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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02911
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 19, 1991
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02911

Full Text






12131199
ARCHIVES BIf4DERy
1508 HWY 431-5
ILERTVILLE AL 3.595o


USPS 518-880


6AIE


STAR


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA


FIFTY-THIRD YEAR, NUMBER 3


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19,1991


330 Per Copy
Plus 2 Tax ...


'Need to


Help Keep


Industry


Healthy'

Ex-Governor Mixon
Speaks At C of C
Honor Breakfast
Former Governor Wayne
Mixon of Marianna, took pot-
shots at Florida's Comprehen-
sive Plan program and advised
citizens and local government to
support local industry in order
to provide the jobs necessary for
Florida citizens Tuesday morn-
ing. Speaking at a breakfast
hosted by the Chamber of Com-
merce, commemorating Florida's
Industry Appreciation Week, the
former Governor and Lieutenant
Governor identified himself as a
friend of industry which showed
a responsibility to its communi-
ty by being good citizens.
The speaker warned that
some industry was leaving Flori-
da simply because local govern-
ment made it too expensive for
them to stay and still make a
profit He pointed specifically to
industry in the Orlando area,
which is threatening to go to Al-
abama because of oppressive lo-
cal requirements, taxes and atti-
tudes.
'We recruit new business
from all over the United States,
here in Florida," the speaker
said, "when what we should be
doing is encouraging those al-
ready here to remain."
Again, the former Florida of-
ficial pointed to the responsibili-
ty of citizens and local govern-
ment to help keep our industry
healthy and not be a hindrance.
"Don't take your local industry
and the jobs they provide, for
granted. If they can't make a
profit, they will move where they
can make a profit."
On the flip side of the coin,
the speaker said it was the re-
sponsibility of industry to be
good citizens and provide com-
munity support.
"Ask yourself this," Mixon
advised, "if your industry were


City Gives 'Go


Ahead'



Paving


On Its



Work


C.W. Roberts Firm Should Begin

Resurfacing Streets by Monday


-.

Former Governor Wayne Mixon receives an art festival
Commerce Executive Director Tamara Laine.


not here, would you miss
them?"
The speaker went on to say
that government bureaucracy
has harmed the position of in-
dustry all over the United
States, as well as in Florida.
"The bureaucratic agencies are
making rules every day and en-
forcing them, which are crip-
pling industry's ability to func-
tion as a responsible part of the
community."
He pointed specifically to
Florida's Comprehensive Plan
requirement, currently under-
way throughout the state. "I told


Governor Bob Graham back
when he supported it, 'Bob,
you'll live to regret it. This thing
will cripple Florida'." The self-
described Marianna farmer said
the plan was causing housing
costs to rise at such a rate that
industry no longer looks on
Florida with favor simply be-
cause their employees cannot
afford decent housing in the
state. The speaker blamed the
plan program on "Making your
$60,000 home a $150,000 home
simply because the regulations
won't allow a reasonably priced
home to be built. This hampers
our people and it hampers in-


T-shirt gift from

dustry."


Chamber of


The former Governor also
took a pot shot at taxes. "Do you
know that just the increase in
state tax revenue through
growth alone last year was
more than the entire state bud-
get the first year I went to the
Florida Legislature back in
1968? And, still they say we
don't have any money."
He pointed out that state
spending had risen 50.5% per
person in the last 10 years. "Our
problem isn't a chicken in every
pot," he quipped, "It's a finger in
every pie!"


The City Commission unani-
mously gave its approval for a
contract with C.W. Roberts Con-
struction Company to begin pav-
ing City streets under the county-
wide bonding program, Tuesday
night.
The contract had been up in
limbo for about a month, when
County Commissioner Nathan Pe-
ters, Jr., filed an objection with
the City against the type asphalt
to be used in the paving process.
The asphalt grade had been sug-
gested by the engineers who de-
signed the county-wide project,
as being more than adequate for
city traffic, as well as allowing for
more streets to be surfaced.
Peters had suggested the City
hold out for a higher grade as-
phalt, even though it meant fewer
streets would be paved.
Tuesday, the Commission ap-
proved use of the asphalt type S-
3. The material has an average
compact strength of 15,000
pounds per square inch and no
less than 14,000 pounds.
Roberts had been using S-3
asphalt with testing strength of
up to 20,000 pounds in his other
paving projects under the pro-
gram.
Paving work should get un-
derway by the first of the week.
BUILDING FEES
Building permit and inspec-
tion fees inside the city limits of
Port St. Joe and now slightly
higher as the result of the final
reading and passage of an ordi-
nance changing the fee schedule
Tuesday.
The City has hiked their fees
to make the service self-
supporting and to meet require-
ments of the Southern Standard
Building Code, which sets the
standards for the City's building
rules and regulations.
The fees are not the same as


23 Homes Receiving Free Rehab


Port St. Joe's City Commis-
sion received bids for a project
manager to oversee a $434,780
housing rehabilitation grant in
the City Tuesday night at their
regular meeting.
The grant, received about six
weeks ago, will be used to reha-
bilitate approximately 23 homes,
in the north Port St. Joe area,
over a period of about two years.
Two bids were received Tues-
day night, to provide administra-
tive services for the project, as re-
quired by the grant guidelines.
The bids for the position were
filed by Julian Webb Associates of
Chipley, who wrote and secured
the grant for the city and Clark


Roumelis and Associates of Lees-
burg.
Both bids were identical.
Both firms offered their services
for a total of $58,000, over the life
of the project.
JANUARY WORK START
The City will study the two
bids, making their decision based
on services to be offered for the
$58,000 fee.
In the meantime, Mayor
Frank Pate told The Star actual
work on rehabilitating the 23
homes will get underway in Janu-
ary. 'There are certain steps we
must take and certain require-
ments to be met before we can ac-
tually get underway with the


work," Pate said. He estimated
that approximately $350,000 will
be spent on the actual repair pro-
ject, with the remainder of the
grant going to pay for administra-
tion, engineering, architects, etc.
The project will provide fund-
ing for making the 23 selected
homes more livable by repairing
roofs, insulating, installing or im-
proving plumbing, wiring, new
windows, doors, etc. Most of the
homes selected to receive atten-
tion through the program have
been neglected over a period of
years and are in dire need of re-
pairs.
Most of the homes are owned
by the elderly and poor.


those recently set by Gulf
County, because there is not as
much travel expense for the in-
spector involved in the fees.
City Clerk Alden Farris said
that while the basic residential
and commercial permit fee was
hiked from $25.00 up to $35.00,
'This was the most drastic fee
change made in the entire sched-
ule." Overall, Farris said the
building fee schedule was hiked
an estimated 2.5% to 3% overall.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters,
the Commission:
-Heard a report that the
president of Gulf Cable TV would
be at the next meeting to confer
with the Commission, concerning
reported dissatisfaction among
(See PAVING on Page 3)



Hearing

to Air

Tax Hike
The Gulf County Com-
mission will take a pro-
posed 11.21% tax hike be-
fore the people in a public
hearing Tuesday, Septem-
ber 24 in a 5:01 p.m. ses-
sion in the Commission
meeting room of the Gulf
County Courthouse.
The Board has arrived
at a tentative budget re-
quiring a levy of 9.188
mills of local taxation for
financing. The increase is
due partially to reductions
in state funding and a
shortfall in fuel taxes
shared with the county.
Public input is invited
at the Tuesday afternoon
meeting.
The tax levy will help
finance a budget of
$11,751.535; a dollar in-
crease of 17.3%.
The huge budget cash
increase is caused in part
by the receipt of two large
grants by the county, one
of which is a 8571.000
grant to install water and
sewer at the Williamsburg
and Methodist Hill Subdi-
visions in Wewahitchka.
Also included in the bud-
get is a $990,000 grant to
pave the road to a pro-
posed fish farm complex
at Dalkeith.
Gulf County's operat-
ing budget would show no
cash increase, without the
grants,


School Board Officially Adopts Budget


Top Temps
Summer took one final gasp before giving way to au-
tumn here this week, sending the time and temperature
sign at Wewahitchka State Bank soaring to the 100 degree
mark for more than an hour Monday afternoon. The tem-
perature had reached the century mark, fleetingly, one
time previously this summer, but only for a few scorching
minutes.
A cooling trend is scheduled to move into the panhandle
today, giving some relief from the oppressive heat, followed
- by afternoon thunder showers experienced for the past
week. The first day of autumn, Monday, marks the end of
"dog days" and more temperate days ahead.


The Gulf County School Board approved one of its most
uncertain budget figures in history last week, putting its
stamp of approval on a financial plan which will almost surely
operate in the red during the coming year.
The new budget will not be fully funded because the Board
was required to draw up a financial plan using income figures
provided by the State of Florida in July. At the time the fig-
ures were released, the local district was told the state fund
total would be reduced, but that the county could not figure
the reduction in their final budget figures.
WARNED OF STATE FUND REDUCTIONS
The reduction amounts to about three percent, or
$115,000 in cash. In addition, the Gulf County system re-
ceived $60,000 less in state funds than they received last
year. This cut was made prior to the percentage reductions
the county was told to expect, but not to eliminate from, their
budget plans.
In addition to the reduction which has already been an-
nounced, the Board was notified last week to expect another
possible reduction in state funds in January of around five
percent. '"We're not real sure this reduction is coming," Super-
intendent Walter Wilder said, "but since they warned us of the
possibility, we're gearing up for the probability that the add-


tional reduction will actually happen." In all, Gulf County can
expect a total fund reduction from the State Department of
Education of approximately $335,000 from last year's contri-
butions.
Finance officer for the School Board, Sissy Worley told The
Star, 'We have a fund balance of some $300,000, which we're
earmarking to make up for the current and expected shortfall
of funds from the Department of Education."
VILLAGE INCREASES
The new budget, approved in final form last week, calls for
an increase In millage of 1.068. The new rate will be 7.770.
Last year's village rate was 6.702.
The budget approved by the School Board in their final
planning session totaled $13,340,401, reflecting an increase
over last year's total budget of $13,088,612.
Local taxes will amount to $3,700,000 of the total budget.
The only sizeable increase in the new financial guidelines
for the School Board, was an additional $452,000 for Capital
Outlay. The increase was to purchase three new school buses
and to complete a construction project which has been under-
way in phases at the Wewahitchka Elementary School.
"It's going to be an interesting year for school financing,"
administrative assistant, Temple Watson said.


II


[


3501












THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19,1991


--I--r-~ -. ---- .n 11 --


Calling 911

Whatever happened to the 911 project?
The word we have is that it is alive and well and functioning
toward the beginning of an enhanced system for Gulf County.
And, in our opinion, it's happening none too soon.
While we haven't heard much of the committee's activities,
they have been steadily at work, coming up with a plan for Gulf
County which will not only fill the bill of being a 911 system, but
which will realize most of the potential convenience and protec-
tion such a system can afford for our people.
But, it doesn't happen overnight.
From the best information available at this time, it appears
as if a definite announcement will be made next week, revealing
the schedule for realizing the operation of 911 in the county.
Even though we are to the announcement stage, it will still be a
while before we can pick up the phone, dial or punch 9-1-1 and
get an answer to our emergencies.
We can hardly wait. We have living proof that the system can
be one of the most reassuring conveniences to come down the
pike in many years. We'll take, for instance, the night when
prowlers tried to break into our automobile, outside our bed-
room window, in the wee hours of the morning. If you think be-
ing awakened by the sound of someone trying to break in is not
an unsettling experience, you have another think coming. Even
though you are not easily frightened, it still causes more than a
little anxiety in your thought processes, to hear a "Bang, Bang,
Bang," going on outsideyour bedroom window.
If you don't happen to have the police station number com-
mitted to memory, you must do as we had to do. You must turn
on the light, with the burgler not 15 feet away, in order to find
the police department number, or else just keep quiet and hope
he/she goes away before they do you any harm.
That particular night, we would have dearly loved to have
911 at our finger tips, so we could just dial in the dark, keep si-
lent, and await the reaction from the police. As it worked out, we
received all the action we could have hoped for, even without
911, but It would have been much more comforting and we
would have felt much safer using the convenience of 911.
You would too!
We're pleased that the planning stage is winding down and
we're getting ready to begin concrete progress toward achieving
the emergency number service in our county. It has been a long
time in coming and the only thing which has been in our favor is
that the system is much cheaper in cost than when we first
started talking about the service in Gulf County.
Charge on, 911 committee! We're anxious to see the day
when a person in distress can pick up a telephone, dial or
punch 9-1-1, and simply leave the rest to the emergency profes-
sionals. We won't even have to say a word into the telephone in
order to get action and to us, that could mean a lot in certain
traumatic situations.



Not Our Fault
Our friend, County Commissioner Billy Traylor came forth
with an exclamatory, '"We're not responsible for all that tax in-.
crease!" last Tuesday, when some of the Commissioners voiced
the fact they were catching flack for increasing tax rates printed
on the TRIM notices. Traylor's explosive statement was caused
by righteous indignation, because his particular ox was gored by
the claim.
As popular as it may be to place the blame for rising taxes on
the County Commission, or any other local governing body, we
can't see how any thinking person can come to this conclusion.
It has been so in the past, but there are new and formerly never
experienced factors involved in budget making these days which
add up to tax increases in a hurry.
In our opinion, we feel that most of us, as individual citizens,
are responsible for the tax increases of recent days. We have all
become so accustomed to government-be it state, national,
county or municipal-catering to our every whim, financing our
every wish, providing all the "gingerbread" social services we can
think of, until it boggles the mind. Add to that the fact the mi-
nority of the citizens actually pay any ad valorem taxes and we
can't agree on which services we no longer care to receive; stir
all of those ingredients up in a budget hearing and you get tax
increases of monumental proportions.
The bottom line is that we are demanding and have more ser-
vices required than the few ad valorem tax payers can pay for
and we're loathe to give any of them up.
That spells fiscal trouble and we have seen the first install-
ment.


) Hunker Down with Kes I



Are You Sure Sid Did It This A'way


Kesley
Colbert


Woodrow Kennon's Drygoods,
Mercantile and Grocery Store had
an advertisement for Chesterfield
Cigarettes hanging just inside the
front door. I'm sure you remem-
ber this one it had A-B-C in big


red letters across It. It was re-
minding folks to Always Buy
Chesterfields. A Always Milder.
B Better Tasting. C Cooler
Smoking. Is it coming back to you
now?
I didn't smoke and I wasn't
into the A-B-C's of cigarettes but
I sure liked that advertisement. It
had a close-up shot of Sid Luck-
man in his Chicago Bears football
uniform. I studied on the way
that leather helmet "form-fitted"
down over his head; kind'a


pooched his cheeks out just a lit-
tle bit. That white, elastic looking
chin strap snugged the helmet
down ust right right and it served to
keep guys like Chuck Bednarik of
the Eagles from ripping Sid's
head gear off.
Come fall I would be in the
seventh grade. I was going out for
football. I was going to get me a
real leather helmet and I'm going
to look just like Sid Luckman. I
couldn't hardly wait! I got up on
my tip toes and leaned forward to


get a closer look. You could stay
all day in Mr. Woodrow's store -
and you didn't have to buy a
thing!
"This must be an old adver-
tisement" I hadn't even seen
Buddy come in.
"How do you know that?"
"Sid Luckman doesn't even
play football any more."
"He does, tool" Now, I don't
know why I said that I didn't
know a thing about Sid Luckman.
The only time I'd ever seen or
heard of him was on this Chester-
field advertisement. But he was
my favorite player! "He's the quar-
terback of the Chicago Bears, it
says so right here."
"Johnny Lujack took his
place seven or eight years ago."
We went back to where Mr.
Kennon was slicing some hoop
cheese. "Mr. Woodrow, how old is
that Chesterfield sign up yonder."
"I've had it a long time, boys."
That night at supper I asked
Leon about Sid Luckman. "He
hung it up back in '51."
It didn't matter. He was still
my favorite player. I even thought
of asking Mr. Kennon if I could
have that old sign. It wasn't doing
no good any how everybody
around here smoked Camels.
'What position do you play,
son?"
"I'm a quarterback, sir.'
Gosh, Coach Campbell was a big
man. We were getting our equip-
ment I didn't pay much attention
to all the stuff he was handing
me I just wanted one of those
helmets.
'We don't have a quarter-
back. We run from the single
wing. But we'll find a place for
you. What size shoes do you
wear?"
You ever put on all that foot-
ball gear? That stuff weighs a tonl
It took me the better part of an
hour to figure out where every-
thing went. I had to beat that-hel-
met down over my head. I under-
stood why Sid's cheeks were
pooching out! And I didn't need a
chin strap. That helmet was
stuck to my head. And hot, let me
tell you, that hard leather didn't
allow no air in or out. My head
was hurting 'cause it couldn't
breathe and we hadn't even got to
the practice field yet
"What's a single wing?"
"I don't know. Sounds more
like a wounded chicken than a
football formation."
The first day we just ran.
Coach Campbell said we had to
get use to our equipment. The
second day we ran some more.
Coach said we had to be in better
shape so we could whip'em in the
fourth quarter. Hollis, who was
kind'a on the big side said after
practice, "Listenj fellas, if we run
like this tomorrow, I won't make
it to the fourth quarter."
I was thinking the same
thing. This ain't football. I want to
get in there and mix it up.
The next day we got in there
and mixed it up. The first play we
learned was "fullback buck." You
know this one? I'm finally going
to get to play like Sid Luckmanl
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


Signs ofFall Are Evident Everywhere Despite 100 Degree Temps


DO YOU THINK It might still
be too early to write a column
about the coming of the fall sea-
son? It may very well be, but I
have no other subject hitting me
a solid blow between the eyes at
the moment, so here we go on the
arrival of fall.
It's here, you know. Even
though the thermometers contin-
ue to reach the 90's during the
day, at times, fall is here. There
are signs everywhere. It doesn't
take an Indian nor a mountaineer
to see the signs of the end of the
summer season.
Besides that, fall begins on
the calendar next Monday, along
with a lot of other momentous
endings and beginnings next
Monday. If we were to take a vote
we could probably make a good
case for declaring next Monday a
holiday for this year in
Port St Joe, at least
Next Monday is the first day
of fall, it is the day the White City
bridge will officially be open to
traffic and it is the day the first


Etaoin Shrdlu


* j


shovel of dirt will be turned on
the new Highland View bridge
construction project You can't
cram many more activities than
that into just one little old 24-
hour day.

BUT BACK to fall.
The leaves are falling. Here in
Port St. Joe, the word "leaves"
translates, "pine needles". The
pine straw is covering the lawn
and providing its share of mulch
material. When I mow the grass
with my push mower, with the
grass catcher on back, most of
what I empty out of the" bag is
ground up pine needles.


By Wesley Ramsey


That's another sign.
The grass has stopped grow-
ing quite so vigorously as it was a
month ago. In July and August, I
could almost see the grass start
growing again behind the mower
as I would progress across the
yard.
A week was as long as most
of us could go without having to
hire a bush-hog to come in and
cut the grass.
Fall is putting the brakes on
all that

ANOTHER SIGN OF fall
rushing in is evident in the squir-
rel's tails. I noticed the other day


that the squirrels which come
down to my feeder in the back
yard have nice sleek, bushy tails
now, as opposed to the scraggly
ones they sported during the
summer months.
The love bugs almost forgot
to put in an appearance, al-
though I have seen signs of a few.
The muscadines and scup-
pernongs are showing up in the
super markets. And, there are al-
ready a few bunches of fresh tur-
nip and collard greens for sale.
That's a sure sign of fall.
The mornings are not quite
yet ready to be described as
"brisk", but they are no longer the
still, humid and sticky mornings
of summer, either. *
There is a definite hint of
comfortable temperatures which
now greet me each morning, as I
go outside to get the newspaper.
Why, we even had a "cold front"
come through the other day,
which featured temperatures still
in the high 80's and low 90's, but
had a low humidity count accom-


paying it, which made most of
us appreciate the change in the
season.
MORE EVIDENCE OF the
approaching fall season is the
third week of football season al-
ready at hand. The Sharks will be
playing their second regular sea-
son, and third including the Jam-
boree, tomorrow night. The col-
lege teams are now into their
fourth game of the season in
some places, and the professional
season is about half over.
Sure signs of fall.
The baseball world series
games will be starting in about
two weeks. Some of these games
are played in cold weather, so
their advent is another solid sign
of fall.
Hunters are beginning to
grow their hunting season
beards. Just last Thursday, I saw
Bill Sumner with his well under
way. Shells are on display in the
stores, sporting goods stores are
advertising shotguns and the


deer hunters are fattening up
their dogs and getting their pick-
up trucks greased.
Why, in just one month, it
will be the height of the season in
the mountains for the leaf color
change. In another month, traffic
on a country mountain road will
look like the end of an FSU foot-
ball game in Tallahassee.
Fall is definitely coming,
quick.
We have already seen at least
five tropical storms: all whipped
up by the advent of the change of
the season and approaching cool-
er air currents.
ALL OF THESE things are
solid signs from Mother Nature
that fall is in the wings. The end
of summer is just a degree or two
away.
About the most convincing
evidence I have seen that fall is
coming is that my arthritis has
been acting up.
You can't beat that for a solid
sign.


St. Joseph Bay Tide Table
Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
Sk Sept. 20 8:59 a.m. H 1.6 7:04 p.m. L .7
/Sept. 21 10:05 a.m. H 1.5 7:00 p.m. L .8
Sept. 22 11:15 a.m. H 1.3 6:30 p.m. L 1.0
11:13 p.m. H 1.1
Sept. 23 5:08 a.m. L .9 1:00 p.m. H 1.2
4:57 p.m. L 1.1 11:00p.m. H .1.2
Sept. 24 7:09 a.m. L .7 11:20 p.m. H 1.5
. .-r- Sept. 25 8:35 a.m. L .6 11:54 p.m. H 1.7
S- Sept. 26 9:54 a.m. L .4


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
SSPHS 518880 Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-o10.60 Six Months
Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue The Star out of County-21.20 Year Out ofCounty-$15.90 Si Months
by Stoear Publishing Copan24 Post Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
@ Phone 227-1278 other than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
,EWS,- 4< William H. Ramsey .......... Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
EWSY Frenchie L. Ramsey .......... Office Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ................. Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


),hL mlha.









THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 19, 1991


Shad

Phantry,
By
Wendell Campbell


- .- .-

Random Thoughts
*Today is Sunday and tomorrow is Monday. Where did the
weekend go?
*I wonder why it's so easy to get sleepy in church. I dozed off
this morning during the preacher's prayer. I'm glad I didn't
snore.
*I've noticed that I eat lots more on weekends. Maybe I
should start working weekends, too.
*I had to buy a new pair of tennis shoes yesterday. If the
price of tennis shoes goes up much more, I'll be walking barefoot.
*There's a lot of sick folks around; a lot more than there were
a few years ago. Could it be I'm growing older, maybe into middle
age?
*It sure seems hot for this time of year. It was so hot Satur-
day I decided not to do a lot of odds and ends I had planned to '
do. What happened to all those complaints I was hearing about
rain?
*The weather doesn't seem to bother younger people when
they're doing something they want to do.
*I really like Wesley Ramsey and Father Jerry Huft. It was
fun visiting with them both during the football game Friday
night. And I don't care what anyone says about them.
*Speaking of liking people, how about Johnny Linton? I don't
know of anyone who works harder on community affairs than
Johnny. He sold me a. "custom-made" hot dog at the ball game
Friday night and delivered it to me.
*I'm glad the Russians have finally seen the light and want
peace. I pray that things work out for them, us and the world.
S*I had to attend a meeting in Bonifay last Thursday so I left a
little early and rode through some back roads and Visited with
my sister for a short time. There is some beautiful country in
Washington County. I may buy a farm up there one day, if I'm '
-ever able to afford it
*Not one person, that I'm aware of, has come by to see Duke.
I thought by now that Duke would be in a new home where the
buffalo roam. Poor Dukel
*I am amazed at the salaries professional athletes make to-
day. Maybe my son will grow up to be one and I can retire. He's
got, a long way to go, but I have confidence in him. Go get'um,
Sonl
*Don't you just hate "Love Bug" season? They come from eve-
rywhere, mess up your vehicle and stink to no end when you go
to wash them off. I wonder what purpose they serve.
*I'm going to slow down on this working a little. Like Charlie,
I've decided that I'm not going to be able to take a cent of money
with me when I leave this earth.
*I hope all of you have a wonderful week and rest of the year.
Remember, there's only 100 shopping days until Christmas. Ain't
that depressing?



Enviroshopping


Saves Energy


Reduce pollution. Decrease
household waste. Save energy -
practice enviroshopping andi help
* preserve the environment, say
Uniiyersity of Florida specialists.
"Enviroshopping is a mind set
that should cover all types of
shopping and not be limited to a
woman shopping in a grocery
store," says Palm Beach County
Extension Agent Sandra Brubak-
er. "People can start by buying
less so they throw away less."
With the environment in
mind, consumers can also buy
products that make the best use
of energy resources and don't pol-
lute air and water. Items can be
reusable and recyclable, made
from plentiful resources or recy-
cled material, and use a mini-
mum of materials in design and
packaging, says Marie S. Ham-
mer, University of'Florida home
environment specialist.
"People should not only buy
an item based on cost or conven-
iehnce, but should also think
about its impact on the environ-
ment," Brubaker says.
Hammer, who coined the
term "enviroshopping," Brubaker,
and three other Florida home eco-
nomics county extension faculty
have developed print, video and
slide materials, and a puppet
show for consumers of all ages,
with a U.S. Department. of Agri-
* culture grant Combined in a
large notebook, the materials will
be distributed nationwide to all
other extension services so they
can start their own enviroshop-












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ping programs. The other exten-
Ssion faculties are Mary Cherne-
,sky, Hillsborough County; Alicia
Homrich, Orange County; and
Paula Stewart, Broward County.
'We can help people realize
that every product they buy con-
tributes to the waste stream and
by reducing, reusing and recy-
cling, they can diminish that
stream," Hammer says. 'We want
to make consumers aware of
strategies they can use to reduce
waste."
By enviroshopping, however,
consumers may have to decrease
the convenience products they
buy, Hammer says, because they
usually use more packaging.
"Consumers have to be willing
to give up some throw-away prod-
ucts and convenience foods that
reduce preparation time," Ham-
mer says.
She suggests that people buy
larger boxes, containers and bot-
tles instead of individually pack-
aged items.


New White City Bridge Opening


Vehicular traffic is scheduled to be al-
lowed across the new high-rise bridge
over the Intracoastal Canal at White City
Monday morning, according to informa-
tion from the Florida Department of
Transportation's Chipley office.
The new bridge replaces a 45-year-old
lift span which was giving DOT problems
in maintaining dependability. The old
bridge will be dismantled and removed
from the site.
Built adjacent to and on the east side
of the present lift span, the new bridge
features a 65-foot clearance for water
traffic.
The new bridge is the second of three
scheduled to be or already replaced in
the county to provide dependable storm
and disaster evacuation routes from the
coastal area.


After a 15-year wait, work-
ers will finally begin con-
struction of a new high-rise
span on Highway 98, cross-
ing the Gulf County Canal at
Highland View, on Monday.
L&A Contracting Company
has 550 days to build the new
bridge.

ANOTHER BRIDGE STARTING
Work will start on building the third
of the trio of new high-rise spans Mon-
day, with L&A Construction Company be-
ginning work on a new bridge over the
Gulf County canal at Highland View.


The project was approved and ground
broken in a ceremony more than 15
years ago, but various things have de-
layed the construction until now.
The new bridge will be located on the
west side of the present 53-year-old
drawbridge, and will have a clearance
span of 75 feet above the high water line.
The extra high clearance will allow
ocean-going barges entrance to the Gulf
County Canal. It will be the only en-
trance to inland waterways for the ocean-
going vessels between Tampa and Mobile,
Ala.
L&A will also be responsible for main-
taining the present bridge during the
construction period and removing it
when they are through with the new one.
The project is expected to take ap-
proximately 550 days and cost over $8
million.


SBA Disaster Loans Available In County


Federal disaster loans are
available from the U.S. Small
Business Administration (SBA)
inl3 Florida Counties. Loans are
for small agricultural-dependent
businesses and small agricultural
cooperatives that were economi-
cally impacted due to excessive
rainfall, flooding, and wind which
occurred between January 1 and
June 17, 1991, arnd continuing.


Gulf Coas


SAT Prep
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege is offering a course titled
"Preparation for the S.A.T. Exam."
The class will meet on Saturday,
October 5 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m.; Tuesday, October 5 from
6:00 to 8:30 p.m.; Saturday, Oc-

tober 12 from 9:00 to 12:30 p.m.;
Tuesday, October 15 from 6:00 to
8:00 p.m. and Saturday, October
19 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.
All times are central.
Classes will be held in the


Paving
(From Page 61)
some customers over their ser-


vice.
-Decided to file for an exten-

sion on expenditure of a grant se-
cured to improve Forest Park.
Public Works Superintendent
Frank Healy said the committee
named to make improvement
suggestions had not contacted
him with the results of their de-
liberations.
-Awarded a contract to Todd
Land Development to haul residu-
al from the Wastewater Treat-
ment Plant to a spoil site. Todd
will take over the project on Octo-
ber 1.
-Received a letter from Po-
lice Sergeant James McGee, that
he was stepping down in retire-
ment on September 30, .due to
health reasons. McGee has been
with the department for 24 years.


Ke ley...... From Page 2

"Coach, let me run that ball." Coach Campbell had pointed.
Bobby Brewer was calling sig- Those high top shoes that
nals from his blocking back posi- weighed 31 pounds each, were
tion, "Down set Utah 16 hut hampering my progress. I hit the
1 hut 2." line with everything I had. The
Ricky Gene hiked me the ball. line hit me. Folks, the line won. I
I dropped it, picked it up and didn't mind getting the wind
started running right where knocked out of me. And the kick


discounts
J drive down
;ar insurance.
eems to be heading in the wrong direction,
d.
*u save money.
Driving record. Or by driving a car equipped
ake system. Even by insuring more than one
;ounts do you A llAd|I I
. We'll get your youre in good hands.
direction. liiruain ymli fax>llix* lis
-GRADDY
e Company
9-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
-782-6802
handle Since 1931


in the shin wasn't bad. I didn't
appreciate Ken Butler stomping
on my hand but what really got
me was Billy Barksdale smashing
me across the nose with his el-
bow.
When I came to Buddy was
a'wiping the blood off my face,
"Kes, I don't think those Chester-
field folks are going to want you
for one of their signs."
Respectfully,
Kesley


The counties included in the
disaster declaration are Calhoun,
Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson,
Okaloosa, Walton, and Washing-
ton, and the contiguous counties
of Bay, Franklin, Leon, Liberty,
and Santa Rosa, according to
SBA District Director Thomas
Short.
Eligible small agricultural-
dependent businesses and small


it Offers


ration

Math/Science Building, Room
113.
The course is designed to as-
sist students in preparing for the
S.A.T. exam. A review in math
and English and "How to Study/
Test Taking Tips" will be includ-
ed. Students must be either high
school juniors or seniors or older
to take the course. High school
students taking the course must
also bring with them a letter of
permission from their guidance
counselor.
Students will receive one col-
lege credit for the class. The cost
of the course is $26.25. Each stu-
dentmust purchase the 16th edi-
on "of Barron's How to Prepare
for the S.A.T. from a local book-
store and bring the book to the
first class meeting. Students may
not share books.
Advanced registration is re-
quired and students must regis-
ter at the Lifelong Learning Regis-
tration Office in the Student
Union East. The office is open
Monday through Thursday from
8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on
Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. CT. Registration deadline for
this class is September 22. More
information may be obtained by
calling 872-3823.

Bruner's Aide

In Wewa Tues.
Senator Vince Bruner (D), Ft.
Walton Beach, announced that
his assistant, Monica Lemieux,
will be at the Wewa City Hall from
9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. CT on
Tuesday, September 24th. Any
citizens with concerns to bring to
the senator's attention are en-
couraged to meet with Mrs. Le-
mieux.

Hoffman Deployed
to Mediterranean
Navy Airman Apprentice
Bryan G. Hoffman, a 1988 gradu-
ate of Port St. Joe High School,
recently departed on a routine
six-month deployment to the
Mediterranean.
Hoffman, a member of the
Carrier' Airborne Early Warning
Squadron 122 based at Naval Air
Station, Norfolk, Virginia, em-
barked aboard the aircraft carrier
USS Forrestal for the ship's final
operational deployment.
He joined the Navy in August
1989.


JOBIE BARFIELD'S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR and,


REPAIRS and PARTS FOR:
*Briggs and Stratton *MTD *McCullough *Echo
*Tecumseh *Onan *Ryobi *Noma *Roper .Homelite
*Craftsman *Wheelhorse *Toro *Murray
*Bob Cat *Poulan *Wisconsin *Weedeater
SRyan .Husquarva
Sears 'Kohler Aireap
A .i -Lawn Boy *Yazoo


agricultural cooperatives that are
expecting difficulty paying bills
and meeting current expenses, as
a direct result of the declared dis-
aster, are encouraged to inquire
about these loans. Loan funds
cannot be used for refinancing of
long-term debt or to provide capi-
tal which was needed prior to the
disaster. The interest rate is 4
percent and loans may be up to
30 years. Actual loan amounts
and terms are set by SBA based
on each applicant's financial con-
dition. The maximum loan to a
business is $500,000. Farmers


are not eligible to apply.
Short advised that loan appli-
cations and program information
is available by calling toll-free 1-
800-334-0309. SBA loan officers
answer these telephones on week-
days from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
ET. Applications are also availa-
ble by writing the U.S. Small
Business Administration, Area 2 -
Disaster Assistance,. One Balti-
more Place, Suite 300, Atlanta,
Georgia 30308.
The economic injury loan ap-
plication filing deadline is April 6,
1992.


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Constitution Week Proclaimed
Alice Core, member of the St. Joseph Bay Chapter of the Nation-
al Society of Daughters of the American Revolution, looks on as
Mayor Frank Pate signs a proclamation declaring the week of Sep-
tember 17 through September 23 as Constitution Week.
Mayor Pate urges all citizens to pay special attention this week
to the Federal Constitution and the advantage of American Citizen-
ship.


r 's


Together Again After 21 Years
Wauneta Brewer of St. Joe Beach had her children together for
the first time in 21 years. Shown from left to right, front row are:
Martha Duff (John) of Midwest City, Oklahoma, Sue Hughes (Sam) of
Hamiltom ,'Kansas, Nelda Lindd'odd (Ray) of Fort Worth, Texas,
Lois Sapp (Jody) of Lynn Haven. Back row, Wauneta Brewer and
Hiaol 0G. (B1edu) Beaumofit oi tifll~ii'~i y -' . .
Mrs. Brewer and her children enjoyed Labor Day together at St.
Joe Beach.


Extended Hours at Clinic

for Childhood Immunizations


A statewide survey reveals
that only 63 percent of Florida's
two-year-old preschool children
are fully immunized and only 12
percent were on schedule for
needed immunizations at 15 to
18 months of age. Serious ad-
verse effects from immunizations
are very rare and the benefits of
vaccines far outweigh the risks.
During "Childhood Immuni-
zation Week", the HRS Gulf
County Public Health Units in
Port St Joe and Wewahitchka
will hold clinics for immuniza-
tions only from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00
p.m. on Monday, September 23,
and Wednesday, September 25.






, I *


Visiting


Taylor Annelise Stevens,
two-and-a ha(f, has enjoyed a
vacation here with her dad,
Jay and her grandparents Peg-
gy and Pa Stevens. She looks
forward to her next visit.


Vaccinations are offered free of
charge.

School Lunch
.-A Menu




Gulf County Schools have an-
nounced the lunch menus for the
week. Meals may change due to
the availability of certain foods.
Monday, September 23: coun-
try fried steak or meat loaf, tur-
nip greens, mashed potatoes and
gravy, cornbread, milk and cook-
ie.
Tuesday, September 24: tur-
key or ham sandwich, French
fries, milk and fruit pie
Wednesday, September 25:
sloppy joe, fruit cup, English
peas, milk and cookie
Thursday, September 26:
cheeseburger, buttered corn, milk
and cake
Friday, September 27: chick-
en, applesauce, English peas,
roll, milk, rice and gravy.

Peterson's Aide
In PSJ Today
Congressman Pete Peterson's
representative, Pete Whiddon, will
visit Port St. Joe on Thursday,
September 19th. He will be at J.
Patrick's Restaurant from 11:30
until 1:30 to talk with constitu-
ents.
The public is invited to come
and talk with him about any con-
cerns they have with the Federal
Government.


CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM

RememberChildhood

^ ^ 4hmnunizatiof Week

September21-29

; ..,, By
.,i;';- .- :c". ^Elizabeth C. Jones, M.D.

Reports tell us that school-age children are 95-97 percent im-
munized. That problem has been solved by state laws requiring
children to be immunized before going to school.
Recent epidemics of measles and polio have occurred in the un-
immunized child under five years of age, and in the college-age per-
son whose immunity has fallen or who was never immunized.
There have been deaths in young children and in the college
students from measles pneumonia.
The paralysis following polio is a tragedy because it is so easily
preventable with use of polio vaccine.
Young infants are particularly susceptible to whooping cough
and can die with it. An older child is stronger and whooping cough
will usually be only a six to eight week nuisance with coughing and
vomiting.
With our current immunizations programs it is possible for eve-
ryone to have their children immunized. If not at the doctor's office,
it can be done at the Health Department. The Health Department is
having extra evening hours during immunizations week September
21-29 to accommodate parents who work.
Most parents today do not remember the days of measles,
mumps, diphtheria, polio, and whooping cough epidemics. Some
grandparents may remember those devastating illnesses. For those
who do not remember, it would be nice to take our word for it. To
have the disease is bad. To be immunized is good.


Ethel Bridges

Club Meets
A happy group of Garden
Clubbers bearing dishes of good-
ies met Thursday, September 12
at noon to start the 1991-92 Gar-
den Club year. A big white sheet
cake decorated with pink roses,
donated by Daisy Reeves, made
everyone more excited about this "
important year. The tables were
decorated with North Florida's
beautiful fall foliage, and given to
all attending to take home for ar-
ranging.
Second Vice President Kath-
ryn Parker presented this year's
programs with their emphasis on
saving lives. The October program
will feature trees.
The Club members, being civ-
ic minded, will have a booth sell-
ing baked goods at the October
Arts and Crafts Festival. The
D.A.R. luncheons will again be
held at the Garden Center.
The Garden Center is availa-
ble for reunions, dinners, and re-
ceptions as a community service.
If interested, call Frenchie at 229-
8997.



**Let me
analyze your
insurance needs
with a free
Family Insurance
Checkup. 99


CALL ME.
BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avenue
(Across from St. Joe Hardware)
Office: 229-6514
State Farm
Insurance Companies
Home Offices: Bltxmington, Illinois

IA HCI
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there


Arts & Crafts

Exhibit to

Begin Sept. 30
The 1991 St. Joseph Bay Arts
Exhibit featuring Gulf County art-
ists and craftsmen will open Sep-
tember 30 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Daytime showings will be from
September 30 through October
6th at the First Union Bank of
Port St. Joe on the first and sec-
ond floors. The exhibit is free to
the public.
Featured will be oil, acrylic,
and water color paintings, draw-
ings, three-dimensional sculp-
ture, photography, and artistic
crafts.
For exhibitor information, call
the Port St. Joe/Gulf County
Chamber of Commerce at 227-
1223.


Monteiro Pledges
Some 137 Samford University
women pledged social sororities
during recent rush activities.
Deby Monteiro, a 1991 grad-
uate of Port St. Joe High School,
has pledged with Chi Omega.
She is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Liba Monteiro of Port St.
Joe.
Gospel Sing
September 28
Pastor Clifton Elmore and the
congregation of Highland View
Church of God invites the com-
munity to attend a community
gospel sing Saturday, September
28 at 7 p.m.
If there is anyone wishing to
participate, please contact Pastor
Elmore at 229-6235 or Earl Peak
at 229-6547.


All Our Seafood Is


GULF
St. Joe Beach
Ph. 647-5013


Deby Monteiro


FOR



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ONLY!

...and STEAK
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.... Washers *.Dryers
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.*


Gulf County Senior Citizens Center
in its continuing effort to
serve our seniors
is offering foot care at the Gulf County Senior Citizen Center
on Thursday, September 26 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
by Dr. Stephen Gross
904-229-8466
Avenue D Port St. Joe


I


i lw


1


-











Couple Exchange Vows

In Streator, Illinois


A double ring ceremony per-
formed recently at Park Presby-
terian Church in Streator, Illi-
nois, united Courtney Alonso and
Timothy Potthoff in marriage. The
Reverend Leonard Beenken offi-
ciated the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie J. Nichols of.
Streator, and Philip K. Alonso of
Tampa. The bride was given in
marriage by her father, Leslie
Nichols. The groom is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Potthoff of
Peru, Illinois.
The bride chose Jodi Wenzel
and Sandy Cilla as maids of hon-
or. The bridesmaids were Mi-
chelle Heitz and Billie Kellerhuis,
nieces of the groom. The groom
chose his brother, Dan Potthoff,
as best man. Groomsmen were
Scott Elter, Doug Klinefelter and
Keith Alonso, brother of the bride.
Randy Wilson and Tony
Schweickert were chosen as ush-
ers.
Kayla Potthoff and Chris Pot-
thoff, niece and nephew of the
groom, served as junior atten-
dants.
Nuptial music was performed
by Sharon Loudon as organist
and Erik Smith as soloist.
Out of state guests attending
the wedding were Alice Harvey,
grandmother of the bride, Kim
Harvey, Donna Clements, and
Brittany Harriman, relatives from
Florida; Gary Clements and Re-
nee Abdouch, aunt and uncle of
the bride from El Paso, Texas;
and Amanda LeBlanc, friend of


Lisa Atkins, 1-8-year-old mod-
el from Port St. Joe, has been
chosen for the 1991 International
Cover Model Fest. Out of every
thousand entries, only six or
eight girls are picked to be flown
to California for a cover test.
Lisa is also pictured in the
October issue of Teen Magazine


the bride from St. Amant, Loui-
siana.
The bride wore a white satin
gown with a jeweled portrait col-
lar neckline. The bodice was em-
bellished with lace and pearl
clusters. The full skirt and cathe-
dral train were edged in a hem
lace border. The back of the gown
was decorated with a bow at the
back collar and waist Her veil
was a heavily beaded three di-
mensional crown with Austrian
crystal festoons and pearl ac-
cents, back pouf and fingertip
veil. She carried an elegant arm
bouquet of white gerber daisies.
sonya and white roses, white
larkspur, stephanotis, ivy, tree
fern, and baby's breath accented
with white bridal satin ribbons
and dangling pearl sprays.
A reception honoring the
couple was held at the Streator
Country Club. Lori and Bonnie
Potthoff, sisters-in-law of the
groom, assisted with the cake.
The bride is a 1986 graduate
of St. Amant High School, St.
Amant. She now attends John
Amicos School of Hair Design in
LaSalle, Illinois, and is employed
as a receptionist at Hair Perform-
ers.
The bridegroom is a 1982
graduate, of LaSalle-Peru High
School. He is currently employed
by LaSalle County.
After a one week honeymoon
in Chicago, the couple is making
their home in Peru.


that is already out all over the
U.S. and Canada. Lisa was
picked as one of 12 finalists out
of 25,000 entries and was flown
to Los Angeles for a week in
June.
In addition to modeling, Lisa
is a Dental Hygiene student at
Gulf Coast Community College.


Goat Day Oct. 19
This year the Calhoun/
Liberty counties will help sponsor
a Goat Day in Blountstown, Sat-
urday, October 19.
The Meat Goat Association
will be on hand to cook goat meat
and to have samples of goat sau-
sage.


-k

Angela Tammy Canington

It's A Girl!
Lavon and Tammy Canington
are proud to-announce the birth
of their daughter, Angela Tammy
born August 29. She weighed 7
pounds, 15.6. ounces. She is
Joined at home by her brothers
and sisters, Travis, Sabrina, Amy
and Andrew.
Maternal grandparents are
Violet ,Foster and the late Roland
Foster. Paternal grandparents are
0. Howard and Lillian Canington.


L iia t- Why wal f or summer
S -" r memories. Now you can
have them the same day
V V V when you bring your film
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WORLD .N
318 ReidAve. Port St. Joe
227-7428


.*'.,ois-. *','ut~0~)--'..0
~.*1 IA


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J. PatrickJ

&estaurantt
.... '412 Reid A.venue
S | Port St,. Joe, Florida
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Featuring Daily Luncheon Specials
and All You Can Eat Salad Bar
Saturday Night Special $A
SSeafood Buffet 1
NOON BUFFET ............$4.95
or Order from the wide selection on Our
Menu
* No cholesterol Evening Meal Begins at 5:00 PM
in food preparation
* High quality food
(904) 227-7400
Catering Services Also Available


r~(sjj*,


Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Potthoff


Sea Oats Club Sets Plans


Sea Oats and'Dunes Garden
Club President Susie Pippin
called to order the first meeting of
the new garden club year. The
new officers for the coming year
are: Susie Pippin, President;
Stephanie Richardson, First Vice
President, Frances Clemons, Sec-
ond Vice President; Betty Chance-
lor, Secretary; Vesta Conley,
Treasurer.
Stephanie Richardson hand-
ed out the new year books and
the beautiful 1992 Florida Flower


Arrangement calendar.
Plans were revealed as to the
programs and projects the Gar-
den Club wants to accomplish in
the coming year.
David Richardson gave a very
informed program on Hurricane
Awareness and how to be pre-
pared for a hurricane.
The October Garden Club
meeting will be held October 8. If
you are interested in gardening
on the beach, come join the fun
or call Susie Pippin at 647-8915.


Embracing the


Golden Harvest


Adult Day


Z -WI S'-w




PROFESSIONAL AUTO AIR

;528 E. 6th Panama City, FL 32401

Complete Automotive & Truck Air
Conditioning & Heating Specialist

Sales Installation Repair

Bay County's only Automotive
A/C Specialist

If it moves, we can cool it!
Make your life easier with Cruise Control.
We install and repair.

785-6735 785-6806


Join Us At The
Highland View
Church of God
323 6th St., Highland View


As We Honor Our Senior Adults!

September 22, 1991

Sunday Morning 10:45 a.m.


Sunday Evening


6:00 p.m.


W/


2nd Annuaf



St. Joseph Bay






























Arts & Crafts



festival

Over 50 Arts and Crafts Booths, Food Booths,
and Entertainment.
October 5 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
October 6 Noon to 6 p.m.
First Union National Park
Port St. Joe
1990 T-shirts are available for $8.00 each. 1991 T-shirts are $10.00 each.
Paul Brent special designed Festival posters $5.00.
For more information call 227-1223
Sept 5, 12, 19. 26, Oct. 3


Lisa Atkins Selected for

International Model Fest


Computerized Record-s: ////
Name Brand & Generic rugs
Over-The-Counter Preparations
First Aid Supplies
Health Care Products
Senior Discounts A


""


L I


k ..









THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 19, 1991


New Instructors


at St. Joe High


Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High
School began the 1991-92 school
year with two new instructors on
staff. Robin Downs, a Port St. Joe
native, took over the duties of
band director, and John Rainwa-
ter is the new athletic trainer and
science instructor. Rainwater re-
placed Rick Williams who left to
work in the sports medicine field
with Doctors Henderson and
Haney of Tallahassee.
Downs, a 1966 graduate of
Port St. Joe High, and a 1974
honors graduate of the University
of West Florida, performed as a
professional musician with Holi-
day Inn, Inc. for 19 years. He
worked all over the Southeastern
United States including six


Trudie Downs for the past 23
years.
John Rainwater, 24, has a
degree in secondary physical edu-
cation with specialization in
coaching. He has worked as an
athletic trainer for North Florida
Christian Academy and Florida
State University, in football and


DAVID W JONE
MEMORIAL
1954-1971


NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the City Commis-
sion of the City of Port St. Joe. sitting as the Board
of Adjustment, will hold a public hearing in the
Commission Room at City Hall, Tuesday, October
1, 1991, at 8:00 p.m., EDT, to determine whether
the city will authorize a deviation in Zoning Ordi-
nance No. 5 for an encroachment of nine feet (9) of
the northwesternly property line, on Lot 17, Block
122. located on the corner of Forest Park Avenue
and Nineteenth Street.
All Interested parties are invitid to attend
and to be heard.
/s/ L.A. Farris
City Auditor-Clerk
Publish: September 19 and 26, 1991.


KING'S
BARBER SHOP
183 Avenue E

PHONE 229-6480
Open Wed.-Sat. 8:30-7:30


- .xl r- I ~ l~;;;


ROBIN DOWNS
months at Disney World. He has
also worked as a professional
reader with an educational firm
which grades the essay portion of
state tests.
Deciding to leave the travel-
ing of a professional musician
behind, Downs accepted a teach-
ing position at Wewahitchka High
School last year as instructor of
"Graduation Options", an alterna-
tive education program. He teach-
es junior high band, senior high
band, keyboarding and, has a
band class in the elementary
school. He has been married to


JOHN RAINWATER
track. This past summer he
served as coordinator for the
National AAU Junior Olympic
games in track and field as well
as multi events.
Rainwater's plans are to con-
tinue the work that Coach Lan-
ford and Rick Williams began-
having an athletic trainer on staff
for all sports and enlisting the
support of student trainers. "I
plan on expanding the program to
supply girl student trainers for
the girls' sports, including volley-
ball, basketball, cheerleading,
softball, cross country and track.
The boys' program will continue
to cover all sports. My goal is to
have a student trainer for each
sport," said Rainwater.
In addition to his training
duties, Rainwater teaches anato-
my/physiology, biology and phys-
ical science, and leads the Fellow-
ship of Christian Athletes on
Thursday mornings.


Washington Gym Renamed
County Commissioner Nathan Peters, Jr., poses before
the old Washington Gym in north Port St. Joe, which was
recently named the David W. Jones Memorial Gym. The
gymnasium, a neighborhood recreation center operated by
the City of Port St. Joe, now carries the name of Jones, a
highly successful basketball and football coach at the gym,
which served the old Washington High School before it was
abandoned and its students sent to the new Port St. Joe
High School.
Peters had the commemorative sign painted on the
building, and paid for by the Gulf County Commission.
Jones coached at Washington High School from 1954 to
1971 and had several Negro high school state basketball
championships to the school's credit. Jones' widow still re-
sides in Blountstown. She is a retired school teacher.


Antique Car Show Set Sept. 28


If you haven't noticed, there
2 is an Amdifcan love affair with
i the automobile. Since Frank Dur-


C&C
TACK & SUPPLY
located 4 ml. south of Port St. Joe on
Hwy. C-30
Selling
Western-English
Clothing & Accessories
Country Arts & Crafts
Quality Equestrian Products
25% off on
All Western Shirts
Ladies, men & boys
229-8561
tfc 8/8


yea drove the first gas engine
powered vehicle on the streets of
the United States on September
22, 1893, the American public
has worked, vacationed and "fan-
cied-up" the automobile to their
individual taste. The love affair
has been on-going.
There is no place more at-
tuned to the automobile, whether
it be antique, classic, sports car,
street rod or home creation, than
in Panama City and the sur-
rounding areas. No less than six
hobbyist clubs and organizations
exist in Bay County. To capitalize
on this resurgence in the auto
hobby, the Panama City Down-
town Improvement Board, with
the combined efforts of all auto
clubs, is hosting a premier event,
touted as the biggest and the
most all encompassing auto event
held in the Panhandle.



Happy #14

Keith

Davis

You're the
GREA TEST!!
Your Best Friend,
A.F.


Open Tuesday thru Saturday
for the Winter Months


Steamed or Raw!
The World's Finest
*Oysters
*Clams

*Shrimp
*Crabs
We now have
frozen yogurt
Enjoy the best from St.
Joseph Bay and
Indian Lagoon with us.
INDIAN PASS

RAW BAR
(On C-30 South of Port St. Joe)


On Saturday, September 28,
downtown Panama City will be
alive with vehicles from out of the
past. A judged show for all class-
es and live entertainment, will
highlight the day's agenda and
hopefully provide for you a trip
down memory lane.
The Miracle Strip Region, Bay
Mustang, the Panhandle A's, the
Sunshine Cruisers, the Panama
City Classic and Antique Motor
Car Association, and the Eastside


Rod and Custom Car Clubs are
combining their knowledge, ex-
pertise, and their cars to bring a
concours d'elegance, a concours
d'excellence and 'a Model A con-
cours to the Panama City area.
Cars will be judged and awards
will be presented. You may pre-
register your car in the DIB
downtown office or get a registra-
tion form. from any of the local
clubs. For further information
contact the DIB 785-2554 or any
club member.


Great Tasting Recipes


Madge Semmes of the Wewa-
hitchka Woman's Club has got to
be one of the best cooks in Gulf
County. Below you will find sever-
al of her mouth watering recipes
with which to tempt even the
most discriminating taste buds.
These recipes and others will ap-
pear in the new cookbook the
Woman's Club will be publishing
this fall. For your copy, contact a
member of the Wewahitchka
Woman's Club.
Chicken Creole Gumbo
1 pkg. Tony Chachere's Creole
Gumbo Mix (Walmarts)
1 large onion, chopped
1 pkg. okra, cut up
4 or 5 chicken legs and thighs or
1 fryer, skin removed
1 1/2 quarts water
1 46 oz. can V8 Juice
Sift creole mix in colander.
Reserve the rice. In large pot of
salty water, cook chicken, spices
from mix, onions, and okra until
chicken is tender.
Remove chicken, cook and
cut into small pieces.
Add chicken, rice, and V8
Juice to chicken broth and vege-
tables in pot.
Cook until rice is done,
More water can be added to


make a thinner gumbo. Makes
about a gallon.
Frozen Dessert
Eclair Cake
Make topping first:
1 stick oleo
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup cocoa
1/4 cup milk
Melt oleo and bring to boil and
boil one minute.
Add to mixture:
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Cool mixture.
Mix:
2 small boxes instant vanilla pud-
ding and pie mix
3 cups milk
Fold in 8 oz. cool whip.
In large pyrex dish layer:
1 whole graham crackers (on
bottom)
2 1/2 pudding mix
3 graham crackers
4- 1/2 pudding mix
5 graham crackers
6 chocolate mix
Freeze well.
Make at least 8 hours before
freezing or serving.
Madge says she always freez-
es hers.


NEED JI) IT?



RENT IT!I



ST. JOE RENT-ALL, Inc.


706 1st St. Port St. Joe'
227-2112 Phil Earley


I would like to take this opportunity to express
my deepest appreciation to those of you in the
City of Wewahitchka that contributed to my suc-
cess in the recent election for City Commissioner
Group II.

Thank you for your support and a JOB WELL
DONEM!
Tommy Morgan





TREMENDOUS

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Experience The Spirit of Farm Bureau


Come be a career agent with us,
be a part of one of Florida's
insurance sales teams.


and
top


For Gulf County area

Contact:
Raymond D. Russell
Blountstown
904-674-5471


Listing highlights from our large, fast moving inventory!
GULF AIRE SUBDIVISION


Windscape Duplex
room, 2 baths,
screened porches
structed gulf view.
both.


- Modem 2 bed-
fireplaces and
each side. Unob-
$139,000.00 for


MEI IUU BEAUH
GULF FRONT COTTAGE
Completely renovated interior 3 bed-
room, 2 bath, sun porch, decks, fur-
nished and equipped. $135,000.00.


ERA PARKER REALTY
904-648-5777
Cathey Hobbs 648-5653, Debbie McFarland 648-5421 after hours


p


' k


in a friendly
atmosphere








Closed Sundays 6 Days a Week
All You Can Eat a Br4 5
LUNCH BUFFET includes Salad Bar4.0U


-Specializing In -
*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches *Meals to Go
Fresh Seafood *Delicious Steaks
r Famous Fresh $9 85
A ...Onlym


Our
e. rA


SEAFOUULD-LAT IlE


30 0FuthS. 227I.-1109 ort S. Jo


FAR~rr D


PAGE 6A


I


FARM
BUREAU
l..7. INSURANCE.


Only









THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. SEPT. 19. 1991


Front row, from left, Shanno
Back row, from left, Michael Whi


Cross Co
Last Thursday, the cross
country team of Port St. Joe High
School opened its 1991 season at
home against Rutherford and
Mosley.
The Sharks finished first in
* the meet as they placed six run-
ners in the top nine and finished
with 27 points. Rutherford placed
second with 55 points while Mos-
ley placed third with 68 points.
"We were happy to get the
win," Coach Scott Gowan said
smiling. "We are a real young
team and to win the meet was a
good way for us to start the sea-
son."
Scott Boykin placed first
overall among the 26 runners
with a time of 17:38. Other
Sharks who participated in the
meet were:
Junior Michael Whitfield with
a time of 19:04; sophomore Lee
Duren 19:35; freshman Shannon
Gant 19:45; freshman Damien
Byrd 19:59; freshman Bryan Ear-
ley 20:06; sophomore Steve Ailes
20:32; junior Tyrus Rudd 20:40;
and freshman Keith McDonald
22:11.
This Saturday the Purple


MESSAGE

SERVICE




S TAR


Locals Helping Saturday In


Florida Coastal Clean-up


on Gant, Damien Byrd, Bryan Earley, Steve Ailes, and Keith McDonald.
itfield, Lee Duren, Tyrus Rudd, Scott Boykin, and Coach Scott Gowan.


unmtry Defeats Bay


Pack will travel to Tallahassee
where they will participate in the
Lincoln Invitational. Teams that
are scheduled to compete are Lin-
coln, Godby, Rickards, and dis-
trict opponents Marianna and
Quincy-Shanks.
Three of the teams participat-
ing are ranked among the top 10
teams in the state in their classi-
fication (Lincoln #10-4A, Quincy-
Shanks #3-2A, and Marianna #4-
2A).
In 1991, the Sharks will com-
pete in District 1-AA along with
Quincy Shanks, Marianna, and
Pensacola Catholic. "This is prob-
ably the toughest district in the
state," remarked Gowan. Quincy-
Shanks moved down from 3A and
Pensacola Catholic moved up
from 1A to join Marianna and
Port St. Joe in District 1. "Four
runners from our district are
ranked among the top 12 runners
in the state in the class 2A pre-
season rankings," said Gowan.
Cecil Whittaker of Quincy-
Shanks is ranked fourth, Fred
Brown of Marianna is ranked
sixth, Scott Boykin of Port St. Joe
is ranked ninth, and Cornelius
McGlocklon of Quincy-Shanks is
ranked 12th.
Below is a schedule of the
1991 cross country season:
Sept 21 Lincoln Invit (A) 9:00
Sept. 28 FSU Invit (A) 9:00
Oct. 5 U.F. Invit. (A) 9:00
Oct. 12 Chipola Invit (A) 9:00



SHOCKING!
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FOR HALF PRICE!


FIRST SHOCK SECOND SHOCK
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GAS GRANDE 33.21 16.60
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SPECIAL PRICING GOOD NOW
THROUGH OCTOBER
NAPA AUTO PARTS
201 Long A, Pho. 229-8.222 1 ih arn
Suxx par-


I ELIJAH SMILEY, M.B.A.I


Str
T


ATTORNEY AT LAW
*PERSONAL INJURY *BUSINESS *AUTO ACCIDENTS
*PROBATE & WILLS *DIVORCES
raight LAW OFFICE DOWNTOWN Reason
ralk 1784-6606 | Fee
433 Harrison Ave. Suite 1B Panama City


able
s


COSmY iKysUAKCE














All eFrms of Insurance
* Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages .Group *Life *Boat
*Hospitalization *Mobile Homes

COSTING INSURANCE AGENCY


~ous


Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


Oct. 19 Eagle Invit. (A) 9:00
Oct. 26 Pre-State (A) 9:00
Nov. 2 PSJ Invit (H) 9:00
Nov. 9 Open
Nov. 16 District (H) 9:00
Nov. 23 State (A) 10:30


Early Duck,

Season Begins

Sept. 21-25

Duck hunters will have an
opportunity to bag wood ducks in
a special season that runs Sep-
tember 21-25. Florida, Kentucky
and Tennessee are the only three
states that have the early season.
During the five-day season
hunters can hunt from 30 min-
utes before sunrise to sunset and
are allowed to bag three wood
ducks per day. Duck hunters
must use steel shot and are re-
quired to have both a state and
federal waterfowl stamp.
David Brakhage, the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion's waterfowl management co-
ordinator, said, "Florida's early
season is held because biologists
have demonstrated by banding
resident wood ducks that the har-
vest of locally-produced birds is
light and the birds have fairly
high survival rates."
He said the early season is a
plus for waterfowlers because the
five-day season is in addition to
the 30-day fall duck and coot sea-
son.
Brakhage said waterfowl
hunters during the September
season can assist research efforts
by collecting one complete wing
from each bird they bag. He said
it's also important the wing is
fairly clean.
"We'll take the wings and de-
termine age and sex for each bird
and then compile an index that
will give us information about
breeding success," he said.
Brakhage said duck hunters
interested in participating in the
study can call him at the North
Florida Waterfowl Field Office in
Tallahassee at (904) 488-5878.


125 Water Street


"Imagine over 20,000 people
leaving the towels and beach um-
brellas at home and heading to
the coast with trash bags in
hand," said Heidi Lovett, coordi-
nator of the Center for Marine
Conservation's 1991 Florida
Coastal Cleanup. This year's
cleanup promises to be the larg-
est ever, breaking the Guinness
record set by Florida in 1990.
The annual cleanup, sched-
uled this year for Saturday, Sep-
tember 21, covers over 1000
miles of the diverse Florida coast-
line, from Fernandina Beach on
the Atlantic to Pensacola in the
Panhandle.
Not only will the volunteers
be collecting trash for recycling
and other proper disposal, they
will also collect valuable data for
CMC's National Marine Debris
Database data which deter-
mines the types and sources of
trash injuring wildlife and de-
stroying our beaches and estuar-
ies.
The information gathered
through the data collection has
helped change major national
and international policy toward
dumping at sea. As a recent ex-
ample, the International Maritime
Organization (IMO) voted on July
4, 1991 to approve Special Area
Designation for the Gulf of Mexico
and Wider Caribbean, which will
end all trash dumping in the re-
gion in the future.
The Florida event is part of
the international cleanup which
takes place each fall in all the
U.S. coastal states and a growing
number of foreign countries. So
far, the countries of Canada,
Mexico, Japan, Israel, Venezuela,
Dominican Republic, Norway, the
Netherland Antilles, and Greece
are confirmed participants.
Continued Lovett, '"Volunteers
can't wait to hit the coast on Sep-
tember 21. Enthusiasm and par-
ticipation by new groups contin-
ues to run high. Our phones are
now busy throughout the day
with calls from eager people from
across the state.
'The cleanup would not be
possible without the great efforts
of many individuals around the
state," concluded Lovett. "The fact
that Florida's Coastal Cleanup
breaks records every year is due
to the outstanding work of more
than 70 Zone Captains."
The Center also greatly appre-
ciates the many sponsors of the
statewide cleanup.


L.U. Tigers
These Livingston University
Tigers from the Florida Panhan-
dle will be ready to take on the Al-
bany State College Rams Satur-
day night in Tiger Stadium. On
the front (left to right) are fresh-
man defensive tackle Eric Black
(Holt/Baker) and freshman defen-
sive back Tony Lombardo (Pensa-
cola H.S.). On the back (left to
right) are senior center Keith
Thornsberry (Niceville H.S.), sen-
ior offensive tackle Sean Broada-
way (Pensacola/Woodham), and
freshman linebacker Darrell Tull
(Port St Joe H.S.). Kickoff is set
for 7:00 p.m. CT on the LU cam-
pus.


'BOSS OYSTER'


643-9364


A quaint seafood restaurant on the
Apalachicola River at 125 Water Street,
Apalachicola.
LIVE LOBSTERS ARE HERE!
*Oysters Every Which Way *Barbecue
*Steamed Fresh Seafood *Blue Crab
Apalachicola known Bobby Wesley
entertaining this weekend evenings with
Island Blues and Rock.
You'll love this place!!


Apalachicola


The Center for Marine Con-
servation has 110,000 members
and has its headquarters in
Washington, D.C., with regional
offices in Florida, Virginia, Texas,
California, and England.
Participation in the Coastal
Clean-up will begin Friday with
65 students from Port St Joe
High School picking up trash
from the beaches.
Friday afternoon approxi-


mately 20 students from High-
land View Elementary School will
go to the State Park for clean up
with teachers Barbara Eells,
Winston Wells, and Herman
Jones.
On Saturday, the official day
for the clean-up, volunteers are
needed to help in designated
areas. For information and to be
assigned a 7one captain, call Guy
Gammill at 227-1289.


PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the Gulf County 3oard of County Commissioners will hold a public hear-
ing in the Commissioners' meeting room in the Courthouse at Port St. Joe, Florida, on September 24,
1991, at 8:15 p.m., E.T., for the purpose of hearing from the public in regard to the adoption of a
Supplemental Budget for the fiscal year ending September 30. 1991.
A summary of receipts and expenditures proposed to be adopted by the Board of County Commission-
ers Is hereby published as required by law.
After said public hearing, the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will make whatever revi-
sions It deems necessary and shall thereupon adopt said budget
SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET 1990-91
GENERAL FUND
Present Budget $4.190,560.60
Additional Other Financing Sources 1,679.00
Proceeds of Installment Notes
TOTAL REVENUES $4.192,239.60

Present Budget $4,190,560.60
County Court Judge New Equipment 1,679.00
TOTAL EXPENSES $4,192.239.60
COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE FUND
Present Budget $844,390.00
Additional Other Financing Sources 155,810.25
Proceeds of Installment Notes
TOTAL REVENUES $1,000,200.25

Present Budget $844,390.00
County Road & Bridge Additional New Equipment 155,810.25
TOTAL EXPENSES $1.000,200.25
BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
/s/ Benny C. Lister, Clerk
Publish: September 19, 1991.





A NEW SERVICE


IN PORT ST. JOE


Now You Can Get Quick Service
On Your Car While You Wait,


DANNY TAYLOR
Is Now In Our Shop Doing Minor Repair and
Maintenance for Your Auto and Light Trucks


*Brake Work .Oil
*Exhaust Work Changes
*Shock Absorbers


EVERYDAY SPECIAL

GREASE and OIL CHANGE
5 qts. oil, filter change, $19 99
check all fluid levels .
8-6 Monday Friday and 8-12 Saturday








BLUE STREAK

SCarpet Cleaning

Now...Professional Carpet
Cleaning in this Local Area


* Carpet Cleaning
* Furniture
Cleaning
Carpet 4
Stretching
Auto Upholstery
Carpet or
Upholstery
Protection
Pressure Washing

.- .-. --- -.

r. ,


Residential or
Commercial

Service Trained
Technicians


A


rim& fr


PAGE 7A










PAGE 8A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 19, 1991


The Sharks break through a goalpost sign "Gig the Gators" to take the field Friday night before the opening kickoff.


St. Joe Claims


Both the Sharks and the Ga-
tors were unknown quantities
Friday night, as they took to the
gridiron, beginning their season
in Shark Stadium.
Both teams showed stout de-
fenses but had offenses which
sputtered at times and couldn't
seem to get going.
The Sharks, displaying al-
most an entirely new team this
season, put together more offen-
sive punch than the Gators could
muster, and captured the County
Trophy again with a 21-12 win
against their county rivals.
The Gators crossed into
Shark territory three times on the
night, and scored on two of the
invasions.
The Sharks couldn't manage
to punch across a touchdown un-
til halfway into the second quar-
ter. A sliced 14-yard punt by
Mark Lester put the Sharks in
business on the Gator 39. An 18
yard pass to Tony Thomas and
four running plays by Calvin
Pryor had the ball on the one
yard line with third down. Pryor
zipped through the middle for the
Sharks' first TD of the season.
Eric Monteiro kicked the first of
his three extra point conversions
of the evening and the Sharks


Calvin Pryor (32) plunges across the goalline for one of the
three touchdowns he scored in the Sharks' victory over county ri-
val Wewahitchka .... __.__. .._


Tony Thomas (4) of the
Sharks makes yards following a
pass reception.

Fishing

Tourney

Status
The 1991 Chamber of Com-
merce Fall Run Fishing Tourna-
ment is underway with some hot
and heavy fishing going on. The
standings thus far are:
Hook and Line Division
First place Shark: Warren
Renfro 21 pounds
First place King Mackerel:
Chris Brumbaugh 15.2 pounds;
second place Cathy Arnold 8
pounds
First place Spanish Mackerel:
Chris Brumbaugh 4.2 pounds;
second place Cathy Arnold 3.8
pounds
First place Trout: Earl Ko-
valska 4.75 pounds; second
place Warren Renfro 4.25
pounds
First place Bass: Warren Ren-
fro 8.75 pounds; second place -
Randy Haddock 4 pounds
First place Crappie: Warren
Renfro 2.5 pounds.
There is still time for you to
sign up and get to fishing for that
big onel The tournament will run
until October 5 and will end with
an awards ceremony at the Arts
and Crafts Festival to be held at
First Union Bank park.

JOLLY ROGERS PIZZA
TEEN NITE
5-9 pm Tuesdays
Free pool, 250 Sodas,
95 0 Pizza
Join the Fun
648-5328
4tc 9/19


Terrance Williams brings down Wewahitchka quarterback Den-
ny McGlon (15).


'Views On

-Dental Healtlj


FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.


BABY BOTTLE TOOTH DECAY


From a dental point of view,
nursing babies from bottles can
cause problems. Dentally-
speaking what's the worst
thing you can do to a baby?
Stick him in his crib with a bottle
at nap time and let him fall
asleep with the bottle in his
mouth. Milk or juice in the
mouth and on the teeth turns to
acid and causes teeth to break
down rapidly. Many babies who
sleep with a baby bottle develop
severe tooth decay, often in
their front teeth. The problem is
not the bottle but what's in it.
The sugar in the milk, formula,
or fruit juices causes the decay.
Sometimes, these teeth become
so decayed they cause severe
pain and may break off or have
to be pulled.


During the day, the baby
swallows these drinks quickly,
so there is no damage to the
teeth. But during sleep, the liq-
uid pools behind the baby's
teeth and keeps them bathed in
sugar for hours.
One solution is to give baby
the last feeding before bedtime.
If your baby is still using a bottle
when his teeth begin to appear,
let him use it for short periods
of time awake or sitting up. If he
is using a bottle as a pacifier,
put water in the bottle.
******
Prepared as a public service
to promote better dental health.
From the office of: FRANK D.
MAY, D.M.D., 319 Williams Ave.,
Phone 227-1123.


had a seven point lead.
The Gators mounted their
only sustained drive of the eve-
ning at the opening of the third
period. Sparked by two big pass
plays from Denny McGlon to
Mark Lester, and clutch running
by Mark Jones, the Gators were
on the scoreboard with a 22 yard
Lester catch at the 8:13 mark.
Jeremy Pridgeon's kick for the ex-
tra point was blocked by the
Shark line and the score stood at
7-6.
The Sharks answered the Ga-
tor score almost immediately,
marching from their own 35 yard
line in seven plays, touched off by
a 30 yard pass play from Jason
Maxwell to Tony Thomas. Calvin
Pryor lunged up the middle on a
seven-yard plunge to score for the
second time, with Monteiro's kick
right through the uprights.
Pryor scored again, three and
a half minutes later, when he set
off at an angle toward the left cor-
ner of the end zone on a 10 yard
gallop.
The Gators had a break early
in the last period, when the
Sharks were called for roughing
punter Jeremy Pridgeon on the


County
Gators' own 46, giving them a
first down in Shark territory on
the 44. The Gators moved to the
Shark 14 on an 11 yard pass
from McGlon to Marty Bryant and
a 28 yard pass play to Marcus
Vann, before the drive was
stopped by a Gator illegal block
penalty. The Sharks dug in and
stopped the drive.
The Gators scored last in the
game. With only one second left,
the Sharks fumbled the ball on
their own 46 yard line. Andy
Clayton scooped up the loose
football and ran 56 yards for the
final score, ending the game at
21-12.
STATISTICS
The Sharks had Calvin Pryor
as their leading ground gainer.
Pryor led both teams in rushing,
with 93 yards gained. Mark Jones
was the leading rusher for the
Gators. The Sharks had a total of
141 rushing yards and the Gators
had 77 yards.
Quarterback Jason Maxwell
was seven for 22, passing, good
for 159 yards. Denny McGlon
tossed four completions in 15 at-
tempts, good for 133 yards.
FRIDAY GAMES


Title
Friday night, the Sharks will
be on the road to Chipley to meet
the Tigers at 8:30 p.m., EDT.
The Gators will open their
home season Friday, against Hilli-
.ard at 7:30 p.m., CDT.
Score by Quarters:
Wewahitchka 0 0 6 6-12
Port St. Joe 07140-21
THE YARDSTICK


First downs
Rushes yards
Passing yards
Total Yards
Passes
Fumbles-lost


Wewa
6
26-77
82
159
4-15-2
4-2


PSJ
9
31-141
133
274
7-22-4
2-1


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Rushing PSJ: Calvin Pryor 17-
92; Devon Thomas 8-38; Tony
Thomas 1-14; Jason Maxwell 4 (-
1).
Passing: PSJ: Maxwell 7-22-0-4;
McGlon, 4-15-2-1.
Receiving: PSJ: Tony Thomas 6-
126; Chris Enflnger 1-7.
Tackling: PSJ Chris Enflnger 8,
Terrance Williams 7, Arion Nick-
son 6, Randy Smith 5.
Interceptions: Randy Smith 1
and Josh Colbert 1.
Caused Fumble: Arion Nickson
1.


Tirestone


All Season Steel-belted Radial Whitewall




13" SIZES 14" SIZES 15" SIZES

3999 499 599
P165/80R13 9 P185/75R14 P205n75R15
P175/80R13 P195175R14 P215 R5
P185/80R13 P205175R14 P225/75R15
S9 P215/75R14 P235/75R15
L" P155/80R13 69 P235/75RlSEEXrRA LOAD
"Any participating Firestone retailer will replace your tires on a pro-rata basis if they do not achieve the
guaranteed mileage. (60,000 miles on FR480, 40,000 to 55,000 miles on other Firestone radials.) Actual
tread life may vary. See us for a copy of our treadwear limited warranty and speed rating and tire safety
information.


Our Best For

Off-Road Traction


Tirestone
* Steel Belted Construction
* All Terrain Tread Design
* Easy to Handle

Radial ATX


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P195/75R14*
OUTLINE WHITE
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SUPPLIESS LIMITED
Load Load
Range Price Size Range Price
C 89.95 32x11.50R15LT C 124.95
SL 76.95 33x12.50R15LT C 139.95
C 79.95 LT255/85R16 D 144.95
C 84.95 31x10.50R16.5LT D 139.95
C 99.95 33x12.50R16.5LT D 149.95
C 104.95


PATER S
SERVIrCE CENTER PHONE 227-1291
SERaStVICE CINTER 216 Monument Ave.


I II I I


Ab


9




THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 19, 1991 PAGE IB


IY


WE MUS CLEAR OUHE REMAINING LEY
WE MUST CLEAR OUT THE REMAINING FURNITURE


MERCHANDISE


209-211 REID AVE.,
PORT S.T JOE,
FLORIDA


LA-Z-BOY
RECLINERS
Reg $569.95
$200


RATTAN QUEEN
SLEEPER
Peach Cotton Print Reg. $809.95
$360


CATNAPPER 5 Pc.
SECTIONAL
w/2 incliners Reg. S2339 95
$951


25" CONSOLE
G.E. TV
Reg. $729.00
$349


!iiTH1 F IAY 1 &JSAtUIRDA 11O:N IYf!] L u


' BLACK LACQUER-
4 PC. SUITE
BEDROOM


BROYHILL
CURIO
Reg. S419.00
$142


IROYHILL CHERRYrV,
DINING
ROOM
D, 5 Side Chairs, 1 Arm Choir
Reg. $4120.00
1400


ODD BROYHILL 5


ODD BROYHILL 5
DRAWER
CHEST
Reg. $339.00
$112


ALL REMAINING .
LIVING ROOMS.... 70% off
ALL REMAINING
BEDROOMS .......... 60% off
ALL REMAINING
DINETTES ............ 7U% off


" 2-4PC. /
CHERRY 4
BEDROOM'
WITH RICE BED
Reg. $829.00


BROYHILL WING
CHAIR


EUREKA CANISTER
VACUUM


MAUVE, Reg $429 00 Reg. $249 00
$179 $128


ALL
MIRRORS


70%


PILOT RACK SYSTEM
STEREO
Reg. $579.00
$194


OFF


LANE CEDAR
CHEST
Reg. $369.00
$145


9X12 BURGUNDY
RUG
$29


3 L-SHAPED
ETAGERES
Reg. $160.00
$56


/ SEPTEMBER 20 and 21


9 a.m. to 6 p.m.


BUDGET TERMS! MONTHS TO PAY!


SHeilig-Meyers
'b-:, We Funi&i AJ/n&77i7

DANLEY FURNITURE
EVERYTHING
MUST GO!
SUPER VALUES
IN EVERY DEPT
OF THE STORE!
BUDGET TERMS!
COMPLETE SUITES!
ODDS 'N ENDS!
PIECES LEFT OVER
FROM SUITES!
ONE-OF-A-KINDS!
FREE DELIVERY!
WE MUST
CLEAR OUT
ALL REMAINING STOCK
TO THE BARE WALLS!
COME IN TO
HEILIG-MEYERS
You'll Come Out Better!
SHeilig-Meyers
WeFun ili Aeina

DANLEY FURNITURE
209-211 REID AVE.
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
227-1277


EVERYTHING G UST GO
,,EVERHIMTs


I


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2
DAYS
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o


I v


N









THE S QTAR.DfPORT ST. JOAE. FL' THURSDAY.CSET.19.1001


PAGEL 2B TIM IUM -CPL.=)Url,. A In~t0Je~lor~e. Ito,


Self-Help Law Clinic Offered

on September 26 at First Methodist Church


Through the concept of "Peo-
ple Helping People" in their legal
needs a "ONE DAY ONLY' Self-
Help Law Clinic is to be held lo-
cally in Port St. Joe, Thursday,
September 26. The Clinic is de-
signed to assist those who want
to reduce, or cannot afford the
sky-rocketing costs of today's ba-
sic legal fees and needing assis-
tance, are encouraged to attend.
The "One Day Only" Self-Help
Law Clinic services over 150
smaller cities and towns in Flori-
da where there is usually no
practicing attorney, coming to vis-
it a community once or twice a
year. Working through churches,
social action and/or service or-
ganizations the Clinic develops
community awareness to the con-
cept of basic "do-it-yourself' legal
resources available to those will-
ing to devote a little time in com-
pleting pre-packaged question-
naires and filing their own
paperwork.
Self-Help Law Clinics are
non-lawyer services that provide
pre-package questionnaires and a
reference library that lay people
can comfortably use to satisfy


their needs in their constitutional
right to personal representation
to the Court of the land. Although
restrictive this appears to answer
much of the basic legal needs to
uncontested, non-advisarial legal
actions.
People simply complete the
pre-packaged questionnaire for
the serve they desire which
takes from 15 to 20 minutes, the
document is forwarded to be tran-
scribed onto standardized forms
and' reviewed by legal profession-
als within the community under
the profession's "Pro Bono (for the
good of the people) Rule;" the doc-
ument(s) is then sent to the per-
son who has it notarized and
filed.
Tleus, someone on a fixed in-
come/budget who "falls through
the crack" being ineligible for le-
gal aide because they're working
and earn too much, can use the
self-help service and be protected
for a small investment of time
and effort Community church,
social action groups and service
organizations volunteer to assist
or bring the infirm and elderly to
the Clinic to fill out the pre-


ak 4 A
I I
7I I





0. Lee Mullis, M.D.









'Bay Eye & Surgical Center
1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT"
1-800-227-5704
imn m w m mw 2w 2 wa- m7 5 "7W4 WmI


Now Under Construction

THE COTTAGES AT...

BARRIER DUNES


Pre-Construction Offering
For A Limited Time
Furnished.Models Starting at C
* Single Family Homes
* 2 Bedrooms, 2 Full Baths
* Landscaped Lot Included
* Clubhouse With Pool
and Fitness Center


, n79,900
* Pitch and Putt Golf
* (2) Lighted Tennis Courts
* Walk to the Gulf of Mexico
(700' of beach front)
* Much More


For more information call:

(904) 229-2777 or (800) 624-3964

THE COTTAGES ATBARRIER DUNES
Star Route 1 Box 223 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


packaged questionnaire, and
those needing transportation or
assistance should contact their
local church or service group.
One off the best services cur-
rently being provided is that of
the little known legal document
called a "Revocable Living Trust"'
and when combined with a "Liv-
ing Will" (a "Right to Die" state-
ment) and a "Durable Power of

Card of Thanks
The family of Rebekah Davis
would like-to express their appre-
ciation to their friends and
church family for thoughtfulness
and prayers during the illness
and loss of our little loved one.
To the doctors, nurses and
employees of St. Jude Hospital,
we appreciate for what they all
did for her during her stay in the
hospital.
She will be missed but we all
know she has gone to be with the
Lord.
God bless each and every
one.
Le Roy & Reba Davis
Little Roy & Rachel
Ella Davis, grandmother
Linda Faye & Robert Raffield
& Family
Patricia & Earl Haney &t
Family
Paul and Debbie Davis &
Family
Annie Ruth and Joe Adama &
Family
Mary Ellen Hall & Family

Card of Thanks
The family of Dorothy Mae
Trawick wishes to express their
appreciation to everyone who was
so kind and thoughtful to her and
us during her lengthy illness and
at her death.
Good friends who care and
take the time to show it, make.
difficult days like these easier to
bear.
Thank you all.
Most sincerely,
Euphramia Roberts
William & Frances Trawick
Harry & Florence Trawick
Robert & Mary Jane Trawick


HVVFD Seeking
Salable Donations,
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Highland View Fire Department fi
seeking donations from the com-
munity for a yard sale, which is
being planned for the month of
October. Salable items such as
clothing, knick knacks, and
household goods are needed.
For more information, or to
arrange for pickup of donations,
please call 229-8219 or 227-
1408. All proceeds will be used to
purchase new equipment for the
fire department.



COLL IN







By: Richard Miller
*Engine hoses can burst-sud-
denly, with disastrous effects.
Check to see if hoses are
cracked, brittle or soft. And if
you have to replace one hose,
it's smart and cost-efficient
to replace them all.
*McPherson strut combines the
shock absorber, the upper con-


than the conventional shock ab-
sorber, but it may cost more to
replace.
*Low-cost safety move: replace
windshield wiper blades often.
Would you believe that 38 per-
cent of drivers have never had
this done?
*Allseason tires are more vul-
nerable to uneven wear than
other types. Rotating them
more often at 6,000 to
8,000 miles, and again at
18,000 to 24,000 protects
the tires.
*"Fuel injection" refers to a
computer-controlled system
that delivers just the right
amount of fuel into the combus-
tion chamber.
*New-Used Cars: Special
names for special features -
let us show you what's terrific
about our new models at
uff FoTrd


Attorney for Health" package a
family is protected from losing its
hard-earned Inheritance that a
husband and wife have worked
for. A Revocable Living Trust in-
stead of a Will, can save literally
hundreds if not thousands of dol-
lars in inheritance and keep a
family's personal affairs away
from years of trauma, legal ad-
ministrative fees and the public
eye of the probate court.
If, for example, someone is
unconscious in case of an acci-
dent, a "Durable Power of Attor-
ney for Health" with "Living Will,"
(Right to Die Statement) allows
one to declare their choice regard-
ing the use of expensive life-
sustaniing procedures, which in
so many cases prolongs a family's
agony. This legal tool is extremely
easy to Implement The "Durable
Power of Attorney for Health"
eliminates the need for conservat-
orship or guardianship proceed-
ings in a court of law should you
ever become incapacitated and be
unable to make your own health
care decisions making certain
that decisions about your health
and money will be made by some-
one you trust and not by some-
one appointed by a court.
A little known but sure-proof
solution that gives peace of mind.
The Self-Help Law Clinics
provide at an affordable price, ba-
sic legal document transcription
preparation such as: No-Fault
Uncontested Divorce; Step-parent
Adoption; Living Wills; Name
change; Short-term Guardian-
ship; Sealing of Juvenile Records
Petition; Child support or Custo-
dy Modification Petitions.
All of the above, plus dozens
of other basic Self-Help non-
lawyer services, will be available
to anyone who comes to the "ONE
DAY ONLY' Self-Help Clinic being
held at the First United Methodist
Church, 1001 Constitution Drive,
Port St. Joe on Thursday, Sep-
tember 26 from 10:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
Anyone able to volunteer to
transport the elderly or semi-
inform or those without transpor-
tation should contact their local
church or the First Methodist
Church Office to express that
they have a vehicle available.
People interested in using the
Self-Help Clinic need to come
with all their papers. All will be
served on a first-come basis.


I


LAW OFFICES OF
FRIER & USKERT, P.A.



IMMEDIATE RELIEF FROM DEBTS

*Stop Harassing Calls, Letters, Etc.
*Stop Repossessions & Foreclosures
*Eliminate Debts
*Eliminate or Extend Student Loan Payments
*Extend Tax Obligation

Start Over
Re-Establish Good Credit
Call Today For A Free Confidential Consultation


784-1361
465 Harrison Ave. Panama City


TFC 4/11/91


NOTICE





OF TAX





INCREASE


The Gulf County Board of County

Commissioners has tentatively

adopted a measure to increase its

property tax levy by 11.21%.


All concerned citizens are invited to

attend a public hearing on the tax

increase to be held on Tuesday,

September 24, 1991, at 5:01 P.M.,

E.D.T., in the County Commission-

ers meeting room at the Gulf

County Courthouse, 1000 Fifth

Street, Port St. Joe, Florida.


A FINAL DECISION on the proposed

tax increase and the budget will be

made at this hearing.


Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales


ID -r -r


I


For All of Your Publishing Needs

Call The Star

227-1278


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Phone 227-1278 FAX 227-7212 304-308 Willhiarns Ave.
L-- --. WANT MORE SAVINGS? CALL FOR OUR LATEST SALESBOOK! -













THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 19, 1991 PAGE 3B


News from Wewahitchka Elementary Local Residents Aiding Turtles
By Linda Whitfield
At nil ht. dlurin, the months rev of raccoons. foxes dogs, and thest point from the Gull, pleas


Request from the
Health Service Team
Our Health Service Team is
in the process of updating the
medical information on our stu-
dents. Please take a few minutes
and complete the form when your
child brings it home. Return it as
soon as possible. Your coopera-
tion in this matter will be greatly
appreciated.
Teachers Attend American
Cancer Society Leadership
Conference
Teachers Joyce Groom and
Linda Whitflel (along with Perry,
Jeannie and jlason) attend the
ACS VolunteerLeadership confer-
ence in Orlando on September 6,
7 and 8. Over 750 volunteers
from over the state's eight dis-
tricts heard panel presentations,
slide shows, group meetings, etc.
on how we can help wipe out that
most dreaded disease, cancer.
Where Have All the Seniors
Gone?...
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege: Ivey Crutchfield, son of


Freddie and Brenda Crutchfield,
is attending GCCC. He is also
working part time with Lanier's
Honey and playing softball.
Ingrid Muina, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Muina, is also attending
GCCC to pursue an AA Degree
and then she plans to transfer to
Florida State University.
Shaun McDaniel is working
at NAPA Auto Parts in Wewa-
hitchka and in January he will
begin school in Texas. studying
auto mechanics.
Star Student of The Week
Meagan Morris, daughter of
Ann (Rish) and Buddy Morris is
our star student of the week.
Meagan is in the first grade class-
room of Mrs. Rhonda Pridgeon.
Meagan likes all her subjects
in school but decidedly likes
reading best. Her favorite book is
The Little Mermaid. Meagan likes
to play with Kimberly McMillion.
When she 'grows' up, Meagan
would like to be a cheerleader.
She also likes watching Funniest
Home Videos. She hopes to travel


to Hawaii one day. Meagan said
this about herself, "I like to have
fun and make good grades in
school." When asked to finish this
sentence, Meagan said, "School is
fun." She always has a pretty
smile on her face, too.

Progress Reports Were Sent
Home
If your child had below a "C"
in any subject, they were given a
Progress Report. Now is the time
to schedule conferences with
their teachers. Report cards will
go out before you know it.

Students in Third Grade
Studying the Ocean
We never mean t it to corre-
late so well, it just happened. In
science, the third grade is study-
ing water habitats. In social stud-
'ies, our unit for the week is "the
oceans". We may be waterlogged
before the week is out or have an
understanding of the uses and
misuses of our oceans. With 70
percent of the earth's surface cov-


of May through August, sea tur-
tles -- usually loggerheads, crawl
up on the beaches of Gulf County
and lay. approximately one hun-
dred eggs. As soon as the mother
goes back to the gulf, the ping-
pong size eggs often become the



Card of Thanks
Words cannot express my ap-
preciation for the many prayers,
cards, flowers and other acts of
kindness during my recent sur-
gery and recuperation. At times
like this it really helps to have so
many friends in your corner. May
God bless you all.
Pauline McGill
G.E. McGill, Jr.
Mrs. A.J. Owens




ered with water, we- may learn
some ways to do our part in 'Sav-
ing the Earth.'


coyotes which will destroy the en-
tire nest in less than an hour. If
these nests can be located within
the next day or two, they can be
staked and wired by state permit-
ted volunteers.,
During 1991, 55 nests were
wired and saved, but many more
were lost. Everyone's help is
needed in locating crawls and
nests. If you see a crawl and it
does not have a stake at.its far-


e


call; the' following number for its
area:
t* Indian Pass to Money Bayou -
227-7304; Money Bayou, Cape
San Blas, and the Peninsula -
647-8245; St. Joe Beach 647-
8238 or 647-8862: Beacon Hill -
647-5031; Overall Coordinator -
229-6036.
If there is no answer, one of
the other numbers will relay the
message.


ALL YOU CAN EAT


PIZZA, SPAGHETTI and SALAD.....$429

SUNDAY 11 a.m. 9 p.m.
Children Under 5 Free Beverage Extra
Not good with any other offer.

JOLLY ROGERS PIZZA

32nd St. & Hwy. 98 Mexico Beach 648-5328 4tc 9/19


BUDGET SUMMARY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
FISCAL YEAR 1991-92

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE
GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ARE 17.3%
MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES.

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
GENERAL FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPT. 30, 1992
Current Ad Valorem Taxes (7.112 Mills) $3,297,283.00
Cable TV: Franchise Fees 2,500.00
Licenses & Permits 23,000.00
Intergovernmental Revenue 255,427.00
Charges for Services 112,960.00
Fines & Forfeitures 2,400.00
Rent & Royalties. 7,332.00
Special Assessments 31,500.00
Miscellaneous Revenues 1,000.00
Less 5% 186,670.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash 549.890.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES
AND BALANCES $4.096,622.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
GENERAL FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
General Government Services $1,840,351.00
Public Safety 440,247.00
Physical Environment 561,523.00
Transportation 81,471.00
Economic Environment 20,052.00
Human Services 922,785.00
Culture & Recreation 113,018.00
Reserve for Contingencies 117,175.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED.EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES $4.096.622,00
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
FINE & FORFEITURE FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Current Ad Valorem Taxes (1.934 Mills) $896,646.00
Licenses & Permits 8,000.00
Intergovernmental Revenue 64,324.00
Charges for Services 7,500.00
Fines and Forfeitures 76,000.00
Less 5% 52.623.00-
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $999.847,00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
FINE & FORFEITURE FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
General Government Services $3,750.00
Public Safety 987,402.00
Reserve for Contingencies 8.695.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
; RESERVES $999.847.00
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE & RECEIPTS
COUNTY ROAD & BRIDGE FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Intergovernmental Revenue $724,631.00
Less 5% 36,231.00-
Balance Brought Forward Cash 153,393.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $841.793.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
COUNTY ROAD & BRIDGE FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Transportation $723,246.00
Budgeted Transfer: To Capital Outlay Fund ..................... 110,000.00
Reserve for Contingencies 8.547.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $841.793.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE and RECEIPTS.
SECONDARY ROAD & BRIDGE TRANSPORTATION FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Intergovernmental Revenue $359,520.00
Less 5% 17,976.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash 519.361.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $860.905.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
SECONDARY ROAD & BRIDGE TRANSPORTATION FUND
GULF COUNTY.
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Transportation $860,905.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $860.905.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE and RECEIPTS
MOSQUITO CONTROL: STATE I & II FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Intergovernmental Revenue $15.000.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $15.000.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
MOSQUITO CONTROL: STATE I & II FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Human Services $10,074.00
Reserve for Contingencies 4926.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $15.000.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUES AND RECEIPTS
ST. JOE FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Ad Valorem Taxes (.440 Mills) $79,020.00
Less 5% 3,951.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash 4.550.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $79.619.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
ST. JOE FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Public Safety $78,083.00
Reserve for Contingencies 1,536.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES $79,619.00
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
TUPELO FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Ad Valorem Taxes (.500 Mills) 13,357.00
Less 5% 667.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash 13.357.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $26.047.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
Q TUPELO FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Public Safety. .$26.047:00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $26,047,00


ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
OVERSTREET FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Ad Valorem Taxes (.500 Mills) $3,437.00
Less 5%. 171.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash 166400
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $4.930.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
OVERSTREET FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT
GULF COUNTY,
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER. 30, 1992
Public Safety $4,387.00
Reserve for Contingencies 543.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES .$4.930.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
HOWARD CREEK FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Ad Valorem Taxes (.500 Mills) $5,288.00
Less 5% 264.00-
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $5.024.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
HOWARD CREEK FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Public Safety $5,02400
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVS $5.024.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
C.D.B.G. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Miscellaneous Revenues .$74.207,00-
TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER
FINANCING SOURCES $74.207.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
C.D.B.G. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Economic Environment $45,307.00
Cash to be Carried Forward 28.900.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $74.207.00
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
WILLIAMSBURG C.D.B.G. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Intergovernmental Revenue ..$571,925.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $571.925.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
WILLIAMSBURG C.D.B.G. FUND
GULF COUNTY'
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Physical Environment $571,925.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $571.925.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
D.C.A. CONTRACT: ROAD
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Intergovernmental Revenue $990,000.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES 8990.000.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
D.C.A. CONTRACT: ROAD
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Transportation $990.000.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
REVENUES $990.000.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
CERTIFICATE OF INDEBTEDNESS: I&S RESERVE FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Balance Brought Forward: Cash $71,814.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $71.814.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
CERTIFICATE OF INDEBTEDNESS: I&S RESERVE FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Reserve for Cash to be Carried Forward $71,814.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $71.814.00

2 ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
CERTIFICATE OF INDEBTEDNESS: I&S FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Ad Valorem Taxes (.142 Mills) $65,834.00
Less 5% 3,291.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES 864.099.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
CERTIFICATE OF INDEBTEDNESS: I&S FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Debt Services $63,927.00
Reserve for Contingencies 172.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES 864.099.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
FIRE STATIONS: BOND & INTEREST FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
BalanceBrought Forward: Cash A$8485.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $8,485.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
FIRE STATIONS: BOND & INTEREST FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Debt Services $8.485.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $8.485.00
d.
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
GULF COUNTY PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Sales & Use Taxes $317,587.00
Intergovernmental Revenue 41,000.00
Less 5% ..17,929.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash .344.020.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $684,678.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
GULF COUNTY PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Debt Services .. ..$684.678.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $684,678.00
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
CAPITAL OUTLAY FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Budgeted Transfer: From County Road


& Bridge Fund.. $110.000,00,
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $110.000.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
' CAPITAL OUTLAY FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Transportation. $110.000.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $110.000.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
GULF COUNTY CONSTRUCTION & ACQUISITION FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Miscellaneous Revenues $120,000.00
Balance Brought Forward: Cash $1 742.000.0Q
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $1,862.000.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
GULF COUNTY CONSTRUCTION & ACQUISITION FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30. 1992
Transportation $1,862.000.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND 0.00
RESERVES $1.862.000.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
OAK GROVE WATER & SEWER: RACE TRACK FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Intergovernmental Revenue $3,700.Q0
Less 5% 185.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash 266.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $3.781.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
OAK GROVE WATER & SEWER: RACE TRACK FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Budgeted Transfer: To O.G.W.S. Bond,.
Interest, & Reserve Fund 3.781.0
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $3,781.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
OAK GROVE W & 8: BOND, INT. & RESV. FUND
.GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Budgeted Transfer: From O.G.W.S. Race Track
-Fund $3,781.00,
Budgeted Transfer: From O.G.W.S. Revenue &
Expense Fund .. 18,793.00
Less 5% 1,128.00-
Balance Brought Forward: Cash 45.367.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $66.813.00
'ESTIMATED EXPENSES
OAK GROVE W & S: BOND, INT. & RESV. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Debt Services $66.813.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $66,813.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
OAK GROVE W & S: REVENUE & EXPENSE FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Charges for Services $8,000.00
Miscellaneous Revenue 300.00
Balance Brought Forward: Cash 19762.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $28.062,00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
OAK GROVE W & S: REVENUE & EXPENSE FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Physical Environment.. $9,269.00
Budgeted Transfer: To O.G.W.S. Bond, Interest,
& Reserve Fund. 18,793.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $28.062,00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
GULF CO. WATER SYSTEM: REVENUE ENT. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Charges for Servites $112,000.00
Less 5% 5.600-
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $106.400.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
GULF CO. WATER SYSTEM: REVENUE ENT. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Budget Transfer: To G.C.W.S.
Operation/Maintenance $80,000.00
Budget Transfer: To G.C.W.S. Bond I &S. 26.400.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $106.400.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
GULF CO. WATER SYSTEM: BOND, INT. & SINKING FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Miscellaneous Revenues $1,000.00
Budgeted Transfer: From G.C.W.S. Revenue
Fund ..................................................................... 26,400.00
Less 5% .. 1,370.00-
SBalance Brought Forward: Cash. 31.81900
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES 857.849.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
GULF CO. WATER SYSTEM: BOND, INT. & SINKING FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Debt Services $57.849.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $57849.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
GULF CO. WATER: OPERATION/MAINT. FUND
GULF COUNTY -
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Budgeted Transfer: From G.C'.W.S.Revenue
Fund. $80,000.00
Less 5% ..000.00-
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES 876.000.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
GULF CO. WATER: OPERATION/MAINT. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Physical Environment $76.000.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES ............................. $76.00000

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
HIGHLAND VIEW WATER SYSTEM: REVENUE ENT. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Charges for Services ... .......................... .......$67,000.00
Less 5% ........................................... .3 350.00-
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES .................................... ......... ...... $835... .00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
HIGHLAND VIEW WATER SYSTEM: REVENUE ENT. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Budgeted Transfer: To H.V.W.S. Operation/


Maintenance $55,650.00
Budgeted Transfer: To f.V.W.S. Bond I & S Sinking
Fund..., 8.800010Q
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES 63.850.00
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
HIGHLAND VIEW WATER SYSTEM: OPERATIONS/MAINT. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Budgeted Transfer: From H.V.W.S. Revenue
Fund ... ................. .......................... .. $55,650.00
Less 5% .................... ............. ................................... .... 2.783.00-
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES 552,867.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
HIGHLAND VIEW WATER SYSTEM: OPERATIONS/MAINT. FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Physical Enivironmient $49,400.00
Reserve for Contingenties 3.467.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES: 52,867.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
HIGHLAND VIEW WATER SYSTEM: BOND. INT. & SINKING FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Budgeted Transfer: From H.V.W.S. Revenue
Fund $8,000.00
Less 5% 400.00-
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $7.600.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
HIGHLAND VIEW WATER SYSTEM: BOND, INT. & SINKING FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Debt Services $7,600.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $7.600.00

ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
HIGHLAND VIEW WATER: RENEWAL & REPLACEMENT FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Balance Brought Forward: Cash $7.138.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $7.138.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES ...,. ;
HIGHLAND VIEW WATER: RENEWAL & REPLACEMENT- FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Reserve for Cash to be Carried Forward $7 138.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $7.138.00
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
SEN. CIT. EMERO. SHELTER TRUST FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Intergovernmental Revenue $5.000.00
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $5000.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
SEN. CIT. EMERG. SHELTER TRUST FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Human Services $5.000.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES $5.000.00
ESTIMATE OF REVENUE AND RECEIPTS
LOCAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE TRUST FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
Fines & Forfeitures $25000.00
ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES $25,000.00
ESTIMATED EXPENSES
LOCAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE TRUST FUND
GULF COUNTY
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1992
General Government Services $20,000.00
Public Safety 5.000.00
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND
RESERVES 825.000.00


1991-92
BUDGET RECAPITULATION AND MILLAGE LEVY
Fund Total Mllage Dolars/Vialu
1 Genetal $4,096,622.00 7.112 7.112/$1000.00
2 Fine & Forfefture 999,847.00 1.934 1.934/$1000.00
3 County Road & Bridge 841.793.00 -0- -0-
4 Secondary Road & Bridge 860,905.00 -0- -0-
5 State I & II
Mosquito Control 15.000.00 -0- -0-
6 C.D.B.G. 74,207.00 -0- -0-
7 WilIiainsburg CDB 571.925.00 -0- -0-
8 DCA Contract-Road 990,000.00 -0- -0-


9 Courthouse &Jail -
Cert. of Indebt. Bond.
Interest 8fReserve .71,814.00
10 Courthouse & Jail -
Cert.'of Indebt.
Bond & Interest 64,099.00
11 Fire Stations: Bond,
Interest. & Reserve 8,485.00
12 Gulf County Public
Improvement
t Service 684.678.00
. 13 Capital Outlay 110.000.00
14 Gulf County Construction
& AcquislUon .. 1,862,000.00
15 Oak Grove Water & Sewer.
RaceI Tack Guaranteed
Entitlement 3,781.00
16 Oak Grove Water & Sewer
Bond. Interest & Reserve 66.813.00
17 Oak GroveWater & Sewer.
Revenue & Expense 28,062.00
18 Gulf County Water System:
Revenue 106,400.00
19 Gulf County Water System:
Bond. Interest. & Sinking 57,849.00
20 Gulf County Water System:
Operation 76.000.00
21 Highland View Water System:
Revenue 63,650.00
22 Highland View Water System:
Operation & Maint. 52.867.00
23 Highland View Water System: ,
Bond. Interest..& Sinking 7.600.00
24 Highland View Water System:
Renewal & Replacement 7,138.00
25 Senior Citizens Emergency
Shelter Trust 5,000.00
26 Local Criminal Justice
Trust 25.000.00
TOTAL COUNTY WIDE 11.751.535.0
SPECIAL FIRE DISTRICTS:
Overstreet Fire control 4.930.00
Howard creek Fire Control 5,024.00
St Joseph Fire Control 79.619.00
Tupelo Fire Control 26,047.00
TOTAL SPECIAL
FIRE DISTRICTS 115.620.00


-0-

.142
-0-

-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
.0-

-0-
-0-
-0-
S9.18


-0-

.142/$1.000
-0-

-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
9 188/81000 00


.500 .500/$1000.00
.500 .500/$1000.00
.440 .440/$1000.00.
.500 .500/$1000.00
1.940 I 1 940/S1000 00


ATTEST:. BENNY C. ULSTER
CLERK OF COURT
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
JAMES E. CREAMER., CHAIRMAN
THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN
THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A
PUBLIC RECORD.


_


I













.' : ^ SPECIALS FOI
Barber's ...-... George W. Duren,
S B* .'.v:' ;.:::." .." 510 5th St.
S.- : Skim -1% and 2%
Skim % a.nd"* Large Tray Soup Bones ....
S.:"" 1 Beef Short Rib Stew .......
::* Select Skinned Deveined
.. IFamily Pak Center Cut Pc
Register Dry Cured Whole
or Half Slab Bacon ..........
: Beef Soup Shanks..........
.. .... .. .......::: . -.:** Fam ily Pak Boneless
..:. ." ... ". ..." :: Chuck Roast ...............
f. E: 1 ..' Our Own Pan Sausage ......
.":'** 1Lykes Hot Dogs ......
S .. :: Lykes Cooked Ham.
o .0:.. Palm River Bacon...
.* *All of our beef is heavy
... ;. *..* corn fed. Check our dia
.*": *- *" s':'*** Special selected and a
S :":* tenderness beef.
... *'* So Special Aged Iowa Corn
.:.- .v :.*.* *.- /*:*\**0. USDA Choice
.. "-t "'.:. "* :..:".-, .* PORTERHOUSE STEA
.... "."".. *..*... T-BONE
S* u : ..::-..: STEAK lb.
VVoe4 o :A Special Aged Iowa Corn
W hole.Milk.t):.%h USDAChoice
.* lo.'.:'" "... **. *:*. *** RIB EYE STEAK and
**.gallon $ *. NEW YORK STRIP
STEAK ...................b.
1/4 LOIN
Pork Chops

a'r. |.i0t 6.5 oz. Star Ki s
__ TUNA


2/ 1 .00 _
LIMIT 6 WITH OTHER PURCHASES


.......... Lb.9 9 0 "q "
.........Lb.2.29
Beef Uver.. Lb.69<
xk Chops........... Lb.1.99
............. Lb.1.19
........Lb.1.99


*


A49 Boneless Chicken
LB. Breast .....LB.


I89 S Our Best Small 3-Down 59
Spare Ribs LeBI
32 oz. elmon-


73o,


32 oz. Delmonte
CATSUP


1.19


S EA Y' A 3 BAER
Fridayand Sturda


Friday and Saturday
1/2 Barbecued
CHICKEN

DINNER


includes cole slaw
and baked beans


64 oz. Southern Touch Apple Juice .............1.29
5 oz. Armour Vienna Sausage................. 2/1.00
12 oz. Real Value Evaporated Milk............. 2/88'
13 oz. 8 O'Clock Coffee ....................... 1,99


5 lb. Real Value S.R. or Plain Flour...................89,
6 oz. 9 Lives Cat Food...............................3/99,
3 1/2 lb. Kozy Kitten Cat Food................... 1.69
14 oz. Raid Ant & Roach Aerosol..................2.69


64 oz. Tropicana Orange Juice....................1.39


gj~


-LUNCH SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK--
BEST IN TOWN MILKSHAKES................special 59 /
Try Them They're Good
ub Sandwiches only 1.59
Donuts 8 Pc. Delicious Fried FRESH
0 S Chicken only 5.99 MADE
Pas.t.r Chicken Box 1.99 BIRTHDAY
Pastries "Chicken, Potato Logs, Coleslaw CAKES


Interstate
FRIES................I...... 20 oz. 39o
Banquet
FRUIT PIES 20 oz.1.49
Real Value
FIELD PEAS & SNAPS .......16 oz. 990
Delicious ,
COOL WHIP .. 880


Merico 9.5 oz.
CINNAMON ROLLS. 990
Breakstone
SOUR CREAM........16 oz.990
Mazola Corn Oil
MARGARINE....... Ib. 1.01 9


Fresh Crisp
GREEN BEANS ........lb. 59
Snowy Head
CAULIFLOWER head 1.29
Tray Pak Salad
TOMATOES .................b. 99<
8 oz. Package
MUSHROOMS............1b. 99
Fresh Crop Green
PEANUTS ...............lb.79

S. FIRM H]
f ,


At


46AM


EAD FRESH

.BA G E .................. 4 lbs.


'A A A A A A A A A I I Aj AA A M A A A A


4 7


DASH DETERGENT
50 oz.

99


r;rzr


pr


-=









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 19, 1991 PAGE 5B


"The Saudis Will Never Be the Same Again"-,
Living in the Saudi Arabian etc., comes into the nation from police since many military vehicle is camel," Todd said. The re- home. Needless to say, we were
desert was definitely different other countries. "It seems like drivers were women. 'They have turned soldier pointed out that ready," Todd concluded.
from living in Port St. Joe in Gulf every male in the nation is given two types of police over there, the Arabians placed their animals Guests of the club were Har-
Countvh Florida. according to a a small white nick-up truck with One kind polices religious viola- [camels, sheep and goats] first; old Quackenbush of Port St. Joe


narrative Mike Todd gave to the
Rotary Club last Thursday.
Todd, a just-returned veteran
of the Persian Gulf war, related
some of his experiences and a lot
of his impressions on Saudi Ara-
bfa to the Rotarians in his pres-
entation, which was illustrated
with many photographs and sev-
eral pieces of memorabilia he
brought back with him.
The speaker said the first
thing Americans noticed about
the Saudi Ardbian people was
that none of them work unless
they want to. 'They bring in peo-
ple from other nations to do the
work," he said. "The Saudi Arabi-
an males are given a percentage
of the nation's oil profits from the
age of 12. He gets it all his life."
Another impression the
desert kingdom made on Todd
was that the Saudi's do not make
anything in their own country. All
their clothing, equipment, auto-
mobiles, household items, food,


a red stripe down the side at the
age of 12 and told, "It's yours, get
in it and drive it off." Almost every
male in the nation seems to have
one of these small white pick-up
trucks with a red stripe down the
side, Todd told the club.
Another oddity about the na-
tion-at least odd to orderly
Americans-is that nobody takes
a driving test, a license is not
necessary, nobody purchases au-
tomobile insurance, nor takes a
driver test "If a boy can manage
to make the car [or truck] go, he's
a driver; and their driving habits
on the highways over there reflect
such haphazard activities," he
said.
Hardly anybody pays any at-
tention to speed limit signs or
traffic signs. "It's almost as if it
were every man for himself," the
speaker said.
Women do not drive in Saudi
Arabia. For this reason, American
forces had trouble with the local


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Flordia Church Phone 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellow-
ship "A CHURCH WITH A VISION"P
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............ 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ..........5:30 p.m. Thursday ...............7:30 p.m.
REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director
L A


You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
S t. James' Episcopal Church
episcopaL
EplSCO ()309 Sixth Street- Port'St Joe

I -SERVICES-
Each Sunday..................7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School................................9:45 a.m.
ch~iIch The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor
ChRCmcb


We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place
BIBLE STUDY.......................... 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING ..............:...11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY....................... 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ...................5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor


THERE IS ROOM
(Luke 14:21-24)
"AND the servant said, Lord it is done as Thou hast command-
ed and yet there is room" (Luke 14:22)
WHEN the host hear that those who had been invited turned
down the invitation, he hold his servants to invite others, people
who were considered by some not to be worth much. After they had
come, the host saw that there was still room for others and sent out
the servants to invite everyone who would come.
Not many people would turn down an invitation to the White
House. Yet some postpone accepting the invitation to eat of the Tree
of Life.
The Lord is "not willing that any should perish, but that all
.should come to repentance" (2 Peter 3:9).
Won't you come today? There is still room for you.

Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
P.O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


tons and the others police the
law. It was against religious prac-
tice for women to drive vehicles,
so our drivers had problems with
their religious police; the most
powerful in Saudi Arabia," the
speaker pointed out.
Saudis are very devout peo-
ple. They are devout Islams and
stop whatever they are doing, six
times a day, to say their prayers.
There are prescribed times to
pray and prescribed methods of
repeating those prayers. The re-
ligious beliefs of the nation are
the most determining factor for
everyday activities for the people.
Todd said their religious activities
are not only prescribed, but those
actions are enforced by the relig-
ious police.
Camels, sheep and goats are
the animals of food, conveyance,
barter and beasts of burden in
the nation. "If there is roast meat
on the menu at a cafe, you can
bet your bottom dollar the meat


their tent second and their family
third in order of importance in
their lives. This is especially true
of the nomadic Bedouins, who
still roam from place to place in
the desert kingdom.
The nation is very dusty and
there is no toilet paper in Saudi
Arabia, Todd explained. A bath-
room consists of a hole in the
floor and a shower-like hose to
wash oneself with. This is a
strange arrangement in a nation
which must depend on water
claimed from the ocean by desa-
linization plants, but it's the way
it is in Saudi Arabia.
Todd said, 'The Saudi's will
never be the same again. They
saw some of our female soldiers
dressed in shorts and T-shirts,
working right alongside the men.
They saw some of our everyday
habits and they ate some of our
food. They will never be the same
again. For this reason, they were
anxious for us to leave -and go


K.I.D.S. Announces

Meal Guidelines


Kids Instructional Day Ser-
vice, Wewahitchka KIDS, and
KIDS Early Childhood Center
have announced that meals will
be available at no separate charge
to enrolled eligible children at the
centers listed above and will be
provided without regard to race,
color, national origin, sex, relig-
ion, age or handicap.
Parents/guardians of chil-
dren eligible for a free and/or re-
duced price meal must complete
an application with documenta-
tion of eligibility information in-
cluding number and names of all
household members, social secur-
ity numbers of all adult house-
hold members or an indication
that a household member does
not have one, total monthly
household income OR Food
Stamp case number or Aid to
Families with Dependent Chil-
dren (AFDC) or Aid to Dependent
Children (ADC) case number, and
the signature of an adult house-
hold member.
Income Eligibility Guidelines
for 1991-92 are available at the


AARP Is

Looking for

Tax Aides
Volunteers, numbering
29,434, provided free personal in-
come tax preparation to
1,496,580 older low and moder-
ate income taxpayers last year via
AARP.
Volunteers, who are trained
in cooperation with the IRS,
spend four hours each week from
February 1 through April 15 as-
sisting taxpayers.
The AARP Tax-Aide Program
is growing, and volunteers are
needed in many locations, volun-
teer positions include:
*Counselors: to provide di-
rect, one-on-one help to the tax-
payer.
*Instructors: to train counse-
lors about income tax informa-
tion.
*Coordinators: to direct tax-
aide activities at the local level.
People helping people: That's
what the AARP Tax-Aide Program
is all about.
For more information write to
Ernest Hendricks, District Coor-
dinator, Route 3 Box 135C, Port
St. Joe, FL 32456.













HEARING AID CENTER
618 W. 23rd St.,
Wllbro Plaza
Panama City, FL
769-5348

FREE HEARING
TEST
Top Quality, Name
Brand Hearing
Aids
eSatisfaction Guaranteed
eMonthly Service Center
Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
1st Tuesday each month


KIDS centers listed above. For
more information, contact the
center nearest you.


Thank You!
Thank you, David Renfro and
friend, Denise, also the nice lady
who stopped and went to the Jr.
Food Store and made phone calls
to the Sheriffs Department and
to deputies H.B. Henderson and
Ray Richter, the employees at the
Jr. Food Store for their help when
my car broke down on Hwy. 98.
Thank you for being friendly
to a Northerner.
Bill Stevens


Vi, IAA





(Us '
- FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP.. 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL.......11 a.m.
*SUNDAY SCHOOL
Young Children
Nursery Available
227-1756
The Rev. Joseph Eckstine
Pastor


Mike Todd
and Wayne Pate of Oklahoma
City, Okla. The club received
George Whiting as a new member
Thursday.


We're just down the street

in caseyouneedtus.

.. More independent agents like myself
are handling Allstate. Insurance every day.
Which makes it easier than ever for you
to get the fast, faiir claim service and
S' competitive rates Allstate has always been
Famous for. On car, home, life, business,
even boat or RV coverage.
So feel free to stop by for a visit. Because
rnow Allstate is even closer to home than
you thought.
Hannon Insurance
Agency, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. 227-1133
Allstate Life Insurance (tni pamn. Northbrook. Illinois




Scenic Waterfront Dining

RIVERFRONT RESTAURANT
At the Rainbow Inn and Marina
123 Water St. Apalachicola 904-653-8139
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
OPEN DAILY FROM 6 A.M. to 10 P.M.
and to 11 P.M. on FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Proudly Introducing Live Maine Lobsters!
Visit our new Package Store!
NEW LUNCH SPECIALS:
Vegetable Plates ......... ................................. $3.00
Soup, Salad & Fruit Bar ...... ................... $4.00
Friday Evening: Surf and Turf. Pecan breaded oysters
and rib eye steak ............................................ $13.95
Saturday Evening: Popular seafood platter for two. To
start, appiteasers: fried blue crab claws, then pan fried
red snapper, snow crab clusters, shrimp and oysters
................................................... For two $28.50
Sunday: Oriental platter for two. Chicken velvet
and corn soup, stir fried frsh trigger fish with
vegetables, deep fried sweet and sour chicken,
rice adndeggroll......................................... $1 0

Mixed Drinks Now Available

Breakfast special this weekend:

Whole Wheat
and Bacon
Waffles with
Molasses Butter


Gulf County Chamber of Commerce -

SFALL RUN FISHING TOURNAMENT

SOver $25,000 In Cash & Prizes!

,/ ENTRY FEE: $25.00 Adults $20.00 Youth & Senior Citizens

SRegister now, September through October 5, at Captain Black's
". or the Chamber Office .


FH' I NG$5000.00 CASH!
T(,QURNAMENT ,
,N EN.-TRYET If You Break Existing "

": R s Florida State Records

SIn The Following Species! :

" 'KING MACKEREL

U0 GROUPER
BLACK BASS

N' I7CATFISHN




FOUR DIVISIONS
S SALTWATER ROD AND REEL FRESHWATER SPEARFISHING YOUTH
SPONSORED BY
S SAVEWAY FOODS DR. DUSTY MAY, DDS J. PATRICK'S WMTO PATE'S SERVICE CENTER *
BARRIER DUNES RESORT TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION CAPTAIN BLACK'S SUZUKI FIRST
/ UNION BANK *ST. JOE MOTEL K.I.D.S. COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME ST. JOE NATURAL
GAS NAPA AUTO PARTS *BRYANT'S LANDING PIGGLY WIGGLY SURE SHOT PEST
CONTROL RENFRO AUTO PARTS
SFor information contact Gulf County Chamber of Commerce :
SP.O. Box 964, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or 904-227-1223
' Sept. 5 12. 19 &26


- Catch the Sikwi
tiEuNItmo ETHoOxsr1c)4u~cm


Constitution and Monument
Port St. Joe


KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children


ALLEN STEWART
Min. of Education
& Youth


Bible Study
10 a.m. Sunday
-7 p.m. Wednesday


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


I I










We'i



o A .: Who

Next week we celebrate National Hunting and Fishing Day.
We're proud of the parents who teach their children how to
be good hunters and fishermen. It is necessary to be clever
and skillful, to know the laws concerning hunting and
fishing and to obey them. Both sports put you outdoors
where you can enjoy fresh air, clean water and clear skies.
Fishing and hunting make you aware of things wild and
beautiful and helps you appreciate a dean healthy environ-
ment that is safe for all people and animals.
Statistics show that although baseball is our most important
spectator sport, fishing is the most popular participant sport
in America.
A good hunter knows that hunting is a privilege rather than a
right and practices courtesy, conservation and hunting safety
along with marksmanship and woodcraft.
We're proud of the parents who share their skills and love of
fishing and hunting.. .and we're proud of our hometown.


re Proud of the Hometown Hunters and

FISHERMEN
Share Their Hobbies With Their Children


TABLERITE QUALITY
4 LBS. OR MORE
GROUND



sEEF


$


19


LB.


TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH PORK FAMILY PAK
Country Style Ribs ..
FRESH FAMILY PAK
Pork Steaks ............
FRESHF RYER
Boneless Breast.......
FRESH FRYER
Liver & Giiuards ....
GRADE A FROZEN
Turkey Breast .........
TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS
Round Roast ..........
TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS
Rump Roast ...........


Lb. 19
Lb. $129

Lb. 259

Lb. 691

Lb. $129
$189
Lb. $1

Lb. $18


TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS
Sirloin Tip Roast....... Lb.
TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS
Sirloin Tip Steak ...... Lb.


LYKES MEAT
Jumbo Franks ......
LYKES
Bologna ...............
LYKES REGULAR
Corn Dogs ............


JIMMY DEAN
Mild Sausage


$209

$209
$20


$199
16 o. .I.


12 oz.


$129


z. $189


. Monsn6oz.$199


ASST. FLAVORS 3 LITER
NATURE'S BEST SODA ...... 79o
ARMOUR. OZ. /99
VIENNA SAUSAGE ..... 99
IGA 16 OZ.
COFFEE CREAMER ............ 99
TRAILBLAZER HI PRO 50 LB. BAG $9 59
DOG RATION ............... .
RONCO THIN AND REGULAR 7 OZ. 3/99
SPAGHETTI ................. 9 9
VAN CAMP 16 OZ.
PORK N BEANS ................ 9
ARMOUR 15 OZ. PRE-PRICED 99
CHILI W/BEANS ............... 890
ARMOUR 24 OZ. PRE-PRICED $1.79
BEEF STEW .................. $1.59
ARMOUR 14 OZ. PRE-PRICED $1.49 1*3 9f
Treet Lunch Meat ....... 1.39
JIFFY SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY 18 OZ.
PEANUT BUTTER ......... $2.19
KRAFT 32 OZ.
GRAPE JELLY .............. $1.29
3 LB. BAG 89
PERFECTION RICE ............ 89


RED DIAMOND ULTRA 10.5 OZ. BAG

COFFEE...


IGA 1/2 GALLON ROUND
ICE
CREAM..
%;K R B


U U U


Limit 1 Bonus Buy Item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entitles you to two
Items, and $30 purchase entitles you to 3 bonus buy Items. Excluding Cigar-
ettes, Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales


:jhlf1I)


IGA 1 GALLON


Vegetable Oil
Umit 1 Bonus Buy Item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entitles you to two
Items, and $30 purchase entitles you to 3 bonus buy Items. Excluding Cigar.
ettes, Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales


SCHARMIN 4 ROLL PKG.


Toilet Tissue .... 5.
Ulmit 1 Bonus Buy Item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entitles you to two' .
Items, and $30 purchase entities you to 3 bonus buy items. ExclMudng Cgar-
ettes, Tobacco Products and Lottery Sales .


$169


DOVE 22 OZ. PRE-PRICED AT $1.29
DISH LIQUID .................... 99
ASST. FLAVORS 46 OZ.
GATORADE DRINKS
$1.19


r FRITO LAY
RUFFLES
CHIPS
............... 99
GOLDEN FLAKE REGULAR & B-B-Q
CORN CHIPS ...........
mm"" "" ii" ana=


DAIR -PRDUT:


SEALTEST REGULAR ASST. FLAVORS 8 OZ.
L-N-L YOGURT


SUNNY DELIGHT 64 OZ
CITRUS.
PUNCH .......


$129


IGA SHREDDED 8 OZ.
Mozzarella ............
PRE-PRICED $1.99 12 OZ.
Velveeta Slices ....


$139


BIRDSEYE REGULAR 8 OZ.

Cool Whip.
BIRDS EYE 12 EARS
Little Ear
CORN ............


I RZE ODS


NATURE'S BEST 11 OZ.
Round Waffle .......
I9 COLE'S BUTTER FLAVOR 16 OZ.
Garlic Bread '.......


............ 3 Ibs.


RAINBOW PAK
Grapes .................. Ib.
WASHINGTON STATE RED DELICIOUS
Apples .............. 8 for
YELLOW
Onions ............ 3 Ib. bag


YELLOW
Sweet Corn
GREEN
Cabbage ..
CANADIAN WAXED
Rutabagas
PRIME BRAND
Mushrooms


....4 ears


3
im.....sm3

.swoonsu.


991

88
$j89

88$
S119


lbs. 99

lbs. 99

tray 990


BULK RATE POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahltchka, IL 32465


Ra


$49


CHIQUITA PREMIUM
Bananas


p


David Rich's
FOODLINERSA N.
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience-
-fP:*^ 0-'


RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


I l4w-


-0.


Ih-


m


.AOI


II ,


I- RON"LIY


r- M -A-i q


0










THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY1 SEPT. 19, 1991 PAGE 7B



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A A~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A AA A A


100'xl50' lot in Apalachicola,
$7,200. Call 229-8828 after 5:00.
tfc 9/19
For Sale by owner : Best Buy on
St. Joe Beach. Lss than 3 yrs. old: 3
bdrm., 2 ba. double wide on 75'x150'
cleared lot with full utilities & septic
tank. Over 1,500 sq. ft. of living space
that can be bought furnished or un-
furnished. Need to sell, returning to
school. Price is negotiable. If you are
serious about a great deal call 229-
8704 (after 5:00 p.m. and weekends),
229-6902 (mornings), or 1-872-8296
(afternoons). 4tc 9/19
House for Sale, Mexico Beach:
421 7th St., 4 bdrm., 2 bath, cen. h/
ac, on 1g. lot, carport, cypress fence,
boat shed, located In nice quiet neigh-
borhood. Equity & assume 9% mort-
gage or refinance. Might consider
lease w/option to buy for one year. Af-
ter Oct. 1st. Work: 647-5701 5 pm
EST, home: 229-6347 after 5:30 p.m.
2tp 9/19
Land for Sale: Overstreet: 2.12
acres, 165'x560', Hwy. 386, 4-5 miles
north of Overstreet Bridge. Has septic
tank, 2 wells, pwr. pole, stor. shed,
pear tees, pecans, plums, blueberries,
over 1/3 cleared, lawn established,
over 1/3 in timber, near good hunting
& fishing. Price negotiable. Home:
229-6347 after 5 p.m., est, work,
647-5701 till 5 p.m. 2tp 9/19


GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH
1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)
BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Blas, Florida
(904) 229-2500
1-800-624-3964
tic 9/5


1967 10'x55 trailer & lot
75'xi00'. Ex. trailer on lot & already
rented, income $250 monthly. Good
pricell Can be seen at 324 Canal St.,
St. Joe Beach. 647-8059.
ltp 9/19
INDIAN PASS. This 4 bdrm.,
home has direct access to the beach
& is only 1 mile from a public boat
landing: Has cen. h&a, with heat re-
coverey sys., Ig. screened porch & fur-
nished kitchen. Owners must sell to
settle estate. Can be purchased for
only $42,500. For information call
904-227-1381 or 227-1501.
4tc 9/12
Are you moving? Ready for a
change? We welcome the opportunity
of assisting you in the sale, purchase
or rental of any type home or com-
mercial property.
Contact Debbie at ERA Parker
Realty, 648-5777, 800-874-5063,
evenings, 648-5421. 4tc 9/5
Unit #131, Barrier Dunes, never
rented. All amenities. Sell furnished,
904/229-2631. John Wright.
5tp 9/5
By Owner: 6 year old 3 bdrm.,
home located on 100'x150' lot on 6th
St. in Highland View. Ch&a, cen. vac-
uum system, appliances & more,
12'x20' matching storage bldg. & pri-
vacy fenced back yard. Seen by appt.
only, $49,500.00. Call 229-8806.
4tc 8/29
Do Not Pass Up. There will not
be a better deal to be found on beach-
es. 2 beautiful corner lots with
14'x70' mobile home, set up and
ready to move in. Lots of extras.
$40,000 negotiable. 647-8424.
Dalkeith Road Front Lots:
110'x400', between Douglas and Wil-
lis Landing. Call George, 229-6031.
Beautiful lot on St. Joseph Drive.
Adjacent to hospital. Prestigious
neighborhood. $32,500. Call Bill Ko-
ran, 229-6330. tfc 9/5


50x150 lot w/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
tfc 9/5
50x100 lot w/12x60 MH, 16x20
shop, all improvements. $21,500. 4th
and 2nd St. Beacon Hill. Financing
available. 648-KENT. tfc 9/5
150'x120' commercial lot on
Hwy. 98 west of Highland View.
$55,000. Call George, 229-6031.
tfc 9/5
For sale by owner- 2 bdrm. house
w/stove & refrig., nice lot w/shade
trees. City water & private pump.
$26,000. Adjacent lot available at
$15,000. Canal St., 1/2 block from
beach, St. Joe Beach, 904-482-3884,
Marianna. tfc 9/5


Experienced housekeeper with
references, seeking houses' to clean.
Call 229-8545. 2tp 9/19
Cakes by Linda. Ninja turtles,
Little Mermaid, Bart Simpson, baby
shower, wedding and all occasions.
Serving St. Joe and beach area. 648-
8828. 4tp9/19
I will clean your apartment, con-
do, office or house. Call 229-8073.
ltp 9/19

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.


PRESSURE CLEANING
Trailers &.Single Story
Houses
Reasonable Rates
^ "Ph. 647-3108
Seniors Discount


BARFIELD'S
LAWN & GARDEN
CENTER
Small Engine Repair

Lawn Mowers
Weed Eaters
Chain Saws \i\
Generators
*Pumps
*,Tillers
Go-Karts
229-2727
328 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe


Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
trc 9/5


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tc 9/.5

THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 9/5

C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box A1C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfc 9/5


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns

Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-387, Howard Creek
tfe 9/5_

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
24 Years Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Acci-
dents. No charge for first conference.
tfc 9/5


3 bedroom, 1 bath house, comer
13th & Garrison, $49,500. Call
George, 229-6031. tfc 9/5
Very Nice! 3 bdrm., 2 ba. house,
stone fireplace in great room, great lo-
cation, 2011 Juniper Ave. Call for ap-
pointment, 229-6427. tfc 9/5
1/2 acre MOBILE HOME LOTS.
12 mi. north of Mexico Beach on
Overstreet Road (Hwy. 386), Creek-
view Sub., no down payments, $86
per month. 229-6031. tfc 9/5
Two acres on county mad off of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 9/26
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 9/26


Blue Steak Carpet Cleaning &
'Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning. Car-
'pet Stretching and Protectors. Call
639-2723 or 1-800-348-4037.
L & V Ceramic Tile. Fireplaces,
counter tops, shower stalls, and etc.
Owners and installers, Lonnie & Vick-
ie Langford, 639-5802. 4tc 8/29
Dee's Lawn and Maid Service.
"We do the work you don't have time
for". Complete lawn care & household
cleaning. Free estimates, 639-5211.
tfc 9/5

< Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
Reg. Stated Communication
1st and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
G. Godwin, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 5/23



ST. JOE

RENT-ALL, Inc.
Small Engine Repairs
Lawnmowers
Weedeaters
Tillers
Blowers'"'
Chain saws
Small Engine Sales
We now make chains


for
706


most chainsaws.
1st St. St. Joe
227-2112
Bob Ridgley,
Repairman
tfc 9/12


BOOT & SHOE
REPAIR
SAFETY SHOES
COWBOY'S TRADITION
102 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


GARRETT INSTALLATIONS
For All Your Carpet & Vinyl In-
stallations and Repairs
Call 229-2735 or 227-1295
Free Estimates 9 yrs. Exp.
Jerry Garret-owner tfc 9/5


LYLE OFFICE SERVICE
Typing, Resume and
Bookkeeping for
Personal or Business Needs
Call 229-8562 9/5

Residential Interior
Commercial Exterior
JEFF THIMMER
Painting & Wallpaper Services
Reliable, Dependable, tfc 9/1
Quality Custom Work
Free estimates Lic. #90373
229-8534 15 yrs. experience

COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581 t&9/


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!







Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. tfc 9/5


Two spitz & husky males & 1
bulldog, 1 friendly cat. For a good pet
with small adoption fee call Bobby
Hayes at City, 229-8247. Itc 9/19


Sewing and Alterations: drapes,
complete outfits, repairs. Call Daisy,
at Aline's, 229-6600, or 229-6972.
tfc 9/5
Women's Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Church. 227-1145 or 227-1128.
All types of yard work. Mowing,
raking, and trimming. Reasonable.
229-6435. tfc 9/5


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043



Greetings Port St. Joe:
Kathryn and I thank
you for all the support
& encouragement in
Jolly Rogers Pizza.

We-met a lot of good
folks & now enjoy see-
ing rhdny of you inoi 'r
Mexico Beach store.
Stop & say hi and
enjoy our Sunday
Smorgasbord.
4tc 9/19






CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460 tfc 9/5


'89 Ford T-Bird in excel. cond.,
low mileage, loaded, $8,000. '86 Ford,
4. wheel drive truck, very good cond.,
new tires & brakes, grill guards, 2
fuel tanks, EF1, auto o.d., am/fm
tape, black over gray. $6,000. 227-
1255. 2tc 9/ 19
'80 Ford Bronco, call 229-6483.
89 Chev. pu, 350 V8, stepside,
loaded with options, brown, 44k
miles, 1 owner, $9,500. 648-5659.




1987 19.5 ft. Bayliner Capri Bow-
rider, 1/0 boat. Call George, 229-
6031. tfc 9/5


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYSI Call 227-1278 to place
yours." $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 54 per word for all over 20.

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Prems
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc9/5

STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
'Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 9/5

Get Your Chimney
Ready for Winter
The
CHIMNEY SWEEP
is scheduling a trip, to
Port-St. Joe Soon" t:Q
inspect, repair or clean
chimneys in the Port St.
Joe area.
CALL
Quality Cleaning
Service
Joe Johnson at
904-785-3941
for inspection, repairs &
cleaning to your wood
burning heaters or fire-
places.
4tc 9/19


U U U "o Bill Quaranta T Construction
Homes OuthousesnT Licensed & Insured
tfc 9/5 Old-Fashioned Quality
Commercial Buildings
Hand-Nailed Craftsmanship
Log Cabins Additions Kevin O'Neill, Owner 229-8635


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer trc9/5

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA tfc 9/5 904/229-6821


PJ'S ROOFING
ALL TYPES OF ROOFS t=95
Hot Roofing, Built-Up, 1-Ply System
Free Estimates
Phone (904) 229-6201 PAT TOUSIGNANT



Terry Parrish Construction Company

New Homes
Additions & Remodeling
All Your Building Needs

WE BUILD TO LAST A LIFETIME!

For Free Estimates, Call 229-8589


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 229-8988
PORT ST. JOE
712 Woodward Ave.: Very neat 2 BR 2 bath home, central h/air, located on comer
lot, outside storage. Perfect starter or retirement home. $33,000.00.
1402 Long Ave.: Well kept 2 BR/1 bath home with c/h & air plus 2 rental aptsl 2 bd/
1 bath each. All for $59,500.
1314 Garrison Ave.: 2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
back yard. $35,000.
213 Tapper Ave.: 3 BR, 2 bath brick home with den and deck, carpet and vinyl, ch/
a. Recently remodeled. Large lot. $65,000.00
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$125,000.00. REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $60,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
BARRIER DUNES
Immaculate Gulf view townhouse with 3 decks, 2 large bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths,
great kichen with all appliances, living room and dining area all beautifully dec-
orated. Amenitities too numerous to mention. Carport and storage. Only
$125,000.00.
HIGHLAND VIEW
Hwy. 98: Large 2 BR, 1 bath stucco home, living room, dining room, 2 large en-
closed porches plus garage and storage building. $32,000. Reduced to
$25,000.00.
OAK GROVE
105 Hunter St.: 3BR, 1 bath with extra room which could be 4th BR, living room, din-
ing room, den, screened porch, privacy fence, carpet, ch/a on 2 lots.
$29,500.00.
WHITE CITY
Remodeled country home. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen all
up-dated. Short drive to town. $32,000.00.
HOWARD CREEK
Corner of Deer and Perch: 2 BR, 1 bath mobile home, furnished, ch/a, utility build-
ing with washer and dryer on 2 lots, covered outside patio or car port. $27,000
138 Louise Ave.: 3BR, 1 bath mobile home, ch/a, utility building on 2 lots. $30,000.
OVERSTREET
2 BR, 2 bath, with fireplace is on approx. 6.1 acres. Approx. 1,512 sq. ft. plus large
deck. Only $52,000
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2 bath home located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must see, to appreciate.
$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
Cape San Bias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part. $900
per front foot.
Gulf Aire: single family residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 corner lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue, $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.
RENTAL
Available August 15th: Like new 2BR 2 bath apartment. Carpet, central h/air, all
kitchen appliances. Washer/dryer hookup and outside storage. $400.00 monthly
with $200 deposit.


TRDE &SEVIE


tf 011,


i












PAGE SB__ TH STR OTS.JE L*TUSA.SP.1,19


Two bedroom trailer at Howard
Creek. Adults, deposit required, fur-
nished or unfurnished. 827-6019.
tfc 9/19

Furnished trailer, 103 Victoria
Ave., Highland View. Close to High-
land View School. Deposit required.
No pets. 639-5700. tfc 9/19

Triplex, 2 bdrm., 2 ba. on the
Gulf, Cape San Blas. $375 month
plus utilities. Call 227-1322.
tfc 9/19

One bedroom furnished, carpet-
ed, air conditioned apartment, good
neighborhood. 1505 Monument Ave.
tfc 9/12

Mexico Beach: Mobile home, like
new2 bdrm., 2 ba. fully furnished,
many extras, no pets or children, se-
curity deposit. 648-5769. Itp 9/19

Mobile home spaces for rent. Call
827-7261, Howard Creek. tfc 9/5

Pressure Washer & Airless Ren-
tals. For more information call 648-
5922. 4tc 9/5

Mexico Beach: 2 bdrm. mobile
home, unfurnished, adults only, no
pets, $210 monthly, 648-5659.
tfc 9/5

Mexico Beach: Streamline travel
trailer, $75 weekly, utilities included,
adults only, no pets. 648-5659.
tfc 9/5

OFFICE SPACE. Call George
Duren at 229-6031 and leave mes-
sage. tfc 9/5

1 Small trailer, 1 studio apt. Call
647-8481. tfc 9/5

2 Dogwood Terrace Apartments
available. 2 bdrms., 1 bath, energy ef-
ficient. 229-2783. tfc 9/5

Mexico Beach: Two small trailers
$55 and $65 weekly, utilities fur-
nished, adults only, no pets. 648-
5659. tfc 9/5

3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1302 Garri-
son Ave. Fenced back yard. $375 per
month. $150 deposit. Call 227-1731.
tfc 9/5

Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfc 9/5

UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air,.W.sher/dryer hook-up.
Onebedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 9/5

Office Space for Lease: Spa-
cious, clean, well located office in con-
venient part of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378 or come by 322 Long
Avenue. tfc 9/5

Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 9/5
No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/90

Nice one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing. tfc 9/5

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 9/5
3 bedroom, 1 bath house, carpet,
a/c, fireplace, 9th St., Port St. Joe.
Call 227-2112 or 229-8409, Phil Ear-
ley. tfc 9/19
3 bedroom, 1 bath apartment,
carpet, central heat and air cond.,
Long Ave., Port St. Joe. Call 227-
7241, Kenny or 227-2112 Phil.
tfc 9/19








1984 Mercury Cougar, V6, $500.
King size waterbed, semi-waveless w/
heater and bookcase, $300. Wooden
utility shed with lighting, $250. Call
229-8828 after 5:00. tfc 9/19

King size waterbed, complete
with bookcase headboard. Call 229-
8405 after 5 p.m. Itc 9/19

AirCiser Full Body Workout
Stationary Exercise Bicycle with
electronic time, speed, distance and
calorie monitor. Less than 2 yrs. old,
looks new. Reg. $229, selling for
$100. Call 227-1286 after 6:00 p.m.


3tp 9/19

Two sofas with matching chairs,
1 bed, 2 dressers, I chiffarobe, 1 car-
pet sweeper, 1 stereo. Call 229-8870.
ltp 9/19

Nature's Diet Tea. Weight man-
agement, digestive aid, appetite sup-
pressant. Natural cleanser, over-
whelming response. For more
information call Beth at 229-8919.
ltp 9/19

Queen size bed w/new mattress-
es, dresser, mirror & night stand.
Very good condition, $400. White twin
bed, $20. 229-8577. tfc 9/12


Moving Sale: Saturday and Sun-
day, dawn to dark, household items
and clothes. 101 22nd St., Mexico
Beach. ltp 9/19

Yard Sale, Friday, Sept. 20, 4:00
p.m. 6:00 p.m., 1014 Woodward
Ave. Some items FREE. Itp 9/19
Yard Sale, Friday, Sept. 20, Sat.,
Sept. 21. 9 a.m. until. 1601 Marvin
Ave. Toys, clothing, lots of other
items. ltp9/19

Yard Sale, 1315 Long Ave. Satur-
day, 8 till. Rain cancels. ltc 9/19


Cantley's Bargain Barn
& Flea Market
(5 miles south of Wewa,
Hwy. 71 5 Acre Farms)
New Tools
New & Used Clothing
Much, Much More






Full time cook needed. Experi-
ence required. Bay St. Joseph Care
Center. Apply in person. ltc 9/19

WJST Broadcast operato-r/
technician needed in Port St. JOe.
Will train. Nights. Part time or full
time. See Ed Curtis at WJST or call
785-9292, 227-1101 or 785-9549.
EOE/M-F. Affirmative Action.
1tc 9/19


JOB NOTICE: The City of Port
St. Joe will be accepting applications
for the following position:
PATROLMAN I
Valid Florida Driver's License Re-
quired. Application and a complete
job description may be requested in
person or by writing:
City of Port St. Joe, 305 Fifth St.,
P. O. Box 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
All applications must be returned
or postmarked no later than Sept. 27,
1991.
The City of Port St. Joe is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE,
/s/ L. A. Farris,
City Auditor-Clerk 2tc 9/12


NURSING ASSISTANT
POSITIONS
No Experience Necessary
Training Program
Certification Program
Competitive Salary & Benefits
BAY ST. JOSEPH
CARE CENTER
Apply in person
tfe 9/12


Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
Apalachicola River, within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.'
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
1/2 overtime pay, on-calli duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with water, sew-
erage, and lawn maintenance provid-
ed free.
Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
(26) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten (10) paid holidays. Free continu-
ing educational courses offered by
State University $500 annual allow-
ance for job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience; or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse In
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst., P. O. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 9/5


666 66W 666 A ~6*66~3 ~~%6g ~ 66 6


BMs
The Gulf County School Board Is receiving
bids for two (2) sets of surplus roll-up metal garage
doors. The doors were used at the Wewahltchka
High Auto Mechanics Facility. The doors may be
inspected by contacting Wewahitchka High School.
The successful bidder will be required to move the
doors from school property. The doors are 12' x
12'. Any Interested person may submit a bid In a
sealed envelope marked "DOORS" and addressed






One king bed complete, $100;
22x19 vanity, marble top & fix., $50;
1 king water bed, waveless with light-
ed mirrored headboard & attached
night tables, solid ash frame & heat-
er, pd. $1,500, will sell for $750. 30"
trailer yard sweeper, $50. One man's
10 speed bike, $30; 1 Sears exercycle,
$35; 1 Sears electric edger, $35. 2 tall
amber glass table lamps, $20 ea. Call
227-7120. ltp9/19

HAPPY JACK TRIVERMICIDE:
Recognized safe & effective by U. S.
Bureau of Veterinary medicine
against hook, round & tapeworms in
dogs & cats. Available O-T-C at BAR-
FIELD'S LAWN & GARDEN, 229-
2727. 8tc 9/5

HAPPY JACK HI-ENERGY DOG
FOOD, specifically formulated for
hunting dogs, field competitors &
growing pups. BARFIELDS' LAWN &
GARDEN, 229-2727. 12tc 9/5

Gas stove, $75. 30' travel trailer,
needs repairs,$650. 648-5659.
tfc 9/5

1982 14'x70' Fleetwood mobile
home. Must see to appreciate. Price.
listed below appraisal to sell. $8,900.,
Call 227-1313. tfc 8/29,.

Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tfyn-
dall Parkway, Panama City, FL
32404. 763-7443. tfc 9/5

Older piano with a roll top, good
for beginner or for antique collector,
asking $600. 229-6965 after 4:00
p.m. tfc 6/6
Port St Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.'
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOOl 227-1105.
tfc 9/5

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 9/5


We're Back & Going Strong
Swings, twin seater stroller, high
chair (good for grandma's or sit-
ter's), playpen, Ridem' house, spe-
cial price offer: 8-pc. baby bedding
set J. C. Penney Bunnies & Bows by
Red Calliope, white wicker bassl-
nett, white lace bassinett skirt w/
hood, Inf. car seats, Inf. carriers, pot-
ty seat, Fisher Price zoo, Fisher
Price Main St., activity blankets,
Mickey Mouse activity gym, toys,
shoes, clothes (size Inf.-tod), diapers
(s,m,L), bby wipes, bottles & much
morel
TINY TOTS BARGAIN SHOPPE
Corner of 3rd St. & 2nd Ave.
BEACON HILL (Turn 2 blocks before
Lookout Lounge behind St. Joe Tel.
& Tel. office)
Open Tues. Fri., 10-5, Sat. 12-5
Closed Sunday and Monday
Vickle Scheffer 647-5010


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYSI Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 5 per word for all over 20.








Learn to prepare income taxes,
enroll in the H & R Block Income Tax
School. Starting soon In Port St. Joe.
Call collect 785-0482 or 227-1558.
2tc 9/19

WMTO looking for skilled sales
representative/manager. Please send
resume: c/o Leigh Helterbran, Gen.
Manager, P. O. Box 13622, Mexico
Beach, FL 32410. tfc 8/29


Combustion Turbine


Technician

U lorida Power Corporation is seeking a Combustion Turbine
Technician who is interested in a high-quality career and lifestyle.
This position will be responsible for maintaining our General
Electric MS 5000 Combustion Turbine Unit located in Port St. Joe.
The ideal candidate will have completed technical maintenance training in
Aircraft or Combustion Turbine power plants and systems. A minimum of
3 years of practical experience including mechanical, electrical systems,
electronic maintenance and troubleshooting on jet engines or industrial
combustion turbine units are required.
This position with FPC offers a salary of $20.00/hour. Interested individuals
should contact: Terry Edwards, Florida Power Corporation,
Recruitment D2A, Dept. PSJ/0919, P.O. Box 14042, St. Petersburg, FL
33733. We are an equal opportunity employer M/F/H/V.


Florida

? M 008/ CORPORATION
The source for generations to come.


to Mr. B. Walter Wilder, Superintendent Gulf
County Schools, Gulf County Courthouse, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456. The bid deadline Is 12:00 noon,
EDT, September 20. 1991.
Publish: September 12 and 19. 1991.
pUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HBREBY GIVEN that the Gulf
County Board of County Commissioners, at their
meeting on September 24, 1991, at 8:15 p.m.,
EDT, In their meeting room at the Gulf County
Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, will consider
adopting an ordinance with the following title:
An ordinance requiring a permit for in-
stalling, removing or relocating petro-
leum storage facilities; establishing a
permit fee: providing for a penalty for
failure to obtain a permit; providing a
severablllty clause; providing a repeal-
er clause; and providing an effective
date. /
THE BOARD WILL FURTHER CONSIDER
said ordinance for adoption at their meeting on
October 8, 1991, at 10:25 a.m., ET, In their meet-
ing room at the Gulf County Courthouse In Port
St. Joe, Florida. A copy of the proposed ordinance
Is on file in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ James E. Creamer, Chairman
Attest/ Is/ Benny C. Lister, Clerk
Publish: September 19 and 26, 1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
STATE OF FLORIDA.
CASE NO.: 91-144
GENERAL JURISDICTION
FLORIDA BAR NO.: 060980
CHASE FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIA-
TION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GEORGE S. JACKSON, If living, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: GEORGE S. JACKSON, if living, and if mar-
ried, MRS. GEORGE S. JACKSON, his wife,
If living, Including any unknown spouse of
said Defendants If either has remarried and
if either or both of said Defendants are de-
ceased, their respective unknown heirs, de-
visees, grantees, assignees, creditors. lienors
and trustees, and all other persons claiming
by, through, under or against the named De-
fendants and ALETHEA C. JACKSON, If liv-
ing, and If married, JOE ROE, her husband,
whose real name Is uncertain, if living. In-
cluding any unknown spouse of the said De-
fendants. If either has remarried and if ei-
ther or both of said Defendants are
deceased, their respective unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lien-
ors, and trustees, and all other persons
claiming by, through, under or against the
named Defendants, both as Co-Trustees of a
Trust dated June 9, 1982 for the benefit of
GEORGE S. JACKSON and ALETHA C.
JACKSON.
Whose residence address is unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in Gulf
County, Florida:
Villa 2DI1 of Parcel 2Q of CAPE SANDS
LANDING, which consists of the following portion
of Lot Two (2), SAN BLAS SUBDMIVISION, according
to the plat thereof recorded In Plat Book 3, Pages
20, 21 and 22, Public Records of Gulf County,
Florida:
A. Fee simple title to the following-described
parcel of land together with the Improvements lo-
cated thereon (the following consisting of the Vil-
la's residence building and the land on which It Is
located):
SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION BELOW AS EX-
HIBIT "A".
B. A one-half undivided fee simple Interest
as tenant in common with the adjacent villa-
owner in the parcel legally described as follows (be-
ing the Common Area):
SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION BELOW AS EX-
HIBIT "B".
FOR VILLA 2D-1
A. Fee simple title to the following-described
parcel of land together with the Improvements lo-
cated thereon (the following consisting of the Vil-
la's residence building and the land on which It Is
located):
Commencing at the Southeast (SE)
corner of Lot Two (2), SAN BIAS SUB-
DIVISION, also known as SAN BIAS
ESTATES, according to the plat there-
of recorded In Plat Book 3, Pages 20,
21 and 22, Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida; thence South
6945'05" West along the Southerly
line of said Lot 2 a distance of 243.00
feet; thence North 20o 1455" West
65.04 feet; thence South 6945'05"
West a distance of 0.66 feet for the
Point of Beginning; thence South
18'29"26" West 62.25 feet; thence
North 7132'18" West 26.13 feet;
thence North 18*29'26" East 62.25
feet; thence South 7132'18" East
26.13 feet to the Point of Beginning.
EXHIBIT "B"
FOR VILLA 2D-1
B. A one-half undivided fee simple interest


Alumni Band Being Formed


Alumni of Port St. Joe are
asking all previous band mem-
bers to participate in an all alum-
ni band to perform at homecom-
ing on November 8th. Anyone


Gator News

By Lee Hall
We have four new students
Joining the Marching Gator
Sound Band. They are Amy Cox,
Nancy Dunseth, Lenore Wolinski,
and Larry Owens. Welcome
aboard.
Saturday, September 21, the
Gator Sound Band will partici-
pate in a parade in honor of the
homecoming of the 710th Divi-
sion of the National Guard in Ap-
alachicola. See you there.
On September 28, the Band
Boosters will be having a welcome
back party for the band members
by taking them to eat at Ryan's
and then skating.
We are still taking orders for
Band Calendars. Please contact
Lee at 639-2931 or Kathy at 639-
2490. We are still selling stadium
cushions for $5.00 each.


as tenant in common with the adjacent Villa-
owner in the parcel legally described as follows (be-
ing the Common Area):
Commence at the Southeast (SE) cor-
ner of Lot Two (2), SAN BIAS SUBDI-
VISION, also known as SAN BLAS ES-
TATES, according to the plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 3. Pages 20, 21
and 22, Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida; thence South
6945'05" West along the Southerly
line of said Lot 2 a distance of 243.00
feet for the Point of Beginning; thence
continue South 69"45'05" West along
said Southerly line for 81.00 feet;
thence North 2014'55" West 122.00
feet to a point on the Northerly line of
said Lot 2; thence North 6945'05"
East along said Northerly line a dis-
tance of 81.00 feet; thence South
20*14'55" East 122.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
The northerly fifteen (15.00) feet of the
above-described property being sub-
ject to an easement for the purpose of
ingress and egress;
LESS the property described In Exhib-
it "A" above; LESS the following-
described property (being part of Villa
2D-2):
Commencing at the Southeast (SE)
corner of Lot Two (2), SAN BLAS SUB-
DIVISION, also known as SAN BIAS
ESTATES, according to the plat there-
of recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 20,
21 and 22, Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida; thence South
69*45'05" West along the Southerly
line of said Lot 2 a distance of 243.00
feet; thence North 2014'55" West
65.04 feet; thence South 69"45'05"
West a distance of 0.66 feet; thence
South 1829'26" West 62.25 feet
thence North 7132'18" West 26.13
feet for the Point of Beginning; thence
continue North 7132'18" West 26.13
feet; thence North 18'29'26" East
62.25 feet; thence South 71*32'18"
East 26.13 feet; thence South
18*29'26" West 62.25 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and JOHN DOE and
JANE DOE, and all other persons in possession of
subject real property, whose real names are uncer-
tain, and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on:
JOSEPH M. PANIELLO, ESQUIRE, Plaintiffs
Attorney whose address Is:'
201 N. Franklin Street, Suite 2720, Tampa,
Florida 33602 on or before the 10th day of Octo-
ber, 1991, and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney or immediately thereafter otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded
In the Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 16th day of September,
1991.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
Joseph M. Panlello, Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2347
Tampa, Florida 33601
Publish: September 19, 26, October 3, and 10,
1991.


BILLY CARR President

BETH SWILLEY Vice President
C, J. GIDDENS- General Manager

Charles Neel Service Manager

Stan Smith Parts Manager


GOOD SELECTION OF


Chrysler Program Cars



'91 Spirit or $9,495

'91 Plymouth Acclaim


Come In and Check Our Large Selection of




New & Used Cars & Trucks






JIM ROBINSON CHEVROLET


CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH DODGE GEO
Two Locations to Serve You
117 S. Main St. Blountstown Hwy. 98 & Bluff Rd. Eastpoint
Call 227-2020 from Port St. Joe Call 227-1110 from Port St. Joe


PAGE 8B


II


k,


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 19, 1991


wishing to participate are asked
to contact Charlotte Pierce at
227-1475, India Miller at 647-
5160 or Robin Downs at 647-
5163.
Attend homecoming and
show your support for your home
team



[OBITUARIES... I


Ray C. Womble
Ray C. Womble, 66, of Oak
Grove, passed away Monday eve-
ning, September 16 at Gulf Pines
Hospital. He had been a resident
of Gulf County for the past 13
years and was a native of Grace-
vllle. He worked several years in
law enforcement, having served
as a Bay County Deputy, and a
police officer in Lynn Haven and
Bonifay.
He is survived by his wife,
Zora Belle Womble of Oak Grove;
one daughter, Carolyn Lambert of
Birmingham, Alabama; four step
sons, Wallace Holley and Doug
Holley, both of Houston, Texas,
Ben Holley and Charles Holley,
both of Wewahitchka; three
brothers, Charles A. Womble of
Panama City, Fred F. Womble of
Tallahassee, and John N. Womble
of Ft. Pierce; two sisters, Evelyn
Davidson of Bonifay and Ruth
Mears of Ocoee; two grandchil-
dren and eight step grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday in the chapel of Gil-
more Funeral Home with Rever-
end Jimmy Clark, Reverend Huft,
and Reverend David Fernandez
officiating. Burial followed in ML
Olive Cemetery in Bonifay.
All arrangements were by Gil-
more Funeral Home.


Ruby M. Davis
Ruby M. Davis, 65, of Wewa-
hitchka, passed away Saturday
afternoon, September 14, in Bay
Medical Center. She was a native
of Geneva, Alabama, and had
been a long time resident of We-
wahitchka.
Survivors include her two
daughters, Pat Shirah of Frank-
ston, Texas, and Sandra Spicer of
Tallahassee; one son, Jim Daniels
of Brownsville, Texas; 11 grand-
children and one great grand-
child; her father, V.C. Prescott of
Wewahitchka; one sister, Bertha
Pitts of Wewahitchka; and two
brothers, Herman Prescott of
Blountstown, and Hubert Pre-
scott of Lakeland.
Funeral services were held
Monday at the College Park
Church of God, conducted by the
Rev. Joe Glass. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot at Rob-
erts Cemetery.
All services were under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home, Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.