe, fruit cup, English
peas, milk and cookie
Thursday, November 7:
cheeseburger, buttered corn, milk
and cake
Friday, November 8: chicken,
applesauce, English peas, roll,
milk, rice and gravy.


an Pass and St. Vincent National
Wildlife Refuge, and Dead Lakes
State Recreation Area.
De Hart's explorations not
only describe his personal experi-
ences, but offers the reader infor-
mation on what to see and do,
where to stay, and where to be-
gin. There is information on the
climate, history, names, address-
es, .and telephone numbers for
natural areas and chambers of
commerce, and services and
amenities for each adventure.
The 26 major adventures may
be a combination or singular ex-
perience of' camping, backpack-
ing, canoeing, fishing, diving, bi-
cycling, horseback riding, surfing,
bird-watching, and exploring. De
Hart says he may be the only hik-
er to have hiked all the trails of
the Florida Trail System. "For the
past 30 years I have criss-crossed
the Sunshine State to research
firsthand all the state's natural
beauty." In addition to Florida,
the book also includes adven-
tures on Georgia's Sea Islands
and Okefenokee Swamp.
Appendices in the book in-
clude a bibliography, a directory
of organizations for additional in-
formation, a glossary, and lists of
navigation charts, scuba diving
areas, and endangered or threat-
ened plant and animal species.
De Hart's interest in Florida's
natural environment began as a
pre-school child in Virginia when
his older brother read him John
La Gorce's "Florida: the Fountain
of Youth" from National Geo-
graphic. "All my wishes to explore
Florida became true when I re-
ceived a research grant from the
National Science Foundation and
I moved to Tallahassee 25 years
late," he says.

Social Security
Help Available
Most Social Security business
can be handles over the phone.
You are invited to call Social Se-
curity at 1-800-772-1213.
If this is not possible, you
may come to the office located at
30 West Government Street, Pan-
ama City. The office is open Mon-
day through Friday from 8:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. CT, except on
national holidays. If you cannot
come to Panama City, you may
meet the Social Security repre-
sentative as shown below:
Port St. Joe: Courthouse, first
and third Monday from 11:00
a.m. to 12:00 noon ET, November
4, 18, December 2 and 16.
Wewahitchka: SES Office, on
the second Monday of each
month from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
noon CT, December 16.


Now Under Construction

THE COTTAGES AT...

BARRIER DUNES


Pre-Construction Offering
For A Limited Time
Furnished Models Starting at C
* Single Family Homes
* 2 Bedrooms, 2 Full Baths
* Landscaped Lot Included
* Clubhouse With Pool
and Fitness Center


nly79,900
* Pitch and Putt Golf
* (2) Lighted Tennis Courts
* Walk to the Gulf of Mexico
(700' of beach front)
* Much More


For more information call:
(904) 229-2777 or (800) 624-3964

THE COTTAGES ATBARRIER DwES
Star Route 1 Box 223 Port St. Joe, FL 32456



NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the 1991 Tax Roll has
been delivered by the Gulf County Property Ap-
praiser to the Gulf County Tax Collector. The Tax
Roll is open for collection beginning November 1,
1991.
The Tax Collector's office is located in the Gulf
County Courthouse, Room 100, 1000 Fifth Street,
Port St. Joe, Florida. Office hours are 9 a.m. 5
p.m., Monday through Friday except holidays. The
mailing address is 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, FL
32456.
Real and personal property taxes will be collect-
ed as levied by the following taxing authorities:
Gulf County Board of County Commissioners
Gulf County School Board
Northwest Florida Water Management District
City of Port St. Joe
City of Wewahitchka
St. Joseph Fire Control District
Tupelo Fire Control District
Howard Creek Fire Control District
Overstreet Fire Control District
DISCOUNT SCHEDULE
4% Discount on payments made during the
month of November
3% Discount on payments made during the
month of December
2% Discount on payments made during the
month of January
1% Discount on payments made during the
month of February
Payable without discount during the month of
March.
Taxes delinquent April 1.
EDA RUTH TAYLOR
TAX COLLECTOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
TELEPHONE NO. 229-6116


THE TREAD MILL


Jeff Powell, owner/operator
Open Monday Friday, 8:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m. and Saturday 8:00 a.m.


-12:00 p.m. \


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


*Auto *Home

*Business

*Flood *Life

*Bonds


Representing "'Tie Travelers'
The Insurance Store Since 1943


J


We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


THE ALIGNMENT
TREAD
MILL
307 Hwy. 98
o Highland
view


Computerized Wheel

ALIGNMENT
Complete 2 and 4 Wheel
Alignments

$2450and Up


NEW TIRES USED




ul uW


4- Z mrPsf
Complete Line of
Passenger & L.T.
RADIALS

BOAT TRAILER TIRES

GALVANIZED WHEELS


OIL & LUBE


ROTATE & BALANCE
L.T. Tires
$18.95 Tax Higher
Oil, Lube & Filter....... 18.95 & Up
CALL JEFF OR BOBBY
229-6709


8:30 till 6:00

Monday through Friday

221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133


I


,


i


-41 1 R k'


oaGE 4a


k


TH SA. OR T.JO-PT -TURDA.OC- 1 19


I


Walking Author


Includes Gulf Co.


In Latest Book



























Saveway's Sizzlers


16 oz. Duncan Hines 99l
Frosting ..................
16 oz. Bush's Hot
Chili Beans ......... 2/89
Microwave Jolly Jack
Popcorn.................... 189
23 oz.
Ultra Gain................. 179
Be Sure to Bring the Kids
to Visit Our Halloween
Booth After the Parade!


VAI
rx, ..
OF,.-


Family Pak Sliced
SLAB BACON ............... Ib. 99
Family Pak Boneless
SIRLOIN STEAK .............. 1.89
Tender Western
T-BONE STEAK ............ lb. 3.89


A Man-Sized Steak:
PORTERHOUSE STEAK


2.0.. lb.3.99


All Meat Grill Perfect
RIB EYE STEAK ........... lb. 3.99
Quarter Loin
PORK CHOPS .............. lb.1.49


Aberdeen Roll
SAUSAGE ................... lb. 88
Aberdeen
SLICED BACON ............. lb. 890
10 lb. Bucket
CHITTERLINGS ........... lb. 2.99


HAM 'N' ALL SMOKED SAUSAGE... lb. 1.99. 10 LB. BOX 18.90


Bag Quartered Fryer
Thighs ................... 2 6


18 1/4 oz. Duncan Hines
Cake Mix
jExcept Angel Food


i f99$9


Family Pak Choice
Drumsticks ...LB.49


12 oz. Cans Real Value
Soft Drinks


6/
Cans


5 Ibs. or more
Grd. Chuck...LB. 1.49


99


DELUXE
CAKE MI


MT T UNII:


Mrs. Smith's 26 oz. M9 1
Pumpkin Pie...... 1.99
Eggo Homestyle
Waff les................... 1 oz 1.39
16 oz. Real Value Green Peas .... 379
40 oz. Real Value Fries ................990

Shedds Country Crock
Spread......................3... 1b. 1.79
Merico
Cinnamon Rolls...... 9.5 oz. 1.19
Real Value

SealtestSour Cream 8 oz. 2/1.00


A..* 20 lb. B4


SOT

Yellow Squash
pound 69o

Fresh Firm Head
Green Cabbage......................3 lbs. 990
18 Count
Fresh Broccoli..........................bch. 99'
Jumbo
Yellow Onions...................3 lbs.87
Georgia
Sweet Potatoes.................l.....lb. 390
California
C elery ............................................ stalk 5 90


rAl


- m


APPLE
POUND


mS



in B ^


.i t


sr, qprF~~


o~w, 11CI~


-,qql


I


I k% 7%. L1










PAGE_ 6B TESA.PR T OF HRDY C.3,19


One acre land at Ponderosa
Pines, Jones Homestead, $12,000.
229-6581 for information.
2tc 10/31
1 1/2 lots on Cypress Avenue.
Not cleared off, $12,000. Call 647-
8424. tfc 10/17
Property for Sale: Want
$200,000.00 property (Panama City
to Destin) in exchange for furnished
town house, Barrier Dunes, pool, club
house, lighted tennis court, security,
etc. Lovely white sand beaches, pay
cash balance or will lease my property
for 1 year. Thelma Wright, 904-229-
2631. 3tc 10/17

1982 14'x70' Fleetwood mobile
home, must see to appreciate. Price
listed below appraisal to sell. $7,500.
Call 227-1313. tfc 11/7
2 bdrm. trailer on 3/4 acre, adja-
cent to Wetappo Creek, fenced, Ig.
screen porch, storage bldg., $19,000
assume. mortgage. 229-8581 or 227-
1566. tfc 11/7

INDIAN PASS. This 4 bdrm.,
home has direct access to the beach
& is only 1 mile from a public boat
landing. Has cen. h&a, with heat re-
coverey sys., Ig. screened porch & fur-
nished kitchen. Owners must sell to
settle estate. Can be purchased for
only $42,500. For information call
904-227-1381 or 227-1501.
2tc 10/31
Dalkeith Road Front Lots:
1 10'x400', between Douglas and Wil-
lis Landing. Call George, 229-6031.
tfc 11/7

Beautiful lot on St. Joseph Drive.
Adjacent to hospital. Prestigious
neighborhood. $32,500. Call Bill Ko-
ran, 229-6330. tfc 11/7

50x150 lot w/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
tfc 11/7
50x100 lot w/12x60 MH, 16x20
shop, all improvements. $21,500. 4th
and 2nd St. Beacon Hill. Financing
available. 648-KENT. tfc 11/7


R BS F S SASLE AAUS .IOBAE


150'x120' commercial lot on
Hwy. 98 west of Highland View.
$55,000. Call George, 229-6031.
tfc 11/7

For sale by owner: 2 bdrm. house
w/stove & refrig., nice lot w/shade
trees. City water & private pump.
$26,000. Adjacent lot available at
$15,000. Canal St., 1/2 block from
beach, St. Joe Beach, 904-482-3884,
Marianna. tfc 11/7
3 bedroom, 1 bath house, corner
13th & Garrison, $49,500. Call
George, 229-6031. tfec 11/7
Very Nice! 3 bdrm., 2 ba. house,
stone fireplace in great room, great lo-
cation, 2011 Juniper Ave. Call for ap-
pointment, 229-6427. tfc 11/7
1/2 acre MOBILE HOME LOTS.
12 mi. north of Mexico Beach on
Overstreet Road (Hwy. 386), Creek-
view Sub., no down payments, $86
per month. 229-6031. tfc 11/7
Two acres on county road off of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 11/7
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 11/7

GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)
BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Bias, Florida
(904) 229-2777
1-800-624-3964
tfc 11/7



SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL

(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 229-8988
PORT ST. JOE
104 21st St.: Very nice, recently updated brick home, 3BR/2ba, living room, dining,.
den with fireplace, new roof, central h/a, large kitchen, garage, covered patio,
outside storage and fenced yard $77,900.00.
139 Westcott Circle: Why build when you can walk into this lovely, immaculate 3
(split) bedroom, 2 bath home with large great room, fire place, dining room, 2
car garage and many amenities too numerous to mention. Landscaped back
yard has privacy fence and screen enclosed pool with connecting walkway and
patio. A must see $105,000.00.
419 18th St.: Sp Tacy toa"./2,ll baoh /ome with lots of built-is, living room
with fireplacA.l', -Br, li, den, fenced back yard and workshop
located in nice neighborhood on corner lot. $72,000.00
712 Woodward Ave.: Very neat 2 BR 2 bath home, central h/air, located on corner
lot, outside storage. Perfect starter or retirement home. $33,000.00.
1402 Long Ave.: Well kept 2 BR/1 bath home with c/h & air plus 2 rental aptsl 2 bd/
1 bath each. All for $59,500.
1314 Garrison Ave.: 2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
backyard. $35,000.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$125,o00900. REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $50,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
OAK GROVE
105 Hunter St.: 3BR, 1 bath with extra room which could be 4th BR, living room, din-
ing room, den, screened porch, privacy fence, carpet, ch/a on 2 lots.
$29,500.00.
HOWARD CREEK
Corner of Deer and Perch: 2 BR, 1 bath mobile home, furnished, ch/a, utility build-
ing with washer and dryer on 2 lots, covered outside patio or car port. $27,000
OVERSTREET
2 BR, 2 bath, with fireplace is on approx. 6.1 acres. Approx. 1,512 sq. ft. plus large
deck. Only $52,000
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2 bath homa located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must see to appreciate.
$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
1908 & 1910 Long Ave.: 2 nice high lots, 60x140 and 68x172.
Cape San Bias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part.
Gulf Aire: single family residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 corner lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue, $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide,
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.
RENTAL
Exceptionally Nice 2BR 2 bath apartment. Carpet, central h/air, all kitchen applianc-
es. Washer/dryer hookup and outside storage. $400.00 monthly with $200 de-
posit.


Aluminum tool box, fits Fleetside
Ford $1,75; Side Band base 40 chan-
nel President radio, $100. Call 227-
1568 after 5 p.m. tfc 10/31
16' travel trailer, air condition-
er, stove, sleeps 5-6. 827-1682. $700.
ltp 10/31
Airline Tickets Northwest from
Panama City to Washington D.C.
Leave 12/20, return 12/30. Round
trip, $200. Call 227-7139.
King size waterbed, mirrored
headboard, 6 drawers, $225. Single
bed complete $45. Oak desk with
chair, $60. Table with 4 chairs,. $50.
large bookcase $20, 120 gal. water
tank, $40. Queen size futon, $20.
One large dresser, $50. Call 229-
6182. Itc 10/31





Carpenter & Builder: I will do
anything from hanging a door, includ-
ing building a house, remodeling, 35
years experience. Brie Ayers, 229-
6666. 4tp 10/31
I will clean your apartment,
house, condo or office. References,
229-8073, 229-6491, 229-6274, or
227-1738. Please call 229-8073.
2tp 10/24
Residential, Business, Office,
and Rental Cleaning. Local area. De-
pendable, honest (with lowest rates in
area) and still receive cleaning the
way you want it done. Rex Andrews,'
229-6799. 4tp 10/17
Don't Take It to the Dumpl Sell
me your broken VCR or TV. For beer
money. Call Jim 647-3116. Will pick
up. tfc 10/24
Narcotics Anonymous
Open Meetings on Monday and
Friday nights, 8 p.m.
at 302 Reid Ave.,
229-6348

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Prems
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tic 11/7


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899

tfc 11/7

THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or dtop/off

tfc 11/7

C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing.
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box A C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfc 11/7

We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns
*
Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-386. Howard Creek
tfc 11/7

JOHN F. LAW
LAYWER 1-2654794
24 Years of Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-tional
Diseases, Injuries and Accidents. No
charge for first conference.
tfc 11/7

COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581
trc 11/7


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer- St. Joe Beach
648-5043



BOB'S PAINT &
BODY SHOP
29 Continuous Years of
Automotive Body Repair

Rebuild Wrecks Body
& Window Work
Expert Automotive Painting
FREE ESTIMATES on Your Body Work
Baltzell Ave. Phone 227-7229
tfc 11/7


King size bed, $175; full size bed
$125; mattress, box springs &
frames. 647-3131. Itc 10/31
HAPPY JACK MANGE MEDI-
CINE: Promotes healing and hair
growth to any mange, hot spot, or
fungus on dogs & horses without ster-
oids. At BARFIELD'S LAWN & GAR-
DEN, 229-2727. l0tc 10/31

To buy or sell Avon call Sarah
Kemp at 229-6495. after 5 p.m. or
weekends. thru Dec. 91
Nature's Diet Tea. Weight man-
agement, digestive aid, appetite sup-
pressant. Natural cleanser, over-
whelming response. For more
Information call Beth at 229-8919.
tfc 11/7


HAPPY JACK HI-ENERGY DOG
FOOD, specifically formulated for
hunting dogs, field competitors &
growing pups. BARFIELDS' LAWN &
GARDEN, 229-2727. 12tc 9/5
Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyn-
dall Parkway, Panama City, FL
32404. 763-7443. tfc 11/7

Older piano with a roll top, good
for beginner or for antique collector,
asking $600. 229-6965 after 4:00
p.m. tfc 6/6

1969 22' Terry travel trailer,
$1,450. 648-5659. tfc 11/7


Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOOl 227-1105.
tfc 11/7
FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.




Situation Wanted: Mature person
will do work in exchange for sleeping
room. Call 647-8641 evenings.
Itp 10/31


RADS &SE


J. 0. Stone Septic Tank Ser-
vice of Blountstown serving Gulf
County since 1965. Free estimates.
674-8745. 4tc 10/10
Sewing and Alterations: drapes,
complete outfits, repairs. Call Daisy,
at Aline's, 229-6600, or 229-6972.
tfc 11/7

j Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
% Reg. Stated Communication
1st and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
G. Godwin, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 5/23


Remodeling SandBlasting
Decks New Construction
Free Estimates 648-5886
TAYLOR CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Mike Taylor P. 0. Box 13459
Lic. #RG0051240 Mexico Beach, FL
4tc 10/31



AVOID

CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Alien Memorial Way @ Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460, trc 11/

STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 11/7

Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 11/7


Ui U U Bill Quaranta
Homes Outhouses
t 11/7Old-Fashioned Quality
Commercial Buildings
Hand-Nailed Craftsmanship
Log Cabins Additions


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!








Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. trc 11/7



ST. JOE

RENT-ALL, Inc.

Small Engine Repairs
Lawnmowers
Weedeaters
Tillers
Blowers
Chain saws
Small Engine Sales
We now make chains
for most chainsaws.
706 1st St. St. Joe
227-2112
Bob Ridgley,
Repairman
tfc 11/7


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.

BOOT & SHOE
REPAIR
SAFETY SHOES
COWBOY'S TRADITION
J102 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
tic 11/7


LYLE OFFICE SERVICE
Typing, Resume and
Bookkeeping for
Personal or Business Needs
Call 229-8562 11/7


Residential Interior
Commercial Exterior
JEFF THIMMER
Painting & Wallpaper Services
Reliable, Dependable, tic 11/7
Quality Custom Work
Free estimates Lic. #90373
227-2737 15 yrs. experience
Leave message


Women's Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Church. 227-1145 or 227-1128.


Need It
Rent It
St. Joe Rental-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Port St. Joe 227-2112
tfc 11/7


I
I
I
I
I
I
I
z
0
CE
U
I'

I
I
I
I
L


-- --. COUPON. ,- -..
A Guaranteed Cleaning
I



Carpet Upholstery
Water Damage Odor I
Control n
NO HIDDEN COSTS o
All Jobs Include: 0
*Pre-spray treatment of stains
*Special treatment of heavily
soiled areas
*Most furniture moved I
*A deodorizer of your choice
*Raking
Nov. Special I
3 rooms for $45.00 I
L-shaped OR over 300 sq. ft. rms.
may require additional charge.
647-8889
COUPON .... -J


BARFIELD'S
.LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

* Lawn Mowers
Weed Eaters
Chain Saws \
Generators J
*Pumps
Tillers -
Go-Karts
229-2727
328 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe tr 11/7


GLEN'S PAINT Rebuild Wrecks
L Body & Window Work

& BODY SHOP Expert Painting
S BODY SO P Free Estimates
503 First Street Port St. Joe Insurance Claims
Phone 227-7133 2tp 10/31

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA tc 11/7 904/229-6821


PJ'S ROOFING

ALL TYPES OF ROOFS tfc 11/7
Hot Roofing, Built-Up, 1-Ply System
Free Estimates
Phone (904) 229-6201 PAT TOUSIGNANT


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer tfc 11/7



Terry Parrish Construction Company

New Homes

Additions & Remodeling

All Your Building Needs

WE BUILD TO LAST A LIFETIME!

For Free Estimates, Call 229-8589


PAGE 6B


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 31, 1991













THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCT. 31, 1991


By Holli Hendrix
="


Homecoming is next week
and students are already prepar-
ing for the activities. The theme
this year is commercials. The
days will be as follows: Monday -
Bum Day; Tuesday Twin Day;
Wednesday Hat, Shades, and
Team Day; Thursday Backwards
Day; Friday Purple and Gold
Spirit Day.
Congratulations to the stu-
dents of the week. They are Molly
Jones and Charlie Lanford in the
seventh grade. Good job! Keep up



Cancer Society

BOD Meeting
The South Gulf County Board
of Directors for the American
Cancer Society will be meeting
Wednesday, November 6 at 12:00
noon.
The meeting will be held at J.
Patrick's Restaurant





Dance Friday

Sonny Morris and the Coun-
try Gold Band will be providing
the music for your dancing and
listening pleasure Friday, Novem-
ber 8 from 7:00 to 11:00 p.m. CT
at the W.T. Neal Civic Center. The
Center is located on Hwy. 69
North in Blountstown.
The Blountstown Singles
Club invites you to join them for
only $3.50 per person.


Cook needed, St. Joseph Bay
Country Club, over 21 years of age.
Must have own transportation and
work varied schedule. Contact Susan,
227-1757. tfc 10/24

RN, part-time, every other week-
end. Bay St. Joseph Care Center.
Contact Judy Howell at 229-8244.
2tc 10/24

Tupperware part time or full
time. No cash outlay. Free training.
* Company van with advancement.
Transportation ard phone required.
1-800-525-4734 or 904-386-6123.
6tc 10/10

Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
,Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
Apalachicola River, within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
1/2 overtime pay, on-call duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with water, sew-
erage, and lawn maintenance provid-
ed free.
Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
(26) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten (10) paid holidays. Free continu-
ing educational courses offered by
State University $500 annual allow-
ance for job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience; or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst., P. 0. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 11/7

POSTAL JOBS, $11.41 to$14.90/
hr. For exam and application informa-
tion call 219-769-6649 ext. FL-171 9
a.m. 9 p.m., 7 days. 5tp 10/3


NURSING ASSISTANT
POSITIONS
No Experience Necessary
Training Program
Certification Program
Competitive Salary & Benefits
BAY ST. JOSEPH
CARE CENTER
Apply in person
tfc 11/7







Wanted: Motivated Individual In-
terested in building their own busi-
ness with one of America's fastest
growing companies. Call (904) 229-
6336 for exciting details, tfc 11/7

Wanted: Home or homesite on
Cape San Bias, prefer Gulf to road.
Call or write: Sottrel 708-530-0623,
15 W 684 Patricia Lane, Elmherst, IL
60126 20tp 10/3


the hard work.
The varsity Sharks will travel
to Tallahassee to play the Florida
High Demons in a district game
on Friday at 8:00. Everyone at-
tend and support our fighting
Sharksl
Thursday, November 7, there
will be a powder puff game played
between the junior and senior
girls. The SGA invites everyone to
participate in a "feed'n frenzy"
skit during half time of the pow-
der puff game. Prizes will be
awarded to the best three.
Congratulations to the cross
country team on their perfor-
mance in Saturday's Bay County
Invitational Cross Country Meet.
The Purple Pack won the team
championship as they scored 36
points. Bay High placed second
with 52 points, Rutherford was
third with 63 points, and Mosley
came in fourth with 81 points.
Scott Boykin placed first among
the 28 runners. Lee Duren placed
sixth, Shannon Gant seventh,
Bryan Earley eighth, Steve Ailes
14th, Tyrus Rudd 17th, and
Keith McDonald 23rd.
Saturday, the cross country
team will host the 2nd Annual
Shark Invitational Cross Country


Small 2 bedroom trailer, adults
only. No pets. Call 648-8211.
tfc 11/71

Looking for a nicely furnished 3
bdrm., 2 ba. bay home to rent on
Cape San Blas? This home is on one
of the best locations on St. Joseph
Bay. $600 per month + cost of utili-
ties. 6 months to 12 months rental
agreement. For more details call Top
Sale Realty, Inc., 229-2500.
ffc 11/7

LIBERTY MANOR APARTMENTS,
800 Tapper Drive., Port St. Joe, FL./
Affordable housing for the elderly and
the handicapped. Amenities include:
Central heat/air, laundry facilities,
energy efficient construction, stove,
refrigerator, carpet, on-site manager.
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENTS,
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY HOUSING
COMPLEX call 229-6353.
2tc 10/24

2 bedroom duplex, kitchen appli-
ances furnished, windowed porches,
private drive, 150' to beach. 2 adults
preferred. 113 5th St., Mexico Beach.
648-5190. 2tc 10/24

Road 20, White City, 3 bedroom
unfurnished house, on large shaded
lot Deposit required. Call after 6:00
p.m., 229-6825. tfc 11/7

Furnished trailer, 103 Victoria
Ave., Highland View. Close to High-
land View School. Deposit required.
No pets. 639-5700. tfc 11/7

Triplex, 2 bdrm., 2 ba. on the
Gulf, Cape San Blas. $375 month
plus utilities. Call 227-1322.
tfc 11/7

Mobile home spaces for rent. Call
827-7261, Howard Creek. tfc 11/7

OFFICE SPACE. Call George
Duren at 229-6031 and leave mes-
sage. tfc 11/7

Mexico Beach: Two small trailers
$55 and $65 weekly, utilities fur-
nished, adults only, no pets. 648-
5659. tfc 11/7

Mobile home lots for rent, located
In Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfc 11/7

UNFURNISHED
Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 11/7

Office Space for Lease: Spa-
cious, clean, well located office in con-
venient part of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378 or come by 322 Long
Avenue. tfc 11/7

Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 11/7

No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/90


The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 11/7


Meet. It will be held at St. Joseph a. ttend. Also, any teacher who
Bay Country Club and will begin would like to help with the meet
at 10:30. Everyone is invited to is asked to see Coach Gowan.


A A5 A At AN N AN ^ A. A N f A S ^ A A
-:^:A-:J^ jy rf :A'


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-49
IN RE: ESTATE OF
YATES GEORGE CATHRALL,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ANCILLARY ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of Yates
George Cathrall, deceased. File Number 91-49, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Flor-
Ida,. Probate Division, the address of which Is 1000
5th Street, Port St. Joe, Florida. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth be-
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED
THAT.
All persons on whom this notice is served
who have objections that challenge the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with the Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice Is served
within three month after the date of the first publi-
cation of this notice must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and per-
sons having claims or demands against the dece-
dent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun on Oc-
tober 10, 1991.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Eugenia Shaw Cathrall
Rt 2, Box 93
Georgetown, Georgia 31754
/s/ Thomas Sale. Jr.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 069972
P.O. Drawer 426
Panama City, FL 32402
904/763-1787
Publish: October 10. 17, 24, and 31, 1991,
NOTICE OF THE PROPOSED VACATION
OF AN ALLEYWAY IN THE CUIT
The Board of City Commission of the City of
Port St. Joe, upon petition by an abutting owner of
a certain alleyway located in Port St. Joe, Block


GIGANTIC MOVING SALE: TV's,
VCR, waterbed, clothes, stereo sys-
tem, everything Saturday, Nov. 2nd,
8 a.m. to 6 p.m., 114 Monica Dr.,
Ward Ridge. ltp 10/31

ESTATE SALE: Furniture, wash-
er, dryer combo, yard tools, lawnmow-
er, odds & ends. Call 648-4055.
ltp 10/31

YARD SALE AT THE PIER: Mex-
ico Beach. Bicycles, silk plants, chil-
dren's clothes, etc. 7 a.m. noon CST.
Saturday, Nov. 2. ltc 10/31

Yard Sale: Sat., Nov. 2, 505 Third
St. 8:00 till 12:00. Rain or shine.
ltp 10/31

Yard Sale: Sat., Nov. 2, comer
Gulf & Americus St., St. Joe Beach. 9
a.m. till. Clothes, all sizes, crafts and
supplies with lots of extras and misc.
items. Itc 10/31

Moving Sale: 2109 Cypress Ave.,
Saturday, Nov. 2, from 8 till 2.
ltc 10/31

Yard Sale: Sat., Nov. 2, 130 Co-
lumbus St., St. Joe Beach, nine a.m. -
two p.m. Used and new. Handmade
and junk. Dishes, cookware, lap quilt.
Itc 10/31
Yard GIVE-A-WAY, Friday, 4-6
p.m. 1014 Woodward Ave.

BIG Yard Sale: Sat., Nov. 2, 1013
Long Ave. 8 a.m. to 12 noon. Clothes
dryer, recliner, chiffarobe, toys, nice
adult & children's clothes and lots
more.

Garage Sale: Saturday, Nov. 2, 8
a.m. Adult's and boy's clothes, bicy-
cle, toys & misc. 100 Sunset Circle,
across from hospital. Itc 10/31


Cantley's Bargain Barn
& Flea Market
(5 miles south of Wewa,
Hwy. 71 5 Acre Farms)
New Tools
New & Used Clothing
Open Friday and Saturday






POUND PUPPIES: Part shep-
herd/part chow. One black & brown
mutt found around Museum. Call
Bobby Hayes at City, 229-8247.
ltc 10/31

Three darling part beagle/part
terrier all male. We deliver, 653-8254
or 227-1322. ltc 10/31

3 free kittens to a good home.
One male Siamese, black & white fe-
male, grey & white male, 227-7523.
ltp 10/31






White Christian male 45 years
old, would like to meet white Chris-
tian female for dating. Write: P. 0.
Box 814, Eastpoint, FL 32328.
Itp 10/31







Earn Extra Income. Earn $1000's
stuffing envelopes. Send self ad-
dressed stamped envelope to:
H&S Southern, P. 0. Box 572,
Troy, AL 36081 ltp 10/31


14 located between Baltzell and Monument Ave-
nties. from Third to Fourth Streets, will consider
and determine on the 5th day of November, 1991.
at the regular meeting of said Commission, wheth-
er or not the city will vacate, abandon, discontinue
and close the above described alleyway and convey
the same to the abutting land owners. All Interest-
ed persons may appear and be heard at the time
and plaee above specified.
Dated this 17th day of October, 1991.
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
By: /s/ LA. Farris
City Auditor-Clerk
Publish: October 24 and 31, 1991.
BID NO. 001-362
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA INVITES
BIDS ON THE FOLLOWING:
QUANTITY: 60 COMPLETE FIXTURES
SPECIFICATIONS: SHALL BE 1500 WATT MET-
AL HALIDE GENERAL DUTY
SPORTS-LIGHTER AND BAL-
LAST, LAMP AND WIRING
ADAPTERS.
All Bids shall meet Specifications or be an
approved equal. Bids shall be sealed in an enve-
lope and plainly marked "001-362". The City of
Port St. Joe, reserves the right to accept any and
all Bids, waive any formalities, and to choose the
Bid deemed best to meet the City's needs. Bids
must be good for 60 days after opening. All Bids
F.O.B. Port St Joe, Florida.
The Bid must conform to Section 238.133(3)
FLORIDA STATUTES on Public Entity Crimes.
Bids must be submitted to City Clerk's Of-
fice on or before 5:00 p.m. EDT, November 19,
1991. Bid opening will be held at the regular City
Commission Meeting November 19, 1991. at 8:00
p.m. EDT In the Municipal Building.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
BY: /s/ L.A. Farris
City Auditor/Clerk
PuLlish October 24 and 31, 1991.
BID NO. 450-235
The City of Port St Joe, Florida invites bids
for Institutional Insurance Package Policy as fol-
lows:
Boiler & Machinery Insurance
Specifications may be obtained from the City
Clerk's Office, P.O. Box 278, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
All Bids shall meet specifications or be an
approved equal. Bids shall be sealed in an enve-
lope and plainly marked "BID NO. 450-235. BOIL-
ER & MACHINERY INSURANCE'. All proposals
must comply with 112.0801 of the Florida Statutes
(Chapter 84-266, Section 17).
The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to
accept any or all bids, waive any formalities, and
to choose the bid deemed best to meet the City's
needs. Bid must be good for 90 days after opening.
Bids must be submitted to the City Clerk's


'91 Isuzu space cab truck, air, 5
speed, stereo, carpet, 3 custom tool
boxes, tailgate guard, $9,300. 827-
1682. ltp 10/31

22 ft. travel trailer, 1930 A model
Ford, Yamaha D-2B organ, brown vel-
vet hideabed sofa, make offer. 648-
8472. 2tp 10/31

1981 Ford F100 pickup truck, 3
speed, runs good, $850. Call 648-
8779. 3tc 10/31

. 1984. Plymouth Reliant station
wagon, 4 speed, ac, am/fm cassette,
cruise control. Call after 6 p.m., 647-
5108. 2tc 10/31

1982 280ZX. Beautiful blue, dark
tinted windows. Excel. condition.
$2,800 negotiable. Call 229-6143 or
229-2777, ask for LeAnna. Itp 10/31

1988 Yamaha 350 Twin Banshee,
2 sets new tires, Thompson race kit,
C. H. Stephens, 229-8032.
2tc 10/24

1989 Chevrolet Blazer S-10-4x4,
metallic grey/grey interior, 5 spd.,
tape/stereo, p/w, pdl, a/c, sports
wheels, cruise, luggage rack, digital
dash, 40,100 miles, like new,
$11,000. Days 639-5999, evenings,
229-8809. 4tp 10/10

'80 Ford Bronco, call 229-6483.
tfc 11/7

89 Chev. pu, 350 V8, stepside,
loaded with options, brown, 44k
miles, 1 owner, $9,500. 648-5659.
tfc 11/7









Aluminum boat, 5- 1/2 hp mot-
gor, galv. trailer, $500 firm. Call 639-
2359 days. tfc 10/10

1987 19.5 ft. Bayliner Capri Bow-
rider, 1/0 boat. Call George, 229-
6031. tfc 11/7









LOST: Male Sheltie tri-color
(black, white and brown). Lost in
White City. $100 Reward offered. Call
827-1495 evenings or 653-8999 days.
4tc 10/17









LOT RENTALS
Cater to Senior Citizens


"Sun & Sand
Mobile Home Park (386-A)
1100N. 15th St.,
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Call (904) 648-8201 d ,10/31





Call 227-1278 to
Place Your
Classified Ad


Office, on or before 8:00 p.m., November 19, 1991.
Bid opening will be held at the regular City Com-
missioner Meeting, November 19, at 8:00 p.m.. In
the Municipal Building.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
By. /s/ LA. Farris
City Auditor/Clerk
Publish: October 24 and 31. 1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-212
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROBERT EDWARD DEAN,
Husband, Respondent,
And
ANITA ANN GRIGGS DEAN,
Wife. Petitioner.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Robert Edward Dean
22705 7th Street
Hayward, CA 94544
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a copy of your
Answer or other leading to the Petitin on Peti-
tioner's Attorney: ROBERT M. MOORE, ESQ.. P.O.
Box 248, Port St. Joe. FL 32456, and file the origi-
nal thereof In the Circuit Court Clerk's Office, Gulf
County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, on or be-
fore the 25th day of November, 1991. If you fall to
do so, a Final Judgment for the relief sought may
be granted by Default.
DATED this the 21st day of October. 1991.
BENNY C. LISTER
Circuit Court Clerk
By: /s/ Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: October 24, 31, November 7 and 14,
1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 91-0047-CP
DIVISION: PROBATE
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
CARLB. DAVIS,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Estate of Carl B.
Davis. deceased, file number 91-0047-CP, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is 1000 5th
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and
address of the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All Interested parties are required to file with
this court (a) All claims against the estate WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE and (b) any objection by an
interested person to whom this notice is served
that challenges the validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
'ICE ON THE OBJECTING PERSON.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun on Oc-
tober 31, 1991.
Personal Representative
/s/ Lucy A. Davis
P.O. Box 560
Wewahitchka. FL 32465
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/ Hugh Cotney
1016 Blackstone Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904) 356-0162
Florida Bar No. 141607
Publish: October 31, November 7, 14, and 21,
1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 91-169
Merrill Lynch Mortgage Capital, Inc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Donald J. Bruhn and Della J. Bruhn, husband
and wife, et al..
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
Suit to Foreclose Mortgage
TO: DONALD J. BRUHN AND DELLA J. BRUHN,
HUSBAND AND WIFE, AND ALL PARTIES
CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST DONALD J. BRUHN AND
DELLA J. BRUHN, HUSBAND AND WIFE,
AND ALL PARTIES HAVING OR CLAIMING
TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST
IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED:
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 815 BOSTON AVENUE
MONTABELLO, CA
90640
YOU ARE NOTIFIED of an action to foreclose
a mortgage on the following property In Gulf
County, Florida:
SEAGULL BAY CONDOMINIUM A, UNIT 11-
A.
Commence at the Southeast corner of
Lot 7, "San Bias Estates", Subdivision
as per map- or plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 3, Pages 20, 21 and 22. of
the Public Records of Gulf County,
Florida, and thence run North 20 de-
grees 14 minutes 55 seconds West,
along the Westerly right of way line of
County Road No. 30-E (having a
100.00 foot wide right of way), for
300.00 feet to the Northeast corner of
Lot 5, in said "San Bias Estates";
thence leaving said Westerly right of
way line, run South 69 degrees 45
minutes 05 seconds West, along the
Northerly boundary line of said Lot 5
for 343.36 feet, thence, leaving said
Northerly boundary line of Lot 5, run
South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 sec-
onds East for 5.00 feet for the POINT
OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING run South 18 degrees 47
minutes 49 seconds East for 47.60
feet, thence run south 70 degrees 04
minutes 15 seconds East for 70.29
feet, thence run South 20 degrees 14
minutes 55 seconds East for 2.35 feet,
thence run South 69 degrees 45 min-
utes 05 seconds West for 97.97 feet,
thence run North 70 degrees 04 min-
utes 15 seconds West for 147.25 feet,
thence run North 69 degrees 45 min-
utes 05 seconds East for 162.11 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING, said
lands lying In and being in a portion of
Lot 5 In said "SAN BLAS ESTATES".
Having a street address of: Unit 11A.
Pompano Place, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
Together with all and singular the
tenements, hereditaments, easements,
riparian rights and other rights now or
hereafter belonging or appurtenant to
the Property.
Together with all machinery, equip-
ment, fittings, fixtures, furniture, fur-
nishings, and articles of property of
every kind and nature whatsoever
(hereinafter collectively called '"Equip-
ment") now or hereafter owned by
Mortgagor and located In, upon or un-
der the Property or any Improvements
on the Property (whether actually or
constructively attached thereto) and
used or usable in connection with any
present or future operation of the
Property or such Improvements;
Together with (a) any and all awards
or payments, including Interest there-
on and the right to receive the same.
growing out of or resulting from any
exercise of the power of eminent do-
main (including the taking of all or
any part of the Property), or any alter-
ation of the grade of any street upon
which the Property abuts, or any Inju-
ry to. taking of, or decrease in the val-
ue of the Property or any part thereof
and (b) any unearned premiums on
any hazard, casualty, liability, other
Insurance policy carried for the benefit
of Mortgagor. Mortgagee and/or the
Property:
Together with all of Mortgagor's rights
to enter Into any lease or lease agree-
ment regarding all or any part of the


Property, and all of Mortgagor's right


Property, and all of Mortgagor's right
to encumber the Property further for
debt.
AND
ROBIN BAY CONDOMINIUM "B" UNIT 10-B.
Commence at the Southeast corner of
Lot 7. "San Blas Estates" Subdivision,
as per map or plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 3, Pages 20, 21 and 22, of
the Public Records of Gull County,
Florida, and thence run North 20 de-
grees 14 minutes 55 seconds West,
along the Westerly right of way line of
County Road No. 30-E (having a
100.00 foot wide right of way), for
300.00 feet to the Northeast corner of
Lot 5, in said "San Bias Estates";
thence, leaving said Westerly right of
way line, run South 69 degrees 45
minutes 05 seconds West, along the
Northerly boundary line of said Lot 5,
for 505.47 feet; thence, leaving said
Northerly boundary line of Lot 5, run
South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 sec-
onds East for 5.00 feet, thence run
South 70 degrees 04 minutes 15 sec-
onds East for 147.25 feet for a POINT
OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING continue South 70 de-
rees, 04 minutes 15 seconds East.
or 32.79 feet; thence run South 81
degrees 24 minutes 01 seconds West
for 87.92 feet; thence run South 72
degrees 21 minutes 01 seconds West
for 75.03 feet. thence run North 69 de-
grees 45 minutes 05 seconds East for
136.01 feet. to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, said lands lying and being a
portion of Lot 6, in said "SAN BLAS
ESTATES".
Having a street address of: Unit 10B,
Pompano Place, Port St Joe, Florida
32456.
Together with all and singular the
tenements, hereditaments, easements.
riparian rights and other rights now or
hereafter belonging or appurtenant to
the Property.
Together with all machinery, equip-
ment, fittings, fixtures, furniture, fur-
nishings, and articles of property of
every kind and nature whatsoever
(hereinafter collectively called "Equip-
ment") now or hereafter owned by
Mortgagor and located in, upon or un-
der the Property or any Improvements
on the Property (whether actually or
constructively attached thereto) and
used or usable In connection with any
present or future operation of the
Property or such Improvements;
Together with (a) any and all awards
or payments, Including Interest there-
on and the right to receive the same,
growing out of or resulting from any
exercise of the power of eminent do-
main (including the taking of all or
any part of the Property), or any alter-
ation of the grade of any street upon
which the Property abuts, or any Inju-
ry to, taking of, or decrease In the val-
ue of the Property or any part thereof
and (b) any unearned premiums on
any hazard, casualty, liability, other
Insurance policy carried for the benefit
of Mortgagor, Mortgagee and/or the
Property;
Together with all of Mortgagor's rights
to enter into any lease or lease agree-
ment regarding all or any part of the
Property, and all of Mortgagor's right
to encumber the Property further for
debt.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, If any, to It
on David C. Cimo, Plaintiffs attorney, whose ad-
dress Is, One East Broward Boulevard, 13th Floor,
Post Office Box 14070. Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33302-4070, on or before November 21, 1991, and
file the original with this Court either before ser-
vice on Plaintiffs attorney or Immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once each
week for four consecutive weeks in The Star.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 21st day of October, 1991.
Benny Lister
As Clerk of the Court
By. /s/ Tonya Knox
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: October 31, November 7, 14. and 21,
1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-216
JEFFREY GUY GAMMILL and Wife, LAURA ANN
JONES GAMMILL,
Plaintiff
Vs.
SHERYL ANNETIE 'TRUITT GAMMILL WHITFIELD,
ROBERT E. GAMMILL and Wife, ELEANOR ELIZA-
BETH GAMMILL,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Sheryl Annette Truitt Gammill Whitflekl
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Custo-
dy Action has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your answer or other
response to the Complaint on Plaintiffs' Attorney:
ROBERT M. MOORE. ESQ., P.O. Box 248, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456, and file the original thereof In the
Circuit Court Clerk's Office, Gulf County Court-
house, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. on or before
the 2nd day of December, 1991. If you fail to do
so, a Final Judgment for the relief sought may be
granted by default
DATED this the 25th day of October, 1991.
BENNY C. LISTER
Circuit Court Clerk
By: /s/ Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: October 31. November 7, 14, and 21,
1991.

IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 91-51
IN RE: The Estate of
DOROTHY MAE TRAWICK,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the ad-
ministration of the Estate of DOROTHY MAE
TRAWICK, deceased, Case No. 91-51 Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is Gulf County
Courthouse, Port St. Joe. Florida 32456. The
name and address of the personal representative's
attorney Is set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF TIE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file with the Clerk of
the above Court, a written statement of any claim
or demand they may have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed. If the claim
Is not yet due, the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliq-
uldated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the Clerk to enable the Clerk
to mail one copy to each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the estate to whom
a copy of the Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM TH'E DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections they may
have that challenges the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, or the venue or Jurisdiction
of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this Notice of
Administration: October 31. 1991.
/s/ David C. Gaskin
Florida Bar No. 027928
Attorney for Personal Representative
P.O. Box 185
Wewahltchka. Florida 32465
904/639-2266
Publish: October 31, November 7, 14, and 21,
1991.


,ALLEMORE


INC.

Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478


NEW LISTINGS:

ST. JOE BEACH: corner of Alabama Ave. &
Balboa St. PLENTY OF ROOM ON 2 LOTS,
14'X70' mobile home, 2 bd., 1 ba., ch&a, front &
rear decks, $39,900.


ELLEN ALLEMORE, Broker 648-8939
SALES and RENTALS


PAGE rB


u













Iar.iqAR- POR01T ST. JO.U FLq* THURSDAY. OCT. 1. 19910


PAGE8 B THE STAR. "eJC .M'I..U, ,- ..-.-.----, a


Halloween Safety


Halloween festivities have
provided enjoyment for young
and old for centuries. But, the
safety of this autumnal celebra-
tion has been questioned in re-
cent years. Being mindful of the
risks associated with Halloween
can help keep this event safe.
Public safety campaigns have
helped educate people about Hal-
loween safety, particularly the
need to scrutinize all treats that
children bring home from a night
of "trick-or-treating."
Unfortunately, nearly every
Halloween there are reports
somewhere in the U.S. of candy
or other edible treats being tam-
pered with or adulterated. Door-
to-door "trick-or-treating" is a
risky practice in today's world.
Parents and guardians are
strongly advised to have their


children forgo "trick-or-treating"
and attend a supervised Hallo-
ween event instead. Organized
events sponsored by civic organi-
zations, school groups, mer-
chants associations and recrea-
tion centers provide a controlled
and secure environment for chil-
dren.
But, Halloween safety consid-
erations shouldn't stop here. Par-
ents and guardians need to be
safety-conscious about. the types
of costumes that they allow their
children to wear. Some materials
could be flammable or pose other
safety hazards. Consumers are
advised to check garments for la-
bels indicating the material is
"fire resistant" or "flame retar-
dant."
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Servic-


IM n tS Gl CutyCmmsio0


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
SEPTEMBER 24, 1991
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners met this date In regular session with the
following members present: Chairman James E.
Creamer, Commissioners Nathan Peters Jr., Al
Ray, Charles S Fortner and Billy E. Traylor. Oth-
ers present were: Attorney Robert M. Moore, Road
Superintendent Bob Lester, Admin. AssL/CivIl De-
fense Director Larry Wells, Mosquito Control Direc-
tor Sam Graves Jr., Deputy Clerk Rene6 Stripling,
Chief Deputy Clerk Douglas C. Birmingham,
County Planner/Solid Waste Coordinator Ralph
Rish and Building Inspector Donald Butler.
The meeting was called to order at 7:10 p.m.,
ET.
Admin. Asst/Civil Defense Director Wells
opened the meeting with prayer and Attorney
Moore led the Pledge of Allegiance.
Approve Minutes: Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Traylor, second by Commissioner Ray and
unanimous vote, the Board approved the minutes
of the following meetings:
September 10, 1991 Regular Meeting
September 11, 1991 Special Meeting
September 13, 1991 Special Meeting
Invoice Medicaid July 1991: Upon mo-
tion by Commissioner Traylor, second by Commis-
sioner Fortner and unanimous vote, the Board ap-
proved the medicaid Invoice for July, 1991, in the
amount of $12,614.86
Invoice Gulf County Transportation:
Upon motion by Commissioner Fortner, second by
Commissioner Peters and unanimous vote, the
Board approved the Gulf County Transportation
invoice In the amount of $184.80.
Dues Florida Association of Counties:
Upon motion by Commissioner Traylor, second by
Commissioner Fortner and unanimous vote, the
Board approved paying $750.00 to the Florida As-
sociation of Counties as dues for Gulf County for
1991-92.
Invoices Prisoner Medical: Upon motion
by Commissioner Traylor, second by Commission-
er Ray and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to
pay all the prisoner medical bills in the agenda
and the supplemental agenda.
Invoice Curry Copy Center: Upon motion
by Commissioner Ray, second by Commissioner
Traylor and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to
table the invoice from Curry Copy Center until the
next regular meeting. Commissioner Ray Is to get
with Clerk Lister to discuss where this Invoice can
be paid from.
Inventory Solid Waste: Upon motion by
Commissioner Traylor, second by Commissioner
Fortner and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to
remove Inventory #70-149 from Mosquito Control
Inventory contingent upon Mosquito Control pro-
viding to the Clerk's Office what this item Is.
Inventory Gulf County Road Depart-
ment: Upon motion by Commissioner Traylor, sec-
ond by Commissioner Ray and unanimous vote,
the Board approved removing the following items
from the Road Department Inventory subject to a
report being provided to the Clerk's Office stating
where the Items are to be transferred to.
mRS District 3 Alcohol Plannin Councmil
Chairman Creamer announced he would come up
with a recommendation for the vacant position on
the Alcohol Planning CounciL
Invoices Medical Examiner: The Board,
Attorney Moore and Charles Tharpe discussed the
medical examiner Invoices. Attorney Moore recom-
mended that the county wait and see on these In-
voices. After lengthy discussion, and upon motion
by Commissioner Ray, second by Commissioner
Fortner and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to
table these Invoices for review by Attorney Moore.
Invoice Medicaid August: Upoh motion
by Commissioner Peters, second by Commissioner
Traylor and unanimous vote, the Board approved
payment of the Medicaid Invoice for August, 1991,
in the amount of $5,562.57.
Travel Voucher County Extension Ser-
vice: Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, sec-
ond by Commissioner Ray and unanimous vote,
the Board approved the travel voucher submitted
by the County Extension Agent In the amount of
$305.10.
ARPC Hazardous Waste Veriflcation:
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Traylor and unanimous vote, the
Board approved the invoice for Hazardous Waste
Verifications In the amount of $674.97. Admin.
AssL Wells and Attorney Moore discussed the pos-
sibility of establishing a fee scale to charge this
back to the people who are being surveyed. Chair-
man Creamer asked Admin. AssLt Wells to look
Into this and report back to the Board. The Board
then discussed that to do this would take an ordi-
nance process. Chairman Creamer asked Admin.
Asst. Wells to turn this Information over to Attor-
ney Moore so he could prepare the Ordinance for
the Board to review.
ARPC Coordinated Transportation: Ad-
min. AssL Wells discussed a letter In the agenda
from Apalachee Regional Planning Council stating
they will be the official planning agency for the co-
ordinated transportation agency for Gulf County.
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Ray and unanimous vote, the Board
approved payment of $1.765.00 as Gulf County's
portion of coordinated transportation funds.
County Insurance Liability Insurance for
Sheriffs: The Board discussed with Admin. Asst.
Wells the information In the Agenda regarding lIa-
bility Insurance for sheriffs. Mr. Wells gave exam-
ples of what the insurance could be used to cover.
Chairman Creamer requested Admin. Asst. Wells
and Attorney Moore check nto this and report
back to the Board.
Tower Repair Southeastern Tower Sor-
vices: Admin. Asst. Wells discussed with the
Board a letter in the Agenda from Southeastern
Tower Services referring to a former employee do-
ing business under a company name very similar
to Southeastern Eastern Tower Services. The letter
Informed the County that this person could have
done work for Gulf County under the company
name that was similar to theirs. The letter stated
the former employee's company was doing work
not up to Southeastern Tower Services' standards.
Attorney Moore stated before any claims could be
made against this company it must first be deter-
mined whether there has been any damage done.
Also discussed was that Southeastern Tower Ser-
vices should be put on notice regarding any de-
fects which could come up In the future because of
work done by Southeastern Tower Services. Chair-
man Creamer asked Attorney Moore to write a let-
ter to this effect to Southeastern Tower Services.
Gulf County Gas Tax: Chairman Creamer
asked Admin. Asst. Wells to contact Senator Brun-
er regarding Gulf County being its own collecting
agent for the 6t Local Option Gas Tax as a large
percentage of the money Is going to the state for
collecting and administering these funds.
Mosquito Control Department Equipment:
Mosquito Control Director Graves discussed the
cost of getting the Mosquito Control tractor fixed.
The Board discussed the possibility of getting a
new tractor. Upon motion by Commissioner Fort-
ner. second by Commissioner Traylor and unani-
mous vote, the Board agreed to advertise to receive
bids for a new Mosquito Control tractor.
Mosquito Control Department Equipment:
Mosquito Control Director Graves reported to the
Board that he needed a new motor for one of the
pick-up trucks at his road department. Chairman
Creamer directed Mr. Graves to wait until October
for the new fiscal year as he did not have the
funds in this budget this year to do this.
Pest Control: Mosquito Control. Director
Graves reported that the money had been used up
so the dog fly plane would not be flying any more.
Chairman Creamer asked for as many people as
possible to write letters to the Governor requesting
funding for this program.
Mosquito Control Inventory: Mosquito
Control Director Graves announced he has an old
truck that someone Is interested In buying, He
stated it was Junk and could be cleared off the
yard. After lengthy discussion, Chairman Creamer
asked Mr. Graves to gather any items on his yard
that could be auctioned.
Road Department: Road Superintendent
Lester asked the Board for direction on the flasher
lights for the school zones. Mr. Lester reported
that they are worn out. Mr. Lester asked who
would be responsible for paying for new lights. At-
torneyj-oor-estated there had-beenrprevious ac-
tion on this. Attorney Moore Is to research his cor-


respondence on this and provide copies to the
Board.
Purchasing Culverts Road Department:
Road Superintendent Lester asked whether or not
the Florida Game and Freshwater Fish Commis-
sion was to be responsible in furnishing a culvert
If the County dug a ditch across their road. The,
Board stated they were responsible just as any
other person would be.
Invoice Litter Prevention Grant: Upon
motion by Commissioner Traylor, second by Com-
missioner Ray and unanimous vote, the Board ap-
proved an invoice for litter prevention signs from
Seaside Woodwork's and Signage In the amount of
$789.60 to be paid from Litter Prevention Grant
Funds.
Change Order #5 Road Paving Upon mo-
tion by Commissioner Traylor, second by Commis-
sioner Fortner and unanimous vote, the Board ap-
proved change order #5 to Contract 2 to add back
Palmetto Street, to add 500 feet to Canal Street
delete Kay Avenue, delete Quadl Avenue, delete Bill
Nelson Road, and add back some footage on Idle-
wood Drive.
Invoice Road Paving: Upon motion by
Commissioner Fortner, second by Commissioner
Traylor and unanimous vote, the Board approved
payment of C.W. Roberts Invoice #15 In the
amount of $169,156.60 for road paving on Con-
tract 2.
Beach Access Grant: County Planner Rish
discussed that the State of Florida has a deal with.
a property owner for beach access property where
the County would only be responsible for
$2,800.00. Attorney Moore stated he felt an Item-
ized bill must be submitted before the Board could
approve this amount
Boating Improvement Funds: County Plan-
ner Rish stated the Boating Improvement Funds
for the City of Port St. Joe Boat Ramp have been
approved.
EMS Grant: County Planner Rish stated he
had received a verbal approval for the EMS Grant
In the amount of $3,000.00 for the Wewahitchka
Volunteer Ambulance Service.
Comprehensive Plan Grant: County Plan-
ner Rish stated he had received a verbal approval
in the amount of $13,000.00 for the Comprehen-
sive Plan Grant.
Comprehensive Plan Meeting: County
Planner Rish announced several reapportionment
meetings are being conducted around the State.
Chairman Creamer asked County Planner Rish
and Admin. Asst. Wells to get together to attend
the closest one possible. Commissioner Peters dis-
cussed possibly attending one.
Finance: County Planner Rish discussed a
letter from the Florida Association of Counties ask-
ing for input from small counties on the major
problems they are being faced with. Chairman
Creamer asked Admin. Asst. Wells to respond on
behalf of the County.
White City/Wimico Park: Upon motion by
Commissioner Traylor, second by Commissioner
Fortner and unanimous vote, the Board agreed to
bid out for tables, grills and a gazebo or shelter for
the White City/Wimico Park.
Tires: County Planner Rish stated that the
tires are being chipped at this time and there are
more than the original estimate. County Planner
Rish stated that there is a possibility of being able
to market the chips and maybe using them or re-
cycling credits. Chairman Creamer asked If the
tires could be used for road fill out at the new
Highland View bridge. County Planner Rish is to
check into this.
White City Water System Engineering:
County Planner Rish asked if the Board wished for
BDE to continue with engineering or to cut them
off until January when money is received. The
Board agreed to put BDE on hold until Gulf
County is sure they have the money.
CDBG Grant Administration Proposals:
County Planner Rish stated they needed to open
bids for the CDBG Grant Administration propo-
sals. Chairman Creamer asked Mr. Rish to wait
until after the public hearing before this is done.
Supplemental Budget Hearing. Upon mo-
tion by Commissioner Traylor, second by Commis-
sioner Ray and unanimous vote, the Board adopt-
ed the Supplemental Budget.
Ordinance Petroleum Storage Tanks: At-
torney Moore read aloud the proposed ordinance
regarding Petroleum Storage Facilities.
After the reading of the Ordinance, the pub-
lic, Attorney Moore and the Board discussed
changing the size of the tanks to be affected, the
amount of penalty assessed and various other top-
Ics. County Planner Rish stated he felt that the
Board should not adopt this Ordinance as this was
a responsibility of the Department of HRS and Mr.
Doug Kent.
Division of Forestry Annual Report: Mr.
Wes Jones of the Division of Forestry gave the an-
nual report for the Division of Forestry for the
1990-91 fiscal year.
The meeting recessed for a break at 8:40
p.m. ET.
The meeting reconvened at 9:05 p.m., ET.
Variance Real Property: Mr. Tom Gibson
came before the Board to request a variance from
the Board of County Commissioners on behalf of
the Estate of Roy Blankenship. The Board dis-
cussed an old barn which did not conform to
building staan d was located on the set
back line. Mr. Gibson stated he needed a variance
so the property could be sold and good title con-
veyed. After lengthy discussion by the Board, Mr.
Gibson and Building Inspector Butler, Commis-
sioner Fortner moved to'deem that the building
was built before October 1, 1983. Commissioner
Traylor seconded the motion and it passed with a
vote of 3 to 2 with Commissioner Peters and Chair-
man Creamer voting no. Mr. Gibson also sated
that the building encroaches on the right-of-way.
The Board discussed whether or not the right-of-
way encroachment could be a problem In the fu-
ture. After lengthy discussion, Commissioner Tray-
lor moved to grant an easement to the Estate of
Roy Blankenship subject to recall If there Is a spe-
cific need for this property by the County. Com-
missioner Fortner seconded the motion and It
passed with a vote of 4 to 1 with Commissioner Pe-
ters voting no.
White City Water System: Mr. Tommy Lay-
field of White City discussed with the Board that
he felt the Board should find out exactly how
much the water system was going to cost each res-
ident on a monthly basis before proceeding. Chair-
man Creamer and County Planner Rish Informed
Mr. Layfleld that Farmer's Home Administration
would do a survey of the residents of White City
and would calculate what the monthly bill would
be and whether or not It could be afforded by the
residents before the system would be Installed.
Gowen Lawsuit: Attorney Moore gave a re-
port on the status of the Gowen lawsuit He report-
ed Attorney Sandy Sanborn Is representing Gulf
County. Mr. Moore also reported that he and Mr.
Sanborn are corresponding on this matter and he
will keep the Board advised.
Indigent Care: Attorney Moore reported a
letter had been received from a Mr. Hugh Steeley
asking for clarification on the County's Health
Care Services Contract. Mr. Moore and Admin.
Ast. Wells are to get together to work out a re-
sponse to Mr. Steeley.
Friends of Indian Lagoon: Attorney Moore
reported on a bill submitted to the Board of
C- -'tv Commissioners In March for over
$8,000.00 from the Friends of Indian Lagoon. At-
torney Moore gave history on the issue of the in-
voices from the Friends of Indian Lagoon. Chair-
man Creamer directed Attorney Moore to get with.
Attorney Pat Floyd and work out what needs to be
paid out of the $5,000.00 amount previously ap-
proved by the Board. The Board agreed to take no
action on these Invoices at this time. Commission-
er Peters stated he wanted the minutes to reflect
that the Board did approve to pay $5,000.00 to
Friends of Indian Lagoon but was approved with a
vote of 3 to 2 with Commissioner Fortner and.
Commissioner Peters voting no. Commissioner Pe-
ters and Commissioner Foriner continue to uphold
the decision made by them at that time.
Group Insurance Gap Coverage: The
Board, Attorney Moore and Admin. Asst Wells dis-
cussed at length the Extended Reporting Coverage
on Errors and Omissions. Attorney Moore stated
after further research he felt it would be best for
the County to obtain this coverage for a period of


three years. Attorney Moore reported that buying
this coverage and changing Insurance companies
would be cheaper than staying with the same com-
pany. Upon motion by Commissioner Ray. second
y Commissioner Traylor and unanimous vote, the
Board approved obtaining this coverage.
Bids CDBG Grant Administration: Pursu-
ant to advertisement to receive sealed bids for the
CDBG Grant Administration for Gulf County, the
following bids were received:
Julian Webb & Associates $36,000.00
Clark, Roumelis & Associates $41,000.00
Chairman Creamer directed County Planner
Rish and Commissioner Traylor to look at these
proposals and report back to the board. Upon mo-
tion by Commissioner Peters, second by Commis-
stoner Ray and unanimous vote, the Board agreed
to award this bid to the low bidder, Julian Webb &
Associates, provided they meet the specifications.
Boating Improvement Grant: After discus-
sion of the contract to receive funds for the boat
ramp for the City of Port St Joe, Commissioner Pe-
ters moved to approve the boating improvement
contract subject to the City of Port St. Joe assum-
ing responsibility and holding the County harm-
less from any liability. Commissioner Ray second
the motion and it passed with a unanimous vote.
Invoice South Gulf County Volunteer
Fire Department: Upon motion by Commissioner
Traylor, second by Commissioner Fortner and
unanimous vote, the Board approved payment of a
Gulf Fabricating invoice for emergency work done
on a South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment Fire Truck Tank.
Adopt A Highway National Honor Society
- Wewahitchka High School Commissioner Fort-
ner requested on behalf of the National Honor So-
clety of Wewahltchka High School to adopt a por-
tion of Highway 22 from West River Road to Road
5 for trash retrieval on a monthly basis. This pro-
gram Is promoted by the Department of Transpor-
tation. The Board agreed to this request
Union Negotiations: Commissioner Peters
asked County Planner Rish the status of the Union
Negotiations. Attorney Moore discussed the negoti-
ation process of a contract with a public body.
County Planner Rish and the Board discussed
where the County and the Union are at right now.
County Planner Rish reported that a new draft will
be submitted very soon.
Road Paving Mosquito Control Depart-
ment: Commissioner Peters discussed with
County Planner Rish the cost of paving the Mos-
quito Control parking lot when Tenth Street Is
paved. County Planner Rish reported that the con-
tract provides for a square yard price. Mr. Rish
said he could figure this and given an approximate
quote.
Road Paving Contract lL: Commissioner
Peters requested Mr. Charles Tharpe of the City of
Port St. Joe be contacted when anything Is going
on with Contract III Road Paving. County Planner
Rish reported that he needed Commissioner Pe-
ters, Commissioner Ray. Mr. Charles Tharpe and
himself to get together to discuss certain cuts
which must be done because of the money. After
discussion, Chairman Creamer asked these gentle-
men to work out a suitable time to all to all to meet re-
garding this contract.
Private Industry CouncIl Commissioner
Peters moved to appoint John Reeves as Gulf
County's representative to the Florida Panhandle
Private Industry Council. Commissioner Peters dis-
cussed several letters he had received from local
unions supporting Mr. Reeves. Commissioner Ray
seconded the motion for discussion. Chairman
Creamer, Commissioner Peters and Attorney
Moore discussed the history of Mr. Reeves' previ-
ous appointment to the Council. Attorney Moore
read aloud a portion of the minutes of the Decem-
ber, 1990, meeting of the Florida Panhandle Pri-
vate Industry Council, Inc. Commissioner Ray
then withdrew his second until further information
Is obtained. Chairman Creamer asked that a letter
be written to all local unions containing a copy ot
the December, 1990, minutes of the Florida Pan-
handle Private Industry Council Inc., requesting
recommendation from them for the representative
for the fiscal year 1991-92. Commissioner Peters'
motion died for lack of a second. Upon motion by
Commissioner Fortner, second by Commissioner
Ray and unanimous vote, the Board tabled this
matter until the next regular meeting.
Board of County Commissioners Chair-
man/Vice-Chalrman: Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Peters, second by Commissioner Fortner
and unanimous vote, the Board appointed Billy E.
Traylor Chairman and Al Ray Vice-Chairman of
the Board of County Commissioners for fiscal year
1991-92.
Mosquito Control Department: Commis-
sioner Peters requested than any discussion that
must be made between supervisor and employee
be done in private and not In public or over the ra-
dio, etc. The Board had discussion on this matter.
The Board concurred with Commissioner Peters
request on this matter.
Highland View Canal Resolution "No
Wake" Zone: Chairman Creamer stated a county
resident had requested he bring before the Board a
request to place "No Wake" signs on the Highland
View Canal from the entrance to Basic Inc. a/k/a
Premier Services, Inc. Mr. Creamer stated the
wake from barges is causing damage to boats In
dock. The Board decided to support this request.
Chairman Creamer discussed that he thought the
Board had taken previous action on this and he
wished the minute be researched.
White City Bridge: Commissioner Peters
asked County Planner Rish If C.W. Roberts Con-
tracting was completely finished with the paving of
the White City Bridge. Mr. Peters discussed the
roughness In going on the bridge and coming off of
it County Planner Rish reported that C.W. Roberts
Contracting still had another layer to go on the
road.
Upon motion by Commissioner Fortner and
there being no further business the meeting did
then adjourn.
JAMES E. CREAMER. CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: BENNY C. LISTER
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
SEPTEMBER 30. 1991
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners met this date in special session with the
following members present: Chairman James E.
Creamer, Commissioners Billy E. Traylor, Al Ray,
and Nathan Peters Jr. Others present were:
County Planner/Solid Waste Coordinator Ralph
Rish, Building Inspector Donald Butler, Clerk Ben-
ny C. Lister. Chief Deputy Clerk Douglas Birming-
ham, Deputy Clerk Renek Stripling and Attorney
Robert M. Moore.
The meeting came to order at 10:10 a.m.,
E.T.
Commissioner Ray led the prayer and Com-
missioner Traylor led the Pledge of Allegiance to
the flag.
Solid Waste Coordinstor/County Planner
County Planner/Solid Waste Coordinator Rish de-
livered to the Board his resignation to be effective
November 1, 1991. Each Board member gave their
comments to Mr. Rish on his help and the fine job
he has done for Gulf County. Chairman Creamer
asked Mr. Rish to draw up an advertisement for
his position. The Board held a lengthy discussion
on where the ads should be published and for how
long. Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, sec-
ond by Commissioner Traylor and unanimous
vote. the Board agreed to accept County Planner/
Solid Waste Coordinator Rish's resignation. Upon
motion by Commissioner Ray, second by Commis-
sioner Traylor and a vote of 4 to I with Commis-
sioner Peters voting no. the Board agreed to adver-
tise for this position and for all applications to be
In by October 14. 1991. Commissioner Peters stat-
ed be felt it would be better to receive applications
until November 1, 1991. Chairman Creamer ap-
pointed Commissioner Ray, Attorney moore,
County Planner/Solid Waste Coordinator Rish and
Admin. Asst Wells to bring five recommendations
to the Board after all the applications have been
received. The Board agreed to conduct Interviews
at a special board meeting on October 21. 1991, at
5:00 p.m. E.T.
Upon motion by Commissioner Peters, sec-
ond by Commissioner Ray, and there being no fur-
ther business, the meeting did then adjourn.
JAMES E. CREAMER. CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: BENNY C. MUSTER


Ilse Newell Fund Begins 6th Year


Tips

es' Commodity Testing Laboratory
routinely tests various materials
for flammability or other inherent
hazards. The Department warns
consumers that materials labeled
"resistant" or "retardant" are not
fire-proof. Instead, such materials
will resist burning and extinguish
quickly when removed from the
source of ignition.
When selecting costumes,
consumers are advised to choose
clothing, masks, beards and wigs
that are properly sized. Loose-
fitting or unwieldy costumes can
impair a child's mobility or vision,
and also can increase the chance
that the child could unknowingly
touch the material to a source of
Ignition.
By observing a few precau-
tions, Halloween can remain a
safe and festive occasion for eve-
ryone.


"Amahl" matinee, at historic Trin-
ity Church, Gorrie Square, Apa-
lachicola. Admission is a modest
$2.00 or by membership. Since
this admission can not possibly
fund this caliber of music, the
Ilse Newell Fund is dependent on
interested patrons. For informa-
tion about memberships or busi-
ness sponsorships or for addi-


tonal information about any of
the concerts, contact Eugenia
Watkins at 1-670-8088.


The Star

Your Hometown

Newspaper!


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The Ilse Newell Fund for the
Performing Arts is proud to an-
nounce the schedule for the
1991-92 concert season, their
sixth year of bringing beautiful
music to Franklin County.
The season will open with the
Roger Drinkall Dian Baker Duo
performing November 3. After an
absence of two years, this popu-
lar cello/piano duo will again de-
light audiences of both old fans
and new with their extensive rep-
ertoire of chamber music and or-
chestral concert. This exception-
al duo performs totally from
memory, and has impressed au-
diences in 18 countries around
the world.
The "second performance of
the series will be a local produc-
tion of the Christmas musical
gem "Amahl and the Night Visi-
tors" directed by Nancy Totman,
featuring Julie Six and Melea
Gunter, each singing the title role
in one performance, and local vo-
calists Wesley Chesnut, Tom
Loughridge, and David Walker
and the Bay Area Choral Society.
In addition to the Sunday pertor-
mance December 8, there will be
a matinee at 3:00 p.m. in Carra-
belle on December 7 at a location
to be announced.
All concerts are on Sunday at
4:00 p.m., except the Carrabelle


* *


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EVER READY DESK CALENDAR
SBy KEITH CLARK

One page has half-hour appointments ruled from 7:00 AM to 5:00 PM; facing
page is unruled with past, current and future month calendars. Pages size 3 1/2"
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