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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02731
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: March 31, 1988
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02731

Full Text


















r FIFTIETH YEAR, NUMBER 31


JSPS 518-880


THE STAR


Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1988


25C


Per Copy


-J


Sewer Main Refurbishing Started

Garrison Avenue Main Is First to be Dug Up and Replaced


Garrison Avenue was blocked off
to through traffic late last week in
preparation for excavations in the
street to replace and repair sewage
force mains which serve the eastern
section of Port St. Joe.
The section, located between
Sixth and Eighth Streets, was found to
be in a bad state of repair by a TV
inspection of all city mains last year.
The sanitary system in this area has
given constant problems to the city's
sanitation workers, in an attempt to
keep the main open and operating.
Parker Mechanical of Crestview
is the contractor doing this and other
S spot repair jobs throughout the city in
an attempt to stop infiltration of
ground water into the treatment
system and to make the collection


system operate in a more efficient
manner.
Some of the size of the project can
be seen by looking at the stack of pipe
which will be used in the project.
Work has been going on for about
a week in correcting faulty and
deteriorated connections in the Garri-
son Avenue area. Excavation to the
main trunk line to make repairs
should get started this week or early
next week. A portion of the main trunk
line-which consists of old-fashioned
clay soil pipe-will be replaced by
PVC piping to eliminate both the
infiltration and flow problems.
In addition to the Garrison
Avenue project, there are also places
on First Street, Woodward Avenue,
Long Avenue and Baltzell Avenues


w. ..7-.



This pile of pipe testifies to the fact that many feet of
damaged sewer mains will be replaced in the City of Port
St. Joe during a six month project which is designed to


The extended weather report
saysPort St. Joe.area residents will
have a clear day in which to begin
the day Sunday with a sunrise
worship service to initiate a day of
Easter activities and worship.
The 35th annual sunrise service
will be held in the football stadium
at 6:00 a.m.
The sunrise program is devel-
oped and presented annually by the
Port St. Joe Ministerial Association,
which is composed of ministers in
South Gulf County.
Rev. Jimmy Clark, pastor of the
Highland View Baptist Church will
be delivering the resurrection mes-
sage this year. Six other ministers
will also be on the program.
Special music will be presented
by Cissi Pippin and Willie Jenkins.
Congregational singing will be led
by James Enfinger, minister of
music for First Baptist Church.
Other ministers on the program
will be Rev. Chester Middleton,
welcome; Dr. Daniel Duncan, invo-
cation; Rev. William Smith, re-

F,


which will be repaired.
Most of the sewer problems are
found in the trunk line system first
installed when sewer collection ser-
vice was first initiated by Port St. Joe.
Where sewer work is progressing,
the contractors urge residents to
observe the markers closing the work
area to through traffic, to reduce
hazards both to drivers and to the
workers.
The entire sewer main rehabilita-
tion project should take about six
months to complete. The work was
recommended by the Environmental
Protection Agency and the Depart-
ment of Environmental Regulation to
curtail the excess groundwater flow
into the Wastewater Treatment Plant.
The city's reason for participating in
the project is to provide better sewer


replace damaged mains in several areas throughout the
city. The project is being handled by Parker Mechanical
of Lynn Haven.


sponsive reading; Rev. Orville
Reynolds, offertory prayer; Rev.
James Wiley, scripture reading and
Rev. Howard Browning, benedic-
tion.
Offerings given at the special
worship experience are used in the
Ministerial Association's traveller's
aid program. Local churches coop-
erate in a program of giving aid to
stranded travellers through a uni-
fied program, rather than on an
individual basis.
GOOD FRIDAY
Tomorrow, the Easter worship
will begin with a Good Friday
devotional period held at the First
Baptist Church, again, with the
Ministerial Association providing
the program.
The Good Friday worship will
be held during the noon hour, with
Rev. Jerry Huft, pastor of St. James
Episcopal Church, giving the short
sermon.
.Special music will be provided
by the ladies trio of Long Avenue
Baptist Church, with singing direct-
ed by Michael Handy of Long
Avenue.
The Good Friday program will
begin with host pastor, Rev. How-
ard Browning, giving the welcome.
Other ministers on the program will
be Dr. Elmer Braden, call to
worship; Rawlis Leslie, invocation;
Rev. Ennis Sellers, responsive
reading; Rev. Robert Rathbun,
offertory prayer; Rev. David Fer-
nandez, reading of scripture and
Rev. Larry Wells, benediction.
COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
Both the Good Friday and the
Easter Sunrise worship services are
non-denominational, with the gen-
eral public invited to attend and
participate.


Engineers Dredging the


Intracoastal Channel
A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dredging operation started in the Gulf
County Canal this week, as the Corps performed some routine maintenance
work on some 4,600 feet of the canal and its entrance.
According to William Gagnon, assistant area engineer, the operation will


service in the areas
older mains.


served by the


It's "Spring Ahead"

One Hour Sunday

Let's see now .. .you "spring ahead" in the spring and "fall back"
during the fall.
Using that tried and true formula, it is with full confidence that we
report to you a necessity to set your clocks ahead by one hour before you
retire to bed Saturday night, or you will be out of step with the rest of the
world on Sunday morning.
The rest of the world will be on Daylight Saving Time beginning Sun-
day morning at 2:00 a.m., and will remain on the "fast time" until
October of this year.
Daylight Saving Time isn't a device of the devil as some claim. It is a
device thought up by our government to allow for an extra hour of
daylight at the end of the day during the summer.
So, enjoy the extra daylight time to spend in leisure activities or
grumble over the change, whichever you wish. Just be sure you set your
clock ahead an hour Saturday night.


deepen the entrance channel for 1,400 feet west of the Highland View
drawbridge and for 3,200 feet east of the bridge. In the photo above, the dredge
is shown at work east of the bridge, in the canal, in front of Raffield Fisheries.
....The authorized channel dimensions of the canal in this are are 125 feet wide
by 12 feet in depth. The Corps will be removing some 81,000 cubic yards of
material to restore the channel to its authorized dimensions. The project is
expected to require four or five more days of work.
Spoil from the dredging is being placed on the west side of Highway 98,
along the shoreline. The spoil is renourishing the shoreline which has suffered
erosion over the years.


The War Against Crack Sales Goes On


The war on drug dealing con-
tinued here in Gulf County this past
week, with the arrest of five more
suspected dealers in crack cocaine
Friday and Saturday.
A combined operation by the Gulf
County Sheriff's Department and the
Port St. Joe Police Department
snared the five as the result of a
continuing investigation and attempt-
ed elimination of the crack cocaine
menace which started in the Port St.
Joe area in November of last year.
Since that time, three sweeps through
*the north Port St. Joe area have
resulted in the arrest of some 30
people, some of them for the second
time.
The round-up Friday and Satur-
day will result in at least two men
facing a situation where they are not
able to make bond and be released
from jail. They were arrested and
charged with dealing and possession
while out on bond on previous arrests
for the same or similar charges.
Bobby Briggs, 30, of Port St. Joe
and Napoleon Hill, 32, of 309 Avenue A
were charged with the sale and
possession of crack cocaine and were
denied the ability to be released on


bond. Both were in the first mass were brought in Saturday.
arrest of dealers back in November S f H s t
and were facing previous charges. we heri arrison ad the arres
Also arrested were Jimmy Fra- were the result of a continuing
zier, 27, 167 Avenue A; Gwendolyn deing in f Count b aw
Cherry, 26, 233 Avenue B and Melvin dealing in Gulf county, by law
Quinn, 27, 272 Avenue B. enforcement agencies.
Gulf County Sheriff Al Harrison "We said we were declaring war
said Frazier had an estimated $300 on dope peddlers and we're going
worth, of crack cocaine on his ahead with it, full speed", Sheriff
possession when the net was pulled in. Harrison said. "You can expect the
Briggs and Frazier were arrested arrests to continue until the problem
Friday afternoon and the other three is eliminated from Gulf County", he


continued.
The Sheriff pointed out that while
courts deal leniently with first-time
offenders, "Some of these are being
arrested for the second and third time
and things won't go so easy for them
from here on", Harrison said.
Sheriff Harrison said the bulk of
Gulf County's drug sales activities
seems to be centered in north Port St.
Joe and said work is already under
way on bringing in more dealers.


Sentences Handed Down On Dealers


Two men were sentenced to two
and a half years in prison Monday, as
a result of cocaine dealing arrests
made in November of last year.
This brings to four the number of
people sent to prison in the round-up of
dealers in November.
Sentenced Monday were Stephon
Sims, 31 of Port St. Joe and Anthony
Lazier, 30, of Gainesville. They
entered pleas of no contest to charges
placed against them and were judged
guilty by the court.


In addition to the possession and
sale charges, Sims was also charged
with aggravated assault with a
firearm.
Arthur North, 19, also arrested in
the raid, was sentenced to one year of
community control, two years of
probation and 75 hours of community
service. A court cost and restitution
levy was also made against North in
the amount of $225.00.
Other suspects charged with


selling cocaine are scheduled to
appear in court on April 25. These
include Johnese Exum, 35; Kenny J.
Mason, 26; Lula McNeil, 46; Fred
Owens, 18; Carla Jean Peterson, 20;
Francine Sims, 22; Michelle Sims, 23
and Pam Thomas 28. All are Port St.
Joe residents and all have filed no
contest pleas to their charges.
Bobby Briggs, who was arrested
again Friday for possession and sale
of cocaine, is scheduled to face trial on
a similar charge on April 4.


Filing

Period


Is Open
Candidates' filing period was
opened here this week for candidates
to declare.themselves for one of two
council seats which will be decided
at the May 10 municipal election.
Up for election this year are the,:
commissioners from Groups Three-
and Four. The positions are current-
ly being held, by veteran James B.
Roberts and first term commission-
er, Emily Roche. Neither 'has
expressed whether they will be
Candidates to succeed themselves.
Potential candidates have until
April 19 to file and pay their
qualification fees, according to City
Auditor and Clerk, Alden Farris.
During the same period of time,
Supervisor of Elections, Cora Sue
Robinson said the voter books are
now open to qualify to vote in the
May primary. Robinson said the
books would remain open until April
8. Voters must register by that date
in order to be eligible to vote on May
10,
Robinson manages the Munici-
pal election procedures, as well as
the county wide voting mechanics.
Commissioners elected on May
10 will serve two year terms.


T














A Stupid Idea

Making Illegal Drugs Legal

The Panama City News Herald has always had a
"different" philosophy from most of us here in the Panhandle
and we had become accustomed to reading of some of their
off-the-wall ideas about certain things. We respect their views
in most instances, although we find it increasingly more
frequent that we disagree with them in their thinking.
No doubt about it; they have really gone awry of the
accepted philosophy of most West Florida conservative
thinking now. The paper has come out in favor of removing laws
against selling and importing illegal drugs as a means to
removing the criminal element from the drug scene.
If we read them right, they are suggesting a counter in most
convenient stores where ,one can pick up his marijuana
cigarettes or his ration of cocaine fora night of partying.
As an example, the writer of an editorial in the News
Herald on March 21 points out that, "Dealers in beverages
containing alcohol do not engage in turf wars with machine
guns." He goes on to say its manufacture and distribution isn't
done by racketeers during the dead of night.
Actually, what he says is true, but that is certainly no
reason to discontinue the war on drugs as a means of removing
the "undesirables" from the market.
It's true alcohol drinks are legal and over the counter these
days, but alcohol takes more lives in the United States each
year than automobile crashes. Actually, it figures into a huge
percentage of the fatal automobile crashes as a cause. It
wrecks more homes and destroys more people's lives than does
the most hideous of diseases in our nation.
Drugs and their use, as bad as they are, don't hold a candle
to alcohol in being the cause of ,bad things which happen to
people. The only reason for this is because the drugs aren't as
accessible as is the drug alcohol.
While we're removing all laws governing the trafficking in
and use of illegal drugs, perhaps we can also persuade the
federal government to drop its supervision of penicillin,
streptomycin, aspirin, codiene, vallium, and the thousands of
other "legal" drugs and regulations over those who administer
them. Then, the next time the editor of theNews Herald gets to
feeling poorly, he can go to the corner drug store, get him a dose
of penicillin and get his janitor to administer it through a dirty
needle to his posterior.
Let's be fair about this. If we're going to make illegal drugs
legal, we need to give the same latitudes to already legal drugs
that we give to the presently illegal substances.



Easter Has A Message

Easter means a lot of things to all of us.
To some, it means buying some new, "dressy" clothes and
joining the Easter parade of fashion.
To some, it means a holiday week end to visit, begin the
.summ.r, season, go to the beach for the first time in the year, go
see Momma or take a trip through the countrysideand see the
,plants,-flowers and trees budding out in their new spring finery.,
To some it is the time to begin thinking seriously about
gardening and planting crops.
To some, it is time for their semi-annual trek to a house of
worship to put in an appearance and "pay their respects" to
God, while upholding their reputation as supporting the
"; "Christian" philosophy.
To others, the Easter season is the time of the year when
they remember the price God paid for sinful man, by sending
his son Jesus Christ to die on the cross.
We think everyone in these United States knows what
Easter is all about, but we heard of an instance the other day in
which it was revealed there is at least one grown man here in
Port St. Joe who doesn't know that Jesus Christ is the Son of
God, much less that Easter was brought about by God's giving
of that son in sacrifice for our sins.
With a revelation like that staring us in the face, it seems
evident that attending church on Easter and Christmas isn't
getting the job done. -It might be a good idea for.us all to go to
church Easter Sunday, just as has been our habit for many
years, then go back every Sunday for the remainder of the year,
if only to find out what Easter and Christmas are telling us.


Comments


THE STAR-


PAGE TWO


Hunker Down with Kes


THURSDAY, MARCH 31,1988


by Kesley Colbert


And Of Course The Boy Wore Shorts


I tell you, it was enough to make
you want to shoot the Easter bunny. It
should have been a happy time for a
young boy. School was out for a week,
the sun was shining bright, spring was
in the air, the baseball season was
here and John Wayne was a'playing
at the Park Theater. Yes sir, Ike was
president, Groucho was trying to get
people to say the magic word and
divide a hundred dollars, Broderick
Crawford of the Highway Patrol
would remind us each week to "leave
your blood at the Red Cross-not on
the highway" and the smell of vinegar
and hard boiled eggs filled the kit-


chen. We each got a chocolate bunny
and I don't know which was more
fun-painting those hard boiled eggs
or looking for them out in the
backyard the next morning. Yes sir, it
should have been the time of my life
but it wasn't.
One thing spoiled every Easter
for me. A super week turned into a
nightmare. It was like being at the
picture show and it's dark and you
think you're putting one of those
orange flavored NECO wafers in your
mouth-turns out to be licorice. The
whole movie turns sour. About Mon-
day of Easter week I'd get to thinking


He Is Risen!

















\ f


of those Buster Brown shoes Mother
was a'going to buy Saturday and force
me to wear Sunday. The whole week
went sour.
You remember those Buster
Brown shoes? Listen, those folks at
Buster Brown didn't like kids. You
ever wonder why that little blonde
boys hat is crooked and he's a'choking
that dog in the picture. He's hurting.
His shoes don't fit. The pain's so bad
he's got one eye closed. Of course I'd
have both eyes shut if I had to wear a
silly looking saucer hat and an over-
sized blue bow tie like that. The dog's
name is Tige. Not Rover or Buster or


*-r ..


M ir Mo-


- V


COLBERT


Duke, but Tige. That ought to tell you
something about the shoes.
My Mother thought Easter was
THE day of the year. How that woman
loves Jesus. She understands the
season. She made sure that we also
understood the price paid for our bad
living. She felt that we ought to put
our best foot forward on Easter Sun-
day. For us kids that meant we wore
those freshly dry cleaned genuine
hand me down brown spring suits, a
starched shirt, a clip on tie and brand
new Buster Brown shoes.
I've told you before that we didn't
have any money. And I can't imagine
how Mom kept coming up with new
shoes each year. I reckon she held a
little back from the cotton money. I do
know that every Easter, without fail,
Mother marched us back to the shoe
part of Woodrow Kennon's Dry Goods,
Mercantile and Grocery Store and
bought each of us a brand new pair of
Buster Brown's. Mr. Kennon carried
Pedwin, Mother Goose and Red Wing
boots. But I think my Mother was in-
fatuated with the little blonde boy
choking that dog.
"How do they feel?" Mr. Kennon
could slice ham thick or thin with the
best of them, but he didn't know
doodley about fitting shoes on a nine
year old boy. To hold down inventory
he used the "one size fits all"
philosophy.
"They hurt."
"You've got to break them in.
You'll get used to them."
Get used to Buster Browns!!!
Woodrow Kennon was living in a
dream world! You ever heard the ex-
pression, "wear like iron"? Someone
coined that after six minutes in a pair
of Buster Browns. As Mom paid up I
snuck a peep around the counter at
Mr. Kennon's shoes. Red Wings. It
figured.
I love my Mother. Sunday school
and church wouldn't have been too
bad. But we started with the sunrise
service, then Sunday school 'big
church, dinner onr the ground and
afternoon singing. We didn't have
time to go home between the singing
and night church so we hobbled over
to the service station and got a small
coke. I crawled back to the church for
Training Union and te worship ser-
vice. 9.
I could feel the blood running
down my heel but I could make it
'cause there was only about 30
minutes left. If I could just hold still..
SAbout that time Brother Hatcher an-
nounced that he had a special Easter
story, "Would all the young boys and
girls come down front!"
My boys don't get new shoes for
Easter. I never did, never have and
never will understand the relationship
between Easter and new shoes. I'll
tell you one thing-when Jesus
returns I bet he won't be wearing
Buster Brown shoes.
Respectfully,
Kesley


.ETAOIN SHRDLU


-_ ._s............ _By: Wesley R. RamseyS


"A"

I ATTENDED A retirement din-
; ner Friday night for one of my friends
* : and a man who has had a huge impact
on the City of Port St. Joe for at least
the past 15 years or so.
The retiree was Bob Simon, head
.- : man at the city's septic tank,
who came here while the City' was
building the huge $10 million waste
.: water treatment plant and has been
its manager and chief operational
officer since the plant was first
started up.
SOld Bob has been the man on the
job regularly and faithfully since the
first day the fire was built in the boiler
to the present time.
Simon wasn't one of your every-
day names which comes to the minds
of hordes of people here in Port St.
Joe, buthe has made his mark here in
Port St. Joe, even if it is only in the
gardens of some people who hit him


SMy Opinion, Port St. Joe Got Its Money's Worth Out of Bob


up for truck loads of the fiber which
piles up outside the plant. Old Bob
tried to talk them out of it, telling
them the fiber was inert after it had
made its trip through the septic tank,
but some insisted and Bob obliged;
+++++
BOB IS NOT your typical Pan-
handle good old boy. He originates
from Pennsylvania, and even though
he has been in Florida for several
years, now, he still sounds like he
came only last week from Pittsburg.
He still keeps some of the same
old habits he had in Pittsburg, even.
When he was doing his part in
providing the expertise for building
the grills for the refurbished picnic
barbecue center behind the Centen-
nial Building, Bob made a large frying
surface on the smaller barbecue pit.
"Why?" I asked him. "People will
use the facility only to barbecue and
smoke meat!"
Bob replied, "Oh, those steak
fries were big things up in Pennsyl-


vania. They had those griddles
everyplace."
Well, Port St. Joe has a little bit of
Pannsylvania, courtesy of Bob Simon
at its barbecue area behind the
Centenial Building.
+++++
IT HAS ALWAYS been a mystery
to me how the City of Port St. Joe
attracts such talent as Bob, Dorton
Hadden, the long-time public works
director and the late Woody Dare, who
fathered the water and sewer system
in our town.
Most of the present and recent
past City employees and department
heads, were taught by these men who
had such varied talents and such a
wide span of knowledge.
Bob Simon and Woody Dare were
probably as much alike as any two
people could be and they both had a
broad knowledge of mechanical
things which would almost boggle the
mind.
Both men came from Pennsyl-


vania and both kept their Yankee way
of talking as long as they were here.
Bob is still here, but shows no signs of
adopting a Southern drawl.
Both men were top-notch machin-
ists, who could take a piece of junk,
and fix it like new again.
Both men knew the business they
were involved in. Woody Dare built
the City a sanitary system of water
and sewer collection during the days
when the City didn't have the money
to buy a length of pipe with. Woody
and Joe Badger just made us a system
out of whatever they could lay their
hands on.
Bob Simon, like Woody Dare likes
to collect machinery and tools.
"You're going to need that in just a

little while", Bob would say as he
lugged some piece of surplus equip-
ment back to town he had picked up at
a surplus sale. And in more cases than
not, he was correct. Bob likes to shop
government surplus sales like a lady
likes to get in on a year-end clearance


sale.
Both men were hard-headed and
ruffled feathers, but they still got their
job done.
+++++
BOB SIMON HAS helped the City
through a very trying period in its
history. The Wastewater Treatment
Plant was an experimental edict of
the state and federal regulation
agencies and has caused the City
continuous problems since it was
built. Not because the system wasn't
constructed properly but because
technology was constantly changing
and the requirements of EPA and
DER were being revised almost
monthly.
There hasn't been a month since
the plant was first built that some
agency required modifications were
in the process of being made.
Bob Simon guided the City
through all this and was able on more
than one occasion to persuade DER
and EPA that their requirements


weren't as good as a less expensive
method of doing things.
Old Bob isn't the most handsome
fellow in the world. He isn't diploma-
tic and he is hard-headed enough to be
really irritating at times. He is more
of a plodder than he is a race horse,
but he has been about the most
effective person the City could have
had in his position for the past 15
years.
The City received vastly more
than its money's worth out of Bob
Simon's tenure at the septic tank.
As Mayor Frank Pate remarked
at the retirement dinner at Butler's
Friday night, "EPA and DER has
been on us constantly for the past 15
years and has cited us for about
everything one could be cited for, but
not once in that 15 years has either
agency cited Port St. Joe for its plant
not being properly operated"..
Bob didn't take any crap. He saw
that the flow continued as it should
through thick and thin.


Ia Tides for St. Joseph's Bay


Time
March31 5:53a.m. L
3:11p.m. L
April 1 4:28a.m.


10:59 a.m.
11:18 a.m.
11:57 a.m.
12:36p.m.
1:24 p.m.


April 2
April 3
April 4
April 5
April 6


Ht.
.3
.3
.5

.9
1.1
1.3
1.4
1.5


Time
10:21a.m.
11:31p.m.
9:45 a.m.
5:29p.m.
7:55p.m.
9:04 p.m.
10:10 p.m.
11:15p.m.


Ht.
H
H .
H
L .
L .
L -.
L -.
L -.


T H E T A 'SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
SA -- POSTOFFICE BOX 308 In County -S 10.00 Year In County $8.00 Six Months
.0 WIN,/v. PHONE 227-1278 Out of County $15.00Year Out of County $10 Six Months
4"" O Published Every Thursday at 304-306 Williams Avenue, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456
Q Port St. Joe, Florida
by The Star Publishing Company TO ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions In advertisements, the
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, FL publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount
Wesley R. Ramsey ..... Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID received for such advertisement.
1 William H. Ramsey ........ Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word Is thoughtfully
WSP Frenchie L.-Ramsey........ Office Manager weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly con.
hir'y Ramsey ................ Typesetter vlnces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
P,,,lly my Ts


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1


Fg i a P












SHAD
'a PHANTRY


i tL ,by Wendell Campbell


The Lottery Winners
ALL OF YOU WHO know me realize by now that I didn't, as I
predicted, win the first million dollar lottery. You must also be aware
that I missed the second one, too.
I don't know what happened. Maybe it was the moon, that's what my
kin folks always blamed when their crops failed.
The first $1 million winner in the Florida Lottery was Thomas W.
Sawyer of St. Petersburg. The second winner was a half-Irishman,
Joseph Hutchins. He lives in Fort Lauderdale with his wife and six
children.
Neither one, in my opinion, deserved to win.
+++++
THIOMAS SAWYER, the first winner, turned out to be an outspoken
opponent of the lottery. He maintains that he found the winning ticket on
the sidewalk outside his paint store in St. Petersburg.
S Everyone who believes that, please send Jim and Tammy Bakker a
$10 donation so they can maintain their indigent lifestyle.
Mr. Sawyer also stated that he would never buy another) lottery
ticket for moral reasons. After he banked the $800,000, he was asked if he
was going to give it all to the church, to which he replied, "I'm going to
pray about it."
I'll bet he did pray about it. I would love to know what answer he
received. I'll bet he wasn't directed to pay more than 10 percent.
THE SECOND WINNER, Joseph Hutchins, was a little more open
about his win. He stated that he bought his winning ticket from a
Winn-Dixie grocery store. In the same breath, however, he said that he
wouldn't play the lottery again because he had "mixed feelings" about it
(the lottery).
If I had pocketed $800,000 cash, I would have mixed feelings, too. The
only difference is that part of my mixed feelings would come from Jim
Beam and water.
Some of these big winners really amaze me. Have you noticed that
almost every one of them, when asked if he will continue to work, has
replied something to the effect, "Yes, I will continue to work because I
love my job."
All of you who believe that, send me a $20 donation. Don't worry, I'm
not going to rush to the post office and rent a larger size box.
+++++
THE WINNER WHO, I think, used the proper approach was the man
I heard of who recently won a fourteen million dollar lottery somewhere
up north. When he was notified at work that he had won the lottery, he
went directly to his boss' office and punched him in the nose. He then
proceeded to the nearest pay phone and called his wife. The following
conversation is said to have taken place:
"Hello."
"Martha, this is Joe."
"'Hii honey. What's up?"
"I'll tell.you what's up. I just won the state lottery. It was worth $14
million dollars. I just punched my boss in the nose and quit my job. Pack
your clothes."
.. :Oh, honey, that's wonderful! Should I pack summer or winter
clothes?"
"Pack all of 'em. .and get your fat butt out of my house!"


OBITUARY:
Minnie Elizabeth Walsh, 92


,,,Minnipe.E Elzabeth ;..Wals,. 92,
passed away Wednesday, March 23 at.
Gulf Pines Hospital. She had been a
resident of Overstreet since 1962 and
was the widow of the late Willis H.
Walsh.
She is survived by: three sisters,
Mrs. Ernie Riddle and Leona Bates,
.both of Apison, T nn. and Fay Ensley
of Riceville, Tenn.; two grandsons,
Ronald Arms of Waynesboro, Va. and
Jessie Arms of West Palm Beach;


four great grandchildren, John W.
Arms of Golden, Colorado, Arnold J.
Arms of West Palm Beach, Robert A.
Arms of St. Louis, Mo. and Deana
Wilkes of Overstreet; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Fri-
day in the chapel of Gilmore Funeral
Home with Rev. Jimmie Clark
officiating.
All arrangements were by Gil-
more Funeral Home.


149- a, /Wotim i~Xq



al5FJelzilyxIala


Sat~ ~hcw74 6Y~ 7j6'c


~ SX~I~to, szx, or~k 4A In'.d


The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31, 1988 Page 3A

Dr. Owen Oksanen Moves to

Port St. Joe; Opens Practice


''"' ~

F'
..



i t
;'~
-'(
i~
-~



i.
~


Dr. Owen Oksanen (pronounced
"ox-nen") moved his family to Port
St. Joe Wednesday of last week and
started a medical practice frqm the
Dr Wayne Hendrix medical office
building.
Dr. Oksanen comes to Port St. Joe
from Clearwater, where he was
involved in a group medical practice
along with two other family practice
physicians.
A native of Baltimore, Dr. Oksa-
S nen received his medical training
from the University of Rochester,


0.6


DR. OWEN OKSANEN


New York and served his residency
with the University of Virginia
Medical Center. He has been practic-
ing medicine for 14 years.
In addition to his private practice,
Dr. Oksanen is an approved flight
physician by the Federal Aviation
Administration, authorized to provide
physical examinations for commer-
cial and private pilots.
The family of Dr. Oksanen
includes his wife, Barbara, a native of
Miami and two daughters, Barbara,
16 and Jenny, three.


* Heating & Air

o Major
Appliance
Repair

Plumbing & Electrical Work
229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle
ER0007623, RF0040131, RA0043378 t 9


We Need to Make Room for New Merchandise
So We're Taking Tremendous Cuts on Many Items Store-Wide!!

A World of Motion & Value 6-Pc. "Rachlin Design" 10-Pcs. by "Typhoon"
by "Benchcraft"










Sofa, Love Seat, Chair $129095
2-Pc. Sectional with $99900 3 Tables ............... 1 Sofa, 2 Chairs, 2 Tables, $1 89
Two Incliners, reg-.$1,400... W 5-Pc. Dinette ... o....... 1899
Herman Chair Reg. *2295 1 9 59
Herman Chair 95eg. $229955With 4 Chairs
Sofa and Chair ........ 4999 Wingback Chair... 99a Dinette......... 15995
Dixie $54995 With 6 Chairs
Sofa and Love Seat ..... $549A Pair of Chairs Dine tte 6 irs2795
Imperial of Morristown a mne .........
Sofa and Chair....... 599 by F anklin90 With 4 Chairs, 42" round table
Southern Manor $5995 Reg. $649$ 4 9 All Wood Dinette .. 995
Sofa and Chair......... 99


St. Joe Furniture's New Annex Over 60 Recliners to Choose From












with 2,300 more sq. feet of floor space to better serve you. Barcalounger Benchcraft Franklin


BEDROOM SPECIALS


Radiant Oak Finish
by Florida Furniture. Dresser, mirror,
chest and headboard ...............
Oak Finish
by Orleans. Triple dresser, hall
tree mirror, 5 dr. chest, book-
case headboard & nite stand


$39995



$59995


ALL CLOCKS ON SALE


Cherry Finish
by Florida Furniture. Triple
dresser, tri-fold mirror, 5 dr.
chest & high poster head & foot
Solid Pine Suite
by Athens. Triple dresser, shelf
mirror, 5 dr. chest, poster head
& foot .. ..................


$79995



$89995


8 day key wind mantle, 31 day keywind wall
and weight-driven grandfather clocks.


Many More Specials
In most cases only one of a kind.
So hurry, no back orders for
these prices.


In Business to Serve Since 1945









Page 4A The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31, 1988


Engagement Party Fetes Cathy Rish, Blane Cox


Cathy Rish and Blane Cox were
feted on March 26 with an engagement
Party given by Mr. and Mrs. Hubert
Richards and Mrs. Elizabeth Thomp-
son.
The hundreds of friends who
called during the appointed hours
were warmly welcomed by Master
Jeffrey Little as they approached the
front door of the Richards' home on
Monument Avenue and by Mr. and
Mrs. Richards inside. After signing
the bride's book attended by Miss
Pam Sanborn and Miss Trish Tapper,
guests were directed by the bride-
elect's uncle, Richard Thompson of
Gainesville, to the- receiving line
where they were greeted by her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Joseph
Rish; the honorees, Miss Rish and
Mr. Cox; the groom's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Jjmmy Cox; and the bride's
grandparents, Mrs. Roy Rish of
Wewahitchka and Mrs. Elizabeth
Thompson of Mexico Beach.
For this festive occasion Miss
Rish was lovely in a waltz-length
party dress in a dusty rose print. It
featured dolman sleeves and a large
cream, lace collar and was fitted and
shirred at the hips. Her mother's
dress of mint green also featured a
large cream, lace collar. The groom's
mother wore a silver-gray print. All
wore corsages of delicate pink rose-
buds, the bride's distinguished by a


white dove.
Guests mingled through several
party rooms bedecked with spectacu-
lar arrangements of white or pink
azaleas. A large and beautiful ar-
rangement of pink rosebuds and
larkspur adorned the dining table
which was covered in a white-on-white
embroidered, cutwork cloth. Honor-
ary hostesses encouraged guests to
partake of the tempting fare from
three tables laden with hors d'oeuvres
-some dainty and some hearty-but
all delectable and all beautifully and
enticingly arrayed on crystal and
silver. They offered, also, coffee
frappe from a large silver punch bowl
and a fountain of punch.
Assisting with the food were Mrs.
Tom Parker, Miss Joy Parker and
Mrs. Steve Lawrence. Honorary hos-
tesses were Mrs. Ralph Rish, Mrs.
Richard Thompson, Mrs. Clifford
Sanborn, Mrs. George Core, Mrs.
Rick Williams, Mrs. George Tapper;
Mrs. Chauncey Costin, Mrs. Charles
Norton, Mrs. Bill Brown, Mrs. Al Ray,
Mrs. W.O. Cathey, Mrs. Nolan Tre-
glown, and Miss Lori Ray. Assisting
them were Miss April Little, Miss
Anna Bietenholz, and Miss Jamie Cox.
Miss Rish and Mr. Cox will be
married on November 12 in Port St.
Joe.


Shannon Frickey and Michael Walding

Plan July Wedding


Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Higdon.
of Port St. Joe announce the engage-
ment and forthcoming marriage of
their daughter, Shannon Marie Frick-
ey, to Michael Wade Walding, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Walding also of
Port St. Joe,
The bride-elect will be a 1988
graduate of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High
School in May. She is currently
employed as a head cashier at
Hardee's of Port St. Joe.
The future bridegroom is a 1983


graduate of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High
School and is presently earning an AA
degree in computer science at Gulf
Coast Community College. He is
currently employed at St. Joe Con-
tainer Division.
The wedding is planned for July 2,
1988 at 5:00 p.m. at the Long Avenue
Baptist Church. A reception will
follow the ceremony in the church
fellowship hall. All friends and
relatives of the couple are invited to
attend.


Share the Good News.. ..
Jesus loves us.




GOD'S LOVE

TOGETHER,

Peace Be with You
This Easter Season!
Are you in the midst of the holiday bustle?
Do you find this season a little more than you can handle?
Does the holiday season cause you to be depressed and
lonely?
Then take a moment and center in on what the EASTER season
is .... PEACE is not a season; PEACE is a way of life, JESUS is
the Prince of Peace; JESUS is a Way of Life.
COME, CELEBRATE the Resurrection of Jesus at your Church
this week. WE extend an invitation to those who do not belong to
.:any Church to join us in worship this HoLyr-Week iand Easter. ;2
SAINT JOSEPH'S CATHOLI etHURCH
20th and Monument Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL
227-1417
**HOLY THURSDAY MASS ................ 7:00 P.M.
ADORATION OF THE BLESSED 7
SACRAMENT ......................... 8:00 P.M. util MIDNIGHT
**GOOD FRIDAY SERVICES ............... 3:00 P.M.
STATIONS OF THE CROSS ....... ...... 7:00P.M.
"EASTER VIGIL MASS ................... 7:00P.M. (NOT 5:30 P.ifT
"EASTERSUNDAY MASS ............... 10:00A.M.






















Easter. ..

Baskets
Grass
Candy
Plastic Eggs


American Greeting Cads
American Greeting Cards


Say You Saw It In The Star!!











Final 1Plans Ret

Dickson Gentr
The final wedding plans of Miss
Krissy Dickson and Pat Gentry have
'been announced.
The wedding will be an event of
Saturday, April 2 at 4:00 p.m. at the
Port St. Joe Garden Club on Eighth
Street.
Rev. David Fernandez will offi-
ciate the double-ring ceremony. Joe

It's A Boy for the
David Kennedys
David and Elaine Kennedy are
proud to announce the birth of their
son, Adam Kyle' on March 24. Kyle
weighed seven pounds, 5.8 ounces and
was 21 inches long. He was welcomed
home by his sister Caycee Nicole.
Proud grandparents are Wandell
and Cathy Butler of Port St. Joe and
Ruby Kenriedy of Tallahassee.

Lindsay Pamela
Jones Makes Arrival
Mr. and Mrs. Troy W. Jones, Jr.
of Sylacauga, Ala. are happy to
announce the birth of their daughter,
Lindsay Pamela, born February 21 at
St. Vincent's Hospital in Birmingham,
Ala. Lindsay weighed eight pounds
eleven ounces and was welcomed
home by her sister Brittany and her
brother Adam.
Proud grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Troy W. Jones, Sr. of Port St. Joe
and Mr. and Mrs. Luther Wallace of
Sylacauga, Ala.


'ealed for the

y Wedding
Schutz, soloist, will present the music,
accompanied by guitar.
A reception will follow immedi-
ately at the Treasure Bay Lodge on
C-30 east of Port St. Joe.
S All friends and relatives .of the
couple are invited to attend the
ceremony and the reception.


Anna Louise Tankersley


Sea Oats Plans

Bake Sale Sat.
The Sea Oats and Dunes Garden
Club will hold its annual bake sale on
April 2nd at the Mexico Beach Post
Office parking area. In addition to
delicious home baked goods, plants,
books and miscellaneous White Ele-
phant articles will be offered for sale.
The time schedule is from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. CST.

Anna Tankersley
Has Third Birthday
Anna Louise Tankersley celebra-
ted her third birthday on March 12 at
the home of her parents Danny and
Janis Tankersley. Anna chose a
Rainbow Brite birthday cake and
shared ice cream, chips and punch
with all her friends.
Anna's grandparents are Louise
and Norbert Schweikert of Mexico
Beach, Debbie and James Tankersley
of Port St. Joe, great grandparents
are Pauline Mouchette of Port St. Joe
and Louise Tankersley of Sylacauga,
Alabama.


The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31, 1988 Page 5A

Jaycees' Second Annual Crawfish Boil Saturday


The Port St. Joe Jaycees will be
hosting their second annual crawfish
boil this Saturday, April 2 from 11:00
a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Florida
National Bank park located at the
intersection of Fifth St. and Monu-
ment Ave. in Port St. Joe.
The menu will consist of fresh
cajun style crawfish complete with
corn on the cob or fresh fried mullet
with cole slaw and hushpuppies. The
cost of either platter is $3.00 with
proceeds from the event to help
purchase playground and recreation-
al equipment for the Gulf County


You're so sweet,
You're so king,
How did you get
so ugly by the
age of 29?

Happy 29th
Bobby T.


Beacon Hill Community Park.
Everyone is urged to come out


and support the Jaycees and their
local community projects.


SNational Doctors' Day

is Wednesday,

March 30th

Bay St. Joseph Care Center

SALUTES THE

Area Doctors

on their day.


MISCELLANEOUS
Homelite chain saw, 2 ft. blade,
heavy duty, $125,,runs good. 648-5047.
Strapless lavender prom gown, size
6, worn once. Paid $193, selling for
$125 negotiable. Call after 4 p.m.,
648-8462.
Freidrich 5 ton heat pump, $300.
Call 229-6182. 2t 3/31

WANTED
Wanted: lady to live in with an
elderly person, good pay. Call
229-8614. 2tc3/31
FOR RENT
3 bedroom, 1 ha. trailer, a.c., no
pets, deposit required. St. Joe Beach.
6488211. tfc3/31
HELP WANTED
Calhoun Correctional Institution;, '
position Vocational AInstructor II I, -
pPS Electrician.-Salary $10.00 per
S hour. Closing date: April 7, 1988 5:00
p.m. Minimum qualifications: A high
school diploma or its equivalent and
three years of experience in the oc-
cupational area being taught, as
defined by the employing agency. Col-
lege or vocationa technical training
in the occupational area being taught,
as defined by the employing agency,
can substitute at the rate of 30
semester, 45 quarter or 720 classroom
hours for each year of the required ex-
perience.
An Equal Employment Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer.
It 3/31
Apalachee Center for
Human Services, Inc.
Program Supervisor I Franklin
County. Masters degree in a social or
rehabilitative science and 3' yrs. of
professional experience, one of which
must have been i an administrative
capacity. Flexible shift. Salary,
$16,598.40 anniially. Excellent
benefits. Closing date:, Open. Apply
direct"59 12th St., Apalachicola, FL
or 625 E. Tennessee St., Tallahassee,'
FL (904) 487-2930. Equal Opportunity
Employer.
It 3/31


Dr. Samir Ebeid
'practicing
General Pediatrics &
Pediatric Cardiology
will be in the office of
Dr. Wesley Grace
EFFECTIVE MARCH 26, 1988
322 Long Avenue
on Wednesday, 9 to 5
and on Saturdays,
,9 to 1 p.m.
Telephone number is the
same as Dr. Grace's,
227.1410



Wayne T. DeWitt
Certified Public
Accountant
Tax,Return Preparation
1,5 years experience
Weekdays: After 5:00 p.m.
Saturday: 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
1306 Woodward Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
S227-1138








Page 6A The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31, 1988


Peter Rabbit Visits
Care Center
Peter Rabbit will once again be
visiting his many friends at Bay St.
Joseph Care Center to celebrate the
Easter season. Peter is scheduled to
make his annual appearance at the
resident Easter Party Friday, April 1
at 2:00 p.m.
The public is welcome to attend
and celebrate with the residents.
Everyone is urged to bring their
cameras and have their picture taken
with Peter Rabbit. Polaroid snapshots
will also be available.


Progress Made In


Revival Starts at
Wewa Glad Tidings
Glad Tidings Assembly of God in
Wewahitchka will be holding revival
services Sunday, April 10 thru Wed-
nesday, April 13 with Rev. David
Warren as guest speaker. Rev.
Warren is a former pastor.
Services for the revival will be
Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
and Monday thru Wednesday nights at
7:00 p.m. The church is located on
Main St. in Wewa and the pastor is
Rev. Donald Asbell. Everyone is
invited to attend the revival.


Say You Saw It In The Star!!





Cal I
Shorty 229-6798 E1 .
Shorty
26 Years Experience Licensed and Bonded
Commercial- Residential
DCimrdrflilnn -nr i r vicP Work


Reg. No. ER-004631
Charles Sowell

Sur-Way Electric
411 Reid Avenue


SAVE-A-LOT
Hwy. C-30 "In the heart of downtown Simmons Bayou"
Everyday Low Prices
Our Goal Is to Serve the.Public

* HARDWARE SUPPLIES BEACH SUPPLIES
* PLUMBING SUPPLIES ICE (Block & Cube)
* ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES FISHING & MARINE
SUPPLIES
S* NOW PUMPING LP FUEL*
Open Monday Friday, 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m., Sat., 9 a.m. 6 p.m.
PHONE 904/227-7220 ,,c,,




LIBERTY MANOR

APARTMENTS
New Apartments for the Elderly & Handicapped

Low rents for low income tenants. Amenities
include:
* Fully Carpeted Units Rec. Room
* Central heat/air On Site Laundry
* Refrigerator Energy Efficient
* Stove One Bedroom Con-
* Emergency Call struction
System
PICK UP APPLICATION AT OFFICE
Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY HOUSING

\


Retirement Dinner for Simon
Bob Simon, pictured above left, is presented a plaque, recognizing his
accomplishments in the wastewater treatment field over the past 40 years. The
presentation is being made by Richard Sublett, a Department of
Environmental Regulation director on the occasion of Simon retiring from his
position with the City of Port St. Joe Friday night.
Simon put himself out to "partial pasture" this past week, deciding to retire
after a long career in waste treatment. He has been manager of the local
wastewater treatment plant ever since it first started operation 15 years ago.
Simon has guided the plant and regulation agencies through a period of
experimentation and changes in plant operation to comply with regulations of
the two controlling agencies.
Simon was honored at a dinner held at Butler's Restaurant Friday night,
where he was presented with several gifts and heard some nice words said in
his behalf.



Easter Week Schedule


The First United Methodist
Church of Port St. Joe will be
observing Holy Week with the follow-
ing services:
Thursday, March 31, 7:00 p.m.,
Maundy Thursday Service of Holy
Communion recalling the Last Supper
Jesus had with his disciples;
Friday, April 1, 7:00 p.m., Good
Friday Tenebrae service. As the
seven last words of Christ are
recalled, the altar candles are extin-
guished. The altar isthen stripped and
the cross draped in black. symbolizing
the death of Christ onthe cross, when ,
'T he Light '.of th WorId" %as-:.
extinguished
Easter Sunday, April 3, 11:00
a.m., morning worship service where
flowers and greenery will be brought
to decorate the large wooden cross on
Easter morning. At the conclusion of
the service, the Living Cross will be
placed on the front portico of the
church to be viewed by those who pass
by.

At Mexico Beach
Methodist, Also
Easter services will be observed
at the Mexico Beach First United
Methodist Church this week. Mautidy
Thursday services will be held tonight
at6:00 p.m. CST at the church. A Good
Friday candlelight service will be
held Friday at 5:00 p.m. CST and an
Easter service will be held at 9:00
a.m. Sunday morning and an Easter
musical will be presented by the
Taunton children at 10:10 a.m.
Everyone is cordially invited.


Rev. Ennis Sellers, pastor of the
church, extends an invitation to the
public to attend all of the special
services.


fus ?'
-FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP...... 10 a.m.
(Easter) The Apostles' Creed:
VII. "I Believe in the
Resurrection"
Nursery availablee
ADULTSCHOOL ........ 11a.m.
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden, Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756


911 Agreemeni
Gulf County is making progress in three-way converse
securing the emergency 911 telephone ler, the 911 disp
system for the county, Linda Borde- emergency person.
lon, external affairs director for St. Bordelon said
Joseph Telephone and Telegraph cost phone subscribe
Company told the Kiwanis Club on their phone bill fo
Tuesday. the rate for the
"The county is going with the reduced to 12 to 15
basic 911 emergency net at this time, The dispatcher
but it's a foot in the door. It can easily the Gulf County Sh
be improved to the Enhanced 911 would have some i
system in the future", Bordelon said. lines to insure im
The basic 911, such as the county when an emergency
is considering, provides only a single Bordelon said
telephone number to call for any fire already in opera
department, ambulance service, po- County.
lice department, Florida Highway The speaker sa
Patrol or Sheriff's Department inside devices available f
the county. The speaker said there are the phones for the
presently 20 different emergency Guests of the
numbers in Gulf County alone. The 911 Melvin, Dewana
system will eliminate the need to Browning and Stev
know any or all of these numbers.
"With 911, all emergencies go into M.B. Method
a central receiving point and the In Bake Sale
dispatcher there relays the need for
emergency assistance to the proper The ladies of t
service for immediate response. First United Method
"In most cases, the person doing having a bake sale
the calling will talk directly to the 2 on the Pier Road.'
emergency service operator in a at 8:00 a.m.


ition with the cal-
patcher and the
the system would
ers 50c per month
or 18 months, when
service would be
cents per month.
will be located in
leriff's office, and
10 to 15 dedicated
mediate response
y iS reported.
the system is
tion in Franklin
lid there are also
'or installation on
hearing impaired.
club were Tracey
Davidson, Tracy
e Howell.
list Ladies
SSaturday
he Mexico Beach
dist Church will be
on Saturday, April
The sale will begin


agganousumammenaweammmmatmumeaammmmmunamnumeammma
.*..


GULF COUNTY


FRANKLIN COUNTY


BAY COUNTY


If you do not like the taste or smell of your water, you may have some of these problems:


* Iron Dingy clothes, fixtures and lawns
* Sulfur bitter taste


* Chlorine city water-
pesticides, detergents, etc.


Excessively hard water- limestone, scale, calcium deposits.
CALL NOW FOR A
FREE WATER ANALYSIS
From the test we can determine-your problem and may recommend a system you can
purchase to solve all of your needs.
Phone 648-8863
KIMWAL WATER SYSTEMS Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach



Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With

Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


The Insurance Store Since 1943
Auto Home
Business 8:30 till 6:00 Monday through Friday


* Flood Life
Bonds
* Mutual Funds


221 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-1133


We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


' Reg. $14.71
50' Indoor/Outdoor
Extension Cord
Perfect for home or shop. Extra
heavy duty construction, 16-
gauge with 3 conductors and
can be used indoors or out-
doors!


$1799
Reg. $42.05
3-Gallon Tank Sprayer
Ideal for home and garden use.
Comes with 18" brass wand,
adjustable nozzle, pressure
relief valve, plus 48" hose.


$749
Reg. $14.75
50 Ft. GH50 Garden
Hose
A must in every home. 50 ft.
reinforced, kink-resistant gar-
den hose with brass couplings.


17 Reg. $68.00
3 Pc. Gott Cooler Combo
Have fun outdoors with an all-
purpose Gott Cooler Combo.
Includes half-gallon jug, inside 8 i
qt cooler inside 34 qt. cooler.
Customized with NAPA logo,
the set has 6-year warranty.
*After manufacturers $4 rebate.


NAPA Auto Pa
201 Long Avenue


Phone 229-8222


Port St. Joe


rts 4A

All the rit parts in
all the night places.


PUBLIC NOTICE

Revenue Sharing Handicapped

Regulations


This notice is published pursuant to thet equire-
ments of Section 51.55 of the Revenue Sharing
Regulations, as published in the Federal Register
on October 17, 1983. Section 51.55 prohibits
discrimination against qualified individuals
because of their handicapped status.

THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, advises the public,
employees and job applicants that it does not
discriminate on the basis of handicapped status
in admission or access to, or treatment or employ-
ment in, its programs and activities.

GULF COUNTY has designated the following of:
fice as the contact to coordinate efforts to comply
with this requirement. Inquiries should be
directed to:
NAME: Gulf County Circuit Clqrk
OFFICE: Clerk of Circuit Cout
ADDRESS: Gulf County Courthouse
PHONE NUMBER: 229-6113


riiiile
jl).I


I~





































Carol Busse Wins Golf Tourney


The Ladies Golf Association held
their club championship tournament
on March 23 and 24 at St. Joseph's Bay
Country Club. Winners are as follows:
The club champion is Carol
Busse. Championship flight was: 1st,
Fulla Draper; 2nd, Pat Anema; and
3rd, Lois Smith.
First Flight, 1st, Margaret Smith;
2 2nd, Carol Mitchell; and 3rd Frances
Brown.
Second Flight: 1st, Meta Buzzett;
2nd, Jean Fitzgerald; and 3rd, Phyllis
Altstaetter.


Third Flight: 1st, Gladys Meyer;
2nd, Barbara Mongold; and 3rd,


Marian Svendsen. Fulla Draper was
awarded for having low putts.


Nicole Quinn Wins A Trophy


Nicole Quinn was a runner up in
the Queen's Contest of the lona Davis
Area Women's Missionary Society
held March 12 at St. James A.M.E.
Church, Panama City. Nicole was a
representative for the youth depart-
ment of New Bethel A.M.E. Church of


Port St. Joe. The competition consist-
ed of poise, talent and interview with
judges panel. She was awarded a
trophy for her placing. She was also a
participant, in the West Florida
Conference, district level 'queens
contest held March 19 in Marianna.
Nicole is the. daughter of Willie
and Cora Quinn of Port St. Joe.


April Set As

Beach Clean

Up Month
The Sea Oats and Dunes Garden
Club and Gulf County Beaches Fire
Department have joined together to
proclaim the month of April as
clean-up month on St. Joe Beach, Gulf
Aire and Beacon Hill. The county will
pick up old appliances, tree limbs and
debris placed on street right of ways.
These items must be separated.
On Saturday, April 23 in conjunc-
tion with Mexico Beach litter clean
up, the residents of St. Joe Beach,
Gulf Aire and Beacon Hill are urged to
participate in the beach and highways
cleanup.


CARD OF THANKS
Joseph Clayton and Josephine
Pool wish to thank their many friends
for their acts of kindness shown
during the passing of their brother,
the late William Clayton of Lakeland.
Whatever part you played, the
family appreciates it and may God
richly bless each of you.
The Clayton family

CARD OF THANKS
The family of Elizabeth Mont-
gomery Flood would like to thank
each and everyone for the prayers,
food and floral offerings, phone calls
and cards. Comforting words were
greatly appreciated.
Alma Lewis
Bill Montgomery
Jim Montgomery


The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31, 1988 Page 7A'



HIGHLAND VIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth Street and Second Avenue
Welcome Friend
SUNDAY SCHOOL ............................ ..... 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIPSERVICE ......................... 11:00 A.M. &7:00 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ............ ............... 6:00 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday)......................... 7:00 P.M.
NURSERY PROVIDED .. JIMMY CLARK, Pastor







Q U Ill'TT iN.' "

BU S INESS


2 % TO 50% OFF S1 1

LAMPS CERAMICS *CASES,
VITAMINS & KITCHEN AIDS ETC.
MINERALS BEACH SUPPLIES
TELEPHONES T-SHIRTS
CLOCKS SHELLS
GIFTS *JEWELRY
PHONE ACCESSORIES ALL FIXTURES 10-4:30
RADIOS COUNTERS ILY
DAILY CST




MEXJo WeM.hc MINI- MALL
SO US Ht&HWAY 98 AT6rTH5T|


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Board of County Commission of Gulf Coun
ty will receive sealed bids from any person, com-
Spany, or corporation interested in selling the coun-
ty the following described personal property:
The successful bidder shall furnish all equip-
Sment and materials specified herein along with all
labor required to install the system in a neat
workmanlike. manner and shall test the system
-upon completion for proper operation.
This system shall be furnished, installed and
Functional within three weeks of notification to pro-
-'ceed.
The owner shall be provided with a one year
written warranty to cover all equipment being fur-
Snished, this includes parts and labor and shall be at
the customer's location.
Equipment used for this system shall be as
follows, equal or better will be considered.
REPEATER: Furnish one Johnson Model
CR1010, 75 watt with tone and duplexer, repeater to
be installed in the radio room of the old courthouse
in Wewahitchka.
BASE.ANTENNAE: Furnish one base anten-
nae No. ASPC 853 installed with 200 feet of 7/8 inch
hardline cable and connectors. Antennae to be in-
stalled on County's tower at the old Courthouse in
Wewahitchka.
PHONE PATCH: Furnish one Fetron Model
45. Install in radio room of the old Courthouse, con-
nect to repeater and phone line (639-5311). Phone
line will be furnished by owner.
LIGHTNING PROTECTOR: Provide proper
Lightning protection on all antennae cables, phone
sines and power source. -*
( -' PORTABLE "RADIOS: Furnish 20 Johnson
Model 5861 Portable radios, each one being com-
plete with desk charger, belt clip, leather case,
heavy duty battery, 15 programmable channels
with channels requested by owner programmed in-
to unit and scanning ability.
Delivery date must be specified. Liquidated
damages for failure togdeliver unit on specified.
date will be set at $25.0O per day.
Specifications are dp file at the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Dourt.
Bids will be received until 9:00 o'clock, A.M.,
Eastern Standard Time, April 12, 1988, at the Of-
fice of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County
:, Courthouse, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Douglas C. Birmingham
2t 3/24/88.
NOTICE
Absentee Ballots for the Regular Election to be
held May 10, 1988, may be requested in person, by
mail, or by telephone at the Supervisor of Elections
Office, Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe,
Florida, if you come within the purview of the
definition of an "absent elector". Absentee Ballots
will be mailed, delivered, or may be voted in per-
son as soon as Ballots are printed, immediately
following Candidate Qualification deadline which
is April 19, 1988. If there is a Run-Off Election,
Absentee Ballots may be requested beginning May
11, 1988. Completed Absentee Ballots must be
received in Supervisor of Elections Office by 7:00
P.M., E.D.T., May 24, 1988, if there is a Run-Off
Election.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE.
By: L. A. Farris,
City Auditor/Clerk 6t3/31
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given by the Board of County
Commissioners of Gulf County, in compliance with
the General Revenue Sharing Regulations 30 CFR
51.2 (1977), that a copy of its fiscal year 198687
Federal Revenue Sharing Use Report is on file in
the Clerk of Court's Office, Gulf County Court-
house, Port St. Joe, Florida. The Report and sup-
porting documentation is available for inspection
LBy the publicly etweenf the hours of "9:00 and 5:0
EDT on weekdays.
ATTEST: Benny C. Lister, Clerk of Court
It 3/31
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice -is hereby given by the Board of County
Commissioners of Gulf County, in compliance with
the General Revenue Sharing Regulations 30 CFR
51.108 (a), (b), that a copy of its fiscal year 1988-87
Audit Report for Gulf Codnty is on file in the Clerk
of Court's Office, Gulf County Courthouse, Port St.
Joe, Florida. The Report and supporting documen-
tation is available for inspection by the public bet-
ween the hours of 9:00 and 5:00 EDT on weekdays.
ATTEST: Benny C. Lister, Clerk of Court
It 3/31


Owen Oksanen, M.D.

announces the opening of his practice
in the office of
Dr. Wayne Hendrix
on March 28

Board Certified In


Family Practice

229-8291

201 20th Street Port St. Joe








Gulf Pines Hospital announces the
Opening of the

Medical Practice of


Karen S. Jones, D.O.

in the office of Dr. Jorge San Pedro
On March 15, 1988

Specializing In

General Surgery & Gynecology

Call for An Appointment

229-8126


324 Long Avenue


- Public Notices -









Page 8A The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31,1988


I


Only 60C with any $5.00 Hallmark purchase.
Limit one per customer. While supplies last.
Easter is Sunday, April 3.


BUZZETT'S
DRUG STORE
317 Williams Ave. Phone 229-8771
Convenient Drive-In Window
01988 Hallmark Cards. Inc.


Dixie Youth Kicks Off Season

Saturday with Day of Baseball


The Dixie Youth Baseball League
will kick off its 1988 season this Satur-
day with a Day of Baseball at the local
complex located on Tenth Street.
Each of the five teams in both the ma-

Church Softball
League Forming
The church softball league will
have a meeting Monday, April 4 at
5:30 p.m. at the high school softball
fields. All churches interested should
have a representative present to
discuss plans for this year's league.
For further information call 229-8588.

Ladies' Softball
There will be a meeting Monday,
April 4 at 6:16 p.m. to form a ladies
softball league. Anyone interested in
playing ir coaching in this league
should attend. The meeting will be
held at the softball fields behind the
high school.


Lose to Wewahitchka


I V V V* V V


i.


jor and minor leagues will play in the
exhibition games, with the regular
season play to begin on April 11,
following spring break.
This year approximately 150
youngsters are involved in the pro-
gram which provides organized.
baseball for local children. During the
day of events, the winner will be'
selected for $100 worth of gas being-
given away as a fund raiser for the
group.
SCHEDULE MINOR LEAGUE
9:00 a.m. Rich's IGA vs.
Saveway; 10:30 a.m. MTI vs. Telco;
and 12:00 Florida Bank vs. Saveway.
MAJOR LEAGUE
9:00 a.m. Stars vs. Norwest;
11:00 Norwest vs. Krafties; and 1:00
Sylvachem vs. Boxers.
The concession stand will be open
for the day, so plan on coming out and
watching these youngsters play ball
on Saturday.


Port St. joe 5, Wakulla 3
The Sharks rapped Wakulla Coun-
ty pitching, for seven hits last
Wednesday inning and took a 5-3 win


Takes District Win


St. Joe
Port St. Joe's Sharks won a 5-3
game in Medart last Wednesday
against the Wakulla War Eagles but
have run into difficulties since that
time.
A scheduled Saturday double-
header against Forida High was
rained out after the first inning of the
first game Saturday. Florida High
had a 2-0 lead after the first inning,
when the game was washed out.
Tuesday afternoon, the high-
flying Wewahitchka Gators blanked
the Sharks, 11-0 on the Gator's home
field.
The Gators tagged Shark pitch-
ing for 12 hits, including a two run
homer by Rusty Wood, a solo shot
over the fence by David Paul and a
two run double by Durand McLeod.
The Sharks touched Gator hurler
John Whitfield for five hits and two
walks. Whitfield struck out five.
Gainnie gave up 10 hits and
walked only one while striking out
eight. Matthew Taylor came on in
relief in the sixth and gave up two hits,
walked one and didn't record a
strike-out.
Hitting safely for the Sharks were
Bill Ramsey with a double, Jamie
Vathis, Reginald Larry, Matthew
Taylor and Jim Anderson all singled.
The Gator attack was led by
Wood's two run homer, Paul's round-
tripper, McLeod's single and double
and singles by John Ward, Whitfield,
Berry Eubanks and Ronald Mayhann.
Line Score:
Port St. Joe 000 000-0 5 0
Wewahitchka 130 043-11 13 1


The Sharks committed four errors
in the game while the War Eagles
played errorless baseball.
J. J. Ray and Bill Ramsey led the
Shark hitting with two singles each,
including Ray's game-running stroke'
in the ninth inning.
Line Score:


Port St. Joe
Wakulla


001 020 002-5 7 4
001 000 200-3 4 0


The Sharks will host Pace Friday


in nine innings.
J. J. Ray had the winning hit in
the top of the ninth, driving in
Matthew Taylor and Reginald Larry
who had reached base on walks. The
single broke a 3-3 tie and a pitching
duel between Mickey Gainnie and
three Wakulla hurlers.
Gainnie went the route for the
Sharks, facing only 44 batters. He
gave up seven hits, six walks and
struck out 12 in the extra-inning
contest.


The Gulf County Cooperative
Extension Service is sponsoring a
Horse Management and Production
meeting for all interested persons in
Gulf County.
The meeting will be held Tuesday,
April 5 at 6:30 p.m. CST, at
Wewahitchka High School in the
commons area. The school is located
on East River Road about 1/2 mile
from Highway 71.
Topics to be discussed are:


Equine Health and Preventive Medi-
cine, Feeding the Young Growing
Horse, and Vitamin Needs of the
Horse. These topics will be discussed
by Extension's Animal Science spe-
cialists Dr. Edward Johnson and Dr.
Saundra H. Tenbroeck with IFAS of
the University of Florida.
For more information contact the
Gulf County Cooperative Extension
Service at 229-6123 or Roy Lee Carter
at 639-5266.


Pistol Matches Set at Gulf Rifle Club


The Gulf Rifle Club will begin
having pistol matches on the second
and fourth Sunday of each m,9nth. The
match on April 10 will be at'bullseye
targets. Course of fire will consist of
20 shots slow fire at 25 yards, 20 shots
time fire at 15 yards and 20 shots rapid
fire at 15 yards.
On April 24 a metallic silhouette
match will be held. This match will
consist of shooting at metal cutouts of


chickens, javelina, turkeys and rams,
at distances from 25 to 100 meters.
All pistol shooters are invited to
come out and have some fun. Starting
time for all matches will be 2:30 p.m.
For more details call 229-8421 after
5:00 p.m.


JOHN GILMORE MUSIC
509 10th St. (Next to Gilmore. Funeral Home)
New, Used & Vintage Instruments & Accessories
By Scalia, 2 models in stock. Includes bow, rosin & case
New Student Violin/Fiddles ......... *699 & s7995
Other models available professional and student.
Guitar, Case, Pitch Pipe, Strap, Instruction Book
La Accoustic Guitar Pkg. Deal ....... Sale *149.95
Phone 229-8111




Catch the rit Constitution and Monument
I S id Port St. Joe
THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
SUNDAYSCHOOL.... 9:30 a.m. EVENINGWORSHIP... 7:00p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00a.m. BIBLE STUDY,
METHODIST YOUTH WEDNESDAY..... 9:30 a.m.
FELLOWSHIP ... 5:30 p.m. THURSDAY ...... 7:30 p.m.
REV. ENNIS G.SELLERS, Pastor GLYNN KEYS, YoutlhMusic Director




Special Easter Sunday
Buffet


GIBSON INN
Apalachicola, Florida
ENTREES
Roast Leg of Lamb with Mint Sauce
Baked Ham with Rum Raisin Sauce
Fried Amber Jack Seafood Casserole
Pastichio (Greek meat and pasta casserole)
VEGETABLES
Spring.Asparagus Carrots with Fennel
Potatoes or Rice Great Array of Salads
Homemade Bread and Dessert


11:30 to 3 p.m. EDT 9.95


Get your picture taken with the Easter Bunny
from 12 to 2

''ai^6 a 'J "q >wta% i ^* *m


Bags Large Gobbler

SMonI) Gentry, center, along with his sons, Heath, right and Daniel, left,
brought home this 173/4 pound gobbler Thursday morning, as the spring
gobbler season opened in Northwest Florida. Gentry said they killed the big
bird north of Kinard.


P155/80R13
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15


$29.89
37.95
39.95
40.95
43.95
45.95
49.95
51.95
53.95
55.95
59.95


Act NowI Sale ends April 9.


FIREHAWK G r
* H speed rated' for today's popular
performance cars
*Aggressive style


P155/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15


$37.95
53.95
57.95
61.95
65.95
74.95
75.95
78.95
80.95


Act Nowl Sole ends April 9.


Outline Sale YOU
White Letters 4-for 3 SAVE


P195/70R14
P205/70R.14
P225/70R15
P205/60R13
P215/60R14
P225/60R14
P235/60R15
P255/60R15
P215/65R15


$353.85
371.85
413.85
326.85
398.85
407.85
419.85
455.85
407.85


$117.95
123.95
137.95
108.95
132.95
135.95
139.95
151.95
135.95


90 DAYS SAM E AS CASHon revolving charge at Firestone stores
and many dealers. Minimum monthly payment required. All finance
charges refunded when paid as agreed. We also honor Viso,
PFestO ne MasterCord, Diners Club, Carte Blanche and American Express.
Prices and credit plans shown ore available at Firestone stores.
See your independent dealers for their prices and credit plans.



Pate's Service Center


216 Monument Avenue


Horse Management Course

Set for April 5 In Wewahitchka


"THE CHURCH AFLAME IN PORT ST. JOE"

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
102 Third Street

* Evangelistic Worship Services Christ Centered Youth Program
Regular Bible Study An Exciting, Place to Attend
Ministering to the Where Everyone is Welcome
Total Family Regular Services
SFully Graded Choirs Sunday & Wednesday
HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor JAMES ENFINGER, Music & Youth


afternoon in a 4:00 p.m., game. Pace
is coached by Buddy Smith, a former
Port St. Joe High School hurler. Pace
went to the state play-offs last season.
Many of the players have returned for
this season.
Saturday, the Sharks will go to
Tallahassee to meet Florida High and
make up one of the games which was
rained out this past week. Game time
is 1:00 p.m.





TEMPERANCE

y y
OOODNESS
FAITH

HIGHLAND VIEW
CHURCH of GOD
319 Sixth St., Highland View
"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An Everflowing
Fountain"
SUNDAY SCHOOL. ... 10:00a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP. 11:00a.m.
EVENING WORSHIP.. 6:00p.m.
WED. EVENING ...... 7:00p.m.
PASTOR
REV. ROBERT RATHBUN


Phone 227-1291


-t~-ee-~e~










Sen. Chiles'


Outstanding Black College GradPlans e tentative
Plans Visit


CLARENCE DAVIS


Leola Davis, a Tampa school
teacher and Clarence Davis, an
archivist in Washington, D.C. are two
of the 100 or more outstanding
graduates of historically black col-
leges and universities (HBCUs) being
honored as Distinguished Alumni at
the 13th National Conference on
Blacks in Higher Education, at the
Washington Hilton Hotel. The confer-
ence is sponsored by the National
Association for Equal Opportunity in
Higher Education (NAFEO).
All honorees are nominated by
their alumni institutions for making
significant contributions to the Amer-
ican society. Presentations of the
NAFEO citation shows that the
historically black colleges and uni-
versities continue to produce many
high-quality individuals who enter
into the American mainstream and
contribute to outstanding progress,
said Dr. Samuel L. Myers, NAFEO
president.
Both Clarence and Leola were
born in Port St. Joe. He is a graduate
of Florida Memorial College and the
University of the District of Columbia,


as well as the Archives Institute. He
previously served as analyst in the
executive office of the mayor and
administrative assistant to the Direc-
tor. He completed research on the
Resource Calendar on Black Colleges
and Universities.
He is a member of the Society of
American Archivists, the Afro-Amer-
ican Historical and Genealogical
Society and Phi Delta Kappa frater-
nity. He was nominated for NAFFO's
1988 Distinguished Alumni Award by
Florida Memorial College.
Leola Davis is a graduate of
Florida Memorial College in Jackson-
ville and Florida A&M University in.
Tallahassee. She received the Foun-
tain of Excellence Award at Florida
Memorial.
She is president of the institution's
Tampa alumni chapter and chaplain
of the National Alumni Association.
Ms. Davis is also an active member
of the First Baptist Church of Tampa.
She was nominated for NAFEO's 1988
Distinguished Alumni Award by Flor-
ida Memorial College.
"Traditional black colleges have
fostered the integration of our stu-
dents into our society, where unfor-
tunately blacks account for only one to
two percent of most professionals in
the nation, by graduating approxi-
mately half of the black lawyers,
doctors, ministers and others," Myers
stated in announcing the 1988 honor-
ees.
"The historically black colleges
enroll less than 20 percent of black
undergraduates, but confer almost 40
percent of all baccalaureate degrees
earned by blacks, Myers reported.
Based on recent statistics, two black
colleges account for 40 percent of all
blacks earning degrees in dentistry;
two account for 82 percent in
veterinary medicine. The historically
black colleges continue even now to
press for expanded access at a time
when many states are restricting
admissions to all colleges," he added.
The HBCU Alumni will be intro-
duced and feted at a special confer-
ence session and honored at NAFEO's
closing, Leadership Awards Banquet,
NAFEO is an association of most of
the nation's historically and predom-
inantly black institutions of higher
learning, including public and pri-
vate, two-year and four-year, under-
graduate and graduate schools.
It was founded in 1969 as a
nonprofit, voluntary independent as-
sociation representing the HBICU.-
which enroll some 250,000 students
each year and graduate inore than,:
40,000 alumni annually.


?stinghouse

White-Westinghouse
22.0 Cu. Ft. Side-by-Side
Refrigerator-Freezer
MODEL RS226G








White Westinsighuse_
MODEL RS226G
Completely Frost-Free 999
14.7Cu. Ft. Fresh Food 999
Capacity
7.3 Cu. Ft. Freezer See-Thru Chilled
Capacity Meal Keeper
Four Cantilevered Twin Dairy
Adjustable Wire Compartments
Shelves Removable Egg Server


White-Westinghouse
Heavy-Duty Laundry
Pair






W White-Westinghouse

Regular, Perm.
3-Position Press Delicates &
Waler Saver Air Fluff Settings
with Reset 180' Door Swing for
3 Wash/Rinse Easier Loading &
Temperature Unloading
Combinations
Washer Dryer
$399 %329






Port St. Joe Phone 227-1277


U.S. Senator Lawton Chiles'
North Florida District Assistant,
Dean Fenn, will be in Gulf County on
April 7, to assist constituents in this
area with any problems they may be
encountering with agencies of the
Federal Government.
According to Senator Chiles, Fenn
will work to assist the residents of
Gulf County with problems concern-
ing Social Security, Medicare, vete-
rans benefits, disability compensat-
tion. and in general, with any Federal
agency where communications or
assistance has broken down.
Chiles urges those who have
problems, but who are unable to meet
with his representative, to contact his
office at the Federal Courthouse,
Room 24, 110 E. Park Ave., Tallahas-
see, FL 32301, telephone, (904) 681--
7514.
Fenn will be in the County
Commissioners' room at the Gulf
County Courthouse in Port St. Joe
from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Grandberry Gets
A.F. Promotion
Timothy Grandberry, son of Ro-
bert C. Larry and grandson of Willie
E. Grandberry of Port St. Joe, has
been promoted in the U.S. Air Force to
the rank of senior master sergeant.
Grandberry is superintendent of
the Plans Branch with the 57th
Fighter Weapons Wing at Nellis Air
Force Base, Nev.
His wife, Pamela, is the daughter
of Willie Mae Moore of Panama City.


Sponsored by These
LOCAL MERCHANTS.
Bay St. Joseph Care Center
Hannon Insurance Agency
Panama Air Equipment & Supply
Panama City
Our Boutique
Norma'sFamily Restaurant on
Mexico Beach
The Decorator Den
Danley Furniture
Tapper and Company
The Comforter Funeral Homes
Pate's Phillips 66 Service Center
Gulf Sands Restaurant, St. Joe Beach
Piggly Wiggly
Campbell's Drugs
Southern Erectors
Citizen's Federal Savings & Loan
Athletic House
Motel St. Joe Restaurant
Instant Images
Florida National Bank


WJBU Radio 1080 A.M.
~- ".i, ^ '- '*' --. a- *u m -> 1- r^ A /


White-Westinghouse
Microwave Oven
* Popular .8 Cu. Ft. Oven
Capacity
2-Stage Cooking
99-Min., 99-Sec. Timer
Convenient Reheat Times
Automatic Temp-Sure Probe
SDefrost & Hold Feature ,
SGlass Tray & Cookbook KM


Bob's Small Engine Repair on
St. Joe Beach
Let's Knit Yarn Shop at Overstreet
Costin's Insurance Agency
Badcock Home Furnishing Center
Pauline's Restaurant
St. Joseph Telephone &
Telegraph Co.


TODDLERS
to 13 Years
Old
PRIZES &
SURPRISES
POPEYE


$259


M487K


, White- n
Westinghouse -'
Room Air -
Conditioner I I


In stock -
Up to 28,000 BTU
Get Ready Now for
the Hot Summer.


Ask about Danley's Extended Warranty


Port St. Joe Natives


h-


HENDEI












BREAK
Ready by
Homemade Bi

Lunch I
Monday -
Fresh Vegs., I

$3.!




MON








Vine-Ripe

Green Cabbage..
Golden Carrots..
Golden Bananas .
Yellow Onions...


TRUCK
Truc

MECHA

TRUCK T
24 hc
Levi, Redman, Beect
Copenhagen Snuff




HENI


PROD

SEAFO

OYSTEI


ISON'S RESTAURANT


309 Mo
Phone


-- SATURDAY SPECIAL
All the Chicken You Can
Eat Inside Only
BB RIBS & 3.
CHI KEN Potato Salad, Baked Be


FAST
6 A.M.
scuits Daily

Buffet
Friday
Fresh Meats

50


Cheeseburgers Jumbo
Hamburgers Jumbo
FRIED SHRIMP....
FRIED OYSTER .....


$225 R
$215 R
S.. pla
... pla


BOILED SHRIMP .... ... pla
MULLET PLATES ........
1/2 FRIED CHICKEN 450
CHEF or REGULAR SALADS
STEAKS of ANY KIND


mnument Ave.
227-7226





50
ans, Cole Slaw


leg. 175
leg. s$16
te *8.OO
te $8.00
te $4.00
.. S4.00
1/4 $350






6-9



s 990


s b. 50'
15c LETTUCE

20 head 50'
290
30" Fresl.
-m m


Steamed Oysters... $3.50h.
Also by the Bag, Pint or Gallon
Mullet ............... .. 69
Fresh Shrimp ............ $3s"&
Flounder ............... I. $17
Smoked Mullet Catfish Steamed Clam


309 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-7226
Port St. Joe


eTomatoe.



. . . pound
. . . poIund

. . . pound


HAULING
k and Car

NIC WORK

IRE SERVICE
ours a day
inut, H.B. Scott Tobacco,


)ERSON'S
U C E HOURS: Mon.-Wed. 8-8; Thurs. -Sat.,
S8-9:30 and Sunday 1-7

I A CE,
'VU ( -i~Flatbed or

XRBAR
and d smal me


The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31,1988 Page 1B.

Class Planning 10th Reunion
Members of the Port St. Joe High their 10 year class reunion.
School Class of '79 will meet at the
Gulf Sands Restaurant at 12:00 noon All class members are urged to
Saturday, April 2 to make plans for attend.

T -- -_ --_-- -_ -- --- _-- ---------_-_- -_--_

BURKET & HALL

Well Service











Water Wells
Over 30 Years Experience
Home Heat Pump Lawn & Garden
Sprinkler Systems and
Irrigation Specialists
STEVE BURKETT WENDELL HALL
(904) 265-9340 (904) 871-0350


EASTER EGG HUNT
Saturday, April 2 10:00 a.m. EST
for Children in Gulf County & Mexico Beach
STAC HOUSE on EIGHTH STREET, PORT ST. JOE


Dependable White-WE


EAT IN or CARRY OUT SERVICE -

IDAY thru THURSDAY 6-8: FRIDAY & SATURDAY -


Reg. 10 Lb
Potatoe


9,


- 18


--41


I II










Page 2B The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31,1988


TOWARD

UNDERSTANDING
,by the Rev. Jerry R. Huft, Rector, St. James Episcopal


A great deal of research has been
done concerning the problem some
people have in getting to church on
Sunday. It would be presumptuous
for me to try to encapsulate even one
percent of that material in this article.
But there are a few things that can be
said, which may be helpful to those of
us who are concerned with the
spiritual health of others.
In some cases a lapsed member
can't stand the pastor. If there is no
way to reconcile the issue, perhaps
the member should do as Paul and
Silas did in their dispute over John
Mark. They went their separate ways,
but maintained a good relationship
and were later reconciled. The
important issue is that we show our
love of God by worshiping God on a
regular schedule, and at the same
time show our love to each other by
accepting differences with brotherly
love.
At times a member gets his or her


feelings hurt and stays away from
church. In such cases it is helpful for a
third party to mediate between the
two. In my own experience, I know of
only three instances where this
method has failed. But I have not
given up hope for two of these. The
third cannot be resolved because the
aggrieved person has entered the
grave without forgiving and making
up with the supposed adversary.
I know of a few people who are
sour on life because "they" aren't
running the world or the church their
way. Such people generally blame
God or the church for a tragedy or
some unhappy situation. This is a
tough one to overcome because
invariably things continue to go wrong
and the complaints are constantly
being reinforced. These folks need all
the love we can give them. They are
truly miserable and they make others
unhappy too.
Most of the people I have known


who shun church are simply apathe-
tic. "Sunday is my only day to rest" or
"I have a golf game scheduled" or
"My kids act up and embarrass me"
or "The service is boring", they say.
The apathetic member is a hazard to
others as well as to himself. By way of
example he teaches children and
friends that the church is insignifi-
cant. The only thing that I know of
that will help these folks is a rich
spiritual experience. And they can
only have this kind of intimacy with
God when they yield their wills to
their Savior.
These are only a few of the
reasons people give for their lack of
dedication to the Lord and his Church.
There are scores of other excuses.
If you want to help these
.endangered friends and relatives, the
first thing to do is to start praying for
them. Ask God to give them health,
prosperity, and peace. Then ask that
both you and they be prepared for.a
time when you can make a friendly


overture.
Be a friend. Show genuine con-
cern and be persistent without being
pushy. Talk about what God is doing
in your life and in the life of your
congregation. Be earnest. And be a
good example by your regular and
punctual worship habits.
Share church bulletins, newslet-
ters and perhaps even books that are
meaningful to you. Introduce your
friend to others in the parish. Share
some time in prayer with them, pray
together about your families and
other common issues.
Invite your friend to dinners and
other church functions. Help your
friend get involved slowly, so he won't
be scared away before God's love has
done its,job.
Never give up. Always show that
you care. And pray sincerely that is
won't take eight strong men to get
your friend through the door of the
church for one final time.


Tell Me About It!


Weeds Are Common In Lawn Grasses


by Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Agent
Weeds are common to all lawn-
grass. They increase the maintenance
cost of a lawn, reduce the land value
and in some cases contribute to
allergies and poisonings. Weeds com-,
pete with all desirable plants for
water, nutrients and sunlight. They
also harbor insects and diseases that
might attack lawngrass, trees and
shrubs. Lawns which are properly
maintained are less apt to be plagued
with weeds. A vigorously growing
lawn provides little area for weed
seed to germinate and will usually
smother out those that so germinate.
The use of chemicals to control
weeds in parks, recreational and
public areas is a relatively common
practice. Herbicides (weed killers)
are rapidly being accepted and there
are chemicals available to control
broadleaf weeds and grass in lawn-
grasses, around trees, ornamental
plants, along ditches and fence lines,
in areas difficult to maintain with
mechanical equipment and in annual
flowering plant beds.
Before one can effectively control
weeds and grasses he must first be
able to recognize his weed problem.'
Weeds can be classified into three
broad categories. First, there are the
annuals which complete their life


bull thistle are examples of this group.
The third and most difficult group
to control are the perennials. They
live for more than two years and may
possible last indefinitely.
Perennials are classified accord-
ing to their method of reproduction.
There are two types, the simple and
the creeping.perennials. Simple per-
ennials reproduce by both seed and
vegetative parts and are the most
troublesome to control. Examples of
this group are wild "strawberry,
mouse-ear, chick-weed, ground ivy,
bermuda grass, nut grass and
Johnson grass.
Herbicidens' can be useful if
applied properly and incorporated
into the overall weed control pro-
gram. Both pre-emergency and post-
emergence herbicides, in combination


with mechanical equipment, are
needed for a good weed control
program. Ask your local county agent
about the proper chemical to use on
specific weeds.
Calibration of equipment is an
important part of any herbicide
application. This is simply making
necessary adjustments to the sprayer
so that the proper amount of chemical
will be applied to a specific area.
Regardless of the herbicide used,
care should be exercised and the
chemical must be applied in accord-
ance with the ,instructions of the
manufacturer's label. Also be sure
that the herbicide you use states on
the label that it can be used on your
particular lawngrass, using the incor-
rect herbicide on your lawn can
seriously damage it.


ROY LEE CARTER
cycle in less than one year, and they
are usually easiest to control. There
are the summer annuals, such as
crabgrass, goosegrass and pigweed. A
few common winter annuals are POA
annual, cominon winter chickweed
and hembit.
The second: category is the
biennial, which requires more than
one year but less than two years, to
complete a life cycle. Wild carrot and


Sergeant Edward Parrish Receives Air
Force Commendation Medal In Italy


Sgt. Edward A. Parrish, Jr., son
of Edward A. Parrish, Sr, of Orange
Park and Lou A. Miller of Richardson,
Texas, has been decorated with the
Air Force Commendation Medal in
Italy.
The Air Force Commendation
Medal is awarded to those individuals
who demonstrate outstanding.
achievements of meritorious service,
in the performance of their duties on
behalf of the Air Force.
Parrish is a munitions operations
specialist with the 487th Tactical


For
RONNIE WILSON
Ronnie Wilson was this
lad's name.
He never achieved much
wealth or fame.
He was raised in Jones
Homestead
A nice looking man they
all said
At a very young age he had
a trick
The old lawnmowers he
could fix
When he grew older he
worked on cars
H9 was better than most
by far
When the old motor got
out of shape,
Never fear or forsake,
He would fix or remake.
This hard working man
was really good with
his hands
He had such a winning
way
When you visited with him
you wanted to stay
He was loved by more than
he knew
Those who really cared
were quite a few.
Ronnie, your mother and
Dad, brothers, sister and
children, and all your fami-
ly and friends, too
Want you to know we will
always love you and miss.
you.
Rev. Darrell Dennis


Missile Maintenance Squadron.
His wife, Sheila, is the daughter of
Charles D. Harvey and Judith L.
Bond, both of Port St. Joe.


St. Joe Beach
Unit 3


Introductory Offer Extended


Today's Price
$15,000.00


* All utilities
* Paved streets
* Planned drainage
* Large lots
* Across from dedicated beach


* Single family
* Title insurance
* Recorded covenants &
restrictions
* Approved fire department
adjoins property


June 1 Price
$18,000.00


* Proposed shopping center
adjoins property
* Terms available


648-5777


Say You Saw It In The Star!!


"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E Port St. Joe, Florida Church Phone 229-8137
/ Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman


SUNDAY
11:00A.M. .... Morning Worship
4:00 P.M......... Youth Service
6:00 P.M...... Evening Worship


MONDAY FRIDAY
12:30 P.M.... Intercessory Prayer
WEDNESDAY
6:30 P.M.......... lst-6th Grade
7:30 P.M. Bible Study & Fellowship


"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune In Every Sunday Morning at 8:45





Gulf Coast Community College

The Department of Corrections in conjunction
with GCCC is offering training and employment
opportunities for 45 qualified applicants who will
work as correctional officers at the Gulf County
Forestry Camp in White City.
Salary: $15,364.00

Requirements: 19 years or older, high school
diploma or GED, and ability to pass a police
background check. Interested applicants should
contact

Criminal Justice Training Center at GCCC,
769-1551, extension 371
GCCC is an Equal Opportunity Affirmative Action Institution
S' 2tc 3124


Many Reasons A Person


Can Not Get to Church


Exclusively offered by:


PARKERR RF.AII
Hay. 98 and 31 SI. REALTOR /904]
Mexico Breac, HF. 32410 .


I ` --


~YP~ a "I


__









The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31, 1988 Page I


Shark Scope
.els tit Putrl .St. Joe Jr.-.>r. High S. lih ,I
by Sonya Quinn


Spring is in the air. Students and
teachers at St. Joe High will go on
spring break April 1-10. School


ec, PA.


dismisses at 12:05 Friday, April 1.
Seniors who are going to Grad
Nite '88 must turn in $40.00 to Mrs.


AMER-FLINT


PAINT JOB
Most Cars,
Never Needs Waxing......


$40000


Call or We Will Come By and Pick Up Your Car
Wax and Detailing Cars ........................ 40.00

Replace Brake Pads, Resurface Front Rotors
BRAKE SPECIAL (Most cars).. ....... 39.99

Specializing In Fiberglass and Body Work -Expert Repairs
SAVE Up to $100 to $200 on All Insurance Jobs

JAMES /(
Paint and Body Shop 4 ,
Phone 229-8061 607 Highway 98 --
HIGHLAND VIEW
32 YEARS EXPERIENCE

....... ............ -'-- _-_-- -_- __ -

CAMPING FISHING HUNTING
Indian Swamp Campground
E RV Park
Located at Howard Creek. Fla. Mailing Address:
Hwy C.387 Rt. 1-Box 182-A
(904) 227-7261 .. Wewahitchka. Fla. 32465



Come Out and Catch a Mess of Fish

Catfish Ponds Open


-Catfish up to
11< b'z


15 pounds.


Get YourRifle, Shotgun or Pistol, ... 9
REBLUED .......... 7
DON'T'WAIT UNTIL HUNTING SEASON TO HAVE YOUR WEAPON
REPAIRED. COME OUT and SEE OUR GUNSMITH.


-- ------ -- --- -- ------ -------- ----- mo



The Choir of


LONG AVENUE

BAPTIST CHURCH

PRESENTS THE

MUSICAL DRAMA






-.o





Experiences of Sorrow turned to Joy
-|
David Danner


Saturday, April 2 &

Sunday, April 3
Both Performances, 7:00 P.M.


IN THE CHURCH SANCTUARY

1601 Long Avenue


MICHAEL HANDY, Director

Nursery Provided for Both Performances


Turner by Friday, April 1. No tickets
will be ordered after the holidays and
no refunds will be given.
The McKnight Achievers Society
has elected new officers for the next
school year. They are: president,
Calondra White; vice president, Ken
Monette; recording secretary, Yolan-
da Daniels; corresponding secretary,
Carmen Frazier; and treasurer,
Denise Boykins.
Congratulations to the following
FBLA members for placing in the
district competition. Becky Batson,
4th in business applications; Aaron
Wilson, 4th in computer concept; J.
Lee Johnson, 2nd in advanced typing;
and Tracy Fields, 4th in job interview.
Cheerleading tryouts will be held
this Friday at 1:30. Tryouts are
closed.
The track team placed fourth with
42 points in the Greensboro High track
meet.
The weightlifting team will host
Wewa this Thursday at 4:00 p.m.


Lacey Lowery

Lacey Lowery

Easter Queen
Lacey Lowery, daughter of Allen
and Pam Lowery was chosen Baby
Miss Easter Queen Sunday, March 27
at the Panama City Garden Club. She
was in the 0-11 months category.
Lacey will have a chance to
participate in the 1988 America's
Cover Miss National finals held in
Fort Walton Beach.

Sr. Citizens Open
"Clothes Closet"
The Gulf County Senior Citizens
Association announced recently the
opening of a'co.r iufitiy clothes closet
to be operated.'fron the Washington
Site Senior Citizen Activities.,Center
on Ave. D at Peters St. in North Port
St. Joe. The purpose of the services
to provide clothing for the less
priviledged of the community. As with
most services offered by the Associ-
ation, there is no charge to the
consumer.
The clothes closet will be staffed
with volunteers under the. direction
and leadership of Mrs. Marion Odum.
Several volunteers are presently
signed up and more are encouraged to
participate in this benevolent oppor-
tunity.
The clothes closet will be open
each Wednesday from 1:00 p.m. to
3:30 p.m. Persons desiring to donate
articles ,of clothing'are asked to call
the center at 229-8466 or contact Mrs.
Odum directly. Free pick up and
delivery of donated clothing is provid-
ed. Only summer clothing will be
accepted through September.
The Gulf County Senior Citizens
Association is a private, non-profit
agency.

CARD OF THANKS
The family of Rod Turner wishes
to thank their neighbors, .friends and
relatives for the many acts of
kindness shown them during their
time of sorrow.
A special thanks to Rev. Cox and
Rev. Browning for their comfort.


For Life
Insurance,
check with
State Farm.
*Permanent Life.
*Term Life.
*Universal Life.





Call: .
BILL WOOD
403 Monument Avenue
Office: 229-6514
Like a g6od neighbor State Farm is there







H e f e g .I


Basic


Rea


Gulf County Literacy Volunteers
is sponsoring a Basic Reading Work-
shop for volunteer tutors beginning
April 11. Meeting on Monday and
Thursday nights from 6:00 until 9:00
p.m. in the library at Port St. Joe High
School, the 18 hour workshop is
designed to train volunteers to help an
adult to learn to read and write. This
learning program has been designed
by Literacy Volunteers of America, a
national organization based in Syra-
cuse, N.Y., whose focus for 25 years
has been the adult non-reader.
"The LVA method is a student
centered whole-language approach to
teaching basic literacy skills to
adults," says Melissa Marlowe,
VISTA coordinator of Gulf Co. Liter-
acy Volunteers. "Student centered"
means that we use material and
subject matter of interest to the
individaul student. 'Whole-language'
means that reading, writing, and
comprehension skills are taught sim-
ultaneously from the very first lesson.
By using this method, an adult can
increase his reading skills by one
grade level in 30 to 35 hours of
tutoring."
After completing the workshop,
each volunteer tutor will be assigned
an adult student. They will work
together for two one hour sessions
each week in a neutral location, such
as the Literacy Volunteers office, the
library, the Bay St. Joseph Care
Center, or other tutoring site. These
tutoring sessions are scheduled at the
convenience of the student and the
tutor, and so may be adjusted around
M.B. Ladies Raising
Funds for Chris
The ladies of the Mexico Beach
First United Methodist Church will be
selling tickets to win a handmade
afghan. Proceeds of the sale will go to
benefit Chris Matincheck. Chances
may be purchased for a $2.00
donation.
A drawing for the afghan will be
held on May 28.


Nathaniel S. Bewey
Oh! how we miss you.
Oh! how we love you.
Although you are gone
but not forgotten,
love you still.
Your wife Bessie,
: son anddaugohters an.d,
mother-in-aw and grand
4-1-56


ding
work and home
The works
ed adults who
years of age
wanting to volut


Workshop Slated
Schedules. information about the program may
iop is open to interest- call 229-6166 and leave their name and
read and who are 18 telephone number; and a member of
and older. Anyone the workshop committee will return
nteer or wanting more the call.


ONEGOODTURN


SNAPPER FEATURES
INCLUDE:


ELECTRIC START MODELS:
Feature an alternator and
back-up recoil starter.
HI-VAC CUTTING DECK:
Cuts grass evenly. Vacuums
clippings with ease.
ADJUSTABLE CUTTING
HEIGHTS: Go from one to


Just turn the key. That's all.
SNAPPER's 21" Self-Propelled
with Electric Start does the
rest: SNAPPER Performance
begins the instant you turn
the key. Starts, finishes, and
tackles your toughest chores
in-between.


JOIN THE MILUONS OF SATISFIED SNAPPER USERS.


ST. JOE HARDWARE
i 201 Williams Avenue Phone 229-8028 -


FORTUNE? YES!


WHEEL? NO!


No need to gamble to make
your money grow fast here.

Your deposits here are safe, sure &
secure...insured by the FSLIC, backed by
the full faith and credit of the United
States itself. What's more, you'll enjoy a
wide choice of high-earning savings
investment options for fast financial
growth. See a savings counselor here this
week.


' CITIZENS FEDERAL
S Savings and Loan Asssociation

Port St. Joe Wewahitchka Apalachicola


1s'k C


5











*IS~ V..
:~ **: ~*
*'~ ,!.:~~a;


MAR. 30-APRIL 5, 1988


12 Lbs. & Up


LB.


QUANTITY
RIGHTS
RESERVED


.' J


480


IP7
i '= &



i-!.
,I-`- --~
-


ir
-IA ,IESH
BAKING,
HENS lr:

l",,59"


HAM


STEAK
m I
(Family 2

LB. Pac.) $


RITZ
DRINKS
12 OZ.


8/880
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE
DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


Check Our


IGA
LARGE


EGGS


DOZEN
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE
DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE '.,


Selection of
Easter
-F Candy


BOLD
"DETER-

.GENT.
S: 2,-OUNCE



WITH I FILLED DOUBLE
DISCpUNT CERTIFICATE


Salon -',el' t Shampoo.. is oz. 189
Sudafed .Capsules.............. 10.'s $239
Fiber Trim T.ablet' 6's 6259
Tylenol' CapletS so5' 389
r-: .'., .


STARKIST ;

TUNA
61/2 OUNCE


28
WITH FILLED DOUBLE
DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


SIGA Open Top Bread..2 20 oz. 89'
IGA B&S Rolls 2 Pa~i 990
Dessert Shells Pak 79
I-


USDA GRADE A
BASTED
TURKEYS


IL" ~-~d~s)


STALEITEHI
m 0 El

SHANKr
PORTION L


,e"


~~.


t %







4 .


BULK RATE
CARRIER ROUTE
PRE-SORTED
Pwrit No. 3
Wewahltchka, FL 32465


.kJzk.
,* 4:


FINEST QUAITY MEATS


TABLERITE BEEF EYE OF ROUND
Roast or Steak ...
HICKORY SMOKED CENTER CUT
Ham Slices......
USDA GRADE A CONCORD
Frozen Ducks ....


4 u


$959
Lb. L
. $158
Lb. A


Lb.


SUNNYLAND
Sliced Bacon ... 12o.


$108
$Jos.
.m.


BRYAN JUICY, BEEF, CHEESY
Jumbo Franks ...
LYKES SALAMI or SPICED
Luncheon Loaf ...
OLD TOWN HOT OR MILD
Pork Sausage ...
FRESH CHICKEN
Livers & Gizzards


Sunnyland Sausage and Biscuits


. $188
Lb. A
. $178

Lb. '89
89"
b. 49
OOL $189


I, I IVRLOKTHSEGOD UY!


Trailblazer 40 lb. bag
Dog Food .. ..
Kraft 2 Ib. jar
Grape or Apple Jelly.
100 count
Mr. Coffee Filters....


$599
$128

690


Campbell's CREAM OF 10.75 oz. 2188c
Mushroom Soup .. /OO
Van Camp 16 ounce 2 /$
Pork & Beans. ... .
Franco American 14.75 oz. 7lC
Pastas ..... .... 79.
Franco American 14.75 oz. 2 C
Spaghetti....... /88
SPRING PLANTING TIME!!
Check Our Large Selection of Bedding Plants,.
Vegetable & Flower Seeds, Potting Soil, Lime.


Aunt Jemima 5 lb. bag
Grits .. .
Roddenbery 22 ounce
Salad Delites......
Sugary Sam 29 ounce
Cut Yams .. ... ....
Reynolds 25' roll
Aluminum Foil .....
IGA 17 ounce
Fruit Cocktail......
IGA 17 ounce
Peaches. .........
IGA 17 ounce
Pears .. ........
Glad Large 30 ct.
Kitchen Bags......
Glad 20 count
Trash Bals .......


1~';~ U:';15"?

-T




F'Iorr~a Lottergj


8-8-8 50 lb. bag '
FERTILIZER .. 399


FLORIDA
LOTTERY
TICKETS
AVAILABLE
HERE


13-13-13 -50 lb. bag
FERTILIZER... 499


KRAFT PARKWAY QTRS.........2 LBs. 88"
Kraft Phil. Cream Cheese..... e oz. 890
Sunny Delight Punch ............... 64 oz. 991
Kraft American Singles............ 1oz. $229
Kraft Orange Juice 64 o. $149
P'bury Crescent Rolls ............... oz. $129
* Land O' Lakes Whip. Butter oz. 890
kLand O' Lakes Butter (Unsalted) Lb. 199


S'" I 'I I I I. :1 $.4

FR.ttztH QUEEN DINNERS 2oz.
Larsen Mix. Veg. or Corn. i : oz. 79"
Pet Pie Shells ...... 890
Birdseye Veg. and Saece io 99*
Birdseye Cool Whip a oz. 89
Sun Vale Strawberries .......2 10 oz. 880
M.G. Ice Cream S'wich............ 6 pk. $14S


Fresh I


Asparagusb.


$129


New Crop Florida; ,
10 lb..69

Potatoes ba LARGE NAVEL
Potatoe-s 1 69 ORANGES 4


for 99


Western Cantaloupes ........... 79
Large Red Delicious Apples ....... pond 49
Fresh Pineapple ............. each 1.29
Fresh Zuchinni ............... pond 690
CrispCelery ............... 2 staks 88

ICEBERG


C


-~ ...- -~


Lettuce


,e49
head *


0


p.. pIj*.
S'S


7i:C


-q
---A


0
O


* f
0


1 ;im


$149
$139

790
69"
69C
69C
69
$199

$29 ,


". o
*To


UTAt


Red Ripe

Strawberries
.- pint -


9 -, s


~-~~--~-~~i-` ~~


w 4 2 m m 0 a 0 m 1


!+


uI













Page 6B The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31, 1988


Public

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF PANAMA CITY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN THOMAS HANNA a/k/a JOHN T. HANNA;
WELLS FARGO CREDIT CORPORATION; U. S.
LIFE CREDIT SERVICE CORPORATION; and
ST. JOE PAPERMAKERS FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION,
Defendants.
CASE NO. 8-28
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: U. S. Life Credit Service Corporation,
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion of foreclosure on the following described pro-
perty in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit:
Begin at the Northwest Corner of the W% of
SW/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11
West and run South for 420 feet to the Point of
Beginning; thence run East for 210 feet;
thence run South for 210 feet; thence run West
for 210 feet; thence run North for 210 feet to the
Point of Beginning. Lying and being in Gulf
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on Jack G. Williams, of Bryant, Higby & Williams,
Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is 833 Harrison
Ave., P. O. Drawer 860, Panama City, FL 32402, on
or before April 28, 1988, and file the original with
the clerk of this court, either before service of the
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of this
Court on this 8th day of March, 1988.
BENNY C. LISTER, Circuit Clerk of Gulf County
By: /s/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
(SEAL) 4tc 3/10/88

NOTICE TO BID
The Board of City Commissioners City of
Wewahitchka, will receive sealed bids from any
person, company, or corporation interested in buy-
ing the following property:
One 1982 Suzuki 850 cc Motorcyle, ID No.
1GS71LOC2101715 fully dressed with fairing,
saddle bags, tour pack and helmet.
Bids will be received until 3:30 p.m., C.S.T.,
Monday, April 11, 1988, at the office of the City
Clerk at Osceola Avenue and Second Street,
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465 or P. O. Box 966,
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465, in double envelopes,
the inner envelope marked "Motorcyle Bid". The
Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids.
Bids will be opened at the next regular meeting of
the City Commission on April 12; 1988.



NEW LISTINGS:
Port St. Joe
Charming older home 2 bd.,2%
ba, Fla. room (could be 3rd bd),
dbl carport w/utility rm, natural
pine & cypress thruout, corner
lot, good buy at $39,500.
Mexico Beach
36th St. Beachside near fishing
pier lovely 3 bd./2 ba. home,
garage, screened porch, com-
pletely furnished, all appliances
included, cen. h/a, nice view of
Gulf.
Cute, well made 1 bd., ba. home
on lovely lot, backs on' canal,
Georgia St. $39,500.
Beacon Hill.
Two lots, 50x100', total 100'x100',
$7,000 ea. or $12,000 for both.
Corner of 6th sti. &'2d Ave. Well
Kept 2 bd./2 ba. house on 2 beau-
tiful lots, screened deck, com-
pletely furnished down to the
dishes. $57,000.

Call Debbie,


At 648-5716


Notices

Board of City Commissioners,
Ray Dickens, Mayor
Attest: Sharon H. Holmes, City Clerk
4tc3/17

TO REGISTER FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Florida
Statutes 865.09, the undersigned persons intend tc
register with the Clerk of Court, Gulf County,
Florida, four weeks after the first publication of
this notice, the fictitious name or trade name
under which they will be engaged in business and
in which said business is to be carried on, to-wit:
COMPANY NAME:
Daylight Donut Shop
LOCATION OF BUSINESS
214 Highway 71 North
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
OWNERS:
Albert & Doris Sheppard
& Betty J. Dudley
4tp 3/10/88

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
LEONARD F. CRAIG,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES CARTER and
SHARON CARTER, his wife,
Defendants.
CASE NO. 87-229
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CHARLES CARTER
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion of foreclosure on the following described real
property:
Begin at the Northwest Corer of the SEE4 of
NEV,4 Section 31, Twp 5 South Rge 11 West.
Which is marked by a St. Joe Paper Co. Monu-
ment and run South 320 feet to the South side of
present County Road, thence run East for 662.5
feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence
continue to run East for 82.5 feet., thence run
South for 250 feet, thence run West for 82.5 feet,
thence run North for 250 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, same lying and being in the
SE4 of NEV4, of Section 31, Twp 5 South, Rge







A nice clean 12'x65' 2 ba., 1 ba.
trailer with porch located 2 blocks
from beach at St. Joe Beach. Call
648-5361. tfc 3/24
Townhouse for rent on St. Joe
Beach. Furnished, 2 bdrm., 1 bath.
Magnificent gulf view. Year to year
lease. 648-5179. 2tc 3/31

Mexico Beach 2 bdrm., 1 ba. unfur-
nished house. Stove & ref. Year round
rental only. Also 2 bdrm., 1 ba. duplex
unfurnished St. Joe Beach. Stove &
ref. Year round rental. Call Charles
229-8282 after 5, call 670-8417.
Apartment for Rent: Unfurnished, 2
bedroom, $335.00 per month. 808
Woodward Ave. Very nice. Energy ef-
ficient. Lease-Option available.
227-1428. Jernyl N. Harper, Lic. Real
Estate Broker. tfc 2/4
Furnished Ig. 1 bedroom apt. h&a,
no pets. Nicely furn., 2 bdrm. house,
screened breezeway; closed garage,
fenced yd, w/d, carpet, h&a, in town.
SNo pets. 229-6777 after 7p.m. tfc 4/7
Year round rentals, nice 1, 2 & 3
bedroom homes or townhomes, furn.
or unfurn., choose a gulf front or quiet
residential location. Call or stop by for
complete information, ERA Parker
Realty, Mexico Beach, Hwy. 98,
648-5777. tfc 11/5

For Rent or Sale: 2 bdrm., 2 bath
room house at Cape San Bias, many
extras. Call 229-8385 or 227-1689.
tfc 2/25

For Rent: Mini-warehouse storage.
For more information call 229-6200.
thru 12/87


*


11 West.
has been filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on
Robert Cintron, Jr., of Dearing & Cintron, Post Of-
fice Drawer 10369, Tallahassee, Florida 32302, on
or before April 28, 1988, and file the original with
the clerk of this court, either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the petition.
Dated March 8, 1988.
BENNY C. LISTER, Circuit Clerk of Gulf County
By: Is/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
(SEAL) 4tc 3/10/88

FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes, the undersigned persons
intend to register with the Clerk of Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the first publica-
tion of this notice, the fictitious name or trade
nan;e under which they will be engaged in business
and in .which said business is to be carried on, to-
wit:
COMPANY NAME:
Whispering Pines of Cape San Bias
LOCATION:
County Road 30E
ADDRESS:
Rt. 1, Box 533,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
OWNERS:
David L. Marley and
Susan M. Marley
4tp 3/31/88

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
REGULATION
Notice of Proposed Agency Action
on Permit Application
The Department gives notice of its intent to
issue a permit to George S. Newman to construct a
boardwalk 390' in length by 3' wide terminating
with an observation platform over a jurisdictional
wetland area contiguous with St. Joseph Bay in
Gulf County off State Road 30A, approximately two
miles south of the City of Port St. Joe. The observa-
tion platform will have the dimensions of 12'x12'.
Persons whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative deter-
Smination (hearing) in accordance with Section
120.57 Florida Statutes. The petition must conform
to the requirements of Chapters 17-103 and 28-5,








Trailer for rent: 1 bedroom, private
yard, $160 month. Call 227-7217 after
7:00.
Mobile home for rent, Mexico
Beach, 3 bd., 2 ba., double wide, furn.,
ch&a, fenced yard, Ig. porch, no pets,
lease required. 229-6553. 2tc 3/31



Furnished two bdrm. trailer, Sea
Street, St. Joe Beach. Deposit re-
quired. Call 229-6825. tfc 3/10
Trailer lots for rent, shaded lots in
nice residential area, 2 blocks from
the beach, ERA Parker Realty,
648-5777. 4tc 3/10
2 bedroom, 1 ba. house on canal in
Mexico Beach, annual rental, $375
mo. 904/725-3616 or 814/723-3917.
tfc 3/10

Warehouse space with office. Ap-
prox. 850 sq. ft. Suitable for contractor
or small service business. 227-1100
days only. t tfc 11/19

Rentals: 1-2 and 3 bedroom houses
& townhouses for rent. Now available.
6 months to 1 year lease required. Call
or stop by for complete information.
ERA Parker Realty, Hwy. 98 at 31st
St., Mexico Beach, FL 904/648-5777.
tfc 11/5

2 bdrm., spacious apartments, easy
to heat and cool. Reasonable deposit
and rent. No pets. Call 227-1689 after 6
p.m. Best deal in town, save on utility
bills! tfc 1/7


PLfT'OT ION


Florida Administrative Code, and must be filed
(received) in the Department's Office of General
Counsel, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee,
Florida 32301, within fourteen (14) days of publica-
tion of this notice. Failure to file a petition within
the fourteen (14) days constitutes a waiver of any
right such person has to an administrative deter-
mination (hearing) under Section 120.57, Florida
Statutes.
If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing
process is designed to formulate agency action.
Accordingly, the Department'sfinal action may be
different from the proposed agency action.
Therefore, persons who may not wish to file a peti-
tion may wish to intervene in the proceeding. A
petition for intervention must be filed pursuant to
Rule 28-5.207, Florida Administrative Code, at
least five (5) days before the final hearing and be
filed with the hearing officer if one has been
assigned at the Division of Administrative Hear-
ings, Department of Administration, 2009
Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida 32301. If
no hearing officer has been assigned, the petition is
to be filed with the Department's Office of General
Counsel, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee,
Florida 32301. Failure to petition to intervene
within the allowed time frame constitutes a waiver
of any right such person has to request a hearing
under Section 120.57, Florida Statutes.
The application is available for public inspection
Monday through Friday except for legal holidays,
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at 160 Governmental Center,
Pensacola, Florida 32501-5794.
It 3/31/88
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners will accept sealed bids from qualified con-
tractors for the County's 1988 Resurfacing Project.
The work will involve patching, resurfacing and
marking approximately five (5) miles of roadway.
All bidders must be Florida Department of Trans-
portation qualified. Interested bidders should con-
tact Mr. Ralph Rish, Baskerville-Donovan
Engineers, Inc., P. 0. Box 366, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, (904) 228003.
Delivery date must be specified. Liquidated
damages for failure to deliver unit on specified
date will be set at $25.00 per day. Specifications are
on file at the Office of Baskerville-Donovan
Engineers, 303 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL
32456.
Bids will be received until 9:00 o'clock, A.M.,
Eastern Standard Time, April 12, 1988, at the Of-
fice of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County








Mexico Beach: Lease clean 2
bedroom, 1 bath. Ch&a, carpet, unfur-
nished, very close to shopping &
beach. Reasonable. (904) 668-2110
work, (904) 386-6004 home. tfc 4/7
No need for wet carpets. Dry clean
them with HOST. Use rooms right
away. Rent machine. St. Joe Fur-
niture, 227-1251. thru 12/87
Trailer lot and 2 overnight or longer
camper spaces in Highland View.
227-1260. 4tp 3/17
For Rent or Sale: 3 bdrm., 2 ba.
house in White City on Hwy. 71: Fish
pond and garden area. Call 229-8735
after 5:00p.m. 4tp 3/17'

Small mobile home, 2 bdrm. $160
plus water deposit. No pets. Call
648-8211. tfc 3/17







Top of the Gulf Restaurant is now
taking applications for the following
positions: waitress, waiter,
bartender, dishwasher, bus person.
Experience preferred. Apply in per-
son between 4 & Q p.m. 2tc 3/31
Part time waitress/bartender. Call
227-1757 after 11:00 a.m. tfc 3/24
Receptionist/office clerk, must
work weekends. Barrier Dunes Real-
ty. Please call for interview, Bob.Wor-
they, 229-2500. tfc 3/24


Gulf County's

Finest Private

Development


Buy Now
Prices Are Going Up!


Golf Course and Runway Lots for Sale
Large 1/2 Acre plus lots
Underground utilities
Paved private road
Close to schools & hospital
**Prices start at $16,900**

CONTACT

JERNYL N. HARPER


Licensed Real Estate Broker
Phone 9041227-1428


411 Reid Ave.


Courthouse, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Douglas C. Birmingham
2t 3/31/88& 4/7/88
NOTICE
Registration Books are now open, at the Office
of Cora Sue Robinson, Gulf County Supervisor of
Elections, Gulf County Courthouse, and will re-
main open through April 8, 1988 for voter registra-
tion and changes in registration for the upcoming
Municipal Election, Tuesday, May 10, 1988.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
L. A. Farris, City Auditor/Clerk 2t 3/31/88


NOTICE
Persons wishing to file as candidates In the Ci-
ty of Port St. Joe election to be held May 10, 198,
for the following offices, must do so on or before
April 19, 1988:
COMMISSIONER, GROUP I
COMMISSIONER, GROUP IV
Forms for filing are available in the Super-
visor of Elections Office, Gulf County Courthouse,
Port St. Joe, Florida.
By: L. A. Farris,
City Auditor/Clerk 3t 3/31

COPIES
Available at The Star office,
304 Williams Ave.


CHANCE OF A
LIFETIME
Beautiful 3 BR, 2/2 bath home
PO .overlooking St. Joseph Bay
Golf Course. Offered for only
S$PL1956 I- Now $99,900.





Gulf County's Finest NEW .
Residential Community



ST. JOSEPH BAY CONSTRUCTION

COMPANY, INC.

411 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(904) 229-87'95 RB0043519







de \ ILLEMORE ^

|,> l REAL ESTATE r



corner 10th Street and U.S. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, Florida 32410
(904) 648-5146

See One of Our Friendly, Well-Qualified Salespeople


Ellen F. Allemore Broker -
648-8939
Joy Holder 648-8493
Bobbie Miller 648-8398
Glenna Holten -648-8195
Dot Craddock 648-5486
Bobbi Ann Seward .229-6908
BEACH FRONT TOWN HOMES
9815 Hwy. 98: Lovely 2 bd., 2V ba. furnished,
$104,500. Unfurnished, $99,000.
9821 Hwy. 98: Beautifully furnished 2 bd., 2'V
ba. townhome. $105,000 unfurn., $115,000 furn.
9811 Hwy. 98: Spacious 3 bd., 2% ba.,
townhome w/f.p., nicely furnished, Reduced to
$125,000.
S9735 Hwy. 98: Roomy 3 bd., 2V ba. townhome,
completely furnished wlf.p. $135,000.
Magellan St. end: Elegant furnished 3 bd., 2 ba.
half of duplex, great location. $159,000.
Ward St.: WATERFRONT, half of duplex, 3 bd., 2
ba., furnished, f.p., NICE! $140,000.
Cortez St.: 3 bd.. 2 ba. elegantly furnished /2
duplex. Beautiful! $159,000.
GULF AIRE
306 Beacon Rd: Gulf view, unique! Beautiful
large 3 bd., 2 be. home, great kitchen, f.p.,
garage, many extras, good financing. Ready to
-sell, $135,000.
Gulf Aire Lot: gulf view lot, nice, $34,000.
Gulf Aire Dr Beautiful 3 bd., 2 ba. stucco home,
cathedral ceilings, tiled f.p., hearth & foyer, 2
car garage, $125,000.
Gulf AIre Dr.: Good corner single family lot,
$25,000.
Beacon Road: Nice single family lot, good
Neighborhood. Reduced to $25,000.
Beacon Road: Two large single family lots,
$19,500 ea.
309 Buccaneer Road. Beautiful wooded vacant
lot close to pool & tennis courts. $22,500.
219 Gulf Aire Dr.: Nice large lot with gulf view.
Single family or duplex, was $30,000. Reduced
again to $28,500.
Sea Pines & Beacon Rd.: Lovely 3 bd., 2 ba. fur-
nished brick home, Ig. garage. Reduced
,$105,000.
Gulf Aire Dr.: Duplex, 3 bd.. 2 ba. ea. side, excel.
construction, $76,500 per unit.
Gulf AIre Dr.: Duplex, triplex or single family va-
cant lot, $22,900.
CAPE SAN BLAS
Bayside: Secluded, gorgeous view from head of
bay. New 2 bd., 2 ba. cypress home, jacuzzi
many amenities. 1,150' x 100' lot from road to
bay. $145,500.
CAPE SAN BLAS
Cape Dunes New Listings
Unit 3A: Waterfront spacious 4 bd., sitting room,
4 ba., fp, custom interior, wet bar, private Gulf
view from hot tub on deck. $149.900.
Unit 4A: Gulf view from Ig. deck. 3 bd., 3 ba.,
new, nicely furnished, microwave, fp, concrete
pilings, $103,900.
Unit 5: Gulfsidelview, 3 bd., 3 ba., all amenities,
fp, unfurnished, $98,900.
Unit 9: Great buy, view of Gulf. 2 bd., 2 ba., fur-
nished, $87,900. .Unfurn., $82,500.
ST. JOE BEACH
DeSoto St.: Newly remodeled 1 bd., 1 ba. house,
walk-in closets, ceiling fans, shed. V' block to
beach. $55,000.
Alabama Very nice 3 bd. 2 ba. mobile home,
chia, screen porches, fully fenced, landscaped.
$45,000.
Ponce de Leon, Lg. 3 bd., 2 ba. 2 story home,
decks, ceiling fans, screen porch, sep 2 car
garage wlworkshop, greenhouse, exquisite
landscaping on 2 lots. Reduced to $137,450.
Selma St.: Super nice Ig. double wide furnished
3 bd., 2 ba. trailer on 1%' lots, with Ig. utility
house. Immaculate. Reduced to $49,950.
Corner of Amerlcus & Balboa: 3 bd., 2 ba. trailer.
1 block to beach. $38,200.
Corner of Balboa & U.S. 98 Gulf Polnte No. 1:
Beautifully furnished 2 bd., 2% bath condo,
great price, $79,900.
Coronado Townhomes. 2 bdrm.. 1% ba.
dedicated beach. Unobstructed view. All.
amenities, Furnished $84,900: unfurnished,
$74,500.
3 lots Pineda St. 1st block. $55,900.
U.S. 98 between Cortez & Desoto: 3 bd., 2 ba.,
unobstructed Gulf view. Gas, cen. h&a, great
buy, $62,000.
Balboa St.: Speakers, music system in lovely,
comfortable 24'x60' double wide 3 bdrm., 2 ba.
modular home, screened 12x32' front porch,
f.p., clha. Watch the birds feed from glassed
12x22' Fla. rm.. as no paint brush needed!
150'x150', l blocks from beach. Was $65,000,
Reduced to $62,500.
Amerlcus St.: Be as snug as a bug in this home.
2 bd.. 1 ba.. ch&a. 536.000.


Nancy Mock 227-1322
Flo Melton 229-8076
Charline Hargraves 648-8921
John Maddox 648-8899
Opal Everette 648-8409

Margaret Carter 648-5884
Mary Jane Lindsey 229-8560
Brenda Guilford 648-5435
Preston Wingate 648-8565
Sandra Scott 648-5849


Balboa St.: Great investment 2 nice 2 bdrm., 1
ba. houses, clha, on 50'x150' lots $95,000 or
will sell separately.
Between Coronado &Bralboa Streets: 50' lot on
Hwy. 98, $40,000. "',t
Between Coronado & Iboa Streets: Nice 50'
lot on Hwy. 98, $35,000.
PORT ST.iyOE
New Listing: 110 Sunst plrcle: lovely brick
home on corner lot & VA, 31bd., 2 ba., garden,
fruit trees, other extras. Sueer neighborhood.
$115,000.
New Listing, 2004 Juniper Avr,: Comfortable 3
bd., 1 V ba. brick home, 1V lIts, good price,
$63,500. *
New Listing: Marvin Avenue, vacant lot,
75'x175', no back door neighbors. J17,500.
Ward Ridge, 13,BarbaDrO Comfortable 3
bd., 2 ba. brick Sl typ om or 2 lots.
SWIMMING PO W,$84,90(
Monument Avenue 2 .tomne & lots.
Great location & S5'fi, 000. V
1314 larrlson Ave.: 2 bd., 1 ba. Good starter
home, $37,000.
230' on U.S. 98, with commercial bldg. & shfd,
interested? $134,900. '
St. Joseph'Bay Country Club: 3 bd.. 2V/ ba,,
Reduced to $64,400. 2 bd., 1% ba.. $53,400.,
Fireplace, tile baths, other amenities. Peace,
quiet & the golf course. -
Ward Ridge: Beautifut 3 bd., 2 ba. brick home
wlswimming pool, deck, fp, quiet area. $110,000.
White City, Sealey Dr.: 3 bd., 1 ba. frame & brick
home, w/greenhouse, stor. shed, fruit trees, 4.
stall horse barn, chain link fence, set up for ex-
tra home with septic tank, power pole, many
possibilities. Peace & quiet on 6/ acres.
$85,000.
White City on Hwy. 71: 3 bd., 1 ba., acre,
recently redone, fruit trees. Reduced, $36,000.
Cape Plantation: Lovely 3 bd., 2% ba. brick
home under construction. $115,000.
Cape Plantation: 3 bd., 2 ba., very comfortable,
peace & quiet. $100,000.
BEACON HILL
Corner of 3rd St. & 3rd Ave.: 2 lots, sell together
for $18,500. Reduced Terms.
Periwinkle: 3 bd., 2 ba., waterfront, owner finan-
cing available. Good investment, $150,000.
Beacon Hill Bluff: Lg. 4 bd., 2 ba. home, ch&a,
totally furnished, gorgeous decor, screen porch,
deck, landscaped, $149,500.
Then assure your fantastic view Buy the
waterfront t across highway at $65,000.
Lovely waterfront duplex 1 bd., 1 / ba. each
side. Furnished, Super rental. $80,000 ea. side.
3rd Ave.: Nice 14x60' Scot 1984 mobile home, 2
bdrm., 1 ba. custom built masonite siding,
shingle roof, other extras. $35,000.
MEXICO BEACH
Dolphin Run Townhome No. 7, End unit,
BEACHFRONT. 2 bd., 21/ ba., ch&a, d.w.,
Icemaker refrig., Super buy. $75,900.
Vacant Property: 110' waterfront and 62" lot
across highway. Good price. $140,000.
Grand Isle, KIm Kove: Two good building lots,
each 75'x115'. Cleared and high. $10,000 as.
404 5th St.: 2 bd., 2 ba., cen. h&a, mobile home, 2
screen porches, Ig. outside utility house, very
nice, on Ig. lot. $44,500.
35th St.: 2 bd., 1 ba., 56'x14' furnished mobile
home. NICE! $35,000.
Third St.: 2 blocks from beach. Neat & comfor-
table 3 bd., 2 ba., mobile home, screen porch,
fireplace, furnished, stoneware dishes,
silverstone cookware & many more extras.
Reduced to $38,000 from $43,500.
12th St. Business Center commercial lot 2nd
from highway. $35,000.
13th St. Business Center Vacant lot, $28,000.
Grand Isle, Nan Nook: 3 bd., 1 ba., f.p. wleffl-
ciency apt., lots of extras. $87,000.
Louisiana St.: Trailer lot, no utilities, $14,000.
WEWAHITCHKA
On Hwy. 71 just inside city limits. Beautiful 2.11
acres and 3 houses. Variety of fruit bearing
trees. $65,000.
Honeyvllle: Lovely 3 bd., 2 ba. brick home nestl-
ed in oak trees. Pecan tree, peach, azalea &
scuppernong vine on 1.2 acres. $74,900. "
YOUNGSTOWN
Approximately 1'/i acres, good price, $11,500.


Bay St. Joseph Care Center

has an opening for a Maintenance Supervisor (working)
from 8:00 to 4:30 with 30 minute meal break.
Requires experience with heating & air conditioning,
boiler & water systems, washers, dryers, emergency
power generators, refrigeration and other basic
physical plant and equipment items. Ability to climb,
work on roof/ladder, bend, stoop, lift and stand on cons-
tant basis. Ability to work with budget. Understanding
of principles of preventative maintenance.
Excellent salary structure and benefit program. In-
cludes health insurance, life insurance, credit union,
paid time off program.

Resumes or letters of interest/background to or applica-
tions may be picked up from:
Bay St. Joseph Care Center, 220 9th St., Port St. Joe, FL
32456, attn: Administrator, 904/229-8244.
Closing date April 5, 1988. An Equal Opportunity
Employer/M/F/V/H


JERNYL N. HARPER
Licensed Real Estate Broker
411 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1428


CAPE PLANTATION
EXCELLENT LOCATION Executive home on golf course. 2 bath, kitchen totally furnished. Lots of
extras. 8'A%% financing available. $106,000.
OWNER ANXIOUS Very unique new 3 bedroom, 2% bath, two story home featuring cedairsiding.
Master bedroom downstairs wlstudy & deck overlooking beautiful lake & golf course. Ceiling fans,
stone fireplace, wall paper in kitchen & baths. Owner anxious. St05000 Now $99,900.
NEW Lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath, large Florida room w/sliding glass doors. Vaulted ceiling in great
room & dining room. Wall paper in' kitchen & baths. Laundry room has double sink. Enclosed sun
room has hook-up for jacuzzi. This home is located adjacent to the Costin Air Park. Only $98,500.
CAPE SAN BLAS
BREATHTAKING PRICE REDUCED- A pleasure to show this townhome with 2 bedrooms. 2%/ bath.
Sundeck at water's edge, also deck off master bedroom, beautifully decorated wlwall paper accents
& dramatic view of the Gulf of Mexico. $82,500. One unit just off the Gulf only $69.900. Owner anx-
ious. Make offer.
HOME & THE BEACH Secluded single family homes under construction in beautiful Silva
Estates. Enjoy miles of magnificent, uncrowded beach. Prices starting at $106,800.
INDIAN PASS
FABULOUS VIEW FROM EVERY ROOM 3 bedroom, 2 baths, overlooking St. Vincent's Island.'
House on stilts wllarge porch & deck on 3rd floor. $91.500.
PRIVATE BEACHES GOOD FISHING & HUNTING New 3 large bedrooms & 2 baths. Large porch
plus deck. Covered concrete parking. $84,900.
OVERSTREET
CANAL FRONT 21V acres MOL wlapproximately 100' on deep water intracoastal canal for boat
docking. 2 bedroom, 1 bath house needs handyman's touch. Lots of trees. $50,000.
PORT ST. JOE
SUPER LOCATION CONVENIENT TO SCHOOL This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has living room, din-
ing room &. separate den. Features include stove, dishwasher, garbage disposal, ceiling fans.
separate utility room & large fenced-in back yard. Reduced to $55,00.
NEW LISTING 101 McClellan Ave.:Very spacious 2 bedroom home with large studio for the artist
or craftsman. Separate living room, family room, large eat-in kitchen and sun porch. Oversized lot
with loads of azaleas and camellias. Priced right at $57,000.

WEWAHITCHKA
COUNTRY LIVING WITH PRIVACY 3 bedroom. 2-bath double wide mobile home. has added garage
and large front porch. Kitchen has island stove and double wall oven. Central heat and air. Situated
on 3 large lots. MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE. $49,000.
ACREAGE
CAPE PLANTATION Ten acres. Owner will consider selling all or part. $13.000 per acre. Zoned
light commercial.
VACANT PROPERTY
ASSUMABLE 1 Acre waterfront lot at Stonemill Creek Estates. Small equity w/payments only
$105.89 per month.
RED BULL ISLAND -.Five lots zoned residential. Owne rmay sell separately. Mobile homes okay.
$20,000 for all.
GREAT LOCATION Beautiful restricted subdivision at Cape Plantation near golf & fishing. Prices
start at $16,500 w/possible owner financing.
BEAUTIFUL GULF VIEW Lots wlunderground utilities starting at $25,000. Cape San Bias.
ST. JOE BEACH 75'x150' residential area. Mobile homes okay. $7,800.
WOODED LOT Nice neighborhood, 75'x150' on paved street. St. Joe Beach.,$8.350.
SIMMONS BAYOU Approximately 1/ acres, beautiful trees. Bay view. Located east side of
Highway C-30. $16,500.


I


I r ~


C










The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31,1988 Page 7


REAESTAT


CREEK VIEW ESTATES
ACRE CREEKFRONT LOTS
100' x approx. 300' on beautiful Wetap-
po Creek. Shady lots with hardwoods.
Underground utilities. Limited to
single family homes. Low down pay-
ment, easy terms. 229-6031 or 229-6961.
tfc 3/31
For Sale or Rent: Beacon Hill
building lot, Second Ave. between
Fifth & Sixth. Ready for mobile home.
Owner: 30 Mellow Lane, Westbury,
N.Y. 11590,516-333-5252. 2tp 3/31
Energy efficient executive home, 5
bedroom, 4 bath. 28'x28' great room
with fireplace, has all the amenities.
34'x60' screen porch with pool sur-
rounded by Italian tile, located on a
large lot on Mexico Beach. 648-8815.
Retirement home, larger than ap-
pears from outside, 2 bd., 1 ba., ch&a,
1 block from Gulf at St. Joe Beach,
$36,000. Can be purchased with $2,500
down. For more information call
648-5160. tfc 3/31
% acre lots Creekview Estates.
Low down payments easy terms.
Located on Hwy. 386 near Wetappo
Creek. Call 229-6031 or 229-6961.
tfc 3/31
LOTS FOR SALE-On Cemetery
Road, 1 mile off Overstreet Road, 9
mi. south of Wewa. Owner financing.
Phone 229-6961. thru 3/89
1 lot at St. Joe Beach, complete for
trailer hook-up. 1969 Ford van, 1977
Chrysler Newport. 648-8252 or
227-1540. 3tc 3/24
Trailer and lot on St. Joe-Beach,
nice large lot runs from Florida Ave.
to Georgia Ave. Septic tank under
ground, 1985 woodside mobile home, 2
bdrm., 1 bath, porch, stove, refrig.,
asking $29,500. Call 229-6961 day, ask
for Becky, call night 648-8384.
8tp3/24
Reduced price on 3 bdrm. complete-
ly remodeled home, ch&a. Large
deck, see to appreciate. 229-8165.
tfc 3/24
3 BR, completely remodeled home,
Ig. lot, fruit trees, between'St: Joe &
White City. Call 648-8664 week days,
weekends and evenings call 227-7468.
tfc 4/7
3 yr. old, 3 bdrm. 1ouse located on 2
lots in Highland View. Carpet, mini-
blinds and ceiling fans thru-out. Cen-
tral heat & air, central vacuum
system. Privacy fenced back with
matching 12'x20' storage bldg. Seen
by appt. only. Call 229-8806. 8tp 3/3
1983 14'x80' mobile home, 3 bd., 2
ba., 8' ceilings, ceiling fans, mini
blinds, plywood floors. On 2 acres with
10'x20' aluminum shed, located 4 mi.
from beach on the Overstreet hwy.
Call 227-1640 or 648-5483. tfc 3/3


2 Houses: 3 bd., 2 ba. & 2 bd., 1 ha.
on 2 lots. Equity and assume loan.
Asking price $56,000, newly remodel-
ed. Call for information, 229-8904.
tfc 4/7
GULF FRONT
% acre lots with 75 feet fronting Gulf
and white sand beach. All utilities,
owner financing, $55,000. Call
227-1539. 6tc 2/25
GULF VIEW
Beautiful lots behind DNR set back
line. Direct access to Gulf. All
utilities. Restricted subdivision.
Owner financing, $30,000. 227-1539.
6tc 2/25
Three 800 sq. ft. ea., 2 bdrm., 1 ba.
apartments. Good rental income. In
excellent condition, located 606 Wood-
ward. Call for appt. Phone 229-8385 or
227-1689. tfc 2/25
Reduced Price. 2 bdrm., 2 ba. lux-
ury piling home. Located in a C-zone
(non-flood zone), exclusive neighbor-
hood, bay access & gulf access in sub-
division, Peninsula Estates, Cape San
Bias. Also lots for sale, terms avail-
able (in same subdivision). Excellent
investments. Call 227-1689 after 6 D,m.
Warehouse for sale or lease, 30'x75'
plus parking. Call 227-7372 after 8:00
p.m. Location: Williams Avenue, Port
St. Joe. tfc 3/17
Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath home for
sale on Selma St., St. Joe Beach. Call
648-5315. tfc 10/8
For Sale by Owner: 3 bd., 1 ba. wood
frame house w/large fenced yard.
Located in White City, nice corner lot.
For more information call 229-8824.
6tp 2/25
3 bedroom house on large lot,
Charles Ave., White City. Phone after
5:00,229-6825. tfc 3/10
3 BR, 1 bath brick home on 1
lots. Liv. rm., din. rm., den, carpet,
mini blinds & ceiling fans thruout.
New dishwasher & stove. Located at
2004 Juniper Ave., just 2 blocks from
elem. school. Call 229-8372 after 6:00.
tfc 4/7
House for Sale: 606 Maddox St., 3
bdrm., 2 ba. $29,000. Call 229-8375 or
904/456-8195. 4tp3/10
Mexico Beach, 2 bdrm., 1 bath,
luxury townhome. Priced below ap-
praisal at $58,500. Excellent term with
assemble FHA fixed mortgage. 904/
893-8386. tfc 4/7





Wanted to Buy: Small boat motor,
4-7 h.p. Call 648-5033, ask for Bill after
6p.m. tfc 3/24


1981 Chevette runs good, body fair,
standard shift, plus parts car, $400
firm. 229-6933, 510 8th St.
1986 Dodge Diplomat, 4 dr., at, ac,
ps, am/fm stereo/cassette, vinyl roof,
grey w/blue interior; exc. cond. Call
229-6773 after 4 p.m. weekdays, any-
time on weekends. 2tp 3/31
1986 Isuzu I Mark, 4 dr., auto., a.c.,
am/fm stereo, take over payments.
Please contact St. Joe Papermakers
Federal Credit Union at 227-1156.
tfc 3/10
1969 Volkswagen van, runs good,
needs some minor body work, $650.
227-1282 after 5:30. tfc 4/7
1981 VW Rabbit, a/c, am/fm cas-
sette; 1969 1-ton Chevrolet dual wheel
flat bed; 1975 ton lwb Dodge pickup,
6 cyl. Call 648-8766 or 6485239, Hwy.
386, 3 mi. on right, Big Bend sign.
4tp 3/17
cond., $2,495. Call day 648-5716, night
648-8511. 4tc 3/17
1985 Olds Cutlass Ciera, v-6, p.w.,
p.c., tilt wheel cruise. $5,995. 648-8489.
tfc 3/3


I ICLANEU O AL I


20' Wellcraft center console off-
shore boat, 140 h.p, inboard/outboard
drive. Engine practically new, some
electronics. Assumable mortgage at
St. Joe Papermakers Federal Credit
Union. 648-5063. tfc 3/31
Canister vacuum cleaner, good
cond., electric broom, also in good
cond., $20 ea. or $35 for both. 229-8686.
2tc 3/24
30' shrimp boat, "Sandra Jean".
Call 229-8035. 4tp 3/24
1986 Horton trailer, masonite
siding, shingle roof, 3 bd., 2 ba., (1
with garden tub), liv. rm. has stone
fireplace, ceiling fans, stereo system.
Stove & refrig. included. In excel.
cond. Assume mortgage. Call 227-1735
between 9 a.m. & 5 p.m. EST or
639-2946 after 5 D.m. EST. tfc 3/17
Brother: Electric computer type-
writer (compact) w/display window,
like new, $175. See at The Star.
Must sell: 28' Chris Craft cabin
cruiser, needs some cosmetic work.
runs great, older model. $3:150.
648-8155. tfc 4/7


500 gallon butane propane gas tank.
In good shape, $350. Call 229-8817.
tfc 3/17
14'x70' Fleetwood mobile home, 2
bd., 2 bath, ceiling fans, garden tub,
cen. h&a, sun deck, screened in porch,
and many other features. Will sell
with 75'x150' beach lot or separately.
Call 227-7326 w/d 9-5 or 648-8514 after 6
& w/e. 4tc 3/17
To buy or sell Avon, call 227-1281.
tfc 2/11
Looking for a good buy? This is it.
1974 Barrington 3 bdrm., 1% bath
mobile home w/expando. Recently
painted. New porches, ceiling fans,
bricked kitchen. In real good cond.
$6,500. Call 229-8577.after 6 p.m.
tfc 3/3
Body glove wet suit, size small, ex-
cellent condition. $125. Call 229-8978.
For sale: Grocery business and
8COP liquor license. Only serious in-
quiries. Only written inquiries consi-
dered. Write: Dept. K, Box 308, c/o
The Star, Port St. Joe, FL 32456.
tfc 1/7/88


SEA OATS & DUNES GARDEN
CLUB
Bake, Plant, Book and White
Elephant Sale. Saturday, April 2, 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT) at Mexico Beach
Post Office parking lot.
Yard Sale: April 1 & 2, 3 families,
furniture, antiques, collectibles,
freezer, clothes, books & much more.
110 4th St., Apalachicola, 9-5. 653-8103.
Garage Sale: Toys, clothes, baby
clothes, baby (fold up) bed, gas wall
heater, Ig. picture window, bathroom
window and many other items. 108
Hunter Circle, Saturday, April 2, 8:30
to 3:30.
Yard Sale: Saturday, April 2, 8 a.m.
till. Children's clothes, 0-4T, shoes,
adult clothing & misc. 228 7th St., Port
St. Joe. Rain or shine.
Moving Sale Port St. Joe Beach,
April 1st. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Desoto St.
(across from Gulf Shore Trailer
Park). Baby items & furniture,
clothing, newborn to adult, toys, rock-
ing horse, car seat, couch, dryer,
space heater, table, dishes, T.V.,
lamp, plants, much more. Everything
must go, cheap. Bargain hour 2-3 p.m.
If rain, come inside, follow signs. Also
2 prom dreses $35 & $75.


Et SERIE


C.R. SMITH & SON
Backhoe work, dozer work, root
rake, front-end loader, lot clear-
ing, septic tanks,.drain fields, fill
dirt.
Rt. 2, Box AIC, Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6018
tfc 11/12/87



COSTIN INSURANCE AGENCY,
Inc.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899 thru12/87


REMODELING Home or Business
New or Old, Let Me Do It All
17 yrs. exp. Free Estimates
Jim Scoggins, 229-8320
tfc 4/7


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon.-Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
thru 12/87


We Buy, Pawn, Sell or Trade

Guns
Indian'Swamp Campground
Highway C-387 Howard Creek
tfc 1/7/88



Wauneta's Accounting
& Income Tax
Wauneta Brewer St. Joe Beach
648-5043
1987 Paid


CARPENTRY
All Phase Carpentry
Residential, Commercial.
Suspended Ceilings
Wewahitchka 639-5818
tfc 4/7





There will be a stated com-
munication the 1st & 3rd Thurs-
day of each month, 8:00 p.m.
W. T. Pierce, W.M., H. L. Blick,
Sec.













Going Fishing?
Stop here first for a complete
line of
Fishing Tackle
HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue


The American Legion Post 116,
meets the first Monday night of each
month at 8 p.m. tfc 11/26


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS YOUR
TELEPHONE!



r



Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
..Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue




BAY VIEW SEPTIC
TANK SERVICE
WE RENT PORT-O-LETS
PUMP SEPTIC TANKS
DONNIE SMITH
ROUTE 2, BOX A1C
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
229-6018
52tc2/19



(BRIGGS & STRATTON]


Authorized Dealer
Bob's Small Engine
Repair
St. Joe Beach, FL
Lawnmowers Chainsaws
Edgers Weedeaters Outboards
648-5106
tfc 1/7/88


LITTLE COUNTRY
STUDIO
Portraits Weddings,
Good pictures at good
prices!!
227-7469


JA


I think it was something I ale.

Rmd^Bug*

kills bugs for up to
six months.
and saves you about $100 yearly
in costly pest control services.

Hurlbut Supply Co.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
thru 12/87


A-1 ROOFING
Carpentry, Repairs,
Painting, Etc.
Ed Mosley
227-1209
RG0051215 tfc 3/24




Companion Aide Service
New service at Home Health Care.
visits by hour or shifts.
Reasonable rates.
For more information call
229-8238
2te3/31




H&R BLOCK
THE INCOME TAX PEOPLE
123 Desoto St., St. Joe Beach, FL
648-5977, 11-5 Mon. thru Sat.
Appointments available tic v/



MEXICO BEACH, FL

Leasing Mobile
Home Lots

SUN & SAND
Mobile Home Park
(across from Mormon church
on Hwy. 386-A)

648-8201

R. BAKER, Owner
tfc3131/88



ST. JOE
CUSTOM BUILDERS




Commercial Building
Residential Building
Cabinet Work
Gen. Con. RG 0033843
GLEN F. COMBS 227-1689
P. O. BOX 456
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
thru 12/87


Cleaning houses, condos and offices,
Mexico Beach, St. Joe, other areas
considered. Experienced, honest.
References. 648-5675. 2tc 3/24
Need car washed and waxed or yard
raked? Call a dependable, hard
worker, Don Campbell at 229-8142.
2tp 3/24



BROOKS BARBER
STYLE SHOP
309 Monument Avenue
(Highway 98)
tfc 2/25




JOHN F. LAW
LAWYER -1-265-4794
22 Years Experience
Workers Compensation, Occupa-
tional Diseases, Injuries and Ac-
cidents. No charge for first con-
ference.
tfc 4/7



FOR

CLEAN


Carpets

& Upholstery
CALL
CUSTOM
CLEAN
227-1166


THE
COUNTRY
GOOSE
CRAFTS


Now Open
130 Gulf St. St. Joe Beach
10 to 6, Tues. thru Fri.,
Saturday by appointment
Owners: Gayle & John Tatum


SOUTHEASTERN Member of Associated
LANDSCAPING Landscape Contractors
of America
SPECIALIZING IN CUSTOM DESIGN
AND IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 2t3/31

Tripp Barrier P. O. Box 847
227-1626 or 227-1927 mobile phone Port St. Joe, Florida



REEVES FURNITURE &
REFINISHING SHOPPE
REFERENCES FREE ESTIMATES Phone 229-6374
CALL AND TALK TO US ABOUT GETTING YOUR FURNITURE REFINISHED
TO LOOK LIKE NEW.
Across from Duren's Economy Store, Highway 98
thru12/87


Say You Saw It In The Star!!


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
221 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Margaret Hale 648-5659 Roy Smith
Broker-Salesman
Frances Chason 229-8747
Ann Six 229-6392
HOMES
Port St. Joe, New Listing: Large older home on 2 lots, $40,000.
Mexico Beach: 3 bedroom, 1 bath house on nice corner lot, $50,000.
St.-Joe Beach: Large home on 2 lots, 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, fireplace, $65,000.
Port St. Joe: Good investment on this duplex. Owner will finance. $48,500.
Port St. Joe: New Listing: Lovely almost new brick home in good neighborhood. Spacious 2
bedroom 2 bath, Florida room, 2 car garage, satellite dish, fenced yard. Must see to appreciate.
$65,000.
Port St. Joe: 3 bedroom, 1 bath masonry home in perfect condition. Central heat & air, mini
blinds, ceiling fans, many other features. $55,000.
SPort St. Joe: Owner anxious: Eager to sell this nice 3 bedroom, 1' bath home with large kitchen,
garage, nice neighborhood. Must see to appreciate. Many other features. $55,000.
Beacon Hill: Charming 2 bedroom cottage fully furnished including dishwasher, deep freezer,
washer, dryer, gas stove, refrigerator. Has new carport, fenced yard. Asking $45,000.
Mexico Beach: Easy living in this energy efficient cottage close to beach. Has central heat & air,
fan, fireplace, ceramic tile in bath & kitchen, asking $50,000. Owner will listen to offers.
Mexico Beach: Make an offer on this nisl lot 3 bedroom, 2 bath trailer. Has larger
undeveloped lot next to it. Close to beaL. VM C
Oak Grove: Possible owner financing on this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home, screen porch, outside
storage. $37,000 asking price. Make an offer!
St. Joe Beach: 2 bedroom, 1 bath, central heat & air, carpet, new kitchen, deck, gulf view. Only
$49,500.
North Port St. Joe: 3 bedroom, 1 bath, remodeled kitchen, new roof. Now only $12,500.
Oak Grove: Good rental property, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, den, carport. Only $21,500.
St. Joe Beach: 2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home, nice shaded lot, $31,500.
St. Joe Beach: Extra large, 4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Brand new carpet, new kitchen, only 2 blocks
from beach. $42,000.
LOTS
Howard Creek: Owner financing on this lot 100'x218'.
St. Joe Beach: 2 lots on high ground. $13,500 each. Owner will listen to offers.
Ward Ridge: 2 lots 75'x185' each to be sold together. $16,000.
Mexico Beach: Owner wants to sell. 2 lots beachside of Hwy. 98. Can be used commercial, make
an offer.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive, $10,000.
St. Joe Beach: Price reduced on corner lot, $10,500.
St. Joseph Shores: 80' Gulf Front, Hwy. 98 to water.
Port St. Joe: Close to business district 50x170', $8,000.
St. Joe Beach: Large tract 231' on Highway and waterfront.
White City: Canal lot reduced to $28,000.
FOR RENT
Mexico Beach: 3 bedroom, 1 bath partially furnished, $300 per month.


- ~-


-7












Page 8B The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, March 31, 1988


Legend He

It's about that time of year when
the dogwoods burst forth in all their
beauty, their brilliant white adorn-
ments proclaiming the arrival of
spring.
The flowering dogwood is one of
Florida's most remarkable trees: It's
beautiful, it's functional and it is
closely related to the Easter season
and the crucifixion.
The stories and legends about the
dogwood go back many centuries. The
most famous, of course, is the myth
that Christ was crucified on a cross
made of dogwood. The crucifixion and
use of the tree so angered God, so the
story is told, that He reshaped the
tree, bending the trunk and branches
to preclude its use as an instrument of
death.
The legend continues that God,
after reshaping the dogwood, en-
dowed itwith lovely white flowers in
honor of His son.
According to the foresters of the
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services' Division of
Forestry, however, the flowers are
not flowers at all but bracts modified
leaves generally mistaken for the
blossom. The four leaves resemble a
cross and are tipped with a dark spot
of red said to represent the nail holes
left in Christ's hands and feet after the
crucifixion.
The actual flowers of the dogwood
are at the center of the four bracts
that make up the "blossom." Insects,
searching for nectar, are attracted to
the flowers by the shimmering bracts.
Practical use was made of the
dogwood by American Indians who
concocted scarlet dye from the bark
and also used the bark and roots as
'ingredients in a bitter tonic that tribal
doctors employed in treating illnes-.
ses.
When quinine was scarce during
the Civil War, Southerners created a
remedy for colds and fever from the
dogwood tree.
The dogwood is a tree for all



"Cracker"


Legislators


Have to


Battle

"A freshman legislator from
sparsely represented Northwest Flor-
ida learns how to trade and deal or he
can get nothing done for his district",
Representative Robert Trammell told
the Rotary Club Thursday. Trammell
says if you take a look at the make-up
of the Legislature, you will see nine
members from Pensacola west to
Tallahassee and 20 from the City of
Miami alone. "Those are pretty stiff
odds and you have to learn to
maneuver in a hurry if you are going
to get anything done for your people
up in this part of the state", the
Legislator said.

In giving some of his impressions
of the Legislature, Trammell was
most impressed by the variety of
people who made up its membership.
"There are Jews, females, blacks,
hispanics, Republicans and Demo-
crats, all with their own power base",
he pointed out.

"This is a changing state", he
said. "No longer are Democrats in
undisputed control. The Democrats
don't have the party votes to over-ride
a Governor's veto", he said.
Other impressions were in how
the complexion of the state was
changing, the need for compromise
and the problems of the state.
He pointed out that Northwest
Florida still had its share of powerful
political leaders, in spite of dwindling
representative numbers in the Legis-
lature.
.The speaker spent some time
defending the services sales tax as a
necessary tax, filling a real need in
the state of Florida. "The reason it
was defeated was because it was
sprung on the people so suddenly
without telling them of the real need
for the revenue. We'll have to go back
to it or some other source of revenue
in the near future to finance Florida's
tremendous growth needs", he point-
ed out. The speaker pointed out that
even with infusions of other tax
income, Florida is still way behind in
money spent on schools, prisons,
roads, human services, waste dispo-
sal, etc.

"Our state has suffered because
of an influx of people and we will
continue to suffer as long as the
migration continues".
Trammell said that other than the


obvious financial problems it is
causing the state, "Growth isn't
always that good. If we're not careful
this top quality of life in the
Panhandle will be like south Florida.
Our quality of life is second to none."
He pointed out, "You can have the
tremendous problems caused by
masses of people of a Miami. I don't
want it. Some people enjoy the agony
of trying to drive from St. Petersburg
to Chiefland. I don't want it." He said
his time in the Legislature was going
to be spent in trying to salvage as
much of the quality of life enjoyed by
the Panhandle as he possibly can.


is It That Christ Was Crucified On A Cross of Dogwood


seasons: Besides being beautifully
white for a few weeks in the spring, its
green leaves provide shade in the
summer and turn a brilliant red in the
fall, and in the winter its bright red


fruit feeds birds of many species. It
seems to be especially favored by
turkeys and migrating robins.
The dogwood tree is beautiful and
versatile and, like the flowering


magnolia, has become closely asso-
ciated with the South. It is easily
transplanted and blends nicely in
most landscaping plans. With the
usual care and attention given other


?JOE .MoC "
-,y~~~J(~


FOR


THE RESURRECTION


or centuries many of the world's
distinguished philosophers have assaulted
Christianity as being irrational, superstitious,
and absurd. Many have chosen simply to ignore
the central issue of the resurrection. Others
have tried to explain it away through various
theories. But the historical evidence just can't
be discounted.

A student at the University of Uruguay said to me, "Professor McDowell,
why can't you refute Christianity?"
"For a very simple reason," I answered. "I am not able to explain away
an event in history-the resurrection of Jesus Christ."
How can we explain the empty tomb? Can it possibly be accounted for
by any natural cause?
A QUESTION OF HISTORY
After more than 700 hours of studying this subject, I have come to the
conclusion that the resurrection of Jesus Christ is either one of the most
wicked, vicious, heartless hoaxes ever foisted on the minds of human
beings-or it is the most remarkable fact of history.
Here are some of the facts relevant to the resurrection:Jesus of Nazareth,
a Jewish prophet who claimed to be the Christ prophesied in the Jewish
Scriptures, was arrested, was judged a political criminal, and was crucified.
Three days after His death and burial, some women who went to His tomb
found the body gone. In subsequent weeks, His disciples claimed that God
had raised Him from the dead and that He appeared to them various times
before ascending into heaven.
From that foundation, Christianity spread throughout the Roman Em-
pire and has continued to exert great influence down through the centuries.
LIVING WITNESSES
The New Testament accounts of the resurrection were being circulated
within the lifetimes of men and women alive at the time of the resurrec-
tion. Those people could certainly have confirmed or denied the accuracy
of such accounts.
The writers of the four Gospels either had themselves been witnesses
or else were relating the accounts of eyewitnesses of the actual events. In
advocating their case for the gospel, a word that means "good news," the
apostles appealed (even when confronting their most severe opponents)
to common knowledge concerning the facts of the resurrection.
F. F. Bruce, Rylands professor of biblical criticism and exegesis at the
University of Manchester, says concerning the value of the New Testament
records as primary sources: '"Had there been any tendency to depart from
the facts in any:material respect, the possible presence of hostile witnesses
in the audience would have served as a further corrective."
IS THE NEW TESTAMENT RELIABLE?
Because the New Testament provides the primary historical source for
information on the resurrection, many critics during the 19th century at-
tacked the reliability of these biblical documents.
By the end of the 19th century, however, archaeological discoveries
had confirmed the accuracy of the New Testament manuscripts. Discover-
ies of early papyri bridged the gap between the time of Christ and existing
manuscripts from a later date.
Those findings increased scholarly confidence in the reliability of the
Bible. William F. Albright, who in his day was the world's foremost bibli-
cal archaeologist, said: "We can already say emphatically that there is no
longer any solid basis for dating any book of the New Testament after about
A.D. 80, two full generations before the date between 130 and 150 given
by the more radical New Testament critics of today."
Coinciding
with the papyri
discoveries, an
abundance of
other manu-
scripts came to
light (over 24,- )

early New -r
Testament
manuscripts
are known to
be in existence m THE GwARDS FELL ASLEEP (EVEn THOUGH IT IOtLD COST THt THEIR LIVES).
THEN HIS FuOLLOWER REMOVED THE TWO-TON STONE AND STOLE HI S BOY WITHOUT
today). The w\Ain sT 1o GcARoDS
historian Luke
wrote of "authentic evidence" concerning the resurrection. Sir William
Ramsay, who spent 15 years attempting to undermine Luke's credentials
as a historian, and to refute the reliability of the New Testament, finally
concluded: "Luke is a historian of the first rank This author should
be placed along with the very greatest of historians."
BACKGROUND
The New Testament witnesses were fully aware of the background
against which the resurrection took place. The body of Jesus, in accordance
withJewish burial custom, was wrapped in a linen cloth. About 100 pounds
of aromatic spices, mixed together to form a gummy substance, were ap-
plied to the wrappings of cloth about the body.

claim to be an historian. My approach to
Classics is historical. And I tell you that the
evidence for the life, the death, and the
resurrection of Christ is better authenticated
than most of the facts of ancient history ...
E. Ml. Blalklok.,
Pmofmr of 4Claics
AucUlaid tIllfmly

After the body was placed in a solid rock tomb, an extremely large stone
was rolled against the entrance of the tomb. Large stones weighing approx-
imately two tons were normally rolled (by means of levers) against a tomb
entrance.
A Roman guard of strictly disciplined fighting men was stationed to guard
the tomb. This guard affixed on the tomb the Roman seal, which was meant
to prevent any attempt at vandalizing the sepulcher. Anyone trying to move
the stone from the tomb's entrance would have broken the seal and thus
incurred the wrath of Roman law..
But three days later the tomb was empty. The followers of Jesus said
He had risen from the dead. They reported that He appeared to them dur-
ing a period of 40 days, showing Himself to them by many "infallible
proofs." Paul the apostle recounted that Jesus appeared to more than 500
of His followers at one time, the majority of whom were still alive and who
wouldd confirm what Paul wrote.
So many security precautions were taken with the trial, crucifixion, bu-
rial, entombment, sealing, and guarding of Christ's tomb that it becomes
vcry difficult for critics to defend their position that Christ did not rise from
the dead. Consider these facts:
FACT #1: BROKEN ROMAN SEAL
As we have said, the first obvious fact was the breaking .of the seal that
stood for the power and authority of the Roman Empire. The consequences
of breaking the seal were extremely severe. The FBI and CIA of the Roman
Empire were called into action to find the man or men who were responsi-
ble. If they were apprehended, it meant automatic execution by crucifix-
ion upside down. People feared the breaking of the seal. Jesus' disciples
displayed signs of cowardice when they hid themselves. Peter, one of these
disciples, went out and denied Christ three times.


FACT #2: EMPTY TOMB
As we have already discussed, another obvious fact after the resurrec-
tion was the empty tomb. The disciples of Christ did not go off to Athens
or Rome to preach that Christ was raised from the dead. Rather, they went
right back to the city ofJerusalem, where, if what they were teaching was
false, the falsity would be evident. The empty tomb was "too notorious
to be denied." Paul Althaus states that the resurrection "could have not
been maintained in Jerusalem for a single day, for a single hour, if the emp-
tiness of the tomb had not been established as a fact for all concerned."
Both Jewish and Roman sources and traditions admit an empty tomb.
Those resources range fromJosephus to a compilation of fifth-century Jewish
writings called the "Toledoth Jeshu." Dr. Paul Maier calls this "positive
evidence from a hostile source, which is the strongest kind of historical
evidence. In essence, this means that if a source admits a fact decidedly
not in its favor, then that fact'is genuine."
Gamaliel, who was a member of the Jewish high court, the Sanhedrin,
put forth the suggestion that the rise of the Christian movement was God's
doing; he could not have done that if the tomb were still occupied, or if
the Sanhedrin knew the whereabouts of Christ's body.
Paul Maier observes that ". .. if all the evidence is weighed carefully
and fairly, it is indeed justifiable, according to the canons of historical
research, to conclude that the sepulcher ofJoseph of Arimathea, in which
Jesus was buried, was actually empty on the morning of the first Easter.
And no shred of evidence has yet been discovered in literary sources, epig-
raphy, or archaeology that would disprove this statement."

FACT #3: LARGE STONE MOVED
On that Sunday morning the first thing that impressed the people who
approached the tomb was the unusual position of the one and a half to two-
ton stone that had been lodged in front of the doorway. All the Gospel
writers mention it..
Those who observed the stone after the resurrection describe its posi-
tion as having been rolled up a slope away not just from the entrance of
the tomb, but from the entire massive sepulcher. It was in such a position
that it looked as if it had been picked up and carried away. Now, I ask you,
if the disciples had wanted to come in, tiptoe around the sleeping guards,
and then roll the stone over and steal Jesus' body, how could they have
done that without the guards' awareness?

rrhere exists no document from the ancient
J world, witnessed by so excellent a set of
textual and historical testimonies ...
Skepticism regarding the historical credentials
of Christianity is based upon an irrational bias.
Clark Pinnock,
McMaster UnTvirlty


FACT #4: ROMAN GUARD GOES AWOL
The Roman guards fled. They left their place of responsibility. How can
their attrition be explained, when Roman military discipline was so excep-
tional?
Justin, in Digest #49, mentions all the offenses that required the death'
penalty. The fear of their superiors' wrath and the possibility of death meant
that they paid close attention to the most minute details of their jobs. One
way a guard was put to death was by being stripped of his clothes and then
burned alive in a fire started with his garments. If it was not apparent which
soldier had failed in his duty, then lots were drawn to see which one would
be punished with death for the guard unit's failure. Certainly the entire unit
would not have fallen asleep with that kind of threat over their heads. Dr.
George Currie, a student of Roman military discipline, wrote that fear of
punishment "produced flawless attention to duty, especially in the night
watches."
FACT #5: GRAVECLOTHES TELL A TALE
In a literal sense, against all statements to the contrary, the tomb was
not totally empty-because of an amazing phenomenon. John, a disciple
of Jesus, looked over to the place where the body of Jesus had lain, and
there were the grave clothes, in the form of the body, slightly caved in and
empty-like the empty chrysalis of a caterpillar's cocoon. That's enough
to make a believer out of anybody. John never did get over it.
The first thing that stuck in the minds of the disciples was not the emp-
ty tomb, but rather the empty grave clothes-undisturbed in form and po-
sition.
FACT #6: JESUS' APPEARANCES CONFIRMED
Christ appeared alive on several occasions after the cataclysmic events
of that first Easter.
When studying an event in history, it is important to know whether
enough people who were participants or eyewitnesses to the event were
alive when the facts about the event were published. To know this is obvi-
ously helpful in ascertaining the accuracy of the published report. If the
number of eyewitnesses is substantial, the event can be regarded as fairly
well established. For instance, if we all witness a murder, and a later police
report turts out to be a fabrication of lies, we as eyewitnesses can refute it.
OVER 500 WITNESSES
Several very important factors are often overlooked when considering
Christ's post-resurrection appearances to individuals. The first is the large
number of witnesses of Christ after that resurrection morning.
One of. the earliest records of Christ's appearing after the resurrection
is by Paul,` The apostle appealed to his audience's knowledge of the fact
that Christ had been seen by more than 500 people at one time. Paul remind-
ed them that the majority of those people were still alive and could be ques-
tioned. Dr. Edwin M. Yamauchi, associate professor of history at Miami
University in Oxford, Ohio, emphasizes: "What gives a special authority
to the list'(of witnesses) as historical evidence is the reference to most of
the five hundred brethren being still alive. St. Paul says in effect, 'If you
do not believe me, you can ask them.' Such a statement in an admittedly
genuine letter written within thirty years of the event is almost as strong
evidence as one could hope to get for something that happened nearly two
thousand, years ago."
Let's take the more than 500 witnesses who saw Jesus alive after His
death andburial; and place them in a courtroom. Do you realize that if each
of those 500 people were to testify for only six minutes, including cross-
examination, you would have an amazing 50 hours of firsthand testimo-
ny? Add to this the testimony of many other eyewitnesses and you would
well have the largest and most lopsided trial in history.
HOSTILE WITNESSES
Another factor crucial to interpreting Christ's appearances is that He
also appeared to those who were hostile or unconvinced.
Over arid over again, I have read or heard people comment that Jesus
was seen alive after His death and burial only by His friends and followers.
Using that argument, they attempt to water down the over-
whelming impact of the multiple eyewitness accounts. But that JESUS
line of reasoning is so pathetic it hardly deserves comment. No Is
author or informed individual would regard Saul of Tarsus as MEN1
being a follower of Christ. The facts show the exact opposite.
Saul despised Christ and persecuted Christ's followers. It was
a life-shattering experience when Christ appeared to him.
Although he was at the time not a disciple, he later became the
apostle Paul, one of the greatest witnesses for the truth of the
resurrection.
The argument that Christ's appearances were only to fol-
lowers is an argument for the most part from silence, and ar-
guments from silence can be dangerous. It is equally possible
that all to whom Jesus appeared became followers. No one ac-
quainted with the facts can accurately.say that Jesus appeared
to just "an insignificant few."


transplanted plants, the dogwood is a
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For information on the trans-
planting and care of dogwood trees,


call or visit your local Division of
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will be glad to answer any questions
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- I II I I


Christians believe that Jesus was bodily resurrected in time and space
by the supernatural power of God. The difficulties of belief may be great,
but the problems inherent in unbelief present even greater difficulties.
The theories advanced to explain the resurrection by "natural causes"
are weak; they actually help to build confidence in the truth of the resur-
rection.
THE WRONG TOMB?
A theory propounded by Kirsopp Lake assumes that the women who
reported that the body was missing had mistakenly gone to the wrong tomb.
If so, then the disciples who went to check up on the women's statement
must have also gone to the wrong tbmb. We may be certain, however, that
Jewish authorities, who asked for a Romah guard to be stationed at the tomb
to prevent Jesus' body from being stolen, would not have been mistaken
about the location. Nor would the Roman guards, for they were there!
If the resurrection-claim was merely because of a geographical mistake,
the Jewish authorities would have lost no time in producing the body from
the proper tomb, thus effectively quenching for all time any rumor resur-
rection.
HALLUCINATIONS?
Another attempted explanation claims that the appearances of Jesus af-
ter the resurrection were either illusions or hallucinations. Unsupported
by the psychological principles governing the appearances of hallucinations,'
this theory also does not coincide with the historical situation. Again, Where
was the actual body, and why wasn't it produced?
DID JESUS SWOON?
Another theory,
popularized by Venturi-
ni several centuries ago,
is often quoted today.
This is the swoon the-
ory, which says that Je-
sus didn't die; he merely
fainted from exhaustion
and loss of bloodI.
Everyone thought Him
dead, but later He resus- ,
citated and the disciples
thought it to be a resur-
rection.
Skeptic David Fried-
rich Strauss-certainly toE JTESUS CoN'T DIE. MAYE HE JUST PASSED OUT ON
no believer in the resur- -T T-TON STONE. OE THE l R'AN SOLDIERS,
rection-gave the death- e A EscAPE at
blow to any thought
that Jesus revived from a swoon: "It is impossible that a being who had
stolen half-dead out of the sepulchre, who crept about weak and ill, want-
ing medical treatment, who required bandaging, strengthening and indul-
gence, and who still at last yielded to His sufferings, could have given to
the disciples the impression that He was a Conqueror over death and the
grave, the Prince of Life, an impression which lay at the bottom of their
future ministry. Such a resuscitation could only have weakened the impres-
sion which He had made upon them ih life and in death, at the most could
only have given it an elegiac voice, but could by no possibility have changed
their sorrow into enthusiasm, have elevated their reverence into worship."
THE BODY STOLEN?
Then consider the theory that the body was stolen by the disciples while
the guards slept. The depression and cowardice of the disciples provide
a hardhitting argument against their suddenly becoming so brave and dar-
ing as to face a detachment of soldiers at the tomb and steal the body. They
were in no mood to attempt anything like that.
The theory that the Jewish or Roman authorities moved Christ's body
is no more reasonable an explanation for the empty tomb than theft by the
disciples. If the authorities had the body in their possession or knew where
it was, why, when the disciples were preaching the resurrection in Jerusa-
lem, didn't they explain: "Wait! We moved the body, see, He didn't rise
from the grave"?
And if such a rebuttal failed, why didn't they explain exactly where Je-
sus' body lay? If this failed, why didn't they recover the corpse, put it on
a cart, and wheel it through the center ofJerusalem? Such an action would
have destroyed Christianity-not in the cradle, but in the womb!
THE RESURRECTION IS A FACT
Professor Thomas Arnold, for 14 years a headmaster of Rugby, author
of the famous, History of Rome, and appointed to the hair of modern his-
tory at Oxford, was well acquainted with the value of evidence in deter-
mining historical facts. This great scholar said: "I have been used for many
years to study the histories of other times, and to examine and weigh the
evidence of those who have written about them, and I know of no one
fact in the history of mankind which is proved by better and fuller evidence
of every sort, to the understanding of a fair inquirer, than the great sign
which God hath given us that Christ died and rose again from the dead."
Brooke Foss Westcott, an English scholar, said: "Taking all the evidence
together, it is riot too much to say that there is no historic incident better
or more variously supported than the resurrection of Christ. Nothing but
the antecedent assumption that it must be false could have suggested the
idea of deficiency in the proof of it."
REAL PROOF: THE DISCIPLES' LIVES
But the most telling testimony of all must be the lives of those early
Christians. We must ask ourselves: What caused them to go everywhere
telling the message of the risen Christ?

f the New Testament were a collection of
secular writings, their authenticity would
generally be regarded as beyond all doubt.
F. F. Bruce


Had there been any visible benefits accrued to them from their efforts-
prest'ge, wealth, increased social status or material benefits-we might log-
ically attempt to account for their actions, for their wholehearted and to-
tal allegiance to this "risen Christ."
As a reward for their efforts, however, those early Christians were beat-
en, stoned to death, thrown to the lions, tortured and crucified. Every con-
ceivable method was used to stop them from talking.
Yet, they laid down their lives as the ultimate proof of their complete
confidence in the truth of their message.
WHERE DO YOU STAND?
How do you evaluate this overwhelming historical evidence? What is
your decision about the fact of Christ's empty tomb? What do you think
of Christ?
When I was confronted with the overwhelming evidence for Christ's
resurrection, I had to ask the logical question: "What difference does all
this evidence make to me? What difference does it make whether or not
I believe Christ rose again and died on the cross for my sins?" The answer
is put best by something Jesus said to a man who ddubted-Thomas. Jesus
told him: "I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the
Father but through Me" (John 14:6).
On the basis of all the evidence for Christ's resurrection, and consider-
ing the fact that Jesus offers forgiveness of sin and an eternal relationship
with God, who would be so foolhardy as to reject Him? Christ is alive! He
is living today.
You can trust God right now by faith through prayer. Prayer is talking
with God. God knows your heart and is not so concerned with your words
as He is with the attitude of your heart. If you have never trusted Christ,
you can do so right now.
The prayer I prayed is: "Lord Jesus, I need You. Thank You for dying
on the cross for my sins. I open the door of my life and trust You as my
Savior. Thank You for forgiving my sins and giving me eternal life. Make
me the kind of person You want me to be. Thank You that I can trust You."
AN OFFER TO YOU
Would you like more Information about the resurrnectiof of je. Christ. the reliability of the Scriptur.,
or on building lasting, meaningful relationship? You c ge a complete calo aturin boot. crassete rpes
films and videos by Josh McDowell by writing:
The Josh McDown ll Ministry. Resource Coner. Box 1000. Dallas. TX 75221. or, by calling toll-free
1-800.222.JOSH