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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02903
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 25, 1991
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02903

Full Text













THE


USPS 518-880

FIFTY-THIRD YEAR, NUMBER 48


/STRY -DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JULY 25,1991


330 Per Copy 3 J
Plus 20 Tax... U


I Stat DOTL*A C ntracing C m a yN w W ri ng Ou P e- on tr ct onAgr em nt f r ro ec


H.V. Bridge Erection Scheduled to Get


Construction on the new White City high-
rise bridge is expected to be opened to traffic
around the end of August, and construction


on the new Highland View highrise is expected
to begin about the same time, Edward Pre-
scott, Director of Operations for the Depart-


ment of Transportation's Chip
the Kiwanis Club Tuesday,
meeting.


Underway In Fall
)ley office told Prescott said the same firm which is build-
at their noon ing the White City bridge, L&A Contracting
Company of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, has the
$8,058,753 contract for the Highland View
span. L&A also built the new Apalachicola
River bridge a few years ago.
Prescott said the contract was awarded on
July 12, but the documents still have not
been signed. 'This is not unusual," Prescott
said. "It's normal for a few weeks to go by be-
fore both parties officially sign these con-
tracts."
Immediately after the documents are
signed, Prescott said the two parties will get
together to agree on such items as suppliers,
method and style of construction, inspection,
days allowed beyond the 526 calendar days
allowed for construction without applying
penalties, agreement on various other aspects
of the construction process. "Then the actual
construction will begin, which I expect to get
underway about mid-fall," Prescott said.
The bridge, itself, will span some 2,600
i feet and approaches to the span will be anoth-
er 2,600 feet, with the span having a clear-
ance of 75 feet above the water line.
The new roadway will be built west [or on
the water side] of the current bridge. A road
will be built parallel to the fill on the north
side of the canal to allow traffic access to the
industrial development along the canal.
BRIDGE WILL BE UNIQUE
The 75 foot clearance will make the High-
land View bridge unique among highrise
bridges in the Florida Panhandle.
The height standard for Florida highrises
is 65 feet above the water line. The Highland
View installation will have an additional 10
foot rise in order to allow ocean-going barges
access to the Gulf County Canal and the In-
land Waterway. The bridge will allow the, only
access by ocean-going traffic to inland water-
ways between Mobile, Alabama and Tampa.
SThe structure of the new Highway 98
crossing over the Gulf County Canal outlet,
will be similar to that of the White City bridge.
It will be be placed on 24-inch square pilings
and will be designed to withstand ship impact.
"We have had a lot of damage to our bridges
'ommission- in the past from ship and barge impact and
Dennis Geo- we are now trying to head off this interruption
(See BRIDGE on Page 3)


Water Systems Under Study

Highland View and Beaches Operations Being Scrutinized


JTPA's Sandie Scott and Freida Sheffield listen as Jan
McDonald makes a presentation to Chamber of Commerce
members Tuesday morning.

JTPA Officials Outline

Activities to Chamber
Freida Sheffield, Executive Director of the Panhandle Private
Industry Council, led discussion of the services offered by the
agency to a breakfast gathering of Chamber of Commerce mem-
bers at J. Patrick's Restaurant Tuesday morning.
The JTPA, which the agency is better known by, is the acro-
nym for the federally administered Job Training Partnership Act.
The Panhandle Private Industry Council operates the program,
introducing jobs to people who need them, but are undertrained
in many cases to fill the jobs which are available. The agency
serves not only as an introductory party, but also helps with the
expense involved in training an undertrained employee to fill a
new position.
The agency makes its services available to high school stu-
dents, training for the work force; it encourages and helps drop-
outs to find employment as well as finish their high school edu-
cation and assists adults to find the training necessary to be-
come employed in new and unfamiliar trades.
Sandie Scott, who manages the Port St. Joe office of JTPA
told the Chamber members that in the Port St. Joe area, the ser-
vice helps adults who are having problems finding a job. "We
help introduce them to a prospective employer and partially pay
(See CHAMBER on Page 3)


A budget which seems to defy
any attempts to reduce it to man-
ageable means was joined Tues-
day night, by reports of a need to
consider two other systems for fi-
nancial overhaul by the Gulf
County Commission.
Working on insistence of
Commissioner Billy Traylor that
community water services pay
their own way, the Board asked
special projects director, Ralph
Rish to head up a committee to
provide a special financial report
for the Beaches and Highland
View water systems, which was
presented to the Board Tuesday.
A second item, presented recent-
ly, and discussed Tuesday, was a
need to upgrade its building in-
spection fee schedule.
WATER SYSTEMS
The Commission has suspect-
ed it all along, but the committee
report, presented by Rish pointed
out that both the Highland View
and Beaches water systems were
barely paying their way for opera-
tions and were making no provi-
sions for depreciation or repairs.
The Highland View system is
in the worse shape, according to
the report. This system borrowed
$123,000 with a bond issue back
in 1964. The issue is all due pay-
able in just ,a few years and the


School B
The Gulf County School
Board. has tentatively come up
with a financial plan for fiscal
1991-92, which will require some
$251,789 above last year's bud-
get, it was revealed this week by
the financial office.
General operations budget of
the county school system is down
by approximately $350,000, but
special capital outlay expendi-
tures being planned to purchase
three new school buses and to
finish construction at Wewahitch-
ka Elementary School, pushed
the capital projects budget up an


system still owes $58,000 on the
bond issue and has a total debt,
to the bond firm and the county
for loans of $106,000.
The report advised that the
system was in need of several fire
hydrants, needed a flushing pro-
gram and at least 80 meters
changed out. Summarized, the re-
port said, 'The system is making
gradual progress, but mainte-
nance needs show a need for a
rate increase.
BEACHES SYSTEM
The Beach system's main
problem seems to be that their
rate structure does not reflect an
increase in bulk water purchase
rates made nearly a year ago. The
system is paying $1.80 for 1,000
gallons of treated water and sell-
ing it to their customers for
$1.60. The Beaches has 460 cuis-
tomers, some of whom do not live
there year-round, but still pay a
minimum water bill. It seems this
situation is the only thing which
is keeping the system afloat.
The report stated the Beaches
system could also use some addi-
tional fire hydrants, stand pipes,
a master valve installation and
find and mark all its system
valves. The report suggested
three Board raise the rates to a
(See UNDER STUDY on Page 3)


budget Up
additional $452,600, accounting
for most of the increase in the
new budget plan.
Sissy Worley, with the School
Board financial office, told The
Star that expected state revenues
would be approximately $60,000
less this year, due to a reduction
in state financial participation. To
make up for the shortfall, the
School Board is considering an
eight-tenths of a mill increase in
local revenues. A full mill in Gulf
County is valued at approximate-
ly $475,000.
With revenues down by near-


Gulf Jury Rules


Against Parker

Says Collection of Unemployment
Funds Was Not Proper In His Position


Ousted County Commis-
sioner Don Parker will more
than likely remain ousted after
a jury of three men and three
women found him guilty Tues-
day of improperly claiming and
accepting unemployment com-
pensation funds from the State
of Florida.
Parker was removed from
his office on the Commission
in April of this year, after the
question of the propriety of
Parker receiving the unemploy-
ment funds came to light.
Parker had filed for the
funds after he lost his job with
Norwest Finance Company af-
ter they closed their Port St.
Joe office.
Parker defended his ac-
tions in court, by claiming the


lady he filed his claim with at
the Panama City office, was
told he was a County Commis-
sioner, but had advised him
this had no bearing on his re-
ceiving the compensation
funds.
CLERK'S STORY
The clerk, Deon Baldwin,
testified she had asked Parker
if he had earnings, when he
made his application, and he
answered, "no". She had not
filled out the form either nega-
tive or positive where the ques-
tion of earnings was called for.
She told the court, "I don't be-
lieve I made a mistake like
that. If he had told me he was
a County Commissioner, I
would have written it on the
(See PARKER on Page 3)


Despite Hefty Cuts
ly $447,000 for general expendi- The total price tag for all
tures, the Board has made cuts school operations for the coming
in: Instruction, $200,000; Devel- year is expected to be
opment Services, $50,000; Gener- $13,340,401. Last year's total
al Administration, $146,000; Pu- budget was $13,088,612. Local
pil Transportation, $24,000; and fund sources are expected to pay
Plant Maintenance, $53,000. $3,700,000 of the new budget
Increases in expenditures funding.
were shown in the capital pro- The board will hold its public
jects budget for the new buses hearing for citizen input Monday
and construction for a total of afternoon at 5:30 p.m. in the
$452,000. Board meeting room in the Gulf
In the general fund, increases County Courthouse.
included $40,000 more in School I A decision will be made on
Administration; and $13,000 for the new budget following thq
Operation of Plant. hearing.


,~1 I


I


srrlAi












THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JULY 25,1991


Counting Pennies

It evidently is not coming as a shock to local governments,
that the theme of the times is that taxes are not generating as
much money as they formerly did and the prevailing opinion
seems to be that governments not make up this shortfall in reve-
nue by levying additional taxes.
The reasons for the reduction in tax revenue, now, is that
those paying these taxes are not generating the kind of revenue
they generated back when the present tax sources were produc-
ing adequate money for the public coffers.
Only last week, the Federal government joined the crowd in
experiencing a shortfall on projected revenue. The shortfall, of
course, is being caused by a reduced amount of earnings by tax
payers. When tax payers are earning less, causing a shortfall at
the old taxing rate, they aren't prone to sit still for new taxes to
make up the shortfall from their present tax source. It Is no easi-
er to pay for new taxes than it is to pay more taxes on the old
taxing base.
One example of this situation is the current activities of the
taxation committee of the State of Florida, currently studying
the state's tax base and recommendations for an overhaul.
A prime vehicle to provide more taxes being recommended by
the tax examination committee, is to remove present exemptions
from the sales tax law, including groceries, medicines, services,
etc. These items are presently exempt, even though some of our
neighbor states collect sales taxes on these items. This situation
also allows some of them to levy a lower rate of sales taxes per
$1.00, than Florida does. There is no guarantee that this situa-
tion would roll over into Florida. Our state started with a three
cent sales tax levy and the amount is now up to six percent,
with more items being taxed than when the program first begun.
So, there is no precedent to lower the tax rate, with the levy
against groceries, medicines, etc. There is also no precedent for
keeping the levy at a lower rate, even though such a new plan
were instituted.
With budget time here to remind us of how much each of us
as an individual is paying into our state, county and city coffers,
and facing the prospects of having to pay even more, we're sus-
ceptible to almost any idea which may serve to spread this tax
burden around and include some of those property owners who
are now getting a free ride.



Easy to Make

Like the New York Times being constantly reminded of their
famous headline which proclaimed New York Governor Tom
Dewey as the winner of the 1948 Presidential race over Harry S.
Truman, most newspapers receive constant reminders that
something they said or did was wrong, when it turned out that
way.
This is how it has been with The Star, and its now famous
mistake, concerning General Homer. We have received constant
digs, reminders, and good-natured kidding about the mistake.
Some of those who reminded us, took advantage of remind-
ing i~Aice again how dumb they think we are. Most, however,
umndstood that nobody is perfect, even with Important matters,
and had a good time ribbing us for making the mistake. We can
laugh right along with these people and the others we
wouldn't have drawn our dissenters' approval if we had been in-
strumental in helping the General to be awarded the Distin-
guished Service medal, or paid his way to and from Saudi Ara-
bia.
What we're saying is that there is no way to please some peo-
ple, while others are pleased to find you are just as human as
they are, in the mistake making department.
Please understand there is no way we would try to justify the
error we made. We're not trying to do this. We are trying to show
you that all newspapers make errors every day. The largest and
the smallest are prone to mistakes. It is a miracle there aren't
more of them made than presently occur. If all readers were fa-
miliar with the pressures and the rush to get a paper out, by
deadline time; if they understood the logistics involved for a
small weekly to get a story collected, written, set up in type, pic-
tures taken, developed, printed and half-tones made between a
Tuesday at 1:30 to Wednesday at noon, along with the thousand
and one other things which must be done to pull a paper togeth-
er, fill every column exactly from top to bottom and every page
exactly from side to side and see there are no errors in any of
this activity, they would marvel that there are no more errors to
crow over than they presently have.


IHunker Down with Kes



Out of the Mouths of Babes


I tell you, It s new and differ-
ent. This Is my first 15-year-old -
- do they all think they are
grown? I quit answering the
phone two or three years ago. I
got tired of taking messages.
Now, we did get a call in April of
1989 that I thought was going to
be for me. Turned out to be Judy
from Time-Life. Shucks, that's
not a real call. I talked to her any-
way asked her about the fami-
ly, how her kids were doing;
which did she sell more of, the
Civil War set or that series about
the kitchens and bathrooms. I fig-
ured I needed the practice. You
can't never tell. Josh may hang


up for a second to Fix him another
sandwich and somebody might
sneak a call In to me.
Now I know what you're
thinking. Who in the world is he
talking to day and night? I've
asked him. "Aw, Dad, just peo-
ple."
Well, I didn't figure it was the
fuzzy haired, green eyed swamp
thing.
His younger brother has shed.
some light on the subject, "Dad,
Josh is talking to his girlfriend!"
"Girlfriend? He's not old
enough -"
"Kes, don't get started. Let's
have a little peace in the family


tonight." Cathy,. as always, got in
the last word.
And then some.
You need to be nice to Josh
and all his friends. Fifteen is a
special age. You remember being
young and having lady friends.
When she comes over, try to be
nice for a change."
Why, when I was 15, we
played baseball, caught frogs,
swung across the big ditch on a
grape vine.... we didn't even have
a phone.... no use to get into that,
I think I have mentioned it to
them nice for a change Wait a
minute. I'm nice. I know this girl.
Josh has been going steady with


Kesley
Colbert

her near 'bout since the second
grade. I feel like she is part of the
family. Her name is Tandy or
Nandy or something like that.
Cute little girl.
And I am friendly when she
shows up at the house. I lean
down kind'a close to her face,
study hard for a minute or so and
say, "Josh, this is not the same
girl that came over last night."
Landy don't talk to me much.
That's why I was a little sur-
prised when she decided to go to
the golf course with me and Josh
the other day. You know how hot
it's been lately too hot for me
to walk. I rented a golf cart to car-
ry me to my ball.
Josh hits, pretty good shot. I
bust one, a country mile, right
down the middle. I kind'a swell
up and swagger off the tee. Josh's
little girlfriend has got to be im-
pressed with that shot! She
wasn't even looking. She's talking
to Josh! Kandy don't know much
about golf.
We take off down the first
fairway. Josh and Zandy riding in
the cart. I'm jogging along be-
hind.
Josh is putting out a number
two, I'm leaning on my putter try-
ing to catch some air, when I no-
tice that he is wearing my brand
new, all purpose, expensive, Nike
cross training shoes. That's the
third pair of those things I've
bought. He wore the other two
out before I got a chance to
put'em on. I thought I told him
not to -
"Dad, if you -can straighten
up, It's your turn."
We're teeing off on four, I
can't get the sweat out of my eyes
and I can't figure out how Josh
found those shoes. I had'em hid
in the top of my closet........I hit a
four iron dead right. The young:
:lady I'm being nice to jumps out!
of the cart, "Did'you see that one,,
it went right into the water."
Fandy don't know a thing
about golf.
While they are waiting for me
to catch up over on seven, Josh
talks her into hitting a shot. It's a
short par three. She's got skinny
legs, weak arms and no swing.
The ball hits a tree over in the left
woods, bounds down the cart
path. careens off a sprinkler
head, bouncing off a rake and
rolls up about a foot from the
hole. I looked her right in the eye,
"Brandy, is your dad a preacher
or something?"
I crawled up on the last fair-
way. "Hurry up, Dad, it's your
shot."
I should have nipped this
thing in the bud. The boy ought
to be out looking for frogs. Merci-
fully, the round ended.
"Mr. Colbert, thanks for
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


ETAOIN SHRDLU


_ m % a. .%v a aSam _- %I


Mutant or Clone ofPost Office Comedians May Be Too Much!


EVER NOTICE HOW people
begin looking like persons they
associate with frequently?
This phenomenon holds true
for beings other than humans,
too. People who have pets for a
long length of time start resem-
bling their pets, or vice versa.
People's habits start reflect-
ing those of their mates, good
friends or relatives. Of course, a
person should resemble a rela-
tive, but not a wife or a husband,
necessarily.
I have read that somewhere
out there, in that large world,
there is someone who looks ex-
actly like someone else. That
could be a hindrance or it could
be something to be desired.
A couple of weeks ago, Fren-
chie and I were in a restaurant in
North Georgia and we both
agreed that the man sitting at the
table next to us was the spitting


image of Genaro IJiggs] Zingarelli,
a friend of ours in Apalachicola.
Most of you probably know Jiggs
and probably wouldn't wish such
a thing as his look-alike on any-
one. But there this guy sat. The
same coloring, facial features,
grayish-red hair, thinning on the
top and all. He even wore the
same style clothing one usually
sees Ziggs wearing.

THE OTHER DAY, I went in
the Post Office to mail a large en-
velope, which I had to have
weighed before it was mailed.
Jean Stebel waited on me at
the counter, since Herb was off
sharing his wisdom somewhere
and [thankfully] Johnny wasn't
there.
But, they just as well have
been there!
Their attitudes were there in
full force, even though they both
were absent.
Johnny and Herb have


earned a reputaUon, over the
years, as running the most laid-
back postal window in the West-.
ern Hemisphere. Some people go'
to the post office every day, not:
because they are expecting any'
mail, but just to see what the two,
will come up with next.
I LAID MY envelope on the'
counter and asked Jean, "How;
many 3 stamps will it take to:
mail this large envelope?"
She laid it up on the post of-:
fice' new computer weighing ma-
chine, punched a key or two,
turned on a switch, did three pir-:
houettes in the middle of the floor
and said, "That'll be 521! How'
many three cent stamps is'that?"
Well, if I hadn't seen it with,
my own eyes, I would have sworn
Johnny or Herb were waiting on
me.
After Jean and I figured out
the 52 would be 14 three cent
stamps, she just looked at the let-
ter, cooed a couple of times and


suggested that we put one of
these cute little old love-bird
stamps on this little old enve-
lope?"
The envelope was going to At-
lanta, so I agreed with Jean that
what that envelope really needed
was a stamp affixed on the post-
age corner with a "cute little old
love bird printed on it."
Anything, just so long as the
envelope gets to Atlantal

BUT, WAIT, WE'RE not
through, yet!
Jean then asked, "Do you
need a receipt for this postage
you have laid out cold hard cash
for?" The "cash" being the afore-
said 52c.
Before I could answer, Jean
started moving handles, punch-
ing buttons, twisting levers and
switching switches. Behold, in
just a couple of minutes, that
computer had printed me out a
receipt for that 520!


I know I will be real success-
ful in keeping up with that little
piece of adding machine paper
until Uncle Sam calls on me once
again to fill out an income tax re-
turn. But, if I can't, I guess that's
my fault.
Jean presided over that new
computer and scale like a maes-
tro leading a bunch of horn
players. "This little machine ac-
counts for every penny I take in
during the day," she said, as she
continued punching buttons,
moving handles, etc.

MAYBE THIS VISIT to the
post office loses a little bit in the
translation. One had to just
about be there to appreciate how
much Herb and Johnny have per-
meated the actions, words and
motions of a sweet lady like Jean
Stebel.
It was shocking and a marvel
at how much she imitates their
actions while they are not there


to put forth their own brand of
postal patter.
I'm not real sure if Jean was
just acting out a role so people
wouldn't think they were in the
wrong post office, or if she has
truly been brain-washed by John-
ny and Herb to the point where
she has taken up their habits and
thinks that all sane people act
like they do.
It made me sort of shudder to
witness the incident and think
that maybe we had a mutant or a
clone of Johnny and Herb run-
ning around in our midst. If we're
not careful, this could begin a
complete new generation of those
two and I don't know if the world
is ready for this or not.
Here in Port St. Joe we are
charitable toward people. We can
accept Johnny and Herb for what
they are-a couple of crazy nuts-
-but when their numbers start
multiplying Well, that might
be a little more than even our
charitable people could absorb.


St. Joseph Bay Tide Table
Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
July 26 11:04 a.m. H 1.8 9:44 p.m. L .1
July 27 11:40 a.m. H 1.7 10:02 p.m. L .2
July 28 12:12 p.m. H 1.6 10:03 p.m. L .4
July 29 12:46 p.m. H 1.4 9:58 p.m. L .5
July 30 1:20 p.m. H 1.2 9:24 p.m. L .7
July 31 5:00 a.m. H .9 8:48 a.m. L .8
S*-- .2:00 p.m. H .9 7:52 p.m. L .8
-----Auq. 01 4:12 a.m. H 1.1 2:01 p.m. L .7)


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
,,USPHS 518880 Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-$10.60 Six Months
9WI1/ USPHS 518880 The Star Out of County-$21.20 Year Out of County-$15.90 Six Months
Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue21.20 Year Out of County 90 S Months
Port St. Joe, Florida 3245-0308 Post Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe. FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 their than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
0 William H. Ramsey ............Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
WSP Frenchie L. Ramsey .......... Office Manager AT PORT ST, JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ......... Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


I c 1 -( (q1 L,~


By: Wesl~ey R. Ramsey









THE STAR PORT ST JOE FL THU JULY 25, 1991 : PAGE SA


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell



It Happened In


New York City
"Have you ever been to Chicago?" a friend asked me last Sat-
urday night. "No, I quickly replied, "and I haven't been to New
York City, either. And that's just half of that story: I have no de-
sire to go to either city!"
'You might be surprised about Chicago," he continued.
"There are some real nice people there and, from what we saw,
Chicago is a real clean town." He related an incident that hap-
pened while he and his wife were on a subway. They were on
their way tp see a baseball game and asked a lady which stop
they should get off to get to Wrigley Field. The lady not only told
them which stop they should get off, but also told them which
side of the street they should walk on to get to the ball park safe-
ly.
Being told to walk on a certain side of the street seemed a
mite peculiar to me so I asked why he was advised to walk on a
particular side of the street. "I didn't ask," he replied. "We just
walked where she told us to walk."
"Chicago is really a nice city," he went on. "It's a lot different
from New York City. People will help you in Chicago, but they
won't in New York. I know because I've been to both places."
It was ironic, I thought but didn't tell him, but just last week
I read an article in the Panama City News Herald with the head-
ing, TOT RAPED ALONG HIGHWAY WHILE MOTORISTS
WATCHED. The article was from the Associated Press and stated
that although details of the case have not been made public, they
had information that described, in graphic detail, what hap-
pened. Excuse me, what allegedly happened.
According to the article, a tow-truck driver, Noel Sanchez,'
was driving along FDR Drive at 115th Street in Manhattan when
he noticed a traffic backup of about 20 cars. Thinking there
might have been an accident, Mr. Sanchez drove around the mo-
torists to see if he could help. When Mr. Sanchez arrived howev-
er, he was surprised to see a man raping a 3-year-old girl, who
was later identified as the rapist's niece,
The thing that shocked Mr. Sanchez, however, was seeing all
the people who had stopped just sitting there doing nothing Mr.
Sanchez must have been driving through from Mexico because
he didn't hesitate. He jumped a fence dividing the highway from
the alleged rape scene and chased the man about two blocks to a
nearby building where he was arrested a few minutes later by po-
lice. Mr. Sanchez is the only witness to come to police, authori-
tied said.
If that don't scald a goat, hot, boiling water won't
Children are being molested and raped at an alarming rate of
frequency. The people who commit these acts are extremely sick,
in my opinion, and should be put in a place where they can't
commit that crime again. A safe place for them would be a grave,
Think.
But, what about the people who were reported to have been
watching and doing nothing? If the facts in this article are true,
and I believe they are, what were those twenty-odd people think-
ing about as they stopped and watched this heinous crime being
committed? If they were not going to help, then why did they
stop? Don't tell me they were all crippled, deaf mutes on their
way to a convention!
According to the article, Leroy Saunders, 29, of New York
City, is in jail, charged with rape and has been ordered held with-
out ball. Surely there must be room in that cell for about 20
more people.
,.. Answer one question and be honest. Where do you think Le-
.roy would be today if that had happened in Georgia, Alabama or
Florida? I'm quite certain that if your answer is honest, you don't
really think he would be in Jail, do you?
Me in New York City? Not in this lifetime!



Chamber --- fromPage l
for their salaries while they are on the job, training," she said.
Jan McDonald, also a part of the, Port St. Joe office, gave a
report on how the service works along with the Diversified Coop-
erative Training department of the high school in placing pupils
in jobs to receive training in the work world, while they are still
students. 'We have 18 students already lined up for the new
school year, and eight presently working full-time this summer,"
she said.
Sheffield was especially high on the agency's role in helping
to discourage drop-outs from high school. She called attention to
several hard-hitting TV spots currently being shown on Channel
7 TV, with prospective employers advising high school graduates
they do not hire workers who do not have a high school diploma.
'This approach is working very well," Sheffield said.
The JTPA executive also took time to praise Gulf County
schools. 'Your school system has a good state-wide reputation
and I want to congratulate you for it," she said. Gulf County has
the lowest drop-out rating of any school system in the state of
Florida.


Bridge
Plans
Shown

From
Pagel


in. service with design standards,.' Prescott
said.
The bridge will also be designed for mili-
tary loads due to its location near several mili-
tary establishments along the coast.
In a summary of his report, Prescott said
there are three steps standing in the way of
actual construction work beginning. '"We must
first execute the contracts; then hold pre-
construction conferences; receive delivery of
pre-stressed concrete bridge members, and
then begin work," the DOT official said.
The present Highland View bridge was put
into service in 1939. The new highrise span
will be the third crossing at the Bay outlet for
the Gulf Canal.


Kesley from Page 2
bringing me. It was a delight to Nike's would look much better on
watch you play. You're the best you than they do on Josh."
golfer I've ever seen." An angel, I'm telling you,
I knew It all along, Amanda she's an absolute angel.
knows golf Respectfully,
"And Mr. Colbert, those Kes


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904-227-7322 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


Parker........... romage


form because that is very im-
portant."
She said, "It's highly im-
probable, but possible that I
might have made a mistake
like that [failure to report
Parker's answer on the unem-
ployment form]".
Baldwin's claim that Park-
er was asked about and denied
employment was vouched for
by at least two other employ-
ees of the compensation de-
partment.
PARKER'S WITNESSES
Parker produced two wit-
nesses, Bill Quarles and Jerry
Gibson, of Port St. Joe, who
filed for unemployment at the
same time as Parker, who both
said Parker informed Baldwin
that he was a Gulf County
Commissioner and she replied,
'That doesn't matter.".
Parker's attorney, Waylon
Graham, entered evidence
pointing out that Parker had
informed the state unemploy-
ment department that he was
a County Commissioner, prior
to his receiving his first check
in December, 1989. "In fact,


Bob Moore, the county attor-
ney advised the agency Parker
was a County Commissioner
and still had several years re-
maining in his term." Still
Parker continued to receive
checks.
Parker received some
$5,000 in compensation over a
25 week period before he was
notified by the department
that he was not qualified to re-
ceive the payments, starting
the investigation into the mat-
ter.
ALL DAY TRIAL
Parker's trial lasted the en-
tire day Tuesday, with a ver-
dict coming from the jury at
6:15 Tuesday evening after
nearly an hour of deliberation.
The verdict will prevent
Parker being reinstated from
the office from which he was
removed. It also makes him el-
igible to receive a prison sen-
tence of five years and/or a
$5,000 fine.
Sentence will not be decid-
ed on until September 3, fol-
lowing a pre-sentence nvesti-
gation.


Under Study from Page 1


reasonable amount, collect its
bad debts, and change Its billing
structure to better control late
payments.
The report shows the system
is still solvent, but lost money in
its operation because it did not
fund a depreciation account
Rish said he had asked the
Florida Rural Water Association
to make a study of both systems,
considering what steps may be
needed to make them both serve
the needs of the customers and
pay for their own operations. He
said the study should be com-
plete within two weeks.
BUILDING FEES
Building inspection fees, in
some instances, are far below the
break even point, according to
Building Inspector Don Butler.
He made the report to the last
meeting of the Commission and
suggested the Board adopt the fee
schedule outlined by the South-
ern Standard Building Code,
whose guidelines the County fol-
lows in their building inspection
program.
Butler told the Board Tues-
day night, the worst abuse of the
schedule fees is on call back in-
spections. "We'll get called out to
make an inspection and when we
get there, the builder isn't ready
for inspection, and so we have to
go back again. This is extremely
costly in time and expenses to
keep making call-backs at no
charge." Butler was recommend-
ing a $25.00 call-back charge, as
outlined in the SBC guidelines.
Most of the proposed rate
changes, other than the call-back
figure, were reflected in services
which now carry a very low rate,
such as the $25.00 minimum fee
to $50.00; inspections for electri-
cal, plumbing and mechanical in-
stallations and changes.
Butler presented his revised,
proposed fee schedule to Board,
which asked attorney Bob Moore
to put the schedule in ordinance
form, so the Board may consider
It at its next meeting.
PAVING CONTRACT
C. W. Roberts Construction
Company of Hosford, will be do-
ing the paving work in Port St.
Joe, the Beaches and White City.
Roberts was awarded the $1 mil-
lion contract on a 4-1 vote, with
Commissioner Nathan Peters
casting a nay vote. Roberts' con-
tract agreement called for class
three asphalt to be used on the
roads and Peters held out for the
higher class asphalt bid by Flori-
da Asphalt Company of Panama
City. The difference in the two
mediums of paving is the size
gravel used in preparation of the
road covering.
George Roberts, present at
the meeting, told The Star he
could begin work on the project
within about two or three weeks.


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Panama City, FL
769-5348

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Roberts said he is still working on
the Wewahitchka program, but
that heavy rains have held up the
project there, which would allow
him to go to work almost immedi-
ately here in the southern portion
of the county.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other items of business,
the Conimission:
-Instructed Ralph Rish to
meet with the Apalachicola North-
ern Railroad officials to discuss
repairs to the railroad crossing on
County Road 382, near Basic
Magnesia.
-Heard a report from Sheriff
Al Harrison that Major Bob Doug-
las of the Florida Marine Patrol
was to meet with the Sheriff and
Commissioner Al Ray to discuss
driving on the beaches. Harrison
also advised the Board that light-
ning was playing havoc with the
county radio tower at the rear of
the Courthouse and perhaps
some arresters needed to be in-


Gulf Democratic Committee Is
Selecting Convention Delegates


Selma Shoemaker, Chairper-
son of the Gulf County DEC has
announced plans for selecting

stalled.
-Librarian Jean Faliski re-
quested an increase in the library
budget, but was told all County'
funds were being reduced by five
percent this year, with the excep-
tion of the Library, where no cuts
in funding had been planned. She
was also advised the county was
placing $20,000 in the budget to
put a new roof on the building.
-Reacting to several re-
quests, the Board agreed to leave
the scallop season opening in St.
Joe Bay as it presently is; open-
ing on July 1. The Board had not
considered making a change, but
there was a suggestion made, in
passing, at the last meeting, by
the Bay Committee, that possibly
the season opening might be
changed to nearer August 1.


*
B'
.4

IA
j ~I
0~~,


' Ilk


four delegates who will represent
Gulf County at the 1991 Florida
Democratic Party State Conven-
tion scheduled for December 12-
14 in Orlando.
Democrats interested in run-
ning for a delegate position must
file with one of the Democratic
Executive Committee officers no
later than August 15, 1991. Dele-
gates will be elected by the mem-
bership of the DEC. However, 25
percent of the delegates must be
non-DEC members.
Qualifying forms and addi-
tional information regarding the
delegate selection process may be
obtained from the following:
Selma Shoemaker, 800 Tap-,
per Drive, H35, Port St. Joe, FL
32456 (904) 229-8237,
Robert M. Moore, P.O. Box
248, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (904)
229-8181, or
Wayne Childers, 702 1/2
Monument Ave., Port St. Joe, FL
32456, (904) 229-6966.


J. Patrickfs

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412 Reid Ive'nue
L Port St. Joe, Fl'orida
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Featuring Daily Luncheon Specials
and All You Can Eat Salad Bar


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NOON BUFFET ..........$4.95
or Order from the wide selection on Our
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PAGE 4A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1991

Rev. Elmer Braden

Completes Ministry


The Rev. Elmer Braden com-
pletes a five-year ministry at the
First Presbyterian Church in Port
St. Joe, and Wewahitchka
churches Sunday, July 28th. He
plans to live in Panama City
Beach, moving on or near July
30th.
Following the Rev. Ennis Sell-
ers' transfer to another city, Dr.
Braden became president of the
Port St. Joe Ministerial Associa-
tion for the year 1990 and part of
1991.
During his pastorate of the
Port St. Joe church, he received
some 12 new members, and
about five at Wewahitchka.
Physical improvements at the
Port St. Joe church included a
small bookcase donated by Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Benn, painting of
the exterior of the building, new
storm gutters, lawn mower, and a




O A11



Ethan Wingate Ellzey
Lee and Cyndi Elizey ofTalla-
hassee are proud to announce
the birth of their son, Ethan Win-
gate, born July 11 at Tallahassee
Memorial Regional Medical Cen-
ter. He weighed 3 pounds, 3.4
ounces and was 16 inches long.
Ethan's grandparents are
Mrs. R.H. Ellzey of Port St. Joe,
and Preston and Iduma Wingate
of Mexico Beach.
His great grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Wood of
Burgess Creek.
Ethan was welcomed home
by his very proud big sister Me-
ghan Lee, age 3 1/2.


Matthew David Jones
Bob and Gaynell Jones of
Panama City are proud to
announce the birth of their son,
Matthew David. He arrived July 7
and weighed 7 pounds, 1 ounce.
David was welcomed home by his
big brother, Phillip, who is 2 1/2.
Proud grandparents are Troy
and LouJones, Charles and Bon-
.n nie Stephens, all of Port St. Joe.


Stephen L. Alexander
Stephen and Melanie Alexan-
der have announced the birth of
their son, Stephen Little Alexan-
der, Jr. He was born July 19 at
Baptist Hospital in Jacksonville.
Grandparents are Bob and
Marilyn McKnight of Jacksonville.
Great grandparents are Lucille
McKnight of Port St. Joe and the
late Harry McKnight.


ATTENTION
This is to inform all
she hasn't told be-
cause she hasn't
seen! On July 24,
NNB will be 15.
'"Happy Birthday,
Chic,
We love you!"


video tape player with monitor, as
well as the refinishing several
pieces of church furniture.
Improvements at Wewahitch-
ka included purchase of new fa-
bles and chairs for the fellowship
room, carpeting of the sanctuary
floor, and cushioning the pews.
The sanctuary was also air condi-
tioned. A complete set of stained
glass windows were installed. The
St. John's Episcopal Church,
which meets in the same build-
ing, took care of half of the costs
on the last two items.
This Sunday will be the Rev.
Braden's farewell sermon entitled
'The Need for Unity." Preachers
during August will be announced
from week to week.

Downtown
Redevelopment
Meeting Tuesday
Notice is being given that
there will be a meeting of the
Downtown Redevelopment Agen-
cy on Tuesday, July 30 in the
commission room at City Hall at
7:00 p.m.
The public is cordially invited
to attend.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late Henry
"Bobby" Blackshire would like to
thank everyone for all the kind
deeds expressed during our loss.
May the love of Jesus forever
shine upon you.
The Dawsons
The Blackshires
The Quinns


Engaged
Mr. and Mrs. Willard Peter-
son, of Wewahitchka, are proud
to announce the engagement and
forthcoming marriage of their
daughter, Brenda Diane to David
Edward O'Barr. Final plans for.a
November wedding will be an-
nounced at a later date.


Scotty Carrillo

Scotty Is Two!
Scotty Carrillo celebrated his
second birthday July 25th. Help-
ing him on his special occasion
were his mom, grandma, Uncle
Richard, Aunt Marsha, and cou-
sin Joe.
Scotty is the son of Kathy
Carrillo.


Mark Wester and Sheri Floyd


August Wedding


Mr. and Mrs. William Tracy
Floyd of Fair Bluff, North Caroli-
na, are pleased to announce the


~iii.


William and June Miller


Golden Anniversary
William and June Miller will
celebrate their 50th wedding
anniversary July 28 at their home
in Gulf Aire with their six chil-
dren, 16 grandchildren and 12
great grandchildren.


SAND DOLLAR
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Glad Tidings'
Homecoming
Glad Tidings, Wewahitchka,
will be holding homecoming Sun-
day, July 28. Rev. J.H. Lee will be
the special speaker and special
singing will be provided by the
Gilleys. Come and please bring
company-size covered dishes for
dinner on the grounds.


Wins Maids
David Lewis of Port St. Joe is
the winner of Maids for a Day.
The CCC's of Port St. Joe
High School is grateful for the
support given them in their re-
cent effort to raise funds for a
1992 cruise.


v/ Qv Why wail (or summer
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227-7428


Pon St Joe


engagement of their daughter,
Sheri Lynn Floyd, to Corporal
Mark David Wester, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard Olynn Wester,
Sr. of Port St. Joe.
Sheri is the granddaughter of
Ruby B. Floyd of Fair Bluff.
The bride elect is employed
by Wal-Mart Pharmacy, and is
currently the pharmacist assist-
anata the Wal-Mart in Whiteville,
North Carolina.
Her fiance, is a communica-
tions security equipment techni-
cian in the United States Marine
Corps and is presently assigned
to Marine Corps Air Station,
Cherry Point, North Carolina.
The wedding is planned for
August 3 at 3:00 p.m. at the Hin-
son Cross Road Baptist Church
in Fair Bluff.

Reception Set for
50th Anniversary
Burl and Susie Davis of We-
wahitchka will celebrate their
50th wedding anniversary on Au-
gust 10. This golden celebration
is being given in their honor by
their daughters, Beneva Collings-
worth, Sandra Lindsey, Margie
McCain, Robbie Brooks, and
Ruth Cantley along with their
sons-in-law, grandchildren and
great grandchildren. The recep-.
tion will be held at the First Bap-
tist Church of Wewahitchka in
the fellowship hall from 2:00 until
5:00 p.m. CT. All friends and rel-
atives of the couple are cordially
invited to attend.


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rliv 4









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1991


* Lions Club Planning Old

Fashioned Chicken BBQ


The Port St. Joe Lions Club is
having an old fashioned chicken
bar-b-que on Saturday, August
17 at the First Union park. Tick-
ets will be pre-sold and for $4.00
a plate you will get a half of
chicken, real baked beans, cole
slaw, and a roll. The cooking will
be done by Waylon "Smoke Fla-
vored" Graham and served by the
Lions Club members and their
wives. Serving will start at 11:00
a.m. and finish up around 3:00
p.m. You can have a picnic at the
park or take it home in go-boxes.
Remember all profits from the Li-
ons Club fund raisers go directly
to the sight conservation pro-
grams. So when you are ap-
proached by a Lion Club member
selling tickets, remember you are
not only going to get a bargain,
you will help sponsor eye glasses


and exams for the needy, as well
as other eye conservation pro-
grams.
Other fund raising projects
are being planned by the Lions
for the near future: A Casino
Night, Donkey Basketball, Gum-
bo booth at the Seafood Festival,
and rummage sale are just some
of what is in the works. As the
particulars are worked out, the
Lions will be advertising and pro-
moting these events.


Paper Takes Off
United States paper and pa-
perboard production totaled 78.6
million tons in 1990 the weight
of about 1,300 Navy aircraft car-
riers.


Alan Stewart

LABC Welcomes

New Minister
Long Avenue Baptist Church
welcomes Alan Stewart as its new
Minister of Education, Youth and
Recreation. Alan recently gradu-
ated from Southwestern Semi-
nary in Fort Worth, Texas, with a
Masters Degree in Religious Edu-
cation, and joined the staff at
Long Avenue on the 17th of July.
Alan and his wife, Susie and
their three children, are originally
from West Virginia and are look-
ing forward to living and working
in Port St. Joe.


Recycle Highland View
Attention Highland View resi-
dents:


Visiting from Switzerland
Lydia and Matthew Lieber, 11, from Bern, Switzerland, have jour-
neyed far to visit with their grandparents, Annette and John Thorpe
of Port St. Joe.


KaLeigh Goodson

KaLeigh Is Four!
KaLeigh Goodson, daughter
of Nell and Tammy Goodson of
White City, celebrated her fourth
birthday June 29 at the Park with
a "Land Before Time" party. Help-
ing her celebrate were many
friends and relatives.
KaLeigh is the granddaughter
of Ralph and Linda Shoemaker of
Kinard, and Donald and Ida
Goodson of White City. She is the
great granddaughter of L.C. and
Lovie Wood of Hosford, Myrtle
Preston of White City, and Ester
Goodson of Marianna.


f3l


Andy Thomas

Thomas Receives

Employee Award
Congratulations are in order
for Andy Thomas who received
the HRS Employee of the Quarter
Award on July 18 at the local
HRS office. Thomas has been
with the department since 1965
and is currently the Gulf County
economic services supervisor.
Award recipients are chosen
each quarter by fellow employees
as the person that made the most
significant contribution to the
people served by HRS. Program
Administrator Norton Kilbourn
m made the presentation.


Recycling bins are at the fire
house in Highland View. Anyone
wanting their recyclable products
(glass-brown, clear or green; plas-
tics-milk jugs, soda bottles, etc.
or aluminum) picked up at their
home and they cannot get to the
fire station, may call Elmo at
227-2034 or Marty at 227-1408
and they will be glad to pick it
up. Keep Highland View clean.
Fifty percent of the proceeds go
the Highland View Volunteer Fire
Department.


ER

,?Nov .: ..,,. ..



i













|i


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different's playing every day.


Turn to your newspaper for a front
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Pick up the ticket and get in the act.
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Call 227-1278 to Subscribe!





THE STAR

Your Hometown Newspaper


308 Williams Ave.


227-1278


GRE Prep

Course Offered
The Office of Continuing Edu-
cation at Florida State University
Panama City Campus is sponsor-
ing a GRE (Graduate Record
Exam) Prep course to assist those
wishing to take the October 12
exam. The prep course will be
held at the FSU Panama City
Campus, Mondays and Thurs- ,
days, 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. CT, Sep-
tember 16 through October 10.
The course is divided into two
sections, math and verbal. Em-
phasis is placed on math opera-
tions, data interpretation, reading
comprehension, and vocabulary
relationships. Test-taking strate-
gies and tips for handling test
anxiety are also offered. The fee
for the course is $140 if regis-
tered by September 9 and may be
done by phone with Visa or Mas-
terCard. To register or for further
information, call 872-4750, ext.
116.

SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


Glad Tidings Annual Homecoming
Wewahitchka

Sunday, July 28, 1991

Rev. J.H. Lee Special Speaker
The Gilleys Special Singing
(Please come and bring company-size dishes)


Small Engine Repair

Lawn Mowers Tillers Go-Karts *
Weed Eaters Chain Saws



229-6965 1106LongA
(Around Ba


Beach


Harmon Realty, Inc

BARBARA HARMON, Broker Ann Six, Sales Associate, 229-6392

648-5767


NEW LISTINGS
132 Miramar Drive, Mexico Beach: Jolli-
day Duplex a rare find! This beach-
side duplex has 2 bedrooms, 1 bath
each side. Cen. h/ac. Only third lot
from the beach. Ceiling fans in living
room and bedrooms, appliances in-
clude refrigerator, range, dishwasher,
microwave. Nice set up, in mint condi-
tion! Possible owner financing,
$84,900.00.

HOMES Mexico Beach
107 N. 26th Street, Mexico Beach: Two bedroom, two bath, two story
home, newly remodeled. All new carpet and vinyl throughout.
Large living, dining and kitchen area upstairs. Large den or family
room downstairs. Beautiful 75' x 100' shaded lot. Only 1 block to
the beach. Upstairs screened porch has view of the gulf. Nice
quiet neighborhood. 689.00-00. REDUCED TO $56,500.00 for
Quick Sale. /
215 Kim Kove: Lovely 4 BR, 2 bath family home on two large corner
lots. Living room has cathedral ceiling, large stone wall fire place
w/heat circulator. Bay window at entrance and and skylights
throughout make for a bright atmosphere. Large master bedroom
suite. Gourmet kitchen w/beautiful oak cabinets w/lazy susans.
Dining area has french doors which lead to sun deck in back.
Double car garage. Energy efficient central heat pump. Many oth-
er features. $102,000.00.
64 Magnolia Ave.: This uniquely designed 2 story,home has many fea-
tures to consider. Only 1/2 block to the beach 3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths. (1 upstairs, 1 downstairs). Liv. rm. has ceiling fan, track
lighting, & sliding doors which lead to large covered deck w/view
of the gulf. Also side sun deck off kitchen w/bar and flourescent
lighting. Completely fenced yard makes nice private outdoor liv-
ing. Lots of shade trees. $86,090.00. Reduced to $79,500.00.
Also additional adjacent lot for $25,000.00.
310 Hwy.98 WATERFRONTI Two bedroom, one bath cottage, complete-
ly remode ,crawailTr oPt,.rlooks the
Gulf! Spacir1 ,,,j, ,, I;AlddtAJl.KJlmnn living uti-
lized In bedroom with triple bunk. Excellent decor and beach fumi.-
ture. The perfect beach get-a-way! Must see this onel $98,500.00.
717 Florida Ave.: Three bedroom, 2 bath brick home on beautiful corner
lot only steps to the beach Central heat/ac. Central vacuum sys-
tem. Large screened porch on back, covered patio off master bed-
room. Nice yard and landscaping. $69,900.00.
809 Maryland Boulevard: Two bedroom, two bath 12'x70' Regent mo-
bile home on nice 75' x 100' corner lot. Central heat & ac. Com-
pletely furnished. Lg. sundeck off back. In nice neighborhood.
$26,000.00
EASY TERMS! Owner will finance w/$2,500.00 down, balance at
10% for 15 years. Monthly payments only $252.55.
140 Pine Street Large unique home on two beautiful wooded large
corner lots. Nine rooms with two full baths, Florida room, den,
large master bedroom, excellent kitchen with lots of cabinet space
and cneter work island. Two fireplaces. one in bedroom. Double
carport, 12'x37" screened porch. Located in nice neighborhood,
only short walk to the beach. Many more amenititsl! $149,900.00.
320 B Wysong Avenue Two bedroom, one bath townhome in nice
residential subdivision. Sunken living room with ceiling fan and full
mirrored wall. Large kitchen and dining area with lots of cabinet
space. Appliances include refrigerator, range, dishwasher. Private
court yard area accent unit. Large storage room. Must see this
onel $48,000.00
Sandollar #1 One bedroom one bath A-frame waterfront property.
Completely furnished. Reduced to $60,000.
Sandollar #2 Two bedroom, one bath cottage, completely furnished,
with screened porches overlooking the Gulfl $60,000.00
Sandollar #3 Two bedroom, one bath cottage, completely furnished,
with screened porches overlooking the Gulfl $60,000.00
Sandollar #4 Three bedroom, one bath cottage completely furnished,
with approximately 65' lot. $85,000.00.
Total package $255,000.00 with 200' waterfront property.
204 Hwy. 98 WATERFRONTI Charming two bedroom, one bath
beach cottage. Scree a fr overlooks the GulfI UN-
OBSTRUCTED VIEV iice Large sun deck over
carport gives additionalTarT plely furnished. On 50'x1 50'
lot. Ceiling fans in living room and bedrooms. LOCATIONI LOCA-
TIONI LOCATIONI Priood at $60,000.00.Reduced to $64,000.00.
Grace Home, 107 30th Street Large BEACHSIDE three bedroom,
two bath home with game room. Living room with fireplace over-
looks the Gulf and leads to sun deck that surrounds house. Pri-
vate deck off master bedroom. Completely furnished. All the com-
forts of home. Owner will listen to offers $438,000.00. Reduced to
$128,000.00.
602 Fortner Avenue Stucco DUPLEX only 1/2 block to the BEACHI 2
Two bedroom, one bath units. Completely furnished. On 50'x150'
lot. Separate entrance to each unit. Excellent rentals. Presently
rented. $53,500.00.
Luxury by the Pier #7, 38th Street WATERFRONTI Immaculate two
bedroom, two and one-half bath waterfront townhome. Owner oc-
cupied, never rented. Sun deck off master bedroom and screened
porch off living area with lower sun deck on beach with outdoor
shower. Ceiling fans and vertical blinds coordinate with flooring.
$99,600-00. REDUCED $96,500.00.
314 Hatley Drive Three bedroom, two bath townhomes in nice resi-
dential area. Vaulted ceiling in living, dining, and kitchen areas.
Large bar in kitchen. All appliances included. $48,500.00 to
$49,900.00.
13th Street -Two bedroom, one bath stilt home 1/2 block to theBeach!
Needs some TLC. Large deck on front and side. Partial view of
the Gulfl Owner will finance. $55,000.00.
Loft by the Pier #12 & #14, Surfvlew and Spindrift Townhomes,
106B and 108D 37th Street Attractive two bedroom townhomes
near fishing pier and beach. Newly remodeled. Completely fur-
nished and equipped for second home or rental. Bay window ac-
cents living room with cathedral ceiling. Private patio in back, off
bedroom. Assumable mortgage. $66,000.00 each.Reduced
$63,000.
200 6th Street Three bedroom, two bath double wide mobile home.
On large 105'x112.5' corner lot. Fastened to home foundation.
Only 2 blocks to the Beach! $45,500.00


ST. JOE BEACH
Corner of Desoto St. & Hwy. 98, St. Joe Beach, two bedroom, one
bath frame home on 50'x90' corner lot. Unobstructed view of the
gulf from Florida room on front Living room and separate family
room or denim PRICED FOR QUICK SALE! $54,000.00.
Hwy. 98 Near Santa Anna Newly remodeled four bedroom, two bath
home overlooking the Gulfl Unobstructed viewl Large living room
with stone fireplace. Large kitchen and dining area. Fenced yard,
screened porch, and raised sun deck. On 50'x90' Ict. $96,Q00.00
Reduced $85,000.00.
End of Pine Street and Hwy. 98 WATERFRONT TRIPLEXI (1) Two
bedroom, one bath unit with screened porch. (2) One bedroom,
one bath units with screened porches. Beautiful location on the
Gulfl Completely furnished. Excellent rental units presently rent-
ed. Possible owner financing. $115,000.00.
LOTS ON MEXICO BEACH
Residential Zoned for Homes Only
13th St., Mexico Beach: Large lot close to the Beach. 120' x 100'
Mexico Beach Business Center Lot 17 Residential zoning.
$28,000.00.
109 13th St.: 120' x 90' lot on paved street. Close to beach. Residen-
tial. Mexico Beach Business Center Lot 22 $28,500.00.
Magnolia Ave.: 75'x102' lot only 1/2 block to the gulfl Good gulf view.
Unit 11, BIk 8, Lot 7. $25,000.00.
Kim Kove,Grand Isle Subd. 75'x115' lot in nice residential subdivi-
sion. Grand Isle Unit 15, BIk C, Lot 22. $12,500.00.
Corner 5th St. & Maryland Blvd. 100'x158.33' come riot. Unit 14, Blk
A, Lot 1. $10,500.00
Hwy. 386, Mexico Beach (4) 75'x100' lots on paved street. Unit 11,
BIk 5, Lots 2, 4, 6, 8. Residential zoning. Nice shade trees.
$25,000 each.
New Mexico Drive (5) 100'x158.33' lots. Mexico Beach Unit 14, BIk
B, Lots 9, 11, 13,15,17. $6,000.00 Each.
New Mexico Drive 100'xl58.33' lot. Unit 14, BIk B, Lot 3. $6,000.00.
New Mexico Drive 100'x158.3 3bt4, BIk B, Lot 8. Reduced
$5,000.00.
Texas Drive 100'x108' lot. Unit 14, BIk F, Lot 6. 6,800.90 Owner will
finance. REDUCED TO $6,300.00.
Arizona Drive 100'x108' lot. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot 16. $7,000.00.
California Drive (4) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk E, Lots 10, 12, 16,
18. $7,000.00 each.
Arizona Drive (5) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk E, Lots 9, 11, 13, 15,
17. $7,000.00 each.
Arizona Drive (5) 110'x110' lots, Unit 14, BIk D, Lots 6, 8, 10,12, 14.
Owner financing. $7,500.00.
Texas Drive (2) 100'x100' lots. Unit 14, BIk G, Lots 9, 10. $8,000.00
each.
7th Street 100'x108' lot. On paved street. Walking distance to the
Beach. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot 15. $10,000.00.
7th Street 100'x108' lot. On paved street. Walking distance to the
Beach. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot 9. $10,000.00.
Robin Lane (2) Large lots on paved street. Nice subdivision. Under-
ground utilities. Unit 17, BIk 3, Lots 10, 100. Owner will finance
with $2,000.00 down, balance at 9% for 5 years. $10,000.00
each.
Wysong Avenue 109'x100' lot. On paved street. Underground utili-
ties. Nice Neighborhood. Unit 17, BIk 1, Lot 8. $11,000.00.
Corner Oak Avenue & Palm Street 1 1/2 lots, large size irregular
shaped. ONLY 1/2 block to the Beachi Owner will finance. Unit
11, Blk 8, E 1/2 of Lot 16, All of lot 18. $29,800.00.
Gulfaire Drive, Gulfaire Subdivision 70'x 15' home lot. BIk G, Lot 2.
Good view of the Gulf. $35,000.00.
LOTS ZONED FOR MOBILE HOMES
5th Street Extra large lot on paved street. Unit 16, lot 15. 80'x174.86'
x83.86'x200'. $13,500.00.
Maryland Blvd., Mexico Beach: (3) 75'x100' lots zoned for mobile
homes. Completely cleared and filled. Nice shade trees. Owner
will finance with $2,500.00 down. $13,500.00 EACH.
Maryland Blvd. 75'x1 00' lot. Unit 12A, BIk C, Lot 4. $13,000.00.
Fortner Avenue between 6th and 7th Street 50'x150' lot. One block
from the Beachl Unit 1, BIk 8, Lot 5. $20,300.00.
WATERFRONT
Hwy. 98 WATERFQIM of 8th Street. 60'x80' lot. $60,000.00.
Unit 2, BlkV, LoPM.l
Hwy; 98 WATERFRONTI End of 8th Street. 66'x80' lot. $66,000.00.
Unit 2, Blk V. Lot 3.
Hwy. 98 ST. JOSEPH SHORES. 120'x397 waterfront lot.
$120,000.00.
ST. JOE BEACH LOTS
Canal Street 50'x125' lot. Yon's addition, BIk 10, Lot 9. $15,950.00.
Pine Street (2) 50'x125' lots. Yon's Addition, BIk 11, Lots 4, 5.
$31,900.00.
OVERSTREET
229 Forest Ave., : 3 bedroom, 2 bath double wide mobile home on 1
1/8 acres. Very well kept & maintained, in mint cond. Living room
has cathedral ceiling w/ceiling fan. Kitchen has bar, and very ade-
quate cabinet and counter space. Master bedroom has ceiling
fan, Ig. walk-in closet, and garden tub in bath. Property is com-
pretely cleared. Small fish pond, Fruit trees, nice garden spot.
Large covered porch on front. $42,900.
263 Forest Ave., Overstreet: Two bedroom, 1 bath mobile home on
1.12 acres. Cen. gas heat/elec. a/c. Appliances include refrig.,
range. 12'x16' storage building. 50'x100' stocked pond. Utility
area w/washer & dryer hook-ups. Excellent starter home.
$25,900.00.
CAPE SAN BLAS
Nautilus Way, Feather Sound Subdivision WATERFRONTI 51' on
the Gulf x 394.54' deep. Lot 8. $52,000.00.
Nautilus Way, Feather Sound Subdivision (2) interior lots. Good
view of the Gulf! $34,000.00 each.
PORT ST. JOE
106 Gautier Memorial Lane: Beautiful executive two story 3 BR, 2 1/2
bath brick home on gorgeous lot just steps from St. Joseph Bay.
Professionally landscaped and sodded yard w/underground
sprinkler system, formal living room and dining room. Large family
room w/stone fireplace, recessed spot lighting, French doors
which lead to large Florida room with jacuzzi. Gourmet's kitchen
has center island w/stone cooktop, abundance of cabinets and
counter space w/adjustable shelves, and pull out drawers. Beauti-
ful bar, dinette area, ceramic tile flooring. Master suite has full ce-
ramic tile bath and separate shower, large vanity and dressing
area w/his & her's walk-in closets. This home is in mint condition,
Many more amenities. Shown by appointment only!


Mexico


CORNER OF 14TH STREET & HIGHWAY 98
MEXICO BEACH


rjIxrlUl


L


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PAGE 5A


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THE STARPORT ST. JOE JULY 25, 1991


EiGAP 6A Battl

Hospital/Cout Fund Battle


Franklin County's Emerald
Coast Hospital, a sister hospital
to Port St. Joe's Gulf Pines, and
the Franklin County Commission
are involved in a battle caused by
Emerald Coast's decision to
down-grade ambulance service in
Franklin County to come more
within the funding provided by
the county.
Franklin County officials,
naturally, are up in arms about
the hospital management's deci-
sion to down-grade the ambu-
lance service from Advanced Life
Support level to Basic Life Sup-


port. The hospital operates
Franklin County's ambulance
service, just as it does here in
south Gulf County.
Hospital management says
the $60,000 annual contribution
made by the county to pay for the
ambulance service is just not
enough money to pay for provid-
ing .the ALS operation from Alliga-
tor Point to Apalachicola. The
hospital also points out that the
$60,000 is repaid to the County
as their lease for the facility.
The two boards met Monday
afternoon, to air their differences,


Ie) OBTAIS I


Carl B. Davis
Carl B. Davis, 63, of Wewa-
hitchka, passed away Wednesday
morning, July 17, in Bay Medical
Center following a courageous
struggle with illness. A native of
Coffeeville, Mississippi, he had
lived in Wewahitchka for the past
six years, coming from Gretna,
Louisiana, where he had lived for
15 years. He was a member of the
Westside Baptist Church in
Wewahitchka, a retired member
of the Association of Bridge,
Structural, and Ornamental Iron
Workers Local 58, of New
Orleans, Louisiana, and he was a
veteran of World War II.
Survivors include his wife,
Lucy Dunn Davis of Wewahitch-
ka; his children and grandchil-
dren: Larry Allison and Christina
Faith Dossett, both of Wewahitch-
ka, Jerry Allison of New Castle,,
Delaware, Diane Lockeby and
John Paul Dossett, both of High-
land, Illinois, Amy Elizabeth Alli-
son of Canton, Massachusetts;
two sisters, Margie Sue Kelly and
Martha Faye Stuckey of Orange
Beach, Alabama; two brothers,
Tommy Smith of Coffeeville, and
Jimmie Smith of Magnolia, Ala-
bama; and many nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services were held
Friday at Westside Baptist
Church, conducted by the Rev.
Michael Husfelt Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot at Jehu
Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home.

John S. Kramer
Join' S. Kramer, 79, of Port
St. Joe, passed away Thursday
evening, July 18, in Bay St Jo-
seph Care Center following an ex-


tended illness. A native of Bogalu-
sa, Louisiana, he had been a
resident here since 1938, working
.for St. Joe Forest Products Co. He
retired as maintenance supervis-
or. He was a member of St. Jo-
seph's Catholic Church, the
Knights of Columbus, and was
one of the charter members of the
Port St. Joe Lions Club.
Survivors include his wife,
Germaine Kramer of Port St. Joe;
one daughter, Charmaine Earley
of Simmons Bayou; one son,Steve
Kramer of Dothan, Alabama; two
grandsons, Brian and Brad Le-
mieux, of Simmons Bayou; and
one sister, Annie Collette of Boga-
lusa.
A funeral mass was celebrat-
ed Saturday at St. Joseph's Cath-
olic Church by Father Thorn
Crandall. Entombment was in the
St. Mathews section of the Holly
Hill Mausoleum.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Funeral
Home.

Bill Allen
William J. (Bill) Allen, 60, of
Highland View, passed away
Thursday evening, July 18, at
home. He was a paint and body
repairman. He had lived in Port
St. Joe since 1967.
He is survived by one sister,
Bobbie Davis, and her husband
Charlie, three uncles, T.D.
Swores and Willis Swores, both of
Ashford, Alabama, and Luna
Swores of Blakely, Georgia, one
aunt, Mrs. John Gormly of San
Antonio, Texas.
Graveside services were held
Sunday in the family plot at Holly
Hill Cemetery of Port St. Joe with
the Rev. Jimmy Clark and the
Rev. Howard Browning officiating.
All arrangements were by Gil-
more Funeral Home.


but after the meeting was over,
the differences were still present.
After the hospital administra-
tor, Paul Fitzgerald filed his claim
that the county was not paying
enough for the level of ambulance
service they were receiving,
Franklin County Clerk, Pal Rivers
contends that the county never
intended to subsidize the ambu-
lance operation. He offered the
opinion that the county had pur-
chased the ambulance vehicles
and that met their responsibility
for the service.
The hospital administrators
also announced they would re-
move the conditional privileges to
admit patients in the hospital
from Dr. Photis Nichols, a veteran
physician in Apalachicola unless
he cooperated with the hospital
operation to a greater degree in
furnishing some emergency room
coverage, peer review coverage,
etc. Nichols had considerable
support present at the meeting
from Apalachicola residents who
felt his 40 years of service to the
community should allow him
some privileges.
The Apalachicola hospital is
owned by Franklin County, but is
leased by Provident Medical Cor-
poration of Orlando.


I


Simmons Credited


With HUD
Bill Simmons, son of Mrs.
William Simmons of Port St. Joe,
is largely credited with the fact
that the City of Pensacola denies
drug offenders residence In public
housing, according to a recent
story in the Pensacola News-
Journal.
Simmons, an economics and
marketing professor, who teaches
at the University of West Florida
and Pensacola Junior College, re-
cently contacted Pensacola au-
thorities with the concept, which
is being adopted as a deterrent to
the drug trade in northern cities,
as a solution to a growing prob-
lem in Pensacola.


Changes
Simmons hatched his idea af-
ter watching a television news
story that showed the same pro-
gram working in a small New
England community.
Since Simmons had heard
about shootings, drugs and vio-
lence in Pensacola's housing pro-
jects, he presented the idea to
community authorities as a solu-
tion there. "We seemed to be hav-
ing a problem in Pensacola, and
we didn't seem to be doing any-
thing about it," he said. "I was on
the phone for seven weeks talking
to politicians, lawmakers and
HUD officials about the program."
Pensacola still doesn't deny
drug offenders residency in pub-
lic housing, but as a result of
Simmons prodding, local officials
now want to implement a federal
program that will help accom-
plish the Idea. One of the officials
pushing the idea is Representa-
tive Tom Banjanin, who has been
working with Housing and Urban
Development officials to institute
an anti-drug trafficking program
in Pensacola. It would allow HUD
to cut off funds to public housing
residents involved in drugs.


club in a positive manner.
Campbell, said Jack Barr,
District Governor of District 694,


will be visiting the Port St. Joe
club on Wednesday and Thuts-
day, August 28 and 29.


ST. JOSEPH TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO.
INTRODUCES THREE NEW CALLING FEATURES
St. Joseph Telephone and Telegraph
Company introduces three new Calling
Features:
*Teen Service Now you can know who
the call is for before you answer the phone.
You can have two telephone numbers as-
signed to the same line, each with a distinc-
tive ring.
*Warm Line (In Port St. Joe only) Within
up to 20 seconds after taking the phone off
the hook, a predesignated number is auto-
matically dialed. When injury or panic
makes it difficult to dial an emergency num-
ber, help can be reached easily.
*Cancel Call Waiting Now when you
have a call that you don't want interrupted,
you can prevent a second call from break-
ing into your line.
Free installation until September 30, 1991,
for these new features plus Touchtone, Call
Waiting, Call Forwarding, Speed Dial, and
Three Way Calling.
Call the Business Office to place an order
at 229-7231 or 1-800-772-7288.


Cpl.Mark D. Wester
Wester Completes
NCO Course
Cpl. Mark D. Wester recently
completed the Non-
Commissioned Officer's Leader-
ship Course at Marine Corps Air
Station, Cherry Point, North Car-
olina.
The course was six weeks
long and is designed to improve
Marine NCO's skills in areas such
as military instruction, physical
training, drill, ceremonies, -uni-
forms, customs, and courtesesies.
Cpl. Wester was honor gradu-
ate of his class. He also received
the high academic award and the
high drill award.

Wood Border to
Border Paneling
More than 27.77 million
square feet of wood panels were
produced in the United States
last year, enough to cover 90 per-
cent of Rhode Island.
According to Georgia-Pacific
Corp., one of the world's largest
forest products companies, struc-
tural wood panels include ply-
wood made from pine, fir and
hardwoods, as well .as oriented
strand board.


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LAURA RAMSEY, Agent ROY SMITH, Agent


Campbell

Assumes

Leadership

Wendell Campbell took over
his leadership of the Port St. Joe
Rotary Club Thursday, beginning
the 51st year of the City's oldest
civic club.
Campbell asked the member-
ship to adopt the Rotary Interna-
tional slogan, Look Beyond Your-
self for the new year and pledged
an active club agenda for the next
fiscal year.
"For instance, we're going to
reinstate the Rotary Charity Ball
this year and we're going to ex-
plore the possibility of holding a
father/son golf tournament as
well as several other projects
which can benefit the community
as well as provide the club an ac-
tive avenue to do something posi-
tive for the community," Camp-
bell said.
The new president, succeed-
ing the leadership of Bill Wood,
whose term ended with the end of
the month of June, said he con-
sidered it a privilege and honor to
be elected to his office and
pledged to do his best to lead the


You Asked for It- Now We Have It!
SURE SHOT PEST CONTROL


(Monthly Flea Protection for Your Home)
Makes no difference if you are a regular customer or not (although regu-
lar customers get a break), you can enjoy a flea-free home this summer.
All you need do is call Sure Shot at 227-7398 or 227-PEST for details on
M.F.P.
Offered by Sure Shot Pest Control Company
"We're Working Hard to Win Your Trust!"

S n=PRE PEST CONTROL
302 Reid Ave. 227-7378 Port St. Joe, FL


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Effective August 5
New Hours for our office located at

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Open Mon.-Thurs. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Closed Friday


ams Ave.


PHONE 22


FRANK HANNON, Agent


[ )I








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1991 PAGE 7A

G di F ord

SEven with Summer Heat, Gardening Gives Pleasure
By Roy Lee Carter forms, which the common name planted by seeds or transplants. months old. Celosia or cocks- varieties have flower heads meas- matic display of garden color, as
County Extension Director suggests crested and plumy. Both Celosia seeds take a week to comb flowers range in color from during six to 10 inches across. The well as unusual cut flowers.
of these grow well in the hot sum- germinate, and the plants will pink and purple to orange, yel- plumed varieties are very spectac- Cockscomb also will work well in
We usually think of Annual mer months, and both can be bloom when they're about two low, and red. The large crested ular in form, and provide a dra- dried bouquets.
Flowers only in terms of a spring
or fall garden, because most of
the popular varieties need a cool
environment for best growth. But,
there are a few annuals which Day Beds AD incredible
will thrive during hot and rainy Brass Bar Stool Bargain!
weather. They provide an inex- a
pensive source of color for Florida
summer gardens. Feet
If you've ever tried raising T l O
tender annuals in Florida's hu-S
mid summer heat, you're well *-
aware that such conditions can
be pretty tough on many flower L SALE!
varieties. However, some species
will do well in hot weather. So, In Caon Danley Furniture &
the trick to successful summer
gardening is selecting the right 8 9
plants. In this article, I'll talk R k Bas
about three colorful and relatively Roc e Brass
Recliner Plant
Beautiful Stand G



,.* County O. CU niTs
Roy Lee'"
Carte 8 '005 WALL
0 Conty 84,UNITS

EtninOak Finish
Extension .,/ Open or Door
Director 3 DAYS ONLY Limit 2 Per Customer
carefree annuals you might like Innerspring Mattress 85
to try in the months ahead. My I S U TE
Information was provided by Ex- 4 B. Ea.
tension Urban Horticulture Spe- Room Air Sold in Set of 3
cialist Dr. Robert Black. i BLACK LACQUER!
Marigolds come in a wide va- I ll Dresser, Mirror, Conditioners
riety of colors and sizes. They're Armoire Chest
also among the easiest plants to Full & Quee T COLONIAL S LE GROUP
care for, because they tolerate iFull & Queen Stand
drought and pests very well. They Headboard MouIn Stand 5
thrive in sun or partial shade. M 82 0
You can grow marigolds from
seed or from transplants, which "3 Position
are available at almost all garden Recliner
centers. Seeds sprout in a few by Catnapper
days. New varieties bloom in 60
days and continue blooming for
several months. Marigolds are ex- li0rms
cellent for use as flower borders. 5-Pleated SkirtL0
If you select one of the dwarf va- 100& aWooted TSrm Seat
rieties, they make attractive edg- 00 Nylon Trim
Inag for the landscape. Marigolds Fabric Sofa 22900
also are useful as cut flowers for
indoor decorations. New marigold ... ...
varieties are continually being
found. So, check a recent seed .
catalog' or your favorite garden CENTER
c* enter for the kinds you'd like to Oak Wood
grwthis ya.Oak Wood
grow year. Finish
Another good choice for sum- In-Carton
mer gardens is the Portulaca .
(Porch-uh-lack-ah), or Rose- White
Moss. These small plants form a 9 Westinghouse -
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flowers, and come in a variety of 87
colors, including white, yellow, Frost Free
orange, rose and red. The blooms 17' Refrigerator
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ter, and may grow singularly or Adj. 9
double on the stem. Portulaca is Shelves,. ....
a favorite choice for edging, bor- Texture
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boxes. Seeds should be planted
on a well-drained site in full sun. 3 PC. COLONIAL
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flowers bloom within several STYLE BEDROOM
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ter. So, plant this species in a dry Shakers
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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1991


IndefatedIn PayThouh ueday


St. Joe In District T


The Port St. Joe Dixie Youth
All-Stars (10-12 year olds) remain


undefeated in District IV competi-
tion through Tuesday of this


week. They began the tour
with an errorless 6-2 wi


ourney
lament Mid City, with Rocky Quinn
n over pitching all six innings for the St.
Joe squad. Quinn gave up two
runs on one hit while striking out
10 and walking 10.
w St. Joe only had three hits,
with Brian Jenkins, Ryan Yeager
and Wayne Summers each pick-
ing up a single.
d St. Joe 220020-6
Mid City 0J0002-2
ST. JOE 8, PARKER 2
Monday evening St. Joe
defeated Parker in the double
elimination tournament 8-2.
Doyle Crosby went the distance
for St. Joe, giving up two runs on
one hit, with four strikeouts and
four walks.
The St. Joe bats were hot as
they drummed out 11 hits, as
Yeager, Jenkins and Crosby each
had two; Michael Groh had a
homerun, D. C. Jones and Rocky
Quinn each a double, and Tyson
Pittman a single.
St. Joe 2 10122-8
..ae., Parker 001001-2


Tracksters Compete In

Sunshine State Games


Last weekend, six members
of the Port St. Joe Track Club
competed in the 12th Annual
Sunshine State Games at Saraso-
ta Booker High School. Over 500
athletes throughout the state of
Florida participated in the TAC
meet.
Luke Taunton placed first in
the midget division (11-12 years)
800 (2:22.6) and 1500 meters
(4:57.78). Both of these times es-
tablished new personal records
for Luke.
Bryan Earley, John Bryant,
and Chris Rudd competed in the
youth division (13-14 years).
Bryan placed fourth in the 1500
meters (5:00.9), John placed sev-
enth in the 800 meters (2:34.9),
and Chris placed 10th in the 800

Post 84 Is

Second In

Sub-Dist.
The American Legion Post 84
finished second in sub-district
competition, to Post 13 of Talla-
hassee. Post 84 defeated Marian-
na 9-6 Saturday morning and
lost to Post 13, 5-3, Saturday eve-
ning at 7:30. They came back out
of the loser's bracket by defeating
Tallahassee Baseball Club 11-8,
and Post 13, 4-3, Sunday eve-
ning, forcing a championship
game Monday evening with Post
13. After playing five games in
three days, Post 84 ran out of
pitching in the Monday game and
lost to Post 13, 11-6.
Port St. Joe players on the
team, Kyle Griffin, Matt Taylor
and Bill Ramsey did well and are
to be congratulated on their sum-
mer of baseball.
Pre-Majors
The Apalachee Dixie Pre-
Majors were knocked out of the.
state competition in Ocala this
past week. They lost to host Oca-
la Saturday night 3-2 and to Her-
nando 12-6 Monday.
Eric Ramsey and Adam Tay-
lor of Port St. Joe were members
of the All-Star team comprised of
players from Liberty Co., Apa-
lachicola, Chattahoochee and
Quincy. They were players on the
Quincy Dixie Majors 15-18 year
old team.


meters (2:45.1).
Shannon Gant competed in
the intermediate division (15-16
years). Shannon placed 10th in
the 3000 meter run with a time of
11:38.3.
Scott Boykin competed in the
young division (17-18 years).
Scott placed sixth in the 1500
meters with a time of 4:32.2.
On July 31, the track club
will participate in the 25th annu-
al AAU Junior Olympic Games in
Tallahassee. The national AAU
Junior Olympics is the largest an-
nual national multi-sport ama-
teur athletic event in America.
Over 4500 athletes, ages 8-19,
are scheduled to participate in 13
sports.

Golf Tourney

Set Aug. 10
The Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens Assoc. Inc. is sponsoring
their first annual golf tournament
at the St. Joseph Bay Country
Club on August 10th. A special
thanks to the Board of Directors,
Len Patrick and Mike Kilbourne.
for helping plan this event.
All golfers in this area are in-
vited to register for this event.
There will be nice prizes for the
top four teams, two prizes for
closest to the pin #4 and 15 and
the longest drive on #2 hole. Reg-
istration fee is $30.00, this in-
cludes green fee, cart, and buffet
dinner.
This is a tournament where
everyone can play, have a good
chance of winning, and help the
Gulf County Senior Citizens raise
money for the elderly in this
county.
You form your own four per-
son teams using the ,handicap
rules, play any time between 7
a.m. and 5 p.m. on August 10
and then everyone will meet for a
delicious buffet, awards presenta-
tions, and a delightful evening at
6:30 p.m. ET in the club dining
room.
Registration forms may be
picked up at the St. Joseph Bay
Country Club Pro-Shop, Sears
Catalog Store, Barrier Dunes, the
Driftwood Inn, and the Athletic
House in Port St. Joe.
Call 229-8466 for further in-
formation.


7ViewS On

-Dental Healtlh

FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.


EARLY TOOTH OVERCROWDING


When should crooked
teeth be straightened? As
soon as they're detected The
old adage about an ounce of
protection is especially true in
orthodontics, where crooked
teeth can be prevented by ear-
ly treatment.
Diagnosed at a sufficiently
early age, an unusual trend
can often be stopped in its
tracks and its effects com-
pletely erased. To ensure ear-
ly detection, a child should
have a checkup by the family
dentist at intervals of about six
months, beginning at 2 1/2 to
3 years of age. Overcrowded
and crooked teeth are most
likely to make their entrance
with the arrival of the four per-
manent incisors and the four


permanent molars at around
age six.
Prompt treatment is rec-
ommended when teeth are
overcrowded. Some baby
teeth may be removed ahead
of their normal shedding time
to allow nature to do a certain
amount of tooth straightening.
Known as interceptive ortho-
dontics, it involves a one-by-
r",- extraction in a well-
planned sequence to make
room for a better bite.

Prepared as a public ser-
vice to promote better dental
health. From the office of:
FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
Williams Ave., Phone 227-
1123.


DIXIE YOUTH ALL STARS: Kneeling, from Patterson, Brian Jenkins, Doyle Crosby, Rocky
left: D. C. Jones, Russell Russ. Michael Groh, Quinn, Ryan Yeager, Tyson Pittman and Jesse
Derrick Tillman, Matt Dixon, Wayne Summers Colbert. Coaches are Warren Yeager, left, John
and alternate Russell Young. Standing, Jarred Crosby and Billy Stephens. -Star photo



Two Sharks In Shrine Bowl


Two Port St. Joe football
players, Willie Smith and Bobby
Williams, will represent the North
in the Third Annual Shrine Bowl
this Saturday. Previously known
as the North/South All-Star
game, the bowl is sponsored by
the Morocco Shriners in the Jack-
sonville Gator Bowl, with pre-
game ceremonies at 7:30. Game
time is 8:00 p.m.
Smith, a two year first team
All-State player, will start at
strong safety for the north squad.
Smith, a five-year letterman for
the Sharks, rushed for 872 yards
and had 97 tackles on defense
during the 90-91 season. He will
attend Bethune-Cookman College


in Daytona Beach.
Also representing the north


BOBBY WILLIAMS


squad is Bobby Williams, a first
team All-Stater and a four-year
letterman for St. Joe. He will han-
dle the kicking duties for the
north on kickoff, field goal and
extra point attempts. During the
90-91 season Williams was 32 of
34 extra points, and 12-14 of
field goals. Williams will attend
the University of Mississippi.
The north squad is coached
by Bill Gierke and staff of May-


nard Evans High School in Orlan-
do. During their week in Jackson-
ville the All-Stars have visited
numerous sights including histor-
ic St. Augustine, the aircraft car-
rier Saratoga at Mayport Naval
Base, the University Children's
Hospital and the Naval flight line
at Cecil Field.


PLAY LYNN HAVEN
The remaining two undefeat-
ed teams, St. Joe and Lynn
Haven met at 9:00 Wednesday
evening. The tournament hosted
by Callaway, had seven entries
from District IV: Apalachicola,
Bayou George, Mid City, Parker,
Callaway, Port St. Joe and Lynn
Haven.
In Port St. Joe defeats Lynn
Haven Wednesday they will place
Thursday evening at 9:00. If they
lose they'll play at 7:00 Thursday.
Team members are: Jesse
Colbert, Doyle Crosby, Brian Jen-
kins, Tyson Pittman, Ryan Yeag-
er, Matt Dixon, Michael Groh,
Jarred Patterson, Derrick Till-
man, D. C. Jones, Wayne Sum-
mers, Rocky Quinn, Russell Russ
and alternate Russell Young.


WILLIE SMITH


Physicals Set
for Athletes
All boys and girls interested
in athletics for the 1991-92
school year will be offered free
physical at Port St. Joe High
School gym on the following dates
listed below. You must have a
parent's permission to take a
physical and these forms are
available in the front office at the
high school.
August 1: Varsity and Junior
Varsity Football 8 a.m. to 12
p.m.; Jr. High Football 1 p.m. to
4 p.m.
August 8: Cheerleaders 8 to 9
a.m.; Girls Basketball, Cross
Country, Volleyball, Softball and
Track 9 to 10 a.m.;
Boys Basketball (Varsity,
J.V., Jr. High) 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.;
Baseball, Golf 1 to 2 p.m.; Wres-
tling, Weightlifting 2 to 3 p.m.;
Track and Cross Country 3 to 4
p.m.

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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1991


12 Area Men Arrested for Illegal Fishing Activities


L PAGE 1B


The Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission released the names of 12 men
caught and charged with taking fresh water
fish illegally, Friday of last week.
The Commission officers had been investi-
gating complaints of people taking fish, primar-
ily catfish from an area five to eight miles north
and south of Wewahitchka since the early part
of June.
The 12 men arrested included 11 'area men
and one from California, according to Captain
Jim Brantley, regional law enforcement super-
visor for the commission.
The men were using a device made by parts
obtained from an electronics store, which was
about the size of a pack of cigarettes. The de-
vice would be lowered in the water, powered by
a 12-volt battery, stunning the catfish within a
100-foot diameter. The fish would float to the
surface where they were scooped up.
ARRESTS MADE, EQUIPMENT SEIZED
Saturday, June 15, the officers arrested two


Eastpoint men, Carl Wayne Ard, 31 and Sidney
Thomas Moore, 23. Also arrested on the same
day were two Wewahitchka men, James Hardy
Whittington, 22 and Wayne Gray, 34. The four


Catfish were the target of extensive ille-
gal fishing operations in the Apalachicola
River, using electrical shock devices. The
Game and Fish Commission say they will
continue to monitor fishing operations in
the River for a while.

were charged with taking fresh water fish by il-
legal methods and Moore's 13-foot homemade


boat and 40 horsepower motor were seized.
Wednesday, June 26, Emory Maurell Cum-
bie, 63, Port St. Joe; Ernest Junior Ake, 51,
Route 1, Wewahitchka and Robert Mitchell, 29,
Pasadena, California, were arrested and
charged with taking fresh water fish by illegal
methods and Mitchell was also charged for not
having a valid non-resident Florida fishing li-
cense. Officers seized Cumbie's 20-foot pontoon
boat and 40 hp motor, Ake's 14-foot boat and
30 hp motor.
Thursday, June 27, Three Wewahitchka
men were arrested and charged with the illegal
'fishing methods. Judson Eddie Carnley, 48,
Route 1, Wewahitchka; Fario Lee Aman, 44,
Route 1, Wewahitchka and Grover Joseph
[Buddy] McLemore, Route 1, Wewahitchka.
Both Carnley and McLemore fled in their vessel
and when apprehended were additionally
charged with fleeing to elude a wildlife officer
and reckless operation of a vessel. They were
booked in the Gulf County Jail and later re-


leased on their own recognizance. Carnley's 15-
foot boat and 20 hp motor were also seized by
officers.
Captain Jim Brantley said, 'Wildlife officers
will continue to work the river utilizing both
uniform and plainclothes details until we are
certain that people are no longer using this ille-
gal method."
2ND, 1ST DEGREE MISDEMEANORS
Using the electro-shocking devices to take
fresh water fish is a second degree misdemean-
or and punishable by up to a $500 fine, 60
days imprisonment in the county jail and pos-
sible forfeiture of all seized equipment. Reck-
less operation of a vessel is also a second de-
gree misdemeanor.
Fleeing and eluding a law enforcement offi-
cer is a first degree misdemeanor and punisha-
ble by up to one year imprisonment and a
$1,000 fine.


Children's Health Forum

All Things in

Moderation for

a Healthy Life
S. By
Dr. Elizabeth Jones


One of the most important things parents can give to a child is
an example of a healthy lifestyle. That will usually include modera-
tion in most things with a little abstinence thrown in along the way.
The areas where most problems occur are those of food, drink,
exercise, and ingestion.
Regarding foods, practically, a family can prepare healthful at-
tractive meals with a cheerful and pleasant environment for eating.
It is prudent to make an effort to limit fats and sweets. The frying
pan should no longer be the symbol of Southern cooking. Broil,
boil, or bake instead of fry.
The best way to be sure your children eat good food and not
junk is simply not to buy the Fritoes, potato chips, twinkles and
other empty calories. They will get enough of these things in the
world outside the family. The funds usually spent on such items
are better spent on fruits.
In the drink department, no one can deny the downright good-
ness of a cold glass of sweet tea, but the calories here can be dead-
ly. Try to cultivate a taste for unsweetened tea with lemon juice.
Carbonated drinks should be in moderation. Stress water as cooling
and refreshing.
Beer, wine, and whiskey taken occasionally will harm no one,
but the detrimental effects on good health are numerous in those
-who--over-indulge -Obesity, liver disease, drunkenness, hyperten-
sion, kidney failure are all manifested in the alcoholic and are the
opposite of the healthy lifestyle one would like to achieve.
Children used to go outside to play. Now they watch television.
Television is a wonderful entertainment, but children should be lim-
ited in the time they are allowed to sit around. Take the T.V. sched-
ule each week and let eachch ild pick out the program he wants to
see each day. Do not use the television as a babysitter.
Exercise is important to develop lungs, muscles, and bones.
Cultivate an exercise all the family can enjoy. Walking, bicycle rid-
ing, and swimming are a few examples.
It is a sad commentary in our present society for the greatest
health problem in the country to be obesity. This has developed as
the country has become rich. Food is plentiful and too readily avail-
able. We continue to develop labor saving devices and toys. I recent-
ly saw a three-year-old on a battery operated toy tractor. This toy is
a novel enjoyable toy, but the child should be pedaling a tricycle or
big wheel.
Ingestions in one form or another such as tobacco, marijuana,
cocaine and heroin are all extremely harmful to the body. More and
more is being written about the harmful effects in children of pas-
sive smoke. Children, who do not smoke but live with people who
do smoke, have many more respiratory problems and ear infections
as a result of their environmental contaminations.
Many parents find ithelpful to play a '"What If' with their chil-
dren when they are trying to get across the concept of no tobacco,
no alcohol, and no drugs. What if your friend offered you some
beer, wine, or whiskey? What if your friend offered you some drugs?
Ask the questions and get your children to respond. If the response
is good, compliment the child. If the response is uncertain and
weak suggest a better response. Once a child has been able to re-
spond, the practice of doing so is very helpful when the real situa-
tion arises.
Growing children need unscheduled time to read, play, day-
dream, etc. It is not healthful if a child is so hurried from one thing
to another he has no time to assimilate what he has learned that
day. A healthy balance in parents will present the proper role model
for the child. There are always exceptions, but generally a child will
imitate and adapt to the lifestyle of the parents. Work hard to make
your lifestyle a worthwhile style to imitate.
< 'J


Summer Heat Helps


Produce Animal


Death Trap In Car


Special to the Star
By P.J. Jones-Trowell
It is against the law in the
State of Florida to leave an ani-
mal in a car or truck cab or any-
thing where the animal may be
subjected to heat related acci-
dents.
A police officer has the au-
thority to do whatever is neces-
sary to try and rescue the animal
in distress. This means prying
the door open or breaking a win-
dow whatever it takes. Chief
Richter was asked how the police
department in Port St. Joe would
handle such an incident. He stat-
ed, "First we would try to find the
animal's owner but if we couldn't,
we would do whatever was neces-
sary."
It is a cruel and gruesome
death and it happens more than
you would care to know. It begins
quite innocently...people put their
pets in the car and head to the
store for a loaf of bread or what-
ever. They are sure they'll only be
in the nice air conditioned store
for just a minute...so they leave a
little crack in the window for their
pet to breathe... they run into
someone they know and start
talking or the line is longer than
it usually is...but they think the
pet will be fin for just a few more
minutes... This is where the hor-
ror story begins. On an average
sunny day, the temperature in-
side a car can quickly reach 160
degrees! The average temperature
for a dog is 101.5 to 102.2 de-
grees. Even at 106 degrees, your
pet will suffer a possible heat
stroke or even worse, death. Be-
cause dogs and cats can't sweat
to cool off as humans can, they
must pant. When they are breath-
ing in nothing but hot air, they
are actually cooking their insides.
Not a very pleasant thought.
The next time you think you
might want to take ol "Killer" or
"Cuddles" for a ride, why not go
and sit out in your car yourself
with the windows "cracked" for
say 10 minutes...while the sun is
broiling down on the roof and the
heat from the asphalt is cooking
the bottom of the vehicle. Oh yes,
you'll be sweating and uncomfort-


able, but at least you can sweat -
not to mention get out of the car
and into the air conditioning.
Your pet doesn't have any of
these options. It will suffer need-
lessly and maybe even die. You
will never forgive yourself.
In this hot climate you must
take every precaution to keep
your pets safe from heat related
accidents. Remember, the kindest
and most humane thing you can
do for your little four-footed
friend is just leave him or her at
home where there is plenty of
shade and fresh water.
If you see an animal in dis-
tress: 1) call the police; 2) try to
find the owner; 3) when you can
get to the animal, immerse it in
cool water while supporting the
head. This will hopefully lower
the body temperature; 4) get the
animal to a veterinarian without
delay.

,`Dance Friday
In Blountstown
The Blountstown Singles
Club is sponsoring a dance on
Friday, July 26 from 7:30 p.m.
until 11:30 p.m. CT. Little Robert
and the Silver Streak will be pro-
viding the music for an evening of
dancing and listening pleasure.
Admission is $3.50 per person
and door prizes will be award.
The dance will be held at the W.T.
Neal Civic Center, Hwy. 69 North,
Blountstown.
For more information, call B.
Newsome at 904-674-8470.

C&C
TACK & SUPPLY
located 4 mi. south of Port
St. Joe on Hwy. C-30
Selling
Western English
Clothing & Accessories
*Country Arts & Crafts
Quality Equestrian Products
229-8561
tfc7/4


Bay St. Joseph Completes

Patient Care Course


Bay St. Joseph Care Center,
an extension campus of Haney
Vocational Technical Center, is
pleased to announced the suc-
cessful completion of their patient
care assistant course.
The course covered 120
hours on the fundamentals of
nursing practice and 120 hours
of clinical experience in a long
term care facility.
The following people graduat-
ed: Judy "Elaine" Adkinson, Pam-
ela Alexander, Shirley "Lesa" Da-


We have discounts
to help you drive down
the cost of car insurance.
If the cost of your car insurance seems to be heading in the wrong direction,
see if Allstate can help turn things around.
We have discounts that can help you save money.
You can save by having a good driving record. Or by driving a car equipped
with air bags or a four-wheel anti-lock brake system. Even by insuring more than one
car with Allstate. J *
Which Allstate car insurance discounts do you AI
qualify for? Just give us a call to find out. We'll get your You're in good hands.
car insurance costs headed in the right direction. l iehw1uKrii,,:Nkinok..1i
GASKIN-GRADDY
Insurance Company
Call Collect 639-5077 or 639-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
1-800-782-6802
Serving the Panhandle Since 1931


vis, Clara Johnson, Sandra
Jones, Mary "Pat" Lanier, Delores
McGee, Alicia Weston, Frentilla
"Fern" Williams, and Kerri Hall
Dolly.
Kerri was the high honor
graduate of the class.
Haney Vocational instructor
for the class was Nancy Howze,
R.N. Mrs. Howze is also the Inser-
vice Director at Bay St. Joseph
Care Center.
Graduation exercises were
held July 12 with a reception fol-
lowing.


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- 309 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-7226
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New Homes
Additions & Remodeling
All Your Building Needs

WE BUILD TO LAST A LIFETIME!

For Free Estimates, Call 229-8589
TFC 7/18/91




TREMENDOUS

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be a part of one of Florida's
insurance sales teams.


For Gulf County area

Contact:
Raymond D. Russell
Blountstown
904-674-5471


and
top


FARM7!
BUREA


'MC 5/9/91



Owen, Barb and Jenny Oksanen
wish to relocate in town closer to
the hospital and their practice.

HOUSE FOR SALE


Must sell,
cedar and


2500 sq. ft. custom
stone house on golf


course. 3 BR 2 1/2 bath with
den, large loft, sun room too
many extras to mention. Reduced
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Call 229-8221
8518 nights.


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with good
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6 a.m. to 10 p.m.
7 Days a Week
All You Can Eat SUNDAY'S
LUNCH BUFFET 4. 25 ONLY 4.95


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*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches *Meals to Go
Fresh Seafood Delicious Steaks
* Famous Fresh $9 85
S-AA ^^r r~l --V V^* r% ^^


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THR STAR. PORT ST .TOE. FL THURSDAY. JULY 25. 1991


rP --W-"


.25 Million In Grants Spurs County's


Solid Waste Recycling Program

Oil, Tires, Glass, Wood, Plastics, Paper, Are Targets


Over the past several months
the "Recycle Gulf' office has
received numerous calls concern-
ing the status of the County's
recycling program. The following
is an update of thp program,
grant status and future plans.
The County has applied for
and received over $250,000 in
grant funds over the past couple
of years. Below is a list of grants
and expenditures for each. Also,
included are future plans for each
grant.
(A) SMALL COUNTY SOLID
WASTE GRANT $25,000 ANNU-
ALLY
The state mandated that the
counties purchase scales for each
solid waste facility before spend-
ing these funds on anything else.
To date the County has received
three allocations and have pur-
chased scales for Five Points
Landfill, Industrial Road Transfer
Station and Wetappo Recycling/
Transfer Station. We have recent-
ly applied for this year's funds
and are expecting a $25,000 allo-
cation by October 1991. These
funds will be used to purchase
computer hardware and software
for all three scale sites. We also
plan to contract the installation
of the scales for the Industrial
Road Site.

(B) USED OIL GRANT
$30,0000
Funds have only been appro-
priated one time for this grant.
The State mandates that the
counties purchase signs and
erect on or near the County lines.
The remaining money was used
to purchase oil collection contain-
ers and construct collection sta-
tions. Several of the containers
were placed at local industries,
municipalities and school bus
barns. The public collection sta-
tions were constructed at the
Industrial Road Transfer Station
and the Wetappo Recycling Cen-
ter. (These are open to the public
during normal operating hours.)
(C) TIRE GRANT $6.000 -
$7.500
These grant funds have been
earmarked for recycling of tires or
to have tires removed from the
County. Past money has been
tised to pay the cost of having the
tires incinerated at the Bay
County Waste Recovery Plant. A
small portion of the funds were
used to build a machine that sep-
arates rims from the tires. Future
funds will either pay for the
removal of tires from the County,
purchase a tire shredder or pay
to have tires shredded.
(D) RECYCLING AND EDU-
CATION GRANT $65,000 -
$85.000
The State mandated that
these funds be used for two spe-
cific purposes: implement a recy-
cling program and a public
awareness or education program.
To date these funds have been
used for the following:
1) Construct the Wetappo
Recycling Center
2) Purchase the recycling
vehicle
#) Purchase collection con-
tainers (igloos)
4) Construct the recycling
building (6,000 sq. ft. pre-
engineered metal building)
5) Fund the education pro-
gram
6) Conduct a waste composi-
tion study
7) Purchase a knuckle boom
and grappler.
Future plans for these funds
will include completing the recy-
cling building, purchase a wood
chipper, glass crusher and bailer.
Funds will also be set aside to
continue the public awareness
program.
In summary, the following is
the overall recycling plan for Gulf
County. By the end of next fiscal
year (September 1991), the


ELIJAH SMILEY, M.B.A.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
.PERSONAL INJURY -BUSINESS *AUTO ACCIDENTS
*PROBATE & WILLS *DIVORCES
right LAW OFFICE DOWNTOWN Reason
Talk 1 784-6606 I Fee
433 Harrison Ave. Suite 1B Panama City


STORE MANAGERS
ASSISTANT MANAGERS
SALES ASSOCIATES
Sunshine-Jr. Stores, Inc. national leader in the convenience
store industry has store manager,.assistant manager and sales
associate positions available for qualified applicants.
Sunshine-Jr. Stores, Inc. offers:
*Flexible full and part time schedules.
*Company training program.
*Excellent starting pay based on experience and education.
*Retirement program.
*Medical/life and disability.
SAdvancement opportunities and more!
Experience desired but not required. Apply today at your local
Jr. Store.


Donald Butler, with the Gulf County spe- election point, determining which products
cial projects department, oversees a sam- the county will target for a recycling pro-
pling of solid waste at a County waste col- gram. The testing was done late in 1990.


County should have all the infra-
structure in place and all equip-
ment purchased to implement the
recycling program. The County
will continue to have drop off sta-
tions at Wewahitchka, Port St.
Joe, Overstreet, Highland View
and White City plus add stations
at Cape San Blas, St. Joe Beach
and Howard Creek. These sta-
tions will have facilities for the
collection of clear glass, brown
glass, green glass, aluminum,
plastics and newspaper. (Newspa-


per Igloos will be set out upon
completion of the recycling build-
ing September 1991.) Upon
completion of the recycling build-
ing and the purchase of the bailer
and glass crusher, the County
will begin purchasing recyclables
at this facility. The building will
also serve as a storage facility
and transfer station for all recy-
clables. The only other program
that is scheduled for implementa-
tion is a mulching program at the
Five Points Class III Landfill. This


will entail purchasing a chipper
and providing mulch to the gener-
al public or to private Industry. In
the near future, recycling tips will
be published in the local papers.
Also, the public will be updated
on the construction of the recy-
cling building and equipment
purchases.
The County appreciates eve-
ryone's participation and interest
in this endeavor. Only with the
support of the citizens will this
program be a success.


Gulf Coast College Ends Two-Year

"Wall of Honor" Scholarship Fund


The 'Wall of Honor" Endow-
ment Campaign, which will add
$3.7 million to the Gulf Coast
Community College Foundation,
ended July 16 with the
announcement that $2 million in
federal matching funds had been
received.
The $2 million Title III
"Endowment Challenge Grant"
will be combined with approxi-
mately $1 million in private con-
tributions and $700,000 in state
matching funds to boost the total
assets of the GCCC Foundation
to over $6 million.
Interest earnings from this
endowment will be used to fund
scholarships and other academic
enhancement projects at GCCC.
Those individuals, business-
es, and civic organizations con-
tributing $6,000 or more to the
campaign are to be depicted on
the 'Wall of Honor," to be con-
structed outside the college's new
$8.7 million Student Union.
The Wall of Honor will be
dedicated during an Open House
scheduled for September 15.
Launched in September,
1988, the Wall of Honor Endow-
ment Campaign was officially
concluded by its principal archi-
tects and promoters, Bill Cramer,
Jr., chairman of the GCCC Dis-
trict Board of Trustees, and Dr.
Bob McSpadden, GCCC Presi-
dent. Cramer also chaired the 14-

From Indian Pass
to Mexico Beach
and Port St. Joe to
Wewahitchka, The
Star is your news
center.


We're just down the street

in case youneedus.
... '\lre independent agents like myself
.r. Iit.ndling Allstate Insurance every da
n ICi makes it easier than ever for vou
I,, ,.I tile ist, fair claim service and"
l, ',il,,titive rates Allstate has always been
1.1111,Is for. Oil car, 11ho,111 lie. business.
lboat or RV coverage.
feel free to stop by otr a visit. Because
P,,,v state is even closer to home than

Hannon Insurance
Agency, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. 227-1133
,.mef II".>' ii-[ I lr 1 t n i(, ip[i[. u\rrihwri, ,k Ilhl nl


member Wall of Honor Steering
Committee, organized under the
auspices of the GCCC Founda-,
tion.
'The accomplishment of our:
combined efforts over the past 34
months will change forever the
character of Gulf Coast Commu-
nity College and the complexion
of the Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege Foundation," Dr. McSpadden
commented. "It will give hope and
purpose to thousands of young
men and women on whom our
ambitions for the future of this
community depend," he said.
In charting the progress of
the campaign, Cramer said that
he was gratified that "all pledges
made were honored in full in
advance of the federally mandat-


ICULL IN








By: Richard Miller
*Vapor lock is a warm weather
problem. When excess heat
causes gasoline to vaporize pre-
maturely, gas vapor and air fill
the fuel lines instead of gasp-
line. Result: the engine 'hesi-
tates, then surges, then stalls.
The only cure is to let the en-
gine cool down.
*They just don't make converti-
bles the way they used to. Ex-
cept for two models, most con-
vertibles sold in the U.S. start
out as coupes with the tops cut
off. One plus: the chassis must
be reinforced, often creating a
stronger car than the original.
*New kind of insurance closes
the gap between the market val-
ue of your car what you'd get
if it was totaled and the
amount you may still owe on
your loan or lease. Otherwise,
you'd have to make up the dif-
ference out of pocket.
*Save fuel by driving at a con-
stant speed. Continually slow-
ing down and speeding up
wastes gasoline. Take advan-
tages of cruise control if your
car has it.
*New-Used Cars: You'll save
fuel with our super-engineered
new models at
Quff ord

Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales


ed deadline" of May 1.
An additional 5,000 scholar-
ships would be awarded to GCCC
:,.,students over theq.next 20 years
as a .result, of the campaign,
Cramer said.


r-


I
I
I


Open
Tuesday thru Thursday 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 8 a.m. 9 p.m.
Sunday 1 to 8 p.m.


Move your oyster shucking
from the backyard to your
kitchen table with Indian Pass
new, washed, boxed oysters.
Same familiar flavor inside
but new clean outside.
40 lb. Washed Box
$25.00
Call 227-1670
to reserve yours today!

INDIAN PASS


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OFFICE SUPPLY STORE
I Phone 227-1278 FAX 227-7212 304-308 Williams Ave. I

L --- WANT MORE SAVINGS? CALL FOR OUR LATEST SALESBOOK! -- J


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We're Proud of Gulf County's


Librarians


Our hometown librarians, through pa- TAI
tience and caring, can make books
come alive to an imaginative
youngster,
Knowing how to reach the curiosity of
a child and teaching him or her how
to appreciate the treasures that
books unlock is a very special gift.
Teaching children (and adults too)
how to use the file card system and
how to find resource material will
benefit them the rest of their lives.
We're proud of our local librarians
and we're proud of our hometown.

11 :TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS
Shoulder Roast ........ m.
TABLERITE QUALITY FAMILY PAK BONELESS
Shoulder Steaks ..... Lb.
TABLE RITE QUALITY FAMILY PAK BONELESS
Chuck Steak ............ m.
TABLE RITE QUALITY BONELESS
Top Blade Steaks ..... Lb.
TABLE RITE QUALITY BONELESS
Chuck Tender Steaks Ib.
JUMBO PAK FRYER
Drumsticks ............... Ib.
FAMILY PAK FRESH
Pork Steaks ............. ib.
LYKES
Hot Dogs ............ 12 oz. pkg.
LYKES PALM RIVER SUCED
Bacon ................ 12oz.pkg.


BLERITE QUALITY BONELESS


CHUCK


$169

$179

$169

$199
$199

79.




99,
$129


22 oz. LIQUID
DOVE DETERGENT ............. 79o
KRAFT ORIGINAL PLAIN 18 OZ.
BARBECUE SAUCE ............. 89o
32 OZ. BOTTLE HEINZ
KETCHUP ........................ .
IGA STYLE CHEERIOS -15 OZ. BOX
TOASTED OATS ................1.29
JIFFY 8.5 OZ. BOX
CORN MUFFIN MIX ....... 4/990
IGA CREAM OR WHOLE KERNEL /
CORN .............................. 890
IGA EARLY JUNE, MEDIUM 2/
PEAS .............................. 89
IGA BLUE LAKE CUT OR FRENCH STYLE
GREEN BEANS ................2/89
CLOROX 32 OZ.
CLEAN UP CLEANER ........ 1.49
BIRITE MEDIUM OR LARGE PREPRICED AT $5.
DIAPERS ......................... '4


IGA FROZEN 12 bi.

ORANGE JUICE....
PET BANANA, CHOC., COCO., LEMON, STRA., NEOP. 12 OZ
CREAM Q. COOL
PIES .. ......... WHIP


NATURE'S BEST 30 OZ.
FRUIT COCKTAIL ......... 1.09
ARMOUR 30OZ.
POTTED MEAT .............. 3/99
29 OZ. IGA
SLICED PEACHES ........ s '.09
$1.00 OFF LABEL PURINA 25 LB. BAG
DOG CHOW .................... 9.99
REGULAR WINDEX 22 OZ. BOTTLE
WINDOW CLEANER ........ 1.99
10 CT. HOMEBEST
TRASH BAGS ................. 1.09
$1.49 SIZE FRITO BRAND
RUFFLES CHIPS ............ 1.09
DELTA
PAPER TOWELS ............ 2/990
RONCO
MACARONI & CHEESE .... 4/99
FLAVORICH REG. 1/2 GAL ROUNDS
ICE CREAM ..................... 2.49


ARk QUARTERS-1 LB. /
7Margarine ............... 9 9
AoTE STYLE BUTTER 10 CT. BRIGHT AND EARLY 64 OZ.
-rlo Orange Drink ......... 990
c ,99 LIGHT & LIVELY 100-ASSORTEDVYf
:I SCUITS U .Yogur .... 9 9Yogurt


TRAY PAK SWEET GEORGIA
Peaches ............


RED ROSA

PLUMS
LB.


GREEN BOILING
Peanuts ...............
JUMBO
Nectarines ............
TENDER
Okra ...................
FRESH
Yellow Squash .......
FLORIDA


lb. 49"

lb. 79,0

lb. 790

lb. 494

lb. 39"


Avocadoes ........... each
CALIFORNIA
Carrots .......... 2 Ib. Bag79
NEW CROP $ 59
White Potatoes ..5 Ib. bag I


David Rich's
FOODLINERS.MI
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.
Prices Good July 24-30, 1991 :


RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


$A


m ApftAftAff AftAftmplkAft l


I


I


r~fne








..rr, -- - ----


NOTICE OF


TAX INCREASE


The Gulf County


School


Board will


soon


consider a measure to increase its property
tax levy by 17.30 percent.
A portion of the tax levy is required under
state law in order for the School Board to


receive $5,117,051.00


in state education


grants. The required portion has increased
by 11.65 percent and represents approxi-
mately eight tenths of the total proposed
taxes.


The remainder of the


taxes


is proposed


solely at the discretion of the School Board.
All concerned citizens are invited to a pub-
lic hearing on the tax increase to be held
on July 29, 1991, at 5:30 p.m. at the Gulf
County Courthouse School Board meeting
room.
A DECISION on the proposed tax increase
and the budget will be made at this hear-
in .,.,.. . .... .., .... ^- .. .. ....


PROPOSED MILLAGE LEVY
OPERATING
LOCAL EFFORT.
DISCRETIONARY
DEBT SERVICE
CAPITAL OUTLAY
TOTAL


6.275
.510
.985
7.770


BUDGET SUMMARY NOTICE
DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF GULF COUNTY
THE PROPOSED OPERATION BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF
GULF COUNTY DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD ARE 1.0 PERCENT
MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES


BUDGET


REVENUES


GENERAL


SPECIAL REVENUE


DEBT SERVICE


CAPITAL PROJECTS


Federal 25,000.00 844,971.16 --
State sources 6,261,997.00 11,200.00 282,000.00 540,7R5 00
Local Sources 3,190,443.00 160,750.00 15,000.00 440,189.00f
Total Revenues 9,477,440.00 1,016,921.16 297,000.00 980,974.00
Transfers In 325,476.00 125,000.00 -- --
Nonrevenue Sources
F'UND BALANCES July 1, 1991 480,155.39 38,322.79 302,517.80 296.594.32
TOTAL REVENUES AND BALANCES 10,283,071.39 1,180,243.95 599,517.80 1,277,568-32
EXPENDITURES
Instruction 5,581,721.39 482,828.97
Pupil Personnel Services 338,286.00 33,:059.00
Instructional Media Services 274,663.00 ,
Instructional & Curriculum
Development Services 112,943.00 14,604.00
Instructional Staff Training 122,460.00
Board of Education 107,795.00
General Administration 325,954.00 32,619.19
School Administration 939,893.00 160.00
Facilities Acquisition Con-
struction 700,266.00
Fiscal Services 107,444.00
Food Services 577,000.00.
Central Services 82,576.00
Pupil Transportation Services 637,869.00 200.00 104,373.00
Operation of Plant 774,961.00
Maintenance of Plant 436,506.00
Community Services 15,000.00 3,500.00
Debt Service 240,370.00
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 9,858,071.39 1,143,971.16 240,370.00 804,639.00
Trasfers Out 125,00,0.00 90,000.00 235,476.00
FUND BALANCES June 30, 1992 300,000.00 36,272.79 269,147.80 237,453.32
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
TRANSFERS & BALANCES 10,283,071.39 1,180,243.95 599,517.80 1,277,568.32
THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE
MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PULBIC RECORD.


THE STAR.b PORT ST. JOB. FL THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1991


PAGE A4B


i


NOTICE OF TAX


FOR SCHOOL


CAPITAL OUTLAY
The Gulf County School Board will soon consider a -
measure to impose a .985 mill property tax for the capi- .
tal outlay projects listed herein.
This tax is in addition to the School Board's proposed
tax of 6.785 mills for operating expenses and is pro-
posed solely at the discretion of the School Board. The
combined School Board tax increase for both operating
expenses and capital outlay is shown in the adjacent
notice.
The capital outlay tax will generate approximately
$437,688.00 to be used for the following projects.
Bus Purchase
Purchase Three School Buses.
Construction and Remodelina
Finish Construction at Wewahitchka Elementary.
All concerned citizens are invited to a public hearing to
be held on July 29, 1991, at 5:30 p.m. at the Gulf
County Courthouse School Board meeting room.
A DECISION on the proposed capital outlay taxes will
be made at the hearing.










~. ~c.
/


Gallon


SPECIALS FOR JULY 25-31
George W. Duren, Owner/Manager
510 5th St. 229-8398


1%o Whole, or 2% Fresh




nini i *- : '


2 TO PAK
T-Bone Steak b.
2 TO PAK
Porterhouse
Steak................. b.
TENDER
Chuck Eye
Steak................... lb.


3.99


3.99


2.49


Family Pak
Chicken Wings lb. 790
Family Pak
Chicken Breast........... b. 1.19
Boston Butt
Pork Roast 1b. 1.29
TENDER
Chuck Tender Steak. Ib. 2.29
FRESH
London Broil Steak.... Ib. 2.29


Lykes
All Meat Bologna..... 12 oz...99
Boneless
Beef Short Ribs...........ib. 1.99
Fresh
Pork Steak Ib.1.49
Select Skinned Deveined
Beef Liver ,b 89
Lykes
Hot Dogs.................10o oz. pkg. 89


FAMILY PAK BONELESS
Rib Eye Steak.........Ib. 3.89


PEPSI DR. PEPPER 7-UP
^JHv -.* A


LIPTON TEA BAGS


$


19


SUBS-Witches Wehave dellcEN SALADS
ZZrhrllhokphvhp'-GREEN SALADS


24
COUNT


1.99

1.69


5 oz..
ARMOUR SAUSAGF 2/1.00


12 oz. Cans


SHASTA DRINKS


Cas/4.99


8. oz.


Cool Whip ....00
l, Ib. McKenzie
Frozen Okra............ 990
.Gorton's Value Pak, 27 oz.
Fish Portions & Sticks 3.29
74 Ear Real Value
corn on Cob .......1.09
-M-0 b0 i'm 0 m m m 0 m 1 009^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


12 oz. Kraft. Singles
Cheese..
16 oz. Squeeze
Parkay .......
'64 oz. Star ,, ,
Flavored Punch
' 9oz. Big-Country -


1...99 r
...... 1.19 I


990


2/99


I A A A AAAAA A A A11: A A A A Al


.r~ ~
V ~


1.


[I


II


with
$10.00
or more
food
order


3 lb. can
CRISCO SHORTENING
39 oz.
BOLD DETERGENT
\


r;


r~r"'


ivw ." aft I


.


mmmmmmmmmmm


41% 0% d













a',ATA PORT ST.TnJOEr. F TmmCT)AY. JI(LY25. 1991


PAGE 6B THE STA R. '-'A.


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50x150 lot w/2 BR, 14x60 MH
and all improvements. $21,500.
Americus St., St. Joe Beach. Financ-
ing Available. Call 648-5323.
TFC 7/25

50x100 lot w/12x60 MH, 16x20
shop, all improvements. $21,500. 4th
and 2nd St. Beacon Hill. Financing
available. 648-KENT. TFC 7/25
20 acres South Long St., Over-
street. See sign. $2,500 per acre. P. 0
Box 937, Highland City, FL 33846.
Ph.: 813-644-1606. 4tp 7/11

2 bdrm. trailer, on 3/4 acre, ad-
jacent to Wetappo Creek, fenced, Ig.
storage building. $18,000 assumable
mortgage. 229-8581 or 227-1566.
tfc 7/4

150'x120' commercial lot on
Hwy. 98 west of Highland View.
$55,000. Call George, 229-6031.
tfc 8/1

Port St. Joe Commercial Proper-
ty. 4 lots and lots and large building in need of
repair. Many possibilities. Priced to
sell! $55,000.
Call Cathey 648-5777 ERA Park-
er Realty, 648-5653 evenings, or 1-
800-874-5073. tfc 8/1
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 8/1


GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Blas, Florida

(904) 229-2500
1-800-624-3964
tfe6/6


For sale by owner. 2 bdrm. house
w/stove & refrig., nice lot w/shade
trees. City water & private pump. Ad-
jacent lot available. Canal St., 1/2
block from beach, St. Joe Beach,
$26,000. 904-482-3884, Marianna.
tfc 8/1

STwo nice lots, Pine St., $16000
each. One nice lot on Canal St., 1/2
block from beach, $15,000. St. Joe
Beach. For sale by owner. 904/482-
3884, Marianna, FL. tfc 8/1
St. Joe Beach, Immaculate brick
home on 2 large landscaped lots. Cy-
press privacy fence, pleasant location.
647-5252. tfc 8/1
3 bedroom, 1 bath house, corner
13th & Garrison, $49,500. Call
George, 229-6031. tic 8/1
Very Nice! 3 bdrm., 2 ba. house,
stone fireplace In great room, great lo-
cation, 2011 Juniper Ave. Call for ap-
pointment, 229-6427. tfc 8/1
1/2 acre MOBILE HOME LOTS.
12 mi. north of Mexico Beach on
Overstreet Road (Hwy. 386), Creek-
view Sub., no down payments, $86
per month. 229-6031. tfc 8/1

Two acres on county road off of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 8/1'
Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable. for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 7/4
No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/90





WANT TO BUY: Hardshell storage
case/luggage carrier for top of car.
Call 229-6654 of 227-1888.
1TC 7/25


2 BR house at 108 7th St., High-
land View. Fenced yard, I block from
school. May be seen by coming by
110 7th St., HV or call 229-6671.
3TC 7/25

Rooms for rent in private home.
Very reasonable. For more informa-
tion, call 647-8059. 1TP 7/25
3 BR, 1 bath frame house, large
sorage building, partially furnished.
No Pets. $250 mo., $100 security de-
posit. 230 7th St., Port St. Joe. 1-
871-4837. 1TC 7/25

1 Small trailer, 1 studio apt. Call
647-8481. TFC 7/25
Unfurnished 2 bedroom house, 1
block off beach, DeSoto St. $100
damage deposit, $300 month. Availa-
ble 1st of August. 227-1696.
tfc 7/25

One bedroom beach cottage, gulf
view. $150 deposit. rent $225 per
month. Call 647-5606. 4tp 7/18
2 bedroom, 1 bath furnished
apartment in town. $200 month -In-
cluding water. 229-6571 after 5:00.
2tp 7/18


2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment,
completely furnished. Clean, like new.
At Gulf Aire. Pool & tennis access.
Call 674-8370. 4tc 7/11

2 bedroom fully furnished house,
a/c, washer & dryer, $300 mo. 229-
8909. Itc 7/25

For Rent ,or Sale: lease option
$75 credit back. 3 bedroom, 1 bath,
in Port St. Joe. 647-8783.
tfc 8/1
2 Dogwood Terrace Appartments
available. 2 bdrms., 1 bath, energy ef-
ficient. 647-8317. tfc 8/1

Mobile home lot for rent,
50'xl50'. Tull's Trailer Parker, Jones
Homestead, 229-8669. tfc 8/1


Two small trailers and one mo-
bile home, adults only, no pets. 648-
5659. tfc 8/1


2 bedroom, 1 bath, garage, very
nice. Gulf Aire. $425 month. 647-
5897. tfc 8/1


3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1302 Garri-
son Ave. Fenced back yard. $375 per
month. $150 deposit. Call 227-1731.
tfc 8/1

Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfc 8/1

Mobile home lots. City water and
garbage fee included. Rustic Sands
Campground, 648-5229. tfc 8/1

Nice one, .two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing. tfc 7/4

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 8/1

Pressure Washer & Airless Ren-
tals. For more information call 647-
8941. 2tp7/18


UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
* Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
* New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
* Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
* One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 8/1

Office Space for Lease: Spa-
cious, clean, well located office in con-
venient part 'of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378 or come by 322 Long
Avenue. tfc 8/1

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath in
Ward Ridge. $375 month. Days 227-
1751 and ask for Becky. Night 647-
8384. tfc 8/1

3 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage,
very nice in Gulf Aire. $650 month.
Call 647-5897. tfc 8/1


RADS &


Housewife would like to do baby-
sitting in her home. 229-8893.
2tc 7/18

L & V CERAMIC TILE. Fire-
places, counter tops, shower stalls,
floors & etc. Installation $2.00 per
square ft. 639-5802. 2tc 7/11
Lawn Mowing, Weed Eating,
Trimming. Quality work. low rates.
229-2720. 2tp 7/11

Gulf Co. Transportation, the Com-
munity Transportation Coordinator
for Gulf County has funds available
to provide transportation to persons
in the county who are because of
physical or mental disabilities, in-
come status, or age or who for oth-
er reasons are unable to transport
themselves or to purchase trans-
portation and are therefore, deperm-
dent upon others to obtain access
to health fare, employment, educa-
tion, shopping, social activities, or
other life-sustaining activities, who
are not subsidized for transporta-
tion financial assistance or specific
trips.
For information regarding fare
structure and advance notice re-
quirements or to access this service
contact Gulf County Transportation
at 229-6550 or come by the office
at 200 Peters St., Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida. Gulf Coordinated Transporta-
tion operates under the sponsor-
ship of State of Florida Trans-
portation Disadvantaged Commis-
sion. tfc 5/30

Narcotics Anonymous
Open Meetings on Monday 8 p.m.
at 302 Reid Ave., and on
Friday 8 p.m. at
The Phantry Hotel
Help Line 229-8348
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00,
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 7/4

THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 7/4

C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box AlC, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfc7/4


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns
0
Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-387, Howard Creek
tfc 7/4

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
24 Years Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Acci-
dents. No charge for first conference.
tfc 7/4


All types of yard work. Mowing.
raking, and trimming. Reasonable.
229-6435. tfc 7/4

SPort St. Joe Lodge No. 111
Reg. Stated Communication
1st and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
G. Godwin, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 5/23

SEWING & ALTERATIONS
of All Kinds.
Fashion, Weddings, or
Domestic
Men's, Women's & Children's
Call 229-6154
after 6 p.m.


SAWS SCISSORS DRILL BITS
LAWN MOWER BLADES
BUTCHER KNIVES

LOCAL SAW SHARPENER
H. L HARRISON
1008 McClellan Ave.
Call 227-1350 or 229-8522
5tS0/i

STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
'"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 7/4

COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returris A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581 s:.n


Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 7/4


WEbDING CAKES
Designed especially for you.

Original recipe.
Call 229-6154 evenings
and weekends.




Avon

CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Mmorilal Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460 tic 7/4

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Prems
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc 7/4

SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!








Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. trce6/6


Women's Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Church. 227-1145 or 227-/1128.



342 Coronado St., St. Joe Beach
*Antiques Collectibles
DepressiOn Glass Dolls &
Crafts Etc.
647-8339 tfe 7/11

BOOT & SHOE
REPAIR
SAFETY SHOES
COWBOY'S TRADITION
._. ^ 102 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Lt, 774


LYLE OFFICE SERVICE
Typing, Resume and
Bookkeeping for
Personal or Business Needs
Call 229-8562 c 6/27


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043



Jobie'Barfield's

Small Engine

Repair
*Lawn Mowers
*Weed Eaters i(A
Chain Saws ,[,
Generators
*.Pumps )
*Tillers
*Go-Karts
Lawn Care Services Available

229-6965
1106 Long Ave. Port St. Joe
(Shop Entrance In the Alley)


GARRETT INSTALLATIONS
For All Your Carpet & Vinyl In-
stallations and Repairs
Call 229-2735 or 227-1295
Free Estimates 9 yrs. Exp.
Jerry Garret-owner itp 7/25
TFC 8/1

NAN'S TEMPORARY SERVICE
Experienced, professional
All types office work, editing,
tutoring, computer work with
specialty in Word Perfect.
Nan Peck, 400 Jeffrey Dr.,
#600-8, Port St. Joe, FL 32456
229-6726
2tc 7/18

Residential Interior
Commercial Exterior
JEFF THIMMER
Painting & Wallpaper Services
Reliable, Dependable, 4tp 6/
Quality Custom Work
Free estimates Lic. #90373
229-8534 15 yrs. experience


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer tfc7/4


Lic. #RA 0060794 #ER0012523 (904) 827-2009

CHIP'S QUALITY
HEATING & COOLING
New Installations & Service 7
Owner RUIL C. LAY P.O. Box 841 Port St. Joe, FL 32456

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODEI.ING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INS]'ALLAION OF \VATIIER I.INES AND SEWER 1. NES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA tIc 7/4 904/229-6821


PJ'S ROOFING

ALL TYPES OF ROOFS "Vt 4
Hot Roofing, Built-Up, 1-Ply System
Free Estimates
Phone (904) 229-6201 PAT TOUSIGNANT


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL

(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 647-5404
PORT ST. JOE
1314 Garrison Ave.: 2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
back yard. $35,000.
1607 Monument: Large 4 BR 2 1/2 bath masonry home with living room, dining
room, den, fireplace, garage, in excellent neighborhood. $75,000.00.
213 Tapper Ave.: 3 BR, 2 bath brick home with den and deck, carpet and vinyl, ch/
a. Recently remodeled. Large lot. $65,000.00
1609 Marvin Ave.: (Ostiter home. 3 BR, 1 bath masonry construction with stor-
age shed, wind lwU9ew roof. $34,000.00.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$425~ 00 W0. REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
51i 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $50,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
BARRIER DUNES
Immaculate Gulf view townhouse with 3 decks, 2 large bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths,
great kichen with all appliances, living room and dining area all beautifully dec-
orated. Amenitities too numerous to mention. Carport and storage. Only
$125,000.00.
HIGHLAND VIEW
Hwy. 98: Large 2 BR, 1 bath stucco home, living room, dining room, 2 large en-
closed porches plus garage and storage building. $35,000.
OAK GROVE
105 Hunter St.: 3BR, 1 bath with extra room which could be 4th BR, living room, din-
ing room, den, screened porch, privacy fence, carpet, ch/a on 2 lots.
$29,500.00.
WHITE CITY
Remodeled country home. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen all
up-dated. Short drive to town. $32,000.00.
HOWARD CREEK
Corner of Deer and Perch: 2 BR, 1 bath mobile home, furnished, ch/a, utility build-
ing with washer and dryer on 2 lots, covered outside patio or car port. $27,000.
OVERSTREET
2 BR, 2 bath, with fireplace is on approx. 6.1 acres. Approx. 1,512 sq. ft. plus large
deck. Only $52,000
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2 bath home located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must see to appreciate.
$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
5th Ave., Beacon Hill: Log Cabin and barn located on 4 lots (3 landscaped) also 1
1 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home. $36,900, Reduced to $31,900, without mobile
home $84-1900 $26,900.
Between Sea St. and 1st St., Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 5 BR, 2 story home with
game room. Completely furnished. $150,000.00.
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
Cape San Bias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part. $900
per front foot.
Gulf Aire: single family residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 corner lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue, $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.


11AIV T













THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1991 PAGE 7B


Matching sofa, loveseat and
chair, $250. Call 229-6140 or 229-
6694. 1TP 7/25

Couch and loveseat, Used ap-
prox. 7 mo. $500.00. Call 229-6509,
ask for Kenny or Cheryl. 1TP 7/25

25 inche console TV $50.00.
Good condition. 229-8079. 1TC 7/25

For Sale: Bob White quail,
dressed. 229-8403. 2TC 7/25

Whirlpool air conditioner, 10,000
btu's, 1 year old, asking $300. May
be seen at 606 Park Ave., Highland
View.

Piano for sale, console home size,
excel. cond., take on low payments,
available in your area. Call anytime:
1-800-622-2047. 4tp 7/18

Taking bids on the sale of 2.71
acres of pine trees located at Sun-
shine Farms, Overstreet. For more in-
formation, call Billy Given at 229-
6223 days or 227-1467 after 6.
tfc 6/20

1986 mobile home, 14'x70', 2
bdrm., 2 ba. (ch&a), assume 10 yr.
mortgage at $187.00 per month. Call
229-8029 or 639-5134. 3tc 7/11

Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyn-
dall Parkway, Panama City, FL
32404. 763-7443. tfc 8/1

Older piano with a roll top, good
for beginner or for antique collector,
asking $600. 229-6965 after 4:00
p.m. tfc 6/6

Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOO 227-1105.
tfc 8/1

FREE: EBight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 8/1






LOST: Camera at St. Joe Beach.
Film is of vacation in Nova Scotia.
Please call 647-5004 if you can help
us locate film. 1TC 7/25

LOST: Reward $25. Brown wallet
east of Black's Island in the potholes.
Allen LeGrone, Blakely, GA 31723.
912-723-5137. 2tp 7/25


LOST CAT
Pretty gray striped tom cat with
white markings on face and
legs. Has collar with vaccination
tag from Bay Animal Hospital.
Please call 229-6922.
ITP 7/25






FREE to good homes. Kittens,
solid white, solid grey and calico. 647-
5092 after 5 p.m. 1TP 7/25






'83 Datson 280Z. Must sell.
$1500.00 or best offer. 648-8334.
2TC 7/25

Take up payments on '87 Nissan
Sentra. 5 sp. (5 in floor). Good cond.
Call 227-7590. 1TP 7/25

'86 Buick. La Sabre. Excellent
cond. $3,900. 1-653-9615 1TP 7/25

'88 Mustang LX, 36,000 miles,
pw, pl, am/fm cassette, 5 speed, air,
rear defrost, 6 yr. extended warranty.
Must sell before Aug. 10, $6,000 obo.
229-8674. 3tc 7/25

1986 Chevy Celebrity station
wagon, good cond., loan value plus
$200. 229-8372. ltp 7/25

1986 Chevy 4x4, $4,500. Call
647-8702. tfc 8/1



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYS! Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 54 per word for all over 20.






MONEY SECRETS
SWant joy, peace, happiness and
wealth? Send $5.00 to: P.J. Bowers,
P.O. Box 2547, Panama City, FL
32402.
1TP 7/25




I.


Cabin Cruiser, 26' i/o stove, re-
frig. sink, (Q.S. bed), CB & SS radios,
shoreline gal. trailer. Must sell. $1500
or best offer. 648-8334. 2TC 7/25

12 ft. bateau, fiberglass over
wood, built in 1991. Boat and trailer,
asking $400. 647-5648 or 647-8000.
2tp 7/18

23' I/o boat with galvanized trail-
er, recently rebuilt engine, ready to
go. See Tom Hudson Mexico Beach
Marina, $3,500. 227-1376. tfc 8/1


SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


3 Family Yard Sale, Saturday, 8
to 12, 2104 Juniper Ave. Baby items
and household goods. 1TC 7/25

Yard Sale, Saturday only. 342
Coronado St., St. Joe Beach. Rain
cancels. 1TC 7/25

Yard Sale, 603 Long Ave., 9 a.m.
till. 1TP

Odds 'n Ends Yard Sale. Satur-
day, 8:00 3:00. 1313 Long Ave. byS.
Bowen.

Garage Sale Saturday, July 27,
Santa Anna, St. Joe Beach, just be-
fore Jr. Store. 7 a.m. Lots of things.
1TP 7/25

Garage Sale Saturday, July 27,
8:00 a.m. 222 Sea Pine Lane, Gulf
Aire. Lots of items. Rain cancels.
1TP 7/25

Yard Sale, Saturday, July 27, Co-
lumbus St., St. Joe Beach. Lots of
children's clothes. 1TC 7/25

Bargain Basket, Mon. Sat., 9-5
at 445 2nd Ave, Highland View. Baby
items, children's clothes, misc. Am in-
terested in buying baby furniture, will
accept donations. 227-1704.
tfc 8/1
















JOB OPPORTUNITY
Position tite: Custodial Worker
The Gulf County School Board is
receiving applications for an 8 hour,
12 month Custodial Worker (Wewa-
hitchka Elementary School) position.
Only current temporary and substi-
tute custodians will be considered for
this position. Application forms are
available at the Maintenance Office lo-
cated in the Automobile Mechanics/
Bus Maintenance facility just behind
Port St. Joe High School. Persons
having applications on file in the
School Board Office and wishing to be
considered for this position must re-
quest to have their application sub-
mitted and/or updated. One (1) posi-
tion is available. Application deadline
is August 5, 1991, 12:00 Noon EDT..
The Gulf County School Board is an
equal opportunity employer.
Publish: July 25 and Aug. 1,
1991

I need someone who can type
and also knows a little bit about com-
puters. Call 229-6377. 1TC 7/25

Gulf County School System is ad-
vertising for an Instructional/
Behavioral Program Specialist at the
GARC Group Home, North Port St.
Joe. Approved salary schedule. Quali-
fications as per job description. Appli-
cation deadline August 1, 1991. Con-
tact S.M. Eubanks, Gulf County Adult
School. Note: special certification or
degree preferred, other certified areas
will be considered.
The Gulf County School Board is
an equal opportunity employer.
1TC 7/25

Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
Apalachicola River, within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
1/2 overtime pay, on-call duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with water, sew-
erage, and lawn maintenance provid-
ed free.
Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
(26) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten (10) paid holidays. Free continu-
ing educational courses offered by
State University $500 annual allow-
ance for Job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience; or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst., P. 0. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 7/4




Jobie Barfield's


Small Engine

Repair
*Lawn Mowers
*Weed Eaters
Chain Saws t 1
*Generators

S Tillers
Ik *Go-Karts

Lawn Care Services Available

229-6965
1106 Long Ave. Port St. Joe
(Shop Entrance In the Alley)


NOTICE OF SALE
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida proposes to
sell to the highest bidder the following described
deep water well site located on Garrison Avenue:
Lot 14, Block 40. Unit No. 3. St. Jo-
seph's Addition of the City of Port St.
Joe, Florida, according to the official
map on file In the office of the Clerk of
Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida.
Minimum Acceptable Bid, $7,000.
Bids shall be submitted to the Board of City
Commission, Municipal Building. P.O. Box 278,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 not later than 5:00
p.m., August 6. 1991. Bids shall be submitted in a
sealed envelope, plainly marked, "Sealed Bid, Wa-
ter Well Site, Garrison Avenue".
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
BY: /s/ LA. Farris
City Auditor-Clerk
Publish: July 25 and August 1, 1991.


BID NUMBER 001-359
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida invites bids
on the following work:
Soil Stabilization at Wastewater Treat-
ment Primary Pumping Station
Specifications may be obtained from the City
Clerk's Office P.O. Box 278, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
All bids shall meet specifications or be an ap-
proved equal. Bids shall be sealed in an envelope
and plainly marked "Bid No. 001-359'. The City of
Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept any or all
bids, waive any formalities, and to choose the bid
deemed best to meet the City's needs. Bids must
be good for 60 days after opening All Bids F.O.B.,
Port St. Joe.
This bid must conform to Section 287.133
(3)(a) Florida Statutes, on Public Entity Crimes.
Bids must be submitted to the City Clerk's
Office, on or before 5:00 p.m., ET, August 6, 1991.
Bids opening will be held at the regular City Com-
mission Meeting, August 6. 1991, at 8:00 p.m..
ET, in the Municipal Building.



License Sales


Down, But -


Revenue Up

Revenues from hunting and
fishing license sales rose 5.6 per-
cent in 1990, John Turner, direc-
tor of the Interior Department's
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an-
nounced. The total sales of hunt-
ing licenses decreased slightly
from the previous year while fish-
ink license sales held steady.
A total of 15,806,864 people
purchased hunting licenses dur-
ing fiscal year 1990, compared
with 15,858,063 in 1989. Fishing
license purchasers numbered
30,731,821 in fiscal year 1990,
compared with 30,302,244 in
1989. Income from the sale of li-
censes and associated permits,
tags, and stamps in 1990 reached
an overall total of $784 million,
compared with $740 million in
1989.
In making the announce-
ment, Turner said, "Nearly 50
million Americans enjoyed hunt-
ing and fishing activities last
year. these sportsmen and wom-
en, through the purchase of li-
censes, tags, and stamps, provid-
ed vital funding. to enhance
outdoor recreation opportunities
for all Americans." Hunting and
fishing are two of the activities
highlighted in the Interior Depart-
ment's recently announced recre-
ation initiative. "Enjoy Outdoors
America."
"Interior Secretary Lujan and
I recognize the valuable contribu-
tions of our hunters and anglers
not only to their own pastime,
but to the conservation of this
country's natural resources. We
look to them as prime examples
of good stewardship and conser-
vation of this Nation's wildlife and
wild lands. I would like to see
more and more Americans show-
ing the same type of commit-
ment," said Turner.
Money from the sale of fish-
ing and hunting licenses, per-
mits, tags, and stamps is used to
fund state fish and wildlife pro-
grams.



What Can You


Do to Keep

Earth Clean?

What can one person do to
keep the world we all live in a lit-
tle cleaner and safer? Quite a bit,
say the experts at the Foodservice
& Packaging Institute. They sug-
gest you keep these 10 ideas in
mind:
1. Recycle everything alu-
minum, steel, glass, plastic,
newspapers, office paper, card-
board.
2. Don't leave lights and ap-
pliances on when not in use.
3. Keep your thermostat at
moderate temperatures all year
long.
4. Don't use the dishwasher's
dry cycle. Let the dishes air dry.
5. Don't wash dishes under
running water; only use a dish-
washer when it's full.
6. Try to buy recycled prod-
ucts as much as possible.
7. Don't dispose of used mo-
tor oil one quart can contami-
nate thousands of gallons of wa-
ter. Recycle it instead at the
recycling centers located at We-
tappo and Industrial Road.
8. Carpool, walk, ride a bike
or use public transportation
whenever possible.
9. Use recyclable or compost-
able foodservice disposables in-
stead of permanentware that
must be washed. Disposables cut
noise pollution, too.
10. Compost yard, food and
paper wastes.
Send for free information on
protecting the environment from
the Foodservice & Packaging In-
stitute, 1025 Connecticut Ave.,
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036,
or call (202) 822-6420.


ITHIE CIr OF PORT ST. JOE
By: /a/ L.A. Farris
City Auditor/Clerk
Publish: July 18 and 25, 1991.
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARThMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION
NOTICE OF AGENCY ACTION
ON PERMIT APPLICATION
The Department gives notice of its issuance
of a permit. File number 231985021. to the Gulf
County Board of Commissioners to place rip-rap
along 450' of Butler Road along and above the
Mean High Water line in St. Joe Bay, Gulf County.
Florida.
F Persons whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative deter-
rmination (hearing in accordance with Section
120.57, Florida Statutes. The petition must con-
form to the requirements of Florida Administrative
Code Chapters 17-103 and 28-5 and must be filed
(received) in the Department's Office of General
Counsel, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Flor-
ida 32399-2400, within fourteen (14) days of pub-
lication of this notice. Failure to file a petition
within the fourteen (14) days constitutes a waiver
of any right such person has to an administrative
determination (hearing) pursuant to Section
120.57, Florida Statutes.
If a petition is filed, the administrative hear-
ing process is designed to formulate agency action.
Accordingly, the Department's final action may be
different from the proposed agency action. There-
fore, persons who may not wish to file a petition
may wish to intervene in the proceeding. A petition
for intervention must be filed pursuant to Rule 28-
5.207, Florida Administrative Code, at least five (5)
days before the final hearing and be filed with the
hearing officer if one has been assigned at the Di-
vision of Administrative Hearings. Department of
Administration; 1230 Apalachee Parkway; Talla-
hassee, Florida 32399-1500. If no hearing officer
has been assigned, the petition Is to be filed with
the Department's Office of General Counsel; 2600
Blair Stone Road; Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
2400. Failure to petition to intervene within the al-
lowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right
such person has to request a hearing under Sec-
tion 12-0.57, Florida Statutes.
The application is available for inspection
Monday through Friday (except for legal holidays),
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at 340 West 23rd Street,
Suite E; Panama City, Florida 32405.
Publish: July 18 and 25, 1991.


,JLLEMORE Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
REAL ESTATE Mexico Beach, FL 32410
INC. (904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478


NEW LISTINGS
Santa Ana, St. Joe Beach: 3 BR, 1 bath stucco.
75x170 partially fenced lot. $37,500.
Coronado St, St. Joe Beach: A must seal 1988
3BR, 1 bath MH, completely fenced. Beautifully
landscaped. $49,900.


MEXICO BEACH
Grand Isle: 3 bd., brick home approx. 1,700 sq. ft.
on 2 lots with 1 bdJ1 ba. apartment attached. All for
$99,500.
4th SL: 3 bd., 1 ba. completely renovated this year.
Great for first home or retirement home. $48,000.
220 Kim Kove. 3 bd., 2 ba. Quiet residential area.
Garage, sprinkler system, $64,000.
131 Pine St. Pretty residential lot, excellent neigh-
borhood, houses only, $12,500.
109 Circle Dr.: Great view of Gulf. 3 bd., 2 ba.,
brick home, spacious enclosed sun room, Ig. deck
& patio, con. h&a, partially furnished, carport,
$95,000.
34th St Nice large vacant beachfront lot Build
your dream home and enjoy the spectacular sun-
setsl $108,000.
16th St lot, Beach access approx. 500', level resi-
dential lot located on small pond. Possible owner fi-
nancing, $23,500.
310 Maryland Ave.: Mobile home on very Ig. lot,
split plan. 2 bd., 2 ba., deck, screen porch, fenced,
a quiet area, $36,400.
508 Georgia Ave.: Vacant lot with power pole and
septic tank, partially cleared, $17,000. Make offer.
37th St., Brittle #21 & #22. 2 bd., 2 be., excel. ren-
tals, completely furnished, just steps to pier & gulf.
$63,000 each.
Brittle #15, 37th St Completely turn., 2 bath, 2 bd.,
townhome, close to Gulf. $63,000.
Prime location for fishermen and beach lovers,
126 Mlramar Dr. CANAL FRONT SINGLE FAMILY
RESIDENCE w/dock, walk to beach, completely fur-
nished, owner bult, 3 bd., 2 ba. single family resi-
dence. $215,000.
Pier Road, 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba., sunken liv. rm., deck w/
great view, $73,500.
Pier Road: 2 bd., 2 be. furnished townhome, 800'.
. fish from pier or swim in gulf. $639000, MAKE
REASONABLE OFFER.
Texas St., 100'108' vacant lot w/1050 gal. septic
tank in place for 3 bd. home. $12,500.
Georgia Ave. Quality built "Peachtree Tall Oaks"
mobile home, 2 be., w/new 3 ton air ond.,
landscaped, deck,-$.89,oo Reduced to $36,500.
Grand Isle location, like new 3 bd, 2 be. custom
built home. Dbl. garage, great room in quiet area.
$86,900.
100'+- waterfront with 66' +- across highway.
Zoned commercial.
C Miramar Dr, canalfront townhome, very nice, to-
tally turn., 2 bd., 2 1/2 ba. w/dock, 9440,00, RE-
DUCED TO $100,000.
127 MIrmar Dr.: OWNER SAYS SELL Beach-
side duplex, excel. location, beautiful view from
your screen porch, 400' to beach, or walk to Canal
Park. 2 bd., 1 be. each side, paved parking, Ig. util.
irm., 4499N. REDUCED TO $125,000.00.
Corner of 386 & U.S. 98. Uniquely On bluff over-
looking the Gulf. Well kept furnished stucco con-
crete block home. 3 bd., 2 be., great room w/
fireplace, dbl. carport. A must see for $114,000.
4th & Fortner: Great view, spacious home w/big
deck, Ig. liv. rm wifp, fam. rm., dr, kit. w/appli., new
carpet & tile. 3 bd., 2 be. master bath has dressing
area w/walk-in closet. PLUS 2 bd. turn. apartment,
Owner Anxious. $95,000.
313 Halley Dr.: 3 bd., 2 be. brick & frame home, Ig.
double garage, quiet street, good buy. $59,000.
Corner of 13th & Hwy. 98,' vacant lot, zoned for
business, 90'xlg9Y0'. $120,000.
Robin Lane: Vacant lot, owner anxious. $10,000.
Sea St: 1 corner lot with adjoining lot, vacant,
zoned for mobile homes. $28,500 total for the two.
37th St., 2 bd., 2 be. townhome, end unit, beautiful-
ly furnished, near pier, OWNER ANXIOUS,
$69,500, make offer.
37th St, Vacant lot, 75'x100'; nice building lot,
close to beach, pier, beachside, $59,900.
37th St, close to pier: Comfortable 2 bd., 1 1/2
ba., townhome, great getaway, $76,000.
1810 Hwy. 98, Great Rental Investment One 2
bdrm., 2 bath apartment, one one bdrm., 1 bath apt.
Reduced to $85,500.
41st St. Beachslde: Unit in four piex. Neat as a
pinl Furnished, 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba. Very affordable,
$54,500.
117 40th St. Apt. 2: 2 bd., 1 ba., furnished, close
to beach, Reduced to $37,900, make offer.
Hwy. 98: Great buy for home across street from
beach. Nice 2 bd., 1 1/2 be. townhomes, furnished.
$48,500 ea. or $146,000 for all 3. 1 SOLD.
404 5th SL: 2 bd., 2 ba., con. h&a. mobile home. 2
screen porches, Ig. outside utility house, very nice,
on 1g. lot, $49,500.
12th St Business Center: commercial lot 2nd
from highway. $35,000.

WATERFRONT
End of 33rd St: Beautiful view from older beach-
front home situated on 2 lots, heart of pine panel-
ling throughout home. 2 bd.J1 be. plus carport &
porch. $198,630.
Great waterfront Inveetrentl Total of 3 lots from
Gulf of Mexico to Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach with 2
bd., 1 ba. older house, $135,000.

BEACON HILL
2nd Ave.: Three lots, 50'x100' with septic tanks,
$13,750.00 each or $39,500 for all three. Owner fi-
nancing available.
Beacon Hill Estates: Lucia Ave., nice residential
lot, 100'x120', $13,000. -
Beacon Hill Estates: Hwy. 386, commercial or res-
idential lot, 100'x120'. $17,000.Beacon Hill Lots:
3rd Ave. Between 1st & 2nd St. Owner financing,
20% down. $7,000 each. 50'x 100.
4th Ave. & 3rd St., Newly remodeled & redecorat-
ad 3 bd., 1 ba. home on 3 lots. Reduced to
$67,000. Call for details.
2nd Ave. & 4th St.: 2 lots 50'x10ff each, cleared,


Ellen F. Allemore, Broker
648-8939
Dot Craddock 648-5486
Joy Holder 648-8493
Brenda Lynn 648-8215
John Maddox 648-8899
Joan Smithwick 648-5374
$22,500 for both.
Choose 1 of 2 lots available, corner of 3rd St. & 4th
Ave. or corner of 3rd St. & 3rd Ave. $13,500 ea.
Faulk & Lucia-Large vacant comer lot 120'x100',
zoned for homes, short distance to beach. $15,000.
6th St, 2 Ig. vacant lots zoned for houses, $32,000
total.
4 wooded lots, $20,000.
1985 double wide 3 bd., 2 bea. mobile home in the
center of 3 lots. $42,900.
3rd Ave.: Nice 14x60' Scot 1984 mobile home, 2
bd., 1 be. custom built masonite siding, shingle
roof, other extras. $35,000.

BEACH FRONT TOWN HOMES
38th St Luxury by the Pier #3, beachfront town-
home, spectacular view, newly furnished, 3 bd., 2 1/
2 ba., completely furnished, $120,000.
Beachfrnt townhome Mexico Beach. 2 bed-
room, 2 U eG. Reduced.
to $79,9001
Townhome 9709. Beachfront townhome, nicely fur-
nished, swimming pool & tennis court privileges.
$96,500.
Seashores #1 and #3, Beautiful 3 d., 2 1/2 ba.,
unit w/fireplace, good storage, closet space, un-
fumrn., $125,000. -
Cortez SL End Triplex at St Joe Beach: Lg. 3
bd., 2 1/2 be., covered deck, good layout, fireplac-
es, $122,900.
Gulf Aire Townhome: 9733, Waterfront, 2 bd., 2
1/2 bea., nicely and completely furnished, $95,000.
9813 Hwy. 98: Absolutely beautiful 3 bd., 2 1/2 ba.,
$159,900.
9821 Hwy. 98: beautiful 2 bd., 2 1/2 ba. townhome.
$98,500 unfurnished, $105,000 furnished.
GULF AIRE
412B Gulf Aire Dr.: 1/2 duplex. Unique 3 bdrm., 2
be., custom designed home, cathedral ceiling,
stone fp, ch/a, garage, all appliances. Many ameni-
ties. $79,900.
Gulf Aire Dr.: multi-family or single family lot,
$29,000.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Comer lot with view of water,
$30,000.
Gulf Aire Dr.: 2 lots available. $17,000 ea.
Prime Lot facing the gulf, 60'x180', $50,000.
Beacon Road: Nice vacant lot, $22,500.
See Pines Dr. Vacant lot, nice. BACK ON THE
MARKET, $28,000.
Beacon Road, good vacant lot, $22,500.
Nice residential lot, $17,900.
Gulf AIre Drive: Good single family vacant lot,
$17,900.
Beacon Road: One large single family lot. $19,500.
Gulf Airs Drive: Multi or single family vacant lot,
sewer tap pd., Readyl $17,200.
Buccaneer Dr.: Extra Ig. vacant lot, beautiful trees,
low traffic area, $35,000.
Gulf Airs Dr.: Close to pool & tennis courts, vacant
lot, $21,500.
Beacon Road: Vacant lot, good location, $19,500.
Periwinkle Dr.: Vacant lot, located in slow traffic
area, $19,500.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Vacant lot close to tennis court &
pool area. $22,800.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Triplex, two 3 bd. 2 ba. units and one
1 bd., 1 ba. unit, very nice, good investment, all 3 at
$155,000 or will sell individually for $69,900 ea 3
bd. units & $34,900 1 bd. unit.
Gulf Aire Drive: 2 triplexes 1 bd. w/loft each, total
of 6 units, furnished. $38,900 ea.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Duplex, 3 bd., 2 bea. ea. side, excel.
construction. $69,900 per unit.
Gulf Alm Dr.: Duplex, triplex or single family vacant
lot, $22,900.


ST. JOE BEACH
Alabama St Nice lot for home or mobile home.
$13,500.
Corner Bay SL & Alabama: 24'x48' quality built
Skyline mobile home. Formal liv. rm. & din. rm.,
den, with kitchen. Comes with all appliances. Cen.
h/a, 1g. dbl. garage, offers workshop and super stor-
age. Landscaped, chain link fenced yard, $55,000
240 Santa Ann St.: Home for family or weekend
living. Liv., din. rm., kit., 2 Ig. bd., 2 be., wrap-
around eck. Septic system allows another bd.
$65,000.
Bay St Drive by to see this attractive 2 bedroom, 2
bath mobile home with large screen porch & deck
on level, wooded lot. Completely furnished for your
vacation retreat or permanent residence. $38,500.
5912 Georgia Ave., 2 bd., 2 be. mobile home with
2 car garagelg. deck nice yd. $42,500.
Corner Gulf St. & Americue Ave.: 1 block frmo
beach. 2 bd., 2 be. 14'x70' mobile home, ch/a. all
appliances, double garage on 2 lots, $42W9, Re-
duced to $41,000.
348 Gulf St.: 2 bd., 1 ba. mobile home. New carpet
& sub flooring, furnished, nice lot, $25,000.
Corner of Canal & Alabama. Partially furnished
clean. well-main-tained 3 bd., 2 ba. double wide,
carport, nice yd. w/fruit trees & shade trees.
$45,000.
Selms St: Vacant lot with drive, 75'x150',.14,9800
$11,000.
Large home, best construction. 4 bd.. 2 ba. up-
stairs; 2 bd., 1 ba., 1/2 ba., 1/4 ba. downstairs, plen-
tyof deck, gorgeous viewl $162,000.
Corner of Americus & Selma, 3 lots available, 2 al
$14,000 ea. & 1 at $15,500. Owner financing.
Coronado & U.S. 98: Unobstructed gulf view. Co-
ronado #4, 2 lod., 1 1/2 ba townhome. ch&a, total
elec., NICEI $72,69Q Reduced to $69,500.


Pineda St.. 4 lots in first block to beach, $20,000
as.
Hwy. 98, between Pine & Canal Streets: Lot,
beautiful view, Reduced to $25,000.
Columbus St, nicely furnished 3 bd., 2 ba. mobile
home, 1 1/2 blocks to beach, $40,000.
St. Joe Beach, Coronado #7, 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba.
townhome, unrestricted gulf view, furnished, nice.
Reduced to $65,000. Make offer.
Corner Santa Anna & U.S. Hwy. 98. 4 bd., 2 ba.
or possibly could be converted into 2 rental units.
$70,0099, Now $60,000. MAKE OFFER.
Hwy. 98 between Balboa & Magellan. Develop-
oral 3/4 of block plus 1 lot. Look to the future. Su-
per investment. $330,000.
Corner of Court & Alabama, St Joe Beach: New
frame stilt home, 2 bd., 1 ba., livJdinJkitchen com-
bo, nice deck, furnished, ch/a. $-#6,99. Reduced
to $69,500.
St Joseph Shores: Great buy for home across
street from beach. 2 bd, 1 1/2 ba. townhome, turnn,
$48,500 or $194,000 for all 4.
Coronado Townhomes: 2 bd., 1 1/2 be., dedicat-
ed beach. Unobstructed view. All amenities. Fur-
nished $84,900; unfurnished $74,500.


98. Reduced to $30,000.


PORT ST. JOE
Cape Plantation: 103 Plantation Drive: A great
home for the golfer 3 bd, plus a bonus room, 2 1/2
be., 2,000 sq. ft. approx. Small equity & assume,
$105,000.
2011 Juniper Ave.: Walking distance to schools &
churches, 3 obd., 2 be., appli. & fp, fenced back yd.
$69,000.
139 Westcott Circle Almost new 3 bd., 2 ba.
home, fp, 1g. bdrms., whirlpool tub in master bath. 2
storage bldgs. Screen enclosed patio, pool & walk-
way to pool. Landscaped yd. & back yard privacy
fenced. Shallow well. Looking for a nice home, you
must see this $118,000.
White City: 3 bd., 1 be. home. approx. 1/2 acre, re-
cently renovated, attractive yard.
206 10th St.: 3 bd., 1 ba. home, new kitchen cabi-
nets, carport, near churches, nursing home.
$39,900.
510 8th St.: Live in 1 apartment and rent out 3 for
income. $48,900.
Howard Creek: Great fishing, year round living, 3
be., 1 be., mobile home, furnished, storage shed,
wall, screened porch, $32,500. 1 Acre cleared.
WHITE CITY: Roomy 2 bd. home w/carport &
screen porches, on Volunteer St., $26,500.
517 10th St: Nice solid starter home, 2 bd., I be.'
on 2 1/2 lots. Room to expand. Reduced to
$29,900.
Oak Grove: 2 lots, mobile home w 3 bd., 2 ba.
$18,500.
Port St. Joe: Very nice 3 bd., 2 ba. home. Stone
trim, stone f.p. in great rm, vaulted ceiling, double
garage, beautifully landscaped yard, excellent
neighborhood.
2004 Juniper Ave.: Comfortable 3 od., 1 1/2 ba.
Brick home, just redone, swimming pool, 1 1/2 lots,
good price, $85,000.
Marvin Avenue: Vacant lot, 75'x175', no back door
neighbors. $17,500.
HOWARD CREEK: 62'x130' vacant lot, $7,300.


OVERSTREET
Three (3) acre parcels on Welappo Creek with sep-
tic tanks. $15,000 each with good owner financing.
Sunshine Acres: Land available only 10 mi. to
beach, unrestricted quiet area, low taxes, $7,000.
Intracoastal Canal Frontage: Lot 1, 1.02 A -
$28,000; Lot 2, 1.08 A $28,000; Lot 3 1.35 A,
$45,500.
Intracoastal Canal front, 1 + acre with well and
septic tank. $20,000.
SUNSHINE FARMS on Hwy. 386.4 miles north of
Hwy. 98, 5.68 acres, $17,000.
SUNSHINE ACRES: 10 mi. from Mexico Beach,
2.1 acres, $12,000.
2 lots with septic tank approx. .5 acre, ready to
build, on county road 386, 3 miles north of Over-
street bridge, $11,000 ea. Owner financing availa-
ble.
1.9 acres on canal, $29,500.
Overstreet: Approximately 2 acres loaded w/trees.
300' along west side of Daniels Rd.. $9,000.
1/2 a nK- d
to $51.Ln r
Wyhu T n t cant

Sunshine Farms: 4.94 acres on main road,
$16,000.
SunsWne Farms, approx. 4 mi. to beach, 3 acres,
$15,000.
Overstreet Hwy. 386 before bridge, 1.47 acres.
septic tank. light pole, well. $15,000.


WEWAHITCHKA
Hwy. 71, near Honeyville. 2.5 acres w/older trailer,
$221900, REDUCED TO $18,000. OWNER ANX-
IOUS
Wewahltchka: 22 plus acres, wooded, pretty,
$69.900.


HIGHLAND VIEW
1988 doublewide mobile home on 3 lots, 7th St.
Custom features, deck, chain link fence, $33,000.
Building behind truss plant, Approx. 1 acre w/
bldg. and 3 phase power to site. $33,500.



CAPE SAN BLAS
Private 100' on beach. 1.66 acres vacant property
$450,90. Reduced to $122,000.


pilW


I


I -












PAGE 8B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1991

l^^tfg^J'ffT~y-- /f=!JiTf^gtEf


Paltry Peanut Packs A Powerhouse for Products


Open a peanut shell and
what do you find inside? You find
ink, lipstick, cooking oil, marga-
rine, paint, soap, explosives,





.4;.


(USA)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP... 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL........ 11 a.m.
Nursery Available
SERMON:
Faith Afloat or Standing Firm
Minister Rev. Wm. C. Cowfer
Exec. of Presbytery of Fla.
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden,
Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756


Catch the SeAlril
0- INS UNrTSD METHooSrcHURCH


paper, flour, milk, shaving cream,
shampoo, ice cream, cheese, and,
of course, delicious high-protein
roasted peanuts and peanut but-
ter. The small kernels (and their
shell and vine) represent one of
the most versatile plants on
Earth, as well as one of the most
nutritious.
Outside North America, pea-
nuts are used mostly for oil, not
for food, which is a shame. Pea-
nuts contain 26 percent protein,
higher than eggs, dairy products
and many cuts of meat and fish.
Two peanut butter sandwiches
and a cup of milk fill 83 percent
of growing children's daily need
for protein and give them the
abundant energy they need.
The human body is built on
proteins, and yet we cannot store
proteins. Rapidly growing chil-
dren need a daily supply to form
bones and tissue; adults need
protein daily to replace worn-out
body cells; and, as we grow older
and begin to eat less, we especial-
ly need a diet high in protein.
That's why peanuts are so valua-
ble to us.
The total food energy in one
pound of peanut butter equals 1
3/8 pounds of cheese, 2 1/2


Constitution and Monument
Port St. Yoe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............... 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship .............5:30 p.m. Thursday ..................7:30 p.m.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


k- -


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Flordia Church Phone 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellow-
ship "A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune in Every Sunday at 8:45 a.m.
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade



You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James' Episcopal Church
309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe
epISCOpaL
t++ I -SERVICES-
Each Sunday..................7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School................................ 9:45 a.m.
SDRCh The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor



"The Exciting Place to Worship"


IFirst Baptist Church

102 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Florida

I HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
JAMES ENFINGER, Music/Youth


A


We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place

BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ........... 7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING ................. 11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY .... .............. 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ...................5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor
KEITH PATE ALAN STEWART
Min. of Music Min. of Education
& Children & Youth



Bible Study Worship
10 a.m. Sunday 11 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday



ONE NATION

UNDER GOD
Check your local T.V. listings for the
nationwide call-in show during July

Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
P.O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456
v_ )


pounds of steak, four quarts of
milk or 32 eggs. Peanuts contain
many of the essential B vitamins
(Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin), pol-
yunsaturated fats, no choleste-
rol, and a balanced share of calo-
ries. Calories balanced with
proteins are essential to your
health. This balance of calories
and proteins creates quick energy
and builds muscle. Appreciable
amounts of calcium, phosphorus,
potassium, iron, magnesium and
important trace elements round
out the nutrition of peanuts.
When you team the protein
from one plant (as in peanut but-
ter) with the protein from another
plant (bread), you multiply the ef-
fectiveness of their protein power.
Nutritionally, a peanut butter
sandwich and a glass of milk are
a perfect pair. Add an orange and
you get a nutritionally balanced
meal. Perhaps this is why Ameri-
cans eat nearly nine pounds of
peanuts each year.
But where did this powerful
plant originate?
Dixie Peanut Brittle
Stove Top Method:
2 cups granulated sugar
1 cup light corn syrup
1/2 cup water
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 cups raw shelled peanuts,
skins on
2 tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons baking soda
Heat sugar, syrup, water and
salt to a rolling boil in a heavy
saucepan. Add peanuts. Reduce
heat to medium and stir con-
stantly. Cook until syrup spins a
thread (2930F). Add butter, then
baking soda. Beat rapidly and
pour on a buttered surface
spreading to 1/4-inch thickness.
When cool' break into pieces.
Store in an airtight container.
Yields about 2 pounds.
Microwave Oven Method:
1 1/2 cups raw shelled peanuts,
skins on


1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup light corn syrup
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon baking soda
Stir together peanuts, sug-
ar,syrup, and salt in a 1 1/2
quart microwave safe container.
Cook eight minutes on high in
microwave oven stirring well.after
four minutes. Stir in butter and
vanilla. Microwave two minutes
longer on high. Add baking soda
and quickly sti- until light and
foamy. Immediately pour onto
lightly greased baking sheet;
spread to 1/4 inch thickness.
When cool break into pieces.
Store in airtight container. Yields
about 1 pound.
Peanut Butter Custard Pie
1 cup confectioners sugar
1/2 cup chunky peanut butter
1 9-inch baked pastry shell
1/4 cup cornstarch
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups scalded milk*
3 egg yolks, beaten
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 egg whites
1/2 cup granulated sugar
Combine confectioners sugar
and peanut butter, blend until
the appearance of biscuit mix.
Spread 3/4 of this mixture on the
bottom of the pastry shell.
Combine cornstarch, granu-
lated sugar and salt.** Add scaled
milk and mix well. Pour small
amount over egg yolks. Mix well,
then return to milk mixture. Cook
in top of double boiler over medi-
um heat until mixture thickens.
Remove from heat. Stir in butter
and vanilla, then pour into pre-
pared pastry shell. Top (with me-
ringue.
To Make Meringue: Beat egg


whites, adding sugar a little at a
time until sugar is all dissolved
and the meringue is stiff and
glossy. Pile onto hot pie filling
and _sprinkle remaining peanut
butter and sugar mixture over the
meringue. Bake at 3500F until
lightly browned. Yields 6 to 9
servings.


*to scale milk, heat to just be-
low boiling.
**Variation: Chocolate Cus-
tard Pie
Stir 2 tablespoons cocoa into
cornstarch-sugar mixture. Then
proceed with preparation of cus-
tard filling according to direc-
tions.


*Heating & Air
*Major
Appliance
Repair

*Plumbing &
Electrical Work

RER0007623
RFA004131 229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle, Port St. Joe





'BOSS OYSTER'

Water Street Apalachicola

Sonny Ray with a TWANG is back from New
Orleans to entertain you once again!

*New Oyster Topping
( Oysters Monterey by Gregory R. Pace
*Our New Blue Crabs are
"HOT" as the Devil
*Introducing a Chicken Barbeque in the
traditional Jamaican way known as "Jerked"
Chicken.

Enjoy it with a cold Red Stripe, mon!







SENII

--MrAsgeA V


U. Lee uVluis, iM.u.










'Bay Eye & Surgical Center

1 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
I 1-800-227-5704
rn rninw m W m *- Wm in* *


The use of easily remembered
names greatly reduces confusion
when two or more tropical storms
occur at the same time. For ex-
ample, one hurricane can be
moving slowly westward in the
Gulf of Mexico, while at exactly
the same time another hurricane
can be moving rapidly northward
along the Atlantic coast. In the
past, confusion and false rumors
have arisen when storm adviso-
ries broadcast from one radio sta-
tion were mistaken for warnings
concerning an entirely different
storm located hundreds of miles
away.
History of Hurricane Names
For several hundred years
many hurricanes in the West In-
dies were named after the partic-
ular saint's day on which the hur-
ricane occurred. Ivan R. Tannehill
describes in his book "Hurri-
canes" the major tropical storms
of recorded history and mentions
many hurricanes named after
saints. For example, there was
"Hurricane Santa Ana" which
struck Puerto Rico with excep-
tional violence on July 26, 1825,
and "San Felipe" (the first) and
"San Felipe" (the second) which
hit Puerto Rico on September 13
in both 1876 and 1928.
Tannehill also tells of Clem-
ent Wragge, an Australian mete-
orologist who began giving wom-
en's .names to tropical storms
before the end of the 19th centu-


An early example of the use of
a woman's name for a storm was
in the novel "Storm" by George R.
Stewart, published by Random
House in 1941, and since filmed
by Walt Disney. During World
War II this practice became wide-
spread in weather map discus-
sions among forecasters, especial-
ly Air Force and Navy
meteorologists who plotted the
movements of storms over the
wide expanses of the Pacific
Ocean.
In 1953, the Unite States
abandoned a confusing two-year
old plan to name storms by a
phonetic alphabet (Able, Baker,
Charlie) when a new, internation-
al phonetic alphabet was intro-
duced. That year, this Nation's
weather services began using fe-
male names for storms.
The practice of naming hurri-
canes after women came to an
end in 1978 when men's and
women's names were included in
the Eastern North Pacific storm
lists. In 1979, male and female
names were included in lists for
the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.


Fo ie nuance

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ol' IKSURAKC



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All forms or Insurance
* Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages .Group 'Life 'Boat
*Hospitalization -Mobile Homes


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY


"0~.,~
't~"~ ~O@N
'.s. ~


Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


Giving 'Canes Names


Reduces Confusion


In Storm Warnings


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