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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02904
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 1, 1991
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02904

Full Text






I L -; 11"I ,

ALBERTVIILLE AL"3~c


USPS 518-880 IND

FIFTY-THIRD YEAR, NUMBER 49



Lightning B(
Edward Benjamin Mobley, 67,' of Lake
Wales, had just retired a few days prior to last
Saturday and purchased a new boat two days
before, intent on getting right down to the busi-
ness of enjoying a long retirement, playing and
traveling.
His retirement, playing and traveling came
to an abrupt end Saturday at about 12:30,
when a bolt of lightning ripped out of the
clouds of a heavy thunderstorm on St. Joseph
* Bay and struck Mobley, killing him instantly.
The fatal lightning bolt was accompanied by
many other jolts and rolling thunder in a driv-
ing rain storm which rolled in at about noon.
Mobley's wife, Daisy, 68, was knocked un-
conscious by the same bolt. The two were scal-
loping in the Bay and were about 1500 feet


'HE


USTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991


)lt Ends Retirement Plans


from the shore of St. Joseph Peninsula, north
of William J. Rish Sunland Park, when the
lightning struck.
Mrs. Mobley remained unconscious for ap-
proximately 45 minutes, according to Gulf
County Sheriffs Deputy, Tom Godwin, who in-
vestigated the incident, along with Deputy Mal-
colm Garrett. As she began to regain con-
sciousness, Robert Myers of Burgess Creek,
came by the boat and saw Mrs. Mobley feebly
trying to wave him down. Myers came along
side and after seeing Mrs. Mobley was in trou-
ble and could not talk, he towed the craft to a
dock about 750 feet away and summoned au-
thorities.
Mobley had fallen over into the Bay waters
after the lightning hit him with the fatal strike


and a search was started for his body. The
search was joined by Florida Marine Patrol offi-
cers and a fire chief from Escambia County, on
vacation, who was familiar with search and res-
cue operations.
About two hours after the strike, Mobley's
body was spotted floating in the bay about
1,500 feet from the dock where the boat was
tied and recovered.
Mrs. Mobley was hospitalized in Gulf Pines
Hospital until Monday, when she was released.
Mobley's body was transferred to the Medical
Examiner's office to determine the actual cause
of death. He had two bums on his body-one
on his head and the other on his right foot,
where the lightning had entered and exited his
body.


Daylight Robbery Spurs Manhunt

Man Threatens Woman With Knife, Takes Several Bags of Cash
A slim black male, wearing a stocking
mask and carrying a sharp knife, kid-
o. napped a super market bookkeeper, car-
rying a bank deposit and made her drive
him off with several money bags to a ce-
metery just outside the City Limits Mon-
day morning.
According to Police Chief, Carl Rich-
ter, Mrs. Don Ashcraft exited the Wewa-
hitchka Bank with the night deposits for
the week end from Rich's IGA, and en-
tered her van to bring the several bags of
money and checks back to the store to
S...~ make up into a deposit.
u .. ..... -As she entered her van, the man
%Ml came up from behind the seats, held a
I *- a ;. sharp knife to her throat and ordered her
-.-,,,. .. to drive. Arriving at Forrest Hill Ceme-
S- ...J.-, tery, the assailant ordered Mrs. Ashcraft
to drive inside the cemetery, then began
Sto open the bags, taking the cash.
1. The robber then hit Mrs. Ashcraft sev-
eral times, threatened her, and left, after
pushing her down in the van, telling her
i'. to stay there so she couldn't see his de-
parture.
Shortly after the robber departed,
Deputy Sheriffs and Police Officers look for clues with a tracking dog as they search Frank Heaortly, Port St. Joe's Street Super-ted,
along Forrest Hills Cemetery road for clues possibly left by the robber as he fled the area. intendent, arrived at the cemetery to
Photo, bottom left, two of the slashed and emptied money bags are shown discarded in check on drainage in the cemetery after
the bushes. Bottom right, three bags were left in the front seat of the victim's van, the heavy rains of recent days. He found
Mrs. Ashcraft outside the van, hysterical,
and called police.
The robbery had taken place around
10:30, according to Chief Richter, and
Healy came on the scene about 45 min-
utes later.
The Chief said a considerable amount
of cash and a few food stamps, checks,
etc., were taken from the bags, and the
rest of the checks left inside the bags,
which were tossed alongside the road
leading from Niles Road into Forrest Hill
Cemetery.
Chief Richter said investigators,
which include his department, the Gulf
County Sheriffs Department and the
..Florida Department of Law Enforcement,
have no hard suspects at the present
time. "We're looking for a thin black
Sale, wearing a faded navy blue t-shirt,
S. blue or black pants and light brown or
grey mesh type slippers. He has scars
Ir from sores and burns on his arms and
V neck. Names of informants will be kept
strictly confidential," Richter said.
f Richter said there is a $1,000 reward
3 "s?, "
S4 '.'-" ... for any information leading to an arrest
"'.'~..-i''""', in the incident. Those with information
.... -."" may call either the Police Department or
;" ,. .. ,,the Gulf County Sheriffs Department.


CONSTITUTION


Plus 2 Tax ... U3 1


It Was A Tough

Weekend In PSJ

* Man Killed by
Lightning Bolt In
Bay

Woman Kid-
napped, Robbed at
Knife Point

Sailboat Collides
with Trawler



County Tax,


Budget, Take

A Hop Up

Diminished Sources of Receipts
Causes Small Increase in Tax Rate
Rather than taking a 'jump", a "leap", a
"surge", or even a "hike", Gulf County's new
tentatively approved budget will take what can
be more properly described as "a small hop" in
the upward direction, with a corresponding
skip in the tax rate.
With a determined goal of cutting five per-
cent from the operating budget, the Commis-
sion has been at work for over a month trying
to pare some $1.2 million from original budget
requests for the new year.
Wednesday, at noon, the Commission
brought all that work to a tentative close, when
they. finally.put their stamp: of approval on a fi-
nance plan which will need some $630,000 in
new dollars to finance, but see only $240,000
in new expenditures. This situation is brought
about by the fact that the county sees a short-
fall of some $390,000 in revenue sources over
last year. According to Clerk, Benny Lister, this
shortfall is due to less cash forward and less
State and Federal funds being anticipated than
last year.
In addition to the $390,000 reduction in
revenue sources, the final tentative budget is
$240,000 larger than last year.
INCREASES ANTICIPATED
Seven budget items use up most of the es-
pected increase, as well as claim some funds
which had been cut from other budgets.
The largest increase went to the Mosquito
Control Department. This county agency is in
charge of the solid waste disposal program,
which is the main culprit in gobbling up some
$109,182 additional dollars. And, even this
might not be enough before the year is over, if
past experience is any indication.
Other substantial but lesser increases will
be seen in:
-An additional $11,923 for the Veterans
Service office, to fund a full-time director for
that service.
-$23,282 more for the Sheriffs Depart-
ment and an additional $15,079 for the deten-
tion service, to provide another Deputy and
care for more prisoners.
-A loan of $7,200 for the Overstreet Fire
Department to enlarge their fire house, was
also tentatively funded.
-The Port St. Joe Library building will re-
ceive new funds of $16,704, for a new roof.
-The Road Department will have its budget
increased by $28,468, to pay a lease purchase
(See A HOP UP on Page 3)


Sailing Trip Comes to Early Morning Halt


A trip from Baltimore, Mary-
land to Panama City in a 27-foot
sailboat, came to an abrupt end
for Jeremy Tolson early Friday
morning, 35 miles from his desti-
nation.
Tolson, was sailing his small
boat on his adventure, intent on

Fish Kill Near
Gulfl County crews were
called out Saturday, to clean up
and bury the results of a huge
fish kill neat Cape San Blas, ac-
cording to the Gulf County Sher-
iffs office.
The kill, made off-shore in
the Cape area, resulted from two
pogey boats dumping several
thousand pounds of fish when
their gear failed, Friday.
The fish began washing up


spending the hurricane season in
Panama City and then on to Cen-
tral America, before heading for
home again.
At about 3:00 a.m., Tolson
was tooling along about the en-
trance to the channel into St. Jo-
seph Bay, when Ricky Lancaster,


Cape San Bias
on shore Friday afternoon and
were a definite nuisance by Sat-
urday morning.
Florida Marine Patrol Bob
Douglas said the boat owners-a
Mississippi firm-had been noti-
fied of the problem their boats
had caused, and that they had of-
fered to pay the expense of clean-
ing up the residue.
Major Douglas said the boat
owners were very cooperative.


piloting the Raffield Fisheries
trawler, Fisherman's Pride, was
coming into port after a fishing
trip off-shore. Tolson, who appar-
ently was napping at the wheel,
turned into the path of the Fisher-
man's Pride knocking down the
sailboat's mast, bending up some
rails, damaging the motor and do-
ing minor damage to the hull.
The sailboat was reported to
have had one small light, low on
the hull, which Lancaster said he
didn't see.
Tolson's boat was towed to
shore by the Fisherman's Pride
where the Raffield Shipbuilders
helped him make repairs and
continue on his way.
Tolson was not hurt, but he
was wide awake for the rest of the
night.
Damage to the sailboat was
estimated at about $2-3,000.


62" for

The Year
With the weatherman
promising an end to the
daily rains by the end of
the week, it's time to give
a "damage report" for the
Gulf County area.
According to Emily
Simmons, The Star's
source for such Informa-
tion, the Port St. Joe area
has now received 62 inch-
es of rainfall this year.
That's a bunch!
In July, alone, Port St.
Joe has been soaked with
12.37 inches of rain.
Rainfall this year has
already exceeded the an-
nual average of about 50".


Three Qualify for Wewa

Commission Positions


Three City Commissioners
will be selected by the Wewa-
hitchka registered voters on the
first Tuesday in September, ac-
cording to City Clerk Tweeta
McGlon.
Two of the Councilmen will
be elected for three year terms,
while the third will be selected to
complete the final year on one of
the Commission slots.
Incumbents in the election
are veteran Commissioner, Ed
Bandjough, Group 1; Harrell Hol-
loway, Group 2 and Rev. Charles
Pettis, Group 3. Of the three in-
cumbents, only Bandjough has
qualified to seek re-election, as of
today.
Holloway had not qualified
Wednesday morning, but Tommy


Morgan had paid his qualification
fee and filed his qualification pa-
pers with the City Hall.
Rev. Pettis, appointed earlier
this year to fill a vacancy on the
Board, is serving only until the
September election, when electors
will make the selection of a candi-
date to complete the one year still
remaining in his term. Rev. Pettis
had not yet announced his inten-
tions Wednesday morning. Tony
Justice, however, has qualified to
seek election to the Group Three
seat.
According to Clerk McGlon,
qualification of candidates ends
on Wednesday, August 14, after
opening last Thursday, July 25.
Qualification fees are $28.50.


I I


0


S; r lR












THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, AUGUST 1,1991


KEla


Keep Your Cool \Hunker Down with Kes
"r 1_ a then.


At this time every year, we all get antsy and we moan and
groan about taxes and how hard they are to pay. We suppose
you could place us right there near the head of the list of those
who moan and groan, right along with the best moaners and
groaners.
Maybe that's the proper thing to do. None of us want our
hard-earned money wasted or frittered: away for nonsensical
purposes. It [money] comes too hard to have it wasted by a
bunch of bunglers who don't know how to wring a dollar bill un-
til George Washington thinks he is getting strung up.
Too, there's nothing particularly funny or noble-feeling about
having to pay out huge chunks of money when the tax bill
comes. There's no kidding around about it. Paying taxes is not
fun and spiraling tax bills stir up the objections in all of us.
When we have four governments here in Gulf County build-
ing budgets at the same time, it seems as if the tax levies are
sometimes more than we can possibly bear. They are tough, but
from what we hear, they are larger in many other places than
they are in Gulf County. In Gulf County, the tax bite isn't all
that large, which is why we used so many paragraphs to explain
that if they were only $10.00 for each tax payer, we would still
moan about high taxes.
Taxes don't disturb us. Having to pay them does. It's that
simple.
The things which gives us some relief here in Gulf County is
something I heard on the TV news the other night. The commen-
tator said that more and more governmental subdivisions--
which includes states, counties, cities, school districts, etc.,-
are going or are already bankrupt. As a matter of fact, the com-
mentator said that many economists feel that only 10% of the
states, cities, etc., are not in danger of going bankrupt or are al-
ready there.
That puts Gulf County, the Gulf County School Board and
the two cities in Gulf County in pretty select company, because
neither are near bankruptcy. In spite of our grumblings over
having to pay taxes, and complaining over the services we may
not have, that others do have, our taxing bodies are, intentional-
ly or accidentally, treating us as citizens pretty well.
So, if you want to keep your cool and your sanity during this
traumatic tax levying season, just look at the bright side. We
may be paying more than we want, but at least our governments
have not put us in the poor house. yet!



Take Heart!

Have you noticed where the summer has gone? We know, it's
just the first day of August and there is plenty of hot weather
ahead for us here in the Panhandle of the Sunshine State. But,
just consider, if you will, that in a short two weeks from today,
the kids will be back in school here in Gulf County for the fall
session.
That means summer-or more properly, summer vacation-
is just about over.
Sumilker vacation has hit hard this',year, also. The people at
%the beach liked it, because it attracted people by the thousands
who wanted to trade a number of their greenbacks for a red or
brown sunburn. Where it hit hard, was in the frenzy of travelling
our people engaged in, trying to get their summer vacation in be-
fore school started again.
Churches have their attendance decimated at this time of the
year. Social, fraternal and civic organizations have problems get-
ting people to their meetings. Even industry works those who
stay, overtime, to make up for the ones who are off on vacation.
But, it will all soon be over and it will be back to the same
old day-to-day schedule before you can say, "Where did the sum-
mer go?"
But there is one bright ray of expectation coming out of all
this. There is light at the end of the summer tunnel which is
rapidly approaching. The end of summer is not all desolation
and disappointment for all but those who exist on summer
business.
The end of July and jumping off into August, as we are doing
today, means that in just a few days more than a month, we will
be going to football games again. Some will start before Septem-
ber 1, but for those high school games which are so much a fa-
vorite in Florida's Panhandle, the first week end in September is
the magic word.
So, take heart, people! The pigskin is coming!


In Search oi...


'Ya'll know Elvis ain't dead."
The young waitress poured our
tea and filled us in on the latest
news.
"I know," my companion
looked up from his taco salad, "I
was checking out over at the Pig-
gly Wiggly yesterday and his pic-
ture was on one of those maga-
zines. Headlines said he was
spotted at the drive-in out in Ari-
zona."
I saw that magazine. He
shared the cover with Dolly Par-
ton. The caption under her photo
said that she actually hadn't lost


any weight at all they were
making her look skinny by using
trick photography. Of course, the
thing that really caught my eye
on that cover was the picture of
the three-headed cow.
"Isn't it great about Elvis?"
The young waitress was announc-
ing the news at the next table.
"I wish," my wife paused be-
tween mouthfuls of her spaghetti,
double order of fries and large
salad, "they would use some of
that trick photography on me!"
Elvis came to my little home-
town once. I know he was alive


It was 1957 and Elvis


stopped off at the Dixie Coffee
Cup for supper. It took about 15
minutes for everybody in town to
get out there. Everyone, that is,
except Bobby Ridley, he was on
duty at the fire station. Elvis sat
in Maudie Mallard's mother's sec-
tion but Dixie Faye, whose father
owned the place, bumped her and
waited on him.
Somebody threw a nickel in
the juke box and played, You Ain't
Nothing' But A Hound Dog.
Elvis ordered a bowl of chili
and seemed kind'a amused at the
swiftness with which the restau-
rant was filling up. Bubba and
Earl were the last to come in.
They'd parked their Harley's just


Kesley
Colbert

as close to that Cadillac as they
could and they'd spent 10 min-
utes out in the parking lot waxing
on their black leather ackets and
combing their ducktalls.
Somebody pushed B-11 and
Don't Be Cruel came on.
I didn't know any of the peo-
ple with Elvis. But one of them
must'a been in the military -
they kept calling him Colonel.
Dixie Faye was so excited that
she near 'bout spilled the chili in
his lap. And sle accidently
brushed his shoulder as she
leaned down with the bowl. Elvis
smiled and said, 'Thank you,
ma'am."
Folks, Dixie Faye swooned.
The Rock-Ola was playing All
Shook Up.
It seems a little odd now. But
nobody rushed over and intro-
duced themselves or asked for an
autograph. They didn't interrupt
his meal or get in the way. Every-
body just stood around the Dixie
Coffee Cup, talking real low and
watching Elvis eat a bowl of chili.
When Elvis stood up to leave,
I Want You, I Need You, I Love You
was blaring out of that juke box.
Patti Houston rushed up to him
and gave him a big kiss. But
heck, didn't nobody think much
about that Patti, at one time or
another, had kissed every eligible
man in the county. As that pink
Cadillac roared off into the night,
people inside were lining up to sit
in Elvis' chair and everybody
was ordering chili.
"Kes, do you truly think Elvis
is alive?" Our waitress was back
with more tea.
'Yes, I do. Just like I know
that wrestling is real and we ain't
never been to the moon."
'You mean wrestling is real!"
Before I could tell her about
the time up in Hibbing, Minneso-
ta, when Sasquatch almost got
me, Cathy raised up from her pe-
can pie and gave me 'one of those
looks'. I knew the conversation
was over.
I probably wouldn't a'thought
nothing else about it As a matter
of fact, I wouldn't even be telling
you this story today if it hadn't
a'been for the car.
I was on a back road about
halfway between Marianna and
Blakely when I came up behind a
1955 Ford. Folks, this one was
extra sharp. It was a red and
white Crown Victoria with fender
skirts, chrome wire wheels, a con-
tinental kit and a lowered rear
end. I'm talking showroom ready.
I floor boarded my old pick-up -
I had to get a better look at this.
As I pulled out to pass, the sun
reflecting off that chrome bumper
almost blinded me. The driver
had long black hair and he was
wearing wrap around sunglasses.
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


I- IAIJIN SHHIJLU


-- ---. -


Some People Really Know How to Ruin A Good Vacation


EVERYBODY KNOWS Bill
Wood. That's Bill Wood of City
Commission fame. He ran for the
job last year and earned his first
term on the Commission Board
and has now been there long
enough to have stopped asking
himself, "What am I doing here?"
If you have never been there,
you hardly know what I am talk-
ing about. I didn't make this ob-
servation in order to discourage
anyone from running for the City
Commission post. It's not all fun
and games, but it is a very satis-
fying service for one's community,
as I am sure Bill is beginning to
find out right about now.
The job is more satisfying in
Port St. Joe than it is in most
small cities, because Port St. Joe
has enjoyed some conservative
and effective leadership out of its
$25.00 per month commissioners
over the past years, and the City


is In a position to do what It
needs to do for its people without
having to scratch and scramble
for the money to do it with.
Port St. Joe .is a solvent city,
due to its fine leadership, while
other cities are going bankrupt
every day.

BUT BACK TO BILL Old Bill
is a different sort. If he isn't play-
ing golf, he is out running, trying
to shed a few pounds. If he isn't
trying to shed a few pounds, he is
eating lots of good food, putting
on a few pounds to lose.
If he isn't playing golf, fish-
ing, trying to lose or put on a few
pounds, he is out taking care of
city business.
When all else fails to keep his
attention span occupied, he is in
his office at the insurance compa-
ny which runs him at the north
end of Williams Avenue the
coming commerce street of Port
St. Joe.


Bill land I'm sure other Insu-
rance agents in town can do the
same can tell you some hair-
raising tales about some of the_
property he has covered under
his firm. Some are funny, some
sad, and others totally unbelieva-
ble. And, of course, Bill comes
from Alabama, so he has the gift
of telling tales to make them
sound more interesting like
my preacher, Dr. Dan Duncan,
Bill Barlow, Lamar Faison, Frank
Pate, Smiley Anchors, Doctors
Bob King and Joe Hendrix .
and the list goes on and on, as do
their stories.

BUT, OLD BILL seems to
have the most intriguing story of
all, of late.
Bill's latest tale involves
Rocky Motley, the head pig at Pig-
gly Wiggly.
Rocky, his wife and two chil-
dren decided to take in the Piggly
Wiggly convention in San Anto-


nio. Texas a week ago. They were
due back in Port St. Joe. after a
week in San Antonio, last
Wednesday.
The Rock said he was driving
his van to San Antonio so he
could take his wife and kids
along. 'We'll get to see things
along .the way, and after spending
two mandatory 30-minute ses-
sions in the convention we can
get out and see interesting things
like the Alamo and other histori-
cal places in and around San An-
tonio."
Rocky had a fine and enjoya-
ble trip all mapped out and was
looking forward to going.
But, it just wasn't to bel
Awhile back, one of the ma-
jor movie studios made a movie
entitled, "National Lampoon's Va-
cation," starring Chevy Chase, so
you know just about what kind of
movie it was. Everything which
can go wrong on a vacation, went
wrong in the movie.


Well. II Chevy Chase hadn't
made that movie a few years
back, Rocky might be able to sell
the screen rights to his vacation
in San Antonio, Texas, and in so
doing, might recover some of the
loss he sustained, making the sit-
uation more humorous than it ac-
tually turned out to be.
Rocky and Jan HAD one of
those pregnant vans you
know, the ones with the bubble
on top. The van couldn't be
parked in the hotel garage be-
cause of the high-rise top, so it
was left in a parking lot outside.
The very first night in San
Antonio, somebody decided they
liked old Rocky's van and took off
in it. The next day the van was
found stripped and burned.
The movie, "Vacation," was a
riot, but Rocky isn't laughing
about his misadventures, yett

I KNOW IT'S HARD to see
how, but Bill Wood does really fit


into this narrative.
Honest!
You see. Rocky was sitting
across from Bill and next to me at
Rotary Club July 18, and he was
leaving for San Antonio immedi-
ately after the meeting was over.
'"We're driving to Baton Rouge to-
night, and on into San Antonio
Friday," he said.
Bill, being the solicitous sort
he is, remarked, "Be careful
Rocky, I have had bad experience
with cars insured by my agency
going to San Antonio, Texas."
Rocky quipped, "Well, I don't
have time to change my insu-
rance before I go. I'll just have to
chance it!"
The kicker is, that. for the
past four years, cars insured by
Bill's firm have taken vacations to
San Antonio, only to have them
demolished or damaged by van-
dals. Rocky was the fourth
So, if you're driving to San
Antonio, I'd think about it!


d St. Joseph Bay Tide Table
IN Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
// Aug. 02 4:20 a.m. H 1.4 3:03 p.m. L .4
Aug. 03 4:52 a.m. H 1.6 3:49 p.m. L .1
Aug. 04 5:44 a.m. H 1.9 4:48 p.m. L -.1
Aug. 05 6:38 a.m. H 2.0 5:40 p.m. L -.2
Aug. 06 7:38 a.m. H 2.2 6:40 p.m. L -.3
.... Aug. 07 8:42 a.m. H 2.2 7:35 p.m. L -.3
.---.-_ Aug. 08 9:41 a.m. H 2.2 8:28 p.m. L -.1
hh ------


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Send Address Change to In County--s5.90 Year In County- 10.60 Six Months
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Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
Arw?10 William H. Ramsey ..........Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
WS Frenchie L. Ramsey ..........Office Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ................. Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING roughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


r-C 0 &Nr 'Sr b 1P 1


BYV: Wesley H. Hamsey









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


^-- *

The Honeymoon Is Over
There comes a time in almost every marriage when the ro-
mantic infatuation is gone and the two persons are faced with
stark reality.
The reality is that they realize that the person they married is
not the person they now live with. At least they don't appear to
be the same person.
This awakening Is called the "Honeymoon's Over" syndrome
and there are scores of ways it manifests itself. Most of the time
It is not an overnight, traumatic event. It's little, quiet, subtle
things that creep in like a snake into a night camp. It's the little
thoughts and events that eventually make both parties know the
honeymoon is definitely over.
Since it takes two to tango and make marriage, and, since it's
still fashionable in Wewahitchka to say, "Ladies first," I would
like to discuss the ladies' point of view this week and try to catch
the men's side next week.
Ladies, recently married and unmarried, pay attention! The
honeymoon Is over when:
*Your husband has been on a weekend hunting trip and the
odor you smell is not "manly" but plain old b.o. and you tell him
so.
*When your fear of becoming pregnant again is greater than
your desire for sex.
*When you catch your husband using your toothbrush and
you throw it away after he goes to work.
*When .what you once called "a little overweight" on hubby is
replaced by "fat, bald and uglyl"
*When your husband stays out all night and you don't care
where he was.
*When your sexy neighbor makes a pass at your husband
and you get mad but you don't know why.
*When you go to a movie and your husband wants some of
your popcorn but you make him go buy his own, although he
bought yours for you.
*When you wake up in the morning and look at him and he
looks so bad that you cover his face with a pillow and hope he
dreams it's a giant marshmallow and tries to eat it.
*When you finally agree with your mother that he really is a
"no good, cheating, lying scoundrel."
*Finally, the honeymoon is definitely over when you get into a
fight and he threatens to leave and you have already packed his
bags and put them in the oldest car.
No one said it was going to be easy. Remember, you can't
make a rose garden out of a briar patch!


%.


Letter to

the Editor...
JTPA Employees
Do Great Job
To the Editor:
The City of Mexico Beach
would like to take this opportuni-
ty to thank the staff of the "Job
Training Partnership Act" (JTPA)
in Port St. Joe for their,,efforts on.
otur city's behalf., This agency in
cooperation with. city, officials
placed two recent high school
graduates into the city work
force. JTPA agreed to pay the in-
dividuals' salaries in exchange for
supervision and training. As a re-
sult of this arrangement, the city
benefited as well as the trainee.
The results have been excel-
lent city productivity was up,
dollar costs down. City supervis-
ors were given a chance to im-"
prove on supervisory skills by be-
ing placed in trainer roles. Most
importantly the JTPA workers be-
gan to experience a feeling of self-
worth.
Throughout the summer,
these excellent young people ex-
hibited enthusiasm, excelled in
the ability to learn and demon-
strated a desire to succeed.
More often than not we hear
comments about young people to-
day aren't what they used to be,
well, maybe more of us should
give them a chance to show what
they really are capable of.
Again, thanks JTPA, and a
special thanks to Demecia Jordan


and David Russ for giving us your
efforts this summer and good
luck in the future.
John McInnis
City Administrator
City of Mexico Beach



Kesley
(From Page 2)
His white sequined collar was
turned up and as I got along side
he, '-with an obviously practiced
move, quickly looked away.
Now I know what you're
thinking. Elvis would be in a Cad-
illac. Not if he was going incogni-
to! When I pulled in front, I
glanced in my mirror. The license
plate read E L V I S 1. I knew itl
I wheeled my truck around
sideways in the road to cut him
off but he was two steps ahead of
me. He spied my intentions and
turned down a side road. By the
time I got back there, he was
gone. Vanished into thin air!
I've been studying on this for
two days now. I think the thing
for me to do is to drive back to
the Dixie Coffee cup and stake
the place out. Sooner or later -
he's going to want another bowl
of that chili.
Respectfully,
Kes
P.S. I would like to thank the
two most preeminent living schol-
ars on Elvisology, John P. Stew-
art of Atlanta, Georgia, and Dr.
Jack Burs of Memphis, Tennes-
see, for their assistance with the
research and development of to-
day's story.


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Florida Tops In Lightning Fatalities


Tips to Avoid Lightning Injury


"Florida ranks number one in


lightning strikes and fatalities


Army Reserve Gives Thanks


To the Editor:
Operation Desert Storm will
probably go down in history as
one of our most successful mili-
tary efforts ever. That was due in
large part to the participation of
the U.S. Army Reserve.
Beginning in August 1990,
thousands of Army Reservists
were called upon to perform the
missions for which they had been
trained. By now the whole coun-
try is aware of the tremendous
contributions they made to the
United States' Operation Desert
Storm effort.
Their success was, in turn,
made possible by the generous
support of the American people.
First, and perhaps most impor-
tant, was the wide-ranging sup-
port by the communities, of the
Army Reservists who were acti-
vated. Local communities were
particularly supportive of home-
town units as they deployed.
Without that, the activation
would have been much harder to
accomplish. But our Army Re-
servists went with the blessings
and good wishes of the American
people. We all realize just how im-
portant that is.
Without a doubt, one of the
most significant factors in inform-
ing the public was the new media
coverage of reserve activations.
Overall, both the print and the
electronic media presented a fair
picture of the Issues and activi-
ties surrounding the mobilization.
As a result, the public saw how
well prepared Army Reservists
were and learned how important
they were to the total Army effort.
The understanding that our
Army Reservists have received
from their employers has been
most encouraging. No one likes to
lose a valuable employee sudden-
ly for an extended and indefinite
period of time, especially in times
of economic uncertainty, but the
response of the great majority of
employers,.has been yery positive.
And many companies went be-
yond the requirements of the law
and generously extended addi-
tional benefits to their Reservists.
As a result, Army Reservists were
able to deploy without worrying
about their job security. Now, as
they are returning, we are seeing
that support continue as employ-
ers are welcoming them back into
the work force.
And finally, the families of our
reservists deserve special recogni-
tion. They bore the emotional, fi-
nancial and physical burdens of
their soldiers' absence. They sup-
ported their soldiers and that,
made a real difference.,
Once again, Army Reservists
have shown themselves to be ded-

Citizenship at
What Age?
To the Editor:
As a property owner at St.
Joe Beach, I enjoy keeping up
with the local news of the area. I
have been a subscriber to The
Star for several years. You have
an excellent weekly newspaper.
Your weekly editions are read and
enjoyed by all of our office staff.
However, we would like to
know at what age do you become
a citizen of Port St. Joe. Is it age
12, or age 18 or 21? In Georgia
you become a citizen when you
are born. Are the rules different
down there?
Sincerely,
Mike Sullivan
Southeast Sealing Engineers

I Say You Saw It In
The Star


e Q hWhy wait for summer
/- r, memories. Now you can
SA ave them the same day
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icated to serving their country.
They sacrificed their time, they
were separated from their fami-
lies, and many lost income when
they were activated. They needed
your support and they got it.
On behalf of our fine Army
Reserve soldiers, I am privileged
to thank all of you whose support
made it all possible.
William F. Ward
Major General, U.S. Army
Chief, Army Reserve


caused by the strikes," Florida
Marine Patrol Major Bob Douglas
said early this week, in the after-
math of the fatality from a strike
in St. Joseph Bay. Douglas, Dis-
trict Commander of the FMP, said
approximately 70% of the strikes
and fatalities occur on or around
water.
Offering some suggestions to
avoid injury from the frequent
.summer lightning storms, Major
Douglas offered the following
three suggestions to boaters or
those near the water when such a
storm comes up.
1.] One should avoid the "an-
vil" or lead shadow of an oncom-
ing storm. The northeast quad-
rant of the storm is the most
dangerous. Boaters should try to
maneuver around that part of a
storm, if they should find them-
selves trapped on the water when
one starts. The "anvil" of a ma-
ture thunderstorm points the di-


reaction the storm is traveling.
Lightning can strike two to three
miles ahead of a storm.
2.1 Swimmers should leave
the waters and seek shelter the
moment any lightning is seen, re-
alizing that thunder is often not
heard until an oncoming storm is
close, because of wind being
drawn into the storm as it ap-
proaches, drowning out the
sounds of the approaching dan-
ger.
3.] Boats attract lightning like
a magnet. If you're in a boat, seek
shelter from the storm. If you
can't, wear rain gear with rubber
sole shoes. Remove jewelry. Stay
clear of engine and helm of the
boat. Take down antennas and
rods and stay low in the boat.
Safety starts before you leave
the dock. Leave float plans, when
you do depart the dock.
Major Douglas said almost all
lightning strikes can be prevented
if boaters follow these precau-
tions.


A H op U p ......................................................... from Page 1


agreement on some new trucks.
NEW BUDGET TOTALS
The new budget totals by departments,
show the General Fund, which finances most
county operations, including the Mosquito Con-
trol department, at $4,142,974. Last year, the
General Fund budget was $3,956,534.
Fine and Forfeiture, which includes the
Sheriffs Department, Jail, and a portion of the
County Judge's office, $1,028,916. Last year,
this budget was $996,202.
The Road and Bridge Department shows a
total of $731,793. Last year, the Road and


rI L l aanJ3


Bridge was $729,211.
The total proposed budget tentatively ap-
proved yesterday was $5,903,683. Last year's
grand total stood at $5,641,947. The totals
show an increase of $261,736.
Taxes are expected to be increased by .969
of a mill, to a 9.416 total-dangerously close to
the state mandated 10 mill cap. The tentative
budget figures will now be placed on the trim
notice, which is mailed out each year to every
tax payer. The tentative budget may be reduced
without going through all the hearing proce-
dures, but it may not be increased.


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PAr A A rTHE'ST'AR. PORT ST JOE.FTL*THTTHRSnAY. AUGUST 1. 1991


r


Bryce Is One!
Bryce McKenzie Nelson, son
of Marshall and Melody Nelson,
celebrated his first birthday on
July 6 with a Fuzzy Bear party at
his home.
Helping Bryce celebrate his
special day were his friends, Ma-
son Adkison, Brennis Bush,
Kathryn Arnold, Jacob Gentry,
Zachary and Ashton Norris, Mat-
thew Rich, Amy Sasnett, Patrick
Schell, Joshua and Jared Smith,
Leah and Lynde Taylor, Megan
and Meredith Todd, Brent Walk-
er, Morgan Wood, Matthew
Wright, Gram and Em Smith,


Happy Birth ay


Bryce McKenzie Nelson


Loofkdown the road
But have no fear
Npw that you're 30
Ife hffilis near.
Love ya, Andria & 'Maine


Granddaddy and Grandmomma
Nelson, Aunt Kim Smith, Uncle
Albert and Aunt Thelma Nichols
from Chipley, Aunt Bea Nichols
and cousins Linda, Chris and
Tracy Curtis from Birmingham,
Alabama.
Bryce is the grandson of Al
and Virginia Smith, F.F. and Lu-
cille Nelson, all of Port St. Joe.

LAWN MOWER &
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Arts Exhibit Is Being Planned


Children's Health Forum

I Is Your

Child Properly

47 Immunized?
Dr."" By
Dr. Elizabeth Jones
> <


Gulf County residents who
produce various forms of art work
will have an opportunity to show
them to the public at the first an-
nual St. Joseph Bay Arts Exhibit.
The exhibits purpose, according
to organizers is to (display and)
promote regional artists with a
single event where art work of all
kinds can be displayed to the
public in one place.
The week long exhibit will be
held in conjunction with the sec-
ond annual St. Joseph's Bay Arts
and Crafts Festival on October
5th and 6th. Organizers of the art
exhibit hope to capitalize on the
success of last year's festival
which brought many talented art-
ists, craftsmen and visitors to
Port St. Joe.
First Union Bank of Port St.
Joe, located next to the festival
site, will provide the exhibit space
needed to house the event. All art.


for the evening ol the 30th. There
is no charge to exhibitors or the
public.
For more information about
the show and to register as an ex-
hibitor, contact the Port St. Joe/
Gulf County Chamber of Com-
merce 227-1223. This event is
sponsored by The Nelson-Plews
Memorial Fund for The Arts, First
Union Bank and Port St. Joe/


Gulf County Chamber of Com-
melr ce.


forms will be encouraged includ-
ing oil, acrylic and watercolor
paintings; drawings in all medi-
umns; sculpture in all mediums;
photography; artistic crafts such
as jewelry, woodworking, wood-
carving, quilt making, doll mak-
ing, and floral arranging. Any
form of creative artwork and ar-
tistic craft will be considered.
Amateurs, students and pro-
fessional artists who reside in
Gulf County are encouraged to
exhibit their work. "We hope to
draw out as much of the local tal-
ent as we can with this show. It's
a chance to show off what we can
do all in one event," says Tim Nel-
son, one of the exhibit's organiz-
ers.
The show will run from Mon-
day, September 30th through
Sunday, October 6th with an
opening night showing planned


Soon school will begin again, and all school children are re-
quired to have the following immunizations: DPT 5 Doses; Polio 4
Doses; MMR 1 Dose.
When your child receives a DPT shot, he is being immunized
against diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough) and tetanus (lock-
jaw). Now days most children have their immunizations, but often
parents will have no concept of the disease for which their child has
been immunized.
Diphtheria is an infectious disease which causes the formation
of a membrane usually in the throat. The membrane grows and
increases in size. Patients die from not being able to breathe. As a
student I had an elderly patient who told me he and his wife had 13
children. Six of the children died in one night from diphtheria. Such
a thing is almost inconceivable for us today.
Older people will remember having whooping cough. This dis-
ease was no fun for an older child as the child would cough spas-
modically for six to eight weeks and follow the cough by vomiting
(the whoop). Where whooping cough was unpleasant for an older
child it became life threatening in a young baby. The baby would
gag and strangle on thick mucus and could die.
Tetanus is manifest with muscle twitches, tremors, spasms.
The muscles of the jaw become so tight the mouth could not be
opened (lockjaw) and the patient would starve to death or aspirate
secretions and die.
Polio is a viral illness that causes paralysis of various muscles -
- more commonly muscles in the legs. Some patients had arm and
chest muscle paralysis and these were the patients who needed to
live in the "iron lung."
Measles is a severe viral disease that can cause blindness, deaf-
ness, and brain damage. Recently there has been a rash of measles
cases in college age people that included several deaths. Because of
this increased number of cases in the young adult group, it is now
recommended for children to have a second dose of MMR about age
10 years.
Mumps causes swelling of the parotid gland (in front of the ear
and on the face). The disease itself was not too troublesome, but
complications can develop. Complications include Orchitis (inflam-
mation of the testes) and Encephalitis (inflammation of the brain).
Rubella (German Measles) is a mild disease in children and
only becomes important when contracted by a woman in the first
trimester of pregnancy. When a woman in the first trimester of
pregnancy has Rubella, the baby is usually born with severe prob-
lems. "Rubella babies" have microcephaly (extremely small head),
blindness and deafness.
Recently there has been an addition to the recommended (but
not required for school) immunizations list. This addition is the HIB
Vaccine. Current recommendations are to have babies get a series
of three injections at two, four and six months with a booster at 15
months.
HIB vaccine is designed to protect the young child against He-
mophilus Influenza Type B disease. This disease does not occur too
frequently, but when it does occur it Is a serious disease and often
leaves a child with serious brain damage.
People traveling outside the Continental United States will often
need special immunizations. The Public Health Service recommends
typhoid immunizations for all international travelers. Yellow fever,
Cholera, and Hepatitis may be recommended or required depending
on the traveler's destination.
Not currently available, but standing in the wings being stud-
ied, is chickenpox vaccine. Another year or two should see this vac-
cine added to the list of vaccines recommended for children, and
see chickenpox as another disease prevented through immuniza-
tions. ""* .-- ,. -


All Our Seafood Is Fresh, Not Frozen


GULF SANDS
St. Joe Beach
Ph. 647-5013 --


RESTAURANT
and LOUNGE


Serena Guillot and James
Fleming were united in holy mat-
rimony on June 18 at the High-
land View Baptist Church with
Rev. Jimmy Clark performing the
double-ring ceremony.
Dewana Johnson, sister of
the bride, served as maid of hon-
or, and Winston Nuckolls served
as best man.















JJD. Strayer

First Birthday!
J.D. Strayer, son of John and
Pat Strayer, celebrated his first
birthday July 25 at his home
with a Tonka Truck party. Those
attending were his grandparents,
Jack and Letha Strayer; aunts,
Sandra Burkett and Jewell Hop-
per; cousins, Ashley and Brandon
Burkett, David and Travis Hop-
per, David and Tina Griffin. Spe-
cial friends were Margaret and
Michael Padgett, Darla and Lind-
say Lyle, Karen and Lil 'Randi'
Chancey, Denise Hayes, Michelle
Wells, Tim and Kathy O'Bryan,
and big sister Stephanie.


Serena is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Wallace Guillot of High-
land View. James is the son of
Beatrice. Fleming of Florala, Ala-
bama, and the late Leroy Flem-
ing.
After a trip to Gatlinburg,
Tennessee, the couple are making
their home at St. Joe Beach.


PSJES Orientation
Slated August 9

Port St. Joe Elementary
School will hold orientation Au-
gust 9 from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Students may visit the school be-
tween these times. Classroom as-
signments will be posted and stu-
dents can meet their teacher and
visit their classroom.


Buddy
Happiest '25" Years
Happy Anniversary
Your Loving Wife
8-6-66 -8-6-91


A ATTENTION!


Making Waves Hair Salon
INTRODUCES

SHARON ANGEL
owner of Heads Up in Panama City
In our salon every 1st Wednesday and 3rd Saturday
to better serve her clients in the area.
NEW CLIENTS WELCOME
904-763-0030 Gulf Aire 904-647-5656


Mr. and Mrs. James Fleming


Exchange Vows


Children and :.

Babies


Beauty '


Pageant-



All ages girls and

boys 0-24 years.


Port St. Joe High School
Friday Night, August 23, 1991
$25.00 Entry Fee-
Trophies, Crown and Cash Awards
Call for free information 827-1767
Licensed director 205/649-4242
^ 2


J. rPat rick

Ress t a u ra n t
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Seafood Buffet 1795
NOON BUFFET ..........$4.95
or Order from the wide selection on Our
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No cholesterol Evening Meal Begins at 5:00 PM
in food preparation \
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Catering Services Also Available I
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New Homes
Additions & Remodeling
All Your Building Needs

WE BUILD TO LAST A LIFETIME!

For Free Estimates, Call 229-8589
TFC 7/18/91









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991 PAGE 5A



SCollege Courses Being Offered Locally


The fall semester at Gulf
Coast Community College will be-
gin Thursday, August 22. Regis-
tration for courses in Port St. Joe,

Faith Christi

Sets Registra
School will begin at Faith
Christian School, Monday, Au-
gust 19th with orientation for
grades K-3 through sixth grade.
All students begin regular classes
on Tuesday, August 20, at 8:05
a.m.
Registration for grades K-3
through grade 12 can be made at
801 20th Street from 9:00 a.m.
until 12:30 p.m. beginning Au-
gust 5.
State regulations require
health examinations, immuniza-
tion records, and birth certificate
numbers to be on file when a stu-
dent enters Florida schools for
the first time, either as a kinder-
garten student or as a transfer
from out of state. All incoming
students are advised to check
with their County Health Depart-
ments about these matters imme-
diately.
Please register your child as
soon as possible. Classes for K-3
and K-4 are filled, but arrange-
ments will be made for additional
classes If there are enough stu-
dents. After school care is also
being considered for Faith Chris-
tian students. If you are interest-


OBITUARIES...

Gene H. Byrd
Gene Herbert Byrd, 62, of
Highland View, passed away
Thursday afternoon, July 25, in
Bay Medical Center following an
extended illness. He was a native
of Lake Wales and had been a
resident here for the past 45
years. He was a commercial fish-
erman.
Survivors include his wife,
Vennie Mae Byrd of Highland
View; two sons, Larry Byrd and
Gerald Byrd, both of White City;
two daughters, Brenda Carroll of
Eastpoint and Angela Brake of
Highland View; seven grandchil-
dren; five sisters, Edna Wood and
Audra McLawhon, both of Port St.
Joe, Joan Duke of Madison, Ohio,
Shirley Fuller and Mary Ester
McGill, both of Panama City; four
brothers, James E. Byrd of Salis-
bury, North Carolina, Charles
* Byrd of Bear Creek, Tommy Byrd
of Niceville, and Albert Byrd of
Panama City.
Funeral services were held
Saturday at the Highland View
Church of God, conducted by the
Dr. Clifton Elmore. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot at Holly
Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home.

Odell R. Smith
Odell R. Smith, 64, of High-
land View, passed away Wednes-
day morning, July 31, In Gulf
Pines Hospital following an ex-
tended illness. A native of Thom-
as County, Georgia, she lived in
West Virginia for a number of
years before coming here in 1959.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Jarrell B. "Smokey" Smith
of Highland View; three daugh-
ters, Phyllis Beaman and Donna
Ritch, both of Port St. Joe, and
Kaye Turvaville of Tallahassee;
four grandchildren and three
great grandchildren.
Funeral arrangements were
incomplete at press time and will
be announced later.
All services are under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home.



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Wewahitchka, Apalachicola and
Carrabelle will be held on August
14 at 6:00 p.m. Registration loca-
tions are Apalachicola High

an School

tion Dates
ed, please call the school.
Faith Christian is a non-
denominational school with class-
es from the three-year kindergart-
en age through twelfth grade. Call
229-6707 for more information.
Summer office hours are 9:00
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., August 5-9.
Beginning August 12, regular
school hours of 8:00 a.m. until
3:00 p.m. will begin.


School, Carrabelle High School,
Port St. Joe Elementary School
and Wewahitchka High School.
Courses offered in Apalachi-
cola include: Creative Writing,
Fundamentals of Oceanography,


Introduction to Business, Basic
Mathematics, Reading Skills I
and Real Estate License Renewal.
Carrabelle courses include:
Real Estate Principles, Practices,

and Law; American National Gov-


Soc. Sec. Representative to Visit
Most Social Security business meet the Social Security rep
can be handled over the phone. sentative in Port St. Joe on
You are invited to call Social Se- first and third Monday of e
curity at 1-800-234-5772. month and in Wewahitchka
If this is not possible, you the second Monday of e
may come to the office located at month.
30 West Government Street, Pan- The schedule for Port St.
ama City. The office is open Mon- is August 5, 19 and Septeir
day through Friday from 8:30 16 from 11 a.m. to 12 noon ET
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. CT., except on In Wewahitchka, August
national holidays. If you cannot and September 9 from 10 a.m
come to Panama City, you may 12 noon CT.


emrnment; United States History I;
World Literature II; and Introduc-
tion to Microcomputer Usage.
Port St. Joe courses include:
Florida History; American Nation-
al Government; Western Civiliza-
tion II; and Real Estate Princi-
ples, Practices, and Law.
Wewahitchka courses in-
chlde: General iinlnogical .c'ienc:.


pre- Western Civilization I; Typewrit-
the ing I; Word Processing with Word-
ach Perfect; and Principles of Sociolo-
on gy.
ach
Gulf Coast will also offer a
Joe number of courses through Open
Lber College. Video tapes and audio
T. cassettes for these courses are
12, available at the Gulf County Pub-
. to lic Library, Gulf County Media
Center, Apalachicola High School,


Carrabelle High School and We-
wahitchka High School.


Still Time to
Contribute
The Gulf County Schools'
Gold Card Club will conclude the
1991-92 sponsorship campaign
next Monday, August 5.
If you would like to be includ-
ed in this year's brochure, you
are asked to mail your contribu-
tion of $10.00 or more to: GCS/
GCC, P.O. Box 1051, Port St. Joe,
FL 32456.
Thanks to the many parents
and businesses who have already
made donations.


CALL ME.
BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avenue
(Across from St. Joe Hardware)
Office: 229-6514
State Farm
Insurance Companies
Home Offices: Bloomington, Illinois



Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.









PAGE 6A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991


Childhood Disability Rules Revised


Summer Seafood is a Breeze!
Easy Shellfish and Capellini
Fresh shellfish and .2" ,-
vegetables make -- .'
Seafood over
Angel Hair Pasta
a bountiful summer
feast. Enjoy these ,
good-for-you ingre-
dients while they're
at their best. The .
delicate tastes of
the shellfish are set -"
off by a sauce made .
with chicken broth, .
sherry, cream and
zesty Wish-Bone
Italian Dressing.
You save time and
money because all
the spices you need are already in the dressing.
Everything is prepared in one pan for easy cleanup. Serve this dish with
a spicy antipasto salad, dry white wine and a special Italian dessert such
as tiramisu or hazelnut gelato with amaretti cookies.
For more great recipes with Wish-Bone Dressings, send a check or money
order for $1.75 to: Wish-Bone Salads Plus Much More, P.O. Box 4154-NR,
Syosset, NY 11791. Make check payable to Thomas J. Lipton Company. Please
allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery.
Seafood over Angel Hair Pasta
1/4 cup Wish-Bone Italian 1/2 pound uncooked medium shrimp,
Dressing cleaned (keep tails on)
1/4 cup chopped shallots 1/2 pound sea scallops
or onions 8 mussels, well scrubbed
1 cup thinly sliced carrots 1/4 cup whipping cream or heavy cream
1 cup thinly sliced snow 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
peas (about 4 oz.) Salt and pepper to taste
1 cup chicken broth 8 ounces angel hair pasta or
1/4 cup sherry capellini, cooked and drained
In 12-inch skillet, heat Italian dressing and cook shallots over medium-
high heat 2 minutes. Add carrots and snow peas and cook 2 minutes.
Add broth, then sherry. Bring to a boil, then add shrimp, scallops and
mussels. Simmer uncovered 3 minutes or until seafood is done and mussel
shells open. (Discard any unopened shells.) Stir in cream blended with
flour and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes or until
sauce is slightly thickened. Stir in salt and pepper. Serve over hot angel
hair pasta and, if desired, with freshly ground pepper. Makes about
4 main-dish servings.


Shorter Hospital Stays Mandated

Patients Feel Secure

With Home Health Care


Mandated shorter stays in
hospitals by patients has
spawned a new patient care in-
dustry, identified to the Kiwanis
Club Tuesday as home health
care.
Dana Holton, district manag-
er of Spectrum Home Health care,
which serves a nine-county area,
including Gulf County, gave the
club a run-down of their services
and activities at their regular
meeting Tuesday.
Holton, who has his central
office in Panama City, said the
firm maintains a corps of some
300 people, including registered
nurses, therapists, clerical people
and other specialists, to provide
patients medical care in the home
they need, but cannot provide or
will not provide for themselves.
"Most of our patients are Medi-
care or Medicaid, but we have a
substantial number of patients
insured by private carriers, or
who pay from their own funds,"
Holton said.
The agency provides services
such as administering medica-


tion, physical therapy, giving IV's,
changing dressings, and any care
offered by nurses in a hospital
setting. "The patients feel more
secure and at ease in the home
setting, and we offer services to
make that recovery complete and
trouble free," the speaker said.
Holton said one of their main
specialties is offering physical
therapy care for those who have
had joint replacement. "There are
a number of people receiving hip
and knee replacements, who need
physical therapy to train their
muscles to handle the new re-
placements," he said.
The home care service, which
was started in 1974 is certified by
Medicare and is becoming in-
volved in working with people
who have Workman's Compensa-
tion injuries.
Lori Goff, who is in charge of
the Port St. Joe office of Spec-
trum, accompanied Holton to the
program.
Bob Freeman of Port St. Joe,
was a guest of the club.


New regulations make sub-
stantial changes in the way the
Social Security Administration
evaluates disabilities in children
applying for Supplemental Secur-
ity Income (SSI) payments. One of
the regulations, which is the
result of the February 20, 1990
Sullivan v. Zeblev Supreme Court
decision, significantly changes
the process and standards used
to evaluate childhood chases.
Two other regulations make spe.
cific revisions to the medical cri-
teria used to evaluate disability in.
children with Down Syndrome,
mental impairments and other
serious hereditary, congenital
and acquired disorders.
In the Zebley decision, the
Supreme Court found that Social
Security.used a narrower test for
evaluating the disabilities of chil-
dren under 18 than it used for
evaluating the disabilities of adult
workers. The determination of
disability for children was based
solely on evaluation criteria con-
tained in Social Security's "List-


ing of Impairmentts." llowever,
when evaluating adults, Social
Security provided additional steps
which considered an individual's
work-related functional capacities
and vocation factors such as age,
education and work experience.
The new childhood regulation
outlines a disability evaluation
process for children that is simi-
lar to the process used for adults.
It expands the method of deter-
mining equivalence to the medical
listings criteria and allows a
determination of disability based
on the child's ability to function.
A child whose disability does not
meet or equal specific "listings"
will be given an individualized
functional assessment to deter-
mine how the disability limits the
child. All the child's functions
and behaviors will be examined
and evaluated, including cogni-
tive, communicative, motor,
social and personal skills.
Since children's functioning
varies enormously from age to
age, the new regulation reflects


Jeremy Tolson of Balti- was broken. Tolson said he will
more, Maryland, assesses the sail on when the necessary re-
damage to his sailboat, tied up pairs are made. See story on
at Raffield Fisheries docks ear- page 1.
ly this week. The sailing craft
collided with a Raffield Fisher-
ies trawler early Friday morn-
ing, at the mouth of St. Joseoh


Bay.
The sailboat, itself, suffered
only superficial damage, but
the boat's engine was pretty
well bunged up and the mast


Congratulations! !!


"PORT ST. JOE DISTRICT 4

YOUTH ALL-STAR CHAMPIONS"


Listen to WMTO 93.5 FM

For All the Play By Play

Action As Port St. Joe Vies

For the State Championship

Title Starting August 5th


Thanks to all the sponsors bringing these games:
The Star Newspaper Costin & Costin Law Firm
St. Joe Communications Newberry Eye Clinic
Pate's Service Center Renfro Auto Parts
Highland View Motors St. Joe Auto Parts
Dr. Tim Nelson, DMV Captain Black's Marine
Jim Robinson Chevrolet Bill Wood Insurance
St. Joe Furniture St. Joe Machine Co.
St. Joe Forest Products Costin's Insurance
Boyer Sign Shop Carr's Auto Sales

PLAY BY PLAY ACTION BROUGHT TO YOU BY
WMTO'S HOWARD BROWNING


this variability. It includes specif-
ic "age-appropriate guidelines" for
children in various age groups:
from birth to age 1, ages 1-3, 3-6,

Correctional
Course Set
The Gulf Coast Community
College Criminal Justice Training
Academy will begin a Correctional
Officer Standards class on Au-
gust 20.
The course, required for Flori-
da Correctional Officer certifica-
tion, covers criminal and consti-
tutional law, defensive tactics,
emergency medical response
techniques, human relations and
firearms training.
Classes will meet at GCCC
Monday through Thursday even-
ings between 5:30 p.m. and 9:30
p.m. Interested applicants should
contact the academy as early as
possible in order to secure place-
ment in this limited enrollment
course. Call 769-1551, extension
5878.


6-12, 12-16 and 16-18.
The other new childhood dis-
ability regulations provide
detailed guidelines for evaluating
mental disorders in children and,
for the first time, specifically cov-
er drug addiction and alcoholism,
anxiety disorders, hyperactivity,
personality disorders, autism, tic
disorders such as Tourette's Syn-
drome and anorexia.
For more information about
SSI benefits for children, call any
Social Security office.

Special Speaker
at Philadelphia
Primitive Baptist
The members of Philadelphia
Primitive Baptist Church will
have Minister Frank Comer Jr. as
their special speaker for the Sun-
day morning worship service be-
ginning at 11:00 a.m. Pastor
Comer hails from Rochester, New
York.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend this special worship ser-
vice.


*Heating & Air ,,
*Major
Appliance
Repair
*Plumbing &
Electrical Work

RER0007623
RF0040131 229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle, Port St. Joe



Open
Tuesday thru Thursday 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 8 a.m. 9 p.m.
Sunday 1 to 8 p.m.

Move your oyster shucking
from the backyard to your
kitchen table with Indian Pass
new, washed, boxed oysters.
Same familiar flavor inside
but new clean outside.
40 lb. Washed Box
$25.00.
Call 227-1670
to reserve yours today!

INDIAN PASS

RAW BAR
(ON C-30 SOUTH OF PORT ST. JOE)


The Ultimate in


Checking.






Check out Ultimate Checking,
and you could be
Banking at Citizens Federal!

Ultimate Checking at Citizens Federal offers
you all this for only $6.00 per month:

FREE PERSONALIZED CHECKS.
FREE TRAVELERS CHECKS.
FREE PHOTO COPIES.
FREE NOTARY SERVICE.
FREE CHECK SAFE KEEPING.
EARNS INTEREST.*
NO MINIMUM BALANCE REQUIRED.


Bank with someone you know and trust. Great
hometown banking from your friends and
neighbors at Citizens Federal Savings.


Citizens Federal Savings Bank at Port St. Joe
Port St. Joe Apalachicola Wewahitchka
401 5th Street & Williams 58 4th Street & Avenue D Highway 71 Near Hwy 22
227.1416 653.9828 639.2111
*Ultimate Checking Earns Interest on Balances Above $100.
A Monthly Service Fee of $6 on Ultimate Checking.
Deposits Federally Insured to $100.000.













































Unprecedented joint commer-
cial fishing industry, government,
recreational fishing group, and
conservation organization effort
to resolve the finfish by-catch is-
sue in the Gulf of Mexico and
South Atlantic gets underway in
Atlanta.
In response to acute and
growing public concern about fin-
fish by-catch, a Steering Commit-
tee hosted by the Gulf and South
Atlantic Fisheries Development
Foundation, Inc. met to com-
mence developing a research plan
for the finfish by-catch in the
Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic
Shrimp Fisheries. This research
plan will be designed to address
gear modification and other man-
agement strategies to reduce fin-
fish by-catch in the shrimp in-
dustry. The Steering Committee
is composed of representatives
from the Gulf and South Atlantic
Commercial Fishing Industry,
Recreational Fishing Groups,
Conservation Organizations, Sea
Grant, the National Marine Fish-
eries Service, the Gulf of Mexico
and South Atlantic Fishery Man-
agement Councils, the Atlantic
States Marine Fisheries Commis-
* sion, the Gulf States Marine Fish-
eries Commission, and State
Fishery Management Agencies. It
is believed that participation of all
the organizations will create a
cooperative atmosphere in which
a viable finfish by-catch research
plan can be developed. Compre-
hensive representation on the
Steering Committee also ensures
that all organizations are kept ful-
ly informed of the research plan's
progress.
Development of this research
plan was mandated by recent
amendments to the Magnuson
Fishery Conservation Manage-

Free Recordkeeping
Seminar August 8
The Florida State University
Small Business Development
Center and Gulf Coast Communi-
ty College Lifelong Learning Cen-
ter are cosponsoring a free semi-
nar, "Recordkeeping Can Be
Easy", on Thursday, August 8.
The seminar will be held at FSU,
Panama City Campus, from 6:30
to 9:30 p.m. CT.
This seminar is designed to
help you understand small busi-
ness finances. Also, a simplified
recordkeeping system designed
for small business owners will be
taught.
There is no charge for the
* seminar, but pre-registration is
required by calling the FSU-
SBDC at (904) 872-4655.

Register for Sr.
Golf Tournament
The upcoming select shot golf
tournament has drawn a lot of in-
terest in the community. Many
people have already picked up
registration forms. Your help is
needed to be sure enough food is
on hand to feed everyone at the
buffet dinner. All registration
forms must be turned in a the
Pro Shop with the entry fee prior
to August 5th. Please indicate
how many buffet dinner reserva-
tions you want. Call Susan Price
at St. Joseph Bay Country Club
to sign up for the buffet dinner at
227-1756, or Becky at the Pro
Shop, 227-1751 or drop by.
There will be lots of surprises
for you to enjoy. Call 229-8466
for further information.
Remember, all proceeds stay
in Gulf County and Mexico Beach
to help the elderly. Your support
is appreciated.

Need Extra Money?
Use the Classifieds


ment Act, and is supported by
Federal Grants awarded to the
Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries
Development Foundation, Inc.
Consequently, the Foundation is
charged with coordinating and
administering development of the
plan, and is responsible for main-
taining cooperation among di-
verse interests.
According to Walter Shaffer,
Board Chairman of the Founda-
tion, the process outlined in the
Foundation grant provides an
"unprecedented opportunity" for
this intensely controversial issue
to be addressed by all concerned
parties in the spirit of coopera-
tion. Almost universal participa-.
tion at the Steering Committee
meeting affirmed that this atti-
tude is shared by virtually every-
one concerned with this issue.
Dr. Andrew J. Kemmerer, Region-
al Director, National Marine Fish-
eries Service, Southeast Region,
added that NMFS is intensely in-
terested in this effort to develop a
flnfish by-catch research plan be-
cause the Federal government re-


gards finfish by-catch as one of
the most serious issues in marine
fishery management today. He ex-
pressed hope that this coopera-
tive effort will help in avoiding
conflicts similar to those that
have occurred with other conten-
tious Fishery Management issues
in the past.
The Steering Committee divid-
ed into four Working Groups each
of which is assigned the task of
writing a portion of the Research
and Management Plans. The
Steering Committee also estab-
lished a Technical Review Panel,
composed of experts from appro-
priate fields, whose focus will be
to overview recommended actions
and research of the Steering
Committee. These Groups will
meet regularly throughout the
course of the project. The next
Steering Committee meeting is
tentatively planned for this fall.
Please address all questions con-
cerning this process to Peter
Hoar, Project Director, Gulf and
South Atlantic Fisheries Develop-
ment Foundation, Inc.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991 PAGE 7A



Tips On Spotting



A Counterfeit Bill


Can you spot a counterfeit
bill? If you handle money daily,
you should be aware of what a
counterfeit bill looks like.
The complicated and careful
process of making genuine cur-
rency is distinctive. United States
currency notes are made from de-
tailed, steel-plate engravings. A
counterfeiter uses photography to
copy original engraving.
Also, the U.S. currency sys-
tem uses high-quality, durable
paper that is unavailable to the
public. It has a certain feel and
strength to it. If the bill is torn,
you can see the small red and
blue threads running through it.
counterfeit paper may be whiter
with red and blue pen lines imi-
tating the threads.
Below are a few suggestions
to help you spot a counterfeit bill.
1. The Portrait. The genuine
bill's picture has eyes that sharp-
ly stand out and appear lifelike.
Whereas, the counterfeit's eyes
blend with the background and
the face appears whiter than nor-
mal.
2. The Seal. The genuine
saw-tooth points around the seal
are sharp and even. The copy
points are broken, uneven and
blunt.
3. The Serial Numbers. The
genuine serial numbers are print-
ed in bold, evenly spaced figures.
The beginning letter always
matches the letter within the
seal. The counterfeit serial num-
bers may be out of line, and
printed too light or dark. The let-
ter within the seal may not agree
with the beginning of the serial
number.
4. The Scroll Work. The gen-
uine scroll work has sharp, un-

Singles Dance
Sonny Morris and the Coun-
try Gold Band will be providing
the music for an evening of danc-
ing and listening pleasure Friday,
August 9 from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m.
CT at the W.T. Neal Civic Center,
Hwy. 69 North, Blountstown. The
dance is sponsored by the
Blountstown Singles Club and all
are invited to attend. Admission
is $3.50 per person with door
prizes being awarded.


BARGAINS OF THE MONTH


Metal-Wizz
Multi-Purpose
Snips

599


%" x 60 Yds.
Tartan Brand
Masking Tape


69

aM_


Masking tape, appropriate
for non-critical applications.
34-7286 5142- "


Wet/Dry Vac W.
Portable Blowek
8999
S16 Gal.
shop.vac

With blower
& bonus
-4 47 accessories.



24-4475 333-29-4


et


16 Oz. Wasp
& Hornet Killer

249


BENGAL
CHEMICAL INC


22" Nest drenching
blast. Shotgun spray
pattern. Active ingre-
dient: .10 Bendiocarb.
21-9220 97117


10.3 Oz.
Architectural Grade
Caulking Compound


Adheres to wood, metal and
masonry. Seals airtight & water-
tight. Sets to a semi-elastic seal.
10.3 Oz. cartridge. 53-8785
18250


9 Oz. Roach Spray

798



BENGAL I
CHEMICAL INC ltl


Guaranteed extermination
overnight. Also kills: ants.
spiders, crickets, silverfish.
gnats, flies and mosquitoes
21-7067 92465


Compound action,
serrated jaws, safety
latch and yellow vinyl
grip. 9" Length, 1%" cut-
ting blade. 14-4196
MPC-3


Promotional Brushes



991




2" Brush 53-3349 P3972
3" Brush
53-3356 P3973 149
4" Brush
53-3364 *P3974 219
Sable kanecaron filament for
latex and oil paint.


50' Triple-Tube
Flexible Sprinkler


Three tubesfor even sprinkling
or soaking at oil water pies-
sures Ideal for watenng anor
row o01 hard-to-reach areas
18-3038 860C 50


10.5 Oz.
Liquid Nails
Panel & Constr.
Adhesive


Bonds plywood, haroboard.
drvwall, steel, plaster con-
crete. polystyrene loam and
most other common buildirna
materials 36 03,:' -'.('


broken lines that crisscross each
other. The counterfeit lines may
be blurred and broken.
If you get a counterfeit bill,
write your name and date on the
back of it. Contact the nearest
U.S. Secret Service office, the lo-
cal police, a commercial bank, or


Free Beef

Recipes
The winning recipes from the
Florida Beef Cook-Off have been
compiled in a booklet and are
available, free, from the Florida
Beef Council.
The winning recipe, "West In-
dian Steak with Pineapple Chut-
ney," is the creation of Gail Dean
of St. Augustine. Her recipe fea-
tures boneless sirloin steak with
a Caribbean flair.
The prize-winning recipe
booklet also contains a nutrition-
al profile on beef and information
on the skinniest cuts of beef.
To receive the booklet, send a
stamped, self-addressed business
size envelope to Prize Winning
Recipes, c/o Florida Beef Council,
P.O. Box 421929, Kissimmee, FL
34742-1929.


an Federal Reserve Bank. Give
them a written description of
how, when and where you got it
and who gave it to you. The fine
for passing a counterfeit bill may
be as much as $5,000 and/or im-
prisonment for up to 15 years.
If you would like a free bro-
chure on "Counterfeit," call the
Comptroller's hotline number at
1-800-848-3792, Monday
through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m.


Guess Who

Got A Job!


308 Williams Ave.


227-1278


Fin-Fish Bycatch Issue


Is Being Investigated


Your Ticket to

Stay in the Know


All the world is a stage and something
different's playing every day.


Turn to your newspaper for a front
row seat and get a better view of the
major players and the changing scene.


Pick up the ticket and get in the act.
And remember, there's no business
like the "know" business.




Call 227-1278 to Subscribe!




THE STAR
Your Hometown Newspaper


-


Johnson's "11111RE and
BUILDING SUPPLY
Phone 229-8232 212 Williams Ave.


a










PAGE 8A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991


DOES YOUR BABY
HAVE NORMAL HEARING?
Watch out for early warnings about possible hearing
problems. A newborn baby usually becomes startled at a
sharp nearby handclap. At three months he should blink his
eyes or move at unexpected loud noises. At 12 months,
babies can hear and turn toward a soft voice three feet
away.
If you suspect trouble, consult your physician. We carry
many medicines Doctors specify for ear problems. Babies'
ears are sensitive and should always get speedy medical
attention.
"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US with their prescriptions, health
needs and other pharmacy products. We consider this trust a privilege
and a duty. May we be your personal family pharmacy?"


Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe
Convenient Drive-Through Window u,
Revlon Cosmetics 229-8771
.40 QjUULwm


Bound for State


Port St. Joe's 11 and 12 year
olds advanced to the State Dixie
Youth baseball tournament for
the fourth consecutive year, as
they downed Lynn Haven Satur-
day evening in the championship
game 14-5.
Earlier in the week they had
defeated Mid City 6-2, Parker 8-2,
Lynn Haven 8-7, Callaway 14-5
before losing to Lynn Haven 14-2
Friday evening, leaving Lynn
Haven and St. Joe each with a
loss and forcing a championship
game Saturday evening. The local
team played the late game each
evening at the Callaway complex,
with game times ranging from
9:00 to 10:00 p.m. They defeated
Callaway Thursday evening but
rain delays and travel time put
the local youngsters home at 2:30
Friday morning. The long hours
took their toll as they lost to Lynn
Haven Friday evening 14-2.
The locals demonstrated that
they could bounce back, as they


Dove Hunting Season Changed

to Include Thanksgiving Holiday


Sportsmen who hunt mourn-
ing and white-winged doves can
enjoy the sport during Thanksgiv-
ing, a holiday which is synony-
mous with hunting for many Flor-
ida families. At its July 19
meeting, the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission
changed dates for the second
phase of the three-phase dove
season to include the Thanksgiv-
ing holiday weekend.
Mourning and white-winged
dove season for 1991 will be:
First phase: October 5-27
Second phase: November 16 -
December 1
Third phase: December 14 -
January 12, 1992.
The Commission's action re-
quired an amendment to Florida
Wildlife Code 39-13.008, which
had been advertised for amend-


ment, as legally required.
"Commission staff did not an-
ticipate changing the second
phase of dove season," said
James Antista, Commission attor-
ney. "However, the change was
one proposed by a citizen at the
meeting. The change in dates is
biologically sound and is in the
sportsman's interest; therefore,
the Commissioners voted to
amend the rule at the July meet-
ing. Action at the Commission's
September meeting would not
have provided adequate public
notice."
Antista said sportsmen will be
able to hunt mourning and white-
winged doves during future
Thanksgiving holidays, unless
there is some biological reason for
the Commissioners to adjust the
season. For information about


hunting in Florida, contact your
county tax collector, your hunting
license subagent or the Commis-
sion for a copy of the 1991-92
Hunting Handbook and Regula-
tions Summary. Rules governing
the taking of mourning and
white-winged doves are included
in a Commission pamphlet which
will be available in early Septem-
ber.

Athletic

Physicals.
All boys and girls interested
in athletics for the 1991-92
school year will be offered free
physical at Port St. Joe High
School gym on the following dates
listed below. You must have a
parent's permission to take a
physical and these forms are
available in the front office at the
high school.
August 1: Varsity and Junior
Varsity Football 8 a.m. to 12
p.m.; Jr. High Football 1 p.m. to
4 p.m.
August 8: Cheerleaders 8 to 9
a.m.; Girls Basketball, Cross
Country, Volleyball, Softball and
Track 9 to 10 a.m.;
Boys Basketball (Varsity,
J.V., Jr. High) 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.;
Baseball, Golf 1 to 2 p.m.; Wres-
tling, Weightlifting 2 to 3 p.m.;
Track and Cross Country 3 to 4
p.m.


jumped on Lynn Haven in the
championship game.
ST. JOE 8, LYNN HAVEN 7
Wednesday evening St. Joe
and Lynn Haven played a nip and
tuck game with St. Joe scoring
and Lynn Haven playing catch
up. St. Joe scored three runs in
the second with Lynn Haven
answering with three in the bot-
tom of the inning. Each team
scored one runm in the third
inning, and St. Joe put two on
the board in the top of the fourth.
Lynn Haven tied the game in the
bottom of the fifth with two, and
St. Joe went ahead in the top of
the sixth scoring two runs on
back to back homeruns by Ryan
Yeager and Brian Jenkins.
Lynn Haven led off in the bot-
tom of the sixth with a single by
Seymour, and pitcher Ryan Yeag-
er struck out the next batter for
the first out. After walking the
next batter, Stephenson doubled
scoring Seymour. Yeager struck
out the next batter for the second
out, and intentionally walked the
clean-up hitter Jeremy Maddox to
load the bases. A called strike
ended the game.
Yeager went the distance for
St. Joe giving up seven runs on
five hits, while striking out 13
and walking five.
St. Joe collected seven hits
with Yeager and Brian Jenkins
each with a solo homerun; Mike
Groh and Doyle Crosby two sin-
gles each; and Wayne Summers


had a double.
St. Joe
Lynn Haven


03 1202-873
03102 1-753


ST. JOE 14, CALLAWAY 5
St. Joe put Callaway out of
the double elimination tourna-
ment Thursday evening 14-5 in
the second game. Lynn Haven
eliminated Apalachicola 13-10 in
the early game of the evening. A
Dixie Youth record was set that
evening as an 11-year-old Apa-
lachicola girl hit a grand slam
homerun.
The 14-5 score was not indic-
ative of the closeness of this
game, which stood at 5-3 with St.
Joe ahead at the end of the fifth


Friends of St.
Joseph Bay to
Meet August 6
The Friends of St. Joseph's
Bay will meet at 7:00 p,m. Tues-
day, August 6 at the Gulf County
Public Library.
This will be their regular
monthly meeting.
All interested persons are in-
vited to attend.


inning. The Callaway team
couldn't get it together after a 45-
minute rain delay and committed
two errors on the rain slick field,
as St. Joe took advantage of the
walks being issued by the Calla-
way pitcher to combine with their
hits to score nine runs in the
sixth.
Rocky Quinn began the game
on the mound for St. Joe before
being relieved in the fourth inning
by Doyle Crosby. Brian Jenkins
pitched the sixth inning for St.
Joe.
St. Joe's bats banged out 11
hits, led by Yeager with two dou-
bles and Quinn with a double
and a single. Summers had
another double for St. Joe, and
D. C. Jones, Derrick Tillman,
Doyle Crosby, Jenkins, Michael
Groh and Tyson Pittman each
had a single.
St. Joe 013019-14 112
Callaway 000212- 5 42
ST. JOE 2, LYNN HAVEN 14
Port St. Joe suffered its first
loss of the tournament Friday
evening as they committed three
errors in the first inning allowing
Lynn Haven to jump ahead by six
runs. From that point it was all
Lynn Haven as they added five
runs in the third and three runs
in the fourth inning. St. Joe only
managed to put one run across
the plate in the bottom of the fifth
and sixth innings.
Four young men pitched for
St. Joe with the starting pitcher,
Yeager, getting the loss. Crosby,
Jenkins and Jarred Patterson
also pitched. Patterson was the
only St. Joe pitcher who didn't
give up any runs or hits.
Lynn Haven 605300-1460
St. Joe 000011- 2.6 3
WIN CHAMPIONSHIP 14-5
It was a different St. Joe team
which took the field Saturday eve-
ning as they jumped on top of
Lynn Haven pitcher, Wesley
Bums, for seven runs in the top
of the first inning.
Bums walked the first three
St. Joe batters, Jeese Colbert,
Jenkins and Yeager before Crosby
flied out for the first out. Wayne
Summers reached first on an
error by the shortstop scoring
Colbert. Tyson Pittman and
Michael Groh each hit back to
back two run singles, and two
consecutive errors by Lynn Haven
allowed Patterson and Dixon to
reach base and advance runners.
Jenkins' RBI single ended the
scoring for St. Joe in the first
inning.
St. Joe added five runs in the
third inning and two in the fifth.
Even though Lynn Haven outhit
St. Joe, eight to six, they only
managed one run in the bottom


of the third and four in the bot-
tom of the sixth. Four costly
errors and 16 walks by Lynn
Haven pitching set the tone for
the ball game.
Brian Jenkins not only
pitched all six innings but also
was three for three at the plate
with two homeruns and a single.
Other hitters for St. Joe were the
middle of the lineup, Wayne Sum-
mers, Tyson Pittman and Michael
Groh, each with a single in the
crucial first inning.
Port St. Joe 70502 0-14 6 4
Lynn Haven 001004- 584
STATE BOUND
The District IV champions
will depart Sunday morning for
Belleview (just south of Ocala).
Opening ceremonies and a ban-
quet will be held Sunday evening,
with St. Joe playing the District 2
champion out of the Pensacola
area Monday at 6:00 p.m. The
games will be aired live by
WMTO.
Anyone wishing to make con-
tributions to help defray expenses
for the St. Joe team may contact
Warren Yeager, Billy Stephens or
John Crosby.
TEAM MEMBERS
Members of the 1991 District
IV championship team are: Jesse
Colbert, Doyle Crosby, Matt Dix-
on, Michael Groh, Brian Jenkins,
D. C. Jones, Jarred Patterson,
Tyson Pittman, Rocky Quinn,
Russell Russ, Wayne Summers,
Derrick Tillman, Ryan Yeager,
and alternate Russell Young.


E Trvrf~ flEN e ~


From left, Mack Kilpatrick H and Justin Miller.

Local Youth Places in Karate Match


Justin Miller recently compet-
ed in the 1991 USKA World Kara-
te Championships in New Or-
leans with his instructor, Mack
Kilpatrick II. Justin placed world
champion in both weapons and
Kata (forms), second in team
fighting and received a medal in
individual fighting. Mack received
world champion in both individu-
al fighting and NBL team fighting,


third in USKA team fighting and
a medal in weapons.
Justin is the nine-year-old
son of Daniel and Tunnie Miller of
Wewahitchka. Mack is the 15-
year-old son of Mack and Linda
Kilpatrick of Callaway and is
ranked second degree black belt.
Justin is also instructed by Mack
Kilpatrick, Sr., a second degree
black belt.


U~~~wg on


-Views On

'Dental Healtk

FANK D. MAY, D.M.D.


IMPROVING YOUR SMILE


When you're speaking,
which is more visible, your upper
or your lower teeth? If you look
into a mirror, you'll discover that
it's your lower teeth that are
more noticeable. Now smile.
Surprised? Your upper teeth are
more noticeable now.
There's a good chance your
dentist can improve upon your
smile. He can check to see if
your six upper teeth follow the
upward curvature of the LOWER
lip. This means that the two
upper front teeth should be
slightly longer than the teeth
next to them. If they're too
short, they may give your face a
frowning look.
If this is the case, an adjust-
ment can be made to improve


your appearance. If any of your
front teeth are of uneven length,
he can contour their shape to
make them even and to give the
proper accent to your two front
teeth, which should be longer.
Chipped or broken teeth can be
repaired. Any tooth badly dam-
ag-d by decay can be crowned
to protect it and given a natural
look.
Why not let your dentist
check YOUR smile? You've got
everything to gain.
****so
Prepared as a public service
to promote better dental health.
From the office of: FRANK D.
MAY, D.M.D., 319 Williams Ave.,
Phone 227-1123.


I U R- LI IT D3TMEOFF R


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Classes starting soon.

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THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991


Weather Back to Normal


- Wet, Humid and Hot!

Mildew and Spores Are Everywhere


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
Weather patterns have re-
turned to normal in Florida this
year with afternoon rains to keep
humidity high. Drier years just
past have put people off-guard.
But this year, mildew is thriving
outside. Spores from outside
come in on our clothing and hair.
Every time windows or doors are
opened, in come more spores.
Some people are allergic to mil-
dew spores. Such allergies are
sometimes triggered by continual
* exposure to mildew spores.
With mildew spores always
ready to grow in our homes, what
protection is needed to stop mil-


Duncan Returns
from Australian
* Mission Trip

Dr. Dan Duncan, who just re-
turned from a mission group trip
to Australia, related some of his
experiences in the continent
down under, and showed a video
prepared by the district where he
visited to the Rotary Club last
Thursday.
Duncan visited in the north-
east portion of the country, near
the famous Barrier Reef. The
northern portion of the country is
the tropical section. Duncan was
in Fort Douglas, which is where
the rain forest section of the
country joins the Barrier Reef.
The Fort Douglas area is pri-
marily an agricultural area, with
the most common crops being
fruits and sugar cane. Most of the
sugar cane on the continent is
grown in the northeast tropical
section.
The video, of course, made
much of the prevalence of croco-
diles and kangaroos in the coun-
try, but Duncan said he never
saw a wild crocodile during his
entire trip. "I did see a snake
which had his head in the ditch
on one side of the road and his-.-
tail in the ditch on the other
side," Duncan said.
The video showed some
breath-taking scenery in the Fort
Douglas area, much like tropical
Florida, with its lakes, streams,
tropical plants and lush greenery.
Duncan said he spoke to the
Rotary Club in Fort Douglas,
while on his trip. "They meet in a
famous restaurant, which oper-
ates in a huge tent, with all kinds
of animals and birds moving
about," he said. "It's unusual to
be eating and have a bird land on,
a limb beside you or an animal
crawl across your feet."
Duncan left July 2, on his
trip, taking 30 hours to fly to
Brisbane. He returned to Port St.
Joe, Friday, July 19.
Guests of the club were Brian
Bell of Gainesville, Georgia and
Jerry Gaskin of Wewahitchka.


Call 227-1278 to
Place Your
Classified Ad


dew from growing and spreading?
The watch words are clean and
dry.
Mildew must have nutrients
to grow on. The sources of mildew
nutrients are many. Any food
spills on carpets, smears on door
sills from sticky or oily fingers,
soap build up on shower walls,
dirt on clothes, dust on air condi-
tioner filters, the drain pan under
the refrigerator, even the air con-
ditioning ducts that channel air
to each home can be hot spots for
mildew to grow.
The first step in avoiding mil-
dew is to plan a program to keep
surfaces clean a regular rou-
tine. How often specific cleaning
jobs' needs to be done may be dif-
ferent for each family depending
on the family's lifestyle. Here are
some general guidelines in your
anti-mildew campaign:
Don't let bathrooms become
mildew gardens. That means reg-
ular cleaning before mildew is vis-
ible. By the time mildew is visible
it has produced enough spores to
contaminate the air in your whole
house. The air conditioning sys-
tem will see the spores are trans-
planted to other areas of the
house.
Change air conditioner filters
frequently. Once a month may be
frequently enough for many
households, but if there are chil-
dren in a family, or pets, check
more frequently.
Check the drip pan under
your frost-free refrigerator and
freezer. Dust and dampness there
can produce enough mildew and
spores to contaminate all the air
in your home.
Wipe up spills as they occur.
Especially clean carpet spills and
spots quickly and thoroughly.
Mildew loves living in the cozy
carpet pile. Vacuum regularly,
too. Dust and dirt, good mildew
nutrients, are harder to remove
after they work down into the
pile.
Wash off finger marks on
door sills, even a slight oily resi-
due on wooden, metal or plastic
chair arms where hands touch
can get slimy with mildew under
severe conditions.
Don't let dirty laundry pile
up. Soiled clothes, towels, etc.
mildew quickly when conditions
are right.
Don't put sweaty clothes back
into closets. The small amount of
moisture they hold will make
your closet smell stale and mus-
ty.
Mildew needs moisture to
grow. The big question is "How
can you keep a home in warm,
humid Florida dry?
Air conditioning removes
moisture from air, but if moisture
comes into a house faster than
air conditioning can remove it,
mildew will show up and it will
spread. Air conditioning can usu-
ally remove the moisture pro-
duced inside a home through
cooking, cleaning, bathing and
other water related activities. The
moisture we need to be most con-
cerned about in Florida's warm
and humid climate comes into a
house from outside in one of sev-
eral ways and there are special
guidelines to cut down or prevent
moisture from coming into a
home for each way:


Every time people open out-
side doors to come and go, mois-
ture moves inside. People must
be free to come and go, but it will
help reduce moisture, if they
open and close doors promptly.
Air enters homes through
cracks and crevices. Just look
around windows and doors. If
you can see daylight anywhere,
that is an invitation to moisture
you can stop with weather strip-
ping. See your friendly hardware
store for the right type of weather
stripping for your window or door
type.
A fireplace has a large open-
ing that air and moisture can
come through. Make sure the
damper (and glass doors, if
present) are closed.
Bath and kitchen exhaust
fans remove moisture and odors
from these rooms. That's good.
But they also create a negative


For All of Your Printing Needs, Sec Us at
The Star.


Roy Lee
Carter


County
Extension
Director


COSJ1N ?IXURAKIC


'I -


pressure in a house that pulls
warm, humid outside air into oth-
er parts of the house. That's not
so good. Usually a bath fan can
remove most of the excess mois-
ture put into the air during show-
ering or bathing in about 10 min-
utes. Wet towels and wet walls
will continue to put moisture into
a bathroom for hours, but long
fan operation can bring in more
moisture than it removes.
Keeping your home mildew-
safe during warm humid weather
requires a routine that is not diffi-
cult, but requires team effort.
Call a family council. What can
each person do to help keep your
home clean and dry to avoid the
hard work of cleaning mildew, the
cost of repairing and repainting
after mildew damage to a home
and its furnishings, and the bad
effects of long-term exposure to
mildew spores?


0S


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* Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages -Group *Life *Boat
*Hospitalization *Mobile Homes

COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
3Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


Now Under Construction

THE COTTAGES AT...

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Pre-Construction Offering
For A Limited Time
Furnished Models Starting at 0
* Single Family Homes
* 2 Bedrooms, 2 Full Baths
* Landscaped Lot Included
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(904) 229-2777 or (800) 624-3964

THE COTTAGES AT BARRIER DUNES
Star Route 1, Box 223 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


___


L PAW!, 10


BACK






TO






SCHOOL


PAGE IB


0










PAGE 2B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991



GCSB Announces Its Free and Reduced Price Meal Policy


The Gulf County School Board has announced
its policy for free and reduced price meals for chil-
dren unable to pay the full price of meals served un-
der the National School Lunch and School Breakfast
programs. The District's administrative office has a
copy of the policy, which may be reviewed by any in-
terested party.
The following household size and income criteria
will be used for determining eligibility:
FLORIDA INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES
FOR FREE AND REDUCED PRICE MEALS
Effective 7/1/91 to 6/30/91


Household
Size
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
For each
additional
member
add
Household
Size
1


Annually
8,606
11,544
14,482
17,420
20,358
23,296
26,234
29,172


+2,938
Reduced Price M
Annually
12,247


2
3
4
5
6
7
8
For each
additional
member,
add


16,428
20,609
24.790
28,971
33,152
37,333
41,514


+4,181


1,369
1,718
2,066
2,415
2,763
3,112
3,460


+349


Children from families whose income
low the levels shown are eligible for free


316
397
477
558
638
718
798


+81
is at or be-
or reduced


Monthly Weekly price meals.
718 166 Application forms are being sent to all homes
962 222 with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for
1,207 279 free or reduced price meals, households should fill
1,452 335 out the application and return it to the school. Addi-
1,697 392 tional copies are available at the principal's office in
1,942 448 each school. The information provided on the appli-
2,187 505 cation will be used for the purpose of determining el-
2,431 561 igibility and may be verified at any time during the
school year by school or other program officials.
Households that receive Food Stamps or AFDC
"Aid to Families with Dependent Children" are re-
+245 +57 quired to list on the application only the child's
teal Scale name and food stamp or AFDC case number, printed
name of adult household member and signature of
Monthly Weekly adult household member.
1,021 236 For the school officials to detennine eligibility, all


other households must provide the following infor-
mation listed on the application:
(1) The total monthly household income must be
listed by the amount received by each household
member receiving income and the type of income it
is (such as wages, child support, etc.):
(2) Names of all household members;
(3) Social Security number of the adult signing
the application or the word "none" for this household
member if they do not have a Social Security num-
ber; and
(4) The signature of an adult household member
certifying that the information provided is correct.
Households that list income information and re-
ceive meal benefits must report to the school any de-
creases in household size and any increases in in-
come of over $50 per month or $600 per year.
Households that list a food stamp or AFDC case
number must report to the school when food stamps
or AFDC is no longer received.
Applications may be submitted at any time dur-
ing the year.
Under the provisions of the free and reduced
price meal policy, the principal of his/her designee
will review applications and determine eligibility. If a
parent or guardian is dissatisfied with the ruling of
the official, he may wish to discuss the decision with
the determining official on an informal basis. If the
parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he may
make a request either orally or in writing to Christo-


pier A. Earley, Coordinator of Operations, Gulf
County School Board, Gulf County Courthouse, Port
St. Joe, FL 32456, 227-1204 or 639-2871, for a
hearing to appeal the decision. The policy contains
an outline of the hearing procedure.
If a household member becomes unemployed or
if the household size changes, the school should be
contacted. Such changes may make the children of
the household eligible for reduced price meals, or for
additional benefits such as free meals for them, if
the household income falls at or below the levels
shown above.
In certain cases, foster children are also eligible
for these benefits. If a household has foster children
living with them and wishes to apply for such meals
for them, the household should contact the school
for more information.
Unless indicated, otherwise on the application,
the information on the free and reduced price meal
application may be used by the school system in de-
tennining whether the child is eligible for other edu-
cational programs.
In the operation of child feeding programs ad-
ministered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, no
child will be discriminated against because of race,
color, sex, national origin, age or handicap. If any
member of a household believes they have been dis-
criminated against, they should write immediately to
the Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
20250.


PSJHS Schedules New Student


Orientation for Tuesday, August 13


The administration and staff
of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School
is extending a welcome to par-
ents, seventh grade students, and
all new students to the annual
Student Orientation.
Parents and students will be
able to meet administrators,


teachers, staff and go through
their schedules during this time.
Orientation will be held in the
high school commons area from
9:00 to 11:30 a.m. ET on Tues-
day, August 13. Transportation
for orientation will be as follows.
Mrs. Gant's bus will pick up stu-


dents at 8:30 a.m. in North Port
St. Joe. Her first stop will be
Apollo Street and Avenue A. The
bus will then proceed to Avenue A
and North Park Avenue, Avenue A
and Main Street, and her last
stop will be Avenue D and Main
Street.-


School Starts Wednesday,


Aug. 12; Schedules Listed


On Wednesday, August 14,
the Gulf County School Board
will begin the 1991-92 school
year.
Below you will find a bell and
bus schedule for both Port St. Joe
and Wewahitchka.
Port St. Joe
Bell Schedule:
Highland View Elementary:


starting time 7:55 a.m. ET; dis-
missal time 2:30 p.m. ET
Port St. Joe Elementary:
starting time 7:50 a.m. ET; dis-
missal time 2:30 p.m. ET
Port St. Joe High: 8:05 a.m.
ET, dismissal time 2:44 p.m. ET
Bus Routes
Jeanette. 'Antley,, bus 10,
White City, starting approximate-


FREE HEARING TEST
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offering to anyone 55 or older a
few hearing test. If you have
been exposed to loud factory
noise, if people seem to mum-
ble or you ask people to repeat
what they have said, come see
us at:
JAMES W. DAME
Hearing Aid Specialistz -- '


ST. JOE MOTEL
501 Monument Ave.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 6
9:00 A.M. 12:00 NOON
This is our regular monthly Service Center and we will service anyone's
hearing aid free of charge. We have the lowest battery prices in the area.
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Bay Eye & Surgical Centeri

1 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT:
1-800-227-5704
~m= = lm m m mm nmW map- nom-N m- mmmmmm


ly 7:10 a.m.; Barbara Creel, bus
43, the Beaches, starting at 7:14
a.m.; Betty Curlee, bus 28, St.
Joe Beach, starting at 7:13 a.m.;
Betty Fain, bus 42, Mexico
Beach, starting approximately'
7:05 a.m.; Mae Ella Gant, bus 5,
Avenue' B and Avenue C at ap-j,
proximately. 7:3D .a.m.; Versa,
McCloud, b'u "'7, Avenue D and
Avenue E at approximately 7:30
a.m.
Wanda Nixon, White City and
Howard Creek on bus 50 starting
at approximately 6:40 a.m.; Wan-
da Pate, bus 44, Overstreet, 6:58
a.m.; Linda Purswell, bus 47, In-
dian Pass at 7:10 a.m.; Hazel
Simmons at M.K. Lewis at 7:00
a.m. on bus 54; Priscilla Taylor,
Avenue A and Millville at 7:20
a.m. on bus 14; Shirley Williams,
the Beaches on bus 52 at 7:09
a.m.; and Pat Walker on bus 15,
Avenue F at 7:20 a.m.
Wewahitchka
Bell Schedule

Wewahitchka Elementary
starting at 7:55 a.m. CT and dis-
missing at 2:30 p.m. CT
Wewahitchka High will take'
in at 7:54 a.m. CT and dismiss at.
2:40 p.m. CT.
Bus routes will be Betty
Cleckley on bus 9, Dam Road
starting at approximately 6:55
a.m. CT; bus 51 TBA, Overstreet
at 6:40 a.m. CT; Phyllis Gortman,
bus 8 at 6:25 a.m. CT and bus 30
to Methodist Hill in the afternoon;
Annie Hall, bus 21 to Stonfe Mill
Creek at 6:45 a.m. CT; Lee Hall
on bus 53 to Dalkeith at 6:38
a.m. CT; Peggy Revell on bus 45
to Honeyville at 6:50 a.m. CT; Pat
Griffin, bus 48 to M.K. Lewis at
6:30 a.m. CT; bus 2 will have a
substitute driver to Whispering
Pines in the afternoon; Rosa Lee
Williams on bus 4 to River Road
at 7:20 a.m. CT.'
The bus routes for both We-
wahitchka and Port St. Joe will
begin the 1991-92 school year us-
ing the same schedule as was
used for 1990-91 school year.


MESSAGE

SERVICE


Mrs. Antley will pick up stu-
dents in White City at 8:30 a.m.
Her only stop will be at Ham-
mond's Store. If seventh graders
live beyond White City, they
should call Mrs. Antley prior to
August 10th at 229-6887 to let
her know.
Beaches and Overstreet stu-
dents will be picked up by Mrs.
Curlee at 8:00 a.m. First stop will
be Canal Street and Overstreet.
Her second stop will be Beacon
Hill to Mexico Beach turning
around at Hideway Harbor. She
will also stop at places on St. Joe
Beach where children will be
standing on Americus and Bay,
Gulf, Santa Anna and Alabama,
Santa Anna and Georgia, and
Bay and Pine streets.
All students in Highland View
should meet the bus at Highland
View Elementary.
Mrs. Purswell will be in Jones
Homesteadat 8:30 a.m. The bus
will go' through Simmohis Bayou,
making stops where students are
standing. The bus will continue
on to Pic's Store where it will turn
around and come back through
Jones Homestead.
Any student living beyond
Pic's Store should call the Opera-
tions Office at 227-1204.

Free Seminar on
Minority Certification
The Florida State University
Small Business Development
Center, Gulf Coast Community
College Lifelong Learning Center
and the Department of Defense
Contracts Administration Region
are cosponsoring a free seminar,
"How to Obtain Minority Certifica-
tion", on Wednesday, August 7.
The seminar will be held at FSU,
Panama City Campus, Room 7,
from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. CT.
If you are a minority-owned
small business selling your prod-
ucts/services to state/federal
government agencies, you may be
qualified for certification on spe-
cial programs. Attend this semi-
nar to find out
There is no charge for the
seminar, but preregistration is re-
quired by calling FSU-SBDC at
(904) 872-4655. Seating is limit-
ed.


SSay You Saw It In
S The Star


Computerized Wheel

ALIGNMENT
Complete 2 and 4 Wheel
Alignments

$2450 and Up


iew uyster o ppings

Live Blue Crab Special
S*Jamaican Jerked Chicken
*Oysters


Introducing this week
Hickory Smoked Barbecued Cornish Hens

A Taste Sensation!




ST. JOSEPH TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO.
INTRODUCES THREE NEW.CALLING FEATURES
--St.-Joseph Telephone --and Telegraph
Company introduces' three' redW' Calling
Features:
*Teen Service Now you can know who
the call is for before you answer the phone.
You can have two telephone numbers as-
signed to the same line, each with a distinc-
tive ring.
*Warm Line (In Port St. Joe only) Within
up to 20 seconds after taking the phone off
the hook, a predesignated number is auto-
matically dialed. When injury or panic
makes it difficult to dial an emergency num-
ber, help can be reached ,edsijy.
*Cancel Call Waiting Now When you
have a call that you don't want interrupted,
you can prevent a second call from break-
ing into your line.
Free installation until September 30, 1991,
for these new features plus Touchtone, Call
Waiting, Call Forwarding, Speed Dial, and
Three Way Calling.
Call the Business Office to place an order
at 229-7231 or 1-800-772-7288.


Complete Line of
Passenger & L.T.
RADIALS-

BOAT TRAILER TIRES

GALVANIZED WHEELS


ROTATE & BALANCE
L.T. Tires
$18.95 Slghtly
Oil, Lube & Filter....... 18.95 & UpHigher
Oil, Lube & Filter........18.95 & Up


CALL JEFF OR BOBBY
229-6709


'BOSS OYSTER'


Apalachicola


Water Street


Continuing with our many


THE TREAD MILL


^il


Aw,


~~~a~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~g~9~~e~~~e~~~~e~~


i








We're Proud of Gulf County's


1 Junior Gourmets

Do you have a cnld who IelDs out in tne kilcnen? TABLERITE QUALITY LYKES
We're prou d of our hometown parents wno take the time to teacn
their children cooking skills that they will use the rest of their lives.
If your child wants to expand his or her cooking experience, why
not consider going to the library and borrowing one of the many
fine cookbooks for children? These cookbooks are filled with sim- S M
ple, delicious recipes geared to a child's understanding and de-
signed to help build our child's confidence in the kitchen. Maybe a
brother or sister, or even a neighborhood friend could combine
forces and make the family dinner one evening. It just might be so
successful... you'll make it a weekly event.
We're proud of our hometown junior gourmets regardless of their
accomplishments .. .and we're proud of our hometown. iMs


TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH
Pork Neckbones


TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH BOSTON BUTT
Pork Roast ..,........... Lb.
TABLE RITE QUALITY SMOKED
. Ham Hocks ............... Lb.
TABLERITE QUALITY BEEF 10-12 LB. AVG. SLICED FREE
Whole Sirloin Tip ...... Lb.
FRYER
Liver or Gizzards ...... Lb.
BRYAN
Franks ....,..............12 oz.


391
$139

$119
$189

691
$129


* IGA TABLERITE $1 39
Bologna ................. 16 oz.


HICKORY HOUSE FAMILY PAK
Sliced Bacon
ABERDEEN HOT OR MILD
Roll Sausage
IGA
Cooked Ham


....u...u~uLb.

...ifim.m. l16oz.

****lOoz...


IGA $ 39
Cooked Salami ...... Ioz
FRESH FROZEN
Baking Hens ............ Lb. 791


EI Fl
P'PEPS

Umiti R'~ Bouy Item with ki;'ro' $20 Order en~titles YOU to two
ft~u4 a plr$3 6Chise bvitil"*utcI 3ou isi byl~m.Excluding Cgr
*ttos Tobcoo Products and Lottery Sales


Check These Delicious Products by Mr. Turkey
MR. TURKEY FRANKS ....................... 12 o 1.09
MR. TURKEY 1/4 BREAST .................. lb. $3.79


MR. TURKEY


VARIETY PAK ............... 12. .09


:~s]4I~U :11km


IGA DOZEN


3 PAK KRAFT 7.25 OZ.
MAC. & CHEESE


SMed. Eggs 'A
SUnmit i Bonus ,By Item with $10 Food Order. $20 Order entitles you to two
I ftems, and $30 purchase entitles you to 3 bonus buy Items. Excluding Cigar-
Settes, Teobcco Products and Lottery Sales


P Uer Towels
Linet 1 Bon" my m with $10 Food Order, $20 Order entities you to two
Itehvs, and $30. piahasntitles you to 3 bonus buy "ems. Excluding Cigar-
ettes, Tobaeco Producta arid Lottery Ses-.


............ 1.49


NATURE'S BEST 12 OZ.
SNACK CRACKERS ............79o
VAN CAMP 16 OZ.
PORK N BEANS ................. 39o
SUMMERTIME 64 OZ.
APPLE JUICE .................... 19,
IGA 18 OZ. SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY
PEANUT BUTTER ........... 1.69
BETTY CROCKER LIGHT FAMILY 20.5 OZ.
FUDGE BROWNIE ...........1.39
GLAD 10 CT. .
TRASH BAGS .... ......1.49
MANCO 12 OZ.
CORNED BEEF .................1.69


2 LB. BAG
PERFECTION RICE ..............59
LGA 13 OZ.
CRISP RICE CEREAL .......1.29
MUELLER'S 16 OZ.
ELBOW MACARONI ........... 59
MUELLER'S REGULAR AND THIN 16 OZ.
SPAGHETTI ..................... 590
MAZOLA GALLON
CORN OIL ...................... 5. 99
FRITO-LAY 9
SANTITOS ........................ 99
PACKER LABEL 16 OZ.
STANDARD TOMATOES .. 399
HO BOY 40 OZ.
SYRUP ...................... 1.69


IDAIRY PROUCT


I FZ FOS


1 qb.
Squeeze Parkay


LIGHT N LIVELY 16 OZ.
Cottage ir
CHESE ......... J.


INTERSTATE CRINKLE 5 LB. RA
French Fries


RAINBOW FARMS CITRUS & 64 OZ.
29 Fruit Punch ............ 9 9 0
FISHER PRE-PRICED AT $1.19 10.6Z. 9 9
Sandwich Mate...... 1


McKENZIE 16 OZ.


a a .


I .


IGA 12 OZ.


$119


Broccoli 06 WHIP A99
CUTS ............ TOPPING ...... 99


RAINBOW PAK
Grapes


SWEET
Nectarines .............
SWEET GEORGIA TRAY PAK


Peaches


JUMBO
Honeydew Melon ...


TROPICAL
Mangos


lb. 99"

lb. 790

. Ib. 49

ea. $229


each


TROPICAL
Pineapple ............... ea.
CANADIAN WAXED
Rutabagas ............. Ib.
ROMAINE
Lettuce .... .......... head


990




391

79"


David Rich's
FOODLINERS...
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.
Prices Good July 31-Aug. 6 t 5A .


RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


BULK RATE POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahltchka, FL 32465


mm.... Lb.


$129



$2 39


....mm.u....u..


- ~~----


..............


WEEMEMMEMOMMUMM









PAGE 4B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991


By Rev. Jerry Huft


All of Life


- Even Worship Service


- Is Hard On All of Us; Be Patient


I have a vision of the perfect
worship service. It goes like this.
We begin with music that stirs
the soul. Every choir member is
in tune. Every guest is warmly
greeted and shown around. The
prayers are sonorous and uplift-
ing. Everyone is attentive to the
sermon, which by the way is mas-
'terfully delivered. The children
are quiet and no one falls asleep.


And of course, everything is over
with in just one houri
Needless to say, we would all
join together afterward for dinner
on the grounds. We would eat
fried mullet along with those deli-
cious casseroles and desserts,
but we would have no harm done
to our waist lines or circulatory
csstemso A We would it Oet to knowr r


yone another better and we
one another better and we w


You are always welcome and visitors are desired
St. James' Episcopal Church
309 Sixth Street.* Port St. Joe
EjpiscopA
++.- -SERVICES-
Each Sunday.................. 7:30 and 11:00 a.
\ / Sunday School................................ 9:45 a.
Jf.RCh The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor


Qtch Hie
St IHE UNrrED NETHoo~s1TctiunmH


Constitution andfMonument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p
Morning Worship.....11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............... 9:30 a
Fellowship ..........5:30 p.m. Thursday ...............7:30 p


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


all be glad that we had wor-
shipped God together.
This vision has yet to be ful-


ents. I know that if I treat them
with love, respect, and compas-
sion. they will grow out of their


Toward Understanding
Rev. Jerry Huft, Rector St. James and St. John's Churches


would filled. The reality of life is that we
seldom come to church in an atti-
tude that would make such a ser-
vice possible. People are tired be-
at cause they are on shift work,
were up with a baby, watched a
late movie, are trying to fill a posi-
tion in the job market and be a
homemaker at the same time, or
just plain don't feel good.
There will never be a perfect
worship service this side of resur-
.m. reaction day. So we might as well
m. get used to it and adjust our
thinking.
When the church comes to-
gether in worship, it brings the
world along for the ride. We bring
our stress, our tiredness, our-
fears, our feelings of inadequacy,
and our impatience into the wor-
ship setting.
God has taught me to see
things in a new way. He has
changed my mind about distrac-
Stions.


.m.

L.M.


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


"The Exciting Place to Worship""


f First Baptist Church
S102 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Florida

SW HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
-- JAMES ENFINGER, Music/Youth
J2


W


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD- OUTREACH CENTER...
-I' .'- The Family Qb t ihu u- '.'
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe;-Flordia-'Church Phone 229-8137 .'
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDTUTfAY Write the Church.


7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellow-
Ohhin


"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM.1080 Tune in Every Sunday at 8:45 a.m.
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade


~'1~


We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place


BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ...........7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING...............11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ................ 5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor


KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children


Bible Study
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


ALAN STEWART
Min. of Education
& Youth


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


ONE NATION

UNDER GOD

r-----------------
I This is our FREE GIFT to you from the Churches of Christ
Learn more about Christ and His church with a free Bible Study Course by mail.
Or fill out the coupon and mail to:
Call toll-free One Nation Under God
4 P.O. Box 3273
1-800-245-9010 Cookeville, TN 38502

(Please print all information)

Name Phone

Address P.O. Box

City State Zip
L -------------------------

This Could Be A New Life For You!

Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the comer of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
P.O. Box 758 Port St. Joe. FL 32456


When I look out at the con-
gregation I see a full house even
when there may be a lot of empty
seats. I know that the Lord will
have whom he will. And I know
he will work with whatever we
bring him.
Noisy children don't bother
me as much as they do their par-


Planert Assumes
Squad Command
Air Force Lt. Col. Michael F.
Planert has assumed command of
the 1551st Flying Training
Squadron at Kirtland Air Force
Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
He is the son of June Ange-
lone of Gibsonburg, Ohio.
His wife, Melissa, is the.
daughter of retired Air Force Lt.
Col. Andy and Barbara C. Ander-
son of Rural Route 1, Port St.
Joe.
The colonel is a 1973 gradu-
ate of 'Gibsonburg High School,
and a 1976 graduate of Embry-
Riddle Aeronautical University,
Daytona Beach.
In 1985 he earned his mas-
ter's degree from Webster Univer-
sity, St. Louis.

Warrender Ends
ROTC Training
Jeffrey B. Warrender has
completed a U.S. Air Force ROTC
field training encampment at
Lackland Air Force Base, San An-
tonio, Texas.
The summer curriculum con-
sists of orientation on jet aircraft,
career opportunities, human rela-
tions education, and equal oppor-
tunity training. Physical fitness
and survival training is also em-.
phasized. The field training is
normally. attended by cadets be-
tween their second and third year
of college.
The cadet is a student at Kan-
sas State University, Manhattan.
He is the son of Gary R. War-
render of Mexico Beach, and Jan-
et F. Sanchez of Derby, Kansas.
Warrehder is a 1987 graduate
of Bishop Carrol High School,
Wichita, Kansas.

Maddox Completes
Officer's Course
Second Lt. Mitchell E. Mad-
dox has graduated from the com-








(USA)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP ... 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL ........ 11 a.m.
Nursery Available
SERMON:
Faith Afloat or Standing Firm
Minister Rev. Wm. C. Cowfer
Exec. of Presbytery of Fla.
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden,
Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756


noisy stage.
Youth who talk or show re-
sentment on their faces give me
reason to be more fervent in' my
prayers. I too talked and resented
being told what to do when I
passed through that stage. And I
know that somebody prayed for
me.
When an older, person, or a
tired mother, or a sleepy shift
worker nods off, I don't feel of-
fended. I know that the Lord can
speak voiceless sermons to the
hearts of those who have felt their
stress roll away in the comfort of,
God's house.
The world is hard on us, but
we often harder on ourselves. The
church is the one place where we
should expect understanding.
Every church goer needs to be pa-
tient and forbearing with the dis-
tractions we encounter when we
assemble in worship. We should
be the last to rub salt into the'
wounds of a troubled person's
spirit.
Remember this the next time
a child rhythmically kicks the
back of your seat. Or the person'
next to you sings off key. Or,
when someone behind you whis-'
pers. Be patient, say a prayer un-
der your breath.,, and remember
God has called. that person too.


munications-computer systems
programming and analysis officer
course at Keesler Air, Force Base,
Biloxi, Mississippi.
Graduates learned program
analysis design, software docu-
mentation, maintenance acquisi-
tion, and configuration manage-
ment.
He is the son of Calvin C. and
Joyce D. Maddox of Wewahitch-


Take Safety Along to Help'

Enjoy Your Summer Trip;


Many Americans will take to
the road on day trips and relaxing
vacations this summer.i"But that
doesn't mean relaxing your atten-
tion to safe driving," says Tony
Nicely, president of Government
Employees Insurance Company
(GEICO).
He offers the following remin-
ders.
*Wear your seat belt every
time you get in the car and be
sure your passengers do the
same. A seat belt provides a bet-
ter than 50 percent chance of
avoiding serious injury and death
in a crash. And seat belt use is
required by law in 39 states and
the District of Columbia.
*Secure, all young children in


ka.
The lieutenant is a 1984
graduate of Wewahitchka High
School. Maddox received a bache-
lor's degree in 1988 from Hun-
tingdon College, Montgomery, Al-
abama.


We have discounts

to help you drive down

the cost of car insurance.
If the cost of your car insurance seems to be heading in the wrong direction,
see if Allstate can help turn things around.
We have discounts that can help you save money.
You can save by having a good driving record. Or by driving a car equipped
with air bags or a foJr-wheel anti-lock brake system: Even by insuring more than one
car with Allstate. A II '-
Which Allstate car insurance discounts do you "l
qualify for? Just give us a call to find out. We'll get your YOU- in goodlianb'.
car insurance costs headed in the right direction. ,teth ruro, ,nV .B. .

GASKIN-GRADDY.
Insurance Company
Call Collect 639-5077 or 639-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
1-800-782-6802
Serving the Panhandle Since 1931


~/ f/j A441 A W*141,111AI


child safety seats. Safety seats
., are more than 70 percent effec-
tive in preventing death and 67
percent effective in preventing
serious injuries in a crash. Child
restraints are required by law in
all 50 states and the District of
Columbia.
*Don't drink and drive. At
those outings where alcohol. Is
served, designate a driver who
doesn't drink in order to provide
a safe ride home for those who
do.
*Drive at or below the posted
speed limit. While speed limits :
may vary, the laws of physics are
constant. As speed increases, the-"
force of a crash increases dramat-
ically. Your chances of serious "
injury or death double with each
10 mph increase, over 40 mph.
'iDon't take a vacation from
common sense behind the wheel,"' '
Nicely says. "By taking a few sim-
ple precautions' you can help
assure that you, your family and -
friends travel safely this summer
and ,throughout the year."


s ip


*-9










U


4 lb. Bag


UGAR
SB I^I


SPECIALS FOR AUG. 1-7
George W. Duren, Owner/Manager
510 5th St. 229-8398


114z,


Limit one
per
customer
with
$20.00 or
more food
order ,


Family Pak Ham 'n All Country
SMOKE SAUSAGE ..b.1.99
Fresh
PORK STEAKS .....Ib. 1.49
Turkey
HAM HALVES........Ib.1.29
Fresh
BAKING HENS..........lb. 79


Select Skinned, Deveined
BEEF LIVER.............. Ib. 89'
Family Pak Choice
SHORT THIGHS....... Ib. 590
Family Pak Choice
DRUMSTICKS ......... b. 490
Family Pak
CHICKEN WINGS.... Ib. 790


..............b. 2 9
While They Last, Lykes
HOT DOGS........... 12 oz. 89
Lykes All Meat
BOLOGNA........ 12 oz. 990
Family Pak Choice
CHICKEN BREAST Ib. 1.19
Boneless
CHICKEN BREAST Ib. 2.39


LYKES NUGGET
Party Ham......... Ib. I .9 9


BOSTON BUTT
Pork Roast ............... 1 .2 9


MEDIUM EGGS


2 WITH $10 OR MORE FOOD ORDER


21


9"


BAL:VALUAUEBILEACH


GALLON 79
*I*-'SS7 9 ^ .B*


3 BarPak5"z. Blue
COAST SOAP........ ............ 79
32 oz. Delmonte
C A TS U P .. ...............................................
,22oz. "
IlVORY DISH LIQUID i .........
Roll
VIVA PPER, TOWEL ...................79


SUBS-Witches We have delicious Tossed
Turkey. Roast or Ham Fried Chicken by the GREEN SALADS
.Made Daily piece or the box full $110 & S130
S / Breast 1.39 Wing 49 REGULAR
I Thigh 1.09 Leg 69 MaOR eF
8 pc. Box 5.99 20 pc. Box 14.9


'~0X*.p:.ii~ .....J2/ 1.000
...16 oz.991,
:dt M"Iiet o.Okra.A.lO5


Yellow & White
Corn ......10 ears/1.99
Broccoli ........ 990


P "arkay,.; ".
rMargarine Quarters .............. 59'
1,2 oz..'RealValue
:Chese................................ .19
-ReR al -Value -10 ct.
scuits.......... ................ .....6 9
eyItstoSour Cream ... 8 oz. 9
.^ ... ,, >J .,.,,Cream "'" 8.oz* ^


Green Boiling
Peanuts ....ib. 6
Fresh Ripe
Bananas .............


OUR BEST OF THE YEAR


, "Faye Alberta Clearseed


Peaches


.MA AE


UE


r -: '*-


LIMIT
.: .


. b.39i





I lb.


Dairy Foods


,t


MMMMMOOIF
qllmmpp".I


P---MWM


mg -r I a


;r~o~ I YCY I ~Ec~-: I


!0


~v_~A]-9~4~;\~iriy~A~t~IEfV~;-~i~'Eb-A~A


'1". I"'k ,,1"









S AIR THE STAR. PORT ST.TJOE, PFL -THUrRSDlAYAU1GU.TST 1, 1991


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A A A A AU.~A A A I A
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A A AA A AAA IA AAAAAA
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AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA A AAA A A A AA A A AA A A


3 bedroom, 1 bath, wood frame,
house in Oak Grove. Fenced in back
yard and storage shed. Call after
5:00, 227-1621. 5tc 8/1

House for sale: 3 bdrm., 1 bath
on 150'x75' lot. Can be seen at 512
9th St., PSJ. Call 229-8958 for appt.
2tp 8/1

50x150 lot w/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
tfc 7/25

50x100 lot w/12x60 MH, 16x20
shop, all improvements. $21,500. 4th
and 2nd St. Beacon Hill. Financing
available. 648-KENT. tfc 7/25

20 acres South Long St., Over-
street. See sign. $2,500 per acre. P. 0
Box 937, Highland City, FL 33846.
Ph.: 813-644-1606. 4tp 7/11

2 bdrm. trailer, on 3/4 acre, ad-
jacent to Wetappo Creek, fenced, Ig.
storage building. $18,000 assumable
mortgage. 229-8581 or 227-1566.
tfc 7/4

150'x120' commercial lot on
Hwy. 98 west of Highland View.
$55,000. Call George, 229-6031.
tfc 8/1

Port St. Joe Commercial Proper-
ty. 4 lots and large building in need of
repair. Many possibilities. Priced to
sell $55,000.
Call Cathey 648-5777 ERA Park-
er Realty, 648-5653 evenings, or 1-
800-874-5073. tfc 8/1

For sale by owner. 2 bdrm. house
w/stove & refrig., nice lot w/shade
trees. City water & private pump. Ad-
jacent lot available. Canal St., 1/2
block from beach, St. Joe Beach,
$26,000. 904-482-3884, Marianna.
tfc 8/1

Two nice lots, Pine St, $16,000
each. One nice lot on Canal St., 1/2
block from beach, $15,000. St. Joe
Beach. For sale by owner. 904/482-
3884, Marianna, FL. tfc 8/1


St. Joe Beach, brick home on 2
large landscaped lots. Cypress privacy
fence, pleasant, location. Large deck
with Sundance spa. Auto. sprinkler
system. 647-5252. tfc 8/1

3 bedroom, 1 bath house, corner
13th & Garrison, $49,500. Call
George, 229-6031. tfc 8/1.
Very Nice! 3 bdrm., 2 ba. house,
stone fireplace in great room, great lo-
cation, 2011 Juniper Ave. Call for ap-
pointment, 229-6427. tfc 8/1

1/2 acre MOBILE HOME LOTS.
12 mi. north of Mexico Beach on
Overstreet Road (Hwy. 386), Creek-
view Sub., no down payments, $86
per month. 229-6031. tfc 8/1

Two acres on county road off of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 8/1

LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 8/1


GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Bias, Florida

(904) 229-2500
1-800-624-3964
tfc 8/1






Wanted: Used desk, preferably a
receptionist type desk. Very good con-
dition. 227-7291. Itc 8/1


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL

(904) 227-1450
-F-RANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 647-5404
PORT ST. JOE
1402 Long Ave.: Well kept 2 BR/1 bath home with c/h & air plus 2 rental aptsl 2 bd/
1 bath each. All for $59,500.
1314 Garrison Ave.: 2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
back yard. $35,000.
1607 Monument: Large 4 BR 2 1/2 bath masonry home with living room, dining
room, den, fireplace, garage, in excellent neighborhood. $75,000.00.
213 Tapper Ave.: 3 hath brick home with den and deck, carpet and vinyl, ch/
a. Recently remrfl.L.arge lot. $65,000.00
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$412,000.00. REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $50,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
BARRIER DUNES
Immaculate Gulf view townhouse with 3 decks, 2 large bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths,
great kichen with all appliances, living room and dining area all beautifully dec-
orated. Amenitities too numerous to mention. Carport and storage. Only
$125,000.00.
HIGHLAND VIEW
Hwy. 98: Large 2 BR, 1 bath stucco home, living room; dining room, 2 large en-
closed porches plus garage and storage building. $36,090. Reduced to
$25,000.00.
OAK GROVE
105 Hunter St.: 3BR, 1 bath with extra room which could be 4th BR, living room, din-
ing room, den, screened porch, privacy fence, carpet, ch/a on 2 lots.
$29,500.00.
WHITE CITY
Rem deled country home. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living room, dining room,.kitchen all
up-dated. Short drive to town. $32,000.00.
HOWARD CREEK
Corner of Deer and Perch: 2 BR, 1 bath mobile home, furnished, ch/a, utility build-
ing with washer and dryer on 2 lots, covered outside patio or car port. $27,000.
OVERSTREET
2 BR, 2 bath, With fireplace is on approx. 6.1 acres. Approx. 1,512 sq. ft. plus large
deck. Only $52,000
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2 bath home located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must see to appreciate.
$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
5th Ave., Beacon Hill: Log Cabin and barn located on 4 lots (3 landscaped) also 1
1 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home. $36,900, Reduced to $31,900, without mobile
home $31,900 $26,900.
Between Sea St. and 1st St., Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 5 BR, 2 story home with
game room. Completely furnished. $150,000.00.
Between 3r d 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
Cape San Bias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part. $900
per front foot.
Gulf Aire: single family residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 corner lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue, $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.


Large, furnished one bedroom
apartment, air cond., carpeted, good
neighborhood. 1505 Monument Ave.
tfe 8/1

Mobile home, like new, furnished
2 bdrm., 2 ba., ch&a, private lot, St.
Joe Beach. Adults, no pets, deposit.
$250 per month. W/s furnished. Call-
James 227-2357 or 647-5194.
tfc 8/1

2 BR house at 108 7th St., High-
land View. Fenced yard, 1 block from
school. May be seen by coming by
110 7th St., HV or call 229-6671.
3tc 7/25

1 Small trailer, 1 studio apt. Call
647-8481. tfc7/25

Unfurnished 2 bedroom house, 1
block off beach, DeSoto St. $100
damage deposit, $300 month. Availa-
ble 1st of August. 227-1696.
tfc 7/25

One bedroom beach cottage, gulf
view. $150 deposit. rent $225 per
month. Call 647-5606. 4tp 7/18

For Rent or Sale: lease option
$75 credit back. 3 bedroom, 1 bath,
in Port St. Joe. 647-8783. tfc 8/1

2 Dogwood Terrace Appartments
available. 2 bdrms., 1 bath, energy ef-
ficient. 647-8317 or 229-2783.
tfc 8/1

Mobile home lot for rent,
50'xl50'. Tull's Trailer Parker, Jones
Homestead, 229-8669. tfc 8/1


Two small trailers and one mo-
bile home, adults only, no pets. 648-
5659. tfc 8/1

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath in
Ward Ridge. $375 month. Days 227-
1751 and ask for Becky. Night 647-
8384. tfc 8/1

3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1302 Garri-
son Ave, Fenced back yard. $375 per
month. $150 deposit. Call 227-1731.
tfc 8/1

Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfc 8/1

Mobile home lots. City water and
garbage fee included. Rustic Sands
Campground, 648-5229. tfc 8/1

UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
* Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
* New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
* Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat a
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
* One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hbok-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.

Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 8/1


Office Space for Lease: Spa-
cious, clean, well located office in con-
venient part of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378 or come by 322 Long
Avenue. tfc 8/1

No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/90

Nice one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing. tfc 8/1
The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 8/1






Cabin Cruiser, 26' i/o stove, re-
frig., sink, (Q.S. bed), CB & SS radios,
shoreline galv. trailer. Must sell.
$1500 or best offer. 648-8334.
2tc 7/25

23' 1/o boat.with galvanized trail-
er, recently rebuilt engine, ready to
go. See Tom Hudson Mexico Beach
Marina, $3,500. 227-1376. tfc 8/1


Yard Sale, Saturday,, Aug. 3, 8:00
a.m. 1:00 p.m. 5824 Americus Ave.,
St. Joe Beach. Exercise bike, chairs,
household goods, clothes & much
more. Itp 8/1

Yard Sale, Back to school sale.
Name brand children's clothes, toys,
misc. items, Super buys! Hwy. 98 at
Beacon Hill. Friday and Saturday,
Aug. 2 and 3. Itp 8/1

Yard Sale, 507 4th St. in High-
land View. Baby clothes and other
odds and ends. Saturday, 8:00 a.m.
to 1:00 p.m. Itp 8/1

Yard Sale, infant clothes, baby
thru 4 yrs. old, infant furniture and
assorted misc. items. Saturday, Aug.
3, 2003 Cypress Ave. 8 a.m. till. Rain
cancels. Itc 8/1

Bargain Basket, Mon. Sat., 9-5
at 445 2nd Ave, Highland View. Baby
items, children's clothes, misc. Am in-
terested in buying'baby furniture, will
accept donations. 227-1704.
tfc 8/1


TR ADE&SEVIE


Women's Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Church. 227-1145 or 227-1128.
Gulf Co. Transportation, the Com-
munity Transportation Coordinator
for Gulf County has funds available
to provide transportation to persons
in the county who are because of
physical or mental disabilities, in-
come status, or age or who for oth-
er reasons are unable to transport
themselves or to purchase trans-
portation and are therefore, depen-
dent upon others to obtain access
to health fare, employment, eduga-
tion, shopping, social activities, or
other life-sustaining activities, who
are not subsidized for transporta-
tion financial assistance or specific
trips.
For information regarding fare
structure and advance notice re-
quirements or to access this service
contact Gulf County Transportation
at 229-6550 or come by the office
at 200 Peters St., Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida. Gulf Coordinated Transporta-
tion operates under the sponsor-
ship of State of Florida Trans-
portation Disadvantaged Commis-
sion. tfc 5/30

Narcotics Anonymous
Open Meetings on Monday 8 p.m.
at 302 Reid Ave., and on
Friday 8 p.m. at
The Phantry Hotel
Help Line 229-8348


Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Prems
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc 8/1


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
ttfc ./


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 8/1
J

C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box A1C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfc 8/1.


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns
0
Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-387, Howard Creek
trc 8/1

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
24 Years Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Acci-
dents. No charge for first conference.
tfc 8/1


All types of yard work. Mowing,
raking, and trimming. Reasonable.
229-6435. tfc 8/1

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.



SAWS SCISSORS DRILL BITS
LAWN MOWER BLADES
BUTCHER KNIVES

LOCAL SAW SHARPENER
H. L HARRISON
1008 McClellan Ave.
Call 227-1350 or 229-8522
5tce/1



AVon

CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460 tfc 8/1




342 Coronado St., St. Joe Beach
*Antiques Collectibles
DepressiOn Glass Dolls &
Crafts Etc.
647-8339 cws/i


LYLE OFFICE SERVICE
Typing, Resume and
Bookkeeping for
Personal or Business Needs
Call 229-8562 t


Residential Interior
Commercial Exterior
JEFF THIMMER
Painting & Wallpaper Services
Reliable, Dependable, tfc 8/1
Quality Custom Work
Free estimates Lic. #90373
229-8534 15 yrs. experience


COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581 tsc8/il


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!








Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. tsC 8/i


Sewing and Alterations: drapes,
complete outfits, repairs. Call Daisy
at Active Styles, 227-1155 or 229-
6972. tfc 8/1

Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
Reg. Stated Communication
1st and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
G. Godwin, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 5/23


GARRETT INSTALLATIONS
For All Your Carpet & Vinyl In-
stallations and Repairs
Call 229-2735 or 227-1295
Free Estimates 9 yrs. Exp.
Jerry Garret-owner TFC 8/1


BOOT & SHOE
REPAIR
SAFETY SHOES
COWBOY'S TRADITION
102 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043



i Jobie Barfield's

Small Engine

Repair
*Lawn Mowers .
*Weed Eaters
*Chain Saws /
Generators

*Tillers
S*Go-Karts
Lawn Care Services Available

229-6965
1106 Long Ave. Port St. Joe
(Shop Entfncs in the Alley)


Yi <5Port St Joe Lodge No. I' 1
Reg. Stated Communication
1st and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
G. Godwin, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 5/23



STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tic 8/1


Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
trc 8/1


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer tfc8/1

LIC # RFOO51042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
POIrST. JOE, FLORIDA / tfc8/1 904/229-6821


PJ'S ROOFING
ALL TYPES OF ROOFS tc s/
Hot Roofing, Built-Up, 1-Ply System
Free Estimates
Phone (904) 229-6201 PAT TOUSIGNANT


FA Nbi I-Z'.l% -MA01.)jr L


I











THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 1991 PAGE 7B


Teenage Male Parenting Conference Set


New Gulf Coast Baptist Asso-
ciation and March of Dimes are
sponsoring a two-day conference
for males ages 13-17. The pur-
pose is to address issues and
problems related to the male as a
teenage parent.
Project Alpha is designed to
improve the quality of life for to-
day's youth and future genera-
tions. Resource people from





JOB OPPORTUNITY
Position title: Custodial Worker
The Gulf County School Board is
receiving applications for an 8 hour,
12 month Custodial Worker (Wewa-
hitchka Elementary School) position.
Only current temporary and substi-
tute custodians will be considered for
this position. Application forms are
available at the Maintenance Office lo-
cated in the Automobile Mechanics/
Bus Maintenance facility just behind
Port St. Joe High School. Persons
having applications on file in the
School Board Office and wishing to be
considered for this position must re-
quest to have their application sub-
mitted and/or updated. One (1) posi-
tion is available. Application deadline
is August 5, 1991, 12:00 Noon EDT.
The Gulf County School Board is an
equal opportunity employer.
Publish: July 25 and Aug. 1,
1991

Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
Apalachicola River, within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
1/2 overtime pay, on-call duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with water, sew-
erage, and lawn maintenance provid-
ed free.
Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
(26) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten (10) paid holidays. Free continu-
ing educational courses offered by
State University $500 annual allow-
ance for job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing In ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience; or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to' practice nursing In ac-
cordance with- -Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst., P. 0. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 8/1

POSTAL JOBS:
$11.41 to $14.90/hr. For exam
and application information call 219-
769-6649, ext. FL-171 9 a.m. 9 p.m.
7 days. 5tp 8/1






1987 Ford Ranger, std. shift, low
milege, rust/undercoated, scot guard-
ed bed liner, $5,500. 229-8416.
2tp 8/1

'83 Datson 280Z. Must sell.
$1500.00 or best offer. 648-8334.
2tc 7/25

'88 Mustang LX, 36,000 miles,
pw, pl, am/fm cassette, 5 speed, air,
rear defrost, 6 yr. extended warranty.
Must sell before Aug. 10, $6,000 obo.
229-8674. 3tc 7/25

1986 Chevy 4x4, $4,500. Call
647-8702. tfc 8/1


health, social, and civic fields will
serve as consultants.
A full agenda is scheduled to
begin at 6:00 p.m. ET, August 9,
with dinner and extend until 5:00
p.m. August 10, with "A Final
Challenge to Spread the Word".
Headquarters for this event is
the David Jones Recreation Cen-
ter in Port St. Joe. Admission is
free but an application must be





LOST: Reward $250. Brown wal-
leteast of Black's Island in the pot-
holes. Allen LeGrone, Blakely, GA
31723. 912-723-5137. 2tp 8/1






Nature's Diet Tea. Weight man-
agement, digestive aid, appetite sup-
pressant. Natural cleanser, over-
whelming response. For more
information call Beth at 229-8919.
ltp 8/1

50 ft. galvanized steel tower with
Channel Master antenna for sale.
227-1741. ltp 8/1

14'x80' trailer, 3 bdrm., 2 ba.,
$2,000 down and take up payments.
Call 227-1230. ltp 8/1

Two 26" bicycles large tires, one
boy's, one girl's; $30 each. Good con-
dition. 1 exercise bike, $10. Banana
trees, any size, $5 ea. 648-5279, 207,
Arkansas Drive. Mexico Beach.
ltp 8/11

For Sale: Bob White quail,
dressed. 229-8403. 2tc 7/25

Piano for sale, console home size,
excel. cond., take on low payments,
available in your area. Call anytime:
1-800-622-2047. 4tp 7/18

Taking bids on the sale of 2.71
acres of pine trees located at Sun-
shine Farms, Overstreet. For more in-
formation, call Billy Given at 229-
6223 days 'or 227-1467 after 6.
tfc 6/20

Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyn-
dall Parkway, Panama City, FL
32404. 763-7443. tfc 8/1
Older piano with a roll top, good
for beginner or for antique collector,
asking $600. 229-6965 after 4:00
p.m. tfc 6/6

Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
em Auto. Discover TOOl 227-1105.
tfc 8/1

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 8/1



SUMMER CLEARANCE
SALE

Save 10% 50%
off
All Clothing & Shoes
It's A Can't Miss Salel
TINY TOTS
BARGAIN SHOPPE
Comer of 3rd St. & 2nd Ave.
BEACON HILL
(Turn 2 blocks before you get to
the Lookout Lounge right behind
St. Joe Tel. & Tel. office)
OPEN TUES. SAT., 10 to 5
Vickle Scheffer, owner
647-5010


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYS! Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 5t per word for all over 20.


filed.
For more lnfoyinaton, call
229-6624.


Say You Saw It In The Star


|PUBLIC NOTICES I

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City
Commi Lssioners of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida.
will receive bids up to 8:00 p.m., EDT, on the 23rd
(lay of August, 1991, for the following two Items
which should be bid separately:
1. The hauling of certain sludge material
from the city wastewater treatment plant to a loca-
tion approximately 6 miles northeast of Overatreet,
Florida. The price quoted will be per cubic yard
and the contractor will be required to furnish proof
of liability Insurance on its vehicles and workers
compensation insurance on its employees;
2. The spreading of certain sludge material
at the dumping site approximately 6 miles north-
east of Overstreet, Florida.
Details for the above bids may be obtained
from City Hall In Port St. Joe, Florida, mand ar-
rangements will be made for prospective bidders to
visit the wastewater treatment plant and the distri-
bution site northeast of Overstreet
THE CITY RESERVES the right to reject any
and all bids.
DATED this 30th day of July, 1991.
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY
OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Frank Pate. Jr.
Mayor-Commissioner
Attest: /s/ L.A. Farris
Auditor-Clerk
Publish: August 1 and 8. 1991.
BID NO. 001-361
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida Invites bids
for Institutional Insurance Package Policy as fol-
lows:
Property and Equipment; Automobile
Liability; Automobile Physical Dam-
age; Inland Marine; Comprehensive
General Liability. Law Enforcement Of-
ficers Liability; Accidental Death and
Dismemberment. Police Officers; Acci-
dental Death and Dismemberment
Volunteer Fireflghters; Money and Se-
curites, Broad Form; Bonds (various);
Electronic Data Processing
Specifications may be obtained from the City
Clerk's office, P.O. Box 278, Port St. Joe. Florida
32456.
All Bids shall meet specifications or be an
approved equal. Bids shall be sealed in an enve-
lope and plainly marked "BID NO. 001-361, BID
FOR GROUP INSTITUTIONAL INSURANCE". All
proposals must comply with 112.0801 of the Flori-
da Statutes (Chapter 84-266, Section 17).
The City of Port St Joe reserves the right to
accept any or all bids. waive any formalities, and
to choose the bid deemed best to meet the City's
needs. Bids must be good for 90 days after open-
ing.
Bids must be submitted to the City Clerk's
office, on or before 8:00 p.m., EDT. September 17.
1991. Bid opening will be held at the regular City
Commission Meeting, September 17, 1991. at 8:00
p.m., EDT. In the Municipal Building.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
/s/ LA. Farris
City Auditor-Clerk
Publish: August I and 8, 1991.


PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf
County Board of County Commissioners, at their
meeting on August 13. 1991, at 10:25 a.m., E.T.,
In their meeting room at the Gulf County Court-
house in Port St. Joe, Florida. will consider adopt-
ing an ordinance with the following title:
An ordinance establishing fees for con-
struction permits; inspection fees for
checking plans, air conditioning, heat-
ing, electrical, and plumbing systems;
inspection fees for mobile and modular
homes, whether permanent or tempo-
rary; permit fee for moving buildings
and other structures; permit fee for
docks, seawalls, boardwalks and de-
tached decks on St. Joseph Bay: estab-
lishing a reinspection fee providing
penalties for not first obtaining permits
and paying fees; repealing Ordinance
Number 90-06; severabllity clause; re-
pealer clause; and providing for an ef-
fective date
THE BOARD WILL FURTHER CONSIDER
said'ordinance for adoption at their meeting on
August 27. 1991, at 8:25 p.m., E.T.., in their meet-
ing room at the Gulf County Courthouse In Port
St. Joe, Florida. A copy of the proposed ordinance
is on file in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ James E. Creamer, Chairman
Publish: August 1 and 8, 1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-33
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
FRANK C. RALLS.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ANCILLARY ADMINISTRATION
THE ADMINISTRATION of the Estate of FRANK C.
RALLS, deceased, File Number 91-33, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of which Is Gulf County
Courthouse. 1000 5th Street. Port St Joe. Florida
32456. The name and address of the Personal Rep-
resentative and the Personal Representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required to file WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, (1) All
claims against the estate and (2) any objection by
an interested person on whom notice was served
that challenges the validity of the Will. the qualifi-
cations of the Personal Representative, venue or
Jurisdiction of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
DATE of the first publication of this Notice of Ad-


DO SCH



Gulf Coast
Community Colklege

Course Description


Port St. Joe
Florida History
Am. National Government
Western Civilization II
Real Estate Principles,
Practices, and Law

Wewahitchka
General Biological Science
Western Civilization I
Typewriting I
(Lab Fee $6.00)
Word Process. w/WordPerfect
(Lab Fee $6.00)
Principles of Sociology


OX1!JO62 UW g F;
0-5


Homemade Ice Cream


For folks from 8 to 80, ice cream
seems to be universally popular!
It's cool, creamy and soothing -
and, with all the new ice cream
makers today, it's easier to make
than ever.
Begin all these variations with a
stirred custard base, add whipping
cream along with your choice of
flavorings, then chill and freeze. If
you prefer to use another favorite
recipe, be sure to cook the sweetened
egg and milk base.




ii.








For regular fluid milk and egg
mixtures, cook until a thin film of
custard adheres to a metal spoon
dipped into the mixture. At this
point, the custard will have reached
1600 F. When using evaporated or
sweetened condensed milk and eggs,
the mixture looks thick very early
in the cooking process and the
spoon test is less reliable. Use a
thermometer to be sure the mixture
has reached 1600 F. Once you've
made the base, cool it immediately
and chill it thoroughly before
freezing.


ministration is August 1. 1991.
/s/ JOHN MCKENZIE RAILS
Personal Representative of the
Estate of Frank C. Rails, deceased.
/s/ THOMAS S. GIBSON
303 Fourth Street
P.O. 1Box 39
Port St. Joe. Florida 32456
(904) 229-8211
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Publish: August I and 8,. 1991.
NOTICE OF SALE
The City of Port St. Joe. Florida proposes to
sell to the highest bidder the following described
deep water well site located on, Garrison Avenue:
Lot 14. Block 40, Unit No. 3, St. Jo-
seph's Addition of the City of Port St.
Joe. Florida. according to the official
map on file in the office of the Clerk of
Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida.
Minimum Acceptable Bid. $7.000.
Bids shall be submitted to the Board of City
Commission, Municipal Building. P.O. Box 278,
Port St. Joe. Florida 32456 not later than 5:00
p.m., August 6. 1991. Bids shall be submitted in a
sealed envelope, plainly marked, "Sealed Bid, Wa-
ter Well Site, Garrison Avenue".
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
BY: /s/ L.A. Farris
City Auditor-Clerk
Publish: July 25 and August 1. 1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-25
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
ROY G. BLANKENSHIP.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
THE ADMINISTRATION of the Estate of ROY
G. BLANKENSHIP, deceased. File Number 91-25,
is pending In the Circuit Court for Gulf County,
Florida. Probate Division. the address of which Is
Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 5th Street, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the
Personal Representative and the Personal Repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are required to file
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. (1) All
claims against the estate and (2) any objection by
an Interested person on whom notice was served
that challenges the qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue or Jurisdiction of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
DATE of the first publication of this Notice of
Administration: August 1, 1991.
/s/ THOMAS S. GIBSON
P.O. Box 39
Port SLt. Joe. Florida 32456
(904) 229-8211
Personal Representative
Publish: August 1 and 8, 1991.


EDULE OF COURSES
GULF COUNTY
FALL SEMESTER 1991


Day



T
W
M

H


Time



6:30-9:15
6:30-9:15
6:30-9:15


Sem.
Hrs.



3
3
3


5:00-9:00 4


6:15-9:00
6:15-9:00
6:15-9:00


6:15-9:00 3

6:15-9:00 3


FEES: $26.25 per credit hour for Florida residents.
(Fees are payable upon enrollment.)

REGISTRATION
August 14, 1991
6:00 p.m.


Port St. Joe Elementary School
Tem le Watson Coordinator


227.


Wewahitchka High School
Genre Cnox Coordinatnr


-1259 (after 5:00 p.m.) 639-2496 (after 5:00 p.m.)

CLASSES BEGIN THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 1991

GCCC is an equal opportunity institution


Freezing is quick and easy in
modern electric freezers, but it's a
more heartwarming affair when
family members pitch in to help
crank an old-fashioned freezer.
Whatever type of freezer you use,
be sure it's spotlessly clean all over.
Don't forget to wash the dasher in
hot, soapy water, too.
Once your Custard Cream is done,
everyone will be amply rewarded for
their efforts when the dasher yields
its creamy contents!
Frozen Custard Cream
1 1/2 to 2 quarts
6 eggs
2 cups milk -
3/4 cup sugar
2 to 3 tablespoons honey
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups whipping cream
1 tablespoon vanilla
Crushed ice
Rock salt
In medium saucepan, beat together
eggs, milk, sugar, honey and salt.
Cook over low heat, stirring constant-
ly, until mixture is thick enough to
coat a metal spoon and reaches 160
F. Cool quickly by setting pan in ice
or cold water and stirring for a few
minutes. Cover and refrigerate until
thoroughly chilled, at least 1 hour.
When ready to freeze, pour chilled
custard, whipping cream and vanilla
into 1-gallon ice cream freezer can.
Freeze according to manufacturer's
directions using 6 parts ice to 1 part
rock salt. Transfer to freezer con-
tainers and freeze until firm.


Variations:
Banana Nut: Reduce vanilla to
1 1/2 teaspoons. Cook and cool as
Sbove. Stir 3 large ripe bananas,
ashed and 1/2 cup chopped toasted
pecans into custard mixture. Freeze
as above.


Cherry: Reduce vanilla to 1 tea-
spoon. Add 2 tablespoons almond
extract. Cook and cool as above.
Partially freeze. Add 2 pounds pitted
pureed dark sweet fresh cherries or
1 can (16 to 17 oz.) pitted dark sweet
cherries, drained and chopped. Com-
plete freezing.
Chocolate: Add 3 squares (1 oz.
each) unsweetened chocolate to egg
mixture. Cook, cool and freeze as
above.
Plum: Reduce vanilla to 1 teaspoon.
Cook and cool as above. Partially
freeze. Add 1 1/2 pounds pitted
pureed ripe fresh plums. Complete
freezing.
Strawberry:Omit vanilla. Cook and
cool as above. Partially freeze. Add
2 cups sweetened crushed fresh
strawberries. Complete freezing.


-d LLEMORE
REAL ESTATE
INC.


Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410

(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478

NEW LISTINGS:

4 cleared lots on Hwy. 386, over 1 acre
each, $8,800 $12,500, one with stocked
catfish pond. Good owner financing.

Immaculate 3 bedroom, 1 bath home in
Highland View. Kitchen comes equipped
with appliances including washer/dryer.
Screen porch, storage house, and fenced
back yard. $49,500.

2012 Long Ave. 4 bedroom, 2 bath with in
ground pool. Completely fenced. $67,500.


ELLEN ALLEMORE, Broker 648-8939


SALES and RENTALS 2




.' "..'3 ..5a, a'a e _,l-l3-as a M .iS..S... ..I .


-- a


a wrai nr miff aIt S P i m SW r ..... n *'." ."

You are invited to hear investment strategist
Jack Vander Vliet talk about what he sees as the three powerful
forces driving the financial markets over the next 10 years.

Vander Vliet directs $47 billion for Dean Witter, one of
the largest mutual fund complexes in the country. He is a
frequent speaker on investment matters and has published
accurate calls on major market moves in 1982, 1986 and six
weeks prior to the 1987 crash. Now Vander Vliet sees 10000 on
the Dow by the year 2000. Come hear his thoughts on the
coming investment boom as well as how you can participate.

Speaker: Jack Vander Vliet, Executive Vice
President and Chief Investment
Officer, InterCapital Division,
Dean Witter Reynolds Inc.

Date: Thursday, August 15,1991

Time: 6:30 p.m., CDT

Place: New World Landing
600 Palafox St.
Pensacola, FL


Admission is free but seating is limited. To reserve
your place, call Rick Hernandez or Cynthia Managhin by
August 14, 1991.

1-8 0-3 -8 86 Amember of the
1-800-326-8286 Sears FinancialNetwiork1

DFAW WI ITiERK


c' 1991 Dean Witter Re nolds Inc. Member SIPC.


I


aIIP -









r-MVVT. 'rT~rT lAV AtT!fTr'T' I 01


SalE l CB ounty OffRiaSlsT. BeginLCirclingAYT.hAUGirTWagon



Small County Officials Begin Circling Their Wagons


The second such meeting of
small county leaders was held in
Tallahassee last week to form a
coalition of local governments
representing the 31 Florida
counties with populations of less
than 50,000.
Delegates agreed the major
concern facing these counties is
the state's demands growing out
of the Growth Management Act of
1985.
Their concerns were backed
up by comments from a number
of legislators, one of whom point-
ed out, "One size does not fit all."
This remark from State Rep-
resentative Robert Trammell, D,
Marianna, set the tone for the
gathering hosted by Clerk of Cir-
cuit Court Willie D. Wise of Cal-
houn County.
Wise pointed out the organi-
zation was not intended to be
break-away from the existing
clerks' association nor the Florida
Association of Counties but to
merely add emphasis io existing
efforts.
While organizing in May,
some concern was expressed that
the Small County Coalition might
water down the effectiveness of
the state organizations, but Wise
insisted this was not likely, but
rather the opposite would occur.
Speaking to this end again
last week, Wise urged the dele-
gates to join the band wagon
pointing out the most powerful
voice in the Florida Legislature


India Waller and Valerie Lovett
Watermelon Fest
Valerie Lovett, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lovett was
crowned the 1991 Panhahandle Wa-
termelon Festival Jr. Miss at the
festival pageant held on June
24th. She is 14 years old and at-
tends Chipley High School. She is
pictured here with India Waller,
the current Miss Chipley, who
hosted the pageant. India is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H.T.
Waller of Chipley. Both beauties
are the granddaughters of Mr.
and Mr. Joel Lovett of Chipley
and St. Joe Beach.


comes from seven members rep-
resenting Dade County.
He explained this delegation
always votes as a block and can
put enough into the voting piles
to swing an issue in either direc-
tion.
Using this as a demonstra-
tion, Wise noted with the small
counties acting as one voice,
enough noise can be made to get
the attention of state govern-
ments.
'There is no way we can sit
here for three hours and go over
all the problems the small
counties face," he said, and urged
the group to, instead, vow to join
into that one voice.
Trammell added the "biggest
friend we have in the Legislature
is you people."
Trammell's colleagues Allen
Boyd, D, Madison County; J.J.
Holland, R, Hardee County; and
Chance Irvine, R, Clay County;
added to the comments agreeing
the state government's heavy bu-
reaucratic hand was dealing what


IPCLL IN







By: Richard Miller
*Family trips are more fun if
you don't have to drive more
than five hours a day. If you
must drive more, try to keep (t
from happening two days in a
row. Stop every two hours or so
to let the kids run off steam.
*How much air for your tires?
Always check the owner's man-
ual first to find the recommend-
ed pressure. There may be dif-
ferent recommendations for
front and rear tires, or for differ-
ent loads.
*Iln coming years, manufactur-
ers will have to strengthen new
cars so they can pass side-
impact tests. Fact: 30 percent
of auto fatalities result when
cars are hit from the side.
ignitionn or fuel cutouts are
among the most effective anti-
theft measures available, and
will often earn premium dis-
counts on your insurance. Note:
they won't prevent professional
thieves from towing the car.
*Listen to your car. A loud
knocking sound inside the en-
gine more than a "ping" -
may indicate a loose rocker
arm, a loose bearing or a faulty
piston.
*Auto Repairs: Let us listen to
your car. Our expert mechanics
can "read" your car's signals
and fix the problem fast at
Gul Ford
Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales


Scenic Waterfront Dining

RIVERFRONT RESTAURANT
At the Rainbow Inn and Marina
123 Water St. Apalachicola 904-653-8139
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
OPEN DAILY FROM 6 A.M. to 10 P.M.
and to 11 P.M. on FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
NEW LUNCH SPECIALS: Vegetable Plates............$3.00
Soup, Salad & Fruit Bar..................................... $4.00
Friday: Surf & Turf. Blackened Delmonico Steak and Sau-
teed Gulf Shrimp,. choice of potato, cheese grits or red
beans and rice, homemade soup and salad bar... $12.95
Saturday: Our Famous Fresh Catch Seafood Platter for
Two. To start: Apalachicola Bay oysters on the 1/2 shell,
whole lobster tail, fresh grilled grouper, sauteed shrimp,
fried oysters, red beans & rice or choice of potato or
cheese grits, homemade soup and salad bar ........30.00
Sunday: Delicious Pot Roast, potatoes, carrots, Brussel
sprouts, cornbread and homemade blueberry
cake .................................................... $5.95
or
Shrimp Creole over rice, carrots, Brussel
sprouts, cornbread, homemade soup and salad
bar ..................................................... $11.95

Now Serving Your Favorite Cocktails!
_. Join the Staff of
The Riverfront
Restaurant
for their weekly
breakfast
specials.


could be fatal blows to the small
jurisdictions.
Boyd explained the small
counties are facing already
strapped budget crises and gave
the conditions of Lafayette
County as an example.
He pointed out that county is
capped at the 10 mil level and the
state is buying up taxable land in
large portions.
Also, Lafayette County is fac-
ing a budgetary situation where
40 percent of all collected ad valo-
rem taxes are earmarked to pay
the salaries of elected officials.
Holland admitted to voting for
the Growth Management Act, but
did so without boast.
'The same plan for everyone
is ludicrous," he said adding,
"we've got some crackers here
with walking around sense."
Irvine said she did not vote
for the Growth Management Law
and urged this part of the state's
governing should be returned to


S


E


R


V





C


at least the regional level.
Two state senators who repre-
sent small jurisdictions took the
podium as well as with at least
one of them reluctantly saying,
"Growth management is here to
stay."
Pat Thomas, D, Quincy, add-
ed without some state revenue
enhancement, the state "cannot
keep going."
'We are trying to do some-
thing about it (growth manage-
ment)," he said urging help from
such organizations as the Small
County Coalition.
Vince Bruner, D, Fort Walton
Beach, also urged the members
to lend aid to the Legislative pro-
cess noting the decline in health
care for Floridians.
"I found out that state prison-
ers are entitled to better health
care than its citizens in rural
counties," he said.
Bruner noted the small
counties probably had more po-


R


E


N


T


A


L


I(26,0 Li ? G 'Ic0BI

* Bull Floats Cement Finishers
* Cement Mixers


Air Compressors Jack
Hammers Generators Pumps
Transits Chain Saws
* Pressure Washers Power Post
Hole Diggers Scaffolding/
Ladders



Drain Snakes Pipe Dies *
Pipe Cutter Tubing Cutter
*Tubing Flare Tool
Pipe Wrenches



Wet/Dry Vacuum
Knee Kickers Carpet Stretch-
ers Seaming Iron Lin. Roller
Floor Buffer Carpet Cleaner


PHIL EARLEY, Owner 706 First Street


An
of





[0Y
ols








or



*H A
*Day


o~e


tential members than the 31
counties represented.
He said counties such as Bay,
Okaloosa and Escambia are also
struggling with Growth Manage-
ment demands.
Accompanying Wise on the
podium was Pal Rivers, his col-
league to the east, Clerk of Cir-
cuit Court at Franklin County.
Rivers lent his voice in sup-


port of the Small County Coali-
tion's formation and was return-
ing to the Tallahassee gathering
for his second time.
Other faces in the crowd were
familiar and a large number of
new names were added to the list.
Both Wise and Rivers noted
the evidence the coalition was
gaining steam looked encourag-
ing.


BANKUPC


Sti
T


ELIJAH SMILEY, M.B.A.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
*PERSONAL INJURY -BUSINESS *AUTO ACCIDENTS
*PROBATE & WILLS -DIVORCES
right LAW OFFICE DOWNTOWN Reason
Talk | 784-6606 I Fee
433 Harrison Ave. Suite 1B Panama City


: r- --1


- F7'/UTRE HOME OF
-arIL Ate


,able
s


7.
I
~Th5[ U- -


*Airless Paint Sprayer
*Texture Gun
*Wallpaper Steamer
*Jumper Cables
*Extension Cords
*Staple Guns
*Levels Bolt Cutters

Circular Saws
Drills
e *Sanders
Saber Saws
Rotary Hammers
Mitre Saws
Sawsalls
Grinders ,







* Blowers Edgers Mowers
* Tillers Lawn Rollers Fertilizer
Spreaders Weed Eaters *
Thatchers Trenchers




* House Jacks Hydraulic Jacks
Come-a-longs Dollies


Phone 227-2112


NOW ... YOU CAN RENT A FULL LINE OF TOOLS and

EQUIPMENT RIGHT HERE IN PORT ST. JOE


All Tools & Equipment New & Will be Kept in Top Shape


RENT ALL TOOLS and
"EN LL EQUIPMENT


I I~


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----al an


- I.


~F~p~'7~4~W~`