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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02617
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 23, 1986
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02617

Full Text














USPS 518-880

FORTY-EIGHTH YEAR, NUMBER 21


THE TAR

Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches in Florida

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1986


2 o Tper Copy


25c Per Copy


m.


Developer Asks for Water and



Sewer for 48 Unit Complex


Has Plans to build Dwellings On South End of Garrison


Port St. Joe is apparently going to get a 48
unit apartment house development if the city can
%' ork out an agreement to allow the developer to
tie on to water and sewer mains at the south end
of Garrison Avenue.
Tuesday night, at the City Commission
meeting..Lott Properties approached the City
with the request, asking for permission for the
company to tie into the utilities and extend them
at the expense of the developers. The property to
be served by the extension is presently outside
the city limits, just south of 23rd Street. The
water and sewer mains have been extended to.
23rd Street recently by the development of St.
Joseph Land and Development Company in
opening up two new'subdivisions in the city.
Before the Commission gives a "yes" or
*"no" answer to the request, the Commission will
draw up an agreement with the firm. Tentative-
ly. the agreement would require the developers
pay city rates plus 20 percent, on readings from a
master meter, or they could ask to be taken into
the city limits and pay the regular city rates as
well as receive other services as well, such as
fire protection.
Attorney Rish advised that whatever
agreement is reached, the City, should have the
approval of any construction methods, so as to
conform with city regulations and requirements.
The firm, with headquarters in Douglas,

A a :*


Georgia, is to be notified the city is willing to
allow them to hook to the utilities if an
agreement can be reached for service.
COMMITTEE REPORT APPROVED
Commissioner Bill Fleming reported from a
committee made up of Fleming, Clerk Farris,
attorney Rish, officer Benny Tiller and Police
Chief Robert Maige. The committee was to study
and investigate any failure of the city to meet
their payment agreement with any member of
the Police Department.
The Police Department and pay for its
officers, has been in sort of a state of confusion
this past year, with Supreme Court rulings
regarding overtime pay and a ,subsequent
relaxing of the former ruling.
Earlier in the year, the Court ruled the City
had to pay overtime to officers who worked more
than 40 hours a week. In October that ruling was
changed to require the overtime pay, or
compensation time at the rate of time and a half
for any officer who worked more thai 42 hours
per week.
Fleming's committee was also to investigate
the matter of holiday pay and whether or not
officers were receiving it.
Fleming said he found the work rules for the
police department called for the officers to be
considered as salaried employees and earn an

- a I.i.


annual salary, rather than be paid on an hourly
basis. "The officers I talked to were informed of
this situation when they came to work and
understood it",,Fleming said. The Commissionet
pointed out he had not interviewed all police
officers but had received reports they were
informed of the pay status.
The question of pay for holidays was brought
up by Commissioner Nathan Peters, Jr., and has
been argued by him ever since. Peters feels te
policemen aren't being dealt with fairly in tle
matter of pay. The remainder of the Commission
thinks they are,
Tuesday, the policemen, themselves, sided
with the majority of the Commission, signing-a
letter presented to the Board that they had be-e
notified of their method of pay when they went to
work and they were satisfied with the situation
as it exists. ,
If a policeman is absent from work or loses
time under the present arrangement, he loses no
pay. Under an hourly pay basis, he would lose
pay if he were not present on the job.
All police employees except three had signed
the letter and one of the three signed the letter
just prior to the meeting and spoke in favor of the
arrangement before the Commission Tuesday
night.
One of the two who didn't sign, veteran
(Continued on Page 3)
s S __K y./ _.'.;.


Tank Graffiti Covered Up


A workman with U.S. Tank Company,
applies the last coat of paint to a guard
placed over the legs of the City's water tank
at the corner of 10th Street and Long Avenue
this week, as work to erase some graffiti on
the tank was completed and the tank made'
virtually) vandal-proof.. ,.
The company had just completed
rebuilding and pain'tiig the tank when the
graffiti authors struck in the middle of one
night, placing huge black letters on the nice,
new, light blue exterior of the lank.
The black lettering hasrbeen covered,
and the tank made harder for amateurs to
climb in the process. The section of tank leg


*


*


being painted is a sheet-steel cover placed
over the ladder-like legs to prevent them
being climbed. The maintenance ladder of
the tank has had a steel cage put over it with
a locked access gate placed at the bottom of
the ladder.
"We have made the tank a challenge for
the next gr.oup.ivgwfioino wii4~ in
,the night to practice their writing", Clerk
Alden Farris said Tuesday.' We.know it can
still be climbed by unauthorized persons.
but it is real chore now", he.said.
Climbing the tank to paint the top is
extremely dangerous as well as a nuisance
to the City.


*


Rolls 701 Names


Load Bearing Tests Being

Made for High Rise Bridge


Visible progress was being made this
week in the 10-year-old project of getting
a high rise bridge built across the Gulf
County Canal at Highland View to
replace the ancient clam-shell draw
bridge now carrying Highway 98 traffic
across the canal.
A work crew from the Florida
Department of Transportation is in town
this week, tak;' soil test borings around
the present bi to see how far down
and how mans .s will have to be
used to hold the iii, rise.
Early this. week, the crew was
drilling onthe west side of Highway 98 in
several locations to get soil characteris-
tics. After they finish these tests, the
drilling operation will move to the east
side of Highway 98 for further drilling.
The time-table released last week by
DOT for construction of the new bridge


was to begin testing and securing
permits early this year.
Tuesday, when the picture above was
made of the crew at work, the drill had
already been sent down some 80 feet,
with the workmen saying they would
probably test to depths of some 100 to 120
feet.
In a related action, the DOT said this
week they would also finally get
underway with replacing the dr w
bridge across the Intracoastal Canal at
Overstreet with a high-rise facility.
DOT announced this project last year
also, along with plans to replace the draw
span at White City.
The Overstreet project made the
television news this week as the
imminent demise of Florida's last
floating draw bridge.


Supervisor of Elections,
Cora Sue Robinson is making
a last-ditch effort to contact
some 701 registered voters
who have had their names
removed from Gulf County's
voting list, in an attempt to
have them reinstated to the
rolls.
"We mailed out cards to
some 701 voters who have
been removed from the voter
lists and who have not
responded in any manner",
Robinson said. This means
their names have been re-
moved from the voter lists.
State law requires Ms.
Robinson to send out the
notices if a voter,fails to cast
a ballot in two successive
elections. If the voter signs
.the notice and returns it to
the Supervisor's office, they
are reinstated as registered
voters.
The Supervisor said, "We
had 311 cards returned to us
marked 'wrong address'
when we mailed out the
notices. That means that 311
of our people have received
no notice that their names
are being removed. Appar-


ently they had moved and not
changed their address with
us, or they may no longer live
in the county. However, we
would like to give every
opportunity possible for
these people to decide on
their own voting future in
Gulf County and not lose
their franchise over the fact
we were unable to contact
them".


*


Lighter
Ms. Robinson is having the
names of those who Iace
removal from the voter rolls
in this week's issue of The
Star. The complete list of
names can be found on page
eight of this week's issue
Robinson emphasized that
the names of ,persons who
were sent notices have al-
ready been removed from
the voter list.


Cabinet Adopts DNR Proposal


Florida's Cabinet took nearly an
hour and a half Tuesday to move Gulf
County's construction control line
along the Gulf of Mexico an average of
about 1,000 feet landward.
The Department of Natural Re-
sources proposed the move this year
and held two public hearings with
local land owners, developers and
'contractors to get their input to the
proposed move.
According to DNR director, Dr.
Elton Gissendanrer, the moving of the
control line was the result of several
years of study and an evident need to
control building and construction
practices farther away from the
shoreline than a previously establish-
ed line had done.
While the new control line mean-
ders along the shoreline, it has been
placed an average of 1,000 feet farther
up the shore from the previous line
established by DNR in 1975.


Most land owners and developers
felt DNR would recommend the
Cabinet adopt the suggestions of their
research people, even after local
interests had opposed the change.
Gulf County's Building Officer
told DNR the designation was un-
necessary because the cost of building
on the shore was forcing land owners
to regulate themselves for safety and
for preserving the integrity of the
shoreline.
TWO EXCEPTIONS
When they made their recom-
mendation to the Cabinet Tuesday,
DNR made two exceptions to their
plans, after arguments were made to
the Cabinet by attorneys representing
James T. McNeill in the Indian Pass
area and St. Joe Paper Company in
the St. Joe Beach area.
McNeill's attorneys argues that
his property was exempt from the


ruling since his property, in the lower
Indian Pass vicinity, didn't face the
Gulf of Mexico. Apparently, the
construction zone dan be established
only on property which faces the Gulf
or the Atlantic Ocean.
St. Joe Paper's attorneys used the
same argument .to exempt property
they own from Butler's Point to St.
Joe Beach. They claimed the property
fronted on St. Joseph Bay and not the
Gulf of Mexico.
The Cabinet did not agree to
exempt this property from the new
regulations, but only delayed the
decision until a new look can be taken
at the property in February.
The remainder of the coastal
property under consideration for the
new regulations had them applied on a
6-1 vote, with Agriculture Commis-
sioner Doyle Conner, voting against
the change.


Hughey Williams had an unexpected surprise as he was was time to fall at the corner of 16th Street and Long Avenue
going home Saturday evening. A utility pole decided that it and caught Williams' truck.


Two Collisions Cause Damage


Two accidents inside the
City during the past week left
considerable damage, but no
serious injuries, according to
records at the Police Depart-
ment.
Saturday night of last
week, an accident involving
a pick-up truck driven by
Hughey Williams and a uti-
ity pole at the intersection of
Long Avenue and 16th Street
blacked out nearly three-
fourths of the city for televi-


sion reception for from 12 to
24 hours.
Williams was approach-
ing the intersection from the
south at about 9:20, when he
saw a cable hanging in front
of his truck about five feet
above the roadway on Long
Avenue. Williams swerved to
avoid the cable, but struck it
anyway. The cable veered
his truck into the utility pole,
where it struck the pole and


broke it off about eight feet
above the ground. The pole
was carrying one of the main
junction boxes of Gulf Cable
TV, knocking out the cable
service in much of the area.
No charges were filed by
investigating officer, Nat
Brannon.
Tuesday afternoon, at
about 2:45 p.m., a van and a
sedan collided at the inter-
section of Avenue D and


Hodrick Street.
Police records show Wal-
ter Lenox was driving a van
south on Hodrick and ran out
into the intersection of Ave-
nue D, sticking a second
vehicle driven by Ernest
Jones.
Investigating officer,
James McGee said shrub-
bery planted beside the road
at the intersection blocked
Lenox' view of Jones' vehi-
cle. He filed no charges.


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A drill bites deep into the ground to
test for placing piling for the new
Highland View high-rise bridge which is


scheduled to begin construction next
year. ---Star photo


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Let's Try to


Get

There are those in our county
and especially those outside our
county-who call themselves news
:people-who just love a big fight;
particularly one in Gulf county.
If there isn't a fight or a stink
going on, they aren't happy. If they
can just spread something juicy
about Gulf County they seem to be
in their prime.
Then, when people from Gulf
County help them out by providing
Some of the fractious behavior, we
have a situation here which makes
.:the rest of us uneasy and uncom-
fortable.
The current rhubarb between
Sour Gulf County Commission and
Sheriff and our Clerk of the Court is
-: one prime example of what should
- not be going on in our county.
It would seem to us that we
: have enough problems and enough
wrongs to right here in Gulf County
without our elected public officials
3 making more... and spreading out
these problems over weeks and
months of agony for our people.
It pains us to have to write
these words, because men on both
sides of the current bickering
among our officials are good
friends of this writers. We consi-
.' der all of them to be good and true


Comments


THE STAR


THURSDAY JAN23 196


PDA VfP T


', .., u. Z ZEo T- A

Along Kesley Colbert's Country Column

friends, but we can't condone their
actions of the past few months.
We do not believe there has Hold the Forklift Boys, She Made It
lift B She Mad It


ueen any monivly mis-piaceu, nlu
funds have been manipulated and
nobody intends to spend the county
into the red. We believe all our
public officials on both sides of the
issue which is bubbling in the
caldron of discontent here in Gulf
County to be honorable men, with
the interest of the county at heart,
Why, then, do'they insist on
tearing the county apart? They
may think they are making a
telling point, but in reality, they are
making their constituents most
uncomfortable and dissatisfied
with their actions.
We see no reason why these
men can't sit down in the same
room and talk sensibly and ration-
ally and come up with an agree-
ment which would settle their
disputes and serve the county well.
We're sure the people of our county
thought they had that capability,
too, when they elected the people
who are currently in office.
Let's try it, men. We're not
interested in your display of pride;
we're interested in good and
harmonious government here in
Gulf County.:.
"''Wi


9 '- Tq fir


He Stuck With It


Joe Badger retired from his
place with the City of Port St. Joe
this month. After working with the
City almost continuously since
1939, Joe finally decided to step
aside and enjoy his elder years.
Joe was an institution with the
City of Port St. Joe, much like the
late Chief Buck Griffin was.
Everybody knew Buck ard every-
one knows Joe.
Joe is a gentleman. He has
always been a gentleman, even
though he confesses, now of ha vithg
to resort to selling moonshine in
days gone by when the City didn't
;have the money to pay his salary
5 when pay-day rolled around.
'^: That's a fact. There was a time
- when the City didn't have the
money to pay its employees on
pay-day. Joe testifies he went as
long as three or four months at a
time without a paycheck.
Things have changed. The City
can pay its bills now. It can buy its
needed equipment. It can meet its
"obligations and its needs.
People like Joe Badger, who
stuck with the City through thick
and thin and took an interest in
.seeing that things were done
properly are the attributes which
made this City able to stand on its
own two feet.


We thank you Joe, for your
years of dedication and friendship.
We won't forget you.


Smells Same

As the old saw goes, "A rose
by any other name, would smell the
same".
Last week, it was revealed that
after nearly 50 years of being
known as "St.,, Joe Paper Com-
-pariy,',4the firm was changing the
name of its paper manufacturing
plant to St. Joe Forest Products
Company.
Somehow or other, that is
supposed to be beneficial to the
company.-If it is, it suits us to call
the plant by its new name,
although, in all honesty, it will
probably be known locally and
colloquially as St. Joe Paper
Company for at least another 50
years. *
So long as the mill continues to
run and turn out paper-providing
those good-paying jobs for our
people, we don't care if they call it
"Alexander's Ragtime Band".
One thing for sure, the change
of name affected the mill no more
than the change of name would
affect the rose. It still smells the
same. like steak and potatoes!


I believe it was about
three, maybe four years ago,
my wife joined Weight
Watchers. I lost eleven
pounds in two weeks. We ate
broiled chicken, broiled
potatoes, broiled salmon pat-
ties, broiled spinach, broiled
meat loaf, broiled leek and a
broiled partridge in a pear
tree. She even brought home
some ice cream that was
O.K. with this diet. I think it
was broiled. Cathy really got
into this thing. She had
scales to weigh the food -
we bought a new broiler.
And, of course, there was no
need to cook two different
meals at each sitting so I got
my first taste of broiled
chicken breast. Cathy didn't
lose an ounce. I think her
problem was that after the
third day she ate her portion
and mine too.
Since that period of fasting
I have been a little leery
anytime Cathy wanted to
"join" something. So the


other day when she mention-
ed that she was going to an
exercise class at the church
on Monday nights I immedi-
ately began to ponder how
this "joining" might affect
me. Shucks, a little exercise
couldn't hurt might even
do her some good. Maybe
there'd be a good western on
the Superstation on Monday
night so I could show the
boys what television was
supposed to be like. At 8:05
on Monday night I turned to
WTBS to get, hopefully, Kirk
Douglass and Burt Lancas-
ter in "The Gunfight at the
O.K. Corral". What we got
was a basketball game bet-
ween the Atlanta Hawks and
the Indiana Pacers. I turned
to the boys, "How about a
game of dominoes?" Josh
said, "Let's play roller der-
by."
We pulled all of the fur-
niture out to the middle of
the room, marked us off a
, track with some chalk, chose


* .-*... 4


i~~- -~.*,IBd. .-. ,... ~~4*


up teams and went to it. Josh
and Jess were the Bombers
- I got to be the T-birds.
Now that roller derby is
tough when you are a lot
taller than your opponents.
It's hard to get down low
enough to get your elbow
under their chins. But when I
did I'd give them a good lick
to the chops and send them
flying off the track. I don't
know much about roller der-
by but I do know the object of
the game is to knock the
other guy over the rail and
into the stands. I was well
ahead by the time Cathy
limped into the house.
"How did it go?" She
didn't answer. She headed
for the bed. She didn't even
ask why the couch was out in
the middle of the room. We
had laid a shirt over the
broken arm of the chair so
she wouldn't see it and Jesse
kept his hand over his eye so
she couldn't see the swelling.
Roller derby is a rodgh


game. It appeared that exer-
cise is too.
I don't remember my
mother ever going to exer-
cise class. Shucks, if you'd
ask us about aerobics back
in those days, we'd have
thought it was a new plane
that Howard Hughes was
a'working on. I guess by the
time my Mom cooked break-
fast, cleaned the table, hand
washed a couple of "loads"
of clothes down at the creek,
hung them out, chopped cot-
ton till lunch, fixed dinner,
cleaned the table, chopped
cotton till she had to go pluck
the chicken for supper, fry
that chicken, clean up the
supper dishes, darn some
socks... well, she just didn't
have time for exercise class.
Poor Mom, to this day she
probably doesn't realize
what she missed. Did you
notice that my mother fried
her chicken?
Early Tuesday morning
Jesse was pulling on my


-COLBERT
arm. "You awake Dad? I'm
hungry."
"Tell your mother."
"Mom said she can't get
out of bed."
Knowing better than to
smile I made my way to
Cathy's side of the bed. I told
her that she'd feel better if
she could get the old muscles
loosened up. I suggested that
she jog around the house a
couple of times. I'll never
forget the look she gave me.
All she said was, "Fix the
boys some breakfast." This
(Continued on Page 3)


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THAT OLD ARGUMENT has
-:been brought to my attention once
again.
All my life I have heard the
arguments pro and con that tomatoes
.are fruits, and not vegetables.
Like the botanical classing of the
Fruit of- the tomato plant, there is also
: considerable discussion about the
: pronunciation of the word "tomato".
Do you pronounce it "toe-may-
toe" or "toe-may-toe"? Do you cover
its slices with "may-o-nayse" or do
:you slap on a generous helping of
"my-o-nayse" when you go to eat your
:"-.toe-may-toe" or your "toe-mah-
toe"?
: Does the delicious round and red
raw material for catsup (pronounced
: by some as "ketchup", belong on the
'"-fruit dish or the vegetable plate?
There's no doubt about it; with
: such weighty matters to be decided
.-..:and such controversial matters to be
:' acted upon, I can see where the
::-decision over the tomato alone can
-.rkeep the SALT talks occupied for the
next generation or so.
Get it? "SALT"!
Nearly everyone salts their "toe-


may-toe", even if they call it a
"toe mah-toe".
I can see where this question may
usurp the matter of star wars in the
SALT talks, in matters of priority.


tion not under the fruit section.
Even those brilliant people who
compile our book of illustrations
which they feel we will use for months
to come, don't know-for sure-whe-


LET'S TAKE THE viewpoint that
a tomato is a vegetable and run with
it.
A tomato has been determined a
vegetable by association. We grow


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By: Wesley R Ramsey


+++++
WHILE TOMATOES have baffled
the more learned minds for the past
umpteen years about their botanical
classification, I can see no greater
progress being made for universal
acceptance of a tomato as a fruit
rather than a vegetable.
Looking in my book of illustra-
tions we have here at The Star to help
with working up grocery store adver-
tisements, I see where I can find
tomatoes under the vegetable see-


their a tomato is a fruit or a vegetable.
It's a matter to confound even the
Supreme Court for resolving correctly
in a manner which can be accepted by
the people.
The'determination of a tomato-
either as a fruit or a vegetable-is
bound to create more of a stir and a
disagreement'than the first prayer in
school decision engendered. You have
a school of thought both ways.


tomatoes in the vegetable garden, so
they were lumped with the vege-
tables.
My Momma used to give me
warnings about being careful who I
associated with when I was just a boy.
'People will draw the opinion you are
just like the ones you associate with",
she told me.
A tomato in a vegetable field is a
classic example of what my Momma
said. Momma must have been right,


just as mommas have always been
and always are, right.
+++++,
I'M NOT SO SURE this botanist is
correct, who insists on classifying a
tomato as a fruit.
A botanist is one of those
experts-a fellow 50 miles from home,
carrying a briefcase.
This "expert" botanist says, a
tomato is a fruit, not a vegetable. A
fruit is the ovary of the plant.
Well. hoop-de-doo!
Does that make a tomato taste
any different? Does that make a
tomato any less popular as a crop for
amateur gardeners? to those with a
couple of extra feet of dirt in a window
box? to those with a couple of pots
sitting out on the patio? to those with a
taste for the distinctively flavored
product of tender, loving care in the
spring?
I have been told that even such
well-known vegetables as eggplants,
cucumbers and pumpkins are also
fruit.
How do you like them apples?
(Which are also fruit!)


ood
I'M NOT A BOTANIST. I even
have trouble spelling the word. To
claim I can delineate between the two
species of vegetables and fruit would
be to make a claim I simply can't
back up.
I admit my ignorance to things ,
agricultural. My thumb is definitely
"dead" brown. It resembles a green
thumb in no manner whatsoever.
I wouldn't be recognized as a
botanical expert even if I were to
travel 50 miles from home and take
along a briefcase.
George Burpee and I have nothing
in common, except that I could print
the catalog he sends out each year.
That's about as close as we could
come to mixing it up with one another.
In spite of my expressed ignor-
ance, I'm going to stun the world with
this revelation.
If a tomato is a fruit, and not a
vegetable, what is a blackeyed pea?
What is cotton? What is corn? What is
wheat? Are they not fruit, also?
I'm going to join right in with that
other ignoramus who claims a tomato.
is fruit and make my claim that these
edible parts of weeds are also fruit!


THE STAR
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Company
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Wesley R. Ramsey .......... Editor and Publisher
William H. Ramsey Production Supt.
Frenchie L. Ramsey .............. Office Manager
Shirley K. Ramsey ................... Typesetter


POSTOFFICE BOX 308
PHONE 227-1278
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456


SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR $10 00 SIX MONTHS. IN COUNTY $8 00
OUTOF COUNTY--ONE YEAR $1500 SIX MONTHS OUTOFCOUNTY $1000
OUTOF US -ONE YEAR $1600


TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold
SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA ---- --- -
The spoken word is given scant attention: the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
barely asserts: the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost: the printed word remains


Tides


The time of high and low waters
for St. Joseph's Bay were furnished
by the U. S. Weather Bureau Service
in Apalachicola.


January 23
January 24
January 25
January 26
January 27
January 28
January 29


High Low
8:48p.m. 6:56a.m.
9:30 p.m. 7:38 a.m.
10:09 p.m. 8:18 a.m.
10:51p.m. 8:55 a.m.
11:30 p.m. 9:27 a.m.
9:52 a.m.
12:12 a.m. 9:55 a.m.


Is A Tomato A Fruit or Is It A Vegetable? Who Cares? It's


r


L _


;, I I


~-P I a I -1


.:- ---
.. i
'i
~lsrr-


*-^es.- ?w* ww.. ^wpvm<-v'^--wej'v^-'--^r'.;


A-TrADW -gt







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1986 PAGE THREE


Dr. Bates at United Methodist


Dr. Ralph K. Bates, Senior
Minister of First United
Methodist Church, Birming-
ham, Alabama, will lead
revival services at First
United Methodist Church,
here in Port St. Joe Monday
through Wednesday of next
week. Services are at 7:00
a.m., for devotionals and 7:00
p.m. for revival worship
daily.
Dr. Bates is chairman of
the Birmingham area Board
of Pastoral Care of the
United Methodist Church. He
serves on the board of


Kesley
(Continued from Page 2)
"joining" had done it to me
again I don't know how to
"fix breakfast." I strolled in-
to the kitchen and suggested
some Captain Crunch.
"We want something hot
Dad."
We were eating our spag-
hetti-o's when Cathy crawled
down the hall. Jesse spied
her and said, "How about
some roller derby before
school Mom we've got the
track ready." I almost chok-
ed on a meatball, but at least
it wasn't broiled.
Respectfully,
Kesley


trustees of Lake Junaluska
Methodist Assembly and of


Dr. Ralph K. Bates


Blood Drive
Northwest Florida Blood
Bank will be holding a blood
drive in Port St. Joe on
Wednesday, January 29. The
bloodmobile will be at the
corner of Reid Avenue and
Fifth Street from 11:00 a.m.
until 5:00 p.m.
Volunteer donors are need-
ed in order to maintain a safe
and adequate blood supply to
meet the community's needs.
Please help by donating the
"Gift of Life."


Huntingdon College in Mont-
gomery. He also serves on
the board of directors of the
Carraway Methodist Medical
Center, Birmingham.
Rev. and Mrs. Bates have
three daughters in Mobile,
Tuscaloosa and Chapel Hill,
North Carolina.
The members of First
United Methodist Church in-
vite everyone to these special
services. A nursery will be
provided nightly. A covered
dish dinner will be observed
on Wednesday at 5:45 p.m.


City (Continued from Page 1)


officer James McGee, was questioned at length
by Peters and the Commission. Peters called on
McGee to corraborate his position in the matter,
but before it was over, McGee couldn't definitely
say he not been notified of the pay method and he
couldn't say he had not been paid for days he had
missed because of illness or any other good
reason. He pointed out he was out of work for
several weeks when he was hurt several years
ago and he was paid by Workman's Compensa-
tion.
"You were paid the difference of your salary
and what Workman's Comp paid by the
city of Port St. Joe, weren't you?" Mayor Pate'
asked.
"I'm not sure. I would have to look back and


see", McGee said.
Oscar Jones was presented to the Commis-
sion by Peters as a case in point, but Jones could
not convince the remainder of the board he had
been mistreated in the past.
Peters and Jones told the Board Jones had
worked with the department for nine years and
five months and had received no holiday pay. "If
I didn't work, I didn't get paid", Jones said.
On questioning by Commissioner Fleming, it
was learned that all this time Jones had worked
as a part-time officer, when Jones could work
around his paper mill employment shift and
never on week ends. "As a matter of fact, we did
you a favor allowing you to work that way and
you did us a favor by providing us with a needed


man at times", Fleming said.
Jones said he had resigned from the
Department when Chief Robert Maige wanted to
platoon him in shift work just like the rest of the
officers were working. "I couldn't do it and keep
up my shift at the mill", Jones said.
After all the discussion, Fleming recalled his
motion to accept the present way of handling
officer pay and working schedules. The motion
was approved by everyone on the Commission
except Peters who voted "no".
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters, the Commission:
-Agreed to accept a change in the loose
animal ordinance, changing the impoundment
fees'
-Amended a previous Resolution, calling
for-a $2.00 fee from all court convictions, with the
money to be used for state-required officer
training.


FURNITURE COMPANY

HAS Store
Hours:


Week Monday
thru

,Vfly Saturday

9 a.m.
to6 p.m.


SHAD

-PHANTRY
by Wendell Campbell





If I Had It...
A FRIEND OF MINE, who lives in a distant, big
city told me this story. It is about an incident that
happened several years ago in his neighborhood. It
sounds a little unusual, but the possibility of it
happening seem good, especially in a big city.
This particular incident happened to a friend of my
friend who lived about a block from him. I'll call his
friend Tom because I have no idea what his name is.
+ +++++f
ONE BRIGHT SUMMER DAY Tom noticed that
some new people had moved into the house next door.
Several days later, while Tom was mowing the grass in
his back yard, he noticed his neighbor's wife sitting in
her back yard sunning herself. Being a man with a big
curiosity and friendly nature, Tom decidedito.g pover.-
and introduce himself. He cut off the lawnmower and
started in her direction.
The closer Tom came to the lady, the more
interested he became. His interest had nothing to do
with the fact that the lady was wearing a string bikini
and looked like something that stepped out of ... well,
let's just say she was a handsome woman.
You see, Tom was a "lips" man and the woman had
-the most beautiful lips he had ever seen. He said,
"Pardon me, my name is Tom. .. you have the most
beautiful lips I have ever seen and I would give a
thousand dollars just to. kiss you!"
With that the woman jumped up and ran into her
house. She was obviously very upset, as Tom was soon
to learn.

THAT EVENING WHEN HER husband came
home, she told him what had happened. Her husband
was a man with a keen ear and a lot of bills to pay. "Did
he actually say he would give you a, thousand dollars
just to kiss you?" he asked.
"Yes, he did!" she replied, "and I want you to go
over there and beat him up!"
"Listen, Honey", he said, "let's be practical about
this thing. You do have beautiful lips and what is a little
kiss? We coulduse the thousand dollars. And, besides
that", he continued, "I will be here to make sure
nothing happens".
+++++
WHEN HE HAD convinced his wife, he went to
Tom's house and knocked on his door. He asked Tom if
he did, in fact, say what his wife had told him. Tom
admitted he did. "Come with me", the man said,
walking toward his house.
When they were in the house, the man called in his
wife and told Tom, "Well, there she is. If you will pay a
thousand dollars to kiss her, go ahead".
+++++
THE WOMAN APPROACHED Tom and he
embraced her. He gently placed his cheek to hers and
rubbed lightly. He-then ran his cheek down her face to
her neck and continued rubbing, ever so lightly.
After a. minuteor two he changed sides, carefully
avoiding her lips; and began the same process with the
other cheek. All the time he was holding her in a firm
'but gentle embrace. The rubbins continued for about
five minutes, with the husband watching and becoming
more and more impatient. Still there had been no kiss.
Finally, his blood at a boiling point, the man
shouted at Tom, "For goodness sakes, go ahead and
kiss her!"
Tom turned and, with a faint smile on his face, said
to the man, "Buddy, there's nothing I would like better
and I would if I had a thousand dollars".
+++++
OLD TOM IS the salt of the earth and confined to a
wheelchair for life.



NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. Theodore Andrews, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL... ................ 9:30A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ......... ........ 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................... 6:00 P.M.
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"


FOR THIS WEEK ONLY WE'RE SLASHING
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.1


PAGE FOUR THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1986


Lt. Col. Hunter Speaks to


Local Chapter of
Lt..Col. Cedric V. Hunter, Mexico, of the satisfaction of
Commander 325th Tactical being able to serve the
Training Squadron, Tyndall country he loves.
Air Force Base inspired St. Concluding, Col. Hunter
Joseph Bay Chapter DAR stated that the young men
members and guests with his entering the Air Force today
patriotic address given Wed- are "sharp, intelligent,
nesday, January 15, at their quick, patriotic and prepared
National Defense luncheon to defend our country".
meeting at the Garden Cen- The question and answer
ter. period following the address
"Memories of An Old Fash- was evidence of the enthusi-
ioned Fighter Pilot" could be asm and interest with which
the title of this address", said the Col. was received. He
Col. Hunter. He then told of presented those present with
boyhood symbols meaningful a color photograph of the
to him seeing his father USAF F-15 Eagle flying over
donning his uniform, the flag St. Andrews Bay, a plane
of the United States of designed to outfight and
America, the national an- outperform any enemy air-
them, his college years in the craft in the foreseeable fu-
sixties when it was not easy ture. Mrs. Hunter accompan-'
to be patriotic, of his desire to ied her husband.
become a fighter pilot, of The speaker was given a
missions flown in the Viet- flag of the United States of
nam War, of seeing the America by Mrs. Archie
beauty of this country from Gardner, chapter National
the air, the Grand Canyon, Defense chairman who, when
glaciers of Alaska and eme- she presented him to his
rald waters of the Gulf of audience remarked that his


the DAR
was a receptive one whose
national policy is advocating
a strong national defense.
Mrs. W.B. Dye, regent,
presided at the meeting and
welcomed Mrs. Mark Lam-
berson as a new member and
visitors Mrs. Frances Moore
and Mrs. Adelaide Bosso of
Caroline Brevard Chapter in
Tallahassee, the Rev. Nell
Mulligan, Mrs. Thelma Mor-
gan, and Col. and Mrs.
Hunter.
Mrs. Paul Kunel, -Mrs.
Robert Reining and Mrs.
Ralph Swatts, Sr., were
elected to the state confer-
ence in Miami in March; and
Mrs. Kunel and Mrs. Reining
to Continental Congress in
Washington, D.C., in April.
The next chapter meeting
is Wednesday, February 19.
Winners of the American
History lonth Essay Contest
will be presented by Mrs.
Wayne Biggs, history month
chairman.


Revivals .

Nazarene Church


F '

7


Shown in the center is Lt. Col. Cedric Hunter, commander Tactical Training Squadr
Tyndall Air Force Base with his wife, left, and Mrs. Archie Gardner, right, chairman o
tional Defense for the DAR.


Infant, Pre-School Child


Care Facility Is Planned


I, The Nazarene Church, lo-
cated on the corner of Long
Ave. and Niles Road, is
holding revival'services this
week at 7:00 p.m. nightly.
Randy and Mary Jane

Pentecostal
Holiness Church
The First Pentecostal Holi-
ness Church of Port St. Joe
will begin youth week Wed-
nesday, January 29 with a
gospel sing featuring the
S Happy Echoes from Tennes-
see.
Revival services begin
Thursday and go through
Sunday night with Rev. Da-
vid Haye of Blountstown
speaking. Services will begin
at 7:00 p.m. nightly.
ron of Everyone is cordially in-
if Na. vited to attend.


James, evangelists in the
Nazarene Church, will be
providing both the challeng-
ing messages and inspira-
tional music.
Pastor Laurence Cox in-
vites any and all who would
enjoy hearing this dynamic
couple to come and join in
these services.

Parent Group
for Academics
The Parent Support Group
for Academic Excellence at
Port St. Joe High School will
meet Monday, January 27 at
7:00 p.m. in the conference
room of the Gulf County
Public Library.
All interested parents,
teachers, and school admini-
strators are cordially invited
to attend.


FOR THE MOST
IMPORTANT DAY OF
YOUR LIFE


Ned Alles, left, executive director of the Gulf County Guidance Clinic, is shown with John
iomarth, architect with the firm designing the new child care facility. ,
-.wih th fir


The Board of Directors of
the Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Inc. have announced
plans to construct an infant
and preschool child care
facility in Port St. Joe. The
Panama City architectural
firm of Smith, Bozarth, and
Fuller have been retained by
the Clinic for architectural
services on the building.
Edwin R. Ailes, Executive
Director of the Clinic, has
indicated that construction of
the facility is.expected to be
started May, 1, 1986 with a
completion date of August 31,
1986. According to Ailes, the
new facility will be construct-
ed adjacent to the existing
Clinic building in Port St.
Joe. The program will be
owned.and operated by the
Guidance Clinic. Child care
and educational services will
be offered for infant through
school-age children begin-
ning in early September 1986.
The Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Inc. is a private
non-profit corporation which
provides mental health in-
tervention, community edu-
cation programs' ard child
's' .


care services. The Clinic
currently operates two li-
censed child care facilities
for school-age students. The


planned infant and preschool
child care facility will com-
plement and extend existing.
services.


SThe Hamms
Pastoring In Memphis, Tennessee
Rev. and Mrs. Richard L. Mill Creek. Wewahitchka.
Hamm and sons Richie and
Brandon were recent guests Rev. and Mrs. Hamm
of their parents, Mr. and recently accepted the pastor-
Mrs. Oscar Raffield of St. Joe ate of Germantown First
Beach and Mr. and Mrs. Assembly of God Church in
Benton "Hamm of Wewa- Memphis, Tennessee. They
hitchka, also Richard's sister have pastored Bagdad First
and family Charles, Debbie Assembly of God, Bagdad,
and Casi Lindsey of Stone for, the past six years


See us for ...

Carlson Craft
INVITATIONS
ENCLOSURES
NAPKINS
THANK YOUS
RECEPTION ITEMS
ATTENDANTS GIFTS

Let your WEDDING
STATIONERY be as Indi-
vidual as you are. Choose
from our wide selection of
contemporary Carlson
Craft wedding stationery..


THE STAR PUBLISHING CO.
OFFICE SUPPLY STORE


306-08 Williams Avenue


Phone 227-1278


'Wheels

, Ms, Joy Ailes has' be









I'O


of Life' Slated for St. Jude's


een


appointed Chairman for the


annual "Wheels for Life"
Bike-A-Thon in Port St. Joe.
The event is scheduled for
April 19, 1986, with a rain
date of April 26, 1986. This
ride will benefit St. Jude
Children's Research Hospi-
tal.
St. Jude Children's Re-
search Hospital is a research
- treatment education cen-
ter where physicians and
scientists working side by
side have actually succeeded
in rewriting medical text-
books through painstaking
research and treatment ad-
vances.
This institution, now the
largest childhood cancer re-
search center in America,
owes its establishment to a
promise made years ago by
entertainer, Danny Thomas.
His dream became reality
when the doors of this
non-sectarian research hos-
pital opened in 1962 dedicated
solely to the conquest of
hopeless diseases of children.
When St. Jude Hospital
accepted its first patient, the


survival rate for children
diagnosed with acute lympo-
cytic leukemia was less than
five percent. Today, the
disease-free survival figure
for children in long-term
remission has grown to more
than 50 percent. Procedures
that originated at St. Jude
are now being used to treat
children throughout the Uni-
ted States and other parts of
the world.
St. Jude Children's Re-
search Hospital has treated
children from 39 states and
29 foreign countries. Upon
referral from their physician
they are admitted to a
research study without re-
gard to race, creed, national
origin, or ability to pay. The
sole criterion is a medical
determination that their dis-
ease is under study. They
receive the very best and
latest total medical care
because it is through these
children that we will learn
how to save others.
St. Jude Hospital is largely
supported by voluntary con-
tributions which are tax
deductible. Events such as
the "Wheels for Life" bike
ride raise the funds to
continue the research and
treatment programs which
are freely shared with all
physicians and research
scientists, extending the
benefits of its work beyond
its walls to children through-
out the world.
Tim Gays Have
A Baby Boy
Mr. and Mrs. Tim Gay of
Highland View are proud to
announce the birth of a son,
Johnathon Price. He was
born January 6 at Gulf Coast
Hospital. He was 2014 inches
long and weighed six pounds,
1312 ounces. He was wel-
comed home by his sister
Christina and his brother
William.
Johnathon is the grandson
of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Gay and
Mr. and Mrs. Bill Weaver all
of Port St. Joe.

*1


Ctch their Revival I
THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ,


JANUARY 27 through 29



-Dr. Ralph K. Bates.

EVANGELIST

Services: 7:00 P.M. Nightly
Morning Devotions
at 7:00 A.M.
Nursery Services Provided!!


EVERYONE INVITED
Dr. Balph K. Bates


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Port St. Joe, Florida


. II


I










Learn How to


Stop Smoking


-,How many times have you
made a promise to yourself
that you were going to stop
smoking and "kick the
habit" forever? Research
studies show that a great
many smokers would like to
discontinue their smoking
habit but that most of them
do not-quit without some type
of support or special assist-
ance.
Edwin R. Ailes, Executive
Director of the Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Inc., has
announced'that the Guidance
Clinic will be conducting a
"Stop Smoking Program"
beginning Tuesday, January
28 from 5:00 p.m.to 6:30 p.m.
The program will continue
every. Tuesday for five con-
secutive sessions.
According to Ailes, this
program will offer behavior-


al and psychological tech-
niques for individuals who
would like to discontinue
their smoking habit. Tech-
niques of hypnosis and be-
havior modification will be
utilized to assist participants
in effectively quitting smok-
ing. Ailes suggested that this
program will be for indivi-
duals who are committed to
putting serious effort into
discontinuing their cigarette
smoking habit.
Anyone interested in the
"Stop Smoking Program" at
the Clinic should contact
Ailes at 227-1145. All interest-
ed participants must sche-
dule an individual interview
with Ailes prior to starting
the program on January 28.
Enrollment in this program
will be limited.'


"HIS" Ministry at First Baptist
"HIS" Ministry ( Mary Ann
Jones) will be coming to
First Baptist Church, Wed-
nesday. January 29 at 7:00
p.m.. presenting and sharing
through music and the spok-
en word to those who have a
hurt, and this includes us all.
This instrument of encour-
agement and truth is entitled
"But Lord ... I Still Hurt".
"HIS" Ministry is a unique
discipleship ministry. "But
Lord ... I Still Hurt" is a
personal encouragement re-
lating to everyone, each to
their own level of hurt,
.regardless of the cause.
The public is cordially
invited to attend. A nursery
will be provided.


JMtO Honor Society students at Port St. Joe High School treat sixth grade students to a
Party. -Star photo


"Honors" Party Given


50 sixth graders from Port
St. Joe and Highland View
Elementary Schools were
given a special party on
Tuesday by the National Jr.
Honor Society Chapter of
Port St. Joe Jr. Sr. High
School. This "Honors Party"


.Kim. Harvey, .W lle J .ns an.d LeAnna Rudd presented
musical selections Monday at school.


was given in recognition, of
their outstanding academic
achievements for the first
semester of the 1985-86 school
year.
Before getting into the real
reason for being there, NJHS
president, Hannon Smith,


gave the students a warm
welcome and encouraged
them to continue to make
good grades with hopes of
becoming members of the
various honor clubs when
they enter Port St. Joe High
School.


Martin Luther King Week


Observed In Port St. Joe


Port St. Joe joined with the
rest of the nation Monday, in
the celebration of the newest
national holiday, commem-
orating the birthday of the
late Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr.
Clarence Monette, the


Left to right: Jessica Whaley, George Farmer, Equador Peters, Russell Cherry, Twila
Burns, Randall ant and Lakisha Ward.

Patriots Named at School


Students and faculty at
Port St. Joe Jr. Sr. High
School participated in a five
day patriotic observance in
commemoration of Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King, Jr. Every-
one was encouraged to wear
red, white and blue arm
bands or lapel bows showing
their patriotic spirit.
The event was designed to


emphasize the ideals for
which Dr. King gave his life.
He was a true patriot be-
cause he loved his country
and his fellowmen. He want-
ed peace and equality for all.
As an incentive for partici-
pating in the patriotism
activity each day two student
were selected as patriots for


the day. Each patriot re-
ceived an award for their
participation and dedication.
Patriots of the week honor-
ing Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. were: Jessica Whaley,
George Farmer, Equador
Peters, Russell Cherry, Twi-
la Burns, Randall Gant,
Eugene Steele and Lakisha
Ward.


chairman of the special
events to mark King's birth-
day,-said Tuesday, he and his
committee were pleased wth
.the response the observance
drew here in Port St. Joe.
Saturday, January 11 kick-
ed off the celebration activi-
ties with a breakfast held in
the Commons Area of Port
St. Joe High School, with an
estimated 200 attending to
hear an address by Judge
David Taunton.
January 15, a "Birthday
Party" was sponsored by the
commemorative celebration
commission at the Senior
Citizens Building, with some
150 in attendance.
Highlights of the "Birthday
Party" were'an address by
Port St. Joe Postmaster
Robert Oliver and a showing
of the film, "From Montgom-
ery to Memphis", showing
the odyssey of King during
his campaign to restore civil
rights to the Negro race.
Oliver's address reminded
his listeners of'the trials and
tribulations of King's cam-
paign and challenged his
audience to continue to en-
courage the "Living the
Dream" espoused by King.
Monday morning, January
20, an assembly program at
Port St. Joe High School used
King's theme, "Living the
Dream" as the program
theme as Rev. Jerry Huft
spoke to the students on the-
importance of protecting the
freedoms which this nation
affords to everyone.
Special events on the pro-
gram included musical selec-
tions presented by a trio of
Kim Harvey, Willie Jenkins
and LeAnna Rudd, students
at the school.
Mrs. Margaret Biggs re-
cited the poem, "An Undeni-
able Dream" and guest poet,
Mrs. Bessie Wynn of Blounts-
town, recited several poetry
selections.
Monday evening, the
NAACP sponsored a com-
memorative celebration at
the Philadelphia Primitive
Baptist Church, honoring Dr.
King.
Mayor Frank Pate wel-
comed the audience of ap-
proximately 200 people, who
witnessed a program of
singing, scripture, poems
and speeches acknowledging

Young Adult
at New, Bethel
Young Adult Day will be
observed this weekend at
New Bethel A.M.E. Church.
Minister Wesley Duhart of
Christian Fellowship Church
of Columbus, GA will be
guest speaker Sunday, Janu-
ary 26 at 11:00 a.m.
Everyone is cordially in-
vited to attend.


Youth Dept.
Selling Chili
New Bethel A.M.E. Church
youth department will be
selling Chili dinners Satur-
day. January 25 from 12:00
noon to 2:00 p.m.
The dinner will consist of
chili, cole slaw, crackers and
tea and will cost $2.00 each.


the accomplishments of Dr.
King.
Rev. Theodore Andrews
presided over the program
and recited an original poem
which told of the mission of
Dr. King.
Dr. Henry C. McCray, Jr.,
Pastor of New Hope Baptist
Church of Lynn Haven, gave
the commemorative address.
Dr. McCray outlined the life
of Dr. King and charged
people today with keeping his
dream alive and healthy. He
compared Dr. King's ac-
complishments of the civil
rights leader with those of
other great men in history,
saying that Dr. King had
,accomplished many and
great things during his short
life.


Card of Thanks
Dear Mr. Ramsey:
On behalf of the Port St.
Joe Chapter No. 3425, of
AARP, I want to say Thank
You for your assistance in
publicizing our Chapter, as to
activities and meeting dates,
and so on.
Sincerely yours,
Rella B. Wexler, Secre-
tary


Home Town Care At Its Best!




Gulf Pines Hospital


Announces the Relocation of




Dr. Jorge San Pedro's




Clinical Practice

to


324 Long Avenue

(former office facilities of Dr. Shirley Simpson, M.D.)



OFFICE HOURS:
Monday 10-12 and 1-5 Tuesday, 1-5
Wednesday 1-5 Friday 10-12 and 1-5
Closed Thursday




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THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1986


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PAGE N


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[IER"








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1986


THE LINGE
IS BAD
How does your cold us
throat, sniffle? For each ol
symptom for each cold. An
its course in about the sam
really a severe one you mig
seeing your physician.
S The cold you want to I
one that does not follow yo
starts off differently or it
efforts to treat it. Don't let
S physician before something

"A GREAT ANY PEO
their prescriptions, heal
macy products. We
Privilege and a duty. M
family pharmacy?"


BUZZETT'S I
Free Parking I
.* 317Williai

as



Gators


Week's

SThe Wewahitchka Gators
took a split of decisions this
:past week, falling victim to a
:strong Sneads quintet and
:dumping Carrabelle by a
lop-sided margin.
Sneads, 92; Wewa, 55
SThe Sneads Pirates got the
Gators, in the Pirate's lair
,Thursday night of last week
,and did a little whipping on
the Gators before a partisan
home crowd.
3 The Pirates had four of
their men scoring in double
;figures as they put a 92-55 win
over the Gators in their
.record.
i The Gators had two men


T\1 p f


I DLrop from :
RING COLD r
NEWS
ually start out-cough, sore S h a r
f us it is most often the same
d usually yourcold will run The Sharks started the
e way every time. If it's not week. ranked number nine in
ght even get rid of it without the state for Class 2-A. It took
a lot of tough games to get
be extra careful with is the the ranking, but it took only
our usual pattern. Either it one two point loss to Blots-
t does not respond to your one two point loss to Blounts-
this kind hang on, see your town to jar them out of the
g serious develops. ] state rankings.
Blountstown, 71; PSJ, 69
PLE ENTRUST US with Blountstown's Gene Bess
th needs and other phar- put up 25 points and, Jesse
consider this trust a Maines scored 23, as the
ay we be your personal Tigers edged the Sharks for
the first time this year,
Friday night.
The Tigers had a six point
STlead at half-time, on a 20
RUG STORE point surge in the second
S stanza. The sharp-shooting
Drive-In Window Blountstown five added sev-
ms Ave. Port St. Joe en more points to their lead
in the third period and held
off a Shark surge in the final
Period to take the win.


Split In


Play

paced by Isiah Jones; Al
Colvin and John Colvin, each
with 15 points to their credit. / '
Roy Myers added 13 and Bill
Smiley 12. W /
Score by Quarters:
Wewahitchka 21 21 24 12-78
Carrabelle 4 18 12 18-52 / Z
WEWA-Jones 7-1-15; My- .
ers 6-1-13; Colvin 7-1-15;, ."-
Colvin 6-3-15; Bidwell 1-0-2; this season.
Baker 2-0-4; D. Hartley 0-0-0; Next Thursday, the Gators
K. Hartley 1-0-2; Smiley will.beon the road to meet
4-4-12. Robert F. Munroe in a 5:30
CARRA.-Edwards 8-1-17; p.m., game.
Williams 4-4-12; Shiver 3-1-7;
Friday 1-0-2; Spann 0-2-2; Softball
Lewis 3-2-8; Reeds 1-0-2; C1urch o all
Horvath 1-0-2. 'The Church. Softball


*scoring in high figures them-
'Ielves, with Isaiah Jones Friday night, the Gators
:marking the way with his 21 will host a strong Apalachi-
:points. Roy Myers added 20 cola Sharks team in a game
Tor the Gators. starting at 4:30 p.m. The
Sneads jumped off to a Sharks are scoring big and
:seven point lead in the first defeating some strong teams
:period and never looked
back, as they out-scored the A
Gators in every period. Seven
Score by Quarters:
Wewahitchka 11 14 16 14-55
Sneads _-- 18 24.23_272-92,. i .1 .-
WEWA-Jones 9-3-21; MyC-. jllu rge
ers 8-4-20; Colvin 1-0-2; Lister r
2-1-5; Bidwell 0-1-1; Baker The Gulf County Sheriff's
2-2-6. Department has been busy
SNEADS-Raines 10-4-24; this week, pursuing its war
Johnson 9-0-18; Scott 4-1-9; against illegal drugs, its use
Wilson 5-0-10; K. Godfrey and sale, here in Gulf County.
1-0-2; Godfrey 10-0-20; Pea- According to Chief Deputy
cock 1-0-2; Blykin 1-5-7. Mike White, the Department
has made seven arrests
Wewa, 78; Carrabelle, 52 during the past week, all
The Gators bounced back charged with violation of the
Tuesday night, up-ending the law pertaining to drugs, their
carrabelle Green Devils, 78- sale and use.
52, as all five Gator starters White said the Department
scored in the double figures. will have more warrants
The Gators jumped off to a being served during the next
huge 21-4,lead in the first few days as "We continue our
period and kept the scoring war against drugs. You
pressure up until the fourth wouldn't believe how the
quarter, when the Green drug problem has gotten into
Devils had a six point bulge. our lives here in Gulf coun-
, The Gators led, 42 to 22 at ty", White said.
half time. Two of the seven arrests
The Gator scoring was were made Friday of last


League will hold an organiza-
tional meeting February 10,
1986 at the Port :St. Joe
Elementary School gym at
7:30 p.m.
All interested church and
officials are urged to attend.


State Rankings



ks Win One, Lose One


It was the Tigers' free-
throw shooting which gave
them the win, with the Tigers
scoring 19 points at the
charity stripe, and missing
only one free chance during
the final period. The Sharks,
who usually kill their opposi-
tion at the free-throw line,
had only 11 points from
penalties Friday.
Josh Jenkins had 19 points,
to lead the Shark scoring.
Dexter Baxter tossed in 18


while Curtis Beard was add-
ing 14 and Doug Robinson, 11.
Score by Quarters:
Port St. Joe 12 16 12 29-69
Blountstown 14 20 19 18-71
PSJ-Robinson 5-1-11; Jen-
kins .6-7-19; Baxter 9-0-18;
Harris 3-0-6; Beard 6-2-14;
Lewis 0-1-1.
SB'TOWN-Maines 10-3-23;
Koonce 3-4-10; Bess 8-9-25;
Kearce 2-3-7; Bush 3-0-6.


Port St. Joe, 69, Apalach, 66
The two "Sharks" tangled
Monday night, with the Port
St. Joe Sharks having to
scramble from behind to
salvage a close game with
the Apalachicola Sharks. The
Apalachicola squad is roar-
ing like a freight train
through the opposition this
year. Port St. Joe is one of
the few teams which has
beaten them, with Port St.
Joe handling them pretty


rough in the Christmas tour-
nament in Panama City.
Apalachicola was out for
revenge Monday, and very
nearly got it.
The Apalachicola squad
took a 35-26 lead into the
locker room with them at
half time Monday, but the
Port St. Joe five came back
with new incentive and fin-
ally put the game away.
Doug Robinson, who had
been the target of Blounts-
town's defense Friday night,
roared back with 22 points
Monday to pace the local
scoring. Dexter Baxter zip-
ped the nets for 21 points and
Josh Jenkins had 17.
Apalachicola's ace, Sean
Williams, had 27 points for
the night.
Doug Robinson put the
Sharks in the lead for the
first time in the game with


two free throws with four and
a half minutes left on the
clock.
Score by Quarters:
Port St. Joe 16 1016 27--69
Apalachicola 23 12 14 17-66
PSJ-Robinson 9-4-22; Jen-
kins 7-3-17; Harris 2-1-5;
Baxter 8-5-21; Hammac 2-0-4.
APALACH-Williams 7-13-
27; Lane 1-0-2; J. Lockley
11-0-22; Rhodes 2-0-4; R.
Lockley 1-0-2; Austin 1-0-2;
Hamilton 1-0-2; Wynn 3-0-6.
During the coming week of
basketball activity, the
Sharks will travel to Monti-
cello Friday night for a 5:00
p.m. game.
Tuesday night, the Sharks-
will host the Marianna Bull-,
dogs at 6:30. It was Marianna:
who kept the Sharks from:
going to the state finals
tournament last season.


* A


BACKED BY OVER

20 MILLION MILES
OF TESTING!


MICHELIN


>IKLEA2


Key to City
Mayor Frank Pate, right, presents
retiring veteran city employee, Joe Badger
with a symbolic key to the city at a dinner


honoring Badger Thursday night. Badger
prided himself at being trusted with a key to
everything the city owned while he was on
the staff, and carried the 97 keys on a heavy
ring fastened to his belt. He turned in the
keys when he retired. -Star photo


arrested On Drug Oituarie


In Port St. Joe Maude S. Burch Dies In


week and the other five were
made Tuesday of this week.
According to information
received from White, La-
mond Daniels and Lenny
Whitfield were arrested near
the Centennial Building at
approximately 7:45 p.m. The
two men had stopped their
car near the building and a
Sheriff's Deputy stopped
with them, finding them in
possession of marijuana and
paraphernalia. Whitfield has
been released on his own
recognizance and Daniels
was released on a $750 bond.
Tuesday, a wide-spread
sweep resulted in the arrest
of five persons in and around
Port St. Joe on various
charges of drug possession.
John Faulkner and his


wife, Tammy Faulkner, were
arrested at 404 Madison
Street and charged with the
possession and sale of mari-
juana and with intent to
distribute. A search warrant
was issued on their home
where a quantity of the
illegal substance was also
found.
Mark Trammel Scott, 304
16th Street, was arrested and
charged with the sale of
marijuana and possession
with intent to distribute. A
search warrant was also
obtained for his home where
a,quantity of the illegal weed
was found.
Steve Brant, 602 Garrison
Avenue, was charged with
the sale of marijuana in the
sweep by the Sheriff's De-
partment.
The final arrest was made
when Calvin Johnson, Ave-
nue C, was charged with the
sale of cocaine and conspira-
cy to sell the drug. ,
White said investigations
ate continuing in several
other cases of drug charges.


Graham Taps

Coldewey
Governor Bob Graham
this week announced the
reappointment of Tom S.
Coldewey as a member of
the Northwest Florida Wa-
ter Management District.
Coldewey, 73, of Port St.
Joe, has been a member of
the District ever since it
was created. He has also
served as chairman of the
group, which has the duty
of enforcing and imple-
menting statutory regula-
tions related to the use and
consumption of water re-
sources in the district.
Coldewey is also director
of the Nemours Founda-
tion, a hospital foundation.
He received his engineer-
ing degree from the Uni-
versity of Cincinatti and
was vice president of St.
Joe Paper Company from
1952 to 1977. He also served
as a Port St. Joe City
Commissioner from 1962 to
1981.
Two other members of
the district, William F.
Bond of Pensacola and
Candis M. Harbison of
Panama City, were reap-
pointed to the District.


tlountstown Home


Maude S. Burch, 77, of
Grand Ridge died Sunday,
January 12 in the Apalachee
Valley Nursing Center in
Blountstown following a long
illness. She was a native and
lifelong resident of Jackson
County and a member of
Shady Grove Pentecostal Ho-
liness Church near Grand
Ridge.
She is survived by three
sons, Roy Burch of Port St.
Joe, and Fred and James
Burch both of Grand Ridge;
five daughters, Marie Wynn,
Jeanette Lee and Annie Ruth
Johnson all of Port St. Joe,
Edna Bush of Panama City


and Margie Carr of Ashford,
Alabama; one brother,
Dempsey Simpson of Tam-
pa; three sisters, Elma
Wright, Nell Thomas and
Lovie Warren all of Tampa;
22 grandchildren and 26 great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, January 14 at Sha-
dy Grove Pentecostal Holi-
ness Church with the Revs.
Charlie Rigdon and W.H.
Hooppell officiating.
Burial followed in Shady
Grove Cemetery with Mad-
dox Chapel of Marianna
directing.


Willie Lee Griffin Dies

At Home; Funeral Sat.


Willie Lee Griffin, 65, pas-
sed away suddenly Thursday
afternoon at his home in
Wewahitchka. He was a
lifelong resident of Wewa-
hitchka, a member of Glad
Tidings Assembly of God
Church and a member of
Tupelo Lodge No. 870.
He is survived by his wife,
Causie B. Griffin of Wewa-
hitchka: three sons, Ray-
mond Griffin, Jerold Griffin
and Bobby Griffin all of
Wewahitchka; one daughter,
Glenda Kelly of Wewahitch-
ka; nine grandchildren:
-three great grandchildren:


five sisters, Ina Shirah, Lu-
cille Griffin and Agnes Grif-
fin all of Wewahitchka, Ida
Goff of Blountstown and
Audrey Chummney of Lake-
land.
Funeral services were held
Saturday at the Glad Tidings
Assermbly of God Church
with the Rev. Bob Claycomb
officiating assisted by Rev.
Claude McGill. Interment
followed in Roberts Cemete-
ry.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Fune--
ral Home, Wewahitchka
Branch Chapel.


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PAGE SIX


I







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1936 PAGE SEVEN*


Opposed


Dear Editor:
Bureaucracies at all levels


of government depend on the
apathy of the people in order


Expert TAX

Preparations


Corporations
Partnership
Individual


/
_ir~ -


ACCOUNTING SERVICES,
Small Business and Individual

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PROFIT and LOSS STATEMENTS
TAX and FINANCIAL PLANNING

Gulf Accounting Services
901 Garrison Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-6332




CLYDE WHITEHEAD, Jr.
ACCOUNTANT


TAX SERVICES
CORPORATION INDIVIDUAL
PARTNERSHIPS
SPECIALIZED HANDLING OF IRS AUDITS
ACCOUNTING SERVICES
SMALL BUSINESS and
INDIVIDUAL SERVICE

e TAX & FINANCIAL PLANNING
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


901 Garrison Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida


Phone 229-8994.
1/9186-4110186


LETTERS...


to work their magic, insure
their posterity, and increase
their size without interfer-
ence from those of us who
pay the bills.
There is a proposal by the
Corps of Engineers which
should rile the people of
Florida's panhandle who find
the Apalachicola River and
Bay to be contributing ele-
ments to our envied way of
life.
The Corps of Engineers
(COE) intends to submit an
application for a twenty-five
year permit for dredging the
100 by 9 foot channel in the
Apalachicola River.
It's one thing for me and
other laymen to complain
that such dredging'is ruining
the river, but it is more
noteworthy when the
"experts" make such com-
plaints.
The COE, while asking for
such a long-term permit; has
even publically stated that
such dredging is ruining the
Apalachicola Bay.
I have seen letters from
one Federal and one State
agency which voice mild
alarm at the proposal of the
25-year permit. The reason-
ing is sound: "The river is
constantly changing and
maintenance needs cannot be
adequately determined over
a long (25 year) period."
"The increased dredging
needs will increase the need
for disposal areas" ... which
will not only threaten, but
ruin fish habitats. The COE
has developed a procedure to
modify the proposed 25 year
permit "as operational re-
quirements and-or environ-
mental concerns dictate. If a
procedure has been devel-
oped to modify the basic 25
year permit as conditions
dictate, then why is a 25 year
permit advantageous as
compared to a 3 year per-
mit?"
Further, it appears the
COE cannot accurately pre-
dict dredging and disposal


St. Joe Hardware Co.
201 Williams Ave. Phone 229-8028


to Granting 25-Year Dredging Permit


Shark Beat


City. Go get 'em girls.
The baseball team has
begun practicing for their
season which will begin at
the end of February. Their
hard work and determination
in preparing for the season is
what makes the team num-
ber one.
There was an assembly
held Monday morning in the
gym to honor Martin Luther
King. Jr. Mr. Clarence Mo-
nette was appointed by the
City Commission of Port St.
Joe to coordinate the Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
commemorative assembly,
by which he did a great job.
There were many outstand-
ing presentations given and
patriotic songs were sung by
a few choir members, Willie
Jenkins, Kim Ermfinger, and
Kim Harvey. The school
would like to thank Mayor


requirements in its mainten-
ance activities (of the chan-
nel). For that reason, one
agency stated, in part. "...
this discrepancy in disposal
requirements for mainten-
ance activities is adequate
justification for dismissing
further consideration of a 25
year permit. It is our re-
commendation that
maintenance permits not be
issued for any length of time
greater than three years."
The COE contracts for
dredging, and has shown by
past performance that they
fail to exercise sufficient
supervision of the dredging
and disposal methods of the
ones doing the damage. The
Federal. agency goes on to
say, "Issuance of a 3 year
maintenance permit would
require the COE and their
dredging contractors to
operate in an environmental-
ly acceptable manner."
A State agency points out
the slipshod way the COE
accomplishes its goals. Ad-
dressing the problem of
ruining fish habitats by dred-
ging, the agency gives an
example of COE's unaccept-
able way of doing things: In
discussing specific disposal
sites, the agency states, "Site
12 (redesignated as 12-A
during recent meetings con-
cerning development of a
long term spoil disposal
plan) was specifically dis-
cussed during an interagency
field inspection with regard
to protecting an identified
area of high quality fish
habitat within the spoil site
boundaries, yet, shortly
thereafter, the identified
area was spoiled on and the
fish habitat was eliminated."
(Emphasis mine).
ThatV agency went on to
express their view that "...
past communications break-
downs on Corps projects and
the inability of the Corps to
control the action of contrac-
tors or to predict river
conditions that future
habitat deterioration will
continue .. ."
The COE's request fora 25
year permit from the Florida
Department of Environmen-
tal Regulation will be based
on the COE's Navigational
Maintenance Plan, a plan
filled with all. kinds of
proposals which would seem
to indicate a concern over the
environmental quality of one
of the finest natural recrea-
tional areas in the country,
but their past performance
insures that they will pay
little heed to their own
admonitions of protecting the
river and its fish habitats,
and striking an acceptable-


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III_ --- ---


4NAPA)


Frank Pate, Reverend Jerry
Huft, Mrs. Margaret Biggs,
Mrs. Deborah Crosby, Mr.
Clarence Monette. Mr. Joe
Brown. Alicia Burke, Brett
Kelly, LaShaun Leslie, the
NJROTC, the concert
band, the Jr. Beta Club, Mrs.
Bessie Wynn from Blounts-
town, and Mr. Edwin Wil-
liams for making this assem-
bly a great success.
All junior and-senior girls
interested in playing powder
puff football and any junior
or senior guy wishing to
coach or cheer at the powder
puff game may sign up in the
library.
All seniors wishing to put
an entry in the yearbook's
Last Will and Testament
should turn these in to either
Mr. Monette, Herman Jones,
or Emily Six by Friday,
January 24.


Program for Young Diabetics


Scheduled for


A monthly educational pro-
gram for the juvenile diabe-
tes action group will be held
Thursday, January 23, 7:00
p.m. at Gulf Coast Communi-
ty Hospital's Wellness Cen-
ter.
The Juvenile Diabetes Ac-
tion Group includes children,
their parents, friends, and
concerned relatives. Pro-.
grams are geared to meet the
needs of all these individuals.
This group is at work to
educate the public about
juvenile diabetes specifical-
ly, and adult onset diabetes
in general. Occasional bene-
fits are given to raise funds
for research in this chronic
illness.


Today


All interested persons are
invited to attend these educa-
tional programs and become
more aware of this ongoing
struggle to combat diabetes
in our lifetime.
For information about this
and future programs andi
diabetes in general ,p lease
contact Betty ,Saidlih, Gu
Coast Community Hospital!

Gulf County
School Lunch


Menu


Below is a list of the
lunchroom menus for Gulf
balance between the environ- County school for the week of
ment and the economical January 27-31.
potential of that river. Monday, Jan. 27
If those of you who see that Battered dipped fish, fruit
river as what it truly is wish cocktail, French fries, bun
to protect it and keep it from and milk.
becoming just another barge- Tuesday, Jan. 28
laden ditch, I strongly re- Corn dog, orange juice,
commend that you write to cole slaw, baked beans,
the DER and voice your cookies and milk.
opposition to the issuance of Wednesday, Jan.29
'a.2gyear permit fer dredging Slo 's0pyjoe, cheese wedge;
and 'maintenance by the applesauce, buttered corn,
COE. Write to: Ms. Victoria and milk.
J. Tschinkel, Secretary, De- Thursday, Jan. 30
apartment of Environmental Chicken with rice, broccoli
Regulation,.Twin Towers Of- with cheese, fruit cup, butter-
fice Building, 2600 Blair ed rolls and milk.
Stone Road, Tallahassee, FL Friday, Jan. 31
32301-8241. Meat and cheese sandwich,
Write now! Ms. Tschinkel lettuce, tomatoes, pickles,
needs to know how we, the French fries, cookies and
taxpayers, feel about this milk.
matter. Menus nmay change without
Tommy Williams notice due to availability of
Blountstown, FL .foods.


ly at 7:00
Wellness Center at 769-8341,
Ext. 402.
Speaker for this months
program will be David Hines,
nutritionist with the depart-
ment of public health. Hines
will bring information re-
garding the nutritional status
for the young diabetic.


SHARON MILLER


BY
SHARON
MTI.LER




There have been a lot of
activities going on this month
at Port St. Joe High School.
and I am here to inform you
of them all.
To begin, the Girl's Basket-
ball team began their season
back in December and is still
on the go. Although they have
only won two out of six games
they are striving to better
their ability and sportsman-
ship to take it to the top. The
next two games will take
place on January 24 at 6:00
p.m. against Havana and
January 28 at 5:00 p.m.
against Mosley in Panama


"THE CHURCH AFLAME IN PORT ST. JOE"

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
102 Third Street
SEvangelistic Worship Services
Regular Bible Study
Ministering to the Total Family
S Fully Graded Choirs
Christ Centered Youth Program
An Exciting Place to Attend
I J* Where Everyone Is Welcome
Regular Services Sunday.& Wednesday
HOWARD BROWNING
/ Pastor




I IPCIESUTO RY


CLEARANCE

I PRICES CUT -


82 Dodge Omni 024 2 door, auto.
air. Nice Car .........................
81 MONTE CARLO 2 door,
alc, p/s, cruise control. Clean ..........
81 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 2-door,
diesel, loaded w/everything. Runs good.
80 MERC. COUGAR XR-7, 2-door,
p/s, automatic, a/c.... ...... ... ...
80 FORD FAIRMONT door, clean,
low mileage, p/s, auto., a/c.............
81 FORD LTD 4-door, pls, auto.,
air conditioned.......................
79 FORD LTD 4-door, white, p/s,
automatic, air conditioned. ............
79 BUICK REGAL 2-door, p/s, auto.,
air conditioned ......................
79 MERCURY CAPRI 2-door, auto.,
air conditioned. ......................
81 CHEVROLET CITATION 2-door,
p/s, alc, straight shift .................
78 PONTIAC CATALINA 4-door, real
nice car, p/s, auto., a/c ................
79 OLDS DELTA 88 4-door, clean
car, p/s, auto., a/c ....................
80 CHEVROLET IMPALA 4-door, pls,
auto., a/c, cruise control, tilt wheel ......
80 OLDS CUTLASS 4-door, p/s, auto.,
air conditioned ......................
81 MERCURY COUGAR 2-door, pls,
automatic, air cond. ......... ...... .
79 CHEVROLET CAPRICE 2-door, p/s,
auto., air conditioned .................
78 FORD VAN power steering,
autom atic ..........................
75 GREMLIN
2 door, runs good ....................
77 DODGE ASPEN
2 door ...........: ..................
76 PLYMOUTH VOLARIE
4 doo r ................. .............
74 PONTIAC CATALINA 4-dr., real
good tires, runs & drives good, has some
rust on body .........................


12995

$3995

12795

s2695

12295-

12895:

$1595

12495

41895

41995

$1995

$2695

$2695

$2695

$2895

$1995

$1995

$595

$595

$395


$395


Highland View Motors, Inc.


603 Hwy. 98


Highland View


Ph. 229-6999


Any senior wishing his
baby picture to appear in the
yearbook, should label and:
turn it in to Mr. Monette or
Paula Ramsey by Friday,
January 24.
Student of the week for the
7th grade is Sharon Cook, and
for the 8th grade is Desmond
Peters. Congratulations. ..
The basketball "Sharks":
are fired up and ready to go.
Their next game is scheduled
for Friday, January .24:
against Monticello. The
game will take place: in:
Monticello beginning at 5:00
p.m. The following game will
take place Tuesday, January
28 on our own courts\against:
Marianna at 6:30 p.m.
"We must remember that.
intelligence is not enough..
Intelligence plus character -
this is the goal of true
education." Dr. Martin Lu-.
ther King, Jr. :


DRYDENE

DIESELALL MOTOR OIL


15W-40
EO-K Approved


,NAPABRANDInew


~aa~i~


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1986


PAGE SEVEN








PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1986


Honor Roll


Below is a list of the
Wewahitchka Elementary
School honor students for the
third six weeks.
First grade


All A's
Roy Buchanan, David Hy-
smith, Margaret Kelsoe,
SKimberly Prescott, Amber
'Rowland, Amanda Davis,
:Jennifer Weeks, Billy Park-
:er, Carina Patterson, Brian
Pippin, Joshua Taunton and
Judith Birmingham.
A&B
Sean Bailey, Brandi Brog-
don, Sherrie Jones, Tomica
Lowery, Rusty McKnight,
Michelle Owens, Rodney
Small, Roy Striplin, Adam
Taunton, Tracy Gray, Cry-
stal Hill, William Mims,
.Amanda Shavers, Ed Sum-


Names I


.Purged


Voting I


NOTICETO GULF
COUNTY VOTERS
Please check the list of names listed
below whose purge card notices were
not returned to the Supervisor of Elec-
tions office. If your name appears on
the list and you wish to remain a voter
n Gulf County you need to contact the
Supervisor of Elections office as soon
as possible.
PRECINCT SA
SBailey, Betty Joe; Bailey, Marvin;
Battle, Laura May; Brock, Brenda B.;
Carter, James E.; Gautney, William
Donald; Harrison, Hershel Lee;
Hunter, Alfred Ray; Kirk, Barbara
Elaine; Langford, Maudle R.; Mims,
Linda Faye; Morton, John Qwen;
Muller, Stanton George; Muller,Stan-
ton George U; Neel, George Randall;
Ohsawa, Sonia Jean; Rowan, Laretta
-Mary; Tew, Vivian; Weston, Kenneth
Wayne; White, Mack.
PRECINCT FOUR
Abernathy, James William; Blake,
Joyce O'Neal; Boucher, Nelson
Joseph Jr.; Boucher, Shane Edward;
Carr, Fred R; Cannon, Johnnie R.;
Costillo, Eva Jane; Craig, Leonard
Frank; Dflmore, Lariene P.; Dilmore,
William B.; Herring, Gregory
*peVaughn; Herring, Marie; Herring,
Rita Elaine; Johns, James Ben;
Knepley, Michael Scott; Marshall,
Melinda Faye; Mims, Jamie Lynn;
Mims, Parion R. Jr.; Mims, Sharie
SDee; Peoples, Wesley; Powel, Doris
SJean; Powell, Herbert E. Jr.; Shur-
rum, Robert W.; Shurrum, William
L.; Snell, William Mark; Surber,
Aletha M.; Surber, Carl N.; Surber,
Rae Ann; Surber; Wayne Edward;
a ihelt..Irp C; Whitings John Alan;
S Williams, Wiliam Carey.
PRECENCT FIVE M
Ahrent, Timothy Lawrence; Ander-
som, John Desmond; Andrews,
Charles Michael; Ard, James R.;
Aylmer, Raymond Peter; Benson,
Margaret A.; Brake, Leroy; Ricky
Lew Brittenham; Brownell, James
Clenton; Butler, Sherri Ann; Byrd,
Gerald Edward; Byrd, Sarah Jane;
Dady, John W.; Elliott, Jerry Carlton;
Gainous, David Clifton; Gieges, Ed-
ward R.; Gieges, Gaynell Annie; Grif-
fin, Joe Daniel; Guertin, Colice Fran-
cis; Holland, Mary J.; Kennedy,
Joseph Daniel; Martin, Linda Mae;
McLendon, Ralph Fred; McLendon,
Mary Lou; Nichols, Ralph Edward;
Patterson, Henry T.; Peters, Larry
Willard; Rhames, Donald Earl;
Roberts, Raymond W.; Seawright,
Gwen Hatfield; Smith, Eleonor;
Smith, Shaleen D.; Stafford, Albert
SHarvey; Stafford, Ronda Ranay; Ste-
wart, Magdalene Douglas; Strickland,
Marty Lee; Todd, Ruby Leigh; Whit-
tlngton, Caroline Dianne; Wood, Ken-
neth C.; Wood, Richard Earl.
-: PRECINCT SIX
Barton, Cynthia Renee; Bordelon,
Wis Paul; Causey, Julie A.; Dees,
Lenora Given; Dobbins, Betty
Catherine; Hardy, Carolyn Ann; Har-
dy, Curtis Holard; Harper, Karl
Ellen; Hicks, Mary Angela; Hitch-
cock, Thelma Amerson; McArdle,
SJeannine Marie; Mobley, Margie
Nell; Miller, Patricia A.; Nixon,
Bruce Dorman; Parker, Deborah Pop-
pell; Pettis, C. E.; Pettis, Esther
SMay; Rich, Kimberly Ann; Starling,
Reffer D.; Taylor, Marla Jean;
Taylor, Vince Efford; Whitfield, Susan
Diane; Williams, Teresa.
PRECINCT SEVEN
S Bailey, Donald K.; Bailey, James
Ellis; Bigelow, Susan E.; Brannan,
: Usbeth G.; Boone, Henry A.; Britt,
S Charles W.; Brock, Thomas Allen;
S Bruce, David D.; Bruce, Marie S.;
Carney, Miles H.; Carr, Carol A.;
" Carter, Vernon M.; Cartwright,
Harold B., Jr.; Cartwright, Nancy M.;
SConley, Mark Albert; Conley, Trudy
Susan; Coon, Maxine E.; Daigle,
-Albert R.; Daigle, Debbie Lynne;
Daigle, Linda E.; Davis, Arienne T.;
SDavis, Robert E.; Eells, Kathleen N.;
: Erwin, Ruth Mae; Gardner, Pamela
: J.; Gardner, Ronald L.; Gibson, Addle
S N.; Gray, Gladys Holmes; Griner,
S James H.; Hagan, George Larry;
HaganfKimberly Ann; Hagler, Eliza-
beth Sue; Hallinan, Danny Christo.
pher; Helms, Carolyn Y.; Helms,
Robert; Herndon, Donna Jo; Hicklin,
Emma 0.; Hill, Bobble L.; Hill, Lyn-
wood, Hill, Crystal R.; Holland,
Robert L; Hopper, Carl R. Jr.; Hop-
per, Wilma Jewell; Hughes, Steven
W.; Johnson, George Willard;
Johnson, Opal D.; Lafata, Anthony;
Luttrell, Thelma J.; Lyle, Lynn Kath-
leen; Martin, Courtney E.; Musgrove,
Demond Christopher; Musgrove,
-Mary Monica; Naples, Goldie R.; Nor-
wood, Gerald Dexter; Norwood, Helen
SL.; Norwood, Tammy Lynn; Oates,
Danny Kenneth; Odom, Geraldine;
Osbourn, Forest K.; Owens, William
'" W.; Parrott, Mabel F.; Parson,
: Michael Lee; Pierce, Rosa M.; Raf-
field, Tammy Teresa; Rich, David
Mitchell; Roney, John Brady; Schan-
i back, Jeanne; Scheffer, Kerry M.;
Shearer, Gerald Clifton; Smith,
Robert Kent; Strayer, Letha Bennett;
Sutherland, Denny E.; Sutherland,
Teresa A.; Tiller, Keith Anthony;
Viau, Timothy Patrick; Waldo, Glenn
Edward; White, Eva M.; Williams,
Donna J.; Wilson, Kerry Steven;
t Winters, Betty J.; Wood, Cathy I.
PRECINCT EIGHT
Addison, Jeanette Marie; Alex-
ander, Leonard; Andrews, John
= 'Calvin; Bailey, Eugene M.; Bailey,
: Patricia A.; Ballard, Willie F.;
Barnes, David L.; Barnes, Mosesi
Barnes, Sedra D.; Bell, Dmilla R.;


Odie E.; Watklns, James 0. Sr.;
Whitaker, Benjamin M.; White, Roy
Jefferson; Wilken, Max G.; Williams,
Vadalee; Wimberly, John Wayne;
Young, Harry; Zlobro, Ann W.
PRECINCT UA
Butler, Woodrow W.; Cassis, Can-
dace N.; Cassis, Richard A.; Choate,
Albert E.; Christensen, Bonnie Susan;
Floran, Robert E.; McDonald, Wrens;
Pace, Samuel; Saltz, Judith L.; Sex-
ton, Aubrey Dean; Tinker, Eunice B.;
Tinker, Lesley Fee; Tinker, Henry
W.; Watts, Kevin T.


Students Named at Wewa Elementary
Kenya Gray, Krissi Hanlon, A & B All A's Williams and Gwen Wil- All A's cie McGill, Adria Muina,
Lonnie Laster, Teleshia Mc- Cora Hathcox, Jason Luck- Kelly Cunningham, Hea- liams. Tracy Davis. Shawn Scott, Kelly Nations,
Nealy, Marlene Mitchell, ie, Scott Patterson, Andy their Goodwin, Jeremy Prid- Fifth Grade A &B Kim Burns, Tony Werden,
Augustus Russ, Brian Tho- Ray, Allen Roberts, John geon, Daniel Sims, Madena All A's Verna Cain, Stacy Davis, Philip Godwin, Emory
mas, Jeffrey Thomas, Tiffani Chambliss, James Fussell, Castleberry, Connie Lanier, Matthew Godwin. Danielle Gillis, Angela Good- Home, Devon Avrigan, Holly
Tucker, Norman Jones and Latrell Kent, Lynn Loveless, Kyle McLemore, Amy Rich, A & B rich, Michale McCorvey, Sta- Herring, and Amber Julson.


Ann Justus

Third Grade
All A's
Shanna Forehand, Cynthia
Faye Jordan, Casey Kelley,
Kim Kizziah, Ray Long, Lori
Layton, Diana Causey, Cor-
rina Copeland, Kelli Jones,
and Stephen Hollopeter.


Lee Mims, Rachel Myers,
Brandi Parker, Niki Taun-
ton, Taveka Jackson, Melis-
sa Alderman, Leigh Sim-
mons, Will Sumner, Jason
Kretzer, Sharon Holmes,
Lane Loveless, Daniel
Rhames and Kizzy Barnes.

Fourth Grade


Cathy Tremain and Patricia
Holmes.
A&B
Terry Addison, Lillie Arm-
strong, Ursula Brown, She-
bretia Danield, Stephen
Taunton, Kim Jones, Cindy
Pickron, Tammy Davis,
Mari Goodrich, Stephen Nor-
ris, Beau Whitfield. Kelvin


ner, Brandon Brogdon, Ales
Caster, Shena Jones, Cha-
leena Williams, Chris Yand,
Ddnnie Daniels, Rachel
Grahl, Shawn Morris and
Kertrina Wright.
Second Grade
All A's
Dusty Daniels, Kim Dietz,
Chris Edwards, Crystal Gas-
kin, Petra Lester, Cameron
Totman, Heather Webb, Chip
Field, Jason Fisher, Nicky
Holley, Jennifer Holmes, and
Lindsay Payne.
A&B
Leeta Buchanan, Jimmy
McDaniel, Ayesha Noble,
Eva Stroman, Dana Thomas,
Beverly Holmes, Chip Dees,
Chassidy Calhoun, Debra
Causey, Christina Dossett,
Daniel Glaze, Eric Gray,




Being


from


List

Boule, Bessie Lee; Brewer, Louise;
Brock, Vera P.; Brownell, Sarah
Jayne; Bryant, Viletta Lee;
Buckman, Lula M.; Butler, Willie L.;
Crawley, Effle G.; Dawson, Carolyn;
Dawson, Mary Sue; Dawson, Robert
L.; Dever, Carolyn Ruth; Dunn,
Robert L.; Dykes, Janie Kay; Farm-
er, Sheila Renee; Fedd, Carolyn;
Filmore, Angela R.; Gainer, Jeffery
Levant; Givens, Rowland S.; Green,
Mattle; Hopps, Nero Sr.; Jenkins,
Rozell; Jones, Daisy L.; Jones,
Elmeaty Bell; Jones, Sandra M.;
Keith, Kendall Renue; King, Betty S.;
Larry, Robert Charles; Mason, Kenny
S.; Mindell, David Paul; Mindell,
Margaret H.; Mitchell, Angela M.;
Morris,.Raymond S.; McCloud, Mary
G.; McCullough, Mae; McGee,
Rodney Allen; McKay, Samuel
Joseph; McKinnon, Elizabeth;
McNair, Eric Lamar; Norris, Laquita
J.; Pace, Diane; Parker, Lugene Jr.;
Peters, Carolyn A.; Peterson, Johnnie
Lee; Price, Karl Stanford; Raines,
Kenneth Ray; Rauie, Benjamin F.;
Riley, Mildred Ann; Rouse, Kelvin R.;
Russ, Bennie L; Russ, Margaret J.;
Sapp, Victoria D.; Siler, John H.; Sim-
mons, Michael Dale; Smith, Stanley
M.; Spencer, Pearlie M.; Thomas,
Nora Lorraine; Thompson, Bennon;
Thompson, Willie Mae; Tiller, Retha
Mae; Walker, Henry Riley; Walker,
R.A.; Walker, Roy; Warren, MaryD.;
Welch, Tonny Lee; Whitehead, Cora
L; Whitley, Pamela; Whitley, Van-
essa; Whittington, Iris N.; Williams,
William R.; Williams, Willie Mae;
Willis, Frederic M.; Wilson, Robert L
Sr.; Winfield, Pearlie Mae; Young,
Linda S.
.PRErB4 F NINE
Blan, Joe B. Jr.; Brown, Samuel
Allen; Brown, Thomas E.; Clayton,
Carolyn E.; Dandy, James F.; Davis,
Mary Cintel; Dorman, Connie; Dur-
ham, Carol A.; Eichelbrenner, Carl
B.; Eichelbrenner, Mae; Etheridge,
William Daniel; Fortner, Teresa L.;
Gentry, Peggy M.; Gorham, Ira S.;
Grubbs, Margie L; Herring, Randal
Davis; Hodges, Michael Keith;
Hodges, Linda Jackie; Ingram,
Charles Gregory; Johnson, Betty Myr-
dine; Johnson, Walter K.; Lewis, Jer-
rie; Lightfoot, Bobby G.; Lightfoot,
Terry L; Pool, Franklin Romaine;
Prince, Laurie Ann; Slowe, Alyce M.;
Smith, Jerry A.; Sullivan, Gerald L.;
Tootle, Roger C.; Walker, William
Warner Jr.; Wimberley, Bessie S.;
Yancey, Joseph A.; Yancey, Marion
G.
PRECINCT TEN
Andrews, Jeff Alan; Atchison, Den-
nis S:; Bell, Alex Bryan; Bennett,
Rodger H.; Bowen, Lawrence Daniel; \
Brackin, Imogene; Bray, Mary Mar-
garet; Catrett, Elsie L; Catrett, Roy
M.; Creel, James E.; Creel, Teresa
F.; Crymes, Mary E.; Gilley, Douglas
Lamar Jr.; Hadden, Mildred C.;
Handley, James E.; House, Barry
Lee; Howell, Margaret Lois B.; In-
gram, June J.; Jackson, A.P.; Kahl,
Carole L.; Kahl, William M.;
LaFrance, Donna A.; McDermott,
Daniel Joseph; Parker, Gall A.;
Parker, Lawrence E.; Powell, Eddie
Ray; Powell, Rita F.; Rich, Billy Joe
Jr.; Rogers, David S.; Rogers, David
Shelton; Rogers, Shirley A.; Sasser,
Brenda Diane; Smith, Clinton Knapp;
Tompson, David A.; White, Robert C.;
Wise, Mrs. Timothy; Zyski, Richard
A.; Zyski, Sherrie L.
PRECINCT ELEVEN
Avant, William E.; Burn, Pauline
Linda; Butler, Charles Calvin; Car-
tier, Carol Ann; Cartier, Joseph J. Jr.;
Childs, Kimberly Cherie; Collier, Len-
ward L.; Conger, Lenora; Cope, Alton
W. Jr.; Cope, Betty S.; Corley, Lynda
S.; Corley, Ted M.; Cramer, Susan L.;
Cricchio, Joseph; Douds, Sandra I.;
Dupree, Cynthia Ann; Dyer, Marilyn
Joyce; Dykes, Katie P.; Dykes,
Evelyn D.; Ford, Donna Joy; Gal-
breath, Karen R.; Galbreath, Ronald
J.; Godwin, Brenda B.; Griffin, Mrs.
C. J.; Harrison, Tony V.; Howell, Mrs.
Pervis A.; Jenkin, Angela Deneen;
Kelley, Wilma W.; Kennedy, Vallie;
lansford, Edna B.; Lattner, Brena-
dine Rae; Leche, Emile J.; Leche,
Lorna G.; Lemieux, Adele Rose;
Levins, Mary Ellen; Linda, Rosie M.;
Macomber, Sharon Wilson;
Macomber, Stephen D.; Martin,
Loretta F.; Maxwell, John D.; May,
Frank; Morales, Katherine R.;
Nielson, Toni.Belinda; Nix, Rebecca
L.; Nix, Tommy H.; Nolen, Mary
Helen; Norris, Doyle E.; Norris,
James V.; Nugent, Rebecca L;
Parisi, Gina Lee; Perry, Martin D.;
Perry, Pamela K.; Philyaw, Wilda
Eleene; Philyaw, Robert Eugene; Pit-
tman, Jewel W.; Reeves, Les N.;
Rich, David M.; Saylors, William M.;
Shoaf, Ruth B.; Silvia, Marlene;
Smith, Patricia J.; Stevens, Graham
Elwood Jr.; Taylor, S.J.; Taylor, Troy
Edward; Thomason, Carolyn R.;
Thompson, Joseph E.; Thompson,
Ralph Gregory; Waters, John H.;
Watford, James Edward; Watford,


Panel discussions on time-
ly topics take place annually
in the English Language Arts
Program at Port St. Joe Jr. -
Sr. High School.
Students in Mrs. Margaret
Biggs' classes vote on topics


I I
.-.h




S'i













Word Pr

Students enrolled in Com-
puter Literacy Applications
class at Port St. Joe High
School have begun a unit of
study to learn how to use the
computer for word process-
ing.
A word processing pro-
gram is one that allows text
material to be entered, cor-
rected, added or deleted, and
printed in a desired form, all
electronically. The students
are using a program called
Appleworks that will allow
them to produce professional


Farmer Ends
Basic Training
Michael Farmer son of Ms.
Jeweline Farmer graduated
from Basic Training in Or-
lando on December 20. He is
presently attending school in
Orlando. He is also listed in
the 1984-85 Who's Who
Among American High
School Students.
Michael is the grandson of
Mr. and Mrs. Cuthbert
Farmer.


that have the highest interest
to the class as a whole.
Each student then lists his
choices in order of prefer-
ence. Most students usually
serve on the panel of their
helice.


processing

documents.
Word processing pro
are being widely u
offices of all kinds
homes these program
extensively used. Th


Eye Openers

by Dr. Wesley Grace

A SECOND PAIR
You wouldn't consider go-
ing on a trip without a spare
tire or extra shirts and socks.
Why rely on just one pair of
glasses when they are a
necessity for the things you
have to do?
For most eyeglass wearers
a second pair of glasses is
essential. Some people find it
convenient to keep a dupli-
cate up-to-date pair in an
office desk or in the car's'
glove compartment. Some
order a second pair of lenses
for the old frames every time
there is a prescription
change. hey realize that a
second pair is not an extra-
vagance, but an investment
in peace of mind and good
vision.
Contact lens wearers
should also have a second
pair. Soft contact lenses may
rip at inopportune times, and
many a contact lens has gone
down a sink drain, never to
be retrieved again.
A second pair of eyeglasses
or contact lenses doesn't take
up much room, but can make
a big difference in your
comfort and vision at the
most unexpected times.
Brought to you as a com-
munity service by:

Dr. Wesley Grace

322 Long Avenue
Phone 227-1410


Shown here are students
whose topic is Terrorism.
Chairing the group is John
Murnan. Members include
Christy Arthur, Jay Rish, Ed
Whaley, and John Treglown.


Theresa Cain, Joy Davis,
Ben Linton, Heather McLe-
more, Lisa Scott, Cherry
Sirmons, Amy Davilla, Misty
Garrett, Anthony Lee, Casi
Lindsey, Carrie Redmon,
Sheneka Noble, Michale
Stringfellow and Lonnie
Wymes.
Sixth Grade


Planning Party

for Graduation
There will be a Project
Graduation parent meeting
Monday, January 27 at the
Portrat. 4JJoe High School
commons area.
Parents of seniors are
urged to attend this meeting.


Card of Thanks
We would like to thank the
people of Port St. Joe for
your thoughtfulness shown us
at the loss of our loved one.
Your prayers, visits,
cards, food and flowers have
meant so much.
May God bless each of you.
The family of,
Gordon Thomas


Catch the Sp rit
STHE UNITEDMETHODIST CHURCH


Constitution and
Monument
Port St. Joe


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH

SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .................... 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP...................... 7:00 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP ........ 6:00P.M.
CHILDREN'S CHOIR (Wednesday) .......... 7:00 P.M.
CHANCEL CHOIR REHEARSAL(Wed.) ..... ,7:30 P.M.
MINISTERS: Alvin.N. Harbour, Jr.
Harry C. Johnson


dents who go on to college
will find their knowledge of
work processing very useful
in the writing and printing of
term papers and other as-
ograms signments. Students who go
sed in directly to work in offices
and in will have an edge on others
ns are entering the job market
ie stu- because of their ability to
utilize word processing tech-
niques.


If you can afford new car payments, you can afford
this new home... only $289.50 per month!
Sx~-- 2 --
SJames W Walter. Chairman of the Board rO _r
KITCHEN DINING
9 08 4
HALL 22
24 ---
MASTE R 118 13
BEDROOMM I1 BEDROOM




You can own the three-bedroom, two-bath American, one of my
newest models, at our SPECIAL 40th Anniversary price of...
SONLY $289.50 CASH or
$29199 ONLY $289.50 per mo. financed


IT'S TRUE! We can build this home
on your property and your monthly
payment will be only $289.50 for 20
(NOT 30) years. Your home will be
completely paid for after only 240
payments.
No, this is NOT a "shell" home. Even
at this low package price, the three-
bedroom, two-bath American model
will be finished 90% complete,
including Trane forced-air heating.
Just install your choice of floor
covering, paint interior walls and
trim, connect to outside utilities
and move in.


Here's What's Included:
* Complete outside finished (No
walks, driveways, or landscaping)
* Pier and precast base foundation
* Double floors Complete wiring to
local codes All plumbing including
kitchen and bath with tub and
shower All walls finished with wall
board ready to be painted
* Sheathing under siding Insulation:
3V2" (R-10) in walls and floor, 6"
(R-19) in ceiling All inside doors
and trim FORCED AIR HEAT BY
TRANE


You may choose additional options,
such as air conditioning, at extra
cost. However at our SPECIAL
package price, you may not delete
any of the above items.

No Down Payment
to qualified property owners
O/ annual
0 percentage rate
Fixed Mortgage Financing
for this and ALL other models


AT THIS PRICE. NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY OUR STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS MEET MOST CODES. HOWEVER, IF STATE OR LOCAL CODES
REQUIRE ADDITIONAL FOUNDATION. FRAMING OR OTHER MODIFICATIONS. AN ADDITIONAL CHARGE WILL BE NECESSARY


be`"*'
AT


Jim ater HOMES
0. :w.P....


Call Toll Free 1-800-4-WALTER
(1-800-492-5837) for free brochure


H&R BLOCK
THE INCOME TAX PEOPLE

New Location 228 Reid Ave.

Complete Tax Preparation
Accounting
Call 229-8307 for an appointment
OPEN MONDAY thru SATURDAY


L


,Discussing Timely Topics







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY. JAN. 23, 1986


Os ESTATE


I OR :RN:


For Sale: St. Joe Beach, Furnished trailer for sale
2,400 sq. ft, home 400' from or rent at Overstreet. Call
beach. First floor perfect for 648-5306. tfc 1/16
small business, beautiful No need for wet carpets.
view, $125,000. Call 6488671.
tfc 1/9 Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
House to Sell: 511 Wood- machine. St. Joe Furniture.
ward Ave., needs some 227-1251. tfc 1/2
work, good price. Call 2 bedroom, 1 bath trailer
229-65Q6 after 6 p.m. at St. Joe Beach. 648-5361.
For Sale by Owner: Nice tfc 1/9
home in nice neighborhood For Rent: St. Joe Beach, 3
E located near schools. Home bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car car-
includes 3 bdrm., 2 ba.,
"large" great groom, effi- port, completely furnished,
washer, dryer, microwave;
ciency kitchen, formal din. w d m
ciency kitchen, formal din. etc. Year around rental only.
rm., laundry rm., dbl. car Call Charles at 229-8282,
'garage, and Ig. deck in back. after 5, 678417. 9
House sits on 1 lots located after 5, 67
Sat 2005 Juniper Ave. Priced 1
at $69,800. HOuse includes Room for Rent: By day,
many extras! Shown 'by week, month. Air cond., TV.
appt. only. Absolutely no. Thames Hotel 229-8723. 302
drop ins. Call Glen Combs Reid Ave. tfc 1/2
for appt. 227-1689. For Rent: Mini-warehouse
tfe1/7 storage. For more informa-
For Sale by Owner: 3 tioncall229-6332. tfc 1/2
bdrm., 2 bath house. Call B H C i
229-8821 or 227-7400. Blue Haven Condos in Gulf
tfc 12/19 Aire, 2 ba., fully loaded kit-
chen, ice maker, etc., wash-
For Sale: 5 yr. old brick er, dryer, ceiling fan, deck.
home on a lot% near schools. priv. den, etc. Rent furnish-
3 bdrms., 2 baths, liv. rm., ed, 375 monthly. 674-4455,
formal din. rm., kitchen, den 674-5863 or 674-8465.
with fireplace, dbl. car tfc 12/19
garage, sep. utility rm.,
cypress privacy fence. Pric- 2 bedroom mobile home-
ed at $75,000. Call 229-8732. for rent, $180 per month, St.
4t 1/23 Joe Beach.Call 648-8862.
St. Joe Beach, Santa Anna tfc 1/2
Ave., 2 bedroom, 2 full bath, Mobile home lot at St. Joe
2 story home with all around Beach. $75 per month. Call
deck and porch. Satellite, 648-8862. tfc 1/2
stove, refrig., washer & 2 bedroom apartment for
-dryer. Appt. only $47,500. rent, $265 per mo. Call
648-5352. 4tp 1/16 rent, $265 per m. Call
48352229-6509 after 6:00,
6 room house on 2 lots, tfnc 1/2
$8,500. Contents extra. See at
g08 2nd Avenue, Highland, For Rent: St. Joe Beach. 1
..View. 1973 Ford, not runn- bedroom apartment, 1 block
ing, $100; ltp 1/23 from beach. Stove & refrig.
SVFor Sale by Owners: finished, deposit, no pets.
;ome at 1309 Woodward 229-8747 or 227-1450.
SAv If interested call- y. 98 & 28th St., Mexico
81. ,<-i K* 2 ''clTiibdrm., 1 b. Wall.
3t 1/16 ing distance to beach and
: .shopping, cen. h&a, washer
hook-up, dishwasher, 3 ceil-
ing fans, new vinyl. $265 per
.month. Call 904/385-7714
weekdays, 648-8789 weekend
: evenings, or 575-3624 week-
day evenings. tfc 1/2
3 bdrm. unfurnished house
in White City. Deposit re-
quired. No pets. Call after 6.
S29-6825. tfc 10/3


m
1 bdrm. furnished aparet-
ment at 1508 .Long Ave.
Deposit required. No pets.
Call after 6. 229-6825.
tfc 10/3
2 bedroom furnished
trailer on Sea Street, St. Joe
Beach. No pets. Deposit re-
quired. Call after 6:30,
229-6825. tfc 1/9





Help Wanted: Top of the
Gulf Restaurant needs wait-
resses and dishwasher. Call
648-8140 day or 648-5275 even-
ings & nights.
Wanted: 5 ladies who want
to work to replace 5 who
don't. For more information
call. 227-1766.
Mature women to keep
children in their own home
on the beaches. Call 648-5173,
references required.
2t 1/16
Local person interested in
running national franchise
for owner. Could be done
part time to -start. Send
background information to
Chem Dry of Bay County., P.
0. Box 9553, Painama City
Beach, FL 32407.
2tc 1/19
POSITION VACANCY
Teacher Aide at Port St.
Joe Elementary School:
Salary range is determined
by the approved salary sche-
dule. Written application is
required, however, if you
have applied for an Aide
position at this school during
the 1985-86 school year, your
application is on file and will
be considered, so re-applica-
tion is not necessary. Appli-
cation frmsare available at
the school office. The contact
is the.Prcipal Gerald Lew-
er. ui l Coudnty School
Board is an equal opportun-
ity employer: Deadline for
applications is January 24,
1986. i 1 2t /16
Avon workers needed to
sell Avon products. Call Mrs.
L. Z. Henderson at 227-1281.
tfc 1/9
GOVERNMENT JOBS
$16,040 $59,230/yr. Now Hir-
ing. Call 1-805-687-6000, ext.
R-6859 for current federal
list. 8tp 1/23


LOST: January 16 around
Highland 'Vfew Jr. store:
Small-medium size female
dog. Part Chihuahua, short
It. brownish-blonde hair,
long body. Has to have
medicine every day.
Answers to the name Miran-
da. REWARD offered with
no questions asked. Call
229-8379, or come by blue &
white trailer behind H.V. Jr.
Last seen in my yard behind
Jr. Please, I must have her
back. She wasn't wearing a
collar.





Yard Sale: Sat., Jan. 25,
St. Joe Beach. Corner Hwy.
98 & Bay St. 9:00 a.m.
Yard Sale: Friday and
Saturday, Santa Anna St., St.
Joe Beach.
Yard Sale: Thursday from
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Sofa,
tables, bikes, lots of chil-
dren's clothes & misc. items.
401 16th St.
Yard Sale: Baby fur-
niture, crafts supplies,
frames, dolls, doll house,
various household items. 6th
St., Mexico Beach. 8:00 a.m.
CST until. Saturday, Jan.
25th.
Yard Sale: 2nd St.,
Highland View. Saturday, 8
a.m. to 12. No early sales.
Dishes, clothes, books, misc.
Huge 4-Family Yard Sale.
Lots of good items at terrific
buys. Books, dishes, clothes,
appliances, and furniture,
just to name a few. Satur-
day, Jan. 21. 8 a.m. 1 p.m.
1001 Marvin Avenue, Port St.
Joe.


Changing table, white
wicker, $50; antique oak
chest of drawers, $160.
227-1299 after 4:00.
Superbowl Special! 25"
Sylvania color console, $175.
Very good condition.
229-8682.
Mobile home, 2 bedrooms,
1 bath, 3 ceiling fans, washer
'& dryer hook-up. Good
shape, $4,500. Call Ron at
227-7336 for more informa-
tion. 4t 1/23
FREE: Fine looking pup-
pies, ready to go. Free to
good home. Call 229-8803.
Chrome & glass dinette
set. Octagon shaped table, 4
chairs with brown cotton
velour, $75. 229-6573.
For Sale or Trade for used
car: Large utility trailer.
Call 648-8852.
2tc 1/23
Apartment size Magic
Chef gas range, avocado col-
or, good cond. & clean. $75
cash. 648-580.
Beauty shop equipment for
sale. Call 229-8000 after 5.
p.m. tfc 1/23
AVON
to buy or sell. Cal Mrs. L. Z.
Henderson, 227-1281.
tfc 1/23
Couch and love seat, tan
background with shrimp and
blue flowers. About 9 month
sold. Excellent cond. $450.
229-8587 after 5 p.m.
Check K and D TV and.
Sound for your hunting equip-
ment. CB radios, antennas,
and antenna hardware sup-
plies. tfc 11-14
S$25.00 REWARD
for Any Sewing Machine
We Cannot Repair
SPECIAL -- $9.95
to clean, oil and adjust ten-
sion onyour sewing-iaclh-'
ine. We guarantee your
machine can sew on any
fabric.
The Sewing Room
410A Reid Avenue
227-1151
tfc 6/7
Home bar, has to be seen
to be appr e iated. Call for
appointment, 227-1296.
tfc 1/2
Motorcyle: 1981 CB Honda
Custom 900. Adjustable
windshield & backrest. Low.
mileage, excel. cond. $1,200.
Call 648-5087. 2tc 1/16
Used window air condi-
tioner Sears 20,000 btu, $150.
Call 2296805.




SIGNS
Boyer Signs
648-8442
billboards Boat, Trck
a Window Letterlan
Lighted, Magnetic a Routed Signa
Plastc a Styrofoam Letters
Camera Ready Art & Logoa


1965 Ford Mustang, 289
V-8, auto. trans., $2,000. Call
after 5.648-8579. tfc 1/23
1957 MERCURY New
engine, new.paint, new tires,
new brakes, new battery,
new voltage regulator. Ex-
cellent mechanical condition
and complete records. Best
offer over $2,000,. Contact
Dave Odum, phone 227-1121
or 227-1484. tfc 1/2
1980 Bonneville, p.s., p.b.,
p.w. c.c., beige with brown
vinyl top. Call 229-6806.
tfc 12/5


NOTICES


ATTENTION:
STUDENTS AGES 1;
you are interested in
the Jr. Fire Dept. of
Beach contact Fire
Frank Hall at 648-561
5:00 p.m.
There will be a r
communication of P
Joe Lodge No. 111, F
every first and third
Sday at 8:00 p.m.
Greg Godwin, W.M.
Billy D. Barlow, Sec.




CARPET CLEAN
$20.00
Average living ro
John Oakley
227-1294

I will babysit, do
work or stay with
derly, 5 days a wee
Elizabeth Thon
229-8915.


3-17. If
joining
Mexico
Chief
6 after
2t 1/23
regular
ort St.
.&A.M.


WILL DO CARPENTER
WORK of ALL TYPES
Remodeling, Roofing
Painting
Vinyl Siding & Soffit Work
Mobile Home Repairs
Also Minor Plumbing &
Electrical Repairs
22 years experience
648-8651
tfc 12/12
MUTUAL OF OMAHA
Are you paying top much for
your health insurance? Call
Mr. Hill at 648-8557.
tfc 2/20
JOE ADAMS
CONSTRUCTION
Any Type Building
Commercial Residential
State Uc. No. RG0027009
Located across from Health
Dept.
408 Long Avenue
2294380
Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M. E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8,:00 P.M. E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church


Thurs-
COSTIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St, Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 7/4



NG Psychological services for
anyone with problems in
om day-to-day living. Gulf Coun-
ty Guidance Clinic, Port St.
tfc 1/9 Joe, 227-1145 (24 hours)
We buy, sell and trade us-
house- ed furniture. Get good prices
the el- for your unwanted furniture.
Ak. Call Country Peddler. 229-8966.


2pson,
2t 1/23
U


3 ROOMS
CARPET
CLEANED
$39.95
Living room, Dining Room,
& Hall, or Great Room up
to 270 sq. ft.
Deep soil extraction
available for extremely
dirty carpets.

Call Today for This Special
Introductory Offer


* Dry Foam Method
* Fast Drying
* No Shrinking -t
* No Browning





LISTOM
LEAN
648-8891
Out of Town Call Collect


anyt inQ or


everything

That's right, you can
sell a personal or
household item or the
entire household if
you wish by placing
one ad in the Classi-
fieds. Thousands of
eager customers read
the Classifieds
every day.It is a trea-
sure for budget-
minded buyers. Let
our Classified service
person help you write
a clever ad and
just listen to your
phone ring.
227-1278
THE STAR


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Mon.-Sat., 8Ei.m. 8 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off


WE MOVE
MOBILE HOMES
Insured, Our Work
Guaranteed
Service Work Skirting
Buy and sell mobile home
axles & tires.
639-5645
tfc 11/7




Wauneta's
Accounting &
Income Tax
Wauneta Brewer
St. Joe Beach
648-5043
tf 5/86









nr II *as someln." g 1 a fi

Rmd^Bug'
kills bugs for
up to six months,

and saves you about $100 yearly
in costly pest control services.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
tfc 7/4


WILDER
Clean-Up & Hauling
648-8543
Clean up yards, job sites,
outbuildings, etc., and haul
away. Free estimates.
Reasonable cost. tfc 1/9
CAR WASHING
Complete Detailing Service
Competitive Rates
JOHN OAKLEY
227-1294
tfc 1/9



St. Joseph Bay
Constructiorq
Aidunt l ,





W. S.(Biff)Quaries
CUSTOM HOMES
MULTI-FAMILY
229-8795
RG0040048


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reld Avenue t 7/


SPACEVIEW
SATELLITE
SYSTEMS
Sales, Service and
Installation
FCC Licensed Technicians
FRANK RITCH
227-1590


REAL ESTATE
APPRAISING
Margelyn G. Woodham,
MRA
Hours: 9-5 Mon.- Fri.
648-8231 or 227-7260
Appraisals ordered by Tues-
day P.M. will be completed
by Monday next. Please
allow five working days for
your appraisal to be com-
pleted. Your business is
greatly appreciated.
tfc11/7

BOB'S SMALL
ENGINE REPAIR
Tillers, Chain Saws, Lawn
Mowers & Weed Eaters
Atlantic St., St. Joe Beach
648-5106
tfc 1/2


GULF
SATELLITE
SYSTEMS
SALES,
SERVICE& .
INSTALLATION



NORMAN BIXLER
Phone 229.8171


ELIZABETH'S
CERAMICS

SGreenware
Firing
Supplies
6 miles south of Wewa
Highway 71
Phone 639-2807


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle
HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue
tfc 7/4


The Sewing Room
410 A Reid Avenue Noy
4pP" Port St. Joe, Florida a O

'Quality Fabrics at Affordable Prices"




Hagan Painting
Contractor
Quality Work at Affordable Prices
Commercial & Residential
Pressure Cleaning for Grime & Mildew
FREE ESTIMATES
LARRY HAGAN
Phone 648-8729




'..




HANNON REALTY, Inc.
(904) 227-1450
FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Evenings and Weekends:
Margaret Hale 648-5659
FrancesChason- 229-8747 Roy Smith
Larry McArdle 227-1551
HOMES
Port St. Joe: New Listing: 3 bedroom, 2 bath, family room, outside shop
or office, carport, plenty of space, $60,000.
Port St. Joe: NEW LISTING: Nice corner lot, 3 bedroom. 1 bath. 2 screen
porches, attached apt garage, $26,500.
Port St. Joe: NEW LISTING: 2 bedroom, 2 bath, den, separate dining room.
garage. $37.500.
Port St. Joe: NEW LISTING: 3 bedroom. 1 bath, on 2 lots, fireplace, carport,
real pine paneling throughout. 1 mile from Gulf, close to school. church.
and town. Assumable mortgage. $37,200.
Port St. Joe: 4 bedroom, 1 bath frame house on 2 lots, cen. h&a. fenced
yard. $37.000.
Port St. Joe: Large two story house on corner lot. 4 bdrms.. 1 % bath. Chain
link fence, new roof. $37.500.
Port St. Joe: Good neighbor, o ledV 1 /2 bath. den. fireplace.
patlh, outside storage, two Il. I S
Highland View: Excellent vieo 2 room, 1 bath stucco. Possible
owner financing, $32,000. 2, I Possib
Oak Grove: House in excellent condition, 3 bdrm., 2 bath. Screen porch.
outside storage, shaded lot. $37,000.
Ward Ridge, Like new 3 bedrock jtfth f ened porch, carpet, heat
pump, 1%V landscaped lots on corMe OlnTi m fence. $49,500.
Port St. Joe: Older home in good condition. 2 or 3 bdrms.. 1% ba. Outside
workshop or efficiency apt., covered patio and carport, only $38.000.
Port St. Joei Good rental property at 1610 Long. 3 bedroom. 1 bath. $29.500.
ort St. Joe: Masonry home in tip top shape. 2 bedroom. 1 bath, carport.
nice yard, $45,000.
Port St. Joe; Brick home only 3 yrs old. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. fireplace, garage.
screened porch, $62,000.
Port St. Joe: Stays rented, 2 bedroom. 1 bath, fenced yard. $27,000.
White City: Stqcked fish pond and house on 5 acres. $40.000.
Howards Creek: Large 2 story home with plenty of room. 5 bedrooms. 2
bath. $47,900.
Mexico Beach: Beachside of Hwy. 98. Duplex, good for investment or rental
property. $94,500.
St. Joe Beach: Large frame home, newly remodeled, 3 bedroom. 2 bath,
fireplace, $50,000.
St. Joe Beach: Excellent buy 3 bedroom, 2 bath house on Hwy. 98. Extra lot
on Desoto. $80,000.
St. Joe Beach: Almost new stilt house. 2 bedroom, '1 bath. carport.
$69,500.
St. Joe Beach: Townhouse with super view, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace.
decks, parking.
LOTS
St. Joe Beach: Corner Coronado & Americus, $15,000.
Stonemlll Creek Area: 40 acres, cleared $40,000.
Gulf AIre: Gulf front 65'x180', $55,900.
St. Joe Beach: 3 lots 50'x125' each, 1 block from water, $45,000.
Mexico Beach: 100'xl00' with water hook-up $8,800.
Ward Ridge: Lot 75'x150', $6,600.
JoneO Homestead: 2 acres, $8,400.
St. Joe Beach: 1 lot on Balboa 50'x125' $16,000.
Overstreet 2 acre plots on canal, $24,000.
St. Joseph Shores: 80' Gulf Front,.Hwy. 98 to water.
Wewahltchka: 80 acres east of town, $69,000.
Port St. Joe: Close to business district 50x170', $8,000.
St. Joe Beach: Large tract 231' on Highway and waterfront.'
White City: 1 acre on canal at bridge, $33,300.


REEVES FURNITURE &

REFINISHING SHOPPE
REFERENCES Phone 229-6374


Call and Talk to Us About Getting
Your Furniture Refinished to
Look Like New.
Across from Duren's Economy Store,
Highway 98


Southern Erectors, Inc.
EQUIPMENT RENTAL
BOOM CRANES AIR COMPRESSORS
BACKHOES WELDING EQUIPMENT
DUMP TRUCKS
sa Phone Day 227-1570
A* Night 648-8417


SERVICES


PAGE NINE











It's Time to Begin Making Plans for Planting

Mulching, Staking, Grazing, Trunk Wrapping, Improve Life Expectancy mfl iali.i-


by Roy Lee Carter
Chances of a successful
tree planting can be in-
creased by mulching, staking
or guying and trunk wrap-
ping.
Mulch applied around a
newly set plant reduces soil
temperature fluctuations,
prevents crusting of the soil,
conserves moisture and
helps to control weeds. Com-
mon mulch materials in-
cludes leaves, pine needles,
compost, bark, wood chips,
sawdust and bagasse. Peat
should not be used since once
dry it is very difficult to wet
and may restrict water
movement into the soil. Inor-
ganic materials like glass
wool, gravel and crushed
stone can also be used.
Some organic mulches,
like fresh sawdust, are de-
composed rapidly by soil
microorganisms. These mi-
croorganisms remove nitro-
gen from the soil, and when


CARTER
soil nitrogen has been deple-
ted, plants become deficient
and turn yellow. Application
of additional nitrogen ferti-
lizer to the mulched area will
prevent this problem. Am-
monium sulfate can be ap-
plied at 1-2 pounds per 100
square feet of planting bed.
SKeep a small circular area
around the stem of plants
free of mulch. Mulches


HIGHLAND VIEW

BAPTIST CHURCH
Comer of Fourth St. and Second Ave.
Welcome Friend
SUNDAYSCHOOL ...................... 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICE ......... 11:00 A.M. & 7:00 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) .............. 6:00 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER(Wednesday) .......... 7:00 P.M.
Nursery Provided JIMMY CLARK, Pastor
c


against the stem of plants
may increase the chance of
stem rot.
Trees or shrubs with a
large canopy can be injured
by winds before, their roots
become established. Many
need to be staked until the
roots anchor the plant. Even
slight root ball movement
can break new roots and slow
plant establishment. Stakes
can also protect tree trunks
from mower injury.
Trunk movement is neces-
sary for the development of a
strong and well proportioned
trunk. Rigid staking and
guiding will interfere with
trunk movement and reduce
proper supportive tissue.
Staking should allow some
trunk movement, however,
the stakes should be rigid.
Ties should be somewhat
flexible and at one level on
the stem.
Trees with trunk diameters
less than two inches can
usually be supported by a
single 2x2 inch wood stake.
Trees two to three inches in
diameter require two to three
stakes for good support. The
stakes should be placed next
to the soil ball and 18 inches
below the soil ball before the
tree is planted. The length of
the stakes should be deter-
mined by the height of the
tree. They should be as short
as possible yet tall enough to
hold the tree upright. The
tree can be attached to the


ome Tow Care At Its Best!
Home Town Care At Its Best!


S. H. Ebeid, M.D.

Pediatrician


Expanded Office Hours

To meet the needs of his pediatric patients and their families in
Port St. Joe, S. H. Ebeid, M.D., is happy to announce that he
will expand his office hours in the Southeast wing of Gulf Pines
Hospital to include Saturdays as. well as Wednesdays. The office
will open from 9:00 A.M. until 1:00 P.M. on Saturdays effective
January 25, 1986. After obtaining his M.D. degree, Doctor Ebeid
completed his internship and residency in pediatrics at South
Baltimore General Hospital and completed a fellowship in
pediatric cardiology at the Medical College of Virginia. Doctor
Ebeid recently relocated his practice to Northwest Florida from
Ada, Oklahoma, and is married and has two children. He is
Board Certified in Pediatrics and Board Eligible in Pediatric Car-
'diology, a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and a
member of the American College of Cardiology.

No Appointment Necessary

Southeast Wing Gulf Pines Hospital
102 20th Street
Telephone: (904) 227-1121
OFFICE HOURS:
Wednesday (9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.)
Saturday (9:00 A.M. 1:00 P.M.)

l4o


' Gulf Pines Hospital
Another
Basic
meican 227-1121
Medical
Company
An Affiliate of Health Care Management Corp., Columbus, GA


supporting stakes with hose-
covered cable or wire. Check
ties periodically for tree
injury and to determine if
support is still needed.
Larger trees, four inches
or larger in diameter at chest
height, should be guided with
three to four wires or cables.
The guide wires are secured
to deeply driven short stakes
evenly spaced six to eight
feet from the base of the tree.
Guide wires should be run
through rubber hose and
attached to the trunk at only
one level. Secure the guy
wires to the stakes so they


Up to half of the Social
Security benefits received by
people in 1985 may be subject
to Federal income tax, but
mainly only for those who
had substantial income in
addition to their benefits.
In fact, we expect that only
one person in ten will actual-
ly have to pay any tax on any
part of his or her Social
Security benefits.
Every person who received
or repaid any Social Security
benefits in 1985 will receive
Form SSA-1099, Social Secur-
ity Benefit Statment, before
the end of January. The form
will show the net amount of
Social Security benefits re-
ceived in 1985 and this is the
figure a person should use to
figure if any of his or her
benefits are subject to tax.
IRS Notice 703 will be
included with Form SSA-
1099, and this work sheet can
be used to see if any benefits
are taxable.
Up to half of a person's
Social Security benefits may
be subject to tax if his or her
combined income taxable
income plus nontaxable in-
terest plus one half the Social
Security benefits exceeds
a. base amount. The base
amount is:
$25,000 if a person'files as a
single taxpayer;
$32,000 for a married cou-
ple filing jointly; or
$0 for a married person
filing a separate return if he

Two Errors In
Honor Roll List
Two names were listed
incorrectly in the list of honor
roll students for Port St. Joe
Elementary School last
week.
Listed incorrectly were
Jennifer Walker who made
all A's and Jennifer Hays
who was on the A&B honor
roll. Both are second grade
students.

Bozeman Is
Outstanding
Gregory Bruce Bozeman
has been selected for inclu-
sion in the 1985 edition of
"Outstanding Young Men of
America."
Gregory is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Clyde Bozeman of
Wewahitchka.

Onions will stay firm long-
er and keep from sprouting
if you wrap them individ-
ually in aluminum foil.

GOOD
41EASONS
to see your good
neighbor agent


CAR HOME
LIFE HEALTH

BILL WOOD
411 Reid Ave.
229-6514 or 229-6103
I ike Ia good neighbor.
Srtit, Form is there.




INSURANCE COMPANIES
HoM. Office: Blool. toe. UllaoI.
mm~mmmmImmImm


may be tightened peri
ly. Guy wires can b
tight by twisting the w
by using turnbuckles.
the support wires with
materials to prevent
dents. Frequent insp
will determine whe
supports are no longer
ed.
Large transplanted
require support if not
planted. They can b
ported with guide wi
wood supports. Wooc
ports should not be-na
the palm. Instead,
three boards about for


or she lived with his
.spouse any part of 19
The amount of b
subject to tax if cor


income exceeds the base
amount is the smaller of:
One-half of the amount
over the base amount; or
One-half of the Social Se-
curity benefits.
If combined income does
not exceed the base amount,
no Social Security benefits
are subject to tax.
People can get the answers
to questions about the infor-
mation on the benefit state-
ment by calling the toll free
telephone number 1-900-200-
1099. Questions about figur-
ing taxable income or figur-
ing taxes should be directed
to the nearest Internal Reve-
nue Service office. The tele-
phone number of the nearest
IRS office is shown on the
back of the IRS worksheet.
A free publication, Publi-
cation 915, explains the en-
tries on Form SSA-1099 and
how to figure if benefits are
taxable. A free copy can be

obtained at any Social Secur-
ity or IRS office.


odical- long in layers of burlap and
e kept fasten these to the trunk of
'ires or the palm with wire. Then nail
Mark support posts to the padded
bright boards being careful that the
t acci- nails do not penetrate into the
sections trunk of the tree.
n the Protect the trunks and
r need- large branches of newly
planted trees with tree wrap.
palms Wrapping prevents moisture
deeply loss from the trunk and
e sup- protects tender bark from
res or sunscald. Burlap is a good
d sup- trunk wrapping material and
iiled to is available in 2,4, and 6 inch
wrap widths for easy application.
ur feet Several trunk wrapping pa-
pers are available in similar
widths. These paper wrap-
pings are waterproof and
usually last two seasons.
Begin wrapping at the
ground and spiral the tree
wrapping material around
the trunk up to and including
the. first major branches.
Overlap each layer by a half
width. Tie the wrap at the
top, bottom and two feet
intervals in between with
or her twine or heavy cord. Inspect
85. the cord or twine often to
benefitss avoid damaging the bark of
nbined the tree.


Heating & Air, Major Appliance Repair
Plumbing & Electrical Work
229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle
ER0007623. RF0040131. RA0043378 tc 1119


Gal 5:22-23



T TEMPERANCE (
LL uj

z I-
z
10Z

GOODNESS

FAITH


HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD
319 Sixth St, Highland View
"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"
SUNDAYSCHOOL ..... 10:DOA.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .. 11:00A.M.
EVENINGWORSHIP ... 6:00P.M:
WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00 P.M.
PASTOR C. W. WHITAKER


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943

Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds

8:30 till 6:00 Monday through Friday


221 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-1133


We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent
I?


FRANK HANNON, Agent


Some Social


Sec. Benefits


Subject to Ta:


I ,


PAGE TEN


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23,1986






LIMIT RIGHTS RESERVED.
CIG. & TOBACCO PRODUCTS
EXCLUDED ON LIMIT ITEMS


'7I.111


SAVEWAY


510 Fifth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida


REAL VALUE


SOFT 2 LITER

DRINKS


NO BRAND 2-Ply Limit 3 with $10 Food Order


Paper Towels 3/119


2 Lb. Aunt Jemima Complete Reg. & Buttermilk
Pancake Mix...


$119


outh Florid YSTERS
Fresh Shucked U STERS
full pint $339
full pint


Betty Crocker 7 oz.$1 19 u
Hamburger Helper 1


Kraft 32 oz.
Miracle Whip


USDA Good Standing
RUMP ROAST .....
Lean
ALL MEAT STEW ..
Genuine Country Meaty
SMOKED HOCKS ..
Sunnyland
COOKED HAM.....


. Lb.
. Lb.
3 Lbs.
10 oz.


Lean
TURKEY HAM HALVES Lb.
Wlionsin Best Red & Black Rind
HOOP CHEESE...... Lb.
Fresh Water
CHANNEL CATFISH .. Lb.
Whole or Half
SMOKED HAM...... b.
10 Lb. Bucket
CHITTERLINGS ... Bucket
Sunnyland Breakfast
LINK SAUSAGE.... 200o.


Sunnyland
SLICED BACON....


$139
$159
$119
$199
$139
$179-
$189
99C
$499
$249
$159


Tupelo Maid Country Smoked
PORK $188
SAUSAGE lb.
FREE SAMPLES of FRESH COOKED
SAUSAGE FRIDAY & SATURDAY


USDA GOOD FAMILY PAK
STEAK SPECIALS


Fanyy R*
Chuck Steak
Family Pak
T-Bone Steak.


$1 39

Lb. 239


Family Pak
Sirloin Steak L..
Family Pak
Rib Eye Steakw.-


Family Pak
Cube Steak ..


b. 99
Lb. J


12 oz.


15 oz.
KELLOGG'S FROOT LOOPS ....
With Spray 22 oz.
PINE MAGIC CLEANER .......
Original Blend 4 lb. bag
PURINA CAT CHOW .........
nIrl i nDaItrnv


$179

690
$2 49


4% Oz. Scented for Face & Body
MONCEL SOAP .......
16 oz.
REAL VALUE TOMATOES
Real Value 5 Lb.
CORN MEAL MIX.....


form fresh


RUSSET "'

POTATOES Lbs.
Yellow Onions 3Ib. bag69.
cauliflower. head99
S5/$100
: Genuine Fla. Temple Oranges ........
.t Red Delicious Virginia Apples ...... 31b. bag
lifo5ia Navel Oranes 100
S. .. California Navel Oranges .......... I


HEEa CBBA
GREEN CABBAGE


51$100
Ibs.


e 0


at


* 0 .


$169


$179

$33?9


2/95C


..... 99c


Ajax Dish Liquid .... 32oz. '1.39
Real Value Pink Fab. Softner 128 OL 1.09
Arm & Hammer H.D. Liq. Detergent 32 .L 99,
Real Value Carpet Deodorizer 14.L 99e


~iis~d" I


----- V


*


II~~~~~I1I~1H


111111









PAGE FOURTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1986




Oysters Recovering



In Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass


Public


Notices

FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to Section 885.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Gulf County, Florida, four weeks after
the'first publication of this notice, the
fictitious name or trade name under
which they will be engaged in business
and in which said business is to be car-


neu on, o-wit:
CARPET COU
OF FLORI
Star Route 1,
Port St. Joe, Flo
PLIERS CARPET,

IN THE CIRCUIT C0
FOURTEENTH JU
CUITIN AND FOR GI
FLORIDA

IN RE: The Estate of
RALPH W. WARD
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMIT
TO ALL PERSONS HA
OR DEMANDS AG
ABOVE ESTATE ANI
PERSONS INTEREST
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HERE
that the administration
RALPH W. WARD,
number 86-2 is pending
Court of Gulf County, F
Division, the address o
Box 968, Port St. Joe
Personal Representati
is GERALDINE A. WA
dress is P. 0. Box 90
Florida 3246. The nan
9f the Personal Repr
trney are set forth be
All persons havir
demands against the-
,quired, WITHIN TH
THS FROM THE D
FIRST PUBLICATI
NOTICE to file with t
above Court a written
any claim or demand
Each claim must be
must indicate the bah
the name and address
or his Agent or Atl
amount claimed. If the
due, the date when it i
shall be stated. If th
fingent or unliquidate
hbe uncertainty shall I
Elaim is secured, the
Alescribed. The Claima
.lufficlent copies to the
the Clerk to mail one c
:onal Representative.
SAll persons interested
,to whom a copy of th
."ninistration.has been
quired, WITHIN THI
-:THS FROM THE D
:FIRST PUBLICATI
;rNOTICE. to file any
:may have that challer
-of th decedent's will
;tions of the personal n
=the venue or jurisdicti
* ALL CLAIMS, DEM
SECTIONSS NOT SO FI
:FOREVER BARRED.
SDate of the first pul
:Notice of Administrati
,January 16, 1986.
,as/ GERALDINE A. W
:Representative of the
.Estate of Ralph W. Wa
/s/ WILLIAM J. ISH
303 4th Street ,
:P.O.Box39 O
..Port St; Joe FL 32456
ATTORNEY FOR PEI
REPRESENTATIVE


FICTITOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to Section 865,09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Gulf County, Florida, four weeks after
the first publication of this notice, the
fictitious name or trade name under
which he will be engaged in business
and in which said business is to be car-
ried on, to-wit:
DAVIS BROS.
GENERAL CONST.
Palmetto Street
Overstreet, Florida 32453
Owners: John T. Davis,
SRichard P. Davis
648-5153 or 648-5680 tc1yg


INTRY NOTICE TO RECEIVE
IDA SEALED BIDS
Box 1i7 The Board of County Commisa
ridS 32456 of Gulf County will receive seal
INC., Owner from any person, company, o
4t1/16 porationinterestdlinsellingthe (
OURT OF THE the following described person
DICIAL CIR- perty:
DICIA One -V6401M Short Block Er
ULF COUNTY, for GMC truck.
CASE N 8 Bids will be received unt
CASE NO. 86-2 O'clock P.M., E.S.T., January 2
IN PROBATE t the office of the Clerk of
Court, 1000 Fifth Street, Port S
FL 32456. The Board reserves te
to reject any and all bids.
NISTRATION BOARD of COUNTY COMMIE
HAVING CLAIMS. ERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORI]
DAINST THE // Billy Branch, Chairman
D ALL OTHER
TED IN THE
I O IE NOTICE UNDER
BY NOTIFIED, FICTITIOUS NAMELAW
of theEstateof NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVE
deceased, file the undersigned, desiring to en
g in the Circuit business under the fictitious n
lorida, Probate STARMED PLAN at number
if whichisP.0.. Street, in the City of Port S
e, Florida. The Florida, intends to register tl
veoftheEstate name with the Clerk of the
AD, whose ad- Court of Gulf County, Florida.
2,'Port St. Joe, Dated at Columbus, Georgi
me and address 28th day of November, 1985.
esentative's at-
elow. s HEALTH CARE MANAGE
ng claims or CORPORATION,:
Estate are. re- .By: /s/ James F. Loudermilk,
BEE (3) MON- President
' 3TE OF TEW Byr/sJuneW. Reese,
ON OF THIS-- Assistant Secretary
the Clerk of the
an statement of
they may have. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0
: in writing and FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CI
is of the claim, OF THE STATE OF FLORII
Sof the creditor AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
torney and the Case Nc
Claim isnotyet ELOISE D. CAIN,
will become due Plaintiff,
e claim is con- and
d, the nature of OSCAR D. CHANCE and wife,
be stated. If the REBA D. CHANCE,
security shall be Defendants.
ant shall deliver NOTICE TO DEFEND
SClerkto enable TO: Mr. Oscar D. Chance
opytoeachPer- 6823 Huntbrook
Spring, Texas 77379
ed in the Estate Mrs. Reba D. Chance
is Notice of Ad- 6823 Huntbrook
Smiled are re- Spring, Texas 77379
REE (3) MON- YOU ARE HEREBY notified
ATE OF THE Complaint for Foreclosure he
ON s OF THIS filed against you; and, you;
objections they quired to serve a copy of your,
age the validity or pleading to sad Complaint
I, the qualifica' Ptlin'ff's attorney, .Hon. Herb
representative or Sapp, Jr., at Twenty East
on of the Court. Street, Panama City, Florida
ANDS AND OB- and, to file the original Ans
[LED WILL BE pleading in the office of the C
the Circuit Court of Gulf i
blication of this Florida, on or before the 30th
ion is Thursday, January, A.D., 1986. If youfailt
Judgment by default will be
VARD, Personal against you for the relief dema
said Complaint for Foreclosure
ard, deceased. DONE AND ORDERED at I
SJoe, Gulf County, Florida, ti
,. day of December, A.D;, 1985.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Gulf County Courthouse
RSONAL Port St. Joe, Florida' .
2t 1/16 Date of Publication: January S









Freeman Components,

INC.


HIGHWAY 98 WEST PHONE(904) 229-621
(Highway 98 west of Highland View)

Builders and Erectors of

Building Components

and Trusses

Built to your blueprint
specifications
WE DELIVER





RG0043684



Custom

S Building
NJ I to Your


Plans and Specifications



FREE ESTIMATES

20 YEARS EXPERIENCE


"Quality at A Reasonable Price



NEWMAN'S CONSTRUCTION Co.

Mexico Beach, Florida 648-566


Ed Joyce told Rotarians a
little more about oysters than
they probably cared to know
last Thursday, but he never
did say for definite sure,
what the Rotarians did want
to know-when are we going
to be able to get some
Apalachicola Bay oysters?
Joyce, Director of the
Division of Marine Resour-
ces for Florida, said all
indications are that some
oyster harvesting will be
allowed in Apalachicola Bay
early this year, but he didn't
say definitely that the state
was going to allow the
harvesting.
Joyce explained that Hur-
ricne Elena is the one which
did the oysters in. The
direction of Elena's winds
caused damage to the east-
ern portion of Apalachicola
Bay, which produces most of
the area oysters. The oyster


Disabled Vet.

Van In Area


N he Disabled American
,'N that
gagein Disaster Van will be in
ame of Apalachicola on January 25,
10220th 26 and 27 from 9:00 a.m. to
it. Joe,
e said 4:00 p.m. The Team will be at
Circuit the Franklin County Court-
i, ths house in the basement. All
war time service connected
MENT veterans and widows are
eligible'for this help. Bring
your DD14 or Honorable or
Medical discharge papers
with you.
4t1/16 The van will be in the
panhandle area on April 16.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
84-115 TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 84-175
IN RE: The Marriage of
BARRY F. BARBER,
Husband, Respondent,
And
BETTY JEAN SHAW BARBER,
Wife, Petitioner.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Barry F. Barber
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED a
that a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
s been has been filed against you and you are
ire re- requied : to serea opy of your
Answer Answer or other : sponse to the Peti-
on the tion-on Petitioner's Attorney: ..
bert P. ROBERT M. MOORE
Fourth P. O. Box 248
32401; Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
wer or and file the original thereof in the Cir-
lerk of cult Court Clerk's Office, Gulf County
county, Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida
day of 32456, on or before the 13th day of
Sdo so, February, 1986. If you fail to do so, a
taken Final Judgment for the relief sought
ended in may be granted by Default.
DATED this the 14th day of January,
'ort St. 1986.
is 20th JERRY GATES,
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Is/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
4t 1/23

,1988 Notice to Contractors
4 1/2Advertisement for Bids
Sealed bids in duplicate will be
S received until 4:00 P.M., E.T., Thurs-
day, February 13, 1986 by the Gulf
County School Board, Port St. Joe,
Florida, ~ t which time and place all
bids will be publicly opened and read
aloud for:
COVERED PLAY AREA
HIGHLAND VIEW
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
HIGHLAND VIEW, FLORIDA
The, Contractor shall furnish all
labor, materials and equipment; and
shall'be responsible for the entire com-
pletion of this project.
Plans, specifications, and contract.
documents may be inspected at the of-
fice of the Architect, State Road 22,
89 Wewahitchka, Florida, and may be
procured by General Contractors,
upon a deposit of $30.00 per set of plans
and specifications,'of which.the full
amount will be refunded to each
General Contractor who submits a bid
'and all other deposits for other than
one complete set of plans and
specifications will be returned less.
deduction to cover reproduction cost of
$15.00. All documents must be return-
ed in good condition within ten (10)
days after the date of opening of bids.
Cashier's check; certified check, or
bid bond, for not less than 5: of the
amount of bid, must accompany each
proposal.
Performance, labor and material
bond, and worker's compensation in-
surance will be required of the suc-
4 cessful bidder.
Right is reserved to reject any or all
proposals and waive technicalities.
No bidder may withdraw his bid for
a period of thirty (30) days after date
set for opening.
Walter Wilder, Superintendent
Gulf County School Board
Port St. Joe, Flor'sa
Charles A. Gaskin, ARA
P. O. Box 7
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 85-141
MEXICO BEACH CORPORATION,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VIRGINIA P. TROUT and
HARMON'S HEAVY EQUIPMENT
COMPANY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment dated
December 4th, 1985, in Case No. 85-141
of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County,
Florida, in which MEXICO BEACH
CORPORATION, INC., is the Plain-
tiff, and VIRGINIA P. TROUT and
HARMON'S HEAVY EQUIPMENT
COMPANY are the Defendants, the
undersigned Circuit Court Clerk shall
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the front door of the Gulf Coun-
ty Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida,
at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern time) on
February 6,1986, the real property set


8f






18


probably draws more atten-
tion from state people than
any other one product and
Joyce said his office had a
handle on the oyster situation
even before the waters calm-
ed down after "Elena".
The speaker said silt cov-
ered the oysters in the bay
and caused them to be unfit
for consumption. He said the
oysters have had an unusu-
ally high spat season this
year and the oysters are
coming back at a very rapid
rate.
"As a matter of fact",
Joyce said, "oysters are
large enough to harvest right
now, but the spatting season
has so many spat clinging to
adult oysters, it would do
more harm to harvest right
now than we would realize
out of them".
Joyce said when and if the
limited season goes back into
action this.spring, there will
be no tolerance allowed for
size. "The entire catch must
conform to legal limits for a
while at least".
The Marine Resources di-
rector said the limited season
is being considered because
up to 70 percent of mature
oysters die during the hot
months of July and August.
"We had just as well harvest
these shellfish as allow them
to die", he pointed out.
"Harvesting encourages oys-
ter growth and expansion of
beds. The damage from the
storm may prove to be a
benefit rather than a set-
back to Apalachicola Bay",
he said.


forth in the Final Judgment and
described as follows:
Lot 5, Creekwood (Phase H), more
particularly described as: Com-
ience at the NE Corner of the S%
of the NWY4 of the NWY of Sect.
35, T5S, RI1W, Gulf County,
Florida, and thence run S (Bear-
ing Base) along the E boundary
line of said NW4 of the NW% for
450.56 feet; thence S89'25'45" Wfor
452.51 feet to the Westerly right of
way line of South Fork Drive;
thence S00234'15" E along said
right of way line for 400.00 feet for
the POINT OF BEGINNING.
From said Point of Beginning con-
tinue S0034'15" E along said right
of way line for 100.00 feet; thence
leaving said right of wy line run
S825'45"' W for 273.73 feet, more
or less, to the water's edge of
Wetappo Creek Swamp; thence
Northwesterly along said waters
edge for 100.24 feet, more or less,
to a point which is 89'25'45" W
280.68 feet, more or less, from the
Point of Beginning; thence leaving
said waters edge run N8925'45" E
for 280.68 feet, more or less, to the
Point of Beginning. Said parcel of
land having an area of 0.64 acres,
more or less. ALSO, being known
as Lot 5 of the UNRECORDED
PLAT OF CREEKWOOD, UNIT
NO. TWO.
AND
Lot 6, Creekwood (Phase I), more
particularly described as: Com-
mence at the NE corer of the S%
of the NW of the NWY4 of Sect.
35, T5S, R11W, Gulf County,
Florida; and thence run S (Bear-
ing Base along the E boundary line
of said NW4 of the NWV for 450.56
feet; thence S892'45" W for 452.51
feet to the Westerly right of way
line of South Fork Drive; thence
SO034'15" E along said right of
way line for 500.00 feet for the
POINT OF BEGINNING. From
said Point of Beginning continue
S0034'15" E for 120.00 feet; thence
leaving said right of way line run
S8925'45" W for 236.00 feet more
or less, to the waters edge of
Wetappo Creek; thence North-
westerly along said waters edge
for 125.79 feet, more or less, to a
point which is S89P25'45" W, 273.73
feet, more or less, from the Point
of Beginning; thence leaving said
waters edge run N89'25'45" E for
273.73 feet, more or less, to the
Point of Beginning. Said parcel of
land having an area of 0.51 acres,
more or less. ALSO, being known
as Lot 6, of the UNRECORDED
PLAT OF CREEKWOOD, UNIT
NO. TWO.
DATED this the 20th day of January,
1986.
JERRY T. GATES,
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Is/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
2t 1/23
NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS
The Board of County Commissioners
of Gulf County will receive sealed bids
from any person, company, or cor-
poration interested in selling the Coun-
ty the following described personal
property:
One -V6401M Short Block Engine for
GMC Truck.
Bids will be received until 7:00
O'clock P.M., E.S.T., January 28, 1986
at the office of the Clerk of Circuit
Court, 1000 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe,
FL 32456. The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
Is/ Billy Branch, Chairman
It 1/23


r


Congressman


Don Fuqua

Reports




Terrorism continues to take lives of countless men, women
a frightful toll of human life and and children. The hijacking of
international resources. There is an ocean liner is but another
almost no adequate defense chapter in this tragic story.
against a terrorist who is willing One of the basic problems is
to die in such attempts, the inability of the international
Airline hijackings have been community to recognize that an
the predominant and most fre- attack against one of us is an at-
quent source of attack. There tack against us all.. Despite ir-
have been the unprincipled car refutable evidence of the
bombings which have taken the participation of Libya in the





Warm Floors



Are Making


A Comeback


A low cost, energy efficient
kind of construction that
offers warm floors this time
of year may make a come-
back now that Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sci-'
ences (IFAS) researchers
have discovered a way to
ensure the homes can be built
safely.
Plenum houses have no
duct work, instead they use
an underground chamber
("plenum") beneath the
floor for circulation where
the earth acts as an efficient
insulator heat loss through
the roof; too. Overhead-duct
systems allow much more.
During the energy crisis of
the early 1970s, builders
nationwide suddenly stopped
constructing plenum houses.
Concern was raised that
chemicals called termiti-
cides, used to treat founda-
tions against termites, might
be harmful to people living in
homes with under-the-floor
ventilation systems.
Based on data collected at
a 960 square foot test house
built on the University of
Florida campus last spring,
. IFAS, researchers, concluded
that a vapor barrier made of
a six-mil Saranex, a trans-
parent plastic film, will
protect occupants from pos-
sible termiticide poisoning.
Other kinds of plastic films
had failed earlier tests.
"We've found that by using
this vapor barrier, the atmo-
spheric levels of terniiticides
are thus far below that which
is recommended by the Na-
tional Academy of Sciences
as being safe," said Dr.
Anson Moye, an IFAS pest
researcher working on the
project.


Adkinson

Completes

School
Army Private Gary S.
Adkinson, son of Mary A. and
Carlos W. Adkinson of Rural
Route 3, Wewahitchka, has
graduated as an armor crew-
man at the U.S. Army Armor
School, Fort Knox, Ky,
The training was conduct-
ed under the one station unit
training (OSUT) program,
which combines basic com-
bat training and advanced
individual 'training into one
13-week period.
During the course, stu-
dents received training in the
duties of a tank crewman,
including firing the tank's
armament and small wea-
pons. Instruction was also
given in field radio opera-
tions, map reading, and tank
maintenance and repair.
His wife, Sandra, is the
daughter of Patricia Gran-
tham of Wewahitchka.
He is a 1985 graduate of
Wewahitchka High School.

The oldest living things
are bristlecone pine trees,
which scientists believe may
have started growing from
4,000 to 5,000 years ago.


infl m- m C- Z -


IL A A,

I A
( s


(USt S

SUNDAY WORSHIP
N


FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH

Sixteenth Street and Forest Park


. 10 a.m.


nursery Available


ADULT SCHOOL.... .............. .... 11 a.m.

The Reverend Nelle Mulligan, Minister
PASTORAL COUNSELING 227-1756
o')0 O mt-_


"Our results may allow the
wood industry to more fully
promote this kind of stric-
ture," said Moye. "Up to
now, it has been hesitant to
do so. I'm sure we will see
more promotion of this kind
of house because it is so
energy-efficient, it is less
expensive to construct than
conventional houses, and it
allows your floors to be cool
in the summer and warm in
the winter."
To test for possible con-
tamination of household air
by termiticides that have
vaporized, IFAS built a sin-
gle story test house behind its
Pesticide Research Labora-
tory. The beige house is cut in
half by a solid wall from the
roof to the ground so that the
atmospheric levels of the two
most commonly used kinds of
termiticides can be separ-
ately studied on opposite
sides of the house.
Save for a few monitoring
devices, the house is empty.
Each half has its own central
air conditioning and heating
systems, Moye said, which
run continually. One indica-
tion of 'how .inexpensive the ,
: 'lenuitt'lhOlswes''r tb:,~4eat e
and cool is reflected in the
totalpower bill, which never
has exceeded $30 a month at
the test house, Moye said.
Test results showed that
the Saranex barrier protect-
ed air in the house from new
and old termite killers from
a newly registered termiti-
cide, chlorpyrifos, as well as
from chlordane, a chemical
used in the termite eradica-
tion industry for some three
decades. While small but
safe levels of both chemicals
were found in test house air,
researchers concluded that
the newer chemical was less
likely to pan through the
barrier into the home.


r

r



c
c

t
f


r
a

F
c
r
c
r
e
ir
fl

a
t
f
r
E


training and deployment of
hijackers, the international com-
munity does nothing.
Nations within the com-
munist bloc see this terrorism as
somehow advancing their self-
interest.
This is an area where Presi-
dent Reagan has done and is
doing all that he feels he can.
When hijackers can hold na-
tions hostage while supposed
friends and allies will allow those
planes to land and hijackers
promised refuge, there can be
no other result than that these
attacks will continue.
Much of what President
Reagan is attempting to do is
done so in private. Neither he
nor the White House staff are
completely satisfied with the
results thus far. However,
everything that is prudent is be-
ing attempted and in those ef-
forts, he has my support.
We face increasing terrorism
and loss of life because much of
the international community re-
fuses to recognize that this is
not a problem just for the Unit-
ed States, but for all mankind.
Until that fact is recogni ed, this
insanity will continue.

*;

When Congress reconvenes
following its hectic conclusion


We Want You

To Be A Part of

The Friendly Place


BIBLE STUDY ...................
MORNING WORSHIP ................
CHURCH TRAINING .................
EVENING WORSHIP .................
WEDNESDAY ... ....... .......... ..


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
5:45 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


Long Ave. Baptist Church

1601 LONG AVENUE


DANIEL W. DUNCAN
Pastor


MICHAEL HANDY
Minister of Music
& Youth


INTRODUCING


CHEM-DRY

A revolutionary NEW carpet cleaning system

Now Available in Gulf and Franklin counties

What makes Chem-Dry NEW and BETTER?
Chem-Drya Is a new and innovative, U.S. Patented process, which uses CO, and a non-toxic, residue
free solution to produce millions of sparkly effervescent bubbles which quickly penetrate carpet
fiber, dissolving dirt, grease and pet'stains. Acting as tiny propellants, these bubbles actually lift
Sdrt to the surface for extraction with a soft shag pad. Crystal clear CO, is the releasing agent,
rather than soaps or harsh chemicals, so there is no sticky residue left in your carpet to attract
dirt. THE CHEM-DRY* METHOD IS:
SAFE. NON-TOXIC *RAPID DRYING ECONOMICAL *STAYS.CLEAN LONG
*NO STICKY RESIDUE *REMOVES DIRT. OREASE & PET STAINS


y-u m mmm COUPON....-..
I THRU MARCH 31

&n 0 2 Rooms. $395
3 Rooms. 5375
,I O 4 Rooms. $6730
S\ SI 5 Rooms. $7995
I 6. Rooms. 9400
a HALLS FREE
I I




0 9-0
o o o


0- -- C o o O 'o o .


S-em-- U

"QUALITY"
CARPET CLEANING
CALL COLLECT
a 234-2829 P
p- - -- ---mmememe


A brief comparison of
other methods:
STEAM OR HOT WATER EXTRACTION
This type of process jets'down large
amounts of water with added chemicals.
The theory Is to loosen the dirt by
FLOODING the carpet, then immedalte
ly remove the dirt and water with suc-
tion. Steam cleaning can SET STAINS,
cause SHRINKAGE, MILDEW, and the
inconvenience of a long DRYING TIME.
It also can DAMAGE the natural jute
backing of your carpet due to over-
wetting.
SHAMPOO, FOAM AND DRY FOAM
The theory of these processes is to loos-
en the dirt through the use of FOAMING
SOAPS or DETERGENTS with the use of
a BRISTLE BRUSH. Then vacuuming
when it dries, except If It never really
dries due to the large amounts of OILY
RESIDUES which can cause a RAPID
RESOILING problem. The brushes used
can sometimes cause a FRAYING of the
carpet fibers.
DRY CLEANING
Dry Cleaning would seem to be the logi-
cal alternative since It uses much less
water or none at all, therefore reducing
the possibility of over-wetting. However,
Sthe majority of dry cleaning products ar
PETROLEUM DISTALLATES. When ap-
plied with enough strength to clean well.
this method results In a HIGH RESIDUE
problem and a possibility Of TOXIC
VAPORS. This method RESOILS VERY
QUICKLY.
YOU'VE TRIED THE RUST
NOW, TRY THE BEST

_________________


I


1 I


in December, many of the same *
problems which have confront-
ed us for the past four decades
will still face us as a nation and
as a people.
As this is written' we are
completing the tabulation of our
questionnaire results and
without question the largest sin-
gle area of concern is the econ-
omy and what inflation is doing
to the individual.
There is no magic formula
nor single solution. The answer
comes in a number of ways,
and all of them involve cooper-
ation between government and
the private sector.
While the federal budget
must be brought into balance,
there is the need for the refur-
bishing of American industry.
Billions of dollars are being in-
vested overseas while industries
here in America languish from
inattention to the need for
modernization and efficiency.
Our ability to produce has
been severely hampered by ar-
chaic work rules and outdated
tax legislation at both the state
and national levels. I believe we
are beginning the process of
coming to grips with these
problems. Not only do I feel we
have unprecedented support in
Congress, I know we have the
support of the American people '
in that effort.







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1986


SMINUTES...


The Board of County Com-
mission, of Gulf County,
Florida, met December 10,
1985 in regular session with
the'following members pre-
sent: Chairman Billy
Branch, Commissioner
Douglas .C. Birmingham,
A.B. Traylor, Everett Ow-
ens, Jr., and Eldridge Mo-
'ney. Others present were:
Clerk Jerry T. Gates, Attor-
ney William J. Rish, Deputy
Clerk Office Manager
Maurell Cumbie, Sheriff Al
Harrison, Port St. Joe Ambu-
lance Director Andy Miller-
gren, Civil Defense Director
Larry Wells, and Clerk's
Finance Officer Benny Lis-
ter.
The meeting came to order
at 9:00 a.m.
Commissioner Money
opened the meeting with
prayer and led the pledge of
allegiance to the flag.
Upon motion by Comm.
Owens, second by Comm.
Money, and unanimous vote,
the Board approved the
minutes of November 12,
1985.
Upon motion by Comm.
Money, second by Comm.
Owens, and unanimous vote,
the Board approved the
minutes of November 19,
1985.
Chairman Branch stated
the budget amendments list-
ed on page 505 were entered
:contrary to the Board's de-
cision, the Board did not take
.action at this point during
meeting, see page 510. Clerk
Gates stated he intended to
let the records reflect entire
amendments as presented.
:.After further discussion,
.upon motion by Commission-
:er Money, second by Comm.
:.Owens, and unanimous vote,.
the Board approved the
minutes of November 26,
:1985, excluding budget
amendments on page 505.
Pursuant to advertise-
.ment, the Board held the
second and final public hear-
Cing to consider adoption of
;the following ordinances.
'Following public comment,
-Comm. Money moved the
Board approved the follow-
ing two ordinances. Comm.
Traylor seconded the motion
.and it passed with the
following vote. Comm. Mon-
ey, Owens, Traylor, and the
Chairman voted yes. Comm.
Birmingham voted no. Ordi'-
-.nance 85-3, an ordinance
providingg for the amendment
of portions of Ordinance No.
83-2; changing the require-
r ments for acceptance of
dsby the Board of County,
omniissioners of Gulf Cou- N
ty and providing an effect-
'ive date. The ordinance is on
-file in the Clerk's office..
SOrdinance 85-4, an ordin-
%ance providing for the
amendment of portions of
:Ordinance No. 83-6; changing
the requirements for accept-
Sance of roads by the Board of
County Commissioners of
Gulf County; and providing
an effective date. The ordi-
nance is on file in the Clerk's
office.
Upon request for clarifica-
tion by Clerk Gates, the.
Chairman agreed the con-
tiection of a telephone in the
Board's meeting room to the
Clerk's Wewahitchka toll line
would be for emergency use.
The Clerk said he had no
objection to emergency use
only, as the line is already
heavily used by his and other
offices.
The Clerk reported the
Highland View Water System
was valued by Property
:Appraiser at $40,410 on pro-
perty rolls; however, insur-
vance premium was billed for
.the following values. Water-
works Office and Pump
Station $9,000, Contents -
$1,000, Steel Elev. and Water
Tank $30,000. The Chairman
stated the present insurance
values are reasonable.
Upon the Clerk's inquiry,
the Board approved the
electrical service invoices
for the White City Park being
paid from the Road Depart-
ment budget.
Comm. Owens requested
the Board's decision on pay-
ment o0 'e allowingg invoice
be table us l later in the
meeting order for the
Deputy Clerk to check con-
tract total amount and
amount previously paid.
Baskerville-Conovan En-
gineer, Inc.; Re: Feasibility
) Study-South Gulf County Wa-
Ster-Sewer; Invoice 695-07;
$530.00.
The Board authorized At-
torney Rish to write the
Council on Aging and pre-
pare an agreement that the
Board will pay fees for
transport of Gulf County
mental health patients from
Bay Memorial Mental Health
Unit to Florida State Hospital
if needed, authorizing the


Sheriff to approve trans-
ports.
The Board requested its
attorney review the Pleasant
Rest Cemetery Bridge con-
struction contract documents
(Board of County Commis-
:sion and Florida Fairchild
SConstruction) received from
engineering firm of Basker-
ville-Donovan. Inc.
The Board approved the
SChairman's signature on a
proxy authorizing the Presi-
dent and Secretary of Blue


Cross-Blue Shield of Florida,
the county's group health
insurance carrier, to repre-
sent the county at corporate
meetings and-or cast in their
discretion all votes the policy
holder may be entitled to.
Wilford Carrol inquired if
the Board would contract
clean up of debris, etc.
caused by Hurricane Kate.
The Chairman stated the
county had received no disas-
ter funds; therefore, it would
utilize county personnel.
Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Owens, second by
Comm. Money, and unani-
mous vote, the Board ap-
proved payment of the fol-
lowing Solid Waste Transfer
Station invoices for pipe, etc.
used for water line installa-
tion from the transfer station
to the waste water treatment
plant, subject to verification
and signature of Job Super-
visor A. Boyett. Davis Meter
and Supply Div. of Atlanta,
GA, $355.00.
Upon presentation by Civil
defense Director Wells, mo-
tion by Comm. Birmingham,
second by Comm. Traylor,
and unanimous vote, the
Board authorized payment of
the following invoice, which
was occurred due to the
Hurricane Kate disaster,
from the $9,000 transferred
from the Clerk's budget to
the Civil Defense budget, line
item-supplies, General Fund.
Rich's IGA, Wewahitchka,
FL, 11-21-85, Groceries,
$764.26.
The Chairman directed Ci-
vil Defense Director Wells to
write the Road Department
and Mosquito Control De-
partment employees the
Board's policy concerning
sick leave time accumulation
and use (in work days not
hours) applied to all types of
leave.
Following a report by the
Civil Defense Director on
disaster center (private as-
sistance) in Port St. Joe,
Commissioner Birmingham
requested Attorney Rish and
Civil Defense Director Wells
make necessary calls asking
that the disaster center be
open an extra day and set up
in Wewvahitchka.
Upon request of Sheriff
Harrison, motion by Comm.
Money, second by Comm.
Owens and unanimous vote,
the Board approved adoption
of a resolution asking the
Department of Transporta-
tion extend a 45 m.p.h. speed
zone on SR71, from the city
limits of Wewahitchka ap
proximately 100Q feet;sot,
at"od'rd tnlrve to ( hilie
Strange's home.
The Sheriff reported on
November 12 he requested a
$500.00 payment for equip-
ment from the Law Enforce-
ment Trust Fund, which he
received; however, it was
paid from the Fine and
Forfeiture Trust Fund Bud-
get; not a separate account.
The Sheriff requested the
Board ask its attorney to
research the statutes on the
proper segregation of these
accounts. At the request of
the Sheriff, and following
discussion with Clerk (funds
are now placed in subsidiary
accounts of the Fine and
Forfeiture budget and inter-
est credited to General Fund
more work, but will
comply), upon motion by
Commissioner Birmingham,
second by Comm. Traylor,
and unanimous vote, the
Board approved the Law
Enforcement Trust Fund and
Second Dollar Education
Fund be placed in separate
bank accounts, with the
interest earned on these
particular funds being credit-
ed to the Second Dollar
Education Fund.
The Sheriff and the Com-
mission discussed the pre-
sent status of employees'
compensation for overtime
work, with the Board attor-
ney stating he previously
reported to the Board if the
Fair Labor bill passes both
the house of representatives
anid the senate., it will allow
governments to permit over-
time compensation at 11/2
leave time, effective April 1,
1986. The Chairman stated
there had been a problem
with a few Road Department
workers mistakenly being
told they would receive time
and one-half pay and these
employees would be paid;
however, there would be no
more such payment.
The Board agreed it would
follow the County personnel
policy regarding the days
employees are off from work
for Christmas holiday -
Christmas Eve (December
24, 1985, Tuesday) and
Christmas Day (December
25, 1985, Wednesday).


Attorney Rish reported the
Disaster Assistance Center
will provide transportation
from Wewahitchka and other
areas of county to the center
in Port St. Joe or Disaster
Assistance will come to
them, with persons needing
transportation to call the City
Hall, City of Wewahitchka or
County Civil Defense Direc-
tor Larry Wells. The Board
asked the media to please
give coverage of this import-
ant announcement
following report of total
amount of contract between


County

Baskerville-Donovan, En-
gineers and the Board on the
feasibility study of a water-
sewer system for the South
Gulf County area being
$10,000, with $9,470.33 pre-
sently spent, payment of
pending invoice of $530.00
would make total payments
.33 cents over contract total,
the Board agreed not to make
any payment to the firm at
this time, as project is
incomplete, with no current
status report being reported
to Board.
As previously approved by
Board, Commissioner Owens
submitted the following three
price quotes obtained for
repair work to the Mosquito
Control Dozier, with the
lowest quote of Burford
Equipment being selected by
Commissioner Owens to per-
form job. Ring Power Corp-
oration, Tallahassee, FL,
$6,112.94;. Burford Equip-
ment, Marianna, FL,
$6,100.00; and Calvin Equip-
ment, Albany, GA, $7,281.68.
Comm. Money stated he
met with Port St. Joe Health
Department personnel at
their request to survey dam-
age caused by Hurricane
Kate (ceiling tiles, etc.). The
Board discussed the county
not being approved for
receipt of federal disaster
funding at this time (public
buildings). The Chairman
requested the Civil Defense
Director check on any avail-
able insurance coverage.
Commissioner Traylor and
Birmingham discussed the
complaints of employees con-
cerning the policy of accumu-
lation of sick leave.
SUpon motion by Commis-
sioner Birmingham, second
by Comm. Traylor, and
unanimous vote, the Board
approved writing the Direc-
tor and each member of the
Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission and
the county's legislative dele-
gation going on record as
being opposed to doe day and
requesting it be discontinued
in Gulf County.
The Chairman reported he
met with Pleasant Rest Ce-
metery Bridge Reconstruc-
tion Project Engineer Silvey
and landowner Coleman
Smith, at the site, with Smith
agreeing to sign a right of
way easement.
The Sheriff discussed the
Mosquito Control Depart-
ment utilizing the county
prisoner work program on a
daily basis.
The Chairman directed let-
ters be written to the Depart-
*mient of-Transportation Dis-
trict Engineer in Chipley and
the Panama City Office in
appreciation of trucks and
drivers made available to the
county following the Hurri-
cane Kate disaster.
The Attorney reported the
Pleasant Rest Cemetery
Bridge reconstruction pro-
ject construction contract
was incomplete and he would
notify the engineers to re-
view and complete. Upon
motion by Commissioner
Birmingham, second by
Comm. Money, and unani-
mous vote, the Board agreed
to execute the contract upon
completion in compliance
with bid award.
The Board agreed to write
Dorothy Browne, of Port
Richey, Florida, in response
to her letter advising proper
procedure to delete a name
from the tax roll.
The Chairman reported
the Board was in receipt of
the following replies from all
constitutional officers except
the property appraiser, who
was out of twon, concerning
if their office would observe
the same holidays as county
commission employees, said
holidays being listed in the
commissioner's personnel
policy. A copy of the replies
Sis on file in the Clerk's office.
Upon motion by Comm.
Owens, second by Comm.
Money, and unanimous vote,
the Board approved purchas-
ing the remaining two weeks
of vacation of Mosquito Con-
trol Director Graves due to
heavy work load.
The Board agreed to write
all Department Supervisors
directing they submit line
item budget amendment re-
quests for Board approval as
ey occur.
Upon motion by Comm.
Money, second by Comm.
Birmingham, and unanimous
vote, the Board cancelled the
regular meeting of Decem-
ber 24th. as it is the Christ-
mas Eve holiday.
The Chairman requested
Deputy Clerk Cumbie write
Essex Cable Vision concern-
ing non-repair of their dam-
age to county road shoulders
on Americus & Cortez Ave-


nue. St. Joe Beach, request-
ing immediate repair. Chair-
man instructed Building In-
spector Manuel to make an
onsight visit and discuss with
company representatives.
The Chairman appointed
the following committee to
research information con-,
cerning the county obtaining
a uniform computer system
for all county offices and
report back to Board as soon
as possible. Clerk's Office
Manager Maurell Cumbie,
Property Appraiser Kesley
Colbert, and Tax Collector


Seniors Given Free .


Blood Pressure Senior Informer

hPL- WLn L by Jerry Stokoe
W 4. RT @ P 5. R .3 .1 I I. L wwVV '~..'


Fifty senior citizens were
given free blood pressure
checks by Donna Drew on
January 17, 1986. Donna, a
local registered nurse, per-
formed free blood pressure
checks from 10:00 to 12:00.
She has also volunteered to
provide her expertise when-
ever medical files must be
reviewed, and will provide
free blood pressure checks
for persons over 60 every
three months.

Ten of our staff members


and senior friends celebrate
their birthdays this month.
Traditionally, one day each
month is set aside and
devoted to this type of
birthday celebration. The
Following have birthdays in
January: Elmeta Jones,
Vida Watson. Charlene Tho-
mas. Nettie Graves. Aunt
Bell DuBose, Idelle Goodwin,
Wilson Dorl. Ometa Osborne,
Gladys McArdle. and Loren
Kelly. A program was held in
their honor. A prayer was
said and a message for all


senior citizens was read by
Ethel Allen.

Senior citizens at the Wash-
ington site celebrated the
birthday of Martin Luther
King. Jr. with an informative
program. The speaker for the
occasion was Rev. Robert
Davis of Apalachicola. Rev.
Davis spoke of the history
and accomplishments of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. He
emphasized the need for love
in our lives today. Rev.
Davis concluded by saying


that "faith inspires, and hope
endures".

Challenges are coming in
from all directions for the
upcoming womanless beauty
contest on March 1, 1986.
Floyd Dickens is going to
give Johnny a run. for his
money. Henry "Jiggs" Buie
from north Port St. Joe says,
"Johnny doesn't have a
chance". Our own Sheriff, Al
Harrison, is deliberating on
what routine it will take to
hand the existing ruler a


defeat. But folks, I've got
news for you! Johnny is not
sitting back and waxing. He
has been getting his act
prepared and is working
hard to maintain his hold on
all competitors.

Speaking of competitors,
you might be wondering who
will judge this exciting event.
All I can tell you is that I've
enlisted the help of some
out-of-towners whom I'm
sure will be a surprise to
many of you.


Auto Rental Franchise Opens


U-Save Auto Rental of
America, one of the nation's
largest and fastest growing
daily rental companies, has
opened its newest franchise
in Port St. Joe.
Carr's Auto Sales and
Rentals, located at Highland



Area Di
To meet the area's growing
need for alcohol and drug
treatment services, con-
struction is nearing comple-
tion at CROSSROADS The
Recovery Center. CROSS-
ROADS is a 28 bed treatment
facility for alcoholism, drug
addiction, and related family
problems. It is located in
Panama City.
It is estimated.that there
are more than 600 Gulf
County residents with the
disease of alcoholism. In
addition, some 2,400 to 4,200
more Gulf County residents
are directly affected by the

Pridgeon

Assigned

to Lowry
Airman Brian M. Prid-
geon, son of Anthony L. and
Maldra S. Pridgeon of Wewa-
hitchka, has been assigned to
Lowry Air Force Base, Colo.,
after co'pijietinig Air 'Force
basic training.
During the six weeks at
Lackland. Air Force Base,
Texas, the airman studied
the Air Force mission, organ-
ization and customs and
received special training in
human relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn
credits toward an associate
degree in applied science
through the Community Col-
lege of the Air Force.
The airman will now re-
ceive specialized instruction
in the munitions and weapons
maintenance field.
He is a 1985 graduate of
Wewahitchka High School.

The Leaning Tower of Pisa
has tipped an additional
foot in the last century.

Eda Ruth Taylor.
Chairman Branch inquired
of the Attorney and Clerk
what the Florida Statutes
require concerning the Clerk
receiving budget draws from
the Board (Quarterly,
monthly, etc.), instead of
present method of including
Clerk's budgeted monies
with Board of County Com-
mission funds (writing
checks from Board of County
Commission General Fund
and crediting proper Clerk
account number). After dis-
cussion the Board agreed for
the Attorney to research this
and beginning next fiscal
year quarter making pay-
ments of portions of Clerk's
1985-86 total budget on what-
ever schedule stipulated by
Florida Statutes, Clerk's
Manuel, etc.
The Board authorized
Building Inspector Manuel
and Attorney Rish to meet
and prepare draft of ordin-
ance for consideration of
adoption of a new building
code, required by State of
Florida prior to March 1,
1986.
Upon request of Commis-
sioner Owens, the Board
agreed to write engineers
Baskerville-Donovan, Inc.,
the Board is paying invoices
for engineering services on
Pleasant Rest Cemetery
Bridge reconstruction pro-
ject according to contract
pay schedule; therefore, pay-
ment of the following invoice
will not be made at this time.
Baskerville-Donovan, En-
gineers, Invoice No. 695-05
R .. W'ater-Sc,
Study Pleasant Rest Ceme-
tery Bridge, $6,625.56 less
credit memo of $4,461.99
equal to $2,163.57.
The meeting then recessed
at the call of the Chairman.


View on Highway 98, is now
affiliated with the nationwide
car rental system.
"We look forward to serv-
ing the needs of the people of
Port St. Joe and the sur-
rounding area with an eco-
nomical and dependable ren-



ug Trea
alcoholism of someone close
to them. According to the
American Medical Associa-
tion, alcoholism is a chronic,
progressive disease which is
the third leading cause of
death in the United States
today.
Treatment at CROSS-
ROADS includes medical de-
toxification, individual and
group therapy, alcohol and
drug education programs,
exercise therapy, nutritional
planning, and participation
in Alcoholics Anonymous,
Narcotics Anonymous, Ala-
non and other self-help
groups. Treatment consists


tal system." noted Brantly
Carr, president of the local
franchise.
"We are pleased to add this
new location to our expand-
ing network of quality car
rental franchises," com-
mented Joe Eikenberg, pres-


ident of U-Save Auto Rental.
"U-Save is known through-
out the industry for its
excellent performance re-
cord, which allows us to pass
on substantial savings to the
car rental consumer."
Carr is a resident of Port


tment Center


of four to six weeks in
residence, followed by plan-
ned continuing care. For
those individuals whose fam-
ily or job obligations prevent
entry into residential treat-
ment, an intensive evening
outpatient program is offer-
ed. Staff includes four physi-
cians, registered nurses, and
certified addictions counse-
lors.
CROSSROADS will work
closely with physicians, em-
ployers, court officials, cler-
gy or family members who
may be faced with problem
drinkers or drug abusers in
their practice, on their jobs,


in their homes or within their
communities. Free and con-
fidential evaluations will be
arranged upon request.
The CROSSROADS facility
is 25,000 square feet, located
on 17 acres of natural wood-
lands at 2121 Lisenby Ave-
nue. The property will fea-
ture nature trails, a two-acre
lake, and complete privacy.
Upon completion, CROSS
ROADS will employ approx-"
imately 45 people from the
area. CROSSROADS expects
to return to the community
revenues in the form of
salaries in excess of $800,000
annually.


St. Joe and has been in auto
sales for the past 14 years.
U-Save Auto Rental, based
in Salisbury, N.C., operates
approximately 420 franchises
in 39 states, and is one of the
nation's largest and fastest
growing daily rental com-
panies. U-Save began in 1978
with the opening of the first
rental office in Salisbury. In
1979, the first U-Save Auto
Rental franchise opened in
Charlotte, N.C.
U-Save franchises rent late
model automobiles in excel-
lent condition, with many
locations now offering new
car rentals. One market
includes individuals who
need to rent a car for three or
four days for a wide variety
of reasons (their own vehicle
is being repaired or they do
not own an automobile);
another important market is
insurance companies who
are responsible for a replace-
ment car for their clients.

Advertising Pays!


OFFICE SUPPLIES



and EQUIPMENT


pReg
i i $6.5


/3 Cut 3/" Tab

Box $785
Hanging of 25 $7
File Folders
Heavy-duty stock. 2" expansion.
Coated rod ends for quiet, easy use.
'Fits most filing systems, adaptable to
all types of filing arrangements. 25
files per box with plastic tabs and
white inserts. Your choice of Letter or
Legal Size with a variety of tab sizes.
(FI-HANGING FILE FOLDERS)


Bankers Box Storage
Holds letter or legal size records.
15"x12"x10" high
Store your 1985 records, safe and neat.



$5.19 Reg5.69 Reg.
5 5.19 $7.2* 5.69 $3.30Reg 2.59


Sanford
Expo Markers
For use on dri-erase, porcelain and
other "white boards,' glass, metal,
glazed ceramics. Wipes off with regular
cloth, tissue or blackboard eraser.
individual Colors
S'4-830-COLOR)
Assorted Set
((One each black, blue, red and green)
( 4-830-4)


$419
Eldon Stackables EA
For sorting, filing, routing, in-and-out,
organizing, etc. Hi-impact styrene,
won't chip, peel, rust or dent.
Contemporary design. Self-stacking.
Letter size, 2/2"H. Available in a variety
of contemporary colors.


.1


3M Hand Size Dis ser
For desk drawer, brief cas iork
pocket. Two-piece construct,
telescopes open to hold 129' 'Is of
tape on 1" core. Clean-cuttii, ', tal
knife. Gray. (Tape not included.)


V" Wide (A8-H-126)
/" Wide (A8-H-127)


90C.


S$5849
Sharp 12-Digit up
Printer/Display Calculator
4-key Independent memory. Easy-to-
read display with automatic 3-digit
punctuation and print/non-print
selector. 2-key roll-over for keying with
minimum interval. Non-add/sub-total
key, percent key, add mode/constant,
floating/fixed decimal.


STha ,tr Publishing Co.


306.08 Williams Avenue
XEROK 306.08 Williams Avenue


OFFICE SUPPLY STORE -


Phone 227-1278


Swingline W
"711" Stapler
Compact, desk-size stapler uses half
strip of staples or full strip broken in
half. Reversible anvil for permanent or
temporary stapling. Staples and tacks.
Your choice of popular colors.
(H1-71 1-COLOR)


* Printers
* Publishers
* Office
Supplies


___


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L1 L o


I P Iofo- mmo-d


.I_ _


__ IF CY


I


PAGE THMRTEEN


X-Axlux -Ictoc TV IUUK


Zi









WE GLADLY ACCEPT
USDA FOOD STAMPS!


QUANTITY
PRICES GOOD RIGHTS
PRICES GOOD JAN. 22-28, 1986 RESERVED!


-I, L I I
go I set ~


L /


BULK RATE
CARRIER ROUTE
PRE-SORTED
Pennlt No. 3
Wewahitchka, FL
32465


I, LE DISCOUNT I SP C AL


MAZOLA
OIL
48 oz.
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE
EXPIRES JAN. 28, 1986


KRAFT
MAY'
NAISE
32 oz. 88
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRES JAN. 28, 1986


TOTINO
PIZZAS
10 oz. 49
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRES JAN. 28, 1986


BOLD 3 $ 39
DETERGENT
42 oz.
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRES JAN. 28, 1986


CAMPBELL'S CHICKEN No. 1
NOODLE 3/$l
SOUP .... I


IGA 16 oz.
GREEN
BEANS ...


32 Oz. Bt.
HEINZ
KETCHUP.


GOLDEN GRAIN 7% Oz.
Mac. & Cheese 2/0
DINNERS / 88


Choice Tablerite BeeTr boneless Bottom 1 98
ROUND STEAK........... 1.
USDA Choice Eye of Round $ 98
STEAK or ROAST........ .298
Choice Tablerite Lean (Family Pak $228
CUBE STEAK........... L2
),U96A Grade "A" Frozen $198
EUAKEY BREAST .. $19
Choice Tablerite Lean (5 Lbs. or More) $138
GROUND CHUCK ........ 1
Country Skillet Split (Family Pak) 18
FRYER BREAST......... L. I8
Country Skillet (Family Pak)I. 58
FRYER WINGS ....... LB. 58
Tablerite Frozen (Family Pak) 3 8 0
PORK NECKBONES ...... 38
Golden
BANANAS

4 s. $1.00
Red Delicious, Gold Delicious or Red Rome
APPLES ..... 3b.bag99


Large
Navel Oranges 3 fo89
Sweet Western 9
Cantaloupes .... a99
Florida Citrus Fruit
ORANGES, TANGELOS,
GRAPEFRUIT


5 lb.
bag


.1.29


IGA Pies ...................... 8"
IGA Giant Bread ............... 24 o.
IGA Cinn. Rolls ................. 6pk.


Sunnyland Boneless Buffet
HAM HALVES ...
Sunnyland
SLICED BACON ..
IGA Tablerite or Lykes Meat or
BEEF WIENERS..
Lykes
SLICED BOLOGNA
Bryan's Meat or Beef
CORN DOGS ....
Lykes Sliced
COOKED HAM ...
Lykes Delicious
RED HOTS......


.. L. $198
120L$148
...... ,,0 la
...... 120o.
$138
..... LB. $138
$168

. .... O. $208
..., $168
. . 20 z.


Sunnyland Pork
PATTY SAUSAGE.......


$1258
120o. Ji I


Sno-White
CAULIFLOWER
head P
A11 Ai + :r


Yellow Onions. 3 b.bag
Georgia Red 3 Lb. Tray
Sweet Potatoes...
Fresh Green
Spinach ....... ,tr
We Have A Large Supply of
Garden Seed, Fertilizer,
Seed Potatoes
Fresh Green
BROCCOLI
M Af&


69

590


bunch


BE


$139
69
89, I


I
KRAFT SQUEEZE Lb.
PARKAY ..... 88
Kraft- Lb. 4
AMERICAN CHEESE SINGLES .
Kraft 10 Oz. $169
SOON L.H. CHEESE.......1
Kraft Philadelphia 8 oz. 89
CREAM CHEESE ...........
Kraft 8 Oz. 29
CRACKER BARREL SPREAD ..
Sealtest Light N Lively 8 oz. 59 C
COTTAGE CHEESE .......... 59
Sealtest 8 oz. 2/
SOUR CREAM ............. /1


Flex Shampoo .. ............... ... 200o.
Di-Gel Tablets ....................... 6os
Di-Gel Liquid ......................... .
VO-5 Hairspray .................... 70o
Vicks Nyquil .............. ........... so


$199
$159
$139
$169
$339


ALPO CANNED- 23 Oz.
DOG 59
FOOD .... 5


MORTON 8 oz. 3
POT PIES. 3
32 Oz. $7
Freezer Queen Suppers 1


Ore Ida 40 oz.
Shoestring Potatoes
Birdseye 4 Ears
CORN ON THE COB..
Meadow Gold 12 Pack
CHOCOLATE FUDGE BARS.


$159
$ 149
$140
. i


I POUD B G-D
II
III
8[O'lock $ 45 OREO $
COFE2 OKE


U


I-" INETQULTYMATSMNEI ANBY!


P Ir


I


3;t1
Tl7


$129


SEED POTATOES
* GARDEN SEED
FERTILIZER


16 Oz.
PLANTER'S $ 19
PEANUTS.




30
VIV $ 491BEp
NAPKINSut


12 Oz.
RONCO
SPAGHETTI


I


DAVID RICH'S
Foodliners ....
Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka


DAWN 22 Oz.
DISH $129,
LIQUID 0 I


I I I


I


I I I- I


I -- -. 1.


HESHY- b


i


0


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