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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02682
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 23, 1987
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02682

Full Text














USPS 518-880


Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches in Florida


FORTY-NINTH YEAR, NUMBER 34


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 1987


Ward Ridge Question Still On Ballot


Incumbents Have No Opposition

Port St. Joe's pending municipal election suddenly overwhelmingly in March to ask for acceptance by Port St.
became a moot question Tuesday at 5:00 p.m., when Joe, but it is now up to Port St. Joe to extend an official hand
opposition to the three incumbents up for re-election failed via the ballot before the two cities become one.
to attract any opposition. The Ward Ridge referendum is still scheduled for May


There will be no election to decide candidate winners in
Port St. Joe this year.
According to Supervisor of Elections, who started
handling municipal elections this year, the deadline for
prospective candidates to qualify passed on by Tuesday
evening without a nibble to the bait of two years in office at
low pay.
REFERENDUM STILL ON BALLOT
The lack of necessity to elect candidates to the City
Commission and its resulting erasure of a need for an
election doesn't mean there will be no balloting on Tuesday,
May 12.
There is still the question for Port St. Joe voters to
decide as to whether or not they will accept Ward Ridge into
the confines of the city limits. Ward Ridge voters voted


ALL CANDIDATES RE-ELECTED
All incumbent candidates in the City were re-elected by
the failure of any opposition to appear as a challenge.
Mayor Frank Patewho has served in office for 20 years
will begin a new two year term at the first meeting in June.
Commissioner Billy Fleming, just completing his third
term on the Commission, will begin his fourth. Fleming has
never faced opposition in his two re-election bids.
Edwin Williams, who was appointed the first of the year
to fill the unexpired term of Commissioner Nathan Peters,
who was 'elected to the Gulf County Commission, will
embark on his first full term on the Commission.
All three newly elected Commissioners will start their
new terms at the June 2 meeting of the Board.


FRANK PATE
... Mayor


EDWIN WILLIAMS
... Commissioner


P Agrees t
Port St. Joe's Merchant's Asso-
ciation feels the downtown area needs
.revitalization and a face-lifting and
want the City Commission to aid them
in seeing that the project is under-
taken.
Wayne Taylor, speaking for the
Merchant's Association, told the
Commission Tuesday night the Asso-
ciation was intending to do a complete
overhaul of downtown-starting with
Reid Avenue-by themselves without
-involving the City government or
-anyone else in the project. "After we
'got started in our endeavor, we found
out we. have structural problems,
especially on Reid Avenue, which
must be addressed before we can
attempt any face-lifting of the street.
This structural problem is just more
than we can handle. .orselves,,sor
we are asking the Commission to
come to our aid with the project",
Taylor said. -
The Merchant's officer pointed
out they had progressed to the point of
getting an engineer to make prelimi-
nary drawings of a new design for
Reid Avenue when they learned there
was problems with drainage being
already inadequate, sidewalks need-
ing replacing and the high crown of
the street aggravating the other
problems.
"We were told the street has been
resurfaced in the past so many times
the asphalt now covers up much of the
drainage system on the street and we
have bad problems with water coming
in several buildings when we get
heavy rains", Taylor said. "We have
been advised the street needs to be
removed and replaced, after adequate
drainage is provided and work done
with the sidewalks. This is too large a
project for us to do by ourselves", he
said.
The Commission was unanimous-
ly receptive to the idea, but Mayor
Frank Pate pointed out there would
need to be considerable consideration,
given to how it would be paid for.
"You know, the only source of money
we have is taxes and if you are
agreeable to being taxed for the
project, we have no problem at all".
He went on to point out there may be
serious objections "from the property
owner down on 16th Street, helping to
( pay for rejuvenating Reid Avenue",
Mayor Pate pointed out.
He explained the options were to
place a special tax on merchants in
the downtown area or gain approval of
residents for the City to involve itself
on the expense side of the project.
Taylor explained the merchants
had already put money into the
project, hiring engineers to come up


Discuss Details for Revitalizing Downtown Area


with concepts of what could be done
with the area and to present ideas in
the form of drawings of suggestions
for beautifying the street. "We have
displayed these drawings and have
received very positive reactions from
everyone", Taylor said.
Commissioner James B. Roberts
suggested the City Commission meet
with downtown merchants to discuss
the methods of financing the project
and "see how committed they are to fix
up the street. If they are interested in


the project, we should help and they
should pledge to fix up their buildings
if the street is dressed up", Roberts
said.
As a result of Roberts suggestion,
the Commission will meet in a special
session with merchants Tuesday of
next week, at 8:00 p.m., in the Fire
Station to talk about possibilities for
financing the project.
APPROVE CHANGE ORDERS
The Commission approved a


change order, agreeing to a proposal
by Altair Maintenance Service to
perform repairs not listed in their
contract for rehabilitating several of
the older sewer mains insidethe City.
Altair said they have found a
particularly bad situation on Long
Avenue in. the vicinity of Ninth Street
where extensive work is needed on the
mains, but is not included in their
contract. The firm also recommended
inmnediate repairs to four manholes
I (Continued on Page 3)


Reid Avenue, in Port St. Joe, is considered "Main in revitalizing the street as a first step toward refur-
Street" and is getting into a pretty dilapidated condition fishing all of the downtown area of Port St. Joe.
according to the Merchants' Association. They want help -Star photo


Dead Lakes Dam In Hands of DE


It will still be at least six months
before a ruling is finally handed down
by the courts affecting the future of
the Dead Lakes dam.
Official hearings, conducted by
the Department of Environmental
Regulations, held in Panama City and
Blountstown last week, fulfilled an
obligation by DER to hold a public
hearing on whether or not it should
issue a permit for removal of the
controversial dam, or deny it.
The DER, along with the North-
west Florida Water Management
District, issued permits for removal
of the dam last year, but objections by


supporters of the dam, claiming the
lack of a public hearing on the matter,
caused DER to rescind its decision to
give the permit until it had held the
hearing. That was the hearing, held
last week, in which both opponents
and proponents for the dam had their
official say as to why the dam should
or should not be removed.
The hearing didn't plow any new
ground in the three year old contro-
versy, with those opposing removal of
the dam being mostly property
owners along the shores of the lake
and those advocating the dam's
demise, saying it is ruining the Dead


Lakes and causing damage to the
lakes fisheries, disturbing the ecology
of the -area in the process.
VOTED TO REMOVE
It was just a little more than three
years ago, when voters of both
Calhoun and Gulf Counties voted
overwhelmingly to have the dam
taken out, so the lakes would return to
their normal state of surging and
receding water lines, which have been
described as serving as a flushing
action to keep the Lakes active.
Opponents of the dam also claim the
impoundment structure also disturbs
the natural migration of spawning


Police, Sheriff Say


Keep Your ATV


Off Road RW's


It's spring time and more and
more, Johnnie and Suzie are going
to pester mom and dad about riding
their three-wheeler, their go-cart,
or their four-wheeler.
The small toy-like vehicles are
everywhere to be seen these days
and are becoming more and more
popular with kids of all ages-in-
cluding grown kids.
The increased use of the three-
wheelers, four-wheelers and go-
carts, especially on the little-travel-
led roads, the beaches and shoul-
ders of roads is fast becoming a
nuisance and an enforcement pro-
blem say Sheriff Al Harrison and
Police Chief Bob Maige.
The two say the increased use of
the recreation,,vehicles.is causing
them a problem because it is
against state law for the ATV's (All
Terrain Vehicles) to be used in the
manner most are being used.
STRICTLY ILLEGAL
"Most of the ATV's we see
being used are in strict violation
of state law", Sheriff Al Harrison
said last week. "We have all
gotten together here in Gulf
County and decided we're going
to have to enforce the state law on
the machines because they are
becoming so plentiful and be-
cause it is the state law."
Very few of the cycles in
operation comply with state laws
and requirements", Harrison
said.
ITo explain his statement, Har-
rison said state law requires an
operator of the vehicles to be at
least 15 years of age and have a
driver's permit, if the vehicle he is


R Hearing
fish, resulting in drastically reduced
fish life in and around the lakes.
The need for a flushing action of
waters in and out of the lakes and a
diminishing sport fish population
were the main arguments of those
who favor removing the dam.
Those who want the dam left
intact say removal will severely erode
the value of their waterfront proper-
ties and deny them access to the laies
for much of the year.
Alvin Peters, attorney for the
landowners suggested, "The best
alternative is to have a manageable
drawdown capacity".


operating travels on a road right of
way. "That road right of way is
from the side of the ditch farthest
from the road to the side of the ditch
on the other side, the farthest from
the road. Even riding on the road
shoulder is illegal. About the only
place a person younger than 15 can
legally ride one of these vehicles is
on private property", the Sheriff
said.
In the case 'of adults, their
machines must comply to state
Department of Transportation regu-
lations for vehicles which travel on
a state highway, in order to legally
ride them on the, road. "The
vehicles must have lights which
comply with statee Jaw, brakess, a
license tag, and other requirements.
of the state code before even a
licensed driver can operate them on
the road", according to the Sheriff.
"A favorite place for these
motor vehicles is at the beaches
where people take their kids and the
cycles to let them ride. We can't
tolerate that any longer. They're
getting too plentiful and there are
those who are abusing the privilege
of riding their machines on the
beach".
CRACKING DOWN
Sheriff Harrison said that as
the summer progresses, those
riding the small vehicles can be
expecting to be hauled in if they
are' operating the machines it.
legally. That is, if an operator
under 15 gets on a road right-of-
way or a licensed driver is
operating a machine which does
meet state code for equipment, he
(Continued on Page 3)


Officer
A drawdown structure was instal-
led adjacent to the dam in the 1960's,
but has proven to be ineffective for
this purpose.
Nearly every government agency
who has anything at all to say about
such matters, advocate removal of
the dam, which was built back in the
middle '50's and has been a source of
controversy of one sort or another,
ever since.
Endorsing removal of the dam
are the U.S. Army Corps of Engine-
ers, the Northwest Florida Water
Management District, the state De-
(Continued on Page 5)


What's This? A Paper Mill Without A Unique Paper Mill Odor?


A paper mill and its distinctive odor have, over the years, been considered
almost inseparable and just part of living in a paper mill town. Sort of like
eggs with bacon, the smell was just part of the package. To visitors, the smell
might seem to be a bit strong, but to those who live in a paper mill town, it's
indicative there will be bacon and eggs on the table as long as the smell is
wafting on the gentle breezes.
The smelly situation is due to change.
All paper mills in the state of Florida must begin immediately to take
steps to eliminate the old familiar odors of the mills, according to Tom Moody,
an executive with the Department of Environmental Regulation this past
week. Moody, speaking from his Pensacola office, said laws passed just
recently in Florida, would require the installation of control devices to
suppress and control the various forms of sulphur emissions which are
responsible for the odors. Moody said the legislation was spurred into being by
the people of Jacksonville, who have been complaining for several years of the
odors emitted by the two paper mills in their vicinity.
Of course, St. Joe Paper Company must also make the applications of the
control devices to their St. Joe Forest Products mill here in Port St. Joe,
according to Moody. He pointed out the control devices will be in the form of


recovery boilers, lime kilns, digesters, evaporators and smelt tanks. All this
will cost an estimated $36,500,000, according to DER figures in a legal
advertisement printed in last week's issue of The Star by DER. Moody said his
state agency figures it will cost approximately that amount for all paper mills
in the state to comply with the new order.
HAVE A 1992 DEADLINE
Moody said the entire project must be completed by May, 1992. "The
same schedule has been applied to all paper mills, so one won't have an
advantage over the other in the manufacturing process", he pointed out.
"We're requiring the work to be done in stages so as not to make the
schedule unreasonable", Moody stated.
The first portion of the project is scheduled to be completed by May
1989, when work with digesters, evaporators and smelt tanks is to be
finished and in operation. The second phase, lime kiln work, should be on
line in November of 1989 and the remainder-recovery boilers-should be in
place by 1992, the deadline for the entire project.
Since the new emission requirements were approved in April of 1985,
paper mills and DER officials have been busy surveying various mills about


the state to pinpoint sources of odor and come up with a plan for controls.
Moody said there are no pollution factors involved in the new rules and
regulations except for the pollution of odor. St. Joe Forest Products has been
dealing partially with the odor problem for a number of years and has one of
the least offensive emissions from a smell standpoint, of any paper mill along
the Northwest Florida coast.
PROJECT NOW BEING PLANNED
Robert Nedley, St. Joe Vice-President, told The Star this week their firm
is presently involved in the planning and engineering for the gigantic
undertaking. "We expect to have our plans ready to begin receiving bids about
the middle of the year and probably start actual construction work sometime
in the fall of the current year", he said.
Nedley said the mill will probably spend "at least the $36 million
estimate and may spend more if we find a recovery of some of the investment
may be realized along the way".
St. Joe just completed a huge improvement program about a year ago,
which involved changes in their power department, modernization of sections
of the paper making process and some pollution controls.


BILL FLEMING
... Commissioner


Board Endorses Downtown Project

















When one goes to messing
with money in the public
realm, chances are he's going
to stir up some conversation,
some objections or some
sounds of wounds being in-
flicted somewhere.
You can really get some
interest generated if you start
messing with "my" money, so
to speak.
That's exactly what the
state Legislature is doing with
their revolution in the state
sales tax law. Although the
dirty deed has probably been
done by the time you read this,
we're still not going to miss
the opportunity to express our
dismay over the high-handed
actions of the Legislature in
removing sales tax exemp-
tions, thus increasing Flor-
ida's tax take from its citizens
by nearly a full billion dollars
in one year. Such an increase
is virtually unheard of in our
state and is causing the rising
rumblings of a revolt of our
citizens because they are
beginning to realize the re-
moval of the exemptions is
going to cost every citizen in
the state who spends money of
any denomination.
We understand it takes
money to generate taxes and it
takes taxes to generate gov-


ernment services. But, prior
to the election, we heard
words of wisdom from our
present and would-be leaders
that Florida could reduce its
spending by some $800 million.
In the meantime, we had a
lottery voted in which is
supposed to produce an addi-
tional $300 million in taxes
each year. On top of that, we
have an expected extra $500
million in taxes due to come to
the state from simply a
growth in business and popu-
lation.
Since we're adding $900
million new taxes, $300 million
from the lottery and $500
million from new growth, that
all adds up to $1.7 BILLION in
new dollars coming in to the
State purse next year.
The legislature's actions
remind us of the old drill
sergeant who was continually
ordering "about face".
The irony of the whole
story is that only attorney's
fees, above a certain limit,
have made it back to the
exemption stage after being
threatened with taxation, as of
this writing. Could that be
because the vast majority of
our law makers are attor-
neys?
Nah! It couldn't be!


Comments


$1.70 Billion In New Taxes



About Face!!.


Leon was born October 19, 1942. I
didn't "first see the light of day" until
January of 1947. Most certainly I
would have been born a few years
earlier, say 1944 or '45, if Dad had'a
been home. It seems that he was on an
all expenses paid, extended vacation
in the South Pacific for four years or
so. You know, you hear a lot of talk
these days about the baby boomers
turning forty. Well, I'm living proof
that there's some merit to those
rumors. My younger brother David
came along in September of 1948. -
I reckin' it was around 1950 or so
before I began to realize that I had
brothers. As a matter of fact the very
first thing that I can remember in this
world was a big dog biting David right
in the face. They penned the dog up
and I would stand at the fence and
pray that the dog wouldn't start-
foaming at the mouth. I didn't know
what "foaming at the mouth" meant
but I understood that it wouldn't be
good for David. Well, the dog didn't
foam and everyone was. happy for


THE STAR


PAGE TWO


ry

A


Ll


4b
- k


Leon, Me and Dave


Dave, including me, that he was toing
to be O.K. Of course,'he still carries
the scar on his face to this day.
* Leon was quite a bit bigger than
me so mostly I remember him beating
on me. He'd make me so mad that I'd
turn around and beat on David. I also
remember Leon telling me about Stan
Musial and the St. Louis Cardinals,
and playing pitch with me in the back
yard and hitting me ground ball after
ground ball. It was the first time I
ever heard, "Eye on the ball, glove
out front, bend at the knees". He let
me play in their pick-up games. I
played right field and batted last but
hey listen, I was in the game.
Now, you won't be reading this
until after Easter but even as I write
today, Cathy is packing our bags for
an Easter trip back to the farm. I'm
going to see my Mother. And my
brothers. Leon, David, and I are
getting together for the annual family
golf tournament. You know, you can't


believe how I love those guys. What
wonderful memories of growing up,
and now, keeping up. They both came
to see me as I turned forty this past
winter they kidded me about being
old, we talked of how the years had
rolled by, mostly they shared in the
moment with me, and we all made
another memory. You know, I've
never told them how much they
mean to me, how much I've enjoyed
having them as brothers over the
years how much I love them. But
listen, I don't think grown men say
things like that.
When I was a senior in high school
Leon was working in Pocahontas,
Arkansas. Every Friday during foot-
ball season that year, he'd leave work
a little early, get his family loaded in
that old Ford and near about fly to
make it to the ball game by kick off.
Listen, it was a long way to
Pocahontas. I wouldn't drive that far
to see anybody play football. Shucks,


THURSDAY, APRIL 23,1987


r
Hunker Down with Kes




Pals


by Kesley Colbert


It's No Bargain


We want. to commend
County Commissioner Doug
Birmingham and laud his
stand last week. Commission-
er Birmingham was the only
Commissioner of the Board
who vocally supported Gulf
County on a certain subject at
the County Commission meet-
ing last week.
For a few weeks, now, the
Commission has been wrest-
ling with the idea that' they.
could send all excess county
money to a stock broker in
Tallahassee, and have the
money invested in govern-
ment bonds which are suppos-
ed to earn the county more
money than they can earn on
the same investment in Gulf
County banks.
Commissioner Birming-
ham was the only Commis-
sioner to point out that this
was Gulf County money and
should stay here in Gulf
County where our citizens
could get the benefit of using
it. Birmingham made a telling
point in his argument when he
revealed Gulf County would
have earned only an addition-
al $39.00 in the last interest


period, had its 'surplus money
been deposited with the Talla-
hassee broker rather than
with local banks. And, we're
talking about more than $1
million in surplus funds in-
vested earning an
additional $39.00.
We agree with Birming-
ham that county money-es-
pecially money paid in as
taxes by Gulf County cati-
zens-should be milked for
every ounce of improvement it
can generate for our county.
We do not approve of shipping
it off for someone else to use
and utilize.
Every purchase of goods
made by county tax money
should be spent here in Gulf
County where it is at all
possible. Every extra penny
invested should be invested
here in Gulf County when it is
competitive-and $39 interest
on $1 million or more doesn't
sound very beneficial for our
people to us.
We say it's our money
and we need to keep it where
we can speak with it once in a
while.


Some Improvements Are On the Way But They Have Taken Us A While


FOR NEARLY A year, now,
we've been working on getting a
different newspaper press into opera-
tion here at The Star. Along about the
middle of March of last year, we
bought a newspaper press which had
survived a fire and looked like it was
in pretty sad shape. Although, when
we got started with re-building the
press, it wasn't in all that bad shape
after all.
When we got what was left of what
was one of the best newspaper presses
"running today, it had its rollers
burned off, blankets were melted to
the print cylinders, ink and grease
which had been on the press had
burned, leaving the units a dirty mess,
mostly.
I might as well tell you, I looked at
that piece of decimated press in a
warehouse up in Atlanta, and I
thought, "Boy, howdy, there's going
to be a lot of work for someone to do to
get this thing running again". The
firm which owned the press is in the
re-building and marketing business,
and he wanted to sell the press as it
stood rather than put his staff of
machinists and his huge machine shop


of sophisticated printing machinery
re-building equipment to work on
re-building the press and selling it as a
running piece of equipment.
+++ ++


ETA


give results which can't be beat.
The presses are just like diesel
engines; you don't wear them out.
You just put in new bearings,
overhaul the remainder and run some


running in six months".
Those were famous last words.
Here it is a year later and we have two
units and a folder unit ready to roll. As
a matter of fact, all or part of this


iOIN SHRDLU
IBy: Wesley R. Ramsey


THIS PARTICULAR press was a
make which is most in use throughout
the world today. In the United States,
there are probably four of these
presses running for one of every other
make made. The make press we are
presently running is probably the
second most popular in the U.S., but
even it is far behind the unit we're
re-building in popularity.
They're popular because they are
quality, fine printing presses which


more.
That was our strategy with tis
press. We were going to replace a11
bearings (of which there are many),
replace all rollers, test all cylinders
and shafts for tolerance, overhaul the
rest and get it back in operation.,
+ + + ++ +
WILLIE LOOKED AT those re-
mains of what was once comparable
to the Queen Mary in ocean vessels,
and said, "I think we can get it


week's paper may be printed on the
different press. It all depends on how
fast final adjustments go. It may be
next week before it is put into service.
The point is, here a year has
passed and there are still two units to
go to get the entire machine into
production. Those other two units
have about two thirds of the work done
on them, so by another three or four
months, the whole four unit machine
should be in production.


Willie, John Ford, one of our back
shop operators and Arden and Billy
Stephens over at St. Joe Machine have
had themselves an adventure taking
the press apart, checking every piece,
replacing parts, machining new bush-
ings arid shafts and putting the thing
back together again.
They congregate around here
about two or three evenings a week to
look at, admire their handiwork and
generally pet the press back into
production.
Even though it took a year to get
half the press into production, they
have done a magnificent job on a
machine which ordinarily takes ex-
perts to get accomplished.
If they didn't know the answer to a
problem~, they got on the phone and
did some calling, or they read a stack
of blueprints or maintenance books
until they figured it out.
ALL OF THIS venture started
because we were beginning to need an
additional unit for our old two-unit
News King, which has served us well
for the past 14 years. While looking for
the additional unit, we came across


this four unit Goss Community, which
is, like I said, the ultimate in
American printing presses.
The press, when fully stretched
out, will double our press capabilities
here at The Star. There are a lot of
small dailies printing every day on a
press just like ours. We don't need the
whole thing right now, but we
shouldn't need more press capacity
for quite some time to come.
Needless to say, The Star isn't
affluent enough to go out on the
market and purchase a four-unit Goss
Community. Not only could we not
raise the money, we couldn't even
justify its purchase. But, if the good
luck holds, the creek don't rise and
everything falls in place as it should,
come about September, we should
have all four units on line and
operating and be one of the smallest
papers in the nation with a Goss
Community to call its own.
PART OF THE REBUILDING
was painting the press. I think it's safe
to say we will have the only Goss
Community press in the nation which
is robin's egg blue.


St. Joseph's Bay
Time
April 23 4:43 a.m. L
April 24 4:44a.m. L
3:19 p.m. L
April 25 3:22 a.m. L


April 26
April 27
April 28
April 29



10:07 a.m.
10:36 a.m.
10:54 a.m.
11:33a.m.


Ht. Time
7:53 p.m. H
12:10 p.m. H
10:23 p.m. H
10:20 a.m. H
6:16p.m.
7:40 p.m. L
8:37 p.m. L
9:23 p.m. L
19:12p.m. L


he was watching me pitch in a college
baseball game in Nashville when his
appendix attacked him. The first
thing he said when he came to after
the operation was "Did Kes win?"
Can you believe that guy?
Dave used to wake me up early on
Saturday mornings to help him work
on that old '56 Chevy. I didn't know a
thing about cars but I could hold one
end while he worked on the other.
When he comes downI still'get him to
"listen to my truck" and tell me what
needs fixing. And, boy howdy, did we
drive those big rigs under the house.
We'd play cowboys and Indians until
the cows literally came home. And
did we win a war or two down at the
big ditch, or what? Dave ended up
spending a year in Viet Nam. I spent a
year with my heart in my throat.
Upon his return I asked him how it
really was over there. He spoke to me
for the first, last and only time about a
real war. He said "You wouldn't
a'liked it K.C. you couldn't get any
real brown beans and cornbread."
Dave don't talk much.
I'd love to tell those guys how I
really feel. Maybe, as we stand on the
first tee I'll just up and tell them how
much fun it's been, and is. I could tell
them how lucky I am to have them for
brothers. How they're just what I've
always wanted, and needed. Bless
their hearts, I can't tell them all this -
listen, we're grown men. I'd like to tell
them but they'd think I'm nuts. I tell
'you what I'll do, if David brings it up..
Respectfully,
K.C.


FL-..


AS T RA R E POSTOFFICE BOX 308 IN COUNTY YEAR$.10.00 SIX MONTHS. IN COUNTY-$8 00
WPMIONE 227-1278 OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $15 00 SIX MOS. OUT OF COUNTY-$S10.00
W ., Published Every Thursday at 304-306 Williams Avenue, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 OUT OF US-ONE YEAR. $1600
Port st. Joe, Florida
by The Star Publishing Company TO ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions In advertisements, the
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, FL publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount
received for such advertisement.
Wesley R. Ramsey ..... Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID
William H. Ramsey ........ Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA The spoken word Is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully
EWS PA1. Frenchie L. Ramsey......... Office Manager weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly con-
SShirley Ramsey ................. Typesetter vines. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Tides


..


J










H SHAD

d hPHANTRY
by Wendell Campbell




Nothing to Do

IT'S BEEN SO LONG since I've had nothing to do that I've forgotten
what it feels like. It seems the older I get, the farther behind I get. And,
it's not a recent thing, either. I just haven't had time to think about it
lately.
Recently Coach Phil Lanford spoke to the Rotary Club about an
intensified recreation program that is currently underway in Gulf
County. It is being designed for preteens and teenagers in our county and
I think it's a wonderful thing. The problem we face here, it seems, is our
teenagers have too much free time on their hands. He didn't mention it
but they also have too much money to spend, too.
Anyway, it wasn't that way when I was a teenager. I know a lot of
teenagers, if they read this, are going to say, "bunk and fodder! He
speaks with forked tongue!" Not so, dear ones. Read on.and believe that I
write the truth and nothing but the truth, so help me, Lone Ranger!
"DADDY," I SAID, "I want to play football. Can I?" I was in the
sixth grade and had never smelled the inside of a locker room.
"No you can't, son." was his reply. "Why can't I?" I asked, with
tears welling up in my eyes. "All the other boys are playing and Curtis
and Howard played ball. Please, please let me play?"
I have never seen him look so disgusted. Finally, with contempt in his
voice and a scrowl on his face, he said, "If you want to go out there and
get your brains and your other eye knocked out, go ahead, but you're still
going to do your work around here. And I don't care if it takes you until
midnight to get it done.
The key words in his last statement were, "still going to do your
work," and he meant every one of them. The brains and eye were
secondary, it seemed.
With those gentle words of encouragement still ringing loudly in my
ears the next day, I marched proudly off to school and football practice.

MY WORK CONSISTED of milking two cows (morning and night),
feeding the hogs and chickens and making sure they had water, gathering
the eggs in the evening, chopping firewood and kindling and bringing it in
for the night and doing various yardwork and working in the fields from
time to time. Sometimes, especially in the winter, it was close to midnight
when I finished.
Have you ever tried to milk a cow in the dark? It's not the most fun
thing I have ever done. Trying-to split kindling in the dark is nothing like
scoring the winning touchdown at the homecoming game, but I got to play
football, though!
"An idle mind is the devil's workshop," my Momma used to say. I
never understood what she was talking about until much later in life. I
never had much free time and the devil was working on me pretty well. I
often wondered what he was doing to all those "city boys" who had all the
free time they wanted. No wonder they were so mean to us country folks!

I THINK MY FRIEND Leon has the perfect solution to our free time
problem. He recommends that the county allot a 100 acre tract of
property for "free time" use. This acreage would be planted in cotton and
all kids would be required to spend two hours a day, after school, picking
or chopping cotton. They could either do that or become involved in the
recreation program that Coach Lanford is running.
After a couple of days picking cotton, they would be very easy to
entertain. They .might even learn to entertain themselves!.


The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23, 1987 Page Three


It Was A Terrible


Day for Motorists


A spectator checks out the damages to two vehicles in an accident Thursday
afternoon.


Emergency medical technicians are shown removing
Tonya Cross from the vehicle in which s-e was a passenger


Last Thursday wasn't a day for
care-free driving for eight vehicles
inside the City of Port St. Joe. Four
accidents during the afternoon, dam-
aged the eight vehicles, resulting in
only minor injuries to some of the
people involved in the four crashes.
The first of the chain of traffic
mishaps happened at approximately
12:10 p.m., Thursday, when a City
truck, driven by Robert Cantley, ran
an intersection at 10th Street and
Garrison Avenue, into the path of a
late model sports car driven by
Ashley L. Wood. Tonya Cross, a
passenger in Wood's car, suffered
slight injuries.
According to Cantley, the brakes
failed to work on the pick-up when he
tried to stop for the intersection. He
turned right to try and avoid a
collision, but the two vehicles collided
in the middle of the intersection.
The accident was investigated by
the Florida Highway Patrol.
TRUCK, CAR, COLLIDE
A second accident also involved a
car and a pick-up truck, on Highway
98, in front of the Post Office.
According to the Police report,


last Thursday afternoon following an accident at the in-
tersection of Garrison Avenue and Tenth Street.


Mary Earley was crossing the inter-
section at Highway 98 and Second
Street, when her vehicle was struck
by a pick-up truck driven by Houston
Philyaw of Oak Grove. The report
charged Philyaw with failure to stop
for the red light at the intersection.
No injuries were reported in the
crash.
Police officers Terry Carr and
Tim Hightower investigated the acci-
dent.
SIXTH STREET COLLISION
A third accident the same after-
noon, was reported on Sixth Street
involving a vehicle driven by Angus
Washington Thomas and Donna Lynn
Dozier. Thomas is a Port St. Joe
resident and Dozier had a Wewa-
hitchka address.
The accident report shows Tho-
mas stopped his vehicle on Sixth
Street, put it in reverse, and started
backing up on the street, backing into
the Dozier car, which was following.
Thomas was charged with improper
backing. Neither driver was injured.
HEAD-ON CRASH
The final crash of the day
'involved two cars at the intersection
of First Street and Highway 98.
The report of officers Carr and
Hightower show Eugene Bailey of 315
Avenue C cut the corner making a left
turn off Highway 98 into First Street,
striking a car driven by William B.
Davis of 125 Hunter Circle, head-on.
Davis was attempting to turn right
from First Street on to Highway 98.


3 LARGE SEMI-TRAILERS
FLOWERS
Priced for Quick Sale
BEST POTTING SOIL FOR ALL
FLOWERS & GARDEN PLANTS
Horse Fertilizer. $2.00 bi.
In Parking Lot of
DAVID RICH'S IGA
Port St. Joe
Mon. Sat.: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.


Audubon Watching Birds .LETTERS
Dear Editor: birds throughout Bay and Gulf
The Bay County Audubon Society counties. This is our share of a
is doing a five-year survey of breeding state-wideproject under the Florida Audubon Society to document and ciate a report. For each observation


A regular meeting of the Sea Oats
and Dunes Garden Club was held
Tuesday, April 14 at the St. Joe Beach
Volunteer Fire Department Commu-
nity Room with Vesta Conley presid-
ing.
Club member, Barbara Mannon
presented an informative program on
horticulture, including a film entitled
"Interior Decorating with Foliage
Plants". Mrs. Mannon gave some
helpful hints on flower growing and
conducted a quiz on identification of
specific flowers.,
Announcements of upcoming
events included the 29th of April trip
to the Bird Sanctuary at Tallahassee.
Members are to meet at the St. Joe
Volunteer Fire Department building
at 7:30 a.m. and are urged to bring a
sack lunch and to wear walking shoes.
A trip to St. Vincent Island is


planned for 15th of May. Meet at 8
a.m. at Indian Pass. Bring a life
jacket, sack lunch and something to
drink. It is also suggested that those
going on the outing bring insect
repellant and sunscreen. There is no
charge for the guided tour.
Ruth Nance will be hostess for the
12th of May Installation Coffee for the
Sea Oats dnd Dunes Garden Club at
her home at St. Joe Beach, at 11
a.m. New officers for the 1987-88 term
are: Barbara Mannon, president;
Rella Wexler, 1st vice president; Ruth
Nance, 2nd vice president; Martha
Hardin, secretary; and Jean Jackson,
treasurer.

For Ambulance Service
CALL 227-1115



map the breeding localities of every
species of bird nesting in Florida. The
final results will be published, in a
book, "Florida Breeding Bird Atlas,"
with a separate map for each species.
This is the second year of our survey;
last season, we confirmed the nesting
of 67 different bird species in Bay
County.
So every Saturday morning for
the rest of the present nesting season,
some 20 BCAS members will be out in
the woods and fields of Bay and Gulf
counties, looking for evidence of
breeding birds nest building, carry-
ing straw or food, pairing and mating,
or fledglings with their parents. But
this is a lot of territory for us to cover,
and we need help from the public.
If anyone sees such evidences of
birds breeding in our area this spring
or summer, we would greatly appre-


j


we need to know: -the species ot mee
bird involved; the kind of behavior
noted; the location in enough detail to
place it on a county map within V4
mile; the date of observation; and
name, address and phone number of
the observer. We are particularly
interested in reports from outside of
Panama City and St. Joe, especially
rural, forest and wetland areas. We
would be downright excited to have
nesting reports of hawks, owls,
vultures, turkeys, bobwhite, herons
and the like; but we also welcome
news of humbler species like wrens,
jays and sparrows.
Please:send your observations to
the Bay County Audubon Society, P.O.
Box 1182, Panama City, 32402; or else
contact me or any Audubon Society
member. Thanks.
Horace Loftin


The Church of the Nazarene
Excitement is in the air. We are a small but growing church with a big welcome.
SUNDAY SCHOOL.... 10:00 A.M. EVENING WORSHIP ... 7:00 P.M.
MORNING WORSHIP.. 11:00 A.M. WED. EVENING ....... 7:00 P.M.
Location: 2420 Long Avenue
DARRELL DENNIS, Pastor J. STERLING SMITH, Youth Minister



"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD OUTREACH CENTER...
The Family Church
252 Avenue E -Port St Jlo, Florida Church Phoem 229M8137
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman


SUNDAY
11:00 A.M ..... Morning Worship
4:00 P.M........ Youth Service
6:00 P.M. ..... Evening Worship


MONDAY FRIDAY
12:30 P.M.... Intercessory Prayer
WEDNESDAY
6:30 P.M. ...... ... 1st-6th Grade
7:30 P.M. Bible Study & Fellowship


"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune In Every Sunday Morning at 8:45


"(Continued from Page 1)


Board Endorses


which are not included in their work
directions.
The City agreed to the change,
surmising it would cost considerably
more to bring in another firm to make
the suggested repairs.
The City also took the position of
saying they are due remuneration
from the bonding firm for extra
engineering expenses involved in
terminating Video and Sealing from
the same job and calling on the
bonding company to complete the job.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters, the
Commission:
-Approved Ordinance Number
174 in its first reading, to establish a
new floodplain management mea-
sure. The ordinance is necessary to
maintain the availability of flood
insurance.
-Received a report from their
auditor, Touche Ross and Company,
who suggested the City capitalize
major repairs at the Wastewater
Treatment Plant, rather than budget
the repairs at the beginning of a fiscal


year. The only other criticism of the
auditors was that one bank deposit
had apparently not been reconciled.
-The Commission agreed to go
on a summer program with water
rates, averaging the annual consump-
tion of customers for summer billing,
rather than charging for actual use,
which would also increase sewer
charges. Since the extra water is
mostly used for yard watering, the
Commission felt it unfair to make the
full sewer charge.

Keep Your ATV

Off the Road
or she is subject to be arrested
and a case made against them.
"That's the way it must be to
protect the safety of our people and
to comply with state law", Sheriff
Harrison said. "We're getting too
many calls and complaints to turn
our heads on the matter. You can
just expect it to be a part of your
summer", the Sheriff concluded.


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A division of Fuqua Industries


ST. JOE HARDWARE COMPANY


201 Williams Ave.


Port St. Joe, Fla.


Phone 229-8028


* ..----- *"...-~-'-- ~dhU1L~-TT' ~


Sea Oats Plan Trip to

Sanctuary In Tallahassee


rymmw--


1,







Page Four The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla.- Thursday, April 23, 1987


Tour Planned for Ozark

Mountains In the Autumn


4 ~


! Mrs. Charles Norton, center, Good Citizen Award
chairman for the Daughters of the American Revolution is


shown with area Good Citizens, Nancy Stoutamire, left,
Port St. Joe, and Georgiana Ponder, right, of Apalachic(


Receive DAR Good Citizen Awards


St. Joseph Bay Chapter Daugh-
ters of the American Revolution held
the regular noon luncheon meeting,
Wednesday, April 15, at the Garden
Center in Port St. Joe.
Honored guests Georgeanna Pon-
der from Chapman High School in
Apalachicola and Nancy Stoutamire,
Port St. Joe High School, presented
their DAR Good Citizen Award
winning papers, "Our American
Heritage and My Responsibility to
Preserve It".
Mrs. Charles Norton, Chapter
Gbod Citizen chairman, introduced
the students chosen by their class-
nates and teachers for outstanding


qualities of leadership, dependability
and patriotism. She will present their
awards to them and to Wewahitchka
High School winner Kelli Pridgeon,
who was unable to be present, at
graduation in Apalachicola and at
Awards Day in Port St. Joe and
Wewahitchka.
Giving the National Defense
report, Mrs. Nobie Stone stated that
the government spent almost two
billion dollars on programs to teach
non-English speaking students in
United States schools in the language
of their origin when parents and
ethnic organizations wanted them
taught in English.


Dana Swatts


Miss Swatts Wins
Dana Kelli Swatts, age 12, daugh- Dana
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Ted Cannon and tion and
Mr. and ,Mrs. Higdon Swatts compe- banner,
ted in the Panama City 2nd annual national f
Easter Beauty Pageant held at the savings b
Woman's Club. This is a preliminary crowns, I
pageant for the America's Cover Miss overall v
and Cover Boy U.S.A. national finals, receive a
Dana competed in photogenic, beauty, two -peop
sportswear and swimsuit in the 10 12 the Unite
age division, Deb Miss. She placed 1st the categ
alternate in beauty and received a program
large trophy and her $200.00 paid sportsweg
entry fees to the National finals. She wear, sw
also placed first in pro-am modeling and talen
and received a large trophy. interview
Cover Bo
Knoxes Have A be held ir
Dana
J3aby Boy Mar. 29 Mrs. Ral
Mr. Ralp
Mike and Tonya Knox are proud Mrs. Will
to announce the birth of their son, Coy Cannon, I
Allen Knox, on March 29, 1987 at Gulf and Mrs.
Coast Hospital. He weighed seven
pounds, 8/ ounces and was 20 inches
long. He was welcomed home by his
brother Christopher, 2.
Coy is the grandson of Fred and I
Sara Allen and Tom and Mary Knox,
all of Port St. Joe. He is the great Served
grandson of Lois Tharpe and Nan fries
Burley of Port St. Joe and True Allen S
of Cleburn, Texas. SH


Trophies
a won the swimsuit competi-
received a large trophy,
tiara and Easter gift. The
finals will award cash prizes,
bonds, trophies, large round
banners, roses and the four
winners in the pageant will
a 7 day Caribbean cruise for
le. Contestants from all over
d States will be competing in
;ories of beauty, photogenic,
book, pro-am modeling,
ar, western wear, formal
imsuit, sleepwear, costume,
t commercial and a judge's
'. America's Cover Miss and
,y U.SA. national finals will
Fort Walton Beach in June.
is the granddaughter of
ph A. Swatts, Sr., and the late
ph A.- Swatts, Sr., Mr. and
iam C. Williams, Mrs. Junie
Dr. and Mrs. G.T. Newberry
Lena Ellis.


Visitors at the meeting included
Mr. and Mrs. Davis Stoutamire and
Mrs. Charles Ponder, parents of the
honorees.
The next chapter meeting will be
the annual cover dish picnic supper at
the Mexico Beach home of Mrs.
Elizabeth Thompson.


People are still talking about the
spring trip to Jekyll Island, St. Simons
Island, Charleston, Savannah and
Waycross, Georgia hosted by Stiles
and Zelda Brown. Many people were
disappointed because that trip was a
complete sell out and there was no
room for them. Stiles is spending this
week in Arkansas with the State
Director of Tourism planning a fall
color tour to Arkansas and the Ozarks.
Mid October and Indian Summer, the
most beautiful season of fall colors of
all, a rainbow of colors, and just a nip
of fall in the air. This is a heady time
to be anywhere, especially in Arkan-
sas.
Picture yourself at the world
famous Arlington Hotel in Hot
Springs, the mineral baths, the
sumptuous meals, then a day mining
for diamonds. Then up a scenic
highway to the Ozark Highlands. If
nature ever blesses an area it is the
limestone hills and steeply carved
valleys that make up the northwest
and north central regions of beautiful
Arkansas. Our destination is Eureka
Springs, a resort since the discovery
of its 63 springs in 1879. Home of the
greatest passion play with a cast of
over 300 and running from April thru
October for the past 39 years. Eureka
Springs, "The Healing Place" as the
SIndians called it. Hot Springs, '"The
Valley of the Vapors", and that's just
the beginning; there is much more,
including a stay at the famous
Peabody Hotel in Memphis with a
visit to Beale Street where the blues
began.
There will be a short informative
meeting at the library. If you want to
be sure there is room for you, we


Chasity Dawn Stanley

Competes In Easter Pageant
Chasity Dawn Stanley, age 11, cousins and competed in the same age
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lonnie H. division.
Stanley of Dalkeith competed in the
Panama City 2nd annual Easter ." .g
Beauty Pageant. The pageant was, 3 2C
held at the Woman's Club in Panama
City.


Chasity competed in the age 10 12
division, Deb Miss in beauty, photo-
genic, sportswear and swimsuit. She
placed 2nd alternate in beauty and
received a large trophy, and her
$200.00 beauty entry fee paid to the
National Cover Miss and Cover Boy
U.S.A. national finals. The Easter
Beauty Pageant was a preliminary
pageant for the National Cover Missf
and Cover Boy U.S.A. Pageant. The,
national finals will be .held in Fortr
Walton in June. Winners of the
pageant will receive many nice gifts,
cash awards, and overall winners will.
receive a 7 day Caribbean Cruise.
Chasity also won Little Miss,
Valentine in 1987 in Wewahitchka. She
received a tiara, trophy, banner and a
bouquet of roses. Chasity is the
granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs,
Thomas Cowart of Dalkeith and Mr.
and Mrs. Jackie Mercer of Panama
City. Chasity and Dana Swatts are


1 AOTEL ST. JOE DINING ROOM
d with Baked Potato or French Served with all the trimmings
saRIMad or slaw95 Fresh Mullet
RIMP .. $85 Fresh MulletS500


REWARD
for information leading to the person
or persons who stole a Virgin Mary
statue from the lot of the deceased
Dan & Beulah Hatfield at Holly Hill
Cemetery. The statue was stolen on
Friday, April 10, 1987. Anyone having
any information on the above, please
call
LINDA COX
229-8710 2tp4/16


suggest you call Zelda Brown and tell
her you are interested. The number is
227-1613.

Deadline Apr. 27

for M.B. Pageant
The 1987 Miss Mexico Beach
Beauty Pageant that will be held on
June 6 has a deadline for applications
and sponsor fees to be turned in by
April 27.
There will be a meeting for the
girls and their mothers on April 27 at
the Mexico Beach Chamber of Com-
merce Building at 5:00 p.m. CST.
Contestants are encouraged to bring
their applications and attend the
meeting even if they have not
obtained their sponsor fees,
For more information about the
pageant please contact Sherry Mc-
Dowell at 648-5942.


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Hardin

50 Years
Joseph D. and Martha Stephenson
Hardin were married on April 27, 1937
at Blessed Sacrament Church in
Tallahassee.
A family celebration will be held
in their honor Saturday, April 25 at the
Gulf Sands Restaurant hosted by their
daughters, Elizabeth Hardin of John-
son City, New York and Ruth Hill of
St. Joe Beach.
Joe and Martha have seven
grandchildren and three great grand-
children.


FLOWERS


FOR YOUR

SECRETARY
We'll deliver a lovely
bouquet* to tell her she's
special during Secretaries
Week. Order by phone or
stop in.
S*f you prefer, select a specially
designed corsage or potted plant.
Professional Secretaries Week, Aprl 1-25, 1S 7


THE DECORATOR DEN
Phone 227.1862





Steamed Shrimp

Clams
Oysters
Crab Legs

A taste treat you can't beat!!
INDIAN PASS

OYSTERS on v/ Shell

Enjoy the best from St. Joseph Bay
and Indian Lagoon with us.


INDIAN PASS

RAW BAR
(On C-30 South of Port St. Joe)
Call 227-1670 for Special Orders


Just in time for Summer, Radcock


>lrk











Long-Awaited Seafood Festival


The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23,1987 'Page Five

Faith Bible Is Observing Its

Twenty-Eighth Anniversary


Full Agenda; Lions Club "Run",


The Bay St. Joseph Care Center
along with Bay, Franklin, and Gulf
County Senior Citizen Associations
have been busy planning and prepar-
ing for the third annual seafood
festival for an entire year.
There are two ingredients neces-
sary for a successful festival. One is
great entertainment, and this year a
great line of talent has been lined up.
The professional eight member
United States Air Force Band will be
performing top 40 hits. The Keith Spell
and Buddy Hamm bands will also be
performing. Cindy's Darlin Dolls will
be performing dance routines and the
Port St. Joe Taekwondo Karate Club
will be on hand for a martial arts
exhibition. Also for those who love to
dance, there will be the Big River
Cloggers and Ron Ray and the
Sunshine Square Dancers.
The second ingredient of a
successful festival is great food and
there will be an abundance of mouth
watering dishes to tempt everyone
including Apalachicola oysters,
steamed clams, hamburgers, hot
dogs, ice cream, peanuts, homemade
cakes and cookies and an assortment
of thirst quenching beverages.
A giant raffle will be held and
prizes will be awarded every hour
beginning at 11:00 a.m. and continu-
ing throughout the day.
Added attraction will be the
Lion's Club Run for Sight, the dunkin
booth, pie eating contest, clowns,
games, arts and crafts and lots of
surprises. Raffle tickets may be
purchased at WJBU Radio Station,
the senior centers in Wewa and Port


Gulf Coun


Emergency
Gulf County has been chosen to
receive $4,132.00 to supplement emer-
gency food and shelter programs in
the area.
The selection was made by a
National Board made up of affiliates
of national voluntary organizations
and chaired by the Federal Emergen-
cy Management Agency (FEMA).
United Way of America will provide
the administrative staff and function
as fiscal agent. The Board was
c hged to distribute $70 million
arI plated by Congress to help
, ___Jnd'__ 'IAca Rity V t 1W NaR
shelter programs in high-need areas
around the country.
A local board made up of Gulf
County Board of Commissioners will
determine how the funds awarded to
Gulf County are to be distributed
among the emergency food and
shelter programs run by local service
organizations in the area. The local
board is responsible for recommend-
ing agencies to receive these funds
and any additional funds available
under this phase of, the program.
Under the terms of the grant from the
National Board, local governmental

Pastor's Day at
Zion Fair Baptist
Everyone is cordially invited to
attend the annual Pastor's Appreci-
ation Day Sunday, April 26 at Zion
Fair Baptist Church.
The morning speaker will be
Elder O.H. Walker of Apalachicola.
The 6:00 p.m. speaker will be Bishop
Dixson of Panama City.
Rev. Alonzo Moore, pastor of the
church, cordially invites everyone to
attend services.


Eye Openers
by Dr. Wesley Grace
Many children who are labeled
underachievers actually have a vision
problem that has caused them to do
poorly at school and lose interest in
learning. In fact, most remedial reading
teachers now insist that a child reading
.below grade level have a complete eye
examination before remedial work is
started.
Even very bright children often
rebel against schooling because of
frustration caused by poor visual per-
- formance. Perceptive parents and
teachers can, however, notice certain
behavioral .patterns that may indicate a
Vision performance problem: a short at-
tention span, rubbing or blinking of the
. eyes, poor eye/hand coordination and
avoidance of close work. Other signs in-
clude frequent headaches, tilting the
head to one side, or covering one eye
when reading. A prompt, thorough
visual examination and correction can
eliminate poor vision and make your
* child more comfortable at school.
Many children also become near-
sighted, farsighted or develop
: astigmatism during the school years.
Left uncorrected, these eye conditions
are likely to produce learning problems
for your child.
Brought to You As A
S Community Service by

Dr. Wesley Grace
322 Long Avenue
Phone 227-1410


St. Joe and from the seniors them-
selves.
Everyone is urged to attend the
festival Saturday, April 25 at Bay St.
Joseph Care Center on 9th St. Begin
the day with a pancake breakfast
sponsored, prepared and served by


Kiwanis Pancake Day Add Zest


the Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club.
Transportation will be provided
for senior citizens aged 60 and over in
the outlying areas of the county.
Wewahitchka residents pick up point
is the senior center and Wewa Bank,
White City pick up point is Ham-


mond's Country Store, Mexico Beach
pick up point is Tommy T's Arcade
and Fiesta Food Store, and St. Joe
Beach pick up point is Gulf Sands
Motel. Buses will be running every
two hours beginning at 9:00 a.m. EST
and ending at 5:00 p.m. EST.


Lions' Club "Run for Sight" at 9:00


The Port St. Joe Lion's Club
fourth annual "Run for Sight" race
will be held Saturday, April 25.
Registration will begin at 7:00 a.m. at
the Constitution site. The one mile fun
run will start at 9:00 a.m. EST. The
cost per runner is $6.00. The first 150
persons to register will receive a free
t-shirt. Trophies will be awarded to
the best overall male and female 13
and under and to the overall male and
female winners 14 and over. Ribbons
will be given to all finishers.
A special award will be given to
the elementary school class that has
the most class members to finish the
Fun Run. They will receive a party at
Hardee's. There will be a drawing for
a new bicycle valued at $150.00
donated by Western Auto. Only
students in grades K through 6 who
are registered for the one mile Fun
Run will be eligible for the drawing
and must be present at the seafood
festival at 12:00 noon to win.
The winners of the Lion's poster
contest will be announced at the
seafood festival and all of them will be
on display at the race site. First place
winner will receive $15.00 cash, a


Lion's Club race t-shirt and first place
ribbon, second place will receive
$10.00 cash and a ribbon and 3rd place
will receive $5.00 plus a ribbon.
The 10K race will begin at
approximately 9:30 a.m. and will start
and finish at the Constitution site. It
will cover one loop through the scenic
residential area on flat asphalt streets
through historical Port St. Joe. There
will be splits each mile and water
tables at the 2nd and 4th mile marks.
Awards will be given to first and
second place winners in each age
group and third and fourth place
winners will receive ribbons.
There will be a grand prize
drawing for all 10K registered run-
ners, a weekend for two at the
Sandman Motel at Mexico Beach. The
drawing will be at 12:00 noon at the
seafood festival and the winner must
be present to win. The cost for the 10K
race is $8.50 with a t-shirt and $6.50
without a t-shirt.
Run for Sight flyers may be
picked up at Western Auto, Hardee's,
Popeye's and Buzzett's Drug Store.
Anyone having any old eyeglasses
is urged to bring them to the seafood


festival where there will be a box set
up to put them in.
All Lion's Club proceeds will go
toward an educational scholarship,
eyeglasses and eye operations for the
needy.

Kiwanis to Flip

Pancakes Sat.
Port St. Joe's Kiwanis Club will be
serving their famous hot pancakes
with the trimmings as the day of
Seafood Festival begins Saturday
morning.
The club is setting up its cook
shack on the grounds of the Festival at
Long Avenue and Ninth Street and
will be open for business with hot
coffee, pancakes and all the trim-
mings at 7:00 a.m., Saturday mor-
ning.
The club has been serving the
pancake breakfasts each spring for
many years, and last year joined with
the Seafood Festival in order to give
the event a boost.


ity Receives Money to Supplement


*y Food & Shelter Area Programs
or private voluntary organizations demonstrated the capability to deliver organizations are urged to apply.
chosen to receive funds must: 1) be emergency food and or shelter Further information on the pro-
-non-profit, .2) have an accounting programs, and 5) if they are a private gram may be obtained by contacting:
system and conduct an annual audit, voluntary organization, they should R. Larry Wells, Administrative As-
3) practice nondiscrimination, 4) have have a voluntary board. Qualifying sistant, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000
Fifth St., Port St. Joe, Fla. 32456.

"Poonany" Will Perform

at Project Graduation


ri Jr.-Sr. fbard"
to having "Poonanny", 'a six member
band from Birmingham, Alabama as
part of the entertainment at Project
Graduation on the night of May 25.
Father Thom Crandall and Mrs.
Ray Brant are co-chairpersons of the
entertainment committee. Their com-
mittee is planning many exciting
events for the seniors between the
hours of 12:00 midnight and 6:00 a.m.

Dead Lakes
(Continued from Page 1)
apartment of Natural Resources, the
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion, the Gulf County Commission, the
Calhoun County Commission, the
Secretary of State, the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency, the Na-
tional Marine Fisheries Service and
the 1984 Legislature.
The 1984 Legislature designated
the Northwest Florida Water Man-
agement District as the state agency
responsible for getting the dam
removed.
Administrative hearing officer,
Robert Benton with the DER now has
the matter on his schedule for a
decision, following the five days of
testimony.

CARD OF THANKS
Q. P. Wise and family gratefully
acknowledge the lovely flowers,
cards; prayers and calls from all of
his wonderful friends, neighbors, and
co-workers during his convalescence.
Thank God for friends attuned
him to Him, who quickly come to
share, with words of cheer and
prayers of faith the burdens that we
bear.
f : .
.1
;


lw -

Goodness, Gracious
Katie, look at you.
Someone told me
you're 52!

Happy Birthday


the next n0jng. .; '-... ...
-~The seniors`apprectate- smuch
the contributions made on their behalf -
by the following merchants and
individuals:
Gulf County Commission, Russ'
Beauty Shop, Lynn Faye Motel,
Peters Laundry, Starlight Lounge,
Cozy Bar and Lounge, Driesbach
Cleaners, Material Transfer, El Gov-
ernor Campground, El Governor
Motel, L&N Communication, ERA
Parker Realty, Roy's Gulf Station,
Beach Lumber, Wallace Pump &
Supply, Marquardt Marina, RAC
Security Service, Highland View
Motors, Basic Magnesia, Ray's TV
Service, Carr's Auto Sales, Walker's
Dixie Dandy, Kent's Fur Company,
Ed & Ruth Ramsey, Susie's Women's
Apparel, Belk Hudson Co., Little
Caeser's Pizza, Aileeh's, Cost Cutters
Family Hair Care Shop, Bob's Hall-
mark Shop, K-Mart, Top 0' The Gulf
Restaurant, Sarah Ann's, Tommy T's,
Cathey's Hardware, The Shell Shack.


; **
Griffin Ennis

Griffin Is One
Griffin Neil Ennis, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Neil Ennis of Columbus, Geor-
gia, celebrated his first birthday on
April 24.
He is the grandson of Mr. and
Mrs. Winston Ennis of Columbus, Ga.
and Mr. and Mrs. Gary Griffin of
Columbus, Ga. and Cape San Blas.


DON'T WAIT


FOR AN


EMERGENCY
.. .to find out if your health insurance provides tlie
protection you need against the high costs of medical care.
Time Insurance offers Major Medical plans with solid, 24
Karat protection designed to cover your emergency and
routine medical care. This solid protection includes:
=$2,000,000 lifetime maximum benefit
Freedom to choose your doctor and hospital
15% non-smoker discount
MOptional Accidental Medical Expense and Maternity
Benefits
SPrescription drugs, ambulance and X-ray coverage


MAJOR MEDICAL COVERAGE
For more information, contact:
GARY W. BARBER
at MARKS INSURANCE AGENCY
61 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone (904) 653.2161


TIME INSURANCE COMPANY


4tp 4123


Faith Bible Church will be
observing their 28th anniversary this
Sunday, April 26. The church started
meeting in the old high school
auditorium with 13 charter members.
Three of the charter members. Mrs.
Mildred Elder and Mr. and Mrs.
Elmore Godfrey are still with the
church.
The church completed a building
on 20th St. in 1966 and has had eight
men pastor it in the 28 year history.
The first pastor was George Miller.
He was followed by Livingston
Blauvelt, William Graham, George
Harris, Ken Schafer, Hugh Daniel and


Hal Haller. The current pastor, Fred
Goebert, has served since 1962.
There will be a special service
Sunday morning followed by dinner on
the ground. All friends of the church
are invited to attend.

Gospel Sing Slated
The monthly gospel sing will be
held this Saturday at 7:00 p.m. at the
Assembly of God Church on Browns-
ville Road in Apalachicola.
Anyone who is interested in
performing that night may contact
Earl Peak at 229-6547.


Wewahitchka Medical Center

is pleased to announce that


Dr. William Watson

will be joining our staff on May 4, 1987.

OFFICE HOURS WILL BE
MONDAY FRIDAY from 8:00 12:00
1:00 5:00
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR APPOINTMENT, CALL

639-5828
2tc 4/23, 4/30



iuf~ouuuuu- ----------hba-01-11,-


ANCHOR


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SPECIAL


Popcorn Shrimp


Salad Bar Included


$5.95


I OPEN. THURSDAY SATURDAY
1 5:00 10:00 p.m
Breakaway Lodge Apalachicola 653-9988


You could win a "Trip to

Remember" just for seeing

a Xerox Memorywriter.
Call for a demonstration now and you can enter the Xerox
"Trip to Remember" Sweepstakes. Win a trip for two to
your choice of Hawaii, the Caribbean, Alaska, Los Angeles
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M XEROX AGENT
Authorized 306 Williams Ave. Port St. Joe
sales Agent Phone 227-1278
See your participating Xerox Typewriter Dealer or Sales Agent for details.
XEROX' and 6020 are trademarks of XEROX CORPORATION.
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r








Page Six The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23, 1987


THE CORRECT WAY TO
SWALLOW A PILL


For those people who have difficulty in swallowing a
pill, tablet or capsule, the reason is usually the
movement of their head backwards. This action tends
to narrow the entrance passageway. Always try to
keep the head lowered or at least level.
If you experience any difficulty taking any
medicine, please ask our professional advice. We can
often suggest simple home liquids that make them
more palatable. For, although we may carry other
products, prescriptions, health-aids and sickroom
needs are our most important service.
"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US with
their prescriptions, health needs and other pharmacy pro-
ducts. We consider this trust a privilege and a duty. May we
be your personal family pharmacy?


Revlon Cosmetics


Buzzett's Drugs
317 Williams Ave. Phone 229-8771 V
Convenient Drive-ln Window

***i !a'.':'a faa


PORT ST. JOE GOLF TEAM: Standing from left,
Adam Miller, Hannon Smith, Phillip Nedley, Bryan


Sharks Finish Season with


Wins


Over Rutherford & Apalachicola


The Sharks went on a tear the last
two weeks of the baseball season, to
up their dismal record to a respect-
able 9-11 showing for the year and an
indication of things to come for next
year.
The Sharks, playing with only five
seniors on their roster, still held their
own with opposition throughout the
Panhandle.
This past week, the Sharks swept
their opposition, taking a game on the
road from Rutherford last Thursday,
and closing out the regular season
schedule at home with a win over
Apalachicola Friday night.
PSJ 5, Rutherford 2
Thursday of last week, the Sharks
turned seven hits into five runs to
defeat the Rutherford Rams, 5-2.
Cris Revell and Tim Davis
swung the big bats for the Sharks,
each with a double and a single.
Randy Wilder, David Staab and
Jamie Vathis each had singles in the
Shark win.


Wagner, Tracy Browning, Billy Miller, Danny Moree, Kris
Bowen and coach Jim Belin. -Star photo


Sambar and-White-Tailed Deer


Hunts Scheduled for St. Vincent's


Tim Wilder started on the mound
for the Sharks and received credit for
the win. Wilder pitched the first three
innings, giving up only one hit and two
bases on balls. Wilder struck out
three. Mickey Gainnie came on in
relief in the fourth inning and gave up
only two hits, while giving up two
bases on balls. Gainnie struck out
three.
Port St. Joe 212 000 0-5
Rutherford 001 100 0-2
PSJ 3, Apalachicola 1
Tim Wilder and Mickey Gainnie
combined their efforts on a six hitter
Friday evening, as the Sharks held
Apalachicola to only one run in
picking up a win for their final regular
season game.


Tim Wilder, who pitched the first
three innings of the game, also rapped
out two singles in the game. David
Staab and Cris Revell each had a
single,' for the Sharks' only hits.
Apalachicola took an early lead in
the game, scoring one run in the first
inning, but the Sharks bounced back
in the third for two runs and took the
lead for the remainder of the game.
The Sharks added an insurance run in
the seventh inning.
Wilder started on the mound and
got credit for the win, giving up three
hits and three walks. He struck out
six. Mickie Gainnie came on in the
fourth, striking out seven batters with
his fast ball and giving up three hits.
Gainnie didn't issue a single walk.


District Tournament


Currently Underway


Play began in Sharks' Centennial
Field Wednesday at 1:00, as the
Sharks hosted the District Tourna-
ment, with four teams represented.
Port St. Joe, rated number two in the
district with a 4-2 district record met
Wakulla at 1:00. The Sharks defeated
Wakulla both times the teams met in
regular season play.
At 3:30, Florida High, ranked
number one with a perfect 6-0 district
record, met Blountstown, seeded
fourth. The results of neither game
were known at press time yesterday.
The winners of the two games will
meet for the District championship ti-
tle Thursday afternoon at 3:30.
Both of the Sharks losses in
Annual C. W.
Roberts Tourney
St. Joseph's Bay Country Club
will host the annual C.W. Roberts
Invitational Golf Tournament on the
weekend of May 16 and 17. There will
be eight man flights with four winners
per flight. Play. will start each day at
1:15.
Each entrant will receive a golf
cap, free drink tickets, and a buffet on
Sunday. For those who want to
participate in activities on Saturday
evening, a steak dinner can be
arranged. Both members and non-
members are invited to enter.
,. Please -contact the olf. -shot,
227-1751, to enter or obtain additional
information. Entry deadline is 6:00
p.m. Sunday, May 9.


district play during the regular
season were at the hands of Florida
High, which is ranked number one in
the state in Class AA baseball.


Port St. Joe
Apalachicola


002 001 -3
100 000 0-1


Strickland Pitches
In Tournament
Stacy Strickland, of Port St. Joe,
attending Florida A & M University
on a baseball scholarship, pitched for
FAMU in the Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference tournament held recently
in Burlington, N.C.
Strickland, who was named to the
all-tournament team on the strength
of his relief work in the game, pitched
six innings, allowing three runs while
scattering three hits. Strickland came
in and pitched two innings of shutout
ball and after the Bison of Howard
University got three runs in the sixth,
the freshman from Port St. Joe settled
down to retire the last 10 batters he
faced.
"Stacy pitched a superb game,"
said Coach Lucas. "It was a good spot
to put anyone in that wanted to do the
job. Stacy wanted to do the job".
Also playing for FAMU was Mit-
chell Burke, another St. Joe product,
who was named to the all-tournament
team, along with Strickland.


Two 3-day white-tailed deer hunts
and one 1-day sambar deer hunt are
scheduled for the St. Vincent National
Wildlife Refuge during the 1987-88
Reason. The hunts will be conducted in
accordance with applicable Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion regulations and special Federal
regulations.
: Hunt dates and bag limits for the
various hunts will consist of the
following:
:' Primitive 'Weapons November,
14, 1987, Sambar Deer one of either
sex, Feral pig no limit; Archery,
December 10-12, 1987, Whitetail one
of either sex, Turkey one of either
sex, Feral pig and raccoon no limit;
and Primitive Weapons, January 7-9,
1988, Whitetail -,one antlered buck,
Turkey one of either sex, Feral pig
and raccoon no limit.
Whitetail harvest regulations
were liberalized during the 1985-86
and 1986-87 seasons due to high levels
of internal parasites. The levels of
parasites were drastically reduced by
the increased harvests. Therefore,
more conservative regulations have
been established for the 1987-88
season. In addition, harvest quotas
will .be established prior to each
white-tail hunt. The quotas will be
determined by population and repro-
duction survey information. Turkey
hunters are reminded not to forget the
State turkey stamp.
Hunting will be by permit only.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
permits will be issued at St. Vincent
Island check stations on a first-come
Basis beginning at 9:00 a.m. the day
before each whitetail hunt. A maxi-
mum of 450 hunters will be allowed on
the island at any one time during the
archery hunt; a maximum of 300
during the primitive weapons hunt. In
addition, no more than 150 hunters at
any one time will be allowed on the
west end of the island (Indian Pass).
Therefore, late arriving hunters are
cautioned to contact the refuge staff
at the refuge's Apalachicola office
(904-653-8808) or a refuge staff -
seasonal volunteer at the Indian Pass
public boat ramp prior to leaving the
mainland, to determine the availabil-
ity of permits on each end of the
island. A few late hunters could be
inconvenienced by hunter limits.
However, the Service believes the
limits are necessary to insure safer,
higher quality hunts. Therefore, the
understanding, cooperation and pa-
tience of refuge hunters will be
necessary.
Only 150 non-transferable sambar
deer hunt permits will be issued.
Since most of the island's sambar
deer use east of Road-3 permits will


only be issued for the West Pass
(eastern end) check station. There-
fore, sambar deer hunters will be
restricted to using only the island's
West Pass access for hunting and or
camping.
Sambar deer permits will be
mailed to successful applicants fol-
lowing a public drawing. The drawing
will be conducted at 10:00 a.m.,
Friday, August 7 at the Apalachicola
Estaurine Research Reserve Head-
quarters. ro apply, hunters must
submit a 31/2 X 5 postcard, bearing on
the back the hunter's full names and
address. Applicants can apply singly
or as a party of two. Only one
application will be accepted from
each person or party. Duplicate
applications and applications with
less than full names will constitute
disqualification. Applications will be
accepted June 15 July 31. Only
successful applicants will be notified.
Only hunt participants with the
proper license and permit will be
permitted on the refuge to hunt and
camp. Hunt participants will be
required to check-in and check-out at
check stations. All primitive weapons
hunters will be required to wear a
minimum of 500 square inches of
flourescent orange material above the
waist.
The Service has revised the youth
hunter policy. Hunters less than 16
years of age must demonstrate
completion of a State approved hunter
education course, and must be
supervised by an adult at least 21
years old and remain in sight and
normal voice contact with the adult.
The adult may supervise only one


youth during big game hunts.
No bridge, causeway or public
transportation facilities to the island
are available. Participants must
provide their own transportation
across coastal water. Primitive
campsites have been designated to
facilitate the deer hunts (only the
West Pass campsite will be open for
the sambar deer hunt). Camp
grounds, motel and restaurant facili-
ties are available in the local area.
Those hunters choosing to camp
on the island are reminded that they
must bring heavy duty garbage bags.
Hunters-campers will be required to
remove their litter from St. Vincent
Island (Pack-it-in,. Pack-it-out). The
litter policy is especially appropriate
during the Interior Department's
"Take Pride in America" campaign;
Leaflets providing 'the hunting
information for St. Vincent National
Wildlife-Refuge may be obtained by
writing the Refuge Manager, St.
Vincent National Wildlife Refuge,
P.O. Box 447, Apalachicola, Florida
32320.

First Ling Caught.
In Fishing Tourney
The first ling caught in the annual
Mexico beach Ling Tournament has
been landed by Nat Wright, Jr. of An-
dalusia, Alabama.
Placing in the Junior division with
a 12 pound ling, the 10-year Nat made
his catch this past Sunday while
fishing with his dad, Nat Wright, Sr.,
and guided by Captain Dave Mullis.


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'3)Pe~c~k C~wr~,







The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23, 1987 Page Seven


VFW Post Presents
The John C. Gainous Post 10069
VFW presented the Voice of Demo-
cracy awards to Nancy Stoutamire,
Paula Ramsey and Donna Young. Ms.
Stoutamire was the first place winner
at Port St. Joe High and she was also
the 2nd place winner in the district. A
plaque was also presented to Mrs.
Lewana Patterson for her outstanding
leadership.


Essay Awards
The members and ladies auxil-
iary would like to thank all the student
who took part in the Voice of
Democracy program.

NAACP to Meet
Gulf County Branch of the
NAACP will meet Friday at 7:00 p m.
at the New Bethel AME Church
annex.


Buy a tape at our special price and you can get a unique
quartz Talking Alarm Clock* for only $16.95.
*Clock measures time not distance.


* Digital Quartz Read-out


* Batteries Are Included


r"


A Visit from

The Easter

Bunny


The staff and residents of Bay St.
Joseph Care Center enjoyed a visit
from Peter Rabbit this past Saturday.
He was such a hit that the residents
have already invited him back for
next Easter.
Shown visiting with Peter Rabbit
are: Top row, left to right, Catherine
Ashley, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mira and
Inez Sanborn; second row, left to
right, Leslie Spillers and Marie
Griswold.


Stanley's Tape Rule Talking Alarm Clock Offer

Register for FREE Quartz Talking Alarm Clock
to be given away April 30

JOHNSON'S LUMBER & SUPPLY
West Highway 98 Highland View Phone 229-8232


Jaycees Put On Day of Feasting


and Entertainment for Children


The Port St. Joe Jaycees are
proud to announce the success of the
Taunton family children's day, held
Easter Saturday. Jaycee public rela-
tions administrator and project chair-
man, Jef A. Gardner reports that
planned activities were carried off in
fine Jaycee tradition. The Tuchkabat-
chee Creek Indian Dancers performed
tribal dances in an outstanding array
thanks to Creek Indian Chief Joseph
McGhee and family. Chief Little Big
Heart of the United Indians of
Northwest Florida was featured in a
festive dance with the McGhee Indian
maidens and all in attendance were
invited to join in dancing with the
Indians in the closing friendship
dance. Next, the children returned
outside to find the Easier Bunny had
hiddefWhT s ofb eF'gg.: 'We ess to
say, they didn't stay hidden very long.
Mister Weather came thru with a
gorgeous day of nearly 80 degrees. If
one was not swimming, playing
volleyball, walking in the woods or
rising to new heights on the trampo-
line you could find them at the buffet.
Cajun style crawfish, smoked
Spanish mackerel, burgers, dogs,
baked beans, deviled eggs, cole slaw
and macaroni salad were abundant
and so delicious.
The Jaycees extend their heart-
felt thanks to the kindness and
hospitality of the entire Taunton
family. The tremendous amount of,
love shared in this home and
distributed among all on this glorious
day put a lump in a lot of throats. This
was-the second outing at the Taunton
home sponsored by the Jaycees, but
surely not the last.
It's near impossible having a
successful project, such as this,
without the generosity of local mer-
chants who open their hearts and
inventory to the Jaycees. We wish to
thank Dave Rich and family (Rich's
IGA), Gene Raffield (Raffield Fish-
eries), O.R. Stockman (MK Ranch),
Al Harrison and Marie Armstrong
(Gulf Co. Sheriff's Dept.), Ted Cannon
and the friendly staff (Florida Natio-
nal Bank), Phil and Mark Collier
(Florida Boy Seafood), Harry, Roy
and Edwina (St. Joe Bar), O'Dell
Harris and family (Harris Roofing -
Mexico Beach), Johnson Brother
Meats (Panama City), Campbell
Drugs, Henderson's Produce, Gulf
Sands Restaurant, Simone's Bakery -
Deli, Saveway, Piggly Wiggly and
Renfro Auto Parts.
A special thanks to Jaycee
non-members who gave their time
and donated goodies: Lewis and
Evelyn Gardner, Constance McPher-
son, Melissa Marlowe and Cindy
Cunningham. Hats off to all our guests
that attended, kindest regards to
county commissioner Nathan Peters,
Jr. and family.
The Jaycees strive to become
involved in the community. There are
so many leadership qualities and
attitudes that a Jaycee will research
and exercise during their member-
ship, and for a long time after. But
this is just a part of the picture. To
wind up the day, Jaycee officers Gene
Dickey and Jef A. Gardner were
approached by an individual who
summed things up pretty well. He said
it had been a long time since he'd seen
such a collective gathering, he said it
was "charged adrenalin" just to see
the Jaycees smiling and watching the
day unfold into such a good time for
all. ."it's hard to tell who's having
more fun, the children or the adults .
He then joined the Jaycees saying
he wanted to be involved. Gulf County,
the Port St. Joe Jaycees are proud to
introduce Kevin Fresa. Kevin resides


.Jaycees are shown above last Saturday at the Taunton family children's
day, along with other guests at the barbecue.


in Winter Park and in June travels to
the state board exams to obtain his
registration to practice architecture.
"Plans are currently underway for an
architectural design build firm
satellite office to open soon (this year;


in Gulf County, main base will be in
Winter Park," commented Fresa.
So the Jaycees got a new member,
Gulf County got a new business for the
area, everyone celebrated and had a
good day.


Jaycees' Upcoming Activities


The Jaycees will be active again
this weekend. Saturday project chair-
person Sandra Wright will spearhead
a dart booth in the Senior Citizen's
seafood festival. Prizes will be
awarded to winners.
The Jaycees will hold a member-
ship night social (M-night) at The
Sandman Motel, Saturday at 6:00 p.m.
Food and beverages will be served.
The Jaycees are now 50 members
strong, but more members are needed
to fulfill the ambitious plans for the

Job Training

Explained to

Kiwanis Club
Marvin Parker, director of. Job
Services of Florida, in Panama City,
gave the Kiwanis Club tips Tuesday
on ways to go about employing people
who need jobs and receive aid in
training individuals who need training
in various skills.
"You can receive rebates for up to
40 percent of an eligible employees'
salary up to $6,000 a year from this
government funded program", Par-
ker said.
The Job Services operation is a
successor to the old CETA program
for training people with on the job
training and give the employer a
break with the expense of the training.
This program is different in
several ways",' Parker said. "The
person hired can never have worked
for you before; he is to be considered a
full time employee and must be
between 18 and 25 years of age. The
best way to approach the program is
to contact us and allow us to
determine if a candidate for the
program fits the requirements before
you hire the employee", Parker said.
Parker encouraged employers to
take advantage of the training pro-
gram which is designed to allow the
employee to receive a liveable wage
while learning a marketable skill or
trade without punishing the employer
financially.


upcoming year. Anyone between the
ages of 18 and 40, of good character,
and interested in personal and com-
munity development is encouraged to
attend.
On Sunday, the Jaycees will be
visiting the Bayou George Jaycees
and helping with their annual MDA
Bog-In.
On Sunday, May 3rd, the Jaycees
volleyball team headed by Dink White
will be practicing behind the Down-
stairs Oyster Bar on Mexico Beach.
Everyone is invited to come out and
play.
The Jaycees meet every Tuesday
at 8:00 p.m. at the St. Joe Beach
Volunteer Fire Department. Come out
and see what the excitement is about.



"Good service.
good coverage.
good price-
That's
State Farm
insurance."


BILL WOOD
403 Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe
Office: 229.6514
Home: 229-6103
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.

STATE FARM




INSURANCE

State Farm Insurance Companies
Home Offices Bloomington, Illinois
Home Offices B -----


4 ,


1


L


, ..z ... .


ANILL.







Page Eight The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23, 1987


Cong. Grant Scores Oil Lease Plan


~7;i


- Public Notices


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
Case No. 87-71
CENTRAL TITLE COMPANY, a California cor-
poration, and SAN JOAQUIN DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY, INC., a California corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIE L. BROWN, and wife, JULIA BROWN,
HAROLD F. GROOMS, and wife, ELAYNE MOR-
RIS GROOMS, CHESTER S. GARBER, and wife,
EMILIA TING GARBER, JACK A RUSTIGAN
and wife, BILLIE J. RUSTIGAN, and PAUL R.
MADSEN and wife, E. STARR MADSEN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: WILLIE L. BROWN, and wife, JULIA
BROWN, HAROLD F. GROOMS, and wife,
ELAYNE MORRIS GROOMS, CHESTER S.
GARBER, and wife, EMILIA TING
GARER, JACK A RUSTIGAN and wife,
BILLIE J. RUSTIGAN, and PAUL R.
MADSEN and wife, E. STARR MADSEN,
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on real property
situate in Gulf County, Florida described as
follows, to-wit:
A tract or parcel of land situate, lying and being in
Fractional Section 19, Township 9 South, Range 10
West, described by metes and bounds as follows:
Begin at a point on the North boundary line of the
right of way of State Road Number 30, said right of
way being 66 feet in width and said point being
marked by a concrete monument, aforesaid Point
of Beginning being 1300 feet Easterly, measured
along State Road Number 30 from the East end of
the bridge across Money Bayou and being also
1560.4 feet South and 2577.8 feet West of the Nor-
theast Corner of said Fractional Section 19, and be-
ing also 62.81 feet South and 272.07 feet East of a
United States Primary Triangulation monument
marked "Peninsular 1934"; from said Point of
Beginning run thence N7_10'E, 200 feet to a point
marked by a concrete monument; thence
N8250'W, 1500 feet to a point marked by a stake;
thence SP10'W, 280.4 feet to a point in the
centerline of said State Road Number 30; thence
continuing S7*10'W, 753.8 feet to.the average high
water mark of the Gulf of Mexico; thence in a Nor-
theasterly direction along the average high water
mark of the Gulf of Mexico S88015'E, 1506.73 feet to
a point, thence N710'E, 692 feet to Point of Beginn-
ing. Excepting therefrom the 66 foot right of way of
State Road 30 (formerly State Road 10), said right
of Way running through the property herein con-
veyed and being 66 feet wide with an additional 17
foot easement being added to the North right of
way line, beginning at the West line of Lot 14 of
Block 2 of Unit No. 2 of Money Bayou Subdivision
and extending to the West boundary of property
hetein,.qpnyyed and also an additional. 17 'foot
easement 'being added to the South right' of way
line beginning at the West line of Lot 20 of Block
"D" of Money Bayou Subdivision and extending to
the West -boundary of property herein conveyed.
Said additional right of way is described in a deed
from Money Bayou, Inc., to the State of Florida for
use and benefit of the Florida Department of
Transportation, dated August 7,1973 and recorded
in Official Records Book 54, Page 928, Public
Records of Gulf County, Florida.
All of Money Bayou Subdivision, Unit No. 1, as
recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 49 and all of Money
Bayou Subdivision, Unit No. 2, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, Page 28, Public Records of Gulf County,
Florida. LESS AND EXCEPT, however the follow-
ing lots in Money Bayou Subdivision, Unit No. 1:
Lots 3 and 4, Block "A"
Lots 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19,
and 21, Block "D"
Lots 4 through 19, inclusive, Block "E"
ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT the following lots in
Money Bayou Subdivision, Unit No. 2:
Lots 1, 2, 4 and 5, Block 1
ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT the right of way of Lee
Street, Griffin Avenue and Palm Drive as shown on
Money Bayou Subdivision, Unit No. 1 and Money
Bayou Subdivision, Unit No. 2, hereinabove men-
tioned.
(State Road 30 was formerly State Road 10 and
United States Highway 98, and is also known as
County Road 30).
YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to the action on
Petitioner's attorney whose name and address is
THOMAS S. GIBSON, Post Office Box 39, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, on or before May, 8, 1987, and
file the original with the clerk of circuit court,
either before service on Petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered to the relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this court on
the 6th day of April, 1987.
BENNY C. LISTER as
Clerk of Circuit Court,
Gulf County, Florida
By: /s/ Teresa Lynch
COUNTY SEAL 4t 4/9

NOTICE
Absentee Ballots for the Regular Election to be
held May 12, 1987, may be requested in person, by
mail, or by telephone at the Supervisor of Elections
Office; Gulf. County Courthouse, Port St. Joe,
Florida, if you come within the purview of the
definition of an "absent elector". Absentee Ballots
will be mailed, delivered, or may be voted in per-
son as soon as Ballots are printed, immediately
following Candidate Qualification Deadline which
is :April 21, 1987. If there is a Run-Off Election,
Absentee Ballots may be requested beginning May
13, 1987. Completed Absentee Ballots must be
received in Supervisor of Elections Office by 7:00


P.M., E.D.T., May 12, 1987, for the Regular Elec-
tion and by 7:00 P.M., E.D.T., May 26,1987, if there
is a Run-Off Election.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
By: /s/ L. A. Farris, City Auditor/Clerk
6t 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23, 4/30, 5/7

FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes, the undersigned person in-
tends to register with the Clerk of Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the first publica-
tion of this notice, the fictitious name or trade
name under which he will be engaged in business
and in which said business s to be carried on, to-
wit:
J. L. CRITSER
Location: City, County, State, Florida
Address: P. 0. Box 13590
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
v. Owner: James L. Critser
4tp4/9
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to
Ordinance No. 173, adopted by the City Commis-
sion of Port St. Joe, Florida, on April 7, 1987, a
special city election will be held on May 12, 1987,
between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. at the
Fire Station in the City of Port St. Joe, on the ques-
tion, "Do you favor merging the City of Ward
Ridge, Florida into the City of Port St. Joe,
Florida."
__ Yes
____No
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
By: /s/ L. A. Farris
City Auditor/Clerk
4tc 4/9
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes, the undersigned person in-
tends to register with the Clerk of Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the first publica-
tion of this notice, the fictitious name or trade
name under which she will be engaged in business
and in which said business is to be carried on, to-
wit:
SAVE A LOT
Hwy. C-30 Simmons Bayou
P. O. Box 456
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Owner: Juawana G. Combs
4tc 4/2

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
Case No. 87-7
. GUI CO U FAHMS, INC.,
a Florida corporatioh,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAYMOND P. GARDNER, ROBERT T. Mc-
CLELLAN, JR. and wife, EILEEN L. Mc-
CLELLAN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RAYMOND P. GARDNER,
ROBERT T. McCLELLAN, JR.
EILEEN L. McCLELLAN
YOU ARE. HEREBY NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on real property
situate in Gulf County, Florida described as
follows, to-wit:
FARM #89, GULF COUNTY FARMS UNIT
THREE. Begin at the Northwest comer of Sec-
tion 30, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf
County, Florida. Thence North 86 degrees 27
minutes 22 seconds East along the North line of
said Section 30 for 326.88 feet; thence South 3
degrees 03 minutes 30 seconds East for 468.89
feet to a point on a cul-de-sac, said cul-de-sac
having a radius of 50.00 feet; thence Southerly
along said cul-de-sac for an arc distance of
124.90 feet, said arc having a chord distance of
94.87 feet bearing South 0 degrees 09 minutes 46
seconds West; thence South 18 degrees 16
minutes 20 seconds East along the Westerly
right-of-way line of a 60 foot street for 100.00
feet; thence South 71 degrees 43 minutes 40
seconds West for 360.41 feet to the West line of
said Section 30; thence North 3 degrees 03
minutes West along said West line for 751.91
feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 5.28
acres more or less.
YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to the action on
Petitioner's attorney whose name and address is
THOMAS S. GIBSON, Post Office Box 39, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, on or before May 4, 1987, and
file the original with the clerk of circuit court,
either before service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered to the relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this court on
the 31st day of March, 1987.
BENNY C. LISTER as Clerk
of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida
By: /s/ Towan Collier
COUNTY SEAL 4t 4/2

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
The Wewahitchka State Bank will sell at public
auction on the 27th day of April, 1987, at 10:00 A.M.
in the parking lot on the south side of the Wewahit-
chka State Bank building in Wewahitchka, Florida,
the following described property:
One 1980 Ford Granada 4 door, I.D. No.
OW82C160383
Wewahitchka State Bank
By: /s/Joe St. Clair 2t 4/16


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Board of County Commission of Gulf Coun-
ty will receive sealed bids from any person, com-
pany, or corporation interested in selling the Coun-
ty the following described personal property:
Job #1 Paving Courthouse Parking Area
Job #2 Road Edge Paving for parking area at
Oak Grove Assembly of God Church.
Delivery date must be specified. Liquidated
damages for failure to deliver unit on specified
date will be set at $25.00 per day. Specifications on
file at Clerk's Office.
Bids will be received until 9:00 o'clock, A.M.,
E.D.T., April 28, 1987, at the Office of the Clerk of
Circuit Court, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, FlI
32456. The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Billy Branch, Chairman It 4/23/87

NOTICE OF INTENT TO APPLY
FOR LOCAL LEGISLATION
NOTICE is hereby given of intent to apply to
the 1987 session of the Florida Legislature for a
legislative act or bill designating the Overstreet
bridge as the W. G. Hardy Bridge. Said designation
to apply to the existing floating bridge and any
replacement high rise bridge.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Billy Branch, Chairman It 4/23

NOTICE OF REGULAR
MUNICIPAL ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that the first primary of
the election of the following will be held at the City
Hall Fire Station in the City of Port St. Joe,
Florida, on Tuesday, May 12, 1987:
MAYOR-COMMISSIONER
COMMISSIONER, GROUP I
COMMISSIONER, GROUP II
The polls will open at 7:00 A.M., E.D.T., and
will close at 7:00 P.M., E.D.T. When there are
more than two candidates for any one office and
neither shall receive a majority of the total votes
cast for such office, then another election shall be
held two weeks from the date of the first election,
or May 26, 1987, at which time the two candidates
receiving the largest number of votes in the former
election shall be voted on again.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE,
/s/ L. A. Farris, City Auditor-Clerk
3t 4/23
4t 4/23

BID NUMBER WWTP 203
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida, requests bids


Burkett Wins

Free T.V.


In the photo at left, Post Com-
mander Bill Schlickman is shown
presenting Eugene Burkett with a
19" remote control color television.
Mr. Burkett won the prize in a recent
- fund-raising promotion by the local
S Veterans of Foreign Wars.


Ani. Stott Finishes

Pharmacy School

Airman Vicki J. Stott; daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. James H. Flint, Sr., of
Rural Route 3, Wewahitchka, has
graduated from the US. Air Force
pharmacy specialist course at Shep-
pard Air Force Base, Texas.
During the course, students were
taught to compound, and dispense
medical agents and chemicals. They
also earned credits toward an associ-
ate degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
She is a 1985 graduate of Macon
County High School, Montezuma,
Georgia.


YEARLY RENTAL
Furnished 2 bdrm., 1 ba. home,
$350 month, St. Joe Beach.
*
Unfurnished 2 bdrm., 11/2 ba.
townhome, $385 month, St. Joe
Beach.
*

Allemore Real Estate, Inc.
Corner 10th & 98 Mexico Beach
648-5146



for one (1) HORIZONTAL FLOW CONSTRUC-
TION ROTARY POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT
STRAIGHT LOBE FLOWERS WITH MOTOR.
Specifications may be obtained from the City
Clerk's Office, P. 0. Box 278, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. All bids F.O.B., Port St. Joe. Bid opening
will be held June 16,1987, at 8:00 P.M., EDT, in the
Municipal Building at the regular meeting of the
City Commission.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE,
/s/L. A. Farris, City Auditor-Clerk 2t 4/23


RG0043684


043 Custom Building to Your

Plans and Specifications


J COME SEE US AT


Simmons Bayou

(Hwy. C-30)

(on St. Joseph Bay)

"Quality at A Reasonable Price"


NEWMAN'S CONSTRUCTION CO.


Simmons Bayou, Florida


(904) 227-1222


Congressman Bill Grant this week
sharply criticized the proposed plan
by the Department of Interior to lease
portions of Apalachicola Bay for oil
exploration.
In a meeting with Interior Secre-
tary Donald Hodel, Grant said the
plan to allow oil drilling in federal
waters south of St. George Island west
to Panama City and surrounding the
Florida Middle Grounds Reef was a
dangerous environmental mistake
and showed an insensitivity to the
character of the Flordia coastline.
"The most important industries in
that area are oystering and fishing,"
Grant said. "Those people have
suffered through two hurricanes in
the last two years and are finally
recovering. One spill can undo what
has taken the area 100 years to


Ellen F. Allemore, Broker 648-8939
Salespeople
Joy Holder 648-8493
Vickie Stokes 648-8825
Preston Wingate- 648-8565
N. F. Allemore, Jr., 648-8939
Bobble Miller 648-8398

GULF AIRE
OWNER SAYS "SELL" 314 Beacon .Road.
Beautiful 3 bd., 2 ba. home on a great lot. Dou-
ble garage, plenty of extras. Reduced to
$85,000. Make an offer. Open House 1-5 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday.
New Listing, Gulf AIre Dr.: Good corner single
family Jot, $25,000.
New Listing: Beacon Road: Nice single family
lot, good neighborhood. $28,000.
New Listing: Beacon Road: Two large single
)amlly lots, $19,500 ea.
New Listing: 417 Gulf Aire Drive: 1 bd.Jstudy, 1
ba., pato home. Pre-construction price $49,500.
Model available.
309 Buccaneer Road. Beautiful wooded vacant
lot close to pool & tennis courts. $22,500.
219 Gulf Aire Dr.: Nice large lot with gulf view.
Single family or duplex, was $30,000. Reduced
to $29,500.
412 Gulf Aire Dr.: Beautiful 3 bd., 2 ba. half
duplex, garage, many amenities. $99,500. All of-
fers considered.
Sea Pines: 3 bdrm., 3 ba., fireplace, sauna,
privacy fence & hot tub. Must see to appreciate.
$125,000.
Periwinkle Dr.: 5 bdrm., 3 ba., 2,800 plus sq. ft.
Lots of room to live In. Screen porch, balcony
with gulf view, sprinkler system. Top floor
separate LR, bath and bdrm. Downstairs, 4
bdrms., 2 ba., family rm. MAKE AN OFFER.
CAPE SAN BLAS
Bayslde: Secluded, gorgeous view from head of
bay. New 2 bd.. 2 ba. cypress home, jacuzzi,
many amenities. 1,150' x 100' lot from road to
bay. $145,500.
ST. JOE BEACH
New Listing, Ward St.: 1 ,/ blocks to beach. Very
nice 3 bd., 1 ba. mobile home on 2 landscaped
lots Must see to appreciate. Reduced to
$46.500.
Alabama St.: Comfortable 2 bd., 2 ba., cen. h&a,
screen porch home with 2 carports,
greenhouse, big storage bldg., garden spot, 2
blocks to beach $57,500.
Coronado Townhomes. 2 bdrm., 1%Y, ba.
dedicated beach. Unobstructed view. All
amenities. Furnished $84,900; unfurnished,
$ 500
3 lots Pineda St. 1st block, $55,900.
Balboa St.: Speakers, music system in lovely.
comfortable 24'x60' double wide 3 bdrm., 2 ba.
modular home, screened 12x32' front porch,
f.p., clha. Watch the birds feed from glassed
12x22' Fla. rm., as no paint brush needed!
150'x150', 1' blocks from beach. Was $65,000,
Reduced to $62,500.
Georgia Ave.: 150' on Georgia by 90' deep va-
cant lot. $16,000.
Balboa St.: Great investment 2 nice 2 bdrm., 1
ba. houses, clha, on 50'x150' lots $95,000 or
will sell separately.
Between Coronado & Balboa Streets: 50' lot on
Hwy. 98. $45,000.
Between Coronado & Balboa Streets: Nice 50'
lot on Hwy. 98, $37,500.
HIGHLAND VIEW
305 Parker St.: 2 bd., 1 ba. on 2 lots. $39.900.
PORT ST. JOE
New Listing: 816 Marvin Ave.: Spacious 3 bd., 2
be. home with his and hers outside storage
houses. Reduced to $53,900.
1306 Woodward Ave. 4 bd., 2 ba. livable home in
good neighborhood, $45,000.


accomplish."
The final draft of the depart-
ment's five year Outer Continental
Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program
for Florida will be released in late
April. But at the meeting, Hodel
indicated that he would not drop the
two Apalachicola Bay sites from the
plan, as was done in the previous lease
sale. Leasing is scheduled for the two
sites in November, 1988.
The Florida delegation is united
behind the effort to persuade Hodel to
defer Apalachicola Bay, plus areas
surrounding the Florida Everglades
and Keys from the Interior plan.
Grant argued that what the delegation
is asking for. only constitutes 18
percent of the total area available for
leasing off the east and west coasts of
Florida.
"We support the goal of becoming
less dependent on foreign oil," Grant
said, "But there are areas we have


Nancy Mock Cape Specialist
227-1322
Flo Melton 229-8076
Charline Hargraves 648-8921
Margaret Carter 648-5884
Mary Jane Lindsey- 229-8560
Brenda Guilford- 648-5435


New LIstIng: 507 Garrison Ave. lovely and effi-
cient 3 bd., 2 ba. new brick home, must see to
appreciate. $79,500.
1404 Long Ave.: 2bd., 1 ba.,decks, utility house,
fenced yd., good buy. $31,000.
St. Joseph Bay Country Club: 3 bd., 2% be.,
Reduced to $67.900. 2 bd., 1 ba.. $65,900.
Fireplace, tile baths, other amenities. Peace,
quiet & the golf course.
BEACON HILL
New Listing at Beacon Hill Bluff: Lg. 4 bd., 2 ba.
home, ch&a, totally furnished, gorgeous decor,
screen porch, deck, landscaped, $149,500.
Then assure your fantastic view Buy the
waterfront lot across highway at $65,000.
New 2 bd., 2 ba. home, screen porch, must see:
Make an offer.
2nd Street 3 blocks from beach, 2 bdrm., 1 ba.,
4 lots, $46,000.
3rd Ave.: Nice 14x60' Scot 1984 mobile home, 2
bdrm., 1 ba. custom built masonite siding,
shingle roof, other extras. $35,000.
MEXICO BEACH
New Listing: U.S. 98 & 35th St.: commercial cor-
ner lot, with building. Come see at $57,500.
12th St. Business Center commercial lot 2nd
from highway. $35,000.
13th St. Business Center Vacant lot, $28,000.
New Listing: corner of 26th & U.S. 98 beachelde.
2 houses, 2 bd., 1 ba. each, comp. furn., 1 with
cen. h&a, 1 with cen. air. Good investment.
$79,000.
Third St.: 2 blocks from beach. Neat & comfor-
table 3 bd., 2 ba. mobile home, screen porch,
fireplace, furnished, stoneware dishes,
silverstone cookware & many more extras. Ask-
ing $43,500, make us an offer.
New Listing: corner of Virginia & Florida. Very
attractive 3 bd., 2 ba. 24'x54' modular home. Ful-
ly furn,, many amenities. Screen porch, stor. sh-
ed, comp. fenced, 2 blocks to beach. Super buy,
$49,500.
386A, 2 bd., 1 ba, stilt house on 386-A. Good
starter home. $45.000.
New Listing, Grand Isle, Nan Nook: 3 bd., 1 be.,
f.p. wlefficiency apt., lots of extras. $87,000.
9th St. & U.S. Hwy. 98 DOLPHIN RUN
TOWNHOMES. 1 bd./study or 2 bd., 2'! ba. Gulf
Front. Reduced to $72,900 unfurnished and
$77,900 furnished.
Louisiana St.: Trailer lot, no utilities. $14.000.
Hwy. 386A: 87.5' highway frontage by 194' deep
commercial. $29,900.
OVERSTREET
New Listing: 150'x75' lot close to Overstreet
bridge. Reduced to $5,800. Terms.
Pine St. 3 bdrm., 1 be. lovely brick home on 1.2
acres, garden, grape arbor & fruit trees. $54,000.
WEWAHITCHKA
On Hwy. 71 just inside city limits. Beautiful 2.11
acres and 3 houses. Variety of fruit bearing
trees. $65.000.
Honeyville: Lovely 3 bd., 2 ba. brick home nestl-
ed in oak trees, Pecan tree, peach, azalea &
scuppernong vine on 1.2 acres. $74,900.

HOWARD CREEK
2 parcels: 1 plus Improved acres, with some fen-
cing & utility building: 1.7 acres with 342' road
frontage, $9,000 each. Priced well below
replacement cost.


- - - - - - ..- -


identified as critical to us as a state
and we are determined to protect
them."
While in the Florida Legislature,
Grant was instrumental in the state's
purchase of 70 miles of coastline in
Taylor and Dixie Counties. "We
wanted to preserve an irreplaceable
part of Florida but an added benefit
was the continued good health of the
Bay," Grant said. "The fight to
protect the economic and environ-
mental vitality of North Florida is far
from over, I assure you."


Project Graduation

There will be a meeting of all
committee chairpersons and mem-
bers of Project Graduation on Tues-
day evening, April 28 at 7:00 p.m. at
the Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School in
Room 102.


Freeman Components,

INC.

Phone (904) 229-6289



Builders and Erectors or

Building Components

and Trusses



Built to your blueprint specifications
WE DELIVER


JERNYL N. HARPER
Licensed Real Estate Broker
411 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL
(904) 227-1428
CAPE PLANTATION SID: Beautiful homesites in restricted subdivision near golf, swimming and ten-
nis. Owner financing possible. $18,000 each.
CAPE RETREAT: 100' x 110' lots with fantastic view of the Gulf. Owner financing. $30,000 each.
COMMERCIAL LOT near town. Great location for restaurant. Owner financing available. $45,000.
TREASURE SHORES: 75 Gulf front lot at Indian pass. Paved street and underground utilities.
$52,500.
9TH STREET: Spacious 4 BR, 2 bath home near schools and shopping. Family room with fireplace.
Large lot. Shown by appt. only. $52,000.
BUY OF THE WEEK: New 2 BR, 2V2 bath townhouse with view of the gulf. Located at Cape San Bias.
Lots of extras. Owner anxious. Only $69,900.
SANDCLIFFS TOWNHOUSES: New 2 BR, 2'1 bath gulf front townhouses. Many extra features.
Owner anxious. $89,500 each.
CAPE PLANTATION: Under construction, 3 BR, 2 bath executive home with family room. Screened
porch provides terrific view of the golf course. Buy now and choose your colors. Only $115,000.
EXECUTIVE HOME at Cape Plantation. 3 BR, 21/2 baths, great room with fireplace and a study. Large
deck overlooks golf course. Buy early and take advantage of preconstruction price. $115,000.


Lo






The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23, 1987 Page Nine


Lot: Mexico Beach, off
Hwy. 386-A on Cypress Lane,
87%'x125'. $5,000 or best of-
fer. Call 648-8565 or 229-8533
anytime.
Office building (nice du-
plex) in Port St. Joe. Positive
cash flow and lengthy rental
history. Serious inquiries on-
ly. Call 813-682-4655. 4tc 416

2.73 acres at Overstreet,
Sunshine Farms. Corner lot,
$7,000. For more information
call 229-8522. 4tp 416
Corner of Georgia and
Louisiana, Mexico Beach.
New 14'x70' trailer, 3 bdrm.,
2 ba., with fireplace, front &
back porches. For more in-
formation contact Bill Carr
at 229-6961. tfc 3/5
GULF FRONT LOTS
75'x400' beautiful white
sand beach. Underground
utilities. $55,000, owner
financing 10% down balance
over 5 yrs payable interest
only for 5 years at 9%.
GULF VIEW LOTS
Restricted lots with direct
access to beach. Nice homes
already built in this subdiv-
ision, high and dry. Only
$30,000. Owner financing.
Call 227-1539
tfc 2/26
2 bdrm., 1% ba. townhouse
in Gulf Aire. Call Gary Over-
holt, 648-5906 or 227-1931.
tfc 4/9
209 7th St., Mexico Beach.
3 bdrm., 2 ba. brick, chain
link fence. Large back
porch, hot house, utility
bldg. Carport, etc. Call
229-6961 or contact Bill Carr.
tfc 3/5


Mexico Beach: for rent,
beautiful 3 bdrm., 2 full bath
home. Good neighborhood.
No pets. 648-5302. Itp
For Rent: Nice 2 bdrm.
apartment in triplex at 606
Woodward Ave. No pets,
adults only. Reasonable rent
and deposit. Call Juawana
G. Combs, 227-1689. tfc 4/9
Available for 1 yr. lease:
unfurnished duplex, Hwy. 98
& 28th St., Mexico Beach. 2/1
ch&a, $285 per mo., ceiling
fans & washer hook-up.
1-385-7714 a.m., 1-386-6004
p.m. and 648-8789 weekends.
tfc 3/26
Room for rent: By day,
week, month. Air cond., TV.
Thames Hotel. 229-8723. 302
Reid Ave. tfc 4/17
For Rent: Warehouse
space with office. Approx.
850 square ft. Suitable for
contractor or small service
business. 227-1100 days only.
tfc 2/19
For Rent: Mini-warehouse
storage. For more informa-
tion call 229-6200. tfc 2/19

Year round rentals furnish-
ed and unfurnished also mob-
bile home spaces. Call 648-5000
tfc 3-26


PERSONAL

PERSONAL
Attractive lady in Ford
LTD parked at Tyndall Fed-
eral Credit Union Monday,
April 20, please call
904-984-5571 if interested in
white-haired gentleman.
2tp4/23


Station 98 taking applica.
tions for bartenders & wait-
resses. Apply in person, 10 to
6.
JOB NOTICE
The City of Port St. Joe
will be accepting applica-
tions for the following posi-
tions:
REFUSE COLLECTOR I
MAINTENANCE I -
STREETS & HIGHWAYS
MAINTENANCE I -
SEWER DEPARTMENT
(Chauffeur's license re-
quired).
Application and a complete
job description may be pick-
ed up and returned to the
Municipal Building, 305 Fifth
Street, beginning Thursday,
April 23 May 8, 1987, 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday -
Friday.
THE CITY OF PORT ST.
JOE IS AN EQUAL OPPOR-
TUNITY EMPLOYER.
THE CITY OF PORT ST.
SJOE
lsf L. A. Farris,
City. Auditor-Clerk
2t 4/23
Elderly lady needs some-
one to live in for small salary
plus room and board. Call
227-1525 ask for Janet or
227-1280 after 6:00 p.m.2tc 416

Baby sitter needed in Mex-
ico Beach in my home.
Transportation provided.
Call 648-5996. 2tc 416
Help Wanted: Inside sales-
person. Apply in person,
Johnson Lumber, Highland
View. tfc 4/9
JOB NOTICE
Gulf County Mosquito Con-
trol Department will be tak-
,ing applications for the foll-
owing positions:
Two (2) temporary and/or
part-time mosquito truck
drivers. Chauffeur's license

Application may be filled
out at the Gulf County Mos-
quito Control, 1001 Tenth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida.
Applications will be received
Monday Friday, 7:30 a.m. -
4:00 p.m., through April.24,
1987.


2t 4/16



U


Yard Sale: St. Joe Beach,
corner Hwy. 98 & Balboa.
Household items, toys, cloth-
ing -(boys, misses, men).
Saturday, April 25, 8:30 a.m.
5:30 p.m. EST. Rain
cancels.
Garage Sale: Friday and
Saturday, 445 2nd Ave., H.V.
Hide-a-couch, baby clothes &
mattress, Ig. adult clothes,
misc.
King size bed, misc. furni-
ture, sewing machine, chil-
dren's clothes, toys. Satur-
day, 8 to 3. 209 Magnolia (off
Sea St.), Mexico Beach.
648-8282.
Yard Sale: Friday, April
24, 9:00 a.m., Gulf St., St. Joe
Beach. Furniture, dishes,
books, clothes, and etc.
Yard Sale: Saturday, 8:30
to 1:00, April 25. 1613 Marvin
Ave. New pedestal. sink,
refrig. & lots of clothes & 2
boys bikes. Cancelled if rain-
ing.
Garage Sale: Boats, organ
& assorted furniture, odds
and ends. 7: 00 5:00., April
25 & 26. Early birds
welcome. 602 Georgia Ave.,
Mexico Beach.
Large 4-family garage
sale. Many household items,
clothes and furniture. Fri-
day and Saturday, 8 till. 117
Monica Dr., Ward Ridge.
Carport Sale: Friday and
Saturday, 9:00 3:00. 302
Battle St. '
Garage Sale: 2420 Long
Ave., Nazarene Church.
Saturday, April 25, 8 till.
Several families.
Yard Sale: Friday, April
24, 8 to 4. Corner Pineda &
Georgia, St. Joe Beach. Rain
cancels.

Steel building sale. Call
now for spring special.
Poloronis Construction.
1-653-8387. 3t 4/9


1981 20 ft. Road Ranger
- travel trailer, excel. cond.
Call 648-5497 after 6 p.m.
2tc 4/23
15 cu. ft. chest freezer,
e $150. Hatch cover, $20.
Custom made oak cabinet
and sink, $100. 648-5285.
King size bed, 11 yr. old.
Large upright freezer.
648-5367 nights or 648-5183
days.
A 16'x24' shop building or
storage shed. Can be seen at
1014 Garrison Avenue.
$1,800. 2tc 4/23
1983 28 ft. houseboat with
90 h.p. Johnson, flying
bridge & twin axle trailer,
$8,000 or best offer. To be
shown or seen at 209 9th St.,
Port St. Joe. 2tp 4/23
One tandem axle trailer
with 6'x12' steel deck &
removable side bodies. Can
be seen at St. Joe Machine or
call 229-6803, 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. 2tc4/23
Boat, motor and trailer.
New '87 motor, 25 Johnson.
$2,500.00. Call 229-6443.4tp 416

Floating houseboat com-
plete. with 2500 watt genera-
tor, gas stove and refrigera-
tor, bunk, bathroom and
screened in porch. $5,700.00,
Call 653-9514. 3tc 416

16 foot flat bottom Jon
boat. 19 foot wooden mullet
boat with accessories. Equip-
ped with 35 hp Mercury
motor, self injected oil sys-
tem. Lowery Tri organ -
double keyboard. See at 602
Georgia Ave., Mexico Beach.
2tp 416

1972 12 X 72 mobile home. 3
bedroom, 2 bath, all appli-
ances, 2 window air condi-
tioners, partly furnished,
$4,000.00. Call 227-1476 or
22948710. 2tp 416

60' mobile home, 2 bdrm.,
2 ba. ch&a, new air condi-
tioner, $5,500. 648-8823.5tc 4/2
Sears riding mower, 36"
cut, excel. cond., 2 yrs. old,
cost $1,100, yours for $600.
648-8823. 5tc 4/2
1984 24' Trembley boat
with 115 h.p. 1984 Evinrude
motor, and like new 5,000 lb.
galvanized trailer. 229-6798.
tfc 4/2
21 foot Trimbly gill net boat
with 85 hp Evinrude motor
with power trim. $1500.00 Call
229-8035 or 227-1400. tfc 326

Used truck tires, 10.00 x 22
BF Goodrich, good wear left. 7
lug tires, 2 steering axle tires.
$60.00 each. Call 648-8752 after
6p.m. tfc 4-2
27' Chris Craft Cruiser,
ready for summer fun,
$8,500. Call 227-1281. 2tc 4/23



JUST RELEASED!
Limited edition prints of
Overstreet Bridge by
Pat Bowen, $35 ea. Call
648-8914 to reserve
yours. tfc 4/23

Beautiful limited edition
prints of Overstreet Post Of-
fice or Indian Pass Trading
Post by Pat Bowep. See
them at Overstreet Post Of-
fice, the Cluett Gallery in the
Mexico Beach Mini-mall,
and at Indian Pass Trading
Post. To reserve yours or for
further information call"
648-8914. Price is $35.00 for
each print, tfc 4/23
1977 Chevy van, $600.
648-8313. tfc 3/19
No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251.
12'x65' mobile home, 2
bdirm., 1 ha., furn. $8,000 or
best offer. Call 227-7291.
tfc 1/1

20' boat & trailer, 318 V8
Chrysler inboard, center
console, 2 axle galv. trail-
er. 1974 Ford van, 4 wheel
drive, excel, cond. Many
extras. Must see to appre-
ciate. Call 648-8319 or
648-8993.


1979 Mazda RX7, standard
5 speed, a-c, AM-FM Pioneer
stereo with cassette, new red
paint job, aluminum wheels.
$3,800.00 Call 229-8899 or
648-8670 tfc 416
Ford truck for sale, $900.00.
Presently in use. Call 648-
8952. tfc 416


1987 Camaro, burgundy
with stripes, t-tops, tinted
windows, louvers, am/fm
stereo, tilt steering, ac, at,
ps, pb, 11,000 miles. Great
shape, must sell. Call or con-
tact Marion at work, 227-1717
before 5:30. tfc 4/16
Buick Riviera 1979. 63,000
miles, take over payments
through Credit Union.
229-6769. ltp


1978 CJ5 jeep. Rusty, come
see, make offer. Call George
229-8398. tfc 4/23
1974 Grand Prix, rebuilt
motor, transmission &
brakes. Looks & runs good,
$1,000. 19" remote control
color TV, $150. Gulf View
Motel No. 5. No phone calls,
please.


Wanted: Secure storage
area 12' x 35' for boat and
trailer. Call 229-6383.. l^

Copies
Available at
The Star
30R Williams AvenueI


I SERVICES-


Tri-Chem class in velvet
painting Wednesday, April
29, 5 to 7 p.m. at The Sand
Dollar Pizza.
Babysitting in my home,
Monday thru Friday, any
hours. Mature, dependable.
References upon request.
227-7477. 3tp 4/23


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon.-Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off




There will be a stated
communication the 1st &
3rd Thursday of each
month, 8:00 p.m.
H.B. Neel, W.M.
C.C. Peterson, Sec.
tfc 1/22/87



C.P. ETHEREDGE
&SON
Plumbing & Electrical
Contractor
Phone 229-8986
Port St. Joe
tfc 2/5



PAINTING
20 years experience
Satisfaction guaranteed.
.229-6886
Darre ens
tfc 2/19

A-1 ROOFING
Carpentry, Repairs,
painting, Etc.
Ed Mosley
227-1209
tfc 2/19


JOHN F. LAW
Panama City
Layer Ph. 265-4794
22 years experience
Worker's compensation
Occupational Diseases
Injuries and Accidents
(No charge for
1st conference)
tfc 3/26



ST. JOE CUSTOM
BUILDERS





--Commercial Building
-Residential Building
--Cabinet Work
Gen. Con. RG 0033843

GLEN F. COMBS
227-1689
P. O. BOX 456 4
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tfc 7/4


LAWN SERVICE AND
YARD WORK
Small job around the home.
Call Dexter Whitaker
227-1371
6tp4/16

COSTIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 4/17



AL'S MOBILE
MECHANIC SERVICE
We bring our shop to
your car.
Serving the beaches and
Port St. Joe area
Phone 648-8244




Elizabeth's
Ceramics
Highway 71
6 mi. south of Wewa

/2 Price
Used Molds, Green-,
ware, Bisque &
Some Paints
Sale Good Thru April



THE SAND DOLLAR PIZZA
and SANDWICH SHOP
Ice Cream Floats
and Cones
229-8900
Mon.- Fri.
10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
10% Discount for
Senior Citizens


TECHNICAL SERVICE TO
THE CONSTRUCTION
INDUSTRY
Design & Drafting
Plot Plans
Energy calculations
Electrical design
Materiel take-off
Cost estimates
Reasonable Rates
THORNTON
ASSOCIATES
648-5142
RG 0045625
ER 0010245
10tp 412


Fishing Tackle
HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue
tfc 7/4


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
j22ttRiMd Ave. Port St. Joe, FL

.(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Margaret-Hale 648-5659 Roy Smith
Broker-Salesman
Frances Chason 229-8747
Denise Strickland 229-6571
HOMES
New Listing: Port St. Joe, 2 ro l ath, shd home on corner
lot in good residential nei r ire.c carpet, appliances,
redecorated kitchen. Pricedi sa M 0.
St. Joe Beach: Very attractive executive home located on 2 beautiful
landscaped lots 3 bedroom, 2 bath, garden tub, great room, fireplace,
screen porch, balcony, deck, lots of built-ins, double garage with
workshop. Many other features, including greenhouse. By appt. only.
Port St. Joe: Price reduced on this nice 3 bedroom, 1% bath masonary
home with garage & large panelled storage room and utility area; located
on 3 nice shaded lots with chain link fence in good neighborhood. $56,600.
Port St. Joe: Immaculate 3 bedroom, 1 bath masonry home,,freshly
painted, central heat & air, mini blinds, with 1,408 sq. ft. living area
located on large lot-with nice storage shed. $55,000.
Port St. Joe: 3 bedroom, 2 bath, large den, new carpet, carport, fenced
yard. $58,000.
New Listing Port St. Joe: Close to downtown, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, outside
storage. Assumable mortgage. Only $27,825.
Port St. Joe: 2 bedroom, lhath, 2 car carport, fenced ayrd on 1 lots. Gas
heat, window a/c. Utility room & outside storage. $37,000.
-Mexico Beach: Prime location, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screen porch, deck,
guest house. Owner will listen to offer.
Mexico Beach: New listing; Attractive and livable 3 bedroom, 2 bath
brick home on 2 shaded lots, replace, porch, garage, fenced yard. Only
$67,000.
Oak Grove: Possible owner financing on this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home,
screen porch, outside storage. $37,000 asking price. Make an offer!
St. Joe Beach: Built for large family. 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, playroom,
workshop, fenced yard. By appointment only $75,000.
Mexico Beach: Price reduced on this unique 2 or 3 bedroom home close to
beach. Great room with fireplace, private patio, plenty of storage. Only
$50,000:
North Port St. Joe: 2 bedroom, 1 bath, enclosed porch, excellent condi-
tion..Now only $18,000.
St. Joe Beach: 2 bedroom, 1 bath, central heat & air, carpet, new kitchen,
deck, gulf view. Only $49,500.
North Port St. Joe: 2 houses in good condition, $30,000.
Port St. Joe: 3 bedroom, 1 bath frame home close to downtown. $14,500.
Mexico Beach: Owner Says Sell, 3 bedroom, 2 bath trailer on 2 lots close
to beach. Was listed at $35,000. Will listen to offers.
North Port St. Joe: 3 bedroom, 1 bath, remodeled kitchen, new roof. Now
only112,500.
Simmons Bayou: Large 4 bedroom home with beautiful hardwood floorS
& juniper paneling. Lots of trees on 3 acres, 267 ft. of bayfront. Shown by
appt.
Oak Grove: Good rental property, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, den, carport. Only
$21,500.
St. Joe Beach: 2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home, nice shaded lot, $31,500.
St. Joe Beach: Extra large, 4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Brand new carpet,
new kitchen, only 2 blocks from beach. $42,000.
LOTS
Ward Ridge: 2 lots 75'x185' each to be sold together. $16,000.
Mexico Beach: Owner financing on two lots zoned for trailers, $15,500.
St. Joe Beach: 4 lots, 150'x75'-each. Comer Cortez & Alabama, $55,000.
Mexico Beach: Owner wants to sell. 2 lots beachside of Hwy. 98. Can be
used commercial, make an offer.
Cape Plantation: Exclusive homesites available close to golf, swimming
& tennis, underground utilities. From $16,000. Owner financing.
Cape Plantation: Acre zoned commercial, excellent restaurant location.
$45,500.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive, $10,000.
St. Joe Beach: Price reduced on lot. Corner Coronado & Americus, now
only $13,500. ,
St. Joseph Shores: 80' Gulf Front, Hwy. 98 to water.
Port St. Joe: Close to business district 50x170', $8,000.
St. Joe Beach: Large tract 231' on Highway and waterfront.
White City: Canal lot reduced to $28,000.
HOUSE FOR RENT
Port St. Joe: 2 bedroom, 1 bath house. No pets. $250 per month. Deposit
required.


Sales, Service and
Installation
FCC Licensed Technicians
FRANK RITCH
227-1590


Psychological services for
anyone with problems in
day-to-day living. Gulf Coun-
ty Guidance Clinic, Port S.
Joe. 227-1145 (24 hours).
We do carpenter work,
painting, rough work, out-
side housecleaning. Call for
free estimates, 639-5030,
Wewahitchka. 4tp 4/9


Ye Olde
Bargain Barn
102 Reid Ave.
JEWELRY TOYS
KNIC KNACS
SOCKS TOOLS
GIFTS NOVELTIES
Artificial Flowers,
etc. Some used
merchandise
COME SEE US -
YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID


BAY VIEW SEPTIC
TANK SERVICE

WE RENT PORT-O-LETS
PUMP SEPTIC TANKS

DONNIE SMITH

ROUTE 2, BOX A1C
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


229-6018


52tc2/19


Fife Construction
and Service Co.
Mexico Beach, Florida
R. Nathan Fife
648-8710
4tp4/23

Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8 P.M., E.S.T.
Al-Anon
Tuesday, 8 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church



Wauneta's
Accounting &
Income Tax
Wauneta Brewer
St. Joe Beach
649-5043
1987 paid


BOB'S AUCTION
across from paper mill
213 S. East Ave.
Panama City
904/265-0699
We buy furniture,
misc. Houseful or by the
piece. All consignments
welcome.
7:30 p.m. Every Saturday
nite. You all come see us.
4tp 4/9



Coastal
Chem-Dry
The Carbonated
Carpet Cleaning
* Most Carpets Dry In 40
Minutes
* No Steam or Shampoo
* Removes Stubborn
Stains, Even Pet Stains
* No Sticky Residue to
Resoil
* Economical
serving Gulf &
Franklin County

Bill & Lyndla
Williams
1.800-602-4907
o or 648-8388


5tp 412


The Sewing Rooni
410 A Reid Avenue
ppj' Port St. Joe, Florida vor/PoS

'Quality Fabrics at Affordable Prices"




REEVES FURNITURE &

B REFINISHING SHOPPE
REFERENCES Phone229-6374
Call and Talk to Us About Getting
Your Furniture Refinished to
Look Like New.
Across from Duren's Economy Store,
Highway 98
tfc 6/6






Southern Erectors, Inc.
EQUIPMENT RENTAL
BOOM CRANES AIR COMPRESSORS
BACKHOES WELDING EQUIPMENT
DUMP TRUCKS
Phone Day 227-1570
ip ~Night 648-8417


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue tfc 7/4


I HELP wANTED I


MISC.
FOR SALE


GARAGE
-SALES


........... v


0






CASHPOT
THIS WEEK


DRAWING FRIDAY 5:00 P.M. ABSOLUTE
DEADLINE TO CLAIM CASHPOT FOLLOW-
ING SATURDAY AT 8:30 P.M. DO NOT
CALL, COME IN & CHECK YOUR NUMBER


Our Cash Pot Is Great!


SOVER $6,300

A has been given away
/ Betty Boyd was the winner of the $300 Cashpot given away April 11. Ann Vitale
was the winner of the $100 Cashpot given away April 18.


510 FIFTH STREET
PORT ST. JOE, FJ_


BULK U. S. POSTAGE
PAID
Permit No. 65
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


CARRIER ROUTE
PRE-SORTED
OCCUPANT P. 0. BOX ______


|k Home-Owned and Operated I
,%%%L byGEORGE W. DUREN I


'A


Prices Good
April 22-28


II


Ground Turkey (Beef Added)(.FamlyPak).. pound49

Quartered Fryer Thighs(FamilyPa., ..... pound 29


i-amiy PaK
SLICED SLAB BACON ........
Family Pak Choice
FRYER DRUMSTICKS.........
Family Pak
GROUND BEEF ............. .
Cooking Good 2 to Bag
WHOLE FRYERS.............


lb. 1.19
.. .59C
l. ..88"
.. b.59"


CUBED CHUCK STEAK ........ lb. 1.79
Family Pak
RIB EYE STEAK ............. lb. 3.99
With 2 Extra Backs & Giblets
CUT-UP WHOLE FRYERS........... 39
Whole and Steaks
Fresh Water CHANNEL CATFISH ib.$1 ..


ROCKBOTOM PECAL


Coupon Expires April 28, 1987


ANGEL SOFT
ISSUE


4 roll


aR


Chocolate & Vanilla
SOFT
ICE CREAM I
CONES ,'t
Breakfast Ready at 5:50 A.M.
Eggs, Grits, Sausage or Bacon,
Biscuit, Country Gravy 4
BREAKFAST PLATE


pkg. Let Our Bakery Create A
C ACK EA
for that special occasion.
Kellogg's [ Call 229-8398 or come by from 6 a.m.
IICE KRISPIES \ ~A


3 oz.$49
box M49


KRAFT
May'naise
qt. jar


Nabisco Premium 1 lb.
SALTINES ....
Nabisco 18 Oz.
CHIPS AHOY ..
12 oz WNabisco
. NILLA WAFERS


12 oz. can
SHASTA
24 can case

$ 399
WITH 6 ROCK BOTTOM COUPONS


$109
$219
$159


IPEMA
Iips


REAL VALUE
Ice Cream
V2 gallon


WITH 6 ROCK BOTTOM COUPONS


HIuNZ
Ketchup
32 oz.

880
WITH 6 ROCK BOTTOM COUPONS


64 oz. Tree Top
Apple Juice...
46 oz. Mt. Olive Fresh
Kosher Dills..
15 oz. Lea Perrins Bonus Pak
Steak Sauce..


$13T
$119

$189


"20 ct. Glad Family Pak
Trash Bags...
24 oz. Basin, Tub & Tile
Lysol Cleaner.
14 oz.
Ajax Cleanser.


$199
$179

3/$1


FROZENFOOIDi


9 Ounce .
FOX DELUXE

PIZZAS 7
8 Oz. Chicken, Turkey or Beef
MORTON POT PIES .....
8 Oz. Morton
MACARONI & CHEESE ...
6 Ears Real Value
COB CORN ............
14 Oz. Choco., Coconut, Banana, Lemon
BANQUET CREAM PIES...


9 C

31$100
3/$100

.. 99
. 89C


1 Lb. Imperial
MARGARINE.. 3I$1
5 Ct. Butter Tasting Regular 3 1 I00
Hungry Jack Biscuits .... /$
6 Oz. Pillsbury
CINNAMON ROLLS ........ 69
8 Oz. Kraft Philadelphia .9 0
CREAM CHEESE .......... 99
0iREAM ...... 990
16 Oz. Breakstone Lowfat I
COTAGE CHEESE......... 99


RED DELICIOUS (LARGE)

APPLES. 5for


$100


y IJ~t!Fresh Bunches 2 A
-n- GREEN ONIONS 1/39
Fresh
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SI Fresh Head
ears W LETTUCE ... head59
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Charcoal


10 lb. bag


9


Totino Pizzas


each 99


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1


II


0


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Hill Wins


Cynthia L. Hill, a reporter for WJHG-TV, is shown recognition o
receiving a $1,000 check from Mrs. George G. Tapper, in Tapper First

HIGHLAND VIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth Street and Second Avenue
Welcome Friend
SUNDAY SCHOOL ................................... ... 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICE ... . . . 11:00 A.M. & 7:00 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ............................ 6:00 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday)................... ...... 7:00 P.M.
NURSERY PROVIDED JIMMY CLARK, Pastor


PI'' V D r We Want You To Be
A Part of The Friendly Place

BIBL.E STUDY......., 9:45a.m. EVENINGWORSHIP... 7:00 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m. WEDNESDAY ......... 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH TRAINING .. 5:45 p.m.

Long Avenue Baptist Church


1601 LONG AVENUE
MICHAEL HANDY, Minister of Music & Youth


DANIEL W. DUNCAN, Pastor


F AlcC hA


Shorty 229-6798
26 Years Experience Licensed and Bonded
Commercial Residential -'f J
Remodeling and Service Work
^1 Reg. No. ER-004631
.: Charles Sowell

r, ^Sur-Way Electric
S-. 411 Reid Avenue


Tapper


of her selection as the winner of the George G.
t Amendment Award.

Dreamers & Doers
The 1987 Florida Teacher of the
Year and three students from Gulf
County will be honored at Walt Disney
World's fourth annual Dreamers and
Doers awards ceremonies May 4 -at
the Contemporary Resort.
Alan Thicke, star of the ABC-TV
series "Growing Pains," will be the
guest speaker.
Jodi Ann Mapes of Port St. Joe
.- Elementary, Peter Klope of Port St.
Joe Jr.-Sr. High and Patria Mathes of
Wewahitchka High are among 141
students statewide who were chosen
by their county school superintendent
for exemplifying the "Four Cs" Walt
Disney felt were necessary to fulfill
dreams courage, curiosity, confi-
dence and constancy during academ-
ic and extracurricular activities.
The Florida Department of Edu-
cation will make its annual Teacher of
the Year announcement at this year's
Dreamers and Doers program. The
five finalists for Teacher of the Year
will be present as well as Florida
Education Commissioner Betty Cas-
S tor, who will announce, the winner.
The Dreamers and Doers cere-
. mony will be held in the Ballroom of
the Americas at the Contemporary
- Resort beginning at 1 p.m.


Raffield Fisheries started as a
family operation nearly 30 years ago,
with two small boats, a little bit of
money and a need to make a living.
"Today, we now have, 11 men of the
family producing and a host of
employees, but we're operating with
state of the art equipment", Gene
Raffield, manager of the business,
told the Rotary Club Thursday.
The speaker pointed out that
today the family firm operates a plant
capable of blast freezing 200,000
pounds of product per day to 20
degrees below zero and capability of
storing 10 million pounds of product
frozen to zero degrees.
"The disastrous fire of two years
ago came at a point when we were
beginning to get over the growth pains
of the past 25 years, and now we are
starting all over again with more
family and a stronger. resolve of
purpose", Raffield said,
The firm has shifted its emphasis
to marketing non-traditional fish
products. "There were plenty of
producers turning out shrimp, oys-
ters, snapper and grouper, but not any
at all specializing in the species of fish
we have been after in recent years",
the fisheries operator said.
Placing its attention on the
under-utilized species of fish, the local
plant has secured a market for
everything they can catch. "We don't
throw anything away", Raffield said.


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With

Hannon Insurance Agency, Inc.


SAuto Home The Insurance Store Since 1943
Auto s Home
Business 8:30 till 6:00 Monday through Friday


* Flood Life
Bonds
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Phone 227-1133


We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


Award


For Coverage

On Books

Controversy
Cynthia L. Hill, a reporter for
WJHG-TV, has been named the
second winner of the George G.
Tapper First Amendment.Award. Hill
was selected for this prestigious
award for her coverage of the book
banning controversy in the Bay
County School System.
This award includes a $1,000 cash
prize and a 24 inch high trophy cast in
bronze and inscribed with the First
Amendment. The trophy was created
by Gulf Coast Community College art
professor and sculptor Roland Hock-
ett.
The late George G. Tapper
established the award in the hope that
such recognition' would encourage
members of the media to improve the
dissemination of news and inform-
ation and "that truth and fairness will
always be an integral part of the
journalist's professional life."'
Albert T. Scroggins, dean emeri-
tus of the College of Journalism at the
University of South Carolina, judged
the competition. Scroggins commend-
ed Hill for "the objectivity and dignity
with which she handled the issue,
especially since the news coverage
subjected her to harassment and even
personal danger."
He also praised her understand-
ing of the critical First Amendment
issues involved and her highly profes-
sional reporting of the issues.
A graduate of the University df
West Florida, Hill has served as
education reporter for WJHG-TV
since May of 1986.
The George G, Tapper First
Amendment Award is administered
by a three-person executive commit-
tee composed of Bill Salter, editor of
The News-Herald; Joe Moore, news
director of WJHG-TV, Panama City;
and Mo Pujol, publisher of the
Washington County News, Chipley.
Assisting the executive committee
was an advisory committee composed
of Wesley Ramsey, The Star, Gulf
County; Larry Donaldson, Radio
Station WTBB, Holmes County; and
Tommy Speights, WTVY, Jackson
County.
The award is open to any
journalist or team of journalists
working at a newspaper, television
station or radio station with offices of
Bay, Gulf, Washington, Holmes;
Franklin or Jackson countiess,


"Even the trimmings and debris from
the fish cleaning operation is ground
up, frozen and sold to pet food
manufacturers", the speaker said.
,"We don't throw anything away but
the water which the fish swim in", he
emphasized.
In addition to marketing the
species usually ignored by seafood
producers, the local firm is branching
out into preparation of seafood
.portions for wholesaling to major
grocery chains. The first step into this
new venture is the marketing of a
blackened fish filet package, contain-
ing a pound of fish fillets, ready for the
micro-wave or the frying pan. "We
have a big contract for this product
and it should mean a lot for our
,business", he said.
The firm has also leased out some
of its processing and freezer capacity
to a Canadian firm which is importing
seafood from Argentina, Chile and
other South American countries,
packing it in retail packets and
marketing it all over the United
States. "This firm is packing and
marketing from 300,000 to 600,000
pounds of this product a month, which
.helps us utilize our entire plant
capacity and provides a source of jobs
for our county", he pointed out.
Raffield pointed out the firm is
still going strong, after the disastrous
'fire and that indications are that the
Future holds nothing but growth and
expansion in the industry in which
they are a major participant along the
Gulf Coast.

Register for

Summer School
Summer school registration for
summer 1987 graduates of Gulf Coast
Community College will be held
Wednesday, April 29, through Friday,
May 1, from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. in the
Office of Admissions and Records.
These students must present a
course approval card signed by their
advisers, in order to register.
Summer Session A will begin May
11 and end June 19. Summer Session B
will begin June 22 and end July 31.
More information about registra-
tion for summer 1987 GCCC graduates
is available at 769-1551, ext. 241.


The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23, 1987 Page Eleven

Say You Saw It In The Star!!

"THE CHURCH AFLAME IN PORT ST. JOE"

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
102 Third Street
Evangelistic Worship Services Christ Centered Youth Program
Regular Bible Study An Exciting Place to Attend
Ministering to the Where Everyone is Welcome
Total Family Regular Services
Fully Graded Choirs Sunday & Wednesday
HOWARD BROWNING, Pastor


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St. Joe Hardware


201 Williams Avenue


Raffield Says Local

Fisheries Is Back and

Gaining Production


Now Open in Port St. Joe

ELLIOTT

COMMUNICATIONS

TELEPHONE REPAIR
TELEPHONE INSTALLATION
TELEPHONES & PARTS FOR SALE
TELEPHONE NEW CONSTRUCTION PRE-WIRE
VCR REPAIR
WIRELESS TELEPHONE REPAIR

Showroom and office located at
210 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
OPEN 8 A.M. till 5 P.M. MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY

K Telephone 229-8049
^ ____ ________


Phone 229-8028


MMMMMM%#.,


mmmmo


in







Page TI elve The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23,1987


Centipede Another Favorite Strain of Lawn Grass


By ROY LEE CARTER
Extension Agent
On recent programs, I have
talked about selecting a lawngrass,
focusing on the advantages and
disadvantages of the varieties most
commonly grown In Florida. In this
article I will discuss another low-
maintenance grass which grows well
in fillsun or light shade, and thrives
on lightly fertilized-, acid soils. My
subject is the most popular lawngrass
in North and West Florida, centipede.
I'Ullalk about how to start a centipede
lawn and the care it needs.
Centipede grass produces a med-
iuro textured lawn with good shade
tolerance and very few maintenance
problems. The biggest draw back with
cefntipede grass is its poor salt
tolerance. So, we don't recommend it
for beach areas. My information on
centipede grass Was provided by
Extension Urban Horticulture Spe-
cia st, Dr. Robert Black, of the

Gal. : 52-23

y I



>OOXNESS
FAITH

HIGHLAND VIEW
CHURCH of GOD
319 Sixth St., Highland View
"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An Everflowing
Fountain"
SUNDAY SCHOOL.... 10:00 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
EVENING WORSHIP ..6:00 p.m.
WED. EVENING ...... 7:00 p.m.'
PASTOR
REV. ROBERT RATHBUN


Catch the S kit
STHE VNrrED METH6O6MT CHURCH


ROY LEE CARTER


" Fast, ea
* Will nev
* Provides.
" Reduces
* Low ma
* Lightwe


University of Florida's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS).
Several types of centipede grass
are grown in the United States. But,
here in Florida, we u -' only the
common variety. You can start z
centipede lawn with sod, sprigs, or
seed. Seeding is the most common
method.
It's best to plant centipede seed
between April and September. Plant-
ing just before the rainy season is
ideal, because you must keep the soil
continuously moist until the seedlings
are well established.
If you have never bought centi-
pede seed before, you are in for a mild
shock when you get to your garden
center. At first glance, the seed prices -
seem outrageous. But seeding is still
cheaper than sodding or sprigging.
That's because the seed goes a long
way. In fact, four ounces of centiped
seed is enough for a one thousand
square foot area. That's good news in


.0 0


Port St. Joe High School


Principal Edwin G. Williams
recently released the honor roll for the
fifth six weeks at Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr.
High School.
SEVENTH GRADE
All A's
Patricia Nedley.
A&B
Chad Arrant, 'Christine Butz,
Ivelisse Cosme, Bobby Gay, Joel Huft,
Kellie Moree, Randy Ramsey and
Dana Swatts.
EIGHTH GRADE
All A's
Peter Klope.
A&B
Jabbar Alexander, Derrick Chit-
ty, Sharon Cook, Stephanie Cox,
Patrick Freeman, Kyle Griffin, Rich-
ard Holley, William Lewis, Rachel


Constitution and Monument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
SUNDAY SCHOOL.... 9:30 a.m. EVENING WORSHIP ... 7:30 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m. BIBLE STUDY,
METHODIST YOUTH WEDNESDAY.....9:30 a.m.
530 p, W'ST iU
FJ LLOW S I 5:30, p.m. WETHUNSDAY '... ; n.'m "
IREV.wENNI,).'E..=I REV.-HARRY C. JOHNSON





SHeating'& Air "



Appliance
Repair

Plumbing& Electrical Work
229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle
ER0007623, RF0040131, RA0043378 i. 19




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CUSTOM CLEAN


to ,IF ONDULINE







YOURIAST.
SRed and Brown In Stock
Other colors available:
& Provides added Insulation as a roof-over Black, white, silver, green, blue,
red, brown. tan. Other colors by
* Ideal for patio roof special order.
* Attractive skirting material u
* Won't rust or corrode'
* Can be repainted any color
Contemporary look
p r1 ,ii.,n H .i k


McCulley, Debra Monteiro, Bobby
Nobles, Paula Pendarvis, Wade Phil-
lips, Chris Roberson, Matthew Taylor,
Steven White, Gwen WhiteEagle, and
Paris Yancy.
NINTH GRADE
A&B
Esther Cox, Timothy Kerigan,
John Parker and Jeff Richards.
TENTH GRADE
All A's
Hilda Cosme and Michael Ram-
sey.
A&B
Stacy Barnhill, Lance Carinpbell,
Stacie Chitty, Dewanna Davidson, J.
Lee Johnson, Stacy Kemp, Michael
Lewter, Margaret Maige, Mitchell
McChristian, Christy McDaniel, Tra-
cy Melvin, Daniel Moree, George
Newsome, Laura Ridgley, Cyrus
Riley, Hannon Smith, Robert Van
Pietersom and James Pate.
ELEVENTH GRADE
A&B
Tracy Fields, Shannon Frickey,
Barry Hoffman, Dawn Holloman,
Steve Howell, Lisa Mahlkov, Marcella
Parker, Doris Sander, George Vathis
and Marsha Wilder.
TWELFTH GRADE
A&B
Twila Burns, Paula Byrd, Kath-
Sone Carrillo, Mark Costin, Charles
Cox, Debbie Davis, Kim Emfinger,
April Fadio, Tommy Ford, Melissa
Handley, Tommy Humphrey, Randi
McClain, Gregory Parker, Emily Six,
David Staab, Randy Wilder, Edward
Wood, Nancy Stoutamire, Christina
Weber, and Carl White.
All B's
Stephen Coffey and Sean Dowis.
ELEVENTH VE
Charles Dawson.


Faith Christian

Honor Students
Fred Goebert, principal of Faith
Christian School recently released the
honor roll for the fifth six weeks.
FIRST GRADE
All A's
Courtney Allen. ,
A&B '
Amanda Haney, Bonnie Young,,
Brandis Paul, Chris Robershaw, Griff
Gainnie, Jason Shoaf, Jeff Schwei-
kert, Lee Goff, Paul Marks, Stepha-
nie Owens, and Wayne Summers.
SECOND GRADE
All A's
Shana Hammock and Nathaif
Marks.
A&B
Wesley Cooper and Kate Jackson.
THIRD GRADE .
ALL A's
Brigette Godfrey.


sy Installation
er rust or corrode
s added insulation
s noise, unlike metal roofing
intenance
ight, easy to handle



The Lifetime Roofulin
The Lifetime Roofing


terms of seed cost. But, it can be bad
news when it comes to spreading the
seed over the lawn site. You'd have a
hard time spreading such a small
amount of seed evenly over such a
large area. So mix the seed with some
kind of carrier, such as sand, to make
it easier to distribute.
Once you get the seed in the
ground, one of the most important
factors in establishing your centipede
lawn is proper fertilization. Unlike
many plants, centipede grass needs
very little fertilizer. In fact too much

Report Any S.S.
Changes Quickly

Here's an important reminder if
you get monthly Social Security
checks: Promptly report any changes
that may affect your benefits. In this
way, you can avoid a possible
overpayment.
The most common cause of
overpayments is too much earnings
from working. Inform Social Security
if you expect 1987 earnings to exceed:
$6,000 if you are under 65; or $8,160 if
you are 65 through 69. (There is no
earnings limit if you are 70 or older.)
Last year the limit was: $5,760 for
those under 65, and $7,800 for people 65
through 69. If you received benefits in
1986 and exceeded those limits, make
sure you complete an Annual Report
of Earnings no later than April 15,
1987, if you haven't done so already.
Following are additional events
that must be reported to prevent an
overpayment: Death of a beneficiary;
marriage of a dependent or survivor;
payee no longer has custody of a
beneficiary; or there is a change in
income, resources, or household occu-
pants if a person also receives
supplemental security income (SSI)
checks.


FOURTH GRADE
A&B
Ashley Allen, Caleb Lanier, John
.Murphy and Philip Murphy.
FIFTH GRADE
A&B
Brant Bizek, Eric Monteiro, Traci
Peiffer and Michael Schweikert.
SIXTH GRADE
Mark Willis.


Name Left Off
Tawanda Jenkins, a 4th grader at
Pprt St. Joe Elementary School, had
ho- name left.pofthe A & B honor roll
in last week's paper.


fertilizer can cause pest problems. In
most cases one or two applications of
15-0-15 or 13-13-13 complete fertilizer is
all that's needed.
You can add extra nitrogen in the
summer if the grass seems to be
losing color. Just don't add nitrogen in
late summer or early fall. Centipede
grass that's had a lot of nitrogen will
brown off very quickly after a frost
and lose its cold tolerance.
One of the common prouiems with
centipede grass is chlorosis, or
yellowing, caused by iron deficiency.
As we said earlier, centipede likes


DRI K r' BR~
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T-.


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acid soil. If the soil is too sweet (too
alkaline) the grass can't get the iron it
needs. You control iron chlorosis by
lowering the soil pH, or by adding an
iron fertilizer usually ferrous sulfate
an iron chelate (Key-late)
Centipeae pest problems include
insects called ground pearls. These
can be especially troublesome, be-
cause there's no good control avail-
able. Lawn caterpillars, grubs, mole
crickets, and nematodes also damage
centipede. For pest control inform-
ation, check with your garden center
or County Extension Office.


EXECUTIVE $43,995 cash price
3 or 4 bedrooms-2Y baths 1652 sq. ft. living area
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Honor Rolls .


FREE

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Port St. Joe


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SMinutes

Gulf County

School Board

The Gulf County School Board
met in regular session on March 3,
1987 at 5:30 p.m. in the Gulf County
Courthouse in Port St. Joe. The
following members were present: Ted
Whitfield, Waylon Graham, Gene
Raffield, Oscar Redd, and James
Hanlon. The Superintendent was also
present.
Chairman Whitfield presided and
the meeting was opened with prayer
by Redd, followed by the pledge of
allegiance to the flag. -
Board Chairman Whitfield pre-
sented a plaque designating Wewa-
hitchka Elementary, Port St. Joe
Elementary, Highland View Elemen-
tary, and Port St. Joe High as
meritorious schools.
Joyce Groom and Donna Roberts
met with the board requesting finan-
cial assistance for the 1987 Project
Graduation program at Wewahitchka
High School. The Board also reviewed
a request from the project committee
of Port St. Joe High School requesting
assistance.-The board discussed the
matter for both high schools and
tabled to make a final decision at the
April meeting.
On motion by Raffield, second by
Redd, the minutes of Feb. 3, 12, 1987
were approved. The vote was unani-
mous.
The board reviewed correspond-
ence from Rev. Howard Browning,
pastor, First Baptist Church extend-
ing appreciation for the use of the Port
St. Joe High School facilities during
the recent Tri-County Evangelistic
Crusade.
The Board discussed the covered
play area project at Highland View
Elementary School with Architect
Charles Gaskin. After a discussion, a
motion was made by Graham, second
by Hanlon to accept liquidation
damages for a period of sixty days.
The vote was unanimous.
On motion by Graham, second by
Redd, the board authorized the
Superintendent to begin preliminary
plans on the media center at Wewa-
hitchka Elementary School.
On motion by Graham, second by
Hanlon, the board voted unanimously
to approve the following personnel
matters for the 1986-87 school year:
Approved the employment of
Bruce Donald Taws for a teaching
position at Wewahitchka High School
for the remainder of the school,
effective March 9, 1987.
Approved a request from Betty
Lewis for a leave of absence from
April 1 through June 30, 1987 due to
illness in family.
Accepted the resignation of Joni
Rekstis as a teacher at Wewahitchka
High School effective February 24,
1987.
Appointed Billie Jean Guilford as
Coodinatf6f'bG hlf Ctihty "Adult'
Sch ao .a lOip-raryJasi&,or.the..
( remainder of the school year.
On motion by Redd, second by
Hanlon, the board voted unanimously
to dismiss David Williams from his
employment with the Gulf County
School Board. The Superintendent
advised Williams, at the meeting, of
his right to request a hearing.
On motion by Graham, second by
Raffield, the Board voted unanimous-
ly to approve the following matters:
Approved Gulf County District
Home-School Dropout Prevention and
Retrieval Program. This includes
letter of agreement and job descrip-
tion.
Approved an agreement between
the Gulf County School Board and
ABC Rehabilitation Services, Inc. for
physical therapy contract services.
Approved program and ancillary
facility lists for the Gulf School
System.
Approved vocational program
and training responsibility for 1986-87.
On motion by Graham, second by
Hanlon, the Board approved an
inter-county agreement to allow a
Franklin County resident to attend
school in Gulf County.
On motion by Graham, second by
Raffield, the Board approved a list of
items from the maintenance and
custodial department as surplus and
worn out and should be removed from
property record.
On motion by Hanlon, second by
Raffield, the board voted unanimous-
ly to accept the lowest and best school
food service bid as follows:
Quarterly Bids (Frozen Chilled;
processed foodstuffs)
Daffin Mercantile Company; Eli
Wit- Wholesale Center; Phillips
Meats;- P.R. Harrell & Sons; T.T.
Todd Company.
The board reviewed each cost
center's budget. No action necessary.
On motion by Raffield, second by
Graham, the board, voted unanimous-
ly that the bills be paid.
SOn motion by Redd, second by
Hanlon, the board voted unanimously
to approve the following matters:
Approved the payment of an
invoice from Florida School Board
Attorney's Association, Inc. in the
amount of $112.50 for 1987 dues.
The board acknowledged a check
in the amount of $2,000.00 from
Wewahitchka High School Band Boos-
ters for repayment of a loan to


purchase uniforms.
On motion by Raffield, second by
Hanlon, the Board unanimously direc-
ted Superintendent Wilder, Chairman
Ted Whitfield, and Board member
Redd to work with the pastor of First
Baptist Church in Wewahitchka re-
garding final settlement of the cost
factors involved in the use of the First
Baptist Church during the school year
1986-87.
Whitfield, yielding the chair to
vice chairman Hanlon, made a motion
and second by Redd that the amount
of proceeds from property sales
involving playground area at the
Wewahitchka Elementary School,
Main Street Site, which lies North of
River Road would be used as needed
to help fund the .construction of an


The Star, Port St. Joe, Fla. Thursday, April 23, 1987 Page Thrte



Make A Tomato Taste Like Vine Ripe


"The only thing standing between
satisfied customers and flavorful
tomatoes at this time of year is
refrigeration," says Wayne Hawkins,
Executive Vice President of the
Florida Tomato Exchange. "After
many years and well over a million
dollar investment in research, Florida
has created tomato varieties that
develop excellent color and delicious
taste. They may not compete with
home grown tomatoes, but they'll
come close if they're stored at room
temperature and not put in the
refrigerator."
The message is a familiar one.
Hawkins has explored a wide range of
media for communicating his vital
policy of "refrigeration no, room
temperatures yes" for fresh toma-
toes. "Yet, we continue to encounter
evidence that homemakers, even


asphalt track which will serve both
Wewahitchka Elementary School and
Wewahitchka High School. The vote
was unanimous.
On motion by Graham, second by
Raffield, the Board voted unanimous-
ly to go on record in support the "Run
for Sight" race sponsored by the Port
St. Joe Lion's Club.
On motion by Redd, second by
Hanlon, the board instructed the
Superintendent to implement and
advertise a school board policy
regarding AIDS or AIDS-ARC. The
vote was unanimous.
There being no further business,
the meeting adjourned to meet again
on April 7, 1987 at 9:00 a.m.


some food editors, place their toma-
toes in the refrigerator as soon as they
get home from the supermarket.
That's unfortunate."
What makes it unfortunate are the
consequences of refrigeration. Toma-
toes are picked at the mature green
stage and then passed through
ripening rooms to stimulate color.
They're shipped in a pink, hard
condition to prevent damage. When
they arrive at local supermarkets
they are still pink, hard and quite


Screening


for Kinder
B. Walter Wilder, Gulf County
School Superintendent, announces the
schedule for kindergarten registra-
tion assessment screening through-
out the county for students who will be
five years old on or before September
1, 1987.
This registration assessment -
screening is very important for each
child. A state law requires that each
child entering school for the first time
have educational assessment and
health screening. These include the
areas of motor, concepts, language,
hearing, vision, height, weight and
general health. Personnel from the
Gulf County Schools, Gulf County
Health Department, and the Parent
Volunteer Program will conduct these
sessions.


tasteless. When subjected to sustained
cold temperatures, the cells of the
tomato break down and the coloriz-
ation stops.
If the tomatoes are stored at
temperatures over 60 degrees how-
ever, they will continue to ripen, soften,
develop a deep red color and an
exquisite flavor. "It may take three
days. it could take a week, but if
they're never chilled, they'll eventual-
ly look like a red ripe right off the
vine." says Hawkins.


Students


gardenn
Each child who is assessed and
screened must be accompanied by a
parent or legal guardian. A copy of the
child's birth certificate and an
immunization record should be pre-
sented at the session.
New kindergarten students for the
school year 1986-87 are expected to
participate in the preschool screen-
ing. Scheduled dates are: Wewahitch-
ka Elementary, Linton Site, April 30;
Highland View Elementary, School
Library, May 8; and Port St. Joe
Elementary, Kindergarten Site, May
15. Screening will be held from 8:00
a.m. until 2:00 p.m.
For further information, Wewa-
hitchka area call Betty Husband at
639-2476, Port St. Joe Highland View
call Lois Byrd at 227-1221.


Part of the problem with tomatoes
has been in the distribution system.
Handlers will sometimes destroy the
tomato by killing it with refrigeration
before the consumer even sees it.
"Florida's tomato industry is aggres-
sively trying to change that," reports
Hawkins. "The tQmatoes will have an
excellent shelf life without refriger-
ation better than bananas or pears
which should not be refrigerated
either."
For best color and flavor, toma-
toes should be set on a shelf or
countertop out of direct sunlight, and
left until deep red. To avoid bruised
shoulders, it's a good idea to set the
tomatoes stem end up. Like a good
wine, tomatoes are at their best when
consumed at room temperature.


IJ


U' A


US i .

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
508 Sixteenth Street
SUNDAY WORSHIP...... 10a.m.
.Nursery Available
ADULT SCHOOL ........ 11 a.m.
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden. Pat
PASTORAL COUNSEUNG
227-1756


[] Associated
File Folders
11 pt. manila folders. 100 box,
assorted position.
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Transparent colors emphasize mate-
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Yellow DN2-07742
Green DN2-07745 Reg. $9.48 d
Blue DN2-07746 55
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NOW 1sT


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High Performance
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Excellent for sealing and heavy-duty
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wide. -.-.


Clear DA8-3750-2-CR
Tan DA8-3750-2-TN


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NOW 3T


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Vinyl covers in handsome suedene finish. All ring mecha-
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The Star Publishing Co. : Publishers
OFFICE SUPPLY STORE Office
X 304-306 Williams Avenue Phone 227-1278 Supplies


SUNDAY
9:45 a.m........ Sunday School
(for all ages)
11:0 a.m ...... Morning Worship
6:00 p.m ...... Evening Worship


WEDNESDAY
6:00 p.m........... Young People
7:00 p.m ........ Prayer Meeting


Pastor: Fred A. Goebert Church Phone: 224707
Sponsor of Faith Chrtstlan School: Three year old kindergarten through Eighth Grade









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XEROX*, TELECOPIER* and the identifying numbers
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"A Place for the Whole Family"

FAITH BIBLE CHURCH
801 20th Street Port St. Joe, Florida


OFFICE PRODUCTS








/55Li


SAV 240/0


1"
Black DL2-C1181-BK
Blue DL2-Cff181-BE
Red DL2-CI 181-RD
Burgundy DL2-CI I81-BY
Gray DL2-C11Ie.GY
Black, with label
holder on backbone DL2-C 110-BKL
Black DL2-C 1 1 ',-BK
Blue DL2-C118S1 '/,-BE
Red DL2-CI81 'i-RD
Burgundy DL2-C .81 '1-BY
Gray DL2-CI I8 '/,-GY
Black, with label
holder on backbone DL2-C1i18'/, BKL
2"
Black DL2-C1 182-BK
Blue OL2.C 1182-BE
Red OL2-C1182-RD
Burgundy DL2-CI lSg.BY
Gray DL2-C. 182-GY
Black, with label
holder on backbone DL2-CI182.BKL
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Blue DL2-C1 183-BE
Red DL2-C 183-RD
Burgundy DL2-C1 183-BY
Gray DL2-C1183-GY
Black, with label
holder on backbone DL2-CI 183-BKL


Port St. Joe


I









DAVID RIC
Foodliners ..
205 Third St. Port St. Joe Hwy. 71


(QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED)


BULK RATE
CARRIER ROUTE
PRE-SORTED
Permit No. 3
Wewahitchka, FL 32465


H'S

- Wewahitchka


APRIL


WIN uo$1,000.00 CA$H
WIN
A NEW DODGE COLT
3 CARS
^- TO BE AWARDED
ONE EVERY MONTH


CONGRATULATIONS TO BINGO WINNERS:
New Dodge Colt Winners: Mrs. H. F. McKnight of Newton, AL
and Mrs. Walter Woodcock of Pensacola, FL.
$1,000 CASH WINNERS: Margie Andrews & Mildred Kirk of
Port St. Joe & 8 other area winners. $100 Cash Winners: Alber-
ta Lynn of Port St. Joe plus 13 other area winners. $50 Cash
Winners: Jack Hopkins of Mexico Beach, Tim Whitfield, Ed-
ward Hall and Ora E. Gibbs, all of Wewahltchka and Mrs. Mar-
tin Bowman of Port St. Joe, plus 26 other area $50 winners.
There have been 10,934 other winners in the first 8 weeks of
the IGA promotion.


MAXWELL HOUSE
or EIGHT O'CLOCK
COFFEE


99


16 oz. bag n
WITH I FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRES APRIL 28, 1987


2 LITER 5 9
RC Cola
& Neh l Flavore
WITH 1 FILLE ODOUBL DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRES APRIL 28, 197'


CHICKENOF SEA
CHUNK
TUNA
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRES APRIL 20, 1987
DOBE DISOUN SPCAL


..'-^,,.


PREMIUM GRADE
FRESH FAMILY PAK
FRYER
D'STICKS


78


SLAB

SLIE


TABLERITE FAMILY PAK (5 lbs. or more) QO
Ground Beef ...................b. 90
CHOICE TABLERITE BEEF 8
T-Bone Steak .................Lb. 288
CHOICE TABLERITE BEEF SIRLOIN
Tip Roast ............ L.1.......b. 98
TABLERITE DELICIOUS FAMILY PAK 4
Pork Steak .....Lb. 1$48
PREMIUM GRADE FRYER
Thighs, (Family Pak)...................L.....b. 780
SUNNYLAND LINK SO68
Sausage ........................ 20Ooz. 2


BRYAN'S JUICY OR BEEFY
Jumbo Franks...............Lb.
IGA REG., THICK OR BEEF
Sliced Bologna .............Lb.
BRYAN'S REG. OR BEEF
Corn Dogs ..................Lb.
LYKES
Smo. Sausage..............Lb.
IGA HOT OR MILD ROLL
Pork Sausage................Lb.
SUNNYLAND SLICED
Cooked Ham .............. ooz.


ORE IDA CRINKLE CUT 19
POTATOES........... 2 Lbs .
ASSORTED $ 489
Hot Pockets................. ooz. 89
SEA PAK S 49
Shrimp'n Batter ....... 13 /2oz. 2
DOWNY FLAKE $ 39
Waffles............................ 19oz.
BANQUET REG. OR HOT & SPICY $ 99
Fried Chicken.............2 Lbs.
GREEN GIANT $ 119
Corn on Cob............ 6's 1
MEADOW GOLD 1/a gallon rounds $*1 99
Ice Cream.................... /2ga.
MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM $ 4 35
Sandwich..................... ak I
Nabisco Reg. or Chewy S 2 9
Chips Ahoy 18oz. $29
Nabisco Assorted $*4 59
Snack Crackers
Nabisco $^ 19
Oreo Big Stuff. $2


A "PIE UTES IORTTA AINS


Hi Pro Dog Food ..
IGA Cooking Oil ..
IGABleach ...
IGA Mayonnaise..
IGA Catsup ......
Kraft Grape Jelly..


Ronco Spaghetti 2


50 lbs. $709
gallon $337
gallon 690
32 oz. 890
32oz. 880
18 oz. 990
12 oz. $I0


Allen Medium 15 oz. 3
Green Limas ................ I
Martha White 7 I., oz. 4/
Corn Muffin Mix ........... 499
Campbell's No. I can 2
Chicken & Rice Soup ....... 2/880


12 oz.
Spam Luncheon Meat ........
11 Oz.
Raid Ant & Roach Bomb.....


12'oz.
Raid Flying Insect Bomb.


$189


..... 49


Red Ripe Pint

Strawberries


69t


SweetWestern Cantaloupes....... each 99


Delicious
Tropical Mangos.....
Large Delicious
Red Apples ....... p
Fancy
Mushrooms ........
Cello lb. bags
Carrots ......... .


99
ea. 99

pound 6
pint 990
2 49c


I Fresh Green Bunch
lo | Broccoli 9


Firm Head
Green Cabbage ......
Crisp Head
Iceberg Lettuce .....


21$100
2/$100


GIANT FLOWER SALE in parking lot
St. Joe Store Only. E. J. Rich has
reduced all flowers for quick sale!!

Fancy Yellow
SWEET 4/r99
lr .CORN ears


IIA I R


FLA. GOLD
ORANGE JUICE...........


o s109
64 oz


SUNNYLAND VEG.
Oleo Patties................6 8 oz.
VELVEETA
Cheese........................ Lbs.


Kraft- 1 Lb. Qtrs.
Parkay


I I


22-28,


1987


$178
$148
168
$198

99C
$2o8


991
$359


0 I


I


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