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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02897
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 13, 1991
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02897

Full Text








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I' HE


USPS 518-880


FIFTY-THIRD YEAR, NUMBER42


INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991


33 Per Copy
Plus 2 Tax ... 350


Thrno, ele EeatdIn FrD IMangeen


Belin Gives U
After a 53-year tenure with St. Joe Paper
Company, Jacob C. Belin stepped down Tues-
day from the company's top executive position.
Belin, who is 76, formally told St. Joe's
board of directors at its annual organizational
meeting in Jacksonville Tuesday, that he wold
not submit his name for another term as St.
Joe's chairman and chief executive officer.
The board elected Belin chairman of its ex-
ecutive committee and named W. L. Thornton
chairman and chief executive officer.
In more than half a century Belin has held
virtually every executive position in St. Joe as
well as many executive posts in its subsidiar-
ies.
OTHER OFFICERS NAMED
Thornton, who lives in St. Augustine, had
been St. Joe's president and chief operating of-
ficer. He has been president since 1984. He is
also chairman, president and chief executive-
officer of Florida East Coast Industries, the
holding company for the Florida East Coast
Railway which is controlled by St. Joe.
Thornton is also president of Talisman Sug-


rp Positions
ar Corporation, a subsidiary of St. Joe, located
in Belle Glade. Earlier this year he was elected
chairman and chief executive officer of St. Joe
Forest Products Company and president of St.
Joe Land and Development Company. He is
also a co-trustee of the Alfred I duPont Testa-
mentary Trust and is an officer and director of
The Nemours Foundation.
Robert Nedley, of Port St. Joe, was elected
by the firm's board of directors as president
and chief operating officer. Nedley has been in
charge of St. Joe's mill operations and forest re-
sources. He was named a vice president of the
firm since 1982 and a director since 1989.
Nedley, who has lived in Port St. Joe since
his youth, joined the company's shipping de-
partment in 1961 after graduation from Florida
State University.
He is chairman of the Florida Pulp and
Paper Association.
BELIN TO REMAIN ACTIVE
He will continue to serve as chairman of the
(See BELIN on Page 7)


Board Disenchanted with Parks

Chairman Says: "County Can't Afford Maintainence on Salinas"


A query from Parks Committee chairman John Reeves, about
whether or not the County Commission wished to apply for more
state grants to improve parks in the county, generated a discus-
sion which made It evident that the Commission is becoming
disenchanted with their Parks Committee and parks in general.
The disenchantment with parks stemmed from an observa-
tion made by chairman, Ed Creamer, who said, "Gulf County
can't afford to support Salinas Park [at Dead Man's Curve]".
What spurred Creamer's remark was a change order request-
ed by. Committee chairman, for Salinas, which rubbed the Com-
mission the wrong. way. Both Creamer and Commissioner Billy
Ttavlor felt Reeres was too involved in the construction activities
e at the park and Traylor finally capped the discussion off by mak-
ing a motion that any changes made in the construction project
by the committee, should be brought to the Commission for con-
sideration by at least three members of the Committee, includ-
ing the vice-chairman and the requests be made only at an open
meeting of the Board.
Traylor agreed with Creamer, that the county could not sup-
port the operation of Salinas. "I'm not opposed to parks, but we
can't afford to maintain this park. It will require .constant super-
vision or people will tear it up faster than we can build it. It will
require round-the-clock supervision and we can't afford that."
Creamer remarked, 'You're looking at about $70,000 a year
there and we don't have that kind of money available."
Traylor and Creamer were also disturbed that Reeves' change
order-while solving a problem-would substitute spending
money from a state grant obtained for construction, to using
county tax money.
Building inspector, Don Butler, who has been overseeing the
job for the county, made a suggestion to solve the problem,
which would reimburse the county for any out-of-pocket ex-
pense, and the Board went along with his suggestion.
AGREE TO APPLICATION
The Commission agreed to make a request for state recrea-
tion money to make improvements to the Wimico Park at White
City.
The park, which features a playground and boat launch facil-
ity into the Intracoastal Waterway, is receiving considerable use,
according to the Board's observations. The Board has plans for
improvements there, while they are disturbed over the money
being poured into Salinas, a park they say they can't maintain.
Creamer remarked, "It's a mystery to me why we have such
problems as people getting sick over tainted water at White City
and we can't get money to complete a water system there, but
we can get $180,000 in state money to build a park which will


be torn up in just a short while."
The Commission also gave Building Department director
Ralph Rish, permission to apply for grant money from the State
of Florida, to purchase 580 feet of beachfront property at St. Joe
Beach. The property has been offered to the County and would
give access to a public beach in the area, where there is present-
ly none.


Dr. James Cersosimo tells County Commissioners there
is a lack of communication between he and the Board.



Cersosimo,



Board, Bury


i the Hatchet
t Chairman Still Wants to Ax the Doctor


Workmen are making swift progress in the construction
of Salinas Park on St. Joseph Peninsula near Dead Man's
Curve.


Dr. James Cersosimo, direc-
tor of the Gulf County Health De-
partment, approached the Gulf
County Commission Tuesday, to
try and settle a simmering resent-
ment which has been building for
the past few months, largely due
to lack of communication.
Cersosimo moved his family
to Lynn Haven in January, when
he received an alert notice from
the Air Force.Reserve, to be ready
to report for Desert Storm.
The Board had come up with
a requirement that their Health
Department director make his
residence in Gulf County, after an
uncomfortable experience with
Cersosimo's predecessor, who
lived on a sailboat in Panama
City, during his tenure here.
Cersosimo told the Commis-
sion his reasons for moving to
Lynn Haven, saying his wife
worked there and he had no de-
sire to have her driving back and
forth to Port St. Joe with two
young children every day, with
him off in Saudi Arabia. "I wanted
them to be nearer her work, for
her convenience, if I was shipped
out," he said simply.
The Doctor said, "I like my
job and I think I am doing a good
job. When I took over, 18 months
ago, the operation was deep in


the red and no organization. We
now provide the services we are
allowed to do and the operation is
now well within budget."
Cersosimo said, "I still have a
commitment to the Reserve as a
result of the manner in which I
received my training. I can't ig-
nore that, but I also wish to re-
main as the Health Doctor for
Gulf County. I enjoy my job and I
love the location."
Commissioners Fortner, Pe-
ters, Ray and Traylor all said they
had nothing but good reports on
Cersosimo's work with the Health
Department and wanted to waver
their residency requirement, to
allow him to stay.
Chairman Creamer remained
adamant about replacing him, al-
tough he was out-voted by his fel-
low Board members.
"I am still opposed to your
continued employment. I feel you
knew the residency requirements
and then there was the matter of
the letter you wrote to The Star in
which you said some things
which shouldn't have been said."
Creamer said.
Cersosimo admitted there
was lack of face to face communi-
cations on the part of both par-
ties. "I was not notified, in per-
(See HATCHET on Page 9)


Mexico Beach Citizens Managing Their Own Development


Improvements at the seaside
,community of Mexico Beach will
continue, if their Commnity Im-
provement Program stays active.,
"We intend to remain active and
make this community a nice
place to live and to visit," said Ja-
kie Spann, president of the CIP.
Tuesday night, the develop-
ment group presented the Mexico
Beach City Council with a check
for $1,663.46, to do still another
project to improve the ambiance
in the community. The newest
project will be one of three
planned dune walk-over board-
walks. The walk-over will be built
on the east end of the beach near
Fifth Street. The committee also
has plans for two more walk-
overs before they are finished.
The CIP has been in business
for only eight months, but al-
ready they have performed such
needed projects as designing,
* paying for and constructing


handsome, landscaped signs at
the east and west entrances to
the City, decorating them with
shrubs, rocks and palm trees;
supplying 50 palm trees and do-
ing much of the landscaping
along the newly-developed facili-
ties on the canal, including the
entrance triangle and the beach-
front park.
The committee has also
adopted Highway 98 from Tyndall
Air Force Base on the west to
Gulf County on the east and have
set up a program of keeping it
clean. 'We have already removed
all the litter from this four and a
half miles once and are now busy
maintaining that situation,"
Spann said.
Two weeks ago, the commit-
tee gave a cook-out party at the
new canal park for Mexico Beach
city employees and their employ-
ees, to show their appreciation for
the employees dedication to the


.4
Mexico Beach Commissioner Sylvia check from Denise Thrasher [holding check,
Whaley, city manager, John Mclnnis, Corn- right] and Jakie Spann, of the Mexico
missioner Fred Nehring, Mayor Tom Hudson Beach CIP, to be used for community Im-
and Commissioner Dana Angerer, accept a provements.


task of keeping their community
neat and clean. "This may be a
small community in size, but it's
large with pride" Spann said.
Naturally, all of this activity
takes money, and the CIP is deep-
ly involved in several activities for
raising money to pay for their
projects. 'We have the only T-
shirts available with the official
Mexico Beach logo printed on the
breast pocket," the committee
president said. "We paid for this
beach walk-over solely with T-
shirt sales."
In addition to the exclusive T-
shirt sales, the active committee
conducts flea markets, ticket
sales, and anything they can
think of to raise a few dollars.
Spann said the committee
has just begun to make their
presence felt in Mexico Beach.
"We have several more ideas we're
kicking around," she said.


I I


J. C. BELIN
Stepping Down


L


STAR












THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JUNE 13,1991


A Bargain

There's nothing which will make a government think about
potholes more than a substantial rainy season, which brings out
the best in potholes. The real reason for about ninety percent of
the potholes in the world, seem to have been caused by this situ-
ation ... a lot of rain mixed with weak spots in the paving.
And, there is nothing which will make people cognizant of the
need for filling in potholes like a preponderance of the pesky
things showing up in the streets and highways one drives on
every day. Potholes demand attention, and given the nature of
the beast, they get it! It is a decided inconvenience to drive down
a street every day and be confronted by a teeth-jarring experi-
ence each and every time one of the holes is hit. The number of
active potholes which exist after the mixture of rain and weak
paving spots, makes the jarring experiences come regularly and
be difficult to avoid by the same ratio as the number of days of
rain, making new potholes by the hour.
By last Tuesday, the pesky nuisances had become so numer-
ous on Port St. Joe streets that the problem occupied fully half
the time of the scheduled City Commission meeting that night.-
That's to advise you just how important it is to many of our peo-
ple that potholes be put behind them.
Potholes are easy to get excited or concerned about. The cur-
rent crop which is as plentiful as a crop of winter wheat, has
stirred the conscienceness of the City Commission to the point
where they didn't even flinch when Public Works Director Frank
Healy said he had a demonstration of the latest thing in pothole
patching gadgets coming this week, to show off. Healy went on
to say the new gadget is being adopted all over as the most effec-
tive way to handle potholes, in order to keep them from washing
out every time it rains. Then came the estimated price tag, and
still not an eyebrow raised, nor a single breath sucked sharply
in. It was all taken in stride when Healy said the equipment
would cost in the neighborhood of $48,000.
The point we're getting to is, had this presentation been
made last July or August, when we were in the midst of a
drought and potholes were something of a rarity, a $48,000
price tag for a pothole patcher would have received an immedi-
ate brush-off. Since everyone is interested in getting rid of the
bumper crop of front end wreckers we are presently blessed
with, the $48,000 price tag seems to be almost a bargain.
Don't you agree?


Politics As Usual

One of the most controversial topics of conversation these
days. Is the so-called civil rights bill which is currently creeping
its way through the halls of Congress. Those who want the bill
passed-especially the minorities-are vehemently supportive of
the bill, even though some of them have misgivings about much
of the bill.
Those who oppose the bill are just as vehemently opposed,
but seem to be more unanimous in their opinion that the bill
bodes far more bad than it does good. Those who are still neu-
tral on the bill, fee4 we doont,really.need.the prpiionsr i, the bill
because we have so many other. laws which protect peoples'
righjtsfin the various categories which are being supported so
hard in the new bill.
Personally, we see no need to come up with a new so-called
civil rights bill each and every year. Most of the bills we have
read about seem to do more taking away of rights from some of
the population than they do in giving new rights to others. We
suppose that whatever is done, some are going to have their
rights abridged and some are going to have certain rights written
down in a law book somewhere which they already enjoy under
laws currently in effect.
The whole thing about a new civil rights bill seems to us to
be more an exercise in politics than it is for any practical pur-
pose.
We'll never have an instant acceptance of minorities in some
places, we believe. Having lived through most of the minority
revolution here in this nation, we can see where there have been
tremendous strides made in equal opportunity, which is really
what we are talking about here. We think equal opportunity is
being provided just about as fast as it can be assimilated and
taken advantage of.
So, what are we doing here? We feel we're just providing an-
other forum for those who would posture before the voters, to
beat their chests either in favor or against a bill whose benefits
are already available and in force.


IHunker Down with Kes


Roy Could, I Couldn't


I got a letter from a lady in
Tallahassee saying that some of
my little stories take her "way
back" and "wouldn't It be nice if
we could go back to those days?"
I studied on that one for a
while. Ma'am, let's not get carried
away with this thing. Sure, a
world without fast food places,
and baseball players with ear
rings would certainly be a kinder,
gentler nation. And black and
white movies are still my favorites
but I got to thinking about some
other things...........
You take for instance, trying
to go to sleep in July and August
back in 1955. Sweat would be
running down my neck, I'd keep
searching for the cool spot on the
sheet. We'd all end up out on the
back porch, hoping for just a hint
of a breeze. Today, I've got this lit-
tle box on my wall. If it gets hot, I
just turn the knob down. You'd
think it's early March in my
house all summer long.
And I know you remember
getting up on a school morning in


January! The first problem was
trying to dig out from under the
12 quilts, three blankets and two
brothers that were laying on top
of me. Listen, we worked at trying
to stay warm. I'd ease my way to
the edge of the bed, mentally
counting the steps it would take
to reach the fireplace in the living
room. You remember the first
step on that wooden floor? Boy
howdy, that would jump start
you! I'd leap down the hall and
vault into the living room. You
don't know the mornings I ate my
Quaker Oats and dressed stand-
ing on that hearth. I'd toast my
face while my backside would be
freezing. Then, I'd turn around
and reverse the process.
You know that little box I was
telling you about that hangs on
my wall. Well, when it gets cold, I
turn that same knob up, the
whole house gets warm. Not just
the living room mind you, but the
bedrooms, the kitchen, the bath-
room.... I tell you, that box is
magic.


Sure, I've thought about "go-
Ing back" many times. I'd love to
hunker down once again on the
front porch of Woodrow Kennon's
Mercantile, Drygoods and Gro-
cery Store. To see old Mr. Jack
Cantrell and Frenchy Mayo at the
checker board. Watch as Mr. Wil-
lard Brush leaned over toward
the NuGrape Soda thermometer
and declare, "It's going to be an-
other hot onel"
It would be neat to once again
hear the grown ups talk about
Ike, the price of hogs and the
Brooklyn Dodgers. But I wouldn't
want to hunker there too long.
Mr. Brooks might come needing
some cotton pickers. I'd pull that
heavy canvas sack down those
rows with my back hurting, my
knees hurting, every finger bleed-
ing....... I'd pick all morning, then
drag that extra heavy sack
around to the back of the wagon
to weigh in. Mr. Brooks paid the
boys a penny a pound. "Let's see,
Kesley, that's 29 pounds."
Twenty nine pounds! Why


'' ''a.




s-fl." -


I ~ff~l:? -

* ,.'.-. .

-, ,
-'


-.e~ .


Kesley
Colbert

that sack weighed a tbn. I'd acci-
dently throwed in some dirt clods
to help my cause. If I ever do
"make it back" you can bet the
first thing I'll do is check Mr.
Brook's scale!
And it would be nice to take
an ice pick and jab me a hole
through the cap of that small bot-
tle Coke and nurse that drink for
most of the afternoon. Coke in
the small bottle in 1956 was the
Real Thing. We were lucky if we
got one a month. 'Course today, I
can have a Coke a day if I want
one. Shucks, I can have two. If
it's really hot I'll drink three.....
There were some embarrass-
ing things back in those days.
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


Headed for Port


ETAOIN SHRDLU


*y -




HERE IT IS, THE middle of
June and you know what that
means It means that good, ripe,
sweet watermelons are waiting in
the wings for someone to start en-
joying.
If it wasn't for watermelons,
we'd more than likely have to
cancel summer. The two just go
together. Here in the Panhandle
of Florida, they grow some of the
best watermelons in the world.
My friend, A. B. Traylor,
grows watermelons every year
and always sends me a sample,
or two, or three, during the sea-
son. A B. has a way with water-
melons. His always turn out red.
firm, sweet and juicy. I have
heard other people say he just
likes to grow them. He exists from
summer to summer, just so he
can plant and harvest watermel-
ons.
A. B. is doing the world a fa-
vor, as he produces good water-


%-- Sam-3-- I


By: Wesley H. Hamsey I


summer's Watermelon Season Is Fast Coming Upon Us


melons.
I have seen a few of those
shipped in melons already turn-
ing up in the super markets the
past two or three weeks, but they
are nothing like the home-grown
variety which comes along be-
tween the middle of June to mid-
July.
After the beginning of sum-
mer passes us by, and the
steamy days of late July and Au-
gust invade with their oppressive
heat, we begin to get watermelons
from central Georgia to Tennes-
see, and they are an acceptable
substitute to a North Florida mel-
on.
NOT ONLY KIDS like water-
melon. They are a favorite of all
ages. I know, I am no longer a
kid, but I still like a sweet water-
melon.
One of life's greatest mo-
ments is to go pick up my grand-
son, stop by a local store and get
an ice cold watermelon and then


make a bee line for the back yard
patio and some quality time eat-
ing and spitting seeds.
The tried and true method to
eat a watermelon is still to just
dig in and get wet from ear to ear,
but after I started getting more
mature, I usually eat my water-
melon by cutting off a bite-size
chunk at a time.
Frenchie will take the water-
melon left after the initial cutting,
cut it off in bite size chunks and
put in a bowl and place it in the
refrigerator. Then, at night, while
watching a Braves baseball game,
out will come that bowl of water-
melon and times could never be
better.
ME AND WATERMELONS
have been pals for a long time.
When I was just a young boy,
back in Oklahoma, we lived right
across the street from the ice
plant. The operator of the plant
always stocked up good on water-
melons every summer and placed


them In his Ice holding room.
Now. you talk about good
You could get one of those mel-
ons, slice it open and start filling
up. The meat was so cold it would
hurt your teeth to eat it.
I remember one time, when
we went across the street to get a
watermelon, Mr. Bryant, the own-
er, let my brother Will and I go in-
side the ice room and pick out
our own watermelon. We went in,
enjoying the delicious cold [in the
days before air conditioning] after
the scorching, dry heat of an
Oklahoma summer.
Inside the room, the wall was
lined with pipes all covered with
frost, which carried the refriger-
ant to keep the room cold.
Will was always an adventur-
ous type and he decided to lick
some of the frost off one of those
pipes. He touched the pipe with
his tongue and lo and behold, he
was stuck tightly
Will started howling as loud
as. he could for someone to get


him loose. I didn't know how to
get him loose and all he knew
was that he was stuck and his
tongue was getting more painful
by the minute.
I finally ran to get Mr. Bryant
, and he came in to assay the situ-
ation. He grunted once or twice
then went to get some water and
pour it on Will's tongue and the
ice-covered pipe. Will was finally
released from his frozen tongue
hold, we picked up our watermel-
on and got out of the room real
quick before he got stuck again.
BACK IN THOSE days, you
were only half through with a wa-
termelon when you ate the meat
out of it. Enjoy that to the fullest,
but there was still more to come.
Naturally, when you have
three or four young boys around,
a watermelon gets eaten right
down to the white on the rind,
with a little fudging if momma
isn't looking.
A kid likes watermelon!


After the ripe center was eat-
en, we had to gather up the piec-
es of rind and get to work cutting
the hard, green outside off the
white part of the rind. This was
the first step in making watermel-
on rind preserves
Our grandmother lived with
us in Oklahoma, and grandma
had a recipe for making preserves
out of almost everything. Water-
melon rind was on that list of pre-
serve ingredients.
Grandma worked for nearly a
half a day making up preserves
from the rinds from a good-sized
watermelon.
She also made preserves out
of those little tomatoes which are
now called salad tomatoes. Just
as they were getting ripe, she
picked them and made them into
preserves.
Grandma made our house a
little crowded, but those tomato
and watermelon rind preserves
made her Welcome as far as the
Ramsey boys were concerned.


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
-T HE STAR0 Send Address Change to In County-$15.90 Year In County--10.60 Six Months
SWNPuished Every SS 18880Wilams Avenu The Star Out of County-$21.20 Yea Out of County-$15.90 Six Months
by Th Star ubhiost Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
="N .Phone 227-.1278 their than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
, ,,s William H. Ramsey........... Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
Frenchie L. Ramsey .......... Office Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ................. Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


St. Joseph Bay Tide Table
Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
June 14 12:25 p.m. H 2.1 11:15 p.m L -.5
June 15 1:10 p.m. H 1.9 11:57 p.m. L -.2
June 16 1:52 p.m. H 1.6
June 17 12:15 a.m. L .1 2:24 p.m. H 1.2
11:54 p.m. L .3
June 18 1:12 p.m. H .9 10:28 p.m. L .5
...... June 19 7:37 a.m. H 1.0 7:03 p.m. L .4
.- -- June 20 7:15 a.m. H 1.2 5:58 p.m. L .2j


Jol


1


-i


I








I'UU' Q1'AR fPORT' ST. PL uM~TR1AV. JUNE 13.1 11901


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


For Children Only
Hi kids Can I play with you? Hey, don't be scared of me. I
won't bite you. I'm really a friendly dog. My name is Duke. What's
yours?
I love to play "toss and fetch." My master and I used to do it all
the time but I slobbered all over the ball and made his hand slimy
so he quit throwing it for me. Want to know a secret? I slobbered
all over the ball on purpose. I knew he didn't like it and that's why I
did it I used to do a lot of things he didn't like, like run off and not
come back, but that was a long time ago and I don't do them any
more.
Want to know what happened? Well, I ran off one day and
when he whistled for me I wouldn't come back because I had spot-
ted this beautiful girl dog...well, she wasn't that beautiful, but she
was a girl and I wanted to stay with her for a while. It wasn't long
before someone came out of the house and ran me off so I decided
to run back to the truck my master was whistling from. Know
what? He was mad! When I jumped in the truck he tried to hit me
with his hand and you know what I did? I tried to bite him. I really
did. Want to know what happened next? Well, all I remember is
seeing that board I think they call it a 2x4 coming at me and
for a long time after that all I saw was stars. And when I quit seeing
stars, you know what I had? I had a terrible headache for a long,
long time. Know what? I don't try to bite him or anyone else any
more. No sir. I bite another dog every now and then but I don't bite
people any more.
But I didn't come here to talk about that; I came here to play!
Try to catch me? See how fast I can run! I can catch you... Hey,
what is that over there? It looks like another dog trying to come
into my territory. Excuse me, boys and girls, but I had better go
run that dog off and mark my territory before we have every hound
in town over here.
Hey, that didn't take long. Did you see how that dog ran when I
barked real loud and ran at him? That's called "bluffing" and I do it
a lot. I'm glad I went over there because I had to use the bathroom
anyway. That lady didn't like it when I marked her car tire. Doesn't
she know that's what tires are for?
Know what I like to do better than chase balls and sticks? I like
to chase things in the water. I'll bet you like to swim, too, don't
you? Let's all run down to the canal and jump in. Come on! Don't
pay any attention to her. Well, you're all a bunch of chickens!
Hey, let me climb up there and slide down that slide. Wouldn't
it be fun if we had a bucket filled with water at the bottom and we
could "splash" in? See if your mother will go get us one. She won't?
Well, big people just don't like to have fun like kids and dogs do.
Well, I see the big man has just pulled up at the house. I had
better run home and play like I'm glad to see him or he might pull
out that board again. He doesn't care if I come over here and play,
but I don't want to take any chances. I can act real happy. Watch
me as I run, how I wag my tail and bark a friendly bark. But you
know what I'm going to do one day? I'm going to run up to him like
I'm glad to see him and bite him as hard as I can right on the arm
or leg. Yes sir! That's what I'm going to do... the day I'm ready to
die!
Hey, I've got to go. I had a good time playing with ya'll! I hope I
see you tomorrow. Remember me, my name's Duke and I love you!
k. -


What A Mess!
To the Editor:
Recently I was visiting rela-
tives in the Port St. Joe area.
During my visit ILattended several
Little League baseball games. It
please me to see how well orga-
nized the Little League Associa-
tion was.
However, I was appalled at
the litter, left by the parents and
children. What a mess! There are
trash containers at all the fields
and no one knows how to use.
them.
The most ironic thing is...
when you enter Gulf County you
see signs that read, "HELP US
KEEP IT BEAUTIFUL"
"PLEASE DO NOT LITTER".
Obviously, the residents in
the Port St. Joe area can not read
and do not take pride in their
community. This lack of concern
towards the community shows
they do not care about the envi-
ronment they are raising their
children in.
Just a concerned visitor.
Sincerely,
T. Boyd
V., Georgia
P.S. Check the restrooms...
they are worse than the field.


* He Disagrees
To the Editor:
I don't know how the other
School Board members feel about


your editorial of June 6, 1991;
but I personally feel that you are
the culprit this time.
You referred to the "in-
fighting" which is so rampant on
our County and School board
governing bodies and that our
governing bodies are not working
as a unit. You blamed the single
member district concept for our
woes in that we are not responsi-
ble nor answerable to all the vot-
ers in the county.
The Florida Statutes hold that
"no single member has power un-_
til he or she votes in the Board
meeting, with the majority ful-
ing". Any decisions the School
Board has made or will make,
represents the majority rule.
I may not like the entire con-
cept of Single Member District
but it is the "Law of the Land"
and we are constitutionally
bound to follow it to the letter un-
less it is changed.
I The School Board welcomes
constructive criticism and has
been functioning quite well with
input from The Concerned Par-
ents Group and other concerned
citizens to improve our system for
everyone.
Your comments can perhaps
be excused by your apparent lack
of knowledge of the facts, since
you or any member of your staff
does not attend our meetings.
Please let this letter serve as an
open invitation to you to attend
these meetings come and see
how we operate before you in-
clude us in your editorial com-


We're just down the street

in caseyou needs.
"-- .More independent agents like myself
S' are handling Allstate Insurance every day.
W hlch makes it easier than ever for you
it get the fast, fair claim service and
Competitive rates Allstate has always been
t',lmous for. On car, home, life, business,
eien boat or RV coverage.
So feel free to stop by for a visit. Because
u,.. Allstate is even closer to home than

Hannon Insurance
2 Agency, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. 227-1133
i, i ." I o rI I (, n \ ,il hl, ,


City Investigating Death of Bailey

Kept Busy With Other Cases During Week


Port St. Joe law enforcement
officials were investigating the
death of Vera Mae Bailey, 38, 214
Avenue E, Tuesday.
Chief Carl Richter said Bailey
was found dead in her home early
Tuesday morning, from unex-
plained causes. She was in bed.
Richter said the department
didn't suspect foul play, but Flori-
da law requires an autopsy be
performed in such instances to
verify death from natural causes.
TWO JUVENILES CHARGED
Two juveniles, aged 10 and
12, were charged with grand theft
Tuesday, in a matter involving
two, motor vehicles.
The first vehicle was taken
from the AN Railroad parking lot
on First Street Monday night. The
vehicle was later located near the
lot, stuck in the sand. The vehicle
was owned by the Railroad com-
pany.
Tuesday morning, operators
of a switch engine, noticed two
young boys in a vehicle in the
same parking lot, and called po-
lice to the vicinity.
As the boys were approached,
they ran from the scene. They
were later identified by the switch
engine operators, along with po-
lice, and apprehended for ques-
tioning, which resulted In charges
being filed.


ments.


James Hanlon
School Board Member
District 3


Thanks!
To the Editor:
We would like to extend many
thanks to our County Commis-
sioner, Nathan Peters, Mr. Graves
and his employees at Mosquito
Control.
To elaborate I live on Madison
Avenue, .better known to some as
Niles Road; for some months a
pile of branches and debris from
the lot that was cleared beside
our house has been sitting in the
ditch. This posed a potential haz-
ard not only to the kids who
walked in the street to go around
the pile; or to the the kids who
chased balls into the pile (as the
lot is used for ball practice) due
to it being a perfect haven for
snakes and such; but to the traf-
fic, as from the side street (Jack-
son Ave.) you could not see past
the pile into the oncoming traffic
which was largely buses and ve-
hicles on the way to school.
Upon my notifying the above
named parties, I went home for
lunch the following day and
found, much to my delight, the
pile was removed with no linger-
ing sign that it had very been
there.
Again I extend my thanks and
thank on behalf of other con-
cerned citizens for the prompt-
ness and efficiency of our County
Commissioner and our county
employees.
The Gammill's
Port St. Joe

Better Cable!
[Editor's Note: Letter to Mr.
Owens on file at The Star office.]
To the Editor:
When I sent out the above let-
ter to Mr. Owens of Rigel Commu-
nications, I decided to start keep-


The boys said they had taken
the cars just to ride around the
parking lot.
POT PLANTS CONFISCATED
Police officers located and de-
stroyed 13 marijuana plants
found growing in the woods be-
tween Garrison Avenue and the
drainage canal alongside Knowles
Avenue Tuesday morning.
The plants were deep in the
woods near the Ninth Street ex-
tension, growing in individual
pots.
'There was equipment there
for their cultivation, such as wa-
tering Jugs, garden tools, etc.,"
Chief Richter said.
The plants were brought into
the police station, where they
were destroyed. No arrests have
been made, as yet.
CHARGED WITH ASSAULT
Emmanuel Fisher was
charged with battery on law en-
forcement officers Friday of last
week, after an altercation in
North Port St. Joe.
Police were called to the loca-
tion, where about 15 young
adults were involved.in a fracas.
When officers attempted to break
up the melee, Fisher turned on
the officers and was placed In jail
on charges stemming from the at-
tack.


ing a diary of any cable problems
I incurred on a day-to-day basis.
Here are the results.
May 9th: The entire cable
went out at 1:33 a.m., and when I
retired at 3 a.m., it was still out. I
called Gulf Cable and got the re-
cording.
May 10: The Dothan channel
was hazy all day, but, to be fair, I
was informed channel 4's prob-
lems stem from the Dothan sta-
tion itself.
May 11 th: The entire cable
went out at 3:15 p.m. and was re-
instated around 6:45 p.m., minus
channel 3; it was scrambled. I
called a friend at the Cape and
her cable was fine. She has Multi-
Vision.
One of the major problems
associated with this cable compa-
ny is, unless the problem occurs
during their working hours, Mon-
day through Friday, we are out of
luck. If you call the company af-
ter hours, you get the recorder,
and the problem seems to remain
until they arrive for work.
It would be helpful if they had
an emergency number they could
monitor, or get call forwarding,
and have the calls forwarded to a
serviceman during off hours.
For information purposes, I
contacted three cable companies
that supply cable from Panama
City Beach to Apalachicola. Listed
below are the companies, along
with their prices for BASIC cable:
Comcast Cablevision: $18.05
plus tax (41 channels)
MultiVision: $18.95 plus tax
(29 channels)
Gulf Cable: $17.50 plus tax
(18 channels)
If you feel the cable should be
better, .contact Johnny Linton.
Johnny can work with Rigel Com-
munications, and maybe some of
these problems can be resolved.
There are many people in this
city, both old and young, who de-
pend on television as a prime
form of entertainment. Let's make
sure they can enjoy it.
Barbara Lawder


Since 1883
SJamIson
It's BEDDER'"Bedding!


BEDDERTM


BEDDING


TRUCKLOAD




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Chief Carl Richter and Lieutenant Jeff Duval of the Port
St. Joe Police Department, show off several marijuana
plants located and removed from a wooded area east of
Ninth Street between Garrison avenue and the Gulf County
Courthouse property.



Kesley From Page 2


We'd sit in the Park Theatre on
Saturday afternoons and actually
cheer when Roy figured out that
the thin mustached saloon owner
was riding after the old man's
ranch and Roy and the posse was
fixing to head'em off. Can you im-
agine being that naive?
But I tell you the real kicker
that will keep me right here in the
present. I had to get up one time
and sing in front of the whole
church. I guess I was, about 14.
And I did all right through the,
Oft our cher-ished plans have


failed, Dis-ap-point-ments have
pre-valled, And we've wandered
in the dark-ness, heav-y-heart-ed
and a-lone.., but when I got the
part where it goes up a little bit,
By-and-by, when the mom-ing
comes....two cows and 14 hogs
came through the front door of
the church.
Folks, I dod't ever want to go
back to a time when somebody
could make me stand up and at-
tempt to sing.
Respectfully,
Kesley


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PA-- --- -.A


Controlling Rabbits In the Garden
Some May Work, Others Are Humorous


It's A Girl!
Mr. and Mrs. Ashley Lee
Wood of Bellview have announced
the birth of their daughter, Ash-
leigh Nicole. Nicole was born
-June 4, weighing 7 pounds, 9
ounces and was 20 inches long.


Her grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Marvin Cross of Port St. Joe,
and Mr. and Mrs. Ashley Wood of
Panama City. Great grandparents
are Mrs. Robbie 'Cooey of West-
ville, Wilmer Wood of Ft. Myers,
and Mrs. Pat Corbin of Canton-
ment.


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
This time of year, many news
releases and articles center
around specific wildlife pests in
the garden. For your reading en-
joyment here are some of the re-
ported controls, many research
based, others sworn by and a few
not so practical or successful.
Likely targets for rabbits are:
fall and winter vegetables, bark of
young trees, and raspberries.
Some suggested controls are:
The long list of reputed repellents
that homeowners sprinkle around
their gardens include wood ash-
es, ground hot peppers, chili pow-
der, garlic powder, crushed mint
leaves, tobacco dust, tankage or
blood meal, talcum powder, and
powdered rock phosphate. Most
of these need to be replenished
every so often or after rains. For
the die hard organic gardeners,
fox urine, lion dung, and dried
blood have good reputations as
rabbit deterrents as well. The dis-
advantages would be the smell,
attraction to other animals and
locating a source, not to mention
Sthe collection process. Other re-
ported controls are:
*Set old leather shoes around
the garden to give it that "hu-
mans are here" smell.


Alicia Burke ot Port St. Joe
was selected as a Trojan Ambas-
sador for 1991-92 at Troy State
University.
Ms. Burke, the daughter of
Mrs. W.J. Burke, is seeking a
master's degree in elementary ed-
ucation.
Ms. Burke's activities include
Alpha Gamma Delta sorority, Psi
Lambda psychologyy organiza-
tion), Sigma Alpha Sigma (social
services organization), and Sigma
Chi "Little Sister." She was also
named on the Dean's List.
Ms. Burke is a graduate of
Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School.


Costin 's


"Featuring"
iitography at
its finest

1 11x14
2 8x1O's
2 5x7's
and
8 wallets


$3.00 deposit and
$15.95 on delivery


200 Reid Ave.


I l


*Snake effigies, commercial or
homemade from old garden hose.
*Grow garlic, onions, or mexi-
can marigolds during the sum-
mer.
*A well mannered dog (one
that doesn't dig in your garden).
*Share the harvest or sow ex-
tra seeds outside the main gar-
den.
*Wrap trees with hardware
cloth, heavy duty foil, or other
sturdy. material or commercially
solid products.
*Fence the garden; fence
should be at least two feet high
with holes holes smaller than two
inches and buried six to eight
inches in the ground. An electric
fence should have two strands set
at four and 10 inches from the
ground.
*Live-trap them and release
them somewhere else. Rabbits
are easily trapped if trap is par-
tially exposed. Apples and carrots
make good bait.
*Alter the habitat to discou-
rage rabbits and encourage pred-
ators such as owls and sparrow
hawks by setting up nest boxes.
*Mothballs tied to a piece o1
string with the string running
through a cup. The string is then
attached to a wire loop that holds


The Trojan Ambassadors are
the official hosts and hostesses of
the university. Through the Office
of Enrollment Services, they pro-
vide campus tours for prospective
students and visitors. Additional-
ly, the Ambassadors assist other
organizations, faculty members,
and administrators' campus func-
tions.
The Ambassadors, who serve
for a year, are chosen for qualifi-
cations which Include academic
achievement, social involvement,
appearance, poise and high de-
gree of enthusiasm for Troy State
University.


Department Store


" -


Groups add $1.00 per person
Age 12 & up pay additional deposit
Saturday, June 15
10-1 &2-4
Lunch Break 1-2


Port St. Joe
BARNARD PORTRAIT PROMOTION


7,


r 0 L Li..L)IIU U l L' 1.I


z. *.- -


.



We're Small Enough To Be


Big On Personal Service

We take pride in providing your family with
friendly, personal service.
Unlike many pharmacies, we take the time to
get to know you, review your medications for
interactions, and carefully explain your doctor'-
instructions.
5top in soon. We look forward
to meeting you.

CAMPBELL'S
DRUG STORE
Two Pharmacists and a Pharmacy e
Technician to serve you promptly.
Saveway Center Phone 227-1224


the mothballs off the ground. The
cup prevents the mothballs from
dissolving too quickly from rain.
*Hot sauce, one tablespoon,


and an anti-desiccant mix vapor-
guard, two tablespoons or wilt-
proof four tablespoons per gallon
of spray mix.


Courtney Lee Alonso and Timothy John Potthoff

To Wed
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie (Sandy) Nichols of Streator, Illinois, along
with Philip K. Alonso of Brandon, are proud to announce the en-
gagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Courtney
Lee Alonso to Timothy John Potthoff, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Potthoff of Peru, Illinois.
The couple will be united in marriage on July 20 at the Park
Presbyterian Church in Streator.
The bride-elect is a 1986 graduate of St. Amant High School in
Louisiana and now attends John Amicos School of Hair Design. Her
fiance is a 1982 graduate of LaSalle-Peru High School and is em-
ployed by LaSalle County.
The couple will be making their home in Peru.
^ '-" '


Biggs Has Poems Being

Taught In Universities

In 1990, Ralph Hammond of at the University of Alabama, Au-
Arab, Alabama, edited an anthol- burn, and several other state uni-
ogy of Alabama poets who are na- versities.
tives or who have lived there for Hundreds of libraries, as well
some time. '. as individuals, have purchased
Poems were selected for quab-.. the anthology.
. @ nd were published b y Liviyng- ,,; .. ".-K. ly hPe anthology was
ato,,State University press ,,Alabama's poet
T h''* poems nfrom' Marg^' book bpe- er y
Key Biggs' Pulitzer-Prize fi0ma t- Thepil u'recelved by Hath-
ed book, The Plumage of the Sun mond has been permanently
were included. placed at Livingston State Univer-
In the fall, Biggs was notified sity.
that her poetry was being taught Biggs lives in White City
where she heads Red Key Press
which publishes full-length books
Spiritual Warfare of contemporary authors. She has
Sn won hundreds of national and in-
Conference Slated international awards for her poetry.


Beach Baptist Chapel will be
holding their second annual Spir-
itual Warfare Conference June
16-19. Sunday services will be at
11:00 a.m. and6:30 p.m. ET, and
Monday through Wednesday at
7:14 p.m. Guest speaker for the
event will be Danny Daniels from
Park Avenue Baptist Church 1i
Titusville. Rev. Daniels will be
speaking on how to destroy the
roots and strongholds of sin.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend these uplifting services.
A nursery will be provided for
children birth through three
years of age.

Children's Program
Needs Volunteers
The Guardian Ad Litem
Program (a speak-up for children
program) needs volunteers who
want to work directly with
parents and children in troubled
families. For more information on
how you can make a difference in.
the life of a child, call 785-7409,
ext. 214.



Daddy's Gir(
Sitting on the sidewalk
paying in the dirt
with smudges on her elbows
and chocolate on her shirt.
'Eyes fixed on the highway,
her life is not so bad.
Just passing time in the sunshine
and waiting for her dad.
Wellalfflthe kids have their heroes
It's really nothing new.
from Wonder Woman, to Barbee,
S to Captain Kangaroo.
S But my hero is someone special
and is the same
My hero is a real man
and 'Daddy is his name.,
H-appy father's Day
'DCaddy '

Love, Carrie


Burke Receives
B.S. Degree
Troy State University held its
annual Spring Commencement
Exercises May 31 at Sartain Hall.
Dr. Aubrey Keith Lucas, Presi-
dent of the University of Southern
Mississippi, addressed the gradu-
ates. Alicia. Francinea Burke .of
Port St. Joe received a Bachelor
Degree.
Congratulations, Alicial


J. Patrickjs

Restaurant t
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po/ St..-oe\l lorid.

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Catering Services A/so Available


. .


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227-7428


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AT MOST LOCATIONS 229-6195


e


Alicia Burke Selected

As TSU Ambassador





r I -A~


THER STAR, PORT ST. JOB, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991


P G4 AA


' ,V U A


w-








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991 PAGE 5A


SHome Health Care Programs Provide In-Home Care


* -an effort to reduce the cost
of medical care, these days, medi-
cal insurance and government
health care agencies limit the
number of days. a person can re-
ceive remuneration for hospital
expenses.
This means patients are go-
ing home earlier after a hospital
stay and are not as fully recov-
ered as they once were after such
a period of time spent in a hospi-
tal. In many cases, the patient
still needs specialized care, medi-
cation, shots, physical, breathing
and speech therapy, and skilled


nursing care.
The Home Health Care pro-
gram takes up the slack in medi-
cal care for recovering patients.
Here in Gulf and franklin
Counties, the Home Health Care
is operated out of Gulf Pines Hos-
pital.
Carol Hudson, director of the
local Home Health Care service,
described some of the services
and the manner of operation of
her particular medical service to
the Rotary Club at their regular
meeting last Thursday.


CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM

Speech In Kids

[ Usually Begins

|at 12-15 mo.
By,
,,-, .: Elizabeth C. Jones, M.D.

Communication through speech is one of the most important
accomplishments parents can teach children. It begins with baby
talk and progresses to complete verbal expressions.
When a baby first begins to coo and make noises, parents will
hold the baby and make noises back. The baby will look at the par-
ent's face and notice facial expressions and muscle movements.
Soon the random Ma-ma and Da-da become Mama and Daddy.
Nursery rhymes and songs have a place in early speech devel-
opment. The informal and exploratory noises and sounds involved
with these everyday occurrences are very helpful.
The ages will vary somewhat, but in general, babies begin form-
ing words at 12-15 months and have several words in their vocabu-
laries by 18 months. Most are 18 months to two years old before
they begin putting words together.
Infantile speech is often noticed in the two. three, and even four
year .old child. He is speaking, but only his parents or someone
closely associated with the family can understand what he is say-
ing. If a four year old child can not be understood by his playmates,
he needs to see a speech therapist prior to beginning'kindergarten.
If left alone, the other children will ridicule him and make him un-
happy. Speech therapists have very good results with this problem
and it is worth the effort and money involved.
Parents of older children should encourage self expression at
home. Do not let one child monopolize the conversation time. Insist
that each child have a fair share of the time for discussion. Practice
may not make perfect, but does make speaking much easier.
Encourage children to speak in a group and before a group.
Start with little things. Coax a shy child to speak by asking simple,
easy to answer questions. Give praise for efforts and accomplish-
ments.
Some young .children are very shy about self expression, but
can be encouraged to give voice and expression in puppet play.
Older children often can speak for a character in a play with
more ease than if they are speaking for themselves. Role playing
helps a lot in self expression.
-4


Wins Science Award
Charles Osborne, Science Department Chairman, is shown pre-
senting Paula Pendaris the Al Hargraves Memorial Science Award
in recognition of scholastic achievement in the field of science for the
School year 1990-91. Miss Pendarvis is seeking a career in environ.
mental science.
Good luck to you on your future plans.



Open
Tuesday thru Thursday 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 8 a.m. 9 p.m.
- Sunday1to 8 p.m.

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' new, washed, boxed oysters.
Same familiar- flavor inside
but new clean outside.
40 Ilb. Washed Box
$25.000.-,.
Call 227-1670

to reserve yburs today!

INDIAN PASS-

RAW BAR
(ON C-30 SOUTH OF PORT ST. JOE)


Hudson said that people of all
ages are eligible for Home Health
Care. "I had a patient, recently,
who was only three months old,
but needed skilled health care on


Great
Buy

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Save $200


a daily basis," she said. The agen-
cy provides its services to people
on Medicare/Medicaid for what
the two medical providers pay.
"We accept private pay patients,


Backyard Bible Study

Classes Set June 17-24


White City and Howard Creek
Baptist Churches will have a
backyard Bible study the week of
June 17-21. Terry Richey and a
group from Baldwin, Mississippi,
will be conducting the classes for
children and youth from grades
one through six. In White City,
grades one through three will
meet at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Graham, and grades four
through six will meet at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Bill Antley. At Ho-
ward Creek, all from grades one
through six will meet at the
church. Pastors William Smith
and Otis Manning invite all chil-
dren and youth to come and take
part in these activities. Also, the
youth group will be conducting
worship services in both church-
es on Sunday, June 16.
On Friday night, June 21, at
7:00 p.m., the team will have a

CARE Meets
June 13
The Chemical Addictions
Recovery Effort, Inc. (CARE) will
be having its monthly meeting on
Thursday, June 13 at 6:00 p.m.
CT, at the Regency Professional
Center, 4000 East Third Street,
Springfield.
CARE is a non-profit organi-
zation that is licensed by the
State of Florida's Health and
Rehabilitative Services. CARE
provides alcohol and drug servic-
es to Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes,
Jackson, and Washington
counties. If you would like addi-
tional information, please call
872-7676.


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lif


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Limited


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Area's

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also," Hudson said.
I The HHC staff of eight trained
professionals provides such medi-
cal services as dressings, injec-
tions, special medications, respir-
atory care, skilled nursing service
and a variety of therapy proce-
dures. The service is available
only for those who are home-
bound by their physical ailments.
Hudson said persons needing
their service have only to call
them at Gulf Pines Hospital or
have their doctor recommend
them.
Guests of the club were Rich-
ard Carrol of Lakeland and
George Whiting of Port St. Joe.


Happy Birthday
Jone
With love from,
Pop, Mom, Ann
& Albert


service at White City Baptist. All
youth, children and adults are in-
vited to comer making this a great
time of praise to God.

'Terrific Tuesdays"
At Long Avenue
Long Avenue Baptist Church
invites children grades one
through seven (grade entering
this fall) to 'Terrific Tuesdays"
(June 18, 25, July 2, 9, and 16).
the camp begins at 9 a.m. an
concludes at -4:00 p.m. Cost is
$3.00 per child June 18, 25 and
July 2 and $6.00 per child July 9
and 16. There will be Bible study,
crafts, recreation, and a different
outing each week. Outings in-
clude: pool party, bowling, "Mu-
seum of the Man by the Sea",
Gulf World, and Wakulla Springs.
Children are asked to bring a
sack lunch and drink each week.
Medical release forms will be
available at registration and
must be filled out by a parent
before a child can attend "Ter-
rific Tuesday." If you have ques-
tions, call Keith Pate, Minister of
Children, at 229-8691.

Parent Awareness
Group Meets Tues.
The Parent Awareness Group
of Gulf County will meet on Tues-
day, June 18, at 7:00 p.m. in the
County Commission meeting
room at the Gulf County Court-
house. All interested persons are
encouraged to attend.


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525 Harrison Ave.
-.anama City
785-6151


209-211 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
227-1277


*Heating & Air
*Major
Appliance
Repair

Electrical Work

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BY

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NAIL TECHNICIAN




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6450 W. Hwy. 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32456 904-647-5656


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Buy with trust from Danley's.


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Convenient Credit Terms!


_


II


1








PAGE 6A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13. 1991


Marketing In
Newspapers
Seminar Slated
The Florida State University
Small Business Development
Center and Gulf Coast Communi-
ty College. Lifelong Learning Cen-
ter are cosponsoring a free semi-
nar, "Marketing Your Business in
Newspapers", on Wednesday,
June 19, from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. CT. The seminar will be held
at the FSU, Panama City Cam-
pus, Room 7.
The guest speaker will dis-


cuss newspaper advertising for
the small business owner. Is this
type of marketing -ight for your
business? Attend tIl s seminar to
find out!
There is no charge for the
seminar, but preregistration is re-
quired by calling FSU-SBDC at
(904) 872-4655. Seating is limited
so make your reservation today.

Quarles Have Visitors
Tyler Jean Smith and boys
from Rhode Island are visiting
with their relatives, the Quarles,
at their beach cottage at Cape
San Blas.


Working on

Salinas Park

Construction on Salinas
Park, adjoining the Gulf of
Mexico, at the intersection of
C-30 and the road to St. Jo-
seph Peninsula State Park, is
slightly more than half fin-
ished, according to Rawlis Les-
lie, spokesman for L&W Con-
struction Company, which has
the prime contract for the pro-
ject.
The park, funded by a
state grant, is costing in the
neighborhood of $175,000.
When it is completed, it will be
a seaside park offering picnic,
bathing, bathhouse, and hik-
ing facilities.
The scenes shown here are
of some of the facilities being
placed on the 40-acre site.


St. Patrick's Seafood


405 Woodward Ave.


Port St. Joe


Phone 229-8070
Open 7 Days A Week
Monday -Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET
Sunday 12 noon to 6 p.m. ET


Shrimp
Jumbo.............. $5.25 lb.
Large...................3.99 lb.
Medium...............2.99 lb.
Fish
Mullet (cleaned) .....89 Ilb.
Mullet.(uncleaned).. 694 lb.
Grouper Filets .....$5.99 lb.
Red Snapper Filets 5.50 lb.
Trout ...................1.99 lb.


Oysters
Pint........................ $5.50
60 lb. bag ..............26.00
30 lb. 1/2 bag......... 13.00
Misc. Seafood
Scallops........... 4.99 pint
Snow Crab Legs.... 4.99 lb.
Bulldoziers ......... 4.99 lb.
Live Crabs........ 3.99 doz.


We also have Blue Crab Meat!


IXSRA--


All Forms or Insurance
* Homeowners Auto Flood
*Business Packages -Group *Life *Boat
*Hospitalization *Mobile Homes

COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY


nouu 5,asfr'aM
~SrrUr'TI~tAGSN
5', ~


Inc.
322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


Bible Study Worship
10 a.m. Sunday 11 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday

COME HOME
Forbid the curse that darkens our way
That we can never go home again;
For our Father's love beckons us back,
If we repent and turn away from sin.
But the Devil delights in digging our ditch
Darker and deeper to our soul's despair.
He damns and denies God's mercy and grace
...And we doubt we have even a prayer.
Pray, dear soul, don't stay away,
Fearing you have strayed too far;
Tis the blood of Jesus that calls you home -
Only He can heal sin's shameful scar.
Friend, If the way back for you is blocked,
Blame it not on God's doing nor design;
Only the Deceiver and your hardened heart
Could such a gracious invitation decline.
What comfort to know He is always there,
Patiently awaiting our soul's return.
0, how He wants to welcome you home -
Such love! Too pure, too deep to discern.
"...BUT WHEN HE WAS YET A GREAT WAY OFF, HIS
FATHER SAW HIM AND HAD COMPASSION, AND
RAN AND FELL ON HIS NECK AND KISSED HIM...
'FOR THIS MY SON WAS DEAD -AND IS ALIVE
AGAIN; HE WAS LOST AND IS FOUND."
Luke 15:20-2
-Bob Wickline

Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.
-j


Card of Thanks
We would like to thank all the
people of Gulf County for their
prayers, visits, phone calls, flow-
ers. cards and many other ex-
pressions of love shown while I
was in the hospital, and at home.
Again, I say thanks from the bot-
tom of my heart. My prayer is
that God will richly bless all of
you.
Thanks,
Phyllis & Marquita Thompkins
Bessie & Michelle Willis








(USA)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP... 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL ........ 11 a.m.
Nursery Available
SERMON:
Fathers' and Grandfathers' Role
In the Christian Family
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden,
Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756


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'he Star

PUBLISHING COMPANY
OFFICE SUPPLY STORE
304-308 Williams Avenue
Phone 227-1278
FAX: 227-7212


UP TO 79% OFFTHESE QUALITY MTS
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TH STAR. PORT ST JO.F HRDY UE1.19 AE7


-Ftr Citimzens of Port St.jJo
Th pcursoftes hidrnweetae rchtyfo pbictoni TeStr


Belin From Page 1


executive committee of St. Joe Land and Devel-
opment Co., and president and director of St.
Joe Communications Co., St. Joseph Telephone
and Telegraph Co., and the Apalachicola North-
ern Railroad Co.
He also will continue as chairman of Gulf
and Florala Telephone companies and as a di-
rector of St. Joe Industries and Florida East
Coast Industries. -
During his tenure with St. Joe, Belin was
instrumental in building and acquiring many of
the company's assets, including all its contain-
er plants and many of its timberlands and de-
velopment properties.


Belin has been considering this move for
the past year. Six months ago he told his direc-
tors privately that he preferred to step down.
His decision to give up some duties marks a
major turning point for St. Joe. Since the com-
pany's founding 55 years ago its management
has reflected the personal philosophies and
styles of Belin and founders Alfred I. duPont
and Edward Ball.
Belin will continue as president of The Nem-
ors Foundation and The Alfred I. duPont Foun-
dation as well as a trustee of The Alfred I. du-
Pont Testamentary Trust. The duPont trust is
St. Joe's largest shareholder.


B.J., 4 1/2, and Justin Heath,
sons of Brent and Rhonda Pierce of
Howard Creek


S


0 4'1


Michele, 5, daughter of Donald
and Donna Keith, Jr. of Port St. Joe


Georgette, 14, and Georgina,
11, daughters of Billy and Marsha
Bouzemann of Highland View




I ^*

I


.....'. .',


Charla, 3, daughter of Charles
and Holly Atkins of White City




'. ,.


Amy, 4, daughter of Gary
4-.11 q .... -4- .PDf + C+- TA


z.it basflVL U). U). Utt U ..euc


- Correctional Officer Course


and Slated to Begin Here July 16


A correctional officer basic
standards, course is scheduled to
begin Tuesday, July 16 in Port St.
Joe. This 450 hour course pro-
vides entry level certification into
the fastest growing public service
career field for the 1990's. Start-'


ing salaries are in the $17,000 to
$20,000 per year range plus a
good benefits package. Chances
for promotion are excellent.
The class will meet Monday
through Thursday from 6 to 10


Learn How to Sell to


Government Agencies


Natalie, 6, and Travis, 4, chil-
dren of Travis and Lynn Burge of
Port St. Joe






4 '


Lt


Stephen, 5, and Rodney, 2, sons Shamirah, 2, granddaughter of
of Craig and Suzanne Besore of Phillip and Lola King of Port St.
Port St. Joe Joe


4. t


Ashley, 5, and Eckley, 3 mo.,
children of Eckley and Dona Sander
of Mexico Beach


The Florida State University
Small Business Development
Center, Gulf Coast Community
College Lifelong Learning Center
and the Department of Defense
Contracts Administration, Region
Atlanta, are cosponsoring a free
seminar, "Selling To The Govern-
ment", on Thursday, June 20,
from 6:30 9:30 p.m. CT. The
seminar will be held at the FSU,
Panama City Campus, in Room 7.
If you are a small business
owner who is interested in selling
your products or services to state
or federal government agencies,
attend this seminar to learn how.
There is no charge for the
seminar, but preregistration is re-
quired by calling the FSU-SBDC

From Indian Pass
to Mexico Beach
and Port St. Joe to
Wewahitchka, The
Star is your news
center.


at (904) 872-4655. Seating is lim-
ited, so make your reservation to-
day!


p.m. The curriculum includes a
wide range of topics including
law, psychology, correctional op-
erations, firearms, defensive tech-
niques, and first aid. Individuals
who enroll in these classes start-
ing in July will avoid having to
pay the new increased tuition and
fees which are effective August,
1991. Financial aid may be avail-
able for these classes.
To take the first step toward
an exciting new career, call Gulf
Coast Community College at 872-
3878 or contact their new office
in the Port St. Joe Police Station
at 229-2760, Monday through
Thursday from 1 to 5 p.m. ET.


FPC Warns of Possible

Summer Energy Shortages
Over the next several weeks, Florida Power Corporation's cus-
tomers will be receiving special notices in their electric bills warning
about potential energy shortages in Florida this summer.
"Over the next 12 months, we expect over 278,000 people to
make Florida their new home," the notice reads. "As our growth
mushrooms, we face more traffic on our roads, and less water and
energy to go around during periods of peak demand."
Florida Power is urging customers to remember that if a long
hot spell hits the state and a major power plant must come off line
for whatever reason, shortages, or even blackouts, could occur.
'This is a statewide problem, not just a Florida Power problem,"
explained Rick Janka, manager of Florida Power's Public Informa-
tion Department.
"Naturally, we hope to give our customers as much warning as
possible but situations could develop where blackouts become nec-
essary without the opportunity to issue a warning," he said.
The best time of day to conserve energy during the summer is
between 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.


Here's


To The


Spirit


of


1991


Project Graduation 1991 and the Senior Class of Port St. Joe High School would like to thank I
all who participated in making Project Graduation a success. Please convey your appreciation of the listed
contributors by acknowledging and utilizing the services and/or products of the following:


$250 Scholarship Contributors
Alvarez, Lehman & Associates
Beard Equipment Company
Chamber of Commerce
City of Port St. Joe
Deloitte & Touche, CPA
Four Way Electric
Gulf County Commission
Gulf County School Board
Gulf Pines Auxiliary
I-C Contractors, Inc.
Melvin E. Lehman
Liebtag, Robinson & Wingfield, Inc.
Williams Environmental Services


Project Graduation Contributors
Aline Abrams' Coiffures
Allemore Real Estate Inc.
Amazing Grace Apostolic Church
Apalachicola Northern Railroad Co.
Badcock Furniture
Barrier Dunes
Basic Magnesia
Beach Baptist Church
Beach Lumber & Supply
Bennettons
Boyer Signs George Boyer
9 Buffalo Rock Company
Butler's Restaurant
C&C Tack & Supply
Campbells Drug Store
Cape San Blas Realty, Inc.
Chipola Beauty Company
Christian Fellowship Church
Captain Jack's
\ Carlyle Jewelry
Champs
C- hurch of God
Citizens Federal
Savings Bank
city of Port St. Joe
City Workers
Comforter Funeral Home
Costin's Dept. Store
Costin's Insurance


C.R. Smith & Son
Dixie Dandy
Driesbach Cleaners
Earnest All-Sports
F&D Silk Flowers
Faith Bible Church
Family Bookstore, Mall :
First Baptist Church Mexico Beach
First Baptist Church
First Church of the Nazarene
First Pentecostal Holiness Church
Rrst Union Bank
Florida Power Corporation
Flower's Baking Company
Friendly Fower Shop
Gayfers
Gilmore Funeral Home
Golden Jewelers
Great American Cookie Company
Gulf Coast Community College
Gulf County Commission
Gulf County School Board
Gulf County Sheriff's Department
Gulf County Trustees
Gulf Pines Hospital, Inc.
Gulf Sands Restaurant
Gyro Wrap
Henderson's
Highland View Assembly of God
Howard Creek Baptist Church
Indian Pass Raw Bar
Indian Pass Seafood
Island 106 Radio
J. Patrick's Restaurant
Jan's Beauty Shop
Johnson's Lumber
Jolly Roger's Pizza
J-Marts
Kinney's Shoes
Lance Company
Lighthouse Utilities
Linda's Restaurant
Little Caesars of Parker
Long Avenue Baptist Church
Material Transfer
Miller Agency


Morrison's Cafeteria
Mount Carmel Baptist Church
New Bethel A.M.E. Church
New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
Old Saltworks Cabins
Oxford Street
Petal Shoppe
Pic's Food Store
Piggly Wiggly
Police Department -
Port St. Joe Lions Club
Professional Windows
P.J.'s Roofing, Inc.
Rich's I.G.A.
Rish and Gibson
Rob & Peter's Convenience Store
Rooster's Fried Chicken
Rosasco Realty
Rotary Club
Ryan's Steak House
Sally's Beauty Supply
Sand Dollar Pizza
Saveway Food Store
Sears, Panama City Mall
Sears, Port St. Joe
Showtime Video"
Sing Food Store
STAC House
St. Joe Auto Parts NAPA
St. Joe Bar
St: Joe Communications
St. Joe Container Co.
St. Joe Forest Products
St. Joe Hardware Company
St. Joe Machine & Fab., Inc.
St. Joe Motel Restaurant
St. Joe Natural Gas
St. Joe Papermakers C.U.
St. Joe Serenity Group
St. Joe Service Company
St. Joseph Telephone
Sub Shop
Sure Shot Pest Control
The Athletic House
The Fashion Connection
The Potpourri club


The Sports Connection
The Star
The Video Merchant
Trawick Construction
Treasures By The Sea
Turtles Tapes & Records
Tyndall Federal Credit Union
Wal-Mart, 23rd Street
Western Auto Dave May
Wewahitchka State Bank
WJHG T.V.
WMTO Radio
Zion Fair Baptist Church
Margaret Adams
Mary Ellen Allyn
Susie Ambrose
Andy Anderson
Tim Ard
Alma Baggett
Larry Bateman
Ronnie Bishop
Mary Linda Butts
Rex Buzzett
James D. Campbell, D.D.S.
Roy Carter
Darrell Chitty
Marvin Clenney
Kesley Colbert
Jimmy Cox
Deborah Crosby
Corine Daniel
Edbert Doolittle
Dora Mae Dykes
Charles Everett
Alden Farris
J. Patrick Floyd, Atty.
The Gamby Man
Paul Gant
Dennis Geoghagan
Lisa Given
Edith Godfrey
Frank Griffin
Sonny Hardy
Supt. Frank Healy
J. Wayne Hendrix, M.D.
Greg Johnson


Mr. and Mrs. Talmadge Kennedy
Robert King, DDS
Tamara Laine
Bunny Langridge
Terri Lyles
Alice Machen
Sara Maddox
Frank D. May, D.M.D.
Supt. Larry McArdle
Mike McDonald
John Miller
Lt. Wayne Miller, FHP
Robert M. Moore, Atty.
Ken Murphy
Tim Nelson, D.V.M.
Almeta Nickson
Teedy Nobles
The Rev. J.C. Odum
Owen D. Oksanen, M.D.
Parents Who Worked
Ralph Rish
J.C. Roberts
William 0. Sain, D.M.D.
Jorge J. San Pedro, M.D.
Al "Buckwheat" Scheffer
Bev Sherman Dollar General
Selma Shoemaker
Jimmy Sims
C.R. Smith
Higdon Swatts
James Tankersley
Gary Tantleff
Debbie Taylor
Eda Ruth Taylor
Eric Teat
Dan Troy
Edna Tunnock
Sara Turner
Martha Weimorts
Greg Weston
Ted White
Kenny Wood
Barry Zweig
We apologize for any name inadvertently
omitted.


1


I W- MEM91 1 11 1I- --


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOB. FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991


PAGE 7A


nr








THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. JUNE 13, 1991


Ghost Fishing Continues


to Haunt Marine Life


heads of her children strung
about her neck and shoulders.
We lack space to do more
than introduce this topic to your
thinking. So I will close with one
reminder, God had given no one
the authority to change the
meaning of scripture texts. So
whatever your bias is, be sure it
is supported by the word of God.


t streets after weeks of heavy rainfall. In the
Patching Potholes photo above, they are shown on Long Ave-
nue working on a man-sized pothole. Yester-
day, the city authorities inspected and
Port St. Joe's premiere pothole patching tried out a newly developed pothole patch-
crew took to the streets this past week to er, which is supposed to do a more lasting
do war with the many trenches in the city job than present methods.



Changing Texts Common Today


God has given no one the au-
thority to change the meaning of
scripture texts. Yet that appears
to be a common practice.
I do not mean that we cannot
translate scripture into new lan-
guages. Nor do I mean that we
shouldn't correct errors in former
translations. These are ways of
transmitting the meaning of
scripture to each generation.
Clearly God has blessed these ef-
forts.
I am getting at a different
problem. One that is perennial.
The problem we are considering
comes out of human pride and a
desire to maintain or create new
traditions.
An example of this is the cur-
rent effort of a vocal minority
known as the radical, militant
feminists. Their efforts to change
the way Christians think are a
mixed bag.
They have raised our con-
sciousness of the sociological bias
against women. This has rightful-
ly opened <&e:door of opportunity
or half the population. And it has
gone a long way to reduce dis-
crimination and sexual harass-
ment.
Unfortunately there is no no-
ticeable change in the exploita-
tion of women in entertainment.
Choreographers, and producers
of music videos, movies, and TV
programs still graphically portray
women as objects. And we all
know what their efforts have done
for the unborn. Yet a willing pub-
lic still clamors for more violence
and sex.
The most serious falling of
this movement is the growing


Mary Thompson
Mary Pearse Thompson, 53,
of Humboldt, Tennessee, passed
away June 8 in Jackson, Tennes-
see. She was born in Shamrock-
and moved from Florida to Ten- :
nessee in 1967. She had lived in'
Humboldt for the past four years.
She belonged to the Central Ave-
nue Christian Church where she
served as a Deaconess and a
Sunday School teacher. She was
also president of the Christian
Women's Fellowship and Chair-
man of the Christian Ed. Commit-
tee. She was a former resident of
Port St. Joe.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Frank N. Thompson of
Humboldt; two sons, Bobby
Thompson and Mark Thompson,
both of Humboldt; one daughter,
Katherine Thompson of Hum-
boldt; and one brother, John
Banks Harris Jr. of Ocatillo, Cali-
fornia.
Funeral services were held
Monday at Central Avenue Chris-
tian Church with interment in
Rose Hill Cemetery in Humboldt.


Nick Mosconis
Nick Carrin Mosconis, 40, of
Apalachicola, died Friday momrn-
ing, June 7; in Apalachicola.
Nickie was a lifelong resident of
Apalachicola, and had been a cor-
rections officer with the Franklin
County Sheriffs Department for
more than 11 years. He was a
member of Apalachicola Lodge
F&AM No. 76, the Scottish Rite
Bodies and Trinity Episcopal
Church.
Survivors are his sisters,
Mary Helen Renfo of Port St. Joe,
and Astasia Amtsburg of Red-
ding, California.
Funeral services .were held
Monday at Trinity Episcopal
Church. Interment followed in
Magnolia Cemetery with Masonic
rites.


success the movement is having
at importing a female deity into
Christianity. Bette Midler's Moth-
er Earth is coming alive in new
Bible translations and in the ex-
perimental liturgies and the trial
prayers of several denominations.
A careful look at the titles in
Christian book stores will show
that the popular writers are pick-
ing up on this trendy theology.
This is especially pronounced in
children's literature.
But before we. rewrite God's
word to satisfy our own pride and
indignation, perhaps we should
consider the fact that every world
religion which has a female deity -
also has a theology which accom-
plishes what we are seeing done
in society today.
The female deities demand
loyalty and special privileges. But
they- also promote moral -license.;
and violence. For instance, ,the
Hindu Mother Earth is depicted
in grotesque statue form with the

Stroke Club
The 'Stroke Club of Bay
County will hold their next regu-
larly scheduled meeting Thurs-
day, June 13 at Bay Medical Cen-
ter's office building, classroom #1
at 4:30 p.m. CT.
Stroke survivors, family,
friends and all interested profes-
sionals are welcome. For further
information contact the American-
Heart Association at 769-3070.


We Want You To Be
SPart of the Friendly Place:
BIBLE STUDY 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ...........7:00 p.m.
MORNING TRAINING............:..... 11:00 am. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ...................5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor
KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children -



V = A


I
I
U
U
I


I
I


Ghost fishing? Do we have
ghost fish in St. Joseph Bay?
Ghost fishing is the ability of lost
or discarded fishing equipment to
continue to catch 'fish or other
marine organisms. Marine ani-
mals can become entangled in a
gill net, cast net, chicken wire,
chain link fence, or a monoflla-
ment line that is discarded in the
bay.
Last week a local resident
found and reported a marine en-
tanglement behind his house on
St. Joseph Bay. He was taking a
stroll along the bay during low
tide and found an eight inch ter-
rapin struggling to free itself. Her
hind legs were twisted in a net,
that had hung on a snag, along
the mud flats of the bay. He freed
the small female Ornate Dia-
mondback Terrapin from her
bonds. She was carried to Dr.
Tim Nelson DDV, who rendered
prompt medical treatment. She
was then cared for and placed
under medical observation. Her
distended hind leg wounds were
unable to heal and she died the
next day.
Life is a daily struggle for
both man and beast. The Ornate
Diamondback Terrapin suc-
cumbed to a very painful death
due to the careless neglect of
some individual who allowed their
net to ghost fish.
There are seven subspecies of
the diamondback terrapins rang-
ing from coastal Maine to Mexico.
The northwest Florida Coastal
salt marsh estuaries are the
homes for the Ornate Diamond-


Lodge 111 to Meet
Port St. Joe Lodge No. 111
will meet for a DDGM official visit
on Thursday, June 20. Dinner
will be served. All master masons
are cordially invited to this stated
communication.


0131TUAR~ g IES


Omie White
Omie White, 82, of Highland
View, passed away suddenly
Tuesday evening, June 4 at her
home. She Vas a long time resi-
dent of Highland View and was a
member of the Highland View As-
sembly of God Church.
She is survived by a son, Bar-
ney Blackmon (Voniciel) of Pana-
cea; three daughters, Vera Mae
Hudson (John) of Panacea, Ber-
nice Whitfleld and Shirley Wil-
liams (Elzie) of Port St. Joe; a
daughter-in-law, Marian Black-
mon of Sopchoppy; two sisters,
Finny Raiford of Port St. Joe and
Cola Tullis of Jones Homestead;
18 grandchildren, 31 great grand-
children, and three great-great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
June 7 at the Highland View As-
sembly of God Church with Rev.
Jean Shoots officiating, Burial
was in the family plot at Panacea
Community Cemetery in Panacea.
All services were under the direc-
tion of Gilmore Funeral Home.

Garland Dunlap
Garland Britt Dunlap, 69, of
Jakir, Georgia, died Monday
night, June 10. He was a native
of Randolph County, Alabama
and was employed by Shingler
Motor Company as an auto sales-
man until health forced his retire-
ment. He was a veteran of World'
War II.
He is survived by his wife,
Mabel Murphy Dunlap of Jakin;
one son, Britt Dunlap of Jakin;
two daughters, Judy Browning of
LaGrange, Georgia, and Shaleen
Smith of Port St. Joe; one broth-
er, Lynn Dunlap of Cuthbert,
Georgia; eight grandchildren, sev-
en great grandchildren; several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday at Jakin Free Will
Baptist Church with interment
following in the church cemetery.
Evans-Skipper Funeral Home
of Donalsonville was in charge of
arrangements.


COW OPEN


I.
7
i
i


COPET YEEAM
U ~l~ ______________ ___Q ________ I


Bay Eye & Surgical Center

A 1600 JenksAve., Panama City
CALL "FOR APPOINTMENT-
1-800-227-5704


Catfish Ponds

at
INDIAN SWAMP

CAMPGROUND


Doc Whitfield Road
227-7261


Howard Creek


back Terrapins. During the terra-
pins' entire life cycle, they never
leave the bay area. The females
nest from April through June on
the white sandy beaches of the
bay. She lays a clutch of four to
seven eggs. More than one clutch
may be laid each season. The ob-
long to elliptical pinkish-white
bumpy appearing eggs, are de-
posited in a flaskshaped to trian-
gular nest. The mature female,
six years or older, lays her eggs
on the. inner beaches and shores


of the bay. The eggs incubate for
a period of 90 days.
Both the male and female ter-
rapin crawl on exposed mud flats
to feed and bask in the sun. They.
feed on fiddler crabs, marine
worms, mosquito larvae, and de-
tritus along the mud flats.
Very little is known about
these salt marsh terrapins. In
fact, unless one is actively fishing
or studying the bay, they would
never know that they exist in St.
. Joseph Bay.


This female Ornate Diamondback Terrapin was the unfortunate
catch of a ghost fisherman.


"-IE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Flordia Church Phone 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellow-
ship "A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune in Every Sunday at 8:45 a.m.
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade



You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James' Episcopal Church
309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe
eplISCOpaL
|> -- -SERVICES-
Each Sunday.. ...............7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School,.................................9:45 a.m.
The REV. JERRY R. HUFT, Pastor



"The Exciting Place to Worship"


S f First Baptist Church
102 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Florida
HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
,s JAMES ENFINGER, Music/Youth
J'*


CaItch hie StIrit
4. TNF UNritEo NEmioDis1'CHURcH


Constitutionand Monument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School ........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday................ 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ......... 5:30 p.m. Thursday 7:30 p.m.
REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director
k- *


SSears Catalog Sales '

Is Now Authorized to


MEET or BEAT

ANY

Competitors'

Advertised Prices



ears CATALOG

Sears SALES
410 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
& Phone 227-1151 A


Toward Understanding
Rev. Jerry Huft, Rector St. James and St. John's Churches


Ii .IeedarelsAssin e AM .


0. LeeMullis, M.D.*
,Lee


_____ __ ___ ______ ____ ___ ___ __ ______


PACUI 5


0


3rj IU I V ~ 3


k*


PAnGr RA


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I










THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991


" H atchet........... from Page 1


son, that you were dissatisfied
with my move," Cersosimo said.
'The first I knew of it was when I
read it in the paper. That hurt,
and I was mad about it when I
wrote the letter."
Cersosimo will continue in
his position, with the blessings of
four of the County Commission,
but with the acknowledged objec-
tions of the Chairman.
SPACEPORT MEETING
Administrative Assistant, Lar-
ry Wells, advised the Board that
the Spaceport Florida wants to
meet in Port St. Joe on July 2.
'They want to use your meet-
ing room on that date, to meet
with you and other Gulf County
officials to discuss coming events
at the Cape San Blas launch
site," Wells said.
Cape San Bias has been
named the official site of the Flor-
ida Spaceport commercial ven-
tures. The Spaceport Commission
met here in Port St Joe last year
to designate the San Blas facility
as their commercial launch site
for sub-orbital space probes.
The first launch from the site
has been tentatively scheduled
for late July or early August, as
soon as state permits can be for-
mally approved.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters,
the Board:
-Agreed to advertise for pur-
chase of a tire cutter, to dispose
* of all used tires in the county in a
manner approved by the Depart-
ment of Environmental Regula-
tion. The City of Port St Joe and
an un-named private individual
will contribute toward the cost of
the cutter.
-Were notified that grant
money for application toward the
White City water system should
be transferred to the county with-
in the next two to three weeks.


Murphy Completes
Course with Honors
Navy Seaman Michael R.
Murphy, son of Joy L. Blanton of
Wewahitchka, recently completed
the Electronic Warfare Technician
Operators course with honors.
During the course, conducted
at Naval Technical Training Cen-
ter Corry Station, Pensacola.
Murphy was instructed in ship-
board mission"- preparation,
a watchstanding procedures, and
operator equipment techniques.
He is a 1990 graduate of We-
wahitchka High School.

Freemap Returns
from Middle East
Navy Seaman Recruit Brian
E. Freeman, son of Virginia C.
Walters of Wewahitchka, recently
returned from deployment to the
Middle East in support of Opera-
tion Desert Storm while serving
aboard the aircraft carrier USS
America, homeported in Norfolk,
Virginia.
Operation Desert Storm was
the largest deployment of U.S.
military forces since Vietnam. The
operation was in response to
Iraq's invasion of Kuwait and
threat to Saudi Arabia.
He joined the Navy in June
1990.


Men's Basketball
Tourney in Wewa
A City League Men's Basket-
ball Tournament is scheduled for
Saturday, June 15 at Wewahitch-
ka High School gym.
Teams participating will be
Tyndall Air Force Base, Apalachi-
cola, Wewahitchka, Tallahassee,
Port St. Joe and Panama City.
The tournament begins at 12
noon ET. The public is cordially
invited to attend. For more infor-
mation, contact Amy Shackleford
229-8515 or Leonard Freeman
639-5265.


He may be over the hill
But he still pays the
bills
Dad's still sexy at sixty.
Happy Birthday!!
Love, B&B


-Accepted bids on purchase
or leasing two dump trucks and
several bids on construction of a
building to store recycled materi-
al in for pick-up. The bids will be


studied before a decision is made
on which vendor will receive the
award.
-Named Charles Arthur Ga-
skin of Wewahitchka, to design


work for renovation of the old
courthouse and retained Mike
Tucker of Blountstown as the
county's auditing firm.


Commodities to be Distributed


to Recipients on June 18 and 20


U.S.D.A. commodities will be
distributed in Gulf County on
June 18th and 20th to those who
are eligible. Recipients will receive
two (2) months' commodities on
these dates, therefore, it is very
important that everyone bring a
bag or box.
Distribution will take place in
Port St. Joe at the Gulf County
Senior Citizens Building on Tues-
day, June 18th from 1:00 until
3:00 p.m. ET. Distribution in We-
wahitchka will take place at the
Wewahitchka Senior Citizens


Peterson's Rep
In Gulf County
Congressman Pete Peterson's
office has announced the follow-
ing schedule of visitation by his
district representative for the Gulf
County area.
He will be in Wewahitchka on
Thursday, June 20 from 8:30 un-
til 11:30 at the City Commission
meeting room.
He will then be at the Gulf
County Courthouse, County
Commissioner's meeting room,
from 1:00 until 4:30 p.m.
The public is encouraged to
attend and bring their concerns
to him.


Kimble Returns
From Mid-East
Marine Lance Cpl. Gabriel M.
Kimble, son of Charlie F. and
Mary A. Kimble of 287 Ave. E,
Port St. Joe, recently returned
from deployment to the Middle
East in support of Operation
Desert Storm while serving with
Brigade Service Support Group-4,
2nd Force Service Support
Group, Camp Lejeune, North Car-
olina.
Operation Desert Storm was
the largest deployment of U.S.
military forces since Vietnam. The
operation was in response to
Iraq's invasion of Kuwait and
threat to Saudi Arabia.
A 1988 graduate of Port St.
Joe High School, he joined the
Marine Corps in August 1988.


Center from 12:00 until 2:00 p.m.
CT, Thursday, June 20th.
Recipients must have a cur-
rent commodity card to receive
their commodities. There will be
no registration at the distribution
centers. If anyone is uncertain of
their eligibility, they should call
227-1735 or come by the Com-
modity Office in the Gulf County
Courthouse prior to these dates.
Wewahitchka residents may come
to the Old Courthouse on
Wednesday, June 19th from 2:00
to 5:00 p.m. CT, to certify for
commodities. To certify or re-
certify, you will need to bring
proof of income or food stamp pa-
pers.
"Acceptance and participa-

Vacation
Bible School
at 1st Baptist
The First Baptist Church of
Port St. Joe will be conducting
Vacation Bible School next week,
June 17-21 from 8:30 to 11:30
a.m. each morning, Monday
through Friday, with commence-
ment exercises Friday evening at
7:00 p.m. According to Jan No-
bles, Bible School Director, the
morning classes will feature Bible
study, crafts and games for three
year olds through sixth graders.
The church bus will make
scheduled stops on Monument
Avenue at 8th, 13th, 15th, 19th
and 20th Streets, on Long Avenue
at 9th and 13th Streets and Gar-
rison Avenue at the north corner
of Westcott Circle, 8th and 13th
Streets, the south corner of Bella-
my Circle, the 4-way stop in Ward
Ridge, on Madison Street and Iola
St. in Oak Grove.
Anyone planning to ride the
bus is encouraged to be at the
bus stop by 8:00 a.m.

Smoking and
Lung Disease
Smoking is the main cause of
chronic lung diseases such as
chronic bronchitis and emphyse-
ma.
Cigarette smoking is respon-
sible for 82 percent of chronic ob-
structive pulmonary disease
(COPD) deaths.
Years of smoking can para-
lyze or destroy cilia (lung follicles
which trap impurities), opening
the lungs to all kinds of infec-
tions.


PORT ST. JOE TIRE PRICES











TIRES
FOR
P155/80R13 3
SIZE EACH SET/4
P155/80R13 19.25 $ 77
P165/80R13 26.75 107
P175/80R13 27.75 111
P185/80R13 29.75 119
P185/80R14 29.75 119
P195/75R14 31.75 127
P205/75R14 33.75 135
P215/75R1m4 34.75 139
P205/75R15 36.75 147
P215/75R15 37.75 151
P225/75R15 38.75 155
P235/75R15 39.75 159
\ [16-8800 series '



Panama City Western Auto Company Store
Advertised Prices

SVISA' Card

NOTE: As in the Company Store, it will be necessary to charge $4 for the
Road Hazard Warranty you will enjoy on your new tire.

Installation FREE In Our Shop
Computer Balancing Available






DAVID D1 2AYA Owner


tion" in the program are the same
for everyone without regard to
race, color, national origin, age,
sex, or handicap.


Social Security Business

Can be Handled on Phone


Most Social Security business
can be handled over the phone.
You are invited to call Social Se-
curity at 1-800-234-5772.
If this is not possible, you
may come to the office located at
30 West Government Street, Pan-
ama City. The office is open Mon-
day through Friday from 8:30 to
3:30 p.m., except on national hol-
idays. If you cannot come to Pan-


ama City, you may meet the So-
cial Security representative as
shown below:
Port St. Joe Courthouse,
June 17 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00
noon EST.


Need Extra Money?
Use the Classifieds


PAGE 9A


I -


IO% &. f 1


219 Reid Ave.


SPhone 227-1105










PAGE 10A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991


w
CHILDREN NEED
THIS HEALTH SUPERVISION
They require the very best medical and surgical care.
Otherwise, their later years may be plagued by continuous
poor health that might have been prevented.
Medical authorities agree that these regular physician
checkups should be scheduled. First year at least every
four to six weeks. Second year every three months. Ages
two to six every six to 12 months. Ages six to 18 at least
once a year. If medication is needed we can fill any
prescription, even those from physicians in other cities.

"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US with their pre-
scriptions, health needs and other pharmacy products. We
consider this trust a privilege and a duty. May we be your
personal family pharmacy?"



Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe
Convenient Drive-Through Window ,
a Revlon Cosmetics 229-8771 -4oQe.ikL



Apply Now to Enter GC's Fall
Dental Assisting or EMT Programs


Gulf Coast Community
College is now accepting applica-
tions for the fall 1991 Dental
Assisting and Emergency Medical
Technician programs.
All students must complete
the application process to be
accepted into the program. Proof
of acceptance will be required at
the time of registration.
Financial aid may be availa-


ble to those who qualify for
assistance through scholarships,
federal grants and loans, the Job
Training Partnership Act or the
Veterans Administration.
More information about the
Emergency Medical Technology
Program is available by contact-
ing Courtney Brooks at 769-
1551, ext. 5844.


Lanford Coaching In Fla./Ga. Game


Phil Lanford, head football
coach and athletic director for
Port St. Joe High School, is in
Gainesville this week preparing
for the annual Florida Georgia
football game. Lanford was cho-
sen to serve as defensive coordi-
nator for the Florida team, along
with head coach Dewight Thomas
of Escambia High School and
Mike Pittman of Sewanee High


School.
Lanford has been working
with the Florida high school sen-
iors chosen for the honor all this
week, and they will play this Sat-
urday, June 15, at 8:00 p.m. The
Sunshine Sports Network will tel-
evise the game, and it can be
seen locally on cable (if it's on the
air).
Lanford has been the head


football coach and athletic direc-
tor of Port St. Joe High School for
the past five years, having come
here from Escambia High, where
he was defensive coach with
Thomas. During his first season
the Sharks posted a 1-9 record,
but have steadily improved each
year to become the state AA run-


ner-ups in 1989 and the Regional
champions in 1990. The last two
seasons the Sharks have posted a
20-5 record. Twelve players have
been named to All State honors
during the past two years under
the coaching of Lanford, and four
have been selected to play in the
prestigious North-South game.


The Krafties, having won the
local Dixie Youth 10-12 year old
championship here in Port St.
Joe for the sixth consecutive
year, will represent St. Joe in the
annual League Championship
Tournament to be hosted by Call-
away. Not only have the Krafties
won the local division but have
also won the District IV tourna-
ment in 1988 and 1989, and fin-
ished second to Hutt Insurance of
Lynn Haven in 1990.
Other teams participating in
the tournament are Lynn Haven,
Bayou George, Mid-City and


Parker. The double elimination
tournament will begin for the
Krafties at 5:00 p.m. EDT Satur-
day as they face Mid City. A win
will see them playing Monday at
9:00 p.m. EDT and a loss will put
them into the loser's bracket
game at 7:00 p.m. EDT.
Kraftie team members are:
Seth Campbell, Jesse Colbert,
Doyle Crosby, Everett Gant, Josh
Kostic, Brian Jenkins, Travis
Jenkins, Tyson Pittman, Nick
Sweazy, Chad Thompson, Jamie
White, and Ryan Yeager.


Coach Phil Lanford (left) will be the defensive coordinator for
the Florida team in the annual Florida-Georgia game.


DO
CacIo


GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE
PORT ST. JOE CLASSES
SUMMER B SEMESTER 1991


Day Time


Gen. Biological Science
Volleyball


MW 6:00-9:30 p.m.
TH 6:00-8:20 p.m.


Sem.
Hrs.

3
1


FEES: $22.05 per credit hour for Florida residents.
(Fees are payable upon enrollment.)

REGISTRATION
June 12, 6 p.m.
Port St. Joe Elementary School
Temple Watson, Coordinator
227-1259 (after 5 p.m.)

SUMMER B CLASSES BEGIN WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19
GCCC is an equal opportunity institution



BIG ARN

Usd uritr


Fleawarke






Antique


FMP Tries to Mend Fences

Major Bob Douglas, newly installed commander of the
Panama City office of the Florida Marine Patrol, personally
delivered Bill Parker of Port St. Joe, some of his equipment
confiscated in a highly-publicized and controversial arrest
of Parker more than a year ago. Major Douglas said he was
returning the equipment to bring the controversy to a close
and to try and mend fractured fences between the Marine
Patrol and many citizens in the Gulf and Franklin county
areas.


I Pties SERVILEIMITED


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60,000 MILE TREADWEAR
LIMITED WARRANTY*
SSteel-Belted Construction
All-Season Tread Design
SOriginal Equipment Choice

FR480 Radial

p 6 5 P1/7 1.4 BI ACKWA.LL
175/70-13 59.95 205/70-15 74.95
S 185/70-13 60.95 215/70-14 79.95
195/70-13 64.95 215/70-15 84.95
u 205/7013 65.95 225/70-15 88.95
185/75-14 65.95 235/70-15 91.95
195/70-14 68.95 245/70-15 95.95
195/75-14 69.956

SALE ENDS SOON


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26x850R14 C 93.95 32/1150-15 C 119.95
205/15 SL 76.95 33/1250-15 C 129.95
215/15 C 78.95 255/85R16 0 139.95
235/15 C 84.96 31/1050-16.5 D 136.95
30/950-15 C 99.95 33/1250-16.5 D 145.95
31/10.50-15 C 104.95
A Plus F.E.T.
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PATE'S SERVICE CENTER

PATE ICE NTER 216 MONUMENT 227-1;
YORIDPNETFRSOEDAE


291


Krafties Entering


League Tourney


ViewS On

CDental Healt
FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D.

CHILD'S FIRST


DENTAL VISIT
A child going to the dentist teeth, using whatever means
for the first time is often a hand- necessary. Remember this: The
ful of anxieties. Any dentist us- child often cries before anything
ing the right techniques can is done to him (even a first hair-
transform the most terrified child cut). He is not hurt, and the den-
into a cooperative patient who is tist has to prove that he can be
no longer afraid a child who trusted to do exactly what he
will leave the office with a smile says he is going to do no
on his face. more, no less. The noise and
The first thing a dentist must hysterics generally disappear af-
do is convince the child of his ter the first visit. If the dentist es-
honesty. Children are smart. tablishes his reliability and that
They are not easily fooled. If a he is trustworthy, there will rare-
youngster is promised that a ly be any more trouble.
particular thing will be done, the ............
dentist had better be sure he Prepared as a public ser-
does it. vice to promote better dental
Usually, the dentist begins health. From the office of:
with something easy. He says, FRANK D. MAY, D.M.D., 319
"Today I am going to count your Williams Ave., Phone: 227-
teeth." And, after that, come 1123.
what may, he must count the


I


xv v y ? y y ? y Y y y Y y Y x X x x x x x x x X x X X














Start Planning Your Child's Immunization


Program Early to Prepare for School Year


As the new school year ap-
proaches, parents are reminded
that Florida law requires all chil-
dren attending school to have up-
to-date immunization records.
For the parents of children who
have not completed their immuni-
zations, early planning can help
avoid a last minute rush.

The childhood immunization
series should begin at two
months of age and continue on
schedule. If the schedule is fol-
lowed, the child will complete the
series by age 18 months long


before school entry. This early
protection is very important be-
cause diseases like measles and
pertussis (whooping cough) are
most serious in young babies.

To protect the health of
school children, children of all
grades in any Florida school -
public and private must be ful-
ly immunized against diphtheria,
tetanus, pertussis (whooping
cough), polio, measles, mumps,
and rubella. The same immuniza-
tions are required for children at-
tending a Florida licensed child


care facility. In addition, child
care attendees will soon be re-
quired to have proof of immuniza-
tion against Haemophilus b
("Hib") disease. To attend school
or child care, these immuniza-
tions must be recorded on an
HRS Form 680. If a child's immu-
nization record is on a different
form, staff at the local HRS
County Public Health Unit can re-
view the information to make cer-
tain the child is properly immu-
nized for age and then copy it
onto a Form 680. Students with
permanent medical exemptions or


IMPORTANT THINGS TO DO
1. It is the universal custom
to display the national flag only
from sunrise to sunset on build-
ings and on stationary flagstaffs
in the open. It should not be dis-
played on days when the weather
is inclement unless constructed
of all weather materials, The U.S.
flag may be displayed at night
when it is desired to produce a
patriotic effect, and when' proper
illumination is provided.
2. Display the U.S. flag on all
days that weather permits but es-
pecially on national and state hol-
idays and other days that may be
proclaimed by the President of
the United States. On Memorial
Day, the U.S. flag should be half-
staffed until noon.
3. The flag should be dis-
played on or near the main build-
ing of all public Institutions, dur-
ing school days in or near every
schoolhouse, and in or near every
polling place on election day.
4. Always hoist the U.S. flag
briskly. Lower it ceremoniously.
5. When it is to be flown at


Joe Hendrix
Active Member
of AAFP
* Dr. Joseph Paul Hendrix of
Port St. Joe has completed con-
tinuing medical education re-
quirements to retain active mem-
bership in the American Academy
of Family Physicians (AAFP). the
national association of family
doctors.
The requirements call for
members to complete a minimum
of 150 hours of accredited contin-
uing medical study every three
years. The Academy, the coun-
try's largest medical specialty as-
sociation with more than 69,000
members, was the first national
medical group to require mem-
bers to keep up with medical
progress through continuing edu-
cation.
Dr. Joseph Paul Hendrix has
ben an AAFP Active member
since 1957. As a family physi-
cian, Dr. Hendrix is qualified to
work in all major medical areas
and trained to treat up to 90 per-

Card of Thanks
We want to thank each and
every one of you who have helped
in any way getting Jack to the
hospital May 29 while there and
now that he's home, the many,
many who are helping him and
me to get him going. Thanks for
the help, love, prayers, and acts
of kindness. You all know who
you are.
Jack & Wauneta Brewer









INC





). wo
>. w "
> f 0 P "

> S


RflBU I
Ij SANJUNE 14



half-staff, the flag is first raised to
the peak and then lowered to the
half-staff position. When being
lowered for the day, it should first
be raised to the peak.
IMPORTANT THINGS NOT
TO DO
1. Never in any way should
any disrespect be shown the U.S.
flag.


cent of all patients. Family physi-
cians care for all family members
all ages and both sexes.
The Academy, headquartered
in Kansas City, Missouri, was in-
strumental in establishing the
medical specialty of family prac-
tice in, 1960. The Academy is the
advocate for patients and endeav-
ors to educate the public in all
health-related matters. The or-
ganization works to preserve and
promote quality, cost-effective
health care. It promotes the sci-
ence and art of family medicine
and works to ensure an optimum
supply of well-trained family phy-
sicians. The Academy also pro-
vides advocacy, representation
and leadership for the specialty of
family practice.








' i


2. The U.S. flag should never
touch anything beneath it -
ground, floor, water, or merchan-
dise.
3. The U.S. flag should not be
embroidered on such articles as
cushions, handkerchiefs, and the
like; printed or otherwise Im-
pressed on paper napkins or box-
es or anything that is designed
for temporary use and discard; or
used as any portion of a costume
or athletic uniform. However, a
flag patch may be affixed to the
uniform of military personnel,
firemen, policemen and members
of patriotic organizations. Adver-
tising signs should not be fas-
tened to a staff or halyard from
which the flag is flown.
4. When the flag is in such
condition that it is no longer a fit-
ting emblem for display, it should
be destroyed in a dignified way,
preferably by burning, privately.
These do's and don't's are
presented to you by the St. Jo-
seph Chapter of the NSDAR.

Business Seminar
Slated at GCCC
The Florida State University
Small Business Development
Center and Gulf Coast Communi-
ty College Lifelong Learning Cen-.
ter are cosponsoringg a free semi- .j
nar, "ABC's of Starting a /a
Business", on Thursday, June 20.
This seminar will cover the
basics of starting your own busi-
ness or expanding an existing
business. Licenses, organization,
fictitious name, taxes and busi-
ness planning are some of the
topics that will be covered.
The seminar will be held at
the Gulf County Public Library,
Port St Joe, from 4:30 7:30
p.m. There is no charge. For more
information and/or reservations,
call the FSU-SBDC at (904) 872-
4655.


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991


TREMENDOUS

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Experience The Spirit of Farm Bureau

Come be a career agent with us, and
be a part of one of Florida's top
insurance sales teams.


FARM~7!


For Gulf County area

Contact:
Raymond D. Russell
Blountstown
904-674-5471


TFC 5/9/91


religious exemptions are required
to show proof of exemption upon
entering any school or licensed
child care facility in the state.
Immunization early in life and
the presence of Florida's immuni-
zation laws are as important as
ever. Dr. Charles Mahan, HRS
Deputy Secretary for Health and
State Health Officer, states,
'These laws protect children from
diseases which can have severe
effects, such as deafness, mental
retardation, and sometimes even
death. Some ofthe diseases, such
as measles, have actually been
increasing in Florida."
The following schedule shows
which immunizations children
need and when they should re-
ceive them:
Age Vaccination
2 mo. DTP (diphtheria-
tetanus-pertussis)
Vaccine
Oral Polio Vaccine
Haemophilus b Con-
jugate (Hib) Vaccine
4 mo. DTP Vaccine, Oral Po-
lio Vaccine, Hib Vac-
cine
6 mo. DTP Vaccine, Hib
Vaccine
12 mo. TB Test
15 mo. Measles, Mumps, Ru-
bella (MMR) Vaccine,
DTP Vaccine, Oral Po-
lio Vaccine, Hib
Booster
4-6 yrs. DTP Booster, Oral Po-
lio Booster
14-16 yrs.* Tetanus-Diphtheria
(Td) Booster
*and every 10 years thereafter
Immunizations are available
through private physicians, clin-
ics, and local HRS County Public
Health Units. "As the school year
approaches," Dr. Mahan contin-
ues, "Lines at the health units get
long and doctors' schedules may
be booked. I urge parents to
check immunization records and,
if needed, call today to schedule
an appointment so that their chil-
dren are protected now."


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


*Auto -Home

*Business

0Flood -Life


*presenting "'The Travelers.
The Insurance Store Since 1943

8:30 till 6:00

Monday through Friday


4J


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


DAGE.r


Notes of'Do's" and "Don't's"


Upon Displaying the Flag


*Bonds 221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


JrAUV I


D


We have discounts
to help you drive down
the cost of car insurance.
If the cost of your car insurance seems to be heading in the wrong direction,
see if Allstate can help turn things around.
We have discounts that can help you save money.
You can save by having a good driving record. Or by driving a car equipped
with air bags or a four-wheel anti-lock brake system. Even by insuring more than one
car with Allstate.
Which Allstate car insurance discounts do you A i ls B
qualify for? Just give us a call to find out. We'll get your You n good hands
car insurance costs headed in the right direction. lOwieimmon viptynrwkM.
GASKIN-GRADDY
Insurance Company
Call Collect 639-5077 or 639-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
1-800-782-6802
Serving the Panhandle Since 1931


*** ** ** * I1$~ r I~r








THE STARPORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991


PSJ High's Final 90-91 Honor Roll


Edwin G. Williams principal
of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School
announces the honor roll for the
sixth six week grading period for
the 1990-91 school year.
All A's
7th Grade
Sheteta Chambers, Leslie Fai-
son, Heather Fields. Brigette God-
frey, Amanda Jennings, Elizabeth
D. Redmond, Jennifer Smallwood
8th Grade
Harlotte Bolden, Alice Ken-
nington, Melissa Nobles, Jessica
White, Stacey Williams
9th Grade
Eric Monteiro
10th Grade
Jason Falbe
11th Grade
Randy Ramsey
12 Grade
Shannon Tousignant
A's & B's
7th Grade
Latonya Bailey, Erica Beard,
Destiny Daniels, Christopher Fol-
lin, Kimberly Franklin, Deanna
Horton, Kristi Lawrence, Jesse
Linton, Serena Littleton, Thomas
Parker, Heather Raffield, Traci
Wilton, Wendy Woodman
8th Grade
Dyshanda Boykins, Christo-
pher Buchanan, William B. Ca-
they, Amber Conley, Stephanie
Gaddis, Natalie Gant, Frances
Garrett, Heather Hanson, Jon
Hawkins, Tawanda Jenkins, Re-
becca Lindsey, Maria Macchia,
Chrystina Marquardt, Johanna
McMullon, James C. Mock, Tara
Mullis, Latresha Quinn, Chantel
Smith, Shelly Weston
9th Grade
Stephen Ailes, Melissa Ander-
son, Bryan Butts, Jennifer Clark,
Joshua Colbert, Clay Cox, Kristi
Davis, Megan Dean, Timothy
Hatcher, Kara Hogue, Steven
Joiner, Caroline Lister, Dana
Maige, Rusty Minger, Christopher
Nixon, Erin Oliver, Jamie Parrish,
Eric Ramsey, James C. Summers,
Heather Walsh, Rita Nicole Wilder
10th Grade
April Carpenter, Terri Caw-
thron, Tina Littleton, Alison Low-
rey, Jodi Mapes, Craig Pate, Trina
Saleh, Kimberly Thomas, Charles
M. Watson
11th Grade
Charles Norton Arrant, Pame-
la Bowen, Joshua Boykin, Jenni-
fer Brewer, Jeanet Hale, Joel
Huft, Howard P. Langridge IV,
Dallas Land, Darrell Land, Franc-


es McMullon, Patricia Nedley,
Bonnie Pritchett, Dana Swatts,
Tracy Wade, Christopher White,
James S. Wilder
12th Grade
Jennifer Barnhart, Roxana
Graham, Sherrin Hill, Ramona
Ann Hunter, Paul Joiner, Deon
Joseph, Becky Keith, Reginald
Larry, Darrell Linton, Cheyenne
Godfrey, Debra Minger, David
Parker, Paula Pendarvis, Christo-
pher Ramsey, William H. Ramsey,
Virginia Carol Sims, Crystal L.
Smith, Patricia Taylor, Candice
Tillman, Wendy Weston, Calon-
dra White, Stephen White, Paola
P. Querejazu
Principal Williams has also
announced the honor roll for the
second semester of the 1990-91
school year.
All A's
7th Grade
Destiny Daniels, Leslie Fal-
son, Heather Fields, Brigette God-
frey, Kristi Lawrence, Elizabeth
Redmond, Jennifer Smallwood,
Alyson Williams
8th Grade
Alice W. Kennington, Melissa
J. Nobles, Jessica A. White, Sta-
cey Williams
9th Grade
Timothy W. Hatcher, Caroline
E. Lister, Jamie M. Parrish
10th Grade
Alison A. Lowrey, Kimberly D.
Thomas
11th Grade
Randy Ramsey
12th Grade
Shannon Tousignant
A' & B's
7th Grade
Latonya Bailey, Erica K.
Beard; Sheteta N. Chambers,
Kimberly.R. Franklin, Amanda R.
Jennings, Kristi A. Kirkland, De-
anna Horton, Thomas R. Parker,
Heather L. Raffleld, Traci J. Wil-
ton, Wendy L. Woodman
8th Grade
Harlotte Bolden, Dyshanda
Boykins, Amber Conley, Natalie
Gant, Tawanda Jenkins, Amanda
Jones, Johanna K. McMullon,
Tara A. Mullis, Chrystina Mar-
quardt, James C. Mock, Latresha
N. Quinn, Natalie N. Terry,
Georgette E. Walden
9th Grade
Melissa Anderson, Carldrick
D. Bailey, Bryan J. Butts, Jenni-
fer A. Clark, Joshua K. Colbert,
Clay S. Cox, Kristi N. Davis, Ste-
ven Joiner, Dana A. Maige, Chris-


E.,.ELIJAH SMILEY, M.B.A. -:
S .Si ATTORNEY AT LAWn : -
*PERSONAL INJURY .BUSINESS -AUTO ACCIDENTS
*PROBATE & WILLS .DIVORCES
Straight LAW OFFICE DOWNTOWN Reasonable
Talk 1 784-6606 I Fees
433 Harrison Ave. Suite 1 B Panama City



Attention Mobile Home Owners

30% Off
TE 100%- Financing Available

r 1' ROOF-OVER SYSTEM
SUMMARY FEATURES
'* Stops Leaks Decreases Utility Bills Increases the
SValue of Your Home Increases Your Comfort & Peace
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All Galvalume (No Wood Beams) Virtually Maintenance
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WEATHER LOCK SYSTEM
One of the best investments a mobile home owner can make
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES 1-800-476-1574


in a friendly
atmosphere
with good
FRIlENDS.:

Serving Breakfast,
\ Lunch & Dinner
6 a.m. to 10 p.m.
7 Days a Week

All You Can Eat 5 SUNDAY'S
LUNCH BUFFET ONLY 4.95

-Specializing In -


-*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches eMeals to Go
*Fresh Seafood *Delicious Steaks.

r Famous Fresh $9 85
A m-# t ^rr-0, 7m ,,,' ^


unlv


-bAFUUU rLAMIEKn


Oui


30 9FuthS. 2279, .-110 *.Jo


tie D. McCulley, Eric P. Monteiro,
Christopher J. Nixon, Erin L. Oli-
ver, Joni L. Peak, Traci D. Peiffer,
Eric Ramsey, David A. Smith,
Heather L. Walsh, Rita Nicole
Wilder
10th Grade
Terri A. Cawthron, Jason
Falbe, David Liffick, Jodi A.
Mapes, Craig A. Pate, Tina M.
Rich. Trina S. Saleh
11th Grade
Pamela N. Bowen, Jeanet E.
Hale, Joel A. Huft, Dallas M.
Land, Darrell R. Land, Howard P.
Langridge IV, Frances C. McMul-'
Ion, Kristy M. Melvin, Patricia


Nedley, Bonnie S. Pritchett, Dana
Swatts, Tracy L. Wade, Christo-
pher L. White, James S. Wilder
12th Grade
Jennifer A. Barnhart, Roxana
M. Graham, Sherrin E. Hill, Ra-
mona Ann Hunter, Paul Joiner,
Rachel E. McCulley, David G.
Parker, Paula M. Pendarvis, Paola
P. Querejazu, Virginia Carol
Sims, Crystal L. Smith, Patricia
A. Taylor, Wendy D. Weston, Ste-
phen M. White
All B's
9th Grade
Joseph A. Newberry.
Congratulations to each of
you on a job well done!


On Leader
At the regular meeting of the
Lions Club on Wednesday, June
4, a program was presented by
Hal Coggin representing the Lead-
er Dog School for the Blind. Mr.
Coggin explained that the Leader
Dog School for the Blind is the
oldest and the largest school of
its kind. At the school, blind peo-
ple are taught how to work with
these wonderful animals. A film
on the school during an actual
training session was shown, and
the professionalism demonstrated
by the staff was remarkable. The
leader dog program enables some
blind people to be independent
and accomplish many tasks that
would be otherwise impossible. It
is through the Lions Clubs and
other charitable organizations
that the Leader School is able to

Darley Family

Reunion June 16
Members of the Darley family,
one of the oldest in Florida, will
celebrate their annual reunion on
June 16 at the Parker Communi-
ty Center.
Dinner on the ground will be-
gin at 12:30 p.m. and all friends
of the family are invited to attend.
Most of those attending the
reunion are direct descendents of
the Rev. John Thomas and
Georgiana Darley, who came to
Florida from Georgia before the
turn of the century. They home-
steaded in Esto, located in north
Holmes County near the Alabama
state line. Some of the clan mi-
grAted,.. t, qalhoux and Gulf
countles... .
Two members of the family
are still living. They are Mrs.
Treasy Darley Kemp of Wewa-
hitchka and Mrs. Cosseta Darley
Walsingham of Port St. Joe.
The first Darley to emigrate to
Florida is believed to have been
James Darley. Records in the
county clerk's office in Pensacola
lists James as a signatory in a
property transaction in 1822.
The United States purchased
Florida from Spain in 1821. Flori-
da was made a territory with Gen.
Andrew Jackson being named the
first territorial governor. Many of
his soldiers remained in Florida,
and it is believed that James Dar-
ley was one of this number.
Capt. Robert Darley of Mor-
ganville, New Jersey, is reimunion
chairman. M.M. Darley is reunion
secretary-treasurer. He resides at
Panama City Beach, and can be
called at 235-0993 for additional
information.
The reunion will be observed
from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., and
some early birds will be on hand
at 10:00 a.m.


"New Office -

same good
neighbor."

"My new office means I can
better serve your family insu-
rance needs. Call or drop in
anytime."

BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avenue
(Across from St. Joe Hardware)
Office: 229-6514








Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.



TAti fARM
State Farm Insurance Companies
H{ome Offllices: Bloomington, Illinois


Dogs
function.
Mrs. Charles Ingram and her
leader dog Dakota was present to
attest to the effectiveness of the
school, and to praise the Lions
Club for its role in helping people
with sight problems. Mr. Ingram
is a member of the Port St. Joe Li-
ons Club, and can also appreciate
the needs of the seeing impaired.
It was wonderful to see first hand
the results of what can be done
within a community when people
care. Many thanks to Mr. Coggin
for his presentation.
On Thursday, June 13, the
Port St. Joe Lions Club will install
its offices for 1991-92 at Butler's
Restaurant. All Lions Club mem-
bers and their dates are invited to
attend. A social hour will begin at
7:00 p.m. and a prime rib dinner
will be served at 8:00.


MESSAGE

SERVICE


Say You Saw It In The Star


Lions Have Program


'BOSS OYSTER'


Apalachicola


Water Street


(Formerly Frog Level)


Enjoy a Lazy Afternoon on our
patio deck with
f Blue Crabs Steamed or Garlic
-Oyster Roasts-
\KJj *Steamed Shrimp Lobster
Happy Clams Barbeque

Introducing Two New Oyster Toppings
Oysters St. George submitted by John Whaley
The Bacon Oyster submitted by Tom Turney
Entertainment Saturday & Sunday with
Chaz Michael from 2-6 p.m.


You Asked for It Now We Have It!
SURE SHOT PEST CONTROL







(Monthly Flea Protection for Your Home)
Makes no difference if you are a regular customer or not (although regu-
lar customers get a break), you can enjoy a flea-free home this summer.
All you need do is call Sure Shot at 227-7398 or 227-PEST for details on
M.F.P.
Offered by Sure Shot Pest Control Company
"We're Working Hard to Win Your Trust!"

wWE SH PEST CONTROL

302 Reid Ave. 227-7378 Port St. Joe, FL


JrILMZI


PAGE 2BH


A









W: re Proud of All Gulf County's ,l


'tATHERS
As we all pause to remember Fathers this Sunday on Father's
Day, let us recognize the contribution that fathers and
grandfathers make to the lives of their families. We are proud
I of their contributions and we're proud of our hometown.


p-


TABLERITE QUALITY

1/4 SLICE


PORK



LOIN


$


49


FAMILY PAK


TABLERITE QUALITY FAMILY PAK 2
Ribeye Steak ............ lb. 429


LYKES FAMILY FAVORITE
Sliced Bacon .......... 12oz $j39


TABLERITE QUALITY CENTER CUT FAMILY PAK REGULAR OR THICK SUCED
Pork Chops ................ lb. $2 19 IGA Bologna .............. Ib. 39
,CENTER CUT DEUCIOUS o
Pork Loin Roast ...... lb. $189 IGA Franks ........... 2 oz. 9
TABLERITE QUALITY WHOLE $ 69 IGA F 2
Pork Loin ................. lb. 1 Beef Franks ............ i2oz.
LYKES 39 RYAN'S69
Turkey Ham Halves lb. 39 Smoked Pork Chops .. Ib. $269
JIMMY DEAN FRESH FROZEN
SRoll Sausage........ b. $. j99 Baking Hens ............. b. 7


FROST BOTTLE GALLON
SPRINGTIME WATER ......... 69o
RONCO REGULAR & THIN '7 oz.
SPAGHETTI ................... 3/ 99
RONCO 7.25 OZ'; 4/
MAC. & CHEESE ...........4/89
DOVE 22 OZ.
DISH LIQUID ...................... 89
IGA OR NATURE'S BEST 16, Z.
SALTINE CRACKERS ........ 590
LNCOLN 64 OZ.
APPLE JUICE ..'................ ...0
DIP & REGULAR, PLAIN
GOLDEN FLAKE CHIPS ....... 990
DELMONTE 32 OZ.
KETCHUP .........................$1 19
RODENBERRY 16 OZ. 1 3A
Sweet Salad Delites ....... $ .1 39
RODENBERRY FRESHPAK 46 OZ. l 79
KOSHER DILLS ............... $1.79


VAN CAMP'S 16 OZ.
PORK N BEANS ...........
ARMOUR 3 OZ.
POTTED MEAT .............


2/79o
3/990


ARMOUR 5 OZ.
VIENNA SAUSAGE ......... 2/990
CRUSHED, CHUNK OR SLICED 20 OZ.
Libety Gold Pineapple ........ 59
6 PAK 9 OZ.
DELMONTE RAISINS ......... 89
NATURE'S BEST GALLON
VINEGAR ....................... .
HEFTY 20 CT.
COMPARTMENT TRAYS .. S1.59
SOLO 16 OZ. (18 CT.)
TRANSCULENT CUPS ......... 8 9
MAXWELL HOUSE ADC 13 OZ. BAG
COFFEE .......................... 19
MAXWELL HOUSE 8 OZ. $
INSTANT COFFEE ........... 3.59


IIDI


SHEDD'S SPREAD 3 LB. TUB
Country Crock.......
BUTTER-ME-NOT 5 CT. KRAFTr 1LB.,
MERICO 3/99 SQUEEZE
BISCUITS 99 PARKAY


$179


$109
.....M


McKenzie, Turnips & Roots, Turnips, Mustard, Collards, 1 Ib

McKenzie Greens
INTERSTATE 20 OZ. BAG McKENZIE 8 OZ.
Shoestring Broccoli
French Fries 39 SPEARS


SEEDLESS
White Grapes


berries
CALIFORNIA


PINT


.....m lb.


RED BEAUTY
Plums .........E.......... b.
GEORGIA TRAY PACK
Peaches ................* b.
ASSORTED
Sprouts ................ pkg.


CAROLINA TRAY PAK
Sweet Potatoes


JUMBO
Sweet Onions
FRESH
Bell Peppers


COLORADO RUSSETT
Potatoes


....... lb.

meo 6 for


...... 10 Ib. bag


LB.


d 1N1;


FZ FO


U


..2/99
Si 91


$j29

990

49"

990


. lb. 39


David Rich's
OODLINERS .
WEWAHITCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.
Prices Good June 12-18, 1991





RIGHT TO ,LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


59"


-


I









510 Fifth St. Ph. 229-8398 ,
a',,e


%
'Ia,
2
I
9
9
*
-S
4~4
~,
* ~*
PS.


CI


r


22 oz. Ivory
Dish Liquid............
112 oz.
Rinso .....................
6 oz. Real Value
Tomato Paste....!.
18 oz. Jif
Peanut Butter......
8 oz. Maxwell House
Instant Coffee ...
7 1/4 oz. Real Value
Macaroni & Che
32 oz. Squeeze
Delmonte Catsur


5 lb. Martha White
Corn Meal


Mix...


-rozenrFodsDaryi Foods


I


POtatOeS r Pillsbury Big Country -10 Ct.
Buttermilk, Butter Tasting '
BrownShred 49 BISCUITS 69
POHTATOES 24 ot. ctn. Ught & Uvely89
Cottage Cheese 1
McKenzie Chopped & Spears
BROCCOLI MERICAN Tasty Green Head
16 oz. CHEESE
packapkgs 0012 Z.99 C cabbage

--P--- --oz- -9 ,- -M-M
IiIIIIIIIIIII II IIII II^^^


I

I

I


_ _


m


i,







mmmmmmmmnmmmmmmm mmmmm...


Family Pak
ger Choice
Frying Chicken Short
Thighs or
Drumsticks
7:,.: ^ t? ^ ^''^ ^


:Family Pak Boneless
lUCK $


/C


Family Pak-Bone In
Rib Eye Steaks................... Ib.
All Meat Tender
Sirloin Tip Steak.................. lb.


u.n.. as.. mu a. mu.

uuuu..uuu urn....,

a mu...... 3mm...

urn... muu mu......

mEn am mm.. maum mu


129

349

3/lOO

259

.... 299
4/l00

..99


369


2.69
2m6 9


Family Pak Tender LONDON BROIL or
Chuck Steak........................... b.


Register's Dry Cured
SLAB BACON Whole or Half.. ........1b. 99
Family Pak 139
COUNTRY STYLE PORK RIBS .............................. Ib.
Power Pak
LY K ES FRAN KFURTERS ...............................12 oz. 6 9
Louis Rich .19
LUNCHEON MEAT VARIETY PAK.................. .12oz.29

Family Pak $

Cubed
E"==- = I, -


Fresh Ground Pure Beef 2 59
Chopped Sirloin..................... lb. 59 1 e ak. lb |

DeltaFor Our Favorite
Maxwell House 13 oz. Dela Customers
FFEE PAPER SOFT ICE CREAM
Reg., ADC., French Roast TOW E S ONES
Thursday, Friday & Saturday


SOWELS 59 1 EA.
Limit I with other purchase




SUBS-Witches Special TossGdREEN SALADS
Turkey, Roast or Ham
59 -MadeTDailya COLE $110 $130
Sweet Red SLAW.......Ib.9 REGULAR
Fresh 59 Chicken Gizzards or Livers Choc.,Lemon, Coconade
GARLIC BUDS.....2/89. -'/ By the Cup or with Lunch 3.69 aiy

BROCCOLI .... bch 1.19 .r Delicius Cakes SHAKES &
Red Delicious CHICKEN Made to SUNDAES
APPLES. 5 Ib.Bag 2 .59 9 Order
For All Occasions a
Chqua lCall 229-8398
Chiquita And Place Your Order
BANANAS We \ -LUNCH SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK-
BA M I1B ake MASeat with 2 Vegetables..............................only 3.69 .
Ib It Fresh Meat with Vegetable................. only 2.59 DELICIOUS
b Every DaVy vegetable Plate....................only 2.29 CHICKEN
Variety of (3Vegetables) By the Piece or
2 Piece the box full -
BREhiAD ckenBox 1.99 Cooked Several
BR A Chicken. PQtato Logs, Coleslaw Times Daily
SL m m mi mlU


3 -


I


19..




.* 0,


THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991 _


A A AA A AA A
A AAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAA A
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Wewahitchka: 2 BR Cabin on
the Deadlakes with porch, boat shed,
$12,000. 205-793-6396. 4tc 6/13
House for sale. Immaculate 3 BR,
brick, carport, utility/laundry room,
landscaped, new -Intracostal water-
way, 1/2 acre, fenced back yard on
cul de sac. 827-7375. 2tc 6/13

Creekfront 3 acre trailer lot on
Wetappo Creek, Overstreet. Septic
tank installed. $12,500. Financing
available. 229-6994. 4tp 6/13

Cape San Blas Bank Repo.
Boardwalk Subdivision. Attractive 2
BR stilt house with beach and pool
access. Others priced much higher.
Great terms! 73,900.
Port St. Joe Commercial Proper-
ty. 4 lots and large building in need of
repair. Many possibilities. Priced to
sell! $55,000.
Call Cathey 648-5777, 648-5653
evenings, or 1-800-874-5073.
White City) 3 bdrm., 2 bath
house, central h/a, fireplace, fully car-
peted, stove, refrig., pool and many
extras. Call Carl for more information
at 827-6053. 2tp 6/6

GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH

1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Blas, Florida

(904) 229-2500
1-800-624-3964
tfc 6/6


2 bdrm.-house, 1 bath, fireplace,'
close to schools. Call after 3:30 p.m.
639-2955, Wewa. .2tc 6/6
For Sale at Mexico Beach. Du-
plex, 2 bedrooms (each house), close
to beach. Reduced $13,000. See to
believe. Owner must sell. 648-5302.
If rio answer call 912-924-5661.
2tc 6/6

For sale by owner: 2 bdrm. house
w/stove & refrig., nice -lot w/shade
trees. City water & private pump. Ad-
jacent lot available. 'Canal St., 1/2
block from beach, St. Joe Beach,
$26,000. 904-482-3884, Marianna.
tfc 6/6

Two nice lots, Pine SL, $16,000
each. One. nice lot on Canal St., 1/2
block from beach, $15,000. St. Joe
Beach. For sale by owner. 904/482-
3884, Marianna, FL. tfc 6/6

1986 14'x70 North River mobile
home, 2 bdrm., 2 ba. on 2.678 acres.
Deep well pump, utility shed, located
at White City. Call Robert for more In-
formation at 827-6432. 6tc 5/9

1 1/2 lots at Ward Ridge, city wa-
ter. For more information call 827-
6432. 6tc 5/9

St. Joe Beach, immaculate brick
home on 2 large landscaped lots. Cy-
press privacy fence, pleasant location.
647-5252. tfc 6/6

150'x120' commercial lot on
Hwy. 98 west of Highland View.
$55,000. Call George, 229-6031.
tfc 6/6

3 bedroom, 1 bath house, corner
13th & Garrison, $49,500. Call
George, 229-6031. tfc 6/6


Creekfront acreage, 12 miles n. of
Mexico' Beach on Hwy. 386. Minimum
10 acres for $2,000 per acre. Call
George, 229-6031. tfc 6/6
1615 Palm Blvd., Port St. Joe. 4
bdrm., 2 bath, great room with brick
fireplace, on 2 lots, quiet street. Over
1,700Q sq. ft. Central h/a. 229-6856
after 6 p.m. tfc 6/6

Very Nicel 3 bdrm., 2 ba. house,
stone fireplace in great room, great lo-
cation, 2011 Juniper Ave. Call for ap-
pointment, 229-6427. tfc 6/6

2 bdrm. trailer, on 1 1/2 acres,
adjacent to Wetappo Creek, fenced, 2
wells, 2 septic tanks, Ig. storage
building. 229-8581 or 227-1566.
tfc 6/6

1/2 acre MOBILE HOME LOTS.
12 mi. north of Mexico Beach on
Overstreet Road (Hwy. 386), Creek-
view Sub., no down payments, $86
per month. 229-6031. tfc 6/6
Two acres on county road off of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 6/6
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile-off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 6/6






HELP! Lost my glasses between
Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe. La-
dies,' cloth, patterned case. $10 Re-
ward. 227-1128 ask for Sherry.
ltc 6/13

Reward. Lost Shetland Sheep-
dog "Devon" (miniature collie) Black,
white & tan. Tallahassee I.D. tags.
Call 229-8573 or 227-2067.





For Sale: Lab puppies $125. 827-
7261. 2tc 6/13


LOT RENTALS


Sun & Sand
Mobile Home Park (386-A)
IlLO00N. 15th St.,
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Call (904) 648-8201 a/

2 bedroom trailer, furnished, wa '
ter provided, fenced yard, $300
month. St. Joe Beach. 317 Canal St.
648-5207. 2tc 6/13

Trailer lot with full hook ups.
227-1260. 2tp 6/13

.St. Joe Beach Townhouse. Built
1990. 2 BR, laundry room, unfur-
nished, clear view of the Gulf. $450
per mo. 871-5705 after 5 p.m.
4tc 6/13

2 bdrm., newly furnished house.
Highland View. $250 per month. De-
posit required. 229-6133.
2tc 6/6

Trailer space for rent, $60 per
month. Call 229-6133. 2tc 6/6

3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2 bath, 2110
Long Ave. Driveway, fenced backyard,
$425 month, $150 deposit. 229-8505.
2tc 6/6

Nice. clean 12'x65', 2 bdrm., 1
bath trailer, with porch on shady lot,
cen. heat, window air, carpet in liv.
rm. No pets. Call 647-5361.
tfc 5/30

Spacious 1200 sq. ft 2 bdrm., 2
ba. townhouse in Port St. Joe. Like
new. Luxury features include Ice
maker refrig., self clean oven, dispo-
sal, dishwasher, washer/dryer hook-
up, covered utility rm., energy effi-
cient all electric. $400/month. For
info. call 1-576-1125 days, 1-893-
1586 evenings. 2tc 5/30

1807 Marvin Ave., 3 bdrm., 1 Ig.
bath, fenced yard, utility hook-up,
ch&a, $350 month + deposits. 647-
8783. tfc 5/23

Apartment, 2 bedroom, 2 1/2
ba., washer & dryer, vertical blinds,
extra nice, $395 month. Call 229-
6314. tfc 6/6


Storage or shop space for rent.
Mexico Beach, 648-5191. tfc 6/6

Apartment for rent, 1 .bdrm. fur-
nished at 1508 1/2 Long Ave. $175
per mo. $100 damage deposit. Phone
after 5:30, 229-6825. tfc 6/6

Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
Mobile home lots. City water and
garbage fee included. Rustic Sands
Campground, 648-5229. tfc 6/6

UNFURNISHED
* Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 6/6

Office Space for Lease: Spa-
cious, clean, well located office in con-
venient part of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378 or come by 322 Long
Avenue. tfc 6/6

Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. tfc 6/6

No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 1.2/90

Nice one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing. tfc 6/6

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will. renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 6/6


Jenny Lind crib, new, $75. Call
942-6366. 4tc 6/13

Electric washer and dryer. $100.
229-2752. 2tcq6/13
1890 antique cottage pump or-
gan with mirrored hutch. Call 229-
8167. tfc6/13

Graco stroll-a-bed stroller, Fisher
Price car seat. Call 229-8673 after 5
p.m. ltc 6/13
ATTENTION: Graduation and
Project Graduation video tapes now
available. Contact Ken Murphy after 5
p.m. at 229-8033.

Butterbeans & peas: Purple Hull
$14 we pick, $8 you pick; White Peas
$14 we pick, $10 you pick; Butter-
beans, $18 we pick, $10 you pick.
Call Otis McDaniel 904-593-6802 or
Randy McDandiel 904-593-1835 at
Grand Ridge. 3tc 6/13

For Sale: Commodore 64 Com-
puter with, disk drive and color moni-
tor. Like new condition. Programming
and operational manuals Included.
Originally $1500/Sales Price $300.
Call 227-1873 after 5 p.m.

For Sale: Upright freezer in excel-
lent condition. Perfect for summer
garden freezing. Price $125. Call 227-
1873 after 5 p.m.

Matching multi-striped br6wn
and tan sofa and loveseat, $299.
Foam queen size sleeper sofa mat-
tress,' $25. Call 648-8806. 2tc 6/6

Older piano with a roll top, good
for beginner or for antique collector,
asking $600. 229-6965 after 4:00
p.m. tfe 6/6
One Dyno Comp II trick bike with
rotor, excel. cond., $195. Etema gui-
tar, like new, with case, $90. Uniden
model MC230 depth flasher like new
with transducer and manuals, $60.
648-4062. 2tc 6/6

Camper trailer with double axle.
$2,000 obo. 229-6654 or 227-1888.
Crib, youth bed, double bed, all
in one. Reg. .$299.95. sale $199.95.
Call 1-942-6366 4tc 5/23


TRADE &SEVIE


services
d, East-
n Pass,
roe and


Reliable housecleaning a
offered for St. George Islan
point, Apalachicola, Indiai
Cape San Blas, Port St. J
Mexico Beach. We supply c
supplies and equipment. C;
8268 or 653-9557 for appoil
If no answer, please leave n
Business run by Georganna
and Ronda Newell. 2

ALCOHOLICS ANONYM
Port St. Joe Serenity G
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:(
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesd
p.m.
All meetings at St. Jan
Episcopal Church, all times
For further AA informal
call 648-8121.

Port St. Joe Lodge No
Reg. Stated Communi
1st and 3rd Thursday
month, Masonic Hall, 207 Re:
G. Godwin, W.M.
'Fred Nehring,. Sec.


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
Stfc 6/6.

THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 6/6


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box A1C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfc 6/6


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns
0

Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-387, Howard Creek
tfc 6L6


JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
24 Years Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Acci-
dents. No charge for first conference.
tfc 6/6


Lawn Mowing, Weed Eating,
Trimming. Quality work, low rates.
229-2720. 2tp 6/6


>ur own Gulf Co. Transportation, the Com-
all 670- tnunity Transportation Coordinator
ntment. for Gulf County has funds available
message. to provide transportation to persons
Raffield in the county who are because of
tp 6/13 physical or mental disabilities, in-
come status, or age or who for oth-
OUS er reasons are unable to transport
group themselves or to purchase trans-
00 p.m. portation and are therefore, depen-
dent upon others to obtain access
to health fare, employment, educa-
tion, shopping, social activities, or
ay 8:00 other life-sustaining, activities, who
are not subsidized for transporta-
nes tion financial assistance or specific
eastern trips.
tion For information regarding fare
structure and advance notice re-
quirements or to access this service
contact Gulf County Transportation
. 111 at 229-6550 or come by the office
ication at 200 Peters St., Port St Joe, Floi-
y of ea. ida. Gulf Coordinated Transporta-
id Ave. tion operates under the sponsor-
ship of State of Florida Trans-
tfc 5/23 portation Disadvaniaged Commis-
sion. tfc 5/30


'-LMARy KAY
Carolyn J. Jones
Independent Beauty Consultant
222 Sea Pine Lane Port St. Joe
(904) 648-5194
tfc 6/6

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Prems
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc 6/6





CATHERINE L. COLLIER
Independent Sales Representative
211 Allen Memorial Way Port St. Joe
(904) 229-6460 tfc 6/6


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!








Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. tIc 6/6


Women's Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Church. 227-1145 or 227-1128.

Narcotics Anonymous
Open Meetings on Monday 8 p.m.
at 302 Reid Ave., and on
Friday 8 p.m. at
The Phantry Hotel
Help Line 1-800-212-8424

Active Styles
Beauty Salon
WELCOMES
DAISY from Orlando'
Introducing the latest styles in cuts,
perms and foil frostings.
227-1155

BOOT & SHOE
REPAIR
COWBOY'S TRADITION

102 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
tfc 6/6s


COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581 fc6/


STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
'Where Quality Is Higher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 6/6


All types of yard work. Mowing,
raking, and trimming. Reasonable.
229-6435. tfc 6/6


LAWN MOWER &
SMALL ENGINE
REPAIR
call 229-6965


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043


Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 6/6


CONTRACTOR ,C -..






U Bill Quaranta
Homes Outhouses
Old-Fashioned Quality
tfc 6/6Commercial Buildings

Hand-Nailed Craftsmanship
Log Cabins Additions


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL

(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Franoes Chason 229-8747
ChF -Shoaf 227-7429 D6h's Stridkland 647-5404
PORT ST. JOE
1609 Monument: Large 4 BR 2 1/2 bath masonry home with living room, dining
room, den, fireplace, garage, in excellent neighborhood. $75,000.00.
213 Tapper Ave.: 3 BR, 2 bath brick home with den and deck, carpet and vinyl, ch/
a. Recently remodeled. Large lot. $65,000.00
209 Allen Memorial Way: 3 BR, 2 bath, ch/a, nice yard, privacy fence. $85,000.00.
1609 Marvin Ave.: Good starter home. 3 BR, 1 bath masonry construction with stor-
age shed, window A/C, new roof. $34,000.00.
1601 Marvin Ave: Very neat 3 BR, 1 bath home, carpet & vinyl, new deck and
screened porch. Assumable Loan. $43,500.00.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$125,900.00. REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
1807 Marvin Ave.: 3 bedroom, 1 bath home new roof, new ch/a unit (w/hot water
recovery heat system), plumbing recently re-done, new hot water heater, chain
link fenced yard, termite inspected. Great Buy $34,0009.90. Reduced to
$29,500.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedro in great condition, new roof,
AND UND1
517 1/2 4th St.: Apartment building wih wo ished apartments, each two bed-.
room, 1 bath. A Great Invnts could make your mort-
gage payments. Good ren LY $50,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
BARRIER DUNES
Immaculate Gulf view townhouse with 3 decks, 2 Ilrge bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths,
great kichen with all appliances, living room and dining area all beautifully dec-
orated. Amenitities too numerous to mention.' Carport and storage. Only
$125,000.00.
OAK GROVE
105 Hunter St.: 3BR, 1 bath with extra room which could be 4th BR, living room, din-
ing room, den, screened porch, privacy fence, carpet, ch/a on 2 lots.
$29,500.00.
WHITE CITY
Remodeled country home. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen all
up-dated. Short drive to town. $32,000.00.
WEWAHITCHKA
2 BR, 1 BA Mobile home Unfurnished w/5 acres plus 1 BR, 1 BA Mobile Home
with large storage building. $42,000.00
2 BR, 1 BA Mobile home with 5 acres Unfurnished. $27,000.00.
OVERSTREET
Wetappo Creek: 10.51 acres, waterfront, Underground permits. Possible owner fi-
nancing. Owner will possibly subdivide property. $46,000.00.
2 BR, 2 bath, with fireplace is on approx. 6.1 .acres. Approx. 1,512 sq. ft. plus large
deck. Only $52,000
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2 bath home located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must see to appreciate.
$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
5th Ave., Beacon Hill: Log Cabin and barn located on 4 lots (3 landscaped) also 1
1 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home. $36,900, without mobile home $31,900.
Between Sea St. and 1st St., Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 5 BR, 2 story home with
game room. Completely furnished. $150,000.00.
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
Gulf Aire: single family'residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St.: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 corner lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue, $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000.00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000,00.
FOR RENT
For rent. Exceptionally nice like new apartment. 2 BR, 2 bath with furnished
kitchen, washer/dryer hook up $400.00 monthly.


PAGE


D 6R


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer trc 6/6

LIC # RF0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR NEW CONSTRUCTION REPAIRS
REMODELING RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
INSTALLATION OF WATER LINES AND SEWER LINES
MINOR ELECTRICAL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA TFC 6/6 904/229-6821


PJ'S ROOFING
ALL TYPES OF ROOFS C 6/6
Hot Roofing, Built-Up, 1-Ply System
Free Estimates
Phone (904) 229-6201 PAT TOUSIGNANT


-- . .


. . .




-- .5--


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 1991


Hurricane Awareness Week June 9-15


Governor Lawton Chiles has
designated June 1991 as Florida
Hurricane Awareness Month. To
heighten awareness as to the







The following is being offered for
sale:
1979 Kenworth Tractor with
1986 Pitt Trailer
1985 Buick Park Ave.
1989 White Boat and Trailer with
20 hp Evinrude motor
1989 Blazer Bass Boat with 50
hp Evinrude Motor and Silkride trail-
er
1978 Ford Granada
1990 Dihatsu Charade SX
For more information contact
Wesley Atkins at St. Joe Papermakers
Credit Union 227-1156.

1985 Nissan Truck, runs good.
body needs work. Call 647-5658.
Itc 6/13

1980 Delta 88 Olds, good run-
ning cond., cold a/c, $950. 227-
1782. 2tc 6/6

'83 Lincoln Town car, Signature
edition, $3,000. 229-6654 or 227-
1888. tfc 5/30







Boat for sale. 14 foot, Galv. tilt
trailer, 18 hp Evinrude. $750. See at
Indian Pass. 229-6752. 3tp 6/13

35' shrimp boat, 453 with 3 to 1
hydraulic gear, ready to work, $3,800.
Call 648-8779. 2tc 6/6

Attention Boat Owners: Towers,
t-tops, radar arches, at prices you can
afford. Contact John Sims at Ameri-
can Bandit, 912-246-2499. Financing
available upon approval. 4te 5/30







WANTED: Good used refrigerator
and gas range. Call 227-1829.
tfc 6/6


SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


Yard Sale, Saturday; 8 a m. cen-
tral time. Includes furniture and some
antiques. 2nd St & kG tVeRd'?'-
@ (22A), Wewa. ltc6/13

Yard Sale, Friday and Saturday,
606 Park Ave., Highland View.
Dishes, furniture and miscellaneous.











Multi-family garage sale, --Satur-
day, 8:00 until. All size clothing,
kitchen, household, and miscellane-
ous items, 1911 Cypress Ave.

Yard Sale, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Saturday. morning. 4th St._ in High-
land View.

New-Old 3-day yard sale, 802 4th
St. behind old St. Joe Ice House, June
13-15, open 10 to 1 and 5 to 7. New
bike, wheelchair, new clothes, hot
plate, 3 big elect. fans, like new small
TV, tires for car size 15. Look around,
your dollar could get you what you
want. We thank you and may God
bless you. Mrs. Miriam Poppell

1907 Cypress Ave. Large variety
of items. Saturday, June 15, 8 a.m.
until. Lots to choose from.

Furniture sale and much more.
Mini storage shed #34 (PSJ). Satur-
day, June 15, 9:00 3:00 p.m.
ltc6/13

Yard Sale: Saturday, 8 am- lpm.
1317 McClellan Ave. Toys, dishes,
children's clothes and lots of misc.
ltc 6/13

Yard Sale Friday and Saturday,
June 14 & 15, 9 a.m. until. 1601
Marvin Ave. Clothes, dishes, furni-
ture, lots of other misc. 227-7377.

New and Old Yard Sale. Several
families. Business clothing marked
down 50% to 60% old items furni-
ture, clothing, toys etc. Saturday 8
a.m. until. 1306 Long Ave. Rain can-
cels. No early sales. 227-2105.

RE-SALE CONNECTION
210 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8337.
New and Used Merchandise -
5tp 5/30

Bargain Basket, Mon. Sat., 9-5
at 445 2nd Ave, Highland View. Baby
items, children's- clothes, misc. Am in-
terested in buying baby fumiture will
accept donations. 227-1704.
S. tfc-6/6


danger from hurricanes, the week
of June 9 through 15 has been
designated for hurricane aware-
ness in Florida. The population of







Gulf Coordinated Transporta-
tion is accepting applications to fill
part time driver positions. Applicants
must possess a valid Florida Chauf-
feurs license and a clean driving
record. Job description, qualifica-
tions, and application may be ob-
tained from the GCARC office at 200
Peters StL, Port St. Joe. Closing date
for accepting applications is 6/26/91,
at 4:00 p.m. Gulf Coordinated Trans-
portation operates under the sponsor-
ship of State of Florida Transportation
Disadvantaged Commission.
2te 6/13

Sr. High Chemistry/Science:
Wewahitchka High School, Approved
Salary schedule. Contact: Larry A.
Mathes or Sara Joe Wboten, Wewa-
hitchka High School, P. 0. Box 130,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465, (904) 639-
2228. Application deadline June 27,
1991, 12:00 C.S.T. Wewahitchka High
School is an equal opportunity em-
ployer. 3tc 6/6

School Bus Driver: Overstreet
Route, Wewahitchka: Approved salary
schedule. Applications will be accept-
ed beginning Monday, June 10, 1991,
through Friday, June 21, 1991. Writ-
ten application form or transfer re-
quest is required.
Contact Chris Earley, Coord. of
Operations, Gulf Co. School Board,
Bus Barn, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Tel-
ephone (904) 227-1204.
Applications may be picked up at
the Bus Barn behind Port St. Joe Jr.-
Sr. High School or at Wewahitchka
Elementary School.
Transfer from present employees
will be given first consideration.
The Gulf Co. School Board Is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
3tc 6/6

School Food Service Worker,
Asst. Manager. Port St. Joe High
School. Approved salary schedule. Ap-
plications will be accepted beginning
Monday, June 10, 1991, through Fri-
day, June 21, 1991. Written applica-
tion form or transfer request is re-
quired.
Contact Chris Earley, Coord. of
Operations, Gulf Co. School Board,
Bus Barn, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Tel-
ephone (904) 227-1204.
Applications may be picked up at
the Bus Barn behind Port St Joe Jr.-
Sr. High School.
Transfer from present employees
will be given first consideration.
The Gulf Co. School Board is an
Equal Opportunity Employer..
3tc.6/6

Nursing assistant positions avail--
able with new pay scale. Apply at Bay
St Joseph Care Center. tfc 6/6

Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
Apalachicola River, within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
.capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
1/2 overtime pay, on-call duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with-water, sew-
erage, and lawn maintenance provid-
ed free.
Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the .State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
(26) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten (0)_ paid holidays. Free continu-
ing educational -courses offered by
State University $500. annual allow-
ance for job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance- with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience; or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse in
accordance with Florida .Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst, P. O. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 6/6

POSTAL JOBS $11.41 to $14.90/
hr. For exam and application informa-
tion call 219-769-6649 ext. FL-171 9
. a.m. 9 p.m. 7 days. 6tp 5/23


Port St. Joe Western Auto now
honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St. Joe West-
ern Auto. Discover TOO! 227-1105..
tfc 6/6

FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
t. fc 6/6


. NOW OPEN SIMMONS BAYOU, C-30 LOOK FOR SIGN
PICK YOUR OWN BLUEBERRIES
$1.00 a Pound
S NO PESTICIDES
229-6604 after 5
Mon. Fri., After 5 PM All Day Sat., After Church on Sundays


the state of Florida has been
growing rapidly during the past
25 years while at the same time
there has been a large decrease
in the number and strength of
hurricanes striking the state. As
a result, over 85 percent of the
population more than 8.7 mil-
lion residents have never expe-
rienced the devastating effects of
a major hurricane.
The National Weather Service
together with state, county, and
local emergency preparedness of-
ficials, and the news media,
would like residents of Florida to
become familiar with safety rules
and actions which can help pre-
vent loss of life and property be-
fore, during, and after a hurri-
cane strikes.
Florida remains the most hur-
ricane-prone state in the United
States despite its decreased hur-
ricane activity during the past 25
years. In this century, 54 hurri-
canes or 36 percent of the hurri-
canes to hit the United States
have hit Florida. Major hurri-
canes those with sustained
winds greater than 110 miles per
hour have hit Florida 22 times,
or 37 percent of the total landfalls
in the United States.


PUBLIC AUCTION
MUNICIPAL WAREHOUSE
1002 Tenth Street
Saturday. June 2, 1991
10:00 A.M. E.D.T.
Premises will be open at 8:00 am. for Inspection.
AUCTIONEER: WI.LIAM J. RISK
TERMS
All sales are final and payable in cash upon
completion of Auction. A deposit of 25 percent of
the total sale price will be accepted upon comple-
tion of Auction and the balance to be paid at the
time merchandise is removed from prendmises. All
merchandise must be removed from the premises
within ten (10) days from the date of Auction.
Telephone for additional information (904)
229-8247.
Publish: June 13 and 20, 1991.


Florida averages between one
and two hurricane strikes per
year with a major hurricane strik-
ing Florida on average once every
four years. The frequency and
strength of hurricane strikes var-
ies in different sections of the
state.
...In the Southeast... Cape Ca-
naveral area southward including
the upper Keys, one landfall every
four years on average with 42
percent of the hurricanes major
hurricanes.
...In the Southwest...Tampa
Bay area southward including the
lower and middle Keys, one land-
fall every five years on average
with 50 percent of the hurricanes
major hurricanes.
...In the Northwest... north of
Tampa Bay area to Pensacola
area, one landfall every four years
with 27 percent of the hurricanes
major hurricanes.
...In the Northeast... north of
Cape Canaveral to the Femandi-
na Beach area, one landfall every
nine years on average with no
major hurricanes during this cen-
tury.
These averages for most of
the state are rather high in spite
of the great decrease in hurricane


Clerk's Office, P.O. Box 278, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
All bids shall meet specifications or be an ap-
proved equal. Bids shall be sealed in an envelope
and plainly marked "Bid No. 001-358". The City of
Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept any or all
bids, waive any formalities, and to choose the bid
deemed best to meet the City's needs. Bids must
be good for 30 days after opening. All Bids F.O.B..
Port St. Joe.
This bid must conform to Section 287.133
(3)(a) Florida Statutes, on Public Entity Crimes.
Bids must be submitted to the City Clerk's
Office, on or before 5:00 p.m., EDT, June 18,
1991. Bids opening will be held at the regular City
Commission Meeting. June 18, 1991, at 8:00 a.m..
EDT, in the Municipal Building.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
By /a/ LA. Farris


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED S Cty Auditor/Clerk
BID NO. 9091-25 Publish: June 6 and 13, 1991.
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida will receive sealed bids from any BID NUMBER 001-3B9
person, company, or corporation interested in sell- The City of Port St. Joe, Florida invites bids
ing the County the following described personal on the followingltems:
property: One (1) Flail Mower
(1) Playground structure to include: Specifications may be obtained from the City
playshell slide, handhold pipe bend, Clerk's Office, P.O. Box 278, Port St Joe, Florida
climbing tire, step tire, slide pole. hori- 32456.
zontal overhead ladder. vertical pipe All bids shall meet specifications or be an ap-
ladder, vertical pipe bend ladder, hori- proved equal. Bids shall be sealed in an envelope
zontal balance log. big wheel, tire tree. and plainly'marked "Bid No. 001-359'. The City of
spiral slide and inclined balance log. Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept any or all
Bidders should include scaled draw- bids, waive any formalities, and to choose the bid
wings If possible. deemed best to meet the City's needs. Bids must
Bidders may include an alternate In- be good for 30 days after opening. All Bids F.O.B.,
stallation price separate from the Port St. Joe.
structure bid. This bid must conform to Section 287.133
Questions on specifications should be (3)(a) Florida Statutes, on Public Entity Crimes.
referred to Ralph Rish at (904) 229- Bids must be submitted to the City Clerk's
8944, 1000 5th St., Port St Joe, FL Office, on or before 5:00 p.m.. EDT. June 18,
32456 1991. Bids opening will be held at the regular City
Delivery date must be specified, and liquidat- Commission Meeting, June 18, 1991, at 8:00 p.m..
ed damages for failure to deliver unit on specified ET. in the Municipal Building.
date will be set at $25.00 per day. THE CrY OF PORT ST. JOE
Please indicate on your envelope that this is By: /s/ LA. Farris
a sealed bid, the bid number, and what Item the City Auditor/Clerk
.biris for. ,. Publlsh:Jun56.and 3,, l991
Bids w ,ll be -lrc -d unl 7 o'ti cloc k p.m., OTICE TO C
eastern time, on June 25, 1991. at the Office of NOTICE TO RECEE SEALEDB BIDS
the Clerk of the Circuit Court. Gulf County Court- The Board o ty C oners of Gulf
house, 1000 Fifth Street. Port St. Joe, Florida Th.B ar -o-Cont Commis ..sioero. ...
'32456. County, Florida wll receive sealed bids from any
The Board reserves the right to reject any perso, company, or corporation interested in pur-
and all bids. chasing the following described personal property:
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 2-1977 LT9000 dump trucks with
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Cummings engines. Trucks can be
BY: /s/ James E. Creamer, Chairman viewed at the Gulf County Road De-
Publish: June 13 and 20. 1991. pariment I Wewahltchka, Florida.


NOTICE OF REQUEST TO RECEIVE BIDS
The Gulf County School Board Invites inter-
ested firms to submit sealed bids for LP (Propane)
Gas for Wewahitchka area schools for school year
.91-92. Specifications and bid instructions are
available by contacting Mr. Charles T. Watson. Di-
rector of Support Services, Gulf County Schools.
Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(904) 229-8256 or (904) 639-2871. The deadline
for receiving bids Is June 25. 1991.
Publish: June 13 and 20, 1991.
REQUEST TO RECEIVE BIDS
The Gulf County School Board will receive
bids until June 25, 1991 at noon for the annual
Externnnation/Pest Control contract for all school
facilities.: Interested parties should contact T. Wat-
son at the School Board Offces in the Gulf County
Courthouse or telephone (904) 229-8256 to obtain
bid information and instructions.
Publish: June 13 and 20, 1991.
NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION
THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD.
Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County School
Board'proposes to amend and adopt policies, as
provided for in the Administrative Procedures Act,
or the purpose of bringing said policies into com-
pliance with Florida Statutes and State Board- of
Education Rules.
Summary: The following is a brief description of
each proposal change of Chapter 6GX23.
3.443 Clarify and establish procedures for
early admission students found
within the Pupil Progression Plan
Economic Impact: These proposals will result in
no direct costs associated with Implementation.
IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT:
Time: 5:30 p.m. E.T.
Date: Tuesday, July 2. 1991
Place: Board Room, Gulf County School
Board Office. Gulf County Court-
house. Highway 71, Port St. Joe, FL
32456
The entire test of the proposed rules can be
inspected during regular office hours at the Gulf
County School Board Office, Gulf County Court-
house. Highway 71, Port St Joe, FL
Special legal authority under which the
adoption is authorized and the law being Imple-
mented and interpreted are made specific.
The addition and changes are proposed by
David Bidwell, Director of Instructional Services
and approved for consideration by B. Walter Wild-
er, Superintendent.
Amendments:
Bul til
3.443 The Pupil Progression Plan
Publish: June 13 and 20, 1991.
NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION
THE G OULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County School
Board proposes to amend and adopt policies, as
provided for in the Administrative Procedures Act.
for the purpose of bringing said policies into conm-
pliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of
Education Rules.
Summary: The following is a brief description of
each proposal change of Chapter 6GX23 .
3.487 Update and establish procedures for
school sponsored trips.
Economic Impacet: These proposals will result In
no direct costs associated with Implementation.
IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT:
Time: 5:30 p.m., E.T.
Date: Tuesday, July 2, 1991
Place: Board Room, Gulf County School
Board Office, Gulf County Court-
house, Highway 71, Port St. Joe, FL
32456
The entire test of the proposed rules can be
Inspected during regular office hour at the Gulf
County School Board Office, Gulf County Court-
house, Highway 71, Port St. Joe, FL
Special legal authority under which the
adoption is authorized and the law being imple-
mented and Interpreted are made specific.
The addition and changes are proposed by
Charles T. Watson, Director of Support Services
and approved for consideration by B. Walter Wild-
er; Superintendent.. -
Amendments: -
3,487.. School Sponsored Trips
Publish: June 13 and 20, 1991.
BID NUMBER 001-358
The City of Port St. Joe. Florida invites bids
on the following Item: -
One (1) Riding Lawn Mower
Specifications may be obtained from the City


Monday rnaay.
Delivery date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver unit
on specified date will be set at $25.00 per day.
Please indicate on your envelope that this is
a sealed bid, the bid number, and what item the
bid is for.
Bids will be received until 7 o'clock p.m.,
eastern time, on June 25. 1991, at the Office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court. Gulf County Court-
house, I000 Fifth Street. Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
BY: /s/ James E. Creamer, Chairman
Publish: June 6 and 13. 1991.
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9091-23
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested in sell-
ing the County the following described personal
property:
Roadside litter prevention signs. The
signs shall be a minimum 198 square
inches and be the sandblasted type.
They shall have a painted border ring
and the message "PLEASE DONT LIT.
TER'. Bidders shall include as an alter-
nate bid: 4" x 4" post with pointed de-
sign and grouted ring around the top.
Quantities: minimum 25 signs and
post, maximum 50 signs and post
Delivery date must be specified.
S Liquidated damages for failure to deliver unit
on specified date will be set at $25.00 per day.
Please indicate on your envelope that this is
a sealed bid, the bid number, and khat Item the
bid Is for.
Bids will be received until 7 o'clock p.m.,
eastern time, on June 25, 1991. at the Office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Fifth Street. Port St. Joe, Florida
S32456.
The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
BY: /s/ James E. Creamer. Chairman
Publish: June 6 and 13, 1991.
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF '
ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION
NOTICE OF AGENCY ACTION ON
PERMIT APPLICATION
The Department gives notice of Its issuance
of a permit File number 231961461, to Mr. Joel
Phillip Davis to construct a 208' x 4' wooden dock
in St. Joe Bay, Gulf County, Florida.
Persons whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative deter-
mination hearingsr In accordance with Section
120.57. Florida Statutes. The petition must con-
form to the requirements of Florida Administrative
Code Chapters 17-103 and 28-5 and must be filed
(received) in the Department's Office of General
Counsel, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Flor-
ida 32399-2400, within fourteen (14) days of pub-
lication of this notice. Failure to file a petition
Within the fourteen (14) days constitutes a waiver
of any right such person has to an administrative
determination (hearing) pursuant to Section
120.57, Florida Statutes.
If a petition is filed, the administrative hear-
ing process is designed to formulate agency action.
Accordingly, the Department's final action may be
different from the proposed agency action. There-
fore, persons who may not wish to file a petition
may wish to intervene in the proceeding. A petition
for Intervention must be filed pursuant to Rule 28-
5.207, Florida Administrative Code, at least five (5)
days before the final hearing and be filed with the
hearing officer if one has been assigned at the Di-
vision of Administrative Hearings, -Department of
Administration, 1230 Apalachee Parkway, Talla-
hassee, FL 32399-1500. If no hearing officer has
been assigned, the petition is to be filed with the
Department's Office of General Counsel. 2600
Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
2400. Failure to petition to intervene within the al-
lowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right
such person has to request a hearing under Sec-
tion 12-0.57, Florida Statutes.
The application is available for inspection
Monday through Friday (except for legal holidays),
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at 340 West 23rd Street.
Suite E, Panama City, Florida 32405.
Publish: June 6 and 13, 1991.


landfalls during the past 25
years. Hurricanes usually affect
Florida in a cyclic manner, and
many locations have gone more
than 25 years without any direct
hurricane strikes, and over 50
years without a major hurricane
strike.
During this period of time the
population growth of Florida has
been very rapid, so that over 85
percent or 8.7 million coastal
county residents (including those
around Lake Okeechobee) have
never experienced the devastating
effects of a major hurricane.
Florida Hurricane Awareness
Week has as its purpose the edu-
cation of both newer and older
residents as to the dangers of
hurricanes, and actions to be tak-
en before, during, and after hurri-
canes. This can best be done by
facts about what has happened
during past hurricanes, what can
happen in future hurricanes, and
safety rules, as they relate to your
local area.
The local National Weather
Service offices and state, county,
and local emergency management
officials, together with the news
media, are working together to
get needed information to the


LEGAL NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given pursuant to Section
367.045, Florida Statutes, of the application of
GULF AIRE PROPERTIES DOING BUSINESS AS
GULF AIRE WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT
to amend its Certificate No. 422-5 for wastewater
service to add and delete territory in Gulf County,
Florida as follows:
ADDITION A (SEASHORE TOWNHOUS-
ES AND ADJACENT PROPERTY)
Township 6 South, Range 11 West and
Township 7 South, Range 11 West.
Gulf County. Florida.
A portion of SE 1/4 of Fractional Sec-
tion 31, Township 6 south, Range 11
West; a portion of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4
of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range
11 West and a portion of NE 1/4 of NE
1/4; Fractional Section 8, Township 7
South, Range 11 West. being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Beginning at a point on the southwest-
erly right-of-way line of U.S. Highway
No. 98 (State Road No. 30), said point
being 33.00 feet from and at right an-
gle to the center line of said U.S. High-
way No. 98, said point also being N.
3951'07' W. 431.52 feet from the
point of intersection of said right-of-
way line with the south line of Frac-
tional Section 31. Township 6 South,
Range 11 West; thence along said
right-of-way line as follows: S.
395100' E. 431.52 feet to a point on
the line between Fractional Section 31..
Township 6 South, Range 11 West and
Fractional Section 6, Township 7
South, Range 11 West, said point being
S. 89"52'49 W. 98.01 feet from the
section corner thence S 89"52'49' W.
along said Section line for 22.106 feet
to a point that is 50.00 feet from and
at right angle to the center-line of said
U.S. Highway No. 98; thence S.
39'51'00 E. 359.90 feet; thence, leav-
ing said right-of-way line S. 5009'00"
W. 222 feet. more or less, to a point on
the mean high water line of the Gulf of
-,Mexicou thence meanderlng Northwest-
rly along and with said mean high wa-
ter line to a point that bears S.
50*09'00' W. from the Point of Begin'
ning: thence N. 50"09'00" E. 263 feet,
more.or less, to the Point of Beginning.
ADDMON B (POOL AND TENNIS
COURTS)
Commencing at the southwest corner
of Section 32, Township 6 south,
Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida;
thence N. 89052'49" E. along the South
line of said Section 32, according to the
record plat of Port SLt. Joe Beach, Unit
2 as recorded in Plat Book 2. page 6,
Public Records of Gulf County, Florida;
for a distance of 10.035 feet to a point
on the Northeasterly right-of-way line
of U.S. Highway No. 98 (State Road No.
30) said point being 33.00 feet from
and at right angle to the centerline of
said U.S. Highway No. 98; thence along
said Northeasterly right-of-way line as
follows: N. 39s51'00" W 1067.05 feet;
thence N. 39"53'03" W. 69.08 feet;
thence leaving said Northeasterly right-
of-way line, N. 49*27'5" E. 384.67 feet;
thence N. 49B0o28" E. 331.33 feet to
the point of curvature of a curve to the
left, said curve having a radius of
305.00 feet; thence Northeasterly along
the arc of said curve through a central
angle of 2525'19" for 135.33 feet to
the Southwest corner of Lot 39, Block
S"C", Gulf Aire Phase II as recorded in
Plat Book 3, pages 30 and 31, in the
Public Records of Gulf County. Florida
for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
S. 66"17ir51" E. along the South line of
said Lot 39 for 155.46 feet to the
Southeast corner of said Lot 39; thence
N. 2*42'30" E. along the East line of
Block "C" 128.82 feet; -thence N.
8931'41" E. 225.31 feet; thence S.
0*21'51" W. 192 feet; thence N.
8938'09 W. 230.55 feet; thence N.
67-43'35" W. (radially) 185.19 feet to a
point on'a curve to the left (Northeast-
erly), thence along said curve having a
delta of 11"17'22". radius of 305 feet
and an arc distance of 60.10 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING, having a chord
bearing of N. 29*20'50" E. This de-
scribedlegal is -for common ingress
and egress to surrounding properties.
ADDmION C (IKE DURENmS ACREAGE)
Commence at the NE corner of Original


public prior to, during, and after
a hurricane threat. Your best
source of information for your
community are these representa-
tives in your area.
Make your plans now in case
this is the year that a devastating
hurricane strikes your area.




Backyard Bible

Club Activities

There will be a backyard bible
club held Monday through Fri-
day, June 17-21st. Activities will
begin at 9:30 a.m. until 11:00
a.m. for grades one through six.
Commencement will be held in
the Highland View Baptist
Church on Friday evening at 7:00
p.m. The clubs will be held at:

Richards Home, 5535 Ala-
bama Ave., St. Joe Beach; Man-
gum Home, 301 Hwy. 98, High-
land View; Guillot home, 306
Fifth Street, Highland View; and
Whitfield Home, 419 Second
Street, Highland View.

Come join the fun. There will
be crafts, refreshments, and lots
more.

A group of young people from
North Carolina will be conducting
these clubs.


Government Lot 7, Fractional Section
31, Township 6 South. Range 11 West.
Gulf County. Florida. and run thence S
89"5347' W for 865.72 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence S
49"0727.5" W for 794.98 feet; thence
N 40W5623" W for 686.19 feet; thence
N 89"53'4T' E for 1050.75 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land
lying and being in Original Government
Lot7, Fractional Section 31, Township
6 South. Range 11 West. Gulf County,
Florida, and having an area of 6.26
acres more or less.
DELETION D (COMMON AREA)
Commence at the point of intersection
of the Northeastern right of way line of
State Road 30-U.S. Highway 98 and
the South boundary line of Section 32,
Township 6 South, Range 11 West. as
corded In Plat Book 2, Page 6, in the
Public Records of Gulf County, Florida,
thence South 89062'49" West along the
South boundary line of said Section 32
for 22.105 feet; thence North 395100"r
West along the Northeastern right of
way line of said State Road 30-U.S.
Highway 98. said right of way being
66.00 feet wide, for 1067.052 feet;
thence North 39*53'03" West along
said right of way for 129.96 feet;
thence South 490q7'27.5" West for
66.01 feet to a point on the Southwest-
ern right of way line of said State Road
30-U.S. Highway 98 for the POINT OF
BEGINNING: Thence North 39*53'03"
West along said right of way. .line for
201.20 feet to a Point of Curve; thence
along the arc of a curve to the left
which has a radius of 39,580.755 feet
and a central angle of 00"59'30" for
685.06 feet to a Point of Tangent;
thence North 40*52'32.5" West along
said right of way line for 468.62 feet;
thence South 4907127.5" West for 217
feet, more or less, to a point on the
mean high water line of the Gulf of
Mexico; thence meander aedd). mean
high water line in a Southeasterly dl- .
reaction for 1,355 feet. more or less. to a
point that is South 49W0727.5" West of
the Point of Beginning; thence North
49W0727.5" East for 225 feet, more or
less, to the Point of Beginning.
Said parcel of land being in Fractional
Section 31. Township 6 South. Range
11 West. Gulf County. Florida. and
having an area of 6.96 acres, more or
less. This parcel of land is shown as
Mract A on the official plat of Gulf Alre.
as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 13, in
the dblic Records of Gulf County.
Any objection to the said application must be
made in writing within thirty (30) days from this
date to the Director, Division of Records and Re-
porting, Florida Public Service Commission. 101
East Gaines Street. Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
0870. A copy of said objection should be mailed to
the applicant whose address s:
Gulfalre Properties, Inc.
Doing Business As:
GulfAire Waste Water Treatment Plant
P.O. Box 13332
"Mexico Beach, FL32410
Publish: May 30. June 6 and 13, 1991.


PAGE 7B


,J'LLEMORE
REAL ESTATE
INC.



Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410

(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478


Gulf Aire Subdivision: 412B Gulf Aire Dr.: 1/2
duplex. Unique 3 bdrm., 2 ba., custom deisnged
home, cathedral ceiling, stone fp, ch/a, garage, all
appliances. Many amenities. $79,900.
St. Joe Beach, corner Bay St. & Alabama: 24'x48'
quality built Skyline mobile home. Formal liv. rm. &
din. rm., den, with kitchen. Comes with all
appliances. Cen. h/a, Ig. dbl. garage, offers
workshop and super storage. Landscaped, chain link
fenced yard, $55,000.


ELLEN ALLEMORE, Broker 648-8939


SALES and RENTALS
'-.. < ',.:; ,,,.- .. _.





~'//////////~;///////~i~'~l~t~











I o i ..' *I Io


Crape Myrtle



Popular and



Easy to Grow
By Roy Lee Carter weak and spindly, and usi
County Extension Director produce few flowers. Also, dis
Crape myrtle is one of Flori- problems, such as powdery
da's most popular ornamental dew and- sooty mold, are r
plants. It's very attractive, has a common on crape myrtle pl
long blooming season, is easy to growing in shady areas.
propagate, and will grow on just Crape myrtle does well
about every type of soil in our most well drained Florida s
state. In this article I will offer However, when planted in pc
some tips on establishing and drained soil, crape myrtles
maintaining crape myrtle for best very little and often die.
growth and flower production.
Crape myrtle is a favorite December through Marc]
among Florida landscapers, be- the normal dormant season -
cause of the beauty of both its the best time to plant crape n
bark and blossoms, its adaptabil- tles. Of course, you can p
ity to Florida soils, its variety of container grown crape my
sizes. Standard upright crape anytime, if you provide adeq
myrtle may reach a height of 20 water after transplanting. C
feet. It can be used as a small parted with other landscape o
tree or a large shrub, depending mental, crape myrtles are
on how you prune it. The other to transplant, and the mort
two common varieties of crape rate during transplanting is (
myrtle are the 'dwarf and the im- low. Also, fairly large plants
proved weeping type. My informa- be moved successfully.
tion on crape myrtle was provided means you can use crape mf
by Extension Horticulture Spe- to provide a feeling of maturi
cialist, Dr. Robert Black. a young landscape in a i
Crape myrtle gets its name
from its flowers, which are crin- ,
kled and crape like. These blooms
range in color from red to pink, ]
lavender and white. Even the
bark of crape myrtle is attractive. B radys A
As the plants get older, their bark
peels off in irregular patches, Gospel recording artists
leaving an interesting mottled de- Bradys" will be appearing in
sign. Crape myrtle is a versatile cert at the Church of God
addition to the landscape, provid- Highland View on June 15 s
ing special eye appeal during eve- ing at 7:00 p.m.
ry season an attractive sculp- 'The Bradys" record
tured form in winter, tender Mark Five Records out of Gr
green foliage in spring, large ville, South Carolina and are
spikes of showy flowers in sum- known for their national sing
mer and, multicolored foliage in
the fall.
Crape myrtles need full sun- ..i .
light for most of the day. Under
heavy shade, the plants become


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Wilbro Plaza
Panama City, FL
769-5348

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1st Tuesday each month


ally
ease
mil-
nore
ants

I in
soils.
poorly
grow

h -
- is
myr-
plant
rtles
uate
Com-
mrna-
easy
tality
quite
can
This
myrtle
ity to
fairly


Roy Lee
Carter

County
Extension


Director

short time.
Crape myrtle flower produc-
tion which runs from June un-
til fall often can be increased
by proper fertilization. Apply
about one-and-a-half pounds of
8-8-8 or 10-10-10 analysis ferti-
lizer for every 100 square feet.
The plants need four applications
of fertilizer per year in early
spring, late spring, summer, and
early winter. To extend the
blooming period for as long as
possible, prune out the faded
flower cluster.
New crape myrtle plants can
be obtained from seeds or
cuttings. Because the cuttings
root so readily, this is the easiest
way to propagate. Hardwood
cuttings will root in November or
December. Softwood cuttings will
root in mid-summer.
Insect pests of craft myrtle in-
clude aphids and white flies. They
excrete a honeydew material
which leads to the buildup of
sooty mold. Ask your garden cen-
ter operator or County Extension
Agent for the recommended mate-
rial to control these pests.


Want to lose weight?
Want to feel better?
The answer to these ques-


Scenic Waterfront Dining I
RIVERFRONT RESTAURANT
At the Rainbow Inn and Marina
123 Water St. Apalachicola
904-653-8139
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Weekend Specialty
Breakfast Huevos Rancheros
Soup Fish Muddle
Now Serving Your Favorite Cocktailsl
Enjoy a The Melon Ball on our patio.
Thursday Evening Senior Citizens Night. Roasted Cornish Gamin
Hen, cornbread stuffing, acorn squash, mashed potatoes & gravy,
cranberry sauce, one trip to salad bar, coffee or tea, homemade
blueberry creme cheese cake............................................. $5.95
Regular Guests: with Soup and Salad bar..........................$8.95
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flounder, red beans and rice, choice of potato, cole slaw, home
made soup and salad bar............................................... $13.95
Saturday Night Seafood Platter for two (Fried or Broiled): Fresh
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stone crab claws, shrimp, oysters, scallops, fresh red snapper,
homemade soup & salad bar.......................................... $25.00
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milk with mint Jelly, baked new potatoes, sauteed zucchini "rib-
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or
Shrimp Parmensan over angel hair pasta, garlic bread, homemade
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New Hours Friday & Saturday Night: Open till11 P.M.
IlI .


PAGE 8B


appearing at Church of God


"The
con-
d in
tart-
with
reen-
well
gle, I


See A Cloud, written by group
member Sylvia Green. This song
won the 1990 "Favorite Southern
Gospel Song" award at the
Awards Convention recently in
Nashville, Tennessee.
Group members Alan and
Gary Brady not only sing, but
they also write songs for the


The Bradys


Weight Loss Group Wants You Now!


tions can be answered by attend-
ing a meeting of the St. Joe
Weight Loss Support Group. The
group is for men, women and
children who have a weight prob-
lem.
For more information, contact
Gall Miles at 227-1555.



GILMORE
MUSIC
229-8889
New Used Vintage
Instruments and
Accessories
We Buy Used
Instruments and
Take Instruments
on consignment.
New Kay Anniversary
Model Accoustic Cuta-
way Guitar with Hard-
shell Plush Case. List
$359.95
Sale $269.95
New Fender Electric
Stratocasters, Fender
Accoustics, Harmony,
Kay, Ovation, Gibson
SG, Casio, Hohner, Pro
Mark, Shure
Used 1955 Epiphone
Electric Archtop $350;
2 Gibson Les Pauls
with Cases
Open 10 am 5 pm
Mon. Sat.
509 10th St.
Gilmore Funeral Home
229-8889


group. As a result, all 10 songs
on their latest project with Mark
Five, titled "Southern Heritage",
are original.
'The Bradys" are a group of
young people who are quick to
point out that the key word be-
hind their music is "ministry".
Each member is well talented in
various forms of gospel music,
but they recognize that all praise
goes to God, "From whom all
blessings flow". Group M.C. and
baritone singer, Keith Brady,
stresses that 'The Bradys" look at
each opportunity to sing, as one
more chance to spread the mes-
sage of salvation in song.
Dr. Elmore and congregation
invites everyone to come and be a
part of this time of Christian fel-
lowship, praise and worship.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, JU~NE 13, 1991


Pre-Construction Offering
For A Limited Time
Furnished Models Starting at C
* Single Family Homes
* 2 Bedrooms, 2 Full Baths
* Landscaped Lot Included
* Clubhouse With Pool
and Fitness Center


nly 79,900
* Pitch and Putt Golf
* (2) Lighted Tennis Courts
* Walk to the Gulf of Mexico
(700' of beach front)
* Much More


For more information call:

(904) 229-2777 or (800) 624-3964

THE COTTAGES ATBARRIER DUNES
Star Route 1, Box 223 Port St. Joe, FL 32456


New VA Clinic
to Benefit Gulf
County Veterans
'The Veterans' Outpatient
Clinic for North Florida has
moved one step closer to reality
and we can anticipate that the
lives of veterans living in Gulf
County will be made a lot easier
by this latest development," an-
nounced Congressman Pete Pe-
terson, of Florida's Second Con-
gressional District.
Peterson's announcement
comes in reaction to this week's
release of bid negotiations by the
Department of Veterans Affairs
for the construction of the Vete-
rans' Outpatient Clinic in Talla-
hassee.
Peterson, a member of the
Committee on Veterans' Affairs
and a Vietnam veteran, said that
the three and a half acre Outpa-
tient Clinic will provide first rate
service and access for the vete-
rans of Gulf County and the en-
tire Second Congressional Dis-
trict.
The VA Outpatient Clinic is a
full service clinic which will serve
74,000 veterans throughout
North Florida including Calhoun,
Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Jack-
son, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty,
Madison, Taylor, and Wakulla
counties. The clinic will also serve
veterans from Georgia and Ala-
bama.
Construction -on the project is
expected to begin in November of
this year.


Now Under Construction

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