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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02804
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 31, 1989
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02804

Full Text













THE


Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches In Florida

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1989


251


Per Copy


Heroin...** found in Gulf County


Sheriffs Deputies Make Two Arrests Since Friday'


Heroin, commonly associated
with big city ghettos like those in
New York, Chicago and other
metropolitan areas, has made its
way to the Florida Panhandle and
Gulf County, according to Sheriff
Al Harrison.
Gulf Cointy Judge David
Taunton, also remarked Tuesday
that he has been county judge for
15 years, and the two incidents
during the past few days are the
only ones he has ever seen in
Gulf County courts.
Twice, since Friday of last
week, Sheriffs Department offi-
cers have apprehended people
S from other counties, with heroin
in their possession inside the
county.
BIG HAUL MADE
The most recent heroin arrest
came in the early morning hours
Tuesday, when Deputy Malcolm
Garrett accosted Russell Steven
Varadoe, 42, of Mexico Beach at
a St. Joe Beach roadside parking
place.
The Gulf County officials had
been alerted to watch for Vara-
doe, who had been seen in Mexi-
co Beach, with a large amount of
money in his possession.
Deputy Garrett spotted Vara-
doe's car parked beside Highway
98 near St. Joe Beach at 3:00
a.m., Tuesday and stopped to
check him out. Garrett saw Vara-
doe stuffing something under-
neath his seat as he approached
the car. Garrett called for back-
up and Captain Jack Davilla re-
sponded.
As the pair began to check
Varadoe out, Garrett spotted
some marijuana on the floor-
board of the car. The two then
began a more thorough search
and located a package of needles
S under the seat, as well as other
.parapheralia-- throughout.- -the
car. A black briefcase was found
to contain two pounds of heroin,


a set of scales, assorted needles,
spoons and $5,732 in cash.
Varadoe was transported to


the Gulf County jail where he is
still being held on $100,000
bond, set by Judge David Taun-


Gulf County Sheriff Al Harrison is
shown holding $5,732 in his right and a
plastic bag containing two pounds of her-


School Board and Teacher representa- Whitfield and Lois Byrd. Back row, Walter
tive officials who signed a pay agreement Wilder and Temple Watson. The agree-
Monday are: front row, left to right, Ted ment gave teachers a 6% raise.


Teachers, School Board, Agree On Wages


The Gulf County School
Board and the Gulf County class-
room Teachers Association, FTP/
NEA, signed a one-year insu-
rance and salary agreement here
in Port St. Joe Monday afternoon.
The new contract will give
teachers throughout the system a
six percent salary increase, as
well as contributions of $118.97
per month for medical insurance
provisions. The insurance seg-
ment of the agreement increases
the county contribution by ap-
proximately $50.00 per month
more than last year's agreement.
According to Temple Watson,
the negotiator for the School
Board, the teachers operate un-
der two separate contracts. The
salary and insurance agreements
are for one year duration and the
; remainder of contract items,
such as work rules, are negotiat-
ed in three year increments. Wat-
son -said this is the final year of
the last three-year contract.
The new contract was signed
in a special session Monday af-
" ternoon7 by Lois Byrd, teacher
representative: Temple Watson,


Board negotiator; Ted Whitfleld,
Board Chairman and Walter


Wilder,
Schools.


Superintendent


Varadoe's car and posses-
(See HEROIN on Page 3)


oin recovered in two arrests made Friday
and. Tuesday. The Sheriff said it was the
first heroin ever recovered in Gulf County.


Showers of

Bubbles Hit

PSJ Area
Lawrence Welk made a mint
of money operating a bubble ma-
chine, but the City of Port St. Joe
has been receiving a number of
complaints for operation of
theirs.
Both bubble machines-
Welk's and the City's-are harm-
less to people and property, but
no matter, the complaints come
in anyhow.
For the past 10 days, periodic
waves of small bubbles have been
floating around the vicinity of
Port St. Joe, causing some con-
cern from some people and being
ignored by others. The bubbles,
of course, are coming off the set-
tling pond of the City's Wastewa-
ter Treatment Plant.
Contacting Larry McArdle,
manager of the Wastewater Treat-
ment Plant failed to reveal any
facts in the matter. McArdle re-
ferred questions to Mayor Frank
Pate, who said the problem has a
multitude of causes, but hopeful-
ly, won't last much longer.
According to Mayor Pate, sev-
eral factors enter into the rash of
bubbles, none of which can be
rectified in a short while. The
Mayor said the problem wasn't
being ignored, and emphasized
of the fact that the bubbles were in-
(See BUBBLES on Page 3)


Apply for Funding to

Repair Water Tower
Attempts at securing funds to repair the Highland View
water tank and put it back into service were initiated this
week, with retiring County Attorney William J. Rish ap-
proaching the Farmers' Home Association for a loan to do
the work, which has been estimated to cost as much as
$40,000.
Engineers have taken a cursory look at the tank to de-
termine it is in basically sound condition, but needs repair
due to a long period of neglect by the old Highland View wa-
ter system. The system is now operated by the Gulf County
Commission, who also function as the water district board.
Rish said Wednesday Farmers' Home is considering the
request, discussing the matter with the present holders of
the old Water District bonds, which ear-mark service reve-
nues from the system for bond payments. Rish seemed op-
timistic about working out an arrangement for the financ-
ing.
The 75,000 gallon storage tank has been valued at ap-
proximately a $175,000 replacement cost.



Inequities, State Pressure

Hike Gulf Assessments


Gulf County Property Ap-
praiser, Kesley Colbert, in a way,
told the Kiwanis Club the grass is
always greener on the other side
of the fence, as he explained the
sudden rash of property apprai-
sal increases in the county this
year.
Colbert said the biggest cause
of the need for property re-
appraisal, such as happened this
year, was inequities in appraised
property values throughout the
county. The other contributing
factor was continued and consid-


erable pressure from the state's
Department of Revenue to place
property on the appraisal list at a
fair market value.
The thing which makes the
grass seem greener on the other
side of the fence is that some
property owners feel they were
singled out for the valuation in-
creases, thinking other like prop-
erty throughout the county is not
appraised with the same yard-
stick.
The Property Appraiser said
(See INEQUITIES on Page 3)


Hearings Reveal Support for Mandatory Garbage Service


Two sparsely attended hearings con-
cerning what to do with garbage collec-
tion service in Gulf County presented
soldified public opinions to the Gulf
County Commission about what the
residents at the hearings wanted done.
With no dissenting input, the Com-
mission was told the people wanted
mandatory garbage collection service
and, after it was brought up, there
seemed to be unanimous agreement
that the county should operate that col-
lection service, rather than hire private
contractors.
The only thing concrete which -has
come out of two public hearings con-
cerning handling of the county's solid
waste is that the Swa-Car collection


County operated pick-up service gets surprising sup-
port from suburban areas. Board leaning toward fran-
chising pick-up service to private contractor.


trailers will be taken out of service and
their collection stations closed down by
October 1.
In two hearings, held recently both
in Wewahitchka and -Port St. Joe, the
Commission listened to public input
concerning their solid waste woes and
stressed there is nothing. certain yet
about future plans, except the closing-
of the Swa-Car sites. -
.. Chairman Doug Birmingham -said


the Commission was currently consid-
ering three options open to them toward
lifting the solid waste expense load off
the ad valorem tax-payers and placing
it on the users as a fee. These options
include, getting out of the-solid waste
. service altogether, partially getting out
of,the garbage collection service or fran-
chising out the collection service to a
. private contractor..
All of this is designed to save the


County approximately $200,000 in the -
cost of operating the Swa-Car service.
Presently, the Swa-Car equipment is
in bad shape and both tow trucks need
replacing. So, in effect, the $200,000
savings is probably a one year saving,
but the annual reduction in cost would
still be considerable. The county pres-
ently empties all of the Swa-Car sta-
tions in the county six days a week. The
trailers are pulled to the nearest com-
pactor site and an empty one left in its
place.
Until the compactor -station is built
in the north end of the county, all Swa-
Car loads in that vicinity are hauled di-
(See HEARINGS on Page 3)


USPS 518-880

FIFTY-FIRST


YEAR, NUMBER 53















rIiI.


THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, AUGUST 31,1989


Good Move!


\Hunker Down with Kes (


Refurbished Water Tank An Asset I Don't Even Remember Voyager I


We used to go out on the
front porch after supper, lay
down on our backs, prop our feet
up on the rail and wait for the
stars to come out. Now, I know
what you're thinking, "Gee, that
sounds like a lot of fun." We
thought it was! It was before the
days of T.V. so there were no re-
runs of the Beverly Hillbillies to
keep our minds occupied and-
growing. Leon lost the double
nine in our domino set sometime
around 1954 so that was out.
Dad was going to buy a deck of
Rook cards the next time he got
to town. But until the creek went
down and he could cross .
let's just say we had ample time
for serious star gazing.
One night a week, of course,
belonged to Amos and Andy. And
the oldest continuous show In the
history of radio, the world famous
Grand Ole Opry took up our Sat-


urday evenings. The rest of the
week we'd lay around on the
porch, talk about going to Mem-
phis-one day and count the stars.
As happens when you get to
doing some serious star gazing
the conversation would drop off
and I'd be left alone to ponder the
amazing world "up yonder." -
How did it all get going? How
far way is the closest one? The
furtherest? Why do some kind'a
sparkle and some don't? Soon
you'd get around to thinking
about our planet. And how did I
get here on Earth at this particu-
lar time and place. What kind of
plan do I have for my life? Does it
fit in with all those stars out
there? Mind bogglingI Undaunt-
ed, we'd ponder on for hours, in-
terrupted only occasionally by the
laughter as someone opened Fi-
ber McGee and Molly's closet or
the phenomenon of a shooting


star.
"Did you see that one?"
'Yeah, it fell all the way to
earth. Must'a hit out in Montana
somewhere."
"Leon, what makes a star
shoot off like that?"
"Gases at the center explode I
think. Also sometimes they just
get tired of their neighbors and
decide to move and some, like
that last on, just want to visit
Montana."
I couldn't wait to get a little
older and understand it all like
Leon. As we'd fall silent again I'd
zero in on one star and wonder to
myself, "Is there a ten year old
boy laying up there on his porch
staring down at me." And some-
times, if you got real still, and
kept your eyes glued to the stars
you could actually feel the earth
move. Mom would stick her head
out the screen door, 'Why are you


By
Kesley
Colbert


-I7
lit


"


guys so quiet out here?"
'We're just pondering, Mom,
must pondering "
I tell you something else
about the stars. You could de-
pend on 'em. They were with you
every night. Shucks, even if it
were cloudy, foggy, and pitch
black out, you knew they were up
there. And when :the weather
cleared they'd be waiting .
every time. They still are.
I read the other day that Voy-
ager II sent back pictures of ice
volcanoes on Triton. You know,
we never noticed that from the
porch. And Neptune has six
moons that no one knew about.
(See KESLEY, Page 3)


WORLD WAR II started 50
years ago this-week, when Adolph
Hitler sent his panzers into Po-
land and invented the new word,
Blitzkrieg. World War II has been
identified by those recalling those -
days during the past week as the
last'civilized war; the last war to"
be fought by gentlemanly rules.
I remember World War II,'
from the beginning to -the bitter
end, and it was anything but a
gentlemanly confrontation.
Everyone in the world knew
Adolph Hitler was gearing up to
start a major conflict. Everyone
in the world' knew Hitler was an
unsettled madman. Everyone in
the world knew the German lead=
er was capable of anything. Still,
the world was not poised and
ready to meet his first thrust into
world domination.
The Poles-his first target-
were still using horse drawn artfl-


y" Port St. Joe Experienced World War II On A Personal Basis
Sly.TeEnglish weedepending to be at least 50 yasold and died. including civilians by the dm ebut during this time, the people of Port St. Jot
wer ourr re- drasmagooe cldae


onull el langsaa sV.t-Uaaan anu evea
had to send a boat to unprepared
America-to get a load of guns to
go into. France with on their ini-
tial foray against the German dic-
fator and his hordes of planes
and tanks.
In the meantime, Hitler was
armed to the teeth with the mod-
ern weapons of war.
In spite of the many evident
signs the war was coming, Ger-
many was ready and the rest of
the world was not.

I REMEMBER WORLD War II
as plain as if it -were yesterday.
I'm sure those of you who were
around during those days re-
member it too. I'm beginning to
realize there are more people
alive in our community today
who do not remember the big war
than there are those who do re-
member.
To remember the war one has


collection to recall. any part of that.
war.
We all thought the world was
coming to an end before the con-
frontation was all over.
Germany, Britain and France
got into the fighting early. They
all started In September of 1939
and the United States didn't get
into the act until the Japanese
bombed Pearl Harbor in Decem-
ber of 1941. Still, those small na-
tions of Germany and Japan
caused us more than a few anx-
ious moments before it was all
over with.
Germany, less than half the
size of the United States, was
taking on Britain, the U.S. and
Russia, all at one time and except
for the diversion Japan was caus-
ing the United States, the small
German nation was hahdlihg us'
all there for a little while.
It was no picnic, during
World War II. Millions of-people


WORLD WAR II caused hard-
ships for the entire world and
those hardships weren't limited
to the fighting men, alone.
There were very few people
anywhere in the world, during
World War II, who didn't feel
some adverse effects from the
fighting and dying.
Every continent on earth had
an unfriendly shell land on their
soil at one time or another during
those six years of untold misery.
Even -the United States. felf
the threat "of -unfriendly guns,
when the Germans sent a 'sub-
marine in "close enough to: shell
the Eastefriseaboard on an occa-
sion or two arfd their U-boats reg-
ularly patrolled our coasts. -
.-The- Ja.~jaese also put a sub-
marine.close enough to shell.Cal-
ifornia on- one. -occasion. They
didn't do any but psychological


worst kind.
We all thought we were safe
from harm in the United States.
When the German sub torpe-
doed the "Empire Mica" off the
coast of Cape San Bias, the war
really came home to us here in
Gulf and Franklin Counties.
When the Germans scuttled a
lumber ship near the entrance to
the Port St. Joe harbor, it caused
people here to be wary of strang-
ers and to man patrols of our
beaches at night in deadly ear-
nest.
The airplane spotting tower
which was right here in front of
the present building of The Star,
in the middle of where Williams
Avenue presently runs, was-
manned regularly and diligently.

THE WAR WAS being fought
in the- South. Pacific and in Eu-
rope, but you couldn't convince


e of that.
at a onr-


tion of that war was being fought
right here in our bacc yard.
With Tyndall Air Force Base
in full operation, training aerial
gunners at that time; with South-
eastern Pipelines furnishing gas-
oline for the entire Southeastern
seaboard through its terminal
and tank farm here in Port St.
Joe; with St. Joe Paper Company
and St. Joe Lumber and Export
Company furnishing paper and
lumber for the war effort, Port St.
Joe was a full-fledged military
target.
Not many people today know
it, but the Willis V. Rowan Post
116, American Legion is named
after -Port St. Joe's first casualty
in World War II. Willis V. Rowan
had his-plane shot down in the
South Pacific. When that hap-
pened, we were all convinced- the
war was part of us. And, it stayed
a part of us until the last shot
was fired.


St. Joseph Bay Tide Table
ate Time Ht. Time
. 31 11:59 a.m. H 1.5 9:00 p.m.
pt. 01 1:08 p.m. H 1.3. 8:21 p.m.
pt. 02 12:48 a.m. H .0 6:40 a.m.
3:01 p.m. H ,1 6:18 p.m.
pt. 03 12:39 a.m. H 1 9:00 a.m.
pt. 04 1:01 a.m. H 1.4 10:50 a.m.
pt. 05 1:36 a.m. H 1.6 12:16 p.m.
pt.06 .2:25 a.m. H 1.7 1:25 p.m.


THE STAR-_ Postmaster: SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
W Send Addre s Change to In County-$10.00 Year In County--$8.00 Six Months..
W Published Every Thursday at 304-306 Williams Avenue Out of County--$15.o0 Year- Out of County--10.00 Six Months
SWU- .PO g Port St. Joe, Florida 32456-0308e Star
i" 4-.- by The Star Publishing Company Post Office Box 308 TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error:or omissions in advertise-
Second-Class Postage Pafd at Port St:Joe, FL Port St. Joe, FL 32456-0308 ments, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage fur--
Wesley R.Ramsey Editor& Publisher Phone 227-1278 their than amount received for such advertisement. -
yI Wesley R. Ramsey............Editor & Publisher -
SWilliam H. Ramsey..............Production Supt. SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thought-,
SP Frenchie L. Ramsey.............Office Manager AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456- fully weighed.. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thor-
Shirley Ramsey.......................ypesetter 0308 oughly.convinces. The'spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


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Water seemed to be the main item of concern by governing
bodies in and around Gulf County last week. At least two gov-
erning boards were concerned with improvements to their 'sys-
tems and one was concerned with being forced to hike rates.
The city of Port St. Joe is hiking its water rates to meet in-
creased expenditures of supplies and equipment and for in--
creased demands placed on this and every system by the regu-
latory agencies.
Being assured of a safe supply costs money.
The Gulf County Commission made what we consider a de-
cision which has been delayed too long already, Tuesday, when
it made the decision to arrange for financing and refurbish the
Highland View water tower, putting it back into service.
Highland View can get along without the tank, so long as it
poses no danger to those living in its vicinity. However, the
Commission learned the tank is more dangerous empty than it
is filled with water. The weight of the water helps hold it in
place.
The tank will make all the difference in the world to the
Beach Water Service system, which is furnished bulk water by
the same system which now furnishes Highland View;
Highland View has plenty of pressure, being as near the
source of supply as they are; but, by the time the water is
pumped to the distance to the beaches, it loses much of its
pressure. The elevated tank at Highland View will give the
beaches the benefit of more pressure than it has now. True, the
pressure still won't be what it would be if the tank were located
in St. Joe Beach, but the improvement will be noticeable.
The safety, factor is the most to be gained. Should the
pumps at the Port St. Joe water treatment plant fail for lack of
power, machinery break-down or any other reason, this entire
area from Highland View to Gulf Aire Subdivision would be
without water. It takes no genius to see what would happen if a
fire should break out in such a situation.
The water tower at Highland View is no lightweight. It is a
sizeable tank, and a valuable asset to this section of our
county. It is more than adequate to serve the population on
both the Highland View and Beach systems.



Pleased with Support

We're pleased with the energetic and spontaneous support
we're getting from every phase of official Gulf county encourag-
ing Florida Power Corporation to locate its proposed new gener-
ating plant here in Gulf county. Almost to a man, every board
which one would expect to express the official position of the
county has unequivocally come out in support of the project
and is encouraging Florida Power to make good on a promise
made 12 years ago to build their next power generating plant
here in Gulf County on the north end of the Gulf County Canal.
Almost a spontaneous voice went up from the county, the
city, the Chamber of Commerce, the man in the street .. from
every direction one could hope for, in a unified shout of approv-
al for the plant to be located here.
We can probably guess that such unified purpose will go a
long way toward convincing Florida Power this is the place to
be. There should be no doubt in their mind but what the gener-
ating plant would be welcome in Gulf County. Being welcome
in a certain location goes a long way toward convincing a final
decision in favor of a particular site.
Florida Power has a long history of responsible, efficient
and safe electric energy generation. Gulf county has a long his-
tory of responsible, efficient and reasonable dealing with major
industry from both the standpoint of a neighbor and employ-
ees. We are relatively free of labor union strife. We are tolerant
of heavy industry, because we have lived with it for a long time
and understand its needs. -
Florida Power would be a most welcome addition to our
community and to our economy. We feel our county can offer
and will offer any incentive any other county will offer because
we feel we already know them and understand that we can get
along with each other.


q k-hlmdwAll-lm WRIA&MA -


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THE S TAR. POR~T S' T. JOEV. FL mTHURSAY. AUG. 31. 19RQ


SShad


Phantry

By Wendell Campbell



Letter Writers

Except for business matters, letter writing has almost become a
thing of the past.
I have a sister who is an avid letter writer. She also writes
books and is talented in many other ways. She writes me from time
to time and her letters are always long and interesting and full of
love and compassion. It's always nice to see one of her fat letters in
the post office box.
Although I don't write many personal letters, I have much re-
spect for those who do. It's much easier for the lazy person, like my-
self, to pick up the phone and make a call, say what we have to say
and hang up.
The written word, however, is different. Once you receive some-
thing that is written you can read it, put it aside and re-read it
again and again, for years to come. When it is written, it is docu-
mented, for as long as the ink and paper last.
For instance, I received a letter just last week from a man who
lives in Indian Pass. It's one of those letters that I will keep and re-
read from time to time because it is funny, it makes a point and I'm
honored that he would take time to sit down and write me. Here it
is: I
August 11, 1989
Dear Mr. Campbell:
I've been sitting in the sun and reading a short article from an
.old Reader's Digest. The article was entitled "Which Mountain Did
*Moses Climb?" It was written by a Gordon Gaskill and is from a
compilation of Digest articles, so I don't know the date of original
publication. I did some hasty math and thought you might get a
laugh from it.
Gaskill states that the Biblical story of Exodus is basically a
simple one. Moses and the Israelites flee Egypt. Moses leads them
through a barren desert to the Promised Land and to Mount Sinai
where he spoke to God. Gaskill admits that history has accepted
this as being the "Holy Mount". BUT he and Mrs. Gaskill have set
out to make a determination as to whether or not this is the true
mountain which Moses ascended for his talk. Then he (Gaskill)
chartered a "small plane" and "covered in 90 minutes what it took
Moses to cover in 40 years."
Well, I figure that a "small plane" can usually cover about 125
miles per hour. This being the case, we can assume that the extent
of the "FLIGHT' (either that of Gaskill or Moses), covered a distance
of approximately 200 miles. THEREFORE, if it took Moses 40 years.
to cover this distance, he must have been traveling a distance of...
70 feet per day.
Then Gaskill goes on to say.. quote,
In Exodus 5:3 Moses asks Pharaoh, "Let us go, we pray thee,
three days journey into the desert and sacrifice to the Lord our
God". Exodus 8:17-28 repeats this, "We will go three days journey
into the wilderness." To which Pharaoh replies: "I will let you go ...
only ye shall not go very far." End quote.
That's what struck me funny. I figure Pharaoh knew what he
was doing if he didn't want them to go "very far away". At the rate
they had been previously traveling, the distance they would cover in
three days would have been just over 200 feet. Assuming the Pha-
raoh had a medium size palace, 200 feet would probably not have
put them even outside the front doorl!
At 70 feet per day, Moses and his people could have covered the
distance, of the Olympic Marathon in just over 5 years the 100
yard "dash" would have been accomplished in slightly more than 4
days.
Just a little sorhething to "alter and illuminate your days".


If all the above points are true, and I'm sure they are; there are
a few observations I would like to make. First of all, either Moses
was lost for several years or he led the Israelites from Egypt
through New York, via California.
Another consideration is that Mr. and Mrs. Gaskill could have
rented a lear jet to cover the distance Moses covered.
The last point is a suggestion for Leo. The next time you plan on
doing some reading, I recommend you don't do it in the sun. These
scientific letters ain't nothing but confusing to me!
Thanks for the letter, Leol


HEROIN -(from Page 1)


sions were confiscated.
Sheriff Al Harrison estimated
the street value of the heroin re-
covered at approximately
$300,000.
FRIDAY ARREST
Friday of last week, the Gulf


Life Insurance
Protection
For You! /


NO HEALTH
QUESTIONS
* NO MEDICAL
EXAMINATION
For Information Call
BOB McKIERNAN
Monday thru Friday
8-5 785-5721
After 5- 227-1321
8/10-31


County Sheriffs Department was
operating a road block on High-
way 98, with drug sniffing dogs,
as part of Operation Rock Pile II
and stopped a GMC pick-up
truck, also found to contain a
quantity of marijuana and hero-
in.
Arrested were Earnest
Wright, 25, of Springfield and
Dennis Mack Jones, 35, of Pana-
ma City.
The drug dogs reacted to the
vehicle when they started the
routine check and officers then
began looking closer for hidden
drugs.
Found under and behind the
seat were several bags of mari-
juana, needles, spoons and two
bottles of suspected heroin al-
ready diluted. Tests later verified
the substance as heroin.
Both the men were arrested
on charges of possession of para-
phernalia, possession of needles,
possession of heroin and had
bonds of $30,000 set by Judge
Taunton. They are still in Gulf
County jail.
Sheriff Harrison said the
presence of heroin in Gulf county
surprised him. 'There hasn't
been much market for this drug
in the entire Panhandle, so we
sure didn't expect to see it in Gulf
County."


CAPE TRADING' POST
C30E (State Park Road)
Near Sunland Center Park '


Wash and Dry Laundromat


Bait Fishing Tackle Groceries
Ice Beachwear Swim Accessories


Open 8- 9- 7 Days a Week,
1TP 8/31/89


HEARINGS
rectly to the incinerator in Bay County
daily.
The county also spent in the neigh-
borhood of $250,000 last year to have
Gulfs solid waste burned in Bay
county's incinerator; a cost which will
continue, regardless of the formula de-
cided upon to handle solid waste.
NEW CONCEPT INTRODUCED
Although the Commission stressed
they were not in favor of requiring pick-
up service after the Swa-Cars are re-
tired, most of the input at the public
hearings was in favor of mandatory
subscription to a pick-up service.
Chairman Birmingham said the
county would deal with private services
to do the pick-up under a franchise
deal, if they elect to go the private col-
lector route.
A surprising amount of support was
also present asking the county to con-


(Continued from Page 1)


sider purchasing packers of their own,
and operate the garbage pick-up routes.
As Richard Herring of Overstreet ob-
served, "I want someone responsible I
can call, and if the county is in the
business, I have that someone availa-
ble."
Residents of Overstreet, St. Joe
Beach and St. Joseph's Peninsula all fa-
vored the county service and a manda-
tory subscription to the pick-up service.
Birmingham stated, 'We're not here
tonight to make a decision. We're here
to get your input and see what you
.would suggest."
The chairman said none of the
present Swa-Car operational force
would be dismissed. "They'll all be
placed on other jobs. The only thing we
will curtail is the collection trailers :and
trucks."


INEQUITIES- (from Page 1)


that for the past few years, beach
property owners in the county
have complained their property is
valued at an inequitable value,
compared to other properties not
situated near the beaches. Col-
bert said, "They were right! The
most real estate transactions
were on beach property and there
was a precedent set as to value
by a willing buyer and a willing
seller. We had no choice but to
set their values as they were set.
They were higher than values of
comparable houses in town, for
instance."
Colbert said the state Depart-
ment of Revenue sets the guide-
lines for coming up with valua-
tions inside the state. 'When a
piece of property or a home is
sold, they know it before my of-
fice does and how much was
paid. They insist on a just valua-
tion being placed against that
property."
The Property Appraiser
blamed the active real estate
market of recent years for the
hikes in property assessments.
'The DOR requires the valuations
follow current values of real es-
tate and homes. If the market
goes up in a certain vicinity, they
insist the assessed values go up.
If the prices go down, they will al-
low a reduction."
INEQUITIES CORRECTED
Gulf County properties were


placed on the assessment rolls at
all sorts of values, causing wide
inequities. These inequities start-
ed worsening rapidly when beach
building started. "An owner of a
beachfront townhouse-three or
more apartments to a single
building-paid around $115,000
for that townhouse and was as-
sessed accordingly. He saw much
nicer, single homes with large
amounts of property in town of a
comparable square footage as his
apartment, assessed at half of
what his assessment was. He
complained of inequities."
Colbert said this same situa-
tion existed in different neighbor-
hoods in town where people pur-
chased homes of comparable
size, but in a different decade.
While the homes were of compar-
able value, the assessments on
county rolls were widely different.
The Property Appraiser said
most of the misunderstanding
among property owners today
has been caused by equalizing
these inequities. "Some proper-
ties went up as much as $30,000
in one year just because they
were on so low to begin with. Re-
alistically, they should have been
increased a small percentage
each year, but they were not."
Colbert said reassessment of
;properties in Gulf County would
have come, no matter who the
.Property Appraiser happened to


BUBBLES --- (from Page 1)


ert and not dangerous.
The Mayor said part of the
problem is the WWP pond, itself.
"The bubble problem is caused by
materials the plant receives in
quantities more than usual. In
the past we have been able to
take care of these periodic influx-
es, but recently DER directed
that we make changes in our set-
tling pond to cause liquids to be
contained in the pond for a long-
er period of time before it is eject-
ed into the bay. These modifica-
tions are a major part of our
present foam problem."
Pate said the foam is stirred
up by aerators which must be op-
erated in the pond. Retaining the
liquid causes the foam to puddle
in the middle of the lagoon, pre-
venting a sprinkling system de-
signed to combat foam from dis-
bursing it. The sprinkling system
does not and never has, reached
the center of the lagoon.
By the time the effluent
reaches the lagoon, however, it
has been treated. Outfall from
the lagoon is nearly as pure as
drinking water.


Letters....
to the Editor

We Must Stop
Drug Peddlers
Dear Editor:
Some people in Dominica and
other countries are making mon-
ey producing cocaine. The dam-
age is done in the United States
where most of it is sold.
The peddlers give crack to
children to get them addicted.
Many are ruined for life. The sale
has spread from the cities to the
smaller towns. Jf we are to remain
a great country, we must stop the
peddlers. We can do this by se-
verity of punishment.
Sincerely,
Larkin Hundley
Port St. Joe


Pate said both the. City and
the firms contributing the foam-
causing agents to the pond are
taking steps to reduce it drasti-
cally. Pate said many of the
changes are already in place, but
said that as with all new installa-
tions, there are glitches in the
system which must be worked
out. He' predicted the problem
would be worked out in a short
while and the bubble problem
abated.
The Mayor again assured
people there was no danger what-
ever from the bubbles. 'They're
nothing but soap bubbles," Pate
said.


Kesley

(Continued from Page 2)
Voyager II even discovered a flat
moon-try selling that one to
Christopher Columbus. And I
don't know how many rings were
discovered to be orbiting Nep-
tune. Great scientific findings?
The Dr. with all the degrees from
Berkley they keep interviewing at
that large observatory in San Ma-
teo, California thinks so. He said
it was the greatest event of our
generation. Of course, some say
the same thing about Woodstock.
I don't want to seem un-space
conscious but I'm not too fired up
on this. I'm not sure I want to
know all of what's out there. And
maybe we're not supposed to un-
derstand the whole universe. You
ever think about that? I just want
to walk out, look up, wonder and
reflect. We're going to mess
around till we eliminate ponder-
ing. And then we won't need a
porch. It's all too deep for me-but
I do have a theory on the stars. I
believe with all my heart that God
put 'em up there to give me some-
thing to do at night between
Amos and Andy and the Grand
Ole Opry.
Respectully,
Kesley


PROVISIONS WILL BE MADE
The audience was concerned about
two things, primarily: how was the
county going to keep people from dump-
ing their waste in the woods once the
trailers were gone, and what would
they, individually, do with their gar-
bage.'
Birmingham said at least two of the
present haulers would be designated to
patrol the county and prevent indis-
criminate dumping. Those who now live
in rural areas would have the choice of
hauling their garbage to one of two
compactor sites or contracting with a
private collector who would be fran-
chised by the county.
That is the situation at the present
time. Birmingham stressed that it might
be entirely different by October 1, but
the public would be kept informed on
the matter.


be. "It was a. long time coming
and when it arrived, it disturbed
some people."'
MORE ON ROLLS
Colbert said one thing which
has been accomplished by the re-
assessment is that many people
who have not been paying taxes
in the past, now have their prop-
erty assessed high enough that
they have become tax payers.
"Most of the problems of my
office during this re-assessment
of low valued real estate has been
from people who have never paid
property taxes in Gulf County be-
fore. Suddenly, they are tax pay-
ers and they can't understand
why."
Colbert said property values
in the county took a $50 million
jump this year because of DOR's
insistence on a fair-market/just-
value being placed against every
piece of real estate.
'You ask, how can the state
get so involved? You'd be sur-
prised! The state is involved in
everything; from garbage disposal
to drilling a well, from determin-
ing the method of building your
house to where it can be built.
The state determines ,more than


most people realize they control,"
Colbert said, "Including who has
the privilege of paying taxes and
how much"
The Property Appraiser said
his office has done what they
think is a fair and equitable as-
sessment of property values, to
comply with state rules and regu-
lations. He pointed out he knew
the office had made some errors
and there is a mechanism to cor-
rect any errors made. He urged
anyone who thought they had
been unfairly treated in the fig-
ures shown on their TRIM sheets,
to contact his office to at least
find out how a correction could
be made.
Colbert has stressed in the
past that his office only assesses
valuations of property. Taxes are
levied by taxing bodies and com-
missions. "Our office mailed out
the TRIM notices as a matter of
convenience. We had the ad-
dresses of all property owners in
the county. We perform the ser-
vice for the County Commission,
who is the board actually charged
with compiling the TRIM notices
and getting them to the property
owners."


We Now Have Frozen Yogurt

Steamed or

Raw!
The World's Finest
Oysters


Shrimp
Crabs

Enjoy the best from St. Joseph Bay
and Indian Lagoon with us.
Open Tuesday thru Sunday

INDIAN PASS


RAW BAR
(ON C-30 South of Port St. Joe)


MOR[


Savings of more than $200 per year start
when you switch from an electric water
heater to natural gas.
You will have more hot water, get it faster
and the savings will go on and on.
For more information call:



ST. JOE NATURAL GAS


A


COMPANY, INC.
301 Long-Avenue Phone 229-8216
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456


Danihlsl Semvie CSo.
* Heating & Air

*Major
Appliance
Repair


Plumbing & Electrical Work
229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle .
-- "I3RF 3-'


J


OIJM, JrJll 01. JJrl. rJLI I"tJMO",MX, IILJLr. PAGE 3A


VAfV 42A


P,


/1


10


OF









PAGE 4A THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AU(Q. 31, 1989-

Browns Renew Vows


On 60th Anniversary
St. Joseph Catholic Churchl o'clock mass. The congregation
was the scene of a simple, yet im- was invited to attend.
-p ressive ceremony es Ida thel The reception hall was ,deco-
marriage vows.with Father Thom rated with Mexican coral vine
Crandall. officiating. Their chil- reminiscent- of the reception in
.dren, grandchildren and great 1929.
- grandchildren were present, and Mr. and Mrs. Brown Were cel-
jofihed in- the Catholic mass re- ebrating their 60th anniversary.
sponses. .. They were the first couple to be
A smflall reception was given- married in the St. Joseph Catho-
by the -children after the 10 lic Church of Port St. Joe.


.: 1 r % -,


Reception to Honor
The children of Francis and
Zulieme. Lovett are honoring their
parents' 50th wedding anniver-
sary with a reception on Saturday
afternoon, September 9, from


Lovetts' 50th
3:00 to 5:od at St. Patrick's Hall,
Apalachicola, corner of Avenue C
and Sixth Street.
All friends and relative are in-
vited. No gifts, please.


Kayla Denise Sanders Arthur Torch Williams

Engaged


. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Sanders
are proud to announce the en-
gagement and forthcoming mar-
riage of their daughter, Kayla De-
nise, to Arthur Torch Williams,
the son of Mae and Carl Phillips
of i015 Monument Avenue,. Port
St. Joe.


Shown from left: Kaye Mormile, Brenda Wood, Cindy Phillips and Lisa Kostic.


New Teachers at Port St. Joe Elementary
Students, faculty and staff at Port St. Joe Elementary School welcomed three new teachers and
one aide to their school this year.
Pictured -are Kaye Mormile,
Brenda Wood, and Cindy Phillips,
teachers in ESE classes, and Lisa
H)_Y Ev -Y B V vKostic, aide. We are fortunate to
f'ER E// ) / ^ have these people "oin" us and
3EN\t E'/ / are looking forward to a great
S\.,,G ....^ S / ( year together.


We happily honor
Senior Citizen
Discounts on all
prescriptions.
Also enjoy:
FREE drug consultation
Price quotations on all prescrip-
tions.
2 REGISTERED PHARMACISTS
& A Registered Pharmacist Techni-
cian
to fill your prescription needs
quickly and efficiently.

CAMPBELL
DRUG STORE
Phone 227-1224 Saveway Center


The wedding will be held at
the Highland View First Baptist
Church on Friday, September 15,
at 4:00 p.m. followed by a recep-
tion. No invitations will be
mailed. However, all friends and
relatives are invited to attend this
happy occasion.

Retired Educators
The Gulf County Retired Edu-
cators Association will hold its
regular meeting on Tuesday, Sep-
tember 5, at 3:30 p.m. in the con-
ference room of the Gulf County
Public Library, Courthouse Com-
plex. All retired educators are cor-
dially invited to attend this first
meeting of the 1989-90 Associa-
tion year.

Band Boosters
The Port St. Joe Band Boost-
ers will meet Tuesday, September
5 at 7:30. p.m. in the high school.
' band room.


Thie Administration of
ulf 'Pines Hospital
10220thStreet
Port St. Joe, FL


Cordially Invites you
to an


Open House

at the new

G(ulfPines Medicaf Cfinic
locatedd in the northeast wing of the hospital)
to meet

Dr. lNancy Morgan

and

Dr. James Cersosimo

on


'lhiursday, 9August 31, 1989

4:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m
%ta i2TC 8/24


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op







Cotns eaten'tr
20 edAe -Pr t o
Op n9am.-6pmMna huStry


MOTEL ST. JOE DINING ROOM

Served with Baked Potato or Served with all '
French fries, salad or slaw ^ -the trimmings .
SHRIMP 5 OYSTERS.;............ 95
SEAFOOD PLATTER Served with baked potato, French'fries,
salad or slaw
Gulf
C $1.00 Off 1 Seafood
i on oyster or shrimp dinner, i
i from 6 to 10 p.m. nightly i ..

Operated
by
Charles Smith
& family


'RAA


S^ ^B A.A


. ... . .


. I,


! I








THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUG. 31, 1989


Gulf 'District". Schools has
, openings for ~hildrenhn "the Pre-
Kindergarten Early Interventiod
Program. Childreri who are fourl
or-fve years of age andeenitering
Kindergarten next year are eligi-l
ble. There Is no charge for. this'
preschool programming, butipar-
ents must meet financial ellgibilf
ty guidelines to qualify their
child. Private preschool program-
ming at reasonable rates 'is also-
available if you do hot meet these
guidelines.,


The Gulf Pre-Kindergarten
Program is operated in coopera-
tion with the 'Kids Instructional'
Day Service (K.I.D.S.). Quality,
.preschQol education, is offered at
the K.I.D.S. Center located at. 309
Williams Avenue in Port St. Joe.
Teaches, at. K.I.D.S. are exten-
- sively .trained to provide for the
learning and care needs of the
preschool child. Further ques-
tions regarding this preschool
programming may be directed to
K.I.D.S.'at 227-7440.


N.W. FLORIDA TEL-COM, Inc.


Openings- n Pre-K

Intervention Program


Residential & Business Telephones
Sales, Installation, Maintenance -
Pre-Wiring & Leasing

Free Estimates 1-800-338-7420


Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Alligood

Golden Anniversary
A reception was held Saturday afternoon at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. J. A. Alligood to honor them on the occasion of their fifti-
eth .wedding anniversary. The reception was held at their home lo-
cated on Land's Lake in Wewahitchka, and many of the couple's
friends and relatives called during the afternoon to wish them well
in this milestone in their lives.


New Arrival V
Richard Stokes O'Donnell was
born June 30 at Gulf Coast Hos-
pital. He weighed 7-pounds, 11-
ounces and was 20 1/4 inches
long. The proud parents are Rich-
ard and Estelane O'Donnell of St.
Joe Beach.
Grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Doy J. Stokes of Dothan, Al-
abama and Mr. and Mrs. Richard-
W. O'Donnell of Colorado.


Richard Stokes O'Donnell


It's A Boy!
Charlie and Janice Wood of
Kissimmee are proud to an-
nounce the birth of. their son,
Zacharie John on August 26 at
Orlando RMC. He weighed 6-
pounds, 14-ounces.
Grandparents are J.B. and
Barbara Wood of White City and
Robert .and Pamela Owens of
Tampa.. .,
Great grandparents are Char-
lie and Eva Wood of Burgess
Creek and Guy Tate of Durham,
North Carolina.


Craig Watson Sandra Scott

Engaged


Mr. and Mrs. John F. Scott of
Marianna are proud to announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Sandra, of Tallahassee, to Craig
Watson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jim-
my Watson of Bristol.
Grandparents of the bride-
elect -are Lena Daniels and the
late Ivey (Bee) Daniels of Marian-
na and the late Mr. and Mrs. W.L.
Scott of Alford.
She is a 1983 graduate of
Marianna High School in Marian-
na.
The prospective groom is the
grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs.
Wilmer T. Watson and the late
Mr. and Mrs. Ervin L. Chewning
all of Pensacola.
He is a 1979 graduate of Lib-
erty County High School in Bris-
tol.
The bride-elect is employed
with the Department of Labor in
Tallahassee as a Secretary Spe-
cialist, and he is self-employed in,


construction.
The wedding will be an event
of October 7 at 8:00 p.m., East-
ern time at the Church of God in
Bristol.
Friends and relatives are in-
vited to attend and share in this
happy event.


HOLE IN


YOUR


CHECKBOOK?


Not with our Interest Checkingi

If your checking funds don't earn
interest, its as if dollars are falling out of
your checkbook and blowing away. Switch
now to our checking with interest We'll
pay you 51A% a year-so you'll start
finding extra dollars, and stop losing.
them.


CITIZENS FEDERAL
'SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION


Port St. Joe
227-1416


Wewahitchka Apalachicola
639-2111 653-982%

EQUAL HOUSING
': LENDER


. I, 6


P. 0. Box 934
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Bus. Ph.: 904/648-8343
Monday Friday 8-12 and 1-5
Office hours E.S.T.


DAGE. 5A


quess Who! Sawe Birthday,
Nota 'Tuins, In 'Their .r Tifts
!lfappy 'Birtfidazy;
Lov'e Mother & ?Belinda


Our Deepest Sympathies on your

40th birthday

Margaret Elaine


I rALrr, 011%


11




...............................- ~1%~~~.


Another great summer came
to an end recently at the Stac
House. Many students took ad-
vantage of the Stac House for
their summer time entertainment
and as usual it was a competitive
ending. The tournaments were
held for all age groups in various
games and activities. Some 200
or better students from ages six
through 18 participated and com-
peted for trophies. Some students
were defending previous titles
while others began competing for
the first time.
Thanks are extended to Chey-
ene Godfrey and Jim Anderson
for such a pleasant and fun sum-
mer. Winners are listed by age
groups in the following catego-
ries:
Pool, 6, 7, 8 year olds, 1st
Tina Taylor, 2nd Wade Kenning-
ton. 9, 10 year olds, 1st Brian
Wood, 2nd Kara McDaniel and


Brian Simon; 11, 12 year olds,
1st Jonathan Pierce, 2nd John
Murphy; 13,14 year olds, 1st Tra-
vis Williams, 2nd, Norton Arrant;
15, 16 year olds, 1st John McDo-
nald, 2nd Brian Donnell; and 17
and up category, 1st Mickey
Gainnie, 2nd Tub Harper.
Ping Pong;- 6, 7, and 8 year
olds, 1st Leigh Lawrence, 2nd
Amanda Bateman and Stephanie
Owens; 9 and 10 year olds, 1st
Jarred Patterson, 2nd Kristi Law-
rence; 11 and 12 year olds 1st
Brad Stephens, 2nd Jonathan
Pierce; 13 and 14 year olds, 1st
Chad Arrant, 2nd Travis Wil-
liams; 15 and 16 year olds, 1st
Scott Boykin, 2nd Brian Donnell;
and 17 and up category, 1st Jim
Anderson and 2nd Mickey Gain-
nie.
Connect 4; 6, 7, and 8 year
olds, 1st Tina Taylor, 2nd Joshua
S.'.'tU


FAUIr DAM Ir2m, oltsm. z-wjml ol. o, r ---- -.1 .---


McCulley; 9 and 10 year olds, 1st
Kristi Lawrence and 2nd Adam
Whitfleld; 11 and 12 year olds,
1st Mathew Roberson, 2nd Jona-
than Pierce; 13 and 14 year olds,
1st Chad Arrant, 2nd Nichole
Wilder; and 15 and 16 year olds,
1st Chris Roberson and 2nd John
McDonald.
Chess is a game where all
ages compete against one anoth-
er, and was won -by John McDo-
nald with second going to Han-
non Smith.
The "Erma Award", which is a
sportsmanship and attitude tro-
phy voted on by the Stac House
workers and directors was award-
ed to Mathew Roberson Way to
go Matt!"
Directors of the Stac House
are: "Erma" Louise Parker and
Pam Lawrence.


"tj;
-~1'


i,-'.~
-I'.,


Revival at Overstreet Church Sept. 1-3
Revival services will begin at the evangelist.
the Free Spirit Community
Church of Overstreet September The public is cordially invited
1 3. Brother Ronnie Kent will be to attend.

L,4__ '" A ".' .A .A .A A .A .A .A .A. AAL~A~b b 4~


Local Residents
at National March
Several Gulf County residents
attended the August 26 "Silent
March" in Washington D.C. spon-
sored by the NAACP. NAACP
members and friends marched in
Washington to protest recent Su-
preme Court ruling which weak-
ened past advances in Civil
Rights.
Attending from Port St. Joe
were: Louise Jones, Lula McNeal,
Trina Lewis, Amy Shackleford
and Angel Shackleford.


4
4
4
4




'F 4
4
*
4
4
4
4
4
4
4*i/'


Local residents in NAACP
march in Washington, D.C.


Sports Day
There will be a Sports Day for
kids Saturday, September 2 at
the ball park located on Avenue A
and Main St. There will be an en-
try fee of $3.00 which will cover
all races which include a tug of
war, bicycle, relay, egg race, bal-
Ion race, three legged race,
through the legs shuffle, under-
dog and many more.


Gospel Concert
There will be a gospel concert
Saturday, September 2 at 6:00
p.m. located at Avenue C and
Main St.


Black Dollar Day
September 1 through 8 is Na-
tional Black Dollar Day. Citizens
are urged to exchange their
spending money for Susan B.
Anthony dollars and two dollar
bills at local financial institutions
during this time.


4
4
4
4
4
4


Has Birthday
Joshua Alan Smith
Joshua Alan Smith turned
five on August 5. He celebrated
with a Dinosaur party at the
park. Helping him to celebrate
were: his brother, Jared, Kevin,
Samantha, Kayla, Leslie, Becky,
Todd, Ken, Ken's daddy, Samuel,
Jesse, Evan, Evan's mom,
Mandy, Luana and James, Aunt
Melody, Nana and Papaw Smith
and Mama and Daddy. Everyone
enjoyed cake with ice cream and
punch.
Everyone received a dinosaur
balloon and dinosaur favors along
with a bag of goodies. Joshua en-
joyed having his friends and fami-
ly with him on his birthday.


. .


TOYO TIRES FA AN O'1P


Up to 60,000 Miles Warranty

THE TREAD MILL
307 WEST HIGHWAY 98
PORT ST. JOE





Saunders Chiropractic Center
122 Market Street Apalachicola, Florida
653-2237

Completely equipped clinic with x-ray
and physiotherapy facility.
. Assignment accepted on Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross/Blue Shield (PPC),
Workmen's Comp., Auto Accidents, and Private Insurance.
TWC 6/29/89


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"


NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Florida Church Phone 229-8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
SUNDAY MONDAY FRIDAY
10:00 A.M. Sunday School, 2 years & Adult 12:30 P.M. Intercessory Prayer


11:00 A.M. Morning Worship-& Childrens Church
4:00 P.M. Youth Service
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship "


WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study & Fellowship


"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune in Every Sunday at 1:00 p.m.
S )Sppspr of New Covenant Christian Academy K-4 thru 6th Grade


('.


WE'RE


. .


. .. .. .. ..


Big (
Charlie
of Port St.
large blue
fishing at
Monday.
Charlie!


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Eunece Tamonica Bryant

Celebrates First
Birthday Aug. 5
Eunece Tamonica Bryant cel-
ebrated her first birthday on Au-
gust 5 with a party. Helping her
celebrate were friends and rela-
tives.
She is the daughter of Barba-
ra A. and Derrick T. Bryant.
Grandparents are Robert C. and
Mary F. Bryant, and Anna L. Gar-
-rett.


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THI. STAR. PORT RT. .ro r. PT. THURSDAY. AUG. 31. 1989


Summer Awards Given at Stac House


- I.


WANT MORE SAVINGS? CALL FOR OUR LATEST SALESBOOK.


78


Henderson's Restaurant
309 Monument Avenue Phone 227-7226

Good 6Cookin'
OperEveryDayMonaa -Sunda I
Open 7 days a week 5 a Fn 9 p m
PRODUCE SEAFOOD OYSTER BAR ,
Breakfast Served from 5:00 to 9:30 a.m. '

Serving Hot Biscuits, Hash Browns, Sausage, Bacon,
Hot Cakes, Sausage Gravy, Tomato Gravy
7 Days L uncL hf 11a.m. to 2p.m.
A Week Lunch Buffet All You Can Eat
1 Meat Your Choice of 3 Fresh Vegetables .
Lunches to Go We Deliver ...... .
Cold Drinks Cookies Milk Bread l
Evening Specials
Mon.-Mullet Plate................ 50 3
Tues.-Spaghetti or
Catfish 4.50 SUNDAY SPECIAL
Wed.-Shrimp 6.50 UNDAYSPECIAL
Thur.-Mullet Plate..............3.50 All Over 60
Fri. & Sat.-BBQ Ribs or 00
Chicken _4.00 Lunch .....3$00

SFresh Market 7.
Oysters FRESH PRODUCE
SOn The $ 50' Onions .................,b. 250
Shell doz. Lettuce.............head 590
'^aw_-- Cabbage................b. 200
White
). Potatoes............ 1# 2.25
Shrimp......... ib. $4.50 Up Potatoes.......... .
$ 4i50 Tomatoes................... b. 90
SCountry Music by Over the Hill Road Service 24 Hrs. a
S Gang, Saturday Night Day & Mechanic Work

HENDERSON TRUCKING CO.
Ph.: 227-7226 309 Monument Ave.


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Beaches VFD Sell
Barbecue, Mullet
Gulf County Beaches Volun-
* teer Fire Department will be serv-
ing barbecue sandwiches and
mullet this Saturday, September
2, starting at 11 a.m. EST, at the
St. Joe Beach Fire Station.
Each plate will be $3.50
which will Include cole slaw,
baked beans, and tea. The fish
plate will include hushpupples. A.
door prize will be awarded every
half hour.
The public is cordially invited
to attend and participate in this
event.

Fish Fry Slated
September 8
The United Methodist Men
from First United Methodist
Church. Port St. Joe will have a
fish fry on Friday, September 8
from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. Plates will
be $3.50 for adults and $2.00 for
children under the age of 12.
Everyone is Invited to come
by for the evening meal before go-
ing to the football game.

Gets Degree
James Patrick Norton of Port
St. Joe was awarded a degree
from Troy State University during
the summer commencement exer-
cises on August 11.


THES.,T AR .. ,,,.PR ,, S JOE. F TnaUTmTAV Af. A -- 1


Tapper Golf Tourney Is

Scheduled for Oct. 6-8


The 16th annual George G.
Tapper Invitational Golf Tourna-
ment will be staged at the St. Jo-
seph Bay Country Club, October
6-8 with a field of 240 partici-
pants expected to compete for tro-
phies and prizes valued at
$13,000.
This year's tournament will
be directed for the first time by a
steering committee appointed by
Mrs. Amy Tapper to assume the
duties of her late brother, B. Roy
Gibson, Jr.
A favorite of area amateurs,
the tournament is sponsored by
the George G. Tapper Founda-
tion, with proceeds designated for
scholarship at Gulf Coast Com-
munity College.
The Tapper Foundation,
created by the Port St. Joe busi-
nessman and philanthropist on
his death three years ago, has al-
ready distributed over $100,000
to charitable activities and organ-


By Linda R. Whitfield
Birthday Parties Beginning
Last Day Of August
On Friday, September 1, all
lucky boys and girls who have
had a birthday in July or August,
will be treated to birthday cake
during their lunch time. This Is
something new this year at WES
but we felt like birthdays were
special days and should be treat-
ed that way. Mr. Kelley's birthday
was August 14, so I guess he'll
eat cake that day tool


'Dusting off' their patron banners from John Miller, Bill Sumner, Rex Buzzett,
last year's George G. Tapper Invitational Mike Tucker, Amy Tapper, David Gaskin,
Golf Tournament are members of the steer- Alice Bowen and Roy Smith. Not shown are
ing committee for the 16th annual tourna- Harrell Holloway, Dr. Bob King and J. V.
ment, which is scheduled October 6-8 at Gander.
the St. Joseph Bay Country Club [I. to r.]:


went to Emanuel Bible College in
Georgia and it was there that he
met is wife, Alisa. Three more col-
leges later, Joe graduated from
FSU with a degree in Elementary
Education and a minor in music.
Joe is from a family of educators.
He likes to hunt, fish, and partici-
pate in all sports. His wife Alisa
now teaches Third Grade at WES.
(Prior to that she taught Kinder-
garten at Highland View.) In Octo-
ber, the Walkers will be the proud
parents of a baby. Baby Walker
will make his arrival into a loving
1'__.


Fourth Grades Go To home.
Tallahassee Junior Museum
Fourth grade teachers Linda dance Friday
Lawrence, Sue Forehand, and Es- Da ce Friday
their Taunton and their students at Club
went on the first field trip of the at Singles Club
year to the Tallahassee Junior The Blountstown Singles
Museum. The classes had been Club will be sponsoring a dance
studying all about dinosaurs and Friday. September 8 at the W.T.
that is what the current display is Neal Civic Center located at High-
about. .... ----......... .. way 69N In -Blountstown. -
Music will be provided by
Don't Forget Labor Day Holiday Sonny Morris and the Country
Just a reminder to all parents Gold Band. Admission is $3.00
that the schools will be closed on per person and door prizes will be
September 4 for the Labor Day given.
lr v_11-, _l___ -I-l Al __ ln ...... ..


Ladies' Golf
Sets Meeting
The Ladies Golf Association of
- the St. Joseph Bay Country Club
will hold their first meeting of the
1989-90 year on Thursday, Sep-
tember 7 at 1:00 p.m. at the St.
Joseph Bay Country Club.
At this time, the new officers
will preside. They are Dot Groom,
President; Olga Burgess, Vice-
President; Phyllis Altstaetter, Sec-
retary; and Mariann Hendrix,
Treasurer.

Card of Thanks
Just want to say thank you to
all our relatives, friends, church
family, Brother Browning, and
Brother James for your visits,
phone calls, food, flowers, and
most of all your prayers while we
were both ill and in the hospital.
We love everyone and pray God
will bless you all.
E.J. and Tiny Rich


holiday. cool will resume on
Tuesday, September 5. That is
the day that the school will also
start serving breakfast at 7:30.
Student of the Week-Kristi Gay
Kristi Gay, who is 8 years old,
was born on December 6, 1980.
She likes to color in school, but
she does not like to do math. Her
favorite colors are blue and hot
pink. Pizza is decidedly her favor-
ite food and her favorite animals
are a cat and dog. If she had a
million dollars to spend, she
would buy a four-wheeler. Kristi's
parents are Barbara Gortman
and Mark Gay. She's in the third
grade at WES in Mrs. Alisa Walk-
er's class. Kristi always has a
smile for everyone.
WES Staff Member of the Week
The students know who Mr.
Walker Is, but maybe some of the
parents don't. Mr. Walker, who
has taught 2nd and 3rd grade in
Wewahitchka Elementary School,
now teaches 5th and 6th grade
science. Mr. Walker is a native of
Cumberland, Maryland. Although
not an Army brat, Joe Walker
went to 11 different schools be-
fore he graduated. From there he

NPO Tracd Floyd
Completes Course
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class
Taci A. Floyd, daughter of Louise
B. Bandjough of Wewahitchka,
has completed the Advanced
Electronic Technician Course.
During the 10-week course
conducted at the Naval Training
Center, Great Lakes, Illinois,
Floyd received instructions on the
operations, maintenance and re-
pair of communication station re-
ceiver systems with an emphasis
on antenna couplers, voice termi-
nal units and microwave equip-
ment.
A. 1985 graduate of Ruther-
ford High School, Panama City,
she joined the Navy in March
1988. .

Musical Friday
at Mt. Carmel -
A musical program entitled
"All My Help Comes From the
Lord" will be presented at Mt.-
Carmel Baptist Chuich, located
on the corner of Avenue D and
Battle Street;- on -Friday, Septem-
ber 1 at 8:00 p.m.
The pastor, Rev. Jerome Wil-
liains invites the public to attend. -


New Arrival
Cynthia and Phillip Wiggins
of Panama City are proud to an-
nounce the arrival of their baby
boy, Corey Tyler Wiggins, on Sun-
day, August 13 at 11:25 CDT. He
weighed seven pounds, ten ounc-
es and was 20" long. Among his
many visitors in the hospital was
his big sister, Kristen.
Corey is the grandson of Jim
and Bunny Miller of Port St. Joe
and Jerry Wiggins and June Wig-
gins of Panama City. He is the
great grandson of Aline Wiggins
of Panama City and Edith and
Odell Lamberth of Gainesville.


Corey Tyler Wiggins


Jeremy Allen Miller


Jeremy Is Four!
Jeremy Allen Miller celebrated
his fourth birthday a day early on
Saturday, August 19, at the
White City Park.
Jeremy had an Alf cake,
chips, ice cream and punch.
Many of his family and
friends helped him celebrate his
big event.
Jeremy is the son of Ray and
Jan Miller of White City. He is the
grandson of Harold and Janell
Kirkland of White City and Flora
Miller of Port St. Joe. His great
grandmother is Elaine Pridgeon of
White City.


REMODELED


On All Crown Victorias and
Mercury Grand Marquis
Several In Stock to Choose From


$1,000.00 REBATES

THE FIRST REBATES EVER ON THESE MODELS.


.~


THUNDERBIRD AND TAURUS


Thimderbird
Discount $1,500.00
Rebate 1.500.00
Total $3,000.00


ST


JC


M(



C(


Ph. 22


Taurus
Discount $1,500.00
Rebate 1.000.00
Total $2,500.00


THUNDERBIRD ............... ..... m ..............$ $1,suu.uu

TAURUS........................................................... $1,000.00

TEMPO .. .......................................... $1,000.00

" ESCORT......... .................................... $1,000.00

) E PROBE.................................................... $500.00

MUSTANG........................................ $500.00

D T O R RANGER M/T........ ...... $1,000.00
O T O y 1RANGER A/T.........................$750.00

S* BRONCO II........................... $1250
*, "Vl=f S = A-LL F150 TRUCKS......... $500.00

7-1336 322 Monument Av AEROSTAR....;........... $500.00


Port St. Joe, Florida -


izations.
A revolving trophy and ma-
roon jacket are awarded to the
champion of the three-round
tournament, which includes a re-
ception at Mrs. Tapper's home on
Friday evening, and social activi-
ties at the club house on Satur-
day and Sunday afternoons.
Information about the tourna-
ment may be obtained by contact-
ing Mrs. Tapper at P.O. Box 280,.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456.

Card of Thanks -
My wife Laura, and I wish to
thank all our friends and neigh-
bors from Port St. Joe, St. Joe
Beach and Mexico Beach for their
prayers, spiritual bouquets,
cards, and flowers sent during
Laura's heart surgery. She is now
convalescing at home.
Again, thanks.
Laura & Joe Berardi


UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT


PANASTICS
GYMNASTICS

Preschool 6 mo. 5 yrs.
Boys & Girls 5-18 yrs.
Cheerleading Tumbling
PRO SHOP
BAY COUNTY'S
Gymnastics and
CHEERLEADING
TRAINING CENTER
Open Observation Deck. Please Come In and
Watch A Class I


CALL NOW!
769-2543
OFFICE HOURS
3-6:30 P.M. DAILY


'Wewa Elementary


Has Active Start


All Forms of Insurance
Homeowners Auto Flood
* Business Packages *. Group Life Boat
*: Hospitalization Pulpwood & Logging
Mobile Homes .


COSTING INSURANCE AGENCY

322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe none 229-8899
.. . : -


,rim wrin unwr --mr Irn!P- liff. TMTRSnAV. AUG. 31. 1989-


PAGE 7A


zl<









THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUG. 31, 1989


WHAT TO EXPECT FROM YOUR
PHARMACIST


Selecting a pharmacist can be a life and death matter.
Thousands of tragedies are prevented each year by alert
pharmacists.
A pharmacist is a professional on whom you depend to
give you the right medications and the proper information
about taking and storing them. He can spot errors and see
that they are corrected and is available to counsel you about V
medicines and health aids both prescription and non- A
prescription. We hope you chose us as your pharmacist and
expect a lot from us.
"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US with their
prescriptions, health needs and other pharmacy products.
We consider this trust a privilege and a duty. May we be
your personal family pharmacy?"

Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Ave. Port St. Joe.
Convenient Drive-In Window
A Revlon Cosmetics 229-8771 _
a a O



Toward Understanding
By Rev. Jerry BHut Rector St. James and St.Jo Churhes


Moses' Wilderness

Wanderings Can

Teach Christians

About Ministering


What are some practical les-
sons the Church can learn from
ministry from the story of Moses
in the wilderness?
Actually, lessons can be
drawn from this story in many
different areas of human affairs.
Among them there are categories
of ethics, theology, sociology, psy-
chology, etc. For today let's just
consider a few principles that re-
late directly to ministry. In this
article we will only touch the sur-
face. But this may be a start for
some of you as you consider your
own ministries.
As you read this, remember
that ministry simply means ser-
vice. And if you are a true believ-
er, you have been called to serve
the Lord with gladness.
An important principle emerg-
es when we begin to notice Moses
was constantly referring to God in
times of trouble. When his con-
gregation complained and nagged
him about the bitter water of Ma-
rah, the shortage of food in the
wilderness of Sin, and the lack of
water at Rephidim, Moses looked
to God.
He could have fallen back on
his good education, received in
Pharaoh's court. Or he could
have relied on his practical expe-
rience gained under his wise fa-
ther-in-law, Jethro. But he
sought out God, always expecting
a miracle.
He picked up on some good
advice from Jethro concerning
administration in relation to min-

VISTA Marks 25
Years of Service
Started August 20, 1964, Vol-
unteers in Service to America
(VISTA) commemorates 25 years
of service to communities across
the United States. The theme for
this special anniversary is "Build-
ing a Community, One Block at a
Time."
The Area Agency on Aging for
North Florida is proud to be the
sponsor of the ACTION grant
which utilizes 19 VISTA volun-
"teers spread throughout fourteen
counties to coordinate adult liter-
acy programs. This grant is a
cooperative effort with the Pan-
handle Area Literacy -Volunteer
Project, funded by the Florida De-
partment of Education.
The area agency commends
the VISTA volunteers for their
outstanding contributions in
North- Florida and Jack Newell,
Director, for his fine project lead-
ership. For more information,
Call 1-800-330-5366 or in Port
. St. Joe, 229-6166.


JAN'S TOTAL
PACKAGE
Now Offering
MORNING EXERCISE
CLASSES
Classes will be held 3 days a week.
Classes begin Sept. 5. Limited space
so call today to register or for more
information.
JAN NOBLES
229-8907 or 229-8936
Come by the gym at 204 ReidA ve.


istry too. When Jethro came to
visit, he notice that Moses was
beginning to get stress burnout.
There was an endless line of peo-
ple at the door to his tent with
problems to be solved and Moses
was pulling his hair. Moses as-
sumed that God wanted him to
run a one man band, so to speak.
When he took the older man's ad-
vice, and selected others to share
his work, life got better for every-
one.
Some negative lessons show
up in that story too. iWhile Moses
was on the mountain, he left Aa-
ron in charge. Aaron was a priest
of God, a nice religious person
who liked to be popular. He was
chosen by God, and he followed
Moses' instructions faithfully.
You might say he was the ideal
number two man.
His problem came when pop-
ular pressure influenced him to
do something that went against
his training. He only wanted to
make the people happy by fabri-
cating a golden calf to set on the
altar. At the moment, it just
didn't seem to be that bad.
The folly of his behavior be-
came apparent when Moses got
home, right in the middle of his
big celebration. He learned that
shared ministry did not include
putting aside good doctrines in
order to please people.
The final words of Moses on
on for several pages in the Bible.
However there are three ministry
principles that govern everything
he said at the end of his life. The
first is that God commands and
expects obedience. Failing to obey
God brings self-inflicted harm.
Secondly, the Lord is always be-
fore you. No matter which way
you turn in life, if you open your
eyes you will see his manifesta-
tions. And finally, you can choose
to obey God. You are never with-
out the/ability to choose.
Shortness of space prevents
more illustrations. Perhaps you
can find time to go back and read
this wonderful story in Exodus.
Select a version you can really
understand, read carefully, and
receive God's blessings.


- "- -"
-- -
im- -r
- m -


M, olm - -- - --, -, ----


Sharks Play

Bay Friday

In Jamboree
The Sharks will kick off
their 1989 gridiron season Friday
evening as they take on the Bay
High Tornadoes at Tommy Oliver
Stadium in the fall Jamboree. The
Sharks will play Bay for an entire
half, beginning at 8:30 p.m. EST,
with Rutherford and Mosley going
head to head in the second half.
After fielding a young team
for the past two seasons, the
Sharks have a complement main-
ly of juniors and seniors with
nine defensive and seven offen-
sive starters returning from last
year.
DEFENSIVE STARTERS
Returning from last year as
starters are Roy Campbell, defen-
sive end; Darrell Tull, defensive
guard; Ernest Gant and Russell
Martin, outside linebackers; Wil-
lie Smith and Calvin Pryor, inside
linebackers; Eric Langston and
Desmond Quinn, half backs and
Terry Quinn, safety. Rounding
out the defensive unit will be
Russell Cherry, defensive guard;
Tyrone Hamilton, defensive end,
Matt Taylor, outside linebacker
and Ken Monette, halfback.
OFFENSIVE STARTERS'
Seven Sharks will be return-
ing starters from last year: Rus-
sell Martin, tight end; John Park-
er, offensive tackle; Eric Lang-
ston, wide receiver, Chris Rober-
son, offensive guard; Ken Mon-
etLe, wide receiver;, Nicholas Ro-
lack, tailback and Russell Cherry,
fullback. Other starters will be
Bill Ramsey, quarterback; Buck
Fernandez, center; Roy Campbell,
offensive guard and Bernard Mill-
er, offensive tackle.
Bobby Williams is the return-
ing place kicker and Matt Taylor
will do the punting duties for the
Sharks this year.
The Sharks will start regular
season play next Friday, Septem-
ber 8, with a home game against


IM*SUZUKI j:4


9.9 MCSK..............$1285


40 MCSK........


OUTBOARD
MOTORS


25 MCSK ..................$1695


................$2040 55 MCLK................ $3055
75 DEMO MODEL ............. $2650


%- SAI.ES & SERVICE
Open 7 Days Port St. Joe


TRUCK BED TOOL BOXES


Our diamond tread plate boxes look just like
chrome and enhance the style and appearance
of your truck. Not only does it enhance the
look it also adds value.
Our boxes are sized to fit all trucks from full-


size, mid-size and imports.
All our tool boxes are constructed from heavy
gauge aluminum to provide the maximum in
strength and protection from rust, pitting and
corrosion.


Reg.
$329.95 Fall Special

A r

4NAPA)

201


$29995


4APA AUTO PARTS


Long Ave.


Port St. Joe


Phone 229-8222


229-6330


MICHELIN XA4
A FRIEND, COME RAIN
OR SHINE. QR SNOW.


155/80R-13 $ 95
ONLY.. 5 1


MICHELIN XH
PERFECT BALANCE
BETWEEN PRICE & QUALITY.


195/75R-14
ONLY..


MICHELIN MXL
SHOWS IMPORTED CARS
HOW TO HANDLE
AMERICAN ROADS.

165/70-13 95
ONLY...


MICHELIN
BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES.



PATE'S

SERVICE CENTER


216 Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe,


Phone229-1261
FL


JAN'S TOTAL PACKAGE
NOWAIR CONDITIONED

Gymnastics and Tumbling Classes for Boys
and Girls Ages 3 and up.

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL
r -------------------------
I COUPON GOOD FOR ONE I
I FREE Gymnastics or Tumbling Class I
I JAN'S TOTAL PACKAGE I
L---------------------------J
Come try a class before you decide. Please bring Coupon for FREE Class!

Registration Fee Is still 1/2 Price thru September.
Class Fees are $20.00 per month for 1 day a week or
$35 per month for 2 days a week. Regular registration
fee Is $20, one time fee.


Wewahitchka.
SEASON TICKETS
Reserved season tickets for
the four home football games will
go on sale Tuesday, Sept. 5th -
8th, at the front office of the
school from 8 a.m. 3 p.m. The
price of the season tickets will be
$12.00 for the four games. No
one game reserved tickets will be
sold.


E 8A


I


M MA


m


$8195












THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUG. 31, 1989


lSrenn Tip


HIGHLAND VIEW

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner Fourth St. & Parker Ave.
"Where Christian Love Is Shown"
SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:00A.M
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 A.M
SUNDAY EVENING SONG SERVICE & BIBLE STUDY 6:00 P.M
THURSDAY BIBLE STUDY (Pine St. Overstreet)............... 2:30 P.M. & 7:30 P.M
WILBUR L REMAIN, Pastor KARESSA H. HEYER, Asst. Pastor
648-8144 TFP 7/13/89-7127/90





electrical services
Call

Shorty 229-6798
26 Years Experience / \
Licensed andBonded
Commercial Residential
Remodeling and Service Work
Reg.No. ER00M81

Charles Sowell 0


Sur-Way Electric




-------- ---------- an-----.-------------



SEASHORES


SUBDIVISION

Is Offering All Remaining Lots at











$1,000 Down Payment
Balance Over Three Years
S10% Interest On Balance Over 5 Years
0All Lots Are $15,000


ERA PARKER REALTY
-0 .Highway 98 and 3istStreet
rB a lMexic Beach, FL
648-5777
-----nterest-On-Balance-O-ver5- ea-rs-


Take a Family


Vacation

at Funtastic


Savings!


Walt Disney
World'
Packages
at Orlando
Marriott
International
Drive
Now through
December 1989 HU1H


$127.00 per couple per day*
Kids under 3 FREE
Kids 3-9, add $23.00 per child.
For one low package price at Orlando Marriott International
Drive, experience the sights and sounds of Walt Disney World*
Vacation Kingdom, just minutes away from where you stay.
All-day passports to your choice of one of the following:
the exciting new Disney MGM-Studios, featuring stage
shows, adventure rides and a behind-the-scenes look at
movie and TV production studios
Magic Kingdom-Park
Epcot*Center 1
Luxury accommodations for 2 days and 1 night at Orlando
Marriott International Drive
Use of three hotel pools, four lighted tennis courts and
beautifully landscaped grounds
Visit a vacation wonderland that's fun for the whole family!
Call today for reservations: toil-free 800-421-8001,
or (407) 351-2420.
*Taxes. not included. Extra day $69.00 room only. Kids sleep free when occupying the
same room as parents. Offer not valid on some dates.

Marriott People know how.

-This affordable vacation package includes:

ORLANDO arno
INTERNATIONAL DRIVE


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
Most garden hobbyists recog-
nize the importance of the three
major fertilizer elements nitro-
gen, phosphorus, and potassium.
But how much do you know
about the so called minor ele-
ments boron, copper, iron,
manganese, and others? -
A typical fertilizer recommen-
dation might call for something
like a 10-10-10, with minor ele-
ments. To most of us, these mi-
nor elements are also called trace
elements. The number 10-10-10
tells how much of the major plant
nutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus
and potassium) the fertilizer con-
tains. What about minor ele-
ments, and how do plants use
them? In this article I will try to
answer some basic questions
about trace elements your plants
are likely to need.
The minor elements we'll talk
about are boron, copper, iron,
manganese, molybdenum, and
zinc. We call these minor ele-
ments because we only find trac-
es of them in the soil' if they're
present at all. A few parts of a mi-
nor element, which spreads
* through millions of parts of soil,
are usually all a plant needs.
- Boron is required to stimulate
a process called meristem diffe-
rentiation. At the tip of a plant,
cells multiply as generalized tis-
sue. Without boron, plants are
unable to turn this tissue to
leaves, roots, and so on. That is
without boron, the meristem re-
mains undifferentiated.
Zinc, controls a plant's ability
to make a material called indolea-
0 cetic acid, which influences plant
growth and root development.
Plants use molybdenum in
making protein a vital part of eve-
ry living cell plant or animal.
Manganese and iron serve a
couple of functions. First, plants
need them to make chlorophyll,
which is essential for photosyn-
thesis, the process by which

Eat More

SChicken for

Good Health
Are you eating your way to
heart health? Recent studies have
proven that diets high in mono-
unsaturated fat. such as olive oil,
reduce blood cholesterol levels
and the risk of coronary heart
disease. That's why olive oil, long
-.4
- a staple in healthy Mediterranean
diet, is fast becoming the oil of
choice for health-conscious Amer-
ican consumers.
Here's a recipe idea that's
ideal for busy cooks. It's a light
dish that takes only 15 minutes
to prepare.
CHICKEN CUTLETS SAUTEED
WITH ROSEMARY
1/2 cup seasoned bread crumbs
1 tablespoon snipped fresh rose-
mary or 1 teaspoon dried rose-
mary, crumbled
1/2 teaspoon freshly-grated lem-
on peel
1/4 teaspoon coarsely-ground
black pepper, or to taste
8 boneless, skinless chicken
breast halves (1 1/2 pounds
fillets)
3 tablespoons extra light olive oil
1/2 cup dry white wine or chick-
en broth
Mix bread crumbs with rose-
mary, lemon peel and black pep-
per. Roll chicken in crumbs to
coat. Heat olive oil in large skillet
over medium-high heat. Add
chicken; cook until golden-brown,
about 2 minutes per side. Add
white wine, reduce heat to low,
cover and cook until chicken
meat turns white and loses pink
color, about 8 minutes. Makes 4
main-dish servings, 2 chicken fil-
lets each.


~.'iij


'4


"The Exciting Place to Worship"


AN=-firstBaptist Church

102 Third Street
Port St Joe, Floria

HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor
JAMES ENFINGER, Music/Youth

L -4


Roy Carter
plants produce sugars and starch
from carbon, oxygen, and hydro-
gen. Also manganese and iron
along with copper act as cata-
lysts, or plant enzyme activators.
A plant may not make anything
out of these elements, but they
have to be present for certain life
processes to go on.
Finally, let's talk about cal-
cium and sulfur, which are in-
cluded in a group of plant nutri-
ents called secondary elements.
Plants use calcium in building
new cells. This element is an es-
sential part of the cell wall struc-
ture. A compound made with cal-
cium also helps plants maintain
the right acid level inside its cells.
Sulfur is used in making amino
acids the building blocks of pro-
tein. We also find sulfur in oil
compound that give some plants
distinctive odors.
When plants don't get the mi-
nor and secondary elements they
need, deficiency symptoms ap-
pear. Spotting, yellowing, leaf
drop, and stunted or deformed
growth are common. However, it
usually takes a trained observer
to diagnose trace elements defi-
ciencies from those symptoms
alone. In most cases, if you buy
healthy plants and follow the cul-
tutal recommendations of your
County Extension Agent or Gar-
deh Center operator, the minor
elements will take care of them-
selves.
> However, never apply more
minor elements than plants need.
Some of these chemicals, espe-
cially boron, can actually harm
plants in high concentrations.



For Life

Insurance,

check with

State Farm.

Permanent Life
Term Life
Universal Life.







Call:

BILL WOOD
403 Monument Avenue
Office: 229-6514

Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.


*ikfl PWA-. .. ~m.".


LIBERTY MANOR


Apartments



800 Tapper Avenue


229-6353


A~ UMI~b(


For the Elderly and Disabled


Rent Based Upon Income.


TFC 8/31/89


8001 International Drive Orlando, Florida 32819 (407) 351-2420


~'~0


) J ULLEMORE
REAL ESTATE
INC.


OF


Corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
(904) 648-5146 or 1-800-458-7478


Ellen F. Allemore, Broker
648-8939 -
Joy Holder 648-8493
Dot Craddock 648-5486
Brenda Lynn 648-8215
Nancy Mock 227-1322
Flo Melton 229-8076
Charline Hargraves 648-8921
John Maddox 648-8899


NEW LISTINGS:
Gulf AIre: Nice residential lot,
$17,900.
BEACH FRONT TOWN HOMES
Mexico Beach, beaJ;=to'home, 2 bd., 2 1/
2 ba., fully furnished, U
35th SL Mexico Beach: Large 3 bd., 3 bea. fur-
nished. close to pier, very nice, Reduced to
$119,900.
Cortez St End Triplex at St Joe Beach: Lg. 3
bd., 21/2 ba., covered eck, good layout, fireplaces,
$122,900-$129,000.
9813 Hwy. 98: Absolutely beautiful 3 bd., 2 1/2 ba.,
$159,900.
9815 Hwy. 98: Lovely 2 bd., 21/2 ba., furnished,
$120,000.
9821 Hwy. 98: beaultufully furnished 2 bd., 2 1/2
ba. townhome. Reduced $98,500.
Ward St: WATERFRONT: half of duplex, 3 bd., 2
ba., furnished, fp., NICEI Reduced $121,500.
GULF AIRE
Gulf Aire Drive: Multi or single family vacant lot,
sewer tap pd., Readyl $17,200.
321 Beacon Rd., Gulf Aire: New beautiful roomy 3
bd., 3 ba. brick home, Ig. garage & deck, many
amenities, double oven, etc. Reduced to $130,000.
211 Sea Pines Lane, Gulf Aire: 2 homes in 1, pro-
fessionally decorated upstairs with mother-in-law
suite downstairs. Total of 4 bd., 2 be. 2 kitchens, ja-
cuzzi, stone fireplace, built-in appliances, fumrn., Re-
duced to $116,000. Great financing.
Gulf AIre Drive: 2 triplexes- 1 bd. w/loft each, total
of 6 units, furnished. $38,900 ea.
305 Gulf Are Drive: Beautiful gulf view, 3 bd., 2
ba. brick home, dbl. garage. $115,000.
Gulf Aie Drive: Good single family vacant lot,
$17,900.
202 Periwinkle: Big 5 bd., 3 ba. home. screen
porch, master bd., bath & own living area upstairs,
$140,000.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Good corner single family lot, Re-
duced to $18,000.
Beacon Road: Nice lfa .aly lot, good neigh-
borhood, Reduced to $e0it5..
Beacon Road: Two large single family lots. One
$19,500, and one reduced to $16,500.
309 Buccaneer Road: Beautiful wooded vacant lot
close to pool & tennis courts. $22,500.
Sea Pines & Beacon Rd.: Lovely 3 bd., 2 ba. fur-
nished brick home. Ig. garage. Reduced $105,000.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Duplex, 3 bd., 2 be. ea. side, excel.
construction. $69,900 per unit.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Duplex, triplex or single family vacant
lot. $22,900.
INDIAN PASS
Cape San Bias, 100 on beach 1.66 acres vacant
property. Privacy. $159,900.
100' gulffront lot, by 486' deep. Good access from
paved road. $90,750.
ST. JOE BEACH
Pineda SL. 4 lots in first block to beach, $20,000
ea.
Hwy. 98, between Pine & Canal Streets: Lot,
beautiful view, $30,000.
Corner of Pine, Alabama & Georgia streets. Tri-
angle, 3 lots, $28,000.
Corner of Georgia and Desoto, Vacant lot w/
septic tank, $12,500.
Columbus SL, nicely furnished 3 bd., 2 be. mobile
home, 1 1/2 blocks to beach, $40,000.
St. Joe Beach: 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba. townhome, unre-
stricted gulf view, furnished, nice. $69,900.
Corner Balboa & Georgia: Large 2 bd., 1 ba. mo-
bile home, well for yard, backyard fenced, very
nice. $40,000.
Americus SL: 3 bd., 2 ba., 1 block to beach,
$54,900.
Corner Santa Anna & U.S. Hwy. 98. 4 bd., 2 be.
or possbily could be converted into 2 rental units.
$70,000.
Bay SL: Furnished for instant living, mobile home,
can be a permanent home or-relreat. Attractive
spacious 1488 sq. ft. includes 2 screen porches,
deck, liv. rm, kitchen w/dining-breakfdast bar. 2 bdJ
2 ba-separate, paved street, high lot.
Selma St.: Large 3 bd., 2 be. fp, fenced yd., swim-
ming pool needs repair. Get ready for summer,
$89,000. Reduced to $82,500.
Hwy. 98 between Balboa & Magellan. Develop-
ersl 3/4 of block plus I lot. Look to the future. Su-
per investment. $330,000.
Corner of Court & Alabama, St. Joe Beach. New
frame stilt home, 2 bd., 1 be., livJdinJkilchen com-
bo, nice deck, furnished, ch/a. Reduced to
$72,500..
St. Joseph Shores: Great buy for home across
street from beach. 2 bd, 1 1/2 be. townhome, furn.,
$48,500 or $194,000 for all 4.
DeSoto SL: Newly remodeled 1 bd., 1 ba. house,
walk-in closets, ceiling fans, shed, 1/2 block to
beach. Partially furnished. Reduced to $50,000.
Selma St: Super n lu joto wide furnished 3
bd., 2 ba. trailer onri L, lh ig. utility house.
Immaculate. Reduce to$3,9.
Corner of Balboa & U.S. 98 Gulf Points No. 1:
Beautifully furnished 2 bd., 2 1/2 bath condo, great
price, $79,900.
Coronado Townhomee: 2 bdrm., 1 1/2 ba., dedi-
cated beach. Unobstructed view. All amenities. Fur-
nished $84,900; unfurnished $74,500.
3 lots Pineds St: 1st block Reduced to $46,500.
U.S. 98 between Cortez & DeSoto: 3 bd., 2 be.,
unobstructed Gulf view. Gas, con. h&a. great buy,
$62,000.
Balboa SL: Speakers, music system in lovely, com-
fortable 24'x60' double wide 3 bdrm., 2 be., modu-
lar home, screened 12x32 front porch., .p. cha.
Watch the birds feed from glassed 12x22' Fla. rm.,
as no paint brush needed 150'x150', 1 1/2 blocks
from beach. Was $65,000, Reduced to $64,500.
Between Coronado & Balboa StL: 50' lot on Hwy.
98. Reduced to $39,000.
PORT ST. JOE
2012 Long Ave., Port St. Joe: New price, owner
transferred. Was $85.900. now $79,500. Comforta-
ble 4 bedroom, 2 bath, family home on 2 lots w/
pool, fence, screen patio, new ch&a.


Margaret Carter 648-5884 I
Mary Jane Lindsey 229-8069
Brenda Guilford 648-5435
Preston Winate 648-8565
Sandra Scott 648-5849
Bobbi Ann Seward 229-6908
Moira Ritch 648-5286



Port St Joe, Oak Grove: Corner of Jackson & Du-
val, 2 lots, 3 bd, ? ba. doublewide mobile home,
cen. h&a, partially fenced, $21,500.
2102 Cypress Ave. 3 bd., 1 1/2 ba. brick home,
cen h&a, fenced, good price, $59,900.
513 4th St: 2 goulta.tfwnished, commercial
zoned, 75'x175'x l LlLnced, outside store ,
neat. $28,000.
2108 Cypress Ave.: 3 bd., 2 ba., brick & stucco
home, great rm., f.p., modern kitchen, outside stor.,
privacy fence. close to schools. 1 1/2 car garage,
NICEI $87,500.
805 Garrison Ave.: 4 bd., 1 ba., fam. rm., screen
porch, cen. h/a, partially fenced. Good financing.
$46,000.
202 16th St. 3 bd., 1 ba. remodeled home with 1
bd., 1 be. apartment for income, $39,900.
504 16th St: 3 bd.. 2 be. block construction, fp, 2
Ig. lots, comer, nice home, $59,500.
1301 Monument Ave.: 2 homes, one 3 bd., 2 ba.,
fp.. one 2 bd., 1 be. on corner lot & extra lot. Possi-
bilities. $56.500. Make offer.
1309 Long Ave.: Redone 3 bd., 1 ba., ch/a. nice
den and deck. Good price, $39,500.
517 10th St.: Nice solid starter home, 2 bd., 1 ba.
on 2 1/2 lots. Room to expand. $32,000.
2004 Juniper Ave.: Comfortable 3 bd., 1 1/2 be.
brick home, just redone, swimming pool, 1 1/2 lots,
good price. $85,000.
Marvin Avenue: Vacant lot, 75'x175',. no back door
neighbors, $17,500.
230' on U.S. 98, with commercial bldg. & shed. In-
terested? $134,900.
BEACON HILL
Beautiful view from high lot, 100' on Hwy. 98, 100'
hwy. x 250Y deep. 3 bd., 1 1/2 ba. home, screen..
porches; front & back. Reduced $5,000 more to
$72,500.
let Ave. Vacant lot, $10,500.
Beacon Hill, GulltW !Lt.,rY h bluff, great view,
concrete block hea l l, 1/2 be., carport,
$55,000.
Lovely waterfront duplex: 1 bd., 1 1/2 bea. each
side. Furnished. Super rental. $80,000 each side.
3rd Ave.: Niced 14x60' Scot 1984 mobile home, 2
bdrm., 1 be. custom built masonite siding, shingle
roof, other extras. $35,000.
MEXICO BEACH
39th St, north of highway. House on canal, 2 bd,
1 be., 100 on canal, den, deck, seawall, floating
dock, reduced to $79,900.
Corner 10th & U.S. 98, Waterfront 2 bedroom, fix-
er-upper $75,000.
Corner of 13th & Hwy. 98, vacant lot, zoned for
business, 9(7x190, $120,000.
136 36th St. On canal w/lighted dock & water. 3
bd., 2 be. brick home, fireplace, fence, stor. shed,
garage, $95,000.
29th St. Gulf view, steps to the beach. Duplex, 2
bd., 1 ba. ea. side, screen porch, furnished,
$87,500. .
38th St. on canal. Vacant lot w/septic and sea wall,
$66,000.
Corner of Georgia & Mississippi: Attractively fur-
nished 3 bd., 2 be. splitplan mobile home, covered
front porch, high level lot. Trees, nice area,
$45,000.
Robin Lane: Vacant lot, owner anxious, $10,000.
Sea SL: 1 corner lot with adjoining lot, vacant,
zoned for mobile homes. $28,500 total for the two.
42nd St: Brick duplex, 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba. each side,
fourth from beach, good price, $84.900.
Corner. of Water & 36th St.: 2 vacant lots, boat
house, dock, 90' on canal. $80,000.
37th St, 2 bd., 2 be. townhome, beautifully fur-
nished, near pier, owner anxious, $69,500.
37th St, Vacant lot, 75'xl00(; nice building lot,
close to each, pier, eachside, $59,900.
Azalea Dr.: Va ,7 f00. close to Beach.
$15,500.
39th St., north of Hwy. 98: Want to go fishing?
House on canal, 2 bd., 1 be., 100' on canal, den.
deck, sea wall, floating dock. $89,900.
37th SL, dose to pier: Comfortable 2 bd., 1 1/2
ba., townhome, great getaway, $76,000.
44th SL: Nice large vacant lot, $25,000.
1810 Hwy. 98, 3 bd., 3 ba. 2 story,. screen nwrch.
partially fenced. Good future investment, $0 G000.
Reduced to $90,000..
Louisiana & Florida Ie0i7mflsible 3 bd., 2 ba.
double wide, fp, fruit tIWMrLJ40,700.
41st St. Beachelde: Unit in four plex. Neat as a
pini Furnished, 2 bd., 1 1/2 be. Very affordable,
$54,500.
12th St. & U.S Beachfront with 3 bd. home, 2
be., Ig. glassed in great j'm, beautiful view. fur-
nished, approx. 67 on the gulf. Reduced to
$118,900.
Hwy. 98 NEWt Great gull viewl 2 bd.. 2 be. house,
covered deck upstairs; office, business or bedroom
downstairs w/3/4 bath. Possibilities $155,000.
507 Cathay Lane: 2 bd., 2 ba. mobile home w/Fla.
rm., Ig. lot, all fenced. Shop with electric & phone.
Immaculately $45,000.
117 40th St. Apt. 2: 2 bd., 1 be., furnished, close
to beach, $42,900.
120 Miramar Dr.: Recently redone 3 bd., 2 ba.
brick home, nicely and fully furnished. Landscaped.
$95,000:
Hwy. 98: Great buy for home across street from
beach. Nice 2 bd., 1 1/2 be. townhomes, furnished.
$48,500 ea. or $146,000 for all 3. 1 sold.
404 5th SL: 2 bd., 2 be., cen. h&a, mobile home, 2
screen porches. Ig. outside utility house, very nice,
on Ig. lot, $44,500.
12th SL Business Center: commercial lot 2nd
from highway. $35,000.
13th St: 120'x90' dose to beach. $28,000,
OVERSTREET
Sunshine Farm*, approx. 4 mi. to beach, 2 acres.
$12,600.
Overstreet, Sunshine Farmsna. A one acre hidea-
way, $6,500.
545 S. Long Ave., Peace and quiet, 3 bd., 2 ba.
Nice home & 5 acres. $85,200.
Hwy. 388, 2.5 acres, garden spot, house, well,
quietly $t9 9 i6 JI d to $32,500.
Overatreet Hwy. 386 before bridge, 1.47 acres,
septic tank. light pole, well, $15,000.
WEWAHITCHKA
Stonemll Creek:QO |I2rfcres with well and
septic tank, $6,00,P .,-I-
Wewahitchka: 22 plus acres, wooded, pretty,
$69,900.


Minor Elements Important to Healthy Plants


I VIMLzrl IM


- - - -- ---. -- I


PAGE P 1iB


I


Apmm(A)aqu














THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUG. 31, 1989


Minutes........Gulf County


Commission


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
T MEETING OF JULY 17. 1969
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida met this date in budget session
with the following members present: Chairman
-Douglas C. Birmingham and Commissioners
James.E. Creamer, Jimmy 0. Gortman, Donald B.
Parker. and Nathan Peters, Jr. Others present
were: Clirk Benny C. Lister. Deputy Clerk Towan
Collier, Admin. Asst/Clvll Defense Director Larry
Wells.-Building Inspector De Wayne Manuel, and
Mosquito Control Director Sam Graves, Jr.
The meeting came to order at 7:01 p.m.
Supervisor of Elections/Election Expens-
es/Capital Outlay: Supervisor of Elections Robtn-
son reported that she did not put in a figure for
Communications because she though the Board
was taking it over, but she will need $57.9.00 for
long distance calls. Upon inquiry, she discussed
the new voting system which she has requested
that the Board fund ($45,000-the State wants to
get rid of the ABM voting machines because they
do not have audit trails). She stated that if the
Board does not fund the new system, they will
need to budget approximately $5,000 to have the
machines completely serviced. Chairman Birming-
ham requested that Ms. Robinson check into get-
ting this new system on lease purchase. Commis-
sioner Peters then moved to tentatively budget
$73,542 for the Supervisor of Elections (Includes
placing $579.00 in Communications), and tenta-
tively approve the Elections Expense"budget as re-
quested ($21,403). Commissioner Qortman sec-
onded the motion, and it passed unanimously.
Chairman Birmingham reported thatthe Capital
Outlay budget ($45,000 for a new voung system)
will be discussed at a later date. -
Tax Collector: After discussion about the
Electronic Data Processing Services and Mainte-
nance & Repairs, Commissioner Parker moved to
tentatively approve tCe Tax Collector budget as re-
quested ($174,285). Commissioner Creamer sec-
onded the motion, and after discussion about legal
fees. it passed unanimously.
Property Appraiser: After discussion that
the Department of Revenue approves and submits
the Property Appraiser's budget request, Property
Appraiser Colbert discussed legal fees and employ-
ee salary increases being included in his request
(State requires that salary increases be included in
his request to them). Chairman Birmingham gave
the Chair to Vice Chairman Peters, and moved to
tentatively approve the Property Appraiser budget
as requested ($174,049). Commissioner Creamer
seconded the motion, and it passed unanimously.
Chairman Peters returned the Chair to Commis-
sioner Birmingham.
Law Enforcement/Detention & Correc-
tlons/Contingencies: After discussion about the
salary increases for Sheriffs, Commissioner Peters
moved to write the Legislature in opposition to
these high increases. Commissioner Parker sec-
onded the motion, and it passed with the following
vote: Commissioners Creamer, Gortman, Parker,
and Peters voted yes. Chairman Birmingham voted
no. Commissioner Peters stated that his motion in
no way reflects on the Sheriffs job performance.
After discussion about the Sheriffs Department
and about enforcement of laws (littering disorderly
intoxication, etc.) in Gulf County, Sheriff Harrison
discussed enforcement. The Board then discussed
the line item increases for Postage (LE.-10%),
Communications (LE.-10%), Books & Publications
(LE.-5%). and Operating Supplies (D.C.-68%).
Upon inquiry by Chairman Birmingham about
housing the Franklin County prisoners, Sheriff
Harrison reported that the fees charged to Frank-
lin County ($10 per prisoner,per day) are enough
to pay for their meals and personal needs, but will
not pay for correctional officers, utilities, etc. The
Board then discussed Repairs & Maintenance
(D.C.-671%), one new deputy (LE.-$15.500), Re-
tirement (LE.-10%), and Insurance (D.C.-10%).
p.m.> Upon inquiry by Commissioner Creamer,
Sheriff Hlarrison stated that his budget is broken
down into law enforcement expenses and jail/
prisoner expenses. turned at 8:19 p.m.> The Board then discussed
Other Charges (LE.-5%), Salaries-Detentions &
Corrections Officers (will start at approximately
$15.000). the number of Deputies (12 presently,
and one more if the Board approves it), Repairs &
Maintenance (D.C.-671%), and Operating Supplies
(D.C.-68%), Commissioner Peters moved to tenta-
tively approve the Law Enforcement budget as re-
quested, ($672,288). and the Detention and Cor-
rections budget with a $3,000.60 reduction In
Operating Supplies, ($858,426.09). Commissioner
Gortman seconded the motion, and it passed with
the following vote: Chairman Birmingham and
Commissioners Gortman and Peters voted yes.
Commissioners Creamer and Parker voted no.
Sheriff Harrison then discussed his budget as
compared to Franklin County's.
The meeting recessed for a short break at
8:53 p.m.
,The meeting reconvened at 9:05 p.m.
Clerk to Board/Clerk of County Court/
Clerk of Circuit Court: Upon inquiry. Clerk Lister
discussed his budget and stated tat it is based on
the Circuit Court converting to a fee system for
next year. He reported that the Clerk to Board and
Clerk of County Court budgets will still operate by
budget, and the Clerk of Circuit Court will operate
on the fees taken in by the Clerk (for Circuit Court
work). After further discussion about the fee sys-
tem by Clerk Lister, the Board discussed the bud-
get percentage decreases/increases. Commissioner
Gortman moved to approve the Clerk budgets as
requested ($249,459), arid.Commissioner Creamer
seconded the motion. After further discussion
about Office Supplies (Clerk to Board), Repairs &
Maintenance of Equipment (Clerk to Board), and
Other Personal Services (Clerk to Board), the mo-
tion passed unanimously.
Garbage: After discussion about "new con-
struction" money. Commissioner Gortman dis-
cussed going to a private firm to handle garbage.
He proposed having house-to-house pickup, with
the company to negotiate a price with the Board.
He reported on a company that furnishes 90-
gallon containers (per household) and picks it up
once a week. He also reported that the company is
willing to lease the compactors if the Board agrees
(the company would take tipping fees at the com-
pactor sites). Chairman Birmingham discussed
that agreements would have to be made with the
Cities concerning the compactor sites. The Board
then discussed that this would be a non-
mandatory pickup system, and they would pull in
all of the dumpsters (those not wanting pickup
would take their garbage to the compactor sites
and pay a tipping fee). Commissioner Gortman re-
ported that this company would also be responsi-
ble for the incinerangburying cost of the gar-
bage. After discussion about bonding the time
frame, and a ceiling on charges, the Board dis-
cussed the costs of garbage to the County. Upon
inquiry about the Mosquito Control Department
employees, Mosquito Control Director Graves re-
ported that he had 7 or 8 men doing Mosquito
Control work before they began with the compac-
tor. The Board also discussed that there is the
possibility that the compactor may want to hire
some of these men. After discussion about compa-
nies and prices. Commissioner Gortman then
moved to invite companies to come in and discuss
their programs on July 24, 1989 at 7:00 p.m.,
E.D.T. Commissioner Creamer seconded the mo-
tion, and it passed with the following vote: Chair- "
man Birmingham and Commissioners Creamer, .
Gortman, and Parker voted yes. Commissioner Pe-
ters voted no, stating that this issue s too impor-
tant for it to be done in a hurry and he personally
favors special assessments. -
SThere being no further business, the meeting
did then adjourn until July 18th at 7:00 p.m,
E.D.T.
DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM, CHAIRMAN
ATIEST BENNY C. ULSTER, CLERK
MEETING OF JULY 18. 1989
The Board of County Commissioners of-Gulf
County, Florida met this date in budget session
with the following members present: Chairman
Douglas C.. Birmingham and Commissioners
James E. Creamer. Jimmy 0. Gprtman, Douglas
B. Parker, and Nathan Peters, Jr.Others present .
were: Clerk Benny Lister, Deputy Clerk Towan
Collier. Admin. Asst./Civil Defense Director Larry
Wells, and Building Inspector De Wayne Manucl.
The meeting came to order at 7.04 p.m.
County Development: Stuart Shoaf, Presi-
oent of the Port St Joe Clamber of Commerce, ap-
peared before the Board to discuss their .plans to
join with the Wewahltchika Chamber of Commerce
oi-develop a County-wide program that includes a
S" full-time Executive Officer and per sonnel. He then
amended the request to include the Wewahltchka
Chamber, which will make the total amount
$10.000 ($8,000 for the new program and $1,000
Search for the operation of the Chambers). After -dis-
cutsion of the new program, Mr. Shoaf gave the
.. Commissioners a copy of the Port SL Joe Cham-'
ber's budget proposal (based on a 3-year appropri-
atiaon). The Board then discussed participation by
the Cities, the cooperation between the 2 cities.
the pay rate for the Executive Officer (16.500 plus
Admintstrati.ve Costs from any grants received),
the New Program budget, the development of an
Executive Committee made up of members from
Port St Joe and Wewahitchka and the possibility
of another correctional facility in the County.
Chairman Birmingham discussed placing the cor-
rectional facility issue on the ballot. and Commis-


- sloner Peteri stated that the gas tax issue was not
on the ballot, and said he would vote today to pur-
chase land for another facility. Chairman Birming-
hamh gave the Chair to Vice Chairman Peters, and
moved to tentatively approve the County Develop-
ment budget as requested ($8.000 for the new pro-
gram/$1,000-Port St. Joe Chamber/$1,000-
Wewahitchka Chamber). Commissioner Gortman
seconded the motion. After discussion about the
Chamber of Commerce's budget, the- motion
passed with the following vote: Commnissioners"
Birmingham, Creamer, Gortman, and Parker voted
yes. Chairman Peters voted no, stating that his
first concern is for the taxpayers and it Is unac-
ceptable to him for the Board to give that much of.
an increase (should not give more than 100%). He


also stated that he feels the Chambers are doing a
wonderful job in the County. Chairman Peters re-
turned the Chair to Commissioner Birmingham.
Mental Health Baker Act/Senior Adult
Guidance Program: Dr. Peter Hampton, of the Life
Management Center, appeared before the Board to
discuss the Baker Act Services Mental Health and
the Senior Adult Guidance Programs. He present-
ed a letter and stated that State and Federal man-
dates have increased the costs, as well as having
an increase in medical care costs. The Board dis-
cussed that the State matches the County funds
at the rate of 75% to the County's 25%. Commis-
sioner Peters moved to tentatively approve the Life
Management budget as requested, and Commis-
sioner Gortman seconded the motion for discus-
sion. After discussion about requests to other
counties and about the match money being State
mandated, the motion failed with the following
vote: Chairman Birmingham and Commissioners
Creamer. Gortman, and Parker voted no. Commis-
sioner Peters voted yes. Commissioner Gortman
moved to tentatively approve $8,085.00 for the
Mental Health Baker Act Services and $275.00 for
* the Senior Adult Guidance Program, until someone
can look at these programs to see what the law
says the Board must do. Commissioner Creamer
seconded the motion, and it passed unanimously.
The meeting recessed for a short break at
7:45 p.m.
The meeting reconvened at 7:55 p.t.
General Fund/Fine & Forfeiture Fund:
Upon mQtion by Commissioner Gortman, second
by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous vote, the
Board .tentatively approved the following budgets
that had either no change or had a decrease.
GENERAL FUND:
Special Events $2,000.00
Tax Adjustment Board $500.00
Circuit Court Operations $7.874.00 (must
reallocate)
State Attorney $2,100.00
Public Defender $6,200.00
Court Reporter $3,600.00
ARPC Dues $5,000.00
County Fire Control $9,660.00
Medical Examiner $10,000.00
State Forestry Soil Conserv. $1.000.00
Big Bend Health Council $500.00 (no re-
quest)
FINE & FORFEITURE FUND:
County Judge $30,068.00
Board of County Commissioners: After dis-
cussion, Commissioner Peters moved to tentatively
approve the budget for the Florida Association of
Counties Dues in the amount of $760.00. Com-
missioner Gortman seconded the motion, and it
passed with the following vote: Commissioners
Creamer, Gortman, Parker and Peters voted yes.
Chairman Birmingham voted no.
Administrative Assistant to Board of
County Commissioners: After discussion, Com-
missioner Peters moved to tentatively approve the
Administrative Assistant budget as requested
($4,860.00). Commissioner Parker seconded the
motion, and it passed unanimously.
Civil Defense: After discussion about equip-
ment, Commissioner Peters moved to tentatively
approve the Civil Defense budget with a $1,000 re-
duction from equipment ($50,257). Commissioner
Creamer seconded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.
Search & Rescue: After discussion about
the Search & Rescue and Jaws-of-Life being split
into 2 different departments, Commissioner Peters
moved to tentatively approve the Search & Rescue
budget as requested $5,200.00). Commissioner
Parker seconded the motion, and it passed unani-
mously.
Jaws-of-Life: After discussion about New
Equipment and Repairb & Maintenance of Equip-
ment. Commissioner Peters moved to table this
budget request Commissioner Creamer seconded
the motion, and it passed unanimously. The Board
further discussed the Jaws-of-Life equipment.
Commodity Program: After discussion,
Commissioner Peters moved to tentatively approve
the Commodity Program budget as requested
$5,545). Commissioner Creamer seconded the mo-
tion, and after further discussion, it passed unani-
mously.
County Courthouse: After discussion, Com-
missioner Peters moved to reduce the. County
Courthouse Repairs & Maintenance budget (capi-
tal outlay items) by $10,000 (was put in for Jail
Repair). Commissioner Gortman seconded the mo-
tion, and it passed unanimously.
Courthouse Maintenance: After discussion
about Retirement, Utilities, and Repairs & Mainte-
nance. Commissioner Gortman moved tentatively
to approve the Courthouse Maintenance budget
with a $5,000 reductionrin Repairs- & Maintenance
and a $2,407 reducaon in rererrent 1$152,0231
Commissioner Peters seconded the motion for dis.
cussion, and after further discussion about Re-
pairs & Maintenance, the motion passed unani-
mously.
County Building Wewahitchka Mainte-
nance: After discussion about rent for the build-
ing, Commissioner Peters moved to tentatively ap-
proved the County Building Wewahitchka
Maintenance budget as requested ($9,078). Com-
missioner Gortman seconded the motion, and it
passed with the following vote: Commissioners
Creamer, Gortman. Parker. &-Peters voted yes.
Chairman Birmingham voted no.
County Veteran's Service Office: After dis-
cussion, Commissioner Gortman moved to approve
the Veteran's Service budget as requested
($20,730). Commissioner Peters seconded the mo-
tion, and It passed unanimously.
Building Department: After discussion
about the Building Department fees (to be placed
in the general fund as revenue in next year's bud-
get), Commissioner Gortman moved to tentatively
approve the Building Department budget as re-
quested ($76,309). Commissioner Parker seconded
e motion, and it passed unanimously.
County Health Departments: After discus-
sion, Commissioner-Gortman moved tentatively to
budget $36,000 (to be remitted by the Tax Collec-
tor) and $4,000 ($2,000-Port St Joe/$2,000-
Wewahitchka) for the Health Departments. Com-
missioner Peters seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.
Gulf County Guidance Clinic Contract:
After discussion, Commissioner Peters moved to
tentatively approve the Guidance Clinic budget as
requested ($3,251.00). Commissioner Creamer
seconded the motion, and it passed with the fol-
lowing vote: Commissioners Creamer, Gortman,
Parker, and Peters voted yes. Chairman Birming-
ham voted no.
Gulf County Retarded Citizens Contract:
After discussion, Commissioner Peters moved to
tentatively approve the Retarded Citizens budget
as requested ($3,625.00). Commissioner Creamer
seconded the motion, and it passed with the fol-
lowing vote: Commissioners Creamer, Gortman.
Parker, and Peters voted yes. Chairman Birming-
ham voted no.
Gulf County Senior Citizens: After discus-
sion. Chairman Birmingham- gave the Chair to
Vice Chairman Peters, and moved to tentatively
approve the Senior Citizens budget as requested
($10,000). Commissioner Creamer seconded the
motion, and after further discussion, It passed
unanimously. Chairman Peters returned the Chair
to Commissioner Birmingham.
Aid to Gulf County Association of Retard-
ed Citizens: After discussion about this budget in
relation to the Gulf County Retarded Citizens Con-
tract budget, Commissioner Peters moved to tenta-
tively budget $2,200. The motion died for lack of a
second. 'Commissioner Creamer moved to tenta-
tively budget $2,000 for Aid to Retarded Citizens.
Commissioner Gortman seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously.
SChemical Addictions Recovery Effort: Af-
ter discussion that this budget is a combination of
the Panhandle Alcoholism Council and the North-
west Florida Drug Council, and about the fees
charged by this program. Commissioner Gortman
moved to tentatively budget $3,915.00 for this pro-
gram. Commissioner Creamer seconded the mo-
ton for discussion. After further discussion of this
program, Commissioner Peters substitutely moved
to tentatively budget $5,000.00 for this program.
Commissioner Parker seconded the substitute mo-
tion, and it failed with the following vote: Chair-
man Birmingham and Commissioners Creamer
and Gortman voted no. Commissioners Parker and
Peters voted yes. The original motion then passed
unanimously.
The meeting recessed for a short break at
8:55 p.m.
The meeting reconvened at 9:05 p.m.
Health h Care Responsibilitya : ct: After dis-
cussion, Commissioner Peters moved to approve
This budget as proposed ($.50.000,00). Commis-
stoner Creamer seconded the motion, and It
passed with the following vote: Chairman Birming-
ham and Commissioners Creamer, Parker, and Pe-
ters voted yes. Commissioner Gortman voted no.
Wewahitchka Ambulance service: After
discussion, Commissioner Gortman moved to ten-
tatively approve the Wewah oltchka Ambulance Ser-
vice budget as requested ($34,694.00). Chairman
Birmingham gave the Chair to Vice Chairman Pe-
ters. and seconded the motion for discussion. After
discussion about each line item of the budget and
about the performance of the service, Chairman
Peters gave the Chair to Commissioner Creamer.
and substltutely moved to tentatively approve this
budget with a 10% overall increase. The substitute
motion died for lack of a "second; and Chairman
Creamer returned the Chair to Vice Chairman Pe-
ters. The original motion then passed with the fol-


lowing vote: Commissioners Birmingham, Cream-
er, Gortman, and Parker voted yes. Chairman
P-ters voted no. Chairman Peters then returned'
Chair to Commissioner Birmingham.
Port St. Joe Ambulance: After discussion
abon. the Port St Joe Ambulance Service and that
the Board is presently in a contract with Gulf
Pines IIospital.to pay.them $150,000.00 (which in-
cludes indigent care.,itcr) for operating the service,
Commissioner Peters 1novid to tentatively approve
the Port St Joe Ambulance budget as proposed
($150,000.00). Commissioner Creamer seconded
the motion for discussion, and after further dis-


cussion about the service, the motion passed
unanimously. Chairman Birmingham requested
that Commissioner Creamer begin to work on ne-
gotiating a new contract with the hospital.
Parks Commission: After discussion by
Clerk Lister and the Board, Commissioner gort-
man moved to' tentatively budget $1,000.00
($500.00/Communications and 5.00/Office
Supplies) for the Parks Commission. Commission-
er Creamer seconded the motion, and after further
discussion, it passed unanimously. Upon discus-
sion about a possible grant. Commissioner Peters
moved to tentatively approve the Parks budget of
$25,000.00 to be used as a disbursement fund for
the possible grant Commissioner Parker seconded
the motion, and it passed unanimously.
Medicaid: After discussion by Clerk Lister
that the Medicaid budget will be overspent this
ear, Commissioner Peters moved to tentatively
budget $80,000.00 for this program. Commission-
er Parker seconded the motion for discussion, and
after discussion that the Board must pay these
bills, the motion passed unanimously.
Libraries: After discussion, Chairman Birm-
ingham gave the Chair to Vice Chairman Peters,
and moved to tentatively budget $29,433.00 (Lo-
cal) and $6,100 (State) for the Northwest Regional
Library. Commissioner Gortman seconded the mo-
tion. After discussion, Chairman Peters gave the
Chair to Commissioner Creamer, and substitutely
moved to tentatively approve a 5% Increase on the
Local funds. Commissioner Parker seconded the
substitute motion, and it failed with the following
vote: Chairman Creamer and Commissioners
Birmingham and Gortman voted no. Commission-
ers Parker and Peters voted yes. Chairman Cream-
er returned the Chair to Vice Chairman Peters.
The original motion then passed with the following
vote: Commissioners Birmingham, Creamer, and
Gortman voted yes. Chairman Peters and Commis-
sioner Parker voted no. Chairman Peters stated
that he voted no because he is in favor of an in-
crease for the libraries, and he returned the Chair
to Commissioner Birmingham.
Extension Service: After discussion about
the Extension Service and about a promotional
salary adjustment for the Agent, Commissioner Pe-
ters moved to tentatively approve the Extension
Service.budget as requested ($39,590.00) Commis-
sioner Parker seconded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.
Fire Districts Overstreet/Tupelo/Howard
Creek: The Board agreed for the Fire District Mil-
lage rates to be handled by the Commissioners
whose districts they are in. Chairman Birmingham
stated that Commissioners Creamer. Parker, and
Peters need to meet as a Fire,Board to decide on
the St Joe Fire Control District millage rate. He re-
ported that he wants the Overstreet Fire Control
District millage rate to remain the same (.500) and
also that he and Commissioner Gortman have
agreed for the Tupelo Fire Control District millage
rate to remain the same (.319). Commissioner
Gortman reported that he wants the Howard Creek
Fire Control District millage rate to be increased to
.500.
Ronald McDonald House: After discussion,
Commissioner Creamer moved to deny the Ronald
McDonald House's request for funding. Commis-
sioner Parker seconded the motion, and it passed
with the following vote: Chairman Birmingham
and Commissioners Creamer, Gortman, and Park-,
er voted yes. Commissioner Peters voted no.
Fire Departments: Upon inquiry by Clerk
Lister, Chairman Birmingham stated that the
$9,000.00 for loans to the Fire Departments
($1,500.00 each) was for this year only, and will
not be available next year. After discussion that
the $30,000.00 budgeted this year for equipment
will have to be funded next year if it is not spent,
Chairman Birmingham gave the Chair to Vice
Chairman Peters, and moved to tentatively budget
$82,500.00 for loan to fire departments for equip-
ment, (he stated that $30,000.00 can be deducted
if the 2 departments spend it this year). After dis-
cussion, Commissioner Birmingham withdrew his
motion, and stated that $30,000.00 will have to be
budgeted because they have already obligated
themselves to it. Chairman Peters returned the
Chair to Commissioner Birmingham.
County Courthouse: After discussion about
the telephone system. Commissioner Peters moved
to tentatively budget $45,000.00 for County Court-
house Equipment. Commissioner Gortman sec-
onded the motion, and after discussion about the
generator, it failed with the following vote: Chair-
man Birmingham and Commissioners Creamer
and Parker voted no. Commissioners Gortman and
Peters voted yes. Commissioner Peters then moved
to tentatively budget $30,000.00 in County Court-
house Equipment for a new telephone system.
Commissioner Gortman seconded the motion, and
after discussion, it failed with the following vote:
Chairman Birmingham and Commissioners
Creamer and Parker voted no. Commissioners
Gortman and Peters voted yes. After discussion.
Commissioner Peters moved to tentatively budget
$76,000.00 for County Courthouse Repairs &
Maintenance. Commissioner Parker seconded the
motion, and it passed with the following vote:
Commissioners Creamer, Gortman, Parker, and
Peters voted yes. Chairman Birmingham voted no.
County Commissioners: After discussion by
Commissioner Peters and Admin. Asst. Wels
about pagers for the County Commissioners and
about free pagers betng give to the Sheriffs De-
partment in exchange for being granted space on
the County's tower, the Board discussed contact-
ing Biddle Communications concerning this mat-
ter. Commissioner Peters then requested that the
board not budget the money for the pagers, and
have Admin. Asst. Wells pursue checking into this
matter. Upon discussion about In/out-of-town
travel for the Commissioners, Commissioner Gort-
man moved to tentatively budget $9,500 for Travel
($125.00 maximum per month per Commissioner
for in-County travel and a total of $2.000.00 for
out-of-town travel). Commissioner Parker second-
ed the motion, and it passed with the following
vote: Chairman Birmingham and Commissioners
Creamer, Gortman, and Parker voted yes. Commis-
stoner Peters voted no.
County Planning- After discussion by Ad-
min. Asst. Wells about State funding, Commission-
er Peters moved to tentatively budget $8.500.00
for Comprehensive Planning. Commissioner
Creamer seconded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.
Hazardous Waste Assessment Plan: After
discussion, Commissioner Peters moved to tenta-
tively budget $1,000.00 for Hazardous Waste Veri-
fications by the Apalachee Regional Planning
Council. Commissioner Creamer seconded the mo-
tion, and it passed unanimously.
Landfill: After discussion about land pur-
chases. Commissioner Creamer moved to tenta-
tively budget $30,000.00 for land purchases for
the landfills. Chairman Birmingham gave the
Chair to Vice Chairman Peters, and seconded the
motion. The motion passed with the following vote:
Commissioners Birmingham, Creamer. Gortman.
and Parker voted yes. Chairman Peters voted no.
Chairman Peters returned the Chair to Commis-
sioner Birmingham.
County Road and Bridge: After discussion
by Clerk iUster about Road Superintendent want-
ing additional money for equipment, CommissiOn-
er Gortman moved to budget $53.123.00 ,for
County Road & Bridge Equipment (lease purchase
payments). Commissioner Peters seconded the -Ao-
tion,. and it passed unanimously. After discussion
about the Road Department building, Commission-
er Gortman moved to tentatively budget
$75,000.00 for a new building for the Road De-
partment Commissioner Peters seconded the mo-
tion, and it passed with the following vote: Chair-
man Birmingham and Commissioners Gortrtran
and Peters voted yes. Commissioners Creamer and
Parker voted no.
County Courthouse: Upon inquiry by Clerk
ULister, and after discussion, Commissioner Peters
moved to tentatively budget $15,000.00 in Cornty
Courthouse Equipment (for the generator). Cbm-
missioner Creamer seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously. Commissioner Peters dis-
cussed the importance of the Board being fully
prepared for emergency situations.
There being no further business, the meeting
did then adjourn until July 20th at 7:00 p m.,
E.D.T.
/s/ DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM, CHAIRMAN
ATT''EST: BENNY C. LISTER, CLERK
JULY 20, 1989
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida met this date in budget session
with the following members present: Chairman
Douglas C. Birmingham and Commissioner James
E. Creamer, Jimmy 0. Gortman. Donald B. Park-
er, and Nathan Peters. Jr. Others present were:
Clerk Benny C. Lister, Deputy Clerk Towan Coller,
Admin. Asst./Civil Defense Director Larry Wtells,
Building Inspector De Wayne Manuel, and Mosqui-
to Control Director Sam Graves, Jr.
The meeting came to order at 7:12 p.m. 5
The Board discussed a letter received from
the City of Port St. Joe. inviting them to attend
their meeting on Tuesday morning to discuss. the
Local Option Gas Tax. The Board agreed to write
the City to Inform them that they cannot attend
their morning meeting, but the City may attend a
special Board of County Commissioners meeting to
discuss this issue. (Chairman Birmingham sched-
uled a special meeting for 6:00 p.m. on July 25.
1989). Chairman Birmingham reported that he is
In receipt of a letter from the City of Wewahitcbka,
stating that they accept the $400,000 offered to
them.


Mosquito Control: After discussion about
the garbage portion of the Mosquito Control;De-
partment (the salary request for 4 new employees -
1 for the Wewahitchka compactor and 3 for, the
scales), Office help, New Equipment (2 truck 1
big trailer for compactor, 1 used truck, and 2 or 3
dumpsters). materials for Construction & Mainte-
nance of Equipment, costs saved by pulling in all
of the dumpsters, litter control officers, Inrurance,
etc.)., Commissioner Peters moved to tentatively ap-
prove this budget as requested ($745.205). Com-
missioner Creamer seconded the motion,, arid it
passed with the following vote: Commnissioners
Creamer, Gortman. Parker and Peters voted yes.
Chairman Birmingham voted no. The Board: fur-
ther discussed proposals from garbage companies
and possible alternatives. Commissioner. Creamer
stated that he does not intend to lay off any of the
Mosquito Control Department employees.
Landfill: After discussion about Professional
Services and Land purchases,- Commissioner Pe-
ters moved to tentatively approve the landfill bud-
get as requested ($45.000), Commissioner Gort-
man seconded the motion, and it passed unani-
moudly.


Incinerator: After discussion about the con-
tract with Bay County for incineration, Commis-
sioner Peters moved to tentatively budget
$230,000 for incineration. Commissioner Creamer
seconded the motion, and it passed unanimously.
Mosquito Control: The Board discussed em-
ployee uniforms and the costs that would be saved
by pulling in the trailers (Mosquito Control Direc-
tor Graves to work up figures).
The meeting recessed for a short break at
7:55 p.m.
The meeting reconvened at 8:05 p.m.
The Board discussed an article in the news-
paper concerning the meeting between the Board
and the Cities about the local option gas tax. and
requested that Admin. Asst. Wells draft a letter in
response to the article.
County Road & Bridge Fund: After discus-
sion about the Road Department employees and
the salaries for the 3 new employees that were
hired. Commissioner Gortman moved to tentatively
approve the Road Department budget as requested
($670,995). Commissioner Creamer seconded the
motion, and it passed unanimously. The Board re-
quested Clerk Lister provide figures of the amount
it will cost to pay the Road Department salaries for
the remainder of this year.
Balance Brought Forward: Cash General
Fund Revenue: Upon discussion that the Road
Department is requesting for the excess funds
form their lease purchase of equipment be put in
next year's budget for the purchase of additional
equipment ($100,000 was budgeted in capital out-
lay for equipment, and $53,123 was spent on this
year's lease payments, which leaves $46,877 in
that budget)., Commissioner Peters moved to place
the excess funds for Road Department Equipment
($46,877.00) from the Capital Outlay Fund in Gen-
eral Fund Balance Brought Forward: Cash. Com-
missioner Creamer seconded the motion, and after
discussion, it passed with the following vote: Com-
missioner Creamer, Parker and Peters voted yes.
Chairman Birmingham and Commissioner Gort-
man voted no.
Board of County Commissioners: After dis-
cussion about Legal Advertising, Commissioner Pe-
ters moved to pay both County newspapers
$100.00 per month for advertising the minutes.
Commissioner Parker seconded the motion, and
after discussion, the motion failed with the follow-
ing vote: Chairman Birmingham and Commission-
ers Creamer and Gortman voted no. Commission-
ers Parker and Peters voted yes. After further
discussion about the minutes, Commissioner Pe-
ters moved to pay both County newspapers $200
per month for advertising the minutes. Commis-
sioner Creamer seconded the motion, and it
passed with the following vote: Commissioners
Creamer, Gortman, Parker. and Peters voted yes.
Chairman Birmingham voted no. After discussion,
Commissioners Peters moved to tentatively budget
$10,000 for Legal Advertising. Commissioner
Creamer seconded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.
The meeting recessed for a short break at
8:35 p.m.
The meeting reconvened at 8:45 p.m.
Board of County Commissioners: After dis-
cussion, Commissioner Gortman moved to tenta-
tively approve the Board of County Commissioners
budget after reducing Legal Advertising by
$11,000 and reducing dues by $740.00
($506,956). Commissioner Peters seconded the
motion, and it passed unanimously.
County Attorney: After discussion. Com-
missioner Gortman moved to tentatively approve
the County Attorney budget as proposed
($16,073). Commissioner Peters seconded the mo-
tion. and it passed unanimously.
Tax Adjustment Board: After discussion,
Commissioner Gortman moved to tentatively ap-
prove the Tax Adjustment Board budget as pro-
posed ($500). Commissioner Peters seconded the
motion, and it passed unanimously.
Public Defender: After discussion, Commis-
sioner Gortman moved to tentatively approve the
Public Defender budget as proposed ($6.200).
Commissioner Peters seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.
Law Enforcement General Fund: After
discussion about HRS Service for Process and Ed-
ucational Costs, Commissioner Gortman moved to
tentatively approve the Law Enforcement budget
as proposed ($3,600). Commissioner Creamer sec-
onced the motion, and it passed unanimously.
Jaws-of-Life: After discussion about New
Equipment, Commissioner Creamer moved to ten-
tatively approve the Jaws-of-Life budget as re-
quested ($9,700). Commissioner Gortman second-
ed the motion, and it passed unanimously.
Fire Truck: Upon discussion about a truck
that is available at the Beaches Fire Department.
the Board had no objection to it being transferred
to Highland View Fire Department (Proposed #150-
3. 1954 Ward LaFrance Pumper Truck).
Animal Control: left the meeting at 9:05 p.m.> After discussion
about animal control and an animal control offi-
cer, p.m.> Commissioner Gortman moved to tentatively
budget $2,000 for Animal Control. Commissioner
Peters seconded the motion for discussion. After
further discussion about equipment, the motion
passed unanimously.
Reserve General Fund: After discussion,
Commissioner Peters moved to tentatively budget

$80,000 for General Fund Reserve for Contingen-
cies. Commissioner Gortman seconded the motion,
and it passed with the following vote: Commission-
ers Gortman, Parker, and Peters voted yes. Chair-
man Birmingham and Commissioner Creamer vot-
ed no. Afer discussion, Commissioner Gortman
moved to tentatively reduce Cash to be Carried
Forward budget by $100,000. The motion died for
lack of a second. Commissioner Gortman moved to
tentatively budget $50.000 in Cash to be Carried
Forward. Commissioner Peters seconded the mo-
tion, and it failed with the following vote: Chair-
man Birmingham and Commissioners Creamer
and Peters voted no. Commissioners Gortman and
Peters voted yes. Commissioner Gortman moved to
tentatively budget $49.000.00 in Cash to be Car-
ried Forward; and Commissioner Creamer second-
ed the motion. Commissioner Creamer then
amended the motion to tentatively remove the
$100,000 proposed for Cash to be Carried For-
ward. The amended motion then passed with the
following vote: Chairman Birmingham and Com-
missioners Creamer. Gortman, and Parker voted
yes. Commissioner Peters voted no.
Law Enforcement Fine and Forfeiture
Fund: After discussion by Clerk LUster about
$10.00 being budgeted in the Law Enforcement
Trust Fund, the Board took no action on this bud-
get.
Reserve Fine and Forfeiture Fund: After
discussion by Clerk Lister, Commissioner Gort-
man moved to tentatively remove the $156,006.00
proposed for Cash to be Carried Forward. Commis-
sioner Peters seconded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.
Chairman Birmingham then scheduled for
the Board to meet at 6:00 p.m. on July 24th, in or-
der for Clerk Lister to present them with the new
budget figures before the garbage companies come
in.
After discussion about inviting the Cities to
attend a meeting on July 25th at 6:00 p.m. con-
cerning the Local Option Gas Tax, the Board dis-
cussedhow to split a $3,000.000 bond issue. After
discussion about different ways of splitting the
money, Commissioner Gortman moved to repeal
the gas tax ordinance. The motion died for lack of
a second. Commissioner Creamer moved to leave
the gas tax in place, and split a $3,000.000 bond
issue 5 ways ($600,000 to each Commissioner).
and Commissioner Gortman seconded the motion,.
The motion then failed with the following vote:
Chairman Birmingham (stating that the ordinance
stated that there are interlocal agreements on file
and that the Commissioners are all in the same
situation), and Commissioners Parker and Peters
voted no. Commissioners Creamer and Gortman
voted yes. Chairman Birmingham gave the Chair
to Vice Chairman Peters, and moved to give
$600,000 to the City of Port St Joe, $400,000 to
the City of Wewahltchka. $800,000 to District 5,
$400,000 each to Districts 1, 2, and 3. to take ad-
ditional funds needed to finish C-30 from the 5th
& 6th Cent Gas Tax (Secondary Road Funds),
and to pay the engineering costs for the Cities of
Port St Joe and Wewahltchka from the remaining
Secondary Road & Bridge Funds. Commissioner
Creamer seconded the motion, and after discus-
sion about the motion, it failed with the following
vote: Chairman Peters and Commissioners Gort-
man and Parker voted no. Commissioners Birm-
ingham and Creamer voted yes. Chairman Peters
returned the Chair to Commissioner Birmingham.
Chairman Birmingham then canceled the previ-
ously scheduled Special Meeting at 6:00 p.m. on
July 24th with the Cities, and requested that Dep-
uty Clerk Collier not write the letter inviting them.
He stated that the Boeard must first work out an
agreement among themselves, before talking to the
Cities.
There being no further business, the meeting
did then adjourn until July 24th, at 6:00 p.m.
DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST. BENNY C. LISTER, CLERK
JULY 24. 1989
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
"County, Florida met this date in budget session
with -the following members present: Chairman
Douglas C. Birmingham, and Commissioners
James E. Creamer, Jimmy 0. Gortman, and Don-
ald.B. Parker. Others present were: Clerk Benny
C. Lister, Deputy Clerk Towan Collier, and Build-


- Ing Inspector De Wayne Manuel.
The meeting came to order at 6:25 p.m.
Upon request by Chairman Birmingham,
Clerk Lister discussed the new millage rate figured
after making the tentative changes (8.482). He
stated that the Board would have to cut
$350,000.00 more in order to be at the same mil-
lage rate as last year. The Board then discussed
items which could possibly be cut to lower the mil-
lage rate ($75,000.00-Road Department Building/
$39,000.00-Voting System/ and approximately
$260,000.00 in the Mosquito Control budget by
pulling in dumpsters and cutting out new employ-
ees and new equipment for garbage). The Board
discussed contracting/franchising with companies
to collect garbage for the citizens who are interest-
ed (those who do not want to pay for private collec-
tion can take their own garbage to The compactor
sites). Chairman Birmingham stated that the
Board can use some of the Mosquito Control De-
artment employees as litter control officers. After
rather discussion about the money that can be
cut from the budget by pulling in the dumpsters,
the meeting did then adjourn until July 27th,


1989 at 7:00 p.m.
DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST. BENNY C. MUSTER, CLERK
JULY 24. 1969
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida met this date In special session
with the following members present: Chairman
Douglas C. Birmingham and Commissioners
James E. Creamer, Jimmy 0. Gortman, Donald B.
Parker, and Nathan Peters, Jr. (entered at 7:10
p.m.). Others present were: Clerk Benny C. Muster,
Deputy Clerk Towan Collier, Admin. Asst/Civil
Defense Director Larry Wells, Building Inspector
De Wayne Manuel, and Mosquito Control Director
Sam Graves, Jr.
The meeting came to order at 7:05 p.m.
Chairman Birmingham reported that the
purpose of this meeting isto to discuss possible solu-
tions to the County's garbage problem. He stated
that the Board is interested in getting completely
out of the garbage business (they do not want to
pay a flat fee to any companies), and they will post-
bly lease or sell equipment which they now own.
He also stated that they do not want a mandatory
pickup system within the County. The following
companies then appeared before the Board to dis-
cuss this matter.
Ralph Bowers, of Waste Management, report-
ed that he is not prepared at this time to make a
statement about what Waste Management will do
in Gulf County. He stated that he will take the
Board's desires back to his company for them to
work up a proposal. Chairman Birmingham stated
that the Board must have a household price in the
franchising process, and they will have the ulti-
mate decision on price increases. Mr. Bowers also
discussed that the Board can expect to meet with
some public resistance when they go to a new sys-
tem.
Governor Webb and Jack Clark. of Argus
Services. Inc., inquired about whether or not the
Board intends to keep their contract with Bay
County for garbage incineration. Chairman Birm-
ingham stated that the Board will leave disposal of
the garbage up to the contractor (at the contrac-
tor's cost). Upon inquiry by the Board, Mr. Webb
reported on the areas of Gulf County that he is
presently servicing (he stated that he had to stop
going to Overstreet because the dumpsters took
away his business there). left the meeting at 7:25 p.m.> Upon inquiry by Mr.
Clark, Commissioner Gortman reported that they
would like for the contractor to operate the Class
III landfills (the whole garbage system). Birmingham returned at 7:27 p.m.> Upon inquiry
by Commissioner Peters, Mr. Webb stated that he
has reservations about a mandatory system be-
cause of the "heat' the Board would have to take.
After discussion about disposal of the garbage, the
Board reported that they intend to have two (2)
Class III landfills and compactor sites. Chairman
Birmingham reported that the Class III landfills
may be included on the proposal specifications as
an alternate, and he also discussed the "heat" that
may be taken out on the collection trucks if they
go to a new system.
Chairman Birmingham discussed that the
Board would also need to have some input con-
cerning the prices that a company would charge as
tipping fees at the compactor sites.
Waverly Osborne, of M & 0 Sanitation, stat-
ed that he does not know how the County can get
100% out of the garbage business. He also dis-
cussed that it will be expensive for a private com-
pany to bear all of the costs involved in collection
and disposal of garbage (Board may need to con-
tinue contracting with Bay County). Upon Mr. Os-
borne's inquiry, Commissioner Gortman reported
there are approximately 2,500 houses in the unin-
corporated areas of Gulf County. After discussion
that the City of Port St. Joe owns one-half of the-
South Gulf County compactor (and City of Wewah-
tichka is to pay one-half of North Gulf County
Compactor). Chairman Birmingham stated that
the Board will invite the Cities to work with them
on a County-wide system. Mr. Osborne discussed
that the more people they have involved, the
cheaper the rates will be. After discussion about
Imposing a one-half cent sales tax, Chairman
Birmingham stated that the tax cannot be imposed
for operation of a garbage system (must be used
for capital outlay projects only). Upon inquiry by
Mr. Osbomrne, Chairman Birmingham reported that
the Board will contact the Cities be ore taking
bids, to find out if they are interested in joining
with the County on this project.
Harry Cumbaa and Clifford Newsome, of C &
N Enterprises, reported that they provide the gar-
bage service for Calhoun County and discussed
some of the problems they have had by going to a
mandatory pick-up system there. Upon inquiry by
Commissioner Gortman, most of the companies
stated they could set up an operation in Gulf
County within 30 days. The Board also discussed
equipment that is presently owned by the County
(trucks, trailers, etc.).
Ralph Bowers discussed the costs that
would be involved for a company that takes over
the County's entire system (will possibly lose mon-
ey). Chairman Birmingham stated that the Board
realizes it is very expensive, but presently 40% of
the people are paying all of the expenses of gar-
bage (everyone should pay for their, own garbage).
Mr. Bowers also discussed the rates of their Spring
Hills landfill, stating that they will be happy to en-
ter into contracts with companies who might have
problems with going to Bay County for incinera-
tion. Chairman Birmingham stated that the Board
is not in any way trying to take Gulf County's gar-
bage from the Bay County incinerator, and re-
quested that the companies allow the Board to
contact the Bay County Board of County Commis-
sibners before they approach them.
There being no further business, the meeting
did then adjourn.
DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM, CHAIRMAN
ATrEST: BENNY C. LISTER. CLERK
JULY 25. 1989
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County. Florida met this date in regular session
with the following members present Chairman
Douglas C. Birmingham and Commissioners
James E. Creamer, Jimmy 0. Gortman. Donald B.
Parker. and Nathan Peters, Jr. (entered at 7:15
p.m.). Others present were: Attorney Williams J.
Rish. Deputy Clerk Towan Collier. Sheriff Al Harri-
son, Admin. Asst/Civil Defense Director Larry
Wells. Building Inspector De Wayne Manuel. Mos-
quito Control Director Sam Graves. Jr., and Road
Superintendent Bob Lester.
The meeting came to order at 7:03 p.m.
Commissioner Gortman opened the meeting
with prayer, and Commissioner Creamer led the
Pledge of Allegiance to the flag.
Approve Minutes: Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Gortman, second by Commissioner Parker,
and unanimous vote, the Board approved the min-
utes of July 11, 1989 Regular Meeting. July 13,
1989 Special Meeting, and July 13, 1989 Bud-
get Mecting.
Gulf Aire Phase II Bubdivision: Charles
York, resident of Gulf Aire Subdivision, appeared
before the Board to request that the County per-
form the drainage work necessary in Gulf Aire
Phase 11 Subdivision (Lots 25-39. Block C) for the
roads to be accepted, with the Property Owners As-
sociation paying for the work (labor, materials,
etc.). Hle reported that the does not feel the proper-
ty owners are going to sign the "No Fault" letters
concerning the drainage (due to their concern over
the flooding that occurred at St. Joe Beach last
August). Mr. York stated that the Association
would need a cost estimate before the County
started work. to see if they can get the money to
proceed. Commissioner Creamer discussed the
drainage problems in the Phase I and Phase II are-
as of Gulf Aire, and recommended that the Coutny
repair the drainage system in Gulf sire Phase I to
see if it will work (if it does, they can do the same
work in Phase I1). Upon inquiry by Commissioner
Creamer, Road Superintendent Lester stated that
he cannot give a good estimate without knowing
which lots he can cross to take dirt to the ditch (if
he can only use the 20-foot easement, the costs
would be more because he would have to haul dirt
from each end). Road Superintendent Lester also
stated that he would be able to work up a cost es-
timate in one day after seeing the site and develop-
ing a plan. After discussion. Commissioner Cream-
er moved to allow Road Superintendent Lester to
inspect this area and develop a cost estimate for
the County to do the work, and report this cost
back to the Board. The motion died for lack of a
second.
Beacon Hill Park: Nancy Smith, of Beacon
Hill. discussed the litter problem at Beacon Hill
Park. She presented pictures (taken this morning)
of litter on the beach at the park. Commissioner
Creamer discussed that Mosquito Control Depart-
ment employees are being trained to supervise
* prisoner work crews (and transportation has been
obtained) to work on cleaning the beaches and
right-of-ways. Sheriff Harrison stated that he does
not have any discretion where his prisoners go to
work because since a Mosquito Control employee
supervises and transports them, that Department
decides where they will work. Commissioner
Creamer discussed the possibility of placing gar-
bage cans at the Beacon lill Park and in the area
of the St Joe Beach Jr. Food Store. Earl Smith
stated that the Park is presently a disgrace to the
County because the volleyball nets and posts are
down. the shed is in a state of disrepair, etc. He
also stated that it either needs to be maintained,.
or needs to be done away with if the County can-
not keen it un.


Health Department Physiclans: Dr. Owen
Oksanen, a private physician, appeared before the
Board to discuss the Board's interest in contract-
ing with local physicians to provide the medical
services for the Health Department. tie stated that
this is not a matter of the local doctors not want-
ing to participate, but the Department of HRS let-
ter they received allowed for them to work at the
Health Department (which would mean closing
down their private practices). He discussed that a
possible solution mgiht be for the Health Depart-
ment to send the scheduled patients to the partici-
pating local physicians (each individual would be.
able to choose which doctor to visit from those
who are part of the program). He stated that the
doctor's payment for the services rendered could
be based on what the Health Department would-
pay their doctor (for example: the amount per hour
divided by the number of patients per hour = how
much per patient). Commissioner Creamer stated
that he feels this is a good plan, and is willing to
look at their proposal. Upon inquiry by Commis-
sioner Gortman, Dr. Oksanen stated that he
schedules patients every 15 minutes, between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through
Friday. He also discussed .that the patlehts would


not be responsible for payment, and stated that
the doctors have many samples of medication
which can help offset some of those expenses.
Commissioner Gortman stated that he would like
for every Gulf County physician to be invited to
participate.
Parks Commission: John Reeves discussed
that $25,000 has been appropriated for the Sall-
nas Park, and he also stated that they are trying to
obtain a grant ($125,000) for this park. Upon in-
quiry by Commissioner Creamer about costs to the
County. Mr. Reeves stated that the only coets to
the County in applying for the grant will be ap-
proximately $3.000 for an appraisal (which is re-
quired). Upon request by Commissioner Creamer,
the Board had no object t Commissioner Parker
replacing him on the ParksCommission while they
are working at Salinas Park. After discussion
about the "point system" for determining grant
awards. Chairman Birmingham discussed that the
County does not have the money in this year's
budget to pay for an appraisal, but It may be bud-
geted for next year. Upon inquiry by Chairman
Birmingham, Mr. Reeves report that the Property
Appraiser's Office cannot do the appraisal because
it must be done by a private appraiser who is
onthe "State Approved" list, and he stated that
they can go ahead and spend the $25,000 they al-
ready have for this park. After further discussion
about appraisals, Commissioner Peters inquired
about spending the $25,000 that they have al-
ready obtained. Chairman Birmingham reported
that the Parks Commission is scheduled to be on
the agenda at 7:00 p.m. on July 27th (budget
meeting) and the appraisal fee issue should be dis-
cussed then.
Upon inquiry about holding public hearings
concerning the parks, Chairman Birmingham re-
ported that these can be held once the Board has
made a decision about the grant and appraisal fee.
Mr. Reeves also presented names of individuals to
be considered for appointment to the Commission.
White City Park: Roy Harper, of White City,
discussed that the White City Park can be fixed up
with a little bit of money, and stated that he feels
the appropriation of $25,000 should be split be-
tween all of the parks. Mr. Harper also discussed
the need for water to be provided to White City,
and discussed available grants for this type of pro-
ject He requested that the Board put men back to
work on the White City Park.
Subdivisions Williamsburg/Methodist
Hill: Charles Bostick. of Wewahitchka, appeared
before the Board to discuss drainage problems in
the Williamsburg and Methodist Hill Subdivisions.
and to discuss the need for a water & sewer sys-
tem in those areas. He stated that the citizens
have been requesting help in these areas for 16
years, but have not received any relief/asiistance.
Chairman Birmingham discussed that there are
many areas in the County with drainage problems.
and he stated that St. Joe Beach is the only area
tht has a water system. He also reported that the
County has applied for a grant for a sewer system
in the Williamsburg/Methodist Hill areas for the
past 3 years (that area is the only area they have
applied for). Upon discussion by Mr. Bostick about
a ditch behind the cemetery, Road Superintendent
Lester reported that the County does not own the
ditch (it belongs to Fico Farms). AFter further'dis-
cussion, Chairman Birmingham directed Road. Su-
perintendent Lester to inspect this areato- see
what needs to be done. Commissioner Peters stat-
ed that the Board has applied for a grant for-this
area every year since he has been on the'Bdard,
and after further discussion about the drainage
problems, he moved to have Baskerville-Donovan
Engineers re-apply for a Community Development
Block Grant for these subdivisions (Baskerville-
Donovan Engineers to be paid if the grant is
awarded). Commissioner Creamer seconded the
motion, and it passed unanimously.
Ambulance Contract: Commissioner
Creamer discussed that he talked to the hospital
Administrator, and they have agreed to accept the
same contract that is presently in effect, for next
fiscal eyar ($150,000), and he moved to enter into
this contract with them for 1989-90. Commission-
er Parker seconded the motion, and it passed
unanimously. .
The meeting recessed for a short break at
8:30 p.m.
The meeting reconvened at 8:45 p.m.
Wetappo Class III Landfill/Comupactor
Site: Ralph Rish, of Baskerville-Donovan Engi-
neers, appeared before the Board to present.the
advertisement/specifications for the work tht
needs to be done to complete the Wetappo Com-
paction Station (septic tank & disposal field, .and/
or water supply well, and/or the compaction/
transfer station). Commissioner Gortman moved to
advertise to receive bids/proposals for these jobs,.
and Commissioner Creamer seconded the motion
for discussion. After discussion that these Items
can be proposed as a group or separately, and that
the Mosquito Control Department is to move the
dirt for the ramp, the motion passed unanimously.
After discussion about the date and time for re-
ceiving the bids, Commissioner Gortman moved to
receive the bids on August 17, 1989. at 7:00 p.m.
E.D.T. Commissioner Peters seconded the motion.
and it passed unanimously.
Disaster Assistance Training Program:
Upon request by Admin. AssLt Wells, Commission-
er Peters moved to allow him to attend a Disaster
Assistance Training Program in Tallahassee on Au-
gust 4, 1989 (with the Stateto reimburse his ex-
penses). Commissioner Creamer seconded the mo-
tion, and it passed unanimously.
Used 0il Recycling Grant: Admin. Asat.
Wells reported that he had previously applied for
advance funds from the Used Oil Recycling Grant,
and $13,230.00 has been received from the
County's use.
Beach Clean-up: Mosquito Control Director
Graves reported that the Department of Natural
Resources made his Department get off the beach
today (they were cleaning the seaweed from the
beach), and stated that they were in violation of
their rules. After discussion aobut Bay County be-
ing allowed to clean their beaches, the Board di-
rected Attorney Rish to contact Mr. Gardner (with
DNR) to seek his assistance in this matter.
Compactor Wetappo Site: Mosquito Con-
trol Director Graves reported that Williams Equip-
ment Company has requested that the Board pay
them the 10% ($2,700.00) that was retained upon
purchase of the mini compactor. Upon inquiry. Mr.
Graves reported that a retiner was held because
the Company agreed to cofistruct the funnel (hop-
per) at their expense. After discussion that the
hopper has not been constructed yet. the Board
agreed for Mr. Graves to write the company and
explain to them that the Board cannot pay this
money until the work is completed.
Radio Prisoner Transport: Upon inquiry
by Mosquito Control Director Graves about a radio
for the bus that is to be used to haul prisoner
work crews. Chairman Birmingham reported that
he is not using the radio that was furnished to him
by the County and the Mosquito Control Depart-
ment can have it for the bus. Commissioner Peters
stated that nay time a Commissioner is not using
equipment provided by the County, it should be
turned in.
Supervisor Prisoner Work Crews: Mosqui-
to Control Director Graves reported that Mosquito
Control Department employees Castldera Watts
and Roy Causey will be attending school, from
7:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. on August 7-11, 1989, to
be trained as prisoner supervisors.
St. Joe Landfill: Mosquito Control Director
Graves reported that 3 monitoring wells have
caved in at the old St. Joe landfill, and he request-
ed that they be repaired when the Buckhorn wells
are installed. He also reported that they hope to be
able to use 1 of the Northwest Florida Water Man-
agement District wells at Buckhorn, so they will
only need 3 there.
Contract Prisoner Work Crews: Attorney
Rish presented and discussed a proposed contract
between Gulf County and the Florida Department
of Corrections regarding DOC's prisoner work
crews. Upon motion by Commissioner Gortman,
second by Commissioner Peters, and unanimous
vote, the Board agreed to execute this contract
Invoice Medicaid: Deputy Clerk Collier
presented the Medicaid billing for June, 1969, in
the amount of $3,003.81, and reported that it has
been audited. Upon motion by Commissioner Pe-
ters, second by Commissioner Gortman, and uan-
nimous vote, the Board approved payment of this
invoice.
State Road 386 (Overatreet Road): Deputy
Clerk Collier discussed a letter from the Depart-
ment of Transportation concerning acceptance/
recording of the official mapa for the Overstreet
Road (386). Commissioner Gortman moved not to
accept this road, and to return the mape to DOT.
Commissioner Creamer seconded the motion, and
after discussion about the poor condition of the
road, the motion passed with the following vote:
Chairman Birmingham and Commissioners
Creamer. Gortinan. and Parker voted yes. Commis-
sioner Peters voted no. Commissioner Gortman
then moved to request an Administrative Hearing
regarding this matter. Commissioner Creamer sec-
onded the motion, and it passed unanimously.
Chairman Birmingham directed Deputy Clerk Col-
lier to write the Department of Transportation.
Insurance: Deputy Clerk Collier reported
that the insurance carrier for General Comprehen-
sive Liability has informed the Clerk's Ofce that


the Public Officials Errors & Omissions policy was
not included intheir bid to provide coverage. She
reported that the carrier has approximated that it
will cost $5,000.00 for them to insure the County
for this coverage. Deputy Clerk Collier stated that
this item was included in the County's specifica-
tions for General Comprehensive Liability, but the
carrier has stated that it was not included in their
bid. After discussion. Commissioner Peters moved
to have the Attorney check into this matter to see
what the Board needs to do. Commissioner Cream-
er seconded the motion, and it passed unanimous-
ly.
State Budget Amendment Health Depart-
ment: Deputy Clerk Collier discussed a budget
amendment from the Department of fRS for the
Health Department's Primary Care Program, and
discussed the deadline for filing a letter of opposi-
tion. The-Board had no objection to the budget in-
crease of $20,000.00 from the State for the Pri-
mary Care Facility.
County Liability Broken Windshield:
Upon inquiry by Commissioner Parker about a let-
ter from Attorney Pat Floyd concerning Helen
Ilamilton's windshield getting broken by material
that blew out of a Mosquito Control Department
truck in that area. but he does not know who was

(Continued on Page 6B)


PALM zn


t *


PAGE 2B













St. Joseph's

Schedules

'Holy Hour'
Tonight, Thursday, August
31, at 7:30 p.m., Saint Joseph's
Catholic Church (20th and Monu-
ment) will hostla Eucharistic Holy
Hour in hopes and prayers for the
protection and legal justice of All
human life. This special devotion
of prayers will bring Christians
together to offer their prayers for
the guidance of equality and jus-
tice upon our elected men and
women who are in positions to
warrant such legal protection for
the unborn and innocent victims
of abortion.
The eyes of our country are
upon our elected officials of the
Sta.t of Florida since Florida is
the, first state to call for a "special
session" to deal with the legal
protection of the unborn. This
session has been called by
Governor Martinez for October of
this year. Remember, human life
is a precious gift from God, not
just a biological creation of man-
kirid .there is life from the mo-
merit of conception
Join in and bring a friend as
the Christian people gather pray-
ing for the protection and the
proclamation of ALL human life.
We can no longer sit and watch
as .the rights of the unborn are so
easily discarded .. the time and
the issues are too sacred and im-
portant.


Chris Watson

Aplin's Grandson
Signs Contract
to Play Soccer
| Lindenwood College Soccer
fCo0ch Buzz Demling has signed
Chris Watson- of Midwest City,
Oklahoma to play for the Lions
next season.
'Watson will be a strong addi-
tion to the Lindenwood program,"
said Lindenwood Athletic Director
Art Siebels. Watson was an All-
State Goalkeeper and the East
Oklahoma County Player of the
Year. He was selected to the All
District team the last two seasons
and traveled to Europe with the
Oklahoma All-Star Soccer Team
in 1988. Watson was also chosen
"Most Valuable Player" of the Mid-
west City Hih School soccer
team. The high school team was
state runner-up in 1989.
Watson is the son of Randy
and Diane Aplin of Midwest City,
Oklahoma, and the grandson of
Deomes and Nadine Aplin of Port
St. Joe. He is interested in study-
ing education.
Lindenwood is a private liber-
al arts college offering more than
40 .majors to undergraduate and
graduate students in the St.
Louis metropolitan area and the
nation.

Card of Thanks
We want to thank and highly
commend the'St. Joe Beach Vol-
unteer Fire Department for their
quick response on the night of
(r August 20th when our residence
in Gulf Aire was on fire. Also our
thanks go out to any and all oth-
er volunteer fire departments,
Highland View and Port St. Joe,
which responded to the call. It
was the hard and dedicated work
which saved the main structure
and 43 years of treasures and
memories which could have gone
up in smoke. Thanks to our local
fire department, we only lost ma-
terial things which can be re-
placed. Thanks and God bless to
all parties who fought the fire and
saved the neighboring residences.
Marvin & Ethel Riley
Gulf Aire


Vandals

Hit Pond
The St. Vincent Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge's
Oyster Pond water control
structure has been vandal-
ized. A vandal, or vandals,
apparently raised the wa-
ter control structure flash-
boards which resulted in a
rapid partial dewatering or
drawdown. The unplanned
drawdown caused a major
fish kill. Approximately
three years will be re-
quired to once again es-
tablish normal Oyster
Pond fish populations. In
the meantime, the May 15
September 30, 1989 pub-
lic fishing season in Oys-
ter Pond will remain in ef-
fect. Boat access and
fishing success, however,
will be very poor due to
low water levels and dras-
tically reduced game fish
populations. The refuge
staff will also use this un-
planned opportunity to ac-
celerate pest plant control
in order to make the best
of a bad situation. A deci-
sion regarding the 1990
Oyster Pond fishing sea-
son will be made following
fall surveys.
The illegal act that
caused the fish kill oc-
curred sometime between
July 30 and August 3. If
anyone has information
believed helpful in deter-
mining who caused the
drawdown, please call the
refuge office. To get the
job done. the refuge staff
needs your good will and
assistance.

Card of Thanks
We want to thank all of our
friends and neighbors in Gulf Aire
for their show of love and concern
during our recent fire loss. For all
the many neighbors who offered
their help and offered to open
their homes to us. Sometimes it
takes a tragedy such as this to
make us realize the importance of
good friends and neighbors.
Thank you and God bless you -
to all the Gulf Aire residents and
to any and all concerned resi-
dents from St. Joe Beach, Port St.
Joe, and Overstreet.
Marvin & Ethel Riley


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUG. 31, 1989 PAGE 3B


Dana Swatts In '"Who's Who" Among Students


Dana Swatts has been re-
ceived and accepted for publica-


tion in the 23rd annual edition of
Who's Who Among High School
Students, 1988-89. Only 5% of all
students from our nation's
22,000 high schools are recog-
nized and honored in Who's Who
each year according to their
achievements.
She will be eligible to compete
in their annual scholarship pro-


gram and she received an appli-
cation for a minimum of $65,000
to be awarded this year to Who's
Who Students. This also makes
the College Referral Service avail-
able which is a valuable reference
service for college-bound Who's
Who Students. In a survey of
2,000, colleges and universities,
92% of responding colleges indi-


cated the value of this program.
More than 100,000 college refer-
rals were made last year for
Who's Who Students.
This is an exclusive honor for
a student to receive and Dana's
picture, name, and her achieve-
ments will appear in the largest
and leading student publication
in the nation.


-IDana Swatts
Dana Swatts


Brownies Meeting
at St. Joseph's
There will be a parents meet-
ing at St. Joseph's Catholic hall
(on 20th Street) Thyrsday, Sep-
tember 7 at 7:00 pan. All girls
who are interested in being in
Brownies must have a parent
present at this meeting. Registra-
tion is to be paid and consent
forms are to be signed, "so a par-
ent is needed.


v iI A/A
--L



(Us N?
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP............ 10a.m.

Sermon Topic:
The Narrow Christian

Nursery Available
ADULT SCHOOL................ 11 a.m.
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden, Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756


We Want You To Be
Part of the Friendly Place

BIBLE STUDY................. 9:45 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP............. 7:00 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP ...... 11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING........ 5:45 p.m.
Long Avenue Baptist Church
1601 Long Avenue
DANIEL W. DUNCAN Pastor


TERRY HUMES
Min. of Music
& Outreach


JEFF BOWDEN
Min. of Youth, Education
& Recreation


The Phantry Hotef

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Port St. Joe
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IGA Reg., Thick or Beef Bologna..........lb. $1.39

IGA Meat Wieners ..................................12oz. 990

IGA Sliced Bacon .................................... 12oz. 990

IGA Cooked Hamr.............................. 10 oz. $1.99
IGA, WHERE FRIENDLY

Martha White Meal ................................ 5 lbs. $1.27

Hefty Foam 9" Plates.........................50oct. $1.67

Hefty Compartment Tray ...................... 20 ct. $1.97

Heinz Relish................................................ ooz. 67
Aunt Jemima Syrup.............................. 240oz. $2.47

1~ 1


Tablerite Whole Sirloin(10-12 Lb.Avg.).......... lb. $2.49

Louis Rich Turkey Franks ...................................b. 990

Market Sliced Red Rind Cheese ...........Ib. $2.29

Lykes Market Sliced Slab Bacon................ ib. 890

Lykes Bacon Ends & Pieces ............ 3 bs. $1.19

PEOPLE MEET TO SHOP

Sunshine Ice Cream Cones.............5.25oz. $1.37

Crystal Hot Sauce.....*............................... 12oz.67

Viva Napkins.................................. ....140 ...oct. 77

FRM Pelleted Dog Food..................40 b.bag $6.49

Golden Flake Potato Chips .....................e.50Z. 990


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IGA Lemonade 12oz. 2/870
Gorton's Crunch Fishsticks.... 8oz. $1.57
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Kraft Parkay Qtrs. Lb. 570
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Kraft American Singles..........12oz. $1.67
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Group Goes Back 20 Million Years


In History In North Florida 'Dig'


.A group of Floridians found a
new kind of vacation that didn't
take them far from home, but
sent them 20 million years back
in time.
A horse trainer, postal clerk,
sewage plant operator, retired
chemical engineer and other ama-
teur fossil collectors are helping
University of Florida researchers
excavate three-toed horses, rhi-
noceroses and other Miocene Era
creatures near Bell in North Cen-
tral Florida.
Some have unearthed fossils
before, while others only know
about, paleontology from what
they read in books or see in- films.
"Indiana Jones is just a mo-
vie," said Lourdes Chu, a Gaines-
vllle cab driver, who found the
tooth of a three-toed horse and a
piece of camel bone after scraping
dirt with, a dental pick for several
hours, "Actually, it doesn't turn
out to be quite that exciting."
The 12 adult paleontologists
are students in the class, "Bones:
From Bats to Bear-Dogs" offered
for the first time by the Florida
Museum of Natural History on
the UF campus and taught by pa-
leontologist Ann Pratt,,who said
that amateurs add to scientific
knowledge. "People who want to
spend their time searching for
fossils give us additional speci-
mens and lots of information that
is really useful," she said.
"It's thrilling to know that
you're digging In soil that is mil-
lions of years old and you're find-
ing part of an animal that lived at


Minutes
(Continued from Page 2B)
driving IL Attorney Rish stated that the County
can notify the Insurance company someone has al-
leged that something blew out of one of the County
trucks and broke her windshield, but our employ-
ee has-no knowledge of it. Sheriff Harrison report-
ed that the lady came into his office concerning
this, and stated that he was later told that a Mos-
quito Control Department truck was in that area.
Upon inquiry by Chairman Birmingham. Mr.
Graves repo-ted that they told her to have the
windshield repaired and her insurance would pay
for It. After discussion abut a State Law that ad-
dresses thlsf Chairman Birmingham stated that'
her Insurance company Is supposed to pay for the
broken windshield without charging her a deducti-
ble. Commissioner Peters reported that he will be
glad to talk, with Ms. Hamilton concerning this
Smatter. Chairman Birmingham directed Mr.
Graves to notify the County's insurance company
of this incident ", : "
Beach'Clean-up: Commissioner Parker dis-
cussed the problem with the Department of Natu-
ral Resources about cleaning the beaches, and
upon his request, the Board agreed to have DNR
and the Marine Patrol obtain permission from the
Commissioner in District 3 or District 5 before
they buy anything on the County's beaches (the
Departments will also need to provide pictures of
what they will be burying).
Local Option Gas Tax: Commissioner IPeters
discussed a letter from the City of Port St. Joe pro-
posing that they will accept (1) $600,000 up fron
for the 6-cent gas tax. (2) 50% of the balance of
funds remaining from the 6-cent tax revenue after
the bond Issue payment Is made each year, and (3)
for all paving to be "let" under one contract with
the County to pay all engineering and Inspection
services. Commissioner Peters moved to accept
this proposal from the City of Port St Joe. The mo-
tion died for lack of a second. Commissioner Pc-
ters moved to pay the City of Port St. Joe $600.000
up front, and $50,000 each year for 6 years from
the 5th & 6th cent gas tax revenue after the bond
Issue on it is paid In full. Commissioner Creamer
seconded the motion. After discussion by City
Commissioner Benny Roberts, Commissioner
Creamer amended the motion to pay them
$600,000 up front, and $50,000 each year for 15
years from the 5th & 6th cent gas tax revenue af-
ter the bond Issue on it is paid in full. Commis-
stoner Peters seconded the amended motion. After
further discussion, the amended motion passed
with the following vote: Chairman Birmingham
and Commissioners Creamer, Parker, and Peters
voted yes. Commissioner Gortman voted no. Chair-
man Birmingham then discussed a letter from the
City of Wewahitchka which states that they will ac-
cept the $00,000 offered to them, but requesting
that the Board reconsider this offer if different op-
tions are offered to the City of Port SL Joe. Chair-
man Birmingham gave the Chair to Vice Chairman
Peters, and moved to pay the City of Wewahltchka
$500,000 up front, and $34,000 (based on the
$600.000/$400.00 split) each year for 15 years
from the 5th & 6th cent gas tax revenue after the
bond issue on it Is paid in full. Commissioner
Gortman seconded the motion, and it passed with
the following vote: Commissioners Birmingham,
Creamer, and Gortman voted yes. Chairman Pe-
ters and Commissioner Parker voted no. Chairman
Peters then returned the Chair to Commissioner
Birmingham, Attorney Rish discussed that if
agreements are reached with the Cities, copies
need to be taken to Tallahassee as soon as possi-
ble.
Port St. Joe Beach Drainage: Upon Inquiry
by Commissioner Creamer about the progress on
the Port St. Joe Beach drainage project, Ralph
Rish reported that Baskerville-Donovan Engineers
has been in contact with the Department of Trans-
portation concerning installation of another outfall
ditch in that'area. meeting a 9:57 p.m.> lie stated that they are try-
ing to get an answer from DOT concerning place-
ment of the outfall and about who will be responsi-
ble for paying for it. Admin. Asst. Wells reported
that a letter'was received today stating that Bas-
kerville-Donovan Engineers has filed a letter cun-
cerning the outfall.
Water Tank Highland View: Commissioner
Creamer discussed the Highland View water tank,
stating that a committee needs to be appointed to
decide whether to restore and use the tank or to
tear It down. Hlie stated that the County may be li-
able if the tower fell (due to its state of disrepair).
After discussion about the tower being used to
provide more water pressure for the Highland View
and Beach .systems, Commissioner Peters dis-
cussed including money in next year's budget to
fund this project. turned at 10:01 p.m.> The Board had no objection
to Commissioner Creamer checking into this mat-
ter. After discussion by Chairman Birmingham,
Commissioner Peters stated that the money for
this project would have to be paid from the water
-system funds. -
Road Acceptance: Chairman Birmingham
reported that he has a letter from Road Superin-
tendent which stated that the Roy Lister Road (be-
hind Methodist Hill Subdivision) has been on the
waiting list for acceptance for 2 years. Mr. Lester
also stated that the road meets the specifications
and is ready for County maintenance. Commis-
sioner Peters moved to accept the Roy Lister Road
for County maintenance, and Commissioner Gort-
man seconded the motion for discussion. After dis-
cussion, about the length of the road (approxi-
mately one-half of a mile), the motion passed
unanimouslyy .
Drainage Problems Dead Lakes/
Williamsburg Subdivision: Chairman Birming-
ham discussed a letter from Cecelia Staley con-
cerning a -drainage problem in the Dead Lakes
area. He directed Road Superintendent Lester to
look into this problem and report back to the
Board. Ile'also directed Mr. Lester to contact Tom
Stevenson, 4t Fico Farms, to request permissIon to
clean the ditch that borders Williamsburg Subdivi-
sion.
Bulkhead George Gaskln Park: "Commis-
stoner Gortman reported that Baskerville-Donovan
Engineers has put stakes at the end of the road
where the bulkhead is to be constructed, and the
Corps of Engineers is ready to begin work in Au-
gust (as soon as the Department of Environmental
Regulation approves the permit application).
There being no further business, the meeting
did then adjourn.
DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM, CHAIRMAN
ATfEST: BENNY C. LISTiR, CIERK


that time," said Gloria Driggers, a
second grade teacher in Orange


Springs.
'The site is incredible -- I just


Paleontologist Ann Pratt and Carl Johnson, ac retired engineer
from Crystal River, examines a plastic replica of the foot bone of
a three-toed horse. The model is used by Johnson and other
adults in a University of Floridafossil collecting class to identify
bones at the Thomas Farm near Bell in North Central Florida.
[UF photo by Walter Coker]




Royal Rangers Founder,


Johnnie Barnes, Has Died


SJohnnie Barnes, founder of
the Assemblies of God Royal
Rangers program and Royal
Rangers national commander,
went to be with Christ June 15.
He died at his home in Spring-
field, Mo., after suffering a heart
attack. He was 61.
Barnes was ordained with the
North Texas District in 1950. He
married Juanita Shipley that
same year. He served as an evan-
gelist for seven years and pas-
tored at Electra, Tex., for four
years. He also served as youth- di-
rector of the North Texas District
1960-61.
Barnes founded Royal Rang-
ers, the Assemblies of God minis-
try to boys, in 1962. According to
Men's Ministries Department offi-
cials, there are 5,290 Royal Rang-
ers groups currently in the U.S.,
with 128,298 members. An esti-
mated 1 million boys have been
involved in Royal Rangers since
1962. The program operates in 43
countries around the world.
In 1985 the National Royal
Rangers Training Center, Barnes'
Training Center, Barnes' longtime
dream and vision, became a reali-
ty with the purchase of 1,533
acres near Eagle Rock, Mo.
As national Royal Rangers
commander, Barnes was senior
editor of High Adventure and High
Adventure Leader, quarterly mag-
azines for boys. Circulation num-
bers around 87,000 for the maga-
zines.
He was an accomplished
songwriter, artist, and the author
of 14 youth and outdoor related
books. His travels took him
throughout the U.S. and into 26
countries on behalf of Royal
Rangers.'
Barnes received the God and
Service Award from the National
Church Commission for Civic


Youth Serving Agencies and has
appeared in Who's Who in Ameri-'
Ca.
"Brother Barnes was indeed a
faithful soldier of the Cross," said
Ken Riemenschneider, Men's Min-
istries Department secretary. "His
tireless efforts to 'reach, teach,
and keep' boys for Christ enabled
him to minister Jesus' love to
thousands of men and boys."
Barnes is survived by his wife
Juanita, a son, and a daughter.
il. Atlv'mrlisn-nl )tv (id l'hdings Assembly ol
Godl Chur'h of Wmwahflchk.


School Lunch

Room Menu

The lunch menu for the Gulf
County Schools have been
planned as follows. Menus may
change due to the availability of
some foods.
Monday, September 4 Labor
Day, No Lunch Served
Tuesday. September 5 ham/
turkey sandwich, lettuce, tomato,
onion, French fries/tater tots,
milk, and cookie
Wednesday, September 6
chicken, applesauce. English
peas, rolls, milk, rice with gravy
Thursday, September 7 chili
(on care, sliced peaches, Eng
lish peas. saltines, and milk
Friday, September 8 tacos.
lettuce, tomato, pinto beans,
milk, peanut bt)tter/cornilake
cookie.


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can't dig anywhere without find-
ing bones," said Jack Cushman,
a mental health administrator in
Ocala, who found a tortoise shell,
an alligator bone and what ap-
peared to be a camel bone on his
first day.
A fossil collector all his life,
Cushman said he found a tapir
skull in the lime pits west of
Gainesville when he was 10 years
old.
One of the best records of ear-
ly life in Florida, the Thomas
Farm has fossils of many animals
that are now extinct. The Bear-
dog a giant wolf-like creature
with a head resembling a bear -
was one of the most spectacular.
prehistoric animals to be found at
the site. Pratt said.
'These bear-dogs probably fed
on little horse that were around,"
she said. 'They certainly would
have been big enough to take
something like that as prey."
Ten-foot-long boa constric-
tors, rodents that are no longer
found in the Eastern United
States and giant poisonous lix-
ards also roamed the site, which
was then probably a large, diy
sinkhole surrounded by forest.
she said.
'The Thomas Farm is so rich
in fossils that these students will
probably destroy more bones
than most people collect in a life-
lime." Pratt said.
The site is not only old geolog-
ically, but it is also one of the
first fossil sites discovered in the
state by the Florida Geological
Survey in 1931, said Gary Mor-
gan. a UF biologist.
Today the state-owned Thom-
as Farm is used primarily to
teach students field techniques in
excavating lbssils.
They use dental picks the
same tool dentists use to scrape
teeth because they are delicate
enough for million-year-old fos-
sils. Once the dirt is cleared
away, the students identify the
bone, remove it from the ground
and help catalog it at lthe Florida
Museum of Natural History on
the UF campus.
"People always want to keep
their fossils because they're unu-
sual and pretty to look at," Pratt
said. "But I try to stress the sci-
entific value of storing it in a mu-
scumi, where it can be preserved
and protected."
The adults didn't seem to be
bothered by the hot sun or the-
nature of the work. "You get dir-
ty." Cushman said, "but) that
washes off."


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THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE. FL* THURSDAY, AUG. 31, 1989 PAGE 7B
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I will accept bids on lot 11 & S
half of Lot 10, block 68, City of Port
St. Joe through Sept. 30, Hulon P.
Mitchell, 393 Whispering Pines, Pine-
ville, LA 71360. 2tp 8/31

Mexico Beach, an absolute steal,
3 bdrm., 1 1/2 ba. luxury townhouse
with great Gulf view, $55,000. Only
$7,500 down and owner will finance
the balance for up to 15 years. 1-893-
8386. ltc 8/31

At Mexico Beach, a 12'x60' com-
pletely furnished mobile home on nice
lot, crenee din 10'x30' front porch,
20'x30' block bldg., privacy fence, sun
deck on back, shade trees & grape
vines, walking distance to beach.
$35,000. Owner financing, 10%
down, remainder over 10 yrs. at 10%
Interest. Call 648-8562.

4 bdrm. 2 ba. cedar home on nice
100x108' lot with privacy fence. As-
sum. FHA mortgage 9 1/2% fixed,
$45,000. 421 7th St., Mexcio Beach.
Call 227-1167 day or 648-8727 after
' 4:30 p.m. & weekends. 4tp 8/31

Beacon Hill, 2 lots with barn,
$17,500. Can be assumed with
$4,500 down. 648-8543.
1 1/2 lots at Ward Ridge, ap-
ptafsed at $13,500. Asking $9,500.
Call 229-6432 for more information.
2tc 8/31

For Sale by Owner: block home,
Ig. shop bldg. & 5 lots, chain link
fence, close to school, 3 bdrm., 2 ba.,
liv. rm. & din. area, kitchen, Fla. rm.,
until. rm., carport, will sell all or just
home. 201 7th SL, Highland View. Af-
ter 5 p.m. please.

Commercial building for sale, 234
Reid Ave. 2 story, downstairs 3616
sq. ft., 2nd level, 1794 sq. ft. Perfect
office location. Must sell, owner fi-
nancing. Make offer. 1-763-5990.
8tc 8/24

1/2 acre lots,. Overstreet area,
$250 down, $80.06 per month. Call
648-5871 or 1-934-3219. 8tc 8/10

3 bdrm., 2 ba. home with fire-
lace & ceiling fans & 2 bdrm., 1 ba.
ome. Many possibilities, consider
lease with option to buy. 229-8904.
tfc 8/31


Margaret Hale 64
Broker/Salesman


OPEN HOUSE ALL DAY
SATURDAY- House for Sale by
Owner Must Sell Make Us an Offer.
Like new, 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 ba., cen.
a&h, front room & kitchen has ponde-
rosa pine, stone fireplace, & stone on
house. Deep well, chain link fence,
with a 20'x23' workshop. Also has
double carport. Rodney Hall, 229-
6859.
4tp 8/31

Excellent single family lot in Gulf
Aire. Access to dedicated beach, wim-
ming pool & tennis courts. Reduced,
(904) 648-5142. 4tp 8/3

Indian Pass S. Seminole. Lots 9-
11-13-15 & 17. Beach cottage on #17,
Call 648-8624 or 227-1167.
tfc 8/31

Home & 3 1/4 acre of land for
sale by owner, 12 miles from Port St.
Joe & Wewa. Good farming land, fire-
place, real nice, like a new home,
chain link fence, plus tractor with
equipment. Appraised at $55,000.
Will sell cheaper. B. R. Williiams,
229-6221. ttc 8/31

House for sale, 3 bdrm., 1 1/2
ba., excellent neighborhood, comer
lot, quality construction, 2102 Cy-
press Ave. Shown by appt. only. Call
1-674-5856 after 7 p.m. tfc 8/31

2 adjoining lots, each measuring
75' wide x 150' deep at Ward Ridge.
For more information call 227-1865
after 6:00. tfc 8/31

Two acres on county road off of
Overstreet. No down payment, pay-
ments $100 per month. Telephone
229-6961 or 227-7411. tfc 8/31

New Listing, for sale by owner:
5 yr. old, 3 bdrm., 2 ba. brick and
stucco home. Large great room w/
brick fireplace, double walk-in closet
in master bedroom, all natural gas
appliances. 1 1/2 lots, privacy fence,
utility building, lawn sprinkler sys-
tem. Located in nice neighborhood
near schools. Call before 5:00, 229-
6803, after 5:00, 229-8346.
tfc 7/6

3 bdrm. brick home w/swimming
pool, new outdoor shop bldg., new
carpet, wallpaper & ceiling fans,
2002 Cypress Ave. 229-6525 or. 1-
643-2940 tfc 8/31


221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
48-5659 Frances Chason 229-8747
Ann Six 229-6392


PORT ST. JOE
,1101 Constitution Excellent Location for this lovely 2 story bay front home, has 3
bedrooms, 2 baths, formal dining room, fireplace, den, 2-car garage. By ap-
pointment d nly. $150,000.
1304 Palm Perfect for retired couple. 2 bedroom, 1 bath on quiet street. Has new
roof, new windows, added insulation, new carpet. Only $36,000.
'103 Yaupon Exce a ulllke new 3 bedroom, 2 bath brick home. Great room
with fireplace. ICd "trck.Garage. $69,000.00.
'603 Long Ave. Walk to town from this 2 bedroom home with nice screen porch.
$29,200.
230 7th St. Price reduced on this newly painted 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with
' deck and outside storage. Good starter home, good rental investment.
: '207 6th St., Highland View Spend the summer at the pool that goes with this at-
tractive 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Many other features. $75,000.
.170 Ave. E 3 bedroom, 1 bath furnished house with storage shed and efficiency
apartment. $18,000.
'523 Welton Drive, Oak Grove 2 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home includes gas stove,
washer, dryer, outside storage. $18,900.
210 6th Street, Highland View 2 bedroom, 1 bath handyman special. New roof,
chain link fence. $20,000.
512 4th St., Highland View 4 bedroom, 2 bath, 1363 sq. ft. doublewide mobile
home on 70'x130' lot. New 1200 gal. septic tank and new 8.5'x17' deck. Only
S $13,900.
523 7th St. Attractive 2 bedroom, 1 bath, large den, landscaped yard. $30,000.
.505 3rd St. Make an offer on this large frame home on 2 50x170 lots. Can be used
as home or office. Appraised at $35,000.
1312 Marvin Ave. Recently redecorated 3 bedroom, 1 bath home in excellent con-
dition. Has central heat/air, ceiling fans, mini blinds, carpet, built-in china cabi-
net, large enclosed porch, outside storage. $51,500.
509 4th St. Commercial zoning on this 2 bedroom masonry home on 3 50'x170'
lots. $37,500.
WHITE CITY
Charles Ave. This well-kept 3 bedroom, 1 bath frame home with deck, new central
heat/air is on 2 75x150 lots. Has many extras including storage building, new
pump, satellite dish. $32,000.
HOWARD CREEK
Howard Creek 2 bedroom mobile home, boat house, greenhouse, under ground
*sprinkler. $40,000.
THE BEACHES
3rd Ave. Beacon Hill Charming 2 bedroom with new carport, fenced yard, com-
pletely furnished.
Corner Canal & Americus St. Joe Beach Duplex 1 block from beach. New roof
and windows.
5424 Americus St. St. Joe Beach Relax and enjoy this comfortable 3 bedroom,
1 bath home with hot tub and lanai, only 1 block from beach. $53,000.
Hwy. 98 St. Joe Beach Unique 2 story home with unobstructed Gulf view. Upstairs
contains 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, great room, fireplace, large deck. Downstairs
has mother-in-law apartment, large utility room, large workshop, on '2 lots.
$175,000.00.
Corner 7th St. & Maryland, Mexico Beach Owner anxious to sell this 3 bedroom,
1 bath stilt house on extra large corner lot. Assumable mortgage and possible
owner financing. Only $50,000.
Ponce De Leon, St. Joe Beach Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath 14'x70' mobile home with
sun deck and screened porch on two 75'x150' lots. Central heat & air, all appli-
ances. $45,000.
LOTS
St. Joseph Shores Owner willlisten to offers on this 3 acres with 231 ft of highway
frontage.
Port St. Joe Monument Ave. $20,000.
St. Joseph Shores 80 ft. gulf front, Hwy. 98 to water.
Port St. Joe 520 3rd St. 50x170. $8,000.
Port St. Joe 301 Woodward zoned commercial 75x150. $20,000.
Mexico Beach Texas Drive, Nice home lot 100'x100'. $10,000.
St. Joe Beach Seashores, Desirable corner lot 85'x150'. $15,000.
Port St. Joe Palm Blvd. and corner of 18th Street, 2 lots. $22,000.
FOR RENT
111 Ponce DeLeon St. Joe Beach 1 bedroom cottage. $225.00.


2 acres with 14x80 mobile home.
Located 4 miles from beach on Hwy.
386. Price reduced, $36,500. Call
227-1192 anytime after 9:00 p.m.
tfc 8/31

2 bedroom furnished nice house
on 1 1/3 lots, 100' from beach. Canal
St., St. Joe Beach. $29,000. Call Mar-
ianna, 904/482-3884. tfc 8/31

Three bedroom, one bath, frame
home. Large lot, recently remodeled,
in good condition. $39,500. Easy fi-
nancing. 227-1416. tfc 8/31

Reduced Price. 2 bdrm., 2 ba.
luxury piling home, Located in a C-
zone (non-flood zone), exclusive neigh-
borhood, bay access & gulf access in
subdivision, Pensinula Estates, Cape
San Bias. Also lots for sale, terms
available (in same subdivision). Excel-
lent investments. Call 227-1689 after
6 p.m. tfc 7/6

GULF FRONT
PRISTINE REMOTE
BEACH
1, 2 AND 3 BR
TOWNHOMES
(Rental Unit Available)

BARRIER DUNES
RESORT
Cape San Bias, Florida
(904) 229-2500
1-800-624-3964
tfic 6/1


Improved lot for sale, 1 block
from Gulf beaches, has culvert/
septic tank/natural gas/city wa-
ter meter/power pole, ideal to
build home or to place a mobile
home. Reduced to $18,500 with
$1,500 cash down. 10 years at
$238.85, 15 years at $198.73
month. Lot is 75x150. Phone
648-8390 or 648-5160.
Lfc 8/17


Are you busy?
yard or house
rate. Call 229-89


Now Ava
TOU<
on Mexic
Air Brushing in
and steamed sea
Bar. Come Join


LOTS FOR SALE--On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
ml. south of Wewa. Owner financing.
Phone 229-6961. paid thru 3/90

For Sale by owner: Nice brick
home, 1 1/2 lots, 3 bdrm., kit. & for-
mal dining rm., Ig. great rm, 2 1/2
ba., & Ig. deck in the back w/privacy
fence. Also has dbl. garage, Ig. storage
area overhead. (cen. h&a). 2005 Juni-
per Ave. Call after 6:00, 229-6851.
tfc 8/31

Three 800 sq. ft. ea., 2 bdrm., I
ba. apartments. Good rental income.
In excellent condition, located 606
Woodward Ave. Call for appt. Phone
229-8385 or 227-1689. tfc 7/6



OFFICE

BUILDING

FOR SALE
OR LEASE

FINANCING
AVAILABLE

MODERN BRICK
CONSTRUCTION
518 FIRST ST.

227-7300








Wanted: Good box springs &
mattresses or twin beds or bunk
beds. Call 229-6933.


I will clean your ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
for a reasonable Port St. Joe Serenity Group
996. Open Meetings: Sunday 4:00 p.m.
2tc 8/31 Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m.
ailable at AL-ANON
Sunday 4:00 p.m & Tuesday 8:00 p.m
CA'"S All meetings at St. James
co Beach. Episcopal Church, all times eastern
the beach store For further AA information
food in the Raw call: 648-8121


us and have fun.
5tc 8/3


COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tic 9/7


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade
Guns
Indian Swamp Campground
,Hwy. C-387, Howard Creek
tfc 1/5


C. R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clearing,
septic tanks, drain fields, fill dirt.
Rt. 2, Box AIC, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tic 9/7


JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER 1-265-4794
24 Years Experience
Workers Compensation, Occupa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Ac-
cidents. No charge for first confer-
ence. tfc 8/31


THE WINDOW & DOOR
SERVICE &
REPLACEMENT EXPERTS

Now servicing the Mexico and
Port St. Joe beaches area.
Let us help you with your
window & door problems.
CALL
WIN-DOOR SALES & SERVICE
for A Free Estimate
Dave (voice pager) 871-8902
Office 235-7817
Panama City, FL
tfc 8/3 1


BEN HUR


SERVICE
Carpet Cleaning
Furniture Shampooing
Carpet Brushing
Homes and Businesses

No Travel Charge

BOB DAVIS &. SON

784-7155
Servicing Panama City, -
Wewa & St. Joe area
tfc 8/17


Mexico Beach TV, VCR,
Stereo Repairs.
Home Service Calls
648-8600
Located in the Mall
800 U.S. Hwy. 98
3tp 8/24


" COLLINS
ELECTRIC
Residential Commercial
Industrial Wiring
Licensed by State of Florida
648-5770 s3p 8/24


BROOKS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Call Anytime
1-763-1901 or
1-874-1843.
tfc 8/31


WALT'S CAR WASH &
DETAILING
Wash & Wax
Wash & Shampoo Carpet
For complete information & price list
Call 229-8992 or
229-6844 after 5
IFC 8/31

RONNIE HUDSON CARPENTER
Free Estimates Decks,
Porches, Portable Buildings
Picnic Tables
Uc. No. RG0058291
NO JOB TOO SMALl.
229-8580
tic 8/3

THE HISTORIC GARDEN CENTER
is the Place for Your Special
WEDDING REHEARSAL
DINNER, PARTY LUNCHEON,
REUNION OR ANY IMPORTANT
EVENT.
Call 227-1613 or 229-6951



SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!








Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reld Avenue
tfe a


2 lamps, 1 studio chair, 2 end ta-
bles, 1 sofa table, 1 sofa, & 1 butler
coffee table. Call 227-1268, see at
Johnnie's Trim Shop.

Complete 12-place setting of
Roseville translucent fine china, some
still in original boxes, plus vegetable
bowls, butter dish, sugar & creamer,
platter. 229-6680. ltp 8/31

Peavey Backstage Plus guitar
amp, $75. Call 229-6226 or leave
message at 229-8160. Itp 8/31

12'x60' trailer, with built-on ex-
tension 24'x12', will move within 50
mi. radius. $4,700. 648-5047.
3tc 8/31

1986 Bayliner, 14', 50 h.p., galv.
trailer, am/fm cassette radio, mint
condition. $4,000. 229-6509.

13" Sears color TV, $75, pickup
truck bug deflector, blue, $12. Call
648-5285.

Fabuglass Fury boat 16' with 60
hp Johnson outboard motor, both
1973 but very little time. New battery,
Royce radio, bimini top, survival gear,
accessories, $1,000 firm. Jimmy
James, 229-6404.

4 ea. stock rims with radial tires
with 21,000 mi, & hub caps, to fit F-
150 4wd. Asking $275. Call 229-6729
after 7:00 p.m. 2tp 8/24

Built-in oven and stove, not very
old, works great, asking $150. Call
229-6729 after 7:00 p.m.
2tp 8/24

Set of Encyclopedia Americana
encyclopedias, still in original carton.
Originally priced at $900. Will sell for
$600. Call 227-1247. 4tp 8/10

Aluminum windows, roll out, dif-
ferent sizes, good buy. Call 648-5880.


r '
All Weather Cooling
& Heating
Lic. # RA0058411
CALL
BRIAN VOLZ
648-5213
3lp 8/31,


EXTERIOR PRESSURE CLEANING
Homes, Mobile Homes, Businesses,
Sidewalks, Driveways
and Pool Areas.
101 Different Jobs Done
FREE ESTIMATES
Call 648-8201
fce 8/31



Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax
Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043



THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 REID AVE. 229-6954
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 9/7


'- u L" Bill Quaranta
Homes Outhouses
Old Fashioned Quality
Commercial Buildings
Hand-Nailed Craftsmanship
Log Cabins Additions


1984 19 1/2' Leisure Craft, 175
hp. Volvo engine w/Magic Tilt trailer,
VHF, LCD recorder & loran. $5,500.
Call 229-6506 after 3:30 p.m.
tfc 7/20

To buy or sell Avon call 227-
1281. tfc 7/6

1978 Ford pickup, F-100, Bass-
boat, 115 h.p. Mercury outboard &
trailer. Call 229-8821 after 5 p.m.
tfc 8/31

30' broadwater, all mahogany,
great family boat FWC, V8 Chrysler
with velvet drive gear, fly bridge,
sleeps 6. $6,000 obo. 229-6965.
tfc 6/1

Electrolux and all other vacuums,
repairs sales bags. Anything for
any vacuum and built-in central
vac's. Callaway Vacuum, Tyndall
Parkway, Panama City, 763-7443.
tfc 8/31







LOST: White cat, one green eye,
one blue, pink collar, answers to
Sam. Call 227-1319 Ann Hammock.

FOUND: in front of Gulf County
Public Health Unit, heart necklace or
bracelet charm. Come by The Star
and identify and pay for ad.




Check Our Sale on

306 Williams Ave.
Th 7sStar


Tel-A-Story, a new Bible story every
day for children and adults. Call
227-1511.




LEVINS' PAINT, BODY
& MECHANIC SHOP
Jones Homestead
Reasonable Rates
Hours 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday thru Friday
Body Work 229-6920
Mechanic 227-7403
24 Hours Road Service
4tc 8/10



-y THE
COUNTRY
GOOSE

'"Handmade
Country
Crafts"

130 Gulf Street
St. Joe Beach

Open Tuesday Friday
10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
(Other times by appointment)
OWNERS: Gayle & John Tatum
tfc 8/31


ST. JOE
CUSTOM BUILDERS
Glen F. Combs

P. 0. Box 456
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456.

COMMERCIAL OR
RESIDENTIAL BUILDING
Bus.: 229-8385 Home: 227-1689



Gen. Con. RG0033843 -
Reclproant Member of GulfCnty Home
Builders As-ocfation_. -
Bullder of the Year 1988 Aivard
tfc 9/7


S-UC. RF 0051042
FREE ESTIMATES RG (-651008
ER 0011618

JOHNNY MIZE PLUMBING
Plumbing Contractor New Construction Repairs
Remodeling Residental and Commercial 904/229-6821
Installation of Water Lines and Sewer Lines
Minor Electrical
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tfc 9/7




L&S

TRUCK & TRAILER REPAIR
Heavy Duty Trucks Tire Service Road Service
Marine Reefer Units
Day 229-6018 -tc 9/7 Night 653-9867


HANNON REALTY, Inc.


TRADES Et SERVICES














'ruu. ATAIR- PORT T JOE 3. TWI- TMMSAY.AUG. 3 1. 198


PFAE 8Bub HEI1c A ,5 oic, -s- w -,- A


Public Notices


NOTICE FOR APPLICATION -
FOR WATER USB PERMIT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Chapter 373. Florida Statutes, the following applit-
cation(s) for water use permits) has (have) been re-
ceved by the Northwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District
Application number S04290 filed 08/17/89
The City of Port SLt. Joe
Mr. Frank Pate. Jr.. Mayor
Poet Office Box 278
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Requesting a maximum withdrawal of
1.556,640 gallons per day
Withdrawal from an existing well(s) for Es-
sential Use.
Well gen. locations) of Sec. 35 & 36 Twp 07S
Rng 1W In Gulf County.
Interested persons may comment upon the
applications) or submit a written 'request for a
cow of the staff reports) containing proposed
action regarding t applications) by writ-
ing to the Governing Board of the Northwest Flori-
da Water Management District, Route 1, Box
3100, Havana. Florida 32333, but such comments
or requests-must be received by 5:00 o'clock p.m.
on September 7; 19Q9. -
No further public notice-will be provided re-
garding this (these). applicationss. A copy of the
staff reports) must. be requested in 5rder to re-
main advised of further proceedings. Substantially
affected persons are entitled to request an admin-
istrative hearing regarding the pr:oeed agency ac-
tion by submitting a written request therefor after
reviewing the staff reportss.
Publish: August 31, 1989.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board
of County Commissioners of Gulf County, Florida
will hold two public Hearings to consider the ques-







3 bedroom trailer, 103 Victoria
Ave., Highland View. Call 639-5700,
Wewa.

Furnished 2 bedroom apartment
in town, 517 4th St. 229-6571 after
5:00. .$200, includes water.
2tp 8/31

Teaching family wishes to rent
their very nice 2 bdrm., 2 ba. mobile
home w/ch&a during school year, 1
block from beach. Call 648-5874 de-
tails after 9 p.m. Would consider year
around. Itp

3 bedroom, 1 bath at Beaco Hill.
$280 per month with $100 deposit.
648-5897. It 8/31

3 bedroom, 2 bath in Gulf Aire.
$700 per month with $200 deposit.
648-5897. It 8/31

Furnished upstairs apartment,
call 227-1477. 2tp 8/24

3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath trailer,
5th St., Highland View. 229-8577 or
229-6335. 2tc 8/24

1 bedroom unfurnished apart-
ment, stove & refrig., couple or single
only. Deposit, no pets. Corner Canal
& Americus. Call Frances 227-8747
or 227-1450. tfc 8/24

2-bedroom trailer, Howard Creek,
adults only, $300 month. 229-6019.
tfc 8/17

2 bedroom furnished trailer for
rent. For sale: 17 camper, call 227-
1260. 4tp 8/17

2 bedroom trailer, furnished or
unfurnished, in Oak Grove. No pets.
227-1281. tfc 8/10

2 bedroom mobile home, large
screen porch on 1 1/2 acres, fenced
adjacent to Wetappo Creek near
Pleasant Rest Cemetery. Call 227-
1566. tfc 8/,3

Clean, nice furniture, 1 bedroom
apartment. Good neighborhood. 1505
Monument Ave. tfc 8/31

Furnished 2 bedroom trailer, Sea
St., St. Joe Beach. Deposit required.
After 6:00, 229-6825. tfc 8/31

Furnished 1 bedroom apartment,
1508 1/2 Long Ave., Port St. Joe. De-
posit required. After 6:00, 229-6825.
tfc 8/31

Warehouses, small and large.
Some with office, suitable for small
business. 229-6200. tfc 8/31

2 bdrm. 1 bath apartment, cen.
h&a, refrig. & stove, $300 mo. Call
227-1159 or 648-5037. tfc 8/31

Nice executive home, 3 bdrm., 2
ba. on golf course. $695 mo. Appli-
ances included. Call Pam at 229-
6314. tfc 8/31

Three one bedroom apartments
equipped for the handicapped. Rent
determined by income. Equal Housing
Opportunity. Call 227-7451 Monday
thru Friday, 9 till 5. tfc 8/31

Furnished large 2 bdrm. apart-
ment No pets. Call 229-6777 after 6
p.m. tfc 8/31

Unfurnished Ig. 2 bdrm., 1 ba.
house w/stove & refrig., carport, stor-
age area, Ig. screen porch, fenced
back yard, ch&a, no pets. Call 229-
6777 after 6 p.m. tfc 8/31

Nice one, two & three bedroom
apartments. Cen. h&a, stove & frost-
free refrigerator, playground available
with parents' .supervision.. Laundry
rm. provided. Rent determined by in-
come. Handicap units available. Pine
Ridge Apartments, 227-7451. Equal
Housing. tfc 8/31

2 bdrm. furnished nice house on
1 1/3 lots. 100' from beach. Canal
St., St. Joe Beach. $200 month. Call
Marianna, 904/482-3884. tfc 8/31

The Phantry Hotel, Rooms Pri-
vate baths or dormitory style. Daily or
weekly rates. Will renovate to your
taste for lease. 302 Reid Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL 229-8723. tfc 8/31

For Rent or Sale: 2 bdrm., 2 bath


house at Cape San Bias, many extras.
SCall 229-8385 or 227-1689. tfc 7/6

2. bdrm. spacious apartments,
easy to heat and cool. Reasonable de-
posit & rent. No pets. Call 227-1689
after 6 p.m. Best deal in town, save
on utility bills tfc 7/6

No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST; Use rooms
right away. Rent machine, St. Joe
Furniture, 227-1251. thru 12/88


tion of closing, vacating and discontinuing a por-
tion of a public street or alleyway, described as fol-
lows: -
All of that certain street described as:
PHILUPS DRIVE in Beacon Hfll Es-
tates. Unit ONE, as recorded in plat
book 2. page 46, Public Records of Gulf
County. Florida .
Each public hearing will be held in the
County Commissioners meeting room at the Gulf
County Courthouse on the following dates:
Ist hearing on.September 12. 1989 at
9:00 a.m.. EST. Port St. Joe Time
2nd hearing on September 26, 1989 at
7:00 p.m. EST, Port St. Joe Time. .
Comments from any interested parties re-
garding this question will be welcome.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Douglas C. Birmingham
Chairman
ATTESr:
/s/ Benny C. Lister
Clerk
Publish: August 31 and September 14. 1989.
NOTICE OF.PROPOSED ORDINANCE
An Ordinance relating to rates, charges and
rules for water and sewer connections and service
of the City of Port St. Joe; providing the terms of
payment and penalties for the violation thereof; re-
ting to cash deposits required for water and sew-
er services to the City system; providing for penal-
ties for reconnecting without permission; repealing
all ordinances or parts of ordinances In conflict
herewith and specifically repealing Ordinance No.
139 and providing for an effective date.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
/s/ FRANK PATE, JR.
MAYOR
Publish: August 17, 24, and 31, 1989







Would you like to earn great com-
missions and prizes, work your own
hours, and receive a FREE kit of mer-
chandise worth $300, plus free train-
ing and paper supplies? If so, I've got
the job for youl Be a Lloyds Super
Party Plan Demonstrator. With no
experience or investment needed, this
has got to be the perfect Jobl For more
information, with no obligation, call
Jan at 229-8936 today! Also booking
partiesll

Environmental Technician: Sr.
Environmental Technician position
with regional consulting firm. Work to
be performed out of project office in
Port St. Joe, FL. Minimum qualifica-
tions include: 3 yrs. related work ex-
perience, AA degree in related field,
Coast Guard cert. In small boats, abil-
ity to work w/minimum supervision,
record of dependability & mechanical-
ly included. Red Cross certification &
BS degree in science preferred. Must
have own transportation. Some long
hours. Work outdoors. Salary com-
miserate with experience, range
$16,000-$22,000 plus bonuses. Send
resume w/three references in com-
plete confidence to: Dr. A. Alvarez -
Lehman, PhD., ALA, Inc., P. 0 Box
15087, Gainesville, FL 32604.
2tc 8/31

Avon needs individuals who want
to earn $6.00 to $12.00 an hour. No
door to door selling necessary, must
be 18. If you qualify you will receive
$20 worth of free products. Call 1-
526-2849 collect. 2tc 8/24

Gulf Co. Senior Citizens Assoc.
will be accepting applications/
resumes for the position of Assistant
Case Manager for the Community
Care for the Elderly (CCE) Program.
This is a part time position (20 hrs.
per week). A Bachelor's Degree in So-
cial Work, Sociology, Psychology,
Nursing, or related field is required.
Other job education and/or experi-
ence may be substituted for all or
part of the basic requirements with
the approval of the Area Agency on
Aging for North Florida.
Applications may be obtained at
the _Association's Office located at 198
Peters St. in Port St. Joe 32456. Ap-
plicants must have own transporta-
tion and be willing to drive in both
Bay and Gulf Counties. Outreach,
Client Assessment, and Administra-
tive work will be required of this posi-
tion. The deadline for applications is
September 11, 1989.
This article was prepared by the
Gulf Co. Senior Citizens Association
which is funded in part by the Older
Americans Act and the Department of
Health and Rehabilitative Services.
3tc 8/24

ATTENTION HIRING Govern-
ment jobs your area. Many immedi-
ate openings without waiting list or
test. $17,840 $69,485. Call 1-602-
838-8885, ext. R5783. 2tp 8/24

JOB NOTICE
The City of Port St. Joe will be ac-
cepting applications for the following
position at the Wastewater Treatment
Plant:
LABORATORY TECHNICIAN
Technician needed to provide la-
boratory and field sample collection
'assistance in major industrial waste-
water treatment plant process control
and monitoring laboratory. Duties will
include all general chemical laborato-
ry tasks including preparation for and
clean-up after tests; assisting with
other tests and responsibility for con-
ducting other tests; check-out and
calibration of instruments, instru-
ment care and maintenance, and test-
ing with standard laboratory and field
instruments. The position requires a
person willing to work in both labora-
tory and field environments; who has
minimum of 2 years college level
chemistry, biology and math course-,
work. Associates degree (A.S.) in a
technical field preferred, but not re-
quired. The successful candidate
must be dependable, willing to work
overtime when necessary, and be ca-
pable of being certified by the Coast
Guard Auxiliary for small boats, and
by the Florida Society of Environmen-
tal Analysts at the Technician I level
within 1 year of employment.
Application must include tran-
script of chemistry, biology and math
Courses.


Application and a complete job
description may be picked up and re-
turned to the Municipal Building, 305
Fifth Street, beginning Thursday, Au-
gust 31 September 8, 1989 from
8:00 a.m., to 5:00 p.m., Monday Fri-
day (except Labor Day, September 4).
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE IS
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOY-
ER.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
/s/ L.A. Farris
City Auditor-Clerk
Publish: August 7 and September 7,
1989.


PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board
of County Comihissoners or Gulf County. Florida,
at Itsinecting on the 1I day of July, 1989, adopted
a resolution closing, vacating and abandoning all
Interest the County might have In 'afid.to the fol-
lowing described ditch, to-wit:
That certain portion of Jackson Street
lying between Lot 14, Block I. J.R.
Norton Subdivision and Lot 18, Block
4, Oak Grove Subdivision, Gulf
County. Florida, subject to reservation
to a utility easement.
Dated this 29 day of August, 1989.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY. FLORIDA
By- /s/ Douglas C. Birmingham
Chainnan
Attest:
/s/ Benny C. Lister
Clerk
Publish: August 31, 1989.










HOMEMAKER NEEDED
The Gulf Co. Senior Citizens As-
soc. is accepting applications for the
position of l~omemaker in the Port St.
Joe area. The homemaker will be per-
forming light housecleaning and
chores in different senior citizens'
homes and will be paid above mini-
mum wage for a 20 hour work week.
Applicants must have own transpor-
tation.
Applications can be picked up
and submitted at the Senior Citizens
Center at 198 Peters Street, PSJ, FL
32456, DEADLINE for submitting ap-
plications is Sept. 8, 1989. For fur-,
ther information, call 229-8466. Gulf
Co. Senior Citizens Assoc., Inc. is an
equal opportunity employer.
3tc 8/24

Easy Worki Excellent Payl Assem-
ble products at home. Call for infor-
mation, 504-649-0670, ext. 9575.
2tp 8/24

VISA/MASTERCARD. US
CHARGE Guaranteed Regardless of
Credit Rating, Call Nowl (213) 925-
9906, ext. U3390. 4tp 8/17

Meadowbrook Manor of East-
point, Hwy. 98 & Begonia. RN's and
LPN's for 3-11 and 11-7 shifts. Also,
Certified Nursing Assistant or -those
willing to train for certification. CNA's
for all shifts. New pay scale with shift
differential for 11-7 shift. Call Direc-
tor of Nursing, Debra Lewis, for an
appointment. 904/670-8571.
tfc 8/31


"DON'T LOOK FOR A JOB!"
LOOK FOR A CAREER...
Start a new secure career as a Nursing
Assistant!
We offer:
Training Program
Health Insurance
Paid Time Off Program
Life Insurance
Credit Union
Starting pay uncertified, $3.80 per
hour.
Starting pay, certified, $4.05 per hour.
APPLY IN PERSON '
'BAY ST. JOSEPH CARE CENTER
tc 8/31







Labor Day weekend, starting Friday,
end of season reduction sale, over
300 plants, 100 hanging pots, lawn
ornaments, used furniture, hide-a-
beds, and beds, gas heater, books,
odds & ends. Fresh boiled peanuts.
Gulf Station, 32nd St., Mexico
Beach.

Garage Sale, Saturday, Sept. 2,
from 8-12. 214 6th St. Rain or shine.

Garage Sale, Saturday, Sept. 2, 8
a.m. Refrigerator, furniture, lots of
odds and ends, 115 Bellamy Circle.

Yard Sale, Sat., Sept. 2, 8:00 a.m.
- 12:00 p.m. 909 lOth St. 3 families,
men's and women's clothing, toys,
baby clothes, household items, some-
thing for everyone

Porch Sale, Friday, September 1,
805 Long Ave.

Garage Sale, Two families. Virgin-
ia Arnold, 110 Sunset Circle, Sat.,
Sept. 2 from 7:00 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bar-
gains in furniture, mattress and box
springs, clothing low priced, many
unusual items. Everything must got!








1978 Ford station wagon, needs
battery, 111,885 miles, $600. Call
229-6808 after 7:30 p.m.
tfc 8/31

1968 Chevrolet, mill truck, $325.
227-1192.

1978 Mustang 302 engine, T-top,
great body & runs, $375. Call 648-
5320. ltc 8/31

1980 Mustang Hatchback, new
tires, runs good, no rust. $1,750.
648-5065. Itc 8/31

1985 CJ7 Jeep, excel. cond. Call
229-1477. 2tc 8/24

St. Joe Papermakers Federal
Credit Union is accepting bids on the
following cars: 1982 Pontiac Grand
Prix, 1982 Ford Thunderbird, 1984
Pontiac Grand Prix. For more infor-
mation call Wesley Atkins at 227-
1156. tfe 8/24

1966 MGB, 41,000 actual miles,
spoke wheels, am/fm cassette, new
top, restored last year, $2,500. Call
229-6965. tfc 6/1

1972 MGB, good solid body, easi-
ly restorable, runs fair, $750 obo.
229-6965. tfc 6/1

1978 Ford 4 wd short wheel base
pick up. Rebuilt from front to back.
Runs great, V-8, auto .trans.,. good
tires & mags, lots of chrome, $3,000.
229-6965. tfc 6/1


IN THE CIRCUrr COURr FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 89-39 d
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WONDALE LAURIMORE
D eased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL-PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINSTTHE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the ad-
ministration of the estate of Wondale Laurimore,
deceased, File Number 89-39, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida. Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is Port St. Joe. Gulf
County, Florida. The personal representative of the
estate is John W. Laurimore. whose address is 3rd
Street. Land's Landing, Wewahitchka. FL 32465.
The name and address of the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands
against-the estate are required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBU-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written statement of any claim
or demand they may have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.. If the claim
is not yet due, the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliq-
uldated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to enable the clerk
to mail one copy to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate to whom
a copy of this Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN TIREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF TIlE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections they may
have that challenge the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the personal representa-
tive, or the venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this Notice of
Administration: August 31, 1989.
/s/ John W. Laurimore
As Personal Representative of the
Estate ofWondale Laurimore. Deceased
/s/C WES PITTMAN
Florida Bar No. 220507
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
314 Magnolia Avenue
Post Office Box 710
Panama City, FL 32402
-/ Telephone: (904) 769-3226
/ Publish: August 31 and September 7, 1,989.


FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Sec-
tion 865.09, Florida Statutes, the undersigned cor-
poration intends to register with the Clerk of
Court. Gulf County, Florida. four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the fictitious name
or trade name under which they will be engaged in
business and in which said business is to be car-
ried on. to-wit
COMPANY NAME: Jan's Total Package
ADDRESS: 204 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe, FL
32456
OWNER: Janice Nobles
Publish: August 10, 17. 24, and31, 1989.


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County will receive separate sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested In sell-
ing the County the following described personal
service:
CONSTRUCTION AT WETAPPO COM-
PACTION/TRANSFER STATION SITE:
Contract I: Septic Tank and Disposal
Field, and/or
Contract II: Water Supply Well.
**The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may
be examined at the Office of the Clerk
of Circuit Court or at Baskerville-
Donovan Engineers, Inc. located at 316
Baylen Street, Suite 300. Pensacola.
Florida 32501. Copies of the CON-
TRACT DOCUMENTS may be obtained
at the office of Baskerville-Donovan En-
gneers, Inc. upon payment of $25.00
or each set. No refunds will be made
for return of CONTRACT DOCU-
M ENTS.
Completion Date must be specified, liquidat-
ed damages for failure to complete work on speci-
fied date will be set at $25.00 per day.
*'Please indicate "SEALED BID WETAPPO
SITE" on the outside of your envelope.
Bids will be received until 9:00 a.m., E.D.T.,
on September 12, 1989. at the Office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court. Gulf County Courthouse,
1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.
The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Douglas C. Birmingham
Chairman
Publish: August 24 and 31, 1989.
REQUEST TO RECEIVE BIDS
The Gulf County School Board invites Inter-
ested parties to submit bids for the rental of a cop-
ier/duplicator to be used at Wewahltchka High
School. Detailed specifications and a bid packet
are available at the School Board Office and may
be obtained by contacting Mr. Temple Watson
(904-229-8256). The equipment is to be a fully au-
tomatic, one step copier/duplicator inco rating
functions of image scanning, preparatiorlm' inter-
mediate (master) and image transfer to the sheet of


Catch Mhe Stpri
-1WHE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH


63 OAK STREET Lovely two bedroom, two bath slilt cottage only 1/2 block
to the beach Beautiful view of the Gulf from front screened porch. Large
Iviing area with separate guest or play room downstairs. Complete fur-
nished. $75,000.00. Owner will finance
CORNER 3RD STREET & FLORIDA AVENUE Complete this building to be '
the Beach Cottage YOU want! On two large beautiful lots only 1 block to
the Beachl Interior needs finishing. Vacation while you work Lots of possi-
bilitieslill $44,900.00.
602 FORTNER AVENUE Stucco DUPLEX only 1/2 block to the Bachl 2 Two
bedroom, one bath units. Completely furnished. On 50' x 150' lot. Separ-
ate entrance to each unit. Excellent rentals. Presently rented. $53,500.00.
PINE STREET 75' x 150' lot. Port St. Joe Beach Unit 1, BIk 2, Lot 3.
$10,500.00. One block from the beach Beautiful shade trees.
120 PINE ST.: Lovely bright, 2 bdrm., 2 1/2 bath custom designed & decorat-
ed home. Beautiful breakfast room w/bay window, w/ceramic tile seat in-
lays. 21'x9 screened porch. Completely furnished. Lovely coordinating
wallpaper & paint in all rooms. Master bath has all inlaid ceramic tile floor-
ing and shower. Very nice yard & neighborhood. Only steps to the beach
Double car garage. Many extras $110.000.00.
HWY. 98 WATERFRONT BEACON HILL Choose from 4 individual water-
front cottages. One bedroom, one bath A-frame with 50' waterfront proper-
ty, $75,000.00 or two, two bedroom one bath cottages with 50' waterfront
property, $75,000.00 each. One three bedroom, one bath cottage with
60+' waterfront property, $85,000.00. All cottages are completely fur-
nished. Excellent rental units. Owner will finance. Total package at
$310,000.00.
200 6TH ST. Three bedroom, 2 bath doublewide mobile home. On large
105'xl 12.5' comer lot. Fastened to home foundation. Only 2 blocks to the
beach $45,500.00.
5841 HWY. 98 END OF BALBOA STREET WATERFRONTIll This unique
floor plan allows for a single family home or duplex. One bedroom, with Ig.
downstairs area which can be used as bedroom or separate living quar-
ters. Two full baths. Large upper & lower decks overlook the Gulll Cathe-
dral ceiling w/skylights accent the living room. Single carport. Sauna,
much more. $125,000.00.
HOMES MEXICO BEACH
13TH STREET Two bdrm., 1 bath stilt home, 1/2 block to the beach Needs
some TLC. Large deck on front and side. Partial view of the Gulfl Owner
will finance. $55,000.00.
319 ROBIN LANE Unique 2 bdrm., 2 ba. family home. Large living, dining,
kitchen area. Lg. deck on back overlooks canal. Entertainment area w/wet
bar. Must see this one. Owner will possibly finance. $55,000.00. RE-
DUCED $52,000.00.
314 HATLEY DRIVE Three bedroom, two bath townhomes in nice residential
area. Vaulted ceiling in living, dining, and kitchen areas. Large bar in kitch-
en. All appliances included. $48,500.00 to $49,900.00.
318 HWY. 98 CORNER 4TH STREET WATERFRONT Two bedroom, 1
bath home on 50'x150' corner lot, screened porch on front overlooking the
Gutll Dedicated beach, in good cond., completely furnished. The perfect
beach cottage for second or retirement home. $79,900.
121 PINE STREET Cozy three bedroom, one and on-half bath home in ex-
cellent location Only steps to the Beach with easy access. Large open
great room with ceiling fan. Screened porch and covered carport. Nice
yard with lots of shade trees. $60,000.00.
121 HWY. 386 Nicel Lg. 3 bdrm., 3 ba. home on 75'x100', lot. Living room
has full stone wall fireplace. Bedrooms have Ig. cedar lined walk-in clos-
ets. Central gas heat/ac system. Energy efficient. Many extras.
$g98,750.00.
107 30TH STREET Lg. BEACHSIDE 3 bdrm., 2 ba. beachside home with
large game room. Living room with fireplace overlooks the Gulf and leads
to ex. large front deck. All the comforts of home. $138,000.
MOBILE HOMES MEXICO BEACH
809 MARYLAND BLVD. 2 drm., 2 ba. 12'x70 mobile home on corner lot.
Completely furnished. Sh jrBto the beach Currently being remod-
eled. New trailer room. $26,000.00. Possible owner financing. REDUCED
$24,000.00.'
807 MARYLAND BLVD. Like Newl 2 bdrm., 2 ba. mobile home with 20'x12'
screened porch on front. 75'xt00' lot. Completely furnished, includes re-
frigerator, range, dishwasher, washer & dryer. A good buy. Reduced to
$32,000.
WATERFRONT
HWY. 98 WATERFRONTI End of 8th Street. 60'x80' lot. $60,000.00. Unit 2,
BIk. V, Lot 4. $60,000.00
HWY. 98 WATERFRONTI End of 8th Street. 66'x80' lot. $66,000.00. Unit 2,
BIk. V, Lot 3. $66,000.00
HWY. 98 GULFAIRE SUBD. WATERFRONT 60'x180' lot. BIk. A, Lot 10.
$52,000.00.
HWY. 98 ST. JOSEPH SHORES 120'x397' waterfront lot. $120,000.
HWY. 98 GULF AIRE SUBD. WATERFRONT 60'x180' lot. BIk. A, Lot 8,
$54,000.00.
GULF AIRE DRIVE GULF AIRE SUBD. 70x115' lot in subd. BIk G. Lot 2.
Good view of the Gulf. $35,000.00.
MOBILE HOMES ACCEPTED
MARYLAND BLVD. 75'xlO0' lot. Unit 12A, Blk C. Lot 4. $13,000.00.
FORTNER AVE. Between 6th & 7th SL 50'x150' lot. One block from the
beach Unit 1, BIk 8, Lot 5, $20.300.00.
ARKANSAS DRIVE 75'= p'(t t septic tank. power pole. and fenced
yard. Nice shade treePI!sPs to the beach. Unit 12. blk 13, Lot 2.
$16.000.00.
LOTS RESIDENTIAL HOMES ONLY
NEW MEXICO DRIVE (6) 100'x158.33' lots. Unit 14, BIk A. Lots 12, 14. 16,
18, 20, 21. $6,000.00 each. Owner financing. $1,500.00 down balance at
10% for 5 years.
NEW MEXICO DRIVE (8) 100'x158.3' lots. Zoned for homes only. Mexico
Beach Unit 14. BIk B, Lots 9,11,13. 15, 17, 19, 23,25. $6.000.00 each.
NEW MEXICO DRIVE 100'x158.33' lot. Unit 14. BIk B, Lot 3. $6.000.00.
TEXAS DRIVE 100'x108' lot. Unit 14, BIk F. Lot 6. $6,800.00. Owner financ-
ing possible.


DAir-1w fala


Constituti ont and (9r1orsumxt
~Port St. Yoe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School........... 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship... 7:30 p.m.
Morning Worship ....... 11:00a.m. Bible Study
Methodist Youth Wednesday............9:30 a.m.
Fellowship 5:30 p.m. Thursday...............7:30 p.m.

REV. ZEDOC BAXTER, Pastor TONY CHUNN, Youth/Choir Dire


actor
j


CORNER OF 14TH STREET

648-5767 & HIGHWAY 98
S MEXICO BEACH

Please contact us for a complete
list of homes and lots. Year round;
monthly rentals also available.

ARIZONA DRIVE 100'x108' lot. Homes only. $7,000.00. Mexico Beach Undl
14, BIk D, Lot 16.
CALIFORNIA DRIVE (14) 100x108.33' lots. $7,000.00 each. Unit 14, BIk E,
Lots 2, 4, 6,8,10, 12,14, 16, 18, 22, 24, 26.
CORNER PERIWINKLE DR. & GULFAIRE DR. Nice comer home lot.
90'x109.88' x 131.72x63.87 lot. Lot 7, BIk F, Gulfaire Phase It1. RE-
DUCED $16,000.00. r
ARIZONA AVENUE (14) 100x108.33' lots. $7,000.00 each. Unit 14, blk E.
Lots1,3, 5,7,9, 11, 13,15,17, 19,21,23,25.
5TH STREET (2) 100fx158.33' lots on paved street. Unit 14, BIk A, Lots 13,
15. $7,500.00 each. Owner financing. $1,500.00 down at 10% for 5 years.
TEXAS DRIVE 100'xo100 lot. Mexico Beach Unit 14, BIk G, Lot 8. $7,500.00.
Owner financing.
ARIZONA DRIVE (5) 110'xl 10' lots. $7,500.00 each. Unit 14, BIk D., Lots 6,
8, 10, 12, 14. Owner financing.
LOTS ON MEXICO BEACH
CORNER OAK AVE. & PALM ST. 1 1/2 lots. Large size irregular shaped.
Only 1/2 block to Ihe beach. $29,800.00. Owner will finance. Mexico
Beach Unit 11, BIk 8, E1/2 of Lot 16, all lot 18.
CORNER 5TH STREET /M YJYND BLVD. 100"x158.33' lot. Unit 14, BIk
A, Lot 1. (9,000.00. ., L,
7TH STREET 100x1 08' lot on paved street. Only steps to the beach. Unit 14,
BIk D. Lot 9. $10,000.00.
COLORADO DRIVE (6= 153' lots. $7,500.00 each. Unit 14, BIk C,
Lots 9, 11, 13, 15, 1 5-
COLORADO DRIVE 100'x158.33 lot completely cleared and ready for build-
ing. Fish pond. Unit 14, BIk B, Lot 22. $7.900.00. Owner will finance w/
$1,000 down, balance at 11%Xfor4years.
TEXAS DRIVE (2) 100'xlOO lots. Zoned homes only. Mexico Beach Unit 14,
BIk G, Lots 9, 10. $8,000.00 each.
5TH STREET (2) lots odd paved street. Unit 14. Lots 17, 19.
$9,000.00 together. Owneim'frariff available.
7TH STREET 100x108' lot. $10,000.00. On paved street. Unit 14, BIk D, Lot
15.
ROBIN LANE (2) Large lots on paved street. Nice subdivision. Underground
utilities. $10,000.00 each. Mexico Beach Unit 17, BIk 3, Lots 10, 11.
$2,000.00 down, balance at 9% for 5 years.
HATLEY DRIVE (3) 87.5x108 lots. Partially cleared. Nice shade trees. On
paved street. North Lake Estates. BIk A, Lots 5, 6, 7. $9,900.00 each.
Owner financing. $1,000.00 down, balance at 11% for 5 years.
WYSONG AVENUE 109Jx100' lot. Mexico Beach Unit 17, BIk 1, Lot 8. Paved
street, underground utilities, nice subdivision. $11,000.00.
LUXURY BY THE PIER #6, SUNSET RETREAT 38th Street WATER-
FRONTI Luxurious 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 be. townhome, completely furnished.
Privately owned, never rented. Excellent condition. Many amenities.
$135,000.00. Owner will finance.
WINDSONG VILLA #1 WATERFRONT 35th Street Luxurious three bed-
room, 3 bath 1927 sq. ft. townhome. Completely fumishedl Excel. rental.
Plenty of room for the whole family REDUCED $139,900.00..
WINDSONG #4 Spacious 3 bedroom, 3 bath 1710 square foot townhome on
the Gulfl Living area overlooks the Gulfl Large kitchen with custom cabi-
netry. All the conveniences. Sun decks off living area and master bed-
room. Completely furnished. Excellent rental $119,900.00.
LUXURY BY THE PIER NO. 7 38th Street Immaculate two bedroom, two
and on-half bath waterfront townhome. Owner occupied, never rented.
Sun deck off master bedroom and screened porch off living area with low-
er sun deck on beach with outdoor shower. Ceiling fans and vertical
blinds coordinate with flooring. $99,500.00.
LA DOLCE VITA, 37th SirIte .JAT.RFRONTI Two bedroom, 2 1/2 bath
unit corrpletely furnished r porch & sun deck are only a few of
the amenities. Very nice decorl Assumable mortgage. $87.500.00.
SURFVIEW AND SPINDRIFT TOWNHOMES
LOFT BY THE PIER #12 & #14, SURFVIEW AND SPINDRIFT TOWN-
HOMES. 106 B AND 108 D 37TH STREET. Attractive two bedroom, two
bath townhomes near fishing pier and beach. Completely furnished and
equipped for second home or rental. Bay window accents living room with
cathedral ceiling. Private patio in back off bedroom. Assumable mortgage.
$65,000.00 each.
LOFT BY PIER NO. 6 Attractive two bedroom, two bath townhome with
sleeping loft. Completely furnished and equipped for rental or second
home. Only steps to the beach and fishing pier. Cathedral ceilings with
ceiling fan make living room open and airy. Assumable mortgage.
$64,000.00
LOTS
CORNER SANTA ANNA & AMERICUS AVE. (2) 50'x175' lots. Yon's Addi-
tion. BIk 5, Lots 12 & 13. $36,000.00.
CANAL STREET 5ffx125' lot. Yon's Addition to Beacon Hill. BIk 10, Lot 9.
$15.950.00.
PINE STREET (2) 50"x125' lots. Yon's Addition to Beacon Hill. BIk 11, Lots
4,5. $31,900.00.
MAGELLAN STREET (3) 5'fx125' lots. Yon's Addition to Beacon Hill. BIk 14.
Lots 11, 12,13. $39,500.00.
ST. JOE BEACH HOMES
HWY. 98 NEAR SANTA ANNA Newly remodeled four bedroom, two bath
home overlooking the Guflt Unobstructed view Large liv. rm. w/stone fire-
place. Fenced yard & screened porch. On 50sx90" lot. Large upper deckl
$95,000.00.
CORNER BALBOA STREET & HWY. 98 Charming 2 bedroom, one bath
beach cottagel On 50'x90' comer lot with unobstructed view of the Guil
Completely furnished. All new electric service and wiring. Central heat
and air conditioning. $68,000.00.
END OF PINE STREET & HWY. 98 WATERFRONT WATERFRONT TRIP-
LEXI (1) Two bedroom, one bath unit with screened porch. (2) one bed-
room, one bath units with screened porches. Beautiful location on the
Gulfl completely fumished. Excellent rental units presently rented. Possi-
ble owner financing. $115,000.00.
WEWAHITCHKA
WATERFRONT RIVER LOTS 3 large lots on Chipola Cut-off. Call for further
information and sizes. $9.000.00. REDUCED $7,000.00.
CAPE SAN BLAS
HWY. C30-E WATERFRONTI Exceptional two bedroom, two bath custom
built home 100' on the Gulf by 700' deep. Many amenities. 1400 sq. ft.
under roof. $175,000.00. Further information and pictures available upon
request.
NAUTILUS WAY, FEATHER SOUND SUBD. Waterfront lot. 51' on the Gulf
x 394.54' deep. $52,000.00. Lot 8. Feather Sound Subd.
NAUTILUS WAY, FEATHER SOUND SUBD. (2) Interior lots. Lot 9. 10.
Feather Sound Subd., $34,000.00 each.


-N'


Mexico Beach





Harmon Realty, Inc.


F ~ U


OPEN HOUSE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1
11:00 2:00 CST 318 Highway 98,
corner 4th St. WATERFRONTI 2 bdrm., 1 ba. home on 50'
150' corner lot, screened porch on front overlooking the Gulf.
Dedicated beach, in good cond., completely furn. The perfect
beach cottage for second or retirement home. $79,900.

2:00 4:00 CST 107 21st St.
This beautiful three bedroom, 2 bath home was designed and
decorated to be your dream home. Mint condition! Ceramic tile
flooring in foyer, kitchen and dining area. White brick fireplace.
All the best appliances. All bedrooms are large with excellent
closet space. Double car garage. Only 1 block to the beach[ On
nice shaded 100'x100' lot. Many more amenitiesI Must see this
one ,$4418,600.00. Reduced $109,900.00.
11:00 4:00 CST 315 Robin Lane
LOVELY 3 bdrm., 2 ba. home. Sunken living room w/fireplace.
Cathedral ceiling. Two car .carport w/circle drive. Lg. master
bdrm. & bath. Beautifully landscaped lot. $62,900.00.


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paper, all with a single rfainframe. Bids will be re-
ceived at the Gulf County School Board Office,
Gulf County Courthouse. Port St Joe. FL 32456
until 12:00 noon, E.T., on September 1, 1989..En-
velopes are to be sealed and marked COPIER/
DUPLUCATOqR.
Publish: August 24 and 31, 1989.
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BID u
The Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County will receive sealed bids from any person.
company or corporation interested in the following
construction:
A total of 4 groundwater monitor wells.
13 landfill gas test probes, and the
abandonment of 4 existing monitor
wells.
The contractor shall hate a minimum
of 3-years experience in the Installation
of monitoring wells and be a certified
well driller..
Contractor shall be allowed 45 days to
complete contract from the date. of No-
tice to Proceed.
Liquidated damages for failure to deliv-
er by said date will be set at $25.00 per
day.
Plans and specifications are on file at the
Clerk's office and at Baskerville-Donovan Engi-
neers, Inc.. 316 South Baylen Street. Suite 300,
Pensacola, Florida 32501. Questions should be di-
rected to Mr. Glenn Halstead, BDE, (904). 438-
9661.
Bids will be received until 9:00 o'clock. a.m.,
E.D.T., September 12. 1989, at the Office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. The Board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
Publish: August 24 and 31, 1989.
PUBLIC HEARING
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners will hold a.public hearing to receive public
input concerning development of Salinas Park,
which is located on County Road 30 at Cape San
Bias. This hearing will be held on September 5,
1989, at 7:00 p.m.. E.D.T. The public is encour-
aged to attend.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Douglas C. Birmingham
Publish: August 24 and 31, 1989.