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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02660
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 20, 1986
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02660

Full Text













THE TAR

Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches in Florida


FORTY-NINTH YEAR, NUMBER 12


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1986


S 25C Per Copy


It's Swearing In Time .


, This week was swearing
in week for newly elected
officials for the City of Port
St. Joe and the Gulf County
School Board.
New officers were given
the oath of office for the
School Board Tuesday
morning, as Supervisor of
Elections, Cora Sue Robin-
son, issued the oath of
office for re-elected Board
members, Ted Whitfield,
Oscar Redd and Gene
Raffield. Raffield, begin-
ning his sixth term on the
Board is the veteran mem-
ber in Gulf County. Redd is
starting on his second term
and Whitfield is beginning
his third.
Port St. Joe High School
principal Edwin Williams
was sworn in as a new
Commissioner for the City
of Port St. Joe in a short
ceremony last Thursday
morning in the office of
City Auditor and Clerk
Alden Farris.
Williams will serve until
May of next year to fill out
. the unexpired term of
Nathan Peters, Jr., who
resigned to seek election to


the County Commission.
Peters will be sworn into


the County Board position
Tuesday night of next


City Auditor and Clerk Alden Farris, left, administers the oath of office to newly
appointed City Commissioner Edwin G. Williams in the photo above. Williams was sworn into
his new office Thursday morning of last week.


at the Gulf County Health
Department told The Star
this week that so far, only a
severe outbreak of chicken
pox has been reported.
Drew said, "There is defin-

E

Early


f Paper
Next week's issue of The\
Star will be printed a day
earlier than usual because
of the Thanksgiving holi-
day falling on next Thurs-
day.
The early publication
date serves two purposes.
It will allow The Star to be
printed and sent through
the mail prior to the postal
holiday Thursday, and it
will allow our staff to take
two days off for the holiday
period.
The early publication
date moves The Star's
deadline up to Monday at
noon. The paper will be
printed and distributed
Tuesday afternoon. Mail
subscribers should receive
their paper Wednesday
morning.


Supervisor of Elections, Cora Sue Robinsin, gives the Oscar Redd and Gene Raffield. The oaths were taken
oath of office to Ted Whitfield, accompanied by his wife, Tuesday morning in the Gulf County Courthouse.



Parade Schedule Set by Merchants


Bob Bearden, chairman of the
annual Christmas parade production
this year, reported yesterday that
response is picking up for entries to
the parade which will be presented
Saturday, December 6. Bearden,
operator 'of the Video Merchant on
Reid Avenue, is coordinator for
entrants to the parade this year.
Bearden pointed out that the
parade this year will be held at 3:00
p.m., in the afternoon this year. The
Merchants Association, which pro-


duces the parade, has been looking for
a new time for their presentation
which would be more convenient for
spectators and participants. The
afternoon time seems to be the most
convenient for the most people, so in
years to come, the parade will be
produced at 3:00 p.m., on the'first
Saturday in December.
Even with hurricanes pounding
the city twice during the fall and a
near miss skimming the fringes of the
Panhandle, the parade was a bright


spot in an otherwise dismal time.
Bearden says he thinks the parade
this year will also be a bright spot in
the month, even though there have
been no hurricanes visiting.
"It'll be a good time for everyone
and we hope a lot of people spend the
afternoon with us that day", Bearden
said. He also pointed out there is still
time for civic, church, school and
other non-profit organizations to
schedule entries and floats in the
parade.


week, following the regu-
lar commission meeting.


Commission Agrees


to January 6


A proposed referendum in
the City of Port St. Joe was
officially set Tuesday night,
when the City Commission
agreed the best date to call
a referendum in Port St. Joe
to make the decision on Jan-
uary 6 as to whether or not
they want Ward Ridge to
become a part of Port St. Joe.
Ward Ridge citizens voted
in October to request annexa-
tion to Port St. Joe, but Port
St. Joe's government is put-
ting off approving the re-
quest until the January date
because of state require-


ments for a comprehensive
plan.
The state has required all
governmental subdivisions in
the state make the plans and
has funded the preparation of
the documents. Ward Ridge
has some $7,500 allocated by
the state for its plan, and
a December deadline for
contracting with a firm to do
the preparation. Early an-
nexation by Port St. Joe may
interfere with receiving state
funding, but would not re-
move the necessity of coming
up with the plan.


Measles, Flu


Bypassing Gulf
With near epidemics of itely a large outbreak of
measles, chicken pox and chicken pox among our
influenza threatening or school children, but we don't
making the rounds in other consider it serious We're
areas of the state of Florida, just urging parents to take
Gulf County seems to be reasonable precautions to
missing the brunt of any prevent its spread and keep
epidemic from either of the their children comfortable if
three diseases. Donna Drew, they catch the chicken pox",
director of nursing services she said


As for the measles and
mumps, which are making
the rounds of school children
throughout the state, Drew
said neither of the infectious
diseases has hit Gulf County
to any extent "We have
reports of a few children with
the common three-day mea-
sles, but none at all on the
more serious Rubella or
Rubeola strains of measles",'
she pointed out. Even the
three-day measles presence
in Gull County seems to be
very light and certainly not
, up to epidemic proportions as
' it is in other parts of the
State
The nursing supervisor
said Gulf County school
children 'are immunized
against the two more serious
strains almost 100 percent.
She pointed out all school
children are supposed to be
immunized against Rubella
and Rubeola strains, but
there may be a few out there
who have not had their shots
'The immunization program
should take care of this
problem here in Gulf Coun-
ty" she said There are no
immunization programs in
Gulf County against the more
mild three-day measles.
Influenza outbreaks have
(Continued on Page 3)


Tuesday night, the City
Commission agreed, unani-
mously to accept the January
6 date for the referendum
and give the Commission up
to 60 days to ratify the
election results. The decision
of the referendum would be
carried out immediately af-
ter ratification of the vote.
Attorney William J. Rish
said this time table should
give Port St. Joe ample time
to determine what the plan
and funding decision of the
state will be.
In the meantime, Rish will
explore the possibility of
merging the Ward Ridge
plan with the Port St. Joe
plan in a move to save
money. "It would be a shame
to-waste that planning money
if we don't need it", Rish


Vote

said. "It's all a waste of
money it seems. tq me",
Mayor Frank Patq quipped.
The City of Port St. Joe has
been allocated $11,876 and
Ward Ridge $7,556 by the
state to pay for their individ-
ual plans.
POSTER CONTEST
Kathy Reynolds, instructor
at Lee's Fitness Center,
brought some of her charges
to the meeting, explaining
they were winners of a poster
contest designed to promote
the "Say No to Drugs"
promotion. Reynolds an-
nounced that Brian Sauls was
first place winner in the
contest, with Stuart Griffin
taking second place and
Natasha Cline, third.
Reynolds was given per-
(Continued on Page 2)


^Thnanksgiving


Special Worship Service

SPlanned for Monday

"Port St. Joe and surrou.dlg area wii be given aml'2
Spportunity : to -job. in a' c"do-.ii.- Thanksgiving'
worshipip service MQoday.ev when the Mrintleriaahe
Assoiaaion spojisui'sa specianl *mirnsi
.- ; .-' ,% ,, .* .*l ..:, ... '*. '' :
p : 'i '..s...ph.i
'aced*9n g@iugjlh ,wi bedointePrtSt..Jop-

'- l i r. e F ,



. a ; .- w; 1 : ;, i* -. q
Th. program iill ta ft imusicAl b 4h" i., Fais
iy Pres ide tt a 'd h~ing -the fr-st^
official thanksgiving day. .Presldent Reagan's procla-,'
Tma to i .' DaIl (a saA,d i.49th nii s family. lso e read.
BAptist Cihui n (ch e pr.gain',wit. e,- Iaw.is-Leslie,
Clarence ones aLe.I, MIe Wdntioal a n e w-1 .

Wells, Rev. W. ) allop .ev. Hnward Browning, '
op ev-a eatery oinwhot.'h .ta-iUs family.
Rev. Harry Johnson of First United Methodist
Church will head the congregational singing and
iMichael .1i id3MtnteteS.i'QB usic of Long Avenue,"
'Baptist Church'will be theOpi nist.
The service. are interdeinoninational and will be:
S'opi to everyone wbo.wtsKAin.ittea4 .
People of the Port St. Joe area can especially be;
-thankful they aren't digging out.'from'under a4_
Hurricane K~tethisgear, as they wefe on the Monday '
prior to Thanksgiving i6f last ear.. -
.1 '


19 Young Ladies Will Compete for Gulf County's Junior Miss Title
process rom he ageat .tofun loa civi acvns


Gulf County will select the young lady to represent the
county in next spring's Junior Miss pageant in Pensacola,
on Saturday night.
According to Al Ray, veteran Junior Miss director, is
producing the pageant for the sponsoring Kiwanis Club
again this year, and says the show will begin promptly at
7:30 p.m., in the Commons Area of Port St. Joe High
School.
"We have one of the best groups of candidates we have
ever had for thp pageant", Ray said Tuesday, as he turned
in a list of 19 contestants from both Port St. Joe and
Wewahitchka High Schools. "All our contestants are


selected strictly from the girls having the highest
scholastic averages" Ray said.
Gulf County's Junior Miss will go on to Pensacola in
March to represent the county and have a chance at
several prizes. "She gets several valuable prizes here at
home for winning the pageant, too", Ray said. "Our Junior
Miss will receive a large trophy and medallion, as well as a
$500 college scholarship", Ray said. In addition, the first
runner-up will receive a trophy and a $175 cash.award.
Second runner-up will be presented with a $50 cash prize
and a trophy. Each participant receives a Jr. Miss charm
as a memento of being a contestant.


The contestants will be judged by a panel of
out-of-town judges who will select the winners, based on
talent, poise and appearance, scholarship, physical fitness
and personality.
In addition to their performance at the pageant, each
participant has a personal interview with the judges,
which counts for 35 percent of the grade given them. The
participants also receive 20 percent of their grading
from their talent presentation; 15 percent for scholastic
performance and 15 percent for physical fitness.
Admission to the pageant Saturday night is $3.00 for
adults and $2.00 for students. The Kiwanians use the entire


proceeds from the pageant to fund local civic activities.
Presently they are building a $10,000 perpetual scholarship
fund for a Gulf County student with Gulf Coast College.
Participants in the pageant are shown above. In the
left photo, from left are: April Fadio, Twila Burns, Paula
Byrd, Nancy Stoutamire, Paula Ramsey, Kelli Pridgeon,
Randi McClain, Lilia Mulna, Teresa Jones and Jeri Wilder.
In the photo at right, from left, are: Kim Emfinger,
Timicia Farmer, Carol Prange, Laura van Pietersom,
Sherry Brahier, LaDonna Boykin, Tracy Bowers, Sherri
Roberts and Debbie Davis.


USPS 518-880


L


t











Editorials and Comments:


THE STAR
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986 PAGE TWO


It's a serious thing to accuse a
President of the United States of
lying. It's even more serious if that
President of the United States is
guilty as accused.
We all remember how impor-
tant a matter it is if a President is
caught in a lie. We all remember
Mr. Nixon. Watergate didn't cause
his resignation. Dirty tricks didn't
force him to step down. Even his
: private secretary erasing impor-
tant passages from a recorded tape
wasn't the activity which caused
Mr. Nixon to be shunted out of the
White House in shame.
The thing which did Mr. Nixon
E in was the fact that he said he knew
nothing about these activities and
that he didn't authorize them. Then
= it was proven he did know about
them and that he had not objected
E to their being carried out.
At least, in the Presidency of
the United States, it is still a
necessity to deal with the truth.
We're sure President Reagan
remembers Richard-Nixon and his
problems as well as anyone. We're
sure he is more than acquainted
with the reasons Mr. Nixon had to
pack up his clean underwear and
go hunt himself a place to live other
than at the White House.


These reasons cause us to-at
the present time-believe Presi-
dent Reagan when he says hedidn't
trade armaments to Libya for the
release of three American host-
ages. If he did, as Mike Royko said
Friday, it's not a very even trade to
give Iran instruments to kill
thousands of Iraqis for the lives of
three Americans.
We recognize, too, there must
be some portion of truth to the
arms sale claims made by Presi-
dent Reagan's enemies in the
House and Senate-enemies cur-
rently trying to grab the chair-
manship of every committee they
can after the elections snatched
away the Republican majority in
the Senate.
We're also aware of the fact the
enemies of the President are not
burdened with having to tell the
whole truth, like President Reagan
is. If they just come close, they can
get by with their tactics.
The need for an impeccable
honesty in the Presidency causes
us, on the surface of it all, to
consider the whole episode as a
political maneuver which is just
skirting about the fringes of what
really is, in order to discredit one of
the most popular Presidents the
nation has had in this century.


Hunker Down with Kes




I Ain't Going to Make It


by Kesley Colbert-


Boys, you're getting a'
break this week 'cause I
don't have time to write my
little blurb. Instead of my
article I suggest you read
Scott's "Ivanhoe" or
Dickens's "Tale of Two
Cities". The Library of Con-
gress could suggest some


other suitable reading
material I am sure. Of
course you've got to find the
Library of Congress first.
I don't have time this week
because my wife's people
are coming next week. Cathy
decided to redo the house


and add a room, etc. in
preparation for the family
visit. I'm working like mad
to get everything ready and I
don't even know some of
these people that are com-
ing. You need a program so
you'll know who everybody
is.


I've got four days left and
I've got to start putting up
the back wall this morning.
If you can hammer, nail or
saw, come to see me and
come quickly.
Res-
Ke-


Congratulations to the City of local government.
Port St. Joe for securing Edwin G. We see our neighbors in
Williams as their city commission- Washington and Bay counties go
er to fill out the unexpired term of for years at a time with nothing but
Nathan Peters, Jr. fighting and fussing, losing sight of
In thewordsof Rev. Raymond their purpose of being in office
In the words of Rev. Raymond which is to govern their people, not
Rogers after the nomination of 11
Williams, "He will make us all a try to force their will on everyone
Williams, "He willmake usaa .........
good commissioner:.He has a'good""" iWe won't even try to point a
record in ourschools. He'll be fair finger of blame for Port St. Joe's
with both black and white". recent turmoil. In all likelihood, a
We feel that way, too. Williams close examination will show that
has filled a difficult position with everyone was to blame at some
our school system for the past few extent.
years, and has done an admirable We hope the reverse will also
job of dealing with both blacks and be true and that every member on
whites in a fair and impartial the board will work toward har-
manner. We feel that nobody mony and accomplishment in the
disputes his accomplishments as future and leave divisiveness to
being those of unbiased actions. others.
We hope Williams can pour his Most sporting teams feel they
special oil of calmness over the can better a poor record with
Commission in weeks to come and a change of managers or coaches.
allow it to once again get at the We hope this works for Port St. Joe
business of running a small but also. The old coaches, managers or
vibrant city. There is no way to get Commissioners aren't necessarily
about the business of progress all that bad or inept at their task,
without harmony and singleness of but the new blood gives us a good
purpose among the members of the excuse to adopt a new attitude.


Is It Lying or Is



It Politics?


Columnists (like Politicians)


IT'S ALL KIND OF hard to
believe, but old Kes told me, out of his
own mouth, last week, that some of his
articles sort of took poetic license with
actualities at times. "The article
Thursday was as near to being factual
as anything I have ever written", Kes
said.
Come to think of it, I forgot to
question him further as to just what he
meant by that remark. Did he mean
the article last week was the truth or
that it was the least of the untruths?
I understand when one gets to
telling a story about something which
happened years ago, in childhood
days, the events take on a little
different set of facts than was the case
when it actually happened. It's
possible for Kes to get a little unsure
of what actually happened to he and
Billy Bob and company, when you
take into consideration the 30 years
Removed between now and then.
Good examples of that are the
stories Dave Maddox has been,
relating for the past 40 years or more.
Dave tells at least two or three
unusual or funny stories every day
_ about things which happened to


people in Port St. Joe back in the
1920's and '30's. His memory never
seems to run dry when it gets to telling
stories.
I know it took longer for the actual


Use Imagination to Make It.Sound Better


activity after another all day, every
day, to provide Dave with all the
stories he has in his considerable
memory.
I have been trying to get him to


ETAOIN SHRDLU

| By: Wesley R. Ra


event to happen than it takes Dave to
tell about it, even though he puts in
every little detail in the telling. Even
so, he has been telling those stories as
long as I have known Dave, which has
been considerably more than a day or
two.
Sometimes, reason takes hold and
I start to harbor the thought that days
gone by must have been a riot. The
people of Port St. Joe during those
days had to commit one humorous


part is settled.
I even can accept the fact only
Kes could come up with the prepos-
terous idea of upholstering the three
seats and placing the convenience


msey


write the stories down, so I could print
them here in The Star, but Dave says,
"I can remember them, but I can't
write them".

BUT, BACK TO Kes and last
week's column.
I know both Kes and Cathy pretty
well. It doesn't boggle my imagination
to believe that if Kes found an old
three hole outdoor privy up in
Tennessee, he brought it home. That


station in his den in order to use it to
watch television from. His mind and
imagination runs that way.
I can also imagine him bringing
it home at 2:00 in the morning and4
waking Cathy up to see it.
All of those activities are pure
Kes. He would even be proud of such
an accomplishment.

THE THING I have trouble with is
Kes' description of Cathy's reaction to


the 2:00 a.m. rendezvous.
The Cathy I know is sweet,
demure, petite, soft-spoken, always
smiling, agreeable and understand-
ing. Stubborness seems to be as far
removed from her nature as is smooth
skin from a toad frog. Cathy and
'stubborn' just don't belong in the
same sentence.
For Kes to say that Cathy pursed
her lips into a hard straight line,
stomped her foot, crossed her arms
across her chest and refused to allow
him to place that outhouse in her
living room is as un-Cathy-like as any
description one could come up with.
It would be more Cathy-nature to
have Kes report that she reacted to his
"surprise" by purring, "That's nice;
where do you want to put it dear?"
I even remember a couple of
years ago we had a 'picture of some
kids from the Highland View Elemen-
tary School we were putting in the
paper for something or other, and I
glanced at the picture while putting
the "cut-lines" together and remark-
ed, "Who's this other kid? There are
five kids in the picture and only four


names!"
Somebody answered me by say-
ing, "That's the teacher. Don't you
know Cathy Colbert?"
That's the kind of person Cathy
Colbert is. At a glance, one would
mistake her for one of her fifth grade
students.
And here Kes wants us to believe
she has a mean and stubborn streak!
Pshaw!
YOU'RE GOING TO have to
watch it, Kes. Everyone in town
knows you are one of those over-the-
hill jocks. They know you played
baseball, football, basketball and
anything else anyone wanted to play.
A history like this means you must
still be in pretty good shape, physi-
cally. We all know you would never,
never be intimidated by a small,
delicate, 98-pound female like Cathy.
You're too big for that.
Next you'll try to make us believe
the reason Cathy didn't want your
treasure in her living room was
because of the Sears catalog you
wanted to hang on the side.


Tides St. Joseph's Bay
High Low
K' November 20 10:40
November21 12:22a.m. 11:30
November22 1:04a.m. 12:15
November 23 1:39 a.m. 12:47
November 24 2:19 a.m. 1:09
-.. November 25 2:51 a.m. 1:20
November 26 2:24 a.m. 12:40
9:00p.m.


a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
)P.M.


City

(from Page 1)
mission to display the win-
ning posters in the City Hall.
APPROVE LOT SALE
Rawlis Leslie was given
approval of a plan for him to
purchase four of the 14 lots he
has options on in north Port
St. Joe. Leslie secured the
option on the property from
the City for the purpose of
building several rental units
on the site. Leslie asked to
purchase only the four lots
for mortgage purposes to get
his first buildings under
construction.
Tuesday, attorney Rish
expressed a need for both
Leslie and the Commission to
spell out the obligations of
each for Leslie's option on
the remaining 10 lots. "His
option was for a year, but you
need to spell out the new
arrangement so both of you
will know what to expect of
the other. You have expres-
sed yourselves in the past in
not wanting to release the
lots for speculation", Rish
said.
Leslie will be asked to meet
with the Commission at their
next session to be sure each
side understands what the
other is expecting.
CEMETERY DAMAGE
Damage from carelessness
and vandalism is creating a
problem at Forest Park
Cemetery, Sally Jenkins told
the Commission Tuesday.
Jenkins said four-wheel drive
trucks are tearing down the
gate to the cemetery, damag-
ing graves and breaking
headstones as they come into
the cemetery, particularly at
night and on week ends.
Police Chief Bob Maige
said his department is aware
of the problem, but there is
no pattern to the time the
damage is caused and the
Department is trying to
catch some of the people in
the act.
"We'll get them", Maige
said, "but it may take a little
time."
Street Superintendent
Martin Adkison said the
damage is caused by young
men in the f6ur-wheel drives
going through the area to a
large mud puddle to engage
in bog ins. "We've repaired
the cemetery gate three
times within a month. If the
gate is closed when they want
through, they just break it
down and go on in".
Adkison said he would get
the gate fixed again and
Maige said he would step up
efforts to catch the ones
responsible for the damage.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters,
the Commission:
-Gave final approval for
closing a portion of the alley
beside Citizens Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association.
The firm will utilize the
space as an entryway to a
parking lot and drive-in
window to be built to the rear
of their building.


A Good Choice


SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ST H E T A R POSTOFFICE BOX 308 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $10.00 SIX MONTHS INOUNTY-S8.00
S- I I PHONE 227-1278 OUT O0 COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $1500 SIX MONTHS, OUT OF COUNTY, $10.00
T H.S A R-IN ,P HONE,227D1278 OUT OF U.S.-ONE YEAR, $16.00
** S PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456
lu; "r Published Every Thursday at 304-306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe. FL
; By The Star Publishing Company TO ADVERTISERS-in case' of error or omissIons In advertisements, the publishers do not hold
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 themselves IIable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
SSECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID
Wesley R. Ramsey ........... Editor and Publisher AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
S. William H. Ramsey .............. Production Supt. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
SWSPO Frenchie L. Ramsey ......... . Office Manager barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word Is lost; the printed word remains.
Shirley K. Ramsey.................... Typesetter


I __




S. .


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986


PAGE THREE


SHAD

PHANTRY
by Wendell Campbell



A Vacation Inn
SHAD MIDDLE AGE
IN THE FEW-ODD years I have lived on planet
earth, I have heard much about the phase of life
everyone who lives long enough goes through called,
"Middle Age."
I have read books and articles about it. I have seen
movies and TV shows about it. I have even talked to
some people who were going through it. I now find that I
have experienced much of it and I must tell someone
about it. In life we learn that experience is the only true
teacher.
So, young men, pay attention!
+++++
THERE IS, I'VE found, no definite age that one
slips quietly or dramatically into middle age. One
doesn't just'wake up one morning and turn to his mate
and say, "Wake up honey. During the night I slipped
into middle age!"
It's not like falling asleep in a deer stand and falling
out. It's more like starting to slide off a steep pitched tin
roof. You are about half way down before you realize
that old-age is just a few short years away.
For those of you men who are not yet aware that
you are starting to slide, allow me to give you some
pointers that may make you aware that you, like ole
man 'time, are passing on.
YOU ARE SLIPPING into middle age when one or
all of the following happens:
When you wake up in the morning after eight hours
sleep and you are just as tired as you were when you
went to bed.
When you see a pretty girl and you get excited but you
can't think of why.
When the "Hunk" of the neighborhood hugs and
kisses your wife. and you take it as a compliment.
When you stay up past midnight and wake up with a
hangover although you didn't drink anything.
When the doctor tells you to lose weight and you
know you should, for health reasons, but that is not
reason enough.
When you start to notice that the obituary column
has many people listed. who are your age.
When you see a sign that says, "Grandchild on
Board" and you want to buy it for your car.
When you finally realize that you are on your own
because your mother and father are dead.
When the boss tells you you've earned a big
promotion and you celebrate by going home and going
to bed early.
When you see a beautiful, twenty-one year old girl
sunbathing nude in the yard next door and you call your
neighbor and tell them to make her get some clothes on;
When you think life has passed you by because you
always wanted to be a writer and not work for a living.
When you come home from work on your
anniversary and your wife has a delicious dinner fixed,
with candles and wine, and she is dressed in a sexy
evening gown and you ask, "Who's coming for dinner?"
+++++
IT'S NOT A BED OF roses, young men. Tne
alternative, however, is cold and deep and lasts an




Say You Saw It In The Star!


County
"Gulf County is definitely
growing", Supervisor of
Elections Cora Sue Robinson
told the Kiwanis Club at their
meeting Tuesday at noon.
Robinson said she was
basing her statement on the
fact that Gulf County now has
over 7,500 voters. "It would
be impossible for us to have
that many registered voters
if we had no more population
than the state of Florida says
we have". The Elections
Supervisor pointed out that
all 7,500 plus voters register-
ed in Gulf County are active
voters, too. "We purged our
list only a year ago and took


"God's. Word Proclaimed God's Son Exalted"

HIGHLAND VIEW
BIBLE CHURCH
(Meeting at Highland View Elementary School)
SUNDAY SCHOOL ................... 10:00 a.m.
WORSHIP SERVICES ................ 11 a.m. &6 p.m.
(Children's Church and Nursery Provided
At All Services)



"THE MIRACLE CENTER"
NEW COVENANT MISSIONARY WORLD
OUTREACH CENTER. .The Family Church
252 Avenue E. Port St Jee, Florida
Pastor: Rev. Napoleon Pittman
Church Phone: 229-8137
SUNDAY
11:00 A.M.................. Morning Worship Service
4:00 P.M ........................ Youth Service
6:00 P.M. ................. Evening Worship Service
MONDAY FRIDAY
12-30 P.M.................... Intercessory Prayer
WEDNESDAY
6:30 P.M. .......... .. ..... .. 1st-6th Grade
7:30 P.M .................. Bible Study & Fellowship
"A CHURCH WITH A VISION"
WJBU AM 1080 Tune In Every Sunday morning at 8:45


MIGUEL TREVINO, M.D.
Internal Medicine


Southwest Wing of Gulf Pines Hospital, 102 20th St., Port St.

(Temporary location until the completion of the new Medical Arts Center).


FREE BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKS


Is DEFINITELY


off all those registered who
expressed no desire in cast-
ing their vote in our county".
Robinson said the voter
lists are now purged every
two years and still the lists
are growing. "When I took
over the office six years ago,
we had only two precincts
with more than a thousand
registered voters. Now we
have four precincts with 1,000
or more voters", she pointed
out.
In this past year, when the
state of Florida was record-
ing a light vote in almost
every county, Gulf County


consistently led the 'pack of
counties in voter percentage
casting their ballots. "We
were either at or near the top
in every one of the primary
elections and in the general
election", she stated.
Robinson pointed c'.t that
the voter lists were growing
fastest in the beaches areas.
"People are moving into the
Beacon Hill and St. Joe
Beach areas and in the
Indian Pass vicinity every
day and they are registering
to vote in our county", she
said. The Supervisor said the
county is experiencing tre-
mendous voter growth in the


Growing
beach communities of the
county.
She pointed out the main.
thrust of the office for the
next two years will be in.
educating voters they cannot
cast a ballot for local candi-
dates in any but their own
commission districts. "The
single member voting dis-
trict made this change and
there are still those.who do
not realize they cannot cast a
ballot for every local candi-
date on the ballot", she said.
Guests of the club were
Key Clubbers Chris Wahl and
Tommy Ford and Junior
Miss candidates Paula Ram-


Breaking Ground for Housing


After nearly five years of trying to get something started in the way of housing for north
Port St. Joe, ground was broken Thursday morning on four units of a complex to be build by
Rawlis Leslie on a 14-lot tract on Main Street and Avenue F.
Leslie has been nearly a year putting a package together, after taking over an option held
by Dolores Jones which she was unable to exercise on the property. Leslie was at least the
fifth person to try to get a project started in the area and the only one to pursue private financ-
ing for the plan. All other attempts at building the housing have been trials to secure federal
funding or grants, with no success.
Thursday, Leslie and a group of friends, supporters and those actively participating in
the project, gathered to break ground and get construction under way. Shown in the photo
above at the ceremony, are, left to right: Charles Measamer of Florida National Bank, which
will provide the financing; Mayor Frank Pate; builder, Melvin Ward, turning the spade of
earth; Leslie; Tony McFarland; Mrs. Leslie, Beverly Daniels, Leslie's sister; Howard
Garland and Leslie's family; his uncle, Walter Leslie, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Leslie
and Chester Gant.
.OiTARiES: Measles

OBITUARIES: Measles


Funeral Rites Today

for Willie J. Allen, 50


Willie J. Allen, 50, of Port

William Young
Passes Away
William Eugene Young, 70,
of Beacon Hill, passed away
suddenly last Thursday at his
home. He was retired from
Fisher Body Division of
General Motors after 32
years of service. He was a
merchant seaman for six
years during World War II.
Survivors include: his
wife, Marie Young of Beacon
Hill; one sister, Irene Mari-
norvich of Inkster, Michigan,
one niece; one nephew; and
several great nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services were held
Monday at the Comforter
Funeral Home Chapel with
the Rev. Thom Crandall
officiating. Interment fol-
lowed in Holly Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Fune-
ral Home.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PAYS TRY IT!!
Call 227-1278


St. Joe passed away Friday
evening after a long illness.
He had been a resident of
Gulf County for the last 35
years and worked in con-
struction.
He is survived by his wife,
Essie Mae Allen of Miami;
two sons, Oliver Rucker and
Arnette Rucker both of Mia-
mi; four daughters, Louise
Parker of Carrabelle, Julia
Johnson of Lakeland, Mary
Rucker and Leatha Madison,
both of Miami; two brothers,
Theodore Allen and Frankie
Allen, both of Port St. Joe;
three sisters, Annis Lee
Andrews, Eva Mae Fennell
and Vera Mae Allen, all of
Port St. Joe; 16 grandchil-
dren; three great grandchil-
dren; and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be
held Thursday at 2:00 p.m. at
the Thompson Temple
Church with Rev. Theodore
Allen officiating. Burial will
follow in the family plot of
Forrest Hill Cemetery.
All services are under the
direction of Gilmore Funeral
Home.


(Continued from Page 1)
been relatively quiet here in
Gulf County this year. Nurse
Drew pointed out the inci-
dence of influenza has not
been above normal here in
the county, but that the
demand for influenza pre-
vention shots has been brisk.
"People are getting the vac-
cines in record numbers",
Drew said. "As a matter of
fact, we ran out of the
vaccine for a time, because
of the demand, and had to
borrow from someone else
until we could renew our
supply", the health depart-
ment nursing head said.
Drew pointed out the
Health Department now has
an ample supply of the flu
vaccine, including the. new
Taiwan strain which warn-
ings have been sounded
about this year. "We have
had no reports of the Taiwan
strain of flu in our county, but
we have the vaccine", she
said.
Nurse Drew said that even
though most of the diseases
which are threatening epi-
demics in other parts of the
state have not hit Gulf county
she warned parents to be
especially alert to the symp-
toms from their children.


K


CARMELLA FARULLA,
M.D.
Internal Medicine
Joe Nephrology


r


(F) COLONIAL 6-RACK GUN
CABINET Pine Veneers with select-
ed solid hardwoods. Duck decora-
tion on silk screened doors. Locks on
bottom and top doors.


$3599 5


- Robinson
sey, Randi McClain, Lilia Muina and Kelli Pridgeon.


The Gibson Inn

Thanksgiving Day Buffet


Nov. 27, 1986


11 a.m. -4 p.m.


*Roast Turkey*
*Honey Baked Ham*
*Broiled Fillet of Fish
*Mashed Potatoes, Gravy*
*Sweet Potato Casserole*
*Corn Bread Stuffing*
*Assorted Vegetables*
*Cranberry Relish*
*Homemade Breads*
*Soup and Salad*
*Traditional Holiday Desserts*
Included


Adults 8 Children under 10 595

Downtown Apalachicola 653-2191


(G) COLONIAL 6-RACK GUN
CABINET Oak Veneers with select-
ed hardwood solids. Storage space
in base with locks on top and bottom
doors.


$379?5


HOME FURNISHING CENTERS,
FURNITURE a APPLIANCES a FLOOR COVERING a HOME ENTERTAINMENT
OVER 200 STORES SERVING THE SOUTHEAST-


STEVE RICHARDSON. Owner
201 Reid Ave. Phone 229-6195


4



















I




1~


MOTEL ST. JOE DINING ROOM

Served with Baked Potato or French Served with all the trimmings
fries, salad or slaw 8 e fS n
SHRIMP.. $95 Fresh Mullet 00


Large Selection of Gun Cabinets


Stock


Miguel Trevino, M.D.

and


Carmela Farulla, M.D.


Phone 227-1783 or 227-1831


OFFICE HOURS and LOCATION:

9:00 A.M. to Noon and 1:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Monday through Friday


I -


I MO&


- L


I







PAGE FOUR THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1988


Miss Kathyrn Jean Lewis, Stephen


Tracy Pierce United In Marriage


Kathryn Jean Lewis and
Stephen Tracy Pierce were
united in marriage at the
John Wesley United Metho-
dist Church, Tallahassee, on
October 25. The Rev. Robert
M. Gibbs, Jr. performed the
double-ring ceremony. The
bride is the daughter of Sam
and Charlotte Lewis of Tam-
pa and the groom is the son of
Tracy and Ming Pierce of St.
Joe Beach.
The bride wore an elegant
gown of candlelight satin,
made by the bride's mother,
featuring a sweetheart neck-


Mrs. Stephen

Carters A
: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ray"
Carter, Jr. would like to

Copies
at
The Star
306 Williams Ave.
Phone 227-1278



Happy
Birthday


"C,


line, lace overlay on the
bodice and on the front of the
skirt, accented with seed
pearls, chapel length train,
long full sleeves with a six
inch cuff enhanced by a lace
insert. The bride's veil was
made from lace taken from
the bride's mother's gown
fastened to a lace Juliet cap
accented with seed pearls.
The bride carried a cascad-
ing bouquet of red and white
roses accented with ivy and
baby's breath.
The matron of honor, Judy
David, bridesmaids, Tina


and Janine Pierce, sisters of
the groom, and flower girl,
Julie Todd wore gowns of red
satin featuring sweetheart
neckline, puff sleeves, lace
overlay on the bodice with
floor length full skirt. The
matron of honor and brides-
maids carried hurricane
lamps decorated with red
and white roses while the
flower girl carried a basket
of red and white roses
accented with baby's breath.
All bouquets were made by
Monique Pierce Cocan-
ougher, sister of the groom,


who also sang "There Will
Never Be Another". Robby
Lewis, brother of the bride
and Blanch Marie Fisackerly
sang "Together". Other mu-
sic was provided by Blance
Marie Fisackerly, flutist and
Phyllis Barger, organist.
Tracy Pierce served his
son as best man. Don Bucci-
arelli and Joe Taylor were
groomsmen. The groom wore
a charcoal grey tuxedo with
tails, ivory shirt, bow tie and
cummerbund. The grooms-
men were dressed in char-
coal grey tuxedoes, ivory
shirts, red bow ties, and red
cummerbunds. Randy and
Jimmy Lewis, brother of the
bride served as ushers.
The mother of the bride
chose a floor length red dress
and the mother of the groom
wore a lacy white blouse and
a red satin skirt made from
the same materials as the
bridesmaid's dresses. Both
mothers wore a corsage of
red and white roses and
baby's breath.
The church was decorated
with white candles, red rose-
buds, ferns and palms. A
reception hosted by the
bride's parents followed the
ceremony in the fellowship
hall.
Following a Windjammer
Cruise in the West Indes, the
couple will be at home in Fort
Walton Beach.
Out of town guests includ-
ed:' Mrs. L.F. Bond, St.
Petersburg, grandmother of
the bride; Mr. and Mrs. Dean
Evalt, Indianapolis, Iowa;
Mrs. Vesta Compton, St.
Petersb'uig Mi M iadi" Mrs.
Don Walling, Tampa; Mrs.
Cecil M. Pierce, grandmo-
ther of the groom, Mr. and
Mrs. Virgil Pierce, Mrs.
Jerry Pittman, David Pierce
and daughters Carmen and
Kristy, and Margie Davis all
of Waycross, Ga.; and Mr.
and Mrs. Tommy James and
Jeremy James of St. Simon,
Ga.


City Commissioner Benny Roberts cuts the ribbon marking the opening of K.I.D.S.


Kids Instructional Day Ser-
vice (K.I.D.S.) opened, as
scheduled on Sunday after-
noon, November 16. The
contractors and the K.I.D.S.
staff worked into the wee
small hours Saturday night
to get ready for this grand
opening.
In spite of occasional hea-
iry rains, a large crown was
on hand to watch city com-
missioner Benny Roberts cut
the ribbon to officially open
this brand new service..
Many parents came with
their children and chose this
time to register for the
available services. Bill Lyles
of radio stations WJBU-AM
and WJST-FM was on hand
with a remote radio broad-
cast from the site.
All of the children received
balloons and everyone enjoy-
ed superb refreshments fur-
nished by K.I.D.S. staff.
Everyone enjoyed and ap-
preciated a tour of the new
building, and much amaze-


Tracy Pierce

re Married


announce their marriage'
November 16, 1986.
Judy is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Angus Peterson of
White City.
Chuck is the son of Ms.
Bonnie Carter of West Mem-
phis, Arkansas, and Mr. and
Mrs. Charles R. Carter, Sr. of
Overstreet.

Gospel Sing
Saturday at HV
The monthly community
gospel sing will be held
Saturday, November 22 at
the Highland View Church of
God, 323 6th St., Highland
View at 7:00 p.m.
Everyone is invited to
come and participate.


HIGHLAND VIEW
BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth St. and Second Ave.
Welcome Friend
SUNDAY SCHOOL .... .............. 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICE ........... 11:00 A.M. & 7:00 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) .............. 6:00 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) .......... 7:00 P.M.
Nursery Provided JIMMY CLARK, Pastor


Carolyn Smith, left, demonstrates her flower designs as Sadie Gardner looks on.



Creative Flower Design Is


Demonstrated to Ladies


The Sea Oats and Dunes
Garden Club held a flower
design workshop, Tuesday
November 11, with Mrs.


Carolyn Smith from Gaines-
ville teaching how to do
creative design. They had 17
members and 14 guests some
from as far as Marianna and
Chattahoochee attending.
Mrs. Smith demonstrated
how to put together a design
to fit your container. To
begin a design materials are
needed that provide line,
form, texture, pattern, size
and space.
A coffee break was taken
mid morning and guests


ment was expressed at the
size and quality of the
facilities.
"We are justly proud of
K.I.D.S. and all that it offers
to our community," said Mr.
Ailes, executive director of
K.I.D.S. "Although we are
more than pleased with the
number of pre-registrations,
we are still open for a few
more," stated Ailes, "and we
hope to complete them right
away."
Children, age six weeks to
twelve year of age are
eligible to enroll, with train-
ed professionals to attend all
ages.
Stop by now at 309 Williams
Ave., Port St. Joe, to tour
K.I.D.S. beautiful new facili-
ties, or call 227-7440 for more
information.

Garden Club
Met Thursday
The November 13 meeting
of the Port St. Joe Garden
Club was held, as usual, at
the center on 8th St.
Following the call to order
by the president, Mrs. Etherl
Bridges, prayer by Mrs.
Robliell JTackson, and the
pledge of allegiance led by
Mrs. Ralph Swatts, Sr., deli-
cious Thanksgiving refresh-
ments were served to those in
attendance. The hall was
beautifully decorated for this
special occasion.
The day's program was
presented by Mrs. Eloise
Cain of Panama City. It was
entitled, "Flowers of the
Bible". She presented a
program about flowers,
plants, fruits and vegetables
and their uses in the Holy
Land.
Mrs. Stiles Brown reported
that many of these plants
may be found in a special
garden in Jackson, Mississip-
pi.
A very welcome visitor to
this meeting was Mrs. I.C..
Nedley's sister, Mrs. Juanita
Noll, a florist.
At the close of the business
meeting which followed the
program, Mrs. Bridges ex-
pressed sincere appreciation
to Mrs. Nedley for her long
and faithful service. Mrs.
Nedley was an active mem-
ber from the beginning of the
life of this Garden Club.


K.I.D.S. Has Its


Grand Opening


were served baked goods.
The morning session ended
at 12:00 noon. Some mem-
bers took advantage of a
"learn by doing" workshop
which lasted from 1:00 to 3:00
p.m. Each person made their
own design and the group
discussed what each lacked
or needed to make it better.
The second vice president,
Sadie Gardner, entertained
Mrs. Smith and her husband
in her home along with eight
other guests Monday night
for dinner.


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PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1986






THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986


FmHA Puts Large Sum




of Money In Fla. in '86


Gazebo Erected
This attractive gazebo has recently been completed in Forest Park, the playground and
park area located off 16th and 17th Streets in the city. The gazebo is the handiwork of local
carpenter, George Hamby, and is a reflection of his considerable skill in decorative wood-
working. The open air structure will provide an attractive picnic area for those desiring to
use the recreational facilities in the park. -Star photo




Home Landscape Can


Be Major Investment


By Roy Lee Carter
Extension Agent
A beautiful home land-
scape can represent a major
investment, sizeable portion y
of which if often accounted
for by trees and shrubs. So a m
it's important to plan careful-
ly, buy only from reputable c
nurseries, and take care of
your new plants properly as :
soon as you get them home.
Most of us add trees and
shrubs to our home grounds
now and then. As we contem- -
plate such a project, we face CARTER
a common question: When is Your next step will be to
the best time to plant? add some soil amendments to
Generally speaking, the the earth you've removed
answer is: During late fall from the hole soil that will be
and winter months. If you're used to fill in around the roots
thinking about setting some when you set your plant. Soil
new trees or shrubs in your amendments are things like
landscape, now through Feb- compost, pine bark and peat
uai 'is'the timie to do it. moss.- Thbjiel hold water
however, thl i a harff" affhutries bitter in Flor-
3 __t -.1


and fast rule, because the
way a plant is packaged at
the nursery has a lot to do
with the best time to plant.
A couple of obvious excep-
tions to the fall planting rule
are evergreens and palms.
It's best to plant evergreens
in August or early Septem-
ber. Palms should be planted
during the summer rainy
season.
Plants usually are pre-
pared for sale in one of four
ways. They may be "Bare
root", which means the roots
are bare of all soil. They may
be in a "packaged bare root"
form, with the bare roots
wrapped in sawdust, bark, or
peat moss. Plants may be
sold "balled and burlapped",
with the root soil ball wrap-
ped in burlap. Many plants
are sold as "container
grown" specimens, in which
case the root system isn't
disturbed at all until planting
time.
For the most part, "bare
root", "packaged bare root"
and "balled and burlapped"
plants will have a higher
survival rate if they're plant-
ed in the late fall or winter.
"Container grown" plants
can be added to the land-
scape anytime. But, you'll
usually pay a lot more for
plants sold in containers.
The next thing we need to
talk about is preparing the
planting site. You should get
the selected site ready well in
advance of buying a plant, so
that you'll be able to getsit in
the ground as soon as you
take it home. This is very
important. If you wait even a
few days between purchase
and planting, a plant that
was healthy when you bought
it may be in poor shape by
the time you set it in your
landscape. If you give a little
extra time and effort to site
preparation, you'll get your
new plant off to a much
better start. The job you do in
preparing the planting area
will have a lot to do with how
your plants will look for
many years to come.
Obviously, the first step is
digging the hole. Be sure you
dig it large enough. The hole
should be at least six inches
deeper and wider on all sides
than the root mass of the
plant. Keep the sides going
straight down, rather than
sloped. Loosen the soil in the
bottom, to allow for root
development.


ida's sandy soils.
Dig the planting hole about
six inches deeper and wider
than the root mass of the
plant, with the sides going
straight down, rather than
sloping, you'll have plenty of
loose earth to work with. Mix
one part soil amendment
with every two parts of soil
you plan to use in setting
your plant. Then place about
six inches of the amended
soil back in the hole. Pack the
added soil down fairly well,
so the plant doesn't settle
after it's set.
Next, stand the plant up-
right in the center of the hole,
and turn it so that its best
side is most visible. Make
sure there's plenty of room
for the roots. When working
with bare root plants, make a
cone shaped mound of soil in
the bottom of the hole, and
arrange the roots around it.
They should be spread natu-
rally not cramped or twisted.
For a. balled and burlapped
or container grown plant,
handle the soil ball gently,
being careful not to break it.
Make sure you placed the
plant at the right level in the
soil. Planting too shallow can
cause the roots to dry out.


But planting too deep can
suffocate roots, and cause
the base of the trunk to rot.
On bare root plants, you can.
usually tell what the right
level is, because there's a
color change where the base
of the trunk meets the soil
line. With balled and burlap-
ped or container grown
plants, line up the top of the
soil ball with the soil surface.
Don't try to remove the
burlap on a balled and
burlapped plant. Simply'roll
the material down away
from the soil ball, and it will
decay naturally. Container
grown plants usually are sold
in plastic or metal cans,
which must be carefully cut
away and discarded before
planting.
After your plant is set,
you're ready to fill up the rest
of the hole with amended soil.
Fill the hole three fourths
full, keeping the plant in an
upright position. Water tho-
roughly. After the water
settles, fill the rest of the hole
with more amended soil, and
water again. Finally, make a
rim of soil a few inches high
and two or three feet away
from the plants trunk. This
saucer shaped basin will help
hold water, and direct it to
the roots of the plant.

Musical

Concert

Enjoyed
On the evening of Satur-
day, November 15, FSU's
New Art Players of the Guest
Artist Concert Series of the
Apalachicola Area Historical
Society's Ilse Newell Fund
for the Performing Arts,
presented an elegant concert
of 18th century Baroque
chamber music to an appre-
ciative audience at Trinity
Church in Apalachicola.
Opening with Diane Stein on
the cello and Lydia Franks
on flute in Telemann's Sona-
ta in D Major, the cello and
flute with Kerren Berz on


*Opening Special*

'85 LTD WAGON


STK#8838
LOW MILEAGE
Power steering, power brakes, AC, luggage rack


Only *300 Down

$195/mo. with 10.5% APR
^ Does not include Florida tax or tag



(Formerly Franklin Ford)


Winter Hours
8a.m. 6 p.m. Mon. Fri.
9a.m. 1 p.m. Sat.


653-9765
118 Market St.
Apalachicola


The Florida Farmers
Home Administration
(FmHA) approved loans and
grants totaling approximate-
ly $107,000,000 during the 1986
fiscal year which ended
September 30, 1986, accord-
ing to L. James Cherry, Jr.,
State Director.
FmHA is the U.S. Govern-
ment's principal rural credit
agency. It provides loan
assistance to farmers and
other rural residents who are
unable to obtain credit from
banks or other lending insti-
tutions, The loans are to be
repaid in full, plus interest, to
the U.S. Government.
In the farm loan area,
FmHA officials approved a
total of 312 loans to Florida
farmers with a value of
$17,474,220. Heading up the


list were farm operating
loans where a total of 249
loans were approved for the
purchase of farm operating
expenses, livestock, or equip-
ment. Fourteen of the operat-
ing loans were made under
the guaranteed program
where a commercial lender
makes the loan and the
government then guarantees
it. According to Cherry,
much more emphasis will be
placed on guaranteed loans
in the future. Next on theilist
of farm loans are the farm
ownership loans used for the
purchase or development of
real estate. A total of 33 loans
were approved under this'
category totaling $2,093,280.
A total of 30 emergency loans
were also approved to assist
farmers in the recovery from


the effects of natural disas-
ters such as hurricanes,
freezes, and droughts. These
loans totaled $1,853,200.00.
Of the 312 farm loans,
approximately 50 percent
were made to farmers that
had not been borrowing
money from FmHA in the
past. The present FmHA
farm loan portfolio in Florida
consists of approximately
10,000 loans made to nearly
3,200 farmers at a dollar
volume of just over
$370,000,000.00.
During the 1986 fiscal year,
the FmHA Rural Housing
Program obligated for the
benefit of the rural residents
of Florida, a total of
$71,641,748.00. These funds
will enable low and moderate


Last of the Hurricane Damages
Members of the City of Port St. Joe's maintenance department are shown repairing the
dugouts of the softball field, located across from the Centennial Building. The facilities were
part of the devastation inflicted upon the city last year by Hurricane Kate, who swung
through our area last year the week before Thanksgiving.


violin completed the first
part of the program with Trio
by C.P.E. Bach. The clear,
rich tones of the cello con-
trasted exquisitely with the
tones of the flute.
The next concert in Janu-
ary will be in a light vein,
with pops. Also tentatively
scheduled, are Dr. Drinkall
on cello for February 6, and
the 1987 Baldwin Pianists,
the Mastrogiacomo Duo on
grand pianos for March 6.


Sa YY-u Saw Ft In The Star!

WANTED
** SKILLED FINISHED CARPENTER **
to Renovate Residential Residence in Mexico Beach
Work includes: rebuilding roof framing, covering exterior
concrete block wall with wood siding, converting garage
to bed & bath room, wooden decks, drywall, and tile
roof.
Provide work experience and references with
phone numbers to:
PSC
P. 0. Box 13560 Mexico Beach, Florida 32410


Interest Rates Have


Even Lower,!!

to the Lowest Rates In Over 5 Years

Come By and Let Us Help You with

Financing Your Home!!





8.75 Adjustable



CITIZENS

FEDERAL
1 Savings & Loan Association


Port St. Joe
227-1416


Apalachicola
653-8928


Wewahitchka
639-2111


wo


4~S J' fl .rJ ~S~VY


income residents to build,
repair or rent modest, de-
cent, safe and sanitary hous-
ing for their families.
FmHA made 795 single
family home loans, totaling
$27,533,260.00, with the ma-
jority being for construction
of new homes. FmHA cur-
rently holds mortgages on
approximately 27,000 Florida
homes.
104 families obtained home
repair loans and grants,
totaling $334,080.00. Also, a
combination loan and grant
of $35,000,000.00 was made to
provide Farm Worker Hous-
ing in Belle Glade. Three
Housing Preservation grants
and One Self-Help Technical
Assistance grant were made
to non-profit and public body
applicants for $723,960.00.
Rural Rental Apartment
loans were made to 32
Apartment complexes, total-
ing $31,773,360.00 and which
will provide 1,002 new apart-
ment units. In addition,
$7,777,088.00 was obligated
for Rental Assistance units,
which are rent supplements
for low income persons.
FmHA is currently financing
over 300 apartment complex-
es in Florida.
Under the community faci-
lities program, loans can be
made to finance public use
facilities such as health
clinics, nursing homes, fire
stations, jails and other
essential facilities. A total of


$3,020,500 was approved and
obligated for various com-
munity facilities. Under the
water and waste disposal
program,. approximately'
$12,616,200 was approved to
assist rural Florida commu-
nities in financing water and
waste disposal systems.
The Business and Industry
Loan Guarantee Program is
to help in the creation of jobs
in rural areas. In 1986, the
Agency approved $2,000,000
in loan guarantees which will
create jobs in rural Florida.
FmHA in Florida consists
of a State Office in Gaines-
ville, five District Offices and
36 County Offices. The State
Office is responsible for
overseeing program admin-
istration and establishing
policy. Each of the five
District Offices are responsi-
ble for the group type loan
programs including com-
munity facilities, water and
waste disposal and rental
housing for families and the
elderly. The 36 County Of-
fices are responsible for the
farm and single family hous-
ing loan programs.


AVON

to Buy
or Sell
Call 227-1281
tfc 11120


PULITZER PRIZE NOMINEE

The Plumage of

the Sun

by
Margaret Key Biggs
AUTOGRAPHED COPIES SENT ANYWHERE
$12,00 plus $1.00 postage
SEND ORDER TO:
Box 551
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


The Gibson Inn


Sunday Brunch

-NOV. 23-

*Escalloped Oysters*
*Ham & Broccoli Rolls*
*Pepper Steak*
*Vegetables Salads Desserts*


$795



Monday Night Football
In the bar

Hamburgers- Oyster Loaf- Chili

*4.95


Draft Beer 50"


Downtown
Apalachicola


*Daily Specials*
Nov. 24 thru Nov. 28

Monday Chicken Pot Pie...... $3.95
Tuesday Catfish............... $3.95
Wednesday Pizza............. $4.25
Thursday thanksgiving ..... See our ad
Friday Shrimp Quiche ...........$3.95


653-2191


PAGE FIVE


-. <-'- *


.1.11






PAGE SIX THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1986


I !'

NEATNESS COUNTS _
It's an old saying but nowhere is it more
applicable than here in odr pharmacy. For every
S drug.package has to be carefully marked and then
stored alphabetically in its exact proper place
* under the right protective conditions. Our
pharmacy counter is always kept antiseptically
clean so that there is no chance of a drug becoming
contaminated while we are filling your
prescriptions.
Neatness also counts when it comes to people
. and that is why all of the people in our pharmacy
make it an extra point to be well-groomed from
their fingernails and shoes to their lab jackets.
"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US
with their prescriptions, health needs and other
pharmacy products. We consider this trust a
* privilege and a duty. May we be your personal
family pharmacy?"

V BUZZETT'S DRUG STORE
Free Parking -.Drive-In Window
229-8771 317 Williams Ave. Port St. Joe


Wakulla War Eagles Dominate Sharks Friday


After playing all their
games in warm weather, the
Sharks stepped out into an
uncomfortably cold tempera-
ture Friday night and stayed
cold the rest of the night. The
Sharks never seemed to
warm to the occasion of
going against the Wakulla
War Eagles, who brought a
strong team to Port St. Joe to
battle the re-building Sharks
to a 40-0 score.
The Sharks brought a
disappointing crowd out with
them Friday night. It could
have been the first cold snap.
of the season which kept
Shark fans home in droves,
but they weren't at the
stadium.
Not only was it unusual for
the Sharks to play in cool
temperatures this season,
but it was unusual for their
fans not to be there.


A ceremony at half time
dedicated the stands at Shark
Stadium to the memory of
C.W. Roberts, who played
such a big part in getting the
bleacher stands built when
he was president of the
Quarterback Club several
years ago.. The family of the
late C.W. Roberts was there
for the dedication and wit-
nessed the unveiling of a
plaque naming the bleacher
section in his memory during
half time ceremonies.
In the football game, the
War Eagles had to struggle
at times to make their 40


points during the game, but
had no trouble at all in
holding the Sharks scoreless,
allowing them only 62 yards
of offense for the game. The
offensive punch was the
smallest number of yards
gained in a game by the
Sharks this year.
The Sharks went into the
game with their starting
quarterback, Tim Wilder,
sidelined by an arm injury
and no substitutes. Blaine
Adams was called up from
the junior varsity team to
lead the team.


The War Eagles took over
the momentum of the game
the first time they touched
the football. Willie Thomas
fielded a Shark punt on his
own nine yard line and came
barreling up the sideline for a
91 yard punt return which put
the Eagles ahead to stay. It
was the first kick return
scored against the Sharks for
a TD all season long. The
Sharks, who have had most
of their problems with failing
to generate an offense, knew
how hard it was for them to
come from behind, so the
Eagles had a psychological
edge from their first play.
Wakulla scored twice in
the second period on an
18-yard pass play to Simeon
Nelson and a two yard plunge
by Thomas. Thomas scored


again in the third period on
still another kick return, as
he galloped 95,yards for the
score. Danny Metcalf scored
on a seven yard run for the
Eagles late in the third
period.
Nelson put his second TD
on the board with 11 minutes
left in the final period for the
Eagles' last score of the
game.
The Shark defense, which
has normally been right in
the game this season, had an
off night Friday, but still
was the only bright spot for
the Sharks during the game.
FRIDAY NIGHT
Friday night, the Sharks
will close out their season
here at home with a game
against the Sneads Pirates.
The Sharks will be looking


for their second win of what
has been one of those years
every school the size of Port
St. Joe has every once in a
while. While the Sharks were
having one of those seasons
they must suffer through,
their opponents, were all
enjoying better than moder-
ate success-against the
Sharks and others.
The final game Friday
night will begin at 8:00 p.m.,
in Shark Stadium.
THE YARDSTICK
Wak PSJ
First downs 24 3
Rushes, yards 35-323 29-23
Passing yards 128 39
Return yards 115 125
Passes 15-12-1 6-2-2
Punts, avg. 4-29.5 7-31
Fumbles lost 2-0 1-0
Penalties, yds. 6-65 2-15


.~,. .ad i


Joe Norton (43), a senior defensive player for the Sharks,
is shown sacking Wakulla quarterback, Herman Metcalf, as
he attempts to get a pass off.
-Star photos


Members of the family of C. W. Roberts are shown with Superintendent Walter Wilder
following the dedication of a plaque naming the concrete stands at Shark stadium in honor
of the late Mr. Roberts. In the foreground are Betty Roberts, his wife, and George Roberts,
his youngest son.


Gators, FAMU, In Title Scrap


Wewahitchka's Gators go
for all the marbles of this
year's football season Friday
when they travel to Tallahas-


see to meet FAMU to decide
which team is the champion
of the District in class 1-A
football.


The Gators take a spark-
ling 8-1 season record into the
game Friday while FAMU
has an identical 8-1 record,
but hasn't lost in District
play.
The Gators' only loss came
two weeks ago at th'eVhanidsiOf
Liberty County, which is in
District 2-A along with the
Gators. FAMU's loss came at
the hands of the Wakulla War
Eagles. ;
If the Gators win the


shoot-out Friday night, they
will go on to represent
District 2-A in the state
play-off system, seeking
their first state football
crown.
FAMU knocked off the
Gtors in th"'seasdns filial
game last year, and the
Wewahitchka team will be
out to avenge that defeat
Friday night.
Game time will be 8:00
p.m., EST, in Tallahassee.


All across America NAPA's new fleet graphics are
coming your way proudly displayed on Nylint's big
model 910-serles tractor trailer. This new NAPA
toy truck is 22" overall length, stands 6-718"
high and 4-718" wide. NAPA toy trucks are
a Christmas tradition and this year we are
offering the 8th edition, a true 18-wheeler.


NAPA Au


201 Long Ave.


The Howard Creek Volun-
teer Fire Department will
have a turkey shoot Satur-


Only
$1595

LIMITED SUPPLY


ito Parts 4 NAPA

Phone 229-8222 Althe right parts in

__ all the right places.


day, November 22 at the
Indian Swamp Camp Ground
on County Road 387, near
Howard Creek.
The volunteers will also
have a turkey shoot, barbe-
cue and live blue grass music
on Saturday, November 29 at
the Camp Grounds.
Both affairs will start at 12
noon. Everyone is urged and
invited to come and partici-
pate.


X The Shark defensive squad converges on the ball carrier for the Wakulla War Eagles.


CAMPING


FISHING


HUNTING


Indian Swamp Campground


Located at Howard Creek
..Hwy C-387
(904) 227-7261


& RV Park
, Fla.
t i


Discount Gun Center

New Browning BAR Auto 30-06.............. *47995
New Browning BAR Auto 270................*47995
New Browning BAR Auto 300 W. Mag.........*49995
New Browning B-80 129a 26" Imp. Cyl...........*39995
New Savage 110E Bolt Action 30-06...........*19995
New Savage 110E w/o sights .308. .......... .*19995


New Savage 110E .270.
New Savage 110E .243.


*19995
.19995


Mailing Address:
Rt. 1 Box 182-A
Wewahitchka, Fla. 32465

Scopes

Ammo

Mounts

Pistols
Widest selection of
new and used guns
in the area
Campsites
Hot Showers
Shooting Ranges
Gunsmith
No Rain Checks
Limited Quantity


Michelin savings


that you


really can be


thankful for.




MICHELIN XH
PERFECT BALANCE
BETWEEN PRICE & QUALITY


* Affordable.
* Longest-lasting
Michelin tire.
* For domestic compact,
intermediate & full-size
cars.
* Excellent wet & dry
traction.


PATE'S SERVICE


201 Monument Ave.


Phone 227-1291


LIST PRICE


$79.81 195175-14...
$83.85 205175-14. ..
$88.90 205175-15...


$65.95
$67.95
$71.95


MICHELIN
BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES.


TURKEY SHOOT
sponsored by the Port St. Joe Jaycees
ALL PROCEEDS FOR
Toys for Tots!
Saturday 1-6 EST (thru Christmas)
at Butler's Restaurant
WIN A
10-12 Lb. Turkey or Ham

V2.50 per shot


Turkey Shoot Saturday

for Howard Creek VFD


New from NAPA


18-Wheeler Express


in timefor CHRISTMAS


IU


I


I







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986


Too Much, too Little Water Can Kill Indoor Plants


By Roy Lee Carter
SExtension Agent
Many plants make attrac-
tive, additions to home decor-
ation. They bring the fresh-
ness and beauty of nature to
the indoor environment. Of
course, there's no such thing
as a true "house plant." But,
many species will grow quite


well indoors, if we maintain
the proper conditions. It's
basically just a matter of
keeping certain vital factors
in mind such things as
temperature and humidity.
As we all know, plants
were never meant to live in
houses. Their natural habitat
is the great outdoors. How-


ever, if we're willing to meet
their special needs, it's not
too difficult to maintain
plants within our homes. In
this article I will offer some
tips on modifying the indoor
climate to stimulate healthy
plant growth. My informa-
tion for this article was
provided by Extension Horti-


culturist Dr. Robert Black, of
the University of Florida's
Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences.
For most plants to do well
in a home, the temperature
should be between 70 and 75
degrees during the day, and
about 65 degrees at night.
However, these are only


$11,000 Raised for the Ducks


The cause of North Ameri-
can. waterfowl conservation
was given an added boost this
week when the Gulf County
Ducks Unlimited committee
forwarded more than
$11,000.00 raised at its recent
banquet to DU National
Headquarters. Commenting
on the event, local DU
committee chairman, Ralph


Roberson said, "It was com-
forting to see such a large,
enthusiastic turnout at this
year's fund raiser. It's also
reassuring to know that the
lion's share of every dollar
we raise will be funneled
directly into wetland habitat
restoration programs in Ca-
nada, where over 70 percent
of this continent's ducks and


geese are produced." Rober-
son went on to congratulate
and thank members of the
community who donated
time and merchandise to
guarantee the banquet's suc-
cess.

In a final statement con-
cerning the future growth of
the organization, Roberson


said, "Over the past 15 years
Ducks Unlimited has grown
at an annual rate of 15
percent a year. Since such
growth is essential to the
well-being of the waterfowl
resource, the area commit-
tee is already planning to-
make next year's DU ba'n-
quet a record-breaker."


Must File Now for Turkey Permits


Sportsmen who plan to
take part in this year's spring
turket quota hunts at the
Andrews, Jumper Creek,
Seminole Ranch of Toso-
hatchee wildlife manage-
ment areas, must file appli-
cations between Dec. 1 and
Dec. 5. Spring turkey permits
will be issued by random


drawing from applications
received during this time
period.
Applications are available
from the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission's
headquarters and regional
offices. In order to apply for
quota hunts, applicants must
purchase wildlife manage-


ment area stamps unless
specifically exempted be-
cause of age or disability.
Eddie White, in charge of
the Commission's quota hunt
program, said the applica-
tions must be received by his
office by 4:30 p.m. Dec. 5.
Hunters who are exempt for
most quota hunts must have
a spring turkey quota permit
to take turkeys on Andrews
or Tosohatchee wildlife man-
agement areas.
Instructions for filling out,


the applications are included
with the application forms.
All hunters who plan to
take turkeys on private or
public land must first obtain
turkey stamps, which are
available from county tax
collectors and their sub-
agents. The stamps cost $5
plus a 50 cent seller's fee.
Resident hunting licenses
cost $11 plus $1 seller's fee.
Wildlife management area
stamps are $10 plus a $1'
seller's fee.


CARTER
rough guidelines. Plant pre-
ferences and tolerance to
temperature vary widely.
For specific requirement of
particular plants, you'd be
wise to check with a nursery-
man, garden center opera-
tor, or your County Exten-
sion Agent.
The most important temp-
erature factor in relation to
your plants is stability, try to
locate them in an area of the
home where the temperature
will vary by no more than
five degrees. This means that
you should avoid placing
plants directly in front of a
heating unit or air condition-
er or even on top of a
television set. During winter
months, it is wise to move
plants away from windows
and doorways. House plants
need a moderately warm
environment. Extended per-
iods of exposure to tempera-


ture of 50 degrees or lower
can cause permanent dam-
age to many plants.
Temperature is just one
environment factor affecting
plants inside your home.
Another is the amount of
humidity or moisture in the
air. Most plants grow best
when the humidity is at least
30 percent. Since indoor air is
usually rather dry you need
to provide enough water,
proper lighting conditions.
and a well regulated temper-
ature to make up for the lack
of humidity.
The installation of a humid-
ifier is an excellent way to


insure maintenance of ade-
quate air moisture levels for
good plant growth. However,
if you feel such a unit would
be too costly, or impractical
for your home, there are
other steps you can take. For
example. humidity can be
increased around your house
plants by setting them on
water filled trays of pebbles.
Never allow them to become
immersed in the water.
Grouping plants also seems
to help. Plants grown separ-
ately usually dry out a lot
faster than plants grown
close together. You might
also consider locating plants


with very high moisture
requirement in naturally
humid areas of your home,
such as the kitchen. Those
house plants that can tolerate
moisture on their leaves will
benefit from regular syring-
ing with a fine mist of water.
Remember that some plants
can be injured by such
treatment.

While humidity is an im-
portant source of the mois-
ture plants need for good
health, they receive most of
their water requirements
through direct applications
to the soil.


Roger L. Clark, E.A.
TAX ACCOUNTANT
proudly announces the expansion
of accounting services to Gulf County
and the Mexico Beach area.
MONTHLY BOOKKEEPING
TAX RETURN PREPARATION
TAX PLANNING
COMPUTER SERVICES
Mr. Clark worked for over seven years with the IRS Audit
Division prior to opening his private practice in 1981. He is
"/ an Enrolled Agent and is licensed by the Federal Govern-
ment to represent taxpayers before the I.R.S.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
CLARK & ASSOCIATES
Collect (904) 785-9893
2304 Winona Drive Panama City, Florida 32405


Fresh Boiled and Green Peanuts


I


I


PAGE SEVEN







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986


They hang upside down in
the cave by day and come out
at dusk to feed swarms of
bats, swooping around in the
evening sky.
Bats, those eerie creatures
symbolic of the nether re-
.' gions, have always thrived in
Florida. But as 7,000 people
move to the state each week
and compete for a dwindling
supply of rural land, bats are


State of Florida
Department of Environmental
Regulation
Notice of Application
The Department announced receipt
of an application for permit from
William D. Baxter, President, Baxter.
Realty to construct a 0.030 MGD
wastewater treatment facility to serve
the El Governor Motel. This proposed
project will be located in Gulf County.
This application is being processed
and is available for public inspection
during normal business hours, 8:00
a.m. to5:00 p.m., Monday through Fri-
day, except legal holidays, at 160
SGovernmental Center, Pensacola,
Florida32501-5794. It 11-20
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
, to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
ur ndersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of Court, Gulf County,
Florida, four weeks after the first
publication of this notice, the fictitious
name or trade name under which they
will be engaged in business and in
: which said business is to be carried on
to-wit:
LET'S KNIT YARN SHOP, Rt. 3B,
Box 11, Highway 386, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456; Owners Jean I. Muns
and Peavy Mims 4tc 11-20
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Board of County Commissioners of
Gulf County, Florida will consider
5 granting a variance pursuant to Arti-
cle IV, Section 3 of the Gulf County
Land Subdivision Regulations. Cecil.
G.Costin, Jr.and ThomasS.Gibsonas
*- fee simple owners of Lots formerly
described as Lots I through II, Block
21,Lots 1 through 10, Block 22, Lots 1
through 7, Block 27, Lots I through 5.
Block 27. Lots I through 5. Block 28,
Lots 1 through 5, Block 31, Lots I
through 8, Block 43, Lots I through 4,
Block 40, St Joe Beach, Unit No.12, as
per plat thereof recorded in the public
records of Gulf County, Florida at Plat
Book 2, page 6, have requested a
variance to allow them to place the
above described property back into
the St. Joe Beach Subdivision and the'
Board will consider said action at its
regularly'scheduled meeting on,
December 9, 1986, at 9:00 A.M. in the
County Commissioner's Room at the
Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe,
Florida.
.:. BOARD OF COUNTY
-. COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Billy Branch
--- Chairman It 11-20
S Attest:
Je Gates Clerk
6L u -


9,


'I


'-I

I

I

I

I-


4 '1,A1


(U


being displaced.
"As we fill up with new-
comers, confrontations be-
tween man and beast in-
crease," said Tim Johnston,
a Citrus County home and
urban horticulturist with the
Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences.
Whether bats, alligators,
raccoons, snakes or armadil-
los, Johnston said, "there's


STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF GULF
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that on the
30th day of April, 1986, pursuant to a
Writ of Execution issued in the Circuit
.court of Gulf County, Florida, Case
Number 81-128 in the cause of DIANE
GABLE MAYHANN, plaintiff vs.
WAYNE GABLE, DEFENDANT, I,
AL HARRISON, SHERIFF OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA have levied upon
the property of the defendant, to-wit:
One (1) 1977 Thunderbird (Ford) 2
door, Red in color, Tag. 673 FTM-
Texas Serial No. 7J87H146171
On the 16th day of December, 1986,
at Two O'Clock (2:00) (EST) in the
afternoon on the steps of the Gulf
County Courthouse, Port St. Joe,
Florida, I will offer for sple said pro-
perty for cash to the highest bidder,
subject to all prior liens, if any, to
satisfy said Writ of Execution.
Al Harrison, Sheriff
Gulf County, Florida 4t 11-20

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY'
FLORIDA TITLE GROUP, fqormerly
FLORIDA TITLE & MORTGAGE
COMPANY, a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CAROLE GRACE CLARKE,
Defendapt.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CAROLE GRACE CLARKE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose an Agree-
ment for Deed on real property situate
in Gulf County, Florida described as
follows, to-wit:
Tract 47, Cape San Bias Gulfside and
Bayside Subdivision according to the
official plat thereof on file in the public"
records of Gulf County, Florida, in
Plat Book 3, page 24.
', YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve A
copy of your written defenses, if any,
to the action on Petitioner's attorney
whose name and address is THOMAS
S. GIBSON, Post Office Box 39, Port,
St. Joe, Florida 32456, on or bIfore
January'13, 1987, and file the original
with the clerk of circuit court, either
before service on Petitioner's attorney
or immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered to the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
court on the 11th day of November,
1986.


Jerry T. Gates as
Clerk of Circuit Court
Gulf County, Florida


FIRST
PRESBYTER
CHURCH


508 Sixteenth Str


SUNDAY WORSHIP
Nursery Available
ADULT SCHOOL
The Rev. Dr. Elmer I. Braden, Pastor
PASTORAL COUNSELING 227-1756


no place for the poor beasts
to retreat to."
Johnston gets several calls
a year from people who want
to rid their property of bats,
as does Dr. Wayne Marion, a
wildlife extension specialist
at the University of Florida.
"They've heard all the
horror stories about rabies,"
Johnston said. "That's their
big fear."
Marion, however, said the
incidence of rabies in bats is
low, usually less than one
percent.
That doesn't mean bats
should be played with, Mar-
ion said, but fewer than 10
people have died from bat-
transmitted. rabies since
194P, and 'none in Florida.
Th~-danger of rabies from
raccoons or household pets is
far greater.
Marion said many people
think the only good bat is a
dead one. "Their perception
is that bats are invading their
territory" and are "bad, evil
and somehow mysterious."


"The whole idea of a
vampire bat is what bothers
people," Marion said.
. Vampire bats, however,
are found only in the tropical
regions of1Central and South
America.
"Just because there's a
colony of bats in an old
abandoned outbuilding on
your property doesn't mean
you need to sleep with a
wreath of garlic around your
neck," Johnston said. Garlic.
wards off vampires, accord-"
ing to superstition.
Johnston and Marion try to
educate and humore bat-be-
sieged callers, telling them
how to get bats out of attics,
chimneys and roof tiles. Both
say bats are good to have
around and should be pro-
tected.
Bats are "bug-eating ma-'
chines," Johnston said.
Some studies indicate one
bat can eat as many as 8,000.
insects a night.
But one bat expert, Dr.
Steve Humphrey, associate


curator of the Flo:
Museum in Gaines
bats prefer to e
moths and beetles
fore contribute little
quito control.
Humphrey and o
life specialists, hov
,concerned about th
of some species of
, The gray bat i
federal endangered
list and was bar
from extinction in t
1982. when the Na
servancy and the
Game and Fresh W
Commission bough
Cave in Jackson C
The cave. about
cumb to a develop
dozer, was the only
maternity cave in
and home to the la
ing colony of six
Apalachicola Rive
age area.
Frank Smith, chi
Bureau of Wildlife
ment in Tallahass
about 10,000 gray


Bats Are Being Displaced by


Vater Fish
it Judges
county.
t to suc-
?er's bull-
gray bat
Florida
st surviv-
x in the
r draini-

ief of the
Manage-
see, said
bats and


For

AMBULANCE

Service

CALL

227-1115


Development

rida State 90,000 southeastern bats live young. Entry at other
ville, said in the cave. about the same is allowed.only under
eat small number as in 1982. vision.
and there- Humphrey said although The southeastern ba
le to mos- most bats in north Florida of Florida's 13species,E
live in trees and have ample under review for pc
their wild- habitat, some cave-bat popu- placement on the endan
Yev.r, are lations have been harmed by' list. Smith said, as ai
e survival spelunkerss" or cave ex- southeastern big-earec
bats. plorers. and the Florida mastil
s on the *Smith said that because
d species gray bats are especially
ely saved sensitive to disturbances, .*.
Florida in Judges Cave is closed to the 1
ture Con- public from March 1.5 to Sept. The Chur
SFlorida 15, when the bats are with I


DUREN'S
Economy Store
Phone 229-8817
Port St. Joe, Florida
New Crop Large'
Paper Shell Mayhann',

PECANS
pound

1 .49


ch of the Nazarene


Excitement is in the air. We are a small but growing church
with a big welcome.
SUNDAY SCHOOL .... ................. 10:00 A.M.
MORNINGIWORSHIP ...................... 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ....................... 7:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY EVENING SERVICE .......... 7:00 P.M.
Location: 2420 Long Avenue ,


Pastor
DARRELL DENNIS


Youth Minister
DWIGHT DENNIS


Freeman Components,
INC.

HIGHWAY 98 WEST PHONE (904) 229-6289

(Highway 98 West of Highland View)
Builders and Erectors of

Building Components
and Trusses

Built to your blueprint
specifications
WE DELIVER

j


Members of the Keyettes and Key Club of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School are shown in
front of the recently completed trophy case'at the school. -Star photo


Trophy Case Finished


4t 11-20


IAN


eet

10am

1 a.m


ri -"-. U- -- -


PLUMBING PROBLEMS?


Custom Plumbing Installation



STOKES PLUMBING COMPANY
P.O. Box 274
Mexico Beach. Fl. 32410
(904) 648-8353
RF 0042744
Single &
New Multi Family
Construction Dwelling


HOT TUBS


WHIRLPOOLS


Eye Openers'
by Dr. Wesley Grace
COORDINATION
Q. How can poor vision
affect a child's development?
A. Sometimes illegible
handwriting is the result of
poor eye-hand coordination
rather than poor visual acu-
ity. Poor eye-hand coordina-
tion is usually caused by
underdeveloped visual skills,
which are often improved
with proper professional at-
tention.
Some youngsters who ap-
pear to see distances clearly
yet can't catch a ball or ride
a bike may have poor eye-
body coordination. Proper
training and treatment can
improve coordination. In
fact, many professional ath-
letes voluntarily take this
kind of training to "sharpen"
eye-hand and eye-body coor-
dination to improve their
performance.
A complete eye examin-
ation that tests for coordin-
ation skills could be the first
step in helping your young-
ster enjoy sports.
..Brought to you as a com-
munity service by:

Dr. Wesley Grace
322 Long Ave.
Phone 227-1410


A new trophy case was
recently completed at .Port'
'St. Joe Jr.-Si. High School to
display the trophies ac-
cumulated through the years
by Washington High School,
Port St. Joe High School, and
the current Port St. Joe
Jr.-Sr. High. The trophy case
has been a project of the Gulf
County School Board, Key


Club and Keyettes for,
several years n0ow.

The interior of the trophy
case was designed and ar-
ranged by Greg Burch, art
instructor and the art de-
partment of the school. The
case is located at the front
doors of the high school in
the commons area.


Engineering Grads


Attention Engineers! The
Florida Engineering Educa-
tion Delivery System
(FEEDS), developed by the
Florida Board of Regents, is
designed to meet the continu-
ing education needs of en-
gineering graduates working
in industry and state-govern-
ment positions within Flor-
ida. The program is open to
all engineers interested in
either obtaining a Master's
Degree or furthering their
Professional Development.
The five primary graduate
Engineering Degree grant-
ing universities in Florida -
University of Florida, Uni-
versity of Soaith~Florida,
University of Central Flor-
ida, Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity and Florida Internation-
al University offer courses
every semester via tutored
videotaped instruction. Spe-
cific areas of specialization
include, but are not limited to
computer-information sci-


. ONDULINE ROOFING SALE!.


* Provides added Insulation as a roo
* Ideal for patio roof
*Attractive skirting material
* Won't rust or corrode
Can be repainted any color
* Contemporary look


Johnon Lmbe.& Sppl
I omerv Er es Hrdwre
Highay 9 Higlan~iew Phon 229123


* '~L.
* -'-7-,- .4' .4. ii.. .~*3~.I')S~9* '


* Fast, et
" Will nev
* Provide
" Reduce
" Low ma
* Lightwe


isy Installation
'er rust or corrode
s added insulation
s noise, unlike metal roofing
ilntenance
eight, easy to handle





The Lifetime Roofing


U4"~G


ences and civil, electrical,
mechanical or industrial-sys-
tems engineering.
Advanced registration for
spring semester 1987 will be
held on Tuesday, November
18 from 10:00 11:30 a.m.,
Bldg 1329 at Tyndall Air
Force Base and 1:30 3:00
p.m., Bldg. 389 at the Naval
Coastal Systems Center. Re-
gistration can be completed
daily November 24 Decem-
ber 17, from 9:30 11:30 a.m.
at Gulf Coast Community
College, Room 305, Health
Sciences Bldg. Contact per-
son: Jackie Russell.
For further information on
course availability and regis-
tration materials, please con-
tact the area coordinator of
the FEEDS program: Dr.
Robert E. Boyer, FAMU-
FSU College of Engineering,
Panama City Campus, 769-
8951. In Tallahassee, call Ms.
Lydia Riedell, (904) 644-6490.




Couple to live on premises
of newly completed lodge on
St. Joseph's Bay. Caretaking
& housekeeper with light
cooking duties. No children.
Ideal for Retirees! Send
resume to Lodge Oppor-
tunities, 4104 West 23rd
Street, Panama City,
Florida, 32405. 4tc 11-20
Beginning Bookkeeper
$3.35 per hour, some week-
end & night work. Ex-
perience preferred, but not
necessary. Apply 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. in person, 518 1st St.,
Port St. Joe. No calls.
tfc 11/6
Judge David L. Taunton
will be taking applications
for the position of Judicial
Assistant beginning
November 6 and continuing
through the month of
November, 1986. '
Interested persons may
call or come by the Judge's
office for more information.
4t 11/6


J .... .


times
super-

t, one
also is
issible
igered
re the
d bat
ff bat.


-- Public Notices -


IFONDULINE

WASN'TYOUR

FIRSTROOF,

MAKE IT

YOURLAST.
Red and Brown In Stock
Other colors available:
f-over ,Black, white, sliver, green, blue,
red, brown, tan. Other colors by
special order.



i;[ ^ -'l ', ir," m *- '"


;s;B


--3 ~-- --


q


I -'


-yr:`PAGE EIGIIT


st


ei







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986 PAGE NINE


f


One lot for sale. 100 X 218.
Blossom Hill Road, Howard
Creek. Call 229-8520. ltc 11-20

For Sale by owner Good
investment. 2 bedr om
houses plus an apartment on
2 large lots. Choice property.
Equity and assume loan.
Call 229-8904 tfc 11-20
Attractive home inside
and out! Nice neighborhood,
4 bedroom, 1 ba. wallpaper,
carpet, kit. appli., cen. h&a,
new roof, covered patio,
fenced backyard designed
for kids. $43,500. 229-6922.
tfc 11/13
By owner: Home only 3
yrs. old, 3 bd., 2 baths, LR,
DR, Ig. breakfast rm., kit.
w/1g. pantry, range & d.w.,
inside laundry, cen. h&a, 2
car garage, insul. windows,
excel. insulation in outside
walls & attic. $54,500.
229-8688. tfc 11/6
First time this older 4
bedroom home has been of-
fered for sale by owner. Ask-
ing 15% below appraised
value with owner financing
possible. On 1% lots in quiet
neighborhood. Fenced in
back yard, storage bldg.
with playhouse, 2 full baths,
family rm., living rm. with
hardwood flooring, remodel-
ed kitchen, all appliances in-
cluded. Must sell, make us
an offer. Call 229-8795 or
229-8790, to see home at 209
9thSt. tfe 11/6
Newly renovated home for
sale by owner: 3 bdrm., 1%
ba., new wiring & plumbing,
cen. h&a, carport with
separate storage area, fenc-
ed in yard in nice location.
Call for appt. to see, 310 16th
Street. 229-8795 or 229-8790.
tfc 10/23
3 bedroom, 2 bath home for
sale, 401 16th St. Call Citizens
Federal Savings & Loan,
9-4:30, M-F, 227-1416.
tfe 11/20


Furnished trailer for rent,
1 person, Overstreet. Call
648-5306. ltc 11-20

Two bedroom, one bath
house. Stove and
refrigerator furnished.
$310.00 per month plus -$200
security deposit. Call
575-8545 or 229-6699.
ltc 11-20
House and 10 acres, 3
bedroom, two bath, large
den. Five miles east of Mex-
ico Beach. $425.00. Call
648-5716 or 871-5486 Itc 11-20
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
Newly remodeled office
suite for $160.00, utilities in-
cluded. Located in office
bldg. of St. Joseph Bay Con-
struction Co. Call 229-8795 or
229-8790. tfc 11/6
House for RentPr Lease:
Unfurnished 3 bedroom, 2
bath brick home on 2 lots.
Central h&a, double car gar-
age, short walk to beach. St.
Joe Beach. $400 plus deposit.
Call 227-1457 or 648-5351.
tfc 11/20
Mexico Beach: Small self
contained RV for rent.
Utilities furnished. No pets.
One or 2 adults only. $50 wk.
648-8289. 3tp 11/6
For Rent: New mobile
home. Furnished for one or
two people. No pets. Court
St., St. Joe Beach, one block
to beach. $275 Call 229-8549.
tfc 11/20

Mexico Beach: 3 BR, 2 B
and a 2 BR, 1 B mobile home,
$210 & $185 per mo. respec-
tively. Lease & deposit re-
quired. No pets. Adults
preferred. 648-8289. 3tp 11/6
Newly renovated home for
rent: 3 bdrm., 1% ba., new
wiring & plumbing, cen:
h&a, carport with ,sep.
storage area, fenceddinyard
in nice location. Call for
appt. to see, 310 16th St.
229-8795 or 229-8790.
tfc 10/30


HANNON REALTY, I
221 Reid Ave. Port St. J
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Margaret Hale 648-5659
Broker-Salesman
Frances Chason -- 229-8747


HOMES
New Listing: North Port St. Joe: 2 houses for only $33,500. Good rental
property.
Port St. Joe: 3 bedroom, 1 bath frame home close to downtown. $15,500.
Mexico Beach: Owner Says Sell, 3 bedroom, 2 bath trailer on 2 lots close
to beach. Was listed at $35,000. Will listen to offers.
Port St. Joe: PRICE REDUCED on this 4 bedroom, 2 bath home with
fireplace. Carport, outside storage, now only $55,000.
New Listing: Port St. Joe: 3 bedroom, I bath, newly painted, mini-blinds.
central heat and air cond.. $58,000.
New Listing: North Port St. Joe: 3 bedroom, 1 bath, remodeled kitchen,
new roof. $15,000.
New Listing: Port St. Joe: Charming 2 bedroom. 2 bath home on corner
lot. Carpets, deck, many other features. $34,500.
PORT ST. JOE MUST SELL: Owner transferred. 3 bedroom, 2 bath
home, family room, over 1,500 sq. ft. Make an offer. $62.000.
Simmons Bayou: Large 4 bedroom home with beautiful hardwood floors
& juniper paneling. Lots of trees on 3 acres. 267 ft. of bayfront. Shown by
appt.
White City: 3 bedroom, 2 bath, carport, new roof! Price reduced to only
$34,000.
Port St. Joe: 2 bedroom, 1 bath on 11 lots, 2 car carport, fenced yard,
$37,000.
Mexico Beach: One block to beach. 2 or 3 bedroom. 1 bath, fireplace,
great room, foyer, private patio. $52,600.
North Port St. Joe: Price Reduced. 2 bedroom. 1 bath, enclosed porch,
carpet, panelling, only $20,000.
Oak Grove: Good rental property. 3 bedroom, 1 bath, den. carport. Only
$21,500.
Port St. Joe: Perfect starter home for young couple. 2 bedroom. 1 bath.
central heat/air. Only $26,500.
St. Joe Beach: Gulf view from deck, '2 block to water. New kitchen, cen-
tral heat & air, fans, carpet. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, $53,000.
St. Joe Beach: 2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home, nice shaded lot, $31.500.
Mexico Beach: 2 bedroom, 1 bath screen porch, deck with gulf view. Hwy.
98. Price includes 1 bedroom guest house. $115,000.
St. Joe Beach: Extra large, 4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Brand new carpet,
new kitchen, only 2 blocks from beach. $42,000.
Port St. Joe: Freshly painted frame home 3 bedrooms. 1 bath, covered
patio, carport, outside storage. $43,000.
LOTS
Mexico Beach: Owner wants to sell. 2 lots beachside of Hwy. 98. Can be
used commercial, make an offer.
Cape Plantation: Exclusive homesites available close to golf, swimming
& tennis, underground utilities. From $16,000. Owner financing.
Cape Plantation: Acre zoned commercial, excellent restaurant location.
$45,500.
Mexico Beach: Texas Drive, $10,000.
Indian Pass: 1 block from water, 75'x105' $9,500.
St. Joe Beach: Price reduced on lot. Corner Coronado & Americus, now
only $13,500.
Stonemill Creek Area: 40 acres, cleared $40,000.
St. Joseph Shores: 80' Gulf Front, Hwy. 98 to water.
Wewahitchka: 80 acres east of town, $80,000.
Port St. Joe: Close to business district 50x170', $8,000.
St. Joe Beach: Large tract 231' on Highway and waterfront.
White City: Canal lot reduced to $28,000.
RENTALS
St. Joe Beach: 1 bedroom house, partially furnished, Gulf view. No pets.
$225.


Roy Smith


Nice 2 bedroom apart-
ment, approx. 800 sq. ft. Rea-
sonable deposit, $300 mo. No
pets, adults only. Located
606 Woodward Ave. Call
227-1689, ask for Mrs. Glen
Combs. tfc 10/23
Mexico Beach: Super nice
large duplex. 2/1. Ceiling
fans, cen. h&a, walk to shop-
ping & beach. $285 per
month. 1-575-3624 p.m. or
1-385-7714 a.m. tfc 11/20
Room for Rent: By day.
week, month. Air cond., TV.
Thames Hotel 229-8723. 302
Reid Ave. tfc 4/17

RENT TO OWN or sell or
rent. All new St. Joe Beach
property with choice of 2 and
3 bedroom mobile homes
furnished or not all hardwood
siding, Central AC, skirted
with two porches each. One,
14 by 54 2 bedroom can be
installed on your lot. Call
Hosswood Estates 648-5060.
tfc 11/20
FOR RENT: 1985 Ford
555-A tractor, 4 wheel drive
backhoe, front end loader,
forklift. 229-6736.
tfc 11/20
No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251. tfc 4/V17
For Rent: Mini-warehouse
storage. For more informa-
tion call 229-6200. tfc 7/3
For Rent: Warehouse
space with office. Approx.
850 sq. ft. Suitable for con-
tractor or small service busi-
ness. 227-1100 days only.
tfc 8-7
2 bedroom, 1 bath house on
canal, Mexico Beach. Cen.
h&a, furnished, year lease,
$375 month. 648-8586 or
1-725-3616. tfc 9/11
Mexico Beach: Two RV or
amm1U t_ il1r I1nk Ata/m.


smau traner 1oUs, i*a
ea. No pets, adults p
red. 648-8289. 31
House for Rent by O
2 bdrm., 1 ba. One
from Highland View S
108 7th St., H.V. Good
tion & fenced in yard
229-6671 after 5:30.
3tc





1981 Ford Country
station wagon. PB, PS
CB, 56,541 miles. One
Excellent condition.
Call 227-1111 or 227-160
2t

1982 VW Jetta 4door
(diesel) gray in color.
miles per gallon. $350
229-6005. In excellent,
tion. 2t

1973 Datsun pick up
Rusty but runs good.
Call 648-5065.

1978 Pontiac Bonn
$850.00. Call 648-5653
6:00 p.m. 2t

1971 Ford truck,
$650.00. Call 648-5653
6:00p.m. 2t

'Newly rebuilt 197
Karmann Ghia. $1795
648-5190 between 4:0
7:00p.m.


'78 PLYM. SPORT F
2 dr .... . . $
'77 FORD PINTO
2 dr ........ .. $
'74 PLYM 1HI$AL
4dr.......... $
ON LOT FINANCE
JONCO USED C
2nd Ave. & Madison
Oak Grove
227-1294


McCullough chain saw,
model 610, used 1 time. Cost
new $375, sell for $250. 52
gallon electric water heater,
$55. 15" Quasar color TV,
$100. Call 227-1100 days only.
tfc 10/23


1979 Holiday Rambler
travel trailer. 24 feet. Fully
equipped. Includes release
hitch, mirrors and storm
windows. Sleeps 6. Back
bedroom. Excellent condi-
tion. $4500 firm. May be seen
at 104 Westlake View,
Wewahitchka or call
639-5187. ; tfc 11-20

Fill dirt, dozer and
backhoe work. Hourly or by
the job. Call 648-5065.
ltp 11-20

Oak firewood, LWB
truckload. Seasoned, split,
delivered and stacked, $45.
Call 639-5513. 3tp 11-20

80cc Yamaha. Runs great.
Make offer. Call 648-8701.
ltc 11-20

12 X 65 mobile home. 2
bedroom, bath and a half,
washer and dryer, central
heat and air. Good condition.
$6500 or best offer. Ski
Breeze Campsites C-30
229%105. 2tc 11-20

Like new, used one season.
LP gas space heater. Asking
$150. Call 229-6657. Itc

6 double, 6 single Gate City
awning type windows with
screens. $5.00 at 115 Bellamy
Cir. 229-6203 Itp

4 Firestone tires 721 for
sale. Less than 10,000 miles,
205-75R-14, $40.00 each. Call
229-6212 after 5:00 p.m. ltp

24' mullet skiff. 3 years
old. 8' wide. 50 hp motor. For
information call 229-6331.
2tp 11-20

WANTED! Responsible
party to assume small mon-
thly payments, on modem
style console piano. May be
seen locally. Please cl,
1-800-523-2890. 3tp 11-20


prefer- CRAFT SUPPLIES: Over
tp 11/6 6,000 craft items Wholesale
to the public Make your
owner: Christmas gifts and decora-
block tions now. Factory Outlet
school. Store International Manu-
I loca- facturing Co., 106 Lillian
1. Call Springs Road, Quincy, FL
(904) 875-2918. Open
/11/20 Mon.-Fri., 9:00-5:30, Sat.
S10:00-5:00. 6tcll/6
FLORIST SUPPLIES:
Wreaths, silks, hard to find
drieds DISCOUNTED
PRICES Factory Outlet
Squire Store International Manu-
S, AC, facturing Co., 106 Lillian
owner. Springs Road, Quincy, FL
$3750. (904) 875-2918. Open
S11-20. Mon.-Fri. 9:00 5:30, Sat.,
c11-20 10:00 5:00.

sedan 1976 Bay Liner, 23' with
40-50 new loran and chart
0. Call recorder. A fresh water boat
condi- in like new condition. $7,200
tp 11-20 O.B.O. Can be seen at Mex-
ico Beach Marina, or call
truck. 648-5023. tfc 10/16
$4000. 1985 18'2" Winner Bass
ltp boat, 150 h.p. Marina
neville Magnum, s.s. prop, 12-24 volt
After trolling motor, galv. drive-
after on trailer, less than 10 hrs.
p 11-20 on motor. Many extras. 6
LWB-. year warranty on boat.
after $9,800. Call after 9 p.m.,
11-20ter 648-5483. tfc 11/20

12'x65' trailer, fully fur-
2 VW nished, 2 bdrm., central
5. Call heat/air. $5,000. 229-8585 or
N0 and 22-7241. tfc 10/23
tp 14'x60' mobile home, 2
bdrm., 1', bath, furnished.
St. Joe Beach. Excel. cond.
URY Call 1-912-924-4956 or 648-5246
499 dn. for information. 4tp 10/30
LAWN FURNITURE
399 dn. Swings, swing frames, pic-
IANT nic tables, lawn chairs, set-
299 dn. tees, and children's picnic
NG tables. Call 639-2860 or
ARS 639-5860. tfc 4/17
n St. Mary Kay Cosmetics
$5.00 special price on
selected skin care products.
Margaret Hale, 648-5659.
Itp 11/20


STEEL ROOFING &
SIDING
American made
From $9.95 per sq.
Based on size, style & qty.
GOLDIN IND., INC.
Gulfport, MS
601-896-6216
12tp 7/3


Give a gift of history for
Christmas! Beautiful
limited edition prints of
Overstreet Post Office or In-
dianl Pass Trading Post. See
them at telephone business
office and at Indian Pass
Trading Post. To reserve
yours or for further informa-
tion call 648-8914. Price is
$35.00 for each print or
$65.00, matted and framed.
9tc 10/30
One set of encyclopedias
and new books of knowledge,
$300. 229-6290.

Fisher wood heater, brick
lined, excel. cond. $330. Call
229-6065. 4tp 10/30


Recent college graduate
would like to tutor children,
grades K-6, in all elementary
subjects. Certified in
elementary education. Rea-
sonable rates. Call Linda at
229-8812. 4tp10/30


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon.-Sat., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off


-PAINTING
20 years experience
Satisfaction guaranteed.
229-6886
tfc 11/20

Ye Olde
Bargain Barn
OPEN FOR BUSINESS
Thursday, Nov. 20
SELLING
TOYS, SOCKS,
GIFTS, BLANKETS
JEWELRY, ETC.
Some Used
Merchandise
tfc 12/4



TOOL

SHARPENING
All Kinds
For Free Pickup
and Delivery
Call Arthur Peavy
Wewahitchka

639-5233
4tp 10/30


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!








Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue tfc 7/4


Griffin's Garage Sale, 2008
Cypress Ave., Nov. 22,l8 a.m.
until. Tons of boys clothes,
men and women's clothes,
household goods, toys, and
several old items. "The
Prices are Right!"

Garage sale, Friday. Nov.
21. 8:30 til. 525 8th St. Many
items from last sale half
price.

Garage sale, Friday and
Saturday, rain or shine,
cabinet stereo, Oster mixer,
Singer Athena 2000 electric
sewing matching, typewriter,
Moulinex food processor,
barbeque, dress material,
misc. items. 1003 Marvin
Ave. .


CERTIFIED LOCKSMITH
Keys made, locks repaired.
Emergency openings, pro-
fessional security
consultant.
For More Information
Call 648-8187
2tc 11/20
Have Singer, will sew!
Minor repairs, jeans rebuilt,
simple sewing. 115
Pinewood, Rustic Sands,
Mexico Beach. tfc 11/20
Psychological services for
anyone with problems in
day-to-day living. Gulf Coun-
ty Guidance Clinic, Port St.
Joe, 227-1145 (24 hours)

DEPENDABLE
CABINET COMPANY
Quality craftmanship,
courteous service, afford-
able, guaranteed. Resi-
dential, commercial. Free
estimates.
1-784-7396
..... tfc 11/206,




Wauneta's
Accounting &
Income Tax
Wauneta Brewer
St. Joe Beach
648-5043
tf 5/86


LITTLE JOHN'S
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Free Estimates
Just One Call and We
Do It All!
from Lawns to Labor
Call 227-1583,
ask for John


A dw


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle
HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue7/4
tfc 7/4


The Sewing Room
) 410 A Reid.Avenue
?"E Port St. Joe. Florida OVS

'Quality Fabrics at Affordable Prices"




Hagan Painting
Contractor
Quality Work at Affordable Prices
Commercial & Residential
Pressure Cleaning for Grime & Mildew
FREE ESTIMATES
LARRY HAGAN
Phone 648-8729


Yard Sale, Saturday, Nov.
22 from 9 to 1. Clothes,
dishes, and misc. items. 323
7th St., H.V. rain cancels.

Yard Sale, corner of
Highway 98 and Ave. P
Saturday, Nov. 22, 8:00 a.m.
until. Lots of nice girls
clothing. Sizes 8 14. Coats,
jackets, sweaters, jeans and
much more. Just in time for
winter. Rain cancels.

Yard Sale, Saturday Nov.
22, corner of 10th St. and Mc-
Clellan Ave. Boys clothes,
furniture, dishes, odds and
ends. Rain cancels.

Garage sale, Friday Nov.
21, 1804 Marvin Ave.


Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M. E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M. E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church


THE SAND DOLLAR PIZZA
and SANDWICH SHOP
MEETING & PARTY
ACCOMMODATIONS
AVAILABLE
229-8900
Mon. Fri.
10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
tfc 11/20



CLASSIC CATERING
9 yrs. experience
Reasonable Rates
Weddings, Office
Parties, All Occasions,
Call Panama City
76-3-094'--
Shirley Raffield Jarzynka

9tc 10/30


St. Joseph Bay
Construcqoor
*RNesidential
c.r..d. aj,




W. S. (Biff) Quarles
CUSTOM HOMES
MULTI-FAMILY
229-8795
RG0040048



ST. JOE CUSTOM
BUILDERS





-Commercial Building <
-Residential Building 4
--Cabinet Work 4
Gen. Con. RG 0033843

GLEN F. COMBS
227-1689'
P. O. BOX 456
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tfe 7/4


Yard sale from 10 until 4.
Clothes, jewelry, tupper-
ware, misc. baby items. 114
First St., Mexico Beach, dou-
ble wide trailer on right.

Moving Sale: 886 Parker
Ave., H.V. Turn onto 7th St.
off 98, 3 blocks then left on
Parker, next to last house on_
end. New and used. A little of
everything. Saturday 8 a.m.
until. 227-1794.

Yard sale, St. Joe Beach,
Corner Coronado and
Alabama. Saturday 9 til 5.
Clothes, dishes, cookware,
CI3 radio, wheelchair, 2
walkers, dinette set and
chairs. Rain cancels.


COSTIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
422 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc4/17




25% off
All
GREENWARE
& BISQUE
*

Elizabeth's Ceramics
6 miles south of Wewa
on Highway 71
Sale Good Thru Christmas


SPACEVIEW
SATELLITE
SYSTEMS
Sales, Service and
Installation
FCC Licensed Technicians
FRANK RITCH
227-1590


REEVES FURNITURE &

/ REFINISHING SHOPPE
REFERENCES Phone 229-6374
Call and Talk to Us About Getting
Your Furniture Refinished to
Look Like New.
Across from Duren's Economy Store,
Highway 98
tic 6/6







Southern Erectors, Inc.
EQUIPMENT RENTAL
BOOM CRANES AIR COMPRESSORS
BACKHOES WELDING EQUIPMENT
DUMP TRUCKS
Phone Day 227-1570
Night 648-8417


.~ ~


0


GARAGE SALES


II


Ecc~ccccrrcc~,srs~c~_-E~E~c~o;~F'Lnsr~E~


SERVICES


I'll f


,77-:"


mr`..- A


i)


''


Inca







PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida -THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986



Abe Lincoln Made Thanksgiving National H


The idea of giving thanks to
Almighty God for blessings
to the nation is an old idea. In
fact you can read about
national Thanksgivings in
the Old Testament.
In our land, the first
Thanksgiving day celebra-
tion was proclaimed by Gov-
ernor Bradford of the Massa-
chusetts Bay Colony in 1621.
And Lincoln made it a
national holiday in 1863.
Archaeologists and an-
thropologists tell us that the
American Indian arrived in
the Massachusetts Bay area
3800 years ago, Phonecian
sailors were established
there 2500 years ago and Leif
Erikson arrived in the year
1003 at Cape Cod. In the
1500's European seafaring
fishermen visited, in 1605
Champlain mapped the
coast, and in 1614 Capt. John
Smith named the area New
England.
Smith impressed the In-
dians with a foretaste of the
white man's ways by stealing
their canoes and trading
them back for beaver pelts.


was their common need that
brought them together in a
cooperative effort. And from
their need, they gave thanks.
The year that Lincoln


On the train to Gettysburg
Lincoln met an old man who
had lost a son there. Lincoln
thought the stress would be
too much for the old man. As


He and his seamen also
introduced the plague which
killed an estimate 95,000
coastal Indians between the
years of 1615 and 1617.
By the time the Pilgrims
arrived there were only
about 5000 Indians left in the
area. For some reason the
Pilgrims expected the In-
dians to be hostile when they
arrived in 1620. There were
only 101 passengers and 48
officers and crew who landed
that year. During the first
winter 47 died because of the
hardships they encountered.
So we can imagine their
surprise when they were met
by a naked Indian named
Samoset in the Spring, who
stood at the edge of a
clearing and called out,
"Much welcome English-
men! Much welcome Eng-
lishmen!"
Samoset and 20 braves,
including Squanto; a former
slave and good interpreter,
taught the Englishmen how
to plant corn. That fall they
celebrated their first Thanks-
giving dinner together. It


made Thanksgiving our na-
tional holiday there was a
great need in his personal life
and in that of the nation. The
country was in the middle of
its Civil War, Lincoln's un-
stable wife was making
emotional public displays.
There were lines of mothers
and wives at the White House
door who wanted to have a
husband or son mustered out
of the Army, and Lincoln had
to make an address at the
most devastating battle
ground where Americans
have ever been called to
fight.


the two talked about the
battle, the old man said, "We
could give thanks even
amidst our tears."
The Chicago Times report-
ed Lincoln's ten sentence,
three minute speech by say-
ing, "The cheek of every
American must tingle with

Narcotics
Anonymous
Narcotics Anonymous of
Port St. Joe, a .new hope
group is now meeting on
Thursday at 8:00 p.m. in the
Parish Hall behind St. James
Episcopal Church.
All interested persons are
invited to attend.
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
PAYS TRY IT!!
Call
227-1278


shame as he reads the silly,
flat, and dish-watery utter-
ances of the man who has to
be pointed out to intelligent
foreigners as the president of
the United States."'
On this dismal year of
Lincoln's life, and this dread-
ful year of American history,
when national need was at its
peak, Lincoln proclaimed a
day of Thanksgiving. In his
proclamation, he alluded to-
the great problems that all
were facing, then he listed an
impressive number of natio-
nal blessings. At this point in
the proclamation he said,
"No human counsel hath
devised nor hath any mortal
hand worked out these great
things."
Like the Pilgrims and the
Indians; Lincoln and the


Catch the S krit
( THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH


nation, from their common
need, were able to find a way
to give God thanks.
This year, the greatest
threat to our understanding
of the real meaning of
Thanksgiving is the short-
ness of our national memory.
We may forget that our
country was born in travail
and has grown through strife.
We may forget that our
forebears gave God thanks
for blessings and were even-
tually united even though
they suffered in the process.
Today we have common
needs that can work to unite
us, as needs have done
before. The issues of today
are alcoholism, drugs, racial
tension, ignorance, apathy,
international aggression, etc.
Can we, like the old man,


Constitution and
Monument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................... 11:00 AM.
EVENING W ORSHIP...... ...... .... .. : 7:30p.m .
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP ..... 6:00 P.M.
CHILDREN'S CHOIR (Wednesday) .......... 7:00 P.M.
CHANCEL CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wed.) ...... 7:30 P.M.
Rev. Ennis G. Sellers
Rev. Harry C. Johnson


"give thanks amidst our
tears?" Can we who have
more than our fair share of
the abundant harvest repeat
the words of Samoset as he
called out to the weak, dirty,
homeless and ailing English-
men, "Much welcome.
.Much Welcome.. ,!"?
In Port St. Joe, our oppor-
tunity to come together as a
worshipping community to


holiday

give Almighty God thanks,
and to share our material
blessings with the needy will
be next Monday at 7:00 p.m.
in the high school commons
area. This worship opportu-
nity is provided by the
Ministerial Association. The
offering will be used to aid
transients, and others as they
find themselves stranded in
our city.


UNDERSTANDING
by the Rev. Jerry R. Huft, Rector, St. James Episcopal


VFW Presents Flags to Girl Scouters


Commander Bill Schlickman
and Quartermaster George
Coody are shown presenting
flags to Brownie Troop 242
and Girl Scout Troop 155.
Schlickman and Coody are
affiliated with the John C.
Gainous Post 10069 VFW.
Bunny Miller is the den
mother for the Brownie troop
and Rev. Jerry Huft of St.


New York City's massive
Pennsylvania Railroad Sta-
tion was originally modeled
after the ancient Roman
balhs of Caracal la.


"Good service.
good coverage.
good price -
That's
State Farm
insurance."

BILL WOOD
403 Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe
Office: 229-6514
Home: 229-6103
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.

STATE FARM



INSURANCE

State Farm InsurancP C;ornpa, es
Honm Offices Bloomngton Iininos


James Episcopal Church is
the sponsor. The Girl Scouts


are under the direction of Jan
Richardson.


"A Place for the Whole Family"

FAITH BIBLE CHURCH
801 20th Street
Port St. Joe, Florida
SUNDAY:
9:45 A.M............... Sunday School (for all ages)
11:00 A.M................. : ; Morning Worship Service
6:00 P.M ................ Evening Worship Service
WEDNESDAY:
6:00 P.M .......... ........ Young People
7:00 P.M. ....... .. .......... Prayer Meeting
,Pastor: Fred A. Goebert Church Phone: 229-6707
Sponsor of Faith Christian School
Three year old Kindergarten through Eighth Grade
52t 1123J86





Cal
Shorty |


229-6798

Commercial Residential
Remodeling and
Service Work
26 Years Experience Licensed and Bonded

Reg. No. ER-004631
Charles Sowell


I( Sur-Way Electric
411 Reid Avenue


Back in 1899, we started business with just one customer... the
City of St. Petersburg with thirty street lights in its downtown
area.
This month, we're planning to install our 1-millionth electric
meter. Over 3,500,000 people now depend on us for service.
What does it take to provide power for this many people? Here's
what happens each day:
l- We hook up 150 new customers.
1- We make 1,200 customer calls and string one mile of electric
cable.
."0 We answer over 7,500 phone calls at our phone centers and
district offices.
t-' We walk 1,950 miles to read 50,000 meters.
o' We provide an average of 63-million kilowatt-hours of
electricity.
It's taken careful planning and hard work to meet the growth in
our part of Florida. And it's also taken the cooperation of you,
our customers, to make it all possible.
You've supported programs like hand delivery that help us
operate more efficiently. You've used energy wisely and
participated in energy management projects, thus enabling us to
delay construction of expensive power plants and still meet your
daily requirements for all the electricity you need. This has
meant savings for all of us.
And when storms downed our lines, you've stood by with
patience and understanding as we worked to restore power...
even offered a kind word and a cup of coffee when they were
needed most.
We're pleased to have you as a customer. And for your support
over the years, we just want to say...










:oe Florida
0O6 :: VPower
0 O*y Your energy neighbors


~


RG0043684



d fter Custom
Building
to Your

Plans and Specifications

COME SEE US AT OUR
NEW OFFICE
at Simmons Bayou C-30

"Quality at A Reasonable Price"



NEWMAN'S CONSTRUCTION Co.
Simmons Bayou, Florida (904) 227-1222






THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986


New Tax Law and Some of Its Deduction Changes Explained


The new tax law recently approv-
ed is the "most horrible piece of
legislation I have ever seen", tax
attorney Byron Block told a gathering
of the Rotary, Kiwanis and Lions
club members last Thursday evening.
at the Country Club.
Block, Merrill Lynch vice-presi-
dent David Cash and tax accountant
Harry Redd, spoke to the 50 or so
people gathered for the meeting.
Alden Farris of the Rotary Club, had
' set up the meeting with the Merrill,
Lynch executive arranging the infor-
mation panel.


Block told the group about the
best way left, after the new law, to
create an effective and acceptable tax
shelter is to establish some sort of
qualified pension plan. "Ninety per-
cent of the bill stinks, but there are
some areas of relief if you look for
them", Block said.
Cash warned his audience that
many of the tax shelters used in years
past will disappear on January 1,
when the new tax law goes into effect.
"Mortgage and business interest will
remain as a deductible under the new
law", he said, "but consumer interest


will not be deductible and some
attention must be paid to medical
expenses in order to be able to deduct
a portion of them", Cash said. "You
will no longer be able to use long term
capital gains for tax reductions",
Cash pointed out, but said a person
can still realize a tax reduction out of
two homes.
Block said a person can have rental
property and take advantages of
losses there applied to his main'source
of income if. he is in active control of
the property and he studies the law


and complies with the new rules. You
can take up to $25,000 losses on real
estate, but after that it gets difficult",
Block said.
Cash warned the new tax law was
going to be complicated, rather than
simplify matters as has been publiciz-
ed. "Initially, it may be more
negative for business, but I think the
long haul is going to show an
improvement in our tax picture", he
pointed out.
Redd pointed out that the greater
change is to incorporated businesses.


"You have three years to decide
whether or not you wish to maintain
your incorporated status without
having to pay a penalty to get olt", he
said. Redd went on to point out that
rates for corporation taxes would be
higher, but there would be more
benefits available, too, which a person
could use effectively if he was alert.
Redd revealed that corporations
must now use January 1 as the fiscal
year's beginning, rather than using
another date during the year. He, too,
stressed the use of a qualified
retirement plan as the best tax hedge


of the future.
Cash said the IRA pension pro-
gram would change under the new law
with tax deferments being removed"
from everyone who is already involv-
ed with a recognized pension plan
where he or she works. People who do
not worlt under such a pension plan,
may still use the IRA effectively.
The three speakers generally
agreed the new tax bill was going to be
sort of a trade-off. Easier to figure tax
rates will be the result of the bill, but
there will be a loss of several common
uses of tax credits.


Elementary School Honor Roll for Second Six Week Period


Gerald Lewter, principal of
Port St. Joe Elementary
School, has recently released
the honor roll for the second
six weeks.
First Grade.
All A
Josh Bietenholz, Seth
Campbell, Lee Cathey, Je-
remy Dixon, Matthew Elder,
Miranda Harvey, Katia Hig-
gins, Brooke Kostic, Krista
Nobles, Jarred Patterson,
Amanda Phillips, Gretchen
Stevens, Lillie Richardson,
Amanda Surrey," Amanda
Turner, Casey White and
Kabby WhiteEagle.
A&B
Michael Bryant, Alan
Hatcher, John Hattaway, Al-
lan Holmes, Tenelya Hutch-
inson, David Jones, Leigh
Lawrence, Burgandy Little,
Tyson Pittman, Shameka
Raimes, Maranda Slate,
Chad Thompson, Casie Wil-
liams, Reginald Wilson and
Mack Young.
Second Grade
All A
Michael Burkett, Amy Buz-
zett, Jeffery Causey, McKay-
la Clark, Charlie Cole, Doyle
Crosby, JoAnna Cutler, Far-
rah Daniels, Matt Dixon,
Karen Falbe, Robbi Funder-
burk, Stuart Griffin, Kayce


Knox, Tory Robinson, Heidi
Thomas, Luke Thomason,
Matthew Toddj Matthew
White, Nikki Whitfield and
Brian Wood.
I A&B
Ronisu Bird, Mary Bowen,
Jason Bryant, Nancy Carter,
Devon Claytoh, Michelle
Douds, Michelle Garland,
Jonathan Gilmore, Valerie
Hanna, Katrina Higgins,
Linda Jones, Wesley Jones,
Joshua Kostic, Charlie Lan-
ford, Tosheka Langston,
Kristie Lowry, John Ludlam,
Yvonne Mortensen, Jenny
Munroe, Katrina Perna, Shi-
nah Quinn, Toby Robinson,
Bryan Simon, Nick Sweazy,
Jason Terry, Jamal Thoma,'
Pam Watkins, Angie White,
Josh Whitfield and Jaclyn
Wimberly.
Third Grade
All A
Leslie Faison, Heather
Fields, Kelley Graham, An-
gel King, Jermaine Larry,
Kristi Lawrence, Vanessa
Mamoran, Heather Raffield,
Jennie Smallwood and Aly-
son Williams.
A&B
Scooter Acree, Sean Bai-
ley, April Bryant, Sharity
Byrd, Travis Cannington,
Nancy Cantley, Sheteta


Chambers, Michello Daniels,
Shontel Fedd, Melissa Gable,
Chad Gregory, Mark Hatch-
er, DeAnna Horton, Laura
Johnson, Kristi Kirkland,
Petra Lancaster, Matt Ro-
berson, Carlos Sims, Domin-
ique Ward, Brandy White
and Wendy Woodman.
Fourth Grade
All A
Jennifer Bell, Jamie Be-
sore, Davida Byrd, Kristi
Capps, Brian Cathey, Teresa
Evensen, Angie Griffin, Alice
Kennington, Missy Nobles,
Jonathan Pierce and Casey
Witten.
A&B
Latresha Bell, Harlotte
Bolden, Dyshanda Boykins,
Chris Buchanan, Damien
Byrd, Bryan Earley, Natalie
Gant, Frances Garrett, Stev-
en Hatcher, Tawanda Jen-
kins, Delana Linton, Shannon
Millergren, Katie Richard-
son, Jessica White and Neil
WhiteEagle.
Fifth Grade
All A
Melissa Anderson, Shan-
nan Antley, Bryan Butts,

Gulf School
Lunchroom


MENU
The Gulf County Schools
have recently released their
menu for the week of No-
vember 24 28.
` Monday, Nov. 24
Hamburger with cheese,
lettuce, tomato, .pickle,
French fries, bun, milk and
cookie.
Tuesday, Nov. 25
Turkey and dressing, fitrut
cup, green beans, rolls, milk
and cranberry sauce.
Wednesday, Nov. 26
No lunch served.
Thursday, Nov. 27
Thanksgiving holiday.
Friday, Nov. 28
Thanksgiving holiday.


Kim Cooper, Clay Cox, Lee
Duren; Faye Gilbert, Timmy
Hatcher, Christie McCulley,
Danielle Moore, Erin Oliver,
Jamie Parrish, Eric' Ram-
sey, Adam Taylor, Nichole
Wilder and Kelli Yeager.
A&B
Jenny Acree, Steve Ailes,
Sherry Bolden, Kelly Bur-
kett, Christy Chancey, David
Goodman, Melissa Hagan,
Antr6ne Lewis, Joey New-
berry, Chris Nixon, Stepha-
nie Norris, Pausha Pendar-
vis, Sandra Peterson, Rebec-
ca Schwendinger, Andy


Smith, Niki Tannehill, Jere-
my Tull and Mindy Whitfield.
Sikth Grade
All A
Anna Bietenholz, David
Clark, Dana Earley, Jon
Elliott, Heather Johnson,
Crystal Kennington, Jodi
Mapes, Nancy Munroe, Leah
Ray and Tina Rich.
A&B
Dedrick Alexander, Brad
Buzzett, Jason Falbe, Kiki
Fields, Tappan Gandy,
Heath Gentry, Christina Gog-
gins, Mitch Harvey, Kendall
Hogue, Lenora Jones, Rai-


lyn Lamb, April Little, Sher-
ry Ludlam, Arion Nickson,
Craig Pate, Tiffany Sanders,
Chuck Watson, John White,
Tim Whitfield, Travis Wil-
liams, Analisa Wood and
Leroy Yarrell.
Exceptional Student
Education
A&B
First Grade
Kevin Lamb.
Second Grade
Rocky Quinn.
Sixth Grade
Tammie Ash and Zyris
Hill.


229-8416 or 227-1954
*ER0007623. RF0040131. RA0043378


106 Bellamy Circle
tfc 1r19


"I've reduced


your cost of owning


a


James W. Walter
Chairman of the Board


if you own property and would like to build,,check with Jim Walter
Homes today. Even if you have shopped us before, come back. I've
reduced prices to make it easier than ever to own a new home...
with a monthly paymenyo.u can afford- ::.
These are NOT "shell" homes. At my low, package prices they will
be finished 90% complete including forced-air central heating. Just
install your choice of;floor covering, paint interior walls and trim,
connect to outside utilities and move in.


48'
LEXINGTON DR KU
4 bedrooms -..-2 baths BR.L, B
- 36-905 cashpice 2 4hB Rr'LttBR
$357.00 per mo. L.
(240 payments) 5' .' p .



WILLIAMSBURG
3 or 4 bedrooms 2' 2 baths
Early American charm Built on your property to
whatever stage you choose up to 90% complete
Price based on degree of completion

S0 .- -]. w,



6% L | I=....'

L l ..... O ,


*. ,


Call 227-1278
to Place your Ad


PRE-HOLIDAY


Carpet Clean-Up


$44.95
Living Room, Dining Room & Hall or
Great Room & Hall Up to 300 Sq. Ft.



We Also
Shampoo Upholstered Furniture


3 Cushion Sofa
.39.95
WE DO NOT USE "STEAM"


Love Seat
'29.95
OR HOT WATER


NEW SERVICE
We Now Strip, Seal & Re-finish'


Vinyl Tile, No-Wax Vinyl & Terrazo

References Supplied On All Types Work




Custom Clean
S"THE FLOOR PROS"
FREE *4 88fi9 Carole & Bill
------ ESTIMATES U8tO-O8FA Franklin, Owners,
M r n .- l l *' i:


Here's What's Included:
* House completely finished outside (no walks, driveways, or
landscaping) Pier and precast base foundation* Double floors
* Complete wiring to local codes All plumbing, including kitchen,
and each bath +vith tub and shower Kitchen and bathroom
cabinets Walls finished with wallboard, ready to be painted
* Sheathing under siding Insulation: 3V/2" (R-11) in walls and floors,
6" (R-19) in ceiling All inside doors and trim Central, forced-air
heating
You may choose additional options, such as air conditioning, septic
tank and solid foundation at extra cost. However, at our SPECIAL
package prices, you may not delete any of the above items.

All Package Prices On Our 90% Complete Homes Have
Been Drastically Reduced! .
Open Every Weekend
Yes, we're open every day including weekends. So come in.
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cost price for you, built on your property to almost any stage you
choose up to 90% complete,

No Down Payment 10% APR Fixed-Mortgage Financing
No "Points"/No Closing Costs or Other Fees
(to qualified property owners)

At these prices, no oth6r discounts apply. Our standard
specifications meet most codes. However, if state or local codes


S AJim Jalter HO MI
w'*' Acclaimed by "Builder" magazine as the nation's largest builder of detach
family homes for the second consecutive year.
FOR FREE BROCHURE
Call Toll Free 1-800-4-WALTER (1-800-492-%
or mail attached coupon or visit the display park nearest you for complete inform


PANAMA CITY, FL
3303 W. Highway 98


AMERICAN
3 bedrooms 2 baths
$29,995"cash price
$289.40 per mo.
(240 payments)


require additional framing or other modifications, an additional
charge may be necessary.
*IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA AND OTHER ISOLATED AREAS,
SPECIAL FOUNDATIONS ARE REQUIRED BY CODE AND WILL
INCREASE THE COST BY AS MUCH AS $3,500.

JIM WALTER HOMES 1186
E S PO Box 22601, Tampa, FL 33622
I would like to have your brochure with information about building
ed, single- on my property I would also like to have costs and monthly
payments and understand you will give me these facts free and
without obligation to buy.
5837) Name
rmation Address


City State- Zip
Telephone (or neighbor)
I own property in County


If rural route please give directions


I. 6


Heating & Air, Major Appliance Repair
Plumbing & Electrical Work


COSTING INSURANCE

v. AGENCY, INCP.







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* Homeowners Auto Flood
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Hospitalization Life Boats
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322 Reid Ave. Port St Joe Phone 229-8899


42;


--


PAGE ELEVEN


I .








J...?M...


I


Ti


GRAD A BSTDFOE

HEN*~


SHANK PORTION

SMOKED HAM...
BUTT PORTION

SMOKED HAM...


USDA GRADE A Up to 14 Lbs.

TURKEYS....


$148


lb. $158


. Ib.


Choice Tablerite Boneless
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST..........
Choice Tablerite
WHOLE BEEF TENDERLOINS ... .
Mott's Premium
FRESH BAKING HENS .... .. ...
Grade A Frozen
TURKEY BREAST ..............
Tablerite Boston Butt
PORK ROAST..............
Tablerite Boston Butt
BONELESS PORK ROAST ........
Tablerite Boston Butt
PORK STEAK ..... ....
Choice Tablerite
BEEF RIB ROAST .............
Smoked
CENTER HAM ROAST ...........
Smoked
HAM CENTER SLICES...........
Tablerite Pork
FRESH SHOULDER PICNICS .....
Morrell's Smoked
BONELESS HAM HALVES ........
'lorrell's Smoked
SMOKED WHOLE HAMS ........


IGA Tibleite
REG. or THICK SLICED BACON ..
Sunnyland .
SLICED COOKED HAM .........
Lykes
MEAT or BEEF WIENERS.......
Reg., Thick or Beef
SUNNYLAND SLICED BOLOGNA ..
Reg., Beef, or Cheese
BYRAN COCKTAIL SMOKIES.....


12


12
*
.*


89C

lb. 88
lb. $329
lb. 88
Ib. $198
lb. $128
lb.
b. $139

lb. $298

lb.
lb. $219
Ib. s$l
lb. $258
lb. $248
Soz. $138

$2 38
o. $18



lb. $238


:- M


I,-


rn-i

mRh~


Fi


CLOSED
THANKSGIVING

DAY


Ism.







DAVID RICH S S
Foodliners...
205 Third St. -Port St. Joe Hwy. 71 Wewahitchka, Florida


BULK RATE
CARRIER ROUTE
PRE-SORTED
Permit No. 3
WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465

PRICES EFFECTIVE NOVEMBER 19-DECEMBER 2, 1986


IGA 64 oz. ctn.
ORANGE JUICE .... 99
IGA MARGARINE.......... Ib.qtrs. 399
SEALTEST SOUR CREAM ....... 8 oz. 21
Kraft Philadelphia CREAM CHEESE s o. 89


FROZEN0FOODS


PET RITZ 2's
PIE SHELLS


0OS*


0*


MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM .. g,
IGA WHIPPED TOPPING .......
McKENZIE VEGETABLES 16 oz.
BUTTER PEASBABY AS FILED PEAS WISNAPS. WHOLE BABY
OKRA, BREADED OKRA, GREEN PEAS. PETITE UMAS
y 4. a' R'' '


-79"
l. rnd $ q79

88C


Ocean Spray Cranberry Sauce (Jellied or Whole) 160z. 68o
Duncan Hines Cake Mix............. s18 oz. 78
SDuncan Hines RTS Frosting .......... .6 o. 149
Baker's Angelflake Coconut ........... 14 o. i1
Eagle Brand Sweetened Cond. Milk ...... 14oz. $53
. IGA Evaporated Milk ..... .: 2 oz.49
Delmonte Raisins .................... isoz. 99,
Libby's Pumpkin . . ..... . o. 79
Delmonte Pineapple ............... 15/ oz 69
SSunshine Pickled Peaches .............. 22 4
Domino lOX or Brown Sugar. ........... b. 211
Carnation Hot Cocoa Mix ... . .. 12ct.
Stovetop Stuffing Mi................ oz. $ 19
Swanson's Chicken Broth .......... 14% oz. 2188
Reynold's Aluminum Foil ....... ...... ... .3 $ i9
SSjgary Sam Yams.. ... ... ;.. oz. 58
SugarSam Yams.................. 29.
WA


d


SHORTENING
CRISCO 78
31 can
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


DOULE ISCUTSPEIL--
Be .. f.a U1I


.


n


-_.


CRANBERRY aC
SAUCE 9
16 Oz.
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRES DECEMBER 2, 1986


LARGE
EGGS w
Dozen
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE

HELLMAN'S
MAYON- n
NAISE
32 oz.
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE

MARTHA WHITE
Self-Rising & All Purpose 9
FLOUR
5 lb. bag
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
i DISCU NT. PECA.







PAGE FOURTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1986


PAEC Council
Meets Dec. 3-4
The Panhandle Area Edu-
cational Cooperative District
Materials Council for Social
Studies, K-8 will meet De-
cember 3-4, 1986.
The Council will evaluate
Social Studies textbooks to be


Public
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids in duplicate will be
received until noon, December 2,1986,
by the Gulf County School Board, Port
St. Joe, Florida, at which time and
place all bids will be publicly opened
and read aloud for:
DEMOLITION
PORTIONS OF OLD WEWAHITCH-
KA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
The Contractor shall furnish all
labor, materials and.equipment, and
shall be responsible for the entire com-
pletion of this project.
Plans, specifications, and contract
documents may be inspected at the of-
fice of the Architect, State Road 22,
Wewahitchka, Florida, and may be
procurred by General contractors,
upon a deposit of $5.00 per set of plans
,and specifications, of which the full
amount will be refunded to each
general contractor who submits a bid,
and all other deposits for other than
one complete set of ,plans and
specifications will be refunded less
deduction to cover reproduction cost of
$2.50 each set. All documents must be
-returned in good condition within ten
(10) days after the date of opening of
bids.
S Cashier's check, certified check, or
bid bond .for not less than 5% of the
'amount of bid, must accompany each
proposal.
SWorker's Compensation insurance
will be required of the successful bid-
-der.
Right is reserved to reject any or all
: proposals and waive technicalities.
No bidder may withdraw his bid for
'a period of thirty (30) days after date
set for opening.
"Walter Wilder, Superintendent,
Gulf County School Board ;
Port St. Joe, FL
tCharles A. Gaskin ARA
3 ARCHITECT
:'P.O. Box 7
WWewahitchka,FL 32465 2t11/13
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Board of County Commissioners at
Sits regular meeting on Tuesday,
November 25,1986 at7:00 P.M., E.S.T.
in the County Commissioner's Room in
*the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St.
SJoe, Florida will consider an or-
dinance with the following title:
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING
ORDINANCE NO. 86-1 PROMU -
GATING STANDARDS FOR
COASTAL CONSTRUCTION IN`
THE AREA OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA KNOWN AS THE
COASTAL ZONE.
The Board of County Commissioners
will further consider said Ordinance
for adoption at its regular meeting on
December 9, 1986 at 9:00 A.M., E.S.T.
in, the County Commissioner's Room
at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port
St. Joe, Florida.
Acopy of this Ordinance is on file in
the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court
of Gulf County, Florida.
; t f
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSION
ERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By /s/ Billy Branch, Chairman
. ATTEST: /s/ Jerry Gates, Clerk
2t-11/13
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
S with the Clerk of Court, Gulf County,
Florida, four weeks after the first
publication of this notice, the fictitious
name or trade name under which they
will.be engaged in business and in
which said business is to be carried on,
to-wit:
BEACH ENTERPRISES
Location: The Beaches, Florida
SAddress: West U.S. 98
Owners: Clara D. Arnold and
Jean F. Arnold
4t 11/13


submitted to the State In-
structional Materials Coun-
cil. The meeting will be held
in the conference room of
PAEC in Chipley from 8:30
a.m. until 3:00 p.m. daily.
The public is invited to attend
all meetings.
Representative counties
are Franklin, Gulf, Holmes,
Jackson and Washington.


Notices -
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Board of County Commissioners of
Gulf County, Florida at its regular
meeting on Tuesday, November 25,
1986 at 7:00 P.M., E.S.T. in the Corn-.
missioner's Room in the Gulf County
Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida will
consider will consider extending the
non-exclusive cable television fran-
chise granted to Esdex Cable T.V. and
dated March 21, 1981 causing it to in-
clude St. Joseph's Peninsula and In-
dian Peninsula.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Billy Branch, Chairman
ATTEST: /s/ Jerry Gates, Clerk
It 11/13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
Case No. 86-48
IN RE: The Estate of I
MURLE D. ARD, deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the Estate of
MURLE D. ARD, deceased, File No.
86-48 is pending in the Circuit Court of
Gulf County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is the Gulf
County Courthouse, Port St. Joe,
Florida. The Personal Represen-
tative of the Estate is MYRTLENE
BRANDON, whose address is 3830
Summerhill Road, Thomasville,
Georgia 31792. The name and address
of the Personal Representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the Estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE (3) MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE to file with the Clerk of the
above Court a written statement of
any demand or claim they may have.
Each claim must be in writing and
must indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor
or his Agent or Attorney and the
amount claimed. If the claim is not yet
due, the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the nature of
the uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall be
described. The Claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to the
Clerk to enable the Clerk to mail one
copy to each Personal Representative.
All persons interested in the Estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS FROM THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifications of
the personal representative or the
eiued or'jdrisdiction of the-Court
SMALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
: Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration is:
November 13, 1986.
/s/ MYRTLENE BRANDON,
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MURLE D. ARD, deceased.
AVA S. POWELL of
POWELL, POWELL & POWELL
Attorneys at Law
Post Office Box 277
Crestview, Florida 32536
(904) 682-2757
Attorneys for Personal Represen-
tative 4t 11/13
ADVERTISING PAYS!


School Custodial Staff Works Behind the Scenes


I i i


For the past several weeks
sneak previews have been
publicized highlighting those
persons who share in the
operational facets of Port St.
Joe Jr.-Sr. High School. This
week's news article high-
lights the custodial staff.
PSJHS's custodial staff not
only worked laboriously dur-
ing the summer months to
beautify and maintain Shark-
land, but work consistently
during the school year to
Keep the high school neat and
tidy.
Hats off to such an energe-
S tic and loyal staff.

the leadership of two head
custodians: Ms. Bessie Willis
who has worked as head
custodian since September,
1974; and Mrs. Joyce Isaacks


Students Participating


In Drug Prevention


Program
Students at selected grade
levels in the Gulf County
Schools will participate this
year in one-week Drug Pre-
vention Programs held in the
classrooms.
At Port St. Joe High, the
program will be presented in
Mark Kostic's Life Manage-
ment Skills classes Decem-
ber 1 5. On Thursday,
December 4, Sheriff Al Har-
rison will speak to the classes
on drugs with particular
emphasis on crack cocaine.
During the second semes-
ter, the program has been
scheduled in grades 3 and 6 in
Port St. Joe Elementary,
Highland View Elementary
and in the Life Management
classes at Port St. Joe High.
A representative from the
Port St. Joe Police Depart-
ment will speak during these
presentations.
The school principals, Ho-
ward Blick, Gerald Lewter
and Edwin Williams, indi-
cate that the program is
worthwhile, especially in its
prevention approach to the
drug issue. Parents are invi-
ted and encouraged to attend
these programs.
The prevention program is
provided by the North
Florida Drug Council, Inc., a
private, non-profit organiza-
tion, licensed by the Depart-
ment of Health and Rehabili-
tative Services. In addition to
the prevention services, the
Council provides drug abuse
treatment.
The offices of Dr. James E.
Hord, Director of the Coun-
cil, are located at 1600 B
Fairy Ave., Panama City.
The 24 hour emergency tele-
phone number is 769-2212.
Mrs. Patricia Odom, preven-
tion coordinator, supervises
and monitors the prevention
program throughout a six-
county area: Gulf, Calhoun,
Bay, Holmes, Jackson and
Washington. There are six
instructors. in the program.
Mrs. Odom's office address
is: 104 North Wynn St.,
Marianna, telephone number
is 526-4700.
The objective of the pre-
vention program is to pro-
vide drug education that
considers the total drug
abuse question relative to:


In Schools


major causes of drug abuse;
physiological, psychological,
social, and legal implications
of drug use; and alternatives
to drugs. A variety of innova-
tive approaches to drug
education are used. The
newest is "Simon," a remote
controlled robot used to
encourage young people to
say "No" to drugs.
Bob Bomke, Rural Case-
load Counselor for the Coun-
cil, is available one day a
week in each county. On


Friday he is at the Gulf
County Guidance Clinic, 311
Williams Ave., Port St. Joe,
227-1145.

Mrs. Gwen Spivey, drug
.prevention instructor, will
conduct the classes in the
Gulf County schools. Mrs.
Spivey is also available to
present programs on drug
prevention and abuse to civic
organizations, churches,
youth and parent groups
throughout the area.


who has worked as head
custodian since March, 1975.
Shown above, left to right
are: Inell Robinson, Queen


Pittman, Lucille Fleming,
Claude Tate, Bessie .Willis,
Joyce Isaacks and Edith
McGee.


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943

Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds

8:30 till 6:00 Monday through Friday


221 Reid Avenue'


Phone 227-1133


We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


IT ISN'T JANUARY 1...BUT IT'S



CALENDAR TIME


JUST ARRIVED!
Selection of EVER READY and SUCCESS

Calendar Pads & Refills


We probably have your
pad or refill in stock.
Give us a call and see.


5 6 7 8 9 10

12 13" 1M 15 16 17

19 20 21 2z 23 24

S .6 V a 7 30 ii


American Pad
Plain Doodler
22" x 17" white pad of 75 sheets.
Perforated at top. Blue binding
at top and both bottom corners.



18.95


3.5O Up


American Pad
Monthly Calendar
Desk Pad
Spacious 22" x 17" white pads with a
month per page, perforated at the top.
Heavy chipboard back.
Bound at top and two corners.
15 months at-a-glance
along top.


DESK PADS


Selection of Refillable
DESIGNER DESK PADS


m4.50


L A


Keith Clark
Monthly Minder
8" x 12" pages, dated for 14 months
(December through January) with each
month per double-page spread. Large,
ruled daily note squares. Address-
phone space provided. Past, current
and 4 future month calendar. Black
Windsor cover, wirebound.


3.55


601 22"x17" Refillable
French wine suede holder/Mauve designer paper


Si






603 22"x17" Refillable
Red lizard holder/Orchid designer paper

Your Choice
of Design


The Star Publishing Co.
OFFICE SUPPLY STORE
306-08 Williams Ave. Phone 227-1278


602 22"xl7" Refillable
Blue suede holder/Blue designer paper


604 22"x17" Refillable
Brown lizard holder/Sand designer paper


$9.60


Free Refill
with Purchase
of Pad


Authorized
SSales Agent
XEROX@ and 1012 are trademarks of
XEROX CORPORATION,


"THE CHURCH AFLAME IN PORT ST. JOE"

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
102 Third Street
Evangelistic Worship Services
* Regular Bible Study
Ministering to the Total Family
Fully Graded Choirs
Christ Centered Youth Program
An Exciting Place to Attend
Where Everyone Is Welcome
Regular Services Sunday & Wednesday

HOWARD BROWNING
Pastor


HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD
319 Sixth St, Highland View
"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"
SUNDAY SCHOOL.... 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .. 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ... 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00 P.M.
PASTOR REV. ROBERT RATHBUN


MARTIN CONCRETE

Blountstown, Florida



Cement Contractors


, Place and Finish All Types Concrete

, Concrete foundations, footing, floors, patios,
sidewalks, garage floors, airport runways, curves
and gutters, concrete swimming pool gunit cool
deck, room additions, driveways and chimneys,
frame or brick.

You Name It We Do It -INo Job Too Large
or Too Small


Phone 904-674-5294 or 762-3470


r. *'


Alp.-