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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02901
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 11, 1991
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02901

Full Text





1213!99


USPS 518-880

FIFTY-THIRD YEAR, NUMBER 46
L^


THE


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1991


330 Per Col
Plus 20 Tax


Building Fee Schedule


Facing Overhaul by County

Slight Increase Seen In Some Rates As Commission
Considers Adoption of Southern Building Code Charges


Torch Lit, Ribbons Gathered, In Ceremony


A good turn-out braved the oppressive
heat Wednesday morning, to witness
lighting of Freedom's Torch and gathering
up of yellow ribbons to send to Tallahas-
see.
The ceremony, designed to show sup-
port and appreciation for the troops of
Desert Storm, was part of a state-wide
event to send the flame of freedom to Tal-
lahassee, for the purpose of lighting a per-
manent Freedom's Flame in front of the
old Capitol building.
The flaming torch and the hundreds of
yellow ribbons collected were taken to


Residents of Gulf County who
do any building on their property
in the future will more than likely
face slightly higher inspection
and permit fees.
Building Department direc-
tor, Ralph Rish advised the Com-
mission Tuesday that there was a
need to take a look at setting rea-
listic fees for building and electri-
cal inspections and permits. "We
especially need to advance the
fees for electrical inspections,"
Rish said. "Presently we charge
$25.00 for permitting an electri-
cal entrance installation. Under
the Southern Standard Building
Code, which Gulf County uses, it
requires the inspector to make
three trips to the site for inspec-
tion. You just can't pay a man to
make three trips and cover the
expenses with a $25.00 charge."
Rish recommended that since
the County uses the Southern
Building Code as their guidelines
for inspection, that they also
adopt the SBC schedule of in-
spection charges.
i "Adopting these charges will
ive us slight increases in some
areas and slight decreases in oth-
ers. In all, adopting the schedule
Should increase the total fee and
permitting charges just a very lit-
,tle bit," Rish said. He was espe-


City Requires Pre-Treatment by WWP Customers
Customers utilizing the City's tageous to treatment of both complaints of garbage collection summer, and 7:00 a.m., in the
Wastewater Treatment facility on types of effluent. Since then, crews operating in the residential winter, to avoid causing a distur-
Industrial Road must now comply many modifications have been section as early as 3:00 or 4:00 bance.
with a newly adopted pre- made to increase efficiency in im- a.m., and the Commission should OTHER BUSINESS
treatment requirement, adopted proving BOD and suspended sol- look into the complaint In other items of business
by the City Commission Tuesday ids counts. Public Works superintendent, 1 Commission:
night-oflast week. Th* p'.p .reatment.-.require ..--.-Erank.Healy-saldthecrews- try -..- re d 6
The pre-treatment require- ment is the latest step designed collect the business district prior misloner Tharpe that state DOm
ment has been a long time in the to improve the quality of the efflu- to early morning traffic of trucks street crews would be making re
making, at the request of Flori- ent water from the plant. loading and unloading merchan- airs to Fifth Street within "
da's Department of Environmen- The pre-treatment ordinance dise. 'We try to get in and out of couple of weeks".
tal Regulation and the federal requires that all three contribu- the residential area before the couple of weeks".
government's Environmental Pro- tors to the plant-the City of Port school buses start making their -Agreed to negotiate Wit
tection Agency, who regulate the St Joe, St Joe Forest Products pick-ups," he said. Tyndall Federal Credit Union tc
plant and its operations. and Arizona Chemical-perform Another factor is that the pave the alley behind their new
Accepting both domestic and designated amounts of treatment crews try to get through with building on Fifth Street, with
industrial wastes, the plant has of their effluent before introduc- their job before the oppressive TFCU paying for the paving ex-
undergone extensive modifica- ing it to the plant's treatment sys- heat sets in for the day. pense.
tions since it went on line 18 tem. The City has a policy that the -Approved a variance in the
years ago. Origiffally both agenr- GARBAGE PICK-UPS collection crews begin their activi- zoning ordinance for Mrs. Rec
cies approved the treatment con- Commissioner Charles ties in the residential section no Todd to have a cover placed over
cept of the plant as being advan- Tharpe said he has been receiving earlier than 6:00 a.m., in the a carport on the side of her home.


Two Suffer Serious Injuries In Wewahitchka Holiday Crash


Charles Gaskin and Amber
Jewelson, both of Wewahitchka,
suffered serious injuries during
the late evening of Friday, July 5,
when the pick-up truck in which
they were riding was struck
broadside by a speeding late mod-
el car.
Gaskin is still in intensive
care in a Panama City hospital in
critical condition. He is reported
to have all his ribs broken, as


well as other severe injuries. Jew-
elson was hospitalized with head
injuries and broken bones but
has since improved enough to be
moved to a private room.
A Havana juvenile, who was
driving a 1991 Ford Escort, was
treated for a broken collar bone
and released. Spokesmen from
the Gulf County Sheriffs Depart-
ment credits his lack of injuries


to the fact his car was equipped
with an air bag and he was wear-
ing a seatbelt.
The crash occurred on High-
way 71, under the red light. The
Escort was travelling east on
Highway 22, at a high rate of
speed, and failed to stop at the
intersection, striking Gaskin's
pick-up truck on the driver's side.
Jewelson was a passenger in the


r




IV
i



r


Gaskin vehicle.
The collision pushed Gaskin's
truck for 50 to 60 feet into the
parking lot of the Jr. Food Store,
narrowly missing two gasoline
pumps in front of the store.
The Florida Highway Patrol,
who normally releases informa-
tion on such accidents, has not
released any details of the acci-
dent as yet, saying it is still under
investigation.


used to be a heavy population in
St. Andrew Bay, but lack of con-
trols over their harvest have prac-
tically eliminated scallops from
that bay."
OTHER BUSINESS
In other items of business,
the Commission:
-Rejected a 50% increase in
the price of fill dirt taken from the
Taunton pit, choosing to stick
with their contracted price until
their agreement is fulfilled.
-Agreed to call for bids for a
new telephone system for the
Courthouse, with bids to be re-
turnable on August 27.



County to

Start on

Budget
The Gulf County Com-
mission will take the first
step towards creation of a
new budget plan for fiscal
1991-92 Tuesday of next
week, in a special session.
Meeting in the Com-
mission Room at 4:00 p.m.,
the Board faces having to
prepare a new financial
plan with some $100,000 in
reduced state and federal
revenue funds, and ap-
proximately $1 million in
new budget requests.
According to finance
officer, Doug Birmingham,
requests from the various
county officials, plus the
revenue reductions would
require 10.7 mills to fi-
nance if all requests were
to be funded.
"Of course, this never
happens;" Birmingham
said. "After the Board gets
through with their cuts
there is usually no resem-
blance between requests
and actual grants. Besides,
the 10.7 mills is seven-
tenths of a mill above our
legal tax levy limit."
Birmingham said a
slight increase in taxable
property being placed on
the rolls this year has in-
creased the value of a mill
to $463,000.
Total budget requests
being made this year add
up to $4,886,500. The larg-
est requested increases
are in the Mosquito Con-
trol Department [which
handles solid waste dispo-
sal, and had a reduction in
state funds] and the Fine
and Forfeiture Fund.


(~~ii I'I p i p p Aof g A di


. Gen. Norman Relives 'Desert Storm'


Lieutenant General Charles Norman,
director of the combined air war against
Iraq, was unashamedly proud of the ef-
fectiveness and the commitment of the
American fighting man in Operation
Desert Storm and expressed this pride be-
fore a gathering of Port St. Joe's civic
club members at a Tuesday dinner meet-
ing held at the St. Joseph Bay Country
Club.
General Norman was also equally
proud of the performance of President
George Bush in the entire Persian Gulf
operation, saying the President was pri-
marily concerned with providing the
troops with the weapons and technical
tools necessary to minimize the loss of
life on both sides of the front. "He wasn't
concerned with the political 'points' he
may or may not make with any particular
decision," the General said.
The General said another primary
concern was in the, attitude of the Saudi
Arabian people. "Some of their leaders
were afraid for America to come to their
land. When they finally agreed for us to
come, we had planes landing on Saudi
soil within 17 hours, to begin the build-
up and to stand as a deterrent force
against Saddam Hussein."
*} ..


The speaker also took the opportunity
to put in a plug for SDI and the B-2
bomber. "We need those weapons and
the technology is already available for
both," he said.
He pointed out that civilians in the
operation zone were all scared to death of
the SCUD missiles. 'They weren't accu-
rate, but they were very destructive," he
pointed out. 'The Patriots intercepted the
scuds, but all they did was divert them
from our street to your street. We needed
something to intercept them in the at-
mosphere before they became a prob-
lem."
Gen. Norman said the Americans
went into the war with technology which
hadn't been tested in action before. 'We
weren't real sure how effective it would
be, but it turned out to meet our every
expectation and then some." He praised
the 'Stealth' bombers for their actions in
knocking out Iraqi tanks at a rate of
about 175 per day. 'The Iranians soon
learned to keep a safe distance from their
tanks, as they were such a favorite target
of a devastating American air war."
PRAISES YOUNG PEOPLE
The speaker said he' had nothing but


praise for America's young people. "They
went about their job determined to do it
right and get back home. They were dedi-
cated to their mission and supported
their country and national leadership."
He praised the nation's young people
who were involved in the operation as be-
ing "Great. They're good! They got
that from somewhere. They didn't com-
plain, they just went about what they
had to do in a methodical manner and
were a credit to their country."
General Norman said, '"The hardest
part of the operation was being away
from our families. The greatest thing we
got out of the war was a renewed pride
and support of our country. It was great!"
He said it was evident, even in Saudi
Arabia, that Americans were supporting
their fighting men. "We also felt the pow-
er of the many prayers issued in our be-
half."
Norman concluded his address, say-
ing that one Saudi official made the re-
mark, "If there must be a super power in
this world today, thank God it's Ameri-
ca." He said that statement expressed the
trust by the Saudis, that the U.S. would
show consideration for the people in that
part of the world.


. ,




I


Dr. Robert King, right, presents a plaque to General Nor-
man, expressing appreciation of the people of Port St. Joe
for the efforts and example set by the troops of Operation
Desert Storm.


Tallahassee by a group of National Guard
troops from the capital city. Also sent
were two long yellow ribbons, which had
been signed by many Port St. Joe area res-
idents who attended Wednesday's ceremo-
nies.
The gathering of ribbons, and torch
lighting ceremony were projects of the
Port St. Joe Chamber of Commerce.
In the photo above, Mayor Frank Pate
lights the torch, held by a National Guard
runner, as Tamara Laine, Chamber of
Commerce executive secretary, removes a
yellow ribbon from the flag pole to send to
Tallahassee.


f


I


I


clally concerned over the smaller
Inspection jobs, which take up
the bulk of the inspector's time,
due to the numbers of permits
and inspections made and do not
produce enough revenue to sup-
ply the service.
A minimum permit [which re-
quires site inspection visits] is
currently $10.00. Rish recom-
mends hiking the fee to $50.00.
Currently, a minimum electric in-
spection [requiring three visits] is
now $25.00. Rish suggested a
$50.00 fee for this service. Other
charges would see both increases'
and decreases by lesser amounts.
Chairman Ed Creamer in-
structed Rish to make out a list
of an entirely new fee schedule
and present it to the Commission
for action.
SPEED LIMITS
Commissioner Al Ray told the
Commission Tuesday that resi-
dents at Cape San Blas and St.
Joseph Peninsula want a speed
limit placed on C-30E, because of
congestion on the Peninsula road,
which leads to the State Park.
"I would suggest that we set a
speed limit of 45 miles per hour,
reducing the limits to 35 miles
per hour in congested areas," Ray
said.
Since residents on the Penin-
sula want the speed limit set, the
board agreed to go through the
procedure to declare the traffic
rule and post signs advising mo-
torists along the route.
SCALLOP SEASON
Bill Kuyper, representing the
St Joseph Bay Committee told
the Commission the committee
was recommending something be
- .dene about the scallop season-irn
St Joseph Bay.
'The season opens every year
on July 1, and people turn out in
force to harvest them, but they
are so small that harvesting them
on July 1 is really a waste. We
would like to see the Commission
use its influence to have the
opening day for taking scallops
moved back to August 1, to allow
them an extra month to increase
in size, Kuyper said.
Commissioners Al Ray and
Ed Creamer confirmed Kuyper's
statement, with Creamer saying,
'They're so small that by the time
a person picks up his bucket-full,
he is too tired to clean them and
they end up being thrown in the
trash."
Ray said he supported mov-
ing the season back to July 15,
"at least", and preferred an Au-
gust I season opener.
The Commission unanimous-
ly supported August 1 as the be-
ginning of the season and agreed
to petition the Florida Depart-
ment of Natural Resources to
amend the law regulating the
scallop season in St.'Joseph Bay.
Kuyper remarked, 'There


STAR











THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1991


247Didn't Die \Hunker Down with Kes


i


A newscast the other day revealed there were 247 fewer high-
way fatalities this year, by mid-year, than there had been report-
ed during the same length of time last year, here in Florida. It
seems there had been some 1,500 highway deaths the first half
of 1990 and only 1,253 thus far this year.
We're not real sure about the actual figures quoted, as we
heard it in passing to something else. The figures are within
about two percent of being correct, which in itself makes a con-
siderable savings in human life becauseof traffic accidents.
One of the things we're sure of is that the commentator said
officials were puzzled over why there was such a dramatic drop
in highway fatalities. He pointed out that the officials expected
the figure to at least hold its own for 1991, but here we have a
sizeable drop in statistics. The savings in lives reported would
just about equal a sizeable Sunday morning church congrega-
tion in most of Port St. Joe's larger churches. That's a lot of peo-
ple who didn't die.
We've been thinking of these startling figures for about 10
days now, wondering, along with the commentator, just why we
should experience such a sudden and sizeable drop in this trag-
ic statistic.
After considerable thought, we have come to the conclusion
that the savings in life is being caused by Florida's tough drunk
driving laws. Here in Florida, we have some of the toughest pen-
alties for driving under the influence of any state in the union. A
person convicted of the act here in Florida can expect to pay
hefty fines, do either time in jail or community service activities,
attend special classes over a considerable period of time, and/or
face the loss of his/her driving license for a period of time.
Whatever penalty is assessed to a driver, operating a motor
vehicle while drinking, it is enough to make the culprit stop and
think-if not prior to driving while drinking, at least he will do so
after he is caught once.
Here in Florida, we are beginning to take the crime of driving
under the influence seriously. Most residents of Florida who do
not drink and drive, are thankful for the law which serves to re-
move much of this hazard from the roadways. The added bonus
seems to be that 247 people who would normally have died on
the state's highways during the first half of this year, didn't!



What Sorta Man...

Momma used to tell us that we are known by the company
we keep. With this admonition in mind, she would advise us to
choose our friends wisely and not get mixed up with the wrong
crowd.
We can't argue with Momma's logic, nor her advice.
During the past couple of weeks, it has dawned upon us that
there is an additional observation which could be added to Mom-
ma's advice, which serves the same purpose as the words she
laid on us five boys.
Since President George Bush has recommended Judge Clar-
ence Thomas to fill the vacancy left on the U.S. Supreme Court
by the sudden resignation of Thurgood Marshall, this additional
observation has come to the surface.
With the nomination of Judge Thomas by the President, eve-
rybody in the nation began to wonder about what kind of person
- and-what kind of Judge is this fellow Thomas and just what
kind of Supreme Court Justice will he make? How are we ever
going to reach a conclusion about someone we have never heard
of?
Well, it seems that by using Momma's advice, we have
learned that Judge Thomas mixes and mingles with the sort of
folks who believe this nation offers a splendid and equal oppor-
tunity for everyone to take advantage of, but who seem to take a
dim view of people expecting opportunities to be handed to them
on a silver platter, again and again, and again, and still cry out
for morel Morel More!
Judge Thomas has arrived at the same conclusion as most of
those who are paying the bill for these continued handouts.
Judge Thomas seems to run with the type people who have
these ideas.
But, there is another side, to this coin. It would seem that in
recent days, the Supreme Court nominee has drawn fire from
even some of his own race for not supporting the continued pipe-
line of money being funneled out of Washington indefinitely.
With the Judge drawing fire from people of the liberal per-
suasion, we think it will be just a little easier to arrive at a deci-
sion as to what sort of man Judge Thomas is. It'll be easy for
most of us to support this President Bush nominee.


The Old Grey Mare


This was going to be a v'ery
special weekend. It seems like I
am always doing something -
golling, a ball game. coon hunt-
ing, a yelling and shouting match
- with my oldest son. Somehow
Jesse kind'a gets lost in the shuf-
fle. You know that can happen
sometimes with the youngest.
Now, Jesse doesn't mind. He's
kinda on the quiet, laid back
side. I think that's because Josh
never let him say very much in
the formative years so he finally
just gave up. If you leave Jess
alone, he sure won't bother you. I
worry sometimes that I do too


much with Josh. not enough ,.ith
Jes5..
That's why this was a very
special trip. I don t remember ex-
actly how it came about but
Jess and I, by ourselves, two best
buddies, just me and him were
going to visit my mother here-
while-back. It's a pretty good
drive and I wanted this to be "his"
trip.
"Jess, where do you want to
eat?"
"It doesn't matter, Dad, where
do you want to?"
"Son, it's just me and you,
two best buddies, I want this to


be a good trip for you. We will eat
wherever you want to."
"O.K."
Silence for about 20 miles.
"Dad, where do you want to
eat?" esley
"Son, it doesn't matter. You Kesley
pick it. I'm just glad we're togeth- Colbert
PrI\nMrfprnnTQ~ hith- e


er. imU 1V1UU1C1, no UUos[., 1 1is 1i
going to be the best trip ever. I
want to show you where I grew
up. I want to take you to the ball
field I played on when I was 12. I
want us to walk down to the big
ditch where we played Tarzan. I
want to show you the pond in Ar-
chie Moore's field where we wres-


tied alligators. I can show you the
exact spot where your Uncle Da-
vid fell through the ice whew,
we like to have lost him on that
one. I want us to walk down the
railroad tracks to town like I used
to do back in the old days. Maybe
there will be a good western on at
the Park Theater. We'll catch a
movie. Then we'll stroll over to
Woodrow Kennon's Mercantile,
Diygoods and Grocery Store. I'll
buy us all the drinks we want.
I've got a pocketful of dimes. Son,
I used to dream of stepping into
Woodrow Kennon's with money
running out of both pockets. I
guess you wouldn't understand
that. Then we'll mosey over to the
high school. I'll show you where
your Dad got his education. We'll
walk the halls that I once walked
with Bobby Brewer, LaRenda
Bradfleld, Buddy Wiggleton, Ruth
Ann Wiley. It will be so much fun,
son son JESS."
Asleep.
Silence for the next 100
miles.
What a beautiful Saturday
morning greeted us at Mima's. A
day full of promise for me and my
all time best buddy. We had
hugged and kissed and visited
the night before. Today, father
and son were exploring Dad's
boyhood days. We couldn't wait
to get -
"Dad, can I stay here with
Mima I want to slide down the
stairs on cardboard."
"Son, the stairs have changed
since we used to do that It was
bare wood back then. They've got
those non-skid runners on them
now, ruined their sliding power.
Let's head for the big ditch!"
We strolled down to the ditch
like I'd done a hundred thousand
times back in the '50's. "Maybe
we can find the old grape vine,
we'll swing ou-" The ditch was
dryl And It wasn't very deep and
big like it used to'bel
"Dad, you swam here? And
tell me again about swinging over
the water on a grapevine."
We headed down toward the
pond. "Let's see, the pond is over
there. No, it's over yonder. Wait a
minute, son. Let me think, it's
been a few years."
'You can't find the pond,
Dad?"
We searched for over an hour.
"Jess, somebody has moved
the pond."
"I don't guess I'll see where
Uncle David fell through the ice."
"Let's walk the railroad tracks
to town." We found the road bed
easy enough, but the tracks had
been pulled upl I wondered if the
L&N was out of business.
'They are on this stretch,
Dad. Ain't been a train through
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


A OIN SHRDL U


By: Wesley R. Ramsey


Newspapers Faced A Tough Survival In Port St. Joe In the Past


DID YOU KNOW that The
Star isn't the first newspaper to
be in business in Port St. Joe. Of
course, if you know any history at
all, you probably know that the
St. Joseph Times was printed at
old St. Joseph back in the 1800's,
around 1838. It, like St. Joseph,
didn't last for very long. Actually,
St. Joseph out-lived The Times.
The Times, and its editor, Pe-
ter Gautler, were pretty famous in
the new state of Florida back in
those days. I can just imagine
that anyone who could read,
write and spell were a scarce
commodity back then, and so,
earned a certain amount of re-
spect due to this capability.
Old Pete Gautier was a shak-
er and a mover in the early days
of the Territory and was largely
responsible for Florida taking the
steps toward becoming a state
and he was also instrumental in


promoting the formation of the
old city of St. Joseph.
Pete Gautier was not your or-
dinary man and, he published a
newspaper in old St. Joseph.
W. S. Smith, the founder of
The Star, once told me that had
he known of the former existence
of The Times when The Star was
brought into being, your local
newspaper would have been
named The Times. But, the new
paper was founded and operating
before he found out about the
previous existence of The Times.

THERE WAS another news-
paper here just months prior to
The Star coming into being. There
was The Sentinel operating out of
a small wooden building where
Costin's Department Store is
now. The Sentinel folded in the
early 40's, leaving only The Star
to carry on the business of a
newspaper until this day, in Port
St. Joe.
The Sentinel was founded by


C. F. Hanlon. editor and publish-
er of The Gull County Breeze, and
later sold to a man by the name
of Larry Evans. Hanlon founded
The Breeze back around 1925,
when Gulf County was sliced off
Calhoun County.

JUST, LAST WEEK, Jack
Tanner of White City brought me
a copy of the Apalachicola Times,
printed May 26, 1926, announc-
ing that, "a newspaper company
is being formed in Port Saint
Joe."
The company had such famil-
iar names on its ownership and
management list as: R. L. Howell,
who was general freight and pas-
senger agent of the AN Railroad
at that time; A. M. Jones, a Port
St. Joe pioneer; J. L. Sharit and
T. H. Stone, well-known names in
Port St. Joe history, and both
long-time mayors; C. B. McCra-
nie, a Rev. Taylor, who was pas-
tor of the Methodist Church at
the time.


Other personalities invhwolved
with forming the newspaper were
Harry Sawyer and H. K. John-
ston, who was publisher of the
Apalachicola Times at the time.
The Times was owned by the Saw-
yer family. Johnson's wife was a
Sawyer. After Johnston died,
Sawyer took over operation of the
newspaper until it was sold out of
the family to other owners in the
mid-60's.
As I see it, the Times owners
were interested in printing a
paper for Port St. Joe and were
probably instrumental in talking
the other men into forming a
company to do just that.

THESE MEN MET in the of-
fices of the Apalachicola Northern
Railroad Company on May 30,
1926, and formed the new news-
paper, declaring a stock issue of
$10,000, with shares valued at
$100 each.
No matter that $10,000
wouldn't even buy a typesetter to-


day. nor even one unit of a news-
paper press to print that paper
on; the men were organized and
in operation.
Officers of the new paper
were: R. L. Howell, president; D.
H. Bynum, vice-president and C.
B. McCranie, secretary-treasurer.
The newspaper was named,
The Port St. Joe News and was to
be printed every Friday. The first
issue was scheduled for publica-
tion on June 11, just 11 days af-
ter the new venture was formed.
The newspaper was probably
printed in Apalachicola on The
Times' equipment. Ironically, to-
day The Times is printed in Port
St. Joe, on The Star's equipment.
Now, get this: subscription
rates were $1.00 per year as an
introductory offer, with the rate
to be hiked to $1.50 after the first
month of publication.
I don't know if that first issue
was ever printed or not. If it was
printed, I don't know how long
the newspaper existed, but since


it was formed in May of 1926.
and since the big crash came in
1929, 1 would have to believe the
newspaper went along with many
other enterprises in 1929, if it
lasted that long.
BUT PORT ST. JOE wasn't
exactly a destitute place in those
days.
Another article on the front
page of that old issue of The Apa-
lachicola Times told of shipments
of lumber out of Port St. Joe,
amounting to a million board feet
in one week. The article told of
the booming lumber shipping
business in the port, with two
schooners tied up at the docks on
the same day, loading lumber
bound for Cuba.
However long the new ven-
ture lasted, it had a value. Many
of us-me included-would never
have learned this little bit of his-
tory, if a newspaper hadn't been
there to print it back in May of
1926.


- St. Joseph Bay Tide Table
/ Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
,. July 12 11:31 a.m. H 2.1 10:18 p.m. L -.3
July 13 12:24 p.m. H .19 10:56 p.m. L .0
July 14 1:06 p.m. H 1.6 10:57 p.m. L .3
July 15 1:49 p.m. H 1.2 20:25 p.m. L .6
July 16 1:18 p.m. H .9 8:36 p.m. L .7
--July 17 5:15 a.m. H 1.1 4:51 p.m. L .5
.... July 18 5:20 a.m. H 1.3 4:30 p.m. L .3


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County-$10 60 Six Months
WI USPHS 518880 ut of County--21.20 Year Out of County-$15 90 Six Months
Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue The Star Ou of ounty-1.20 Ye Ou 90 S Monhs
byort heSt. o, Publishing Copan Postffice Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 other than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
William H. Ramsey............ Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
EWSPF Frenchie L. Ramsey .......... Office Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ................. Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


I









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1991 PAGE 3A


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


I Had A Dream
Age and over indulgence has forced me to cut back on my
coffee drinking and caffeine intake. Too much caffeine makes me
extremely nervous, especially on an empty stomach. It will also
keep me awake at night, and when I do fall asleep I will dream, it
seems, all night long.
Just last week I had such a night. I had attended an eve-
ning meeting and drank two cups of coffee and it was close to
10:00 p.m. before I could drift off to sleep. And when I did fall
asleep, the dream began.
The dream started early Sunday morning as I was drinking
coffee and reading the paper. I decided to check my lotto ticket
with the numbers in the paper, and, guess what? I had won the
lottery
It was a wonderful feeling, that sudden rush of excitement,
knowing that I would never have to work again unless I wanted
to. When I- checked with Tallahassee I found that I had won
$15,867,562.41, before taxes, of course. As I remember the
dream, I was to receive a yearly check for a tad over $700,000.00
for 20 years. That amount, I figured, would last me for several
months before I had to start borrowing money again.
In the dream and shortly after my winning ticket was validat-
ed, my mother and father-in-law suddenly appeared. After much
prayer and thought, they said, they had decided to forgive me for
marrying their daughter. As a reward I bought them a home in
California and furnished them maid service for the rest of their
lives.
As the dream continued, my wife suddenly approached me
and handed me an envelope. Inside were all her credit cards, cut
in half, and with tears in her eyes as big as marbles, she said,
"Here, honey. I won't be needing these any more. From now on
I'm going to pay cash like you've wanted me to all along." I don't
remember, but I think I cried, too.
After that all my children, one by one, approached me and, in
their own words, told me that they didn't really think I was the
old "fogy" they once thought I was. They also said that from that
point on they were going to listen to What I said and would agree
with me when they could or until the money ran out.
Later in the dream I found myself at the post office checking
the mail. And what to my wandering eyes do you think did ap-
pear? Why, it was a letter from the Franklin County Humane So-
ciety Executive Committee. The letter was one of apology. In it all
seven members apologized for writing the letter to the editor
about the article I wrote about Duke, my faithful dog and com-
panion. They admitted that they read too much into. the article
and wouldn't have me arrested after all.
Finally, I found myself at the golf course. The match is over
and I'm loading all my winnings into an armored car.
As the armed guard holds all my opponents at bay, I realize
that Roy, Gary, and a few others will have to mortgage their
homes to pay me. Suddenly I feel a rush of empathy and tear up
the mortgage papers and take their cars and golf clubs instead. I
also take their golf shoes and leave them high and dry in the
parking lot with these words: "Let that be a lesson to you about
gambling!"
Dreams, however, are like vacations, it seems. When they are
over, and even if they are good, you don't know if it was worth it
or not. Reality is hard to face sometimes.
<. '


Pays Up; Asks for Favor


To the Editor:
Enclosed is a check for
$21.20 for one year's subscrip-
tion to The Star.


Kesleyom Page 2

here in years."
o We went to the Park Theater.
No matinee! I couldn't believe it.
"We can come back tonight,
Dad."
"I dunno, Son, is Silence of
the Lambs a western?"
Woodrow Kennon's was
closed. A victim of the stream-
lined, homogenized, all look alike,
made out of ticky tacky, quick
-sack stores that how adorn every
comer. I brushed the spiderwebs
off the NuGrape thermometer.
"Son, it hurts that you didn't
know the place back when......"
We headed over to the high
school. Well, some things never
change. Son, we used to make
the halls ring. We knew how to -
the school was gone.
'You went to school in a park-
ing lot?"
"Son, I don't believe this!"
"It seems to me, Dad, that
your whole past is gone, torn
down, lost, moved or out of busi-
ness."
One of those Wolf guys, I
can't remember if it was Thomas
or Blitzer, said you can't go home
again. Well, he's wrong,, you can.
The trick is to keep home like it
ought to be.
Respectfully,
Jess and Kes


I hope both of you are well.
I'm sure your work with the paper
keeps you pretty busy.
If you have time, please call
my niece' Onnie. (I think her mar-
ried name is Herring.) She wrote
me a lovely letter sometime ago,
and we corresponded for some
several months.
Please ask her to write again
and tell how they are, and send
her mailing address as it has
been misplaced.
Thank for this favor.
Sincerely,
Adalyn N. LeHlardy

Seminar
The Gulf County Chamber of
Commerce is sponsoring a two-
hour seminar entitled "How to
Motivate Your Employees Beyond
Their Limits." The course will in-
clude:
-What is your present man-
agement style
-What are de-motivators
-What are incentives vs. mo-
tivators
-What type of motivators will
work best for your business
-Communication techniques
for motivating people
This two-hour session uses a
hands-on approach which will en-
hance everyone's management
capabilities. The seminar will be
held Tuesday, July 16, at 6:00
p.m. in the First Union board
room. The cost is $15 for Cham-'
ber members and $20 for non-
members.
'For more information, contact
the Chamber office at 227-1223.


LQQK

Evening Opening
for

Your Shopping Convenience
Thursday, July 11 & Friday, July 12
9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

BIG BARN
FLEA MARKET
wy. 98 Come By! Port St. J0


-1


CALL ME.
BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avenue
(Across from St. Joe Hardware)
Office: 229-6514
State Farm
Insurance Compa(nai.s
Home O)ffices: Bxoomingtl lllino i



I.ike a good ncighbTr,
Slit[c i'tIrn is thcTru


City's


Paving


Program


Delayed
Ralph Rish, who is coordinat-
ing the County's $3 million pav-
ing program, said this week that
re-surfacing of Port St. Joe
streets will be delayed from four
to six weeks.
The delay is being caused be-
cause the Commission rejected
both bids received two weeks ago,
because they were both for more
than the money available to pay
for the project.
'The Board agreed to re-
advertise the project, making
some changes in the projects to
be paved," Rish said.
With a total of $1 million plus
change available for paving in the
City of Port St. Joe and the
Beaches projects, both bids, from
Florida Asphalt and C.W. Roberts
Construction Company were
more than money available.
Rish said the delay caused by
re-bidding the projects would
probably mean that the actual
work of paving should begin in
September, "If we don't have any
more delays along the way," Rish
said.
In the meantime, City crews
are keeping busy correcting un-
derground problems which have
caused sinks .in the present pav-
ing, before re-surfacing is done.
City public work supervisor,
Frank Healy said, 'The delay in
re-surfacing should work in our
favor. We should have all the
problem spots we know about re-
paired prior to a September start-
ing date for the paving. We have
only eight streets remaining in
our repair program."
Healy said their program may
not correct all situations which
exist on city streets. 'You can't
really tell anything is wrong un-
derground unless you see evi-
dence on the surface, or dig down
and see."

Commodity
Recertification
in Wewahitchka
Commodity
Certification only for Wewa-
hitchka commodity recipients ,
take place on" Wedneday. Jtl '
17, from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. CT at
the Old Courthouse. Those in We-
wahitchka whose cards have ex-
pired should bring their neces-
sary papers on that day to
recertify.
The commodity office at the
Gulf County Courthouse in Port
St. Joe is open Monday through
Friday (except holidays) from 9:00
a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 to
5:00 p.m. ET for certification.
Please note that the next
commodity distribution will be in
August. For further information
call 227-1735 or 639-5068.

Children's Program
Needs Volunteers
The Guardian Ad Litem pro-
gram (a speak-up for children
program) needs volunteers who
want to work directly with par-
ents and children in troubled
families. For more information on
how you can make a difference in
the life of a child, please call 785-
7409, ext. 214.
Board Meeting
The Board of Directors of the
Gulf County Guidance Clinic, Inc.
will hold its regularly scheduled
meeting on Tuesday, July 16, at
7:00 p.m. ET. The meeting will be
held in the Guidance Clinic con-
ference room in Port St. Joe.


((Let me
analyze your
insurance needs
with a free
Family Insurance
Checkup. 99


intersection of Industrial Road and Highway 98.
Committee members from left are: Mayor Frank
Pate, Johnny Linton, Isadora Blackshire, Quin
Lowrey, Ms. Hickson, Mike McDonald, Chamber
of Commerce Director, Tamara Laine, and James
Dumas.
The Beautification Committee selected this
design from several that were submitted. The
other two entrances to the city, on Hwy. 71 and
Hwy. 98 from the south will also have the wel-
come signs erected. -Star photo


COMFORT& SAVING


Whirlpool Room T
Air Conditioner
Model ACE144XS
*13.700/13.500 BTU/Hr. Cc
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Fan *2-way Air Direction *Ai
Thermostat *COMFORT GUW
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I.- r I ... :. L.: F r P I





ST. JOE

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pool



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ooling Capacity
eating Capacity
found Comfort
atio *2-Speed
adjustable
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Mo-,l l"I AC250-IXS


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ON

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028


H


Warm Welcome for

Visitors to City

The north entrance to the City of Port St. Joe
has been graced with a handsome welcome sign,
designed by Willie Hickson. Members of the Port
St. Joe Beautification Committee are shown with
Ms. Hickson below the new welcome sign at the


r


31


oe









'r7W' TsU' E T T. TMTX AV *TTTT 1 1. 1991


PAGE 4A THE STARPRT ST. JOE -


Lacey Dupree Williams
First Birthday!
Lacey Dupree Williams,
daughter of Frankle and Kim Wil-
liams, celebrated her first birth-
day on June 29 with a "Precious
Moments" party at her home.
Helping Lacey celebrate this
special day were her big brother
Zach and several friends and rel-
atives.
Lacey is the granddaughter pf
Mamie Harper, Frank and Alicia
Williams, all of Port St Joe and
Ann Sealey of Clarksville. She is
the great granddaughter of Fan-
nie Montgomery of Port St. Joe.


Layton Jamal Dixson


Will Be Three!
Layton Jamal Dixson will cel-
ebrate his third birthday on Mon-
day, July 15 at KIDS with his
friends and teacher.
He is the son of Margie Dix-
son. His grandparents are Marga-
ret Bewey- of Port St. Joe, and
Janies. Ba4jey of PA.


January 30, 1921 -
February 8, 1991
god saw that you were getting
tired and a cure was not to be. So
He put 9is ahns around you and
whispered, 'Come with me." With
tearful eyes we watched you suffer.
We saw youj fade away. Although
we loved you dearly, we could not
makf you stay. A golden heart
stopped beating hard Working
hands were put to rest. God bro
our hearts to prove to us He only
takes the best.
We love and miss you,
L.Z., Kids, and Grandkids


Cissi Pippin In

Music Service at

White City Bapt.
Sunday night, July 14, 7:00
p.m. ET, Cissi Pippin will sing her
way into your heart. If you have
not had the opportunity to hear
Cissi as she praises the Lord with
music, you are invited to attend
the service at the White City Bap-
tist Church as the congregation
Join her in praising Jesus.


Suit Winsg
Image Award
The Career Apparel Institute
recently honored the 1990-91
classic navy Mary Kay Sales Di-
rector suit with its Image of the
Year Award. The institute, a divi-
sion of the National Association of
Uniform Manufacturers and Dis-
tributors, sponsors the annual
competition. This is the seventh
time Mary Kay has won the
award, an institute record.
"Mary Kay's program is an ex-
ample of career apparel at its
best," says Bernard J. Lepper, ex-
ecutive director of the associa-
tion. He calls the Director suit
program "creative" and says it
"provides instant customer identi-
fication" and "helps increase pro-
fessionalism."


*Heating & Air







*Major229416 or 227-954 106 Bellamy Circle, Port St. Joe



Open
Tuesday thru Thursday 8 a.m. -ir pm.
Friday & Saturday 8 a.m. 9 p.m.
Sunday 1 to 8 p.m.

Move your oyster shucking
from the backyard to your Yr
kitchen table with Indian Pass
new, washed, boxed oysters.
Same familiar flavor inside
but new clean outside.
40 l b. Washed Boxork
RER00762 $25.003










Call 227-1670 6
to reserve yours today!ster shucking

INDIAnN PASS
but new clean outside.









RAW BAR
(ON C-30 SOUTH OF PORT ST. JOE)


I


.


Eddie Carlton Haddock and Jenny Marie Hicks

Engaged


Mr. and Mrs. John F. Tatum
have announced the engagement
and forthcoming marriage of their
daughter, Jenny Marie Hicks, to
Eddie Carlton Haddock, son of Al-
lene Haddock and James Had-
dock.
The bride-elect is a 1990
graduate of Port St. Joe High
School and is presently attending
Haney Vo-Tech.
Her flanc6 is a 1988 graduate
of Port St. Joe High School and is
also presently attending Haney


Vo-Tech.
The wedding is planned for
August 3 at, 4:00 p.m. ET at the
First Baptist Church of Mexico
Beach. A reception will immedi-
ately follow at the Chamber of
Commerce building at Mexico
Beach.
No local invitations are being
sent but all friends and relatives
of the couple are invited to at-
tend.


:iI


Mr. and Mrs. Michael Anthony Lollie

Chancey and Lollie Wed
Christy Lynn Chancey and Michael Anthony Lollie were joined
in marriage June 15 at the Oak Grove Assembly of God Church.
Rev. Dave Fernandez performed the double ring ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of Royce and Susan Chancey of White
City. She is the granddaughter of Roy and Inez Chancey of Ala-
bama, and L.C. and Lovie Wood of Hosford.
The groom is the son of Roy H. Lollie, Jr. of White City and the
late Janet D. Lollie. He is the grandson of Roy and Willie Mae Lollie, -
and James and Lou Yates, all of Port St. Joe.
A reception followed in the fellowship hall of the church.
The couple now reside in White City.


Trina Saleh
Participates In
Health Camp
Trina Saleh, the daughter of
Drema Hess, and a student at
Port St. Joe High School has been
selected to participate in the
Bend AHEC's Summer Health Ca-
reer Camp.
lTwenty-eight students from
the Big Bend region have been se-
lected to attend the camp during
the week of July 14-20 in Talla-
hassee and will spend the week
exploring a wide variety of health
care careers. During the week,
students will obtain knowledge
needed to make realistic deci-
sions about their future in health
care fields and develop their own
"action plan" for the future.
Big Bend Area Health Educa-
tion Center is an educational pro-
gram directed toward increasing
health manpower in medically
under-served areas of North Flori-
da. Tallahassee Memorial Region-
al Medical Center (TMRMC)
serves as the host institution for
the BBAHEC.


Puppet Show at
Public Library
During Summer Safari at the
Gulf County Library this Tues-
day, 2:30 p.m., the puppet show,'
"King of the Jungle" will be fea-
tured. Frances Wittkolph and
Nancy Strickland from the Lynn
Haven Public Library are return-
ing again to do the puppet show.
The program will last for one
hour and is free for children K
through fourth grade.


Patricks

.. Restaurant
41/-2 Reid Avenue
Port S,. Joe, /,orida
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Featuring Daily Luncheon Specials
and All You Can Eat Salad Bar
Saturday Night Special $f
.Seafood Buffet i 9;I,
NOON BUFFET ..........$4.95 5 ;;
or Order from the wide selection on Our
Menu
* No cholesterol Evening Meal Begins at 5:00 PM
in food preparation'
* High quality food ,
(904) 227-7400
Catering Services Also Available

----- -- 77 M


-low


o m., -, --T .._ ..







We're Small Enough To Be

Big On Personal Service

We ake pride in providing your family with
friendly, personal service.
Unlike many pharmacies, we take the time to
get to know you, review your medications for
interactions, and carefully explain your doctor's
Instructions.
5top in soon. We look forward
to meeting you.

CAMPBELL'S
DRUG STORE
Two Pharmacists and a Pharmacy t ei
Technician to serve you promptly.


Saveway Center


Phone 227-1224


Gig, ,y, al. i r Why wail for summer
Memories Now yqu can
S have them the same day
S V V V when you bring your film
to us for high-quality, on-
site developing and printing. Big. beautiful. vibrant
prints. We handle oall film sizes- disc. 110. 126. 135.
and can enlarge most sizes too!

PHOTO

WORLD
318 Reid Ave Por St Joe
227-7428


--- I A


From left, Patrea and Kenneth Dowless, Father Jerry Huft and Came-
ron Dowless, Elmer and Betty Briggs.

Baptized


Elmer and Betty Briggs are
proud to announce the baptism
of their grandson, Kenneth Came-
ron Dowless. The Rev. Jerry R.
Huft, St. James Episcopal
Church, Port St. Joe, baptized
Cameron on June 16th at St.


James. Kenneth M. and Patrea T.
Dowless, Cameron's parents,
named Wilson John Martin
Briggs and Cathy Lauren Briggs,
both of Las Vegas,' Nevada, and
Paul Joseph Sefclk of Anniston,
Alabama, as godparents.









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1991 PAGE 5A


Social Security
Help Available
Most Social Security business
. can be handled over the phone.
You are invited to call Social Se-
curity at 1-800-234-5772.
If this is not possible, you
may come to the office located at
30 West Government Street, Pan-
ama City. The office is open Mon-
day through Friday from 8:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. CT., except on
national holidays. If you cannot
come to Panama City, you may
meet the Social Security repre-
sentative in Port St. Joe on the
first and third Monday of each
month and in Wewahitchka on
the second Monday of each
month.
The schedule for Port St. Joe
is July 15, August 5, 19 and Sep-
tember 16 from 11 a.m. to 12
noon ET.
In Wewahitchka, August 12,
and September 9 from 10 a.m. to
12 noon CT.

Snarr Completes
Artistic Course
Ruth Snarr of Star Rt. 1, Box
620, Port St. Joe, has successful-
ly completed a comprehensive
course in The Fine Art of Painting
and Drawing with North Light Art
School, a national home study
school for fine artists at all levels.
The artist worked on a one to one
basis with several of the profes-
sional artist-teachers who make
up the School's faculty, to fulfill
lesson requirements in drawing,
composition, perspective, color
and the principal art mediums.
North Light Art School is offered
by the publishers of The Artist's
Magazine, the nation's leading
magazine for visual artists. For
more information, please write to
Bonnie Wilson, North Light Art
School, 1507 Dana Avenue, Cin-
cinnati, Ohio 45207.

YARD SALE
1621 Palm Blvd. (comer of
18th St. & Palm)
Saturday, July 13
8 a.m. ?
Three Families
Check Out Our Bargains!


Gloria Best and James Earl Harden

Plan August Wedding


Eva Mae Fennell, of Port St.
Joe, has announced the engage-
ment and forthcoming marriage
of her daughter. Gloria Evon
Best, to James Earl Harden, son
of Ollie Mae Harden of Panama
City. Gloria is also the daughter
of the late A.D. Fennell.
The bride-elect Is a graduate
of Port St. Joe High School and
attended Gulf Coast Community
College. She is employed as a
bookkeeper with Gulf County
A.R.C., Inc.
Her fiance is a graduate of
Bay High School. He spent four


CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM

Chickenpox in

i Children -

Shingles in Adults


*'..'* Elizabeth C. Jones, M.D.
S.... -' j

With a flurry of chickenpox in the area, it might be good to re-
view some of what we know about the disease and its management.
A primary case of Varicella-Zoster Virus disease is chickenpox.
Most people are exposed to this in childhood and have a relatively
uneventful illness.
After the primary illness, the virus remains around but dor-
mant. If the virus becomes activated in later life, the person devel-
ops shingles. You will hear about children developing chickenpox
after an adult has shingles same disease.
The incubation period for chickenpox in a susceptible person,
is usually 14-16 days. It can be as early as 11 days or as late as 20
days.
If you know your child has been exposed to chickenpox, you be-
gin watching for signs or symptoms of the disease about two weeks
after exposure. These signs and symptoms do not usually amount
to much. A slight fever and then a few red spots. The spots begin
up around the head and neck and spread outward and down along
the body extremities. The skin lesions are red spots about the size
of the tip of your little finger. In the center of the red spot is a tiny
blister that may not be obvious unless you look at the red spot at
an angle. The spots itch. The children scratch and shortly there are
red crusting sores.
Baths with cornstarch, baking soda, and oatmeal have all been
tried to help the itching. Calamine lotion will often help the itching
and some people find Benadryl by mouth to help. You can keep an
older child occupied by giving him a watercolor brush and letting
him paint the sores with calamine lotion as they itch. This gives
him something to do besides scratch.
People with chickenpox are contagious until they are no longer
getting new sores and all the lesions are crusted over. Children can
return to activities with all sores crusted, but often they feel strange
about doing so and feel that other children will poke fun at.them.
They may elect to remain at home until all the crusts are gone.
Patients with chickenpox should not -receive aspirin because
there is an increased incidence of Reye's Syndrome in chickenpox
patients receiving aspirin. Instead of aspirin, acetominophen (Tyle-
nol) may be given for fever or comfort.
Healthy children will usually not have complications after
chickenpox. Problems can arise in several situations. The baby
born to a woman who was ill with chickenpox in the first and early
second trimester of the pregnancy, may be born with several differ-
ent birth defects. If the mother develops the disease just before or
just after delivery, the baby can be very ill and some die. The most
common complication of chickenpox in adults is pneumonia.
Immuno-compromised patients (children being treated for leu-
kemias, cancer, arthritis, and AIDS) can become deathly ill with
chickenpox. Fortunately, there are current treatments that can be
used in these extreme situations.
There is currently a vaccine being licensed for use in the United
States. This vaccine was developed and has been used for years in
Japan. The vaccine is anticipated to be licensed soon and we expect
chickenpox to go the way of diphtheria, whooping cough, and teta-
nus and disappear.
<-.



COWBOY'S TRADITION
Boot & Shoe Repair
S102 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe
Steel Toe Work Boots on Sale Now
$9.00 to $30 off on all Wolverine
Boots and Lace ups
-Also-
5 Pair Only with Special Discount
Prices Good thru 7/19/91


years in the U.S. Navy. He is
presently a student of electronics
at Tom P. Haney Vocational
School. He is employed at Jones
Spacelink Cable, Inc., Panama
City Beach.
The wedding is planned for
August 17, 6:00 p.m. at Zion Fair
Baptist Church, Port St. Joe. A
reception will follow in the fellow-
ship hall of the church. All
friends and relatives are invited
to attend.

Visual Arts
Center Accepting

Applications
The Visual Arts Center is now
accepting applications for the
first Arts Academy and Art School
for children in grades three
through eight designed to provide
continuous art instruction to
supplement the public school
curriculum. Classes will be held.
on Tuesday evenings throughout
the 1991-92 school year. Applica-
tions are available at the Visual
Arts Center, corner of Fourth
Street and Harrison Avenue,
downtown Panama City. For more
information or an application,
please call 769-4451. Space is
limited; early application is rec-
ommended.


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Helpful Hints for Bachelors...


OBIUAIE


Velma Stoinoff
Velma Lois Stoinoff, 51, of
Jacksonville, passed away last
Tuesday, July 2, at Gulf Pines
Hospital after a long illness. She
was Clerk for the Duval County
Court System and was a visitor to
Port St Joe.
She is survived by her par-
ents, Arthur and Dollie Wood of
Bristol; husband, Michael of
Jacksonville; son, Michael, Jr. of
Jackscnville; three brothers, Mel-
vin Wood of Ocala, Glenn Wood
and Eugene Wood, both of Bris-
tol; four sisters, Evelyn Saucer of
Jacksonville, Dorothy Ward of
Tallahassee, Florence Lemieux
and Mae Phillips, both of Port St.
Joe.
Funeral services were held
Friday in Jacksonville. Local ar-
rangements were by Gilmore Fu-
neral Home.

Terri Larry
Terri Sha nri Larry, 3 1/2
year old daughter of Terry and
Renae Larry, passed away June
28 in San Antonio, Texas.
She is survived by her par-


ents; grandparents, Voncile Nick-
son, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Charles Larry, all of Port St. Joe;
great grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Otis Nickson of Port St Joe, and
Nicey Larry of Clearwater; eight
aunts; 10 uncles; 10 great aunts;
12 great uncles; many cousins;
and god parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Freddie Byrd of Maniz, Germany.
Funeral services were held
Saturday at the Philadelphia
Primitive Baptist Church with
Rev. Jessie Hawkins officiating.
Burial followed in the family plot
at Forest Hill Cemetery.
Services were under the direc-
tion of Gilmore Funeral Home.

Sue Ann Lanier
Sue Ann Lanier, 52, of Mari-
anna, died Tuesday night, July 2,
at Jackson Hospital following a
long illness. She was a native of
Marianna, a homemaker and for-
mer resident of Port St. Joe.
She is survived by two sons,
Ricky and Kevin Martin, both of
Marianna; one daughter, Melanie
Chason of Grand Ridge; one
brother, Randy Lanier of Talla-
hassee; one sister, Janice Guy of


When a man first moves out
of his house to college or into his
own apartment, he will discover
the challenge of living on his own.
We're not talking about a barren
refrigerator that contains only a
jar of ice water or about the layer
of dust that gathers on some
bookshelves. We are referring to
that huge mound of clothing,
piled next to the bed in a tiny
room that may face a brick wall.
"I don't know the first thing about
lights and darks, spin and rinse
cycles, or blends and cottons!" is
the cry of the inexperienced laun-
derer.
If you are on your own for the
first time, here are some sugges-
tions that will help you manage.
*Don't get used to seeing that
pile. (And that doesn't mean play-
ing hide and go seek with the
laundry, either!) Do your laundry
more often, in smaller loads, so
"Laundry Day" doesn't take all
day.
*Separate your lighter colors
from the darker ones. New fabrics
still have excess dyes that "bleed"
and make white underwear and t-
shirts turn pink. Do an extra load
for dark clothes if necessary.
*If you are paying for utilities,
are environmentally-conscious, or
both, you realize it takes more en-
ergy and money to heat water
than to use cold water during the
rinse cycle. Set the dial of the
washing machine for a cold rinse.
You'll be surprised at how clean
your clothes will come out
*Clean the lint basket before
every use of the clothes dryer.
*Many times, polyester blends

Rifle Club
Meets Tonight
The Gulf Rifle Club will hold
their monthly meeting Thursday,
July 11 starting at 6:30 p.m. All
members and interested shooters
are invited to attend.

Panama City; one grandchild;
and her mother, Bruneese Lanier
of Marianna.
Funeral services were held
Friday at Maddox Chapel with the
Rev. Garnett Chastain officiating.
Burial followed in Pope Cemetery
with Maddox Chapel of Marianna
directing.


Don't
come out of the dryer ready to
wear, but if they're wrinkled, you
can touch them up with a spray
of fabric finish and light ironing.
*When you're ironing cottons,
starch can give a garment crisp-
ness and body that will keep a
dress shirt looking great the
whole day.
*It is not necessary to dry
clean sportscoats, trousers, and


Let That Laundry Pile Up
suits after every wearing. These and how clean your clothes are. A
garments are made to be work wrinkled shirt that looks like it's
several times before needing dry been slept in can ruin a business
cleaning. Hang neatly on hangers deal that took hours to assemble.
after each wearing to prevent un- By following these simple steps
wanted creases. and taking good care of your
Your appearance becomes clothes, rather than piling them
very important as you enter the up, your clothes will last longer
professional world. You will be and you can gain the respect of
judged by your contemporaries your peers for being a neat
according to the way you dress dresser.


'A


.1~


Chris Roberson, left, is shown receiving the graduating athlete with the highest grade point
R. Marion Craig award from Athletic Director Phil average at Port St. Joe High School. Chris is the
Lanford. The award is given each year to the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Roberson.


Diabetes Support
Group to Meet
The American Diabetes Asso-
ciation, in conjunction with The
Wellness Center at HCA Gulf
Coast Hospital, will be holding a
Diabetes Support Group meeting
Thursday, July 11 at 7:00 p.m.
CT at The Wellness Center.
For more information, contact
Bruce Stephens at 785-8855.

LAWN MOWER &
SMALL ENGINE
REPAIR
call 229-6965


I

Li.




y~~L


Mike and Barbara Wilkes
are shown accepting their
prize from Commander Roy


'VWiews On

CDental Healtl

FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.


WHAT IS A ROOT CANAL?


Years ago, a badly infect-
ed tooth was doomed to be
pulled. Today, that's a last re-
sort. Root canal treatment
consists of: 1) the removal of
the infected pulp that lies with-
in the root canals of the tooth,
and 2) the sealing of the root
ends to prohibit any further in-
fection.
The pulp is the tooth's
center core of soft tissue
(nerves, blood vessels and fi-
bers). When the dentist re-
moves a "nerve" from a tooth,
he really removes pulpal tis-
sue that contains the nerve.
Removing the pulp from
the tooth does not produce a
"dead" tooth. It will be very


much alive and functioning be-
cause it has a source of blood
and nerve supply from the sur-
rounding tissues that hold it in
place. The tooth will have no
sense of feeling because the
nerve has been removed, but
the tooth itself will be fine: it
should last as long as your
other teeth and could even be
eventually used as an anchor
tooth for a denture or bridge.

Prepared as a public ser-
vice to promote better dental
health. From the office of:
FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
Williams Ave., Phone 227-
1123.


Robinson and President Maxine
M. Robinson.

VFW Drawing
The John C. Galnous Post
#10069 VFW held a drawing on
July 4 for a microwave oven. The
lucky recipients were Mike and
Barbara Wilkes of 111 7th Street,
Highland View.


Firestone

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P175/80R13 44.99
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P185/75R14 52.99
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216 Monument Ave. Phone 227-1291


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at Mexico Beach City Limits

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Lessons for Men,
Women, and Children
Classes starting soon.
For more
information and
registration
Call 227-7506
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MFC Proposes New Mullet Rule


The Marine Fisheries Com-
mission held a final public hear-
ing regarding amendments to the
mullet rule, developed further
policy to manage the mullet fish-
ery, and provided staff with direc-
tions concerning future manage-
ment of the spiny lobster fishery
during a two day meeting held
this week at the Mote Marine La-
boratory in Sarasota.
Mullet Final Public Hear-
ing
The Commission received
public comment and voted to pro-
pose amendments to the mullet
rule that would change the daily
bag limit for recreational fisher-
men to 50 per person or vessel,
whichever is less, and delete the
"restricted species" provisions in
the rule for the Panhandle Region
(a previous proposal to specify al-
lowable recreational fishing gear
for mullet was removed and will
be considered as part of the Com-
mission's statewide fishing gear
rule now in development). These
rule amendment proposals will go
to the Governor and Cabinet for
approval on July 23, 1991.
Mullet Other Policy Deci-
sions
The Commission received sci-
entific testimony and public com-
ment regarding the Commission's
policy to develop a management
plan to protect and replenish the
mullet fishery, and voted to pro-
pose the following:
Escambia through Hernando
Counties: closure of all harvest
(commercial and recreational)
during a seven day period each
month (the 22nd through the
28th) in the months of September
through December each year,
with a 500 pound daily commer-
cial trip limit January through


August each year
Pasco County through Gulf
Waters of Monroe County and
Lake Okeechobee: closure of all
harvest (commercial and recrea-
tional) during a seven day period
each month (the 22nd through
the 28th year rourid, with a 500
pound daily commercial trip limit
February through September
each year
East Coast Waters including


St. Johns River: closure of all
harvest (commercial and recrea-
tional) during a seven day period
each month (the 22nd through
the 28th) in the months of Octo-
ber through January each year,
with a 500 pound daily commer-
cial trip limit February through
September each year.
In addition, a maximum net
length of 600 yards for mullet


harvesting would be established
for all regions statewide. These
provisions listed above would re-
place the commercial weekend
closures during the roe mullet
season now in effect. The Com-
mission also voted to implement
further harvest restrictions over
three year periods when neces-
sary. The Commission intends to
hold a final public hearing on
these proposals in September.


The Star is the Place for ill of Your

Printing and Business Supply Needs


IL BA N KR U


Sti
7


ELIJAH SMILEY, M.B.A.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
*PERSONAL INJURY *BUSINESS *AUTO ACCIDENTS
*PROBATE & WILLS *DIVORCES
right LAW OFFICE DOWNTOWN Reason
Talk | 784-6606 Fee
433 Harrison Ave. Suite 1B Panama City


able
s


Controlling Plant Am


Disease Without


Over Spraying


By Roy Lee Carter
Gulf County Extension Director
You can have healthy and at-
tractive plants in your landscape
without having to follow a preven-
tive spray schedule to control
plant diseases.
Selection of plant material
will greatly affect the amount of
disease problems. Some plants
are very susceptible to diseases
while others have very few, if any,
disease problems. The use of na-
tive plants can reduce the inci-
dence of plant diseases. Often,
certain diseases are known to ex-
ist in an area. Avoid varieties and
species of plants known to be


RAO & REDDY ASSOCIATES, M.D. P.A.

Announce the Association of


EUGENE EVANS, M.D.
for
Gastroenterology, Endoscopy, and
Laser Surgery


Gulf Coast Medical Plaza
2202 State Ave., Suite 111
Panama City, FL 32405


Bay Medical Office Building
801 E. Sixth Street, Suite 304
Panama City, FL 32401


Office Hours By Appointment

Telephone 763-5409

Accepting Medicare, Champus, Blue Cross Assignment
Publish: 7/11 & 18







I I





0. Lee Mullis, M.D.






CALL FOR. APPOINTMENT






1-800-227-5704J,
I n






I

CALL FOR APPOINTMENT'
I 1-800-227-5.704
---...-- .-= ww. -. W= .-.w.-.OR-=== .MWOF- rNo


subject to these diseases.
Some diseases such as pow-
dery mildews and Botrytis Blights
are encouraged by high humidity
in plantings. Losses can be re-
duced by not crowding plants.
Think plants to permit free air
circulation and allow sunlight to
reach the lower parts of the
plants and soil.
Diseased branches and
shoots should be removed before
a disease can spread. In routine
pruning, always remove diseased
or unthrifty growth first and then
prune to control the size and
shape of the tree or shrub. Prun-
ing shears and saws can be
dipped in a weak alcohol solution
(1 part alcohol to 9 parts water)
to prevent the spread of disease
between plants.
Many disease organisms car-
ry over from one season to the
next on fallen leaves. It is advisa-
ble to collect and dispose of this
diseased foliage. Do not include
diseased material in the compose
heap because of the danger of
survival of disease organisms and
subsequent spread.
The maintenance of a bal-
anced fertilizer and water pro-
gram generally produces plants
which have some resistance to
plant diseases. Some diseases,
such as certain cankers, are more
prevalent on plants that are un-
fed or suffering from drought.
However, other diseases such as
rusts and powdery mildews are
more severe on succulent growth.
High fertilizer content, especially
nitrogen, and abundant moisture
will favor these diseases. Excess
soil moisture may also lead to

Community
Dance Saturday
There will be a community
dance at the Wewa Community
Center Saturday, July 20 from
7:30 to 11:30 p.m. CDT. Admis-
sion is $4.00 per person and door
prizes will be awarded. Music will
be provided by the Sonny Morris
Band.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend an evening of music and
dancing.

Singles Dance
The Blountstown Singles
Club is hosting a dance Friday,
July 12 from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m.
CT at the W.T. Neal Civic Center,
Hwy. 69 North, Blountstown. Mu-
sic will be provided by Sonny
Morris and the Country Gold
Band.
Admission is $3.50 per per-
son and door prizes will be
awarded.
For more information, contact
B. Newspme at 904-674-8470.

Wins Gas
New Bethel Baptist Church
held a drawing and the lucky re-
cipient of the gas was Carrie Bai-
ley.
Ticket sales were sponsored
by the New Bethel Baptist
Church with proceeds going to
the church building fund.


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.,


*Auto *Home

*Business
.Ilnnrl .1 ife


Representing "The Travefers"
The Insurance Store Since 1943

8:30 till 6:00
Mnndav through Fridav


J


-E "LJ11t: IW UU A -aIllj I>11 %4%4
*Bonds 221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


Roy Lee
Carter

County
Extension
Director


root rot problems.
When a disease problem de-
velops in a planting, particularly
of annuals or succulent perenni-
als, the gardener should consider
moving the planting to a new lo-
cation. This is the same as crop
rotation that is commonly prac-
ticed by farmers. It permits the
plants to grow In soil relatively
free of disease organisms and
also hastens the natural decline
of these disease organisms in soil
where they have build up be-
cause of the growth of susceptible
plants.
Plant in a location suitable for
the plant. Don't put shade-loving
plants in exposed situations or
sun-loving plants in the shade.
Also, avoid extremely wet or dry
locations unless plants are suita-
ble to these conditions. Many root
diseases are favored by wet soils.
Creating good drainage may re-
duce the severity of these diseas-
es.
Following these good cultural
practices will not guarantee dis-
ease-free landscape plants but it
will reduce the incidence of dis-
ease and the need for preventive
chemical control.


CONGRATULATIONS


TO ALL THE PARTICIPANTS


IN THIS YEAR'S



DIXIE YOUTH ALL-STARS


DISTRICT 4 TOURNAMENT


Q FROM,



'WMTO 93.5 FM C:


Your official All-Stars Tournament Station!!


Hear all the actionstarting July 20th on

WMTO as we broadcast the entire All-Stars

tournament live!!

Howard Browning Thanks to all the Sponsors that
will bring you all the bring you these games!
lala liv at Port St. Joe Ball Games Brought to you by:
play by play live a St. Joe Communications Dusty May
every game. Listen Costin & Costin Whitfield Landing
t0n ~11 the cp t tc q n Boyer Signs St. Joe Forest Products


L.U 1^11 IO I Lil t; OLO. % I I
your favorite team:
Port St. Joe
Apalachicola
Lynn Haven
Bayou George
Parker
Callaway
Mid City


The Star
Coopers Barber & Styles
Bill Wood Ins.
Costin's Insurance


St. Joe Machine Co.
St. Joe Furniture
Captain Blacks
Sports Connection


Apalachicola Ball Games Brought to you by:
Marks Ins. Agency Buddy Ward & Son Seafood
The Gibson Inn Apalachicola Times
Apalachicola Divers Supply Lanier Pharmacy
Mayor Jimmy Nichols


-- -- -M M


t













ARPC Receives National


Council's
The Apalachee Regional Plan-
ning Council (ARPC), Blountl-
stown, has been named recipient
of the National Association of Re-
gional Council's Rural Leadership
Award.
The award is presented annu-
ally to a rural council of govern-
ments that has made "significant
and continuing contributions to
the local governments and resi-
dents of its region." The award
was presented during the associ-
ation's annual conference in At-
lantic City, New Jersey. Charles


Leadership
D. Blume, executive director of
the council, accepted the award.
In his acceptance remarks,
Blume noted that if private enter-
prise, local, regional, state and
federal organizations demonstrat-
ed the same cooperation and co-
ordination as in the AGRI-PARK
Project, many of the economic
and social problems facing the
nation's communities could be
solved more effectively and effi-
ciently.
ARPC was cited for its devo-
tion to the future economic well


"Recycled Paper" Must Contain

At Least 50% Waste Paper


Large Zucchini
The huge zucchini squash be-
ing held by the grandchildren of
Marion and Bill May were grown
in a garden behind the May home
at St. Joe Beach.
The children are, from front
to back, Krystal, Nicole, Bobby
and James.


What is "recycled paper?" To
meet the definition of the United
States Environmental Protection
Agency, paper must contain 50
percent or more waste paper to
be called "recycled."
Georgia-Pacific Corp., one of
the world's largest forest products
companies, removes the ink from
magazines, newspaper inserts,
and newspaper pages at its Ka-
lamazoo paper mill, among oth-
ers, and combines the pulp with

Card of Thanks
We the family of the late Stel-
la Oliva Shackleford would like to
extend our thanks for all the kind
deeds shown us during our time
of loss. May the love of Jesus for-
ever shine upon you.
The Shackleford, Dawson,
Barr and Thomas Families


MESSAGE

SERVICE


NOTICE
For further information, contact Jackie Egland 904-488-0569,
Tallahassee.
The Interim Health and Human ,Services. Planning Groups of Bay,
Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson,
Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, Wakulla, and Washington Counties
are required to make recommendations to the legislature concerning
the reorganization of Health and Rehabilitative Services by October
1, 1991. They are planning a series of public .hearings to receive
comments from the public that will aid them in making these recom-
mendations.
The meetings will be held as follows:
DATE AND TIME: Monday, July 15, 1991, 5:00 7:00 p.m.
(CDT)
PLACE: Calhoun County Commission Meeting Room, 425 East
Central Avenue, Blountstown, Florida
DATE AND TIME: Monday, July 15, 1991, 5:00 7:00 p.m.
(CDT)
PLACE: Washington/Holmes Area Vocational Technical Center,
Cafeteria, 209 Hoyt Street, Chipley, Florida
DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, July 16, 1991, 5:00 7:00 p.m.
(CDT)
PLACE: Gulf Coast Community College Language Arts Lecture
Hall, 5230 WEDT U.S. Highway 98, Panama City, Florida
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, July 18, 1991, 5:00 7:00 p.m.
(CDT)
PLACE: Gulf County Commission Conference Room, 1000 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, July 23, 1991, 5:00 7:00 p.m.
(EDT)
PLACE: Taylor County Courthouse, Board of County Commission
Room, 108 North Jefferson Street, Perry, Florida
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, July 25, 1991, 7:00 9:00 p.m.
(EDT)
PLACE: Jefferson County Courthouse, Circuit Courtroom, Monti-
cello, Florida
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, July 25, 1991, 5:00 7:00 p.m.
(EDT)
PLACE: Walker School Administration Building, Board Meeting
Room, 35 Experiment Station Road, Quincy, Florida
DATE AND TIME:'Thursday, July 25, 1991, 7:00 9:00 p.m.
(EDT)
PLACE: Leon County Courthouse, 5th Floor, County Commission
Chambers, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida
The public is cordially invited to attend and present comments.
on the following:
(a) revision of the boundaries of the current eleven Health and
Rehabilitative Services Districts;
(b) the criteria that the Legislature should use in deciding new
boundaries for the service districts;
(c) the creation of a local health and human services planning
body that will participate in the planning and managing of the deliv-
ery of health and human services within the boundaries of newly de-
fined districts;
(d) whether existing advisory or planning bodies, including Dis-
trict Advisory Councils, should be abolished, incorporated, or rede-
fined, in relation to the new health and human services planning
body;
(e) the membership, or membership criteria, of the new health
,and human services planning body;
(f) the precise authority and responsibility that should be vED-
Ted in the new health and human services planning body;
(g) the relationship that should be established between the dis-
trict administrator and the health and human services planning
body. Po 3Ao116
Publish 7/11/91


other waste paper and 50 percent
new materials to product some
140,000 tons of paper a year un-
der the brand names ReRun,
ReComm, Ardor and Proterra.
The paper goes on to a second
use in annual reports, brochures,
manuals, carbonless forms, work-
books and even the text stock for
children's books.


Burch Retiring
from Military
Sergeant Major Thomas J.
Burch is retiring after completing
23 years of active military service.
His final assignment was Chief
Intelligence NCO Directorate of
Intelligence and Security, United
States Army Infantry Center, Fort
Benning, Georgia. His previous
awards include the Meritorious
Service Medal (fourth award), Air
Medal (eighth award), Joint Ser-
vice Commendation Medal. Army
Commendation Medal, Joint Ser-
vice Achievement Medal, Good
conduct Medal (seventh award),
Senior Alrcrew Member wings,
and Air Assault wings. His previ-
ous assignments include First
Sergeant, Headquarters Compa-
ny, 125th Military Intelligence
Company, Scholdfleld Barracks,
Hawaii; Senior Instructor, Aerial
Surveillance Division, United
States Army Intelligence. Center
and School, Fort Huachuca, Arin-
zona; Chief Evaluator, Directorate
of Evaluation and Standardiza-'
tion, United States Army Intelli-
gence Center and School, Fort
Huachuca, Arizona; Platoon Ser-
geant, Aerial Surveillance Pla-
toon, Military Intelligence Detach-,
ment (aerial surveillance), Fort
Wainwright, Alaska; two tours in
the Republic of Vietnam and one
in Hannau, Germany as an Aerial
Surveillance Specialist.
Sergeant Major Burch is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L.



CtLL IN









By: Richard Miller
*Car makers are building in
anti-theft protection: locks that
are tougher to pick, including
some that will disable the car if
the wrong key is used to open
it.
*Check coolant levels summer
and winter. The ethylene glycol
that keeps your car from boiling
over now will keep it from freez-
ing later.
*It should take two seconds be-
tween the time the car in front
of you passes a road marker
and when your car does. If not,
you're following too closely. If
you're towing a trailer, add one
more second per 10 feet of
trailer.
*Buying a new car? It's smart
to choose a model with a good
safety record.
*How do you describe your
car's brake trouble? If you have
to push the pedal further to
make the car stop, you have
"low brake pedal." If it takes
longer than usual to stop, it's
"brake fade." Both are fix-it-now
problems. Report brakes that
pull to one side, too.
*New-Used Cars: How do we
describe our new models? "Ter-
rific!" You'll love the ride and
the handling. Come see our win-
ners at

GuffFord

Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales


Award
being of its region through the de-
velopment of Project AGRI-PARK.
The Park is a diversified facility,
with all necessary infrastructure,
for agricultural products for a
five-county area. Its initial tenant
is an aquaculture processing
plant operated by the Florida
Aquaculture Processors Coopera-
tive. The plant is capable of pro-
cessing approximately 30,000
pounds of pond raised fish per
day at full capacity.
"ARPC looked at its region
and set in motion an economic
development strategy that capital-
ized on the area's strong points, a
sound strategy that should pro-
vide growth and stability," said
Richard C. Hartman, executive di-
rector of the National Association
of Regional Councils.
"ARPC's efforts to establish
the AGRI-PARK is also an out-
standing example of a regional
council working with local, state
and federal agencies and private
organizations to bring new jobs to
its area to revitalize its economy,"
said NARC president, John A.F.
Melton, mayor of Santa Paula,
California.


Burch, formerly of Port St. Joe.
He will retire to Columbus, Geor-
gia, with his wife, Jean, and two
daughters, Pam and Miki.

Fortunes Reports
for Naval Duty
Navy Fireman Wes Fortunas,
son of George E. Fortunas of 410
Madison St., Oak Grove, recently
reported for duty aboard the sub-
marine tender USS Frank Cable,
homeported in Charleston, South
Carolina.
He is a 1990 graduate of Port
St. Joe High School.

Gant Arrives
for Duty
Air Force Maj. Raymond C.
Gant, a general dentist, has ar-
rived for duty at Langley Air Force
Base, Hampton, Virginia.
He is the brother of Chester
J. Gant of 108 Main St., and An-
nie G. Baker of 16 Broad Street,
both of Port St. Joe.
His wife, Lenora, is the
daughter of Nathan and Mary Pe-
ters of 149 Avenue F, Port St.
Joe.
The major is a 1961 graduate
of Washington High School, Port
Ste. Gant received his docto-
rate degree at Meharry Medical
College, Nashville, Tennessee.


We have discounts
to help you drive down

the cost of car insurance.
If the cost of your car insurance seems to be heading in the wrong direction,
see if Allstate can help turn things around.
We have discounts that can help you save money.
You can save by having a good driving record. Or by driving a car equipped
with air bags or a four-wheel anti-lock brake system. Even by insuring more than one
car with Allstate. AL. l t
Which Allstate car insurance discounts do you Ilb lU
qualify for? Just give us a call to find out. We'll get your You're in good hands.
car insurance costs headed in the right direction. ,Aiinm~rOI h s~upNitMk.i.~Vw,
GASKIN-GRADDY
Insurance Company
Call Collect 639-5077 or 639-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
1-800-782-6802
Serving the Panhandle Since 1931




Now Under Construction

THE COTTAGES AT...

BARRIERDUNES


Pre-Construction Offering
For A Limited Time
Furnished Models Starting at C
* Single Family Homes
* 2 Bedrooms, 2 Full Baths
* Landscaped Lot Included
* Clubhouse With Pool
and Fitness Center


,l79,9000

* Pitch and Putt Golf
* (2) Lighted Tennis Courts
* Walk~toythe'Gulfof Mexico:
(700' of beach front) .
Much More


For more information call:

(904) 229-2777 or (800) 624-3964

THE COTTAGES ATBARRIER DUNES
Star Route 1, Box 223 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


II I








BULK RATE
POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahltchka,
FL 32465


We're Proud of Gulf County's


Extension Service.


TABLERITE QUALITY

GROUND

BEEF

1P d M


We're proud of the services that the
Gulf County Extension Service and IGA
Roy Lee Carter, Extension Agent offer
to the citizens of Gulf County. Their I
horticultural and agricultural advice is
invaluable to homeowners as they
strive to make Gulf County a beautiful C
place to live in. The Extension Ser- 6 PA
vice also supports the 4-H Club and 6 P
its activities. Support the Gulf County NE!
Rodeo this weekend in Wewahitchka.
We're proud of the Extension Service
and we're proud of our hometown.

S10 Pounds or More
TABLERITE QUALITY
PORK LOIN
End Chops,

L1.39


1 0 undsuudo ir More


FAMILY PAK



29


REGULAR OR THICK SUCED


BONELESS Lb. $4 M IGA Bacon...
Shldr. Steak Cooked Ham


$139
12 oz.


mm..... 12 oz.


TABLERITE QUALITY LIPON (12-14 LB. AVG.) (CUT FREE) $ 99
Whole Ribeyes ......... Lb.


TABLERITE QUALITY FRESH FAMILY PAK
Pork Steak .............
PREMIUM GRADE FRYER FAMILY PAK
Drumsticks ..............
PREMIUM GRADE FRYER FAMILY PAK
Thighs .......................


S$139
Lb. am


IGA ASSORTED PARTY PAK
SI. Lunchmeats ....


LYKES FAMILY FAVORITE E
Ham Half


BONELESS


g9o FLANDERS
Lb. 79 Beef Patties


Lb.79


FRESH FROZEN
Chitterlings ............. s..


IGA 12.0Z.
VANILLA WAFERS ........... 9
KRAFT 7.25 OZ.
MACARONI & CHEESE ... 2/990
3 LB. BAG
PERFECTION RICE ............. 79o
SUMMER TIME 64 OZ. $1
APPLE JUICE ............... 19
TRAILBLAZER 50 LB. BAG
HI PRO DOG FOOD .......... $9.49
IGA 130Z.
CRISPY RICE ................., 19
13 OZ. BAG
GENERIC COFFEE .....a....99
DOWNY REGULAR BLUE 64 OZ. /
FABRIC SOFTENER ..........2.99
EASY-ON PRE-PRICED AT 99$
SPRAY STARCH ................ 89
GALLON
IGA BLEACH ........... .....6...,96
THIN & REGULAR 7 OZ.
RONCO SPAGHETTI ....... 3/99


ARMOUR 3 OZ.
POTTED MEAT .......... .... 3/990
ARMOUR 5 OZ.
VIENNA SAUSAGE.......... /99.
RODDENBERY 16 OZ.
SALAD DELITES .............. 1.39
RODDENBERY 46 OZ. l 79
KOSHER DILLS ............... .79
32 O Z.
IGA MAYONNAISE ............. 89
IGA 32 OZ.
FANCY CATSUP ................. 69o
BI-RITE 42 OZ. CAN 99
SHORTENING ................. .
RC PRODUCTS 2 LITER
RC COLA ......................... 79
HUNT'S REGULAR PLAIN 15 OZ.
TOMATO SAUCE ............ 2/99
FRITO-LAY $1.39 SIZE
SANTITAS CHIPS ...............99
FRITO-LAY $1.39 SIZE
LAY POTATO CHIPS .......... 99.


BAMA 32 OZ.
GRAPE JELLY ...................


990


KRAFT INDIVIDUALLY'-WRAPPD 12 OZ 6
Cheese Singles, 691
BUTTER-ME-NOf 10 CT. SUNNY DEUTE 64 OZ.
EMe rico 2 c Citrus Punch ........ $1
BISCU /9 '9 AXELROD ASSORTED FLAVORS 8 OZ.
BISCUITS .go ,t ............4/99
"p" 1 '


-, ~i*9


OZARK CHICKEN, MAC. & CHEESE. IGA 12 OZ.
POT TURKEY 8 OZ. 4/99 WHIP
PIES ........ .... TOPPING ...... .


FANCY
Blueberries ...... pint
RED SEEDLESS
Grapes ................. Ib.
TROPICAL
Pineapple ............. ea.
EXTRA FANCY DELICIOUS
Red Apples ........... Ib.
SWEET GEORGIA tray pak
Peaches ................ Ib.
YELLOW
Onions ............. 3Lb. bag
CRISP GREEN


Cabbage


S.


.... 3 Ibs.


$149


99'
$j149

790

49*
$119

99*


SNOW WHITE
Cauliflower ........... head


David Rich's
FOODLINERS...
S- WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.
Prices Good July 10-16, 1991


RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


OS




S.


f 10 Pounds or More v
BONELESS
CHUCK
STEAK

Lb. .79
Lb.


S289


189
16o.. J


mmom


...mommum......Lb.

.u~..u.SML.


$229

$299

$289


I


..........l


* %















Seminoles on Sunshine Network


p.m., Florida State vs. Memphis
State in Orlando from November
17, 1990,
; Saturday, ALIugust 31 at 7:30
p.m., 1991 Pigskin Classic: Flori-
da State vs. Brigham Young fronm


Anaheim, CA.


Need Extra Money?
Use the Classifieds


In recognition of Florida State
University's official entrance into
the Atlantic Coast Conference
(ACC), Sunshine Network has an-
nounced a special primetime se-
ries highlighting the Seminoles'
1990 college football season and
their ascent to the preseason No.
1 ranking for 1991.
For seven nights over a nine-
day period (August 20-28) leading
up to the Seminoles' 1991 season
opener vs. Brigham Young on Au-
gust 29, Sunshine Network will
air encore presentations of the
seven Sunshine Network-
produced Seminole football


games from 1990. "Seminole
Football: Tune Up To '91" will
kickoff the 1991 season with a
look back at the 1990 team in ac-
tion versus East Carolina, Geor-
gia Southern, Tulane, Virginia
Tech, South Carolina, Cincinnati
and Memphis State.
"We are proud to have the op-
portunity to provide Seminole
fans across the state with a tune-
up to the 1991 Seminole football
season," said Dave Almstead, vice
president and general manager of
Sunshine Network. "Sunshine
Network is where viewers turn for
FSU athletics year round. We


STORE MANAGERS
ASSISTANT MANAGERS
SALES ASSOCIATES
Sunshine-Jr. Stores, Inc. national leader in the convenience
store industry has store manager, assistant manager and sales
associate positions available for qualified applicants.
Sunshine-Jr. Stores, Inc. offers:
*Flexible full and part time schedules.
*Company training program.
*Excellent starting pay based on experience and education.
*Retirement program.
*Medical/life and disability.
*Advancement opportunities and more!
Experience desired but not required. Apply today at your local
Jr. Store.


An Equal Opportunity Employer


RTC 7/11-8/29


look forward to another exciting
season of Seminole football on
Sunshine Network this fall."
Almstead said the network's'
schedule will include statewide
airing of promotional messages
for FSU and the ACC prior to and
during the special series as well
as throughout other network pro-
gramming.
"Since 1988 Florida State
University has been an important
part of Sunshine Network's pro-
gramming lineup and we espe-
cially value our association with
the University and its people,"
continued Almstead. "As the
home of FSU athletics in Florida,
we are in the unique position of
providing FSU and the ACC with
not only viewer loyalty but also
the largest statewide audience of
any Florida media outlet, includ-
ing radio, television and print.
For the past three seasons, Sun-
shine Network has provided Flori-
da football fans with exciting ACC
football action. We salute FSU
and the ACC on their new rela-
tionship and look forward to our
continued association with them
both."
The Florida State Seminoles


open their 1991 season versus
Brigham Young in the Pigskin
Classic on Thursday, August 29
in Anaheim, CA. Sunshine Net-
work will provide statewide cover-
age of that game on Saturday,
August 31, at 7:30 p.m. ET. Addi-
tional 1991 FSU football telecasts
on Sunshine Network will be an-
nounced as they become availa-
ble.
The schedule for "Seminole
Football: Tune Up To '91" is as
follows:
Tuesday, August 20 at 7
p.m., East Carolina at Florida
State from September 8, 1990
Wednesday, August 21 at 8
p.m., Georgia Southern at Florida
State from September 15, 1990
Friday, August 23 at 10 p.m.,
Florida State at Tulane from Sep-
tember 22, 1990
Saturday, August 24 at 7:30
p.m., Virginia Tech at Florida
State from September 29, 1990
Sunday, August 25 at 8 p.m.,
Florida State at South Carolina
from November 3, 1990
Tuesday, August 27 at 8
p.m., Cincinnati at Florida State
from November 11, 1990
Wednesday, August 28 at 8


St. Patrickfs Seafood
405 Woodward Ave. i Port St. Joe

Phone 229-8070
Open 7 Days A Week
Monday -Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET
Sunday 12 noon to 6 p.m. ET


Shrimp,
Jumbo...............$5.25
Large.................. 3.99
Medium...............2.99
Fish
Mullet (cleaned) .....894
Mullet uncleanedd).. 694
Grouper Filets .....$5.99
Red Snapper Filets 5.50
Trout...................1.99


Oysters
Pint........................ $5.50
60 lb. bag ...........26.00
30 lb. 1/2 bag........13.00
Misc. Seafood
Scallops........... 4.99 pint
Snow Crab Legs.... 4.99 lb.
Bulldoziers ......... 4.99 lb.
Live Crabs.........3.99 doz.


We also have Blue Crab Meat!


I I


TREMENDOUS

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Experience The Spirit of Farm Bureau

Come be a career agent with us, and
be a part of one of Florida's top
insurance sales teams.

For Gulf County area

Contact:0
Raymond D. Russell A
Blountstown
904-674-5471 A
BIFC 5/9/91





'BOSS OYSTER'


l Yo in a friendly
.. atmosphere
with good
FRIENDS.

Serving Breakfast,
Lunch & Dinner
6 a.m. to 10 p.m.
7 Days a Week
AII You can Eat SUNDAY'S
LUNCH BUFFET ONLY 4.95

-Specializing In -


*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches *Meals to Go
*Fresh Seafood *Delicious Steaks
r Famous Fresh 9-85
A CAA r% m 0 A"B'irC 1


Only


Our
, -- A


SEAFOOD PLATTER


30 orhSt:. 22-119:ortSt.Jo


Diana Joy Taunton

T.aiuito.in NameLId


Jx.J
QI

of Ji
gail
of M
in W
sent
upco
13th
grad
ing I

C

pres
stan
loved

sine
"Tha
bles


IL&ILLPIUJL L CAJ.J.JLA. 1 ~
teen of Rodeo
Diana Joy Taunton, daughter
judge David Taunton and Abi-
Taunton, won the overall title
iss Rodeo Queen on June 14 HEARING AID CENTER
'ewahitchka. Diana will repre-
the 4-H Saddle Club in the
coming rodeo on July 12th and 618 W. 23rd St.,
iin Wewahitchka. Wilbro Plaza
She will be entering the sixth Panama City, FL
le and enjoys modeling, play- '769-5348
baseball, and dancing.
SThanks FREE HEARING
ard of Thanks ( TEST
You thoughtful and kind ex- Top Quality, Name
3sions of sympathetic under- Brand Hearing
ding following the loss of our
d one will never be forgotten. Aids
We can never express all our *Satisfaction Guaranteed
ere gratitude in aerere *MonthlyService Center
ink You". May God richly.,, Motel St. Joe (PSJ)
s each of you. 1st Tuesday each month
James & Winnie Hamilton
and Family


cOsriN IKSUrAKCE
S AGJ!CY

^~ ~ ~ ~~~~- l:' ;iMB ~B'



Bi
,, / -i


* Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages 'Group'-Life 'Boat
*Hospitalization -Mobile Homes

COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY


Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


-HB.


PREMIUM WITH A PREMIUM

Summer Special
Add a Premium Channel like HBO, THE MOVIE
CHANNEL, or DISNEY and get a free PREMI-
UM (And the Connection's Free Too!)
YES:
ADD HBO
Get a VCR Tape Storage Box Full of Microwave
Popcorn so you can tape the Great Summer Mo-
vies coming up on HBO like Days of Thunder in
July and Die Hard 2 in August and enjoy Popcorn
while you watch. Also through July 31st, we'll
give you instructions on how to get a TALES
FROM THE CRYPT CALENDAR direct from HBO.

ADD THE MOVIE CHANNEL
Get a TMC Beach Towel.

ADD DISNEY
Before July 19th, get a Rocketeer Watch; from
July 20-August 31, get a DISNEY Beach Towel.

Call 1-800-388-6577 for Details
HURRY, OFFER ENDS AUGUST 31, 1991


GULF CABLE TV
(Rigel Communications)
Port St. Joe, FL


Apalachicola


Water Street


Sonny Ray with a TWANG is back from New
Orleans to entertain you once again!

*New Oyster Topping
Oysters Monterey by Gregory R. Pace
*Our New Blue Crabs are
"HOT" as the Devil
*Introducing a Chicken Barbeque in the
traditional Jamaican way known as "Jerked"
Chicken.
Enjoy it with a cold Red Stripe, mon!


L2FL








SPECIALS FOR JULY 11-17
George W. Duren, Owner/Manager
510 5th St. 229-8398


2 Liter


PEPSI and


-t
c!00.S00^
*PEP--oS


PRODUCTS


I:


1111


FAMILY PAK
C ube Steak ..................................


.ti ........ ............ ............lb.


.2.19


10 oz. Pkg.
COOKED HAM ............. 1.88
Eye 0
ROUND ROAST ........lb. 2.59
Bag
QUARTERED THIGHS..Ib. 33'
Family Pak Boneless
CHUCK STEAK......... b.1.79


Family Pak Boneless
SHOULDER ROAST. lb. 1.89
Turkey
HAM HALVES.......... Ib. 1.29
12 oz. Pkg. Hormel
LITTLE SIZZLERS .......1.39
Family Pak Register's Count S le
SAUSAGE ................b.1.9


Skinned, Deveined
BEEF LIVER ............... Ib. 89
Family Pak Choice
DRUMSTICKS.............. b. 59
Boneless
CHICKEN BREAST.......2.29
Bryan's
CORN DOGS ............Ib. 1.49


FAMILY PAK FAMILY PAK
Slab Bacon..b. I. 29 Rib Eye Steaks...3 99


1.19


32 oz. Delmonte
CATSUP........................................................ 9 9
5 Ib. Martha White
MEAL MIX.............................................L.. .U
7 1/4 oz. Kraft
MACARONI & CHEESE ..................... 9


22 oz.
D A W N ....................................................


1.29


32 oz.
GATORADE........................................* 99*
22 oz. Warren
CHARCOAL LIGHTER ....................... 990
5 oz. Armour
VIENNA SAUSAGE...................... 09


SUBS-Witches We have delou To SALADS
7urI~ey. Roast or Harr Fried Chicken by the GREEN SALADS
1a0e D.a i piece or the box full S110 & S130
Breast 1.39 Wing 49 RPEGULAR
59 Thigh 1.09 Leg 690 OR CHEF
8 pc. Box 5.99 20 pc. Box 14.9 .Da, '
12 pdc. Delicious akes SHAKES &
Fried Cakes
CHICKEN (' ^wMade to SUNDAES -
9. f'9Q9 Order _r`'":'
i s 9 For All Occasions e ,
SCall 229-8398 E ea/
And Place Your Ordw 7 9
LUNCH SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK-- /
Cheon. Meat with 2 Vegetables only 3.69/
Coconut Meat with I Vegetable only 2.59 DELICIOUS
P|I lVegetable Plate only 2. 29 ICKEN
I11- (3 Vegetables) yCHICKEN
\~ce \9By mne Piece or
3 6 \Chicken Box 1.9 Ccooed Seeral
6 Chlcken, Potato Logs, Colesl/ TrmeS Daily
1/1


A A AAA A A AAA A ALEA A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A Al


PEPSI


6 Pak
SH A STA S ............................................


0
Dairy Foods


ppp-



OT4












-T-iur STAR. PORT S.rO.1gFL -TIE THURSD~AY. .)V111991q


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20 acres South Long St.L, Over-
street. Sec sign. $2,500 per acre. P. 0
Box 937, Highland City. FL 33846.
Ph.:813-644-1606. 4tp7/11

2 bdnn. trailer, on 3/4 acre, ad-
jacent to Wetappo Creek, fenced, Ig.
storage building. $18,000 assumable
mortgage. 229-8581 or 227-1566.
tfc 7/4

150'xl20' commercial lot on
Hwy. 98 west of Highland View.
$55,000. Call George, 229-6031.
tfc 7/4

Port St. Joe Commercial Proper-
ty. 4 lots and large building in need of
repair. Many possibilities Priced to
sell! $55,000.
Call Cathey 648-5777 ERA Park-
cr Realty, 648-5653 evenings, or 1-
800-874-5073. tfc 6/13
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, I mile off Overstreet Road. 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 7/4


GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Bias, Florida

(904) 229-2500
1-800-624-3964
tfc 6/6


For sale by owner: 2 bdrm. house
w/sLovc & refrig.. nice lot w/shade
trees. City water & private pump. Ad-
jacent lot available. Canal St., 1/2
block from beach, St. Joe Beach,
$26.000. 904-482-3884, Marianna.
tfc 7/4

Two nice lots, Pine St., $16,000
each. One nice lot on Canal St., 1/2
block from beach, $15,000. St. Joe
Beach. For sale by owner. 904/482-
3884, Marianna, FL. tfc 7/4

St. Joe Beach, immaculate brick
home on 2 large landscaped lots. Cy-
press privacy fence, pleasant location.
647-5252. tfc 7/4

3 bedroom, 1 bath house, corner
13th & 'Garrison, $49,500. Call
George, 229-6031. tfc 7/4
Very Nice! 3 bdrm., 2 ba. house,
stone fireplace in great room, great lo-
cation, 2011 Juniper Ave. Call for ap-
pointment, 229-6427. tfc 7/4
1/2 acre MOBILE HOME LOTS.
12 mi. north of Mexico Beach on
Overstreet Road (Hwy. 386), Creek-
view Sub., no down payments, $86
per month. 229-6031. tfc 7/4

Two. acres on county road off of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 7/4


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYSI Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 50 per word for all over 20.


I lot tub, 8'x8'. Commercial grade
gas heater, hd pump and blower
$2.000 obo. 13'6" boat, motor & trail-
er. $850 each obo. 647-8339.
2tc 7/11

Taking bids on the sale of 2.71
acres of pine trees located at Sun-
shine Farms, Overstreet. For more in-
formation, call William Given at 227-
6223 days or 227-1467 after 6.
.tfc 6/20

1986 mobile home, 14'x70', 2
bdrm., 2 ba. (ch&a), assume 10 yr.
mortgage at $187.00 per month. Call
229-8029 or 639-5134. 3tc 7/11

Utility trailer, 4x8, $450. Five 4
ft. fluorescent lights, $18 each. 647-
8277. ltp 7/11

17,000 btu 210 volt air condi-
tioner, $75. See after 4. p.m. 1303
Long Ave. or 227-1363. ltc 7/11

Used room air conditioners; 1
Wizard 115 volt 5000 btu; 1 Westing-
house 115 volt 7600 btu; 1 GE 115
volt 7800 btu; heating panel 3600
btu. 603 Garrison Ave. PSJ
2tp 7/11

1978 Bethany pop-up camper,
sleeps 6, stove & refrig., clean, $600.
See to appreciate. 229-6941.
2tp 7/11

Small typing or sewing desk with
swivel chair, $15. Call 229-2729.
2tc 7/11


Nature's Diet Tea. Weight man-
agement, digestive aid, appetite sup-
pressant. Natural cleanser, over-
whelming response. For more
information call Beth at 229-8919.
ltp 7/11

2 single heavy, duty air mattress-
es, $15 each. New White Stag sleeping
bag, $20; scissor jack $5; new Black
& Decker 8" orbital polisher $20; new
Black & Decker 6" sander/polisher
$15. 229-2729.

Electrolux and all other vacu-
ums, repairs and sales, bags, any-
thing for any vacuum and any central
built-in vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyn-
dall Parkway, Panama City, FL
32404. 763-7443. tfc 6/27

To buy or sell Avon, call Sarah
Kemp at 229-6495 after 5 p.m. or on
the weekends. 4tp 6/20

Older piano with a roll top, good
for beginner or for antique collector,
asking $600. 229-6965 after 4:00
p.m. tfc 6/6

Port SLt. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOO! 227-1105.
FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 7/4


The Poet TGPFY. and Democrat
for President in 1992. Ray Rollinson
(me), needs a good working refrigera-
tor. You will arrange to deliver this in-
expensive, maximum 30 inches wide,
clean, nice refrigerator to the Demo-
crat for President in 1992, Ray Rollin-
son, trailer in Mexico Beach for a
sacrifice price, including delivery. OK?
Good Keep trying 904-648-8568,
thank you. ltp 7/11

WANTED: Good used refrigerator
and gas range. Call 227-1829.





Certified Nurses Assistant and
Home Health Care Aide Interested in
private home care, in the Port St. Joe
area. For more information please call
227-7454. ltp 7/11







FREE kittens, all males. Call
229-8978 after 5 p.m. tfc 6/27
FREE to a good home only! Male
black cocker spaniel, good with kids.
229-8294 days, 647-8210 after 5:00
p.m.


Huge multi-family yard sale. Lots
and lots of baby items, toys, clothes.
all sizes, antiques, fruit jars, knick-
knacks, furniture, twin/bunk beds,
planters and much more. Saturday,
8-? 219 Iola St. Wewa, follow signs.
ltp 7/11

Yard Sale, Sat., 7 a.m. noon.
228 7th St., PSJ. Men's, women's and
children's clothes. Household items,
air guns, misc. tools, crab basket, su-
per single waterbed, new bricks, pic-
ture frames, lavatories and vanity top,
toys and etc. ltc 7/11
Yard Sale: This weekend and
next weekend, Saturday and Sunday.
Overstreet Road, 5 miles from Hwy.
71, 7 miles from Overstreet Bridge.
Starts at 8 a.m. edt until.

Bargain Basket, Mon. Sat.. 9-5
at 445 2nd Ave, Highland View. Baby
items, children's clothes, misc. Am in-
terested in buying baby furniture, will
accept donations. 227-1704.
tfc 7/4







Sub Shop business for sale: for
information call 227-1323 or 229-
6020. 4tp 6/20


TRADE & SEVICE


L & V CERAMIC TILE. Fire-
places, counter tops, shower stalls,
floors & etc. Installation $2.00 per
square ft. 639-5802. 2tc 7/11

Lawn Mowing, Weed Eating,
Trimming. Quality work, low rates.
229-2720. 2tp 7/11


Gulf Co. Transportation, the Com-
munity Transportation Coordinator
for Gulf County has funds available
to provide transportation to persons
in the county who are because of
physical or mental disabilities, in-
come status, or age or who for oth-
er reasons are unable to transport
themselves or to purchase trans-
portation and are therefore, depen-
dent upon others to obtain access
to health fare, employment, educa-
tion, shopping, social activities, or
other life-sustaining activities, who
are not subsidized for transporta-
tion financial assistance or specific
trips.
For information regarding fare
structure and advance notice re-
quirements or to access this service
contact Gulf County Transportation
at 229-6550 or come by the office
at 200 Peters St., Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida. Gulf Coordinated Transporta-
tion operates under the sponsor-
ship of State of Florida Trans-
portation Disadvantaged Commis-
sion. tfc 5/30

Narcotics Anonymous
Open Meetings on Monday 8 p.m.
at 302 Reid Ave., and on
Friday 8 p.m. at
The Phantry Hotel
Help Line 229-8348

SAWS SCISSORS DRILL BITS
LAWN MOWER BLADES
BUTCHER KNIVES

LOCAL SAW SHARPENER
H. L HARRISON
1008 McClellan Ave.
Call 227-1350 or 229-8522
55t el/i


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 7/4,


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 7/4


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box A1 C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfc 7/4


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns

Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-387, Howard Creek
tic 7/i


JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
24 Years Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Acci-
dents. No charge for first conference.
gli 7/.i


All types of yard work. Mowing,
raking, and trimming. Reasonable.
229-6435. tfc 7/4
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.
Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
% Reg. Stated Communication
1st and 3rd Thursday of ea.
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Reid Ave.
G. Godwin, W.M.
Fred Nehring, Sec.
tfc 5/23


STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 7/4

COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581 ,=:n


Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 7/4



AVORn


CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229.6460 tfc 7/4


*LMARy KAy.
Carolyn J. Jones
Independent Beauty Consultant
222 Sea Pine Lane Port St. Joe
(904) 648-5194
tfc 7/4

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Prems
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc 7/4


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!



(r




Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. rc 6/6


Women's Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Church. 227-1145 or 227-1128.

Now Open: Eddy's Paint & Body
and General Repairs. Behind Gulf
Sands Restaurant. No job too large to
too small. Free estimates. Open 9 till
6. Call for information, 648-4011.
4tp 6/20




342 Coronado St., St. Joe Beach
*Antiques Collectibles
DepressiOn Glass Dolls &
Crafts Etc.
647-8339 tI 7/1

BOOT & SHOE
REPAIR
SAFETY SHOES
OWBOY'S TRADITION
102 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
I- t. 774

Residential Interior
Commercial Exterior
JEFF THIMMER
Painting & Wallpaper Services
Reliable, Dependable, 4tp 6/
Quality Custom Work
Free estimates Lic. #90373
229-8534 15 yrs. experience


LYLE OFFICE SERVICE
Typing, Resume and
Bookkeeping for
Personal or Business Needs
W Call 229-8562 tfc6/27



Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax


Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043


Jobie Barfield's

Small Engine
Repair

*Lawn Mowers
*Weed Eaters I
*Chain Saws
*Generators

*Tillers
*Go-Karts
Lawn Care Services Available

229-6965
1106 Long Ave. Port St. Joe
(Shop Entrance In the Alley)


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer t. 7/4


Lic. #RA 0060794 #ER0012523 (904) 827-2009 .

CHIP'S QUALITY
HEATING & COOLING
New Installations & Service s

Owner RUIL C. LAY P.O. Box 841 Port St. Joe, FL 32456

LIC # RFOO51042
FREE ES11MATES RG 0051008
ER 00o1 1618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
I'LUJMING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSI'IrUC'ION REI'AIRS
IRE'MODI)IING I:RESIDIE:NTIAI. ANI) C(OMMI:RCI.\.
INSI'AI.Ir'ION OF WA'n:R I.INIS AND) SEW\:\ R I.INES
MINOR E.I.:ECTRICAI.
IOle'ST. JOE. FLORID[A c 7/4 904/229-6821


PJ'S ROOFING
ALL TYPES OF ROOFS -7
Hot Roofing, Built-Up, 1-Ply System
Free Estimates
Phone (904) 229-6201 PAT TOUSIGNANT


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL

(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES/ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747
Charles Shoaf 227-7429 Doris Strickland 647-5


PORT ST. JOE
1314 Garrinoh 'Ave..*2 BR, 1 bath home with double carport on 1 1/2 lots, fenced
back yard. $35,000.
1607 Monument: Large 4 BR 2 1/2 bath masonry home with living room, dining
room, den, fireplace, garage, in excellent neighborhood. $75,000.00.
213 Tapper Ave.: 3 BR, 2 bath brick home with den and deck, carpet and vinyl, ch/
a. Recently remodeled. Large lot. $65,000.00
209 Allen Memorial Way: gOLpth, ch/a, nice yard, privacy fence. $85,000.00.
1609 Marvin Ave.: tpflstarter home. 3 BR, 1 bath masonry construction with stor-
age shed, wind ,,-ew roof. $34,000.00.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$126,000.00. REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
1807 Marvin Ave.: 3 bedroom, 1 bath home new roof, new ch/a unit (w/hot water
recovery heat system), plumbing recently re-done, new hot Water heater, chain
link fenced yard, termite inspected. Great Buy! $34,000.00. Reduced to
$29,500.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $69,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
BARRIER DUNES
Immaculate Gulf view townhouse with 3 decks, 2 large bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths,
great kichen with all appliances, living room and dining area all beautifully dec-
orated. Amenitities too numerous to mention. Carport and storage. Only
$125,000.00.
HIGHLAND VIEW
Hwy. 98: Large 2 BR, 1 bath stucco home, living room, dining room, 2 large en-
closed porches plus garage and storage building. $35,000.
OAK GROVE
105 Hunter St.: 3BR, 1 bath with extra room which could be 4th BR, living room; din-
ing room, den, screened porch, privacy fence, carpet, ch/a on 2 lots,
$29,500.00.
WHITE CITY
Remodeled country home. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen all
up-dated. Short drive to town. $32,000.00.
HOWARD CREEK
Corner of Deer and Perch: 2 BR, 1 bath mobile home, furnished, ch/a, utility build-
ing with washer and dryer on 2 lots, covered outside patio or car port. $27,000.
WEWAHITCHKA
2 BR, 1 BA Mobile home Unfurnished w/5 acres plus 1 BR, 1BA Mobile Home
with large storage building. $42,000.00
2 BR, 1 BA Mobile home with 5 acres Unfurnished. $27,000.00.
OVERSTREET
2 BR, 2 bath, with fireplace is on approx. 6.1 acres. Approx. 1,512 sq. ft. plus large
deck. Only $52,000
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2 bath home located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must see to appreciate.
$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
5th Ave., Beacon Hill: Log Cabin and barn located on 4 lots (3 landscaped) also 1
1 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home. $86,900, Reduced to $31,900, without mobile
home $1,900 $26,900.
Between Sea St. and 1st St., Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 5 BR, 2 story home with
game room. Completely furnished. $150,000.00.
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2-ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
Cape San Bias: 270 ft. prime Gulf frontage 600 ft. deep. Will sell or all part. $900
per front foot.
Gulf Aire: single family residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 corner lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue. $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000 00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.


PAGE B b AK, UM 10 1. r- U -_ 2LMZ L IL I,) Ul I 11, 1 Z L


- - - - - -- -


L


IEA-Va


I


i404













THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1991 PAGE 7B


IDoesYor usnes is t Slltoth Gvenmnt


Free Counseling Seminar Offered
On July 19, representatives teams Center will be available for 4917 N. Bay Drive, Room 7. vices you want to sell to t
from the U.S. General Services one-on-one counseling at the Counseling sessions will be from ernment, don't miss this o
Administration, Tyndall Air Force Florida State University Small 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CT. No ap- nity to meet
Base and the Naval Coastal Sys- Business Development Center, pointment is necessary and there representatives.


Roberts Cemetery is having a
clean up day Saturday, July 13th
at 7 a.m. Please come and bring


2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment,
completely furnished. Clean, like new.
At Gulf Aire. Pool & tennis access.
Call 674-8370. 4tc 7/11

2 bedroom fully furnished house,
a/c, washer & dryer, $300 mo. 229-
8909. tfc 7/11

For Rent or Sale: lease option
$75 credit back. 3 bedroom, 1 bath,
in Port St. Joe. 647-8783.
tfc 7/11

Dogwood Terrace Apartments, 2
bdrms., 2 bath, energy efficient apart-
ment, 229-6314 or 647-8317.
tfc 7/11

LOT RENTALS



* ^Sun & Sand
Mobile Home Park (386-A)
o100N. 15th St.,
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Call (904) 648-8201 ,' 7/4


'89 T-Bird, small equity & take
up payments, call 227-1255 after 5.
2tc 7/11

1986 Chevy 4x4, $4,500. Call
647-8702. tfc 7/4

1986 Mercury Cougar, $3,990.
Call 827-8110 or 227-1388.
2tc 7/11







23' i/o boat with galvanized trail-
er, recently rebuilt engine, ready to
go. See Tom Hudson Mexico Beach
Marina, $3,500. 227-1376. tfc 6/27


Temporary Employee for part-
time help. Inquire at Post Office in
Port St. Joe. Itc 7/11

CLERK-TYPIST
Gulf County Guidance Clinic,
Inc. is accepting applications for a
Clerk-Typist. Duties: Typing, answer-
ing phones, filing, recordkeeping.
Min. req.: h.s. dipl. or equiv., typing
at least 35 wpm, HRS, screening.
Must be personable and relate well to
public. Applicants with exp. given
preference. Apply to: Edwin R. Ailes,
Exec. Director, G.C.G.C., Inc., 311
Williams Ave., PSJ, FL 32456. EOE.
ltc 7/11

Part Time Help Wanted: Two
Christian ladies, at least 21 years of
age, to work in Church nursery keep-
ing children from birth through three
years of age. Hours will vary, but will
primarily be Sundays and Wednes-
days. Interested persons may apply at
First Baptist Church, 102 Third St.,
during office hours Monday Friday,
8:00 A.M. 4:00 P.M. 4tc 6/20

Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
Apalachicola River, within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
** 1/2 overtime pay, on-call duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with water, sew-
erage, and lawn maintenance provid-
ed free.
Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
(26) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten (10) paid holidays. Free continu-
ing educational courses offered by
State University $500 annual allow-
ance for job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience; or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst., P. 0. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 6/6

ASSEMBLERS: Excellent Income,
easy work assembling products at.
home. 7-da6 24-hr. service. Info 504-
646-1700. Dept. P6661. 21p 7/4


lawn mowers, rakes, etc. All help
is appreciated.







Large on bedroom, one person
apartment on 8th St. $60 week. Fur-
nished with utilities. 229-6933.
ltp 7/11

Mobile home lot for rent,
50'x150'. Tull's Trailer Parker, Jones
Homestead, 229-8669. tfc 7/11

Pressure Washer & Airless
Rentals. For more information call
647-8941. 2tp 7/4

Two small trailers and one mo-
bile home, adults only, no pets. 648-
5659. tfc 7/4

2 bedroom furnished house in
Highland View, $250 month. Deposit
required. 229-6133. 2tc 7/4

Trailer space: Nice large lot, $60
month, 229-6133. 2tc 7/4

2 bedroom, 1 bath, garage, very
nice. Gulf Aire. $425 month. 647-
5897. tfc 6/27

Mobile home lots for rent. 229-
8942 or 648-8761. 4tp 6/27

3 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage,
very nice in Gulf Aire. $650 month.
Call 647-5897. tfc 6/27

Nice 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath in
Ward Ridge. $375 month. Days 227-
1751 and ask for Becky. Night 647-
8384. tfc 6/27

3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1302 Garri-
son Ave. Fenced back yard. $375 per
month. $150 deposit. Call 227-1731.
tfc 7/4

Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfc 7/4

Mobile home lots. City water arid
garbage fee included. Rustic Sands
Campground, 648-5229. tfc 7/4

UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& reirig., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 11/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish!
washer &-stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 7/4

Office Space for Lease: Spa-
cious, clean, well located office in con-
venient part of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378 or come by 322 Long
Avenue. tfc 7/4

Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfic 7/4

No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use, rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/90

Nice one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing. tfc 7/4

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 7/4


is no charge for this service. First'
come, first served!
If you have products or ser-


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 90-219
ST. JOE PAPERMAKERS FEDERAL CREDIT UN-
ION,
Plaintiff
vs.
SCOTT W. BURKETT and wife, MICHELLE S. BUR-
KETT and TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 8, 1991
and entered in Civil Cape No. 90-219 of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the
State of Florida, in and for Gulf County, wherein
ST. JOE PAPERMAKERS FEDERAL CREDIT UN-
ION Is Plaintiff and SCOTT W. BURKETT and wife,
MICHELLE S. BURKETT and TYNDALL FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION are Defendants, I will sell to the
highest bidder for cash at the front door of the
Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at
11:00 (Eleven O'Clock) A.M. ET on the 1st day of
August. 1991, the following described property as.
set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
Lot Five (5), Block Twenty-six (26), Unit
Number Two (2), Port St. Joe Beach.
according to the official plat thereof on
file in the Office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court. Gulf County, Florida,
AND ALSO:
1986 Woodslde Mobile Home being 14
feet in width, and 58 feet in length and
bearing Identification number
5614DC 1035 together with all improve-
ments thereon.
DATED this 8th day of July. 1991.
BENNY C. LISTER
CIRCUIT COURT CLERK
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
By: /s/Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: July 11 and 18. 1991.
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BID
BID NO. 9091-27
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County. Florida will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested in sell-
ing the following described personal property:
Road Re-surfacing projects, per at-
tached specifications.
Separate sealed bids for the resurfac-
ing of existing paved, roads and the
surfacing of existing dirt roads includ-
ing: compaction of subgrade. haul-
spread-and compact sand clay base,
prime base, asphaltic concrete surface,
provide and install sand asphalt base.
install "crack relief" type pavement. in-
stall sod, grassing and seeding, grading
and drainage structures and engineer-
ing layouts as required to complete
this project.
Separate sealed bids will be received at
the offices of Gulf County Clerk's Of-
fice. 1000 5th Street. Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida 32456, until 5:00 p.m., ET. July
23. 1991, and then publicly opened
and read aloud at 7:00 pm., ET, July
23, 1991, in the County Commission-
ers meeting room. The Commissioners
have the right to refrain from award of
contract pending review of all bids sub-
mitted.
The contract documents may be exam-
ined at the offices of Baskerville-
Donovan located at 2852 Remington
Green Circle, Suite 102, Tallahassee,
Florida 32308.
A Bid Bond of 5% of bid is to accompa-
ny bid. A Payment and Performance
Bond of 100% of contract pric will be '" -
required as part of this contract. All
contractors bidding must be certified
with the Department of Transportation.
The Board of County Commissioners
reserves the right to reject any and all
bids received, or to select and award
any portion of any or all Bid Items or to
limit quantities under Bid Items. The
Gulf County Commission is an equal
opportunity employer.
Copies of the contract documents may
be obtained at the offices of Basker-
ville-Donovan upon payment of $50.00
for each set. This payment is non-
refundable.
Delivery date must be specified, and liquidat-
ed damages for failure to deliver unit on specified
date will be set at $25.00 per day.
Please indicate on your envelope that this is
a sealed bid, the bid number, and what item the
bid is for.
Bids will be received until 5 o'clock p.m.,
eastern time, on July 23. 1991, at the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
house. 1000 Fifth ,Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ James E. Creamer, Chairman
Publish: July 11 and 18. 1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-41
SUN COMMERCIAL BANK, formerly Commercial
Bank in Panama City.
Plaintiff
vs
HUBERT T. ANDERSON and wife, DORIS L AN-
DERSON, and FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF BALE
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned.
Benny C. Lister, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida, under and by virtue of the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in said Court on
June 27, 1991, In that certain cause wherein HU-
BERT T. ANDERSON and wife, DORIS L ANDER-
SON, and FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY, were
Defendants, being Circuit Court Case No. 91-41,


he gov-
pportu-
these


For more information, contact
Patricia Newman, FSU-SBDC at
(904) 872-4655.


will offer for sale and sell at public outcry, to the
highest and best bidder for cash. at the Gulf
County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at the
hour of 11:00 A.M. on the 25th day of July, 1991,
the following described property situated in Gulf
County, Florida, to-wit.
Lots 1 and 2, Block 8, Corrective Re-
plat of Riverside Park Subdivision, ac-
cording to an official plat thereof on file
in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit
Court of Gulf County, Florida.
LESS AND EXCEPT A parcel of land,
triangular in shape, situate, lying and
being, in Lot 1, Block 8, of the Correc-
tive Replat of Riverside Park. Unit 1. as
per plat recorded in Plat Book 2, page
38. of the Public Records of Gulf
County, Florida, and being more par-
ticularly described as follows: Begin at
the Northeast comer of said Lot 1;
thence run South 33*42'06" East 30.0
feet along the Easterly line of said Lot
1; thence run Northwesterly along a
straight line to a point on the North
line of said Lot 1 which is 30.0 feet
North 8803'16' West of the Point of
Beginning; thence run South 8803'16'
East 30.0 feet along the North line of
said Lot 1 to the Point of Beginning;
Containing 371 square feet, more or
less.
Said property to be sold with all the tenements,
hereditaments and appurtenances thereto belong-
ing, and being sold to satisfy said Final Judgment
of Foreclosure.
Dated this 1st day of July, 1991.
BENNY C. LUSTER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By. /s/Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: July 11 and 18, 1991.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE SrATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-88
ASSOCIATES FINANCE. INC.,
Plaintiff.
vs.
MINNIE LYNN and husband, AUDIE E. LYNN, and
THE CITIZENS AND SOUTHERN BANK
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MINNIE LYNN and husband. AUDIE/E. LYNN,
last known residence: 532 Third Street, Port
St. Joe. Florida. 32456, if alive, and if dead.
all of their heirs. executors, administrators,
personal representatives, beneficiaries and as-
signs, and any and all other persons, firms or
corporations claiming by. through or under
them or claiming any interest in the real prop-
erty described in the Complaint.
YOU AND EACH OF YOU are hereby notified
that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Gulf County. Florida. to-wit.
Begin at the Northeasterly corner of
Lot 30. Block 18, City of Port St. Joe.
Florida, according to the official Plat
thereof o infile n the of Clerk of
Circuit Court. Gulf County, Florida, for
a Point of Beginning thence run In a
southerly direction along the right-of-
way line of Woodward Avenue to a
point on said right-of-way which inter-
sects and is perpendicular to an Imagi-
nary line running from the easterly
boundary line of Lot 30 to the westerly
boundary line of Lot 30 and parallel
with the northerly boundary line of Lot
30. 3 feet North of the base of a pecan
tree. thence turn 90 right and run
along said line described above to the
S'1westerly: boundary line of L.t 30,
,. 'thence turn 90* right and run along
the westerly boundary line of Lot 30 in
a northerly direction to the Northwest-
erly comer of Lot 30, thence turn 90'
right and run along the northerly


boundary of Lot 30 to the Point ot Be-
ginning.
The above described property includes
a house which is basically 42 1/2 feet
long at the back of the house parallel
to Woodward Avenue and 24 feet wide
at the northerly end of the house run-
ning parallel to 3rd Street. That it fur-
ther includes a storage building which
is 6 feet by 6 feet and which is present-
ly situated at the southwesterly comer
of the house and approximately 3 feet
northerly of the southerly boundary
lines described above. The above prop-
erty is a portion of Lot 30, Block 18,
City of Port St Joe, Florida, and consti-
tutes approximately the northerly half
of said LoL
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to It
on Allen N. Jelks, Jr., Esq., of JOIHNSTON, IIAR-
RIS, GERDE & JELKS, P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff.
whose address is: 239 East Fourth Street, Panama
City, Florida, 32401. on or before the 17th day of
July. 1991, and file the original with the Cler of
this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney, or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded
In the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of said
Court on the 17th day of June, 1991.
BENNY C. LISTER. Clerk,
Gulf County Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: June 27, July 4, 11, and 18, 1991.
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Board of County Commission of Gulf
County will receive sealed bids for the rental, pur-
chase, lease, or lease/purchase of the following
personal property:
-Complete telephone system including tele-
phones for the following offices located at the Gulf
County Courthouse
--Clerk of Circuit Court
-Tax Collector
-Property Appraiser
-Cooperative Extensions
-Supervisor of Elections
--County Judge
-Building Department
-Building Custodian/
Maintenance


-Veteran's Service
-AdministraUive Assistant/Civil
Defense
Additive alternates:
1) Long distance calls cost ac-
counting system
2) Add telephone to Law Library
3) Add Circuit Judge's offices to
system
4) Inter-connection with Sheriffs
Department telephone system
5) Inter-connection with State At-
torney's offices telephone system
Requirements'
-Must be installed on or before
9/30/91
-To include telephones for the
above listed offices or at a mini-
mum. the cost each or per unit for
telephones.
-Specify line capacity of system
as offices currently have 21
lines)
-Specify telephone/instrument
capacity of system as bid (offices
currently have 46 telephones)
-Specify the features available
(installed) at the price quoted in
bid or proposal.
-To include training
---Specify: Warranty, repair/
service procedures, service/repair
response times, maintenance ser-
vice contract availability (includ-
ing cost)
Reauirel Features-
-Line sharing capability
-Call transfer
-Full Intercom capability
*If unable to bid exactly according
to specs, submit bid on equipment
nearest to specs.
Bids will be received until 9.00 o'clock, a.m.,
ET, August 13. 1991. at the office of the Clerk of
Circuit Court. 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, FL
32456.
The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
By /s/ James E. Creamer
Chairman
Publish: July 11 and 18. 1991.


Clean Up Day at Roberts Cemetery


ll/ \ t4LLEMORE
-- -


S" REAL ESTATE
SI INC.


Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98

Mexico Beach, FL 32410

(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478

Mexico Beach: 3nd of 33rd St. Beautiful view from
older beachfront home situated on 2 lots, heart of
pine panelling throughout home. 2 bd.,/1 ba. plus
carport & porch. $198,630.
Grand Isle: 3 bd., brick home approx. 1,700 sq. ft.
on 2 lots with 1 bd./1 ba. apartment attached. All for
$99,500.

Three (3) acre parcels on Wetappo Creek with
septic tanks. $15,000 each with good owner
financing.

Great waterfront investment! Total of 3 lots from
Gulf of Mexico to Hwy. 98, Mxico Beach with 2 bd./1
ba. older house, $135,000.
Beacon Hill: 2nd Ave. Three lots, 50'x100' with
septic tanks, $13,750.00 each or $39,500 for all
three. Owner financing available.


ELLEN ALLEMORE, Broker -648-8939


SALES and RENTALS












Love Should be the Winner, But Is It?


Toward Understanding
Rev. Jerry Huft, Rector St. James and St. John's Churches


Love always wins, or does it'?
Jesus summarized the law by
telling us to love God more than
anything else and to love other
people the way we love ourselves.
This should be the winning for-
mula for successful living.
There are cases where mis-
sionaries have followed this ap-
proach to hostile people. After
much suffering they were able to
win converts and overcome great
obstacles.
There are wives who have
stuck it out with obnoxious hus-
bands, constantly praying for'
them and living a virtuous life. Fi-
nally these men turn and receive
Christ and become responsible
husbands and fathers.
There are parents who uphold
godly standards for wayward chil-


Jobie Barfield's
Small Engine
Repair
*Lawn Mowers
*Weed Eaters f
S*Chain Saws I
*Generators ,
*Pumps
Tillers
*Go-Karts
Lawn Care Services Available
229-6965
1106 Long Ave. Port St. Joe
(Shop Entrance In the Alley)


dren, continually doing good and
being concerned for their welfare.
These kids eventually reach a
point in their lives where they re-
turn and become model adults.
All of these illustrations
would lead us to believe that if we
stick to our principles and always
respond with love, there will al-
ways be a happy ending.
But how about the missionar-
ies who are murdered by the sav-
ages they love? Or the wives who
are brutalized until the end by
despicable -men? Or the parents


Revival Services
at Philadelphia
Baptist Church
Revival services will begin at
Philadelphia Primitive Baptist
Church Monday, July 15th. Elder
Washington of the Greater Rising
Star Missionary Baptist Church
of Tampa will be the revivalist.
Services will begin at 7:30 p.m.
nightly with local choirs providing
the song worship. Pastor Jessie
Hawkins and the Philadelphia
Baptist congregation extends an
invitation to everyone to attend.


The Star Covers
Gulf County Like
the Pine Pollen!


who bear the shame of their un-
repentant offsp' ing?
Where is .ove's success when
no measurable improvement
comes at the end of a life of self-
giving kindness and hope? How
do Christians dare to believe that
love always wins?
We know that love always
wins for two reasons. First, the
Lord commanded that we love
one another. And second, love
gives a benefit to the lover that
surpasses the benefit to the one
being loved.


Love is more than an attrib-
ute of God, the Bible Leaches that
God is love. He loves us before we
know Him,, and He loves us more
than we can comprehend. His de-
sire is that we love each other. He
derives pleasure when we learn to
return his love and share it with
others. This by itself is reason
enough to say that love conquers
all.
But, on the human side of
life, there are great benefits for
the loving person which tran-
scend the effect of their love for


others.
The missionary who is slain
in the field may not see results
from his sacrifice. Nevertheless,
his soul has found the reward of
faithful service.
. The loving wife may see her
husband die without repenting,
but she will know that her love
made her a better, stronger per-
son.
The devoted parents may nev-
er be able to enjoy a child who re-
jects them and their lifestyle, but
they will know that love has
taught them patience and perse-
verance.
Love always wins because the
lover is the winner. Seeing mea-
surable results that come from


Catch the
41 'tIE uNrrED mETmooisrCHURCH


love will always be a bonus. The
real success is not seen, for it is
in the heart of the lover, hidden
from all but God.


C&C
TACK & SUPPLY
located 4 mi. south of Port
SSt. Joe oh Hwy. C-30
Selling
Western English
Clothing & Accessories
*Country Arts & Crafts
Quality Equestrian Products
229-8561
tfc 7/4


Constitution and Monument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............... 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ............5:30 p.m. Thursday .................7:30 p.m.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


Emily Cabaniss

Cabaniss In Who's Who


Emily Cabaniss has been se-
lected for the 25th annual edition
of Who's Who Among High School
Students, an honor reserved for
five percent of the high school
students in the United States.
Who's Who recognizes the


'THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Flordia Church Phone 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellow-
ship "A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune in Every Sunday at 8:45 a.m.
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade



You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James' Episcopal Church
309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe
EplscopaL
+ -SERVICES-
Each Sunday..................7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
I / Sunday School................................9:45 a.m.
",h The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor




'F" We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place
BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ...........7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING...............11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ................ 5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor
KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children


Bible Study
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


AN ANSWER



FOR ALL



PROBLEMS?
Check your mailbox and
local TV listings during July.

Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
P.O. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


achievements of outstanding stu-
dents who have contributed to
their schools and communities.
Emily is a junior at Port St.
Joe High School. She is the
daughter of Jerry and June Caba-
niss of St. Joe Beach.


Prepare for the


Hurricane Season


By Bob Crawford
Commissioner of Agriculture
Florida summers are a time
to enjoy the great outdoor life.
But the summer season is also
the time to prepare for hurri-
canes. Hurricane season began
June 1 and continues through
November 30. Florida is the most
hurricane-prone state.
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Servic-
es urges consumers to be pre-
pared by storing a two-week sup-
ply of non-perishable foods,
medication, fire extinguisher,
first-air kit, tools, battery-
powered radios and flashlights,
and extra batteries. Also, check
battery-powered equipment. A
battery-operated radio could be a
family's only source of informa-
tion during a hurricane if power
lines are down.
Consumers also should make
sure they have sufficient flood in-
surance. Damage from rising or
tidal water is specifically excluded
from a homeowners policy and
must be covered by flood insu-
rance issued under the National
Flood Insurance Program.
Flood insurance is a separate,
special policy, but it can be pur-
chased in conjunction with a
homeowners policy. However,
many insurance companies won't
issue new homeowners coverage
once an area has been placed un-
der a hurricane watch or warning
by the National Weather Service.
Because hurricanes can dam-
age water systems and lead to
contamination, consumers
should store water if a hurricane
is imminent.
During hurricane season,
consumers are advised to keep
their vehicle's fuel tank full to be
prepared for sudden evacuation.
If a hurricane warning is is-
sued, board up or tape windows.








(USA)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP... 10a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL........ 11 a.m.
Nursery Available
SERMON:
Those Special Gifts
God Gives Us
Ordination and Installation
of Elder-Candidate,
Mrs. Elizabeth Stuart
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden,
Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756


Check refrigerated foods for
spoilage if an electrical power out-
age occurs. Foods that are not
properly refrigerated, or those
that are not cooked thoroughly
can harbor food-borne illnesses.


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


Board Adopts Educational Equity Rules
Superintendent of Schools, B. Walter Wilder, an-
nounced today that on July 2, 1991, the School Board
once again expressed the desire to comply with federal
and state regulations prohibiting discrimination:
"No person in this state shall, on the basis of
race, sex, national origin, marital status or
handicap, be excluded from participation in, be
denied the benefits of, or be subjected to dis-
crimination under any education program or ac-
tivity, or any employment condition or practices.
(Section 228.2001, F.S.)
Any violation of the provisions of this policy should be
reported to: Charles T. Watson, Director of Support Ser-
vices, Gulf County School Board, Gulf County Court-
house, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or phone 229-8256 or
639-2871.
The School board has adopted a grievance procedure
to resolve complaints of discrimination. A copy of this
procedure is available in each school office, and in the
office of the Superintendent of Schools which is located
in the Gulf County Courthouse.


--I














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