<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02808
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 28, 1989
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02808

Full Text


12/31/99
Archives Bindery
1508 Hwy. 431-5
AlbertvillIeAL 35950


THE


USPS 518-880

FIFTY-SECOND YEAR, NUMBER 4


Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches In Florida

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1989


250 Per Copy


Solid Waste Collection System Shutting Down

Argus Given Franchise

to Operate Service in

County Suburban Areas


Solid waste trailer systems being discontinued by County Monday Morning -- waste must be hauled to compactor site.


TV Program

Gets Results

On Mystery
Chief of Police Carl Richter
said the local Police Department
received some 20 to 25 calls from
different parts of the nation fol-
lowing the NBC television pro-
gram, "Unsolved Mysteries," last
Wednesday night.
Chief Richter said that in ad-
dition to the local calls, the NBC
network said they received 348
calls at their California number
publicized on the show, which
they considered to be a good re-
action to the program.
"As a result of the calls, we
have several good leads in the
case which are now being
checked by the FBI," Richter
said. "Most of the calls were from
people reporting they had seen
suspicious white vans, all of
which are being checked out ei-
ther by us or by the FBI. We also
had several good leads which
may lead us to being closer to
solving this mystery which we
have found ourselves involved
in." the Chief said.
Richter said some of the calls
are being checked in the Port St.
Joe area, while several are being
looked at in other parts of the na-
tion.
'We feel real good about re-
sults from the program and hope
it results in something concrete,"
Richter said..
The mystery involved two-
young people who were thought
to be abducted in New Mexico. A
picture found on a Port St. Joe
convenience store parking lot of
the two children are the only
clues to the mystery. The photo
was shown on the TV show.


Port St. Joe Gathering Relief


Supplies for Hugo's Victims
Port St. Joe remembers the devastat- early Saturday morning of this week.
ing effects of Hurricane Kate, even A truck is being furnished by St. Joe
though Kate visited four years ago. There Paper Companyifor the mercy trip. It wil]
were trees down, power lines down, debris be parked in front of the Fire Station un-
everywhere and about three or four days til its departures time for people-anyone
of makeshift living, who will-to brig theirdisaster contribu-


The people of the Charleston, South
S,-Carolina -area-had-it-even- worse- late last- -
week from Hurricane Hugo.
Reports are that fresh water supplies
are short to non-existant, power is out
and will be for up to two weeks in some
places. People who depend on power to
prepare meals, preserve food, pump wa-
ter, etc., are suffering hardships not ima-
gined in .the brief inconvenience caused
here from Kate.
For this reason, a sudden, spontane-
ous effort has been started here in Port
St. Joe to get together a truckload of
needed supplies and ship them to
Charleston on late Friday afternoon or


UT7747


tions to be placed in the truck.
,,SThe people Charleston especially.
need bottled water, canned foods, dry
foods, bedding, baby food and diapers and
small hand tools. Foods which need little
to no cooking would be preferred. They
can also use camp stove and lantern fuel,
flashlight batteries and other emergency
items.
The supplies will be supervised at all
times during loading in the truck and
contacts have already been made to see
the supplies get to those who need it by
authorities in Charleston.
The relief truck is scheduled to pull
out for South Carolina late Friday after-
noon or very early Saturday morning.


The Gulf County Commission
did what they have been threat-
ening to do, Tuesday night, when
they officially gave the notice to
Sam Graves, director of the Mos-
quito Control Department to
bring in all the Swa-Car garbage
collectors and don't place them
out again.
The move was made by the
Commission as the first step in a
year-long program to overhaul its
solid waste program to be more
manageable and more affordable
in a hard-pressed county budget.
In addition to bringing in all
the collection trailers from their
several convenient locations
throughout the county, the Board
voted to grant a one year garbage
collection franchise to Argus, In-
corporated of Panama 'City.
Argus was one of three bid-
ders, but lacked three cents per
month being the low bidder of the
three.
The low bidder was M&O
sanitation of Panama City, but
M&O either couldn't or didn't
meet the requirement of putting
up a performance bond in its bid,
so it was rejected in Argus' favor.
The third bidder in the field
was C&N Enterprises of Blount-
stown, which bid $12.95 per
month for once a week pick-up.
C&N's price included provision
of a 90 gallon garbage container
and a tipping fee for transporting
the collection to the Bay County
incinerator.
WINNING BID
Argus' winning bid was to
collect from Its customers one
time a week for a $9.00 monthly
collection fee. Argus' owner said
he -also. provided--discounts -for-
senior citizens in-all his collection
areas.
Argus was also awarded the
bid because he is already operat-
ing in much of Gulf County on a
private basis, serving many of the
unincorporated areas in both
ends of the county and along the
Beaches areas.
Argus said he is already mak-
ing plans to expand his opera-
tions throughout the county and
will be in full operation by Octo-
ber 1, when his contract begins.
Argus has only a franchise
and is not a contracted operator
for the county. His dealings will
be with private customers and


not with Gulf County, who has
only the power over the collector
given by his franchise.
Commissioner Jimmy Gort-
man wanted the Commission to
accept the C&N bid of $12.95 per
month to rid the county of the ex-
pense of tipping fees at the incin-
erator. "I want Gulf County to get
completely out of the garbage
business," Gortman said.
'To do that, you would have
to make subscription to the col-
lection system mandatory for our
people and I'm not ready to do
that just yet," Commissioner Ed
Creamer said.
On the vote to award the
franchise, Gortman backed up
his convictions by refusing to ap-
prove the franchise. Creamer,
Chairman Birmingham and Park-
er all voted in favor. Commission-
er Nathan Peters was absent
from Tuesday's meeting.
TRAILERS GONE
On Monday, collection trail-
ers throughout the county will be
removed and taken out of service.
This ends the practice of allowing
private home owners to haul
their own solid waste to the trail-
ers and the county trailing the
collection bins to the compactor
located just north of Port St. Joe
and to the new compactor pres-
ently under construction on
Highway 22, west of Wewahitch-
ka.
Beginning Monday, it will be
the responsibility of the home-
owners to take their solid waste
to one of the two compactors in
the county or subscribe to Argus'
service. Residents inside incorpo-
rated areas will see no changes in
their garbage collection services. _
The county will have moni-
tors patrolling in an attempt to
control indiscriminate dumping
on lonely roads, in wooded areas
and other places throughout the
county in an attempt to prevent
the same situation from recurring
which the placement of trailers
solved several years ago.
Whatever the county finally
does, it will still be in the solid
waste business.
ROAD PROGRAM
Six bids were received from
fiscal agents, who all wanted to
handle the county's pending $3
million road building bond issue
(See SOLID on Page 3)


Hugo's Rains Batter Gulf County


Port St. Joe missed the dubious distinc-
tion of hosting Hurricane Hugo last week,
but the rains which followed behind the
huge hurricane battered Gulf County over
the week end, dumping a total of 7.1 inches
of rain in the Port St. Joe area between Sat-
urday afternoon and Tuesday morning.
The Star's official unofficial rain person,
, Emily Simmons, said her gauge showed a to-
Stdrff 5.2 inches of precipitation from 8:00
a.m., Sunday through 7:00 p.m., Monday,
when the heaviest rains were recorded.


County

Adopts

Tax Rate
The Gulf County Com-
mission gave its official fi-
nal approval. to the 1990
fiscal budget. Tuesday
night, setting the tax rate
at 7.55 mills and the bud-
get total at $6,144,450.28.
This reflects a dollar In-
crease of $288,534 .over
last year. The increase in
budgeted money was made
possible by an increase in
property valuation of
847,331,675, over the pre-
vious year.
The money increase of
the county's spending plan
shows an increase of 8.5%
over last year's total figure.
Last year's mill rate was
7.685, or .135 higher than
the new fiscal levy.
The new budget will go
into effect Monday, October
1 and will govern county
operations until September
30, 1990.
Tax bills to collect the
new budget will be sent out
in November.


The St. Joe Paper Company Woodlands
office on Garrison Avenue, recorded the 7.1
inch record from Saturday afternoon, when
the rains started, through Tuesday morning,
when they finally ended.
The final heavy downpour came Monday
night and early Tuesday prior to daybreak.
The gauge in the photo at left was emptied
Monday evening because it was full, then re-
corded the inch of rainfall shown during the
night Monday.


,let


Culverts and storm drains were full and overflowing from heavy weekend rains.


"N


I


STAFt











THE STAR
PAGE TWO .THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28,1989


-t C) M.- M- *. h.


See the Signs

We can see the unmistakable signs everywhere. It's in the
news, the editorials, the columnists are subtly preparing us
and even the editorial cartoons are geared toward getting us
ready to accept what is going to be introduced within about a
year, according to our reckoning.
We're talking about an attempt to legalize drugs which are
presently abusing and totally upsetting the mood of our nation.
Occasionally a warrior against the drug trade will resolutely
throw up his hands and lament that the only way we can de-
feat it is to legalize it, taking the enormous profit out of dealing
in the deadly stuff.
Like we did with liquor.
Just last week, we read a column by normally level-headed
Mike Royko-who is liberal to a point, but also cynical enough
to pretty much admit to reality-where Mike was interviewing a
Chicago policeman who works with trying to control drugs in
his district and had reached the conclusion that legalization
was the only way to combat the drug traffic. The only thing
which bothered us about Royko's column is thatihe didn't close
out in his usual realistic style, presenting the policeman's theo-
ry, then adding a Royko "but..."
That Royko "but. ." is what I always look for when I read
his columns. He carries on a lot of foolishness between the
opening and closing lines, with the closing line usually sup-
porting the accepted American way of solving the problem at
hand.
In the same issue of the newspaper which had printed Roy-
ko's column, was an editorial cartoon which showed the Re-
publicans and the Democrats playing cards, with one raising
the other two billion in the "game" against drugs. The point of
the cartoon was unmistakable, as it should be with all editorial
cartoons. The author saw the present war on drugs as just a
never-ending no-win game the nation was playing, with the po-
litical parties going along with the polls by making a big, but
meaningless show against the drug menace.
We will agree with Royko's policeman in one respect. If we're
not going to get deadly serious about winning the war on con-
trolled substances, we had just as well make preparations to-
ward legalizing it, even if the majority of our people don't want
any part of it.
Of course, here in the United States, where probably less
than 20% of our people have ever used illegal drugs, we're ac-
customed to the minorities, of whatever stripe, determining
what the rest of us do. It's just the prerogative of those of us
who keep our nose clean to pay the bill for cleaning up after
those who don't.
As for legalization, let's consider this; did legality solve the
problems of alcoholism and the horrendous expense we as a
nation endure each and every year because of liquor?



They Need Our Help

Remember what it was like in Port St. Joe four years ago
when Hurricane Kate paid us an unwelcome visit?
Remember how you made arrangements to cook meals,
light.up. the dark and keep the food in your freezers and refrig-
erators from going bad? Remember how helpless. you felt. not
being able to buy gasoline because it couldn't be pumped out
of the ground? The futility of going to the grocery store because
they couldn't operate nothing without power?
It was a helpless feeling in Port St. Joe for three or four
days after Kate went whistling off into the sunset.
That same feeling is being felt by the people in and around
Charleston, South Carolina, now, and a group of people in Port
St. Joe has decided to give back a little bit of the help which
poured into our city after Kate's call. We. had food vans come
in. People came to help clear debris. The Baptists of Alabama
sent a self-contained trailer to serve food to all who had no way
to prepare it themselves. They stayed as long as needed and
cooked up food which came into the area from those wishing to
help.
Now Port St. Joe is asking all who will to help those in
Charleston. Join in the effort to send supplies to that devastat-
ed area by the last of this week. Bring your donations to the
Fire Station. A truck will be waiting. You'll have repaid a great
kindness shown you when you help others.


IHunker Down with Kes


I Un-Starched It A Little


The governor of the entire
state came to our little town once:.
I forget the year but I was around
nine or ten. I didn't know much
back in those days but I could tell
this was pretty special 'cause peo-
ple got all dressed up and it was
only Saturday afternoon Mother
was honest to goodness excited
about the whole thing. She kept
telling us what a big event this
was, And he was such an impor-
tant man. And to be sure to listen
to every word. And we could tell
our grandchildren about the day
the governor came to our little
town. And for goodness sakes, be-
have ...
His first name was Frank.
Last names and remembering


something to tell my grandchil-
dren wasn't high tip on my priori-
ty list back in the mid-fifties.
Leon said he was just going to
stand up there and talk to us for
about six hours. Six hours! I
didn't like it already and we
hadn't even gotten there yet.
My Dad hadn't said a word.
As we were riding to town I fig-
ured out Leon was a'pulling my
leg. My Dad wouldn't go any-
where to hear anybody talk for
six hours I don't care if he is
the governor of the whole state.
Mom notice my ;Dad's silence.
"What do you think he'll talk
about, Father?"
"If he don't tell us corn and
cotton is up and seed and fertiliz-


er is down. we're wasting our
time."
If the governor of the whole
state wanted to Impress my Dad
he needed to spend a Saturday
afternoon over at the house pull-
ing roasting ears with the rest of
us. Mother didn't ask any more
governor questions and as we
passed the Baptist church I hun-
kered down in the back and un-
did the top button of the only
white shirt that I owned. Well, ac-
tually it was Leon's shirt but he'd
out-grown it two years before. I
was going to be as comfortable as
possible even if the gov only
spoke for an hour.
Everybody and his brother
was in town. Mother was right!


Lang'S Thang Lang Newberry


6Ai5UL


-1-/

'A__


it takes total conm-


.. . w mS


-U'


By
Kesley
Colbert


This was a big event. We had to
park down behind the theater.
There was no room left up on the
square. Dad gave us each a dime
and went off to talk to the men
about the weather. Mrs. Mitchell
stopped Mother to talk about
church. She shooed us off with a
wave and a wink, 'You boys run
along, your Mother and I have
some grown-up talking to do."
Good ole Mrs. Mitchell, she
saved us a million times a ten
year old couldn't have a better
friend. We made a bee line for
Woodrow Kennon's Dry Goods,
Mercantile and Grocery Store. I
was on the front porch pouring
peanuts into my Dr. Pepper when
Bobby and Ricky showed up.
They must'a got to town a'few
minutes before we did. Ricky's
white shirt already had dirt all
over one sleeve.
"The governor here yet?"
"Naw, the High School Band
hasn't started playing."
I kind'a worked on my Dr.
Pepper slowly it had the mak-
ings of a long day. I was com-
menting that this governor visit
wasn't going to be much when
Bobby interrupted, "We could be
picking cotton."
I hadn't thought of it that
way. All of a sudden I was kind'a
proud he was coming. It was Sep-
tember, Indian Summer, too hot
to be working down those rows,
pulling that mile long sack. Mr.
Cantrell came by and announced
(just like he was a part of the offi-
cial touring entourage) that the
governor would be an hour late.
Boy, I thought, our band is in big
trouble. They don't know but -two
songs, "Dixie" and the other one
was "Cherry Pink and Apple Blos-
som White" or something like
that.
"Let's play hide-and-go-seek."
"Right here in town, are you
nuts?"
"There ain't nothing else "-to
do, these steps can be base. Who
wants to be'i'-4"first?" .
David Mark was the young-
est, he started counting to 100.
Folks, the rest of us took off like
shots out of a cannon. I hid tin-
der the back steps of Mr. Can-
non's Drug Store. I'd just
squirmed back as far as I could
go when I felt the drip hit my
shoulder. Mr. Cannon's ice was
melting and running off the back
porch. Before I could move, David
came around the comer. I froze,
he hung around for five minutes,
checking every back step. By the
time he passed me and I could
break for base, my shirt was drip-
ping wet. I rounded the comer of
the tractor place three steps
ahead of David and ran right into
(See KESLEY on Page 3)


Doctors In Dinky Hospital Gowns Are Not A Pretty Sight


IT WAS MORE OR less sad- -
istic reasons which sent me to
Panama City late Monday after-
noon to check on my old friend,
Dr. Wayne Hendrix after his re-
wiring job of last Friday.
As you probably know, by
now, Dr. Wayne had four brand-
new by-passes plugged into his
heart on Friday morning, after di-
agnosing himself as needing
them and sending himself to the
hospital, with unfortunate nurse
Kathleen Grace, doing the trans-
p6rting in Dr. Wayne's car.
I could really do a hatchet job
on Dr. Wayne finally being on the
receiving end of the torture of a
stay in the hospital.
The good doctor is going to
get all he can handle when he
gets back home and Miss Ruth
reads him the riot act for his ac-
tions leading up to and including
his admission to Bay Medical for
his re-wiring job.
You see, he kept all the pre-
liminary events a secret from
Miss Ruth, and the roof is fixing


to fall in at the Hendrix house-
hold. The good doctor may just
find himself back in the hospital
with bruises and contusions, af-
ter he gets back home.

OLD DOC WAYNE didn't tell
Miss Ruth he didn't sleep at all
Wednesday night.
When he let Ruth sleep to
7:00 a.m., Thursday morning,
rather than waking her at 6:00,
he got a grouch instead of a
thank-you. When he went to the
office at 8:30 rather than the
usual 9:30, Ruth was ready to
flip her lid, because the doctor
was deviating from the standard
routine of daily motion in all di-
rections. Nothing was going to fit
at all that day!
Dr. Wayne went to work,
grumbled at his staff to take
some tests, then shanghaied
Kathleen into his car and away
they went, with Kathleen driving
like the occasion required and
Dr. Wayne grumbling and griping
every speeding mile of the way.
Kathleen just gritted her
teeth, and sweetly cooed, "Doc,
just shut your mouth, I'm trying


to save your life!" Then she hit
the gas pedal even harder, touch-
ing the ground only twice from
Mexico Beach to Bay Medical.
You see, it's OK to endanger
the life of a dying patient rushing
him to the hospital as fasts as
possible, but don't try it with a
doctor!
I SAID MY VISIT was for
sadistic reasons. I took my
preacher, Dr. Dan Duncan along
to comfort the good Doc and Cecil
Harrison, one of our deacons, to
assure old Doc his back row -at
church was being handled by a
couple of teen-agers while he was
gone.
But the real reason was to
gloat over the condition the com-
passionate Doc found himself in
after being confined to the hospi-
tal.
Haven't you ever had a rqal
hankering to see a doctor con-
fined to bed with one. of those
non-concealing hospital bibs they
call a gown, dangling from his
neck?
Haven't you ever been in a
hospital and secretly cussed out
the doctor for not allowing you


out of bed to get a decent show-
er? Or go the bathroom, rather
than use those cans they shove
at you? ,
I have. And I was all set to
enjoy seeing Dr. Wayne-even,
though he's my friend-in this
position and ask him, as kindly
as possible, "Now, how do YOU
like them apples?"
You see, old Doc Wayne has
put me in this position twice.
Once, he messed up my
Christmas vacation by perform-
ing a hernia operation and strap-
ping me in a bed for five days in
Municipal Hospital. Consider, if
you will, spending a Christmas
Day in ANY hospital
A second time, he made me
spend a Labor Day week end in
Municipal, after deciding to take
out my .appendix on a Sunday
morning. :
Notice, both times, he chose
a holiday to lay me low. He
couldn't select a time when I was
up to my eyebrows in work and
could use a few days of rest. He
picked holidays!
On Monday morning, after
taking out my appendix on Sun-
day, he added insult to injury, by


sending his wife, Miss Ruth, into
the hospital room with a plateful
of steamed crab claws, resting on
a dome of ice.
There's not much I like more
than steamed crab claws, but the
morning after an appendectomy,
somehow those crab claws just
didn't look all that appetizing.
He just patted me on the
shoulder and said, "Get with it
boy! The sooner you eat those
crab claws and move those bow-
els, the sooner you get out of that
soft, warm, comfortable bed and
out of this wonderful place."
I GUESS ALL THESE things
came flooding back into Doctor
Wayne's mind Monday evening
late.
He had just gotten out of in-
tensive care, where his visit will
long be remembered, I'm told. He
told the nurses how to treat him,
where to stick the needles and
what they could do with their
bedpans and pills.
He was a holy terror in that
ICUI I'm told they shipped him
out two days early because of the
ruckus he was causing.
While we were there, the


nurse came by and removed his
IVs and he immediately started
trying to climb out of bed.
I've tried that. Haven't you? I
got shoved back into bed and
told, unceremoniously to stay
there! What happened to you?
That's what happened to Dr.
Wayne, too! Served him right!
He decided he didn't want
visitors in the room at that par-
ticular time and I strongly sus-
pect it was because he hadn't
bathed in four days, his hair
hadn't been combed or washed in
nearly a week and he hadn't
shaved that morning. Nor did he
have his shirt and tie on.
Have you ever had these feel-
ings when the hordes of visitors
have been allowed into your hos-
pital room by our good doctor
and others like him?
Now you know what I mean
by sadistic reasoning for going to
see my long time friend.
By the way. As you gathered
by his directing, grouching, de-
manding and shouting at nurses,
old Dr. Wayne is doing finely
He at least has presence of
mind not to try these tactics on
Dr. Cook, his cardiologist.


St. Joseph
Date Time
Sept. 28 12:28 a.m. H
11:42 a.m. H
10:48 p.m. H
Sept. 29 5:54 a.m. L
Sept. 30 7:27 a.m. L
Oct. 01 8:36 a.m. L
Oct. 02 9:39 a.m. L
Oct. 03 12:11 a.m. H
Oct. 04 12:47 a.m. H


Bay Tide Table
Ht. Time Ht.
.9 2:29 a.m. L .8
1.3 6:13 p.m. L 1.0
1.1
.9 10:46 p.m. H 1.3
.7 11:11 p.m. H 1.5
.6 11:33 p.m. H 1.6
.5
1.8 10:34 a.m. L .4
1.8 11:36 a.m. L .3


'Tm just a dumb ole' mule, but even I know
mitment to win a war. not dingy cash outlays!"


-THE STAR- Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
USPHS 518880 Send Address Change to In County-$10.00 Year in County--8.00 Six Months
W A USPHS 518880 Out of County-15.00 Year out of County-$10.00 Six Months
%(.u 4If Published Every Thursday at 304-306 Williams Avenue The Star
y 'Port St. Joe, Florida 32456-0308 Post Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur-
Phone 227-1278 their than amount received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey ............ Editor & Publisher
William H. Ramsey .............. Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-
4A'WS P Frenchie L. Ramsey Offce Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA32456-0308 fully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey. Type-setter WEEKLY PUBLISHING oughly convinces: The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


n


16LIM WMAOMP-'IM mihk-AmMAW 11--NtMb-qA Ak---"w4M








THE S ~TAR. PO T AT-AnP VT'e TTfm 'IuRDSflLV V. SP 'a1fD A' AAw,~. ,,.C.~tf.rt-*~~l~l S ICIRO'J


Shad


iPhantry
By Wendell Campbell


A Bachelor Again

A little over a month ago our night manager at the hotel left and
went home to Alabama. His departure left me in somewhat of a
bind.
For those of you who have never owned or worked in a hotel, I
must tell you that you have missed one of the most interesting pro-
fessions on earth. Interesting may not be the proper word, but I'll
just leave it at that for now.
Anyway, it was my job to find someone reliable and dependable
to replace our former manager. I discovered a person the day before
the manager left. I saw him looking back at me that morning as I
was shaving.
My youngest son agreed to stay with me at night so I wouldn't
be too lonely. This made a potentially unpleasant job turn out to be
quite an enlightening experience. When we started moving in, I was
reminded of my old college days; the carefree days of bachelorhood.
As I said, it was quite an experience. Here are some of the things
we did and did not do that we normally would have done or not
have done had we been living with our entire family.
*We watched t.v. until our eyes were bloodshot and we couldn't
stay awake any longer. We didn't miss Johnny Carson a single night
except when we rented two or three movies. It was tough getting up
some mornings.
*We never made up our bed in the morning and we didn't put
our dirty clothes in the hamper. Dirty jeans, shirts and socks were
so thick on the floor at times that we couldn't see the carpet. After a
*' few days our bedroom began to smell something like a football lock-
er room.
*We never used napkins when we ate. I was amazed at how
wasteful I've been with paper napkins throughout the years. If we
happened to spill something or leave some food residue on our fac-
es, we just wiped it with our shirt sleeves. We didn't use a table
cloth because they have to be washed.
*We ate a lot of heavy, late-night snacks. We ate things like
cookies and ice cream, banana and peanut butter sandwiches, pan-
cakes and sausage and such. And we ate until we couldn't eat any
more.
*We didn't wash dishes but once a week or until all of them were
dirty. Admittedly, the kitchen began to smell a little like the garbage
dump, but we didn't stay in there much.
*We cut our bathroom time in half. We also saved a bundle on
toothpaste, soap and deodorant and such. What the heckl you don't
need to be that clean and smell that good if there's no women
around.
*We dressed very casually after eight o'clock. Most of the time
we just wore our shorts when we had clean ones because we
were just relaxing. You don't have to dress to watch t.v. or read
comic books. It was also convenient to scratch where it itched.
*We ran the air conditioner as low as it would go at night. One
morning I woke up and the t.v. was frozen up and wouldn't come on
it was so cold. This didn't help our light bill but it sure made sleep-
ing comfortable.
We did and didn't do a lot of other things, too, like talking a lot
of "'man talk". We discussed girls, hunting and fishing, wrestling
and football and many other things that escape me right now. But
now it's time to get ready to go back home and I have to get rid of
the-dandruff, athlete's foot and jock itch I have.
The "bachelor life" ain't what I remember it being. I'm glad to be
going home!


Social Security Business

' Can be Handled over Phone


Most Social Security business
can be handled over the phone.
You are invited to call the So-
cial Security Office. The Panama
City telephone number is 769-


Kesley
(From Page 2)
Mr. McAdams. I went down in a
pool of John Deere grease and
ripped the elbowout of my only
white shirt.
I didn't even notice the blood.
I was trying to apologize to Mr.
McAdams when the band broke
into "Dixie". We gathered with the
rest of the folks up on the square.
My Mother saw me and I thought
for a second she was a'going to
faint. Mrs. Mitchell had her by
the arm. "Come on Mrs. Mitchell,
don't falr'me now."
They finished that. "Apple
Blossom" song and the governor
got up and apologized for being
late. He said what a pretty town
we had and then he took off his
coat, rolled up his sleeves and
started talking about how we
needed better education for our
young people. Mother was nod-
ding her head up and down so
* hard that I think she forgot about
me. I got the bleeding stopped
about the time the governor got
around to all the new roads he
was going to build in our little
town.
I don't remember if he said
anything about cotton prices or
not. I was too busy figuring on
what I was going to tell my grand-
children someday if they asked
me if I really saw the governor. I
guess I'll just tell them the truth.
"Grandchildren, it's not a matter
of whether or not I saw the gov-
ernor I just hope he didn't see
me."
Respectfully,
Kesley


Watch for

details on the

Grand Opening

of The Star's

new business

supply office.
/e


4871. If this is not possible you
may come to the office located at
30 West Government Street, Pan-
ama City. The office is open Mon-
day through Friday from 8:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m., except on na-
tional holidays. If you cannot
come to Panama City, you may
meet the Social Security repre-
sentative in Port St. Joe at the
Courthouse on the first and third
Monday of each month from 11
a.m. to noon EST. In Wewahitch-
ka, Social Security representative
will be at the SES Office on the
second Monday of each month
from 10 a.m. until noon CST. The
October 9 trip to Wewahitchka
has been cancelled due to a na-
tional holiday.


Solid Waste Collection


Tuesday night.
The bids, all very complex
and voluminous, were tabled for
study by a committee composed
of Commissioner Don Parker, at-
torney William J. Rish and Clerk
Benny Lister. The committee is to
make a recommendation to the
board by October 4, when their
call for bids specifies a decision
will be made as to who will han-
dle the bond issue.
Attorney Rish commented,
"'Whoever is chosen, the county
can be assured its financial pro-
gram will be in good hands.
These bidders are all top-notch



Oktoberfest

If it's September, it must be
time for Oktoberfestl Sound a
little confusing? Well, that's the
way it's done in Bavaria and
that's the way Panama City is
doing it this year. Oktoberfest is
being held on Saturday, Septem-
ber 30th, from 8:00 a.m. till
10:30 p.m., and the site for this
year's festivities will be the Grace
Avenue Mini Mall area.
Oktoberfest, celebrating one
of the many cultural heritages of
the Bay County region, is a time
when everyone is a little bit
German for a day. So dust off
your lederhosen, bring a hearty
appetite and raise your steins to
the delicious German dishes, the
"oom-pah-pah" music, dancing,
games and authentic costumes
you will find at this year's
Oktoberfest.
To start the day there will be
a downtown Merchant's Market
where you will have the chance to
shop for everything from antiques
to yo-yos, all donated by
downtown businesses and all
proceeds going to benefit the
Junior Museum. The Market will
run from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Children's activities will begin at
noon and continue until 4:00
p.m., running the gamut from
face painting to the Grand Slam.
from the Whopper Hopper "moon
walk" to mysterious fortune
tellers. In all, 30 activities are
planned which will test the
youngsters' skill and luck. One of
the highlights of the day is the
much anticipated and hotly
contested Corporate Tricycle
Race, also known as "The Great
Trike Race", to be held from 2:30
to 3:00, featuring such area
luminaries as Deck Hull, Guy
Tunnell, and Tom Najjar to name
but a few.
Additional contests and
activities will be ongoing through-
out the afternoon and evening. A
St. Pauli Girl 'T-shirt Tug" has
been added this year (it's one of
those things where you just gotta
be there") sponsored by St. Paull
Girl beer. And no Oktoberfest
would be complete without a
Sausage Dog Contest! The
dachshund's German ancestry
will be celebrated at 3:00 p.m.,
and prizes and admiration will be
awarded. (If you have one of these
special dogs and would like to be
included let us know.) Other
contests include beer drinking,
pie-eating, polka, German
costume, and the beer barrel race
which should entertain
celebrants and bring fame to the
winners. For more information
call 769-6128.


members of the fiscal agent pro-
fession."
In the meantime, the Board
gave the go-ahead for Baskerville
Donovan, Engineers to begin de-
sigh work on re-surfacing C-30
arid other projects already slated
for re-surfacing and paving so
work can proceed as soon as the
bond issue is sold.
Ralph Rish, local representa-
tive for BDE presented the firm's
contract which called for a five
percent fee on construction costs
and provides all usual engineer
design services and oversees, the
work.
The BDE contract calls for
payment of $75,000 on January
1, 1990, or when the bonds are
sold, whichever comes first.
BEACH CABLE TV
Multi-Vision Cable 'IV offi-
cials came to the meeting Tues-
day night, to discuss refusal of
the county to give them a permit
for work on St. Joe Beach- road
rights-of-way.
When their time came for ap-
pearance before the Board, the
fireworks started, with the county
threatening to lift their franchise
if they were given promises which
were not kept just one more time.
Commissioner Ed Creamer
said the firm had transmission
difficulties for about "three or
four days" last week. "I called the
number listed and didn't get any-
body. I finally called an 800 num-
ber I was given and got hold of an
answering service in Mobile, who
said they would relay the mes-
sage. Eventually I got the answer-
ing service back who reported it
would be Monday before the
cable company would collect its
calls," Creamer said.
The commissioner went on to
say, 'We were promised there
would be a warm body in Gulf
County we could call and get our
problems taken care of and this
didn't happen," he charged.
Chairman Birmingham reit-
erated the claim saying, "this is
the third or fourth time we have
been made this promise and it
has never been carried out. We
have two more firms wanting to
go into your operating area right
now and if this keeps up, we are
going to have to do something,"
he said.
Charles Roberts again told
the Commission his firm would
do better, it was re-building the
system and needed the permits
for that work and he would per-


Starting
At


$S99
sq. yard


sonally check out the complaints
aired by the Commissioners.
Roberts was instructed to get
with Building Supervisor De-
wayne Manuel for his permits
and Manuel would instruct him
in what he would have to do. "He
will also see that it is done if you
maintain your permit," Birming-
ham said.
Birmingham told Roberts, "If
your firm intends to get along
with Gulf County from this day
forward, you're going to have to
perform."
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters,
the Commission:
-Delayed a request for an
insurance company to collect by
payroll deductions until some
guidelines could be set up to con-
trol the manner of deductions.
-Passed an ordinance allow-


Installed
over 1/2"
Pad


$1 95
2 sq. yd.


On Hwy. C-30, 3/10's of a mile east of the Cape San Bias road (C-30B)


Fried Crab Claws ........
Served with French Fries and Cole Slaw


$6.95


Catch of the Day This Week is
Fresh Flounder.
Fried, Broiled or Charcoal Grilled


Peter's Convenience Store

We have fresh baked bread and pastries daily.
Also fresh oysters, shrimp, crab fingers, and fish
filets.
All purchases over $15 in the Restaurant and the
Store receive a free lottery ticket when presented
with this advertisement.

Phone 227-1774
k- -J


No-Wax Vinyl
Floor Covering
Starting At

$299
sq. yard


I m Monsanto DE CARPET


'ITM b'I'AK. k'VKTbT. JOE, ICL 0 -fJtIUKbJJAY. bEVI-. 213, 19t5U I-AFLUZ U^


From Page 1
ing driving on Gulf County
beaches from Indian Pass to the
State Park because the area
didn't have sufficient parking
places to allow the general public
to use the beaches otherwise.
-Agreed to allow parks com-
mittee chairman Wayne Childers
to request a line item fund of
$95,000 from the State of Florida
to develop the White City park.
Childers was also authorized to
seek a 25-year lease of the Coast
Guard property at Cape San
Bias.
-Authorized Elections Su-
pervisor Cora Sue Robinson to
print names of 1,279 voters in
the newspaper. Robinson said
the electors have not cast a vote
in two elections and face removal
from the rolls by state law unless
they make a request to be left on
the rolls.


PAGE1 SA


IL








THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. SEPT. 28, 1989


Local Motel Changes Ownership


Are You Tired of All the Junk Around Your House?
Have A Garage Sale! Place Your Ad With Us.


Motel St. Joe, a landmark at
the intersection of Highways 71
and 98, was sold late last week
and the new owners have already
taken possession of the local
business.
David Harvey- of Pensacola,
had been owner of the hostelry
for a little more than a year, pur-
chasing it from the Johnson Es-
tate of Fort Walton Beach, after
the owner was killed by an in-
truder in his home about two
years ago.
The new owners of the motel
and restaurant facilities are Jerry
and Eric Martin, a father and son
team, formerly of San Antonio,
Texas. Eric Martin Is already liv-
ing in Port St. Joe and has taken
over management of both the ho-
tel and restaurant.
Jerry Martin, the father of
Eric, is scheduled to arrive in
Port St. Joe in just a few days
and will assume active manage-
ment of the restaurant portion of
the business, while Eric will be
occupied with management of the
hotel only.
Eric Martin told The Star
this week the sale was suddenly
consummated in just the last few
days of last week. "It was a fast
transaction," Martin said.


The new owners said there
will be no changes in the manner


of operation for the hotel at the
present time. "Hopefully we can


make some changes for the better
in just a short while," he said.


-. ~ ~ ~ .-.~--- -. -- -r


Volunteers Pick Up 1,860 # of Beach Debris


The rains held off Saturday
until the volunteers cleaning the
beaches of Gulf County could fin-
ish their task, and had collected
1,860 pounds of debris which
had been deposited on Gulfs
beaches. These volunteers joined
others from all over the Florida
and 19 other states in the annual
Coastal Clean-Up Day.
Locally, 55 volunteers spent
three hours Saturday morning
combing the beaches, looking for
litter, making an active statement
for cleaner beaches. Not only did
the volunteers collect the debris,
but also recorded on data cards
the nature of the debris, which
was collected on 25 miles of the
county's coastline. Over 62% of
the debris was made of plastic,
11% metal & paper, 9.5% glass,
2.3% wood, 1.7% rubber and
1.3% cloth. These materials take
hundreds of years to disintegrate.
and over the years Just pile up,
-creating an unhealthy, unsightly
litter problem..
The Center of Marine Conser-
vation and Port St. Joe City
Beautification Committee thanks
the participants and station coor-
dinators for taking the time to
care and helping with the area's
third coastal clean-up.
Data collected from this
clean-up will be compiled with
the other 34 counties that partic-
ipated in this effort, with the
state's complete information for-
warded to the Center of Marine
Conservation in Washington,
D.C.
Everyone who enjoys the
area's beaches, either as a sun-
bather or a boater, is urged to
bring their trash home after an
outing.
STATE PARK
St. Joseph Peninsula State
Park also extends its thanks to
the volunteers who participated
in the state-wide Beach Clean-Up
Project. A special thanks was ex-
tended to The Cape Cafe for do-
nating pizza and ice, and to Pep-
si-Cola for donating the drinks.
Thirty-four volunteers cleaned up
three miles of coastline and
picked up 324 Ibs. of trash said
Ranger Carolyn Kempton.


Band Boosters

The Port St. Joe Band Boost-
ers will hold its regularly meeting
on Monday, October 2.
The meeting will begin at 7:30
p.m. in the band room.
All interested persons are in-
vited to attend.








fus0
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP ............ 10 a.m.

World Communion
Sunday
Nursery Avaiable
ADULT SCHOOL................ 11 a.m.

The Rev. Dr. Elmer 1. Braden, Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756
227-1756


Easy Apple-Walnut Loaf Is Lightly Spiced And Wholesome

S runchy walnuts and freshly w
grated apples combine with
spices in this flavorful quick bread.
It goes together easily, has a moist
texture and slices beautifully into
snacks, mealtime treats or desserts. .
Whole wheat flour adds an addi-
tional bonus of fiber and contrib-
utes to the loaf's hearty flavor. In
these days of nutrition awareness, it .p
is wise planning to include health- bt
ful foods such as apples, walnuts .
and whole grain products each day.
This moist loaf, studded. with
Walnuts, keeps well in "4
the refrigerator. Slice the bread to
toast for breakfast or add entice-
ment to a fresh fruit luncheon
salad. For a delicious snack orP.
dessert that's not too sweet, it's an
excellent choice.
No matter which way you slice it,
this wholesome'ebread fits in from
..breakfast to bedtime'.
SPICED APPLE
WALNUT BREAD
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1A teaspoon baking soda Stir together flour, baking powder, salt, soda and spices. Prepare
1 teaspoon cinnamon apple; set aside.* Cream together shortening, sugar and eggs. Stir in half
S/A teaspoon nutmeg the flour mixture until moistened; mix in apple. Gradually blend in
1 cups pared, shredded tart remaining flour mixture and whole wheat flour. Set aside 1A cup of the
baking apple walnuts for top of loaf. Blend remaining walnuts into batter, turn into
2/ cup shortening or margarine greased 81/2 x 4/2-inch loaf pan; spread level. Sprinkle with reserved
% cup granulated sugar walnuts. Bake below oven center at 350'F. about 1 hour or until pick
2 large eggs inserted in center comes out clean. Remove from oven; let stand in pan 10
1 cup whole wheat flour minutes, then turn out onto wire rack to cool. Makes 110af.
11/ cups coarsely chopped *If the apples used are excessively juicy when shredded, drain them
Walnuts lightly before adding to the batter.


- - -


A A A A A A
AAAAA.A. AAAA A
A A A A'. A AAA%. A: A A
A A A A A A A A A A
A'A A A A A A. A'
.AAA A. AIA
A A
^ .... I A A A
AA.A.A
AAA.. A A F A-A A,
A. ^ff -G
A. A... A.. A. A.Al. A A A. A. A
A A A.. I A A A. A A. A. A.
AA
A. A A..
AAAAA
%AAAAA,
A. A
A. A A A Ap rPf---
A.. MERGM N AAAA.
.AAA.A, A^ AA"^
.A A.A.AA% AAkA
A A. A. AAA A A%%
A A. -A.. A. A.I -,- I A %AAAAA
A.A. A
A AAA A A. A. A 1. A

A. A A A A
A A A A A A A A
A A A A
A A A
A A
A AZ .,A
AA A A A, .,A A
A A.. AA.A. A A A A A A A
A A A -A .
A A A A A A* A- A A A,
A A A A A
%A A A
A, A
A.
A- %.
A A.
A 0 A A A
'A^.,^ A A
A.A
.-A A.AAA ,A-
AAA.A^A,
.A A. A. A... A A A'A
A. A
A' AAA-
A. A..
A.
A
A
A
A. A.
^-A A ..... AAA- A% A

%j A*, -J
A A A A A
A
A- A
A A'.
1- A
A wif.WA awki
ry AAA^.l. A^A`A^A.
A- AA.A.
^^A^ AAA


Costin's Departm re
200 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe


Say You Saw It In The Star


Mark's Cleanning Service

Professional House Cleaning
From Top to Bottom
Rentals Residential Homes Offices
and New Construction
Licensed
Local References Provided

Call 648-5362


~1mALL OUl CAN EAT~
MONAY PECAL


FAUN 4A


I FRESH SALAD BAR I


PAr 4 A


i







THESTA. PRT T. OE FL THURSDAY. SEPT. 25. 199 OAf


* ~ I


Rites Held for Wi


Willie V. Sealey, 83, of St. Joe
Beach, passed away September
19 at Bay Medical Center follow-
ing a long illness. She had been a
resident of Gulf County since
1923 arid was employed with the
Gulf County School System.
She, was preceded in death by
her husband, James W. Sealey.
Sr. She is survived by two sons,
James W. Sealey Jr. of Port St.
Joe and John A. Sealey of Blount-
stown; three daughters, Selma
Shoemaker and Dot Creamer,
both of St. Joe Beach, and Sara
Landry of Morgan City,. Louisia-
na; 13 grandchildren; 12 great
grandchildren; and numerous
niedes and nephews.
SFuneral services were held
Friday, September 22 at the First
United Methodist Church with
Ry. Zedoc Baxter officiating. Bu-
ria was held in the family plot at
Jehu Cemetery in Wewahitchka.
; Arrangements- were by Gil-
more Funeral Home. O

Christina M. O'Keefe
Christina Marie O'Keefe,. 76,
of Pine Street, Mexico Beach, died
early Sunday morning after a
long illness. She had been a resi-
* dent of Mexico Beach for the past
five years and was a retired tele-
phone operator.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Thomas O'Keefe of Mexico.
Beach.
A funeral mass was held at.
St 'Joseph's Catholic Church .of
Port St. Joe with Father Thorn
Crindall officiating. Burial .16fol-
lowed in the Garden of Memories
Mausoleum in Panama City.
.. Gilmore Funeral Home was in
chprge of arrangements.

Gladys Boyer
Gladys Lawson Boyer, .82,
died Wednesday morning in ; the
Mary Ella Villa Retirement Cen-.
ter. She was a former resident of
Bryants Landing in Gulf County..
S- .She is survived tby three sons,
Thomas D. Bartee of Watertown.
Wisconsin, Charles L. Boyer of.
Pensacola Beach and George E.
Boyer of Bryants Landing; and
nine grandchildren.
FunTeral services were held
Saturday at the First Presbyteri-
ahn Church of Port St. Joe with
Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden officiat-
ink. Burial followed in the family
plot in Jehu Cemetery of Wewa-
hitchka.
Gilmore Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.

* |IIinie Jenm thver
Bennie Jean Tolliver, 51, of
Apalachicola, passed away Sep-.
tember 19 at TallahasseeMemOri-
al Hospital after a long illness.
She was a lifelong resident of Port.
St. Joe and had been a resident
of Apalachicola for the past eight
years.
She is survived by her hus-
band. Arnold Tolliver of Apalachi-
cola; three sons, Greg Van Grego.-
ry. Freddie Woullard dr., arind
Terrance B. Woullard, all of Port
St. Joe; five daughterss, Sharon
McNeal, Marty Fay Gregory, Caro-


Channming Lei Osborne
Chan Is Two!
Channing Lei Osborne cele-
brated his second birthday on
September 19th with a Circus
Clown party. He was joined by his
family and friends. Chan is the
son of Kimberly Osborne and
Curtis Beard. His grandparents
are Charles and Ometa Osborne,
and Dorothy Peterson of Port St.
Joe, and Roosevelt Beard of Oca-
Sla. '


M Gulf Pines Medical Clinic
S10220th Street

i i-A Announces the Arrival of the
;:J 1989 FLU VACCINE
FREE FLU SHOT with your next office visit to the
first 20 who call. Call for an appointment today.
Nancy J. Morgan, M.D. 229-8979
22 87


Monday




" ::Ready to ser
Debbie Butler,
Call for appo



ACTIVE

SBEAU


, October 2 at Our New Locatio .

404 Long Avenue
Across From the Health Department
ve you 6 days a week.
Brenda Mathes, Sonja Linton, and Laura Taylor.
ointment
227-1155

VE STYLES 10.%off

TY SALON Any Service



404 Long Ave.
. Phone 227-1155
DEBBIE BUTLER


EMS Personnel Are Constantly Training


illie V. Sealey
lyn Gregory, Candye Woullard, all
of Port St. Joe, and Debra McNeal
bf Apalachicola; and 12 grand-
children.
"Funeral services were held
Saturday at St. Patrick's Catholic
Church in Apalachicola with Fa-
ther Peter Wood officiating. Burial
was in the family plot at Forest
Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe.
Arrangements were by Gil-
more Funeral Home.

Virgie M. Atwell
Virgie M. Atvell, 67, of St. Joe
Beach, passed away Saturday
morning in Gulf Pines Hospital
following an extended illness. She
was a native of Blountstown and
had been a lifelong resident of
Gulf County. She worked as a ]-,
censed practical nurse for a num-
bet of years at the Municipal Hos-
pital.
Survivors include two sisters,
Marguerite Tootle of Port St. Joe
and Sadie A. Chandler of De-
cherd, Tennessee; and one broth-
er, David C. Arnette, Jr., Besse-
mer, Alabama.
Funeral services were' held
Tuesday at the First Baptist
Church, conducted by the Rev.
Howard Browning. Interment fol-
lowed In the family plot at Green-
wood Cemetery.
All services were under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home.



It's A Boy!
Randy and Debra Johnson
are the proud parents of a baby
boy. Justin Randall, born Sep-
tember 24 at Gulf Coast Commu-
nity Hospital. He weighed 7-
pourids, 10-ounces.
The proud grandparents are
Doss and Jobnie Kelly of .High-
land View and Rob and Kathleen
Johnson of Eufaula, Alabama.


Just as those physicians who
had to rotate duty in emergency
rooms throughout the country re-
alized, Emergency Medical Servic-
es realized emergencies were not
specific to one entity. From trau-
ma and heart attacks, to drown-
ings and delivering babies, the
persons working in the field to
answer emergency calls on an
ambulance needed training as di-
versified as the emergencies
themselves. Colleges began un-
dertaking the tasks of setting up
training programs to meet the
>needs of all emergencies. Natural-
,lyi, as research and progress im-
proved, the training became more
intense and diversified. Each year
as more research .data is .pro-
cessed, regulation restrictions are
tightened and new laws are
passed .to upgrade services and
standards for emergency care.
More restrictions, laws, and high-
-er standards means more ad-
vanced training. Socio-economic
changes have brought about the
need for still more advanced and
diversified knowledge for those in
the field.
The early days of EMS dealt
with heart 'attacks, diabetics,
auto accidents, and an occasional
industrial accident. Now, as with
wars of the past, new skills and
new treatments must be learned.
Another war is being fought, this
time it is in ,our hometowns and
on our city streets. Now also, un-
like the military medic predeces-
sors who learned to survive first,
then treat, self defense must be
learned. The Drug War has
brought new emergencies and
also unlike our military medics,
we were not all prepared for cat-
astrophic violence and mass cas-
ualty situations. All were not to-
tally unprepared for the types of
emergencies this culture" has
created. Now, the bizarre behav-
ior of druggies is seen who are ,io
longer satisfied with alcohol and

Square Dancing
The time is here to begin
learning how to square dance. If
you don't know how and would
like to join in the fun, call Buck
Garrett at, 227-1280 or Buford
Griffin at 229-6694 for more in-
formiation.


SWe Are Taking
0-
S. TREMENDOUS REDUCTIONS
__ On Many Items In Our Huge Inventory

*8621-23by Frankline- Loreloi/Sandi- E DMI
Sofa/Loveseat.. was $s999.95s NOW 795.95 -
#608 by Frankline Wallstreet Sail #486 by Florida Furniture
SSectional ...........9..wus. NOW 899.95 Db.Dresser, 4 Drawer,Chest, Night
#5851-53 by Frtankline South Hampton P Stand, King
Sofa/Loveseat...wa 1199.9s5 NOW 9 .95 sHeadboard.......was $999.9 NOW 799.95
Rattan, Sunset/Copen #4250 by Broyhill Ocean Reef
ueen Sleeper, Chair, Tri-Dresser, 5 Drawer Chest,
Tables.........was 1879.95NOW 14 95 Night Stant, Queen..
#8461 by Frankfine Palace/Woodhue Headboard p.was s, 2 NOW 949.95
Sofa.......was399.95 Now 299.95 #4461 by Broyhill Washed Pine
-. Tri-Dresser, Chest on Chest,
SR MNight Stand, Queen Windsor
B ed wasl9 No Ow 1499.95
#821-Rachiin Almond & Brass 36", x60 2B Bed wr ss a NW 1499.95
5 Pc..Dinette Just 299.95 #4285 by Broyhill Oak .
Tri-Door Dresser with Tri-Fold, Mir-
#960-18- Davis, MNaple 42" round, 1- 18" Leaf 0TrDoorchest, Night Stand, Panel
5 Pc. Dinette......was $489.95 N OW399 Headboard. was 399.9 Now 299.95
#5580.- -Broyhill Table, One Arm Chair, 5 Side .
Chairi China Cabinet .. ..___r_________
8Pc.hOak SetN....NOW ONLY1399.95
Pearl -36" x 48" Set [#80R80G Collar Beech
5 Dinnette..............ONLY 169.95 3 Pc. Set of Tables.........ONLY 299.95
N E E D4 Sets of Rachlin (1 coffee & 2 ends per set)
Rattan Tables.. was $519.95N0W399.95
We do not have them often our everyday Broyhill Oak, 56" wide x 50" high
prices often compare with other's sale pric- Entertainment
es so when we do have a sale you can W Center................. Was Wao NOW 449.95
count on legitimate mark down prices.
One Stop Service for:
Floors Walls Windows -
Furniture & Accessories

205 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe



"00.# .


sonnel who must treat them; In
EMS, training can never take a


Catch the S t
SINHE UNITED METHOPISTCHURCH


vacation for lives are at stake -
Yours and Ours!


Constitution andf Mlonument
!Part St. Yoe


marijuana, 'but mix them with co-
caine, angel dust, peyote, and
mushrooms. They become crazed
maniacs and sometimes killers.
And sometimes they die. The
Drug Wars have armed local
gangs with Uzi's and other mili-
tary weapons. Some EMS services
in the larger cities have organized
and trained their own SWAT
teams to. protect themselves as
they must treat the wounded.
Street names for drugs have had
to be learned, what they look like,
how they smell, in order to know
how to treat the patients that be-
come victims with their use. The
effects on their bodies and minds
must be learned. A keen sense of
smell, a sharp eye and quick re-
flexes have had to 'be developed.
S' elf defense has had. to be
Learned in order to protect our-
selves, and train regularly for
mass casualty situations.
Though the aveiager'r person
thinks the big action is, in cities
like Detroit, Los Angeles, Chicago
and Miami, EMS personnel know
different. Those in EMS read
carefully the accounts of a McDo-
nald's in a small town in Califor-
nia, the name of which few people
remember, or Palm Bay. Now pa-
tients have to be checked for
weapons lest they use them
against the ones who are there
only to. help. This war, like the
others have taught many things.
Though it is not a military battle-
field, survival has had to be
learned first, for without EMS,
the patients have less chances for
recovery.
Another entity that must be
trained for deals with nuclear
waste and other hazardous mate-
rials. All are transported in vehi-
cles; trucks which overturn on in-
terstate highways or Jackknife
because an inattentive driver
moves into its path or stops
abruptly in front of it, and of
course the trains which have
been known to derail. With all
these come injuries and EMS per-

The Place for All Your
Printing Needs
The Star
k.


REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor


Cape Cafe


Sunday 9-5
Tues.- Thur. 9-8,


TONY CHUNN, Youth/Choir Director


Located 1/4 mile be-
fore the St. Joseph
State Park on Cape
San Bias. Give us a
call at
229-8688


Monday Closed
Fri. & Sat. 9-9


CAPE CAPE DINNER SPECIALS


Thursday 9/28............ Spaghetti & Meatballs
Friday 9/29.........................Shellfish Steampot
Saturday 9/30 ...........G......nocchi & Meatballs
Sunday 10/1 .................. Jumbo Fried Shrimp
Monday 10/2 ...........,..................... CLOSED
Tuesday 10/3 ..... Fettucini Alfredo w/Scallops
Wednesday 10/4.............. Ravioli & Meatballs
All Dinners Are Served With A Tossed Green Salad
and Out Fresh Made Garlic Bread.

Also Featuring Our Stone Baked Pizza and
"Waldo's Famous" Calzone.

Eat in or take out. Come see why everyone
is talking.
niniiiitiiiii un nu[ munnunnummiiunii unii i nii m ni m niniiiiiiiiii uiuiinii nininii i i nnii


I PAGE 5A


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School.............. 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship ...7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship......... 11:00a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............. 9:30 a.m.
Fellowship 5:30 p.m. Thursday................7:30 p.m.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOB, FL a THURSDAY. SEPT. 28, 1989


PAGEM SA


I








THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 28, 1989


Host Sneads Friday Night


Gators Lose District Game


The Wewahitchka Gators had
the Greensboro Bulldogs on
friendly turf last Friday night, but
*still couldn't get their offense un-
corked enough to overcome a
strong Greensboro offensive ef-
fort.
Greensboro put together two
touchdowns in the second quar-
ter and one in the third, to edge
the Gators in a 19-7 game.
It was a critical game for both
teams, as the Gators have been
two-time winners in their 1-A dis-
trict and Greensboro has been a
perennial powerhouse in the Pan-
handle for the past several years.
It was an early district position
game for both teams.
The Gators lone score came
on a one-yard plunge by quarter-
back Mike Sewell in the final pe-
riod of the game.
The scrambling Gator quar-
terback also led his team on the
ground with 72 of the Gators'
115 rushing yards. He also
passed twice to Michael Myers for
47 yards through the air.
Defensively, Myers picked off
two pass interceptions for the Ga-
tors and Solomon Fisher snagged


one. Denny McGlon picked up a
Greensboro fumble and returned
it 60 yards before he was caught
from behind. McGlon also
blocked a Greensboro punt.
The Bulldogs scored in the
second period on a 10 yard run
by Curtis Crittenden, but had the
extra point attempt blocked, by
Denny McGlon of the Gators.


Crittenden also scored on a seven
yard run in the second quarter,
but the two point conversion at-
tempt failed to add more points
on the board. Crittenden scored
again for Greensboro in the third
period on a 27 yard scamper.
This time. J.R. Hostetter kicked
the lone extra point for the visi-
tors.


Jose Cheka continued his ac-
curate kicking, by kicking the
Gators' only attempt at an extra
point.
Friday night, the Gators will
be seeking revenge for their loss
of Friday night, when they host
the Sneads Pirates in Gator stadi-
um. Game time will be 7:30 p.m.,
cst.


Florida's three-phase dove
season is set to open. The first
phase opens October 7 and closes
October 29. The second phase
will run November 11-26 and the
final phase December 9 through
January 7.
During the first phase, hunt-
ers can shoot from 12 noon until
sunset. During the second and
third phases, hunting is allowed
from one-half hour before sunrise
until sunset.
The daily bag limit is 12
mourning doves.
One of the most commonly
asked questions by hunters con-
tacting Game and Fresh Water


One of nature's more beauti-
ful sights is a newborn white-
tailed deer fawn in its native hab-
itat. But some people want to
take young deer home to make
pets of them and that can lead to
problems.
First of all, it is illegal to re-
move a fawn deer from the wild.
Anyone doing so faces a second
degree misdemeanor charge by
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission wildlife officers and con-


Fish Commission offices is what
can be done to attract doves with-
out violating baiting laws. ,
Major Ron Walsingham, the
GFWFC's regional law enforce-
ment commander said, "Hunters
can shoot in areas where normal
agricultural practices are used.
'This does not mean however
that once a field is harvested that
grain that grew there can be re-
turned to the field or any other
type of grain placed there to at-
tract birds."
Walsingham said anyone with
questions about dove hunting
can contact the GFC's regional of-
fice at (904) 265-3678.


Gator Eggs to be Hatched on Farms


What happens if a nuisance
alligator, removed because it was
a threat to humans, was a female
with a nest full of eggs?
The Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission has implement-
ed a pilot program that allows
nuisance alligator trappers to de-
liver orphaned eggs to licensed al-
ligator farmers to rear.
According to Dennis David,
coordinator of the Commission's
alligator management program,
the eggs could hatch on their
own, but they probably would fall
victim to raccoons or other preda-
tors first.
"Female alligators don't sit on
their nests to hatch their young
like birds do," David said. "In-
stead they guard their nests from
predators and help the young
move into the water after hatch-
ing. Even if predators do not de-
stroy the eggs, hatchlings usually
need their mother's assistance to
make it out of nests and into the
water."
Female alligators build nests
of decaying vegetation. They are
usually 3 to 4 feet in diameter.
They deposit an average of 40
eggs, which incubate within the
nest for 60 to 65 days.
David said nesting females
are not necessarily more likely to
be nuisances.
'They usually build nests in
secluded areas and are not likely
to attack unless they sense a
threat to their nests," he said.
"Occasionally, a female will build
a nest near an area of human ac-
tivity, and it may become a prob-
lem."
If a nuisance trapper removes
an alligator that turns out to be a
nesting female, he must receive
authorization from the Commis-
sion before transferring the eggs
to a licensed gator farm.
The Commission established
its nuisance alligator program in


Public Notice

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Board of County Commission of Gulf
County will receive sealed bids from any person,
company, or corporation Interested In selling the
County the following described personal property:
One (1) self-contained cubed ice maker (to be
delivered as soon as possible) as follows:
Ice Production: 400 pounds per 24
hours
Storage Capacity: approximately
100% of the Ice production per 24
hours
Condensing Unit: air-cooled
Cabinet Finish: please specify
FOB: Gulf County Road Department, Wewa-
hitchka. Florida 32465
Delivery Date must be specified.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliver unit
on specified date will be set at $25.00 per day.
Please indicate on envelope that this is a
Sealed Bid, and the Item the bid is for.
Bids will be received until 9:00 o'clock, A.M.
Eastern Standard Time, October 10, 1989, at the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
. County Courthouse. 1000 Fifth Street, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456.
The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Douglas C. Birmingham
Publish: September 28 and October 5, 1989.


1978 to deal with alligators that
pose a threat to humans, pets or
livestock. The agency contracts
vwiith 50 independent trappers to
remove alligators when the rep-
tiles become dangerous. In an av-
erage year, trappers remove more
than 3,000 nuisance alligators
statewide.
'The trappers pay an extra
$50 for the right to remove eggs
from the nests of female alligators
that have been removed as nui-
sances," David said. "Any li-
censed alligator farm wishing to
participate pays a $2.50-per-egg
fee to the Commission and nego-
tiates its own per-egg price with
the trappers."


fiscation 3f the deer.
Officers typically try to relo-
cate the fawn back to the are
where it was taken if possible.
But ordinarily too much time has
elapsed and the young deer has
to be placed in the care of a spe-
cially-licensed wildlife caretaker.
More often than not the young
deer dies.
In years past, the GFWFC
had a lenient policy toward peo-*'
ple who wanted to keep a deer as
a pet. Permits for personal pos-
session were routinely issued but
this caused problems said Lt.
Stan Kirkland, the GFWFC's Pub-
lic Information Specialist in
Northwest Florida."
He said, "The permits were
tacitly encouraging the removal of


fawn deer from the wild and also
deer that survived could cause
real problems."
Kirkland said a cute three-to-
four pound fawn within a year
can grow to a hundred-pound
wandering menace, jumping fenc-
es, grazing in neighboring gar-
dens and becoming an easy tar-
get for packs of area dogs.
"As they grow they lose their
* cuddly appeal and people start
looking for places to put them but
sanctuaries that can handle the
animals are usually few and far
between," Kirkland said.
'The best policy is to leave
wild animals, particularly deer,
where you find them," he said.
"They'll be a lot better off in the
long run."


Duck and Coot Dates

to be Set by FG&FWFC


The Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission will con-
sider proposed dates for the
1989-90 duck and coot season.
when it meets in Destini Septem-
ber 29.
The federal guidelines within
which hunting dates may be es-
tablished are November 22 26
and December 14 January 7.
Proposed shooting hours are one-
half hour before sunrise to sun-
set.
The Commission also will dis-
cuss proposed major rule chang-
es for the 1990-91 hunting and
fishing seasons. The proposed.


changes will be made available
for public review and comment.
Preceding the meeting will be
a workshop on Thursday, Sep-
tember 28. The 1:30 p.m. CDT
workshop will include time for the
public to speak about issues be-
ing considered by the Commis-
sion.
The Commission meeting will
begin at 9 a.m. CDT Friday. both
the workshop and the Commis-
sion meeting will take place at the
Holiday Inn, U.S. Highway 98
East, Destin.
The meetings are open to the
public.


* Heating & Air

* Major
Appliance
Repair


Plumbing & Electrical Work
.,229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle
raIm6. P43L NRAR004337


N.W. FLORIDA TEL-COM, Inc.


P. 0. Box 934
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Bus. Ph.: 904/648-8343
Monday Friday 8-12 and 1
Office hours E.S.T.


Residential & Business Telephones
Sales, Installation, Maintenance
Pre-Wiring & Leasing

Free Estimates 1-800-338-7420







DEALER




FANTASTIC



FALL SALE



19" Color TV/Monitor enot

Cut $11195


28800 b,.
Reg. $39995
Radio Shack TC-1010. Now 28% i
Off0 UL Listed AC. Remote requires
2 "AAA" batteries. #16-260
Screen diagonally measured.
Simulated reception



Full-Range Stereo Headphones

25% OFF Reg.$3995
Unique Electro-Accoustical Design
Big 2" Dynamic Elements
Realistic LV-10. Save $10 & enjoy superb 95
stereo with these studio-quality dynamic -i 9
headphones. Response: 20-20,000 Hz.Ten ft. coiled cord with
1/4" plug. #33-1004.


THE BEST CHECKING

ACCOUNT PACKAGES


BASIC CHECKING
* FREE When You Maintain A $100 Minimum Balance
* Interest On Balances Above $100
* FREE Travelers Checks
* FREE Check Safe Keeping
* No Per Check Charge
* FREE Notary Service
* $7.00 A Month If Balance Falls Below $100

ULTIMATE CHECKING
* No Minimum Balance Requirement
* Interest On Balances Above $100
* FREE-Personalized Checks
* FREE-Photocopies
" FREE Travelers Checks
. FREE Check Safe Keeping
* No Per Check Charge
* Free Notary Service
* All For Only $6 A Month













CITIZENS FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
401 5th Street Phone 227-1416
* Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
,.ia.. r 58 4th Street Phone 653-9828
" ./ 1 Apalachicola, Florida 32320

S' Highway 71 Phone 639-2111
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465


Fawns Are Cute, But They're


Illegal to Remove From Wild


Dove Season's 1st Phase

Set to Open October 7


PAGE GA


PAGE 6A


I


6








THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 28, 1989 PAGE 7A


A PRAYER
St. Jude's Novena
May the Sacred Heart of Je-
sus be adored, glorified,
loved and preserved through-
out the world now and forev-
er.
Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray
for us.
St. Jude, worker of miracles,
pray for us.
St. Jude, helper of the help-
less, pray for us.

Say this prayer nine times a
day, on the eighth day your
prayers will be answered. It
has never been known to fail.
Publication must be prom-
ised.
Thank you, St. Jude.
M.S.A.
HP


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Florida Church Phone 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY MONDAY FRIDAY
10:00 A.M. Sunday School, 2 years & Adult 12:30 P.M. Intercessory Prayer


11:00 A.M. Morning Worship & Childrens Church
4:00 P.M. Youth Senrice
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship


WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study & Fellowship


"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune in Every Sunday at 1:00 p.m.
Sponsor of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade


CROSS COUNTRY TEAM: Kneeling, from left, Jason White, Norton Arrant, Brad Buzzett, Lee Duren
and Jeff Little. Standing, from left: Coach Scott Gowan, Michael Whitfield, Tom Moore, Dontae Quinn,
Scott Boykin and manager Chad Arrant. Not pictured is Collins Hamilton.


Saunders Chiropractic Center
122 Market Street Apalachicola, Florida
653-2237

Completely equipped clinic with x-ray
and physiotherapy facility.
Assignment accepted on Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross/Blue Shield (PPC),
Workmen's Comp., Auto Accidents, and Private Insurance.
1C6 029/89




We Now Have Frozen Yogurt

Steamed or

Raw!
The World's Finest
Oysters
Clams

ShrimpA
Crabs

SEnjoy the best from St. Joseph Bay
and Indian Lagoon with us.
Open Tuesday thru Sunday

INDIAN PASS


RAW BAR
(ON C-30 South of Poit St. Joe)
11 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111 W W 'Y IIIIII-luli iIIIIII ilil i-lilMl l iIIIIII


Henderson's Restaurant
309 Monument Avenue Phone 227-722

Good *Cookin'
Open Every Day. Monday Sunday ,
Open 7 days a week 5a.m.- 10 p.m.
PRODUCE SEAFOOD OYSTER BAR i


Breakfast Served from 5:00 to 9:30 a.m.


Serving Hot Biscuits, Hash Browns, Sausage, Bacon,
Hot Cakes, Sausage Gravy, Tomato Gravy


-Star photo

Cross Country Track

Team In Area Meet


Saturday, September 16, the
cross country team traveled to
Pace where they competed in the
12th annual S.S. Dixon Invita-
tional Cross Country Meet.
One hundred-twelve runners
from 17 schools competed in the
3-mile race. Class 4A power Nice-
ville captured first place with a
team score of 42. The remaining
top five spots were: second place -
Pensacola Washington 72, third
place Pensacola Tate 98, fourth
place Fort Walton 102, and fifth
place Pine Forest 196.
Chris Wilson of Niceville took
first place honors with a time of
15:24. Wilson is one of the top
distance runners in the nation,
and he is favored to win the Class
4A State Cross Country title.
Port St. Joe finished seventh
among the 17 teams that partici-
pated in the meet, and first
against Class 2A schools. The top
five runners combined for a team
score of 244.
This was a strong perfor-
mance for the team considering
that seven df the 10 runners were
running in the first ever cross
country meet. The top five finish-
ers were: Collins Hamilton (34th)
18:35, Scott Boykin (36th) 18:42,
7 Dontae Quinn (41st) 18:50, Tom
Moore (58th) 19:55, and Michael
Whitfield (75th) 20:20.
The next meet for the Sharks
will be on October 1. They will
travel to Tallahassee, and com-
pete in the F.S.U. Invitational.
Below are the results of the
meet:
1 Niceville 42
2 Washington 72
3 Tate 98
4 Fort Walton 102
5 Pine Forest 196


6 Pace 213
*7 Port St. Joe 244
#34 Collins Hamilton 18:35
#36 Scott Boykin 18:42
#41 Dontae Quinn 18:50
#58 Tom Moore 19:55
#75 Michael Whitfield 20:20
#85 Norton Arrant 21:23
Brad Buzzett 22:38
Lee Duren 23:48
Jeff Little 27:18
8 Marianna 257
9 Pensacola 303
10 Pensacola Christian 304
11 Escambia 315
12 Gulf Breeze 325
13 Woodham 346
14 Jay 372
15 Rutherford 402
16 Bay 470
17 Mosley Incomplete

Checking Cars
The Florida Highway Patrol
will be conducting Driver License
and Vehicle Inspection Check-
points during the week of Sep-
tember 29 through October 5 on
SR-22, SR-71, SR-30 and CR-386
in Gulf County.
Recognizing the danger pre-
sented to the public by defective
vehicle equipment, troopers will
concentrate their efforts on vehi-
cles being operated with defects
such as bad brakes, worn tires
and defective lighting equipment.
In addition, attention will be di-
rected to drivers who would vio-
late the driver license laws of
Florida.
:The patrol has found these
checkpoints to be an effective
means of enforcing the equipment
and driver license laws of Florida
while insuring the protection of
all motorists.


HIGHLAND VIEW
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner Fourth St. & Parker Ave.
"Where Christian Love Is Shown"
SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 A.M.
SUNDAY EVENING SONG SERVICE & BIBLE STUDY .......................... 6:00 P.M.
THURSDAY BIBLE STUDY (Pine St. Overstreet).................. 2:30 P.M. & 7:30 P.M.
WILBUR L REMAIN, Pastor KARESSA H. HEYER, Asst. Pastor
648-8144 TFP 7/13/89-7/27/90





QUICK CHANGE ARTIST.




















THE NE QUICK SLCCESS'PROGRA.I

1-800-432-2712


PORT ST. JOE
GULF PINES HOSPITAL
20TH ST.
*5:30 PM THUR.
('A NEW TIME)


'4
'4
'4
'4
'4
'4
'4
'4
'4
4



4
4

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4


1


- w


26









* THURSDAY, SEPT. 28, 1989


STOP LOOK READ
BEFORE YOU TAKE


Down Taylor Co. Bulldogs 16-7



Shark Defense Muzzles the 'Dogs


S Even the mildest of medicines can be harmful if
improperly taken. And, some of today's wonderful new
drugs, prescribed for a particular condition, can be
dangerous if taken by the wrong person.
Each prescription is carefully typed to specify the exact
directions. Never take medicine in the dark or before
reading the label. Follow directions exactly and as carefully
as pharmacists obey a doctor's specifications. a
- YOU OR YOUR DOCTOR CAN PHONE US when you
need a delivery. We will deliver promptly without extra
charge. A great many people rely on us for their health
needs. We welcome requests for delivery service and
charge accounts.


Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe
Convenient Drive-Through Window "-

Revlon Cosmetics 229-8711 A
:yij:MM~~'9i1iMiN~~nri


The Sharks brightened up an
extremely nasty night in Perry
last Friday night at least it
was bright for the Sharks. In
spite of losing the ball three times
on five fumbles and having two
passes intercepted on a sloppy,
rain-soaked field, the Sharks still
put together a 16-7 win over the
3-A Taylor County Bulldogs. The
win vaulted the Sharks up anoth-
er notch in the 2-A standings,
state-wide. The Sharks are now
ranked number five.
Throwing a wet ball, which
was regularly slipping through
the hands of Shark receivers, the
Sharks couldn't depend on what
has been a potent air attack this
year.
That was only a minor prob-
lem, though, since the Sharks
showed their best ground game of
the season Friday night. Their
pass threat helped it out.
After throwing two passes
which squirted through the
hands of his receivers, quarter-


game. Brian Barfield kicked the
extra point, making the score 9-7
at half time.
In spite of Shinholser's score,
the Bulldogs failed to make a sin-
gle first down in the first half. It
was the final quarter before the
Bulldogs chalked up a first down,
and they had only four during
the entire game.
The Sharks put their final
scoring drive together in the final
period, when a long punt return
by Eric Langston, put the Sharks
on the Bulldog 23 with a first
down.
Nicholas Rolack ripped off
seven yards and Willie Smith
scrambled for 12, putting the ball
on the four yard line. It took
three more plunges at the line by
Willie Smith before he finally
plunged over with the game's fi-
nal TD. Bobby Williams kicked
his second extra point of the
night giving the Sharks a 16-7
victory.
OFFENSIVE LEADERS


Martin had seven tackles and
Matt Taylor had six. Tyrone Ham-
ilton, Roy Campbell, Desmond
Quinn and Calvin Pryor each had
four tackles.
Ken Monette intercepted two
Taylor Co. passes and Eric Lang-
ston and Terry Quinn each inter-
cepted one.
FRIDAY NIGHT
Friday night, the Sharks take
their squad to Panama City to
meet the Rutherford Rams at
Tommy Oliver Stadium. The


game begins at
St. Joe time.

First downs
Rushes yd.
Passing yd.
Passes
Punts avg.
Fumbles lost
Penalties yd.


8:30 p.m., Port


Perry
4
14-20
59
8-20-4
6-30
0-0
9-85


PSJ
13
41-257
51
8-21-2
3-33
5-3
5-40


Taylor Co. 0 7 0 0- 7
Port St. Joe 7 2 0 7-16


Players of
the Week

OFFENSIVE PLAYER
Offensive player of the week
against Taylor County is Russell
Cherry, who graded out at 84%.
He gained 55 yards rushing on
five carries.
DEFENSIVE PLAYER
Ken Monette was named de-
fensive player of the week, grad-
ing out at 85%. He had two inter-
ceptions for the evening.


V.F.W. Lists
Meeting Place

The Star ran an article from
Post #10069 V.F.W. about their
meeting on September 12. The ar-
ticle failed to mention that the
Post is located at 115 5th Ave-
nue, Highland View across from
Wood Fisheries.
All veterans are welcome to
join the post. The next meeting
will be announced in The Star,
so watch for details.


Port St. Joe's defense proved a formidable force against 3A Tay-
lor County Friday evening. Shown above are Roy Campbell taking
out the Perry runner, Tyrone Hamilton (34) and Russell Cherry (44)
on the ground at left. St. Joe's defense has only had seven points
scored on them in three games.


Every time Perry tried to move the ball Friday evening, there was a host of Shark defenders to stop
the play. Taylor County did not make a first down until the second half of the game.


Terry Quinn tackles Perry's punter in the end zone for a
two-point safety.
ti^ n ifl iitnii<-nl w iln. i.-rt -ww-' . -fl -f*ifl


WE'VE



MOVED


NEXT DOOR

and changed our name


But we STILL offer the Best
Auto Service in Port St. Joe


* Self Service or
Full Service


* Auto Repair
* Tires, Tubes


Watch for Our
Grand Opening Next Week


B&L CHEVRON
113 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL

227-1690
-- -- -- 1


back Bill Ramsey started the
Sharks moving on a keeper
around the left side for 18 yards.
Willie Smith ripped off six, and
Terry Quinn broke loose for 40
yards and the Sharks were
threatening on the Taylor 15. A
Bulldog jumped early and the
Sharks were on the 10.
A pass to Ken Monette In the
left comer of the end zone was
good, but the ball was called
back on a Shark mis-cue. Ram-
sey tried his keeper play again
and rambled in from the 14 yard
line. for the first score of the
game. Bobby Williams kicked the
extra point and the Sharks were
in the lead with a 7-0 score.
Two minutes later, the Bull-
dogs nearly tied the score, when
the Sharks fumbled on the Taylor
one yard line. Ike Montgomery
scooped up the ball and took off
for the Shark goal line. Russell
Martin caught the speedy Mont-
gomery on the 50 yard line and
the Sharks shut them down
there.
Mid way through the second
period, the Bulldogs were backed
up on their own four yard line
and were in a punting situation.
The hard charging Shark line gt
to the punter and put him on the
ground in the end zone for a safe-
ty, making the score 9-0.
Those extra points looked
pretty good later in the period, as
Donnie Shinholser intercepted
one of two errant Shark passes 6f
the game, at the Bulldog 44 and
ran in, untouched, for the only
Taylor score or threat of the


Pacing the Sharks offensively
were Willie Smith with his 92
yards of rushing and a touch-
down. Russell Cherry had 55
yards on the ground in five car-
ries. Bill Ramsey added 49 yards
and a TD for the Sharks. Terry
Quinn rushed for 39 yards in five
carries and Nicholas Rolack
plunged for 28.
Ken Monette caught four
passes, good for 24 yards, Rus-
sell Martin hauled in three for 29
yards and Eric Langston had one
for one yard. Martin added 69
yards on three kick returns.
DEFENSIVE STANDOUTS
Defensively, the Sharks had
both Ernest Gant and Willie
Smith with eight tackles. Russell


Ken Monette returns an in-
tercepted Taylor County pass,
late in the game, to quench
Perry's last chance.


Check Our Stock!

Aimmo ale! .


SUPREME QUALITY. $5 itestripe
SU REE 3 7 Nova, Chevette and Geo, Ford Escort,
TIRE VALUES. Plymouth Horizon, Dodge Omni and
SUPREME STEEL Colt, Mercury Lynx, Pontiac 1000, Nissan Sentra E,
Mitsubishi, Isuzu, Toyota Corolla, and many more.
BElTED RADIAL.
$ 5 P205/70R14
Blackwall
4 8 Fits vehicles like Camaro Berlinetta,
Ford Taurus, T-Bird, Mustang, and
Mercury Sable and Cougar, Olds
Cutlass, Pontiac Firebird, Grand Prix, and Sunbird,
Mazda MPV, Nissan 280 ZX, and many more.
5 P225/75R15
SBlackwall
S49 Fits vehicles like Buick, Chevrolet,
4\ Oldsmobile, and Pontiac station
o010\ o^ wagons, Chevrolet vans and pickups,
Dodge B150 van, GMC vans and pickups, Ford E150 van,
Jeep Grand Wagoneer, Mitsubishi Montero, and many more.

$ 5 7 95 P205/70R14
White stripe
Fits vehicles like Buick Regal, Riviera,
-5 7 and Century, Cadillac Seville and
Eldorado, Chevrolet Monte Carlo,
Camaro, Ford Taurus, T-Bird, and Mustang, Mercury
Sable and Cougar, Olds Cutlass, Pontiac Grand Prix,
Sunbird SE, and many more.

S2White stripe
Fits vehicles like Buick, Chevrolet,
3 Olds, and Pontiac station wagons,
Cadillac, Chevrolet vans, GMC vans,
Jeep Grand Wagoneer, and many more.


HURRY Other Sizes
QUANTITIES LIMITED Priced To Go


SEIBERLING II"

EVERYDAY P p 1
LOW PRICE! P155/80R13
State-of-the-art. all-season tread.
Two steel-cord belts.
Polyester cord
radial body.
Sizes to fit
dozens of
domestic
and
imported
p C An cars.


'Special credit terms offered thru Amentrust
national credit card for Firestone customers -
your choice:
* No Payments Until February 1990 on tire, or
tire and service purchases thru September.
Interest Free until your October statement.
Finance charge of 22.2% begins to accrue in
October 1989. and a monthly minimum
payment of approximately 5% of the unpaid
balance is due beginning February 1990
* 90 Days Same as Cash. Minimum monthly
payment required Finance charges refunded
when paid as agreed
Normal Monthly Payments Ask for details at
participating retailers.
WE ALSO HONOR



VEXafififlfM I^ ifj^^


PATE'S

SERVICE CENTER
216 Monument Ph. 229-1291
Port St. Joe, FL


Y OURINDPNDN IRESTOEEAE


THE STAR,


PAGE


I


v v v v












County
The Gulf County Seni
'zens Association will be cc
ing Rock-a-thon II. This ev
be held on Saturday, Octol
the Port St. Joe Fire Depa


You can lose weight and still
not be hungry, Serena Hightower,
operator of the New Leaf Weight
Loss Clinic of Port St. Joe, told
Rotary Club members Thursday.
How do you do this strange
and wonderful thing? You couple
a reduced intake of certain foods
with a programmed intake of cer-
tain vitamins and food supple-
ments, the speaker said, pointing
out that the program prevented
that hungry feeling which almost
always accompanies ordinary diet


I The menus for the Gulf
County Schools have been select-
ed. Some days the menus may
change due to the availability of
some foods.
Monday, October 2 taco, let-
tuce, tomato, pinto beans, milk
and cake
Tuesday, October 3 pizza,
sliced peaches, green beans, milk
and cookie
Wednesday, October 4 -
cheeseburger,' lettuce, tomato,
pickle, French fries, milk and
cherry pie v
Thursday, October 5 hoagle
sandwich, lettuce, tomato, onion,
French fries, milk and cookie
Friday, October 6 batter
dipped fish, cole slaw, green
beans, cornbread, milk and tartar
sauce.

School Board
The regular School Board
meeting scheduled for October 3
scheduled for October 10 at 9:00
a.m.


The Phantry H(otef

and

Business Center


lor Citi-
onduct-
'ent will
ber 7 at
artment


building. The day will start out at
10:00 a.m. EDT with live enter-
tainment, radio coverage by
WJBU and fun and games for all
ages. The Senior Citizen Rock-a-


regimens.
Hightower said that her or-
ganization requires a doctor's ex-
amination before beginning their
program and is constantly under
a doctor's watchcare. The speak-
er said she was a paramedic,
which gives added medical super-
vision over the diet time frame.
During the weight loss peri-
od, the subject is weighed twice a
week for a nine week period. Vi-
tamins and mineral supplements
are given as needed to maintain
proper metabolism and fend off
the hungry feeling.
Ernie Eaves of Port St. Joe
and Wesley Owens of Milledge-
ville, Georgia were visitors of the
...c lu .b ,. .. .. ... .= .- ..


Dennis Harcus
Harcus Earns
Associate Degree
Dennis Kevin Harcus suc-
cessfully completed the require-
ments for an Associate Degree it
Funeral Service Management on
August 17 at Gupton-Jones Col-
lege of Atlanta, Georgia.
Harcus is a 1978 graduate of
Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Murdic Harcus of White City.
Currently, he is employed by
Lowndes and McLane Funeral
Home in Atlanta.


!! lip


We're Fixin' Up! Our Hotel
Rooms Are Being Renovated and We have
some new businesses) located here. WE'RE
WORKING HARD TO WIN YOUR TRUST!!

Come to See Us!


Wee Beginnings
(Open Sept. 1st)
New Leaf Weight
Loss Clinic


Sure Shot Pest
Control Company
Baskerville-Donovan
Engineers


302 Reid Avenue Phone 229-8723
Corner of Reid Avenue and Third Street
Port St. Joe


thon contestants will start their
contest.
The Senior Citizens will be
asking friends and neighbors for
pledges between September 15


For Women, Infants and Children

Weekly Clinics at Gulf H.D.


The Gulf County Florida Food
Program for Women, Infants, and
Children (WIC) will hold weekly
clinics to assist families with in-
fants and children under five
years of age and expecting moth-
ers.
The clinics are designed to
provide a variety of services in-
cluding'nutrition counseling, reg-
ular measurement' of children's
growth and weight gain, and
screening for anemia. In addition,
the clinics will provide WIC cou-


pons for such foods as milk,
cheese, eggs, iron-fortifled ce-
reals, juice, peanut butter, and
infant formula.
WIC services children and
pregnant women whose incomes
are no more than 185 percent of
the official poverty level $18,611
for a family of three.
Clinics will be held every 1st
and 3rd Tuesdays of the month,
and Wednesdays, 8:30 4:00, at
the Port',St. Joe Health Depart-
ment, 502 4th Street, Port St.


Joe. At the Wewa Health Depart-
ment, located at East Lake and
North 3rd Street, Wewahitchka,
clinics will be held from 8:00 -
4:00 on the 2nd and 4th Tues-
days of the month.
WIC services are free and all
Gulf County families who have.
expecting mothers, infants, or
children under five years old are
encouraged to contact the HRS
Gulf County WIC Program at
(904) 227-1276 for further infor-
mation.


.WHS Spirit Book Going on Sale


The 1989-90 WHS Spirit
Yearbook will go on sale October
9-13th. The cost of the yearbook
during this special sale week is
$15.00. Any yearbook purchased
after the 13th will be $20.00.
The WHS Yearbook Staff is
now selling Patron and WHS Spir-
it Supporter ads. The patron ads
are $10.00 to $24.00; the WHS


Spirit Supporter ads are $25.00
and up. Names only will be listed
in a special section of the year-
book, and recognized under their
headings.
A perfect gift for the graduat-
ing senior is a "Grad Ad". An ad
may be purchased alone or with a
group. The cost of the ads are:
1/8 page $20.00 + $5.00


with photo
1/4 page $30.00 + $5.00
with photo
1/2 page $50.00 + $5.00
with photo
1 page $100.00 + $5.00 with
photo
While publication costs of the
yearbook continues to rise, the
Yearbook Staff has struggled to
keep student purchase price at a
level affordable to all students.
This means additional revenue
must be generated by these types
of ads from parents and friends
who realize the importance of the
yearbook.
If you wish to purchase an
ad, contact Karen Collins, year-,
book advisor, at WHS 639-2229.
Your support is greatly appre-
ciatedll


and October 7. The funds raised
will be used to meet the CCE lo-
cal budget remaining to close out
the year of $1,400.00, The CCE
Program is provided to the senior
citizens 60 years or older who are
functionally or mentally impaired.
These services include the follow-
ing: Home Delivered Meals,
Homemaker Service, Respite
Care, Chore, Medical Transporta-
tion, Case Management.
Thank you to our sponsors
and all of the citizens of the tri-
city area for their continued sup-
port. Anyone wishing to make a
financiall pledge can mail it to the
following address:
Gulf County Senior Citizens
198 Peters Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Watch for more details in The
Star. Baked goods, barbecue
sandwiches, hot dogs, and chill.
Come on down and support the
rockers and have a ball.


(1


St. Joe
Communications, Inc.
Since 1924


Sr. Citizens Schedule Rock-A-Thon


*Complete Business
*Telecommunications
Systems
*Designed to Your
Specifications


* Facsimile Equipment
* 24 Hr. Service
* Installations


* Repair
* Telephone Equipment
* Dependable
Equipment, Systems
and Service


Terms Available -

227-7272
502 5th St. FL WATS 1-800-441-4406


BUDGET SUMMARY
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA FISCAL YEAR 1989-90
THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET
EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
ARE 8.0566% MORE THAN
-AST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT
FORWARD
ESTIMATED REVENUES:


General
Fund
$212,500,00


Taxes: ............................................... Millage
Ad Valorem Taxes............... 5.1562..........$1,024,074.00
Franchise Taxes ...................................................94,500.00
Utility Taxes ....................................................... 136,300.00
Occupational Taxes ...............................................7,300.00
Permits and Fees ................................................................ 7,500.00
State Revenue Sharing ....................................................244,750.00
Intergovernmental Revenue ..................................................3,000.00
Copy Services ...............................100.00
Garbage Fees.................................................................. 140,000.00
Cemetery Revenue .................................................................4,500.00
Lot Mowing/Trash Removal ................................................. 2,000.00
Animal Shelter ........................................................................ 750.00
Fines/Forfeitures ................................................................ 8,500.00
Miscellaneous Revenues ....................................................... 2,500.00
Earned Interest .................................................................. 35,000.00
Debt Service .................................................................................0.00
Rents and Royalties ............................................................1,000.00
Equipment Sales ................................................................. 5,000.00
Equipment Rental ................................................................ 6,500.00
Q qualifying Fees ......................................................................... 150.00
Water/Sewer Services ..................... ......................................... 0.00
Wastewater Treatment........................ ....................................

Total Revenues and -----
Other Financing Sources $1,723,424.00

Total Estimated Revenues
and Balances $1,935,924.00

EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES:
City Commission .11,045.00
City Auditor/Clerk 77,367.00
City Attorney 5,500.00
Municipal Building 75,425.00
Non-Departmental 125,850.00
Police Department 506,553.00
Fire Department 53,217.00
Building Inspector 7,700.00
Garbage/Trash Removal 355,512.00
Streets and Highways 256,010.00
Mosquito Control 6,000.00
Parks and Cemeteries 191,400.00
Recreation 85,925.00
Warehouse and Garbage 178,420.00
Water Department
Sewer Department
Water/Sewer Administration 4,000.00
Wastewater Treatment
Debt Service

Total Appropriated Expenditures $1,935,924.00


Oak Grove.
Water/Sewer


Water/Sewer
Fund
$35,000.00


Wastewater
Treatment
$1,950,600.00


$100,600.00


6,450.00

9,250.00


13,500.00
20,750.00


4,000.00
235,000.00
630,000.00


1,000.00


20,800.00


653,565.00


4,062,601.00

$36,500.00 $789,415.00 $4,931,701.00


$36,500.00


15,000.00
8,250.00
93,875.00


$824,415.00


279,630.00
346,160.00


$6,882,301.00


6,277,025.00
9,250.00 104,750.00 604,276.00

$36,500.00 $824,415.00 $6,882,301.00


The Tentative, Adopted, and/or Final Budgets are on File in the Office of the above mentioned Taxing Authority as a Public Record.


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 28. 1989 PAGE 1B

Are You Tired of All the Junk Around Your House?
Have A Garage Sale! Place Your Ad With Us.



electrical services
Call

Shorty 229-6798 _
26 Years Experience /
Licensed andBonded
Commercial Residential
Remodeling and Service Work
Reg.No.ER-004831
Charles Sowell -

Sur-Way Electric ,
CE U ,,.,.:


Rotarians Get Tips (Most Don't

Need Them) on Losing Weight











PAGE 2B THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 28, 1989
.***..**......................................................



NOTICE


TAX IMPACT OF PROPERTY APPRAISAL


ADJUSTMENT BOARD


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD


Nathan Peters, Jr., County Commissioner, Dist. 4

Donald B. Parker, County Commissioner, Dist. 5

David L. Byrd, School Board Member, Dist. 4

James L. Hanlon, School Board Member, Dist. 3


The Property Appraisal Adjustment Board meets each year to review complaints re-
garding property tax assessment and exemptions.

The purpose of the board is to enhance fairness in property taxes by correcting er-
rors when they are found to exist.'

THE FOLLOWING TABLE SUMMARIZES THIS YEAR'S ACTION BY THE BOARD

Column 1 Column 2 Column 3 Column 4 Column 5 Column 6
TYPE OF Number Total Number Total Number Reduction Loss
Exemption Number of Assessments of Requests In Taxable Tax
Requests Exemption Reduced by for Value Due Dollars
Granted by Requests the Board Assessment to Board
the Board Reductions Action.

Residential 1

Commercial

Industrial & Misc.

Agricultural 2

Business,
Machinery &
Equipment

Vacant Lots,
& Acreage


TOTALS 0 0 0 3 $-0- .$-0-

ALL TAXPAYERS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT BOARD ACTIONS WHICH RE-
DUCE TAXABLE VALUE CAUSE TAX RATES APPLICABLE TO ALL PROPERTY
TO BE PROPORTIONALLY HIGHER.
Questions concerning the actions taken by this Board may be addressed to the chairperson or clerk at the fol-
lowing telephone numbers:

CHAIRPERSON: Nathan Peters, Jr., at 229-6113
CLERK OF COURT: Benny C. Lister, at 229-6113
Pi sh:A epltember 28 and Oct=r 5, 1989.
..hunhff.hfh.hhhff...hn.hh..uuunuuhu.........nu.uunuuu..nuun..







Notice




of




Tax Increase









The City of Port St. Joe has tentatively


adopted a measure to increase its prop-


erty tax levy by 19.77%.



All concerned citizens are invited to at-


tend a public hearing on the tax increase


to be held on Tuesday, October 3, 1989


at 7:30 p.m., EST in the Municipal Build-


ing, 305 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Flori-


Tired of Weeds?



Try Some Mulch


It's Easier Than Bending Your

Back and Not Half As Messy


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
Most homeowners are looking
for ways of reducing maintenance
in their yards and gardens. The
use of a mulch around plants can
greatly reduce the time spent
mowing and weeding.
A mulch consists of any kind
of material applied to the soil sur-
face around plants to control
weeds, conserve moisture, and
moderate soil temperature. The
mulch material may be organic
such as compost, bark, leaves,
grass clippings or similar materi-
als; or inert such as gravel, peb-
bles or polyethylene film. Mulches
suppress weeds when the mulch
materials itself is weed-free and is
applied deeply enough to prevent
weed germination or smother ex-
isting small weeds. An occasional
weed may poke through the
mulch, but it can be easily pulled
out.
Mulch materials have many
beneficial effects upon the soil
and plants. They prevent loss of
water from the soil by evapora-
tion. Moisture moves by capillary
action to the surface and evapo-
rates if not covered by a mulch.
Mulching will prevent crusting of
the soil surface, thus improving
absorption and percolation of wa-
ter into the soil and at the same
time, eliminating erosion.
Maintenance of more uniform
,soil temperature can be obtained
. by mulching. The mulch acts as
an insulator that keeps the soil
cool under intense sunlight and
warm during cold spells.
Organic materials used as a
mulch can improve soil structure
and tilth. As it decays the materi-
al works down into the top soil.
Decaying mulch also adds nutri-
ents to the soil.
Mulches also add to the beau-
ty of the landscape by providing a
cover of uniform color and inter-
esting texture to an otherwise
drab surface. Dark colored
mulches widen the pupil of the
Seye, allowing more of the sensible
light from flowers to enter the
eye. Consequently, these dark
mulches give plantings a more at-
tractive appearance,
The time to apply a mulch to
most established" ornamental
plants is in the spring. When ap-
plying a mulch to newly set vege-
tables or ornamental plants, do
so after they are put into place
and thoroughly watered.
For best results, apply mulch
at least 2 to 4 inches deep over
the whole area; but avoid cover-
ing the crowns of low-growing or-
namental plants. Keeping the
layer deep enough to do the job is
important. This means that more
mulching materials should be
added to the older layers to get
the maximum benefits.
Many organic materials, such
as straw, wood chips, and saw-
dust are rich in carbohydrates
and low in nitrogen. Usually, you
will find it beneficial to add nitro-
gen fertilizer to the material be-
fore applying it as a mulch. One
to two cups of fertilizer high in ni-
trogen (ammonium nitrate, sodi-
um nitrate, or ammonium sul-
fate) for each bushel of organic
material will supply the needed
nitrogen.
When plastic film or alumi-
num foil is used as a mulch, it is
essential that fertilizer be applied
before placing the mulch material
on the soil. Broadcast and incor-
porate into the top 2 to 3 inches
of soil a complete fertilizer at the
rate of 2 pounds per 100 square
feet of garden area. The mulch


How? With the Allstate
Auto Advantage: a special way
to save up to 15% on car insur-
ance for having Allstate Home
Insurance and a great driving
record basically, a clean slate.
Call us today and ask if you quali-
fy. Let's see how low we can
drive your rates!
S3blS W b (, l.ulllbll*l *,, q 1*IM,.flt .**


Allstate
"Call us and compare"

GASKIN-GRADDY
Insurance Company
Call Collect
639-5077 or 639-2553
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465


material reduces the leaching of
fertilizer from the area where the
roots will develop, hence large
amounts of fertilizer are not re-
quired.
Mulching may be your most
valuable garden practice. A good
mulch will reduce the amount of


Roy Carter

cultivating, weeding and watering
and increase your chances of
growing a healthy and vigorous
plants.


S 4LLEMORE
REAL ESTATE
SINC. IMTI

Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478


Ellen F. Allemore, Broker
648-8939
Joy Holder 648-8493
Dot Craddock 648-5486
Brenda Lynn 648-8215

NEW LISTINGS:


BEACH FRONT TOWN HOMES
Mexico Beach, beachfront townhome, 2 bd., 2 11/
2 ba., fully furnished, $89,500.
35th St. Mexico Beach: Large 3 bd., 3 ba. fur-
nished, close to pier, very nice, Reduced to
$119,900.
Cortez St End Triplex at St. Joe Beach: Lg. 3
bd., 21/2 bea., covered eck, good layout, fireplaces,
$122,900-$129,000.
9813 Hwy. 98: Absolutely beautiful 3 bd., 2 1/2 ba.,
$159,900.
9815 Hwy. 96: Lovely 2 bd., 21/2 ba., furnished,
$120,000.
9821 Hwy. 98: beauitufully furnished 2 bd., 2 1/2
ba. townhome. Reduced $98,500.
Ward St.: WATERFRONT: half of duplex, 3 bd., 2
ba., furnished, f.p., NICEI Reduced $121,500.

GULF AIRE
Gulf Aire: Nice residential lot, $17,900.
Gulf Aire Drive: Multi or single family vacant lot,
sewer tap pd., Readyl $17,200.
321 Beacon Rd., Gulf Aire: New beautiful roomy 3
bd., 3 1/2 ba. brick home, Ig. garage & deck, many
amenities, double oven, etc. Reduced to $130,000.
211 Sea Pines Lane, Gulf Aire: 2 homes in 1, pro-
fessionally decorated upstairs with mother-in-law
suite downstairs. Total of 4 bd., 2 be. 2 kitchens, ja-
cuzzi, stone fireplace, built-in appliances, furn., Re-
duced to $116,000. Great financing.
Gulf Aire Drive: 2 triplexes -1 bd. w/loft each, total
of 6 units, furnished. $38,900 ea.
305 Gulf Aire Drive: Beautiful gulf view, 3 bd., 2
ba. brick home, dbl. garage. $115,000.
Gulf Aire Drive: Good single family vacant lot,
$17,900.
202 Periwinkle: Big 5 bd., 3 bea. home, screen
porch, master bd., bath & own living area upstairs,
$140,000.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Good corner single family lot, Re-
duced to $18,000.
Beacon Road: Nice single family lot, good neigh-
borhood. Reduced to $25,000.
Beacon Road: One large single family lot. $19,500.
309 Buccaneer Road: Beautiful wooded vacant lot
close to pool & tennis courts. $22,500.
Sea Pines & Beacon Rd.: Lovely 3 bd., 2 ba. fur-
nished brick home, Ig. garage. Reduced $105,000.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Duplex, 3 bd., 2 ba. ea. side, excel.
construction. $69,900 per unit.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Duplex, triplex or single family vacant
lot, $22,900.

INDIAN PASS
Cape San Bias, 100' on beach 1.66 acres vacant
property. Privacy. $159,900.

ST. JOE BEACH
Between Canal & Pine Streets. 2 bd., 1 ba. up-
stairs, 2 bd., 1 bea. downstairs, unobstructed gulf
view-$49,5001
Pineda St.. 4 lots in first block to beach, $20,000
ea.
Hwy. 98, between Pine & Canal Streets: Lot,
beautiful view, $30,000.
Comer of Pine, Alabama & Georgia streets. Tri-
angle, 3 lots, $28,000.
Comer of Georgia and Desoto, Vacant lot w/
septic tank, $12,500.
Columbus St., nicely furnished 3 bd., 2 be. mobile
home, 1 1/2 blocks to beach, $40,000.
St Joe Beach: 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba. townhome, unre-
stricted gulf view, furnished, nice. $69,900. Make of-
fer.
Comer Balboa & Georgia: Large 2 bd., 1 ba. mo-
bile home, well for yard, backyard fenced, very nice.
$40,000,
Americus St.: 3 bd., 2 bea., 1 block to beach,
$54,900.
Comer Santa Anna & U.S. Hwy. 98. 4 bd., 2 ba. or
possibly could be converted into 2 rental units.
$70,000.
Bay St.: Furnished for instant living, mobile home,
can be a permanent home or-retreat. Attractive spa-
cious 1488 sq. ft. includes 2 screen porches, deck,
liv. rm, kitchen w/dining-brealdast bar. 2 bdJ2 be.-
separate, paved street, high lot.
Hwy. 98 between Balboa & Magellan. Develop.
eral 3/4 of block plus 1 lot. Look to the future. Super
investment. $330,000.
Comer of Court & Alabama, St. Joe Beach: New
frame stilt home, 2 bd., 1 ba., livJdinJktchen com-
bo, nice deck, furnished, ch/a. Reduced to
$72,500..
St. Joseph Shores: Great buy for home across
street from beach. 2 bd, 1 1/2 ba. townhome, furn..
$48,500 or $194,000 for all 4.
DeSoto St.: Newly remodeled 1 bd., 1 be. house.
walk-in closets, ceiling fans, shed, 1/2 block to
beach. Partially furnished. Reduced to $40,000.
Make offer.
Selma St: Super .ll.ld:l= e wide furnished 3
bd., 2 be. trailer o0,, l iIth Ig. utility house.
Immaculate. Reduced to $39,900.
Comer of Balboa & U.S. 98 Gulf Pointe No. 1:
Beautifully fumished 2 bd., 2 1/2 bath condo, great
price, $79,900.
Coronado Townhomes: 2 bdrm., 1 1/2 be., dedi-
cated beach. Unobstructed view. All amenities. Fur-
nished $84,900; unfurnished $74,500.
3 lots Pineda St: 1st block Reduced to $46,500.
U.S. 98 between Cortez & DeSoto: 3 bd., 2 be.,
unobstructed Gulf view. Gas, can. h&a, great buy,
$62,000.
Balboa SL: Speakers, music system in lovely, com-
fortable 24'x60' double wide 3 bdrm., 2 be., modu-
lar home, screened 12x32 front porch, f.p. c/ha.
Watch the birds feed from glassed 12x22 Fla. rm.,
as no paint brush needed 150'x150', 1 1/2 blocks
from beach. Was $65,000, Reduced to $54,500.
Between Coronado & Balboa St: 50' lot on Hwy.
98. Reduced to $39,000.
PORT ST. JOE
1301 Constitution Dr.: Large & lovely 4 bd., 3 be.
brick home, exclusive neighborhood, sep. bdrm. &
bath upstairs. Ig. den w/1bq, excel, floor plan, many
amenities. $183,900.
1807 Marvin Ave.: 3 bd., 1 large be. brick home,
con. h&a, fenced backyard, until. rm., new roof, com-
fordable, $39,900.
Highland View, 203 2nd St.-3 lots, 3 bd., 1 ba.
frame home fixer/upper. $32,000.


Nancy Mock 227-1322
Flo Melton 229-8076
Charllne Hargraves 648-8921
John Maddox 648-8899
Margaret Carter 648-58Rd
Mary Jane Lindsey 229 ,iu69
Brenda Guilford 648-5435
Preston Wlnate 648-8565
Sandra Scott 648-5849
Bobbl Ann Seward 229-6908
Moira Ritch 648-5286
Highland View, 301 Hwy. 98. 3 bd., 2 be. frame .
home & a 2 bd., 1 ba. frame home w/trailer park,
commercial possibilities. $168,700.
102 Yaupon, if you are looking for a beautiful, ig. 3.
bd., 2 ba. rick home, den, screen porch, excel.
neighborhood, fence-many amenities. You must'
see this. Satellite dish. $77,900.
2012 Long Ave., Port St. Joe: New price, owner -
transferred. Was $85,900, now $79,500. Comforta-
ble 4 bedroom, 2 bath. family home on 2 lots w'
pool, fence, screen patio, new ch&a.
Port St. Joe, Oak Grove: Corner of Jackson & Du-
val, 2 lots, 3 bd, 2 ba. doublewide mobile home.
cen. h&a. partially fenced, $21,500.
2102 Cypress Ave. 3 bd., 1 1/2 ba. brick home,
cen h&a, fenced, good price, $59,900.
513 4th St: 2 bd., 1 ba., commercial zoned,,
75'x175' lot, nice yard, fenced, outside stor., neat
Reduced to $25,000.
2108 Cypress Ave.: 3 bd., 2 ba., brick & stucco
home, great rm., f.p., modern kitchen, outside stor.,
privacy fence, close to schools. 1 1/2 car garage,
NICEI $87,500.
202 16th St. 3 bd., .1 be. remodeled home with 1
bd., 1 be. apartment for income, $39,900.
504 16th SL: 3 bd., 2 ba. block construction, fp, 2
Ig. lots, comer, nice home, $59,500.
1301 Monument Ave.: 2 homes, one 3 bd., 2 be..
fp., one 2 bd., 1 be. on corner lot & extra lot. Possi-
bilities. $56,500. Make offer.
1309 Long Ave.: Redone 3 bd., 1 ba., ch/a, nice
den and deck. Good price, $39,500.
517 10th SL: Nice solid starter home, 2 bd., 1 ba.
on 2 1/2 lots. Room to expand. $32,000.
2004 Juniper Ave.: Comfortable 3 bd., 1 1/2 ba.
brick home, just redone, swimming pool, 1 1/2 lots,
good price, $85,000.
MarvlinAvenue: Vacant lot, 75'x175', no back door
neighbors, $17,500.
230' on U.S. 98, with commercial bldg. & shed. In-
terested? $134,900. ... .
BEACON HILL
Beautiful view from high lot, 100' on Hwy. 98. 100'
hwy. x 250' deep. 3 bd., 1 1/2 ba. home, screen
porches, front & back. Reduced $5,000 more to
$72,500.
1st Ave. Vacant lot, $10,500. Great Pricet
Lovely waterfront duplex: 1 bd., 1 1/2 ba. each
side. Furnished. Super rental. $80,000 each side.
3rd Ave.: Niced 14x60' Scot 1984 mobile home, 2
bdrm., 1 ba. custom built masonite siding, shingle
roof, other extras. $35,000.

MEXICO BEACH
Business for sale, art gallery, frame shop, art
school, great buy for the artist, $20,000.
64 Magnolia St: 3 bd., 2 ba. 2 story home, water-
view w/Ig. deck, w/vinyl siding, easy upkeep,
$95,000.
Corner of U.S. 98 & 26th SL, 2 bd., 1 ba. upstairs,
2 bd., 1 ba. downstairs, stucco, gulf view, 1 block to
beach, rental. $91,500.
39th St., north of highway. House on canal, 2 bd.
1 ba., 100' on canal, den, deck, seawall, floating
dock, reduced to $79,900.
Corner 10th St. & pyajront, 2 bedroom,
fixer-upper, $75,000 ,L-IT
Corner of 13th & Hwy. 98, vacant lot, zoned for
business, 9(7x190, $120,000.
1 36th St. On canal w/lightedxdock & water. 3
bd., 2 be. brick home, fireplace, fnce., stor. shed,
garage, $95,000.
29th St. Gulf view, steps to the beach. Duplex, 2
bd., 1 ba. ea. side, screen porch, furnished,
$87,500.
38th St. on canal. Vacant lot wlseptic and sea wall,
$66,000.
Corner of Georgia & Mississippi: Attractively fur-
nished 3 bd., 2 ba. splitplan mobile home, covered
front porch, high level lot. Trees, nice area.
$45,000.
Robin Lane: Vacant lot, owner anxious, $10,000.
Sea SL: 1 comer lot with adjoining lot, vacant,
zoned for mobile homes. $28,500 total for the two.
42nd SL: Brick duplex, 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba. each side,
fourth from beach, good price, $84,900.
37th SL, 2 bd., 2 ba. townhome, beautifully fur-
nished, near pier, owner anxious, $69,500.
37th SL, Vacant lot, 75'x100'; nice building lot,
close to beach, pier, beachside, $59,900.
37th St., dose to pier: Comfortable 2 bd.. 1 1/2
ba., townhome, great getaway, $76,000.
44th SL: Nice large vacant lot, $25,000.
1810 Hwy. 98, 3 bd., 3 ba. 2 story, screen'porch,
partially fenced. Good future investment, 96000.
Reduced to $90,000.
Louisiana & norl dAAi ..Cqortable 3 bd., 2 ba.
double wide, fp, fru ,lrU $40,700.
41st St. Beachside: Unit in four piex. Neat as a
Spin Furnished, 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba. Very affordable.
$54,500.
Hwy. 98 NEWI Great gulf viewl 2 bd., 2 ba. house,
covered deck upstairs; office, business or bedroom
downstairs w/3/4 bath. Possibilities $155,000.
117 4th St. Apt. 2: 2 bd., 1 ba., furnished, close
to beach, $42,900.
120 MIramar Dr.: Recently redone 3 bd., 2 bea.
brick home, nicely and fully furnished. Landscaped.
$95,000.
Hwy. 98: Great buy for home across street from
beach. Nice 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba. townhomes, furnished.
$48,500 ea. or $146,000 for all 3. 1 sold.
404 5th St.: 2 bd., 2 ba., cen. h&a, mobile home, 2
screen porches, Ig. outside utility house, very nice,
on Ig. lot, $49,500.
12th St. Business Center: commercial lot 2nd
from highway. $35,000.
13th SL: 120"x90' close to beach, $28,000.

OVERSTREET
Sunshine Farms, approx. 4 mi. to beach, 2 acres,
$12,600.
Overstreet, Sunshine Farms. A one acre hidea-
way. $6,500.
545 S. Long Ave., Peace and quiet, 3 bd., 2 ba.
Nice home & 5 acres. $85,200.
Hwy. 386, 2.5 acres, garden spot, house, well,
quietly $,255H, Reduced to $32,500.
Overstreet Hwy. 386 before bridge, 1.47 acres,
septic tank. light pole, well, $15,000.
WEWAHITCHKA
Wewahlitchka: 22 plus acres, wooded, pretty,
$69,900. *


da.



A FINAL DECISION on the proposed


tax increase and the Budget will be


made at this hearing.


I


4









I'H CST'AR. PORT U! TS~ T. O. LsTHMD~fAY. SEPT.28.1989Q PAGE 3B


Toward Understanding
By Rev. Jerry Huft Rector St. James and St. John Churches

Growing Agreement

Church Purpose Is


to Introduce Jesus


Some Christians are experi-
encing a restoration of unity be-
tween denomination lines that
has no apparent human leader-
ship. This unity of thought and
commitment is hard to define,
and it is not shared by everyone.
Nevertheless, those who are in-
volved can readily identify one an-
other.
I can't presume to circum-
scribe something that is probably
undefinable. But I do think it is
possible to characterize some of
the more important particulars of
this unifying force.
Those involved see Jesus
Christ as the central figure of
both salvation history and secu-
lar development. God's revelation
of himself through the person of
Jesus is recorded in the Bible
and defined by the Spirit through
the experience of His Church.
This means that the biblical
expression of the Gospel is our
primary guide to both spiritual
and social matters. While there is
an undeniable drift toward secu-
larism, the Bible, and the ancient
creeds of the Primitive Church,
express and define the essence of
our relationship with God and the
world.
Since the Bible reveals Jesus
as our only savior and mediator,
we are empowered by the Holy


Spirit to worship Almighty God
through him alone. We may rev-
erently honor the memories of
biblical characters, historical per-
sons, and living saints. Yet we
look only to God's revelation of
himself for our doctrine of salva-
tion.
Since Jesus is the central

Key Club

Offering

Its Services
The Key Club of Port St. Joe
Jr.-Sr. High School is offering its
services to the community ac-
cording to Club President Aaron
Louis Wilson.
'This year we are planning
new events and would like input
from the community," Wilson
said.
If anyone knows of a need in
the community, they should con-
tact Aaron Wilson, P.O. Box
1103, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or
call (904) 227-1144.
Key Club International is the
world's largest high school service
organization with clubs in 13
countries around the world. With
a unified membership of over
125,000 in over 3,600 clubs, Key
Club prides itself on its une-
qualed service to home, school
and community.
The Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High
School Key Club is sponsored by
the Kiwanis Club of Port St. Joe.

Vet Office Closing
to Attend Seminar
The Veterans Service Office of
Gulf County will be closed Octo-
ber 4, 5, and 6 while the Veterans
Service Officer, Jim Sealey, is at-
tending a training seminar. Any-
one needing assistance during
this time may call 1-800-282-
8821.
The office will re-open Octo-
ber 9, with regular hours.


Card of Thanks
Thank you Port St. Joe, espe-
cially students of Port St. Joe Jr.-
Sr. High, faculty, and parents, for
your prayers, hard work and con-
tinued concern for J.J. Words
alone cannot express the grati-
tude and appreciation that we
feel. We have been blessed with
an abundance of outstanding
young men and women in our
community which is a reflection
upon parents, schools, and
churches.
May God continue blessing
each and everyone of you.
J.J., Travis,
Margaret & Johnny Ray


Shark News.


* *


By Danielle Scott


Rev. .
Jerry
Huft

character in our relationship with
God, and his holy word is our pri-
mary source for the knowledge of
God, it is no surprise that the
spiritually perceptive come to an-
other common conclusion. That
is the chief concern of the Church
is to win the world for Christ.
The Lord Jesus, according to
his recorded word, came to
present salvation to all who will
come to him. After his crucifixion
he left his Church with the re-
sponsibility of making this pres-
entation. The Church is the body
of Christ in the contemporary
world, thus our singular purpose
is to introduce Jesus and his
good news to others.
The three premises you have
just read are a beginning outline
of the unifying forces within our
faith. Admittedly they are basic
and primitive concepts. Not with-
standing this, they are the prem-
ises that caused the early Church
to multiply at an incredible rate
within the environment of the an-
cient world. And even today,
many of us see them as the basis
for a kind of Christian unity that
transcends any formal structure.
Our beliefs help us to recognize
one another in a world which is
crowded with confusion and de-
ception.


Congratulations to the
Sharks for another win, against
Perry 16-7. They will be going to
play Rutherford Friday, Septem-
ber 29. The game will be at Tom-
my Oliver Stadium starting at
8:30. Tickets will be on sale at
the high school until Friday.
Jr. High played against Flori-
da -High Thursday with an excit-
ing win of 8-6 in overtime. Jr.
High will play Blountstown at
home at 5:00. J.V. played last
Thursday against Blountstown
with a loss of 14-0. The J.V. will
not be playing this week.
The Keyette's will be having
their initiation this Thursday,
September 28 during halftime at

Keith Gets Use of
Mary Kay Car
Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc -
famous for awarding cars to top
achievers has done it again.
Donna Keith of Port St. Joe is the
latest to win the use of a Pontiac
Grand Am as a direct result of
her accomplishments as an inde-
pendent beauty consultant.
Keith joins more than 1500
Mary Kay Independent business-
women who are members of the
company's VIP Club. VIP means
Very Important Performer! The
VIP program, which began in Feb-
ruary 1984, marked the first time
Mary Kay offered the use of a car
as an incentive.


the Jr. High game.
Juniors: If you would like to


order a T-shirt, please see Trisha
Phillips, Deby Monteiro, Nicole
Smith, or Jennifer Barnhart.
All Juniors and Seniors who
wish to take the ACT are remind-
ed to stop by the Guidance Office
to pick up a registration form for
the October 28th test. The dead-
line for registering is September
29th. You must register by Sep-
tember 28th since ACT does not
have a walk-in policy.


pp.


I


I


LIBERTY MANOR

Apartments


800 Tapper Avenue

229-6353






For the Elderly and Disabled

Rent Based Upon Income.
TFC 8/31/89


A


"New

Office-
same good
neighbor."
"My new office means I can
better serve your family
insurance needs. Call or drop
in anytime.*
BILL WOOD
101 Williams Avenue
(Across from St.Joe Hardware)
Office: 229-6514






Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
[ sTAtE FARMM 1

,NSURANCI |
State Farm Insurance Companies
Home Offices: Bloomington. Illinois


Tnrl bl-ACLK, PUMA- ZT. jUZ, r-jL,


-.4rom--


Danley Furniture 227-1277
209-211 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, Florida ]77











IA


o9f 9


1st BI(


(QUANTITY RIGHTS


lo-t. : .
t^ ^i:


10 LBS. OR MORE BUNDLES;

Ground Beef ............. l. $1.19
Beef Liver ................. ,. 790
Ground Chuck... ... a$1 .4o
Neck Bones .............m.......b. 49o
Leg Quarters ..............m.a.mIL 33o
Pork Riblet..................... b. 690
Round Steak.............lb. $1.69


TABLERITE SELECTED
." 'BONELESS
CHUCK

ROAST
FAMILY

14 PAK


- Ia~j11- SELECTED
B EYE
STEAK


LR 4.49


TABLERITE SELECTED LEAN
GROUND

CHUCK
LO.4

$1 m4 OR
LB. MORE


-~ ~ STC YOUR __FREEZER___DURING__THESE__LOW__PRICES__...__(CUT__AND__WRAPPED__FREE!)


Yol


BNDE O.5.
10 LBS GROUD BEE
10 LS. LG QURTER
10 BS BSTN UT4 RAS
50LB, TOA


BUNDLE NO. 2 -
10 LBS. PORK CHOPS
5 LBS. FRYER BREAST
5 LBS. BACON
20 LBS. GROUND CHUCK
10 LBS. CHUCK ROAST
10 LBS. SIRLOIN STEAK
60 LBS. TOTAL


ONLY $9989

BUNDLE NO. 6 -
10 LBS. SHOULDER SkfVISS STEAK
10 LBS. BONELESS STEW BEE-F
10 LBS. CUT-UP FRYERS
10 LBS. GROUND CHUCK
10 LBS. TOP SIRLOIN STEAK
50 LBS. TOTAL

$ 89
ONLY 83.


,. 1 .. I


(FAM ILY-PAK)
^^^MiTABIy
^BONELESS^^
C~HUC


BUNLENO.30
5 LBS BEF LVE








10 L.S ACO


BUNDLE NO. 4 -
10 LBS. GROUND BEEF
10 LBS. ROUND STEAK
10 LBS. MARKETBACON
10 LBS. SIRLOIN TIP ROAST
10 LBS. FRYER LEG QUARTERS
50 LBS. TOTAL


ONLY $6889.


BUNDLE NO. 8 -
5 LBS. CHUCK ROAST
5 LBS. SHOULDER ROAST
5 LBS. GROUNDCHUCK
5 LBS. STEW BEEF
5 LBS. CHUCK STEAK
25 LBS. TOTAL


ONLY $4989


eUT AND WlAPI CD FREE
BSOBTWHOLE BEEF
BNLS.$49
j
BCHUCK............ LB.
Cuts Inle, Ground Chuck. Delmrnorco Steak Chuck Steak. Crhuck Roas. 40-50 lb.


. m '. A-Wt. m pw w -Row., ... m m _.. U.- m


GWEEK!..
















Whole Top Sirloin Butt (10-12 b. av.).......lb. $2.49
Whole Sirloin Tip (1012i-b.avg)...............b. $1.99
Tablerite Beef Cube Steak (Fam.Pak)...Ib. $2.29
Tablerite Beef Top Sirloin Steak ..... lb. $2.69
Lykes Hot Dogs............ ..... 12 oz. $1.19
Ball Park Meat Franks ...................... b. $1.69
Lykes Meaty Jumbos ....................... lb. $1.69
Lykes Sliced Slab Bacon (Fam.Pak).............lb. 890












DAVID RICH


yi ,Ovg


/.


'4 .4,


'73D57n ST., POF
HWY. 71 WEWA[

OPEN 7 DAYS A W
YOUR SHOPPING CO
YoI


ID


PREMIUM GRADE


FRYER


LEG


QTRS.LB


(9-11 Lb. Bag Avg.)'
I1


rABLERITE
hole Beef Loin ................Ib.
'ut Into Siroin Steak, T-Bone.Steak and Porterhouse Steak, 40-50 lb
"ABLERITE BEEK 12-14 LB. AVG.
hole New York Strips...............Ib.


1 :i'd r:i : : '

Parade Tuna in Water............ 6.50o. 590
IOyal Guest Sh&rtening 42oz.. $1.29
Ifynold's Stnd. Foil 25,,. 770
16A Facial Tissue 175 e. 670
"Toe Detergent (40eoff) ....... 42oz. $2.19
Mrtha White PI. or S.R. Flour.....5 lb. $1.29
FRZ FOODS
-j^^ iiiiiiii^


TABLERITE BEEF .. .. .:..
$2.19 Whole Boneless Shoulder............ 1.59
. avg. Cut Into Savoy Steak, BnIs. Shldr. Rodat, Finger Stk, Stew Beef, Gr. Beef, 25-35# avg.
TABLERITE 14-17 LB. AVG. '
$3.69 Whole Pork Loin ..1.. a6... :L....@ .


HEINZ IGA OPEN TOP AE PAPER
CATSUP BREADWELS
32oZ 20 oz. loaf 1/
1/2 GALLON SINGLE ROLL



WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE
DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
PRODUCE DAIRY'


Sal. Steak., B. Stew, SI. Turkey, Meat Loaf
IFreezer Queen Entrees ..$1.99
ORE IDA 6 ears
Corn on Cob .................. $1.19
Quantity Rights Reserved
; Not Responsible for


SWEET
Pomegranates
EACH 49


SALAD 10 oz. bag
Sninarch I I :


FANCY
Yellow Squash
Lo. 59


CANADIAN WAXED
RIutabanas


YELLOW
Sweet Corn
4 ears890
i. I


a Ibs 99,


r4S I


(7


KRAFT AMERICAN
Cheese Singles
12 0Z..
$ + 99..:+


' SEALTEST
Sour Cream
F, Oz.- .


IGA 9.5 oz. .
Cinnamon Rolls............ $ ;29
SUNNY DELIGHT 6402. oz..
Pubnch ........- .....a....... $es19s@@@ago
. fc :*':: : .
run i ********************. 1 I .;'' w''1^,


We Gladly Accept USDA Food Stamps


. p. .. ....- .- .. I ,,, ,.. ."I. .. ... .. ....: ." I l.A W IC 'A ++ ... .
WI approved
Typographical Errors W.pi-
.-., ____.___,_.___._....__..__.._._.. ..__,__..___,___,__._v_._. ......._.__-_.__.::,_._...-,__.._._...


a I


BUIK-RATE
CARRIER ROUTE
'ST JOPRE-SORTED:,:'
PERMIT Nd.' 3
WEWAHITCHKA,.FL 32465

PRICES GOOD
EPT 27-OCT. 3

- I,;::!:::


M ,1+++,, ,+ ;,


v '.


I











PAGE 6B THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE. FL THURSDAY. SEPT. 28. 1989


(A. AAAAA.AAAAAAA AA A AAA A AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAA A AAAAA
LAA A AAAAAAAAA AAAAAL A A A A AA A A A AAA AAA A A A A A AAAAAAAA dAA
AAAAAA^AA
A -AAAAA--AAAAAA- AA A A A A A A AAAAA AA AA A A
A A AAA A A A A A A AAAA
A A A A A A AAAA A AAAA A AAAAAIAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAA AAAAAAAAA AA A AA AA A
A AAAAAAA AAA.AAA .A AAA AA A AA A A A A A A A A A A A A A A AA A A A A A A A A A A A AAA A A A A A A A A A A A A AAAAAAA AAA A A A A A A
AA A A AA A A A AA AAA A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A AA AA AA A A A A A A A AAA A A A A A A AA A A A A i A A A AA A A A AA AAA A A .A


Deal of a lifetime, frame home, 3
lots, chain link fence in Wewa,
$14,000 firm. Gulfaire Realty, Inc.
648-5716. Itc 9/28
Lot for Sale: 1 1/2 acres, 460'
deep well, Ig. septic tank, located on
C-30, 1/4 mi. from county line. 227-
1231 after 5. 4tp 9/28
1/2 acre mobile home lots, 12 mi.
north of Mexico Beach on Overstreet
Road (Hwy. 386), Creekview Sub., no
down payments,' $100 per month.
229-6031. tfc 9/21
Frame house for sale or lease in
Howard Creek; 2 bedroom, call 1-873-
3743. 4tp 9/21
Repossessed house, 1/3 acre of
land, south of Wewa, $500 down,
10% financing. Call 1-800-277-4041.
2tc 9/21
St. Joe Beach, lovely 2 bdrm., 2
ba. home, completely redeccorated,
painted throughout, carpet, wallpa-
per, ch&a on a beautiful lot. Has Ig.
util. bldg.; greenhouse & 2 carports.
Plenty of shade. Must see to appre-
ciate. In mid '50's. Call for an appt.
648-5643. 2tc 9/21
Overstreet, 270' on deep Intra-
coastal Waterway w/new boat dock &
large brick home on 3.28 acres sur-
rounded by beautiful old: oak trees.
Call for details, ERA Parker Realty,
904-648-5777. tfc 9/21
Overstreet 3 bdrm. brick home
on 1.02 acres within 50 ft. of Inter-
coastal Waterway (additional acre can
be purchased w/home.) Has central
heat & air, carpet, appliances,
screened porch, laundry rma., 2 car
garage & shop, chain link fence &
more. $48,500: ERA Parker Realty,
648-5777. tfc 9/14
Highland View, 3 bdrm., 1 ba.
home on 2 lots, new hot water heater
& window a/c's, includes stove, re-
frig., ceiling fans & carpet, comer of
7th St. & 2hd Ave., Highland View.
$28,000. Call ERA Parker Realty,
648-5777. tfc 9/7

Commercial building for sale, 234
Reid Ave. 2 story, downstairs 3616
sq. ft., 2nd level, 1794 sq. ft. Perfect
office location.- Must sell, owner fi-
nancing. Make offer. 1-763-5990.
8tc 8/24


Ma
Bro


Property for Sale or Rent: 3
bdrm., 1 1/2 ba., townhouse at Mexi-
co Beach. Close to the gulf. 904/893-
2746. tfc 9/7
1/2 acre lots, Overstreet area,
$250 down, $80.06 per month. Call
648-5871 or 1-934-321,9. 8tc 8/10

APPRAISED AT $50,000,
SELLING FOR $43,000.-
House for Sale by Owner Must Sell -
Make Us an Offer. Like new, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 ba., cen. a&h, front
room & kitchen has ponderosa pine,
stone fireplace, & stone on house.
Deep .well, chain link fence, with a
20'x23' workshop. Also has double
carport. Rodney Hall, 229-6859.
4tp 8/31
Indian Pass S. Seminole. Lots 9-,
11-13-15 & 17. Beach cottage on #17.
Call 648-8624 or 227-1167.
tfc 8/31
Home & 3 1/4 acre of land for
sale by owner, 12 miles from Port St.
Joe & Wewa. Good farming land, fire-
place, real nice, like a n&w home,
chain link fence, plus tractor with
equipment Appraised at ;$56,000.
Will sell cheaper. B. R. Williiams,
229-6221. ltp 9/14
.:3 bdrm., 2 ba. home with fire-
place & ceiling fans & 2 bdi-m., 1 ba.
home. Many possibilities,, consider
lease with option to buy. 229-8904.
tfc 8/31
2 adjoining lots, each rieasuring
75' wide x 150' deep at Ward Ridge.
For more information call 227-1865
after 6:60. tfc 8/31
Two acres on county road of0 of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. 'Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 8/31


3 bdrm. brick home w/Awimming
pool, new outdoor shop bldg., new
carpet, wallpaper & ceiling fans,
2002 Cypress Ave. 229-6525 or 1-
643-2940 tfc 8/31
2 acres with 14x80 mobile home.
Located 4 miles from beach on Hwy.
386. Price reduced, $36,600. Call
227-1192 anytime after 9:00 p.m.
tfe 8/31


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
irgaret Hale 648-5659 Frances Chason 229-8747
oker/Salesman Ann Six 229-6392


PORT ST. JOE
1101 Constitution Price Reduced on this lovely 2 story Bayfront home. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, fireplace, den, 2 car garage. Now only $125,000.
1304 Palm Perfect for retired couple. 2 bedroom, 1 bath on quiet street. Has new
roof, new windows, added insulation, new carpet. Only $36,000.
103 Yaupon Excel i Jljike new 3 bedroom, 2 bath brick home. Great room
with fireplace. CriM k. Garage. $69,000.00.
206 10th St. Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath with central heat/air.
603 Long Ave. Walk to town from this 2 bedroom home with nice screen porch.
$29,200.
230 71h St. Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with
deck and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
207 6th St., Highland View Spend the summer at the pool that goes with this at-
tractive 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Many other features. $75,000.
170 Ave. E 3 bedroom, 1 bath furnished house with storage shed and efficiency
apartment. $18,000.
523 Welton Drive, Oak Grove 2 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home includes gas stove,
washer, dryer, outside storage. $18,900.
210 6th Street, Highland View 2 bedroom, 1 bath handyman special. New roof,
chain link fence. $20,000.
512 4th St., Highland View 4 bedroom, 2 bath, 1363 sq. ft. doublewide mobile
home on 70'x130' lot. New 1200 gal. septic tank and new 8.5'x17' deck. Only
$13,900.
523 7th St. Attractive 2 bedroom, 1 bath, large den, landscaped yard. $30,000.
505 3rd St. Make an offer on this large frame home on 2 50x170 lots. Can be used
as home or office. Appraised at $35,000.
1312 Marvin Ave. Recently redecorated 3 bedroom, 1 bath home in excellent con-
dition. Has central heat/air; ceiling fans, mini blinds, carpet, built-in china cabi-
net, large enclosed porch, outside storage. $51,500.
509 4th St. Commercial zoning on this 2 bedroom masonry home on 3 50'x170'
lots. $37,500
l .WHITE CITY
Charles Ave.L This well-kept 3 bedroom, 1 bath frame home with deck, neW central
heat/air is on 2 75x150 lots. Has many extras including storage building, new
pump, satellite dish. $32,000.
HOWARD CRfEEK
Murphy Road Have your own mini farm on a.couple of acres with greenhouse,
sprinkler system. Includes large boat house and 2 bedroom mobile home with added
canning kitchen. Only $40,000.
THE BEACHES
3rd Ave. Beacon Hill Charming 2 bedroom with new carport, fenced yard, com-
pletely furnished.
Corner Canal & Americus St. Joe Beach Duplex 1 block from beach. New roof
and windows.
Hwy. 98 St. Joe Beach Unique 2 story home with unobstructed Gulf view. Upstairs
contains 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, great room, fireplace, large deck. Downstairs
has mother-in-law apartment, large utility' room, large workshop, on 2 lots.
$175,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland, Mexico Beach Owner anxious to sell this 3 bedroom,
1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and possible
owner financing. Only $50,000.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,000.
LOTS
St. Joseph Shores Owner will listen to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft of highway
frontage.
hP St. Jitg ~f ludhiu t Ave. $20,000.
St. Joseph Shores,- 80 ft. gulf front, Hwy. 98 to water.
Port St. Joe 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.
Port St. Joe 301 Woodward zoned commercial 75x150. $20,000.
Mexico Beach Texas Drive, Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.
St. Joe Beach Seashores, Desirable corner lot 85'x150'. $15,000.
Port St. Joe Palm Blvd. and comer of 18th Street, 2 lots. $22,000.
FOR RENT

%as?MIM iw -"" -1btA1


New Listing, for sale by owner:
5 yr. old, 3 bdrm., 2 ba. brick and
stucco home. Large great room w/
brick fireplace, double walk-in closet
in master bedroom, all natural gas
appliances. 1 1/2 lots, privacy fence,
utility building, lawn sprinkler sys-
tem. Located in nice neighborhood
near schools. Call before 5:00, 229-
6803, after 5:00, 229-8346.
tfc 7/6
2 bedroom furnished nice house
on 1 1/3 lots, 100' from beach. Canal
St., St. Joe Beach. $29,000. Call Mar-
lanna, 904/482-3884. tfc 8/31
Three bedroom, one bath, frame
home. Large lot, recently remodeled,
in good condition. $39,500. Easy fi-
nancing. 227-1416. tfc 8/31
Reduced Price. 2 bdrm., 2 ba.
luxury 'piling home, Located in a C-,
zone (non-flood zone), exclusive neigh-
borhood, bay access & gulf access in
subdivision, Pensinula Estates, Cape
San Blas. Also lots for sale, terms
available (in same subdivision). Excel-
lent investments. Call 227-1689 after
6 p.m. tfc 7/6
LOTS FOR SALE--On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
mi. south of Wewa. Owner financing.
Phone 229-6961. paid thru 3/90
For Sale by owner: Nice brick
home, 1 1/2 lots, 3 bdrm., kit. & for-
mtal dining rm., Ig. great, rm, 2 1/2
ba., & Ig. deck in the back w/privacy
fence. Also has dbl. garage, Ig. storage
area overhead. (cen. h&a). 2005 Juni-
per Ave. Call after 6:00, 229-6851.
tfc 8/31
Three 800 sq. ft. ea., 2 bdrm., 1
ba. apartments. Good rental income.
In excellent condition, located 606
Woodward Ave. Call for appt. Phone
229-8385 or 227-1689. tfc 7/6


GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH
1, 2 AND 3 BR
TOWNHOMES
(RentAl Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES,
RESORT
Cape San Bias, Florida
(904) 229-2500 .. .
1-800.624.3964
tfc 6/1


OFFICE

BUILDING
FOR SALE
OR LEASE

FINANCING
AVAILABLE
MODERN BRICK
CONSTRUCTION
518 FIRST ST.

227-7300


SUPER BUY
102 Yaupon, Port St. Joe
Excellent neighborhood, large
3 bedroom, 2 bath brick home,
many amenities. Satellite dish,
must see! $77,900.



fu LLLEMORE |
REAL ESTATE
INC. J



648-5146






1983 Buick LeSabre Limited,
- loaded, in excel. cond. Call 639-2222
Wewa 8-4:30 or 639-5029 after 5
p.m. 2tc 9/28
1984 Crown Victoria, 4 dr., am/
fm radio, cruise control, 54,000 miles,
$5,600. 227-1200 after 5:00.
1984 Ford Ranger, 4 cyl., 4
speed, am/fm cassette, $2,000. Call
229-6664. 2tp 9/28
1982 4x4 Chevrolet-C-10 pickup,
pb, ps, ac, new front end, new disc
brakes, 56,000 miles. .$3,400. Call.,
229-6336 after, 5:00. tfc 9/28
1978 Mustang II, excel. cond.,
call 227-1286 after 6 p.m. 2tc 9/21


Guitar and case; Bentwood rock-
er, kitchen table with 4 chairs. Call
229-8488.
FREE mixed breed puppies, born
July 21st, good with children. 229-
8922.
6 captain's chairs, green; 3 up-
holstered chars, davenport and black
chair, lamp w/table. Call 648-8994,
St. Joe Beach, 130 Santa Anna.

3 bedroom, 1 1/2 ba. mobile
home, 5th St., Highland View.
$4,500. Call 229-8577. tfc 9/28
18' Cobla boat, 1 6 ,yl. Mercruls-
er engine, 1 outdrive disassembled, 1
boat trailer. Hull perfect, engine good,
oudrive good for parts. Trailer needs
repair, sell together or split up, any
offer considered. Call day or night un-
til 11 p.m. 648-8359.
1922 Starek piano, needs some
work, call 227-1831.
Sofa, 2 piece, sectional, matching ot-
toman-end table, lamp included, ex-
cel. cond. $150. Call 229-8800.
Twin bed Broyhill Pinedale bed,
complete with Sealy box springs and
mattress. Nearly new, .boxed, and in
storage. $125 complete. Call 229-
6246. 2tp9/21

Sofa sleeper bed, $35; kitchette
set $35. Also drapes. Call 648-8575.
2tc 9/21
Used electric stove, 229-6811.
tfc 9/14
1984 19 1/2' Leisure Craft, 175
hp. Volvo engine w/Magic Tilt trailer,
VHF, LCD recorder & loran. $5,500.
Call 229-6506 after 3:30 p.m.
tfc 7/20
1978 Ford pickup, F-100, Bass-
boat, 115 h.p. Mercury outboard &
trailer. Call 229-8821 after 5 p.m.
tfc 8/31
For Sale or Trade for a boat &
trailer (preferably twin engine): 30'
broadwater, all mahogany, great fami-
ly boat FWC, V8 Chrysler with velvet
drive gear, fly bridge, sleeps 6. $6,000
obo. 229-6965. tfc 6/1
Electrolux and all other vacuums,
w repairs sales_ ;. bags.. Anything for
, any., vacuum ,and built-in central
vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyndall
Parkway, Panama City, 763-7443.
tfc 8/31


Sale Friday and Saturday. Every-
thing reduced. Plants 40 cents and
up, washer, air cond. w/heat strip,
tables & kitchen sets, beds, so a
sleepers, comm. slicer, heaters, elec.
blankets, pots & pans & much more.
Gulf Station, 32nd St., Mexico Beach.
2 Family Yard Sale, Sat., Sept.
30th, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. 505 Madison
St., Oak Grove. Lots of ladies, men's
and children's clothing, men's camou-
flage Fatiques, household items, air
conditioner, shoes. etc.
Yard Sale, 2nd Ave., Beacon Hill
at dead end. Furniture and lots more.
Saturday, 1 p.m. until.
Yard Sale, Sat., Sept. 30, 8 a.m. -
12. Hwy. 98 & Gulf St., St. Joe
Beach. Rain cancels.
Yard Sale, Hwy. 98 at St. Joe
Beach, Friday, Sept. 29, 8:30 5 p.m.
4 Family Carport Sale, Furniture,
bunk beds, drop leaf table, bar stools,
swing set, baby swing, 50 lb. pull
compound bow, 14' fiberglass boat 2/
galv. trailer and 20 h.p. Mercury mo-
tor. Clothes (all sizes), lots of odds
and ends. 23' shrimp boat w/tunnell,
100 horse Mercury, electric wehch,
will sall all together or separate. 1305
Woodward Ave., Saturday, Sept. 30, 9
a.m. until. Rain or shine.
Yard Sale, Sept. 30, 601 Garrison
Ave., 7 a.m. until. Clothing, plants
and miscellaneous items.




1978 Ford station wagon, needs
battery, 111,885 miles, $600. Call
229-6808 after 7:30 p.m.
tfe 8/31

St. Joe Papermakers Federal
Credit Union is accepting bids on the
following cars: 1982 Ford Thunder-
bird. For more information call Wes-
ley Atkins at 227-1156. tfe 8/24
1966 MOB, runs great, reasona-
ble offer. Call 229-6965. tfc 6/1
1972 MGB, runs, make reasona-
ble offer. 229-6965. tfc 6/1
-1978 Ford 4 wd short wheel base...
pick up. Rebuilt from front to back.
Runs great, V-8, auto trans., good
tires & mags, lots of chrome, $3,000.
229-6965. tfc 6/1


TRADES Et-*-SERVICES


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
AL-ANON -
Sunday 4:00 p.m & Tuesday 8:00 p.m
All meetings at St. James
Episcopal Church, alltimes eastern
For further AA information
call: 648-8121




C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer 'work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box AIC, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfe 9/7

JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1.265-4794
24 Years Experience ,
Workers Compensation, OccUpa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Ac-
cidents. No charge for first confer-
ence. tfc 8/3



COUNTRY
j GOOSE

handmadede
/ Country
Crafts",

130 Gulf Street
St. Joe Beach

Open Tuesday Friday
10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
(Other times by appointment)
OWNERS: Gayle & John Tatum
tfc 8/31


BEN HUR 1

SERVICE
Carpet Cleaning
Furniture Shampooing
Carpet Brushing
Homes and Businesses

No Travel Charge

BOB DAVIS & SON

784-7155
Servicing Panama City,
Wewa & St. Joe area
tr 6/117


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns
Indian Swamp Campground
Hwy. C-387, Howard Creek
te 1/5

COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 9/7

MARK'S CLEANING
SERVICE
Professional House Cleaning
Commercial Residential
Lic.
Local References Furnished
648-5362
4tMiA/14

BROOKS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Call Anytime
1-763-1901 or
1-874-1843.
tfc 8/31


WALT'S CAR WASH &
DETAILING
Wash & Wax
Wash.& Shampoo Carpet
For complete information & price list
Call 229-8992 or
229-6844 after 5
rTFC 8/31

THE HISTORIC GARDEN CENTER
is the Place for Your Special
WEDDING REHEARSAL
DINNER, PARTY LUNCHEON,
REUNION OR ANY IMPORTANT
EVENT.
Call 227-1613 or 229-6951


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!







Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue
5i50


Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax
Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043


Call 227-1278 to
Place Your
Classified Ad

ST. JOE
CUSTOM BUILDERS
Glen F. Combs

P. O. Box 456
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456

COMMERCIAL OR
RESIDENTIAL BUILDING
Bus.: 229-8385 Home: 227-1689



Gen. Con. RG003843
Reclprocant Member of Gqu County Home
Builders Assocation
Builder qf the Year 1988 Award
tfc 9/7


Tel-A-Story, a new Bible story every
day for children and adults. Call
227-1511.




THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 REID AVE. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tre I7


S- U U ~Bill Quaranta
Homes Outhouses
Old Fashioned Quality
Commercial Buildings
Hand-Nailed Craftsmanship
Log Cabins Additions


PICKUP & DELIVER
GUARANTEED WORK AT A FAIR PRICE

HY-JAX
HYDRAULIC REPAIR CENTER
P.O. BOX 433 HWY. 71 NORTH
BLOUNTSTOWN, FLORIDA 32424 -


CARL D. MILLER (904) 674-5737

LIC. # RF 0051042
RG 0051008
FREE ESTIMATES ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
Plumbing Contractor New Construction Repairs
Remodeling Residental and Commercial 904/229-6821
Installation of Water Lines and Sewer Lines
Minor Electrical
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tifc 9/7




L&S

TRUCK & TRAILER REPAIR
Heavy Duty Trucks Tire Service Road Service
Marine Reefer Units
Day 229-6018 t 9/7 Night 653-9867


------------------- -------- ----------- ----------------------------------------


l


I

















FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Sec-
tion 865.09; Florida Statutes, the undersigned per-
sons intendd to register with the Clerk of Court,
Gulf County. Florida, four weeks after the first
publication. of this notice, the fictitious name or
trade name under which they will be engaged in
business and in which said business is to be car-
ried on, to-wit:
COMPANY NAME: Professional Drywall Systems
LOCATION:,SL Joe Beach, FL
ADDRESS: Rt 2 Box 13F, Port St Joe, FL 32456
OWNER: David E. O'Barr
Publish: September 21. 28. October 5, and 12,
1989.
FICTITIOUS NAME
Nolee Is hereby given that pursuant to Sec-
tion 866.09, Florida Statutes, the undersigned per-
sons Intend to register wi(h the Clerk of Court,
Gulf Couoty. Florida, fou1 weeks after the first
publication of this notice, the fictitious name or
trade name under which they will be engaged in
business and in which said business is to be car-
ried on to-wit:
COMPANY NAME: Top Sale Realty
LOCATION: Cape San Bias, FL
ADDRESS: Star RL 1 box 601, Port St. Joe, FL
32456
OWNER: tangdon Flowers. Jr.
Publish:-September 21. 28, October 5. and 12,
1989. -
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
WILLIAM R. SCHULICMAN.,






Quiet, private, fenced 2 bdrm.,
acc. trailer, end of Canal St., SJB, w/
or without furnishings. Inquire, 648-
* 5207.
tfc 9/28

1 bedroom house, single person
or couple only, $100 deposit, $175
mo. Located on Madison St., Oak
Grove, 229-8121.
2tp 9/28

3 bdrm., bath and 1/2 block
home, 2110 Long Ave., fenced in lot,
driveway, $100 deposit, $375 mo. call
229-8505.
2tp 9/28

Mobile home, 2 bdrm., 2 ba. Bea-
con Hill, $200 mo. 648-5897.
tfc 9/28

Attractive 3 bedroom mobile
home, Ideal for single person or
couple, :$250 deposit & $250 per
month. all 648-5795. 2tc 9/21

House for Rent, 3 bedroom, 1 1/2
ba., cen. h&a, close to schools, excel-
lent neighborhood, For more informa-
tion, call 1-674-5856 after 6 p.m.
tfc 9/21

Unfurnished mobile home, 106
Cherokee, Oak Grove. $160 mo., baby
ok, no pets. 229-8116 or 229-6908.
ltc 9/28

2 bedroom frame house in Ho-
ward Creek, for sale or lease. Call 1-
973-3743. 4tp 9/21
Partially furnished 2 bedroom
trailer in Howard Creek. 229-6527 af-
ter 6 p/.n. tfc 9/21
'F(iflished hoitsffor rent, call
648-5306.' --... -' tfc 9/21

Shibdio apartment and small trail-
er, fully furnished. 648-8481.
;* tfc9/14

F)ipnished two bedroom town-
house ,on St. Joe Beach. Located on
highway, on access to beach, beauti-
ful view of bay. Call 648-5884 after
5:00 p.n tfc 9/28

-Office for Lease: Modem office for
lease. Perfect for doctor's office or
small business. Downtown location,
convenient to everything. Call 227-
7378 for appointment to see.
4t 9/7

2 bedroom mobile home, $250
month, Americus & Balboa St. Joe
Beach. 648-5060. 2tp 9/21

1 bedroom unfurnished apart-
ment, stove & refrig., couple or single
only. Deposit, no pets. Comer Canal
& Americus. Call Frances 227-8747
or 227-1450. tfc 8/24

Clean, nice furniture, 1 bedroom
apartment. Good neighborhood. 1505
Monument Ave. tfc 8/31

Furnished 2 bedroom trailer, Sea
St., St. Joe Beach. Deposit required.
After 6:00, 229-6825. tfc 8/31

Furnished 1 bedroom apartment,
1508 1/2 Long Ave., Port St. Joe. De-
posit required. After 6:00, 229-6825.
tfc 8/31

Warehouses, small and large.
Some with office, suitable for small
business. 229-6200. tfc 8/31

*2 bdrm. 1 bath apartment, cen.
h&a, refrig. & stove, $300 mo. Call
227-1159 or 648-5037. r tfc 8/31

(Nice executive home, 3 bdrm., 2
ba. on .golf course. $695 mo. Appli-
ances included. Call Pam at 229-
6314. tfc 8/31

Furnished large 2 bdrm. apart-
merit. No pets. Call 229-6777 after 6
p.m. tfc 8/31

Unfurnished Ig. 2 bdrm., 1 bha.
house w/stove & refrig., carport, stor-
age area, Ig. screen porch, fenced
back yard, ch&a, no pets. Call 229-
6777 after 6 p.m. tfc 8/31

Niced one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' supervision. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine


Ridge Apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing;, tfc 8/31


APARTMENTS FOR RENT:
2 & 3 bedroom. Central h&a, gas
appliances, carpet, ceiling fans,
dishwasher. Located corner of
Long Ave. & 9th St., Port St. Joe.
Call Kenny, 229-6509
.. Phil 229-8409


Plaintiff,
Vs.
GLENN H. THURMAN and
ROBERT R. SHIPMAN a/k/a
WILLIAM R. SHIPMAN.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Glenn H. Thurman
and Robert R. Shipman
a/k/a William R. Shipman
111 Peachtree Park Drive
Atlanta. GA 30309
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in Gulf
County. Florida:
Exhibit A
Parcel 1:
Begin at the mean high water line of the
Gulf of Mexico at a point on a line that is
700 feet West of and parallel to the East
line of U.S. Government Original Lot I,
Section 23, Township 9 South. Range 11
West, and extend said line North 0"01'30"
East to a point on the South boundary of
the right-of-way line of State Road 30:
thence run in an Easterly direction along
the South right of way boundary of said
State Road 30 100 feet to the point which
is the POINT OF BEGINNING: thence con-
tinue in an Easterly direction along the
South right of way boundary of said State
Road 30 100 feet; thence South 0`01'30"
West to a point on the mean high water
line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence run in a
Westerly direction along the mean high
water line of the Gulf of Mexico to inter-
sect a line extended South 001'3(7 West






2 bdrm. furnished nice house on
1 1/3 lots. 100' from beach. Canal
St., St. Joe Beach. $200 month. Call
Marianna, 904/482-3884. tfc 8/31

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 8/31

For Rent or Sale: 2 bdrm., 2 bath
house at Cape San Blas, many extras.
Call 229-8385 or 227-1689. tfc 7/6

2 bdrm. spacious apartments,
easy to heat and cool. Reasonable de-
posit & rent. No pets. Call 227-1689
after 6 p.m. Best deal in town, save
on utility bills! tfc 7/6

No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use rooms
right away. Rent machine. St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/88







FOUND on highway going to the
beach last weekend, Nice end sofa
cushion. To receive information call
Juanita at 229-8151 or after 3 p.m.,
e-nl .227- 1 R219;_ nnt c nia flu etA


:i 2-f i 520 aa ayior aaflU


U


.Need: babysitter to care.for a 4 yr-- -
old from 4:30 --12t :00, preferably in.
my home. 227-1831.

Need medical secretary. Must
have experience in medical terminolo-
gy. Apply in person at 321 Reid Ave.
Call 229-8238 for appointment.
ltc 9/28

Mental Health Aide Neded. Gulf
Co. Guidance Clinic, Inc. is seeking a
part-time (10 hrs. a- week) mental
health aide. Min. req,: H.S. dipl. or
equiva., and completion of H.R.S.
screening. Apply to: Edwin R. Alles,
Exec. Director, Gulf Co. Guidance
Clinic, Inc., P.S.J., FL 32456. E.O.E.
ltc 9/28

ATTENTION HIRING Govern-
ment jobs your area. Many immedi-
ate openings without waiting list of
test. $17,840- $69,485. Call 1-602-
838-8885, ext. R5783.
2tp 9/28

For extra money for Christmas
needs, sell or buy Avon. Call Mrs. L.
Z. Henderson, 227-1281. tfc 9/21

Christian helpers needed. The
Bible Grace Church located in Tag-
bilaran City, Phillippines desperate-
ly needs Bible tracts, Bibles, Sun-
day school material. This Protest-
ant church is winning many souls
to Christ, but lacks Christian mate-
rial. Will you help? Send to Bible
Worker Elvira Estorosas, 75 Jacinto
Borja Extension Tagbilaran City,
Bohol, Phillippines 9701. For more
information write: Dale A. Wilhite,
6226 Cypress Point Dr., #Apt. 6,
Panama City, Beach, FL 32407.
2tp 9/21

Easy Worki Excellent Payl Assem-
ble products at home. Call for infor-
mation, 504-649-0670, ext. 9575.
2tp 9/21

VISA/MASTERCARD. US
CHARGE Guaranteed Regardless of
Credit Rating, Call Nowl (213) 925-
9906, ext. U3390. 4tp 9/14

Meadowbrook Manor of East-
point, Hwy. 98 & Begonia. RN's and
LPN's for 3-11 and 11-7 shifts. Also,
Certified Nursing Assistant or those
willing to train for certification. CNA's
for all shifts. New pay scale with shift
differential for 11-7 shift. Call Direc-
tor of Nursing, Debra Lewis, for an
appointment. 904/670-8571.
tfc 8/31


RN'S, LPN'S, CNA'S
IF YOUR JOB DOESN'T OFFER:
* Paid Time Off
* Selection of Health Insurance
Plans
* Disability Insurance
* Dental Insurance
* Life Insurance
* Credit Union Deductions
* Direct Deposit Progra
* In-house C.E.U.'S
* 401 K Retirement Plan
* Top wages & other incentives
Then you owe it to yourself to
apply at Bay St. Joseph Care
Center, phone 229-8244
tfc 9/7


Wewahitchka Elementary

School News ...........By Linda Whitfield


Report Cards Go Home Oct. 4
If your child has been telling
you he's doing fine in school,
you're soon going to find out for
sure. Report cards will be sent
home with your child on October
4. So did deeper in the array of
everyday papers, and hidden
away in the uneaten lunch will be
the new computer printout for
the first grading period!
Snakes in Pockets
If you see your children trying

from the Point of Beginng. Thence run N
001'30" East to the Point of Beginning.
Exhibit B
Pared 2:
Begin at the mean high water line of the
Gulf of Mexico at a point on a line that is
700 feet West of and parallel to the East
line of U.S. Government Original Lot 1.
Section 23, Township 9 South, Range 11
West, and extend said line North 001'30"
East 2472 feet to a point which Is the
POINT OF BEGINNING: thence run South
001'30" West to a point on the North right
of way boundary of State Road 30; thence
run Easterly along the North right of way
boundary of said State Road 30 200 feet;
thence run North 0`01'30` East to a point
which intersects a line extended from a
point drawn 89*51' right from the Point of
Beginning; thence run in a Westerly direc-
tion to the Point of Beginning. LESS the
North 545 feet of said property containing
2 1/2 acres, more or less, previously deed-
ed to First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe,
Florida.
has been Sled against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to It
on ROBERT M. MOORE. Plaintiffs Attorney.
whose address is Post Office box 248, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, on or before the 25th day of Octo-
ber. 1989, and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on Plaintiffs Attor-
ney or Immediately thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint
DATED this the 19th day of September,
1989.
BENNY C. LISTER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tonya Knox
Deputy Clerk
Publish: September 21, 28, October 5 and 12,
1989.
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Sec-
tion 865.09, Florida Statutes, the undersigned cor-
poration intends to register with the Clerk of
Court. Gulf County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the fictitious name
or trade name under which they will be engaged in
business and in which said business is to be car-
ried on, to-wit:
COMPANY NAME: Tyree's Restaurant
LOCATION: Hwy. 71 North of Wewahltchka
ADDRESS: Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
OWNER: Carol L Tyre
Publish: September 14, 21. 28. and October 5,.
1989.
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA
PANAMA CITT DIVISION
IN ADMIRALTY
FROSr NATIONAL BANK OF
SAN ANTONIO.
Plaintiff,
CASE NO. 89-50055-WS
v.
O/S EL HONDO, her engines,
boilers. etc.. O/S THE DEEP,
her engines, boilers., etc.,
and BARCOS DEL MAR. INC.,
a Texas corporation,
Defendants.
NOTICE FOR SALE OF VESSEL
The United States Marshal. Northern District
of Florida, has arrested the O/S EL HONDO and
the 0/S THE DEEP in the above capq, civil and
maritime for fo el -adueo of Itefered'sAhP'ipiortgag- "
es. By order of the United States District Court for
the Northern District of Florida, these vessels are
to be sold at Wood Fisheries. First Street, Highland
View. Port St Joe, Florida on the 16 day of Octo-
ber, 1989 at 12:00 noon, C.S.T. These vessels will
be sold by public auction with the United States
Marshal Service overseeing the proceedings. The
terms of the sale are as follows:
The successful high bidder will pay a
deposit of ten percent (106) by Postal
Money Order or Certified Check made
payable to theto the U.S. Marshal's Service
on the date of the sale. The balance of
the purchase price shall be paid within
48 hours. Sale is subject to confirma-
tion of the Court.
The vessels may be inspected by contacting
Mr. Allen Scott, telephone number 407/799-2860.
Lambert International Fisheries, Incorporated. 727
Scallop Drive. Cape Canaveral, Florida.
DATED at Tallahassee, Florida. the 21 day of
September, 1989.
W.L. "MAC" MCLENDON
United States Marshal
Northern District of Florida
By: /s/ Betty Pearce
Legal Technician
Frank E. Hamilton, III
FRANK HAMILTON & ASSOCIATES, P.A.
2620 West Kennedy Blvd.
Tampa, Florida 33609
813/879-9842
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Publish: September 28 and October 5, 1989.
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Sec-
tion 865.09. Florida Statutes, the undersigned per-
sons intend to register with the Clerk of Court.
Gulf County, Florida, four weeks after the first
publication of this notice, the fictitious name or
trade name under which they will be engaged in
business and in which said business is to be car-
ried on. to-wit:
COMPANY NAME: Linda's Restaurant
LOCATION: 302 4th St., Port St. Joe, FL 32456
ADDRESS: 302 4th StL. Port St. Joe, FL 32456
OWNERS: Charles and Linda Smith
Publish: September 28. October 5, 12 and 19,
1989.
NOTICE TO INDIVIDUALS. HOUSE MOVERS
AND DEMOLITION CONTRACTORS
Sealed bids will be received at the Port St.
Joe Fire Station Conference Room located at 305
5th St. Port St Joe, Florida, at 11:00 AM on Octo-
ber 13, 1989, for the sale and removal ofbuildings
and other improvements on White City Bridge Pro-
ject. known as Job Number 51020-2514, WPI No.
3113732. The bids will be opened and announced
at the time and place designated for receiving
them.
No bid will be considered unless it is submit-
ted on the official proposal form provided by the
State of Florida Department of Transportation.
Such proposal forms may be obtained from the
State of Florida, Department of Transportation,
. Highway 90 East, Chipley. Florida 32428.
The Department reserves the right to reject
any and all bids and to waive technical errors as
may be deemed best for the interest of the State.
Betty G. Wilson
Dist. Adm. Property Management
(904) 638-0250, Ext 455
Publish: September28, 1989.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
WALTER ROBERSON,
Plaintiff,
VS.
EDWARD MOSLEY and Wife, CAROLYN A. MOS-
LEY, .
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Edward Mosley
Address Unknown
Carolyn A. Mosley
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Com-
plaint has been iled against you seeking to fore-
close a Mortgage on the following property in Gulf
County, Florida:
Lots 9. 12. 14 and 15, Block "G", Bay
View Heights Subdivision, as per plat
thereof recorded in the Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 1,
page 26
and you are required to serve a copy of your An-
swer or other response to the Complaint on Plain-
tifs Attorney:
Robert M. Moore, Esq.
P.O. Box 248
Port SL Joe. FL 32456


and file the original thereof in the Circuit Court
Clerk's Office, Gulf County Courthouse, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, on or before the 12th day of
October. 1989. If you fall to do so, a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure for the relief sought may be
granted by Default.
DATED this the.31st day of August, 1989.
BENNY C. LISTER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tona Knox
Deputy CSeptember 7, 14 21. and 28. 1989.
Publish: September 7, 14, 21. and 28, 1989.


to sneak past you with snakes in
their pockets, relax. They're just
bringing part of their homework
to school! The second grades are
studying reptiles and amphibians
in science. Teachers Judi Lister
and Joyce Quinn make this and
all aspects of learning fun.
Star Student of the Week -
Grover Crutchfield
Grover Crutchfield, who is the
son of Grover Crutchfield Sr., and
the late Mrs. Crutchfield, is 12
years old and is in the sixth grade
at WES. His favorite subject is
Social Studies. His teacher is
Mrs. Diane Atchison. Grover
would very much like to visit the
state of Louisiana. IF he could
meet any one person, he would
be thrilled over the chance of
meeting muscle man turned ac-
tor, Arnold Schwartznegger.
When he grows up, he would like
to fly jet planes. Grover likes to
read and the last book that he
read was Winning Moments.
Grover said, "I make the A-B
Honor Roll. I like to watch TV and
play Nintendo." We're glad Grover
is at our school.
Open House & PTO Spaghetti
Dinner on Tuesday, Oct. 3
WES will have its first PTO/
Open House/Spaghetti Dinner on
Tuesday, October 3. Prior to the
meeting, there will be a Spaghetti
Dinner beginning at 5:30, spon-
sored by the WES PTo. The din-
ner will consist of spaghetti with
meat sauce, salad bar (one trip),
rolls, dessert and tea. Tickets will
be on sale at the following mer-
chants: Wewa State Bank, May-
hann's Department Store, Wewa-
hitchka Medical Center, and the
WES office. Prices are $3.50 for
adults, $2.00 for children ages 5 -
12, and under age 4 is free.





1985 28'x65' 3 bdrm., 2 ba. mod-
ular home. Lg. great rm. w/fp, spa-
cious kitchen w/island range & d.w.,
cen. h&a, vaulted ceilings, ceiling
fans, gas heating & cooking, mini
blinds, laundry rm w/washer & dryer.
Deck on back. All on 2 acres. 5' chain
link fence around 1 acre w/12'x16'
utility shed. 2 shallow wells, & under-
ground septic tank. Overstreet, 6
miles from the beaches. Call (904)
648-5480, (no collect calls, please.)
tfc 9/28


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY. SEPT. 28, 1989 PAGE 7B

Hunter Education Course

Being Offered by Game & Fish


Fall is here and it will soon be
time for hunting season. Hunters
are already making preparations
and gearing up for this season's
hunt.
Once again, the Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion will be offering a free hunter
education course to the public
here in Port St. Joe. The course
will be taught by experienced,
trained, local volunteer instruc-
tors who wish to promote firearm
safety, good ethical hunting and
enjoyment of this traditional
sport.
In order to complete a hunter
education course, one must at-
tend 12 hours of classroom in-
struction followed by an examina-
tion along with four to six hours
of range time with practical appli-
cations of their skills in the safe
handling of a firearm.
Certification of the hunter ed-


The Open House will be form
6:30 7:15 and then at 7:15, the
business meeting will begin.
Staff Member of the Week
Betty S. Gainous
Mrs. Betty Shirley Gainous,
the daughter of the late Henry
and Naida Shirley, was born in
Wewahitchka but has traveled ex-
tensively in the years while her
husband was in the military.
"Miss Betty", as staff and stu-
dents alike address her, has two
children, John and Robert, six
grandchildren, and one great
grandchild. Betty is a member of
the Baptist church.
Betty has worked at WES for
the past 12 years as an aide in
various program. Before return-
ing to Wewa, she lived at Fort
Campbell, Kentucky, 20 years
and in Germany for three years.
Betty has worked in printing at


ucation course is recognized in all
states and will become mandato-
ry in Florida on June 1, 1991.
Anyone born after June 1, 1975,
who wishes to purchase a hunt-
ing license and stamps will be re-
quired to take this course.
Pre-registration for the course
will be conducted at the Florida
Power Company office on Reid Av-
enue Thursday and Friday, Sep-
tember 28 and 29, from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. All interested persons are
asked to sign up at this time.
This will be the only time this
course will be offered before hunt-
ing season gets into full swing.
The class will be conducted
each Saturday in October with
range time on Sunday afternoon.
the exact date, place and time
will be announced to the pre-
registrants. This is depending
upon the amount of people regis-
tering to take the course.


Josten's Yearbooks, but she said
she has never worked anywhere
as much as. she has at WES. Bet-
ty someday hopes to re-visit Ger-
many. The people there were very
friendly and Betty said it was the
cleanest place she ever saw.
If given the opportunity, Betty
would like to meet country singer
Ronnie Milsap and comic Minnie
Pearl (Mrs. Henry Cannon). Both
these exemplify qualities that she
admires.
Betty likes to read all kinds of
books and her hobbles are crafts
and sewing. All who know her,
know there is nothing she can't
do. Betty is a positive type person
who has an uplifting outlook on
life. She makes working at WES a
much nicer place. WE wish there
were more Betty Gainous' in the
world.


itJ


WE'RE


SCOTCH" BRAND
MAGIC- TAPE by 3M
Invisible tape Is easytowrite on andmends paper
permanently. Resists cracking and yellowing.
Moisture-resislant. 1" core, 1296" length.
Width List Ird IZd 36d
V AAM81U.O-1 -1/2 $2.09 lS.4 312S 31.10
V AAI80-12gU/4 2.76 1.3 1.78 1.M


PULLING OFF


SAVINGS!


DURABLE AND ECONOMICAL 28 LB. KRAFT
CLASP ENVELOPES KEEP CONTENTS SAFE
AND SECURE
-Heavy-duty.
-Heavily gummed flap.
-Secure, rust-resistant metal clasp.
-Variety of sizes available.
-100/box.
List Ibx 5bx 10 bx
6" x 9" AP2-55BK S 8.75 $ 6.68 3 6.29 $ 5.99
9" x 12" AP2-908K 13.50 8.98 8.39 7.98
9'/" x 12Y2" AP2-938K 15.00 9.59 89 8.49
10" x 13" AP2-97BK 1550 10.28 9.58 8.99
10" x 15" AP2-98BK 19.60 "12.49 11.88 10.98
12" x 15'/" AP2-110BK 22.50 14.49 13.28 12.58


/

"a. ,~4 *4


TAPE DISPENSERS by 3M
Dispensers hold 1296" length tape on 1" core.
maximum W width.
M High Impact plastic. Weighted for one-
handed dispensing.
List i IOn tu
AMA--." $4.64 S22 t3.0 31.79
'Specify color: Black-BK; Pulty-PY.
[B Made of chip-proof plastic with
weighted base.
List I a1 s 8 12
AM-C-15-' 55.20 259 i32.3 32
*Specify color: Black-BK; Putty-PY.
[B Dispenser in smoke only.
List I a 12u
AM-H4127 $ .62 3 .47 3 .45


WANT MORE SAVINGS? CALL FOR OUR LATEST SALESBOOK.


* Printers
* Publishers
* Office
Supplies


Public Notices


TOVyO T RILI :N 4N |


Up to 60,000 Miles Warranty


THE TREAD MTTILT
307 WEST HIGHWAY 98
PORT ST. JOE

1., ,2


3
/^


I


I


=t


N'" "


The Star Publishing Co.

OFFICE SUPPLY STORE -
306-08 Williams Avenue Phon@2274Z


OF


278


I


I


i











THE STARPORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPT. 28, 1989


Flu Season Is Almost Here!

Vaccination Can Prevent or Lessen Effects of Bout with Influenza


By Nancy J. Morgan, M.D.
The autumn season is almost
upon us: harvest time, school
time, football and the flu. Influen-
za infections have probably
plagued mankind since our earli-
est beginnings and there have
been almost yearly outbreaks
throughout recent recorded histo-
ry. It's caused by a tiny germ
called a virus, less than 1/30th
the size of common bacteria, they
can't be seen with a standard
light microscope. The outbreaks
begin every fall, build up to a
peak over two to three weeks, last


for two to three months, then ta-
per off and disappear just as fast.
The flu is mainly a respiratory
disease and almost always begins
so suddenly that its victims can
often recall the exact hour when
they began feeling bad. Usual
symptoms begin with an intense
headache, followed by feverish-
ness or chilliness, muscle aches,
general weakness and finally the
respiratory symptoms of cough,
sore throat and congestion. Fever
may run from 100*F to 1050F
during the first day and can last
for several days. The whole


U.S. Pos.. tI e
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT AND CIRCUI.ATION
IA. Tlls .of IP.blhhotlo- ",. P a-CAIoN N"O. 2Doleof PF11"


4. Cionmpele M,1ii.g Ad8S.., of Known Office. of Pubtlcation, 0~,. Cit. COo.". Show wil ZIP+4 Codlf4atpOkIeo'-o
a. coopletotaghl;ingAdd,.., of tiHow..qu,tist 1Of ottohioOf0- o ,hri*.UatA.t

11. FullN-01, a nd Coit"9410Milifog Addit.u 04 OfPl5 law,04 Maoglgkq .,tow(kJint.,5M AVT Nk?&11-1U~
Io~he N- oo tId Cw.Vfto. lavAo tdilw.o

Edit.. 0"-. ',d

7 wr(f ~~db *o~~dt.h 0 ~o o~0 h o~a .oaon5 o7 ,Uoa4oaohf~

I pat~own~ead ho~aL V0. ~l'.po~h. in .04adi.. ho -up el-M-11a- ho11,o by I7


g. Known Gondlold m. Mortgogee, oand Ottw Seurity Holdmt Owning or HNing 1 Prcetn or Moe of Total Anmont of Bonds. Mortgage a Ol
Iomties (i$A- a --.a o mu)


9. Ft CaopiMton by Nmpirotlt Orgwltlone Authodried To MaNat SpectlwM RI O SUM Soad. ".'2 .
Thl um o e. tloin, nt. c ondnew oflat u o th alg saiton.lo and Ithe eewnpt etot -m Fed nco l me M pwlposeM (Od -


O1)
E .N.Not Clhtoe ODutat
U pr~lng 1 Motithl


121
Mm OeCtwp ."gdOon
PNectog 12 M-ftla


1Ifoh..god~ pittolor 0 ,ad.h o~to. ~
-o olOt, iSo ".-oi


10. Etent od Natu s of CrclIaton Avwe.g N. Coptie l.E.Im. During Atul Ns CoPS.OfShoris I6
(S. rtnmdi Os mnnw'jPw i) Pnid 12 Montha Pubsd NeatiM to 0 Fre Dar
A. Tot. No. Copliesj tP -i AR3 q v ? 0 e
B. P.id anOr .. ..IqoMK.. d Ci ".7 a ti
1. ScleNthrough ol 4 Wd coilOS. ginM. t 0i cou odeS "O.S 0 0O5to'.
2. Maell o ecplltio0
/ 46 SPT Ieoroeo
C. TBot Pai ando Roeewtedh Chotad ofn
M- *18 ICwI=
D. FmDIebtbtieo by Mal. CaMtnieaOllr..WMeona
Itpli., Comilnwety .d4 Othe FrPo COiM -I-
To Dosieut.th ot O,. CeD) .3
1. o,,a..,o.. -,,ct. a,.-,ep / / 9
2. Rowmn wa ..Ni.- g1 stA1
a. TomrAL a-oilr .oad 3-sfos"--. -s h-" 3oto0
I oet that the tatementsmads by SIgnure end Tite of EdtTi Puta ., Businel Mmeg, 0- O
m.a Wbomve a coct and compete
"SPo 3526 ""19


FOL R,

"






MEM TO



\ SWITCH!




Savings of more than $200 per year start
when you switch from an electric water
heater to natural gas.
You will have more hot water, get it faster
and the savings will go on and on.
For more information call:



ST. JOE NATURAL GAS
I: COMPANY, INC.
301 Long Avenue Phone 229-8216
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456
I -- II -


course typically builds to a peak
and then resolves in two to five
days. There are a few, though,
that may be left with a "post in-
fluenza" weakness and weariness
that may last for several weeks
after all the other symptoms have
gone away.
Like most other diseases, the
flu knows no age or class distinc-
tions and is just as happy infect-
ing an adult as a child. Children
usually bounce back with little or
no problem but adults, especially
those with chronic conditions
such as emphysema, bronchitis,
diabetes or heart problems are at
risk for developing serious and
sometimes fatal complications.
Pneumonia is the most common
of these, but others can include
inflammation of the heart, en-
cephalitis or inflammation of the
brain, inflammation and swelling
of the muscles and Reye's Syn-
drome. This last complication is
one that may affect children and
is associated with inflammation
of both the brain and the liver.
You may have heard that aspirin
can increase risk of Reye's and,
indeed, aspirin and its relatives
should never be used during a flu
infection.
While it is-true that this little
virus can cause a lot of problems,
it is unfairly blamed for many
other viral diseases. Even those of
us in the medical field are often
guilty of casually calling gastroen-
teritis "the stomach flu" when we
know that real flu mainly infects
the respiratory system. It does
not cause gastrointestinal symp-
toms such as nausea or diarrhea.
There are only two ways we
have of fighting the virus itself.
One is an antibiotic which kills
the virus directly, Just like peni-
cillin attacks bacterial infections.
The other Is a vaccination which
helps our own immune system
fight off the virus before it can in-
fect us. The first influenza vac-
cine was developed in 1958 but it
still took years of development be-
fore it became as effective and


free of side effects as it is today.
The virus is a tricky little custom-
er and seems able to "change its
coat" every year so that our im-
mune system doesn't quite recog-
nize it when it comes to attack us
again. Something like a clever ac-
tor that puts on different make-
up and clothes each time he
comes to visit so we think he's
somebody new. Thus a new vac-
cine has to be made for each year
that will give our immune system
a set of "magic glasses" to see
through the villain's latest dis-
guise. Unlike the vaccines that we
remember from years back, the
present generation is remarkably
effective and has almost no signif-
icant side effects. The most likely
adverse reaction would be mild
redness or tenderness around the
site of injection in 30% or less of
the people and, more rarely, low
grade fever and mile symptoms
eight to 24 hours after the vacci-
nation in less than 5%.
Who should get vaccinations?
1) Any person, six months of age
or older, who has chronic lung or
heart problems, including asth-
ma; 2) residents of nursing
homes; 3) anyone 65 years of age
or older; 4) any adult or child who
has a chronic condition treated
during the preceding year (such
as diabetes); 5) anyone who
works in a health institution such
as hospital, nursing home or doc-
tor's office.
If you have already caught
the flu, the course of symptoms
can be shortened greatly by early
treatment of the one viral antibio-
tic we have, amantadinee". If you
have been exposed to the flu,
haven't caught it yet but haven't
had the vaccine, then treatment
with amantadine, along with a flu
shot, can help keep you from get-
ting sick.
So now is the time to get your
shots. By the time the new year
arrives the season will just about
be over. Just ask your doctor, he
or she will have the weapons to
help you fight back against the
flu before it gets you.


James Lester Graduates from

University of Central Florida


James E. "Jamie" Lester of,
Wewahitchka has recently gradu-
ated from the University of Cen-
tral Florida with a Bachelor's De-
gree in Public Administration
with a minor in Political Science.
In 1987 he received an Associate
in Arts Degree from Gulf Coast
Community College. After comple-
tion he attended Florida State
University and became President
of the Political Science Associa-
tion and Vice-President of the Phi
Sigma Alpha fraternity, which. is
the National Political Science
Honor Society. He left F.S.U. in
1988 and started at the Universi-
ty of Central Florida in Orlando
where he graduated on August
11, 1989.
While attending U.C.F. Jamie

was awarded a plaque during the
first part of the year for his hard
work and dedication to help pro-
duce good government in Central
Florida. This award was present-
ed to him by then Chairman
Commissioner Fred Streetman of
Seminole County.
Soon after, Jamie completed a
stage production to help raise
money for under privileged chil-
dren. The production was pro-
duced and directed by James
Best, otherwise known as Sheriff

Card of Thanks
The family of Mrs. Willie: V.
Sealey wish to thank each of you
who helped us through her long
illness and death. We wish we
were able to thank each one for
the prayers, food and flowers, but
most of all for the visits and clls
when the burden was so heavy.
Thank you John Gilmore and
Staff, Dr. Oksanen and Spectrum
Home Health. A very special
thanks to Rev. Zedoc Baxter.
Momma loved you, and our feel-
ings are the same.
Need Extra Cash?
Place Your Classified
Ad With Us


Jamie and Bo John Lester
Roscoe P. Coltrain of the televi-
sion series The Dukes of Haz-
zard. Jamie appeared with Mr.
Best portraying a scene back in
the 1950's in a southern honky-
tonk in Tennessee.
At the present time, he is em-
ployed by Diversified Energy Ser-
vice, Inc. as a real estate consul-
tant with Parara Services Inc. In
the future, he intends to do some
campaign work in next year's
elections and may enter politics
himself.
Jamie is the son of Bo John
Lester of Wewahitchka and Joyce
Wynn Suber of Port St. Joe. He is
the grandson of Ed and Marie
Wynn of Port St. Joe.



TOUGHEST
OF 'EM ALL
SAFETY



WE'VE GOT
YOUR SIZE IN STOCK
2233 SIZES
AA A3 B C 5 EE EEE
10-13 10-13 9-14 1812 5- 613 712 7-12
MADE IN U.S.A.
DISCOUNT SHOES, INC.
3123 E. Bus. Hwy. 98
Panama City, FL 32401
Phone (904) 785-1132

R.-


*Auto -Home
*Business
*Flood .Life
*Bonds
*Mugtual Funds


The Insurance Store Since 1943

8:30 till 6:00 Monday through. Friday

221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


LAURA RAMSEY, Agent ROY SMITH, Agent


Say You Saw It In The Star


"The Exciting Place to Worship"

First Baptist Church

102 Third Street
Port St Joe, Florla
HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
JAMES ENFINGER, Music/Youth
^ *


We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place


BIBLE STUDY............... 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP............7:00 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP ...... 11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING........ 5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor


TERRY HUMES
Min. of Music
& Outreach


JEFF BOWDEN
Min. of Youth, Education
& Recreation


Reduced Price Clearance Sale

Highland View Motors, Inc.
603 Hwy. 98 H.V.
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Phone 229-6999
4 door (Loaded)
83 Cad. Sedan Seville $4395
2 door, automatic & air
86 Dodge Aries ...............................................2995
2 door, P/s, automatic, AC, Electronic Windows
84 Merc. Cougar .............................................3495
P/S, automatic, cruise control, air, tilt s/wheel, stereo
87 Ford Taurus L 4-door........................ 5995
4-door, loaded
84 Ford LTD ............................................ 2495
AM/FM Stereo, P/S, tilt s/wheel, automatic, air cond.
85 Chev. Celebrity 4-door ......................... 3495
6 cyl., Clean, P/S, automatic, air condition
82 Ford Granada 4-door............................ 1695
P/S, automatic, air condition
83 Ford LTD 4-door ................................... 1495
4 cyl., automatic, air cond.
85 Ford Mustang LX 2-door................... 2995
Automatic, air cond.
83 Toyota Corolla 2-door .......................... 2595
Low miles, clean, loaded
84 Buick Riviera 2-door......................... 4995
P/S, automatic, Air cond., AM/FM Stereo Tape Player,
cruise control, tilt s/wheel, power windows & door locks
85 Pontiac 6000 4-door V-6.................... 4195
AM/FM Stereo, 5-speed trans., Air Cond. Sport Wheels
88 Chev. S10 Sport P.U.......................... 6495
P/S, automatic, air cond.
86 Chev. Custom Deluxe P.U. L.W.B....... 4995
P/S, AM/FM Cassette Tape Player, automatic, Air cond.
85 Ford Ranger P.U................................ 4195
V/8, P/S, P/B, AM/FM Cassette Tape Player, tilt s/wheel,
cruise control, air cond., elect. windows, captains chairs,
couch, table, curtains & blinds, running boards
84 Dodge Ram 250 Prospector Conversion
Van ......................................................... 4995
Loaded, 8,000 miles
89 Toyota Camry 4-door ........................ 9995






Call Foanradi gn u yso .a
cIt to n otlb.r number .
Break the busy signal barrier So you can vbit friend
Call Waiting will let you know calls'yiiiet rI1 T"out home
when someone I trying to call.
The callr through to. i








Haveathree-way numbers.
conversation. With Speed Calling a
You used to call Dan and then I Imporantm numbr is aut
Diane. No, you can talk to estaically dale rc. It makes
..Cu st yom lng F t who has tpaoubaidialing o
with friends.

I FREE SERVICE CONNECTION
DURING OCTOBER AND NO-
VEMBER ONLY FOR CUSTOM CALLING FEATURES AND
TOUCH TONE SERVICE.
CALL AND PLACE YOUR ORDER TODAY!!!
Port St. Joe and The Beaches call 229-7231. All others call 1-800-
772-7288.
Touch Tone Service is available in all areas.
Custom Calling Features are available only in Apalachicola, Blount-
stown, Carrabelle, Chattahoochee, Eastpoint, Port St. Joe, St. George
Island, The Beaches, Tyndall, and Wewahitchka.

St. Joseph Telephone & Telegraph Company


. .,.Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


JrJLXrl OM A -. -~~~~, .- -- -- -


PAGE SB a


FRANK HANNON, Agent