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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02887
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 4, 1991
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02887

Full Text














uiSPS 518-880


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INDUSTRY DEEP WATER PORT FINE PEOPLE SAFEST BEACHES IN FLORIDA


FIFTY-THIRD YEAR, NUMBER 32


330 Per Copy
+ 20 Tax ....


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, APRIL 4,1991


Cathy Colbert Sarah Turner


FSU Honors Local Teachers

Stavros Center Recognizes Colbert and Turner


Two Gulf County teachers were recently hon-
ored by the Stavros Center for Free Enterprise
and Economic Education at Florida State Uni-
versity. The prestigious "Apple Award" was pre-
sented to Sarah Turner, a teacher at Port St. Joe
*,Highg ho~ol, and Cathy Colbert. an instructor., at
Highland View Elementary School for their out-
standing efforts and achievements in promoting
economic education in their classrooms.
The two teachers were presented their
awards at a dinner held last Wednesday, at the
Rotunda of the College of Law at FSU by Gus
Stavros, the distinguished entrepreneur' and
benefactor of the center.
Turner and Colbert join other distinguished
teachers as members of the "Free Enterprise Ed-


ucation Hall of Fame".
As one of the eight centers comprising ,the
Florida Council on Economic Education, the'
Stavros Center for the Advancemient of Free En-
terprise and Economic Education has the re-
..sponsibility of furthering economic edyqgtqln in
public schools and the communities of its 12-
county service area.
The center located at Florida State Universi-
ty in Tallahassee offers staff assistance to school
districts, In-service workshops, seminars, speak-
ers to the business community and a loan ser-
vice for books, videos and other materials on ec-
onomic subjects.
Gulf County is represented on the Board of
Directors by Ralph Roberson and George Duren.


Port St. Joe is going to be
faced with securing at least one
more permit in the near future,
according to information provided
the Commission by City Auditor
and Clerk Alden Farris, Tuesday
night.
'We have received word that
we must begin setting up a pro-
gram to secure drainage permits,"
Farris said. The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Regula-
tion has notified the City of a new
federal stormwater permitting re-
quirement which the City must
meet, under the guidelines re-
quiring the permits.
One of the entities which
makes the City responsible for
the report is their Wastewater
Treatment Plant. Any community
with such a plant of at least one
million gallons per day capacity,
must get involved in the program.
Port St. Joe's plant is rated at 35
million gallons per day.
Farris said the city must sub-
mit an application to the Environ-
mental Protection Agency by No-
vember 18 of this year, with
information pointing out topogra-
phy. maps, drainage areas, de-
scription of materials which
stormwaters are exposed to, sig-
nificant spills during the past
three years, storm water testing
for such materials as oil, grease.
pH, BOD, COD, TSS, phosphor-
us; nitrogen, nitrates, and. flow
measurements.
The City has until May 18,
1992 to submit the data gath-
.ered, toEPA.
Farris said there has been no
' criteria provided for the new
drainage planning requirement,
at this time.
DRAINAGE PROBLEM
Immediately after Farris gave
his report, Public Works Superin-
tendent Frank Healey, advised
the Commission of a problem
which would be related to the


Saturday Is Tupelo Festival Day In Wewa


It will be a'big day in Wewahitchka Saturday, with their an-
nual Tupelo Festival and the Tupelo Freshwater Fishing Tourna-
ment, going on all day long.
First order of the day will be a pancake breakfast at the
Methodist Church, beginning at 7:30, featuring all the pancakes
you can eat.
The Festival grounds will be in the City Park on the shores of
Lake Alice in downtown Wewahitchka. Festivities at the festival
headquarters will begin at 10 a.m., CST, and continue until 5:00
p.m., in the afternoon.
Sponsored and produced by the Wewahitchka Chamber of

Commerce, the festival is designed to attract attention to the rec-
reational possibilities in this "City With A Heart on the Dead
Lakes" and to promote their unique product-tupelo honey. The
Apalachicola River valley is the only place the honey Is pro-
duced, with bees using the blossom of the tupelo tree for their
honey-producing nectar. Tupelo honey is the only honey in the
world which does not granulate.
The festival will feature exhibits of antiques, handcrafts,


plants, baked goods, homemade preserves [some using Tupelo
honey], all types of art and canned goods. All the craft and
homemade items will be on sale from various booths.
No commercial displays will be allowed at the festival.
FRESHWATER FISHING TOURNAMENT
In conjunction with the Tupelo Festival, the Chamber will
also be sponsoring the Tupelo Freshwater Fishing Tournament
all day long Saturday.
First place prize awards of $100, and second place prize
awards of $50 will be given away in four separate categories. The
categories include bass, bream, shell cracker and crappie. In ad-
dition to the first and second place awards, a cash award of
$25.00 will be given for the heaviest single fish of each of the
species.
Entry fee for the fishing tournament will be $20.00, with the
contest headquarters set up at Douglas Landing, on Dalkeith
Road. There is no admission fee for the downtown Tupelo Festi-
val grounds.


storm water requirement.
'We have a citizen who put in
a concrete driveway from the
street to his property on Marvin
Avenue and he didn't put any
drain pipe under the -concrete,"
Healey said. He went on to report,
"I don't know if this is going to be
a problem or not, but it certainly
sets a precedent and in most
places in the city, it would cause
a problem."
Attorney William J. Rish said
the city. didn't have an ordinance
requiring a drain pipe under
paved driveways. "People have al-
ways put them in and we didn't
need one. We do have an ordi-
nance stipulating a' minimum size
for the pipes when they are in-
stalled.
The Commission advised
Healey to keep an eye on the in-
stallation and if it causes prob-
lems during times of heavy rain-
fall in the future, the Board will
require the property owner to
make the proper installation. .
In the meantime, the Board
will begin looking at an ordinance
to require drain pipe under paved
driveways.
OTHER BUSINESS
Other items to come before
the Commission, in the short ses-


slon, were:
-Gave fire chief Stacy Price
authority to advertise for the pur-
chase of two new self-contained
breathing apparatus when he re-
ported two of the four units could
not be overhauled.
-Instructed public works su-
perintendent, Frank Healey to in-
spect streets to be paved under
the county bonding program for"
problems with sewage collection
mains. Healey was authorized to
repair any problems found before
the paving. was done. One of
these problem areas is on Sev-
enth Street.
Fleming, Pate, to
Seek Re-election
Qualifying for City Commis-
sion candidates will begin on
April 17, with three seats up
for election this year. Commis-
sioners whose terms are expir-
ing include Bill Fleming, Edwin
Williams and Mayor Frank Pate.
Both Mayor Pate and Com-
missioner Fleming said Tues-
day they would seek re-
election. Commissioner Wil-
liams was not at Tuesday's
meeting, but he is expected to
seek re-election, also.


Spring Forward An Hour



Changes...


It's that time of the year again. Saturday night or more
properly. Sunday morning the United States will set its col-
lective clock ahead
by one hour to go
to Daylight Savings
time. The nation
has been on Stan- =
dard time since Oc-
tober of last year f1
and will again go
back to more day-
time hours In
which to work or
play. /
In order to be
in step with the re- i
mainder of the na- I ;
tlon, it will be nec-
essary for you to
set your clock,
watch, hour glass,
sundial or dog
AHEAD by one hour
before you go to .'
bed Saturday night.
The time offi-
cially changes at "
2:00 a.m. Sunday
morning.
]Daylight Saving '
Time was first '
adopted during World War U to save on power and has been.'
used by some sections of the nation since that time as. amat-
ter of convenience. The practice of switching time became A.'.
universal practice in the United States several years ago.


Secod TIaffi Fataity


19-Year-Old Killed In Crash


Evans thrown from this vehicle in Easter Sunday morning crash fatality near Indian Pass.


Jody Evans Dies In
Easter Morning Wreck
Port St. Joe was shocked and saddened
Easter Sunday morning, when 19-year-old Jo-
seph Daniel "Jody" Evans was killed in a one
car accident.
Evans became Gulf County's second auto-
mobile fatality of the year and the fifth young
man to die a violent death, in the county, in the
past three months.
He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jackie
Evans and was a student at Gulf Coast Com-
munity College.
Florida Highway Patrol officer E.F. Jordan
reported Evans died when his 1985 Ford 4-
door left the road after he had lost control,
throwing him out of the vehicle. Evans struck a
pine tree with considerable force, which was
probably the cause of his death.
The FHP report shows Evans was driving to-
ward Port St. Joe on C-3U, about a mile east of


Indian Pass, when he ran off the road, travel-
ling 155 feet, then came back on the road. At
this point he over-corrected the vehicle, cross-
ing the road, and the rear of the vehicle striking
a tree.. The car started spinning clockwise,
ejecting the driver.
FHP Sgt. W. A. Hart was also an investiga-
tor of the accident.
Sheriff Al Harrison said their office received
notification of the accident at 8:14 a.m., when
Roy Solomon of Apalachicola came upon the
accident and called for help. Sheriff Harrison
said the accident had evidently just happened
when Solomon came by, because he said a
wheel on the car was still turning and smoke
was coming from the vehicle.
Evans, a resident of 205 Allen Memorial
Way, was pronounced dead at the scene. The
accident is still under investigation.
Funeral services were held Wednesday
morning from the Long Avenue Baptist Church,
where a full house gathered to pay their last re-
spects to the young accident victim. Rev. J. C.
Odum and Dr. Daniel Duncan presided.


I I


Must Provide Plans



for Drain Permits

Has to Have Guidelines In Force By May '92,

No Guidelines for Limits Have Been Set by EPA


I -


rrik












THE STAR

PAGE TWO THURSDAY, APRIL 4,1991


Can We Talk?

Both the City of Wewahtchka and the Gulf County Commission are
aghast at the position of the other in the matter of road paving in the
Wewahitchka area. Both sides feel they are justified in their position in
the matter and as a result, both governmental bodies are harboring
hard thoughts for the other side, which should not be harbored. We
have enough REAL problems in Gulf County without generating more of
them on purpose through a failure to communicate with one another.
The Star has been caught squarely in the middle of the conflict
merely because we reported the actions of both sides on occasion. Both
the actions of each of the governmental bodies and the fact that we can
stir the ire of either side merely by reporting on the actions or repeating
statements made by the other is enough to show us that both sides are
beginning to have thoughts and opinions about the other which they
should not have.
We know, from personal experience, that failure to be candid with
each other and failure to communicate in an open manner has caused
the rift which now exists between the City of Wewahitchka and the Gulf
County Commission. It is an unusual position. Usually, it is the City of
Port St. Joe which is having difficulty with the Commission, but this
time it is the City of Wewahitchka.
It should never be either city having problems with the County
Commission. The county board serves both cities with equal responsi-
bility and needs to be eager to do what it can to make life easier to citi-
zens in both Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe. As a person put it the other
day, 'We live next door to one another. We need to be concerned with
not disturbing our neighbor and we need to be concerned with our
neighbor's welfare." When we're bickering back and forth, we can't do
this.
We think that if the Wewahitchka City Commission would sit down
and draw up a list of problems they have with the paving program-
real, imagined, or expected-and sit down with the County Commission
and talk about it, the problems could be solved. As long as we oppose
one another long-distance, fail to be perfectly candid with each other
and hold back on our differences, the differences are only going to con-
tinue to grow, rather than diminish.
The sad part of the whole situation is that there is no need for it to
exist at all. Nobody is anxious to continue any program with which
there is a problem. The thing for Wewahitchka to do is to sit down with
the paving contractor and find out, from the horse's mouth if there is
any basis to their thoughts. If there are real causes for these fears, then
the City should come to the County Commisson for help. They'll never
get it by threatening to sue, pushing their weight around, or accusing
the County Commission of failure to provide what the City has coming
to them, without talking it out, face to face.



Unaccustomed Visit
What's this?
We have been around Port St. Joe for a long time. We have been
right here in this editor's chair since November 10, 1952. That makes
nearly 39 years of being involved in what's going on in Port St. Joe and
Gulf County. During all these years, we don't ever remember a Repre-
sentative AND a Senator visiting our county all in one week.
Actually, we can remember for many years, about the only Wash-
ington, D.C.-type politician we would ever see would be an occasional
visit by Bob Sikes, when he came here to visit with and be seen with his
good friend, George Tapper.
We have never been too successful in attracting top echelon state
leaders, much less those from Washington, D.C.
We remember taking a photograph of Roselyn Carter coming to Port
St. Joe to campaign for her husband who was running for. President,
ahd Henry "Scoop" Jackson of Washington state, who was running for
the same office, simply because we had never had a presidential candi-
date or a presidential candidate's wife, here before.
There were several things our people wanted from these men. They
wanted simple necessities such as flood insurance for property on the
Peninsula and at Cape San Blas. We have been denied the protection in
those areas because the property was considered to be a barrier island.
Well, the property is attached to the mainland and is not a barrier is-
land. The local people argued that since St. George and Dog Island
property owners are able to purchase flood insurance, then property
owners on the Peninsula and at Cape San Blas should also be able to
buy it. They spent a good deal of time last Monday and Tuesday, telling
our representatives in Washington, D.C., of this desire.
Even though neither member of the Congress expressed himself
along those lines, we suspect one of the reasons for their visit here was
to make a "house call" on their constituents in preparation to the elec-
tions next year. Evidently, both wish to maintain residency in Washing-
ton for another term.
One of these men-Senator Mack-is a Republican. The other-
Cong. Peterson-is a Democrat Both were equally welcomed with
warmness and enthusiasm to our predominantly Democratic county.
Lest Stiles Brown and Nolan Treglown, or Sheriff Al Harrison, give us
the blues about this statement, we will add that the Republican popula-
tion Is growing.
Perhaps that one fact, as much as any one other thing, is what at-
tracted these two men to our county for an unaccustomed visit from
our national representatives in government.


IHunker Down with Kes


Check's In the Mail...


I don't know how I found the
place. I'd stopped at a couple of
baseball card shops they had
blown up pictures of Jose Canse-
co in the window "Pardon me,
young man, do you know of a
card place that specializes In the
old cards."
'Yeah, there's this guy over in
Largo... you sure I couldn't show
you a Bo Jackson rookie..."
I pulled into the first service


station that I came to. "Sir, could
you tell me how to get to Largo?
And please keep It simple, this Is
the first time I've ever been to
Tampa."
He backed up a step, looked
up and down my 1973 pick-up
with the rust kind'a eating away
on the sides, squinted at the
dried chewing tobacco stain,
leaned forward to get a better
look at my gun rack, flipped the


raccoon tail tied to my antenna
and said, 'Do tell Go up here to
21 st, hang a right, sLx lights, turn
left. stay on Dale Mabry to I 275,
'cross the Howard Franklin
Bndge. take the second exit. that
would be 680. stay on It around
the airport, it's a little wishy
washy but you hang with it, it
will run into Roosevelt and that
will take you right into Largo,
can't miss it."


Kesley
Colbert


Whew, I was used to direc-
tions like, "take the dirt road
down by the big oak."
"Got it. Thank you." I didn't
want to look like a rube in the big
city. As I pulled out looking for
21st, I heard my friend yell, "Hey
Juan, come here, quickly"
That was a couple of years
ago. After discoirering downtown
St. Petersburg and driving
through most qf Clearwater, I
found Largo. I found The Baseball
Card Company. And I found Orve
Johansson. Son-of-a-gun, he had
a big color painting of "Pee Wee"
Reese, leaping high over a sliding
runner, frozen in time with arm
outstretched, in the middle of an-
other double play.
"Could I help you?" Orve had
strolled down to where I was
leaned over his counter studying
the Reese picture. He didn't in-
sult my intelligence by explaining
the painting was taken from Pee
Wee's 1953 Bowman card. Base-
ball people know baseball people.
"It's not for sale." He said it kind'a
low like, not wanting to Intrude
on my thoughts.
I knew it wouldn't be. Base-
ball people know baseball people.
I bought a 1952 Stan Musial
card. And a 1953 Musial card.
And a 1959 Musial. And, of
course, I had to have the auto-
graphed picture of Enos Slaugh-
ter sliding across home plate with
the winning run in the 1946
World Series. I couldn't wait to
get home and tell my wife I'd met
a super nice guy that had hun-
dreds of real baseball cards for
sale. She never said a word when
I proudly hung "Enos" on a choice
wall In the den. Boys, I married
above myself.
I was back in Tampa last
'* -week.- And right down the street
from the hotel was Baseball
Cards, Unlimited. The sign in the
window noted, "We've got them
all." I checked 'em out. "Excuse
me son, do you have a 1953
Johnny Riddle?"
"1953??... I've got a Bo Jack-
son rook-"
"Just point me toward that
Howard Franklin Bridge."
"Hey Orve, you got a '53
Johnny Riddle?"
"Cardinal coach, wasn't he?
He's a high number... Let's see...
here it is."
Took about two seconds. We
talked about Harvy Haddix and
Tony Jacobs, "Peanuts" Lowery
and "Rip" Repulski. We didn't
mention, the upcoming season,
the current salaries or the im-
pending strike, lock out or what-
ever with the umpires. No sir,
Orve talks real baseball. Ernie
Banks, Sportsman Park, grass,
Bubba Church, Ebbets Field, Kir-
by Higbe, Al Brazle... you know,
(See KESLEY on Page 6)


NOW, AS I was saying before
I was interrupted Fort Valley
was an older town than Perry and
a quaint little town when my em-
ployers purchased the Leader-
Tribune and gave me the respon-
sibility of operating it. Most of the
buildings in Fort Valley had been
built prior to the turn of the cen-
tury. It's claim to fame was the
Fort Valley State College, a black
institution; the Woolfolk Chemi-
cal Works, which made agricultu-
ral chemicals and. .. Peachesl
The newspaper plant, build-
ing and former owner, were all
genuine museum pieces and I
never failed to marvel at the old
equipment in that place, which
still operated like it had been pur-
chased the day before.
Of course, this was prior to
the days of offset printing and all
printing machinery was nearly
like its predecessor or its succes-


ETA OIN SHRDLU


Now.


sor. Some was new and some was
old. The Leader-Tribune machin-
ery was mostly old.

FIRST, LET ME tell you
about the owner who was selling
out. His name was Johnny Jones
and he had owned the Leader-
Tribune for years and years. He
reminded me of Judge Fred Turn-
er, who retired in the 14th Judi-
cial Circuit just last year. Johnny
Jones could have been Judge
Turner's twin brother.
Jones was a cigar smoker. He
kept a Tampa Nugget going all
day long. He wasn't a cigar chew-
er; he was a cigar puffer. Every-
where you saw Johnny Jones, he
had a box of Tampa Nuggets
tucked under his right arm, and
one belching smoke in his mouth.
He didn't carry a few in his shirt
pocket like most people.
He purchased a modern auto-
matic press to do his commercial
printing with, but got rid of it


By: Wesley R. Ramsey


.. As I Was Saying Before I Was Interrupted


when he thought it was running
too fast to be safe. He didn't know
how to set the feeder properly, so
occasionally the press would feed
two sheets of paper at once. Since
only one of these sheets of paper
was printed, Johnny printed up a
notice he placed at the top of
each bundle of printing which
said, 'These printed sheets are
counted automatically. The un-
printed sheets are not counted."
Johnny was peculiar In other
ways. He oiled everything he had,
every day, whether it was used or
not.
His daughter was one of his
printers. She was Just as slender,
long-necked and peculiar as he.
She called him "Faw-thuh". I had
never heard a real live person re-
fer to their daddy as "Father" be-
fore.
The old girl could feed a
printing press with the best of
them.
We inherited an itinerant


printer when the Leader-Tribune
was purchased. His name was El-
mer Taylor, He was a little fellow,
who probably didn't weigh 120
pounds. He didn't have any teeth,
although he didn't appear to be
more than 35 years old.
This itinerant printer-the
first of this species I had ever
seen-was from Indiana. He was
a veritable dynamo. He was mov-
ing all the time. I found out why
about the second or third trip to
Fort Valley. He existed on coffee,
cigarettes and benzadrine tablets.
Since this was before using nar-
cotics became the vogue among
many people, I didn't think any-.
thing of it. He said truck drivers
used them to stay awake while on
long hauls and he purchased
them from a truck stop just out-
side of town.

THE LEADER-TRIBUNE was
more than 100 years old and had
piles of old newspapers in the


basement which went back to the
first day of their publication.
It was the most interesting
place I had ever worked and I
used to look through those old
newspapers every chance I had,
which wasn't too many.
It had been .a thriving busi-
ness in former days. There were
three hand-fed job presses lined
up against one wall, all running
off a single electric motor, which
ran a power take-off arrange-
ment. You just shoved over a lev-
er, which engaged a belt and your
press was off and running.
When I left Georgia and came
back to Florida, Dan Grahl quit
his position [I won't say "'ob"]
with Robins Air Force Base and
went to Fort Valley to run that
historical treasury. He moved it
to another building and I often
wonder what happened to all
those copies of 100-year-old
newspapers, with their wealth of
history. Grahl hired a "black-


smith" [printer euphamism for
someone who doesn't care for his
machines] and eventually he
ruined all those fine old antique
machines which made the Lead-
er-Tribune a museum piece.
A few years later I visited the
place and I nearly cried when I
saw those fine old presses sitting
on a junk heap, the ancient trays
of type scattered hither and yon,
the ancient old paper cutter brok-
en beyond repair. The old cutter
was a power cutter without a mo-
tor. It had a fly wheel on the side
which the operator turned a
couple of times, turned it loose
and the centrifugal force of the
spinning wheel forced the cutter
blade through the paper to be
cut.
I think the highlight of my
few years spent in Georgia was
spending a few days and months
in the old Leader-Tribune. It
would take any printer back to
his "roots".


St. Joseph Bay Tide Table
Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
Apr. 05 12:44 a.m. L -.2 2:21 p.m. H 1.4
Apr. 06 2:45 a.m. L -.2 3:20 p.m. H 1.3
Apr. 07 3:38 a.m. L -.1 5:15 p.m. H 1.3
Apr. 08 4:24 a.m. L .0 6:21 p.m. H 1.2
Apr. 09 4:57 a.m. L .1 7:27 p.m. H 1.1
Apr. 10 5:19 a.m. L .2 8:46 p.m. H .9
. Apr. 11 5:12 a.m. L .4 11:32 a.m. H .5
-2:58 p.m. L .4 11:00 p.m. H .7


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
WI USPHS 518880 Send Address Change to In County--415.90 Year In County-$10.60 Six Months
y **/AV. Published Every Thursday at 304-308 Williams Avenue The Star ou of county-$21.20 Year Out of County--15.90 Six Months
by The St e, ar Publishing Copany Pst Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 other than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey............ Editor & Publisher
,,W ^ William H. Ramsey .......... Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
WSPF Frenchie L. Ramsey Office Manager: AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey ......... Typesetter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


(


I









THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991


Shad

Phantry
By
Wendell Campbell


Jilted Men Have


Feelings, Too
If you women think you have the market cornered on not forget-
ting when you've been jilted, think again! There are many men who
are just as unforgetting and unforgiving as some women. There's
one man,. David Taylor, who so far hasn't done either and it's been
over 20 years.
The story of Mr. Taylor's romantic affair with his high school
sweetheart, Kathleen McHugh, Is movie material; horror-movie ma-
terial. It is very interesting, to say the least, and I read about it sev-
eral weeks ago in The News Herald. Below are the highlights.
In 1967 David Taylor was a senior at Bremen High School in
Midlothian, Illinois. He was elected to the All-Chicago football team
and had just won a wrestling tournament when he met an attrac-
tive, blue-eyed Junior named Kathleen McHugh. It was a vast un-
derstatement when the article said, "He never quite recovered."
David and Kathleen dated for two-and-one-half years, but Kath-
leen suddenly broke off the relationship, via long distance, when
she told David, "I never want to see you again." The call came dur-
ing Christmas vacation in 1970. David probably didn't think too
much of Santa after that, but the article didn't mention Santa.
David Taylor, however, was undeterred. Starting shortly thereaf-
ter, he faithfully sent more than 1,000 love letters, post cards, and
other communications to his former sweetheart, according to the
article. Thd article didn't say, but I would assume that his commu-
nications to Kathleen stopped after he was arrested, and jailed
in1990.
In the 20 years since the break-up, Kathleen.- between read-
ing letters from David married and moved to Florida where she
and her husband, David Goldstein, are both principals in Broward
County schools.
David Taylor tried to forget, it seems. He dated other girls, the
article stated, and even married and had two children. His mar-
riage, however, ended in divorce when his wife discovered a tele-
gram that Taylor sent to Kathleen Goldstein stating that he had
named the couple's daughter, Kathleen Ann, after his high school
sweetheart. And that ain't even funny; not one bit!
For years, Taylor was intent on patching things up and winning
his sweetheart back. But in the late 1980's, his letters began to re-
flect desperation and a more sinister plot.
One letter indicated that Kathleen's husband, David Goldstein,
was on the verge of some serious health problems and would even-
tually die. "I am truly sorry that this is the 'kay ser ra sir ra' scenar-
io that has to take place," he wrote. "However, you will always be
the focus of my desires."
A 1988 letter was a little more personal and to the point. It par-
aphrased an old proverb: "If you love a woman let her go. If she re-
turns, it is meant to be. If she doesn't come back, you must for
God's sake, hunt the b ___ down and kill her." I wonder who
wrote that onel
Shortly after being jailed, Mr. Taylor is alleged to have attempt-
ed to hire another inmate, Fred R. Pollak, "to carry out the murders
of David and/or Kathleen Goldstein," according to FBI documents.
The arms of love reach afar, don't they?
Taylor, of course, denies trying to hire someone to kill the Gold-
steins. He also defends his letters to the Goldsteins. "Most," he was
quoted as saying, "were 'standard love letters', but perhaps 20 were
'bad ones' and 980 were 'good ones'."
.. Mr. Taylorv I think, isright, where he belongs. As for Mr. Gold-
stein, I hope,,he, doesn't receive, a Christmas phone call. Kathleen
must have sofilething to drive a man to where David Taylor is.
Ain't love grand?


LETER To The
LEE S...* Editor

Dear Editor: From Kuwait
I would like to take this op- Kuwait
portunity to say a few things There was mass devastation
about our Fine County Deputies. on the road here in Kuwait, but
I say Fine with a grain of salt It the people waved their flags as we
seems here lately it's all right for entered the towns and turned to
a policeman to ASSAULT some- us:with a peace sign. As damaged
one without reason, but if the as the towns and the entire coun-
shoe was on the other foot, you try, the Kuwaiti people were glad
would be charged. the Allied Forces were there to
I'm speaking of an incident free their homes and allow them
that happened in Highland View to call Kuwait 'theirs' again.
last Thursday. It seems some I tried to Imagine myself in
young people were playing their their shoes, but I couldn't; I am
radio too loud. Someone called an American. I have known noth-
our Fine County Deputies. By the ing but freedom from the day I
time the police arrived, they had was born and until now, did not
already turned the music down. realize how valuable that freedom
But this one deputy saw to it to is. When seeing these people with
ASSAULT one of these boys be- so little, I realized how much we
fore and AFTER he was hand- have as Americans.
cuffed, but he's a policeman, so Americans are known
naturally he will be Justified in throughout the world as "Keepers
what he done. I believe he used of Peace", even though at times
excessive force and so does sever- we are called to lend a helping
al people who saw it. hand in unjust worldly events. I
In the eyes of the law, a cop feel as if God has given us the
doesn't do anything wrong, he's spirit and hope necessary to ena-
always in the right. Bottom line, ble us. to make the right deci-
they cover for each other, right or sions.
wrong. This time they were As we well know of America,
WRONG. Hopefully something it is the home of the brave, and
can be done about this very the land of the free. I can proudly
SOON! hold my head high and say, "I am
Thank You, an American."
Russell Phillmon David Miller




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Gulf Reducing Waste Through Recycling


Gulf County has already re-
duced, dramatically, its volume of
solid wastes through its tentative
step into a recycling program,
Ralph Rish, Gulf County's coordi-
nator for the program, told the Ki-
wanis Club Tuesday.
The county has reduced its
tonnage sent to the Bay County
incinerator by slightly more than
30 percent, but Rish says this
doesn't mean the county has al-
ready complied with the mandat-
ed 30 percent reduction it must
meet by 1992.
Figures kept on the wastes
transported to Bay County's in-
cinerator for burning, has
dropped from 9,009.63 tons in
1989 to 5,803.62 tons in 1990
and is showing another reduction
thus far this fiscal year. Rish said
that in the period from January
through March, the county has
sent 171.33 tons less than the
same period of last year.
'This means money saved by
Gulf County tax payers," R sh
said. "Every ton we can reduce in
the incinerated tonnage is money
in our pocket," the speaker said.
He warned that some of the
wastes were going to industrial
and construction landfills inside
the county, pointing out that
even these landfills are expensive
operations when they meet DER
requirements, which every landfill
in the state of Florida must do.
Rish said the recycling would
definitely pay its own way. "We
won't make money off our recy-
cled products," the county coordi-
nator said. '"We will save money
when we recycle rather than pay
to burn or bury these items we
are recycling."
Already, Gulf County is recy-
cling used motor oil, aluminum,
glass, plastics and paper. As a
dramatic example in favor of the
practice of recycling, the speaker
pointed out that an aluminum
can can take up to 500 years to
decompose in a landfill. It can
also take enough energy to oper-
ate a television set for three
hours to make a replacement for
that can from raw products.
"Americans throw away
enough glass to fill the Twin Tow-
ers of the New York World Trade
Center every three weeks. Glass
stays in our landfills for centuries
and is almost indestructible,"
Rish said.
As another dramatic exam-
ple, Rish said Americans create
enough solid wastes to fill up the
New Orleans Superdome twice a -
day, every day. Presently, most of
this waste material is buried in
landfills.
'The main reason we are re-
cycling is because the state of
Florida has mandated that we do
so and remove 30% from our
wastestream, Including 50% of
glass, paper, aluminum and plas-
tics. Now that we are into it, we
find that the main reason for re-
cycling is to save on the tremen-
dous costs for disposing of the
waste products in any other way."
Thus far, the state and feder-
al governments have helped Gulf
County and other counties get
into recycling with grants for edu-
cating the public to recycle, set-
ting up collection stations and
putting the system into motion.


'We receive regular payments to
recycle such items as tires and
used oil," Rish said.
Future plans for the recycling
program include purchase of a
chipper to handle yard trimmings
which are now buried in landfills,
a baler to handle waste paper, a
glass crusher, storage building
and more collection Igloos.


Rish said the county is just
getting into the paper recycling
business. 'There was no market
for it in this area until just re-
cently. We are now working with
a firm which will take our paper.
We won't get much, if anything
for it, but we won't have to pay to
have it incinerated which will be
a big savings."


"' I /
,


In the meantime, Rish said
his program has plans to contin-
ue with its education program to
get everyone involved in recycling.
Part of this education includes a
video the county has had pre-
pared with a portion of its educa-
tion grant, which shows the need
of the environment of Gulf
County for recycling.


BREAKING GROUND for new Tyndall Federal
Credit Union, from left: .Joseph Manning, Chair-
man of Board of Directors; Jim Mitchell,Director
and Chairman of Building Committee; Joseph


Ground

Broken for

lyndall

Credit Union
Ground was broken last
Wednesday for a new branch of
Tyndall Federal Credit Union in
Port St. Joe. Credit union offi-
cials, members, friends, and local
dignitaries gathered at the Fifth
Street site for the groundbreaking
ceremony. :
...When completed later this
year, the new branch will contain
2,566 square feet of business
space, three drive-thru teller win-
dows, and a drive-thru ATM (Au-
tomated Teller Machine). Chair-
man of the credit union's board of
directors, Joseph T. Manning,
stated, "We are excited about the
potential for dynamic growth in
Gulf County and want to provide
the very best facilities to serve
our growing Gulf County mem-
bership."
Upon completion in the fall,
operations will relocated from the
present Reid Avenue site to the
new facility.



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PAGEP A


I









THE STARPORT ST. JOE 1991


A Pinch of Herbs


Adds Punch to Meals


Housewarming Party Sunday





Stop, look and listen. You are
invited to a housewarming party
to be given in honor of Doreatha
and Willie Allen on Sunday, April
7 at 6:00 p.m. The party will take
place at 239 Ave. E, Port St. Joe.


The party is being given by Ear-
lene Skanes, Anthony Skanes
and Sung Hai Skanes.

SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


Go easy on the salt. Try herbs
instead.
That's the recommendation of
many health experts. Salt in the
foods we eat is a primary source
of sodium which has been linked
to hypertension, or high blood
pressure, for those people who
are salt-sensitive. Most Ameri-
cans consume about twice the
amount of sodium that is recom-
mended.
Fortunately, getting by with
less salt can be easy to do with a
few changes In the way we cook
and eat. It works best to cut back
on salt gradually, allowing time
for the taste buds to adjust.
*Taste food before salting it. If
you must add salt, try one shake
instead of two. You might discov-
er that foods you've always salted
taste fine unsalted.
*Sometimes the salt shaker is
so handy that we salt foods out of
habit. Replace it with a pepper
mill or jar of mixed seasoning.
*If your taste buds Just aren't
satisfied without salt, try to salt
foods lightly while cooking or at
the table, not both.
*Alternatives to salt are easy
to find at the supermarket.
Choose garlic and onion powder
rather than their counterparts.
*Shop for low-sodium varie-
ties of foods that are traditionally
high in sodium, such as canned
soups and sauces as well as
cheese and cured meat.
While cutting back on salt,
you may want to boost flavor by
adding herbs and spices instead.
They're great salt substitutes,
contributing virtually no sodium,
calories or fat. This list offers
some food and seasoning match-
ups.
Basil tomato-based sauces,
pasta, veal, lamb, fish, poultry
Bay leal soups, stews,
roasts


Chives potatoes, cauliflower,
carrots, omelets
Cumin fish, seafood, poultry
Dill weed fish, lamb, soups,
salads
Garlic soups, dips, mari-
nades
Oregano pizza, chili, barbe-
cued meat, cabbage, squash
Rosemary yeast bread, corn
bread, pork, chicken salad
Tarragon marinades, veal,
poultry.
Also, try red cayenne pepper
and thyme on skinless chicken
and broil for a tasty dish.
These are just a few possibili-
ties. Be creative and try favorite
foods with a dash, pinch or sprin-
ide of an herb or spice. ,

Garden Club
Meets April 11
The Port St Joe Garden Club
will meet April 11 at 2:00 p.m.
EDT at the Garden Center on
Eighth Street.
Flora Blackmon will teach all
those present to make a Garden
Club arrangement. Mrs. Black-
mon asks that all bring a special
vase and a flower or flowers.
Come and take advantage of this
special program.
If you want to make a ribbon
rose, Mrs. Blackmon will also
help you learn this skill.
The Port St. Joe Garden Club
cordially invites interested ladies
to attend and share this class on
flower arranging given by a flor-
ist
Hostesses greeting guests will
be Betty Lewis, Grace McFarland
and Juanita Noll.
So, for a fun and interesting
time, plan on attending the Gar-
den Club meeting April 11th at
2:00 p.m. at the Garden Center
on Eighth Street.


Try These Quick,


Tasty
Add a little zip to you
It's easy with these new r
Zip Tip recipes pi
quick and easy way to ma
licious array of flavorful
zesty side dishes, scrn
appetizers and creamy
entire family can enjoy..
No more last minute
,the delicatessen or con
stores You can prepare t
main and side dish
scratch in 20 minutes
from basic ingredients
home.
Marinated Italia
Garlic Chicken
1/2 cup salad dressing



'Wew Offic
same gooc
neighbor.

"My new office means
better serve your family
rance needs. Call or dr
anytime."

BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avei
(Acrmss from St. Joe Har
Office: 229-6514




L


4r#
L



Like a good neigh
State Farm is the





State Farm Insurance Com
Home Offices: Bloomington


* Umbrellas


Recipes...
ur meals 1/2 cup Italian dressing
recipes. 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
provide a 1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
ake a de- 4 chicken breast halves, boned,
i meals, skinned
umptious Stir together dressings and
dips the seasonings. Pour over chicken;
marinate 20 minutes.
Stips Plae chicken on grill or, rack
ivenience of broiler pan. Grill or broil 10
hese five minutes on each side or until ten-
es from der.
or less Serves four.
right at Fettuccini Alfredo
1/2 cup salad dressing
n 1 tablespoon flour.
1 cup milk
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
4 cups (4 ozs.) medium noodles,
cooked, drained
1/2 cup (2 ozes.) 100% grated
parmesan cheese
S- 2 tablespoons finely chopped par-
e sley (optional)
1/8 teaspoon pepper
d. In medium saucepan, whisk
ff salad dressing and flour over low
heat until smooth. Add milk and
garlic powder.
I can Cook, stirring constantly,
y insu- over low heat until thickened and
rop in smooth.
Toss with noodles, cheese,
parsley and pepper.
Serve immediately. Six serv-
nue ings.
rdware) Italian Pasta Salad
1 cup salad dressing
1/2 cup Italian dressing
3 cups cut up mixed vegetables
Salt and pepper to taste
Mix ingredients until well
blended.
Toss with six cups cooked
pasta and three cups cut up vege-
tables. Season with salt and pep-
per.
Chill. Serves eight.
Spicy Italian Dip
Lbor, 1 cup salad dressing
ere. 1/2 cup sour cream
1 (.7 oz.) package Italian salad
dressing mix
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
Mix salad dressing, sour
cream, salad dressing mix and
pepper saucd until well blended.
Chill.
,panies Serve with assorted chips
, llinois and/or vegetable dippers. Makes
1 1/2 cups.


AN>9 LA A TA E T
Mexico Beach Mini-Mall Hwy. 98

NOW OPEN
Shop Here for All Your Beach Needs


* Sandals T-Shirts


Chairs Plus More

Open Sunday I to 5

Monday through Saturday 9 to 5


* Swimwear T-Dresses


* Visors


B-C Jewefers
301 Fourth Street Port St. Joe
229-6969
Specialists In:
Watch Repair, Jewelry Repair, Clock Repair,
Fair Prices Work Done On Premises Fast Service
43 Years Experience
Hours: 8:30 5:30, Wednesday 8:30 2:00
Clyde & Bonnie Russell, Owners


George Clifton Marty Mart

To Wed
Mr. and Mrs. David M. Rich
Sr., of Wewahitchka, have an-
nounced the engagement and
forthcoming marriage of their
daughter, Kimberly Ann, to
George Clifton Marty Martin III,
son of Mr. and Mrs. George Clif-
ton Martin Jr. of Panama City.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Port St. Joe High School and
attended Gulf Coast Community
College. She is employed as a sec-
retary with M&M Mobile Homes
Inc.
Her finance is a graduate of


April 27
Rutherford High School. He re-
ceived an associate's degree from
Gulf Coast Community College
and a bachelor's degree in mar-
keting from Florida State Univer-
sity. He is employed as a sales
manager with M&M Mobile
Homes Inc.
The wedding is planned for
April 27 at 7:00 p.m. at St. An-
drews Baptist Church in Panama
City. A reception will follow at St.
Andrew's Bay Yacht Club. All
friends and relatives are invited
to attend.


Garden Club's Annual Sale


It's Spring time and the Port'
St. Joe Garden Club will hold
their annual plant, caladium bulb
(many colors), jewelry and good
home baked goodies sale.
Ida Baker and Bertha Byme
will open the sale at 9:00 a.m.
Friday; April 5th and Saturday,
April 6th, at the Garden Center,
on Eighth Street.
These ladies have assembled
many colorful plants, lovely jewel-
ry, and tasty goodies for you to


Taylor Boone Kennedy

Karen Has A
New Brother
Taylor Boone Kennedy, weigh-
ing in at 9 pounds even with a
20-inch height advantage, arrived
at the Donalsonville Hospital on
Monday, March 25th at 2:18 p.m.
Taylor is joined in his comer
by his proud mom and dad, Stan
and Melody Kennedy, and 9 1/2
year old sister Karen from Donal-,
sonville, Georgia; his granrdpar-
ents, Harvie and Agnes Kennedy'
of Port St Joe and Donalsonville,
Don and JoAnna Spooner of Iron
City, Georgia, and the late Betty'
W. Spooner; two uncles and two
aunts, Connor and Sue Vernon of'
Austin, Texas, and Lee and Don-
na Conoly of Iron City; and one
cousin, Zack Conoly.
Stan is formerly from Port St.
Joe.


purchase.
Do go by the Garden Center,
buy some beautiful plants and
get your lawn ready for a colorful
summer.


Final Plans for
Boykins-Banks
Vinnie Mae Boykins and the
Reverend T.C. Banks will speak
their vows of marriage on April
20, 3:00 p.m. at Philadelphia
Primitive Baptist Church in Port
St. Joe.
The bride-to-be is a home-
maker and longtime resident of
Port St. Joe. The groom is a na-
tive of Apalachicola. He has re-
tired after living' in Washington,
D.C. for many years.
No local invitations are being
sent, however all friends and rela-
tives are invited to attend the
wedding ceremony and a recep-
tion to follow immediately after-
wards at New Bethel AME
Church annex.


Now In
CALADIUM BULBS
to place orders
Call 229-6879 afternoons,
227-1278, 227-1613 or contact
a Garden Club Member


in a friendly
Atmosphere
with good
FRIENDS.

SServing Breakfast,
Lunch & Dinner
I6 a.m. to 10 p.m.
7 Days a Week

Lunch Buffet Sunday thru Friday

-Specializing In -
*Buffet Lunch *Sandwiches *Meals to Go
*Fresh Seafood eDelicious Steaks


Our Famous Fresh
SEAFOOD PLATTER


Only


*9.85


LidaI' s Restaurant


PAGE 4A


I


4od-1PAA


I


nF!Lc








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991


Got A Favorite Recipe for Catfish?

Enter It In Tri-State Contest


Jones Rt
After 32 years of dedicated
service to the Gulf county Cooper-
ative Extensin Service, Mildred
Jones has decided to move on to
better things.
* ."I must say it has been a
pleasure working with her," said
Roy Lee Carter, County Extension
Director. "She has been very loyal
to Gulf County and The Institute
of Foods and Agricultural Scienc-
es (IFAS) of the University of Flor-
ida, which have been cooperating
partners in this venture.
"During my 12-year tenure
with the Florida Cooperative Ex-
tension Service, I have been


Florida Agriculture Commis-
sioner Bob Crawford is encourag-
ing Florida, Georgia and Alabama
residents to submit their favorite
recipes to the Tri-State Farm-
Raised Catfish Cook-off.
'This cook-off is an, excellent
example of the ongoing consumer
education and promotion efforts
needed to boost the demand for
catfish, a nutritional and healthy
addition to any meal," Crawford
said.
As the lead agency in develop-
ing programs for aquaculture and
rural economic development,
Crawford said the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consu-
mer Services encourages commu-
nities to organize events which
will highlight these areas.
"As consumer demand for
catfish grows, more and more
farmer will examine the viability
of catfish production," he said.
"In turn, this will spur economic
development throughout Florida's
rural areas."
The first contest began a tra-


edition. The contest began with
tremendous success nearly
100 entries. Norma Thornton of
Cape Coral won the competition
with "Oven Baked Catfish with
Pecan Sauce." Other prize-
winning recipes included "Catfish
Pie," "Baked Catfish with Clam
Stuffing," "Catfish Balls," "Catfish
Melange" and "Florida Catfish
Sunshine Medley."
To enter the 1991 contest,
simply submit a maximum of two
recipes featuring farm-raised cat-
fish. Recipes may be for tradition-
al or microwave oven preparation
and should yield six servings. All
ingredients used must be familiar
and readily available. Recipes will
be judged on flavor, nutritional
value, appearance, simplicity and
appeal regarding trends in cook-
ing and eating. Please include
name, address, and telephone
number with recipes and mail to:
Tri-State Farm-Raised Catfish Cook-Off
Calhoun County Extension Service
340 East Central Avenue
Blountstown, FL 32424


Finalists whose recipes are
chosen will receive cash prizes of
$300, $150, $100 and $50, and
then must participate in the Tri-
State Farm-Raised Catfish Cook-
off on Saturday, May 18 during
the Calhoun County Catfish Fes-
tival in Blountstown.


The judges' decisions are fi-
nal. Entry constitutes permission
to edit, modify, adapt, publish
and otherwise use the recipes
without further compensation.
All recipe entries must be.
postmarked no later than April
26, 1991.


Local AARP Chapter

To Meet Wed., April 10


St Joseph Bay AARP Chapter
#3425 will meet April 10 at 2:30
p.m. ET in the Centennial Build-
ing on Allen Memorial Way.
After a business meeting and
a sing-along session, there will be
a slide presentation on "Snakes of
the Florida Panhandle" and a dis-
cussion of other wildlife led by*
Woody Miley of the Apalachicola
Estaurine Research Reserve.
There will be refreshments
served after the program and cop-
ies of Living Wills, 'Where We


Stand" pamphlets and brochures
on the profiles of older Americans
will be available to all members
who attend the meeting.

VFW Meeting
The members of the John C.
Gainous Post #10069 V.F.W. and
the Ladies Auxiliary will hold it
regular meeting on Tuesday, April
9 at the post home in Highland
View at 7:30 p.m. All members
are urged to attend.


tires


amazed with Mildred's ability to
offer encouraging words to col-
leagues who for some reason were
experiencing severe depression.
Patience is a virtue of any public
servant, Mildred displayed no
shortage of it, in- the process of
trying to satisfy our constituen-
cy," continued Carter.
The local County Cooperative
Extension Service, Florida A&M
University and The University of
Florida would like to wish Mildred
a happy retirement and may God
bless her with much longevity to
enjoy the fruits of her labor.


Antique Autos To


Race Thru County


The Miracle Strip Region of
the Antique Automobile Club of
i..America will be hosting the sixth
';annual Gold Cup Antique Car
;Race, Saturday, April 13. The
*race is open to all authentic, un-
'-'modified cars 25 years old or old-
er. The race will start in Panama
City and go via Wewahitchka to
Port St Joe and on to Apalachico-
S:la. The finish line for the first leg
S.ill be Volunteer Avenue in Whitet:'
..GlIty, The cari wil tewn.-continue.-
9 '-. on to Port St .joe and will drive
',through the business district on
,Reid Avenue.
The drivers will make a lunch
stop at the First Union Bank park
and the cars will be displayed


Law Enforcement
Course Begins 5115
The Gulf Coast Community
n, College Criminal Justice Training
Academy will be offering a "Law
SEforcement Basic Standards"
course .beginning Wednesday,
,May 15. This course will meet
Monday through Thursday from 6
,,o 10 p.m. until March 1992.
-0 Those interested are encour-
aged to apply as soon as possible
,to ensure timely completion of the
'"admission procedures.
More information about appli-
cation procedures and require-
ments may be obtained by calling
,872-3878. .

Historical Society
Meets Saturday
The Historical Society of Port
St. Joe will meet Saturday, April
;'6 at 3:00 p.m. 'at the Public Li-
brary. All members and interest-
ed persons are urged to attend.


* Card of Thanks
The family of Jimmy Herring
wish to express our deep appreci-
ation for the food, flowers, cards,
,Uprayers, love, and many acts of
kindness shown us during the re-
,cent loss of aur loved one.





'.A
C.ass .,
Advertising'


in conjunction with the Port St.
Joe seniors' "Project Graduation".
The first cars should start arriv-
ing about 11:00 a.m. and will de-
part on the second leg of the jour-
ney to Apalachicola around 12:30
p.m.
This year about 25 cars are
expected to participate and in-
clude several makes by compa-
nies no longer in business. There
:Will be a Durant and a Star, both
made by the Durant Motor Com-
pany in the mid-twenties. Several.
Packards and a Hudson are par-
ticipating which were also made
by companies no longer in busi-
ness. Other makes represented
are Plymouth, Chrysler, Chevrolet
and Ford, There are more Fords
than any other make and include
Model T's, Model A's, T-Bird's,
Mustangs. and a Lincoln Conti-
nental four-door convertible.
The public is invited tocome
to the First Union Bank park and
view the cars and take pictures
during the stopovers.


Derrick Chitty

Chitty Participates
In DCT Program
Derrick Chitty, 18, is a senior
at Port St. Joe High School where
he is participating in the DCT
program. The DCT program puts
students to work in different
businesses around town. Derrick
works at St. Joe Furniture under
the direction of Mr. and Mrs.
Wayne Taylor where he is learn-
ing about retail sales and hard-
ware management
Derrick said, "My objective af-
ter school is to go to college and
pursue a degree in-law."
Good luck on your future
plans, Derrick.


Shoe Repair Shop Opening Soon

Shoe and Boot Repair
Custom Shoes and Boots
Made to Order

Experienced- Capable


COWBOY'S TRADITION
1st and Reid Port St. Joe


rrPAGE 5A


TA '-tR M A


I


r ,*









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991


Tr HK


April 6 Tupelo Festival in Wewahitchka
Tupelo Festival Freshwater Fishing
Tournament
April 5 7 Alcohol Free Weekend
April 7 Daylight Savings Time Begins (Runs
through October 27th)
April 9 City Commission Meets at 9:00 a.m.
April 10 Salvation Army Founder's Day 1829
April 13 Project Graduation's Spring Fling
Antique Car Race
April 16 County Commission Meets at 5:00 p.m.
^~ ^


Eric Ramsey Is
Named An All-
American Scholar
The United States Achieve-
ment Academy announced today


Eric Ramsey


Kesley
(Continued From Page 3)
the good stuff. Orve brought out a
1953 baseball autographed by
the Brooklyn Dodgers. I turned it
around slowly to read the signa-
tures. Duke Snider, RoyCapanel-
la, Clem Labine, Pee Wee Reese,'
Jackie Robinson, it had'em all.
"How much Orve?" Oooee-
that's more than I've got. He took
$50 off. It still cost more than I'd
brought... "Orve, it's the '53
Dodgers. You've got to help me
out!"
He saw the pleading in my
eyes. And I think he understood
the longing in my heart. He gave
me the ball, told me to send the
money when I could. I was rolling
up the interstate, ball carefully
beside me, when I realized that
Orve doesn't. even know my
name, he has no idea where I live.
We didn't sign any papers. He
just thought the ball and I fit...
And he trusted me. Boy, the
world could use a few more like
that.
Respectfully,
Kesley

Public Notice I
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the City Commis-
sion of the City of Port St. Joe, sitting as the Board
of Adjustment, will hold a public hearing In the
Commission Room at City Hall, Tuesday, April 16,
1991, at 8:00 p.m., EDT. to determine whether the
city will authorize a deviation in Zoning Ordinance
No. 5 for an encroachment of five feet (5) of the
northwesternly side of set-back line to build a resi-
dence on Lot 28, Block 130, St. Joseph Addition,
located at 2001 Marvin Avenue.
All Interested parties are Invited to attend
and to be heard.
Is/ L.A. FARRIS
CITY AUDITOR-CLERK
Publish: April 4 and 11, 1991.


that Eric Ramsey has been
named an All-American Scholar.
The USAA has established
the All-American Scholar Award
Program in order to offer deserved
recognition to superior students
who excel in the academic disci-,
plines. The All-American Scholars
must earn a 3.3 or better grade
point average. Only scholars se-
lected by a school instructor,
counselor, or other qualified
sponsor are accepted. These
scholars are also eligible for other
awards given by the USAA.
Eric, who attends Port St. Joe
High School, was nominated for
this national award by Carol Ca-
they, guidance counselor.
Eric will appear in the All-
American Scholar Directory,
which is published nationally.
"Recognizing and supporting
our youth is more important than
ever before in American history.
Certainly, winners of the All-
American Scholar Awards should
be congratulated and appreciated
for their dedication to excellence
and achievement," said Dr.
George Stevens, Executive Direc-
tor of the United States Achieve-
ment Academy.
Eric is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Willie Ramsey of Port St.
Joe. He is a freshman, maintain-
ing a 4.0grade point average and
plays both football and baseball
for the Sharks. He received the
freshman academic award at the
annual football banquet this year.



Card of Thanks
It is with great pleasure that I
extend my appreciation to all the
employees in the Gulf County
Courthouse for such an enjoyable
retirement party that was given in
my honor. My best wishes are ex-
tended toall and may you all re-
tire one day with good memories
such as I.
Mildred Jones


Police Solve Burglaries, Theft


Port St. Joe's Police Depart-
ment had a flourish of activity
this week, with three -arrests
made, with two of them being
cases of theft and the third, for
disorderly conduct.
Tuesday, Greg Cloud was ar-
rested on stolen car charges, fac-
ing accusations of stealing two
vehicles.
The first of the stolen cars be-
longed to Cecil Harrison, of 132
Bellamy Circle. Harrison discov-
ered the car was missing when he
started to work Tuesday morning
at about 6:20. Police were notified
of the missing vehicle and spotted
it about 45 minutes later in north
Port St. Joe, with Cloud inside.
As they approached the vehicle,
Cloud ran, but was apprehended
by the officers.
Harrison said he would not
press charges.
Later in the day, Cloud is ac-
cused of making off with a pick-


up truck, owned by Chris Clay-
craft of Panama City. The truck
contained about $1,000 worth of
tools. Both the truck and tools
were recovered the next day.
Claycraft is expected to prefer
charges.
BURGLARY SUSPECT
Freddie Lamar Granger was
arrested by Port St. Joe police
Tuesday and charged with two
counts of burglary. Granger is


. charged with the burglary of the
Childhood Development Center in
north Port St. Joe.
The arrest came after two
weeks of investigation and Grang-
er ,is presently being held in Gulf
County Jail.
JUVENILE ARRESTED
A juvenile was arrested and
charged Tuesday with disorderly
conduct. He was released in the
custody of his parents.


GC Grads Pass Tests


The number of Gulf Coast
Community College Respiratory
Care graduates passing the state
licensing examination is almost
twice the state 'average, according
to a state report.
According to the Florida De-
partment of Professional Regula-
tion, 100 percent of the GCCC
Respiratory Care graduates


die~


passed the state licensing exami-
nation last fall. The average pass-
ing rate for Florida schools is only
55.3 percent.
Program coordinator Robert
Moore said that the excellent
passing rate demonstrates the
commitment to quality that the
GCCC Respiratory Care Program
as made. "We credit this success
to the students, Respiratory Care
faculty, medical directors, our ad-
visory committee, hospital per-
sonnel and GCCC administrative
support for the program."
More information about the
Respiratory Care Program is
available from Courtney Brooks
at 769-1511, ext. 5844.

SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


JOB
OPENING
The Gulf County Clerk's Of-
fice will be receiving applica-
tions for the position of Sec-
retary of the Clerk, this
Deputy Clerk is primarily re-
sponsible for attending
Board meetings, preparing
agendas and minutes, han-
dling correspondence for the
Clerk and board, and acting
as the Clerk's personal sec-
retary. Minimum qualifica-
tions include a high school
diploma, advanced typing
skills, good mathematical
skills, knowledge and experi-
ence with business equip-
ment, and good communica-
tion skills.
Applications will be received
at the Clerk's Office until Fri-
day, April 12, 1991, at 5:00
p.m. EDT. All applicants will
be given a skills test to help
determine their suitability for
this position. You may con-
tact Doug Birmingham at
229-6112, Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
PubliAh: April 4, 1991.


- B:AN K R U P T C Y
Im


Wins Second Place
Molly Jones, a sixth grade student at Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary School,'placed second in the junior division of the Chipola
Regional Science and Engineering Fair with her project, 'How
Sugar Affects Behavior". Congratulations, Molly.


Sti


ELIJAH SMILEY, M.B.A.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
*PERSONAL INJURY -BUSINESS *AUTO ACCIDENTS
*PROBATE & WILLS .DIVORCES
right LAW OFFICE DOWNTOWN Reason
Talk 784-6606 I Fee
433 Harrison Ave. Suite 1B Panama City


table
s


*Heating & Air
*Major6'
Appliance .

*Plumbing &
Electrical Work

RER0007623
RFA0040131 229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle, Port St. Joe


COMFORT& $AVINGS


WORKSHOP
The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners has
scheduled a Special Public Workshop to discuss the cur-
rent problems of the County's Mosquito Control Program.
These problems are a direct result of the withdrawal of
funds (for'mosquito control) by the State of Florida. The
Workshop will be held at 6:00 p.m. ET on April 9, 1991
in the County Commissioners' Meeting Room. We en-
courage the general public to attend this workshop.
James Ed Creamer, Chairman
Gulf County Board of County Commissioners


Whir


Whirlpool Room u
Air Conditioner
Model ACE144XS
*13.700/13,500 BTU/Hr. C(
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Fan *2-way Air Direction *A(
Thermostat *COMFORT GUL
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All-weather Cabinet


- Extras that

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and make s








Comfort Guard control
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m 3,rn r, .3 T, .:r.- :.:.nrr, : T ai ,: ,,r
CrIC" ;,O-, r lr,': R .1E F i,:, ,. ,_,
r.l,m T,n-, 3 -r.:.r ': l ,3j IT. ,




ST. JOE

201 Williams Avenue


pool



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cooling Capacity
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Whirlpool Room
Air Conditioner
Model AC1854XT
* 18.000/17.800 BTU/Hr. Cooling Capacit
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Model ACE184XT
*17.800/17,600 BTU/Hr. Cooling Capacity
*14.000/1 1,500 BTU/Hr. Heating Capacity
*Heats and Cools for Year-round Comfort
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Phone 229-81
Your ACE Hardware


YAU U


PAGE 6A


I


c


te.










THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991 PAGE 7A


Ling Tourney In Full Swing


Houso

Volunteer firemen and policemen are shown
entering the home of Willie B. McCloud last
* Wednesday when it caught on fire. The interior of
the home suffered substantial damage in the


e Fires


blaze. The fire department was also called out
Tuesday to the home of Donna Gay on Seventh
St. to extinguish a minor blaze on the front
porch of the home.


The Mexico Beach Annual
Ling Tournament kicked off on
April 1 and will run through May
11.
Fishing is allowed from boat
or pier and the entry fees are $30
from a boat and $10 pier. Boat
entries get one free T-shirt and
pier entries get one.
Over $1350 in cash plus tro-
phies will be awarded in six cate-
gories.
1st place of $500, 2nd place
of $250, and $100 3rd place will
be paid in the ling division. Span-
ish, whiting, flounder, black

Andy Smith
Shoots 37
Tuesday the Sharks were de-
feated in Quincy by R.F. Munroe.
The Munroe team score was 171,
four strokes better than the
Sharks. Other team scores were:
Wakulla 222 and Gadsden Chris-
tian 227.
Team member scores are as
follows: Low medalists Andy
Smith 37, Norton Arrant 40,
Chad Arrant 49, and Brad Buz-
zett 49. This brings the Sharks
overall record to 4-2.
TIE RUTHERFORD
The varsity golf team of Port
SL Joe High School tied Ruther-
ford 168-168. Low medalists for
the Sharks were Brad Buzzett 39,
Chad Arrant 41, Andy Smith and
Norton Arrant 44 each. This was
Brad Buzzett's lowest team score
for the year. This brings the
Sharks to 4-2-1.


Track Team Competes In Gainesville


Last Thursday, seven mem-
bers of the Port St Joe Sharks
track team traveled to Gainesville
and competed in the 48th annual
Florida Coke Classic Relays. This
meet, which is hosted by the Uni-
versity of Florida, is regarded as
one of the top meets in the South-
east Teams from Florida, Geor-
gia, Alabama, South Carolina,
Tennessee, New York, and even
one team from the Virgin Islands,
participated in this year's meet.
"I was real pleased with how
we did," remarked Scott Gowan,

Girls' Softball
Attention all second, third
and fourth grade girls: if you are
interested in playing softball and
have not registered, please con-
tact Sherry McDowell at 647-
9. 5942 or Donna Daniels at 227-
7236 for more information.


coach of the team. "All but one
runner ran their best time of the
season at the meet. The lone ex-
ception was freshman Joe Price."
Joe has a slight muscle strain in
his thigh and this has slowed him
down the last couple of weeks.
His time in the. 100 meters was
11.83 which is real slow for him.
Seniors Desmond Quinn and
Dontae Quinn both participated
in the 800 meters. "Desmond ran
his best time of the season
(2:05.9), while Dontae's time of
2:06.2 established a new person-
al best for him," praised Gowan.
Junior Scott Boykin ran very
well in the 3200 meters (2 miles),
and set a new personal record
with his time of 10:07.25. "Scott
is really beginning to come on. He
finished 11th among the 27 run-
ners in the race but fourth among
the Florida athletes," said Gowan.


The 4x400 relay team im-
proved its best time of the season
by more than jive seconds when
it ran 3:37.3. "We won our heat
by more than 50 yards., Fresh-
man Zyris Hill (53.50) led off for
us and he gave us the lead at the
first exchange. Then Dontae
Quinn (55.70), Charles Keene
(55.45), and Desmond Quinn
-(52.64) all ran strong legs and
this enabled us to win pretty
easy," observed Gowan.
Junior Letron Alexander par-
ticipated in the high jump compe-
tition. "Letron cleared 5'10" in the
meet. He is beginning to jump
better, and I feel that he ,is capa-
ble of going 6'2" by the end of the
season," said Gown excitedly.
While most of the team is en-
joying a few days off during
Spring Break, several members of
the team will participate in the


Kiwanis meet Saturday at Florida
State.
"The same group that ran in
Gainesville will participate Satur-
day in Tallahassee," said Gowan.
'This is a very good meet for our
team to participate in. The com-
petition is very strong and gener-
,*ally our runners perform well at
this meet"
Also, Florida State is.hosting
the University of Colorado so not
only will the athletes get to run
but they will also get to see two
top-notch track programs in ac-
tion.
Everyone is encouraged to at-
.tend the Kiwanis Invitational in
Tallahassee on Saturday and also
the team will be going against
IRutherford on April 9,, ,


grouper, and red snapper will re-
ceive $100 for 1st place and a
plaque for 2nd place.
Awards will be on May 11 at
5:00 pm at the Ling Festival. Jim
Wilson of "Jim Wilson Outdoors",
Channel 28, Panama City, will
serve as master of ceremonies.

FSU Golf
Tourney Set
FSU-Panama City Campus
will hold a golf tournament at the
Hombre Golf Course on April 20.
FSU Head Football Coach Bobby
Bowden and Chicago Bears quar-
terback, Peter Tom Willis, are two
of the celebrities who will play
and participate in the tour a-
ment. Entry fee is $100.00.
Monies earned from the tour-
nament will go into the Panama
City Campus Foundation to ex-
pand and enrich academic pro-



%Wester


P155/80R13
P165/80R13 7
P175/80R13 _
PI18/80R13 Each
ALL 14 IN.
P185/75R14
P1950 5R14 9
P205/75R14
P215/75R14 Each
ALL 15 IN.
P205/75R15 97
P215/751R5 9f u 7
P225/75R15 -
P235n5R15 Each
i
These are the advertised prices of
the Westemrn Auto Company owned
store in Panama City. As in the com-
pany store, it will be necessary to
add $4 for the Road Hazard Warranty
you will enjoy on your new tire.
Western Auto
Dave May, owner
227-1105 219 Reid Ave.


grams and services offered
through the Panama City Cam-
pus. These funds will also provide
more higher educations opportu-
nities for citizens of Panama City
and surrounding communities.
Persons interested in playing
in the tournament should contact
the FSU-Panama City Campus at
872-4750, ext. 39.



ROLL IN
WI-IHEELS







By: Richard Miller
*Basic driving skills and road
signs are the same all over the
country, but the rules of the
road vary from state to state. In
Idaho, for example, unattended
cattle and sheep have the right
of way.
*The same antifreeze coolant
that keeps your radiator from
freezing in the winter is also
what keeps it from boiling over
in hot weather. Change coolant
every two years, or more often,
to ensure the built-in benefits
of anticorrosive additives.
*For safer steering, profession-
al drivers tell us, keep hands at
10 o'clock and 2 o'clock on the
steering wheel on straight
roads; move to 9 o'clock and 3
o'clock on 'winding roads or in
heavy traffic.
*Though they may be intimidat-
ing, six-lane highways are actu-
ally safer than smaller roads,
accident statistics show.
*"High-perfobrmance" tires gen-
erally have a lower tread-wear
rating because they are made
of softer compounds than ordi-
nary tires in order to hold the
road better and improve trac-
tion.
*New-Used Cars: You'll like the
performance of our newest
models at

Gulf Ford

Mercury
118 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida
1-800-239-9650
Service and Sales


SAVE


4L 4L 4L 4L 4L 4L 4L 4L 4L 4- 4L 4L 4L 4L 4L 4. 4L 4L I 4L 4L











PAGE 8A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991


Sharks Win 3 Out of 4
Defeat Havana and Two Kentucky Teams


Select Shot Tournament

To Benefit Kiwanis Club


The Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club
will be sponsoring their second
annual 4-man select shot golf
tournament on Saturday, April
20, according to co-chairmen,
Len "Bubba" Patrick and Steve
Richardson.
The tournament is a fund
raising project of the Kiwanis
Club to help fund their extensive
work with youth organizations in
Gulf County, which includes sev-
eral annual scholarships to Gulf
Coast College, support of a per-
petual scholarship fund at the
college, support of Girl Scout ac-
tivities and several other youth
projects of a temporary or one-
time nature.
Patrick and Richardson said
entries to the tournament are be-
ing accepted now and sign-up will
continue until the 18 teams
scheduled for the tournament,
are filled.
'We want this to be a fun
event, so we are paying close at-
tention to the handicaps of golf-
ers on the individual teams," Pat-
rick said. "For this reason, teams
may have three players with a
handicap of 1 to 20, but no more
than one player with a handicap
from 1 to 12."
Entry fees for this year will be
$30.00 per individual golfer, or
$120.00 per team. "The fees in-
clude the golfer's greens fee and


use of a golf cart," Patrick said.
Richardson pointed out that
there will be three prizes given,
with each golfer in a team receiv-
ing a prize, when one is awarded.
"First prize is four $50.00 gift cer-
tificates for the winning team.
Second prize is a $40.00 gift cer-
tificate for each winning team
member and third prize will be a
$25.00 gift certificate." The certifi-
cates are redeemable with any
merchant in Gulf County.
Entries may be submitted by
mail to Richardson at P.O. box
910, Port St. Joe, 32456, or to
Patrick in the pro shop at the St.
Joseph Bay Country Club.
Entry fee checks should be
made payable to the Port St. Joe
Kiwanis Club.


Gators Home
for 3 Games
Wewahitchka's baseball Ga-
tors begin a three-game home
stand today, when they meet the
visiting North Hardin, Kentucky
team in a 2:30 p.m. game on Ga-
tor Field. Friday, the Gators will
host the LaRue County, Kentucky
squad in a game at 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday, Carrabelle will be
coming to town for a game at
3:00 p.m.


St. Joe Powers Over Wakulla


The Sharks outlifted the
War Eagles 43-36 March 25 in
a dual lifting competition at
Wakulla. Port St. Joe will
compete in the state weightlift-
ing meet at Lemon Bay High


School in Englewood on April
13.

Individual results for Port
St. Joe weight lifters are
shown below:


Port St. Joe's Sharks played
two of a scheduled four games in
the Quincy Pepsi Cola Invitation-
al baseball tournament last week
end, before having to drop out
when their pitchers had all
pitched the allowed number of in-
nings for the week.
QUINCY 15, PSJ 8
The Sharks scored two runs
in the first and second .innings
and four in the fifth, fAr a 8-5
lead over Quincy before the host
team jumped on Shark reliever,
Reginald Larry in the fifth inning
for two quick runs. Matt Taylor
came in to put out the fire, but
the Tigers had the momentum in
high gear and put three more
runs on the board for a 11-8 lead
before the fire could be put out.
The Tigers went on to score four
more runs in the sixth off Taylor
before the Sharks could get the
last out.
The Tigers worked Shark
pitching for only eight hits, 10
walks and nine costly errors in
taking their victory.
The Tigers scored only five
earned runs.
Port St. Joe had eight runs
on eight hits and left eight men
on base. Rick Freeman went
three for four; Jon Elliott was two
for three; Adam Taylor and Kyle
Griffin, one for three-all singles.
Reginald Larry had the loudest
hit for the Sharks, a two-run
homer in the second inning.
Tyrone Hamilton started on
the mound for the Sharks, giving


Kyle Griffin bangs out a sin-
gle Tuesday evening.
up two runs on three hits. Regi-
nald Larry went for two innings,
allowing three runs on one hit.
Matt Taylor came on for the final
two innings, allowing only four
hits, but the Tigers 'made them
count for eight runs.
St. Joe 220 040 0- 8 8 9
Suincy 301 164 x-15 8 7
PSJ 19, HAVANA 5
Still smarting from the defeat
at the hands of one Gadsden
County team, the Sharks came
tearing back Friday at noon and
ripped the Havana Gladiators,
19-5. The Shark bats rang out 15
hits and managed to get all run-
ners home but one.
Matt Taylor started on the
mound for the Sharks and was
relieved in the third by Tyrone


Hamilton. The two gave up eight
hits in the five innings played,
and allowed only two walks.
Hamilton allowed a home run,
the only Havana threat of the
game.
The Sharks started the scor-
ing marathon in the second in-
ning, with three runs. They added
eight more in both the third and
fourth, and the game was called
at the mid-point of the fifth in-
ning by the 10-run rule.
The. Sharks whacked a


Matt Taylor pitched his
fourth win against Owensboro
High.
homer, seven doubles and two
triples in the slug-fest. Reginald
Larry out-ran a long drive up
against the center field fence for
an inside the park home run and
a triple. Bill Ramsey and Tyrone
Hamilton banged out triples. Lar-
ry, Matt- Taylor, Kyle Griffin,
Hamilton and Vince Addison all
hit one double each. Rick Free-
man rapped two doubles and a
single. Griffin added two singles
and Bobby Nobles hit for two sin-
gles.
Havana 011 21- 5 83
St. Joe 038 8x-19 15 2
Port St. Joe's Sharks took
two baseball victories over visiting
Kentucky teams Tuesday, in a
four-game day of baseball.
Bill Ramsey hurled'a three-
hit shutout against Owensboro
Catholic in the first game and
Matt Taylor allowed only two hits
in his 14-2 win over Owensboro
High.
The Sharks edged Catholic,
2-0, by pushing two un-earned


Bobby Nobles slashes a sin-
gle against Owensboro.


runs across the plate. Tyrone
Hamilton was safe on an error in
the second inning, and was driv-
en home with a single by Bobby
Nobles. The second run came
when Matt Taylor was hit by a
pitch and came home on- Bill
Ramsey's sacrifice fly in the fifth
inning.
Ramsey went the route for
the Sharks, giving up three sin-
gles, walked two and struck out
nine for his third win of the sea-
son.
O'boro C. 000 000 0-0 3 3
St. Joe 010 010 x-2 4 2
In the second game the
Sharks went on a slug-fest and
dumped their guests, Owensboro
High, 14-2 in a game shortened
by the 10 run rule.
Matt Taylor went all the way
on the mound for his fourth win
of the season, giving up only
three hits and striking out 11
batters. He walked three.
Shark batters ripped 11 hits


in their four at-bats, mixed them
with seven walks and three Ow-
ensboro errors to collect their 14
runs.
Reggie Larry, Rick Freeman
and Matt Taylor ripped doubles
for the Sharks' big hits of the eve-
ning. Taylor was the only Shark
which didn't score a run.
Bill Ramsey and Jon Elliott
each had two singles. Rapping
out one single were Reggie Larry,
Kyle Griffin, Bobby Nobles, and
Adam Taylor.
O'boro Hi 001 01- 2 3 5
St. Joe 224 6x-14'11 2
The Sharks will be on the
road Monday for their only game
of the week ahead. The Sharks
will meet Panama City Christian
School at Gulf Coast College
Commodore Field at 5:00 p.m.,
Port St. Joe time.
The junior varsity will play at
home this coming Wednesday at
5:00 p.m.


0
Kiwanis Charity 4-Man Select
Shot Golf Tournament
Saturday, April 20

St. Joseph's Bay Country Club


Choose your own team. Men, women, and
students welcome. The tournament will be limit-
ed to 18 teams.
Entry fee is $30.00 per player or your busi-
ness may sponsor a team. Fee includes greens
fee and cart.
Send team, list of players and handicaps
along with entry fee to Steve Richardson, Box
910, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or give them to
Len "Bubba" Patrick at St. Joseph's Bay Country

Club.
Teams may have three players with a handi-
cap of 1-18 but no more than one player with a
handicap from 1-12.
First Prize will be 4 $50.00 gift certificates.
Second Prize will be 4 $40.00 gift certifi-


cates.
Third Prize will
cates.
Gift certificates
Gulf County.


be 4 $25.00 gift certifi-

are good at any merchant in


SPlayer Name Handicap
I (1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Donation: $30.00 per player
- -----------------------------------18/90
3TC: 4/4-18/90


Wt. Bench
Class Name Press
114 Matt Roberson.............................. 95
123 Jamie Kosier .................................165
Josh Bateman.............................. 120
132 Chris Butler ..................................160
148 Charlie Taylor................................230
Mike Norris ..................................215
165 Chris Roberson .............................270
Vic Sellers .................................... 190
181 William Lewis ............................340
Randy Smith ..................................200
198 Roy Campbell................................310
Jeremy Tull....................................260
220 Darrell Tull....................................330
Paul Joiner....................................310


Heavy
Weight


Calvin Pryor ..................................385
Perez Davis.................................... 350


Clean
& Jerk
90
160
120
175
185
160
200
155
210
165
270
190
270
250


Tot.
185
325
240
335
415
375
470
345
550
365
580
450
600
560


Place
2nd
1st
3rd
3rd
2nd
3rd
3rd
1st
1st
2nd
1st
2nd


260 645 1st
255 605 2nd


New Business

NOW OPEN


r iTack & Supply
Located 4 miles South of Port St. Joe
on Hwy. C-30
904-229-8561

Selling Western English Saddlery,
Clothing & Accessories
Also Country Arts & Crafts
TEMPORARY OPERATING HOURS
M-F 3:00 7:00 p.m. EST
Sat. 9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. EST
Sun. 1:30 6:00 p.m. EST
Gift Certificates Available
VISA MASTERCARD ACCEPTED Cn u, & &/4,/


PASSENGER A E


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Steel-Belted Construction
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P175/70R13 $58.95 P205/70R14 $73.95
P185/70R13 60.95 P215/70R14 77.95
P195/70R13 63.95 P215/70R15 82.95
P205/70R13 .64.95 P225/70R15 86.95
D 40/r-32AP&aA 89 rfiA1 79o


8P 5l /b' 7 l 65.0 9 |
P195/70R14 67.95
P195/75k14 70.95


P245/70R15 94.95


SALE ENDS SOON


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER
216 MONUMENT
'A'.iITITTITol T T-li a A4fT -5 1 IATK IA :1 1 I4 4 q'


Timm -'A -T4


I










THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991


Add A Touch of Color


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
Annual flowering plants can
provide that necessary touch of
color to an often drab landscape.
They are best displayed as bor-
ders along walkways, fences, and
shrub beds. Annuals planted in
containers can add a splash of
color to a porch, deck, or patio
area.
Annuals should serve as an
accent to the landscape, not a
dominant feature in the setting.
Those used in front of the home
should harmonize with the set-
ting and colors;should blend with
each other and with the home.
Large elaborate annual displays
are usually too distracting for this
area and are best used in the


backyard.
When selecting annuals for
beds or borders, it is best to limit
the choice to as few kinds as pos-
sible. Combinations of many flow-
er colors and plant forms can dis-
tract from the overall appearance
of the display. Attractive flower
'beds can be created by using one
plant species.
Flower beds should be pre-
pared before plants are pur-
chased. Allowing plants to remain
in their original containers for
prolonged periods after purchase
can have a negative effect on their
performance about planting. Pur-
chase plants when you're ready
and plant them as soon as possi-
ble, preferably within 24 hours.
The time spent preparing the


Roy Lee
Carter

County
Extension
Director


planting beds is important if you
are to be successful with annual
flowers. Flower beds should be
spaded or tilled at least six inches
deep several weeks before plant-
ing. Florida's sandy soils have


0 OB IT UAR IES I


James Herring
1st Sgt. James 0. Herring,
65, U.S. Army retired, of 131
Hunter Circle, Port St. Joe,
passed away Saturday morning,
March 30, in Bay Medical Center.
Born in Louisville, Alabama, he
served in the armed forces during
World War II and the Korean Con-
- flict, and retired from the U.S.
Army. He was a long time resi-
dent of Port St. Joe where he
worked as a letter carrier for the
U.S. Postal Service until his re-
tirement. He was a member of the
Port St. Joe Lodge #111, F&A.M.,
the Hadji Temple, AAONMS, and
the York Rite Temple.
Survivors include his wife,
Onnie Herring, his daughter, Lin-
da White, and his& grandson,
James Robert White, all of Port
SLt. Joe; one sister,'Flora Herring
Long of Panama City; and several
nieces and nephews.
Graveside funeral services
were held Monday, April 1 at Hol-
ly Hill Cemetery, conducted by
the Rev. Howard Browning. Inter-
ment followed with military hon-
ors by the Fort Rucker Honor
Guard.
The family requested that, in
lieu of flowers, donations be
made to the American Cancer So-
ciety or the the Heart Fund.
All services were under the di-
rection of the Comforter Funeral
Home.

Eva M. Danford
9 Eva Maloney Danford, 87,
passed away Saturday morning,
March 30, at Bay St. Joseph Care
Center following an extended ill-
ness. She had been a long time
resident of Panama City before
moving to Port St. Joe and later
to Wewahitchka. She was of the
Presbyterian denomination.
Survivors include two nieces,
Patricia Donaldson of Panama
City, and Antoinette Terry of Pan-
ama City Beach; two granddaugh-
ters, Judy Carson of Marianna
and Shirley Harvell of Lynn
Haven; and five great grandchil-
dren.
Graveside funeral services
were held Monday, April 1 at
Jehu Cemetery, conducted by Dr.
Elmer Braden. Interment fol-
lowed.
All services were under the di-
rection of the Comforter Funeral
Home, Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.

Dessie Edgar
Dessie Edgar, 84, passed
away Sunday evening, March 31,
at Bay St. Joseph Care Center af-
ter a long illness. She had been a
resident of St. Joe Beach for the
past 10 years.
She is survived by three
daughters, Gloria Pippin and
Gayle Tatum, both of St. Joe
Beach, and Joyce Parmele of Car-
rabelle; one brother, Brogdon Wil-
kerson of Opp, Alabama; three
sisters, Willie Wilkerson of Opp.
and Alice Wilkerson and Mary
Wilkerson, both of Panama City;
10 grandchildren and six grand-
children. /
Funeral services were held
Wednesday at the First Baptist
Church in Mexico Beach with the
Rev. William Smith and the Rev.
Tommy Doss officiating. Burial
followed in Magnolia Cemetery at
DeFunlak Springs.
All arrangements were by Gil-
more Funeral Home.

Willie D. Lewis
Willie D. Lewis, 64, of High-
land View, passed away Wednes-
day, March 27 at Gulf Pines Hos-


FELLOWSHIP
MEETING
April 4 5 p.m.
Liberty Manor
Everyone is invited for a
time of fellowship, good
food and music.


pital after a long illness. He had
been a resident of Gulf County for
the past 40 years and was retired
from the box plant at St Joe Con-
tainer Company.
He is survived by his wife,
Ethel Lewis of Highland View;
four sons, Willie B. Lewis of East-
point, Jake Lewis of Apalachicola,
Harry Lewis of St. Joe Beach, and
Larry Lewis, of Tallahassee; one
daughter, Gall Miles ;of Highland
View; two brothers, Malvin Lewis
and Carrol Lewis, both of Tampa;
three sisters, Irene Lewis and Lo-
ray Lewis, both of Pansey, Ala-
bama, and Soffle Rogers of Orlan-
do; 15 grandchildren and three
great grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Sunday at the Church of God in
Highland View with Rev. Clifton
Elmore officiating. Burial was in
the family plot at Liberty Springs
Church Cemetery in Pansey.
All arrangements were by Gil-
more Funeral Home.

Ross Stripling
Ross Stripling, 78, of Wewa-
hitchka, passed away Tuesday,
March 26, in Bay Medical Center
following an extended illness. A
native of Geneva, Alabama, he
had been a resident of Wewa-
hitchka and Gulf County for the
past 60 years. He was a bee keep-
er and a member of the First Bap-
tist Church. He served a term as
Commissioner of the City of We-
wahitchka, and was the founder
and past president of the Howard
Creek Volunteer Fire Department.
Survivors include two sons,
Ray E. Stripling and Mike Strip-
ling, two daughters, Faye Cox
and June Green, three sisters,
Mildred Lanier and Edith Na-
tions, all of Wewahitchka, and
Ilene Gay of Port St. Joe, nine
grandchildren and nine great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Friday at the First Baptist
Church, conducted by the Rev.
Charles Pettis and the Rev. Rich-
ard Maddox. Interment followed
in the family plot at Jehu Ceme-
tery.
All services were under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home, Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.

Marilyn Batson
Marilyn C. Batson, 47, of Port
St. Joe, died Saturday, March 23
in Bay Medical Center. She was a
native of Coffee County Alabama,
but had been a long time resident
of Port St. Joe. She was a mem-
ber of New Bethel AME Church
where she served on the Usher
Board and the Missionary Socie-
ty. She received her education in
the public schools of Gulf County
and attended Gulf Coast Commu-
nity College.
She is survived by her six
children, Christine (Robert) Lee of
Groton, Connecticut, Christopher
Patrick (Twanda) Batson, U.S.


Army, Korea, Shauntae Batson,
U.S. Army, Japan, Alisa (Ken-
neth) Parker, Rebecca Batson,
and Jeffery Batson, all of Port St.
Joe; two grandsons, Ashyla Park-
er and Chatzen Byrd; three sis-
ters, Eara (Joe) Buie and Lovie
Whitfield, both of Port St. Joe,
and Dorothy Bunyon of Hampton,
Virginia; three aunts, four uncles,
and a host of nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral services were held
Friday in the New Bethel AME
Church in Port St. Joe with Rev.
William Collier officiating. Inter-
ment followed in Forest Hill Ce-
metery.
Battle Memorial Funeral
Home of Panama City in charge of
all arrangements.

Luther Christmas
Luther Christmas, 82, of
Highland View, passed away Sun-
day afternoon, March 31, at his
home following an extended ill-
ness. A native of Ben Hill County,
Georgia, he had been a resident
of Highland View since 1943. He
was an employee of St. Joe Forest
Products Co. until his retirement
in 1975, and was a member of
the Highland View Baptist
Church.
Survivors include his wife,
Doris Christmas, one stepson,
Donald Ray Baker, and wife, Rita
Baker, all of Highland View, three
grandchildren and one step
grandchild; three sisters, Claudie
Sewell of Port St. Joe, Lucy Mims
of Dalkeith, and Bessie Morris,
Georgia.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday at the Highland View
Baptist Church, conducted by the
Rev. Jimmy Clark. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot.
All services were under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home.

Jody Evans
Joseph Daniel "Jody" Evans,
19, of Port St. Joe, passed away
Sunday morning, March 31, as a
result of injuries sustained in an
automobile accident He was a
native and life long resident of
Port St. Joe and graduated from
Port St. Joe High School. He was
currently attending Gulf Coast
Community College, and was a
member of the Long Avenue Bap-
tist Church.
Survivors include his parents,
Jackie and Sharon Evans, his
brother, Michael Evans, and his
grandparents, L.D. and Merle Da-
vis, all of Port St. Joe; also, a
number of aunts, uncles, and
cousins.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday at the Long Avenue
Baptist Church, conducted by the
Rev. J.C. Odum and Dr. Dan
Duncan. Interment followed.
All services are under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home.


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322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


very low capacities for holding
nutrients and water. Incorporate
of two to three inches of organic
matter into planting beds will in-
crease the nutrient and water re-
tention of these soils. Organic
materials such as compost or
peat should be thoroughly mixed
into the soil.
Garden soils, especially in re-
cently developed areas, are fre-
quently infertile. Flower beds
should be fertilized prior to plant-
ing or at planting time and re-
peated on a monthly basis. Apply
8-8-8 or a similar complete ferti-
lizer at the rate of two pounds per
100 square feet of bed area. con-
trolled release fertilizers are ideal
for Florida's sandy soils. Plants
usually grow much better with a
continuous nutrient supply and
labor is reduced since controlled
release fertilizers can be incorpo-
rated uniformly throughout the
soil before planting and applied
on the soil surface of established
plantings.
Water the plants after plant-
ing and water daily until the
plants have become established.
Water the plants "as needed"
thereafter.
Weeds should be controlled
by mulching and hand weeding.
Mulching materials should not
come in contact with plant stems.
The high moisture environment
created by mulch increases the
chances of stem rot which can re-
sult in plant death.
Annuals flowers require more
maintenance than most other
landscape plants. However, their
brilliant colors add an atmos-
phere of warmth and life to a
landscape which more than justi-
fies the additional maintenance.


We would like to thank every-
one who came by and had their
car washed. For those who were
not able to come, there will be an-
other one on April 20. Also,


thanks to the parents for being
there to supervise and help us
out.
Our next planned fund raiser
will be at the Tupelo Festival on
April 6. We will be serving catfish
dinners and boiled crawfish. Be
sure to come out and help send
the band to Washington.
Parents, don't forget the next
regularly scheduled band booster
meeting on April 16 at 6:30 p.m.
in the band room.


THE COTTAGES AT...


BARRIER DUNES


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For A Limited Time
Furnished Models Starting at C

* Single Family Homes
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* Landscaped Lot Included
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(700' of beach front)
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(904) 229-2777 or (800) 624-3964

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PAGE 1B


0








PAGE 2B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE,. FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991


Wastewater Plant A Sizeable


Mayor Frank Pate told the
Rotary Club last Thursday, that
while other governmental entities
in Florida and other places are
having budget difficulties, Port St.
Joe is in sound financial condi-
tion, "and with proper manage-
ment we will remain in sound fi-
nancial condition," he said.
The City's big chance to suf-
fer from the cash flow problems
which is dealing the blues to gov-
ernment operations from the fed-
eral government down to the
state and city level, was in the
Wastewater Treatment Plant. But
even that operation, through judi-
cious management is not a finan-
cial drain on the city purse.
'That wastewater plant is a
tremendous expense every year,
both to operate and to do testing
and make changes dictated by
state and federal agencies," Pate
said. "For instance, Port St. Joe


has had to spend some
$7,494,242.40 in the past five
years just to make changes, do
testing and provide engineering
reports to the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency and the Depart-
ment of Environmental Regula-
tion, in order to remain in
operation and secure operating
permits."
Pate said that in the past six
years, the City has been required
to spend $2,761,374 for environ-
mental engineering reports and
testing; $757,700.00 for testing
laboratory services; $200,000 to
patch a broken pipeline;
$1,876,000 to replace the same
pipeline and $2,098,996 to build
an auxiliary electric power plant
at the treatment plant.
"Half of these laboratory and
environmental expenses were
made necessary when one of the
laboratories we were using gave


us bad data, causing us problems
with the regulation agencies.
When you operate something like
the Wastewater Treatment Plant,
rather than someone proving you
are causing problems, you must
continuously prove that you are
not causing problems. That's the
reason for all the engineering and
laboratory testing," the Mayor
said.
Port St. Joe's plant is self-
supporting; that is, the three cus-
tomers it has, pay the expenses
for operations. "If this were not
so, Port St. Joe would have some
tremendous sewer treatment bills
for its citizens," the speaker said.
With a budget of $8.5 million
for a small city like Port St. Joe,
one would think the tax rate here
would be tremendous, but it re-
mains very modest. The secret of
that, the Mayor pointed out is be-
cause all but $2 million of that
budget is provided by self-


Liability
supporting services, such as wa-
ter and sewer, garbage, etc. The
Wastewater Treatment Plant bud-
get takes up a whopping $5.676
million of the total sum.
'The past five years have
been the most expensive period of
time for the WWP. During this
time period, the $2 million-plus
auxiliary power plant was built,
at the insistence of EPA. The
plant has been run only during
the testing runs each week, since
it was built. It hasn't produced a
single KW of power for the plant,
because there have been no inter-
ruption of services and state law
will not allow the City to use the
plant if the domestic power ser-
.vice has the power available to
serve the plant's needs.
Guests of the club were, Jack
Hood of Traverse City, Mich.,
Rudy Carrol of Lakeland and
Hoyt Smithwick of Albany, Geor-
gia.


I I


r CHILDREN'S HEALTH FORUM

Breast Milk Is

Ideal Food for

Human Infants

By
Elizabeth C. Jones, M.D.

Breast milk is the ideal food for the human infant. There are
different amounts of fats, proteinfand lactose in the milk of different
species of animals. Thus, the slogan "Breast milk for babies and
cow's milk for calves".
A mother who plans to breast feed should be in good health
and maintain a nutritious diet which should be supplemented with
vitamins.
Initiating breast feeding is sometimes not too easy. The mother
needs encouragement and help from the father and from someone
experienced with breast feeding. This can be either a medical per-
son or some family member or friend who has been successful in
breast feeding.
Along with a nutritious diet, it should go without saying, a
breast feeding mother should not smoke or use illegal drugs.
It will often take two to three weeks for a new mother to estab-
lish her milk supply and feel confident with what she is doing. Dur-
ing this period it is helpful to use extra water and some supplemen-
tary formula if the baby is hungry.
Some people think the straw-colored secretions present in the
early days of breast feeding are not nutritious. This liquid is called
colostrum and is equally nutritious for babies. The colostrum also
is full of antibodies which help to protect the infant from infectious
dis s .- .
No longer sla it expected for .a mother tpo 'lose one tooth with
each baby". With proper dental care and supplemented nutritious
diet a mother can breast feed and remain in good condition herself.
If a mother is concerned about maintaining her correct weight,
(and all should be concerned) this can be accomplished while
breast feeding. No one uses as many calories as a breast feeding
mother unless it is someone physically digging ditches. Most wom-
en will lose 10-12 pounds with the birth of their baby. Any addition-
al weight will have to be gradually worked off.
Some mothers use breast feeding as the excuse to over eat. "I
have to eat so I can feed the baby". These mothers end up obese,
tired and unhappy. Moderation A careful diet with gradual in-
crease in physical activity coupled with breast feeding should see.
the mother back in shape after five to six months.
Families with limited incomes would fare better if the money
available was spent on good food for the nursing mother and other
family members than on a baby formula.
Nothing puts the end to breast feeding as quickly as having a
mother who has been up every two hours feeding her baby. She is
exhausted and needs to rest. The father or some family member can
usually give some supplementary formula at this time. After her
rest, mother will feel like continuing the feeding.
A mother's milk supply is usually lowest in the late afternoon or
early evening. It will work well to have mother go to bed immediate-
ly after dinner at 6:00 or 6:30 and have father give a bottle feeding
at 9:00 or 10:00 p.m. By 1:00 2:00 a.m., mother has had a long
period of rest and will be able to cope.
We will usually advise a breast feeding mother to avoid excess-
es of onion, garlic, chocolate, brussel sprouts or cauliflower. There
may be other foods the mother feels upsets her baby every time she
eats it but the previous list includes the usual offenders.
Things to encourage are liquids of all kinds water, juice,
soups, weak tea, and beer. This helps milk production.
Instead of supplementary formula, some people would prefer to
use breast milk. If a mother wants to do this she can hand express
or pump her breasts after each feeding and collect bottles of breast
milk. The milk can be placed in clean bottles and put in the freezer.
If you have a small amount in one bottle, more can be added each
time some is expressed or pumped until the bottle is full. When
ready to use, just thaw and feed.
< 4


Heal


FREE HEARING TEST
Set For -
SENIOR CITIZENS

GULF COAST HEARING AID
CENTER of Panama City will
I .4 be offering to anyone 55 or
'' older a free hearing test. If
",' you have been exposed to
loud factory noise, if people
I seem to mumble or you ask
people to repeat what they
have said, come see us at:
JAMES W. DAME
airing Aid Specialist

ST. JOE MOTEL
501 Monument Ave.


PITTSBURGH PAINTS



April




Sales



Spectacular


Pittsburgh Paints quality and variety is on sale this month!
From interior flat and semi-gloss latex to exterior paints
and stains, we've got what it takes to make your painting
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Carpet Coutry


W. Hwy. 98 Highland View


Course Description
Port St. Joe
SUMMER A
Badminton (Lab Fee $2.00)
General Psychology
SUMMER B
Volleyball (Lab Fee $2.00)
General Biological Science

Wewahitchka
SUMMER A
Word Process. w/WordPerfect
(Lab Fee $4.00)
Human Anat. & Physio. Lab
(Lab Fee $8.00)
SUMMER B
Word Process. w/Microcomp.
III (Lab Fee $2.00)


Robert Keel and his daughter, Angela Keel, accept a check
from Lions Club president, Ed Creamer.


.Angela Keel Getting


Lens Transplant


Angela Keel doesn't see very
well now and had prospects of
having even the partial sight she
enjoys now, dim even further in
the days to come, if it were not for
a surgical procedure she will un-
dergo today.
Angela, 11-year-old daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Keel of St.
Joe Beach will undergo surgery in
a Pensacola hospital today to re-
ceive a human lens transplant to
restore her failing vision. '


Angela's trip to Pensacola is a
project of the Port St. Joe Lions
Club's sight conservation pro-
gram, which has contributed
$200 to help defray the expenses
of her parents while they are in
Pensacola during the surgery and
recovery period.
Sight conservation support
and projects are one of the aims
of Lions Clubs throughout the
world.


GCCC Sponsoring 4th Annual

Secretaries Short Course.


Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege's Business Division and Of-
fice of Lifelong Learning are co-
sponsoring AMA's Fourth Annual
Secretaries Briefing "Blazing
News Trails into the '90s" on
Wednesday, April 24, in the Lan-
guage Arts Lecture Hall from
11:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. All times are
central.
The teleconference will con-
sist of a practical training lecture,
lively panel discussions, pretaped
role plays and approximately 40
minutes of interaction ques-
tions phoned in via an 800 num-
ber by the audience and an-
swered by the speakers.


MESSAGE

SERVICE


Si-THE

Y" fSTAlRlT1M'io


THURSDAY, APRIL 4TH
9:00 A.M. 12:00 NOON

This is our regular monthly Service Center and we will service any-
one's hearing aid free of charge. We have the lowest battery prices
in the area. One pack FREE with this ad!


Participating speakers in-
clude Natasha Josefowitz, an in-
ternationally known speaker,
management consultant and syn-
dicated columnist; Betsy Lazary,
one of the best known experts on
the changing role of the secretary;
Cecilia B. Walker, CAM, CPS,
president of Professional Secre-
taries International; Anna
Barnes, secretary at the Universi-
ty of Maryland; and Debbie
Brown, assistant to the president
of DDB Needham Worldwide Ad-
vertising, Inc.


Phone 227-7241


DO SCHEDULE OF COURSES
(3Q GULF COUNTY
Gul Coast. SUMMER SEMESTER 1991
Community College Sem.


Day


TH
MW

MW



TH

TH


TH


Time


6:00-8:20 1
6:00-9:30 3


. 6:0(-8:20
6:00-9:30



6:00-8:30


Hrs.


6:00-8:20 1


6:00-7:30 1


FEES: $22.05 per credit hour for Florida residents.
(Fees are payable upon enrollment.)

REGISTRATION
Summer A-April 29
Summer B-June 12
6:00 p.m.
t>
Port St. Joe Elementary School
Temple Watson, Coordinator
227-1259 (after 5:00 p.m.)

Wewahitchka High School
George Cox, Coordinator
639-2496 (after 5:00 p.m.)

SUMMER A CLASSES BEGIN WEDNESDAY, MAY 8
SUMMER B CLASSES BEGIN WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19
Classes may be cancelled because of low enrollments. Students are
advised to call local coordinators before going to the first class.
GCCC is an equal opportunity institution


THE TREAD MILL


.Oka-


Computerized Wheel

ALIGNMENT
Complete 2 and 4 Wheel
Alignments

$245T and Up


Complete Line of
Passenger & L.T.
RADIALS

BOAT TRAILER TIRES

GALVANIZED WHEELS


ROTATE & BALANCE
L.T. Tires
S$1695 Tax Higher
Oil, Lube & Filer....... 16.95 & Up
CALL JEFF OR BOBBY
229-6709


I


.



















Plan for A Good Retirement

Most Will Be Able to Meet the Challenge With Proper Preparation


.Special to The Star
By Bill Cordell
Your Retirement Lifestyle
Retirement is no longer sim-
ply stopping work; it's about con-
tinuing your personal growth and
development, no matter what you
want to do. But that only holds
true for those of us whove saved
enough to permit the freedom of
choice.
Take heart Experts agree
that, with some planning, most of
us will be able to meet this chal-
lenge. A good way to start is by
reviewing the three critical steps
to retirement security: building,
preserving, and protecting your
wealth. Let's take a brief look at
each.
1. Building Your Wealth
First, identify your goals.
What kind of lifestyle will you
want? Will Yu travel? Start a
new business or second career?
Pursue .an expensive hobby?
While the old rule of thumb sug-
gests that the majority of us will


make do with about 75 percent of
our current income during retire-
ment, only you can determine
how much you'll really need.
Next, identify your sources of
income. Most people will have the
following four:
*IRAs. Regardless of whether
or not you can deduct your con-
tribution, it makes sense to in-
vest as much as you can in your
IRA to take full advantage of its
tax-deferred growth. If you have
more than one IRA, you should
also give consideration to consoli-
dating them into a' single ac-
count. This will allow you to man-
age their growth more effectively.
eSocial Security. While many.
of us can expect to receive the
maximum benefit currently
about $13,000 annually for the
average 65-year-old it's a good
idea to check with the Social Se-
curity Adininistration to get a Per-
sonal Earnings and Benefit Esti-
mate Statement (PEBES), Form
SSA-7004. You can request this


FSU and GC Seminars
On Accounting, Recordkeeping, Business and Divorce


The Florida State University
Small Business Development
Center and Gulf Coast Communi-
ty College Lifelong Learning Cen-
ter are cosponsoring a free semi-
nar, "Marketing Your Business on
the Radio", on Wednesday, April
10, from 11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
The seminar will be held at the
FSU, Panama City Campus,
Room 7. All times are central.

i The Florida State University
' Small Business Development
Center and Gulf Coast Communi-
ty College Lifelong Learning Cen-
ter are cosponsoring a free semi-
nar, "Recordkeeping Can Be
Easy'", on Thursday, April 11. The
seminar will be held at the Gulf





% e* % % %% % % %% ,. % % %% %



The Gulf County School Board met in regu-
" lar session on February 5, 1991 at 9:00 a.m. in
:> the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St Joe. The
1 following members were present: Charlotte Pierce,
Ted Whitfleld, James Hanlon, Oscar Redd. Board
member David Byrd~yas absent due to illness. The
Superintendent and board attorney were also
present.
Chairman Hanlon presided and the meeting
was opened with pfryer by Reverend William
Smith, Pastor, White City Baptist Church, followed
by the pledge of allegiance to the flag led by Mr.
Whitfleld.
Hear from Public: Mr. Elmo Sander met
with the board and shared his concerns regarding
the boards role in developing programs for excep-
tional students.
Adoption of Agenda: A motion was made by
Mr. Whitfield, second by Mr. Redd to adopt the
agenda.
Budget Matters/Paymentof Bills: On mo-
i tion by Mr. Whitfleld, second by Mrs. Pierce, the
board voted to approve the following Budget Mat-
ters/Payment of Bills:
a Approved Budget Amendment No. IV; Gener-.
alFund.
alf Approved Budget Amendmept No. IV. Feder-
al Fund. "
Approved payment of bills.,
Approval of Minutes: A motion' ws made
? by Mr. Redd, second by Mr. Whitfileld to approve,.
the minutes of January 8, 1991.
Personnel Matters: On motion by Mr. Whit-
field, second by Mrs. Pierce, the board voted to ap-
prove the following personnel *matters for the
1990-91 school year:
Approved Miriam Dismuke.to fill the vacancy
created by education leave 'f absence for Richard
Williams. ;
I Approved the employment of Carol Ahn Bar-
ry as Behavioral Program Specialist.
Approved a request from Lois Byrd for a
change in contract status from Continuing Con-
tract Teacher to Professional Service Contract.
Approved the employment of Robin Downs
as Senior High Alternative Education teacher at
" Wewahitchha High School.
Approved the following as substitutes in the
maintenance department: Terry Clements, Shirley
Addison, Mary Baxter. .
'Approved Marian Deeson, as School. Food
Service regular employee at Port St. Joe Elemen-
Approved Doris Mincy as Assistant School
od Service Manager at Wewahitchka Elementary
School .
Approved;ValerIa Myers be transferred from
5 1/2 hour position to 6 hour position at Wewa-
hitchka Elementary School. .
-,, Approved Brian Pajrick Lemleux to pick up
oi food servi6 s4ll at PoAr St'Joe Elelne'ftary
and Port St. Joe High Schools.
Approved Lena Weeks work day be increased
, fromrm 3 ours to 3.1/2 hours per day.
S Approved Professional Orientation Program
Team as follows: Teachers DeEtta Smallwood, MI-
f cah Peak, Larry Witt Robert CIowiis; Peer Teachers
Juanise Willians., Etna Gaskin, Ivelyr'Cox, De-
? bra Betts; OPE -D)avid Bidiell, Chris Earley. S.M.
P Eubanks, Jerry lilley. ..
Approved the following persons as substitute
teachers fro the Gulf'County School Board; Mari-
anna R. P Nell Wooten, Sylvia Irene Lang,
Thomas J. Morgan. Sally Malone.
-Approved,, the,,emplpyment. of Pamela Jo
Hornme as student records clerk at Port St. Joe
High School.
Approved the employment of Johnny Taun-


County Public Library, Port St.
Joe, from 4:30 7:30 p.m. EST.

The Florida State University
Small Business Development
Center and Gulf Coast Communi-
ty College Lifelong Learning Cen-
ter are cosponsoring a free semi-
nar, "How to Obtain Minority
Certification", on Thursday, April
11. The seminar will be held at
the FSU, Panama City Campus,
Room 7, from 6:30 9:30 p.m. All
times are central.
0* *
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege will sponsor an eight-week
course titled "Rebuilding After Di-
vorce" on Tuesdays beginning
April 9.



- -.- I / / / ,e "
% % % % % % % % % % % % % % % \ % %'%
K~k^ ^ ^^'v.'v%


form by calling 1-800-234-5772.
*Emolover-sponsored retire-
ment plans. If you have a 401(k)
or an alternative plan to which
you can contribute pre-tax dol-
lars, take maximum advantage
because, like your IRA, these as-
sets grow tax-deferred Under cur-
rent law, that's up to 15 percent
of your salary, to a maximum of
$7,979 (adjusted annually to ac-
count for inflation).
*Investment assets. Over the
years, inflation and health care
costs can take a sizable bite out
of retirement income. By diversi-
fying your investment assets -
such as stocks, bonds and money
market funds to seek the high-
est possible long-term return, you
can keep pace with rising costs.
2. Preserving Your Wealth
When it comes to preserving
the wealth you've built, there are
to important considerations: first,
the importance of minimizing the
taxes on your retirement assets,
and second, the impact of infla-
tion on your purchasing power.
When you change Jobs or re-
tire, you have 60 days to decide
what to do with your vested as-
sets under employer-sponsored
retirement plans. You can either
accept the money and pay taxes
on it immediately, or choose to
roll the sum over into an IRA. For
many people, it makes sense to
continue to let your savings grow
tax-deferred in an IRA. However,
this is a complicated issue and
professional advice is recom-
mended.
For some high-income indi-
viduals, tax provisions in the re-
cent budget agreement have
made tax-free investments -
such as municipal bonds, unit
trusts and tax-free money market
and mutual funds even more
attractive. Speak to your financial


ton for the auto mechanics aide at Wewahitchka
High School.
Approved James A. Stanley as Head Football
Coach/Athletic Director at Wewahitchka High
School.
Approved Charles Fortner as Head Softball
coach at Wewahitchka High School
Bid Matters: On motion by Mrs. Pierce, sec-
ond by Mr. Redd, the board approved the following
bid matters.
Approved the low bid from S&S Computers
for Business and Office Computer Equipment at
Port St. Joe,High School Business Education De-
partment.
Approved the low bid from Gulf Coast Com-
puter Exchange for Library computer for Port St.
Joe High School Library.
Student Matters: On motion by Mr: Redd,
second by Mr. Whitfleld, the board approved Gulf
County School District Procedures for Identifying
Migrant Students.
.Project Graduation: On motion by Mr.
Redd, second by Mrs. Pierce, the board .voted
unanimously to contribute $1,250.00 to Project
Graduation for Port St. Joe High School.
*., School Food Service: The board reviewed
'breakfast survey results.' On motion by Mr. Whit-
field, second by Mrs. Pierce, the board voted that
'no breakfast program be initiated in the two'high
schools at this time.
Transportation Matters: On motion by Mr.
Redd, second by Mr. Whitfield, the board voted to
provide a bus and gas for the Wewahitchka High
SMiddle School Alternative Education class and var-
ying exceptionalities class trip in the spring.
'Program Matters: On -motion by Mr. Redd,
second by Mr. Whitfield, the board approved the
following program matters:
Approved Gulf County's Master Plan Update
for 1990-91.
Approved Inservice Activities for February
18-19-1991.
On motion by. Mr. Whitfleld, second by Mrs.
Pierce, the board voted to conditionally approve
Application for Supplemental Health Program for
Februaiyl through June 30, 1991 with an accept-
able contract with Health Department. The board
also approved Job Description for this program as
follows: Health Service Projedt School Social Work-
er, Health Services Project School Health Nurse,
Health Services Project Psychologist.
Superintendent's Report: On motion by Mr.
Whitfield, second by Mrs. Pierce, the board agreed
to participate in a rally honoring our troops In the
Persian Gulf.
On motion by Mr. Redd, second by Mrs.
Pierce, the board approved a Resolution support-
inpg the American Armed Forces in Operation
Desert Storm.
On motion by Mrs. Pierce, second by Mr.
Redd, the board approved for any school board
.member who wishes to. attend Legislative Process
Workshop scheduled for February 25 in Tallahas-
see.
On motion by Mr. Redd, second by Mrs.
Pierce, the board acknowledged receipt of report
filed from walk- through with Parent Awareness
Group on'January 28.
On motion by Mrs. Pierce, second by Mr.
Whitfield, the board acknowledged a letter from
Gloria Ramsey expressing concern over operation-
al problems regarding students being exempt from
final semester exams.
There being no further business, the meeting
adjourned to meet again on March 5, 1991 at 5:30
p.m.


consultant about exploring these
options.
How can you beat inflation?
By planning carefully and diversi-
fying your investments. That
means including a growth compo-
nent in your portfolio. This is true
even if you're already retired, be-
cause over time, inflation can se-
riously erode your buying power
and your quality of life. If you're
apprehensive about owning
stocks, consider this: despite
short-term ups and downs, his-
torically the stock market has
outperformed all other invest-
ments.
3. Protecting Your Wealth
We've talked about building
wealth and preserving what
you've, built, but even the most
sophisticated investment strategy
won't help you if you haven't pro-
tected your nest egg against po-
tential catastrophe.


*Auto *Home

*Business

*Flood -Life

*Bonds

We

LAURA RAMSEY, Agen


The Ii



Mc


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991 PAGE 3B


111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 Il11111111111111111

Open Tuesday thru Saturday for

the Winter Months


Move your oyster shucking
from the backyard to your
kitchen table with Indian' '
Pass new, washed, boxed
oysters. Same familiar '
flavor inside but new clean
outside.

40 lb. Washed Box

$25.00

Call 227-1670 -
to reserve yours today!


INDIAN PASS


RAW BAR
(ON C-30 SOUTH OF PORT ST. JOE)
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Presenting 'Th Travelers'
insurance Store Since 1943

8:30 till 6:00

monday through Friday


u/


221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

Are HERE to Service What We Sell

it ROY SMITH, Agent FRANK HANNON, Agent


Rapid


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Wihywait for your tax refund
when you can get your money FAST!

': Use the


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It's a loan against your expected federal income tax refund.
Available at participating locations.


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


I


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_ _






















isn't the problem. As I see it we
need these books. Reading them
can do a lot of good.
The problem that modern
readers face is that we are getting
very little that will ethically, mo-
rally, or theologically confront our
sloppy thinking.
Literature reflects the fact
that at one time educated people
were Bible literate. That means
that they not only read the Bible
but they understood its message
well enough to use its wisdom in
their speech and in their writing.


You are always welcome and visitors are desired at
St. James' Episcopal Church
SA 309 Sixth Street Port St. Joe
episcopal
I+ I -- -SERVICES-
Each Sunday..................7:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School................................ 9:45 a.m.
CdX~IR (The REV. JERRY Fl. HUFT, Pastor




We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place
BIBLE STUDY.................. 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP.............. 7-00 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP...... 1100 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7.00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING ........ 5:45 p.m
Long Avenue Baptist Church
"i 1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor
KEITH PATE
Min. of Music
& Children


CtEch dte.S1~iit
4.'tAtUftMOMEMOOISCHURCH


Constitution andMfonument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........9:45 a.m. Evening Worship......7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship..... 11:00 a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............ 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship ..........5:30 p.m. Thursday 7:30 p.m.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


JEFF BARNES, Youth/Music Director


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Flordia Church Phone 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY DAILY PRAYER
Worship: 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. For Prayer or Counseling, Call or
WEDNESDAY Write the Church.
7:30 p.m. Bible Study & Fellow-
ship "A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune in Every Sunday at 8:45 a.m.
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade


We have discounts
to help you drive down

the cost of car insurance.
If the cost of your car insurance seems to be heading in the wrong direction,
see if Allstate can help turn things around.
We have discounts that can help you save money.
You can save by having a good driving record. Or by driving a car equipped
with air bags or a four-wheel anti-lock brake system. Even by insuring more than one
car with Allstate. I11t
Which Allstate car insurance discounts do you
qualify for? Just give us a call to find out. We'll get your Youreingoodhands.
car insurance costs headed in the right direction. eh, ,n'.xllii,
GASKIN-GRADDY
Insurance Company
Call Collect 639-5077 or 639-2553 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
1-800-782-6802
Serving the Panhandle Since 1931


Toward Understanding
By Rev. Jerry Huft. Rector St. James and St. John's Churches


Polls Show Books


On Religion Are Still


A Popular Item


The way we think conditions our
actions. 'In other words we are
molded by our intellectual envi-
ronment.
It is time for American read-
ers to demand better writing from
our authors. This applies espe-
cially to Christian writers.
In the physical sense, feeling
good may not reflect your body's
health. This is also true of your
spiritual well-being. Too many of
us have convinced ourselves that
immorality and lack of ethical
purpose will not really be life
threatening.
Be responsible about what
you read and about how you find
entertainment These elements
will mold 'your life.


Costs for r
A practical and realistic plan
that will provide greater access to,
medical care for two million Flo-
ridians who cannot afford it and
lower medical costs for everyone
has been unveiled by the Florida
Medical Association.
Called "Health Access Flori-
da," the plan represents a cooper-
ative approach by the private sec-
tor to meet the health care needs
of all Floridians, says Guy T. Se-
lander, M.D., FMA President.
Such an approach, Dr. Se-
lander says, is preferable to that
being proposed by House Bill
1161, introduced by Rep. Mike
Abrams, which would create a
Florida Health Care Commissionj
to plan and regulate all aspects of
Health care at a time when the
state is undergoing a budgetary
crisis.
"HB 1161 will merely produce
another level of bureaucracy by
bringing together under one mon-
olithic body all the various health
care and regulatory and planning
functions now performed by a
number of different agencies," Se-
lander says.
Even sponsors of HB 1161
agree that it cannot and will not,
make direct impact on delivery of
health care service to Floridians,.,
until at least the middle of this-
decade or later.,
"On the other hand, 'Health*
Access Florida' is a more direct'
and workable approach to mak-'
ing changes that benefit the
state's indigent and uninsured
and underinsured working poor,
while controlling costs," Selander 7
explains.
The FMA plan will help cur-.
rent Medicaid patients by focus-
ing on recruitment of more physi-,
clans to participate in Medicaid,
and educating patients on the'
value of preventive medicine. It
also expands medical care for in-
digents through county health
units and coverage for the work-
ing poor through innovative em-
ployer-based insurance plans,
particularly for small businesses.
"This plan also calls for cover-:
age for the traditionally uninsura-
ble those individuals who suf-
fer from chronic illness or have a,
history of medical problems'
which makes it difficult for them'
to acquire insurance coverage -1
through mechanisms that will
bring this group back into the.
mainstream of the health insu-
rance market," Selander says.
"The cornerstone of 'Health


Bible Study
10 a.m. Sunday
7 p.m. Wednesday


Seedy
Access Florida' is the commit-
ment by Florida physicians to
bring health care costs under
control while expanding access
for the indigent and uninsured,"
Selander points out
"We believe this plan offers a
fair and effective approach to
remedy the state's health care
problems while preserving a prov-
en delivery system that offers Flo-
ridians the highest quality care
available anywhere.
'We should not fall victim to
superficial health care schemes
like that proposed in HB 1161
which ultimately will shortchange
all Floridians," ended Selander.

HV Church of
God to Observe
Homecoming
The Highland View Church of
God, located at 323 Sixth Street,
Highland View, will be having
their annual homecoming this
Sunday, April 7th.
The day will begin with Sun-
day School at 10:00 a.m. with the
Reverend John Hillis of Homer-
ville, Georgia, ministering in the
morning worship at 10:45 a.m.
Dinner on the grounds will follow
the morning worship hour and at
2:00 p.m. a gospel sing with the
Bryan Brothers Gospel Singing
group and local singers will be-
gin.
Dr. Clifton Elmore, pastor,
and congregation extend a cordial
invitation to everyone to come
and worship with them on this
special day.

Parenting

Seminars
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege's Office of Lifelong Learning
and Girls Incorporated are offer-
ing a series of free parenting sem-
inars. The seminars will be held
at Girls Incorporated.
*Introduction to Parenting:
Birth to 18 months, Mondays,
April 15-29
*Early Childhood Parenting:
18 months to 3 years, Thursdays,
April 11-25
*Parenting Teenagers: Part II,
Tuesday, April 16-30
*Child Abuse Workshop,
Thursday, April 18
Call to reserve your seat, as
seating is limited. 872-3823.


Worship
11 a.m. Sunday


GOD LOVES YOU!
"FOR GOD so loved the world, that he gave his
only begotten Son, that4whosoever believeth in him
should not perish, but have everlasting life" (John
3:16).
"BUT GOD commendeth his love toward us, in
that we were yet sinners, Christ died for us" (Ro-
mans 5:8).
'THE LORD is not slack concerning his promis-
es as some men count 'slackness; but is long suf-
fering to us-ward, NOT WILLING THAT ANY
SHOULD PERISH, but that all should come to re-
pentance" (2 Peter 3:9)."
It doesn't matter who you are, what you are,
what color skin you have, or what you have done.
GOD LOVES YOU. He wants you to be saved. He's
the only true never-failing friend that any of us
have.
Won't you make up your mind that God does
love you and come to him.
Repent of your sins, confess Jesus as God's son
and be willing to be buried with our Lord in bap-
tism for the forgiveness of sins. GOD LOVES YOU!
Presented by the church of Christ
The church meets at the corner of
20th Street and Marvin Avenue.


P.O. Box 758


Port St. Joe, FL 32456


Card of Thanks
The family of the late Deacon
John Lewis, Jr. would like to take
this opportunity to express their
gratitude for your many tender
ways of expressing friendship,
love, and sympathy with flowers,
food, cards, telephone calls, tele-
grams and in any way you made
a glow sparkle during our trying
experience.
Marie Lewis, wife
Alphonso Lewis, son
Adrian Lewis, grandson
Mentoria Higgins, sister
Nieces, Nephews
& Sisters-in-law

Card of Thanks
I would like to thank everyone
for their prayers, visits, calls,
cards, flowers and other acts of
kindness during my illness and
stay in the hospital. May God for-
ever bless each of you.
Laura Williams

Card of Thanks
I would like to express my
thanks to everyone for the
prayers, flowers, phone calls, vis-
its and food during my stay in the


hospital and recovery at home.
Don & Cindy Ray

SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR








(USA).
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP... 10 a.m.
ADULT SCHOOL........ 11 a.m.
SERMON:
The Bright Daylight After
the Easter Dawn
Nursery Available
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden,
Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756


Scenic Waterfront Dining
RIVERFRONT RESTAURANT
At the Rainbow Inn and Marina
123 Water St. Apalachicola
904-653-8139
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Thursday Senior Citizen Night: Fresh caught amberjack
(try it chargrilled) baked beans, cole slaw, hushpuppies, one
trip to salad bar. $5.95 other guests include homemade
soup and salad bar (all you want) $10.95
Friday: Surf & Turf night. Blackened 8-ounce Delmonico
Steak and fried fresh grouper, red beans and rice, husupup-
pies, homemade soup and salad bar. $13.95
Saturday: Outrageious combination. Chargrilled marinated
trigger fish and half a broiled lobster tail, stuffed baked new
potato, hushupppies, homemade soup and salad bar.
$13.95
Sunday 12 10 p.m.: Roast duck with 40 cloves of garlic,
wild rice, fordhook lima beans, glazed baby carrots, home-
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with Homemade Soup and salad bar. $8.95
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hushpuppies, homemade soup and salad bar $10.95
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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991


That has all changed. Litera-
ture is now filled with the un-
printable. No longer do these dis-
ciplines, which have the potential
to reflect the best side of humani-
ty, represent biblical truth.
What is the effect of these
changing trends on American so-
ciety?
Consider the fact that during
the period of time represented by
an educated class who were Bible
literate, the moral structure of
America was superior to that of
today. Many people are realizing
that ethical and moral leadership
percolates downward.
The things we read and hear
become a part of our thinking.


According to the Gallup re-
searchers, religious books are
selling better than ever. That in
itself is very encouraging.
But there is another side to
the story. Most of the books are
of the self-hell type. They are the
kind that ma :es one feel good
about oneself without challenging
the reader to renewal of lifestyle.
They give comfort with, t correc-
tive gui dance.
Any clear thinking person
knows that -._ed to have a
high level o. self-esteem. That


FMA Unveils Plan


to Lower Medical


.0*



























*


rRU 41


PAGE 413


I










THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, April 4, 1991 PAGE 5B


News from Wewahitchka Elementary
By Linda Whitfield


Rabbits Galore!
Commander Jim McLeod de-
lighted the first graders on Easter
party day with his newest addi-
tion to his animal kingdom. He
brought mama rabbits, baby rab-
bits, and dwarf rabbits. Com-
mander McLeod has a wide varie-
ty of animals at his home.
Kindergarten Classes Had Egg
Hunt at Dead Lakes Park
One of the best places for hid-
ing eggs is the Dead Lakes State
Park, just north of Wewa. The
kindergarten classes of Connie
St Clair, Alisa Walker and Na-
dine Whitfield enjoyed a fun-filled
morning of hiding, hunting, eat-
ing, and playing.
Carina Patterson Wins $100
Carina Patterson is now a lit-
tle richer! By winning the Spelling
Bee at WES, she received $50.00
and by winning the Gulf County
Spelling Bee, she also won
$50.00. Carina Is and always has
been a super speller. She did her
best in the Regional competition,
but she lost Carina, we are very
proud of you.
.,Woman's Club Held Easter
Party for ESE Classes
:As has been their practice


since the early 1970's, the Wewa
Woman's Club has been giving
parties for special boys and girls.
This last party was for the ESE
classes of Diane Atchison, Debbie
Cole, and Pam Sumner. Under
the expertise of Dottie Taylor and
Lois Bidwell, the classes were
treated to a great Easter party in
the WES lunchroom. Handmade
decorations adorned the tables.
Also, these ladies from the Wom-
an's Club judged the door deco-
rating contest sponsored by the
WES PTO. Those birthdays who
were celebrated were Mark Ca-
rithers and Michael Eubanks.
Coach Baxley Announces
Upcoming Track & Field
Coach Bryan Baxley and aide,
Teresa Redd are announcing
plans for the upcoming WES
Track and Field Day. It will be
held May 3. So mark your calen-.
dars and plan to attend this fun-
filled day. There will be lots of fun
for everyone. More details later.
'"If You're Not Going to Use
That, May I Have It?"
When Kindergarten teacher
Nadine Whitfield was in K-Mart a
while back, she saw some empty
plastic egg forms lying on the


floor. As she is very resourceful
and innovative, she asked the
clerk, "If you're not going to use
that, may I have it?" Her request
was granted and this morning I
saw the fruits of her labor in her
classroom. On the beautiful egg:
tree, there are plaster of paris,
eggs, handpainted by the chil-
dren, and tied on the tree with
love from Miss Nadine.
Easter Stories from 2nd Grade
In Joyce Quinn's second
grade, the children have been
writing some creative stories
about Easter. Here are a few sam-
ples:
"About Easter"
By Stefanie McDaniel
I like Easter. I like to find
eggs and hid eggs. I hid one in
the ground last year. I like East-
er!"
"Easter"
By David H. Kemp
I love Easter because it is in
Spring. You get to be with your
family. It Is fun to be with my
family.
"Writing About Easter"
By Renee Ardire
I like Easter because it is fun
to find the eggs. And also Easter
is when Jesus rose from the
dead. And I get clothes for Easter
too.
"Easter"
By PhillipAddison
Easter is the best time of the
year. It is when Jesus rose from
the dead.
Winners of Easter Door
Decorating Contest
They all looked good but
someone had to win. In the K-3
division, first place went to Kin-
dergarten-Alisa Walker, and sec-
ond place went to Joyce Quinn in
Grade 2.
In the 4-6 division, Debbie
Cole took top honors with first
prize, and Diane Atchison won
second prize. The first prize win-
ners received $15.00 and the sec-
ond prize I winners received
$10.00. Congratulations.
Jackie and Jon in
State Piano Competition
WES students Jon Helms and
Jackie Husband will both be play-
ing in Jacksonville in state piano
competition. Both boys excelled
in the district competition in Pan-
ama City. Both students are in
the program of Pamela Rish. They
will be going in June. Good luck.


Pre-registration for all 1991-
92 Wewahitchka High School
ninth grade students will be held
April 8 and 9 from 6:00 8:00
p.m. in the WHS commons. If
your child is in the eighth grade
this year, it will be necessary for
you and your child to attend one
of these registration sessions.
,.: The purpose of pre-
registration is to afford you and
your child the opportunity to
meet the ninth grade advisors
and to decide on a Four-Year Ed-
ticational Plan which MUST be

Lotus Course
Offered at GC
The Gulf Coast Community
College Lifelong Learning Center
and Florida State University
Small Business Development
Center are cosponsoring a Week-
end Computer Institute class,
'"jtus 1-2-3, Level 3" on April
Learn techniques of building
and using macros to increase the
effectiveness ofspreadsheet appli-
cations. Macr help save time
and allow users to customize a
spreadsheet to meet their specific
needs. Students should. have
completed Level 1 or have a work-
ing knowledge of Lotus 1-2-3
spreadsheet commands and func-
tions. Students must supply one
3! 1/2" DS/DD data disk (for IBM
PC microcomputer).
The weekend class will be
held at Gulf Coast Community
College. Registration deadline is
April 10. For more Information
and/or registration call GCCC at
(904) 872-3823. Refer to class
1512-601,.,


-Registration Set
for Summer Terms
V Early registration for Summer
,A and 1 semesters at Gulf Coast
SCommunity College will be held
*April 15 through May 6. Students
imay be advised in the Student
Development Building Monday.
through Thursday from 8 a.m. to
6 p.m. arid on Friday from 8, a.m.
Sto 4 p.m. ^Registration will be held
in the.: Office of Admissions and
I Records Monday through Thurs-
'day from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and
;on Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4.
S ;p.m.
p Summer A begins May, 8;
Summer B begins June 19.
More information about early
registration is available at 872-
3892.


Volunteers Needed

The Guardian Ad Litem Pro-
gram (a speak-up for children
program) needs volunteers who
want to work directly with par-
ents and children in troubled
families. For more information on
how you can make a difference in
the life of a child, please call 785-
7409, ext. 214.


$100 REWARD
Beautiful white male
Samoyed Husky lost
,'March 30th P.S.J. area
but could be anywhere.
$100.00 reward for the
return or information that
leads to the return of my
DOG! Please HELP! Call
John 227-1564 (work) or
229-6348 (home).


approved and signed by you.
Your child's class schedule will be
determined by this plan and the.
only way to change it will be dur-
ing the summer with parent ap-
proval.
Pre-registration for grades
10-12 for the 1991-92 school-
year is as follows:
10th Grade Monday, April
22, WHS Commons 6:00-8:00
p.m.
11th Grade Tuesday, April
23, WHS Commons 6:00-8:00
p.m.
12th Grade Thursday, April
25, WHS Commons 6:00-8:00
p.m.
Further information for these
grades will be forthcoming.
Please call the TAP Office
(639-5394) for additional informa-
tion regarding this pre-
registration.


1


Your Ticket to


Stay in the Know


All the world is a stage and something
different's playing every day.


Turn to your newspaper for a front
row seat and get a better view of the
major players and the changing scene.


Pick up the ticket and get in the act.
And remember, there's no business
like the "know" business.





Call 227-1278 to Subscribe!





THE STAR

Your Hometown Newspaper


308 Williams Ave.


227-1278


School Lunch

.: Menu




Gulf County Schools have an-
nounced the lunch menus
planned for the week.
Monday, April 8: batter
dipped fish, cole slaw, baked
beans, cornbread, milk and tartar
sauce
Tuesday, April 9: chicken, ap-
plesauce, turnip greens, roll/
cornbread, milk, rice or potatoes
with gravy
Wednesday, April 10: taco,
lettuce, tomatoes, pinto beans,.
milk and brownie
thursday, April 11: cheese-
burger, lettuce, tomatoes, pickle,
French fries or tater tots, milk
and fruit pie
Friday, April 12: pizza, sliced
peaches, green beans, ,milk and
.,bokie.
Gold Card Club
Meets Tuesday
The Gulf County Schools'
,Gold Card Club will meet Tues-
day, 'April 9 at 7:00 p.m. in the
* conference room of the Public Li-
brary in Port St. Joe.
Plans for the annual banquet
will be discussed.
All parents, students,- teach-
ers, and administrators are en-
couraged to attend.


Project Graduation's


Spring Fling April 13
Project Graduation '91 of Port asked to contribute one arts
St. Joe will hold their Spring crafts item. Remember, your
Fling on Saturday, April 13 from ticipation is needed to make
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The Fling a successful Project Graduati
will include arts, crafts, garage Bring or send your good
sale, food, and cake walk. Port St. Joe High School. Pr


All parents, grandparents,
aunts, uncles, and concerned citi-
zens are put on notice that your
junk is needed. Now that it is
Spring and time for Spring clean-
ing, don't trash your junk, Project
Graduation will take it. If every-
one would donate one bag of
goods, the Fling should promise
to be very successful.
All parents of seniors are


and
par-
this
on.
is to
oject


Graduation officers will pick up-
deliveries daily. If you need some-
one to pick up goods from your
home or you have large items
such as furniture, etc., please call
Mary Griffin at 229-8383 or
Becky Bateman at 227-7515.
All parents are asked to help
Project Graduation give the sen-
iors a drug-free/alcohol-free night
they will remember for the rest of
their lives.


h Mexico Beac h.:6-


armon e


Inc.


BARBARA HARMON, Broker

648-5767


NEW LISTINGS
310 Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: WATERFRONTI
Two bedroom, one bath cottage, completely
remodeled Large 30' screened porch on
front overlooks the Gulfl Spacious living,
dining, and kitchen area. Maximum living
utilized in bedroom with triple bunk. Excel-
lent decor and beach furniture. The perfect
.ib ach ;,get- a-wayl r.MAt see this qnet
; $98)500,O0....,- -i .I., "jn;..
Kim Kove, Grand.IsleSubdivision: 75' x 115' lot
in nice residential subdivision. Grand Isle
Unit 15, Blk C, Lot 22. $12,500.00
717 Florida Ave.: Three bedroom, 2 bath brick
home on beautiful corner lot only steps to
the beach! Central heat/ac. Central vacu-
um system. Large screened porch on back,
covered patio off master bedroom. Nice yard
and landscaping. $69,900.00.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Established Video Business for sale. Complete inventory of 1550
films, video cassette players, 1 mita DC copy machine and
more. Established membership. $!41500O.,0 Call for com-
plete inventory and details. REDUCED $35,000.00.
HOMES Mexico Beach
13th St., Mexico Beach: Large lot close to the Beach. 120' x 100' Mex-
ico Beach Business Center Lot 17 Residential zoning.
S$28,000.00.
109 13th St.: 120' x 90' lot on paved street. Close to beach. Residen-
tial. Mexico Beach Business Center Lot 22 $28,500.00.
809 Maryland Boulevard: Two bedroom, two bath 12'x'0' Regent mo-
bile home on nice 75' x 100' corner lot. Central heat & ac. Corn,
pletely furnished. Lg. sundeck off back. In nice neighborhood.
$26,000.00
EASY TERMSI Owner will finance w/$2,500.00 down, balance at
10% for 15 years. Monthly payments only $252.55.
140 Pine Street Large unique home on two beautiful wooded large
corner lots. Nine rooms with two full baths, Florida room, den,
large master bedroom, excellent kitchen with lots of cabinet space
and cneter work island. Two fireplaces, one in bedroom. Double
carport; 12'x37' screened porch. Located in nice neighborhood,
only short walk to the beach. Many more amenititsll $149,900.00.
318 Hwy. 98, Comer 4th Street WATERFRONTI Two bedroom, one
Sbath home on 50'x150' corner lot. Screened porch on front over-
looks the Gulfl Dedicated beach. In good condition. Completely
furnished. The perfect beach cottage for second or retirement
home. $79,99090. Reduced to $72,000.00.
320 B Wysong Avenue Two bedroom, one bath townhome in nice
residential subdivision. Sunken living room with ceiling fan and full
mirrored wall. Large kitchen and dining area with lots of cabinet
space. Appliances include refrigerator, range, dishwasher. Private
court yard area accent unit. Large storage room. Must see this
onel $48,000.00
107 N. 26th Street, Mexico Beach: Two bedroom, two bath,
two' story home, newly remodeled. All new carpet and vinyl
throughout. Large living, dining and kitchen area upstairs.
Large den or family room downstairs. Beautiful 75' x 100'
shaded lot. Only I block to the beach. Upstairs screened
porch has view of the gulf. Nice quiet neighborhood.
$58,500.00.
Sandollar #1 One bedroom one bath A-frame waterfront property.
Completely furnished. Reduced to $60,000.
Sandollar #2 Two bedroom, one bath cottage, completely furnished,
with screened porches overlooking the Gulfl $60,000.00
Sandollar #3 Two bedroom, one bath cottage, completely furnished, ,
with screened porches overlooking the Gulfl $60,000.00
Sandollar #4 Three bedroom, one bath cottage completely furnished,
with approximately 65' lot. $85,000.00.
Total package $255,000.00 with 200' waterfront property.
204 Hwy. 98 WATERFRONTI Charming two bedroom, one bath
beach cottage. Screened porch on front overlooks the Gulfl UN-
OBSTRUCTED VIEWII Dedicated beach! Large sun deck over
carport gives additional charm. Completely furnished. On 50'x150'
lot. Ceiling fans in living room and bedrooms. LOCATION I LOCA-
TION! LOCATIONI Priced at $60,000.00.Reduced to $64,000.00.
Grace Home, 107 30th Street Large BEACHSIDE three bedroom,
two bath home with game room. Living room with fireplace over-
looks the Gulf and leads to sun deck that surrounds house. Pri-
vate deck off master bedroom. Completely furnished. All the com-
forts of home. Owner will listen to offers $1,388990.00. Reduced to
$128,000.00.
602 Fortner Avenue Stucco DUPLEX only 1/2 block to the BEACHI 2
Two bedroom, one bath units. Completely furnished. On 50'x150'
lot. Separate entrance to each unit. Excellent rentals. Presently
rented. $53,500.00.
Luxury by the Pier #7, 38th Street WATERFRONTI Immaculate two
bedroom, two and one-half bath waterfront townhome. Owner oc-
cupied, never rented. Sun deck off master bedroom and screened
ST. JOE BEACH LOTS
Canal Street 50'xl25' lot. Yon's addition, BIk 10, Lot 9. $15,950.00.
,ine Street (2) 50'x125' lots. Yon's Addition, BIk 11, Lots 4, 5.
i#b31,900.00.


< )


FEATURE OF THE WEEK
Gulfaire Drive, Gulfaire Subdivison: 75' x
125' residential lot Close to beach. Resi-
dential. Mexico Beach Business Center Lot
22. $28,500.

porch off living area with lower sun deck on beach with outdoor
shower. Ceiling fans and vertical blinds coordinate with flooring.
34. $99,500.00. .. .
S314 Hatley Drive- Tl re bedioom,two bath townhomes inni" resi-
dential area. Vaulted ceiling'in living, dining, and kitche6 areas.
Large bar in-kitchen.,.All appliances included. $48,500.00 to
$49,900.00.
13th Street Two bedroom, one bath stilt home 1/2 block to the
Beach Needs some TLC. Large deck on front and side. Partial
view of the Gulfl Owner will finance. $55,000.00.
Loft by the Pier #12 & #14, Surfview and Spindrift Townhomes,
106B and 108D 37th Street Attractive two bedroom townhomes
near fishing pier and beach. Completely furnished and equipped
for second home or rental. Bay window accents living room with
cathedral ceiling. Private patio in back, off bedroom. Assumable
mortgage. $65,000.00 each.
200 6th Street Three bedroom, two bath double wide mobile home.
On large 105'x112.5' corner lot. Fastened to home foundation.
Only 2 blocks to the BeachI $45,500.00
ST. JOE BEACH
Hwy. 98 Near Santa Anna Newly remodeled four bedroom, two bath
home overlooking the Gulfl Unobstructed view Large living room
with stone fireplace. Large kitchen and dining area. Fenced yard,
screened porch, and raised sun deck. On 50'x90' lot. $96099.99
Reduced $85,000.00.
End of Pine Street and Hwy. 98 WATERFRONT TRIPLEXI (1) Two
bedroom, one bath unit with. screened porch. (2) One bedroom,
one bath units with screened porches. Beautiful location on the
Gulfl Completely furnished. Excellent rental units presently rent-
ed. Possible owner financing. $115,000.00.
LOTS ON MEXICO BEACH
Residential Zoned for Homes Only
Corper 5th St. & P Ilvd. 100'x158.33' corner riot. Unit 14, BIk
A, Lot 1.$10,=tt-,
Hwy. 386, Mexico Beach (4) 75'x100' Iots on paved street. Unit 11,
BIk 5, Lots 2, 4, 6, 8. ResidentiaF zoning. Nice shade trees.
-$25,000 each.
New Mexico Drive (5) 100'x158.33' lots. Mexico Beach Unit 14, BIk
B, Lots 9,11,13,15,17. $6,000.00 Each.
New Mexico Drive 100'x158.33' lot. Unit 14, BIk B, Lot 3. $6,000.00.
New Mexico Drive- 100'X158.33' lot. Unit 14, BlI B, Lot 8. Reduced
$5,000.00.
Texas Drive 100x108' lot. Unit 14, BIk F, Lot 6. $6,80000 Owner will
finance. REDUCED TO $6,300.00.
Arizona Drive 100'x108' lot. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot 16. $7,000.00.
California Drive (4) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk E, Lots 10, 12, 16,
18. $7,000.00 each.
Arizona Drive (5) 100'x108.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk E, Lots9, 11, 13,15,
17. $7,000.00 each.
Arizona Drive -(5) 110x110' lots. Unit 14, BIk 0, Lots 6, 8,10, 12, 14.
Owner financing. $7,500.00.
Texas Drive (2) 100'x100' lots. Unit 14, BIk G, Lots 9, 10. $8,000.00
each.
7th Street 100'x108' lot. On paved street.-Walking distance to the
Beach. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot 15. $10,000.00.
7th Street 100'x108' lot. On paved street. Walking distance to the
Beach. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot 9. $10,000.00.
Robin Lane (2) Large lots on paved street. Nice subdivision. Under-
ground utilities. Unit 17, BIk 3, Lots 10, 100. Owner will finance
with $2,000.00 down, balance at 9% for 5 years. $10,000.00
each.
Wysong Avenue 109'x100' lot. On paved street Underground utili-
ties. Nice Neighborhood. Unit 17, BIk 1, Lot 8. $11,000.00.
Corner Oak Avenue & Palm Street 1 1/2 lots, large size irregular
shaped. ONLY 1/2 block to the Beachl Owner will finance. Unit
11, BIk 8, E 1/2 of Lot 16, All of lot 18. $29,800.00.
Gulfaire Drive, Gulfaire Subdivision 70'xl 15' home lot. Blk G, Lot 2.
.Good view of the Gulf. $35,000.00.
LOTS ZONED FOR MOBILE HOMES
5th Street Extra large lot on paved street. Unit 16, lot 15. 80'x174.86'
x83.86'x200'. $12,000.00.
Maryland Blvd. *75'x100' lot. Unit 12A, BIk C, Lot 4. $13,000.00.
Fortner Avenue between 6th and 7th Street'- 50'x150' lot. One block
from the BeachI Unit 1, BIk 8, Lot 5. $20,300.00.
WATERFRONT
Hwy. 98 WATERFRONTI End of 8th Street. 60'x80' lot. $60,000.00.
Unit 2, BIk V, Lot 4.
Hwy. 98 WATERFRONTI End of 8th Street. 66'x80' lot. $66,000.00.
Unit 2, BIk V, Lot 3.
Hwy. 98 ST. JOSEPH SHORES. 120'x397' waterfront lot.
$120,000.00.
CAPE SAN BLAS
Nautilus Way, Feather Sound Subdivision WATERFRONTI 51' on
the Gulf x 394.54' deep. Lot 8. $52,000.00.
Nautilus Way, Feather Sound Subdivision (2) Interior lots. Good
view of the Gulfl $34,000.00 each.


CORNER OF 14TH STREET & HIGHWAY 98
I MEXICO BEACH


. WHS Registering Next


Year's Freshman Class


Henderson's Restaurant & Produce
309 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-7226
Lunch Buffet 7 Days A Week
Shrimp Plate .............................................. $6.50
Oyster Plate ................................................. 6.50
C atfish......... ................................................ 5.00
Thursday, Friday & Saturday Only
Potatoes 10 lb. $1.49

Sweet Potatoes............. 4 lb. $1.00
WE DELIVER EVERYDAY!


~I


'












TFP ST C'PARPOTSuT i'. JOE.FL-TEIMSDAY. Anril 4. 1991


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Real Estate? Would like to trade
50 acres 10 miles south of Chipley'for
beach house or lots. Property is high
& dry, has 1/4 mile road frontage &
is in an area loaded with deer & tur-
key. Call 904-526-4699 after 8 p.m.
3tc 4/4
2 story 2 bedroom, 2 bath town"
home in Gulf Aire. Fully furnished.
Great Investment at $41,900. 233-
0203. 4te 3/28
2 acres plus at Overstreet. 2
wells, septic tank, approx. 165'x560'
on Hwy. 386. Power pole, over 1/3
cleared with established lawn & fruit
trees. 4.5 miles north of Overstreet
bridge. Call 229-6346 for more infor-
mation. ltp 4/4
Mexico Beach: 3 bedroom, .. 2
bath, ch&a, fenced yard, well main-
tained. 1 block from Gulf. $62,500.
648-8412 after 6 p.m. 2tc 3/28
Land for sale at White city. Call
827-1767. 4tc 3/28
See this nice 2 BR. 1 ba. home
with extra lot on Garrison and Hunter
Circle. Asking $55,000. Top Sale Re-
alty, Inc. 229-2500. tfc 4/4


GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE *
BEACH
1, 2 and 3 BEDROOM
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)
BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Blas, Florida

(904) 229-2500
1-800-624-3964
tfc 3/7


2 bdrm., 1 ba., liv. rm., kitchen,
separate dining area, oak floors,.
fenced backyard, $39,000. 107 Hunt-
er Circle. Call 229-8305 after 5 p.m.
tfc 4/4
e Two bedroom house, ch&a, kitch-
en appliances included. $32,000. Call
,229-2793. tfc 4/4

Cabin, Dead Lakes, Wewahitch-
ka, 2 bdrm., porch, boat shed,
$12,000. 1-205-793-6396. 4tc 3/21.

1615 Palm Blvd., Port St. Joe. 4
bdrm., 2 bath, great room with brick
fireplace, on 2 lots, quiet street. Over
1,700 sq. ft. Central h/a. 229-6856
after 6 p.m. tfc 4/4
For sale by owner: executive
home In Gulfaire, gulf view, 5 bed-
rooms, 3 baths, fireplace, sauna,
hardwood floors & more. A sacrifice at
$98,900. 233-0203. 4tc 3/14

Need to sell 3 bedroom house on
Ig. lot on St. Joe Beach. $34,000. For
more information call 227-1405 or
647-8468. tfc 4/4
3 bedroom, 2 bath home, large
den/Florida room, deck. Call 229-
8356 after 6:00 p.m. $62,500. Serious
inquiries only. tfc 4/4


MUST SELL 3 bdrm., 1 ba. home.
Fenced in yard, central h/a, Ig. kitch-
en/family rm., 1908 Cypress Ave.
$41,000. Call 227-1425. tfc 4/4
1/2 acre + lots near Port St. Joe
High School. Mobile homes permitted.
Owner financing, easy terms. Call Bil-
ly Carr, 229-6961. tfc 4/4
2 bdrmr trailer, on 1 1/2 acres,
adjacent to Wetappo Creek, fenced, 2
wells, 2 septic tanks, Ig. storage
building. 229-8581 or 227-1566.
tfc 4/4


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL

(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Frances Chason 229-8747 .Ann Six 229-6392
Doris Strickland 647-5404
PORT ST. JOE
104 21st St.: Newly remodeled 3 BR, 2 bath home. Living room, dining area and
nice den w/fireplace. New roof, new central heating & cooling system, & new
carpet Private covered patio, fenced yard with storage building. $70,000.
1601 Marvin Ave: Very neat 3 BR, 1 bath home, carpet & vinyl, new deck and
screened porch. Assumable Loan. $43,500.00.
1101 Constitution Drive: BAYFRONT Lovely two story, 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath home.
$426,000.00. REDUCED TO $99,000.00.
1903 Juniper Ave.: WELL KEPT 3 BR, 1 ba. home w/carpet & vinyl, new roof, cen-
tral heat and air. $45,000.00.
1807 Marvin Ave.: 3 bedroom, 1 bath home new roof, new ch/a unit (w/hot water
recovery heat system), plumbing recently re-done, new hot water heater, chain
link fenced yard, termite inspected. Great Buy! $34,900.00. Reduced to
$32,900.
517 4th St.: Charming older 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in great condition, new roof,
AND
517 1/2 4th SL: Apartment building with two furnished apartments, each two bed-
room, 1 bath. A Great Investment! Rent from apartments could make your mort-
gage payments. Good rental record. BOTH FOR ONLY $60,000.00. Reduced
to $55,000.00.
603 Long Ave.: Wahft, from this 2 bedroom home with nice screen porch.
$29,200.00.
230 7th St.: Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, .1 bath home with deck
and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
170 Ave. E: 3 bedroom, 1 bath furnished house with storage shed and efficiency
apartment. $18,000.00.
503 3rd St.: Make an offIr on this large frame home on 2 50x170 lots. Can be used
as home or office. Appraised at $35,000.00.
WHITE CITY
Remodeled country home. 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living room, dining room, kitchen all
up-dated. Short drive to town. $32,000.00.
WEWAHITCHKA
2 BR, 1 BA Mobile home Unfumished w/5 acres plus 1 BR, 1BA Mobile Home
with large storage building. $42,000.00
2 BR, 1 BA Mobile home with 5 acres Unfurnished. $27,000.00.
OAK GROVE
91 Duval St: Large 2 bedroom, 1 bath home w/alum. siding, double carport, chain
link fence on two lots. $25,000.00.
105 Hunter St: 3 bedroom, 1 bathhome, chair, screen porch on 2 lots w/privacy
fence. $29,500.
115 Hunter St.: 5,500 sq, ft. business and residence. Complete recording studio w/
50 seat auditorium Furniture and equipment included. $68,000.00.
OVERSTREET
Wetappo Creek: 10.51 acres, waterfront, Underground permits. Possible owner fi-
nancing. Owner will possibly subdivide property. $46,000.00.
SIMMONS BAYOU
Comfortable 4 bedroom, 2.bath home located on waterfront with 3+ acres, outside
storage building with full bath. Beautiful grounds. Must se to appreciate.
$135,000.00.
THE BEACHES
5th Ave., Beacon Hill: Log Cabin and barn located on 4 lots (3 landscaped) also 1
1 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home. $36,900, without mobile home $31,900.
Between Sea St. and 1st St, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 5 BR, 2 story home with
game room. Completely fumished. $150,000.00.
Between 3rd and 4th Street, Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 ba home with large
glassed in front porch. Completely furnished. $125,000.00.
3rd Ave., Beacon Hill: Two bedroom, 1 bath home, 3 blocks from the Beach, ideal
for young couple or retired couple, 1 1/2 lots, fenced in yard with fruit trees,
quiet neighborhood. $45,000.00.
Comer 7th St. & Maryland Ave., Mexico Beach: Owner anxious to sell this 3 bed-
room, 1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and pos-
sible owner financing. Only $50,000.00.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach: Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,00.00.
LOTS
Gulf Aire: single family residential lot, Gulf Aire Drive $17,900.
Mexico Beach, 43rd St: Nice canal lot w/city dock across street, 71'x90'. $39,000.
Ward Ridge: 2 comer lots, Barbara Drive & Tapper Avenue, $18,000.
Howard Creek: 1.7 acres MOL $6,000.00. Owner will subdivide.
Chipola Cut Off PRICED FOR QUICK SALE 3 lots ONLY $8,000.00.
St. Joseph Shores: Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft. of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe: 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.00.
Port St. Joe: 301 Woodward zoned commercial, 75x150. Reduced to $10,000,00.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive. Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.00.
St Joe Beach: Seashores. Desirable corner lot 85'x150'. $46,000900. Reduced to
$14,000.


2 lots on comer of Gulf St. &
Americus St., with 14x70' mobile
home setting on it. Deep well, septic
tank, etc. Ready to move in, 24'x28' 2
car shingle roof garage, $43,000. 647-
8424. tfc 4/4
1/2 acre lot on Hwy. C-30, near
Cape San Blas, zoned residential. Ac-
cess to Treasure Bay Game Preserve.
Reduce to $8,500. 229-8351.
St. Joe Beach, 3 bdrm., 2 ba.,
2,200 sq. ft. home. Cypress privacy
fence with auto. sprinkler system.
Spacious deck with Sundance spa,
fireplace. For more information call
648-5252. tfc 4/4
Very Nice! 3 bdrm., 2 ba. house,
stone fireplace in great room, great lo-
cation, 2011 Juniper Ave. Call for ap-
pointment, 229-6427. tfc 4/4

1/2 acre MOBILE HOME LOTS.
12 mi. north of Mexico Beach on
Overstreet Road (Hwy. 386), Creek-
view Sub., no down payments, $86
per month. 229-6031. tfc 4/4
Two acres on county road off of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 4/4
LOTS FOR SALE-On, Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
miles south of Wewa. Owner financ-
ing. Call 229-6961. tfc 4/4


Cloth recliner, good cond., $20;
black love seat, good cond., $20; plaid
loveseat, very good cond., $35. Call
229-8669 after 5:30.
Atlas portable sewing machine,
with all attachments. Baby swing,
both in good cond., 227-7550.
2tp 4/4
55 gal. aquarium w/stand, hood
and lights. 2 filter systems, $325.
Evenings, 227-1192. tfc 4/4
4-pc. living room suite and elec-
tric stove, call 229-6743. Itp 4/4
Prom dress, size 9, pink. $75.
Call after 5:30 p.m., 827-8604.
20 gal. hexagonal aquarium w/
stand. All accessories for fresh or salt
water. All you need is fish, $65. Call
229-2729 evenings. Itc 4/4
To buy or sell'Avon, call Sarah
Kemp at 229-6495 after 5 p.m. or on
the weekends. 4tc 4/4
1/2 carat diamond solitaire ring, /
valued at $1,800, asking $900. 648-
4041. Itp 4/4
Elec. water heater "Rheem", 30
gals., $40. Westinghouse clothes dry-
er, $80. 648-8575. ltc 4/4
Punch 45 amplifier, 2 Punch 12"
speakers & 2 boxes. Call 229-8633.


Electric hospital bed, new, $850.
20 gal. aquarium with stand & light.
Many extras. $475. 827-6019.
ltp 4/4

3 interior doors, two 80"x30", one
is 80"x24" louvre. All have frames,
$15 each. 648-8595. ltc 4/4
STRAWBERRIES
Open Daily. 8 a.m. 6 p.m. Sun.
11 am 6 pm. 85 cents per lb. Con-
tainers furnished. Please call before
you come for picking up date. Locat-
ed: 17 mi. north of PC Mall on Veal
Rd., Sweatmore Ranch, 722-4819.
3tc 4"/4

Panasonic W1510 personal word
processor. Still under warranty, less
than 1 yr. old. Excellent condition,
$300. 229-2729 evenings. 2tc 4.4

New heavy blue vinyl van seat,
adjustable base, $87. Hirsh folding
work table, converts cutoff saw to ia-
ble saw, $37. 647-8458. 2tc 3/28
4 Wheeler 125 Honda 1987,
runs good, looks good. Only been
driven 15 hours or 'less. Asking
$1,150. Call after 5, 229-8358.
Port St. Joe Western Auto now
.honoring Panama City Western Auto
Co. store advertised tire sale prices.
Sears Card now at Port St: Joe West-
ern Auto. Discovery TOO1227-1105.
tfc 4/4


Need AVON products? Call
Catherine Collier after 5 p.m., 229-
16460. tfc 4/4
FREE: Eight lesson Bible study.
Postage and envelope supplied.
Send request to Bible Study, P. 0.
Box 758, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 4/4





1983 14' boat, 75 hp motor &
trailer, motor has low hours, will. sell
for $1,500. 647-8702. 4tp 4/4
Jason 1570 bass boat with 85.hp
Suzuki o.b., trolling motor & depth
finder. Call 229-8174 after 5, p.m.
It 4/4
37' 3 axle boat trailer, $1,'000.
229-6965. tfc 6/21





Affectionate cat desperately
needs loving home, permanent or
temporary for May-Oct. Neutered
male, gray tabby, 3 yrs. old, has all
shots. Call 229-6383. Itp 4/4


TRADE & SEVICE


Women's Support Group, 7:00
p.m. Monday St. James Episcopal
Church. 227-1145 or 227-1128.
Mary Kay Cosmetics, Margaret
Hale Presswood, call 1-800-659-0641.
4tc 3/14

Narcotics Anonymous
Open Meetings on Monday 8 p.m.
at 302 Reid Ave., and on
Thursday 8 p.m. at
St. James Episcopal
Help Line 1-800-212-8424
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
SOp-en Meetings; Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday. 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m. & Tuesday 8:00
p.m.
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, all times eastern
For further AA information
call 648-8121.

J.T.P.A/JOB SERVICE
Office Hours:
229-8438
Monday, 8:00 12:00
Tuesday 8-12; 12:30 4:30
Wednesday, 8:00 12:00
Thursday, 8:00 12; 12:30 4:30
Friday, 8:00 12:00.
tfc 4/4


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax

Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043



COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
I tfc 3/7

THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfe 3/7


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root,
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.?
Rt. 2, Box A1C, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfe 3/7


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns
i
Indian Swamp Campground'
Hwy. C-387, Howard Creek
tfc 3/7


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
MICHAEL KILBOURN, Owner
410 Reid Ave. 3/7
tfe 3 /7


All types of yard .work. Mowing,
raking; and trimming. Reasonable.
229-6435. tfc 4/4


The Gulf County A.R.C. would
like to help you with your business
or special events.. We can take
those tedious routine chores such
as mail-outs, sending invitations,
correlations, stapling booklets or
just about anything. Please contact
us about your needs at:
Gulf County A.R.C.
200 Peters St., P. 0. Box 296
Port St.. Joe, FL 32456
..... rpa)!!.229-6327

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
24 Years Experience
Worker's Compensation, Occupa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Acci-
dents. No charge for first conference.
tfc 4/4


SEWING & ALTERATIONS
of All Kinds.
Fashion, Weddings, or
Domestic
Men's, Women's & Children's
Call 229-6154
after 6 p.m.
S1 tc4/4


MMARy ,KAy,
Carolyn J. Jones
Independent Beauty Consultant
222 Sea Pine Lane Port St. Joe
(904) 648-5194
tfc 4/4

Phone 227-1782
Cuts, Color, Frosting, Prems
Betty's Beauty Salon
"A Family Salon"
311 Madison St. Betty Heath
Oak Grove Owner/Mgr.
tfc may

STUTZMAN CONST. CO.
All Types Roofing and Remodeling
30 years experience
Lic. #RB0030039, RC 0038936
"Where Quality Is -igher
Than Price"
229-8631
tfc 4/4


LAWN MOWER &
SMALL ENGINE
REPAIR
call 229-6965


House Cleaning Service: If you
would like to have someone dependa-
ble to clean your home, give me a call
at 229-8828 evenings and weekends.
References available, tfc 4/4


PALOMINO RIDING
STABLES
Boarding, How to Feed & Care
for Your Horse, Training and
Riding Lessons Now Available
for All Ages.
Lighted Riding Arena and
pther Facilities.at .
Reasonable Rates,,
For more information call(,"'.
827-68i2 or 227-1767
White City
4tp 4/4

WEDDING CAKES
Designed especially for you.

Original recipe.
Call 229-6154 evenings
and Weekends.
1 I me month


Thomas Heat/
Air/Electrical
10 Years Experience
All Types of Services
Commercial, Residential
Major Appliance Service
Call 648-3045
tfc 4/4

COSTIN'S
Bookkeeping Service
Tax Returns A Specialty
302B Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8581 tfc3/Z


Experienced painter or fix-it-
man. References available. Call 229-
6671. tfc 3/28











SOUTHEASTERN
LANDSCAPING

Specalkzing In Custom Design,
Irrigation Systems,
Tractor Work with Grading
Greenhouse Plants& Maintenance
TRIPP BARRIER
639-5660 or 227-1626 after 5


P. O. Box 133
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


COMPLETE SMALL ENGINE REPAIR SERVICE
Specializing In Lawn Mowers and Tillers
Tune-Ups fIepair Overhauls
S Offering prompt, courteous service on your
116 N. West Street 2 -cycle or 4-cycle engine.
Burgess CK.
Wewahitchka, FL 32465 HUGH BARFIELD 904-639-2435 .


Harmon's Heavy Equipment Co.
Specializing In Black Top Soil
BULL DOZERS BACKHOES LOADERS
TRACTORS DUMP TRUCKS
648-8924 or 648-5767 if no answer tfc4/4


PJ'SROOFING
ALL TYPES OF ROOFS4/4
Hot Roofing, Built-Up, 1-Ply System
Free Estimates
Phone (904) 229-6201 PAT TOUSIGNANT


T. J. Construction C(
Commercial & Residential
* NEW HOMES
* REMODELING
* ADDITIONS
* DECKS Call Terry Parris]
FRAMING 1-800-468-TJC


).


h or
0


UC. #RF 0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG 0051008
ER 0011618
JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
Plumbing Contractor New Construction Repairs
Rcmodcling Residcntial and Commercial
Installation of Water Lines and Scwer Lines
Minor Electrical
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA fc 3/7 904/229-6821


tfc 4/4


IDAf-'IP ATI


I











THE; C-IAk C, as'1' Y'P UV T. n'l rzURSDAY Aprl., 01P.113UfCA -5 v 1-


1989 Kawasaki Ninja 250 motor-
cycle, excell. cond., less than 6,000
miles, $2,200. 639-2987 after 5:00
p.m. ltc 4/4

1984 Jeep Cherokee, 66,000
miles, 4 wheel drive, 4-dr., 5 sp. man.
tran., a/c, am/fm cassette deck, p.s.,
p.b., 4 cyl. engine. Call 229-8315 af-
ter 5 p.m. 4tp 4/4

1986 Chevy 4x4, p.s., p.b., a.c.,
auto. with overdrive. $5,000. 647-
.8702. 4tp 4/4

1991 R/S Camaro, assume pay-
.'ients (St. Joe Papermakers Credit
Union). 227-1192 evenings.
tfc 4/4

1984 Ford F-150 pickup, at, ps,
pb, ac, camper shell, running boards,
.good tires, less than 50K miles.
$5,000 obo. 647-5142. 3tc 4/11

1976 Jeep CJ5, excel. condition.
639-5108. 4tc 3/21

.. 1990 Toyota pickup, ac, am/fmn
cassette, bed liner, aluminum wheels,
*tinted glass, 10,000 miles. 229-6460
after 5 p.m. tfc 3/14

SThe following vehicles are being
offered for sale at St. Joe Papermak-
ers. Federal Credit Union:
1982 Dodge Van
Farmall tractor with bushhog
and disc
1974 Queen Craft boat & trailer
with 1982 Mercury 40 hp motor
1989 White Boat, trailer & 20 hp
-Evinrude
t 1990 Boat, trailer and 1989 mo-
tor
1989 Pontiac Grand Prix.
For more information call Wesley
Atkins at 227-1156. 4t 3/14





Now taking applications for
waiters and waitresses. Riverfront
Restaurant, Apalachicola, FL. 653-
8139. ltc 4/4

R.N. for Hospice of Frahklin
County. "A special kind of caring".
Flexible hours. Call Bonnie William-
son, 653-8417. ltc 4/4

Apalachee Center for Human
Services, Inc. Counselor II Apalachi-
cola, FL. A master's deg. in a social or
'rehabilitative science & 1 yr. of relat-
ed profess. exp., prefer exp. with ado-
lescents and/or chemical dependen-
Scy. Salary range: $15,659.28-
S$19,500.00 annually. Excellent bene-
-fits. Closing date: 4/8/91. Apply di-
,rect: 159 12th St., Apalachicola, FL or
imall a completed Apalachee Center
'for, Human Services application to
Personnel, P. 0. Box 1782, Tallahas-
see, FL 32302. (904) 487-0217. An
Equal Opportunity Employer. ltc 4/4


'


Gulf Pines Hospital Home Health
Agency now hiring RN's for field visits.
Excellent pay, flexible-hours,.with un-
limited opportunity for growth. Please
call Carol Hudson, R.N., Administra-
tor, 227-1121. Equal Opportunity
Employer. ,' 2tc 3/28


Gulf Pines hospital Home Health
Agency now hiring Home Health
Aides. Top pay & mileage. To inter-
view call Carol Hudson, R.N., Admin-
istrator, 227-1121. Equal Opportuni-
ty Employer. 2tc 3/28

Waitress wanted. part day days
and nights. Apply in person. Linda's
Restaurant, 302 4th St. tfc 4/4

Trained computer operator
needed for office work. Must have ex-
perience in meeting the public and a
knowledge of bookkeeping. Contact
ERA Parker Realty, 648-5777.
tfc 3/7

HOSPITAL JOBS Start $6.80/
hr., your area. No experience neces-
sary. For Info F call 1-900-226-9399
ext. 2376 6 am 8 pm, 7 days.
$12.95 phone fee. 4tp 3/7

Immediate Openings: Calhoun
Correctional Institution located in
Blountstown, Florida on the pristine
Apalachicola River, within 1 hr. drive
of the Gulf of Mexico and the state
capitol, is currently recruiting for Sr.
Registered Nurse-F/C positions.
Salary range, $1,072.69-
$1,349.94 (salary range negotiable).
Optional salary incentives include:
$80.00 bi-weekly shift differential, 1
1/2 overtime pay, on-call duty pay,
on-site mobile home space for a cost
of $2.00 per month, with water, sew-
erage,and lawn maintenance provid-
ed tree.
*1 Additional benefits: Retirement
paid by the State of Florida, excel.
State Health Insurance Coverage at
reduced premium cost. Special dental
health coverage and rates. Twenty six
126) paid annual and sick leave days,
ten .(10) paid holidays. Free continu-
ing4Mitcational courses offered by
State University $500 annual allow-
ance for job related professional de-
velopment courses.
Minimum qualifications: license
as a registered professional nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27 and 1 yr. of profession-
al nursing experience; or a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in nursing
and licensure as a registered nurse in
accordance with Florida Statute 464
or eligible to practice nursing in ac-
cordance with Fla. Administrative
Code 210.8.27.
Please send a State of Florida ap-
plication to:
Personnel Office, Calhoun Cor-
rectional Inst, P. 0. Box 2000,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Op-
portunity Employer. tfc 3/7

Nursing assistants needed, all
Shifts. Bay St. Joseph Care Center.
Call 229-8244. tfc 3/7

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IS
HIRING. $16,000 $72,000/yr. 1-
805-564-6500 ext. GB5363 for Imme-
S diate response. 4tp 3/28


One bedroom furnished, air con-
ditioned, carpeted, apartment, 1505
Monument Ave. tfc 4/4

Highland View: One three bed-
room trailer and one 1 bedroom
house. 639-5538. Itc 4/4

LOT RENjTALS


Sun & Sand
Mobile Home Park (386-A)
1100N. 15th St.,
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Call (904) 648-8201 a3/sn

Nice 2 bedroom, energy efficient
2 bedroom end apartment. Call 229-
6314, $345 month. ltc 4/4

OFFICE SPACE, 2 offices, ii-
cluding all utilities & cleaning service.
Call George at 229-6031. tfc 3/28

Liberty Manor Apts., one bdrm.
apartment for senior citizens or disa-.
bled. ch&a, emergency system in bath
& bedrooms. Refrig. & stove fur-
nished, w-to-w carpet, water, garbage
& sewer furnished. Limited income
apartment rent based on income.
229-6353. 3tc /21

Storage or shop space for rent.
Mexico Beach, 648-5191. tfc 4/4

Apartment for rent, 1 bdrm. fur-
nished at 1508 1/2 Long Ave. $175
per mo. $100 damage deposit. Phone
after 5:30, 229-6825. tfc 4/4

60' furnished trailer, 5 miles
from Overstreet Bridge on hwy. to
Wewa. 648-5306. tfc 4/4

Nice, clean 14'x52' trailer, unfur-
nished on St. Joe Beach. No pets.
647-5361. tfc 4/4

One small trailer and studio
apartment. Furnished. Call 647-8481.
tfc 4/4

2 bdrm. furnished trailer, depos-
it, lease, no pets. Call 648-8211 after
6 p.m. tfc 4/4

Mexico Beach, small trailer, $55
weekly; utilities & cable tv included,
small deposit and tax required. Travel
trailer, $65 weekly, cable TV, etc. No
pets, adults only, 648-8289.
tfc 4/4

Mobile home lots for rent, located
in Mexico Beach. 648-5476.
tfc 4/4

Mobile home lots. City water and
garbage fee included. Rustic Sands
Campground, 648-5229. tfc 4/4

UNFURNISHED
Large 2 bdrm. house, stove & re-
frig., cen. h&a, screen porch, car-
port & laundry rm.
Large 2 bedroom apartment, stove
& refrig., washer/dryer hook-up.
New extra Ig. 3 bdrm. house, 1 1/2
ba., inside laundry rm, ch&a, dish-
washer & stove, fully carpeted. No
pets.
FURNISHED
Small 2 bdrm. home, auto. heat &
air, washer/dryer hook-up.
One bedroom apartment, washer/
dryer hook-up.
Call 229-6777 after 7 p.m.
tfc 4/4

Office Space for Lease: Spa--
clous, clean, well located office in con-
venient part of town. Lease required.
Call 227-7378 or come by 322 Long
Avenue. tfc 3/7

Warehouses, small and large,
some with office, suitable for small
business, 229-6200. ,tfc 3/7

No need .for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/90

Nice one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing. tfc 3/7

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 3/7





Yard Sale, Clothes, "girls' sizes 8-
12, new & used boys 4-7; new day
bed, king size water bed with 8 draw-
er pedestal, odds and ends, sheets,
1985 Pontiac Parisienne, excel, cond.
324 1st St., Highland View. 227-
1760.

Port St. Joe Garden Club is hav-
ing a junk, plant, bulb & baked good
sale at the Garden Center on 8th St.
9-4 Friday and 9-1 Saturday.

Carport Sale, Friday, April 5th,
9-1, 113 Monica Dr., Ward Ridge.
Boy's clothes, 2T-size 7, toddler toys,
G.I. Joe, misc. babyitems, high chair.
Itp 4/4

205 Third St., Mexico Beach, 8
a.m. CST, Friday, April 5. Cement
steps, stove, refrig., oak table, lots of
other items. Itc 4/4


Yard Sale, Saturday, April 6, Sev-
eral families. 112 Bellamy Circle, be-
gins at 8 a.m. ltc 4/4

4 Family Yard Sale, Friday & Sat-
urday, 8-2 cst. Inside if raining.
Something for everyone. Electronics,
furniture, toys, nicknacks, clothing,
kids: nb-6; women's, many sizes;
men's med. & large. 1 pr. new boots,
men's 8; ladies' shoes 8-10,klds to
size 3. Reasonably priced, some free.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYS! Call 227-1278 to place
yours. $3.50 for first insertion,
$2.00 a week for consecutive runs,
plus 5 per word for all over 20.


L PUBLIC NOTICES...


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 9091-16
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County. Florida will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested In pur-
chasing the following described personal property:
1-1BM copier Series III
Type 6808-001, Model 60
Serial Number 40-6808-35-0146188.
Features Include: 70 copies per min-
ute, automatic feed, and a 20 bin sort-
er, provides functions for lighter or
darker copies, duplexing, alternate
paper size, reduce to 1 or 2, separate,
collate, and to Interrupt
*"Terms and conditions on file In the
Clerk's Office.
Delivery date must be specified.
Li quidated damages for failure to deliver unit
on specified date will be set at $25.00 per day.
Please indicate on your envelope that this is
a sealed bid, the bid number, and what item the
bid is for.
Bids will be received until 7 o'clock a.m.,
eastern time, on April 23, 1991, at the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Court-
house, 1000 Fifth Street Port St. Joe, Florida
32456.
The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
BY: /s/ James E. Creamer, Chairman
Publish: April 4 and 11, 1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 91-01
CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSO-
CIATION OF PORT ST. JOE, a Florida corporation
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARL L. LESTER. BAY MEDICAL CENTER and
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Defendant,
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice Is hereby given that pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 1, 1991, and
entered In Civil Case No. 91-01 of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the
State of Florida, in and for Gulf County, wherein
CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSO-
CIATION OF PORT ST. JOE is Plaintiff and CARL
LESTER, BAY MEDICAL CENTER and THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, are Defendants, I
will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front
door of the Gulf County Courthouse In Port St.
Joe, Florida at 11:00 am. EDTon the 26th day of
April, 1991, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
Commence at an Iron pin at the NE
corner of the SW 1/4 of Section 36,
T4S, RIOW, and run E 378.3 ft.;
thence turn R running Southeasterly
1170.8 ft.; thence turn R running W
35.75 ft. to the W R/W line of SR 71;
thence turn L and run Southeasterly
468.77 ft.; thence turn R and run W
along the N R/W line of SR 386 for
166.67 ft.; thence turn R and run N
142.4 ft.; thence turn L and run W 50
ft.; thence turn R and run N 10 ft. to
the POB; thence continue the line last
described running N for 60 ft.; thence
turn L and run W for 65 ft.; thence
turn L and run S 60 ft.; thence turn L
and run E 65 ft. to the POB;
ALSO:
Lot 41 In Lester's Subdivision also de-
scribed as: Commence at an Iron pin at
the NE corner of SW 1/4 of Sect. 36,
T4S, RIOW, and run East 37.3 ft. to
center of SR 71; thepce SE along cen-
ter of SR 71 for 1170.8 ft.; thence W
35.75 ft. to West Side (West R/W line)
of said SR 71; thence In a Southerly di-
rection along West R/W of sd. road for
348.77 ft.; thence continue in the same
direction for 120 ft. which is the SE
corner of the Glenn Store lot; thence
run West along the North R/W line of
SR 386 for 166.67 ft. for POB, this be-
ingthe SW comer of Lot 42 of Lester's
Subdivision: thence run W along said
R/W of SR 386 for 60 f.; thence North
92.4 ft.; thence East 60 ft.; thence
South 92.4 ft. to the POB.
ALSO:
Lot 41 and the West 50 ft. of Lot 44
and Lot 45 of the unrecorded plat of
Lester Subdivision in Section 36. T4S,
R10W, Gulf County, Florida.
ALSO:
3.9 acres, more or less, at Willis Land-
ing described as: Beginning at the cen-
ter of SR No. 381 at a point on the
West line of the NE 1/4 of SE 1/4,
Section 7; TS;, R8W, and run S. along
said Forty line for 216.65 ft.; thence
run due'East for 1056 ft. for a point of
beginning; thence run South 330 feet
to the S line of above mentioned Forty;
thence run East 132 ft.; thence run
North 330 ft; thence run West 132 ft.
to the P0B, less and excepted SO ft. R/
W through the center of said lot of land
deeded by grantor to Gulf County, Flor-
ida and lot lying and being In the S I/
2 ofS 1/2 ofNE 1/4 ofSE 1/4 of Sect.
7. T6S, R8W, Gulf county. Florida.
ALSO:
Beginning at the center of SR 381 at a
point of the West line of the NE 1/4 of
SE 1/4 Section 7, T6S, RSW and run
South along said Forty line for 216.65
ft.; thence run due East for 660 ft. for
a POB; thence run South for 330 ft. to
the South line of said Forty; thence
run East 132 ft.; thence run N 330 ft.;
thence run West 132 ft. to the POB,
less and accepted 50 ft. R/W through
the center of said lot df land deeded by
grantor to Gulf County, Florida, for a
county road.
ALSO:
Beginning at the center of SR 381 at a
point on the W line of the NE 1/4 of SE
1/4, Section 7, TBS, R8W, and run S
along said Forty line for 246.65 ft.;
thence run due E for 528 ft. for a POB;
thence run South 300 ft.; thence run
East 132 ft.; thence run North 300 ft.;
thence run West 132 ft. to the POB.
ALSO:
Beginning at the center of SR 381, at a
point on the W line of the NE 1/4 of SE
1/4, Sect. 7, T6S, R8W, and run S
along said Forty line for 216.65 ft.;
thence run due E for 528 ft to the
POB; thence run South 330 ft to the S
line of the above mentioned Forty;
thence run East 132 ft.; thence run
North 330 ft.; thence run West 132 ft.
to the POB, less and except a 50-ft. R/
W through the center of said lot of land
deeded by grantor to Gulf County, Flor-
Ida.
ALSO:
Beginning at the center of SR 381 at a
point on the W line of the NE 1/4 of SE

Bryan Brothers at

HV Church of God
The Bryan Brother Gospel
singing group will be in concert at
the Highland View Church of
God, located at 323 Sixth Street,
Highland View. This group can be
heard often on radio station
WJST.
The sing will begin at 2:00
p.m. and Dr. Elmore, pastor, ex-
tends an invitation to everyone to
come and worship with them and
be blessed by the singing of this
group.


Handgun Safety

Course at GCCC

Advanced Handgun Safety
will be taught at Gulf Coast Com-
munity College April 18 and 19.
This course is required for a con-
cealed weapon permit.
The instructor is Capt. Wil-
liam Leonard of the Bay County
Sheriffs Department. This class
meets from 6:30 9:30 D.m. in


the Language Arts Lecture Hall.
All classes must be attended
for certification. Participants
must preregister at the Lifelong
Learning window in the Regis-
trar's Office before April 10. There
is a $9 charge for Florida resi-
dents.
More information may be ob-
tained by calling 872-3823.


1/4, Sect. 7, T6S, R8W and run S
along said Forty line for 216.65 ft.;
thence run due E for 1188 ft. for a
POB; thence run S for 330 ft. to the S.
line of said Forty; thence run E 132 ft.;
thence run N 330 ft.; thence run W
132 ft to the POB, less and excepted
50 ft. through the center of said lot of
land deeded by grantor to Gulf County,
Florida for a county road.
DATED this 1st day of April, 1991.
BENNY C. LISTER
By: Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: April 4 and 11. 1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
'CASE NO. 91-24
CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSO-
*CIATION OF PORT ST. JOE, a Florida corporation
Plaintiff,
vs.
BILLY WAYNE FREEMAN, et al
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 1, 1991,
and entered In Civil Case No. 91-24 of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the
State of Florida. in and for Gulf County, wherein
CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSO-
CIATION OF PORT ST. JOE Is Plaintiff and BILLY
WAYNE FREEMAN Is the Defendant I will sell to
the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the
Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe. Florida at
11:00 a.. EDTon the 26th day of April, 1991, the
following described property as set forth in said Fi-
nal Judgment, to-wit:
Lot One (1), Block Three (3). Yon's Ad-
dition to Beacon Hill, according to an
official plat thereof on file in the Office
of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida.
DATED this lst day of April, 1991.
BENNY C. LISTER
By: /s/ lTobnya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: April 4 and 11, 1991.
NOTICE
Persons wishing to file as candidates in The
City of Port St. Joe election to be held May 14,
1991 for the following offices:
Mayor-Commlsloner
Commlssioner, Group I
Commnlssloner', Group H
"Candidate qualifying Period" will begin April
17, 1991 at 12:00 p.m. and end April 24, 1991 at
12:00 noon. Forms for filing are available in the
Supervisor .of Elections Office. Gulf County Court-
house, Port St. Joe, Florida.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
By. /s/ LA. Farris
City Auditor-Clerk .
Publish: March 21 and 28, April 4, 1991.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 90-219
ST. JOE PAPERMAKERS FEDERAL CREDIT UN-
ION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SCOTTW. BURKETr and wife, MICHELLE S. BUR-
KET" and TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
.TO: SCOTT W. BURKETT and wife, MICHELLE S.
S BURKIETT, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINSTTHE NAME DEFENDANTS.
Whose last known residence is:
SCOTTW. BURKETT and wife,
MICHELLE S. BURKEIT
Route 2, Box 47-A
Florida Avenue
St Joe Beach, Florida 32456
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property In Gulf
County, Florida.


Lot Five (5), Block Twenty-six (26), Unit
Number Two (2), Port St. Joe Beach,
according to the official plat thereof on
file in the office of the Clerk of Circuit
Court, Gulf County, Florida.
AND ALSO:
1986 Woodside Mobile Home being 14
feet in width, and 58 feet in length and
bearing identification number
5614DC1035.
has been filed against you, Tyndall Federal Credit
Union, and all other persons in possession of sub-
ject property, and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to it on:
J. Patrick Floyd, P.A.. Plaintiffs attor-
ney whose address is:
J. Patrick Floyd, P.A.
408 Long Avenue
Post Office Drawer 950
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(904) 227-7413
on or before April 22, 1991, and file the original
with th the Clerk of this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint.
DATED this the 18th dayofMarch, 1991.
BENNY C. LISTER
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICE OF
J. PATRICK FLOYD, P.A.
408 Long Avenue
Post Office Drawer 950
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(904) 227-7413
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
Publish: March 21, 28, April 4 and 11. 1991.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE C
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 91-58
IN RE: The Marriage of
JUDY I-H. ARNOLD,
Wife/Petitioner
and
JERRY LEE ARNOLD,
Husband/Responden
NOTICE OF ACTIO
TO: JERRY LEE ARNOLD
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
of Marriage has been filed against
quired to serve a copy of your wri
any, to the action on Petitioner'sA
name and address is CHARLES A
Office box 98, Port St. Joe, Florid
before April 30, 1991 and file the c
Clerk of this Court either before
tloner's Attorney or Immediately th
wse a judgment will be entered
handed in the petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
March 22, 1991.
BENNY C.LISTER
CLERK OF GULF COUNTY COURT
By: /s/ Tonya Knox,
Deputy Clerk
Publish: March 28, April 4, 11. and
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOUR
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE O
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
IN RE: The Marriage of
CHARLES D. MELVIN,
Husband, Petitioner,
and
SONYA JO SIMMONS MELVIN,
Wife, Respondent
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Sonya Jo Simmons Melvin
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED th
Dissolution of Marriage has been f
and you are required to serve a c
swer or other response to the Peti
her's Attorney: ROBERT M. MOORE
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, and
thereof In the Circuit Court CleI
County Courthouse, Port St Joe,
on orbefore the 18th day of April,
to do so, a Final Judgment for t
may be granted by Default.
BENNY C. LISTER,
Circuit Court Clerk
By: /s/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
Publish March 21, 28, April 4 and


MTEENTH JUDI-
)F FLORIDA, IN




int
N
n for Dissolution


VA Housing

May Be for You

In, the last few years, thou-
sands of people have delayed in
purchasing a home because of
high interest rates. If you have
been waiting for the right time,
this, announcement is for you.
The U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs (VA) has over 1,000 homes
and multiplex units in 'the State
of Florida to, choose from. You
can have government financing at
9 percent on a fixed rate, assum-
able mortgage for 30 years, and
you do not have to be a VETERAN
to buy. Many liomes aire listed
with low down payments. Closing
costs are minimal. Occupancy
within 10 days of approval. For
complete information, contact
your local real estate broker or
call the VA number in your local
telephone directory under U.S.
Government, U.S. Department of
Veterans Affairs, .VA is an equal
housing opportunity lender.


dBase Classes

Offered at GC


you. You are re- The Gulf Coast Community
tten defenses, If
Attorney, whose College Lifelong Learning Center
. COSN. Post and Florida State University
da 32456, on or
original with the Small Business Development
service on Peti Center are cosponsoring a Week-
hereafter, other-
to the relief de- end Computer Institute class,
this Court on "dBase IV, Level 3" on April 19-
21.
This is a continuation of Level
2. Students will review dBase IV
d 18, 1991. commands at the "dot" prompt,
create, execute and modify key-
LTEENT JUDI- board macros; create, execute
'F FLORIDA, IN
and modify programs and learn
Case No. 91-48 the use of the Applications Gener-
ator. Students should come pre-
pared with a detailed understand-
ing of a practical application to be
developed during the class. Stu-
dents should have completed
dBase IV Levels 1 and 2 and
filed anst you must supply one 3 1/2" DS/DD
copy o your An- data disk (for IBM PC microcom-
Ition on Petition-
P. Box 248, puters).
file the original Registration deadline for this
rk's Office, Gulf
Florida 32456, weekend class, is April 10. For
1991. If you fall more information and/or registra-
h relief sought tion call GCCC at (904) 872-
3823. Refer to class CGS 1542-
601. The class will be held at Gulf,
11, 1991. Coast Community College.


. 01- ns '-


Reaching Out In





All Directions




Balanced, fair reporting of the

local, news- business, society, sports.


Provocative editorials, with a chance

for everyone to reply.


Advertising and classified that help

you find what you need.


We're proud of the way we reach our

community from north to south, east to

west, cover to cover




THE STAR


Gulf County's most complete source of local news
Phones 227-1278, 229-8997, FAX 297-7212
3**^ ** {$ 1 4 &


I


I


PAGE 7B


13


TH TR PR T Tp-r. mpnA-Arl .19


.j










We're Proud of the Wewahitchka Chamber of Commerce for Presenting the


TUPELO FESTIVAL


The Wewahitchka Chamber of Commerce, and its
new director, Tamara Laine, are sponsoring the
Tupelo Festival this Saturday at Lake Alice. Many
exhibitors of handcrafts and artists will display
their works to the public for sale. In conjunction
with the Festival a Freshwater Fishing Tournament
will be held at Douglas Landing. For a day of fun
and excitement plan on attending the 1991
Tupelo Festival at Lake Alice. We are proud of the
Chamber .... and we're proud of our hometown.


TABLERITE QUALITY
COUNTRY STYLE

SPARE


RIBS


FAMILY PAK


LB.


TABLERITE QUALITY BONELESS FAMILY PAK
Sirloin Steak .......
FLOUNDER OR


Grouper Fillet
JIMMY DEAN HOT OR MILD
Roll Sausage


LYKES
Hot Dogs ...........


$S79
Lb. $2

$j99
Lb. .A


UMIT 3 15 OZ.
LESUEUR PEAS ................ 590
SOAP POWDER 500 OFF LABEL 39 QZ.
SURF DETERGENT ......... $1.69
GOLDEN FLAKE 8 OZ.
Cheese Curls or Puffs ....... 990
BI-RITE 12 OZ.
FILLED MILK .................. 2/790
IGA CRISP & GOOD 12 OZ.
SNACK CRACKERS ............ 790
CRUSHED, SLICED OR CHUNK 20 OZ.
Liberty Gold Pineapple......... 590
TRAILBLAZER 50 LB. BAG
HI PRO DOG FOOD ......... $9.99


32 OZ.
IGA MAYONNAISE
IGA BLUEBERRY OR STRAWBERRY
TOASTER PASTRY


....... .... 89
11 oz. r6
.......... ...89


LYKES MEAT
Jumbo Franks ........ 1isoz. 5
LYKES FAMILY FAVORITE
Sliced Bacon ........ 12 .. L
'* r


IGA GALLON
VEGETABLE OIL ............. $3.99
Asst. Sandwich Creme, Duplex; Van., Peanut Butter
32 oz.
BI-RITE COOKIES ............ $1.39
BI-RITE 22 OZ.
COFFEE CREAMER ......... $1.19
JIM DANDY 1 LB.
QUICK GRITS .................. 2/990
SELF-RISING OR ALL PURPOSE 5 LB. BAG
Martha White Flour ............. 990
EMBERS 4 LB. BAG
Inst. Lite Charcoal .............. 990
RODDENBERY 46 OZ. FRESH PAK
KOSHER DILLS .............. $1.79
RODDENBERY SWEET 16 OZ.
SALAD DELITES .............. $1.39
SUNLIGHT 22 OZ. .
DISH LIQUID ................... $1.09


KRAFT PARKAY 1LS.LQTRS.

MARGARINE .......
LIGHT N LIVELY "FREE" 16 OZ. BUTTER-ME-NOT 5 CT.
Cottage $ 29 Merico
Cheese ........ Biscuits


INTERSTATE 2 LB. BAEI 4

CrinkIl Fres ENZE 16 Z.
PI[LLSBURY M ROWA/" 2Z. -'. -V *'S McKENZIE 165 Z Z
Orig. Pancakes ...., "L Cut Okra ................ 99
MRS. TRAYLOR 12 OZ. McKENZIE 16 OZ.
implings ho!e Okra ............9


WHITE
Grapefruit


RED, GOLD, ROME
Apples ..............
RED OR BLACK
Seedless Grapes


FLORIDA VALENCIA
Oranges
YELLOW
Onions .


CRISP GREEN
Celery
CELLO
Carrots


CANADIAN WAXED
Rutabagas


3 Ib. bag


$229

$J69


$ 19
.. Ib. JS 1

5 lb. bag $229

3 lb. bag 89,


49"

69"

39"


We do not sacrifice quality
for price. You can depends
always on our quality.


...u. .m ..m .


TABLERITE BOSTON BUTT
Pork Roast ......... Lb. $
USDA INSPECTED BONELESS BUTTERFLY
Pork Chops ......... Lb.299


$239
........ 16 oz.


12oz. 99":


SWEET FLORIDA

Strawberri


PINT


m..... 5 lb. bag


David Rich's
FOODLINERS...
WEWAHffCHKA and PORT ST. JOE
Open 7 days a week
for your shopping convenience.

Prices Good April 3-9 .






RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES PURCHASED
IS RESERVED BY STORE.


.....,,,......., stalk


........ 21 b. bag

........... lb.


M- Aft Af P~f~~fmptl%


I


I DAIRY PRODUCTS I


KILN DRIED SWEET LO

Potatoes 3 Lbs. 9 9


sommummommomm